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Most famous Companies from New Zealand

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    1

    99 MP Party

    The 99 MP Party was a small New Zealand political party that contested the 2005 General Election. It supported a reduction of the number of Members of Parliament from 120 to 99. With the introduction of Mixed Member Proportional in 1996, the number of MPs rose from 99 to 120. Margaret Robertson organised a referendum in 1999 calling for the number to be reduced back to 99. Local businessman Jack Yan proposed that Robertson's campaign be turned into a political party in 2001, a decision that she agreed to the following year after finding that most parties in Parliament generally did not support a reduction. Robertson took initial steps toward achieving the membership number required. Yan initially served as president and designed the logo and marketing collateral, but lived in Europe in the northern summer of 2002, became less involved on his return, and was replaced. The 2002 policies were centrist to conservative, including the toughening of the Crimes Act 1961 and reforming Parliament and the select committee structure. In addition to the reduction of MP numbers, the party also supports making referendums mandatory for all constitutional changes. The Electoral Commission accepted
    8.00
    6 votes
    2

    Association of Staff in Tertiary Education

    The Association of Staff in Tertiary Education (ASTE) is a national trade union in New Zealand. It was formed in 1988 by the merger of the Teacher Colleges Association (TCA), and the NZ Association of Polytechnic Teachers (NZAPT). The majority of members are from polytechnics. However, it retains coverage of the academic staff at the Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and has members at the Victoria, Massey, Waikato and Auckland universities who were employed at the former Wellington Polytechnic and former colleges of education before these institutions were merged with the universities. Most of the other staff at the seven established universities belong to the Association of University Staff, although some belong to the Public Service Association (PSA) and the Service and Food Workers Union. ASTE & Association of University Staff (AUS) have elected to amalgamate to become New Zealand Tertiary Education Union (NZTEU) effective 1 January 2009 The ASTE is a member of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
    9.20
    5 votes
    3

    New Zealand Police

    The New Zealand Police (Māori: Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa, lit. The Policemen of New Zealand) is the national police force of New Zealand, responsible for enforcing criminal law, enhancing public safety, maintaining order and keeping the peace throughout New Zealand. With over 11,000 staff it is the largest law enforcement agency in New Zealand, and with few exceptions has primary jurisdiction over the majority of New Zealand criminal law. The New Zealand police also has responsibility for traffic and commercial vehicle enforcement as well as other key responsibilities including dignitary protection, firearms licensing and matters of national security. The current Minister of Police is the Hon. Anne Tolley, of the New Zealand National Party. Policing in New Zealand started in 1840 with the arrival of six constables accompanying Lt. Governor Hobson's official landing party to form the colony of New Zealand. Early policing arrangements were along similar lines to the UK and British colonial police forces, in particular the Royal Irish Constabulary and the New South Wales Police Force. Many of its first officers had seen prior service in either Ireland or Australia. The early Force was
    7.00
    6 votes
    4
    New Zealand Ministry of Transport

    New Zealand Ministry of Transport

    The Ministry of Transport (In Maori: Te Manatū Waka) is the New Zealand Government's principal transport policy adviser. It leads and generates policy, and the government's New Zealand Transport Strategy (NZTS) provides the framework within which transport policy is developed. The MoT also liaises with the transport Crown entities, the Aviation Security Service, and the National Rescue Co-ordination Centre. The Chief Executive is Martin Matthews. The Ministry of Transport was formerly responsible for enforcement of traffic laws before their division of traffic officers was merged into the same organization as the police. The transport sector includes four Crown entities, one State-owned enterprise and one trust: They are responsible for day-to-day hands-on management of daily traffic, aviation, rail and maritime activities. Their roles and the composition of their boards are defined in legislation. The Ministry negotiates an annual performance agreement with each entity on behalf of the Minister (excluding the Road Safety Trust which operates under a trust deed), monitors the entities' performance against that agreement, and recommends appointments to the entities' governing
    8.00
    5 votes
    5

    New Zealand Council of Trade Unions

    The New Zealand Council of Trade Unions (NZCTU) is a national trade union center in New Zealand. The NZCTU represents 360,000 workers, and is the largest democratic organisation in New Zealand. It was formed in 1987 by the merger of the New Zealand Federation of Labour (NZFL) and the Combined State Unions (CSU). The NZCTU is often linked to the Labour Party. While there is no formal link between the two, many unions are formally affiliated to the Labour Party. Furthermore, the Secretary of the NZCTU speaks at the annual conference of the Labour Party. The NZCTU is affiliated with the International Trade Union Confederation.
    7.60
    5 votes
    6
    Destiny New Zealand

    Destiny New Zealand

    Destiny New Zealand was a Christian political party in New Zealand centred on the charismatic/pentecostal Destiny Church. The party described itself as "centre-right". It placed a strong focus on socially conservative values and argued that the breakdown of the traditional family was a primary cause of many of New Zealand's problems. It announced its de-registration as a political party on 18 September 2007, and was removed from the register a month later. It did not hold any seats in Parliament. Destiny New Zealand first formed early in 2003. By June 2004 the party claimed to have around three thousand members, and indicated an intent to stand candidates in all electorates. The party took a strongly conservative stance in most policy areas. It repeatedly criticised what it saw as the permissive nature of modern society, with Brian Tamaki saying that New Zealand "has moved so far away from God that anything goes now". The party's political leader, Richard Lewis, spoke out strongly against the former Labour-Progressive administration, saying that the nation "simply cannot afford to spend another term under the dictates of an anti-marriage, anti-family and anti-Christian government."
    8.75
    4 votes
    7

    New Zealand Patriot Party

    The New Zealand Patriot Party was a small far-right political party in New Zealand. It was founded by Sid Wilson, formerly the secretary and Auckland regional leader of the New Zealand National Front. Wilson failed to convince any other NZNF officials to join him, and Wilson subsequently returned to the National Front.
    7.20
    5 votes
    8

    Direct Democracy Party of New Zealand

    The Direct Democracy Party of New Zealand (2005-2009) was a political party in New Zealand that promoted greater participation by the people in the decision-making of government. The party's leader was Kelvyn Alp. It was one of the few parties in New Zealand that openly challenged the current monetary system and actively promoted solutions to irredeemable debt. It aimed to establish a system of binding referendums (similar to the Landsgemeinde used in parts of Switzerland) for all major decisions. The Party also advocated for a New Zealand Constitution to protect and enshrine the rights and freedoms of the people. In 2005 the Direct Democracy Party gained official registration as a political party. It fielded 32 party members in the 2005 elections, but won only 782 votes (or 0.03% of the total vote), failing to get any MPs into parliament. The party did not apply for broadcasting funding in 2008, nor did it submit a party list. The official results for the party vote in that year's election recorded no votes for the DDP. The party's registration was cancelled at its own request on 30 June 2009.
    6.00
    6 votes
    9

    New Zealand First

    New Zealand First is a political party in New Zealand. It was founded in 1993, following the resignation of its leader and founder, Winston Peters, from the then governing National Party. New Zealand First generally lies in the centre of the political spectrum. It has formed governments with both major parties in New Zealand: first with the National Party in 1996, and then with the Labour Party in 2005. The Party held seats in the New Zealand House of Representatives from its formation in 1993 until 2008, when it failed to gain enough party votes to retain representation. However, a resurgence in support in the 2011 election saw New Zealand First gain 6.59% of the total party vote, entitling it to eight MPs in the House. The Party currently sits in Opposition. At the core of New Zealand First's policies are its "Fifteen Fundamental Principles"; the first of which being "To put New Zealand and New Zealanders First". New Zealand First is best known for its policies regarding the welfare of the elderly and its strong anti-immigration policies, which has caused media controversy in the past. The Party also espouses a mixture of economic policies. It opposes the privatisation of state
    8.25
    4 votes
    10

    McGillicuddy Serious Party

    The New McGillicuddy Serious Party was a relaunching of the old McGillicuddy Serious Party, a satirical political party in New Zealand. It was apparently established by former members of the original party, and made its first press release on 18 July 2005. It announced plans to stand at least one candidate in the 2005 election. However, no further press releases or candidates ever appeared. .
    6.80
    5 votes
    11

    Polynesian Panthers

    The Polynesian Panther Party was an organisation founded by New Zealand born Polynesians on June 16, 1971. The party was explicitly influenced by the American Black Panther Party, particularly Huey Newton’s policy of black unity. They located the causes of Māori and Pacific Island oppression within the exploitative social relations of capitalism. Consequently, the Polynesian Panthers promoted a strategy of liberation based on the complete overthrow of the capitalist system and the social relations necessary for its development. The group greatly increased in profile during Robert Muldoon's immigration scare campaign in 1975, and the subsequent dawn raids under his administration. The Polynesian Panther Movement was founded in inner city Auckland by six young Pacific Islander men; Fred Schmidt, Nooroa Teavae, Paul Dapp, Vaughan Sanft, Eddie Williams and Will 'Ilolahia. At the time many Pacific Island youth were supporters of Māori political initiatives such as the Bastion Point occupation and Waitangi Day protests, and gained skills in political lobbying and processes which they used to raise the profile of Pacific people in New Zealand. Because of the working class background of
    6.80
    5 votes
    12
    Outdoor Recreation New Zealand

    Outdoor Recreation New Zealand

    Outdoor Recreation New Zealand (sometimes abbreviated as ORNZ) is a small political party in New Zealand. It is primarily based around the hunting and fishing lobbies, but also includes other people who participate in other outdoor sports. The party states its goal as being to fight "the rapid erosion of sporting rights, resources and opportunities for outdoor sportspeople", claiming that current environmental policies impose unreasonable restrictions. The party was first proposed in October 2001. Shortly afterwards, a meeting near Nelson agreed to establish a political party. The founders of the party say that "lobbying government has never been effective", and that establishing a political party was the only way to achieve their goals. On 8 March 2002, the party successfully registered with the Electoral Commission, having obtained the necessary five hundred members. This entitled it to seek and gain list votes under the MMP system. The party also gained government funding for broadcasting. Outdoor Recreation New Zealand had its first test in the 2002 elections, and although it did not win any seats, it performed better than many had anticipated. It won 25,985 votes, around
    8.00
    4 votes
    13

    Southern Amalgamated Workers' Union

    The Southern Amalgamated Workers' Union (AWUNZ) is a trade union in New Zealand. It is one of three autonomous unions, with the Northern Amalgamated Workers' Union, and the Central Amalgamated Workers' Union, who operate nationally as the Amalgamated Workers' Union. The AWUNZ is a member of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
    8.00
    4 votes
    14
    Vector Limited

    Vector Limited

    Vector Limited (NZX: VCT) is a multi-network infrastructure company in New Zealand. It is the national number one provider of electricity distribution, number one provider of gas transmission and distribution, number one provider of electricity and gas metering, number two wholesaler of LPG and number three wholesaler of natural gas. It also owns a fibre optic cable network. History 2010: Vector purchased Siemens’ 50% shareholding in Advanced Metering Services Limited (AMS) and now owns a 100% shareholding in AMS. 2010: Vector acquires an additional 47,980,362 shares, through the New Zealand Windfarms rights issue, taking their shareholding up to 22.11%, from 19.99%. 2009: Vector announces the building of a 150 km fibre optic network connecting Transpower’s 14 Auckland substations. 2008: Vector sells its Wellington electricity network to Cheung Kong Infrastructure Holdings Limited for a price of $785 million. 2008: Vector announces plans to extend its fibre optic network by over 300 km in Auckland with Vodafone as its flagship customer. 2007: Vector establishes a joint venture with Siemens (NZ) to deliver advanced metering technology and services throughout New Zealand. 2007:
    9.67
    3 votes
    15

    New Zealand Family Rights Protection Party

    The New Zealand Family Rights Protection Party was a political party in New Zealand. It was primarily based around Pacific Islanders, and claims that the established political parties do not give sufficient consideration to the concerns of Pacific Islanders in New Zealand. The party was approved for official registration on 7 March 2005. It contested the 2005 elections and garnered 0.05% of the vote, with the aim of a more serious attempt in the 2008 elections. It was reported to have reached an informal agreement with the Maori Party not to compete against each other. The Labour Party, which has traditionally received substantial support from Pacific Islanders, has dismissed the new party's chances. In 2007, the party requested and received deregistration.
    6.60
    5 votes
    16

    Ministry of Education

    The Ministry of Education (Māori: Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga), is the primary state sector organisation of New Zealand responsible for New Zealand's education system. It was established in 1989 when the former, all-encompassing Department of Education was broken up into six separate agencies, The Ministry's role is to raise the overall level of educational achievement and reduce disparity. It is not an education provider. That role is met by individual elected Boards of Trustees for every state school in the country. The ministry has numerous functions - advising government, providing information to the sector, providing learning resources, administering sector regulation and funding, and providing specialist services. The ministry works with other education agencies including the Education Review Office, the New Zealand Qualifications Authority and Learning Media Limited.
    7.75
    4 votes
    17
    New Zealand Labour Party

    New Zealand Labour Party

    The New Zealand Labour Party (Māori: Rōpū Reipa o Aotearoa) is a New Zealand political party. It describes itself as centre-left and socially progressive and has been one of the two primary parties of New Zealand politics since 1935. Labour was last in government from 1999 to 2008 with Helen Clark as party leader and Prime Minister. Since the party's defeat in the 2008 general election, Labour has formed the second-largest (in terms of parliamentary seats) political party represented in the Parliament of New Zealand, and functions as the core of the Official Parliamentary Opposition. Following the 2011 general election, Phil Goff and Annette King stepped down as leader and deputy leader respectively. On 13 December 2011, the parliamentary caucus voted David Shearer and Grant Robertson to replace them. The Labour Party was established on 7 July 1916 in Wellington, bringing together socialist groups advocating proportional representation and "the Recall" of Members of Parliament, as well as the nationalisation of production and of exchange. Its origins lie in the British working-class movement, heavily influenced by Australian radicalism and events such as the Waihi miners' strike.
    7.75
    4 votes
    18

    Christian Coalition

    The Christian Coalition was an Evangelical Christian political party operating in New Zealand. It was an alliance of the now-defunct Christian Heritage Party and the Christian Democrats, New Zealand's two fundamentalist Christian parties. The Christian Coalition did not meet with the success that it hoped for, and was eventually dissolved. The Coalition was established for the purpose of contesting the 1996 election, which was the first to be held using the new mixed member proportional (MMP) voting system. Under MMP, it would not be necessary for the party to win any electorate seats – it merely needed to gain more than five percent of the national vote. The party was led by the Christian Democrat's leader Graeme Lee and Graham Capill. In terms of policy, the Coalition generally pursued goals located somewhere between those of the Christian Democrats and Christian Heritage. At times, there appeared to be dispute between the two groups, with the Christian Democrats pursuing a more moderate path and Christian Heritage insisting upon a hard line. There were also complaints from the Christian Democrats that Christian Heritage was dominating the Coalition, and that Graham Capill
    7.50
    4 votes
    19

    New Zealand Republican Party

    The New Zealand Republican Party of 1967 was a political party which campaigned for the creation of a New Zealand republic. It was founded by Bruce Jesson in 1967, and was linked to the Republican Association. It did not win any seats in Parliament, and was dissolved in 1974. Later, another party, which was also subsequently dissolved, arose under the same name. The two are, however, unconnected.
    9.00
    3 votes
    20

    Equal Values Party

    The Aotearoa New Zealand Equal Values Party was a small political party in New Zealand. It claimed that the "basic requirements for life" were not being met by either of the two main parties in New Zealand politics (Labour and National), and that a new vision was needed for the country. Its policies included: The party's leader was Adele Hughes. The party was launched on 27 January 2005, but was never registered with the Electoral Commission, meaning that it could not contest the party vote. During the 2005 election it ran a single candidate, and received 86 votes. The party did not contest the 2008 elections, and is now defunct.
    5.80
    5 votes
    21

    Human Rights Party

    The Human Rights Party is a small political party in New Zealand. It focuses on what it sees as social justice, believing that insufficient emphasis is placed on people's economic, social and cultural rights. The party believes that liberals are in error by pursuing only civil and political freedoms, saying that without a just society, the disadvantaged cannot exercise these freedoms. In the 2002 elections, the Human Rights Party stood one candidate, Anthony van den Heuvel. He won 66 votes. In the 2005 elections, van den Heuvel stood again, and was joined by Anthony Ravlich. The two gained a total of 66 votes between them. In the 2008 election, the party stood three candidates, gaining 222 votes. One of its candidates, Anthony Ravlich, was subsequently convicted and fined $200 for refusing to file the required return of electoral expenses The party contested the 2009 Mt Albert by-election, gaining 13 votes. The party is standing a single candidate in the 2011 election: Anthony van den Heuvel in Auckland Central.
    8.33
    3 votes
    22

    Mauri Pacific

    Mauri Pacific (literally meaning "spirit of the Pacific") was a short-lived political party in New Zealand. It was formed in 1998 by five former members of the New Zealand First party. It has often been described as a Māori party. Officially, Mauri Pacific was a multiculturalist party, welcoming anyone who supported racial and cultural harmony. Three of its five MPs were Māori, and two were Pākehā. The party only contested one election, and failed to retain any of its five seats in Parliament. The party disbanded shortly afterwards. Mauri Pacific had its origins in New Zealand First, a populist party led by former National Party minister Winston Peters. After the 1996 election, New Zealand First won 17 seats, including a sweep of all five Māori seats. It held the balance of power in Parliament, and eventually went into coalition with the incumbent conservative National Party with Peters as deputy prime minister. Gradually, however, the relationship between New Zealand First and the National Party deteriorated. In August 1998, Peters was sacked from Cabinet, and he pulled New Zealand First out of the coalition. Many New Zealand First MPs were not willing to follow their party back
    8.33
    3 votes
    23

    Piri Wiri Tua Movement

    Piri Wiri Tua Movement is a Māori political party in New Zealand and is based around the Ratana movement. The name "Piri Wiri Tua" was sometimes used by the religion's founder, Tahupotiki Wiremu Ratana, and means The Campaigner. A literal translation is Billy Bore Through or stick fast and bore to the other side. In the 1999 elections, the Piri Wiri Tua Movement fielded three candidates, who won 568 votes between them. In the 2002 elections, the party was affiliated to the Mana Māori Movement. One of the party's better known candidates was the entertainer Dalvanius Prime.
    8.33
    3 votes
    24

    New Zealand Democrat Party

    The New Zealand Democrat Party was a political party in New Zealand, founded in 1934 with the purpose of opposing "socialist" legislation by the government. The Democrat Party was founded and developed by Albert Davy, a prominent political organiser of the time. Davy had worked first for the Reform Party, then for the United Party, and finally for Reform again. He was highly effective in both campaign management and fundraising, but often came into conflict with those he worked for. Politically, Davy was an advocate of reducing the size of government, and of minimising government intervention in the business world — the slogan "More Business in Government, Less Government in Business", once used by the Reform Party, was thought up by Davy. When the United Party and the Reform Party formed a coalition, Davy initially supported it, but later resigned in protest at the legislation the coalition enacted to counter the Great Depression. Davy denounced the coalition as "socialistic by inclination, action and fact". In 1934, Davy was approached by William Goodfellow, a wealthy Auckland businessman and industrialist. Goodfellow strongly opposed the economic policies of the United-Reform
    6.75
    4 votes
    25

    Association of Salaried Medical Specialists

    The Association of Salaried Medical Specialists (ASMS) is a trade union in New Zealand. It has a membership of 3500 and represents salaried consultant doctors and dentists who are employed in New Zealand District Health Boards. The ASMS is a member of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
    10.00
    2 votes
    26

    New Zealand Co-operative Party

    The New Zealand Co-operative Party was a short-lived political party in New Zealand. It was founded in 1942 by anti-socialist political organiser Albert Davy after he left the People's Movement. Davy had previously managed a number of successful political campaigns for other parties, but had frequently fallen out with his colleagues over ideological differences. The Co-operative Party was strongly rooted in Davy's strong hostility to the left-wing Labour Party, which was in government at the time. Davy soon abandoned his new party, however, and returned to the remnants of the People's Movement. The Co-operative Party never won seats in Parliament.
    6.50
    4 votes
    27

    Central Amalgamated Workers' Union

    The Central Amalgamated Workers' Union (CAWU) is a trade union in New Zealand. It is one of three autonomous unions, with the Northern Amalgamated Workers' Union, and the Southern Amalgamated Workers' Union, who operate nationally as the Amalgamated Workers' Union (AWUNZ). The AWUNZ is a member of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
    9.50
    2 votes
    28

    Progressive Green Party

    The Progressive Green Party was an environmentalist political party in New Zealand. It was established as a "blue-green" party - that is, one which is environmentalist ("green"), but is economically right-wing ("blue") rather than left-wing ("red"). The Progressive Green Party was established on 9 August 1995 as a splinter group of the larger Green Party. The founders of the Progressive Greens were unhappy at the direction taken by the Green Party, which they believed was too left-wing. The Progressive Greens particularly opposed the Green Party's membership in the Alliance, a broad left-wing coalition. Prominent members of the new party included Stephen Rainbow (a former member of the Wellington city council), Guy Salmon (head of the Maruia Society, forerunner to today's Ecologic Foundation), and Gary Taylor (a former Waitemata City city councillor). In the 1996 election, conducted under the new MMP system, the Progressive Greens won only 0.26% of the vote, considerably below what they had hoped for. No Progressive Greens were elected to Parliament. The Progressive Green Party did not contest any further elections, and is now disbanded. Many of the party's members, however, are
    9.50
    2 votes
    29

    National Socialist Party of New Zealand

    The National Socialist Party of New Zealand, sometimes simply called the New Zealand Nazi Party, was a far-right political party in New Zealand. It promulgated the same basic views as Adolf Hitler's Nazi Party in Germany, and had a particular focus on Jews and the banking sector. From 1969 the party was led by Colin King-Ansell. The party would be dominated by King-Ansell for the duration of its existence. King-Ansell was the party's sole candidate, and contested several elections. The party dissolved in 1980.
    7.67
    3 votes
    30
    New Zealand Labour Party

    New Zealand Labour Party

    The original New Zealand Labour Party (as distinct from the modern Labour Party) was a short-lived left-wing political party in New Zealand. It is a predecessor of the modern party. The original Labour Party was founded in 1910. It was based on the remnants of the Independent Political Labour League, the first real working-class party in New Zealand, formed in 1904-05. While the IPLL had managed to elect one MP (David McLaren) to Parliament, it quickly began to collapse into disarray — internal disputes about the party's political alignment were a significant factor, as was poor organisation and coordination. The Labour Party was an attempt to relaunch the IPLL. In the 1911 election, the Labour Party retained representation in Parliament, presumably John Robertson. It did not, however, represent the totality of the left-wing vote — the Socialist Party and various independent candidates had also attracted a certain amount of support. In 1912, a "Unity Conference" was called, aiming to unite the diverse leftist factions. The Socialists refused to attend, but a number of independent activists agreed to take part in discussions. In the end, a new party, called the United Labour Party,
    7.67
    3 votes
    31

    Socialist Unity Party of New Zealand

    The Socialist Unity Party was one of the better-known communist parties in New Zealand. It had a certain amount of influence in the trade union movement, but never won seats in Parliament. The Socialist Unity Party was founded in 1966 as a splinter group of the Communist Party. The Communist Party had been bitterly divided by the Sino-Soviet Split, a dispute between the Soviet Union under Nikita Khrushchev and China under Mao Zedong. The party eventually decided to take China's side. Shortly afterwards, a number of the more prominent supporters of the Soviet position, such as Ken Douglas, George Jackson and Bill Andersen, established the Socialist Unity Party. The Socialist Unity Party retained ideological and political links to the Soviet Union for most of its existence. The Socialist Unity Party's association with the Soviet government drew considerable criticism from mainstream politicians. In 1980, the Soviet ambassador to New Zealand, Vesevelod Sofinsky, was expelled after allegedly giving $10,000 to a member of the Socialist Unity Party. In 1987, another Soviet diplomat, Sergei Budnik, was ordered to leave the country by Prime Minister David Lange for his alleged involvement
    9.00
    2 votes
    32

    Communist Party of New Zealand

    The Communist Party of New Zealand (CPNZ) was a Communist political party in New Zealand from the 1920s to the early 1990s. It never achieved significant political success, and no longer exists as an independent group, although the Socialist Worker organisation is considered organisationally continuous with the CPNZ. The CPNZ was founded in March 1921, five years after the New Zealand Labour Party, and it consisted mainly of some dozens of former members of the New Zealand Marxian Association (established in 1918) and the old Socialist Party. The men who established the Communist Party were supporters of the Russian Bolsheviks, and remained independent from those who did not echo this support. The new CPNZ attempted to establish itself in the 1920s as a militant force in the industrial sector, mainly in the mining towns of the West Coast of the South Island, and it gained some modest successes; a few hundred supporters were recruited. In line with the United Front policy of the Comintern, an attempt was made to join the Labour Party but this failed, and the two parties became fierce competitors. A Communist attempt to seize control over the main leftwing newspaper, the Maoriland
    7.33
    3 votes
    33

    Imperial British Conservative Party

    The Imperial British Conservative Party was a farcical political party founded by The Wizard of New Zealand. It was dedicated to the grand traditions of British Imperialism in the face of capitalism, globalisation and the distinct lack of culture in Christchurch, New Zealand. The Imperial British Conservative Party also had a presence in Australia, especially during the republican debate of the 1990s. One of its candidates, Cecil G. Murgatroyd, had run for parliament in several Australian federal elections, at each time standing against the Prime Minister (initially Bob Hawke). In official statements, Murgatroyd listed his occupation as "dole bludger". At other times, Murgatroyd stood under the banner of another New Zealand joke party, the McGillicuddy Serious Party. In one Australian election in the 1980s, the party promised to dye the Speaker's wig a conservative blue.
    7.33
    3 votes
    34

    Mana Motuhake

    Mana Māori Motuhake was a Māori political party in New Zealand. The name is difficult to translate accurately, but essentially refers to Māori self-rule and self-determination — mana, in this context, can be understood as "authority" or "power", while motuhake can be understood as "independent" or "separate". Mana Motuhake was formed in 1979 by Matiu Rata, a member of the Labour Party. Rata had served as Minister of Māori Affairs in the third Labour government (1972–1975), but grew increasingly dissatisfied with the party's policy. Eventually deciding that Māori needed an independent voice, he quit the Labour Party in 1979. Shortly afterwards, he founded Mana Motuhake, and resigned from Parliament to contest a by-election under its banner. In the Northern Maori by-election of 1980, however, Rata was narrowly defeated by the new Labour candidate, Bruce Gregory. Mana Motuhake stood candidates in the 1981 elections, 1984 elections, 1987 elections, and 1990 elections, but was unsuccessful on each occasion. In 1991, the party agreed to join forces with three other political parties (NewLabour Party, the Green Party, and the Democratic Party) to form a single group, known as the
    7.33
    3 votes
    35

    Māori Party

    The Māori Party, a political party in New Zealand, was formed on 7 July 2004. The Party is guided by eight constitutional "kaupapa", or Party objectives. Tariana Turia formed the Māori Party after resigning from the Labour Party where she had been a Cabinet Minister in the Fifth Labour-led Government. She and Pita Sharples, a high-profile academic, became co-Leaders. After the 2008 election, the Party supported the National-led government, and Turia and Sharples became ministers outside of cabinet. The foreshore and seabed controversy, a debate about whether Māori have legitimate claim to ownership of part or all of New Zealand's foreshore and seabed, became the catalyst for setting up the Māori Party. The Māori Party believes: A court judgement stated that some Māori appeared to have the right to seek formal ownership of a specific portion of seabed in the Marlborough Sounds. This prospect alarmed many sectors of New Zealand society, however, and the Labour Party foreshadowed legislation in favour of state ownership instead. This angered many Māori, including many of Labour's Māori MPs. Two MPs representing Māori electorates, Tariana Turia and Nanaia Mahuta, announced an intent to
    7.33
    3 votes
    36

    Christian Heritage Party of New Zealand

    The Christian Heritage Party of New Zealand (CHP, known for a time simply as Christian Heritage New Zealand) was a New Zealand political party espousing Christian values. Although it never won seats in an election, it came close to doing so in 1996 as part of the Christian Coalition and briefly had a member in Parliament. On 3 October 2006, the Party said it would disband to allow "new things to arise in Christian politics in New Zealand". This came after a highly-publicised scandal which resulted in its leader, Graham Capill, going to jail for committing sex-crimes against young girls. According to Christian Heritage New Zealand's self-description, the party aimed "to provide leadership that takes the initiative in building a culture that affirms marriage, strengthens families, and celebrates life as a precious gift of God. We believe these are the key issues that need to be addressed if we are to make an impact for the next generation." It described its three key policies as "Affirming Marriage, Building Families and Celebrating Life", i.e. opposition to same-sex marriage and abortion and support of law-and-order. The party espoused strongly conservative views on social policy.
    6.00
    4 votes
    37

    New Zealand Liberal Party

    The New Zealand Liberal Party is generally regarded as having been the first real political party in New Zealand. It governed from 1891 until 1912. Out of office, the Liberals gradually found themselves pressed between the conservative Reform Party and the growing Labour Party. The Liberals fragmented in the 1920s, and the remnants of the Liberal Party eventually merged with Reform in 1936 to establish the modern National Party. Prior to the establishment of the Liberal Party, MPs were all independent, although often grouped themselves into loose factions. Some of these factions were occasionally referred to as "parties", but were vague and ill-defined. In the history of Parliament, factions were formed around a number of different views — at one time, centralism and provincialism were the basis of factions, while at another time, factions were based on geographical region. Towards the 1880s, however, factions had gradually become stabilised along lines of liberalism and conservatism, although the line between the two was by no means certain. The key figure in the establishment of the Liberal Party was John Ballance. Ballance, an MP, had served in a number of liberal-orientated
    7.00
    3 votes
    38

    NZ South Island Party

    The NZ South Island Party was a New Zealand regionalist political party, advocating greater representational say for the South Island. The party is not currently registered. Its aims are for the establishment of a regional assembly to handle issues relating directly to the South Island. The party was based in the Otago Region, and led by Dunedin publican Pat McCarrigan and former trade unionist Alan McDonald. It was not very effective in achieving a wide acclaim, poor organisation and lack of financial resources probably being to blame. In the 1999 elections, the party put forward only five electorate candidates (with none in Canterbury) and seven list candidates. The party won no seats in 1999, with just 0.14% of the vote or 2,622 votes in total across the whole country. Its highest percentage of the party vote in any seat was 1.5%, although one of their candidates received over 800 votes (2.6% of the votes cast in that electorate). The party's registration was cancelled at its own request on 14 June 2002, and it did not contest the 2002 elections. The South Island Independence movement is not a political party in its own right and may not be considered as being connected with the
    8.50
    2 votes
    39

    Workers Party of New Zealand

    The Workers Party of New Zealand (previously known as the Anti-Capitalist Alliance) is a socialist/communist political party in New Zealand. It publishes a monthly magazine called "The Spark". Its current National Organiser and Secretary is Rebecca Broad. According to the party's official website, The five-point policy platform of the Workers Party is as follows: The party's magazine The Spark states that the party wants: "A world without poverty and war, a world of material abundance where human potential can be expressed in full," adding that "While these ideas appear untenable today, they were the notions that inspired revolutions in the 20th century." The party was founded in 2002. It was formed by an electoral alliance of the original Workers' Party (pro-Mao, Marxist-Leninist) and the pro-Trotsky Revolution group, with the intention of fielding candidates in the 2002 New Zealand general election. The party was unregistered, and so could not contest the party vote in New Zealand's Mixed Member Proportional electoral system. In 2004, the original Workers' Party and Revolution merged to become the Revolutionary Workers' League (RWL), which describes itself as a "Marxist current".
    8.50
    2 votes
    40

    Jim Anderton's Progressive Party

    Jim Anderton's Progressive Party (formed in 2002 as the Progressive Party and renamed after its founder in 2005), was a New Zealand political party generally somewhat to the left of its ally, the Labour Party. The party was established when Anderton and his supporters left the Alliance party. The party held at least one seat in Parliament from 2002 to 2011 following its leader, Jim Anderton's victories in the electorate in Wigram. The party did not contest the 2011 general election and is not represented in Parliament. It was deregistered at its own request in March 2012. The Progressive Party has a particular focus on the creation of jobs, and has said that it is committed to achieving full employment. The party also lists free education and free healthcare as policy objectives. Economically, the party is moderately left-wing, and places particular attention on economic development. Recently, the party has been promoting its proposal for four weeks of annual leave from work, an "anti-drugs" policy and cutting the corporate tax rate to 30%. It also advocates an abolition of the Goods and Services Tax in favour of a broad based financial transactions tax, and monetary policy reform.
    10.00
    1 votes
    41

    New Zealand Nurses Organisation

    The New Zealand Nurses Organisation (NZNO) is New Zealand's largest trade union and professional organisation that represents the nursing profession, midwives and caregivers. It is one of the oldest organisations of this type in the world, tracing its lineage back to the Wellington Private Nurses Association which formed in 1905. NZNO is committed to the representation of its members and the promotion of nursing and midwifery. NZNO embraces Te Tiriti of Waitangi and seeks to improve the health status of all peoples of Aotearoa/New Zealand through participation in health and social policy development. NZNO produces a monthly journal Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand. The NZNO is affiliated with the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions, and the International Council of Nurses. NZNO also works closely with a number of other international organisations including the World Health Organisation (WHO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), UNICEF and UNESCO.
    5.50
    4 votes
    42

    United Future

    United Future is a New Zealand political party. With the formation of the 49th New Zealand Parliament after the 2008 election, it has a single member of the Parliament of New Zealand – party leader Peter Dunne, an electorate MP – and it has signed a confidence and supply agreement with the National Party, making it, along with ACT and the Maori Party, a support partner to the minority National government. United Future was formed from the merger of liberal centrist party United New Zealand and Christian-dominated conservative Future New Zealand to contest the 2002 election. United, formed as a centrist party by a group of moderate Labour and National MPs, held one seat in parliament. Future New Zealand, which was not represented in parliament, was a "secularised" evolution of the Christian Democrats, following the same basic principles as the Christian Democrats, but abandoning the explicit religious connection. United Future's first party president, Inky Tulloch, stated that "United Future isn't a Christian party – it's a political party that has a lot of Christians in it, and a lot of non-Christians." Tulloch said that the "universal principles of family, of common sense, of
    6.67
    3 votes
    43

    Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party

    The Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party (sometimes known as the ALCP) is a political party in New Zealand. It is dedicated to removing or reducing restrictions on the use of cannabis and similar substances. Under New Zealand's Misuse of Drugs Act 1975, cannabis is currently classed (depending on product / substance) as either a Class B drug ("Very high risk of harm") or a Class C drug ("moderate risk of harm"). The ALCP was founded in 1996. It has never won representation in Parliament. It won 1.66% of the vote in the 1996 election but its support was declining until the party made a resurgence in 2008, almost doubling its vote. In the 1999 election it won 1.10% of the vote, in the 2002 election 0.64%, in the 2005 election 0.23%, and in the 2008 election 0.41%. One Green MP Metiria Turei and former Green MP Nandor Tanczos were ALCP candidates in 1996. The party's leader is Michael Appleby. The party contested the by-election in Te Tai Hauauru in mid 2004 — with their candidate, Dun Mihaka finishing second behind Maori Party Leader Tariana Turia, receiving 197 votes (2.52%). The ALCP mounted an aggressive campaign for the 2008 general election, with several high profile candidates
    8.00
    2 votes
    44
    New Liberal Party

    New Liberal Party

    The New Liberal Party of New Zealand was a splinter group of the original Liberal Party. It was formed at a meeting in the Christchurch suburb of Papanui in June 1905 by two Liberal-aligned independents who sought a more "progressive" policy than that followed by the Liberal leader, Richard Seddon, and was similar to the Radical Party in 1896. The New Liberal Party was launched by Harry Bedford and Francis Fisher, but attracted a number of other MPs as well. George Laurenson, Frederick Baume, Alexander Hogg, William Tanner, and William Barber, all dissident Liberal MPs, associated themselves with the party, and two independents who had formerly been aligned with the loose opposition block, Ewen Alison and Alfred Harding, also joined. Tommy Taylor, a radical independent with a reputation as a firebrand, became the New Liberal Party's leader. Some Liberal dissidents, however, refused to be involved in the new party - the most notable being John Millar, George Fowlds, and Robert McNab. Many critics of Seddon believed that the New Liberals risked splitting the liberal vote and allowing a conservative government. The New Liberal Party announced an intention to contest the 1905
    8.00
    2 votes
    45
    United Labour Party

    United Labour Party

    The United Labour Party of New Zealand was an early left-wing political party. Founded in 1912, it represented the more moderate wing of the labour movement. In 1916 it joined with other political groups to establish the modern Labour Party. The United Labour Party has is origins in the first Labour Party, a distinct organisation from the modern one. The first Labour Party had been established in 1910 after the perceived failure of its predecessor, the Independent Political Labour League. The Labour Party represented the moderate wing of the labour movement, with the Socialist Party representing the more radical faction. By 1912 there was growing recognition that the division of the labour movement was costing votes, and a "Unity Conference" was called. The Socialists and the associated Federation of Labour (the "Red Feds") refused to attend, however, saying that they would continue to advocate their more hard-line positions. As such, the Unity Conference consisted only of the Labour Party, various moderate trade unions, and independent labour candidates. At the conclusion of the conference, it was agreed that the Labour Party, the moderate unions, and a number of independents
    8.00
    2 votes
    46

    United Party

    The United Party of New Zealand, a party formed out of the remnants of the Liberal Party, formed a government between 1928 and 1935, and in 1936 merged with the Reform Party to establish the National Party. Note that United Party members of parliament are included in the Category:New Zealand Liberal Party MPs. In the 1920s the Liberal Party, although previously dominant in New Zealand party politics, seemed in serious long-term decline with the advent of Labour, and its organisation had decayed to the point of collapse. The United Party represented an unexpected resurgence of the Liberals, and some historians consider it nothing more than the Liberal Party under a new name. The United Party emerged from a faction of the decaying Liberal Party known as "the National Party" (not directly related to the modern National Party, although it may have inspired the name). George Forbes, a Liberal Party leader, led the faction. In 1927 Forbes joined with Bill Veitch (who led another faction of the Liberals, but who had once been involved with the labour movement) and with Albert Davy (a well-known and highly successful organiser for the Reform Party, the traditional opponent of the
    8.00
    2 votes
    47

    Archives New Zealand

    Archives New Zealand (Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga in Māori) is the National Archives of New Zealand, with overall responsibility for government recordkeeping and for community archives. Since 1 February 2011 it has been part of the Department of Internal Affairs. Before 1 February 2011 Archives New Zealand was a separate government department. Archives New Zealand holds more than 80 kilometers of New Zealand government records, dating from the early 19th to the early 21st century. Researchers can search descriptions of the records online, via the Archway finding aid. The Treaty of Waitangi is on display in the Constitution Room at the head office in Wellington. The Public Records Act 2005 greatly expanded the role of Archives New Zealand and the powers of the Chief Archivist. The organisation now has a leadership role for recordkeeping throughout central and local government. New Zealand’s Digital Continuity Action Plan claims to be a world first initiative to prevent important public records being lost and ensure that today’s information is available tomorrow.
    6.33
    3 votes
    48
    New Zealand Party

    New Zealand Party

    The New Zealand Party was a political party operating in New Zealand. It was established by millionaire property tycoon Bob Jones, and promoted both social and economic liberalization. The New Zealand Party's motto was "Freedom and Prosperity", and it has sometimes been classified as libertarian (although that term is not particularly common in New Zealand). It failed to win any seats in Parliament, but is sometimes credited with causing the defeat of Robert Muldoon's National Party government in the 1984 election by splitting the vote (i.e. as a spoiler). At the time of the New Zealand Party's foundation in 1983, the Prime Minister was Robert Muldoon. Muldoon was a strong believer in the need for state intervention in the economy, claiming that only with government involvement could New Zealand be prosperous. In accordance with his economic theories, Muldoon introduced the so-called "Think Big" program, which saw massive overseas borrowing to finance large government construction projects. Later, as New Zealand's economy declined and its deficit increased, Muldoon introduced wage and price controls. Bob Jones, a self-made millionaire and author, strongly opposed these policies,
    6.33
    3 votes
    49

    Ministry of Economic Development

    The Ministry of Economic Development (Manatū Ōhanga in Māori) is a New Zealand public sector organisation tasked with promoting development of New Zealand's economy. The Ministry deals with policy in a wide range of different areas including: energy, communications, the radio spectrum, industry and regional development, intellectual property, consumer issues, tourism, international trade, and the regulatory environment. The Ministry serves eight ministerial portfolios and two associate ministerial portfolios to a total of seven Ministers and Associate Ministers (some of which have multiple portfolios). It is led by Chief Executive David Smol. The Ministry is divided into seven branches focussing on specific areas, each with its own deputy secretary: The Ministry also includes the following sub-entities:
    7.50
    2 votes
    50
    Social Democratic Party

    Social Democratic Party

    The Social Democratic Party of New Zealand was an early left-wing political party. It existed only a short time before being amalgamated into the new Labour Party. During its period of existence, the party held two seats in Parliament. The Social Democratic Party was founded in January 1913 at a so-called "Basis of Unity" Conference (often simply called the "Unity Conference"). This meeting drew together the most prominent left-wing groups in New Zealand, including both political parties and trade unions. The aim was to unite the fractious labour movement into a cohesive force. At the end of the Conference, most of the attendees agreed to merge into two new organisations — the new United Federation of Labour would co-ordinate the trade unions, while the two main political parties (the hard-line Socialist Party and the moderate United Labour Party) would merge to form the Social Democrats. Not all members of the United Labour Party accepted the plan, however, and some continued on under the same banner. John Alexander McCullough was the organiser for the Lower Riccarton branch and also organised campaigns for Christchurch City Council elections. The Social Democrats gained a rapid
    7.50
    2 votes
    51

    Natural Law Party of New Zealand

    The Natural Law Party of New Zealand was formed in 1995 and based its policies on the concept of "natural law" as understood by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi's Transcendental Meditation movement. According to the party, most of the country's problems can be solved using meditation. Among other things, the Natural Law Party proposed to: The Natural Law Party never won any seats in Parliament, and was removed from the register of official political parties in February 2001.
    9.00
    1 votes
    52

    New Democratic Party

    The New Democratic Party of New Zealand was a small political party established in 1972. It was a splinter group from the better-known Social Credit Party, having been founded by former Social Credit leader John O'Brien. O'Brien was considered a powerful and energetic orator, but had a controversial and aggressive leadership style, and alienated many of his followers. After being replaced as leader by Bruce Beetham, O'Brien quit the Social Credit Party and established his own group. In the 1972 elections, the New Democrats fielded eighty-six candidates, but did not win any seats. The New Democrats won 0.63% of the vote, compared with 6.65% for Social Credit.
    9.00
    1 votes
    53

    Communist Party of Aotearoa

    The Communist Party of Aotearoa is a Maoist political party which formed in 1993 as a split from the Communist Party of New Zealand, which had formerly been Maoist, but was then drifting towards Trotskyism. Since the mid-90s the CPA has been in merger negotiations with another Maoist split from the old CPNZ, the Organisation for Marxist Unity (OMU). No merger has yet taken place, however since 2002 the CPA appears to have suspended production of its paper Red Flag in favour of the OMU journal Struggle.
    6.00
    3 votes
    54

    New Zealand Democratic Party for Social Credit

    The New Zealand Democratic Party for Social Credit (formerly the New Zealand Democratic Party and New Zealand Social Credit Party) is a small leftist political party in New Zealand. It is based around the ideas of Social Credit, an economic theory which also attracted some degree of support in Canada and Australia. The party does not currently hold any seats in parliament, although it has previously held two. Democratic Party members also held seats when the party was part of the Alliance. The party was formerly known as the Social Credit Party, and was for many years the largest minor party in New Zealand politics. The party's economic policy is still based on Social Credit theories, while in social matters, the party takes a position similar to progressive liberal parties elsewhere. The Democratic Party describes its foremost goal as being the recovery of "economic sovereignty". This will be accomplished, the party says, by "the reform of the present monetary system, which is the major cause of war, poverty, inflation and many other social problems." The reforms promoted by the Democratic Party are based on the ideas of Social Credit. The party emphasises "economic democracy",
    6.00
    3 votes
    55
    Alliance

    Alliance

    The Alliance is a left-wing political party in New Zealand. It was formed in 1991, and was influential in the 1990s, but has since declined and has no representation in parliament. It suffered a major setback after Jim Anderton, the party's leader, left the party in 2002, taking several of the party's MPs. After the remaining MPs lost their seats in the 2002 election, some commentators predicted the demise of the party. The Alliance stood candidates in the 2005 election but won less than 1% of the party vote. The Alliance contested Auckland City Council elections under the City Vision banner, in concert with the New Zealand Labour Party and Green Party. The Alliance ran 15 electorate candidates and a total of 30 candidates on the party list in the 2008 election, increasing its party vote marginally from 2005. A strongly left-wing party, the Alliance supports free education, free healthcare, the elimination of unemployment, and the maintenance of the welfare state. It also has an emphasis on women's rights, environmentalism, and Māori rights. It supports New Zealand's nuclear-free policy and believes that New Zealand should not participate in military actions in Afghanistan and
    7.00
    2 votes
    56

    Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance

    The Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance (MEAA) (The Alliance) is the Australian trade union and professional organisation which covers the media, entertainment, sports and arts industries. Its 24,000 members include people working in TV, radio, theatre & film, cinemas, entertainment venues, recreation grounds, journalists, actors, dancers, sportspeople, cartoonists, photographers, orchestral & opera performers as well as people working in public relations, advertising, book publishing & website production; in fact everyone who works in the industries that inform or entertain Australians. The Alliance was created in 1992 through the merging of the unions covering actors, journalists and entertainment industry employees: Since amalgamation, the Symphony Orchestra Musicians Association (SOMA) & the NSW Artworkers Union have joined the Alliance, a Professional Sports Branch has been created & the Screen Technicians Association of Australia (STAA) reconstituted itself under the Alliance banner. In recent years the Equity section added a New Zealand branch to the Alliance. The Alliance is affiliated with the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), the International Federation of
    7.00
    2 votes
    57

    New Zealand Reform Party

    The Reform Party, formally the New Zealand Political Reform League, was New Zealand's second major political party, having been founded as a conservative response to the original Liberal Party. It was in government between 1912 and 1928, and later merged with the United Party (a remnant of the Liberals) to form the modern National Party. The Liberal Party, founded by John Ballance and fortified by Richard Seddon, was highly dominant in New Zealand politics at the beginning of the 20th century. The conservative opposition, consisting only of independents, was disorganised and demoralised. It had no cohesive plan to counter the Liberal Party's dominance, and could not agree on a single leader — it was described by one historian as resembling a disparate band of guerrillas, and presented no credible threat to continued Liberal Party rule. Gradually, however, the Liberals began to falter — the first blow came with the death of Richard Seddon, their popular leader, but other factors contributed to their decline. Importantly for conservatives, the Liberals were slowly losing support from small farmers, who had once backed the Liberals due to their promise of land reform. Having achieved
    7.00
    2 votes
    58

    World Socialist Party

    The World Socialist Party of New Zealand is a political party in New Zealand. It is revolutionary and anti-Leninist. It was founded in 1930 as the Socialist Party of New Zealand. It is affiliated with the Socialist Party of Great Britain and the World Socialist Movement. The party last ran a candidate in the 1996 election, gaining a total of 27 votes.
    7.00
    2 votes
    59

    Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand

    The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand (in Māori: Rōpū Kākāriki o Aotearoa) is a political party that has seats in the New Zealand parliament. It focuses firstly on environmentalism, arguing that all other aspects of humanity will cease to be of concern if there is no environment to sustain it. Ecological economics, progressive social policies, participatory democracy, and non-violence make up the balance of its platform. The party is currently co-led by MP Metiria Turei and Russel Norman. The party has both a male and female co-leader. The male co-leader position was vacant following the November 2005 death of Rod Donald until the 2006 annual general meeting when Norman was elected using the alternative vote system by party delegates from electorates around the country. The Green Party contests Auckland City Council elections under the City Vision banner, in concert with the NZ Labour Party and The Alliance. The Greens generally focus primarily on environmental issues. In recent times, they have expressed particular concerns about mining of national parks, fresh water, climate change, peak oil and the release of genetically engineered organisms. They have also spoken out in
    5.67
    3 votes
    60
    Independent Political Labour League

    Independent Political Labour League

    The Independent Political Labour League (IPLL) was a small New Zealand political party. It was the second organised political party to win a seat in the Parliament of New Zealand, and was a forerunner of the modern Labour Party. The IPLL was the product of a gradual move towards an independent working-class political vehicle. Previously, most workers supported the powerful Liberal Party, which had dominated Parliament since its creation. Eventually, however, the pace of reform began to slow, and calls arose for an independent workers' party. In 1904, the annual conference of Trades and Labour Councils called for the formation of a new organisation — this party would be focused solely on workers, unlike the Liberal Party, but would be committed to change through reform, unlike the revolution-minded Socialist Party. A constitution was drawn up in late 1904, and the first conference was held in early 1905, with John Rigg elected as the first president. At the conference, it was claimed that the new organisation had over a thousand members. Initially, the IPLL did not perform well. In the 1905 elections, the party stood eight candidates, but none were elected — all but one failed to
    8.00
    1 votes
    61

    The Republic of New Zealand Party

    The Republic of New Zealand Party (RONZP or "The Republicans") was a political party in New Zealand. The party's registration was cancelled at its own request in 2009. It was not, and has never been, affiliated to the Republican Movement of Aotearoa New Zealand, which is a non-partisan organisation that does not share any of the party's policy platforms. Despite deregistering, a handful of the party's members remain active under its banner - burning the New Zealand flag at parliament in March 2010. In September 2011 the party announced it would merge with the OurNZ Party. However, the merger appears to have not gone ahead, as the party continues to issue media releases. John Kairau founded the party, which merged with another group in April 2005. In an interview with the New Zealand Herald, Kairau said "The party's aim is simple: to cut all ties with the British monarchy and install a New Zealander as head of state. A president, elected at large by the citizens, would replace the Governor-General as a figurehead, with parliament continuing as normal." He claimed the party had 3,000 members. In 2009 the party was deregistered for failing to file a donations return, and failed to
    8.00
    1 votes
    62
    United New Zealand

    United New Zealand

    United New Zealand was a centrist political party in New Zealand founded in 1995. It merged with the Christian-based Future New Zealand party to form the United Future New Zealand party in 2000. United was founded in the middle of 1995, one of a number of new parties hoping to capitalize on the upcoming switch to the MMP electoral system. It was intended to be a liberal centrist party, encompassing moderate voters from both the centre-left and the centre-right. The party was established by four MPs from the National Party, two MPs from the Labour Party, and former Labour MP Peter Dunne, who had already established his own party, Future New Zealand (not to be confused with the Christian-based party of the same name which United later merged with). The party was led by Clive Matthewson, a former Labour MP. The MPs who established United were: The party, while initially attracting interest, performed poorly in the 1996 election. The party's policies were centrist and liberal in nature but to many appeared too bland to attract media profile. In addition, Matthewson, while charismatic, was seen by many as an intellectual light-weight. When United entered into a coalition with the
    5.33
    3 votes
    63

    Young Māori Party

    The Young Māori Party was a New Zealand organisation dedicated to improving the position of Māori. It grew out of the Te Aute Students Association, established by former students of Te Aute College in 1897. It was established as the Young Māori Party in 1909. While the Young Māori Party had political intentions, it did not function as a political party as they are generally understood. The Young Māori Party's members either acted as independents or joined an existing party, such as the New Zealand Liberal Party. In most respects, the Young Māori Party is best understood as a club or association, not a united electoral bloc. The membership of the Young Māori Party consisted primarily of younger Māori who had received a European-style education. Many were from the East Coast or the Bay of Plenty. Prominent members included James Carroll, Paraire Tomoana, Apirana Ngata, Te Rangi Hīroa, and Maui Pomare. The most important concern of the group was the improvement of Māori health and welfare. Most members of the Party believed that in order to prosper, Māori needed to adopt European ways of life, particularly Western medicine and education. At times, especially earlier in their careers,
    5.33
    3 votes
    64

    Asia Pacific United Party

    The Asia Pacific United Party was a New Zealand political party based around the country's Asian and Pacific Islander populations. It was formed in anticipation of the MMP electoral system, which made it easier for smaller parties to be elected. In the 1996 elections, the party won 0.02% of the vote, insufficient to gain any seats. The party, although registered, did not submit a list for the 1999 elections, and none of its electorate candidates were elected. It subsequently merged with United New Zealand.
    6.50
    2 votes
    65

    People's Choice Party

    The People's Choice Party or PCP is a New Zealand political party. The People's Choice Party was conceived in 1997 when Doug Wilson began a protest walk from New Plymouth to Wellington collecting 52,000 signatures for a petition calling for the then Governor-General Sir Michael Hardie Boys to impose a snap election. It was a historical event in that it was the first ever people's petition to have been presented to a Governor-General in New Zealand. The People's Choice Party was officially registered on 14 May 1999 after declaring 1172 financial members. The party was de-registered after Doug Wilson's retirement in 2002. It remained and stayed active as a Ginger Group and supported Rusty Kane as an Independent on national and local issues. These included the Waitara Leaseholders Associations (WLA) fight with the NPDC and Māori to freehold Waitara land and his activities with CEPRA (Chemically Exposed Paritutu Association) fight with the Government Ministers and the TDHB to have New Plymouth's Paritutu residents and workers be recognised for being chemically exposed from living and working in or near the old Ivon Watkins Dow Chemical Plant now (Dow Agro) at Paritutu, and his
    6.50
    2 votes
    66
    Unite Union

    Unite Union

    The Unite Union (Unite) is a trade union in New Zealand. It is the sponsor of the Supersizemypay.com campaign directed towards improving working conditions for fast food workers in the country, in addition to representing other hospitality and retail workers. The current secretary of Unite is Matt McCarten. Unite is affiliated with the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions. It was the inspiration for the Australian UNITE Union, which was founded in Melbourne in 2003. In response to the Key Government's amendment to the Employment Relations Act 2000 allowing small businesses greater liberty to 'hire and fire' workers in the first 90 days, Unite established the 'Rat Patrol' to name and shame companies that abuse the legislation. McCarten's United Support Services, a company he formed to supply support services to the union, was placed into liquidation on 17 June 2011 owing $92,000 in unpaid taxes to the IRD.
    6.50
    2 votes
    67

    WIN Party

    The WIN Party was a small political party in New Zealand. It was founded by a group of publicans and bar-owners who objected to the government's ban on smoking in bars and restaurants, introduced in December 2004 its leader was Nav Karan Parmar who was an owner of a bar himself. WIN's slogan was "Freedom of Choice", and the party said that it was fighting a growing trend in which "the average Kiwi ... is being told more and more what they can and can't do". According to the party's leaders, opposition to the smoking ban was the party's primary campaign plank, but other related issues were also given attention. WIN's leader was John van Buren, a publican from the Banks Peninsula area. Geoff Mulvihill, a publican from Timaru, was the deputy leader. Both van Buren and Mulvihill have been accused by the Ministry of Health of not enforcing the smoking ban, as required by law. Mulvihill is known for supporting freedom of choice for his patrons, having once lost his liquor license for operating around the clock prior to the legislation of 24 hour trading. The party had been given official registration, but chose not to field candidates in the 2005 elections. Instead, it endorsed the
    5.00
    3 votes
    68

    New Zealand National Front

    The New Zealand National Front is a small white nationalist political party in New Zealand. Mirroring developments in the UK, a group called the National Front evolved out of the New Zealand branch of the League of Empire Loyalists in 1967. It was led by Brian Thompson; another notable member was Roger Clare who would later become an activist with the League of St George. It published a magazine called Counter-attack. The group dissolved by the beginning of the 1970s, with Thompson remaining an overseas supporter of the UK National Front. The National Front of New Zealand, commonly known as the "New Zealand National Front" (NZNF) was an initiative of John Tyndall of the British National Front formed in 1977; sister organisations were also formed in Australia and South Africa at the same time. The party's first Chairman was David Crawford aided by Brian Thompson, with Kerry Bolton joining in 1978. It distributed "large numbers of Holocaust denial pamphlets and books". Thompson represented the NZNF at the march in Lewisham in 1977. The NZNF encouraged its activists to infiltrate mainstream parties such as the National Party. The organisation became moribund during the early 1980s,
    6.00
    2 votes
    69

    Te Tawharau

    Te Tawharau (roughly translated as "the shelter") was a Māori political party in New Zealand. Te Tawharau briefly had representation in Parliament when Tuariki Delamere, a former New Zealand First MP, transferred his loyalty to it. In the 1999 elections, Te Tawharau contested electorates under its own banner, but contested the party vote as part of the Mana Māori Movement. It did not, however, win any seats, with Delamere losing his position to Mita Ririnui of the Labour Party. Te Tawharau was founded by Delamere, the late Wharekaihua (Willie) Coates and Rangitukehu David Paul. Te Tawharau was founded on the principles espoused by Te Haahi Ringatu (the Ringatu Church) and sought to persuade the Māori people to recognise that under the new MMP voting system it was possible for Māori to hold the balance of power if Māori was able to unite under a common umbrella. In the 1999 general election the Māori parties of Te Tawharau, Mana Māori and Piri Wiri Tua formed a political alliance for that very purpose. Although that 1999 alliance did not win any seats the next step in that journey of Māori political awakening was reached in 2005 with the Māori Party winning 4 of the Māori
    6.00
    2 votes
    70

    Country Party

    The Country Party of New Zealand was a political party which based itself around rural voters. It was represented in Parliament from 1928 to 1938. Its policies were a mixture of rural advocacy and social credit theory. The Country Party had its origins in the Auckland Farmers' Union, a branch of the New Zealand Farmers' Union which covered most of the upper North Island. In the 1920s, members of this branch increasingly came to believe that the Reform Party, which traditionally enjoyed much support in rural areas, was now putting the interests of farmers behind those of businesses in the city. The Auckland branch was also strongly influenced by the social credit theory of monetary reform, promoted by C. H. Douglas. Many farmers believed that the country's financial system did not treat them fairly, and that they were being exploited by big-city bankers and moneylenders. The Auckland branch grew increasingly frustrated with the Farmers' Union leadership, which did not support having an independent rural party. Eventually members of the Auckland branch established the Country Party without the Union's backing. In 1928, the branch broke away from the Union altogether, giving its full
    7.00
    1 votes
    71

    Mana Māori Movement

    The Mana Māori Movement was a New Zealand political party. It advocated on behalf of the Māori people. It was founded by Eva Rickard, a prominent Māori activist. Rickard was originally a member of Mana Motuhake, another Māori party, but quit when Mana Motuhake joined the Alliance (a broad left-wing coalition). Rickard, believing that an independent Māori party was needed, founded Mana Māori in 1993. Rickard's daughter, Angeline Greensill later took over co-leadership of the Mana Māori Movement, the largest wholly Māori party contesting the New Zealand general election, 2002, and incorporated the smaller Te Tawharau and Piri Wiri Tua parties, but did not win any seats. The emergence of the new Māori Party, founded by sitting MP Tariana Turia, prompted the transfer of support from Mana Māori, and Greensill agreed to temporarily recess the party which was officially deregistered in 2005.
    7.00
    1 votes
    72

    Democratic Labour Party

    The Democratic Labour Party (DLP) was a left-wing political party in New Zealand in the 1940s. It was a splinter from the larger Labour Party, and was led by the prominent socialist John A. Lee. The Democratic Labour Party originated in the internal disputes within the first Labour Party government, which lasted from 1935 to 1949. The division was primarily between moderates, such as Michael Joseph Savage, Peter Fraser, and Walter Nash, and radicals like Lee. Lee and his allies criticised the "cautious" approach taken by the party's leadership, and advocated a considerably stronger policy line. Lee's views were a mixture of conventional socialist theory and the social credit theory of monetary reform. He was also strongly critical of the Labour Party's internal structures, calling its leadership unaccountable and autocratic. MPs sympathetic to Lee’s credit ideas were Arnold Nordmeyer, Bill Barnard, Clyde Carr, Gervan McMillan and also Bill Anderton, Dan Sullivan, Gordon Hultquist and William John Lyon (Hultquist and Lyon both died while serving in World War II). In 1940, after a long period of rebellion against the Labour Party leadership, Lee was finally expelled from the party.
    4.67
    3 votes
    73

    People's Movement

    The People's Movement was a political party in New Zealand. It was active in the late 1930s and early 1940s, and was individualist in outlook. It campaigned for a reduction in the size of government, a reform of the civil service, a limit on the powers of political parties, and an end to the governing Labour Party's "socialist" policies. Although the Movement had a relatively high political profile, it did not achieve any notable successes. In April 1940, the Movement was joined by Albert Davy, a political organiser who had been credited with successful campaigns for the United Party and the Reform Party, but Davy failed to make much impact. In February 1941, a faction of the Movement merged into the National Party, and in 1942, Davy branched off to found the New Zealand Co-operative Party. In the 1943 elections, the remnants of the People's Movement sponsored a number of candidates under the name of the "Independent Group", but none were elected.
    4.67
    3 votes
    74

    New Zealand Republican Party

    The New Zealand Republican Party of 1995 was a political party which campaigned for the creation of a New Zealand republic as one of its main policies. It existed from 1995 to 2002. The party was registered as an incorporated society on 24 January 1995 as "The Confederation of United Tribes of New Zealand Incorporated" but changed its name on 8 February 1995 to the New Zealand Republican Party. It was led by William Powell. Although the party was registered in time for the 1996 election, it was late in submitting its party list. The party challenged its exclusion as a result of failing to submit a list at the High Court of New Zealand, and attempted to have the 1996 elections postponed to allow this. Their application for an injunction was rejected however. In the 1999 election, the party submitted a list, but won only 0.01% (292 votes in total) of the vote, the lowest of all registered parties. The party was officially de-registered on 24 June 2002., just before the 2002 election
    5.50
    2 votes
    75

    Social Credit Party

    The New Zealand Social Credit Party (sometimes called "Socred") was a political party which served as the country's "third party" from the 1950s through into the 1980s. The party held a number of seats in the Parliament of New Zealand, although never more than two at a time. It has since renamed itself the New Zealand Democratic Party, and was for a time part of the Alliance. The party was based around the ideas of Social Credit, an economic theory established by C. H. Douglas. Social Credit movements also existed in Australia (see: Douglas Credit Party & Australian League of Rights), Canada (see: Canadian social credit movement), and the United Kingdom (see: UK Social Credit Party) although the relationship between those movements and the New Zealand movement was not always good. Before the founding of the Social Credit party in 1953, there was the Social Credit Association. The Association focused most of its efforts on the Country Party and New Zealand Labour Party, where they attempted to influence policy. Roly Marks stood as a monetary reform candidate for Wanganui in the 1943 general election, and was later made a life member of the League. Social Credit claimed that the
    5.50
    2 votes
    76

    Libertarianz

    Libertarianz is a political party in New Zealand (hence the suffix -nz) that advocates libertarianism, favouring self-government and limiting the power of the government over the individual. Ayn Rand's philosophy of Objectivism is a major influence on the party. Its slogan, "More Freedom, Less Government", is indicative of the party's basic policy platform. Libertarianz was founded in late 1995 by Ian Fraser, who served as the party's first leader. Later, Lindsay Perigo, a well-known New Zealand broadcaster for Radio New Zealand and TVNZ, assumed the leadership. Perigo was followed as leader by Peter Cresswell and then Russell Watkins. The current leader is Richard McGrath, and the Party president is Shane Pleasance. The party's first campaign was the 1996 election, the first to be held under the MMP electoral system. Libertarianz's involvement in the election produced negligible public interest. They gained 671 votes (0.03%), which placed them in 19th place. In the 1999 elections, the party performed somewhat better, gaining 5,949 votes (0.29%). This put them in 11th place, and in fourth place among the parties which did not gain seats in parliament. Libertarianz did not contest
    4.33
    3 votes
    77

    ACT New Zealand

    ACT New Zealand is a free market political party in New Zealand. Until the New Zealand general election, 2011 it was led by former National Party leader and Reserve Bank Governor Don Brash. The party's current leader is John Banks. ACT now has one member of the Parliament of New Zealand, which is John Banks, a former two-term Auckland mayor and Police and Tourism ministers in the New Zealand National Party Bolger administrations of the nineties. According to former party leader Rodney Hide, the party stands for "individual freedom, personal responsibility, doing the best for our natural environment and for smaller, smarter government in its goals of a prosperous economy, a strong society, and a quality of life that is the envy of the world". The name comes from the initials of the Association of Consumers and Taxpayers, founded in 1993 by Roger Douglas and Derek Quigley, from which the party grew in 1994. The party is commonly known by the acronym "ACT" and pronounced as a word rather than as initials. ACT bases its philosophy on individual freedom and on personal responsibility. ACT states its principles as: Former leader Don Brash promised to focus the party on controlling
    5.00
    2 votes
    78

    Hell Pizza

    Hell Pizza is a New Zealand-based pizza chain. Hell began in New Zealand in 1996 next to Victoria University, and has expanded within New Zealand and to the UK, Australia, Ireland ,Canada and Korea. Hell Pizza International is owned by Warren Powell, Callum Davies and Stu McMullin. In 2006, Hell sold the New Zealand Master Franchise rights to Tasman Pacific Foods (the NZ master franchisee for Burger King) for NZ$15,000,000 and aimed to expand to the UK. The NZ Master Franchise rights were purchased back from Tasman Pacific Foods in 2009. There are currently 64 stores nationwide in New Zealand. Since arriving to the UK in 2006, Hell have opened a pilot store in Fulham, as well as two franchisee operated stores in Clapham and Shepherds Bush, all in London. Australia has opened two stores in South-east Queensland. Hell also opened its first stores in Dublin, Ireland, and Vancouver, Canada, in 2009 and in India in 2010. In 2009 Hells Pizza owner Warren Powell verbally pledged to pay all proceeds from a Hell takeaway van at the Big Night In Telethon to the charity KidsCan, amounting to about NZ$10,000. Julie Nelson, chief executive of the charity, said "after seeing reports that some of
    5.00
    2 votes
    79
    Christian Democrat Party

    Christian Democrat Party

    The Christian Democrat Party of New Zealand was a Christian political party established in 1995. It contested the 1996 general election as part of the Christian Coalition with the Christian Heritage Party. It changed its name to Future New Zealand in 1998 and contested the 1999 election. It formed a coalition with the United Party as United Future New Zealand in 2000 and contested the 2002 election. The coalition became a full merger the following year. The Christian Democrats were founded by Graeme Lee, a National Party MP. Lee had a reputation as one of the more conservative MPs in Parliament, and was particularly active in opposing Fran Wilde's homosexual law reform bill. When the Christian Heritage Party, a strongly conservative group, was established, Lee initially rejected it, believing that it was better to work from within the National Party. Later, however, when he lost his ministerial rank in a Cabinet reshuffle, Lee decided to leave National. Although there were attempts to have him join Christian Heritage, Lee disagreed with many Christian Heritage policies. He instead established a group called the United Progressive Party. After a failed attempt to merge the United
    6.00
    1 votes
    80

    Department of Internal Affairs

    The New Zealand Department of Internal Affairs (in Māori Te Tari Taiwhenua) is a state sector organisation whose roles include the issue of passports; administering citizenship grant applications, and lottery grant applications; enforcement of censorship and gambling law; registration of births, deaths, marriages and civil unions; providing policy advice on a range of issues; and supplying support services to Ministers of the Crown. Other services provided by the department include a translation service, publication of the New Zealand Gazette (the official newspaper of the Government of New Zealand), a flag hire service, management of VIP visits to New Zealand, running the Lake Taupo harbourmaster's office (under a special agreement with the local iwi) and the administration of offshore islands. The Minister of Internal Affairs is the Hon. Chris Tremain and Peter Mersi is the Acting Secretary of Internal Affairs. However, in total there are seven Ministers with responsibilities administered by the Department. On 25 March 2010 the Minister of State Services announced that Archives New Zealand and the National Library of New Zealand would be merged into the Department. Library and
    6.00
    1 votes
    81

    Radical Party

    The Radical Party was a proposed new political party in New Zealand. It was part of an abortive attempt by members of the Liberal Party to establish a breakaway group. No actual party was ever formed, but the name was frequently applied to the group of dissident MPs by the press. The leaders of the Radical Party proposal were George Russell and Frederick Pirani, both Liberal Party MPs. Russell and Pirani, along with other MPs such as William Collins and George Smith, were dissatisfied with the Liberal Party under Richard Seddon, believing that it had lost its commitment to its founding ideals. Both were considered to belong to the Liberal Party's left wing. In 1896, Russell spoke openly about formalising "the advanced section of the Liberal Party", either as an organised faction in the Liberal caucus or as a separate party. However, the new group failed to emerge. Tensions appeared to rise between its various members, with rumours circulating that neither Russell nor Pirani would concede the leadership to the other. The MPs whose names had been mentioned in connection with the Radical Party distanced themselves from it, stating that they had never made any commitments. Pirani and
    6.00
    1 votes
    82
    New Zealand National Party

    New Zealand National Party

    The New Zealand National Party (Māori: Rōpū Nāhinara, "National" or "the Nats") is a centre-right New Zealand political party, and one of the two major parties in New Zealand politics. The party was founded in 1936 on the merger of the United and Reform parties, making it the nation's second-oldest political party. As of April 2012, National has the largest share of seats in the New Zealand House of Representatives, with 59 out of a total of 121. Since November 2008, it has been the incumbent governing party, forming a minority government with support from three minor parties. According to the party's website, "The National Party seeks a safe, prosperous and successful New Zealand that creates opportunities for all New Zealanders to reach their personal goals and dreams". The National Party As of 2007 advocates policies of reducing taxes, reducing social welfare payments, promoting free trade, restoring or maintaining New Zealand's traditional (Western) defence and security alliances and promoting one standard of citizenship for all New Zealanders ("One law for all"). The party's policy-documents contain commitments to doubling New Zealand's economic growth, to giving welfare
    4.50
    2 votes
    83

    Ethnic Minority Party of New Zealand

    The Ethnic Minority Party was a New Zealand political party which focused on Asian voters, particularly Chinese and Indians. The party was formed on 2 April 1996, and hoped to take advantage of the benefits given to smaller parties by the new MMP electoral system. It was organised by Robert Hum, an immigrant to New Zealand from Malaysia. The party's foundation came as the anti-immigration New Zealand First party made significant gains in the polls. In the 1996 elections, it stood a list of eleven candidates, and received 0.12% of the vote. In 1997, the Ethnic Minority Party merged into the United New Zealand party, and in the 1999 elections, many Ethnic Minority Party candidates were in high positions on United's list. However, United won only a single seat, leaving the Ethnic Minority candidates outside Parliament. Later, United merged with another party to create the modern United Future New Zealand, and the Ethnic Minority influence has been considerably diluted.
    5.00
    1 votes
    84

    Finance and Information Workers Union

    Finance and Information Workers Union (Finsec) is a small organising trade union covering about 6,600 workers in the New Zealand finance sector. It was formed in 1990 from the merger of the Bank Officers’ Union and the Insurance Workers Union. The majority of its members work at one of the four big foreign owned banks in New Zealand; ASB, ANZ National Bank, BNZ and Westpac. However, it also covers legal employees, accountancy employees, stock and station employees and commerce workers, and a growing number of members work in call centres, information technology, communications and related industries. Finsec has offices in Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington and Christchurch. It is an affiliate of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions (NZCTU) and Union Network International (UNI).
    5.00
    1 votes
    85

    Freedom Party

    The Freedom Party was a political party in New Zealand. It was founded by Gareth Turner and Paul King, formerly members of the ACT New Zealand party. The party was announced on 13 March 2005, the same day that Turner failed to unseat Catherine Judd as president of ACT. Turner and King claimed that the leaders of ACT were ignoring ordinary members, and were too closely influenced by big business. Turner claimed that the party would have enough support to register for the 2005 elections, but this did not occur. The party did not nominate any candidates.
    5.00
    1 votes
    86

    Natural Law Party

    The Natural Law Party (NLP) was a transnational party based on the teachings of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. It was active in up to 74 countries, and ran candidates in at least ten. Founded in 1992, it was mostly disbanded in 2004 but continues in India and in some U.S. states. The NLP viewed "natural law" as the organizing principle that governs the universe. The Natural Law Party advocated using the Transcendental Meditation technique and the TM-Sidhi program to reduce or eliminate problems in society. Perhaps the most prominent candidate running on the NLP platform was John Hagelin, who campaigned for U.S. president in 1992, 1996, and 2004. The NLP in the United Kingdom received attention due to the support of former members of The Beatles. The only electoral successes were achieved by the Ajeya Bharat Party in India, which elected a legislator to a state assembly, and by the Croatian NLP, which elected a member of a regional assembly in 1993. The Natural Law Party (NLP) was founded in the U.S. in 1992 by a group of educators, business leaders, and lawyers in Fairfield, Iowa, many of whom practiced the Transcendental Meditation technique. While Natural Law Party leaders denied formal
    4.00
    2 votes
    87

    Nga Iwi Morehu Movement

    The Nga Iwi Morehu Movement is a New Zealand political party based around Māori. Its name literally translates as "the surviving people" or "the remnant people". It contested the 1996 election as an unregistered party, running a single candidate and gaining 194 votes. It ran two candidates in the 2002 election, winning 522 votes. In the 1999 election, members of Nga Iwi Morehu stood under the banner of the Freedom Movement. In September 2011 it applied to register its logo with the Electoral Commission. The application was declined on the grounds that, in the opinion of the Electoral Commission, the logo could mislead voters into believing that the party was backed by the Ratana Church. The party is standing two electorate candidates in the 2011 election under the label "Nga Iwi" — Te Ariki Karamaene in Hauraki-Waikato and Jennifer Waitai-Rapana in Te Tai Hauāuru.
    4.00
    2 votes
    88

    Mana Wahine Te Ira Tangata

    Mana Wahine Te Ira Tangata was a small and short-lived political party in New Zealand. It was established by Alamein Kopu, a member of the Parliament of New Zealand who had left her original party (the Alliance). After a short time as an independent MP, Kopu established Mana Wahine as her own party. It was officially registered on 12 June 1998. The name "Mana Wahine Te Ira Tangata" is difficult to translate, but essentially refers to dignity or respect for women. Kopu claims that the party was intended to support Māori women, promoting a Māori form of feminism. Critics of Alamein Kopu, however, did not see the party as a genuine ideological organization. Rather, they saw a more cynical reason for the party's creation – as leader of a party rather than an independent, Kopu was entitled to $80,000 in additional funding. Jim Anderton, leader of Kopu's former party, said that the creation of Mana Wahine approached corruption, a sentiment which was echoed by several other politicians. Kopu (and thus Mana Wahine) closely followed the National Party government of Jenny Shipley. National, having recently ended its coalition with the New Zealand First party, was highly interested in finding
    4.00
    1 votes
    89

    New Zealand Socialist Party

    The New Zealand Socialist Party was founded in 1901, promoting the works of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. The group, despite being relatively moderate when compared with many other socialists, met with little tangible success, but it nevertheless had considerable impact on the development of New Zealand socialism. It was one of the parties that united in 1916 to form the New Zealand Labour Party. The party was founded by members of the 'Clarionettes', a group of about 190 English Socialist immigrants recruited through William Ranstead's weekly publication. The original goal was to establish a socialist colony, though the colony was never organized. The Wellington branch of the party was founded on 28 July 1901, and the Christchurch branch in January 1902. Some of the most prominent leaders of the party were Frederick Cooke, Ted Howard, and Tom Mann. By 1903, Robert Hogg was publishing a party journal called the "Commonweal" in Wellington. Membership had increased to 3,000 by April 1908. A different group, the Socialist Party of New Zealand, was founded in 1930 and became the World Socialist Party (New Zealand).
    4.00
    1 votes
    90

    Northern Amalgamated Workers' Union

    The Northern Amalgamated Workers' Union (AWUNZ) is a trade union in New Zealand. It is one of three autonomous unions, with the Southern Amalgamated Workers' Union, and the Central Amalgamated Workers' Union, who operate nationally as the Amalgamated Workers' Union. The AWUNZ is a member of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
    4.00
    1 votes
    91

    One New Zealand Party

    The One New Zealand Party was a small political party in New Zealand. It was partly modeled on the Australian One Nation Party, founded by Pauline Hanson. Its primary focus was on matters such as the Treaty of Waitangi, but its wider platform was broadly paleoconservative or producerist. It strongly opposed the policies of the government at the time, accusing it of giving special privileges to Māori and of undermining the concept of "one law for all". It claims that the policies amount to a form of apartheid. People involved with the party included Richard Fisher, John Porter, and Alan McCulloch, a former mayor of East Coast Bays. One New Zealand was founded in 1999, and in the 1999 elections, it won 0.06% of the vote. In the 2002 elections, it won 0.09% of the vote. In the 2005 elections, it won 0.02% of the vote. In 2006, the party went into recess pending a decision as to whether the party would continue. In September, it was deregistered at its own request.
    4.00
    1 votes
    92

    The Hunger Project

    The Hunger Project (THP) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization incorporated in the state of California. The Hunger Project describes itself as an organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. It has ongoing programs in Africa, Asia and Latin America, where it implements programs aimed at mobilizing rural grassroots communities to achieve sustainable progress in health, education, nutrition and family income. The Hunger Project is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. In Africa, Asia and Latin America, The Hunger Project seeks to end hunger and poverty by empowering people to lead lives of self-reliance, meet their own basic needs and build better futures for their children. The Hunger Project carries out its mission through three activities: mobilizing village clusters at the grassroots level to build self-reliance, empowering women as key change agents, and forging effective partnerships with local government. In 2009 The Hunger Project was active in Africa, in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, and Uganda, in Asia, in Bangladesh and India, and in Latin America, in
    4.00
    1 votes
    93
    The Kiwi Party

    The Kiwi Party

    The Kiwi Party was a New Zealand political party formed in 2007. Briefly known as Future New Zealand, it was a breakaway from the United Future New Zealand party and sought to carry on the tradition of Future New Zealand. The party was formed when MP Gordon Copeland left United Future after a dispute over support for the Crimes (Substituted Section 59) Amendment Act 2007. At the 2008 general election, the Kiwi Party was unsuccessful, and was not re-elected to Parliament. It did not contest the 2011 general election under its own banner, but the leaders and other members stood for the Conservative Party. The party advocated more direct democracy through referenda and a return to the "Judeo-Christian ethic in democracy". On February 8 2012, it requested that the New Zealand Electoral Commission cancel its registration, which rendered it wholly subsumed into the Conservative Party. On its website, it announced that after holding a executive committee meeting in December 2011, the party had agreed to be 'wound up' and 'bring its existence to an end.' On 16 May 2007, list MP Gordon Copeland resigned from the United Future party, citing differences with party leader Peter Dunne over the
    4.00
    1 votes
    94

    Animals First

    Animals First was a New Zealand political party dedicated to animal rights and animal welfare. In the 1996 elections, it won 0.17% of the vote, putting it in twelfth place. In the 1999 elections, it declined slightly, winning 0.16% of the vote (fourteenth place). The party was deregistered at its own request the following year.
    0.00
    0 votes
    95

    Green Society

    The Green Society was a small New Zealand political party dedicated to environmentalism. It was one of three environmentalist parties involved in the 1996 elections, the others being the Green Party (then part of the Alliance) and the Progressive Green Party. The Green Society believed that environmentalism should be the sole and exclusive focus of any "green" party, and that both of the other groups were in error in their attempts to lay out social and economic policies as well. The party was led by Simon Reeves, an environmental lawyer, who contested the Auckland Central electorate. The party contested 8 electorates as well as the party list, but gained only 1,140 electorate and 2,363 list votes (0.11%), failing to win any seats. The party did not contest the 1999 election and was deregistered in February 2001. The Green Society was established in 2005 as a NGO (Non Government Organization) It is an international movement of persons, business and organizations that wish to create local and global support systems that develop sustainable resource based communities. We are currently expanding our humanitarian efforts to spread technologies that provide the essential needs for
    0.00
    0 votes
    96

    Imperial Party of New Zealand

    The Imperial Party of New Zealand is a political party from New Zealand. Its leader is Jeffery Robinson. Its policies include restricting immigration, forced repatriation, chemical castration for sex offenders, the re-introduction of slavery, and supporting the creation of a Commonwealth Parliament. It has since been revealed as a comedy hoax against the Imperial Party in Britain.
    0.00
    0 votes
    97

    New Zealand Conservative Party

    The New Zealand Conservative Party (originally known as Right of Centre) was a short-lived political party in New Zealand. It was founded by a dissident National Party MP, Ross Meurant. Meurant had led the New Zealand Police's high-profile "Red Squad" during the controversial 1981 Springbok Tour. he became a National Party MP in 1987 and won re-election as such in 1990 and in 1993. Meurant often clashed with the leadership of the National Party over Maori policy, and was regarded as one of the leading dissidents within the National caucus at the time. Eventually, in September 1994, Meurant decided to break away from National and to establish his own party, adopting the name "Right of Centre" (or "ROC"). The acronym represented Meurant's right-wing economic philosophy of privatisation of government assets. The new party was originally conceived by former National MPs Rob Munro (formerly a lieutenant-colonel in the New Zealand Army), lawyer Graham Reeves, and Meurant. Munro and Reeves had lost their National seats in 1993. Meurant remained in Parliament but was an implacable critic of Prime Minister Jim Bolger. To some extent the new party represented an opportunity for the former
    0.00
    0 votes
    98

    New Zealand Open Source Society

    The New Zealand Open Source Society is an incorporated society supporting the advocacy and promotion of open source software in New Zealand. NZOSS was formed in February 2003, after David Lane wrote an open letter suggesting the use of open source software in Government in 2002, co-signed by over four hundred New Zealanders Peter Harrison then suggested that a national organisation be formed to promote and advocate use of open source software, via the New Zealand Linux Users Group. This led to several meetings throughout New Zealand in 2002 and 2003, and finally resulted in the NZOSS being formed as a formal incorporated society on the 27th of February 2003. Since this time the NZOSS has been involved with various efforts to promote open source in Government, including participation with the Ministry of Economic Development's Authentication Project, and later a report on the State Services Commission guidelines on the legal issues of open source software. The society has an active mailing list known as 'OpenChat', which is open to participation from anyone with an interest in F/OSS and the business of the Society. Membership of the society is required for voting rights, and helps
    0.00
    0 votes
    99
    New Zealand Public Service Association

    New Zealand Public Service Association

    The NZPSA –New Zealand Public Service Association Te Pukenga Here Tikanga Mahi – is a democratic union representing the interests of around 59,000 members working in government departments, local government, the health sector, crown agencies, state-owned enterprises and community and government-funded agencies. It is the largest trade union in New Zealand. The PSA represents members on workplace issues, negotiates collective employment agreements and advocates for strong public services. The PSA is affiliated to the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions and Public Services International. Though its origins go back to 1890, The New Zealand Public Service Association officially dates from 1 October 1913. The early history of the PSA is one of dogged resistance to cuts in pay and conditions. Public servants were poorly paid and were often forced to take pay cuts when the economy stalled. In 1931, for example, all public servant salaries were cut by 10%. Many public servants suffered acute hardship. It was only loans from the Public Service Investment Society, set up by the PSA in 1928, that prevented many of them falling into the clutches of loans sharks. Working conditions were
    0.00
    0 votes
    100

    Phoenix Party

    The Phoenix Party was a short-lived left-wing political party in New Zealand. It was founded by Gerald Williams, formerly an organiser for the Labour Party. During Norman Kirk's leadership of Labour (1965–1974), Williams came to disagree with a number of Labour Party policies, particularly over the policy of giving state funding to church schools. Believing that the Labour Party was becoming moribund, Williams founded the Phonenix Party. The name is an allusion to the mythical Phoenix, representing Williams' hope that the party would "rise from the ashes" of the Labour Party. Williams was the party's only candidate, and attracted a certain number of protest votes. In the 1969 elections, he contested the Dunedin Central electorate, placing fourth (with 365 votes). He continued to criticise the Labour Party by means of satire. Williams later became a member of the Values Party, the world's first national-level environmentalist political party.
    0.00
    0 votes
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