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Most famous Dishes from India

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    1
    Chicken curry

    Chicken curry

    Chicken Curry (also referred to as Curry Chicken) is a common delicacy in South Asia, East Asia, as well as in the Caribbean. The main ingredients in this dish are chicken and curry. The curry powder along with an array of other spices including, masala powder, saffron, ginger and so on (depending on cookery style), are mixed to form a sauce to blend in with the chicken. In most places the terms "chicken curry" and "curry chicken" are interchangeable. However, in some regions there is a considered difference between the two terms, even though both dishes include curry and chicken. One such distinction is concerned with the order of preparation: In adding a curry mixture to chicken meat, the act of "currying the chicken", the name generally is derived from the action. Thus "curried chicken" or the derivative term "curry chicken". If however a curry flavoured sauce is prepared and then chicken pieces are added to form a kind of stew, the term "chicken curry" is often used to describe this. When all is said, depending on the regional difference many cultures call any dish consisting primarily of chicken and curry either, curry chicken or chicken curry. This difference of naming is
    6.57
    7 votes
    2

    Jain

    The traditional Jain cuisine is completely vegetarian and also excludes onions and garlic like the shojin-ryori cuisine of Japan. This is also called 'satvic' because onions and garlic are regarded to be tamasic. The strict Jain cuisine also excludes potatoes and other root vegetables because when the root is pulled up, the whole plant dies. Followers of Jainism, called Jains, believe that every living thing has a soul that is in some stage of reincarnation, trapped in a cycle of birth and rebirth. Jainism takes non-violence to a very strict level and respects life at any level including plant life. They make sure that their lifestyle does not cause injury to anyone. As a result of this, the Jain diet consists of grains like wheat, rice, lentils or pulses and beans, oil-seeds are recommended as they fall under the category of non-injurious food. They are yielded only when their plants get dried of their own after their age ends. Fruits and vegetables that become ripe on the plants or branches of trees or those that fall on their own after becoming ripe, are used for food. Jains are strict vegetarians and many avoid root vegetables as it is violent to plants. They avoid liquor so
    7.67
    6 votes
    3
    Pilaf

    Pilaf

    Pilaf is a class of rice dishes, most commonly referring to rice cooked in a seasoned broth with meat or vegetables. The English term is borrowed from Turkish pilav, from Persian pilāv, which in turn is borrowed from Sanskrit pulāka. The English term is further influenced by Modern Greek pilafi. Due to the vast spread of the dish, there exist variations of the name in many languages, including plov, polou, palov, etc. It is well known in Trinidad and Tobago as 'pelau'.
    7.33
    6 votes
    4
    Handi

    Handi

    A handi is a deep, narrow-mouthed cooking vessel used in north Indian, Pakistani and Bengali cooking. Because there are many specific Indian and Pakistani dishes cooked in this vessel, their names reflect its use, such as handi biryani. Handis resemble American beanpots, French soupières, and Mexican and Spanish ollas. They are used similarly.
    8.20
    5 votes
    5
    Gulkand

    Gulkand

    Gulkand, or Gulqand (Urdu: گل‏قند, Hindi: गुलक़न्द), is a sweet preserve of rose petals from Pakistan and North India. Gul means flower in both Persian and Urdu whereas qand means sweet in Arabic. Place the rose petals and sugar in layers in a wide-mouthed airtight glass jar. Place this jar in sunlight for 6 hours per day for around 3 to 4 weeks. On alternate days, the contents of the jar should be stirred with a wooden stick. The jar should be kept indoors once done. Other ingredients, such as silver foil, Praval Pishti, cardamom seeds, or Muktapishti (powdered pearl) can be added to increase the "cooling" properties of the gulkand. Gulqand is an Ayurvedic tonic. The National Institute of Ayurvedic Medicine provides a list of the benefits obtained from eating gulkand. This includes reduction of pitta and heat in the body, a reduction in eye inflammation and redness, strengthening of the teeth and gums, and the treatment of acidity. A complete list of benefits is available on their website. Gulqand is commonly used as an ingredient of Paan, a popular dessert and digestive of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.
    8.00
    5 votes
    6
    Mattar paneer

    Mattar paneer

    Mattar paneer (Hindi: मटर पनीर) is an Indian dish consisting of paneer and peas in a slightly sweet and spicy sauce. Some people also add "aloo" (potato) to it. It is similar to Palak Paneer (paneer with spinach). It is usually served with an Indian type of bread (Naan, paratha, poori, or roti depending on region). Some people prefer to take it with rice preparations. It is usually served as North Indian (Punjab) food. The dish may be garnished with a splash of cream or coriander leaves. The dish is usually vegetarian. Mattar Paneer Masala is probably the most popular curry found in all over India. First, the cottage cheese is prepared in the traditional method. The base is prepared with cumin seeds, garam masala, vine ripened tomatoes and the green peas and Paneer cheese cubes are added for stir frying on high heat.
    7.60
    5 votes
    7

    Chikkolee

    Chikkolee is a spicy wheat dish common in southern Andhra Pradesh and parts of Maharastra. It is made in a manner similar to rothi (chapathi) after it is cut into pieces and served with addition of spices. This is a traditional pudding of Rangrez, Bhavasara Kshatriya. It is a semi-liquid with crushed wheat, and meat pieces may be added. It can also be served as a snack. Ingredients are:
    6.33
    6 votes
    8
    Khichdi

    Khichdi

    Khichṛī (Hindustani pronunciation: [ˈkʰɪtʃɽi]), alternate spellings khichdi, khichri, khichdee, khichadi, khichuri, khichari, "kitcheree", "kitchree", and many other variants, (Hindi: खिचड़ी khicṛī, Urdu: کھچڑی khicṛī, Oriya: ଖେଚେଡ଼ି khecheṛi, Bengali: খিচুড়ী khichuṛi, Gujarati: ખીચડી khichḍi) is a South Asian preparation made from rice and lentils (dal). Khichri is commonly considered to be a comfort food, and was the inspiration for the Anglo-Indian dish of kedgeree. The word khicṛī is derived from Sanskrit खिच्चा khiccā, a dish of rice and pulses. Some divergence of transliteration may be noted in the third consonant in the Hindi/Urdu word khicṛī. The sound is the retroflex flap [ɽ], which is written in Hindi with the Devanagari letter ड़, and in Urdu script with the Perso-Arabic letter ڑ. In Hindi-Urdu phonology, the etymological origin of the retroflex flap was /ɖ/ when it occurred between vowels. Hence in Devanagari the letter ड, representing /ɖ/, was adapted to write /ɽ/ by adding a diacritic under it. In Urdu script, the phonological quality of the flap was represented by adapting the letter ر, representing /r/, with a diacritic added above it to indicate the retroflex
    7.20
    5 votes
    9

    Chole bhature

    Chola Bhatura (also Choley Bhaturey, Bhatura Cholle) is a food common in North India, often sold by roadside vendors. It consists of chola (also known as Chana masala, a spiced chickpea dish, and Bhatura, a large puffy fried bread made out of maida (bleached and refined wheat flour).
    6.00
    6 votes
    10
    Chicken Madras

    Chicken Madras

    Chicken Madras (in Indian Cuisine) is a hot, thick gravy, dish that consists of Chicken, and Chili powder, onions, Chili, garlic, Root Ginger, Coriander and Garam Masala. When Cooked, the ingredients are fried together in vegetable oil. The sauce has a lot of smoky heat, and can be compared to some Tex-Mex sauces that have Chipotle chilies in them. It is rich with ghee or oil. The onion, garlic and tomato taste blend well with the heat of the sauce. The curry should be served with or on top of Basmati rice and sprinkled with finely chopped Coriander. Historically, the name of this recipe took the name of the Indian, south Eastern city of Madras (even though it was not invented there). Subsequent to the conception of this curry, the city Madras has been renamed Chennai. Because of this there have been calls to rename this curry "Chennai". Despite this, the curry is still widely known as "Madras curry".
    7.00
    5 votes
    11
    Indian omelette

    Indian omelette

    An Indian omelette is a version of the omelette found in Indian cuisine. Its main ingredients are eggs, herbs, tomatoes and spices that vary by region. The omelette commonly includes finely chopped green chili peppers and onions (or shallots), finely chopped fresh green coriander, salt, and jeera (cumin). Variations include grated coconut, ground black pepper, curry leaves, and finely chopped tomatoes. Grated cheese may also be added. The egg mixture is whisked until fluffy and then cooked on a skillet. Usually the skillet is not warmed much before the mixture is poured in and it does not immediately solidify. The stove is usually turned on right before the egg is poured in.
    8.25
    4 votes
    12

    Dal baati

    Dal Baati (Hindi: दाल बाटी), popular name for a preparation comprising Dal and Baati, is a very well known dish of Rajasthan and Malwa region in Madhya Pradesh state in India. Dal is basically prepared from tuvaar dal. Tuvaar dal is first boiled in pressure cooker and after that it is prepared for the tadka. First the oil is heated in the frying pan and then rai-jeera are sprinkled into it then put green meshed chilli and garlic then all spices including salt, hing, red chilli, haldi, coriander, ginger and many more spices are mixed into it. And finally we put the boiled tuvaar daal into this paste. Baati is basically a hard bread made up of wheat powder commonly known as aata. First we mesh wheat powder with little bit of salt and water. Then we prepare tennis ball size round balls of this mixture and put it in well heated cow dung cake. After it get brown colour its been taken out and stuffed in Ghee. This Dal-Baati is then served with Rava Ladoo, rice, pudina chaatni, kari (green mango) chaatni, green salad with excess of onion and fresh curd milk (chass). It has the highest number of calories. 100grams of Dal Baati has 99grams of calories. Dal Bafla (Hindi: दाल बाफला) is a
    7.75
    4 votes
    13
    Appam

    Appam

    Aappam, Aappam hoppers, are a type of food in South India and Sri Lankan cuisine (Tamil: அப்பம்). It is called chitau (ଚିତାଉ) Pitha in Oriya, Paddu or Gulle Eriyappa in Kodava. It is known as ආප්ප (Appa) in Sinhala and Arpone in Burmese. It is eaten most frequently for breakfast or dinner. Appum or aapum – pronunciation varies between regions – is a term equivalent to bread. Another form of appam is "Kallappam", where "kall" (Malayalam) means toddy, which is used for fermentation. This type of appam is prepared in an appa kal (mould). Kallappam looks like a pancake. According to Gil Marks "Each of the three separate Indian Jewish communities - Cochin, Mumbai, Calcutta - counts in its culinary repertoire grain dishes called appam." . The palappam dish of Malabar Jews and Malabar Nasrani Christians, akin to dosa, is made from the batter of ground soaked rice, coconut milk. . A little kall which means toddy in Malayalam is used for fermentation. This is otherwise known as Kallappam. The presence of Tamils in Malaysia has over the years led to the popularity of the apam. Apam is the term used for a steamed cup-cake sized dessert made from rice flour that is eatened with shredded fresh
    7.50
    4 votes
    14
    Banana leaf rice

    Banana leaf rice

    Banana leaf rice is a typical dish in South Indian cuisine. In banana leaf rice, white rice (or parboiled rice in authentic South Indian restaurants) is served on a banana leaf with an assortment of vegetables, curried meat or fish, pickles, and/or papadum. Usually, only the gravy of the curry will be served and no meat is served as it is meant to be a traditional Indian vegetarian dish. It is traditionally eaten with the hand. The banana leaf is used as it is believed that the hot rice will release the coating on the banana leaf, which aids in digestion. In Malaysia, to show one's appreciation after a satisfying meal, the guest will fold the banana leaf inward to signify that the meal was good. Folding in the opposite direction (i.e. upward or outward) signifies that the meal was not satisfying.
    7.50
    4 votes
    15
    Bhang

    Bhang

    Bhang (Hindi: भांग, [bʱaːŋɡ]; Punjabi: ਭੰਗ [pə̀ŋɡ]; Bengali: ভাং; [bʱaŋ]) is a preparation from the leaves and flowers (buds) of the female cannabis plant, smoked or consumed as a beverage in the Indian subcontinent. Bhang is illegal in many of the major countries such as the United States and anywhere where cannabis is not allowed. Bhang has been used as a cheap intoxicant for centuries in the sub-continent. Bhang in India is distributed as a religious offering during Shiva festivals like "Mahashivratri". It has now become synonymous with the Holi festival, to the point where consuming bhang at that time is a standard practice. It is also available as Bhang golis (balls) which is just freshly ground hemp with water. Apart from this, sweetened bhang golis are also widely available. These are not considered a drug, but a traditional sleeping aid and appetizer. Bhang is also part of many ayurvedic medicinal preparation, i.e. bhang powder is available at ayurvedic dispensaries Bhang Ki Thandai also known as Sardai is a drink popular in many parts of sub-continent which is made by mixing bhang with thandai, a cold beverage prepared with almonds, spices (mainly black pepper), milk and
    7.50
    4 votes
    16

    Dalda

    Dalda is a brand of hydrogenated vegetable oil popular in South Asia. Dalda’s story begins in early 1930s when Hindustan Vanaspati Manufacturing Co (today’s Hindustan Lever Limited) wanted to start manufacturing Vanaspati locally. At that time hydrogenated vegetable oil was imported in India by a Dutch company, Dada & Co. Dada & Co, insisted that the branded product should reflect their name, hence in a bid to establish their ownership of the brand Hindustan Lever introduced the letter ‘L’ for Lever into the name; and thus was born DALDA, one of the longest-living brands in India. Dalda came to be synonymous with the vanaspati (hydrogenated vegetable fat) genre. Dalda Banaspati through its promise of superior quality & taste has won the hearts millions of consumers making it not only a household name in the sub-continent by synonymous with the genre vanaspati. Dalda, in its quest to meet the changing needs of its consumers; entered the oils segment through the launch of Dalda Cooking oil. Hindustan Lever Limited has since sold the brand to Bunge Limited who now owns Dalda, offering new variants of Dalda in India. Bunge being the largest manufacturer of bottled oils in the world has
    7.50
    4 votes
    17
    Bhelpuri

    Bhelpuri

    Bhelpuri (Hindi भेलपूरी, Marathi भेळ) is a savoury Indian snack, and is also a type of chaat. It is made out of puffed rice, vegetables and a tangy tamarind sauce. Bhelpuri is often identified with the beaches of Mumbai (Bombay), such as Chowpatty. Bhelpuri is called Jhaal Muri in Kolkata (meaning "hot puffed rice"). A native Mysore variant of Bhelpuri is known as Churumuri in Bangalore. A dry variant of Bhelpuri popularly known as Bhadang is consumed after garnishing with onions, coriander and lemon juice. It was created by a Gujarati migrant to Mumbai, whose descendants run Vithal Bhelwala, near Victoria terminus railway station, Mumbai. Bhelpuri is made from puffed rice and Sev (a fried snack shaped like thin noodles made from besan flour) mixed with potatoes, onions, Chat masala and chutney and mixture (a mix of different types of fried snacks mixed together), as the base of the snack. Other commonly used ingredients include tomatoes, onions and chilis added to the base; In northern India recipes also made by adding boiled potatoes cut into small pieces. Different chutneys impart a sweet,tangy or spicy flavour. There are two popular chutneys used: a dark brown sweet one made
    9.00
    3 votes
    18

    Akuri

    Akuri is a spicy scrambled egg dish eaten in Parsi cuisine. The spices used are ginger, coriander, chopped chilis, and black pepper; minced tomatoes are commonly added. Akuri is traditionally eaten with pav or double roti (types of Indian bread) and for this reason is somewhat liquid in texture. The popular dish egg bhurji (egg khagina in Pakistan) is another version of this.
    7.00
    4 votes
    19
    Chicken tikka

    Chicken tikka

    Chicken tikka (Hindi: मुर्ग़ टिक्का; [ˌmʊrɣ ˈʈɪkkaː]) is a chicken dish served in British and Indian cuisine. It is popular in countries all over the world. It is traditionally small pieces of boneless chicken baked using skewers, in a clay-based oven called a tandoor, after marinating in spices and yogurt. The word tikka means "bits, pieces". The Punjabi version of the dish, however, is grilled over red-hot coals, and does not always contain boneless pieces. The pieces are brushed with ghee (clarified butter) at intervals, which gives it taste, while being continuously fanned. It is typically eaten with a green coriander and tamarind chutney, served with onion rings and lemon, or used in preparing a chicken tikka masala. A chicken tikka sizzler is a dish where chicken tikka is served on a heated plate, with onions. The dish is also known and eaten in Afghanistan, though the Afghan version (generally like Persian and Arab dishes) is less spicy compared with the Indian versions.
    7.00
    4 votes
    20
    GoTa

    GoTa

    In telephony, GoTa or “Global Open Trunking Architecture” is a CDMA-based digital trunking system. The GoTA system was developed by ZTE, a Chinese manufacturer. The GoTA system can be used for both private and public trunking network applications. GoTa is capable of providing a variety of trunking services: In addition to trunking service, GoTa can provide value-added services such as short messages, location based services and other data services. The original GoTa standard was developed for the 800 MHz band. GoTa is adapted to work in the 450 MHz band as well. PTT PoC or Push to talk over Cellular is a feature similar to walkie-talkie that is provided over a cellular phone network.
    8.33
    3 votes
    21
    Kebab

    Kebab

    Kebab (or originally kabab) is a wide variety of meat dishes originating in Midlle East and later on adopted in the Middle East, Turkey, South Asia and Asia Minor, that are now found worldwide. In English, kebab with no qualification generally refers more specifically to shish kebab served on the skewer. In the Middle East, however, kebab refers to meat that is cooked over or next to flames; large or small cuts of meat, or even ground meat; it may be served on plates, in sandwiches, or in bowls. The traditional meat for kebab is lamb, but depending on local tastes and taboos, it may now be beef, goat, chicken, pork; fish and seafood; or even vegetarian foods like falafel or tofu. Like other ethnic foods brought by travellers, the kebab has become part of everyday cuisine in many countries around the globe. The origin of kebab may lie in the short supply of cooking fuel in the Near East, which made the cooking of large foods difficult while urban economies made it easy to obtain small cuts of meat at a butcher's shop. The phrase is essentially Persian in origin and Arabic tradition has it that the dish was invented by medieval Persian soldiers who used their swords to grill meat
    8.33
    3 votes
    22

    Lobia

    Lobia is an Indian curry dish made with black-eyed beans. References: http://indianfood.about.com/od/vegetarianrecipes/r/lobia.htm
    8.33
    3 votes
    23
    Dahi puri

    Dahi puri

    Dahipuri, or Dahi puri (Marathi: दही पुरी), is an Indian snack which is especially popular in the state of Maharashtra. The dish is a form of chaat and originates from the city of Mumbai. It is served with mini-puri shells (golgappa), which are more popularly recognized from the dish pani puri. Dahi puri and pani puri chaats are often sold from the same vendor. The round, hard, puffy puri shell is first broken on top and partially filled with the main stuffing of mashed potatoes or chickpeas. A small amount of haldi powder or chilli powder, or both, may be added for taste, as well as a pinch of salt. Sweet tamarind chutney and spicy green chutney are then poured into the shell, on top of the stuffing. Finally, sweetened beaten yoghurt is generously poured over the shell, and the finished product is garnished with sprinklings of crushed sev, moong dal and finely chopped coriander leaves. Dahi puri typically comes as 5 or 6 dahi puris per plate. While pani puri is typically served one piece at a time, a plate of many dahi puri is often served together. Each dahi puri is intended to be eaten whole, like pani puri, so that the spectrum of flavors and textures within may all be tasted
    6.75
    4 votes
    24
    Bhajji

    Bhajji

    Bhaji is a spicy Indian snack that consists of a core food (like soaked potato or fried onions), similar to potato fritters, with several variants. It is usually used as a topping on various Indian meals but has become popular to eat alone as a snack. It is a popular street food in Maharashtra, India and you can find it on many stalls around the streets, especially in dhabas on highways. It is generally served with Bread (Pav) and called Bhajjipav. Apart from being a must in the traditional Maharashtrian Hindu meal on festivals and alike, bhajjis top the comfort food list when it comes to monsoons and rains. They are generally relished with a stewing hot coffee or tea. The basic recipes consist of chopped onions incorporated into a dough made from rice and gram flour, spices, and sometimes herbs, then fried until golden. Variations like chilli bhajji are more popular in South India. Red chili powder, Turmeric powder and rice powder are used for coating chili bhajjis. Onion Bhajjis are often eaten as starters to main Indian cuisine courses, along with Poppadoms and other Indian snacks. They may be served with a side of salad and slice of lemon, or with mango chutney and are
    9.50
    2 votes
    25
    Cafreal

    Cafreal

    Cafreal is a spicy chicken preparation consumed widely in the Indian state of Goa. The preparation originated from the Portuguese colonies in the African continent. It was introduced into the Goan cuisine by the Portuguese. The generic preparation involves onion, garlic, ginger, cinnamon, pepper, chilli, mace and fresh coriander leaves.
    9.50
    2 votes
    26

    Pesaha Appam

    Pesaha Appam is the unleavened Passover bread made by the Saint Thomas Christians of Kerala, India to be served on Passover night. It is served on passover night of Maundy Thursday. Pesaha appam is made from rice batter like Palappam, but it is not fermented with yeast in its preparation. Traditionally, Pesaha Appam is served in a ceremonial manner on Passover night in Syrian Christian households. The head of the family cuts the appam, dips it in paalukurukku (syrup) or Pesaha Pal (Passover milk), and serves it to the other family members. The Pesaha Appam is sometimes referred to as INRI appam. The word INRI comes from the acronym INRI, the Latin inscription IESVS·NAZARENVS·REX·IVDÆORVM (Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum), which translates to English as "Jesus the Nazarene (Galilean), King of the Jews (Judeans)" The Pesaha Appam is derived from the ancient bread of Jewish tradition. It has survived and continued as a tradition by the Nasranis that migrated to Kerala from the levant in the early days of Jewish Christianity. During Passover the Saint Thomas Nasrani Christian prepare bread without yeast in accordance with the Jewish commemoration of Pesahah or Passover. This unleavened
    9.50
    2 votes
    27

    Bengal potatoes

    Bengal potatoes is a dish in Indian cookery. It is served as a snack food with drinks, or as part of an Indian meal. Normally, the potatoes are baked with spices, peppers and curry leaves in an oven heated by cow patties. The potatoes and vegetables are then battered and deep-fried and served with mint or coconut chutney.
    7.67
    3 votes
    28

    Bisi Bele Bath

    Bisi bele bhath (Kannada: ಬಿಸಿ ಬೇಳೆ ಭಾತ್) is a rice-based dish with its origins in the state of Karnataka, India. Bisi-bele-bhaath translates to hot-lentil-rice in the Kannada language. It is also known as Bisi bele huliyanna'(Kannada: ಬಿಸಿ ಬೇಳೆ ಹುಳಿ ಅನ್ನ)'. The traditional preparation of this dish is quite elaborate and involves the use of spicy masala, toor dal (a type of lentil) and vegetables. Spices like nutmeg and asafoetida, curry leaves and tamarind pulp used in its preparation contribute to the unique flavour and taste of this dish. It is served hot and sometimes eaten along with salad, papad or potato chips. This dish is commonly found in restaurants that serve the Udupi cuisine. The masala used for the dish is available off the shelf. The name Bissi bheale bhaath is a Kannada phrase, which literally means "Hot Lentil brown Rice", as in Kannada, Bisi means hot, bheale means Lentils and bhaath means a dish made of rice. There is a saying Bisi re Bisi, Bele re bele, bhath to Bisi bele hi hole. For Powder For Powder [[Karnataka food in tamil .Bisibelebathwww.tamilkudumbam.com visit www.tamilkudumbam.com ]]
    7.67
    3 votes
    29
    Halva

    Halva

    Halva (or halawa, xalwo, haleweh, ħelwa, halvah, halava, helava, helva, halwa, halua, aluva, chalva, chałwa) refers to many types of dense, sweet confections, served across the Middle East, South Asia, Central Asia, West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Malta and the Jewish world. The term halva (Arabic: حلوى‎ / ALA-LC: ḥalwà), meaning "sweet", is used to describe two types of desserts: Halva may also be based on numerous other ingredients, including sunflower seeds, various nuts, beans, lentils, and vegetables such as carrots, pumpkins, yams, and squashes. The word halva entered the English language between 1840 and 1850 from the Yiddish halva. The latter term came from Bulgarian, which in turn came from the Turkish helva, a word which itself ultimately derived from the Arabic ḥalwā, meaning sweet confection. The Arabic root حلوى ḥalwā means "sweet". Most types of halva are relatively dense confections sweetened with sugar or honey. Their textures, however, vary. For example, semolina-based halva is gelatinous and translucent, while sesame-based halva is drier and more crumbly. This type is made by frying the flour such as semolina in oil into a
    7.67
    3 votes
    30
    Chaat

    Chaat

    Chaat (Hindi: चाट) is a term describing savoury snacks, typically served at road-side tracks from stalls or carts in India. With its origins in east India, chaat has become immensely popular in the rest of India and the rest of South Asia. The word derives from Hindi cāṭ चाट (tasting, a delicacy), from cāṭnā चाटना (to lick), from Prakrit caṭṭei चट्टेइ (to devour with relish, eat noisily). The chaat variants are all based on fried dough, with various other ingredients. The original chaat is a mixture of potato pieces, crispy fried bread Dahi vada or Dahi Bhalla ("Bhalla" in Hindi), gram or chickpeas and tangy-salty spices, with sour home-made Indian chilli and Saunth (dried ginger and tamarind sauce), fresh green coriander leaves and yogurt for garnish, but other popular variants included Aloo tikkis (garnished with onion, coriander, hot spices and a dash of curd), bhel puri, dahi puri, panipuri, dahi vada, papri chaat, and sev puri. There are common elements among these variants including dahi, or yogurt; chopped onions and coriander; sev (small dried yellow salty noodles); and chaat masala. This is a masala, or spice mix, typically consisting of amchoor (dried mango powder),
    6.25
    4 votes
    31
    Koottu

    Koottu

    Kootu (Tamil:கூட்டு) is a Tamil word means 'add' i.e. vegetable added with lentils which form the dish, made of vegetable and lentils and are semi-solid in consistency, i.e., less aqueous than sambhar, but more so than dry curries. Virundhu Sappadu (Typical Tamil feast) comes with the combo of boiled rice ('Choru' in Tamil), sambar, rasam, curd, poriyal, kootu, appalam, pickle and banana. All kootus by default have some vegetables and lentils, but many variations of kootu exist:
    9.00
    2 votes
    32

    Dum pukht

    Slow Oven or Dum Pukht has become one of the most refined forms of cooking in India and Pakistan, even though the technique is no more than 200 years old. Slow oven means cooking on very low flame, mostly in sealed containers, allowing the meats to cook, as much as possible, in their own juices and bone-marrow. The cuisine of Awadh, India is the original cuisine which introduced Dum Pukht to the world. Now it is also commonly used in other cuisines like Mughlai, Punjabi and Hyderabadi. Less spices are used than in traditional Indian cooking, with fresh spices and herbs for flavouring. In some cases, cooking dough is spread over the container, like a lid, to seal the foods. This is known as a purdah (veil), but on cooking becomes a bread which has absorbed the flavours of the food and the two are best eaten together. In the end, Dum Pukht food is about aroma, when the seal is broken on the table and the fragrance of an Avadhi repast floats in the air. Dum’ means to ‘breathe in’ and ‘Pukht’ to 'cook'. Dum Pukht cooking uses a round, heavy – bottomed pot, a handi, in which food is tightly sealed and cooked over a slow fire. There are two main aspects to this style of cooking; bhunao
    7.33
    3 votes
    33
    Kofta

    Kofta

    Kofta (see section Name for other names) is a Middle Eastern and South Asian meatball or meatloaf. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls of minced or ground meat—usually beef or lamb—mixed with spices and/or onions. In Pakistan and Iran, koftas are usually made of beef and chicken. They are often shaped into meatballs which are prepared with a mixture of ground meat, rice, leeks and some other ingredients. The (Kufteh Tabrizi) is also very popular in Pakistan and forms part of the common diet. The vegetarian varieties, like lauki kofta and shahi aloo kofta, are popular in India. The meat is often mixed with other ingredients such as rice, bulgur, vegetables, or eggs to form a smooth paste. Koftas are sometimes made with fish or vegetables rather than red meat, especially in India. They can be grilled, fried, steamed, poached, baked or marinated, and may be served with a rich spicy sauce. Variations occur in North Africa, the Mediterranean, Balkans and South Asia. In Pakistan, koftas are made of beef and chicken. Nargisi kofta with eggs are also very popular in Pakistan. According to a 2005 study done by a private food company, there were 291 different kinds of kofta in
    7.33
    3 votes
    34

    Chhota haazri

    Chhota haazri, from the Hindustani words for "small" and "presence", was a meal served in households and barracks, particularly in northern British India, shortly after dawn. In subsequent years, the tradition of such a meal has disappeared, but the phrase lives on in Anglo-Indian households, certain regiments of the Indian Army, and in public schools such as The Doon School and Lawrence School, Sanawar and St. Paul's School, Darjeeling where it has come to refer to a cup of tea with a biscuit served at 6:00 a.m.
    7.00
    3 votes
    35
    Thai curry

    Thai curry

    Thai curry refers to dishes in Thai cuisine that are made with various types of curry paste; the term can also refer to the pastes themselves. A Thai curry dish is made from curry paste, coconut milk or water, meat, seafood, vegetables or fruit, and herbs. Curries in Thailand mainly differ from the curries in Indian cuisine and other South Asian cuisines in their use of fresh ingredients such as herbs and aromatic leaves over a mix of spices. Thai people refer to dishes that are known as "Thai curries" in the Western world as "kaeng" (also written as "gaeng"; Thai: แกง, IPA: [kɛːŋ]). The first Thai dictionary from 1873 CE (2416 in the Thai Buddhist calendar) defines kaeng as a watery dish to be eaten with rice and utilizing shrimp paste, onions or shallots, chillies, and garlic as essential ingredients. Coconut milk is not included in this definition and many Thai curries, such as kaeng som and kaeng pa, do not feature it. Curries in Lanna (northern Thai) cuisine, with only a few exceptions, do not use coconut milk due to coconut palms not growing well, if at all, in the climate of the Thai highlands. The spiciness of Thai curries depends on the amount and kind of chilli used in
    7.00
    3 votes
    36
    Flattened rice

    Flattened rice

    Flattened rice (also called beaten rice) is a dehusked rice which is flattened into flat light dry flakes. These flakes of rice swell when added to liquid, whether hot or cold, as they absorb water, milk or any other liquids. The thicknesses of these flakes vary between almost translucently thin (the more expensive varieties) to nearly four times thicker than a normal rice grain. This easily digestible form of raw rice is very popular across Nepal, India and Bangladesh, and is normally used to prepare snacks or light and easy fast food in a variety of Indian cuisine styles, some even for long-term consumption of a week or more. It is known by a variety of names: Aval in Tamil and Malayalam, Chindé in Bengali and parts of Bihar and Jharkhand, Chira in Assamese, Chudaa in Oriya, Chiura (चिउरा) in Nepali, Bhojpuri and Chhattisgarhi, Poha or Pauwa in Hindi, Baji in Newari, Pohe in Marathi, Phovu in Konkani, Avalakki in Kannada, Atukula Poni in Telugu, and Pauaa/Paunva (પૌંઆ) in Gujarati. Flattened rice can be eaten raw by immersing it in plain water or milk, with salt and sugar to taste, or lightly fried in oil with nuts, raisins, cardamoms, and other spices. The lightly fried variety
    8.50
    2 votes
    37
    Jalebi

    Jalebi

    Jalebi, or Imaratee or Jilawii (and sometimes Jalibi) (jilebi, Pashto: جليبي, Hindi: जलेबी, Nepali जिल्फी/जेरी , Urdu: جلیبی, Sindhi: جلیبی, Sinhala: පැණි වළලු, Punjabi: ਜਲੇਬੀ jalebī; Bengali: জিলাপী jilapi; Persian: زولبیا zulbia; Arabic: zalabiyah) is a sweet popular in Persia and countries of the Indian Subcontinent such as India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh. It is made by deep-frying batter in pretzel or circular shapes, which are then soaked in syrup. The sweets are served warm or cold. They have a somewhat chewy texture with a crystallized sugary exterior coating. Citric acid or lime juice is sometimes added to the syrup, as well as rosewater or other flavours such as kewra water. A similar sweet is imarti, which is red-orange in color and sweeter in taste, made in North Indian states including Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Madhya Pradesh. A variant Chhena Jalebi, made with chhena, is popular in parts of Rajasthan, Bengal, and Orissa, though the form can differ significantly from place to place. In India Jalebi is served as the Celebration Sweet of India, popular during national holidays like Independence Day and Republic Day, on which it is supplied in
    8.50
    2 votes
    38

    Chakkoli

    Chakkoli is a dish made with rice flour balls and curry spices with meat, usually shrimps. This is a well known dish among the Muslim population in Kanyakumari District in Tamilnadu, India. It is a rare traditional dish. It is usually consumed along with ginger flavored black tea. Making Chakkoli is a very time consuming process. The dough for the tiny rice balls is prepared by adding roasted rice flour in boiling water with grated coconut and salt and kneading thoroughly.
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    1 votes
    39
    Chicken 65

    Chicken 65

    Chicken 65 is a spicy, deep-fried chicken dish originating from Chennai(Madras), as a bar snack, entree, or quick snack. The flavour of the dish comes from ginger, cayenne pepper, mustard powder and vinegar although the exact recipe can vary. It can be prepared using chicken on or off the bone. While the name "Chicken 65" is universally used to refer to the dish, there are many different stories for how the name came about. It is generally acknowledged that no one knows which (if any) of these anecdotal theories are correct
    10.00
    1 votes
    40
    Chicken lollipop

    Chicken lollipop

    Chicken lollipop is an hors d'œuvre that is made from the middle (and sometimes inner) segments of chicken wings. The middle segment has one of the two bones removed, and the flesh on the segments is pushed to one end of the bone. These are then coated in a spicy red batter and deep fried. It is also a popular item in Indian Chinese cuisine, served with Szechuan sauce.
    10.00
    1 votes
    41
    Koottukari

    Koottukari

    Koottukari or Koottu curry is a prominent dish in the "Sadhya" of Kerala, south India. It is a yellow curry featuring one or two vegetables such as banana and coconut, and has a hot and sweet taste. Ingredients: 200 gm: Kadala Parippu (Chena dal) Vegetables - 200 gm each: Chena, Banana (Pacha Nendrakaya), Mathan, Carrot ( all cut into small pieces) Spices: Mulakupodi, Manjalpodi, Kurumulakupodi, Jeerakam, Kaduke (mustard seed), Vattal Mulaku & Karuveppila 1 no: Cocunut 2 tsp: Coconut Oil Method: Cook Chena Dal and then add vegetables along with Manjalpodi, Mulakupodi and Kurumulakupodi as per requirement. Cook for 15 minutes. Grate and grind the coconut with jeera and add to the curry and cook well. Add salt. For tadka - put mustard seeds, vattal mulaku and Kariveppila in two spoon coconut oil and pour this into the curry. Delicious Kootukari is ready. Kootukari can be served with rice or roti /chappathi.
    10.00
    1 votes
    42

    Avre bendi

    Avre Bendi is a spicy Konkani recipe for a gravy base to which one can add any type of pulses. The main ingredients are coconut, dried red chillies and tamarind. The tamarind balances the spiciness of the red chillies. It is typically served with plain steamed rice and is a main dish at Konkani weddings.
    6.67
    3 votes
    43
    Curry Mile

    Curry Mile

    The Curry Mile is a nickname for the part of Wilmslow Road running through the centre of Rusholme in south Manchester, England. The name is earned from the large number of restaurants, take-aways and kebab houses specialising in the cuisines of South Asia and the Middle East, thought to be the largest concentration of South Asian restaurants outside the Indian subcontinent. Within a length of less than a mile there are least seventy establishments of this kind. The Curry Mile is notable for its streets being busy into the early hours of the morning. The area is much visited by local students, because of its location near the Oxford Road and Fallowfield Campuses of the University of Manchester, and the Oxford Road / All Saints campus of the Manchester Metropolitan University From the 1990s to early 21st century, the area was dominated by mainly Indian, Iranian and British cuisines. However, due to the mass migration of South Asians into the Rusholme area, only the Indian market flourished. Since 2000, Pakistani and North Indian restaurants remain dominant. However, there has been a noticeable increase in Afghan and Arab cuisine into the area also. Each year, the Eid festival
    6.67
    3 votes
    44
    Korma

    Korma

    Korma (sometimes spelled kormaa, qorma, khorma, or kurma) is a dish originating in South Asia or Central Asia which can be made with yogurt, cream, nut and seed pastes or coconut milk; it is usually considered a type of curry. The word Korma (Azid) (قورمه in Persian) derives from the Turkish verb for roasting/grilling of Azid (Kavurma). Korma (Azid) has its roots in the Mughlai cuisine of modern-day India and Pakistan. It is a characteristic Indian dish which can be traced back to the 16th century and to the Mughal incursions into present-day Northern India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. Classically, a korma is defined as a dish where meat or vegetables are braised with water, stock, and yogurt or creamy Azid (the name is in fact derived from the Hindi and Urdu words for "braise"). The technique covers many different styles of korma (Azid). The flavour of a korma is based on a mixture of spices, including ground coriander and cumin, combined with yogurt kept below curdling temperature and incorporated slowly and carefully with the meat juices. Traditionally, this would have been carried out in a pot set over a very low fire, with charcoal on the lid to provide all-round heat. A korma
    6.67
    3 votes
    45
    Biryani

    Biryani

    Biryani, biriani, beryani or beriani is a set of rice-based foods made with spices, rice (usually basmati) and meat, fish, eggs or vegetables. The name is derived from the Persian word beryā(n) (بریان) which means "fried" or "roasted". The cooking method of Biryani originated in Iran (Persia) and it was brought to the Indian subcontinent by Iranian travelers and merchants. In India, the recipe of biryani developed to its current form. Local variants of this dish are popular not only in the Subcontinent but also in Southeast Asia, Arabia, and within various Asian expatriate communities in the West. The spices and condiments used in biryani may include, but are not limited to, ghee, nutmeg, mace, min, pepper, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, bay leaves, coriander, mint leaves, ginger, onions, and garlic. The premium varieties include saffron. For a non-vegetarian biryani, the main ingredient that accompanies the spices is the meat—beef, chicken, goat, lamb, fish or shrimp. The dish may be served with dahi chutney or Raita, korma, curry, a sour dish of eggplant (brinjal), boiled egg and salad. The difference between biryani and pullao is that while pullao may be made by cooking the items
    8.00
    2 votes
    46
    Dahi vada

    Dahi vada

    Dahi vada (also known as Dahi Bhalla in Punjabi, thayir vadai in Tamil and perugu vada in Telugu, mosaru vade in Kannada, ଦହି ବରା Dahi Bara in Oriya and Doi Bora in Bengali) is an Indian chaat, prepared by soaking vadas in thick yogurt (dahi). The hot deep fried vadas are first put in water and then transferred to thick beaten yogurt. For best results, the vadas have to soak for at least a couple of hours before serving. To add more flavor, it can be topped with coriander or mint leaves, chili powder, crushed black pepper, chaat masala, cumin, shredded coconut, green chilis or boondi. A sweeter dahi is preferred in some places in India, especially in Maharashtra and Gujarat, although the garnishing remains the same.A combination of coriander and tamarind chutneys are often used as garnishments in addition to those mentioned above. They are mainly popular in south of India e.g. Tamil Nadu and Chennai. Sambhar vadas and Rasam vadas are also popular snacks in southern India.
    8.00
    2 votes
    47

    Khatkhate

    Khatkhate (खटखटे) is a well-known last name in Saraswat Brahmin (GSB) community hailing from Konkan province of Maharashtra State and the coastal region of Goa in India. Additional information on Khatkhate as surname is available at Khatkhate Wadi link. In Indian Cuisine, Khatkhate (खतखतें) Curry is an exotic mixed vegetable stew of Goan cuisine. This dish is usually prepared for weddings, pujas and during many other occasions. Khatkhate is a Goan and Konkani dish. Khatkhate Curry is prepared with at least five vegetables, plus grated coconut, jaggery, kokum, tamarind, tirphala/Tepphal (Sichuan pepper- a special spices from Konkan region) , dried red chillies, garam masala powder, and turmeric powder. The vegetables include radish (mooli), potato, sweet potato (ratala), carrots, corn on the cob, pumpkins (bhopala), and any seasonal vegetables. In Konkani Cuisine, Khatkhate Ladu (खटखटे लाडू) is a traditional gourmet delicacy from Malvan, Maharashtra. Khatkhate Ladu are prepared by binding together, in the shape of a baseball, the sugar coated crispy croissants (called "Khaja" by native Konkani population). The specialty of Khatkhate Ladu is that they are very dry, hard and crisp
    8.00
    2 votes
    48
    Manchow soup

    Manchow soup

    Manchow soup is a soup popular in Indian Chinese cuisine due to its ease of preparation and hot spicy taste. It is available in large restaurants and street food carts alike. Although the soup is named for Manchuria, the soup does not resemble any that is normally found in the cuisines of the region. It is a dark brown soup prepared with various vegetables, scallions, and chicken (in the non-vegetarian version only), thickened with stock and corn flour, and flavored with relatively generous doses of soy sauce, salt, garlic and chili peppers. It may also be garnished with chopped scallions.
    8.00
    2 votes
    49

    Baghara baingan

    Baghara baingan is a popular Indian eggplant curry of Hyderabad. It is also used as a side dish with the Hyderabadi biryani. Bhagare Baigan are originally from Taskent, then became popular in Hyderabad.
    6.33
    3 votes
    50
    Bombay mix

    Bombay mix

    Bombay mix is the name used in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland for a traditional Indian snack known as chiwda, chevdo, bhuso (if made without potato), chevda (चिवडा) or chivdo (चिवडो) in India, or Chanāchura (Oriya: ଚନାଚୁର) in Orissa and chanachur (চানাচুর) in Bengal. The English name originates from the city of Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay), India. It consists of a variable mixture of spicy dried ingredients, which may include fried lentils, peanuts, chickpea flour noodles, corn, vegetable oil, chickpeas, flaked rice, fried onion and curry leaves. This is all flavoured with salt and a blend of spices that may include coriander and mustard seed. The traditional Indian food can be eaten as part of a meal; as a standalone snack, though, it is usually consumed with the hands. Alternative, regional versions include:
    6.33
    3 votes
    51
    Qeema

    Qeema

    Keema, Kheema, or Qeema (Hindi: क़ीमा, Urdu: قیمہ, pronounced [ˈqiːmaː]; Punjabi: ਕ਼ੀਮਾ) is a traditional South Asian meat dish. Originally this word meant minced meat. It is typically minced mutton curry with peas or potatoes. Keema can be made from almost any meat, can be cooked by stewing or frying, and can be formed into kababs. Keema is also sometimes used as a filling for samosas or naan. Ingredients of keema in South Asia usually include minced meat, ghee/butter, onions, garlic, and ginger together with spices including cinnamon, bay leaves, and cloves. Some varieties may include peas (matar) and/or liver (kaleji). Oftentimes, to give it enhanced richness, the keema is cooked in ghee instead of oil. The meat is first boiled or fried until brown and set aside. Chopped onions, garlic, ginger, and green chillies are fried in ghee until the onions turn golden brown. Whole or ground spices are added to this mixture. The keema is then added to the onion/garlic mixture together with yogurt/peas and cooked for 15–20 minutes in a covered pot or a pressure cooker.
    6.33
    3 votes
    52
    Butter chicken

    Butter chicken

    Butter chicken (or murgh makhani) is part of Indian cuisine and Pakistani cuisine, popular in countries all over the world. The origins of butter chicken can be traced back to a Punjabi. Butter chicken is regarded to have been first introduced by Moti Mahal in Daryaganj, Delhi. Butter chicken is usually served with naan, roti, parathas, roomali roti or steamed rice. It should not be confused with chicken tikka masala, a similarly coloured Indian chicken dish that originated among the South Asian diaspora in the United Kingdom. It is thought that butter chicken was hastily prepared by a Delhi eatery chef post dinner time for a harried VIP customer who wanted "some" chicken dish. The chef had only half of a Tandoori chicken which he tossed with liberal amounts of butter, tomato and garam masalas to come up with the earliest version of "butter chicken". He later improvised to make this a regular feature of the menu. Though various versions exists for the recipe, typically dressed chicken (with or without bones) is marinated overnight in a yogurt and spice mixture usually including garam masala, ginger, garlic paste, lemon or lime, pepper, coriander, cumin, turmeric and chili. The
    7.50
    2 votes
    53
    Congee

    Congee

    Congee or conjee (from Tamil kañji, the English form may have arrived in the language via Portuguese. The derivation of the Tamil word is unknown as it appears to be non-Dravidian.) is a type of rice porridge or gruel popular in many Asian countries. When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients, such as meat, fish, and flavorings, are added whilst preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation. Despite its many variations, it is always a thick porridge or soup of rice which has usually disintegrated after prolonged cooking in copious water. To prepare the dish, rice is boiled in a large amount of water until it softens significantly. Congee can be made in a pot or in a rice cooker. Some rice cookers have a "congee" setting, allowing it to be cooked overnight. The type of rice used can be either short or long grain, depending on what is available and regional cultural influences. Culture also often dictates the way congee is cooked and eaten. In other Asian cultures, it is also called kanji (Tamil/Tulu), kaṇni /Malayalam), pakhal bhat (Oriya),
    9.00
    1 votes
    54

    Dopiaza

    Dopiaza (Urdu: دوپیازه "from Persian meaning (having) two onions") is a South-Asian curry dish. It is prepared with a large amount of onions, both cooked in the curry and as a garnish. Onions are added at two stages during cooking, hence the name ("two onions"). The dish usually contains a meat, usually king prawns, chicken, lamb, or shrimp; however, it can also be prepared in a vegetarian style. According to the legend the dish was created when a courtier of Mughal emperor Akbar Mullah Do Piaza accidentally added a large quantity of onions to a dish. The dish evolved further in Hyderabad, India and became a staple of Hyderabadi cuisine. As many other Hyderabadi dishes, the addition of a sour agent is a key part of dopiaza. Most often, raw mangoes are used; however, lemon juice or cranberries can be used as well.
    9.00
    1 votes
    55

    Gosht

    A ghoust is a type of Indian, Pakistani, or Bangladeshi curry dish made from Lamb (food), or Beef. Also spelled ghost or gosht and other variants, as this is transliterated from the Hindi script. Variations include saag or sag ghoust, which includes spinach or the karahi ghoust which is cooked in a traditional cooking pot from which it takes its name.
    9.00
    1 votes
    56

    Balti Triangle

    The Balti Triangle is an area of Balti houses clustered along Ladypool Road, Stoney Lane and Stratford Road, to the south of Birmingham city centre. It covers parts of Sparkbrook, Sparkhill and Balsall Heath. This area probably contains Birmingham's highest concentration of balti restaurants, as well as some of the oldest to be found in Britain. Birmingham is popularly believed to be the birthplace of the Balti curry
    6.00
    3 votes
    57

    Cuisine of Pune

    Pune, undoubtedly, is one of the education cities of India. Students from all over the country come to this place for graduation courses in engineering and commerce. With so much influx of students, Pune is now also capturing the eyes of the corporates who are setting up their IT development centers to attract talented engineers. With a large outside population, local residents of Pune thrive on providing services like laundry, student-mess (a place where students can come and have cheap home-like food) and tuitions. One will be surprised to see lots of road-side eating places around every nook and corner of the city. Also, with so much outside population, local search services are also gaining traction in Pune. There are online properties like pune.burrp.com, clickindia, etc. who provide with basic search services on restaurants and other daily needs. Burrp Pune with special focus on Pune's restaurants and hang-out places is one of the popular sites with the college and professional crowd in the city. Then there is a new site which has been launched recently www.tastykhana.com , this site has much more details and they have put up complete menu listings of restaurants, which you
    6.00
    3 votes
    58

    Aam papad

    Aam papad or Amawat (Hindi:अमावट) or Mamidi Tandra (Telugu:మామిడి తాండ్ర) or Aamsotto (Bengali) is a traditional Indian snack. It is a fruit leather made out of mango pulp mixed with concentrated sugar solution and sun dried. It is a part of the South Indian and North Indian cuisine and is available is numerous varieties all over North India. Traditional Aam Papad is sweet, although it is available in different varieties. It can be preserved for months making it popular in the off season of mangoes. A village Atryapuram in Rajahmundry is popular for mamidi tandra. Mango pulp is mixed with potassium metabisulfite and spread on trays to dry in the sun. After the first layer dries, another layer is spread over it and allowed to dry. The process is repeated until the desired thickness is reached. The thickness varies depending upon the quality of mango pulp used. When this thickness is reached the aam papad is cut into pieces and wrapped in oiled paper or into different packages. Aam Papad can be consumed in any season as it can be preserved for a long period of time. There are certain controversies concerning the commercial manufacturing of aam papad. The Canadian Inspection Food
    7.00
    2 votes
    59
    Chana masala

    Chana masala

    Chana masala or chole masala is a popular vegetable dish in Pakistani and Indian cuisine. The main ingredient is chickpeas. It is fairly dry and spicy with a sour citrus note. The dish is found throughout South Asia, and is particularly popular in northern India and Pakistan. Along with chickpeas, the ingredients typically include onion, chopped tomatoes, coriander seed, garlic, chiles, ginger, dried mango powder (amchur, sometimes spelled "amchoor"), crushed pomegranate seed (anaardana) and garam masala. It is popular mainly in the Punjab region of northern-India, and also notably in the regions of Gujarat. In Gujarat and Rajasthani areas, it is commonly cooked dry, with tangy spices. In India, it is often eaten with a type of fried bread and is known as chole bhature. It is commonly sold by street vendors but also can be found in restaurants. Aloo chole is a Pakistani variation of chana masala made with potatoes as well as chickpeas.
    7.00
    2 votes
    60
    Hyderabadi haleem

    Hyderabadi haleem

    Hyderabadi haleem is a type of stew composed of meat and pounded wheat made into a thick paste. It was introduced in Hyderabad state by the Arab diaspora during the Mughal period, and in the early 19th-century it became a popular food among the native residents. Originally it is an Arabic dish and was blended with local traditional spices to form a unique Hyderabadi Haleem. The preparation of haleem in Hyderabad, India has become an art form, like the popular Hyderabadi biryani. Though Hyderabadi Haleem is the traditional hors d'oeuvre at weddings, celebrations and other special occasions, it is particularly prepared and consumed during the Islamic month of Ramadan after Iftar, as it gives instant energy and is high in calories. This has made the dish synonymous with Ramadan. In recognition of its cultural significance and popularity, in 2010 Hyderabadi Haleem was granted Geographical Indication status (GIS) by the Indian GIS registry office, making it the first non-vegetarian dish in India to be listed as GIS. Haleem is originally an Arabic dish, made with meat and pounded wheat as the chief ingredients. Haleem was introduced to Hyderabad by the Arab diaspora during the Mughal
    7.00
    2 votes
    61

    Khoa

    Khoa (also khoya) is a milk food widely used in the Indian cuisine, made of either dried whole milk or milk thickened by heating in an open iron pan. It is similar to ricotta cheese, but lower in moisture and made from whole milk instead of whey. There are three types of khoya - batti, chickna, and daanedaar. Batti, meaning “rock,” has 50% moisture by weight and is the hardest of the three types; it can be grated like cheese. It can be aged for up to a year, during which it develops a unique aroma and a mouldy outer surface. Chickna (“slippery” or “squishy”) khoya has 80% moisture. For daanedaar, the milk is coagulated with an acid during the simmering; it has a moderate moisture content. Different types of khoya are used for different preparations. A concentration of milk to one-fifth volume is normal in the production of khoa. Khoa is used as the base for a wide variety of Indian sweets. About 600,000 metric tons are produced annually in India. Khoa is made from both cow and water buffalo milk. Khoa is normally white or pale yellow. If prepared in the winter, it may be saved for use in the summer, and may acquire a green tinge and grainier texture from a surface mould. This is
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    2 votes
    62

    Kosambari

    Kosambari or Koshambari is a salad made from pulses (split legumes) and seasoned with mustard seeds. The pulses generally used are split bengal gram (kadale bele in Kannada) and split Green gram (Hesaru bele in Kannada). These salads are sometimes eaten as snacks, but usually as a part of full course meal in Udupi cuisine. Ingredients required:- Soak split gram in water for about two hours and drain the water away. Heat coconut oil in a frying pan. Add mustard seeds and red chilli to it. Heat the mixture till the mustard seeds start popping. Remove pan from heat and pour it into the bowl containing the split gram. Add salt to taste and stir thoroughly. Garnish with grated coconut and chopped coriander leaves. Some people add grated carrot also. The kosambari is now ready to eat.
    7.00
    2 votes
    63
    Malai

    Malai

    Malai is a South Asian term for clotted cream or Devonshire cream. It is made by heating non-homogenized whole milk to about 80°C (180°F) for about one hour and then allowing to cool. A thick yellowish layer of fat and coagulated proteins forms on the surface, which is skimmed off. The process is usually repeated to remove most of the fat. Malai has about 55% butterfat. Buffalo milk is thought to produce better malai because of its high fat content. Malai is used in such recipes as Malai Kofta dumplings and the sweet Malai Kulfi.
    7.00
    2 votes
    64
    Aloo gobi

    Aloo gobi

    Aloo gobi (Hindi: आलू गोभी)(Urdu: آلو گوبی)(Burmese: အာလူး​​​ဂေါ်ဖီ álù gốphí /alu: gɔpʰi/, also spelled as 'alu gobi' or 'aloo gobhi' and 'alu gawbi' ) is a dry Indian, Nepali and Pakistani cuisine dish made with potatoes (aloo), cauliflower (gob(h)i) and Indian spices. It is yellowish in color, due to the use of turmeric, and occasionally contains kalonji and curry leaves. Other common ingredients include garlic, ginger, onion, coriander stalks, tomato, peas, and cumin. A number of variations and similar dishes exist, but the name remains the same.
    8.00
    1 votes
    65

    Handia

    Handia (Also Hadia, Handiya or Hadiya) is a rice beer commonly made by the indigenous people in Bihar, Jharkhand, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh states of India. The making involves the use of Ranu tablets, which is essentially a combination of about 20-25 herbs and acts as a fermentor. The Ranu tablets are then mixed with boiled rice and left to ferment. The drink is generally ready within a week. It is served cool and has lower alcoholic strength than other Indian country liquors. Rice wine Related beverages Indian country liquors
    8.00
    1 votes
    66

    Khichra

    Khichra (Urdu: کھچڑا) is a variation of the Pakistani/Indian dish Haleem, popular with Muslims, particularly during Ramadaan. It is made up of meat, lentils and spices, slowly cooked to a thick paste. In South Asia, both Haleem and Khichra are made with same ingredients. Haleem is cooked until the meat blends with the lentils. While in Khichra chunks of meat remains as cubes. Khichra is similar to Haleem and is a meat dish. While Khichri is a vegetarian dish with rice and pulses or lentils and with no spices.
    8.00
    1 votes
    67

    Bagara khana

    Bagara khana is a spiced rice delicacy prepared in Hyderabad, India. Long grained rice, dark spices, green chillies. The side dish served with bagara khana can be baghara baingan or dalcha. Vegetarians who do not eat Hyderabadi biryani enjoy this dish.
    6.50
    2 votes
    68
    Chicken tikka masala

    Chicken tikka masala

    Chicken ṭikka masālā (Bengali: চিচ্কেন টিক্কা মসলা; Hindi: चिकन टिक्का मसाला; Urdu: مرغ تکہ مصالحہ) is a dish of roasted chicken chunks (tikka) in a spicy (masala) sauce. The sauce is usually creamy, spiced and orange-coloured. Chicken tikka masala has been found to be the most popular dish in British restaurants and it has been called "a true British national dish." Chicken tikka masala is chicken tikka, chunks of chicken marinated in spices and yogurt, that is then baked in a tandoor oven, served in a masala ("mixture of spices") sauce. A tomato and coriander sauce is common, but there is no standard recipe for chicken tikka masala; a survey found that of 48 different recipes, the only common ingredient was chicken. The sauce usually includes tomatoes, frequently as puree; cream and/or coconut cream; and various spices. The sauce or chicken pieces (or both) are coloured orange with food dyes or with orange foodstuffs such as turmeric powder, paprika powder or tomato puree. Other tikka masala dishes replace chicken with lamb, fish or paneer. One explanation of the origins of the dish is that it was conceived in an Indian restaurant. Rahul Verma, an Indian expert on street food
    6.50
    2 votes
    69
    Gulai

    Gulai

    Gulai is a type of food contained rich, spicy and succulent curry-like sauce. The main ingredients might be chicken, beef, mutton, various kinds of offals, fish and seafoods, and also vegetables such as cassava leafs and young jackfruit. The gulai sauce commonly have thick consistency with yellowish color because of the addition of ground turmeric. Gulai ingredients consists of rich spices such as turmeric, coriander, black pepper, galangal, ginger, chilli pepper, shallot, garlic, fennel, lemongrass, cinnamon and caraway, all these spices is ground into paste and cooked in coconut milk with main ingredient. Gulai is often described as an Indonesian type of curry, although Indonesian cuisine also recognize kari or kare (curry). Gulai is one of the popular and widely distribute dish in Indonesian archipelago, especially in Sumatra, Java and also Malay peninsula. The dish was originated from Sumatra, and thought to be the local adaptation of Indian curry, developed and derived from Indian cuisine influence on Indonesian cuisine. The thick and yellowish gulai sauce is one of the most common sauce in Minangkabau cuisine to gave rich and spicy taste for meats, fishes or vegetables. The
    6.50
    2 votes
    70

    Kori Rotti

    Kori rotti is a popular spicy Coastal Karnataka dish, a combination of red-chili based chicken curry and crisp dry wafers (about 1mm thick) made from boiled rice. This is somewhat similar to the Arabic dish tashreeb—the crispy hubz (similar to pita bread) seasoned in bland thin chicken or mutton gravy. Kori rotti is a traditional dish of the Tuluvas (Tulu speaking people) and served at weddings, parties and special occasions. Almost all restaurants in the area of Udupi and Mangalore serve this food.
    6.50
    2 votes
    71

    Chippi appam

    Chippi appam is an appetizer made with curried rice flour and oysters. This is a favorite among the Muslim population in the Kanyakumari District in Tamil Nadu, India.
    6.00
    2 votes
    72

    Ghugni

    Ghugni is an evening snack in Eastern India (Bengal, Orissa, Assam). Black gram (Kala Chana) or dried yellow peas or dried white peas is cooked with gravy, in the traditional eastern Indian style. It is then served with kurmura (puffed rice), and at times with hot onion pakoda/bhajiya. Dried Yellow Peas - 2 cups Water - 4 cups Salt Oil Onion - 1/2 Ginger - 1 tsp Garlic - 1tsp Tomato -1 Green Chillies - 0-2 ( your taste) Cumin Powder - 1 tsp Coriander Powder - 1 tsp Coconut Slices - 1 handful Garam Masala - 1 tablespoon Green Coriander Leaves - for garnishing Tamarind chutney (optional) Soak the peas overnight in water in a large container (to accommodate expansion). Boil the soaked peas with some salt till soft. While the peas are cooking: Add coconut slices and garam masala (preferably Bengali garam masala in this case). Garnish with tamarind chutney, coriander greens, and onion pieces.
    6.00
    2 votes
    73
    Kachori

    Kachori

    Kachori or Kachauri or Kachodi or Katchuri (Oriya କଚୋଡ଼ି, Bengali কচুরি) is a spicy snack popular in various parts India including Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Delhi, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Bengal and Orissa. The kachori is supposed to have originated in Uttar Pradesh or Rajasthan. In these states it is usually a round flattened ball made of fine flour filled with a stuffing of baked mixture of yellow moong dal or Urad Dal (crushed and washed horse beans), besan (crushed and washed gram flour), black pepper, red chili powder, salt and other spices. Additionally in Rajasthani cuisine, the Pyaaj Kachori (onion kachori) is very famous.Another form of Kachori which is famous in Rajasthan is the Mawa Kachori. It is a sweet dish which is dipped in sugar syrup. In Gujarat, it is usually a round ball made of flour and dough filled with a stuffing of yellow moong dal, black pepper, red chili powder, and ginger paste. In Delhi it is often served as a chaat. Also Delhi has another kind of kachori, called 'Khasta kachori' or 'Raj Kachori'. A variant includes sweet upwas (fast) kachori, made with potato, coconut, and sugar. Kachoris are often served with a chutney, often made from
    6.00
    2 votes
    74
    Aloo pie

    Aloo pie

    An aloo pie is a variant of the samosa popular in Trinidad and Tobago. It is a soft, fried pastry made from flour and water, and filled with boiled, spiced and mashed potatoes (aloo being a romanization of the Hindi word for "potato") and other vegetables like green peas or chana dal (split chickpeas without their seedcoat). Its shape is similar to a calzone, and it is usually larger than a samosa, approximately 5 inches (12.7 cm) long. It is usually ordered with a sweet and sour type Indian dipping sauce known as "imli ki chutney".
    7.00
    1 votes
    75
    Dal

    Dal

    Dal (also spelled Dahl or Daal, or Dhal) is a preparation of pulses (dried lentils, peas or beans) which have been stripped of their outer hulls and split. It also refers to the thick stew prepared from these pulses, an important part of Indian, Nepali, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, West Indian and Bangladeshi cuisine. It is regularly eaten with rice and vegetables in southern India, and with both rice and roti (wheat-based flat bread) throughout northern India and Pakistan. Dal is a ready source of proteins for a balanced diet containing little or no meat. Sri Lankan cooking of dal resembles that of southern Indian dishes. The word dāl derives from the Sanskrit verbal root dal- 'to split'. In South India, dal is often used to make sambar, a spicy soup of red lentils and vegetables cooked with tamarind, asafoetida and some vegetables. It is eaten with rice and rice dishes. In West India, dals are used to make curries to be eaten with rice. Dals are also used to make fermented preparations such as idli, dosa, in south and coastal India. In East India, rice is also the main accompaniment. In Sri Lanka, dal is most often consumed in a curry made with coconut milk. Dal preparations can be
    7.00
    1 votes
    76
    Jalfrezi

    Jalfrezi

    Jalfrezi (also jhal frezi, zalfrezi, and many alternative spellings) is a type of curry in which marinated pieces of meat or vegetables are fried in oil and spices to produce a dry, thick sauce. It is cooked with green chillies, with the result that a jalfrezi can range in heat from a medium dish to a very hot one. Typically those eating jalfrezi cool it down by combining it with cream. Other main ingredients include peppers, onion and tomato. From the times of the Chinese, when it was created as a way of using leftover meat; the chillies helped to disguise any disagreeable taste. The name comes indirectly from Chinese and Bengali jhāl, spicy food, and Urdu parhezī, suitable for a diet. It is the most popular dish in UK Indian restaurants.
    7.00
    1 votes
    77

    Mangalorean Bangude Masala

    Mangalorean Bangude Masala is a dish made of cooked mackerel fish served in households and eateries along the Karavalli coastline, in south-western India. This dish is popular in the coastal districts of Dakshin Kannada and Udupi. Mackerel is common along the Arabian Sea coastline, and is widely consumed in the states of Kerala, Karnataka, Goa and Maharashtra. Bangude, in Tulu/Konkani and in the various dialects spoken along the Konkan/Karavalli coast, means mackerel. Preparing Mangalorean Bangude Masala involves stewing skinned and cleaned mackerel in a thick gravy. Even though the gravies for most sea food dishes consumed along the Arabian Sea coast have generous amounts of grated coconut, the bangude masala gravy does not. The ingredients for the gravy are garlic, coriander, red chilli powder, ginger, onion and tomatoes. However, in coastal Kerala generous amounts of grated coconut too are used. The tomatoes give a tangy taste to the dish. Recently, restaurants serving this dish have started using tomato puree and ketchups that are readily available in the market. Freshly chopped coriander leaves are used to garnish this dish. Traditionally, tamarind was used to impart tanginess
    7.00
    1 votes
    78
    Chennai cuisine

    Chennai cuisine

    Tamil Nadu is famous for its hospitality and its deep belief that serving food to others is a service to humanity, so eating-out in its capital city Chennai, is a great experience and provides a glimpse of the unique lifestyle of the city. Chennai is known for Tamil cuisine, brought to the city by people who have migrated from different parts of Tamil Nadu. Its rich traditions offer a variety of dishes, not only vegetarian but also Non-Vegetarian food. Chennai has a large collection of restaurants, some of them are unique 'Speciality Restaurants', which serve 'Indian Cuisine' with an ambience to match, while most others cater South Indian tiffin and meals, at very reasonable prices. Pure vegetarian restaurants under the brand name of Udupi cuisine, which is synonymous with delicious vegetarian food all over world, serve a variety of tiffin and vegetarian meals, mostly from South Indian state of Karnataka. Many of these restaurants have nowadays diversified and offer other Indian and Indianized Chinese dishes as well. Tiffin or light meals is served for breakfast or as a snack. These are usually one or more dishes like Idli, Dosai, Idiyappam, Pongal and Vadai along with coconut
    5.50
    2 votes
    79

    Dahi chutney

    Dahi chutney is strained yogurt that is mixed into a chutney of mint and onions. It is popular in Northern India. It is a side dish of Hyderabadi biryani.
    5.50
    2 votes
    80
    Goat roti

    Goat roti

    Goat Roti ( /ˈroʊti/ ROH-tee) is a type of wrap roti, a traditional East-Indian dish, popular in the West Indies and Caribbean communities throughout North America. It consists of curried goat served in a roti, often with dal.
    5.50
    2 votes
    81

    Kalathappam

    Kalathappam is a North Malabar delicacy made of rice flour, jaggery sugar, fried onions or shallots and coconut flakes and either cooked in a pan like a pancake or baked in a traditional oven.
    5.50
    2 votes
    82

    Jhunka

    Junka is a dish prepared in North Karnataka and Maharashtra. It is also known by the name of "Pitla". Its chief ingredient, gram flour (besan), is mixed with water to form a stiff paste. It is then sauteed in oil with other ingredients and served with roti or more traditionally with Bhakri. The dish is also referred to as Junka bhakar.
    5.00
    2 votes
    83
    Karahi

    Karahi

    A karahi ( /kəˈraɪ/; Hindi: कड़ाही kaṛāhī, Urdu: کڑاہی; also kadai, korai, karai, kadhi, kadahi, kadhai or cheena chatti) is a type of thick, circular, and deep cooking pot (similar in shape to a wok) used in Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Nepalese cuisine. Karahi are traditionally made out of cast iron, and look like woks with rounded bottoms. They are sometimes now made with other materials like stainless steel and copper and non-stick, and flat-bottomed varieties now exist. Karahi are useful for the shallow or deep frying of meat, potatoes, sweets, and snacks such as samosa and fish and also a indian dish known as papar, but are most noted for the simmering of stews or posola, which are often named karahi dishes after the utensil. Stews prepared in a karahi include "chicken karahi" and "karahi paneer." Stews prepared using other methods are sometimes also referred to as karahi. The name karai is so much attached to cooking that one Bangladeshi TV program on cooking was named “Korai Khunti”. A balti is also a dish cooked in a karahi, though in this case the term likely originated in Birmingham, England. Baltis are based on the food of Baltistan, an area of Pakistan close to
    5.00
    2 votes
    84
    Malvani cuisine

    Malvani cuisine

    Malvani cuisine is the standard cuisine of the Konkan region of Maharashtra and Goa, and some northern parts of West Karnataka. Although Malvani cuisine is predominantly non-vegetarian, there are many vegetarian delicacies. Although it is an independent cuisine, it overlaps Maharashtrian cuisine and Goan cuisine. Malvan is a town in the Sindhudurg district on the west coast of Maharashtra. Malvan being a coastal area in Konkan, it has its own distinct way of cooking food. Malvani cuisine uses coconut liberally in various forms such as grated, dry grated, fried, coconut paste and coconut milk. Many masalas have dried red chilies and other spices like coriander seeds, peppercorns, cumin, cardamom, ginger, garlic, etc. Some dishes also use kokum, dried kokam (amsul), tamarind, and raw mango (kairi). However not all of the cuisine is hot and spicy. The 'Konkanastha Brahmin' style of food is quite bland yet very tasty and vegetarian too. Fish dishes dominate the Malvani cuisine. The fiery seafood curries may be a bit too spicy for some people, but are quite tasty. The Malvani cuisine is very similar to Goan or coastal South Indian cuisine. Sol Kadhi is a pink colored appetizer drink
    5.00
    2 votes
    85
    Egg bhurji

    Egg bhurji

    Egg Bhurji or Egg khagina (as it is known in Pakistan), is a dish popular in north and western India and Pakistan. Its preparation and appearance are similar to scrambled eggs and the Parsi dish Akuri. The difference lies in the addition of sautéed chopped onions, chilies, and optional spices. It is usually served with rotis or bread. A typical preparation would be as follows: Ingredients may differ, but a typical khagina will contain the following: All vegetables added to a khagina are chopped rather than sliced. The cooking method may take the following form. Some cooking oil or ghee is warmed in a frying pan and chopped onions are added and sauteed. Once the onions have softened chopped tomatoes, salt, coriander and the spices are added and cooked for further minute or two until the tomatoes become soft. Finally the eggs are cracked into the frying pan and scrambled along with the rest of ingredients until the eggs are fully cooked through. Roti or paratha is then used to scoop up the khagina. Other ingredients may be added as per personal preferences; however, the ingredients listed above are widely believed to form the base for any khagina, much in the same way as margherita
    6.00
    1 votes
    86
    Haleem

    Haleem

    Haleem (Arabic: حلیم‎, Urdu: حلیم, Persian: حلیم‎, Bengali: হালিম) is a thick Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Indian cuisine dish. In Anatolia, Iran, the Caucasus region and northern Iraq, other variations of Haleem, Keşkek and Harisa, are popular. Although the dish varies from region to region, it always includes wheat, barley, lentils and meat. A variation of Haleem called Khichra and Hyderabadi Haleem is very popular in India. Haleem is made of wheat, barley, meat (usually beef or mutton, but sometimes chicken or minced meat), lentils and spices. This dish is slow cooked for seven to eight hours, which results in a paste-like consistency, blending the flavors of spices, meat, barley and wheat. Haleem is sold as a snack food in bazaars throughout the year. It is also a special dish prepared throughout the world during Ramzaan and Moharram months of Muslim Hijri calendar, particularly amongst Iranian, Pakistani and Indian Muslims. In India, Haleem prepared in Hyderabad, India during the Ramzaan month, is transported all over the world through a special courier service. Haleem is also very popular in Bangladesh, especially during the holy month of Ramadan, when it is a staple
    6.00
    1 votes
    87

    Rice water

    Rice water is the suspension of starch obtained by draining boiled rice or by boiling rice until it completely dissolves into the water. This may be used as a weak gruel for invalids. It is especially effective in the treatment of diarrhea such as that arising in cholera or gastroenteritis. Kanjivellam is Malayalam word for the water (vellam) drained from boiled rice (kanji).
    6.00
    1 votes
    88

    Chakna

    Chakna (or "chaakna") is a spicy stew made out of goat tripe and other animal digestive parts. It is a speciality dish among Hyderabadi Muslims. The tripe stew with chunks of liver and kidneys. The Chaknawadi neighbourhood near Charminar in Hyderabad (India) is famous for its chakna. In Pakistan, Karachi's Hyderabad Colony neighbourhood is known for its chakna.
    4.50
    2 votes
    89

    Bhat

    Bhat(भात,ভাত) is preparation of rice and the main accompaniment with Daal and Tarkari, one of the most popular and traditional dishes in India and Nepal. Bhat is the cooked rice, daal is a type of lentil soup and tarkari is curried vegetables. There are several varieties of bhat usina ko chamal(paraboiled rice), basmati, mansooli, sabitri, pokhareli chamal, anadi and many more. The procedure of cooking rice is quite simple. It is simply boiled with about half or less amount of water in a pressure cooker, rice cooker. The name Bhat is used in Nepal as well as in Bengali and Marathi. In Hindi the same dish is called chaaul
    5.00
    1 votes
    90
    Kadhi

    Kadhi

    Kadhi or karhi ( Hindi: कढ़ी, Rajasthani: कड्डी/खाटो, Punjabi: ਕੜ੍ਹੀ, Gujarati: કાઢી, Urdu: کڑھی, Marathi: कढी) is a North Indian and Pakistani dish. It is a spicy dish whose thick gravy is based on chickpea flour (called Besan in Hindi) and contains vegetable fritters called pakoras, to which sour yogurt is added to give it little sour taste. It is often eaten with boiled rice or roti. Among the Sindhi people, its other is variety popular and often vegetables are also added. In Northern India (mainly Punjab), pakodas are added to the chickpea gravy and sour yogurt is added to add flavour to it. They are eaten either with boiled rice or roti. In Rajasthan and Gujarat, it is usually served with khicṛī, roti, parantha and rice. It is considered a light food. Rajasthani and Gujarati kadhi differs from the Punjabi variety. Traditionally, it is sweeter than the other variants, because sugar or jaggery is added to it, but it can be made without sugar for a more sour taste. It is eaten without pakoras and its consistency is slightly thinner. The Gujarati kadhi is made preferably from buttermilk as it gives a more smooth texture compared to yogurt. Variations on this basic dish includes
    5.00
    1 votes
    91

    Kanjika

    Kanjika (Indian functional food, also abbreviated as Kanji), is a dish in which lactic fermentation is the terminal step in food processing; it is suitable for vegans as it is prepared from raw material of plant origin and devoid of dairy product. Kanjika-satwa is a dried kanjika. Kanjika may be prepared using barley or millet in place of rice. Sometimes bamboo leaves are added along with radish in the fermentation mixture. Fried lentil balls (Urid wada) are also combined with Kanjika. This dish is known as Kanjiwada.
    4.00
    2 votes
    92

    Churri

    Churri is a Pakistani and Indian spicy side dish, made from yoghurt and butter milk. In Pakistan and India, it is eaten as a refreshing supplement with a variety of spicy dishes.
    4.00
    1 votes
    93
    Dabbawala

    Dabbawala

    A dabbawala (Marathi: डबेवाला); also spelled as dabbawalla or dabbawallah; literally meaning ("box person"), is a person in India, most commonly found in the city of Mumbai, who is employed in a unique service industry whose primary business is collecting freshly cooked food in lunch boxes from the residences of the office workers (mostly in the suburbs), delivering it to their respective workplaces and returning the empty boxes back to the customer's residence by using various modes of transport. "Tiffin" is an old-fashioned English word for a light lunch or afternoon snack, and sometimes, by extension, for the box it is carried in. For this reason, the dabbawalas are sometimes called Tiffin Wallahs. The word "Dabbawala" in Marathi when literally translated, means "one who carries a box". "Dabba" means a box (usually a cylindrical tin or aluminium container), while "wala" is a suffix, denoting a doer or holder of the preceding word. The closest meaning of the Dabbawala in English would be the "lunch box delivery man". Though this profession seems to be simple, it is actually a highly specialized service in Mumbai which is over a century old and has become integral to the cultural
    4.00
    1 votes
    94

    Mangalore bajji

    Mangalore Bajji, as it is referred to in Karnataka (Golibaje in South Canara), is a popular food made from maida, curd, rice flour, chopped onion, coriander leaves, coconut, jeera, green chillies, and salt. The ingredients should be thoroughly mixed to form a hard batter, then shaped into a small ball and deep fried, preferably in coconut oil. It is often served with chutney. It is also called Golibaje in Tulu. Mangaloreans often eat this at tea time.
    4.00
    1 votes
    95

    Dal biji

    Dal Biji is an Indian snack made of crispy gram flour noodles and cantelope seeds and musk melon seeds.
    0.00
    0 votes
    96
    Dal makhani

    Dal makhani

    Dal Makhani (Hindi: दाल माखनी) ("Lentil rich sauce") is a staple food originating from the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent. The dish differs from other popular Punjabi dal dishes, such as dal tadka, in that the primary ingredients in dal makhani are whole black lentil (urad) and red kidney beans (rajma), rather than red lentil (masoor). Dal makhani was popularized in India following partition, when many people from the Punjab migrated to the northern regions of India. As the Punjabi diaspora migrated across India and internationally, the dish was introduced to local consumers by entrepreneurial Punjabi migrants who opened restaurant businesses. Dal makhani is now universally recognized as a quintessentially Indian dish, and variations of the fare are served in a wide variety of eateries and restaurants internationally. Dal Makhani’s popularity is due in part to its versatility and the rich vegetarian dish can be served as a main meal, included in a buffet (thali) or as an accompaniment to a principle meal. In India, soups and curries with a red or yellow lentil base are an important staple; however, due to dal makhani's rich texture and lengthy preparation process, many
    0.00
    0 votes
    97
    Dhansak

    Dhansak

    Dhansak is a popular Indian dish, especially popular among the Parsi Zoroastrian community. It combines elements of Persian and Gujarati cuisine. In Parsi homes, dhansak is traditionally made on Sundays owing to the long preparation time. Dhansak consists of lentils, vegetables, spices, cumin seeds, ginger, and garlic together with meat and either gourd or pumpkin. Within the Parsi community, dhansak usually contains goat meat (mutton); it is rarely made with other meats, or without meat. Outside of India, some variants of dhansak use pineapple chunks for sweetness, however the traditional recipes never contain fruit, instead favoring the subtle sweetness of pumpkin, squash or gourd.
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    98

    Gavvalu

    Gavvalu is one of the typical sweets made in Andhra Pradesh, and is a mixture(dough) of rice flour and water or milk. The prepared dough is shaped into small rounds, which are flattened and rolled (on a special tool) so as to take the shape of gavvalu (cowrie shells). These shells are fried in oil or ghee and can be set aside for some time until the diners are ready to eat them. When eaten, these shells are poured into sugar or jaggery syrup. Authentic gavvalu recipe from Thrilling Treats
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    0 votes
    99
    Hyderabadi biriyani

    Hyderabadi biriyani

    Hyderabadi Biryani is a Hyderabadi biryani dish made with basmati rice and goat meat. Popular variations use chicken instead of goat. The blending of Mughlai and Andhra Pradesh cuisines in the kitchens of the Nizam, ruler of the historic Hyderabad State, resulted in the creation of Hyderabadi Biryani. The ingredients are basmati rice, meat, yogurt, onions, spices, lemon, saffron. Coriander and fried onions used as garnish. The preferred meat is lamb, goat or chicken. Hyderabadi biryani is of three types, the Kacchi (raw) Biryani,the Jappu (raw) Biryani and the Pakki biryani. The kachchi gosht ki biryani is prepared with meat marinated with spices overnight and again soaked in yogurt before cooking. The meat is sandwiched between layers of fragrant long-grained basmati rice, and is cooked on dum (steaming over coals), after sealing the handi (vessel) with a layer of dough. This is a challenging process as it requires meticulous attention to time and temperature to avoid over- or under-cooking the meat. In a pakki biryani, the meat marinating time is shorter, and the meat is cooked before being layered with the rice and cooked in a dough-sealed vessel. In Pakki Yakhni (with cooked
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    0 votes
    100

    Kombdi vade

    vade Sagoti is a non-vegetarian dish native to the Konkan region in the Indian state of Maharashtra. The dish consists of a traditional chicken curry (including chicken pieces with bones), vade (fluffy fried dumplings made of rice flour, and occasionally of wheat and Ragi flour), onions, lemon juice and solkadhi (a gravy made from coconut milk).. This dish is majorly prepared on "Gatari" and "Dev Diwali" in Raigad, Ratnagiri and Sindadurg districts of Konkan.
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