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Most famous Companies from Canada

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    1

    Parti nationaliste du Québec

    The Parti nationaliste du Québec was a fringe Quebec-based federal political party in Canada, that advocated sovereignty of Quebec and was founded by Parti Québécois (PQ) supporters. Its primary goal was to represent Quebec's interests in Ottawa and serve as a federal wing for the PQ. For decades, the Social Credit Party's Quebec wing, the Ralliement créditiste, attracted many Quebec nationalists as a party that could represent Quebec's interests in the Canadian House of Commons. When Créditistes were wiped off the electoral map in 1980 federal election, the political situation seemed favourable for the growth of the Parti nationaliste. The Parti nationaliste was a successor to the Union Populaire, a party that had little success in the 1979 and 1980 federal elections. Marcel Léger, who had been the PQ Member of the provincial legislature for the district of LaFontaine since 1970 became the party's first leader on September 14, 1983. He was a former Minister of the Environment who had been dropped from the Cabinet in 1982. In the aftermath of the 1982 Patriation of the Constitution by the federal government, PQ leader René Lévesque adopted the beau risque strategy and refused to
    7.00
    6 votes
    3

    International Brotherhood of Teamsters

    The International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) is a labor union in the United States and Canada. Formed in 1903 by the merger of several local and regional locals of teamsters, the union now represents a diverse membership of blue-collar and professional workers in both the public and private sectors. The union had approximately 1.4 million members in 2008. Formerly known as the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, the IBT is a member of the Change to Win Federation and Canadian Labour Congress. The American Federation of Labor (AFL) had helped form local unions of teamsters since 1887. In November 1898, the AFL organized the Team Drivers' International Union (TDIU). In 1901, a group of Teamsters in Chicago, Illinois, broke from the TDIU and formed the Teamsters National Union. The new union permitted only employees, teamster helpers, and owner-operators owning only a single team to join, unlike the TDIU (which permitted large employers to be members), and was more aggressive than the TDIU in advocating higher wages and shorter hours. Claiming more than 28,000 members in 47 locals, its president, Albert Young, applied for
    8.00
    5 votes
    4

    Nationalist Conservative

    The label Nationalist Conservative was used by several Quebec Members of the Canadian Parliament (MPs) and several unsuccessful candidates. They used this label in order to distinguish themselves from the British imperialist reputation of the Conservative Party or as a result of disputes with the party. The three MPs were first elected in the nineteenth century when the term nationalism in Quebec referred to Canadian nationalism, as opposed to British imperialism or a desire for an independent Quebec.
    6.67
    6 votes
    5

    Communist Party of Canada

    The Communist Party of Canada (CPC) is a communist political party in Canada. Although it is currently a minor or small political party without representation in the Federal Parliament or in provincial legislatures, historically the Party has elected representatives in Federal Parliament, the Ontario Legislature and the Manitoba Legislature as well as various municipal governments. The party has also contributed significantly to trade union organizing and labour history in Canada, peace and anti-war activism, as well as many other social movements. The Communist Party of Canada is the second oldest registered party after the Liberal Party of Canada, and the only registered political party to historically have been declared illegal (in 1921, 1932, and 1940). In 1990 the party was also de-registered and had its assets seized, begging a successful thirteen-year political and legal battle to allow small political parties in Canada. The campaign culminated with the final decision of Figueroa v. Canada, changing the legal definition of a political party in Canada. As outlined in its campaign for the 2011 federal election, the party advocates "fundamental change to end corporate control,
    4.75
    8 votes
    6

    Socialist Labour Party

    The Socialist Labour Party was a political party in Canada that was formed by Canadian supporters of the ideas of American socialist Daniel De Leon and the Socialist Labor Party of America. The party never won any seats. The party ran only a small number of candidates (listed below), all of whom placed last in their respective elections. The party dissolved in 2005 following the accidental death of its national secretary. The party also unsuccessfully contested three provincial elections in British Columbia:
    7.60
    5 votes
    7

    United Reform

    The United Reform Movement or United Reform was an attempt in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, to create a left wing farmer-labour coalition. Clergyman Walter George Brown won election to the House of Commons as a United Reform Movement candidate in a 1939 by-election in the riding of Saskatoon City, and was re-elected in the 1940 general election with the endorsement of the National Government party (as the Tories were called in 1940). He died on April 1, 1940, five days after being re-elected. The URM recruited Agnes Macphail, a long time Member of Parliament (MP) who had been defeated in the 1940 election to run in the by-election to fill Brown's vacancy. MacPhail had been an MP since 1921, first as a representative for the Progressive Party of Canada and since 1930 as a United Farmers of Ontario-Labour MP, although she was active with the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. In deference to her nominators, she ran as a "United Reform" candidate in the August 1940 by-election, but was defeated by the Conservative candidate. There was also a "United Reform" candidate in the Saskatchewan riding of Weyburn who ran in the 1940 general election. As he ran against Tommy Douglas of
    6.33
    6 votes
    8
    Alberta Liberal Party

    Alberta Liberal Party

    The Alberta Liberal Party is a provincial political party in Alberta, Canada. Originally founded in 1905, when the province was created, it was the dominant political party until 1921 when it was defeated. It has never been in government since that time. However, it had formed the official opposition in the Legislative Assembly of Alberta several times, most recently from 1993 until 2012. As of 2012, 14 different Liberals have served as Leader of the Opposition. Since 1976, the Alberta Liberal Party is no longer formally affiliated with the Liberal Party of Canada. The Liberals formed the government in Alberta for the first 16 years of the province's existence. Alexander C. Rutherford (1905–1910), Arthur L. Sifton (1910–1917) and Charles Stewart (1917–1921) led Liberal governments, until the party was swept from office in the 1921 election by the United Farmers of Alberta. Currently the party is the Official Opposition in the Alberta legislature, but the party has suffered through some difficult times in the eight decades since their defeat as the province's governing party. In opposition, the party has won up to 32 seats but has also at times been shut out of the provincial
    7.00
    5 votes
    9

    Alberta Social Credit Party

    The Alberta Social Credit Party is a provincial political party in Alberta, Canada, that was founded on the social credit monetary policy and conservative Christian social values. The Canadian social credit movement was largely an out-growth of the Alberta Social Credit Party. The Social Credit Party of Canada was originally strongest in Alberta, before developing a base in Quebec when Réal Caouette agreed to merge his Ralliement créditiste movement into the federal party. The British Columbia Social Credit Party formed the government for many years in neighbouring British Columbia, although this was effectively a coalition of centre-right forces in the province that had no interest in social credit monetary policies. The party won a majority government in 1935, barely months after its formation, and remained in power until 1971. However, it has held no seats since 1982, and finished a distant seventh in the 2012 general election. William Aberhart, a Baptist pastor and evangelist in Calgary, was attracted to social credit theory while Alberta was in the depths of the Great Depression. He soon began promoting it via his radio program on CFCN in Calgary, adding a heavy dose of
    8.25
    4 votes
    10

    Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan

    The Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan is a right-of-centre political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. Prior to 1942, it was known as the Conservative Party of Saskatchewan. Members are commonly known as Tories. It nominated candidates for the first time in the 1912 election, seven years after the province of Saskatchewan was formed. The party emerged from the Provincial Rights Party after the retirement of that party's leader, Frederick W. A. G. Haultain. The Conservative Party's best performance in the first half of the twentieth century was in the 1929 election, when it won 36% of the popular vote and 24 out of 63 seats. Despite having fewer seats than the Liberals, the Conservatives were able to form a coalition government with Progressive Party MLAs and independents. Conservative leader James T.M. Anderson became Premier. The Tories were suspected of being in league with the Ku Klux Klan, which was a strong force in the province at the time, and railed against Catholics and French-Canadians. The Anderson government introduced amendments to the Schools Act banning French as a language of instruction, as well as the display of religious symbols in
    6.80
    5 votes
    11

    Canadian Action Party

    The Canadian Action Party (CAP) (French: Parti action canadienne [PAC]) is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1997. It promotes Canadian nationalism, monetary and electoral reform, and opposes neoliberal globalization and free trade agreements. The Canadian Action Party was founded by Paul T. Hellyer, a former Liberal minister of defence in the cabinet of Lester Pearson. Hellyer ran unsuccessfully for the leadership of the Liberal Party in 1968, and for the leadership of the Progressive Conservative Party in 1976. It nominated candidates for the first time in the 1997 federal election. After the 1997 election, it absorbed the Canada Party, another minor party concerned about monetary reform which had been formed by former members of the Social Credit Party of Canada. Former Canada Party leader Claire Foss served as vice president of CAP until November 2003. Hellyer resigned as CAP leader in 2003 after the New Democratic Party didn't agree to a merger proposal, under which the NDP would change its name. In 2004, Connie Fogal, an activist lawyer, was acclaimed party leader after David Orchard failed to respond to an invitation to take over the leadership. Fogal stepped
    8.00
    4 votes
    12

    United Automobile Workers

    The International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America, better known as the United Auto Workers (UAW), is a labor union which represents workers in the United States and Puerto Rico, and formerly in Canada. Founded as part of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in the 1930s, the UAW grew rapidly from 1936 to the 1950s. Under the leadership of Walter Reuther it played a major role in the liberal wing of the Democratic party, including the civil rights and anti-Communist movements. The UAW was especially known for gaining high wages and pensions for the auto workers, but it was unable to unionize auto plants built by foreign-based car-makers in the South after 1970s, and went into a steady decline in membership. UAW members in the 21st century work in industries as diverse as autos and auto parts, health care, casino gaming and higher education. Headquartered in Detroit, Michigan, the union has about 390,000 active members and more than 600,000 retired members in 750 local unions, which negotiated 2,500 contracts with some 1,700 employers. The UAW was founded in May 1935 in Detroit, Michigan, under the auspices of the American
    8.00
    4 votes
    13

    Christian Heritage Party of Canada

    The Christian Heritage Party of Canada, also referred to as CHP Canada, is a federal political party that advocates that Canada be governed according to Biblical principles. It believes "the purpose of civil government is to ensure security, freedom, and justice for all its citizens from conception till natural death, by upholding just laws". This socially and fiscally conservative party held its founding convention in Hamilton, Ontario in November 1987, where Ed Vanwoudenberg was elected its first leader. Jim Hnatiuk has led the party since 2008. The party nominated candidates for the first time in the 1988 federal election, and ran numerous candidates in the 1993 and 1997 elections. It was unable to field 50 candidates in the 2000 election and was consequently de-registered by Elections Canada, the government elections agency. The party was re-registered in time for the 2004 election. Many of its founders had been members of the Social Credit movement. The party hopes to "apply proven Judeo-Christian principles of justice and compassion to Canada's contemporary public policy needs". The party claims that it seeks to represent all Canadians, and specifically denies any interest in
    7.75
    4 votes
    14

    Social Credit Party of Canada

    The Social Credit Party of Canada (French: Parti Crédit social du Canada) was a conservative-populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. It was the federal wing of the Canadian social credit movement. The Canadian social credit movement was largely an out-growth of the Alberta Social Credit Party, and the Social Credit Party of Canada was originally strongest in Alberta. When first formed in 1935, as the Western Social Credit League, it attracted many voters from the Progressive Party of Canada and the United Farmers movement. The party grew out of disaffection with the status quo during the Great Depression. The depression hit the party's western Canadian birthplace especially hard, and can be credited both for the creation of this party and the rise of a social democratic party, the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. In the party's first election in 1935, it ran candidates only in Western Canada and won 17 seats, all but two of them in Alberta, where it won over 46% of that province's popular vote. John Horne Blackmore was chosen as the party's parliamentary leader. In 1939, Social Credit merged with the New Democracy movement
    8.67
    3 votes
    15

    Ontario New Democratic Party

    The Ontario New Democratic Party (ONDP) or (NDP), formally known as New Democratic Party of Ontario, is a social democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. It is a provincial section of the federal New Democratic Party. It was formed in October 1961 from the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (Ontario Section) (Ontario CCF) and the Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL). For many years, the ONDP was the most successful provincial NDP branch outside the national party's western heartland. It had its first breakthrough under its first leader, Donald C. MacDonald in the 1967 provincial election, when the party elected 20 Members of Provincial Parliament (MPPs) to the Ontario Legislative Assembly. After the 1970 leadership convention, Stephen Lewis became leader, and guided the party to Official Opposition status in 1975, the first time since the Ontario CCF did it twice in the 1940s. After the party's disppointing performance in the 1977 provincial election, that included losing second party status, Lewis stepped down and Michael Cassidy was elected leader in 1978. Cassidy lead the party through one campaign, the 1981 election. The party did poorly again, and Cassidy resigned. In
    7.00
    4 votes
    16
    United Mine Workers

    United Mine Workers

    The United Mine Workers of America (UMW or UMWA) is a North American labor union best known for representing coal miners and coal technicians. Today, the Union also represents health care workers, truck drivers, manufacturing workers and public employees in the United States and Canada. Although its main focus has always been on workers and their rights, the UMW of today also advocates for better roads, schools, and universal health care. The UMW was founded in Columbus, Ohio, on January 22, 1890, with the merger of two old labor groups, the Knights of Labor Trade Assembly No. 135 and the National Progressive Miners Union. Adopting the model of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), the union was initially established as a three-pronged labor tool: to develop mine safety; to improve mine workers' independence from the mine owners and the company store; and to provide miners with collective bargaining power. After passage of the National Recovery Act in 1933, organizers spread throughout the United States to organize all coal miners into labor unions. During the 1930s, the UMWA was involved in Washington politics, a controversial involvement which generated such alternative unions
    7.00
    4 votes
    17

    Freedom Party of Canada

    The Freedom Party of Canada (abbreviated to "FpC") was founded on July 20, 2001 by Paul McKeever (then a member of the executive of the Freedom Party of Ontario) and Robert Metz (President and co-founder of Freedom Party of Ontario). It has not registered itself with Elections Canada for election finance purposes and has never run candidates. The Freedom Party of Canada is the federal counterpart of the Freedom Party of Ontario, which was founded in 1984. The party advocates individual liberty and personal responsibility. It describes its political orientation as being in the tradition of John Locke and Ayn Rand. It is a pro-capitalist party and favours minimal government involvement in economic matters. The Freedom Party of Canada is associated with Freedom Party International, an organization formed to continue the educational role of The Freedom Party of Ontario ("FpO") when FpO, in 2002, began the process of structuring itself to become an electoral party. The party released a platform called The Right Direction, also known as the "burgundy book" which calls for a flat tax, less protectionism, more competition, same-sex marriage, and legalized abortion. The party released its
    8.33
    3 votes
    18

    Labour candidates and parties in Canada

    There have been various groups in Canada that have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. These were usually local or provincial groups using the Labour Party or Independent Labour Party name, backed by local Labour Councils (made up of all the union locals in a city) or individual trade unions. There was an attempt to create a national Canadian Labour Party in the 1920s, but this was ultimately unsuccessful. A number of local Labour parties and clubs participated in the formation of the Communist Party of Canada in 1921. The Independent Labour Party and other labour groups helped found the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) in 1932. The first Labour Member of Parliament (MP) was Arthur Puttee who founded the Winnipeg Labour Party, and was elected to the House of Commons from Winnipeg, Manitoba in a 1900 by-election and kept his seat at the 1900 federal election held later the same year. Other MPs elected under the Labour or Independent Labour label include: MacInnis, Heaps and Woodsworth joined the Ginger Group of left wing MPs prior to forming the CCF. Four Independent Labour Party
    6.75
    4 votes
    19

    Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta

    The Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta (often referred to colloquially as Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta) is a provincial centre-right party in the Canadian province of Alberta. The party has formed the provincial government, without interruption, since 1971 under premiers Peter Lougheed (1971–1985), Don Getty (1985–1992), Ralph Klein (1992–2006), Ed Stelmach (2006–2011) and Alison Redford (2011–present). As of 2012, this is the third-longest unbroken run in government at the provincial level in Canadian history, behind their Ontario counterparts' 42-year run from 1943 to 1985, and the Nova Scotia Liberals' 43 years from 1882 to 1925. The party was created from the Northwest Territories Liberal-Conservative Party that existed from 1898 to 1905. Unlike their predecessor party, that formed government during its entire existence, the Alberta Conservatives were a marginal party in Alberta for most of the province's early history. In the province's first election, the 1905 election, the Conservatives, led by future Canadian Prime Minister Richard Bennett, won only two seats and were barely able to improve on that in subsequent elections. The main policy
    6.75
    4 votes
    20

    Progressive Party of Canada

    The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. It was linked with the provincial United Farmers parties in several provinces and, in Manitoba, ran candidates and formed governments as the Progressive Party of Manitoba. The party was part of a farmers' political movement that included provincial Progressive and United Farmers' parties. The United Farmers movement in Canada rose to prominence after World War I. With the failure of the wartime Union government to alter a tariff structure that hurt farmers, various farmers movements across Canada became more radical and entered the political arena. The United Farmers movement was tied to the federal Progressive Party of Canada and formed provincial governments in Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba. It rejected the National Policy of the Conservatives and also felt that the Liberals were not strong enough proponents of free trade and were too strongly tied to business interests. Generally, farmers groups formed alliances with Labour and socialist groups though, in power, they became closer to the Liberals causing ruptures in several provinces between United Farmer governments and their organizations.
    6.75
    4 votes
    21

    Socialist Party of Canada

    There have been two different but related political parties in Canada that called themselves the Socialist Party of Canada (SPC). The current Socialist Party is an electorally inactive and unregistered federal political party in Canada. The first Socialist Party of Canada existed from 1904 to 1925; the second has existed since June 1931 when it was relaunched by some members of the first party, but has not run a candidate at the federal level since 1961. The founding of the Socialist Party of Canada began at the Socialist Party of British Columbia 4th annual convention on December 30 and 31, 1904. Delegates at the convention were urged to consider organizing the nucleus of a federal party, noting the acceptance of the platform with Socialist Parties and organizations in other provinces. Socialist organizations quickly approved the party formation, and the new party executive met for the first time on February 19, 1905. The party had a revolutionary Marxist orientation: it saw attempts to reform capitalism as counterproductive to the goal of overturning the capitalist system entirely and replacing it with a socialist model. The SPC was strongest in British Columbia, and won seats in
    6.75
    4 votes
    22

    Abolitionist Party of Canada

    The Abolitionist Party of Canada was a Canadian political party founded by perennial candidate John C. Turmel. The party ran on a platform of: monetary reform, including the abolition of interest rates and the income tax, the use of the local employment trading system of banking, and introducing a form of Social Credit with monthly dividends being paid out to each Canadian. Unlike many Canadian social credit parties, the Abolitionists were not social conservatives, advocating, for instance, the legalization of marijuana and gambling. Turmel attempted to run for the leadership of the national Social Credit party after the resignation of Fabien Roy in 1981, but the party chose to appoint Martin Hattersley instead. In 1982, Turmel founded the Christian Credit Party, which he disbanded in 1983. Turmel founded the Abolitionist Party in 1993 with a similar program to that of the Christian Credit Party. The Abolitionist Party nominated 80 candidates in the 1993 federal election, who collected only 9,141 votes between them. (See also: Abolitionist Party candidates, 1993 Canadian federal election.) The Abolitionist Party subsequently reverted to being a personal vehicle for Turmel. In 2003,
    10.00
    2 votes
    23

    British Columbia Conservative Party

    The British Columbia Conservative Party is a political party in British Columbia, Canada. First elected as the government in 1903, the party went into decline after 1933. In May 2011, a leadership convention acclaimed former Conservative MP John Cummins leader of the party. The BC Conservative Party, (also known as Tories), was formed in 1900 when the Liberal-Conservative Party selected its first provincial leader, Charles Wilson. Several Opposition factions contested the 1900 general election against the non-partisan government but these were loose formations. In 1902, the Conservative Party convention passed a resolution to stand candidates in the next general election. Party government was introduced on June 1, 1903 by Premier Sir Richard McBride when he announced the formation of a Conservative government. The subsequent 1903 election along party lines. McBride believed that the system of non-partisan government that the province had been using was unstable and inhibiting development. His Conservatives won British Columbia's first election fought on the party system on October 3, 1903 with a two-seat majority in the British Columbia Legislative Assembly. The Tories implemented
    8.00
    3 votes
    24

    Family Coalition Party of Ontario

    The Family Coalition Party is a small political party in Ontario, Canada that promotes a socially conservative ideology. It was formed in 1987 by members of the pro-life organization Campaign Life Coalition, and has fielded candidates in every provincial election since then. It is led by Phil Lees, a Hamilton school teacher and university instructor. The first leader of the party was Donald Pennell, who was previously a candidate for the Ontario Liberal Party in the 1975 provincial election. He served as FCP leader from 1987 to 1997. Pennell subsequently campaigned for the Canadian Alliance in the 2000 federal election. Pennell was replaced by Giuseppe Gori, who led the party from 1997 to October 2009. A leadership convention was held in Hamilton on October 24, 2009, to elect a new leader. Phil Lees was the only candidate for the leadership registered. The Family Coalition Party's strongest showing to date was in the 1990 provincial election, when it received over 100,000 votes. In 1990 several candidates received over 10% of the popular vote (the best was 13%) but the party ran only 76 candidates. Its support declined in the 1995 and 1999 elections, followed by a modest recovery
    6.50
    4 votes
    25
    Green Party of Saskatchewan

    Green Party of Saskatchewan

    The Green Party of Saskatchewan is a left-leaning Green political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. It was founded in 1998 as the New Green Alliance (NGA) by environmental and social justice activists frustrated by the social democratic Saskatchewan New Democratic Party's move to the right under Roy Romanow. Unlike many Green parties in Canada, the NGA was decidedly left wing, favouring, for example, progressive taxation, workers' rights and the elimination of poverty. NGA supporters believed that the Green Party of Canada and Green Party of Ontario were essentially eco-capitalist parties because they favour regressive consumption taxes and oppose taxes on incomes and corporations.  The NGA also opposed privatization of Crown corporations. As a Green party, the NGA supported ecological agriculture, balanced ecological forestry and forest use, and promote a soft energy path. The NGA was committed to peace and non-violence, and in contrast to the Green Party of Canada, took a strong stance against the U.S. war in Iraq.  The NGA ran candidates in Saskatchewan elections, but was unable to win any seats in the Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan. In the 2003 election, the
    9.50
    2 votes
    26

    Grey Party of Canada

    The Grey Party of Canada is a political party in Canada. The party is a protest movement started by senior citizens who want to make views known on specific issues including tax credits for seniors, saving Medicare, and free medications for seniors. The Grey Party was founded in January 2002, by Jim Webb of New Brunswick. Webb once ran federally for the Confederation of Regions Party in Saint John, New Brunswick and 2 times for the New Brunswick Confederation of Regions Party in the provincial riding of Saint John Lancaster. In the New Brunswick general election, 2003 the party nominated 10 candidates in the province's 55 ridings, including 23-year-old Mark LeBlanc who ran in the former provincial riding of Saint John Kings. At the time having a 23-year-old candidate for a senior issued party was a newsmaker. Grey Party candidates received 1,550 votes (0.4% of the popular vote). See also: List of political parties in Canada, Manitoba Grey Party, British Columbia Grey Party
    9.50
    2 votes
    27

    Green Party of British Columbia

    The Green Party of British Columbia is a political party in British Columbia, Canada. It is led by former Esquimalt municipal councillor, university professor and businessperson Jane Sterk, she was elected by the party in 2007. The party is headquartered in Victoria. - Grassroots Democracy - Sustainability - Social Justice - Respect for Diversity - Ecological Wisdom - Non-Violence - Gender Equality - Decentralization - Personal and Global Responsibility - Community Based Economy The first Green Party in North America, was formed in British Columbia, Canada on February 4, 1983, registering as both a provincial society and a political party shortly before the 1983 provincial election in which it fielded four candidates and received 0.19% of the vote under the leadership of Adriane Carr. In a federal by-election in the riding of Mission—Port Moody the same year, Betty Nickerson was the Green Party of Canada's first federal candidate, but the party's official status was not yet recognized by Elections Canada. She appears in electoral records as an "independent" candidate. Adriane Carr stepped back from active involvement in the party in 1985, and the party abolished the position of
    7.67
    3 votes
    28

    Saskatchewan Party

    The Saskatchewan Party is a conservative liberal political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The party was established in 1997 by a coalition of former provincial Progressive Conservative and Liberal party members and supporters who sought to remove the Saskatchewan New Democratic Party (NDP) from power. The Saskatchewan Party served as the province's Official Opposition until the provincial election on November 7, 2007. The Saskatchewan Party won 38 seats in the Legislative Assembly, and leader Brad Wall was sworn in as the province's 14th Premier on November 21, 2007. During the November 7, 2011 general election, the party won a landslide victory, winning 49 of 58 seats and re-electing all 18 cabinet ministers. Historically, Saskatchewan politics has tended towards a two-party system, with third parties enjoying limited political success. For the first 25 years of the province's existence, political power was split between the Saskatchewan Liberal Party in government, and the Conservatives (initially the Provincial Rights Party) in opposition. The emergence of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), forerunner of the NDP – a left-of-centre political party
    7.67
    3 votes
    29
    Alberta New Democratic Party

    Alberta New Democratic Party

    The Alberta New Democratic Party or Alberta NDP is a social-democratic political party in Alberta, Canada, which was originally founded as the Alberta section of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. From the mid-1980s to 2004, the party abbreviated its name as the "New Democrats" (ND). The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was founded in Calgary on 1 August 1932 but organised in fits and starts in Alberta due to lack of support from the United Farmers of Alberta (UFA). While most UFA Members of Parliament, led by William Irvine, the first president of the Alberta CCF, supported the CCF and ran for re-election (unsuccessfully) in the 1935 federal election as CCF candidates, the UFA was also the governing party in the Alberta legislature and was more ambivalent. The CCF did not run in the 1935 provincial election because of its ties with the UFA. The UFA was defeated badly and fell into disarray. Federally, eight of the UFA's Members of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons ran as UFA-CCF candidates in the 1935 federal election - and were all defeated largely because of their association with the unpopular UFA government. In 1936, William Irvine, a CCF founder and
    9.00
    2 votes
    30

    Rassemblement pour l'Indépendance Nationale

    The Rassemblement pour l'Indépendance Nationale (RIN, in English: Rally for National Independence) was a political organization dedicated to the promotion of Quebec national independence from Canada. It was founded on September 10, 1960, by about 30 people at the very beginning of the Quiet Revolution. The founders included many of former Alliance Laurentienne members. (The Alliance Laurentienne was dissolved after the creation of the RIN.) The founding members included André D'Allemagne, Jacques Bellemare and Marcel Chaput. Other prominent members included Andrée Ferretti, Hubert Aquin and Raymond Villeneuve. D'Allemagne, having participated in the Alliance Laurentienne, has stated that he had found the Alliance's right-wing tendencies quite unpleasant. This was a factor leading to the creation of an officially neutral organisation. However, as the RIN attracted many new young members it quickly became associated with more radical left-wing ideas. In October 1960, the first general assembly of the organization published its manifesto calling for the independence of Quebec. Pierre Bourgault, who had joined shortly after foundation, became its president in 1964. Following the wish
    9.00
    2 votes
    31
    Western Federation of Miners

    Western Federation of Miners

    The Western Federation of Miners (WFM) was a radical labor union that gained a reputation for militancy in the mines of the western United States and British Columbia. Its efforts to organize both hard rock miners and smelter workers brought it into sharp conflicts – and often pitched battles – with both employers and governmental authorities. One of the most dramatic of these struggles occurred in the Cripple Creek district in 1903-04, and has been called the Colorado Labor Wars. The WFM also played a key role in the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World in 1905, but left that organization several years later. The WFM changed its name to the International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers (more familiarly referred to as Mine Mill) in 1916. After a period of decline it revived in the early days of the New Deal and helped found the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in 1935. The Mine Mill union was expelled from the CIO in 1950 during the post-war red scare for refusing to shed its communist leadership. After spending years fighting off efforts by the United Steelworkers of America (USWA) to raid its membership, Mine Mill and the USWA merged in 1967. After
    7.00
    3 votes
    32

    AFL–CIO

    The American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL–CIO) is a national trade union center, the largest federation of unions in the United States, made up of fifty-six national and international unions, together representing more than 11 million workers (as of June 2008, the most recent official statistic). It was formed in 1955 when the AFL and the CIO merged after a long estrangement. From 1955 until 2005, the AFL–CIO's member unions represented nearly all unionized workers in the United States. Several large unions split away from AFL–CIO and formed the rival Change to Win Federation in 2005. The largest union currently in the AFL–CIO is the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), with more than a million members. The AFL–CIO is a federation of international labor unions. As a voluntary federation, the AFL–CIO has little authority over the affairs of its member unions except in extremely limited cases (such as the ability to expel a member union for corruption (Art. X, Sec. 17) and enforce resolution of disagreements over jurisdiction or organizing). As of June 2008, the AFL–CIO had 56 member unions. Membership in the
    8.50
    2 votes
    33

    Manitoba Liberal Party

    The Manitoba Liberal Party is a political party in Manitoba, Canada. Its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth-century, following the province's creation in 1870. Originally, there were no official political parties in Manitoba, although many leading politicians were affiliated with parties that existed at the national level. In Manitoba's first Legislative Assembly, the leader of the opposition was Edward Hay, a Liberal who represented the interests of recent anglophone immigrants from Ontario. Not a party leader as such, he was still a leading voice for the newly-transplanted "Ontario Grit" tradition. In 1874, Hay served as Minister of Public Works in the government of Marc-Amable Girard, which included both Conservatives and Liberals. During the 1870s, a Liberal network began to emerge in the city of Winnipeg. One of the key figures in this network was William Luxton, owner of the Manitoba Free Press newspaper and himself a member of the Manitoba legislature on two occasions. Luxton was not initially supportive of Premier Robert A. Davis (1874–1878), but endorsed the Davis ministry after brought John Norquay into cabinet (Davis's early supporters were primarily from the
    8.50
    2 votes
    34

    United Farmers of Ontario

    The United Farmers of Ontario (UFO) was a political party in Ontario, Canada. It was the Ontario provincial branch of the United Farmers movement of the early part of the 20th century. The UFO was founded in 1914 by the union of various farmers' organizations that had been created over the previous fifteen years. James J. Morrison was the leading figure in the party, serving as its general secretary and secretary of the United Farmers Co-operative Company Ltd. (the purchasing co-operative the UFO operated on behalf of its members). The organization grew rapidly and by 1917 it had 350 local clubs and 12,000 members. The UFO had a comprehensive farmer's platform that called for the nationalization of railways, progressive taxation, and legislation that would facilitate the operation of co-operatives. In 1917, supporters of the UF formed the Farmers' Publishing Company and purchased The Weekly Sun renaming it The Farmer's Sun to act as the organ of the UFO. The UFO entered politics by contesting and winning a by-election in Manitoulin in 1918, in which Beniah Bowman was elected as the party's first Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA). In the subsequent 1919 provincial election,
    8.50
    2 votes
    35

    New Democratic Party of Manitoba

    The New Democratic Party of Manitoba (NDP) is a social-democratic political party in Manitoba, Canada. It is the provincial wing of the federal New Democratic Party, and is a successor to the Manitoba Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. It is currently the governing party in Manitoba. In the federal election of 1958, the national Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was reduced to only eight seats in the Canadian House of Commons. The CCF's leadership restructured the party during the next three years, and in 1961 it merged with the Canadian Labour Congress to create the New Democratic Party (NDP). Most provincial wings of the CCF also transformed themselves into "New Democratic Party" organisations before the year was over, with Saskatchewan as the only exception. There was very little opposition to the change in Manitoba, and the Manitoba NDP was formally constituted on November 4, 1961. Future Manitoba NDP leader Howard Pawley was one of the few CCF members to oppose the change. Outgoing CCF leader Russell Paulley easily won the new party's leadership, defeating two minor figures who offered little in the way of policy alternatives. The NDP did not initially achieve an
    10.00
    1 votes
    36
    Parti Québécois

    Parti Québécois

    The Parti Québécois (PQ) is a centre-left provincial political party that advocates national sovereignty for the province of Quebec and secession from Canada. The Party traditionally has support from the labour movement. Unlike many other social-democratic parties, its ties with the labour movement are informal. Members and supporters of the PQ are called "péquistes" ([peˈkist] ( listen)), a French word derived from the pronunciation of the party's initials. Since June 2007, the party is headed by Pauline Marois. The PQ is the result of the 1968 merger between René Lévesque's Mouvement Souveraineté-Association and the Ralliement national. Following the creation of the PQ, the Rassemblement pour l'Indépendance Nationale held a general assembly that voted to dissolve the RIN. Its former members were invited to join the new Parti Québécois. The PQ's primary goals were to obtain political, economic and social autonomy for the province of Quebec. Lévesque introduced the strategy of referenda early in the 1970s. In the 1976 provincial election, the Parti Québécois was elected for the first time to form the government of Quebec. The party's leader, René Lévesque, became the Premier of
    5.50
    4 votes
    37
    Delta Kappa Epsilon

    Delta Kappa Epsilon

    Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or "Deke") is a fraternity founded at Yale College in 1844 by 15 men of the sophomore class part of whom hadn't been invited to join the two existing societies (Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon) among others who had been invited to join. They therefore formed their own fraternity to establish a fellowship "where the candidate most favored was he who combined in the most equal proportions the gentleman, the scholar, and the jolly good fellow." The fraternity was founded June 22, 1844, in room number 12 Old South Hall, Yale College, New Haven, Connecticut. At this meeting, the Fraternity's secret and open Greek mottos were devised, as were the pin and secret handshake. The open motto is "Kerothen Philoi Aei" ("Friends from the Heart, Forever"). The fifteen founders were: William Woodruff Atwater, Dr. Edward Griffin Bartlett, Frederic Peter Bellinger, Jr., Henry Case, Colonel George Foote Chester, John Butler Conyngham, Thomas Isaac Franklin, William Walter Horton, The Honorable William Boyd Jacobs, Professor Edward VanSchoonhoven Kinsley, Chester Newell Righter, Dr. Elisha Bacon Shapleigh, Thomas DuBois Sherwood, Albert Everett Stetson,
    6.67
    3 votes
    38

    Social Democratic Party of Canada

    The Social Democratic Party was a social democratic political party in Canada founded in 1911 by members of the right wing of the Socialist Party of Canada. these members were dissatisfied with what they saw as that party's rigid, doctrinaire approach. As opposed to the Socialist Party of Canada, the SDP allowed minority language groups ample room for self-determination, which led to a perception that the ethnic groups were more dominant than the overarching SDP. When the authorities cracked down on ethnic groups during the 1918 wave of repression, many of these individual ethnic chapters were shut down. The British Columbia-based SDP put forward a more moderate, evolutionary socialist position, and had a more positive view of the trade union movement than its rival. The party won seats in the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia in the early part of the century, and also won seats in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba in 1915 and 1920. The SDP's official platform can be seen as being far from revolutionary, as put forth in their newspaper Canadian Forward: As a means of preparing the minds of the working class for the inauguration of the Co-operative commonwealth, the
    6.67
    3 votes
    39

    Rest of Canada Party

    The Rest of Canada Party was a Canadian political party that intended to run candidates in all provinces outside of Ontario and Quebec, which the party believed were unfairly running the country. The party planned to form a coalition government with the Bloc Québécois if ever elected. Founded by Ace Cetinski, a Chartered Accountant from Sherwood Park, Alberta, the party's website indicated its intent to advertise for candidates for federal by-elections to be held in September 2000, but there is no evidence that candidates were found. Cetinski had previously sought election to the Canadian House of Commons on three occasions: The party's website is now dormant. Cetinski has posted an article entitled, "Western Independence Now", on the Alberta Republicans website.[www.albertarepublicans.org] (From the party's website) The thrust of the ROC Party Concept is National Unity. In essence, it identifies Ottawa as the corrupter and not Quebec or the rest of Canada. The ROC solution to the problem is a "made-in-Canada" Swiss-style republic with the following main initiatives See also: List of political parties in Canada
    8.00
    2 votes
    40
    Libertarian Party of Canada

    Libertarian Party of Canada

    The Libertarian Party of Canada is a political party in Canada that subscribes to the tenets of the libertarian movement across Canada. The party was founded on July 7, 1973 by Bruce Evoy, who became its first chairman, and 7 others. Evoy ran for election to Parliament in the 1974 federal election in the Toronto riding of Rosedale. The party achieved registered status in the 1979 federal election by running more than fifty candidates. The party described itself as Canada's "fourth party" in the 1980s, but it has since been displaced by new parties such as the Bloc Québécois and the Green Party of Canada. The party declined to join the Reform Party of Canada when it was formed in 1987. Many libertarians were also attracted to provincial Progressive Conservative parties that moved to the right during the 1990s in Ontario under Mike Harris, and in Alberta under Ralph Klein. The decline in the party's membership and resources resulted in Elections Canada removing their status as a registered party immediately before the 1997 federal election when the party failed to run the minimum fifty candidates needed to maintain its registration. The party successfully re-registered with Elections
    5.25
    4 votes
    41

    United Farmers of Alberta

    The United Farmers of Alberta (UFA) is an association of Alberta farmers that has served many different roles throughout its history as a lobby group, a political party, and as a farm-supply retail chain. Since 1934 it has primarily been an agricultural supply cooperative headquartered in Calgary. Formerly it was farmers' lobby group, and a political party which formed the government of Alberta from 1921 to 1935. As of 2012, UFA operates 35 farm and ranch supply stores in Alberta, over 100 fuel stations in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan., and 25 outdoor adventure sporting goods stores in Western Canada and the Pacific Northwest. UFA was founded in 1909 as a government lobby group following a merger between the Alberta Farmers' Association and the Canadian Society for Equity. UFA began as a non-partisan organization whose aim was to be a lobby group promoting the interest of farmers in the province. In 1913, it was able to pressure Alberta's Liberal government to organize the Alberta Farmers' Cooperative Elevator Company which eventually became the United Grain Growers. The UFA was a believer in the co-operative movement, and supported women's suffrage. In 1912 women
    6.33
    3 votes
    42

    Yukon Party

    The Yukon Party (in French: Parti du Yukon), is a conservative political party in the Yukon Territory of Canada. It was previously known as the Yukon Progressive Conservative Party. With Prime Minister Brian Mulroney's Progressive Conservative federal government's increasing unpopularity, the Yukon Progressive Conservatives decided to sever their relations with the federal Conservatives, and renamed themselves the "Yukon Party" prior to the 1992 election. However, two Progressive Conservative MLAs, Bea Firth and Alan Nordling, quit the party in protest and subsequently sat as independent MLAs until 1996. Nordling later returned to the fold, being defeated as a Yukon Party candidate in the 1996 election, while Firth retired from politics. After seven years in power, the NDP was defeated in 1992 and the Yukon Party's John Ostashek became Premier of Yukon. His government became very unpopular by increasing taxes and cutting services. Ostashek was voted out of office in 1996 after only one term. The Yukon Party won only three seats, falling to third place for the first time behind the Yukon Liberal Party. The party's fortunes continued to decline at the 2000 general election. The Yukon
    6.33
    3 votes
    43

    Action démocratique du Québec

    The Action démocratique du Québec, commonly referred to as the ADQ was a right-wing provincial political party in Quebec, Canada. On the sovereignty question, it defined itself as autonomist, and had support from both soft nationalists and federalists. Its members were referred to as adéquistes, a name derived from the French pronunciation of the initials 'ADQ'. Under longtime leader Mario Dumont, the ADQ had a strong showing in the 2007 provincial election, reducing the ruling Quebec Liberal Party (PLQ) to a minority government and relegating the Parti Québécois (PQ) to third place. The ADQ won 41 seats with 31% of the popular vote to serve as the Official Opposition in the National Assembly of Quebec. However, the ADQ's popularity declined significantly soon afterward and in the 2008 provincial elections, the party failed to secure at least twenty percent of the popular vote or twelve Members of the National Assembly (MNAs) in the last election, and consequently lost official party status, though in early 2009 it was recognized as an official party by the PLQ and the PQ. On January 21, 2012, the membership approved a merger with the Coalition Avenir Québec (Coalition for the
    7.50
    2 votes
    44

    British Columbia New Democratic Party

    The New Democratic Party of British Columbia (BC NDP) is a social-democratic political party in British Columbia, Canada. The party currently forms the official opposition to the governing British Columbia Liberal Party following the 2009 provincial election in British Columbia. The BC NDP is the provincial arm of the New Democratic Party of Canada. Unlike other parties in Canada, where provincial and federal politics are strictly separated and members of one are not necessarily members of the other, NDP members are members of both the federal party and the provincial party. The party was formed in 1933 as the British Columbia section of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) by a coalition of the Socialist Party of Canada (BC), the League for Social Reconstruction, and affiliated organizations. In August 1933, the latter two organizations merged to become the Associated CCF Clubs. The new party won seven seats in the 1933 provincial election, enough to form the official opposition. A further merger with the SPC (BC) took place in 1935. In 1936 the party split as its moderate leader, Reverend Robert Connell was expelled over doctrinal differences in what was called the
    7.50
    2 votes
    45

    Conservative Party of Canada

    The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a political party in Canada which was formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance (formerly the Reform Party of Canada) and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in 2003. It is positioned on the right of the Canadian political spectrum. The party came to power in the 2006 federal election as a minority government, a position it maintained after the 2008 election, before winning its first majority government in 2011. The current party leader is Stephen Harper, who has been the Prime Minister of Canada since 2006. The historical Conservative Party identified strongly with the British Empire and aimed instead to model Canadian political institutions after British ones opposing the policies of the Liberal Party which favoured Canadian nationalism and political independence from Britain as well as economically continentalist policies such as free trade and further integration with the United States rather than greater political and economic ties with the British Empire and later the Commonwealth. A reversal occurred under the leadership of Brian Mulroney, the party
    7.50
    2 votes
    46

    Democratic Representative Caucus

    The Democratic Representative Caucus was a group of Canadian Members of Parliament who left the Canadian Alliance in 2001 in protest against the leadership of Stockwell Day. Day came under fire very shortly after his disappointing performance in the 2000 election, and soon came under the fire from members of his own caucus, and through the spring of 2001, several members of the Alliance resigned their shadow cabinet seats, the most high-profile resignation being that of deputy leader Deborah Grey. On May 2, Art Hanger was the first Alliance MP suspended from caucus for criticizing Day. Two weeks later, on May 16, he was followed by Chuck Strahl, Gary Lunn, Jim Pankiw, Val Meredith, Grant McNally, Jay Hill and Jim Gouk. In late June, they were joined by Monte Solberg, Andy Burton and Brian Fitzpatrick, and in the first week of July by Inky Mark and Grey. Through the summer, this group of MPs sat as "Independent Alliance Caucus", and were jokingly dubbed the "Rebel Alliance" by political commentators. In early September, an offer was made to the MPs to readmit them to the Alliance caucus if they promised to refrain from criticizing Day's leadership. The MPs surveyed their
    7.50
    2 votes
    47

    Freedom Party of Ontario

    The Freedom Party of Ontario is a provincial political party in Ontario, Canada. It was founded on January 1, 1984 in London, Ontario by Robert Metz and Marc Emery, as a successor to the Unparty. The Freedom Party has fielded candidates in every provincial election since 1985, and in several by-elections. It has also participated in numerous public policy debates, often on contentious social issues. The Freedom Party of Ontario is an affiliate of Freedom Party International, which was formed by some members of the Freedom Party of Ontario executive in 2002. Freedom Party promotes capitalism on the ground that it is the only social system compatible with reality, reason, rational self-interest, and consent. Freedom Party is opposed to attempts to promote capitalism with appeals to altruistic, irrational (e.g., faith, group consensus), or supernatural rationale. Freedom Party's policy direction is founded upon rational governance. As such, the party rejects and condemns libertarianism. Freedom Party of Ontario's current leader, Paul McKeever, has written several explanations, and made several videos, explaining why Objectivism condemns and rejects libertarianism, and why he and
    7.50
    2 votes
    48

    Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario

    The Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario (in French: Parti progressiste-conservateur de l'Ontario), is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. The party was known for many years as "Ontario's natural governing party." It has ruled the province for 80 of the 144 years since Confederation, including an uninterrupted run from 1943 to 1985. It currently forms the Official Opposition in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. The first Conservative Party in Upper Canada was made up of United Empire Loyalists and supporters of the wealthy Family Compact that ruled the colony. Once responsible government was granted in response to the 1837 Rebellions, the Tories emerged as moderate reformers who opposed the radical policies of the Reformers and then the Clear Grits. The modern Conservative Party originated in the Liberal-Conservative coalition founded by Sir John A. Macdonald and George-Étienne Cartier in 1854. It is a variant of this coalition that formed the first government in Ontario with John Sandfield Macdonald as Premier. Sandfield Macdonald was actually a Liberal and sat concurrently as a Liberal Party of Canada MP in the Canadian House of Commons but he was an
    7.50
    2 votes
    49

    Quebec Liberal Party

    The Quebec Liberal Party (French: Parti Libéral du Québec, PLQ) is a federalist provincial political party in Quebec. It has been independent of the federal Liberal Party of Canada since 1955. The party has traditionally supported Quebec federalism, meaning it is in favour of Quebec remaining within Canada, and operating within Canadian federalism. While it is sometimes described as centre-right in the context of Quebec politics, the party believes in a strong role for government in the economy and supports socially liberal policies. The Quebec Liberals have always been associated with the colour red; each of their three main opponents in different eras have been associated with the colour blue. In 2007, however, the Action démocratique du Québec (ADQ), whose official colours are blue and red, temporarily became the official opposition in the National Assembly of Quebec. The Liberal Party is descended from: The most notable figure of this period was Louis-Joseph Papineau. The Liberals were in opposition to the ruling Conservatives for most of the first 20 years after Canadian Confederation, except for 18 months of Liberal minority government in 1878-1879. However, the situation
    7.50
    2 votes
    50

    Canadian Alliance

    The Canadian Alliance (French: Alliance canadienne), formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance (French: Alliance réformiste-conservatrice canadienne), was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. The party was the successor to the Reform Party of Canada and inherited its position as the Official Opposition in the House of Commons and held it throughout its existence. The party supported policies that were both fiscally and socially conservative, seeking reduced government spending on social programs and reductions in taxation. The Alliance was created out of the United Alternative initiative launched by the Reform Party and several provincial Tory parties as a vehicle to merge with the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. The federal PC Party under Joe Clark rebuffed the initiative to "unite the right". In December 2003, the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative parties voted to disband and merge into the Conservative Party of Canada. The Canadian Alliance's origins were in the Reform Party of Canada, which was founded in 1987 as a populist party supporting Western Canadian interests. However, soon after its formation it
    9.00
    1 votes
    51

    National Liberal and Conservative Party

    The National Liberal and Conservative Party was the name adopted by the Conservative Party of Canada in 1920 after the end of the Unionist government of Robert Borden. The Conservatives, led by Arthur Meighen, adopted the name in the hope of making permanent the war-time Unionist coalition of Conservatives and pro-conscription Liberals (known as Liberal-Unionists). Very few Liberals stayed with the party, and some Conservatives balked at the move. MP John Hampden Burnham quit the government caucus to sit as an Independent Conservative and then resigned from the House of Commons in an attempt to win a by-election on the issue. The name was abandoned following the 1921 election.
    9.00
    1 votes
    52

    Saskatchewan New Democratic Party

    The Saskatchewan New Democratic Party (NDP) is a social-democratic political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. It forms the official opposition, but has been a dominant force in Saskatchewan politics since the 1940s. The party is the successor to the Saskatchewan Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, and affiliated to the federal New Democratic Party. The origins of the party began as early as 1902. In that year a group of farmers created the Territorial Grain Growers' Association. The objective of this group was to lobby for farmer's rights with the grain trade and the railways. The name was changed to the Saskatchewan Grain Growers Association (SGGA) when Saskatchewan became a province in 1905. In 1921 a left-wing splinter group left the SGGA to form the Farmer's Union. However, the two groups reconciled in 1926 and reformed as the United Farmers of Canada (Saskatchewan Section) (UFC). The first leader of the UFC was George Williams. The Progressive Party of Saskatchewan, a farmers movement, elected six MLAs in the 1921 provincial election as well as in the 1925 election and five in 1929 but were never able to field candidates in more than half a dozen of the
    9.00
    1 votes
    53
    Co-operative Commonwealth Federation

    Co-operative Commonwealth Federation

    The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) (French: Fédération du Commonwealth Coopératif, then in 1955 rebranded in French as Parti social démocratique du Canada) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups, and the League for Social Reconstruction. In 1944, it became the first socialist government in North America (based in Saskatchewan). In 1961, it disbanded and was replaced by the New Democratic Party. The full, but little used, name of the party was Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (Farmer-Labour-Socialist). The CCF aimed to alleviate the suffering of the Great Depression through economic reform and public "co-operation". Many of the party's first Members of Parliament (MPs) were former members of the Ginger Group of left-wing Progressive and Labour MPs. These MPs included: United Farmers of Alberta MP William Irvine; Agnes Macphail, MP; Ted Garland, MP; Humphrey Mitchell, MP; Abraham Albert Heaps, MP; Angus MacInnis, MP; J.S. Woodsworth, MP. Also involved in the plans to found a new party were members of the League for Social Reconstruction (LSR) such as F.R. Scott and Frank
    6.00
    3 votes
    54

    Liberal Party of Canada

    The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits, is the oldest federal party in Canada. In the conventional political spectrum, the party sits between the centre and the centre-left. Historically the Liberal Party has positioned itself to the left of the Conservative Party of Canada and to the right of the New Democratic Party (NDP). The party dominated federal politics for much of Canada's history, holding power for almost 69 years in the 20th century, more than any other party in a developed country. Over the last decade however the party has lost a significant amount of support, to the benefit of both the Conservative Party and the NDP. In the most recent federal election, held on May 2, 2011, the party had its worst showing in its history. The Liberal Party captured 18 per cent of the popular vote and won 34 seats, becoming the third-place party in the House of Commons for the first time. On May 25, 2011, the Liberal Party caucus chose Bob Rae as their interim leader. The party is scheduled to select their next leader at some point between March 1, 2013, and June 30, 2013. The principles of the party are based on Liberalism as
    6.00
    3 votes
    55
    New Democratic Party

    New Democratic Party

    The New Democratic Party (French: Nouveau Parti démocratique), commonly referred to as the NDP, is a federal social-democratic political party in Canada. The current leader of the NDP is Thomas Mulcair, who was elected in the 2012 leadership election. The provincial wings of the NDP in Manitoba and Nova Scotia currently form the governments in those provinces. Provincial parties have previously formed governments in British Columbia, Ontario, and Saskatchewan, and the territorial party formed the government in Yukon. In the 2011 federal election under the leadership of Jack Layton, the NDP won the second-most seats in the Canadian House of Commons, gaining the title of Official Opposition for the first time in Canadian history. The NDP evolved from a merger of the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF). The CCF grew from populist, agrarian and socialist roots into a modern socialist party. Although the CCF was part of the Christian left and the Social Gospel movement, the NDP is secular and pluralistic. It has broadened to include concerns of the New Left, and advocates issues such as gay rights, international peace, and environmental
    6.00
    3 votes
    56

    Ontario Libertarian Party

    The Ontario Libertarian Party is a political party in Ontario, Canada that was founded in 1975 by Bruce Evoy, Vince Miller, and others, inspired by the formation three years earlier of the US Libertarian Party. The Party is guided by adherence to the philosophical ideas of Austrian Economics and influenced by authors and thinkers like Jan Narveson and Murray Rothbard. The party's current leader is Allen Small. It claimed, for a time, to be Ontario's fourth party, but has been surpassed in popularity by the Green Party of Ontario and the Family Coalition Party of Ontario. The Ontario Libertarian Party split in 1980 when the Unparty was formed. In 1984, under the leadership of Marc Emery and Robert Metz, the Unparty's name and nature changed: it became the Freedom Party of Ontario. The Ontario Libertarian Party lost support with the rise of Mike Harris and his Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario in the 1990s. The party is associated with the Libertarian Party of Canada. The party's most successful election was the 1990 election, in which the OLP candidates won 24,613 votes or 0.61% of the vote. In the 45 ridings where the OLP ran candidates, the party averaged 547 votes or
    6.00
    3 votes
    57
    Party for the Commonwealth of Canada

    Party for the Commonwealth of Canada

    The Party for the Commonwealth of Canada was a Canadian political party formed by Canadians who supported the ideology of U.S. politician Lyndon LaRouche in the 1984, 1988 and 1993 elections. In the 1988 election, party leader Gilles Gervais led a slate of 58 candidates campaigning against the monarchy, hemispheric free trade, dollarization of Latin American economies, and "financial oligarchy". The party never won any seats. It was also known as the Party for the Commonwealth-Republic. It now operates as the Committee for the Republic of Canada.
    6.00
    3 votes
    58

    Yukon Liberal Party

    The Yukon Liberal Party is a political party in the Yukon Territory in Canada. Darius Elias is the Leader of the Yukon Liberal Party on basis interim. After twenty years as a minor party, the Yukon Liberal Party won the 2000 general election and formed a government under Premier Pat Duncan. The government was plagued with defections, however, and was reduced to minority government status. Duncan called a snap election for November 2002 in the hope of regaining her government's majority. The party was almost completely wiped out, however, by the conservative Yukon Party. Duncan won the Liberals' sole seat in the Yukon Party's landslide.
    6.00
    3 votes
    59

    Service Employees International Union

    Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is a labor union representing about 1.8 million workers in over 100 occupations in the United States (including Puerto Rico), and Canada. SEIU is focused on organizing workers in three sectors: health care (over half of members work in the health care field), including hospital, home care and nursing home workers; public services (local and state government employees); and property services (including janitors, security officers and food service workers). SEIU is the fastest growing labor union in the United States and has over 150 local branches. It is affiliated with the Change to Win Federation and the Canadian Labour Congress. SEIU is based out of Washington, D.C., and has several internal divisions which include: Communications, Government Affairs, New Media, Organizing, Political, Global Strength, Pension/Benefits, Community Strength, Research, and Legal. The union states that its top priorities are to stand up for working families to help bring economic relief to millions across the country, fix the nation's broken health care system, and fight to guarantee workers' rights on the job. SEIU is sometimes referred to as the "purple
    7.00
    2 votes
    60

    Yukon New Democratic Party

    The Yukon New Democratic Party (NDP) is a social-democratic political party in the Yukon territory of Canada. The Yukon NDP first formed the government of the territory under the leadership of Tony Penikett from 1985 to 1992, and under the leadership of Piers McDonald from 1996 to 2000. The party's current leader is Elizabeth Hanson. The NDP sat as official opposition to the current Yukon Party government in the Yukon Legislative Assembly until May 2006. In the 2006 Yukon election later that year, the three incumbent New Democrat Members of the Legislative Assembly were reelected, but the party failed to win any additional seats and remained in third place behind the five members of the Yukon Liberal Party and the ten member Yukon Party majority government. In January 2009 the NDP were reduced to two seats: Todd Hardy (Whitehorse Centre) and Steve Cardiff (Mount Lorne), after the Party's third member, John Edzerza, resigned to sit as an independent. Edzerza later rejoined the Yukon Party, for which he had originally been elected in 2002. Hardy died in July 2010, reducing the NDP to a single seat. On November 12, a by-election was called for his riding of Whitehorse Centre on
    7.00
    2 votes
    61

    New Democracy

    New Democracy was a political party in Canada founded by William Duncan Herridge in 1939. Herridge, a former Conservative party adviser who was Canada's Envoy to the United States from 1931-35 during the government of R. B. Bennett. Herridge advocated monetary reform and government intervention in the economy as a means of fighting the Great Depression. His ideas were similar to those of the social credit movement, and in the 1940 election, the Social Credit Party of Canada joined with Herridge to run candidates jointly under the New Democracy umbrella. The experiment was unsuccessful as Herridge failed to win a seat, and the three New Democracy MPs elected were Social Creditors. The name remained associated with the national Social Credit movement until 1944 when the name Social Credit was readopted at a national convention held in Toronto. The party should not be confused with the subsequent New Democratic Party.
    5.67
    3 votes
    62

    Amalgamated Transit Union

    The Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) is a labor union in the United States and The Amalgamated Transit Union Canadian Council (ATUCC) in Canada, representing workers in the transit system and other industries. The ATU was founded as the Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees in 1892; today, the ATU is the largest labor organization representing transit workers in the United States and Canada, with over 190,000 members in 270 local unions spread across 46 states and nine provinces. The ATU consists of bus, van, subway, and light rail operators, clerks, baggage handlers and maintenance employees in urban transit, over-the-road and school bus industries, as well as emergency medical service personnel, ambulance operators, clerical personnel, and municipal workers. The ATU can be found in most major cities of the United States and Canada. The Union is guided by a triennial convention at which delegates chosen by locals meet to debate and direct the future of the Union. The International officers consist of the International President, the International Executive Vice President, the International Secretary-Treasurer, and 18 International Vice Presidents. The
    8.00
    1 votes
    63

    American Federation of Musicians

    The American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada (AFM/AFofM) is a labor union of professional musicians in the United States and Canada. In deference to the differing laws and cultural attributes of each country, in the US it is referred to as the American Federation of Musicians (AFM) and in Canada as the Canadian Federation of Musicians/Fédéracion canadienne des musicienes (CFM/FCM). The American Federation of Musicians was founded in 1896, at which time it took over from an older and looser organization of local musicians unions, the National League of Musicians. Among the most famous actions by the AFM was a ban on all commercial recording by members in 1942–44, in order to pressure record companies to make a better arrangement for paying royalties to recording artists. This was sometimes called the Petrillo Ban, because James Petrillo was the newly–elected head of the union. Petrillo also organized a second recording ban in 1948 (from January 1 to December 14), in response to the Taft–Hartley Act. AFM requires its member orchestras to exclude all spectators during rehearsals.
    8.00
    1 votes
    64

    Labour-Progressive Party

    For the Labour-Progressive Coalition Government in New Zealand see the Fifth Labour Government of New Zealand The Labor-Progressive Party was the legal political organization of the Communist Party of Canada between 1943 and 1959. When the Communist Party of Canada was banned in 1940, it refounded itself as the Labor-Progressive Party (LPP) in 1943 after the release of Communist Party leaders from internment. Only one LPP Member of Parliament (MP) was elected under that banner, Fred Rose, who was elected in a 1943 by-election in Montreal and sat in the House of Commons. In 1947, he was charged and convicted for spying for the Soviet Union, and was expelled from the House of Commons. Dorise Nielson was elected to the House of Commons in the 1940 federal election from Saskatchewan as a "Progressive Unity" MP, and declared her affiliation to the LPP when it was founded in August 1943. She was defeated in the 1945 election when she ran for re-election as an LPP candidate. In Ontario, two LPP members, A. A. MacLeod and J. B. Salsberg, sat in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1943 to 1951 and 1955 respectively. The LPP also jointly nominated several Liberal-Labour candidates with
    8.00
    1 votes
    65

    British Columbia Social Credit Party

    The British Columbia Social Credit Party, whose members are known as Socreds, was the governing political party of British Columbia, Canada, for more than 30 years between the 1952 provincial election and the 1991 election. For four decades, the party dominated the British Columbian political scene, with the only break occurring between the 1972 and 1975 elections when the New Democratic Party of British Columbia was in power. Although founded to promote social credit policies of monetary reform, the Social Credit Party became a political vehicle for fiscal conservatives and later social conservatives in BC, who discarded the social credit ideology. After its defeat in 1991 the party essentially collapsed. Prior to 1952, the social credit movement in British Columbia was divided between various factions. The Social Credit League of British Columbia nominated candidates for the first time in the 1937 election, but did not do so in the 1941 election. In the 1945 election, these factions formed an alliance to field 16 candidates, who won a total of 6,627 votes (1.42% of the provincial total.) This alliance broke down before the 1949 election, and three separate groups nominated
    5.33
    3 votes
    66

    Parti de la Democratie Socialiste

    The Parti de la démocratie socialiste (PDS) (in English: Party of Socialist Democracy) was a political party in Quebec, Canada. The PDS' roots can be traced to 1939, with the founding of the Fédération du Commonwealth Coopératif (FCC), later renamed Parti social démocratique du Québec (PSD; Social Democratic Party) in 1955. The FCC/PSD was the Quebec counterpart of the Canadian Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF). After the CCF became the New Democratic Party in 1961, the Quebec wing was re-founded as the New Democratic Party of Quebec (Nouveau Parti démocratique du Québec, NPDQ). The NPDQ contested Quebec general elections in 1970, 1976, 1985, 1989 and 1994. The NPDQ became independent from the federal NDP in 1989. A new branch of the federal NDP, called New Democratic Party of Canada - Québec Section was refounded in 1990, and is active only in federal politics. The NPDQ's ties to the federal NDP were finally severed in 1991 as a result of the provincial party's endorsement of the Bloc Québécois in a 1990 by-election. It was encouraged to change its name and became the "Parti de la démocratie socialiste" in 1995, and as such contested the 1998 Quebec election. In 2002, the
    5.33
    3 votes
    67

    Cosmopolitan Party of Canada

    The Cosmopolitan Party of Canada (French: Parti Cosmopolite du Canada) is a minor socially progressive political party in Canada that began to develop in the 2000s. The party promotes The party has representatives in about 75 ridings across the country who organize discussion groups called "political cafés". It has representatives in all provinces except Saskatchewan and New Brunswick. It does not have representatives in any of the three territories. It also organizes through web forums. It is not clear whether the party intends to nominate candidates in elections. The party applied to Elections Canada (the government's elections agency) to be a "registered political party", but the application was refused, leading the party to accuse Elections Canada of trying to protect Liberal Party of Canada candidates. The party's leader is Raymond Samuels. He claims his professional background in law includes teaching at the college/university level, but he has never provided specifics as to where or what he taught.
    6.50
    2 votes
    68

    Natural Law Party of Canada

    The Natural Law Party of Canada (NLPC) was the Canadian branch of the international Natural Law Party founded in 1992 by a group of educators, business leaders, and lawyers who practiced Transcendental Meditation. The magician Doug Henning was Senior Vice President of NLPC, and ran as the party's candidate for the former Toronto riding of Rosedale in the 1993 federal election, finishing sixth out of ten candidates. The party was led by Dr. Neil Paterson. The NLPC supported federal funding for further research in the technique of yogic flying, a part of the TM-Sidhi program, as a tool for achieving world peace. The NLPC platform maintained that once it took over the government, Canada’s crime, unemployment, and deficit would disappear. Naomi Rankin, the leader of the Communist Party of Alberta, called the NLP "crackpot". One of its slogans was "If you favor Natural Law, Natural Law will favor you." The NLPC was primarily active in the provinces of Ontario (Natural Law Party of Ontario), Quebec (Parti de la loi naturelle du Québec) and British Columbia. The provincial wings had candidates and are now defunct. The party was de-registered by Elections Canada, the Canadian government's
    6.50
    2 votes
    69

    United Transportation Union

    The United Transportation Union (UTU) is headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio. It is a broad-based, transportation labor union representing about 125,000 active and retired railroad, bus, mass transit, and airline workers in the United States. The UTU is the largest railroad operating union in North America, with more than 600 locals. The UTU represents employees on every Class I railroad, as well as employees on many regional and shortline railroads. It also represents bus and mass transit employees on approximately 45 bus and transit systems and has grown to include airline pilots, flight attendants, dispatchers and other airport personnel. The UTU is very interested in the airline sector and hopes to expand its representation with pilots and flight attendants. The UTU believes it is a viable alternative to other aviation labor unions because the UTU is, and has been, proficient in interpreting and enforcing provisions of the Railroad Labor Act (RLA), under which airlines operate. Membership is drawn primarily from the operating crafts in the railroad industry and includes conductors, brakemen, switchmen, ground service personnel, locomotive engineers, hostlers and workers in
    5.00
    3 votes
    70
    Bloc populaire

    Bloc populaire

    The Bloc populaire canadien was a political party in the Canadian province of Quebec from 1942 to 1947. It was founded on September 8, 1942 by opponents of conscription during World War II. The party ran candidates at both federal and provincial levels. In early 1942, Liguori Lacombe formed the anti-conscriptionist Parti canadien which finished strongly in two February by-elections. In the April 27, 1942 national plebiscite on conscription held in Canada, a little more than 70% of Quebec voters refused to free the federal government from its promise to avoid a general mobilization, while about 80 per cent of the citizens of the rest of Canada accepted it. (see also Second Conscription Crisis) The party was inspired by the nationalist ideas of Henri Bourassa and supported by Montreal mayor Camillien Houde. Jean Drapeau and Pierre Elliot Trudeau were members in their youth. In addition to opposing conscription, the party aimed to defend provincial autonomy and the rights of French-Canadians. At the provincial level, it was led by André Laurendeau and won four seats in the 1944 Quebec general election, but soon lost popularity. Laurendeau resigned in July 1947, and the party
    6.00
    2 votes
    71
    British Columbia Liberal Party

    British Columbia Liberal Party

    The British Columbia Liberal Party (also referred to as the BC Liberals) is the governing political party in British Columbia, Canada. First elected for government in 1916, the party went into decline after 1952, with its rump caucus merging with the Social Credit Party for the 1975 election. It was returned to the legislature through the efforts of Gordon Wilson in a break-through in the 1991 election. At this time, the Social Credit Party collapsed, with the BC Liberals able to garner the centre vote traditionally split between left and right extremes in British Columbia politics. After Wilson lost a leadership challenge in the wake of a personal scandal in a bitter three-way race, the party was led by Gordon Campbell, who became Leader of the Opposition after Wilson's convention defeat. In the wake of the collapse of the British Columbia New Democratic Party (BC NDP) vote in the 2001 election, the Campbell-led BC Liberals won an overwhelming majority in 2001. In November 2010, after mounting public opposition to a new tax and the controversial ending of a political corruption trial, and with low popularity ratings, Campbell announced his resignation, and on February 26, 2011,
    6.00
    2 votes
    72

    Liberal-Progressive

    Liberal-Progressive was a label used by a number of candidates in Canadian elections between 1926 and 1953. In federal and Ontario politics, there was no formal Liberal-Progressive party, but it was an alliance between two separate parties. In Manitoba, a party did exist with this name. With the Progressive Party of Canada's 1921 electoral breakthrough, Canadian federal politics operated under a "three party system" for the first time. The Liberal Party of Canada under William Lyon Mackenzie King tried to deal with this situation by co-opting the Progressives, offering to form a coalition with them. The Progressive Party itself refused. But by 1926, the party had split and some Progressives decided to support the Liberals, running as Liberal Progressive or Liberal-Labour-Progressive candidates or similar variations. This phenomenon occurred particularly in the 1925 election and the 1926 election. A number of Liberal Progressive Members of Parliament became full fledged Liberals in the 1930s. In the 1925 election, only one candidate ran under the Liberal Progressive banner. He was unsuccessful. In the 1926 election, a total of 11 candidates ran as Liberal Progressive: eight in
    6.00
    2 votes
    73

    Unity

    Unity or Progressive Unity was the name used in Saskatchewan, Canada, by a popular front party initiated by the Communist Party of Canada for the 1938 Saskatchewan and 1940 Canadian election. Under this label, two Saskatchewan MLAs were elected and Dorise Nielson was elected to the House of Commons. Nielson was a supporter of the Communist Party and ran for re-election in 1945 federal election as a Labour Progressive Party candidate (the name adopted by the Communist Party after it was banned) and was defeated. See also: In the 1940 federal election, William Halina sought election to the Canadian House of Commons in the riding of Vegreville, Alberta under the United Progressive banner. Halina won 2,727 votes, or 19.4% of the total cast, placing third behind the Social Credit and Liberal candidates, but ahead of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation candidate. His campaign may have been related to the Progressive Unity platform that elected communist Dorise Nielsen in Saskatchewan in the same election. Halina ran for the communist Labour-Progressive Party in the 1945 election. Communist Party (Alberta)
    6.00
    2 votes
    74

    Farmer

    In the 1930 federal election in Canada, five supporters of the United Farmers ran in Saskatchewan as "Farmer" candidates. None of them were elected. Additionally, in the 1925 federal election, one supporter of the Progressive Party of Canada ran in Quebec as a "Farmer" candidate.
    7.00
    1 votes
    75

    Lemon Party

    The Lemon Party of Canada (Parti Citron) is a frivolous Canadian party which has operated on a federal level, as well as provincially in Quebec. The party was officially registered on January 8, 1987, by then leader, Denis R. Patenaude and deregistered on November 14, 1998 for failing to have at least ten candidates stand for election. The party is headed by "Pope Terence the First", whose existence is unconfirmed. Their official agent is Mary-Gabrielle Blay II. Their 2004 national convention produced a platform of policies which were "placed in small green plastic boxes and sold to industrial pig farms in Mexico", according to a large party spokeswoman. The subsequent electoral campaign, under the slogan "For a bitter Canada," received minor, but sympathetic, media coverage. Their most recent press release was published online 5 days prior to the 2006 Canadian elections, ridiculing both Liberal Paul Martin and Conservative Stephen Harper. The Lemon Party prides itself on its record on fiscal discipline and in pushing for economic growth. Their economic plan was allegedly authored by Montreal economist Ianik Marcil. The Lemon Party has not been officially registered as a political
    7.00
    1 votes
    76

    Saskatchewan Liberal Party

    The Saskatchewan Liberal Party is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The party dominated Saskatchewan politics for the province's first forty years providing six of the first seven Premiers, and being in power for all but five of the years between the province's creation in 1905 and World War II. Located on the middle of the political spectrum, it assiduously courted "ethnic" (i.e., non-British) voters, as well as the organized farm movement, and refused to pander to "nativist" sentiment that culminated in the short, spectacular existence of the Ku Klux Klan in Saskatchewan in 1927-28. In the 1944 election, however, Saskatchewan experienced a dramatic change when it elected the first democratic socialist government in North America under Tommy Douglas and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF). The Liberals were nearly wiped off the map, dropping from a strong majority of 38 seats to only five--the worst defeat of a sitting government in the province's history. The Liberals moved to the political right and remained out of power for twenty years until Ross Thatcher's victory in 1964 election. Thatcher led the Liberals to re-election in 1967.
    7.00
    1 votes
    77

    Western Canada Concept

    The Western Canada Concept was a Western Canadian political party founded in 1980 to promote the separation of the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia and the Yukon and Northwest Territories from Canada in order to create a new nation. The party argued that Western Canada could not receive fair treatment while the interests of Quebec and Ontario dominated Canadian politics. The party gained popularity in Alberta when western alienation was at its height following the federal Liberal government announcement of the National Energy Program in October 1980. This policy aimed to ensure low energy costs for Canadian industry and consumers, a policy that would not benefit Alberta, Canada's major producer of oil and gas. A member of the party, Gordon Kesler, was elected to the Alberta legislature in a 1982 provincial by-election in Olds-Didsbury riding that drew national attention. The best showing for the party came later in the same year in the Alberta general election, where they took 11.8 per cent of the vote, but did not elect any MLAs (Kesler lost his seat). Kesler became leader of the Alberta WCC with his election to the legislature. In 1984, he was
    7.00
    1 votes
    78

    Canada Party

    The Canada Party was a short-lived political party in Canada that nominated 56 candidates in the 1993 federal election and one candidate in a 1996 by-election. It was unable to win any seats. The party was populist and ran on a platform of banking and monetary reform. It also advocated direct democracy, referendums and recall. One element of their direct democracy policy was the proposal that the prime minister and cabinet members be elected by the government party's caucus in the House of Commons. The party argued that this would remove the power that the prime minister currently has to command loyalty from caucus members in return for the rewards of more authority in the government, e.g., appointments to Cabinet or to parliamentary secretary positions. Many of the party's supporters were members of the Committee on Monetary and Economic Reform, and later joined the Canadian Action Party. Some had been active in the Canadian social credit movement which shared similar views on monetary reform. The party was founded by Joseph Thauberger who had been an unsuccessful Social Credit Party of Canada candidate in the 1972 election. Saskatchewan and British Columbia were the main sources
    4.67
    3 votes
    79

    Bloc Québécois

    The Bloc Québécois (French pronunciation: [blɔk kebekwa], Quebec Bloc) is a federal political party in Canada devoted to the protection of Quebec's interests in the House of Commons of Canada, and the promotion of Quebec sovereignty. The Bloc was formed by Members of Parliament who defected from the federal Progressive Conservative Party and Liberal Party. BQ founder Lucien Bouchard was a cabinet minister in the federal Progressive Conservative government of Brian Mulroney. The BQ seeks to create the conditions necessary for the political secession of Quebec from Canada and campaigns actively only within the province during federal elections. As with its provincial counterpart, the Bloc Québécois has been supported by a wide range of voters in Quebec, from large sections of organised labour to more conservative rural voters. Members and supporters are known as Bloquistes (French: [blɔkist]). English-speaking Canadians commonly refer to the BQ as "the Bloc". The party is sometimes known as the BQ in the English-speaking media. The Bloc won four seats in the 2011 federal election, fewer than the 12 required for official party status in the House of Commons. It remains a registered
    5.50
    2 votes
    80

    National Alternative Party

    The National Alternative Party was a short-lived political party that was created to fill the lack of a united party on the right in Canada. It was registered with Elections Canada in February 2002. This Alma, Quebec-based party was launched on March 4, 2003 at a press conference at the Charles Lynch Press Gallery in the Parliament of Canada by the leader of the party, Gilles Lavoie. Lavoie had been an unsuccessful independent candidate in the November 2000 federal election. The National Alternative dissolved itself in March 2004 when Stephen Harper was elected leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. Gilles Lavoie was candidate for the Conservative Party of Canada in the 2004 federal election. The party's website is no longer available. The party promised a new political approach based upon the right of MPs to vote freely and represent the interests of their constituents while respecting the differences between regions.
    5.00
    2 votes
    81

    New Party

    New Party was the interim name used by the new political party being established in Canada from 1958 to 1961 by the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) and the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC), which eventually defined itself as a social democratic party. In 1958 a joint CCF-CLC committee, the National Committee for the New Party (NCNP), was formed and spent the next three years laying down the foundations of the 'New Party'. During the process of founding the party, the New Party name was used in the October 1960 Peterborough, Canadian federal by-election; which was won by its candidate, Walter Pitman. In August 1961, at the end of a five-day long convention, the New Democratic Party (NDP) was born and T.C. 'Tommy' Douglas was elected its first leader. Once the NDP was formed, the New Party clubs, and affiliates automatically ceased, and became part of newly formed party.
    5.00
    2 votes
    82

    Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba

    The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is the only right wing political party in Manitoba, Canada. It is also the official opposition party in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. The origins of the party lie at the end of the nineteenth century. Party politics were weak in Manitoba for several years after it entered Canadian confederation in 1870. The system of government was essentially one of non-partisan democracy, though some leading figures such as Marc-Amable Girard were identified with the Conservatives at the federal level. The government was a balance of ethnic, religious and linguistic communities, and party affiliation was at best a secondary concern. In 1879, Thomas Scott (not to be confused with another person of the same name who was executed by Louis Riel's provisional government in 1870) and Joseph Royal attempted to introduce partisan politics into the province. Both were Conservatives, and both believed that they could lead a provincial Conservative Party. Their plans were thwarted by Premier John Norquay, who also supported the Conservatives at the federal level but included both Liberals and Conservatives in his governing alliance. Norquay himself
    5.00
    2 votes
    83

    Reform Party of Canada

    The Reform Party of Canada (French: Parti réformiste du Canada) was a Canadian federal political party that existed from 1987 to 2000. It was originally founded as a Western Canada-based protest party, but attempted to expand eastward in the 1990s. It viewed itself as a populist party. Soon after its formation it moved to the right and became a populist conservative (largely socially conservative) party. Initially, the Reform Party was motivated by the need for democratic reforms and by profound Western Canadian discontent with the Progressive Conservative government of Brian Mulroney. Led by its founder Preston Manning, the Reform Party rapidly gained momentum in western Canada and sought to expand its base in the east. Manning, son of longtime Alberta Premier Ernest Manning, gained support partly from the same political constituency as his father's old party, the Social Credit Party of Alberta. With the collapse of a fragile Tory coalition composed of westerners, Ontarians and Quebec nationalists, the Reform Party's fortunes rose. It first entered Parliament in 1989 when Deborah Grey won a by-election in an Edmonton-area riding. The party achieved major success in the 1993
    5.00
    2 votes
    84

    British Columbia Unity Party

    The British Columbia Unity Party was a political party in British Columbia, Canada. The party was founded as an attempted union of five conservative parties: the Reform Party of British Columbia, the British Columbia Social Credit Party, the British Columbia Conservative Party, the British Columbia Party, and the Family Coalition Party of British Columbia. Members from the first four parties joined with the Family Coalition Party to refound the Family Coalition Party as the BC Unity Party on January 10, 2001. The party was formed to present a united conservative option to voters in opposition to the BC Liberals and the New Democratic Party (NDP). Five months after the party was founded, it nominated 56 candidates across the province for the May 16, 2001 provincial elections. During the election campaign, BC Unity positioned itself as a solidly conservative party, in contrast to the BC Liberals. Despite being included in the leaders debate, along with Premier Dosanjh and Liberal Leader Gordon Campbell the unpopularity of the NDP government was so great that most conservative-minded voters chose to vote for the BC Liberals, rather than split the right-of-centre vote once again. The
    6.00
    1 votes
    85

    Confederation of Regions Party of Canada

    The Confederation of Regions Party (CoR) was a right-wing Canadian political party founded in 1984 by Elmer Knutson. It was founded as a successor to the Western Canada Federation (West-Fed), a non-partisan organization, to fight the Liberal Party of Canada. The CoR aimed to fill the void on the right of the political spectrum left by the decline of the Social Credit Party of Canada and the growing unpopularity among westerners of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada of Brian Mulroney. The party also attracted significant support as a protest vote against official bilingualism among some voters who were not necessarily ideologically opposed to mainstream Canadian political parties on other issues. In the 1984 federal election, it nominated 55 candidates, who won 65,655 votes in total, or 0.52% of the popular vote across the country. The party took 2.2% of the vote in Alberta and peaked with 6.7% in Manitoba. In the 1988 federal election, its 51 candidates won 41,342 votes, 0.31% of the popular vote. One of its candidates was Paul Fromm, leader of the far right-wing Citizens for Foreign Aid Reform and Canadian Association for Free Expression, and who is known to attend
    6.00
    1 votes
    86

    The Hunger Project

    The Hunger Project (THP) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization incorporated in the state of California. The Hunger Project describes itself as an organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. It has ongoing programs in Africa, Asia and Latin America, where it implements programs aimed at mobilizing rural grassroots communities to achieve sustainable progress in health, education, nutrition and family income. The Hunger Project is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. In Africa, Asia and Latin America, The Hunger Project seeks to end hunger and poverty by empowering people to lead lives of self-reliance, meet their own basic needs and build better futures for their children. The Hunger Project carries out its mission through three activities: mobilizing village clusters at the grassroots level to build self-reliance, empowering women as key change agents, and forging effective partnerships with local government. In 2009 The Hunger Project was active in Africa, in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Senegal, and Uganda, in Asia, in Bangladesh and India, and in Latin America, in
    4.50
    2 votes
    87

    Bloc pot

    The Bloc Pot is a provincial political party in Quebec, Canada that is dedicated to ending cannabis prohibition. It has contested three provincial elections but it has failed to win any seats in the National Assembly of Quebec. The party was launched in 1997 by Marc-Boris St-Maurice as a way to push for political change to marijuana laws. He also went on to launch Its federal offspring; the Marijuana Party of Canada.
    5.00
    1 votes
    88

    Marijuana Party of Canada

    The Marijuana Party of Canada (French: Parti Marijuana) is a Canadian federal political party, whose agenda focuses purely on ending the prohibition of cannabis. Apart from this one issue, the party has no other official policies, meaning party candidates are able to express their personal views on all other political issues freely. Candidates appear on election ballots under the short form "Radical Marijuana" and their status is similar to that of independent candidates. Although governed by the Canada Elections Act, the Marijuana Party of Canada is a "decentralized" party, without by-laws, charter or constitution that govern its operations. Its Electoral District Associations are autonomous units of the party as whole. The party was founded by Marc-Boris St-Maurice. In the November 2000 federal election, the party nominated candidates in 73 ridings in seven provinces and won 66,419 votes (0.52% of national popular vote). In January and May 2004, changes were made to Canada's electoral laws which significantly reduced the fund raising abilities of the Marijuana Party; specifically, the elections law was amended so that most of the Marijuana Party's political contribution tax
    5.00
    1 votes
    89

    Progressive Conservative Party of Canada

    The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) (PC) (1942–2003) was a Canadian political party with a centre-right stance on economic issues and, after the 1970s, a centrist stance on social issues. The party began as the Conservative Party in 1867, became Canada's first governing party under Sir John A. Macdonald, and for years was either the governing party or the largest opposition party. The party changed its name to the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in late 1942. In 2003, the party membership voted to dissolve the party and join the new Conservative Party of Canada being formed with the members of the Canadian Alliance. One member of the Senate of Canada who opposed the merger continues to sit as the sole member of the "Progressive Conservative" caucus, and the conservative parties in most Canadian provinces still use the Progressive Conservative name. Some PC Party members formed the new Progressive Canadian Party, which has attracted only marginal support. Canada's first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, was originally a member of the Conservative Party. But in advance of confederation in 1867, the
    4.00
    2 votes
    90

    Protestant Protective Association

    The Protestant Protective Association was an anti-Catholic group in the 1890s based in Ontario, Canada, associated with the Orange Order. Originally a spinoff of the American group the American Protective Association, it became independent in 1892. The PPA denounced the role of Catholics and French-Canadians in politics, and warned Protestants that Catholics were attempting to take over Ontario. It aimed to eliminate French language education in schools in Ontario and western Canada (particularly Manitoba), and to roll back or block Catholic school systems in those provinces. The PPA ran several candidates in Ontario for the 1896 federal election as a protest against the Conservative Party's conflicted position on the Manitoba Schools Question. The PPA failed to win any seats in the Canadian House of Commons, but was instrumental in defeating Conservative candidates in four of the five ridings in which it nominated candidates. In the 1894 provincial election the party succeeded in winning several seats in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, who worked closely with the opposition Ontario Conservative Party.
    4.00
    2 votes
    91

    Gauche Socialiste

    Gauche Socialiste is a Trotskyist faction within Quebec Solidaire (formerly the Parti de la Democratie Socialiste (PDS) in Quebec, Canada). It was formed in 1983 by Trotskyists who left or were expelled from the Revolutionary Workers League/Ligue Ouvrière Révolutionnaire when the group turned away from Trotskyism in the early 1980s. Gauche Socialiste members had previously been in the Organisation Combat Socialiste, which existed from 1980 to 1982, and were briefly part of the Mouvement socialiste, which was founded in 1981. Gauche Socialiste is the Quebec section of the reunified Fourth International. The group publishes the periodical La Gauche. The group's counterpart in English Canada was Socialist Challenge which later joined the New Socialist Group and forms a Fourth International Caucus within it. Gauche Socialiste joined with several other organizations to form the Union des forces progressistes (UFP) in 2002. Gauche Socialiste is now involved in Quebec Solidaire. Quebec Solidaire was formed in February 2006 in a merger of UFP and Option Citoyenne.
    4.00
    1 votes
    92
    National Unity Party

    National Unity Party

    The Parti National Social Chrétien was a Canadian political party formed by Adrien Arcand in February 1934. The party identified with anti-semitism, and German leader Adolf Hitler's Nazism. The party was later known, in English, as the Canadian National Socialist Unity Party or National Unity Party. The party was formed by Adrien Arcand in February 1934. It was known in English as the Christian National Socialist Party. Arcand was a Quebec-based fascist and anti-semite. An admirer of Adolf Hitler, Arcand referred to himself as the "Canadian führer". In October 1934, the party merged with the Canadian Nationalist Party, which was based in the Prairie provinces. By the mid 1930s, the party had some success, with a few thousand members mainly concentrated in Quebec, British Columbia and Alberta. In June 1938, it merged with Nazi and other racist clubs in Ontario and Quebec, many of which were known as Swastika clubs, to form the National Unity Party at a national convention held in Kingston, Ontario. At a time of English-French Canadian tension, Arcand tried to create a pan-Canadian (English and French) nationalist political movement. It was based on the National Socialist (Nazi)
    4.00
    1 votes
    93

    Absolutely Absurd Party

    The Absolutely Absurd Party is a Canadian joke political party, which carries on the tradition of political satire. It was founded in Kitchener, Ontario by John Jagiellowicz in 2003. Dave Nesarajah was its auditor. The party is satirical of government, and is semi-anarchistic; they claim to promote a form of direct democracy. Proposed laws appear to support activities such as drinking alcohol, recreational drug use, and recreational sex. The party advocates many policies that are seen by many as jokes, including: reducing the legal voting age to 14 ("When was the last time a 14 year-old started a war?"); in federal elections, the individual in dead last becomes the elected official, rather than the one with the most votes; "streamline the Department of Defence by replacing the Department with a crack, elite squad of Rock/Paper/Scissors commandos." Another proposal was to raffle off senate seats, which could have served as a fund-raising mechanism. The chief electoral officer ruled that the party could be officially registered "if it has candidates whose nomination has been confirmed in 50 electoral districts at the next general election", but they did not stand in the 2004 general
    0.00
    0 votes
    94

    Communist Party of Canada (Ontario)

    The Communist Party of Canada (Ontario) is the Ontario, Canada provincial wing of the Communist Party of Canada. Using the name Labour-Progressive Party, the group won two seats in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario: A.A. MacLeod and J.B. Salsberg served as Members of Provincial Parliament (MPPs) from 1943 until 1951 and 1955 respectively. It has not been able to win any seats at the provincial level since then. The party continued to run under the Labor-Progressive banner up to the 1959 provincial election, after which it identified itself as the Communist Party. Individual members of the party have been elected to school boards in the past few decades, but have done so as independents rather than as "Communist Party" candidates. The party is led by Liz Rowley.
    0.00
    0 votes
    95
    Conservative Party of Canada

    Conservative Party of Canada

    The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. In many of Canada's early elections, there were both "Liberal-Conservative" and "Conservative" candidates; however, these were simply different labels used by candidates of the same party, both were part of Sir John A. Macdonald's government and official Conservative and Liberal-Conservative candidates would not, generally, run against each other. It was also not uncommon for a candidate to run on one label in one election and the other in a subsequent election. The roots of the name are in the coalition of 1853 in which moderate Reformers and Conservatives from Canada West joined with bleus from Canada East under the dual prime-ministership of Sir Allan MacNab and A.-N. Morin. The new ministry were committed to secularize the Clergy reserves in Canada West and to abolish seigneurial tenure in Canada East. Over time, the Liberal-Conservatives evolved into the Conservative party and their opponents, the Clear Grits and the Parti
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    96

    Green Party of Canada

    The Green Party of Canada (French: Parti vert du Canada) is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1983 with 10,000–12,000 registered members as of October 2008. The Greens advance a broad multi-issue political platform that reflects its core values of ecological wisdom, social justice, grassroots democracy and non-violence. It has been led by Elizabeth May since August 26, 2006. The party broke 1% of the popular vote in the 2004 federal election, when it received 4.3% and qualified for federal funding. Its support has ranged between 3.1% and 14% since the 2006 federal election. In the 2008 federal election, the Green Party of Canada was invited to the debates for the first time and achieved a high mark of 6.8% of the popular vote. With just under a million votes, it was the only federally funded party to receive more votes than in 2006, but it still failed to win any seats. In the 2011 federal election the Green Party of Canada saw its share of the popular vote drop to below 4% for the first time in eleven years. On August 30, 2008, independent MP Blair Wilson joined the Green Party and became its first Member of Parliament. He was defeated in the 2008 federal election,
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    97

    National Party of Canada

    The National Party of Canada was a short-lived Canadian political party that contested the 1993 federal election. The party should not be confused by an earlier and unrelated National Party that was founded in 1979. Founded and led by Edmonton publisher Mel Hurtig (best known as publisher of The Canadian Encyclopedia), the National Party was created in 1992 to oppose the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, an increase in continentalism, and the privatization policies of the Progressive Conservative government of Brian Mulroney. The party ran in the 1993 election on a platform of economic nationalism, lowering the value of the Canadian dollar relative to the American to encourage exports, and social responsibility. An important platform in the National Party's campaign was the idea that electoral campaigns should be funded by individual Canadians each contributing a small amount each year, thus taking away what the National Party considered was the undue influence of large, multinational corporations funding political campaigns. While the election was successful for two other new parties, the Bloc Québécois and the Reform Party, the National Party failed to win a seat. The party
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    98

    Reconstruction Party of Canada

    The Reconstruction Party was a Canadian political party founded by Henry Herbert Stevens, a long-time Conservative Member of Parliament (MP). Stevens served as Minister of Trade in the Arthur Meighen government of 1921, and as Minister of Trade and Commerce from 1930 to 1934 in the Depression-era government of R. B. Bennett. He was Chairman of the Price-Spreads Commission in 1934. Stevens argued for drastic economic reform and government intervention in the economy. He quit the Bennett government and formed the Reconstruction Party when it became evident that the Tories would not implement the proposals of the Price-Spreads Commission. The party was also isolationist and opposed Canadian involvement in a European war and opposed the League of Nations sanctions against fascist Italy for its invasion of Ethiopia. The Reconstruction Party nominated 174 candidates in the 1935 federal election. It won more votes nationally than the other new parties. The Liberal vote was 2,076,394, the Conservatives 1,308,688, and that for the Reconstruction Party 389,708; while the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit parties garnered 386,484 and 187,045 votes respectively. Many
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    99

    Union des forces progressistes

    The Union des forces progressistes (UFP) was a left- wing political party in Quebec, Canada from 2002-2006. Four parties merged to form the UFP in 2002 out of desire to unite Quebec's political left: On 4 February 2006, UFP merged with Option citoyenne to form the new political party Québec solidaire. The aim of the UFP was to bring together progressive forces across the broad left wing of the political spectrum, including social democrats, socialists and communists. The UFP also advocated altermondialism, feminism, pacifism and green politics. Its platform did not specifically endorse social democracy, socialism or communism. The Green Party of Quebec pledged to try to avoid running candidates in ridings where there was a UFP candidate, although it reserved the right to run anywhere it wants to (even ridings with a UFP candidate), and did not merge with the UFP. The UFP presented itself as an alternative to the main three parties in Quebec: the centre-left Parti Québécois, the centre-right Quebec Liberal Party, and the conservative Action démocratique du Québec/Equipe Mario Dumont, saying that all three are but different faces of the same right-wing ideology called neoliberalism.
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    100

    United Food and Commercial Workers

    The United Food and Commercial Workers International Union is a labor union representing approximately 1.3 million workers in the United States and Canada in many industries, including agriculture, health care, meatpacking, poultry and food processing, manufacturing, textile, G4S Security, chemical trades, and retail food. Until July 2005, UFCW was affiliated with the AFL-CIO, where it was the second largest union by membership. Along with two other members of the Change to Win Coalition, the UFCW formally disaffiliated with the AFL-CIO on July 29, 2005. The UFCW was created through the merger of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters union and Retail Clerks International Union following its founding convention in June 1979. William H. Wynn, president of the RCIU and one of the designers of the merger, became president of UFCW at the time of its founding. The merger created the largest union affiliated with the AFL-CIO. The UFCW continued to expand both by organizing and merging with several smaller unions between 1980 and 1998. In 1980, the Barbers, Beauticians and Allied Industries International Association merged with UFCW, followed by the UFCW Local 811|United Retail Workers Union in
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