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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Wine Region of All Time

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    1
    8.63
    8 votes
    2
    7.43
    7 votes
    3

    Collio Goriziano

    The Gorizia Hills (Italian: Collio Goriziano or Collio; Slovene: Goriška Brda) is a hilly landscape in the northeastern Italy and the southwestern Slovenia. The region is predominately a white wine producer with Friulano, Ribolla Gialla, Malvasia Istriana, Chardonnay, Pinot Bianco, Pinot Grigio and Sauvignon blanc being the leading varietals. Red wine is produced under the Collio Rosso designation and is usually a blend of Merlot, Cabernet franc and Cabernet Sauvignon. In Italy, the Gorizia Hills are designated Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) and belong to the Italian wine region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. The DOC is located in the province of Gorizia near the border with Slovenia. Some Slovenian wine from the region of Goriška Brda also carry the designation of Collio due to their vineyards overlapping across the Italian border. The history of the Gorizia Hills has been largely influenced by its close Slavic and Austro-Hungarian ties, and it was annexed to Italy only after the first World War. After second World War, the vast majority of the region became part of Yugoslavia, and only a small strip of territory between the villages of San Floriano del Collio and Dolegna
    8.17
    6 votes
    5
    South West France

    South West France

    South West France or in French Sud-Ouest, is a wine region in France covering several wine-producing areas situated respectively inland from, and south of, the wine region of Bordeaux. These areas, which have a total of 16,000 hectares (40,000 acres) of vineyards, consist of several discontinuous wine "islands" throughout the Aquitaine region (where Bordeaux region itself is situated), and more or less to the west of the Midi-Pyrénées region. Thus, South West France covers both the upstream areas around the rivers Dordogne and Garonne (which also flow through Bordeaux where they combine to form the Gironde estuary) and their tributaries, as well as the wine-producing areas of Gascony including Béarn, and the Northern Basque Country. However, only areas closer to the Atlantic than to the Mediterranean are included in the region, with the city of Toulouse being situated roughly halfway between the South West wine region and the Languedoc-Roussillon wine region on the Mediterranean. The brandy-producing region Armagnac is situated within Gascony and the wine region of South West France, and some of its grapes are used to make Vin de Pays under the designation Vin de Pays de Côtes de
    9.20
    5 votes
    6

    Calabrian wine

    Calabrian wine (Italian Vino Calabrese is Italian wine from the Calabria region of southern Italy. Over 90% of the region's wine production is red wine, with a large portion made from the Gaglioppo grape. Calabria has 12 Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) regions but only 4% of the yearly production is classified as DOC wine. The region is one of Italy's most rural and least industrialized with per capita income less than half of the national average. Following World War II, many of Calabria's inhabitants immigrated to the United States and Argentina. Those left behind have been slow to developed a vibrant wine industry with only the red wines of Cirò garnering much international attention. Today Calabrian wines are mostly produced to high alcohol levels and sold to co-operatives who transfer the wines to the northern Italian wine regions to use as blending component. There are no Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) regions but 12 Indicazione Geografica Tipica (IGT) designations. The region of Calabria was first cultivated by the ancient Greeks. The Greek athlete Milo of Croton was from this region and was reported to drink 10 litres (2.6 US gal) of Ciró
    6.86
    7 votes
    7
    Algarve

    Algarve

    • Wines: Vida Nova
    The Algarve (Portuguese pronunciation: [aɫˈɡaɾv(ɨ)], from Arabic: الغرب‎, trans. Al-Gharb, meaning "The West") is the southernmost region of mainland Portugal. It has an area of 5,412 square kilometres (2,090 sq mi) with approximately 450,484 permanent inhabitants, and incorporates 16 municipalities. The region coincides with the Faro District, and has as its administrative centre the city of Faro, where both the region's international airport at Faro (FAO) and public university (the University of the Algarve) are located. Tourism and related activities are extensive and make up the bulk of the Algarve's summer economy. Fish, seafood and fruit production, which includes oranges, carob beans, figs and almonds, are other important activities in the region. The Algarve is the most popular tourist destination in Portugal, and one of the most popular in Europe. Its population triples in the peak holiday season thanks to a high influx of visitors, and receives an average of 7 million foreign tourists each year. In total, including national visitors, almost 10 million people visit the Algarve every year. The Algarve is currently the third richest region in Portugal, with a GDP per capita
    7.50
    6 votes
    9
    Piedmont

    Piedmont

    • Wines: 1995 Bruno Giacosa Gallina di Neive Barbaresco
    Piedmont (Italian: Piemonte, pronounced [pjeˈmonte]; Piedmontese and Occitan: Piemont; French: Piémont) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. It has an area of 25,402 square kilometres and a population of about 4.4 million. The capital of Piedmont is Turin. The main local language is Piedmontese. Occitan is also spoken by a minority in the Occitan Valleys situated in the Provinces of Cuneo and Turin. Franco-Provençal is also spoken by another minority in the alpine heights of the Province of Turin. The name Piedmont comes from medieval Latin Pedemontium or Pedemontis, i.e., ad pedem montium, meaning “at the foot of the mountains” (attested in documents of the end of the 13th century). Piedmont is surrounded on three sides by the Alps, including Monviso, where the Po rises, and Monte Rosa. It borders with France, Switzerland and the Italian regions of Lombardy, Liguria, Aosta Valley and for a very small fragment with Emilia Romagna. The geography of Piedmont is 43.3% mountainous, along with extensive areas of hills (30.3%) and plains (26.4%). Piedmont is the second largest of Italy's 20 regions, after Sicily. It is broadly contiguous with the upper part of the drainage basin of the
    8.40
    5 votes
    10
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    South Australia

    South Australia

    • Wines: 2005 Kangarilla Road McLaren Vale Zinfandel
    South Australia (abbreviated as SA) is a state in the southern central part of Australia. It covers some of the most arid parts of the continent; with a total land area of 983,482 square kilometres (379,725 sq mi), it is the fourth largest of Australia's six states and two mainland territories. South Australia shares borders with all of the mainland states and the Northern Territory. It is bordered to the west by Western Australia, to the north by the Northern Territory, to the north-east by Queensland, to the east by New South Wales, to the south-east by Victoria, and to the south by the Great Australian Bight and the Indian Ocean. With over 1.6 million people, the state comprises less than 8% of the Australian population and ranks fifth in population among the states and territories. The majority of its people reside in the state capital, Adelaide, with most of the remainder settled in fertile areas along the south-eastern coast and River Murray. The state's origins are unique in Australia as a freely settled, planned British province, rather than as a convict settlement. Official settlement began on 28 December 1836, when the colony was proclaimed at The Old Gum Tree by Governor
    7.00
    6 votes
    12
    Barolo

    Barolo

    • Wine styles: Barolo
    Barolo is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Cuneo in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 50 km southeast of Turin and about 40 km northeast of Cuneo. As of April 30, 2009 it had a population of 750 and an area of 5.6 km². Barolo borders the following municipalities: Castiglione Falletto, La Morra, Monforte d'Alba, Narzole, and Novello.
    8.00
    5 votes
    13

    Langhorne Creek

    Langhorne Creek (formerly Langhorne's Creek) is a town and wine region in South Australia. It is less than an hour's drive from Adelaide on Fleurieu Peninsula. At the 2006 census, Langhorne Creek had a population of 1,198. Langhorne Creek has a wine history dating back to 1850. Traditionally a red wine growing district well known for production of outstanding Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz. These two red wine grape varieties constitute approximately 70% of the total vineyard plantings in the region. Over recent years considerable experimentation has occurred and a wide range of grape varieties are now grown. The vineyards harvest from early March to late April. The town is on the banks of the Bremer River which flows into Lake Alexandrina. In winter, the river frequently floods across the vineyards, contributing to the terroir of the region. One of the primary features, excluding vinyards and wineries, is the Football Club. The Langhorne Creek Hawks play in the GSFL (Great Southern Football League), and have some of, if not the best, facilities in the league. The club last won a premiership 2012/2013 back to back #hawknation. The township has three central eating places restaurants;
    8.00
    5 votes
    15
    Friuli-Venezia Giulia wine

    Friuli-Venezia Giulia wine

    Friuli-Venezia Giulia wine (or Friuli wine) is wine made in the northeastern Italian region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Once part of the Venetian Republic and with sections under the influence of the Austro-Hungarian Empire for some time, the wines of the region have noticeable Slavic and Germanic influences. There are 11 Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) and 3 Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia area. The region has 3 Indicazione Geografica Tipica (IGT) designations Alto Livenza, delle Venezie and Venezia Giulia. Nearly 62% of the wine produced in the region falls under a DOC designation. The area is known predominantly for its white wines which are considered some of the best examples of Italian wine in that style. Along with the Veneto and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, the Friuli-Venezia Giulia forms the Tre Venezie wine region which ranks with Tuscany and Piedmont as Italy's world class wine regions. The winemaking history of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia has been strongly influenced by the history of the Friuli and Venezia Giulia regions that were important stops along the Mediterranean spice route from the Byzantine Empire
    9.25
    4 votes
    16
    Central Otago Wine Region

    Central Otago Wine Region

    At latitude 45° south, the Central Otago Wine Region is the most southerly wine producing region in the world. The vineyards are also the highest in New Zealand at 200 to 400 metres above sea level, on the floor of glacial valleys. Central Otago is a sheltered inland area with a continental microclimate characterised by hot, dry summers, cool autumns and crisp, cold winters. Central Otago is in the process of applying for a geographic indication for wines grown in the area. This will be in conjunction with the New Zealand Winegrowers Association, which is preparing to submit a national geographic indication for New Zealand wines Significant European occupation in this region started with the Central Otago Gold Rush in the 1860s, but a French immigrant gold miner, Jean Desire Feraud, soon started planting vines and embarking upon small-scale commercial wine production — even winning medals in Australian wine competitions. Late in the nineteenth century, the New Zealand government hired a winemaker to survey the country (see Romeo Bragato). He singled out Central Otago as a region of utmost potential. While this early experimentation showed the wine-growing potential of the region,
    6.00
    7 votes
    17

    Extremadura

    Extremadura is a Spanish geographical indication for Vino de la Tierra wines located in the autonomous region of Extremadura. Vino de la Tierra is one step below the mainstream Denominación de Origen indication on the Spanish wine quality ladder. The area covered by this geographical indication comprises the all the municipalities in Extremadura. It acquired its Vino de la Tierra status in 1999.
    6.83
    6 votes
    18
    7.80
    5 votes
    19
    Lombardy

    Lombardy

    • Wine styles: Lombardia
    Lombardy (Italian: Lombardia Italian pronunciation: [lombarˈdiːa], Western Lombard: Lumbardìa, Eastern Lombard: Lombardia) is one of the 20 regions of Italy. The capital is Milan. One-sixth of Italy's population lives in Lombardy and about one fifth of Italy's GDP is produced in this region, making it the most populous and richest region in the country and one of the richest in the whole of Europe. Major tourist destinations in the region include the historic, cultural and artistic cities of Milan (which is Italy's second top tourist destination), Brescia, Mantua, Pavia, Como, Cremona, Bergamo, Sondrio, Lecco, Lodi, Varese, Monza, and the lakes of Garda, Como, Maggiore, and Iseo. The official language, as in the rest of Italy, is Italian. The traditional local languages are the various dialects of Lombard (Western Lombard and Eastern Lombard), as well as some dialects of Emilian, spoken in some parts of the provinces of Mantua, Pavia, and Cremona. According to Istat, almost 27% of Lombards are bilingual with Lombard and Italian languages; 9.1% are monolingual in Lombard and 57.6% are monolingual in Italian. Lombardy is bordered by Switzerland (north: Canton Ticino and Canton
    8.50
    4 votes
    20

    Plan de Dieu

    Plan de Dieu Côtes du Rhône Villages AOC. Consecrated in 2005 as a Côtes du Rhône Villages (Named Villages) wine. Vineyard was established during the Middle Ages in particular under the influence of the Templar Knights. Chapels, religious communities were established all around the Plan de Dieu. The religious cultivated the vines under the protection of God, and as a sign of God or as a benediction, these wines rapidly developed a certain renown for their quality. Classical Mediterranean Climate. Grape variety mix : (AC red only) Black Grenache 50% minimum, Syrah and/or Mourvèdre 20% minimum, other grape varieties authorized in the appellation 20% maximum.
    6.33
    6 votes
    21
    McLaren Vale

    McLaren Vale

    • Wines: 2008 Vincognita Madeleines Shiraz
    McLaren Vale is a wine region approximately 35 km south of Adelaide in South Australia. It has a population of about 2,000 and is internationally renowned for the wines it produces. The region was named after either David McLaren, the Colonial Manager of the South Australia Company or John McLaren (unrelated) who surveyed the area in 1839. Among the very first settlers to the region in late 1839, were two English farmers from Devon, William Colton and Charles Thomas Hewett. William Colton established the 'Daringa Farm' and Charles Thomas Hewett established 'Oxenberry Farm'. Both men would be very prominent in the very early days of McLaren Vale. Although initially the region's main economic activity was the growing of cereal crops, John Reynell and Thomas Hardy planted grape vines in 1838 and the present-day Seaview and Hardy wineries were in operation as early as 1850. Grapes were first planted in the region in 1838 and some vines more than 100 years old are still producing. Today there are more than 88 cellar doors in McLaren Vale. The majority are small family-run operations and boutique wineries. McLaren Vale has a Mediterranean climate with four clear seasons. With a dry warm
    5.43
    7 votes
    22
    Eger

    Eger

    • Wine styles: Egerszóláti Olaszrizling
    Eger (Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈɛɡɛr]; German: Erlau; Turkish: Eğri; Serbian: Jegar, Јегар ) is the second largest city in Northern Hungary, the county seat of Heves, east of the Mátra Mountains. Eger is best known for its castle, thermal baths, historic buildings (including the northernmost Turkish minaret), and red and white wines. The name Eger is thought to derive from the Hungarian word égerfa (alder tree). In German, the town is known as Erlau, in Latin as Agria, in Serbian and Croatian as Jegar / Јегар or Jegra / Јегра, in Czech and Slovene as Jager, in Slovak as Jáger, in Polish as Jagier, and in Turkish as Eğri. Eger has been inhabited since the Stone Age. Today's Eger was formed in the 10th century by St. Stephen (997–1038), the first Christian king of Hungary, who founded an episcopal see in Eger. The first cathedral of Eger was built on Castle Hill, within the present site of Eger Castle. Eger grew up around its former cathedral and has remained an important religious centre in Hungary since its foundation. The 14th-16th centuries were an age of prosperity for Eger. Winegrowing, for which the town is still famous for, began to be important around that time. The bishops
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    San Juan Province

    San Juan Province

    • Wines: 2008 Colon Malbec
    San Juan (Spanish pronunciation: [saŋ ˈxwan]) is a province of Argentina, located in the western part of the country. Neighbouring provinces are, moving clockwise from the north, La Rioja, San Luis and Mendoza. It borders with Chile at the west. The province has an area of 89,651 km, covering a mountainous region with scarce vegetation, fertile oases and turbulent rivers. Throughout the entire province there are an important number of paleontological sites. Similar to other regions in Argentina, agriculture is one of the most important economic activities, highlighting wine production and olive oil. Additionally, a variety of fruits and vegetables are produced in the fertile valleys irrigated by artificial channels in the western part, close to the Andes mountain range. This is the second province in volume of wine production at the national level and in South America, and possesses outstanding varietal wines. It is also an important center of mining and oil production. Before the arrival of Spanish conquistadores, different tribes like Huarpes, Diaguitas, Capazanes, Olongastas and Yacampis, highly influenced by the Inca empire, inhabited the area. The city of San Juan de la
    8.25
    4 votes
    24

    Pyrenees

    The Pyrenees is a wine region centred on the Pyrenees ranges located in Victoria, Australia near the town of Avoca. The altitude of the ranges is 300 to over 750 m (approximately 980–2460 ft). Main peaks in the range include Mount Avoca (747 m) and Mount Warrenmang (537 m). The explorer and surveyor Thomas Mitchell was the first European recorded to have traveled through the district on his 1836 journey of exploration. The ranges reminded him of the Pyrenees in Europe where he had served as an army officer, hence the name he gave them. He found the area more temperate in climate and better watered than inland New South Wales, and he encouraged settlers to take up land in the region he described as "Australia Felix". Vines were first planted in the region in 1848. Several wine growers produced and sold wine in the region in the late 1800s and early part of the twentieth century. The pioneer of the region Edwin Horatio Mackereth had his vineyard sold to a dairy farmer in 1929 by his descendants. Another early producer Kofoeds survived until 1947. The 1960s saw the re-establishment of vineyards in the area with the French Cognac producer Rémy Martin planting grapes in the mid 1960s.
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Province of Avellino

    Province of Avellino

    • Wine styles: Taurasi
    The Province of Avellino (Italian: Provincia di Avellino) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. The area is typified by many small towns and villages scattered across the province; in fact only two towns have a population over 20,000; its capital city Avellino and Ariano Irpino. It has an area of 2,792 km², and a total population of 429,178 (2001). There are 119 comuni (singluar: comune) in the province, see Comuni of the Province of Avellino. In the ancient Kingdom of Naples the province roughly corresponded to the Principato Ultra, though some places were included in Capitanata or Principato Citra. It is an inner province, unconnected to the sea. The ancient name of the area was "Hirpinia" (modern Italian: Irpinia), derived from the Oscan "hirpus", wolf, an animal that is still present in the territory though in greatly reduced numbers. The province has great environmental interest including the Regional Parks Monti Picentini and Partenio, together with two WWF sites, Valle della Caccia in Senerchia and the area around the Ofanto dam in Conza della Campania. Avellino was known for its royal guards during the medieval and Roman times. Typical products are hazelnuts (one
    6.80
    5 votes
    28
    7.75
    4 votes
    29
    Champagne

    Champagne

    • Wines: G.H. Mumm Cordon Rouge Brut
    • Wine styles: Sampanie
    The Champagne wine region (archaic English: Champany) is a historic province within the administrative province of Champagne in the northeast of France. The area is best known for the production of the sparkling white wine that bears the region's name. EU law and the laws of most countries reserve the term "Champagne" exclusively for wines that come from this region located about 100 miles (160 km) east of Paris. The viticultural boundaries of Champagne are legally defined and split into five wine producing districts within the administrative province: Aube, Côte des Blancs, Côte de Sézanne, Montagne de Reims, and Vallée de la Marne. The towns of Reims and Épernay are the commercial centers of the area. Located at the northern edges of the wine growing world, the history of the Champagne wine region has had a significant role in the development of this unique terroir. The area's proximity to Paris promoted the region's economic success in its wine trade but also put the villages and vineyards in the path of marching armies on their way to the French capital. Despite the frequency of these military conflicts, the region developed a reputation for quality wine production in the early
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Henty

    Henty

    Henty is a town on the Olympic Highway almost midway between Albury and Wagga Wagga in New South Wales, Australia. Henty is situated on the border of the South West Slopes and the Riverina districts. At the 2006 census, Henty had a population of 863 people. The first European explorer to visit and record the area was Major Thomas Mitchell in 1835. The first settlers arrived around 1850 were squatters, allowed to lease crown land. The area was known as 'Dudal Comer', Aboriginal for 'Sweet Water', with the first property station taking this name. The village of Henty was originally called 'Doodle Cooma'. Nearby wetlands are still called Doodle Cooma Swamp; they cover 20 square kilometres and are a breeding area for waterbirds. The post office changed its name in 1886 as the railway station's name was thought to be confused with Cooma in the Monaro district. The town's new name was after the Henty family of Portland, Victoria and Launceston, Tasmania. Henry Henty had leased Round Hill station north of Gerogery (south of Henty) in the early 1860s (some suggest the lessor was Edward Henty). The bushranger Dan 'Mad Dog' Morgan operated in the area for a time. Two kilometres west of the
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Tuscany

    Tuscany

    • Wines: 2005 Querciabella Camartina
    • Wine styles: Vin santo
    Tuscany (Italian: Toscana, pronounced [tosˈkaːna]) is a region in Italy having an area of about 23,000 square kilometres (8,900 sq mi) and a population of about 3.8 million inhabitants. The regional capital is Florence (Firenze). Tuscany is known for its landscapes, traditions, history, artistic legacy and its permanent influence on high culture. It is regarded as the birthplace of the Italian Renaissance and has been home to many figures influential in the history of art and science. As a result, the region boasts museums (such as the Uffizi, the Pitti Palace and the Chianciano Museum of Art). Tuscany is famous for its wines, including the well-known Chianti, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Morellino di Scansano and Brunello di Montalcino. Six Tuscan localities have been designated World Heritage Sites: the historic centre of Florence (1982); the historical centre of Siena (1995); the square of the Cathedral of Pisa (1987); the historical centre of San Gimignano (1990); the historical centre of Pienza (1996); and the Val d'Orcia (2004). Tuscany has over 120 protected nature reserves, making Tuscany and its capital Florence popular tourist destinations that attract millions of
    7.75
    4 votes
    33

    Lafões IPR

    • Wines: Lafões
    Lafões is a Portuguese wine region, near Viséu, overlapping into the Dão and Vinho Verde DOCs. The region has the second tier Indicação de Proveniencia Regulamentada (IPR) classification and may some day be promoted to Denominação de Origem Controlada (DOC). The region is known for its acidic, light bodied, red and white wines. The principle grapes of the region include Amaral, Arinto, Cerceal and Jaen.
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Côte-Rôtie AOC

    Côte-Rôtie AOC

    Côte-Rôtie is a French wine Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) in the northern Rhône wine region of France. The vineyards are located just south of Vienne in the communes of Saint-Cyr-sur-le-Rhône, Ampuis, and Tupin-et-Semons. The vineyards are unique because of the steep slopes facing the river and their stone walls. Côte-Rôtie can be rendered in English as "the roasted slope" and refers to the long hours of sunlight that these steep slopes receive. The wines are red, made with Syrah grapes and up to 20% Viognier, a white grape used for its aroma. According to appellation rules, Syrah and Viognier must be fermented at the same time, a process known as cofermentation. Côte-Rôtie wine typically exhibits an almost paradoxical combination of meat aromas (including bacon) and floral aromas. However, even Côte-Rôtie from 100% Syrah can smell floral. The Côte-Rôtie has a continental climate that is very different from the more Mediterranean climate of the southern Rhône. Winters are wet and marked by the cold mistral winds that can last into the spring. During the late spring and early autumn, fog can settle on the vineyards making ripening of the grapes a challenge. The wine region
    8.67
    3 votes
    35
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    7.25
    4 votes
    38
    7.25
    4 votes
    39
    Côte de Nuits

    Côte de Nuits

    The Côte de Nuits is a French wine region located in the northern part of the Côte d'Or, the limestone ridge that is at the heart of the Burgundy wine region. It extends from Dijon to just south of Nuits-Saint-Georges, which gives its name to the district and is the regional center. Though some white and rosé wines are produced in the region, the Côte de Nuits is most famous for reds made from Pinot noir. The Côte de Nuits covers fourteen communes. Six produce grand cru wines, in the central district between Gevrey-Chambertin and Nuits-Saint-Georges, with four lesser villages either side. The Grand Crus of the Cote de Nuits are some of the smallest appellations in France, less than a hectare in the case of La Romanée. Among the northern villages of the Côte de Nuits there are several distinct terroir. Uniquely in Burgundy, Marsannay-la-Côte produces wine of all three colors - red and rosé from Pinot Noir, white from Chardonnay. The 529 acres (214 ha) of the Marsannay appellation extends into Couchey and Chênove. The village of Fixin has its own appellation, but the area of Brochon Côte de Nuits Villages extends into the commune with 55 acres (22 ha) of premier cru vineyards out of
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Tupungato Department

    Tupungato Department

    Tupungato is a department located in the province of Mendoza, Argentina. The cabecera (departmental capital) 0f Tupungato is located approximately 70 km south of Mendoza city, in the Valle de Uco. Its name comes from the Tupungato volcano (with 6.570 metres, one of Argentina's highest peaks) with towers over the city from the Andes mountain rig. The volcano's name, in turn, is said to mean "star viewpoint" in the huarpe tongue. The department is approximately 1.200 metres above mean sea level, and comprises 2.485 km² (1.6% of the provincial total). According to the 2001 census [INDEC], the total population of the department was 28.539 with a density of 11.48 inhabitants per km². The region is mainly dependent on agricultural production, with vineyards being its most important produce, representing 30% of the planted lands. Other regional products are fruit (mainly peach) and garlic. The wine industry, however, is particularly relevant due to the constant investments and intensive labour occupation. Recent developments in the Argentine economy have further fuelled the Argentine wine industry, attracting foreign investors and tourists to the region in an unprecedented scale.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Clare Valley

    Clare Valley

    • Wines: 2000 Jim Barry, The McCrae Wood, Shiraz
    The Clare Valley is one of Australia's oldest wine regions, best known for Riesling wines. It lies in the Mid North of South Australia, approximately 120 km north of Adelaide. The valley runs north-south, with Main North Road as the main thoroughfare. The original inhabitants of the Clare Valley were the Ngadjuri people. It is believed that they had major camping sites at Clare and Auburn, as well as other areas outside the valley. The first European to reportedly explore the region was William John Hill, who arrived in South Australia on the HMS Buffalo in 1836. He was a surveyor and explored the Clare Valley district in 1838, discovering and naming the Hutt River. The Hill River was later discovered and named in his honour. On returning to Adelaide, he reported his findings of potentially good farmland to his friend and associate, Edward John Eyre. Eyre in turn informed John Horrocks, who had only arrived in the new colony in March 1839. Eyre later explored the Clare Valley on the return journey from his second 1839 expedition to the northern regions of South Australia. Horrocks set out with his servant, John Green and established himself in the area now known as Penwortham. This
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Chablis

    Chablis

    Chablis (pronounced: [ʃa.bli]) is a town and commune in the Yonne department in Burgundy in north-central France. It lies in the valley of the River Serein. The village of Chablis gives its name to one of the most famous French white wines. Chablis is made with Chardonnay, a grape that grows particularly well in the region. Each year the Festival du Chablisien is held May to June in Chablis, featuring classical, jazz, and world music. The fifth stage of the 2007 Tour de France departed from Chablis towards Autun.
    9.50
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    45
    9.50
    2 votes
    46

    Paso Robles

    Paso Robles Wine Country is an American Viticultural Area located in the San Luis Obispo County, California. It has approximately 26,000 vineyard acres planted with wine grapes, and is well known for its heritage varietal Zinfandel, Rhône-style wines, and "Crazy Blends," blends and styles that are unique to Paso Robles Wine Country. Grapes were first introduced into the Paso Robles area in 1797 by missionaries at Mission San Miguel Arcangel, where more than one thousand vines were planted. Commercial wine growing, however, wasn't started until the 1880s with the establishment of Ascension Winery, today known as York Mountain Winery, the longest continuously operating winery in the County. Since 1990, when there were fewer than 20 wineries in Paso Robles, a large expansion of activity has seen the number rise to more than 200 wineries today. Wine critic Robert M. Parker, Jr. commented on the region's promise of quality of wine, emphasizing the wineries Alban Vineyards, L'Aventure, Linne Calodo, Saxum Vineyards, Villa Creek Cellars and Tablas Creek Vineyard as the "leading Paso pioneers". In 2007, a proposal to split the area at the Salinas River and form a new "Paso Robles Westside
    9.50
    2 votes
    47
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Côtes du Rhône Villages AOC

    Côtes du Rhône Villages AOC

    Côtes-du-Rhône-Villages is a French wine Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) in the southern Rhône wine region of France. It is made up from a list of villages around the region which supposedly produces a high quality of wine. It is above the more generic Côtes-du-Rhône AOC but below appellations such as Châteauneuf-du-Pape or Vacqueyras. Red, white and rosé wine are all produced within the appellation and while being below the mentioned appellations, it is the second largest appellation in the Rhône, only surpassed by AOC Côtes-du-Rhône. Côtes-du-Rhône-Villages was established as AOC in 1966-1967 though drafts originated from as early as 1953. Five communes stood out, Cairanne, Gigondas (now an appellation in itself), Chusclan, Laudun and Saint-Maurice-sur-Eygues. These communes or villages were allowed to put their name on the label in exchange of submitting to a number of regulations, such as a minimum alcohol level (12.5%). In 1955 Vacqueyras was accepted in the small group and two years later, Vinsobres. The inspiration for the appellation was found in Beaujolais, which also has a village-level of wine. Since, the appellation has expanded to almost 10,000 hectares, half of
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    6.00
    5 votes
    51
    8.00
    3 votes
    52
    Maipú

    Maipú

    • Wines: Argento Malbec 2008
    Maipú is a city in Mendoza Province, Argentina. It is the capital of the Maipú Department. It is located a short distance from the provincial capital, Mendoza. Maipú is at the centre of an important wine-growing region, and has a wine museum. It has a population of 89,433 (2001 census [INDEC]). VISITE MAIPU wine photos service shop weather professional all information of CITY MAIPU Municipal information: Municipal Affairs Federal Institute (IFAM), Municipal Affairs Secretariat, Ministry of Interior, Argentina. (Spanish)
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    Orvieto

    Orvieto

    Orvieto is an Italian wine region located in Umbria and Lazio, centered on the comune of Orvieto. It is primarily known for its white wines made from a blend of mostly Grechetto and Trebbiano, which is sold under the Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) Orvieto and Orvieto Classico. Blended red wine and eight varietal reds are sold under the Rosso Orvietano DOC. The region has been producing wine since the Middle Ages, when Orvieto wine was known as a sweet, golden-yellow wine. Today's white Orvieto is dry, but a semi-sweet style, known as Orvieto Abboccato, and dolce (sweet), are also produced in small quantities. The Orvieto zone is in the in the province of Terni in the south-western corner of Umbria. It extends southward into the Viterbo province of Lazio and north to the border between Terni and the province of Perugia. The Orvieto Classico region is characterised by tufa, limestone and volcanic soil. Viticulture was introduced to the Orvieto region by the early Etruscans, who carved out cellar-like caves from volcanic soil that could house wine production with long, cool fermentation and produced the type of sweet wine that was popular in the ancient world. From the
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Victorian wine

    Victorian wine

    Victorian wine is wine made in the Australian state of Victoria. With over 600 wineries, Victoria has more wine producers than any other Australian wine-producing state but ranks third in overall wine production due to the lack of a mass bulk wine-producing area like South Australia's Riverland and New South Wales's Riverina. Viticulture has existed in Victoria since the 19th century and experienced a high point in the 1890s when the region produced more than half of all wine produced in Australia. The phylloxera epidemic that soon followed took a hard toll on the Victoria wine industry which did not fully recover till the 1950s. Today winemaking is spread out across the state and features premier wine regions such as Heathcote, Rutherglen and the Yarra Valley. Single varietal wines produced in the region include the Australian mainstays of Shiraz and Chardonnay as well as the more obscure Viognier, Pinot noir, Graciano and Tannat. The style of wine ranges from full body red wine to Madeira-like fortified wines such as Liqueur Muscat. Some of the earliest commercial plantings in Victoria were near Yering and established by Hubert de Castella, a Swiss immigrant who came to the
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    Oregon

    Oregon

    • Wines: 2007 August Cellars "Kramer Vineyard" Oregon Pinot Gris
    Oregon (/ˈɔrɨɡən/ ORR-ə-gən) is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is located on the Pacific coast, with Washington to the north, California to the south, Nevada on the southeast and Idaho to the east. The Columbia and Snake rivers delineate much of Oregon's northern and eastern boundaries, respectively. The area was inhabited by many indigenous tribes before the arrival of traders, explorers, and settlers who formed an autonomous government in Oregon Country in 1843. The Oregon Territory was created in 1848, and Oregon became the 33rd state on February 14, 1859. Oregon is the 9th most extensive and the 27th most populous of the 50 United States. Salem is the state's capital and third-most-populous city; Portland is the most populous. Portland is the 29th-largest U.S. city, with a population of 583,776 (2010 US Census) and a metro population of 2,241,841 (2009 estimate), the 23rd-largest U.S. metro area. The valley of the Willamette River in western Oregon is the state's most densely populated area and is home to eight of the ten most populous cities. Oregon contains a diverse landscape including the windswept Pacific coastline, the volcanoes of the
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Padthaway

    Padthaway

    Padthaway is a small town on the Riddoch Highway in the Limestone Coast region of south-eastern South Australia, halfway from Keith to Naracoorte. The name is derived from the Potawurutj, the Aboriginal name for Good Water. Padthaway is in the Tatiara District Council, the state electorate of MacKillop and the federal Division of Barker. Padthaway was the name of the original pastoral station which was established near here in 1847 by a successful Scottish businessman, Robert Lawson. In 1882 the Padthaway Estate Homestead was built by Eliza and Robert Lawson. A notable legend about Padthaway is the ghost at Padthaway Estate, her name is Eliza Lawson but she is not the Eliza Lawson who settled and built the Padthaway Estate in the 1800s. In 1952 Padthaway became the centre of a soldier settlement scheme. The first vineyards were planted here in 1968 and quickly transformed marginal grazing land into a top wine-producing region. White wines, especially, from the region are regular winners of major awards. These wines may be purchased at the local cellar door sales and at wine retailers around Australia. Agriculture is also strong in Padthaway with onion, olives and seeds being grown
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    6.50
    4 votes
    67
    6.50
    4 votes
    68
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Buenos Aires Province

    Buenos Aires Province

    The Province of Buenos Aires (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈbwenos ˈaiɾes], Provincia de Buenos Aires) (English: Fair Winds) is the largest and most populous Argentinian province. It takes the name from the city of Buenos Aires, which used to be the provincial capital until it was federalized in 1880. The current capital of the province is the city of La Plata, founded in 1882. The province borders Entre Ríos to the north; Santa Fe to the west; Córdoba, La Pampa and Río Negro to south and east; and the Atlantic Ocean. The entire province is part of the Pampas geographical region. The province has a population of about 15.6 million people, or 39% of Argentina's total population. Nearly 10 million people live in Greater Buenos Aires, the metropolitan area surrounding the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires. The area of the province, 307,571 km (118,754 sq mi), makes it the largest in Argentina with around 11% of the country's total area. The inhabitants of the province before the 16th century advent of Spanish colonisation were aboriginal peoples such as the Charrúas and the Querandíes; but their culture was lost over the next 350 years. They were subjected to a virtual genocide from which
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    California

    California

    • Wines: 2005 Ridge "Pagani Ranch" Sonoma Valley Zinfandel
    California (/ˌkæləˈfɔrnjə/) is a state located on the West Coast of the United States. It is by far the most populous U.S. state, and the third most extensive (after Alaska and Texas). It is home to the nation's 2nd and 6th largest census statistical areas (Los Angeles metropolitan area and San Francisco Bay Area, respectively), and eight of the nation's fifty most populated cities (Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, Fresno, Sacramento, Long Beach and Oakland). The capital city is Sacramento. California's diverse geography ranges from the Pacific Coast in the west, to the Sierra Nevada mountains in the east – from the Redwood–Douglas-fir forests of the northwest, to the Mojave Desert areas in the southeast. The center of the state is dominated by Central Valley, a major agricultural area. California contains both the highest and lowest points in the contiguous United States (Mount Whitney and Death Valley), and has the 3rd longest coastline of all states (after Alaska and Florida). Earthquakes are a common occurrence due to the state's location along the Pacific Ring of Fire: about 37,000 are recorded annually. The name California once referred to a large area of
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    King Valley

    King Valley

    The King Valley, or King River Valley is a wine-producing and agricultural region centred on the King River in north-eastern Victoria, Australia between Wangaratta and the Alpine National Park. There are a number of small towns within the region including Cheshunt, Whitfield, King Valley, Edi, Claremont, Moyhu, Byrne, Docker and Oxley. The fertile valley area has been used since the 1880s to grow a variety of crops including hops and tobacco. A narrow-gauge railway was built between Wangaratta and Whitfield in 1889 and a government tobacco research farm was established in Edi and moved to Whitfield in 1902. Following the end of World War II, a large number of Italian, Yugoslav and Spanish migrants settled in the area and established tobacco farms. Following a decline in the tobacco industry in the late 70s, local farmers branched out into other crops such as chestnuts, hops and berries. In recent years, a number of vineyards have been established.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Margaret River

    Margaret River

    Margaret River is a town in the South West of Western Australia, located in the valley of the eponymous Margaret River, 277 kilometres (172 mi) south of Perth, the state capital. Its Local Government Area is the Shire of Augusta-Margaret River. The surrounding area is the Margaret River Wine Region and has become known for its wine production and tourism, attracting an estimated 500,000 visitors annually. In earlier days the area was better known for hardwood timber and agricultural production. The town is named after the river, which is presumed to be named after Margaret Whicher, cousin of John Garrett Bussell (founder of Busselton) in 1831. The name is first shown on a map of the region published in 1839. European migrants lived in the area as early as 1850, with timber logging commencing in around 1870. By 1910, the town had a hotel which also operated as a post office. After World War I, an attempt by the Government of Western Australia to attract migrants to Western Australia (known as the Group Settlement Scheme) and establish farms in the region attracted new settlers to the town. In 1922, over 100 settlers moved into the district. In the early 1920s the Busselton to
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    Riverland

    The Riverland is a region of South Australia. It covers the area near the Murray River from where it flows into South Australia downstream to Blanchetown. The major town centres are Renmark, Berri, Loxton, Waikerie, Barmera and Monash. Each of these are accompanied by minor townships, the total area comprising approximately 30,000 people. Many of the towns were established for the re-settlement of soldiers after their return from World War I or World War II. Most towns were established as separate irrigation districts. The region hosted an internment camp for people of Japanese, German and Italian origin or descent during World War II. This camp was based at Loveday and little remains to testify to its existence. The region grows about half of South Australia's grapes, and 90% of the citrus and stone fruit. Most major Australian wine companies source a significant amount of bulk wine from the Riverland. The Agriculture industry is the largest employer in the area. Houseboating, water skiing and golfing are popular pastimes for visitors to the area. Most Riverlanders share an active concern and interest in the health of the River Murray. The majority of the River Murray and
    10.00
    1 votes
    77

    Santa Barbara County

    • Wines: 2008 Pacific Ridge Vineyards Chardonnay
    Santa Barbara County is a county located in the southern portion of the U.S. state of California, on the Pacific coast. As of 2010 the county had a population of 423,895. The county seat is Santa Barbara and the largest city is Santa Maria. The Santa Barbara County area, including the Northern Channel Islands, was first settled by Native Americans at least 13,000 years ago. Evidence for a Paleoindian presence has been found in the form of a fluted Clovis-like point found in the 1980s along the western Santa Barbara Coast, as well as the remains of Arlington Springs Man found on Santa Rosa Island in the 1960s. For thousands of years, the area was home to the Chumash tribe of Native Americans, complex hunter-gatherers who lived along the coast and in interior valleys leaving rock art in many locations including Painted Cave. Europeans first contacted the Chumash in AD 1542, when three Spanish ships under the command of Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo explored the area. The Santa Barbara Channel received its name from Spanish explorer Sebastian Vizcaino when he sailed over the channel waters in 1602; he entered the channel on December 4, the day of the feast of Santa Barbara. Although Spanish
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    Alsace AOC

    • Wine styles: Alsace wine
    Alsace is an Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) for wines made in the Alsace wine region of France. Unlike most other French wine regions, there is only one AOC appellation for most wines made in the whole of Alsace. In 2006, 78 per cent of the Alsatian vineyards were producing wine under this appellation. Other French wine regions have numerous appellations within them, often designating wine from a particular town or, even, an area within a certain town. Alsace AOC wines are often sold with one of the varietal labels or similar designations that are allowed under the AOC rules. In some cases, a lieu-dit, the name of a vineyard, is also displayed on the bottle. Neither the varietal labels or the lieux-dits are separate appellations; all carry "Appellation Alsace Contrôlée" on the label. The Alsace Grand Cru AOC, which is a separate appellation, was not created until 1975.
    7.33
    3 votes
    79
    Beaujolais

    Beaujolais

    • Wines: 2009 Thorin Ame du Terroir Brouilly rouge
    • Wine styles: Beaujolais
    Beaujolais (French pronunciation: [boʒɔlɛ]; Arpitan: Biôjolês) is a historical province and a wine-producing region in France. It is located north of Lyon, and covers parts of the north of the Rhône département (Rhône-Alpes) and parts of the south of the Saône-et-Loire département (Burgundy). The region is known internationally for its long tradition of winemaking, and more recently for the enormously popular Beaujolais nouveau. See History of France The historical capital of the province is Beaujeu (Arpitan: Bôjor / Biôjœr) and the economic capital of the area is Villefranche-sur-Saône (Velafranche). The Beaujolais Region is located south of Burgundy and its climate is warmer. Because of the difference in region, the Pinot Noir grape normally grown in Burgundy would not do well here. The best soils are mostly granite. Almost all the wine produced in the region is red wine from the Gamay grape, of which the heavily-marketed Beaujolais Nouveau is the most famous, the village crus the most prized.
    7.33
    3 votes
    80

    Eden Valley

    Eden Valley (34°38′S 139°05′E / 34.633°S 139.083°E / -34.633; 139.083) is a small South Australian town in the Barossa Ranges. It was named by the surveyors of the area after they found the word "Eden" carved into a tree. Eden Valley has an elevation of 460 metres and an average annual rainfall of 716.2mm. Eden Valley gives its name to a wine growing region that shares its western boundary with the Barossa Valley. The region is of similar size to the Barossa Valley, and is well known for producing high quality riesling and shiraz wines. Englishman Joseph Gilbert planted the first Eden Valley vineyard, Pewsey Vale, in 1847. Within the Eden Valley region there is a sub-region called High Eden which is located higher in the Barossa Ranges, giving cooler temperatures. Eden Valley is in the Barossa Council local government area, the state electoral district of Schubert and the federal Division of Wakefield.
    7.33
    3 votes
    81
    7.33
    3 votes
    82
    7.33
    3 votes
    83
    7.33
    3 votes
    84
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Savoy

    Savoy

    Savoy (/ˈsævɔɪ/; Arpitan: Savouè, IPA: [saˈvwɛ]; French: Savoie, IPA: [savwa]; Italian: Savoia) is a region of France. It comprises roughly the territory of the Western Alps situated between Lake Geneva in the north and Dauphiné in the south. The historical land of Savoy emerged as the feudal territory of the house of Savoy during the 11th to 14th centuries. The historical territory is shared between the modern republics of France and Italy. Installed by Rudolph III, King of Burgundy, officially in 1003, the House of Savoy became the longest surviving royal house in Europe. It ruled the County of Savoy to 1416 and then the Duchy of Savoy from 1416 to 1714. The territory of Savoy was annexed to France in 1792 under the French First Republic, before being returned to the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia in 1815. Savoy was finally annexed to France, under the Second French Empire in 1860, as part of a political agreement brokered between the French emperor Napoleon III and King Victor Emmanuel II of the Kingdom of Sardinia that began the process of unification of Italy. Victor Emmanuel's dynasty, the House of Savoy, retained its Italian lands of Piedmont and Liguria and became the ruling
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Adelaide Hills

    Adelaide Hills

    The Adelaide Hills are part of the Mount Lofty Ranges, east of the city of Adelaide in the state of South Australia. It is unofficially centred on the largest town in the area, Mount Barker, which has a population of around 29,000 and is also one of Australia's fastest growing towns. The Adelaide Hills were amongst the first areas of South Australia to be settled by European settlers. A number of towns in the Hills were started as German settlements; Hahndorf, and Lobethal are two widely known examples. The original town names and architecture still reflect this. Descendants of these first settlers and others of German origin still reside in the area. This explains the strong German cultural connection seen in the number of Lutheran churches, Lutheran schools which often have German on the curriculum, and the number of older residents who still speak German. Some customs have grown, such as the Lobethal Christmas lights which began in the 1950s. For most Adelaide residents, a drive through the hills is a popular pastime, particularly due to proximity. With Adelaide being a linear city extending 90 kilometres (56 mi) north to south, the hills are within 20 kilometres (12 mi) of the
    6.25
    4 votes
    88
    Coonawarra

    Coonawarra

    Coonawarra is a wine region, on the Limestone Coast of South Australia, that is known for the Cabernet Sauvignon wines produced on its "terra rossa" soil. Coonawarra is an Aboriginal word meaning "Honeysuckle". It is about 380 km southeast of Adelaide, close to the border with Victoria. The first vines were planted by John Riddoch at Yallum, South Australia in 1890. Only the Redman family of Rouge Homme continued to produce table wine during this period, during which Shiraz was the main grape variety grown. Fortunes changed when Samuel Wynn recognised the potential of the strip of terra rossa soil, and bought the original Riddoch cellars in 1951. Led by Wynns and Penfolds, Coonawarra was to play a leading role in the transformation of the Australian wine industry as it changed from making fortified wines to conventional table wines. Coonawarra's terra rossa soil is one of the most famous terroirs in the New World, covering an area of just 15 km x 2 km north of Penola. It lies on a shallow limestone ridge, raising it above the swampy land either side - it is no coincidence that the Riddoch Highway follows this ridge as carters sought the firmest ground in times past. This special
    6.25
    4 votes
    89
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    Mornington Peninsula

    Mornington Peninsula

    The Mornington Peninsula is a peninsula located south-east of Melbourne in Victoria, Australia. It is surrounded by Port Phillip to the west, Western Port to the east and Bass Strait to the south, and is connected to the mainland in the north. Geographically, the peninsula begins its protrusion from the mainland in the area between Pearcedale and Frankston. The area was originally home to the Mayone-bulluk clan and formed part of the Boonwurrung nation's territory prior to European settlement. Much of the peninsula has been cleared for agriculture and settlements. However, small areas of the native ecology remain in the peninsula's south and west, some of which is protected by the Mornington Peninsula National Park. Around 135,000 people live on the peninsula, most in the small towns on its western shorelines which are sometimes regarded as outlying suburbs of greater Melbourne. During the summer months, the population can swell to around 250,000 people. The peninsula is primarily a local tourist region, with popular natural attractions such as the variety of beaches both sheltered and open-sea and many scenic sights and views. Other popular attractions include the various
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    6.00
    4 votes
    94
    6.00
    4 votes
    95
    8.00
    2 votes
    96
    Côte d'Or

    Côte d'Or

    • Wine styles: Red Burgundy
    The Côte d'Or is a limestone escarpment in Burgundy, France that lends its name to the department which was formed around it. It stretches from Dijon in the north to the river Dheune to the south, overlooking the valley of the Saône to the east. The east-facing slope of the Côte d'Or is home to some of the greatest names of Burgundy wine, such as Gevrey-Chambertin, Clos de Vougeot, Meursault and Montrachet. The northern half, the Côte de Nuits (centred around Nuits-Saint-Georges) produces red wine almost exclusively. The Côte de Beaune, around Beaune in the south, produces a mix of white wine and red wine. The Route des Grands Crus (Route Nationale 74) runs along the foot of the ridge and is popular with tourists. The area was settled by the Celts, and there is considerable evidence of Roman occupation in the area. Later it came under the influence of the Dukes of Burgundy, with the Cistercians from Cîteaux Abbey playing a prominent role in the development of the vineyards. If the Paris hydrological and geological basin is viewed as a saucer with Paris at its centre, the Côte d'Or may be seen as a segment of its south-eastern rim; the counterpart of the chalk cliffs of the Pays de
    8.00
    2 votes
    97
    8.00
    2 votes
    98
    Salta Province

    Salta Province

    • Wines: 2007 Michel Torino Estate Don David "Reserve" Cafayate Valley Torrontés
    Salta (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsalta]) is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. Neighboring provinces are from the east clockwise Formosa, Chaco, Santiago del Estero, Tucumán and Catamarca. It also surrounds Jujuy. To the north it borders Bolivia and Paraguay and to the west lies Chile. Before the Spanish conquest, numerous native peoples (now called Diaguitas and Calchaquíes) lived in the valleys of what is now Salta Province; they formed many different tribes, the Quilmes and Humahuacas among them, which all shared the Cacán language. The Atacamas lived in the Puna, and the Wichís (Matacos), in the Chaco region. The first conquistador to venture into the area was Diego de Almagro in 1535; he was followed by Diego de Rojas. Hernando de Lerma founded San Felipe de Lerma in 1582, following orders of the viceroy Francisco de Toledo, Count of Oropesa; the name of the city was soon changed to "San Felipe de Salta". By 1650, the city had around five hundred inhabitants. An intendency of "Salta del Tucumán" was created within the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata. In 1774, San Ramón de La Nueva Orán was founded between Salta and Tarija (Tarija was added to
    8.00
    2 votes
    99
    Hunter Valley

    Hunter Valley

    The Hunter Region, more commonly known as the Hunter Valley, is a region of New South Wales, Australia, extending from approximately 120 km (75 mi) to 310 km (193 mi) north of Sydney. Most of the population of the Hunter Region lives within 25 km (16 mi) of the coast, with 55% of the entire population living in the cities of Newcastle and Lake Macquarie. There are numerous other towns and villages scattered across the valley in the eleven Local Government Areas that make up the region. The eleven LGAs are: At the 2011 the combined population of all LGAs in the region was 620,530. The Hunter Region contains the Hunter River and its tributaries with highland areas to the north and south. The Hunter Valley is one of the largest river valleys on the NSW coast, and is most commonly known for its wineries and coal industry. The main river is the Hunter River, after which the region is named. There are several other rivers including the Williams, Karuah, Chichester, Goulburn, Pages, Paterson, Avon and Gloucester. Fresh water supply for the region is provided from a number of sources. Glenbawn, Chichester and Lostock are dams on the Hunter, Chichester and Paterson rivers respectively.
    9.00
    1 votes
    100
    Jura

    Jura

    Jura (French pronunciation: [ʒyʁa]) is a department in the east of France named after the Jura mountains. Historically, Jura belonged to the Free County of Burgundy, known in French as the Franche-Comté. Dole was the capital until the region was conquered by Louis XIV and it was moved to Besançon. It is now a sous-préfecture of Jura. As early as the 13th century, inhabitants of the southern 2/3 of Jura spoke a dialect of Arpitan language. It continued to be spoken in rural areas into the 20th century. Jura is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution on March 4, 1790. It was created from part of the former province of Franche-Comté. The departments of Jura, Doubs, and Haute-Saône form the modern Franche-Comté region of France. The prefecture (capital) is Lons-le-Saunier. Jura is one of four departments of the Franche-Comté region and is surrounded by the French departments of Doubs, Haute-Saône, Côte-d'Or, Saône-et-Loire, and Ain, as well as the Swiss canton of Vaud on the east. The Jura mountains are wooded and rolling, not craggy and rocky like the Alps. Many lakes can be found throughout the Jura - the largest natural lake being Lac de Chalain,
    9.00
    1 votes
    101
    Languedoc-Roussillon

    Languedoc-Roussillon

    • Wines: Le Petit Merle aux Alouettes
    Languedoc-Roussillon (French pronunciation: [lɑ̃ɡdɔk ʁusijɔ̃]; Occitan: Lengadòc-Rosselhon; Catalan: Llenguadoc-Rosselló) is one of the 27 regions of France. It comprises five departments, and borders the other French regions of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, Rhône-Alpes, Auvergne, Midi-Pyrénées on the one side, and Spain, Andorra and the Mediterranean Sea on the other side. The region is made up of the following historical provinces: Llívia is a town of Cerdanya, province of Girona, Catalonia, Spain, that forms a Spanish exclave surrounded by French territory (Pyrénées-Orientales département). At the regional elections in March 2004, the socialist mayor of Montpellier Georges Frêche, a maverick in French politics, defeated its center-right president. Since then, Georges Frêche has embarked on a complete overhaul of the region and its institutions. The flag of the region, which displayed the cross of Languedoc as well as the Flag of Roussillon (the "Senyera"), was changed for a new flag with no reference to the old provinces, except in terms of the colors (red and yellow), which are the colors of both Languedoc and all the territories from the former Crown of Aragon. Georges Frêche
    9.00
    1 votes
    102
    9.00
    1 votes
    104
    9.00
    1 votes
    105
    Utiel-Requena

    Utiel-Requena

    • Wines: White Wine
    Utiel Requena is a Spanish Denominación de Origen (DO) for wines located in the province of Valencia (Valencian Community). It takes its name from the two neighbouring towns of Utiel and Requena. It is renowned for the predominant use of the Bobal grape variety. Archaeological finds in ancient Iberian settlements such as the one at Villares show that grape growing and wine production in the area dates from at least the 7th century BC. In the 1st century BC, the ancient Romans, after defeating the Carthaginians, settled the area and introduced new wine making techniques. During the Moorish dominion of the Iberian Peninsula, wine production was tolerated, even though it was forbidden by the Koran. The first written references to vineyards and wine date from the 15th century. During the course of the 17th and 18th centuries, population and the areas under vineyards increased, and some distilleries are known to have operated. The 19th century was the golden age for the Utiel-Requena area as the number of vineyards increased even more. In 1847, communications with the port of Valencia were improved and in 1887 a railway line connected Utiel with Valencia. The renowned Bodega Redonda
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    107
    Alentejo

    Alentejo

    • Wines: Loios
    • Wine styles: Alentejo Wines
    Alentejo (Portuguese pronunciation: [ɐlẽˈtɛʒu]) is a south-central region of Portugal. The origin of its name, "Além-Tejo", literally translates to "Beyond the Tagus" or "Across the Tagus". The region is separated from the rest of Portugal by the Tagus river, and extends to the south where it borders the Algarve. Alentejo is a region known for its polyphonic singing groups, comparable to those found on Sardinia and Corsica. Its main cities are Évora, Elvas, Portalegre, Beja, Serpa and Sines. Being a traditional region, it is also one of the more recent seven Regions of Portugal (NUTS II subdivisions). Today Lezíria do Tejo subregion, formerly belonging to Lisboa e Vale do Tejo region, is part of Alentejo NUTS II region. The comarca of the Alentejo became the Alentejo Province, divided into upper (Alto Alentejo Province) and lower (Baixo Alentejo Province) designations. The modern region of the Alentejo was expropriated from the medieval provinces and historical territories of Estremadura Province (specifically the 1936 portions of the Ribatejo). Topographically the countryside varies considerably, from the open rolling plains of the south of the Alentejo to the granite hills that
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    3 votes
    108
    Barbaresco

    Barbaresco

    • Wine styles: Barbaresco
    Barbaresco is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Cuneo in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 50 km southeast of Turin and about 60 km northeast of Cuneo. As of 31 December 2004, it had a population of 656 and an area of 7.6 km². Barbaresco borders the following municipalities: Alba, Castagnito, Guarene, Neive, and Treiso.
    6.67
    3 votes
    109
    Bourgogne

    Bourgogne

    • Wines: 2004 Domaine Prieur Brunet Jehanne de Chantal
    Burgundy (French: Bourgogne, IPA: [buʁ.ɡɔɲ] ( listen)) is one of the 27 regions of France. The name comes from the Burgundians, an ancient Germanic people who settled in the area during the early Middle Ages. The region of Burgundy is both larger than the old Duchy of Burgundy and smaller than the area ruled by the Dukes of Burgundy, from the modern Netherlands to the border of Auvergne. Burgundy is made up of the following old provinces: The climate of this region is essentially oceanic (Cfb in Köppen classification), with a continental influence (sometimes called a "half-continental climate"). Burgundy was inhabited in turn by Celts, Romans (Gallo-Romans), and in the 4th century, the Roman allies the Burgundians, a Germanic people possibly originating in Bornholm (Baltic Sea), who settled there and established their own kingdom. However, Agathias identifies Burgunds (Βουρουγουνδοι) and Ultizurs as Bulgaric people of Hunnic circle tribes, near relatives of Turkic Cotrigurs and Utigurs. This Burgundian kingdom was conquered in the 6th century by another Germanic tribe, the Franks who continued the kingdom of Burgundy under their own rule. Later, the region was divided between the
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    Napa Valley

    Napa Valley

    • Wines: 1991 Ravenswood Dickerson Vineyard Napa Valley Zinfandel
    Napa Valley AVA is an American Viticultural Area located in Napa County, California, United States. Napa Valley is considered one of the premier wine regions in the world. Records of commercial wine production in the region date back to the nineteenth century, but premium wine production dates back only to the 1960s. The combination of Mediterranean climate, geography and geology of the region are conducive to growing quality wine grapes. John Patchett established the Napa Valley's first commercial vineyard in 1858. In 1861 Charles Krug established another of Napa Valley's first commercial wineries in St. Helena. Viticulture in Napa suffered several setbacks in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including an outbreak of the vine disease phylloxera, the institution of Prohibition, and the Great Depression. The wine industry in Napa Valley recovered, and helped by the results of the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976, came to be seen as capable of producing the best quality wine - equal to that of Old World wine regions. Napa Valley is now a major enotourism destination. The valley floor is flanked by the Mayacamas Mountain Range on the western and northern sides the Vaca Mountains on
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    3 votes
    115
    New York City

    New York City

    • Wines: Ice wine
    New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. The city is referred to as New York City or The City of New York to distinguish it from the State of New York, of which it is a part. A global power city, New York exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the United Nations Headquarters, New York is an important center for international diplomacy and has been described as the cultural capital of the world. Located on one of the world's largest natural harbors, New York City consists of five boroughs, each of which is a state county. The five boroughs—The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island—were consolidated into a single city in 1898. With a Census-estimated 2011 population of 8,244,910 distributed over a land area of just 305 square miles (790 km), New York is the most densely populated major city in the United States. As many as 800 languages are spoken in New York, making it the most linguistically diverse city in the world. The New York City Metropolitan
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    3 votes
    116

    Península de Setúbal

    • Wines: 2003 Joao Pires Vinho Regional Terras do Sado
    The Península de Setúbal is a NUTS III subdivision of Lisbon Region (NUTS II), in Portugal. The subregion's administrative center is Setúbal, and the largest cities are Almada and Setúbal. It takes its name from the Setúbal Peninsula. Area: 1,729 km². Population (2001): 714,589 inhabitants. It is composed of nine municipalities: Almada, Setúbal, Amora, Barreiro, Seixal, Montijo and Costa da Caparica. Sesimbra,Moita,Palmela,Alcochete, Corroios, Pinhal Novo, Monte da Caparica, Charneca da Caparica, Trafaria, Lavradio and Baixa da Banheira
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    6.67
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    118

    Sauternes

    Sauternes is a commune in the Gironde department in Aquitaine in southwestern France. It is also a wine region within the Graves portion of Bordeaux that produces sweet white dessert wines, named "Sauternes" after the commune, as well as some dry white wine.
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    119
    6.67
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    120
    Barossa Valley

    Barossa Valley

    The Barossa Valley is one of Australia's oldest wine regions. Located in South Australia, the Barossa Valley is about 56km (35 miles) northeast of the city of Adelaide. Unlike most of Australia whose wine industry was heavily influenced by the British, the wine industry of the Barossa Valley was founded by German settlers fleeing persecution from the Prussian province of Silesia (in what is now modern day Poland). The hot continental climate of the region promoted the production of very ripe grapes that was the linchpin of the early Australian fortified wine industry. As the modern Australian wine industry shifted towards red table wines (particularly those made by the prestigious Cabernet Sauvignon) in the mid-20th century, the Barossa Valley fell out of favor due to its reputation for being largely a Shiraz producers whose grapes were destined for blending. During this period the name "Barossa Valley" rarely appeared on wine labels. In the 1980s, the emergence of several boutique family specializing in old vine Shiraz wines began to capture international attention for the distinctive style of Barossa Shiraz, a full bodied red wine with rich chocolate and spice notes. This led to
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Constantia, Cape Town

    Constantia, Cape Town

    • Wine styles: Constantia
    Constantia is an affluent suburb of Cape Town, South Africa, situated about 15 kilometres south of the centre of Cape Town. The Constantia Valley lies to the east of and at the foot of the Constantiaberg mountain. Constantia Nek is a low pass linking to Hout Bay in the west. Constantia is one of the oldest suburbs of Cape Town and is famed for its wine. The estate of Groot Constantia (Great Constantia) was established in 1684 by the Dutch Colonial Governor of Cape Town, Simon van der Stel. Other notable wine farms in the area include the oldest estate, Steenberg (Mountain of Stone), established in 1682, Buitenverwachting (Beyond Expectations), Klein Constantia (Small Constantia) and Constantia Uitsig (View of Constantia). Before the twentieth century, the region was noted for its exports of Vin De Constance a sweet dessert wine. Many years ago the trade was crippled by the arrival in the Cape of a parasite that attacked the vines. In 1661, during the Dutch conquest of Sumatra, Sheik Abdurachman Matebe Shah and his companion Sheikh Mahmoud were banished to Constantia by the Dutch. Sheik Abdurachman is regarded as one of the three people that first brought Islam to South Africa. The
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Cuyo

    Cuyo

    • Wines: 2006 Merlot Altosur
    Cuyo is the name given to the wine-producing, mountainous area of central-west Argentina. Historically it comprised the provinces of San Juan, San Luis and Mendoza. The term New Cuyo is a modern one, which indicates both Cuyo proper and the province of La Rioja. New Cuyo is a political and economic macroregion, but culturally La Rioja is part of the North-West rather than Cuyo. Cuyo has some of the most popular tourist attractions in Argentina and the highest mountain massifs in the Andes, including Aconcagua itself, the highest peak outside Asia, and the Ischigualasto Provincial Park. The soil is arid and reddish, crossed by few rivers. Most of the rivers are fed by the thawing of snow on the peaks, and their volume of water increases considerably in spring. The Desaguadero River is the main collector, receiving waters from the Bermejo, Vinchina and Salado before reaching the Colorado River. Viticulture is one of the main activities of the area. The wine production of the region represents almost 80% of national production, and the wines are highly considered in the world. Olives, potatoes, tomatoes and some fruits are also cultivated, and there is production of sweets and
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    2 votes
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    Marlborough

    Marlborough

    • Wines: 2003 Cloudy Bay Sauvignon Blanc
    Marlborough is one of the regions of New Zealand, located in the northeast of the South Island. Marlborough is a unitary authority, both a region and a district, and its council is located at Blenheim. Marlborough is known for its dry climate, the picturesque Marlborough Sounds, and Sauvignon Blanc wine. Marlborough's geography can be roughly divided into four sections. Two of these sections, in the south and the west, are mountainous. This is particularly true of the southern section, which rises to the peaks of the Kaikoura Ranges. These two mountainous regions are the final northern vestiges of the ranges that make up the Southern Alps, although that name is rarely applied to mountains this far north. Between these two areas is the long straight valley of the Wairau River. This broadens to wide plains at its eastern end, in the centre of which stands the town of Blenheim. This region has fertile soil and temperate weather, and as such has become a centre of the New Zealand wine industry. Marlborough's fourth geographic zone lies along its north coast. Here, the drowned valleys of the Marlborough Sounds make for a convoluted and attractive coastline. The town of Picton is located
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    2 votes
    127
    Médoc

    Médoc

    The Médoc (French pronunciation: [medɔk]; Gascon: Medòc [meˈðok]) is a region of France, well known as a wine growing region, located in the département of Gironde, on the left bank of the Gironde estuary, north of Bordeaux. Its name comes from (Pagus) Medullicus, or "country of the Medulli", the local Celtic tribe. The region owes its economic success mainly to the production of red wine; it is home to around 1,500 vineyards. The area also has pine forests and long sandy beaches. The Médoc's geography is not ideal for wine growing, with its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean resulting in a comparatively mild climate and high rainfall making rot a constant problem. It is generally believed that the nature of the region's wine derives from the soil; although the terrain is flat, excellent drainage is a necessity and the increased amount of gravel in the soil allows heat to be retained, encouraging ripening, and extensive root systems. With the exception of Château Haut-Brion from Graves, all of the red wines in the 1855 Classification are from the Médoc. Many of the Médoc wines that are not in this classification are classified using the (defunct as of 2007) Cru Bourgeois system.
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    2 votes
    128

    New South Wales

    • Wines: Tarrango
    New South Wales (abbreviated as NSW), is Australia's most populous state, and is located in the south-east of the country, north of Victoria, south of Queensland, east of South Australia, west of Jervis Bay Territory and encompasses the whole of the Australian Capital Territory. The colony of New South Wales was founded in 1788 and originally comprised much of the Australian mainland, as well as Van Diemen's Land, Lord Howe Island and Norfolk Island in addition to the area currently referred to as the state of New South Wales, which was formed during Federation in 1901. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welsh or New South Welshmen. New South Wales's largest city and capital is Sydney. New South Wales produces roughly one third (33%) of Australia's grape crush. With 3/4 of that being from the large inland irrigation region of the Riverina in the Murray Darling river basin. Grapes cuttings were brought with the First Fleet in 1788, several failed attempts at planting vineyards in the early settlements. It was not until Scottish born statesman James Busby first successfully planted vines in the Hunter Valley of NSW that the Australian wine industry got off to a start. His vines were collected over a period of three months travelling through Spain and France in 1831. The unique Australian nomenclature of Shiraz, to represent the Syrah vine dates back to the original Hermitage vine cuttings Busby collected in his travels. Australia doesn't apply strict appellation laws, varieties may be grown in any region and declared on the label. The label integrity law stipulates that 85% of the finished wine in the bottle must originate from the variety declared and the region stated on either the front or back label.
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    Provence wine

    Provence (Provençal) wine comes from the French wine-producing region of Provence in southeast France. The Romans called the area provincia nostra ("our province"), giving the region its name. Just south of the Alps, it was the first Roman province outside Italy. Wine has been made in this region for at least 2,600 years, ever since the ancient Greeks founded the city of Marseille in 600 BC. Throughout the region's history, viticulture and winemaking have been influenced by the cultures that have been present in Provence, which include the Ancient Greeks, Romans, Gauls, Catalans and Savoyards. These diverse groups introduced a large variety of grapes to the region, including grape varieties of Greek and Roman origin as well as Spanish, Italian and traditional French wine grapes. Today the region is known predominantly for its rosé wine, though wine critics such as Tom Stevenson believe that region's best wines are the spicy, full-flavoured red wines. Rosé wine currently accounts for more than half of the production of Provençal wine, with red wine accounting for about a third of the region's production. White wine is also produced in small quantities throughout the region with the
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    5.25
    4 votes
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    1 votes
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    Goulburn Valley

    Goulburn Valley

    The Goulburn Valley is a region of Victoria, Australia. The region consists of those areas in the catchment of the Goulburn River and other nearby streams, and is part of the Murray-Darling Basin. The Goulburn Valley is bordered on the south by the Great Dividing Range and to the north by the Murray River, the state border with New South Wales. The region is one of Australia's most productive and intensively farmed areas and is predominantly irrigated. The major regional centre of the Goulburn Valley is the city of Shepparton. Other important regional centres include Echuca, Benalla, Yarrawonga, Kyabram and Seymour. Major transport routes through the Goulburn Valley region include the Goulburn Valley Highway, Midland Highway and the Murray Valley Highway. Passenger rail services are provided from Melbourne to Shepparton and Echuca by V/Line. Aboriginal groups inhabited the Goulburn Valley region prior to European settlement. In the central Goulburn around Nagambie, these groups are said to have included the Natrakboolok, Ngooraialum or Thagungwurung tribes. Downstream, at Shepparton, the area was inhabited by the Yorta Yorta people. Industries in the Goulburn Valley include
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Great Southern region of Western Australia

    Great Southern region of Western Australia

    The Great Southern region is one of the nine regions of Western Australia. It is a section of the larger South Coast of Western Australia and neighbouring agricultural regions. It officially comprises the local government areas of Albany, Broomehill-Tambellup, Cranbrook, Denmark, Gnowangerup, Jerramungup, Katanning, Kent, Kojonup, Plantagenet and Woodanilling. The Great Southern has an area of 39,007 square kilometres (15,061 sq mi) and a population of about 54,000. Its administrative centre is the historic port of Albany. The region has a Mediterranean climate, with hot, dry summers and cool, wet winters. The economy of the Great Southern is dominated by livestock farming and crop-growing. It has some of the most productive cereal grain and pastoral land in the state, and is a major producer of wool and lamb. Albany is a major fishing centre. The Great Southern coast, which has milder summer weather than areas on the west coast proper, is also a popular destination for holidaymakers, tourists, anglers and surfers. Albany is home to the Kalgan River which is associated with riverboats, from 1918 to 1935 with the Silver Star which lowered its funnel to get under a bridge, and today
    8.00
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    Rutherglen

    Rutherglen

    Rutherglen  pronunciation (help·info) is a small town in north-eastern Victoria, Australia, near the Murray River border with New South Wales. The town was named after the Scottish town of Rutherglen which lies just outside Glasgow. At the 2006 census, Rutherglen had a population of 1,990. Rutherglen is located north of Wangaratta and west of Wodonga, just 10 kilometres from the Murray River at the state border towns of Wahgunyah and Corowa. Originally a gold-mining town of the mid-19th century, Rutherglen Post Office opening on 1 November 1860, it has since developed into a major wine producing area, with 17 wineries all located within a short drive from the town centre,the best of which are highly regarded by wine critics (Halliday, Parker). The muscat and tokay styles are sometimes described as having no worldwide equal. The region produces a good port style of fortified wine. The largest winery in the region is the All Saints Winery, located just a short drive north-west outside of Wahgunyah. Established in 1864, it features landscaped gardens, ponds, a restaurant and wine tasting facilities. The Rutherglen Wine Experience Visitor Information Centre, located in the town centre
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    1 votes
    143

    Trãs os Montes

    Trás os Montes is a village situated at the northern part of Santiago Island in Cape Verde. It is part of the municipality of Tarrafal. The village is linked with the road linking to the Tarrafal-Praia and is east of Tarrafal and approximately 95 km north of Praia, the national capital. The area around Trãs os Montes are made up of farmlands around the villages with dry grass and barren soil elsewhere. Crops, groves and pastures covers the valley areas. The nearby mountain has one of the most angle and slopes on Cape Verde, its slopes is at 80° making it climbable only since there are no roads on the treacherous mountain. Many houses were built in the late-20th century, many homes are built with mud and brick as well as stone which was common until the mid-20th century. The living standards are in the low range as well as its income, one time, there were no money until the mid-20th century. The village is in the island's low to middle. Much of the population are farmers and are based in agriculture where banana plantations, pineapple, livestock and other crops including fruits and vegetables are common, the rest works in shops, ports and other businesses including its ports,
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Wrattonbully

    Wrattonbully

    Wrattonbully is a wine region and farming district in South Australia's South East, between the Padthaway and Coonawarra regions, between the Riddoch Highway and the Victorian border. The Wrattonbully wine region lies over several ranges in the area surrounding Naracoorte, including the Naracoorte Range (also known as the Kanawinka escarpment – the original coastline of the continent of Gondwana). Wrattonbully is a region of ancient World Heritage-listed geology, which in more recent times has been chosen to establish a successful wine region due to its outstanding viticultural attributes. The first vines for winegrapes were planted in the late 1960s; however it was in the 1990s that the excellent soils and elevated sites attracted many winemakers from surrounding areas. The region now draws winemakers and the attention of wine connoisseurs from around the world. Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz are the two main varieties grown, and Wrattonbully wines of these varieties are highly regarded for their complexity and elegance. Merlot and Chardonnay are also widely grown with great success - in fact the cool climate of the Wrattonbully wine region is proving suitable for many
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    145
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    146
    Marin County

    Marin County

    Marin County ( /məˈrɪn/) is a county located in the North San Francisco Bay Area of the US state of California, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco. As of 2010, the population was 252,409. The county seat is San Rafael and the largest employer is the county government. Marin County is well known for its natural beauty, liberal politics, and affluence. In May 2009, the county had the fifth highest income per capita in the United States at $91,483. The county is governed by local cities and the Marin County Board of Supervisors. San Quentin Prison is located in the county, as is Skywalker Ranch. Autodesk, the publisher of AutoCAD, is also located there, as well as numerous other high-tech companies. The headquarters of film and media company Lucasfilm Ltd., previously based in San Rafael, have moved to the Presidio of San Francisco. The Marin County Civic Center was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and draws thousands of visitors a year to guided tours of its arch and atrium design. In 1994, a new county jail facility was embedded into the hillside nearby. America's oldest cross country running event, the Dipsea Race, takes place annually in Marin County, attracting
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Montalcino

    Montalcino

    • Wines: 2005 Poggiarellino Rosso di Montalcino
    • Wine styles: Brunello di Montalcino
    Montalcino is a hilltown and comune in Tuscany, Italy. It is famous for its Brunello di Montalcino wine. The town is located to the west of Pienza, close to the Crete Senesi in Val d'Orcia. It is 42 km from Siena, 110 km from Florence and 150 km from Pisa. The Monte Amiata is located nearby. The hill upon which Montalcino sits has been settled probably since Etruscan times. Its first mention in historical documents in 814 AD suggests there was a church here in the 9th century, most likely built by monks who were associated with the nearby Abbey of Sant'Antimo. The population grew suddenly in the middle of the tenth century when people fleeing the nearby town of Roselle took up residence in the town. The town takes its name from a variety of oak tree that once covered the terrain. The very high site of the town offers stunning views over the Asso, Ombrone and Arbia valleys of Tuscany, dotted with silvery olive orchards, vineyards, fields and villages. The lower slopes of the Montalcino hill itself are dominated by highly productive vines and olive orchards. During medieval times the city was known for its tanneries and for the shoes and other leather goods that were made from the
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    2 votes
    148

    Swan Valley, Western Australia

    The Swan Valley is a region in the upper reaches of the Swan River between Guildford and Bells Rapids, Western Australia. It is bordered to the east by the Darling Scarp. Both Ellen Brook and Jane Brook lie within the region and discharge into the Swan River. There are 14 suburbs within the region including Herne Hill, Baskerville, Henley Brook, Caversham, Upper Swan, Brigadoon and Whiteman; It occurs in the City of Swan local government area. The area was explored in 1827 by Captain James Stirling later to become governor of the Swan River Colony. Stirling was so impressed with the area the he wrote in his diary:. When Stirling returned to establish the colony in 1829 he created three settlements: Fremantle as the port; Perth as the major commercial and political centre; and Guildford on the southern end of the Swan Valley region. Descendants of many of the early families still reside within the shire. Within the first ten years, two of Perth's oldest churches had been built there: the first was St. Mary's Church in Middle Swan, followed by All Saints Church, Henley Brook built at the site of Stirling's 1827 camp. St. Mary's was rebuilt in 1869 but All Saints still retains its
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    2 votes
    150
    Mendocino County

    Mendocino County

    Mendocino County is a county located on the north coast of the U.S. state of California, north of the greater San Francisco Bay Area and west of the Central Valley. As of the 2010 census, the population was 87,841, up from 86,265 at the 2000 census. The county seat is Ukiah. The county is noted for its distinctive Pacific Ocean coastline, Redwood forests, wine production, microbrews, and liberal views about the use of cannabis and support for its legalization. It is estimated that roughly two-thirds of the economy is based on the cultivation of marijuana. The notable historic and recreational attraction of the "Skunk Train" connects Fort Bragg with Willits in Mendocino County via steam-locomotive trains and other vehicles. Mendocino County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. Due to an initially low population, it did not have a separate government until 1859 and was under the administration of Sonoma County prior to that. The county derives its name from Cape Mendocino, which was probably named in honor of either Antonio de Mendoza, Viceroy of New Spain, 1535–1542 (who sent the Juan Cabrillo Expedition to this coast in 1542), or
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    151
    Mudgee

    Mudgee

    Mudgee ( /ˈmʌdʒi/) is a town in the central west of New South Wales, Australia. It is in the broad fertile Cudgegong River valley 261 kilometres north-west of Sydney. Mudgee is the centre of the Mid-Western Regional Council Local Government Area. At the 2011 census, Mudgee had a population of 9,830 people. The Mudgee district lies across the edge of the geological structure known as the Sydney Basin. The Mudgee district is well known for its fine wine. Mudgee has developed as a wine producing region and is a popular destination for tourists, who visit the forty wineries operating in the Mudgee district. Other rural produce includes cattle, sheep, wheat, lucerne, olives, fruit, tomatoes, corn, honey and dairy products. The Ulan coal mines are in the district. During the 19th century, the area was a major goldmining area and the district also produces marble, pottery clays, shale and dolomite. The tourism industry is also a growing industry based largely on the wineries. A laboratory was established in 1987 to test meat for pesticide residues. Mudgee has a hospitality sector with many bed & breakfast establishments, cafés and restaurants, which add flair to its diverse wine
    6.00
    3 votes
    152
    Riverina

    Riverina

    The Riverina ( /rɪvəˈriːnə/) is an agricultural region of south-western New South Wales (NSW), Australia. The Riverina is distinguished from other Australian regions by the combination of flat plains, warm to hot climate and an ample supply of water for irrigation. This combination has allowed the Riverina to develop into one of the most productive and agriculturally diverse areas of Australia. Bordered on the south by the state of Victoria and on the east by the Great Dividing Range, the Riverina covers those areas of New South Wales in the Murray and Murrumbidgee drainage zones to their confluence in the west. Home to Aboriginal groups for over 40,000 years, the Riverina was originally settled by Europeans in the mid-19th century as a pastoral region providing beef and wool to markets in Australia and beyond. In the 20th century, the development of major irrigation areas in the Murray and Murrumbidgee valleys has led to the introduction of crops such as rice and wine grapes. The Riverina has strong cultural ties to Victoria, and the region was the source of much of the impetus behind the federation of Australian colonies. Major population and service centres in the Riverina
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    153
    Alba

    Alba

    • Wine styles: Dolcetto d'Alba
    Alba (Latin: Alba Pompeia) is a town and comune of Piedmont, Italy, in the province of Cuneo. It is considered the capital of the hilly area of Langhe, and is famous for its white truffle, peach and wine production. The confectionery group Ferrero is based in Alba. Alba's origins date from before the Roman civilization, connected probably to the presence of Celt and Ligurian tribes in the area. The modern town occupies the site of ancient Alba Pompeia, the name given after being officially recognized as a town by the Roman consul Gnaeus Pompeius Strabo while constructing a road from Aquae Statiellae (Acqui) to Augusta Taurinorum (Turin). Alba was the birthplace of Publius Helvius Pertinax, briefly Roman emperor in 193. After the fall of the Western Empire, the city was repeatedly sacked by Burgundians, Lombards and Franks. In the 11th century it become a free commune (or city-state) and was a member of the Lombard League. Montferrat and the Visconti fought over the town; later it became a possession of the Gonzaga. Charles Emmanuel I of Savoy conquered it twice, while later France and Spain battled for its possession. The Treaty of Cherasco (1631) assigned Alba definitively to
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    6.50
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    157
    British Columbia

    British Columbia

    • Wines: Adora Estate Winery Chardonnay 2003
    British Columbia /ˌbrɪtɪʃ kəˈlʌmbiə/ (B.C. or BC) (French: la Colombie-Britannique, C.-B.) is the westernmost of Canada's provinces. Its name was chosen by Queen Victoria in 1858 and, in 1871, it became the sixth province of Canada. Its Latin motto is Splendor sine occasu ("Splendour without Diminishment"). As well as being the westernmost province of Western Canada, British Columbia is also a component of the Pacific Northwest, along with the US states of Oregon and Washington. The province has strong cultural and personal ties to the Canadian Prairies and Ontario as well as to the West Coast of the United States and to Alaska and the Yukon. The capital of British Columbia is Victoria, the 15th largest metropolitan region in Canada, named for Canada's Queen at Confederation. The largest city is Vancouver, the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada, the largest in Western Canada, and the second largest in the Pacific Northwest. In 2009, British Columbia had an estimated population of 4,419,974 (about two and a half million of whom were in Greater Vancouver). The province is currently governed by the BC Liberal Party, led by Premier Christy Clark, who became leader as a result of
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    158
    New South Wales wine

    New South Wales wine

    New South Wales wine is Australian wine produced in New South Wales, Australia. New South Wales is Australia's most populous state and its wine consumption far out paces the region's wine production. The Hunter Valley, located 130 km (81 mi) north of Sydney, is the most well known wine region but the majority of the state's production takes place in the Big Rivers Zone-Perricoota, Riverina and along the Darling and Murray Rivers. The wines produced from the Big Rivers zone are largely used in box wine and mass produced wine brands such as Yellow Tail. A large variety of grapes are grown in New South Wales-including Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Shiraz and Sémillon. New South Wales is the second largest wine producing state in Australia, accounting for 30% of the $AUD5 billion Australian wine industry In 1994 the various wine regions within New South Wales agreed there was a need to form a peak lobby group to act as the conduit between industry and the New South Wales Government, and to represent New South Wales at the Federal level through the Winemakers Federation of Australia Inc. This body is the New South Wales Wine Industry Association. The 800,642 km (309,130 sq mi) of
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    New York

    New York

    • Wines: 2005 Martha Clara Vineyards North Fork Pinot Grigio
    New York (/nuː ˈjɔrk/; locally IPA: [nɪu ˈjɔək]) is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. New York is the 27th most extensive, the 3rd most populous, and the 7th most densely populated of the 50 United States. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east. The state has a maritime border with Rhode Island east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Ontario to the west and north, and Quebec to the north. The state of New York is often referred to as New York State to distinguish it from New York City. New York City, with a population of over 8.1 million, is the most populous city in the United States. Alone, it makes up over 40 percent of the population of New York state. It is known for its status as a center for finance and culture and for its status as the largest gateway for immigration to the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, New York City is also a destination of choice for many foreign visitors. Both the state and city were named for the 17th century Duke of York, James Stuart, future James II and VII of England
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    Portugal

    Portugal

    • Wine styles: Lancers
    Portugal /ˈpɔrtʃʉɡəl/ (Portuguese: Portugal, IPA: [puɾtuˈɣaɫ]; Mirandese: Pertual), officially the Portuguese Republic (Portuguese: República Portuguesa, Mirandese: República Pertuesa) is a country located in Southwestern Europe, on the Iberian Peninsula. It is the westernmost country of mainland Europe, and is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the west and south and by Spain to the north and east. The Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira are Portuguese territory as well. The country is named after its second largest city, Porto, whose Latin name was Portus Cale. The land within the borders of the current Portuguese Republic has been continuously settled since prehistoric times. In the 8th century most of the Iberian Peninsula was conquered by Moorish invaders professing Islam, which were later expelled by the Knights Templar. During the Christian Reconquista, Portugal established itself as an independent kingdom from León in 1139, claiming to be the oldest European nation-state. In the 15th and 16th centuries, as the result of pioneering the Age of Discovery, Portugal expanded western influence and established the first global empire, becoming one of the world's major
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    Western Australia

    The Swan Valley established in 1829 by Thomas Waters is the historical centre for wine production in Western Australia, however the states cooler climate south-western wine regions such as Margaret River, and The Great Southern are considered to be more significant due to the Swan Valley being noted as one of the hottest viticultural regions in the world. Partly because of this, and as a reaction to the emergence of the Margaret River and Great Southern regions spanning the far south western corner of the state a large number of producers have deserted the area with the numbers of vineyards shrinking. In the year 1970, 90 percent of the state's wine was made from grapes grown in the Swan Valley; by 1980 the figure was 59 percent; by 1996 it was 15 percent and still falling.
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    Lesbos Island

    Lesbos Island

    • Wine styles: Lesbian wine
    Lesbos (Greek pronunciation: [ˈle̞zvo̞s]) (Greek: Λέσβος, transliterated as Lesvos, sometimes also referred to as Mytilini after its major city Mytilene) is a Greek island located in the northeastern Aegean Sea. It has an area of 1,632 km (630 sq mi) with 320 kilometres (almost 200 miles) of coastline, making it the third largest Greek island. It is separated from Turkey by the narrow Mytilini Strait. Lesbos is a separate regional unit of the North Aegean region, and the only municipality of the regional unit. Its population is approximately 90,000, a third of which lives in its capital, Mytilene, in the southeastern part of the island. The remaining population is distributed in small towns and villages. The largest are Kalloni, the Gera Villages, Plomari, Agiassos, Eresos, and Molyvos (the ancient Mythymna). Mytilene was founded in the 11th century BC by the family Penthilidae, who arrived from Thessaly, and ruled the city-state until a popular revolt (590–580 BC) led by Pittacus of Mytilene ended their rule. In early Middle Ages, it was under Byzantine and Genovese rule. Lesbos was conquered by the Ottoman Empire in 1462, who ruled the island until the First Balkan War in 1912,
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    Margaret River

    Margaret River is the foremost Geographical Indication wine region in the South West Australia Zone, with nearly 5,500 hectares under vine and over 138 wineries as at 2008. Margaret River wine region is made up predominately of boutique size wine producers; although winery operations range from the smallest crushing 3.5 tonne per year to the largest around 7000 tonne. The climate of Margaret River is more strongly maritime-influenced than any other major Australian region. It has the lowest mean annual temperature range, of only 7.6C, and for good measure has the most marked Mediterranean climate in terms of rainfall, with only 200 millimetres of the annual 1160 millimetres falling between October and April. The low diurnal and seasonal temperature range means an unusually even accumulation of warmth. Overall the climate is similar to that of Bordeaux in a dry vintage. Although the region produces just three percent of total Australian grape production, it produces over 20 percent of Australia's premium wine market. The principal grape varieties are fairly evenly split between red and white; Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, Shiraz, Merlot, Chenin Blanc and
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    Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

    Mosel is one of 13 German wine regions (Weinbaugebiete) for quality wines (QbA and Prädikatswein), and takes its name from the Moselle River (German: Mosel). Before 1 August 2007 the region was called Mosel-Saar-Ruwer, but changed to a name that was considered more consumer-friendly. The wine region is Germany's third largest in terms of production but is the leading region in terms of international prestige. The region covers the valleys of the rivers Moselle, Saar, and Ruwer near Koblenz and Trier in the federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. The area is known for the steep slopes of the region's vineyards overlooking the river. At 65° degrees incline, the steepest recorded vineyard in the world is the Calmont vineyard located on the Mosel and belonging to the village of Bremm, and therefore referred to as Bremmer Calmont. The Mosel is mainly famous for its wines made from the Riesling grape, but Elbling and Müller-Thurgau also contributes to the production. Because of the northerly location of Mosel, the Riesling wines are often light, low in alcohol, crisp and high in acidity, and often exhibit "flowery" rather than "fruity" aromas. It is believed that viticulture was brought
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    Tufo

    • Wine styles: Greco di Tufo
    Tufo is a town and comune in the province of Avellino, Campania, southern Italy. As of 2009 its population was of 938. The name of the town derives from the tuff , the volcanic rock that is widely present in the subsoil of the whole area of the country. Situated in the geographical region of Irpinia, it has an area of approximately five square kilometers and a population density of 190 people per square kilometer. Tufo is bordered by the municipalities Altavilla Irpina, Petruro Irpino, Prata di Principato Ultra, Santa Paolina and Torrioni. The Sabato river flows south of the town. The town has given its name to the pouplar white wine known as "Greco di Tufo" (Greek of Tufo).
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    Carmignano

    • Wine styles: Carmignano
    Carmignano is an Italian wine region located in the Tuscany region and centered around the city of Carmignano, about 10 miles (16 kilometers) northwest of Florence. Noted for the quality of its wines since the Middle Ages, Carmignano was identified by Cosimo III de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany as one of the superior wine producing areas of Tuscany and granted special legal protections in 1716. In the 18th century, the producers of the Carmignano region developed a tradition of blending Sangiovese with Cabernet Sauvignon, long before the practice became popularized by the "Super Tuscan" of the late 20th century. In 1975, the region was awarded Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) status and subsequently promoted to Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) status in 1990 (retroactive to the 1988 vintage. Today Carmignano has approximately 270 acres (110 ha) planted, producing nearly 71,500 gallons ( 2,700 hectoliters) of DOCG designated wine a year. Wine has been produced in the Carmignano region since Roman times. During the Middle Ages, the area was widely reputed for the quality of it wines, something that the local ruling Medici would take pride in during
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    Washington

    Washington

    • Wines: 2005 Cadence "Coda" Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon
    Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/) is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States located north of Oregon, west of Idaho and south of the Canadian province of British Columbia, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. Washington was carved out of the western part of Washington Territory which had been ceded by Britain in 1846 by the Oregon Treaty as settlement of the Oregon Boundary Dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Washington is the 18th most extensive and the 13th most populous of the 50 United States. Approximately 60 percent of Washington's residents live in the Seattle metropolitan area, the center of transportation, business, and industry along the Puget Sound region of the Salish Sea, an inlet of the Pacific consisting of numerous islands, deep fjords, and bays carved out by glaciers. The remainder of the state consists of deep rainforests in the west, mountain ranges in the west, center, northeast and far southeast, and a semi-arid eastern basin given over to intensive agriculture. Washington is the second most populous state on the west coast and in the western United States after California. Washington was named after George Washington, the
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    Heathcote wine region

    The Heathcote Wine Region of Victoria, Australia, is nestled between the Goulburn Valley and Bendigo regions. The region is famous as for its Shiraz production. North of the Great Dividing Range the region is at elevations between 160 and 380 metres (520 and 1,250 ft). The climate and soils are strongly influenced by the Mt Camel range that extends from Corop to Tooborac. For the most part, the soil under vine is Cambrian - red and deep with excellent water holding capacity. As a consequence some vignerons do not irrigate and aim for smaller fruit intensely rich in flavour. The region’s rainfall is evenly distributed between the seasons and the temperature range is defined as temperate, with cooling winds emanating from the south resulting in summer temperatures two to three degrees cooler than nearby Bendigo. Heathcote is recognised as a producer of high-end Shiraz wines, even rivaling those of the Rhone Valley from where the Syrah vine cuttings were originally sourced for Australia's Syrah/Shiraz vineyards. It is home to some flagship winemakers who have achieved international fame for their representations of Australian Shiraz. The oldest Shiraz vines on the Cambrian soil where
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    Vinho Verde

    Vinho Verde

    • Wines: Soalheiro
    Vinho Verde is a Portuguese wine that originated in the historic Minho province in the far north of the country. The modern-day 'Vinho Verde' region, originally designated in 1908, includes the old Minho province plus adjacent areas to the south. In 1976, the old province was dissolved. Vinho Verde is not a grape varietal. The name literally means "green wine," but translates as "young wine", as opposed to mature wine. It may be red, white or rosé, and it is meant to be consumed within a year of bottling. The region is characterized by its many small growers, which numbered more than 30,000 as of 2005. Many of these growers train their vines high off the ground, up trees, fences, and even telephone poles so that they can cultivate vegetable crops below the vines that their families may use as a food source. Most countries limit the use of the term Vinho Verde to only those wines that come from the Minho region in Portugal. In Europe, this principle is enshrined in the European Union by Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status. The Vinhos Verdes are light and fresh. At less than one bar of CO2 pressure, they do not quite qualify as semi-sparkling wines but do have a definite
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    Yarra Valley

    The Yarra Valley is the name given to the region surrounding the Yarra River in Victoria, Australia. The river originates approximately 90 kilometres east of the City of Melbourne and flows towards it and out into Port Phillip Bay. The name Yarra Valley is usually used in reference to the upper regions surrounding the Yarra River and generally does not encompass the lower regions including the city and suburban areas, where the topography flattens out, or the upper reaches which are in inaccessible bushland. Included in the Yarra Valley is the sub-region of Upper Yarra (or the Upper Yarra Valley) which encompasses the towns of the former Shire of Upper Yarra in the catchment area upstream of and including Woori Yallock. The Yarra Valley a popular day-trip and tourist area, featuring a range of natural features and agricultural produce, as well as the Lilydale to Warburton Rail Trail. The Yarra Valley is host to a thriving wine growing industry. The area's relatively cool climate makes it particularly suited to the production of high-quality chardonnay, pinot noir and sparkling wine. Yarra Valley towns fall under the Nillumbik and Yarra Ranges Shire Councils. Major towns include
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    Dão DOC

    Dão DOC

    • Wines: 1943 Dão Real Vinícola
    Dão is a Portuguese wine region situated in the Região Demarcada do Dão with the Dão-Lafões sub region of the Centro, Portugal. It is one of the oldest established wine regions in Portugal. Dão wine is produced in a mountainous region with a temperate climate, in the area of the Rio Mondego and Dão rivers in the north central region of Portugal. The region became a Denominação de Origem Controlada (DOC) appellation in 1990. The Dão region is the origin of the Touriga Nacional vine that is the principal component of Port wine. The wine region is located primarily on a plateau that is sheltered on three sides by the granite mountain ranges of Serra da Estrela, Serra do Caramulo and Serra da Nave. This helps the area maintain its temperate climate away from the effects of the nearby Atlantic Ocean. The region experiences abundant rainfall in the winter months and long, warm dry summers leading up to harvest. The region's vineyards are planted on sandy well-drained soil on top of granite rock. The Dão was first officially recognized as a Região Demarcada in 1908. In the 1940s, to improve the quality of the wine from the region and promote some sort of national identity, the government
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    Montecarlo DOC

    Montecarlo is a denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) in northern Tuscany, Italy. The vineyards surround the small town of Montecarlo which is located close to Lucca and Pisa. Montecarlo wines are unusual for the region in that they are commonly made from the Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Bianco grape varietals. This is unusual as most Tuscan white wines are made from Trebbiano and Malvasia grapes. Wines from the region are often called the best Tuscan whites. The DOC is defined under the following laws : The DOC bianco allows between 40% to 60% Trebbiano Toscano, and between 40% to 60% Semillon, Pinot Gris, Pinot Bianco, Vermentino, Sauvignon Blanc and/or Roussane, with no more than 10% of any single one. The DOC rosso is 50% to 75% Sangiovese, 5% to 15% [[Canaiolo], 10% to 15% Ciliegiolo, Colorino, Malvasia Nera, Sjriak, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and/or Merlot, and up to 20% other red varietals.
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    Province of Asti

    Province of Asti

    • Wine styles: Barbera d'Alba
    The Province of Asti (It. Provincia di Asti) is a province in the Piedmont region of northern Italy. Its capital is the city of Asti. To the north west it borders on the province of Turin; to the south west it borders on the province of Cuneo. To the east it borders on the province of Alessandria, while in the south it shares a very short border with the Ligurian province of Savona. It has an area of 1,504.5 km², and a total population of 222,336 (2012). The Province of Asti was created on April 1st 1935 by Royal Decree No. 297 of King Victor Emmanuel III. It was detached from the existing Province of Alessandria. The Province of Asti is among the institutions awarded the Gold Medal for Military Valor (Medaglia d'Oro al Valor Militare) for its contribution to the partisan struggle during the last two years of the Second World War. There are 118 municipalities (comuni, singular: comune) in the province: the largest by population are:
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    Alpine Valleys

    The Alpine Valleys are an Australian wine region located in the north eastern section of Victoria. Along with nearby by Beechworth, the area is distinctly cooler in climate than some of the other north east wine regions like Rutherglen. The Alpine Valleys produce grapes primarily for table wine production.
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    Bordeaux

    Bordeaux

    • Wines: 1990 Château d'Yquem Sauternes
    Bordeaux (French pronunciation: [bɔʁ.do] ; Gascon: Bordèu; Basque: Bordele) is a port city on the Garonne River in the Gironde department in southwestern France. The Bordeaux metropolitan area has a population of 1,105,000 and constitutes the sixth-largest urban area in France. It is the capital of the Aquitaine region, as well as the prefecture of the Gironde department. Its inhabitants are called Bordelais. Bordeaux is the world's major wine industry capital. It is home to the world's main wine fair, Vinexpo, while the wine economy in the metro area moves 14.5 billion euros each year. Bordeaux wine has been produced in the region since the 8th century. The historic part of the city is on the UNESCO World Heritage List as "an outstanding urban and architectural ensemble" of the 18th century. In historical times, around 300 BC it was the settlement of a Celtic tribe, the Bituriges Vivisci, who named the town Burdigala, probably of Aquitainian origin. The name Bourde is still the name of a river south of the city. In 107 BC, the Battle of Burdigala was fought by the Romans who were defending the Allobroges, an allied Roman tribe, and the Tigurini led by Divico. The Romans were
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    Greece

    Greece

    • Wine styles: Retsina
    Greece (Greek: Ελλάδα, Elláda), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία, Ellīnikî Dīmokratía), is a country in Southeast Europe. Athens is the country's capital and largest city (its urban area also including the municipality of Piraeus). According to the preliminary 2011 census data, Greece's population is about 11 million. Greece has land borders with Albania, the Republic of Macedonia and Bulgaria to the north, and Turkey to the east. The Aegean Sea lies to the east of mainland Greece, the Ionian Sea to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Greece has the 11th longest coastline in the world at 13,676 km (8,498 mi) in length, featuring a vast number of islands (approximately 1,400, of which 227 are inhabited), including Crete, the Dodecanese, the Cyclades, and the Ionian Islands among others. Eighty percent of Greece consists of mountains, of which Mount Olympus is the highest at 2,917 m (9,570 ft). Modern Greece traces its roots to the civilization of ancient Greece, generally considered the cradle of Western civilization. As such, it is the birthplace of democracy, Western philosophy, the Olympic Games, Western literature and historiography, political
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    Beiras VR

    Beiras VR

    • Wines: Quinta do Cardo
    Beiras is a Portuguese wine region covering the same areas as its namesake region. The region is classified as a Vinho Regional (VR), a designation similar to a French vin de pays region. Located in the northern regions of Portugal, Beiras produces wines of every imaginable style including sparkling and fortified wines but quality varies dramatically depending on producer and region. Within the Beiras region there exists the following wine regions at IPR or DOC level: The principle grapes of the Beiras region includes Arinto, Baga, Bastardo, Borrado das Moscas, Camarate, Cerceal, Esgana Cao, Fernao Pires, Jaen, Malvasia, Marufo, Monvedro, Periquita, Rabo de Ovelha, Rufete, Tinta Amarela, Touriga Nacional and Vital.
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    Bairrada DOC

    • Wines: Quinta do Encontro
    Bairrada is a Portuguese wine region located in the Beira province. The region has Portugal's highest wine classification as a Denominação de Origem Controlada (DOC). It is located close to the Atlantic which ocean currents have a moderating effect on the climate. The region is bordered to the north by the Lafões IPR and to the east by the Dão DOC. The region is known for its deep colored tannic red wines that often have bell pepper and black currant flavors as well its emerging rosé production. The boundaries of the Bairrada DOC includes the municipalities of Anadia, Cantanhede, Mealhada and Oliveira do Bairro. Viticulture in the Bairrada has existed since at least the 10th century, when the region gained independence from the Moors. Located just south of the major Port wine producing center of Oporto, the fortunes of Bairrada were on the upswing during the 17th century when Port producers, eager to supply the growing British market, would blend Bairrada wines with the product coming from the Douro. The principal grapes of the Bairrada region includes Baga, Borrado das Moscas, Castelao Frances, Fernao Pires, Rabo de Ovelha and Tinta Pinheira.
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    Bucelas DOC

    Bucelas DOC

    • Wines: Bucellas Velho
    Bucelas (historically known as Bucellas) is a Portuguese wine region located in the Lisboa wine region. The region has Portugal's highest wine classification as a Denominação de Origem Controlada (DOC). Located south of the Arruda DOC, the region is noted for its potential for cool fermentation white wine production. Vineyards in the area are planted on predominately loam soils. The white wines of Bucelas were widely popular during the Elizabethan era in England and again during the Victorian age. In London the wines were sometimes described as "Portuguese hock" because of their similarities to the German Rieslings from the Rhine. Located north of the capital city of Lisbon, urban sprawl in the 20th century has caused viticulture in the area to be drastically reduced. Viticulture in Bucelas, located just north of Lisbon, has likely existed since Roman times. Historically a white wine, during the Elizabethan age it was popular among the English as a fortified wine with wine historians believing that the wine was likely the same "Charneco" wine mentioned by William Shakespeare in the play Henry VI, Part 2 with Charneco being a local village in the Bucelas region. Eventually Bucelas
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    Cachapoal Province

    • Wines: 2005 La Capitana Cabernet Sauvignon Barrel Reserve
    Cachapoal Province (Spanish: Provincia de Cachapoal) is one of three provinces of the central Chilean region of O'Higgins (VI). Its capital is the city of Rancagua (pop. 214,344). According to the 2002 census by the National Statistics Institute (INE), the province spans an area of 7,384.2 km (2,851 sq mi) and had a population of 542,901 inhabitants (271,226 men and 271,675 women), giving it a population density of 73.5 /km (190 /sq mi). It is the fifth most populated province in the country. Between the 1992 and 2002 censuses, the population grew by 13.8% (65,871 persons). As a province, Cachapoal is a second-level administrative division of Chile, governed by a provincial governor who is appointed by the president. The province comprises seventeen communes, each governed by a municipality consisting of an elected alcalde and municipal council.
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    Champagne

    Champagne

    • Wine styles: Grower Champagne
    Champagne (French pronunciation: [ʃɑ̃paɲ]) is a historic province in the northeast of France, now best known for the sparkling white wine that bears its name. Formerly ruled by the counts of Champagne, its western edge is about 100 miles (160 km) east of Paris. The cities of Troyes, Reims, and Épernay are the commercial centers of the area. Most of Champagne is now part of the French administrative region of Champagne-Ardenne, which comprises four departments: Ardennes, Aube, Haute-Marne, and Marne. The name Champagne comes from the Latin campania and referred to the similarities between the rolling hills of the province and the Italian countryside of Campania located south of Rome. In the High Middle Ages, the province was famous for the Champagne Fairs.
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    Douro DOC

    Douro DOC

    • Wines: Crasto
    Douro is a Portuguese wine region centered on the Douro River in the Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro region. It is sometimes referred to as the Alto Douro (upper Douro), as it is located some distance upstream from Porto, sheltered by mountain ranges from coastal influence. The region has Portugal's highest wine classification as a Denominação de Origem Controlada (DOC). While the region is associated primarily with Port wine production, the Douro produces just as much table wine (non-fortified wines) as it does fortified wine. The non-fortified wines are typically referred to as "Douro wines". The style of wines produced in the Douro range from light, Bordeaux style claret to rich Burgundian style wines aged in new oak. There is archaeological evidence for winemaking in the region dating from the end of the Western Roman Empire, during the 3rd and 4th centuries AD, although grape seeds have also been found at older archaeological sites. In Medieval times from the mid-12th century, Cistercians had an important influence on winemaking in the region, through their three monasteries Salzedas, São João de Tarouca and São Pedro das Águias. In the 17th century, the region's vineyards
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    Mendoza Province

    Mendoza Province

    • Wines: 2005 Malbec Grand Reserve Terroir Selection
    The Province of Mendoza (Spanish pronunciation: [menˈdosa]) is a province of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. It borders to the north with San Juan, the south with La Pampa and Neuquén, the east with San Luis, and to the west with the republic of Chile; the international limit is marked by the Andes mountain range. Its capital city is the homonymous city of Mendoza. Covering an area of 148.827 km², it is the seventh biggest province of Argentina with 5.35% of the country's total surface. The population for 2010 is 1.741.610 inhabitants, which makes it the fifth largest populated province of the country, or 4.35% of the total national population. Archeological studies have determined that the first inhabitants in the area date from the Holocene, but there are few remains of those people to know their habits. The earliest sites of human occupation in Mandoza Province, Agua de la Cueva and Gruta del Indio, are 12-13,000 years old. On the basin of the Atuel River, in 300 BC lived a group of people that lived from hunting, and the cultivation of maize, pumpkins and beans. Those valleys saw the rise of the Agrelo culture, antecesor of the
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