General

Found 2.107 items about «General»:

5

12th General Convention of the Nepali Congress

The twelfth general convention of the Nepali Congress party was held in Kathmandu from September 17–21, 2010. Elections were held for the posts of President, General Secretary and Treasurer. The convention also elected 61 members to the party's Central Working Committee (CWC). President General Secretary Treasurer Central Working Committee (CWC) Members Elections to the 61 CWC seats were held in three categories : 25 seats were contested under the open category, 14 seats under the zonal category and 22 seats under reserved quotas for women, Dalit, Madeshi, Muslim and Janajati categories. Elected in open category  : Elected in zonal category: Elected in Janajati, Women, Dalit, Madhesi and Muslim category  :
7.00
2 votes
6

12th General Convention of the Nepali Congress

The twelfth general convention of the Nepali Congress party was held in Kathmandu from September 17–21, 2010. Elections were held for the posts of President, General Secretary and Treasurer. The convention also elected 61 members to the party's Central Working Committee (CWC). President General Secretary Treasurer Central Working Committee (CWC) Members Elections to the 61 CWC seats were held in three categories : 25 seats were contested under the open category, 14 seats under the zonal category and 22 seats under reserved quotas for women, Dalit, Madeshi, Muslim and Janajati categories. Elected in open category  : Elected in zonal category: Elected in Janajati, Women, Dalit, Madhesi and Muslim category  :
6.60
5 votes
7

144th Delaware General Assembly

The 144th Delaware General Assembly was a meeting of the legislative branch of the state government, consisting of the Delaware Senate and the Delaware House of Representatives. Elections were held the first Tuesday after November 1st and terms began in Dover on the first Tuesday in January. This date was January 9, 2007, which was two weeks before the beginning of the seventh administrative year of Democratic Governor Ruth Ann Minner from Kent County and Democratic Lieutenant Governor John C. Carney, Jr. from New Castle County. Currently the distribution of seats for both houses was based on the interpretation of the federal 2000 census. It resulted from a large number of memberships in the New Castle County area and ruling that the election districts would abandon county lines for their boundaries, but would design whatever district boundaries that would accomplish such population equals. In the 144th Delaware General Assembly session the Senate had a Democratic majority and the House had a Republican majority. About half the State Senators were elected every two years for a four year term, except the decade district redesign year, when all served two years. They were designed
6.00
1 votes
8

1842 General Strike

  • Form of protest: General strike
The 1842 General Strike, also known as the Plug Plot Riots, started among the miners in Staffordshire, England, and soon spread through Britain affecting factories, mills in Lancashire and coal mines from Dundee to South Wales and Cornwall. The strike was influenced by the Chartist movement - a mass working class movement from 1838-1848. After the second Chartist Petition was presented to Parliament in April 1842, Stalybridge contributed 10,000 signatures. After the rejection of the petition the first general strike began in the coal mines of Staffordshire. The second phase of the strike originated in Stalybridge. A movement of resistance to the imposition of wage cuts in the mills, also known as the Plug Riots, it spread to involve nearly half a million workers throughout Britain and represented the biggest single exercise of working class strength in nineteenth century Britain. On 13 August 1842 there was a strike at Bayley's cotton mill in Stalybridge, and roving cohorts of operatives carried the stoppage first to the whole area of Stalybridge and Ashton, then to Manchester, and subsequently to towns adjacent to Manchester including Preston , using as much force as was necessary
7.50
2 votes
9

1877 Saint Louis general strike

  • Form of protest: General strike
Generally accepted as the first general strike in America, the 1877 Saint Louis general strike grew out of the Great Railroad Strike of 1877. The general strike was largely organized by the Knights of Labor and the Marxist-leaning Workingmen's Party, the main radical political party of the era. When the railroad strike reached East St. Louis, Illinois in July 1877, the St. Louis Workingman's Party led a group of approximately 500 people across the river in an act of solidarity with the nearly 1,000 workers on strike. The party transformed, through speeches and organization, an initial strike among railroad workers into a strike by thousands of workers in several industries for the eight-hour day and a ban on child labor. One speaker was noted to say, At another large rally a black man spoke for those who worked on the steamboats and levees. He asked, "Will you stand to us regardless of color?" The crowd shouted back, "We will!" The St. Louis strike was marked by a bloodless, efficient and quick take-over by dissatisfied workers of commerce and transportation in the area. By July 22, the St. Louis Commune began to take shape as representatives from almost all the railroad lines met
6.50
2 votes
10

1911 Liverpool General Transport Strike

  • Form of protest: General strike
The 1911 Liverpool General Transport Strike involved dockers, railway workers and sailors, as well people from other trades. It paralysed Liverpool commerce for most of the summer of 1911. It also transformed trade unionism on Merseyside. For the first time, general trade unions were able to establish themselves on a permanent footing and become genuine mass organisations of the working class. Strike action began on 14 June when the National Sailors' and Firemen's Union announced a nation-wide merchant seamen's strike. Solidarity action in support of the seamen led to other sections of workers coming out on strike. A strike committee - chaired by syndicalist Tom Mann - was formed to represent all the workers in dispute. Many meetings were held on St. George's Plateau next to St. George’s Hall on Lime Street, including the rally on 13 August where police baton charged a crowd of 85,000 people who had gathered to hear Tom Mann speak. This became known as "Bloody Sunday". In the police charges and subsequent unrest that carried on through the following night, over 350 people were injured. 3,500 British troops were stationed in the city by this time, and two days later soldiers of the
8.50
2 votes
11

1912 Brisbane General Strike

  • Form of protest: General strike
The 1912 Brisbane General Strike in Queensland, Australia, began when members of the Australian Tramway Employees Association were dismissed when they wore union badges to work on 18 January 1912. They then marched to Brisbane Trades Hall where a meeting was held, with a mass protest meeting of 10,000 people held that night in Market Square (later known as King George Square). The Brisbane tramways were owned by the General Electric Company of the United Kingdom. Despite this they were managed by Joseph Stillman Badger, an American, who refused to negotiate with the Queensland peak union body, then known as the Australian Labour Federation. After this rebuff a meeting of delegates from forty-three Brisbane based Trade Unions formed the Combined Unions Committee and appointed a General Strike Committee. The trade unionists of Brisbane went out on a general strike on 30 January 1912, not just for the right to wear a badge but for the basic right to join a union. Within a few days the Strike Committee became an alternative government. No work could be done in Brisbane without a special permit from the Strike Committee. The committee organised 500 vigilance officers to keep order among
5.50
2 votes
12

1936 Syrian general strike

  • Form of protest: General strike
The 1936 Syrian general strike (Arabic: الإضراب الستيني‎) was a 50-day strike that was organized as a response to the policies of the French occupation of Syria and Lebanon. The strike action paralyzed the country for two months and forced France to negotiate the Franco-Syrian Treaty of Independence with the National Bloc. On 11 January 1936, the National Bloc held a commemoration for one of its leaders, Ibrahim Hananu, who had died in November 1935. The meeting featured several speeches that lamented and attacked the French occupation. Soon thereafter the French mandate authorities closed the office of the National Bloc in Damascus, and arrested two prominent nationalist leaders from the party, Fakhri al-Baroudi and Sayf al-Din al-Ma'mun. In response, the Bloc called for strike action against the French occupation policies. The strike, which started on 20 January with work stoppages and student protests in Damascus, Homs, Hama and Aleppo, soon spread to all major towns. Leaders from the National Bloc, including Jamil Mardam Bey, Lutfi al-Haffar and Faris al-Khoury actively participated and organized demonstrations against the French occupation and the French-appointed president,
7.00
1 votes
14

1998 Puerto Rican general strike

  • Form of protest: General strike
The Puerto Rican general strike of 1998 began as a strike of Puerto Rico Telephone Company workers to protest a government privatization plan. Three weeks later, an estimated 500,000 people joined a two-day general strike, bringing commerce and travel in Puerto Rico to a standstill. Protests and pickets were mostly peaceful, but in the week before the general strike some infrastructure elements were sabotaged, and two bombs were detonated. The strike failed to stop the privatization plan, and in July a consortium led by GTE bought the PRTC for US$1.9 billion. At the start of the 20th century, brothers Hernan and Sosthenes Behn founded the Puerto Rico Telephone Company, before moving to New York and incorporating International Telephone and Telegraph (ITT) in 1920. ITT ran the PRTC for many years, coordinating telephone service on the island with the government's Interior Department. In the 1940s, the Puerto Rican government enacted a series of laws designed to make telephone access more available in the eastern part of the island and allowed the state to play more of a role in providing service. By the end of 1959, the island had 76,000 phone lines. Service under the ITT/ID
7.33
3 votes
15
7.75
4 votes
18

2007 General Motors strike

  • Form of protest: Strike action
The 2007 General Motors strike was a strike from September 24 to 26, 2007, by the United Auto Workers against General Motors. On September 24, 2007 at approximately 11:00 a.m. EDT, the roughly 73,000 General Motors workers represented by the United Auto Workers union went on strike against the company. The first nationwide strike against GM since 1970 was expected to idle 59 plants and facilities for an indefinite period of time. Talks broke down after more than 20 straight days of bargaining failed to produce a new contract. Major issues that proved to be stumbling blocks for an agreement included wages, benefits, job security and investments in US facilities. Within hours, the ripple effect was felt in Canada with closures of two car assembly plants in Oshawa, Ontario and a transmission facility in Windsor on September 25. However, at 3:05 EDT on September 26, a tentative agreement was reached, and the strike's end was announced by UAW officials in a news conference at 4 a.m. By the following day, all GM workers in both countries were back to work.
8.50
4 votes
19

2007 Guinean general strike

  • Form of protest: General strike
The 2007 Guinean general strike began on January 10, 2007. Guinea's trade unions and opposition parties called on President Lansana Conté to resign, accusing him of mismanaging the economy and abusing his authority. The strikers also accused Conté of personally securing the release of Mamadou Sylla and Fode Soumah, both accused of corruption, from prison. The strike ended on January 27 with an agreement between Conté and the unions, according to which Conté would appoint a new prime minister; however, Conté's choice of Eugène Camara as prime minister was deemed unacceptable by the unions, and the strike resumed on February 12. Martial law was imposed on the same day. Nearly two weeks later, Conté agreed to choose a prime minister acceptable to the unions, and on February 26 he named Lansana Kouyaté as prime minister. The strike ended on February 27, and Kouyaté was sworn in on March 1. Two general strikes had been held in 2006, but these were limited to Conakry. The 2007 protests were first visible in Conakry, where workers stayed at home and businesses were shut. The government responded by threatening to sack striking civil servants. Youths took to the streets, despite a ban on
8.33
3 votes
20

2007 Swazi general strike

  • Form of protest: General strike
The 2007 Swazi general strike has been ongoing since 25 July 2007, led by the Swaziland Federation of Trade Unions, the Swaziland Federation of Labour and the Swaziland National Association of Teachers. They plan to stage a two-day full stoppage of public life every month until the incumbent absolute monarch Mswati III gives in to their demands: multi-party elections in October 2008, that benefits cease to be taxed and an end to absolute monarchy. The first two-day stoppage occurred on 25 July in Manzini and on 26 July in Mbabane, when tens of thousands of workers demonstrated on the streets. The demonstrations constituted Swaziland's biggest civil movement for over a decade, since the last large-scale protests in 1996. Government spokespersons denied the unions' and strikers' claims, stating that they should not demonstrate, but rather lobby the parliament, as only parliament has the power to change the constitution to allow multi-party elections. On 2 August 2007, union representatives threatened further strikes if the government was not willing to listen, and also raised labour issues in addition to their political demands.
8.00
1 votes