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  • Feb 20th 2014
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Most famous Dishes from Japan

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    1
    Katsudon

    Katsudon

    A katsudon (カツ丼) is a popular Japanese food, a bowl of rice topped with a deep-fried pork cutlet, egg, and condiments. Variations include sauce katsudon (with Worcestershire sauce), demi katsudon (with demi-glace and often green peas, a specialty of Okayama), shio katsudon (with salt, another Okayama variety), shōyu-dare katsudon (with soy sauce, Niigata style), and miso katsudon (a favorite in Nagoya). Beef and chicken can substitute for the pork. The dish takes its name from the Japanese words tonkatsu (for pork cutlet) and donburi (for rice bowl dish). It has become a modern ritual tradition for Japanese students to eat katsudon the night before taking a major test or school entrance exam. This is because "katsu" is a homophone of the verb 勝つ katsu, meaning "to win" or "to be victorious".
    8.80
    5 votes
    2

    Imperial Japanese rations

    Imperial Japanese rations were the field rations issued by Imperial Japan in World War II, and which reflected the culture of the Japanese military. Rations had to be stout, durable, simple, sturdy and had to survive without refrigeration for long periods of time. Typically each ration was served in the field in tin boxes, and cooked near the battlefield. The rations issued by the Imperial Japanese Government, usually consisted of rice with barley, meat or fish, vegetables, pickled vegetables, umeboshi, shoyu sauce, miso or bean paste, and green tea. A typical field ration would have 1½ cups of rice, with barley. The reason why rice was issued with barley was to combat nutritional deficiencies such as beriberi. Typically ¼ cup of canned tuna, or sausages, and/or squid would be cooked from either captured locations or hunting in the nearby area. Preserved foods from Japan typically were issued sparingly. Other foods issued: 1 ¼ cups of canned cabbage, coconut, sweet potato, burdock, lotus root, taro, bean sprouts, peaches, mandarin oranges, lychee or beans. 3 teaspoons of pickled radish (typically daikon), pickled cucumber, umeboshi, scallions and ginger added flavor to the rations.
    8.20
    5 votes
    3

    Honzen-ryōri

    Honzen ryōri (本膳料理) is one of three basic styles of Japanese cuisine and a highly ritualized form of serving food, in which prescribed dishes are carefully arranged and served on legged trays.
    6.67
    6 votes
    4
    Negimaki

    Negimaki

    Negimaki (ねぎ巻き), also called negima, is a Japanese food consisting of broiled strips of beef marinated in teriyaki sauce and rolled with scallions (negi). The dish is thought to have originated in the Kantō region of Japan.
    7.40
    5 votes
    5
    Nikujaga

    Nikujaga

    Nikujaga (肉じゃが) (meaning meat-potato) is a Japanese dish of meat, potatoes and onion stewed in sweetened soy sauce, sometimes with ito konnyaku and vegetables. Generally, potatoes make up the bulk of the dish, with meat mostly serving as a source of flavor. It usually is boiled until most of the liquid has been reduced. Thinly sliced beef is the most common meat used, although minced/ground beef is also popular. Pork is often used instead of beef in eastern Japan. Nikujaga is a common home-cooked winter dish, served with a bowl of white rice and miso soup. It is also sometimes seen in izakayas. Nikujaga was invented by chefs of the Imperial Japanese Navy in the late 19th century. The story that Tōgō Heihachirō ordered naval cooks to create a version of the beef stews served in the British Royal Navy was devised as part of an ongoing campaign beginning in 1895 to promote the city of Maizuru, Kyoto, which hosted an Imperial Japanese Navy base where Tōgō was stationed, as the birthplace of nikujaga. The municipal government of Kure, Hiroshima, responded in 1998 with a competing claim that Tōgō commissioned the dish while serving as chief of staff of the Kure naval base.
    7.40
    5 votes
    6
    Gyūdon

    Gyūdon

    Gyūdon (牛丼), literally beef bowl, is a Japanese dish consisting of a bowl of rice topped with beef and onion simmered in a mildly sweet sauce flavored with dashi (fish and seaweed stock), soy sauce and mirin (sweet rice wine). It also often includes shirataki noodles, and is sometimes topped with a raw egg. A very popular food in Japan, it is commonly served with beni shōga (pickled ginger), shichimi (ground chili pepper), and a side dish of miso soup. Gyū means "cow" or "beef", and don is short for donburi, the Japanese word for "bowl". Due to the Movement Towards Westernization (文明開化 - Meiji Restoration in Japan) that Japan experienced in the Meiji Era, western customs like eating beef were adopted and spread throughout Japan. The prototype for the modern gyūdon as a dish for the general public was invented at this time from gyūmeishi. Gyūdon is considered to have come from Sukiyaki-don and the old dish gyūnabe, where thin slices of beef are cooked with vegetables in a pot, and at some point was put over rice and served in a bowl. In 1862, the Kantō region's version of gyūnabe became the first popular version of this dish. From the Taishō era (1912~) until the early Shōwa era
    6.17
    6 votes
    7
    Akashiyaki

    Akashiyaki

    Akashiyaki (明石焼き, "grilled food in Akashi") is a small round dumpling from the city of Akashi in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. Made of an egg-rich batter and octopus dipped into dashi (a thin fish broth) before eating. Locals refer to it simply as tamagoyaki (玉子焼き, "grilled egg"). Modern style akashiyaki first started selling in the Taishō period by a yatai shopper Seitarō Mukai. There are over 70 akashiyaki shops in Akashi now. Although takoyaki, another Japanese dumpling, is more popular in Japan, it is based on akashiyaki. Both are made with a takoyaki pan, a type of frying pan or cooktop with many hemispherical molds. Compared to takoyaki, akashiyaki has a softer, more eggy texture. A similar dish called "Neo Kobe Pizza" is shown in the cyberpunk visual novel video game Snatcher.
    7.20
    5 votes
    8

    Kushikatsu

    Kushikatsu (串カツ) is a Japanese-style of deep-fried kebab. In Japanese, kushi (串) refers to the skewers used while katsu means a deep-fried cutlet of meat. Kushikatsu can be made with chicken, pork, seafood, and seasonal vegetables. These are skewered on bamboo kushi; dipped in egg, flour, and panko; and deep-fried in vegetable oil. They may be served straight or with tonkatsu sauce. The Shinsekai neighborhood of Osaka is famous for its kushikatsu.
    8.25
    4 votes
    9
    Karasumi

    Karasumi

    Karasumi (Japanese: カラスミ (鱲子), Romaji: karasumi; Chinese: 烏魚子; pinyin: wūyúzi; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: o͘-hî-chí) is a food product made by salting mullet roe and drying it by the sunlight. A theory suggests that it got its name from its resemblance to a block of sumi (inkstick) imported from China (Kara) and used in shodo. Karasumi is a high priced delicacy and it is eaten while drinking sake. It is a speciality of Nagasaki and along with salt-pickled sea urchin roe and Konowata one of the three chinmi of Japan. The town of Tungkang in Taiwan specializes in the delicacy.
    6.80
    5 votes
    10
    Kasuzuke

    Kasuzuke

    Kasuzuke (粕漬け), also kasu-zuke, is a Japanese dish made by pickling fish or vegetables in the lees (residual yeast and other precipitates) of sake, known as sake kasu. Kasuzuke was made in the Kansai region as early as the Nara period, twelve hundred years ago. Vegetable kasuzuke, known as shiru-kasu-zuke or Narazuke was originally made with white melon, but later with cucumbers, eggplants, uri, and pickling melons. It was made by Buddhist monks, and used by samurai as imperishable wartime food. During the Edo period of the 17th century, a sake dealer promoted it widely. The dish spread throughout Japan and remains popular today. Carrots, watermelon rind, and ginger may also be pickled in this way. To make shiru-kasu-zuke vegetables are pickled in a mixture of sake-kasu (in paste or sheet form), mirin, sugar, and salt. Optionally, ginger and citrus may be added. Pickling time ranges from one to three years, with the younger pickles consumed locally in the summer and the older pickles, having turned an amber color, distributed as Narazuke. To make fish kasuzuke, sugar is sometimes omitted, and sake, soy sauce, pepper and/or ginger may be added. Typical fish include cod, salmon,
    6.80
    5 votes
    11
    Kakuni

    Kakuni

    Kakuni (角煮) is a Japanese braised pork dish which literally means "square simmered". Kakuni is a meibutsu (popular regional product) of Nagasaki. The origin of this dish is most likely Chinese, making it a form of Japanese Chinese cuisine, and it is similar to Dongpo's pork, though not as heavy in sauce. During the Ming Dynasty and Song Dynasty, the main Sino-Japanese trading route existed between Hangzhou and Kyūshū. Many Chinese lived in major Kyūshū port cities, such as Nagasaki and Japanese in Hangzhou. Therefore pork was popularized in major Kyūshū cities. Kakuni is made of thick cubes of pork belly simmered in dashi, Soy sauce, mirin, sugar and sake. By cooking it for a long time over a low temperature the collagen breaks-down into gelatin keeping the meat moist while becoming extremely tender allowing it to be consumed with chopsticks easily. The dish is often served with scallions, daikon and karashi
    8.00
    4 votes
    12
    Mushimono

    Mushimono

    Mushimono is a Japanese culinary term referring to a steamed dish, usually containing chicken, fish or vegetables; sometimes treated with sake. The foods are steamed until soft and served hot. Chawanmushi is a popular example. The steaming methods include:
    6.60
    5 votes
    13
    Oden

    Oden

    Oden (おでん) is a Japanese winter dish consisting of several ingredients such as boiled eggs, daikon radish, konnyaku, and processed fish cakes stewed in a light, soy-flavoured dashi broth. Ingredients vary according to region and between each household. Karashi (Japanese mustard) is often used as a condiment. Oden was originally what is now commonly called misodengaku or simply dengaku; konnyaku or tofu was boiled and one ate them with miso. Later, instead of using miso, ingredients were cooked in dashi and oden became popular. Oden is often sold from food carts, and most Japanese convenience stores have simmering oden pots in winter. Many different kinds of oden are sold, with single-ingredient varieties as cheap as 100 yen. In Nagoya, it may be called Kantō-ni (関東煮) and soy sauce is used as a dipping sauce. Miso oden is simmered in hatcho-miso broth, which tastes lightly sweet. Konjac and tofu are common ingredients. In the Kansai area, this dish is sometimes called Kantō-daki (関東煮 or 関東炊き) and tends to be more strongly flavoured than the lighter Kantō version. Oden in Shizuoka uses a dark coloured broth flavoured with beef stock and dark soy sauce, and all ingredients are
    6.60
    5 votes
    14
    Oyakodon

    Oyakodon

    Oyakodon (親子丼), literally "parent-and-child donburi", is a donburi, or Japanese rice bowl dish, in which chicken, egg, sliced scallion (or sometimes regular onions), and other ingredients are all simmered together in a sauce and then served on top of a large bowl of rice. The name of the dish is a poetic reflection of the fact that both chicken and egg are used in the dish. The simmering sauce varies according to season, ingredients, region, and taste. A typical sauce might consist of dashi flavored with soy sauce and mirin. Proportions vary, but usually there is three to four times as much dashi as soy sauce and mirin. For oyakodon, Tsuji (1980) recommends dashi flavored with light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and sugar. To make oyakodon, cut chicken and other ingredients into bite-sized pieces. Heat ¼ cup simmering sauce in a small frying pan. Add chicken (and sliced onion, if desired) and simmer until the chicken is cooked. Then add scallions and other ingredients. When all ingredients are cooked, slowly pour 1–2 lightly beaten eggs evenly over the whole dish. When eggs are nearly cooked (edges set), slide the topping from the pan onto hot cooked rice served in a large bowl. The
    7.75
    4 votes
    15
    Sashimi

    Sashimi

    Sashimi (Japanese: 刺身, pronounced [saɕimiꜜ]; /səˈʃiːmiː/) is a Japanese delicacy. It consists of very fresh raw meat, most commonly fish, sliced into thin pieces. The word sashimi means "pierced body", i.e. "刺身 = sashimi = 刺し = sashi (pierced, stuck) and 身 = mi (body, meat). This word dates from the Muromachi period, and was possibly coined when the word "切る = kiru (cut), the culinary step, was considered too inauspicious to be used by anyone other than Samurai. This word may derive from the culinary practice of sticking the fish's tail and fin to the slices in identifying the fish being eaten. Another possibility for the name could come from the traditional method of harvesting. 'Sashimi Grade' fish is caught by individual handline. As soon as the fish is landed, its brain is pierced with a sharp spike; and it is placed in slurried ice. This spiking is called the Ike jime process. The flesh contains minimal lactic acid because it died instantly so it will keep fresh on ice for about ten days, without turning white or otherwise degrading. The word sashimi has been integrated into the English language and is often used to refer to other uncooked fish preparations. Many non-Japanese
    6.20
    5 votes
    16
    Ebi chili

    Ebi chili

    Ebi Chili is a Japanese dish derived from China's Shanghai cuisine. It consists of stir-fried shrimp in chilli sauce.
    9.00
    3 votes
    17
    Char siu

    Char siu

    Char siu (also spelled chasu, cha siu, chashao, and char siew), otherwise known as barbecued meat (usually pork) in China or Chinese-flavored barbecued meat outside China, is a popular way to flavor and prepare pork in Cantonese cuisine. It is classified as a type of siu mei, Cantonese roasted meat. It is listed at number 28 on World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Go in 2011. Pork cut used for Char siu can vary, but it uses a few main cuts: "Char siu" literally means "fork burn/roast" (Char being fork (both noun and verb) and siu being burn/roast) after the traditional cooking method for the dish: long strips of seasoned boneless pork are skewered with long forks and placed in a covered oven or over a fire. The meat, typically a shoulder cut of domestic pork (although in ancient times wild boar and other available meats were also used), is seasoned with a mixture of honey, five-spice powder, hóngfǔrǔ (red fermented bean curd), lǎochōu (dark soy sauce), hoisin sauce, red food colouring (not a traditional ingredient but very common in today's preparations) and sherry or rice wine (optional). These seasonings turn the exterior layer of the meat dark red,
    7.25
    4 votes
    18
    Myoga

    Myoga

    Myōga (茗荷) or myoga ginger (Zingiber mioga, Zingiberaceae) is an herbaceous, deciduous, perennial native to Japan and southern part of Korea that is grown for its edible flower buds and flavorful shoots. Flower buds are finely shredded and used in Japanese cuisine as a garnish for miso soup, sunomono and dishes such as roasted eggplant. In Korean cuisine, flower buds are skewered alternately with pieces of meat and then are pan-fried. A traditional crop in Japan, myoga has been introduced to cultivation in Australia and New Zealand for export to the Japanese market. As a woodland plant, myoga has specific shade requirements for its growth. It is frost-tolerant to 0F, -18C possibly colder. Some constituents of myoga are cytotoxic, others have shown promise for potentially anti-carcinogenic properties. There is an old saying in Japan that eating too much myoga makes you forgetful or stupid.eating too much myoga makes you forgetful
    7.25
    4 votes
    19
    Naporitan

    Naporitan

    Naporitan or Napolitan (Japanese: ナポリタン) is the name of a pasta dish, which is popular in Japan. The dish consists of spaghetti, tomato ketchup or a tomato-based sauce, onion, button mushrooms, green peppers, sausage, bacon and Tabasco sauce. Naporitan is claimed to be from Yokohama. An instant Naporitan is also available in Japan today. It was created by Shigetada Irie (入江茂忠), the general chef of the New Grand Hotel in Yokohama, when he was inspired by one of the military rationing of GHQ, which was spaghetti mixed with tomato ketchup. The chef named the dish after Naples, Italy (hence "napoli"). Phonetically, the Japanese language writes "R" for both R and L sounds and the spellings in the Roman alphabet for Japanese sound can vary. The spelling Naporitan is derived from the usual romanization of Japanese, while the spelling Napolitan takes the origin of the name into account.
    7.25
    4 votes
    20
    Chicken Tatsuta

    Chicken Tatsuta

    Chicken Tatsuta (チキン タツタ) is a Japanese-style fried chicken. Tatsuta indicates a way of cooking, which is a type of deep frying. After marinating meat/fish, sprinkle the meat with Japanese katakuri-ko (potato starch) before frying. Corn starch can be used if katakuriko is unavailable. Tatsuta dishes are cooked with pork or mackerel as well. They can also be served for lunch with bread as a kind of sandwich or bun.
    8.67
    3 votes
    21
    Sushi

    Sushi

    Sushi (すし, 寿司, 鮨, 鮓, 寿斗, 寿し, 壽司) is a Japanese food consisting of cooked vinegared rice (shari) combined with other ingredients (neta). Neta and forms of sushi presentation vary, but the ingredient which all sushi have in common is shari. The most common neta is seafood. Raw meat sliced and served by itself is sashimi. The original type of sushi, known today as nare-zushi (馴れ寿司, 熟寿司), was first developed in Southeast Asia, and spread to south China before introduction to Japan. The term sushi comes from an archaic grammatical form no longer used in other contexts; literally, sushi means "sour-tasting", a reflection of its historic fermented roots. The oldest form of sushi in Japan, narezushi, still very closely resembles this process, wherein fish is fermented via being wrapped in soured fermenting rice. The fish proteins break down via fermentation into its constituent amino acids. The fermenting rice and fish results in a sour taste and also one of the five basic tastes, called umami in Japanese. In Japan, narezushi evolved into oshizushi and ultimately Edomae nigirizushi, which is what the world today knows as "sushi". Contemporary Japanese sushi has little resemblance to the
    7.00
    4 votes
    22
    Ikizukuri

    Ikizukuri

    Ikizukuri (生き作り), also known as ikezukuri (活け造り), is the preparation of sashimi made from live seafood. The most popular sea animal used in ikizukuri is fish but octopus, shrimp, and lobster may also be used. The practice is controversial due to the fact that the animal is still moving after death. The restaurant may have one or several tanks of live sea animals for a customer to choose from. After the customer chooses an animal. There are different styles in which a chef may serve the dish but the most common way is to serve it on a plate with the filleted meat assembled on top of the body. Ikizukuri is outlawed in Australia and Germany.
    6.75
    4 votes
    23
    Omurice

    Omurice

    Omurice, sometimes spelled "omu-rice" (Japanese: オムライス, Omu-raisu), is an example of contemporary Japanese fusion cuisine (Yōshoku) consisting of an omelette made with fried rice and usually topped with ketchup. Omu and raisu being contractions of the words omelette and rice, the name is a wasei-eigo. It is a popular dish both commonly cooked at home and can be found at many western style diners and izakaya restaurants in Japan. The dish is also popular with children and often featured on okosama-ranchi or kids' meals. The dish typically consists of chikin raisu (chicken rice: rice pan-fried with ketchup and chicken) wrapped in a thin sheet of fried egg. The ingredients that flavor the rice vary. Often, the rice is fried with various meats (but typically chicken) and/or vegetables, and can be flavored with beef stock, ketchup, demi-glace white sauce or just salt and pepper. Sometimes, the rice is replaced with fried noodles, yakisoba, instead of fried rice, to make omusoba. A variant in Okinawa is omutako, consisting of an omelet over taco rice. Fried hotdog or Spam (food) are also two popular meats to include in the dish. Omurice is said to have originated around the turn of the
    5.60
    5 votes
    24
    Donburi

    Donburi

    Donburi (丼, literally "bowl", also frequently abbreviated as "don", thus less commonly spelled "domburi") is a Japanese "rice bowl dish" consisting of fish, meat, vegetables or other ingredients simmered together and served over rice. Donburi meals are served in oversized rice bowls also called donburi. Donburi are sometimes called sweetened or savory stews on rice. The simmering sauce varies according to season, ingredients, region, and taste. A typical sauce might consist of dashi flavored with soy sauce and mirin. Proportions vary, but there is normally three to four times as much dashi as soy sauce and mirin. For oyakodon, Tsuji (1980) recommends dashi flavored with light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, and sugar. For gyudon, Tsuji recommends water flavored with dark soy sauce and mirin. Traditional Japanese donburi include the following: Donburi can be made from almost any ingredients, including left-overs. Inexpensive Chinese restaurants in Japan often serve chūkadon (中華丼) or gomoku-chukadon (五目中華丼)—stir-fried assorted vegetables with some meat over rice in a big bowl. Not traditionally Japanese or Chinese, the hybrid dish indicates the popularity of donburi in Japan.
    8.00
    3 votes
    25
    Jiaozi

    Jiaozi

    Jiǎozi (simplified Chinese: 饺子; traditional Chinese: 餃子; Japanese: gyōza; Vietnamese: bánh chẻo; Nepali: म:म: or ममचा) or pot sticker is a Chinese dumpling widely spread to Japan, Eastern and Western Asia. Jiaozi typically consists of a ground meat and/or vegetable filling wrapped into a thinly rolled piece of dough, which is then sealed by pressing the edges together or by crimping. Jiaozi should not be confused with wonton; jiaozi has a thicker skin and a relatively flatter, more oblate, double-saucer like shape (similar in shape to ravioli), and is usually eaten with a soy-vinegar dipping sauce (and/or hot chili sauce); while wontons have thinner skin, are rounder, and are usually served in broth. The dough for the jiaozi and wonton wrapper also consist of different ingredients. Chinese dumplings (jiaozi) may be divided into various types depending on how they are cooked: Dumplings that use egg rather than dough to wrap the filling are called "egg dumplings" or (蛋餃; pinyin: dànjiǎo). Cantonese style Chinese dumplings (gaau) are standard fare in dim sum. Gaau is simply the Cantonese pronunciation for 餃 (pinyin: jiǎo). The immediate noted difference to jiǎozi is that they are
    9.50
    2 votes
    26
    Kamameshi

    Kamameshi

    Kamameshi (釜飯) literally translates to "kettle rice" and is a traditional Japanese rice dish cooked in an iron pot. Similar to takikomi gohan, kamameshi is a type of Japanese pilaf cooked with various types of meat, seafood, and vegetables. By cooking it in an iron pot, the rice gets slightly burned at the bottom which adds a desirable flavor to the rice. It is often sold as ekiben. Chinese cuisine also prepare rice in a similar way using a clay pot and is known in Chinese as guō fàn (鍋飯) or in Cantonese bo jai fan (煲仔飯). The cooking style is popular in Canton and Hong Kong.
    9.50
    2 votes
    27
    Motsunabe

    Motsunabe

    Mot(s)unabe (もつ鍋) is a type of nabemono in Japanese cuisine, which is made from beef or pork offal. A hot pot (nabe) is filled with soup, prepared beef or pork offal and boiled for a while; cabbage and garlic chives are added. The base soup is usually soy sauce with garlic and chili pepper, or miso. Champon noodles are often put into the pot and boiled to complete the dish.The offal used in motsunabe is mostly beef intestines, but various kinds of offal can be used. Originally, motsunabe was a Fukuoka dish, but some restaurants advanced into Tokyo in the 1990s, and it was made a boom by the mass media and became known nationwide. Later, with BSE reaching Japan and the boom turning into a fad, motsunabe restaurants have not been very popular in Kantō and Tokyo. In the Kansai area horumonyaki is very popular, which is similar to motsunabe in that it is a local cuisine made from beef or pork offal. In Fukuoka, motsunabe remains popular, as it is not so expensive. It is enjoyed with alcohol.
    9.50
    2 votes
    28
    Edamame

    Edamame

    Edamame (枝豆) (/ˌɛdəˈmɑːmeɪ/) or edamame bean is a preparation of immature soybeans in the pod, which commonly are found in the cuisines of Japan, China, and Hawaii. The pods are boiled in water together with condiments, such as salt, and served whole. Occasionally they are steamed. Outside East Asia, the dish is most often found in Japanese restaurants and some Chinese restaurants, but it also has found popularity elsewhere as a healthy food item. The Japanese name, edamame (枝豆), is used commonly to refer to the dish. It literally means, "twig bean" (eda = "twig" + mame = "bean") and refers to young soybeans cropped with their twigs. Edamame also refers to the salt-boiled dish because of its prevalence. Edamame is a popular side dish at Japanese izakaya restaurants with local varieties being in demand, depending on the season. Salt is a typical condiment for edamame. In Japan, arajio is the preferred salt, because it is a natural sea salt. This coarse salt is wet with brine, thus loaded with ocean and mineral flavors. In Chinese, young soybeans are known as maodou (Chinese: 毛豆; pinyin: máodòu; literally "hairy bean"). Young soybeans in the pod are known as maodoujia (Chinese: 毛豆荚;
    7.67
    3 votes
    29
    Menma

    Menma

    Menma (メンマ or 麺麻 or 麺碼) is a Japanese condiment made from lactate-fermented bamboo shoots. The bamboo shots are dried in the sun or through other means before the fermentation process. Menma is a common topping for noodle soups, notably ramen. Menma is primarily produced in China, with popular brands being imported from southern China and Taiwan being popular. Menma is also known as shinachiku (支那竹).
    7.67
    3 votes
    30

    Shimotsukare

    Shimotsukare(しもつかれ) is a local Japanese dish served in Northern parts of Japan particularly, Tochigi Prefecture, Gunma Prefecture and Ibaraki Prefecture. The dish is generally served on hatsu-u-no hi (初午の日, literally; first day of horse in the month of February) together with sekihan as an offering to appease the legendary deity, inari-no-shin (稲荷の神). Shimotsukare is usually made by simmering vegetables, soybeans, abura-age (あぶらあげ or deep fried tofu skins) and sake kasu (酒粕, literally rice pulp from fermented sake). Common additional ingredients include grated raw radish (oroshi daikon) and carrots. The dish is also known as shimitsukari, shimitsukare or sumitsukare in some areas. The origins of shimotsukare can be traced back to Edo Period (1603-1868) and is thought to be a derivation of su-mutsukari (酢むつかり,literally roasted soy beans in vinegar), a speciality dish which was mentioned in mytological narratives of Uji-jyu-i-monogatari (宇治拾遺物語) and Ko-ji-dan(古事談). The origin of the name 'shimotsukare' remains in debate. It is also widely believed that as the dish is mainly served in Tochigi Prefecture, formerly known as Shimotsuke Province(下野国), the name of the dish is thought to be
    7.67
    3 votes
    31
    Jingisukan

    Jingisukan

    Jingisukan (ジンギスカン, "Genghis Khan") is a Japanese grilled mutton dish prepared on a convex metal skillet or other grill. The dish is particularly popular on the northern island of Hokkaidō and Thailand. The dish is rumored to be so named because in prewar Japan, lamb was widely thought to be the meat of choice among Mongolian soldiers, and the dome-shaped skillet is meant to represent the soldiers' helmets that they purportedly used to cook their food. There is a dispute over from where the dish originated; candidates include Tokyo, Zaō Onsen, and Tōno. The first Jingisukan dedicated restaurant was a Jingisu-sō (成吉思荘, "Genghis House") that opened in Tokyo in 1936.
    6.25
    4 votes
    32
    Chazuke

    Chazuke

    Chazuke (茶漬け, ちゃづけ) or ochazuke (お茶漬け, from o + cha tea + tsuke submerge) is a simple Japanese dish made by pouring green tea, dashi, or hot water over cooked rice roughly in the same proportion as milk over cereal, usually with savoury toppings. Common toppings include tsukemono, umeboshi (both types of pickles), nori (seaweed), furikake, sesame seeds, tarako and mentaiko (salted and marinated Alaska pollock roe), salted salmon, shiokara (pickled seafood) and wasabi. The dish is easy to make and provides a way to use leftover rice as a quick snack. It is also known as cha-cha gohan. This dish first became popular in the Heian period, when water was most commonly poured over rice, but beginning in the Edo period, tea was often used instead. In Kyoto, ochazuke is known as bubuzuke. When a Kyoto native asks if a guest wants to eat bubuzuke, it really means that the person has overstayed and is being politely asked to leave. Since the 1970s packaged "instant ochazuke", consisting of freeze-dried toppings and seasonings, have become popular.
    9.00
    2 votes
    33
    Horumonyaki

    Horumonyaki

    Horumonyaki (Japanese: ホルモン焼き) is a kind of Japanese cuisine made from beef or pork offal. Kitazato Shigeo who was the chief of the Western-influenced cooking restaurant in Osaka devised this dish, and registered a trademark in 1940. The name of the hormone is derived from the Hormone, which means "stimulation" in Greek. The name horumon originates from the Kansai dialect term hōrumon (Kansai Japanese: 放る物), literally meaning "discarded goods". Horumonyaki has the reputation of being "stamina building" food.
    7.33
    3 votes
    34
    Japanese curry

    Japanese curry

    Curry (カレー, karē) is one of the most popular dishes in Japan. It is commonly served in three main forms: curry rice (カレーライス, karē raisu), karē udon (thick noodles) and karē-pan (bread). Curry rice is most commonly referred to simply as 'curry' (カレー, karē). A wide variety of vegetables and meats are used to make Japanese curry. The basic vegetables are onions, carrots, and potatoes. For the meat, beef, pork, chicken are the most popular. Katsu-karē is a breaded deep-fried pork cutlet with curry sauce. Curry was introduced to Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912) by the British, at a time when India was under their administration. The dish became popular and available for purchase in supermarkets and restaurants in the late 1960s. It has been adapted since its introduction to Japan, and is so widely consumed that it can be called a national dish. As curry rice was introduced to Japan via English cuisine, it was originally considered to be Western cuisine. This Western-style curry currently co-exists alongside Indian-style curry, which has become popular since the increase in Indian restaurants in the 1990s. A third style that combines these two, original curry (オリジナルカレー, orijinaru
    7.33
    3 votes
    35
    Osechi

    Osechi

    Osechi-ryōri (御節料理 or お節料理) are traditional Japanese New Year foods. The tradition started in the Heian Period (794-1185). Osechi are easily recognizable by their special boxes called jūbako (重箱), which resemble bentō boxes. Like bentō boxes, jūbako are often kept stacked before and after use. The dishes that make up osechi each have a special meaning celebrating the New Year. Some examples are: The term osechi originally referred to o-sechi, a season or significant period. New Year's Day was one of the five seasonal festivals (節句 sekku) in the Imperial Court in Kyoto. This custom of celebrating particular days was introduced from China into Japan. Originally, during first three days of the New Year it was a taboo to use a hearth and cook meals, except when cooking zōni. Osechi was made by the close of the previous year, as women did not cook in the New Year. In the earliest days, osechi consisted only of nimono, boiled vegetables with soy sauce and sugar or mirin. Over the generations, the variety of food included in osechi has increased. Today osechi may refer to anything prepared specially for the New Year, and some foreign dishes have been adopted as "Westernized osechi" (西洋お節
    7.33
    3 votes
    36
    Flaming onion volcano

    Flaming onion volcano

    The flaming onion volcano is a type of "food performance" demonstrated by chefs at some teppanyaki restaurants. It consists of a number of slices of onion stacked to look like Mount Fuji, which are set on fire and then doused in liquid that bubbles up like lava. In the traditional preparation, an onion is sliced into layers, and one layer from the top or bottom of the stack is separated out. This stack is then separated into individual "rings". The largest, outermost, ring is used as the base, with its wider side down. The smaller rings are then stacked on top, forming an open cone. The rings can be stacked because they are wider on the bottom than the top. After constructing the cone, oil is poured into the center through the open top, then diluted ethyl alcohol, and then the mixture is set on fire. The alcohol burns off in a few seconds, leaving a steam of unburned alcohol streaming out of the top like a smoking volcano. For an added touch, teriyaki sauce can be poured in after the flames die down, and the oil, heated by the grill, will cause it to boil out out of the top like lava. Like any flaming dish, the onion volcano should only be attempted in situations where open flame
    7.00
    3 votes
    37
    Ganmodoki

    Ganmodoki

    Ganmodoki (がんもどき, 雁擬き) is a fried tofu fritter made with vegetables, egg white and sesame seeds. "Ganmodoki" means "pseudo-goose." This is because ganmodoki is said to taste like goose; compare mock turtle soup. "Ganmodoki" is also called "Ganmo" for short. In the Edo period, "ganmodoki" was a stir-fried konjac dish. A dish similar to the ganmodoki today was made by wrapping chopped up vegetables in tofu (much like a manjū) and deep frying it. In the Kansai Region, Ganmodoki is called "hiryōzu", "hiryuzu" or "hirōsu", from the Portuguese word "filhós." ("fried cake").
    7.00
    3 votes
    38

    Ikayaki

    Ikayaki (いか焼き, イカ焼き or 烏賊焼, literally baked squid) is a popular fast food in Japan. It may refer variously to either simple grilled topped with soy sauce or a style of squid pancake in Osaka. The pancake style is prepared like folded crêpes and made of chopped squid, hard dough, sauce and sometimes egg, and is cooked and pressed between two iron plates. Ikayaki's popularity is partly due to its speed, as it only takes a minute to cook it this way. The Snack Park of Hanshin Department Store (Umeda, Osaka) is famous for its ikayaki. Ikayaki is also commonly served on the street or at the beach. It should not be confused with takoyaki, which are spherical octopus dumplings also from Osaka.
    7.00
    3 votes
    39
    Meibutsu

    Meibutsu

    Meibutsu (名物) is a Japanese term for famous products associated with particular regions. Meibutsu are usually items of Japanese regional cuisine, although the category includes local handicrafts. Meibutsu typically have a traditional character, although contemporary products may qualify as meibutsu if they are distinctive and popular. They are often purchased as omiyage (souvenirs) to be given as gifts. Sweets intended as omiyage are referred to as miyagegashi. Several prints in various versions of the ukiyoe series The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō depict meibutsu. These include Arimatsu shibori, a stenciled fabric sold at Narumi (station 41) and Kanpyō (sliced gourd), a product of Minakuchi (station 51), as well as a famous teahouse at Mariko (station 21) and a famous tateba (rest stop) selling a type of rice-cake called ubagamochi at Kusatsu (station 51). According to a paper by Laura Nenzi cited by Jilly Traganou in The Tokaido Road: Traveling and Representation in Edo and Meiji Japan (Routledge, 2004), meibutsu could be "classified into the following five categories: (1) simple souvenirs such as the swords of Kamakura or the shell-decorated screens of Enoshima; (2)
    7.00
    3 votes
    40
    Fugu

    Fugu

    Fugu (河豚 or 鰒; フグ, literally "river pig") is the Japanese word for pufferfish and the dish prepared from it, normally species of genus Takifugu, Lagocephalus, or Sphoeroides, or porcupinefish of the genus Diodon. Fugu can be lethally poisonous due to its tetrodotoxin; therefore, it must be carefully prepared to remove toxic parts and to avoid contaminating the meat. The restaurant preparation of fugu is strictly controlled by the law in Japan and several other countries, and only chefs who have qualified through rigorous training are allowed to deal with the fish. However, the domestic preparation occasionally leads to accidental death. Fugu is served as sashimi and chirinabe. Some consider the liver the tastiest part but it is also the most poisonous, and serving this organ in restaurants was banned in Japan in 1984. Fugu has become one of the most celebrated and notorious dishes in Japanese cuisine. Fugu contains lethal amounts of the poison tetrodotoxin in its organs, especially the liver, the ovaries, and the skin. The poison, a sodium channel blocker, paralyzes the muscles while the victim stays fully conscious.. The victim is unable to breathe, and eventually dies from
    5.75
    4 votes
    41
    Hiyashi chūka

    Hiyashi chūka

    Hiyashi chūka (冷やし中華, lit. "chilled Chinese") is a Japanese dish consisting of chilled ramen noodles with various toppings served in the summer. Toppings are usually colorful cold ingredients and a tare sauce. Popular toppings are strips of tamagoyaki (egg), carrot, cucumber, ginger, ham, and chicken. It may also contain barbecued pork. The tare sauce is usually made from water, rice vinegar, soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, sesame seeds.
    8.50
    2 votes
    42
    Kiritanpo

    Kiritanpo

    Kiritanpo (きりたんぽ) is a Japanese dish particularly in Akita Prefecture. Freshly cooked rice is pounded until somewhat mashed, then formed into cylinders around Japanese cedar skewers, and toasted over an open hearth. It can then be served with sweet miso or used as dumplings in soups.
    8.50
    2 votes
    43
    Chankonabe

    Chankonabe

    Chankonabe (ちゃんこ鍋) is a Japanese stew (a type of nabemono or one-pot dish) commonly eaten in vast quantity by sumo wrestlers as part of a weight-gain diet. It contains a dashi or chicken broth soup base with sake or mirin to add flavor. The bulk of chankonabe is made up of large quantities of protein sources (usually chicken (quartered, skin left on), fish (fried and made into balls), tofu (or sometimes beef)) and vegetables (daikon, bok choy, etc.). While considered a reasonably healthy dish in its own right, chankonabe is very protein-rich and usually served in massive quantities, with beer and rice to increase the caloric intake. Leftover chankonabe broth can also later be used as broth for somen or udon noodles. It is not made according to a fixed recipe and often contains whatever is available to the cook. It is traditionally served according to seniority, with the senior rikishi and any guests of the heya receiving first choice, with the junior wrestlers getting whatever is left. It is also a popular restaurant food, often served in restaurants operated by retired sumo wrestlers who specialize in the dish; the first of these, Kawasaki Chanko, was started in 1937 in the
    10.00
    1 votes
    44
    Giri choco

    Giri choco

    Giri choco (義理チョコ, literally, "obligation chocolate" in Japanese) is chocolate given by women to men on Valentine's day in Japan. It is a relatively cheap type of chocolate women give to male co-workers, casual acquaintances, and others to whom they have no strong attachment. Giri choco is lower-quality than honmei choco (more expensive chocolates women give to their romantic partners). Men generally reciprocate by giving women cookies and other gifts on White Day, celebrated on March 14.
    10.00
    1 votes
    45
    Miso soup

    Miso soup

    Miso soup (味噌汁, misoshiru) is a traditional Japanese soup consisting of a stock called "dashi" into which softened miso paste is mixed. Many ingredients are added depending on regional and seasonal recipes, and personal preference. The choice of miso paste for the miso soup defines a great deal of its character and flavor. Miso pastes can be categorized into red (akamiso), white (shiromiso), or mixed (awase). There are many variations within these themes, including regional variations, such as Shinshū miso or Sendai miso. The most common dashi soup stocks for miso soup are made of niboshi (dried baby sardines), kombu (dried kelp), katsuobushi (thin shavings of dried and smoked bonito, aka skipjack tuna), or hoshi-shiitake (dried shiitake). The kombu can also be used in combination with katsuobushi or hoshi-shiitake. The kelp and/or shiitake dash Outside Japan, American or European style miso soup is sometimes made by dissolving miso in a Western vegetable stock. The stock might include ingredients such as negi, carrot, potato and daikon radish. In some versions of the dish chicken stock, Western-style fish stock, and other non-dashi bases can even be used, but there is some debate
    10.00
    1 votes
    46
    Pig's ear

    Pig's ear

    Pig's ear, as food for human consumption, is literally the cooked ear of pig. It is found in a number of cuisines around the world. In Chinese cuisine, pig's ear is often an appetizer or a side dish, called 豬耳朵 (pinyin: zhū ěr duo, "pig's ear"). Pig's ear can be abbreviated in Chinese to simply 豬耳. In some regions, pig's ears are known as 层层脆 (ceng ceng cui, literally "layers of crunch"). It can be first boiled or stewed, and then sliced thin, served with soy sauce or spiced with chili paste. When cooked, the outer texture is gelatinous, akin to tofu, and the center cartilage is crunchy. Pig's ear can be eaten warm or cold. In Cantonese cuisine, it is another ingredient used in lou mei. The emphasis is on using all edible parts of the pig. Pigs' ears (and lou mei in general) are not considered as delicacies. In Okinawan cuisine, pig's ear is called mimigaa. It is prepared by boiling or pickling and is served with vinegar or in the form of sashimi. Pigs' ears are a part of the soul food cuisine which originated among African-Americans in the southern United States. In the Philippines, the dish known as Sisig may sometimes use pig ears as part of its ingredients In Spanish cuisine,
    10.00
    1 votes
    47

    Shoronpo

    Shoronpos [¥ᄚマ￧ᆲᄐ¥フナ xiao long lao] in chinese and [¥ᄚマ￧ᄆᅠ¥フナ] in japanese are small piece of meat cooked in buns using steam. The shoronpo plays the same role as raviolis does in Italian cuisine. Shoronpos are very popular in China, Japan and Taiwan(in which unfortunatelly are not necessarily cheap)
    10.00
    1 votes
    48
    Congee

    Congee

    Congee or conjee (from Tamil kañji, the English form may have arrived in the language via Portuguese. The derivation of the Tamil word is unknown as it appears to be non-Dravidian.) is a type of rice porridge or gruel popular in many Asian countries. When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients, such as meat, fish, and flavorings, are added whilst preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation. Despite its many variations, it is always a thick porridge or soup of rice which has usually disintegrated after prolonged cooking in copious water. To prepare the dish, rice is boiled in a large amount of water until it softens significantly. Congee can be made in a pot or in a rice cooker. Some rice cookers have a "congee" setting, allowing it to be cooked overnight. The type of rice used can be either short or long grain, depending on what is available and regional cultural influences. Culture also often dictates the way congee is cooked and eaten. In other Asian cultures, it is also called kanji (Tamil/Tulu), kaṇni /Malayalam), pakhal bhat (Oriya),
    5.50
    4 votes
    49
    Chawanmushi

    Chawanmushi

    Chawanmushi (茶碗蒸し,Chawanmushi, literally "tea cup steam" or "steamed in a tea bowl") is an egg custard dish found in Japan that uses the seeds of ginkgo. Unlike many other custards, it is usually eaten as an appetizer. The custard consists of an egg mixture flavored with soy sauce, dashi, and mirin, with numerous ingredients such as shiitake mushrooms, kamaboko, yuri-ne (lily root) and boiled shrimp placed into a tea-cup-like container. The recipe for the dish is similar to that of Chinese steamed eggs, but the toppings may often differ. Chawanmushi can be eaten either hot and cool. When udon is added as an ingredient, it is called odamaki mushi or odamaki udon. Unusual for a traditional Japanese dish, it is commonly eaten with a spoon.
    6.67
    3 votes
    50
    Dried shredded squid

    Dried shredded squid

    Dried shredded squid is a dried, seasoned, seafood product commonly found in coastal Asian countries, Russia and Hawai'i, made from squid or cuttlefish. The snack is also referred to as shredded squid, dried seasoned squid, prepared rolled squid or sun dried squid, and dried shredded cuttlefish. It should not be confused with regular dried squid found in the Philippines. Historically, squid is common in Pacific coastal regions of East Asia and Southeast Asia. Only after the packaged form began shipping to English speaking regions, did the translated English-language name "dried shredded squid" get imprinted on packages. The snack was popularized, sold and consumed regularly in Hong Kong during the 1970s. Shredded squid began being sold in Macau as an addition to their almond biscuit. In Japan, dried shredded squid is popularly served as an otsumami (snack consumed while drinking alcohol). In Korean cuisine, dried shredded squid is eaten as anju (food to eat while drinking), and as banchan (small side dishes) such as the dish ojingeochae bokkeum, which is made by stir-frying shredded dried squid seasoned with a mixture of gochujang (chili pepper paste), garlics, and mulyeot
    6.67
    3 votes
    51
    Fuki

    Fuki

    Petasites japonicus, (Japanese: 菜蕗) also known as Fuki, bog rhubarb, or giant butterbur, is an herbaceous perennial plant in the family Asteraceae. It is native to Japan, where the spring growth is relished as a vegetable. It has also been introduced to southern British Columbia by Japanese immigrants. The traditional preparation method for this vegetable involves pre-treating with ash or baking soda and soaking in water to remove harshness (astringency), which is a technique known as aku-nuki (灰汁抜き, literally "harshness removal"). The shoot can be chopped and stir fried with miso to make Fuki-miso which is eaten as a relish thinly spread over hot rice at meals. The bulb-like shoots are also picked fresh and fried as tempura. Like other Petasites species, fuki contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids which have been associated with cumulative damage to the liver and tumor formation. The concentration of potentially hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids are below the detection limits in modern butterbur extracts. Petasites japonicus has activity in a mouse model of asthma. Based on additional studies in mice, the plant may contain plasma and hepatic lipid-lowering and antioxidant
    8.00
    2 votes
    52
    Korokke

    Korokke

    Korokke (Japanese: コロッケ) is the Japanese name for a deep-fried dish originally related to a French dish, the croquette. It was introduced in the early 1900s. Korokke is made by mixing cooked chopped meat, seafood, or vegetables with mashed potato or white sauce, rolling it in wheat flour, eggs, and breadcrumbs, then deep frying this until brown on the outside. Korokke are usually shaped like a flat patty. They are generally called (ingredient) Korokke. For example, those using beef would be called gyuniku korokke, those using shrimp, ebi korokke, etc.. Those using white sauce may also be called Cream Korokke. They are also available in curry flavor. Korokke is often served with Tonkatsu worcestershire sauce and shredded cabbage. Korokke can be eaten as is, and are sometimes sold wrapped in paper at stalls. They may also be used as a topping for other dishes. When sandwiched between two slices of bread, they are called Korokke pan (pan being bread in Japanese).
    8.00
    2 votes
    53

    Honmei choco

    Honmei Choco (本命チョコ), literally, "true feeling chocolate" in Japanese. Honmei choco is chocolate given by women on Valentine's day to men whom the giver has romantic feelings for. This is often given to boyfriends, prospective boyfriends, and husbands. Honmei chocolate is higher-quality and more expensive than giri choco ("obligation chocolate"). Giri choco is given to male coworkers and other men to whom the woman has no romantic attachment. Homemade honmei choco is also popular. This is generally reciprocated on White day, celebrated on March 14th, when men buy candy and gifts for women.
    6.33
    3 votes
    54
    Kinpira

    Kinpira

    Kinpira (金平, きんぴら) is a Japanese cooking style that can be summarized as a technique of "sauté and simmer". It is commonly used to cook root vegetables such as carrot, gobō and lotus root, seaweeds such as arame and hijiki and other foods including tofu and wheat gluten (namafu),and even meat (chicken, pork, beef). The dish features the use of soy sauce and mirin, as well as often slivered chili peppers.
    6.33
    3 votes
    55
    Matsusaka beef

    Matsusaka beef

    Matsusaka beef (松阪牛, Matsusaka-ushi, also "Matsuzaka beef") is black-haired wagyū (Japanese beef), aka "Kuroge Washu" or "Japanese Black", originating in the Matsusaka region of Mie, Japan. It is one of the most famous beef types within Japan and internationally, with a high fat-to-meat ratio. Within Japan, Matsusaka beef is generally considered one of the three top brands (known as "Sandai Wagyuu", "the three big beefs"), along with Kobe beef and Ōmi beef or Yonezawa beef. Matsusaka beef is produced from Tajima-ushi heifers chiefly born in Hyōgo Prefecture. They are raised in the quiet, serene area surrounding Matsusaka between the Kumozu River to the north and Miyagawa River to the south. Only female wagyu are raised in Matsusaka, where they are fed plenty of fodder, as well as tofu lees and ground wheat. When they have no appetite, they are fed beer to stimulate their eating, and receive regular massages. Soothing music is played to the cattle to "calm" them and promote better quality beef.
    7.50
    2 votes
    56
    Okonomiyaki

    Okonomiyaki

    Okonomiyaki (お好み焼き, o-konomi-yaki) is a Japanese savoury pancake containing a variety of ingredients. The name is derived from the word okonomi, meaning "what you like" or "what you want", and yaki meaning "grilled" or "cooked" (cf. yakitori and yakisoba). Okonomiyaki is mainly associated with Kansai or Hiroshima areas of Japan, but is widely available throughout the country. Toppings and batters tend to vary according to region. Tokyo okonomiyaki is usually smaller than a Hiroshima or Kansai okonomiyaki. Kansai- or Osaka-style okonomiyaki is the predominant version of the dish, found throughout most of Japan. The batter is made of flour, grated nagaimo (a type of yam), water or dashi, eggs and shredded cabbage, and usually contains other ingredients such as green onion, meat (generally pork or bacon), octopus, squid, shrimp, vegetables, kimchi, mochi or cheese. Okonomiyaki is sometimes compared to an omelette or a pancake and may be referred to as "a Japanese pancake" or even "Osaka soul food". Some okonomiyaki restaurants are grill-it-yourself establishments, where the server produces a bowl of raw ingredients that the customer mixes and grills at tables fitted with teppan, or
    7.50
    2 votes
    57
    Instant noodles

    Instant noodles

    Instant noodles are dried or precooked noodles and are often sold with packets of flavoring including seasoning oil. Dried noodles are usually eaten after being cooked or soaked in boiling water, while precooked noodles can be reheated or eaten straight from the packet. Instant noodles were invented by Momofuku Andō of Nissin Foods, Japan. Instant noodles were first marketed in Japan on August 25, 1958, under the brand name Chikin Ramen (チキンラーメン) by Momofuku Ando, who was born in southwestern Taiwan, formally known as Formosa, when the island was under Japanese colonial rule. Momofuku developed the production methodology of flash frying the noodles after they had been made, creating "instant" noodles. This step dried the noodles and gave them a longer shelf life. Chikin Ramen itself was distinctly different from modern instant noodles in that each block of noodles was pre-seasoned and sold for 35 Yen. Initially, due to its price and novelty, Chikin Ramen was considered a luxury item, as Japanese grocery stores typically sold fresh noodles for one-sixth their price.. Despite this, instant noodles eventually gained immense popularity, especially after being promoted by Mitsubishi
    9.00
    1 votes
    58
    Onigiri

    Onigiri

    Onigiri (お握り or 御握り; おにぎり), also known as omusubi (お結び; おむすび) or rice ball, is a Japanese food made from white rice formed into triangular or oval shapes and often wrapped in nori (seaweed). Traditionally, an onigiri is filled with pickled ume (umeboshi), salted salmon, katsuobushi, kombu, tarako, or any other salty or sour ingredient as a natural preservative. Because of the popularity of onigiri in Japan, most convenience stores stock their onigiri with various fillings and flavors. There are even specialized shops whose only products are onigiri for take out. Despite common misconceptions, onigiri is not a form of sushi. Onigiri is made with plain rice (sometimes lightly salted), while sushi is made of rice with vinegar, sugar and salt. Onigiri makes rice portable and easy to eat as well as preserving it, while sushi originated as a way of preserving fish. Onigiri are also found in many convenience stores in Hong Kong, mainland China, Taiwan and South Korea. In Korean, it is called "jumeok bap" (Hangul: 주먹밥) or "samgak gimbap" (Hangul: 삼각김밥), literally "fist-rice" or "triangle-seaweed-rice," respectively. In Lady Murasaki's 11th-century diary Murasaki Shikibu Nikki, she writes
    9.00
    1 votes
    59

    Okazu

    Okazu (おかず) is a Japanese word meaning a side dish to accompany rice. They are typically made from fish, meat, vegetable, or tofu and designed to add flavor to the rice. In modern Japanese cuisine, Okazu can accompany noodles in place of rice.
    6.00
    3 votes
    60
    Gyūtan

    Gyūtan

    Gyūtan (牛タン) is a Japanese food that is made from grilled beef tongue. The word gyūtan is a combination of the Japanese word for cow (牛, gyū) and the English word tongue. Since gyūtan literally means "cow tongue," the word is also used to refer to cow tongues in Japan. The custom of cooking gyūtan originated in Sendai in 1948, and is usually served with barley rice, tail soup, and pickles in the Sendai area. In other areas in Japan, gyūtan is most often served in yakiniku restaurants. Gyūtan was originally conceived to be flavored with salt, which lead to gyūtan being called tanshio (タン塩, lit. "tongue salt") in many yakiniku restaurants. However, some stores now serve gyūtan with tare sauce. Gyūtan was created when Sano Keishirō, the owner of a yakitori restaurant in Sendai, opened a new restaurant that served cow tongue dishes in 1948. This restaurant was called Tasuke (太助), and is still considered one of the best places to eat gyūtan in Sendai. Sano decided to open this restaurant to use cow tongues and tails left over by occupation forces, which were stationed in Sendai after Japan was defeated in World War II. Gyūtan was initially considered a rather unusual dish, but gradually
    4.75
    4 votes
    61

    Blue-backed fish

    Blue-backed fish (背の青い魚 se no aoi sakana); also referred to as Blue-fish (青魚 aozakana) is a category of fish used in Japanese cuisine that have a rich and fatty taste, and are distinguished from another category of white meat fish that tend to have a lighter and more delicate flavor. It is not a scientific categorization, but refers to commonness in outer appearance, fleshiness and oiliness and include such species of fish as sardine, mackerel, herring, perch and anchovy. Blue-backed fish tend to be high in the essential amino acid, histidine, as well as the omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and are generally said to have health benefits when included in a balanced diet, including such effects as reducing cholesterol. Almost without exception, blue-backed fish are salt water fish that travel in schools close to the surface of the water, have wide migratory patterns and are relatively low on the food chain so feed on plankton, etc. Their appearance, as is indicated by their name, is a dark blue dorsal with a nearly white under belly. Further, blue-fish are generally fairly small in size and caught in large quantities resulting in low
    7.00
    2 votes
    62
    Dango

    Dango

    Dango (団子) is a Japanese dumpling made from mochiko (rice flour), related to mochi. It is often served with green tea. Dango are eaten year-round, but the different varieties are traditionally eaten in given seasons. Three to four dango are often served on a skewer. There are many different varieties of dango which are usually named after the various seasonings served on or with it. A common Japanese proverb “Hana yori dango” (花より団子, literally, “dumplings rather than flowers”) refers to a preference for practical things rather than aesthetics. Dango is used internationally amongst Go players as a derogatory term for an inefficient, dumpling-like cluster of stones in a Go game. It is also the name of a go variant invented in 1991. A hairstyle consisting of dango-like buns on either side of the head is sometimes known as odango.
    7.00
    2 votes
    63
    Mochi

    Mochi

    Mochi (Japanese: 餅) is a Japanese rice cake made of glutinous rice (not to be confused with gluten) pounded into paste and molded into shape. In Japan it is traditionally made in a ceremony called mochitsuki. While also eaten year-round, mochi is a traditional food for the Japanese New Year and is commonly sold and eaten during that time. Similar snacks are prominent in Hawaii, South Korea, Taiwan, People's Republic of China (where it is called 麻糬, Hokkien môa-chî or Mandarin máshu), Cambodia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Indonesia. Traditionally, mochi was made from whole rice, in a labor-intensive process. The traditional mochi-pounding ceremony in Japan is Mochitsuki: Mochi can also be prepared from a flour of sweet rice (mochiko). The flour is mixed with water to a sticky opaque white mass that is cooked on the stovetop or in the microwave until it becomes elastic and slightly transparent. Many types of traditional wagashi and mochigashi (Japanese traditional sweets) are made with mochi. For example, daifuku is a soft round mochi stuffed with sweet filling, such as sweetened red bean paste (an) or white bean paste (shiro an). Ichigo daifuku is a version containing a whole
    7.00
    2 votes
    64
    Satsuma age

    Satsuma age

    Satsuma age (薩摩揚げ) is a fried fishcake from Kagoshima, Japan. Surimi and flour is mixed to make a compact paste that is solidified through frying. It is a specialty of the Satsuma region. It is known as chikiagi in Okinawa. It is a paste made from fish and seasoned with salt, sugar, and other spices and molded into several shapes. It is made not only from ground fish but added 木耳 (the tree ear), Beni shōga, onion, welsh onion and other vegetables, squid, octopus, shrimp and other sea foods, and some spices. In fishing villages, it is made from various local fishes, for example sardines, shark, bonito, mackerel, etc. In most cases it is made by mixing two or more kinds of fish. People eat it plain or lightly roasted and dipped in ginger and soy sauce or mustard and soy sauce. It is used in oden, udon, sara udon or Nimono (stewed dishes). There are varied histories of Satsuma age, but the most famous birthplace is the Satsuma district in Kagoshima. It is said that, in about 1864, the Shimazu clan brought it to Satsuma from Okinawa through some exchange and invasion. In those days, Okinawans called fried-boiled fish paste chigiage. After it was brought to Kagoshima, it was produced as
    7.00
    2 votes
    65
    Ainu cuisine

    Ainu cuisine

    Ainu cuisine is the cuisine of the ethnic Ainu in Japan. The cuisine differs markedly from that of the Wajin, or ethnic Japanese. Ainu cuisine, for instance, does not prepare raw meats like sashimi instead preferring to boil, roast or cure meat. The island of Hokkaidō in northern Japan is where most Ainu live today; however, they once inhabited most of the Kuril islands, the southern half of Sakhalin island, and parts of northern Honshū Island. Until recently, the Ainu were thought to be exclusively a hunter-gatherer society, but recent excavations on the Hokkaido University campus have revealed extensive fossilized grains. There are very few Ainu restaurants in the world, such as Ashiri Kotan Nakanoshima in Sapporo, and Poron'no and Marukibune in Ainu Kotan, Hokkaidō.
    5.67
    3 votes
    66
    Karaage

    Karaage

    Karaage (唐揚げ or 空揚げ or から揚げ), commonly pronounced /ˌkærəˈɑːɡeɪ/ KARR-ə-AH-gay in English, is Japanese cooking technique in which various foods — most often meat and fish — are deep fried in oil. Small pieces of the food are marinated in a mix of soy sauce, garlic, and/or ginger, then lightly coated with a seasoned wheat flour or potato starch mix, and fried in a light oil — similar to the preparation of tempura.
    5.67
    3 votes
    67
    Miyagegashi

    Miyagegashi

    Miyagegashi, also Miyagekashi (土産菓子), literally "souvenir sweet", refers to a sweet made with the purpose of selling it as a souvenir. As with most other Japanese souvenirs (omiyage), the typical miyagegashi is a regional specialty (meibutsu), and cannot be bought outside its specific geographic area. The making and selling of omiyagegashi is an important part of Japan's omiyage (souvenir) industry.
    8.00
    1 votes
    68
    Namasu

    Namasu

    Namasu (膾) is a Japanese dish consisting of thinly sliced uncooked (nama) vegetables and seafood, marinated in rice vinegar (su) for several hours, pickling them slightly. Namasu was brought to Japan from China during the Nara period (710-794). Namasu may also be called namasu-kiri (kiri means "sliced"). Sunomono and other vinegared salads are related to namasu.
    8.00
    1 votes
    69
    Pacific saury

    Pacific saury

    The Pacific saury, Cololabis saira, is a member of the family Scomberesocidae. This saury, which is a food source in some East Asian cuisines, is also known by the name mackerel pike. It is known as sanma (サンマ / 秋刀魚) in Japanese, kongchi (꽁치) in Korean, qiu dao yu (秋刀魚) in Chinese, and saira (сайра) in Russian. Pacific saury are often imported to the United Kingdom where they are used as bait for sea fishing. In the UK they are usually called blueys, possibly due to people confusing the Pacific saury with blue mackerel. The term saira used in its scientific name is the fish's local name in the Kii Peninsula region of Japan. The Chinese characters used in the Chinese and Japanese names of the fish (秋刀魚) mean "autumn knife fish", in reference to its body shape, somewhat resembling a knife, and its peak season. The Japanese name is not related to the pronunciations of the Chinese characters in Japanese, and is an example of gikun (characters used for meaning only, not sound). It is a fish with a small mouth, an elongated body, a series of small finlets between the dorsal and anal fins, and a small forked tail. The color of the fish is dark green to blue on the dorsal surface, silvery
    8.00
    1 votes
    70
    Sake set

    Sake set

    A sake set is a generic term for the flask and cups used to serve sake, the traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice. Sake sets are commonly ceramic, but may be glass or lacquered plastic. The flask and cups may be sold individually instead or as a set. The server of a sake set is a flask called tokkuri (ja:徳利). Tokkuri is generally bulbous with a narrow neck, but may have a variety of other shapes, including spouted serving bowls (katakuchi). Traditionally, heated sake is often warmed by placing the sake-filled tokkuri in a pan of hot water, and thus the narrowed neck would prevent the heat from escaping. In more authentic places such as oden bars and ryōtei in Japan, sake is sometimes warmed and served in metal containers known as chirori (ja:ちろり, kanji:銚釐) or tanpo (ja:たんぽ, kanji:湯婆). Recently, glass chirori is also used to chill sake. Formerly, sake was sold by measure in a wooden box measuring cup, known as masu which has a volume of 180 ml (1 gou, 6 fl oz) then was also used as drinkware. In the past, the wooden box was said to complement the traditionally brewed sake, as it is brewed in a wooden cask (ja:樽), but in modern times, the masu is shunned by sake
    8.00
    1 votes
    71
    Agedashi tofu

    Agedashi tofu

    Agedashi tofu (or agedashi dofu, 揚げ出し豆腐 Agedashi dōfu – see rendaku – often shortened to age tofu or age dofu) is a Japanese way to serve hot tofu. Silken (kinugoshi) firm tofu, cut into cubes, is lightly dusted with potato starch or cornstarch and then deep fried until golden brown. It is then served in a hot tentsuyu broth made of dashi, mirin, and shō-yu (Japanese soy sauce), and topped with finely chopped negi (a type of spring onion), grated daikon or katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes) are sprinkled on top. Agedashi tofu is an old and well-known dish. It was included in a 1782 Japanese all-tofu cookbook entitled Tofu Hyakuchin (literally "One hundred Tofu"), along with other tofu dishes such as chilled tofu (hiyayakko) and simmered tofu (yudofu). While agedashi tofu is the best-known agedashi dish, some other dishes may be prepared with similar techniques. These include agedashi nasu (揚げ出し茄), using eggplant.
    5.33
    3 votes
    72
    Monjayaki

    Monjayaki

    Monjayaki (もんじゃ焼き) (often called simply "monja") is a type of Japanese pan-fried batter with various ingredients. It is similar to okonomiyaki but monjayaki, a specialty of the Kantō region, is made with a dough more liquid than is okonomiyaki. The ingredients are finely chopped and mixed into the batter before frying. The mixture is far runnier than okonomiyaki, and it has a consistency comparable to a pool of melted cheese when cooked. It is then eaten directly off the grill using a small metal spatula. Many monjayaki restaurants can be found in the Tsukishima district of Tokyo, where the dish is said to have originated. Most also serve regular okonomiyaki.
    5.33
    3 votes
    73
    Mukimono

    Mukimono

    Mukimono (剥き物) is the traditional Japanese art of decorative garnishing. Examples of this include carving traditional images into skins of fruit and vegetables, as well as carving vegetables (such as daikon, carrot, eggplant) into attractive shapes such as flowers, twists, and fan shapes. These are commonly served as a garnish on the same plate as the meal, or on a small side plate.
    5.33
    3 votes
    74
    Egg drop soup

    Egg drop soup

    Egg drop soup (traditional: 蛋花湯; pinyin: dàn huā tāng; literally "egg flower soup") is a Chinese soup of wispy beaten eggs in boiled chicken broth. Condiments such as black pepper or white pepper, and finely chopped scallions and tofu are also commonly added. The soup is finished by adding a thin stream of beaten eggs to the boiling broth in the final moments of cooking, creating thin, silken strands or flakes of cooked egg that float in the soup. Egg drop soup using different recipes is also known as a simple-to-prepare soup in different European countries and Japan. In the United States, egg drop soup is often one of the main soups offered in American Chinese cuisine, and is also called egg flower soup. Cornstarch may be used to thicken the chicken stock and add a rich texture. In Chinese cuisine,egg drop soups have a thinner consistency than their Western counterpart. Depending on the region, they may be garnished with ingredients ranging from tofu, scallion, bean sprouts and corn. In Japan, egg is often dropped scrambled as the topping for tsukimi udon or soba. The moon-like appearance of the whole yolk is responsible for the name, which means "moon viewing". In Italy,
    6.00
    2 votes
    75
    Makunouchi

    Makunouchi

    Makunouchi (幕の内) is a popular type of Japanese bento which consists of fish, meat, pickles, eggs and vegetables along with rice and an umeboshi. There are also other kinds such as a chestnut-rice, sweetfish sushi and meat-and-rice-casserole forms. The word makuno-uchi bentō ("between-act bento"), dates back to the Edo Period (1603 to 1867), when they were served during the intermissions (幕間) of Noh and Kabuki theater performances. From the Meiji Period onward, Makunouchi has become a common convention for bentos sold at train stations. Convenience stores usually also sell a bento under the Makunouchi name. Though the selection and number of items in a Makunouchi bento vary from store to store, it often contains more items and costs more than other offerings.
    6.00
    2 votes
    76
    Sake kasu

    Sake kasu

    Sake kasu (酒粕) are the lees left over from sake production. It can be used as a pickling agent, the main ingredient of amazake, a cooking paste to add flavor to food and as a marinade.
    6.00
    2 votes
    77
    Kaiseki

    Kaiseki

    Kaiseki (懐石) or kaiseki ryōri (懐石料理) is a traditional multi-course Japanese dinner. The term also refers to the collection of skills and techniques that allow the preparation of such meals, and are analogous to Western haute cuisine. There are basically two kinds of traditional Japanese meal styles called kaiseki or kaiseki ryōri. The first, where kaiseki is written as 会席 (and kaiseki ryōri, 会席料理), referring to the fancy meal served at banquets. The other is written 懐石 or 懐石料理, referring to the simple meal that the host of a chanoyu gathering serves to the guests, and which is also known as cha-kaiseki (茶懐石). The kanji characters 懐石 used to write kaiseki literally mean "stone in the bosom." These kanji are thought to have been incorporated by Sen no Rikyu (1522–91), to indicate the frugal meal served in the austere style of chanoyu (Japanese tea ceremony). The idea came from the practice where Zen monks would ward off hunger by putting warm stones into the front folds of their robes, near their bellies. Before these kanji started to be used, the kanji for writing the word were simply ones indicating that the cuisine was for a get-together (会席料理). Both sets of kanji remain in use
    7.00
    1 votes
    78

    Karashi

    Karashi (芥子, 辛子, からし, or カラシ) is a type of mustard used as a condiment or as a seasoning in Japanese cuisine. Karashi is made from the crushed seeds of Brassica juncea. Karashi is usually sold in powder form or paste form in tubes. Karashi in powder form is prepared for use by mixing with lukewarm water to a paste and leaving it covered for a few minutes. Karashi is often served with tonkatsu, oden, natto, and shumai. Karashi can be used as part of a dipping sauce when mixed with mayonnaise, called karashi mayonnaise or with vinegar and miso, called karashi su miso. It is also used to make pickled japanese eggplant, called karashi-nasu. One of Kumamoto's best-known meibutsu is Karashi Renkon - a Lotus Root stuffed with karashi and served in slices.
    7.00
    1 votes
    79
    Menchi-katsu

    Menchi-katsu

    Menchi katsu (メンチカツ) is a breaded and deep-fried ground meat cutlet or croquette. The meat is usually ground beef, or pork, or sometimes a mixture of the two. It is a rather pedestrian dish often served in inexpensive bento and teishoku. The ground meat is mixed with chopped onion, salt, and pepper, and made into patties. Flour is applied on both sides of these patties. They are coated with beaten eggs, and further coated with bread crumbs, and deep fried until golden brown. The bread crumbs, called panko, are specially dehydrated and have a coarser texture than other bread crumbs. Katsu are usually served with Japanese Worcestershire sauce or tonkatsu sauce (a variant of Worcestershire thickened with fruit and vegetable purees) and sliced cabbage. Menchi and katsu are phonologically modified versions of the words "mince" and "cutlet". Katsu may refer to any deep-fried meat cutlet coated with flour, egg, and bread crumbs. It is an example of yoshoku, or foods adapted from western cuisine. Katsu by itself usually refers to tonkatsu, which is made with pork cutlets. While menchi katsu is used prevalently in eastern Japan, in western Japan it is more commonly called minchi katsu
    5.50
    2 votes
    80
    Hiyayakko

    Hiyayakko

    Hiyayakko (冷奴, cold tofu) is a popular Japanese dish made with chilled tofu and toppings. It is usually served during the summer season. There are two kinds of tofu used in hiyayakko: kinugoshi (silken), which is more frequently used, and the less common momen (cotton). Hiyayakko can be served with ordinary meals or with beer. It is best made with fresh tofu. In winter, boiled tofu (湯豆腐, yudofu) is served more often than hiyayakko. The choice of toppings on the tofu vary among households and restaurants, but a standard combination is chopped green onion with katsuobushi (dried skipjack tuna flakes) and soy sauce. Other toppings include: Hiyayakko is also known as hiyakko or yakko-dōfu. Hiya means cold, and yakko refers to the servants of samurai during the Edo period in Japan. They wore a vest on which the "nail-puller crest" was attached, on the shoulders, therefore cutting something (e.g. tofu) into cubes was called "cutting into yakko" (奴に切る, yakko ni kiru). "Hiyakkoi" or "hyakkoi", the Tokyo dialectal term equivalent to the standard Japanese "hiyayaka" (冷ややか), is also a possible etymology. In the Tofu Hyakuchin (豆腐百珍), it is said that hiyayakko is so well-known that it needs no
    5.00
    2 votes
    81
    Nabemono

    Nabemono

    Nabemono (鍋物, なべ物, nabe cooking pot + mono things, stuff, kinds) or simply called nabe, is a term referring to all varieties of Japanese hot pot dishes, also known as one pot dishes. Eating together from a shared pot is considered as an important feature of nabemono; East Asian people believe that eating from one pot makes for closer relationships. The Japanese thus say, Nabe (w)o kakomu (鍋を囲む, "sitting around the pot"), implying that sharing nabemono will create warm relations between the diners who eat together from the shared pot. Most nabemono are stews and soups served during the colder seasons. In modern Japan, nabemono are kept hot at the dining table by portable stoves. The dish is frequently cooked at the table, and the diners can pick the cooked ingredients they want from the pot. It is either eaten with the broth or with a dip. Further ingredients can also be successively added to the pot. There are two types of nabemono in Japan: lightly flavored stock (mostly with kombu) types such as yudōfu (湯豆腐) and mizutaki (水炊き), eaten with a dipping sauce (tare) to enjoy the taste of the ingredients themselves; and strongly flavored stock (typically with miso, soy sauce, dashi,
    6.00
    1 votes
    82
    Kabayaki

    Kabayaki

    Kabayaki (蒲焼) is a Japanese term for a typical preparation of the unagi eel, sometimes exetended to preparation of other fish, where the fish is split down the back (or belly), gutted and boned, butterflied, cut into square fillets, skewered, dipped in a sweet soy sauce-base sauce before broiled on a grill. The same preparation is made of other long scaleless fish such as hamo (pike conger), dojō (loach), catfish, anago (conger eel), and gimpo (ギンポ) (Pholidae). One can also find canned products labeled as kabayaki-style sanma (Pacific saury). Kabayaki eel is very popular as a nutritious envigorating food (a rich source of vitamins A and E, and Omega-3 fatty acids). A popular custom from the Edo period calls for eating kabayaki during the summer to gain stamina, especially on a particular mid-summer day called doyō-no ushi-no-hi (土用の丑の日), which can fall anywhere between 7/18~8/8 each year. The eel kabayaki is often served on top of a bowl (donburi) of rice, and called unadon, the fancier form of which is the unajū, placed inside a tiered lacquered boxes called jūbako. It is also torn up and mixed up evenly with rice to make hitsumabushi (櫃まぶし), which is enjoyed especially in the
    4.50
    2 votes
    83
    Botamochi

    Botamochi

    Botamochi (ぼたもち or 牡丹餅) are a springtime treat made with sweet rice and sweet azuki (red bean) paste. They are made by soaking sweet rice for approximately six hours. The rice is then cooked, and a thick azuki paste is hand-packed around pre-formed balls of rice. A very similar treat, ohagi (おはぎ), uses a slightly different texture of azuki paste, but is otherwise almost identical. It is made in autumn. Some recipe variations in both cases call for a coating of soy flour to be applied to the botamochi/ohagi after the azuki paste. The two different names are derived from the Botan (peony) which blooms in the spring and the Hagi (Japanese bush clover or Lespedeza) which blooms during autumn. Ohagi is named after the bush clover (hagi), which flowers during autumn. The editors of the English-language Rurouni Kenshin comic book volumes said that ohagi "is said to be especially delicious" when consumed with matcha, or green tea. Botamochi is the modern name for the dish "Kaimochi (かいもち) mentioned in the Heian Period text Ujishui Monogatari (宇治拾遺物語).
    5.00
    1 votes
    84
    Chimaki

    Chimaki

    Chimaki (粽 or ちまき) is the Japanese name for a glutinous rice dish wrapped in a bamboo leaf which is originally from ancient China (see also zongzi). This food is also popular in Korea. They are eaten especially on the Kodomo no hi (see also Duanwu Festival in Chinese) Festival on May 5.
    5.00
    1 votes
    85
    Chinmi

    Chinmi

    Chinmi (珍味) is a Japanese term meaning literally "rare taste", but more appropriately "delicacy". They are local cuisines that have fallen out of popularity or those cuisines that are peculiar to a certain area. Many involved pickled seafood. The three best known chinmi of Japan are salt-pickled sea urchin roe (uni), salt-pickled mullet roe (karasumi) and pickled sea cucumber innards. (konowata).
    5.00
    1 votes
    86
    Ekiben

    Ekiben

    Ekiben (駅弁) (railway boxed meals) are a specific type of bento boxed meals, sold on trains and train stations in Japan. Today, many types of ekiben can still be purchased; at stands in the station, on the platform, or on the train itself. They come with disposable chopsticks (when necessary) or spoons. Ekiben containers can be made from plastic, wood, or ceramic. Many train stations have since become famous for their especially tasty ekiben, made from local food specialties. The "Golden Age" of ekiben, however, ended three decades ago. At that time, air travel was quite expensive and trains were slower. Many tourists needed them during their train journeys.
    5.00
    1 votes
    87

    Noppe

    Noppe (のっぺい, noppei, also 濃餅 or 能平) is a traditional stew served throughout Japan. It has many different names depending on the region, but its most famous version is from Niigata, known as either Noppe, Noppei, or Noppe-jiru. Noppe is generally made from left-over vegetable parts, sauteed or boiled in sesame oil . The ingredients and thickening agents vary widely per town and region, but yams, carrots, shiitake mushrooms, konjac, and fried tofu are often used. After the ingredients are boiled into a stew, thickening agents such as soy sauce, salt and starch are added. Chicken or fish are also occasionally used. In and around Niigata, it is often eaten at festivals, Buddhist ceremonies, and during the New Year period.
    5.00
    1 votes
    88
    Okara

    Okara

    Okara or Soy Pulp is a white or yellowish pulp consisting of insoluble parts of the soybean which remain in the filter sack when pureed soybeans are filtered in the production of soy milk. It is part of the traditional cuisines of Japan, Korea, and China, and since the 20th century has also been used in the vegetarian cuisines of Western nations. Okara is low in fat, high in fiber, and also contains protein, calcium, iron, and riboflavin. It contains 76 to 80% moisture, 20 to 24% solids and 3.5 to 4.0% protein. On a dry weight basis okara contains 24% protein, 8 to 15% fats,and 12 to 14.5% crude fiber. It contains 17% of the protein from the original soybeans. While relatively flavourless when eaten on its own, it can be used in stews such as the Korean biji-jjigae (비지찌개), or in porridges, or as a taste neutral addition to bread and pastry doughs. In Japan it is used in a side dish called unohana (卯の花), which consists of okara cooked with soy sauce, mirin, sliced carrots, burdock root and shiitake mushrooms. Occasionally unohana is used as a substitute for the rice in sushi. Okara can also be fermented with the fungus Rhizopus oligosporus to make okara tempeh (called tempe gembus
    5.00
    1 votes
    89
    Ostrich Fern

    Ostrich Fern

    The ostrich fern or shuttlecock fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris) is a crown-forming, colony-forming fern, occurring in temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in eastern and northern Europe, northern Asia and northern North America. It grows from a completely vertical crown, favoring riverbanks and sandbars, but sends out lateral stolons to form new crowns. It thus can form dense colonies resistant to destruction by floodwaters. The fronds are dimorphic, with the deciduous green sterile fronds being almost vertical, 100–170 cm tall and 20–35 cm broad, long-tapering to the base but short-tapering to the tip, so that they resemble ostrich plumes, hence the name. The fertile fronds are shorter, 40–60 cm long, brown when ripe, with highly modified and constricted leaf tissue curled over the sporangia; they develop in autumn, persist erect over the winter and release the spores in early spring. Matteuccia species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Sthenopis auratus. The ostrich fern is a popular ornamental plant in gardens. While choosing a place of planting it should be taken into account that these ferns are very expansive and its leaves
    5.00
    1 votes
    90
    Hayashi rice

    Hayashi rice

    Hashed beef rice or Hayashi rice (ハヤシライス) is a dish popular in Japan as a Western-style dish. It usually contains beef, onions, and button mushrooms, in a thick demi-glace sauce which often contains red wine and tomato sauce. This sauce is served atop or alongside steamed rice. The sauce is sometimes topped with a drizzle of fresh cream. It resembles Japanese curry and usually appears on menus alongside curry. There is some debate regarding the origin of the name of this dish. One belief is that the name was given by the first president of Maruzen (丸善), Yuteki Hayashi (早矢仕 有的 Hayashi Yūteki). Another theory is that a cook named Hayashi at the restaurant Ueno Seiyōken (上野精養軒), who often served this dish for staff meals, thought of the name. Perhaps the most common explanation is that the name is simply derived from the English phrase "hashed beef". Hayashi rice is one of Japan's most popular Western-style dishes. Thanks to hayashi rice mix (normally sold as roux blocks) and prepared demiglace sauce (normally canned), which are commonly available at Japanese supermarkets, this dish is common household fare. Like Japanese curry, it is usually eaten with a spoon. Hayashi rice was an
    4.00
    1 votes
    91

    Imoni

    Imoni (芋煮) is a type of thick potato and meat soup eaten traditionally in the autumn in the Tōhoku region of Japan. Yamagata Prefecture in particular is famous for its imoni, but other prefectures in the region also have their own different varieties. Imoni is eaten like any soup, primarily during the late summer and early autumn, but is most famous as an outdoor food. In the autumn, groups of people preparing imoni around a fire near a river is considered a sign of the season, and convenience stores maintain a stock of firewood and other supplies just for the occasion. The different recipes for imoni vary from prefecture to prefecture: for example, inland Yamagata imoni contains beef, sugar, and soy sauce and is sweet, while the imoni prepared in the neighbouring prefecture of Miyagi does not, but includes miso paste to flavour the soup. Similarly, even the Shonai region of Yamagata features a pork and miso base rather than the beef and soy sauce base of inland areas of the same prefecture. However, several ingredients are considered standard parts of the recipe: Other ingredients may include Chinese cabbage (hakusai), burdock root (gobō), daikon, carrot, negi (Japanese green
    4.00
    1 votes
    92
    Shabu-shabu

    Shabu-shabu

    Shabu-shabu (しゃぶしゃぶ, , also spelled syabu-syabu) is a Japanese variant of hot pot. The name shabu-shabu is derived from the "swish swish" sound of cooking the meat in the pot. The dish is related to sukiyaki in style, in that both use thinly sliced meat and vegetables and are usually served with dipping sauces, but it is considered to be more savory and less sweet than sukiyaki. It is considered a winter dish, but is eaten year-round. Shabu-shabu was introduced in Japan in the 20th century with the opening of the restaurant "Suehiro" in Osaka. Its origins are traced back to the Chinese hot pot known as shuan yang rou. Shabu-shabu is most similar to the original Chinese version when compared to other Japanese dishes (nabemono) such as sukiyaki. The name shabu-shabu was applied when Suehiro served it. After that, Suehiro registered the name of as a trademark in 1955. The cuisine rapidly spread through Asia. Together with sukiyaki, shabu-shabu is a common dish in tourist hot-spots, especially in Tokyo, but also in local Japanese neighborhoods (colloquially called "Little Tokyos" or "Japantowns") in countries such as the United States and Canada. The dish is traditionally made with
    4.00
    1 votes
    93

    Shizuoka oden

    Shizuoka oden is a variation of oden, a stew-like Japanese food consisting of fish paste cakes, boiled eggs, daikon, potatoes, kelp rolls, konnyaku, and other ingredients that are first boiled then kept simmering in a broth until consumption. Shizuoka oden differs from other types of oden in two ways: the preparation of the broth and the way every ingredient is skewered on a stick. The broth is made with beef sinew (instead of the dried skipjack flakes used in other types of oden) and seasoned with strong soy sauce. Because the simmering broth is only replenished rather than discarded, it takes on a very deep, brown-black color; but this process of adding new broth to old is what gives Shizuoka oden the distinctive flavor that many people find so delicious. Like other types of oden, Shizuoka oden is particularly suitable for consumption in the colder seasons because of the warming effect it has, much like hot soups and stews served in other countries with cold seasons. Hot (spicy) karashi mustard goes well with it.
    4.00
    1 votes
    94
    Butajiru

    Butajiru

    Tonjiru or Butajiru (豚汁,とん汁,とんじる) - both literally mean pig/pork soup - is a Japanese soup made with pork and vegetables, flavoured with miso. Compared to normal miso soup, tonjiru tend to be more substantial, with a larger quantity and variety of ingredients added to the soup. Tonjiru is usually made by stewing thinly sliced pieces of pork, alongside vegetables, in dashi stock, and flavoured by dissolving miso. Common additional ingredients include gobō, konjac, seaweed, spring onions, daikon radish, carrot, tofu including fried tofu (aburaage), tubers such as potatoes, taro or sweet potato, and mushrooms such as shiitake and shimeji. On rare occasions, mildly degreased (not crispy) bacon can be used in place of pork. The name butajiru is said to be dominant in Western Japan and Hokkaidō, while the name tonjiru is said to be more common in Eastern Japan. A version of the dish, containing sweet potatoes, as served to skiiers in the ski resorts of Niigata Prefecture up until about 1960, is known as sukii-jiru ("skiing-soup"). Instant Tonjiru is available.
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    95
    Chikuwa

    Chikuwa

    Chikuwa (竹輪) is a Japanese tube-like food product made from ingredients such as fish surimi, salt, sugar, starch, monosodium glutamate and egg white. After mixing them well, they are wrapped around a bamboo or metal stick and steamed or broiled. The word chikuwa, ("bamboo ring") comes from the shape when it is sliced. Variants of surimi products such as kamaboko and satsuma age are popular. In Tottori, the per-household consumption has been the highest of all prefectures for the past 30 years, since the first year such records were kept. There are several regional varieties. In the east part of Tottori and part of Nagasaki, tofu chikuwa is produced that adds tofu to surimi. Often, firm tofu is the preferred selection. In Yawatahama, Ehime, Kawa-chikuwa (literally skin chikuwa) is produced, which uses fish skin wrap around the skewers and broiled. This is a by-product of regular chikuwa, however texture and taste are different. In Shikokuchūō, Ehime, there is Ebi-chikuwa, which contains shrimp paste in surimi. In Komatsushima, Tokushima, there is Take chikuwa (literally bamboo chikuwa), which remains on the bamboo after it is broiled. As it is cheap and a relatively low-fat source
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    96
    Fried prawn

    Fried prawn

    Fried prawn (海老フライ, ebi furai) is a deep fried cuisine popular in Japan as well as Japanese restaurants worldwide. It is a speciality of the city of Nagoya. A popular ingredient of Japanese bento, Fried Prawn Bentō (エビフライ弁当, ebi furai) is a common menu item at bentō shops. Traditionally Kuruma Ebi was used, but since a decline in its cultivation, many stores have started using black tiger shrimp and Ise Ebi. It is thought that ebi furai was created around 1900 in response to the growing popularity of similar dishes such as Tonkatsu and minced meat cutlets in the Western food restaurants of Ginza and Tokyo. Each prawn is straightened out flat, and a small incision made along its back. The gritty tasting digestive tract is then pulled out of this incision. The prawn is then coated with flour, beaten egg and breadcrumbs in that order, and deep-fried in hot cooking oil. The head is usually removed before cooking. However if the prawn is fresh enough, it may be cooked and served whole. Some people prefer to eat the head, which becomes crispy. Fried prawns are often eaten with a choice of thick Worcester sauce, Hoisin sauce, lemon juice or tartare sauce. Ebi-don (エビ丼, fried prawn and egg
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    97

    Nattokinase

    Nattokinase (pronounced nat-oh-KY-nase) is an enzyme (EC 3.4.21.62) extracted and purified from a Japanese food called nattō. Nattō is made from fermented soybeans and has been eaten in Japan for many years. Nattō is produced by fermentation by adding the bacterium Bacillus natto to boiled soybeans. Nattokinase is produced by the bacterium acting on the soybeans. While other soy foods contain enzymes, it is only the nattō preparation that contains the specific nattokinase enzyme. In spite of its name, nattokinase is not a kinase enzyme, but a serine protease of the subtilisin family. It exhibits a strong fibrinolytic activity. Nattokinase can now be produced by recombinant means and in batch culture, rather than relying on extraction from Nattō. Nattokinase is sometimes promoted in the alternative medicine community as a clot-buster and blood thinner or as a substitute for daily aspirin therapy. However, this substitution is not recommended since there is no evidence that nattokinase is effective in preventing cardiovascular disease. Nattokinase may interact with aspirin to increase the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Note: there does appear to be evidence for the effectiveness of
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    98

    Rui-be

    Rui-be or ruibe (ルイベ) is a dish of the Ainu people of northern Japan, consisting of salmon that is frozen outdoors, sliced like sashimi, and served with soy sauce and water peppers.
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    99

    Sakana

    Sakana (肴) or shukō (酒肴) is a Japanese term referring to food eaten as an accompaniment to alcohol. Sakana may also be referred to as otsumami; this term usually applies to smaller dishes. Because fish, especially dried fish, was a popular choice for these dishes, over the years the term sakana also came to mean "fish". In Japan, when alcohol is consumed, it is customary that the drinks are always accompanied with some sort of foodstuff. The term sakana traditionally refer to food served to accompany sake. These are usually quite salty and served in relatively small portions. However, since the 19th Century, Japanese beer has overtaken sake as the nation's most popular alcoholic beverage, and at the same time various foods designed to accompany beer have become popular. These dishes, served in restaurant-pubs known as izakaya, are usually more substantial than tapas although they are not considered a meal as such as they do not contain the all-important Japanese rice. Traditionally, the Japanese regarded sake, which is made from rice, as a substitute for white rice served in a standard Japanese meal, and as a result many Japanese do not eat rice and drink alcohol
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    100
    Salisbury steak

    Salisbury steak

    Salisbury steak is a dish made from a blend of minced beef and other ingredients, which is shaped to resemble a steak, and is usually served with gravy or brown sauce. Hamburger steak is a similar product, but differs in ingredients. Salisbury steak was invented by an American physician, Dr. J. H. Salisbury (1823–1905), an early proponent of a low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss; the term "Salisbury steak" has been in use in the United States since 1897. The dish is popular in the United States, where it is traditionally served with gravy and mashed potatoes or noodles. The USDA standards for processed, packaged "Salisbury steak" require a minimum content of 65% meat, of which up to 25% can be pork, except if defatted beef or pork is used, the limit is 12% combined. No more than 30% may be fat. Meat byproducts are not permitted; however, beef heart meat is allowed. Extender (bread crumbs, flour, oat flakes, etc.) content is limited to 12%, except isolated soy protein at 6.8% is considered equivalent to 12% of the others. The remainder consists of seasonings, vegetables (onion, bell pepper, mushroom or the like), binders (can include egg) and liquids (such as water, milk, cream,
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