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Best Waterfall of All Time

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    1
    Barr Creek Falls

    Barr Creek Falls

    Barr Creek Falls is a waterfall located in Prospect, Southern Oregon along SR 66. Mill Creek Falls is another falls close by.
    7.00
    8 votes
    2
    Churchill Falls

    Churchill Falls

    Churchill Falls are waterfalls named after former British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill. They are 245 ft (75 m) high, located on the Churchill River in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. 4 mi (6.4 km) above the falls, the Churchill River narrowed to 200 ft (61 m) and negotiated a series of rapids before dropping into MacLean Canyon, from which sheer cliffs rise several hundred feet on either side. The river flowed 12 mi (19 km) through the canyon over a series of rapids. The total drop from the rapids above the main falls to the end of MacLean Canyon is 1,038 ft (316 m). Since 1970, the waters of the Churchill River have been diverted into the nearby Churchill Falls hydroelectric power station. Today water flows down the falls less than once a decade, during spring thaw or periods of exceptional rains. The Churchill Falls power station has the second largest hydroelectric-generating capacity in North America (5,428 MW or 7,279,000 hp installed, expandable to about 6,300 MW or 8,400,000 hp) and is also the second largest underground power station in the world, after the Robert-Bourassa generating station in northern Quebec. The falls were a significant landmark for local
    7.67
    6 votes
    3
    Staubbach Falls

    Staubbach Falls

    The Staubbach Falls (German: Staubbachfall) is a waterfall in Switzerland, located just above Lauterbrunnen in the Bernese Oberland. The waterfall drops about 300 metres (1000 ft) from a hanging valley that ends in overhanging cliffs above the Lütschine River. The stream, on reaching the verge of the rocky walls of the valley, forms a cascade so high that it is almost lost in spray before it reaches the level of the valley. After rain, and early in the season when fed by the melting snows, the Staubbach Falls is a very striking object. The force of the stream above the fall at such times is sufficient to carry the water clear of the precipice, and the whole mass descends in a condition of liquid dust, between spray and cloud, that sways to and fro with the gentlest breeze. In a dry summer, when the supply of water is much reduced, the effect is comparatively insignificant. The height of the cascade is between 800 and 900 ft, one of the highest in Europe formed of a single unbroken fall. The falls were featured on the Swiss 3-centime postage stamp of the 1930s.
    6.71
    7 votes
    4
    Kiliyur Falls

    Kiliyur Falls

    Kiliyur Falls is a waterfall in the Shervaroyan hill range in the Eastern Ghats, Tamil nadu, India. The waters overflowing the Yercaud Lake fall 300 ft (91 m) into the Kiliyur Valley. The falls is situated at a distance of 2.5 km (1.6 mi) from the yercaud lake. The final 500 m (1,600 ft) or so consist only of a rough unpaved steep pathway. But it is a breathtaking sight in the monsoon time when the water levels are at the maximum. The best time to visit this place is immediately after the monsoons.
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    Seven Falls

    Seven Falls

    Seven Falls is a series of seven cascading waterfalls in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The sum of the height of the seven falls is 181 feet (55.17 m) and there are a total of 224 steps on the staircase from the base of the falls to the peak. In the late 19th century, some of the associated property was developed as a scenic resort. It was popular for a time with travelers who arrived by horse-drawn vehicles or by horseback or burro.
    9.75
    4 votes
    6
    Glen Nevis

    Glen Nevis

    Glen Nevis (Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Nibheis) is a glen in Lochaber, Highland, Scotland, with Fort William at its foot. It is bordered to the south by the Mamore range, and to the north by the highest mountains in the British Isles: Ben Nevis, Càrn Mor Dearg, Aonach Mòr, and Aonach Beag. It is home to one of the three highest waterfalls in Scotland, Steall Falls, where the Allt Coire a'Mhail joins the Water of Nevis in the glen. Below the waterfall is a steeply walled and impressive gorge. A public road runs for 10km up the Glen, becoming single track after 7km. There is a hotel, Scottish Youth Hostels Association hostel, and campsite at the bottom of the glen, near Fort William, and a small hamlet further up at Achriabhach. From the car park at the end of the Glen Nevis road, a path continues through a gorge. After a scramble up this rocky path, the view opens up and the path leads into the peaceful upper glen. A wire bridge crosses to the base of the waterfall. This bridge was closed for three months in 2010 when one of the cables snapped. The path has been improved periodically to ease access and to reduce the damaging effects of soil erosion caused by many walkers, but it
    8.40
    5 votes
    7
    Elbow Falls

    Elbow Falls

    Elbow Falls is a small set of waterfalls along the Elbow River, west of the hamlet of Bragg Creek within Kananaskis Improvement District, Alberta. They are located along Highway 66, 20 km (12 mi) west of the Bragg Creek turnoff on Highway 22. In the dry season, the falls reach a height of 6 meters (20 ft), while in June, during high discharges, the river fills up and the waterfall is only 3 m (9.8 ft) high. A day use area (i.e. picnics) is maintained at the falls site, and also serves as the start/finish of a short 1 km (0.62 mi) long hiking trail. Overnight camping is available at several nearby campgrounds.
    7.00
    6 votes
    8
    Steinsdalsfossen

    Steinsdalsfossen

    Steinsdalsfossen (also called Øvsthusfossen or Øfsthusfossen) is a waterfall 2 kilometers west of Norheimsund, Hardanger in western Norway. The waterfall is one of the most visited in Norway. A path goes behind it where visitors can walk dryshod "into" the rumbling water. Steinsdalsfossen is about 50 meters high and is greatest when the snow melts in May and June. Steinsdalsfossen is part of the Fosselva river that spring from the water Myklavatn 814 meters above sea level. The waterfall is near Norheimsund, Norway. Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany visited Steinsdalsfossen every summer (apart from two years) from 1889 until the start of World War I in 1914. At Expo 2000 in Hannover Norway was represented with an installation by Marianne Heske where a 15 meter high copy of Steinsdalsfossen was an important part.
    7.80
    5 votes
    9
    Gjáin

    Gjáin

    Like the Háifoss, the small valley Gjáin with its small waterfalls, ponds, and volcanic structures is situated in the south of Iceland. It is to be found at about half an hour walking distance from the historical farm Stöng. The volcano Hekla can be seen from the site.
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    Bond Falls

    Bond Falls

    Bond Falls is a waterfall on the middle branch of the Ontonagon River, a few miles east of Paulding in Haight Township in southern Ontonagon County, Michigan. The site is near U.S. Highway 45 in the western portion of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The waterfalls are listed by the state of Michigan as the Bond Falls Scenic Site. The total drop of the falls is about 50 feet (15 m). Trails lead to and from the falls from a picnic area atop the falls. There is a newer walkway that extends across the river below the base of the falls that allows for perfect viewing. The river drops 875 feet (267 m) down from Bond Falls Flowage, which is perched on the highlands of the western Upper Peninsula, to Lake Superior. Bond Falls is the first stage of this drop in elevation. From Bond Falls, the river continues northward to the Agate Falls Scenic Site. A "flowage", in the language of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, is a reservoir. Bond Falls is a natural waterfall, but it has been enhanced by a nearby dam built by the Upper Peninsula Power Company (UPPCO). There is a rest-area park below the dam and waterfall, from which the falls can be admired. The Ontonagan River and Bond Falls Flowage
    8.75
    4 votes
    11
    Raysko Praskalo

    Raysko Praskalo

    Raysko Praskalo (Bulgarian: Райско пръскало, "Heavenly Spray"), 124.5 m in height, is the highest waterfall in Bulgaria and the Balkans. It is located under Botev Peak (2,376 m) in the Balkan Mountains and is part of the Dzhendema Reserve of the Central Balkan National Park. The waterfall gathers water from snow-drifts.
    7.40
    5 votes
    12
    Tequendama Falls

    Tequendama Falls

    The Tequendama Falls (Spanish: Salto del Tequendama) is a 132m high waterfall on the Bogotá River, located about 30 km southwest of Bogotá in the municipality of San Antonio del Tequendama. Circa 10000 BC, El Abra and Tequendama were found to be the first permanent settlements in Colombia. One of the country’s major tourist attractions, the falls are located in a forested area 20 miles (32 km) west of Bogotá. The river surges through a rocky gorge that narrows to about 60 feet (18 m) at the brink of the 515-foot- (157-metre-) high falls. During the month of December the falls become completely dry. The falls, once a common site for suicides, may be reached by road from Bogotá. According to Muisca legend, the waterfall was created by Bochica, who used his staff to break the rock and release the water that covered the Bogotá Savannah. According to another legend, during the Spanish conquest in South America, in order to escape slavery the indigenous people of the area would jump off the Salto Del Tequendama and become eagles to fly to their freedom.
    7.40
    5 votes
    13
    Snow Creek Falls

    Snow Creek Falls

    Snow Creek Falls is a long series of cascades located in Yosemite National Park toward the eastern extent of Yosemite Valley. It descends a steep gorge on a sizeable stream that originates in May Lake to the north, dropping east of the trail that leaves the Valley above Mirror Lake en route to North Dome and other north-rim destinations. Snow Creek Falls is the second highest waterfall in Yosemite National Park.
    8.50
    4 votes
    14
    Wilberforce Falls

    Wilberforce Falls

    Wilberforce Falls is an almost 60 m (197 feet) tall waterfall located in the Wilberforce Gorge of the Hood River in Nunavut, Canada. The falls are one of the few major waterfalls in the world north of the Arctic Circle
    8.50
    4 votes
    15
    Oneonta Gorge

    Oneonta Gorge

    The Oneonta Gorge is in the Columbia River Gorge in the American state of Oregon. The U.S. Forest Service has designated it as a botanical area because of the unique aquatic and woodland plants that grow there. The basalt walls are home to a wide variety of ferns, mosses, hepatics and lichens, many of which grow only in the Columbia River Gorge. Oneonta Creek runs through the gorge. There are four major waterfalls on the creek. Middle Oneonta Falls can be seen clearly from a footpath and is very often mistaken for the upper or lower falls. The lower gorge has been preserved as a natural habitat, so there is no boardwalk or footpath through it as such. Thus, Lower Oneonta Falls can only be seen by walking upstream from the creek's outlet at the Historic Columbia River Highway. To get to a vantage point where the entire lower falls is visible can require wading through water that in some places can be chest-deep, depending on the season and the relative amount of snow-melt. The upper falls are about 1 mile upstream from the middle falls and require scrambling up the creek or climbing down a canyon wall to view. The fourth falls which is "Triple falls" can be seen from a vantage point
    6.33
    6 votes
    16
    Jonha Falls

    Jonha Falls

    The Jonha Falls (Hindi: जोन्हा जलप्रपात) (also called Gautamdhara Falls) is a waterfall located in Ranchi district in the Indian state of Jharkhand. Situated at an edge of the Ranchi plateau, the Jonha Falls is an example of a hanging valley falls. The Gunga River hangs over its master stream, Raru River and forms the falls. One has to descend 500 steps to admire the surroundings. Water in the falls drops from a height of 43 metres (141 ft). The Johna Falls is an example of a nick point caused by rejuvenation. Knick point, also called a nick point or simply nick, represents breaks in slopes in the longitudinal profile of a river caused by rejuvenation. The break in channel gradient allows water to fall vertically giving rise to a waterfall. There is a tourist rest house which encloses a Buddhist shrine with a deity of Lord Gautam Budha. A temple and an ashram dedicated to Buddha was built atop Gautam Pahar by the sons of Raja Baldevdas Birla. A fair is organized in Jonha every Tuesday and Saturday. The Jonha Falls is 40 kilometres (25 mi) from Ranchi. It is approachable by both road and train. Jonha Station is just 1.5 km from the fall. For travel by road, one has to take the
    6.17
    6 votes
    17
    Niagara Falls

    Niagara Falls

    Niagara Falls (Cayuga: Gahnawehtaˀ or Tgahnawęhtaˀ) is the collective name for three waterfalls that straddle the international border between the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. state of New York. They form the southern end of the Niagara Gorge. From largest to smallest, the three waterfalls are the Horseshoe Falls, the American Falls and the Bridal Veil Falls. The Horseshoe Falls lie on the Canadian side and the American Falls on the American side, separated by Goat Island. The smaller Bridal Veil Falls are also located on the American side, separated from the other waterfalls by Luna Island. The international boundary line was originally drawn through Horseshoe Falls in 1819, but the boundary has long been in dispute due to natural erosion and construction. Located on the Niagara River which drains Lake Erie into Lake Ontario, the combined falls form the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world, with a vertical drop of more than 165 feet (50 m). Horseshoe Falls is the most powerful waterfall in North America, as measured by vertical height and also by flow rate. The falls are located 17 miles (27 km) north-northwest of Buffalo, New York and 75 miles (121 km)
    6.17
    6 votes
    18
    Cataratas de Agua Azul

    Cataratas de Agua Azul

    The Cataratas de Agua Azul (Spanish for "Blue-water Falls") are found in the Mexican state of Chiapas. They are located in the Municipality of Tumbalá, 69 kilometers from Palenque by the road that leads towards San Cristóbal de las Casas. This waterfall consists of many cataracts following one after another as can be seen in the first photo in the picture gallery, taken from near the top of the sequence of cascades. The larger cataracts may be as high as 6 meters (20 feet) or so. The one pictured to the right is next to the bottom of the sequence. The water is as blue as it looks in the pictures, and has a high mineral content.People normally like to go skinny dipping near these waters Where it falls on rocks or fallen trees it encases them in a thick shell-like coating of limestone. This can be seen clearly in one of the minor falls in one of the pictures in the gallery below, where the part of a tree that leans against the waterfall is heavily coated while the part further away is not coated. Some fully coated log shapes can also be seen inside the fall in that same picture, as well as coating on the rocks. During much of the distance the water descends in two streams, with small
    7.00
    5 votes
    19
    Lower Falls

    Lower Falls

    The Lower Falls area is located just to the east of Canyon Village in Yellowstone National Park. A one-way loop drive takes you to the brink of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone and offers four views, with the last stop at the trail that leads to the top of the Falls. Lower Falls is the biggest waterfall in Yellowstone. The 308 foot tall waterfall is believed to be the second most photographed spot in Yellowstone, with Old Faithful Geyser being the first. There are numerous views of the Falls from both the east (Inspiration Point, Grandview Point and Lookout Point) and west (Artists Point) sides of the Grand Canyon, most of which require only a short walk or virtually no walk to see. The trail to the top of the Falls (3/4 of a mile roundtrip, but steep with many switchbacks) is a must, as the experience of standing atop the Falls is one of the most breath-taking experiences in the entire Park. The canyon's colors were created by hot water acting on volcanic rock. It was not these colors, but the river's yellow banks at its distant confluence with the Missouri River, that occasioned the Minnetaree Indian name which French trappers translated as roche jaune, yellow stone. The
    7.00
    5 votes
    20
    Looking Glass Falls

    Looking Glass Falls

    Looking Glass Falls is a waterfall in Western North Carolina, located near Brevard. The name comes from Looking Glass Rock, which resembles a wintertime mirror (or "looking glass") of sunlight, as water freezes on its sides and reflects the sun. The waterway is Looking Glass Creek, which flows through the Pisgah National Forest. The falls are open to the public and are accessible on the side of U.S. Highway 276, approximately 5.6 miles north of the intersection of 276, U.S. Highway 64, and NC Highway 280 in Brevard, North Carolina. It is an extremely popular waterfall, due to ease of access to the falls directly on the side of the road. There is a path that leads to the plunge pool. According to local Emergency Services personnel, there have been many injuries and deaths at the falls, mainly due to individuals who rock climb near the edge of the falls and accidentally fall in the plunge pool, or persons who jump in the plunge pool. Persons who visit Looking Glass Falls should take care to respect both basic safety rules and the fragile environment that exist at the falls.
    8.00
    4 votes
    21
    Lushington Falls

    Lushington Falls

    Lushington Falls, also called Unchalli Falls, is a waterfall created by a 116 metres (381 ft) drop in the Aghanashini river. The fall is located in Siddapur taluk, Uttara Kannada District of Karnataka, India. The falls are named for J. D. Lushington, a District Collector for the British Government, who discovered the falls in 1845. Heggarne, a hamlet in Uttara Kannada district, is 35 km from Siddapur The falls are reached by a 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) trek from Heggarne through thick forest. Here the river makes a cavalcade of water falls and eventually leaps into a steep valley to form a spectacular, picturesque waterfall. The falls are sometimes called Keppa Joga because of the deafening sound they make. The Lushington the falls are named after is Thomas Davies Lushington, the brother of Edmund Law Lushington who married Cecilia Tennyson.
    6.00
    6 votes
    22
    Latourell Falls

    Latourell Falls

    Latourell Falls is a waterfall along the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon, within Guy W. Talbot State Park. The Historic Columbia River Highway passes nearby, and at certain locations the Lower falls are visible from the road. Near the base of the falls, a parking lot and path were erected to assist visitors to the site. Visitors must hike along the 2.1 mile loop trail to see the upper falls. Latourell is unique among the best-known Columbia Gorge waterfalls, in the way that it drops straight down from an overhanging basalt cliff. Most of those falls (even the famous Multnomah Falls) tumble to some degree.
    6.80
    5 votes
    23
    Limekiln Falls

    Limekiln Falls

    Limekiln Falls is a 100 ft waterfall near Lucia in Limekiln State Park, on the Big Sur coast California.
    6.80
    5 votes
    24
    Wollomombi Falls

    Wollomombi Falls

    Wollomombi Falls (pronounced 'walla mom bee'), from an Aboriginal word, are located in the Oxley Wild Rivers National Park, 40 km due east of Armidale, New South Wales and 1 km off the Waterfall Way. At one time they were believed to be the tallest in Australia. However, recent geographical revisions place them at second or third tallest, depending on the source, after Tin Mine Falls (New South Wales) and Wallaman Falls (near Ingham, Queensland). The Chandler Falls are located to the right of the Wollomombi Falls when viewed from the main lookout. After they join, these rivers are known as the Chandler River and become a tributary of the Macleay River. From the very top to the very bottom the height is approx 220 metres although its biggest drop where the water "falls" is only 100 m. The National Parks and Wildlife Service has constructed two walking tracks. The first, the Chandler Walk, is only for the fit and healthy. This route passes Checks Lookout before reaching the Chandler Lookout and then winding down to the bottom of the gorge downstream from the falls. Checks Lookout is about a third of the way along this walk with a view back along the gorge to the falls. At the end of
    6.80
    5 votes
    25
    Dry Falls

    Dry Falls

    Dry Falls is a 3.5 mile long scalloped precipice in central Washington, on the opposite side of the Upper Grand Coulee from the Columbia River, and at the head of the Lower Grand Coulee. Ten times the size of Niagara, Dry Falls is thought to be the greatest known waterfall that ever existed. According to the current geological model, catastrophic flooding channeled water at 65 miles per hour through the Upper Grand Coulee and over this 400-foot (120 m) rock face at the end of the last ice age. At this time, it is estimated that the flow of the falls was ten times the current flow of all the rivers in the world combined. Nearly twenty thousand years ago, as glaciers moved south, an ice sheet dammed the Clark Fork River near Sandpoint, Idaho. Consequently, a significant portion of western Montana flooded, forming the gigantic Lake Missoula. About the same time, Glacial Lake Columbia was formed on the ice-dammed Columbia River behind the Okanogan lobe of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet. Lake Columbia's overflow – the diverted Columbia River – drained first through Moses Coulee and as the ice dam grew, later through the Grand Coulee. Eventually, water in lake Missoula rose high enough to
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Falls of Glomach

    Falls of Glomach

    The Falls of Glomach, in Ross-shire, Scotland, is one of the highest waterfalls in Britain, at 113 m (370 ft). The falls border Kintail, donated to the National Trust for Scotland in 1944 and subsequently incorporating West Affric in 1993. It is not easily reached on foot, requiring an 8 kilometre trek through remote and wild countryside.
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Itiquira Falls

    Itiquira Falls

    The Itiquira Falls is a waterfall in Brazil. They are located 34 kilometers north of Formosa in the state of Goiás and 115 kilometers from Brasília on a paved road. The falls have a height of 168 meters, making them possibly the highest accessible waterfall in Brazil and the second highest overall. The falls are formed by the drop of the Itiquira River from the higher central plateau north of Formosa into the deep Paranã River valley. The waters are unpolluted and a bottling plant is located on the river above the falls (access from a different road heading north from Formosa towards Planaltina de Goiás). The area is a municipal park and is protected from development. There are tourist facilities outside the park, near the entrance.
    7.75
    4 votes
    28
    Hardraw Force

    Hardraw Force

    Hardraw Force (OS grid ref: SD869917) is a waterfall on the Hardraw Beck in Hardraw Scar, a wooded ravine just outside the hamlet of Hardraw at the foot of Buttertubs Pass and the head of Wensleydale in the Yorkshire Dales. The Pennine Way long distance footpath passes close by. Comprising a single drop of 100 feet from a rocky overhang, Hardraw Force is claimed to be England's highest unbroken waterfall – at least discounting underground falls. (The underground waterfall inside nearby Gaping Gill on the western flank of Ingleborough has an unbroken fall of over 300 feet.) Geologically, the bed of the river and plunge pool is slate; on top of that is sandstone and the top layer is carboniferous limestone. Public viewing of Hardraw Force is rather unusual, as the visitor has to go through the bar of the Green Dragon Inn public house in Hardraw to reach the falls; an entrance fee is payable on the way through the pub. It is currently £2 per adult. Access behind the falls is now prohibited. Hardraw Scar (54°18′58″N 2°12′18″W / 54.316°N 2.205°W / 54.316; -2.205) is a limestone gorge located behind the Green Dragon inn at Hardraw near Hawes in the Yorkshire Dales. It is a natural
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    Sipi Falls

    Sipi Falls

    Sipi Falls is a series of three waterfalls in Eastern Uganda in the district of Kapchorwa, northeast of Sironko and Mbale. The waterfalls lie on the edge of Mount Elgon National Park near the Kenyan border. The Sipi Falls area is the starting point for many hikes up Mt. Elgon. The most popular route starts in Budadiri and follows the Sasa trail to the summit and then descends down the Sipi trail back into the Sipi Falls. Hikes around the falls offer stunning views of the Karamoja plains, Lake Kyoga, and the slopes of Mt. Elgon. Individuals can organise trips through the Uganda Wildlife Authority or private operators. There are a number of lodges and backpackers / campsites in the area offering a range of accommodation for all budgets. With a cooler climate than most of the country Sipi Falls is a nice place to unwind, relax and literally chill out away from the hustle and bustle of the towns and cities. Being on the foothills of Mt. Elgon, Sipi offers a number of alternative activities to the mainstream river activities in and around Jinja. Rob's Rolling Rock, a local outfit trained by Italian climbers offers abseiling along the side of the main 100m Sipi waterfall as well as
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    Tueeulala Falls

    Tueeulala Falls

    Tueeulala Falls is located on the north side of Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park. At roughly 880 feet it is the smaller of two large waterfalls that spill into Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the other being Wapama Falls. It is, however, the larger of the two in terms of greatest free-fall distance, as Wapama is split into two falls. Tueeulala Fall drops free for 600 feet, hits a ledge, then slides steeply down 280 feet further. The hike to the top of the falls is off trail but fairly brush free and straightforward.
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    Wallaman Falls

    Wallaman Falls

    The Wallaman Falls are notable for their single-drop of 268 metres, which is Australia's highest permanent waterfall. The pool at the end of the waterfall is 20 metres deep. The waterfall is formed by a tributary of the Herbert River, Stony Creek, which plunges over an escarpment in the Seaview Range. The geological history of the formation may be traced back some 50 million years, when the uplift of the continental margin in this region resulted in the ancestral Herbert River to change its course from westwards to eastwards. As a result it began to cut through the raised igneous substrata en-route to its outflow in the Coral Sea. The gorge produced by this erosive action gradually retreated inland along the Herbert River's course, and in the process eventually causing tributaries such as Stony Creek to be suspended, forming the waterfall. On 23 May 2010, a 49 year old basejumper died during a base jumping accident.
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Keyhole Falls

    Keyhole Falls

    Keyhole Falls is the unofficial name for the largest waterfall along the Lillooet River in British Columbia, Canada. The falls are 75 feet (23 m) high and are a punchbowl type of waterfall. It is called Keyhole Falls because it resembles a giant old-fashioned keyhole. Keyhole Falls was formed when the Lillooet River was dammed with breccia from a Plinian eruption at Mount Meager about 2350 years ago. The thick breccia soon eroded from water activity, forming Keyhole Falls. There was a massive flood when the water first broke through the breccia. The flood was big enough that small house-sized blocks of breccia were carried away during the flood.
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    Celilo Falls

    Celilo Falls

    Celilo Falls (Wyam, meaning "echo of falling water" or "sound of water upon the rocks," in several native languages) was a tribal fishing area on the Columbia River, just east of the Cascade Mountains, on what is today the border between the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington. The name refers to a series of cascades and waterfalls on the river, as well as to the native settlements and trading villages that existed there in various configurations for 15,000 years. Celilo was the oldest continuously inhabited community on the North American continent until 1957, when the falls and nearby settlements were submerged by the construction of The Dalles Dam. The main waterfall, known variously as Celilo Falls, The Chutes, Great Falls, or Columbia Falls, consisted of three sections: a cataract, called Horseshoe Falls or Tumwater Falls; a deep eddy, the Cul-de-Sac; and the main channel. These features were formed by the Columbia River's relentless push through basalt narrows on the final leg of its journey to the Pacific Ocean. Frequently more than a mile (1.6 km) in width, the river was squeezed here into a width of only 140 feet (43 m). The seasonal flow of the Columbia changed the
    10.00
    2 votes
    34
    Anna Ruby Falls

    Anna Ruby Falls

    Anna Ruby Falls is located near Unicoi State Park in White County near Helen, Georgia. The waterfall is accessible via a half mile (800 m) trail from a public use area with a small admittance charge. The Anna Ruby Falls Trail is designated a National Recreation Trail in Georgia. Anna Ruby Falls is actually twin waterfalls created where two separate streams- Curtis Creek and York Creek- join at the base of the falls to form Smith Creek, which flows into Unicoi Lake. Both Curtis and York creeks begin on Tray Mountain, Georgia's sixth-highest peak: Curtis Creek drops 153 feet (47 m) and York Creek drops 50 feet (15 m). The falls are named after Anna Ruby Nichols. The Anna Ruby Falls Scenic Area is a 1,600-acre (6 km) area around Anna Ruby Falls and is part of the Chattahoochee National Forest, though access is only through Unicoi State Park. The U.S. Forest Service leases it to the non-profit Cradle of Forestry. The Cradle of Forestry accepts the "Golden Age" pass allowing seniors in free, with pass. There is an entry fee for the parking area, and a Georgia ParkPass (required for parking at Unicoi) is not honored, as it is on federal land rather than state. Anna Ruby Falls is one of
    6.40
    5 votes
    35
    Yosemite Falls

    Yosemite Falls

    Yosemite Falls is the highest measured waterfall in North America. Located in Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada of California, it is a major attraction in the park, especially in late spring when the water flow is at its peak. The total 2,425 feet (739 m) from the top of the upper falls to the base of the lower falls qualifies Yosemite Falls as the sixth highest waterfall in the world, though with the recent discovery of Gocta Cataracts, it appears on some lists as seventh. Although often referred to as a "two-stage drop", the falls actually consist of three sections: In years of little snow, the falls may actually cease flowing altogether in late summer or fall. A very small number of rock climbers have taken the opportunity to climb the normally inaccessible rock face beneath the falls, although this is an extraordinarily dangerous undertaking; a single afternoon thunderstorm could restart the falls, sweeping the climbers off the face. The Lower Falls are easily accessible near the Yosemite Lodge in Yosemite Valley. The top of the Upper Falls may be reached via a steep, strenuous, and usually crowded 3.5 miles (5.6 km) hike beginning near Camp 4. The Upper Falls may
    6.40
    5 votes
    36
    Bassi Falls

    Bassi Falls

    Bassi Falls is a waterfall in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, to the west of Lake Tahoe in the El Dorado County, California. It falls for nearly 100 ft. It is off of a 5 mile 4x4 road which leads to a trailhead just 1/2 mile from the falls.
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    Blue Nile Falls

    Blue Nile Falls

    The Blue Nile Falls is a waterfall on the Blue Nile river in Ethiopia. It is known as Tis Abay in Amharic, meaning "smoking water". It is situated on the upper course of the river, about 30 km downstream from the town of Bahir Dar and Lake Tana. The falls are considered one of Ethiopia's best known tourist attractions. The falls are estimated to be between 37 and 45 metres high, consisting of four streams that originally varied from a trickle in the dry season to over 400 metres wide in the rainy season. Regulation of Lake Tana now reduces the variation somewhat, and since 2003 a hydro-electric station has taken much of the flow out of the falls except during the rainy season. The Blue Nile Falls isolate the ecology of Lake Tana from the ecology of the rest of the Nile, and this isolation has played a role in the evolution of the endemic fauna of the lake. A short distance downstream from the falls sits the first stone bridge constructed in Ethiopia, built at the command of Emperor Susenyos in 1626. According to Manuel de Almeida, stone for making lime had been found nearby along the tributary Alata, and a craftsman who had come from India with Afonso Mendes, the Catholic Patriarch
    7.25
    4 votes
    38
    High Force

    High Force

    High Force is a waterfall on the River Tees, near Middleton-in-Teesdale, Teesdale, County Durham, England. The waterfall is within the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and European Geopark. Despite popular belief that it is the highest waterfall in England, at 21.5 metres (71 ft), others have a longer fall: Cautley Spout, in Cumbria's Howgill Fells, is almost 180 metres (590 ft) high, and Hardraw Force, in North Yorkshire, has an unbroken drop of 30 metres (98 ft); whilst underground, on the flanks of Ingleborough, Fell Beck falls an unbroken 96 metres (315 ft) down the Jib Tunnel of Gaping Gill Hole. The whole of the River Tees plunges over a precipice (cliff edge which is almost vertical) in two stages. In former times flooding created two separate falls, but after the completion of Cow Green Reservoir in the upper Teesdale this seldom happens now. In harsh winters the falls would freeze, creating cathedral-like ice formations. High Force was formed where the River Tees crosses the Whin Sill – a hard layer of igneous rock (also seen at Hadrian's Wall and other locations). The waterfall itself consists of three different types of rock. The upper band is
    7.25
    4 votes
    39
    Lehamite Falls

    Lehamite Falls

    Lehamite Falls is located in Yosemite National Park. It consists of a long series of steep cascades that fall 1,180 feet (360 m) into Yosemite Valley, in a manner similar to Sentinel Fall. The falls are located in a small cleft in the north wall of the valley known as Indian Canyon, immediately to the right of Yosemite Falls and seen above Yosemite Village. Lehamite is Indian for “arrowwood.” Lehamite Falls is probably the most underappreciated significant waterfall in Yosemite National Park, simply because it's located almost right next to Yosemite Falls, so people don't usually pay any attention to it. It is also little known as the falls appear only in the early spring or after a heavy rainfall. It is one of the few features in the park that has retained its original Ahwaneechee name.
    7.25
    4 votes
    40
    Skógafoss

    Skógafoss

    Skógafoss (pronounced [ˈskou.aˌfɔs]) is a waterfall situated in the south of Iceland at the cliffs of the former coastline. After the coastline had receded seaward (it is now at a distance of about 5 kilometres (3.1 miles) from Skógar), the former sea cliffs remained, parallel to the coast over hundreds of kilometres, creating together with some mountains a clear border between the coastal lowlands and the Highlands of Iceland. The Skógafoss is one of the biggest waterfalls in the country with a width of 25 metres (82 feet) and a drop of 60 m (200 ft). Due to the amount of spray the waterfall consistently produces, a single or double rainbow is normally visible on sunny days. According to legend, the first Viking settler in the area, Þrasi Þórólfsson, buried a treasure in a cave behind the waterfall. The legend continues that locals found the chest years later, but were only able to grasp the ring on the side of the chest before it disappeared again. The ring was allegedly given to the local church. The old church door ring is now in a museum, though whether it gives any credence to the folklore is debatable. At the eastern side of the waterfall, a hiking and trekking trail leads
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Gavarnie Falls

    Gavarnie Falls

    The Gavarnie Falls (French: Grande Cascade de Gavarnie) is a tiered waterfall in France. With its overall drop of 422 metres, it is the highest waterfall in France. The falls are situated in the Cirque de Gavarnie, near the village Gavarnie in the Hautes-Pyrénées. The waterfall is the beginning of the Gave de Pau stream. It is fed by a melting snow and a small glacier, located in Spain. This water seeps underground until it appears at the upper rim of waterfall. The average annual flow in the waterfall is 3 m/s. In summer, when the snowmelt is most intense, it can reach up to 200 m/s. In winter it sometimes freezes and stops flowing. The waterfall has 2 - 3 steps; the height of the tallest drop is 281 m. Media related to Grande Cascade de Gavarnie at Wikimedia Commons
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    Montezuma Falls

    Montezuma Falls

    Montezuma Falls are located on a minor tributary to Lake Pieman, north-east of Zeehan, on West Coast Tasmania, Australia. In historical context - on the route of the former North East Dundas Tramway not far from the old mining town of Williamsford at the foot of Mount Read. With a fall of 104 Metres, the falls are considered to be one of the highest in Tasmania
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Rusumo Falls

    Rusumo Falls

    Rusumo Falls is a waterfall located on the Kagera river on the border between Rwanda and Tanzania, part of the most distant headwaters of the river Nile. Although the falls themselves are not of a significant height in comparison to other waterfalls, they have played an important part in the history of Rwanda because they form the only bridging point on the river in that area. The falls were the scene of the first arrival of Europeans in Rwanda in 1894, when the German count Gustav Adolf von Götzen came across from Tanzania (Rwanda had been considered part of German East Africa since 1885 but no German had yet entered the country). He continued from there to the palace of the Mwami at Nyanza, and onward to the shores of Lake Kivu. The Belgians also entered Rwanda via the falls, when they took over the country during World War I in 1916. The bridge at Rusumo was the only feasible crossing of the river at the time, and the Germans had entrenched themselves on the Rwandan side. By taking up positions in the surrounding hills, the Belgians were able to remove these guards using mounted artillery opening up the route by which they invaded the rest of the country. The falls gained
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Waterwheel Falls

    Waterwheel Falls

    Waterwheel Falls is a waterfall in the Sierra Nevada of California, located at 37°55′36″N 119°27′31″W / 37.92667°N 119.45861°W / 37.92667; -119.45861 in Yosemite National Park. It is the largest of the many waterfalls of the Tuolumne River. Its upper part contains a series of small ledges, each of which creates a small plume as the water is deflected away from the rock face. An extraordinary phenomenon appears at the first and largest of these ledges during the high-water season of early summer. Strong gusts of wind can lift part of the spray and blow it back upward, causing it to reenter the falls above the ledge. This cyclic "waterwheel" gives the falls their name.
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Inga Falls

    Inga Falls

    Inga Falls is a rapids 40 km from Matadi in the Democratic Republic of the Congo where the Congo River drops 96 m (315 ft) over the course of 15 km (9 mi). Inga Falls form a part of a larger group of rapids - Livingstone Falls and are located closer to the lower part of these falls. Falls have formed in a sharp bend of Congo River where the width of river fluctuates from more than 4 km to mere 260 m. At medium discharge of 42,476 m³/s (1,500,000 ft³/s) it is arguably the largest waterfall in the world, although Inga Falls is not a true waterfall. Its maximum recorded volume is 70,793 m³/s (2,500,000 ft³/s). Inga falls is also the site of two large hydroelectric dams, named Inga I & II, as well as two projected dams, one of which would be the largest (by power production) in the world.
    6.20
    5 votes
    46
    Fallbach Waterfall

    Fallbach Waterfall

    Fallbach Waterfall is a waterfall in the Maltatal valley of Austria in the Austrian Alps near Malta. It is particularly dramatic during snow-melt season. The waterfall is part of the Hohe Tauern National Park.
    9.50
    2 votes
    47
    Kakabeka Falls

    Kakabeka Falls

    Kakabeka Falls ( /ˈkɛkəˈbɛkə/) is a waterfall on the Kaministiquia River, located beside the village of Kakabeka Falls in the municipality of Oliver Paipoonge, Ontario, 30 km (19 mi) west of the city of Thunder Bay. The falls has a drop of 40 m (130 ft), cascading into a gorge carved out of the Precambrian Shield by meltwater following the last glacial maximum. Because of its size and ease of access, it has been consequently nicknamed "the Niagara of the North". The rock face of the falls and the escarpments along the gorge are composed primarily of unstable shale, and are eroding. These rocks host sensitive flora, and contain some of the oldest fossils in existence, some 1.6 billion years of age. Due to the fragile rock, going into the gorge below the falls is prohibited. The name "Kakabeka" comes from the Ojibwe word gakaabikaa "waterfall over a cliff" (French pronunciation: [ˈɡəkaːˈbɪkaː]). Kakabeka Falls Provincial Park, established in 1955, covers 5 km² (1,236 acres) and is managed by Ontario Parks. It surrounds the falls and extends along the Kaministiquia River, which was used centuries ago by Voyageurs, who were the first Europeans to overwinter annually in northern
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Skakavitsa Waterfall

    Skakavitsa Waterfall

    The Skakavitsa Waterfall (Bulgarian: Скакавица or Скакавишки водопад, Skakavishki vodopad) is the highest waterfall in the Rila Mountains in Bulgaria. It is part of Rila National Park and is located on the Skakavitsa River. The waterfall is situated on approximately 2,000 m above sea level, the water falling down from 70 m. The Skakavitsa Waterfall is one of the chief tourist attractions in the area owing also to the century-old endemic white fir (Pinum peuce) forests surrounding it. Skakavitsa Peak on Graham Land in Antarctica is named after the Skakavitsa nature site.
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Sutherland Falls

    Sutherland Falls

    Sutherland Falls is a waterfall near Milford Sound in New Zealand's South Island. At 580 metres (1,904 feet) the falls were long believed to be the tallest waterfall in New Zealand. However, Browne Falls cascades 843 metres (2,766 feet) down a mountainside in Doubtful Sound, leading some to view that as the tallest. Water falls in three cascades, the upper is 229 m tall, middle - 248 m, lower - 103 m tall. Vertical fall of 580 m is made over 480 m of horizontal distance, thus the mean grade of falls is approximately 56 degrees. The base of Sutherland Falls is a 90 minutes (return) walk from Quintin Public Shelter on the Milford Track.
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Bow Falls

    Bow Falls

    Bow Falls is a major waterfall on the Bow River, Alberta just before the junction of it and the Spray River. The falls are located near the Banff Springs Hotel and golf course on the left-hand side of River Road. The falls are within walking distance of both Banff and the Banff Springs Hotel so they are visited by a large number of tourists despite their relatively small size. The 1953 Marilyn Monroe film River of No Return featured the falls.
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Nachi Falls

    Nachi Falls

    Nachi Falls (那智滝, Nachi no Taki) in Nachikatsuura, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, is one of the best-known waterfalls in Japan. With a drop of 133 m, it is often erroneously thought to be the country's tallest. In fact, the tallest waterfall in Japan is the Hannoki Falls, at 497 m. Believed to house a kami called Hiryū Gongen worshiped at Kumano Nachi Taisha, it is part of the "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range" UNESCO World Heritage Site.
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Ruby Falls

    Ruby Falls

    Ruby Falls is a 145-foot high underground waterfall located within Lookout Mountain, near Chattanooga, Tennessee in the United States. The cave which houses Ruby Falls was formed with the formation of Lookout Mountain. About 200 to 240 million years ago (in the Carboniferous period, at the end of the Paleozoic era) the eastern Tennessee area was covered with a shallow sea, the sediments of which eventually formed limestone rock. About 200 million years ago, this area was uplifted and subsequent erosion has created the current topography. The limestone in which the cave is formed is still relatively horizontal, just as it was deposited when it was below sea level. The Lookout Mountain Caverns, which includes Ruby Falls Cave, is a limestone cave. These caves occur when slightly acidic groundwater enters subterranean streams and eats away at the relatively soluble limestone, causing narrow cracks to widen into passages and caves in a process called chemical weathering. The stream which makes up the Falls entered the cave sometime after its formation. Ruby Falls Cave features many of the more well-known types of cave formations (or speleothems) including stalactites and stalagmites,
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Dingmans Falls

    Dingmans Falls

    Dingmans Falls is a waterfall located in Dingmans Ferry in Delaware Township, Pike County, Pennsylvania, United States near the Silverthread Falls. It has a vertical drop of 39.6 m (130 ft).
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Illilouette Fall

    Illilouette Fall

    Illilouette Fall is a 370 foot (112 m) waterfall in Yosemite National Park. It is located in a small side canyon directly across from Vernal Falls, and is visible from the trail to Vernal and Nevada Falls. The best vantage point is from the Panorama Trail as it descends from Glacier Point. This waterfall is said to pour the most water out in the Valley.
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Janet's Foss

    Janet's Foss

    Janet's Foss is a small waterfall in the vicinity of the village of Malham, North Yorkshire, England. It carries Gordale Beck over a limestone outcrop topped by tufa into a deep pool below. The pool was traditionally used for sheep dipping, an event which took on a carnival air and drew the village inhabitants for the social occasion. The name Janet (sometimes Jennet) is thought to be a folk tale reference to a fairy queen held to inhabit a cave at the rear of the fall. Foss is a Nordic word for waterfall, still used in Scandinavia, and is presented in a number of cases in England as 'force'. Janet's Foss was the location of the fictional Molkham Falls as featured in the 2006 independent British film, WATERFALL. Filming took place there in May 2006.
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Langfossen

    Langfossen

    Langfossen is a waterfall located in the municipality of Etne in western Norway. The total fall is around 600 meters, where it leaps out into Åkrafjorden. European route E134 runs along the base of the waterfall, making access very easy. The World Waterfall Database declared this waterfall to be one of the "best in the world". March 2011 CNN/Budget Travel sat Langfossen as one of the worlds ten most beautiful waterfalls.
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Ramnefjellsfossen

    Ramnefjellsfossen

    Ramnefjellsfossen (also known as: Utigardsfossen or Utigordsfossen) is unofficially listed as the third-highest waterfall in the world in several publications. On the other hand, The World Waterfall Database, which includes all minor and seasonal waterfalls, lists it as eleventh-tallest. The falls are located on the mountain, Ramnefjellet, in the municipality of Stryn in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway–about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) southeast of the villages of Loen and Olden. The falls are fed by the Ramnefjellbreen glacier, an arm of the great Jostedalsbreen glacier. After the falls, the water flows into the lake Lovatnet. The falls are easily reached by boat, sea plane, or road, and a campsite is located within hiking distance of the base of the falls. The total drop is 818 metres (2,684 ft) from three free-leaping cascades. Due to the small flow of water it is one of the few major waterfalls in Norway that has not been slated for hydroelectric usage. The mountain, Ramnefjellet, has killed over 100 people as a result of major landslides in 1905 and 1936. A 2008 photograph of the falls taken from Lovatnet lake was included in the Emirates Airline "Skywards" brochure.
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    East Gill Force

    East Gill Force

    East Gill Force is a waterfalls in Swaledale, 330 yards (300 m) to the east of the hamlet of Keld, in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, North Yorkshire, England. The falls are located on East Gill at grid reference NY896012, just before its confluence with the River Swale at the point where the Pennine Way and the Coast to Coast Walk intersect. The falls are a popular spot for visitors, not just long distance walkers but also families and picnickers because of the close proximity of the road. East Gill Force has two main torrents: the upper falls have an impressive 4.5 metre drop while the lower section is a series of stepped cascades that fall three metres as East Gill enters the River Swale. East Gill Force is one of four waterfalls in the Keld area, the others being Kisdon Force, Catrake Force and Wain Wath Force and occur where the river cuts a gorge through the carboniferous limestone between the hills of Kisdon and Rogan's Seat. The falls in this area are called “forces” after the Norse word “Foss” which means waterfall. The falls are surrounded by deciduous broad leaved woodland.
    5.17
    6 votes
    59
    Basin Falls

    Basin Falls

    Basin Falls is located in Uvas Canyon County Park, near Morgan Hill, California, at approx. 37.07973N, 121.80613W. The waterfall is around 20 feet tall, and is at an elevation of about 1100 ft. Nearby falls include Black Rock Falls, Granuja Falls, Triple Falls and Upper Falls 1. 37°04′47″N 121°48′22″W / 37.07973, -121.80613
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Bridal Veil Falls

    Bridal Veil Falls

    Bridal Veil Falls is a 607-foot-tall (185 m) double cataract waterfall in the south end of Provo Canyon, in Utah, United States. An aerial tramway service to the top of the falls was built in 1967 and the small, six-passenger tramway functioned as a recreational attraction and as the only access (except via helicopter) to a restaurant built by Groneman Construction situated on a cliff at the top of the falls until an avalanche destroyed the tram in early 1996. (This was the second major avalanche to destroy the tram. The tram and visitor center were rebuilt after the first avalanche, but after the second disaster, its ruins were left there. In July 2008, a fire burned the ruins, and very little remains. In August 2008, the tram line was cut down. When the tramway was in operation prior to the 1996 avalanche, it was heralded as the "world's steepest aerial tramway," although that claim is difficult to ascertain. The falls were a featured point along the route of the Heber Creeper tourist train until the train discontinued its service past the falls. The train tracks in front of the falls were removed and converted into a recreational trail. Now the falls and a small park just west
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Falls of Foyers

    Falls of Foyers

    The Fall of Foyers (Scottish Gaelic: Eas na Smùide, meaning the smoking falls) is a waterfall on the River Foyers, which feeds Loch Ness, in Highland, Scotland, United Kingdom. The waterfall has "a fine cascade", having a fall of 165 feet. It is located on the lower portion of the River Foyers at grid reference NH497203. The river enters Loch Ness on the East side, North-East of Fort Augustus. This waterfall influenced Robert Addams to write a paper in 1834 about the motion aftereffect. The flow over the falls has been much reduced since 1895 when North British Aluminium Company built an aluminium smelting plant on the shore of Loch Ness which was powered by electricity generated by the river. The plant shut in 1967 and the site is now part of a Pumped-storage hydroelectricity system.
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Josephine Falls

    Josephine Falls

    Josephine Falls are located at the foot of the southern face of Mount Bartle Frere in the Wooroonooran National Park, in Queensland, Australia. The falls are a popular recreation site among locals as the water flows over a large rock to form a natural waterslide. Josephine Falls are located on Josephine Creek, a tributary of the Russell River. Accessed by sealed road just off the Bruce Highway between Babinda and Innisfail. In order to arrive at Josephine Falls, one must turn left just south of Miriwinni if coming from Innisfail or right if coming from Cairns. If visiting, listen to the locals - the natural rock slide can be dangerous for those unused to the area and there is occasional flash flooding - no warning, just a sudden increase in the water volume.
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Toccoa Falls

    Toccoa Falls

    The Toccoa Falls waterfall, with a vertical drop of 186 feet (57 m), is located on the campus of Toccoa Falls College in Stephens County, Georgia. Toccoa is the Cherokee word for beautiful. Some claim that Toccoa Falls is the tallest free-falling waterfall in the Eastern United States, however, the waterfall does not hold that title. Crabtree Falls in Virginia (cascading 1,000 feet (300 m), including one 400-foot (120 m) drop), Fall Creek Falls in Tennessee (256 foot sheer drop) and Taughannock Falls in New York (215 foot sheer drop) are all taller. In addition, one other Georgia waterfall includes a drop that is taller: Cascade Falls includes a 262-foot (80 m) drop. During the early morning hours of November 6, 1977, after five days of almost continual rain, the dam that impounded the waters of Kelly Barnes Lake (located above the Toccoa Falls College campus) burst, and 176 million gallons of water surged through the campus below in the space of a few minutes. Most of the college personnel who lived in the path of the flood were asleep at the time, and 39 of them were swept to their deaths in the raging waters of Toccoa Creek. The dam was not rebuilt.
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Berkelah falls

    Berkelah falls

    Berkelah Falls is a cascade of waterfalls located in Pahang, Malaysia. It is about 31-35 km away from Kuantan City in the direction of Maran. The falls consist of seven tiers, according to official data from the Forestry Department Peninsular Malaysia (Jabatan Perhutanan Semenanjung Malaysia), but there are actually more tiers above the seventh. The seventh and highest fall reaches an estimated height of 50 metres (3°45'13.31"N, 102°58'47.5"E). To get there from Kuala Lumpur, one needs to drive along the Karak Highway, then continue on to the East Coast Expressway. Drive 110 km toward Exit 827, Sri Jaya, then turn into the Federal Route 2. Drive in the direction of Kuantan. At kilometre 46, there is a signboard which says "Hutan Lipur Berkelah". Turn left, drive for approximately 5 km, then you will reach a car park designated for campers. The river and falls were named "Berkelah", because once upon a time ago, there were ikan kelah, or mahseer in the river. The species has suffered a severe population decline, and are now considered threatened, due to habitat loss.
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Granuja Falls

    Granuja Falls

    Granuja Falls is a waterfall located in Uvas Canyon County Park, near Morgan Hill, California. Nearby falls include Basin Falls, Black Rock Falls, Triple Falls and Upper Falls.
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Punch Bowl Falls

    Punch Bowl Falls

    Punch Bowl Falls is a waterfall on Eagle Creek in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon, United States. Eagle Creek drains into the Columbia River, with its outlet on the Columbia River Gorge in Multnomah County. The falls is 35 feet (11 m) tall and 10 feet (3.0 m) wide. Eagle Creek cuts through a narrow channel and shoots powerfully into a large bowl that resembles a punchbowl. This waterfall was responsible for the waterfall classification type of punchbowl.
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Shoshone Falls

    Shoshone Falls

    Shoshone Falls (/ʃoʊˈʃoʊniː/ or /ʃəˈʃoʊniː/) is a waterfall on the Snake River located approximately five miles east of Twin Falls, Idaho. Sometimes called the "Niagara of the West," Shoshone Falls is 212 feet (64.7 m) high—45 feet (14 m) higher than Niagara Falls—and flows over a rim 1,000 feet (305 m) wide. A park overlooking the waterfall is owned and operated by the City of Twin Falls. Shoshone Falls is best viewed in the spring, as diversion of the Snake River for irrigation often significantly diminishes water levels in the summer and fall. Shoshone Falls has existed at least since the end of the last ice age, when the Bonneville Flood carved much of the Snake River canyon and surrounding valleys. It is a total barrier to the upstream movement of fish. The falls were the upper limit of sturgeon, and spawning runs of salmon and steelhead could not pass the falls. Yellowstone cutthroat trout lived above the falls in the same ecological niche as Rainbow Trout below it. Due to this marked difference, the World Wide Fund for Nature used Shoshone Falls as the boundary between the Upper Snake and the Columbia Unglaciated freshwater ecoregions. Prior to the construction of the many
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Silverthread Falls

    Silverthread Falls

    Silverthread Falls is a waterfall located in Dingmans Ferry in Delaware Township, Pike County, Pennsylvania, United States, near Dingmans Falls. It has a vertical drop of 24.3 m (80 ft).
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Athabasca Falls

    Athabasca Falls

    Athabasca Falls is a waterfall in Jasper National Park on the upper Athabasca River, approximately 30 kilometres south of the townsite of Jasper, Alberta, Canada, and just west of the Icefields Parkway. A powerful, picturesque waterfall, Athabasca Falls is not known so much for the height of the falls (23 metres), as it is known for its force due to the large quantity of water falling into the gorge. Even on a cold morning in the fall, when river levels tend to be at their lowest, copious amounts of water flow over the falls. The river 'falls' over a layer of hard quartzite and through the softer limestone below carving the short gorge and a number of potholes. The falls are able to be safely viewed and photographed from various viewing platforms and walking trails around the falls. Access is from the nearby parking lot, which leads off Highway 93A just northeast of the falls. Highway 93A takes off from the nearby Icefields Parkway, and crosses the falls on the way north to the town of Jasper. White water rafting often starts below the falls to travel downstream on the Athabasca River to Jasper, Alberta. It is a class 5 waterfall, with a drop of 80 ft (24 m) and a width of 60 ft
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Goomoolahra Falls

    Goomoolahra Falls

    Goomoolahra Falls are found within the Springbrook section of Springbrook National Park in Springbrook, part of the Gold Coast hinterland district of South East Queensland, Australia. At the base of the waterfall the moist conditions have created a good habitat for the giant spear lily.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Goðafoss

    Goðafoss

    The Goðafoss (Icelandic: waterfall of the gods or waterfall of the goði) is one of the most spectacular waterfalls in Iceland. It is located in the Mývatn district of North-Central Iceland at the beginning of the Sprengisandur highland road. The water of the river Skjálfandafljót falls from a height of 12 meters over a width of 30 meters. In the year 999 or 1000 the Lawspeaker Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði made Christianity the official religion of Iceland. After his conversion it is said that upon returning from the Alþingi, Þorgeir threw his statues of the Norse gods into the waterfall. Þorgeir's story is preserved in Ari Þorgilsson's Íslendingabók. A window in the Cathedral of Akureyri (Akureyrarkirkja) illustrates this story. Named after the waterfall was MS Goðafoss, an Icelandic ship carrying both freight and passengers, that was sunk by a German U-Boat in World War II, resulting in great loss of lives.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Purakaunui Falls

    Purakaunui Falls

    The Purakaunui Falls are a cascading multi-tiered waterfall on the Purakaunui River, located in the Catlins in the southern South Island of New Zealand. A highly distinctive cataract, it is an iconic image for southeastern New Zealand, and were featured on a New Zealand postage stamp in 1976. The falls are located 17 km (11 mi) to the southwest of the small town of Owaka and five kilometres (3 miles) from the river's outflow into the Pacific Ocean. They can be reached via a short, well-signposted bush walk from a gravel side-road off the main Owaka-Invercargill road. The falls are in an isolated area surrounded by native bush in a scenic reserve of 5 km (1.9 sq mi), and fall 20 m (66 ft) in three tiers.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Russell Falls

    Russell Falls

    Russell Falls are located on the eastern boundary of Mount Field National Park, in Tasmania, Australia. Accessible by a paved walking track, the falls are a popular tourist attraction. They were first named the Brownings Falls after the original discoverer, c.1856, but were known as the Russell Falls after 1884, by which time they were already a popular tourist attraction. The Falls Reserve was established to protect them in 1885. In 1899 the Russell Falls were selected as one of eight images to be used on a set of pictorial postage stamps, aimed at promoting the then colony's growing tourist industry. Russell Falls are located 100 metres downstream of Horseshoe Falls. The horizontal rock strata over which the falls flow are Permian siltstone, and their more-resistant vertical faces consist of sandstone. The surrounding plant life includes swamp gum and sassafras.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Smith Falls

    Smith Falls

    Smith Falls, at 63 feet (19 m), is the highest waterfall in the state of Nebraska. Located 18 miles (29 km) east of Valentine, the falls is part of Smith Falls State Park and is adjacent to the Niobrara National Scenic River. The state park was established by the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission in 1992; in 1996, a footbridge was built across the Niobrara River to provide more convenient public access. The falls are on a short spring-fed stream that plunges into a small canyon on the south side of the Niobrara. As the canyon is narrow and sheltered from direct sunlight, it is much cooler than the surrounding landscape; this allows a unique set of flora to grow that is atypical for the Sand Hills of Nebraska. The canyon is home to Paper Birch and an endemic hybrid grove of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) and bigtooth aspen (P. grandidentata). During the Wisconsin glaciation, which ended around 10,000 years ago, north-central Nebraska was much cooler than it is today. The ice age climate supported boreal forest trees like birches, spruces, and aspens, all of which currently predominate in Canada. As the glaciers retreated, so did the boreal forest, which is ill-suited for hot,
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Union Falls

    Union Falls

    Union Falls ht. 250 feet (76 m) is a waterfall on Mountain Ash Creek, a tributary of the Fall River in the Cascade Corner (southwest) of Yellowstone National Park. It is the second highest waterfall in Yellowstone exceeded in height only by the lower Yellowstone Falls. The falls got its name from members of the Arnold Hague Geological Surveys sometime between 1884-86. Geologist J.P. Iddings claims the name derives from the fact that a tributary of Mountain Ash Creek joins at the very brink of the falls, thus Union Falls. Access to the falls is via the Mountain Ash Creek trail and the Grassy Lake Road.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Whitewater Falls

    Whitewater Falls

    Upper Whitewater Falls is a waterfall in North Carolina on the Whitewater River. As with most of North Carolina's waterfalls, it is in the mountainous area of the state. There is a cluster of falls in the area where the borders of Georgia and the Carolinas come together. Whitewater Falls is part of that group, very close to the South Carolina border. The waterfall is protected by the Nantahala National Forest. Although some claim that Whitewater Falls is simply the tallest East of the Mississippi, that title may belong to Crabtree Falls in Virginia, depending on how one defines "waterfall". In fact, there is debate as to whether Whitewater falls is the tallest waterfall in North Carolina, as there are some in the state which may lay claim to being even taller, such as Glassmine Falls on the Blue Ridge Parkway. There is a Lower Whitewater Falls in South Carolina about 2 miles downstream from Upper Whitewater Falls. Visitors to the falls must pay a $2 fee to view the falls. There are several viewing platforms at varying heights that offer different views of the falls. The area surrounding the falls is sufficiently treacherous that hiking off-trail in the area is strongly discouraged
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Willamette Falls

    Willamette Falls

    The Willamette Falls is a natural waterfall on the Willamette River between Oregon City and West Linn, Oregon, in the United States. It is the largest waterfall in the Pacific Northwest by water volume, second largest in the United States behind Niagara Falls, and the eighteenth largest in the world. Horseshoe in shape, it is 1,500 feet (460 m) wide and 40 feet (12 m) high with a flow of 30,849 cu ft/s (874 m³/s), located 26 miles (42 km) upriver from the Willamette's mouth. Until 2011 a canal and set of locks allowed vessels to pass into the main Willamette Valley. Those locks are now closed. Native American legends taught that the falls were placed there by a great god so that their people would have fish to eat all winter. Many local tribes built villages in the area because of the abundance of salmon that could only pass the falls at certain water levels. Native Americans still harvest Pacific Lamprey at the falls each year in the early summer. Willamette Falls is a traditional fishing site for the Warm Springs Indians as well as other tribes. It was first discovered by European fur traders in 1810. John McLoughlin established a land claim at the falls in the name of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Geli Eli Beg Waterfall

    Geli Eli Beg Waterfall

    Gali Ali Beg Waterfall is located in the Iraqi Kurdistan which lies in the mountainous northern part of the country in the Kurdistan Region, northern Arbil. This waterfall is host for many visitors and tourists across the country.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Mill Creek Falls

    Mill Creek Falls

    Prospect State Scenic Viewpoint, is a state park in the U.S. state of Oregon. It was formerly known as Mill Creek Falls Scenic Area, a private hiking area that was developed by Willamette Industries near the community of Prospect on Oregon Route 62 in Jackson County. Both Mill Creek Falls and Pearsony Falls are contained within the area, with Barr Creek Falls close by. A hydroelectric dam was built in the 1920s which drained the narrow valley containing the group of falls. A group of large boulders appeared. These have become a local attraction known as the Avenue of the Giant Boulders. Media related to Prospect State Scenic Viewpoint at Wikimedia Commons
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Minnehaha Falls

    Minnehaha Falls

    Minnehaha Falls cascade about 100 feet over a stair-stepped rock formation. They are located on Falls Creek in Rabun County, Georgia within the boundaries of the Chattahoochee National Forest in the Chattooga River Ranger District and are near Lake Rabun. The falls can be reached by a short trail (0.4 miles) from Bear Gap Road called the Minnehaha Trail. The trail is maintained by the U.S. Forest Service. Minnehaha Falls are considered by some to be the most picturesque in Rabun County.
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Ngonye Falls

    Ngonye Falls

    The Ngonye Falls or Sioma Falls are a waterfall on the Zambezi river in Western Zambia, near the town of Sioma and a few hundred kilometers upstream from the Victoria Falls. Situated in the southern part of Barotseland, the falls are a difficult two or three day journey from the capital, Lusaka. Their inaccessibility makes them much less known than Victoria Falls. The falls are formed by the same geological process as Victoria Falls, with cracks in the basalt riverbed being eroded away to form the drop. Their height is only 10-25 meters, but the width of the falls is impressive. They form a broad crescent, interrupted by rocky outcrops. Upstream from the falls, the river is broad and shallow as it flows across Kalahari sands, but below the falls extensive white water rapids exist, as the river is hemmed in by gorges cut into basalt rock. The surrounding area supports extensive wildlife, especially in the nearby Sioma Ngwezi National Park, and elephants are frequently seen by the river in the vicinity of the falls.
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Chunchanakatte Falls

    Chunchanakatte Falls

    Chunchanakatte Falls is a waterfall on the Kaveri River, near the village of Chunchanakatte in Mysore district, Karnataka, India. Water cascades from a height of about 20 meters. It is in the Western Ghats. Here the river falls in two small cascades before joining again to flow as one. The waterfall can be reached by taking a diversion at Krishnarajanagar on the Mysore-Hassan highway. The diversion is on the left at the circle in the town of KR Nagar. A subsequent right turn on to a mud road leads to the waterfall. It is located at approximately 15 km from the town of KR Nagar. Chunchanakatte is the holy place where Lord Sri Rama during his vanvas stopped by and availed the hospitality of a tribal couple called Chuncha and Chunchi. The significance of this place is that the sound of the powerful falls can be heard all over except inside the sanctum sanctorum of the centuries old temple, the story goes that Lord Rama was tired of the constant complaining of Sita Mata and gave a curse saying that the tongue of a woman should not be sharp and since Cauvery (river) is considered to be female the noise that the river generated would not be heard in the sanctum sanctorum of the lord. It
    7.33
    3 votes
    83
    Gullfoss

    Gullfoss

    Gullfoss (English: Golden Falls) is a waterfall located in the canyon of Hvítá river in southwest Iceland. Gullfoss is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the country. The wide Hvítá rushes southward. About a kilometer above the falls it turns sharply to the left and flows down into a wide curved three-step "staircase" and then abruptly plunges in two stages (11 m and 21 m) into a crevice 32 m (105 ft) deep. The crevice, about 20 m (60 ft) wide, and 2.5 km in length, is at right angles to the flow of the river. The average amount of water running over this waterfall is 140 m³/s in the summertime and 80 m³/s in the wintertime. The highest flood measured was 2000 m³/s. As one first approaches the falls, the crevice is obscured from view, so that it appears that a mighty river simply vanishes into the earth. During the first half of the 20th century and some years into the late 20th century, there was much speculation about using Gullfoss to generate electricity. During this period, the waterfall was rented indirectly by its owners, Tómas Tómasson and Halldór Halldórsson, to foreign investors. However, the investors' attempts were unsuccessful, partly due to lack of money.
    7.33
    3 votes
    84
    Iguazu Falls

    Iguazu Falls

    Iguazu Falls, Iguassu Falls or Iguaçu Falls (Portuguese: Cataratas do Iguaçu [kataˈɾatɐz du iɡwaˈsu]; Spanish: Cataratas del Iguazú [kataˈɾatas ðel iɣwaˈsu]; Guarani: Chororo Yguasu [ɕoɾoɾo ɨɣʷasu]) are waterfalls of the Iguazu River on the border of Brazilian State Paraná and Argentine Province Misiones. The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. The Iguazu River rises near the city of Curitiba. It flows through Brazil for most of its course. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, the Iguazu River forms the boundary between Argentina and Brazil. The name "Iguazu" comes from the Guarani or Tupi words "y" [ɨ], meaning "water", and "ûasú "[waˈsu], meaning "big". Legend has it that a god planned to marry a beautiful woman named Naipí, who fled with her mortal lover Tarobá in a canoe. In rage, the god sliced the river, creating the waterfalls and condemning the lovers to an eternal fall. The first European to find the falls was the Spanish conquistador Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca in 1541. Iguazu Falls is located where the Iguazu River tumbles over the edge of the Paraná Plateau, 23 kilometres (14 mi) upriver from the Iguazu's confluence with the Paraná River.
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Low Force

    Low Force

    Low Force is a 5.5m high set of falls in the Tees Valley, England. Further upstream is the High Force waterfall. Low Force is also the site of the Wynch Bridge, completed in 1830. It is suggested that only one person at a time should cross the bridge as it may be unstable. Low Force is within the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and European Geopark
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Murchison Falls

    Murchison Falls

    Murchison Falls, also known as Kabarega Falls, is a waterfall on the Nile. It breaks the Victoria Nile, which flows across northern Uganda from Lake Victoria to Lake Kyoga and then to the north end of Lake Albert in the western branch of the East African Rift. At the top of Murchison Falls, the Nile forces its way through a gap in the rocks, only 7 metres (23 ft) wide, and tumbles 43 metres (141 ft), then flows westward into Lake Albert. The outlet of Lake Victoria sends around 300 cubic metres per second (11,000 ft³/s) of water over the falls, squeezed into a gorge less than ten metres (30 ft) wide. Sir Samuel Baker named them after Sir Roderick Murchison, president of the Royal Geographical Society. The falls lend their name to the surrounding Murchison Falls National Park. During the regime of Idi Amin in the 1970s the name was changed to Kabarega Falls, after the Omukama (King) Kabarega of Bunyoro, although this was never legally promulgated. The name reverted to Murchison Falls following the downfall of Idi Amin It is still sometimes referred to as Kabarega Falls. Ernest Hemingway crashed a plane just downriver from Murchison Falls in 1954
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Nunobiki Falls

    Nunobiki Falls

    Nunobiki Falls (布引の滝, Nunobiki no Taki) is a set of waterfalls near downtown Kobe, Japan, with an important significance in Japanese literature and Japanese art. In Japan, Nunobiki is considered one of the greatest "divine falls" together with Kegon Falls and Nachi Falls. Nunobiki waterfalls comprises four separate falls: Ondaki, Mendaki, Tsusumigadaki, and Meotodaki. A well-known section of the Tales of Ise describes a trip taken by a minor official and his guests to Nunobiki Falls. They begin a poetry-writing contest, to which one of the guests, a commander of the guards, contributes: The minor official offers his own composition:
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Chilnualna Falls

    Chilnualna Falls

    Chilnualna Falls is a series of waterfalls totaling 690 feet (210 m), located on Chilnualna Creek in the southern section of Yosemite National Park. The falls are a popular horseback riding destination. Chilnualna Falls consists of five tiers ranging from 30–300 feet (9–91 m) in height. The first tier is 90–120 feet (27–36 m) high. The second is a 30-foot (9 m) high cascade. The third and largest is 300 feet (91 m) high. The fourth is 60 feet (18 m) high. The final tier is a 180–210 foot (54–64 m) high cascade. The trailhead to the falls is in the eastern extremity of Wawona, at the end of Chilnualna Creek Road. The trailhead elevation is approximately 4,000 feet (1,200 m), and the trail reaches the main portion of the waterfall at 6,200 feet (1,900 m).
    6.25
    4 votes
    89
    Kaieteur Falls

    Kaieteur Falls

    Kaieteur Falls is a high-volume waterfall on the Potaro River in central Guyana, Potaro-Siparuni region. It is located in Kaieteur National Park. It is 226 meters (741 ft) high when measured from its plunge over a sandstone and conglomerate cliff to the first break. It then flows over a series of steep cascades that, when included in the measurements, bring the total height to 251 meters (822 ft). While many falls have greater height, few have the combination of height and water volume. This has given Kaieteur Falls the misleading label of "largest single drop" waterfall in the world which is often misinterpreted as "tallest single drop." However, it is likely one of the most powerful waterfalls in the world . Kaieteur Falls is about three times higher than the more well known Niagara Falls, located on the border between Canada and the United States and about two times the height of the Victoria Falls located on the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe in Africa. It is a single drop waterfall which is the 123rd tallest (single and multi-drop waterfall) in the world, according to the World Waterfall Database. The same web site lists it as 19th largest waterfall in terms of volume , and in
    6.25
    4 votes
    90
    Margoon Waterfall

    Margoon Waterfall

    Margoon (Margun) Waterfall is located in the Fars province of Iran near the city of Sepidan. Its name means in Persian "snake like".
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    Stoney Creek Falls

    Stoney Creek Falls

    Stoney Creek Falls are found in the Barron Gorge National Park, north-east of Cairns, in Queensland, Australia. The falls are formed where Stoney Creek starts to descend in steps from the shoulders of the gorge. The falls are best known for the curved lattice railway bridge that passes in front of them. This gives passengers aboard the Kuranda Scenic Railway and The Savannahlander an excellent view of the falls as their train crosses the creek.
    6.25
    4 votes
    92
    Amoskeag Falls

    Amoskeag Falls

    The Amoskeag Falls are a set of waterfalls located in Manchester, New Hampshire on the Merrimack River. "Amoskeag" derives from the Pennacook word "Namoskeag," which roughly translates as "good fishing place.” Here, the Merrimack River drops 50 feet (15 m). Native American tribes in the region visited Amoskeag Falls due to its plentiful migrating sturgeon, alewife, and salmon, which were easily fished in the rapids. Natives typically caught fish using a combination of large nets strung across the river. Significant native settlements were sited near the falls, particularly on the high bluffs overlooking the east side of the river. In 1807, Samuel Blodgett started a canal and lock system at the river to help vessels navigate around the falls, opening the area to development. This soon led to the use of the falls for a power canal to provide water power for Manchester's 19th century industrial development, most notable for the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Due to the significance of the falls in Manchester history, a number of local companies have adopted their name. Examples include the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company (which operated a majority of Manchester's textile mills until
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Cohoes Falls

    Cohoes Falls

    Cohoes Falls is a waterfall on the Mohawk River shared by the city of Cohoes and the town of Waterford, New York, United States. Discovered by the indigenous Mohawk tribe, the falls were originally called Ga-ha-oose, which is believed to mean "The Place of the Falling Canoe." Cohoes historian Arthur Masten wrote in his 1880 history that the phrase might mean "Potholes in the River," referring to the potholes that appear in the riverbed when it is dry. In the oral tradition of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), the Cohoes Falls are the site where The Great Peacemaker, performed a feat of supernatural strength, convincing the Mohawk people to become the founders of the Iroquois League of Nations or Confederacy. Some historians believe the Mohawks launched the Confederacy as early as 1142 CE, though other experts report dates ranging from 1450-1650. Celebrated by 18th century travelers in letters and journals, the Cohoes Falls, also called The Great Falls of the Mohawk, were regarded as the second most beautiful cataract in New York State after Niagara. In 1804, the national poet of Ireland, Thomas Moore, visited Cohoes and wrote a paean to the waterfall's beauty: "Lines Written at the
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Huangguoshu Falls

    Huangguoshu Falls

    Huangguoshu Waterfall (simplified Chinese: 黄果树瀑布; traditional Chinese: 黃果樹瀑布; pinyin: huáng guǒshù pùbù; Wade–Giles: Huang-kuo-shu p'u-pu; literally "Yellow-Fruit Tree Waterfalls"), is one of the largest waterfalls in China and East Asia located on the Baishui River (白水河) in Anshun, Guizhou province. It is 77.8 m (255 ft) high and 101 m (331 ft) wide. The main waterfall is 67 m (220 ft) high and 83.3 m (273 ft) wide. Known as the Huangguoshu Waterfall National Park, it is 45 km (28 mi) southwest of Anshun City. Together with minor waterfalls, the charms of the waterfall is a natural tourist draw, classified as a AAAAA scenic area by the China National Tourism Administration. Huangguoshu Waterfall's vista changes depending on the location of the viewer. One viewing spot is Waterfall-Viewing Pavilion (Guan Bao ting), where you see the whole waterfall from a distance. Another is Water-Viewing Stage (Guan Bao Ting) where you get a bird's eye view. The third is Waterfall-Viewing Stage (Guan Bao Tai) in which you raise your head to see the scene. There is a special line of buses servicing Huangguoshu Waterfall, the Dragon's Palace at Guiyang, and Anshun railway stations. The
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Kisdon Force

    Kisdon Force

    Kisdon Force is a series of waterfalls on the River Swale in Swaledale, England. The falls are situated at grid reference NY898010 within the Yorkshire Dales National Park in the county of North Yorkshire, 500 metres downstream from the small hamlet of Keld. Kisdon Force is one of several waterfalls on the Swale in the Keld area, the others being East Gill Force, Catrake Force and Wain Wath Force. All occur where the river cuts a gorge through the Carboniferous limestone between the hills of Kisdon and Rogan's Seat. The falls in this area are termed forces after the Norse word fors or foss, which means "waterfall". Both upper and lower Kisdon Force can be negotiated by canoeists, although a high degree of skill and experience is needed. The upper falls are rated Grade IV, while the lower falls are rated more difficult at Grade V. The falls drop 10 metres (33 ft) over two cascades and are surrounded by Kisdon Force Woods, a Site of Special Scientific Interest covering an area of 38 hectares, which consists of mixed broad-leaved woodland with ash, wych elm and rowan trees dominating. In the springtime Primula vulgaris grows profusely in the area. The falls can be easily visited by a
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Rideau Falls

    Rideau Falls

    The Rideau Falls are two waterfalls located in Ottawa, Canada where the Rideau River empties into the Ottawa River. The falls are divided by Green Island, with the Old City Hall just to the south. To the west of the falls is the headquarters of the National Research Council while to the east are the Canada and the World Pavilion and the French Embassy. The falls were named by the early French for their resemblance to a curtain, or rideau in French. The Rideau River was later named after the falls. The Rideau Canal was constructed to bypass these falls and the Hog's Back Falls. Flickr Photos of Rideau Falls
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Tumwater Falls

    Tumwater Falls

    Tumwater Falls are a series of cascades on the Deschutes River in Tumwater, Washington, United States, near where the river empties into Budd Inlet, a southerly arm of Puget Sound in Olympia. Tumwater Falls was the site of New Market, the first European settlement in Western Washington. It was also the site of the now-defunct Olympia Brewing Company. The Tumwater Falls created an impassible barrier to salmon until 1952, when a fish ladder was built by the Washington Department of Fisheries (now the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife), to provide salmon access to the newly constructed fish hatchery located immediately above the falls. Prior to the 1952 hatchery operations, the Deschutes river above the Tumwater Falls was a river system free of the influence of migrating and spawning salmon, an unusual ecological occurrence in the riparian systems of Puget Sound.
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Carrington Falls

    Carrington Falls

    Carrington Falls are located where the Kangaroo River crosses the western escarpment of the Budderoo Plateau to descend to the Kangaroo Valley in New South Wales, Australia. Protected within the Budderoo National Park, viewing platforms of the falls are wheelchair accessible.
    6.00
    4 votes
    99
    Great Falls

    Great Falls

    The Great Falls of the Potomac River are located at the fall line of the Potomac River, 14 miles (23 km) upstream from Washington, D.C. Great Falls Park, operated by the National Park Service, is located on the southern banks in Virginia, while Chesapeake and Ohio Canal parkland is located along the northern banks of the river in Maryland. The Potomac and the falls themselves are within Maryland. The Billy Goat Trail on Bear Island, accessible from Maryland, offers scenic views of the Great Falls, as do vantage points on Olmsted Island (also accessible from Maryland) and overlook points on the Virginia side. The Great Falls area is popular for outdoor activities such as kayaking, whitewater rafting, rock climbing, and hiking. Roughly 35,000 years ago, The Potomac River began carving out the Great Falls of the Potomac. The river cascades over a series of 20-foot (6.1 m) falls, falling a total of 76 feet (23 m) in elevation over a distance of less than 1 mile (1.6 km), making the Great Falls the steepest fall line rapids of any river in the eastern United States. The Potomac narrows significantly as it passes over the falls and through Mather Gorge. Heavy rain or snow in the
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    Takakkaw Falls

    Takakkaw Falls

    Takakkaw Falls ( /ˈtækəkɔː/) is a waterfall located in Yoho National Park, near Field, British Columbia, in Canada. Its highest point is 384 metres (1,260 ft) from its base, making it the second-highest officially measured waterfall in western Canada, after Della Falls on Vancouver Island. However its true "free-fall" is only 254 metres (833 ft). "Takakkaw", loosely translated from Cree, means something like "it is magnificent". The falls are fed by the Daly Glacier, which is part of the Waputik Icefield. The glacier keeps the volume of the falls up during the warm summer months, and they are a tourist attraction, particularly in late spring after the heavy snow melts, when the falls are at peak condition. The Takakkaw Falls were featured in the 1995 film Last of the Dogmen.
    6.00
    4 votes
    101
    Aysgarth Falls

    Aysgarth Falls

    Aysgarth Falls are a triple flight of waterfalls, surrounded by forest and farmland, carved out by the River Ure over an almost a one-mile stretch on its descent to mid-Wensleydale in the Yorkshire Dales of England, near the village of Aysgarth. The falls are quite spectacular during wet weather, as thousands of gallons of water cascade over the series of broad limestone steps. Aysgarth Falls have attracted visitors for over 200 years; Ruskin, Turner and Wordsworth visited, all enthusing about the falls’ outstanding beauty. The upper fall was featured in the film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. In addition to the falls, there are walks which wind through the wooded valley, offering views of the river and falls. Wild flowers appear in the spring and summer, and wild birds, squirrels and deer may also be seen. Nearby is St Andrew's church, which has a large churchyard, reputed to be the largest in England. The church has a medieval painted wooden screen rescued from the destroyed Jervaulx Abbey. The name originates from old Norse, meaning the open space in the oak trees. It was featured on the television programme Seven Natural Wonders as one of the wonders of the North.
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Black Rock Falls

    Black Rock Falls

    Black Rock Falls is located in Uvas Canyon County Park, near Morgan Hill, California. Nearby falls include Basin Falls, Granuja Falls, Triple Falls and Upper Falls. 37°04′57″N 121°48′03″W / 37.08246, -121.80095
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Detian Falls

    Detian Falls

    Ban Gioc – Detian Falls (Chinese: 德天瀑布 & 板約瀑布 - Vietnamese: Thác Bản Giốc & Thác Đức Thiên) are 2 waterfalls on the Quây Sơn River or Guichun River straddling the Sino-Vietnamese border, located in the Karst hills of Daxin County in the Chongzuo prefecture-level city of Guangxi Province, on the Chinese side, and in the district of Trung Khanh District, Cao Bằng province on the Vietnamese side, 272 km north of Hanoi. The waterfall drops thirty meters. It is separated into three falls by rocks and trees, and the thundering effect of the water hitting the cliffs can be heard from afar. It is currently the 4th largest waterfall along a national border, after Iguazu Falls, Victoria Falls, and Niagara Falls and was one of the crossing points for China’s army during the brief Sino-Vietnamese War. Nearby there is the Tongling Gorge accessible only through a cavern from an adjoining gorge. Rediscovered only recently, it has many species of endemic plants, found only in the gorge, and in the past was used as a hideout by local bandits, whose treasure is occasionally still found in the cliff-side caves. A road running along the top of the falls leads to a stone marker that demarcates the
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Eas a' Chual Aluinn

    Eas a' Chual Aluinn

    Eas a' Chual Aluinn (grid reference NC281278) in the parish of Assynt, Sutherland, Highland, Scotland, is Britain's highest waterfall with a sheer drop of 658 ft (200 m). When in full flow it is over three times higher than Niagara Falls. The waterfall can be reached by a six mile walk across boggy ground from the road three miles south of Kylesku in Sutherland, Scotland. In good weather, a boat-trip runs from the slipway by the Kylesku Hotel to Loch Beag, from where the waterfall is visible. The same boat also runs trips to Kerrachar Gardens at the other end of the loch. The name is a corruption of Scottish Gaelic "Eas a' Chùil Àlainn", ("waterfall of the beautiful tresses").
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Rippon Falls

    Rippon Falls

    Ripon Falls at the northern end of Lake Victoria in Uganda is often considered the source of the river Nile. In 1862–3 John Hanning Speke was the first European to follow the course of the Nile downstream after discovering the falls that his intuition had marked as the source of the Nile. He named the falls after George Robinson, 1st Marquess of Ripon. The Falls functioned as a natural outlet for Lake Victoria, until in 1954 the construction of Owen Falls Dam was completed, effectively extending Lake Victoria and submerging Ripon Falls.  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Seljalandsfoss

    Seljalandsfoss

    Seljalandsfoss is one of the most famous waterfalls of Iceland. It is very picturesque and therefore its photo can be found in many books and calendars. It was a waypoint during the first leg of The Amazing Race 6. Seljalandsfoss is situated in between Selfoss and Skógafoss at the road crossing of Route 1 (the Ring Road) with the track going into Þórsmörk. This waterfall of the river Seljalandsá drops 60 metres (200 ft) over the cliffs of the former coastline. It is possible to go behind the waterfall.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Skakavac

    Skakavac

    Skakavac is a waterfall located 12 km from Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Its height is about 98 meters. The Skakavac waterfall near Sarajevo is one of the greatest and most attractive waterfalls in BiH and it stands for a real tourist attraction. The waterfall is 98 meters high and placed in the landscape of exceptional beauty. The surroundings are one of the most heterogenic areas in that region dominated by spruce and fir and beech and fir forests with spruce on more pronounced slopes. On shallow carbon grounds in the vicinity of the waterfall, there are termofil forests and underbrushes of eastern hornbeam and autumn locust as well as eastern hornbeam and manna ash. The rocks surrounding the waterfall have a very interesting vegetation dominated by endemic and relic types. The waterfall at Skakavac is for more than one reason, one of the most attractive tourist sites in the vicinity of Sarajevo. The name Skakavac means grasshopper in Bosnian.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Wailua Falls

    Wailua Falls

    Wailua Falls is an 173-foot waterfall located in Kauai, Hawaii that feeds into the Wailua River. There is a path to the bottom of the falls, but it is muddy, slippery and dangerous. Some hikers have strung ropes along the path, but officials come by every so often and cut them. In ancient times, Hawaiian men would jump from the top of the falls to prove their manhood. There is another waterfall nearby named 'Opaeka'a Falls. The Falls were featured on the opening credits of the television show Fantasy Island.
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Athirappilly Falls

    Athirappilly Falls

    Athirappilly Falls is situated in Athirappilly panchayath in Thrissur district of Kerala, on the southwest coast of India. Located on the west-flowing Chalakudy River near the Vazhachal Forest Division and the Sholayar ranges, this 24-metre (80 ft) waterfall and the nearby Vazhachal Falls are popular tourist destinations. It is nicknamed "The Niagara of India". Controversy about a state-proposed hydroelectric dam on the Chalakudy River above the waterfalls began in the 1990s and has continued through 2011. The 145 kilometres (90 mi) long Chalakudy River, originates in the Anamudi mountains of the Western Ghats and flows through the Vazhachal Forest toward the Arabian Sea. The river initially runs smoothly but becomes more turbulent as it nears Athirappilly. At Athirappilly Falls, the water surges around big rocks and cascades down in three separate plumes. Below the falls, the river remains turbulent for about 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) until it reaches Kannamkuzhi. Then it calms and flows smoothly until reaching the dam at Thumburmuzhi. Forest wildlife in the area includes the Asiatic elephant, tiger, leopard, bison, sambar, and lion-tailed macaque. The unique 180 metres (590 ft)
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Bridal Veil Falls

    Bridal Veil Falls

    Bridal Veil Falls is a waterfall near the town of Kagawong on Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada. The water source is the Kagawong River which flows between Lake Kagawong and Lake Huron. It has a height of approximately 35 feet (11 m). There is a short hiking trail from the fall down to Lake Huron. It is easily accessible, just off Highway 540.
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Cuquenan Falls

    Cuquenan Falls

    Cuquenan Falls (or Salto Kukenan, Kukenaam, or similar) is the second tallest major waterfall in Venezuela after Angel Falls. It is also the second tallest free-leaping waterfall in the world. Overall, it is usually cited as the 11th highest waterfall in the world. The falls drop in a single leap of around 2,000 feet (610 m) and the final portion of the falls trickles down towards the base of the Kukenan Tepui. The Kukenan Tepui is located near Mount Roraima, which serves as the geographical marker of the border between Brazil, Venezuela, and Guyana. Mount Roraima also hosts its own waterfall, usually referred to as Roraima Falls, which leaps off the tepui in four tiered leaps. The height is estimated at approximately 2,000 feet (610 m). There has been some controversy over the years regarding the overall ranking of Cuquenan Falls among the world's tallest waterfalls. It has been listed anywhere from 2nd to 20th in various publications and Internet sites. Such discrepancies probably arise because most official measurements of the falls take into consideration only the free-leaping portion, omitting the bottom part that cascades along the tepui. Some published listings incorporate
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Falls of Dochart

    Falls of Dochart

    The Falls of Dochart are situated on the River Dochart at Killin in Stirling (formally in Perthshire), Scotland at the western end of Loch Tay. A bridge crosses over the river just as you enter Killin giving a fabulous view of the falls as they cascade down over the rocks and around the island of Inchbuie, which is the traditional burial place of the MacNab clan.
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Ófærufoss

    Ófærufoss

    Ófærufoss is a waterfall situated in the Eldgjá chasm in central Iceland. Until the early 1990s a natural bridge spanned the falls, but it collapsed from natural causes.
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Scale Force

    Scale Force

    Scale Force is considered the highest waterfall in the English Lake District. Opinions can vary about how its precise height is calculated, but the total height is normally stated as 170 feet (51.8m), with a single drop of water of 120 feet (36.6m) and several smaller drops. It is on the stream Scale Beck. The waterfall – or force (a Cumbrian term for waterfall) – is hidden in a deep gorge on the northern flank of Red Pike (Buttermere). It lies south of Crummock Water and is near the village of Buttermere. William Wordsworth described Scale Force as "a fine chasm, with a lofty, though but slender, fall of water", while Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote: "Scale Force, the white downfall of which glimmered through the trees, that hang before it like the bushy hair over a madman's eyes".
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Turner Falls, Oklahoma

    Turner Falls, Oklahoma

    Turner Falls, at 77 feet (23 m), is locally considered Oklahoma's tallest waterfall, although its height matches one in Natural Falls State Park. The falls are located on Honey Creek in the Arbuckle Mountains in south central Oklahoma, near the city of Davis. The falls are named after Mazeppa Thomas Turner, a farmer who settled in the area in 1878 and discovered them. Recreational use began in or before 1868. Today, the falls are part of Turner Falls Park, a city park operated by the city of Davis, Oklahoma. The Falls cascade into a natural swimming pool, one of two such pools within the park, and these are popular tourist destinations in the summer. The park covers 1,500 acres (6.1 km), and also contains nature trails, caves and other interesting geological features. It also has a walk-in castle which was built in the 1930s. The venue can be crowded in summer. Reviews of the location at TripAdvisor give an average score of 3 out of 5, but express a wide range of opinions.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Angel Falls

    Angel Falls

    Angel Falls (Spanish: Salto Ángel; Pemon language: Kerepakupai Vená, meaning "waterfall of the deepest place", or Parakupá Vená, meaning "the fall from the highest point" is a waterfall in Venezuela. It is the world's highest uninterrupted waterfall, with a height of 979 m (3,212 ft) and a plunge of 807 m (2,648 ft). The waterfall drops over the edge of the Auyantepui mountain in the Canaima National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Canaima), a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Gran Sabana region of Bolívar State. The height figure 979 m (3,212 ft) mostly consists of the main plunge but also includes about 400 m (0.25 mi) of sloped cascades and rapids below the drop and a 30-metre (98 ft) high plunge downstream of the talus rapids. The base of the falls feeds into the Kerep River (alternatively known as the Río Gauya), which flows into the Churun River, a tributary of the Carrao River. The waterfall has been "Angel Falls" for most of the twentieth century, named after Jimmie Angel, a US aviator who was the first to fly over the falls in a plane. The common Spanish name "Salto Ángel" derives from his surname. In 2009, President Hugo Chávez announced his intention to change the name to
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Barron Falls

    Barron Falls

    Barron Falls is where the Barron River makes its descent from the Atherton Tablelands to the Cairns coastal plain, in Queensland, Australia. Protected within the Barron Gorge National Park, the volume of water seen in the upper photo only occurs after substantial rainfall during the wet season. For much of the rest of the year, little more than a trickle is evident, due in part to the presence of a weir behind the head of the falls that exists to supply the Barron Gorge Hydroelectric Power Station located downstream in the gorge proper. There are three ways to visit and view Barron Falls: highway, narrow-gauge railway (Kuranda Scenic Railway), and aerial tram (Skyrail). The train stops at Barron Falls overlook, where passengers are allowed to disembark for several minutes. The Skyrail stops at two rainforest mid-stations, Red Peak and Barron Falls. The trail at Barron Falls Skyrail station leads through the rainforest to three separate lookouts providing views of the Gorge and Falls. Media related to Barron Falls at Wikimedia Commons
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Dick's Creek Falls

    Dick's Creek Falls

    Dick's Creek Falls is a waterfall that features a 60 ft (18 m) drop of Dicks Creek into the Chattooga River. Located in the Chattahoochee National Forest, it is reached by using the Dick's Creek Trail, which is short trail (about 1.4 miles in and out) that connects to the Bartram Trail in eastern Rabun County, Georgia. To reach the falls, take Warwoman Road from Clayton, Georgia east. Turn right on Sandy Ford Rd. Sandy Ford Rd. will make a left turn over a bridge and turn into a dirt road. Follow the narrow dirt road until the creek crosses over the road. Just before this splash-through is the small parking area for the trail. The trail will appear to fork, and you should follow the fork to the right alongside the creek. The trail will cross Bartram Trail. Cross the bridge in front of you to continue to the falls. The falls will be on your right as you approach the Chattooga River.
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Kaaterskill Falls

    Kaaterskill Falls

    Kaaterskill Falls is a two-drop waterfall located in the eastern Catskill Mountains of New York, on the north side of Kaaterskill Clove, between the hamlets of Haines Falls and Palenville in Greene County's Town of Hunter. The dual cascades total 260 feet (79 m) in height, making it one of the higher waterfalls in New York, and one of the Eastern United States' taller waterfalls. The falls are one of America's oldest tourist attractions, with it appearing in some of the most prominent books, essays, poems and paintings of the early 19th century. Long before Alexis de Tocqueville's famous essay on America, Kaaterskill Falls was lauded as a place where a traveler could see a wilder image, a sort of primeval Eden. Beginning with Thomas Cole's first visit in 1825, they became an icon subject for painters of the Hudson River School, setting the wilderness ideal for American landscape painting. The Falls also inspired "Catterskill Falls", a poem by William Cullen Bryant. The falls, like the clove and creek with which they share a name, are a relatively recent addition to the Catskills in geologic time. They evolved through stream capture at the end of the Illinoian Stage, when runoff
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Montmorency Falls

    Montmorency Falls

    The Montmorency Falls (French: Chute Montmorency) are a large waterfall on the Montmorency River in Quebec, Canada. The falls are located on the boundary between the borough of Beauport, Quebec City, and Boischatel, about 12 km from the heart of old Quebec City. The area surrounding the falls is protected within the Montmorency Falls Park (French: Parc de la Chute-Montmorency). The falls, at 84 meters (275 ft) high, (and 150 feet wide) are the highest in the province of Quebec and 30 m (98 ft) higher than Niagara Falls. The basin at the foot of the falls is 17 m (56 ft) deep. The falls are at the mouth of the Montmorency River where it drops over the cliff shore into the Saint Lawrence River, opposite the western end of the Île d'Orleans. The falls were given this name in 1613 by Samuel de Champlain. He named them in honour of Henri II, duc de Montmorency, who served as viceroy of New France from 1620 until 1625. There are staircases that allow visitors to view the falls from several different perspectives. A suspension bridge over the crest of falls provides access to both sides of the park as well as a spectacular view. There is also an aerial tram (Funitel) that carries
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Sgwd Henrhyd

    Sgwd Henrhyd

    Sgwd Henrhyd (Henrhyd Waterfall or Henrhyd Falls) in Powys, Wales, is the tallest waterfall in South Wales with a drop of 90 feet (27 m). It lies on National Trust land on the southern edge of the Brecon Beacons National Park. The falls occur where the small river, the Nant Llech (grid reference SN854122) drops over the faulted edge of a hard sandstone known as the Farewell Rock. The nearest settlement to it is Coelbren, on the road between Glynneath and Abercraf. Though not in the core of the area, it is considered by many to constitute a part of South Wales' celebrated Waterfall Country. The waterfall is reached after a steep walk down into the valley from the car park established by the National Trust, and is a popular spot to visit. One of the area's most famous visitors was Sir William Edmond Logan (later head of the Geological Survey of Canada), who carried out detailed geological survey work in the area, discovering near the foot of the falls the fossil trees which now stand outside Swansea Museum. The final scene of The Dark Knight Rises was filmed at the waterfall, where it doubled as the entrance for the Batcave.
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Simpson Falls

    Simpson Falls

    Simpson Falls are located within the Mount Coot-tha Forest, in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. The waterway formed by Simpson Falls is the western branch of the headwaters of Ithaca Creek. Mt Coot-tha Forest is around 1,500 hectares of open eucalypt forest forming the south-eastern part of D'Aguilar National Park. These two areas make up a 30,000 hectare forest that extends well into suburban Brisbane. It is home to powerful owls, goshawks, eagles, wrens and robins as well as possums and bats. Visitor facilities in the forest include picnic tables, barbecues and toilets. Approach from Sir Samuel Griffith Drive or Gap Creek Road, Mt Coot-tha. Limited parking is available. The area is popular with birdwatchers, who can see White-throated Treecreeper, Variegated Fairy-wren, Powerful Owl, Rose Robin and Varied Sitella. In 2006 a 58-year-old Bardon woman was walking her dog through the Mount Coot-tha picnic spot Simpson Falls when two dingoes stalked and circled her for a kilometre. Brisbane City Council put up warning signs and set more traps in response to the incident. Brisbane City Council occasionally burns sections of bush around Simpson Falls to prevent fuel build up.
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Thalaiyar Falls

    Thalaiyar Falls

    Thalaiyar Falls, also known as Rat Tail Falls is located in the Palani Hills of Dindigul District, Tamil Nadu State, South India. It is 975 ft (297 m) tall and is the highest waterfall in Tamil Nadu, the third highest in India and the 267th highest in the world. On a clear day Rat Tail Falls is visible from the Dum Dum Rock viewpoint on the Batalugundu-Kodaikanal Ghat Road, 3.6 kilometres (2.2 mi) away to the west. It appears across the valley as a long thin white strip of cascading water on a background of black rock cliff face that juts out of the foothills. The very edge at the top of the Falls has a low concrete wall on either side concentrating the flow of water to focus the falls into a better rat tail shape. One can walk along the wall and get near the center of the falls. Just below one wall is a large flat rock about 5 ft (1.5 m) wide. One can get down to the edge of the rock to look directly straight down to see a little river at the bottom continuing placidly through the forest. Looking back up to the side, one can watch the water in freefall, mostly silent. The noise of the crashing water below doesn't rise up. The only noise is the water pushing around the stone walls,
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Yellowstone Falls

    Yellowstone Falls

    Yellowstone Falls consist of two major waterfalls on the Yellowstone River, within Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, United States. As the Yellowstone river flows north from Yellowstone Lake, it leaves the Hayden Valley and plunges first over Upper Yellowstone Falls and then a quarter mile (400 m) downstream over Lower Yellowstone Falls, at which point it then enters the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, which is up to 1,000 feet (304 m) deep. The upper falls (44°42′46″N 110°29′59″W / 44.71278°N 110.49972°W / 44.71278; -110.49972) are 109 feet (33 m) high. The brink of the upper falls marks the junction between a hard rhyolite lava flow and weaker glassy lava that has been more heavily eroded. The lower falls (44°43′05″N 110°29′46″W / 44.71806°N 110.49611°W / 44.71806; -110.49611) are 308 feet (94 m) high, or almost twice as high as Niagara. The volume of water is in no way comparable to Niagara as the width of the Yellowstone River before it goes over the lower falls is 70 feet (22 m), whereas Niagara is a half mile (800 m). The lower falls descend from the 590,000 year old Canyon Rhyolite lava flow. The lower falls of the Yellowstone is still the largest volume major
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Bujagali falls

    Bujagali falls

    Bujagali Falls (also spelled Budhagali) was a waterfall near Jinja in Uganda where the Nile River comes out of Lake Victoria, sometimes considered the source of the Nile. Starting November 2011, the falls have become submerged by the newly built Bujagali Dam. An acute electricity crisis is impacting the livelihoods of millions of Ugandans and threatens the country’s development. Hospitals, schools, businesses, and residences suffer daily power shortages, which have stunted Uganda’s economic growth by an estimated one percent of the country’s gross domestic product. The Bujagali hydropower project is a 200MW hydropower facility currently under construction on the Victoria Nile in Uganda that will help address the country’s energy crisis. The project supports Uganda’s broader development strategy, which focuses in large part on improving the investment climate to promote growth and reduce poverty. Others say the costly dam’s power will not meet the needs of the vast majority of the country’s population, will drown a sacred waterfall, and could do further harm to Lake Victoria, the world’s largest tropical lake. Approximately 6,800 people will be directly affected by the creation of
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Hannoki Falls

    Hannoki Falls

    Hannoki Falls, in Toyama Prefecture, Japan, is the tallest waterfall in Japan at a height of 497 m (1,640 feet). However, it only has water from April to July when the snow covering the Midagahara plateau melts, so its neighbor, Shōmyō Falls, is usually considered the tallest. Hannoki and Shōmyō falls are therefore twin waterfalls.
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Mossbrae Falls

    Mossbrae Falls

    Mossbrae Falls is a waterfall flowing into the Sacramento River, in the Shasta Cascade area in Dunsmuir, California. Access to the falls is via a mile-long hiking trail on the Union Pacific Railroad tracks. The route begins at the Shasta Retreat on Scarlett Way in Dunsmuir. Mossbrae Falls is one of the more scenic waterfalls in California. Approximately 50 ft (15 m) in height and150 ft (46 m) wide, the falls are fed by springs, which course down the canyon wall, and into the Sacramento River, creating the effect of many waterfall streams falling into the river. The entire course of the falls is longer than 50 ft (15 m), however the upper cascades cannot be observed through flora which covers the mountainside. The bottom 50 ft (15 m) is a straight plunge into the river. The falls are mostly two major outfalls. Pictured here are both, with smaller drops between them. The trail to the falls follows beside the Union Pacific railroad tracks, and is narrow in some places. The waterfall is to the right, immediately before a nearby railroad trestle that crosses the river. In the summer of 2011, city officials began urging people not to visit the falls, citing the danger of walking on and
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Multnomah Falls

    Multnomah Falls

    Multnomah Falls is a waterfall on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge, located east of Troutdale, between Corbett and Dodson, along the Historic Columbia River Highway. The falls drops in two major steps, split into an upper falls of 542 feet (165 m) and a lower falls of 69 feet (21 m), with a gradual 9 foot (3 m) drop in elevation between the two, so the total height of the waterfall is conventionally given as 620 feet (189 m). Multnomah Falls is the tallest waterfall in the State of Oregon. It is credited by a sign at the site of the falls, and by the United States Forest Service, as the second tallest year-round waterfall in the United States. However, there is some skepticism surrounding this distinction, as Multnomah Falls is listed as the 137th tallest waterfall in the United States by the World Waterfall Database (this site does not distinguish between seasonal and year-round waterfalls). Underground springs from Larch Mountain are the year-round source of water for the waterfall, augmented by spring runoff from the mountain's snowpack and rainwater during the other seasons. A foot trail leads to Benson Footbridge, a 45-foot (14 m)-long footbridge that allows
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Nevada Fall

    Nevada Fall

    Nevada Fall is a 594-foot (181 m) high waterfall on the Merced River in Yosemite National Park, California. It is located below the granite dome, Liberty Cap, at the west end of Little Yosemite Valley. The waterfall is widely recognized by its "bent" shape, in which the water free-falls for roughly the first third of its length to a steep slick-rock slope. This mid-fall impact of the water on the cliff face creates a turbulent, whitewater appearance in the falls and produces a great deal of mist which covers a wide radius, which led to its current name (Nevada is an old Spanish word meaning "snowy"). Additionally, when viewed from the left-hand side, its angular shape is suggestive of the western border of the state of Nevada. The Indian name was Yo-wy-we, signifying the twist or squirm of the falling water. Lafayette Bunnell suggested the name "Nevada" for the waterfall. He wrote, "The Nevada Fall was so called because it was the nearest to the Sierra Nevada, and because the name was sufficiently indicative of a wintry companion for our spring (Vernal Fall)... The white, foaming water, as it dashed down Yo-wy-we from the snowy mountains, represented to my mind a vast avalanche of
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Tinago Falls

    Tinago Falls

    Tinago Falls is a waterfall in Iligan City, Lanao del Norte in the southern Philippine island of Mindanao. It is one of the main tourist attractions in Iligan, a city known as the City of Majestic Waterfalls. Tinago is a Filipino term meaning "hidden", the falls being hidden in a deep ravine. Trekking to the falls requires approximately 500 descending steps called the winding staircase. The falls is high, its very cold waters cascading beautifully into a deep and calm basin-like pool which appears like a blue-colored lagoon. Under the falls is a small cave where people can enter and listen to the rumbling waters. Legend has it that there once lived an influential and powerful Sultan Agok and his wife. They were appointed by their people as their king and queen. But they became too proud of themselves and became selfish rulers of their kingdom. When the sultan's wife was pregnant, an enchantress, disguised as a beggar, begged for their help but instead they exiled and rejected her. Because of this, the enchantress cursed the couple that the child will become ugly but they did not take it seriously and permanently banished the enchantress. The child did become ugly. The couple was
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Twin Falls, Labrador

    Twin Falls, Labrador

    Twin Falls are waterfalls, 175 ft (53 m) high, located on the Unknown River, a tributary of the Churchill River that drains the central Labrador basin and flows into Lake Melville and the Atlantic Ocean. Hydroelectric power development rights on the river were acquired by the British Newfoundland Development Corporation (Brinco) in the 1950s. In partnership with Wabush Mines Limited and the Iron Ore Company of Canada, the two mining corporations operating in Western Labrador, Brinco created the Twin Falls Power Corporation to deliver power 115 miles (185 km) west to the two mining operations being developed near the Labrador-Quebec border. Construction of the Twin Falls power station began in 1960 and was located at the base of a 300 ft (91 m) high, dry river canyon, adjacent to the Unknown River. The river was dammed at Twin Falls to form a reservoir (Ossokmanuan Reservoir), raising the water to the height of the old channel's escarpment. When finished in 1963, the station had a total capacity of 225 MW with two 115-mile (185 km) long transmission lines at 230,000 volts (or 230 kV), with remote switching at the far end from the station. It was a masterpiece of hydro engineering
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Wapama Falls

    Wapama Falls

    Wapama Falls is the larger of two waterfalls located on the northern wall of Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park. Arguably the most powerful waterfall in Yosemite National Park, it flows almost year-round and during peak flow has been known to inundate the trail bridge crossing it, making the falls impossible to pass during peak flow. The falls consist of two primary drops angled roughly 60 degrees to each other, and a broad cascade at its base. Wapama Falls is fed by Lake Vernon, a few miles to the north. Wapama Falls descends just under 1,100 feet. Like Yosemite Falls, it has three distinct parts. The topmost is a free drop of perhaps 300 feet, followed by a steeply-cascading stream which descends 600 feet in a steep-sided gorge, much like the stream between Upper and Lower Yosemite Fall. These cascades cannot be seen in their entirety from the trail: such a view is seen from across the Valley high on Kolana Rock. Finally, the bottom drop, seen from the dam and intimately from the trail, is one of about 200 feet down an escarpment that is not vertical, but in high water the water shoots outward to clear this descent.
    5.50
    4 votes
    133
    Falls of Lora

    Falls of Lora

    The Falls of Lora is a tidal race which forms at the mouth of Loch Etive when a particularly high tide runs out from the loch. They form white water rapids for two to five days either side of the spring tides. The falls are generated when the water level in the Firth of Lorn (i.e. the open sea) drops below the level of the water in Loch Etive as the tide goes out. As the seawater in Loch Etive pours out through the narrow mouth of the loch, it passes over a rocky shelf which causes the rapids to form. As the tide rises again there is a period of slack water when the levels are the same on either side. However due to the narrow entrance to the Loch, the tide rises more quickly than the water can flow into the Loch. Thus there is still considerable turbulence at high tide caused by flow into the Loch. Thus, unlike most situations where slack water is at high and low tides, in the case of the Falls of Lora slack water occurs when the levels on either side are the same, not when the tidal change is at its least. As a result the tidal range is much greater on the coast than it is inside the loch. A 3 metres (9.8 ft) range at Oban may produce only a 1.3 metres (4.3 ft) at Bonawe on the
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Lichtenhain Waterfall

    Lichtenhain Waterfall

    The Lichtenhain Waterfall is a waterfall formed by the Lichtenhainer village brook and is situated in the Kirnitzsch Valley in the Saxon Switzerland of Germany. William Lebrecht Götzinger, chronicler of the Saxon Switzerland, mentioned the waterfall in his 1812 work Schandau and its environments. The original waterfall was not impressive enough for tourists, so the brook was dammed up by a pushable weir. Since the Kirnitzschtalbahn, a tramway linking the waterfall with Bad Schandau, was opened in 1898, hundreds of thousands of tourists have visited the waterfall. Media related to Lichtenhainer Wasserfall at Wikimedia Commons
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Millaa Millaa Falls

    Millaa Millaa Falls

    The Millaa Millaa Falls are adjacent to the town of Millaa Millaa, on the Atherton Tableland in Far North Queensland, Australia. Millaa Millaa is an Aboriginal word meaning plenty of water or waterfall. A popular destination of international tour operators, the falls are 18.3 metres high with a pool suitable for swimming at their base. The Millaa Millaa Falls are accessed by sealed road off the Palmerston Highway about 5 minutes from the township of Millaa Millaa. Video filmed here include See also
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Sai Yok waterfall

    Sai Yok waterfall

    Sai Yok Noi is a waterfall in the Tenasserim Hills, Sai Yok district of Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand, near the small town Nam Tok Sai Yok Noi. It is the most popular attraction of the Sai Yok National Park for domestic and foreign tourists alike, in part because it lies next to the province's trunk road alongside which there is ample parking space. The immediate vicinity features several sites of interest including the Krasae Cave, a small Buddhist shrine next to a section of rail tracks of the notorious Death Railway and, to the west, Dawadung Cave, a secluded collection of impressive stalactites. Hellfire Pass Memorial, a museum and tribute to those lost during the construction of the Death Railway's cuttings and trestle bridges, lies about 35 km to the west of Sai Yok Noi falls. A small market geared toward travellers is also nearby. Sai Yok Yai waterfall, some 40 km to the west lies offset from the valley's main road, adjacent to the Sai Yok National Park Headquarters. It comprises a 10 metre (32 ft) picturesque cascade which drops directly into the Kwae Noi river.
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Toketee Falls

    Toketee Falls

    Toketee Falls is a waterfall in Douglas County, Oregon, United States, on the North Umpqua River at its confluence with the Clearwater River. It is located approximately 58 miles (93 km) east of Roseburg near Oregon Route 138. Toketee (pronounced TOKE-uh-tee), is a Chinook Jargon word meaning "pretty" or "graceful". The falls was officially named by a United States Board on Geographic Names decision in 1916, over alternate names Ireland Falls and Toketie Falls. Carved from ancient columnar basalt, Toketee Falls drops approximately 120 feet (36 meters) in two stages. With a reliable water flow on the North Umpqua River, the falls avoids the seasonal fluctuations of other creek-fed waterfalls in Oregon. The waterfall is regulated by a dam built just upstream by PacifiCorp, which now regulates and reduces the water flow over the falls. The damming forms a reservoir called Toketee Lake. Previously the full volume of the North Umpqua River was allowed to flow over the falls, but the flow has been reduced by a penstock that utilizes the drop of the falls to generate hydroelectricity. There was a Toketee Falls, Oregon post office from 1952 to 1956 during the construction of the PacifiCorp
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Aber Falls

    Aber Falls

    Aber Falls (Rhaeadr Fawr in Welsh) is a waterfall located about two miles (3 km) south of the village of Abergwyngregyn, Gwynedd, Wales. The waterfall is formed as the Afon Goch plunges about 120 feet (37 m) over a sill of igneous rock in the foothills of the Carneddau range. Two tributaries merge; the enlarged stream is known as Afon Rhaeadr Fawr; from the road bridge, Bont Newydd, the name becomes Afon Aber. Visitors walking along the main footpath towards the falls may spot several small Bronze Age settlements including an excavated roundhouse and smithy fenced off with an information plaque adorning it, several standing stones and cairns are also present, most of these sites can be found on the right side of the pathway. There is also a piece of recording equipment that is recording the weather Visitors can park at Bont Newydd, from where the Falls are accessible on foot on a clearly marked trackway. There is a small charge for parking but there are toilets and picnic benches available. The nearest place where food can be purchased is the cafe in the tourist information centre at Abergwyngregyn village. It is possible to bathe in the plunge pool of the falls, although the water
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    High Falls of Lookout Mountain

    High Falls of Lookout Mountain

    High Falls of the Lookout Mountain is a manmade waterfall that is located in the Rock City Gardens and is one of its attractions. The waterfall is approximately 140 feet high and falls into a base which appears like a small pool. High Falls is located within Lookout Mountain, Georgia.
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Sunwapta Falls

    Sunwapta Falls

    Sunwapta Falls is a waterfall of the Sunwapta River located in Jasper National Park, Canada. It is accessible via a short drive off the Icefields Parkway that connects Jasper and Banff National Parks. The falls have a drop of about 18.5 metres. Sunwapta is a native word that means turbulent water. It is most spectacular in the late spring when the spring melt is at its peak. An aerial video can be viewed by clicking here There are actually two falls, a lower and an upper one. The one most people see is the upper falls as access is easy. The lower falls are a short distance away. The water originates from the Athabasca Glacier, and volumes are higher in early summer, caused by glacial meltdown. It is a class 6 waterfall, with a drop of 60 ft (18 m) and a width of 30 ft (9.1 m).
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Upper Falls in California

    Upper Falls in California

    Upper Falls is located in Uvas Canyon County Park, near Morgan Hill, California. Nearby falls include Basin Falls, Black Rock Falls, Granuja Falls and Triple Falls.
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Kivach

    Kivach

    Kivach (Russian: Кивач, from Karelian kiivas, "impetuous") is a 10.7-m-high cascade waterfall in Russia. It is situated on the Suna River in the Kondopoga District, Republic of Karelia and gives its name to the Kivach Natural Reserve, founded in 1931. Kivach owes much of its fame to Gavrila Derzhavin, a Russian poet who was inspired by its "unruly stream" to write "Waterfall", one of the most important Russian poems of the 18th century. Many other eminent visitors followed Derzhavin to see the famed waterfall. One of these was Alexander II of Russia, who commissioned a new road to Kivach, a pavilion on the right bank of the stream and a bridge slightly downstream. In 1936, the Soviets diverted part of the river to feed a local hydroelectric power station, which affected the waterfall negatively, while its rivals — Girvas (14.8 m) and Por-Porog (16.8 m) — were destroyed altogether. Although it is not as spectacular as it used to be, Kivach is still considered a major sight in Karelia.
    5.25
    4 votes
    144
    Blencoe Falls

    Blencoe Falls

    Blencoe Falls are located on Blencoe Creek, a tributary of the Herbert River, 2 km north of a confluence, within the Girringun National Park in Queensland, Australia. The main drop of the falls is about 90 metres and they cascade for another 230 meters to the base of the gorge. The second season of Survivor was filmed in an area close to the falls. They can be accessed by road from Mount Garnet on the Kennedy Highway. There is another road from Kennedy on the Bruce Highway but a section of this has been closed by the Cardwell Shire Council but the road is still in a drivable state. Blencoe Falls lookout is about 62 km west of Kennedy. The road from Kennedy soon changes from bitumen to a narrow and poorly maintained gravel road but about half way the road does improve again upon crossing a shire boundary.
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Horsetail Falls

    Horsetail Falls

    Horsetail Falls (or Horse Tail Falls) is a waterfall along the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon, United States. The waterfall is easily accessed, in contrast to its near neighbor Oneonta Falls, as it is right next to the Historic Columbia River Highway. The shape of the falls and the rounded rockface over which it flows cause it to resemble a horse's tail. There are actually two waterfalls along the creek. The upper falls, called Upper Horsetail Falls or Ponytail Falls, can be accessed from a footpath.
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Huka Falls

    Huka Falls

    The Huka Falls are a set of waterfalls on the Waikato River that drains Lake Taupo in New Zealand. A few hundred metres upstream from the Huka Falls, the Waikato River narrows from approximately 100 metres across into a narrow canyon only 15 metres across. The canyon is carved into lake floor sediments laid down before Taupo's Oruanui eruption 26,500 years ago. The volume of water flowing through often approaches 220,000 litres per second. The flowrate is regulated by Mighty River Power through the Taupo Control Gates as part of their hydro system planning, with Waikato Regional Council dictating flows during periods of downstream flooding in the Waikato River catchment. Flowrates through Taupo Control Gates can be sourced through the Mighty River Power website At the top of the falls is a set of small waterfalls dropping over about 8 metres. The most impressive, final stage of the falls (pictured here) is an 11 metre drop. The drop is technically six metres (cliff beneath the water) but the water flow raises the level to 11m. The falls are a popular tourist attraction, being close to Taupo and readily accessible from State Highway One, although there are much higher waterfalls to
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Jurong Falls

    Jurong Falls

    Jurong Falls is one of the tallest artificial waterfalls in the world, at 30 metres (98 ft) tall. The falls are located within the open-access Waterfall Aviary at the Jurong Bird Park in Singapore. Water plunges over the top of a towering cliff at a rate of 140 litres (37 USgal) per second. The water is recirculated through a meandering stream that cascades down over a series of levels, creating an ideal environment for water birds, fishes, plants and other lifeforms at the aviary. Designed with a rainforest landscape, the Waterfall Aviary is a 20,000-square-metre (4.9-acre) walk-in aviary, the largest in the world, that houses some 1,500 free-flying birds from 80 African species and 10,000 plants with 125 species of trees, bamboo, palms and ground-cover vegetation. Two observation posts at the top of the waterfall offer visitors panoramic views of the aviary.
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Rhine Falls

    Rhine Falls

    The Rhine Falls (Rheinfall in German) is the largest plain waterfall in Europe. The falls are located on the Upper Rhine between the municipalities of Neuhausen am Rheinfall and Laufen-Uhwiesen, near the town of Schaffhausen in northern Switzerland, between the cantons of Schaffhausen and Zürich. They are 150 m (450 ft) wide and 23 m (75 ft) high. In the winter months, the average water flow is 250 m³/s, while in the summer, the average water flow is 700 m³/s. The highest flow ever measured was 1,250 m³/s in 1965; and the lowest, 95 m³/s in 1921. The falls cannot be climbed by fish, except by eels that are able to worm their way up over the rocks. The Rhine Falls were formed in the last ice age, approximately 14,000 to 17,000 years ago, by erosion- resistant rocks narrowing the riverbed. The first glacial advances created today's landforms approximately 500,000 years ago. Up to the end of the Wolstonian Stage approximately 132,000 years ago, the Rhine flowed westwards from Schaffhausen past Klettgau. This earlier riverbed later filled up with gravel. About 132,000 years ago the course of the river changed southwards at Schaffhausen and formed a new channel, which also filled up
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Ribbon Falls

    Ribbon Falls

    Ribbon Fall, located in Yosemite National Park in California, flows off a cliff on the west side of El Capitan, and is the largest single-drop waterfall in North America. The fall is fed by melting winter snow; while therefore dry for much of the year, the fall is a spectacular 1,612 feet (491 m) in the spring. In exceptional years, an ice cone develops at its base during the winter months similar to that which usually forms beneath Upper Yosemite Fall. This deposit can reach a depth of 200 feet, versus 322 feet for the greatest depth of the ice cone beneath the Upper Fall and Lower Fall. It is the tallest, continuous falls waterfall in the United States.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Rinka

    Rinka

    Rinka Falls is a waterfall in the Logar Valley, in the Municipality of Solčava in Slovenia. It is the source of the Savinja River. It has been proclaimed a natural heritage feature. Rinka Falls is one of the most beautiful and best-known waterfalls in Slovenia. It is also a popular tourist destination. With its drop of 105 metres (344 ft), it is the highest of the 20 waterfalls in the Logar Valley. The longest step has a length of 90 m (300 ft). It is visited in all seasons of the year. In the winter it is popular with ice-climbers. The best view of the waterfall is from the Kamnik Saddle (Slovene: Kamniško sedlo).
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Silver Strand Falls

    Silver Strand Falls

    Silver Strand Falls drops 574 feet (175m) along Meadow Brook, at the western end of Yosemite Valley, within Yosemite National Park. The falls are commonly thought to drop 1170 feet (356m), this is incorrect. The name Widow's Tears had been applied to Silver Strand Falls in the past, but the lower-volume waterfall located one drainage to the east of Meadow Brook, is now known as Widow's Tears, and is thought to drop 1,170 feet (360 m), hence the confusion regarding the height. Note that the recent 1:24,000 topo map of Yosemite Valley shows the height of this waterfall as 400 feet (120 m), not 574 feet (175 m), which is derived, apparently, from ice climbers. Since the waterfall is not vertical, it is possible that the ice-climbing height is, in fact, 574 feet (175 m), while the difference in elevation between the top and bottom is as shown on the topo sheet at 400 feet (120 m). The origin of the number "1170 feet" for the height either of this or of nearby Widows Tears is obscure. But in any case, this height is not supported either by a field survey or by the topo sheet. It appears that the Widow's Tears drop more or less steeply in a square alcove for about 810 feet (250 m), then
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Yahoo Falls

    Yahoo Falls

    Historic Yahoo Falls, also known as Ywahoo Falls (possible Muscogee origin > Yahola, Yahoo Creek & Wahoo in northeast Georgia), is located in McCreary County, Kentucky. A Scenic overlook marks the trail from the highway to the falls, which stand 113 feet (34 m). A similar waterfall in the Red River Gorge is said to exceed Yahoo Falls in height by a few inches. Further along, the trail leads to the Yahoo Arch. Cumberland National Forest, now Daniel Boone National Forest, was created in 1937. It includes the Falls and surrounding second-growth timberland. It is owned by the Federal government and management is entrusted to the U.S. Forest Service. Forest supervisor, Robert Collins created the Yahoo Falls Recreation Area in the 1960s. The decision was made to turn Yahoo Falls into an accessible scenic attraction in an effort to lure visitors to the Stearns Ranger District. An all-weather road was built to the top of the gorge and a picnic area and primitive campsite was established. Trails were constructed and a long flight of steel stairs led visitors down into the gorge past cliffs and nearly vertical lush slopes adorned with mountain laurel, rhododendron, and many threatened and
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Boyoma Falls

    Boyoma Falls

    Boyoma Falls, formerly known as Stanley Falls, consists of seven cataracts, each no more than 15' high, extending over more than 100 km (62 mi) along a curve of the Lualaba River between the river port towns of Ubundu and Kisangani/Boyoma in the Orientale Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. At the bottom of the rapids, the Lualaba becomes the Congo River. The seven cataracts have a total drop of 61 meters (200 feet). The two major cataracts are the first below Ubundu, forming a narrow and crooked stream that is hardly accessible, and the last that can easily be seen and also be visited from Kisangani. A 1000mm portage railway bypasses the series of rapids, connecting Kisangani and Ubundu. Especially among French speakers the cataracts are also known as Wagenia Falls (chûtes Wagenia), referring to the local people of fishermen named Wagenia or Wagenya who have developed a special technique to fish in the river. They build systems of wooden tripods across the rapids fixed in holes carved in the rock by the water current. They serve as anchors for baskets that entrap large fish.
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Glen Coe

    Glen Coe

    Glen Coe (Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Comhan, pronounced [klan̪ˠˈkʰo.ən̪ˠ]) is a glen in the Highlands of Scotland. It lies in the southern part of the Lochaber committee area of Highland Council, and was formerly part of the county of Argyll. It is often considered one of the most spectacular and beautiful places in Scotland, and is a part of the designated National Scenic Area of Ben Nevis and Glen Coe. The narrow glen shows a grim grandeur. The glen, approaching from the east on the main A82 road, is surrounded by wild and precipitous mountains. Further west at Invercoe, the landscape has a softer beauty before the main entrance to the glen. The main settlement is the nearby village of Glencoe located in Carnoch. The name Glen Coe is often said to mean "Glen of Weeping", perhaps with some reference to the infamous Massacre of Glencoe which took place there in 1692. However, "Gleann Comhann" does not translate as "Glen of Weeping". In fact the Glen is named after the River Coe which runs through it, and bore this name long before the 1692 incident. The name of the river is believed to predate the Gaelic language and its meaning is not known. One possibility is that it was named after
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    Gocta Cataracts

    Gocta Cataracts

    Gocta (Spanish: Catarata del Gocta) is a perennial waterfall with two drops located in Peru's province of Chachapoyas in Amazonas, approximately 700 kilometres (430 mi) to the northeast of Lima. It flows into the Cocahuayco River. Although the waterfall had been well known to locals for centuries (it is in full view of a nearby village), its existence was not made known to the world until after an expedition made in 2005 by a German, Stefan Ziemendorff, with a group of Peruvian explorers. At the time of the discovery Ziemendorff successfully persuaded the Peruvian government to map the falls and to measure their height. On 11 March 2006, following his third expedition to the falls, he held a press conference, the contents of which were published by several of the world's wire services. He stated that the total height was measured at 771 metres (2,530 ft), which ranked Gocta as the third tallest free-leaping waterfall in the world after Angel Falls in Venezuela and Tugela Falls in South Africa. However, this was apparently based on outdated and incomplete information gleaned from the National Geographic Society, and Ziemendorff's comments as to the waterfalls' ranking have since
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Great Falls of the Passaic River

    Great Falls of the Passaic River

    The Great Falls of the Passaic River is a prominent waterfall, 77 feet (23 m) high, on the Passaic River in the city of Paterson in Passaic County in northern New Jersey in the United States. The Congress authorized its establishment as a National Historical Park in 2009. One of the United States' largest waterfalls, it played a significant role in the early industrial development of New Jersey starting in the earliest days of the nation. It is part of the Great Falls of Paterson-Garret Mountain National Natural Landmark. It has also been designated as a National Historic Landmark District since 1976. The Great Falls' raceway and power systems were designated an List of Historic Civil Engineering Landmarks in 1977. During floods the Great Falls becomes a spectacular sight, with tremendous amounts of water cascading over the falls. Geologically, the falls were formed at the end of the last ice age approximately 13,000 years ago. Formerly the Passaic had followed a shorter course through the Watchung Mountains near present-day Summit. As the glacier receded, the river's previous course was blocked by a newly-formed moraine. A large lake, called Glacial Lake Passaic, formed behind the
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    Grey Mare's Tail

    Grey Mare's Tail

    Grey Mare's Tail is a 60-metre (200 ft) hanging valley waterfall near to Moffat in southern Scotland. The fall is produced by the Tail Burn flowing from Loch Skeen cascading into the Moffat Water in the lower valley below. The surrounding area forms the Grey Mare's Tail Nature Reserve, owned by the National Trust for Scotland. The footpath from the valley floor up to Loch Skeen is one of the more popular walks in the area. Parking is also provided. White Coomb
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Howick Falls

    Howick Falls

    Howick Falls is a waterfall in Howick, KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. The waterfall is approximately 95 m in height (310 feet) and lies on the Umgeni River. The Zulu people called the falls KwaNogqaza, which means "Place of the Tall One". The falls were most likely first seen by European explorers in the early 19th century. However the KwaZulu-Natal province has known human occupation for well over 30,000 years and it is likely that it was a well known site prior to any western influence, given the rich legend surrounding the area. Many people have been swept over the falls, especially in the pioneer days of the province, as some settlers thought the easiest place to cross the river was just above the falls. There have been a recorded 40deaths surrounding Howick falls with the first recorded death occurring in 1851. Most of these have been recorded as suicides but accidents and murder have also been known to happen, contributing to if not maintaining the local legendary status of the falls. In 1999, Jeb Corliss had a near-fatal BASE jump into the waterfalls where his chute opening went asymmetric and he could not avoid flying into the downpouring water. According to local
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Mekedaatu

    Mekedaatu

    Mekedatu (Kannada: ಮೇಕೆದಾಟು) is a location along Kaveri in Kanakapura Taluk. Sangama is the place where Arkavati merges with Kaveri. From this point, about 3.5 kilometers downstream, the river Kaveri flows through a deep gorge so narrow that one would think that a goat can leap across it ('Mekedatu' means 'goat's leap' in Kannada). It is not really so narrow and no goat commonly found in that part of India could cross that distance in a single leap. It is about 100 km from Bangalore via Kanakapura. The name comes from an incident which is believed to have been witnessed by herdsmen in that area a long time ago. It is said that a goat being chased by a tiger made a desperate attempt to save its life by leaping from one side of the gorge and managed to cross over the raging river below, whereas the tiger did not attempt to replicate this feat, and abandoned the chase. The point where the goat leapt has widened since then from erosion caused by the river Cauvery. There is also some mythological significance to this place (both Sangama and Mekedatu). As per one version, the goat (meke) that is believed to have leapt across the Kaveri was Lord Shiva in disguise. On both rocky precipices
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Pissing Mare Falls

    Pissing Mare Falls

    Pissing Mare Falls are located in Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland, Canada. The falls, at 350 metres (1148 ft) high, are among the highest in eastern North America, and drop from the plateau above (aka Big Level Plateau) into Western Brook Pond.
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Pliva Waterfall

    Pliva Waterfall

    The Pliva Waterfall is located by the town of Jajce, in central Bosnia and Herzegovina, where the river Pliva meets the river Vrbas. It was 30 meters high, but after an earthquake during the Bosnian war and attacks on the power plant further up the river, the area was flooded and now the waterfall is 22 meters high, now it's the sixth largest in the world. It's unique because it is in the middle of the town and it is one of the twelve most beautiful in the world.
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Ryuzu Falls

    Ryuzu Falls

    Ryūzu Falls (龍頭滝, -taki, lit. "Dragon's Head Waterfall") is a waterfall located upstream from the Yugawa River which makes its way into Lake Yunoko and Lake Chuzenji. It is located near Nikkō in Tochigi Prefecture, Japan. Ryūzu can be translated as 'Dragon's Head', and is so named because its twin falls are said to resemble a dragon's head.
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Tarawera Falls

    Tarawera Falls

    Tarawera Falls is a 35 m high waterfall on the Tarawera River in the Bay of Plenty region in New Zealand's North Island. The Tarawera River flows out of Lake Tarawera and across a rhyolitic lava flow that erupted from Mt Tarawera about 11,000 years ago. The river disappears into flooded caves in the lava and pours out halfway up the cliff on the far side of the flow. After rain, part of the flow passes over the top of the cliff as a 65m companion fall. Access is from the town of Kawerau and is a drive of about 45 minutes over unsealed roads, followed by a walk of about 20 minutes. A forestry access permit is required, available from the Information Centre in Kawerau.
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Tyssestrengene

    Tyssestrengene

    Tyssestrengene falls are waterfalls near Odda, Norway fed by the Tysso River. The total drop is 646 metres (2,119 ft), while the tallest single drop is 312 metres (1,024 ft). Unfortunately, following their incorporation in the Norwegian Hydroelectric Power Authority, their water flow is diminished to such a point that only after heavy snow melts is there any flow of substance. However, they are amongst the highest waterfalls in the world and, according to Statistics Norway, the tallest single drop in Norway.
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Horsetail Falls

    Horsetail Falls

    Horsetail Falls is a waterfall in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, to the west of Lake Tahoe in the Desolation Wilderness of El Dorado County, California, United States. It falls in stages for nearly 500 ft (150 m). It can be reached by hiking north out of the Twin Bridges trailhead on U.S. Route 50. It is located at 38°49′40.28″N 120°7′23.87″W / 38.8278556°N 120.1232972°W / 38.8278556; -120.1232972.
    5.00
    4 votes
    167
    Reversing Falls

    Reversing Falls

    The Reversing Falls are a series of rapids on the Saint John River located in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, where the river runs through a narrow gorge before emptying into the Bay of Fundy. The diurnal tides of the bay force the flow of water to reverse against the prevailing current at this location when the tide is high, although in the spring freshet, this is frequently surpassed by the downstream volume of water. The rapids, or "falls", are created by a series of underwater ledges which roil the water in either direction, causing a significant navigation hazard, despite the depth of water. As a result, vessels wishing to enter or exit from the river must wait for slack tide. The Reversing Falls has also been an important industrial site for over a century. The Canadian Pacific Railway constructed the Reversing Falls Railway Bridge in 1885 and this structure was replaced in 1922; it is currently used by the New Brunswick Southern Railway. The railway bridge crosses the gorge immediately downstream from the falls, parallel to the Reversing Falls Road Bridge. The location of the falls was the site of a foundry and other light industrial operations on the east side of the
    5.00
    4 votes
    168
    Bridal Veil Falls, British Columbia

    Bridal Veil Falls, British Columbia

    Bridal Falls is a community in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, located east of Rosedale and immediately adjacent to the on-ramps for the Agassiz-Rosedale Bridge, which connects the Trans-Canada Highway at Bridal Falls to Agassiz, on BC Highway 7. Bridal Falls is mostly a highway services community, with several truck stops and restaurants. The town's name is derived from Bridal Veil Falls, which was the original rationale for tourist services at the location and at one time included cabins that were promoted as a honeymoon holiday, playing off the bridal theme of the name. The falls were named in the 19th century by the village of Popkum, which in the 20th century used it for a source of hydroelectricity for a chalet and heated swimming pool. Later tourist attractions in the area were a Flintstones-themed waterpark and similar family entertainments. "Bridal Falls (community)". BC Geographical Names. http://apps.gov.bc.ca/pub/bcgnws/names/34731.html.
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Dip Falls

    Dip Falls

    Dip Falls are found on the Dip River on the north-west coast of Tasmania, Australia.
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Livingstone Falls

    Livingstone Falls

    Livingstone Falls (French, Chutes Livingstone) — named for the explorer David Livingstone — are a succession of enormous rapids on the lower course of the Congo River in west equatorial Africa, downstream from Malebo Pool in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Livingstone Falls consist of a series of rapids dropping 900 feet in 220 miles (270 metres in 350 km). They end in Matadi in Bas-Congo. The Congo River has the second largest flow rate in the world after the Amazon, which has no falls or rapids (except near its sources). The lowest rapids of Livingstone Falls, therefore, are the world's largest waterfall in terms of flow rate — provided one accepts these rapids as being a waterfall. An interesting aspect of the 220-mile (350 km) long Livingstone Falls is the width of the channel. The channel is very narrow: in several stretches the channel width is less than 300 metres and for the majority of the length the channel is less than 800 metres wide. This is an extraordinarily narrow channel since the river flow rate typically exceeds 42,000 cubic metres per second (1,500,000 cu ft/s). Although he explored the upper Congo, Livingstone never travelled to this part of the river and
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Svartifoss

    Svartifoss

    Svartifoss (Black Fall) is a waterfall in Skaftafell National Park in Iceland, and is one of the most popular sights in the park. It is surrounded by dark lava columns, which gave rise to its name. Other well-known columnar jointing formations are seen at the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland, Devil's Tower in Wyoming,USA and on the island of Staffa in Scotland. The base of this waterfall is noteworthy for its sharp rocks. New hexagonal column sections break off faster than the falling water wears down the edges. These basalt columns have provided inspiration for Icelandic architects, most visibly in the Hallgrímskirkja church in Reykjavík, and also the National Theatre.
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Aira Force

    Aira Force

    Aira Force is a waterfall in the English Lake District, in the county of Cumbria. The origin of the name comes from the Old Norse language with the word "eyrara", meaning "gravel-bank stream or river", while the word force, from fors, is used in many parts of northern England as a synonym for "waterfall". The stream which flows over the waterfall is Aira Beck, which rises on the upper slopes of Stybarrow Dodd at a height of 720 metres (2,362 ft) and flows north-easterly before turning south, blocked by the high heather-covered slopes of Gowbarrow Fell. It turns south on its eight-kilometre journey to join Ullswater, at a height of 150 metres (492 ft). One kilometre before entering the lake, the beck makes the 20 metres (66 ft) leap down a rocky ravine at the falls known as Aira Force. Aira Force lies on land owned by the National Trust. The Trust purchased the 750 acre Gowbarrow Park (on which the force lies) in 1906 and has provided facilities, such as car parking, disabled access, graded paths, and viewing platforms to make Aira Force one of the most famous and most visited waterfalls in the Lake District. A small arched bridge spans the stream just as the beck goes over the
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Gordale Scar

    Gordale Scar

    Gordale Scar is a dramatic limestone ravine 1 mile or 1.5 km NE of Malham, North Yorkshire, England. It contains two waterfalls and has overhanging limestone cliffs over 100 metres high. The gorge was formed by water from melting glaciers. The stream flowing through the scar is Gordale Beck, which on leaving the gorge flows over Janet's Foss before joining with Malham Beck two miles downstream to form the River Aire. A right of way leads up the gorge, but requires some mild scrambling over tufa at the lower waterfall. William Wordsworth wrote a sonnet about Gordale Scar; James Ward created a large and imaginative painting of it that can be seen in Tate Britain. J. M. W. Turner also painted a picture of it in 1816, also to be seen in Tate Britain.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Mardalsfossen

    Mardalsfossen

    Mardalsfossen is one of the ten highest waterfalls in Europe. It is located in the municipality of Nesset in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The falls are on the Mardøla river which flows into the lake Eikesdalsvatnet, about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) northwest of the village of Eikesdalen. The waterfall is depicted in Nesset's coat-of-arms. The total fall is 705 metres (2,313 ft) according to SSB, 657 metres (2,156 ft) according to World Waterfall Database. It consists of two large drops and several smaller ones lower down. The highest vertical drop, which is 358 metres (1,175 ft), is one of the tallest in Norway. It is on average 24 metres (79 ft) wide. It is a tiered waterfall. The water, which has been tapped for hydroelectric use, flows over the falls during the summer tourist season of 20 June to 20 August. At other times the water is channeled through the hydroelectric scheme. The highest rate of flow ever recorded in the falls is 45 cubic metres per second (1,600 cu ft/s). Currently in the summers, the flow limited to less than 3 cubic metres per second (110 cu ft/s). In 1970 Arne Næss, the Norwegian founder of the Deep Ecology movement, tied himself with 300 others in protest
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Purlingbrook Falls

    Purlingbrook Falls

    Purlingbrook Falls are found within the central section of Springbrook National Park, at Springbrook which is part of the Gold Coast hinterland, south-west of Surfers Paradise, in Queensland, Australia. After heavy rains the falling waters creates a spectacle that attracts large numbers of tourists. At these times the danger from falling rocks during landslides can be hazardous so barricades are erected to prevent walking along tracks that pass the base of the falls.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Williamsport Falls

    Williamsport Falls

    Williamsport Falls is a waterfall near the center of the town of Williamsport, the county seat of Warren County, Indiana. With a height of 90 feet (27 m), it is the highest free-falling waterfall in the state of Indiana. Fall Creek flows through the town between the old part of the town (nearer the river) and the newer part (established when the railroad was constructed through the area). Near the point where Monroe Street crosses the railroad, the creek falls over a sandstone ledge. The actual height of the waterfall has changed somewhat over the years, as pieces of the ledge have sheared off and fallen to the bottom of the falls. Below the falls, sandstone used to be quarried and was used to build the foundations of many local buildings. The water flow was sufficiently substantial in the 19th century to support a mill located below the falls; but the flow is less consistent now, and the falls are frequently quiet. This is due to the conversion of woodlands and grasslands to intensive mechanized farming and the diversion of natural water flows to impoundments used to provide reliable water supplies for irrigation and other purposes. A feasibility study on providing a steady flow
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Bird Woman Falls

    Bird Woman Falls

    Bird Woman Falls is a 492 feet (150 m) waterfall located immediately west of the continental divide in Glacier National Park, Montana, United States. The falls are readily visible from a distance of two miles (3.2 km) along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, which bisects the park east to west. The falls are fed by snowfields and a remnant glacier located on the north and west flanks of Mount Oberlin. The falls flow is greatest in late spring and early summer and has been known to almost cease flowing in the autumn.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Cachoeira da Fumaça

    Cachoeira da Fumaça

    The Cachoeira da Fumaça ("Smoke Falls", once known as "Glass Falls", after the pilot who discovered it in 1960) was believed to be Brazil's highest waterfall, until Cachoeira do Araca was recently discovered in the Amazon. This waterfall is known as Cachoeira do El Dorado. It is 353 m high. It's located in Chapada Diamantina, a very attractive region for adventurers from all over the world, given its hundreds of caves and waterfalls, and was named that way because the tiny water flow is sprayed by the wind before it touches the ground, 380 meters (more than 1000 feet) down from where it first fell. However, depending on the season, it can be completely dry. There are two ways to reach it: from above, walking 6 kilometers (3.7 mi) from the ecological base placed in the Vale do Capão, or from below, after a three-day trek starting from Lençoís, Chapada's best-known city. In the film Dhoom 2, there is a scene at the waterfall where Sunehri (Aishwarya Rai) is dared to jump off without any support mechanism in order to gain Aryan's (Hrithik Roshan) trust. She does so only to have him leap behind her with a bungee cord.
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Dettifoss

    Dettifoss

    Dettifoss is a waterfall in Vatnajökull National Park in Northeast Iceland, and is reputed to be the most powerful waterfall in Europe. It is situated on the Jökulsá á Fjöllum river, which flows from the Vatnajökull glacier and collects water from a large area in Northeast Iceland. The falls are 100 metres (330 ft) wide and have a drop of 45 metres (150 ft) down to the Jökulsárgljúfur canyon. It is the largest waterfall in Europe in terms of volume discharge, having an average water flow of 193 m/s. The waterfall can be reached by a new tarmac road, finished in 2011. On the west bank there are no facilities and the view on the waterfall is somewhat hindered by the waterfall's spray. On the east bank there is an information panel maintained by the staff of Vatnajökull National Park (Vatnajökulsþjóðgarður) and a maintained track to the best viewpoints. The closest populated areas include Vopnafjörður, Mývatn and Húsavík. The musical composition 'Dettifoss' (Op.57) by Jón Leifs is inspired by this waterfall. The waterfall is featured in the 2012 science-fiction film Prometheus, standing in as landscape on a primordial Earth.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Eagle Falls

    Eagle Falls

    Eagle Falls is located in Cumberland Falls State Resort Park in McCreary County, Kentucky, United States. Water from Eagle Creek descends 44 feet (13 m) before landing on the rocks below on the Cumberland River shoreline. Eagle Falls can be accessed by hiking Trail 9 located on Kentucky Route 90 in the Cumberland Falls State Park. The trail to Eagle Falls is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) and has very beautiful scenery along the way including the best views of Cumberland Falls.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Pistyll Rhaeadr

    Pistyll Rhaeadr

    Pistyll Rhaeadr (Welsh pronunciation: [pɪstɪɬ r̥aeadr], meaning "spring of the waterfall") is a waterfall, located a few miles from the village of Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant in Powys, Wales, twelve miles west of Oswestry. Pistyll Rhaeadr is formed by the Afon Disgynfa's falling, in three stages, over a 240-foot (73 m) Silurian cliff-face, after which the river is known as the Afon Rhaeadr. The tallest stage is estimated at about 40 metres. It is counted as one of the Seven Wonders of Wales and is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. The 19th-century author George Borrow, in his book Wild Wales, remarked of the waterfall: "What shall I liken it to? I scarcely know, unless it is to an immense skein of silk agitated and disturbed by tempestuous blasts, or to the long tail of a grey courser at furious speed. I never saw water falling so gracefully, so much like thin, beautiful threads as here." There is car parking space at the foot of the waterfall for people who want to explore the waterfall, with a café and a B&B alongside. The waterfall is often referred to by the media, government sources, and other sources as the tallest in Wales or the tallest single drop in the United Kingdom.
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Wadsworth Falls

    Wadsworth Falls

    Wadsworth Falls is located in Middlefield, Connecticut in Middlesex County, Connecticut. At Wadsworth Falls State Park there is a swimming and picnicking area. The swimming pool is paved with soil cement to prevent leakage. Water is pumped from water well located near the Coginchaug River. Through the hiking trail there is a small brown bridge leading to the falls. Wadsworth is 30 feet (9.1 m) high, with 52 feet (16 m) of water trickling over sandstone along the trail. The falls are named after Clarence C. Wadsworth, who was a colonel in the New York National Guard. He had a fine reputation in academics, and studied linguistics avidly. Then he settled in Middletown, Connecticut, home of Wesleyan University, and became passionate for 45 years to preserve the Wadsworth Falls. He established the Rockfall Corporation. Their job is to maintain the protection of the land, plants, and animals. In 1942 the 267 acres were given to the state. The park is now operated by the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and is open every day until sunset. This park features a pond with a sandy beach with lifeguard supervision in the summer. Amenities include picnic tables
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Changbai Waterfall

    Changbai Waterfall

    Changbai Waterfall (Chinese: 长白瀑布; pinyin: Chángbái Pùbù) is a 68 m (223 ft) waterfall in China in Baitou Mountain in the Changbai Mountains. It is more dramatic during the snow-melt season as nearby Lake Tianchi fills up.
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Laja Falls

    Laja Falls

    The Laja Falls (Spanish: Salto del Laja) is a waterfall located in the Laja River in southcentral Chile. It lies next to the old Pan-American Highway, between the cities of Los Ángeles and Chillán. Below the falls Laja River has formed a narrow canyon. The surroundings of the waterfall are very commercialized. Laja Falls consist of four horseshoe shaped falls - one on each arm of Laja River. The tallest (35 m) is the easternmost fall, but the western falls are 20 m tall. Total width of all four falls - approximately 455 m.
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Cumberland Falls

    Cumberland Falls

    Cumberland Falls, sometimes called the Little Niagara, the Niagara of the South, or the Great Falls, is a large waterfall on the Cumberland River in southeastern Kentucky. Spanning the river at the border of McCreary and Whitley counties, the waterfall is the central feature of Cumberland Falls State Resort Park. On average the falls, which flow over a resistant sandstone bed, are 68 feet (21 m) high and 125 feet (38 m) wide, with an average water flow of 3,600 cubic feet per second (100 m³/s). Under a full moon on clear nights, an elusive lunar rainbow or moonbow is sometimes formed by the mist emanating from the falls. The Moonbow that appears here may be observed under a full moon and a clear sky. An arch of white light is usually produced at base of Falls and continues downstream. Generations of people have visited here to see this natural phenomenon. The last hotel on this site, Moobow Inn, was named for the moonbow. Historical Marker Erected 1987. (Number 1801.) Location. 36° 50.296′ N, 84° 20.634′ W. .
    4.50
    4 votes
    186
    Royal Arch Cascade

    Royal Arch Cascade

    Royal Arch Cascade is a waterfall located on the north wall of Yosemite Valley and the Yosemite National Park, USA, within walking distance from the Ahwahnee Hotel. The falls are 1,250 feet (380 m) high and are usually dry by June. The waterfall gets its name from its location immediately adjacent to the Royal Arches, which are a series of concentric semicircular setbacks in the cliff face directly opposite Glacier Point.
    4.50
    4 votes
    187
    Bridal Veil Falls

    Bridal Veil Falls

    The Bridal Veil Falls is the smallest of the three waterfalls that make up Niagara Falls. It is located on the U.S. side (in New York State); Luna Island separates it from the American Falls and Goat Island separates it from the Horseshoe Falls. The Bridal Veil Falls faces to the northwest and has a crest 56 feet (17 m) wide. Luna Island being very small, the Bridal Veil is similar in appearance to the American Falls, starting with a vertical fall of 78 feet (24 m), followed by the water violently descending the talus boulders to the Maid of the Mist Pool 103 feet (31 m) below. The total vertical drop is 181 feet (55 m). The crest elevation of the Falls is 508 feet (155 m). The Cave of the Winds attraction allows visitors to walk up to the base of Bridal Veil Falls. A pedestrian bridge crosses from Goat Island to Luna Island several yards (meters) upstream from the crest of the falls. The waterfall has also been known in the past as Luna Falls and Iris Falls.
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Falls of Clyde

    Falls of Clyde

    The Falls of Clyde is the collective name of four linn (Scots: waterfalls) on the River Clyde near New Lanark, South Lanarkshire, Scotland. The Falls of Clyde comprise the upper falls of Bonnington Linn, Corra Linn, Dundaff Linn, and the lower falls of Stonebyres Linn. Corra Linn is the highest, with a fall of 90 feet. Bonnington Linn (fall of 30 feet), Corra Linn and Dundaff Linn are above New Lanark and located within the Falls of Clyde Reserve managed by the Scottish Wildlife Trust, a national nature conservation charity. Stonebyres Linn is located several miles downstream from the reserve and New Lanark. The area has long been a popular destination for visitors. The Wordsworths, Coleridge and Sir Walter Scott all visited the Falls. In 1802, William Wordsworth immortalised Corra Linn, the largest of the waterfalls, in verse. Corra Linn has also been painted by a number of artists, including J. M. W. Turner. The name comes from the Gaelic 'currach', a marshy place. A legend gives 'Cora' as a daughter of King Malcolm II, who lept to her death here whilst trying to escape imagined danger. Near Corra Linn is the Pavilion, built by Sir John Carmichael of Bonnington, probably in 1708.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Hog's Back Falls

    Hog's Back Falls

    The Hog's Back Falls, officially known as the Prince of Wales Falls, but rarely referred to by this name, are a series of artificially-created waterfalls on the Rideau River in Ottawa, Canada. The falls are located just north of Mooney's Bay and the point where the Rideau Canal splits from the Rideau River. Prior to the construction of the Rideau Canal, these were a gentle set of rapids originally known as Three Rock Rapids. The name Hog's Back came into use shortly before canal construction. Civil Engineer John MacTaggart, in 1827, described them as “a noted ridge of rocks, called the Hog’s Back, from the circumstances of raftsmen with their wares [timber rafts] sticking on it in coming down the stream.” These rapids were about 600 metres (2 000 feet) in length with a drop of about 1.8 metres (6 feet). They were navigable by canoe, no portage was required. As part of his concept for a slackwater navigation system, Lt. Colonel John By's design for the Rideau Canal called for a large dam to be raised in this location. It would divert water from the Rideau River into the artificially-created section of the canal leading to the Ottawa locks. It would also flood the Three Island Rapids
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Hopetoun Falls

    Hopetoun Falls

    Hopetoun Falls is located five kilometres south of Beech Forest, Victoria, Australia. Much attention has been given to preserving the natural characteristics of Hopetoun Falls while allowing ample access for visitors. The falls have a large set of well-built and maintained stairs that lead down a natural patio to a viewing platform very close to the foot of the waterfall. Hopetoun Falls plunges 30 m in a rectangular shape. Many visitors come every year to look at its natural beauty. Hopetoun Falls is right off Apollo Bay - Beech Forest Road about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) south of the Beauchamp Falls turnoff and roughly 20 kilometres (12 mi) northwest of the coastal town of Apollo Bay.
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Wahkeenah Falls

    Wahkeenah Falls

    Wahkeena Falls is the name of a 242 foot (73 m) waterfall in the Columbia River Gorge in the state of Oregon. Spellings of this word are dubious, because the word is merely an English transliteration of a Pacific Northwest Native American (reportedly Yakama) phrase meaning "most beautiful". The waterfall is unlike Multnomah Falls, in that the water does not just 'plunge' into the ground. Wahkeena Falls, rather, has a more subtle cascading flow. These falls have been featured in numerous travel guides and in photography books. Wahkeena Falls is along the Historic Columbia River Highway, about 13 miles (21 km) east of Troutdale, Oregon. A short hike uphill from the parking lot at the base leads to the stone bridge that crosses the main part of the falls. That trail continues on east to Multnomah Falls, the next falls down the road. This waterfall is visible directly from the Historic Columbia River Highway. Visitors often slow down to view this cascading waterfall directly from their car.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Jog Falls

    Jog Falls

    Jog Falls is the second-highest plunge waterfall in India, Located near Sagara, Karnataka, these segmented falls are a major tourist attraction. It is also called by alternative names of Gerusoppe falls, Gersoppa Falls and Jogada Gundi. Jog Falls is created by the Sharavathi River falling from a height of 253 m (830 ft), making it the second-highest plunge waterfall in India after the Nohkalikai Falls with a height of 335 m (1100 ft)in Meghalaya. Sharavati, a river which rises at Ambutirtha, near Nonabur, in the Thirthahalli taluk and takes the north-westerly course by Fatte petta, receives the Haridravati on the right below Pattaguppe and the Yenne Hole on the left above Barangi. On arriving at the frontier it bends to the west, and precipitating itself down the Falls of Gersoppa and passing that village (properly Geru-Sappe), which is really some 29 kilometres distant, discharges into the sea at Honnavar in North Kanara. The Sharavati, flowing over a very rocky bed about 250 yards wide, here reaches a tremendous chasm, 290 m (960 ft) in depth, and the water comes down in four distinct falls. The Raja Fall pours in one unbroken column sheer to the depth of 830 ft (250 m). Halfway
    5.00
    3 votes
    193
    Gokak Falls

    Gokak Falls

    The Gokak Falls is a waterfall located on the Ghataprabha River in Belgaum district of Karnataka, India. The waterfall is six kilometers away from Gokak After a long winding course, the Ghataprabha river takes a leap of 52 metres (171 ft) over the sand-stone cliff amidst a picturesque gorge of the rugged valley, resembling Niagara Falls on a smaller scale. The waterfall is horse shoe shaped at the crest, with a flood breadth of 177 metres (581 ft). During rainy season, the thick reddish brown water sweeps far over the brink of the cliff with a dull roar that can be heard from some distance. There is a hanging bridge across the river, measuring about 201 metres (659 ft). Its height above the rock bed is 14 metres (46 ft). There is an old electricity generation station and electricity was generated here for the first time in 1887. One interesting feature of this place is the monuments from the Chalukya era that are found on either bank of the rocky gorge. Another attraction of this place is the very old river-front temple dedicated to Lord Mahalingeshwara, built in the Later Chalukyan style of architecture. Distance from Belgaum : 65 km Distance from Gokak : 6 km Nearest Airport:
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Orinduik Falls

    Orinduik Falls

    The Orinduik Falls lie on the Ireng River, a highland river that thunders over steps and terraces of red jasper on the border of Guyana and Brazil before merging with the Takutu River and into Brazil to join the Amazon River. The falls are situated amid the rolling, grass-covered hills of the Pakaraima Mountains. Orinduik Falls is a wide, multi-tiered series of cascades making it an ideal waterfall for swimming. Waterfall is approximately 25 m tall and more than 150 m wide. There are other waterfalls on Ireng River, including the approximately 100 m tall Kurutuik Falls located more than 40 km to the north, but due to hard accessibility these falls are rarely visited. Thanks to the airstrip next to the falls, Orinduik Falls is a popular tourist destination. The falls lies at the edge of the Pakaraima Mountains. There are frequent flights from Ogle Airport and Cheddi Jagan International Airport in Georgetown and most tours are combined with Kaieteur Falls. Tannin dissolved in the water from the leaves of the rain forest leaves your hair feeling soft and silky.
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Ouzoud Falls

    Ouzoud Falls

    Ouzoud Waterfalls (French: Cascades d'Ouzoud) (110 m high) are located in the Grand Atlas village of Tanaghmeilt, in the province of Azilal, 150 km north-east of Marrakech, in Morocco. Ouzoud is the Berber word for "olive", referring to the nearby olive trees. The bottom of the falls is accessible through a shaded path of olive trees. At the summit of the falls, there exist a dozen of old small mills that are still in use. One can also follow a narrow and difficult track leading to the road of Beni Mellal while descending the gorges from the "wadi el-Abid" by a canyon sometimes which one does not distinguish the bottom with nearly 600 metres. It is the most visited site of the region. In the vicinity, Green valleys, mills, orchards and a superb circuit of the gorges of the El Abid River (in Arabic, "Slaves' River" ), are found. Many local and national associations lead projects to protect and preserve the site.
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Salmon Creek Falls

    Salmon Creek Falls

    Salmon Creek Falls is a 120 foot (36 meter) waterfall near Gorda in Los Padres National Forest, Monterey County, California, USA.
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Spokane Falls

    Spokane Falls

    Spokane Falls is the name of the series of waterfalls and dams on the Spokane River in downtown Spokane, Washington. The Indian name for the Spokane Falls was "Stluputqu", meaning "swift water". The falls was once the site of a large Spokane people village. The falls consists of an Upper Falls and a Lower Falls. The Upper Falls is the site of the Upper Falls Dam, a diversion dam constructed in 1920 that directs the water into the Upper Falls intake on the south channel of the Spokane River. The Upper Falls Power Plant incorporates a Francis turbine capable of generating 10 MW. The Lower Falls is the site of a second diversion dam, the Monroe Street Dam. Completed in 1890, it was the first dam built on the Spokane River and is currently the longest-running hydroelectric generation facility in Washington State. Its Kaplan turbine has a generating capacity of 14.82 MW. Both Upper Falls and Lower Falls dams are operated by the power company Avista.
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Cauldron Snout

    Cauldron Snout

    Cauldron Snout is a waterfall on the upper reaches of the River Tees in Northern England, immediately below the dam of the Cow Green Reservoir. It is well upstream of the High Force waterfall, and is on the boundary between County Durham and Cumbria, England. The waterfall lies within the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and European Geopark. It is more a long cataract than a waterfall, and at 200 yards (180 m) long, reckoned to be the longest waterfall in England. It is impressive by the scale of the British landsape, and attracts a lot of visitors, despite the 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) walk from the nearest carpark (at Cow Green Reservoir). No fee is payable as of 2010. The Pennine Way takes in Cauldron Snout. The falls are caused by the upper Tees passing over dolerite steps of the Whin Sill.
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Gabai Falls

    Gabai Falls

    The Gabai Falls are located in Hulu Langat at the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur. It is a popular attraction for the locals, but relatively unknown with tourists. A cemented path leads from the parking to the lower falls. Along the path several shelters have been built. The upper falls can be reached by trails. The falls are located in a natural Dipterocarp forest reserve. Notable species include the leech Phytobdella catenifera.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Hogenakal Falls

    Hogenakal Falls

    Hogenakkal Falls or Hogenakal Falls is a waterfall in South India on the river Kaveri. It is located in the Dharmapuri district of the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, about 180 km (110 mi) from Bangalore and 46 km (29 mi) from Dharmapuri town. It is sometimes referred to as the "Niagara of India". With its fame for medicinal baths and hide boat rides, it is a major site of tourist attraction. Carbonatite rocks in this site are considered to be the oldest of its kind in South Asia and one of the oldest in the world. This is also the site of a proposed project to generate drinking water. The word Hogenakal is formed of two Kannada words hoge and kal. When the water falls on the rocks it appears as if hoge (smoke) is emanating from the top of the kal (rock) because of the force of the water, hence Hogenakkal (smoking rocks). It is also called as Marikottayam by the people of Tamil Nadu. The Kaveri is considered to form at Talakaveri in the Brahmagiri hills in Kodagu district in Karnataka and gathers momentum as the land drops in elevation. It becomes larger as various tributaries feed into it on the way down. At Hogenakkal, the Kaveri, now a large river, drops and creates
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Låtefossen

    Låtefossen

    Låtefossen or Låtefoss is a waterfall located in the municipality of Odda in western Norway. The total height is 165 meters. The water fall is a well known tourist attraction in the area. It is special in that it consists of two separate streams from its source, Lotevatnet, that meets in the middle of the water fall.
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Limonsodan Falls

    Limonsodan Falls

    Limunsudan Falls is a two-tiered waterfall located in Barangay Rogongon, Iligan City, in the Province of Lanao del Norte, Philippines, 55 kilometers away from the City proper. It is said to be the Philippines' highest waterfall with the height of 870 feet, with the lower part cascading alone higher than the Maria Cristina Falls.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Barnafossar

    Barnafossar

    Barnafossar is also known as Bjarnafossar, which was its previous name. Barnafoss is near Hraunfossar which burst out of Hallmundarhraun which is a great lava plain. Barnafossar is a waterfall in Western Iceland, about 100 kilometres (62 mi) from Reykjavík. Barnafoss is on the river Hvita in Borgarfjordur. Hraunfossar flows out of a lava field into Hvita near Barnafoss, creating a stunning scenery. Many Icelandic folk tales have been associated with Barnafoss, the most famous being about two boys from a nearby farm, Hraunsás. One day, the boys' parents went with their ploughmen to a church. The boys were supposed to stay at home, but as they grew bored they decided to follow their parents. They made a shortcut and crossed a natural stone-bridge that was above the waterfall. But on their way, they felt dizzy and fell into the water and drowned. When their mother found out what had happened, she put a spell on the bridge saying that nobody would ever cross it without drowning himself. A little while later, the bridge was demolished in an earthquake. Another waterfall, Barnafoss, is on the River Skjalfandafljot near the abandoned farm Barnafell in Ljosavatn County. There the river
    5.00
    2 votes
    204
    Millstream Falls

    Millstream Falls

    Millstream Falls is found on a tributary to the Herbert River known as The Millstream, 15 km southwest of Ravenshoe, on the Atherton Tableland in Far North Queensland, Australia. Protected within the Millstream Falls National Park, the falls are accessible by road from the Kennedy Highway. Millstream Falls is Australia's widest waterfall.
    5.00
    2 votes
    205
    Nooksack Falls

    Nooksack Falls

    Nooksack Falls is a waterfall along the North Fork of the Nooksack River in Whatcom County, Washington. The water flows through a narrow valley and drops freely 88 feet into a deep rocky river canyon. The falls are viewable from the forested cover near the cliffs edge. The falls are a short 2/3 of a mile drive off the Mount Baker Highway, Washington State Highway 542. The falls were featured in the hunting scene of the movie The Deer Hunter. Throughout the late 19th century, there were significant mineral discoveries being made in eastern Whatcom County and in particular the Nooksack Falls region. The richest and most significant strike was the Lone Jack Claim of 1897. Before the mine closed in 1924, approximately $500,000 worth of gold was excavated. Due to the success of the Lone Jack Claim, the area became known as the Mount Baker Mining District and produced over 5,000 claims between 1890 and 1937. One of the claims, known as the Great Excelsior Mine was located ten miles southwest of the Lone Jack Mine and only one mile from the Nooksack Falls Powerplant. In 1902, the Excelsior Claim erected a 20-stamp mill to crush the ore and a water powered turbine provided the power. In
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    Rjukanfossen

    Rjukanfossen

    Rjukanfossen is a waterfall of 104 meter in the western part of the Westfjord valley in Tinn, a municipality in the county of Telemark, Norway, west of the industrial town Rjukan. The waterfall is a part of the Måne river, earlier a major tourist attraction, being one of the first floodlighted waterfalls by electricity produced by the same waterfall. In 1905 Rjukanfossen was built out to produce hydro electrical power for the saltpetre production when Norsk Hydro was established. The name (West Norse Rjúkandi) is derived from the verb rjúka 'to smoke' (referring to all the froth from the waterfall). The last element fossen, the finite form of foss 'waterfall', is a later addition. See also > Rjukandefossen
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    Tugela Falls

    Tugela Falls

    Tugela Falls is the world's second highest waterfall. The total drop in five free-leaping falls is 948 m (3,110 ft). They are located in the Drakensberg (Dragon's Mountains) in the Royal Natal National Park in KwaZulu-Natal Province, Republic of South Africa. They are easily viewed after a heavy rain from the main travel road into the park, glistening from the reflection of the late afternoon sun. The source of the Tugela River (Zulu for 'sudden') is the Mont-Aux-Sources plateau which extends several kilometers beyond The Amphitheatre escarpment from which the falls drop. There is an undeveloped camp site and mountain hut immediately above the falls. There are two trails to the Tugela Falls. The most spectacular trail is to the top of Mount-Aux-Sources, which starts at the Sentinel car park (through Phuthaditjhaba on the R57, approximately 2hrs drive from Royal Natal National Park via the R74, 90 minutes from Harrismith via the R712, or 80 minutes from Golden Gate Highlands National Park). From here it is a relatively easy climb to the top of the Amphitheatre, however it does take about 4.5 to 8 hours round trip depending on fitness level. Access to the summit is via two chain
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Wain Wath Force

    Wain Wath Force

    Wain Wath Force is a waterfall situated on the River Swale in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, North Yorkshire, England. The falls are located at grid reference NY883015, one kilometre upstream from the hamlet of Keld which has three other waterfalls in its vicinity, namely Kisdon Force, East Gill Force and Catrake Force. The falls in the north of England are often termed “Forces” after the Norse word “Foss” which means waterfall. Its name derives from the ford above the fall, wath being the Anglo-Saxon word for a ford. Wain may denote that it was passable for a cart or wain. Wain Wath Force is not a substantial falls; it has a drop of only around 1.5 metres as the river flows beneath the limestone cliffs of Cotterby Scar. Despite its modest height it is popular with visitors, the Coast to Coast long distance footpath passes the falls on the north bank of the River Swale while the main motor road up Upper Swaledale passes on the south bank.
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    Llovizna falls

    Llovizna falls

    Llovizna falls is a waterfall on the Caroní River, close to its confluence with the Orinoco, are located in the Llovizna Park, Puerto Ordaz, Venezuela. The nearby Macagua Dam has reduced the flow over the waterfall in recent years, but the cascade continues to be spectacular and returns to its former glory several times a year when the floodgates of the dam are opened. (Llovizna - "yoviz-nah", is Spanish for mist, drizzle, spray).
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    María Cristina Falls

    María Cristina Falls

    Maria Cristina Falls is a waterfall of the Agus River on the island of Mindanao. It is sometimes called the "twin falls" as the flow is separated by a rock at the brink of the waterfall. It is a landmark of Iligan City, nicknamed the City of Majestic Waterfalls, because of the presence of more than 20 waterfalls in the city. It is located 9.3 kilometers away southwest of the city proper at the boundaries of Barangays Maria Cristina, Ditucalan, and Buru-un. Well known for its natural beauty and grandeur, the 320 - feet (98 meters) high waterfall is also the primary source of electric power for the city's industries, being harnessed by the Agus VI Hydroelectric Plant. Maria Cristina Falls powers the Agus VI Hydroelectric Plant, one of the several hydroelectric plants that harness Agus River. The power plant has a 200 MW potential capacity supplied by a water flow of about 130 cubic meters per second. Agus VI is operated by the National Power Corporation and was commissioned on May 31, 1953. Under President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo's Mindanao Super Region development plan, the Agus VI is planned to undergo a 1.856-billion-peso upgrading project.  :)
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    American Falls

    American Falls

    The American Falls is one of three waterfalls that together are known as Niagara Falls on the Niagara River along the Canada-U.S. border. Unlike the much larger Horseshoe Falls, of which two-thirds of the falls is located in Ontario, Canada and one-third in New York State, United States, the American Falls is completely within the U.S. state of New York. The falls receive approximately 10% of the flow from Niagara River, with most of the rest going over Horseshoe Falls, from which it is separated by Goat Island. It has a straight line crest width of about 830 feet (250 m). If measured along the jagged lip of the falls, the crest is about 950 feet (290 m) long. The torrent of water passing over the crest of the falls is about 2 feet (0.61 m) deep. The height of the American Falls ranges between 70 to 110 feet (21–34 m). This measurement is taken from the top of the Falls to top of the rock pile (talus). The height of the Falls from the top of the Falls to the river is 188 feet (57 m). The falls are viewable from a steep angle on the American side, where it is possible to approach to within several meters of the edge of the falls. One can view the falls from the bank of the river, as
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    212
    Basaseachic Falls

    Basaseachic Falls

    Basaseachic Falls on the Basaseachic River is the second-highest waterfall in Mexico, located in the Parque Nacional Basaseachic at Cañon Basaseachic in the Copper Canyon region of northwest Mexico, near Creel, Chihuahua. It is 246 meters (807 ft) tall, second in Mexico only to the Cascada de Piedra Volada (Flying Stone Falls). Basaseachic Falls is located in the high mountains of the Sierra Madre Occidental, in the Municipality of Ocampo, 3 km (1.9 mi) from Basaseachi community and about 265 km (165 mi) west of Chihuahua. It is reached via Federal Highway 16 and its surroundings make up the Parque Nacional Cascada de Basaseachic (Basaseachi Falls National Park). The waterfall is made by two streams, Arroyo del Durazno and Arroyo de Basaseachic, which merge in the high mountains and then fall down the canyon wall. Past the falls, the stream is called Río Candameña (Candamena River), which is the namesake of the canyon it flows through, Candamena Canyon (Cañon Candameña). Candamena River contributes to the formation of Río Mayo (Mayo River). The falls' surroundings, such as rock formations and pine woods, are known for their beauty. Basaseachic Falls was considered the tallest
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    Bridalveil Fall

    Bridalveil Fall

    Bridalveil Fall is one of the most prominent waterfalls in the Yosemite Valley in California, seen yearly by millions of visitors to Yosemite National Park. The Ahwahneechee tribe believed that Bridalveil Fall was home to a vengeful spirit named Pohono which guarded the entrance to the valley, and that those leaving the valley must not look directly into the waterfall lest they be cursed. They also believed that inhaling the mist of Bridalveil Fall would improve one's chances of marriage. Bridalveil Fall is 188 metres (617 ft) and flows year round. The glaciers that carved Yosemite Valley left many hanging valleys which spawned the waterfalls that pour into the valley. All of the waterways that fed these falls carved the hanging valleys into steep cascades with the exception of Bridalveil Fall. Bridalveil still leaps into the valley from the edge of the precipice, although that edge has moved back into an alcove from the original edge of the valley. While Yosemite Falls seem to also fall into this category, the original course took the Yosemite Creek down a gorge to the west of its current location. The primary source of Bridalveil Falls is Ostrander Lake, some 16 kilometres
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    214
    Dudhsagar Falls

    Dudhsagar Falls

    Dudhsagar Falls (दुधसागर धबधबा in Marathi; ದೂದಸಾಗರ್ ಜಲಪಾತ in Kannada; English translation: Sea of Milk ) is a tiered waterfall located on the Mandovi River in the state of Goa, India, on Goa's border with the state of Karnataka. It is 60 km from Panaji. Legend has it that a beautiful princess lived in the forest (near present day, Dudhsagar Falls) where there was then a palace. She loved and enjoyed bathing in a lake nearby and used to drink "sweetened milk" from her "Golden Jug" after finishing with her bath. One day while enjoying her jug of milk she found herself being watched by a prince, who was standing amongst the trees. Red with embarrassment at her inadequate bathing attire, she poured the jug of milk in front of him to form an improvised curtain to hide her body, while the maids rushed to cover her with her dress. And it is said that, it is that sweetened milk that cascades down the mountain slope to this day as tribute to the virtue and modesty of the Princess, as the "Dudhsagar Falls". The falls is in the border of Karnataka and Goa and the roads leading to it are maintained by the Goa Forest Department, and are closed in the rainy season. The roads are again opened
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    215
    Hraunfossar

    Hraunfossar

    Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 meters out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name hraun comes from the Icelandic word for lava. The Hraunfossar are situated near Húsafell and Reykholt and lava-tube cave Víðgelmir is close by. Literally a stone's throw upstream from Hraunfossar, there is another waterfall called Barnafoss. Its name, the waterfall of the children, comes from an accident which is said to have taken place here in former times. There was a natural bridge over the waterfall and two children from a nearby farm fell to their deaths crossing the river on the bridge. Afterwards, the grief-struck mother had the bridge destroyed.
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    Pihtsusköngäs

    Pihtsusköngäs

    Pihtsusköngäs is the largest waterfall in Finland. Its maximum height is 17 metres (56 ft). It is located about 45 kilometres (28 mi) from Kilpisjärvi village. It is accessible by following the Nordkalottleden Trail. Media related to Pihtsusköngäs at Wikimedia Commons
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    Tahquamenon Falls

    Tahquamenon Falls

    The Tahquamenon Falls are two different waterfalls on the Tahquamenon River. Both sets are located near Lake Superior in the eastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The water is notably brown in color from the tannins leached from the cedar swamps which the river drains. This phenomenon is responsible for the alternative local name 'Root Beer Falls'. The upper falls are more than 200 feet (60 m) across and with a drop of approximately 48 feet (14 m) During the late spring runoff, the river drains as much as 50,000 US gallons (190,000 L) of water per second, making the upper falls the third most voluminous vertical waterfall east of the Mississippi River, after Niagara Falls and Cohoes Falls, both in New York State. There is no jumping off the falls. The lower falls, located four miles (6.5 km) downstream, are a series of five smaller falls cascading around an island which can be reached by rowboat. A hiking trail runs between the falls along the riverside, and visitors often play in the lower falls during the summer heat. The falls are within Tahquamenon Falls State Park, between Newberry, Michigan, and Paradise, Michigan. They are a popular tourist destination in the Upper Peninsula
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    218
    Victoria Falls

    Victoria Falls

    The Victoria Falls or Mosi-oa-Tunya (Tokaleya Tonga: the Smoke that Thunders; the 'i' is silent) is a waterfall located in southern Africa on the Zambezi River between the countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe. David Livingstone, the Scottish missionary and explorer, is believed to have been the first European to view the Victoria Falls, on the 16th November 1855 — which he did from what is now known as 'Livingstone Island' in Zambia, the only land accessible in the middle of the falls. David Livingstone gave the falls the name 'Victoria Falls' in honour of Queen Victoria, but the indigenous name of 'Mosi-oa-Tunya' — literally meaning the 'Cloud that Thunders' — is also well known. The World Heritage List recognizes both names. While it is neither the highest nor the widest waterfall in the world, it is claimed to be the largest. This claim is based on a width of 1,708 metres (5,604 ft) and height of 108 metres (354 ft), forming the largest sheet of falling water in the world. The falls' maximum flow rate compares well with that of other major waterfalls (see table below). For a considerable distance upstream from the falls, the Zambezi flows over a level sheet of basalt, in a shallow
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    Big Manitou Falls

    Big Manitou Falls

    Big Manitou Falls is a waterfall situated on the Black River, a tributary of the Nemadji River. The falls are located within Pattison State Park in Douglas County, Wisconsin, approximately 13 miles south of Superior. At 165 feet, Big Manitou falls is the highest waterfall in Wisconsin. The Native Americans, who originally settled in the area around the falls, believed they heard the voice of the Great Spirit within the roaring of the falls and gave it the name "Gitchee Manitou". In 1920 a state park was created around the falls, and it received a further level of protection in 2003 upon being named a unit of the Wisconsin State Natural Areas Program.
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    Bash Bish Falls

    Bash Bish Falls

    Bash Bish Falls, a waterfall in Bash Bish Falls State Park in the Taconic Mountains of southwestern Massachusetts, US (Berkshire County, Berkshire Hills, the Berkshires), is the highest waterfall in the state. The falls are made up of a series of cascades, nearly 200 feet (61 m) in total, with the final cascade being split into twin falls by a jutting rock, dropping in an 80-foot (24 m) "V" over boulders to a serene pool below. The waters of Bash Bish Falls begin at a spring in Mount Washington and after the falls, Bash Bish Brook continues on a gentler course through New York State until joining the Hudson River and flows through Copake. The waterfall is at the mouth of a gorge formed during the last ice age. At the rear of the gorge, opposite the waterfall, is a 194 feet (59 m) sheer rock wall. There are two access points for viewing Bash Bish Falls and one additional via a hiking trail network, both of the two on Falls Road in Egremont, Massachusetts. Falls Road is the continuation in Massachusetts of New York State Route 344. There are both upper and lower access points with views of the falls on the road. The hiking trail access is a short steep trail (blue blazed) off of the
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    221
    Canajoharie

    Canajoharie

    Canajoharie ( /ˌkænədʒoʊˈhæri/) is a village in the town of Canajoharie in Montgomery County, New York, USA. As of the 2010 census, the village had a population of 2,229. The name is said to be an Iroquois term meaning "the pot that washes itself," a reference to the "Canajoharie Boiling Pot," a circular gorge in the Canajoharie Creek, just south of the village. The village of Canajoharie is at the north border of the Town of Canajoharie and is west of Amsterdam. Canajoharie is home to one of at least three operating "dummy-lights" in the United States, located downtown at the intersection of Church, Mohawk and Montgomery Streets. It is a traffic signal on a pedestal which sits in the middle of an intersection, first installed in 1926. The other two are also located in New York State, in Beacon and Croton-on-Hudson. The Erie Canal passes the north side of the village. It was the headquarters for the manufacturing operations of the Beech-Nut baby food company. The plant was closed in March 2011 with production moving to Florida, New York. The current village is located east of the historic Canajoharie, a village of the Mohawk nation. The Mohawk Upper Castle Historic District in
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    Chaudière Falls

    Chaudière Falls

    The Chaudière Falls are a set of cascades and waterfall in the centre of the Ottawa-Gatineau metropolitan area in Canada where the Ottawa River narrows between a rocky escarpment on both sides of the river. The location is just west of the Chaudière Bridge, northwest of the Canadian War Museum at LeBreton Flats and south of the E.B. Eddy complex. The islands at Chaudière Falls are Chaudière Island immediately to the east and Victoria Island east of that. The falls are about 60 metres (200 ft) wide and drop 15 metres (49 ft). The area around the falls was once heavily industrialized, especially in the 19th century, and provided a significant contribution to the growth of the surrounding cities. The name of the falls come from the French Chutes de la Chaudière, meaning "Cauldron Falls" but has been historically translated as "Kettle Falls". The shape of the falls before its development resembled a large cauldron. The damming of the river and the presence of industry have greatly altered the waterfall's appearance, especially in the summer when the Ottawa River is low. Then the falls all but disappear because the water is diverted to power stations. The development also greatly limits
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    Reichenbach Falls

    Reichenbach Falls

    The Reichenbach Falls (Reichenbachfall) are a series of waterfalls on the River Aar near Meiringen in the Canton of Bern in central Switzerland, Europe. They have a total drop of 250 metres (820 ft). At 90 metres (300 ft), the Upper Reichenbach Falls is one of the highest cataracts in the Alps. The falls are made accessible by the Reichenbachfall funicular. Today, a hydro-electric power company harnesses the flow of the Reichenbach Falls during certain times of year, greatly reducing its flow. In popular literature, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle gave the falls as the location of the final fight of hero Sherlock Holmes with his nemesis Professor Moriarty. The town and the falls are known worldwide as the setting for a fictional event: it is the location where Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's hero, Sherlock Holmes, fights to the death with his archnemesis, Professor Moriarty, at the end of The Final Problem. Out of many waterfalls in the Bernese Oberland, the Reichenbach Falls seems to have made the greatest impression on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the author of the Sherlock Holmes stories, who was shown them one Swiss holiday by his host and founder of Lunn Poly and the Public Schools Alpine Sports
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    Vøringfossen

    Vøringfossen

    Vøringfossen is the 83rd highest waterfall in Norway on the basis of total fall. It lies at the top of Måbødalen in the municipality of Eidfjord, in Hordaland, not far from Highway 7, which connects Oslo with Bergen. It has a total drop of 182 meters, and a major drop of 163 meters. It is perhaps the most famous in the country and a major tourist attraction on the way down from Hardangervidda to Hardangerfjord. The name Vøringfossen (Old Norse Vyrðingr) is derived from the verb vyrða (English: esteem, revere). The last element fossen, the finite form of foss (waterfall), is a later addition. The waterfall was hardly known by anyone else beside the locals until 1821. In that year professor Christopher Hansteen on his way to Hardangervidda to make astronomical observations, estimated the height of the waterfall to be about 280 meters by throwing stones down from the edge and measuring the time with his pocket watch. In 1893 it was measured with a string, and the real height revealed 163 meters. In 1880 Ola Garen decided to build a hotel on top of the waterfall hill. The only way up there was a path with 1,500 stairs up Måbøbjerget and a ride way from 1872, built to carry English
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    Aberdulais Falls

    Aberdulais Falls

    The Aberdulais Falls are found on the River Dulais at Aberdulais, near Neath in the county borough of Neath Port Talbot, South Wales. The falls are formed as the river plunges over beds of hard Lower Pennant Sandstone just before meeting the River Neath flowing down the Vale of Neath. They are home to Europe's largest electricity-generating waterwheel. The falls and associated industrial infrastructure are in the care of the National Trust in recognition of the site's value as a key part of the region's industrial heritage. Car parking for visitors is available just off the A465 road which passes the site. The falls are considered by some to constitute a part of South Wales' celebrated Waterfall Country though the bulk of the falls are located several miles to the northeast at the head of the Vale of Neath. Power has been drawn from the waterfall since 1584, when it first provided energy used in the manufacture of copper, using ore imported from Cornwall. The copper-works ceased to operate early in the 17th century, and the site was later used for corn-milling and later as a tinplate works. The weir and waterwheel were added during the 19th century. Media related to Aberdulais
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    Aughrabies Falls

    Aughrabies Falls

    The Augrabies Falls ( /ɔːˈxrɑːbiːz/) is a waterfall on the Orange River, South Africa, within the Augrabies Falls National Park. The falls are around 60m in height. The original Khoikhoi residents named the waterfall Ankoerebis, "place of big noises", from which the Trek Boers, who settled here later on, derived the name Augrabies. The falls have recorded 7,800 cubic metres (280,000 cu ft) of water every second in floods in 1988 (and 6,800 cubic metres (240,000 cu ft) in the floods of 2006). This is over three times the average high season flow rate of Niagara Falls of 2,400 cubic metres (85,000 cu ft) per second, more than four times Niagara's annual average, and greater than Niagara's all time record of 6,800 cubic metres (240,000 cu ft) per second. The gorge at the Augrabies Falls is 240 m deep and 18 km long, and is an impressive example of granite erosion.
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    Bridal Veil Falls

    Bridal Veil Falls

    Bridal Veil Falls is a waterfall located on the Columbia River Gorge in Multnomah County, Oregon, United States. The Historic Columbia River Highway passes over Bridal Veil Falls on a bridge. From a parking lot on the highway, a winding footpath and another bridge lead to a vantage point for the falls. The falls consists of two cascades in quick succession along angling rockfaces, so when there is a good amount of water the falls looks very much like its namesake. There is a post office in the nearby community of Bridal Veil. Many couples have their wedding invitations shipped there in order to have the town's postmark applied to them.
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    Burney Falls

    Burney Falls

    Burney Falls is a waterfall on Burney Creek, in McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park, Shasta County, California. The water comes from underground springs above and at the falls, which are 129 feet high, and provides an almost constant flow rate of 100 million US gallons per day (4 m³/s), even during the dry summer months. The falls are an example of river drainage regulated by stratigraphically-controlled springs, and also of a waterfall formed by undercutting of horizontal strata. The falls were called "the Eighth Wonder of the World" by President Theodore Roosevelt, and were declared a National Natural Landmark in December 1984.
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    Cautley Spout

    Cautley Spout

    Cautley Spout is England's highest waterfall above ground. (Gaping Gill on Ingleborough falls a greater distance into a pothole). The broken cascade of falls tumbles a total of 650 feet (198 m) down a cliff face at the head of a wild and bleak glacial valley that comes down from a high plateau called The Calf. It is located in the Howgill Fells, traditionally in the West Riding of Yorkshire but now in Cumbria on the western edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. The waterfall is just north of the small town of Sedbergh. This fall is one of the few cascade falls in England; most are either tiered or plunge falls.
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    Della Falls

    Della Falls

    Della Falls is a waterfall in Strathcona Provincial Park on Vancouver Island. It is widely regarded as the tallest in Canada, 440 metres (1443 ft), though there is some question as to whether it deserves this title (see Height). Della Falls is located 60 km (37 mi) from the city of Port Alberni, British Columbia in Strathcona Provincial Park. The only way to reach Della Falls, other than by helicopter, is by crossing the entire Great Central Lake by boat; the only road access to the lake is at the opposite side from Strathcona Park. After the 35km (21 mi) crossing, there is a dock that marks the beginning of Strathcona Park, and a camping area which can be used as a base camp before trying the next 15km (9 mi) ascent to the base of Della Falls. More campsites are available along the trail and near the base of the falls. The hike, part of which follows an old logging railway, takes about seven hours one way and is suitable for intermediate level hikers. It ranks 16th in the world in terms of vertical drop. In 1899, prospector and trapper Joe Drinkwater discovered Della Falls and named them after his wife. Drinkwater also built a 16km (10 mi) hiking trail to the falls via Drinkwater
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    Engstligen falls

    Engstligen falls

    The Engstligen falls near Adelboden in the Bernese Oberland are the second highest waterfalls in Switzerland. They are listed in the Swiss inventory of landscapes of national significance. The Engstligen falls have one of the highest water volumes of alpine water falls and are one of the sights of Adelboden. The numerous mountain streams of Engstligenalp, a plateau at an elevation of 2,000 m, join together near its northern exit and fall in two steps over the rocks 600 m into the Engstligen valley where they become the official beginning of the Engstlige river. The upper fall can be seen partially from the Engstligenalp cable railway, a full view is possible from the seam path leading up the rocks. The lower fall is accessible by a comfortable mountain path from the lower station of the Engstligenalp cable railway. In winter, the Engstligen falls are a paradise for ice climbers.
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    Helmcken Falls

    Helmcken Falls

    Helmcken Falls is a 141 m (463 ft) waterfall on the Murtle River within Wells Gray Provincial Park in British Columbia, Canada. The protection of Helmcken Falls was one of the reasons for the creation of Wells Gray Provincial Park in 1939. Helmcken Falls is the fourth highest waterfall in Canada, measured by total straight drop without a break. Higher Canadian waterfalls are Hunlen Falls in Tweedsmuir Provincial Park, Takakkaw Falls in Yoho National Park, and Della Falls in Strathcona Provincial Park, all in British Columbia. There are six other waterfalls on the Murtle River, upstream from Helmcken Falls. The others are The Mushbowl, Dawson Falls, Majerus Falls, Horseshoe Falls, Meadow Falls and McDougall Falls. Only Helmcken, The Mushbowl and Dawson can be reached by road. Majerus, Horseshoe and McDougall Falls are accessed by trails . Meadow Falls is very difficult to view, except by air. Helmcken Falls was discovered in 1913 by Robert Lee, a land surveyor working for the British Columbia government. He was so impressed with the waterfall that he wrote a letter from his remote camp to Sir Richard McBride, Premier of British Columbia, requesting that the falls be named "McBride
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    Horseshoe Falls, Wales

    Horseshoe Falls, Wales

    The Horseshoe Falls (grid reference SJ195433) is an artificially created waterfall on the River Dee near Llantysilio Hall in Denbighshire, Wales, approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) west of the town of Llangollen. The distinctively shaped weir helps create a pool of water that can enter (via an adjacent valve house and flow meter) the Llangollen Canal, which begins here, and was originally designed and constructed in 1808 by civil engineer Thomas Telford. It is 460 feet (140 m) long.
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    Kalambo Falls

    Kalambo Falls

    The Kalambo Falls on the Kalambo River is a 772ft (235m) single drop waterfall in Zambia, very near the border with Tanzania at the southeast end of Lake Tanganyika. The falls are some of the tallest uninterrupted falls in Africa (after South Africa's Tugela Falls, Ethiopia's Jin Bahir Falls and some more waterfalls). Downstream of the falls the Kalambo Gorge which has a width of about 1 km and a depth of up to 300 m runs for about 5 km before opening out into the Lake Tanganyika rift valley. Falls were first seen by white people approximately in 1913. Initially it was assumed that the height of falls exceeds 300 m, but measurements in 1920s gave a more modest result above 200 m. Later measurements in 1956 gave a result 221 m. After this there have been made several more measurements, each with slightly different results. Widths of falls is 3.6 - 18 m. Archaeologically, Kalambo Falls is one of the most important sites in Africa. It has produced a sequence of past human activity stretching over more than two hundred and fifty thousand years. It was first excavated in 1953 by John Desmond Clark who recognised archaeological activity around a small basin lake upstreams from the
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    Kanching Falls

    Kanching Falls

    The Kanching Falls are located between Kuala Lumpur and Rawang in Selangor, Malaysia, and is a popular tourist destination in Kuala Lumpur. The waterfalls consist of seven tiers. A well-maintained recreation park provides access to the lower falls. To reach the upper falls uphill scrambling may be necessary.
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    Khone Phapheng Falls

    Khone Phapheng Falls

    The Khone Falls and Pha Pheng Falls (Lao: ຂກົກນເກະ ຜກະ ຜເກະງ) is a waterfall located in Champasak Province on the Mekong River in southern Laos, near the border with Cambodia. The Khone Falls are the largest in southeast Asia and they are the main reason that the Mekong is not fully navigable into China. The falls are characterised by thousands of islands and countless waterways, giving the area its name Si Phan Don or 'The 4,000 islands'. The highest falls reach to 21 metres (69 ft); the succession of rapids stretch 9.7 km (6.0 mi) of the river's length. The average discharge of the cataract is nearly 11,000 m/s (390,000 cu ft/s), though the highest volume on record was reached at over 49,000 m/s (1,700,000 cu ft/s). The Khone Falls are well known as the prime reason why the Mekong river is not fully navigable into China. In the late 19th century French colonialists made repeated attempts to navigate the falls but their efforts failed. This difficulty led to the construction of the Don Det – Don Khon narrow gauge railway on Don Det and Don Khon islands. The falls are home to the plabuck, an endangered species of catfish said to be the largest freshwater fish in the world. The
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    Kjelfossen

    Kjelfossen

    Kjelfossen (English: Kjell Falls) is one of the highest waterfalls in Norway. The falls are located near the village of Gudvangen in the municipality of Aurland in Sogn og Fjordane county. With a total fall height of 755 metres (2,477 ft), the waterfall is listed as the 18th tallest waterfall in the world. The tallest single drop is 149 metres (489 ft). The height of the waterfall has never been accurately measured, so there are discrepancies in its actual height. Some sources list it as 840 metres (2,760 ft) tall. The largest of the three (the one on the left) is officially named Kjelfossen, but is also known as Stor Kjelfossen. The middle falls is known as Vetle Kjelfoss, and the one on the right (and the smallest by volume) is thought to be unnamed. The falls are located just east of Gudvangen at the end of the Nærøyfjord. The falls can be seen from the E16 highway, just west of the entrance into the Gudvanga Tunnel. The falls are located about 18 kilometres (11 mi) west of Flåm and 27 kilometres (17 mi) west of Aurlandsvangen.
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    Månafossen

    Månafossen

    The Månafossen waterfall, located at the bottom of the fjord Frafjord in Gjesdal of Rogaland, Norway is fed by the river Mån. The total drop is 92 m.
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    Muthyalamaduvu

    Muthyalamaduvu

    The Muthyala maduvu is a tourist attraction located in India. Getting There: It is near a town called Anekal on the outskirts of Bangalore. It may be easier and faster to reach this town via Hosur Road, although there is another route via Bannerghatta National Park. Directions via Hosur Road: While going towards Hosur from Bangalore, watch out for Narayana Health City (on your Right) and you have take a right from under that next flyover. You'll see an obscure "Anekal" sign board before you reach the flyover. From here, you'll be on State Highway 87 (Anekal Main Road). Keep going straight until you reach Anekal town. Then you need to take a left towards "Anekal Athibele Road" or State Highway 35. You can ask for Taluk Office or Anekal Bus-stand. Continue on this road. From Bus-stand, after about 2 Kims, you'll have to deviate on to left smaller road from the state highway 35. Directions via Bannerghatta National park Road: While going towards Bannerghatta National Park, go past the park (without taking any deviation), continuing on the National Highway 87 (Anekal-Bannerghatta Road) towards Anekal. Once you reach Anekal town, you'll have to take a left deviation on to a smaller town
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    Powerscourt Waterfall

    Powerscourt Waterfall

    | average_flow = | watercourse = | world_rank = 687 }} Powerscourt Waterfall (Irish: Eas Chúirt an Phaoraigh) is a waterfall on the river Dargle near Enniskerry, County Wicklow, in Ireland, located in a valley surrounded by Djouce Mountain and the Great Sugar Loaf. At a height of 121 metres (397 ft), it is the highest waterfall on the island. The waterfall and surrounding valley are owned by the Powerscourt Estate. In August 1821, during the visit of King George IV to Ireland, Richard Wingfield, 5th Viscount Powerscourt decided to dam the waterfall, so that he could release a torrent while the two stood on the bridge below the falls. The king was unable to leave a banquet at Powerscourt House; however when the water was finally released, the bridge was washed away.
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    Queen Mary Falls

    Queen Mary Falls

    Queen Mary Falls are found in Main Range National Park on the McPherson Range near the New South Wales/Queensland border. The 40 m waterfall is located 50 km south-east of Warwick, 10 km east of the town of Killarney in Queensland, Australia. Queen Mary Falls are on Spring Creek, a tributary of the Condamine River. The falls formed when water erosion by streams created gorges through layers of basalt and resistant trachyte. The falls are currently retreating as large blocks at the bottom of the falls were not evident in photos taken in the 19th century. Facilities at the falls include toilets, tables and fireplaces. Other waterfalls in the area include Teviot Falls, Dagg's Falls, Brown’s Falls and Upper Brown’s Falls.
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    Saint Anthony Falls

    Saint Anthony Falls

    Saint Anthony Falls, or the Falls of Saint Anthony, located northeast of downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, was the only natural major waterfall on the Upper Mississippi River. The natural falls were replaced by a concrete overflow spillway (also called an "apron") after it partially collapsed in 1869. Later, in the 1950s and 1960s, a series of locks and dams were constructed to extend navigation to points upstream. Named after the Catholic saint Anthony of Padua, the falls is the birthplace of the former city of St. Anthony and to Minneapolis when the two cities joined in 1872 to fully use its economic power for milling operations. From 1880 to about 1930, Minneapolis was the "Flour Milling Capital of the World." Today, the falls is defined by the locks and dams of the Upper Saint Anthony Falls, just downstream of the 3rd Avenue Bridge, and the Lower Saint Anthony Falls, just upstream of the I-35W Saint Anthony Falls Bridge. These locks were built as part of the Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Navigation Project. The area around the falls is designated the St. Anthony Falls Historic District and features a 1.8 mile self-guided walking trail with signs explaining the area's
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    Snoqualmie Falls

    Snoqualmie Falls

    Snoqualmie Falls is a 268 ft (82 m) waterfall on the Snoqualmie River between Snoqualmie and Fall City, Washington, USA. It is one of Washington's most popular scenic attractions, but is perhaps best known internationally for its appearance in the cult television series Twin Peaks. More than 1.5 million visitors come to the Falls every year, where there is a two acre (8,000 m²) park, an observation deck, and a gift shop. Most of the river is diverted into the power plants, but at times the river is high enough to flow across the entire precipice, which creates an almost blinding spray. High water occurs following a period of heavy rains or snow followed by warm rainy weather. This can occur during the rainy season which lasts from November through March. During high water, the falls take on a curtain form. For the Snoqualmie People, who have lived for centuries in the Snoqualmie Valley in western Washington, Snoqualmie Falls is central to their culture, beliefs, and spirituality. A traditional burial site, to the Snoqualmie, the falls are "the place where First Woman and First Man were created by Moon the Transformer" and "where prayers were carried up to the Creator by great mists
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    Staircase Falls

    Staircase Falls

    Staircase Falls is a series of waterfalls located on Gossamer Creek in Yosemite National Park, California. The falls descend a total of 1,300 feet (400 m) into Yosemite Valley over a series of steps. Staircase Falls is relatively ephemeral and only flows after rainfall. It is usually dry by May. The falls are located immediately behind Camp Curry on cliffs below Glacier Point.
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    Stony Kill Falls

    Stony Kill Falls

    Stony Kill Falls is the site of one of many access points to the Delaware Aqueduct. It is located in the town of Wawarsing, on the northwestern edge of the Minnewaska Preserve on land recently acquired by the State of New York and The Open Space Institute from Napanoch Sand and Gravel Company that once owned the land. Long a little know back entrance into the Minnewaska Preserve, utilized by curiosity seekers and more experienced mountaineers, as a more convenient access point to Stony Kill Falls and the accompanying creek and carriage road. From the parking area walk East along a gravel woods road into an open clearing. On the left and right views begin to open. Steep cliffs are visible on the left and right as you continue further along the path. The higher section of the clearing features the fenced in shaft, a deep water valve, running hundreds of feet below the earth to the Catskill Aqueduct, one of the major sources of water for New York City. On the right is an aging helipad, possible utilized as a quick access point for repairs to the Aqueduct. Continuing along the woods road the path dips down into an expansive gravel pit. Care is needed in this area as the shale is loose
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    Tin Mine Falls

    Tin Mine Falls

    Tin Mine Falls is a waterfall located in the remote Pilot Wilderness Area, part of Kosciuszko National Park in southern New South Wales, Australia. Described from top to bottom, the falls consist of non-segmented tiered cascades over bedrock with a few smaller plunges, followed by a single large plunge into a pool. The falls are recessed into a punchbowl feature making it impossible to view the entire waterfall from a single location on the ground. Since no roads or trails go to the falls, access is quite difficult and the falls are rarely visited or photographed (no public photographs are known except those on this page). The closest walking path is the Cascade Fire Trail, which runs South from the Alpine Way just West of Thredbo Village. Satellite imagery of the site is available via Google Maps. The height of Tin Mine falls is a matter of some controversy, due to two factors: A number of sources list the height of Tin Mine Falls as 459m (1,381') or 360m (1080'), and quote a story concerning the origin of this figure: "The falls were apparently measured in 1990 by a Dr. John Pease ... using a plumb line" If true, this height would make Tin Mine Falls the tallest waterfall in
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    Vazhachal Falls

    Vazhachal Falls

    Vazhachal Falls is a rushing watercourse in the Chalakkudy River in the Thrissur district of Kerala, South India. It is located 36 km from Chalakkudi and 5 km from Athirappilly Falls. The riparian forests of the Chalakudy River have revealed the existence of a thick riparian vegetation of more than 10 metres width for a distance of 10.5 km downstream from Peringalkuth, covering an area of 58.5 hectares. Out of this, 26.4 hectares lie within the Vazachal area, including three large islands densely covered by riparian forests.Chalakkudi is the nearest railway station and Athirappilly is the nearest bus station.
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    Vernal Falls

    Vernal Falls

    Vernal Fall is a 317 feet (97 m) waterfall on the Merced River just downstream of Nevada Fall in Yosemite National Park, California. Vernal Fall, as well as Nevada Fall, is clearly visible from Glacier Point. The waterfall runs all year long, although by the end of summer it is substantially reduced in volume and can split into multiple strands, rather than a single curtain of water. Yan-o-pah (little cloud) was the local name of the fall before it was named "Vernal" by Lafayette Bunnell, a member of the Mariposa Brigade in 1851. Hikers will start at the Happy Isles trail head in Yosemite Valley. Travel is generally East-South-East. This is one of the shortest (1.3 mi/2.1 km)—though in places steep—and most popular trails in Yosemite. The trail is mostly shaded and is progressive in incline until it reaches the base of the waterfall where mist sprays onto the hikers. Depending on the time of the year hikers can be totally drenched by the time they pass the mist from the waterfall. The final 15 minutes of the trail is a very steep climb up rocks to the top of the waterfall. Once atop the falls there is a pool of water called the Emerald Pool around which hikers lounge and rest.
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    Vettisfossen

    Vettisfossen

    Vettisfossen is one of Norway's tallest waterfalls, and the 284th tallest in the world. It is located in the Jotunheimen mountain range inside the Utladalen Landscape Protection Area in the municipality of Årdal in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The waterfall has a single drop of 275 metres (902 ft). This is the highest fall which is not regulated through a hydroelectric power station (Måbødalsfossen being the highest). The waterfall can be accessed by nice walking tour of about one hour from Øvre Årdal up the Utladalen valley. The name of the waterfall comes from the Vetti farm, which is located near the base of the waterfall. The mountain farm Vettismorki is also located nearby, just above the falls.
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    Watson Falls

    Watson Falls

    Watson Falls is a 272-foot waterfall located on Watson Creek, a tributary of the Clearwater River tributary of the North Umpqua River in Oregon.
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