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Most famous Companies from United Kingdom

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    1

    Referendum Party

    The Referendum Party was a Euro-sceptic, single issue party in the United Kingdom formed by Sir James Goldsmith to fight the 1997 General Election. The party called for a referendum on aspects of the UK's relationship with the European Union. The party's position was that there should be a referendum on the UK's membership of the European Union. It planned to contest every constituency where there was no leading candidate in favour of such a referendum. In general, most seats it did not contest had sitting Eurosceptic Conservative MPs; however, some prominent pro-European MPs from all parties were not opposed because they supported putting the issue to the vote. Similarly, most Referendum Party candidates, activists and supporters were Eurosceptic, but some were pro-European. In Northern Ireland, the Referendum Party did not stand, but instead endorsed the Ulster Unionist Party. The referendum question which the party proposed was announced on 28 November 1996: The Referendum Party briefly held a seat in the House of Commons after George Gardiner, the Conservative MP for Reigate, changed parties following a battle against deselection by his local party. In March 1997 the party
    8.00
    6 votes
    2

    Professional Footballers' Association

    The Professional Footballers' Association (PFA) is the trade union for professional footballers in England and Wales. The world's oldest professional sport trade union, it has 4,000 members. The aims of the PFA are to protect, improve and negotiate the conditions, rights and status of all professional players by collective bargaining agreements. The PFA is affiliated with the Professional Footballers' Association Scotland. The Northern Ireland PFA disbanded in 1995. The PFA was formed on 2 December 1907 as the Association of Football Players' and Trainers' Union (the AFPTU, commonly referred to at the time as the Players' Union). On that date, Charlie Roberts and Billy Meredith (who had been involved in the AFU), both of Manchester United, convened the Players' Union at Manchester’s Imperial Hotel. This was the second attempt to organise a union of professional footballers in England, after the Association Footballers' Union (the "AFU"), formed in 1898, had been dissolved in 1901. The AFU had failed in its objectives of bringing about a relaxation of the restrictions on the movement of players from one club to another in the Football League and preventing the introduction of a
    6.71
    7 votes
    3
    Liberal Party

    Liberal Party

    The Liberal Party was one of the two major political parties of the United Kingdom during the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was the third largest political party throughout the latter half of the 20th century. The party moved towards social liberalism during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and came to be seen as being on the centre-left of British politics. It grew out of the Whig Party in 1859, and William Gladstone carried the party through governments in the late 19th century. The party split over the issue of Irish Home Rule, but returned to power in 1906 through a landslide victory. During this time in government, the Liberals are credited with the so-called Liberal Reforms, which saw the creation of a basic welfare state. During World War I, the Liberals governed Britain through a coalition with the Conservatives, which ended in 1922. In the 1920s, the Labour Party permanently replaced the Liberals as the largest opponent of the Conservative Party in British politics, and the Liberals went into decline, which culminated in them winning as few as 6 seats at general elections during the 1950s. A comeback of sorts was seen during the 1960s and 1970s, but it was not
    6.67
    6 votes
    4
    Heriot-Watt University

    Heriot-Watt University

    Heriot-Watt University is a teaching and research university based in Edinburgh, established in 1821 as the world's first Mechanics' Institute. The eighth oldest higher education institution in the United Kingdom, it has been a university by Royal Charter since 1966. It has branch campuses in the Scottish Borders, Orkney and Dubai, and announced plans to open a campus in Malaysia in November 2011. Heriot-Watt is known for the strong prospects of its students, with 80% in graduate-level jobs six months after leaving the institution. It came 29th in the UK in the 2011 National Student Survey, and saw the largest increase in UK applicants of any UK university for the 2013 academic session. It also has a strong research profile, with over 50% of its submitted research results considered internationally excellent in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. In 2011, Heriot-Watt was named as the Sunday Times Scottish University of the Year 2011-2012, with the paper emphasising the employability of the institution's graduates. In 2012 it was ranked 5th in Scotland by the Complete University Guide and 20th in the United Kingdom by the Guardian University League Table. Heriot-Watt was
    7.40
    5 votes
    5

    Independent Working Class Association

    The Independent Working Class Association (IWCA) is a minor working-class political party in the United Kingdom that aims to promote the political and economic interests of the working class, regardless of the consequences to existing political and economic structures. It has been most successful in the Blackbird Leys and Wood Farm estates of East Oxford and has councillors on Oxford City Council. The IWCA was formed in 1995 by several organisations, including Anti-Fascist Action, Red Action, and the Revolutionary Communist Group, who argued that the likely election of a New Labour government would entrench the legacy of Thatcherism and further diminish the political influence of the working class. It says its ideology stems from the trade union collectivism of the 1970s, and it has received support from some anarchists, but it criticises socialism. From 1998, the Independent Working Class Association formed groups in Birmingham, Oxford, Glasgow, the London boroughs of Islington and Hackney, and a few other areas. In 2003, the IWCA was launched as a national organisation. In the 2002 Oxford City Council elections the IWCA achieved the election of a local councillor, Stuart Craft,
    8.75
    4 votes
    6

    Liberal Unionist Party

    The Liberal Unionist Party was a British political party that was formed in 1886 by a faction that broke away from the Liberal Party. Led by Lord Hartington (later the Duke of Devonshire) and Joseph Chamberlain, the party formed a political alliance with the Conservative Party in opposition to Irish Home Rule. The two parties formed a coalition government in 1895 but kept separate political funds and their own party organisations until a complete merger was agreed in May 1912. The Liberal Unionists owe their origins to the conversion of William Ewart Gladstone to the cause of Irish Home Rule (i.e. limited self government for Ireland). The 1885 General Election had left Charles Stewart Parnell's Irish Nationalists holding the balance of power, and had convinced Gladstone that the Irish wanted and deserved Home Rule. Some Liberals believed that Gladstone's Home Rule bill would lead to independence for Ireland and the dissolution of the United Kingdom, which they could not countenance. Seeing themselves as defenders of the Union, they called themselves 'Liberal Unionists' though at this stage most of them did not think it was going to be a permanent split from their former colleagues.
    8.50
    4 votes
    7
    Revolutionary Communist Party

    Revolutionary Communist Party

    The Revolutionary Communist Tendency (RCT), which emerged in 1978, began as a Trotskyist political organisation in Britain in 1978, becoming the Revolutionary Communist Party in 1981, in the tradition of the revolutionary Bolshevik Party. After 1991, the party slowly metamorphosed into what might be characterised as a Libertarian group rather than a Bolshevik or Trotskyist one as traditionally conceived. The Party was disbanded in 1997, although a number of former members maintain a loose political network which promotes some of its core ideas. The party originated as a tendency within the Revolutionary Communist Group, which had split from the International Socialists in the 1970s. This group had concluded that there was no living Marxist tradition in the left, and Marxism would have to be re-established. Disagreements about the course the Revolutionary Communist Group should take in relation to support for the Anti-Apartheid Movement led Frank Furedi, a sociologist at the University of Kent (better known then by his cadre name Frank Richards), to break off and form his own group: the Revolutionary Communist Tendency - which became the Revolutionary Communist Party (RCP). The
    7.00
    5 votes
    8

    Islamic Party of Britain

    The Islamic Party of Britain is a defunct political party in the United Kingdom that was active from its formation in 1989 until 2006. The IPB was Islamist, opposed to both capitalism and communism. David Musa Pidcock, a convert to Islam, founded and led the party. They had limited electoral success with Pidcock achieving 800 votes in the Bradford North by-election, 1990. The IPB was generally supportive of the Respect coalition with one of their leading members, home affairs spokesman Mohammad Naseem, standing for and funding the coalition. The IPB published a quarterly magazine entitled Common Sense. The party believed in equal treatment under the law regardless of an individual's status, income or ethnicity. The IPB argued that religion is the most important thing in life. It called for reform of the British banking system to make it interest-free and Islamic, and for increased trade with the Islamic world. At one time, the party answered questions sent in by readers. It argued that homosexuality needed treatment, was not to be tolerated and that homosexuals should be put to death for a "public display of lewdness", a policy that was condemned by Peter Tatchell.
    8.25
    4 votes
    9

    Alliance for Green Socialism

    The Alliance for Green Socialism (AGS) is a socialist and environmentalist political grouping operating across Britain (although its most active membership is in West Yorkshire, particularly in the City of Leeds). Its first annual conference was in 2003 following the 2002 merger of the Leeds Left Alliance (formed by Mike Davies, Celia Foote, Garth Frankland and other former members of the Labour Party) and the Green Socialist Network (whose origins lay in the former Communist Party of Great Britain). The Leeds Left Alliance had previously been involved in the former Socialist Alliance and a small number of AGS members remained involved in it until it was dissolved by the SWP (who had effectively taken it over) in February 2005. The AGS has sponsored various attempts by one of its affiliate organisations (Rugby Red Green Alliance) and the Socialist Alliance Democracy Platform to re-form the Socialist Alliance from 2005 onwards but this has had little success and the AGS concluded in 2011 that such efforts were no longer politically productive (although the AGS still actively supports the idea of a broader Socialist/Environmentalist political alliance). The AGS describes itself as an
    8.00
    4 votes
    10

    Fire Brigades Union

    The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) is a trade union in the United Kingdom for wholetime Firefighters (including Officers up to Chief Fire Officer/Firemaster), Retained Duty System (RDS – part time) and Emergency Control Room staff. It has around 44,000 members, and represents the majority of uniformed fire brigade staff in the United Kingdom. The first recorded instance of trade union organisation of firefighters was when the Municipal Employees' Association recruited several London County Council firemen in early 1905, which by the end of the following year had grown to a branch of 500. After the entire branch had transferred to the rival National Union of Corporation Workers (NUCW), the branch grew to 1,100 of the 1,300 London firemen and to protect the then branch secretary from potential dismissal, sub-officer E. W. Southgate handed over branch secretaryship to Jim Bradley, a London park-keeper who had been nominated by the union's executive. Following the strike of police officers on 29th August 1918, Bradley organised a secret ballot of firemen on the issue of strike action over pay and conditions. After winning the right to a representative board for London firemen, the fire
    8.00
    4 votes
    11
    National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers

    National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers

    The National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT) is a trade union in the United Kingdom which unionises transport workers. It has more than 80,000 members, and its current general secretary is Bob Crow. It is one of Britain's fastest growing trade unions, increasing its membership by more than a third in the first five years of Crow's leadership. It was formed by a merger of the National Union of Railwaymen (NUR) and the National Union of Seamen (NUS). Predecessors of the RMT were among the unions which set up the Labour Representation Committee in 1900. In 2003, some Scottish branches of the RMT, affiliated to the Scottish Trades Union Congress, voted to donate some of their funds to the Scottish Socialist Party. This led the Labour Party to disaffiliate the union in early 2004. In Wales some branches supported Forward Wales, led by the former Labour Welsh Assembly member John Marek. The RMT is affiliated to the Left pressure group the Labour Representation Committee (LRC), which is named after the original LRC of 1900, and works to restore socialist principles within the Labour Party. Some local branches of the RMT, such as Grimsby, are still affiliated to their
    7.75
    4 votes
    12
    Respect Party

    Respect Party

    Respect is a socialist political party in England and Wales founded in 2004. Its name is a contrived acronym standing for Respect, Equality, Socialism, Peace, Environmentalism, Community and Trade Unionism. Respect was set up in January 2004, as a left-wing alternative to the three established parties - Labour, Conservatives and Liberal Democrats.. The party was opposed to the War in Iraq and is opposed to the War in Afghanistan (2001-present). It seeks to "provide a broad-based and inclusive alternative to the parties of privatisation, war, and occupation" and has a broad socialist agenda. Some of the policies on which it campaigns include: In its founding constitution the Respect Party states its overall aim is to "help create a socially just and ecologically sustainable society", giving a definition of social justice that includes "the organisation of society in the most open, participative, and accountable way practicable based on common ownership and democratic control". The party was originally launched by The Guardian journalist George Monbiot and Birmingham Stop the War Coalition chair Salma Yaqoob. The initial idea to form Respect arose in a Bangladeshi family house in
    7.75
    4 votes
    14

    Transport Salaried Staffs' Association

    The Transport Salaried Staffs' Association (TSSA) is a trade union for "white collar" workers in the transport industry in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Its head office is adjacent to Euston station, London, it has branch offices located in Dublin and Glasgow, and staff also located in Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham and Bristol. As of 2003 it has about 30,000 members in the UK and 2,000 members in Ireland. While principally a union for people in the railway industry, the effect of the nationalisation and subsequent privatisations following the Second World War has meant that it has members working for railway companies, shipping companies, bus companies, travel agencies, airlines, call centres, and IT companies. At the start of the 21st century it was actively recruiting new members in the travel trade, such as employees of Turkish Airlines in London. Individual members are allocated to branches. Historically branches were organised geographically and by grade, e.g. Liverpool; Dublin No. 1; Crewe No. 4 Technical; Crewe Management Staffs (the separate branches for different grades of staff were so that people with grievances against their managers wouldn't find
    7.75
    4 votes
    15

    Liberal Democrats

    The Liberal Democrats are a social liberal political party in the United Kingdom which supports constitutional and electoral reform, progressive taxation, wealth taxation, environmentalism, human rights laws, cultural liberalism, banking reform and civil liberties. The party was formed in 1988 by a merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party. The two parties had formed the electoral SDP–Liberal Alliance for seven years before then, since the SDP's formation. The Liberals had been in existence for 129 years and in power under leaders such as Gladstone, Asquith and Lloyd George. Nick Clegg was elected Leader in 2007. At the 2010 general election, Liberal Democrats won 23% of the vote and 57 of the 650 seats, making them the third-largest party in the House of Commons, behind the Conservatives with 307 and Labour with 258. No party having an overall majority; the Liberal Democrats became the junior partners in a coalition government with the Conservatives, with Clegg becoming Deputy Prime Minister and other Liberal Democrats taking up ministerial positions. The opening line to the preamble of the Liberal Democrats constitution is "The Liberal Democrats exist to build
    6.20
    5 votes
    16

    Transport and General Workers' Union

    The Transport and General Workers' Union, also known as the TGWU and the T, was one of the largest general trade unions in the United Kingdom and Ireland - where it was known as the Amalgamated Transport and General Workers' Union (ATGWU) - with 900,000 members (and was once the largest trade union in the world). It was founded in 1922, and its final general secretary was Tony Woodley. In 2007, it merged with Amicus to form Unite. At the time of its creation in 1922, the TGWU was the largest and most ambitious amalgamation brought about within trade unionism. Its structure combined regional organisation, based on Districts and Areas, with committee organisation by occupation, based on six broad Trade Groups. Trade groups were not closely linked to trades, but were elected by activists. Officials of the union were grouped by region, and could be asked to serve each or any trade group. The amalgamating unions were: Docks Group Waterways Group Administrative, Clerical and Supervisory Group There was often ambiguity in the TGWU over the actual name of its white-collar section. From the 1960s it was generally known as ACTS (Administrative, Clerical, Technical and Supervisory) but also
    6.20
    5 votes
    17
    7.25
    4 votes
    19
    Department for Culture, Media and Sport

    Department for Culture, Media and Sport

    The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) is a department of the United Kingdom government, with responsibility for culture and sport in England, and some aspects of the media throughout the whole UK, such as broadcasting and internet. It also has responsibility for the tourism, leisure and creative industries (some joint with Department for Business, Innovation and Skills). The department is also responsible for the delivery of the 2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games and the building of a Digital Economy. The DCMS originates from the Department of National Heritage (DNH), which itself was created on 11 April 1992 out of various other departments, soon after the Conservative election victory. The former Ministers for the Arts and for Sport had previously been located in other departments. The DNH was renamed as the "Department for Culture, Media and Sport" on 14 July 1997, under the Premiership of Tony Blair. DCMS was the co-ordinating department for the successful bid by London to host the 2012 Olympics and appointed and oversees the agencies delivering the Games' infrastructure and programme, principally the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) and LOCOG. The June 2007
    7.25
    4 votes
    20

    Bloomsbury Gang

    The Bloomsbury Gang, also known as the Bedford party, was a political party formed in the United Kingdom in 1765 by John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford. The group took its name from Bloomsbury, a district of central London now in the London Borough of Camden.
    7.00
    4 votes
    21

    Church of the Militant Elvis Party

    The Church of the Militant Elvis Party is a frivolous political party in the United Kingdom. The leader of the party is David Bishop who also goes by the nickname of Lord Biro/Bus-pass Elvis. The party has 6 registered campaign groups i.e. 'Bus-pass Elvis Party', 'Elvis Defence League', 'Elvis turns Green Party', 'Grumpy old Elvis Party', 'Militant Elvis Anti-Tesco Popular Front' (MEAT-PF) and the 'Elvis and the Yeti Himalayan Preservation Party'. The party is concerned with the depletion of the Amazon rainforest, climate change, the power of Tesco on the British high street and the power of large corporations. A book on Elvis noted that "an obviously ironic attitude toward Elvis is used in the service of rather serious anti-imperialist political objectives". It deregistered in December 2008, but re-registered in March 2010 and stood in the 2010 general election in Kettering, gaining 112 votes. Bishop previously stood in the 1997 general election in Tatton against Neil Hamilton as "Lord Byro versus the Scallywag Tories", gaining 116 votes (0.2%). He first stood as the Church of the Miltant Elvis in the 2001 General Election in Brentwood, where the party came last with 52 votes.
    8.33
    3 votes
    22

    Ofwat

    The Water Services Regulation Authority, or Ofwat, is the body responsible for economic regulation of the privatised water and sewerage industry in England and Wales. Ofwat is primarily responsible for setting limits on the prices charged for water and sewerage services, taking into account proposed capital investment schemes (such as building new wastewater treatment works) and expected operational efficiency gains. The most recent review was carried out in 2009; reviews are carried out every five years, and thus the next will take place in 2014. Ofwat consists of a board, plus an office of staff which carries out work delegated to them by the board. The current board consists of: The Environment Agency is responsible for environmental regulation, and the Drinking Water Inspectorate for regulating drinking water quality. The water industry regulator in Scotland is the Water Industry Commission for Scotland. Ofwat was set up in 1989 at the time when the 10 Water Authorities in England and Wales were privatised by flotation on the stock market. The resulting companies are known as "the water and sewerage companies"; this distinguishes them from around a dozen smaller companies which
    10.00
    2 votes
    24

    National Labour Organisation

    The National Labour Organisation, also known as the National Labour Committee, was a British political group formed after the 1931 creation of the National Government to co-ordinate the efforts of the supporters of the government who had come from the Labour Party. The most prominent Labour Party member involved in the Government was the Prime Minister, Ramsay MacDonald. National Labour sponsored Parliamentary candidates but did not consider itself a full political party as it had no policy distinctive from that of the Government which it supported. After MacDonald's death, the group continued in existence until winding up on the eve of the 1945 general election; its newsletter ceased publication two years later. The sudden decision to call a general election in October 1931 left Ramsay MacDonald and the other Labour supporters with the difficult job of organising their own re-elections without any form of organisation. Preparations had been started on 19 September, and by early October National Labour supporters had a list of 34 seats which they wanted to fight: 14 out of 15 sitting National Labour MPs wished to fight for re-election, and a further 10 candidates were ready to
    6.50
    4 votes
    25
    Royal Academy

    Royal Academy

    The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London. The Royal Academy of Arts has a unique position in being an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects whose purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and appreciation of the visual arts through exhibitions, education and debate. The Royal Academy of Arts was founded through a personal act of King George III on 10 December 1768 with a mission to promote the arts of design in Britain through education and exhibition. The motive in founding the Academy was twofold: to raise the professional status of the artist by establishing a sound system of training and expert judgment in the arts and to arrange the exhibition of contemporary works of art attaining an appropriate standard of excellence. Behind this concept was the desire to foster a national school of art and to encourage appreciation and interest in the public based on recognised canons of good taste. Fashionable taste in 18th-century Britain had centered on continental and traditional art forms, providing contemporary British artists little opportunity to sell their works. From 1746 the
    6.50
    4 votes
    26

    Workers' Socialist Federation

    The Workers' Socialist Federation was a socialist political party in the United Kingdom, led by Sylvia Pankhurst. Under many different names, it gradually broadened its politics from a focus on women's suffrage to eventually become a left communist grouping. It originated as the East London Federation of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU, better known as the Suffragettes). The East London Federation was founded by Sylvia Pankhurst in 1913, and differed from its parent organisation in being democratic and including men, such as George Lansbury. By this point, Sylvia had many disagreements with the route the WSPU was taking. She wanted an explicitly socialist organisation tackling wider issues than women's suffrage, aligned with the Independent Labour Party, based among working class people in the East End of London. She also wanted to focus on collective workers' action, not individual attacks on property. These and other differences, including personal ones, led to Sylvia's expulsion, along with the East London Federation, from the WSPU. In early 1914, they renamed themselves the East London Federation of Suffragettes (ELFS) and launched a newspaper, the Women's
    9.50
    2 votes
    27

    SDP–Liberal Alliance

    The SDP–Liberal Alliance was an electoral pact formed by the Social Democratic Party (SDP) and the Liberal Party in the United Kingdom which was in existence from 1981 to 1988, when the bulk of the two parties merged to form the Social and Liberal Democrats, later referred to as simply the Liberal Democrats. Following the establishment of the SDP by the 'Gang of Four' (Roy Jenkins, David Owen, Bill Rodgers, Shirley Williams), who had left the Labour Party in March 1981, the new party entered into an informal alliance with the existing centre party, the Liberals, led by David Steel. The SDP fought its first by-election, in Warrington, with future leader Roy Jenkins standing as "SDP with Liberal support". On 16 June 1981, this arrangement was formalised into an alliance, with both parties agreeing to stand down in each other's favour. Between 1981 and 1983, the parties together won seats in by-elections in: The formation of the SDP and the subsequent alliance came at a time when the British economy was in a deep recession and Margaret Thatcher's Conservative government was proving deeply unpopular as unemployment had risen from just over 1,500,000 since they came to power in May 1979
    7.67
    3 votes
    30

    National Union of Mineworkers

    The National Union of Mineworkers is a trade union for coal miners in the United Kingdom. Formed in 1945 as a reorganisation of the Miners' Federation of Great Britain (MFGB), the miners' unions were for much of the 20th century a powerful force not only in the British union movement, but also in British politics. The NUM took part in three national miners' strikes in 1972, 1974 and 1984-85. Its influence was destroyed by the failure of the 1984-85 strike and by the closing of most of Britain's coal mines; it is now a small union with negligible political power. The Miners' Federation of Great Britain was established in Newport, Monmouthshire in 1888 but did not function as a unified, centralised trade union. Instead the federation represented and co-ordinated the affairs of the existing local and regional miners' unions whose associations remained largely autonomous. The South Wales Miners' Federation was founded in 1898, joining the MFGB in 1899, while the Northumberland Miners' Federation joined in 1907, followed by the Durham Miners' Federation in 1908. The federation's total membership in 1908 was 600,000. The MFGB was involved in many trade disputes, including the National
    9.00
    2 votes
    31

    New Party

    The New Party was a political party briefly active in the United Kingdom in the early 1930s. It was formed by Sir Oswald Mosley, an MP who had belonged to both the Conservative and Labour parties, quitting Labour after its 1930 conference narrowly rejected his "Mosley Memorandum", a document he had written outlining how he would deal with the problem of unemployment. On 6 December 1930, Mosley published an expanded version of the "Mosley Memorandum", which was signed by seventeen Labour MPs: Oliver Baldwin, Joseph Batey, Aneurin Bevan, W. J. Brown, William Cove, Robert Forgan, J. F. Horrabin, James Lovat-Fraser, John McGovern, John James McShane, Frank Markham, Lady Cynthia Mosley, Sir Oswald Mosley, H. T. Muggeridge, Morgan Philips Price, Charles Simmons, and John Strachey. It was also signed by A. J. Cook, general secretary of the Miners' Federation. On 28 February 1931 Mosley resigned from the Labour Party, launching the New Party the following day. Mosley initially attracted the allegiance of six Labour MPs, although two resigned membership after a day and sat in the House of Commons as independent MPs. The party received £50,000 funding from Lord Nuffield and launched a
    7.33
    3 votes
    32

    Pro-Euro Conservative Party

    The Pro-Euro Conservative Party was a British political party announced by John Stevens and Brendan Donnelly in February 1999, formed to contest the 1999 European Parliament Elections. The founders were Members of the European Parliament who had resigned from the UK Conservative Party in protest at its anti-euro stance. Their reported aim was to replace the Eurosceptic Conservative leadership of William Hague with that of Kenneth Clarke. Stevens later said that they had intended to push Ken Clarke, Michael Heseltine, Chris Patten and other pro-Europeans in the Conservative Party into "an SDP-style breakaway, in combination with the Liberal Democrats". The party disbanded in 2001. The party said it was "based on traditional Conservative values", and they self-defined as "One Nation Conservatives". The main aim of the party was for the United Kingdom to join the euro, also known as "the single currency", for economic reasons. At the time the British pound was strong against the euro, which had dropped in value to be equal to the US dollar, and the then-Governor of the Bank of England Eddie George said that it would be "an act of faith" for Britain to join the Eurozone. The party
    6.00
    4 votes
    33

    Unity Gazette

    Unity Gazette is a broad left caucus group in the Amicus trade union. It includes activists from the former MSF and AEEU trade unions which merged to form Amicus. The broad left of AEEU was also known as Unity Gazette or Engineering Gazette. Recent mergers between Amicus and UNIFI and GPMU have resulted in new members from those unions. Unity Gazette is often known as "the Gazette" or "the Left" by supporters and opponents alike. Membership of Unity Gazette is open to any lay member or employee of Amicus who shares its aims, regardless of any position they may hold within the union. Grass-roots activity of the Gazette is organised on a regional basis, each region being permitted a high degree of autonomy in how it organises its own activities. In some regions, candidates for membership must be proposed, seconded and approved by the attendees at the regional meeting, while other regions grant membership immediately on request. National Gazette policy is decided at National Meetings, which normally take place every three months in Preston, Lancashire. At all other times the Editorial Committee are empowered to run the affairs of the national Gazette. Activities of Unity Gazette
    6.00
    4 votes
    34

    Workers' Socialist League

    The Workers Socialist League (WSL) was a Trotskyist group in Britain. The group was formed by Alan Thornett and other members of the Workers Revolutionary Party (WRP) after their expulsion from that group in 1974. Thornett and his comrades had questioned what they saw as a sectarian turn of the WRP. They argued that this turn would isolate the WRP and that it was necessary to turn back to Trotsky's Transitional Programme. They wrote a number of documents to argue their case and as a result were expelled. A minor controversy surrounded these documents when some WRP members alleged that Thornett was not their author, but that in fact they were written by members of the Bulletin Group, who were supporters of Pierre Lambert and therefore strongly opposed by the WRP. The WSL was founded in 1975 with a leadership grouped around Thornett, Tony Richardson and John Lister. Terry Eagleton was a well-known member. Unlike the WRP, whose politics it inherited, it covered Irish politics, women's struggles and broke with the homophobia characteristic of Gerry Healy. The group also concluded that Cuba had been a deformed workers state since the revolution of 1959. It published the weekly paper
    7.00
    3 votes
    35

    Countryside Party

    The Countryside Party was a minor political party operating in the United Kingdom. It was formed in May 2000 by Jim Crawford who was the Northern Director of the Countryside Alliance. Much of the party's agenda was the same as that of the Alliance, such as opposition to any restrictions on fox hunting. They formed themselves out of what they perceive as a lack of understanding or care about rural issues by the mainstream political parties. They are by and large a conservative-minded organisation, and have unsuccessfully opposed measures such as the Scottish Land Reform Act, which has been designed to give greater rights to tenant farmers and crofters. According to its 2004 accounts, the party's membership is formally "limited to the two founders, Jim Crawford and Richard Malbon plus a very small number of supporters who are not actually members of the Party." The Countryside Party stood in the Scottish Parliament 2003 election for the Highlands and Islands electoral region. They polled just 1,768 votes (1.05% of the vote in the area). They contested the 2004 European elections. In the South West England region, they got 2.1% of the vote which was sufficient to regain their deposit;
    5.75
    4 votes
    36

    Freedom Party

    This article is about the defunct Freedom Party (UK). For the current, similarly named, party see British Freedom Party The Freedom Party was a right wing political party in the United Kingdom. The party was founded in December 2000 by former members of the British National Party (BNP), dubbed "ultra-Tories" by BNP leader Nick Griffin, who were disaffected with the party's refusal to moderate its position on race. They were expelled following a feud with the BNP leadership and allegations of financial irregularities and misconduct. Most prominent were two party activists in the West Midlands, husband and wife Steve Edwards (who became Freedom Party agent) and Sharron Edwards (formerly deputy chairman of the BNP and then deputy chairman of the Freedom Party). Adrian Davies was Party Chairman and Michael Newland was the treasurer. Most of the leadership were prominent in the Bloomsbury Forum, a right-wing discussion group. The party was primarily anti-immigration, although it claimed to place more of an emphasis on culture rather than race. It was more mainstream on issues such as race than the British National Party, with which it had a stormy relationship. The party aimed to appeal
    10.00
    1 votes
    37
    Whigs

    Whigs

    The Whigs were a party in the Parliament of England, Parliament of Great Britain, and Parliament of the United Kingdom, who contested power with the rival Tories from the 1680s to the 1850s. The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute rule. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688, and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715, and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories back in. The "Whig Supremacy" (1715–60) was enabled by the Hanoverian succession of George I in 1714 and the failed Jacobite rising of 1715 by Tory rebels. The Whigs thoroughly purged the Tories from all major positions in government, the army, the Church of England, the legal profession and local officials. The leader of the Whigs was Robert Walpole, who maintained control of the government in the period 1721–1742; his protégé was Henry Pelham (1743–54). Both parties began as loose groupings or tendencies, but became quite formal by 1784, with the ascension of Charles James Fox as the leader of a
    10.00
    1 votes
    38

    Campaign for Social Democracy

    The Campaign for Social Democracy was a minor political party operating in the United Kingdom in the 1970s. They were formed in September, 1973 by Dick Taverne, who had resigned from the Labour Party, after falling out with his Constituency Labour Party over the European Economic Community. He had formed the Democratic Labour Association in Lincoln and had been elected as an MP for Lincoln under that banner in a by-election in March, 1973. He formed the Campaign for Social Democracy as an attempt to build a radical non-doctrinaire social democratic movement, and at the February 1974 general election they stood four candidates against leading Labour left-wingers (including Tony Benn). All were unsuccessful (the highest polling only 2.4% of the vote in their constituency), and the campaign was wound up when the Labour Party won the February general election, making a split in the Labour Party less likely. Such a split did occur in the early 1980s, when leading Labour moderates formed the Social Democratic Party.
    5.50
    4 votes
    39

    Mebyon Kernow

    Mebyon Kernow (MK; Cornish for Sons of Cornwall) is a left-of-centre political party in Cornwall, United Kingdom. It primarily campaigns for devolution to Cornwall in the form of a Cornish Assembly, as well as social democracy and environmental protection. MK was formed as a pressure group in 1951, and contained as members activists and politicians from a number of political parties. Its first leader was Helena Charles. Its first election win came in 1953, with its members running as independents. In the 1970s it became a fully-fledged political party, and since then it has fielded candidates in elections to Westminster and the European Parliament, as well as local government in Cornwall. The party is a member of the European Free Alliance and has close links with Plaid Cymru, the Scottish National Party and the Breton Democratic Union. It currently has five elected councillors in Cornwall Council and 25 town and parish councillors. Dick Cole is the current leader. In July 2000 Mebyon Kernow issued the "Declaration for a Cornish Assembly" claiming; Cornwall is a distinct region. It has a clearly defined economic, administrative and social profile. Cornwall's unique identity
    6.67
    3 votes
    40

    ProLife Alliance

    ProLife Alliance (or simply ProLife) is an advocacy group in the United Kingdom, formed in October 1996. It is opposed to any form of euthanasia and opposes human cloning, abortion and experiments on human embryos. It supports anti-abortion taxation policies and guaranteed maternity and paternity leave. Its leader is Dominica Roberts. Originally formed as a political party, it put up 50 candidates to contest the 1997 election. The refusal of the BBC to show its television broadcast led to litigation, in which it was ultimately unsuccessful - Regina v. British Broadcasting Corporation (Appellants) ex parte Prolife Alliance. The ProLife Alliance gained 20,000 votes in the European Parliament election, 2004. It withdrew from the Electoral Commission's Register in 2004. In 2003 the Department of Health (DOH) significantly reduced the statistical information it provided about abortions for suspected foetal abnormalities. The ProLife Alliance challenged this under the Freedom of Information Act, and this challenge was supported by the Information Commissioner. An appeal by the DOH to the Information Tribunal failed. The Tribunal rejected the DOH view that personal information would be
    6.67
    3 votes
    42

    Free Scotland Party

    The Free Scotland Party is a minor political party in Scotland that stands for an independent Scotland, independent of both the United Kingdom and the European Union. The party was founded by Brian Nugent, from Shetland, after he left the SNP due to disagreements over Europe. The party holds up Norway, a non-EU country, as an example for Scotland. The party contested three constituencies in the 2005 general election campaigning on the issue of the fishing industry in Scotland. Maitland Kelly received 183 votes (0.4%) in Ochil and South Perthshire, Nugent received 176 votes (1.0%) in Orkney and Shetland, and Dallas Carter received 384 votes (1.0%) in Motherwell & Wishaw. The party also stood in the Scottish Parliament election, 2007, gaining 664 votes (0.24%) in the Mid Scotland and Fife electoral region. Jim Fairlie, a former deputy leader of the SNP and the party's finance spokesman, received 575 votes (1.65%) in Perth.
    8.00
    2 votes
    43

    Public and Commercial Services Union

    The Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS) is the fifth largest trade union in the United Kingdom. Most of its members work in government departments and other public bodies although some work for private companies. The union was founded in 1998 by the merger of the Public Services, Tax and Commerce Union (which mostly represented the executive 'managerial' grades of the Civil Service) and the Civil and Public Services Association (mostly representing the administrative grades). The union has over 250,000 members and is the largest trade union representing civil servants in the UK. Its current general secretary is Mark Serwotka. PCS is organised into groups that deal with different bargaining units such as Revenue and Customs, Department for Work and Pensions and Law and Justice. In November 2004, PCS workers across government departments undertook a one-day strike in protest against government plans to cut the Civil Service by 20%. This action was followed by further one-day strikes on 31 January and 1 May 2007. Three one day strikes over pay in Liverpool Museums. On 8 March 2010, 270,000 civil servants began a 48 hour strike over government changes to redundancy
    8.00
    2 votes
    44
    Socialist Party of Great Britain

    Socialist Party of Great Britain

    The Socialist Party of Great Britain (SPGB), is a small Marxist political party within the impossibilist tradition. It is best known for its advocacy of using the ballot box for revolutionary purposes; opposition to reformism; and its early adoption of the theory of state capitalism to describe the Soviet Union. Detractors have been known to mockingly refer to it as Simon Pure's Genuine Brand or the Small Party of Good Boys. The Socialist Party of Great Britain was founded in 1904 as a split from the Social Democratic Federation (SDF). It was formed to oppose the SDF's reformism and as part of a response to that organisation's domination by H. M. Hyndman (which also led to the SPGB's aversion to leadership). This split was also partly a reaction to the SDF's involvement in the Labour Representation Committee which went on to found the Labour Party. It mirrored the split that led to the foundation of the Socialist League, stemming from an ongoing dispute within the socialist movement over tactics and the question of reform or revolution. The founders of the SPGB considered themselves to be part of a wider impossibilist revolt within the Second International. When in 1903 most of SDF
    8.00
    2 votes
    45

    The Hunger Project

    The Hunger Project (THP) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization incorporated in the state of California. The Hunger Project describes itself as an organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. It has ongoing programs in Africa, Asia and Latin America, where it implements programs aimed at mobilizing rural grassroots communities to achieve sustainable progress in health, education, nutrition and family income. The Hunger Project is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. In Africa, Asia and Latin America, The Hunger Project seeks to end hunger and poverty by empowering people to lead lives of self-reliance, meet their own basic needs and build better futures for their children. The Hunger Project carries out its mission through three activities: mobilizing village clusters at the grassroots level to build self-reliance, empowering women as key change agents, and forging effective partnerships with local government. In 2009 The Hunger Project was active in Africa, in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, and Uganda, in Asia, in Bangladesh and India, and in Latin America, in
    8.00
    2 votes
    46

    UNISON

    UNISON is the second largest trade union (Unite being the largest) in the United Kingdom with over 1.3 million members. The union was formed in 1993 when three public sector trade unions, the National and Local Government Officers Association (NALGO), the National Union of Public Employees (NUPE) and the Confederation of Health Service Employees (COHSE) merged. UNISON's current general secretary is Dave Prentis. He was elected on 28 February 2000 and took up the post on 1 January 2001, succeeding Rodney Bickerstaffe who had held the post for five years. Members of UNISON are typically from industries within the public sector and generally cover both full-time and part-time support and administrative staff. The majority of people joining UNISON would be workers within areas such as local government, education, the National Health Service, police services, utilities (such as gas, electricity and water), and transport. These 'Service Groups' all have their own national and regional democratic structures within UNISON's constitution. As a trade union, UNISON provides support to members on work related issues, including protection and representation at work, help with pay and conditions
    8.00
    2 votes
    48

    Bakers, Food and Allied Workers Union

    The Bakers, Food and Allied Workers' Union (BFAWU) is a trade union in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1847 in Manchester, it is a trade-based union of workers in the food industry. Soon after foundation, the union began organising nationally and became the Amalgamated Union of Operative Bakers. It gained prominence when its 1861 campaign for improvements in working conditions led to the Bakehouse Regulations Act 1863. The union gradually adopted a federal structure. In 1964, the union was renamed the Bakers' Union, but this was later lengthened to the present name.
    7.50
    2 votes
    49

    Democratic Party

    The Democratic Party was a political party in the United Kingdom, founded in November 1998 by Malvern businessman Geoff Southall, who also funded the party. It was described as "right wing" or "hard right" in news reports, but claimed to occupy the centre-ground of British politics. It aimed to reduce Britain's involvement with the European Union, opposed the adoption of the Euro, called for direct democracy, and argued for limits on immigration. The slogan was "The will of the people NOT the party". In 1999 it had a few hundred members, including previous supporters of James Goldsmith's Referendum Party. The Earl of Burford stood as its candidate in the November 1999 Kensington and Chelsea by-election against Michael Portillo, receiving 189 votes (0.9%). The party decided not to stand any candidates in the 2001 general election, citing a lack of media attention. The party criticised the United Kingdom Independence Party in 2000 for being perceived as right-wing, lacking political acumen, and performing poorly in Westminster elections. In 2003 the party took legal action against the UK government in the High Court over the then proposed EU Constitution. Until 2001 the home and
    9.00
    1 votes
    50

    League of Empire Loyalists

    The League of Empire Loyalists (LEL) was a British pressure group (also called a 'ginger group' in Britain and the British Commonwealth), established in 1954, which campaigned against the dissolution of the British Empire. The League was a small group of current or former members of the Conservative Party led by Arthur K. Chesterton, a former leading figure in the British Union of Fascists, who had served under Oswald Mosley. The League found support from a number of Conservative Party members, although they were disliked very much by the leadership. Chesterton established the group in 1954 on the far right of the Conservative Party, effectively as a reaction to the more liberal forms of Toryism in evident at the time, as typified by the policies of R.A. Butler. Chesterton feared the growth of both the Soviet Union and the United States and concluded that American style capitalism and Bolshevism were actually in alliance as part of Jewish-led conspiracy against the British Empire, a mindset that informed the LEL from the beginning. The wide reaching critiques that this conspiracy theory utilised meant that the LEL won membership from various sectors of right-wing opinion including
    9.00
    1 votes
    51

    Solidarity Federation

    The Solidarity Federation, also known by the abbreviation SolFed, is a federation of class struggle anarchists active in Britain. The organisation advocates a strategy of anarcho-syndicalism as a method of abolishing capitalism and the state. In 1994 it adopted its current name, having been the Direct Action Movement since 1979. The Syndicalist Workers' Federation was an early syndicalist group in active in Britain, and one of the Solidarity Federation's earliest predecessors. It was formed in 1950 by members of the dissolved Anarchist Federation of Britain (not to be confused with the current Anarchist Federation which was founded as the Anarchist Communist Federation in 1986). Unlike the AFB, which was influenced by Anarcho-Syndicalist ideas but ultimately not Syndicalist itself, the SWF was an primarily an Anarcho-Syndicalist organisation from the outset. The group joined the International Workers Association and gave particular support to the Spanish resistance during the Franco era. It initially had some success, but when Tom Brown, a long-term and very active member was forced out of activity, it declined until by 1979 it had only one lone branch in Manchester. The SWF then
    5.00
    4 votes
    52

    Broadcasting, Entertainment, Cinematograph and Theatre Union

    The Broadcasting, Entertainment, Cinematograph and Theatre Union (BECTU) is a trade union in the United Kingdom. It has around 26,500 members who work in broadcasting, film, theatre, entertainment, leisure and interactive media. BECTU was founded in 1991 with the merger of the Association of Cinematograph Television and Allied Technicians (ACTT) and the Broadcasting and Entertainment Trades Alliance (BETA), the history of which can be traced back to 1890 . In July 1995 the Film Artists Association (FAA), founded in 1927 as a trade union for film extras transferred itself to BECTU becoming a sub-division of BECTU. BECTU is financed entirely by individual subscriptions from members. BECTU's affiliations include the Trades Union Congress, the Scottish Trades Union Congress, Union Network International, the General Federation of Trade Unions, the Federation of Entertainment Unions and the Labour Party. Anyone working or seeking employment in the sectors covered by BECTU in the UK can apply for membership. Gerry Morrissey was elected General Secretary in February 2007, the position having been left vacant on the death from cancer of Roger Bolton in November 2006.
    6.00
    3 votes
    53
    Christian Peoples Alliance

    Christian Peoples Alliance

    The Christian Peoples Alliance is a Christian democratic political party in the United Kingdom. Founded in its present form in 1999; it grew out of a cross-party advocacy group known as the Movement for Christian Democracy. The party is active throughout England and has fledgling groups specific to Scotland and Wales. The party has two elected members as town councillors in England. The current leader of the party in general is Alan Craig, who took over the role from Ram Gidoomal in 2004. Public awareness of the party was first achieved due to members standing in the London mayor elections, in which they achieved almost 100,000 votes. The values and policies the party looks to uphold — Christian democracy — were already reflected elsewhere in Europe, but the Christian Peoples Alliance claim to have been the first to bring them to the United Kingdom. The CPA has also received encouragement from other Christian democrat parties and are affiliated with the European Christian Political Movement. As part of Christian social teaching, the party emphasises social justice; commitment to the "poor, the elderly and the vulnerable". Based on the teaching of Jesus Christ, it also supports
    6.00
    3 votes
    54

    GMB

    GMB is a general trade union in the United Kingdom, and has more than 617,000 members. Its members are drawn from many sectors, with particular strength amongst manual workers in local government including schools, health care and the ambulance service, security, retail, distribution and the utilities. GMB originates from a series of mergers, beginning when the National Amalgamated Union of Labour (NAUL), National Union of General Workers (NUGW) and the Municipal Employees Association in 1924 joined into a new union, named the National Union of General and Municipal Workers. The union merged with many others including the Association of Professional, Executive, Clerical and Computer Staff (APEX), the Furniture, Timber and Allied Trades Union (FTAT) and the National Union of Tailors and Garment Workers (NUTGW). In 1982, following a merger with the Amalgamated Society of Boilermakers, Shipwrights, Blacksmiths and Structural Workers (ASBSBSW), the union was renamed the General, Municipal, Boilermakers and Allied Trade Union, from the initials of which its present name is derived. The initials 'GMB' do not stand for just 'General, Municipal, Boilermakers'. GMB is one of the three
    6.00
    3 votes
    55

    Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen

    The Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen (ASLEF) is the trade union representing railway workers in Great Britain who are train drivers or in the line of promotion to train driver. ASLEF is part of the International Transport Workers' Federation and the European Transport Workers' Federation. ASLEF is a small union (18,500 members in 2007). Its current General Secretary is Mick Whelan. British news media have sometimes characterised it as a "militant left-wing" union. In 1865 North Eastern Railway footplatemen founded a union called the Engine Drivers' and Firemen's Society. It unsuccessfully attempted strike action, as a result of which the NER was able to break up the Society. In 1872 an industrial union, the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, was founded with the support of the Liberal MP Michael Bass. In 1872 the ASRS reported having 17,247 members but by 1882 this had declined to only 6,321. By the end of the 1870s many UK railway companies had increased the working week from 60 to 66 hours, a 12 hour working day was common and wages had been reduced. The Great Western Railway had not increased wages since 1867, had increased the working day from 10 to
    4.75
    4 votes
    56
    Chartism

    Chartism

    Chartism was a working class movement for political reform in Britain between 1838 and 1848. It takes its name from the People's Charter of 1838. Chartism was the first mass working class labour movement in the world. "Chartism" is the umbrella name for numerous poorly-coordinated local groups, often named "Working Men's Association," articulating grievances in many cities from 1837. Its peak activity came in 1839, 1842 and 1848. It began among skilled artisans in small shops, such as shoemakers, printers, and tailors. The movement was more aggressive in areas with many distressed handloom workers, such as in Lancashire and the Midlands. It began as a petition movement which tried to mobilize "moral force", but soon attracted men who advocated strikes and violence, such as Feargus O'Connor. One faction issued the "People's Charter" in 1838 and it was widely adopted by the movement. The People's Charter called for six basic reforms to make the political system more democratic: Eventually, the first five goals were achieved, but that happened long after Chartism was a spent force. Chartism flourished in hard times, and faded during prosperity. Political elites saw the movement as
    7.00
    2 votes
    57
    Conservative Party

    Conservative Party

    The Conservative Party, formally the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom that adheres to the philosophies of conservatism and British unionism. It is the largest party in the United Kingdom: being the largest single party in the House of Commons with 306 MPs, the largest party in local government with 9,391 councillors, and the largest British party in the European Parliament with 25 MEPs. It governs in coalition with the Liberal Democrats, with party leader David Cameron as Prime Minister. Colloquially referred to as the Tory Party or the Tories, the Conservative Party emerged in 1834 out of the original Tory Party, which dates to 1678. The party was one of two dominant parties in the nineteenth century, along with the Liberals. It changed its name to Conservative and Unionist Party in 1912 after merging with the Liberal Unionist Party, although that name is rarely used and it is generally referred to as simply the Conservative Party. In the 1920s, the Liberal vote greatly diminished and the Labour Party became the Conservatives' main rivals. Conservative Prime Ministers led governments for 57 years of the 20th century,
    5.67
    3 votes
    58
    British Humanist Association

    British Humanist Association

    The British Humanist Association is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes Humanism and represents "people who seek to live good lives without religious or superstitious beliefs." The BHA is committed to secularism, human rights, democracy, egalitarianism and mutual respect. It works for an open and inclusive society with freedom of belief and speech, and for an end to the privileged position of religion in law, education, broadcasting and wherever else it occurs. There are over 28,000 members and supporters of the BHA in the United Kingdom. The BHA is the foremost provider of humanist and non-religious ceremonies in England and Wales, maintaining a national network of accredited officiants. This network offers humanist wedding/civil partnership celebration, humanist baby naming and humanist funeral ceremonies. The BHA is a member organisation of the International Humanist and Ethical Union and of the European Humanist Federation. (Also see other BHA affiliations). The Association's logo is closely derived from the international Happy Human symbol, which itself is a BHA trademark freely licensed by the BHA for use by other bona fide Humanist organisations. The British
    8.00
    1 votes
    59
    Office for National Statistics

    Office for National Statistics

    The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the executive office of the UK Statistics Authority, a non-ministerial department which reports directly to the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It is charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. It functions as the office of the National Statistician, who is also the UK Statistics Authority's Chief Executive and principal statistical adviser to the UK's National Statistics Institute and the 'Head Office' of the Government Statistical Service (GSS). Its main office is in Newport near the United Kingdom Intellectual Property Office and Tredegar House, but another significant office is in Titchfield in Hampshire, and a small office is in London. The ONS was formed on 1 April 1996 by the merger of the Central Statistical Office (CSO) and the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS). Following the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007, the United Kingdom Statistics Authority became a non-ministerial department on the 1 April 2008. ONS produces and publishes a wide range of the information about Britain that can be
    8.00
    1 votes
    60

    People's Justice Party

    The People's Justice Party (PJP) was a minor political party in the United Kingdom from 1998 to 2006. It was formed in 1998 and grew out of Justice for Kashmir, which changed its name to the Justice Party before settling on its final name. It operated mainly in the Birmingham area, where it won a few council seats from the Labour Party, drawing its support mainly from the sizable Kashmiri population in the city (there are some 90,000 residents of Kashmiri descent in Birmingham). The party platform was based on an appeal for votes on two fronts: local and international. It promised single-sex schools for girls, changes to housing grants, and improved street lighting beside commitments to campaign for self-determination for Kashmir, the formation of a Palestinian state and the release of two Kashmiris (Mohammed Riaz and Quayyam Raja) imprisoned in 1984 for their role in the killing of an Indian diplomat. Indeed, it was that very issue that prompted their formation—before being named Justice for Kashmir, the group was entitled, the Free Riaz and Quayyam Campaign. The PJP was also active in the anti-war activity at the time of the American led campaign against the Taliban regime in
    8.00
    1 votes
    61

    Rock 'n' Roll Loony Party

    The Rock 'n' Roll Loony Party was a minor political party in the United Kingdom. It split from the Official Monster Raving Loony Party after the death of Screaming Lord Sutch. In elections to Swale Borough Council in 2003, one of its candidates polled more than a member of the Liberal Democrats. The party was led by Chris "Screwy" Driver, who for a while was Mayor of Queenborough, on the Isle of Sheppey in Kent. At the 2005 General Election the party fielded one candidate, in Sittingbourne and Sheppey, who managed to poll more votes than the Veritas candidate. It was deregistered in August 2007.
    8.00
    1 votes
    63
    Labour Party

    Labour Party

    The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom, and one of the two main British political parties along with the Conservative Party. The Labour Party was founded in 1900 and overtook the Liberal Party in general elections during the early 1920s, forming minority governments under Ramsay MacDonald in 1924 and 1929–1931. The party was in a wartime coalition from 1940 to 1945, after which it formed a majority government under Clement Attlee. Labour was also in government from 1964 to 1970 under Harold Wilson and from 1974 to 1979, first under Wilson and then James Callaghan. The Labour Party was last in national government between 1997 and 2010 under Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, beginning with a majority of 179, reduced to 167 in 2001 and 66 in 2005. Having won 258 seats in the 2010 general election, Labour is the Official Opposition. Labour has a minority government in the Welsh Assembly, is the main opposition party in the Scottish Parliament and has 13 MEPs in the European Parliament, sitting in the Socialists and Democrats (S) group. The Labour Party is a member of the Socialist International and Party of European Socialists. The Party's current leader
    6.50
    2 votes
    64

    National Front

    The National Front (NF) is a British far right, racial nationalist, whites-only political party. It reached the peak of its popularity in the 1970s. Its electoral support peaked in the 1979 general election, when it received 191,719 votes (0.6% of the overall vote). The British prison service and police services forbid their employees to be members of the party. The party accounts submitted to the Electoral Commission in 2007 detailed national profitability. It put up 17 candidates in the 2010 general election and 18 candidates for the 2010 local elections. The party failed to gain any representation at either national or local level. The National Front have been described as fascist in their policies and neo-fascist. In his book, The New Fascists, Wilkinson, comparing the NF to the Italian Social Movement (MSI), comments on their neo-fascist nature and neo-Nazi ideals: "The only other case among the western democracies of a neo-fascist movement making some progress towards creating an effective mass party with at least a chance of winning some leverage, is the National Front (NF) in Britain. It is interesting that the NF, like the MSI, has tried to develop a 'two-track' strategy.
    6.50
    2 votes
    65

    Women's Party

    The Women's Party was a minor political party in the United Kingdom. It was founded by Christabel and Emmeline Pankhurst when they dissolved the Women's Social and Political Union in November 1917. The party proclaimed the need for more stringent measures in support of Britain in World War I. Indeed, it gave out white feathers to all conscientious objectors. It changed the name of its paper from "Votes For Women" to "Britannia": a paper which concentrated on enlisting women for the war effort. It claimed that this was far more important than the fight for women's suffrage, although it also had policies on equality for women and the abolition of trade unions. At the 1918 general election, following the passing of the Parliamentary Qualification of Women Act 1918, the party stood Christabel as a candidate in the Smethwick constituency in Staffordshire. She won 47.8% of the vote, losing by only 778 votes to her only opponent, the Labour Party's John Davison. In 1919, Christabel was chosen as the Coalition's Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Westminster Abbey, but in the event no by-election was held until 1921, when the Conservative Party chose their own candidate to represent
    6.50
    2 votes
    66

    Co-operative Party

    The Co-operative Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom committed to supporting and representing co-operative principles. The party does not put up candidates for UK elections, instead, Co-operative candidates stand jointly with the Labour Party as "Labour and Co-operative Party" candidates. Although a sister party of the Labour Party, the Co-operative Party is legally a separate political organisation, and members of the Co-operative Party do not have to join the Labour Party although they are not permitted to be members of another political party. In its formative years the Co-operative Party was almost exclusively concerned with the trading and commercial problems of the co-operative movement. Since the 1930s it has widened its emphasis, using influence gained through strong links with the political and commercial left to spread what it sees as Co-operative ethos and moral principles. The basic principles underpinning the party are to seek recognition for co-operative enterprises, recognition for the social economy, and to advance support for co-operatives and co-operation across Europe and the developing world. The party stands for a sustainable economy
    6.00
    2 votes
    67

    Equity

    Equity (formerly known as the British Actors' Equity Association) is the trade union for actors, stage managers and models in the United Kingdom. It was formed in 1930 by a group of West End performers. Equity was the last of the closed shop unions in the UK. This was criticised in 1981 and made illegal in 1988 - it is now no longer a requirement that a professional actor be a member of Equity. Equity requires its members to have unique professional names. Like many other British trade unions, Equity operated a closed shop policy - it was not possible for someone to join unless they had had sufficient paid work, and most jobs were reserved for Equity card holders. In order to allow new members to join, there were a limited number of non-card holding jobs on regional productions. Whilst working on these productions, actors held a provisional membership card, and, on completing the requisite number of weeks, could apply for full membership, and thereafter work in the West End, or on film and television. In 1976, Equity introduced a policy of refusing to sell programming to the South African Broadcasting Corporation, an action that led to a virtual blackout of British television in
    6.00
    2 votes
    68
    Irish Parliamentary Party

    Irish Parliamentary Party

    The Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP; commonly called the Irish Party or the Home Rule Party; in Irish Páirtí Parlaiminteach na hÉireann) was formed in 1882 by Charles Stewart Parnell, the leader of the Nationalist Party, replacing the Home Rule League, as official parliamentary party for Irish nationalist Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons at Westminster within the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland up until 1918. Its central objectives were legislative independence for Ireland and land reform. Its constitutional movement was instrumental in laying the groundwork for Irish self-government through three Irish Home Rule bills. The IPP evolved out of the Home Rule League founded by Isaac Butt after he defected from the Irish Conservative Party in 1873, to gain a limited form of freedom from Britain in order to protect and control Irish domestic affairs in the interest of the Protestant landlord class, after William Ewart Gladstone and his Liberal Party came to power in 1868 under his slogan Justice for Ireland, when Irish Liberals gained 65 of the 105 Irish seats at Westminster. Gladstone said his mission was to pacify Ireland and with the Irish Church
    6.00
    2 votes
    69

    National Liberal Party

    The National Liberal Party, known until 1948 as the Liberal National Party, was a liberal political party in the United Kingdom from 1931 to 1968. It broke away from the Liberal Party, and later merged with the Conservative Party. The Liberal Nationals evolved as a distinctive group within the Liberal Party when the main body of Liberals were maintaining in office the second Labour government of Ramsay MacDonald, who lacked a majority in Parliament. A growing number of Liberal MPs led by Sir John Simon declared their total opposition to this policy and began to co-operate more closely with the Conservative Party, even advocating a policy of replacing free trade with tariffs, an anathema to many traditional Liberals. By June 1931, three Liberal MPs including Simon, Ernest Brown and Robert Hutchison (an ex-Lloyd George supporting coalitionist/National Liberal) resigned their party's whip and sat as independents. When the Labour Government was replaced by a National Government in August 1931, dissident Liberals were temporarily reconciled with the rest of their party within the coalition, but in the following two months the acting Liberal leader, Herbert Samuel, came close to
    6.00
    2 votes
    70

    Campaign for Real Ale

    The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is an independent voluntary consumer organisation based in St Albans, England, whose main aims are promoting real ale, real cider and the traditional British pub. It is now the largest single-issue consumer group in the UK, and is a founding member of the European Beer Consumers' Union (EBCU). The organisation was founded in 1971 by a group of four drinkers—Graham Lees, Bill Mellor, Michael Hardman, and Jim Makin—who were opposed to the growing mass production of beer and the homogenisation of the British brewing industry. Other early influential members included Christopher Hutt, author of Death of the English Pub, who succeeded Hardman as chairman, Frank Baillie, author of The Beer Drinker's Companion, and later the current Good Beer Guide editor, Roger Protz. The original name was the Campaign for the Revitalisation of Ale. CAMRA's stated aims are to: CAMRA's campaigns include promoting small brewing and pub businesses, reforming licensing laws, reducing tax on beer, and stopping continued consolidation among local British brewers. It also makes an effort to promote less common varieties of beer, including stout, porter, and mild, as well as
    7.00
    1 votes
    71

    FTSE 100 Index

    The FTSE 100 Index, also called FTSE 100, FTSE, or, informally, the "footsie" ( /ˈfʊtsiː/), is a share index of the stocks of the 100 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange with the highest market capitalisation. It is one of the most widely used stock indices and is seen as a gauge of business prosperity. The index is maintained by the FTSE Group, an independent company jointly owned by the Financial Times and the London Stock Exchange. Its name derives from the acronym of its two parent companies, but has since been registered as a limited company in its own right. The index began on 4 January 1984 at the base level of 1,000; the highest value reached to date is 6,950.6, on 30 December 1999. After falling dramatically during the financial crisis of 2007-2010 to below 3,500 in March 2009, the index recovered by a significant margin to its peak of 6,091.33 on 8 February 2011, its highest since mid-2008. It plummeted under the 5,000 mark on the morning of 23 September 2011. As of 19 April 2012 it was at 5,744. The index is maintained by the FTSE Group, an independent company which originated as a joint venture between the Financial Times and the London Stock Exchange. It is
    7.00
    1 votes
    72

    Official Monster Raving Loony Party

    The Official Monster Raving Loony Party is a registered political party established in the United Kingdom in 1983 by musician and politician David Sutch (1940–1999), better known as Screaming Lord Sutch. Starting in 1963, David Sutch, head of Screaming Lord Sutch & The Savages, stood in British parliamentary elections under a range of party names, mainly as the National Teenage Party candidate. At time the minimum voting age was 21. The name party's was intended to highlight what Sutch and others viewed as hypocrisy, since teenagers were unable to vote because of their supposed immaturity while the adults running the country were involved in scandals such as the Profumo Affair. After being shot at during a mugging attempt whilst living in the United States, Sutch returned to Britain and to politics during the 1980s. The "Raving Loony" name first appeared at the Bermondsey by-election of 1983. A similar concept had appeared earlier in the "Election Night Special" sketch by Monty Python's Flying Circus, in which the "Silly Party" and the "Sensible Party" competed against each other, and a similar skit by The Goodies (wherein Graeme Garden stood as a "Science Loony"). There had also
    7.00
    1 votes
    74

    UK Independence Party

    The UK Independence Party (UKIP,  /ˈjuːkɪp/ YEW-kip) is a Eurosceptic and right-wing populist political party in the United Kingdom. The party was founded on the idea of Britain's withdrawal from the European Union but has since become a multi-issue party with a full manifesto. UKIP has never won a seat in the House of Commons. UKIP holds two in the unelected House of Lords, both due to defections from Conservative peers. It has 12 seats in the European Parliament, down from 13 won due to defections; but one gained from the defection of Roger Helmer from the Conservative Party The leader of UKIP, Nigel Farage, was re-elected on 5 November 2010, having first served from 2006 to 2009. Farage has been a UKIP MEP since 1999 and is a founding member of the party after leaving the Conservative Party in 1992 when it led Britain into the Maastricht treaty. In the 2009 election to the European Parliament, UKIP attained 13 seats with 16.5% of the vote, coming second behind the Conservative Party, overtaking the Labour Party in terms of votes, and drawing with it in terms of seats. In the 2010 general election, the party polled 3.1% of the vote, an increase of 0.9% from the 2005 general
    7.00
    1 votes
    75

    Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers

    The Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers (USDAW) is a trade union in the United Kingdom. Consisting of over 405,000 members, USDAW is the UK's fourth largest and fastest growing trade union. Membership has increased by more than 17% in the last five years and by nearly a third in the last decade. Most USDAW members work in the retail sector, but the union also has many members in transport, distribution, food manufacturing, chemicals and other trades. It has a reputation as one of the less militant unions, rarely organising industrial action. The union was formed in 1947 by the merger of the National Union of Distributive and Allied Workers and the National Union of Shop Assistants, Warehousemen and Clerks. There is also a managerial and supervisory section called Sata - the Supervisory, Administrative and Technical Association. This is a special section of the union representing employees in middle and lower management or with administrative or technical responsibilities. USDAW have the biggest recognition agreement in private sector by been the recognised trade union for workers employed by Tesco, with more than 160,000 members in this company. Amongst the companies who
    4.67
    3 votes
    76

    Affiliated trade union

    In British politics, the term affiliated trade union refers to a trade union that has an affiliation to the British Labour Party. The Party was created by the trade unions and socialist societies in 1900 as the Labour Representation Committee. Since then, the unions have retained close institutional links with the Party, although these arrangements have been strained significantly in recent years, with the RMT and Fire Brigades Union severing their links. Affiliation means that the unions pay an affiliation fee to the Labour Party; in return, they and their members receive the privileges of affiliated membership. Unions select twelve of the thirty-two members of the Labour National Executive Committee and elect fifty per cent of the delegates to Labour Party Conference. In many cases, local union branches also affiliate to Constituency Labour Parties and their members who are also individual members of the Party may represent the Union as delegates on Labour Party structures. Members of the unions may opt out of the affiliation, so that the member is not allowed to take part in any Labour Party ballots (such as the leadership election) in which other members of the affiliated union
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    2 votes
    77

    Labour Research Department

    The Labour Research Department (LRD) is an independent trade union based research organisation, based in London, that provides information to support trade union activity and campaigns. LRD's publications Labour Research, Bargaining Report, Fact Service and LRD Booklets, along with an Enquiry Service provide detailed information for supporting negotiations and campaigns. About 2,000 trade union organisations, including 54 national unions in the UK, representing more than 99% of total Trades Union Congress (TUC) membership, are affiliated. LRD had its beginnings as the Committee of Inquiry into the Control of Industry, set up by the Fabian Society in 1912. The following year the committee was consolidated as the Fabian Research Department. Its first monthly bulletin was established in 1917, as the Monthly Circular. In 1918 the organisation broadened its membership and changed its name to the Labour Research Department. Since then the organisation has become a source of information for British trade unionists at all levels of organisation.
    5.50
    2 votes
    78
    National Union of Students

    National Union of Students

    The National Union of Students (NUS) is Britain’s confederation of students’ unions. Around 600 students’ unions are in membership, accounting for more than 95 per cent of all higher and further education unions in the UK. Through their member students’ unions, NUS represents the interests of more than seven million students. Although the NUS is the central organisation for all affiliated unions in the UK, there are also the devolved national sub-bodies NUS Scotland in Scotland, NUS Wales in Wales and NUS-USI in Northern Ireland (the latter being co-administered by the Union of Students in Ireland). NUS is a member of the European Students' Union. The NUS was formed in 1922 at a meeting held at the University of London. At this meeting, the Inter-Varsity Association and the International Students Bureau (which organised student travel and had been lobbying for a national body) agreed to merge. Founding members included the unions of University of Birmingham, Birkbeck College, London, LSE, Imperial College London (who first left in 1923 and have subsequently rejoined and left three times, the last time being in June 2008), King's College London (who supplied the first President, Sir
    5.50
    2 votes
    79
    Skandia

    Skandia

    Skandia is one of the world's leading independent providers of solutions for long-term savings and investments. They offer products and services that cater for various financial needs and security. Skandia pioneered the "MultiManager" approach, which has now been adopted by most life insurance providers. Skandia started out as a Swedish insurance company in 1855. Today the brand operates in Europe, Latin America, and Asia. Skandia also operates an internet bank called Skandiabanken in the Nordic region. In 2003 the operations in North America, American Skandia, was acquired by Prudential Financial. The CEO of American Skandia, Wade Dokken partnered with Goldman Sachs and sold the division to Prudential Financial for $1.2 billion. In 2005 South African/British financial services group Old Mutual launched a $6.5bn (£3.6bn) bid to acquire majority control of Skandia, which was met with resistance from some of Skandia's shareholders and directors. On February 3, 2006 Old Mutual completed its acquisition of Skandia, which was subsequently delisted from the Stockholm and London stock exchanges. Skandia's largest operation, in terms of new business and profit, is the United Kingdom which
    5.50
    2 votes
    80

    British Union of Fascists

    The British Union (BU) was a political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1932 by Sir Oswald Mosley as the British Union of Fascists, in 1936 it changed its name to the British Union of Fascists and National Socialists and then in 1937 to simply the British Union. It existed until 1940, when it was proscribed by the authorities. Oswald Mosley was the youngest elected Conservative MP before crossing the floor in 1922, joining first the Labour Party and, shortly afterwards, the Independent Labour Party. He became a minister in Ramsay MacDonald's Labour government, advising on rising unemployment. In 1930 he issued his 'Mosley Memorandum' a proto-Keynesian programme of policies designed to tackle the unemployment problem, and resigned from the party soon after, in early 1931, when the plans were rejected. He immediately formed the New Party, with policies based on his memorandum; but, despite winning 16% of the vote at a by-election in Ashton-under-Lyne in early 1931, the party failed to achieve any electoral success. Over 1931 the New Party became increasingly influenced by Fascism. The next year, after a January 1931 visit to Benito Mussolini in Italy, Mosley's own conversion to
    5.00
    2 votes
    81

    Communication Workers Union

    The Communication Workers Union (CWU) is the main trade union in the United Kingdom for people working for telephone, cable, DSL and postal delivery companies, with 215,000 members. Formed in 1995 by the merger of the Union of Communication Workers with the National Communications Union, its current general secretary is Billy Hayes. CWU members work for Royal Mail, BT, O2, cable TV, Accenture HR Services, the Alliance & Leicester, Girobank, Orange, Virgin Media and other communication companies. Members' expertise includes engineering, computing, clerical, mechanical, driving, retail, financial and manual skills. The basis of the strike was a disagreement over pay and pensions. On 7 June 2007, the union's postal members voted by 77.5% to strike after a 2.5% pay rise coupled with £350 million every year for five years (totalling £1.5 billion) of cuts was offered. They took their first one day strike on 29 June 2007, and the second on 12 July and 13 July. The action then progressed to a series of rolling strikes. Further industrial action was taken in 2009. An overwhelming YES vote of 3 to 1 backed the action and 2 days of national strike action was taken in October 2009. This
    5.00
    2 votes
    82

    Isle of Wight Party

    The Isle of Wight Party is a minor British political party, formed in January 2001 to contest the Isle of Wight constituency at the 2001 United Kingdom General Election. It was formed to represent the special and specific needs of the island at local, United Kingdom and international levels. Its main policy was to secure what it described as a "fixed link" between the Isle of Wight and the UK mainland, and this policy proved to be the most controversial. The party also advocated road improvement and the building of a metro rail system for the island, as well as investigating the possibility of a direct ferry link to the European mainland. The party also advocated various other measures to improve the island's infrastructure, economy and tourist industry. The party is not directly related to the now disbanded Vectis National Party which operated on the island in the 1970s. The Isle of Wight Party's activist and sole candidate was Philip (Phil) Murray, who stood for election only once. Murray polled poorly at the 2001 general election, receiving only 1.8% of the votes cast on the Isle of Wight. Although there has been no statement that the party has been wound up, no activity is
    5.00
    2 votes
    83

    Manufacturing, Science and Finance

    Manufacturing, Science and Finance (or the Manufacturing, Science and Finance Union; almost exclusively known as MSF) was a trade union in Britain. Over eighty members of Parliament (primarily members of the Labour Party) were also members of MSF. The MSF was the result of a merger in January 1988 between the Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staffs (ASTMS) and the Technical, Administrative and Supervisory Section (TASS). In 2001 the MSF merged with the Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union to form Amicus. The General Secretary of MSF from 1992 until the merger with Amicus was Roger Lyons, who continued as Joint General Secretary of Amicus's MSF section. In 2007 Amicus merged with the TGWU to form Unite.
    6.00
    1 votes
    84

    National Union of Journalists

    The National Union of Journalists (NUJ) is a trade union for journalists in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. It was founded in 1907 and has 38,000 members. It is a member of the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ). There is a range of national councils below the NEC, covering different sections and areas of activity. There is an industrial council for each of the NUJ's "industrial" sectors -- Newspapers and Agencies, Freelance, Magazine and Book, Broadcasting, New Media and Press and PR. There are also national Executive Councils, covering all sectors, for Ireland and Scotland. The Irish Executive Council, which has a higher degree of autonomy, covers Northern Ireland as well as the Republic. The union's structure is democratic and its supreme decision-making body is its Annual Delegate Meeting, a gathering of elected delegates from all branches across the UK, Ireland and Europe. Between meetings, decisions lie with the NUJ's National Executive Council, a committee of 27 people, elected annually by members. The NEC is chaired by a President, elected, along with a Vice-President and Treasurer, at the Annual Delegate Meeting. The General Secretary (GS) is
    6.00
    1 votes
    85

    Ulster Unionist Party

    The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) – sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party (OUP) or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party – is the older of the two main unionist political parties in Northern Ireland. Before the split in unionism in the late 1960s, when the former Protestant Unionist Party began to attract more hardline support away from the UUP, it governed Northern Ireland between 1921 and 1972 as the sole major unionist party. It continued to be supported by most unionist voters throughout the period known as the Troubles. The UUP has lost support among Northern Ireland's unionist and Protestant community to the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) in successive elections at all levels of government since 1999. The party is currently led by Mike Nesbitt. In 2009 the party agreed to an electoral alliance with the Conservative Party and the two parties fielded joint candidates for elections to the House of Commons and the European Parliament under the banner of "Ulster Conservatives and Unionists – New Force" (UCUNF). Literature and the website for the 2009 European Parliament election used "Conservatives and Unionists" as the short name. The party held its
    6.00
    1 votes
    86

    Marxist Party

    The Marxist Party was a tiny Trotskyist political party in the United Kingdom. It was formed as a split from Sheila Torrance's Workers' Revolutionary Party in 1987 by Gerry Healy and supporters including Vanessa and Corin Redgrave. At first, it was also known as the Workers Revolutionary Party, but it renamed itself later in the year. The party also maintained its own version of the International Committee of the Fourth International, although this was moribund by the late 1990s. After the death of Healy in 1989, the party declined, and in 1990 expelled a group which became the Communist League. The group, which called for support for the Liberal Democrats in the 2001 UK general election, published The Marxist magazine. They also famously owned Trotsky's death mask. In April 2004, the Marxist Party announced its dissolution. The Redgraves then announced the formation of a new group named the Peace and Progress Party, supporting liberal principles of human rights.
    5.00
    1 votes
    87
    National Secular Society

    National Secular Society

    The National Secular Society is a British campaigning organisation that promotes secularism and the separation of church and state. It holds that no-one should gain advantage or disadvantage because of their religion or lack of religion. It was founded by Charles Bradlaugh in 1866. The society is a member organisation of the International Humanist and Ethical Union, and endorses the Amsterdam Declaration 2002. The Society campaigns for "Challenging Religious Privilege" the disestablishment of the Church of England; the withdrawal of state subsidies to religious schools; the end of tax exemption for churches and an end to the public funding of chaplains in prisons, hospitals and the armed services, as well as keeping religious influence out of health care, legislation, Human Rights and equality issues. It was recently highly involved in the abolition of the blasphemy laws. Another issue it campaigns about is the conscientious objections by doctors and pharmacists to administer certain procedures or treatments and their refusal to treat certain patients. Although the organisation was explicitly created for those who reject the supernatural, the NSS does not campaign to eradicate or
    5.00
    1 votes
    88

    National Socialist Party

    The National Socialist Party was a small political party in the United Kingdom, founded in 1916. It originated as a minority group within the British Socialist Party who supported British participation in World War I; while historically linked with the Marxist left, the party grew more moderate. It affiliated to the Labour Party and was eventually absorbed by it. The National Socialist Party was founded by Henry M. Hyndman and his followers after his defeat in the leadership elections of the British Socialist Party. They believed that it was desirable to support the United Kingdom in World War I against "Prussian militarism". Although maintaining that they were a Marxist party, after affiliation to the Labour Party in 1918, they renounced vanguardism and saw in the Russian Revolution only the danger that it might weaken the United Kingdom's war effort. The party was grouped around the newspaper Justice. Three members of the party were elected to Parliament in the 1918 election; Dan Irving and Will Thorne were elected for the Labour Party, and Jack Jones under the National Socialist Party name. In 1919, the group changed its name to the Social Democratic Federation, reverting to the
    5.00
    1 votes
    89

    Social Democratic and Labour Party

    The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP; Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is a social-democratic, Irish nationalist political party in Northern Ireland. Its basic party platform advocates Irish reunification, and the further devolution of powers while Northern Ireland remains part of the United Kingdom. During the Troubles, the SDLP was the most popular Irish nationalist party in Northern Ireland, but since the Provisional IRA ceasefire in 1994 it has lost ground to the republican party Sinn Féin, which in 2001 became the more popular of the two parties for the first time. Established during the Troubles, a significant difference between the two parties was the SDLP's rejection of violence, in contrast to Sinn Féin's support for the Provisional IRA. The SDLP is a social-democratic party affiliated to the Socialist International and Party of European Socialists. The SDLP has fraternal links with other European social-democratic parties, including the Irish Labour Party and British Labour Party (neither of which contest elections in Northern Ireland). The SDLP currently has three MPs in the House of Commons, and 14 MLAs in the Northern Ireland Assembly. The
    5.00
    1 votes
    90

    Peelite

    The Peelites were a breakaway faction of the British Conservative Party, and existed from 1846 to 1859. They were called "Peelites" because they were initially led by Sir Robert Peel, who was the British Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader in 1846. The Peelites were characterised by commitment to free trade and a managerial, almost technocratic, approach to government. Though they sought to maintain the principles of the Conservative Party, Peelites disagreed with the major wing of that party, the landed interest, on issues of trade; in particular, the issue of whether agricultural prices should be artificially kept high by tariffs. The Peelites were often called the "Liberal Conservatives", in contrast to "Protectionist Conservatives" led by Benjamin Disraeli and Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby. In 1845, facing a serious famine in Ireland, Peel sought to lower food prices by repealing the Corn Laws. He was able to carry the repeal vote in the House of Commons, but only at the price of splitting the Conservative Party; a split which led to the fall of Peel's government in June 1846, and its replacement by a Whig government led by Lord John Russell. The leading
    4.00
    1 votes
    91
    Third Way

    Third Way

    The National Liberal Party – The Third Way is a United Kingdom political party that was formed on 17 March 1990 as The Third Way. In 2006, the Third Way registered the name National Liberal Party – The Third Way with the Electoral Commission. The National Liberal Party describes itself as a Patriotic Centre and National liberal party rooted in the culture and traditions of the British islands. It advocates direct democracy along Swiss lines using referenda and citizens' initiatives. It supports small business and co-operative ownership. The National Liberal Party opposes over-centralised government and promotes decision making at the lowest practical level. The party argues that its policies would benefit and empower all citizens and asks for support on that basis from all sections of the national community. The organisation's website claims that "Third Way is for everyone." The group has condemned neo-Nazi ideology and its supporters claim it actively recruits from all ethnic and religious communities. It stood its first Asian candidate in local elections in 2006. Policies include de-criminalisation of prostitution and cannabis, and reform of Britain's role in the European Union
    4.00
    1 votes
    92
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    0 votes
    93

    Independent Irish Party

    The Independent Irish Party (1852-1858) was an Irish political party founded in July 1852 by 40 Liberal Irish MPs who had been elected to the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. It is sometimes mentioned as the Irish Independent Opposition Party, and colloquially known as the Pope’s Brass Band because of their stance on the Ecclesiastical Titles Act. Its MPs were also called the "Irish Brigade". It had two central aims: The Independent Irish Party initially achieved the balance of power in the House of Commons. It brought down Lord Derby's Tory ministry and enabled the leader of the Peelites Lord Aberdeen and Whigs to form a coalition government. However two Irish MPs, John Sadleir and William Keogh then broke ranks by joining this ministry, an act for which they were never forgiven in Ireland, where they were remembered with contempt a century later. Some but not all Irish Liberal candidates in the 1852 election had pledged themselves to form an independent party in Parliament. This was done in their election address or at two conferences in 1852, one held by the Tenants League and the other about Religious Equality. 48 Irish MPs were elected after
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    0 votes
    94
    Independent Labour Party

    Independent Labour Party

    The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a socialist political party in Britain established in 1893. The ILP was affiliated to the Labour Party from 1906 to 1932, when it voted to leave. The organisation's three parliamentary representatives defected to the Labour Party in 1947 and the organisation rejoined the Labour Party as Independent Labour Publications in 1975. As the 19th Century came to a close, working class representation in political office became a great concern for many Britons. Many who sought the election of working men and their advocates to the Parliament of the United Kingdom saw the Liberal Party as the main vehicle for achieving this aim. As early as 1869 a Labour Representation League had been established to register and mobilise working class voters on behalf of favoured Liberal candidates. Many trade unions themselves became concerned with gaining parliamentary representation to advance their legislative aims. From the 1870s a series of working class candidates financially supported by trade unions were accepted and supported by the Liberal Party. The federation of British unions, the Trades Union Congress, formed its own electoral committee in 1886 to further
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    95

    Liberal Party

    The Liberal Party is a United Kingdom political party, formed in 1989 by a group of individuals within the original Liberal Party. It is not connected to the coalition government of Conservatives and Liberal Democrats and is opposed to what the party considers excessive cuts imposed by the coalition. The Liberal Party has 16 councillors. It put up a full slate of candidates in the North West England region for the 2004 European Parliament elections, and came seventh, with 4.6% of the vote (0.6% of the total British popular vote). At the 2001 UK general election, the party came second behind Labour in Liverpool West Derby, pushing the Liberal Democrats into third place. However, they were unable to repeat this at the 2005 general election, finishing third behind the Liberal Democrats but still beating the Conservatives; they repeated this performance at the 2010 general election. The party president is Steve Radford and the party chairman is Fran Oborski. The party anthem is The Land. The party states that it exists: The Liberal Party's highest policy-making body is its annual conference, the Liberal Assembly, at which all party members are entitled to vote. Liberal policies
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    0 votes
    96

    Partito Nazionale Britannico

    The British National Party (BNP) is a British far-right political party formed as a splinter group from the National Front by John Tyndall in 1982. It restricted membership to "indigenous British" people until 2010, after a legal challenge to its constitution. The BNP advocates "firm but voluntary incentives for immigrants and their descendants to return home", as well as the repeal of anti-discrimination legislation. The BNP finished fifth in the 2008 London mayoral election with 5.2% of the vote and secured one of the London Assembly's 25 seats. In 2009 it won its first county council seats and two seats in the European Parliament. During the 2010 General Election, the BNP received 1.9% of the vote and failed to win any seats. The party's current leader, Nick Griffin, is a former national organiser of the National Front. The British National Party was founded in 1982 following a split within the National Front (NF) two years before. After a poor showing at the 1979 general election, internal factional division heightened within the National Front. This culminated in chairman John Tyndall leaving the party in 1980, founding the New National Front, which became the BNP two years
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    0 votes
    97

    Social Democratic Party

    The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a political party in the United Kingdom that was created on 26 March 1981 and existed until 1988. It was founded by four senior Labour Party 'moderates', dubbed the 'Gang of Four': Roy Jenkins, David Owen, Bill Rodgers and Shirley Williams. At the time of the SDP's creation, Owen and Rodgers were sitting Labour Members of Parliament (MPs); Jenkins had left Parliament in 1977 to serve as President of the European Commission, while Williams had lost her seat in the 1979 general election. The four left the Labour Party as a result of policy changes enacted at the January 1981 Wembley conference which committed the party to unilateral nuclear disarmament and withdrawal from the European Economic Community. They also believed that Labour had become too left-wing, and had been infiltrated at constituency level by Trotskyist factions whose views and behaviour they considered to be at odds with the Parliamentary Labour Party and Labour voters. For the 1983 and 1987 General Elections, the SDP joined the Liberal Party in the SDP-Liberal Alliance. After a ballot of members and the passing of a motion at the 1987 Portsmouth conference, the party merged
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    0 votes
    99

    White Nationalist Party

    The White Nationalist Party (WNP) was a neo-fascist British political party, founded in May 2002 as "the British political wing of Aryan Unity" . On 6 June 2005 the White Nationalist Party National Council decided at a meeting in Sheffield to pass out of existence and to turn its membership over to the Nationalist Alliance. The party was formed by Eddy Morrison, and Kevin Watmough "a key figure in Combat 18" and webmaster of Redwatch; the new party was effectively the Yorkshire branch of the British National Front, and the party conducted most of its activities in Yorkshire - an area where the far-right had always been very weak until fairly recently. The national youth leader of the White Nationalist Party was a teen called Ronnie Cooper from the South Yorkshire area who was exposed for his fascist beliefs by the Sunday People newspaper in 2003. Cooper is now understood to be a serving member of the Royal Navy. The WNP was severely weakened in 2004 by the breaking away of the England First Party (EFP) under Mark Cotterill. The name was initially intended to be used by the WNP after the Electoral Commission refused to register WNP as an official name ; but after a dispute between
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    0 votes
    100

    Woodland Trust

    The Woodland Trust is a conservation charity in the United Kingdom concerned with the protection and sympathetic management of native woodland heritage. It was founded in Devon, England in 1972 by retired farmer Kenneth Watkins OBE (6 December 1909 - 13 November 1996). By 1977 it had twenty two woods in six counties. In 1978 it announced that it would be a UK-wide charity, and moved to Grantham in Lincolnshire. It has supported the National Tree Week scheme, which is in late November and ran by The Tree Council. From 2005-8 it co-operated with the BBC for their Springwatch programme and the BBC's Breathing Places series of events held at woods. Nations Its first employee and Director, John James, came from Lincolnshire and was living in Nottingham at the time. It had a small office on Westgate. John James was Chief Executive from 1992-7, and then Michael Townsend from 1997-2004. A new eco-friendly headquarters, adjacent to the former HQ, was completed in 2010 at a cost of GB£5.1million. The new headquarters have been designed by Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, and incorporates light shelves to distribute natural daylight around the 200 workstations, and concrete panels to absorb
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