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  • Feb 20th 2014
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Most famous Dishes from Hong Kong

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    1
    Steamed meatball

    Steamed meatball

    Steamed meatball is a Cantonese dim sum dish. It is popular in Hong Kong and most overseas Chinatowns. The meatball is made of beef, and usually has a tofu skin layer in the bottom, garnished with some vegetables like scallions. It is served with the standardized non-Chinese worcestershire sauce worldwide. The sauce in Hong Kong is known as kip zap (喼汁; Yale: gipjap), and is entirely optional.
    7.57
    7 votes
    2
    Sweetheart cake

    Sweetheart cake

    A sweetheart cake or wife cake is a traditional Chinese pastry with flaky and thin skin made with winter melon, almond paste, and sesame, and spiced with five spice powder (Chinese spice blend of fennel seed, star anise, licorice root and cloves). "Wife cake" is the translation of lou po beng from Cantonese, and although the meaning is "wife," the literal translation is "old lady cake," paralleling the colloquial usage of "old lady" for "wife" in American English. The cake is still popular among many in Hong Kong and Mainland China. Many people in Hong Kong, as well as professional chefs, also bake "modern" varieties of this cake. The orthodox version is from the Guangdong-Hong Kong region, where filling consists of wintermelon made by the process of candying. The candied mash is then combined with white sesame seeds and glutinous rice flour. Coconut in the form of mash or desiccated shreds and almond paste as well as vanilla is also sometimes added. The authentic flavour and flaky texture of the pastry is produced by the usage of pork lard shortening then by glazing with egg wash. Due to its rising popularity in Western countries brought about by immigration, butter is sometimes
    7.83
    6 votes
    3
    Chinese sausage

    Chinese sausage

    Lap cheung is a form of pork sausage, and is a common food in Guangdong Province, Hong Kong and Macau. It consists of ground pork, usually packed in a casing (the large intestines of a pig) going through compression, drying and exposure to sunlight. The Hong Kong government, on September 14, 2006, disclosed that a sample made in Macau sold at Kee Wah contains a forbidden colouring, Rhodamine B, which can cause vomiting and suppress the central nervous system.
    7.33
    6 votes
    4
    Siu yuk

    Siu yuk

    Siu yuk (roasted pig, Chinese: 燒肉; Jyutping: siu1 juk6) is a variety of siu mei, or roasted meat dishes, within Cantonese cuisine. It is made by roasting an entire pig with seasoning in a charcoal furnace at high temperature. Roasted pigs of high quality have crisp skin and juicy and tender meat. Usually the meat is served plain, but it is sometimes served with soy sauce or hoisin sauce. When individual pieces are served, it is known as "roasted pork" or "roasted meat" (Chinese: 燒肉, Mandarin: shāoròu, Cantonese: siu1 juk6). When the entire pig is served, the dish is known as "roasted pig" (Chinese: 燒豬, roasted pig, Mandarin shāozhū, Cantonese: siu1 zyu1). In most cases it is referred to by the former term, since it is always consumed in small quantities. The style of cooking is nearly identical between the different parts of mainland China and Hong Kong. Sometimes the entire pig is purchased for the sake of special family affairs, business openings, or as a ritualistic spiritual offering. For example, in the entertainment industry in Hong Kong, one tradition is to offer one or several whole roast pigs to the Jade Emperor to celebrate a film's opening with a roast pig; the pig is
    7.00
    6 votes
    5
    Peanut butter bun

    Peanut butter bun

    A peanut butter bun is a Chinese pastry found in Hong Kong as well as overseas Chinatown bakery shops. The bun has layers of peanut butter fillings, sometimes with light sprinkles of sugar mixed with the peanut butter for extra flavor. Unlike other, similar buns, the shape varies, depending on the bakery.
    6.67
    6 votes
    6
    Paper wrapped cake

    Paper wrapped cake

    Paper wrapped cake is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most standard pastries served in Hong Kong. It can also be found in most Chinatown bakery shops overseas. In essence, it is a chiffon cake baked in a paper cup.
    7.80
    5 votes
    7
    Beef ball

    Beef ball

    Beef ball is a commonly cooked food in southern China and overseas Chinese communities. As the name suggests, the ball is made of beef that has been finely pulverized. They are easily distinguishable from fish balls due to the beef balls' darker color. Another characteristic is the tiny pieces of tendon in each ball will dissolve with prolonged cooking. Nearly all meatballs (made from pork, beef, fish, etc.) made in Asia differ significantly in texture to their counterparts with European origins. Instead of mincing and forming meats, meat used for making meatballs is pounded until the meat is more or less pulverized. This is also often the case for fillings in steamed dishes. This process is what lends a smooth texture to the meatballs. Pounding, unlike mincing, uncoils and stretches previously wound and tangled protein strands in meat and allows them to cure to a gel with heat in a similar manner as surimi. Beef balls are commonly mixed in with wonton noodles and other fish ball noodles. It is available in traditional markets and supermarkets. Beef balls are also a popular ingredient for hot pot dishes. It has a variety of uses within Chinese cuisine.
    9.25
    4 votes
    8
    Chrysanthemum coronarium

    Chrysanthemum coronarium

    Garland chrysanthemum, botanically Chrysanthemum coronarium or Leucanthemum coronarium, also known as chrysanthemum greens or edible chrysanthemum, is native to the Mediterranean and East Asia. It is a leaf vegetable in the genus Chrysanthemum, or by some botanists in Leucanthemum. A leafy herb, the Garland chrysanthemum, Chrysanthemum coronarium, is one of the few annual plants in its genus and has yellow florets grouped in small rayed flower heads and aromatic, bipinnately lobed leaves. The vegetable grows very well in mild or slightly cold climates, but will go quickly into premature flowering in warm summer conditions. Seeds are sown in early spring and fall. "The plant is rich in minerals and vitamins with potassium concentrations at 610 mg/100 g and carotene at 3.4 g/100 g in edible portions. In addition, the plant contains various antioxidants (in stem, leaf,and root tissues) that have potential long-term benefits for human health, although toxic (dioxin) properties have also been observed. Extracts from C. coronarium var. spatiosum have been shown to inhibit growth of Lactobacillus casei, a beneficial human intestinal bacterium." The plant’s greens are used in many Asian
    9.00
    4 votes
    9
    Beef chow fun

    Beef chow fun

    Beef chow fun is a staple Cantonese dish, made from stir-frying beef, hefen (wide rice noodles) and bean sprouts and is commonly found in yum cha restaurants in Guangdong, Hong Kong, and even overseas, as well as in cha chaan tengs. The main ingredient of this dish is ho fun noodles, which is also known as Shahe fen, originating from the town of Shahe in Guangzhou. The most common methods of cooking ho fun are in soup or stir fried. Ho fun can be dry-fried (fried without sauce) or wet-fried (fried with a sauce). Dry-fried beef ho fun is made by first stir frying beef strips until they are half-cooked. Bean sprouts and onions are then fried in oil. The ho fun is added and stir fried very quickly, along with soy sauce and heated oil. Finally, the beef is added. An important factor in the making of this dish is "wok hei" (鑊氣). The cooking must be done over a high flame and the stirring must be done quickly. Not only must the ho fun be stirred quickly, it must not be handled too strongly or it will break into pieces. The amount of oil also needs to be controlled very well, or the extra oil or dry texture will ruin the flavor. Because of these factors, this dish is a major test for
    7.40
    5 votes
    10
    Tea egg

    Tea egg

    Tea egg is a typical Chinese savory food commonly sold as snacks by street vendors or in night markets in most Chinese communities throughout the world. Fragrant and flavorful tea eggs are a traditional Chinese food. The original recipe uses various spices, soy sauce, and black tea leaves. A commonly used spice for flavoring tea eggs is Chinese five-spice powder, which contains ground cinnamon, star anise, fennel seeds, cloves and Szechuan peppercorns. Some recipes do not use tea leaves, but they are still called "tea eggs". In the traditional method of preparation, eggs are boiled until they reach a hardened, cooked state. The boiled eggs are removed from the water, and the entire shell of each egg is gently cracked all around. Smaller cracks produce more marbling when the egg is peeled for eating. The extra water from the boiling should be allowed to seep out of the eggs on its own. After about ten minutes, the cracked eggs are ready to be put into the prepared spiced-tea liquid and simmered at medium heat. The simmering allows the spiced fluid to seep into the cracks and marinate the eggs inside their shells. After about 20 minutes, the eggs and the spiced-tea liquid should be
    6.80
    5 votes
    11
    Tofu skin roll

    Tofu skin roll

    Tofu skin roll or Tofu roll is a dim sum dish. It can be found in Hong Kong and among overseas Chinese restaurants. It is usually served in a small plate in twos or threes. In all cases, the outer layer is made of tofu skin. There are a number of cooking styles. The fillings range from pork with vegetable, to fish or beef. The fried version is known as (腐皮捲, fu pei gyun). The first character "fu" comes from tofu, though a more accurate description is that the skin is made from the ingredient bean curd. Some Cantonese restaurants serve the fried crispy version at night, often with mayonnaise as dipping sauce. Another name is the (豆腐捲, tofu gyun). Some ingredients include shrimp, leek, chicken, bamboo shoot, small carrots, tofu, scallions, sesame oil, bean sprouts. The bamboo steamed version is generally known as (鮮竹捲, sin zuk gyun). It is wrapped with dried tofu skin (腐竹, fu zhu). During the cooking process, the tofu skin is hydrated. It makes the roll very soft and tender. This is the version most commonly served as a dim sum dish during yum cha sessions. The steamed tofu skin rolls often contain bamboo shoots.
    6.40
    5 votes
    12
    Fish slice

    Fish slice

    Fish cake or fish slice is a commonly cooked food in southern China and overseas Chinese communities. The fillet is made of fish that has been finely pulverized. It is made of the same surimi used to make fish balls. When production is finished, the fish usually comes in a large frozen rectangular fillet. Prior to cooking, the large rectangular fish mold must be defrosted and cut into smaller slices. Fish slices are often used in Chinese cuisine, especially in noodle dishes. They are commonly found in dai pai dong. Perhaps the most popular use of fish slices is mixing with fish balls or wonton noodles. Another usage in home cooking is to combine them with soft vegetables like cabbage or bean sprouts. Meats like pork are also sometimes used for plate-dishes.
    7.50
    4 votes
    13
    Haw flakes

    Haw flakes

    Haw flakes are Chinese sweets made from the fruit of the Chinese hawthorn. The dark pink candy is usually formed into discs one millimeter thick. Some Chinese people take the flakes with bitter Chinese herbal medicine. Also known as "Saan Zaan Pin" (山楂片) in many Cantonese speaking areas around the world. Haw flakes are manufactured in China and are available in many parts of Asia. They have been available in Hong Kong and Malaysia, since the 1970s. There has been very little change in the recipe or taste from the original version. Haw flakes are reminiscent of dried pineapple slices or raisins with a slight tang of guava. The candy is soft and chewy with a fruity sweetness and a slight chalky texture. By comparison to other dried fruit sold as confectionery, they are relatively inexpensive. Gourmet haw flakes are also available at specialty Chinese markets. Gourmet haw flakes tend to be larger than the Shandong haw flakes (gourmet haw flakes are about 35–40 mm in diameter whereas the Shandong haw flakes are about 25 mm in diameter.) Haw flakes have been seized on several occasions by the United States Food and Drug Administration for containing Ponceau 4R (E124, Acid Red 18), an
    7.25
    4 votes
    14
    Sausage bun

    Sausage bun

    A sausage bun is a type of Chinese pastry. It is essentially the equivalent of the American hot dog. It is found in Hong Kong as well as many Chinese bakeries overseas. It uses westernized sausages instead of Chinese sausages, which are usually used as a cooking ingredient.
    7.25
    4 votes
    15
    Beef bun

    Beef bun

    Beef bun is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most standard pastries in Hong Kong and can also be found in most Chinatown bakery shops overseas. The bun has a ground beef filling, sometimes include pieces of onions.
    8.33
    3 votes
    16
    Taro dumpling

    Taro dumpling

    Taro dumpling is a variety of dim sum served within Chinese cuisine. It is a standard dish in dim sum restaurants in Hong Kong and around the world. Among overseas Chinatowns, it is often sold as a Chinese pastry. The outer shell is made from a thick layer of taro that has been boiled and mashed. The filling is made from seasoned ground pork. The dumpling is deep fried, and the outermost layer of taro becomes crisp, light, and fluffy.
    8.33
    3 votes
    17
    White sugar sponge cake

    White sugar sponge cake

    White sugar sponge cake (also called white sugar cake and white sugar pastry) is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most common pastries in Hong Kong. Overseas, however, it is much more rare in Chinatown bakery shops. It is made from rice flour, white sugar, water, and a leavening agent. While it is called a "cake", it is never served as a circular round cake. It is usually purchased as an individual triangular piece or a mini square. The cake is bright white in color. The consistency is spongy and soft. The taste is sweet, and sometimes has a slightly sour due to fermentation of the batter prior to cooking. Like most Chinese cakes, it is steamed, giving it a moist, soft, and fluffy texture, as opposed to a dry and firm one. If left exposed to the air, it hardens quickly. It is usually kept under some cover to preserve moistness. It is typically served hot, because when it is cold it is not as soft and moist. The batter is either poured over a bowl in a steamer, a Chinese steamer cloth or aluminum foil. If made from brown rice flour and brown sugar it is called a brown sugar sponge cake. A Vietnamese version of the cake, called bánh bò, differs from the Chinese version in
    6.75
    4 votes
    18
    Sugarcane juice

    Sugarcane juice

    Sugarcane juice is the juice extracted from pressed sugarcane. It is consumed as a beverage worldwide, and especially in regions where sugarcane is commercially grown such as Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Latin America. Evaporated cane juice is a loosely defined term which can include combinations of sugars including glucose, and fructose. It is less processed than bleached white sugar. Nutritional benefits are minimal; evaporated cane juice contains trace minerals and vitamins but has the same amount of calories as table sugar and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration defines evaporated cane juice as any sweetener derived from sugar cane syrup. This is a popular drink in India especially in states such as Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. It is known as "Oosacha Ras" or "Ganneka Ras" in Maharashtra in Marathi and Hindi accordingly ('Ras' translates to 'juice', whereas the former in both terms, 'Oos' and 'Ganna' translate to 'Sugar cane'. It is called Roh in eastern Punjab. People usually like this drink in the summer months. Some other additives are added to the fresh juice like lemon,ginger, mint,
    10.00
    2 votes
    19
    Rousong

    Rousong

    Rousong (肉鬆), also sometimes called meat wool, meat floss, pork floss, pork sung, is a dried meat product that has a light and fluffy texture similar to coarse cotton, originating from Fujian. Rousong is used as a topping for many foods such as congee, tofu, and savory soy milk. It is also used as filling for various buns and pastries, and as a snack food on its own. Rousong is a very popular food item in Chinese culture, as evidenced by its ubiquitous use in Chinese cuisine. Rousong is made by stewing cuts of pork in a sweetened soy sauce mixture until individual muscle fibres can be easily teased apart with a fork. This usually happens when the collagen and elastin that normally hold the fibres have been cooked out of the meat. The teased-apart meat is then strained and dried in the oven. After a light drying, the meat is mashed and beaten while being dry cooked in a large wok until it is completely dry. Additional flavourings are usually added while the mixture is being dry fried. 5 kg (11 lb) of meat will usually yield about 1 kg (2.2 lb). Fish can also be made into floss (魚鬆; yú sōng) though initial stewing is not required due to the low collagen and elastin content of fish
    8.00
    3 votes
    20
    Rice noodle roll

    Rice noodle roll

    A rice noodle roll (also translated as steamed rice roll) is a Cantonese dish from southern China and Hong Kong, commonly served as a variety of dim sum. It is a thin roll made from a wide strip of shahe fen (rice noodles), filled with shrimp, pork, beef, vegetables, or other ingredients. Sweet soy sauce is poured over the dish upon serving. The rice noodle is also known as chee cheong fun where chee cheong means pig intestine, and fun means noodle; this is because the noodle resembles the small intestine of a pig. The rice noodle sheets are made from a viscous mixture of 1 cup of rice flour and 1/3 cup tapioca or glutinous rice flour and water, this recipe will scale well as long as the ratio of flours and water remain the same. The combination of both types of flour and water should be a consistency of heavy cream. The rice flour serves as the bulk and flavor of rice, the tapioca gives the elasticity and springiness, therefore it should never crumble nor being too chewy. It should never have the al dente texture as with Italian pasta. This liquid mixture is poured into a specially made flat pan with holes (similar to a flat colander). Commercial restaurants use instead special
    7.67
    3 votes
    21
    Biscuit roll

    Biscuit roll

    The biscuit roll, crispy biscuit roll, crisp biscuit roll or cookie roll is a type of biscuit snack commonly found in many parts of Asia. It is crunchy and can be easily broken into pieces. The Chinese name of "蛋卷" is identical to that of the Chinese name for egg roll, despite both items being very different. In Hong Kong, biscuit rolls are made of wheat flour, butter, egg, sugar, and vanilla flavour. The New Territories is one of the places that manufacturers biscuit rolls. It is called barquillos in the Philippines and is commonly sold in souvenir shops or delicacy stores all over towns, cities, and highways along the provinces.
    9.50
    2 votes
    22
    Congee

    Congee

    Congee or conjee (from Tamil kañji, the English form may have arrived in the language via Portuguese. The derivation of the Tamil word is unknown as it appears to be non-Dravidian.) is a type of rice porridge or gruel popular in many Asian countries. When eaten as plain rice congee, it is most often served with side dishes. When additional ingredients, such as meat, fish, and flavorings, are added whilst preparing the congee, it is most often served as a meal on its own. Names for congee are as varied as the style of its preparation. Despite its many variations, it is always a thick porridge or soup of rice which has usually disintegrated after prolonged cooking in copious water. To prepare the dish, rice is boiled in a large amount of water until it softens significantly. Congee can be made in a pot or in a rice cooker. Some rice cookers have a "congee" setting, allowing it to be cooked overnight. The type of rice used can be either short or long grain, depending on what is available and regional cultural influences. Culture also often dictates the way congee is cooked and eaten. In other Asian cultures, it is also called kanji (Tamil/Tulu), kaṇni /Malayalam), pakhal bhat (Oriya),
    9.50
    2 votes
    23
    Seafood birdsnest

    Seafood birdsnest

    Seafood birdsnest is a common Chinese cuisine dish found in Hong Kong, China and most overseas Chinatown restaurants. It is also found within Cantonese cuisine. It is usually classified as a mid to high-end dish depending on the seafood offered. The edible nest holding the seafood is made entirely out of fried taro. There are different intricate netting used in the nest making. In all cases, the basket is tough and crunchy. Despite the name there is nothing bird related in this dish. The most common ingredients are scallops, peapods, boneless fish fillet, celery sticks, straw mushrooms, calamari, shrimp. There are no dried ingredients in this dish.
    9.50
    2 votes
    24
    Siu yeh

    Siu yeh

    Siu yeh (Chinese: 宵夜) is a late night meal in the food culture of Hong Kong. It comes after dinner, and is similar to supper. Mealtime may start from about 9pm onwards until 4am, which would be early morning yum cha time. It can range anywhere from a snack to a full-fledged meal. For people working late night shifts, siu yeh is also associated with their post-midnight meals. Siu yeh is also common in some parts of southern China, and is known there as yeh siu (Chinese: 夜宵).
    6.00
    4 votes
    25
    Bao yu

    Bao yu

    Baoyu is the common Chinese name given to abalone and also the dried seafood product produced from the adductor muscle of abalone. In dried form, it is a highly priced and expensive ingredient used in Chinese cuisine. In certain regional Chinese cuisines, its status ranks with such priced ingredients as shark's fin, sea cucumber and bird's nest. Fresh abalone is rarely used in Chinese cuisine. It is often purchased in dehydrated form and rehydrated prior to cooking. Recently, the use of canned abalone in recipes has risen in popularity. Unlike Japanese cuisine, only the adductor muscle of the abalone is consumed in Chinese cuisine. Abalone innards are rarely, if ever, used in Chinese cooking.
    7.33
    3 votes
    26
    Dai pai dong

    Dai pai dong

    Dai pai dong is a type of open-air food stall once very popular in Hong Kong. The government registration name in Hong Kong is "cooked-food stalls", but dai pai dong literally means "restaurant with a big license plate", referring to its size of license which is bigger than other licensed street vendors. There are only 28 such stalls remaining in Hong Kong. A dai pai dong is characterised by its green-painted steel kitchen, untidy atmosphere, the lack of air conditioning, as well as a variety of low priced great-wok hei dishes. Regarded by some as part of the collective memory of Hong Kong people, official dai pai dong are scarce today, numbering only 28, situated in Central (10), Sham Shui Po (14), Wan Chai (1), Tai Hang (2), and Tai O (1). Although the term dai pai dong is often used generically to refer to any food stall operating on the roadside with foldable tables, chairs and no air-conditioning (like those on Temple Street), legally speaking the term can only refer to those 28 stalls which possess the "big licenses". Unlicensed food stalls, which provided cheap everyday food such as congee, rice and noodles to the general public of humble income, appeared as early as the
    7.33
    3 votes
    27
    Cream bun

    Cream bun

    Cream bun is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most standard pastries in Hong Kong. It can also be found in most Chinatown bakery shops overseas. The bun has either butter cream or whipped cream filling down the middle with coconut sprinkles on the outside. Variations of it include the "Cream Horn", a pastry in a spiral shape, much like a horn, filled with cream.
    8.50
    2 votes
    28
    Yum cha

    Yum cha

    Yum cha (simplified Chinese: 饮茶; traditional Chinese: 飲茶), also known as Ban ming (品茗), is a Chinese style morning or afternoon tea, which involves drinking Chinese tea and eating dim sum dishes. Yum cha in Cantonese literally means "drink tea", while ban ming is a more poetic "tasting of tea". In the U.S. and UK, the phrase dim sum is often used in place of yum cha; in Cantonese, dim sum (點心) refers to the wide range of small dishes, whereas yum cha, or "drinking tea", refers to the entire meal. The Cantonese name yum cha primarily refers to the tradition of morning tea in Cantonese cuisine exemplified by the traditional tea houses of Guangzhou. Due to the prevalence of Cantonese cuisine outside China, the Cantonese yum cha tradition can be found in many parts of the world. By analogy, yum cha is also used to refer to morning or afternoon teas in other Chinese cultural traditions, even though such meals have different native names. Similarly to a Western morning or afternoon tea, despite the name, yum cha is focused as much on the food items served with the tea as the tea itself. These food items are collectively known as "dim sum", a varied range of small dishes which may
    6.67
    3 votes
    29
    Chinese herb tea

    Chinese herb tea

    Chinese herb(al) tea, also known as medicinal herbal tea, is a kind of tea-soup made from purely Chinese medicinal herbs in Guangdong (Kwangtung), China. It usually tastes bitter or lightly sweet and its colour is typically black or dark brown, depending on what kinds of herbs are used. Although it is referred to as "tea", it seldom contains any part of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis). The climate of Guangdong is sub-tropical, with a primarily hot and humid climate. Cantonese people boil what are referred to as cooling herbs in Traditional Chinese medicine to made herbal tea, which is consumed in order to relieve the heat and humidity in the body. Therefore, Chinese herb tea is referred to as cold tea or cooling tea in the Chinese language. There are many kinds of cooling tea. Different kinds of tea are purported to cure or relieve a variety of diseases. Some teas are consumed to alleviate sore throats, some for flu, and others for a number of ailments. Cooling tea is quite popular in Guangdong, Macau and Hong Kong, as well as other subtropical locales. Many families make their tea at home. Some families are herb tea specialists who open their own shops, selling different kinds
    10.00
    1 votes
    30
    10.00
    1 votes
    31
    Ham and egg bun

    Ham and egg bun

    Ham and egg bun is a type of Chinese pastry. It contains a sheet of egg and ham. It is commonly found in Hong Kong as well as some Chinatown bakery shops overseas.
    10.00
    1 votes
    32
    Jin deui

    Jin deui

    Jian dui is a type of fried Chinese pastry made from glutinous rice flour. The pastry is coated with sesame seeds on the outside and is crisp and chewy. Inside the pastry is a large hollow, caused by the expansion of the dough. The hollow of the pastry is filled with a filling usually consisting of lotus paste (蓮蓉), or alternatively sweet black bean paste (hei dousha, 黑豆沙), or less commonly red bean paste (hong dousha, 紅豆沙). Depending on the region and cultural area, jian dui are known as matuan (麻糰) in northern China, ma yuan (麻圆) in northeast China, and jen dai (珍袋) in Hainan. In American Chinese restaurants and pastry shops, they are known as Sesame Seed Balls. They are also sometimes referred to as zhimaqiu (芝麻球), which translates to sesame balls in English. The origins of jian dui can be traced back to the Tang dynasty as a palace food in Chang'an, known as lüdui (碌堆). This food item was also recalled in a poem by the Tang poet Wang Fanzhi. With the southward migration of many peoples from central China, the jian dui was brought along and hence became part of southern Chinese cuisine. In Hong Kong, it is one of the most standard pastries. It can also be found in most Chinatown
    10.00
    1 votes
    33
    Flame on the iceberg

    Flame on the iceberg

    Flame on the Iceberg is a dessert popular in Hong Kong, similar to Baked Alaska in Western cuisine. The dessert is an ice cream ball in the middle of a sponge cake, with cream on the top. Whisky and syrup are poured over the top and the ball set alight before serving. Decades ago, the delicacy was served only in high-end hotel restaurants, but today it is commonly served in many Western restaurants and even in some cha chaan teng.
    5.25
    4 votes
    34
    Buddha's delight

    Buddha's delight

    Buddha's delight, often transliterated as Luóhàn zhāi, lo han jai, or lo hon jai, is a vegetarian dish well known in Chinese and Buddhist cuisine. It is sometimes also called Luóhàn cài (simplified Chinese: 罗汉菜; traditional Chinese: 羅漢菜). The dish is traditionally enjoyed by Buddhist monks who are vegetarians, but it has also grown in popularity throughout the world as a common dish available as a vegetarian option in Chinese restaurants. The dish consists of various vegetables and other vegetarian ingredients (sometimes with the addition of seafood or eggs), which are cooked in soy sauce-based liquid with other seasonings until tender. The specific ingredients used vary greatly both inside and outside Asia. In the name luóhàn zhāi, luóhàn – short for Ā luóhàn (simplified Chinese: 阿罗汉; traditional Chinese: 阿羅漢; pinyin: Ā LuóHàn) – is the Chinese transliteration of the Sanskrit arhat, meaning an enlightened, ascetic individual or the Buddha himself. Zhāi (simplified Chinese: 斋; traditional Chinese: 齋; pinyin: zhāi) means "vegetarian food" or "vegetarian diet." The dish is usually made with at least 10 ingredients, although more elaborate versions may comprise 18 or even 35
    8.00
    2 votes
    35

    One bowl with two pieces

    One bowl with two pieces (Chinese: 一盅兩件), is a slang term that has long been in the vernacular of Hong Kong tea culture, meaning "a bowl of tea with two dim sum". In the past, tea was not offered in a present-day teapot but a bowl in Cantonese restaurants. Dim Sum was not bite-sized. Instead, quite a number of them were simply big buns such that two of them easily filled up one's stomach. The legendary "雞球大包" (Lit. Chicken Ball Big Bun, meaning a bun with chicken filling) serves as an excellent example. This saying, however, is now rendered anachronistic under the heavy influence of the "bite-sized trend".
    6.33
    3 votes
    36
    Zha cai

    Zha cai

    Zha cai (literally "pressed vegetable") is a type of pickled mustard plant stem originating from Sichuan, China. Other transliterations might include cha tsai, tsa tsai; or jar choy, jar choi, ja choi, ja choy, or cha tsoi (from Cantonese). In English, it is commonly known as Sichuan vegetable, Szechwan vegetable, or Chinese pickled vegetable, although all of these terms may also refer to any of a number of other Chinese pickles, including the several other types in the Sichuan province itself. The pickle is made from the knobby, fist-sized, swollen green stem of Brassica juncea, subspecies tatsai. The stem is first salted, pressed, and dried before being rubbed with hot red chili paste and allowed to ferment in an earthenware jar. This preservation process is similar to that used to produce Korean kimchi. The taste is a combination of spicy, sour, and salty, while the aroma is similar to sauerkraut with hot chili paste. Its unique texture—crunchy, yet tender—can only be vaguely compared to Western pickled cucumbers. Zha cai is generally washed prior to use in order to remove the chili paste. Excess salt in the preserved vegetable is leached out by soaking in fresh water. Depending
    6.33
    3 votes
    37
    Crispy fried chicken

    Crispy fried chicken

    Crispy fried chicken is a standard dish in the Cantonese cuisine of southern China and Hong Kong. The chicken is fried in such a way that the skin is extremely crunchy, but the white meat is relatively soft. The dish often served with two side dishes, a pepper salt (椒鹽) and prawn crackers (蝦片). The pepper salt, colored dark white to gray, is dry-fried separately in a wok. Traditionally, it is to be eaten at night. It is also one of the traditional chicken dishes used in Chinese weddings and other Asian weddings.
    7.50
    2 votes
    38
    Mango pudding

    Mango pudding

    Mango pudding is a dessert that originated in India but is very popular in Hong Kong. There is very little variation in how mango pudding is prepared in both places. The dessert is also popular in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and Macau and is often found in dim sum restaurants worldwide. There are two types of mango pudding, fresh and factory-made. The fresh variant is prepared by the restaurant or eatery and consists of agar or gelatin, fresh mangoes, evaporated milk and sugar. In addition, some places add fresh fruit such as mango, strawberries, berries and kiwifruit as garnish. Served and eaten refrigerator cold. It has a rich and creamy texture. Factory-made mango pudding does not contain fresh mangoes and instead, consists of mango essence and either gelatin or agar. Serves 3-4 Canned mangoes in its puree or pulp form may be used instead of fresh mango. The recipe requires milk although the type of milk varies - white milk, evaporated milk, or any other type of milk may be used instead of coconut milk. Whipping cream or other higher fat content milks may be used to create a richer tasting pudding. Gelatin is not required - agar, derived from seaweed, may be used
    7.50
    2 votes
    39
    Swiss Wing

    Swiss Wing

    Swiss Wing is the name given to a kind of sweet soy sauce-flavored chicken wings served in some restaurants in Hong Kong. It is marinated in sauce made up of soy sauce, sugar, Chinese wine, and spices. Despite the name "Swiss," it is unrelated to Switzerland. Instead, it is believed to have originated in either Hong Kong or Guangzhou. There are no concrete answers as to the source of the name of the dish. One story goes that a Westerner came across the dish "sweetened soya sauce chicken wings" in a restaurant, and asked a Chinese waiter what that was. The waiter, who did not speak perfect English, introduced the dish as Sweet Wing. The customer misinterpreted sweet as Swiss, and the name was used ever since. However, this story may be a mere urban legend. Some claim that the dish was invented by a local restaurant, the Tai Ping Koon (太平館). It is a common practice in Hong Kong restaurants to name a new dish after a place, which may or may not have any connection with the dish itself at all. Swiss Wing is also features in the TVB cooking variety series So Good.
    7.50
    2 votes
    40
    Cart noodle

    Cart noodle

    Cart noodle is a kind of à la carte noodle which became popular in Hong Kong in the 1950s through independent street vendors operating on roadsides and in public housing estates in low-income districts, using carts. Many street vendors have vanished but the name and style of noodle endures as a cultural icon. With many immigrants arriving from mainland China during the 1950s, hawkers would sell food out of a cart roaming the streets. Some vendors specialising in cooked noodles would sell them with an assortment of toppings and styles. Historically, the cart frames were assembled out of wood with metallic basins. It allowed the heat inside to cook the ingredients. In the old days, it was possible to receive large quantities for a cheap price. The noodles were considered "cheap and nasty". Cost was generally low to appeal to the average citizens. It was known for its poor hygiene. As such, they were also commonly referred to as "filthy noodle" (嗱喳麵). When hygiene standards rose, many street vendors (licensed or otherwise) have vanished. The name and style of the noodle endures, and remain widely available in low- to mid-end eateries. The price may vary depending on the combination of
    6.00
    3 votes
    41
    Cha chaan teng

    Cha chaan teng

    A cha chaan teng (lit.: tea food hall) meaning tea restaurant, is commonly found in Greater China, including particularly Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan and parts of Guangdong. They are known for eclectic and affordable menus, which include many dishes from Hong Kong cuisine and Hong Kong-style Western cuisine. Since the 1980s they can also be found in the Chinatown districts of many Western countries like Australia, Canada, United Kingdom and the United States. Cha chaan teng establishments provide tea (usually weak tea) called "clear tea" (清茶 cing1 caa4), to customers as soon as they are seated. Some patrons use the hot tea to wash their utensils. The name, literally "tea restaurant", serves to distinguish itself from Western restaurants that provide water to customers instead of tea. The "tea" in the name refers to the inexpensive black tea, not the traditional Chinese tea served in traditional dim sum restaurants and teahouses (茶樓 caa4 lau4). Moreover, some cha chaan tengs prefer the use of the word "café" in their names. The "tea" may also refer to tea drinks, such as the Hong Kong-style milk tea and cold lemon tea, which are very popular in cha chaan tengs. The older generations in
    6.00
    3 votes
    42
    Deuk Deuk Tong

    Deuk Deuk Tong

    Deuk Deuk Tong or commonly referred to as Ding Ding Tong is a type of traditional candy in Hong Kong. It is a hard maltose candy with sesame and ginger flavours. The sweet is made by first melting maltose, then adding to it various ingredients and continuously stirring the mixture. Before the mixture solidifies, it is put on a metal stick and pulled into a line shape, then coiled into the shape of a plate. In Cantonese, deuk means chiselling, breaking things into pieces. When street hawkers sold the candy, it was necessary for them to break apart its original shape with a pair flat chisels, namely "deuk". Chiselling makes noise and attracts children to buy. Deuk Deuk Tong was thus named (Tong means "candy" or "sugar" in Cantonese). Today, in order to cater to young people's tastes, different flavours of Deuk Deuk Tong are also made, including coconut, chocolate, mango, banana, and strawberry flavours.
    9.00
    1 votes
    43
    Dried shredded squid

    Dried shredded squid

    Dried shredded squid is a dried, seasoned, seafood product commonly found in coastal Asian countries, Russia and Hawai'i, made from squid or cuttlefish. The snack is also referred to as shredded squid, dried seasoned squid, prepared rolled squid or sun dried squid, and dried shredded cuttlefish. It should not be confused with regular dried squid found in the Philippines. Historically, squid is common in Pacific coastal regions of East Asia and Southeast Asia. Only after the packaged form began shipping to English speaking regions, did the translated English-language name "dried shredded squid" get imprinted on packages. The snack was popularized, sold and consumed regularly in Hong Kong during the 1970s. Shredded squid began being sold in Macau as an addition to their almond biscuit. In Japan, dried shredded squid is popularly served as an otsumami (snack consumed while drinking alcohol). In Korean cuisine, dried shredded squid is eaten as anju (food to eat while drinking), and as banchan (small side dishes) such as the dish ojingeochae bokkeum, which is made by stir-frying shredded dried squid seasoned with a mixture of gochujang (chili pepper paste), garlics, and mulyeot
    9.00
    1 votes
    44
    Pineapple bun

    Pineapple bun

    A pineapple bun is a kind of sweet pastry popular in Hong Kong, Macau, and some other areas in southern China including Guangzhou and Shenzen, and also in various Chinese communities around the world. They can also be found in bakeries in Taiwan or Vancouver. It is known in Cantonese as bo lo baau, in which "bo lo" means "pineapple", and "baau" refers to a kind of bun-like item in Chinese cuisine. It is commonly found in Chinese bakeries. The top of the pineapple bun (the part which is made to resemble a pineapple) is made of a dough similar to that used to make sugar cookies, which consists of sugar, eggs, flour, and lard. As such, it is crunchy and is quite sweet compared to the bread underneath. The bread dough underneath is the same used in Chinese style Western breads, which is a softer and sweeter dough compared to Western breads. It is a popular pastry for breakfast or afternoon tea. Although the pastry is known as "pineapple bun", the traditional version contains no pineapple. The name "pineapple bun" actually originated from the fact that its sugary top crust is cooked to a golden-brown color, and because its checkered top resembles the epicarp of a pineapple. It is very
    9.00
    1 votes
    45
    XO sauce

    XO sauce

    XO sauce is a spicy seafood sauce invented in Hong Kong, commonly used in Chinese cuisines especially in southern China such as Guangdong province. Developed in the 1980s in Hong Kong for Cantonese cuisine, it is made of roughly chopped dried seafoods including scallops, dried fish and shrimp and cooked with chili peppers, onions, garlic and oil. Once a prestigious concoction confined to gourmet seafood restaurants, XO sauce can now be found as a pre-made product on grocery store shelves, produced by Asian food companies like Lee Kum Kee, ANJI, and Amoy. The name XO sauce comes from fine XO (extra-old) cognac, which is a popular Western liquor in Hong Kong and considered by many to be a chic product there. In addition the term XO is often used in the popular culture of Hong Kong to denote high quality, prestige, and luxury. In fact, XO sauce has been marketed in the same manner as the French liquor, using packaging of similar colour schemes. XO sauce can be used as a condiment on the side of main dishes or used in cooking to enhance the flavour of fish, meats, vegetables, and otherwise bland foods such as tofu or noodles. Home cooks often use this sauce as the chief flavorant for
    9.00
    1 votes
    46
    Cocktail bun

    Cocktail bun

    The cocktail bun is a Hong Kong-style bread with a sweet filling of shredded coconut. It is one of several iconic types of baked goods originating from Hong Kong. The cocktail bun is said to have been created in the 1950s in Hong Kong, when the proprietors of a bakery resisted the wasteful disposal of unsold but perfectly edible buns. The solution was to incorporate these buns into a new product to be sold fresh. The day-old buns were ground up, with sugar and coconut added in, to create a tasty filling mixture; fresh bread dough was wrapped around this mixture to make the first filled "cocktail bun". Its name is said to have come from comparing the baker's mixture of hodgepodge of ingredients to a bartender's exotic mixture of alcoholic liquors, both formulating a "cocktail". The Chinese name is a literal translation of "cocktail", and is called a "chicken-tail bun". Originally, the filling was made of blending day-old buns with granulated sugar. Newer versions saw the addition of shredded coconut and butter or margarine to the recipe, now key ingredients in the cocktail bun filling. Each bun is approximately 6 to 8 inches long and 2 to 3 inches high in the shape of a small
    7.00
    2 votes
    47
    Got fan

    Got fan

    Gotfan is a traditional pudding-like hot soup within Chinese cuisine. It is a considered a more traditional and home-style dish in Hong Kong and China, and is rarely served restaurants. The soup recipe is simple as it only requires the boiling of water and powder extracted from plant roots. Sugar is added for sweetness. The thickness varies depending on the ratio of water and powder. More powder and less water equals more thickness. It is mostly considered a healthy snack. Sometimes it is used to cleanse digestive system due to its purity. Different plants offer different powder. The soup ends up looking clear, white or even light green. In all cases, it is served hot.
    7.00
    2 votes
    48
    Hong Kong-style milk tea

    Hong Kong-style milk tea

    Hong Kong-style milk tea is a beverage originating from Hong Kong consisting of black tea with evaporated milk or condensed milk. It is usually part of lunch in Hong Kong tea culture. Although originating from Hong Kong, it is also frequently found overseas in restaurants serving Hong Kong cuisine and Hong Kong-style western cuisine. In the show Top Eat 100 aired on 4 February 2012, Hong Kong-style milk tea is ranked number 4 in Hong Kong cuisines and Hong Kongers consume a total of 900 million glasses/cups a year. Hong Kong-style milk tea originates from British colonial rule over Hong Kong. The British practice of afternoon tea, where black tea is served with milk and sugar, grew popular in Hong Kong. Milk tea is similar, except with evaporated or condensed milk instead of ordinary milk. It is called "milk tea" (Chinese: 奶茶, Cantonese naai5 cha4) to distinguish it from "Chinese tea" (Chinese: 茶, Cantonese cha4), which is served plain. Hong Kong-style milk tea is made of a mix of several types of black tea (the proportion of which is usually a "commercial secret" for some milk tea vendors, often Pu Lei and a type of Ceylon tea), evaporated milk, and sugar, the last of which is
    7.00
    2 votes
    49
    Taro cake

    Taro cake

    Taro cake is a Chinese dish made from the vegetable taro. While it is denser in texture than radish cakes, both these savory cakes made in a similar ways, with rice flour as the main ingredient. When served in dim sum cuisine, it is cut into square-shaped slices and pan-fried before serving. It is found in Hong Kong, China, and overseas Chinatowns restaurants. Other ingredients often include pork and Chinese black mushroom, or even Chinese sausages. It is usually topped with chopped scallions. The pan fried square taro cake is semi-crunchy on the outside and medium-soft on the inside. It is also the most consistent version with more or less the same formula in East and Southeast Asia, or among overseas Chinese communities. The other version is the more home-style baked version. Usually it uses the same ingredients and steamed for long periods of time in a deep pan until it is ultra soft and pasty. The formula varies greatly depending on the family recipe or regional tastes. Some restaurants offer taro cakes cut into small cubes as part of a main course appetizer to a major Chinese cuisine. These are sometimes frozen to a more solid state, though it is not nearly as common as the
    7.00
    2 votes
    50
    Sea cucumber

    Sea cucumber

    Sea cucumbers are marine animals of the class Holothuroidea used in fresh or dried form in various cuisines. The creature and the food product are commonly known as bêche-de-mer (lit. "sea-spade") in French, trepang (or trīpang) in Indonesian, namako in Japanese and in Tagalog it is called balatan. In Malaysian it is known as the gamat. Most cultures in East and Southeast Asia regard sea cucumbers as a delicacy. There are a number of dishes made with sea cucumber as this ingredient is expected to have a strong cultural emphasis on health. In most dishes, the sea cucumber has a slippery texture. Common ingredients that go with sea cucumber dishes include winter melon, dried scallop, kai-lan, Shiitake mushroom, and Chinese cabbage. Sea cucumbers destined for food are traditionally harvested by hand from small watercraft; a process anglicised into "trepanging" (after the Indonesian noun trepang). They are dried for preservation purposes and have to be rehydrated by boiling and soaking in water for several days. They are mainly used as an ingredient in Chinese cuisine soups or stews. There are many commercially important species of sea cucumber that are harvested and dried for export
    5.33
    3 votes
    51
    Lai fun

    Lai fun

    Lai fun is a variety of Chinese noodle. It is commonly found in Pearl River Delta Region, Hong Kong and to some degree among overseas Chinatowns. Its name comes from the Cantonese language. Lai fun may also be referred to as Bánh canh by Vietnamese, in which case, it is made from rice flour and tapioca starch. Lai fun noodles are made from rice flour and/or tapioca starch and are available in short or long varieties. Lai fun has a very similar appearance with silver needle noodles. One way to distinguish the two is to look at the ends of each lai fun piece. The ends of lai fun noodles are often cut straight down as opposed to leaving a tapering "tail."
    6.50
    2 votes
    52
    Bird's nest soup

    Bird's nest soup

    Bird's nest soup is a delicacy in Chinese cuisine. A few species of swift, the cave swifts, are renowned for building the saliva nests used to produce the unique texture of this soup. The edible bird's nests are among the most expensive animal products consumed by humans. The nests have been used in Chinese cooking for over 400 years, most often as bird's nest soup. The Chinese name for bird's nest soup, yàn wō (燕窝), translates literally as "swallow's nest". When dissolved in water, the birds' nests have a gelatinous texture used for soup or sweet tong sui. It is mostly referred to as "yan wo" unless references are made to the salty or sweet soup in Chinese cuisine. The most heavily harvested nests are from the Edible-nest Swiftlet or White-nest Swiftlet (Aerodramus fuciphagus) and the Black-nest Swiftlet (Aerodramus maximus). The white nests and the red nests are supposedly rich in nutrients, which are traditionally believed to provide health benefits, such as aiding digestion, raising libido, improving the voice, alleviating asthma, improving focus, and an overall benefit to the immune system. Most nests are built during the breeding season by the male swiftlet over a period of
    8.00
    1 votes
    53
    Fish ball

    Fish ball

    Fish balls are a common food in southern China and overseas Chinese communities made from surimi (魚漿, yújiāng). They are also common in Scandinavia, where they are usually made from cod or haddock. 魚蛋 (literally "fish eggs") are used at street hawker stalls and dai pai dong in Hong Kong. 魚丸 (yú wán) and 鱼圆 (yú yuán) are more commonly used in Singapore and Malaysia. Fish balls made in Scandinavia are similar to meatballs, only with fish meat instead of pork or beef. Meatballs made in Asia differ significantly in texture to their European counterparts. Instead of grinding and forming meats, meat used for making meatballs is pounded, which lends a smooth texture to the meatballs. This is also often the case for fillings in steamed dishes. Pounding, unlike grinding, uncoils and stretches previously wound and tangled protein strands in meat. In Faroe Islands, fish balls are called "knettir" and made with ground fish and fat. In the Fuzhou area, "Fuzhou fish ball" (福州鱼丸) is made from fish and has minced pork filling within the fish ball. There are two kinds of fish balls in Hong Kong. One is smaller in size, yellow in colour, made with cheaper meat, and is sold on a bamboo skewer with
    8.00
    1 votes
    54
    Nuomici

    Nuomici

    Nuomici is a type of Chinese pastry. It is one of the most standard pastries in Hong Kong. It can also be found in most Chinatown bakery shops overseas. It is also referred to as glutinous rice dumpling. The glutinous rice ball can be dusted with dried coconut on the outside. The outer layer is made of a rice flour dough and the inside is typically filled with a sweet filling. The most common fillings are sugar with coconut and crumbled peanuts, red bean paste, and black sesame seed paste.
    8.00
    1 votes
    55
    Put chai ko

    Put chai ko

    Put chai ko is a snack which originates from Hong Kong. The pudding cake is palm size and is sweet in taste. It is soft, but can hold its molded shape outside of a bowl or small bowl. The cake is made from different forms of steamed sugar and select ingredients. The snack is also known by a number of English names, including Put chai pudding, Earthen bowl cake, Bootjaigo, Red bean pudding, Bood chai ko and the more direct but unofficial translation of Sticky rice pudding. The pudding is made like other traditional Cantonese steam cakes. It is said to have originated in the Chinese county of Taishan, which is 140 km west of Hong Kong. The pudding reached its popularity peak in the early to mid-1980s when hawkers sold it all over the streets in their push carts. At the time, there were only a small handful of flavors. One of the dish's cultural trademarks is that it is served in a porcelain bowl or an aluminium cup. The snack is still available today in select Chinese pastry or snack shops, or from street hawkers. The pudding can also be served like an ice pop, held up by two bamboo sticks.
    8.00
    1 votes
    56
    Saang mein

    Saang mein

    Saang mein is a type of Chinese noodle found in Hong Kong. It is often available among overseas Chinatowns. It is made of wheat flour, tapioca flour, salt, potassium carbonate, and water. Saang mein can be cooked quickly similarly to ramen noodles. It is known for a more smooth and soapy texture. It can be eaten plain or with additional sesame oil. Vegetables like kai-lan can be added. The noodle does have a wheat taste. It is served hot.
    6.00
    2 votes
    57
    Wonton

    Wonton

    Not to be confused with Wanton A wonton (also spelled wantan, wanton, or wuntun in transcription from Cantonese; Mandarin: húntún [xwə̌n.tʰwə̌n]) is a type of dumpling commonly found in a number of Chinese cuisines. Wontons are made by spreading a square wrapper (a dough skin made of flour, egg, water, and salt) flat in the palm of one's hand, placing a small amount of filling in the center, and sealing the wonton into the desired shape by compressing the wrapper's edges together with the fingers. Adhesion may be improved by moistening the wrapper's inner edges, typically by dipping a fingertip into water and running it across the dry dough to dissolve the extra flour. As part of the sealing process, air is pressed out of the interior to avoid rupturing the wonton from internal pressure when cooked. The most common filling is ground pork with a small amount of flour added as a binder. The mixture is seasoned with salt, spices, and often garlic or finely chopped green onion. Factory-made, frozen varieties are sold in supermarkets. Commonly, they are handmade at the point of sale in markets or small restaurants by the proprietor while awaiting customers. In markets, they are sold by
    6.00
    2 votes
    58
    Banana roll

    Banana roll

    Banana roll is a common Chinese pastry found in Hong Kong, and may occasionally be found in some overseas Chinatowns. The pastry is soft and made with glutinous rice. Ingredients may vary depending on where it is purchased. Each roll is a vanilla flavored circular tube, slightly bigger than an adult sized index finger, thus resembling banana. Sometimes it may have a cinnamon swirl filling. At other times it may have a filling that consists of a very ripe (but not rotten) banana diced finely. Occasionally the more traditional red bean paste may be used.
    7.00
    1 votes
    59
    Egg tart

    Egg tart

    The egg tart or egg custard tart (commonly romanized as dan tat) is a kind of custard tart pastry commonly found in Hong Kong and other Asian countries, which consists of an outer pastry crust that is filled with egg custard and baked. It is listed at number 16 on World's 50 most delicious foods compiled by CNN Go in 2011. Custard tarts were introduced in Hong Kong in the 1940s by cha chaan tengs. They were then introduced in western cafes and bakeries to compete with dim sum restaurants, particularly for yum cha. During the economic boom of the 1950s and 1960s, Lu Yu Teahouse took the lead with the mini-egg tart. Ironically, mini egg tarts are now a common dim sum dish and are richer than those served in bakeries. One theory suggests Hong Kong egg tarts are an adaptation of English custard tarts. Guangdong had more frequent contact with the West, in particular Britain, than the rest of China. As a former British colony, Hong Kong adopted some British cuisine. Another theory suggests that egg tarts evolved from the very similar Portuguese egg tart pastries, known as pastel de nata, traveling to Hong Kong via the Portuguese colony of Macau. Today, egg tarts come in many variations
    7.00
    1 votes
    60
    Red bean ice

    Red bean ice

    Red bean ice is a drink commonly found in Hong Kong. It is usually served in restaurants like cha chaan teng (simplified Chinese: 茶餐厅; traditional Chinese: 茶餐廳; pinyin: chácāntīng). The standard ingredients include azuki beans, light rock sugar syrup, and evaporated milk. It is often topped with ice cream to become a dessert. Red bean ice tea has been around since the 1970s. The later iterations of red bean bubble tea is a derivative. Some places which serve the drink add in chewy flavoured jelly.
    7.00
    1 votes
    61
    Stinky tofu

    Stinky tofu

    Stinky tofu or chòu dòufu is a form of fermented tofu that has a strong odor. It is a popular snack in East and Southeast Asia, particularly mainland China, Malaysia, Taiwan and Hong Kong and in East Asian enclaves elsewhere where it is usually found homemade, at night markets or roadside stands, or as a side dish in lunch bars rather than in restaurants. Unlike cheese, stinky tofu fermentation does not have fixed formula for starter bacteria; wide regional and individual variations exist in manufacture and preparation. The traditional method for producing stinky tofu is to prepare a brine made from fermented milk, vegetables, and meat; the brine can also include dried shrimp, amaranth greens, mustard greens, bamboo shoots, and Chinese herbs. The brine fermentation can take as long as several months. Although stinky tofu is very popular in East and Southeast Asia, not many households prepare stinky tofu brine at home due to its strong odor, especially in metro-residential areas. Even though the traditional method is still widely practiced by street vendors, modern factories often use quicker methods to mass produce stinky tofu. Fresh tofu is marinated in prepared brine for only a
    5.50
    2 votes
    62
    Water chestnut cake

    Water chestnut cake

    Water chestnut cake is a sweet Cantonese dim sum dish made of shredded Chinese water chestnut. When served during dim sum the cake is usually cut into square-shaped slices and pan-fried before serving. The cake is soft, but holds its shape after the frying. Sometimes the cake is made with chopped water chestnuts embedded into each square piece with the vegetable being visible. One of the main trademark characteristics of the dish is its translucent appearance. It is one of the standard dishes found in the dim sum cuisine of Hong Kong, and is also available in select overseas Chinatown restaurants.
    5.50
    2 votes
    63
    Char siu

    Char siu

    Char siu (also spelled chasu, cha siu, chashao, and char siew), otherwise known as barbecued meat (usually pork) in China or Chinese-flavored barbecued meat outside China, is a popular way to flavor and prepare pork in Cantonese cuisine. It is classified as a type of siu mei, Cantonese roasted meat. It is listed at number 28 on World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Go in 2011. Pork cut used for Char siu can vary, but it uses a few main cuts: "Char siu" literally means "fork burn/roast" (Char being fork (both noun and verb) and siu being burn/roast) after the traditional cooking method for the dish: long strips of seasoned boneless pork are skewered with long forks and placed in a covered oven or over a fire. The meat, typically a shoulder cut of domestic pork (although in ancient times wild boar and other available meats were also used), is seasoned with a mixture of honey, five-spice powder, hóngfǔrǔ (red fermented bean curd), lǎochōu (dark soy sauce), hoisin sauce, red food colouring (not a traditional ingredient but very common in today's preparations) and sherry or rice wine (optional). These seasonings turn the exterior layer of the meat dark red,
    5.00
    2 votes
    64
    Hot pot

    Hot pot

    Hot pot (simplified Chinese: 火锅; traditional Chinese: 火鍋; pinyin: huǒ guō), less commonly Chinese fondue or steamboat, refers to several East Asian varieties of stew, consisting of a simmering metal pot of stock at the center of the dining table. While the hot pot is kept simmering, ingredients are placed into the pot and are cooked at the table. Typical hot pot dishes include thinly sliced meat, leafy vegetables, mushrooms, wontons, egg dumplings, and seafood. Vegetables, fish and meat should be fresh. The cooked food is usually eaten with a dipping sauce. In many areas, hot pot meals are often eaten in the winter. The Chinese hot pot has a history of more than 1,000 years. Hot pot cooking seems to have spread to northern China during the Tang Dynasty (AD 618-906). In time, regional variations developed with different ingredients such as seafood. By the Qing Dynasty, the hot pot became popular throughout most of China. Today in many modern homes, particularly in the big cities, the traditional coal-heated steamboat or hot pot has been replaced by electric, gas or induction cooker versions. Because hot pot styles change so much from region to region, many different ingredients are
    4.50
    2 votes
    65
    Wonton noodles

    Wonton noodles

    Wonton noodles [Mandarin: Yun-tun mian; Cantonese: Wan-tan Min], sometimes called wanton mee ("wanton" is a Cantonese word for dumpling while noodles in Hokkien is "mee" or in Cantonese, "min") is a Cantonese noodle dish which is popular in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, and Malaysia. The dish is usually served in a hot broth, garnished with leafy vegetables, and wonton dumplings. The types of leafy vegetables used are usually kailan also known as Chinese kale. Another type of dumpling known as shui jiao is sometimes served in place of wonton. It contains prawns, chicken or pork, spring onions with some chefs adding mushroom and black fungus. In Hong Kong, wonton noodles are usually served in steaming hot soup with shrimp wontons and garnished with leafy vegetables. There are plenty of variations of this popular Cantonese dish, with different toppings and garnishes. For example, the soup and wontons in a separate bowl, the noodles being served relatively dry, with the toppings and garnishes, dressed with sauce, dipping the noodles in the soup to eat it. There are four distinct features: First, the wontons are predominantly prawn, with small amounts of minced pork, or no
    4.50
    2 votes
    66
    Bakkwa

    Bakkwa

    Bakkwa (Hokkien: 肉干; BP: bbāhgnuā), also known as rougan, is a Chinese salty-sweet dried meat product similar to jerky, made in the form of flat thin sheets. Bakkwa is made with a meat preservation and preparation technique from China. The general method for production have remained virtually unchanged throughout the centuries, but the techniques have been improved. It is often made with beef, pork, or mutton, which are prepared with spices, sugar, salt, and soy sauce, while dried on racks at around 50°C to 60°C. However, nowadays, products with a softer texture, lighter color, and less sugar are preferred. In Malaysia, Singapore, Riau Islands and the Philippines bakkwa or bagua is the most widely used name derived from the Hokkien Chinese dialect. Cantonese speakers use the term yuhk gōn', Anglicised version long yok, while in China and Taiwan the product is more commonly known as rougan. Commercially available versions are sometimes labeled as "barbecued pork," "dried pork," or "pork jerky." Bakkwa is particularly popular as a snack in East Asia and Southeast Asia. In Beidou, Taiwan, it is regarded as one of the three pork delicacies. In Malaysia and Singapore, bakkwa has become
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    Cha siu bao

    Cha siu bao

    Cha siu bao or char siu bao is a Cantonese barbecue-pork-filled bun (baozi). The buns are filled with barbecue-flavored cha siu pork. They are served as a type of dim sum during yum cha and are sometimes sold in Chinese bakeries. There are two major kinds of cha siu bao: steamed (蒸, zheng) and baked (烤, kao). Steamed cha siu bao has a white exterior, while its baked counterpart is browned and glazed. Cha siu refers to the pork filling; the word bao simply means "bun." Although visually similar to other types of steamed baozi, the dough of steamed cha siu bao is unique since it makes use of both yeast and baking powder as leavening. This unique mix of leavening gives the dough of cha siu bao the texture of a slightly dense, but fine soft bread. Encased in the center of the bun is tender, sweet, slow-roasted pork tenderloin. This cha siu is diced, and then mixed into a syrupy mixture of oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, roasted sesame seed oil, rice vinegar, shaoxing wine or dry sherry, soy sauce, sugar and cornstarch. In Hawaiian pidgin, the item is called Manapua. The word does not mean "chewed-up" (mana) "pork" (puaʻa), as its spelling suggests. Rather, the current form is a shortening
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    Jerky

    Jerky

    Jerky is lean meat that has been trimmed of fat, cut into strips, and then dried to prevent spoilage. Normally, this drying includes the addition of salt, to prevent bacteria from developing on the meat before sufficient moisture has been removed. The word "jerky" is a corruption of the Spanish charqui which is from the Quechua word ch'arki. which means to burn (meat). All that is needed to produce basic "jerky" is a low-temperature drying method, and salt to inhibit bacterial growth. Modern manufactured jerky is normally marinated in a seasoned spice rub or liquid, and dried, dehydrated or smoked with low heat (usually under 70 °C/160 °F). Some makers still use just salt and sun-dry fresh sliced meat to make jerky. Some product manufacturers finely grind meat, mix in seasonings, and press the meat-paste into flat shapes prior to drying. The resulting jerky from the above methods would be a salty and/or savory snack. However, often a sweet or semi-sweet recipe is used, with sugar being a major ingredient (in contrast to biltong which is a dried meat product that utilizes the acid in vinegar rather than salt to inhibit bacterial growth when drying the meat). Jerky is ready-to-eat
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    69
    Poon choi

    Poon choi

    Poon Choi (pronounced: [pʰun˩ʦʰɔy]), also known as pun choi or Big Bowl Feast, is a traditional type of dish originating from Hong Kong village Hakka cuisine. It may also be found in different parts of Hong Kong. It is served in wooden, porcelain or metal basins. It was said that Poon Choi was invented during the late Song Dynasty. When Mongol troops invaded Song China, the young Emperor fled to the area around Guangdong Province and Hong Kong. To serve the Emperor as well as his army, the locals collected all their best food available, cooked it, and because there were not enough containers, put the resulting dishes in wooden washbasins. In this way, Poon Choi was invented. Ip, Stephen, The Standard, Friday, April 23, 2010, Volume 3, No. 153, p. 33. Poon Choi includes ingredients such as pork, beef, lamb, chicken, duck, abalone, ginseng, shark fin, fish maw, prawn, crab, dried mushroom, fishballs, squid, dried eel, dried shrimp, pigskin, beancurd and Chinese radish. Poon Choi is special in that it is composed of many layers of different ingredients. It is also eaten layer by layer instead of "stirring everything up", but impatient diners may snatch up the popular daikon radish at
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    70
    Almond biscuit

    Almond biscuit

    Almond biscuit (also called almond cake or almond cookie) is a type of Chinese pastry. The biscuit is one of the most standard pastries in Canton, and can also be found in some Chinatown bakery shops overseas. Most that are sold overseas are imported from Macau. The biscuits are small with no filling by default. It is also crunchy, sometimes crumbling on first bite. In Macau, the snack has been one of the most popular specialty products. Especially near the Ruins of the Cathedral of St. Paul, streets are packed with 10 to 20 stores all selling different flavors of almond biscuits next to one another. Hawkers line up on the street to push the merchandise. It is recommended on the official Macau tourism website as a famous Macanese snack. Koi Kei almond cookies are one of the famous brands from Macau.
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    Almond jelly

    Almond jelly

    Almond jelly, almond pudding, or almond tofu (杏仁豆腐) is a popular dessert in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, and Japan and often found in dim sum restaurants worldwide, commonly garnished with wolfberries. The name is sometimes misleading, as the dish is often prepared using apricot kernels (杏仁), not almonds – though the flavor is similar – and in most recipes does not use soy beans (as are used in tofu, 豆腐), though the consistency is similar. In the traditional recipe, the primary ingredient is southern Chinese almond (南杏, which is in fact apricot kernel) or sweet Chinese almond, soaked and ground with water. The almond milk is extracted, sweetened, and heated with a gelling agent (usually agar). When chilled, the almond milk mixture solidifies to the consistency of a soft gelatin dessert. Almond jelly can be made using instant mix or from scratch. Although the agar-based recipe is vegan, there are numerous nontraditional recipes that are not. Most of them are based on dairy products and a small amount of almond-flavored extract. Gelatin is also a common substitute for agar. There is also an "instant" almond-flavored soy-based powder with a coagulating agent, which
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    72
    Coconut bar

    Coconut bar

    Coconut bar is a refrigerated dim sum dessert found in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Southern China and in overseas Chinatowns. It is sweet and has a soft, gelatin-like texture but is white in color rather than translucent like gelatin. It is sometimes referred to as coconut pudding despite not really being a pudding. The dessert is made of coconut milk (preferably freshly made) and set with a mixture of tang flour (wheat starch) and corn starch, or a mixture of agar agar and gelatin. It is sweetened, and sometimes sprinkled with desiccated coconuts. The texture varies from silky springy (if gelatin and agar agar is used as setting agent) to creamy and texture (if wheat starch and corn starch are used to set the dessert) depending on individual preparations, and the standard dim sum version has no filling.
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    73
    Douhua

    Douhua

    Douhua (Chinese: 豆花, dòuhuā) or doufuhua (Chinese: 豆腐花, dòufuhuā) is a Chinese dessert made with very soft tofu. It is also referred to as tofu pudding and soybean pudding. Tofu is thought to have originated in ancient China during the Western Han Dynasty. Chinese people have developed and enriched the recipes for tofu dishes on the basis of their own tastes, such as mapo tofu, stinky tofu, pickled tofu and uncongealed tofu pudding, etc. In northern China, douhua is often eaten with soy sauce, thus resulting in a savory flavor. Northern Chinese often refer to douhua as doufunao (Chinese: 豆腐腦; pinyin: dòufunǎo; literally "tofu brains"). Douhua in Sichuan is often made without any sugar at all, then served by carrying pole or bicycle vendors with a number of condiments such as chili oil, soy sauce, Sichuan pepper, scallions, and nuts, and is sometimes eaten along with white rice as well. Douhua is served only with sugar in Hubei. It is referred to as either doufunao (Chinese: 豆腐腦) or doufuhua (Chinese: 豆腐花). In Taiwanese cuisine, douhua is served with sweet toppings like cooked peanuts, adzuki beans, cooked oatmeal, tapioca, mung beans, and a syrup flavored with ginger or almond.
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    Roast goose

    Roast goose

    Roast goose is a dish found within Chinese and European cuisine. In southern China, roast goose is a variety of siu mei, or roasted meat dishes, within Cantonese cuisine. It is made by roasting geese with seasoning in a charcoal furnace at high temperature. Roasted geese of high quality have crisp skin with juicy and tender meat. Slices of roasted goose are generally served with plum sauce. Roast goose, as served in Hong Kong, is no different from its counterpart in the neighboring Guangdong Province of southern China, but, due to its cost, some Hong Kong restaurants offer roast duck instead. English & German-speaking people roasted geese traditionally only on appointed holidays. Generally replaced by the turkey in the United Kingdom it is eaten on occasions as is the turkey in the United States. Roasted goose is a favoured Christmas dish as well as commonly eaten on St. Martin's Day. The most prevalent stuffings are apples, sweet chestnuts, prunes and onions. Typical seasonings include salt and pepper, mugwort, or marjoram. Also used are red cabbage, Klöße, and gravy, which are used to garnish the goose. Another version of roast goose is the Alsatian-style with Bratwurst-stuffing
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    Siu mei

    Siu mei

    Siu mei is the generic name in Cantonese cuisine given to meats roasted on spits over an open fire or a huge wood burning rotisserie oven. It creates a unique, deep barbecue flavor and the roast is usually coated with a flavorful sauce (a different sauce is used for each meat) before roasting. 66,000 tons are consumed in Hong Kong each year. Usually meat of this type is purchased as take-out as siu mei takes a great deal of resources to prepare, and few families in Hong Kong or China have the equipment for it. Shops generally have large ovens and rotisserie-like utilities for cooking the meat. Families order or prepare their own plain white rice to accompany the siu mei. A siu mei meal usually consists of one box comprising half meat and half rice, and maybe some vegetables. Certain dishes, such as orange cuttlefish, or white cut chicken, are not roasted at all, but are often prepared and sold alongside BBQ roasted meats in siu mei establishments, hence they are generally classified as siu mei dishes.
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    White cut chicken

    White cut chicken

    White cut chicken or white sliced chicken is a siu mei. Unlike most other meats in the siu mei category, this particular dish is not roasted. The chicken is salt marinated and is cooked in its entirety in hot water or chicken broth with ginger. Other variations season the cooking liquid with additional ingredients, such as the white part of the green onion, cilantro stems or star anise. When the water starts to boil, the heat is turned off, allowing the chicken to cook in the residual heat for around 30 minutes. The chicken's skin will remain light coloured, nearly white and the meat will be quite tender, moist, and flavourful. The dish can be served "rare" in which the meat is cooked thoroughly but a pinkish dark red blood secretes from the bones. This is a more traditional version of white cut chicken that is rarely served in Chinese restaurants anymore. The chicken is usually cooled before cutting into pieces. The chicken is served in pieces, with the skin and bone, sometimes garnished with cilantro, leeks and/or a slice of ginger. A classic dip is made by combining finely minced ginger, green onion, salt and hot oil. Additional dips can be soy sauce, oyster sauce, or a chili
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    Yuanyang

    Yuanyang

    Yuanyang or Coffee with tea (often spelled according to the Cantonese pronunciation Yuenyeung, Yinyong or Yingyong) is a popular beverage in Hong Kong, made of a mixture of three parts of coffee and seven parts of Hong Kong-style milk tea. It was originally served at dai pai dongs (open air food vendors) and cha chaan tengs (cafe), but is now available in various types of restaurants. It can be served hot or cold. The name yuanyang, which refers to Mandarin Ducks, is a symbol of conjugal love in Chinese culture, as the birds usually appear in pairs and the male and female look very different. This same connotation of a "pair" of two unlike items is used to name this drink. There are disputes if there were independent inventions of coffee-and-tea-mixtures in the Western world, some claiming it to be a Dutch serving. Various individuals have combined coffee with tea, sometimes using the name CoffTea or Tea Espress. The concept was suggested on the Halfbakery in 2000, and singer Peter André claimed to have invented CoffTea in an interview in 2004. In an interview in 2006, Sandra Blund recommended combining Savarin with chamomile tea in a ratio of 2 to 1 or combining organic Bolivian
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