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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Video Game Engine of All Time

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    8.67
    6 votes
    2
    8.17
    6 votes
    3
    Quake engine

    Quake engine

    • Used for computer games: Quake
    • Developer: id Software
    • Engine Family: id Tech
    The Quake engine is the game engine that was written to power 1996's Quake, written by id Software. It featured true 3D real-time rendering and is now licensed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). After release it immediately forked, as did the level design. Much of the engine remained in Quake II and Quake III Arena. The Quake engine, like id Tech 1, used binary space partitioning (BSP). The Quake engine also used Gouraud shading for moving objects, and a static lightmap for nonmoving objects. The Quake engine was created in 1996 for Quake. John Carmack did most of the programming of the engine, with help from Michael Abrash in algorithms and assembly optimization. It was later upgraded to id Tech 2 (Quake II engine). Quake was the first true-3D game to use a special map design system that preprocessed and pre-rendered the 3D environment, so as to reduce the processing required when playing the game on the 50-75 MHz CPUs of the time. The 3D environment in which the game takes place is referred to as a map, even though it is three-dimensional in nature rather than a flat 2D space. The map editor program uses a number of simple convex 3D geometric objects known
    8.00
    6 votes
    4

    Mizar chess engine

    • Engine Family: Chess
    Mizar is a chess engine developed by Nicola Rizzuti. Mizar is distributed with its source code for the use of programmers who may wish to understand how a chess program works. Mizar uses the Chess Engine Communication Protocol and can run under the popular chess interfaces XBoard and Arena. Mizar is written in C. The chess board in Mizar is represented by an array of 256 squares, laid out so that square a8 has the value 68 and square h1 has the value 187 (you can imagine a 16×16 board where the real board is centered in it). Each square contains: Mizar uses two lists of pieces instead to scan the board every time. The list position is sorted by piece value, king position is always in 0. When a piece is captured a flag is set to an appropriate value. Mizar uses also two bitboards (64-bit) to store white and black pieces and two bitboards to store white and black pawns. Bitboards are used to speed up attack detection and in evaluation function. The enp variable stores the square position at which an en passant capture is possible. The castle struct stores both a bitset indicating the castling right and a bitset to know where the castle move was done. Each board position also has a
    5.88
    8 votes
    5

    Filmation

    • Used for computer games: Knight Lore
    • Developer: Ultimate Play The Game
    Filmation is the trademark name of the isometric graphics engine employed in a series of games developed by Ultimate Play The Game during the 1980s, primarily on the 8-bit ZX Spectrum platform, but various titles also appeared on the BBC Micro, Amstrad CPC, MSX and Commodore 64 platforms. The Filmation engine allowed the creation of forced perspective 3D flip-screen environments, ideally suited to platform-based arcade adventures. Player characters could move in four diagonal (from the player's perspective) directions, were able to jump over or onto obstacles, and even push objects around the game environment. At least three games had used an isometric perspective before Filmation's first appearance in 1984; the arcade games Q*bert and Zaxxon (both 1982) from Gottlieb and Sega respectively, and the ZX Spectrum title Ant Attack (1983) by Sandy White. Q*bert and Zaxxon have little else in common with Filmation, though Ant Attack was a platform game of similar style, and was the first of these games to feature an extra degree of freedom (the ability to move up and down as well and north, south, east and west). It was claimed by White that Ant Attack was "the first true isometric 3D
    7.50
    6 votes
    6

    RenderWare

    • Used for computer games: Burnout Paradise
    RenderWare (RW) is a computer and video game middleware from British games developer Criterion Software. RenderWare is a 3D API and graphics rendering engine used in video games, Active Worlds, and some VRML browsers. RW is developed by Criterion Software Limited (which used to be a wholly owned subsidiary of Canon but is now owned by Electronic Arts). It originated in the era of software rendering on PCs prior to the appearance of GPUs, competing with other libraries such as Argonaut's BRender and RenderMorphics' Reality Lab (the latter was acquired by Microsoft and became Direct3D). RenderWare's principal commercial importance was in providing an off-the-shelf solution to the difficulties of PS2 graphics programming. It was almost describable as "Sony's DirectX" during this era—although the name refers to surrounding framework and toolchain middleware. Prior to version 2, an external programming or scripting language was required to take advantage of RenderWare. RenderWare 2, on the other hand, has its own internal scripting language: RWX (RenderWare script). However, in RenderWare 3 RWX support was removed. This next iteration focused on a binary model file format. As with the
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    7.33
    6 votes
    8
    Dark engine

    Dark engine

    • Used for computer games: System Shock 2
    The Dark Engine is the computer game engine used for the Looking Glass Studios games Thief: The Dark Project (1998), Thief II: The Metal Age (2000), and the Looking Glass/Irrational Games title System Shock 2 (1999). The Dark Engine's renderer, originally created by Sean Barrett in 1995, supports graphics similar to that of the original Quake, with Unreal-like skybox effects and colored lighting introduced in Thief II. Due to the limited hardware of the time, the Dark Engine was not designed with scalability in mind, and can therefore only display 1024 terrain polygons onscreen at once, as well as various other limits on objects and lights. In terms of textures, the game supports palletized PCX and TGA textures, in powers of two up to 256x256. Textures are grouped in "families" which share the same palette. There is a maximum of 216 textures and independent palettes, excluding 8 animated water textures. The engine does not natively support advanced game scripting, with AI and object behavior being controlled by 'Object Script Module' (.OSM) files, which are DLLs that are loaded at runtime. As such, new modules can be written and plugged into the level editor, DromEd, but are
    7.17
    6 votes
    9

    FPS Creator

    • Used for computer games: Beyond Life
    FPS Creator is video game creation application developed by The Game Creators. It is used to create First Person Shooter games with a 3D editor. It uses drag and drop tools to add things such as walls, lights, doors, enemies, ammo, weapons and more. FPS Creator comes with various custom scripts for just about every element of the game.
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    6.14
    7 votes
    11
    Java

    Java

    • Used for computer games: Whyville
    Java is a set of several computer software products and specifications from Sun Microsystems (which has since merged with Oracle Corporation), that together provide a system for developing application software and deploying it in a cross-platform computing environment. Java is used in a wide variety of computing platforms from embedded devices and mobile phones on the low end, to enterprise servers and supercomputers on the high end. While less common on desktop computers, Java applets are sometimes used to provide improved and secure functions while browsing the World Wide Web. Writing in the Java programming language is the primary way to produce code that will be deployed as Java bytecode. There are, however, bytecode compilers available for other languages such as Ada, JavaScript, Python, and Ruby. Several new languages have been designed to run natively on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), such as Scala, Clojure and Groovy. Java syntax borrows heavily from C and C++, but object-oriented features are modeled after Smalltalk and Objective-C. Java eliminates certain low-level constructs such as pointers and has a very simple memory model where every object is allocated on the heap
    7.00
    6 votes
    12
    Retribution Engine

    Retribution Engine

    The Retribution Engine is a 3D game engine that is used to make first person shooter games. The engine is open source and is supplied with a suite of editing tools that allow the development of customized games. The engine and the original game, Corridors of Power, are available for download from a range of websites (most notably demonews.com and TheGameHippo.com) and have been featured in news articles and software listings on notable sites such as opengl.org. The engine has been in development for over a decade and has contributed over 150,000 lines of code to the open source community. The engine provides powerful features often only seen in commercial game engines without heavy reliance on third-party libraries. Thus it is highly customisable and also provides valuable educational information to anyone interested in writing 3D games. The Retribution Engine is written by Andrew Gardner et al. and the editing tools were written by Paul Moxon. The engine is open source and is distributed under the GPL license. It is designed to run on Windows and uses OpenGL for rendering and DirectSound for 3D sound effects. The install package includes a game launcher, the game engine, a level
    7.00
    6 votes
    13

    Build engine

    • Used for computer games: Blood
    • Developer: 3D Realms
    The Build engine is a first-person shooter engine created by Ken Silverman for 3D Realms. Like the Doom engine, the Build engine represents its world on a two-dimensional grid using closed 2D shapes called sectors, and uses simple flat objects called sprites to populate the world geometry with objects. It is generally considered to be a 2.5D engine as the basic world geometry is two-dimensional, with an added height component, allowing each sector to have a different ceiling and floor height, and allowing them to be angled along one line of the sector. The engine renders the world in a way that looks three-dimensional; however, the sizing for perspective only depends on the horizontal distance. This is noticeable in that wall vertices are always straight vertical lines on screen, regardless of the angle of view. Therefore, with no vertical distance parameters (only horizontal), this can cause small size distortion when looking up and down but generally it is barely noticeable. However, this distortion can be severe if the player is looking at a structure that is very tall. As such, most Build games restrict objects' vertical height to a fairly limited range. Sectors could be
    8.00
    5 votes
    14

    C4 Engine

    • Used for computer games: Quest of Persia: Lotfali Khan Zand
    The C4 Engine is a proprietary computer game engine developed by Terathon Software that is used to create 3D games and other types of interactive virtual simulations for Windows (XP, Vista, and 7), Mac OS X (versions 10.5, 10.6, and 10.7), Linux, and PlayStation 3. It is ranked in the number one position among commercial game engines on the engine review site DevMaster.net. Development of the C4 Engine is led by computer graphics author Eric Lengyel, who is also the founder of Terathon Software. Although in development sporadically for several years beforehand, the engine was first made available under a commercial license in May, 2005. Since then, the C4 Engine has been under continuous development, and 60 updates have been released through the end of 2011, averaging nine updates per year. The architecture of the C4 Engine is that of a layered collection of software components, in which the lowest layers interact with the computer hardware and operating system, and the higher layers provide platform-independent services to the game code. While a considerable portion of the engine is dedicated to 3D graphics, there are also large components dedicated to functionality pertaining to
    9.00
    4 votes
    15

    Crystal Space

    • Used for computer games: Yo Frankie!
    Crystal Space is a framework for developing 3D applications written in C++ by Jorrit Tyberghein and others. The first public release was on August 26, 1997. It is typically used as a game engine but the framework is more general and can be used for any kind of 3D visualization. It is very portable and runs on Microsoft Windows, Linux, UNIX, and Mac OS X. It is also free software, licensed under GNU Lesser General Public License, and was SourceForge.net's Project of the Month for February 2003. Crystal Space is programmed in object oriented C++. It is very modularly built with a number of more or less independent plugins. The client programs use the plugins, such as the OpenGL 3D renderer, by registering them via Crystal Space's Shared Class Facility (SCF). Crystal Space has modules for 2D and 3D graphics, sound, collision detection and physics through ODE and Bullet.
    7.40
    5 votes
    16

    PhyreEngine

    • Used for computer games: Savage Moon
    PhyreEngine (also known as Phyre Engine) is a free to use, cross platform (PC, PSP, 360, PS Vita and PS3) game engine from Sony Computer Entertainment. By 2011 PhyreEngine had been adopted by dozens of game studios "to power almost fifty" games for the PlayStation Store or on Blu-ray Discs. PhyreEngine is distributed as an installable package that includes both full source code and PC Windows tools, provided under its own flexible use license that allows any PS3 game developer, publisher or Tools & Middleware company to create software based partly or fully on PhyreEngine on any platform. The engine uses sophisticated parallel processing techniques that are optimized for the Synergistic Processor Unit (SPU) of the Cell Broadband Engine of PS3, but can be easily ported to other multi-core architectures. PhyreEngine supports OpenGL and Direct3D, in addition to the low level PS3 LibGCM library. It also provides fully functional “game templates” as source code, including support for Havok Complete XS, NVIDIA PhysX and Bullet for physics. PhyreEngine was launched during GDC 2008 with new features (including Deferred rendering) being showcased during GDC 2009. Version 2.40, released in
    7.40
    5 votes
    17

    RPG Maker XP

    • Engine Family: RPG Maker Series
    RPG Maker XP (RPGツクールXP) is the PC version in the RPG Maker series of programs developed and published by Enterbrain. It is the first PC version to be officially translated into English and released outside of Japan. RPG Maker XP integrates the Ruby programming language, allowing for greater flexibility of development compared to the purely command based system of its predecessors. As Ruby does not directly support graphics or audio, the Ruby Game Scripting System is included to provide an interface for these as well as basic data structures used by the editor. The program's EULA allows games to be sold. This version is the first RPG Maker since RPG Maker 95 to feature a resolution of 640×480, compared to the 320×240 resolution of RPG Maker 2000 and RPG Maker 2003. The program's resolution can be raised through the program's scripting system, though this requires modifying the RGSS. RPG Maker XP uses graphic resources for title screens, game over screens, character sets, tile sets, transition effects, battle animations, battle icons, item icons, backgrounds, and window skins. New graphics can be created by users through image editing software. The program can accept virtually any
    8.50
    4 votes
    18

    Odyssey Engine

    • Used for computer games: Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic
    The Odyssey Engine is a computer game engine developed by BioWare and has exclusively been used to create three dimensional role-playing video games. The engine is BioWare's third license-able engine, after the Infinity Engine and the Aurora Engine. The engine was first used by BioWare to produce the critically acclaimed Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic released on November 19, 2003. The engine was later licensed to Obsidian Entertainment to develop the sequel, Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords first released December 6, 2004. The engine was based on the Aurora Engine (the one used in Neverwinter Nights) and added 3D backgrounds and character facial motions. As of June 2005, the Odyssey Engine appears to have been retired, with no future titles based on it announced — rather Bioware has developed the Eclipse engine as the Odyssey Engine's successor. The engine has been used on the following platforms:
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Frostbite Engine

    Frostbite Engine

    • Used for computer games: Battlefield: Bad Company
    • Developer: EA Digital Illusions CE
    • Engine Family: Frostbite
    Frostbite is a game engine developed by EA Digital Illusions CE, creators of the Battlefield series. The engine currently is designed for use on Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, Wii U and Xbox 360 platforms and is adapted for a range of video game genres. The engine was first used by DICE to create first-person shooters, but it has been expanded to include various other genres such as racing and real-time strategy and is employed by a number of EA studios. Thus far, the engine is exclusive to Electronic Arts with all titles being published by EA. DICE used the first generation of the engine for their in-house games Battlefield: Bad Company, Battlefield 1943, and Battlefield: Bad Company 2. The Frostbite engine launched with the release of Battlefield: Bad Company; subsequent titles employed an updated version referred to as Frostbite 1.5. Frostbite 1.5 was also used for the multiplayer component of Medal of Honor which DICE developed. (The single-player was developed by another EA studio with the Unreal Engine 3.) The next generation of the engine, Frostbite 2, debuted with the release of Battlefield 3. The creation of Frostbite 2 started the first usage of the Frostbite engine by
    8.25
    4 votes
    20

    RPG Maker 95

    • Used for computer games: Moon Whistle
    • Engine Family: RPG Maker Series
    RPG Maker 95, or RM95 for an abbreviation, is the first Windows version of the RPG Maker series developed and published by ASCII, released in Japan March 28, 1997 as RPG Tsukūru 95 (RPGツクール95, Ārupījī Tsukūru Kyūjūgo). The game is ASCII's third RPG making application for the PC. The game is also the first in the series to receive an unauthorized English translation and release. RPG Maker 95 games run in 640×480 resolution and incorporates a 2D tile engine, that involve separate graphics files for characters, tile sets, backgrounds, and battle animations. The battle style of RPG Maker 95 is turn-based and in first-person perspective. The music featured in RPG Maker consists of midi and wav files. The first 2000 releases in Japan were accompanied with a soundtrack CD album "ZONDERLAND" of RPG themed music based on RPG Maker. Music was composed by the U.K. band INTELLIGENTSIA, who also created the RPG MAKER in game FX.
    6.17
    6 votes
    21
    9.33
    3 votes
    22
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    OpenMoHAA

    OpenMoHAA

    OpenMoHAA is a game engine project intended to be capable of running Medal of Honor: Allied Assault game assets. It is based on the ioquake3 project, and as such written in C (as opposed to the original game, which was written in C++), using the cross-platform libraries: SDL, OpenGL and OpenAL. OpenMoHAA is currently undergoing active development. OpenMoHAA is free software under the GNU General Public License (GPL). The OpenMoHAA project was founded in December 2007 by a group of MoH:AA modders, frustrated with the lack of support from the game manufacturer, Electronic Arts, and the severe limitations the game imposed on mods. The developers are currently focused on implementing MoH:AA file formats support into the new engine, already with significant success regarding the level file format (BSP).
    8.00
    4 votes
    24

    SAGE engine

    • Used for computer games: The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth
    • Developer: EA Los Angeles
    SAGE (Strategy Action Game Engine) is a game engine used by Westwood Studios and Electronic Arts for real-time strategy games. The first version of the engine was known as W3D (Westwood 3D) was highly modified version of SurRender 3D engine, developed by Hybrid Graphics Ltd. Westwood used W3D for Emperor: Battle for Dune and updated for Command & Conquer: Renegade. After Westwood was dissolved by Electronic Arts the engine was further updated for Command & Conquer: Generals, and renamed to SAGE. The rendering part remains nearly identical to the W3D engine, but most other elements have been redesigned from the ground up. The SAGE engine allows for dynamic lighting that casts realistic shadows and realistic reflections on most objects. High quality visual effects are now possible with the SAGE engine powering games. One example of a unique effect is the stop-motion camera. Blow up a gas station, for example, and the action will freeze in mid-explosion, and the camera will quickly pan around the environment, revealing pieces of debris and shrapnel suspended in the air, before the action promptly resumes. The SAGE engine also allows games to take place during different times of the
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Ren'Py

    Ren'Py

    • Used for computer games: Katawa Shoujo
    The Ren'Py Visual Novel Engine is a free software engine which facilitates the creation of visual novels, a form of computer-mediated storytelling. Ren'Py (a portmanteau of Ren'ai, the type of game made using Ren'Py, and Python, which is the system that runs Ren'Py) has proved attractive to English-language hobbyists; over 400 games use the Ren'Py engine, nearly all in English. Ren'Py supports nearly all features that a visual novel might reasonably be expected to have, including branching stories, saving and loading of games, rollback to previous points in the story, a variety of scene transitions and so on. Ren'Py scripts have a screenplay-like syntax, and can additionally include blocks of Python code to allow advanced users to add new features of their own. Additionally, tools are included in the engine distribution to obfuscate scripts and archive game assets to mitigate copyright infringement. Ren'Py is built on pygame (which is built with Python upon SDL), and is officially supported on Windows, recent versions of Mac OS X and Linux, and is included as part of the Arch Linux (as an AUR package), Ubuntu, Debian and Gentoo (in experimental overlay) Linux distributions. It can
    6.80
    5 votes
    26

    Visual3D.NET Game Engine

    Visual3D Game Engine is a Game Engine with a Toolset written in C#/.NET for XNA to run on Microsoft Windows and with upcoming Xbox360 support. Visual3D Game Engine is the commercial successor to the open-source RealmForge Game Engine with roots going back to the OGRE Engine 3D open-source engine. Visual3D.NET is the flagship product of Realmware Corporation, based in Seattle, Washington, and incorporated in February 2006. As of July 2008, Visual3D Game Engine has been employed for multiple private business projects and by the US Department of Defense for military simulation and training. Also in 2008, Visual3D Game Engine has begun to permeate education and Indie sectors as a part of the recent XNA trends. In August 2006, Microsoft's GameFest keynote speech first declared the viability of .NET for gaming, with the first public release of XNA and Game Studio products, which would open up the Xbox360 and PC for game development by Indies and students. This announcement set into motion the rise of many new XNA-based game engines (e.g. TorqueX). Microsoft's XNA initiative is a part of the larger trend for gaming technology migrating from traditional C++ to higher level managed
    6.80
    5 votes
    27

    Creation Engine

    • Used for computer games: The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim
    • Developer: Bethesda Game Studios
    Bethesda's own Creation Engine is an engine created prior to Skyrim's release. Bethesda has officially stated that the engine will be used at least in one more project apart from Skyrim. After Fallout 3's release, the team devised numerous design objectives to meet for Skyrim, and as Howard described, the team "got all those done and kept going". Had the team not been able to meet their design goals with current hardware, they would have waited for the next generation and released Skyrim then, but, as Howard felt, the current technology did not hold the team back at all. The Creation Engine allowed for numerous improvements in graphical fidelity over Bethesda's previous efforts. For example, the draw distance renders farther than in previous Elder Scrolls games; Howard furnished an example where the player could stare at a small object such as a fork in detail, and then look up at a mountain and run to the top of it. Dynamic lighting affords shadows to be created by any structure or item in the game world, and while Bethesda utilized SpeedTree to produce flora in previous games, the Creation Engine utilized by Skyrim allowed for greater detail than what had been allowed by SpeedTree. For example, with Bethesda's own technology, the team was able to give weight to the branches of trees which affected how the tree blew in wind; in addition, the technology afforded wind to affect the flow of water in channels such as rivers and streams. Because of the large presence of snow in Skyrim's game world, the technological upgrades were applied to weather effects and allowed for dynamic snow fall upon the terrain, instead of snow that was rendered as a textural effect in previous games.
    9.00
    3 votes
    28

    Freescape

    • Used for computer games: Dark Side
    • Developer: Incentive Software
    The Freescape engine was an early 3D game engine used in games such as 1987's Driller. Developed in-house by Incentive Software, Freescape is considered to be one of the first proprietary 3D engines to be used in computer games, although the engine was not used commercially outside of Incentive's own titles. The project was originally thought to be so ambitious that according to Incentive designer Ian Andrew, the company struggled to recruit programmers for the project, with many believing that it could not be achieved. Paul Gregory (graphics artist for Major Developments, Incentive's in-house design team) mentions that Freescape was developed on an Amstrad CPC, as it was the most suitable development system and had adequate power to run 3D environments. Due to the engine's success, it was later ported to all the dominant systems of the era: the ZX Spectrum, the IBM PC, the Commodore 64, Commodore Amiga and Atari ST. The Freescape engine allowed the generation of complete 3D environments that consist of a floor and as many primitives as memory and processor speed realistically allowed for. These primitives were cuboids, four-sided frustums (called pyramids by Freescape),
    9.00
    3 votes
    29

    BRender

    • Used for computer games: Carmageddon
    • Developer: Argonaut Games
    BRender (abbreviation of Blazing Renderer) is a development toolkit and a real-time 3D graphics engine for computer games, simulators and graphic tools. It was developed and licensed by now defunct Argonaut Software. The engine had support for Intel's MMX instruction set and it supported Microsoft Windows, MS-DOS and Sony PlayStation platforms. Support for 3D hardware graphics accelerator cards was added.
    7.75
    4 votes
    30

    NanoFX GE

    NanoFX Graphics Renderer (previously known as NanoFX GE) is a graphics rendering engine for the Microsoft Windows platform currently being developed by Michael T. Braams. Known to the Star Trek Bridge Commander modding community as NanoByte, Michael T. Braams is highly regarded for his work on the visual effects enhancement mod, NanoFX. The renderer is being designed primarily for space simulation games and currently supports many high end Direct X 9 features such as normal mapping and specular mapping, planetary atmosphere effects as well as HDR lighting and glow and bloom effects. Other visual effects such as explosions and weapon effects have been roughly implemented as part of the 1.7a release of the NanoFX Viewer. NanoFX GR is currently in pre-release alpha version 1.8a. Its development is still ongoing however updated versions of the model viewer will no longer be made available anymore. Focus for development has been giving to developing NanoFX GR within the Evolved Engine. The NanoFX Graphics Renderer is currently being used along side Newton Physics Engine within the Evolved Engine developed primarily by John Hardy. This combination will form the game engine for Star Trek:
    7.75
    4 votes
    31

    Multimedia Applications Development Environment

    • Used for computer games: Return to Zork
    M.A.D.E. is the Activision game engine used to create the following game titles: It was designed by William Volk who also was the main designer of the point-and-click interface used in Return to Zork, and used a Lisp-like language similar to Infocom's ZIL. MADE's language was created by David Betz. MADE featured video playback, advanced U.I. functionality, and virtual memory. Originally created to port the HyperCard title The Manhole to DOS in 1988 . The engine has been announced to be compatible with the ScummVM interpreter.
    6.60
    5 votes
    32
    ScummVM

    ScummVM

    • Used for computer games: Beneath a Steel Sky
    ScummVM is a collection of game engine recreations. Originally designed to play LucasArts adventure games that use the SCUMM system (the VM in the name stands for virtual machine), it now also supports a variety of non-SCUMM games by companies like Revolution Software and Adventure Soft. It was originally written by Ludvig Strigeus. Released under the terms of the GNU General Public License, ScummVM is free software. ScummVM is a reimplementation of the part of the software used to interpret the scripting languages such games used to describe the game world rather than emulating the hardware the games ran on; as such, ScummVM allows the games it supports to be played on platforms other than those for which they were originally released. Portability is a design goal of the project. Ports of ScummVM are available for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and a variety of Unix-like systems including Linux (RPM Based, Debian based, source based), members of the BSD family (FreeBSD/NetBSD/OpenBSD/DragonFly BSD) and Solaris. It has also been ported to console systems. Less mainstream personal computer ports include those to AmigaOS/MorphOS, Atari/FreeMiNT, Haiku/BeOS/ZETA and OS/2. A variety of
    6.60
    5 votes
    33

    Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare

    • Used for computer games: Quantum of Solace: The Video Game
    Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare is a 2007 first-person shooter video game, developed by Infinity Ward and published by Activision for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Wii. A handheld game was made for the Nintendo DS. The game was released in North America, Australia, and Europe in November 2007 for video game consoles and Microsoft Windows. It was released for the Mac in September 2008, then released for the Wii in November 2009, given the subtitle Reflex Edition. It is the fourth installment in the Call of Duty video game series, excluding expansion packs, and is the first in the Modern Warfare line of the franchise, followed by a direct sequel, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 as well as the first game in the series to have a Mature rating. The game breaks away from the World War II setting of previous games in the series and is instead set in modern times. Call of Duty 4 was in development for two years. It uses a proprietary game engine. On September 10, 2009, it was re-released in Japan by Square Enix. The story takes place in the year 2011, where a radical leader has executed the president of an unnamed country in the Middle East, and an ultranationalist
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    Id Tech 5

    Id Tech 5

    • Used for computer games: Rage
    • Developer: id Software
    • Engine Family: id Tech
    id Tech 5 is the latest proprietary game engine being developed by id Software, currently still being actively upgraded, and follows its predecessors, id Tech 1, 2, 3 and 4. It is a major advancement over id Tech 4. The engine was first demonstrated at the WWDC 2007 by John D. Carmack on an eight-core computer; however, the demo only used a single core with single-threaded OpenGL implementation running on a 512 MB 7000 class Quadro video card. id Tech 5 was first used in a game in Rage, and the upcoming Doom 4 has also been announced to make use of it. The development of id Tech 5 has centered predominantly on making the engine easier to use for developers. Demonstrations of id Tech 5 have so far focused more on the advantages to developers rather than players, which is directly opposite to past releases of id Tech, which focused more on players than developers. The initial demonstration of the engine featured 20 GB of texture data (using a more advanced MegaTexture approach called Virtual Texturing, which supports textures with resolutions up to 128,000 × 128,000 pixels), and a completely dynamic and changeable world. This technique allows the engine to automatically stream
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Intellivision

    Intellivision

    • Used for computer games: Star Strike
    The Intellivision is a video game console released by Mattel in 1979. Development of the console began in 1978, less than a year after the introduction of its main competitor, the Atari 2600. The word intellivision is a portmanteau of "intelligent television". Over 3 million Intellivision units were sold and a total of 125 games were released for the console. In 2009, video game website IGN named the Intellivision the No. 14 greatest video game console of all time. The Intellivision was developed by Mattel Electronics, a subsidiary of Mattel formed expressly for the development of electronic games. The console was test marketed in Fresno, California, in 1979 with a total of four games available, and was released nationwide in 1980 with a price tag of US$299 and a pack-in game: Las Vegas Poker & Blackjack. Though not the first system to challenge Atari, it was the first to pose a serious threat to Atari's dominance. A series of advertisements featuring George Plimpton were produced, that demonstrated the superiority of the Intellivision's graphics and sound to those of the Atari 2600, using side-by-side game comparisons. One of the slogans of the television advertisements stated
    6.40
    5 votes
    39

    IW engine

    • Used for computer games: Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3
    The IW engine is a game engine developed by Infinity Ward for the Call of Duty series and has recently become the main engine for the James Bond video games. The engine itself is proprietary with inclusion of GtkRadiant by id Software. It has been used by Infinity Ward, Treyarch, Raven Software, and Sledgehammer Games. The engine was first used for Call of Duty 2 in 2005 under a proprietary license of id Tech 3 created by id Software in 1999, as at this time, the engine was a heavily modified version of the Quake III engine. The engine did not have an official name until IGN was told at the E3 2009 by the studio that Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 would run on the "IW 4.0 engine". Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare was released using version 3.0 of the engine. This game included features such as bullet penetration, improved AI, lighting engine upgrades, particle system enhancements and many more improvements. This is the first version of the engine to maintain 60+ fps on the console version. Treyarch began using an enhanced version of the IW 3.0 engine for Call of Duty: World at War.Improvements were made to the physics model and dismemberment was added. Environments also featured more
    6.40
    5 votes
    40

    Multimedia Fusion 2

    • Used for computer games: Puyo Puyo VS
    Multimedia Fusion 2 is part of a series of development tools designed for those interested in creating their own computer games, programs, and multimedia applications. It utilizes a unique method of development where users simply drag and drop objects and events to create their game or application. MMF2 includes many features that were not present in its predecessors, such as the ability to control frame rate, show where memory is being allocated, add alpha channels and different object "layers" (allowing for parallax and for static "background" objects to overlap the more dynamic "active" objects). There are three editions of Multimedia Fusion 2 available. The Games Factory 2 (TGF2), named after Clickteam's previous title The Games Factory, is the most basic, designed for customers new to game development, and those who want to explore the idea of making games. This version includes a splash screen at the end of each game created, stating that it was created with TGF2, and a link to Clickteam's website. Multimedia Fusion 2, the standard edition, is designed for more serious creators, and can make use of extension objects to enhance the functionality of the product. This edition
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    PLIB

    PLIB

    PLIB is a suite of Open Source portable computer game libraries, originally written by Steve Baker in 1997 and licensed under the LGPL. PLIB includes sound effects, music, a complete 3D engine, font rendering, a simple windowing library, a game scripting language, a GUI, networking, 3D math library and a collection of utility functions. All are 100% portable across nearly all modern computing platforms. Each library component is fairly independent of the others to encourage replacement with other libraries like SDL or FLTK. PLIB has been used by many projects (not all games, and not all open source), but has not kept pace with technical developments that happened after its original conception (e.g., shader technology), so it is currently outdated and rarely used for new projects. While nowadays there are better portable and Open Source replacements for all of its components are available, a similar comprehensive suite of libraries is still missing.
    6.40
    5 votes
    42

    TADS

    • Used for computer games: 1893: A World's Fair Mystery
    Text Adventure Development System (TADS) is a prototype-based domain-specific programming language and set of standard libraries for creating interactive fiction (IF) games. The original TADS 1 was released by High Energy Software as shareware in 1988, and was followed by TADS 2 not long after. In the early 1990s, TADS established itself as the number one development tool for interactive fiction, in place of simpler systems like AGT (Adventure Game Toolkit). In the late 1990s, it was joined by Inform as the most popular interactive fiction development language. TADS 2 syntax is based on C, with bits of Pascal. TADS 2 has been maintained and updated at regular intervals by its creator, Michael J. Roberts, even after it became freeware in July 1996. Graham Nelson, creator of Inform, describes Inform and TADS as the "only two systems... widely used" in the last half of the 1990s, and TADS has been called "The second most commonly used IF programming language today". Multimedia TADS, introduced in 1998, allows games to display graphics, animation and play sounds, if the platform supports it. In 2006, TADS received a major overhaul with the release of TADS 3, which is a complete rewrite
    7.25
    4 votes
    43

    Adventure Game Studio

    • Used for computer games: The Adventures of Fatman
    Adventure Game Studio (acronym AGS) is a free software development tool that is primarily used to create graphical adventure games. It is aimed at intermediate-level game designers, and combines an Integrated development environment (IDE) for setting up most aspects of the game with a scripting language to process the game logic. Adventure Game Studio was created by British programmer Chris Jones. AGS was originally released in 1997 as an MS-DOS program entitled "Adventure Creator". Jones was inspired by the apparent simplicity of Sierra On-Line's adventure game interface, specifically as showcased in Space Quest IV: Roger Wilco and the Time Rippers. The first version of Adventure Creator allowed users to create only low-resolution, keyboard-controlled games. Initially only small tests and demo games were created with AGS, and most of the more ambitious projects were cancelled. As a result of the lack of completed games and engine features, the user base was small, but the community grew slowly. Game developers started requesting more features so that they could create more complex games. Gradually, as these requests were implemented, AGS became a more capable toolkit and it was
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Dim 3

    Dim 3

    Dim3, also known as Dimension 3, is a freeware open-source 3D game engine created by Brian Barnes. It has been chosen as a staff pick for OS X development software by Apple. and featured as one of their "hot game building tools." dim3 has an entry in DevMaster's 3D engines database. dim3 uses OpenGL for rendering, JavaScript for scripting, XML for data and Simple DirectMedia Layer for resolution switching, input, and sound. dim3 includes four applications: Engine, Editor, Animator, and Setup. The Engine is the deployment application that runs games created in dim3. The games (or "projects") are cross-platform and only require the proper engine to run on the proper platform. The engine runs on Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows, iOS, and can be compiled on Linux. All versions can play network games with each other. The Editor is used to create levels by importing various 3D models into it. The Editor is capable of per-pixel lighting, bump and specular mapping, real-time lighting and/or baked lighting, particles and other special effects, skeletal animation, and customization through javascript. The Animator is used to add loop animations and effects to models used with dim3. The Animator
    8.33
    3 votes
    45

    StepMania

    • Used for computer games: In the Groove
    StepMania is a cross-platform rhythm video game and engine. It was originally developed as a simulator of Konami's arcade game series Dance Dance Revolution, and has since evolved into an extensible rhythm game engine capable of supporting a variety of rhythm-based game types. Released under the MIT License, StepMania is open source free software. Several video game series, including In the Groove and Pump It Up Pro use StepMania as their game engine. StepMania was included in a video game exhibition at New York's Museum of the Moving Image in 2005. StepMania was originally developed as an open source port of Konami's arcade game series Dance Dance Revolution (DDR), and was able to import DDR PC's file format. During the first three major versions, the Interface was based heavily on DDR's. Development of StepMania branched out in Version 4.0, with two versions being developed concurrently. The CVS version is based on a 2006 build of StepMania, better known as 3.95. StepMania creator Chris Danford later forked the CVS build and called it StepMania 4 beta. Beginning with the announcement of this beta, StepMania's CVS/SVN fork was unofficially branded by the StepMania community as
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    8.33
    3 votes
    47

    Torque Game Builder

    • Used for computer games: Aveyond
    Torque Game Builder, otherwise known as TGB, T2D, and Torque 2D is a game engine designed for 2D games based on the Torque Game Engine. The name was eventually changed to the Torque Game Builder when a graphical game builder was added on top of the software. Torque2D is the name of the underlying game engine while Torque Game Builder is the graphical editing suite that sits on top of the engine and allows easy access to some of the advanced engine features without the need to write code. Behaviors were added in TGB 1.5 and allow code to be assigned to objects through the game engine. It also allows variables to be changed in TGB which makes making games a lot easier. Tutorials are available on the TDN the Torque Development Network. TDN can only be accessed by GarageGames community members. TGB has been used to develop a number of commercially published games.
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    8.33
    3 votes
    49

    Titan 2.0

    Titan 2.0 is a game engine created by Stainless Steel Studios, an update of the original Titan Engine. Its purpose was to be a comprehensive real-time strategy engine, and was sold before Stainless Steel Studios was dissolved in 2005 . SSSI described their engine on their website (before it shut down) at the day of its release. They said it would handle all objects in the gaming world, has an integrated scenario editor, a powerful mulitplayer mode and communicator, built-in artificial intelligence and 3D graphics. The engine was announced in May 2004 , and was designed by SSSI, whose head designer is Rick Goodman, the designer of the Empire Series and Age of Empire. SSSI's last game made using this engine was Rise and Fall: Civilizations at War . Since SSSI has closed its doors, its website, the original Titan website, and any information about Titan 2.0 has for the most part has disappeared. Little more is known about the original game processor, other than that it was used in some of the Empire series, such as Empire Earth. After its press release, the engine was promptly purchased by Tilted Mill Entertainment, a small production company out of Massachusetts. The engine was also
    6.20
    5 votes
    50

    Genie Engine

    • Used for computer games: Age of Empires
    The Genie Engine is a game engine developed by Ensemble Studios and used in several popular computer games, such as Age of Empires, Age of Empires II and its expansion (but is not used in other Ensemble Studios games) and Star Wars: Galactic Battlegrounds. Some of those games have been ported to the Apple Mac. The Genie engine was developed as the basis for Ensemble Studios first game, Age of Empires which had the development name of "Dawn of Man". The designers received much of their inspiration from the game Civilization, with its proven historical setting; this was noted among reviewers as something positive. Age of Empires was designed by Bruce Shelley,. Tony Goodman (in charge of the game's artwork), and Dave Pottinger (in charge of the game's artificial intelligence). The game was described as "Civilization II meets Warcraft II" and this shows in the game's engine design. Like Warcraft it is real time strategy but unlike Warcraft and like Civilization II it is historical and has an isometric perspective. The sequel's, The Age of Kings, design team intended to complete the game within a year by using code from the original and reusing the Genie game engine. Several months into
    9.50
    2 votes
    51

    Kinetica

    • Used for computer games: SOCOM: U.S. Navy SEALs
    Kinetica engine is a video game engine developed by SCE Santa Monica Studio. It's designed for PlayStation 2 first-party titles. The first game released featuring this engine was Kinetica and will serve many forthcoming games. Template:Kinetica engine games
    9.50
    2 votes
    52

    Shark 3D

    • Used for computer games: Dreamfall: The Longest Journey
    Shark 3D is a middleware from Spinor for computer, video games and realtime 3D applications. Shark 3D is a middleware for 3D applications and is mainly used in computer games, broadcasting, and industrial simulation. Shark 3D is developed by Spinor. Shark 3D is a complete suite of a tool pipeline, renderer, sound system, physics engine and scripting language. These components can be also used separately. The renderer is a central component. Typically an application is based on the complete Shark 3D package. Alternatively, applications that have their own game engine code use the Shark 3D renderer only. Shark 3D is available for use in Windows and Linux based PC applications, and consoles such as PlayStation 2, Xbox, and Xbox 360. Companies using Shark 3D include:
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    7.00
    4 votes
    54

    Enigma Engine

    • Used for computer games: Blitzkrieg
    The Enigma engine (also called the Blitzkrieg engine) is a game engine developed by Nival Interactive that is used in several real-time tactics video games, including their own games, Blitzkrieg and Blitzkrieg 2. Games that have utilized this engine include Blitzkrieg (with several stand-alone add-ons), Stalingrad, Cuban Missile Crisis: The Aftermath, Frontline: Fields of Thunder, World War 1, Talvisota: Icy Hell and X-Team: Day of Freedom. Graphics deliver realistic 3D rendered isometric terrain and details include seasons, climatic zones and weather conditions which can affect game play. Blood is present although it can be deactivated. The player has the ability to build pontoon bridges, dig trenches, lay mines, resupply and repair units or call in air support but there are no resources apart from warehouses which can be captured present in the game. Virtually everything can be destroyed including buildings and bridges. Forests can be flattened by tanks or artillery. Each unit of a respective nation speaks its own language, adding immensely to the immersion. Later versions of this engine forgo isometric graphics in favor of true 3D graphics, facilitating true line-of-sight and
    7.00
    4 votes
    55

    Leadwerks Engine

    The Leadwerks Engine is a 3D game engine powered by OpenGL 2.1. It was designed by Leadwerks Software. Leadwerks Engine 2.0 made its debut in The Game Creators May Newsletter on May 1, 2008. The engine makes use of the Newton Game Dynamics SDK 2.0 (Newton Archimedes) for physics, and OpenAL and EAX for sound and 3D sound effects. The engine is based around a deferred renderer as of Leadwerks 2.1 and a unified lighting system that allows for dynamic lighting and soft shadowing without the use of lightmaps or any pre-compilation. Occlusion culling is performed on the GPU to remove the need for binary space partitioning or portal zones. The engine was developed by Leadwerks Software, and was written in BlitzMax. Modules have been made by members of the community to allow the use of the engine in languages such as Java, C#, VB.NET, and Python, but C/C++, BlitzMax and Lua are its originally targeted and officially supported languages. The engine is unofficially supported in any language that can load a DLL. Leadwerks Engine first began as a 2D render/physics engine for the Blitz Basic programming language. After the development of the BlitzMax programming language, the 2D engine plan
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Rybka

    Rybka

    • Engine Family: Chess
    Rybka is a computer chess engine designed by International Master Vasik Rajlich. As of February 2011, Rybka is one of the top-rated engines on chess engine rating lists and has won many computer chess tournaments. Although Rybka won four consecutive World Computer Chess Championships from 2007 to 2010, it was stripped of these titles after an International Computer Games Association panel concluded in June 2011 that Rybka plagiarized code from both the Crafty and the Fruit chess engines. The finding is disputed. The word rybka, pronounced [ˈrɪpka], means little fish in Czech (and in many other Slavic languages) and Vasik Rajlich was once asked in an interview by Alexander Schmidt, "Did you choose the name Rybka because your program always slipped out of your hands like a little fish?" He replied, "As for the name Rybka - I am sorry but this will remain my private secret." It is interesting to point out that the programmer's wife, Iweta Rajlich (Radziewicz), was born under an astrological sign of Pisces. Iweta Radziewicz was born in Poland and is still considered one of the strongest female chess players. The word rybka means exactly the same in the Polish and Czech languages. It is
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    Adventure Game Toolkit

    The Adventure Game Toolkit is software that supports the development of adventure games. It was written in 1987 by David Malmberg. It was a revision on Mark J. Welch's GAGS (Generic Adventure Game System), which was written in 1985. AGT was produced until 1992, after which time it was released as freeware (the final version is AGT 1.7). AGT was originally built for DOS but has also been compiled for Microsoft Windows, Macintosh, Amiga, and others. Scorpia of Computer Gaming World called it, "essentially, a sophisticated compiler", noting its lack of an in-game editor.
    8.00
    3 votes
    58

    Exult

    Exult is a free software reimplementation of the Ultima VII game engine. It enables play of Ultima VII: The Black Gate and Ultima VII Part 2: Serpent Isle, and their corresponding expansion disks Forge of Virtue and Silver Seed, on modern machines. In order to play these games, data files from the original games are needed. Exult itself is distributed under GNU General Public License. Exult is included in many free *nix distributions, such as Debian and FreeBSD. Exult originally started as Ultima VII map viewer for the X Window System, but later, as the reverse engineering efforts became more fruitful in finding explanation on the Ultima VII scripting files, the project expanded to become a complete reimplementation of the Ultima VII runtime engine. Before the project came to fruition, there was a demand for a new implementation of Ultima VII. Original Ultima VII executables started to show their age: they were rather difficult to get working on the systems of even their own era due to their memory management configuration, and in new versions of Windows, the MS-DOS support in general is getting less and less viable. According to an anecdote by Serpent Isle project leader Bill
    8.00
    3 votes
    59

    INSANE

    • Used for computer games: Full Throttle
    INSANE is a proprietary INteractive Streaming ANimation Engine developed at LucasArts, primarily by programmer/game designer Vincent Lee. Using custom video compression technology, it greatly compresses moving images so that high quality full-screen videos can be displayed even in hi-res graphics modes on the PC. An early version was first developed for Star Wars: Rebel Assault, and was followed by a much enhanced version in Star Wars: Rebel Assault II: The Hidden Empire and then in Full Throttle, Outlaws, and The Dig. It was also used in the 1998 games Star Wars: Droid Works, Mysteries of the Sith, and Mortimer and The Riddles of the Medallion, and its compression technology was incorporated into Star Wars: Behind the Magic, Star Wars Episode I - Insider's Guide, and Jar Jar's Journey Adventure Book. The use for Full Throttle caused some problems since INSANE was intended to be photorealistic, contrasting to the general cartoony feeling. The rendered environment had to be scaled down to match to the rest of the game world. Later enhancements were made to the compression technology to optimize it for the cartoon style imagery used in Outlaws.
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    8.00
    3 votes
    61

    CryENGINE2

    • Used for computer games: Crysis
    • Engine Family: CryEngine
    CryEngine 2 is a game engine developed by Crytek, and is the successor to CryEngine the game engine used in Far Cry. CryEngine 2 is used in Crytek's game Crysis, and an updated version in Crysis Warhead, a side story of Crysis. Also, the MMORPG Entropia Universe recently upgraded its graphics to the CryEngine 2. In March 2009 at the Game Developers Conference, CryEngine 2's successor, CryEngine 3, was shown on the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. CryEngine2 was first licensed out to French company IMAGTP who specializes in architectural and urban-planning communication. The purpose of licensing the engine was to create a program to allow clients to see exactly what a building or other structure would look like before any actual building was undertaken. As of March 7, Simpson Studios, a new development studio, has licensed CryEngine2 out to use on a Massively Multiplayer Virtual World (MMVW) that takes place on a terraformed Mars. On May 11, 2007 Crytek announced that they would be using the engine to create a game based on their new “intellectual property”. It is also confirmed that it will not be a part of Crysis and in fact may not even be a first person shooter. On September 17,
    6.75
    4 votes
    62

    Odin Engine

    • Used for computer games: Saboteur
    • Developer: Pandemic Studios
    The Odin engine started with a single polygon—just one simple shape rotating on the screen. Four years and several hundred thousand lines of code later, Odin has evolved into an incredibly powerful and versatile engine, one which promises to bring an open-world WWII-era Paris to life like never before. Co-lead programmers Dan Andersson and Fidde Persson were members of the original strike team assembled by the Pandemic studio shortly after they received their first Alpha Xbox 360 kit in 2004. At that time, the team consisted of four tech leads and a director. Today there are more than 30 people on the engineering team, plus a few more external contractors.
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    9.00
    2 votes
    64

    Xilon Engine II

    The Xilon II Engine is a 2D game engine written entirely in Visual Basic .NET. The Xilon engine first started with Visual Basic 6 using DirectX 8.1 but was never publicly released. In 2005, the engine was converted to Visual Basic .NET then again was never released. The second redevelopment of the engine was then started in early 2006, using Visual Basic .NET and Managed DirectX 1.1; the engine was used for a commercial project but was once more never publicly available. Late 2006 a new version of the engine (Xilon II) began and publicly released the source code on SourceForge.net. A few months in development, the engine was completely redesigned from scratch to allow for multiple graphic API support as well as multiple physics engine support.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65

    Crystal Tools

    • Used for computer games: Final Fantasy XIII
    • Developer: Square Enix
    Crystal Tools is a game engine created and used internally by Square Enix. It was originally titled the "White Engine", but the name was changed in 2007. The engine was created when the company decided to create an internal engine for use with seventh generation consoles. The game developers at the company believed that the hurdles were bigger moving from the PlayStation 2 to the PlayStation 3 than moving from the PlayStation to the PlayStation 2 and wanted a middleware to help support the challenges of development. The engine was developed with the aims of being able to create advanced facial animations and to have a single 3D format throughout the company. Beginning in 2004, Square Enix decided there was a need to create a common 3D data format, and as a result a Research and Development Division was established in September 2006, with Taku Murata as the manager. At the 2007 Game Developers Conference, Murata noted that the development of Final Fantasy XII used proprietary software to allow "real time display" of the game on a television to see immediately and precisely how the game would look. At the 2008 Game Developers Conference, Murata did a presentation called "The
    7.67
    3 votes
    66

    Forgelight Engine

    • Used for computer games: PlanetSide 2
    • Developer: Sony Online Entertainment
    The Forgelight engine is an MMO game engine under construction by Sony Online Entertainment. Forgelight will feature: It will be used in the games PlanetSide 2 and EverQuest Next.
    7.67
    3 votes
    67

    HeroEngine

    • Used for computer games: Hero's Journey
    • Developer: Simutronics
    HeroEngine is a 3D game engine and server technology platform originally developed by Simutronics Corporation specifically for building MMO-style games. At first developed for the company's own game Hero's Journey, the engine won multiple awards at tradeshows, and has since been licensed by other companies such as BioWare Austin (which is using it for Star Wars: The Old Republic) and Stray Bullet Games (for an as yet unnamed project). On June 12, 2010, Idea Fabrik announced that it had purchased "the HeroEngine and HeroCloud game development technologies" as well as hired "the staff of Simutronics that was associated with the development and support of HeroEngine/HeroCloud". The engine has online creation. For example, one developer can be creating a house and the entities inside, while another works on the landscaping and terrain around it. Each sees the other's work in real time. Games made with HeroEngine are expected to take 18 months. The simulation and rendering processes of the engine are currently run on a single-thread. However, it is planned for there to be a multi-threaded release, but the publish date has not yet been determined. HeroBlade contains integrated features
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    7.67
    3 votes
    69

    YETI engine

    • Used for computer games: America's Army: Rise of a Soldier
    YETI is a game engine developed and used by Ubisoft. The engine was originally developed by Ubisoft Tiwak and Paris studios for the their critically acclaimed Xbox 360 version of Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter. A heavily modified version of the engine is used in Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Future Soldier. Ubisoft's official website
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Coldstone game engine

    The Coldstone game engine is a game creation suite for the Macintosh developed by Beenox Studios and Ambrosia Software. Although the Coldstone game creation software itself only runs on the Mac OS platform, it is capable of compiling stand-alone games that run on the Mac OS 9 platform, the Mac OS X platform, or the Windows platform. The software is designed to provide a full solution for creating role-playing or adventure-style games. The full version of Coldstone shipped with a CD of royalty free artwork for use in one's custom games. A commercial game, titled Pillars of Garendall, was produced in-house at Ambrosia to demonstrate the Coldstone software's abilities. The Coldstone game engine is currently indicated as being "Discontinued" with regard to the latest version information on the Ambrosia Software Web site. According to Ambrosia Software, the Coldstone software has certain flaws to be dealt with before it is made available.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71

    Cyclone Game Engine

    The Cyclone Game Engine (CGE) is a 3D game engine developed by David Beirne during the final year his undergraduate study at the University of Huddersfield BSc(Hons) Computer Games Programming. Cyclone is a cross-platform engine which supports Microsoft Windows,Mac,Linux, and Xbox.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Digital Molecular Matter

    • Used for computer games: Star Wars: The Force Unleashed II
    Digital Molecular Matter, better known as simply DMM, is a proprietary middleware physics engine developed by Pixelux for generating realistic destruction and deformation effects. The offline version can support high-resolution simulations for use in movie special effects. The real-time version is designed for computer, video games, and other simulation needs by attempting to simulate physical real-world systems. Unlike traditional realtime simulation engines which tend to be based on rigid body kinematics, the use of FEA allows DMM to simulate a large set of physical properties. Developers can assign physical properties to a given object (or portion of an object) which allow the object to behave as it would in the real world (e.g. ice, gummy bear, etc.) In addition the properties of objects (or even just parts of objects) can be changed at runtime allowing for additional interesting effects. DMM can be authored or used in Maya or 3ds Max to create simulation-based visual effects. DMM is available and optimized for Microsoft's Windows, Xbox 360, Sony's PlayStation 3, Apple's Mac OS X, and Linux. DMM is a physical simulation system which models the material properties of objects
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    G-java

    G-java 2.x was a cross-platform game/software Java-based compiler for G-Creator and Game Maker. It has since dissolved into various projects such as Pineapple and Dolphin, although downloads for it are still around, but unsupported. It ran on and created software for any Java supported operating systems such as Microsoft Windows 95+, Mac OS, Linux, Unix and Sun Solaris. G-java is made up of two components: the IDE and the API, both of which were originally based on Game Maker but have since been modified and became more close to Java's API. The G-java API is a java API for creating games and other software based on the Game Maker Language used in Game Maker. This allows Game Maker developers to quickly learn Java, while also giving Java programmers a lot of useful functions for game or software development. So far, the G-java API is still in an alpha stage, but the JavaDocs can already be viewed: G-java API javadoc Originally G-java was a Game Maker to Java converter application written by TGMG(lead developer), IsmAvatar (optimization), and BZGaming (programmed some functions) in the Java programming language. It was first released in December 2004. It is designed to allow its
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    OGRE Engine

    • Used for computer games: Ankh: Tales of Mystery
    • Developer: Torus Knot Software
    OGRE (Object-Oriented Graphics Rendering Engine) is a scene-oriented, real-time, flexible 3D rendering engine (as opposed to a game engine) written in C++ designed to make it easier and intuitive for developers to produce applications utilizing hardware-accelerated 3D graphics. The class library abstracts the details of using the underlying system libraries like Direct3D and OpenGL and provides an interface based on world objects and other high level classes. OGRE has a very active community, and was SourceForge's project of the month in March 2005. It has been used in some commercial games such as Ankh, Torchlight and Garshasp. Recently, OGRE has received multi-platform support and currently supports PC, Mac, Linux, NaCl, WinRT, Windows Phone 8, iOS and Android. 1.0.0 ("Azathoth") was released in February 2005. The current release in the 1.x.y series is 1.8.1 ("Byatis"), released on September 2nd, 2012. Released under the terms of the MIT License and previously under a modified GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL), the engine is free software. The modification to this license allows users to statically link the library under the same terms as dynamic linking, though a
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    Game Blender

    • Used for computer games: Yo Frankie!
    • Developer: Blender Foundation
    The Blender Game Engine is a component of Blender, a free and open-source comprehensive 3D production suite, used for making real-time interactive content. The game engine was written from scratch in C++ as a mostly independent component, and includes support for features such as Python scripting and OpenAL 3D sound. Erwin Coumans and Gino van den Bergen developed the Blender Game Engine in 2000. The goal was to create a marketable commercial product to easily create games and other interactive content, in an artist-friendly way. These games could run either as stand-alone applications, or embedded in a web page using a special plugin. This plugin was eventually discontinued, as the inability to sandbox Python resulted in security concerns, though there was a later effort to revive it (an updated alpha version for Internet Explorer, and Firefox and COLLADA support was considered). Another plugin has surfaced named Burster, which enables secure embedded gameplay on websites, with sandboxing and encryption support. Key code in the physics library (SUMO) did not become open-source when the rest of Blender did, which prevented the game engine from functioning until version 2.37a.
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    6.50
    4 votes
    78

    PONScripter

    PONScripter (aka "Proportional-OnScripter") is a special fork of ONScripter, an open source clone of NScripter engine for the creation of visual novels. Like ONScripter, it is based on the SDL library, and can thus be used to play NScripter games on a number of other platforms, from Mac OS X and Linux, although its game compatibility has been decreased. Originally maintained by Peter "Haeleth" Jolly. Since September of 2009th, the official PONScripter is maintained by Mion of Sonozaki Futago-tachi, Higurashi no Naku Koro ni Visual Novel translation group. Unlike ONScripter, PONScripter successfully support native UTF-8 encoded script files, and there are no requirements to the nature of the fonts used (they need not be TrueType, Japanese, monospaced, etc.), which makes it possible to translate most of NScripter-based visual novels into any language other than English (for example, Cyrillic text in "normal" ONScripter looks broken and may crash the game when calling Backlog). Also, PONScripter introduces text style tags, including "bold", "italic", "underline", "struck out", string color changing, size, kerning, etc. WinKiller Studio, an Russian visual novel translation group
    6.50
    4 votes
    79

    Euphoria

    • Used for computer games: Grand Theft Auto IV
    Euphoria is a game animation engine created by NaturalMotion based on Dynamic Motion Synthesis, NaturalMotion's proprietary technology for animating 3D characters on-the-fly "based on a full simulation of the 3D character, including body, muscles and motor nervous system". Instead of using predefined animations, the characters' actions and reactions are synthesized in real-time; they are different every time, even when replaying the same scene. While it is common for current video games to use limp "ragdolls" for animations generated on the fly, Euphoria employs a more complex method to animate the entirety of physically bound objects within the game environment. The engine was to be used in an Indiana Jones game that has since been cancelled. According to its web site, Euphoria runs on the Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 platforms and is compatible with all commercial physics engines. A press release that was enclosed with the second trailer eventually confirmed that Grand Theft Auto IV is the first of Rockstar's games to feature Euphoria. Red Dead Redemption is their second game to also use this engine. The Star Wars titles, Star Wars: The Force Unleashed and The
    8.50
    2 votes
    80

    GoldSrc

    • Used for computer games: Half-Life
    • Developer: Valve Corporation
    GoldSrc, or Goldsource, is the retronym used internally by Valve Software to refer to the heavily modified Quake engine that powers their science fiction first-person shooter Half-Life (1998). The successor of the GoldSrc engine is the Source engine, which powers games such as Half-Life 2. The engine had no official name until Valve came to announce its successor:
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    8.50
    2 votes
    82

    Jedi

    • Used for computer games: Star Wars: Dark Forces
    The Jedi Engine is a game engine developed primarily by Ray Gresko for LucasArts. While not a true 3D engine, it supported a three-dimensional environment with no limitations in the 3rd dimension (Z). In Doom environments or levels were limited to existing in the X-Y plane only — levels were laid out linearly, and while floor and ceiling heights could differ, areas could not overlap vertically. The Jedi Engine had support for areas or rooms (called "sectors") on top of one another. In the Dark Forces revision of the engine, the renderer could not display two rooms situated on top of each other at the same time. This capability was added for Outlaws. The Jedi Engine also included the ability to jump and crouch, the ability to look up and down, and atmospheric effects (achieved by careful manipulation of 256-color palette files). The engine is limited in its rendering capabilities, however, and used two-dimensional sprites (pre-rendered in different angles) for most of its object graphics. The Jedi Engine's lifetime was short lived, being used in two titles, Star Wars: Dark Forces and Outlaws. The sequel to Dark Forces, Jedi Knight, used the Sith engine. It was sometimes rumored that
    8.50
    2 votes
    83

    Sierra's Creative Interpreter

    • Used for computer games: Police Quest II: The Vengeance
    • Developer: Jeff Stephenson
    Sierra's Creative Interpreter (SCI) is the scripting language created by Jeff Stephenson of Sierra On-Line for its adventure games after the older AGI, and the runtime environment for such adventure games. Although ports for the Amiga, Atari ST, Macintosh and PC-9801 platforms exist, the primary development was for the IBM PC platform. While AGI was a procedural language, SCI is completely object-oriented. Although continuously developed between 1988 and 1996, five major versions can be isolated: First used for King's Quest IV: The Perils of Rosella in 1988, SCI0 (0.000.xxx) allowed for 320x200 graphics with 16 colors as well as a music-card compatible soundtrack. It also supported parser-based keyboard input which a game could be scripted to use if it wishes to do so (non-adventure games usually didn't). Games using SCI0 (in order of release): Later versions of SCI0 added bilingual support for international versions; their version string reads "S.OLD.xxx". Games include: The last SCI0 game, Jones in the Fast Lane, already used the graphics engine from SCI1 and thus was available in a 256 color version. Released in 1990, the most notable improvement in SCI1 (1.000.xxx/T.A00.xxx)
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    Vicious Engine

    • Used for computer games: Marvel Trading Card Game
    The Vicious Engine is a game engine offering functionality for rendering, sound, networking, physics, game play scripting, and lighting. It is developed by Vicious Cycle Software, and was first released in January 2005. Versions of the Vicious Engine are available for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Network, Xbox, Xbox 360, Xbox Live Arcade, Nintendo GameCube, Wii, WiiWare, and PlayStation Portable (PSP). The second iteration of the Vicious Engine (V) was released on March 25, 2009 at the Game Developers Conference. It features improvements for next-generation console, especially the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. D3P and Vicious Cycle Software's Eat Lead: The Return of Matt Hazard was the first retail title to use the new technology. The Vicious Engine is a fully featured, standalone development platform. No additional 3rd party libraries are required, and all source code is included. It supports: Vicious Engine 2 is the next iteration of the Vicious Engine that has been optimized for current-generation consoles and high-end PCs. As well as the previous platforms, it also supports PlayStation 3.
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    Zillions of Games

    Zillions of Games is a commercial General Game Playing system developed by Jeff Mallett and Mark Lefler in 1998. The game rules are specified with S expressions, Zillions rule language. It was designed to handle mostly abstract strategy board games or puzzles. After parsing the rules of the game, the system's artificial intelligence can automatically play one or more players. It treats puzzles as solitaire games and its AI can be used to solve them. The scripting language of Zillions-of-Games uses S expressions. The rules are stored in a text file with extension ".zrf" (zillions rules file). The users can create their own ZRF-files and make the AI of Zillions-of-Games play their newly created game. Here is an example of rules for Tic-tac-toe (copyright by Zillions Development Inc.): The result of loading of this ZRF into Zillions-of-Games and playing against the computer is shown in screenshot at right. The definition of games usually contains the following pattern: Zillions of Games is so called because of its potential to play a very large number of user-programmed games. The system is shipped with over 300 games and puzzles. These include a lot of popular board games, such as
    8.50
    2 votes
    86

    Daybreak motor

    DBM (Daybreak motor XNA 3D Game Engine) is a 3D game engine (fully shader-based) and toolkit using XNA and .NET technologies designed for the creation of game titles for many genres, as well as 3D Virtual Reality projects. The DBM Development Kit (DBMDK) consists of a series of helper applications and core components to empower both seasoned and novice programmers to develop great games and visualisations. Official Daybreak motor Website (english) Russian community (russian)
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    DXFramework

    DXFramework

    DXFramework is a simple, illustrative, general purpose 2D (and 3D) computer game engine for Microsoft Visual Studio using Microsoft’s DirectX technology, version 9.0c. DXFramework is currently running version 1.0. It has 3 revisions for C++ available for download on their website, as well as a XNA studio express version. It requires Microsoft Visual Studio 2005(or express), the latest DirectX SDK, the Windows SDK, as well as a Python Interpreter. All of these are available from the DXFramework Wiki. The original version of DXFramework was written by Corey Johnson and Jonathan Voigt. The DXFramework 0.9.4 rewrite was completed by Jonathan Voigt. DXFramework is currently maintained and managed by Jonathan Voigt at the University of Michigan. It has been used at the University of Michigan since 2002 and University of Massachusetts Dartmouth since 2008 with success in game design classes focusing on arcade style games. Adding a sprite into a software being made using DXFramework. Written in the header file of a class this declares the variable “tank” as a sprite. This is written into the .cpp file that the header is imported into; it will attach an image onto the sprite variable to be
    7.33
    3 votes
    88

    HydroEngine

    • Used for computer games: Hydrophobia
    The HydroEngine is a video game engine created by Blade Interactive for their video game Hydrophobia for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360; it will also be the first to use the gaming engine. Developed over three years, it has a unique capability which allows modelling of flowing water and other liquids for the first time. It is entirely dynamic, which means the effect is not repeated and thus allowing different effects each time. The engine can also interface with solid body physics engines such as Havok, which allows objects and debris to be carried with the flow. Another new development platform, called the InfiniteWorldsGCS, interfaces directly with the HydroEngine. According to the developers it is "an underlying architecture, which can interface with bespoke editors tailored to individual game projects". This is a list of video games that use the HydroEngine:
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    Truevision3d

    Truevision3D is a 3D commercial 3D engine first created by Sylvain Dupont in 1999. The Truevision3D (commonly abbreviated as TV3D) engine is written in Visual Basic 6 and C++ and layered on top of the Microsoft DirectX API, currently supporting DirectX version 8. The engine is accessible from a number of programming languages including C++, C#, Delphi and Visual Basic (6 and .NET). The current version of Truevision is 6.3. Version 6.5, currently in public prerelease and very stable, includes significant updates to the engine, including DirectX 9 and shader support, as well as being rewritten in 100% C++. There are no plans to support DirectX 10 or XNA until a new version is worked on (TV7). Versions 6.2 and 6.3 have issues with C++ support, it is not possible for example to make it work in certain compilers. Version 6.5 works with any language that can utilize COM, Managed libraries, or static libs. There is also a known issue between the version 6.3 on Windows Vista since it needs a dll from DirectX 8 which Vista does not have and it is contractually illegal to simply add it. Microsoft has been contacted regarding this issue but has not demonstrated in their forums any will to
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    Ultimate 3D

    Ultimate 3D, also referred to as U3D, is a free 3D engine designed for use with Game Maker. It currently uses DirectX 8.1 and is programmed by Christoph Peters in C++. As of July 1, 2008, Christoph Peters has announced that future Ultimate 3D versions will not offer interfaces to be used with Game Maker anymore. Ultimate 3D 3.0, which is currently being developed, will be based upon DirectX 10 or even 11 and may become the base for a complete game making solution . Ultimate 3D was originally designed to be an easy-to-use 3D engine for the user friendly game creation software Game Maker, which only supported 2D rendering at the time of the first Ultimate 3D versions, and the early versions' features were quite limited in the beginning. Ultimate 3D 2.0 beta 1 offered a much wider range of features, which could be used to make advanced 3D graphics. Through the Ultimate 3D effect file format (*.ufx) and the support for post screen shaders new shader effects could be added in a comfortable way. In spite of the big changes, the engine's ease of use, detailed documentations, and good support, especially on the forum, are still important attributes of Ultimate 3D. Currently, the latest
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    3Impact

    3Impact

    3Impact is an free 3D engine written in C++. 3Impact is known for its rock-solid collision detection and for 3D Game Maker that is using it 3D Rad from Fernando Zanini . The following platforms are also supported by individual community members or groups: .NET languages (C#, VB.net etc), Dev-C++, Delphi, Framework Pascal, BlitzMax, AutoIt. Features overview Volumetric Lighting,Particle Systems,Animation ( skeletal, mesh warping, and texture),Integrated Physics,Integrated Networking,3D audio with Ogg Vorbis (.ogg) support. 3Impact supports 3D rendering via DirectX. The engine comes with collision detection that is predone to use, where engine deal with per-polygon collision detection and response on them. Sound supported format is .ogg and its supported in Mono (for 3D sound) and Stereo tupes. The network synchronized simulation alows to run on multiple LAN or Internet connected computers. Engine have examples that can show some capabilities and usage of some basic or some more advance usage. Engine functions can be called via Dll Call that make it easy to connect with almost any other programing/scripting languages, the reference file is nicely documented to direct users to easly
    6.25
    4 votes
    93

    Adobe Flash

    • Used for computer games: Super Smash Flash 2
    Adobe Flash (formerly Macromedia Flash) is a multimedia platform used to add animation, video, and interactivity to web pages. Flash is frequently used for advertisements, games and flash animations for broadcast. More recently, it has been positioned as a tool for "Rich Internet Applications" ("RIAs"). Flash manipulates vector and raster graphics to provide animation of text, drawings, and still images. It supports bidirectional streaming of audio and video, and it can capture user input via mouse, keyboard, microphone, and camera. Flash contains an object-oriented language called ActionScript and supports automation via the JavaScript Flash language (JSFL). Flash content may be displayed on various computer systems and devices, using Adobe Flash Player, which is available free of charge for common web browsers, some mobile phones, and a few other electronic devices (using Flash Lite). Some users feel that Flash enriches their web experience, while others find the extensive use of Flash animation, particularly in advertising, intrusive and annoying. Flash has also been criticized for adversely affecting the usability of web pages. Flash originated with the application SmartSketch,
    5.40
    5 votes
    94
    7.00
    3 votes
    95

    Genesis Device

    Genesis Device is the name for a recently-released game engine created by Luuk van Venrooij, based in the Netherlands. The Genesis Device engine was created in aspiration of games such as Oblivion, Crysis, Enemy Territory: Quake Wars, and S.T.A.L.K.E.R., with a purpose of allowing developers to use it in creating their first-person shooter games in large environments. The engine has been out for little time, but has seen much attention from program development groups, including the Pascal Game Development site, many hobby sites, and even the OpenGL home page. FIXED: For a while, the engine had problems with water showing right on ATI cards However, at the moment, ATI cards are not supported due to NV specific OpenGL extensions used.
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    7.00
    3 votes
    97

    Aleph One

    Aleph One (formerly known as the Marathon Open Source Project) is a free and open-source first-person shooter engine based on the source code of Bungie Studios' Marathon 2: Durandal. The project commenced in early 2000, when Bungie released the code shortly before being acquired by Microsoft and spurred the fan community to further develop it. Since that time, Aleph One has become a successful project in terms of development and community support. Most modern-day and die-hard Marathon enthusiasts use Aleph One due to its enhancements over the original games and the fact that it is playable with today's platforms. Its name is taken from the second infinite cardinal number () in transfinite arithmetic and references Marathon Infinity, the final game in the Marathon Trilogy (the "smallest" infinity is ). Initially, Aleph One was only compatible with Classic Mac OS (with Bungie stating that the code for the port of Marathon 2 to Windows 95 had been lost, requiring developers to backport the Mac code), but it has since been modified to work with SDL across a wide range of various platforms, including Mac OS X, Windows, Linux, BSD and BeOS. A number of aesthetic additions to Marathon
    5.20
    5 votes
    98

    Stratagus

    Stratagus is a free cross-platform real-time strategy game engine used to build other games. It is written in C with the configuration language being Lua. SDL, gzip and bzip2 are among the external libraries used. On June 15, 1998 Lutz Sammer released the first public version of a free Warcraft II clone for Linux he had written, named ALE Clone. In 1999 it was renamed to Freecraft. Because of its history, all Stratagus games currently inherit the Warcraft II style gameplay. In June 2003, a cease and desist letter was received from Blizzard Entertainment, who thought the name Freecraft could cause confusion with the names StarCraft and Warcraft, and that some of the ideas within the engine were too similar to Warcraft II. The project halted on June 20, 2003. Soon the developers regrouped to continue the work by the name of Stratagus, with a change in the aim: former interest in using the data-files from WarCraft had diminished; the project using the data-files from Warcraft II was split-off into the new and separate project Wargus and the free media set imitating Warcraft II was discontinued. Development on Stratagus was paused on June 10, 2007. The Stratagus developers are now
    6.00
    4 votes
    99

    Virtual Theatre

    • Used for computer games: Beneath a Steel Sky
    The Virtual Theatre is a computer game engine designed by Revolution Software to produce adventure games for computer platforms. The engine allowed their team to script events, and move animated sprites against a drawn background with moving elements using a point-and-click style interface. The engine was first proposed in 1989, while the first game to use it, Lure of the Temptress, was released in 1992. Upon its first release, it rivaled competing engines like LucasArts' SCUMM and Sierra's Creative Interpreter, due to its basic level of artificial intelligence. It allowed in-game characters to wander around the gameworld independently of each other, performing "every day life" actions, which was not previously possible. Another unique feature All of the in-game objects (including non-player characters) occupied space. Consequently non-player characters had to side-step the player's protogonist and any other object they came across, as well as the player had to side step them. As the result, the engine achieved a more realistic game world than previous engines were unable to provide, though non-player characters could unwittingly block a path as the player was traversing the game
    6.00
    4 votes
    100
    8.00
    2 votes
    101

    Glulx

    • Used for computer games: Floatpoint
    Glulx is a 32-bit portable virtual machine intended for writing and playing interactive fiction. It was designed by Andrew Plotkin to relieve some of the restrictions in the venerable Z-machine format. For example, the Z-machine provides native support for 16-bit integers, while Glulx natively supports 32-bit integers. The Inform compiler, starting with version 6.30, can produce either Z-machine or Glulx story files. A Spanish interactive fiction development system called Superglús also uses Glulx. Despite being a better-adapted virtual machine for modern computing hardware and being just as accessible to developers, Glulx continues to lag behind the Z-machine in popularity, largely due to the comparative rarity of interpreters. The most popular interpreter for Glulx is Andrew Plotkin's Glulxe. Glulxe uses the Glk API for input and output. The MIME type for Glulx is "application/x-glulx". Glulx files have the file extension .ulx, but they are commonly archived in Blorb packages. For Blorb packages containing a Glulx work, accepted file extensions are .gblorb, .glb, .blorb and .blb. The former two extensions are intended to make it easy for interpreters to figure out which type of
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    PhysX

    PhysX

    • Used for computer games: Mass Effect
    PhysX is a proprietary realtime physics engine middleware SDK. It was developed by Ageia with the purchase of ETH Zurich spin-off NovodeX in 2004. Ageia was acquired by Nvidia in February 2008 The term PhysX can also refer to the PPU expansion card designed by Ageia to accelerate PhysX-enabled video games. Video games supporting hardware acceleration by PhysX can be accelerated by either a PhysX PPU or a CUDA-enabled GeForce GPU (if it has at least 32 CUDA cores), thus offloading physics calculations from the CPU, allowing it to perform other tasks instead. This typically results in a smoother gaming experience and additional visual effects. Middleware physics engines allow game developers to avoid writing their own code to handle the complex physics interactions possible in modern games. PhysX is one of the handful of physics engines used in all of today's games. The PhysX engine and SDK are available for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and the Wii. The PhysX SDK is provided to developers of all platforms for free, both for commercial and non-commercial use. What is known today as PhysX originated as a physics simulation engine called NovodeX. The
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    VASSAL Engine

    VASSAL Engine

    The VASSAL Engine is a game engine for building and playing online adaptations of board games, tabletop games and card games. It allows users to play in real time over a live Internet connection, and also by email (PbeM). It runs on all platforms, and is free, open-source software. For example, there is a Star Wars Miniatures module, where players can play with up to three others in a digital replica of the table-top game. It is written in Java and is available from SourceForge under the LGPL open source license. VASSAL began as VASL (Virtual Advanced Squad Leader), an application for playing Advanced Squad Leader. Interview with Rodney Kinney, designer of the VASSAL Engine. VASSAL modules exist for over 800 games, some of which are listed here. A more comprehensive, but not exhaustive, list of modules exists on the VASSAL module site list. In September 2008, Games Workshop issued a cease-and-desist order regarding V40k to Tim Davis, the team leader at that time. The module is still played. Games Workshop has also issued a cease-and-desist order regarding Space Hulk.
    8.00
    2 votes
    104

    Anvil

    • Used for computer games: Assassin's Creed
    Anvil (development project name Scimitar before 2006) is a game engine created in 2007 by video game developer Ubisoft Montreal for use on Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U, and PlayStation Vita. Claude Langlais (Technical Director of Ubisoft Montreal) says that modeling is done in 3ds Max for environment and ZBrush for characters. The engine uses Autodesk's HumanIK middleware to correctly position the character's hands and feet in climbing and pushing animations at run-time. Anvil has been improved for Assassin's Creed II. Features added include a full night and day cycle, enhanced draw distance, the same vegetation technology used in Far Cry 2, improved lighting, reflection and special effects, new cloth system, and a new AI and NPC navigation system. Assassin's Creed: Lineage short films made by Hybride Technologies (a post-production VFX studio acquired by Ubisoft) and Ubisoft Digital Arts used assets from Anvil to recreate the environment in which the live actors are filmed. The latest iteration of the engine called AnvilNext which is going to be used for the upcoming title Assassin's Creed III has support for weather cycling. AnvilNext is reported to have the
    9.00
    1 votes
    105

    Nebula Device

    • Used for computer games: Project Nomads
    The Nebula Device is an open source real-time 3D game engine developed by German game studio Radon Labs. It is written in C++ and scriptable through Tcl/Tk and Lua, with support for Python, Java, and the full suite of .NET-capable languages pending. It supports DirectX 9, but work on support for OpenGL is ongoing. It runs on Windows, with ports being done to Linux and Mac OS X. The engine is distributed under the very liberal MIT License.
    9.00
    1 votes
    106
    9.00
    1 votes
    107

    Qfusion

    • Used for computer games: Warsow
    • Developer: Victor Luchits
    • Engine Family: id Tech
    Qfusion is a 3D game engine based on the source code of the Quake II engine. The engine is available under the GNU General Public License. The project was started by Victor Luchitz along with several others. It is written in C for use on Windows and Unix-based systems. The engine also supports the data of Quake III as maps, 3D models and shaders. The engine supports Ogg Vorbis sound and TGA and JPEG for images. More recent versions of Qfusion engine also extend the Q3 rendering scheme to include Normal Mapping, GLSL shaders (including bump mapping and cel shading), and skeletal animation. The engine is used by following games:
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    ShugenDo

    ShugenDo

    ShugenDo is a 2D Fighting Engine based on the M.U.G.E.N Fighting Engine from Elecbyte created by Sakirsoft. ShugenDo trys to be fully compatible with the char format of M.U.G.E.N. It wants improve a lot of things, like dynamic stages, hardware accelerated rendering, network play, Force Feedback....Also ShugenDo is designed for multiple platforms like Windows, Linux, PSP.
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    9.00
    1 votes
    110

    SLUDGE

    SLUDGE (Scripting Language for Unhindered Development of a Gaming Environment) is an open source adventure game engine developed by Hungry Software. It combines a scripting language with other IDE tools (including a sprite bank editor and a floor region editor). Freeware and commercial adventure games can be created with the engine. Originally shareware and then freeware, the engine and development kit are now open source as of 6 January 2008. The project is hosted on Sourceforge and can be found here. The editor and runtime engine was originally designed for Windows operating systems. SLUDGE can create games with any screen resolution and up to 16-bit colours. Version 1.6 of the SLUDGE engine introduced support for anti-aliased sprites. The 2.0 version of the game engine (currently in public beta) will introduce complete Mac OS support, Linux support of the runtime engine, and 32-bit graphics, complete with alpha channels.
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    6.67
    3 votes
    113

    Graphic Adventure Creator

    • Used for computer games: Star Wreck
    Graphic Adventure Creator (often shortened to GAC) is a game creation system/programming language for adventure games published by Incentive Software, originally written on the Amstrad CPC by Sean Ellis, and then ported to other platforms by, amongst others, Brendan Kelly (Spectrum), Dave Kirby (BBC, Electron) and "The Kid" (Malcolm Hellon) (C64). The pictures in the demo adventure, Ransom, were made by Pete James and the box cover art by Pete Carter. GAC was available for the ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64, BBC Micro and Amstrad CPC. A simplified version without graphics, called just the Adventure Creator, was also available for the Acorn Electron. GAC was later ported to the Atari ST as ST Adventure Creator (STAC). GAC had a more advanced parser than The Quill, allowing commands like GET THE LAMP THEN LIGHT IT, and a built-in graphics editor. Over 117 titles were written using GAC. It also came with a built in text compressor. The Graphic Adventure Creator used the Lenslok copy protection system.
    6.67
    3 votes
    114
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    M.U.G.E.N 1.0

    M.U.G.E.N 1.0

    • Developer: Elecbyte
    In September 2009 a full candidate of M.U.G.E.N 1.0 that includes various new features — most notably (official) support for HD resolutions, victory screens and language localization — was made available through the Elecbyte website. Although this current build has various visual glitches and requires a fair amount of adjustments to the previously made content in order to be fully compatible with the new engine,
    6.67
    3 votes
    116

    Simple DirectMedia Layer

    • Used for computer games: World of Goo
    Simple DirectMedia Layer (SDL) is a cross-platform, free and open source multimedia library written in C that presents a simple interface to various platforms' graphics, sound, and input devices. SDL has the word "layer" in its title because it is actually a wrapper around operating-system-specific functions. The main purpose of SDL is to provide a common framework for accessing these functions. For further functionality beyond this goal, many libraries have been created to work on top of SDL. Software developers use it to write computer games or other multimedia applications that can run on many operating systems including Android, AmigaOS, AmigaOS 4, FreeBSD, BeOS/Haiku, iOS, Linux, Mac OS 9, Mac OS X, MorphOS, OpenVMS, PlayStation Portable, Syllable, Symbian, webOS, and Windows. It manages video, events, digital audio, CD-ROM, sound, threads, shared object loading, networking and timers. SDL itself is very simple; it merely acts as a thin, cross-platform wrapper, providing support for 2D pixel operations, sound, file access, event handling, timing, threading, and more. It is often used to complement OpenGL by setting up the graphical output and providing mouse and keyboard
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    6.67
    3 votes
    118

    XnGine

    • Used for computer games: The Elder Scrolls Adventures: Redguard
    XnGine was a 3D engine developed by Bethesda Softworks. In 1997 support for higher resolutions was added and in 1998 it was made compatible with 3dfx graphics cards. The Terminator: Future Shock was the first game to use the engine, and also the first 3D PC game to use the now popular mouse-look interface, which was initially unpopular with gamers. Games which used the engine: Originally, TES 3: Morrowind was supposed to use the engine but it was ultimately dropped in favor of NetImmerse (the predecessor to GameBryo).
    6.67
    3 votes
    119

    PyOgre

    Python-Ogre is a Python binding for the OGRE 3D engine, providing the functionality and performance of OGRE (written in C++) with the accessibility and ease of use of Python. This facilitates the rapid development of 3D games, as well as making the OGRE engine more accessible to the beginner, who would otherwise be daunted by the technicalities of writing the program in the native C++. The performance of the engine is decreased in comparison to the original C++ demos, however, the original OGRE engine provides such high performance, the performance of Python-Ogre is more than acceptable for all but the most graphics-intensive games. Python-Ogre is unique from the Ogre3D engine it is based upon, as it comes pre-bundled with Python bindings and demos for many other support libraries. The following libraries are either currently supported, or have at one point in time worked with the Python-Ogre engine. Support for particular libraries are noted in each release. Demos are available for all libraries listed, however, not all demos function, due to the constantly evolving codebase and limited number of active developers. Python-Ogre has been compiled on all platforms supported by OGRE:
    5.75
    4 votes
    120

    Riot engine

    • Used for computer games: The Suffering
    Riot Engine is a computer/video game engine developed by Surreal Software.
    5.75
    4 votes
    121

    Southpaw engine

    • Used for computer games: Duke Nukem Advance
    Southpaw engine is a video game engine designed for the Game Boy Advance to produce first person shooters. It was developed by Australian developer Torus Games. The engine allows first person games to be reproduced with a maximum of 19 levels, 8 enemies and 5 save game slots, to fit within an 8MB Game Boy Advance cartridge. The game engine is most likely retired with no titles announced using the Southpaw engine.
    5.75
    4 votes
    122
    Doom engine

    Doom engine

    • Used for computer games: Doom
    • Engine Family: id Tech
    The Doom engine is the game engine that powers the id Software games Doom and Doom II. It is also used by HeXen, Heretic, Strife, Freedoom, and HacX, and other games produced by licensees. It was created by John Carmack, with auxiliary functions written by Mike Abrash, John Romero, Dave Taylor and Paul Radek. Originally developed on NeXT computers, it was ported to DOS for Doom's initial release and was later ported to several game consoles and operating systems. The source code for the Linux version of Doom was released to the public in 1997 under a license that granted rights to non-commercial use, and was re-released under the GNU General Public License in 1999. The dozens of unofficial Doom source ports that have been created since then allow Doom to run on previously unsupported operating systems and sometimes radically expanding the engine's functionality with new features. Although the engine uses raycasting to display a 3D space, that space is projected from a two-dimensional floor plan. The line of sight is always parallel to the floor, walls must be perpendicular to the floors, and multi-level structures are not possible. Despite these limitations, the engine represented
    7.50
    2 votes
    123

    Genesis3D

    • Used for computer games: Ethnic Cleansing
    Genesis3D was a project by Eclipse Entertainment to create a real-time 3D engine for Microsoft Windows. It was released as source code in 1998. The first released version supported hardware acceleration and a software renderer. Genesis3D had RGB lightmaps, fogging, binary space partitioning (the same visibility algorithm used in Quake and Quake II), a sprite system, alpha masking and blending, and a map and model editor. Genesis3D allows the game creators to animate 3D models using now-standard "skeletal animation", allowing for complex smoothed movement (instead of interpolated vertex keyframes used in the Quake games). An early game using the Genesis3D Engine was G-Sector by Freeform Interactive and was released as a free game/technology demo in December 1998. The free editor "Reality Factory" uses the Genesis 3D engine.
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    7.50
    2 votes
    125

    IMUSE

    • Used for computer games: Sam & Max Hit the Road
    iMUSE (Interactive MUsic Streaming Engine) is an interactive music system used in a number of LucasArts video games. The idea behind iMUSE is to synchronize music with the visual action in a video game so that the audio continuously matches the on-screen events and transitions from one musical theme to another are done seamlessly. iMUSE was developed in the early 1990s by composers Michael Land and Peter McConnell while working at LucasArts. The iMUSE system is patented by LucasArts, and was added to the fifth version of the SCUMM game engine in 1991. iMUSE was developed out of Michael Land's frustration for the audio system used by LucasArts while composing The Secret of Monkey Island. His goal was to create a system which would enable the composer to set the mood via music according to the events of the game. The project was much more daring than he had imagined. He then brought in an old friend, Peter McConnell to collaborate on creating the system which they later patented together. The first game to use the iMUSE system was Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge and it has been used in all LucasArts adventure games since. It has also been used for some non-adventure LucasArts
    7.50
    2 votes
    126

    IW 4.0

    • Used for computer games: Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2
    • Developer: Infinity Ward
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Jogre

    Jogre

    JOGRE (pronounced Joe-ger) is the acronym for "Java Online Gaming Real-time Engine". JOGRE is a Java based client/server game engine and API created by Bob Marks. It is used for the easy creation and execution of online real time games. Multiplayer games programmed so far include Abstrac, Backgammon, Battleship, Camelot, Car Tricks, Checkers, Chess, Chinese Checkers, Connect4, DOTS, Go, Grand Prix Jumping, Hex, Ninety Nine, Octagons, Propinquity, Reversi, Spades, Tetris, Texas Holdem and Tic-tac-toe etc. JOGRE is designed to be an open source equivalent to popular gaming websites such as Yahoo! Games. It has been used in academic institutions, such as universities as part of the course work. JOGRE is currently in beta release 0.3.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128

    Neon Engine

    • Used for computer games: Operation Flashpoint 2
    Ego Game Technology Engine (more commonly referred to as Ego Engine or EGO, stylised ego) is a video game engine developed by Codemasters. Ego is a modified version of the Neon game engine that was used in Colin McRae: Dirt and was developed by Codemasters and Sony Computer Entertainment using Sony Computer Entertainment's PhyreEngine cross-platform graphics engine. The Ego engine was developed to render more detailed damage and physics (as seen in Colin McRae: Dirt 2) as well as render large-scale environments (such as those in Operation Flashpoint: Dragon Rising).
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    NScripter

    • Used for computer games: Narcissu
    NScripter is a software engine that is used for the creation of visual novels, written by Naoki Takahashi. Due to its simplicity and its liberal license (while it is not open source, royalty-free commercial use is permitted), it quickly became popular in Japan, and was used for a number of high-profile commercial and dōjin titles, such as HaniHani and Tsukihime. The original NScripter is closed-source and only available for Microsoft Windows. A number of cross-platform clones have been written. The best-known NScripter clone is the free software implementation, ONScripter. Its popularity among the visual novel localisation community is attributed to the ease of modifying the engine to support languages other than Japanese. It strives to maintain compatibility with visual novels designed for NScripter. ONScripter is based on the Simple Directmedia Layer (SDL) library, and can thus be used to run NScripter games on platforms supported by SDL, such as Mac OS X, Linux, Dreamcast, PlayStation Portable and the Apple iPod. ONScripter-EN is a branch of ONScripter that is maintained separately by the English-language community, for convenience and for ease of introducing enhancements that
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    7.50
    2 votes
    131

    Sith

    • Used for computer games: Star Wars Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II
    The Sith engine is a game engine developed by LucasArts. The game Star Wars Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II is based on this engine, and its expansion, Star Wars Jedi Knight: Mysteries of the Sith, is based on a slightly updated version. The engine has also been used in Grim Fandango as a basis for the GrimE engine, and used in Star Wars: Droid Works. A modified third-person view version of the code with drastically rewritten lighting, collision, rendering and tools was renamed to Jones engine and used in Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine. The Sith engine is an early example of a scripted game engine. Most object behaviors are implemented with the integrated COG scripting language or defined parametrically using a template system which allows simple inheritance. The engine is also an example of a portal engine. Level geometry is rendered as a series of negative-space convex polyhedrons connected by adjoining polygons. Levels require no preprocessing and hidden surface determination is computed at run-time.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    Source Engine

    • Used for computer games: Half-Life 2
    • Developer: Valve Corporation
    Source is a 3D game engine developed by Valve Corporation. It debuted in June 2004 with Counter-Strike: Source and shortly thereafter Half-Life 2, and has been in active development ever since. Unusual for a game engine, Source has been designed to receive constant incremental updates and does not have a meaningful version numbering scheme. Source was created to power first-person shooters, but has also been used professionally to create role-playing, side-scroller, puzzle, MMORPG, top-down shooter and real-time strategy games. The Source Filmmaker is a video capture and editing application that works from inside Source. The tool was used to create Team Fortress 2's "Meet the Team" videos, Left 4 Dead's movies and trailers, and the Half-Life 2 Episode One and Two trailers. It allows users to place each character many times over in the same scene, creating the illusion of many participants; as well as supporting a wide range of cinematographic effects and techniques such as motion blur, Tyndall effects, Dynamic Lighting, and depth of field. (Motion blur has been added to the games themselves since the Orange Box version of the engine, though it was applied for camera movement only —
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    The Quill

    • Used for computer games: The Colour of Magic
    • Developer: Gilsoft
    The Quill (formally known as The Quill Adventure System) is a program to write home computer adventure games. Written by Graeme Yeandle, it was published on the ZX Spectrum by Gilsoft in December 1983. Although available to the general public, it was used by several games companies to create best-selling titles; over 450 commercially published titles for the ZX Spectrum were written using The Quill. Yeandle has stated that the inspiration for The Quill was an article in the August 1980 issue of Practical Computing by Ken Reed in which Reed described the use of a database to produce an adventure game. After Yeandle wrote one database-driven adventure game, Timeline, for Gilsoft, he realised that a database editor was needed, and it was this software which became The Quill. After the original ZX Spectrum version, The Quill was ported to the Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, Atari 8-bit family, and Apple II. Versions were also published by CodeWriter, Inc. in North America (under the name of AdventureWriter) and a version by Norace in Danish, Norwegian and Swedish. A French version was also made by Codewriter. In 1985 Neil Fleming-Smith ported The Quill to the BBC Micro and Acorn Electron
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    The Spring Project

    The Spring Project

    Spring (also known as SpringRTS or formerly TA Spring), is a free open source RTS game engine originally created by Stefan Johansson and Robin Westberg members of the Swedish Yankspankers game clan. Originally intended to bring the gameplay experience of Total Annihilation into three dimensions, the engine has since evolved to support a plethora of more modern and more flexible features, including built-in high-level extensibility through a Lua scripting interface. The core game engine is licensed under the GNU GPL. Various games leveraging the Spring engine range from free content games with minimal restrictions on use and distribution to games with commercially licensed art, such as P.U.R.E. Additionally, content from Total Annihilation has been modified to run on the Spring Engine, although playing games that incorporate such content requires that one own a copy of the original Total Annihilation game. Spring is being developed by the engine's community since 2005. The project has surpassed its initial goal to have the game run the mods and third-party units from Total Annihilation, and has evolved into a more general RTS engine. Most of the games running on the engine (as of
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    WGAF

    • Used for computer games: Vendetta Online
    WTF is the game engine developed by Guild Software which powers their MMORPG Vendetta Online. It runs on Linux, Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X. It has also been known to run on various BSD Descendants. An example screenshot from Vendetta Online can be seen at right. WTF uses several methods including dynamic level of detail (LOD) to ensure performance across a wide range of systems. It also uses vertex and pixel shaders to generate sophisticated lighting effects. However, one should note that WTF does not actually support dynamic lighting or shadowing. WTF also has unique network code. All data is sent over UDP instead of TCP, allowing for packets to arrive out-of-sequence (which is sanity-checked by the client). Vendetta Online, and therefore WTF, uses very little bandwidth (literally in the bits per second range), and generally can give users pings in the 40-200ms range, depending on the user's physical location.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136

    World Builder

    • Used for computer games: Enchanted Scepters
    World Builder is an authoring system for point-and-click adventure games. It was released in 1986 by Silicon Beach Software and had already been used for creating Enchanted Scepters in 1984. In 1994 World Builder along with Course Builder, SuperCard and HyperDA was cited as the reason Appleton was "something of a legend." On August 7, 1995 developer William C. Appleton released World Builder as freeware. The games World Builder created used different layers of code to manipulate the images the game contained: object code, scene code, and finally world code. The World Template included with the program contained default world code with default failure responses to standard text commands like north, south, up, down, and so on. Other than actions with characters (which were always combat oriented) and clicking on objects to pick them up everything had to set up through code and dialog boxes. The map is organized in compass directions and up/down as was common in earlier interactive fiction. Characters can be defined to move around independently and interacted with. There is also a special provision for weapons, which have a stochastic impact just as the dice of role-playing games.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137

    Electron engine

    • Used for computer games: Neverwinter Nights 2
    The Electron engine, developed by Obsidian Entertainment, is a 3D video game engine, based on BioWare's Aurora Engine. It is used in Obsidian's Neverwinter Nights 2. It features faster graphics and pixel-based shading technology, and was rumored to be very efficient. However, once Neverwinter Nights 2 was released, the engine was criticized by many for its lack of optimization, running sluggishly on many machines. This engine, unlike its predecessor, has no support for platforms other than Windows.
    5.50
    4 votes
    138
    6.33
    3 votes
    139

    Id Tech 4

    • Used for computer games: Doom 3
    • Developer: id Software
    • Engine Family: id Tech
    id Tech 4, popularly known as the Doom 3 engine, is a game engine developed by id Software and first used in the video game Doom 3. The engine was designed by John Carmack, who also created previous engines such as those for Doom and Quake, which are also widely recognized as marking significant advances in the field. This OpenGL-based game engine has also been used in Quake 4, Prey, Enemy Territory: Quake Wars, Wolfenstein and Brink. id Tech 4 began as an enhancement to id Tech 3. During development, it was initially just a complete rewrite of the engine's renderer, while still retaining other subsystems, such as file access, and memory management. The decision to switch from C to the C++ programming language necessitated a restructuring and rewrite of the rest of the engine; today, while id Tech 4 contains code from id Tech 3, much of it has been rewritten. At the QuakeCon 2007, John Carmack, the lead graphics engine developer at id, said to LinuxGames: "I mean, I won't commit to a date, but the Doom 3 stuff will be open source". And like its predecessors, John Carmack has said that id Tech 4 will be released as open source. At the QuakeCon 2009, Carmack said that he planned to
    6.33
    3 votes
    140

    Ika

    ika is a basic game engine platform for Windows and Linux. ika was all but discontinued at one point, but a rise in interest has led the developers to begin working towards a new version. The latest released version of the game engine is version 0.62, which uses Python 2.5. ika originally began as derivative of the RPG engine Verge, and was known as Verge 2.7. However, due to disputes over its use of the Python programming language instead of VergeC (which is the custom C-based scripting language used by Verge) it became a separate entity and formed its own community. Similar to Pygame, ika can use all of the functionality of Python, and includes additional built-in libraries for functionality commonly used in games, like playing music and sound effects, utilizing keyboard, joypad, and mouse input, as well as managing graphics. Unlike with Pygame, it usually isn't necessary to install the Python libraries to play an ika game, since the engine-specific libraries are embedded in the ika executable, and external Python modules should be included with the game for the user's sake. A comparison between the two, however, is of limited usefulness, as ika is a basic game engine, whilst
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    M.U.G.E.N

    M.U.G.E.N

    M.U.G.E.N (also known simply as MUGEN) is a freeware 2D fighting game engine designed by Elecbyte, written in C which originally used the Allegro library. The latest versions of the engine now uses the SDL library. The engine uses 4 directional keys along with 7 buttons for gameplay (X, Y, Z, A, B, C and Start), in order to accommodate six-button fighters which use three punches, three kicks and a start button. However, characters do not necessarily use all seven buttons, nor need to follow a traditional six- or four-button format. At most, two human players can control characters, with others being controlled by the engine's AI (including Watch Mode, a demo mode where the computer controls all characters). In addition, several gameplay modes are available via the main menu. The main mode of play is Arcade mode, where a character fights random characters as in other fighter games or use a coding to decide order. There are also three different kinds of Team modes: Single, Simul, and Turns. A fourth mode, Tag, is listed in the EXE along with two related script controllers, but was never used. In Team mode, either side can use any of the team modes. Single is identical to not having a
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    ORX

    ORX

    Orx is an open source, portable, lightweight, plugin-based, data-driven and easy to use 2D-oriented game engine written in C. It currently runs on Windows (MinGW and Visual Studio versions), Linux, Mac OS X (10.4-10.6, PowerPC & X86), iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad and Android. Orx provides a complete game creation framework including a 3D scene graph, hardware accelerated 2D rendering, animation, input, sound, physics and much more. Its main goals are to allow fast game prototyping and creation. Orx is published under Zlib license. Despite being written in C, Orx has an object oriented design with a plugin architecture. This allows its kernel to be cross-platform and delegates hardware- and OS-dependent tasks to plugins. Most of these plugins are based on other open source libraries, such as SFML, SDL and Box2D. Build files are provided for GCC makefiles, Visual Studio (2005 & 2008), Codelite and Xcode. The following example opens a 640x480 window, and display a hello world message. In the actual code we'll execute orx and create an object called "HelloWorld". In the config file we define all the property for our game and the HelloWorld object. Those can be modified at will without
    6.33
    3 votes
    143

    Elflight Engine

    Elflight Engine is a high-performance 3D scene-graph based games engine designed for the Web. It supports games in a web browser, a window or full-screen. It can download game resources when needed in the background over the Net to allow games to start up quickly when first played. Java 1.5+ is required and the engine is OpenGL-based. It is particularly useful for the development of MMOs and virtual worlds. Collada is supported for importing assets into the engine. The Elflight Engine is used in Everplanes , a game of exploration, building and survival for Mac OS X, Windows and Linux.
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    8.00
    1 votes
    145

    Havok

    • Used for computer games: Half-Life 2
    Havok Physics is a physics engine developed by Irish company Havok. It is designed primarily for video games, and allows for real-time collision and dynamics of rigid bodies in three dimensions. It provides multiple types of dynamic constraints between rigid bodies (e.g. for ragdoll physics), and has a highly optimized collision detection library. By using dynamical simulation, Havok allows for more realistic virtual worlds in games. The company has also released the product Havok Animation, which provides efficient playback and compression of character animations in games, and features such as inverse kinematics. On September 14, 2007, Intel announced it had signed a definitive agreement to acquire Havok Inc. In 2008, Havok was honored at the 59th Annual Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards for advancing the development of physics engines in electronic entertainment. Version 1.0 of the Havok SDK was unveiled at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in 2000. The current release, Havok Version 2011.2, released in September 2011, is known to work on Microsoft Windows, Xbox and Xbox 360; Nintendo's GameCube and Wii; Sony's PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, and PlayStation Portable; Linux;
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Iron Engine

    • Used for computer games: Sins of a Solar Empire
    Iron Engine is a game engine developed by Ironclad Games and is used in the PC game Sins of a Solar Empire. Iron Engine supports a number of advanced features including per-pixel specular lighting, dynamic fractal generation, post-process bloom filtering, environment mapping, custom pixel and vertex shaders for all meshes and effects and an advanced particle system.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    NxMakaqu

    nxMakaqu is a source port of id Software's Quake engine to the Dreamcast video game console by Manoel Kasimier. It is a merger of Stuart Dalton's nxQuake and the PC Quake engine Makaqu, and thus is the official continuation of nxQuake. NxMakaqu supports the registered and shareware versions of Quake. It also has a modlist that allows you to select the original game, mods, and total conversions. In late 2002, the nxQuake base was used in a project named RADQuake. Stewart Dalton would send his changes into the project, so work on nxQuake was halted in favor of RADQuake. RADQuake was maintained by Stewart Dalton, Ian Micheal, speud, and Manoel Kasimier. It implemented VMU saving support, preliminary sound support, and preliminary rumble pack support. In late 2005, work on nxQuake moved to a project named nxMakaqu. It is a combination of Stewart Dalton's nxQuake and Manoel Kasimier's PC Quake source port, Makaqu. nxMakaqu has improved sound support, CD music support, an improved modlist, multiple renderer changes, and support for skyboxes. nxMakaqu has superseded both nxQuake and RADQuake, and is the current active incarnation of the nxQuake codebase. In 2007, nxMakaqu was to be used
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    Residual

    Residual is a game engine recreation of GrimE, the 3D adventure game engine, released under the GNU General Public License. Residual is a reimplementation of the part of the software used to interpret the scripting languages by conducting reverse engineering on the original game. It is considered a sister project to ScummVM, the 2D adventure game interpreter. Residual's aim is to reimplement the residual (remaining) adventure games. The original Lua-based engine was called GrimE (as opposed to SCUMM), so Residual's title is also a word pun as grime is a type of residue. Residual is currently able to run on multiple platforms including Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Amiga OS. The following games have support built into the current release of Residual.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149

    Silent Storm engine

    • Used for computer games: Heroes of Might and Magic V
    The Silent Storm engine is a turn-based tactics game engine developed by Nival Interactive for their video game Silent Storm. The engine was reused for Silent Storm: Sentinels, Night Watch, Hammer & Sickle and Day Watch. A modified version of this engine was used for Heroes of Might and Magic V. The engine features an advanced physics model—nearly all structures are destructible, and ragdoll physics is employed for bodies with variation according to the precise velocity and impact of projectiles. Three-dimensional mapping allows for obstruction calculations and cover effects from any direction. Bullets ricochet, and their stopping power depends on the strength of the weapon. Also modeled are materials' effectiveness at stopping ordnance and visibility based on lighting conditions. All these effects are, however, exaggerated for a more cinematic experience (e.g., a hail of non-fatal bullets only makes the target shake, but a single fatal bullet can send the target flying), which has been praised by some reviewers as a feature. Reviewer Greg Kasavin commented that "pray and spray" tactics are quite viable, as the game uses silhouettes to mark enemies' estimated positions when they
    8.00
    1 votes
    150

    Torque Game Engine

    • Used for computer games: Blockland
    The Torque Game Engine, or TGE, is a 3D computer game engine originally developed by Dynamix for the 2001 FPS Tribes 2. The Torque engine and its many derivative products are available for license from GarageGames, a company formed by many members of the Tribes 2 team at Dynamix. GarageGames was later acquired by InstantAction, but on November 11, 2010, InstantAction announced that it was winding down its operations and looking for potential buyers for Torque. As of January 19, 2011, GarageGames announced their return to their old name and with new owners. Torque3D (as well as most of their other products) are continuing to be developed and supported. Several notable commercial titles developed using the Torque engine include Blockland, Marble Blast Gold, Minions of Mirth, TubeTwist, Ultimate Duck Hunting, Wildlife Tycoon: Venture Africa, ThinkTanks, The Destiny of Zorro, Penny Arcade Adventures and most recently, indie video games S.P.A.Z. and Frozen Synapse. GarageGames released Torque 3D under the MIT License on September 20, 2012. As well as being a 3D graphics engine, TGE provided networking code, scripting, in-engine world editing, and GUI creation. The source code could be
    8.00
    1 votes
    151

    CPAGE

    • Used for computer games: Darkness Within: In Pursuit of Loath Nolder
    CPAGE (Complete Panoramic Adventure Game Engine) is a game engine used for the point-and-click adventure computer game "Darkness Within: In Pursuit of Loath Nolder". Darkness Within: In Pursuit of Loath Nolder (2007, PC) - Zoetrope Interactive, Lighthouse Interactive Zoetrope Interactive website
    7.00
    2 votes
    152

    Game Maker

    • Used for computer games: Seiklus
    GameMaker (ゲームツクール in Japanese) (originally named Game Maker and often abbreviated to GM) is a Windows and Mac IDE originally developed by Mark Overmars in the Delphi programming language. It is currently developed and published by YoYo Games, a software company in which Overmars is involved. GameMaker allows users to easily develop computer games without the requirement of prior computer programming experience, while allowing advanced users to create complex applications much faster than possible with most other programming languages with its built-in scripting language(gml). The latest stable Windows release is GameMaker:Studio As of May 2012 and version 7 on Macintosh as of 11 August 2010 (2010 -08-11). Game Maker Studio was released on the 22nd May 2012, with the latest GameMaker Standard release being GameMaker 8.1. Since its initial release in 1999, GameMaker gained many new features, notably 3D graphics support, cross-platform support, as well as a significant user base, with YoYo Games providing free hosting for user-created games. YoYo Games has just undertaken a serious overhaul of the GameMaker software in the form GameMaker Studio. GameMaker Studio allows development
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    GrimE

    • Used for computer games: Grim Fandango
    From the late 1980s to the early 2000s, LucasArts was well known for their point-and-click graphic adventure games, nearly all of which received high scoring reviews at the time of their release. Their style tended towards the humorous, often irreverent or slapstick humour, with the exceptions of Loom and The Dig. Their game design philosophy was that the player should never die or reach a complete dead-end, although there were exceptions to the former. Many of the games shared similar game interfaces and technology, powered by SCUMM (Script Creation Utility for Maniac Mansion). After 1997, these games transitioned into 3D graphics with the GrimE game engine. Common features between the games include in-joke references to both other LucasArts games and Lucasfilm productions, as well as other running gags, such as Chuck the Plant and Sam & Max cameo appearances, that spanned numerous games. Most of the games were designed by the people with experience from creating preceding adventure games for LucasArts, whilst the same composers were involved in the majority of productions. In 2004, after a string of titles that never reached release, LucasArts ceased development on graphic
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    HyperCard

    • Used for computer games: Cosmic Osmo and the Worlds Beyond the Mackerel
    HyperCard was an application program and programming tool for Apple Macintosh and Apple IIGS computers that was among the first successful hypermedia systems before the World Wide Web. It combines database capabilities with a graphical, flexible, user-modifiable interface. HyperCard also features HyperTalk, a programming language for manipulating data and the user interface. This combination of features - simple form layout, database capabilities and ease of programming - led to widespread use in many different roles. Some HyperCard users employed it as a programming system for Rapid Application Development of applications and databases, others for building interactive applications with no database requirements, command and control systems, and many examples in the demoscene. HyperCard was originally released in 1987 for $49.95 and was included for free with all new Macs sold at the time. It was withdrawn from sale in March 2004, although by then it had not been updated for many years. HyperCard is based on the concept of a "stack" of virtual "cards". Cards hold data, just as they would in a rolodex. Each card contains a number of interactive objects, including text fields, check
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    OpenGL

    OpenGL

    • Used for computer games: Dwarf Fortress
    OpenGL (Open Graphics Library) is a cross-language, multi-platform API for rendering 2D and 3D computer graphics. The API is typically used to interact with a GPU, to achieve hardware-accelerated rendering. OpenGL was developed by Silicon Graphics Inc. in 1992 and is widely used in CAD, virtual reality, scientific visualization, information visualization, flight simulation, and video games. OpenGL is managed by the non-profit technology consortium Khronos Group. OpenGL is an evolving API. New versions of the OpenGL specification are regularly released by the Khronos Group, each of which extends the API to support various new features. The details of each version are decided by consensus between the Group's members, including graphics card manufacturers, operating system designers, and general technology companies such as Mozilla and Google. In addition to the features required by the core API, GPU vendors may provide additional functionality in the form of extensions. Extensions may introduce new functions and new constants, and may relax or remove restrictions on existing OpenGL functions. Vendors can use extensions to expose custom APIs without needing support from other vendors
    7.00
    2 votes
    159

    Refractor 2

    • Used for computer games: Battlefield 1942
    Refractor Engine is a game engine that was designed by Stockholm-based studio Refraction Games, first developed for the video game Codename Eagle, which was released in November 1999. Refraction Games was later bought by Digital Illusions CE, and the engine was used in their flagship first-person shooter title, Battlefield, specifically the first in the series Battlefield 1942. DICE later designed and developed the Refractor 2 Engine to be used for the second installment of the sequel to Battlefield 1942, Battlefield 2.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160

    RPG Maker 2003

    • Used for computer games: Yume Nikki
    • Engine Family: RPG Maker Series
    RPG Maker 2003 (RPGツクール 2003) is the third in the series of programs for the development of Role-Playing Games, developed by the Japanese group ASCII. It features a database of pre-made backgrounds, music, animations, weapons and characters. All graphics within RPG Maker 2003 are in 2D like its predecessor, RPG Maker 2000, and makes use of the same graphical resources with a few minor changes in resolution (though some tilesets, while similar in style to those included in RPG Maker 2000, include redrawn resources). In addition, Battle Character and System2 sets are used to go with RPG Maker 2003's new battle system. Sprites The majority of all graphics within the game are achieved with sprites, or single images that has a composition of frames in a specific orientation so that the graphics rendering software of RM2k3 can give the impression of movement. RPG Maker 2003 allows the use of MIDI and WAV much like RPG Maker 2000, its predecessor, for background music, but in addition now also allows the use of MP3 files which was a strongly desired feature in RPG Maker 2000. RM2k3 does not support any audio editing software so a third party program is needed in order to compose desired
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Torque Shader Engine

    Torque Shader Engine

    • Used for computer games: Marble Blast Ultra
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    7.00
    2 votes
    163

    CryEngine 3

    • Used for computer games: AeroGauge
    • Developer: Crytek
    • Engine Family: CryEngine
    CryEngine 3 (often stylized as CryENGINE 3) is a game engine released by Crytek on October 14, 2009. On March 11, 2009, Crytek announced that it would introduce CryEngine 3 at the 2009 Game Developers Conference, held from March 25 to March 27. The new engine is being developed for use on Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Wii U. As for the PC platform, the engine is said to support development in DirectX 9, 10, and 11. As of June 1, 2009, it was announced that Crysis 2 would be developed by Crytek on their brand new engine. A teaser has been released. Additionally, a website named mycryengine.com was launched as a front to this new technology. On March 1, 2010, a new video of the engine was released for the i3D 2010 symposium, which demonstrates 'Cascaded Light Propagation Volumes for Real Time Indirect Illumination'. On June 11, 2011, the Australian Defence Force revealed that Navy personnel would train on a virtual landing helicopter dock ship made using the CryEngine 3 software. As of July 1st, the Mod SDK version of CryEngine 3 specifically to create custom maps, mods and content for Crysis 2 is available on Crytek's website. Crytek also released a free-to-use
    6.00
    3 votes
    164

    Gamebryo

    • Used for computer games: Civilization IV: Colonization
    • Developer: Emergent Game Technologies
    Gamebryo is a game engine that facilitates and simplifies video game development by providing a complete toolset, flexible workflow, rapid prototyping capabilities and a high-performance runtime. Gamebryo 3D and LightSpeed engines are owned by Gamebase Co., Ltd. and Gamebase USA and have been chosen by top video game developers including Trion Worlds, 2K Games, Disney, Ubisoft, Bethesda Softworks, Tencent, Firaxis Games, Sony, Shanda and NCsoft for numerous cross-platform game titles. Gamebryo was originally created by Numerical Design Limited (NDL) as the NetImmerse engine in 1997. NDL was merged into Emergent Game Technologies (EGT) in 2005. Gamebryo then evolved to Gamebryo LightSpeed. Both Gamebryo and LightSpeed were updated and marketed. During 2009 the development staff of Gamebryo was downsized, and by July 2010 the engineering office in Chapel Hill, North Carolina was closed. On November 11, 2010, assets of Emergent Game Technologies, Inc., were offered for acquisition, including its Intellectual Property (“IP”), in whole or in part. In December, 2010, Korea-based Gamebase Co., Ltd., a longtime partner of Emergent, finalized the acquisition of Emergent assets and
    6.00
    3 votes
    165

    Medusa

    • Used for computer games: DarkSpace
    Medusa is a proprietary C++ 3D game engine that has been in development by Palestar since 1998, and is used in the relatively little known DarkSpace sci-fi MMO. Key features of the Medusa SDK include: GameCQ is based on the Medusa engine and provides the client front-end and the required server backend for games. It can also be used as an independent publishing platform for games or software titles that do not use the Medusa engine. The GameCQ Lobby Client (GCQL.exe) provides a stand-alone lobby client that can be installed on the player's computer separate from the game application.
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Phoenix Engine

    Phoenix Engine

    • Used for computer games: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine
    The Phoenix Engine is a game engine being developed by Relic Entertainment based on the Darksiders engine. The engine is currently used only in Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine.
    6.00
    3 votes
    167

    Unity

    • Used for computer games: GooBall
    Unity is a cross platform game engine and IDE developed by Unity Technologies, targeting web plugins, desktop platforms and mobile devices. Unity Technologies was founded in 2004 by David Helgason (CEO), Nicholas Francis (CCO), and Joachim Ante (CTO) in Copenhagen, Denmark after their first game, GooBall, failed to gain success. The three recognized the value in engine and tools development and set out to create an engine that any and all could use for an affordable price. Unity Technologies has received funding from the likes of Sequoia Capital, WestSummit Capital, and iGlobe Partners. Unity’s success has come partly due to the focus on the needs of independent developers unable to either create their own game engine and tools or purchase licenses to use fully featured options available. The company’s focus was and remains to “democratize game development” and make development of 2D and 3D interactive content as accessible as possible to as many people around the world as possible. 2008 saw the rise of the iPhone and Unity was one of the first engine developers to begin supporting the platform in full. Unity is now being used by 53.1% of developers (according to Game Developer’s
    6.00
    3 votes
    168

    Wintermute Engine

    • Used for computer games: Limbo of the Lost
    Wintermute Engine (commonly abbreviated as WME) is a set of software tools and a runtime interpreter (game engine) primarily designed for creating and running graphical adventure games. Wintermute Engine (WME) was designed and programmed by Czech programmer Jan Nedoma, who goes by the nickname Mnemonic on the WME forums. The first public beta version was released on January 12, 2003. The engine is in active development and several updates are released every year, though irregularly due to the small development team. The game engine provides most of the features necessary for creating classic 2D graphical adventure games. Although originally built as a 2D graphics engine, with a built-in script interpreter for implementing game logic, the Wintermute Engine provides support for the combination of real-time 3D characters and 2D backgrounds, a combination sometimes known as "2.5D", that has become the de-facto standard for modern adventure games (for example Syberia, Still Life), and survival horror games. The is also an active community that, while small, is growing in size and is willing to help newcomers with coding or recommendations. Community-created free book of tutorials went
    6.00
    3 votes
    169

    DarkPlaces

    • Used for computer games: Nexuiz
    • Developer: Forest Hale
    DarkPlaces is a gameplay modification and a source port engine based on the computer game Quake. It adds enhanced network code, with asynchronous delta compression inspired by Tribes networking, a built in server browser, real-time lighting, and bump mapping, makes use of the OpenGL Shading Language and supports Ogg Vorbis. DarkPlaces is actively developed by Forest "LordHavoc" Hale and contributors. It is based on the Quake source code. Games that use DarkPlaces include Nexuiz, Transfusion, Xonotic and Nehahra (and by extension the machinima film The Seal of Nehahra).
    5.67
    3 votes
    170

    Essence Engine

    • Used for computer games: Company of Heroes
    Essence Engine is a game engine developed by Relic Entertainment for video game Company of Heroes. The Essence Engine features many new graphical effects, including High Dynamic Range lighting, dynamic lighting and shadows, advanced shader effects and normal mapping. The Essence Engine is also one of the first RTS engines to create detailed faces with facial animations. In Company of Heroes: Opposing Fronts, the Essence Engine was further improved to include weather effects, and also added support for DirectX 10 for Windows Vista. Dawn of War II uses an updated version of Essence Engine (Essence 2.0) which allows for more detailed models and textures; more advanced lighting and shading effects; more complex "sync-kills" than those in Dawn of War; and better support for multi-processor systems.
    5.67
    3 votes
    171

    Flatredball

    FlatRedBall (FRB) is a 2.5D game engine using XNA and .NET technologies. Games using FRB utilize 2-dimensional assets within 3-dimensional space, creating a unique gaming environment that combines tradition with innovation. The FlatRedBall Development Kit (FRBDK) consists of a series of helper applications and core components to empower both seasoned and novice programmers to develop great games. FlatRedBall is also a community of gamers and game developers. Official FlatRedBall Website
    5.67
    3 votes
    172

    Inform

    Inform is a programming language and design system for interactive fiction originally created in 1993 by Graham Nelson. Inform can generate programs designed for the Z-code or Glulx virtual machines. Versions 1 through 5 were released between 1993 and 1996. Around 1996, Nelson rewrote Inform from first principles to create version 6 (or Inform 6). Over the following decade, version 6 became reasonably stable and a popular language for writing interactive fiction. In 2006, Nelson released Inform 7 (briefly known as Natural Inform), a completely new language based on principles of natural language and a new set of tools based around a book-publishing metaphor. All versions of Inform generate files in Z-code (also called story files) from source code. These files can then be run by any Z-code interpreter – that is, by any program which properly implements the Z-code virtual machine (or Z-machine) specification. The Z-machine was originally developed by Infocom in 1979 for their interactive fiction titles. Because there is at least one such interpreter for nearly every major and minor platform, this means that the same Z-code file can be run on a multitude of platforms with no
    5.67
    3 votes
    173

    JADE engine

    • Used for computer games: Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time
    The Jade engine is a game engine developed and used by Ubisoft. The engine was originally developed by a development team on Ubisoft Montpellier, including Michel Ancel, for their critically acclaimed video game Beyond Good & Evil, the main character of which, Jade, shares its name. The engine allows for great flexibility that includes different gameplay sequences and detailed graphics, both in cinematics and gameplay. Since its introduction in 2003, the engine has been developed further for use in later games, listed below.
    5.67
    3 votes
    174

    Ogre4j

    ogre4j is a project that enables usage of the OGRE engine library within Java applications. The main goal is to provide access to every public interface of the library to Java developers.
    5.67
    3 votes
    175
    5.67
    3 votes
    176
    Ioquake3

    Ioquake3

    • Used for computer games: OpenArena
    ioquake3 (or ioq3 for short; formerly known as icculus.org/quake3, which also used to be the URL of the project's website) is a game engine project which aims to build upon id Software's Quake 3 source code release. The source code was released on August 20, 2005 under the GPL. The project's goal is to create a bug-free, enhanced open source Quake 3 source code distribution upon which new games and projects can be based, as well as an improved version (in relation to the original binaries) of the engine for playing Quake III: Arena, the Team Arena expansion pack and all the popular mods. While the PunkBuster anti-cheat software is not supported (it is proprietary software), the security level is increased thanks to the bugfixes which are not present in the original executables. Ioquake3 has been the basis of several id Tech 3-derivative games, including both stand-alone game projects, as well as former Quake III modifications exploiting the opportunity to become stand-alone thanks to the source code release. Examples include OpenArena, Tremulous, Urban Terror and World of Padman. There are also other engines based on ioq3, such as Evolution Q3, a Star Trek: Voyager: Elite Force
    6.50
    2 votes
    177

    JMonkey Engine

    • Used for computer games: Bang! Howdy
    jMonkeyEngine (jME) is a game engine made especially for modern 3D development, as it uses shader technology extensively. jMonkeyEngine is written purely in Java and uses LWJGL as its default renderer. OpenGL 2 through OpenGL 4 is fully supported. jMonkeyEngine is a community-centric open source project released under the new BSD license. It is used by several commercial game studios and educational institutions. The default jMonkeyEngine 3 download comes readily integrated with an advanced SDK. By itself, jMonkeyEngine is a collection of libraries, making it a low-level game development tool. Coupled with an IDE like the official jMonkeyEngine 3 SDK it becomes a higher level game development environment with multiple graphical components. The SDK is based on the NetBeans Platform, enabling graphical editors and plugin capabilities. Alongside the default NetBeans update centers, the SDK includes its own plugin repository and a selection between stable point releases or nightly updates. Note: The "jMonkeyPlatform" and the "jMonkeyEngine 3 SDK" are exactly the same thing. jMonkeyEngine was built to fulfill the lack of full featured graphics engines written in Java. The project has a
    6.50
    2 votes
    178

    Naum

    • Engine Family: Chess
    Naum is a computer chess engine by Aleksandar Naumov (Canada). The current version 4.2 was released in March 2010. The commercial distribution is "engine only" on the website of the programmer. The program supports both UCI and Winboard and can therefore be operated under different graphical interfaces. There are versions for single-and multiple-processor systems running Microsoft Windows, Linux, or Pocket PC. Endgame databases are supported with up to five pieces. At the beginning of 2009, Naum attained second place behind Rybka on chess engine rating lists, such as CCRL.. Naum tied for first with Rybka in the 2008 Internet Computer Chess Tournament , but has not yet competed in other public tournaments. There is a freeware version 2.0 of September 2006 with, however, only single-processor or single core support, as well as a version 1.8 for Palm OS from June 2006.
    6.50
    2 votes
    179

    Real Virtuality

    • Used for computer games: Operation Flashpoint
    "'Real Virtuality"' was a concept that Mark Weiser used to contrast his idea of ubiquitous computing with the then popular notion that we would all spend a lot of time in virtual reality environments. He conceives of the concept in his influential 1991 article "The Computer for the 21st century", and explains that the "virtuality" of computers, in other words, the ability to compute, view, and alter data with a computer, will exist within our physical world, outside of an electronic shell. Though the concept was first written about by Weiser using the term "embodied virtuality", Manuel Castells was actually one of the first scholars to use the term "real virtuality" within his trilogy entitled The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture in 1996. It could be said that the concept first described by Weiser has already been legitimized with the increasing creation of UbiComp, or Ubiquitous computing devices like the cell phone, iPod, GPS, and iPad. Manuel Castells successfully predicted the ubiquity of real virtuality devices that are inter-connected and capable of communicating through a network Real Virtuality describes the potential for technology to become seamlessly
    6.50
    2 votes
    180

    RealmForge

    RealmForge is a free and open-source game engine for the Microsoft .NET Framework, predecessor to Visual3D Game Engine, the cross-platform game engine and visual development toolset for .NET 2.0 and Microsoft XNA. RealmForge is built upon the Axiom 3D rendering engine, a C# port of the popular C++ OGRE Engine. It is written entirely in C# and built entirely upon a backbone of free and open-source libraries and enables development of free and commercial 3D games and simulations using .NET. RealmForge was featured on the front page of Software Developer's Journal as the first promising .NET game development solution and ranked as 9th top open-source engine in the DevMaster 3D Game and Graphics Engine Database. RealmForge is no longer under development but there is a fork of this project named ForgeRealm which is currently in development.
    6.50
    2 votes
    181

    RelentENGINE

    RelentENGINE is a next-generation first-person shooter game engine developed by Itlit Software for the video game Relent: The Fallen. The RelentENGINE technology was developed with the aim of bridging the gap between pre-compiled and dynamic shadowing; it focuses on support for massive destroyable city environments and realistic vehicle control. The engine makes extensive use of shader model 3 for effects such as dynamic ambient lighting, volumetric clouds, motion blur, dynamic soft shadows, HDR lighting, specular reflections, reflective and refractive water, etc. The engine also features support for extremely high polygon models, adaptable AI, realistic physics, 64-player networking and an in-game world editor. Itlit's lead programmer has recently confirmed the existence of a Direct3D 10 shader model 4.0 renderer that has temporarily been shelved due to cross-platform compatibility issues. Itlit Software has started to license the technology before releasing what was intended to be engine's flagship title, Relent: The Fallen.
    6.50
    2 votes
    182
    6.50
    2 votes
    183

    Wolfenstein 3D engine

    • Used for computer games: Wolfenstein 3D
    • Developer: id Software
    The Wolfenstein 3D engine is the engine that powers Wolfenstein 3D. The biggest part of the engine is programmed by John Carmack. It is written in C and x86 assembly language. It features graphics (ray casting), sound (WAV and IMF), player physics and game control. To render the walls in pseudo-3D, the game uses ray casting. This technique emits one ray for each column of pixels, checks if it intersects a wall, and draws textures on the screen accordingly, creating a one dimensional depth buffer against which to clip the scaled sprites that represent enemies, powerups, and props. Before Wolfenstein 3D, the technology had already been used by id Software in 1991 to create Hovertank 3D and Catacomb 3-D for Softdisk. Other games using the Wolfenstein 3D game engine or derivatives of it were also produced, including Blake Stone, Corridor 7: Alien Invasion, Operation Body Count, Super 3D Noah's Ark, Rise of the Triad, and Hellraiser, an unreleased Color Dreams game planned for the PC and the Nintendo Entertainment System. According to id Software programmer John Carmack, the game's engine was inspired by a technology demo of Looking Glass Studios'/Origin's first-person role-playing
    6.50
    2 votes
    184

    Fruit

    • Engine Family: Chess
    Fruit is a chess engine developed by Fabien Letouzey. In the SSDF rating list released on November 24, 2006, Fruit version 2.2.1 had a rating of 2842. In the CEGT rating list released on January 24, 2007, Fruit version 2.2.1 had a rating of 2776. At the World Computer Chess Championship in Reykjavík in 2005, Fruit 2.2 scored 8.5 out of 11, finishing in second place behind Zappa. Until Version 2.1 (Peach), Fruit was an open source engine. The source of the version 2.1 is still open (under GNU GPL) and contributed much to the development in computer chess in recent years. Some people still work on the old source code and have created variations from the original Fruit. Fruit uses the classical Negascout (principal variation search) algorithm with iterative deepening to traverse the game tree. It also uses the null-move heuristic. The original version used a simplistic evaluation function with a robust search. Later versions have improved evaluation functions. The board representation is distinct — Fruit uses a 16x16 board. As of July 23, 2007, Fruit became freeware. The latest version Fruit 2.3 and Fruit 2.3.1 are free to download on superchessengine.com. Fruit 2.3.1 was one of the
    4.75
    4 votes
    185

    Aurora Engine

    • Used for computer games: The Witcher
    The Aurora Engine is a game engine developed by BioWare for use in computer and console role-playing games. The Aurora Engine was the 3D successor to BioWare's earlier, 2D game engine, called the Infinity Engine. The engine allows for real-time lighting and shadows, as well as surround sound. The first game released using the Aurora Engine was Neverwinter Nights, and included an accompanying "Aurora toolset" for users to create their own content. The sequel, Neverwinter Nights 2, developed by Obsidian Entertainment, features an updated version of BioWare's engine named the Electron engine. Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, another BioWare game, and its sequel (from Obsidian Entertainment) use an updated version of the Aurora Engine called the Odyssey Engine. Aurora was also used by CD Projekt Red in their game The Witcher, although the rendering engine was written from scratch.
    7.00
    1 votes
    186

    Axiom Engine

    The Axiom 3D Engine is an open-source, cross-platform 3D graphics rendering engine for .NET and Mono. The engine is a C# port of the well-known OGRE engine. It provides complete abstraction from the 3D API, supports both OpenGL and DirectX, contains a scene graph model and provides support for complex shaders.
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    7.00
    1 votes
    188

    Delfi

    • Engine Family: Chess
    Delfi is a Winboard/UCI chess engine written in Pascal designed by Italian chess programmer Fabio Cavicchio. It is designed to emulate a human playing style and is rated 2627 on the CEGT . The latest released version is 5.4. Source code for version 5.1 is available. From its release page, Delfi does not use bitboards like Crafty, but uses 16 x 16 array of bytes for board presentation. It uses capture history heuristic & smart thinking time allocation, from 50% to 400% of the average time. When some moves seem equal in its evaluation, it makes random moves.
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    7.00
    1 votes
    190

    Lightfeather 3D Engine

    Lightfeather is a cross-platform open source 3d engine written in C++ using OpenGL for rendering. It has been in development since May 2005 and the first public alpha version was released on October 7, 2005. The project started as a fork of the Irrlicht Engine (see history) but has since been completely rewritten. Applications developed with Lightfeather run on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux and the zlib license allows usage in commercial projects without the need to release code changes. Lightfeather includes an exporter script for Blender which allows for models to be written in the Lightfeather file format directly from within Blender. It also includes a model converter with which models from different formats such as .X, .LMTS and .OBJ can be converted into .lfm files. Lightfeather can easily be incorporated as a rendering widget into applications built with various GUI- libraries such as QT, WxWidgets or native (MFC) Windows applications. It supports vertex, pixel and geometry shaders written in GLSL or Cg. There is a paging manager in Lightfeather with the possibility to write custom paging handlers. Lightfeather includes 3 different terrain implementations for different needs.
    7.00
    1 votes
    191

    Crafty

    • Engine Family: Chess
    Crafty is a chess program written by UAB professor Dr. Robert Hyatt. It is directly derived from Cray Blitz, winner of the 1983 and 1986 World Computer Chess Championships. Crafty finished in second place in the 2010 Fifth Annual ACCA Americas' Computer Chess Championships. Crafty lost only one game to the first place winner Thinker. Crafty also finished in second place in the 2010 World Computer Rapid Chess Championships. Crafty won seven out of nine games, finishing just behind the first place winner Rybka by only ½ point. In the World Computer Chess Championships 2004, running on slightly faster hardware than all other programs, Crafty took fourth place with the same number of points as the third place finisher, Fritz 8. On the November 2007 SSDF ratings list, Crafty was 34th with an estimated Elo rating of 2608. Crafty uses the Chess Engine Communication Protocol and can run under the popular chess interfaces XBoard, Winboard, and Arena. Crafty is written in ANSI C with assembly language routines available on some CPUs, and is very portable. The source code is available, but the software is for "personal use" only. Crafty pioneered the use of rotated bitboard data structures to
    5.33
    3 votes
    192
    5.33
    3 votes
    193

    Alamo

    • Used for computer games: Star Wars: Empire at War
    Alamo Game Engine is a game engine developed by Petroglyph, which is used to create the real-time strategy games Star Wars: Empire at War, and Star Wars: Empire at War: Forces of Corruption. A modified version of the Alamo Game Engine was used for Petroglyph's third title, Universe at War: Earth Assault. The Alamo Game Engine features 3D gameplay and a real time strategic view of a map on which the game is taking place.
    6.00
    2 votes
    194

    LS3D engine

    • Used for computer games: Mafia: The City of Lost Heaven
    The LS3D game engine was developed by Illusion Softworks and used by the games Mafia: City of Lost Heaven, Hidden & Dangerous 2 and Chameleon. The first game that used the LS3D engine was Mafia: City of Lost Heaven, released in 2002, followed by Hidden & Dangerous 2 in 2003.
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    6.00
    2 votes
    196

    Stockfish

    • Engine Family: Chess
    Stockfish is an open source chess engine, developed by Tord Romstad, Joona Kiiski and Marco Costalba and licensed under the GNU General Public License version 3. The current version 2.3 (as of September 15, 2012) is available as C++ source code, and also has precompiled versions for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux 32-bit/64-bit. The program uses the UCI protocol and can therefore be operated under various graphical interfaces. It can use up to thirty-two CPU cores in multiprocessor systems. The maximum size of the transposition tables is eight gigabytes. Stockfish implements an advanced alpha-beta search and uses bitboards. In various computer chess rankings Stockfish 2.1.1 was second or third behind the top gratis program Houdini and the free program Critter. The program originated from another open source program by Romstad named Glaurung. Stockfish was forked from the 2.1 version of Glaurung; the latest Glaurung version 2.2 was released December 2008 but is no longer developed. Stockfish is bundled with the Internet Chess Club interface programs BlitzIn and Dasher.
    6.00
    2 votes
    197

    Delta3d

    Delta3D is an Open Source Software gaming/simulation engine API. Primarily managed and supported by the Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (MOVES) Institute at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. Alion Science has also been a major contributor to enhancements and features. Delta3D is released under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL). The external modules have their own licensing. Some modules, such as Qt, require the user to download and install separately for use with Delta3D. As a cross-platform "application" different operating systems and development environments are supported. Delta3D can be used to create a game/simulation — it is not a "finished product" ready for release/deployment. Tests, examples, and other support applications are provided. The "user" (developer) is expected to "leverage" these as resources and technical references in order to create their own custom implementation. In order to make "full" use of Delta3D you will need a compiler/development environment. Additionally, you will need a Source Control application to access the source code for the latest versions of Delta3D and the related libraries/modules. This is
    5.00
    3 votes
    198

    Adventure Game Interpreter

    • Used for computer games: King's Quest I: Quest for the Crown
    • Developer: Sierra Entertainment
    The Adventure Game Interpreter (AGI) is a game engine which Sierra On-Line used through most of the 1980s to create and run animated, color adventure games. AGI-based computer games accept typed commands via keyboard, as well as joystick input. In 1983, IBM commissioned Sierra On-Line to develop a game that would showcase the technical capabilities of the IBM PCjr, a home computer which IBM planned to release the following year. To meet the challenge, game designer Roberta Williams scripted a game that was to become King's Quest: Quest for the Crown, and lead developer Arthur Abraham developed a custom programming language called Game Assembly Language. After Sierra dismissed Abraham, IBM contributed to the development of King's Quest's game engine in order to help ensure the project's success. The PCjr proved unpopular in the marketplace, and the May 1984 launch of King's Quest foundered. Nevertheless, later that year Tandy Corporation released the Tandy 1000, another IBM PC compatible that had originally been designed as an enhanced clone of the PCjr and which succeeded where the PCjr failed. King's Quest caused a sensation in the burgeoning market of PC-compatible computers, and
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    5.50
    2 votes
    200

    Diesel

    • Used for computer games: FlatOut
    The Diesel engine is a game engine developed and used by GRIN. The engine was originally developed for their game Ballistics and has been used, albeit with modifications, in a number of other games since then. The first installment of the engine was developed in close collaboration with NVIDIA, aimed to showcase the capabilities of their latest graphics chip at the time, the GeForce 3. The engine is now being used by Overkill Software, as the former owners of GRIN are the same people running Overkill Software. Overkill's game, Payday: The Heist, uses this engine.
    5.50
    2 votes
    201

    Panda3d

    • Used for computer games: Toontown Online
    Panda3D is a game engine which includes graphics, audio, I/O, collision detection, and other abilities relevant to the creation of 3D games. Panda3D is open source and, as of May 28, 2008, free software under the revised BSD license. Releases prior to May 28, 2008 are not considered Free Software due to certain errors in the design of the old Panda3D license. Despite this, these older releases of Panda3D can also be used for both free and commercial game development at no financial cost. Panda3D's intended game-development language is Python. The engine itself is written in C++, and utilizes an automatic wrapper-generator to expose the complete functionality of the engine in a Python interface. This approach gives a developer the advantages of Python development, such as rapid development and advanced memory management, but keeps the performance of a compiled language in the engine core. For instance, the engine is integrated with Python's garbage collector, and engine structures are automatically managed. The manual and the sample programs use Python, although the developers are working on translating the manual to C++ and providing C++ sample programs. A developer using Panda3D
    5.50
    2 votes
    202

    RPG Maker 2000

    • Used for computer games: Touhou Mother
    • Developer: Enterbrain
    • Engine Family: RPG Maker Series
    RPG Maker 2000 (RM2K) is the second Microsoft Windows version of the RPG Maker series of programs developed by Enterbrain and published by ASCII. RPG Maker 2000 was originally released as RPG Tsukūru 2000 (RPGツクール2000) in April, 2000 in Japan. Although, outside Japan, it has only received weak distributions among Taiwan and South Korea markets, it has undergone unauthorized translations into various languages, and illegal distribution via Internet. Enterbrain later released its inexpensive version, RPG Tsukūru 2000 Value!, in May, 2003, which also included some major updates that allow, for example, to use a larger number of picture files simultaneously. RPG Maker 2000 was the most popular RPG maker of its time; being discussed on many popular websites, and enjoyed a large userbase for many years. This was amplified by the fact that many popular RM2K sites refused to adopt RPG Maker 2003. RM2K was first taken over by RPG Maker 2003, but has now been superseded by RPG Maker XP and is no longer as popular as it used to be. RPG Maker 2000 was also one of the RPG Makers to be illegally translated and distributed by the Russian programmer Don Miguel. Compared to RPG Maker 95, RM2K
    5.50
    2 votes
    203

    Unreal Engine 3

    • Used for computer games: BioShock
    • Developer: Epic Games
    • Engine Family: Unreal Engine
    Unreal Engine 3 (UE3) is a computer game engine developed by Epic Games. It is the third generation of Unreal Engine, designed for DirectX 9/10/11 personal computers (PC), the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii U, PlayStation Vita, Android, and OpenGL-based operating systems (OS) such as iOS and Mac OS X. Its renderer supports many advanced techniques including high dynamic range rendering (HDRR), per-pixel lighting, and dynamic shadows, and builds upon the tools available in prior versions of the engine. Epic has used this version of the engine for their in-house games Unreal Tournament 3, Gears of War, Bulletstorm, Mortal Kombat IX, and an improved version for Gears of War 2 and Gears of War 3. Due to aggressive licensing, this current iteration has gathered a great deal of support from several big licensees, including 2K Games, 3D Realms, Activision, Atari, Capcom, Disney, Electronic Arts, Koei, Konami, Microsoft for Kinect, Midway Games, Sega, Sony, Square Enix, THQ, Ubisoft, and more. The first screenshots of the Unreal Engine 3 were first presented in 2004, at which point the engine was in development for 18 months already. Unlike the Unreal Engine 2, which still supported
    5.50
    2 votes
    204
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    6.00
    1 votes
    206

    Id Tech 3

    • Used for computer games: Quake III Arena
    • Developer: id Software
    • Engine Family: id Tech
    id Tech 3 is a game engine developed by id Software for Quake III Arena and has been used in many games under the Quake III Arena engine and Quake III: Team Arena engine branding. During its time, it competed with the Unreal engine; both engines were widely licensed. id Tech 3 is not based on id Tech 2; it was written from scratch. Successor id Tech 4 was derived from id Tech 3. At QuakeCon 2005, John Carmack announced that the Quake III source code would be released under the GNU General Public License (version 2), and it was released on August 19, 2005. The code can be downloaded from id's FTP site. Unlike most other game engines released at the time—including its primary competitor, Unreal Tournament, id Tech 3 requires an OpenGL-compliant graphics accelerator to run. The engine does not include a software renderer. id Tech 3 introduced spline-based curved surfaces in addition to planar volumes, which are responsible for many of the surfaces present within the game. The graphical technology of the game is based tightly around a "shader" system where the appearance of many surfaces can be defined in text files referred to as "shader scripts." Shaders are described and rendered as
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    Open Dynamics Engine

    Open Dynamics Engine

    • Used for computer games: BloodRayne
    The Open Dynamics Engine (ODE) is a physics engine in C/C++. Its two main components are a rigid body dynamics simulation engine and a collision detection engine. It is free software licensed both under the BSD license and the LGPL. ODE was started in 2001 and has already been used in many applications and games, such as BloodRayne 2, Call of Juarez, S.T.A.L.K.E.R, Titan Quest, World of Goo, X-Moto and OpenSimulator. The Open Dynamics Engine is used for simulating the dynamic interactions between bodies in space. It is not tied to any particular graphics package although it includes a basic one called drawstuff. It supports several geometries: box, sphere, capsule (cylinder capped with hemispheres), triangle mesh, cylinder and heightmap. Higher level environments that allow non-programmers access to ODE include Player Project, Webots, Opensimulator and anyKode Marilou. ODE is a popular choice for robotics simulation applications, with scenarios such as mobile robot locomotion and simple grasping. ODE has some drawbacks in this field, for example the method of approximating friction and poor support for joint-damping.
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    208

    Pygame

    • Used for computer games: Frets on Fire
    Pygame is a cross-platform set of Python modules designed for writing video games. It includes computer graphics and sound libraries designed to be used with the Python programming language. It is built over the Simple DirectMedia Layer (SDL) library, with the intention of allowing real-time computer game development without the low-level mechanics of the C programming language and its derivatives. This is based on the assumption that the most expensive functions inside games (mainly the graphics part) can be completely abstracted from the game logic in itself, making it possible to use a high-level programming language like Python to structure the game. Pygame was built to replace pySDL after its development stalled. Pygame was originally written by Pete Shinners and is released under the open source free software GNU Lesser General Public License. It is a community project since around 2004/2005. There are many tutorials and there are regular competitions to write little games using Python (and usually but not necessarily, Pygame).
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    209

    SCUMM

    • Used for computer games: The Secret of Monkey Island
    • Developer: LucasArts
    Script Creation Utility for Maniac Mansion (SCUMM) is a scripting language developed at LucasArts (known at the time as Lucasfilm Games) to ease development of the graphical adventure game Maniac Mansion. It falls somewhere between a game engine and a programming language, allowing designers to create locations, items and dialogue sequences without writing code in the language in which the game source code ends up. This also allowed the game's script and data files to be re-used across various platforms. SCUMM is also a host for embedded game engines such as iMUSE (standing for Interactive MUsic Streaming Engine), INSANE (standing for INteractive Streaming ANimation Engine), CYST (in-game animation engine), FLEM (places and names object inside a room), and MMUCUS. SCUMM has been released on the following platforms: 3DO, Amiga, Apple II, Atari ST, CDTV, Commodore 64, Fujitsu Towns & Marty, Apple Macintosh, Nintendo Entertainment System, DOS, Microsoft Windows, Sega Mega-CD and TurboGrafx-16/PC Engine. The original version was coded by Aric Wilmunder and Ron Gilbert in 1987, with later versions enhanced by Aric Wilmunder (a.k.a. the SCUMM Lord) and various others. SCUMM was
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    210

    Micro-Max

    • Engine Family: Chess
    Micro-Max (µ-Max) is a chess engine developed by Dutch H.G. Muller, born in 1956. The program is written in C and according to IOCCC rules it is 1088 characters, not counting ; { } nor leading spaces and line feeds. The author claims that it is the smallest non-trivial chess engine in existence. The source code for Micro-Max and other chess variant engines is available.
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    211

    RPG Maker VX

    • Engine Family: RPG Maker Series
    RPG Maker VX (RPGツクールVX, RPG Tsukūru VX) is the latest program from the PC RPG Maker series developed by Enterbrain, following its predecessor, RPG Maker XP. RPG Maker VX follows the naming pattern present in previous RPG Maker releases by having a suffix based on the Windows versions the software was designed for (in this case, Windows Vista and Windows XP). A Japanese trial for RPG Maker VX was released on Enterbrain's Japanese VX website and was available for download. It features limited and reduced features, like the inability to save games and limited database functionality. An English version of the program is also available from Enterbrain, with full functionality and a 30-day time limit. The standard runtime package for RPG Maker VX is available for download on the Enterbrain website. This allows users to play games created with RPG Maker VX. It was developed so that games used mostly default resources and can be distributed to the public with a small file size. Early Japan order included Masterpiece Note notebook. In late January 2008, Enterbrain of Japan released an update that included an extra script which improved performance. This release was called RPG Maker VX 1.01
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    212

    Thousand Parsec

    Thousand Parsec (TP) is a free and open source project with the goal of creating a framework for turn-based space empire building games. Thousand Parsec is a framework for creating a specific group of games, which are often called 4X games, from the main phases of gameplay that arise: eXplore, eXpand, eXploit and eXterminate. Some examples of games from which Thousand Parsec draws ideas are Reach for the Stars, Stars!, VGA Planets, Master of Orion and Galactic Civilizations. Unlike commercial alternatives, it is designed for long games supporting universes as large as the player's computer can handle. It allows a high degree of player customization, and features a flexible technology system, where new technologies may be introduced mid-game. Development of the project (under a different name) was started in January 2002 by Tim Ansell. Originally it was going to be a simple clone of Stars!. Later, Tim decided to try starting a full open source project to become the "Worldforge" of space empire games. He hoped that this would encourage other people who didn't want to just clone Stars! to help out with the project and give it a broader appeal. After the announcement of the project Lee
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    213

    AGAST

    AGAST (Adventure Game Authoring System) is a freeware product primarily aimed at the creation of adventure games in the spirit of The Secret of Monkey Island, Myst and King's Quest. Games made using AGAST include AfterShocked!, Eye of the Kraken, Patrimonium , The Breakdown and Passage: Path of Betrayal . It features its own scripting language. The system is now mostly of historical interest - the AGAST official website was last updated in 2003 and the forum is dead. In 2003, the old AGAST system received a significant and complete overhaul, the outcome of which was entitled AGAST Morningstar. Morningstar featured several major new features and changes to the core AGAST system, including a new GUI system (Midnight), new IDE, hardware accelerated graphics and ANGEL, a highly customized version of SciTE 1.53 with many useful new features, including popup function hints. Morningstar ushered in a new era for the AGAST development system. Powered by a brand-new, hardware accelerated graphics system, sporting lots of language improvements, and packed with powerful new standard scripts, Morningstar expanded AGAST's already impressive flexibility. The first version of Morningstar was
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    Auran jet

    Auran JET is the name of a game engine produced by Auran, written in C++, and used in the Trainz series and in the Bridge It by Chronic Logic.
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    MacVenture

    • Used for computer games: Shadowgate
    The MacVenture games is a series of four adventure games introducing a characteristic menu-based point-and-click interface. They were originally developed for the Apple Macintosh by ICOM Simulations: All these games have been released on other platforms including Commodore Amiga, Apple II, Atari ST, Commodore 64, IBM Personal Computer (PC), Pocket PC and Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). This article is about the original Macintosh versions which introduced new interface ideas to the adventure game genre and were blueprints for the other versions. The MacVenture engine was written in 1985 for the first game in the series, Deja Vu: a Nightmare Comes True. Making the entire game fit together with system software on two 400 k single-sided floppy disks proved to be quite a challenge and special image compression routines had to be written to accomplish this. Déjà Vu was awarded SPA excellence in software awards for Best Entertainment Product and Best New World in 1986 as the first genuine point-and-click adventure game. The MacVenture interface saw no significant changes for the remaining three games. A handful of sequels such as Beyond Shadowgate and Shadowgate 64 were later made,
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    216

    S3D

    • Used for computer games: Tropico
    The S3D engine is the game engine that was written to power 1998's Railroad Tycoon II, developed by PopTop Software for the Windows 32bit platform. It was later ported to Linux and Mac OS Classic. Improved versions were used for Tropico and Tropico 2: Pirate Cove. The S3D engine featured an isometric 3D view with several levels of zoom and 90 degree rotation. Initial version was specifically optimised for 1024x768 16bit resolution. Later version improvements included more resolutions support, 3D sprites and some 3D models, and anti-aliasing.
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    217

    Box2D

    • Used for computer games: Crayon Physics
    Box2D is a free open source 2-dimensional physics simulator engine written in C++ by Erin Catto and published under the zlib license. It has been used in Crayon Physics Deluxe, Limbo, Rolando, Fantastic Contraption, Incredibots, Angry Birds, Tiny Wings, Transformice, Happy Wheels, and many online Flash games, as well as iPhone, iPad and Android games using the Cocos2d game engine and Corona Framework. Box2D was first released as "Box2D Lite", a demonstration engine to accompany a physics presentation given by Erin Catto at GDC 2006. On September 11, 2007 it was released as open source on Sourceforge. On January 17, 2010 Box 2D moved the project to Google Code for hosting. On March 6, 2008, version 2.0 was launched, introducing continuous collision detection and revamping the API. Box2D is itself written in platform-independent C++ (usable on any system with a C++ compiler available). The engine may be compiled in fixed point and floating point modes, and has been used on the Nintendo DS, Wii, and several mobile phones (including Android and iPhone) as well as most major operating systems. The engine has been ported to many other programming languages and environments, including
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    Gold Box

    • Used for computer games: Pool of Radiance
    Gold Box is the name for a series of role-playing video games produced by SSI. The company won a license to produce games based on the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game from TSR, Inc. These games shared a common engine that came to be known as the "Gold Box Engine" after the gold-colored boxes in which most games of the series were sold. In 1985 TSR, after seeing the success of the Ultima series, offered its license to game developers. Ten companies, including Electronic Arts and Sierra Entertainment, applied for the license. SSI President Joel Billings acquired the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D) license from TSR in a 1987 major deal due primarily to their computerised wargaming experience and their broader vision. The development of the Gold Box engine and the original games was managed by SSI's Chuck Kroegel and George MacDonald. Later versions were led by Victor Penman and Ken Humphries. The first game produced in the series was Pool of Radiance, released in 1988. This was followed by Curse of the Azure Bonds (1989), Secret of the Silver Blades (1990), and Pools of Darkness (1991), the games forming one continuous story rooted in the once-glorious city of Phlan
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    Dunia Engine

    Dunia Engine

    • Used for computer games: Far Cry 2
    • Engine Family: CryEngine
    The Dunia Engine is a game engine designed by Kirmaan Aboobaker while working at Crytek. It is based on the CryEngine but was heavily modified by the Ubisoft Montreal development team for use in Far Cry 2. A reworked and modified version of the Dunia Engine is used for James Cameron's Avatar: The Game. Assassin's Creed II and Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood also use Far Cry 2's vegetation technology, though the games do not use the Dunia Engine itself, instead opting to run on Anvil. Far Cry 3 is using an advanced version of the Dunia engine called Dunia 2. Features of Dunia Engine include: Dunia Engine takes advantage of DirectX 10 on Windows Vista, but is also designed to run on DirectX 9. Features of Dunia 2 Engine include: Dunia 2 Engine takes advantage of DirectX 10 and DirectX 11 on Windows Vista and Windows 7. A map editor for Far Cry 2 and the Dunia Engine is included on all versions of the game. A map editor for Far Cry 3 is supposed to be included on the final game.
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    ADRIFT

    ADRIFT is a graphical user interface used to create and play text adventures. The name is an acronym for "Adventure Development & Runner - Interactive Fiction Toolkit". The project is solely developed by Campbell Wild. The toolkit consists of two programs; a generator (used to write games), and a runner (used to play them), though the runner is available to download separately. In the current stable release (version 4.0.51), released in 2002, both programs only run on Microsoft Windows platforms as they are written in Visual Basic. The generator is shareware (adventures over a certain size cannot be saved until a registration fee of 18.95 USD - around 12 GBP is paid), though the runner is available free to everyone. Older (freeware) versions of the program can also be downloaded on the website. However, version 5 is now donationware, enabling full functionality of the software without requiring payment. The runner program is also able to run on Linux using the Mono project. A Mac version is expected soon. Coinciding with the 2011 Interactive Fiction competition, ADRIFT WebRunner was launched. This allows any ADRIFT game to be played online. Because the game runs server side, it
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    Bigworld Technology

    • Used for computer games: XVM: eXtended Visualisation Mod
    BigWorld Technology is a middleware platform for the development of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (also known as MMOGs or MMORPGs) and virtual worlds. It was developed by the Australian game development and technology company, Micro Forté. After the cancellation of Citizen Zero (Microsoft decided to cancel this and all of the other MMO titles under development for its own strategic reasons), Micro Forté focused on extending the BigWorld Technology and it is now consolidated into the BigWorld company. Games that have utilized the platform include:
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    Blade3D

    Blade3D is an All-in-One Game Engine and Toolset written in C#/.NET for XNA targeting Microsoft Windows and Xbox360. Blade3D is a product that primarily targets Indies providing a Toolset and engine that enables artists and designers to more easily create 3D games for Microsoft Windows and Xbox360. Blade3D is the flagship product of Digini Inc., based in Issaquah, Washington and incorporated in 2004. Blade3D is one of many new XNA Game Engines recently created in response to the release of Microsoft XNA in 2006. In August 2006, Microsoft's GameFest keynote speech first declared the viability of .NET for gaming, with the first public release of XNA and Game Studio products, which would open up the Xbox360 and PC for game development by Indies and students. This announcement set into motion the rise of many new XNA-based game engines . On 30th July 2009, Tom Sperry (CEO/Blade Games) posted an announcement on the Blade3D discussion forum entitled "Blade3D Transition" in which he stated "We have decided to wind down Blade3D in its current form as a 3D game engine and leverage the technology in a new direction" It was not made entirely clear what form the "new direction" would take.
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    CryENGINE

    • Used for computer games: Aion: The Tower of Eternity
    • Engine Family: CryEngine
    CryENGINE is a game engine designed by Crytek primarily for use in first-person shooter video games. CryENGINE 3 Free SDK, originally called Sandbox Editor, is the current version of the level editor used to create levels for the CryENGINE line of game engines by Crytek. Tools are also provided within the software to facilitate scripting, animation, and object creation. It has been included with various Crytek games (including, but not limited to, Crysis and Far Cry), and is used extensively for modding purposes. The editing style is that of the sandbox concept, with the emphasis on large terrains and a free style of mission programming. The editor can also construct indoor settings. Opposed to editors like UnrealEd which use a "subtractive" editing style that takes away areas from a filled world space, the Sandbox has an "additive" style (like Quake II). Objects are added to an overall empty space. The Sandbox's concentration on potentially huge (in theory, hundreds of square kilometers) terrain, means that it uses an algorithmic form of painting textures and objects onto the landscape. This uses various parameters to define the distribution of textures or types of vegetation.
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    Cube

    • Used for computer games: ActionCube
    Cube is a first-person shooter video game that shares the name of its free and open source engine. Engine and game were developed by Wouter van Oortmerssen. It runs on a variety of operating systems, including Microsoft Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, OS X, AmigaOS 4, iPhone, Wii and even Pocket PC devices with 3D acceleration such as Dell Axim x50v. It uses OpenGL and SDL. Cube features both singleplayer and multiplayer gameplay. The game contains a built-in level editor. First release with singleplayer mode was in January 2002. The latest update of Cube was released on August 29, 2005. The Cube engine was designed as an outdoor engine, i.e. it's designed for maps that are outdoors rather than Doom and Quake, which are optimized for indoors. It utilizes a pseudo-3D world model similar to the Doom engine, based on a 2D height map. This imposes some limitations (e.g. no rooms above rooms), but does permit slopes and 3D props which in turn can be used to make up for most limitations, for example to create bridges with a passage below. The engine is based on zero-precompilation philosophy—all map data is interpreted dynamically, with no need to recalculate such as shadowmaps or BSP data.
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    Fore Thought Entertainment QuakeWorld

    Fore Thought Entertainment QuakeWorld is one of the modern free software Quake engines. In addition to QuakeWorld, FTE can also run Quake I, Quake II, Quake III, Nexuiz, and Hexen II games. The main goal of the FTEQW client is to improve the Quake engine without losing backwards compatibility. The FTEQW engine can render graphics in OpenGL, Direct3D & Software rendering. Part of the FTE QuakeWorld project. FTEQCC boasts many unique features, language constructs, and even some optimisations. FTEQCC is probably the best QC compiler if you're after the smallest progs. It is also the compiler with the most C like code. FTEQCC was originally begun to supplement FTE's FTE_MULTIPROGS extension. It was coded primarily by Spike, from id's original qcc source code though it does contain a fair amount of FrikQCC code and ideas (thanks FrikaC). There are contributions from others also. FTEQTV is a streaming proxy. It is designed to sit somewhere between a compatible server, and any standard client. It was written from scratch by Spike. It was the first widely used and tested QuakeTV, and its development started in September 2005. It transfers MVD data (known as MultiViewDemo files) over TCP.
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    Id Tech 2

    • Used for computer games: Quake II
    • Developer: id Software
    • Engine Family: id Tech
    id Tech 2 (Quake II engine), upgraded from Quake engine is a game engine developed by id Software for use in their games, most notably Quake II. Since its release, the Quake II engine has been licensed for use in several other games. One of the engine's most notable features was out-of-the-box support for hardware-accelerated graphics, specifically OpenGL, along with the traditional software renderer. Another interesting feature was the subdivision of some of the components into dynamic-link libraries. This allowed both software and OpenGL renderers, which were switched between by loading and unloading separate libraries. Libraries were also used for the game logic, for two reasons: The level format, as with previous id Software engines, used BSP. The levels were lit through a lightmap method, in which light data for each surface is precalculated (this time, via a radiosity method) and stored as an image in the level file, which is then used to determine how much lighting intensity each model should receive, but not its direction. John Carmack released the source code on 22 December 2001 under the terms of the GNU General Public License.
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    Infinity Engine

    • Used for computer games: Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn
    Infinity Engine is a game engine which allows the creation of isometric role-playing video games. It was originally developed by BioWare for a prototype RTS game codenamed Battleground Infinity, which was ultimately re-engineered to become the first installment of the Baldur's Gate series. BioWare used it again in the subsequent installments of the series, but also licensed the engine to Interplay's Black Isle Studios. Infinity Engine features pausable realtime gameplay. The engine uses a three quarters perspective with pre-rendered 2D backgrounds and sprite-based characters. Although graphically 2D for the most part, Baldur's Gate II added the use of OpenGL to accelerate drawing. Designed for six-character party-based adventuring by default, the Infinity Engine was the spiritual successor to the Gold Box Engine, and provided the basis for five Dungeons & Dragons licensed role-playing video games plus additional expansion packs and a number of fanmade total conversion RPGs. It was succeeded by BioWare's Aurora Engine. A free compatible game engine recreation is in development under the name of GemRB. It runs on multiple platforms, including FreeBSD, Linux, Mac OS X, Windows,
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    K2 Engine

    • Used for computer games: Savage 2: A Tortured Soul
    • Developer: S2 Games
    An 3D game engine used in Heroes of Newerth and Savage2 by S2 Games.
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    Kaneva Game Platform

    The Kaneva Game Platform (KGP) is a game development solution geared towards end-to-end MMO games of the first-person shooter and RPG genres. KGP features many current graphic rendering capabilities, while providing back-end and networking features required for supporting hundreds of thousands of simultaneous players. It is developed by Kaneva, Inc., an Atlanta-based technology firm. KGP is an integrated, unified system that includes the game client updater/launcher, editing suite, artificial gaming intelligence, and server components. The business model on which Kaneva is based provides a unified platform so that game studios can focus on adding features to their worlds rather than trying to assemble and integrate disparate parts together. The idea is that studios may bring games to market faster with richer content at a much lower cost. KGP provides a comprehensive game design and runtime environment to create and run MMO games. It utilizes an extensible blade architecture for function-specific engines that allow for third-party or custom enhancements. The Lua/Python interface provides flexibility for gameplay and AI customization. In 2010 Kaneva extended the KGP with the release
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    238

    KiriKiri

    • Used for computer games: True Remembrance
    KiriKiri (吉里吉里) is a scripting engine by Japanese developer "W.Dee". It is almost exclusively used with the KAG (KiriKiri Adventure Game System) framework to produce visual novels. Usually, the package of the two components is regarded as the whole engine, and referenced with major version numbers. Thus, the current version is called KiriKiri2/KAG3. It is available under the GNU General Public License, though commercial licenses can be acquired if somebody wishes to expand the software without disclosing the changes. KiriKiri has been used in both dōjin and commercial visual novels, the most well known of which are TYPE-MOON's Fate/stay night and Fate/hollow ataraxia. It is often used as a more modern and expandable replacement of the older NScripter engine. KiriKiri stores its resources in archives with the .xp3 extension, though those archives can be concatenated with the executable for simple distribution as well. Another file format associated with KiriKiri is .tlg, a bitmap image file format with an integrated alpha channel. The scripting language itself (called TJS) is reminiscent of the object-oriented languages derived from ECMAScript (for example JavaScript), and KAG
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    239

    Metismo

    Metismo is a mobile middleware developer founded in August 2007 by John Chasey, Glenn Broadway, Nick Reed and Matthew Cope who previously had been employed at mobile game studio IOMO, a subsidiary of InfoSpace. In May 2010 Metismo was named one of the winners in the wireless category at the TiEcon 2010. The TiE50 awards are presented by TiE, the organizer of TiEcon 2010 which claims to be the world’s largest conference for entrepreneurs. In May 2011 Metismo was acquired by Software AG for an undisclosed amount. Metismo's core product is their Java based Cross-platform middleware technology Bedrock, used to ease development of games and applications across a wide range of Java ME handsets. The Bedrock Cross-Compiler automatically converts the Java source to other programming languages including C++, C# and ActionScript. This process along with the Bedrock supplied libraries enables a title to be converted to native OS platforms such as BREW, Symbian and Windows Mobile. Subsequently OpenGL ES support was announced in July 2008 via JSR 239 along with support for the Apple iPhone. During 2009 a number of other platforms were announced including and HTML5 & Flash. Additional platforms
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    240

    MT Framework

    • Used for computer games: Devil May Cry 4
    MT Framework is an exclusive seventh generation game engine built to be used with "all of the Capcom next-generation games" on the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 (and later on the Wii and the Nintendo 3DS), as commented by Dead Rising, Lost Planet, Devil May Cry 4, and Resident Evil 5. MT stands for "Multi-Thread", "Meta Tools" and "Multi-Target". Originally meant to be an outside engine, but none matched their specific requirements in performance and flexibility. Games using the MT Framework are originally developed on the PC and then ported to the other two platforms. Keiji Inafune mentioned in an interview with 1UP that the lead programmer for MT Framework designed the engine specifically for Dead Rising, Lost Planet, and Mega Man Legends 3, which Inafune has been hoping to make for several years. MT Framework 2.0, which was first introduced with Lost Planet 2, provides better visuals over its predecessor. Sengoku Basara 3/Utage Ps3/Wii
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    Professional Adventure Writer

    • Used for computer games: The Dream Concert
    • Developer: Tim Gilberts
    Professional Adventure Writer or PAW (sometimes called PAWS for Professional Adventure Writing System) is a program that allows the user to write textual adventure games with graphic illustrations. It was written by Tim Gilberts, Graeme Yeandle and Phil Wade, based on Yeandle's earlier system called The Quill. PAW was published by Gilsoft in 1986 and quickly gained a loyal following. PAW improved over The Quill in several ways. In particular, its textual input parser was more sophisticated, meaning inputs were no longer confined to the two-word telegraphic verb noun (e.g. "GO WEST; TAKE LAMP") style. PAW also supported NPCs, different character sets, and full use of the memory of the 128K ZX Spectrum. Later a program called WinPAW was written by Douglas Harter. It could read adventures written in PAW, but ran under MS-Windows and had a few extensions to the original. The adventures made in WinPAW could only be played using the MS Windows runtime. In 2009 InPAWS was released in its first version. It allows you to extract PAW adventures, edit them or create from scratch and write back a database for PAW for either Amstrad CPC or ZX Spectrum. It thus also allows PAW adventures to be
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    Revolution3D

    Revolution3D is a 3D graphics engine developed by VirtualART. It is free for non-commercial and commercial use and uses DirectX 9.0. The project was started in 1998 by Simon Theophil and competed with the engine Truevision3D. Revolution3D can be used with C++, C#, Visual Basic, Java and Python. In 2001 Microsoft developed a game called Donkey .NET using Revolution3D. This game was a programming example for the new .NET platform and Visual Basic .NET programming language.
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    Titan

    • Used for computer games: Empire Earth
    Titan is a game engine developed by Stainless Steel Studios used in the real-time strategy genre. It was mainly used as a PC game engine in the early 2000s. The engine was used in Stainless Steel Studio's first couple games, such as Empire Earth and Empires: Dawn of the Modern World. Titan 2.0, an update of the original Titan Engine, was to be a comprehensive real-time strategy engine, and was sold before Stainless Steel Studios was dissolved in 2005. SSSI described their engine on their website (before it shut down) at the day of its release. They said it would handle all objects in the gaming world, has an integrated scenario editor, a powerful mulitplayer mode and communicator, built-in artificial intelligence and 3D graphics. The engine was announced in May 2004 , and was designed by SSSI, whose head designer is Rick Goodman, the designer of Empire Earth and Age of Empires. SSSI's last game made using this engine was Rise and Fall: Civilizations at War . Since SSSI has closed its doors, its website, the original Titan website, and any information about Titan 2.0 has for the most part has disappeared. Little more is known about the original game processor, other than that it was
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    TOSHI

    • Used for computer games: Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis
    TOSHI is a sixth generation cross-platform game engine designed by Blue Tongue Entertainment. The engine allows simultaneous multi-sku development across all next generation consoles, as well as PC. The engine is component based allowing for a high level of code reusability. The engine has been used in the following games;
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    Vengeance engine

    The Vengeance Engine is a game engine based on Unreal Engine 2/2.5. It was created by Irrational Games to make Tribes: Vengeance. The Vengeance Engine, also known as the Tribes: Vengeance engine had several new features: In addition, it was shipped with new and improved tools: Vengeance Engine 2 was an enhanced version of the Vengeance Engine, based on the Unreal Engine 2.5. As this engine was developed for the game BioShock, the engine has become known as the "BioShock engine". This version also backports technology from Unreal Engine 3. Supported features: Toolsets:
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    Z-machine

    Z-machine

    • Used for computer games: Suspended
    The Z-machine is a virtual machine that was developed by Joel Berez and Marc Blank in 1979 and used by Infocom for its text adventure games. Infocom compiled game code to files containing Z-machine instructions (called story files, or Z-code files), and could therefore port all its text adventures to a new platform simply by writing a Z-machine implementation for that platform. With the large number of incompatible home computer systems in use at the time, this was an important advantage over using native code or developing a compiler for each system. The "Z" of Z-machine stands for Zork, Infocom's first adventure game. Z-code files usually have names ending in .z1, .z2, .z3, .z4, .z5, .z6, .z7 or .z8, where the number is the version number of the Z-machine on which the file is intended to be run, as given by the first byte of the story file. Version# and specification. This is a modern convention, however. Infocom itself used extensions of .dat (Data) and .zip (ZIP = Z-machine Interpreter Program), but the latter clashes with the present widespread use of .zip for PKZIP-compatible archive files starting in the 1990s, after Activision had shut down Infocom. Infocom produced six
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