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  • Feb 20th 2014
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  • 130 votes
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Most famous Dishes from Singapore

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    1
    Acar

    Acar

    Acar is a type of pickling made in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. It is made from different vegetables such as yardlong beans, carrots and cabbage which are pickled in vinegar and dried chillies. The vegetables are then tossed in ground peanuts. Variants of acar include acar awak or Nyonya acar, and Malay acar. Acar awak is more elaborate, containing other vegetables such as eggplants as well as aromatic spices in the pickling mix. Acar is commonly served as a condiment to be eaten with a main course. In Indonesia, acar is commonly made from small chunks of cucumber, carrot, shallot and occasionally pineapple, and marinated in a sweet and sour solution of sugar and vinegar. Some households add lemongrass or ginger to spice it up. The salad has also been adopted in to Thai cuisine where it is called achat (Thai: อาจาด). It is made with cucumber, red chillies, red onions or shallots, vinegar, sugar and salt. It is served as a side dish with the Thai version of satay (Thai: สะเต๊ะ).
    7.00
    6 votes
    2
    Roti john

    Roti john

    Roti John, essentially an omelette sandwich, is a popular Malay breakfast and snack item in Malaysia and Singapore. The ingredients include minced meat (chicken or mutton), onion, egg, sardines, tomato-chilli sauce and a baguette-type loaf. The minced meat, sardines, egg and chopped onions are fried on a frying pan and then placed into the cavity of a baguette halved lengthwise. The whole baguette is then briefly pan-fried on the frying pan and then served after being cut into several portions. A variant is to place the minced meat, onions and sauce inside the baguette, then baguette dipped into beaten egg, and the whole then panfried on the frying pan. 'Roti' is the Hindi, Urdu and Malay word for bread, and more generally for any bread-based or bread-like food, including sandwiches and pancakes. The origin of the 'John' in the name is allegedly due to the Western origin of the Baguette and the tomato sauce used in the dish.
    7.80
    5 votes
    3
    Putu mayam

    Putu mayam

    Iddiyappam;இடியாப்ப‌ம் or 'Putu mayam' in Malay is a Tamil dish. It is popular in southern India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Singapore. The process for making putu mayam (also known as string hoppers in English) consists of mixing rice flour or idiyappam flour with water and/or coconut milk, and pressing the dough through a sieve to make vermicelli-like noodles. These are steamed, usually with the addition of juice from the aromatic pandan leaf (screwpine) as flavouring. The noodles are served with grated coconut and jaggery, or, preferably, gur (date palm sugar). In some areas, gula melaka (coconut palm sugar) is the favourite sweetener. Putu piring is a Malaysian version of putu mayam in which the rice flour dough is used to form a small cake around a filling of coconut and gur or jaggery. Putu mayam is also closely related to the Malaysian cendol which substitutes green pea flour for the rice flour in making the noodles. In all forms of the dish, pandan flavouring, as an extract or as chopped leaves, is typical. In Malaysia and Singapore, putu mayam and its relatives are commonly sold as street food from market stalls or carts, as well as being made at home, and are
    7.60
    5 votes
    4
    Banmian

    Banmian

    Banmian (板麵) is a popular noodle dish, comprising handmade noodles served in soup. The name banmian (board/block noodle) came from the Hakka's method of cutting the noodle into straight strands using a wooden block as ruler. In Hakka, some might call it Man-Foon-Char-Guo (麵粉茶粿) or Dao-Ma-Chet (刀嬤切). In Hokkien, it was called Mee-Hoon-Kueh (麵粉粿; lit. "wheat snack") but what we can find at hawker stalls is generally called banmian. The current style is a mix between the Hakka traditional method and the Hokkien traditional method. The Hakka initially made the noodle by shaving off a dough, whilst the Hokkien would roll the dough into a flat piece then hand-tear into bite-size. Banmian is a culinary dish that is popular in China, Malaysia, and Singapore. It consists of egg noodles served in a flavorful soup, often with some type of meat or fish, vegetables and various spices. The meal is considered one of the healthier food choices and can be found for sale by restaurants, street vendors and food stalls in the region. The base of the entire meal is a soup, so there are numerous variations in ingredients, stocks and noodle shapes. In many instances, the completed soup is topped with an
    7.20
    5 votes
    5

    Chee cheong fun

    Chee cheong fun are square rice sheets which are used in Singaporean cuisine and Malaysian cuisine The sheets are made from a viscous mixture of rice flour and water. This liquid is poured onto a specially-made flat pan in which it is steamed to produce the square rice sheets. Chee cheong fun can be served with different flavour of sauce. In Malaysia, most of the people prefer serving Chee cheong fun with one kind of black sweet sauce called "timzheong"(￧ヤワ←ナᄆ). Some other prefer specially-made chilli sauce or mix two kind of sauce together. There is another kind of food which is similar with Chee cheong fun called "laicheong"(₩ヒノ│ナᄌ) in Cantonese. This food is popular in Hong Kong and Guangzhou. The difference between Chee cheong fun and "laicheong" is "laicheong" does serve with stuffing (such as shrimp, pork or dough sticks) but Chee cheong fun does not. Besides, people use different sauce to serve these two kinds of food. Chee cheong fun is a popular breakfast food in Singapore and Malaysia. Chee cheong fun is frequently served in kopitiam and Chinese restaurants.
    7.00
    5 votes
    6
    Youtiao

    Youtiao

    Youtiao (simplified Chinese: 油条; traditional Chinese: 油條; pinyin: yóutiáo; literally "oil strip" - also known as you char kway in Hokkien, yau ja gwai in Cantonese, and Chinese oil stick, Chinese donut, Chinese cruller, fried bread stick- is a long, golden-brown, deep fried strip of dough in Chinese cuisine and other East and Southeast Asian cuisines and is usually eaten for breakfast. Conventionally, youtiao are lightly salted and made so they can be torn lengthwise in two. Youtiao are normally eaten as an accompaniment for rice congee or soy milk. At breakfast, youtiao can be stuffed inside shāobǐng (燒餅; lit. roasted flatbread) to make a sandwich known as shāobǐng yóutiáo (燒餅油條). Youtiao wrapped in a rice noodle roll is known as zháliǎng. Youtiao is also an important ingredient of the food Cífàn tuán in Shanghai cuisine. Tánggāo (糖糕), or "sugar cake", is a sweet, fried food item similar in appearance to youtiao but shorter in length. In Thailand, youtiao ("patongkoh" in Thai) are eaten for breakfast with sweetened condensed milk and coffee. Although generally known as yóutiáo in Standard Mandarin throughout China, the dish is also known as guǒzi (果子) in northern China. In Min
    6.40
    5 votes
    7
    Chwee kueh

    Chwee kueh

    Chwee kueh (or chwee kway) (Chinese: 水粿; pinyin: shuǐguǒ; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: chúi-kóe; literally "water rice cake") is a type of steamed rice cake, a cuisine of Singapore and Johor. To make chwee kueh, rice flour and water are mixed together to form a slightly viscous mixture. They are then placed in small cup-shaped containers that look like saucers and steamed, forming a characteristic bowl-like shape when cooked. The rice cakes are topped with diced preserved radish and served with chilli sauce. Chwee kueh is a popular breakfast item in Singapore and Johor.
    9.67
    3 votes
    8
    Kueh tutu

    Kueh tutu

    Kueh Tutu is a traditional Singaporean delicacy. Made primarily with rice flour or glutinous rice flour, the light snack contains either ground peanut and sugar or shredded coconut as its filling. The typical method of preparation involves rapid steaming of the flour and the filling. Once ready, the Tutu is served on pandan leaves to add fragrance.
    7.50
    4 votes
    9
    Yong Tau Foo

    Yong Tau Foo

    Yong tau foo ( also spelled yong tao foo, yong tau fu, or yong tau hu yong tofu; yen tafo in Thailand) is a Chinese soup dish with Hakka origins commonly found in China, Singapore, Thailand and Malaysia. There are also Teochew and Hokkien variations. It is ubiquitous in Singapore food courts, too. Essentially the dish originated in the early 1960s in a restaurant called "Chew Kuan" as tofu stuffed with a meat paste of fish and pork, thereby earning the dish its name "Yong Tau Foo," which means "stuffed bean curd." Since then all variety of vegetables and even fried fritters have been similarly stuffed, and the name Yong Tau Foo has thus been used liberally to apply to foods prepared in this manner. Yong tau foo is essentially a clear consomme soup containing a varied selection of food items, including fish balls, crab sticks, bittergourds, cuttlefish, lettuce, ladies fingers, as well as chilis, and various forms of fresh produce, seafood and meats common in Chinese cuisine. Some of these items, such as bittergourd and chili, are usually filled with fish paste (surimi). The foods are then sliced into bite-size pieces, cooked briefly in boiling broth and then served either in the
    7.50
    4 votes
    10
    Krupuk

    Krupuk

    Krupuk or kerupuk in Indonesia; keropok in Malaysia; kropek in the Philippines; bánh phồng tôm in Vietnam; kroepoek in the Netherlands is a popular snack in parts of East and Southeast Asia as well as former colonizer the Netherlands and another of its former colonies, Suriname. Krupuk are deep fried crackers made from starch and other ingredients that usually give the taste. Prawn based krupuk are popular types of krupuk. These are called krupuk udang in Indonesian, prawn crackers in British and also in Australian English, shrimp chips or shrimp crackers in American English, Krabbenchips (Crab chips) in German, Nuvole di Drago (Dragon's Clouds) in Italian, 炸庀虾片 (fried prawn crisps) in Chinese. Prawn chips in Australia. Indonesia has perhaps the largest variety of krupuk. In Indonesia, the term krupuk refers to the type of relatively large crackers, while the term kripik or keripik refers to smaller bite-size crackers; the counterpart of chips (or crisps) in western cuisine. For example potato chips are called kripik kentang in Indonesia. Usually krupuk is made from the dried paste from the mixture of starch with other ingredients, while kripik is usually made entirely from thinly
    6.00
    5 votes
    11
    Ais kacang

    Ais kacang

    Ais kacang is a Malaysian dessert which is also common in Singapore and Brunei. Traditionally a special ice machine is used to churn out the shaved ice used in the dessert, originally hand cranked but now more often motorized. Formerly, it was made of only shaved ice and red beans, though the number and diversity of ingredients has since expanded. Today, ais kacang generally comes in bright colours, and with different fruit cocktails and dressings. In Malaysia, almost all variants now contain a large serving of attap chee (palm seed), red beans, sweet corn, grass jelly and cubes of agar agar as common ingredients. Other less-common ingredients include aloe vera, cendol, nata de coco, or ice cream. A final topping of evaporated milk, condensed milk, or coconut milk is drizzled over the mountain of ice along with red rose syrup and sarsi syrup. Some stalls have even introduced novelty toppings such as durian, chocolate syrup and ice cream. There are also versions that shun the multi-coloured syrup and are served with just a drizzling of gula melaka syrup instead. Many Southeast Asian coffee shops, hawker centres, and food courts offer this dessert. Nowadays, ais kacang is mostly
    7.25
    4 votes
    12
    Wonton noodles

    Wonton noodles

    Wonton noodles [Mandarin: Yun-tun mian; Cantonese: Wan-tan Min], sometimes called wanton mee ("wanton" is a Cantonese word for dumpling while noodles in Hokkien is "mee" or in Cantonese, "min") is a Cantonese noodle dish which is popular in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, and Malaysia. The dish is usually served in a hot broth, garnished with leafy vegetables, and wonton dumplings. The types of leafy vegetables used are usually kailan also known as Chinese kale. Another type of dumpling known as shui jiao is sometimes served in place of wonton. It contains prawns, chicken or pork, spring onions with some chefs adding mushroom and black fungus. In Hong Kong, wonton noodles are usually served in steaming hot soup with shrimp wontons and garnished with leafy vegetables. There are plenty of variations of this popular Cantonese dish, with different toppings and garnishes. For example, the soup and wontons in a separate bowl, the noodles being served relatively dry, with the toppings and garnishes, dressed with sauce, dipping the noodles in the soup to eat it. There are four distinct features: First, the wontons are predominantly prawn, with small amounts of minced pork, or no
    7.25
    4 votes
    13
    Rendang

    Rendang

    Rendang is a spicy meat dish which originated from the Minangkabau ethnic group of Indonesia, and is now commonly served across the country. One of the characteristic foods of Minangkabau culture, it is served at ceremonial occasions and to honour guests. Also popular in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, the southern Philippines and southern Thailand, rendang is traditionally prepared by the Indonesian community during festive occasions. Culinary expert often describe rendang as: 'West Sumatra caramelized beef curry'. Though rendang is sometimes described as being like a curry, and the name is sometimes applied to curried meat dishes in Malaysia, authentic rendang is nothing like a curry. In 2011 an online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International chose Rendang as the number one dish of their 'World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods' list. Rendang is rich in spices; next to main meat ingredient, rendang uses coconut milk (Minangkabau: karambia), and mixture of ground spices paste, which include ginger, galangal, turmeric leaves, lemon grass, garlic, shallot, chillies and other spices. These spices are called pemasak in Minangkabau language. Spices used in rendang are known as a natural
    8.00
    3 votes
    14
    Chai tow kway

    Chai tow kway

    Chai tao kway is a common dish or dim sum of Teochew cuisine in Chaoshan (China), Singapore and Malaysia, consisting of stir-fried cubes of radish cake. It is also known as "fried carrot cake" or simply "carrot cake" in Southeast Asian countries, as the word for daikon (POJ: chhài-thâu), one of its main ingredients, can also refer to a carrot (POJ: âng-chhài-thâu, literally "red radish"). There is no connection between this dish and the sweet Western carrot cake eaten as a dessert. This misnomer gave the title to a popular guidebook on Singapore's street food, There's No Carrot in Carrot Cake, which was published by Epigram Books in 2010. It is made with radish cake (steamed rice flour, water, and shredded white daikon), which has then been stir-fried with eggs, preserved radish, and other seasonings. The radish cake is often served in large rectangular slabs which are steamed and then later fried whole. Alternatives to chai tow kway include those made of taro or solely of rice flour. The versions served by hawkers in Johor and Singapore, where Teochews live, are typically prepared by frying the daikon cake with chopped preserved radish, diced garlic, eggs, and Chinese fish sauce
    10.00
    2 votes
    15
    Laksa

    Laksa

    Laksa is a popular spicy noodle soup from the Peranakan culture, which is a merger of Chinese and Malay elements found in Malaysia and Singapore, and Riau Islands. The origin of the name "laksa" is unclear. One theory traces it back to Hindi/Persian lakhshah, referring to a type of vermicelli, which in turn may be derived from the Sanskrit lakshas (लकशस्) meaning "one hundred thousand" (lakh). It has also been suggested that "laksa" may derive from the Chinese word 辣沙 (Cantonese: [lɐ̀t.sáː]), meaning "spicy sand" due to the ground dried prawns which gives a sandy or gritty texture to the sauce. The last theory is that the name comes from the similar sounding word "dirty" in Hokkien due to its appearance. There are two basic types of laksa: curry laksa and asam laksa. Curry laksa is a coconut curry soup with noodles, while asam laksa is a sour fish soup with noodles. Thick rice noodles also known as laksa noodles are most commonly used, although thin rice vermicelli (bee hoon or mee hoon) are also common and some variants use other types. Curry laksa (in many places referred to simply as “laksa”) is a coconut-based curry soup. The main ingredients for most versions of curry laksa
    7.67
    3 votes
    16
    Tahu goreng

    Tahu goreng

    Tahu goreng (Indonesian spelling) or Tauhu goreng (Malaysian and Singaporean spelling) is a dish of fried tofu commonly found in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. When preparing the dish, cakes of hard tofu are deep fried until golden brown. The bean curds are then cut diagonally in half and arranged on a plate garnished with bean sprouts, cucumber and spring onion. A thick sauce is prepared with shallots, garlic, chillies, shrimp paste, soy sauce and tamarind juice. In Indonesian and Malay language; tahu or tauhu refers to 'tofu' and goreng indicates 'fried'. Tofu was originated from China and brought to Southeast Asia by Chinese immigrants to the region. Fried tofu cannot be claimed as a dish exclusively found in Malay cuisine or Indonesian cuisine since tofu and fried tofu are consumed extensively in Asian cultures, and has found its way into mainstream Western vegetarian diets. Tahu goreng is largely similar to the Japanese dish agedashi tofu where the latter is not spicy and uses fewer condiments, although both versions use generous servings of soy sauce. Tahu goreng is a generic name for any type of fried tofu in Indonesia, it can be mildly fried or deep fried, plain or
    7.67
    3 votes
    17
    Nasi lemak

    Nasi lemak

    Nasi lemak (Jawi: ناسي لمق) is a fragrant rice dish cooked in coconut milk and "pandan" leaf commonly found in Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Riau Islands and Southern Thailand. Malaysia proclaims it its national dish and a national heritage of Malaysia, although it's widely served in other parts of the region. It is not to be confused with Nasi Dagang sold on the east coast of Malaysia or Terengganu and Kelantan although both dishes can usually be found sold side by side for breakfast. However, because of the nasi lemak's versatility in being able to be served in a variety of manners, it is now served and eaten any time of the day. With roots in Malay culture and Malay cuisine, its name in Malay literally means "fatty rice", but is taken in this context to mean "rich" or "creamy". The name is derived from the cooking process whereby rice is soaked in coconut cream and then the mixture steamed. This is the same process used to make a dish from their neighboring country, Indonesia, which is nasi uduk, therefore the two dishes are quite similar. Sometimes knotted screwpine (pandan) leaves are thrown into the rice while steaming to give it more fragrance. Spices such as ginger and
    7.33
    3 votes
    18
    Tangyuan

    Tangyuan

    Tāngyuán is a Chinese food made from glutinous rice flour. Glutinous rice flour is mixed with a small amount of water to form balls and is then cooked and served in boiling water. Tangyuan can be either small or large, and filled or unfilled. They are traditionally eaten during Yuanxiao, or the Lantern Festival. Historically, a number of different names were used to refer to tangyuan. During the Yongle era of the Ming Dynasty, the name was officially settled as yuanxiao (derived from the Yuanxiao Festival), which is used in northern China. This name literally means "first evening", being the first full moon after Chinese New Year, which is always a new moon. In southern China, however, they are called tangyuan or tangtuan. Legend has it that during Yuan Shikai's rule from 1912 to 1916, he disliked the name yuanxiao (元宵) because it sounded identical to "remove Yuan" (袁消), and so he gave orders to changed the name to tangyuan. This new moniker literally means "round balls in soup". Tangtuan similarly means "round dumplings in soup". In the two major Chinese dialects of far southern China, Hakka and Cantonese, "tangyuan" is pronounced as tong rhen and tong jyun respectively. The term
    7.33
    3 votes
    19
    Kaya toast

    Kaya toast

    Kaya toast is a popular snack amongst Singaporeans and Malaysians. It consists of kaya, a spread of eggs, sugar and coconut milk and flavored with pandan on toasted or fresh bread or cream crackers. Butter or margarine may be spread as well. This delicacy is credited to the Hainanese. Many Hainanese worked on British ships as kitchen hands. When they settled in Malaysia, they started selling the foods which they prepared for the British, including coffee, toast, and French toast, to the local populations. They replaced the Western jams and preserves favored by the British with native coconut jams. Singaporeans and Malaysians like to consume this food with a cup of tea or coffee, which has merited the snack's inclusion in many coffee houses. The Singaporean companies Ya Kun Kaya Toast and Killiney Kopitiam are franchises which have proliferated by this popular snack.
    7.00
    3 votes
    20

    Red bean soup

    Red bean soup (￧ᄡナ│ᄆニ₩ᄍᆵ; pinyin: hᅢᄈng dᅢᄇu tᅣチng) is Red bean paste with more water added to form a thick soup. Often cooked and eaten with tangyuan and lotus seeds.
    7.00
    3 votes
    21
    Pig's organ soup

    Pig's organ soup

    Pig's organ soup (simplified Chinese: 猪杂汤; traditional Chinese: 豬雜湯; pinyin: zhū​ zá​ tāng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: ti-cha̍p-thng, tu-cha̍p-thng) is a Malaysian and Singaporean soup originating in Teochew/Chaozhou, China. The dish is a clear and refreshing soup; the reason why sometimes referred just as chhing-thng (清湯), served with other optional side dishes as well as rice. The broth is boiled from a mix of pig offals including liver, heart, intestines, stomach, tongue, blood cubes, as well as pork meat slices, strips of salted vegetables, Chinese lettuce and a sprinkle of chopped onion leaves and pepper. Side dishes include braised tofu puffs, and eggs and salted vegetables sometime are served. The meal is usually served with a special chili sauce or soy sauce with chopped hot chili.
    8.50
    2 votes
    22
    Mi rebus

    Mi rebus

    Mi rebus or Mie rebus (Indonesian spelling) or Mee rebus (Malaysian and Singaporean spelling), (literally boiled noodles in English) is a noodle dish popular in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. The dish is made of yellow egg noodles, which are also used in Hokkien mee, with a spicy slightly sweet curry-like gravy. The gravy is made from potatoes, curry powder, water, salted soybeans, dried shrimps, and peanuts. The dish is garnished with a hard boiled egg, calamansi limes, spring onions, Chinese celery, green chillies, fried firm tofu (tau kwa), fried shallots and bean sprouts. Some eateries serve it with beef, though rarely found in hawker centres, or add dark soy sauce to the noodles when served. The dish also goes well with satay. In the past, mi rebus was sold by mobile hawkers who carried two baskets over a pole. One basket contained a stove and a pot of boiling water, and the other the ingredients for the dish. In certain area, due to the local situation, a similar variety of this Mi Rebus is called Mee Jawa, Mi Jawa or Bakmi Jawa.
    8.00
    2 votes
    23
    Chilli crab

    Chilli crab

    Chilli crab is a seafood dish that popular in Singapore. Mud crabs are commonly used and are stir-fried in a semi-thick, sweet and savoury tomato and chilli based sauce. Despite its name, chilli crab is not a very spicy dish. It is listed at number 35 on World's 50 most quite delicious foods complied by CNN Go in 2011. Chilli crab sauce is usually semi-thick, sweet and savoury. The base of the chilli crab sauce is usually curry powder and cumin powder. It is thickened with a cornstarch and flavoured with rice vinegar, kecap masin and etc. Beaten eggs are added near the end of the cooking process to create egg-ribbons in the sauce. It is commonly garnished with coriander leaves (cilantro). Although mud crabs are commonly used, other varieties of crab that have been used include Flower crab / Blue swimmer crab and Soft-shell crab. Chilli crabs are commonly served with breads for mopping up the sauce: Steamed or fried mantou (Chinese buns), French loaves, Toasted sliced bread. Plain white rice may be eaten with chilli crabs too.
    10.00
    1 votes
    24

    Curry chicken noodles

    Curry Chicken Noodle usually uses curry as soup base coupled with yellow noodles. The dish contains chicken meat, fish cake, potatoes and tau pok. In this dish, the curry plays an important part in dish. Usually a more watery curry base is preferred in this case so that the noodle is not hard to swallow.
    10.00
    1 votes
    25
    Mango pudding

    Mango pudding

    Mango pudding is a dessert that originated in India but is very popular in Hong Kong. There is very little variation in how mango pudding is prepared in both places. The dessert is also popular in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and Macau and is often found in dim sum restaurants worldwide. There are two types of mango pudding, fresh and factory-made. The fresh variant is prepared by the restaurant or eatery and consists of agar or gelatin, fresh mangoes, evaporated milk and sugar. In addition, some places add fresh fruit such as mango, strawberries, berries and kiwifruit as garnish. Served and eaten refrigerator cold. It has a rich and creamy texture. Factory-made mango pudding does not contain fresh mangoes and instead, consists of mango essence and either gelatin or agar. Serves 3-4 Canned mangoes in its puree or pulp form may be used instead of fresh mango. The recipe requires milk although the type of milk varies - white milk, evaporated milk, or any other type of milk may be used instead of coconut milk. Whipping cream or other higher fat content milks may be used to create a richer tasting pudding. Gelatin is not required - agar, derived from seaweed, may be used
    10.00
    1 votes
    26
    Hae mee

    Hae mee

    Hae mee is a noodle soup dish popular in Malaysia and Singapore. It can also refer to a fried noodle dish known as Hokkien mee. The dish's name literally means "prawn noodles" in the Hokkien dialect of the Chinese language. Egg noodles are served in richly flavoured dark soup stock with prawns, pork slices, fish cake slices, and bean sprouts topped with fried shallots and spring onion. The stock is made using dried shrimps, plucked heads of prawns, white pepper, garlic and other spices. Traditionally, lard is added to the soup, but this is now less common due to health concerns. A "dry" (without soup) version is also available and this version usually involves flavouring the noodles and toppings with vinegar, soy sauce, oil and chili if desired. The dish is also usually served with freshly cut red chili slices in light [soy sauce] and lime
    6.00
    3 votes
    27
    Almond jelly

    Almond jelly

    Almond jelly, almond pudding, or almond tofu (杏仁豆腐) is a popular dessert in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Japan and often found in dim sum restaurants worldwide, commonly garnished with wolfberries. The name is sometimes misleading, as the dish is often prepared using apricot kernels (杏仁), not almonds – though the flavor is similar – and in most recipes does not use soy beans (as are used in tofu, 豆腐), though the consistency is similar. In the traditional recipe, the primary ingredient is southern Chinese almond (南杏, which is in fact apricot kernel) or sweet Chinese almond, soaked and ground with water. The almond milk is extracted, sweetened, and heated with a gelling agent (usually agar). When chilled, the almond milk mixture solidifies to the consistency of a soft gelatin dessert. Almond jelly can be made using instant mix or from scratch. Although the agar-based recipe is vegan, there are numerous nontraditional recipes that are not. Most of them are based on dairy products and a small amount of almond-flavored extract. Gelatin is also a common substitute for agar. There is also an "instant" almond-flavored soy-based powder with a coagulating agent, which
    7.50
    2 votes
    28

    Kuih kochi

    Kuih kochi (also known as passover cake in English) is a Malaysian dumpling made from ground unpolished glutinous rice. For the Eurasians in Malaysia and Singapore, this snack is often sold at funerals. The black colour of the unpolished rice symbolises death, while the sweet filling represents resurrection.
    7.50
    2 votes
    29
    Oyster omelette

    Oyster omelette

    Oyster omelette is a Taiwanese dish that is widely known in Taiwan and many parts of Asia for its savory and addictive taste. Variations of the dish preside in some southern regions of China although the actual taste and appearance of these can vary by a lot from the original version from Taiwan. Oyster Omelette is often sold in night markets, and has constantly been ranked by many foreigners as the top cuisine from Taiwan and one of the most addictive food in the world. It is also popular in other places with Chaozhou and Fujianese influences such as in Guangdong, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, and the Philippines. The dish consists of an omelette with a filling primarily composed of small oysters. Starch (typically potato starch) is mixed into the egg batter, giving the resulting egg wrap a thicker consistency. Pork lard is often used to fry the omelette. Depending on regional variation, a savory sauce may then be poured on top of the omelette for added taste. Spicy or chili sauce mixed with lime juice is often added to provide an intense taste. Shrimp can sometimes be substituted in place of oysters; in this case, it will be called shrimp omelettes (蝦仁煎). In the Chinese
    7.50
    2 votes
    30
    Yusheng

    Yusheng

    Yusheng, yee sang or yuu sahng (Chinese: 鱼生; pinyin: yúshēng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: hî-seⁿ or hû-siⁿ), or Prosperity Toss, also known as lo hei (Cantonese for 撈起 or 捞起) is a Teochew-style raw fish salad. It usually consists of strips of raw fish (most commonly salmon), mixed with shredded vegetables and a variety of sauces and condiments, among other ingredients. Yusheng literally means "raw fish" but since "fish (鱼)" is commonly conflated with its homophone "abundance (余)", Yúshēng (鱼生) is interpreted as a homophone for Yúshēng (余升) meaning an increase in abundance. Therefore, yusheng is considered a symbol of abundance, prosperity and vigor. While versions of it are thought to have existed in China, the contemporary version is created and popularised in the 1960s amongst the ethnic Chinese community and its consumption has been associated with Chinese New Year festivities in Malaysia and Singapore. In Malaysia and Singapore, government, community and business leaders often take the lead in serving the dish as part of official functions during the festive period or in private celebrity dinners. Fishermen along the coast of Guangzhou traditionally celebrated Renri, the seventh day of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    31

    Char siew rice

    Char siew rice is a dish common in Malaysia and Singapore. As its name implies, the dish is by its bare basics char siew served with plain rice. Regional variations may exist however. In Singapore, the dish is very often served in the same stall as that for the dominant Hainanese chicken rice, hence using the same chicken-flavoured rice, topped off with sliced cucumber, and always served with a choice of sauces comprising of garlic chilli and soy sauce. Upon request, it is also possible for both chicken and char siew to be served in the same dish. In Hong Kong, char siu is almost always served at restaurants serving other BBQ or roasted meat items, such as soy sauce chicken, boiled sliced chicken, roasted pork, duck or goose, hence it is less referred to as a dish in its own right compared to those in Singapore or Malaysia, and commonly referred to as Barbecued pork with rice. Asian action movie star Jackie Chan has mentioned in his biography that he loves Char siew rice.
    5.67
    3 votes
    32
    4.50
    4 votes
    33
    Char kway teow

    Char kway teow

    Char kway teow, literally "stir-fried ricecake strips", is a popular noodle dish in Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei and Singapore. The dish was (and still is in some places in Malaysia and Singapore) typically prepared at hawker stalls. It is made from flat rice noodles (河粉 hé fěn in Chinese) of approximately 1 cm or (in the north of Malaysia) about 0.5 cm in width, stir-fried over very high heat with light and dark soy sauce, chilli, a small quantity of belachan, whole prawns, deshelled cockles, bean sprouts and chopped Chinese chives. The dish is commonly stir-fried with egg, slices of Chinese sausage and fishcake, and less commonly with other ingredients. Char kway teow is traditionally stir-fried in pork fat, with crisp croutons of pork lard, and commonly served on a piece of banana leaf on a plate. Char kway teow has a reputation of being unhealthy due to its high saturated fat content. However, when the dish was first invented, it was mainly served to labourers. The high fat content and low cost of the dish made it attractive to these people as it was a cheap source of energy and nutrients. When the dish was first served, it was often sold by fishermen, farmers and
    9.00
    1 votes
    34
    Douhua

    Douhua

    Douhua (Chinese: 豆花, dòuhuā) or doufuhua (Chinese: 豆腐花, dòufuhuā) is a Chinese dessert made with very soft tofu. It is also referred to as tofu pudding and soybean pudding. Tofu is thought to have originated in ancient China during the Western Han Dynasty. Chinese people have developed and enriched the recipes for tofu dishes on the basis of their own tastes, such as mapo tofu, stinky tofu, pickled tofu and uncongealed tofu pudding, etc. In northern China, douhua is often eaten with soy sauce, thus resulting in a savory flavor. Northern Chinese often refer to douhua as doufunao (Chinese: 豆腐腦; pinyin: dòufunǎo; literally "tofu brains"). Douhua in Sichuan is often made without any sugar at all, then served by carrying pole or bicycle vendors with a number of condiments such as chili oil, soy sauce, Sichuan pepper, scallions, and nuts, and is sometimes eaten along with white rice as well. Douhua is served only with sugar in Hubei. It is referred to as either doufunao (Chinese: 豆腐腦) or doufuhua (Chinese: 豆腐花). In Taiwanese cuisine, douhua is served with sweet toppings like cooked peanuts, adzuki beans, cooked oatmeal, tapioca, mung beans, and a syrup flavored with ginger or almond.
    9.00
    1 votes
    35
    Rojak

    Rojak

    Rojak (Malaysian and Singaporean spelling) or Rujak (Indonesian spelling) is a traditional fruit and vegetable salad dish commonly found in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. The term "Rojak" is Malay for mixture. In Malaysia and Singapore, the term "rojak" is also used as a colloquial expression for an eclectic mix, in particular as a word describing the multi-ethnic character of Malaysian and Singaporean society. In Indonesia, among the Javanese, rujak is an essential part of the traditional prenatal ceremony called Tujuh bulanan (literally: seventh month). Special fruit rujak is made for this occasion, and later served to the mother-to-be and her guests, primarily her female friends). It is widely known that the sweet, spicy and sour tastes of rojak are adored by pregnant women. The recipe of rujak for this ceremony is similar to typical Indonesian fruit rujak, with the exceptions that the fruits are roughly shredded instead of thinly sliced, and that jeruk bali (pomelo/pink grapefruit) is an essential ingredient. It is believed that if the rujak overall tastes sweet, the unborn would be a girl, and if it is spicy, the unborn baby is a boy. Mangarabar, or rujak making, is a
    7.00
    2 votes
    36

    Black pepper crab

    Black pepper crab is one of the two most popular ways that crab is served in Singapore. It is made with hard-shell crabs, and cooked in a thick gravy made with black pepper. The creation of Singapore's black pepper crab is attributed to Long Beach Seafood Restaurant in 1959. The black pepper crab is liked by many locals and foreign tourists over the chilli crab because of its drier and fragrant pepperish nature. It is becoming very popular to mix the pepper crab with a fresh jackfruit sauce. It has, however, not made it into the nomination list for Singapore's National Food.
    6.50
    2 votes
    37
    Mie goreng

    Mie goreng

    Mie goreng (Indonesian: mie goreng or mi goreng; Malay: mee goreng or mi goreng; both meaning "fried noodles") is a dish common in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. It is made with thin yellow noodles fried in cooking oil with garlic, onion or shallots, fried prawn, chicken, or beef, sliced bakso (meatballs), chili, Chinese cabbage, cabbages, tomatoes, egg, and acar (pickles). Ubiquitous in Indonesia, it can be found everywhere in the country, sold by all food vendors from street-hawkers to high-end restaurants. Mie goreng is Indonesian one-dish meal favorite, at the street food hawkers mie goreng is very common to be sold together with nasi goreng (fried rice). It is commonly available at mamak stalls in Singapore and Malaysia and is often spicy. The dish is derived from Chinese chow mein and believed to have been introduced by Chinese immigrants in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. Mie goreng is also similar to Japanese yakisoba. However mie goreng has been more heavily integrated into Indonesian cuisine; for example the application of popular sweet soy sauce, spinkle of fried shallots, addition of spicy sambal and the absence of pork and lard in favour for shrimp, chicken,
    6.50
    2 votes
    38
    Murtabak

    Murtabak

    Martabak or murtabak, also mutabbaq, (Arabic: مطبق‎) is a stuffed pancake or pan-fried bread which is commonly found in Saudi Arabia (especially the Hejaz region), Yemen, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore, and Brunei. Depending on the location, the name and ingredients can significantly vary. The name mutabbaq (or sometimes mutabbag) in Arabic means "folded". In Malaysia, where it is called "Murtabak", it is sold by Mamak salesmen, and usually includes minced mutton, along with garlic, egg and onion, and is eaten with curry sauce. Murtabak also usually includes mutton in Yemen. In Indonesia, particularly Jakarta, it is called "martabak", and has two versions: a sweet one, and a savory one. Vegetarian murtabaks exist, too, and can be found around Singapore's "Little India" neighborhood, among other places. Murtabak originated in Yemen and hijaz region of Saudi Arabia the word mutabbaq in Arabic means folded,through traders it has spread to India and southeast of Asia. The dish referred to as Murtabak is a multi layered pancake that originated in the state of Kerela where the people referred to disparagingly as "mamak's" (or uncle) hail from. The word mutabar is the correct
    5.00
    3 votes
    39
    Congee

    Congee

    Congee or conjee (from Tamil kañji, the English form may have arrived in the language via Portuguese. The derivation of the Tamil word is unknown as it appears to be non-Dravidian.) is a type of rice porridge or gruel popular in many Asian countries. When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients, such as meat, fish, and flavorings, are added whilst preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation. Despite its many variations, it is always a thick porridge or soup of rice which has usually disintegrated after prolonged cooking in copious water. To prepare the dish, rice is boiled in a large amount of water until it softens significantly. Congee can be made in a pot or in a rice cooker. Some rice cookers have a "congee" setting, allowing it to be cooked overnight. The type of rice used can be either short or long grain, depending on what is available and regional cultural influences. Culture also often dictates the way congee is cooked and eaten. In other Asian cultures, it is also called kanji (Tamil/Tulu), kaṇni /Malayalam), pakhal bhat (Oriya),
    6.00
    2 votes
    40
    Lontong

    Lontong

    Lontong is an Asian dish made of compressed rice wrapped inside banana leaf that is then cut into small cakes as staple food replacement of steamed rice. The smaller size of lontong filled with vegetables (carrot, common bean and potato) sometimes also filled with meat, are eaten as snack. Popular in Indonesia and Malaysia, the dish is usually served cold or at room temperature with sauce-based dishes such as gado-gado and salads, although it can be eaten as an accompaniment to other dishes such as Satay and curries. It is also used in Soto as an alternative to vermicelli noodles. Lontong is traditionally made by boiling the rice until it is partially cooked and packing it tightly into a rolled-up banana leaf. The leaf is secured and cooked in boiling water for about 90 minutes. Once the compacted rice has cooled, it can be cut up into bite-sized pieces. Alternative ways of cooking lontong include placing uncooked rice into a muslin bag then letting the water seep in and cause the rice to form a solid mass (Ingram, 2003).
    5.50
    2 votes
    41
    Curry puff

    Curry puff

    Curry puff (Malay: Karipap, Epok-epok; Chinese: 咖哩角; Thai: กะหรี่ปั๊บ, RTGS: karipap, IPA: [karìːpáp]) is a Malaysian, Singaporean, and Thai snack. It is a small pie consisting of specialised curry with chicken and potatoes in a deep-fried or baked pastry shell, and it looks like the Portuguese stuffed bread called Empanada. The curry is quite thick to prevent it from oozing out of the snack. A common snack in the region, the curry puff is one of several "puff" type pastries with different fillings, though now it is by far the most common. Other common varieties include sardines and onions or sweet fillings such as yam. Some varieties of the South Asian samosa are very similar to curry puffs. In Malaysia, this snack is considered a Malaysian version of empanadas. Found in many stores, especially at Indian and Malay food stalls. Another Malay version of this snack is known as epok-epok and teh-teh which is smaller than the curry puff. Other varieties of the epok epok are filled with a half boiled egg instead of chicken. Another alternative is tinned sardines. Manufacturers have developed a version of the curry puff that can be frozen and later reheated by the consumer. These are
    7.00
    1 votes
    42
    Roti prata

    Roti prata

    Roti prata is a fried flour-based pancake that is cooked over a flat grill. It is usually served with a vegetable or meat based curry and is sold all over Singapore in food centres. Prata is also commonly cooked (upon request) with cheese, onion, banana, red bean, chocolate, mushroom or egg. It is listed at number 45 on World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Go in 2011. Roti prata is prepared by flipping the dough into a large thin layer before folding the outside edges inwards. The dough will then be heated on a hot plate. Flavorings or toppings, if ordered, can be added either before or after it is flipped, depending on the flavorings or the desired outcome. The 'tissue' and 'paper' variants are pan-fried with butter, rolled into a cone shape and sprinkled with sugar. Roti prata is a traditional North Indian food. It has always been known as Paratha in India while it is usually known as roti prata in countries like Singapore. Roti prata and the Malaysian variant Roti canai are served slightly differently, influenced by each country's culture. There are also differences in nomenclature in Singapore and Malaysia. In Singapore, the varieties of roti prata are
    7.00
    1 votes
    43
    Soto ayam

    Soto ayam

    Soto ayam is a yellow spicy chicken soup with lontong or nasi empit or ketupat (all compressed rice that is then cut into small cakes) and/or vermicelli or noodles, commonly found in Indonesia, Singapore, and Suriname. Turmeric is added as one of its ingredients to get yellow chicken broth. Besides chicken and vermicelli, it is also served with hard-boiled eggs, slices of fried potatoes, Chinese celery leaves, and fried shallots. Occasionally, people will add "koya", a powder of mixed prawn crackers with fried garlic or bitter Sambal (orange colored). Krupuk are a very common topping. Different regions have their own variation of this dish, for instance:
    7.00
    1 votes
    44
    Hainanese Chicken Rice

    Hainanese Chicken Rice

    Hainanese chicken rice is a dish of Chinese origin, and is most commonly associated with Hainanese, Singapore and Malaysia, although it is also commonly sold in Thailand. It is based on the well-known Hainanese dish called Wenchang chicken (文昌雞), due to its roots in Hainan cuisine and its adoption by the Hainanese overseas Chinese population in the Nanyang area (present-day Southeast Asia). The chicken is prepared in traditional Hainanese methods which involve the boiling of the entire chicken in a pork and chicken bone stock, reusing the broth over and over and only topping it up with water when needed, in accordance with the Chinese preferences for creating master stocks. This stock is not used for rice preparation, which instead involves chicken stock created specifically for that purpose, producing an oily, flavourful rice sometimes known as "oily rice" with Southeast Asian pandan leaves added sometimes. Some cooks may add coconut milk to the rice, reminiscent of the Malay dish nasi lemak. The Hainanese prefer using older, plumper birds to maximise the amount of oil extracted, thus creating a more flavourful dish. Over time, however, the dish began adopting elements of
    5.00
    2 votes
    45
    5.00
    2 votes
    46
    Popiah

    Popiah

    Popiah (Pe̍h-ōe-jī: pȯh-piáⁿ) is a Fujian/Chaozhou-style fresh spring roll common in Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia and Burma/Myanmar, where it is called kawpyan (ကော်ပြန့်). Popiah is often eaten in the Fujian province of China (usually in Xiamen) and its neighbouring Chaoshan on the Qingming Festival. In the Teochew (Chaozhou) dialect, popiah is pronounced as "Bo-BEE-a"(薄餅仔). which means "thin wafer". In Thailand, no doubt influenced by its large Teochew Overseas Chinese community, the spring rolls are called "Bpaw! Bee Uh". In variants of the Hokkien dialect, it is also commonly referred to as "lun-BEE-a"(潤餅仔), which probably explains why the spring rolls are referred to as "lumpia" in the Philippines. It is sometimes referred to as runbing (潤餅) or baobing (薄饼) in Mandarin, and also as bópíjuǎn (薄皮卷). A popiah "skin" (薄餅皮) is a soft, thin paper-like crepe or pancake made from wheat flour. The method of producing the wrapper involves making an extremely wet and viscous dough. A ball of this dough is held to the right hand, then quickly "rubbed" (擦潤餅皮, Hokkien: chhat jūn-piáⁿ phê, lit. "to rub a lumpia crepe") against a hot steel plate in a circular fashion, and lifted. Through this
    6.00
    1 votes
    47

    Satay bee hoon

    Satay bee hoon is a dish of the cultural fusion between Malay and Chinese. Satay bee hoon sauce is a chilli-based peanut sauce very similar to the one served with satay. The satay sauce is spread on top of rice vermicelli. The main ingredient of satay bee hoon is satay sauce. Cuttlefish, kang kong, bean sprouts, pork slices, prawns and cockles can be added to the vermicelli before spreading the sauce.
    6.00
    1 votes
    48
    Bak kut teh

    Bak kut teh

    Bak-kut-teh (also spelled Bah-kut-teh) (Chinese: 肉骨茶; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: bah-kut-tê) is a Chinese soup popularly served in Malaysia, Singapore, Mainland China and Taiwan (where there is a predominant Hoklo and Teochew community) and also, neighbouring regions like Riau Islands and Southern Thailand. The name literally translates as "meat bone tea", and, at its simplest, consists of meaty pork ribs simmered in a complex broth of herbs and spices (including star anise, cinnamon, cloves, dang gui, fennel seeds and garlic) for hours. However, additional ingredients may include offal, varieties of mushroom, choy sum, and pieces of dried tofu or fried tofu puffs. Additional Chinese herbs may include yu zhu (rhizome of Solomon's Seal) and ju zhi (buckthorn fruit), which give the soup a sweeter, slightly stronger flavor. Light and dark soy sauce are also added to the soup during cooking, with varying amounts depending on the variant. Garnishings include chopped coriander or green onions and a sprinkling of fried shallots. Bak kut teh is usually eaten with rice or noodles (sometimes as a noodle soup), and often served with youtiao / cha kueh [yau char kwai] (strips of fried dough) for dipping into
    5.00
    1 votes
    49
    Nasi goreng

    Nasi goreng

    Nasi goreng, literally meaning "fried rice" in Indonesian and Malay, can refer simply to fried pre-cooked rice, a meal including stir fried rice in small amount of cooking oil or margarine, typically spiced with kecap manis (sweet soy sauce), shallot, garlic, tamarind and chilli and accompanied with other ingredients, particularly egg, chicken and prawns. There is also another kind of nasi goreng which is made with ikan asin (salted dried fish) which is also popular across Indonesia. Nasi goreng has been called the national dish of Indonesia, though there are many other contenders. There are many Indonesian cuisines but few national dishes. Indonesia's national dish knows no social barriers. It can be enjoyed in its simplest manifestation from a tin plate at a roadside warung, travelling night hawker's cart; eaten on porcelain in restaurants, or constructed at the buffet tables of Jakarta dinner parties. In 2011 an online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International chose Nasi Goreng as the number two of their 'World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods' list after rendang. Nasi goreng can trace its origin from Chinese fried rice, however it is not clear when Indonesians began to adopt the
    4.00
    1 votes
    50
    Satay

    Satay

    Satay ( /ˈsæteɪ/,  /ˈsɑːteɪ/ SAH-tay), or sate, is a dish of marinated, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce. Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef, pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings. Satay originated in Java, Indonesia. Satay is available almost anywhere in Indonesia, where it has become a national dish. It is also popular in many other Southeast Asian countries, such as: Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Thailand as well as in the Netherlands, as Indonesia is a former Dutch colony. Satay is a very popular delicacy in Indonesia; Indonesia's diverse ethnic groups' culinary arts (see Indonesian cuisine) have produced a wide variety of satays. In Indonesia, satay can be obtained from a travelling satay vendor, from a street-side tent-restaurant, in an upper-class restaurant, or during traditional celebration feasts. In Malaysia, satay is a popular dish—especially during celebrations—and can be found throughout the country. Close
    4.00
    1 votes
    51
    Claypot chicken rice

    Claypot chicken rice

    Claypot chicken rice (Chinese: 瓦煲鸡饭 or Chinese: 煲仔鸡饭) is usually a dinner dish in the southern regions of China, Singapore and Malaysia. It is typically served with Chinese sausage and vegetables. More often than not, the rice is cooked in the claypot first and cooked ingredients like diced chicken and Chinese sausage are added in later. Traditionally, the cooking is done over a charcoal stove, giving the dish a distinctive flavour. Some places serve it with dark soya sauce and also dried salted fish. Salted fish enhances the taste of the claypot chicken rice, depending on the diner's preference. Due to the time-consuming method of preparation and slow-cooking in a claypot, customers might have to wait a period of time (typically 15-30 minutes) before the dish is ready.
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    0 votes
    52
    Hokkien mee

    Hokkien mee

    Hokkien mee refers to fried noodles cooked in Hokkien (Fujian) style. Hokkien mee is served in many Southeast Asian countries (mostly Malaysia and Singapore) and was brought there by immigrants from the Fujian province in southeastern China. There are two types of Hokkien mee: Hokkien hae mee and Hokkien char mee. Hokkien hae mee (Hokkien prawn noodles) is commonly served in Penang and Singapore while Hokkien char mee (Hokkien fried noodles) is commonly served in Kuala Lumpur and the Klang Valley. The dish commonly referred to as "Hokkien mee", depending on the locality, can mean either Hokkien hae mee or Hokkien char mee. For example, Hokkien mee in Kuala Lumpur refers to Hokkien char mee. Strictly speaking, the Penang and Singapore versions of Hokkien mee are two different dishes, except that they are both prawn noodle dishes and share the name "Hokkien." The ingredients and methods of cooking are different, and the Penang version is cooked in soup while the Singapore version is stir fried. In this respect, the dish Hokkien mee can refer to no fewer than three different distinct dishes: Penang Hokkien mee, Singapore Hokkien mee, and Kuala Lumpur Hokkien mee. Penang Hokkien mee is
    0.00
    0 votes
    53
    Ketupat

    Ketupat

    Ketupat or packed rice is a type of dumpling from Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines (where it is known by the name pusô in Cebuano, bugnóy in Hiligaynon, patupat in Kapampangan, or ta’mu in Tausug), and Singapore. It is made from rice that has been wrapped in a woven palm leaf pouch and boiled. As the rice cooks, the grains expand to fill the pouch and the rice becomes compressed. This method of cooking gives the ketupat its characteristic form and texture of a rice dumpling. Ketupat is usually eaten with rendang or served as an accompaniment to satay(chicken or beef or lamb in skewers) or gado-gado (mixed vegetables with peanut sauce). Local stories passed down through the generations have attributed the creation of this style of rice preparation to the seafarers' need to keep cooked rice from spoiling during long sea voyages. The coco leaves used in wrapping the rice are always shaped into a triangular form and stored hanging in bunches in the open air. The shape of the package facilitates moisture to drip away from the cooked rice while the coco leaves allow the rice to be aerated and at the same time prevent flies and insects from touching it. There are many
    0.00
    0 votes
    54
    Lor mee

    Lor mee

    [[image:|thumb|Lor mee sold in Bukit Batok, Singapore Lor mee (Chinese: 鹵麵; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: lóo-mī) is a Chinese-inspired noodle dish served in a thick starchy gravy and thick flat yellow noodles (also known as lor mee). The dish is eaten by Hokkiens (Min Nan speakers) in Singapore and Malaysia. The thick gravy is made of corn starch, spices and eggs. The ingredients added into the noodles are usually ngo hiang, fish cake, fish, round and flat meat dumplings (usually chicken or pork), half a boiled egg, and other items depending on the stall and the price paid. Vinegar and garlic can be added as an optional item. The dish is also eaten with red chili. Traditional versions also include bits of fried fish as topping though few stalls serve this version anymore.
    0.00
    0 votes
    55
    Otak-otak

    Otak-otak

    Otak-otak (Chinese: 鲤鱼包) is a cake made of fish meat and spices. It is widely known across Southeast Asia, where it is traditionally served fresh, wrapped inside a banana leaf, as well as in many Asian stores internationally - being sold as frozen food and even canned food. Otak-otak is found in certain parts of Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. The southern Malaysian town of Muar in Johor is a popular destination for it — people from surrounding states and even Singaporeans often visit to buy the famous otak-otak in bulk. It is commonly known in Singapore as otah. Otak means brains in Indonesian and Malay, and the name of the dish is derived from the idea that the dish somewhat resembles brains, being grey, soft and almost squishy. It can be eaten as a snack or with bread or rice as part of a meal. Otak-otak is made by mixing fish paste (usually mackerel) with a mixture of spices. In Indonesia, the mixture typically contains fish paste, shallots, garlic, green onions, egg, coconut milk, and sago flour or can be substituted for cassava starch. While in Malaysia, it is usually a mixture between fish paste, chillies, garlic, shallots, turmeric, lemon grass and coconut milk. The
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    0 votes
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