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Most famous Companies from Netherlands

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    1

    National European Social Movement

    The National European Social Movement (NESB, Dutch: Nationaal Europese Sociale Beweging) was a Dutch neo-Nazi party, founded in 1953 as the political arm of the Stichting Oud Politieke Delinquenten ("Foundation for Political Delinquents"), and disbanded by a ruling of the Dutch Supreme Court in 1955. Since the Second World War, three parties have been disbanded by court order in the Netherlands. The other two parties are the Nederlandse Volks-Unie (NVU, Dutch People's Union) and Centre Party. The NESB was founded by Paul van Tienen, a former Waffen-SS commandant in the Wiking Division, and Jan Wolthuis, a former NSB member.
    9.00
    5 votes
    2

    Pacifist Socialist Party

    The Pacifist Socialist Party (in Dutch: Pacifistisch Socialistische Partij, PSP) was a Dutch left-socialist political party. The PSP played a small role in Dutch politics. It is a predecessor of the GreenLeft. In 1955 a group of "politically homeless" activists had formed. The group mainly consisted of former members of the Labour Party (PvdA) and the Communist Party of the Netherlands (CPN). They had left the PvdA over the military intervention against the Indonesian independence movement and the Labour party's support for NATO. Many of them had a background in the orthodox Marxist wing of the Social Democratic Workers' Party or the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), which had merged into the PvdA. The member of the CPN had left their party over the Stalinist course of the CPN. Some of these politically homeless had never been members of parties, while others had been member of pre-war parties such as the Independent Socialist Party. These politically homeless individuals were a diverse group: progressive Christians, leftwing socialists, orthodox Marxists, anti-Stalinist Trotskyists, left communists, liberal pacifists and some anarchists. Many of them were active in the developing
    7.00
    6 votes
    3
    General Dutch Fascist League

    General Dutch Fascist League

    The General Dutch Fascist League (in Dutch Algemeene Nederlandsche Fascisten Bond, ANFB) was a Dutch fascist party. It was founded in 29 June 1932 and dissolved in 1934. The leader of ANFB was Jan Baars, a merchant from Amsterdam. ANFB won 17,157 votes in the general elections of 1933, 0.46% of the total. This was insufficient for a seat in parliament. ANFB then entered into a 'corporative concentration' with the followers of Alfred Haighton and the National Union. Jan Baars did not get on with Carel Gerretson (the leader of National Union), therefore Baars quit ANFB. Consequently, ANFB floundered without its leader and disappeared. The party sought to create a volksfascisme, although they failed to fully define this aim and were considered closer to Benito Mussolini than Adolf Hitler despite their rhetoric. Payne, Stanley G. (2001). A History of Fascism 1914-1945. London: Roultedge. p. 302.
    8.00
    5 votes
    4

    Christian Democratic Party

    The Christian Democratic Party (in Dutch: Christen-Democratische Partij, CDP) was a Dutch left-wing Christian-democratic political party. The CDP played only a minor role in parliament. It is historically linked to both the Labour Party and the Christian Democratic Appeal. Between 1894 and 1901 Andries Staalman was a member of the House of Representatives for the district of Den Helder. He was a member of the main Reformed party, the Anti Revolutionary Party (ARP). He operated on the left of the ARP and he advocated increased government interference in the economy and the extension of suffrage. In 1901 Staalman was re-elected into the House of Representatives on an Anti-Revolutionary Ticket, but he was dissatisfied by the conservative course of the ARP. Staalman therefore sat as an independent Anti-Revolutionary. He was dissatisfied by the conservative composition and program of the cabinet Abraham Kuyper had formed after the elections and did not support it. Before the elections 1905 Staalman founded his own party the Christian Democratic Party to enter in the elections. He was unable to win a seat. Between 1909 and 1917 Staalman entered in several other elections. In 1917
    9.25
    4 votes
    5

    Frisian League

    The League of caucuses on Christian Historical foundation in the province of Friesland (in Dutch: Bond van Kiesvereenigingen op Christelijk-Historischen grondslag in de provincie Friesland, informally called Frisian League or Friesche Bond) is a Dutch conservative Reformed political party. The Frisian League is historically linked to the Christian Democratic Appeal, which is currently one of the major parties of the Netherlands. The Frisian League was founded on 24 March 1898 by the reformed minister Hoedemaker. It was founded as one of several parties that were founded in the 1890s, which all turned again the leadership and ideology of Abraham Kuyper, the leader of the Protestant Anti Revolutionary Party. Kuyper had initiated a new political course for Protestantism in the Netherlands, which included cooperation with the Catholics, in the coalition, strategical support for extension of suffrage a rejection of theocracy in favour of a specific conception of state neutrality, sphere sovereignty and a strong party organization and party discipline. The party also rejected the split of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands from the Dutch Reformed Church. The party won one seat
    7.40
    5 votes
    6
    National Socialist Movement in the Netherlands

    National Socialist Movement in the Netherlands

    The National Socialist Movement in the Netherlands (Dutch: Nationaal-Socialistische Beweging in Nederland, NSB) was a Dutch fascist and later national socialist political party. As a parliamentary party participating in legislative elections, the NSB had some success during the 1930s. It remained the only legal party in the Netherlands during most of the Second World War. The NSB was founded in Utrecht in 1931 during a period when several nationalist, fascist and national socialist parties were founded. The founders were Anton Mussert, who became the party's leader, and Cornelis van Geelkerken. The party based its program on Italian fascism and German national socialism, however unlike the latter before 1936 the party was not anti-semitic and even had Jewish members. In 1933, after a year of building an organization, the party organized its first public meeting, a Landdag in Utrecht which was attended by 600 party militants. Here the party presented itself. After that the party's support began to grow. In the same year the government forbade civil servants to be members of the NSB. In the provincial elections of 1935 the party gained 8 percent of the votes and two seats in the
    7.40
    5 votes
    7

    One NL

    Eén NL (One NL) is a Dutch political party founded in September 2006. It took part in the 2006 Dutch election under the leadership of Marco Pastors and Joost Eerdmans, but a dismal election result leaves the political future of the party quite uncertain. The party is seen as one of the political heirs of the late Pim Fortuyn. The Eén in the name Eén NL, meaning 'one', emphasizes national unity where NL is the standard abbreviation of the Netherlands. The party broadly stands for opposition to mass immigration to the Netherlands, tax cutting and shrinking government, zero tolerance on crime, constitutional reform (particularly more direct democracy and the direct election of the prime minister and members of parliament), restoring the "human dimension" in large public sectors such as education and health care, and a skeptical attitude to European integration. Although the party is critical of the "islamization" of the Netherlands, in favor of the assimilation of minorities and opposed to further immigration, it is perceived as taking a less hard line on this issue than other right-wing parties such as Geert Wilders' Party for Freedom or Hilbrand Nawijn's Party for the Netherlands.
    7.40
    5 votes
    8

    Socialist Alternative Politics

    The Socialist Alternative Politics (Dutch: Socialistische Alternatieve Politiek) is a socialist political party in the Netherlands without parliamentary representation. Many of its members are currently active in the Socialist Party, as for instance a member of the party's board was elected into the Rotterdam municipal council for the SP. The party was formed as a split from the Pacifist Socialist Party in 1972. It was originally called League of International Communists (Dutch: Internationale Kommunistenbond). It changed its name to Socialist Workers Party (Dutch: Socialistische Arbeiderspartij), then to SAP-Rebel. The party is the Dutch section of the United Secretariat of the Fourth International. They publish a magazine called Grenzeloos (Borderless).
    7.20
    5 votes
    9

    Roman Catholic Party of the Netherlands

    The Roman Catholic Party Netherlands (in Dutch: Rooms Katholieke Partij Nederland, RKPN) was a Dutch strict catholic political party. The RKPN played a marginal role in Dutch politics. The RKPN was founded by former members of the Catholic People's Party who were upset with what they saw as the liberal course of their party. In reaction they founded the RKPN. In the 1972 the party got one seat, which was taken by Klaas Beuker, who also was the party's chair. In 1974 a conflict between Beuker and the party board, caused him to continue as an independent MP. The party unsuccessfully entered in the 1977 elections. The RKPN was an orthodox catholic testimonial party in contrast to the pragmatic and liberal course of the Catholic People's Party. The party took the Ten Commandments as their main perspective. The RKPN followed the conservative course of Pope Paul VI. The RKPN wanted to strengthen catholic schools and youth work. It wanted to government to act against euthanasia and abortion. This table shows the RKPN's results in elections to the House of Representatives and Senate, as well as the party's political leadership: the fractievoorzitter, is the chair of the parliamentary party
    8.50
    4 votes
    10

    Evangelical People's Party

    The Evangelical People's Party (Dutch: Evangelische Volkspartij, EVP) was a minor progressive Christian political party in the Netherlands. The EVP was founded in March 1981 by members of the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA), which were united in the group "Not by Bread Alone" (Niet bij Brood Alleen) and members of the Evangelical Progressive Party, which had previously left the Protestant Anti Revolutionary Party. Both groups were opposed to the formation of the CDA and its conservative course. After winning one seat in the 1982 general election - it was unable to do so in 1981 - the party joined the opposition. The party became divided between a left wing and a centrist wing. The left wing wanted to co-operate with the Political Party of Radicals (which had split from the Catholic People's Party in 1968) and its left-wing allies, the Pacifist Socialist Party and the destalinized Communist Party of the Netherlands. The EVP was more reserved towards the CPN. The centrist wing wanted to co-operate with the Labour Party and the CDA. Although some members were willing to co-operate, the party congress rejected the co-operation with the CPN, the PSP and the PPR in the 1984 European
    8.00
    4 votes
    11

    Political Party of Radicals

    The Political Party of Radicals (Dutch: Politieke Partij Radikalen, PPR) was a Christian left and green political party in the Netherlands. The PPR played a relatively small role in Dutch politics. It historically linked to GreenLeft, into which it merged. The foundation of the PPR is linked to formation of the centre-right De Jong cabinet and the Christian-democratic alliance Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA). After the 1967 elections it became clear that a centre-right cabinet would be formed by the Protestant Anti Revolutionary Party (ARP) and Christian Historical Union (CHU), the Catholic People's Party (KVP) and the conservative-liberal People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD). Progressive forces within the KVP and ARP had hoped for the formation of a centre-left cabinet with the Labour Party (PvdA) without the participation of CHU and VVD. In March 1967 a group of "regret voters" (ARP-members who regretted voting ARP) published an advertisement in the Protestant paper Trouw, aimed at the leadership of the ARP: they claimed that the leftwing, so called "evangelically radical", ideal of the ARP could not be realised in a cabinet with the VVD. In April this group began to
    6.60
    5 votes
    12
    Anti-Revolutionary Party

    Anti-Revolutionary Party

    The Anti Revolutionary Party (in Dutch: Anti-Revolutionaire Partij, ARP) was a Dutch Protestant Christian democratic political party. The ARP is one of the predecessors of the Christian Democratic Appeal. After 1917 the party never received more than twenty percent of the vote. The anti-revolutionary parliamentary caucus had existed since the 1840s. It represented orthodox tendencies within the Dutch Reformed Church. Under the leadership of Guillaume Groen van Prinsterer they became a real political force, which opposed the liberal tendencies within the Dutch Reformed Church and the liberal tendencies within Dutch politics. The three values of the anti-revolutionaries were "God, the Netherlands, and the House of Orange". At the time the anti-revolutionary ideal was a Protestant theocracy in which Catholics and Jews were second-class citizens. An important issue was public education, which in the view of the anti-revolutionaries should be Protestant-Christian in nature. The anti-revolutionaries had ties with the April movement, which opposed the official re-establishment of Roman Catholic bishoprics, and a mixed relationship with (liberal-)conservatives in the House of
    7.25
    4 votes
    13

    Alliance for National Reconstruction

    The Alliance for National Reconstruction (in Dutch: Verbond voor Nationaal Herstel, VNH) was a Dutch conservative-nationalist political party. The VNH played only a marginal role in the Dutch parliament. Since 1931 Van Gybland Oosterhoff had tried to unite all conservative and nationalist forces in the Netherlands. In the autumn of 1932 he founded the National Reconstruction Concentration, which was to prepare the foundation of new conservative party. On January 28, 1933 this committee founded the Alliance for National Reconstruction. In 1933 the VNH entered in the election. Its top candidate Snijders, a former general, had already announced that he would not take his seat in parliament. He also served as the party's honorary chair. The party won one seat which was taken by the party's second candidate Westerman. After 1935 the party got considerable competition from the fascist NSB, many members advocated a merger with the NSB, wanted to steer a more conservative course. In 1937 Van Gybland Oosterhoff died, leaving the party in disarray. In the 1937 election the party lost its seats. Most of its members left the party, some found their way to the NSB. Since then the VNH saw itself
    7.00
    4 votes
    14

    Free Indian Party and Elderly Union

    The Free Indian Party and Elderly Union (in Dutch: Vrije Indische Partij en Ouderenunie) is a political alliance that participated the elections of 2003. It consisted out of the Free Indian Party (VIP) and the Elderly Union. The VIP was a political party for people from the Dutch former colonies, Dutch East India and Suriname, that never got a seat in the parliament. The elderly one issue parties, General Elderly Alliance and Union 55+ were very successful in the 1990s, gaining many seats, but after scandals, the elderly lost the confidence among their voters. VIP and old aged merged for the elections of 2003.
    7.00
    4 votes
    15

    Hervormd Gereformeerde Staatspartij

    The Hervormd Gereformeerde Staatspartij (in English: Reformed Reformed State Party (see below), HGS) was a Dutch orthodox Protestant political party during the interbellum. For its orthodox political ideals and its refusal to cooperate in any cabinet, the party is called a testimonial party. The HGS was founded in 1921 as split from the Protestant Christian Historical Union. The party's support from female suffrage and the Catholic/Protestant coalition were important reasons for the split. The direct reasons was a series of demonstrations held in Amsterdam by orthodox Protestants, who opposed the lifting of the ban on catholic processions in the Northern provinces. The movement had called itself the June Movement, a reference to the April movement which was crucial in the formation of the first Protestant party, the ARP. A driving force in the split had been the minister Casper Lingbeek. The split is very similar to the split of the orthodox Protestant SGP from the mainstream Protestant ARP. The party entered in the 1925 and won one seat, it was taken by Lingbeek. The elections were turbulent because the cabinet led by Charles Ruijs de Beerenbrouck had fallen over the Dutch
    7.00
    4 votes
    16

    Liberal Party

    The Liberal Party (in Dutch: Liberale Partij, LP) was a Dutch conservative liberal political party. The LP played only a marginal role in Dutch politics. The Liberal Party was founded in 1922 by 85-year old former minister Samuel van Houten in reaction to the foundation of the Liberal State Party which united all liberal parties. Van Houten disagreed with the political course of this new party especially where it came to economic policy and electoral law. Van Houten had started out as an extremely progressive liberal, who as an MP in the 1870s had initiated the first forms of social legislation and as a minister in the 1880s had reformed the electoral law. In the 1910s he had become more conservative, opposing encroaching social legislation and the new electoral system. In the 1922 elections the party won one seat. Van Houten was the party's top candidate; he had already announced that he would not take a seat in parliament, if the party would win too little seats. The party's one seat was taken by Lizzy van Dorp a classical liberal and feminist, who had been member of the Liberal State Party. After the elections of 1925 the Liberal Party merged with the State Party for People's
    7.00
    4 votes
    17

    Party of the Future

    The Partij van de Toekomst (Party of the Future) is a satirical political party of the Netherlands. The party is often named "The Party Party" because their program is heavily based on more parties and more fun in general, even suggesting there should be a "minister of partying". The party has never won a seat in the Dutch Parliament. The candidate list of the Party of the Future was filled with Dutch celebrities. Chairman was Johan Vlemmix, enthusiast monarchist and founder of the fanclub for Emily Bremers, the former girlfriend of Willem-Alexander, Prince of Orange. Second on the list was Theo Nabuurs, also called Mental Theo. He was famous for his Happy Hardcore house music and his controversial television programs, asking questions about sex in discos filled with youngsters. Third was Eric Dikeb. The filling of the list led to arguments, because Dutch positivity guru Emile Ratelband was not pleased with his position on the list, wanting to be second after Vlemmix. Emile Ratelband founded his own political party, List Ratelband.
    7.00
    4 votes
    18
    Party for Freedom

    Party for Freedom

    The Party for Freedom (Dutch: Partij voor de Vrijheid, PVV) is a right-wing political party in the Netherlands. Founded in 2005 as the successor to Geert Wilders' one-man party in the House of Representatives, it won nine seats in the 2006 general election, making it the fifth largest party in parliament. It came second in the 2009 European Parliament election, winning 4 out of 25 seats. In the 2010 general election it won 24 seats, making it the third largest party. Since then, the PVV has agreed to support the minority government led by Prime Minister Mark Rutte, without having ministers in the Rutte cabinet. However the PVV withdrew its support in April 2012 due to differences over budget cuts. With programme items like administrative detention and strong assimilationist stance on the integration of immigrants into Dutch society, the Party for Freedom breaks from the established centre right parties in the Netherlands (like the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy, VVD). In addition, the party is consistently Eurosceptic. PVV is the name under which the foundation Stichting Groep Wilders operates. It has Geert Wilders as its sole member., making the party unique in the Dutch
    5.80
    5 votes
    19
    Democrats 66

    Democrats 66

    Democrats 66 (Dutch: Democraten 66, D66; official name: Politieke Partij Democraten 66) is a progressive and social-liberal political party in the Netherlands. D66 was formed in 1966 by a group of politically unaligned, young intellectuals, led by journalist Hans van Mierlo. The party's main objective was to democratise the political system; it proposed to create an American style presidential system. In the 1967 general election, the party won 7 of the 150 seats in the House of Representatives, no new party had ever gained that many seats before. The electoral history of the party is characterised by large fluctuations. At one point they had 24 seats, currently (following the June 2010 Parliamentary elections) they have 10. The party was in government from 1973-1977, 1981-1982, 1994-2002 and 2003-2006. Over time the party began to emphasise other issues in addition to democratic reform, creating a social-liberal programme. Currently the party is represented by ten seats in the House of Representatives, five in the Senate and three in the European Parliament. The party leader, and chair of the parliamentary party in the House of Representatives, is Alexander Pechtold. The party is
    8.33
    3 votes
    20

    Fatherland League

    The Fatherland League (Dutch: Vaderlandsch Verbond) was a Dutch liberal / reactionary political party founded in 1924. The party was founded on November 15, 1924, by members of various (conservative) liberal groups, by initiative of J.A.A.H. de Beaufort and R.A. Fockema. Its initial members were industrialist, lawyers, civil servants, and politicians, like Samuel van Houten. After the party obtained a disastrous result in the 1925 Dutch elections, the League started negotiations with the Verbond van Actualisten, a fascist party. Most of the liberals would have left the party by 1926 though. On June 12, 1926, the party would be reinstituted as The Fatherland League, when the last remaining members of the Fatherland League merged with the faction de Jong of the Verbond van Actualisten.
    8.33
    3 votes
    21

    Middle Party for City and Country

    The Middle Party for City and Country (in Dutch: Middenpartij voor Stad en Land, MPSL) was a Dutch political party defending the interests of the middle class. The Middle Party played only a marginal role in Dutch politics. The party was founded by Abraham Staalman who had previously been member of the liberal Liberal State Party (LSP) after his own Middle Class Party had merged into that. Before the elections of 1929 Staalman had founded his own party and had left the LSP parliamentary party. The Middle Party entered in the 1929 elections, who held a personality-based campaign around the Bussum milk industrial and anti-toll campaigner Floris Vos. The Middle Party was able to win one seat in the House of Representatives. The party played a marginal role in parliament. Vos came into conflict with Staalman over his support for a law on mandatory closing times for shops. The party consequently fell apart in parties around Staalman and Vos, who fought legal battles over the ownership of the party's name. Neither party entered in the 1933 election. The party wanted to increase public wealth by reducing the restrictions for trade, industry and agriculture. The most important issues of
    8.33
    3 votes
    22

    Dutch Bellamy Party

    The Dutch Bellamy Party (in Dutch: Nederlandse Bellamy-Partij) was a political party in the Netherlands that upheld the thoughts of the American utopian socialist Edward Bellamy. The Bellamy-movement emerged in the Netherlands in 1927, and in 1933 the International Bellamy Association (IVB) was founded in Rotterdam. By the end of the 1930s the IVB had around 10 000 followers. The IVB did, however, not involve itself in party politics. During the Second World War, German occupation authorities banned IVB. During this period, a section of the movement felt a need to involve the ideals of Bellamy in party politics. On May 30 1945, just a few weeks after the end of the occupation the NBP was founded by a group of six IVB leaders in Groningen. The chairman of the party was J. Derksen Staats. IVB, which was reorganized after the war, did not actively support the idea of a political party. The NBP contested the 1946 parliamentary election, with L.B. van den Muyzenberg as its top candidate. The party contested elections with the slogan of 'gradual yet consequent socialization of the means of production'. The party got 11 025 votes (0.23%), about half of them in Rotterdam and the Hague. It
    6.75
    4 votes
    23

    Freedom Party

    The Freedom Party (PvdV) (Dutch: Partij van de Vrijheid) was a short lived Dutch liberal political party. The PvdV was a predecessor of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD). The PvdV was founded on March 23, 1946 by a group around the young liberal Korthals and the director of Heineken. After the foundation they were joined by the rest of the top of the pre-War Liberal State Party. The party was supposed to be less conservative and more modern that its predecessor. In 1948 it merged with social-liberal dissidents from the PvdA, led by Pieter Oud, to become the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy. In the 1946 elections it received six seats and it was confined to a minor position in opposition. The PvdV was classical liberal party with progressive leanings, committed to individual freedom and free market economics. This table shows the PvdV's results in elections to the House of Representatives, Senate and States-Provincial, as well as the party's political leadership: the fractievoorzitter, is the chair of the parliamentary party and the lijsttrekker is the party's top candidate in the general election, these posts are normally taken by the party's leader. The
    6.75
    4 votes
    24

    League of Free Liberals

    The League of Free Liberals (in Dutch: Bond van Vrije Liberalen) was a Dutch conservative liberal political party and a predecessor of the Liberal State Party which is historically linked to the VVD, the major Dutch liberal party. The League of Free Liberals was the first official organisation of old, free or conservative liberals, who had been elected on individual tickets since the 1870s. They held a considerable number of seats in the late 1880s and 1890s. The conservative liberals were opposed to the progressive politics of liberal politicians like Kappeyne van de Coppello. After the 1877 elections the first signs of a real conservative tendency were visible. They were led by Gleichman and where therefore called Gleichmannians, as opposed to Kappeynians (who supported Kappeyne van de Coppello). In 1885 however all liberals united in the Liberal Union. In 1894 the conflict between the progressive and conservative tendencies heated over the proposed relaxation of the census. A group of prominent conservative liberals left the Liberal Union. They lacked real leadership, they had no official chairman for their parliamentary party in the House of Representatives. Instead charismatic
    6.75
    4 votes
    25

    Liberal State Party

    The Liberal State Party, "the Freedom League" (LSP, Dutch: Liberale Staatspartij "de Vrijheidsbond"), was a Dutch conservative liberal political party from 1921 to 1948. It is historically linked to the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD), a major Dutch political party. The LSP was founded in 1921 as a merger of the mainstream liberal Liberal Union, the conservative liberal League of Free Liberals, the minor Economic League and the single seat parties of the Neutral Party and the Middle Class Party. They were joined by the General Political Party, who lacked parliamentary representation. These were all the liberal parties in the Netherlands except for the progressive-liberal Free-thinking Democratic League (VDB). The merger was forced by the constitutional revision of 1918 implementing universal suffrage and proportional representation. The two biggest parties (the Liberal Union and the League of Free Liberals) had lost a considerable number of seats with the implementation of universal suffrage, while the other three parties had profited from the system of proportional representation. During its entire existence the LSP lost seats, the party started with ten seats in
    6.75
    4 votes
    26

    Neutral Party

    The Neutral Party (in Dutch: Neutrale Partij, NP) was a Dutch political party representing artists' interests. It played only a marginal role in Dutch politics. The NP was founded by Henri ter Hall a wellknown variety artist. The 1918 elections were the first in the Netherlands to use a system of proportional representation. With about 7,000 votes (0,5% of the votes) the NP won one seat, as did several other one or two person parties. After the elections the election law became more restrictive. After the elections the NP initiated the formation of a neutral parliamentary party, which united several one and two person parties, namely the Neutral Party, Peasants' League, the Economic League, the Middle Class Party and the Alliance for Democratization of the Army. The parliamentary party was led by former minister Willem Treub. In 1921 several of these parties, including the Neutral Party merged into the Liberal State Party, together with two larger liberal parties. Until 1929 the party was an independent part in the Liberal State Party, campaigning with its own list. The NP was a typical special-interest party. Its main goal was to represent the interests of artists and people
    6.75
    4 votes
    27

    Labour Party

    The Labour Party (Dutch: Partij van de Arbeid, PvdA), is a social-democratic political party in the Netherlands. Since the 2003 Dutch General Election, the PvdA has been the second largest political party in the Netherlands. The PvdA was a coalition member in the fourth Balkenende cabinet following 22 February 2007. On 20 February 2010, the party withdrew from the government after arguments over the Dutch role in Afghanistan, leading to the 2010 Dutch General Election. The Labour Party is currently in opposition to the governing Rutte cabinet. The Labour Party (PvdA) was founded on 9 February 1946, through a merger of three parties: the Social Democratic Workers' Party (SDAP), the minor left-liberal Free-thinking Democratic League (VDB) and the small social-Protestant Christian Democratic Union (CDU). They were joined by individuals from Catholic resistance group Christofoor and the Protestant parties Christian Historical Union (CHU) and Anti Revolutionary Party (ARP). The founders of the PvdA wanted to create a broad party, breaking with the historic tradition of Pillarisation. This desire to come to a new political system was called the Doorbraak. The party combined socialist
    10.00
    2 votes
    28
    Reformatory Political Federation

    Reformatory Political Federation

    The Reformatory Political Federation (Reformatorische Politieke Federatie; RPF) was a minor Protestant Christian political party in the Netherlands. The RPF was founded in 1975 by three groups of orthodox Christians. The first group were members of the Protestant-Christian Anti-Revolutionary Party, secondly the National Evangelical Union, a small party which had earlier left the ARP, and several independent electoral committees. The founders opposed the formation of the Christian Democratic Appeal, because the Protestant ARP and Christian-Historical Union would join the Catholic People's Party. During the period of pillarisation, the Catholics and Protestants had lived in a form of cold war. The RPF sought to unite all other orthodox Protestant Christian parties, namely the Reformatory Political Union (GPV) and the Reformed Political Party (SGP). In the subsequent 1977 elections the RPF was unable to win any seats. In 1981 it won two seats in House of Representatives (Meindert Leerling and Aad Wagenaar). In the period 1981 to 2002 it had one to three members. It also won seats in the Dutch Senate. The remained in opposition throughout its existence. In 1985 one of its two members
    8.00
    3 votes
    29
    Nederlands Verbond van Vakverenigingen

    Nederlands Verbond van Vakverenigingen

    The Nederlands Verbond van Vakverenigingen (English: Dutch Association of Trade Unions, NVV) was a Dutch social-democratic trade union. The NVV was founded in 1906 as a merger of fifteen smaller unions, as a result of the inability of the previous unions to control the radical elements of the workers movement in the railworkers' strike of 1903. The NVV was led by Henri Polak, who was a prominent member of the socialist SDAP. During World War II the NVV was taken over by the German occupiers, its Dutch leader was Mr Woudenberg. Under the German occupation the NVV was transformed into a National Socialist union. After the war these influences were purgued and the NVV cooperated tightly with the centre left government to create a welfare state based on the principles of corporatism. In the 1970s NVV membership began to decline due to depillarization. Under the leadership of Wim Kok the NVV attempted to form a federation with the Protestant CNV and the Catholic NKV which could strengthen all three. The CNV, however, left the talks in 1973. In 1976 the NVV and the NKV merged to form the FNV. The FNV started out as a socialist union, in favour of class struggle, workers' ownership of the
    6.50
    4 votes
    30

    Free Anti Revolutionary Party

    The Free Anti Revolutionary Party (in Dutch: Vrij-Antirevolutionaire Partij, VAR) was a Dutch conservative Reformed political party, which existed from 1898 to 1903. The VAR is historically linked to the Christian Democratic Appeal which is currently one of the major parties of the Netherlands. The VAR was founded as one of several parties that were founded in the 1890s, which all turned again the leadership and ideology of Abraham Kuyper, the leader of the Protestant Anti Revolutionary Party. Kuyper had initiated a new political course for Protestantism in the Netherlands, which included cooperation with the Catholics, in the coalition, strategical support for extension of suffrage a rejection of theocracy in favour of a specific conception of state neutrality, sphere sovereignty and a strong party organization and party discipline. The opposition against Kuyper was led by Alexander de Savorin Lohman. The elections of 1894 proved decisive. An important issue in the election was the extension of suffrage proposed by the Minister of the Interior Johannes Tak van Poortvliet. After the election two anti-revolutionary parliamentary parties were formed one, led by Kuyper favoured the
    9.00
    2 votes
    31

    Independent Senate Group

    The Independent Senate Group (Dutch: Onafhankelijke Senaatsfractie, OSF) is a parliamentary party in the Dutch Senate with one senator, representing several provincial parties. The Dutch Senate is elected by the legislatures of the provinces. In 1995, several provincial parties and the Greens proposed their own list. Marten Bierman nominated by The Greens and second on the list was elected senator by a preference vote. In 1999, Bierman was re-elected. In 2003, Hendrik ten Hoeve became senator for the OSF. He had been member of the Frisian provinciale legislature for the Frisian Nationalist Fryske Nasjonale Partij. He remained senator and leader of the party until 2011, when his role was taken over by Kees de Lange. The main parties involved are the Frisian National Party, The Greens, the Party for the North, the Party New Limburg and the Brabant Party.
    7.33
    3 votes
    32

    Peasants' League

    The Peasants' League (in Dutch: Plattelandersbond, PB) was a Dutch agrarian political party. The League played only a minor role in Dutch politics. The party was founded on February 17, 1917. In the elections of the 1918 the party won one seat. It had campaigned with two lists, one religious list and one secular list, in order to appeal to both religious and secular farmers. During the First World War the Netherlands, a neutral country, had to rely on its own agriculture. Government influence in agriculture had increased, to the unhappiness of many farmers. The party's seat was taken by Frederik Bos. Between 1918 and 1919 the League cooperated in the neutral parliamentary party, with other four one or two seat parties, namely the Alliance for the Democratization of the Army, the Economic League, the Middle Class Party and the Neutral Party. The parliamentary party was led by former minister Willem Treub. TIn 1919 Bos was replaced by Arend Braat as member of parliament. Braat was an unsophisticated and unconventional MP, who attempted to revoke the law on daylight saving time on five occasions but failed in each. He was ignored by most other politicians and scorned by the media for
    7.33
    3 votes
    33

    Progressive Integration Party

    The Progressive Integration Party (Vooruitstrevende Integratie Partij) is a political party in the Netherlands without parliamentary representation. Its seeks its voters within the ethnic minorities in the country.
    7.33
    3 votes
    34

    Social Democratic League

    The Social Democratic League (in Dutch: Sociaal-Democratische Bond, SDB) was a Dutch socialist political party. The SDB was the first socialist party to enter the Dutch House of Representatives. In the 1860s a socialist movement began to develop in the Netherlands. The development was aided by the foundation of the First International and the foundation of the first trade unions. Most of those unions however were united in the moderate Algemeen Nederlandsch Werklieden Verbond (General Dutch Workingmans' Association; ANWV) in 1871, which was founded by Protestants and liberals to combat the influence of the Dutch section of the First Internationale. Some prominent Dutch representatives of the First International joined the ANWV in order to radicalize the organization. In 1878 they, led by Willem Ansigh, left the ANWV to found the Sociaal-Democratische Vereeniging (Social-Democratic Association; SDV). It had branches in major cities like Amsterdam, the Hague, Haarlem and Rotterdam The SDB was founded in 1881 by members of the SDV and similar local socialist parties. The strongest of these local socialist parties were located in the poor rural province Friesland. The party was based
    7.33
    3 votes
    35

    Catholic People's Party

    The Catholic People's Party (Dutch: Katholieke Volkspartij; KVP) was a Catholic Christian democratic Dutch political party. During its entire existence, the party was in government. The party is one of the precursors of the Christian Democratic Appeal. The KVP was founded on 22 December, 1945. It was a continuation of the pre-war Roman-Catholic State Party (RKSP). Unlike the RKSP, the KVP was open to people of all denominations, but mainly Catholics supported the party. The party adopted a more progressive course and a more modern image than its predecessor. In the elections of 1946 the party won a third of the vote, and joined the newly founded social democratic Labour Party (PvdA) to form a government coalition. This Roman/Red coalition (Roman (Rooms) for the Roman Catholic KVP, Rood, Red for the social-democratic PvdA) lasted until 1956. In the first two years the KVP's Louis Beel led the Cabinet. Beel was not the party's leader a post which was taken by Carl Romme, who led the KVP between 1946 and 1961, from the House of Representatives. After the 1948 election the PvdA became larger and supplied the prime minister Willem Drees. The PvdA and the KVP were joined by combinations
    6.00
    4 votes
    36

    Reformed Political League

    The Reformed Political League (GPV; Gereformeerd Politiek Verbond ) was a Dutch orthodox Protestant political party. The GPV is one of the predecessors of the ChristenUnie. The party was a testimonial party. The GPV was founded in 1948 as the result of a theological conflict within the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, which led to the creation of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands (Liberated). In 1944 a group of orthodox Protestants left the Reformed Church, because they disagreed with Abraham Kuyper's view that God had created multiple branches of Christianity (Catholicism, Protestantism etc.), each with their own sphere. In 1948 adherents of the Reformed Church in the Netherlands (Liberated) left the Anti Revolutionary Party, the party linked to the Reformed Church in the Netherlands. On April 1, 1948 they founded the GPV during a congress Amersfoort. Former ARP MP Albertus Zijlstra chaired the congress, and also led the party in its early years. The party was specifically linked to the liberated Reformed Church. Membership of the church was a pre-requisite for membership of the party. This dogmatic position isolated the party. The party participated, without success
    5.75
    4 votes
    37

    Livable Netherlands

    Livable Netherlands (Dutch: Leefbaar Nederland, LN) was a Dutch political party. Pim Fortuyn began his political career in the party. Historically there have always been parties in States-Provincial (provincial legislatures) and Gemeenteraad (municipal assemblies or city councils) that were independent from the national party system. In the predominantly Catholic south of the Netherlands during the 1950s, the Catholic People's Party gained eighty percent of the vote in national elections, local and provincial groups of independents were organized. During the 1980s, independent parties began to spread to other parts of the Netherlands. Some successful groups like Independent Rijswijk began to move towards a national movement. A congress for this purpose held in 1989 did not result in much progress towards this goal, although independent parties were still very successful in municipal elections especially in Hilversum and Utrecht. Some of them choose the name "Leefbaar" (liveable). It became a distinctive political movement. It is not a party in itself but consisted of many municipal branches. These branches had no formal ties, and often have radically different programs, sharing
    8.50
    2 votes
    38
    Essent

    Essent

    Essent NV, based in Arnhem, The Netherlands, is an energy company. It is a public limited liability corporation. Essent is one of the largest players on the energy market in its chief market the Netherlands, and also operates in Belgium. Essent is part of RWE AG. Essent was formed in 1999 by the merger of PNEM/MEGA Groep and EDON Groep, energy groups based in the south and north of the Netherlands respectively. Until October 1, 2009 the shares of Essent were owned by six Dutch provinces of Overijssel (18%), Groningen (6%), Noord-Brabant (30.8%), Drenthe (2.3%), Flevoland (0.02%) and Limburg (16%) and by more than 100 municipalities in these provinces and in the province of Friesland (the remaining 26%). In January 2009, German energy major, RWE AG, announced its intention to buy-out all outstanding and issued shares of Essent. The deal, valued to be around 9.3 billion euros, would make Essent an operating company of RWE in the Netherlands and Belgium. This deal was objected by socialist legislators, who were not in favor of privatizing a prominent public utility. On September 30, 2009, the deal was closed. In 2010 Essent opened the first commercial fast-charge station for electric
    10.00
    1 votes
    39

    Farmers' Party

    The Farmers' Party (in Dutch: Boerenpartij, BP) was a Dutch agrarian political party, with a strong conservative outlook and a populist appeal. The BP was the first anti-establishment party elected into the Dutch House of Representatives after the Second World War. The precise foundation date of the BP is not known. In 1958 in several Gelderland municipalities "Free Farmers" lists contested in municipal elections. In 1959 the Farmers' Party officially applied at the Kiesraad to participate in the 1959 elections, although the party was unable to win a seat. The founder of the party was Hendrik Koekoek, the chair and founder of the Association for Freedom for Agricultural Business, also known as the "Free Farmers". The organization resisted increasing government intervention and the institutionalization of farming. These also became important issues for the Farmers' Party. In the elections of 1963 the Farmers' Party won three seats in the House of Representatives. The party had gained considerable attention when the police had forcibly seized farms whose owners had not paid their taxes. Koekoek, the party's leader, came from the same region and acted as spokesperson for these
    10.00
    1 votes
    40

    Christian Democratic Union

    The Christian-Democratic Union (in Dutch: Christelijk-Democratische Unie) was a minor Christian left party in the Netherlands in the interbellum. It was formed in 1926 as a merger of three even smaller Christian left parties, the Christian Social Party, the Christian Democratic Party and the League of Christian Socialists. It had one seat between 1929 and 1937 and two between 1937 and 1946. The party always was in opposition. It was linked to the minor denomination Reformed Churches in Repaired Union (Dutch: Gereformeerde Kerken in Hersteld Verband), which was split from the mainstream Reformed churches, because of their pacifism. The Synod of the reformed church therefore decreed disciplinary measures against members of the CDU. After World War II, the party joined the newly founded Partij van de Arbeid. In the 1950s many members left to join the pacifist PSP because of the relatively rightwing course of the PvdA. The CDU stood for a just society based on biblical rules. The parties principals were based on the reformed theologian Karl Barth. It was a left-wing party, to the extent that it was opposed to war in any form and it demanded radical redistribution of income,
    5.50
    4 votes
    41

    Democratic Socialists '70

    Democratic Socialists '70 (Dutch: Democratisch Socialisten '70, DS'70) was a social-democratic political party in the Netherlands. DS'70 was founded on 4 April 1970 as a result of a split from the Labour Party (PvdA). In June 1970 two members of the House of Representatives, Goedhart and Schuitemaker, left the PvdA and became members of DS'70, because of the anti-American position the PvdA had taken in the Vietnam war. They had previously been frustrated by its cooperation with other left-wing parties, such as the Pacifist Socialist Party, and its leftist fiscal policy. In its declaration of principles (Beginselverklaring), the Democratic Socialists argued that whilst the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) lacked the comprehension of the necessity of social and economic reforms, the PvdA had at the time anarchist and unrealistic pacifist aspirations In the 1971 general election, the party won eight seats in parliament. After the elections, the party cooperated in the first Biesheuvel cabinet, together with the VVD, Anti Revolutionary Party (ARP), Christian Historical Union (CHU) and Catholic People's Party (KVP). The party supplied two ministers and two junior
    6.67
    3 votes
    42

    Europe Transparent

    Europe Transparent (Dutch: Europa Transparant) was a political party in the Netherlands. The founder of the party, Paul van Buitenen, announced the party's establishment on 8 April 2004. In the 2004 election to the European Parliament the party gained two seats, after a campaign that cost no more than €4,000. Van Buitenen and the number two on the list, Els de Groen, who has written about corruption scandals in Eastern Europe, have joined the European Greens–European Free Alliance party group as independent members. The party was claiming to be non-ideological: they aimed to fight for more open European government, against fraud, corruption and favouring of friends. Because the pursuit of this goal was their primary occupation, they participated only to a limited extent in the normal system of debates, reports, meetings, etc. Their ultimate goal is to be able to disband themselves when they have made the European Union transparent.
    6.67
    3 votes
    43
    Pim Fortuyn List

    Pim Fortuyn List

    The Pim Fortuyn List (Dutch: Lijst Pim Fortuyn, LPF) was a political party in the Netherlands. The eponymous founder of the party was Pim Fortuyn, a charismatic former university professor and political columnist who initially had planned to contest the 2002 general election as leader of the Livable Netherlands (LN) party. He was however dismissed as party leader in February 2002 due to controversial remarks he made in a newspaper interview on immigration-related issues, and instead founded LPF a few days later. After gaining support in opinion polls, Fortuyn was assassinated on 6 May, days before the election. The party held onto its support, and went on to become the second-largest party in the election. The LPF formed part of a coalition government with the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) and the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD), but internal conflicts in the LPF led to the coalition's break-up and fresh elections after a few months. Following the 2003 election, the party was left in opposition. It became clear that the party was not viable without its original leader, and it went into decline until it was finally dissolved in 2008. Fortuyn announced his
    6.67
    3 votes
    44

    Christian Historical Party

    The Christian Historical Party (in Dutch: Christelijk Historische Partij, CHP) was a Dutch conservative Reformed political party, which existed from 1903 to 1908. The CHP is historically linked to the Christian Democratic Appeal which is currently one of the major parties of the Netherlands. The CHP was founded in April 1903 as a merger of two conservative Protestant parties, the Free Anti Revolutionary Party and the Christian Historical Voters' League. Both were turned again the leadership and ideology of Abraham Kuyper, the leader of the main Protestant Anti Revolutionary Party. Kuyper had initiated a new political course for Protestantism in the Netherlands, which included cooperation with the Catholics, in the coalition, strategical support for extension of suffrage a rejection of theocracy in favour of a specific conception of state neutrality, sphere sovereignty and a strong party organization and party discipline. The opposition against Kuyper was led by Alexander de Savorin Lohman, who founded the Free Anti Revolutionary Party. In 1908 the CHP merged with the Frisian League, another conservative Protestant party, to form the Christian Historical Union The term "Christian
    8.00
    2 votes
    45

    Rapaille Partij

    The Rapaille Partij was a Dutch political party founded in Amsterdam in the 1920s. Its platform included free alcoholic beverages for citizens in Amsterdam, the abolition of compulsory voting, and free fishing and hunting in the Vondelpark. The party won two seats on the city council of Amsterdam in 1921, but the elected representatives rarely attended meetings. This caused the party to lose popularity, and it soon dissolved.
    8.00
    2 votes
    46

    The Hunger Project

    The Hunger Project (THP) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization incorporated in the state of California. The Hunger Project describes itself as an organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. It has ongoing programs in Africa, Asia and Latin America, where it implements programs aimed at mobilizing rural grassroots communities to achieve sustainable progress in health, education, nutrition and family income. The Hunger Project is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. In Africa, Asia and Latin America, The Hunger Project seeks to end hunger and poverty by empowering people to lead lives of self-reliance, meet their own basic needs and build better futures for their children. The Hunger Project carries out its mission through three activities: mobilizing village clusters at the grassroots level to build self-reliance, empowering women as key change agents, and forging effective partnerships with local government. In 2009 The Hunger Project was active in Africa, in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, and Uganda, in Asia, in Bangladesh and India, and in Latin America, in
    8.00
    2 votes
    47

    Party New Limburg

    The Party New Limburg (Partij Nieuw Limburg) is a provincial political party in the Dutch province of Limburg. It has no parliamentary representation, but it is linked to the Independent Senate Group.
    5.25
    4 votes
    48

    Centre Democrats

    The Centre Democrats (Dutch: Centrumdemocraten / Centrum Democraten, CD) was a political party in the Netherlands. Founded in 1984 by members who split out from the Centre Party (CP), the Centre Democrats was joined one month later by the only CP Member of Parliament—Hans Janmaat. Janmaat went on to become the leader of the party, which subsequently became strongly centered around his person. The newly formed Centre Democrats represented the more moderate faction of the Centre Party, but espoused an anti-immigration and nationalist ideology. Their claims of standing in the centre of the political landscape have thus been disputed by political scientists. The Centre Democrats did not gain enough votes for parliamentary representation in the 1986 general election, but Janmaat won back his seat after the following election in 1989. In 1994 he was joined by two additional representatives won by the party. The CD was subject to a cordon sanitaire by the other parties in Parliament, although some parties rather sought to confront it following its 1994 success. The CD failed to win any seats in the 1998 election, and it fell into disarray until it was finally dissolved in 2002. The Centre
    6.33
    3 votes
    49

    Christian Organisation of Self-employed Persons

    Action for the Small Farmer (in Dutch: Actie voor de Kleine Boer, better known as Actie Bouwman) was a political party in the Netherlands. The party was led by Alphons Bouwman, a RKSP member. The party drew its support from rural Catholic sectors. It emerged after large-scale dissatisfaction amongst Catholic farmers towards the Northern Brabant Christian Farmers League (NCB) during the agrarian economic crisis of 1933. The party was founded in 1934. In February the party changed its name to the Christian Organisation of Self-employed Persons (Christelijke Organisatie van Kleine Zelfstandigen). The party expanded rapidly during 1935, during which the party had 110 branches and 20 000 followers. Thousands visited its 1935 party days. In 1937 the party was radicalized. In 1940 it merged into the Agrarian Front of the National Socialist Movement, in which Bouwman became an important leader.
    6.33
    3 votes
    50

    Communist Circle of Breda

    Communist Circle of Breda (marxist-leninist) (in Dutch: Kommunisten Kring Breda (marxistisch-leninistisch)) was a communist group in Breda, the Netherlands. KKB(ml) was formed in August 1972 by a group of Communist Unity Movement of the Netherlands (marxist-leninist) militants in Brabant who refused to shift to Rotterdam when the new party leadership ordered them to do so. In 1978 the Communist Workers Organisation (KAO), the League of Dutch Marxist-Leninists (BNML) and KKB(ml) merged into the Communist Workers Organisation (marxist-leninist) (KAO(ml)).
    6.33
    3 votes
    51

    Brabant Party

    The Brabant Party (Brabantse Partij) is a provincial political party in the Dutch province of North Brabant. It has no parliamentary representation, but it is linked to the Independent Senate Group. It's main issues are family farmers' rights, investment in nanotechnology, ICT, sport and culture, and a more open government. Official website
    7.50
    2 votes
    52

    Centre Party

    The Centre Party (Dutch: Centrumpartij, CP) was a Dutch nationalist extreme right-wing political party espousing an anti-immigrant program. The party was founded by Henry Brookman in 1980, and was represented by Hans Janmaat in the Dutch House of Representatives from 1982, until he was expelled from the party in 1984 and joined the more moderate Centre Democrats. The CP, as well as the CD, was subject to a cordon sanitaire by the other parties in the House of Representatives. After much infighting and finally legal proceedings against the party, it was declared bankrupt in 1986. The party was soon after succeeded by the Centre Party '86, which would become increasingly radical, until it was banned in 1998. The Centre Party was founded on 11 March 1980 by Henry Brookman, one of the founders of the short-lived National Centre Party (NCP) in 1979 (which had been dissolved the day before the founding of the CP), and a prominent member of the Dutch Peoples-Union (NVU). In February 1980 some radical NCP members had harassed Moroccan refugees who held a hunger strike at the Moses and Aaron church in Amsterdam. This led to a conflict within the NCP. Brookman dissolved the NCP and founded
    7.50
    2 votes
    53

    General Elderly Alliance

    The General Elderly Alliance (in Dutch: Algemeen Ouderen Verbond, AOV) was a Dutch pensioners' political party. The AOV was very successful in the 1994 elections but disappeared four years later. The AOV was founded on December 1, 1993. The direct cause for the formation of the AOV were budget cuts on retirement homes. During the 1994 election campaign one of the governing parties, the CDA, announced that it would cut government pensions. This made the AOV very attractive to the elderly. During the campaign the party organized several successful mass protests against budget cuts. The party won six seats. The Union 55+, another party aiming to represent the elderly, also won one seat. In the autumn of 1994 a conflict developed in the party between Nijpels and the party's founder Batenburg. This results in a split within the parliamentary party and the party board. After the split there was no party in parliament which was allowed to call itself AOV by the presidium. In the 1995 Senate election, the party won two seats, one of which was taken by Batenburg, who immediately became an independent. In 1998 the party's sole senator joined the CDA. In the elections of the same year the AOV
    7.50
    2 votes
    54

    Party for the Animals

    The Party for the Animals (Dutch: Partij voor de Dieren, "PvdD") is a political party in the Netherlands. Among its main goals are animal rights and animal welfare, though it claims not to be a single-issue party. The party does consider itself to be a testimonial party, which does not seek to gain political power, but only to testify to its beliefs. Its chairwoman and political leader is Marianne Thieme. At the moment the Party for the Animals holds 2 of the 150 seats in the House of Representatives and 1 of the 75 seats in the Senate. In the House of Representatives Marianne Thieme and Esther Ouwehand represent the PvdD since November 30, 2006, whereas Niko Koffeman represents it in the Senate since June 12, 2007. The party's leading candidate for the 2009 European parliamentary election was Natasja Oerlemans, who failed to gain a seat. The Party for the Animals was founded in October 2002 by among others Marianne Thieme. In the Dutch general election of 2003 it gained 50,000 votes (0.5%), but not a seat in the House of Representatives. In the February 2004 European Parliament election the party gained 153,000 votes (3.2%), three times as much as in the 2002 Dutch general
    7.50
    2 votes
    55

    People's Party for Freedom and Democracy

    The People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (Dutch: Volkspartij voor Vrijheid en Democratie), VVD) is a conservative-liberal political party located in the Netherlands. The VVD supports private enterprise in the Netherlands and is an economic liberal party. After the fourth Balkenende cabinet was formed, the VVD was the second largest opposition party in the House of Representatives. During the Dutch general-election of 2010 the VVD obtained the highest number of votes cast, resulting in their occupying 31 of the 150 seats in the House of Representatives. The VVD is currently the senior party in a centre-right minority Rutte cabinet with the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA), supported by the Party for Freedom (PVV) to obtain a majority. Mark Rutte has been VVD party leader since 31 May 2006 and incumbent Prime Minister of the Netherlands since 14 October 2010. The VVD was founded in 1948 as a continuation of the Freedom Party, which was a continuation of the interbellum Liberal State Party, which in turn was a continuation of Liberal Union. They were joined by the Comité-Oud, a group of liberal members of the Labour Party (PvdA), led by Pieter Oud. The liberals within the PvdA
    7.50
    2 votes
    56

    Union 55+

    Union 55+ (in Dutch: Unie 55+) was a Dutch pensioners' political party. The Union was somewhat successful in the 1994 elections but disappeared four years later. Union 55+ was founded on 24 September 1992. During the 1994 election campaign one of the governing parties, CDA announced that it would cut government pensions. This made Union 55+ very attractive to the elderly. The party won one seat. The General Elderly Alliance (Algemeen Ouderen Verbond, AOV), another party seeking to represent the elderly won six seats. The two parties had formed an electoral alliance. The party's sole representative was Bertus Leerkes. While the six members of the AOV spent their time fighting with each other, Leerkes became a well-respected spokesperson for the elderly. The party continually sought to cooperate with the AOV. In 1995 they formed communal lists for the 1995 provincial elections. Before the 1998 general elections Union 55+ formed a new party with the AOV, the Elderly Union (Ouderenunie). They were unable to win a seat. The party was a typical one issue party: it sought to better the position of the elderly with higher government pensions, better healthcare and improved facilities for
    7.50
    2 votes
    57

    New Middle Party

    The New Middle Party (in Dutch: Nieuwe Midden Partij, NMP) is a Dutch small business-interest political party. The NMP is a marginal party and was only successful during the 1971 elections. The NMP was founded in 1970. It entered in the 1971 elections, and won two seats. Several months after the elections one of its MPs, De Jong, came into conflict with the party's chair, Te Pas, because he was involved in law suits over corruption. De Jong continued as independent MP. In the 1972 election the party won no seats. The party continues to exist and unsuccessfully competed in the 2002 election. The party saw itself as the continuation of the pre-war Middle Class Party, as such it styled itself as "New Middleclass Party" or "New Middle Party". The NMP is a party for businesspeople and shopkeepers. It also appeals to forgotten groups like the elderly, unmarried and disabled. It wants to spread taxes and benefits more equally between social groups. It is fiscally conservative and seeks to reduce bureaucracy and government debt. Meanwhile it wants to protect the value of old age pensions and increase spending on healthcare. Furthermore it wants to end "car bullying", that is taxes on
    9.00
    1 votes
    58
    Social Democratic Workers' Party

    Social Democratic Workers' Party

    The Social Democratic Workers' Party (in Dutch: Sociaal Democratische Arbeiders Partij, SDAP) was a Dutch socialist political party and a predecessor of the social-democratic PvdA. The SDAP was founded by members of the Social Democratic League (SDB) after a conflict between anarchist and reformist factions. During the SDB party conference of 1893 in Groningen, a majority voted to stop participating in the elections. They were afraid that the parliamentary work would drift the socialists away from what socialism was really about. A minority of members led by Pieter Jelles Troelstra tried to prevent this, and later left the party in order to create a new party. The foundation of a new party was controversial within the socialist movement, because Troelstra was seen as a bourgeois force who had destroyed the unity of the SDB and the socialist movement. When the anarchist elements began to take full control of the SDB, important regional social-democratic figures joined the group around Troelstra. Together they formed a group called "the twelve apostles". The twelve apostles nearly all came from the provinces of Fryslan and Groningen or from large cities like Amsterdam and Rotterdam,
    6.00
    3 votes
    59

    Free-thinking Democratic League

    The Free-thinking Democratic League (in Dutch: Vrijzinnig Democratische Bond, VDB) was a Dutch progressive liberal political party. The VDB played a relatively large role in Dutch politics, supplying one prime minister. The League is a predecessor of two of the major Dutch political parties, the liberal People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and the social-democratic Dutch Labour Party (PvdA). The social-liberal Democraten 66 claims that it and the VDB are ideologically connected. The VDB is a merger of two groups; one, the Radical League, was founded in 1892 as an Amsterdam secession of the Liberal Union; they left the Union over the issue of universal suffrage. The second group was the Free-thinking Democratic political club (Dutch: Vrijzinnig Democratische Kamerclub, VD-kamerclub). This was a club of Liberal Union MPs (in 1901 it had about twenty-five members, out of thirty-five Liberal Union MPs and one hundred MPs in total). The second group left the Union over the same matter. In 1901 the board of the Liberal Union, supported by the VD-kamerclub, proposed that all its candidates would stand on a platform of universal suffrage. The party congress rejected this
    7.00
    2 votes
    60
    Nederlandse Spoorwegen

    Nederlandse Spoorwegen

    Nederlandse Spoorwegen (English: Dutch Railways), or NS, is the principal passenger railway operator in the Netherlands. Its trains operate over the tracks of the Dutch national rail infrastructure, operated by ProRail, which was split off from NS in 2003. Freight services, formerly operated by NS Cargo are now part of the DB Schenker group since a merger in 2000. NS handles 1.1 million passengers every day, with 4,800 scheduled trains. The NS was founded in 1938 when the two largest Dutch railway companies, the Hollandsche IJzeren Spoorweg-Maatschappij (HSM) and the Maatschappij tot Exploitatie van Staatsspoorwegen (SS), formally merged. These two companies, however, had been intensively cooperating as early as 1917. There were both economic and ideological reasons for the cooperation. As a result of the First World War, the Netherlands' economy had declined causing HSM and SS fall from profitability. But, given their national importance, allowing them to slip into bankruptcy was not considered acceptable. While remaining independent companies, HSM and SS improved overall efficiency by cooperatively integrating their operations. The Dutch government further supported HSM and SS by
    7.00
    2 votes
    61

    New Communist Party of the Netherlands

    The New Communist Party of the Netherlands (NCPN) (Nieuwe Communistische Partij Nederland) is a communist party in the Netherlands. The NCPN was founded in 1992 by communist hardliners (so-called "horizontals") who disagreed with the decision of the CPN to merge into GreenLeft. The NCPN give through the Stichting HOC (Foundation HOC) the monthly newspaper Manifest. The party has about 2,500 members. The NCPN supports the socialist government of Cuba and the socialist developments in the Venezuela of Hugo Chavez and Evo Morales of Bolivia. The party was against the invasion of the U.S. in Iraq and against neoliberalism. The party criticized in the past, the justice of Slobodan Milosevic. The NCPN has since 2003 also a political youth organization, the Communist Youth Movement (CJB). In 1982 a group of members inside the Communist Party of the Netherlands founded the newspaper Manifest, out of discontent with the CPN leadership. In 1984 this group founded the League of Communists in the Netherlands (VCN). After the formal dissolution of the CPN in 1992 the VCN, together with groups of former members of the CPN, founded the NCPN. The CPN dissolved in order to make place for a new
    7.00
    2 votes
    62

    Reformed Political Party

    The Reformed Political Party (Dutch: Staatkundig Gereformeerde Partij, SGP) is an orthodox Protestant Dutch political party. The term Reformed is not a reference to political reform, but is a synonym for Calvinist. The SGP is the oldest political party in the Netherlands in its current form, and has for its entire existence been in opposition. The party has, owing to its orthodox political ideals and its refusal to cooperate in any cabinet, been called a testimonial party. The SGP was founded on April 24, 1918, by several conservative members of the Protestant Anti Revolutionary Party. They did not support with female suffrage, which the ARP had made possible. Furthermore they were against the alliance the ARP had formed with the Catholic General League. The party entered in the 1918 general elections, but was unable to win any seats. The leading figure in the party's foundation was Yerseke minister Gerrit Hendrik Kersten. In the 1922 election the party entered Parliament. In this period the SGP became most noted for proposing to abolish the Dutch representation at the Holy See during each annual parliamentary debate on the budget of the ministry of foreign affairs. Each year the
    7.00
    2 votes
    63
    Socialist Party

    Socialist Party

    The Socialist Party (Dutch: Socialistische Partij, SP) is a democratic socialist political party in the Netherlands. After the 2006 general election, the Socialist Party became one of the major parties of the Netherlands with 25 seats of 150, an increase of 16 seats. The party was in opposition against the fourth Balkenende cabinet. In the 2010 election the party obtained 15 seats, and is currently in opposition to the Rutte cabinet. The Socialist Party was founded in October 1971 as a Maoist party named the Communist Party of the Netherlands/Marxist-Leninist (KPN/ML). This KPN/ML was formed following a split from the Communist Unity Movement of the Netherlands (Marxist-Leninist). The issue that provoked the split from KEN(ml) was an intense debate on the role of intellectuals in the class struggle. The founders of KPN/ML, with Daan Monjé in a prominent role, belonged to the 'Proletarian' wing of the KEN(ml), who did not want an organisation dominated by students and intellectuals. In 1972 KPN/ML changed its name to Socialistiese Partij (Socialist Party). Even in its early years, while adhering to maoist principles such as organizing the masses, the SP was very critical of the
    7.00
    2 votes
    64

    Christian Democratic Appeal

    The Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) (Dutch: Christen-Democratisch Appèl) is a centre Dutch Christian democratic political party founded in 1977, which participated in all but two governments since then. It was a merger from the Catholic People's Party, which was part of all cabinets since World War II, and the Anti Revolutionary Party and the Christian Historical Union. The party suffered severe losses in the 2010 elections and, by halving their share, fell from the first to the fourth place. Consequentely, the CDA is currently a junior coalition partner in a right-wing minority cabinet with the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD), supported in parliament by the Party for Freedom (PVV). The CDA has 6 ministers in the Cabinet Rutte along with the 6 VVD cabinet ministers. Some senior offices are held. Sybrand van Haersma Buma leads the CDA in the House of Representatives and is the new Party leader since May 18, 2012. Since 1880 the sizeable Catholic and Protestant parties had worked together in the so-called Coalitie. They shared a common interest in public funding of religious schools. In 1888 they formed the first Christian-Democratic government, led by the
    8.00
    1 votes
    65

    Party for Justice, Action and Progress

    The Party for Justice, Action and Progress (Partij voor Rechtvaardigheid, Daadkracht en Vooruitgang) was a political party in the Netherlands without parliamentary representation. It was founded May 2005 by the crime journalist Peter R. de Vries. The abbreviation of the party's name, PRDV, is also his initials.
    8.00
    1 votes
    66

    Frisian National Party

    The Frisian National Party (West Frisian: Fryske Nasjonale Partij; Dutch: Friese Nationale Partij) is a Frisian nationalist political party in the Netherlands. The FNP is mostly involved in Frisian politics. On the national level it is represented by one senator. The party was founded in 1962 by young activists of the Frisian movement (West Frisian: Fryske Beweging), which developed in the 19th century. It advocated the importance of the (West) Frisian language, culture and sports. The movement was founded in reaction to the use of Dutch in sermons of Dutch Reformed Churches in Fryslân. The Frisian movement has links with the reformed Anti Revolutionary Party, but in the 1962 provincial elections it claimed that Frisian interests were less important than Dutch national interests. In 1966, it won its first seat in the provincial legislature and municipal councils. In 1995, it cooperated with provincial parties and the Greens to get a seat in the Senate, which is elected indirectly, in the so-called Independent Senate Group. Between 1995 and 2003, it was taken by a member of the Greens, since 2003 it is taken by a member of the FNP. The FNP is a left-wing nationalist party, which
    5.33
    3 votes
    67

    ChristianUnion – Reformed Political Party

    Christian Union – Reformed Political Party (Dutch: ChristenUnie – Staatkundig Gereformeerde Partij) was a parliamentary party in the European Parliament formed by two Dutch orthodox Protestant parties: the ChristianUnion and the Reformed Political Party. The parliamentary party existed between 2001 and 2009. The CU-SGP was formed in 2001 as a successor of the RPF-GPV-SGP parliamentary party that had existed since the 1984 European Parliament elections. After the merger of the Reformed Political Party (RPF) and the Reformed Political Alliance (GPV) into the ChristianUnion, the group was renamed ChristianUnion-SGP. Both parties, ChristianUnionand SGP are eurosceptic and morally conservative. Since 1984 the RPF, GPV, later ChristianUnion and SGP had participated in the European parliament elections with one combined list which has candidates from all parties. Since 2004, the party currently had two MEPs, Johannes Blokland for the Christian Union and Bastiaan Belder for the Reformed Political Party. The ChristenUnie–SGP was part of the Independence and Democracy group. In June 2009, the group broke up, as the ChristianUnion joined the European Conservatives and Reformists (ECR). The
    6.50
    2 votes
    68

    General League of Roman Catholic Caucuses

    The General League of Roman Catholic Caucuses (in Dutch: Algemeene Bond van Roomsch-Katholieke Kiesverenigingen; informally called General League or Algemeene Bond) was a Dutch Catholic political party. The General League is historically linked to the Christian Democratic Appeal, currently a major party in the Netherlands. During the 19th century, Catholics were a disadvantaged minority in the Netherlands. They enjoyed considerable independence in the southern provinces North Brabant and Limburg, where they formed 90% of the population. In the North, Catholics were forbidden to organize religious rallies and demonstrations. Until 1848 the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church was forbidden in the Netherlands. A mix of Protestantism and nationalism, inspired by the struggle for independence against the Catholic Spanish lay at the basis of this. Until the 1890s the most important ally of the Catholics were the liberals, who advocated freedom of religion. Catholic supported several liberal governments. Internally the Catholics were divided between two groups, those around progressive Schaepman and those around the conservative Bahlman. The progressives favoured a corporatist economy
    6.50
    2 votes
    69

    Libertarian Party

    The Libertarian Party (Dutch: Libertarische Partij) is a Dutch political party. It was founded in 1993 and took part in the elections of 1994 for the Dutch House of Representatives. Its founder and chairman is Toine Manders (not to be confused with the VVD MEP of the same name), who works for the Haags Juristen College. In 2003 the board members Laura Buit, Arjan van Eersel, David Jessurun and Niek Holtzappel, left the party because of a dispute about the party's goals. Their intention was to found a new party, which has resulted in "De Liberalen", a short-lived initiative. David Jessurun Later joined "De Vrijheidslijst" but is currently not active politically.
    6.50
    2 votes
    70

    Middle Class Party

    The Middenstandspartij (in Dutch: Middenstandspartij, MP) was a Dutch political party representing middle class interests. It played only a marginal role in Dutch politics. The MP was founded by Abraham Staalman a businessman from Amsterdam. The 1918 elections were the first election in the Netherlands which used a system of proportional representation. With about 12500 votes (1% of the votes) the MP won one seat, as did several other one or two person parties. After the elections the election law became more restrictive. Between 1918 and 1921 the MP cooperated in the neutral parliamentary party, with four other one or two seat parties, namely the Peasants' League, the Economic League, the Neutral Party and the Alliance for Democratization of the Army. The parliamentary party was led by former minister Willem Treub. In 1921 several of these parties, including the Middle Class Party merged into the Liberal State Party, together with two larger liberal parties. The Middle Class Party continued as an independent part of this new party, with a separate list for the elections (some times combined with the Neutral Party). In 1929 this special position was abolished and Staalman left the
    6.50
    2 votes
    71

    The Greens

    The Greens (De Groenen) is an ecologist party. It advocates a basic income and emphasizes its anti-militarism. A group of Dutch environmentalists led by Marten Bierman founded the Greens on December 17, 1983. They entered the European elections under the name "European Greens" since the name "The Greens" was controlled by Bas de Gaay Fortman. The party's foundation was supported by the Francophone Belgian green party Ecolo, while the German Greens supported the Green Progressive Accord. The party became involved in the formation of the Coordination of European Green Parties. It won 1.3% of vote in the 1984 European parliament election below the threshold of 4% for a seat. For the 1986 national elections the party used now the name "The Greens" which was abandoned. With Marten Bierman as top-candidate it won 0.2% of the votes, below the threshold of 0,7% for a seat. The party had a federal structure consisting of provincial parties. In 1987 the Greens participated in the North Holland, South Holland and Gelderland provincial elections. They won one seat on North Holland Provincial council, partially because of the support of Green Amsterdam led by Roel van Duijn. On March 10, 1989
    6.50
    2 votes
    72
    Revolutionary Socialist Party

    Revolutionary Socialist Party

    The Revolutionary Socialist Party (in Dutch: Revolutionair Socialistische Partij, RSP) was a Dutch socialist political party. The oldest predecessor of the Revolutionary Socialist Party is the Revolutionary Socialist Union (Dutch: Revolutionair Socialistisch Verbond; RSV), a group of dissidents from the Communist Party Holland (CPH) led by Henk Sneevliet. Another predecessor is the Socialist Party (Dutch: Socialistische Partij; SP), a syndicalist party, which was closely linked to the anarcho-syndicalist trade union National Workers' Secretariat (NAS). In 1929 former members of both the Revolutionary Socialist Union and the Socialist Party founded the Revolutonary Socialist Party. Both parties opposed both the reformist social-democracy of the SDAP and the CPH. A leading person in the foundation was Henk Sneevliet, a prominent former member of CPH and an associate of Leon Trotsky. The Central Intelligence Service, the Dutch secret service at the time, attributed the foundation of the RSP to Sneevliets personal need for power and glory, from which he was blocked in the CPH which distrusted the "trotskyite" Sneevliet. The RSP entered in the 1929 elections but was unable to win a
    5.00
    3 votes
    73

    Amsterdamese Police and Firefighting Party

    Amsterdamese Police and Firefighting Party (in Dutch: Amsterdamsche Politie- en Brandweerpartij) was a political party in the Netherlands. The party contested the 1918 parliamentary election in the constituencies of Amsterdam and Arnhem with a one-man list consisting of Renze van der Meulen. Demands of the party included an abolition of the hunting law, an introduction of a law for civil servants, and a ban on food exports until 1919. The party obtained just 417 votes (0.03%). It got 0.34% in Arhem and 0.14% in Amsterdam. Van der Meulen would later launch the National Party for Pension Interests (Landelijke Partij voorPensioenbelangen).
    6.00
    2 votes
    74
    Party for Neighbourly Love, Freedom, and Diversity

    Party for Neighbourly Love, Freedom, and Diversity

    The Party for Neighbourly Love, Freedom, and Diversity (Partij voor Naastenliefde, Vrijheid en Diversiteit, PNVD) was a Dutch political party with no representation in parliament, and only three known members. It was commonly known as "pedopartij" ("pedo party") in the media, due to its advocacy for legalization of child pornography and the lowering of the age of consent to age 12. PNVD was founded on 31 May 2006 by three self-described pedophiles. Its motto is "sapere aude ("Have courage to use your own reason")." PNVD has not participated in any election. In 2006, it did not receive the 30 signatures from each of the 19 Dutch electoral regions it would need to get on the ballot for the 2006 elections. Since 14 March 2010 the party no longer exists. According to their official statement, the PNVD's platform aimed to maximize diversity and liberty. They proposed allowing individuals, from the age of 12, to vote, have sex, gamble, choose their place of residence, and use soft drugs. Hard drugs would be legal at 16, as that would be the new age of majority. They also intended to eliminate marriage in the law, permit public nudity anywhere in the country, make railway travel free, and
    6.00
    2 votes
    75

    Tegenpartij

    The Tegenpartij (Counterparty, but also opponent) was a Dutch fictional political party, founded by Jacobse and Van Es, two vrije jongens (free guys, literally), played by Kees van Kooten and Wim de Bie. The Tegenpartij was the party for all Dutchmen who can no longer stand the Netherlands. Van Kooten and De Bie were trying to fight the populist tendencies of some of the other parties with their parody, but things turned out a bit differently: the Tegenpartij became so popular that it might well have gained several seats in parliament if it had actually taken part in elections. The party was finally disbanded on May 10, 1981, just before the elections, because Jacobse and Van Es were shot at the Binnenhof, the center of Dutch politics. Twenty-one years later, the Tegenpartij sketches once again became topical, because of their strong resemblance in parts to the rise of the right-wing political party Pim Fortuyn List.
    6.00
    2 votes
    76

    Central Democratic Labour Party

    Central Democratic Labour Party (in Dutch: Centrale Democratische Arbeiderspartij) was a political party in the Netherlands, which participated in the 1933 parliamentary election. The party mustered 182 votes, almost exclusively from Amsterdam (0.05%). The head of the list of the party was E.H. Baanders. The party was sometimes called the 'Baanders List'.
    7.00
    1 votes
    77

    ChristianUnion

    The ChristianUnion (Dutch: ChristenUnie), abbreviated to CU, is a Dutch Christian democratic political party. A centrist party, the CU's policies combine social conservatism and soft euroscepticism with more centre-left positions on economic, immigration, and environmental issues. The party describes itself as a Social Christian. Founded in 2000 as a merger of the Reformed Political Alliance (GPV) and Reformatory Political Federation (RPF), the ChristianUnion has five seats in the House of Representatives and four in the Senate. After doubling its seats in the 2006 elections it became the smallest member of the newly formed fourth Balkenende cabinet. In some elections, it forms an alliance with the more conservative Reformed Political Party, which, unlike the CU, is a testimonial party. Primarily a Protestant party, the CU bases its policies on the Bible, and takes the theological principles of charity and stewardship as bases for its support for public expenditure and environmentalism. The party seeks for government to uphold Christian morality, but supports freedom of religion under the doctrine of sphere sovereignty. The party is moderately Eurosceptic; it sits with the ECR in
    7.00
    1 votes
    78

    Proud of the Netherlands

    Proud of the Netherlands (Dutch: Trots op Nederland, TON) is a Dutch Political party. The party was founded on 17 October 2007 by Rita Verdonk, who at that time was an independent member of the House of Representatives. Verdonk declared that her movement would consist of "sympathizers" and, like the Party for Freedom, would not have a membership structure. However on July 7, 2009 it was officially announced that the "movement" would become an official Dutch political party. The party has been labeled as right wing and conservative liberal by the Dutch newspaper NRC Handelsblad. Dutch newspaper Trouw has labeled the party "explicitly nationalist". Verdonk stated that she wanted to use the party's own Wiki as a debating platform for citizens. An opinion poll by Interview-NSS taken in week 42 of 2007 showed that Verdonk's movement would obtain 9.9% of the parliamentary vote, with losses for the VVD, PVV and SP. Polls by TNS-Nipo and Maurice de Hond (Peil.nl) even indicated that the party would take second place. On 3 April 2008, Verdonk officially launched the party. A subsequent poll by Maurice De Hond indicated that Proud of the Netherlands and the PvdA would be tied for second
    5.50
    2 votes
    79

    Socialist Party

    The Socialist Party (in Dutch: Socialistische Partij, SP) was a Dutch revolutionary syndicalist libertarian socialist political party. The SP played only a minor role in Dutch political history. The Socialist Party was founded in 1918 as the political arm of the syndicalist trade union National Workers' Secretariat (Nationaal Arbeiders' Secretariaat). All its founders had their personal background in the free socialist movement of Ferdinand Domela Nieuwenhuis. The secretary of the NAS, Harm Kolthek, became the top candidate of the SP. In the 1918 election the threshold for admission to the House of Representatives was relatively low, at just over half of 1% of the vote. Consequently the SP was elected with only 9000 votes (that is .7% of vote). In parliament the party worked together with League of Christian Socialists and the Social Democrat Party (later Communist Party Holland) in the revolutionary parliamentary party. This cooperation was not very productive and soon Kolthek became more independent. In 1922, after the election laws were made more stringent, the SP was unable to retain its seats. Increased competition from the Communist Party Holland and the anarchist Rapaille
    5.50
    2 votes
    80

    CNV Public

    CNV Public is a trade union affiliate of the Christelijk Nationaal Vakverbond in the Netherlands. It was formed in 1983 from the merger of the ARKA, NCBO, and the NCVVV. CNV Public represents civil servants and healthcare workers in the Netherlands.
    5.00
    2 votes
    81

    Independent Socialist Party

    The Independent Socialist Party (in Dutch: Onafhankelijke Socialistische Partij; OSP) was a revolutionary socialist political party in the Netherlands. The party was founded by a group around Jacques de Kadt and Piet J. Schmidt on March 28, 1932. The group had split from the SDAP after a conflict over the internal opposition publication, the De Fakkel. The moderate leadership of the SDAP banned the publication, in reaction to this the leftwing opposition left the party. It entered in the 1933 elections where at won 27,000 votes and nearly one seat. In 1935 the party merged with the Revolutionary Socialist Party, and formed the Revolutionary Socialist Workers Party. The OSP was an orthodox Marxist, revolutionary socialist party, which opposed both the authoritarian stalinism of the Communist Party of the Netherlands and the moderate reformism of the Social-Democratic Workers' Party. The party's main goal was the proletarian world revolution, which would replace the capitalist system by a system of workers' councils. In the end this would result in a Communist society where inequality, exploitation and class would be eliminated. The RSP was mainly supported by leftwing intellectuals
    5.00
    2 votes
    82

    Livable Rotterdam

    Livable Rotterdam (Leefbaar Rotterdam) is a political party in the large Dutch city of Rotterdam, which was founded by Ronald Sørensen. It won the council elections of March 2002 due to the charismatic leadership of Pim Fortuyn. This made it the city's largest political party, a position held for 30 years by PvdA (Labour Party). Leefbaar Rotterdam started as a spin-off of the national party Leefbaar Nederland but is commonly seen as the local party of the LPF (Lijst Pim Fortuyn), the national party of Pim Fortuyn which was founded just after Pim Fortuyn was fired as lijsttrekker of the Leefbaar Nederland party in spring 2002. The party consists of a large number of members that are new to politics and were attracted to Fortuyn's dreams of political change. The party attracts attention and criticism for the impolitic behavior of its members and its unconventional, sometimes right wing vision, especially on immigration and tolerance. This has resulted in numerous splits in the faction since 2002. Nieuw Rechts was an example of this. In the municipal elections of 7 March 2006 Leefbaar Rotterdam lost 5%, dropping to 29,7% of their votes and PvdA gained 15%, making the latter the
    5.00
    2 votes
    83

    Liberal Union

    The Liberal Union (LU) (in Dutch: Liberale Unie) was a Dutch liberal political party. A major party in its time, the LU was one of the historic predecessors of the Liberal State Party, and therefore of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy. Liberals had been an important political force in the Netherlands. Since 1848 they were the dominant political force. They were organized in loose political clubs and caucuses. Liberals were divided between progressive, centrist and conservative liberals, but because of the lack of organized political parties, these divisions were not very strong. In 1879 the division became explicit when a separate parliamentary party was formed by supporters of Kappeyne van de Copello. With the rise of both catholic and protestant parties, the liberals were forced to organize themselves better. In 1885 all the liberal political clubs and caucuses were united in the Liberal Union. The Union was factionalized: it had a progressive, a conservative and a centrist faction. In 1888 the liberals were forced into opposition by a majority of the confessional political parties. In 1891 the confessional parties lost their majority and a liberal cabinet led by Van
    6.00
    1 votes
    84

    Natural Law Party

    The Natural Law Party (NLP) was a transnational party based on the teachings of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. It was active in up to 74 countries, and ran candidates in at least ten. Founded in 1992, it was mostly disbanded in 2004 but continues in India and in some U.S. states. The NLP viewed "natural law" as the organizing principle that governs the universe. The Natural Law Party advocated using the Transcendental Meditation technique and the TM-Sidhi program to reduce or eliminate problems in society. Perhaps the most prominent candidate running on the NLP platform was John Hagelin, who campaigned for U.S. president in 1992, 1996, and 2004. The NLP in the United Kingdom received attention due to the support of former members of The Beatles. The only electoral successes were achieved by the Ajeya Bharat Party in India, which elected a legislator to a state assembly, and by the Croatian NLP, which elected a member of a regional assembly in 1993. The Natural Law Party (NLP) was founded in the U.S. in 1992 by a group of educators, business leaders, and lawyers in Fairfield, Iowa, many of whom practiced the Transcendental Meditation technique. While Natural Law Party leaders denied formal
    6.00
    1 votes
    85

    Roman Catholic People's Party

    The Roman Catholic People's Party (in Dutch: Roomsch-katholieke Volkspartij, RKVP) was a Dutch Social Catholic political party. The RKVP played only a marginal role in Dutch politics. The RKVP was founded in 1922 by Pius Arts. In the 1925 election the party won one seat which was taken by Aarts. In the 1929 election the party lost its one seat. In the 1933 election the party regained one seat. In same year the party merged with the Catholic Democratic League to form the Catholic Democratic Party. In 1937 this party merged with the Roman Catholic State Party, the larger, centrist, catholic party. The RKVP combined a conservative Catholic stance on ethical issues with a progressive, leftwing stance on economic issues. It advocated the interest of Catholic workers and it wanted just taxation and a strong influence of labour unions in companies. It wanted to increase support for large families and also price controls. The party was in favour of private home-ownership and lower rents. It also supported national disarmament. In ethical issues, it was as conservative as the Roman Catholic State Party, the larger, centrist, Catholic party. It advocated the re-institution of the envoy at
    6.00
    1 votes
    86

    Catholic National Party

    The Catholic National Party (in Dutch: Katholieke Nationale Partij, KNP) was a Dutch conservative Catholic political party. The KNP served as a catholic protest party against Indonesian independence. The KNP was founded on December 11, 1948 as a continuation of the list-Welter (Committee for Action). This list got one seat in the 1948 election. It was led by Charles Welter, a former Dutch Minister for Colonial Affairs, who rejected the Dutch government's support for Indonesian independence. It also turned against the cooperation of the Catholic People's Party with the Labour Party. In 1952 election the party won another seat. In 1955 the bishops pressured the KNP to return to the KVP. Welter joined the KVP parliamentary party. In the 1956 and 1959 election Welter got a seat for the KVP. The KNP was a catholic party, which advocated christian-democratic politics. The party was conservative in economic and ethical matters. The most important issue for the KNP was the unity of the Dutch empire. It rejected the independence of the Dutch Indies and it stead wanted to form a kingdom in which the Netherlands and Indonesia were equal partners. In 1950 the independence of Indonesia was
    5.00
    1 votes
    87

    Christian Historical Union

    The Christian Historical Union (in Dutch: Christelijk-Historische Unie, CHU) was a Dutch conservative Protestant political party. The CHU is one of the predecessors of the Christian Democratic Appeal. In 1879 the Anti Revolutionary Party (ARP) was founded by a group of orthodox reformed Protestants, who had split from the main Dutch Reformed Church to form the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands. It advocated equal funding for religious schools, universal suffrage and Protestant morality. Their main tactic was the anti-thesis between religious and non-religious parties, which meant that it sought to break the cooperation between liberals and Catholics and to create an alliance between Catholics and Protestants. Furthermore it was the first party with a strong centralised organization - previously parties were organized as factions. The party was joined by many conservatives, who agreed with part of their program, many of whom were still members of the Dutch Reformed Church. The Anti-Revolutionaries were rather successful winning 13 (out of 100) seats in the House of Representatives in the 1879 election, although not all MPs who campaigned as "Anti-Revolutionaries" were members of
    5.00
    1 votes
    88

    Christian Historical Voters' League

    The Christian Historical Voters' League (in Dutch: Christelijk Historische Kiezersbond, CHK) is a Dutch conservative protestant political party. The CHK is historically linked to the Christian Democratic Appeal which is currently one of the major parties of the Netherlands. The CHK was founded in 1897. It was a continuation of the National Party, which was founded in 1888 but had never gained a seat in parliament. They were founded as one of several parties that were founded in the 1890s, which all turned again the leadership and ideology of Abraham Kuyper, the leader of the Protestant Anti Revolutionary Party. Kuyper had initiated a new political course for Protestantism in the Netherlands, which included cooperation with the Catholics, in the coalition, strategical support for extension of suffrage a rejection of theocracy in favour of a specific conception of state neutrality, sphere sovereignty and a strong party organization and party discipline. The party was led by two reformed ministers Bronsveld and de Visser. In the election of 1897 de Visser was elected to the House of Representatives for the district of Rotterdam, while Bronsveld became chair. A conflict between
    5.00
    1 votes
    89

    Christian Social Party

    The Christian Social Party (in Dutch: Christelijk-Sociale Partij, CSP) was a Dutch Christian socialist political party. The CSP played only a minor role in Dutch politics and is historically linked to the Labour Party. The CSP was founded in 1907 by former members of the conservative reformed Christian Historical Union. In the 1918 elections, the first election with a system of proportional representation and male universal suffrage the restriction to get into the Tweede Kamer were relatively low, one needed more than half of a percentage of the vote to be elected. Consequently the CSP was elected with only 8000 votes (that is .6% of vote). The CSP MP Van der Laar played only a minor role in Dutch politics. In the 1922 elections the restrictions to enter parliament where raised. The CSP was unable to maintain its seat. In the 1925 elections the party campaigned as the Protestant People's Party (Dutch: Protestantse Volkspartij, PVP). In 1926 the CSP founded the Christian Democratic Union with former members of the Christian Democratic Party and the League of Christian Socialists. CSP was both a social-democratic and a conservative Christian party. CSP was a reformist party and
    5.00
    1 votes
    90

    Radical League

    The Radical League (in Dutch: Radicale Bond) was a Dutch progressive liberal political party. The league is historically linked with the PvdA. In November 1892 one of the Amsterdam caucuses of the Liberal Union seceded from the party and formed the Radical League. The caucus was called "Amsterdam". The debate in the Liberal Union about the extension of suffrage was not moving in the direction of the Radicals. They were led by the charismatic, solistic politician Willem Treub. He set up a national organization. In 1893 the party won the Leeuwarden seat in a by-election. The newly MP was former Amsterdam alderman C.V. Gerritsen, who was also the husband of feminist Aletta Jacobs. In 1894 the party won two additional seats. They played a minor role in parliament. In 1897 they won an additional seat. The Radicals supported the progressive liberal cabinet led by Pierson, although they were not necessary for its majority. In 1901 the League merged with another group of progressive former Liberal Union members to form the Free-thinking Democratic League. The League was a progressive liberal and radical democratic party, committed to implementation of universal suffrage and social laws.
    5.00
    1 votes
    91

    National Socialist Dutch Workers Party

    The National Socialist Dutch Workers Party (Dutch Nationaal-Socialistische Nederlandsche Arbeiderspartij or NSNAP) was a minor Dutch national socialist party founded in 1931 and led by Ernst Herman van Rappard. Seeking to copy the fascism of others, notably Adolf Hitler, the group failed to achieve success and was accused by rivals such as the National Socialist Movement in the Netherlands (NSB) and the General Dutch Fascist League of being too moderate for a fascist movement. The group looked to the National Socialist German Workers Party for its inspiration, setting up its own Storm Trooper battalion in imitation of the Sturmabteilung and its own Holland Youth like the Hitler Youth, as well as copying the black swastika in a white circle on a red background as its emblem. Unlike its far right counterparts, who claimed to endorse Dutch patriotism, the NSNAP sought full incorporation of the Netherlands into the Third Reich, a policy which won it little support as the 998 votes which the party captured in the 1937 election demonstrated. Van Rappard was unable to hold the party together and before long three separate group were claiming the NSNAP name, one under Major Cornelis
    4.00
    1 votes
    92

    Communist Party of the Netherlands

    The Communist Party of the Netherlands (Dutch: Communistische Partij Nederland, CPN) was a Dutch communist political party. The CPN is one of the predecessors of the GreenLeft. In 1907 Ceton and David Wijnkoop founded De Tribune (The Tribune), a magazine in which they criticized the leadership of the Social Democratic Workers' Party (SDAP) of which they were members. They were still oriented towards orthodox Marxism and expected a proletarian revolution and opposed the leadership of the SDAP, who were more oriented towards more a revisionist ideology and a parliamentary and reformist political strategy. At a party congress in Deventer 1908 the leadership of the SDAP demanded that they stop publishing De Tribune or be expelled from the party. Wijnkoop and Ceton refused and they and their supporters, including the poet Herman Gorter, lost their membership to the SDAP. This conflict took place in almost all European Socialist parties, but the SDP was one of the parties founded as an orthodox Marxist split. In 1909 dissenters founded a new party called the Social-Democratic Party (SDP). In the 1910s the SDAP paid much attention to attacking the newly formed SDP. The mobilization for
    0.00
    0 votes
    93
    Dutch Peoples-Union

    Dutch Peoples-Union

    The Dutch Peoples-Union (Dutch: Nederlandse Volks-Unie, NVU) is a Dutch political party. Because of its many calls for the rehabilitation of convicted World War II war criminals and SS costumes worn at demonstrations, it is counted among the most extreme right of Dutch politics. The party strives for a fusion of the Netherlands with Flanders and a Europe of the Fatherlands. The party was founded as a political party in 1971 by Guus Looy, with as key purpose to rehabilitate convicted WW-II war criminals. In 1973 Roeland Raes, of the Belgian Vlaams Blok, becomes vice-president (reflecting the desire of both parties to unite the Netherlands and Flanders) and later that year Joop Glimmerveen took over the position of president. During the 1970s, the party became increasingly militant as younger neo-Nazis joined its ranks. When Glimmerveen revealed his sympathy for Adolf Hitler and Anton Mussert and the NVU became more and more a National Socialist party, support for the party collapsed and in the end it was forbidden. Due to a mistake in the law, the NVU managed to continue after it was forbidden. Some members formed the Centrumpartij (CP), which later split into the Centrum Demokraten
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    94

    Economic League

    The Economic League (in Dutch: Economische Bond, EB) was a Dutch liberal political party. It played only a marginal role in Dutch politics. The EB was founded in 1917 by Willem Treub a popular former Minister of Economic Affairs. He was a political independent although he had been member of the progressive liberal Freethinking Democratic League (VDB) until 1913. He was a very successful minister and popular politician, especially in business and middle class circles. He was known as "Minister Forward". He advocated pragmatic politics implemented by strong independent politicians drawn from business. Treub's personalized campaign was supported by successful businessmen. In the 1918 elections the party won only three seats. After the elections the League joined the newly formed neutral parliamentary party, which united several one and two-person parties, namely the Economic League, the Neutral Party, the Peasants' League, the Middle Class Party and the Alliance for Democratization of the Army. The parliamentary party was led by Treub. In parliament Treub was unable retain his popularity, in the 1919 municipal elections the party lost half its votes and won no seats. In the same year
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    95

    GreenLeft

    GreenLeft (Dutch: GroenLinks, GL) is a green political party operating in the Netherlands. GreenLeft was formed on 1 March 1989 as a merger of four left-wing political parties: the Communist Party of the Netherlands, Pacifist Socialist Party, the Political Party of Radicals and the Evangelical People's Party. After disappointing results in the 1989 and 1994 general elections, the party fared particularly well between 1994 and 2002. The party's leader Paul Rosenmöller was seen as the unofficial leader of the opposition against the Kok cabinet-led Purple governments by the media, fellow politicians and academics, even though it was only the second largest party in the opposition. GreenLeft describes itself as "green" "social", and "tolerant". It places itself in the freedom-loving tradition of the Left. Currently the party is represented by ten seats in the House of Representatives, four in the Senate and three in the European Parliament. The party leader, and chair of the parliamentary party in the House of Representatives, is Jolande Sap. The party is in opposition against the governing Rutte cabinet. The party has over 100 local councillors and it participates in the government of
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    96

    League of Christian Socialists

    The League of Christian Socialists (in Dutch: Bond Christen-Socialisten, BCS) was a Dutch Christian socialist political party. The BCS is historically linked to the Dutch Labour Party and GreenLeft. The BCS was founded in 1907. In the 1918 elections, the first election with a system of proportional representation and male universal suffrage the threshold for the House of Representatives was relatively low, at just over half of 1% of the vote. Consequently the BCS was elected with only 8000 votes (that is 0.6% of vote). In parliament the party worked together with Socialist Party and the Social Democrat Party (later Communist Party Holland) in the revolutionary parliamentary party. In 1919 the SP MP had left the parliamentary party, disaffected with the cooperation. The BCS representative however embraced the cooperation and left his own party with to join the Communist Party Holland. Some members joined him, while others joined the social-democratic SDAP, a third group continued separately and founded the Christian Democratic Union with the Christian Social Party and the Christian Democratic Party in 1926. The BCS was both a Marxist and a Christian party. In its manifesto of
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    97

    Mobile Netherlands

    The Mobile Netherlands (Nederland Mobiel) is a political party in the Netherlands without parliamentary representation. It was founded on December 5, 1997 by members of the PRO AUTO transport advocacy organization out of dissatisfaction with the policies of the Purple Kok coalition cabinet. Led by Jan Holsteijn and primarily concentrated in Spijkenisse, Mobile Netherlands primarily advocates for improvement of government-owned or regulated mobility and transport facilities.
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    98

    National Alliance

    The National Alliance (Dutch: Nationale Alliantie, abbr. NA or N.A.) was a Dutch nationalist political party. The party was disbanded in 2007. The party was formed on 12 November 2003, by Jan Teijn and Virginia Kapić. Teijn kicked off his political career in the Centrum Democraten in Rotterdam, before going over to the CP'86, where he was one of the local council members in Rotterdam of a national socialist faction. Teijn was elected to the district council in the Feijenoord district for the NNP, before he moved to the NA midterm. They lost that seat in the 2006 elections (302 votes or 1.2%). The NA's ideology was based on nationalism and socialism. The party wanted to protect Dutch culture, was in favour of animal rights and against Battery cage farming, unnecessary animal testing, fur and leather for which animals have to be slaughtered independent from meat production, against the bio-industry in general, and wanted tougher sentences for criminals. The Party sought the withdrawal of the Netherlands from NATO and the EU and was strongly anticapitalistic. The party also rejected other sexual preferences than heterosexuality. The party displayed itself as a "social and democratic
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    99
    New Right

    New Right

    New Right (Dutch: Nieuw Rechts, abbr. NR) was a nationalist Dutch political party, founded by Michiel Smit in February 2003 and dissolved in December 2007. Michiel Smit was secretary of Pim Fortuyn's local Leefbaar Rotterdam party. He was elected into the Rotterdam city council in March 2002. After the assassination of Fortuyn, May 6, 2002, the Leefbaar Rotterdam leadership was handed over to Ronald Sørensen. Michiel Smit was forced out of the Leefbaar Rotterdam party though in February 2003, after it became public that Smit participated on various rightwing radical internet fora, one of which was the American based Stormfront.org and operating the site www.arabischeuropeseliga.nl. Sørensen earlier forbade Smit from visiting the Belgian Vlaams Blok as representative of Leefbaar Rotterdam. However, Smit held on to his seat in the Rotterdam city council, forming a one person party called Nieuw Rechts. From this position Smit started to build up the Nieuw Rechts party. New Right worked with the nationalist NNP party (whose chairman Florens van der Kooi worked for a time at the New Right party office) to form the Actiecomité Stop MARTIJN in 2003, which campaigned against the pedophiles
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    100

    Roman-Catholic State Party

    Roman-Catholic Political Party (Dutch: Rooms-Katholieke Staatspartij, RKSP) was a Dutch Catholic Christian-Democratic political party. The party was founded in 1926 as a continuation of the General League. In 1945 the party became the Catholic People's Party (KVP). The RKSP was founded June 3, 1926, as the continuation of the Algemeene Bond van RK-kiesverenigingen (General League of Roman-Catholic Caucuses). Since 1918, the General League called itself RKSP informally. Instead of the loose league of caucuses, with little party discipline, as the General League was, the RKSP became a real party, with stronger party discipline and organisation. In 1922 another Catholic party, RKVP, was founded by former members of the General League. It was oriented towards Catholic workers. The General League received little competition from this party, but accelerated the RKSP's process of party-formation. During the 1920s and the 1930s, the RKSP was the biggest party in the Netherlands, receiving a steady 30% percent of the vote at each election. During this entire period the party was in government, in coalition with the Anti Revolutionary Party (ARP) and the Christian Historical Union (CHU), two
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