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Best Venue of All Time

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    1
    Dallas Convention Center

    Dallas Convention Center

    The Dallas Convention Center, originally the Dallas Memorial Auditorium, is a meeting hall, event/convention center and civic center in the Convention Center District of downtown Dallas, Texas (USA). The original Dallas Memorial Auditorium was designed by George Leighton (L.) Dahl in 1957. The dome is supported by one column. It hold approx 10,000 seats. Dahl was responsible for the renowned Art Deco building at the Dallas Fair Park, as well as countless other Texas landmarks. The Convention Center additions were designed by Larry Oltmanns who was a Design Partner with Skidmore, Owings and Merrill at the time. The Dallas Memorial Auditorium was originally constructed in 1957 near the intersection of Canton and Akard Streets. In the 1970s, the center was expanded and renamed the Dallas Convention Center; the expansion was designed by local architects Omniplan. The center was expanded again in 1984 and once more in 1994, when Dallas Area Rapid Transit constructed the Convention Center Station underneath the west-wing of the facility, connecting it to the Red and Blue light rail lines. The most-recent addition to the facility was completed in 2002. Together with Reunion Arena, it was
    9.33
    6 votes
    2
    Battersea Arts Centre

    Battersea Arts Centre

    The Battersea Arts Centre ("BAC") is a performance space near Clapham Junction in Battersea, in the London Borough of Wandsworth that specialises in music and theatre productions. The theatre was founded in 1980 in a Grade II* listed building which originally opened in 1893 as Battersea Town Hall. The building was designed in 1891 by E. W. Mountford. The space was converted to a community arts centre in 1974. BAC currently receives grants towards the building's operating costs from Arts Council England and the London Borough of Wandsworth, among others. In 1901 a large pipe organ was installed in the Grand Hall. This was an unusual instrument designed by Robert Hope-Jones, a pioneering organ builder who invented many aspects of the modern pipe organ. His ideas went on to form the basis of the Wurlitzer theatre organ in the 1920s and 30s. The BAC pipe organ has been unusable for years, but restoration work has begun. David Jubb has been the BAC's artistic director since 2004. In 2008 he was joined by David Micklem, with whom he shares the Joint Artistic Directorship of BAC. BAC operates a "scratch" methodology as part of its "ladder of development" for new work. Performances are
    7.71
    7 votes
    3
    Westpac Stadium

    Westpac Stadium

    Westpac Stadium, (formerly WestpacTrust Stadium, noncommercial name Wellington Regional Stadium) is a major sporting venue in Wellington, New Zealand. Due to its shape and silver coloured external walls, it is colloquially known as The Cake-Tin to the locals and other New Zealanders. Fans of football (soccer) team Wellington Phoenix sometimes refer to the stadium as The Ring of Fire. The stadium's bowl site size is 48,000 sq m. The stadium was built in 1999 by Fletcher Construction and is situated close to major transport facilities (such as Wellington Railway Station) one kilometre north of the CBD. It was built on reclaimed railway land, which was surplus to requirements. It was built to replace Athletic Park, which was no longer considered adequate for international events due to its location and state of disrepair. The stadium was also built to provide a larger-capacity venue for One Day International cricket events, due to the Basin Reserve ground losing such matches to larger stadia in other parts of the country. The stadium also serves as a large-capacity venue for concerts. The stadium is a multi-purpose facility, though used mainly for sporting events. It is the home of
    8.17
    6 votes
    4
    Heaven

    Heaven

    Heaven is a superclub in London, England which appeals predominantly (but not exclusively) to the gay market. It is located underneath Charing Cross railway station in Central London, just off Trafalgar Square. Heaven opened in Dec 1979. It was opened by Jeremy Norman (cf Burkes Peerage) in a former roller disco venue called Global Village. The interior was designed by his partner Derek Frost. Norman had started an earlier club, The Embassy, in Bond Street in 1978. The Embassy had taken London by storm and is generally seen as the London equivalent of New York's Studio 54. Norman, an entrepreneur, took his knowledge and used it to create an entirely new form of gay club on a larger scale in the arches beneath Charing Cross railway station, once part of Adelphi Arches, a large wine-cellar for the hotel above. Heaven quickly established itself as the centre of the (then understated) gay London nightlife. Until Heaven, most gay clubs were small hidden cellar-bars or pub discos. Heaven brought gay clubbing into the mainstream and finally got a club to rival New Yorks gay super club at the time The Saint. In 1982, Heaven was acquired from Norman by Richard Branson's Virgin Group.
    9.00
    5 votes
    5
    Winter Garden Theatre

    Winter Garden Theatre

    The Winter Garden Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 1634 Broadway between 50th and 51st Streets in midtown Manhattan. The structure was built by William Kissam Vanderbilt in 1896 to be the American Horse Exchange. In 1911 the Shuberts leased the building and architect William Albert Swasey redesigned the building as a theatre. The fourth New York City venue to be christened the Winter Garden, it opened on March 10, 1911, with the early Jerome Kern musical La Belle Paree. The show starred Al Jolson and launched him on his highly successful singing and acting career. He played the Winter Garden many times after that. The Winter Garden was completely remodeled in 1922 by Herbert J. Krapp. The large stage is wider than those in most Broadway houses, and the proscenium arch is relatively low. The building is situated uniquely on its lot, with the main entrance and marquee, located on Broadway, connected to the 1526-seat Seventh Avenue auditorium via a long hallway, and the rear wall of the stage abutting 50th Street. When Al Jolson performed there, the Winter Garden had a runway built, going out into the audience, and Jolson would run out and slide on his knees while singing, and
    6.71
    7 votes
    6
    Teatro della Pergola, Florence

    Teatro della Pergola, Florence

    The Teatro della Pergola is a historic opera house in Florence, Italy. It is located in the centre of the city on the Via della Pergola, from which the theatre takes its name. It was built in 1656 under the patronage of Cardinal Gian Carlo de' Medici to designs by the architect Ferdinando Tacca, son of the sculptor Pietro Tacca; its inaugural production was the opera buffa, Il potestà di Colognole by Jacopo Melani. The opera house, the first to be built with superposed tiers of boxes rather than raked semi-circular seating in the Roman fashion, is considered to be the oldest in Italy, having occupied the same site for more than 350 years. It has two auditoria, the Sala Grande, with 1,500 seats, and the Saloncino, a former ballroom located upstairs which has been used as a recital hall since 1804 and which seats 400. Work on completing the interior was finished in 1661, in time for the celebration of the wedding of the future grand duke Cosimo III de' Medici, with the court spectacle Ercole in Tebe by Giovanni Antonio Boretti. Primarily a court theatre used by the Grand Dukes of Tuscany, it was only after 1718 that it was opened to the public. In this theatre the great operas of
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    Old Red Lion Theatre

    Old Red Lion Theatre

    The Old Red Lion Theatre is a fringe theatre, situated above a pub at The Angel, in the London Borough of Islington. It was founded in 1948 as the Old Red Lion Theatre Club. The pub in itself is one of the oldest in London, having first been built in 1415 in what was then the rural village of Islington in open countryside and fields. A house called Goose Farm and some nearby cattle pens (for herds being driven to Smithfield Market) were the only structures to adjoin it, and St John Street (then called Chester Road) was a country lane. In the late 18th century Chester Road became notorious for highwaymen, with patrols being provided to protect those travelling along it at night. At this time descriptions state that the Old Red Lion was a small brick house with three trees in its forecourt, visited by William Hogarth (who portrayed it in the middle distance of his painting "Evening", with the foreground being Sadler's Wells), Samuel Johnson and Thomas Paine (who wrote The Rights of Man in the shade of the trees in its forecourt). The Old Red Lion was rebuilt in 1899, adding two exits onto different streets. This gave the pub the nickname "the In and Out", since taxicab passengers
    7.33
    6 votes
    8
    Pasadena Playhouse

    Pasadena Playhouse

    The Pasadena Playhouse is an historic performing arts venue located 39 S El Molino Avenue in Pasadena, California. The 686-seat auditorium produces a variety of cultural and artistic events, professional shows, and community engagements each year. Beginning around 1912, the period known as the Little Theatre Movement developed in cities and towns across the United States. The artistic community that founded the Pasadena Playhouse was started in 1916 when actor-director Gilmor Brown began producing a series of plays at a renovated burlesque theatre with his troupe "The Gilmore Brown Players". Brown established the Community Playhouse Association of Pasadena in 1917 that would later become the Pasadena Playhouse Association, which necessitated a new venue for productions. The community theatre organization quickly grew and in May 1924, the citizens of Pasadena raised funds to build a new theatre in the city center at 39 South El Molino Avenue. Completed in 1925, the theater was designed in a Spanish Colonial Revival style by Pasadena artist and architect Elmer Grey. Its non-professional, community beginnings and the tremendous amount of local support for the project led George
    8.40
    5 votes
    9
    Powerhouse, Brisbane

    Powerhouse, Brisbane

    Brisbane Powerhouse is an arts and cultural hub located in the Brisbane suburb of New Farm, Queensland, Australia. The venue offers an array of performing arts, visual arts, festivals, and free community events. Positioned on the northern bank of the Brisbane River, Brisbane Powerhouse was developed from a decommissioned power station. The original New Farm powerhouse, designed by Architect Roy Rusden Ogg and commissioned by the newly formed Greater Brisbane City Council, went into service as the first council-operated power station built in Brisbane in June 1928. Earlier power stations in Brisbane had been operated by private companies. The New Farm powerhouse supplied electricity for the whole tramway network, as well as power and lighting loads for the suburbs of Yeerongpilly, Toowong and Ithaca. As Brisbane grew more suburbs drew their electrical power from the powerhouse. The commercial areas and older suburbs of Brisbane drew their electricity from a private power generating company called the City Electric and Light Company, whose powerhouses were located on the Bulimba Reach of the Brisbane River. The Government of Queensland decided that there should be one electrical
    7.17
    6 votes
    10
    Theatre Royal, Bath

    Theatre Royal, Bath

    The Theatre Royal in Bath, England, is over 200 years old. It is one of the more important theatres in the United Kingdom outside London, with capacity for an audience of around 900. The theatre building from 1805 is supplemented by two smaller and more recent studio theatres. In 2010 the theatre underwent a major refurbishment. The present main entrance to the Theatre Royal, in Sawclose, was built in 1720 by Thomas Greenway, and was Beau Nash's first house. Pevsner criticizes the mouldings of window-frames and of frieze and the volutes of the brackets of the door-hood as "characteristically overdone", and mentions Wood remarking on its "profuse ornament" and on how it was typical of a mason rather than an architect. The exterior of the building, with arches, pilasters, garlands and ornaments, which is visible from Beauford Square, was designed by George Dance the Younger and erected by John Palmer. The theatre itself was erected in 1805, replacing the Old Orchard Street Theatre which was also called the Theatre Royal, which is now a Freemason's Hall. After a fire in 1863 the interior was redone by C J Phipps. The theatre, along with the neighbouring Garrick's Head public house, is
    6.83
    6 votes
    11
    Eugene O'Neill Theatre

    Eugene O'Neill Theatre

    The Eugene O'Neill Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 230 West 49th Street in midtown-Manhattan. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it was built for the Shuberts as part of a theatre-hotel complex named for 19th century tragedian Edwin Forrest. It opened on November 24, 1925 with the musical Mayflowers as its premiere production. The venue was renamed the Coronet in 1945, with renovations by architects Walker & Gillette, then in 1959 rechristened the O'Neill in honor of the American playwright by then-owner Lester Osterman. It later was purchased by playwright Neil Simon, who sold it to Jujamcyn Theaters in 1982. The Book of Mormon achieved the box office record for the Eugene O'Neill Theatre. The production grossed $1,615,230.71 over eight performances, for the week ending June 10, 2012.
    7.80
    5 votes
    12
    Paramount Theatre

    Paramount Theatre

    The Paramount Theatre in Seattle, Washington is a 2,807-seat performing arts venue at 9th Avenue and Pine Street in Downtown Seattle in the United States of America. The theater originally opened March 1, 1928 as the Seattle Theatre with 3,000 seats, the theater was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 9, 1974. It is also an official City of Seattle landmark. The theatre was designed by the Chicago-based firm of Rapp & Rapp, with Seattle architect B. Marcus Priteca collaborating. It was renamed the Paramount in the 1940s. The Paramount was built expressly for showing film and secondarily, vaudeville. As of 2009, the Paramount is currently operated as a performing arts venue, serving a diverse patron base that attends Broadway theatre, concerts, dance, comedy, family engagements, silent film and jazz. It is considered to be one of the busiest theatres in the region. It is currently owned and operated by the Seattle Theatre Group, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit performing arts organization, which also runs the 1,419-seat Moore Theatre in Belltown and the Neptune Theater in the University District. During the “Roaring Twenties,” particularly before the first
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Byrd Theatre

    Byrd Theatre

    The Byrd Theatre is a cinema in the Carytown neighborhood of Richmond, Virginia. It was named after William Byrd II, the founder of the city. The theater — the first in Virginia to be equipped with a sound system — opened on December 24, 1928 to much excitement and is affectionately referred to as "Richmond’s Movie Palace". Built in 1928, the theater cost $900,000 (2009 Adjusted Inflation $11,000,000) to construct. The builder were Charles Somma and Walter Coulter. The original name for the theater was the State Theater, but by the completion of the construction the name was already taken. It was then named after William Byrd, founder of the city of Richmond. The Byrd Theatre opened for the first time on December 24, 1928. At the time, adult tickets were 50 cents for evening shows and 25 cents for matinees, while a child’s tickets was only 10 cents. The first movie was the film "Waterfront", a First National Film. In addition, the manager at the time was Robert Coulter, who remained the manager until his retirement in 1971 (he is rumored to haunt the theatre). In 1953, the original 35mm Simplex standards were replaced by the current Simplex 35mm projectors, which are still used
    9.00
    4 votes
    14
    McDonald Theatre

    McDonald Theatre

    McDonald Theatre is a theater and music venue in Eugene, Oregon, United States. Opened in 1925 as a movie house, the building was converted to a theater for performing arts, and is still in business. The theater is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
    9.00
    4 votes
    15
    Ahmanson Theatre

    Ahmanson Theatre

    The Ahmanson Theatre is one of the four main venues that comprise the Los Angeles Music Center. Through the generosity of philanthropist Howard F. Ahmanson, Sr., construction began on March 9, 1962. The theatre opened on April 12, 1967 with a production of More Stately Mansions starring Ingrid Bergman, Arthur Hill, and Colleen Dewhurst. Since then, it has presented a wide variety of dramas, musicals, comedies, and revivals of the classics, including six world premieres of Neil Simon plays and works by Wendy Wasserstein, August Wilson, A.R. Gurney, Terrence McNally, John Guare and Edward Albee. The Ahmanson also has served in the capacity of co-producer for a number of Broadway productions, including Amadeus, Smokey Joe's Cafe, The Most Happy Fella, and The Drowsy Chaperone. The Ahmanson has the largest theatrical season-ticket subscription base on the West Coast. Its year-round season begins in early fall and lasts through late summer. A major $17 million renovation moved the mezzanine and balcony closer to the stage, reduced the width of the auditorium, lowered the ceiling and improved the acoustics. It also allowed the theatre's seating capacity to be reconfigured from 1,600
    6.67
    6 votes
    16
    Royal Shakespeare Company

    Royal Shakespeare Company

    The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is a major British theatre company, based in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England. The company employs 700 staff and produces around 20 productions a year from its home in Stratford-upon-Avon and plays regularly in London, Newcastle upon Tyne and on tour across the UK and internationally. The company’s home is in Stratford-upon-Avon, where it has recently redeveloped its Royal Shakespeare and Swan theatres as part of a £112.8-million "Transformation" project. The theatres re-opened in November 2010, having closed in 2007. The new buildings attracted 18,000 visitors within the first week and received a positive media response both upon opening, and following the first full Shakespeare performances. Performances in Stratford-upon-Avon continued throughout the Transformation project at the temporary Courtyard Theatre. As well as the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, the RSC produces new work from living artists and develops creative links with theatre-makers from around the world, as well as working with teachers to inspire a lifelong love of William Shakespeare in young people and running events for everyone to explore and
    6.67
    6 votes
    17
    Sadler's Wells Theatre

    Sadler's Wells Theatre

    Sadler's Wells Theatre is a performing arts venue located in Rosebery Avenue, Clerkenwell in the London Borough of Islington. The present day theatre is the sixth on the site since 1683. It consists of two performance spaces: a 1,500 seat main auditorium and the Lilian Baylis Studio, with extensive rehearsal rooms and technical facilities also housed within the site. Sadler's Wells is one of the United Kingdom's foremost dance venues and producing houses, with a number of associated artists and companies who produce original works for the theatre. Sadler's Wells is also responsible for the management of the Peacock Theatre in the West End. Richard Sadler opened a "Musick House" in 1683, the second public theatre opened in London after the Restoration. The name Sadler's Wells originates from his name and the rediscovery of monastic springs on his property. The well water being thought to have medicinal properties, Sadler was prompted to claim that drinking the water from the wells would be effective against "dropsy, jaundice, scurvy, green sickness and other distempers to which females are liable – ulcers, fits of the mother, virgin's fever and hypochondriacal distemper." In 1698
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool

    Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool

    The Royal Court Theatre is a theatre at 1 Roe Street, Liverpool, England. It was built in 1938 in an Art Deco style. Built in the 12th century, the site of the current Royal Court Theatre was originally a water well. The turning point was in 1826 when a circus owner, John Cooke, bought the site for his circuses, plays, operas and concerts, and it became known as 'Cooke's Royal Amphitheatre of Arts.' During this time, Pablo Fanque, the black circus performer and proprietor immortalised in the Beatles song, Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite! performed here as a part of William Batty's circus. In 1881, the building was redesigned by Henry Sumner as a regular theatre and it was re-opened as the Royal Court. A fire destroyed the building in 1933 during the opera and drama that Howard and Wyndhams Ltd were staging. After a small delay, construction works began in March 1938 to ensure the theatre was rebuilt and reopened in October of the same year. The Royal Court Theatre we know now was opened on 17 October 1938. It had been totally rebuilt with a new Art Deco style, making it Liverpool's number one theatre with all its splendour and grandeur. The interior of the building holds a
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Avalon Hollywood

    Avalon Hollywood

    Avalon (or Avalon Hollywood) is a historic night club and music venue in Hollywood, California, located near the intersection of Hollywood and Vine, at 1735 N. Vine Street. It has previously been known as The Hollywood Playhouse, The WPA Federal Theatre, El Capitan Theatre, The Jerry Lewis Theatre, The Hollywood Palace and The Palace. It has a capacity of 2,000. Originally known as The Hollywood Playhouse, 1735 Vine St. opened for the first time on January 24, 1927. It was designed in the Spanish Colonial Revival style by the architectural firm of Gogarty and Weyl. During the Great Depression, the theatre was renamed The WPA Federal Theatre (after the Works Progress Administration), and used for government-sponsored programs. Later, the theatre hosted numerous CBS Radio Network programs, including Fanny Brice's Baby Snooks show and Lucille Ball's My Favorite Husband program. Lux Radio Theater broadcast condensed movie scripted versions, usually with the movie's original cast performing their movie roles. Ginger Rogers and Ray Milland performed "Lady in the Dark" in 1945. In the 1940s, 1735 Vine was renamed The El Capitan Theatre, and was used for a long-running live burlesque
    7.20
    5 votes
    20
    Her Majesty's Theatre

    Her Majesty's Theatre

    Her Majesty's Theatre is a West End theatre, in Haymarket, City of Westminster, London. The present building was designed by Charles J. Phipps and was constructed in 1897 for actor-manager Herbert Beerbohm Tree, who established the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art at the theatre. In the early decades of the 20th century, Tree produced spectacular productions of Shakespeare and other classical works, and the theatre hosted premières by major playwrights such as George Bernard Shaw, J. M. Synge, Noël Coward and J. B. Priestley. Since World War I, the wide stage has made the theatre suitable for large-scale musical productions, and the theatre has specialised in hosting musicals. The theatre has been home to record-setting musical theatre runs, notably the World War I sensation Chu Chin Chow and the current production, Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera, which has played continuously at Her Majesty's since 1986. The theatre was established by architect and playwright John Vanbrugh, in 1705, as the Queen's Theatre. Legitimate drama unaccompanied by music was prohibited by law in all but the two London patent theatres, and so this theatre quickly became an opera house. Between
    7.20
    5 votes
    21
    Sunderland Empire

    Sunderland Empire

    The Sunderland Empire Theatre is a large theatre venue located in High Street West in Sunderland, North East England. The theatre, which opened in 1907, is owned by City of Sunderland Council and operated by Ambassador Theatre Group Ltd, on behalf of Sunderland Empire Theatre Trust. The Sunderland Empire is one of the largest venues in the North East, with 1,860 seats and the capacity to accommodate 2,200 when all standing positions are occupied. http://www.visitsunderland.com/attraction-details.asp?venueid=7%7Caccessdate=2009-06-26 |title=Sunderland Empire|author=Visit Sunderland website|year=2009}} The auditorium is also one of the few remaining in the UK to have four tiers, namely the Orchestra Stalls, the Dress Circle, the Upper Circle and the Gallery. There are four private boxes on the Dress Circle level, as well as two proscenium boxes on the Upper Circle balcony. The Empire Palace, as it was originally called, was established independently by Richard Thornton after his partnership with theatre magnate Edward Moss was dissolved. It was opened on 1 July 1907 by variety and vaudeville star Vesta Tilley, who had laid the foundation stone on 29 September 1906. The dome on
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    Dominion Theatre

    Dominion Theatre

    The Dominion Theatre is a West End theatre on Tottenham Court Road close to St Giles Circus and Centre Point Tower, in the London Borough of Camden. The Dominion was built in 1928–29, designed by W and TR Milburn with a steel-framed construction and a concave Portland stone facade. It was built as a theatre for live shows, but after faltering business in the early 1930s, the building was converted to also allow it to show films. The theatre was built on the location of the former Horse Shoe Brewery, which was the site of the 1814 London Beer Flood. During the 1980s it became a popular venue for music concerts. Tangerine Dream's album Logos was recorded there in 1982, and contains a tune called "Dominion" in tribute, and Dolly Parton's 1983 concert at the Dominion was filmed and released as a television special, Dolly in London. In the mid-1980s the Dominion hosted the musical Time, and the interior was extensively reconstructed to accommodate the shows effects. Since the early 1990s the venue has played host to David Ian and Paul Nicholas' new production of Grease, Scrooge: The Musical, Matthew Bourne's Swan Lake, Disney's Beauty and the Beast, a return of Grease, and Notre Dame de
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Theatre Royal, Brighton

    Theatre Royal, Brighton

    The Theatre Royal, Brighton is a theatre in Brighton, England, United Kingdom presenting a range of West End and touring musicals and plays, along with performances of opera and ballet and a Christmas pantomime. In 1806 the Prince of Wales gave Royal Assent for the theatre to be built and it opened on 27 June 1807, with a performance of William Shakespeare's Hamlet. It struggled with mixed fortunes until the theatre was purchased in 1854 by actor Henry John Nye Chart, who engaged theatre architect Charles J. Phipps to begin a programme of expansion and redevelopment. The theatre improved its reputation and finances, becoming a respected venue. When Henry John Nye Chart died in 1876 his wife took over and continued the success as one of the first female theatre managers. Since 1999 the theatre has been owned by the Ambassador Theatre Group. In 2007 the theatre celebrated its 200th anniversary with a visit from Queen Elizabeth II who renamed a box after herself.
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Dolby Theatre

    Dolby Theatre

    The Dolby Theatre (formerly known as the Kodak Theatre) is a live entertainment theatre in the Hollywood and Highland shopping mall and entertainment complex on Hollywood Boulevard and North Highland Avenue in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles, United States. Since its opening on November 9, 2001, the theatre has been the home of the annual Academy Awards ceremonies (the Oscars), which were first held there in March 2002, and is the first permanent home for the awards. Since 2002, the theatre was also the home for American Idol. The theatre was designed by David Rockwell of the Rockwell Group, and Theatre Projects Consultants specifically with the Oscars in mind. The stage is one of the largest in the United States, roughly tied with the Elliot Hall of Music at Purdue University, measuring 113 feet (34 m) wide by 60 feet (18 m) deep. However, it has a seating capacity for up to 3,332 people, about half the size. The theatre is particularly successful as a venue for a televised theatre performance (improving production values and economies in American Idol and the Academy Awards) through the planning and technical design. The architect and advisers undertook extensive
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    Lyceum Theatre

    Lyceum Theatre

    The Lyceum Theatre is a 2,000-seat West End theatre located in the City of Westminster, on Wellington Street, just off the Strand. There has been a theatre with this name in the locality since 1765, and the present site opened on 14 July 1834 to a design by Samuel Beazley. The building was unique in that it had a balcony overhanging the dress circle. It was built by the partnership of Peto & Grissell. The present building retains Beazley's façade and grand portico, but the theatre behind is substantially different from the 1904 design of Bertie Crewe, restored to theatrical use in 1996 by Holohan Architects, after a long period of use as a Mecca Ballroom The Old Lyceum Theatre was first built in 1765 on an adjacent site, and in the late 18th century, musical entertainments were given by Charles Dibdin. Famed actor David Garrick also performed at the Lyceum. Between 1794 and 1809, the building was used as a circus, brought by Philip Astley when his amphitheatre was burned down at Westminster, and then a chapel, a concert room, and for the first London exhibition of waxworks displayed by Madame Tussaud in 1802. The theatre became a "licensed" house in 1809, and until 1812 it was
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    Sage Gateshead

    Sage Gateshead

    The Sage Gateshead is a centre for musical education, performance and conferences, located in Gateshead on the south bank of the River Tyne, in the North East of England. It opened in 2004. It is tenanted by the North Music Trust, which for the financial year 2010-11 reported a deficit of £302,761. The venue is part of the Gateshead Quays development, which also includes the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art and the Gateshead Millennium Bridge. The centre occupies a curved glass and stainless steel building designed by Foster and Partners, Buro Happold (structural engineering), Mott MacDonald (building services) and Arup (acoustics), with views of Newcastle and Gateshead Quaysides, the Tyne Bridge, and the Gateshead Millennium Bridge. Foster and Partners were selected following an architectural design competition managed by RIBA Competitions. Planning for the centre began in the early 1990s, when the Northern Sinfonia orchestra, with encouragement from Northern Arts, began working on plans for a new concert hall. They were soon joined by regional folk music development agency Folkworks, which ensured that the needs of the region's traditional music were taken into consideration;
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Roxy Theatre

    Roxy Theatre

    The Roxy Theatre (often just The Roxy) is a famous nightclub, on the Sunset Strip, in West Hollywood, California. The Roxy is owned by Lou Adler and Adler's son, Nic, who operates the club. The Roxy was opened on September 23, 1973, by Elmer Valentine and Lou Adler, along with original partners David Geffen, Elliot Roberts and Peter Asher. They took over the building previously occupied by a strip club owned by Chuck Landis called the Largo. (Adler was also responsible for bringing the stage play The Rocky Horror Show to the United States, and it opened its first American run at The Roxy Theatre in 1974, before it was made into the movie The Rocky Horror Picture Show the next year.) Neil Young and his band The Santa Monica Flyers played the Roxy for the first week it was open. Only three months later, the original Genesis lineup with Peter Gabriel played several consecutive days at the Roxy, a run that some band members and many fans consider to be amongst their finest performances (due partially to the intimate atmosphere and good acoustics of the venue, as well as the legendary reputation of "Hollywood" amongst performers around the world). Paul Reubens, then a struggling
    6.00
    6 votes
    28
    Almeida Theatre

    Almeida Theatre

    The Almeida Theatre, opened in 1980, is a 325 seat studio theatre with an international reputation which takes its name from the street in which it is located, off Upper Street, in the London Borough of Islington. The theatre produces a diverse range of drama and holds an annual summer festival of contemporary opera, music and theatre. Successful plays are often transferred to West End theatres. The theatre was built in 1837 for the newly formed Islington Literary and Scientific Society and included a library, reading room, museum, laboratory, and a lecture theatre seating 500. The architects were the fashionable partnership of Robert Lewis Roumieu and Alexander Dick Gough. The library was sold off in 1872 and the building disposed of in 1874 to the Wellington Club (Almeida Street then being called Wellington Street) which occupied it until 1886. In 1885 the hall was used for concerts, balls, and public meetings. The Salvation Army bought the building in 1890, renaming it the Wellington Castle Barracks (Wellington Castle Citadel from 1902). To suit the building's new purpose, the front-facing lecture hall's tiered benches were replaced so that the congregation was seated in the
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    Hammerstein Ballroom

    Hammerstein Ballroom

    The Hammerstein Ballroom is a two-tiered, 12,000-square-foot (1,100 m) ballroom located within the Manhattan Center Studios on 311 West 34th Street in Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States of America. It is known for its elegant appearance and excellent acoustical design. The capacity of the ballroom is dependent on the configuration of the room; the ballroom seats 2,500 people for theatrical productions and musical performances, and several thousand for events held within a central ring. The two main balconies—which are unusually close to the ground and gently sloped—seat a total of 1,200. There are six shallow balconies which are normally used for celebrity guests. The floor slants down to the stage area to enable those in the back rows to see easily. The Manhattan Center was constructed in 1906 by Oscar Hammerstein as the Manhattan Opera House, an alternative to the popular yet comparatively expensive Metropolitan Opera. In 1910, the Metropolitan Opera paid Hammerstein $1.2 million USD to stop operating the Manhattan Opera House as an opera venue for ten years. This led to the elaborately decorated theater being used for a variety of events, including vaudeville
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Royal Lyceum Theatre

    Royal Lyceum Theatre

    The Royal Lyceum Theatre is a 658 seat theatre in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, named after the Theatre Royal Lyceum and English Opera House, the residence at the time of legendary Shakespearean actor Henry Irving. It was built in 1883 by architect C. J. Phipps at a cost of UK£17,000 on behalf of J. B. Howard and F. W. P. Wyndham, two local theatrical managers and performers who went on to establish the renowned Howard & Wyndham company in 1895. With only four minor refurbishments, in 1929, 1977, 1991, and 1996, the Royal Lyceum remains one of the most original and unaltered of the architect's works. In 1965, the building was purchased by the Edinburgh Corporation to house the newly formed Royal Lyceum Theatre Company, who are now the permanent residents, leasing it from the local council. The Royal Lyceum has been one of the principal venues for the Edinburgh International Festival since the festival's inception in 1947, renting out the building for three weeks every August for visiting companies, and often for a further week to Fringe companies. The theatre is believed to be haunted and there have been sightings of a blue lady that is believed to be Ellen Terry, the actress
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    Grand Lake Theater

    Grand Lake Theater

    The Grand Lake Theater is a historic movie palace located at 3200 Grand Avenue and Lake Park Avenue in the Grand Lake neighborhood of Oakland, California in the United States of America. The Grand Lake was designed as a single auditorium theater by the Reid Brothers for West Coast Theaters, Inc. After it opened on March 6, 1926, it held vaudeville and silent movie showings, but with the arrival of "talkies" it began to exclusively show sound films. In 1928, the Grand Lake became part of the Fox Theaters chain, and in total, changed ownership five times until 1980. In 1980, the theater was purchased by Allen Michaan of Renaissance Rialto, Inc. The theater's exterior is surmounted by a giant illuminated rooftop sign. Neoclassical faux columns and urns line the main interior space and the ceiling is adorned with a crystal chandelier in the lobby and classical frescos in the auditorium. The theater's interior artwork is considered to be Art Deco. After purchasing it, Renaissance Rialto, Inc. spent $3.5 million on renovation and expansion. In 1981, the balcony of the auditorium was split into a second auditorium. In 1985, neighboring storefronts were purchased and attached to the
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Minneapolis Convention Center

    Minneapolis Convention Center

    The Minneapolis Convention Center is a large convention center located in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is located one block away from Nicollet Mall near Orchestra Hall. The Minneapolis Convention Center has a quadruple-domed roof and because of its volume can host multiple events on the same day. The Minneapolis Convention Center is also the largest indoor, contiguous, convention center in the upper midwest.
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Overture Center for the Arts

    Overture Center for the Arts

    Overture Center for the Arts is a performing arts center and art gallery in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. The center opened on September 19, 2004, replacing the former Civic Center. In addition to several theaters, the center also houses the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. The center was commissioned by Jerome Frautschi, designed by Cesar Pelli, and built by J.H. Findorff and Son. Frautschi paid $205 million to construct the building, making it the largest private gift to the arts of its kind. It was intended to replace the Madison Civic Center, located on the same block on State Street. The building has seven venues, in addition to art galleries: The 2251-seat Overture Hall is the facility's largest theater. Consisting of four levels of seats, it has a striking architectural style. The balconies have "continental-style" seating arrangements, where aisles other than those on the sides of seat rows are omitted in order to provide greater seat size. It houses a large, permanent organ by the German organ builder Klais. The Madison Symphony Orchestra, Madison Opera, and Madison Ballet call this theater home. In addition to local Madison performing groups, touring performances have
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Peabody Opera House

    Peabody Opera House

    The Peabody Opera House is a civic performing arts building in St. Louis, Missouri. Founded as the Kiel Opera House, it opened it 1934 and operated until 1991, when it and the adjacent Kiel Auditorium were closed so the auditorium could be demolished and replaced by the Scottrade Center. When the auditorium was slated for demolition, the owners of the complex promised to rehabilitate the opera house as well. The owners, however, never renovated the building, instead claiming that they had fulfilled their financial obligations. In June 2009, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen voted 25-1 to subsidize the renovation and reopening of the Opera House under the direction of its new owners, Sports Capital Partners. The subsidies were funded by municipal bonds and state/federal historic tax credits. On July 12, 2010, it was announced that the name of the opera house would be changed to the Peabody Opera House, named after the company Peabody Energy. The renovation lasted for fourteen months and included the construction of a new entrance for the building. On October 1, 2011, the Peabody Opera House opened for the first time since the $79 million renovation. The show featured personalities
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    St. James Theatre

    St. James Theatre

    The St. James Theatre is located at 246 W. 44th St. Broadway, New York City, United States. It was built by Abraham L. Erlanger, theatrical producer and a founding member of the Theatrical Syndicate, on the site of the original Sardi's restaurant. It opened in 1927 as The Erlanger. Upon Erlanger's death in 1930, control of the venue was taken over by the Astor family, who owned the land on which the theatre stood. The Astors renamed it the St. James Theatre. The theatre was purchased by the Shuberts in the late 1930s. They were forced to sell it to William L. McKnight in 1957 following the loss of an antitrust case. McKnight renovated the St. James and reopened it in 1958. In 1970, McKnight then transferred the theatre to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger, who had formed Jujamcyn Theaters.
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Teatro Lirico

    Teatro Lirico

    The Teatro Lirico (known until 1894 as the Teatro alla Canobbiana) is a theatre in Milan, Italy. In the 19th and early 20th centuries it was particularly notable for opera performances, including the world premieres of Donizetti's L'elisir d'amore and Giordano's Fedora. The theatre, located on Via Rastrelli, closed in 1998. However, a restoration project was begun in April 2007, and it was due to re-open in 2009 as the Teatro Lirico Giorgio Gaber. The Court Theatre of the Ducal Palace in Milan was destroyed by fire on February 26, 1776. With the city deprived of its only theatre, Giuseppe Piermarini was commissioned to design and build two new theatres on land surrounding the Palace. The church of Santa Maria della Scala was demolished to build the Teatro alla Scala. A second theatre was built nearby, on the site of the Scuole Cannobiane and was called the Teatro alla Canobbiana. It was inaugurated on August 21, 1779 (a little more than year after the opening of La Scala) with an opera buffa and ballet by Salieri. Like La Scala and many Italian opera houses of the time, it was built in a horseshoe shape, surmounted by a cupola, with four tiers of boxes and a gallery (or loggione).
    6.60
    5 votes
    37
    Grand Theatre Leeds

    Grand Theatre Leeds

    The Grand Theatre (also known as Leeds Grand Theatre and Leeds Grand Theatre and Opera House) is a theatre and Opera house in the centre of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It was designed by James Robinson Watson, chief assistant in the office of Leeds-based architect George Corson, and opened on 18 November 1878. The exterior is in a mixture of Romanesque and Scottish baronial styles, while the interior has such Gothic motifs as fan-vaulting and clustered columns. The theatre is a Grade II* listed building. It seats approximately 1,500 people. The theatre is home to Opera North and is regularly visited by Northern Ballet Theatre. It has hosted many touring productions, musical artists and comedians. The theatre closed at the end of May 2005 for a major refurbishment, entitled transformation, and reopened on 7 October 2006 with a production of Verdi's Rigoletto. The Stalls area was completely re-seated and re-raked, the orchestra-pit enlarged, air-conditioning installed, backstage technical facilities dramatically improved, and Opera North now has an Opera Centre to the south of the theatre, accessible via a bridge and at street-level. The Centre includes two new stage-sized
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Royal Festival Hall

    Royal Festival Hall

    The Royal Festival Hall is a 2,900-seat concert, dance and talks venue within Southbank Centre in London. It is situated on the South Bank of the River Thames, not far from Hungerford Bridge. It is a Grade I listed building - the first post-war building to become so protected (in 1981). The London Philharmonic Orchestra and Philharmonia Orchestras perform the majority of their London concerts in the hall. The hall was built as part of the Festival of Britain for London County Council, and was officially opened on 3 May 1951. When the Greater London Council (LCC's successor) was abolished in 1986, the Hall was taken over by the Arts Council. Since the late 1980s the hall has operated an 'open foyers' policy, opening up the substantial foyer spaces to the public throughout the day, even if there are no performances. This has proved very popular and the foyers are now one of the most used public spaces in London. The closest tube stations are Waterloo and Embankment. The foundation stone was laid in 1949 by Clement Attlee, then Prime Minister, on the site of the former Lion Brewery, built in 1837. The building was constructed by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts and officially opened on 3 May
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Cadogan Hall

    Cadogan Hall

    Cadogan Hall is a 900-seat capacity concert hall on Sloane Terrace in Chelsea / Belgravia in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London, United Kingdom. It is two minutes' walk from Sloane Square tube station on the Circle/District lines. Previously, the building was the First Church of Christ, Scientist, completed in 1907 to designs in the Byzantine style by the architect Robert Fellowes Chisholm, who also designed the Napier Museum in Kerala, India. By 1996, the congregations had diminished dramatically and the building fell into disuse. Mohamed Fayed, the then owner of Harrods, had acquired the property, but Cadogan Estates Ltd (the property company owned by Earl Cadogan, whose ancestors have been the main landowners in Chelsea since the 18th century – the nearby Cadogan Square and Cadogan Place are also named after them) purchased the building in 2000. It is a Grade II listed building. The resident music ensemble at Cadogan Hall is the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO), the first London orchestra to have a permanent home. Cadogan Estates offered the RPO the use of the hall as its principal venue in late 2001. The RPO gave its first concert as the resident ensemble of
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    St David's Hall

    St David's Hall

    St David's Hall (Welsh: Neuadd Dewi Sant) is a performing arts and conference venue in the heart of Cardiff city centre, the capital of Wales. St David's Hall is the National Concert Hall and Conference Centre of Wales. It hosts the annual Welsh Proms, the International Orchestral Series attracting renowned conductors and performers and the biennial BBC Cardiff Singer of the World Competition. As well as classical music it also plays host to jazz, soul, pop, rock, dance, children's, r&b, musicals and other forms of world music, as well as light entertainment artists like Joan Collins. The foyers in the centre are open and have regular free performances from often local groups, and the many foyers, balconies and bar areas are also used to host art exhibitions. It also has its own Celebrity Restaurant, on top of the numerous bars. Built in 1982 the Hall proved to be a tricky and remarkable building. Architects Seymour Harris Partnership had the task of fitting a major 2000 seat, acoustically perfect auditorium, with surrounding dressing rooms, bars, foyers, a restaurant, offices and spacious concourse into a cramped city centre space. The space available was so cramped that they had
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    Echo Arena Liverpool

    Echo Arena Liverpool

    Echo Arena Liverpool is the arena half of ACC Liverpool located on the former King's Dock in Liverpool, England, United Kingdom. The BT Convention Centre forms the other half of the complex. In terms of capacity, Echo Arena Liverpool is the eleventh largest arena in the United Kingdom. ACC Liverpool as a whole was designed by Wilkinson Eyre architects. There are six dressing rooms, five team locker rooms and two promoter offices within the arena. Vehicles weighing up to 38 tonnes can gain access to the basement of the arena. Echo Arena Liverpool is one of the most sustainable venues in Europe, designed to reduce half of its CO2 emissions. Features across the complex control light, temperature and electricity usage and harvest rainwater for toilet flushing, while a crop of turbines on the River Mersey contributes to its electricity supply. Due to this design, Echo Arena has been awarded a string of environmental and architectural accolades. ACC Liverpool, the home to both Echo Arena and BT Convention Centre has a BREEAM rating of 'very good'. The Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool complex is capable of hosting a whole range of events including music concerts, conventions,
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    Fox Theatre

    Fox Theatre

    The Fox Theatre, a former movie palace, is a performing arts center located at 527 N. Grand Blvd. in St. Louis, Missouri. Also known as "The Fabulous Fox", it is situated in the arts district of the Grand Center area in Midtown St. Louis, one block north of Saint Louis University. It opened in 1929 and was completely restored in 1982. The Fox was built in 1929 by movie pioneer William Fox as a showcase for the films of the Fox Film Corporation and elaborate stage shows. It was one of a group of five spectacular Fox Theatres built by Fox in the late 1920s. (The others were the Fox Theatres in Brooklyn, Atlanta, Detroit, and San Francisco.) When the theater opened on January 31, 1929 it was reportedly the second-largest theater in the United States, with 5,060 seats. It was one of St. Louis's leading movie theaters through the 1960s and has survived to become a versatile performing arts venue. The Fox was designed by an architect specializing in theaters, C. Howard Crane, in an eclectic blend of Asian decorative motifs sometimes called Siamese Byzantine. The interior is the architectural twin of another Fox Theatre built in Detroit in 1928. Reporters in 1929 described the Fox
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Al Hirschfeld Theatre

    Al Hirschfeld Theatre

    The Al Hirschfeld Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 302 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. Designed by architect G. Albert Lansburgh for vaudeville promoter Martin Beck, the theatre opened as the Martin Beck Theatre with a production of Madame Pompadour on November 11, 1924. It was the only theater in New York that was owned outright without a mortgage. It was designed to be the most opulent theater of its time, and has dressing rooms for 200 actors. The theatre has a seating capacity of 1,424 for musicals. Famous appearances include Basil Rathbone as Romeo with Katharine Cornell as Juliet in December 1934; Frank Langella in Dracula; Elizabeth Taylor in The Little Foxes; Christina Applegate as the title role in Sweet Charity; David Hyde Pierce as Lt. Coffi in the musical Curtains; and Daniel Radcliffe in the latest revival of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying. On June 21, 2003, it was renamed the Al Hirschfeld Theatre in honor of the caricaturist famous for his drawings of Broadway celebrities, and reopened on November 23, 2003, with a revival of the musical Wonderful Town. This is one of five theatres owned and operated by Jujamcyn Theaters. The
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Camden Palace

    Camden Palace

    KOKO is a nightclub in a former theatre in Camden Town, London, England, at the bottom of Camden High Street close to Mornington Crescent tube station. Until 2004 it was called the Camden Palace. The building is considered to have some architectural significance and is a Grade II listed building. The Camden Theatre, opened on Boxing Day 1900. With a capacity of 2,434 it was one of the largest theatres in London outside the West End. The theatre was designed by the prolific theatre architect W.G.R. Sprague with an exterior symmetrical stone façade in a Classical style with four stone pillars that are spaced between windows. The building is dominated by a large copper dome, that originally had an open lantern that was topped by a statue. There were also eight statues of classical figures mounted on the corner pediments of the building. Decorated in a Baroque style with naked female figures holding supports for the boxes and columns, the rectangular marble proscenium is topped by more plaster reliefs of reclining naked women. The ceiling contains a shallow dome. The theatre was opened by Ellen Terry, then the most celebrated actress in England, who had lived in nearby Stanhope Street
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Gate Theatre

    Gate Theatre

    The Gate Theatre, in Dublin, was founded in 1928 by Hilton Edwards and Micheál Mac Liammóir, initially using the Abbey Theatre's Peacock studio theatre space to stage important works by European and American dramatists. The theatre later moved to 1 Cavendish Row (part of the Rotunda Hospital complex) where leading Irish architect Michael Scott undertook the revisions necessary to the room to convert it into a theatre. The theatre's current artistic director is Michael Colgan. Edwards/McLiammoir Productions presented European plays in sharp contrast to the country kitchen fare available at the Abbey Theatre bringing the Irish Premieres of Ibsen and other such dramatists to the Irish public. Orson Welles, James Mason and Michael Gambon started their acting careers at The Gate. In December 1983 the directorship of the Gate was handed to Michael Colgan. In 1991 the Gate became the first theatre in history to launch a full retrospective of the nineteen stage plays of Samuel Beckett. This festival was repeated at the Barbican Centre in London and New York's Lincoln Center. The Gate also featured three separate festivals of the works of Harold Pinter, the first theatre in Europe to do
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Hill 16

    Hill 16

    Hill 16 officially called Dineen/Hill 16 is a terrace on the railway end of Croke Park, the show-piece stadium of the Gaelic Athletic Association in Dublin City, Ireland. It is considered a national icon. When Croke Park was first used for Gaelic games the Railway End of the park was little more than a mound of earth. Before it was known as Hill 16, it was called Hill 60, because it was a mound measuring 60 metres (200 ft) - like Hill 60, a battle fought in World War I. There is debate over how the terrace became known as Hill 16, however, the most common explanation is that the rubble from the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin was used to build a more permanent terrace at the ground. The Hill has always lagged behind the rest of the stadium in terms of comfort. It was only in 1936, when the Cusack Stand was redeveloped, that the turf and mud of Hill 16 was replaced with concrete terracing. It was after the 1983 All-Ireland Football Final between Dublin GAA and Galway GAA, where overcrowding on Hill 16 caused a few supporters to suffer injuries, that the GAA decided to rebuild the Hill. This work was completed in 1988, allowing a capacity of 10,000 spectators. In the mid 1990s the GAA
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    King's Theatre, Glasgow

    King's Theatre, Glasgow

    The King's Theatre is located in Glasgow, Scotland. It was built for Howard & Wyndham Ltd under its chairman Baillie Michael Simons as a sister theatre of their Theatre Royal in the city and was designed by Frank Matcham, opening in 1904. The theatre is primarily a receiving house for touring musicals, dance, comedy and circus-type performances. The theatre also provides a prominent stage for local amateur productions. The King's Theatre also stages an annual pantomime, produced by First Family Entertainment The theatre is currently operated by the Ambassador Theatre Group, under a lease from Glasgow City Council who own the building. The theatre occupies the corner of Bath Street and Elmbank Street, in the Charing Cross area of the city. The longer Bath Street elevation houses both the main entrance, the scenery dock and stage door. The equally decorative but shorter Elmbank Street elevation has various fire exits and the entrance to the Gallery. The King's Theatre was commissioned by the theatre company Howard & Wyndham at a cost of over £50,000 and opened on 12 September 1904. In the 1930s like many city theatres, it had been policy to close during the summer while many city
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Olympia Bruno Coquatrix

    Olympia Bruno Coquatrix

    The Olympia is a music hall in the 9th arrondissement of Paris. Located at No. 28, Boulevard des Capucines, its closest métro/RER stations are Madeleine, Opéra, Havre – Caumartin and Auber. Founded in 1888, by Joseph Oller, the creator of the Moulin Rouge, today easily recognizable by its giant red glowing letters announcing its name. It opened in 1889 as the "Montagnes Russes" but was renamed the Olympia in 1893. Besides musicians, the Olympia played host to a variety of entertainment including circuses, ballets, and operettas. However, following a steady decline in appearances by the great stars, from 1929 until 1944 it served as a movie theater. It may have opened as a music hall under the German occupation of France during World War II, but certainly in 1945 after the Liberation, it was a music hall free to Allied troops in uniform. Attendees had to listen to the playing of four national anthems before the varied programs that always ended with a spirited French can-can performed by dancers, some of whom were no longer young. Thereafter, at times it may have reverted to movies again until Bruno Coquatrix revived it as a music hall with a grand re-opening in February 1954. After
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Madlenianum Opera and Theatre

    Madlenianum Opera and Theatre

    Madlenianum Opera and Theatre is the first privately owned opera and theater company both in Serbia and in south-eastern Europe. It is located in Belgrade, Serbia, and was founded on 26 January 1999, by Madlena Zepter, wife of the Philip Zepter, Serbian businessman. The name Madlenianum derives from Madlena Zepter's name. Madlenianum was officially founded on 25 December 1997, while first performance on 26 January 1999 marks theater public revelation. Madlenianum is located in the building that previously housed second stage of National Theatre of Serbia. After seven years of work and five different stages of reconstruction, on 19 April 2005, a completely refurbished, reconstructed and conceptually enriched edifice opened its doors to the public. It is situated in the Old city core of Zemun, which is Spatial Cultural-Historical Units of Great Importance of Serbia. Theatre housed opera, ballet, concert program, drama and musical repertoire. As of 2010, the following operas, musicals and plays were in the repertoire of the Madlenianum . Premieres marked with "*" are still in the repertoar.
    6.20
    5 votes
    50
    Brattle Theatre

    Brattle Theatre

    The Brattle Theatre is a repertory movie theater located in Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the United States of America. The theatre is a small movie house with one screen. It is one of the few remaining movie theaters, if not the only one, that use a rear-projection system; the projector is located behind the screen rather than behind the audience. The Brattle Theatre mainly screens a mixture of foreign, independent, and classic films. It began showing repertory and foreign films in 1953. Despite the rapid disappearance of American arthouse theaters, the Brattle has managed to maintain a loyal base of moviegoers while remaining independently operated. The theatre was started by the Cambridge Social Union, cofounded in January 1871 by the Reverend Samuel Longfellow, brother of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. In 1889, the union purchased the lot on Brattle Street for $9,000, and hired the Cambridge architectural firm headed by Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow, Jr. to draft plans for Brattle Hall. The gala opening occurred on January 27, 1890. Starting in the late 1950s, the Brattle started a tradition of screening Humphrey Bogart films during the week of final exams at
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Abbey Theatre

    Abbey Theatre

    The Abbey Theatre (Irish: Amharclann na Mainistreach), also known as the National Theatre of Ireland (Irish: Amharclann Náisiúnta na hÉireann), is a theatre located in Dublin, Ireland. The Abbey first opened its doors to the public on 27 December 1904. Despite losing its original building to a fire in 1951, it has remained active to the present day. The Abbey was the first state-subsidized theatre in the English-speaking world; from 1925 onwards it received an annual subsidy from the Irish Free State. Since July 1966, the Abbey has been located at 26 Lower Abbey Street, Dublin 1. In its early years, the theatre was closely associated with the writers of the Irish Literary Revival, many of whom were involved in its founding and most of whom had plays staged there. The Abbey served as a nursery for many of the leading Irish playwrights and actors of the 20th century, including William Butler Yeats, Augusta, Lady Gregory, Sean O'Casey and John Millington Synge. In addition, through its extensive programme of touring abroad and its high visibility to foreign, particularly American, audiences, it has become an important part of the Irish tourist industry. The Abbey arose from three
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Howard Theatre

    Howard Theatre

    The Howard Theatre is a historic theatre, located at 620 T Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C.. Opened in 1910, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. In its heyday, the theatre was known for catering to an African-American clientele, and played host to many of the great black musical artists of the early and mid-twentieth century. The Howard was billed as the "Theater of the People", and supported two theatrical organizations, the Lafayette Players and the Howard University Players. In September 2010 extensive renovations were started to restore the theatre to its former glory. The theatre reopened on April 9, 2012 to headline acts like Wanda Sykes, Blue Oyster Cult, and Chaka Khan, all appearing in the first month since reopening. The theatre was founded and owned by the National Amusement Company, a white-owned group. When built, it had a capacity of more than 1,200. Designed by J. Edward Storck, the theatre featured orchestra and balcony seats and eight proscenium boxes, with a lavishly decorated interior. No less extravagant was the exterior, which combined elements of the Beaux-Arts, Italian Renaissance, and neoclassical styles. The whole was
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Regent Theatre

    Regent Theatre

    The Regent Theatre in Brisbane is a multi-cinema picture palace, in what was once one of the original Hoyts' Picture Palaces from the 1920s. It is located at 167 Queen Street on the popular Queen Street Mall. It was constructed as the first and only American-style picture palace, reflecting the opulence and grandeur of the great Hollywood era, to be built in Queensland, and was one of many operated by Hoyts in Australia. Other significant Regent Cinemas around Australia were the Regent in George Street, Sydney, now demolished, the Regent on the Rundle Mall in Adelaide which is now converted into a shopping mall and the Regent Melbourne on Collins Street, restored in the 1990s and now a major successful live theatre for Melbourne. The Regent Theatre, Dunedin in New Zealand was adapted for live performances in the 1970s and continues to be used for those and as a cinema. Smaller Regent cinemas include the Regent in downtown Ballarat, Victoria, now remodelled into a multi-screen complex. The picture palaces were built to imitate Hollywood's Golden Era and were designed to function as a cinema and theatre. The Regent was designed by Melbourne architect, Charles N. Hollinshed, with
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    INTECH

    INTECH

    INTECH is an internationally renowned educational resource centre for science situated in Morn Hill, just outside the city of Winchester in the United Kingdom. Opened in 2002 after major grants from amongst others the Millennium Commission,, IBM, SEEDA and Hampshire County Council it replaced an existing facility in a more functional building in Winchester. The hands-on exhibition houses over 100 activities. During term time it is used mainly by local schools, while at week ends and holidays it attracts a wider audience. The dome is now a state of the art digital planetarium seating 176.
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Ordway Center for the Performing Arts

    Ordway Center for the Performing Arts

    Ordway Center for the Performing Arts is located in downtown Saint Paul, Minnesota and hosts a variety of performing arts, such as touring Broadway musicals, orchestra, opera, and cultural performers. It serves as a home to several local arts organizations, including the Minnesota Opera, The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, and The Schubert Club. James Rocco is currently the center's Vice President and Producing Artistic Director. In 1980, Saint Paul resident Sally Ordway Irvine (3M heiress and arts patron) dreamed of a European-style concert hall offering “everything from opera to the Russian circus.” Sally contributed $7.5 million—a sum matched by other members of the Ordway family—toward the cost of the facility. Fifteen Twin Cities corporations and foundations were the principal funders of the $46 million complex, then the most expensive privately funded arts facility ever built in the state. The internationally known architect (and Saint Paul native) Benjamin Thompson, whose other projects included the Faneuil Hall renovation in Boston and South Street Seaport in New York, was selected to design a building that would project “a visible contemporary image” but would also fit
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Orpheum, Vancouver

    Orpheum, Vancouver

    The Orpheum is a theatre and music venue in Vancouver, British Columbia. Along with the Queen Elizabeth Theatre and the Vancouver Playhouse, it is part of the Vancouver Civic Theatres group of live performance venues. The Orpheum is located on Granville Street near Smithe Street in Vancouver's downtown core. Designed by Scottish architect Marcus Priteca, the theatre officially opened on November 7, 1927 as a vaudeville house, but it hosted its first shows the previous day. The old Orpheum, at 761 Granville Street, was renamed the Vancouver Theatre (later the Lyric, then the International Cinema, then the Lyric once more before it closed for demolition in 1969 to make way for the first phase of the Pacific Centre project). The New Orpheum, which was the biggest theatre in Canada when it opened in 1927, with three thousand seats, cost $1.25 million to construct. The first manager of the theatre was William A. Barnes. Following the end of vaudeville's heyday in the early 1930s, the Orpheum became primarily a movie house under Famous Players ownership, although it would continue to host live events on occasion. Ivan Ackery managed the Orpheum during most of this period, from 1935 up
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Best Buy Theater

    Best Buy Theater

    The Best Buy Theater (formerly known as the Nokia Theater) in Times Square is an indoor theatre, owned and managed by Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG), located on 1515 Broadway, at the corner of Broadway and 44th street. It was designed by architect David Rockwell and opened in September 2005. The venue has a large standing room orchestra section, combined with a large area of seating towards the rear of the auditorium. In September 2010, it was announced that Best Buy had purchased the naming rights to the venue following Nokia's decision not to renew its contract with AEG. At the time of its construction, it replaced the historic Astor Plaza movie theater, which closed in August 2004. The estimated total cost of the transformation was $21 million. The venue seats 2,100 and features an 85-foot-long (26 m) LED high-definition screen that is one of the largest marquees on Broadway. The venue also is capable of presenting live footage from the stage or anywhere else in the theater. The theater's marquee sign is directly connected to MTV Studios and allows for live footage to be displayed there as well. The theatre lounge features interactive and downloadable content for phones and
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    New London Theatre

    New London Theatre

    The New London Theatre is a West End theatre located on the corner of Drury Lane and Parker Street in Covent Garden, in the London Borough of Camden. The Winter Garden Theatre formerly occupied the site until 1965. The modern theatre is built on the site of previous taverns and music hall theatres, where a place of entertainment has been located site since Elizabethan times. Nell Gwynn was associated with the tavern, which became known as the Great Mogul by the end of the 17th century, and presented entertainments in an adjoining hall, including "glee clubs" and "sing-songs". The Mogul Saloon was built on the site in 1847, which was sometimes known as the "Turkish Saloon or the "Mogul Music Hall." In 1851, it became the Middlesex Music Hall, known as The Old Mo. This in turn was rebuilt as the New Middlesex Theatre of Varieties, in 1911 by Frank Matcham for Oswald Stoll. In 1919, the theatre was sold to George Grossmith, Jr. and Edward Laurillard, refurbished and reopened as the Winter Garden Theatre. They produced Kissing Time (1919, with a book by P. G. Wodehouse and Guy Bolton and music by Ivan Caryll), followed by A Night Out (1920), both starring Stanley Holloway. Grossmith
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Academy of Music

    Academy of Music

    The Academy of Music, also known as American Academy of Music, is a concert hall and opera house located at Broad and Locust Streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1857 and is the oldest opera house in the United States that is still used for its original purpose. Known as the "Grand Old Lady of Broad Street," the venue is the home of the Pennsylvania Ballet and the Opera Company of Philadelphia. The Academy was home to the Philadelphia Orchestra from its inception in 1900 until 2001 when the orchestra moved to the new Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. The Philadelphia Orchestra still retains ownership of the Academy. The hall was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1962. The Academy has been in continuous use since 1857, hosting many world-famous performers, conductors and composers, and a significant number of American premieres of works in the standard operatic and classical repertoire. Noted operas that had their American premieres there include Strauss's Ariadne auf Naxos, Gounod's Faust, and Wagner's The Flying Dutchman. In 1916, Leopold Stokowski conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in the American premiere of Mahler's Eighth Symphony (the
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    American Players Theatre

    American Players Theatre

    American Players Theatre (APT) is a classical theater located just south of Spring Green, Wisconsin. It includes a 1,148-seat outdoor amphitheater. APT sits on 110 acres (0.45 km) of woods and meadow just off the Wisconsin River across Wisconsin Highway 23 from Frank Lloyd Wright's studio Taliesin. Founded in 1979, APT has grown rapidly in recent years, with more than 100,000 patrons attending performances each year. It currently claims to have the second largest audience in the United States for outdoor classical theater. APT typically produces 116 performances of five plays running in repertory from June to October. In 2009, APT opened the new, indoor Touchstone Theatre. With 200 seats, the Touchstone provides an intimate, complementary space to the outdoor amphitheater, and allows for new genres to grace an APT stage.APT's repertoire consists primarily of plays by Shakespeare and other noted (usually Western) playwrights, such as George Bernard Shaw, Anton Chekhov, and Molière. Three of the plays up the hill are typically Shakespeares, with some 20th-century productions performed in the Touchstone. A significant part of APT's mission is its education program. APT works with
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    Slovak National Theatre

    Slovak National Theatre

    The Slovak National Theatre (Slovak: Slovenské národné divadlo, abbr. SND) denotes: The Slovak National Theatre is the second oldest Slovak professional theatre. It has 3 ensembles (drama, opera and ballet). It was founded in 1920 after the creation of Czechoslovakia as a cooperative and became a state-run company in 1945. Between 1920 and 1945, there was also a musical ensemble. The Slovak National Theatre has represented Slovak culture on its numerous tours abroad. It was created and, in the 1920s, also run by Czech artists (e.g. Oskar Nedbal, director during 1923-1930). The first performance was the Czech opera Hubička by Bedřich Smetana on March 1, 1920. The ensembles were Slovakized only gradually. In 1932, the drama ensemble split into the SNT Slovak Drama Company led by Janko Borodáč, and into the SNT Czech Drama Company, led by V. Šulc. The Czech Drama Company ceased to operate when it was forced to leave Slovakia in 1938. Since then, the drama ensemble has performed in Slovak only, but in the opera ensemble there were Czech artists even after 1945. In recent years, operas have been presented in their original languages. Initially, all 3 ensembles were active at the old
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Wilton's Music Hall

    Wilton's Music Hall

    Wilton's Music Hall is a grade II* listed building, built as a music hall and now a more general-purpose performance space in Grace's Alley, off Cable Street in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is one of very few surviving music halls in its original state. Originally, the Prince of Denmark Public House (1828, also known as the Mahogany Bar, from c.1839) owned by Matthew Eltham. The Mahogany Bar came into the ownership of John Wilton in about 1850. The Music hall was built for him in 1858 by Jacob Maggs, on the same site, as the former concert room of the public house. The bar itself was retained as the public entrance, and the hall was built in the area behind the existing block of houses. This was common practice at the time, as 'street frontage' for music halls was very expensive. The music hall passed into the ownership of George Robinson (1870), to George Fredericks in 1874, and then in 1877 to Henry Hodkinson. The hall was rebuilt after a disastrous fire in 1877, by J. Buckley Wilson of Wilson, Wilcox and Wilson of Swansea, when a raked auditorium floor and proscenium arch were introduced and re-opened as Frederick's Royal Palace of Varieties. In 1880, John Wilton
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Belasco Theatre

    Belasco Theatre

    The Belasco Theatre is a Broadway theatre opened in 1907 at 111 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan. Originally known as the Stuyvesant Theatre, it was designed by architect George Keister for impresario David Belasco. The interior featured Tiffany lighting and ceiling panels, rich woodwork and expansive murals by American artist Everett Shinn, and a ten-room duplex penthouse apartment that Belasco utilized as combination living quarters/office space. The theatre opened as the Stuyvesant Theatre on October 16, 1907 with the musical A Grand Army Man with Antoinette Perry. The theatre was outfitted with the most advanced stagecraft tools available including extensive lighting rigs, a hydraulics system, and vast wing and fly space. Meyer R. Bimberg was the actual owner of the Stuyvesant/Belasco. He made his fortune selling political campaign buttons. In 1910 Belasco attached his own name to the venue. After his death in 1931, it was leased first by actress Katharine Cornell and then playwright Elmer Rice. Marlon Brando had his first widely noticed success in this theater, in a production of Maxwell Anderson's Truckline Cafe which opened on Feb. 27th, 1946. He played the small but
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    Edinburgh Playhouse

    Edinburgh Playhouse

    The Edinburgh Playhouse is a former cinema in Edinburgh, Scotland which now hosts touring musicals and music concerts. Its capacity is 3,059, (Stalls: 1,519, Balcony: 860 and Circle: 680) making it the UK's largest working theatre in terms of audience capacity. (The Hammersmith Apollo, which is a similar building, has more seats, but it is only used for concerts, not for musicals). The theatre is owned by Ambassador Theatre Group. The theatre opened in 1929 as a super-cinema, and was modelled on the Roxy Cinema in New York. It was designed by the specialist cinema architect John Fairweather, most famous for his Green's Playhouse cinema in Glasgow. The original colour scheme was described on opening as follows: At the time of its opening, it was the second largest cinema in Scotland, and the 4th largest in the UK. The building was originally listed Category B in 1974, and this was upgraded by Historic Scotland to Category A in 2008. In recent years, The Playhouse has played host to a wide variety of artists and shows. It also caters to the youth of the surrounding area who are involved in stage experience projects and youth musicals projects in which children as young as 10, and
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    New Alexandra Theatre

    New Alexandra Theatre

    The New Alexandra Theatre, commonly known as the Alex, is a theatre on Station Street in Birmingham, England. Construction of the theatre commenced in 1900 and was completed in 1901. The architects were Owen & Ward. The theatre was opened on 27 May 1901 as the Lyceum Theatre on John Bright Street; however, it was met with few theatre goers. It was decided to bring in a star, and for ten weeks from the middle of June 1901 H. A. Saintsbury trod the boards as the theatre's leading man, playing in costume dramas. However, as a result of disappointingly low returns the new theatre was sold to Lester Collingwood for £4,000, who renamed it the Alexandra on 22 December 1902. Collingwood was killed in a road traffic accident in 1910 and was succeeded by Leon Salberg, who died in his office at the theatre in 1938. His ghost is said to inhabit the theatre. Other ghostly sightings include that by a cleaner of a woman dressed in grey in 1987. It was rebuilt with a fine Art Deco auditorium in 1935 to a design by Roland Satchwell. Upon Leon Salberg's death, Derek Salberg took over the running of the theatre. The Salberg family ran the theatre from 1911 to 1977. Following World War II, the theatre
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Piccadilly Theatre

    Piccadilly Theatre

    The Piccadilly Theatre is a West End theatre located at 16 Denman Street, behind Piccadilly Circus and adjacent to the Regent Palace Hotel, in the City of Westminster, England. Built by Bertie Crewe and Edward A. Stone for Edward Laurillard, its simple facade conceals a grandiose Art Deco interior designed by Marc-Henri Levy and Gaston Laverdet, with a 1,232-seat auditorium decorated in shades of pink. Gold and green are the dominant colours in the bars and foyer, which include the original light fittings. Upon its opening on 27 April 1928, the theatre's souvenir brochure claimed, "If all the bricks used in the building were laid in a straight line, they would stretch from London to Paris." The opening production, Jerome Kern's musical Blue Eyes, starred Evelyn Laye, one of the most acclaimed actresses of the period. The Piccadilly was briefly taken over by Warner Brothers, and operated as a cinema using the Vitaphone system, and premièred the first talking picture to be shown in Great Britain, The Singing Fool with Al Jolson. The theatre reopened in November 1929, with a production of The Student Prince, having a success in January 1931 with Folly to be Wise, running for 257
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Teatro Regio di Torino

    Teatro Regio di Torino

    The Teatro Regio ('Royal Theatre') is a prominent opera house and opera company in Turin, Italy. Its season runs from October to June with the presentation of eight or nine operas given from five to twelve performances of each. Several buildings provided venues for operatic productions in Turin from the mid-Sixteenth century, but it was not until 1713 that a proper opera house was considered, and under the architect Filippo Juvarra planning began. However, the cornerstone was not laid until the reign of Carlo Emanuele III in 1738 after Juvarra's death. The work was supervised by Benedetto Alfieri until the theatre was completed. The Nuovo Teatro Regio (New Royal Theatre) was inaugurated on 26 December 1740 with Francesco Feo's Arsace. It was a sumptuously built seating 1,500 and with 139 boxes located on five tiers plus a gallery. However, the theatre was closed on royal order in 1792 and it became a warehouse. With the French occupation of Turin during the Napoleonic War the theatre was renamed the Teatro Nazionale and finally, after Napoleon's ascent to Emperor, renamed again as the Teatro Imperiale. Napoleon's fall in 1814 saw the Reggio returned to its original name, the Regio.
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Alabama Theatre

    Alabama Theatre

    The Alabama Theatre is a public theatre located in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and part of the Barefoot Landing complex. Opened in 1993, the theatre hosts many shows that are geared towards families who spend time vacationing in the Myrtle Beach area. The theatre is most popular for having traditional country music singers. Over the years, the theatre gained media attention from the CBS Morning Show, CMT, TNN and many national/regional publications. The Alabama Theatre is one of the most popular live-entertainment theaters in Myrtle Beach. The longest-running locally-produced production in modern theatre, One: The Show is about to celebrate its 20th anniversary. Utilizing a modern take on vaudeville, the concept reminds the viewer of a cruise ship or theme park variety type show with singers, dancers, impressionists, comedians and lots of other entertainment. Not counting the Christmas version, the show is re-mounted once or twice a year, retaining about half the segments from the previous version. The remaining material is re-arranged, re-conceptualized and/or re-cast, giving newer performers a chance to upgrade from the chorus and sink their teeth into a more substantial
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Booth Theatre

    Booth Theatre

    The Booth Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 222 West 45th Street (George Abbott Way) in midtown-Manhattan, New York City. Architect Henry B. Herts designed the Booth and its companion Shubert Theatre as a back-to-back pair sharing a Venetian Renaissance-style façade. Named in honor of famed 19th-century American actor Edwin Booth, brother of John Wilkes Booth, the theater's 783-seat auditorium was intended to provide an intimate setting for dramatic and comedy plays. It opened on October 16, 1913, with Arnold Bennett's play The Great Adventure. The venue was the second New York City theatre to bear this name. The first, Booth's Theatre, was originally owned by Edwin Booth, and built by the architectural partnership Renwick & Sands between 1867-69 on the corner of 23rd Street and 6th Avenue (see picture, below). The Booth Theatre appeared in The West Wing episode Posse Comitatus. It hosted a fictitous charity performance of War of the Roses which an equally fictitious President Bartlet attended during the assassination of the Qumari Defence Minister Abdul ibn Shareef. The theatre was recently home to the critically acclaimed Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize winning musical Next
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Cockpit

    Cockpit

    Formerly the Cock of the North pub, The Cockpit opened in 1994. Situated on Swinegate in Leeds, close to Leeds station the venue hosts small to medium sized touring artists as well as occasional showcases for local acts. The venue's main room can hold 500, whilst the second room can hold 250, and the small upstairs room can hold 125. A regular competition run by promoters Futuresound (and sharing their name) gives unsigned bands from Yorkshire the chance to win a spot on the bill at the Leeds Festival. The Cockpit is also apparently where Nick Hodgson introduced Ricky Wilson to the other members of Kaiser Chiefs, who were then known as Runston Parva. The Cockpit is split into three live gig rooms with individual stages in each: The Cockpit (The Pit), Cockpit 2 (The Venue) and Cockpit 3 (The Upstairs). The venue has the ability to host 2 gigs on the same night, with a band in the main room using the second room as a bar, and a band in the upstairs using the main bar. The venue has played host to a variety of bands before they reached further fame, including Fall Out Boy, The Flaming Lips, The White Stripes, Panic! at the Disco and The Killers. Four weekly clubnights run at the
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Eden Court Theatre

    Eden Court Theatre

    Eden Court Theatre (Scottish Gaelic: Cùirt an Aodainn) is a large theatre, cinema and arts venue situated in Inverness, Scotland. The theatre has recently undergone a complete refurbishment and major extension, adding a second theatre, two dedicated cinema screens, two performance/dance studios, improved dressing room and green room facilities and additional office space. The theatre's restaurant and bar facilities have also been totally overhauled and improved. The Eden Court Theatre was formally opened on 15 April 1976 by Alexander Cruickshank MBE, an actor best known for his portrayal of Dr Cameron in BBC's long-running series "Dr Finlay's Casebook". It was built on a site next to the Ness river and incorporated the gothic Bishop's Palace residence (from which it took its name) into a new building designed by architects Law Dunbar and Naismith. The theatre was at that time a revolution to Inverness, and the wider Highland Region. It provided modern theatre performance space for the first time since the early '30s. Inverness had previously had a number of theatres including the Theatre Royal, previously situated on Bank street which burnt down in 1934 and the Empire Theatre on
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    French Laundry

    French Laundry

    The French Laundry is a French restaurant located in Yountville, California, in the Napa Valley. The chef and owner of the French Laundry is Thomas Keller. The restaurant building dates from 1900, and is in the National Register of Historic Places. The French Laundry is a perennial awardee in the annual Restaurant Magazine list of the Top 50 Restaurants of the World (having been named "Best Restaurant in the World" in 2003 and 2004), and since 2006, it has been awarded three stars in the Michelin Guide to San Francisco. It has also been favorably reviewed by The New York Times and called "the best restaurant in the world, period" by Anthony Bourdain. The building was built as a saloon in the 1900s by a Scottish stonesman for Pierre Guillaume. When a law was passed in 1906 prohibiting sale of alcohol within a mile of a veteran's home, Guillaume sold the building. In the 1920s, the building was owned by John Lande who used it as a French steam laundry, which is the origin of the restaurant's name. In 1978, the mayor of Yountville renovated the building into a restaurant. Don and Sally Schmitt owned the French Laundry for much of the 1980s, and the early 1990s. In 1994, Keller bought
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Lincoln Theatre

    Lincoln Theatre

    Lincoln Theatre is a theater in Washington, D.C. located at 1215 U Street, next to Ben's Chili Bowl. The theater, located on "Washington's Black Broadway", served the city's African American community when segregation kept them out of other venues. The Lincoln Theatre included a movie house and ballroom, and hosted jazz and big band performers such as Duke Ellington. The theater closed after the 1968 race-related riots. It was restored and reopened in 1994, and hosts a variety of performances and events. The U Street Metro station, which opened in 1991, is located across the street from Lincoln Theater. Construction of the Lincoln Theatre began in the summer of 1921, and it opened in 1922. The Lincoln Theatre, which showed silent film and vaudeville, served the city's African American community. The theatre was designed by Reginald Geare, in collaboration with Harry Crandall, a local theater operator. In 1927, the Lincoln Theatre was sold to A.E. Lichtman, who decided to turn it into a luxurious movie house, and added a ballroom. The theatre was wired for sound in 1928. The ballroom, known as Lincoln Colonnade, and the theater were known as the center of "Washington's Black
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Novello Theatre

    Novello Theatre

    The Novello Theatre is a West End theatre on Aldwych, in the City of Westminster. The theatre was built as one of a pair with the Aldwych Theatre on either side of the Waldorf Hotel, both being designed by W. G. R. Sprague. The theatre opened as the Waldorf Theatre on 22 May 1905, and was renamed the Strand Theatre, in 1909. It was again renamed as the Whitney Theatre, in 1911 before again becoming the Strand Theatre, in 1913. In 2005, the theatre was renamed by its owners (Delfont Mackintosh Theatres) the Novello Theatre in honour of Ivor Novello, who lived in a flat above the theatre from 1913 to 1951. The black comedy Arsenic and Old Lace had a run of 1337 performances here in the 1940s, and Sailor, Beware! ran for 1231 performances from 1955. Stephen Sondheim's musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum opened here on the day of Kennedy's assassination, running for nearly two years. In 1971, the comedy No Sex Please, We're British opened here, remaining for over 10 years of its 16-year run until it transferred to the Garrick Theatre in 1982. The theatre was extensively refurbished in 1930 and again in the early 1970s. It was Grade II listed by English Heritage on 20
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Orpheum Theatre

    Orpheum Theatre

    The Orpheum Theatre, located on South Main St. at the corner of Beale in Memphis, Tennessee, was built in 1928 and is one of the few remaining "movie palaces" of the 1920s. The theatre presents a variety of events from Broadway shows and concerts to films. A $4.7 million dollar renovation in the 1980s included refurbishing of ornamental plasterwork, crystal chandeliers and original furnishings plus remodeling of backstage and technical areas. It seats 2,400. The Orpheum Theatre has survived several financial bankruptcies, a devastating fire, the decay of downtown Memphis and the threat of demolition for the construction of an office complex. However, the Orpheum, called the "South's Finest Theatre" rose above all this and now is a premiere performing arts center for the Mid-South. In 1890 The Grand Opera House was built on the corner of Main and Beale Street. The Grand was billed as the classiest theatre outside of New York City. Vaudeville was the main source of entertainment at the time. The Grand became part of the Orpheum Vaudeville circuit in 1907, and was renamed the Orpheum Theatre. Vaudeville at the Orpheum was successful for almost two decades. Then in 1923, after a show
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Queen Elizabeth Theatre

    Queen Elizabeth Theatre

    The Queen Elizabeth Theatre is a performing arts venue in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Along with the Orpheum and the Vancouver Playhouse, it is one of three facilities operated by the Vancouver Civic Theatres Department (the Playhouse adjoins the QE Theatre in the same complex). Formerly the home of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, which is now based at the Orpheum, the Queen Elizabeth Theatre is the home of the Vancouver Opera and Ballet BC, in addition to hosting various other musical events year-round. The theatre has a 70' wide x 40' deep (21.34m x 12.19m) stage / performing area and seats 2,929 people at maximum capacity.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Tricycle Theatre

    Tricycle Theatre

    The Tricycle Theatre is located on Kilburn High Road in Kilburn in the London Borough of Brent, England. During the last 30 years, the Tricycle has been presenting plays reflecting the cultural diversity of its community; in particular Black, Irish, Jewish, Asian and South African works, as well as political work. The Tricycle Theatre opened on the Kilburn High Road, London, in 1980 as the permanent home of the Wakefield Tricycle Company, a touring theatre company that was known for producing British premieres, new writing, children's shows and theatre for the community in London and the South East. After securing the support of the London Borough of Brent, the GLA and Arts Council England, the company began work converting an old music and dance Forester's Hall on the Kilburn High Road into what is now known as the Tricycle Theatre, opting for this space due to the lack of local entertainment facilities for the residents of Kilburn at the time. The 235 seat auditorium, designed by architect Tim Foster and theatre consultant Iain Mackintosh, resembled a courtyard and was built using free-standing builders scaffolding that supported padded benches rather than individual seats, which
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Wang Center for the Performing Arts

    Wang Center for the Performing Arts

    The Citi Performing Arts Center (formerly Wang Center for the Performing Arts) is located in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. It consists of two theatres, Wang Theatre and Shubert Theatre, both of which are neighbors, on Tremont Street, in Boston's Theatre District. The Center adopted its new name late in 2006, after signing a 15 year agreement with Citigroup. The center maintains partnerships with the Boston Lyric Opera and the Commonwealth Shakespeare Company.
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    West Yorkshire Playhouse

    West Yorkshire Playhouse

    The West Yorkshire Playhouse is a theatre in the city of Leeds, West Yorkshire, in the north of England. It opened in 1990 as successor to Leeds Playhouse. It has two auditoria and hosts a wide range of productions and engages in outreach work in the local community. The origins of the West Yorkshire Playhouse lie in the earlier Leeds Playhouse, which was established following a campaign for a new theatre begun in 1964. Despite some opposition from the local council on the grounds that Leeds already had a theatre (the Grand Theatre), a public appeal was launched to raise funds at a mass meeting in Leeds Town Hall on 5 May 1968. The meeting was addressed by Peter O'Toole, Keith Waterhouse, and the Actor and Director of Nottingham Playhouse John Neville amongst others. £20,000 was raised by public subscription, but the project still needed support from Leeds City Council. The Council eventually promised £25,000, and £5,000 annually if necessary. This, along with grants from the Arts Council and the Gulbenkian Foundation, meant that the project could go ahead and the Leeds Playhouse opened in 1970 in premises loaned to the Leeds Theatre Trust by the University of Leeds. The first
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Biltmore Theatre

    Biltmore Theatre

    The Samuel J. Friedman Theatre (formerly the Biltmore Theatre) is a Broadway theatre located at 261 West 47th Street in midtown-Manhattan. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp for impresario Irwin Chanin, it opened on December 7, 1925 with the play Easy Come Easy Go. With a seating capacity of 903, it was one of Broadway's smaller venues. The theatre was used by Federal Theatre's Living Newspaper project in the 1930s. CBS leased it for use as a radio and television studio from 1952 until 1961. In 1968, the groundbreaking rock musical Hair opened at the theatre. In 1987, a fire struck the Biltmore. The blaze, which was later determined to be an act of arson, destroyed the interior. After the fire, the building sat vacant for fourteen years, suffering more structural damage from water and vandals. The theatre's ownership changed hands several times between 1987 and 2001, but most plans proposed for its future use - such as a showcase for "Best of Broadway" revues - were rejected since its New York City landmark designation required it to operate only as a legitimate Broadway house if renovated. In 2001, the property was purchased by the Manhattan Theatre Club as a permanent home
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre

    Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre

    The Saint Petersburg Imperial Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre (The Big Stone Theatre of Saint Petersburg, Russian: Большой Каменный театр) was a theatre in Saint Petersburg. It was built in 1783 to Antonio Rinaldi's Neoclassical design as the Kamenny (i.e., Stone) Theatre; Giovanni Paisiello’s opera Il mondo della luna was performed at the opening on 24 September/5 October. It was rebuilt in 1802 according to the designs of the architect Thomas de Thomon and renamed the Bolshoi, but burned down in 1811. The building was restored in 1818, and modified in 1826–1836 by Alberto Cavos to accommodate more modern machinery. Until 1886, the Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre was principal theatre to both the Imperial Ballet and the Imperial Russian Opera. It was there that the first Russian operas — Glinka's A Life for the Tsar and Ruslan and Lyudmila — were premiered. Although the theatre would include many of the great Russian operas in its repertory, many of the works of Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, and Rimsky-Korsakov would receive their world premieres on the stage of the Imperial Mariinsky Theatre. Many of the great 19th century ballets of Marius Petipa and Arthur Saint-Léon were given for the first time
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    George Gershwin Theatre

    George Gershwin Theatre

    The Gershwin Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 222 West 51st Street in midtown-Manhattan in the Paramount Plaza building. The theatre is named after composer George Gershwin and lyricist Ira Gershwin. It has the highest seating capacity of any Broadway theatre, with 1,933 seats. Designed in an Art Nouveau style by set designer Ralph Alswang, it is situated on the lower levels of a towering office complex built at an estimated cost of $12.5 million on the site of the historical Capitol Theatre. It opened as the Uris Theatre on November 28, 1972 (named for the building developer Uris Brothers) with the musical Via Galactica starring Raul Julia. It proved to be an inauspicious start for the venue, with the first show to lose a million dollars closing after only seven performances. From 1974-76 it served as a concert hall for limited engagements by a number of legendary pop music and jazz performers. The American Theatre Hall of Fame is located in the lobby. On June 5, 1983, during the Tony Awards ceremony, the theatre was rechristened to honor the Gershwins. The blockbuster musical Wicked achieved the box office record for the Gershwin Theatre. The production grossed $2,228,235
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Keller Auditorium

    Keller Auditorium

    Keller Auditorium, formerly known as the Portland Municipal Auditorium, the Portland Public Auditorium, and the Portland Civic Auditorium, is a performing arts center located on Clay Street in Portland, Oregon, United States. It is part of the Portland Center for the Performing Arts. Opened in 1917, the venue first changed names in 1968, being renamed again in 2000 in honor of a $1.5 million renovation donation by Richard B. Keller. Originally holding 4,500 people, the venue now has a capacity of 2,992. The Keller Auditorium is the home of many performances of the Portland Opera and the Oregon Ballet Theatre. President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivered a campaign speech on October 18, 1956 at the auditorium. Then-Senator John F. Kennedy spoke at the auditorium on September 7, 1960. In June 1970, Ada Louise Huxtable called the redesigned auditorium "a building of unrelieved blandness". Media related to Keller Auditorium at Wikimedia Commons
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Leicester Square Theatre

    Leicester Square Theatre

    The Leicester Square Theatre is a 420-seat studio theatre in Leicester Square, in the City of Westminster, London. The theatre also has a 60-seat basement space. The venue hosts stand-up comedy, cabaret, musical acts, small musical theatre productions, plays and comedies. It was formerly a popular venue for live music. The theatre is open-plan with grandstand-style seating, flexible staging and is situated beneath the Notre Dame French Catholic Church. An unrelated cinema formerly known as The Leicester Square Theatre is now known as the Odeon West End. The building originated as the Notre Dame Hall in 1953, replacing an earlier building that had been destroyed by World War II bombing. It was used as a French cultural centre for a time. It became a popular music venue in the 1960s under the name Cavern in the Town, regularly hosting beat music group The Small Faces. It was renamed Notre Dame Hall in the 1970s and presented The Rolling Stones and The Who, but specialised in punk music, hosting such acts as The Sex Pistols. In 1979, The Clash previewed material from London Calling here shortly before recording the album. The hall continued as a live music venue and dance hall,
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Liverpool Empire Theatre

    Liverpool Empire Theatre

    Liverpool Empire Theatre is located on the corner of Lime Street and London Road in Liverpool, Merseyside, England. The theatre is the second to be built on the site, and was opened in 1925. It has the largest two-tier auditorium in Britain and can seat 2,350 people. During its time it has hosted many types of entertainment, including variety shows, musicals, operas, pop concerts, and plays. The Beatles appeared in the theatre in their early days. The theatre has hosted two Royal Command Performances and, in 2007, a Royal Variety Performance to mark Liverpool's being designated a European City of Culture the following year. It is sited in the William Brown Street Conservation Area. The first theatre on the site, opening on 15 October 1866, was named the "New Prince of Wales Theatre and Opera House". It was at that time Liverpool's largest theatre. On 29 July 1867 its name was changed to the "Royal Alexandra Theatre and Opera House" in honour of Princess Alexandra, Princess of Wales. The theatre closed in 1894, but was re-opened the following year under the ownership of Empire Theatre (Liverpool) Ltd. In 1896 the theatre was sold to Messrs. Moss and Thornton for £30,000 (£2,570,000
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    London Palladium

    London Palladium

    The London Palladium is a 2,286 seat West End theatre located off Oxford Street in the City of Westminster. From the roster of stars who have played there and many televised performances, it is arguably the most famous theatre in London and the United Kingdom, especially for musical variety shows. Walter Gibbons, an early moving pictures manager, built the Palladium in 1910 to compete with Edward Moss's London Hippodrome and Oswald Stoll's London Coliseum. The facade (originally that of Argyll House, which is why the pub opposite is called The Argyll Arms) dates back to the 19th century. Formerly it was a temporary wooden building called Corinthian Bazaar, which featured an aviary and aimed to attract customers from the recently closed Pantheon Bazaar (now Marks and Spencers) on Oxford Street. The theatre was rebuilt a year later by Fredrick Hengler, the son of a tightrope walker, as a circus venue that included an aquatic display in a flooded ring. Next it became the National Skating Palace - a skating rink with real ice. However the rink failed and the Palladium was redesigned by Frank Matcham, a famous theatrical architect who also designed the Coliseum, for a site that
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    O2 Academy Bristol

    O2 Academy Bristol

    The O2 Academy Bristol is a music venue located below the ice rink on Frogmore Street, Bristol, England. It is run by the Academy Music Group. On 1 January 2009 sponsorship was taken over from Carling by telecommunications company O2 and the venue's name changed from the Carling Academy to the O2 Academy. The Academy which hosts club nights (capacity 1,900) and gigs (capacity 1,600) was opened in 2001, and was the third Academy venue in the UK. The venue was originally part of Mecca's New Entertainments Centre and was an ABC Cinema. Opening in 1966, it included a dozen licensed bars, an ice rink, bowling lanes, the Craywood Club casino, a night club, a grand cinema and the 2,000-capacity Locarno ballroom with its infamous illuminated ceiling. Only the ice-rink and the cinema survived, the rest being demolished in 1998 and subsequently the site given over to student accommodation. The cinema closed in 1996 and was converted into a nightclub in 2000, originally called Rock. Soon after it became the Bristol Academy. Ramshackle occurs every Friday night. In the main room Indie and Alternative music is played, DJ'ed by Ramshackle residents: The Postman & Andy Tokyo plus occasional guest
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Stanley Industrial Alliance Stage

    Stanley Industrial Alliance Stage

    The Stanley Industrial Alliance Stage (formerly the Stanley Theatre) is a landmark theatre at 12th and Granville Street in Vancouver, British Columbia which serves as the main stage for the Arts Club Theatre Company. The Stanley first opened as a movie theatre in December 1930, and showed movies for over sixty years before falling revenues led to its closure in 1991. After years of threatened commercial redevelopment, the Stanley was renovated as a stage theatre in 1997–1998 and subsequently awarded status as a heritage building. As a stage for the Arts Club, the Stanley has been used to put on classics, Broadway musicals and other large productions, including Swing!, My Fair Lady, Miss Saigon, Disney's Beauty and the Beast and Irving Berlin's White Christmas. The theatre, which went through major fundraising to finance its renovations and mortgage, at one stage lost its sponsor du Maurier due to tobacco regulations, but in 2005 received new sponsorship from Industrial Alliance Pacific Life Insurance Company and the theatre's name was changed to the Stanley Industrial Alliance Stage. The Stanley opened on December 15, 1930. Originally envisioned as a vaudeville venue, it was built
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Teatro Comunale di Firenze

    Teatro Comunale di Firenze

    The Teatro Comunale di Firenze (or Teatro del Maggio Musicale Fiorentino) is an opera house in Florence, Italy. It was originally built as the open-air amphitheatre, the Politeama Fiorentino Vittorio Emanuele which was inaugurated on 17 May 1862 with a production of Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor and which seated 6,000 people. It became the focus on cultural life in the city. After closure caused by fire, it reopened in April 1864 and acquired a roof in 1882. By 1911 it had both electricity and heating. In 1930 the building was taken over by the city authorities who renamed it the Teatro Comunale. Bombing during the Second World War damaged the building once again, and other problems closed it for three years in 1958. Finally, in May 1961, the then-modernized theatre re-opened with Verdi's Don Carlo. It had become a 2,000 seat elliptically shaped auditorium consisting of a large orchestra section, one tier of boxes, and two wide semicircular galleries, which betray the building's amphitheatre origins. As the theatre became more closely associated with Italy's first and most important music festival, the annual Maggio Musicale Fiorentino which had begun in 1931 as a triennial
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Hartford Stage

    Hartford Stage

    Hartford Stage, located in Hartford, Connecticut, is one of the leading resident theatres in the United States, known internationally for entertaining and enlightening audiences with a wide range of the best of world drama, from classics to provocative new plays and musicals and neglected works from the past. The theatre has earned many of the nation's most distinguished awards, including the Regional Theatre Tony Award, the Margo Jones Award for Development of New Works, OBIE awards, a New York Critics Circle award, a Dramatists Guild/CBS Award and an Elliot Norton Award. Founded in 1963 by Jacques Cartier, Hartford Stage began in a former grocery store warehouse on Kinsey Street. On April 1, 1964, Othello, directed by Cartier, opened the theatre, which quickly established itself as a major cultural resource for the region, producing seasons offering a range of works from Molière to Beckett to Genet. Paul Weidner, who assumed leadership of the theatre in 1968, oversaw its move to its present home-the 489-seat John W. Huntington Theatre, designed by renowned architect Robert Venturi. Weidner continued the theatre's dedication to both classic and contemporary works, as well as
    6.25
    4 votes
    91
    Geffen Playhouse

    Geffen Playhouse

    The Geffen Playhouse (or the Geffen) is a not for profit performing arts theater in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Originally named the Westwood Playhouse, UCLA purchased the property in 1993. UCLA's then chancellor, Charles E. Young, appointed Gil Cates (founder and former president of the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television) Producing Director. The theater was renamed in 1995 after media mogul David Geffen donated $5 million, one of the largest philanthropic donations ever made to an already constructed theater. The Geffen Playhouse was built in 1929 as the Masonic Affiliates Club, or the MAC, for students and alumni at UCLA. One of the first 12 structures built in Westwood Village, it was designed by 'architect Stiles O. Clements. In 2002, The David Geffen Foundation made a $5-million lead gift towards an eventually $17-million capital campaign to renovate the theater. The renovation was completed and the Geffen reopened on November 16, 2005; the historic character of the theater was maintained, but the interior was gutted. The renovation resulted in the main 500 seat theater being retained, as well as the new 125-seat Audrey Skirball-Kenis Theater
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    New Theatre Oxford

    New Theatre Oxford

    The New Theatre Oxford (known, for a period, as the Apollo Theatre Oxford or simply The Apollo from 1977–2003) is the main commercial theatre in Oxford, England and has a capacity of 1,800 people. It is located on George Street, in the centre of the city, and puts on a wide variety of shows, from musical theatre, to stand-up comedy and concerts. The first "New Theatre" on this site opened in 1836 and presented music hall entertainment. This was replaced in 1886, by new premises, which were the home of Oxford University Dramatic Society. The theatre was damaged by fire in 1892 and enlarged in 1908, from which date, until 1972, the New Theatre was continuously under the management of the Dorrill family. The present building dates from 1933 and was designed by Milburn Brothers with an art deco interior by T.P. Bennet and Sons. The colour scheme was originally in shades of deep brown with gilt friezes but in later years (circa 1980?) a multi-colour scheme was introduced, which did not reflect the original design. There has been a theatre on the corner of George Street for almost 170 years. The first theatre built in 1836 was known commonly as the 'Vic', and later as the 'Theatre
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Prinzregententheater

    Prinzregententheater

    The Prinzregententheater, or Prince Regent's Theatre, is a theatre and opera house located at 12 Prinzregentenplatz in the Bavarian city of Munich, Germany. Initiated by Ernst von Possart, the theatre was built in the Prinzregentenstrasse as a festival hall for the operas of Richard Wagner near an area where a similar project of King Ludwig II had failed some decades before. Named after Luitpold, Prince Regent of Bavaria the building was designed by Max Littmann and opened 21 August 1901 with a production of "Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg" by Richard Wagner. Like the Bayreuth theatre, the auditorium was designed to Wagner’s specifications, however an amphitheater has replaced the loges. After the destruction of the Nationaltheater during World War II, the Prinzregententheater housed the Bavarian State Opera from 1944 to 1963 even though it also suffered damage during the war which was not repaired until 1958. Since its renovation in 1988, the Prinzregententheater, with 1122 seats, has served also for the Bavarian Staatsschauspiel and now houses the Bavarian Theatre Academy founded by August Everding. Another theatre in the building, the Akademietheater or Academy Theatre, seats
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Royal Opera House, Valletta

    Royal Opera House, Valletta

    The Valletta Royal Opera House was an opera house and performing arts venue in Valletta, Malta. It was designed by English architect Edward Middleton Barry and was erected in 1866. In 1873 its interior was extensively damaged by fire but was eventually restored by 1877. The theatre received a direct hit from aerial bombing in 1942 during World War II in 1942. The design of the building was entrusted to Edward Middleton Barry, the architect of Covent Garden Theatre. The original plans had to be altered because the sloping streets on the sides of the theatre hadn’t been taken into consideration. This resulted in a terrace being added on the side of Strada Reale (Republic Street). The building of the 206 feet (63 m) by 112 feet (34 m) site started in 1862, after what was the Casa della Giornata was demolished. After four years, the Opera House, with a seating capacity of 1095 and 200 standing, was ready for the official opening on October 9, 1866. The theatre was not to last long; on May 25, 1873, a mere six years after its opening, it was brought to a premature end by a fire. The exterior of the theatre was undamaged but the interior stonework was calcified by the intense heat. It
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    The O2

    The O2

    The O2 (stylised as The O2) is a 14,000-seat amphitheatre located at North Wall Quay in the Dublin Docklands in Dublin, Ireland, which opened on 16 December 2008. The venue is jointly owned by Live Nation and Harry Crosbie (Amphitheatre Ireland Limited) with Live Nation in charge of programme booking and operating the venue. Amphitheatre Ireland Limited have owned and operated the venue led by Mike Adamson (Live Nation) CEO of Amphitheatre Ireland Limited since 1989. The venue has played host to many world renowned performers. Michael Flatley's Lord of the Dance first premiered at the O2 in 1996 and did a comeback in November 2010 during the European tour. In 2011, The O2 was the second busiest concert venue in the world, in terms of ticket sales, only behind its counterpart in London. In 2012 in was named as the fifth busiest arena in the world with ticket sales of 670,000 putting in behind London's O2 Arena, The Manchester Arena, Antwerp's Sportpaleis and Melbourne's Rod Laver Arena. The O2 was built on the site of the former Point Theatre, a smaller music venue which operated from 1988–2007, retaining only some of the outer facade. Following its closure, the site underwent major
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Birmingham Repertory Theatre

    Birmingham Repertory Theatre

    Birmingham Repertory Theatre (commonly called Birmingham Rep or just The Rep) is a theatre and theatre company based on Centenary Square in Birmingham, England. It is one of the most influential companies in the history of the English Stage. The Rep was founded by Barry Jackson in 1913 when the earlier amateur 'Pilgrim Players' company opened a permanent home on Station Street (now the Old Rep). The theatre was opened on February 15, 1913 by Barry Jackson and the first production in the new theatre was Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. The stated aim was to "serve an art instead of making that art serve a commercial purpose." and under Jackson the company quickly revolutionised English Theatre, promoting experimental productions and pioneering innovations such as performing Shakespeare in modern dress. The Birmingham Civic Society played a critical role in saving the Repertory Theatre from closure in 1924, and again in 1934-5. The link with the Repertory Theatre continues through ex officio membership of the Sir Barry Jackson Trust which holds the shares of Birmingham Repertory Theatre Ltd. However, in spite of the unexpected box office hit 1066 And All That in 1935 Birmingham City
    6.00
    4 votes
    97
    Haymarket Theatre

    Haymarket Theatre

    The Theatre Royal Haymarket (also known as Haymarket Theatre or the Little Theatre) is a West End theatre in the Haymarket in the City of Westminster which dates back to 1720, making it the third-oldest London playhouse still in use. Samuel Foote acquired the lease in 1747, and in 1766 he gained a royal patent to play legitimate drama (meaning spoken drama, as opposed to opera, concerts or plays with music) in the summer months. The original building was a little further north in the same street. It has been at its current location since 1821, when it was redesigned by John Nash. It is a Grade I listed building, with a seating capacity of 888. The freehold of the theatre is owned by the Crown Estate. The Haymarket has been the site of a significant innovation in theatre. In 1873, it was the venue for the first scheduled matinée performance, establishing a custom soon followed in theatres everywhere. Its managers have included Benjamin Nottingham Webster, John Baldwin Buckstone, Squire Bancroft, Cyril Maude, Herbert Beerbohm Tree, and John Sleeper Clarke, brother-in-law of John Wilkes Booth, who quit America after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Famous actors who débuted at
    6.00
    4 votes
    98
    Orange County Convention Center

    Orange County Convention Center

    The Orange County Convention Center (OCCC) is the primary public convention center for the Central Florida region. The center currently ranks as the second largest convention center in the United States (the first is McCormick Place in Chicago). The OCCC offers 7,000,000 sq ft (650,000 m) of total space, 2,100,000 sq ft (200,000 m) of which is exhibit space. The large complex is located on the South end of International Drive, a major tourist area in Orlando, Florida. Solar panels on the roof of the South Concourse provide 1 MW of power. On April 18, 2012, the American Institute of Architects's Florida Chapter placed the building on its list of Florida Architecture: 100 Years. 100 Places. The Orange County Convention Center consists of two buildings joined together by a covered pedestrian sky-bridge. The West Building, completed in four phases between 1983 and 1996, is located on the south side of International Drive. The North/South Building, located on the north side of International Drive, was completed in 2003. In its entirety, the Orange County Convention Center features: On average, the Orange County Convention Center (OCCC) hosts approximately one million delegates annually
    6.00
    4 votes
    99
    Badisches Staatstheater Karlsruhe

    Badisches Staatstheater Karlsruhe

    The Badisches Staatstheater Karlsruhe is a theatre and opera house in Karlsruhe, Germany. It has existed in its present form and place at Ettlinger Tor since 1975. Achim Thorwald became the “Intendant” (Artistic director) in the summer of 2002, retiring at the end of the 2010/11 season, and being replaced by Peter Spuhler from the 2011/12 season onwards. The Staatstheater is a Dreisparten house, comprising the three performance genres of music theatre, ballet and theatre, as well as the studio stage in Karlstraße. The Badische Staatskapelle (orchestra) and the Badische Staatsopernchor (opera chorus) are attached to the theatre. The first predecessor of the Badischen Staatstheater was built in 1808 by the then city architect Friedrich Weinbrenner, near the castle. In 1810 it became the Großherzoglichen Hoftheater (court theatre). A fire broke out during a performance on February 28, 1847, in which the building, which had been built mostly from wood and canvas, was completely destroyed. A total of 63 spectators perished, most in a panic caused by doors opening inwards and preventing a speedy escape. Building regulations worldwide have since been adapted to prevent such occurrences.
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    Bridgewater Hall, Manchester

    Bridgewater Hall, Manchester

    The Bridgewater Hall is an international concert venue in Manchester city centre, England. It cost around £42 million to build and currently hosts over 250 performances a year. The hall is home to the The Hallé orchestra, the UK's oldest extant symphony orchestra and the primary concert venue for the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra. The building sits on a bed of 280 springs, which help reduce external noise. The venue is named after the Third Duke of Bridgewater who commissioned the eponymous Bridgewater Canal that crosses Manchester, although the hall is situated on a specially constructed arm of the Rochdale Canal. Proposals to replace the concert venue in the Free Trade Hall existed since it was damaged in the Second World War but the hall, which was home to the The Hallé orchestra was repaired and renovated. Despite being a popular venue, the Free Trade Hall, built in the 1850s, had poor acoustics. Throughout the 1970s and 80s several schemes to replace it were considered but the project became more likely in 1998 after the creation of the Central Manchester Development Corporation. In the 1990s, land east of Lower Mosley Street and north of Great Bridgewater Street adjacent to the
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre

    Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre

    Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre (BCEC), located in South Bank, Queensland is Australia’s most awarded venue and has been officially ranked among the world’s top three convention centres on three separate occasions. The Centre's home city of Brisbane is the capital of the state of Queensland in the heart of Australia's premier tourist region. Located on the eastern seaboard of Australia, Brisbane is Australia's only subtropical capital city. Brisbane is Australia's fastest growing city with direct access to Australia's iconic world heritage listed natural attractions. The Centre is centrally located in the city’s unique riverside precinct at South Bank, home to Brisbane’s thriving arts and cultural community. The Centre is built upon the former site of World Expo Park, the rollercoaster theme park built for the successful hosting of Brisbane's World Expo '88. The building is 450 metres in length, 120 m wide and 24 m high. The complex roof design is based on five hyperbolic paraboloids. The building is stabilised by concrete shear walls and clad in steel. A car park is located on the ground floor. Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre on Grey Street, the five level, $140
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Garrick Theatre

    Garrick Theatre

    The Garrick Theatre is a West End theatre, located on Charing Cross Road, in the City of Westminster. It opened on 24 April 1889 with The Profligate, a play by Arthur Wing Pinero. In its early years, it appears to have specialised in the performance of melodrama, and today the theatre is a receiving house for a variety of productions. The theatre is named for David Garrick, considered the most influential Shakespearean actor. The Garrick Theatre was financed in 1889 by the playwright W. S. Gilbert, the author of over 75 plays, including the Gilbert and Sullivan comic operas. It was designed by Walter Emden, with C. J. Phipps brought in as a consultant to help with the planning on the difficult site, which included an underground river. Originally the theatre had 800 seats on 4 levels, but the gallery (top) level has since been closed and the seating capacity reduced to 656. A proposed redevelopment of Covent Garden by the GLC in 1968 saw the theatre under threat, together with the nearby Vaudeville, Adelphi, Lyceum and Duchess theatres. An active campaign by Equity, the Musicians' Union, and theatre owners under the auspices of the Save London Theatres Campaign led to the
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Monte Carlo Resort and Casino

    Monte Carlo Resort and Casino

    The Monte Carlo Resort and Casino is a megaresort hotel and casino on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada, USA. The hotel, with a height of 360 ft (110 m), has 32 floors, featuring a 102,000-square-foot (9,500 m) casino floor with 1,400 slot machines, 60 table games, and 15 poker tables. It is owned and operated by MGM Resorts International. The hotel offers 2,992 guest rooms, including 259 luxury suites. The hotel, named to invoke the Place du Casino in Monte Carlo, features chandelier domes, marble floors, neoclassical arches, ornate fountains, and gas-lit promenades. As of 2010, Monte Carlo has a AAA-Four-Diamond rating. The resort includes 22,000 sq ft (2,000 m) of retail stores, plus convention facilities, a spa, fitness center, a hair salon, a 2,000-square-foot (190 m) exercise room, a pool area, which includes a wave pool lazy river, a wedding chapel, and the Street of Dreams shopping area collection of retail stores which includes Optica, Marshall Rousso, Misura, Harley Davidson of Las Vegas and Art of Music. A 21,000 sq ft (2,000 m) pool area includes a wave pool with constantly changing wave patterns, and a "Lazy River" feature. The CityCenter Tram offers access to
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Munich National Theatre

    Munich National Theatre

    The National Theatre Munich (German: Nationaltheater München) is an opera house in Max-Joseph-Platz, in Munich, Germany. It is the home of the Bavarian State Opera, and the Bavarian State Ballet (Bayerisches Staatsballett). The Bavarian State Opera also performs in the Prinzregententheater which opened in 1901 and, like the Bayreuth Festspielhaus, is built to Richard Wagner's specifications, and in the Cuvilliés Theatre, constructed 1751-1753 and described by Thierry Beauvert as "a Rococo gem". The first theatre was commissioned in 1810 by King Maximilian I of Bavaria as the nearby Residence Theatre had too limited space. It was designed by Karl von Fischer 1811-1818, with the 1782 Odéon in Paris as its architectural basis. The new theatre was opened with Die Weihe by Ferdinand Fränzl, but then was soon destroyed by fire in 1823. (Coincidentally the Paris Odéon itself burned down in 1818.) It was then immediately reconstructed and re-opened in 1825. This second theatre, designed by Leo von Klenze, incorporated Neo-Grec features as seen in its portico and triangular pediment. The entrance is supported by Corinthian columns. The interior is also designed according to classical Greek
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    The Town Hall

    The Town Hall

    The Town Hall is a performance space, located at 123 West 43rd Street, between Sixth Avenue and Broadway, in New York City. It seats approximately 1,500 people. In the 1930s the first public-affairs media programming originated here with the "America's Town Meeting of the Air" radio programs. In recognition of this the National Park Service designated the building a National Historic Landmark in 2012. The Town Hall was built by The League for Political Education, whose fight for passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution led them to commission the building of a meeting space where people of every rank and station could be educated on the important issues of the day. The space, which became The Town Hall, was designed by the renowned architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, to reflect the democratic principles of the League. To this end, box seats were not included in the theater's design, and every effort was made to ensure that there were no seats with an obstructed view. This design principle gave birth to The Town Hall's long-standing mantra: "Not a bad seat in the house." It has not only become a meeting place for educational programs, gatherings of
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Hermitage Theatre

    Hermitage Theatre

    The Hermitage Theatre (Russian: Эрмитажный театр, Ermitazhnïy teatr) in Saint Petersburg, Russia is one of five Hermitage buildings lining the Palace Embankment of the Neva River. The palatial theatre was built between 1783 and 1787 at the behest of Catherine the Great to a Palladian design by Giacomo Quarenghi. The crumbling Third Winter Palace of Peter the Great was demolished to make room for the new structure, although its old foundations are still visible in the ground floor. Quarenghi's designs for the theatre were engraved and published in 1787, earning him a European reputation. The semicircular auditorium is decorated with color marble and surrounded with ten niches for statues of Apollo and the muses. As the interior has never been overhauled, the original stage machinery remains in situ, but the elaborate sets, an acclaimed work of the Italian artist Pietro Gonzaga (1751-1831), were lost during the years of Soviet neglect. The ceremonial opening of the theatre took place on 22 November 1785. Though the auditorium could seat no more than 250 spectators, it was seldom overcrowded. Usually, the performance would be attended by several dozen aristocratic spectators, all
    9.00
    1 votes
    107
    Nikon at Jones Beach Theater

    Nikon at Jones Beach Theater

    Nikon at Jones Beach Theater is an outdoor amphitheatre, located at Jones Beach State Park in Wantagh, New York. It is one of two major outdoor arenas in the New York metropolitan area, along with PNC Bank Arts Center. The theater was designed to specifications provided by Robert Moses, who created Jones Beach State Park. Opened in 1952 as the Jones Beach Marine Theater, the venue originally had 8,200 seats and hosted musicals. Moses had several boxes designated for his own use - Moses' friend Guy Lombardo performed often in the early years. The opening show was the operetta extravaganza "A Night in Venice" by Johann Strauss II, produced by film producer, Mike Todd, complete with floating gondolas and starring Enzo Stuarti,Thomas Hayward (tenor), Norwood Smith and Nola Fairbanks. Lombardo's final show was the 1977 production of Finian's Rainbow, with Christopher Hewett in the title role. After Lombardo's death in 1977, the series resumed in 1978 with Annie Get Your Gun, starring Lucie Arnaz. Beginning in the 1980s, the primary focus of the venue would change to concerts. In 1991 and 1992, under contract from concert promoter Ron Delsner, the theatre would undergo an extensive
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    Nottingham Playhouse

    Nottingham Playhouse

    The Nottingham Playhouse is a theatre in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England. It was first established as a repertory theatre in the 1950s when it operated from a former cinema. Directors during this period included Val May and Frank Dunlop. The current Modern movement theatre was opened in 1963. The architect was Peter Moro who had worked on the interior design of the Royal Festival Hall in London. It was initially controversial as it faces the gothic revival Roman Catholic cathedral designed by Augustus Pugin. The buildings received a Civic Trust Award in 1965. Despite the modern external appearance and the circular auditorium walls, the theatre has a conventional proscenium layout, seating an audience of 770. During the 1980s, when the concrete interiors were out of fashion, the Playhouse suffered from insensitive "refurbishment" that sought to hide its character. Since 1996, it has been a Grade II* listed building and in 2004, the theatre was sympathetically restored and refurbished with a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund. The sculpture Sky Mirror by Anish Kapoor was installed between the theatre and the adjacent green space of Wellington Circus in 2001 at a cost of £1.25m
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Sacramento Convention Center Complex

    Sacramento Convention Center Complex

    The Sacramento Convention Center Complex is a complex of entertainment venues and a convention center located in downtown Sacramento, California. The complex consists of the Sacramento Convention Center, the Community Center Theatre, the Memorial Auditorium, and the Jean Runyon Little Theater at the Memorial Auditorium. The Sacramento Convention Center, located at 1400 J Street, is a convention and meeting venue. The Convention Center features an exhibit hall with 134,000 square feet (12,400 m) of exhibit space, a ballroom, and 31 meeting rooms. The Community Center Theatre, located at 1301 L Street, is a 2,452 seat entertainment venue. The theatre hosts national touring artists, and Sacramento performing arts groups such as The Sacramento Ballet and the Sacramento Philharmonic Orchestra. The Memorial Auditorium, located at 1515 J Street, is a 3,867 seat multi-purpose venue. Completed in 1926, the Auditorium opened in February, 1927. Closed in 1986, the building fell into disrepair, and re-opened in 1996, after renovation, as part of the Convention Center Complex. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Auditorium hosts a variety of events, including concerts,
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    The Broadway Theatre

    The Broadway Theatre

    The Broadway Theatre (formerly Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre, and Ciné Roma) is a Broadway theatre located in midtown-Manhattan. It has a large seating capacity of 1,761, and unlike most Broadway theaters, it is literally located on Broadway, at number 1681. Designed by architect Eugene De Rosa for Benjamin S. Moss, it opened as B.S. Moss's Colony Theatre on Christmas Day 1924 as a venue for vaudeville shows and motion pictures. The theater has operated in many capacities and under many names. It was renamed Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, and Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre before becoming a legitimate theater house simply called Broadway Theatre on December 8, 1930. In 1937, known as Ciné Roma, it showed Italian films. For a short time during the 1950s it showed Cinerama films. On November 18, 1928 the first Mickey Mouse cartoon released to the public, Steamboat Willie, debuted at the Colony. Producer Walt Disney returned on November 13, 1940 to debut the feature film Fantasia in Fantasound, an early stereo system. The legitimate theater opened in 1930 with The New Yorkers by Cole Porter. Stars
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Wigmore Hall

    Wigmore Hall

    Wigmore Hall is a leading international recital venue that specialises in hosting performances of chamber music and is best known for classical recitals of piano, song and instrumental music. It is located at 36 Wigmore Street, London, UK and was built to provide London with a venue that was both grandly impressive yet intimate enough for recitals of chamber music. With near perfect acoustics, the hall became quickly celebrated across Europe, acquiring the greatest artists of the twentieth century. Today the Hall promotes some 400 concerts a year and broadcasts a weekly concert on BBC Radio 3 attracting an audience of several hundred thousand listeners as well as a worldwide internet audience. The Hall also promotes an extensive education programme throughout London and beyond. Originally named the Bechstein Hall, it was built between 1899 and 1901 by C. Bechstein Pianofortefabrik, the German piano manufacturer whose showroom was next door. The hall was designed by Thomas Edward Collcutt, who also designed the Savoy Hotel on The Strand. Similar concert halls were also built by Bechstein in Saint Petersburg and Paris. The building follows the Renaissance style, using alabaster and
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Birmingham Town Hall

    Birmingham Town Hall

    Birmingham Town Hall is a Grade I listed concert and meeting venue in Victoria Square, Birmingham 1, England. It was created as a home for the Birmingham Triennial Music Festival established in 1784, the purpose of which was to raise funds for the General Hospital, after St Philip's Church (later to become a Cathedral) became too small to hold the festival, and for public meetings. Between 2002 and 2008, it was refurbished into a concert hall and is now used for performances as diverse as organ recitals, rock, pop and classical concerts and events such as graduation ceremonies for Aston University. Two sites were considered by the Birmingham Street Commissioners for the construction of a concert hall in the city; Bennetts Hill and the more expensive Paradise Street site. Paradise Street was chosen and a design competition was launched which resulted with the submission of 67 designs including one by Charles Barry, whose design for the King Edward's School on New Street was then under construction. Joseph Hansom, of Hansom cab fame, and Edward Welch were chosen as the architects and they expressed that they expected the construction cost to be £8,000 (£620,000 as of 2012),. Hill of
    6.67
    3 votes
    113
    Colston Hall

    Colston Hall

    The Colston Hall is a concert hall and grade II listed building situated on Colston Street, Bristol, England. A popular venue catering for a variety of different entertainers, it seats approximately 2,075 and provides licensed bars, a café and restaurant. The venue is owned by Bristol City Council, but since April 2011 it has been run by the independent Bristol Music Trust. The site has been occupied by four buildings named Colston Hall since the 1860s. In the thirteenth century, the site was occupied by a Carmelite friary, known as Whitefriars. Subsequently, the location held a large Tudor-era mansion known as the Great House, used by Queen Elizabeth I in 1574 on a visit to the city. In 1707, Edward Colston established the Colston Boys' School in this building, which was acquired by the Colston Hall Company in 1861. Colston Hall opened as a concert venue on September 20, 1867. The architects were the prolific Bristol firm of Foster & Wood working in the Bristol Byzantine style. It has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II listed building. Most of the building was damaged during a fire on September 1, 1898; the auditorium suffered immense structural damage, and the
    6.67
    3 votes
    114
    George Street Playhouse

    George Street Playhouse

    George Street Playhouse is a theatre in New Brunswick, New Jersey, one of the state's preeminent professional theatres committed to the production of new and established plays. Under the leadership of Artistic Director David Saint, George Street Playhouse is a nationally recognized thrust theatre, presenting an acclaimed mainstage season while providing an artistic home for established and emerging theatre artists. Founded in 1974 by Eric Krebs, the Playhouse has been represented by numerous productions both on and off-Broadway – recent productions include Anne Meara's Down the Garden Paths, the Outer Critics Circle, Drama Desk and Drama League-nominated production of The Spitfire Grill - musical, and the Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning play Proof by David Auburn, which was developed at GSP during the 1999 Next Stage Series of new plays. In addition to its mainstage season, GSP's Touring Theatre features five issue-oriented productions that tours to more than 250 schools in the tri-state area, and are seen by more than 80,000 students annually. When founded, the theatre was located on George Street and moved later to its current location on Livingstone Avenue.
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    Majestic Theatre

    Majestic Theatre

    The Majestic Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 245 West 44th Street in midtown Manhattan. It is one of the largest Broadway theatres with 1,607 seats, traditionally has been used as a venue for major musical theatre productions. Among the notable shows that have premiered at the Majestic are Carousel (1945), South Pacific (1949), The Music Man (1957), Camelot (1960), A Little Night Music (1973), and The Wiz (1975). It was also the second home of 42nd Street and the third home of 1776. The theatre has housed The Phantom of the Opera since it opened on January 26, 1988. With a record-breaking 10,210 performances to date, it is currently the longest-running production in Broadway history. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, the present-day Majestic was constructed by the Chanin Brothers as part of an entertainment complex including the John Golden Theatre, the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, and the Milford Plaza hotel. It opened on March 28, 1927 with the musical Rufus LeMaire's Affairs. The Majestic was purchased by the Shubert brothers during the Great Depression and currently is owned and operated by the Shubert Organization. Both the interior and exterior were designated
    6.67
    3 votes
    116
    Shrine Auditorium

    Shrine Auditorium

    The Shrine Auditorium is a landmark large-event venue, in Los Angeles, California. It is also the headquarters of the Al Malaikah Temple, a division of the Shriners. Opened in 1926, the current Shrine Auditorium replaced an earlier 1906 Al Malaikah Temple which had been destroyed by a fire on January 11, 1920. The fire gutted the original building in just 30 minutes, and nearly killed six firefighters in the process. The new auditorium was designed in the Moorish Revival style by San Francisco-based theater architect G. Albert Lansburgh, with local architects John C. Austin and A. M. Edelman associated. When built, the auditorium could hold 1,200 people on stage and seat an audience of 6,442. An engineer who consulted on the project said that the steel truss supporting the balcony was the largest ever constructed. In 2002, the Auditorium underwent a $15 million renovation that upgraded the auditorium's stage with state-of-the-art lighting and rigging systems, and included new roofing and air conditioning for both the Auditorium and Expo Center, modernized concession stands, additional restrooms, repainting of the Expo Center, and a new performance plaza and parking garage. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Walt Disney Concert Hall

    Walt Disney Concert Hall

    The Walt Disney Concert Hall at 111 South Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles, California, is the fourth hall of the Los Angeles Music Center. Bounded by Hope Street, Grand Avenue, and 1st and 2nd Streets, it seats 2,265 people and serves (among other purposes) as the home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic orchestra and the Los Angeles Master Chorale. Lillian Disney made an initial gift in 1987 to build a performance venue as a gift to the people of Los Angeles and a tribute to Walt Disney's devotion to the arts and to the city. The Frank Gehry-designed building opened on October 24, 2003. Both the architecture by Frank Gehry and the acoustics of the concert hall (designed by Yasuhisa Toyota) were praised in contrast to its predecessor, the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The project was launched in 1992, when Lillian Disney, widow of Walt Disney, donated $50 million. Frank Gehry delivered completed designs in 1991. Construction of the underground parking garage began in 1992 and was completed in 1996. The garage cost had been $110 million, and was paid for by Los Angeles County, which sold bonds to provide the garage under the site of the planned hall. Construction of the concert hall
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Imperial Theatre

    Imperial Theatre

    The Imperial Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 249 West 45th Street (George Abbott Way) in midtown-Manhattan. The theatre seats up to 1417 people. The Shubert Organization's fiftieth venue in New York City, it was constructed to replace their outdated Lyric Theatre. Designed by Herbert J. Krapp specifically to accommodate musical theatre productions, it opened on December 25, 1923 with the Oscar Hammerstein II-Vincent Youmans production Mary Jane McKane. Since then, it has hosted numerous important musicals, including Annie Get Your Gun (1946), Fiddler on the Roof (1964), Dreamgirls (1981), The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1985) and Les Misérables (1990), which played at the theatre until 2003. Billy Elliot the Musical played at the theatre from November 2008 until January 2012. Among the famed 20th century composers and lyricists whose works were housed here are Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart, Irving Berlin, Harold Rome, Frank Loesser, Lionel Bart, Bob Merrill, Stephen Sondheim, Jule Styne, E.Y. Harburg, Harold Arlen, and George and Ira Gershwin. Performers who have graced the stage include Ethel Merman, Gertrude Lawrence, John Gielgud, Clifton Webb, Montgomery Clift,
    5.75
    4 votes
    119
    Joyce Theater

    Joyce Theater

    The Joyce Theater is a 472-seat dance performance venue located in the Chelsea area of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. The Joyce Theater Foundation, the organization founded in 1982 that operates the theater, also owns the Joyce SoHo dance center located in a former firehouse on Mercer Street between Houston and Prince Streets. The Foundation won a 1986 Drama Desk Special Award for its American Theatre Exchange program. The Joyce is located in the former Elgin Theater, a 1941 revival movie house that was closed by the community after it became a porno theatre. The Elgin was completely renovated to create in the Joyce a venue suitable for dance, a process that took two years. The theater was conceived of and created by Eliot Feld and Cora Cahan as a home for the Feld Ballet, and continues to be owned by Ballet Tech Foundation Inc. The theatre attracts an audience of over 140,000 people annually. The Joyce was made possible financially in large measure due to the philanthropic efforts of LuEsther T. Mertz whose family founded Publishers Clearing House, the well known magazine and merchandise sweepstakes company. In appreciation of her generosity, the theater was named
    5.75
    4 votes
    120
    Residenz Theatre

    Residenz Theatre

    The Residence Theatre (in German: Residenztheater) or New Residence Theatre (Neues Residenztheater) of the Residence in Munich was built from 1950 to 1951 by Karl Hocheder. The renovation of 1981 by Alexander von Branca removed the decoration which had been done in the typical style of the early 1950s. Elector of Bavaria Maximilian III Joseph ordered to construct a new theatre outside the palace after a fire in the St.George's Hall of the Residence which had served as before as a theatre room. This theatre was also destroyed during World War II and replaced by the New Residence Theatre. Since the decoration of the Old Residence Theatre had been rescued it was moved into a wing of the Residence and re-opened as Cuvilliés Theatre (Old Residence Theatre). The New Residence Theatre houses the Bavarian State Theatre (Bavarian Staatsschauspiel), one of the most important German language theatres in the world.
    5.75
    4 votes
    121
    Teatro dell'Opera di Roma

    Teatro dell'Opera di Roma

    The Teatro dell'Opera di Roma (Rome Opera House) is an opera house in Rome, Italy. Originally opened in November 1880 as the 2,212 seat Costanzi Theatre, it has undergone several changes of name as well modifications and improvements. The present house seats 1,600. The Teatro dell'Opera was originally known as the Teatro Costanzi after the contractor who built it, Domenico Costanzi (1810-1898). It was privately financed by Costanzi who commissioned the Milanese architect Achille Sfondrini (1836-1900), a specialist in the building and renovation of theatres. The opera house was built in eighteen months, on the site where the house of Heliogabalus stood in ancient times, and was inaugurated on 27 November 1880 with a performance of Semiramide by Gioachino Rossini. Designing the theatre, Sfondrini paid particular attention to the acoustics, conceiving the interior structure as a "resonance chamber", as is evident from the horseshoe shape in particular. Originally, the theatre, with a seating capacity of 2212, had three tiers of boxes, an amphitheatre, and two separate galleries, surmounted by a dome with splendid frescoes by Annibale Brugnoli. Costanzi was obliged to manage it himself
    5.75
    4 votes
    122
    Bradford Alhambra

    Bradford Alhambra

    The Bradford Alhambra is a theatre in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It was built in 1913 at a cost of £20,000 for theatre impresario Francis Laidler, and opened on Wednesday 18 March 1914. In 1964 Bradford City Council bought the Alhambra for £78,900. In 1974 it was designated a Grade II listed building. It was extensively refurbished in 1986. It seats 1456. Today it is a receiving house for large-scale touring theatre of all types. Francis Laidler, who already owned two music halls in Bradford, opened the new Alhambra Theatre in 1914. The architects were Chadwick and Watson, who described it as "English renaissance of the Georgian period". Today, the Alhambra is a major touring venue and hosts a wide range of stage shows from ballet and opera to variety and comedy, musicals, drama and, of course, the annual pantomime. Regular visits are made from prestigious companies such as Opera North, the Royal Shakespeare Company, Birmingham Royal Ballet, Northern Ballet Theatre and the Royal National Theatre to complement spectacular West End musicals such as Grease, Whistle Down the Wind and The Phantom of the Opera.
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Cruzan Amphitheatre

    Cruzan Amphitheatre

    Cruzan Amphitheatre is a 19,000-seat open-air music venue in West Palm Beach, Florida. The facility, owned by the South Florida Fairgrounds, is a modern amphitheatre used primarily for concerts and other performances. The loading dock and backstage area is sometimes used for concerts that are general admission standing room only (mostly heavy metal concerts), while the amphitheater stage is used as the backstage area in these situations. Since opening, the venue has gone through numerous name changes. It was initially named Coral Sky Amphitheater because the seats face into the west, often in view of a colorful sunset. It was Sony Blockbuster Coral Sky originally. After many years becoming familiar with that name, people still use that name despite the various sponsorships and name changes since then. The first sponsor was Mars Music (making the venue Mars Music Amphitheater), but when Mars filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2002, the Mars Music name was removed. After a short return to the Coral Sky name, it changed again when Sound Advice became the new sponsor, and was renamed Sound Advice Amphitheatre. In early 2008, the venue was renamed again following a new sponsorship
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Cutler Majestic Theatre

    Cutler Majestic Theatre

    The Cutler Majestic Theatre at Emerson College, in Boston, Massachusetts, is a 1903 "Beaux Arts" style theater, designed by the architect John Galen Howard. Originally built for theatre, one of three theaters commissioned in Boston by Eben Dyer Jordan, son of the founder of Jordan Marsh, a Boston-based chain of department stores. The Majestic was converted to accommodate vaudeville shows in the 1920s and eventually into a movie house in the 1950s. The change to film came with renovations that transformed the lobby and covered up much of John Galen Howard's original Beaux-Arts architecture. The theater continued to show movies until 1983 as the Saxon Theatre. By then, the theater began to deteriorate both in appearance and in programming. In the mid-1980s Emerson College purchased the theater and restored it to its original Beaux-Arts appearance. The theater today is a performing arts center for both Emerson College and the community at large. It is the home base of Opera Boston as well as frequently staging shows by New England Conservatory, Teatro Lirico D'Europa, Celebrity Series of Boston, Emerson College's Emerson Stage company and the Boston Gay Men's Chorus. In 2003 the
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Ed Mirvish Theatre

    Ed Mirvish Theatre

    Ed Mirvish Theatre is a historic film and play theatre in Downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It was initially known as the Pantages Theatre, then became the Imperial Theatre and later the Canon Theatre, before it was renamed in honour of Ed Mirvish, a popular businessman and theatre impresario. The theatre was first opened in 1920 and is located near Yonge-Dundas Square. Ed Mirvish Theatre began as the Pantages Theatre in 1920 as a combination vaudeville and motion picture house. Designed by the great theatre architect Thomas W. Lamb, it was the largest cinema in Canada (originally having 3373 seats) and one of the most elegant. The Pantages was built by the Canadian motion picture distributor Nathan L. Nathanson, founder of Famous Players Canadian Corporation, the Canadian motion picture distributing arm of Adolph Zukor's Paramount Pictures. While Famous Players retained ownership, management and booking were turned over to the Pantages organisation, one of the largest vaudeville and motion picture theatre circuits in North America. The Pantages circuit had its beginnings in Canada, in the Yukon. Pericles Alexander Pantages had been a sailor on a Greek merchant ship who left the
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Fox Theatre

    Fox Theatre

    The Fox Theatre (often marketed as the Fabulous Fox), a former movie palace, is a performing arts venue located at 660 Peachtree Street NE in Midtown Atlanta, Georgia, and is the centerpiece of the Fox Theatre Historic District. The theater was originally planned as part of a large Shrine Temple as evidenced by its Moorish design. The 4,678 seat auditorium was ultimately developed as a lavish movie theater in the Fox Theatres chain and opened in 1929. It currently hosts a variety of cultural and artistic events including the Atlanta Ballet, a summer film series, and performances by national touring companies of Broadway shows. The venue also hosts occasional concerts by popular artists. When the Fox Theatre first opened, the local newspaper described it as having, “a picturesque and almost disturbing grandeur beyond imagination”. It remains a showplace that impresses theatre-goers to this day. The principal architect of the project was Olivier Vinour of the firm Marye, Alger and Vinour. The original architecture and décor of the Fox can be roughly divided into two architectural styles: Islamic architecture (building exterior, auditorium, Grand Salon, mezzanine Gentlemen’s Lounge
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Glyndebourne

    Glyndebourne

    Glyndebourne ( /ˈɡlaɪndbɔːn/) is a country house, thought to be about six hundred years old, located near Lewes in East Sussex, England. It is also the site of an opera house which, with the exception of its closing during the Second World War, for a few immediate post-war years, and in 1993 during the construction of the new theatre, has been the venue of the annual Glyndebourne Festival Opera since 1934. "There had been a manor house at Glynde Bourne (as it was often spelt) since the fifteenth century", but the exact age of the house is unknown. Some surviving timber framing and pre-Elizabethan panelling makes an early sixteenth-century date the most likely. In 1618, it came into the possession of the Hay family, passing to James Hay Langham in 1824. He inherited his father's baronetcy and estate in Northamptonshire in 1833 which under the terms of his inheritance should have led to him relinquishing Glyndebourne, but as a lunatic he was unable to do so. After litigation the estate passed to a relative, Mr Langham Christie, but he later had to pay £50,000 to persuade another relative to withdraw a rival claim. Langham Christie's son, William Langham Christie, made substantial
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Jiffy Lube Live

    Jiffy Lube Live

    Jiffy Lube Live (formerly Nissan Pavilion at Stone Ridge or Nissan Pavilion) in Bristow, Virginia, is an outdoor live performance amphitheater in suburban Prince William County, about 35 miles west of Washington, DC. Owned and operated by Live Nation, the amphitheater can seat 25,000: 10,000 in reserved seats and 15,000 on the lawn. Development of the venue was a result of work by Cellar Door Productions, a prominent concert promoter in the area at the time. Two separate controversies led to the opening of the venue. The community had voiced complaints regarding the Grateful Dead shows at nearby RFK Stadium, a circumstance similar to the creation of Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California 9 years prior. Meanwhile, the Walt Disney corporation was in the planning stages of it's proposed Disney's America theme park in the area. Locals were angered at the proposed theme park. As a result, authorities granted permits for the pavilion instead. The location was decided due to proximity to the interstate as well as the capacity of the proposed facility to handle large crowds over multiple days. The amphitheater opened in June 1995, with a show including KC and the Sunshine Band
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Lyric Theatre

    Lyric Theatre

    The Lyric Theatre is a West End theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster. Designed by architect C. J. Phipps, it was built by producer Henry Leslie with profits from the Alfred Cellier and B. C. Stephenson hit, Dorothy, which he transferred from the Prince of Wales Theatre to open his new venue on 17 December 1888. It was the second theatre to be constructed on this stretch of Shaftesbury Avenue and is now the oldest on the street. The foyer and bars were refurbished in 1932-33, and the facade was restored in 1994. At present it seats 967 on four levels, although it originally was designed with a seating capacity of 1,306. The theatre still uses an electric pump to operate its iron curtain. Early in the theatre's history, it staged mostly comic operas, and later it has been a home to light comedies, musicals and straight dramas. The theatre retains many of its original features (including being built behind an original 1767 house front, at the rear to Great Windmill Street, the former house and museum of Sir William Hunter) and the theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in September 1960.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Neil Simon Theatre

    Neil Simon Theatre

    The Neil Simon Theatre, formerly the Alvin Theatre, is a Broadway venue built in 1927 and located at 250 West 52nd Street in midtown-Manhattan. As of 2011, the record for its longest running show is held by the musical Hairspray, which opened August 15, 2002 and ran for 2,642 performances before closing on January 4, 2009. A revival production of Ragtime began on October 23, 2009, but due to poor ticket sales, Ragtime closed on January 10, 2010 after 28 previews and 65 regular performances. On October 19, 2010, RAIN – A Tribute to The Beatles opened at the Neil Simon Theatre and ran through January 15, 2011 when it moved to the Brooks Atkinson Theater. The new musical Catch Me If You Can began performances at the theatre in spring 2011. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, the developer, real estate mogul Alexander Pincus originally named it the "Alvin Theatre" as an amalgam of the names of producers ALex Aarons and VINton Freedley. With its address originally listed as 244-54 West 42nd Street, it opened on November 22, 1927 with George and Ira Gershwin's Funny Face starring Fred and Adele Astaire. In 1930, the legendary Ethel Merman made her Broadway debut in Girl Crazy; in
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    The Scoop

    The Scoop

    The Scoop is an outdoor amphitheatre situated on the south side of the River Thames near Tower Bridge in London, located underneath City Hall, providing seating for approximately 800 people. Designed by Townshend Landscape Architects, it is a venue used during the summer to show films, musical performances and theatre productions by such companies as The Steam Industry and The Pantaloons. In June 2008, films shown at The Scoop included The Dam Busters, Atonement and Withnail and I. As of 2010, The Scoop has been used as a performance venue for eight years.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Apollo Theatre

    Apollo Theatre

    The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster. Designed by architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfield, and the fourth legitimate theatre to be constructed on the street, its doors opened on 21 February 1901 with the American musical comedy The Belle of Bohemia. The production was followed by John Martin-Harvey's season, including A Cigarette Maker's Romance and The Only Way, an adaptation of Charles Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities. The first London theatre built in the Edwardian period, the Apollo was renovated by Schaufelberg in 1932, and a private foyer and anteroom was installed to the Royal Box. The sculpted work on the stone fascia is by T. Simpson, the building is of plain brick to the neighbouring streets. The theatre has a first floor central loggia. Inside there is a three galleried auditorium with elaborate plasterwork. The theatre seats 796, and the balcony on the 3rd tier is considered the steepest in London. The Stoll Moss Group purchased the Apollo Theatre in 1975 and sold it to Andrew Lloyd-Webber's Really Useful Group and Bridgepoint Capital in 2000. Nica Burns and Max Weitzenhoffer purchased the
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Apollo Victoria Theatre

    Apollo Victoria Theatre

    The Apollo Victoria Theatre is a West End theatre, located on Wilton Road near Victoria station in the City of Westminster. Opened as a cinema and variety theatre, the Apollo Victoria became a venue for musical theatre, beginning with The Sound of Music in 1981, and including the long-running Starlight Express, from 1984 to 2002. The theatre is now the home of the musical Wicked, which celebrated five years at the venue in September 2011. The theatre was built by architects Ernest Wamsley Lewis and William Edward Trent in 1929 for Provincial Cinematograph Theatres, a part of the Gaumont British chain. The theatre was built with two identical façades on Wilton and Vauxhall Bridge Roads. Construction is principally of concrete, with strong horizontal banding along the exterior sides of the auditorium. By contrast the entrances feature a cantilevered canopy, and are framed by vertical channelling, with two black marble columns rising to the roof line. The entrance is simple, making use of chrome trimmings, this leads to a nautical themed interior in the original Art Deco style that makes extensive use of concealed lighting, decorated with scallop shells and columns that burst into
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Aronoff Center

    Aronoff Center

    The Aronoff Center is a large performing arts center in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. Events that can typically be found at the Aronoff Center include: plays, ballet, popular music concerts, stand-up comedy shows, and musicals. The center was designed by renowned architect César Pelli. Additional Areas
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    August Wilson Theatre

    August Wilson Theatre

    The August Wilson Theatre, located at 245 West 52nd Street in New York City, is a Broadway theatre. Designed by architects C. Howard Crane and Kenneth Franzheim and constructed by the Theatre Guild, it opened as the Guild Theatre in 1925 with a revival of George Bernard Shaw's Caesar and Cleopatra. In 1943, the building was leased to WOR-Mutual Radio as a studio. The American National Theater and Academy purchased it in 1950 and renamed it the ANTA Theatre. In 1981, the theatre was purchased by Jujamcyn Theaters and named the Virginia Theatre for owner and Jujamcyn Board member Virginia McKnight Binger. After her husband James H. Binger's death in 2004, producer and president of Jujamcyn Rocco Landesman announced that he planned to buy Jujamcyn. He told the New York Times he had a long-standing understanding with Binger that he would buy the corporation's five playhouses. The theatres had an estimated net asset value of $30 million. On October 16, 2005, fourteen days after American playwright August Wilson's death, the theatre was renamed in his honor.
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Boston Opera House

    Boston Opera House

    The Boston Opera House is a performing arts venue located at 538 Washington St. in Boston, Massachusetts. Originally built as a movie palace, it opened on October 29, 1928 and was rededicated in 1980 as a home for the Opera Company of Boston. Completely restored in 2004, the theater currently serves as the home of the Boston Ballet and also presents touring Broadway shows. The Boston Opera House was originally built as the B.F. Keith Memorial Theatre, a lavish movie theater in the Keith-Albee chain, The Keith's Memorial was designed by the prominent theater architect Thomas W. Lamb in one of his most elaborate designs. The theater was dedicated to the vaudeville pioneer B.F. Keith and opened October 29, 1928 presenting first run films along with live vaudeville. By 1929 the theater, now operated by RKO Theatres and called RKO-Keith's, had converted to showing only films and remained a leading Boston movie showcase through the 1950s. In the 1970s, the Sack Theaters company owned the theater, operating it under the name Savoy Theater. Sack operated two screens in the house: one in the original auditorium, and a second smaller cinema in the stage space, separated by a masonry wall
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    National Theatre

    National Theatre

    The National Theatre is located in Washington, D.C., and is a venue for a variety of live stage productions with seating for 1,676. Despite its name, it is not a governmentally funded national theatre, but operated by a private, non-profit organization. This historic playhouse was founded on December 7, 1835, by William Corcoran and other prominent citizens who wanted the national capital to have a first-rate theater. The theater's initial production was Man of the World. The theater has been in almost continuous operation since, at the same Pennsylvania Avenue location a few blocks from the White House. Its name was changed at times to "Grover's National Theatre," and "Grover's Theatre," as management changed. Famed actor Joseph Jefferson managed the theater at one time. The structure has been rebuilt several times, including partial reconstructions after five fires in the 19th century. The current building, at 1321 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, was constructed in 1923, opening in September of that year. Located three blocks from the White House, the theater has entertained every U.S. President of the United States since Andrew Jackson. Like many theaters in the U.S. prior to the civil
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Sheffield City Hall

    Sheffield City Hall

    Sheffield City Hall is a Grade II* listed building in Sheffield, England, containing several venues, ranging from the Oval Concert Hall which seats over 2,000 people to a ballroom featuring a sprung dance floor. It is currently operated by Sheffield International Venues. The large hall dominates Barker's Pool, one of Sheffield's central squares, which also contains the city's War Memorial. The building was designed in 1920 by E. Vincent Harris but construction was delayed 8 years because of the economic climate in the early 1920s. Eventually construction started with the laying of the foundation stone in 1929 and the City Hall was officially opened on 22 September 1932. During World War II a bomb exploded in Barkers Pool, damaging the pillars of the building. The scars of the explosion can still be seen to this day. It is a neo-classical building with a giant portico. The Oval Hall is the largest hall in the building, seating 2,271 people and is commanded by an angel's chorus. This provides both natural light to the main hall and can also be used by a hidden choir whose voices are carried through the building and down onto the audience. The Grand Willis III Organ is the largest in
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Teatro Carlo Felice

    Teatro Carlo Felice

    The Teatro Carlo Felice is the principal opera house of Genoa, Italy, used for performances of opera, ballet, orchestral music, and recitals. It is located on the Piazza De Ferrari. The hall is named for Duke Carlo Felice, and dates from December 24, 1824, when the Most Excellent Department of Theatres was established. On January 31, 1825, local architect Carlo Barabino submitted his design for the opera house which was to be built on the site of the church of San Domenico. The Dominican monks were moved elsewhere without delay or ceremony, and the first stone of the new building was laid on 19 March 1826. The inaugural performance of Bellini's Bianca e Fernando took place on April 7, 1828, even though the structure and decoration were not quite finished. The auditorium accommodated an audience of about 2,500 in five tiers (each with 33 boxes), a gallery above, and standing room in the orchestra pit. The acoustics were considered among the best of the time. For nearly forty years from 1853, Verdi spent the winter in Genoa, but he had few strong professional ties with the Teatro Carlo Felice. In 1892, Genoa commemorated the 400th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America and to
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    Vector Arena

    Vector Arena

    Vector Arena is a 12,000-seat arena for sports and entertainment events in Auckland, New Zealand. Named for a sponsor, Vector Limited, the arena is located at Quay Park, Parnell, very close to the former Auckland Railway Station. Vector Arena cost around $80 million, and of this sum ratepayers contributed $68 million for the facility to be managed by QPAM, the NZ operator, in New Zealand first big public-private partnership. This runs for 40 years before ownership is transferred to the city. After delays due to construction-related issues, the arena's first concert was Rock Star Supernova on 24 March 2007. The venue has since hosted numerous local and international events, with a full list available from the official website. Scheduled to open early 2006, this was first delayed towards the end of 2006, when a second opening date was again missed. The delays were apparently due to the Arena's builder, Mainzeal, having various problems with the structure, especially with the roof, where the 120 m main truss had to be strengthened, and where added insulation to waterproof the building against the humid local climate had to be included. In a related issue, extra ventilation also had to
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Aviva Stadium

    Aviva Stadium

    The Aviva Stadium (Irish: Staid Aviva) (also known as Lansdowne Road) is a sports stadium located in Dublin, Ireland, with a capacity for 51,700 spectators (all seated). It is built on the site of the former Lansdowne Road stadium, which was demolished in 2007, and replacing it as home to its chief tenants: the Irish rugby union team and the Republic of Ireland national football team. The decision to redevelop the stadium came after plans for both Stadium Ireland and Eircom Park fell through. The Aviva Group signed a 10-year deal for the naming rights in 2009. The stadium, located adjacent to Lansdowne Road railway station, officially opened on 14 May 2010. The stadium is Ireland's first, and only, UEFA Elite Stadium and in 2011, it hosted the Europa League Final. It also hosted the inaugural Nations Cup, as well as the regular home fixtures of the national rugby team and national football team from August 2010 onwards. Unlike its predecessor, which was solely owned by the Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU), the current stadium is controlled by the IRFU and the Football Association of Ireland (FAI) through a 50:50 joint venture known as the Lansdowne Road Stadium Development Company
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Chichester Festival Theatre

    Chichester Festival Theatre

    Chichester Festival Theatre, located in Chichester, Sussex, England, was designed by Philip Powell and Hidalgo Moya, and opened by its founder Leslie Evershed-Martin in 1962. Subsequently the smaller and more intimate Minerva Theatre was built nearby in 1989. The inaugural Artistic Director was Sir Laurence Olivier, and it was at Chichester that the first National Theatre company was formed. Chichester's productions would transfer to the NT's base at the Old Vic in London. The opening productions in 1962 were: The Chances by John Fletcher (first production 1638) which opened on 3 July; The Broken Heart (1633), by John Ford, opened 9 July; Uncle Vanya (1896), by Anton Chekov, opened 16 July. Among the actors in the opening season were: Lewis Casson, Fay Compton, Joan Greenwood, Rosemary Harris, Kathleen Harrison, Keith Michell, André Morell, John Neville, Laurence Olivier, Joan Plowright, Michael Redgrave, Athene Seyler, Sybil Thorndike and Peter Woodthorpe. The Festival Season runs from April to September and includes productions from classics to contemporary writing and musicals. During this time the theatre also puts on outdoor promenade performances and organises other festival
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    1 votes
    143
    Fairfield Halls

    Fairfield Halls

    Fairfield Hall is an arts centre in Croydon, London, England and opened in 1962. It contains a concert hall, the Ashcroft Theatre (named after local Peggy Ashcroft), the Arnhem Gallery civic hall (Croydon is twinned with Arnhem) and an art gallery. The large concert hall is frequently used for BBC recordings. The Halls are the home of the London Mozart Players. Many famous faces have appeared at the Fairfield Halls, including Traffic (who recorded a live album in the halls), Family (who recorded the first side of their album, Anyway in the halls) and The Nice (who recorded their album, Five Bridges in the halls). It is frequently used by local schools as the venue for their annual choral concerts. The halls are built on the site of Croydon's historic fair field, and above disused railway cuttings which used to link the main London to Brighton railway to Croydon Central Station in what is now Queen's Gardens. Fairfield Halls has also been used for British professional wrestling for many years, with various cards having been featured on ITV's World of Sport in the 70s and 80s. In 2009, Fairfield Halls was used in the "SpecSavers" TV advertisements. It was renamed "Fairview Shopping
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Fox Theater Pomona

    Fox Theater Pomona

    The Fox Theater Pomona is a fully restored Art Deco movie palace from Hollywood’s golden age in Pomona, Los Angeles County, California. Today the Fox Theater Pomona is a state-of-the-art venue for concerts, cinema, performances, and parties. It is the flagship attraction of the Pomona Arts Colony, a vibrant neighborhood of galleries, nightclubs, lofts, and restaurants. Operated as a first-run theater for many years, it went into decline along with other large, single screen theaters in the early 1970s as a result of the increasing popularity of multiplex theaters. It survived for a few years showing Spanish language movies, then closed in 1977. It was reopened in 1998 and used as a venue for live music events and raves, but the city withdrew the operation's permit after several violent incidents took place. The theater's interior was damaged during this period. Partly as a result of citizen activism, the city bought the building. In 2002 the non-profit Pomona Fox Corporation was founded to explore means of preserving and reusing the theater, but they were not able to secure enough funding for their restoration efforts. The building was then sold to its current owners, the Tessier
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Globe Theatre, London

    Globe Theatre, London

    This article is about the Globe Theatre of Shakespeare. For the modern reconstruction in London, see Shakespeare's Globe. For other uses, see Globe Theatre (disambiguation). The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed in 1642. A modern reconstruction of the Globe, named "Shakespeare's Globe", opened in 1997 approximately 750 feet (230 m) from the site of the original theatre. Examination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However, the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations, including one original pier base, was discovered in 1989 beneath the car park at the rear of Anchor Terrace on Park Street. The shape of the foundations is now replicated on the surface. As the majority of the
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    1 votes
    146
    Hampstead Theatre

    Hampstead Theatre

    Hampstead Theatre is a theatre in the vicinity of Swiss Cottage and Belsize Park, in the London Borough of Camden. It specialises in commissioning and producing new writing, supporting and developing the work of new writers. In 2009 it celebrated its 50 year anniversary. The original theatre (The Hampstead Theatre Club) was created in Moreland Hall in 1959. James Roose-Evans was the first Artistic Director, and the 1959–1960 season included The Dumb Waiter and The Room by Harold Pinter, Eugene Ionesco's Jacques and The Sport of My Mad Mother by Ann Jellicoe. In 1962 the company moved to a portable cabin in Swiss Cottage where it remained for nearly 40 years, before, in 2003, the new purpose-built Hampstead Theatre opened in Swiss Cottage. The main auditorium now seats between 150 and 325 people. The studio theatre, the Michael Frayn Space, seats up to 80 people and hosts Heat&Light, Hampstead Theatre's Young Company for ages 10-25. Heat&Light produces 12 productions each year, including, previously, new plays by Bola Agbaje, Mike Bartlett, Joel Horwood, Jane Bodie, Ed Hime, Nick Grosso and John Donnelly. As part of its commitment to developing new writers and new writing, the
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    1 votes
    147
    Minack Theatre

    Minack Theatre

    The Minack Theatre (Cornish: Gwaryjy Minack) is an open–air theatre, constructed above a gully with a rocky granite outcrop jutting into the sea (minack from Cornish meynek means a stony or rocky place). The theatre is located at Porthcurno, 4 miles (6.4 km) from Land's End in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The season runs, each year, from May to September and by 2012 some 80,000 people a year see a show, and more than 100,000 pay an entrance fee to look around the site. The theatre was the brainchild of Rowena Cade (2 August 1893 – 1983), who moved to Cornwall after the First World War and built a house for herself and her mother on land at Minack Point for £100. In 1929, a local village group of players had staged Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream in a nearby meadow at Crean, repeating the production the next year. They decided that their next production would be The Tempest and Miss Cade offered the garden of her house as a suitable location, as it was beside the sea. Miss Cade and her gardener made a terrace and rough seating, hauling materials down from the house or up via the winding path from the beach below. In 1932, The Tempest was performed with the sea as a
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    1 votes
    148
    Cliffs Pavilion

    Cliffs Pavilion

    Cliffs Pavilion is a live theatre in Station Road, Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, England, which seats 1,630 and offers an assortment of variety acts. Work began on the original Cliffs Pavilion during the 1930s. It was intended to be a 500 seat theatre incorporating the art deco style of the times. With the outbreak of World War II, however, the building work halted. The site remained boarded-up until 1959, when the original building was leveled. It was then moved to one side and slightly closer to the edge of the cliff to form the basis of the present Cliffs Pavilion, which opened in 1964. On July 19, 1991, Paul McCartney performed one of his six "secret" shows at the Pavilion during his 1991 Unplugged Summer Tour. From July 1991 to December 1992, the building was closed to be redeveloped and enlarged, with the funding of Southend Borough Council and designed by Tim Foster Architects. The stairs were rebuilt, a new Foyer Bar added and a balcony added to the auditorium. Since re-opening, annual audience figures increased from about 200,000 to about 340,000. On 31 August 1995, Oasis played a concert, which was released on a VHS/DVD, titled Live by the Sea. In May 2008, 70's icon Gloria
    5.25
    4 votes
    149
    Her Majesty's Theatre, Melbourne

    Her Majesty's Theatre, Melbourne

    Her Majesty's Theatre is a 1,700 seat theatre in Melbourne, Australia. Built in 1886, it is located at 219 Exhibition Street, Melbourne. It is classified by the National Trust of Australia and is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register. Purchased in 2000 by Mike Walsh, the theatre was restored and refitted to accommodate larger productions. The gold rush of the 1850s brought both increased prosperity and population to the new colony of Victoria. Melbourne thrived and businesses flourished. The first recorded use of the area near the corner of Stephen (later to become Exhibition) Street and Little Bourke Street – land traditionally owned by the people of the Kulin nation – as a venue for entertainment was in 1880, when tiered seating was constructed and an openair venue for circuses and equestrian shows established. The Hippodrome lasted four years before the French born entrepreneur, Jules François de Sales Joubert, secured a 30 year lease on the site and commissioned architect Nahum Barnet to design a theatre, business and accommodation complex. In 1886, construction began on the Eiffel Tower in Paris; in New York, the Statue of Liberty was dedicated and in Melbourne, work on
    5.25
    4 votes
    150
    Benedum Center

    Benedum Center

    The Benedum Center for the Performing Arts (formerly the Stanley Theatre) is a theater and concert hall located at 719 Liberty Avenue in the Cultural District of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Originally built in 1912 as The Stanley Theatre, the former movie palace was renovated and reopened as The Benedum Center for the Performing Arts in 1987. It's opening act was a W.C. Fields show. The Stanley Theatre, built at a cost of $3 million, opened as a deluxe movie palace February 27, 1928, and seats about 2,885 people (the original seating configuration was over 6,000). It was designed by the architectural firm Hoffman and Henon, who were most well known for their design and construction of 35 theaters in the Philadelphia area. The Stanley Theatre had the distinction of being the largest movie theater in Western Pennsylvania. Operated by the Stanley Warner Theater circuit division of Warner Bros., it was Pittsburgh's main first run house for all Warner Brothers film releases. In 1976, The Stanley was purchased and renovated by the Cinemette Corporation to be operated as a movie theater. In 1977, DiCesare Engler Productions bought the theater and presented live rock and roll concerts
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    2 votes
    151
    Broward Center for the Performing Arts

    Broward Center for the Performing Arts

    The Broward Center for the Performing Arts is a large multi-venue theater and entertainment complex located in the heart of downtown Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. Opened in 1991 on a 5.5-acre (22,000 m) site along the north bank of the New River at Sailboat Bend, the center became a catalyst for major downtown revitalization efforts and an anchor of the Riverwalk Arts and Entertainment District. Designed by award-winning architect Benjamin C. Thompson, the Broward Center is considered the cultural heart of Broward County. Hosting operas, ballets, concerts, plays, lectures and numerous community events in its four theaters, Broward Center is partners in the arts with several renowned organizations including the Symphony of the Americas, Florida Grand Opera, Miami City Ballet, Concert Association of Florida, Gold Coast Jazz. National tours of Broadway productions are presented in partnership with Broadway Across America. Broward Center's mission includes a strong focus on integrating the arts into education and a substantial portion of annual programming is dedicated to educational and community endeavors. Broward Center for the Performing Arts is in the downtown riverfront area, in
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    2 votes
    152
    Coliseum Theatre

    Coliseum Theatre

    The London Coliseum (also known as the Coliseum Theatre) is an opera house and major performing venue on St. Martin's Lane, central London. It is one of London's largest and best-equipped theatres and opened in 1904, designed by theatrical architect Frank Matcham (designer of the London Palladium), for impresario Oswald Stoll. Their ambition was to build the largest and finest 'People's palace of entertainment' of its age. The inaugural performance was a variety bill on 24 December 1904. In 1911, dramatist W. S. Gilbert produced his last play here, The Hooligan. The theatre changed its name from the London Coliseum to the Coliseum Theatre between 1931 and 1968 when 651 performances of the musical comedy White Horse Inn started on 8 April 1931). It reverted to the original name when the Sadler's Wells Opera Company (having moved from Sadler's Wells Theatre) moved to the Coliseum in 1968. The Company changed its name to the English National Opera in 1974 and bought the freehold of the building for £12.8m. From 16 June 1963 it became the second of London's three Cinerama Theatres, first showing the 3-strip version for the first 5 months, then 70mm single strip film was shown until 22
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    2 votes
    153
    Corn Exchange

    Corn Exchange

    The Corn Exchange is a 400 seat arts centre in Newbury. It presents a varied programme including dance, film, music, drama, children's events, comedy and an annual pantomime. The building was originally a corn exchange which opened for trade in 1861, but after the decline in corn trading it was used for public meetings; in 1993 it was opened as an arts centre after a £3.5 million refurbishment. The building is now a Grade II listed building. On 1 June 2000 the operation of The Corn Exchange passed from West Berkshire Council to The Corn Exchange (Newbury) Trust, an independent charity, which also manages New Greenham Arts (an arts centre based at Greenham Common). In 1966 the band The Who were performing, when Keith Moon and John Entwistle came in late to a performance to see bandmates Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey playing with members of a support act. The resulting punch-up left Moon with a black eye and a broken ankle. In 2004 The Corn Exchange produced the first Newbury Comedy Festival, which featured Linda Smith, the Comedy Store Players, comedy films, David Benson’s Think No Evil of Us: My Life With Kenneth Williams, Population:3’s The Wicker Woman, Tina C, Orchestra
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    2 votes
    154
    Jane Street Theater

    Jane Street Theater

    The Jane is a boutique hotel located at 505-507 West Street, with its main entrance at 113 Jane Street in the West Village section of the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The building was originally the American Seamen's Friend Society Sailors' Home and Institute, a hotel for sailors built in 1906-08 and designed by William A. Boring in Georgian style. The building featured a chapel, a concert hall, and a bowling alley, and a beacon which played over the river from the polygonal observatory. The hotel was used to house the survivors of the RMS Titanic while the American inquest into the sinking was held. In 1944, the YMCA took over the building, running it as a transient hotel called the Jane West. Most recently, it was called the Riverview Hotel. The hotel was renovated by developers Sean MacPherson and Eric Goode in 2008 in partnership with BD Hotels, converting a facility which had become long-term housing for drug addicts and those down on their luck into an upscale hotel. The building is a New York City landmark, designated in 2000. The ballroom of the hotel was converted into a theatre space by Theater for the New City in the 1970s. The Jane Street
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    2 votes
    155
    Metro Toronto Convention Centre

    Metro Toronto Convention Centre

    Metro Toronto Convention Centre (originally and still colloquially Metro Convention Centre, and sometimes MTCC), is a convention complex located in downtown Toronto, Ontario at 255 Front Street West. The property is owned by Oxford Properties. The centre is operated by the Metropolitan Toronto Convention Centre Corporation, an independent agency of the Government of Ontario. The MTCC has 600,000 square feet (56,000 m) of space, and is home to the 1330-seat John Bassett Theatre. To the east end of the complex is the 586-room InterContinental Toronto Centre hotel (formerly Canadian National Railway's L'Hotel CN). At the west end of the complex is a 265,000 square foot Class-B office building. Within the office building is the Baton Rouge restaurant, which was formerly a Planet Hollywood from 1996 to 2006. A south building containing exhibition space is located south of the rail lines, on Bremner Boulevard. The centre is connected to the Union Station railway and transit station through the Skywalk footbridge, and is also accessible via the underground PATH system. The centre is also connected by the Skywalk system to the nearby Rogers Centre and large conventions or exhibitions will
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    2 votes
    156
    Molson Canadian Amphitheatre

    Molson Canadian Amphitheatre

    Molson Canadian Amphitheatre (commonly called (the) Molson Amphitheatre or simply the Amphitheatre) is a semi-enclosed outdoor concert venue in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Its address is 909 Lake Shore Boulevard West, located on the grounds of Ontario Place. The venue hosts many diverse acts, including genres like rock, pop, and jazz. The first musician to perform at this music venue was Bryan Adams on May 18, 1995. Ontario Place opened in May 1971 with the original Forum as one of first attractions at the amusement park. The original structure consisted of a vinyl canopy, which was replaced by a copper canopy roof in 1978. Its unique configuration consisted of a round stage, which slowly rotated before the audience, which completely surrounded it. The venue had a capacity of approximately 16,000 seats, which included 7,000 seats on the lawn, 5,500 seats under a covered roof, and 3,500 seats that were uncovered. Over the winter of 1994-1995, came the controversial demolition of the popular Forum and the construction of a larger venue on the site. In May 1995, the Molson Canadian Amphitheatre opened with two Bryan Adams concerts before sold-out audiences. Many critics lamented the
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    2 votes
    157
    Palace Theatre

    Palace Theatre

    The Palace Theatre is an entertainment venue, in downtown Albany, New York, located on the corner of Clinton Avenue (US 9) and North Pearl Street (NY 32). The 2,844 seat theater is owned by the City of Albany and presents various music, drama, film and comedy performances. It is home to the Albany Symphony Orchestra. At its opening, in October 1931, it was the third largest movie theater in the world. Designed by John Eberson, The Palace is considered an excellent example of the architect's atmospheric theatres. In 1979 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Nine years later it was declared a contributing property to the Clinton Avenue Historic District. The theater is on a small lot at the northwest corner of the intersection, just north of downtown. It is a brick and stone steel frame building in two sections. The front two stories, facing the corner and including the marquee with a modern scrolling LED display, are faced in tan brick with some stone ornamentation. The windows have carved brackets. There are open pediments with cartouches and brick parapets with molded stone coping. The taller auditorium, to the northwest, features a banded chimney and
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    2 votes
    158
    Palais Garnier

    Palais Garnier

    The Palais Garnier (pronounced: [palɛ ɡaʁnje]) is an elegant 1,979-seat opera house, which was built from 1861 to 1875 for the Paris Opera. It was originally called the Salle des Capucines because of its location on the Boulevard des Capucines in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, but soon became known as the Palais Garnier in recognition of its opulence and its architect, Charles Garnier. The theatre was also often referred to as the Opéra Garnier, the Opéra de Paris or simply the Opéra. It was the primary home of the Paris Opera and its associated Paris Opera Ballet until 1989, when a new 2,700-seat house, the Opéra Bastille, with elaborate facilities for set and production changes, opened at the Place de la Bastille. The Paris Opera now mainly uses the Palais Garnier for ballet. The Palais Garnier is "probably the most famous opera house in the world, a symbol of Paris like Notre Dame cathedral, the Louvre, or the Sacré Coeur basilica." This is at least partly due to its use as the setting for Gaston Leroux's 1911 novel The Phantom of the Opera and the novel's subsequent adaptations in films and Andrew Lloyd Webber's popular 1986 musical. Another contributing factor is that among
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    2 votes
    159
    Paper Mill Playhouse

    Paper Mill Playhouse

    Paper Mill Playhouse is a regional theatre with approximately 1200 seats, located in Millburn, New Jersey, fewer than 25 miles from Manhattan. Due to its location, it can draw from the pool of actors (and audience members) who live in New York City. Its location, as well as its focus on producing large-scale shows, makes Paper Mill a Broadway theatre thirty minutes from Broadway. Paper Mill was officially designated as the "State Theatre of New Jersey". Since 1971, Paper Mill has had the New Jersey Ballet as its resident ballet company, with the annual production of Nutcracker. Mark S. Hoebee serves as the Artistic Director and Todd Schmidt serves as the Managing Director. Toward the end of the 18th century, in March 1795, Sam Campbell built a mill on a tract of land along a brook in a town then known as Millville. He operated it for nearly 20 years until a fire ended his business. After several abandoned years, the mill changed hands many times until, in the late 1870s, Diamond Mill Paper Company took over and began making paper products until 1928. Around the time the mill was shutting down, Antoinette Scudder, an artist and writer of poetry and plays, began a friendship with
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    2 votes
    160
    Saratoga Performing Arts Center

    Saratoga Performing Arts Center

    The Saratoga Performing Arts Center (SPAC) is complex consisting of a large amphitheater and a smaller indoor theater in Saratoga Springs, New York. It is on the grounds of Saratoga Spa State Park. It presents summer performances of classical music, jazz, pop and rock, dance, opera, as well as a Wine & Food Festival. It opened on July 9, 1966, with a presentation of George Balanchine's A Midsummer Night's Dream by the New York City Ballet. The Center is the official summer home of the New York City Ballet and the Philadelphia Orchestra, both of which are in residence for two or three weeks during the summer. SPAC also serves as the common grounds for high school graduations, particularly for Burnt Hills - Ballston Lake, Saratoga Springs, Shenendehowa, and Ballston Spa High Schools. Saratoga Performing Arts Center, inc, is a non-profit charitable corporation that runs the arts center. It holds a 50 year renewable lease with the State of New York, which owns the land, theaters and buildings that comprise the center. SPAC subcontracts with Live Nation, which organizes and presents the popular music and rock concerts every summer. The income derived from the Live Nation contract goes
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    2 votes
    161
    The Anvil, Basingstoke

    The Anvil, Basingstoke

    The Anvil is a concert hall with theatre functionality and a performing arts centre in the town of Basingstoke in Hampshire, UK. Built on a site originally set aside for the third phase of Basingstoke's shopping centre, The Anvil was built to tackle what was then seen as a 'cultural desert' in the Basingstoke area. The aim of the project was to raise the profile of the Borough and to establish it as a major regional centre with a range of first class facilities. The building's name reflects its unusual shape, particularly when seen from the western approach which somewhat resembles the horn end of a traditional blacksmith's anvil. The hall has adjustable seating and acoustics plus a removable proscenium to cater for different performance types. There is a small second auditorium, The Forge. The acoustic design was by Richard Cowell of Arup Acoustics.
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    2 votes
    162
    The Egg

    The Egg

    The Egg is a performing arts venue in Albany, New York. Named for its shape, the building was designed by Harrison & Abramovitz as part of the Empire State Plaza project, and built between 1966 and 1978. It is located in the northeast corner of the Plaza. It has become an icon of New York's Capital District due to its unusual shape and central location. The Egg is slightly inclined, and has a small pedestal on which it appears to sit. In fact, the building is held by a stem that goes down six stories into the Plaza. Attached to this stem is a concrete girdle that surrounds The Egg, enabling it to retain its shape and transmitting its weight to the pedestal. The building's organic shape reflects Nelson Rockefeller's original goal of architectural design that uses the fine artistic elements of sculpture. The Egg houses two amphitheatres, the 450-seat Lewis A. Swyer Theatre and the 982-seat Kitty Carlisle Hart Theatre. It draws many performing acts to Albany, including music, dance, and traditional stage presentations as varied as Henry Rollins, the Zucchini Brothers, Emmylou Harris, the New York City Ballet, Perú Negro, Demetri Martin, They Might Be Giants, Porcupine Tree and Hot
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    2 votes
    163
    The Journal Tyne Theatre

    The Journal Tyne Theatre

    The Mill Volvo Tyne Theatre is a theatre in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. It is a Grade I listed building. It opened in 1867 as the Tyne Theatre and Opera House. In 1919 it became a cinema, the Stoll Picture House, the name which can still be seen on the building front and side. It was seriously damaged by fire in 1985, with subsequent rebuilding restoring the Victorian stage machinery. Since 2002 it has been operated by SMG Europe, which also owns the nearby Metro Radio Arena, and is sponsored by Volvo. It was sponsored by The Journal newspaper during the 2000s, until January 2012.
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    2 votes
    164
    Alley Theatre

    Alley Theatre

    The Alley Theatre is a Tony Award-winning indoor theatre in Downtown Houston, Texas, and hosts two stages. The "Hubbard" is the main stage with seating for 824; the more intimate "Neuhaus" seats 310. Nine towers and open-air terraces give the Alley Theatre a castle-like quality. Inside, a staircase spirals from the entrance vestibule to the second-floor lobby. A truly wide variety of plays have been performed in this theater. The Alley Theatre is one of the three oldest resident theatres in the United States. Under the leadership of Nina Eloise Whittington Vance (1914–1980), the Alley Theatre first started in a “former dance studio with an opening on Main Street. A brick corridor led from Main to the back of the studio, hence the name Alley Theatre.” In 1948, early paying members scouted Houston for a new location for the Alley, finally landing on an abandoned fan factory on Berry Avenue. The Alley re-opened on February 8, 1949, with a production of Lillian Helman’s The Children’s Hour. In 1954, Ms. Vance brought in Albert Dekker to ‘guest-star’ in Death of a Salesman. The Alley then became a fully professional/Equity company. The Alley Theatre was invited by the United States
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Bristol Hippodrome

    Bristol Hippodrome

    The Bristol Hippodrome (grid reference ST590729) is a theatre in the centre of Bristol, England with seating on three levels giving a capacity of 1,951. It frequently features West End theatre shows when they tour the UK as well regular visits by Welsh National Opera, and an annual pantomime. The theatre was designed by Frank Matcham, and opened on 16 December 1912. It has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II listed building. An important feature of the theatre when it opened was a huge water tank at the front of the stage; which could be filled with 100,000 gallons (450,000 litres) of water. Along with the tank was a large protective glass screen which could be raised in order to protect the orchestra and those in the stalls. It also has a dome, which can be opened when necessary; however since air conditioning had been installed it is rarely opened. The theatre survived World War 2, however less than three years after it ended, a fire destroyed the stage— luckily the auditorium was saved. The theatre reopened about 10 months later, and there have been no other disasters as severe. The theatre now plays host to many top shows, such as Miss Saigon, Cats, Les
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    3 votes
    166
    Capitol Theatre, Sydney

    Capitol Theatre, Sydney

    The Capitol Theatre is a historic theatre building located at 13 Campbell Street, Haymarket, Sydney, Australia. The Capitol Theatre is at the former site of the Belmore Markets. The latter were built in 1891 by George McRae, City Architect, and the structural engineer Norman Selfe, but were commercially unsuccessful because they were located too far from Darling Harbour. The old site was divided up between the Manning Building (1895–1924), facing Pitt Street, and the western half, which was rebuilt as a theatre in 1928. The current theatre is a brick building designed by R.H.Broderick. It was intended as a hippodrome for arena theatre and featured stone cornices, terra-cotta capitals, rosettes and tiled panels. The architect Henry White turned the interior into a movie palace in 1927, creating the effect of an internal Italian garden or piazza. It also featured an internal imitation courtyard which is the only one surviving in Sydney. The building is listed on the Register of the National Estate. The site of the Capitol Theatre has provided entertainment to the people of Sydney since the early 19th century when this piece of land was used by early settlers as a market place for
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    3 votes
    167
    Open Air Theatre, Regent's Park

    Open Air Theatre, Regent's Park

    Regent's Park Open Air Theatre, in the City of Westminster, London, is a permanent venue with an annual sixteen-week summer season. It was founded in 1932 by Sydney Carroll and Robert Atkins. The theatre is located in Queen Mary's Gardens, on the Inner Circle of Regent's Park and consequently is surrounded entirely by parkland. It is completely uncovered; the only sheltered area being underneath the tiered auditorium, which houses one of the longest bars of any theatre in London — stretching the entire length of the seating. The bar serves full meals from one and a half hours before performances begin and remains open for light refreshments until midnight. A barbecue is also provided as well as a picnic lawn with tables for the audience to bring their own food. The theatre houses an extensive backstage area complete with green room for the company and technical team, a full wardrobe, makeup and wigs department, a workshop and paintshop for the creation and maintenance of stage sets and numerous offices for stage management, sound, LX and other crew. Being open air, performances are dependent on the not-so dependable British weather. In the case of wet weather, the Met Office is
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    3 votes
    168
    Royal Exchange, Manchester

    Royal Exchange, Manchester

    The Royal Exchange is a grade II listed Victorian building in Manchester, England. It is located in the city centre on the land bounded by St Ann’s Square, Exchange Street, Market Street, Cross Street and Old Bank Street. The complex includes the Royal Exchange Theatre and the Royal Exchange shopping centre. The Royal Exchange was heavily damaged in the Manchester Blitz and in the 1996 Manchester bombing. The current building is the last of several buildings on the site used for commodities exchange, primarily but not exclusively of cotton and textiles. The cotton industry in Lancashire was served by the Manchester Royal Exchange which traded in spun yarn and finished goods throughout the world including Africa while the Liverpool Cotton Exchange traded in imported raw cotton. In the 18th century the trade was part of part the slave trade in which African slaves were transported to America where the cotton was grown and then exported to Liverpool where the raw cotton was sold. The first exchange opened in 1729 but closed by the end of the century. As the cotton industry boomed, the need for a new exchange was recognised. Thomas Harrison designed the new exchange of 1809 at the
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    3 votes
    169
    Savoy Cinema

    Savoy Cinema

    The Savoy Cinema is the oldest operational cinema in Dublin, and it is the preferred cinema in Ireland for film premières. The cinema was built in 1929 on the site of the old Granville Hotel. The luxurious auditorium, housing 2,789 seats, opened to the public with the film On With The Show. It was altered in 1954 to incorporate a large CinemaScope screen, and showed Ireland's first widescreen feature, The Robe, at the time owned by Odeon Ireland Ltd. It was reported in February 2012 that the cinema was in danger of closing. In the previous decade, audience numbers fell from 740,000 to 250,000 per annum. The Savoy holds the dubious honour of being the most altered cinema in Dublin's history, and in 1969 the cinema was converted into a twin cinema. In 1975, the Savoy's restaurant was converted into a third screen, holding 200 seats, followed in 1979 by further sub-divisions, creating five screens in all. In 1988, the cinema was given its sixth screen. In the process, the Savoy had lost a third of its capacity. In 2004, renovation work was carried out, moving the box office from the two booths located on either side of the entrance to what was formerly an adjoining shop. The
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    3 votes
    170
    The Stephen Sondheim Theatre

    The Stephen Sondheim Theatre

    The Stephen Sondheim Theatre, formerly Henry Miller's Theatre, is a Broadway theatre located at 124 West 43rd Street, between Broadway and 6th Avenue, in Manhattan's Theatre District. Designed in the Neo-classical style by architects Paul R. Allen and Ingalls & Hoffman, it was built by and named for actor-producer Henry Miller. His financial backers were Elizabeth Milbank Anderson, owner of the lot at 124 West 43rd, and Klaw & Erlanger. The original theatre had 950 seats. It opened on April 1, 1918 with the play The Fountain of Youth. It was the first air-conditioned theater in Manhattan. The theatre had its first hit show with Noël Coward's The Vortex in 1926. Following Miller's death that year, the theater was managed by his son, Gilbert, who bought the Klaw & Erlanger interest and paid 25% of the gross take of each play he produced to the Milbank Memorial Fund, Anderson's legatee. From the 1930s through the late 1960s, the theater enjoyed its golden years, with performances by Helen Hayes, Leslie Howard, Lillian Gish, Douglas Fairbanks, and Ruth Chatterton gracing its stage. In 1968, it was sold to Seymour Durst. It showed feature films as the Park-Miller until it became a porn
    6.00
    3 votes
    171
    Perth Concert Hall, Western Australia

    Perth Concert Hall, Western Australia

    The Perth Concert Hall is a concert hall located in Perth, the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. Owned by the City of Perth, the hall is the main venue of the West Australian Symphony Orchestra, and also hosts a number of other events and performances. The building itself is located in Perth's central business district, adjacent to the Supreme Court Gardens and Council House. The building has two façades: facing north over St Georges Terrace, and facing south over the Swan River. The concert hall was constructed on land granted to the City of Perth by the Government of Western Australia, and opened on Australia Day (26 January), 1973. Designed by Howlett and Bailey Architects, local architectural firm, the building is constructed in the Brutalist style, making heavy use of white off-form concrete and a solid opaque interior. The main auditorium of the hall seats 1,729 people, as well as a 160-person choir gallery and a 3000-pipe organ. Acoustically, the venue is considered one of the best in Australia, with the design overseen by the New Zealand acoustician Sir Harold Marshall. As early as 1950, the City of Perth secured a site between Stirling
    5.00
    4 votes
    172
    National Arts Centre, Ottawa

    National Arts Centre, Ottawa

    The National Arts Centre (NAC) is a centre for the performing arts located in Ottawa, Ontario, between Elgin Street and the Rideau Canal. The National Arts Centre was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 2006. Ottawa did not have a major performing arts venue after 1928 when the Russell Theatre was expropriated and demolished to make way for Confederation Square. Performers and orchestras visiting the capital were required to use the stage of the Capitol Cinema, which had been designed for vaudeville and films. In 1963, an organization named the National Capital Arts Alliance was founded by G. Hamilton Southam and Levi Pettler. They successfully convinced the city and government to build the new centre. The NAC was one of a number of projects launched by the government of Lester B. Pearson to commemorate Canada's 1967 centenary. It opened on 2 June 1969 having cost C$46 million to build. The site at one time was home to Ottawa City Hall, and the city donated the land to the federal government. Conductor Jean-Marie Beaudet served as the NAC's first music director (1969-1971). The building, designed by Fred Lebensold, is in the Brutalist style and based on the shape of a
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Vaudeville Theatre

    Vaudeville Theatre

    The Vaudeville Theatre is a West End theatre on the Strand in the City of Westminster. As the name suggests, the theatre held mostly vaudeville shows and musical revues in its early days. It opened in 1870 and was rebuilt twice, although each new building retained elements of the previous structure. The current building opened in 1926, and the capacity is now 690 seats. Rare thunder drum and lightning sheets, together with other early stage mechanisms survive in the theatre. The theatre was designed by prolific architect C. J. Phipps, decorated in a Romanesque style by George Gordon, and opened on 16 April 1870 with Andrew Halliday's comedy, For Love Or Money and a burlesque, Don Carlos or the Infante in Arms. A notable innovation was the concealed footlights, which would shut off if the glass in front of them was broken. The owner, William Wybrow Robertson, had run a failing billiard hall on the site but saw more opportunity in theatre. He leased the new theatre to three actors, Thomas Thorne, David James, and H.J. Montague. The original theatre stood behind two houses on the Strand, and the entrance was through a labyrinth of small corridors. It had a seating capacity of 1,046,
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    Citizens' Theatre

    Citizens' Theatre

    The Citizens Theatre is based in Glasgow, Scotland and is the principal producing theatre in the west of Scotland. The theatre includes a 500-seat Main Auditorium, and two studio theatres, the Circle Studio (100 seats, a theatre in the round space) and the Stalls Studio (50 seats, an alley theater space). The Citizens Theatre repertory group, originally called the Citizens Company, was founded in 1943 by gallery director Tom Honeyman and dramatists James Bridie and Paul Vincent Carroll, the latter of whose plays were first performed at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin (founder W.B.Yeats) and later on Broadway, winning the New York Drama Critics' Circle award for Shadow and Substance (1938) and The White Steed (1939). The Citizens Company was based at first in the Glasgow Athenaeum. It moved in 1945 to its present site, the then Royal Princess's Theatre (opened 1878), where it became the Citizens Theatre. The Citizens Theatre is based in the Gorbals area of Glasgow, Scotland and produces a breadth of work, from professional productions for its main auditorium and studio spaces through to an ongoing commitment to creative learning and engaging with the community. While the Citizens Theatre
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Glasgow Royal Concert Hall

    Glasgow Royal Concert Hall

    Glasgow Royal Concert Hall is an arts venue, in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. It is operated by Glasgow Life, an agency of Glasgow City Council, which also runs Glasgow’s City Halls and Old Fruitmarket venue. The Catering Department is operated by Encore Hospitality. Planned as the Glasgow International Concert Hall and constructed in the late 80s, the building was officially opened in October 1990, after what had been a controversial construction programme, beset with technical and financial problems. It was a byproduct of Glasgow's 1990 City of Culture status, and was intended as a replacement for St. Andrews Hall, adjacent to the Mitchell Library, which had been destroyed by fire in 1962. It was seen as a major symbol of the city's regeneration after years of neglect and deprivation. The hall occupies a site at the junction of Buchanan Street and Sauchiehall Street, which was once home to the Glasgow NAAFI, and the former Parliamentary Road, which was rendered derelict after the building of Buchanan bus station in 1978. The development also included plans for a massive shopping mall, which would become the Buchanan Galleries, although it was almost a decade later before this
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Vienna State Opera

    Vienna State Opera

    The Vienna State Opera (Wiener Staatsoper) is an opera house – and opera company – with a history dating back to the mid-19th century. It is located in the centre of Vienna, Austria. It was originally called the Vienna Court Opera (Wiener Hofoper). In 1920, with the replacement of the Habsburg Monarchy by the First Republic of Austria, it was renamed the Vienna State Opera. The members of the Vienna Philharmonic are recruited from its orchestra. The building was the first major building on the Vienna Ringstraße commissioned by the Viennese "city expansion fund". Work commenced on the building in 1861 and was completed in 1869, following plans drawn up by architects August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll. It was built in the Neo-Renaissance style. The Ministry of the Interior had commissioned a number of reports into the availability of certain building materials, with the result that stones long not seen in Vienna were used, such as Wöllersdorfer Stein, for plinths and free-standing, simply-divided buttresses, the famously hard stone from Kaisersteinbruch, whose colour was more appropriate than that of Kelheimerstein, for more lushly decorated parts. The somewhat
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Donmar Warehouse

    Donmar Warehouse

    The Donmar Warehouse is a 251 seat, not-for-profit theatre in Covent Garden, London, England. Under the artistic leadership of Sam Mendes, Michael Grandage and now Josie Rourke, the theatre has a diverse artistic policy that includes new writing, contemporary reappraisals of European classics, British and American drama and small-scale musical theatre. As well as presenting at least six productions a year at its home in Covent Garden, every year the Donmar tours one in-house production in the UK. Theatrical producer Donald Albery formed Donmar Productions around 1953, with the name derived from the first three letters of his name and that of his friend Dame Margot Fonteyn, the prima ballerina. In 1961, he bought the warehouse, a building that in the 1870s had been a vat room and hops warehouse for the local brewery in Covent Garden, and in the 1920s had been used as a film studio and then the Covent Garden Market banana-ripening depot. His son Ian Albery, a producer and theatre design consultant, converted the warehouse into a private rehearsal studio for Fonteyn's London Festival Ballet. In 1977 the Royal Shakespeare Company acquired it as a theatre and renamed it the Warehouse,
    4.75
    4 votes
    178
    Capitol Theatre

    Capitol Theatre

    The Capitol Theatre (French: Théâtre Capitol) in Downtown Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada is an 800 seat, restored 1920s-era vaudeville house on Main Street that serves as the centre for cultural entertainment for the city. Having been converted to a cinema early in its history, the theatre was purchased by the City of Moncton in 1991, restored to its original look commencing in 1992, and was officially reopened as a performance space in 1993. The theatre routinely hosts the live stage productions of Theatre New Brunswick and The Atlantic Ballet Theatre of Canada, as well as symphony orchestra and dance performances.
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Harold Pinter Theatre

    Harold Pinter Theatre

    The Harold Pinter Theatre, formerly the Comedy Theatre until 2011, is a West End theatre, and opened on Panton Street in the City of Westminster, on 15 October 1881, as the Royal Comedy Theatre. It was designed by Thomas Verity and built in just six months in painted (stucco) stone and brick. By 1884 it was known as just the Comedy Theatre. In the mid-1950s the theatre went under major reconstruction and re-opened in December 1955, the auditorium remains essentially that of 1881, with three tiers of horseshoe-shaped balconies. In 1883, the successful operetta Falka had its London première at the theatre, and in 1885, Erminie did the same. The theatre's reputation grew through World War I when Charles Blake Cochran and André Charlot presented their famous revue shows. Famous actors who appeared here include Henry Daniell who played John Carlton in Secrets in September 1929. The theatre was notable for the role it played in overturning stage censorship by establishing the New Watergate Club in 1956, under producer Anthony Field. The outdated Theatres Act 1843 still required scripts to be submitted for approval by the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Formation of the club allowed plays that
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    The UCL Bloomsbury

    The UCL Bloomsbury

    The Bloomsbury Theatre is a theatre on Gordon Street, Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden, owned by University College London. The Theatre has a seating capacity of 535 and offers a professional programme of innovative music, drama, comedy and dance all year round. Funded by a UGC grant and a considerable private donation, the theatre was opened in 1968 as the Collegiate Theatre, and was renamed the Bloomsbury Theatre in 1982. Between 2001 and 2008, the theatre was known as The UCL Bloomsbury, to emphasise links with UCL, who use it for student productions 12 weeks a year. The Bloomsbury Theatre recently returned to the logo designed by cartoonist Gerald Scarfe which it had used for nearly twenty years until 2001. The theatre building also provides access to the UCL Union Fitness Centre and Clubs and Societies Centre on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th floors. The basement also holds one of the three University Shops. A UCL Union-run cafe is on the Ground Floor. Access to the Main UCL Wilkins Building (Octagon Building) and the UCL Refectory is possible through the theatre building. Amongst the many other artists who have performed at the theatre are; UCL alumnus Ricky Gervais has
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Usher Hall, Edinburgh

    Usher Hall, Edinburgh

    Usher Hall is a concert hall, situated on Lothian Road, in the west end of Edinburgh, Scotland. It has hosted concerts and events since its construction in 1914 and can hold approximately 2,900 people in its recently restored auditorium, which is well loved by performers due to its acoustics. The Hall is flanked by The Royal Lyceum Theatre on the right and The Traverse Theatre on the left. Historic Scotland has registered the Hall with Category A listed building status. The construction of the hall was funded by Andrew Usher, the son of a whisky distiller, who donated £100,000 to the city specifically to fund a new concert hall. The choice of site caused early delays but in 1910 an architectural competition was announced with the requirement that the hall be simple but dignified. The winning bid (one of 130 entries) came from Stockdale Harrison & Howard H Thomson of Leicester. The design was partly a backlash against Victorian Gothic, with a return to classical features owing much to the Beaux-Arts style. On 19 July 1911, George V and Queen Mary laid two memorial stones, an event attended by over a thousand people. Its curved walls, unusual for the time, were made possible by
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Scala

    Scala

    Scala is a nightclub in London, England, near King's Cross railway station. The Scala was originally built as a cinema to the designs of H Courtney Constantine, but construction was interrupted by the First World War and it spent some time being used to manufacture aircraft parts, and as a labour exchange for demobilised troops before opening in 1920 as the King's Cross Cinema. The cinema changed hands and names several times through its life and also changed focus, ranging from main-stream to art-house to adult film over 70 years, as well as spending a short time as a primatarium. In the summer of 1972, the Scala (then known as the King's Cross Cinema) played host to the one and only UK concert by Iggy & The Stooges (who were in London recording the album Raw Power.) All photographs later featured in the Raw Power album sleeve (including the famous cover shot) were taken that night during the show. Intended to be an alternative National Film Theatre, the Scala Film Club (which took its name from Scala House on Tottenham Street) moved to this venue in 1981. However, when the Scala showed the film A Clockwork Orange, then withdrawn from UK distribution, the copyright holder Warner
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Taganrog Theatre

    Taganrog Theatre

    The Taganrog Drama Theater named after Anton Chekhov and decorated with Order of Honor (Russian: Таганрогский ордена Почета драматический театр имени А.П.Чехова) is a traditional Russian drama theater based in Taganrog, Rostov Oblast. The Taganrog Theater was established in 1827 by governor Alexander Dunaev. The theater was subsidized by the Taganrog's City Council since 1828, and its first director was Alexander Gor. The first group of Russian drama artists was directed by Perovsky and toured around the region, giving performances in Rostov on Don, Novocherkassk, Bahmut. The repertoire consisted mainly of dramas, melodramas and vaudevilles. Since 1861, Italian opera regularly performed in Taganrog. In 1865 was created a stock company to finance the construction of the new theater building. Forty-five thousand silver rubles of stocks were issued, for the total budget of 55,000 rubles. In 1866, Taganrog established its very own Italian opera in a new opera theater building by the project of the architect Londeron from Odessa. The interiors of the theater were designed after the image of the Milano opera theater La Scala. The repertoire of that time included Giuseppe Verdi, Gioachino
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre

    Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre

    The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 242 West 45th Street (George Abbott Way) in midtown-Manhattan. Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it opened as the Royale Theatre on January 11, 1927 with a musical entitled Piggy. Producer John Golden leased the theatre and renamed it for himself from 1932 to 1937 (when he moved to the Theatre Masque next door). The Shubert Organization then assumed ownership and initially leased the theatre to CBS Radio. In 1940 the Royale was restored to use as a legitimate theatre under its original name. On May 9, 2005, it was renamed for longtime Shubert Organization president Bernard B. Jacobs.
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Dollar Cinema

    Dollar Cinema

    The Dollar Cinema, in Montreal, Canada, is a twin screen movie theater that shows second run films at low-cost. Contrary to its name, admission is currently $2.50. The theatre is in the Decarie Square Mall, on the outskirts of Côte-des-Neiges. It seats 1,000 patrons: Cinema #1 has 350 seats and Cinema #2 has 650 and a small stage. Both screening rooms have old style same-height seating, flat screens and late 70's projectors. The sound system has been upgraded to DTS, and new seating installed. Second-run Hollywood movies, with an occasional classic film, play seven days a week. Cinema #2 has been used for amateur performances, usually for fund raising events. Food concessions cost $1.00 plus tax. The theater, opened in 1977, was owned and operated by the Cineplex Odeon chain until it closed in 1997. Bernie Gurberg, the current owner, operates it as the Dollar Cinema.
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Grand Théâtre de Bordeaux

    Grand Théâtre de Bordeaux

    Grand Théâtre de Bordeaux, is a Theatre in Bordeaux, France, first inaugurated on 17 April 1780. It was in this theatre that the ballet La Fille Mal Gardée premiered in 1789, and where a young Marius Petipa staged some of his first ballets. The Theatre was designed by the architect Victor Louis (1731-1800), who was selected for the task by winning the famous Grand Prix de Rome. Louis was also famous for designing the galleries surrounding the gardens of the Palais Royal, and the Théâtre Français in Paris. The Grand Théâtre de Bordeaux was conceived as a temple of the Arts and Light, with a neo-classical facade endowed with a portico of 12 Corinthian style colossal columns which support an entablature on which stand 12 statues that represent the nine Muses and three goddesses (Juno, Venus and Minerva). In 1871 the theatre was briefly the National Assembly for the French Parliament. The inside of the theatre was restored in 1991, and once again has its original colours of blue and gold. The Grand Théâtre de Bordeaux is one of the oldest wooden frame opera houses in Europe not to have burnt or required rebuilding. Today the theatre is home to the Opéra National de Bordeaux, as well as
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Raimund Theater

    Raimund Theater

    The Raimund Theater is a theatre in the Mariahilf district of Vienna, Austria. Named after the Austrian dramatist Ferdinand Raimund, the theatre was built by an association of Viennese citizens and opened on 28 November 1893 with Raimund's play Die gefesselte Phantasie. The theatre mainly presented German folk dramas and plays. In 1908 it turned to operetta, with Johann Strauss' The Gypsy Baron. Other premieres included Robert Stolz's Das Glücksmädel and Dreimäderlhaus, set to various pieces of music by Franz Schubert; this was performed more than 1200 times between 1916 and 1927. As the theatre was spared bombing damage during the war, the theatre re-opened promptly on 25 April 1945 with Dreimäderlhaus. In 1948, Rudolf Marik took over as director for almost 30 years, transforming it into an internationally recognised theatre of the German-speaking world exclusively staging operettas with stars such as Johannes Heesters, Marika Rökk, and others. Many well-known actors started their careers at the Raimund Theatre, including Hansi Niese, Paula Wessely, Attila Hörbiger, and Karl Skraup. After 1976 the theatre was occasionally used for musicals, such as Kurt Weill's Lady in the
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Teatro Dal Verme

    Teatro Dal Verme

    The Teatro Dal Verme is a theatre in Milan, Italy located on the Via San Giovanni sul Muro, on the site of the former private theatre the Politeama Ciniselli. It was designed by Giuseppe Pestagalli to a commission from Count Francesco Dal Verme, and was used primarily for plays and opera performances throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries. Today, the theatre is no longer used for opera, and is a venue for concerts, plays and dance performances, as well as exhibitions and conferences. The original 3000-seat theatre, surmounted by a large cupola, was constructed in the traditional horseshoe shape, with two tiers of boxes and a large gallery (or loggione) which alone contained more than 1000 seats. It opened on September 14, 1872 with a production of Meyerbeer's Les Huguenots and soon established itself as one of Italy's most important opera houses. During its "golden years", the theatre saw the world premieres of Puccini's Le Villi (May 31, 1884); Leoncavallo's Pagliacci (May 21, 1892) and I Medici (November 9, 1893); and Cowen's Signa (November 12, 1893). It also saw the Italian premiere of Lehár's The Merry Widow (April 27, 1907). By the 1930s, the theatre was mainly being
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Alexandrine Theater

    Alexandrine Theater

    The Alexandrinsky Theatre (Russian: Александринский театр) or Russian State Pushkin Academy Drama Theater (Российский государственный академический театр драмы им. А. С. Пушкина) is a theatre in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The Alexandrinsky Theatre rivals the Fyodor Volkov Theatre in Yaroslavl as the oldest Russian national theatre. It was founded on 30 August 1756 by a Senate decree signed by Elizabeth of Russia to play Fonvizin, Lukin, Racine, Molière, Beaumarchais, Voltaire, and Derzhavin. Since 1832, the theatre has occupied an Empire-style building that Carlo Rossi designed. It was built in 1828-1832 on Alexandrinsky Square (now Ostrovsky Square), which is situated on Nevsky Prospekt between the Russian State Library and Anichkov Palace. The theatre and the square were named after Empress consort Alexandra Feodorovna. The building is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Historic Centre of Saint Petersburg and Related Groups of Monuments. The premières of numerous Russian plays have been performed at the stage of the Alexandrinsky, including plays by Alexandr Griboyedov, Alexander Ostrovsky, and Anton Chekhov. Famous directors who have staged work there include Vsevolod
    5.00
    3 votes
    190
    Tower Theater

    Tower Theater

    The Tower Theater is located in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania at the intersection of 69th and Ludlow Streets. It is adjacent to 69th Street Terminal and is just west of Philadelphia. Since the 1970s, it has been a popular venue for music acts. Known for its natural acoustic properties, the venue has been used for recording live albums by many bands. The Tower Theater, built in 1927, was opened a year later, by John H. McClatchy, as one of Upper Darby Township's first movie houses. Located just outstide the city limits of Philadelphia, the theater thrived in the busy area that was once the most highly traveled route to Center City from the west. In its early years, Tower Theater showed both vaudeville acts and movies. By the 1970s, the Tower had fallen on hard times. It was then owned by the A.M. Ellis chain and showed third-run movies for a $1 admission. In June, 1972, Midnight Sun Concerts from Northern New Jersey, promoted its first concert at the Tower, Dave Mason and Buzzy Linhart, a sold out show on June 14, 1972. Reviewer Jonathan Takiff in the Philadelphia Daily News announced in the next day's paper that "Philly Finally has its Fillmore," making reference to New York's famed
    5.00
    3 votes
    191
    York Hall

    York Hall

    The York Hall is a health and leisure centre and one of Britain's best known boxing venues. The venue is situated on Old Ford Road in Bethnal Green, London, England. The hall, opened in 1929 with a capacity of 1,200, stages boxing as well as providing a gymnasium and swimming pool. The hall is owned by Tower Hamlets Council and in 2004 was threatened with closure. However, the Hall was saved and in 2005 it underwent a major multi-million pound refurbishment in a joint project between the local Tower Hamlets council and Greenwich Leisure. The site is split into two sections: a leisure centre and a hall with gymnasium. The historic Turkish Bath or banya in the basement was the last publicly run example in the East End of London. In 1972 there were still six Turkish baths, a legacy of the high Jewish population of Russian and Polish origin. This included the traditional suites of Russian and Turkish steam rooms, sauna, relaxation lounge. This popular and often full facility was closed and re-branded as and upmarket "Spa London" by the council in July 2007, amid vocal protests from its users. Treatment rooms were added to provide a range of upmarket beauty treatments. Where customers
    5.00
    3 votes
    192
    Bass Performance Hall

    Bass Performance Hall

    The Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth, Texas is located in downtown Fort Worth near Sundance Square, occupies a whole city block, and was opened in 1998. It was built entirely with private funds and seats 2,056 people in a city with an estimated 2009 population of 720,250. It is regarded as an important symbol of one of the most successful downtown revitalization efforts in the country. The European opera house-inspired limestone structure has been called the "crown jewel of downtown Fort Worth". It was designed by David M. Schwarz/Architectural Services, Inc. and is characteristic of the classic European opera house form. An 80-foot-diameter (24 m) Great Dome, artfully painted by Scott and Stuart Gentling, tops the Founders Concert Theater. Two 48-foot-tall (15 m) angels sculpted by Marton Varo from Texas limestone grace the Grand Façade. The Hall's acoustics were designed and implemented by JaffeHolden Acoustics, Inc. of Norwalk, CT. The Hall itself is renowned for its superb acoustics, exceptional sightlines and ambience on level with the great halls of the world. In fact, in an article by Daniel March in the March 1999 issue of Travel and Leisure
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Cambridge Theatre

    Cambridge Theatre

    The Cambridge Theatre is a West End theatre, on a corner site in Earlham Street facing Seven Dials, in the London Borough of Camden, built in 1929-30. It was designed by Wimperis, Simpson and Guthrie; interior partly by Serge Chermayeff, with interior bronze friezes by sculptor Anthony Gibbons Grinling. The theatre is built in steel and concrete and is notable for its elegant and clean lines of design. The theatre was refurbished in 1950—the original gold and silver décor was painted over in red, and candelabras and chandeliers were added. In 1987, in order to restore the original décor, the theatre was once again refurbished, this time by Carl Toms. The theatre has a circular entrance foyer, with Grinling's bronze frieze depicting nude figures in exercise poses, the theme continues into the main foyer, with dancing nudes, marble pilaster up lighters and concealed lighting. English Heritage notes the Cambridge Theatre is a rare, complete and early example of a London theatre adopting the moderne, expressionist style pioneered in Germany during the 1920s. It marked a conscious reaction to the design excesses of the music hall and contemporary cinemas. Theatres looked for a new style
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) is a venue comprising part of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. JALC's performing arts complex, Frederick P. Rose Hall, is located in New York City, slightly south of the main Lincoln Center campus and directly adjacent to Columbus Circle, housed inside the Time Warner Center. The complex was designed by acclaimed architect Rafael Viñoly and constructed by Turner-Santa Fe, a joint venture between Turner Construction and Santa Fe Construction. It opened in October 2004. The organization was founded in 1987. JALC's Frederick P. Rose Hall consists of three main music performance venues: The hall also contains the Irene Diamond Education Center with rehearsal and recording rooms and the Nesuhi Ertegun Jazz Hall of Fame (NEJHF). JALC also launched a website based on the NEJHF. Visitors can celebrate the lives, artistry and music of the jazz greats so integral to the art form and industry. Wynton Marsalis serves as the Artistic Director, Adrian Ellis serves as the Executive Director, and Antonio Ciacca serves as Director of Programming. The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis (JLCO) serves as the resident orchestra performing at
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Portsmouth Guildhall

    Portsmouth Guildhall

    Portsmouth Guildhall is the biggest events venue in the Hampshire city of Portsmouth in England. The building, completed in 1890 , was designed in the neo-classical style by architect William Hill, who had earlier been responsible for the design of the town hall in Bolton. Local Architect Charles Bevis in partnership with Hill directed the construction, Hill died before the completion of the building with Bevis adding to the design. The building was originally called the Town Hall, but on 21 April 1926 it was announced that Portsmouth would be raised to the status of a city and the town hall was renamed the Guildhall. The Guildhall has a capacity of up to 2000 It is located in the city centre of Portsmouth, very close to the Portsmouth and Southsea railway station. On 10th January, 1941, during the Second World War, the building was hit by incendiary bombs and was gutted. The interior and roof were totally destroyed, with just the outer walls and tower remaining, albeit fire-damaged. The building was rebuilt after the war for £1.5 million, using war compensation funds, and on 8 June 1959 Her Majesty the Queen performed the re-opening ceremony. However, the interior was changed
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    State Theatre

    State Theatre

    It was built in 1921 as Reade’s State Theatre by Thomas W. Lamb and managed by Walter Reade for both movies and live performances. It opened with five vaudeville acts and a single matinee screening of the silent western, White Oak, starring William S. Hart. Patrons, including first ticket buyer, nine-year-old Victor Levin, paid 20-30 cents per admission. The theater was placed under the management of Benjamin Franklin Keith and Edward Franklin Albee II of B.F Keith Theatre chain, which then was the largest vaudeville theater chain in the early 1920s. After the death of Keith, Albee continued the operation and eventually merged with Orpheum, the largest western booking agency to form Keith-Albee-Orpheum (KAO). In 1928, The Radio Corporation of America (RCA) acquired KAO as a subsidiary and KAO changed to Radio-Keith-Orpheum; also known as RKO. Within one year, the theater is equipped for sound. In 1933 the RKO State Theatre underwent major renovations ending with a RKO Art-Deco renovation. With the advent of talking movies, the theater became a popular cinema for first-run movies beginning in 1939. In the 1950s RKO State Theatre began to host rock ‘n’ roll shows featuring popular
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Symphony Hall, Birmingham

    Symphony Hall, Birmingham

    Symphony Hall is a 2,262 seat concert venue located inside the International Convention Centre (ICC) in Birmingham, England. It was officially opened by the Queen in June 1991, although had been opened on April 15, 1991. It is home to the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and hosts around 270 events a year. It was completed at a cost of £30 million. The hall's interior is modelled upon the Musikverein in Vienna and the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam. In addition to concerts, the venue is also used for community events, graduation ceremonies and conferences. Symphony Hall's acoustic, widely considered one of the finest in the world, was designed by Percy Thomas Partnership and Renton Howard Wood Levin, (who together formed the Convention Centre Partnership for the ICC) with specialist help from Russell Johnson of Artec Consultants Inc.. A particularly innovative feature is the hall's acoustic flexibility. It has a reverberation chamber behind the orchestra and extending high along the sides, adding 50% to the hall's volume, the doors to which can be remotely opened or closed. The U-shaped reverberation chamber area has a volume of 12,700 cubic metres (450,000 cu ft). There is an
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Teatro Malibran

    Teatro Malibran

    The Teatro Malibran, formerly known as the Teatro San Giovanni Grisostomo, is an opera house in Venice known for its operatic importance in the 17th and 18th centuries. Richly decorated, the theatre consists of five levels of thirty boxes and a large stalls area. Designed by Thomas Bezzi for the Grimani family, the theatre was inaugurated during the 1678 carnival with Vespasiano by Carlo Pallavicino. It became the biggest, most luxurious and extravagant stage in Venice, known for its sumptuous productions and high quality singers such as Margherita Durastanti, prima donna between 1709 and 1712. During its golden age composers such as Carlo Francesco Pollarolo, Alessandro Scarlatti and Georg Friedrich Händel were active at the theatre. During the 1730s, the San Giovanni Grisostomo began a slow and inexorable decline, although managing to keep its position at the head of Venetian theatres until the middle of the eighteenth century. In 1737, when Carlo Goldoni was placed in charge of the Venetian stage, prose works began to be performed (many of these his own comedies). Subsequently, because of its considerable size, the Grimani family decided to open a smaller theater in 1755, the
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    2 votes
    199
    The Fillmore

    The Fillmore

    The Fillmore Auditorium is a historic music venue in San Francisco, California, made famous by Bill Graham. Named for its original location at the intersection of Fillmore Street and Geary Boulevard, it lies on the boundary of the Western Addition and the Pacific Heights neighborhoods. In 1968, Graham moved his concerts to a different venue in San Francisco, formerly known as The Carousel Ballroom and El Patio at Market Street and South Van Ness Avenue, that he renamed Fillmore West. The original Fillmore Auditorium continued under the name The Elite Club. Graham began presenting concerts at the original Fillmore Auditorium again in the 1980s, but it was closed due to earthquake damage in October 1989. After much structural work, in 1994 the original Geary Boulevard location reopened as The Fillmore. As of 2008, The Fillmore is leased and operated by Live Nation. In the mid-1960s, The Fillmore Auditorium became the focal point for psychedelic music and counterculture in general, with such acts as John Mahon, The Grateful Dead,The Steve Miller Band, Jefferson Airplane, Quicksilver Messenger Service, The Doors, Jimi Hendrix Experience, The Byrds, Big Brother and the Holding Company,
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    3 votes
    200
    Adelphi Theatre

    Adelphi Theatre

    The Adelphi Theatre is a 1500-seat West End theatre, located on the Strand in the City of Westminster. The present building is the fourth on the site. The theatre has specialised in comedy and musical theatre, and today it is a receiving house for a variety of productions, including many musicals. The theatre was Grade II listed for historical preservation on 1 December 1987. It was founded in 1806 as the Sans Pareil ("Without Compare"), by merchant John Scott, and his daughter Jane (1770–1839). Jane was a British theatre manager, performer, and playwright. Together, they gathered a theatrical company and by 1809 the theatre was licensed for musical entertainments, pantomime, and burletta. She wrote more than fifty stage pieces in an array of genres: melodramas, pantomimes, farces, comic operettas, historical dramas, and adaptations, as well as translations. Jane Scott retired to Surrey in 1819, marrying John Davies Middleton (1790–1867). On 18 October 1819, the theatre reopened under its present name, which was adopted from the Adelphi Buildings opposite. In its early years, the theatre was known for melodrama, called Adelphi Screamers. Many stories by Charles Dickens were also
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    1 votes
    201
    Belgrade Theatre

    Belgrade Theatre

    The Belgrade Theatre is a live performance venue seating 858 and situated in Coventry, England. It was the first civic theatre to be built after the Second World War in Britain and as such was more than a place of entertainment. It joined the new Coventry Cathedral as a symbol of optimism and culture in one of the largest re-development projects then undertaken, to rebuild the city of Coventry, which had been almost totally destroyed by bombing. The building is now a grade II listed building. In 1963 the Belgrade was registered as a charity by the Charity Commission (number 219163). The Belgrade acquired its name in recognition and thanks for a gift of timber from the Serbian capital city of Belgrade (Coventry's official sister city), that was used extensively in the construction of the auditorium. Since opening in 1958, the theatre has established itself as a centre for the new and innovative production. Having pioneered the Theatre-in-Education movement in the 1960s the theatre continues to work with disadvantaged young people and uses drama as a tool to develop personal and social skills. Their most successful programme "Acting Out" has been commissioned by Coventry's LEA for
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    1 votes
    202
    Birmingham Hippodrome

    Birmingham Hippodrome

    The Birmingham Hippodrome is a theatre situated on Hurst Street in the Chinese Quarter of Birmingham, England. Although best known as the home stage of the Birmingham Royal Ballet, it also hosts a wide variety of other performances including visiting opera and ballet companies, touring West End shows, pantomime and drama. Every summer, the Hippodrome usually houses a major West End touring show, some of these consist of Starlight Express, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Cats, Mary Poppins and We Will Rock You. Every year, the Hippodrome houses a pantomime from the company QDOS - the entertainer Brian Conley, 'Loose Woman' Lynda Bellingham and Puppet Basil Brush have been confirmed as the stars of Cinderella for 2011/12. The theatre's Chief Executive is Stuart Griffiths. With a regular annual attendance of over 500,000, the Hippodrome is the busiest single theatre in the United Kingdom, and the busiest venue for dance outside London. The first venue built on the Hippodrome site was a building of assembly rooms in 1895. In 1899 a stage and circus ring was added together with a miniature of Blackpool Tower (removed 1963) and the enterprise named the "Tower of Varieties". After failing, this
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    1 votes
    203
    Count Basie Theatre

    Count Basie Theatre

    The Count Basie Theatre is an historic landmark that operates as a theatre for performing arts in Red Bank, New Jersey. It opened as the Carlton Theater in 1926 and was renamed in 1984 to honor jazz great and Red Bank native William “Count” Basie. It has seating capacity for 1,543 patrons. The Count Basie Theatre box office is the only official ticketing outlet for Count Basie Theatre presented shows. Edward Franklin Albee II opened the Carlton on November 11, 1926 as one of a series of elaborate new Keith-Albee-Orpheum vaudeville theatres. The investment was ill-timed as the public was moving to less expensive movies, and Albee was soon pushed out. The theatre chain was absorbed into Keith-Albee-Orpheum in 1928 and was soon controlled by Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr.. Opening night in 1926 included vaudeville acts and the feature film The Quarterback, starring Richard Dix. Nearly 4,000 people attended two shows that night, with crowds gathering two hours before the first performance. The New Jersey Register called the new theatre “…a marvel of beauty, convenience and comfort. Outside and inside it is a veritable and architectural triumph.” The theatre was one of the highlights of
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Edinburgh Festival Theatre

    Edinburgh Festival Theatre

    The Edinburgh Festival Theatre is a performing arts venue located on Nicolson Street in Edinburgh Scotland used primarily for performances of opera and ballet, large-scale musical events, and touring groups. After its most recent renovation in 1994, it seats 1,915. It is one of the major venues of the annual summer Edinburgh International Festival and is the Edinburgh venue for the Scottish Opera and the Scottish Ballet. The present theatre’s location is Edinburgh’s longest continuous theatre site, for there has been a theatre in that location since 1830. From being Dunedin Hall, the Royal Amphitheatre, Alhambra Music Hall, the Queen’s Theatre, Pablo Fanque's Amphitheatre, and Newsome’s Circus, the site became the Empire Palace Theatre, the first of the famous Moss Empires’ chain, opening on 7 November 1892. Designed by the great British theatre architect, Frank Matcham, (who built the London Coliseum, among others) its décor was lavish, with elephants with Nubian riders, nymphs and cherubs in abundance on the plasterwork, and it seated 3000 people on four levels. For the following twenty years all the top artists of the day played at the Empire Palace until, on 9 May 1911, there
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Marquis Theatre

    Marquis Theatre

    The Marquis Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 1535 Broadway (at 45th St.) in midtown-Manhattan. Situated on the third floor of the Marriott Marquis Hotel, the 1611-seat venue was designed by developer/architect John C. Portman, Jr. Because construction of the hotel involved the demolition of five theaters – the original Helen Hayes, the Morosco, the Bijou, and remnants of the Astor and the Gaiety – New York City officials permitted Portman to construct the new property only if he agreed to include a theater within the structure. It presently is one of nine operated by the Nederlander Organization. The Marquis - with state-of-the-art backstage facilities and a sleekly modern auditorium - opened on July 9, 1986 with a series of concerts by Shirley Bassey. The stage version of White Christmas returned from November 13, 2009 through January 13, 2010. The previous production, the Dolly Parton musical, 9 to 5 closed on September 6, 2009. The new Twyla Tharp dance musical, Come Fly Away, based on the music of Frank Sinatra, opened officially on March 25, 2010. However, due to low ticket sales, the production closed on September 5, 2010. Donny and Marie Osmond presented their new
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    1 votes
    206
    Mercury Theatre

    Mercury Theatre

    The Mercury Theatre is a theatre in Auckland, New Zealand, located on Mercury Lane, off Karangahape Road. It was built in 1910 by the architect Edward Bartley and is the oldest surviving theatre in Auckland. Built in the English Baroque style, it was initially known as the Kings Theatre. On being converted into a cinema in 1926, a new entrance was built on Karangahape Road – this is now the Norman Ng Building. From 1968 to 1991 it was the premises of the Mercury Theatre Company. In 1966 the Auckland Theatre Trust was established by Professor John C Reid. It raised finance to open the building as a professional theatre in 1968. The first production initiated by the theatre was The Admirable Crichton by J.M. Barrie. At least 12 productions were put on annually after this period ranging from children's pantomimes to serious tragedy-dramas including those by Shakespeare and Chekhov. Notable actors who performed at the theatre during their careers include Pam Ferris, Lee Grant, Roy Billing, George Henare, Michael Hurst and Ian Mune. Raymond Hawthorne joined the theatre in 1971 and worked as an actor, director and a tutor and became artistic director of the theatre in 1985 until its
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Nouvel Opéra

    Nouvel Opéra

    The Opéra Nouvel (Nouvel Opera House) in Lyon, France is the home of the Opéra National de Lyon. The original opera house was re-designed by the distinguished French architect, Jean Nouvel between 1985 and 1993 and is named after him. In 1756, one of the first opera houses created inside an existing freestanding building was opened in Lyon. It was designed by Jacques-Germain Soufflot, the architect of the Panthéon in Paris. By early in the following century it was found to be too small, and Antoine-Marie Chenavard and Jean-Marie Pollet erected the new Lyon theatre which opened on July 1, 1831. It was considered rather undistinguished, but served its purpose. It was not until 1985 that the City decided to once again re-build the opera house, but this time it was to be within the shell of the existing 1831 building. One of France's most distinguished architects was commissioned to create the house. The style of the house is essentially Italian with a horseshoe-shaped auditorium and tiers of boxes. Leaving only the existing foyer and the exterior façade, Nouvel tripled the space within the house by excavating below ground to create rehearsal space and, most strikingly, by doubling the
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    1 votes
    208
    Alabama Theatre

    Alabama Theatre

    The Alabama Theatre is a movie palace in Birmingham, Alabama. It was built in 1927 by Paramount's Publix Theatre chain as its flagship theater for the southeastern region of the United States. Seating 2,500 people at the time, it was the largest in the Birmingham Theatre district. The district was once home to a myriad of large theaters that featured vaudeville, performing arts, nickelodeons, and large first-run movie palaces. The Alabama is the only district theater still operating today. Built to show silent films, the Alabama still features its original Wurlitzer theater organ. Other than the Alabama, the Lyric Theatre is the only theater still standing in the district. The Alabama and its historic organ were added to the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage on February 15, 1977 and to the National Register of Historic Places on November 13, 1979. The theater has been surveyed by the Historic American Buildings Survey on several occasions, the last time being in 1996. Construction plans for the Alabama were announced in 1926, but ground breaking was delayed until April 1, 1927. The grand opening was held as originally scheduled on December 26, 1927. Construction of the
    4.33
    3 votes
    209
    DTE Energy Music Theatre

    DTE Energy Music Theatre

    Originally built by the Nederlander Organization in the early 1970s, the DTE Energy Music Theatre is a 15,274-seat amphitheater located in Clarkston, Michigan. It was originally known as the Pine Knob Music Theatre, due to its proximity to the nearby Pine Knob ski area and golf course. The name was changed in 2002 when DTE Energy (the parent company of Detroit Edison) purchased the naming rights to the amphitheater in a ten-year, $10 million deal. Despite this change, many people still continue to call the venue "Pine Knob", "The Knob", or "The Hill". The amphitheater is currently owned by Palace Sports and Entertainment, owner of the Detroit Pistons, The Palace of Auburn Hills and the historic Meadow Brook Music Festival. Annually, the music theater has consistently ranked among the top-selling outdoor concert venues in the nation. The amphitheater held its grand opening in June 1972 with an Andy Williams concert. However, on June 25, 1972, a few days before Williams' appearance, there was a "pre-opening" concert featuring teen idol David Cassidy. The original sound system was novel in its day, a huge theatrical performance system designed for an outdoor theater with a custom
    4.33
    3 votes
    210
    Kamenny Island Theatre

    Kamenny Island Theatre

    The Kamenny Island Theatre (Russian: Каменноостровский театр, Kamennoostrovsky teatr) is a wooden summer theatre on the grounds of the Kamennoostrovsky Palace, Kamenny Island, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Two operas of a famous Neapolitan composer Giovanni Paisiello (1740 – 1816), were premiered at Kamenny Ostrov (before this theatre was built): The theatre was built in 1826 to a design by Smaragd Shustov in 40 days. It was intended that building would be reliable for at least seven years, however 180 years later it is still in a fine condition.
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    2 votes
    211
    Venue Cymru

    Venue Cymru

    Venue Cymru is a large arts venue in Llandudno, Conwy county borough, north Wales, incorporating a 1,500 seat theatre, restaurant, conference centre and arena. The venue was previously known as the North Wales Theatre and the North Wales Conference Centre. There has been a theatre on the Venue Cymru site since 1894. Originally named the Victoria Palace, it was built by Jules Rivière (then aged 75) who for many years had been the celebrated resident conductor of the Llandudno Pier Orchestra and a pioneer of the seaside promenade concert. He established his own 42 piece orchestra at the 1,015 seat Victoria Palace, which attracted eminent visiting soloists including Sir Charles and Lady Hallé who in 1895 gave a piano and violin recital with the Orchestra. The building was only intended to be a temporary structure but became a landmark on the promenade for over 100 years. It changed its name several times, firstly to Rivière's Concert Hall, then in 1900 it became the Llandudno Opera House and the venue for the Carl Rosa Opera Company. Later it was called the Hippodrome. In 1915 the theatre was bought by Will Catlin and renamed the Arcadia. The Arcadia provided 1,147 seats in the
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    2 votes
    212
    Broadhurst Theatre

    Broadhurst Theatre

    The Broadhurst Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 235 West 44th Street in midtown Manhattan. It was designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, a well-known theatre designer who had been working directly with the Shubert brothers; the Broadhurst opened 27 September 1917. Built back-to-back with the Plymouth, it was meant to resemble the style of the neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts, using less expensive brick and terra cotta materials on the discreetly neoclassical facades. Like all of Krapp's work during this period, it features minimal ornamentation, a single balcony, wide space, and excellent sightlines. It was named after George Howells Broadhurst, an Anglo-American dramatist who came to America in 1886. In addition to writing plays, he managed theaters in Milwaukee, Baltimore, and San Francisco before he decided to open his own in association with the Shubert brothers. The theatre was constructed to house both musicals and plays, which it has done successfully for more than ninety years. It has been designated a New York City landmark. The Broadhurst opened on September 27, 1917 with George Bernard Shaw's Misalliance, the first New York
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Chicago Theatre

    Chicago Theatre

    The Chicago Theatre, originally known as the Balaban and Katz Chicago Theatre, is a landmark theater located on North State Street in the Loop area of Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. Built in 1921, the Chicago Theatre was the flagship for the Balaban and Katz (B&K) group of theaters run by A. J. Balaban, his brother Barney Balaban and their partner Sam Katz. Along with the other B&K theaters, from 1925 to 1945 the Chicago Theatre was a dominant movie theater enterprise. Now the Chicago Theatre is a performing arts venue for stage plays, magic shows, comedy, speeches, and popular music concerts. It is owned by Madison Square Garden, Inc. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 6, 1979, and it was listed as a Chicago Landmark on January 28, 1983. The iconic Chicago Theatre marquee, "as an unofficial emblem of the city", appears in film, television, artwork, and photography. Abe and Barney Balaban, together with Sam and Morris Katz (founders of the Balaban and Katz theater chain), built the Chicago Theatre in 1921 with plans for it to be one of a large chain of opulent motion picture houses. The theater would become the flagship for 28
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    1 votes
    214
    Live Theatre Company

    Live Theatre Company

    The Live Theatre Company is a theatre and company based in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. The company aims to attract new audiences for its accessible work as well as its friendly and informal theatre space. It was founded in Tyneside in 1973 by Val McLane and Geoff Gillham. The company originally toured its work regionally to non-traditional theatre settings, such as community halls and working men's clubs. The company was creating plays and stories that were relevant to the North East community and sought to break down barriers by presenting this work to ordinary working-class people within their own communities. The company has been based in Newcastle Quayside since 1982, expanding over the years to occupy the current premises which combine converted warehouses and Almshouses to create a unique building which houses a theatre auditorium, café bar, rehearsal spaces and administrative offices. Live Theatre develops new writing talent in the region. The company has enjoyed significant relationships with many writers such as CP Taylor, Tom Hadaway, Alan Plater and, more recently, Peter Flannery, Michael Chaplin, Peter Straughan, Julia Darling, Lee Hall, Sean O'Brien and Karen Laws.
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Minskoff Theatre

    Minskoff Theatre

    The Minskoff Theatre is a Broadway theatre, located at 1515 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan. It is now showing the musical The Lion King, based on the Disney animated film of the same name. The 1,621-seat venue, designed by architects Kahn and Jacobs, is on the third floor of One Astor Plaza, an office tower constructed on the site of the legendary Astor Hotel. Named after Sam Minskoff and Sons, builders and owners of the high-rise building, it opened on March 13, 1973, with a revival of Irene starring Debbie Reynolds. Over the years it has served as host to musicals, dance companies, and concerts. In 1981, it hosted Miss Universe 1981, won by Irene Saez of Venezuela, as well as the transfer of Joseph Papp's production of The Pirates of Penzance. In 1994, Sunset Boulevard was a hit at the theatre. In 2006, The Lion King transferred to the theatre, where it continues to run, as of 2012. In September 2007, a new set within the Minskoff space was created for the syndicated news magazine The Insider, which had formerly been based on the second floor of Astor Plaza in MTV's studios and in Los Angeles. The program moved back to Los Angeles fully for the 2008–09 season. The Tony Award
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    New Jersey Performing Arts Center

    New Jersey Performing Arts Center

    The New Jersey Performing Arts Center (NJPAC), in downtown Newark, New Jersey, United States, is one of the largest performing arts centers in the United States. Home to the Grammy Award-winning New Jersey Symphony Orchestra (NJSO), more than 6 million visitors (including more than one million children) have visited the center since it opened in October 1997 on the site of the former Military Park Hotel. NJPAC has been an important component in revitalization of New Jersey's largest city. Located just west of the Passaic River waterfront, the Center lies in the heart of the city's cultural district around Military Park and Washington Park that also includes the Newark Museum, New Jersey Historical Society, and the Newark Public Library. The Prudential Center is just to the south. NJPAC has one of the largest arts education programs offered by a performing arts center in the nation. The program includes arts training classes, scholarships, in-school residencies, professional development, and family and children's programming, allowing students, teachers and families to interact with professional artists and explore the various genres of music, theater, dance, poetry and more. The
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Royal Court Theatre

    Royal Court Theatre

    The Royal Court Theatre is a non-commercial theatre on Sloane Square, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London. It is noted for its contributions to modern theatre. In 1956 it was acquired by and is home to a resident company, the English Stage Company. The first theatre on Lower George Street, off Sloane Square, was the converted Nonconformist Ranelagh Chapel, opened as a theatre in 1870 under the name The New Chelsea Theatre. Marie Litton became its manager in 1871, hiring Walter Emden to remodel the interior, and it was renamed the Court Theatre. Several of W. S. Gilbert's early plays were staged here, including Randall's Thumb, Creatures of Impulse (with music by Alberto Randegger), Great Expectations (adapted from the Dickens novel), and On Guard (all in 1871); The Happy Land (1873, with Gilbert Abbott à Beckett; Gilbert's most controversial play); The Wedding March, translated from Un Chapeau de Paille d'Italie by Eugène Marin Labiche (1873); The Blue-Legged Lady, translated from La Dame aux Jambes d'Azur by Labiche and Marc-Michel (1874); and Broken Hearts (1875). By 1878, management of the theatre was shared by John Hare and W. H. Kendal. Further alterations
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    1 votes
    218
    Soho Theatre

    Soho Theatre

    Soho Theatre is a theatre in the eponymous Soho district of the City of Westminster. It presents new works of theatre, together with comedy and cabaret. The theatre is also home to a Writers' Centre, which provides support to new writers, aimed at developing writers to work in theatre as well as film, TV and radio. The Centre accepts unsolicited scripts sent by budding writers. The theatre has stand-up comedy, cabaret, and performance programmes. It often features newer comedians of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, as well as established comedians working on new material. The Soho Theatre Company was formed in 1969 by Verity Bargate and Fred Proud, and initially performed at a venue in Old Compton Street. Soon, the company moved to the Soho Poly, where it would remain for eighteen years. In 1990, the Soho Theatre Company entered a brief migrational period, where it visited the venues of the Royal Court, Riverside Studios and the ICA. Falling into a slow decline, the company was revitalised when it took up residence at the Cockpit Theatre of Marylebone, from 1993-95. During this "renaissance", they expanded their now famous Writers' Development programme, and premiered the works of
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    The Hexagon

    The Hexagon

    The Hexagon is a multi-purpose theatre and arts venue in Reading, Berkshire, England. Built in 1977 in the shape of an elongated hexagon, the theatre is operated by Reading Borough Council under the name "Reading Arts and Venues" along with South Street Arts Centre and Reading's concert hall. The theatre was built in 1977 by Robert Matthew Johnson Marshall (RMJM), who also built the adjacent Civic Centre. The original design featured a proscenium but no fly tower. Upon opening, the venue was comparable to Derby's Assembly Rooms—which also opened in 1977—but the Hexagon was described as architecturally and acoustically superior. As the building was designed operate as a multi-use venue, the arena-style seating was used to avoid limited visibility. This proved useful for sports such as snooker or boxing, but rendered a number of seats unusable during performances that utilised the proscenium. A review of the Hexagon's architectural design in a 1979 edition of the Architects' Journal surmised that dramatic performances were seen as a low priority in the design—despite an estimated quarter of all events being of this type. The stalls, which use removable and retractable seats, have
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Thekla

    Thekla

    Thekla is a cargo ship moored in the Mud Dock area of Bristol's Floating Harbour, England. Originally brought to Bristol as the Old Profanity Showboat, it was a late 1982 brainchild of novelist Ki Longfellow-Stanshall, the wife of Vivian Stanshall. The showboat was based on the idea of creating, owning, and running a theatre on a sea-going ship and using it to showcase music of every sort (limited only by the size of the hold), including cabaret, comedy, plays, musicals, and poetry events. The ship also contained an art gallery. The living quarters were home for Vivian, Ki, their daughter, Silky Longfellow-Stanshall, and Ki's daughter, Sydney Longfellow, as well as a few key personnel. During the 1990s, under new management, it was run as a rent-a-nightclub. The ship has now been returned to its original working name of The Thekla. The Thekla was built in Germany in 1959. One of the last of the riveted ships to be produced, she was 650 tons unladen, measured one hundred and eighty feet long from stem to stern, and thirty feet wide, with an eight foot draft. The Thekla's hold was lined with one of the hardest woods in the world, red jarrah from Australia. She is a "Coaster" ship and
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Mark Hellinger Theatre

    Mark Hellinger Theatre

    The Mark Hellinger Theatre is a generally used name of a former legitimate Broadway theater, located at 237 West 51st Street in midtown Manhattan, New York City. Since 1991, it has been known as the Times Square Church. The former theater, which remains largely unaltered in appearance, is most notable for having been the site of the original production of My Fair Lady, which ran from 1956-1962. Designed by architect Thomas W. Lamb, the theater was built by Warner Bros. as a deluxe movie palace to showcase their films on Broadway. It opened as the Warner Bros. Hollywood Theatre on April 22, 1930 with the Warner Technicolor musical film Hold Everything starring Winnie Lightner and Joe E. Brown. Although built as a cinema, the theater's stage, one of the largest on Broadway, was designed with the capacity to present large musical shows. As early as 1934 the Hollywood began presenting legitimate Broadway musicals, returning to films between live engagements. The first of these was Calling All Stars, a musical revue with Martha Raye. Still a Warner theater, on October 9, 1935, the Hollywood was the site of the New York premiere of Warner Bros's lavish film of A Midsummer Night's Dream.
    4.00
    2 votes
    222
    Athens Concert Hall

    Athens Concert Hall

    The Athens Concert Hall (Greek: Μέγαρον Μουσικής Αθηνών, Mégaron Mousikis Athinon) is a concert hall located in Athens, on Vassilissis Sofias Avenue. The Hall was inaugurated in 1991 with two halls. Since then it has been augmented with two more halls and now has a total of four: two large and two smaller ones. The Hall has optimal facilities for opera performances, and some operas are presented every season. The Megaro Moussikis station of the Athens Metro is just outside the Hall, on Line 3. The design of the 8,000 square meters floor was performed by Christopher Alexander; the process of designing and laying the floor and its result are described in his work The Nature of Order: An Essay on the Art of Building and the Nature of the Universe. In 2004 the International Conference Centre opened at the Athens Concert Hall, adding the List of concert halls
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Blackpool Grand Theatre

    Blackpool Grand Theatre

    Blackpool Grand Theatre is a theatre in Blackpool, Lancashire, England. Since 2006, it has also been known as the National Theatre of Variety. It is a Grade II* Listed Building. The Grand was designed by Victorian theatre architect Frank Matcham and was opened in 1894 after a construction period of seven months, at a cost of £20,000 between December 1893 and July 1894. The project was conceived and financed by local theatre manager Thomas Sergenson who had been using the site of the Grand for several years to stage a circus. He had also transformed the fortunes of other local theatres. Matcham's brief was to build Sergenson the "prettiest theatre in the land". The Grand was Matcham's first theatre to use an innovative 'cantilever' design to support the tiers, thereby reducing the need for the usual pillars and so allowing clear views of the stage from all parts of the auditorium. Sergenson's successful directorship of the theatre ended in 1909 when he sold the operation to the Blackpool Tower Company for a considerable profit. The success of the Grand continued through World War I and on until the 1930s. The theatre now faced stiff competition from the newly introduced talking
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Chrysler Hall

    Chrysler Hall

    Chrysler Hall is a performing arts venue in Downtown Norfolk, Virginia. Built in 1972 and located next to the Norfolk Scope arena, the venue is home to the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, the Virginia Ballet and hosts Broadway plays while serving as Norfolk's primary theater and concert venue.The venue also contains a studio theater in the lower levels of the complex that serves as the current home of the Generic Theater. The City of Norfolk owns and operates the venue.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Crucible Theatre

    Crucible Theatre

    The Crucible Theatre is a theatre built in 1971 and located in the city centre of Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. As well as theatrical performances, it is home to the most important event in professional snooker, the World Snooker Championship. The Crucible Theatre was built by M J Gleeson and opened in 1971 replacing the Playhouse Repertory theatre in Townhead Street. In 1967 Colin George, the founding Artistic Director of the Crucible, recommended a thrust stage for Sheffield, inspired by theatres created by Sir Tyrone Guthrie. Tanya Moiseiwitsch, who had been involved in designing Guthrie’s theatres, was the designer. The architects Renton Howard Wood Levin Architects were engaged and the building itself began to take shape in 1969. It was completed in two years, on time for the opening performance in November 1971 of Fanfare an evening’s entertainment comprising children participating in an improvised scene, Chekhov’s Swan Song with Ian McKellen and Edward Petherbridge and a Music Hall Finale with a Sheffield Brass Band. This demonstrated the versatility of the stage, which has since been adapted to Dance and Musical performance, as well as classical and modern theatre,
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Mariinsky Theatre

    Mariinsky Theatre

    The Mariinsky Theatre (Russian: Мариинский театр, Mariinskiy Teatr, also spelled Maryinsky, Mariyinsky) is a historic theatre of opera and ballet in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Opened in 1860, it became the preeminent music theatre of late 19th century Russia, where many of the stage masterpieces of Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, and Rimsky-Korsakov received their premieres. The Mariinsky Theatre is home to the Mariinsky Ballet, Mariinsky Opera and Mariinsky Orchestra. Since Yuri Temirkanov's retirement in 1988, the conductor Valery Gergiev has served as its general director. The theatre is named after Empress Maria Alexandrovna, wife of Tsar Alexander II. There is a bust of the Empress in the main entrance foyer. The theatre's name has changed throughout its history, reflecting the political climate of the time: Note: The acronym "GATOB" (Gosudarstvennïy Akademicheskiy Teatr Operï i Baleta) is often encountered in historical accounts. The theatre building is commonly called the Mariinsky Theatre. The companies that operate within it have for brand recognition purposes retained the famous Kirov name, acquired during the Soviet era to commemorate the assassinated Leningrad Communist Party
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    Phoenix Theatre

    Phoenix Theatre

    The Phoenix Theatre is a West End theatre in the London Borough of Camden, located on Charing Cross Road (at the corner with Flitcroft Street). The entrance is in Phoenix Street. The theatre was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, Bertie Crewe and Cecil Massey and is Grade II listed. It has a restrained neoclassical exterior, but an interior designed in an Italianate style by director and designer Theodore Komisarjevsky. It opened on 24 September 1930 with the première of Private Lives by Noël Coward, who also appeared in the play, with Adrienne Allen, Gertrude Lawrence and a then young Laurence Olivier. Coward returned to the theatre with Tonight at 8:30 in 1936 and Quadrille in 1952. On 16 December 1969, the long association with Coward was celebrated with a midnight matinee in honour of his 70th birthday, and the foyer bar was renamed the Noel Coward Bar. The Phoenix has had a number of successful plays including John Gielgud's Love for Love during the Second World War. Harlequinade and The Browning Version, two plays by Terence Rattigan, opened on 8 September 1948 at the theatre. In the mid 1950s, Paul Scofield and Peter Brook appeared at the theatre. In 1968, a musical
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    Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts

    Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts

    The Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts is a performing arts center in downtown West Palm Beach, Florida. It is operated by a private, not-for-profit 501(c)(3) corporation, and with a growing national and international reputation, is one of the premier performing arts centers in the Southeast. The Kravis Center opened fully funded in 1992 and is a success story that provides communities worldwide with an example of a thriving performing arts center and a major community and economic catalyst. Set on 10.6 acres of property at the highest point in the city, the Kravis Center includes four venues -- the 2,195-seat Alexander W. Dreyfoos, Jr. Concert Hall, the flexible 289-seat Rinker Playhouse, the 170-seat Helen K. Persson Hall and the outdoor Michael and Andrew Gosman Amphitheatre with a capacity for 1,400 guests. Additionally, the Kravis Center facilities include the Cohen Pavilion, which houses the Weiner Banquet Center including the Gimelstob Ballroom, The Elmore Family Business Center for the Arts and The Picower Foundation Arts Education Center, which includes Persson Hall and The Khoury Family Dance Rehearsal Hall. The Center also has a five-level parking garage.
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    Sydney Opera House

    Sydney Opera House

    The Sydney Opera House is a multi-venue performing arts centre in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It was conceived and largely built by Danish architect Jørn Utzon, opening in 1973 after a long gestation that had begun with his competition-winning design in 1957. Joseph Cahill's New South Wales Government gave the go-ahead for work to begin in 1958. The government's bold decision to select Utzon's design is often overshadowed by the scandal that followed. The Sydney Opera House was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site on 28 June 2007. It is one of the 20th century's most distinctive buildings and one of the most famous performing arts centres in the world. The Sydney Opera House is on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour, close to the Sydney Harbour Bridge. It sits at the northeastern tip of the Sydney central business district (the CBD), surrounded on three sides by the harbour (Sydney Cove and Farm Cove) and inland by the Royal Botanic Gardens. Contrary to its name, the building houses multiple performance venues. The Sydney Opera House is among the busiest performing arts centres in the world, hosting over 1,500 performances each year attended by some 1.2 million people. It
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    Trafalgar Studios

    Trafalgar Studios

    Trafalgar Studios, formerly The Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London. Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on June 3, 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus. The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. The theatre opened on September 29, 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the
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    Al-Aqsa Mosque

    Al-Aqsa Mosque

    Al-Aqsa Mosque (Arabic:المسجد الاقصى al-Masjid al-Aqsa, IPA: [ʔælˈmæsʒɪd ælˈʔɑqsˤɑ] ( listen), "the Farthest Mosque,") also known as Al-Aqsa and Bayt al-Muqaddas, is the third holiest site in Islam and is located in the Old City of Jerusalem. The site on which the silver domed mosque sits, along with the Dome of the Rock, also referred to as al-Haram ash-Sharif or "Noble Sanctuary," is the Temple Mount, the holiest site in Judaism, the place where the Temple is generally accepted to have stood. Muslims believe that Muhammad was transported from the Sacred Mosque in Mecca to al-Aqsa during the Night Journey. Islamic tradition holds that Muhammad led prayers towards this site until the seventeenth month after the emigration, when God directed him to turn towards the Ka'aba. The mosque was originally a small prayer house built by the Rashidun caliph Umar, but was rebuilt and expanded by the Umayyad caliph Abd al-Malik and finished by his son al-Walid in 705 CE. After an earthquake in 746, the mosque was completely destroyed and rebuilt by the Abbasid caliph al-Mansur in 754, and again rebuilt by his successor al-Mahdi in 780. Another earthquake destroyed most of al-Aqsa in 1033, but
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    Bethel Woods

    Bethel Woods

    The Bethel Woods Center for the Arts is a not-for-profit performing arts center and museum located at the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival in Bethel, New York, which took place on a parcel of the original Max Yasgur's Dairy Farm. Located approximately 90 miles (140 km) from New York City, the 15,000-capacity outdoor performing arts venue, intimate 400-seat Event Gallery, and Museum at Bethel Woods are located on a 2,000-acre (8.1 km) campus. Bethel Woods offers a diverse selection of performances, educational and community programs, including the annual Harvest Festival, which covers topics such as history and the arts, community collaboration and outreach. In 1996, Alan Gerry, a Liberty, New York cable television pioneer (Cablevision Industries Corporation) and philanthropist purchased the original festival field and 1,700 acres (6.9 km) surrounding it, with eventual plans for an arts center. The $100 million project was launched by the Gerry Foundation in 2004. The Museum is designed to preserve the historic site on which the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair took place. Bethel Woods features a 7,500-square-foot (700 m) stage, a 4,500 covered seat pavilion and a natural
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    Bryantsev Youth Theatre

    Bryantsev Youth Theatre

    The A. Bryantsev Youth Theatre (also spelled State Theater For Young Audience Named After A. A. Bryantsev or Bryantsev Young Viewers Theater; Russian: Театр Юного Зрителя имени Брянцева) is one of the first professional children's theatres in Russia, opened in 1922. In Soviet time the theatre was called Leningrad Young People's Theatre (Russian: Ленинградский театр юных зрителей, ЛенТЮЗ). In 1962 it was moved to the current newly constructed building. The theatre is in Saint Petersburg, on the Pionerskaya Square near the end of Gorokhovaya Street. The theatre has been the start of many well-known actors, and is well known for playing fairy tales. The Theatre is named after its founder Alexander Bryantsev (1883-1961). He was the leader of the theatre in 1921-1961 and directed more than fifty plays there. In 1962-1986 the leader of the theater was Zinovy Korogodsky. He directed more than one hundred plays and left a whole school of actors in the theatre. In 1986-1996 the artistic director of the theater was Andrey Andreyev.In 1996-1998 the artistic director was Anatoly Praudin succeeded by Sergey Kargin (1999-2002). In 2002-2007 Theater's Artistic Director was Grigory Kozlov.
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    Charles Theatre

    Charles Theatre

    The Charles Theatre, often referred to as simply the Charles, is the oldest movie theatre in Baltimore. The theatre is a Beaux-Arts building designed as a streetcar barn in 1892 by Jackson C. Gott, located in what is now the Station North arts and entertainment district. The theater was renamed the Charles (for its location on Charles Street) circa 1959 and became a calendar revival house in 1979. Many of John Waters's early films premiered at this theatre; this honor has since shifted to the Senator Theatre. In 1999, it underwent a major expansion and is now a five-screen theater, though the original main theater has been left largely intact and is still the largest theater in the complex. The Charles now serves as an arthouse multiplex, showing a variety of independent films along with some major studio prestige pictures. The main theatre hosts revival series and special screenings several times a week, as well as the occasional live concert performance. The entire theater complex serves as the host of the annual Maryland Film Festival. The Charles sits just across the tracks of the Northeast Corridor from Penn Station, putting the theater within easy walking distance of Amtrak,
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    Croke Park

    Croke Park

    Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh, IPA: [ˈpaːɾʲc ən̪ˠ ˈxɾˠoːkˠə]) is a sports stadium located in Dublin, Ireland. It is the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). Since 1884 the site has been used primarily by the GAA to host Gaelic games, most notably the annual finals of the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship and Senior Hurling Championship. Music concerts by major international acts have also been held in "Croker", as it is often called by Dubliners, and it hosted the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2003 Special Olympics. During the construction of the Aviva Stadium, the stadium also hosted the Ireland rugby union team and the Republic of Ireland soccer team. In June 2012, the stadium was used to host the closing ceremony of the 50th International Eucharistic Congress during which Pope Benedict gave an address to approximately eighty thousand people. Following a redevelopment programme started in the 1990s, Croke Park has a capacity of 82,300, making it the fourth largest stadium in Europe, and the largest not primarily used for association football. The area now known as Croke Park was originally an Athletics Course known
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    Hackney Empire

    Hackney Empire

    The Hackney Empire is a theatre on Mare Street, in the London Borough of Hackney, built in 1901 as a music hall. Hackney Empire is a grade II* listed building. The theatre was built as a music hall in 1901, designed by the architect Frank Matcham. Charlie Chaplin, WC Fields, Stanley Holloway, Stan Laurel and Marie Lloyd all performed there, when the Hackney Empire was a music hall. ATV bought the theatre to use as studios in the 1950s, and shows such as Take Your Pick and Oh, Boy! were broadcast live. Some scenes from Emergency - Ward 10 were also filmed there. From 1963 to 1984 the theatre was used by the Mecca Organisation as a bingo hall. In 1984, Mecca found the building too expensive to maintain as a bingo hall, and it was offered to C.A.S.T, a satirical touring theatre group, headed by Claire and Roland Muldoon, as a London base. They also mounted successful variety nights headlined by a new breed of alternative comedy acts, such as Ben Elton, Dawn French, and Jennifer Saunders. The theatre was threatened with demolition, and in 1986, actor-manager Roland Muldoon mounted a campaign to acquire the freehold and to re-open the Hackney Empire as a permanent performance space;
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    Joiners Arms

    Joiners Arms

    The Joiners Arms is a Public House and small music venue at 141 St Mary's Street, St Mary's, Southampton, England. It has played host to many up-and-coming bands such as Oasis and Coldplay. There are gigs most nights of the week by national acts and local bands. The venue is currently owned by Patrick Muldowney, who also plays a vital role as the doorman. Bands such as Arctic Monkeys during interviews with NME have often mentioned the Joiners, describing it as "a place where you have to play to get started." Friendly Fires stated that "without the Joiners Arms and other venues like that around the UK, we would not be where we are, and for that we are so grateful." Richard Ashcroft from the Verve is very fond of the venue, saying Verve played their best ever gig there. It runs shows from a wide range of genres including rock, metal, indie, dance, drum and bass and hip-hop. It is one of the only venues in the country still putting on music every night. Many bands have played there when just starting out; the maximum capacity is 150 people. The team that runs The Joiners, Pat and co, also runs an alternative nightclub named Unit off Clovely Road in Southampton. Their website provides
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    Longacre Theatre

    Longacre Theatre

    The Longacre Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 220 West 48th Street in midtown Manhattan. Designed by architect Henry Beaumont Herts in 1912, it was named for Longacre Square, the original name for Times Square. The French neo-classical building was constructed by impresario Harry Frazee, better remembered as the owner of the Boston Red Sox who, needing money for his theatrical ventures, sold Babe Ruth's contract to the New York Yankees. A curse allegedly lingers on the theater as a result, and superstitious producers avoid it for fear they'll be backing a flop, as noted by William Goldman in his seminal book The Season: A Candid Look at Broadway. Despite the rumor, a large number of performers who have appeared on stage here have taken home a Tony Award for their efforts. The Longacre's first show was a production of the William Hurlbut-Frances Whitehouse comedy Are You a Crook?, which opened on May 1, 1913. With the exception of its use as a radio and television studio in the mid-1940s to early 1950s, the theatre has operated as a legitimate Broadway venue. The second Broadway revival of La Cage aux Folles in 2010 achieved the box office record for the Longacre Theatre.
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    Manchester Opera House

    Manchester Opera House

    The Opera House in Quay Street, Manchester, England is a 1,920 seater commercial touring theatre which plays host to touring musicals, ballet, concerts and a Christmas pantomime. It is a Grade II listed building. The theatre opened as the New Theatre, renamed the New Queen’s Theatre in 1915 and the Opera House in 1920. It closed in 1979 and for five years was a bingo hall. The Palace Trust acquired it in 1984 and returned it to a theatre. In 1990 it was acquired by Apollo Leisure and staged large-scale musicals. The theatre has a rectangular plan and is built of stuccoed brick with a slate roof. Its symmetrical 15 bay facade is in the Classical style with a five bay centre with fluted Ionic columns. Above the three central bays is a relief of a horse-drawn chariot within a semi-circular arch. The gable has a moulded cornice on brackets. The entrance canopy is a 20th century addition. The auditorium has two curved cantilevered balconies with large overhangs each holding 500 seats. Either side of the stage are stacked boxes between pairs of fluted Corinthian columns. The high proscenium arch is decorated with a circular medallion flanked by gryphons. The high ceiling above the
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    Massey Hall

    Massey Hall

    Massey Hall is a venerable performing arts theatre in the Garden District of downtown Toronto. The theatre originally was designed to seat 3,500 patrons but, after extensive renovations in the 1940s, now seats up to 2,765. Massey Hall and the more intimate Eaton Auditorium were the only substantial concert venues in Toronto before the opening of Roy Thomson Hall as the new home of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Massey Hall was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1981. Designed by architect Sidney Badgley, Massey Hall was completed in 1894 at a cost of $152,390.75. Construction was financed by Hart Massey of Massey-Harris (later Massey Ferguson, before its ultimate principal shareholder director Conrad Black wound down its operations and retired its assets into the Varity Corporation) holding company. The hall's debut concert was on June 14, 1894. In 1933, the Massey Foundation undertook further renovations to the hall. It is currently used for a variety of events and is operated by the same corporation as Roy Thomson Hall. Many dignitaries have attended the Hall since its inauguration. In 1901, the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and
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    Nederlander Theatre

    Nederlander Theatre

    David T. Nederlander Theatre (formerly the Billy Rose Theatre and National Theatre, commonly shortened to the Nederlander Theatre) is a 1,232-seat Broadway theatre located at 208 West 41st Street, in New York City. One of the Nederlander Organization's nine Broadway theatres, the legacy of the theatre began with David Tobias Nederlander, for whom the theatre is named. Built by Walter C. Jordan in 1921, the theatre was originally named the National Theatre. It was renamed the Billy Rose Theatre in 1959, and in 1979 was very briefly renamed the Trafalgar Theatre; it became the David T. Nederlander Theatre in 1980. It housed Times Square Church before The Nederlander Organization sold the Mark Hellinger Theatre to the church's pastor, David Wilkerson. A wide variety of shows have played the Nederlander, including Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and King Lear, Edmond Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac, Noël Coward's Private Lives, Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and the Tony award winning Rent. Lena Horne won a 1981 Tony Award for her performance at the Nederlander in her eponymous Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music. Located in the Times Square Theatre District, the Nederlander
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    Old Vic

    Old Vic

    The Old Vic is a theatre located just south-east of Waterloo Station in London on the corner of The Cut and Waterloo Road. Established in 1818 as the Royal Coburg Theatre, it was taken over by Emma Cons in 1880 when it was known formally as the Royal Victoria Hall. In 1898, a niece of Cons, Lilian Baylis assumed management and began a series of Shakespeare productions in 1914. The building was damaged in 1940 during air raids and it became a Grade II* listed building in 1951 after it reopened. It was also the name of a repertory company that was based at the theatre. The company formed the core of the National Theatre of Great Britain on its formation in 1963, under Laurence Olivier. The National Theatre remained at the Old Vic until new premises were constructed on the South Bank, opening in 1976. It underwent complete refurbishment in 1985 and in 2003, American actor Kevin Spacey was appointed as new artistic director of the Old Vic Theatre Company which received considerable media attention. The theatre was founded in 1818 by James King and Daniel Dunn (formerly managers of the Surrey Theatre in Bermondsey), and John Thomas Serres, then Marine painter to the King who managed to
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    Prince Edward Theatre

    Prince Edward Theatre

    The Prince Edward Theatre is a West End theatre situated on Old Compton Street, just north of Leicester Square, in the City of Westminster. The theatre was designed in 1930 by Edward A. Stone, with an interior designed by Marc-Henri Levy and Gaston Laverdet. Named after Prince Edward (then the Prince of Wales, briefly Edward VIII and later Duke of Windsor), it opened on April 3, 1930 with a performance of the musical Rio Rita. Other notable events in its opening years included the London debut of famed cabaret artiste Josephine Baker, who performed her famous 'Bananas Dance'. In 1935, Stone converted the theatre to a dance and cabaret hall, being renamed the "London Casino". In 1942, stage alterations were undertaken by Thomas Braddock, re-opening as the "Queensberry All Services Club" in 1942 – a club for servicemen, the shows were broadcast on the BBC. After the war, the architects T. and B. Bradock restored the building to theatrical use, becoming the "London Casino" once again — when the King of Yiddish Music Leo Fuld hit the stage. In 1954, the same architects converted it to a cinema, reopening as the "Casino Cinerama Theatre". In 1974, the theatre was acquired by impresario
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    Prince of Wales Theatre

    Prince of Wales Theatre

    The Prince of Wales Theatre is a West End theatre in Coventry Street, near Leicester Square in the City of Westminster. It was established in 1884 and rebuilt in 1937, and extensively refurbished in 2004 by Sir Cameron Mackintosh, its current owner. The theatre should not be confused with the former Scala Theatre in Charlotte Street, off Tottenham Court Road that was known as the Prince of Wales Royal Theatre or Prince of Wales's Theatre from 1865 until its demolition in 1903. The first theatre on the site opened in January 1884 when C.J. Phipps built the Prince's Theatre for actor-manager Edgar Bruce. It was a traditional three-tier theatre, seating just over 1,000 people. The theatre was renamed the "Prince of Wales Theatre" in 1886 after the future Edward VII. Located between Piccadilly Circus and Leicester Square, the theatre was favourably situated to attract theatregoers. The first production in the theatre was an 1884 revival of W. S. Gilbert's The Palace of Truth starring Herbert Beerbohm Tree, preceded by a one act comedy, In Honour Bound. This was soon followed by a free adaptation of Ibsen's A Doll's House, called Breaking a Butterfly. In 1885, Lillie Langtry, reputedly
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    Savoy Theatre

    Savoy Theatre

    The Savoy Theatre is a West End theatre located in the Strand in the City of Westminster, London, England. The theatre opened on 10 October 1881 and was built by Richard D'Oyly Carte on the site of the old Savoy Palace as a showcase for the popular series of comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan, which became known as the Savoy Operas as a result. The theatre was the first theatre, and the first public building in the world, to be lit entirely by electricity. In 1889, Richard D'Oyly Carte built the Savoy Hotel next to the theatre. For many years, the Savoy was the home of the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, and it was run by the Carte family for over a century. Richard's son Rupert D'Oyly Carte rebuilt and modernised the theatre in 1929, and it was rebuilt again in 1993 following a fire. It is a Grade II* listed building. Apart from The Mikado and other famous Gilbert and Sullivan premières, the theatre has hosted such notable premières as Noël Coward's Blithe Spirit in 1941. In recent years it has presented opera, Shakespeare and other non-musical plays, as well as musicals, including revivals of Fiddler on the Roof and Carousel, and new shows like Never Forget. The original London
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    Teatro alla Scala

    Teatro alla Scala

    La Scala (Italian: Teatro alla Scala), is a world renowned opera house in Milan, Italy. The theatre was inaugurated on 3 August 1778 and was originally known as the New Royal-Ducal Theatre at La Scala (Nuovo Regio Ducale Teatro alla Scala). The premiere performance was Antonio Salieri's Europa riconosciuta. Most of Italy's greatest operatic artists, and many of the finest singers from around the world, have appeared at La Scala during the past 200 years. Today, the theatre is still recognised as one of the leading opera and ballet theatres in the world and is home to the La Scala Theatre Chorus, La Scala Theatre Ballet and La Scala Theatre Orchestra. The theatre also has an associate school, known as the La Scala Theatre Academy (Italian: Accademia Teatro alla Scala), which offers professional training in music, dance, stage craft and stage management. La Scala's season traditionally opens on 7 December, Saint Ambrose's Day, the feast day of Milan's patron saint. All performances must end before midnight, and long operas start earlier in the evening when necessary. The Museo Teatrale alla Scala (La Scala Theatre Museum), accessible from the theatre's foyer and a part of the house,
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    The Helix

    The Helix

    The Helix is a building on the Dublin City University campus between Glasnevin and Whitehall on Dublin's Northside, originally planned to be called the Aula Maxima. It was completed in 2002, and it is described as a "performance space" and holds concerts, university conferring ceremonies and national arts shows. The Helix has three areas for live performances: At a cost of €36.5 million, The Helix is an Arts Centre comprising Concert Hall, Theatre, Studio Theatre, Exhibition Area, Artists in Residence Studios and full support spaces; the building is three storey over basement (undeveloped space). The gross floor area of the building is 11,650m2. It was designed by architects A & D Wejchert & Partners, with acoustics by Arup Acoustics. The venue prides itself on the range of performing arts that it can stage. The seating layouts in each of the three venues and the ratio of audience to performance can be changed to allow alternative uses. The Helix has been host to world-class performances ranging from the Russian State Philharmonic Orchestra, The St. Petersburg Ballet, International Theatre and World Singers to hit west End Shows. The Helix has been host to many orchestras from
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    The Muny

    The Muny

    The Muny, short for The Municipal Theatre Association of St. Louis, is an outdoor musical amphitheatre, located in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri. The theater seats 11,000 people with approximately 1,500 free seats in the last nine rows that are available on a first come, first served basis. The Muny has completed its 92nd annual summer season. The Muny seasons run every year from mid-June to mid-August. It is run by a not-for-profit organization. The current president and chief executive is Dennis M. Reagan. The current executive producer is Mike Isaacson. In 1914, Luther Ely Smith began staging pageant-Masques on Art Hill in Forest Park. In 1916, a grassy area between two oak trees on the present site of The Muny was chosen for a production of As You Like It produced by Margaret Anglin and starring Sydney Greenstreet with a local cast of "1,000 St. Louis folk dancers and folk singers." Soon after, the Convention Board of the St. Louis Advertising Club was looking for an entertainment feature for its thirteenth annual convention, which was to take place June 3, 1917. Mayor Henry Kiel, attorney Guy Golterman, and Parks Commissioner Nelson Cunliff stepped in and, in forty-nine
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    Uptown Theater

    Uptown Theater

    The Uptown Theater is a historic theater located at 3700 Broadway in the Valentine neighborhood in the Midtown area of Kansas City, Missouri. As Uptown Building and Theatre, the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. The original design for the Uptown was carried out by Kansas City architect Robert Gornall. Construction first began on the portion of the Uptown that would house offices and shops along Broadway. This office and retail portion of the Uptown was completed in November 1926. Gornall's plans also called for a theater to extend along the rear portion of the building, with a tower at the north end to serve as an entrance and foyer. As the office and retail portion of the Uptown was nearing completion, the footing was also poured for the theater portion of the Uptown; however work was halted until the Universal Film Company acquired the unfinished building in 1927. Austrian-born designer John Eberson was hired to complete the construction of the Uptown and oversee the decoration of the interior. Kansas City-based Fleming-Gilchrist Construction Company served as the general contractor for both phases of the Uptown construction. Eberson
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    Victoria Palace Theatre

    Victoria Palace Theatre

    Victoria Palace Theatre is a West End theatre in Victoria Street, in the City of Westminster, opposite Victoria Station. The theatre began life as a small concert room above the stables of the Royal Standard Hotel, a small hotel and tavern built in 1832 at what was then 522 Stockbridge Terrace, on the site of the present theatre – not, as sometimes stated, on land where the train station now stands. The proprietor, John Moy, enlarged the building, and by 1850 it became known as Moy's Music Hall. Alfred Brown took it over in 1863, refurbished it, and renamed it the Royal Standard Music Hall. The hotel was demolished in 1886, by which time the main line terminus, Victoria Station and its new Grosvenor Hotel, had transformed the area into a major transport hub. The railways were at this time building grand hotel structures at their termini, and Victoria was one of the first. Added to this was the integration of the electric underground system and the building of Victoria Street. The owner of the music hall, Thomas Dickey, had it rebuilt along more ambitious lines in 1886 by Richard Wake, retaining the name Royal Standard Music Hall. The Royal Standard, was demolished in 1910, and in
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