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Best US Census Designated Place of All Time

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    1
    Idylwood

    Idylwood

    Idylwood is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 16,005 at the 2000 census. It originally developed as an exurban community along the route of the Washington and Old Dominion Railroad, and then as a residential suburb along Virginia State Route 7. The construction of the Capital Beltway in the 1960s, and I-66 and the Orange Line of the Washington Metrorail system in the 1980s, as well as the concurrent development of nearby Tysons Corner into Washington's leading suburban business district, led to the development of several apartment, townhouse, and small-lot single-family housing complexes, as well as the high-rise Idylwood Towers condominium, in the portion of Idylwood lying to the north of I-66. The area to the south of I-66 remains largely large-lot single-family. Idylwood is located at 38°53′23″N 77°12′21″W / 38.88972°N 77.20583°W / 38.88972; -77.20583 (38.889722, -77.205920). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.8 square miles (7.4 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,005 people, 6,560 households, and 3,831 families residing in the CDP. The population
    7.25
    8 votes
    2
    Piney View

    Piney View

    Piney View is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 989 at the 2010 census. Piney View is located at 37°50′58″N 81°8′43″W / 37.84944°N 81.14528°W / 37.84944; -81.14528 (37.849380, -81.145257). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.1 square miles (10.5 km²); 4.1 square miles (10.4 km²) of this is land, and 0.03 square miles (0.1 km²) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,046 people, 420 households, and 307 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 99.5 people per square mile (38.4/km²). There were 461 housing units at an average density of 43.9/sq mi (16.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.37% White, 1.15% African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.10% Asian, and 0.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.96% of the population. There were 420 households out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.9% were non-families. 23.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone
    7.29
    7 votes
    3
    Pea Ridge

    Pea Ridge

    Pea Ridge is a census-designated place (CDP) in Cabell County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 6,650 at the 2010 census. Pea Ridge is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2010 census, the MSA had a population of 287,702. Pea Ridge is located at 38°24′56″N 82°19′17″W / 38.41556°N 82.32139°W / 38.41556; -82.32139 (38.415668, -82.321367). It is a suburban community to nearby Huntington, West Virginia. It is centered around Pea Ridge Road, running from Barbousville to Altizer, a neighborhood in Huntington. Pea Ridge Road is divided into East and West sections separated by a short section of Route 60. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.1 km²), of which, 2.3 square miles (5.9 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (2.41%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,363 people, 2,814 households, and 1,820 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,756.2 people per square mile (1,063.5/km²). There were 3,046 housing units at an average density of 1,319.4/sq mi (509.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.58% White,
    8.17
    6 votes
    4
    Fishersville

    Fishersville

    Fishersville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 4,998 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Fishersville is also home to Barren Ridge Vineyards (on the Shenandoah Valley Wine Trail), winner of the 2009 Best in Show wine at the Virginia State Fair. Fishersville is located at 38°05′55″N 78°58′04″W / 38.098737°N 78.967824°W / 38.098737; -78.967824 (38.098737, -78.967824). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 13.1 square miles (34.0 km), of which, 13.1 square miles (34.0 km) of it is land and 0.08% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,998 people, 1,826 households, and 1,433 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 380.6 people per square mile (147.0/km). There were 1,931 housing units at an average density of 147.0/sq mi (56.8/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.76% White, 3.98% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.62% of the population. There were 1,826 households out of which 32.6% had
    9.00
    5 votes
    5
    Rushmere

    Rushmere

    Rushmere is a census-designated place (CDP) in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,083 at the 2000 census. Rushmere is located at 37°4′43″N 76°40′28″W / 37.07861°N 76.67444°W / 37.07861; -76.67444 (37.078580, -76.674436). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.5 square miles (22.0 km²), of which, 8.4 square miles (21.6 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.4 km²) of it (1.88%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,083 people, 435 households, and 313 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 129.6 people per square mile (50.1/km²). There were 529 housing units at an average density of 63.3/sq mi (24.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 36.38% White, 62.14% African American, 0.65% Native American, 0.28% Asian, and 0.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.83% of the population. There were 435 households out of which 23.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.0% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals and
    6.86
    7 votes
    6
    Lakeside

    Lakeside

    Lakeside is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. The population was 11,849 at the 2010 census. Lakeside is located at 37°36′39″N 77°28′33″W / 37.61083°N 77.47583°W / 37.61083; -77.47583 (37.610695, -77.475747). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.4 square miles (11.4 km), of which 4.3 square miles (11.2 km) is land and 0.077 square miles (0.2 km), or 1.58%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,157 people, 4,982 households, and 2,909 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,657.1 people per square mile (1,025.7/km²). There were 5,177 housing units at an average density of 1,232.9/sq mi (475.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 86.16% White, 8.75% African American, 0.61% Native American, 1.43% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.22% from other races, and 1.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.45% of the population. There were 4,982 households out of which 24.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.1% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.6% were non-families. 33.9%
    7.67
    6 votes
    7
    Huntington

    Huntington

    Huntington is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 11,267 at the 2010 census. To the east is Belle Haven, Fairfax County, Virginia and to the south Groveton, Virginia. Its main component is the namesake Huntington subdivision, a late-1940s neighborhood of mainly duplex homes. In June 2006, the lower-lying northern section was ravaged by floods due to a torrential rainstorm that sent adjoining Cameron Run over its banks. Nevertheless, it remains popular with first-time home buyers due largely to its proximity to the Huntington Metro station, the southern terminus of Metrorail's Yellow Line. There are also several high-rise apartment and condominium complexes on and near Route 1 where much of the CDP's remaining population resides. The area is included in ZIP code 22303, to which “Alexandria” is assigned as the place name. Huntington is located at 38°47′33″N 77°4′20″W / 38.7925°N 77.07222°W / 38.7925; -77.07222 (38.792563, -77.072120). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.8 square miles (2.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 8,325 people, 4,615 households, and
    8.80
    5 votes
    8
    Springfield

    Springfield

    Springfield is a census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States and a suburb of Washington, D.C. The Springfield CDP is recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau with a population of 30,484 as of the 2010 census. Homes and businesses in bordering CDPs including North Springfield, West Springfield, and Newington are usually given a "Springfield" mailing address. The population of the collective areas with Springfield addresses is estimated to exceed 100,000. The CDP is a part of Northern Virginia, the most populous area of the Washington Metropolitan Area and the most affluent region in the nation. Springfield is located at 38°46′45″N 77°11′4″W / 38.77917°N 77.18444°W / 38.77917; -77.18444 (38.779238, -77.184636). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.9 square miles (20.4 km²), of which, 7.9 square miles (20.3 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.49%) is water. The area is dominated by the interchange of I-95, I-395, and the Capital Beltway (I-495), known as the Springfield Interchange. The center of the town is at the intersection of Route 644 (Old Keene Mill Road / Franconia Road) and Route 617
    7.50
    6 votes
    9
    Dryden

    Dryden

    Dryden is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lee County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,253 at the 2000 census. Dryden is located at 36°46′33″N 82°56′39″W / 36.77583°N 82.94417°W / 36.77583; -82.94417 (36.775836, -82.944157). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.1 square miles (18.4 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,253 people, 453 households, and 329 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 175.9 people per square mile (67.9/km²). There were 507 housing units at an average density of 71.2/sq mi (27.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.64% White, 0.72% African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.24% Asian, and 0.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.16% of the population. There were 453 households out of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.2% were non-families. 24.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and
    8.60
    5 votes
    10
    South Wallins

    South Wallins

    South Wallins is a census-designated place (CDP) in Harlan County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 996 at the 2000 census. South Wallins is located at 36°48′59″N 83°24′41″W / 36.81639°N 83.41139°W / 36.81639; -83.41139 (36.816469, -83.411475). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.3 square miles (16.3 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 996 people, 405 households, and 287 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 158.4 people per square mile (61.1/km²). There were 448 housing units at an average density of 71.2/sq mi (27.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.29% White, 0.20% Native American, and 2.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.20% of the population. There were 405 households out of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.9% were non-families. 26.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size
    9.75
    4 votes
    11
    Tamalpais-Homestead Valley

    Tamalpais-Homestead Valley

    Tamalpais-Homestead Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Marin County, California, United States. The population was 10,735 at the 2010 census. Tamalpais-Homestead Valley is located at 37°53′19″N 122°32′23″W / 37.888526°N 122.539609°W / 37.888526; -122.539609. Nearest cities are Mill Valley to the north and Sausalito to the south. It is about 10 minutes north of San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge by car. California State Route 1 (also known as Shoreline Highway and the Pacific Coast Highway) runs through the Valley and is the road most often used to access western Marin County. Nearby landmarks include the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), Mount Tamalpais State Park, Muir Woods National Monument, Tennessee Valley and Muir Beach. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.7 square miles (12 km), of which, 4.6 square miles (12 km) of it is land and 0.32% is water. The 2010 United States Census reported that Tamalpais-Homestead Valley had a population of 10,735. The population density was 2,307.6 people per square mile (891.0/km²). The racial makeup of Tamalpais-Homestead Valley was 9,449 (88.0%) White, 91 (0.8%) African
    7.33
    6 votes
    12
    West Simsbury

    West Simsbury

    West Simsbury is a census-designated place (CDP) and section of the town of Simsbury, Connecticut. It is located in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. The population of the CDP was 2,395 at the 2000 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.4 square miles (11 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,395 people, 745 households, and 659 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 548.6 people per square mile (211.6/km). There were 763 housing units at an average density of 174.8 per square mile (67.4/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.58% White, 0.67% African American, 0.04% Native American, 1.80% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.54% of the population. There were 745 households out of which 47.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 81.6% were married couples living together, 4.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 11.5% were non-families. 10.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average
    6.43
    7 votes
    13
    Red Jacket

    Red Jacket

    Red Jacket is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mingo County, West Virginia, in the United States. The population was 581 at the 2010 census. The community was named for Red Jacket, a Seneca orator. Red Jacket is located at 37°38′50″N 82°8′16″W / 37.64722°N 82.13778°W / 37.64722; -82.13778 (37.647273, -82.137672). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.3 square miles (13.6 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 728 people, 275 households, and 210 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 139.8 people per square mile (54.0/km²). There were 313 housing units at an average density of 60.1/sq mi (23.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 92.03% White, 7.28% African American, and 0.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.14% of the population. There were 275 households out of which 40.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 18.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.3% were non-families. 20.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.
    8.20
    5 votes
    14
    Gainesville

    Gainesville

    Gainesville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 11,481 in the 2010 census. Gainesville was once a changing point for stagecoach horses on the Fauquier & Alexandria Turnpike. In 1852, the Manassas Gap Railroad reached the area and the stop became known as Gainesville. The town was a shipping point for grain, timber, and cattle and remained a major cattle shipping point into the early 1960s. During the American Civil War, nearby Thoroughfare Gap in the Bull Run Mountains served as a path for soldiers to reach the First and Second battles of Bull Run. In 1994, the groundbreaking for the town's first townhome community began; it was named Crossroads. This marked the beginning of mass-development for Gainesville. In 2006, VDOT began working on the Gainesville Interchange improvement project in order to ease the traffic in the rapidly growing Gainesville-Haymarket area. Gainesville is located at 38°47′41″N 77°37′14″W / 38.79472°N 77.62056°W / 38.79472; -77.62056 (38.794784, -77.620651). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 10.3 square miles (26.6 km²), of which, 9.7 square miles
    7.00
    6 votes
    15
    Plymouth

    Plymouth

    Plymouth is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Plymouth in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States. It is often referred to as Downtown Plymouth or Plymouth Center. The population was 7,494 at the 2010 census. Plymouth Center is considered to be the most prominent neighborhood of Plymouth. It is the location of Plymouth's town hall and of the town harbor. In addition, Plymouth Center is home to Plymouth Rock, the Pilgrim Hall Museum, and the Mayflower II. The geographical locations of North, South, and West Plymouth are named in relation to Plymouth Center. The post office located at the intersection of Main Street Extension and Leyden Street was the main post office in Plymouth until sometime in the 1970s, when the current main post office located in South Pond was built. The ZIP code for Plymouth Center (officially simply "Plymouth, MA") is 02361. Non-post office box holders in Plymouth Center use the zip code of 02360. Plymouth Center is located at 41°57′21″N 70°39′59″W / 41.95583°N 70.66639°W / 41.95583; -70.66639 (41.955841, -70.666549). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 10.1 km² (3.9 mi²). 5.9 km² (2.3 mi²) of it is
    8.00
    5 votes
    16
    Harts

    Harts

    Harts is a census-designated place (CDP) at the mouth of Big Harts Creek in Lincoln County, West Virginia, United States, along the Guyandotte River. As of the 2010 census, its population was 656. Harts is located at 38°1′50″N 82°7′41″W / 38.03056°N 82.12806°W / 38.03056; -82.12806 (38.030643, -82.128147). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.3 square miles (24.1 km²), of which, 9.2 square miles (23.8 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²) of it (1.44%) is water. The census area includes both Big Harts Creek and Little Harts Creek. The West Fork of Big Harts Creek is often mis-identified as "East Fork" on maps and in deeds. However, West Fork was named for a man by the name of West, not the direction of the creek. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,361 people, 858 households, and 700 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 78.9 people per square mile (30.5/km²). There were 1,004 housing units at an average density of 33.5/sq mi (13.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.36% White, 0.04% Native American, 0.17% Asian, and 0.42% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.21% of the
    7.80
    5 votes
    17
    Unity

    Unity

    Unity is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Unity in Waldo County, Maine, United States. The population was 486 at the 2000 census. Unity is located at 44°37′8″N 69°20′12″W / 44.61889°N 69.33667°W / 44.61889; -69.33667 (44.619003, -69.336696). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 486 people, 244 households, and 112 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 267.3 people per square mile (103.1/km²). There were 319 housing units at an average density of 175.4/sq mi (67.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.91% White, 0.21% Black or African American, 0.82% Native American, and 2.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.03% of the population. There were 244 households out of which 23.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29.9% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 53.7% were non-families. 42.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 23.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.99
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    Woodstock

    Woodstock

    Woodstock is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Ulster County, New York, United States. The population was 2,088 at the 2010 census. The community of Woodstock is in eastern part of the Town of Woodstock and is northeast of Kingston, New York. It is located along NY 212 near its junction with NY 375. Although the name of the community and the town lent its name to the Woodstock Festival, that event did not take place in Woodstock. Woodstock is located at 42°2′24″N 74°7′2″W / 42.04°N 74.11722°W / 42.04; -74.11722 (42.040269, -74.117258). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.9 square miles (15.3 km²), of which, 5.9 square miles (15.3 km²) of it is land and 0.17% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,187 people, 1,124 households, and 528 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 370.3 per square mile (142.9/km²). There were 1,385 housing units at an average density of 234.5/sq mi (90.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 93.23% White, 1.55% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 1.78% Asian, 0.64% from other races, and 2.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.89% of the
    10.00
    3 votes
    19
    Washington

    Washington

    Washington is a census-designated place (CDP) in Wood County, West Virginia, along the Ohio River. It is part of the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,175 at the 2010 census. The CDP is home to the Washington Works, one of the largest single facilities of chemicals manufacturing giant DuPont. Also home to Sabic Plastics Washington Works. (previously GE Plastics, acquired from Borg Warner Plastics, née Marbon) Washington is located at 39°14′17″N 81°40′14″W / 39.23806°N 81.67056°W / 39.23806; -81.67056 (39.237991, -81.670477). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.4 square miles (11.3 km²), of which, 4.2 square miles (10.8 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.6 km²) of it (5.13%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,170 people, 466 households, and 376 families residing in the community. The population density was 275.6 people per square mile (106.3/km²). There were 518 housing units at an average density of 122.0/sq mi (47.1/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 98.21% White, 0.17% African American, 0.60% Native American, 0.43% Asian, and 0.60% from two or more
    7.40
    5 votes
    20
    Rotterdam

    Rotterdam

    Rotterdam is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Rotterdam in Schenectady County, New York, United States. It is a suburb of Schenectady. The population was 20,652 at the 2010 census. Rotterdam was part of the Dutch colony on the eastern seaboard, and is named after Rotterdam, Netherlands, and as such predates English settlement. Rotterdam is located at 42°46′57″N 73°57′26″W / 42.7825°N 73.95722°W / 42.7825; -73.95722 (42.782776, -73.957261). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.9 mi² (17.9 km²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 20,536 people, 8,492 households, and 5,876 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,144.2/km² (2,963.3/mi²). There were 8,825 housing units at an average density of 491.7/km² (1,273.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.07% White, 1.06% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.21% from other races, and 0.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.03% of the population. There were 8,492 households out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.5% were married couples living
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    Bellwood

    Bellwood

    Bellwood is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. The population was 6,352 at the 2010 census. Bellwood is located at 37°24′20″N 77°26′3″W / 37.40556°N 77.43417°W / 37.40556; -77.43417 (37.405598, -77.434205). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.8 square miles (15.0 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,974 people, 2,323 households, and 1,598 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,005.0 people per square mile (388.3/km²). There were 2,448 housing units at an average density of 411.8/sq mi (159.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 69.17% White, 20.32% African American, 0.80% Native American, 2.56% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 4.35% from other races, and 2.76% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.52% of the population. There were 2,323 households out of which 36.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 18.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    Lyndhurst

    Lyndhurst

    Lyndhurst is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,527 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Lyndhurst is located at 38°1′35″N 78°57′5″W / 38.02639°N 78.95139°W / 38.02639; -78.95139 (38.026381, -78.951379). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.1 square miles (15.8 km²), of which, 6.1 square miles (15.8 km²) of it is land and 0.16% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,527 people, 580 households, and 447 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 250.6 people per square mile (96.8/km²). There were 602 housing units at an average density of 98.8/sq mi (38.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 93.12% White, 5.17% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.72% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.90% of the population. There were 580 households out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.3% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.9% were non-families.
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    Spring Creek

    Spring Creek

    Spring Creek is a census-designated place (CDP) in central Elko County, in northeastern Nevada in the western United States. It mainly serves as a bedroom community for the businesses and industries in and around the nearby city of Elko. It is part of the Elko Micropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 12,361 at the 2010 census. Spring Creek is located in a large valley between the Elko Hills to the northwest, and the Ruby Mountains to the southeast. To the southwest is Huntington Valley and the South Fork of the Humboldt River, while to the north is the main branch of the Humboldt. The city of Elko is approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) to the northwest, while Lamoille is just to the east. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 58.7 square miles (152 km). The community was developed in the 1970s by Robert P. McCulloch as three large housing sections. The western section, at the base of the Elko Hills, is located near the post office (zip 89815), a shopping center, and a supermarket. About 1 mile to the east is the main school campus for grades 1-12. The central section of the community, another mile to the east, includes a park and lake ("The
    7.20
    5 votes
    24
    East Bernstadt

    East Bernstadt

    East Bernstadt is a census-designated place (CDP) and coal town in Laurel County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 774 at the 2000 census. East Bernstadt is located at 37°11′27″N 84°7′11″W / 37.19083°N 84.11972°W / 37.19083; -84.11972 (37.190818, -84.119647). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.1 square miles (5.4 km), all of it land. Two public school districts serve K-12 students in East Bernstadt: As of the census of 2000, there were 774 people, 312 households, and 237 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 371.6 people per square mile (143.7/km²). There were 350 housing units at an average density of 168.0/sq mi (65.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.22% White, 3.49% African American, 0.26% from other races, and 1.03% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.90% of the population. There were 312 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.6% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.0% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.4% had someone
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Huguley

    Huguley

    Huguley is an unincorporated census-designated place in Chambers County, Alabama, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 2,540. Huguley is located at 32°50'16.811" North, 85°13'59.300" West (32.838003, -85.233139). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the community has a total area of 8.3 square miles (21 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,953 people, 1,154 households, and 850 families residing in the community. The population density was 336.5 people per square mile (129.9/km²). There were 1,241 housing units at an average density of 141.4 per square mile (54.6/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 73.76% White, 25.16% Black or African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.10% from other races, and 0.81% from two or more races. 1.02% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 1,154 households out of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.6% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.3% were non-families. 23.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Ledbetter

    Ledbetter

    Ledbetter is a census-designated place (CDP) in Livingston County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 1,700 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area. Ledbetter is located at 37°2′55″N 88°29′54″W / 37.04861°N 88.49833°W / 37.04861; -88.49833 (37.048501, -88.498251). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.3 square miles (14 km), of which, 5.3 square miles (14 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.75%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,700 people, 681 households, and 493 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 322.4 people per square mile (124.5/km²). There were 712 housing units at an average density of 135.0/sq mi (52.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.06% White, 0.29% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.12% Asian, and 0.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.53% of the population. There were 681 households out of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.5% were
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    Lincolnia

    Lincolnia

    Lincolnia is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 15,788 at the 2000 census. Lincolnia is located at 38°49′5″N 77°8′35″W / 38.81806°N 77.14306°W / 38.81806; -77.14306 (38.8184, -77.1433). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.9 square miles (7.6 km²), all of it land. It is between Annandale and Alexandria. As of the census of 2000, there were 15,788 people, 5,166 households, and 3,704 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 5,369.5 people per square mile (2,073.4/km²). There were 5,255 housing units at an average density of 1,787.2/sq mi (690.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 47.62% White, 18.82% African American, 0.22% Native American, 15.01% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 11.48% from other races, and 6.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 22.37% of the population. Lincolnia is the most diverse area in Fairfax County. There were 5,166 households out of which 36.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.3% were
    8.25
    4 votes
    28
    Stanaford

    Stanaford

    Stanaford is a census-designated place (CDP) and coal town in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,350 at the 2010 census. Stanaford is located at 37°49′17″N 81°9′5″W / 37.82139°N 81.15139°W / 37.82139; -81.15139 (37.821262, -81.151458). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.9 square miles (5.0 km²); 1.9 square miles (4.9 km²) of this is land, and 0.02 square miles (0.04 km²) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,443 people, 595 households, and 449 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 768.2 people per square mile (296.4/km²). There were 638 housing units at an average density of 339.6/sq mi (131.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 87.18% White, 9.42% African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.90% Asian, 0.76% from other races, and 1.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.90% of the population. There were 595 households out of which 24.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.7% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.4% were non-families. 21.5% of all households were made up
    6.17
    6 votes
    29
    Rustburg

    Rustburg

    Rustburg is a census-designated place (CDP) in Campbell County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,431 in the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Campbell County. Rustburg is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. The public high school in Rustburg is Rustburg High School. The public primary and elementary schools are Rustburg Middle School, Rustburg Elementary School, Yellow Branch Elementary School, Fray Educational Center, and Campbell County Technical Center. Rustburg was named for Jeremiah Rust, who donated 50 acres (200,000 m) of his land for the village in 1784. Rustburg is located at 37°16′25″N 79°05′56″W / 37.273731°N 79.098914°W / 37.273731; -79.098914 (37.273731, -79.098914). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 10.8 square miles (28 km), of which 0.09% is water. The town of Rustburg has three neighborhoods: As of the census of 2000, there were 1,271 people, 474 households, and 321 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 117.3 people per square mile (45.3/km). There were 518 housing units at an average density of 47.8/sq mi (18.5/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 74.82% White, 23.60%
    7.00
    5 votes
    30
    Woodlawn

    Woodlawn

    Woodlawn is a census-designated place (CDP) in Carroll County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,249 at the 2000 census. Woodlawn is musically notable as the home of Heritage Shoppe and Heritage Records, a store and record label owned by Bobby Patterson, a musician from a regionally important family of performers. Heritage Records specializes in local musicians, and also releases recordings from the Old Fiddlers' Convention in Galax, Virginia. Woodlawn is located at 36°43′58″N 80°48′7″W / 36.73278°N 80.80194°W / 36.73278; -80.80194 (36.732719, -80.801934). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 19.5 square miles (50.6 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,249 people, 847 households, and 597 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 115.1 people per square mile (44.4/km²). There were 926 housing units at an average density of 47.4/sq mi (18.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.58% White, 0.49% African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.36% from other races, and 0.22% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.93% of the population. There were 847 households
    7.00
    5 votes
    31
    Woodlawn-Oakdale

    Woodlawn-Oakdale

    Woodlawn-Oakdale is a census-designated place (CDP) in McCracken County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 4,937 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area. Woodlawn-Oakdale is located at 37°2′38″N 88°34′16″W / 37.04389°N 88.57111°W / 37.04389; -88.57111 (37.043786, -88.571223). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.9 square miles (15 km), of which, 5.9 square miles (15 km) of it is land and 0.17% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,937 people, 2,049 households, and 1,407 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 831.8 people per square mile (320.9/km²). There were 2,243 housing units at an average density of 377.9/sq mi (145.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.55% White, 2.51% African American, 0.41% Native American, 0.41% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 1.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.87% of the population. There were 2,049 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 13.2% had a female householder with no husband
    9.33
    3 votes
    32
    Branford Center

    Branford Center

    Branford Center is a neighborhood and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Branford, Connecticut, United States. The CDP encompasses the traditional town center area (roughly the area bounded by U.S. Route 1, the Amtrak railroad tracks, and the Branford River) and the area known as Branford Point (the portion of the CDP south of the railroad tracks). The population of the CDP (including Branford Point) was 5,819 at the 2010 census. The Branford Center Historic District was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1987. The historic district represents the area of the traditional town center and excludes Branford Point. The designated portion is an irregularly-shaped 250-acre (100 ha) area that includes 557 contributing buildings out of a total of 706 buildings in the district, including garages, carriage houses, and other structures. It includes two other contributing sites: the Center Cemetery and the Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Cemetery. The district boundaries were drawn to exclude modern construction such as the Branford High School and to exclude older buildings that did not retain their "historic architectural integrity". Architectural styles
    8.00
    4 votes
    33
    Buckner

    Buckner

    Buckner is a census-designated place (CDP) in Oldham County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 4,000 at the 2000 census. Oldham County High School is located in Buckner. Buckner is located at 38°23′36″N 85°26′24″W / 38.393248°N 85.439928°W / 38.393248; -85.439928. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.5 square miles (19 km), of which, 7.4 square miles (19 km) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km) of it (2.00%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,000 people, 580 households, and 512 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 543.8 people per square mile (209.8/km²). There were 597 housing units at an average density of 81.2/sq mi (31.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 80.75% White, 18.25% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.38% from other races, and 0.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.72% of the population. There were 580 households out of which 49.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 80.5% were married couples living together, 5.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 11.7% were non-families. 9.5% of all
    8.00
    4 votes
    34
    Lenox

    Lenox

    Lenox is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Lenox in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 1,667 at the 2000 census. Lenox is located at 42°21′25″N 73°17′3″W / 42.35694°N 73.28417°W / 42.35694; -73.28417 (42.35722, -73.284172). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.6 km² (1.8 mi²). Situated near the Berkshire Mountains, Lenox is drained by the Housatonic River. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,667 people, 885 households, and 386 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 359.6/km² (931.5/mi²). There were 1,045 housing units at an average density of 225.4/km² (584.0/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.66% White, 0.60% Black or African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.78% Asian, 0.36% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.74% of the population. There were 885 households out of which 15.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.6% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 56.3% were non-families. 49.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 29.7%
    8.00
    4 votes
    35
    Hazardville

    Hazardville

    Hazardville Historic District in the Hazardville section of Enfield, Connecticut dates from 1835. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. The district is an irregularly shaped area that surrounds two interior areas that are not historical and are not included in the district. The four "dominant" buildings in the district are the school, the institute, the Episcopal Church, and the Methodist church. The Methodist church, built of brick and brownstone in 1872, is of Romanesque Revival style architecture (see accompanying photo #10) The Hazardville Institute, 317 Hazard Street, is Italian-styled brownstone, and was built in 1869 (See accompanying photo#7). Other significant contributing properties in the district include:
    9.00
    3 votes
    36
    Lubeck

    Lubeck

    Lubeck is a census-designated place (CDP) in Wood County, West Virginia, United States. It is part of the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,311 at the 2010 census. Lubeck is located at 39°13′58″N 81°38′22″W / 39.23278°N 81.63944°W / 39.23278; -81.63944 (39.232846, -81.639491). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.3 square miles (11.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,303 people, 510 households, and 403 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 305.0 people per square mile (117.8/km²). There were 540 housing units at an average density of 126.4/sq mi (48.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.70% White, 0.46% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.23% of the population. There were 510 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.1% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.8% were non-families. 18.4% of all households were made up of
    9.00
    3 votes
    37
    Cassville

    Cassville

    Cassville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Monongalia County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 701 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Morgantown, West Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. Cassville was named after Lewis Cass, a prominent American statesman who served as Secretary of War, Secretary of State, and Governor of Michigan. Cassville is located at 39°39′43″N 80°3′3″W / 39.66194°N 80.05083°W / 39.66194; -80.05083 (39.661889, -80.050873). According to the United States Census Bureau, the Cassville CDP has a total area of 9.2 km² (3.5 mi²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,586 people, 644 households, and 446 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 40.6/km² (105.1/mi²). There were 704 housing units at an average density of 18.0/km² (46.6/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.59% White, 1.83% African American, 0.57% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 1.70% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.01% of the population. There were 644 households out of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.4% were married couples living together, 8.9% had
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Selma

    Selma

    Selma is a census-designated place (CDP) in Alleghany County, Virginia, United States. The population was 485 at the 2000 census. Selma is located at 37°48′16″N 79°50′55″W / 37.80444°N 79.84861°W / 37.80444; -79.84861 (37.804444, -79.848716). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.8 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 485 people, 196 households, and 135 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,542.8 people per square mile (604.1/km²). There were 217 housing units at an average density of 690.3/sq mi (270.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.59% White, and 0.41% African American. There were 196 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.7% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.01. In the CDP the population was spread out with 24.3% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Horse Pasture

    Horse Pasture

    Horsepasture is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henry County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,255 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area. Horsepasture is located at 36°37′35″N 79°56′27″W / 36.62639°N 79.94083°W / 36.62639; -79.94083 (36.626394, -79.940695). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.6 square miles (25.0 km²), of which, 9.6 square miles (24.9 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.31%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,255 people, 957 households, and 673 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 234.3 people per square mile (90.5/km²). There were 1,021 housing units at an average density of 106.1/sq mi (41.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 70.16% White, 27.98% African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.18% Asian, and 1.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.35% of the population. There were 957 households out of which 24.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.6% were
    6.60
    5 votes
    40
    Boaz

    Boaz

    Boaz is a census-designated place (CDP) in Wood County, West Virginia, in the United States. It is part of the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the CDP population was 1,297. The community was named in 1878 by the United States Post Office Department, which selected from three names suggested by a resident named William Johnson: "Johnson," "Ruth," and "Boaz." Boaz is located at 39°22′5″N 81°29′24″W / 39.36806°N 81.49°W / 39.36806; -81.49 (39.368194, -81.490045), along the Ohio River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.5 square miles (11.7 km²), of which, 3.7 square miles (9.6 km²) of it is land and 0.8 square miles (2.1 km²) of it (18.10%) is water. Boaz has several unknown Indian Mounds that have been protected by the residents of Boaz since it was discovered in 1895. These mounds have yet to be excavated. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,345 people, 534 households, and 412 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 362.5 people per square mile (140.0/km²). There were 554 housing units at an average density of 149.3/sq mi (57.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Brookhaven

    Brookhaven

    Brookhaven is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Suffolk County, New York, United States. The population was 3,451 at the 2010 census. The community of Brookhaven is part of the Town of Brookhaven. Brookhaven is located at 40°46′33″N 72°55′4″W / 40.77583°N 72.91778°W / 40.77583; -72.91778 (40.775834, -72.917994). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.2 square miles (16.0 km²), of which, 6.1 square miles (15.7 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²) of it (2.10%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,570 people, 1,101 households, and 833 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 590.3 per square mile (227.8/km²). There were 1,167 housing units at an average density of 193.0/sq mi (74.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 84.99% White, 10.11% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.64% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.34% from other races, and 2.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.39% of the population. There were 1,101 households out of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.0% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    Falmouth Foreside

    Falmouth Foreside

    Falmouth Foreside is a census-designated place (CDP) within the town of Falmouth in Cumberland County, Maine, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the CDP population was 1,511. It is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area. Falmouth Foreside is located at 43°43′39″N 70°12′52″W / 43.727516°N 70.214522°W / 43.727516; -70.214522. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.7 square miles (4.3 km), of which 1.5 square miles (3.9 km) is land and 0.15 square miles (0.4 km), or 8.69%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,964 people, 746 households, and 511 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 829.8 people per square mile (320.0/km²). There were 794 housing units at an average density of 335.5/sq mi (129.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.13% White, 0.41% Asian, 0.10% from other races, and 0.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.25% of the population. There were 746 households out of which 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Lake Monticello

    Lake Monticello

    Lake Monticello is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fluvanna County, Virginia, United States. The population was 6,852 at the 2000 census. The community is centered on a lake of the same name, which is formed by a dam on a short tributary of the nearby Rivanna River. Lake Monticello is part of the Charlottesville Metropolitan Statistical Area. Lake Monticello is located at 37°55′6″N 78°19′36″W / 37.91833°N 78.32667°W / 37.91833; -78.32667 (37.918286, -78.326803). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.4 square miles (24.2 km²), of which 8.8 square miles (22.7 km²) is land and 0.6 square mile (1.5 km²) (6.10%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,852 people, 2,754 households, and 2,194 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 780.9 people per square mile (301.7/km²). There were 2,950 housing units at an average density of 336.2/sq mi (129.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.06% White, 3.50% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.51% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 1.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.49% of the population. There were 2,754
    7.50
    4 votes
    44
    Laymantown

    Laymantown

    Laymantown is a census-designated place (CDP) in Botetourt County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,034 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. Laymantown is located at 37°21′37″N 79°50′56″W / 37.360271°N 79.848828°W / 37.360271; -79.848828 (37.360271, -79.848828). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.3 square miles (8.5 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,034 people, 762 households, and 653 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 618.1 people per square mile (238.7/km). There were 794 housing units at an average density of 241.3/sq mi (93.2/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.95% White, 1.67% African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.59% Asian, 0.20% from other races, and 0.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.34% of the population. There were 762 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 77.0% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.3% were non-families. 13.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had
    7.50
    4 votes
    45
    Ewing

    Ewing

    Ewing is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lee County, Virginia, United States. The population was 436 at the 2000 census. Ewing is one of the westernmost settlements in the state of Virginia, before reaching the Cumberland Gap, and the borders with Kentucky and Tennessee. Ewing is located at 36°38′27″N 83°25′55″W / 36.64083°N 83.43194°W / 36.64083; -83.43194 (36.640738, -83.431908). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 436 people, 183 households, and 127 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 112.4 people per square mile (43.4/km²). There were 216 housing units at an average density of 55.7/sq mi (21.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.31% White, 0.23% from other races, and 0.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.23% of the population. There were 183 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Keokee

    Keokee

    Keokee is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lee County, Virginia, United States. The population was 316 at the 2000 census. Keokee is located at 36°51′24″N 82°54′28″W / 36.85667°N 82.90778°W / 36.85667; -82.90778 (36.856575, -82.907861). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.3 square miles (11.2 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 316 people, 128 households, and 88 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 72.9 people per square mile (28.1/km²). There were 147 housing units at an average density of 33.9/sq mi (13.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.78% White and 2.22% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.95% of the population. There were 128 households out of which 30.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.3% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 28.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.02. In the CDP the population was
    8.67
    3 votes
    47
    Lakeview

    Lakeview

    Lakeview is a census-designated place (CDP) in Catoosa and Walker counties in the U.S. state of Georgia. The population was 4,820 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Chattanooga, TN–GA Metropolitan Statistical Area. Lakeview is located at 34°58'42" North, 85°15'26" West (34.978472, -85.257346). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km), of which, 2.3 square miles (6.0 km) of it is land and 0.44% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,820 people, 1,996 households, and 1,413 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,112.1 people per square mile (816.2/km²). There were 2,160 housing units at an average density of 946.5/sq mi (365.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.93% White, 0.62% African American, 0.50% Native American, 0.77% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.98% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.91% of the population. There were 1,996 households out of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.4% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.2% were
    8.67
    3 votes
    48
    Mechanic Falls CDP

    Mechanic Falls CDP

    Mechanic Falls is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Mechanic Falls in Androscoggin County, Maine, United States. The population was 2,237 at the 2010 census. Mechanic Falls is located at 44°6′35″N 70°23′23″W / 44.10972°N 70.38972°W / 44.10972; -70.38972 (44.109828, -70.389872). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.5 square miles (14.1 km²), of which, 5.4 square miles (14.1 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.55%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,450 people, 909 households, and 643 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 451.3 people per square mile (174.2/km²). There were 977 housing units at an average density of 180.0/sq mi (69.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.06% White, 0.61% Black or African American, 0.65% Native American, 0.65% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.57% of the population. There were 909 households out of which 35.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.8% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no
    8.67
    3 votes
    49
    Cloverdale

    Cloverdale

    Cloverdale is a census-designated place (CDP) in Botetourt County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,986 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. Cloverdale is the birthplace of Charles Follis, who became the first African-American to play professional football when he signed with the Shelby Blues of Shelby, Ohio in 1902 (note that he was first paid for playing in 1904). Cloverdale is located at 37°21′40″N 79°54′16″W / 37.36111°N 79.90444°W / 37.36111; -79.90444 (37.361008, -79.904575). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.1 square miles (8.1 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,986 people, 1,158 households, and 858 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 956.2 people per square mile (369.5/km²). There were 1,204 housing units at an average density of 385.6/sq mi (149.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.01% White, 2.21% African American, 0.10% Native American, 1.17% Asian, 0.80% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.77% of the population. There were 1,158 households out of which 37.0% had
    6.40
    5 votes
    50
    Duanesburg

    Duanesburg

    Duanesburg is a census-designated place within the town of Duanesburg in Schenectady County, New York. The name of the CDP is the name of a hamlet in that region of the town. The census provides separate or additional population and demographic data for the more densely populated central settlement described by the CDP. The population was 391 at the 2010 census. (For aggregate values and other information about the town as a whole, See: Duanesburg, New York. ) According to the United States Census Bureau, the settlement consists of a total area of 2.5 square miles (6.6 km) within the town. 2.4 square miles (6.3 km) of it is land, and 0.077 square miles (0.2 km) of it (3.77%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 339 people, 153 households, and 93 families residing in the settlement. The population density was 132.2 per square mile (50.9/km²). There were 159 housing units at an average density of 23.9 persons/km² (62.0 persons/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.23% White, 1.77% from other races. 3.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 153 households out of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.4% were
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    Little Rock

    Little Rock

    Little Rock is a census-designated place (CDP) within the Lower Red Lake unorganized territory in Beltrami County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 1,208 at the 2010 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.5 square miles (19.6 km²), of which, 7.2 square miles (18.7 km²) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.9 km²) of it (4.38%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,055 people, 281 households, and more than 234 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 80.9 people per square mile (31.2/km²). There were 298 housing units at an average density of 22.8/sq mi (8.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 0.76% White, 0.09% Black or African American, 98.86% Native American, and 0.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.90% of the population. There were 281 households out of which 54.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 26.7% were married couples living together, 38.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.7% were non-families. 12.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The
    7.25
    4 votes
    52
    Teays Valley

    Teays Valley

    Teays Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Putnam County, West Virginia, United States. The place is divided into the two districts of Teays Valley and Scott Depot. The population was 13,175 at the 2010 census. Teays Valley is located at 38°26′50″N 81°56′14″W / 38.44722°N 81.93722°W / 38.44722; -81.93722 (38.447204, -81.937324). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.3 square miles (18.8 km²), of which 7.2 square miles (18.6 km²) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²) (1.34%) is water. The valley referred to by "Teays Valley" is a portion of the remains of the pre-glacial Teays River. Today, the valley's water is shed through a number of creeks which empty into the Kanawha and Mud rivers. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,704 people, 4,789 households, and 3,749 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,730.0 people per square mile (668.3/km²). There were 5,062 housing units at an average density of 689.3/sq mi (266.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.39% White, 0.94% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 1.59% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    Woodbridge

    Woodbridge

    Woodbridge is a census-designated place and magisterial district of Prince William County, Virginia, United States, located 20 miles (32 km) south of Washington, D.C.. Bounded by the Occoquan and Potomac rivers, Woodbridge Magisterial District had 54,275 residents at the 2010 census. The Woodbridge census-designated place comprises just one portion of the magisterial district and had a population of 4,055 in the 2010 census. The census-designated place consists solely of the section north of Occoquan Road and Dawson Beach Road, and east of Interstate 95. Woodbridge offers a variety of amenities for residents and visitors, including the Potomac Mills shopping mall and the Potomac Festival Shopping Centers. Woodbridge is served by the Prince William County Public Schools, and the Woodbridge campus of Northern Virginia Community College borders the district. Potomac Hospital recently expanded and now has the capacity to serve 183 patients. Transportation includes access to Interstate 95, two VRE commuter train stations, bus service, and a local “slug” system, offering residents a variety of transit options. Woodbridge offers a wide range of recreational opportunities for resident and
    7.25
    4 votes
    54
    Camden CDP

    Camden CDP

    Camden is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Camden in Knox County, Maine, United States. The population was 3,934 at the 2000 census. Camden is located at 44°12′37″N 69°4′6″W / 44.21028°N 69.06833°W / 44.21028; -69.06833 (44.21044, -69.068376). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.8 square miles (9.8 km²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,934 people, 1,826 households, and 1,028 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,041.1 people per square mile (401.8/km²). There were 2,108 housing units at an average density of 557.9/sq mi (215.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.20% White, 0.31% Black or African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.41% Asian, 0.18% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.84% of the population. There were 1,826 households out of which 22.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.7% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.7% were non-families. 37.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years
    8.33
    3 votes
    55
    Mineral Wells

    Mineral Wells

    Mineralwells, also known as Mineral Wells, is a census-designated place (CDP) in Wood County, West Virginia, United States. It is part of the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,950 at the 2010 census. The United States Census Bureau calls the community Mineralwells, although the United States Postal Service renamed the community's post office in the late 1990s to Mineral Wells. Mineralwells is located at 39°10′44″N 81°30′37″W / 39.17889°N 81.51028°W / 39.17889; -81.51028 (39.178764, -81.510242), south of the Little Kanawha River, along Tygart Creek. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.5 square miles (4.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,860 people, 674 households, and 552 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,171.8 people per square mile (451.7/km²). There were 708 housing units at an average density of 446.0/sq mi (171.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.71% White, 0.16% African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.22% of the
    8.33
    3 votes
    56
    Phelps

    Phelps

    Phelps is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pike County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 1,053 at the 2000 census. Phelps is located at 37°30′50″N 82°9′14″W / 37.51389°N 82.15389°W / 37.51389; -82.15389 (37.513969, -82.153987). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.9 square miles (23 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,053 people, 423 households, and 321 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 117.9 people per square mile (45.5/km²). There were 491 housing units at an average density of 55.0/sq mi (21.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.15% White, 0.19% African American, and 0.66% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.47% of the population. There were 423 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.9% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.9% were non-families. 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.90. In
    8.33
    3 votes
    57
    Hampden Sydney

    Hampden Sydney

    Hampden Sydney is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince Edward County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,360 at the 2010 census. Most of the residents are current students attending Hampden–Sydney College. Hampden Sydney is located at 37°14′45″N 78°27′41″W / 37.24583°N 78.46139°W / 37.24583; -78.46139 (37.245804, −78.461357). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.5 square miles (11.6 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,360 people, 167 households, and 154 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 302.2 people per square mile (118.3/km²). There were 184 housing units at an average density of 41.3/sq mi (16.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 82.52% White, 16.61% African American, 0.24% Asian, and 0.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.95% of the population. In the CDP the population was spread out with 8.5% under the age of 18, 69.1% from 18 to 24, 9.6% from 25 to 44, 7.9% from 45 to 64, and 4.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 21 years. For every 100 females there were 499.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were
    6.20
    5 votes
    58
    Montcalm

    Montcalm

    Montcalm is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mercer County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 726 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Bluefield, WV-VA micropolitan area which has a population of 107,342. Montcalm is located at 37°21′16″N 81°15′3″W / 37.35444°N 81.25083°W / 37.35444; -81.25083 (37.354558, -81.250898), along the Bluestone River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.1 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 885 people, 344 households, and 256 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 321.4 people per square mile (124.3/km²). There were 384 housing units at an average density of 139.4/sq mi (53.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.74% White, 0.56% African American, 0.79% Native American, 0.11% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.81% of the population. There were 344 households out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.1% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 22.1% of all households
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Reidland

    Reidland

    Reidland is a census-designated place (CDP) in McCracken County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 4,353 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area. Reidland is located at 37°0′41″N 88°31′18″W / 37.01139°N 88.52167°W / 37.01139; -88.52167. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.8 square miles (12 km), of which, 4.8 square miles (12 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.83%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,353 people, 1,793 households, and 1,368 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 907.2 people per square mile (350.1/km²). There were 1,937 housing units at an average density of 403.7/sq mi (155.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.98% White, 0.30% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.71% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 0.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.64% of the population. There were 1,793 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.8% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband
    9.50
    2 votes
    60
    Lakeview

    Lakeview

    Lakeview is a census-designated place (CDP) in Riverside County, California, United States. The population was 2,104 at the 2010 census, up from 1,619 at the 2000 census. The community is named for nearby Mystic Lake. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.3 square miles (8.5 km), all of it land. The 2010 United States Census reported that Lakeview had a population of 2,104. The population density was 645.4 people per square mile (249.2/km²). The racial makeup of Lakeview was 1,117 (53.1%) White, 15 (0.7%) African American, 48 (2.3%) Native American, 7 (0.3%) Asian, 2 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 842 (40.0%) from other races, and 73 (3.5%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1,350 persons (64.2%). The Census reported that 2,089 people (99.3% of the population) lived in households, 15 (0.7%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized. There were 538 households, out of which 285 (53.0%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 347 (64.5%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 63 (11.7%) had a female householder with no husband present, 40 (7.4%) had a male householder
    7.00
    4 votes
    61
    Monarch Mill

    Monarch Mill

    Monarch Mill is a census-designated place (CDP) in Union County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 1,811 at the 2010 census. Monarch Mill is located at 34°42′54″N 81°35′33″W / 34.715°N 81.5925°W / 34.715; -81.5925. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.6 square miles (15 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,930 people, 796 households, and 580 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 343.1 people per square mile (132.6/km²). There were 862 housing units at an average density of 153.3/sq mi (59.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 84.61% White, 14.77% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.00% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 0.00% from other races, and 0.47% from two or more races. 1.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 796 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 24.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The
    7.00
    4 votes
    62
    Woodland Beach

    Woodland Beach

    Woodland Beach is an unincorporated community in Monroe County in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is a census-designated place (CDP) for statistical purposes and does not have any legal status as an incorporated municipality. The population was 2,179 at the 2000 census. The community is in Frenchtown Charter Township on the shore of Lake Erie about four miles northeast of downtown Monroe. The area defined by the CDP is bounded on the northeast by the Stony Creek, on the northwest by N. Dixie Highway (with a cutout to include Englewood Dr. west of Nadeau Rd.), and on the southwest by S. Grove Dr. The CDP of Detroit Beach is adjacent to the southwest and the CDP of Stony Point is about three miles to the east. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,179 people, 794 households, and 605 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 4,155.0 per square mile (1,617.9/km²). There were 831 housing units at an average density of 1,584.6 per square mile (617.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.12% White, 0.23% African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.09% from other
    7.00
    4 votes
    63
    Broad Brook

    Broad Brook

    Broad Brook is a neighborhood and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of East Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. As of the 2010 census, the CDP population was 4,069. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.9 square miles (15 km), of which, 5.9 square miles (15 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.34%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,469 people, 1,433 households, and 932 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 586.2 people per square mile (226.2/km). There were 1,589 housing units at an average density of 268.5 per square mile (103.6/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 91.76% White, 4.44% African American, 1.53% Asian, 1.04% from other races, and 1.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.16% of the population. There were 1,433 households out of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.2% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.9% were non-families. 28.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of
    6.00
    5 votes
    64
    Ettrick

    Ettrick

    Ettrick is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. The population was 6,682 at the 2010 census. The town is home to Virginia State University and the Petersburg Amtrak train station. Most of Ettrick has a Petersburg mailing address, ZIP code 23803, although the community is not part of the city of Petersburg. Ettrick was named around 1765 by the foreign merchant Neil Buchanan, who dubbed the eventual village Ettrick Banks for its similarities to his native Ettrick area of Selkirk, Scotland. Capt. Christopher Newport led expeditions in this area. Near Petersburg, which developed as an industrial city, Ettrick also developed industry. It had cotton mills, as it was on the fall line and could use water power. During the American Civil War, the Confederate Army established a large hospital here. In the late nineteenth century, the biracial state legislature established the first state-supported black college, founded here in 1882 as Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute (now Virginia State University). John Mercer Langston, who founded the Law School at Howard University, was its first president. He was elected as a US Congressman from
    6.00
    5 votes
    65
    Del Monte Forest

    Del Monte Forest

    Del Monte Forest is a census-designated place located in Monterey County, California. As of the 2010 census, the CDP had a total population of 4,514, down from 4,532 at the 2000 census. The census area includes the separate well-known community of Pebble Beach. Alternatively Del Monte Forest is a habitat area of the same location, which originally occupied considerably more area prior to urban development of the 20th century. The forest is dominated by Monterey Pine, but also contains other important tree species and a variety of rare and endangered plant species. Del Monte Forest is located at 36°35'11" North, 121°56'51" West. According to the United States Census Bureau, Del Monte Forest has a total area of 10.6 square miles (27 km), of which, 8.0 square miles (21 km) of it is land and 2.6 square miles (6.7 km) of it is water. The total area is 24.54% water. This location is a habitat for a number of limited range and endangered species. The 2010 United States Census reported that Del Monte Forest had a population of 4,514. The population density was 424.0 people per square mile (163.7/km²). The racial makeup of Del Monte Forest was 3,922 (86.9%) White, 43 (1.0%) African
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Mystic

    Mystic

    Mystic is a village and census-designated place (CDP) in New London County, Connecticut, in the United States. The population was 4,205 at the 2010 census. A historic locality, Mystic has no independent government because it is not a legally recognized municipality in the state of Connecticut. Rather, Mystic is located within the towns of Groton (west of the Mystic River, and also known as West Mystic) and Stonington (east of the Mystic River). Historically a leading seaport of the area, the story of Mystic's nautical connection is told at Mystic Seaport, the nation's largest maritime museum, which has preserved a number of sailing ships (most notably the whaleship Charles W. Morgan) and seaport buildings. The village is located on the Mystic River, which flows into Long Island Sound, providing access to the sea. The Mystic River Bascule Bridge crosses the river in the center of the village. Before the 17th century, the Pequot had established an empire across southeastern Connecticut. For many years, historians believed that they migrated in the 16th century from eastern New York. Archaeological evidence showing the presence of a people who lived in an area called Gungywump,
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    Oakton

    Oakton

    Oakton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, in the United States and is in the Washington Metropolitan Area. The population was 29,348 at the 2000 census. The ZIP code is 22124. Oakton is located at 38°52′59″N 77°17′24″W / 38.88306°N 77.29°W / 38.88306; -77.29 (38.883050, -77.289900). The area is traversed by I-66 and Virginia State Route 123. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.7 square miles (25.1 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 29,348 people, 11,118 households, and 7,649 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,024.1 people per square mile (1,168.2/km²). There were 11,392 housing units at an average density of 1,173.9/sq mi (453.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 74.46% White, 5.79% African American, 0.20% Native American, 13.83% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 3.08% from other races, and 3.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.65% of the population. There were 11,118 households out of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no
    8.00
    3 votes
    68
    Stuarts Draft

    Stuarts Draft

    Stuarts Draft is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 9,235 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Its been called the "Warehouse capital of the U.S." because of the seven warehouse/factories including Target Corporation distribution (T-560), Hershey Chocolate of Virginia, McKee Little Debbie, Hollister Inc, Nibco, Ply Gem, and Sayre factory. The Bare House and Mill and the Harper House are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1749, Thomas Stuart purchased 353 acres (1.43 km) near the South River, a tribuary of the South Fork of the Shenandoah River. 'Draft' probably refers to the document drafting the land sale or is a reference to the river itself (draft is an old term for river or creek and is part of the name of several such in the area). The plain on the south side of the river tends to channel the wind, thus forming a rather constant draft. Stuarts Draft is located at 38°1′39″N 79°1′44″W / 38.0275°N 79.02889°W / 38.0275; -79.02889 (38.027515, -79.028760). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 19.8 square miles
    8.00
    3 votes
    69
    Verona

    Verona

    Verona is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 3,638 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Verona is located at 38°11′49″N 79°0′11″W / 38.19694°N 79.00306°W / 38.19694; -79.00306 (38.197048, -79.003116). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.0 square miles (18.2 km²), of which, 7.0 square miles (18.2 km²) of it is land and 0.14% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,638 people, 1,509 households, and 1,030 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 517.3 people per square mile (199.8/km²). There were 1,562 housing units at an average density of 222.1/sq mi (85.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.83% White, 3.24% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.60% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.63% of the population. There were 1,509 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.7% were
    8.00
    3 votes
    70
    Brookhaven

    Brookhaven

    Brookhaven is a census-designated place (CDP) in Monongalia County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 5,171 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Morgantown, West Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. Brookhaven is located at 39°36′38″N 79°54′0″W / 39.61056°N 79.9°W / 39.61056; -79.9 (39.610580, -79.900119). According to the United States Census Bureau, the Brookhaven CDP has a total area of 9.3 square miles (24.0 km²); 9.2 square miles (23.9 km²) of this is land, and 0.1 square miles (0.1 km²) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,734 people, 1,838 households, and 1,336 families residing in the community. The population density was 508.1 people per square mile (196.1/km²). There were 1,984 housing units at an average density of 212.9/sq mi (82.2/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 96.28% White, 1.04% African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 1.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.80% of the population. There were 1,838 households out of which 37.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together,
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Chantilly

    Chantilly

    Chantilly is an unincorporated community located in western Fairfax County and southeastern Loudoun County of Northern Virginia. Recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census designated place (CDP), the community population was 23,039 as of the 2010 census -- down from 41,041 in 2000, due to the splitting off of parts of it to form new CDP's including Greenbriar and Fair Lakes. It is named after an early 19th century mansion and farm. Chantilly is part of the Washington metropolitan area and is approximately 24 miles (39 km) from Washington, D.C. Chantilly is home to Washington Dulles International Airport, which serves Washington, D.C. It is also the location of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center annex of the National Air & Space Museum and the headquarters of the National Reconnaissance Office. Chantilly was also home to the annual Bilderberg summit in 2008 and 2012. Chantilly was home to a number of colonial plantations in the 1700s, including "Sully," built by Richard Bland Lee I, George Richard Lee Turberville's "Leeton," and the John Hutchison Farm. Growth of the village predominantly occurred during the 19th century, particularly following the construction of Little River
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Daniels

    Daniels

    Daniels is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,881 at the 2010 census. Daniels is located at 37°44′23″N 81°7′29″W / 37.73972°N 81.12472°W / 37.73972; -81.12472 (37.739752, -81.124609). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.6 square miles (12.0 km²), all of it land. Daniels is located on US Route 19 south of Interstate 64. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,846 people, 818 households, and 525 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 395.0 people per square mile (152.6/km²). There were 913 housing units at an average density of 195.4/sq mi (75.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.72% White, 1.08% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.60% Asian, 0.16% from other races, and 0.22% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.43% of the population. There were 818 households out of which 23.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.7% were non-families. 32.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.6% had
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    Gardiner

    Gardiner

    Gardiner is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) in Ulster County, New York, USA. The population was 950 at the 2010 census. The community is near the center of the Town of Gardiner on routes 44 and 55. Gardiner is located at 41°40′48″N 74°09′04″W / 41.680114°N 74.151143°W / 41.680114; -74.151143 (41.680114, -74.151143). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.8 square miles (9.9 km). None of the area is covered with water. As of the census of 2000, there were 856 people, 342 households, and 234 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 223.8 per square mile (86.5/km). There were 371 housing units at an average density of 97.0/sq mi (37.5/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.85% White, 0.23% Native American, 0.58% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 1.05% from other races, and 1.17% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.56% of the population. There were 342 households out of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.6% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    Mount Vernon

    Mount Vernon

    Mount Vernon is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. Nearby CDPs are Fort Belvoir (west), Groveton, Virginia and Hybla Valley, Virginia (north), and Fort Hunt, Virginia (east). The population was 28,582 at the 2000 census. While "Mount Vernon" -- drawn from the Mount Vernon plantation, the home of George Washington located south of Alexandria -- is often used locally to refer to the entire unincorporated area between Old Town Alexandria and Fort Belvoir, Mount Vernon as defined by the Census Bureau encompasses only the part of it coextensive with Alexandria ZIP code 22309, bounded by the Potomac River to the south, Fort Belvoir to the west, Huntley Meadows Park to the north, and Little Hunting Creek to the east. Mount Vernon is located at 38°43′31″N 77°06′26″W / 38.725214°N 77.107349°W / 38.725214; -77.107349 (38.725214, -77.107349) According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.4 square miles (21.8 km), of which, 7.6 square miles (19.7 km) of it is land and 0.8 square miles (2.1 km) of it (9.51%) is water. As of the Census GR2 of 2000, there were 28,582 people, 10,575 households, and 7,487 families residing in
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    Pinch

    Pinch

    Pinch is an unincorporated census-designated place in Kanawha County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 3,262 at the 2010 census. Pinch is located at 38°24′23″N 81°29′5″W / 38.40639°N 81.48472°W / 38.40639; -81.48472 (38.406348, -81.484682). According to the United States Census Bureau, the Pinch CDP has a total area of 3.6 square miles (9.3 km²), of which, 3.5 square miles (9.2 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (1.13%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,811 people, 1,138 households, and 869 families residing in the community. The population density was 801.4 people per square mile (309.2/km²). There were 1,194 housing units at an average density of 340.4/sq mi (131.3/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 99.22% White, 0.14% African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.07% from other races, and 0.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.50% of the population. There were 1,138 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.7% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families.
    9.00
    2 votes
    76
    Winchester CDP

    Winchester CDP

    Winchester CDP is a census-designated place (CDP) within the town of Winchester in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, United States. The U.S. census defines the CDP in order to report detail demographic data for the more densely populated main settlement of the town. The population was 1,832 at the 2000 census. Winchester was settled in 1732, and incorporated in 1753. The Census Bureau defines the CDP as a total area of 3.0ᅡᅠsquare miles (7.7ᅡᅠkmᅡᄇ), none of which is covered with water. Winchester is drained by the Ashuelot River and Roaring Brook. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,832 people, 690 households, and 467 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 615.7 people per square mile (237.4/kmᅡᄇ). There were 727 housing units at an average density of 94.2 persons/kmᅡᄇ (244.3 persons/sqᅡᅠmi). The racial makeup of the town was 96.94% White, 0.49% African American, 0.66% Native American, 0.38% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 1.31% from two or more races. 1.20% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 690 households out of which 36.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.4% were married couples living together,
    9.00
    2 votes
    77
    Bon Air

    Bon Air

    Bon Air is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. The population was 16,366 at the 2010 census. The community is considered a suburb of the independent city of Richmond in the Richmond-Petersburg region. Originally developed as a resort, a central portion of Bon Air has been designated as a National Historical District with many structures of Victorian design from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its name means "good air," reflecting its role as a resort getaway that wealthy Richmonders enjoyed for its fresh air as opposed to the dirty air of Richmond's industrial downtown of the late 19th century. The area came to be known as Brown's Summit, probably named for the Brown family farm which was located nearby along the old Warwick Road (near the southwest corner of present-day intersection of Belleau Drive and Jahnke and Brown roads). Brown Road and Belleau Drive each follow portions of the old Warwick Road which are now west of Chippenham Parkway, which severed the old route in the mid-1960s when it was built between present-day Jahnke Road and Midlothian Turnpike. An 1864 map, noted as "Published by D. Van Nostrand, New York", and
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Collinsville

    Collinsville

    Collinsville is a village and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Canton in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 2,686 at the 2000 census. The central portion of the village is a historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Collinsville is located in the southwestern part of Canton. It was built around The Collins Company Axe Factory, a world renowned manufacturer of edge tools, such as axes, machetes, picks and knives. Collins machetes were the brand of choice in South America. Collins tools were used almost exclusively for the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railroad and axes and picks made their way across the country to be used in the California Gold Rush. Admiral Peary carried Collins tools to the North Pole. Typical of New England mills, the Collins Company axe factory was sited on a river and their production was powered by utilizing the water's strength to turn turbines and power machines. The numerous old buildings ramble along the riverbanks intertwined by an intricate maze of sluices that run throughout the site. The company closed its doors in 1966, but the factory buildings are now home to an eclectic and
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Milo

    Milo

    Milo is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Milo in Piscataquis County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,898 at the 2000 census. Milo is located at 45°15′0″N 68°58′59″W / 45.25°N 68.98306°W / 45.25; -68.98306 (45.250182, -68.983186). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.0 square miles (20.8 km²), of which, 7.8 square miles (20.1 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.6 km²) of it (3.12%) is water. Milo is located at the confluence of the Sebec River with the Piscataquis River. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,898 people, 830 households, and 522 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 244.2 people per square mile (94.3/km²). There were 977 housing units at an average density of 125.7/sq mi (48.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.52% White, 0.42% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.05% from other races, and 0.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.21% of the population. There were 830 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    Sissonville

    Sissonville

    Sissonville is an unincorporated census-designated place in Kanawha County, West Virginia, along the Pocatalico River. The population was 4,028 at the 2010 census. The community was named for John Sisson, who owned the original townsite. Many people erroneously believe "Sissonville" encompasses all of the area north of the City of Charleston along State Route 21 and Interstate 77 but in fact, the area comprises four separate communities: Guthrie, Pocatalico, Millertown, and Sissonville. The area has four (4) interstate interchanges: Edens Fork; Tuppers Creek; Sissonville-Pocatalico; and Haines Branch off Interstate 77. The four closely connected communities are all served by the Sissonville Fire Department. There is a local branch of the Kanawha County Public Library located in the Pocatalico community near Virgil L. Flinn Elementary School. The largest employer in the Sissonville area is the NGK/NTK Manufacturing facility located just off the Sissonville-Pocatalico Exit of Interstate 77. The facility employs over 200 full-time employees. The area is served with two elementary schools (Sissonville Elementary and Flinn Elementary), one middle school (Sissonville Middle School); and
    7.67
    3 votes
    81
    Callicoon

    Callicoon

    Callicoon is a hamlet and census-designated place in Sullivan County, New York, United States. The population was 167 at the 2010 census. Callicoon is in the western part of the county in the Town of Delaware. Callicoon got its name from Dutch hunters who settled the location in the 17th century. Because of the population of wild turkeys in the area, they named the community Kollikoonkill which translates into Wild Turkey Creek. In addition to animal abundance, the area was a source for lumber and a transport center with the Delaware River offering access to coastal cities to the south and east. In the 1840s, the Erie Railroad added to transportation by passing through along the banks of the Delaware River to link the Great Lakes with the East Coast. Because of the train station's vital central location, the community was renamed Callicoon Depot. In 1888, a major fire destroyed much of Callicoon's business district. The town quickly rebuilt, but lost much of its architectural history prior to the late 19th century. The community's economy also became badly damaged when railroad travel gave way to the automobile. By the late 1960s, tourism took over as the main industry as
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Riverhead

    Riverhead

    Riverhead is a census-designated place (CDP) roughly corresponding to the hamlet (unincorporated community) by the same name located in the town of Riverhead in Suffolk County, New York on Long Island. The CDP's population was 13,299 at the 2010 census. Situated at the mouth of the Peconic River which empties into Peconic Bay and at the intersection where the North and South Forks of Long Island split, Riverhead is the official county seat of Suffolk County. In the 1960s most of the county offices moved to Hauppauge in the more populated western half of the county—a move which still spurs attempts for Riverhead to lead the way for the secession of eastern Long Island towns to form Peconic County. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 15.4 square miles (40 km), of which 15.1 square miles (39 km) is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km), or 2.33%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,513 people, 3,878 households, and 2,547 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 696.5 per square mile (269.0/km²). There were 4,167 housing units at an average density of 276.1/sq mi (106.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 69.98% White,
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Tysons Corner

    Tysons Corner

    Tysons Corner is an unincorporated census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. Part of the Washington Metropolitan Area located in Northern Virginia, Tysons Corner lies between the community of McLean and the town of Vienna along the Capital Beltway (I-495). Companies in the area typically use McLean or Vienna addresses, however in April 2011 the United States Postal Service approved the use of Tysons Corner as a postal address for the 22102 and 22182 ZIP codes of McLean and Vienna, respectively. The population was 19,627 as of the 2010 census. It is the 12th largest employment center in the United States. The area is home to Tysons Corner Center – the largest shopping mall in the state and in the Baltimore-Washington area – and two upscale shopping centers, Tysons Galleria and Fairfax Square, which neighbor it to the north and south. Every weekday, Tysons Corner draws 55,000 shoppers from around the region. Tysons Corner has 46 million square feet (4.3 million m²) of office and retail space, making it an important business district in its own right and the classic example of an edge city. Tysons Corner was one of the inspirations for, and figures
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Gloucester Courthouse

    Gloucester Courthouse

    Gloucester Courthouse is a census-designated place (CDP) in and the county seat of Gloucester County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,269 at the 2000 census. Gloucester Courthouse is located at 37°24′46″N 76°31′27″W / 37.41278°N 76.52417°W / 37.41278; -76.52417 (37.412876, -76.524140). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.2 square miles (18.6 km²), of which, 7.0 square miles (18.1 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.5 km²) of it (2.78%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,269 people, 857 households, and 561 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 324.7 people per square mile (125.3/km²). There were 907 housing units at an average density of 129.8/sq mi (50.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 86.78% White, 10.67% African American, 0.48% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.48% from other races,1.00% of households had 7 people., and 1.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.15% of the population. There were 857 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.3% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Newington

    Newington

    Newington is a census-designated place (CDP) in affluent, suburban Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 19,784 at the 2000 census. While the ZIP code for Newington is 22122, this is only for delivery points within the post office itself. Homes and businesses in the CDP have Springfield or Lorton street addresses. The area is poised for a great challenge as the U.S. Army in 2006 announced controversial plans to relocate 16,000 personnel positions to the Fort Belvoir Proving Ground in the next few years as part of the Base Realignment and Closure program, despite already gridlocked traffic and inadequate public transportation services in the neighborhood. Newington is located at 38°44′7″N 77°12′13″W / 38.73528°N 77.20361°W / 38.73528; -77.20361 (38.735414, -77.203558). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.6 square miles (17.2 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 19,784 people, 6,710 households, and 5,321 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,977.8 people per square mile (1,150.4/km²). There were 6,793 housing units at an average density of 1,022.5/sq mi (395.0/km²). The racial
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    Amherstdale-Robinette

    Amherstdale-Robinette

    Amherstdale-Robinette is a former census-designated place (CDP) in Logan County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,785 at the 2000 census. For the 2010 census, the place was split into two CDPs, Amherstdale and Robinette. Amherstdale-Robinette is located at 37°47′7″N 81°47′34″W / 37.78528°N 81.79278°W / 37.78528; -81.79278 (37.785295, -81.792749, along Buffalo Creek. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 17.8 square miles (46.1 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,785 people, 677 households, and 519 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 100.3 people per square mile (38.7/km²). There were 735 housing units at an average density of 41.3/sq mi (15.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.47% White, 2.75% African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.06% from other races, and 0.62% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.90% of the population. There were 677 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.3% were
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Castlewood

    Castlewood

    Castlewood is a census-designated place (CDP) in Russell County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,036 at the 2000 census. Castlewood was an incorporated town from 1991 to 1997, when it reverted to unincorporated status. Castlewood is located at 36°52′43″N 82°17′21″W / 36.87861°N 82.28917°W / 36.87861; -82.28917 (36.878614, -82.289229). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.2 square miles (18.7 km²), of which, 7.2 square miles (18.6 km²) of it is land and 0.14% is water. It was originally named Castle's Wood's, as the land in the immediate area had once belonged to Jacob Castle, a frontiersman in the likes of Daniel Boone. Castle purchased the land from the Shawnee Indians, for very little in trade. It is reported that the purchase was made with the Shawnee Indians for a "hound dog, a knife, and a shot of whiskey. As a "Long Hunter", he spent long periods of time in the wilderness on hunting expeditions. There he befriended the Indians that inhabited the land in the Castlewood area. He married a Shawnee maiden by the name of Gliding Swan and they produced many children. It has been said that Castle himself showed Daniel Boone the
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Cross Lanes

    Cross Lanes

    Cross Lanes is an unincorporated census-designated place and suburb of Charleston in Kanawha County, West Virginia, United States. As of the 2010 census, its population was 9,995. Cross Lanes is an unincorporated city in the suburbs of Charleston, West Virginia. It is located at 38°25′45″N 81°46′33″W / 38.42917°N 81.77583°W / 38.42917; -81.77583 (38.429096, -81.775854). According to the United States Census Bureau, the Cross Lanes CDP has a total area of 6.4 square miles (16.6 km²), of which, 6.4 square miles (16.5 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.65%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,353 people, 4,231 households, and 2,991 families residing in Cross Lanes. The population density was 1,594.4 people per square mile (615.9/km²). There were 4,481 housing units at an average density of 690.1/sq mi (266.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 93.63% White, 3.84% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 1.24% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.57% of the population. There were 4,231 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Forest

    Forest

    Forest is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bedford County, Virginia, United States. The population was 9,106 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. Forest is located at 37°22′15″N 79°16′0″W / 37.37083°N 79.266667°W / 37.37083; -79.266667 (37.370723, -79.266801). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 13.9 square miles (35.9 km), of which 13.7 square miles (35.6 km) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.3 km), or 0.89%, is water. Forest is a rural suburb of Lynchburg, Virginia, containing many subdivided properties carved from and around surrounding farms and woodlands. The Ivy Hill community is the largest development and is built around the Ivy Hill Golf Course. The town has been experiencing rapid growth and development over the past 10 years, which is expected to continue into the near future. The recent construction of shopping centers such as Cavalier Corner and a large strip mall beside the post office evidence this recent growth. Forest is home to Jefferson Forest High School (the Cavaliers, ~1400 students), Forest Middle School (the Knights, ~1100 students), Forest Elementary School, Thomas Jefferson
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Blennerhassett

    Blennerhassett

    Blennerhassett is a census-designated place (CDP) in Wood County, West Virginia, United States. It is part of the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 3,089 at the 2010 census. This community is named after Blennerhassett Island, an island in the Ohio River near the area. The island got its name from the owner of the island in the 19th century: Harman Blennerhassett, an Irish immigrant to the United States. Blennerhassett is located at 39°15′15″N 81°37′25″W / 39.25417°N 81.62361°W / 39.25417; -81.62361 (39.254298, -81.623522). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.0 square miles (13.0 km²), all of it land. At the 2000 census, there were 3,225 people, 1,227 households and 996 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 643.8 per square mile (248.5/km²). There were 1,271 housing units at an average density of 253.7/sq mi (98.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.45% White, 0.56% African American, 0.03% Native American, 0.50% Asian, and 0.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.37% of the population. There were 1,227 households of which 32.8% had
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Granite Bay

    Granite Bay

    Granite Bay is a census-designated place (CDP) in Placer County, California, United States. It is part of the Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 20,402 at the 2010 census, up from 19,388 at the 2000 census. The ZIP code is 95746. Granite Bay is a primarily residential suburb of Sacramento located just east of Roseville and west of Folsom Lake. Granite Bay is located at 38°44′55″N 121°10′47″W / 38.74861°N 121.17972°W / 38.74861; -121.17972 (38.748504, -121.179793). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 21.6 square miles (56 km), of which, 21.5 square miles (56 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.20%) is water. The place name, Granite Bay, is derived from a bay in Folsom Lake on the east side of the town. The entire town is underlain by granodiorite of the Penryn Pluton of Cretaceous age, hence the geological basis for the place name. The 2010 United States Census reported that Granite Bay had a population of 20,402. The population density was 945.8 people per square mile (365.2/km²). The racial makeup of Granite Bay was 17,960 (88.0%) White, 148 (0.7%) African American, 138
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Hurley

    Hurley

    Hurley is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in the Town of Hurley, Ulster County, New York, USA. The population was 3,458 at the 2010 census. Hurley is a community near the east town line of the Town of Hurley. Much of the hamlet is within the Hurley Historic District, a National Historic Landmark. Hurley is located at 41°55′14″N 74°3′16″W / 41.92056°N 74.05444°W / 41.92056; -74.05444 (41.920701, -74.054508). It is bisected by US 209. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.5 square miles (14.3 km²), of which, 5.5 square miles (14.2 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.54%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,561 people, 1,415 households, and 1,049 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 647.2 per square mile (250.0/km²). There were 1,476 housing units at an average density of 268.2/sq mi (103.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.76% White, 1.24% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 1.43% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.06% from other races, and 1.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.13% of the population. There were 1,415 households out
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Shawsville

    Shawsville

    Shawsville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Montgomery County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,310 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Blacksburg–Christiansburg–Radford Metropolitan Statistical Area which encompasses all of Montgomery County, Virginia and the city of Radford. However, many residents of the eastern section of Montgomery County more often travel to Roanoke, Virginia or Salem, Virginia for work, shopping, and services since these cities are generally closer and do not require driving up Christiansburg Mountain on US 460 (which is a concurrency with US 11 here) or Interstate 81. Shawsville is located at 37°10′24″N 80°14′55″W / 37.17333°N 80.24861°W / 37.17333; -80.24861 (37.173248, -80.248580). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,029 people, 431 households, and 299 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 444.1 people per square mile (171.2/km²). There were 443 housing units at an average density of 191.2/sq mi (73.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.21% White, 1.07% African American, 0.58% Native
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Culloden

    Culloden

    Culloden is a census-designated place (CDP) in West Virginia. Most of Culloden is in Cabell County, with the remainder in Putnam County. As of the 2010 census, the CDP population was 3,061 (2,683 in Cabell County, 378 in Putnam County). The Cabell County portion of Culloden is part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area, while the Putnam County portion is considered part of the Charleston, WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. The community was named by L. R. White, who lost a leg while working for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad. White was asked to name the town upon the establishment of its post office and train station; he suggested "Culloden" because there were so few places with that name in the United States. Culloden is located at 38°25′6″N 82°4′4″W / 38.41833°N 82.06778°W / 38.41833; -82.06778 (38.418238, -82.067883). According to the United States Census Bureau, the Culloden CDP has a total area of 4.2 square miles (10.9 km²), of which, 4.2 square miles (10.9 km²) of it is land and 0.38% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,940 people, 1,177 households, and 894 families residing in the community. The population density was 796.8
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Fort Lee

    Fort Lee

    Fort Lee is a census-designated place (CDP) in Petersburg, Prince George County, Virginia, United States. The population was 7,269 at the 2000 census. Fort Lee is a United States Army post and headquarters of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command (CASCOM)/ Sustainment Center of Excellence (SCoE), the U.S. Army Quartermaster School, the U.S. Army Ordnance School, The U.S. Army Transportation School, the Army Logistics University (ALU), Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA), and the U.S. Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA). A U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) unit, the 49th Quartermaster Group (Petroleum and Water), is stationed there. Fort Lee also hosts two Army museums, the U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum and the U.S. Army Women's Museum. The Army's Ordnance Museum has plans to establish a collection preservation site at Fort Lee. The fort is named for Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Just 18 days after a state of war with Germany was declared, the first Camp Lee was selected as a state mobilization camp and later became a division training camp. In June 1917, building began and within sixty days some 14,000 men were on the installation. When construction work ended,
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Bensley

    Bensley

    Bensley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. The population was 5,819 at the 2010 census. Bensley is located at 37°26′56″N 77°26′44″W / 37.44889°N 77.44556°W / 37.44889; -77.44556 (37.448897, -77.445605). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.9 square miles (7.5 km), of which 2.9 square miles (7.4 km) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.06 km), or 0.81%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,435 people, 2,252 households, and 1,407 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,882.8 people per square mile (726.1/km²). There were 2,368 housing units at an average density of 820.3/sq mi (316.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 62.34% White, 24.32% African American, 0.64% Native American, 4.40% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 5.04% from other races, and 3.15% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.68% of the population. There were 2,252 households out of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.3% were married couples living together, 18.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.5% were non-families. 30.1% of
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Chamberlayne

    Chamberlayne

    Chamberlayne is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. The population was 5,456 at the 2010 census. Chamberlayne is located at 37°37′51″N 77°26′16″W / 37.63083°N 77.43778°W / 37.63083; -77.43778 (37.630794, -77.437807). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.7 square miles (9.5 km), of which 3.4 square miles (8.7 km) is land and 0.35 square miles (0.9 km), or 8.99%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,380 people, 1,884 households, and 1,352 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,163.5 people per square mile (449.8/km²). There were 1,916 housing units at an average density of 509.0/sq mi (196.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 47.83% White, 49.20% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.12% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 1.21% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.84% of the population. There were 1,884 households out of which 19.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.4% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.2% were non-families. 24.2%
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Great Falls

    Great Falls

    Great Falls is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 15,427 at the 2010 census. Although primarily a bedroom community for Washington, D.C., one major attraction is Great Falls Park which overlooks the Great Falls of the Potomac River, for which the community and the park are named. George Washington was involved with building a canal around the falls on the southwest, or Virginia, side, called the Patowmack Canal, which did not become commercially viable. Remnants of the canal and of a village around the canal named Matildaville are still visible in the park. The Great Falls and Old Dominion Railroad extended along Old Dominion Drive to Great Falls Park in 1906. River Bend County Park is another gathering area in Great Falls, as is the Village Green, which hosts community celebrations around Easter (Spring Festival, including an Egg Hunt), Fourth of July, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas (Tree Lighting), as well as concerts in the summer. Great Falls is located at 38°59′53″N 077°17′18″W / 38.99806°N 77.28833°W / 38.99806; -77.28833 (38.9981653, -77.2883157). The area is sparsely populated due to the vast tracts of
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Lake Ridge

    Lake Ridge

    Lake Ridge is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 30,404 at the 2000 census. Lake Ridge was started in the late 1960s when Sorensen Construction Corporation began building in the area now known as East Lake Ridge. Lake Ridge Parks and Recreation was formed in 1972 as the HOA for the area. The community grew rapidly throughout the 70s and 80s from about 3350 homes in 1983 to approximately 6600 in 1990. Lake Ridge as it is now was completed in the late 1990s with the completion of Ridgeleigh. Currently Lake Ridge comprises about 7700 housing units spread out over 70+ subdivisions and 9 condominium complexes. Lake Ridge is located at 38°41′17″N 77°18′32″W / 38.68806°N 77.30889°W / 38.68806; -77.30889 (38.688190, -77.308953). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.6 square miles (22.4 km²), of which, 8.2 square miles (21.3 km²) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km²) of it (4.63%) is water. The community of Lake Ridge is located along Old Bridge Road between Harbor Drive and Springwoods Drive. As of the census of 2000, there were 30,404 people, 10,980 households, and 8,103
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Mallory

    Mallory

    Mallory is a census-designated place (CDP) in Logan County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,654 at the 2010 census. Mallory is located at 37°43′49″N 81°50′9″W / 37.73028°N 81.83583°W / 37.73028; -81.83583 (37.730315, -81.835857), along Huff Creek and West Virginia Route 10. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 13.0 square miles (33.8 km²); 13.0 square miles (33.6 km²) of this is land, and 0.05 square miles (0.1 km²) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,143 people, 437 households, and 343 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 99.2 people per square mile (38.3/km²). There were 491 housing units at an average density of 42.6/sq mi (16.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.94% White, 2.27% African American, 0.09% Asian, and 0.70% from two or more races. There were 437 households out of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.1% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.5% were non-families. 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Massanutten

    Massanutten

    Massanutten is a census-designated place (CDP) in Rockingham County, Virginia, United States, built around a ski resort. The population was 1,945 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Harrisonburg Metropolitan Statistical Area Massanutten is located at 38°24′16″N 78°44′24″W / 38.40444°N 78.74°W / 38.40444; -78.74 (38.404566, -78.740120). It lies within a valley at the southern end of Massanutten Mountain. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 14.3 square miles (37.1 km²), all of it land. The first European-American to settle permanently in the area was Adam Miller (Mueller) (1703–1783), a native of Germany who arrived in 1726 and made his homestead near present-day Elkton. At the 2000 census, there were 1,945 people, 751 households and 582 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 135.7 per square mile (52.4/km²). There were 1,051 housing units at an average density of 73.3/sq mi (28.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.12% White, 2.06% African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.67% Asian, 0.51% from other races, and 1.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.49% of the population. There were 751
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Merrifield

    Merrifield

    Merrifield is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 11,170 at the 2000 census. Merrifield is located at 38°52′23″N 77°14′35″W / 38.87306°N 77.24306°W / 38.87306; -77.24306 (38.873144, -77.242994). It is bounded by I-66 on the north, the Capital Beltway on the east, Arlington Boulevard on the south, and Nutley Street (Virginia State Highway 243) on the west. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,170 people, 4,396 households, and 2,725 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 4,107.2 people per square mile (1,585.6/km²). There were 4,534 housing units at an average density of 1,667.1/sq mi (643.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 54.67% White, 5.94% African American, 0.25% Native American, 29.94% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 5.00% from other races, and 4.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.91% of the population. There were 4,396 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.7% were married couples living together,
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Fairview Beach

    Fairview Beach

    Fairview Beach is a census-designated place (CDP) in King George County, Virginia, United States. The population was 230 at the 2000 census. It is located within the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace American Viticultural Area winemaking appellation. Fairview Beach is located at 38°19′45″N 77°14′31″W / 38.329155°N 77.241928°W / 38.329155; -77.241928 (38.329155, -77.241928). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.5 km), of which, 0.2 square miles (0.4 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km) of it (11.11%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 230 people, 112 households, and 63 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,507.7 people per square mile (592.0/km). There were 222 housing units at an average density of 1,455.3/sq mi (571.4/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.39% White, 0.87% Asian, and 1.74% from two or more races. There were 112 households out of which 17.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.3% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.8% were non-families. 34.8% of all households were made
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Hollins

    Hollins

    Hollins is a census-designated place (CDP) in Botetourt and Roanoke counties in the U.S. state of Virginia. Hollins covers much of the area known locally as "North County". The population was 14,309 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. The area is also the home of Hollins University in addition to four properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the Black Horse Tavern-Bellvue Hotel and Office, Harshbarger House, the Hollins College Quadrangle, and Old Tombstone. Hollins is located at 37°20′23″N 79°57′11″W / 37.33972°N 79.95306°W / 37.33972; -79.95306 (37.339601, -79.953069). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.7 square miles (22.5 km²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 14,309 people, 5,722 households, and 3,782 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,650.3 people per square mile (637.2/km²). There were 5,947 housing units at an average density of 685.9/sq mi (264.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.68% White, 5.98% African American, 0.18% Native American, 1.86% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.39% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    Bassett

    Bassett

    Bassett is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henry County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,338 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area. The town was founded along a rail line by the same family that later started Bassett Furniture. Bassett Furniture's headquarters have remained in Bassett, Va., since it began in 1902. A few miles outside of Bassett is Billy's Flea Market, which is home to frequent traditional music and dance shows in the traditions of the Blue Ridge area, as well as an annual Jamboree. Bassett's Riverside Park was home to the "Furniture Makers" in the 1939-1940 Bi-State League during the 1939-1940 seasons. Bassett is located at 36°45′36″N 79°59′12″W / 36.76°N 79.98667°W / 36.76; -79.98667 (36.759905, -79.986763). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.5 square miles (9.1 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,338 people, 530 households, and 338 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 379.5 people per square mile (146.3/km²). There were 601 housing units at an average density of 170.5/sq mi (65.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Burlington

    Burlington

    Burlington is a census-designated place (CDP) in and the county seat of Boone County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 10,779, at the 2000 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, Burlington has a total area of 8.4 square miles (22 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,779 people, 3,799 households, and 2,887 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,276.0 people per square mile (492.5/km²). There were 4,083 housing units at an average density of 483.4 per square mile (186.6/km²). The racial makeup of Burlington, Ky is presently (2006) 93.9% White, 1.89% African American, 0.6% Native American, 1.11% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.94% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.73% of the population. There were 3,799 households out of which 42.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.3% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.0% were non-families. 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Coldfoot

    Coldfoot

    Coldfoot is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 10 at the 2010 census. Coldfoot primarily serves as a truck stop on the Dalton Highway from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay. North of Coldfoot, there are no services for 240 miles (400 km), until Deadhorse. It has a restaurant and a small number of overnight accommodations (converted pipeline construction camp quarters). Bus tours along the highway typically take two days with passengers spending the night in Coldfoot. The BLM, USFWS, and NPS jointly staff a small visitor center during the summer. The Coldfoot truck stop was founded by Iditarod champion Dick Mackey who started his operation by selling hamburgers out of a converted school bus. Truckers helped build the existing truck stop and cafe. The Alaska Department of Transportation (DOT) has a Camp (Maintenaince Station) in Coldfoot. The town was originally a mining camp named Slate Creek, and around 1900 got its present name when prospectors going up the nearby Koyukuk River would get "cold feet" and turn around. In 1902 Coldfoot had two roadhouses, two stores, seven saloons, and a gambling house. A post office
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Kittery Point

    Kittery Point

    Kittery Point is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Kittery, York County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,135 at the 2000 census. Located beside the Atlantic, it is home to Fort McClary State Historic Site and, on Gerrish Island, Fort Foster Park. Cutts Island is home to Seapoint Beach and the Brave Boat Harbor Division of the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge. Kittery Point is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area. A show involving Kittery Point is DinoSquad. First settled as early as 1623, the southern part of Kittery was once called Champernowne's after Sir Francis Champernowne, a prominent merchant adventurer and cousin of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, the prime mover behind settlement north of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Nicholas Shapleigh built the first house in the area, and Edward Godfrey established a trading post in 1632. Early professions included fishermen, hunters and trappers. Others harvested the region's abundant timber, which was shipped to England or the West Indies. Kittery was incorporated in 1652 when Maine became part of Massachusetts Bay Colony. The Pepperrells were a distinguished Kittery
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    North Springfield

    North Springfield

    North Springfield is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 9,173 at the 2000 Census. North Springfield is located at 38°48′14″N 77°12′30″W / 38.803813°N 77.208213°W / 38.803813; -77.208213 (38.803813, -77.208213). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.6 square miles (6.7 km), of which, 2.4 square miles (6.3 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.4 km) of it (5.43%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,173 people, 3,251 households, and 2,470 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,762.2 people per square mile (1,451.5/km). There were 3,291 housing units at an average density of 1,349.8/sq mi (520.8/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 71.99% White, 3.65% African American, 0.17% Native American, 16.13% Asian, 0.21% Pacific Islander, 4.63% from other races, and 3.21% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.50% of the population. There were 3,251 households out of which 34.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.9% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.0%
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Penhook

    Penhook

    Penhook is a census-designated place (CDP) in Franklin County, Virginia, United States. The population was 726 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. Penhook is located at 37°0′16″N 79°37′43″W / 37.00444°N 79.62861°W / 37.00444; -79.62861 (37.004501, -79.628747). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 12.6 square miles (32.7 km²), of which, 11.2 square miles (28.9 km²) of it is land and 1.5 square miles (3.8 km²) of it (11.71%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 726 people, 308 households, and 243 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 65.0 people per square mile (25.1/km²). There were 694 housing units at an average density of 62.2/sq mi (24.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 80.85% White, 18.18% African American, 0.28% Asian, and 0.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.41% of the population. There were 308 households out of which 21.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.5% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.8% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Crab Orchard

    Crab Orchard

    Crab Orchard is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, USA. The population was 2,678 at the 2010 census. Crab Orchard is located at 37°44′27″N 81°13′46″W / 37.74083°N 81.22944°W / 37.74083; -81.22944 (37.740792, -81.229307). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.2 square miles (5.8 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,761 people, 1,120 households, and 807 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,217.2 people per square mile (469.6/km²). There were 1,219 housing units at an average density of 537.4/sq mi (207.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.19% White, 0.91% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.18% from other races, and 0.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.62% of the population. There were 1,120 households out of which 31.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.9% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.3% had someone living alone who
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Dooms

    Dooms

    Dooms is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,282 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Dooms is located at 38°6′8″N 78°51′13″W / 38.10222°N 78.85361°W / 38.10222; -78.85361 (38.102255, -78.853735). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.0 square miles (10.3 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,282 people, 522 households, and 386 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 323.0 people per square mile (124.7/km²). There were 553 housing units at an average density of 139.3/sq mi (53.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.43% White, 1.33% African American, 0.08% Asian, and 1.17% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.62% of the population. There were 522 households out of which 26.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Elkview

    Elkview

    Elkview is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kanawha County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,222 at the 2010 census. It is named after the Elk River, which flows into the Kanawha River. Interstate 79, the "Jennings Randolph Expressway", provides highway access to Elkview from exit 9. U.S. Route 119 also reaches Elkview. A shopping center was built off I-79 which includes a Country Inns & Suites, Kroger, K-Mart,and several fast food restaurants. This small town is nestled between the larger town of Clendenin, and the municipality of Kanawha County, Charleston. Elkview is located at 38°26′16″N 81°28′55″W / 38.43778°N 81.48194°W / 38.43778; -81.48194 (38.437810, -81.482007), twelve miles east of Charleston. According to the United States Census Bureau, the Elkview CDP has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.6 km²), of which 1.7 square miles (4.4 km²) is land and 0.1 square mile (0.2 km²) (4.49%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,182 people, 507 households, and 370 families residing in the community. The population density was 697.4 people per square mile (270.0/km²). There were 552 housing units at an average density of 325.7/sq mi (126.1/km²).
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Gloucester Point

    Gloucester Point

    Gloucester Point is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gloucester County, Virginia, United States. The population was 9,429 at the 2000 census. It is also home to The College of William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science, a graduate school for the study of oceanography. Gloucester Point is located at 37°16′12″N 76°29′55″W / 37.27°N 76.49861°W / 37.27; -76.49861 (37.269907, -76.498604). Gloucester Point is situated along the York River in southeastern Virginia. To the south across the river on US 17 and the George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge is Yorktown, Virginia. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 15.4 square miles (39.8 km²), of which, 8.4 square miles (21.7 km²) of it is land and 7.0 square miles (18.1 km²) of it (45.44%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,429 people, 3,787 households, and 2,715 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,125.2 people per square mile (434.4/km²). There were 4,071 housing units at an average density of 485.8/sq mi (187.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 87.18% White, 9.16% African American, 0.47% Native American, 1.27% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.60% from
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Greenville

    Greenville

    Greenville is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Greenville in Piscataquis County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,319 at the 2000 census. Greenville is located at 45°27′37″N 69°36′1″W / 45.46028°N 69.60028°W / 45.46028; -69.60028 (45.460428, -69.600306). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.1 square miles (13.1 km²), of which, 4.2 square miles (10.9 km²) of it is land and 0.9 square miles (2.2 km²) of it (16.83%) is water. Situated beside Moosehead Lake, Greenville is drained by Wilson Stream. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,319 people, 606 households, and 346 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 314.3 people per square mile (121.3/km²). There were 905 housing units at an average density of 215.7/sq mi (83.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.56% White, 0.15% Black or African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.23% of the population. There were 606 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.2% were married couples living together, 8.1% had
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Short Pump

    Short Pump

    Short Pump is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. The population was 24,729 at the 2010 census. The original village of Short Pump, located at the intersection of Three Chopt Road, Richmond Turnpike and Pouncey Tract Road, was named for the short handled pump beneath the porch of a tavern located there. This area was on the principal route between Richmond and the Blue Ridge Mountains. Thomas Jefferson, the Earl Cornwallis, the Marquis de Lafayette, General Peter Muhlenberg, Stonewall Jackson, and Ulric Dahlgren were some of the major people in American history that visited this area. Short Pump has greatly increased in population and area in recent years, due to its proximity to Richmond. It has now become part of Richmond's Far West End. In 2003, developers opened Short Pump Town Center, a 1,200,000-square-foot (110,000 m) open air shopping mall. Short Pump is the site of many shopping centers and fast-food and upscale restaurants. There is also a skating rink, bowling alley and many neighborhoods under development. There are nine schools: Short Pump Elementary School, Nuckols Farm Elementary School, Gayton Elementary School, Colonial Trail
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Daleville

    Daleville

    Daleville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Botetourt County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,454 as of the 2000 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. One of the county's two high schools, Lord Botetourt, is located in Daleville. Daleville is located at 37°25′2″N 79°55′10″W / 37.41722°N 79.91944°W / 37.41722; -79.91944 (37.417146, -79.919528). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.5 square miles (6.4 km²), of which, 2.5 square miles (6.4 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.80%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,454 people, 562 households, and 477 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 588.9 people per square mile (227.3/km²). There were 573 housing units at an average density of 232.1/sq mi (89.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.32% White, 1.51% African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.41% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 0.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.03% of the population. There were 562 households out of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 77.9% were married
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Fancy Gap

    Fancy Gap

    Fancy Gap is a census-designated place (CDP) in Carroll County, Virginia, United States. The population was 260 at the 2000 census. Fancy Gap is located at 36°40′12″N 80°42′3″W / 36.67°N 80.70083°W / 36.67; -80.70083 (36.669884, -80.700892). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.1 square miles (10.5 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 260 people, 110 households, and 81 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 64.2 people per square mile (24.8/km²). There were 156 housing units at an average density of 38.5/sq mi (14.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.23% White, 0.38% Native American, 0.38% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.38% of the population. There were 110 households out of which 25.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.3% were married couples living together, 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.5% were non-families. 23.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.79. In the CDP the
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Ferrum

    Ferrum

    Ferrum is a census-designated place (CDP) in Franklin County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,313 at the 2000 census. Ferrum is home to Ferrum College and its Blue Ridge Folklife Festival. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. Ferrum is located at 36°55′35″N 80°0′40″W / 36.92639°N 80.01111°W / 36.92639; -80.01111 (36.926381, -80.011181). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.2 square miles (24.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,313 people, 285 households, and 169 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 141.9 people per square mile (54.8/km²). There were 307 housing units at an average density of 33.2/sq mi (12.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 80.81% White, 16.22% African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.69% Asian, 0.91% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.68% of the population. There were 285 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.4% were non-families.
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Lisbon Falls

    Lisbon Falls

    Lisbon Falls is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Lisbon, located in Androscoggin County, Maine, United States. The population of Lisbon Falls was 4,420 at the 2000 census. It is included in both the Lewiston-Auburn, Maine metropolitan statistical area and the Lewiston-Auburn, Maine Metropolitan New England city and town area. Abenaki Indians called the falls Anmecangin, meaning "much fish." The area was once part of Little River Plantation, a portion of which was incorporated in 1799 as Thompsonborough, then renamed in 1802 after Lisbon, Portugal. In 1806, Lisbon annexed the remainder of Little River Plantation. With water power from the Androscoggin River, Lisbon Falls became a small mill town. Before it burned down in 1987, the Worumbo Mill was the main mill in Lisbon Falls. It had been incorporated in 1864, and was world famous for its woolens. Especially well known were its vicuna wool products, which became famous when President Eisenhower's Chief of Staff, Sherman Adams, received a vicuna sport coat as a gift from a wealthy industrialist and had to resign due to the resulting scandal. The town's primary employment is at a gypsum mill and the nearby Bath Iron
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Springvale

    Springvale

    Springvale is a census-designated place (Village) in the town of Sanford in York County, Maine, United States. The population was 4,338 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine metropolitan statistical area. Springvale is located at 43°27′51″N 70°47′44″W / 43.46417°N 70.79556°W / 43.46417; -70.79556 (43.464053, -70.795608). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 10 square miles (26 km), of which, 9.9 square miles (26 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km) of it (3.67%) is water. Springvale is drained by the Mousam River. As of the census of 2010, there were 4,338 people, 1,437 households, and 913 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,314.5 people per square mile (510.4/km²). There were 1,501 housing units at an average density of 476.6/sq mi (184.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.8% White, 0.5% African American, 0.4% Native American, 2.8% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.04% from other races, and 1.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.70% of the population. There were 1,437 households out of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Belle Haven

    Belle Haven

    Belle Haven is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. Nearby CDPs are Huntington, Virginia (west), Groveton, Virginia (southwest) and Fort Hunt, Virginia (south). The population was 6,518 at the 2010 census. The CDP is located just south of Old Town Alexandria and bounded on the west by Richmond Highway (U.S. 1) and on the east by the Potomac River. It encompasses Belle Haven, a wealthy subdivision dating from the 1920s, and several adjoining neighborhoods. Some, particularly New Alexandria and Belle View, are among the lowest-lying residential areas of Fairfax County, and sustained extensive flood damage from storms including 2003's Hurricane Isabel and 1972's Hurricane Agnes. The Belle View branch of the Alexandria Post Office is located here, and serves the 22307 ZIP code in which the majority of the CDP falls. Belle Haven is located at 38°46′44″N 77°3′39″W / 38.77889°N 77.06083°W / 38.77889; -77.06083 (38.779013, -77.060721). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.7 square miles (6.9 km²), of which, 2.0 square miles (5.1 km²) of it is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km²) of it (25.66%) is water. As of
    5.75
    4 votes
    123
    Dale City

    Dale City

    Dale City is an unincorporated community in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. As of the 2010 Census, the total population was 65,969. The community is roughly bounded by Minnieville Road to the northwest, Prince William Parkway to the north, Smoketown Road to the northeast, Gideon Drive to the east, and Cardinal Drive to the south. Dale City was the idea of a real estate developer Cecil Don Hylton. Many myths surround Hylton and his choice of names for the community. Many erroneously believe Hylton's middle name was "Dale". He actually chose the term because it aptly describes the "hills and dales" of the rolling Virginia Piedmont, where he developed the community. His company, Hylton Enterprises, began Dale City approximately 1 mile east of Interstate 95 and continued to build west towards Hoadly Rd (State Route 642). Several places in Dale City are named after Hylton, such as C.D. Hylton High School and the Hylton Memorial Chapel. More recently, the Hylton Foundation underwrote a major new addition to Potomac Hospital in nearby Woodbridge, Virginia. As Dale City is nearing completion, Hylton companies have branched into new markets, especially real estate of
    5.75
    4 votes
    124
    Westwood

    Westwood

    Westwood, KY is a census-designated place (CDP) in Boyd County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 4,888 at the 2000 census. It serves as a suburb of Ashland, Kentucky. Westwood is closely affiliated with Ashland, as it shares its zipcode and bus system with the city. Westwood is located on a flat to hilly elevation just west of the Ohio River. The flat hill top is unusual to eastern Kentucky and was created by the Teays River which existed in ancient times and flowed in the opposite direction of the Ohio River. Westwood is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,649. Westwood was after 1920 a residential addition to the city of Ashland, but due to its residents' independence, annexation into the city of Ashland has never occurred. Employees of Armco Steel, American Rolling Mill Company were the majority of the new homeowners who originally built homes in Westwood. Most lots were sold and homes were built from 1920–1950, although some subdivisions have sprung up since then in the Westwood area. The population has grown over the years but the community was never incorporated. As
    5.75
    4 votes
    125
    Arlington

    Arlington

    Arlington is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Arlington, Bennington County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,199 at the 2000 census. In 1989, the Arlington Village Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The district covers an area of 180 acres (73 ha) and includes 190 contributing buildings and sites in the village center. In addition to historical and architectural significance, the district is also noted for being the place where composer Carl Ruggles spent the later years of his life. The buildings in the district provide examples of Colonial Revival, Greek Revival, and Federal styles. The St. James Episcopal Church (1829–30), the second oldest Gothic Revival church in Vermont, is located in Arlington Village. In the early 20th century, the village was an important industrial center with several mills and factories. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.7 mi² (9.6 km²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,199 people, 516 households, and 327 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 125.5/km² (324.6/mi²). There were 599 housing units at an average density
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Collinsville

    Collinsville

    Collinsville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henry County, Virginia, United States. The population was 7,777 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area. Collinsville is also where the administration building and county courthouse of Henry County are located (though nearby Martinsville - an independent city which is not technically part of the county - is usually identified as the county seat). Collinsville is located at 36°43′19″N 79°54′55″W / 36.72194°N 79.91528°W / 36.72194; -79.91528 (36.721950, -79.915253). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.9 square miles (20.4 km²), of which, 7.9 square miles (20.4 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.25%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,777 people, 3,466 households, and 2,197 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 988.1 people per square mile (381.5/km²). There were 3,758 housing units at an average density of 477.5/sq mi (184.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 84.84% White, 11.28% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.63% Asian, 0.18% Pacific Islander, 1.98% from other races, and 0.95%
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Glen Allen

    Glen Allen

    Glen Allen is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. The population was 14,774 at the 2010 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.9 square miles (22.9 km²), of which 8.9 square miles (22.9 km²) is land and 0.11% is water. Glen Allen is located north and west of the city of Richmond. As Richmond has expanded, Glen Allen has become a suburb of Richmond. A large area of northern and western Henrico County, from the Goochland County line north of Broad Street to the neighborhoods surrounding the Virginia Center Commons mall off U.S. Route 1, has a Glen Allen postal address (ZIP codes 23059 and 23060). However, the actual Glen Allen CDP is a much smaller area, near the intersection of Warren Road and Mountain Road. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,562 people, 5,131 households, and 3,504 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,420.1 people per square mile (548.0/km²). There were 5,297 housing units at an average density of 598.8/sq mi (231.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 74.92% White, 19.54% African American, 0.41% Native American, 3.08% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander,
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    North Corbin

    North Corbin

    North Corbin is a census-designated place (CDP) in Knox and Laurel counties in the U.S. state of Kentucky. The population was 1,662 at the 2000 census. The Harland Sanders Café and Museum, the restaurant where Colonel Harland Sanders developed the fried chicken recipe that would later become famous as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is located in the Laurel County portion of North Corbin. North Corbin is located at 36°57′38″N 84°5′38″W / 36.96056°N 84.09389°W / 36.96056; -84.09389 (36.960433, -84.093867). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,662 people, 689 households, and 469 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 913.4 people per square mile (352.6/km²). There were 774 housing units at an average density of 425.4/sq mi (164.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.41% White, 0.06% African American, 0.60% Native American, 0.24% Pacific Islander, 0.06% from other races, and 1.62% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.06% of the population. There were 689 households out of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Pine Knot

    Pine Knot

    Pine Knot is a census-designated place (CDP) in McCreary County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 1,680 at the 2000 census. Pine Knot is located at 36°39′41″N 84°26′25″W / 36.66139°N 84.44028°W / 36.66139; -84.44028 (36.661333, -84.440412). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.4 square miles (17 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,680 people, 584 households, and 390 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 263.2 people per square mile (101.7/km²). There were 653 housing units at an average density of 102.3/sq mi (39.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.95% White, 5.71% African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 1.37% from other races, and 1.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.32% of the population. There were 584 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.2% were non-families. 30.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Searsport

    Searsport

    Searsport is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Searsport in Waldo County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,102 at the 2000 census. Searsport is located at 44°27′30″N 68°55′06″W / 44.45843°N 68.918441°W / 44.45843; -68.918441 (44.45843, -68.918441). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.5 square miles (14.3 km), of which, 4.4 square miles (11.3 km) of it is land and 1.1 square miles (3.0 km) of it (20.80%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,102 people, 532 households, and 303 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 251.4 people per square mile (97.1/km). There were 625 housing units at an average density of 142.6/sq mi (55.1/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.00% White, 0.18% Black or African American, 0.73% Native American, 0.09% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.18% of the population. There were 532 households out of which 20.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.4% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.9% were non-families. 36.3% of all
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    West Gate

    West Gate

    West Gate is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 7,493 at the 2000 census. West Gate is located at 38°47′2″N 77°29′48″W / 38.78389°N 77.49667°W / 38.78389; -77.49667 (38.783909, -77.496778). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,493 people, 2,473 households, and 1,706 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 6,388.1 people per square mile (2,472.7/km²). There were 2,544 housing units at an average density of 2,168.9/sq mi (839.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 56.25% White, 17.18% African American, 0.59% Native American, 3.98% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 17.06% from other races, and 4.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 26.20% of the population. There were 2,473 households out of which 38.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 23.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Coal City

    Coal City

    Coal City is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,815 at the 2010 census. Coal City's population is composed of other surrounding unincorporated communities (Whitby, Jonben, and Fireco). Coal City is located at 37°41′8″N 81°12′37″W / 37.68556°N 81.21028°W / 37.68556; -81.21028 (37.685475, -81.210217). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP known as Coal City has a total area of 6.3 square miles (16.2 km²), all of it land. At one point part of Coal City was part of the unincorporated coal town of Abney WV. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,905 people, 794 households, and 578 families residing in Coal City. The population density was 303.8 people per square mile (117.3/km²). There were 845 housing units at an average density of 134.7/sq mi (52.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.22% White, 0.37% African American, 0.05% Asian, 0.21% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.05% of the population. There were 794 households out of which 24.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.2% were married couples living together, 9.8% had
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Hooverson Heights

    Hooverson Heights

    Hooverson Heights is a census-designated place (CDP) in Brooke County, West Virginia, United States. It is part of the Weirton–Steubenville, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 2,590 at the 2010 census. Hooverson Heights is located at 40°19′22″N 80°34′57″W / 40.32278°N 80.5825°W / 40.32278; -80.5825 (40.322685, -80.582438). It is a suburban area near the town of Follansbee, in Brooke County. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km²), of which, 2.3 square miles (5.8 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (2.94%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,909 people, 1,144 households, and 814 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 486.2/km² (1,259.8/mi²). There were 1,206 housing units at an average density of 201.6/km² (522.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.90% White, 0.28% African American, 0.03% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 0.00% from other races, and 0.62% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.41% of the population. There were 1,144 households out of which 28.8% had children under the age of 18 living
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Matoaca

    Matoaca

    Matoaca is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,403 at the 2010 census. It is named after the Pamunkey princess Matoaka who was better known by her nickname "Pocahontas". Matoaca is located at 37°13′41″N 77°28′14″W / 37.22806°N 77.47056°W / 37.22806; -77.47056 (37.228138, -77.470437). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km), of which 2.5 square miles (6.5 km) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km), or 4.49%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,273 people, 866 households, and 651 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 892.0 people per square mile (344.2/km²). There were 911 housing units at an average density of 357.5/sq mi (137.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 65.55% White, 32.12% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.26% from other races, and 1.50% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.75% of the population. There were 866 households out of which 34.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 16.2%
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Powellton

    Powellton

    Powellton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fayette County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 619 at the 2010 census. Powellton is located at 38°6′27″N 81°19′15″W / 38.1075°N 81.32083°W / 38.1075; -81.32083 (38.107412, -81.320872). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.4 square miles (13.9 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,796 people, 697 households, and 515 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 50.5 people per square mile (19.5/km²). There were 781 housing units at an average density of 22.0/sq mi (8.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 88.08% White, 9.35% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.17% Asian, and 2.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.39% of the population. There were 697 households out of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.2% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.1% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Reston

    Reston

    Reston is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States, within the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. The population was 58,404, at the 2010 Census and 56,407 at the 2000 census. An internationally-known planned community founded in 1964, it was built with the goal of revolutionizing post-World War II concepts of land use and residential/corporate development in American suburbia. The Reston Town Center is home to many businesses, with high-rise and low-rise commercial buildings that are home to shops, restaurants, offices, a cinema, and a hotel. It comprises over 1,000,000 square feet (93,000 m) of office space. Municipal, government-like services are provided by the nonprofit Reston Association, which is supported by a per-household fee for all residential properties in Reston. The land on which Reston sits was initially owned by Lord Fairfax during the 18th century. C.A. Wiehle (for whom Wiehle Avenue is named) bought the land later in the 1880s. He died after construction of several buildings. His sons did not share his vision, and sold the land to A. Smith Bowman, who built a bourbon distillery on the site while maintaining a farm on most of the
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Craigsville

    Craigsville

    Craigsville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Nicholas County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 2,213 at the 2010 census. Craigsville is located at 38°20′0″N 80°38′34″W / 38.333333°N 80.64278°W / 38.333333; -80.64278 (38.333389, -80.642766). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.1 square miles (15.7 km²), all of it land. Located near Craigsville is the Beaver Mill, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,204 people, 920 households, and 655 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 364.1 people per square mile (140.7/km²). There were 1,007 housing units at an average density of 166.4/sq mi (64.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.36% White, 0.09% African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.05% Asian, and 0.23% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.23% of the population. There were 920 households out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.0% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 25.9% of all households were
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Despard

    Despard

    Despard is a census-designated place (CDP) in Harrison County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,004 at the 2010 census. Despard is located at 39°16′57″N 80°18′48″W / 39.282369°N 80.313338°W / 39.282369; -80.313338 (39.282369, -80.313338). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.5 square miles (3.8 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,039 people, 392 households, and 286 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 706.7 people per square mile (272.9/km). There were 431 housing units at an average density of 293.2/sq mi (113.2/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.73% White, 2.31% African American, 0.10% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.29% of the population. There were 392 households out of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.3% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Groveton

    Groveton

    Groveton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. Nearby CDPs are Mount Vernon, Virginia (south), Belle Haven, Fairfax County, Virginia (east) and Hybla Valley, Virginia (southeast). The population was 14,598 at the 2010 census, down from 21,296 in 2000 due to a reduction in area. Located just south of the city of Alexandria, it encompasses numerous neighborhoods including Groveton, Bucknell Manor and Stoneybrooke and is part of unincorporated Alexandria. Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County's largest park, is located nearby. Groveton High School, which served the community since 1959, was renamed in the mid-1980s as West Potomac High School, which also serves Fort Hunt. It covers the largest portion of the northbound Route 1 Corridor commercial area south of Alexandria, including the Beacon Hill Shopping Center and surrounding retail stores all of which run right down to Huntington. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.2 square miles (15.9 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 21,296 people, 8,076 households, and 5,297 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,462.2
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Spiveys Corner

    Spiveys Corner

    Spivey's Corner is a census-designated place located in Sampson County, North Carolina, at the intersection of U.S. Highway 13 and U.S. Highway 421. As of the 2000 census, the CDP had a total population of 448. Every year since 1969, Spivey's Corner has been the home of the National Hollerin' Contest. Contestants from the contest have appeared on Johnny Carson's The Tonight Show and the Late Show with David Letterman. Spivey's Corner is located at 35°12'6" North, 78°29'8" West (35.201600, -78.485572). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.8 square miles (20 km). 7.8 square miles (20 km) of it is land and none of the area is covered with water. As of the census of 2000, there are 448 people in the town, organized into 149 households and 119 families. The population density is 57.8 people per square mile (22.3/km²). There are 178 housing units at an average density of 23.0/sq mi (8.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP is 58.48% White, 37.95% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.00% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 3.35% from other races, and 0.00% from two or more races. 5.58% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. There are
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Timberlake

    Timberlake

    Timberlake is a census-designated place (CDP) in Campbell County, Virginia, United States. The population was 12,183 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. Timberlake is located at 37°19′53″N 79°14′52″W / 37.33139°N 79.24778°W / 37.33139; -79.24778 (37.331482, -79.247904). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 11.3 square miles (29.3 km), of which 11.2 square miles (29.0 km) is land and 0.12 square miles (0.3 km), or 1.12%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 10,683 people, 4,523 households, and 3,152 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,211.8 people per square mile (467.7/km²). There were 4,707 housing units at an average density of 533.9/sq mi (206.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 91.13% White, 5.42% African American, 0.28% Native American, 1.71% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.47% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.01% of the population. There were 4,523 households out of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Newell

    Newell

    Newell is a census-designated place (CDP) in Hancock County, West Virginia, along the Ohio River. It is part of the Weirton–Steubenville, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. Newell is the northernmost settlement in the state of West Virginia and the Southern United States as defined by the United States Census. The population was 1,376 at the 2010 census. The Waterford Park and William E. Wells House are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Newell is located at 40°37′3″N 80°36′3″W / 40.6175°N 80.60083°W / 40.6175; -80.60083 (40.617544, -80.600856). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.9 square miles (2.4 km²), of which, 0.8 square miles (1.9 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.5 km²) of it (21.28%) is water. New Cumberland, East Liverpool, OH (Via Newell Toll Bridge), Chester As of the census of 2000, there were 1,602 people, 645 households, and 437 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,142.0 people per square mile (824.7/km²). There were 709 housing units at an average density of 948.0 per square mile (365.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.63% White, 0.19% African American, 0.06% Native
    5.25
    4 votes
    143
    Alum Creek

    Alum Creek

    Alum Creek is a census-designated place (CDP) in Kanawha and Lincoln counties in the U.S. state of West Virginia. Located along the Coal River, it had a population of 1,749 at the 2010 census. Alum Creek is located at 38°16′45″N 81°49′32″W / 38.27917°N 81.82556°W / 38.27917; -81.82556 (38.279034, -81.825657). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 10.3 square miles (26.6 km²); 10.2 square miles (26.4 km²) of this is land, and 0.1 square miles (0.2 km²) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,839 people, 759 households, and 563 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 107.0 people per square mile (41.3/km²). There were 837 housing units at an average density of 48.7/sq mi (18.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.18% White, 0.33% African American, and 0.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.16% of the population. There were 759 households out of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.3% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 23.3% of all households were made up of individuals and
    7.00
    2 votes
    144
    Dahlgren

    Dahlgren

    Dahlgren is a census-designated place (CDP) in King George County, Virginia, United States. The population was 997 at the 2000 census. The community is located within the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace American Viticultural Area winemaking appellation established by the United States government. Since 1918, Dahlgren has been the site of a U.S. Naval base named for Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren. It was then the "U.S. Naval Proving Ground" but was renamed, after 1950, "U.S. Naval Weapons Laboratory", in 1974, the "Naval Surface Weapons Center","in 1987 the "Naval Surface Warfare Center", and around 1990, as the "U.S. Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD)". In 2006, it was renamed "Naval Support Activity-South Potomac (NSA-SP)", with NSWCDD becoming a tenant command of the base. The "U.S. Naval Space Surveillance Systems" command was located at that base, but was moved in 2006. The AEGIS Training and Readiness Center is currently a tenant command at NSA-SP. The 2-mile long, narrow 2-lane Harry Nice Memorial Bridge funnels interstate traffic across the wide Potomac River at Dahlgren, offering an alternative to using Interstate 95. According to the United
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Farmington CDP

    Farmington CDP

    Farmington is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Farmington, which is the county seat of Franklin County in Maine, United States. The population was 4,288 at the 2010 census. Farmington is home to the University of Maine at Farmington. Farmington is located at 44°40′11″N 70°8′46″W / 44.66972°N 70.14611°W / 44.66972; -70.14611 (44.669885, -70.146322). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.1 square miles (10.5 km²), of which, 4.0 square miles (10.4 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.49%) is water. Farmington is drained by the Sandy River. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,098 people, 1,568 households, and 625 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,015.8 people per square mile (392.6/km²). There were 1,668 housing units at an average density of 413.4/sq mi (159.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.88% White, 0.37% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.93% Asian, 0.24% from other races, and 1.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.85% of the population. There were 1,568 households out of which 18.2% had children under the age of 18
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    King Salmon

    King Salmon

    King Salmon is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bristol Bay Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census the population was 374. King Salmon is the borough seat of neighboring Lake and Peninsula Borough, but does not serve that purpose in its own borough, whose borough seat is in Naknek. King Salmon is located on the north bank of the Naknek River on the Alaska Peninsula, about 25 km (16 mi) upriver from Naknek, near Naknek Lake. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 171.0 square miles (443 km), of which, 169.6 square miles (439 km) of it is land and 1.4 square miles (3.6 km) of it (0.82%) is water. King Salmon has a Temperate (Köppen Dfc). Temperatures, especially extreme temperatures are not uncommon in this temperate climate, are much less moderate than on the Pacific Ocean side of the Alaska Peninsula; however, average temperatures in winter are still milder than a number of cities in the contiguous United States, such as Fargo, North Dakota. The town lies just below the southern limit of sporadic permafrost in Alaska, and is strongly sheltered from the extremely wet Aleutian Low which drops most of its moisture on the
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    MacArthur

    MacArthur

    MacArthur is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. Originally, it was named Hollywood and renamed MacArthur in 1942. The population was 1,500 at the 2010 census. MacArthur is located at 37°45′26″N 81°12′40″W / 37.75722°N 81.21111°W / 37.75722; -81.21111 (37.757180, -81.211114). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.0 square miles (7.7 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,695 people, 714 households, and 496 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 571.4 people per square mile (220.8/km²). There were 783 housing units at an average density of 264.3/sq mi (102.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.52% White, 0.41% African American, 0.35% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 0.06% from other races, and 0.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.71% of the population. There were 714 households out of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.4% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Pimmit Hills

    Pimmit Hills

    Pimmit Hills is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 6,152 at the 2000 census. In practical terms, it is more of a neighborhood within a densely-populated urban area than a traditional town. It is found within the triangle made by the intersection of three highways: Interstate 495 (the Capital Beltway), Interstate 66, and State Route 267 (the Dulles Toll Road). Within this triangle, the actual bounds of the neighborhood are Pimmit Run, Leesburg Pike (State Route 7), and Magarity Road. Although Pimmit Hills is politically part of Fairfax County, Pimmit Hills addresses use Falls Church as their mailing address. The area that is now Pimmit Hills was primarily farm land until the sub-division was built beginning in 1950. The houses in Pimmit Hills were mostly built during the 1950s for World War II and Korean War veterans and their families. Most of the houses were originally built as three bedroom, one bath dwellings of 833 square feet. Their initial price in 1950 was $9,950. The houses are mostly single-family detached dwellings, with an average property size of 1/4 acre (1,000 m²). When the houses were first built, all trees
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Shelter Island

    Shelter Island

    Shelter Island is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Suffolk County, New York, USA. The population was 1,333 at the 2010 census. The census location (CDP) excludes the population of Dering Harbor, a village in the town. The community of Shelter Island is in the Town of Shelter Island. This village is at the eastern end of Long Island. Shelter Island is reachable only by ferry. Many of the properties are owned by wealthy New York City residents who use the island as a weekend retreat. Shelter Island is characterized by a quieter and less social lifestyle than that of the nearby Hamptons. Shelter Island is located at 41°3′43″N 72°19′40″W / 41.06194°N 72.32778°W / 41.06194; -72.32778 (41.062171, -72.328003). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.7 square miles (17.3 km²), of which, 6.5 square miles (16.9 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.4 km²) of it (2.10%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,234 people, 531 households, and 349 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 188.8 per square mile (72.9/km²). There were 964 housing units at an average density of 147.5/sq mi (56.9/km²). The racial makeup of
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Skowhegan CDP

    Skowhegan CDP

    Skowhegan is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Skowhegan in Somerset County, Maine, in the United States. The population was 6,696 at the 2000 census. Skowhegan is located at 44°46′13″N 69°42′54″W / 44.77028°N 69.715°W / 44.77028; -69.715 (44.770308, -69.715087). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 14.1 square miles (36.5 km²), of which, 13.4 square miles (34.7 km²) of it is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km²) of it (5.04%) is water. Skowhegan is drained by the Wesserunsett Stream and Kennebec River. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,696 people, 2,883 households, and 1,764 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 500.2 people per square mile (193.1/km²). There were 3,193 housing units at an average density of 238.5/sq mi (92.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.66% White, 0.24% Black or African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.52% Asian, 0.16% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.70% of the population. There were 2,883 households out of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.5% were married couples living together, 14.4%
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    South Barre

    South Barre

    South Barre is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Barre in Washington County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,242 at the 2000 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.4 km² (2.1 mi²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,242 people, 534 households, and 367 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 229.4/km² (593.3/mi²). There were 553 housing units at an average density of 102.2/km² (264.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.87% White, 0.24% African American, 0.24% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.74% of the population. There were 534 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.7% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.78. In the CDP the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 6.6% from
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Hybla Valley

    Hybla Valley

    Hybla Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States south of Alexandria, Virginia. Nearby CDPs include Groveton, Virginia (north), Belle Haven, Fairfax County, Virginia (northeast), Fort Hunt, Virginia (east) and Mount Vernon, Virginia (southwest). The population was 15,801 at the 2010 census, down from 16,721 in 2000 due to a reduction in area, resulting from some of the eastward neighborhoods including Hollin Hills being moved to Fort Hunt CDP. The Mason family's Hollin Hall plantation, just south of Alexandria, had become the property of several owners, including Edward Curtis Gibbs and the Wilson family. Thomson Dairy had been founded on the land in the late 19th century, and lasted until Merle Thorpe purchased it in the early 20th century. The various dairy farms, such as Sherwood Farm, Hybla Valley Farm, and Popkins Farm were converted into suburban neighborhoods, while plans for the construction of the George Washington Air Junction, or the Hybla Valley Airport, began. The civilian airport was proposed to be the largest in the world, yet the land, which had once been dairy farm, was abandoned and is currently Huntley Meadows Park.
    6.00
    3 votes
    153
    Laurel

    Laurel

    Laurel is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. The population was 16,713 at the 2010 census. Laurel is located at 37°38′2″N 77°30′24″W / 37.63389°N 77.50667°W / 37.63389; -77.50667 (37.634012, -77.506661). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.4 square miles (14.1 km), of which 5.4 square miles (14.0 km) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km), or 0.71%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 14,875 people, 6,288 households, and 3,634 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,713.6 people per square mile (1,048.0/km²). There were 6,522 housing units at an average density of 1,189.8/sq mi (459.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 64.98% White, 24.30% African American, 0.33% Native American, 6.16% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 2.08% from other races, and 2.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.15% of the population. There were 6,288 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.0% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.2% were non-families. 32.8% of
    6.00
    3 votes
    154
    Oak Level

    Oak Level

    Oak Level is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henry County, Virginia, United States. The population was 885 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area. Oak Level is located at 36°47′51″N 79°56′22″W / 36.7975°N 79.93944°W / 36.7975; -79.93944 (36.797437, -79.939578). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.1 square miles (15.8 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 885 people, 415 households, and 278 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 145.4 people per square mile (56.1/km²). There were 465 housing units at an average density of 76.4/sq mi (29.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 92.54% White, 7.12% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.11% from other races, and 0.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.34% of the population. There were 415 households out of which 23.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Raleigh Hills

    Raleigh Hills

    Raleigh Hills is a census-designated place and neighborhood within the metropolitan area of Portland, Oregon, in the United States. It is located in the southwest hills in Washington County, with Beaverton to the west, West Slope to the north, and Progress and Garden Home to the south. As of the 2000 census, the census-designated place had a total population of 5,865. Raleigh Hills is located at the intersection of Oregon Routes 10 and 210. Raleigh Hills was named after Raleigh Robinson, a resident of the neighborhood. A post office named Raleigh was established in the area April 1892, and was closed twelve years later. Southern Pacific's Red Electric line had a stop in Raleigh from 1914 until the line ceased operation in 1929. A Raleigh Hills branch of the Portland post office was opened in 1968. Raleigh Hills is located at 45°29'5" North, 122°45'20" West (45.484790, -122.755575). According to the United States Census Bureau, the neighborhood has a total area of four km² (1.5 sq mi), none of which is covered with water. As of the census of 2000, there are 5865 people in the neighborhood, organized into 2586 households and 1561 families. The population density is 3,829.5 people per
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    Stearns

    Stearns

    Stearns is a census-designated place (CDP) in McCreary County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 1,586 at the 2000 census. It was founded by Justus Smith Stearns. Stearns is located at 36°41′53″N 84°28′36″W / 36.69806°N 84.47667°W / 36.69806; -84.47667 (36.697976, -84.476776). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.0 square miles (10 km), of which, 4.0 square miles (10 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.50%) is water. At the 2000 census, there were 1,586 people, 641 households and 464 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 396.7 per square mile (153.1/km²). There were 707 housing units at an average density of 176.8/sq mi (68.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.36% White, 0.95% Native American, 0.06% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.38% of the population. There were 641 households, of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.6% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Oyster Bay

    Oyster Bay

    Oyster Bay is the name of a hamlet and census-designated place on the North Shore of Long Island in Nassau County in the state of New York, United States. The hamlet is also the site of a station on the Oyster Bay Branch of the Long Island Rail Road and the eastern termination point of that branch of the railroad. The community is within the Town of Oyster Bay, New York, a town which contains 18 villages and 18 hamlets. The hamlet's area was considerably larger before several of its parts incorporated as separate villages. At least six of the 36 villages and hamlets of the Town of Oyster Bay have shores on Oyster Bay Harbor and its inlets, and many of these were previously considered part of the hamlet of Oyster Bay; three of those are now known as Mill Neck, Bayville & Centre Island. The Oyster Bay Post Office (ZIP code 11771) serves several of the surrounding areas also, including the villages Oyster Bay Cove, Cove Neck, and Upper Brookville. The Oyster Bay-East Norwich Central School District was created on July 1, 1960, by the action of the voters in the former Oyster Bay and East Norwich School Districts. The district's 13.1 square miles (34 km) boundaries include the hamlets
    5.00
    4 votes
    158
    East Highland Park

    East Highland Park

    East Highland Park is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, in the United States. The population was 14,796 at the 2010 census. East Highland Park is located at 37°34′15″N 77°23′48″W / 37.57083°N 77.39667°W / 37.57083; -77.39667 (37.570945, -77.396655). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.0 square miles (23.3 km), of which 8.8 square miles (22.8 km) is land and 0.19 square miles (0.5 km), or 2.24%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 12,488 people, 4,960 households, and 3,313 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,393.1 people per square mile (538.1/km²). There were 5,226 housing units at an average density of 583.0/sq mi (225.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 18.47% White, 79.36% African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.39% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.00% of the population. There were 4,960 households out of which 29.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.9% were married couples living together, 23.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.2%
    5.67
    3 votes
    159
    Inwood

    Inwood

    Inwood is a census-designated place (CDP) in Berkeley County, West Virginia, United States, located south of Martinsburg. The population was 2,954 at the 2010 census. It is located on U.S. Route 11. In the late 1880s, coinciding with the arrival of the Cumberland Valley Railroad (CVRR) extension, a resort that became known as Inwood Park was established on the property of the Strong family of south Berkeley County, West Virginia. On May 5, 1890, the Inwood Post Office opened and the village grew around the Park. From 1892 - 1913, an annual event called the Inwood Fair was held at the Park. This event drew in the range of 7,000 - 12,000 people. The Cumberland Valley Railroad station in Inwood also included a grain elevator, which ensured that much of the local agricultural products would be brought to Inwood to be shipped elsewhere. Other products shipped from Inwood via the CVRR were wood products, such as bark (for tanning) and railroad ties from the area west of the town. The station at Inwood was one of the most profitable stations on the CVRR line. The town of Inwood was originally called Gerrard. There are two stories as to how the town got its name. One story is that it was
    5.67
    3 votes
    160
    Oak Park

    Oak Park

    Oak Park is a census-designated place located in the Simi Hills, in Ventura County, California. As of the 2010 census, Oak Park had a population of 13,811, down from 14,225 at the 2000 census. It is located in the Conejo Valley, north from Malibu and Agoura Hills and is a part of Ventura County. Oak Park was formed from ranchland owned by Cosmo Stevens and Marian Jordan, stars of the radio show Fibber McGee and Molly. The land was purchased by Metropolitan Development Corporation in the 1940s and '50s. Homes were developed starting in the late 1960s. Kanan Road (named after a local family) was the only access road to the community, from Agoura Hills, California in neighboring Los Angeles County. As such, the community was served by police and firefighters based in the nearest Ventura County city, Thousand Oaks, 10 miles (16 km) away, with L.A. County services responding when able. In 1967 Ventura County officials who were concerned about the isolation of the community proposed a land swap with L.A. County, but they were rebuffed. The isolation—coupled with the distance to junior and senior high schools—also drove down the property values, and homeowners found it difficult to sell
    5.67
    3 votes
    161
    Stanford

    Stanford

    Stanford is a census-designated place (CDP) in Santa Clara County, California, United States and is the home of Stanford University. The population was 13,809 at the 2010 census, with a daily population of 35,000. Stanford is an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County and is adjacent to the city of Palo Alto. Stanford, California is a valid postal address, and has its own post office and ZIP codes: 94305 (campus buildings) and 94309 (post-office boxes). A popular landmark in the town is the Dish. Most of the Stanford University campus is situated within the CDP of Stanford. The Stanford University Medical Center and the Stanford Shopping Center, on the campus periphery, are counted as part of Palo Alto. Its resident population consists of the inhabitants of on-campus housing, including graduate student villages and the "Faculty Ghetto" of single-family homes owned by their faculty inhabitants but located on leased Stanford land. A residential neighborhood adjacent to the Stanford campus, College Terrace, featuring streets named after universities and colleges, including Cambridge, Oxford, Harvard and Princeton, is not part of the Stanford CDP but of Palo Alto. Stanford is located
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    Burke

    Burke

    Burke is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. As of the 2000 census, Burke had a total population of 57,737. Before 2010, the CDP was divided, with a portion of it becoming Burke Centre CDP; the population remaining in the Burke CDP was reported at 41,055 in the 2010 census. The area of Fairfax County known as Burke is named for Silas Burke (1796–1854), a 19th century farmer, merchant, and local politician who built a house on a hill overlooking the valley of Pohick Creek in approximately 1824. The house is still standing. When the Orange and Alexandria Railroad was constructed in the late 1840s, the railroad station at the base of that hill was named Burke's Station after Burke, who owned the land in the area and donated a right-of-way to the railroad company. The community that grew up around the railroad station acquired a post office branch in 1852. Currently, railroad tracks on the same historical line are owned by the Norfolk Southern Railway and form part of the Manassas line of the Virginia Railway Express commuter rail system, of which two stations lie in the Burke area. During the American Civil War, the railway station was
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Butters

    Butters

    Butters is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bladen County, North Carolina, United States. As of the 2000 census, the CDP population was 261. Butters is located at 34°33'37" North, 78°50'42" West (34.560262, -78.844955). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.4 km).1.3 square miles (3.4 km²) of it is land and 0.76% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 261 people, 108 households, and 77 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 201.1 people per square mile (77.5/km²). There were 119 housing units at an average density of 91.7/sq mi (35.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 92.72% White, 4.60% African American, 2.30% from other races, and 0.38% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.30% of the population. There were 108 households, out of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Gakona

    Gakona

    Gakona ( /ɡəˈkoʊnə/) (Ggax Kuna’ in Ahtna) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population of the CDP was 218. Gakona is located at 62°18′17″N 145°16′24″W / 62.30472°N 145.27333°W / 62.30472; -145.27333 (62.301940, -145.30194) (Sec. 18, T006N, R001E, Copper River Meridian). Gakona is located in the Chitina Recording District. Gakona is located in the center of Copper Valley, surrounded by mountains and the famous Copper River. Gakona is at the confluence of the Copper and Gakona Rivers, 15 miles northeast of Glennallen. It lies at mile 2 on the Tok Cut-Off to the Glenn Highway, just east of the Richardson Highway. Gakona is located in the continental climate zone, with long, cold winters and relatively warm summers. Temperature extremes have been recorded from -62 to 91. Snowfall averages 61 inches, with total precipitation of 13 inches per year. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 61.3 square miles (159 km), all of it land. Ahtna Athabascans have lived in the Copper River basin for 5,000 to 7,000 years. Gakona served as a wood and fish camp, and later
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Low Moor

    Low Moor

    Low Moor is a census-designated place (CDP) in Alleghany County, Virginia, in the United States. The population was 367 at the 2000 census. Low Moor was the birthplace of World War II Medal of Honor recipient Jimmie Monteith, for whom Camp Monteith, located in Kosovo, was named. Low Moor is located at 37°47′32″N 79°52′36″W / 37.79222°N 79.87667°W / 37.79222; -79.87667 (37.792094, -79.876604). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.8 square miles (2.1 km²), of which, 0.8 square miles (2.1 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (2.41%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 367 people, 150 households, and 106 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 450.4 people per square mile (174.9/km²). There were 161 housing units at an average density of 197.6/sq mi (76.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.64% White, 3.81% African American, 0.27% Native American, and 0.27% from two or more races. There were 150 households out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.3% were
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Montrose

    Montrose

    Montrose is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. The population was 7,993 at the 2010 census. Montrose is located at 37°31′14″N 77°22′42″W / 37.52056°N 77.37833°W / 37.52056; -77.37833 (37.520646, -77.378212). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.3 square miles (8.5 km), of which 3.2 square miles (8.3 km) is land and 0.077 square miles (0.2 km), or 2.31%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,018 people, 2,924 households, and 1,850 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,062.4 people per square mile (797.0/km²). There were 3,081 housing units at an average density of 905.4/sq mi (349.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 46.48% White, 49.97% African American, 0.36% Native American, 1.01% Asian, 0.88% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.57% of the population. There were 2,924 households out of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.9% were married couples living together, 24.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.7% were non-families. 29.9% of all households were made up
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Nokesville

    Nokesville

    Nokesville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,236 at the 2000 census. Nokesville is the center of a farming community with cattle and dairy farms; it became a town and intermediate stop on the Orange & Alexandria Railway in 1865. In the late 19th century–early 20th century, Nokesville was the location of a religious movement called the German Baptist Brethren, which became known as the Church of the Brethren. In the 1950s, it was cut off from passenger trains and remains a rural community today. Nokesville consists of three schools, including the recently finished "Patriot High". The oldest school, Nokesville Elementary was built in 1929 to serve all grades until 1964 when it was lowered to K-5 with the construction of Brentsville District High School. Nokesville is located at 38°41′54″N 77°34′25″W / 38.69833°N 77.57361°W / 38.69833; -77.57361 (38.698350, -77.573656). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.5 square miles (24.5 km²), all of it land. Nokesville is touched by Bristow, VA to the north, Catlett, VA to the west, Independent Hill, VA to the south and Canova, VA
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Smithtown

    Smithtown

    Smithtown is a hamlet (and census-designated place (CDP) ) in Suffolk County, New York, USA. The population was 26,470 at the 2010 census. The community of Smithtown is in the Town of Smithtown. The CDP or hamlet of Smithtown is located at 40° 51' 21" North, 73° 12' 53" West (40.855794, -73.214607). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 12.4 square miles (32.0 km²), of which, 11.9 square miles (30.7 km²) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km²) of it (3.96%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 26,901 people, 8,815 households, and 7,245 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,265.7 per square mile (875.0/km²). There were 8,956 housing units at an average density of 291.3 persons/km² (754.3 persons/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.35% White, 0.61% African American, 0.04% Native American, 1.77% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.53% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. 3.38% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 8,815 households out of which 38.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.2% were married couples living together, 7.3% have a woman whose
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    South Paris

    South Paris

    South Paris is a census-designated place (CDP) located within the town of Paris in Oxford County, Maine, in the United States. The population was 2,237 at the 2000 census. While the CDP refers only to the densely settled area in the southern part of the town of Paris, the entire town is located within the South Paris ZIP code, resulting in many residents referring to the entire town as South Paris. During the 19th-century, the Little Androscoggin River provided water power to operate mills in South Paris, and the village grew up around them. The opening of the St. Lawrence Railroad and Atlantic on June 8, 1850 further spurred development of the small mill town. In the 1890s, the Oxford County Courthouse moved from Paris Hill to be near the Grand Trunk Railway station. Much of the manufacturing and industry faded with the Great Depression, but South Paris remains the commercial section of Paris, and retains much of its Victorian era architecture. Oxford Hills Comprehensive High School, the regional high school, was founded in South Paris in 1961. South Paris is located at 44°13′18″N 70°30′53″W / 44.22167°N 70.51472°W / 44.22167; -70.51472 (44.221609, -70.514603). According to the
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Wiley Ford

    Wiley Ford

    Wiley Ford is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mineral County, West Virginia, United States and part of the 'Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area'. The population was 1,026 at the 2010 census. Wiley Ford is located at 39°36′58″N 78°46′30″W / 39.61611°N 78.775°W / 39.61611; -78.775 (39.616008, -78.774898). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.9 square miles (7.5 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,095 people, 463 households, and 308 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 378.6 people per square mile (146.3/km²). There were 515 housing units at an average density of 178.1/sq mi (68.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.09% White, 0.27% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.09% Asian, and 0.46% from two or more races. There are no Pacific Islanders or people of other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.18% of the population. There were 463 households out of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.3% were non-families. 28.3% of all
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Crozet

    Crozet

    'Crozet (pronounced /ˌkɻoˈzeɪ/) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Albemarle County in the U.S. state of Virginia. It is situated along the I-64 corridor approximately 12 miles (19 km) west of Charlottesville and 21 miles (34 km) east of Staunton. Originally called "Wayland's Crossing", it was renamed in 1870 in honor of Colonel Claudius Crozet, the French-born civil engineer who directed the construction of the Blue Ridge Tunnel. The population was 5,565 at the 2010 census. Crozet is part of the Charlottesville Metropolitan Statistical Area. Crozet is located at 38°4′12″N 78°42′6″W / 38.07°N 78.70167°W / 38.07; -78.70167 (38.069922, -78.701576). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.7 km² (3.7 mi²), all land. As of the census of 2010, there were 5,565 people, 2,119 households, and 1,522 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,504.1 people per square mile (573.7/km²). There were 2,229 housing units at an average density of 602.4/sq mi (229.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.2% White, 4.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 3.3% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Holden

    Holden

    Holden is a census-designated place (CDP) in Logan County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 876 at the 2010 census. Holdme is located at 37°49′7″N 82°3′42″W / 37.81861°N 82.06167°W / 37.81861; -82.06167 (37.818640, -82.061541), along the Copperas Mine Fork. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.7 square miles (3.7 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,105 people, 436 households, and 324 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 113.1 people per square mile (43.7/km²). There were 488 housing units at an average density of 49.9/sq mi (19.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.23% White, 8.87% African American, 0.18% Asian, 0.09% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.27% of the population. There were 436 households out of which 27.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 17.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.5% were non-families. 23.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Jolivue

    Jolivue

    Jolivue is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,037 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Jolivue is located at 38°6′55″N 79°4′18″W / 38.11528°N 79.07167°W / 38.11528; -79.07167 (38.115146, -79.071791). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.0 square miles (5.1 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,037 people, 551 households, and 249 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 527.2 people per square mile (203.2/km²). There were 594 housing units at an average density of 302.0/sq mi (116.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 92.67% White, 2.80% African American, 1.54% Asian, 0.96% from other races, and 2.03% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.09% of the population. There were 551 households out of which 17.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.5% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 54.8% were non-families. 49.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 26.7% had someone living
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Livermore Falls

    Livermore Falls

    Livermore Falls is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Livermore Falls in Androscoggin County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,626 at the 2000 census. Livermore Falls is located at 44°28′21″N 70°11′4″W / 44.4725°N 70.18444°W / 44.4725; -70.18444 (44.472679, -70.184468). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.4 km²), of which, 1.2 square miles (3.2 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.2 km²) of it (6.82%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,626 people, 718 households, and 409 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,327.1 people per square mile (510.4/km²). There were 842 housing units at an average density of 687.2/sq mi (264.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.05% White, 0.55% Black or African American, 0.43% Native American, 0.12% Asian, and 1.85% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.48% of the population. There were 718 households out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.4% were married couples living together, 12.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.0% were non-families. 37.2%
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Stanleytown

    Stanleytown

    Stanleytown is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henry County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,515 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area. Stanleytown is located at 36°45′6″N 79°56′55″W / 36.75167°N 79.94861°W / 36.75167; -79.94861 (36.751657, -79.948714). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.7 square miles (6.9 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,515 people, 662 households, and 442 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 564.3 people per square mile (218.3/km²). There were 723 housing units at an average density of 269.3/sq mi (104.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 88.32% White, 2.57% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 7.46% from other races, and 1.39% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.49% of the population. There were 662 households out of which 22.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.1% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Beaver

    Beaver

    Beaver is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,308 at the 2010 census. The West Virginia community got its name around 1860 “from the great numbers of beavers abounding in the creeks during the early days of settlement,” according to “A History of Shady Spring District” compiled by the Shady Spring District Woman’s Club in 1979. When the community was eligible for a post office in the early 1900s, the residents discovered another West Virginia town already had the name. The community adopted the name “Oxley” for a Huntington, W.Va., man who ran a clothing store. In 1929 or 1930, Grover Hedrick bought Ritter Lumber Co. and had the community name changed to “Glen Hedrick.” The residents petitioned the federal government for another name change and finally, the community was officially named Beaver in 1939. Beaver is located at 37°44′51″N 81°8′31″W / 37.7475°N 81.14194°W / 37.7475; -81.14194 (37.747601, -81.141843). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.4 square miles (11.4 km²), of which, 4.4 square miles (11.4 km²) of it is land and 0.23% is water. As of the census of 2000,
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    Cana

    Cana

    Cana is a census-designated place (CDP) in Carroll County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,228 at the 2000 census. It is the only CDP designated area in the county that is outside of the Appalachian Mountains in the Virginia Piedmont. In addition, the weather in Cana is similar of Mount Airy, North Carolina than it is in Hillsville or Galax. Cana is located at 36°35′3″N 80°40′13″W / 36.58417°N 80.67028°W / 36.58417; -80.67028 (36.584150, -80.670186). US Highway 52 runs through Cana just above the North Carolina state line. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.9 square miles (20.5 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,228 people, 520 households, and 362 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 155.0 people per square mile (59.9/km²). There were 576 housing units at an average density of 72.7/sq mi (28.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.23% White, 0.08% African American, 0.08% Native American, 1.55% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.69% of the population. There were 520 households out of which 28.1% had children under the age
    5.33
    3 votes
    178
    Kennebunkport

    Kennebunkport

    Kennebunkport is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Kennebunkport in York County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,376 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area. Kennebunkport is located at 43°21′36″N 70°27′58″W / 43.36°N 70.46611°W / 43.36; -70.46611 (43.360221, -70.466142). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.1 square miles (8.0 km²), of which, 2.9 square miles (7.6 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²) of it (4.23%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,376 people, 631 households, and 401 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 467.5 people per square mile (180.7/km²). There were 945 housing units at an average density of 321.1/sq mi (124.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.69% White, 0.36% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.07% from other races, and 0.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.36% of the population. There were 631 households out of which 19.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.3% were married couples living
    5.33
    3 votes
    179
    Lorton

    Lorton

    Lorton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, USA. The population is 27,709 as of the 2008 census estimate. Lorton is named for a village in the Lake District National Park, Cumbria in England, the hometown of Joseph Plaskett who settled in the area running a general store and opened the Lorton Valley, Virginia Post Office on November 11, 1875. Before the identity of Lorton, the commercial center was Colchester and the spiritual and historical center of the community around which the leading citizens of the time revolved was Pohick Church. From the early 20th century until November 2001, Lorton was the site of a District of Columbia correctional facility called the Lorton Reformatory which, among other things, detained approximately 168 women from the women's suffrage movement from the Washington D.C. area from June to December 1917. A Nike missile site was built at Lorton in 1955, and remained until 1973. Lorton also is one of the two stations that serves Amtrak's Auto Train which carries passengers and their vehicles non-stop to Sanford, FL, about 30 minutes away from Orlando, FL. The Lorton and Occoquan Railroad once operated between the Lorton
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    Crimora

    Crimora

    Crimora is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,796 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Crimora is located at 38°9′39″N 78°50′21″W / 38.16083°N 78.83917°W / 38.16083; -78.83917 (38.160845, -78.839088). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.1 square miles (8.0 km²), all of it land. What put Crimora on the map was the Crimora Magenese Mine that started in 1866. The mineral maganese was used in the production of steel. At one time the mining operations there were among the largest in the world. The mines are located at the foothills of the mountains of the Shenandoah National Park. They are two miles east of Crimora Station on the Norfolk Southern railroad formerly known as the Shenandoah valley railroad. Crimora Station was located at mile post 136.9. The station is no longer there. The remains of the mine consist of three adjoining man-made lakes that range from 20 to 100 ft. deep, with underwater shafts connecting multiple water sources around the Crimora area. Crimora is located roughly 5 miles north of Waynesboro, Virginia on
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Enterprise

    Enterprise

    Enterprise is a census-designated place (CDP) in Harrison County, West Virginia, United States, along the West Fork River. The population was 961 at the 2010 census. Enterprise is located at 39°25′11″N 80°16′36″W / 39.41972°N 80.27667°W / 39.41972; -80.27667 (39.419860, -80.276738). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.9 square miles (7.6 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 939 people, 378 households, and 275 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 319.8 people per square mile (123.3/km²). There were 413 housing units at an average density of 140.7/sq mi (54.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.89% White, and 0.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.64% of the population. There were 378 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.1% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 24.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Fort Hunt

    Fort Hunt

    Fort Hunt is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. (For the former military base see Fort Hunt Park). It is one of the wealthiest places in the United States with a median household income surpassing that of Greenwich, Connecticut and Malibu, California, and is most famous for the site of former P.O. Box 1142, a military interrogation center during World War II . It is also notable for its high population of senior citizens and for being one of the first suburbs in wealthy Fairfax County . Nearby CDPs include Mount Vernon, Virginia (southwest), Belle Haven, Virginia (north) and Hybla Valley, Virginia (west). The population was 16,045 at the 2010 census. Fort Hunt encompasses the 22308 ZIP code of Alexandria, composed of much of the most affluent section of southeast Fairfax County, close to the George Washington Memorial Parkway and Potomac River, including the neighborhoods of Riverside Gardens, Tauxemont, Herbert Springs, Waynewood, Plymouth Haven, Potomac Valley - River Bend, Collingwood, Stratford Landing, Stratford on the Potomac, Hollin Hall, Wellington, Arcturus and (in ZIP code 22307) Villamay and Marlan Forest. As of the 2010 Census,
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Mantua

    Mantua

    Mantua is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. Mantua is a bedroom community serving as a suburb to the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Most of the homes in Mantua were built between the 1950s and the 1980s. The population was 7,485 at the 2000 census. Mantua is located at 38°51′7″N 77°15′28″W / 38.85194°N 77.25778°W / 38.85194; -77.25778 (38.852012, -77.257675). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.4 square miles (6.3 km²).2.4 square miles (6.3 km²) of it is land and a small river called "Crooks Branch" flows through it. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,485 people, 2,627 households, and 1,938 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,090.4 people per square mile (1,194.2/km²). There were 2,723 housing units at an average density of 1,124.3/sq mi (434.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 78.78% White, 1.96% African American, 0.41% Native American, 13.61% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.93% from other races, and 2.26% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.83% of the population. There were 2,627 households out of which 35.9% had children under the
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Masonville

    Masonville

    Masonville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Daviess County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 1,075 at the 2000 census. It is included in the Owensboro Metropolitan Statistical Area. Masonville is located at 37°41′1″N 87°2′12″W / 37.68361°N 87.03667°W / 37.68361; -87.03667 (37.683612, -87.036563). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.9 square miles (23.2 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,075 people, 381 households, and 310 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 120.1 people per square mile (46.4/km²). There were 411 housing units at an average density of 45.9/sq mi (17.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.16% White, 0.09% African American, and 0.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.19% of the population. There were 381 households out of which 41.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.7% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.6% were non-families. 17.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Massac

    Massac

    Massac is a census-designated place (CDP) in McCracken County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 3,888 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area. Massac is located at 37°1′48″N 88°40′53″W / 37.03°N 88.68139°W / 37.03; -88.68139 (37.030066, -88.681369). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10 km), all of which is land. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,888 people, 1,610 households, and 1,189 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,005.7/sq mi (387.9/km²). There were 1,693 housing units at an average density of 437.9/sq mi (168.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.80% White, 2.70% African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.85% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.23% from other races, and 1.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.26% of the population. There were 1,610 households out of which 34.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.5% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.1% were non-families. 21.9% of all households were made up of
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Noank

    Noank

    Noank is a village and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Groton in New London County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,830 at the 2000 census. The original settlement in Noank along Elm Street (Route 215) and east of it towards Morgan Point is listed as a historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.2 square miles (5.7 km), of which 1.5 square miles (4.0 km) is land and 0.7 square miles (1.7 km) (30.32%) is water. The CDP includes areas further west and north from the original village, extending as far west as Palmer Cove and as far north as U.S. Route 1. In 1614, the area then known as "Nauyang" (meaning "point of land") was a summer camping ground of the Pequot. The Pequot were taken under English protection in 1655 following the Pequot War. The land comprising Noank Peninsula was acquired by James Morgan through a lottery in 1712. In 1861, Charles Mallory and Elihu Spicer, Jr., established the C. H. Mallory and Company Steamship line. In 1879, Robert Palmer put steam railways into his shipbuilding plant in Noank. His company became one of the largest in the
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Rowley

    Rowley

    Rowley is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Rowley in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 1,416 at the 2010 census. Rowley is located at 42°43′07″N 70°52′38″W / 42.718692°N 70.877164°W / 42.718692; -70.877164 (42.718692, -70.877164). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.74 square miles (4.51 km), of which 1.71 square miles (4.44 km) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.07 km), or 1.53%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,434 people, 569 households, and 386 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 316.4/km (817.7/mi). There were 584 housing units at an average density of 128.8/km (333.0/mi). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.33% White, 0.35% Black or African American, 0.49% Native American, 0.56% Asian, and 0.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.49% of the population. There were 569 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.5% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.0% were non-families. 27.1% of all households were made up of individuals and
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Sherando

    Sherando

    Sherando is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 665 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Sherando is located at 37°59′25″N 78°57′4″W / 37.99028°N 78.95111°W / 37.99028; -78.95111 (37.990334, -78.950983). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.1 square miles (18.3 km²), of which, 7.0 square miles (18.2 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (0.28%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 665 people, 270 households, and 207 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 94.6 people per square mile (36.5/km²). There were 281 housing units at an average density of 40.0/sq mi (15.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.39% White, 1.20% African American, 0.60% Native American, 0.45% Asian, 0.60% from other races, and 0.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.75% of the population. There were 270 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.0% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present,
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    McRoberts

    McRoberts

    McRoberts is a census-designated place (CDP) in Letcher County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 921 at the 2000 census. McRoberts is located in Kentucky's Eastern Mountain Coal Fields region. McRoberts is located at 37°12′30″N 82°40′21″W / 37.208256°N 82.672469°W / 37.208256; -82.672469. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.4 square miles (14 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 921 people, 359 households, and 272 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 169.2 people per square mile (65.4/km²). There were 397 housing units at an average density of 73.0/sq mi (28.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 93.16% White, 6.08% African American, 0.11% Native American, and 0.65% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.87% of the population. There were 359 households out of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 13.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.2% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or
    5.00
    3 votes
    190
    Lake Pocotopaug

    Lake Pocotopaug

    Lake Pocotopaug is a census-designated place (CDP) in the Town of East Hampton in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. It is named for the large local lake, which for years has been a popular resort area. The lake is surrounded by numerous homes. Most are year round residences, although some summer cottages don the shore. It is especially noted for two islands in its center, separated by a narrow, shallow strait (both of which have cabins). The lake's name comes from the local Pequot Indian word for "lake with pierced islands". Some time long before the area was settled by whites, the tribe living there felt they were being cursed by their irritable Great Spirit. To try and appease him, the main chief agreed to sacrifice his daughter, who willingly threw herself into the lake and drowned. The tribe's shamans announced that never again would an Indian be killed on the lake. Lake Pocotopaug is the largest inland body of water in Connecticut with 512 acres (2.07 km). Sears Park is located at the lake and has various swimming, boating and recreational facilities for residents. In recent years the lake has become a place of ecological study due to the large scale algae blooms
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Sudley

    Sudley

    Sudley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 7,719 at the 2000 census. Sudley is located at 38°47′34″N 77°29′56″W / 38.79278°N 77.49889°W / 38.79278; -77.49889 (38.792783, -77.498784). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 7,719 people, 2,640 households, and 1,998 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 4,940.2 people per square mile (1,910.5/km²). There were 2,703 housing units at an average density of 1,729.9/sq mi (669.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 75.41% White, 11.88% African American, 0.48% Native American, 3.72% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 5.10% from other races, and 3.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.29% of the population. There were 2,640 households out of which 41.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.1% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.3% were non-families. 16.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.6% had someone living
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Triangle

    Triangle

    Triangle is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 5,500 at the 2000 census. It is bounded to the south by the Quantico Marine Corps Base, which surrounds the town of Quantico. It is bounded to the north and west by the town of Dumfries. It is bounded to the west by Prince William Forest Park and to the east by the Potomac River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.6 square miles (6.8 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,500 people, 2,196 households, and 1,341 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,088.5 people per square mile (807.4/km²). There were 2,318 housing units at an average density of 880.2/sq mi (340.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 61.07% White, 28.33% African American, 0.49% Native American, 2.87% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 3.58% from other races, and 3.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.42% of the population. There were 2,196 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.4% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Mount Gay-Shamrock

    Mount Gay-Shamrock

    Mount Gay-Shamrock is a census-designated place (CDP) in Logan County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,779 at the 2010 census. Mount Gay-Shamrock is located at 37°50′50″N 82°1′47″W / 37.84722°N 82.02972°W / 37.84722; -82.02972 (37.847234, -82.029823), at the confluence of Island Creek and the Copperas Mine Fork. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.6 square miles (19.6 km²); 7.5 square miles (19.5 km²) of this is land, and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km²) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,623 people, 1,065 households, and 726 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 219.3 people per square mile (84.7/km²). There were 1,216 housing units at an average density of 101.6/sq mi (39.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.43% White, 8.27% African American, 0.30% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.38% of the population. There were 1,065 households out of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.2% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a female
    4.67
    3 votes
    194
    Amenia

    Amenia

    Amenia is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was 955 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Poughkeepsie–Newburgh–Middletown, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the larger New York–Newark–Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area. The community of Amenia is in the Town of Amenia on US Route 44 at the junction of Routes 22 and 343. The community is near the border of Connecticut at 41°50′49″N 73°33′17″W / 41.84694°N 73.55472°W / 41.84694; -73.55472 (41.846984, -73.55474). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.0 square miles (5.2 km), of which 2.0 square miles (5.2 km) is land and 0.49% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,115 people, 438 households, and 295 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 552.9 per square mile (213.1/km²). There were 478 housing units at an average density of 237.0/sq mi (91.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 91.03% White, 3.32% Black or African American, 0.90% Native American, 0.72% Asian, 1.35% from other races, and 2.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.50% of the
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    Bailey's Crossroads

    Bailey's Crossroads

    Bailey's Crossroads is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 23,643 at the 2010 census. Bailey's Crossroads lies at the "crossroads" of State Route 7 (Leesburg Pike) and State Route 244 (Columbia Pike). Bailey's Crossroads is located at 38°50′58″N 77°7′45″W / 38.84944°N 77.12917°W / 38.84944; -77.12917 (38.849474, -77.129093). According to the United States Census Bureau, the community has a total area of 2.0 square miles (5.3 km²), all of it land. The area occupies a broad, flat plain, bounded on the west by Munson's Hill. This unbroken expanse of level ground caused the Union Army to select it as the site of a massive review of troops during the Civil War. The review, which took place on November 20, 1861 involved thousands of troops marching in formation and parading before President Abraham Lincoln. Bailey's Crossroads is formed by the junction of State Route 7 connecting Alexandria, Virginia with the Shenandoah Valley and State Route 244 (Columbia Pike) connecting the Pentagon and Washington, D.C., with Annandale, Virginia. The most noticeable landmark at Bailey's Crossroads is Skyline Center,
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Brandon

    Brandon

    Brandon is an unincorporated village and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Brandon, Rutland County, Vermont, United States. The population of the CDP was 1,648 at the 2010 census. It includes part or all of Brandon Village Historic District. In 1976, approximately 3,000 acres (12 km) along U.S. Route 7 in Brandon and its vicinity were listed as a historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. The resulting Brandon Village Historic District includes nearly 250 buildings significant for their history and their architecture. Brandon is located at 43°47′53″N 73°5′11″W / 43.79806°N 73.08639°W / 43.79806; -73.08639 (43.798056, 73.086389). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.4 km² (2.8 mi²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,684 people, 718 households, and 463 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 228.1/km² (591.7/mi²). There were 781 housing units at an average density of 105.8/km² (274.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.46% White, 0.06% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.12% Asian, and 1.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.18% of
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Chesterfield Court House

    Chesterfield Court House

    Chesterfield Court House is an unincorporated community that is the county seat of Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. It was a census-designated place (CDP) at the 2000 census, at which time its population was 3,558. It was not delineated as a CDP for the 2010 census. The county courthouse and adjoining public square are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Chesterfield Court House is located at 37°22′35″N 77°30′14″W / 37.37639°N 77.50389°W / 37.37639; -77.50389 (37.376449, -77.503798). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP had a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km). As of the census of 2000, there were 3,558 people, 1,139 households, and 775 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,563.0 people per square mile (602.5/km²). There were 1,171 housing units at an average density of 514.4/sq mi (198.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 70.24% White, 24.06% African American, 0.70% Native American, 1.46% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 1.55% from other races, and 1.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.49% of the population. There were 1,139 households out of which 37.0% had children under
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Chevy Chase

    Chevy Chase

    Chevy Chase is a census-designated place (CDP) in Montgomery County, Maryland, United States. The population was 9,381 at the 2000 census. Chevy Chase is located at 38°59′21″N 77°4′34″W / 38.98917°N 77.07611°W / 38.98917; -77.07611 (38.98926, -77.076198). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.5 square miles (6.3 km²). None of the area is covered with water. As of the census of 2000, there were 9,381 people, 3,831 households, and 2,463 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,828.8 people per square mile (1,478.4/km²). There were 3,959 housing units at an average density of 1,615.8/sq mi (623.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 89.99% White, 3.68% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 2.97% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.11% from other races, and 2.05% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.73% of the population. There were 3,831 households out of which 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.7% were non-families. 29.4% of all households were made up of
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Fort Ashby

    Fort Ashby

    Fort Ashby is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mineral County, West Virginia along Patterson Creek. It is part of the 'Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area'. The population was 1,380 at the 2010 census. The community was originally chartered as Frankfort and then known as Alaska before it took the name of its well-known historic landmark. Fort Ashby is located at 39°29′52″N 78°46′4″W / 39.49778°N 78.76778°W / 39.49778; -78.76778 (39.497767, -78.767851). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.2 km² (3.6 mi²). 9.2 km² (3.5 mi²) of it is land and 0.1 km² (0.04 mi²) of it (1.03%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,354 people, 574 households, and 390 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 160.4/km² (415.8/mi²). There were 609 housing units at an average density of 72.1/km² (187.0/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.82% White, 0.30% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.30% from other races, and 0.22% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.44% of the population. There were 574 households out of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them,
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Greenville

    Greenville

    Greenville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 886 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. As early as 1794, Greenville was platted and divided into 14 lots of 1-acre (4,000 m) and sold by Thomas and Jane Steele. Greenville soon became a very busy stagecoach stop. This was because there were 3 major roads all intersecting at or near Greenville. One road connected Greenville with Staunton, another ran from Waynesboro to Middlebrook, and the south road led to Midway (now Steeles Tavern), Fairfield, and Lexington. The town slowly grew, and by 1810, the population had grown to 162, comparing to Staunton's 1225, and Waynesboro's 250. An 1835 account of Greenville said that it had an extensive manufacturing flour mill and a woolen manufactory, two physicians in the area, contained 50 dwelling houses, 3 general stores, 2 taverns, 1 academy, 2 tanyards, 2 saddlers, 2 tailors, 1 blacksmith shop, 1 cabinet maker, 1 wheelwright, 1 saddle tree maker, 3 house carpenters, 1 hatter, and 4 boot and shoe makers. The population was about 250 in 1928. Kate Smith, an immensely popular
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Elliston-Lafayette

    Elliston-Lafayette

    Elliston-Lafayette was a census-designated place (CDP) in Montgomery County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,241 at the 2000 census; in 2010, Elliston and Lafayette were split into separate CDPs. It is part of the Blacksburg–Christiansburg–Radford Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses all of Montgomery County, Virginia, including the towns of Blacksburg and Christiansburg, and the city of Radford. However, many residents of the eastern section of Montgomery County more often travel to Roanoke or Salem for work, shopping, and services since these cities are generally closer and do not require driving up Christiansburg Mountain on U.S. Route 460 (which is a concurrency with U.S. Route 11 here) or Interstate 81. Elliston and Lafayette are also considered distinct communities by most local residents. Lafayette is located along the Roanoke River just across the Roanoke County line. The north fork and south fork of the river join near Interstate 81 north of Lafayette. While Lafayette is named for the Marquis de Lafayette, it is pronounced "Luh-fett" or "Luh-fay-ett". The center of Elliston, which is the larger community, is approximately three miles west of
    5.00
    2 votes
    202
    Patrick Springs

    Patrick Springs

    Patrick Springs is a census-designated place (CDP) in Patrick County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,068 at the 2000 census. Patrick Springs is located at 36°38′10″N 80°12′13″W / 36.63611°N 80.20361°W / 36.63611; -80.20361 (36.636201, -80.203654). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 15.7 square miles (40.6 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,068 people, 872 households, and 622 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 131.9 people per square mile (50.9/km²). There were 966 housing units at an average density of 61.6/sq mi (23.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 91.15% White, 6.82% African American, 0.34% Native American, 0.68% from other races, and 1.02% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.84% of the population. There were 872 households out of which 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.6% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The
    5.00
    2 votes
    203
    Remsenburg-Speonk

    Remsenburg-Speonk

    Remsenburg-Speonk is a census-designated place (CDP) located in the Town of Southhampton, Suffolk County, New York. It consists of the hamlets of Remsenburg and Speonk. The population was 2,675 at the 2000 census. The population of this town and surrounding ones increases in the summer due to summer renters who come out for the beaches and scenery. As early as 1712, meadows in Speonk were leased to cattle owners from Southampton. Most of the early residents came west from Southampton and Bridgehampton in the 1740s, building farms and clearing the forests of wood. In the 1880s, duck farms thrived in Speonk, but few survived past the turn of the century. The name Speonk was inspired by a Native American word meaning high place. An 1897 Long Island Rail Road catalog listed Speonk, noting that that name "certainly sounds like the call of a frog." Some residents pressed to change the name to Remsenburg, after prominent resident Charles Remsen donated a new Presbyterian Church. Today, both names remain is use, each covering different areas of the community. Remsenburg-Speonk is located at 40° 49' 13" North, 72° 42' 4" West (40.820400, -72.701133). According to the United States Census
    5.00
    2 votes
    204
    Tariffville

    Tariffville

    Tariffville is a neighborhood and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Simsbury in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. It is a popular location for whitewater paddlers who use the Farmington River. The population was 1,371 at the 2000 census. Part of the original mill village area is included in the Tariffville Historic District, a historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The historic district excludes newer development around West Point Terrace and Hayes Road, as well as properties along White Water Turn, Wooster Road, and Main Street Extension. The historic district is architecturally significant for preserving some evidence of early nineteenth century mill village characteristics (in retaining some old mill housing and street layout) and for also preserving later 19th century Greek Revival and Gothic Revival structures. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.6 square miles (1.7 km), of which, 0.6 square miles (1.6 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km) of it (6.15%) is water. In 1825 (or 1827), the Tariff Manufacturing Company built a carpet mill along the Farmington River, giving its
    5.00
    2 votes
    205
    Weyers Cave

    Weyers Cave

    Weyers Cave ( /ˈwɪərz/ weerz) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Augusta County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,225 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Staunton–Waynesboro Micropolitan Statistical Area. Weyers Cave is the site of the first chapter (1927) of the Future Farmers of Virginia, later to become the National FFA Organization. It is also the site of Shenandoah Valley Regional Airport and the main campus of Blue Ridge Community College. Weyers Cave is located at 38°17′13″N 78°54′50″W / 38.28694°N 78.91389°W / 38.28694; -78.91389 (38.286833, -78.913977). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.6 square miles (17.1 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 2,473 people, and 910 households residing in the CDP. The racial makeup of the CDP was 85.3% White, 1.8% African American, 0.06% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.5% of the population.
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    Fort Hood

    Fort Hood

    Fort Hood is a United States military post located in Killeen, Texas. The post is named after Confederate General John Bell Hood. It is located halfway between Austin and Waco, about 60 miles (100 km) from each, within the U.S. state of Texas. Its origin was the need for wide-open space to test and train with World War II tank destroyers. The War Department announced the location in January 1942, and the initial completion was set for that August. As originally constructed, Fort Hood had an area of 158,706 acres, with billeting for 6,007 officers and 82,610 enlisted personnel. The main cantonment of Fort Hood had a total population of 53,416 as of the 2010 U.S. Census. It is in Bell County, with some portions of the base in Coryell County. During World War II, tank destroyers were developed to counter German mobile armored units. These were mobile anti-tank guns on armored halftracks or specially developed tanks. Wide-open space was needed for the tank destroyer testing and training, which Texas had in abundance. Andrew Davis (A.D.) Bruce was assigned to organize a new Tank Destroyer Tactical and Firing Center, and he chose Killeen, Texas for the new camp. The War Department
    4.50
    2 votes
    207
    Dunn Loring

    Dunn Loring

    Dunn Loring is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 8,803 at the 2010 census. Dunn Loring, Virginia, the earliest platted subdivision in Fairfax County and possibly the Commonwealth of Virginia, was founded in 1886. General William McKee Dunn and his wife Elizabeth Lanier Dunn purchased about 600 acres (2.4 km) located on the Washington, Ohio and Western Railroad, now the Washington and Old Dominion Regional Trail, from L. B. Clarke and his wife on June 8, 1886. On September 22, 1886, the land was transferred to the Loring Land and Improvement Company, composed of General Dunn, then a retired Army Brigadier General and former Judge Advocate General; George B. Loring, a former Congressman and Commissioner of Agriculture; and George H. LeFetra, a Washington temperance hotel proprietor. The Town of Dunn Loring was advertised for residential sales in 1887. The Loring Land and Improvement Company built a railroad station and a post office, but shortly thereafter General Dunn died, and the development stagnated. During the Spanish-American War, the founding of Camp Russell A. Alger brought growth and prosperity to Dunn Loring, and
    5.00
    1 votes
    208
    Hendron

    Hendron

    Hendron is a census-designated place (CDP) in McCracken County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 4,239 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area. Hendron is located at 37°2′16″N 88°38′42″W / 37.03778°N 88.645°W / 37.03778; -88.645 (37.037800, -88.644889). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.2 square miles (13 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,239 people, 1,832 households, and 1,278 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 816.7 people per square mile (315.4/km²). There were 1,932 housing units at an average density of 372.2/sq mi (143.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.59% White, 2.24% African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.66% Asian, 0.42% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.25% of the population. There were 1,832 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6%
    5.00
    1 votes
    209
    Madison Heights

    Madison Heights

    Madison Heights is a census-designated place (CDP) in Amherst County, Virginia, United States. The population was 11,285 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. Madison Heights is located at 37°26′22″N 79°7′2″W / 37.43944°N 79.11722°W / 37.43944; -79.11722 (37.439406, -79.117259). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 19.5 square miles (50.6 km), of which 19.2 square miles (49.7 km) is land and 0.31 square miles (0.8 km), or 1.67%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 11,584 people, 4,451 households, and 3,182 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 600.7 people per square mile (232.0/km²). There were 4,656 housing units at an average density of 241.5/sq mi (93.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 77.80% White, 19.57% African American, 0.66% Native American, 0.45% Asian, 0.58% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.89% of the population. There were 4,451 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband
    5.00
    1 votes
    210
    Prosperity

    Prosperity

    Prosperity is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,498 at the 2010 census. Prosperity is located at 37°50′9″N 81°12′21″W / 37.83583°N 81.20583°W / 37.83583; -81.20583 (37.835936, -81.205919). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.5 square miles (6.4 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,310 people, 570 households, and 395 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 840.6 people per square mile (324.2/km²). There were 624 housing units at an average density of 400.4/sq mi (154.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.24% White, 0.92% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.15% Asian, and 0.53% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.53% of the population. There were 570 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.7% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
    Southold Hamlet

    Southold Hamlet

    Southold is a census-designated place (CDP) that generally corresponds to the hamlet (unincorporated community) by the same name in the town of Southold in Suffolk County, New York, USA. The CDP population was 5,748 at the 2010 census. Southold was the first English settlement in the future New York State, though this is partially due to a historical technicality—the territory of New Netherlands was still owned by the Dutch at the time but Southold lay in a part of Long Island that was part of Connecticut at the time and was later ceded in a legal dispute. English Puritans from New Haven, Connecticut settled in Southold on October 21, 1640. Under the leadership of the Reverend John Youngs, with Peter Hallock (after lots were drawn, the first to step ashore), the settlement consisted of the families of Barnabas Horton, John Budd, John Conklin, William Wells, John Tuthill, Thomas Mapes, Richard Terry, Matthias Corwin, Robert Akerly, Zachariah Corey and Isaac Arnold. The land had been purchased in the summer of 1640 from an Indian tribe, the Corchaugs. The Indian name of what became Southold was Yenicott. Southold was to remain under the jurisdiction of New Haven until 1662, and of
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    Ashland

    Ashland

    Ashland (formerly, San Leandro South) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Alameda County, California, United States. The population was 21,925 at the 2010 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km), all of it land. Ashland developed in the 1940s. It was named for an Oregon ash tree. The 2010 United States Census reported that Ashland had a population of 21,925. The population density was 11,926.7 people per square mile (4,604.9/km²). The racial makeup of Ashland was 6,705 (30.6%) White, 4,269 (19.5%) African American, 232 (1.1%) Native American, 4,031 (18.4%) Asian, 260 (1.2%) Pacific Islander, 5,124 (23.4%) from other races, and 1,304 (5.9%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9,394 persons (42.8%). The Census reported that 21,739 people (99.2% of the population) lived in households, 103 (0.5%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 83 (0.4%) were institutionalized. There were 7,270 households, out of which 3,209 (44.1%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 2,786 (38.3%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,589 (21.9%) had a female householder with no
    4.00
    1 votes
    213
    Brooks

    Brooks

    Brooks is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bullitt County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 2,678 at the 2000 census. Brooks was struck by a tornado in 1996. Brooks is located at 38°4′5″N 85°42′40″W / 38.06806°N 85.71111°W / 38.06806; -85.71111 (38.068139, -85.711202). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.7 square miles (12 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,678 people, 1,032 households, and 762 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 571.7 people per square mile (220.9/km²). There were 1,083 housing units at an average density of 231.2/sq mi (89.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.31% White, 0.71% African American, 0.67% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.90% of the population. There were 1,032 households out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.4% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.1% were non-families. 20.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.7% had someone living alone who
    4.00
    1 votes
    214
    Fairlawn

    Fairlawn

    Fairlawn is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pulaski County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,211 at the 2000 census. It is served by the Radford, Virginia post office. Fairlawn is part of the Blacksburg–Christiansburg–Radford Metropolitan Statistical Area. History of the village of Fairlawn Riverlawn School History In the bend of the beautiful New River, directly across from West Radford, in Pulaski County, there nestled, in the year 1880, a blooming little town called “New River.” This thriving little community boasted a depot and a post office along with an energetic group of people. Needless to say, there soon became a growing concern for a school to serve the town. So, in the middle 1880’s a two story four-room building was constructed. Among the instructors serving this school the following have been mentioned: Mr. Bud Morgan, Mr. D. M. Swain, Miss Nellie Morehead, Miss Daisy Miller, Miss Margaret Miller and Mrs. Ida V. Stone. Two of these earlier teachers were remembered endearingly as a Miss Brown and a Miss Darnell. In the year 1907, Plans were drawn up to relocate the school and make it more accessible to outlying farm families. As a result, upon a site at
    4.00
    1 votes
    215
    Fairlea

    Fairlea

    Fairlea is a census-designated place (CDP) in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,747 at the 2010 census. Fairlea is the location of the annual West Virginia State Fair, held in August. Fairlea is located at 37°46′48″N 80°27′31″W / 37.779967°N 80.458538°W / 37.779967; -80.458538 (37.779967, -80.458538). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.7 square miles (9.6 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,706 people, 770 households, and 428 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 461.8 people per square mile (178.5/km). There were 861 housing units at an average density of 233.1/sq mi (90.1/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.66% White, 1.17% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.76% Asian, 0.35% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.41% of the population. There were 770 households out of which 24.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.5% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.4% were non-families. 39.4% of all households were made up of
    4.00
    1 votes
    216
    Hobart Bay

    Hobart Bay

    Hobart Bay is a census-designated place located in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska. As of the 2010 Census, the population of the CDP was one. The bay was named in 1889 by Lt. Commander Mansfield of the U. S. Navy. The site was first settled as a logging camp. The population has declined in recent years and it would probably not be incorporated as a town with the present population. Hobart Bay is located at 57°27'11" North, 133°23'36" West (57.453007, -133.393308). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 129.8 square miles (336 km), of which, 117.4 square miles (304 km) of it is land and 12.4 square miles (32 km) of it is water. The total area is 9.54% water. As of the census of 2000, there are three people, two households, and one family residing in the CDP. The population density was 0/km². There were seventeen housing units at an average density of 0.1/sq mi (0.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was two White and one Native American. There were two households with no children under the age of eighteen living with them; one was a married couple living together, and one was a male individual. In the CDP the population was spread out with two
    4.00
    1 votes
    217
    Laurel Park

    Laurel Park

    Laurel Park is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henry County, Virginia, United States. The population was 781 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area. Laurel Park is located at 36°41′23″N 79°47′27″W / 36.68972°N 79.79083°W / 36.68972; -79.79083 (36.689798, -79.790791). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.3 km²), of which, 1.3 square miles (3.3 km²) of it is land and 0.78% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 781 people, 331 households, and 231 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 614.4 people per square mile (237.4/km²). There were 342 housing units at an average density of 269.0/sq mi (104.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 33.29% White, 64.40% African American, 0.38% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 1.15% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.92% of the population. There were 331 households out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.3% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 27.5%
    4.00
    1 votes
    218
    South Shaftsbury

    South Shaftsbury

    South Shaftsbury is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Shaftsbury in Bennington County, Vermont, United States. The population was 772 at the 2000 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.9 km² (2.3 mi²), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 772 people, 306 households, and 230 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 131.3/km² (339.4/mi²). There were 319 housing units at an average density of 54.3/km² (140.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.70% White, 0.52% Asian, and 0.78% from two or more races. There were 306 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.5% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.8% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.91. In the CDP the population was spread out with 24.6% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The
    4.00
    1 votes
    219
    Union Hall

    Union Hall

    Union Hall is a census-designated place (CDP) in Franklin County, Virginia, United States. The population was 957 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. Union Hall is located at 37°1′35″N 79°41′31″W / 37.02639°N 79.69194°W / 37.02639; -79.69194 (37.026474, -79.691856). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 18.0 square miles (46.7 km²), of which, 14.5 square miles (37.6 km²) of it is land and 3.5 square miles (9.1 km²) of it (19.59%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 957 people, 407 households, and 326 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 66.0 people per square mile (25.5/km²). There were 813 housing units at an average density of 56.1/sq mi (21.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.51% White, 3.76% African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.31% from other races, and 0.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.84% of the population. There were 407 households out of which 20.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.3% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.9% were
    4.00
    1 votes
    220
    Annandale

    Annandale

    Annandale is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 41,008 at the 2010 census, down from 54,994 in 2000 due to the splitting off of the western part of it to form Wakefield and Woodburn CDP's. Annandale is located at 38°50′3″N 77°12′41″W / 38.83417°N 77.21139°W / 38.83417; -77.21139 (38.834134, -77.211277). Annandale is mostly traversed by the Capital Beltway and Virginia State Route 236. The center of town is considered to be where Route 236, Columbia Pike, and Backlick Road meet around two miles (3 km) east of Interstate 495 on Route 236. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 13.8 square miles (36 km), of which, 13.8 square miles (36 km) of it is land and 0.17% is water. The area is part of the coastal plain located just east of the Fall Line separating the coastal plain of Virginia from the piedmont. It is characterized by rolling hills, stream valleys, and heavy red clay soils. The Annandale region is bisected by Accotink Creek, which in Colonial times was a primary link for ocean-going ships that would load tobacco and other goods where Little River Turnpike - Annandale's oldest road
    0.00
    0 votes
    221
    Bear

    Bear

    Bear is a census-designated place (CDP) in New Castle County, Delaware, United States. The population was 17,593 at the 2000 census. Originally a small crossroads in a rural area south of Wilmington, the area supported small farms growing mainly corn and cattle. In the late 1980s and 1990s Bear became a popular location for the construction of sprawling housing developments and shopping centers along US Route 40. Bear is not an incorporated municipality or strictly delineated area in the county, but instead a general reference to the collection of communities in the US ZIP codes 19701-19702. According to common legend, the name "Bear" originated from a tavern located along the roadway from Wilmington to Dover, Delaware (at the intersection now formed by US 40 and State Route 7), whose sign was decorated with the image of a large bear. Bear is located at 39°37′13″N 75°41′5″W / 39.62028°N 75.68472°W / 39.62028; -75.68472 (39.620362, -75.684776). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.7 square miles (15 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 17,593 people, 6,027 households, and 4,544 families residing in the CDP. The
    0.00
    0 votes
    222
    Blue Ridge

    Blue Ridge

    Blue Ridge is a census-designated place (CDP) in Botetourt County, Virginia, United States. The population was 3,188 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Roanoke Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.3 square miles (16.4 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,188 people, 1,181 households, and 968 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 504.1 people per square mile (194.8/km²). There were 1,219 housing units at an average density of 192.8/sq mi (74.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.33% White, 2.85% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.06% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.53% of the population. There were 1,181 households out of which 34.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.5% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.0% were non-families. 15.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family
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    223
    Bradley

    Bradley

    Bradley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 2,040 at the 2010 census. Bradley is located at 37°52′35″N 81°12′12″W / 37.87639°N 81.20333°W / 37.87639; -81.20333 (37.876409, -81.203450). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.6 square miles (14.6 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,371 people, 873 households, and 613 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 422.0 people per square mile (162.9/km²). There were 934 housing units at an average density of 166.2/sq mi (64.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.46% White, 0.97% African American, 0.42% Native American, 1.10% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.34% of the population. There were 873 households out of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.5% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.7% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65
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    224
    Centreville

    Centreville

    Centreville is an unincorporated community in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. Recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau as a Census Designated Place (CDP), the community population was 71,135 as of the 2010 census and is approximately 20 miles (32 km) west of Washington, DC. Beginning in the 1760s, the area was known as Newgate due to the popularity of the conveniently-located Newgate tavern. William Carr Lane operated the tavern and was co-proprietor of a nearby store with James Lane, Jr. The Lanes sold convicted servants, which may explain why the tavern had the same name as a London prison. The small stream that passed near the tavern was named the River Thames, another London association. The town of Centerville (shortly thereafter spelled Centreville) was established in 1792 on the turnpike road at the village of Newgate by the Virginia General Assembly in response to petitions by local landowners. The petitioners reasoned that a town on the turnpike road leading from the Northwest Territory and centrally located to Alexandria, Colchester, Dumfries, Middleburg, George Town (later Georgetown), Fauquier Court House (later Warrenton), and Leesburg would be convenient. The
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    225
    Chatmoss

    Chatmoss

    Chatmoss is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henry County, Virginia, USA. The population was 1,742 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area. Chatmoss takes its name from a 2,700-acre (11 km) Hairston family plantation on the site, which was later incorporated into a larger country club building on the site. The Hairston family owned many plantations scattered across the South, including plantations in North Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi and Virginia. The family's Henry County plantations included still extant Beaver Creek Plantation and Hordsville, as well as plantations at Marrowbone, Magna Vista, Leatherwood, Camp Branch and Shawnee, which are no longer standing. The Chatmoss property was long owned by Harden Hairston, who inherited it, but it was later sold by a descendant to the developers of the country club on the site. Chatmoss is located at 36°40′47″N 79°48′20″W / 36.67972°N 79.80556°W / 36.67972; -79.80556 (36.679666, -79.805641). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 5.4 square miles (13.9 km²), of which, 5.3 square miles (13.9 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it
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    226
    Chattaroy

    Chattaroy

    Chattaroy is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mingo County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 756 at the 2010 census. The name "Chattaroy" has been recorded in several variations since 1775. It referred to the Big Sandy River and the Tutelo Native American tribe. Chattaroy is located at 37°42′8″N 82°17′1″W / 37.70222°N 82.28361°W / 37.70222; -82.28361 (37.702309, -82.283613). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.1 square miles (18.5 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,136 people, 475 households, and 342 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 159.3 people per square mile (61.5/km²). There were 524 housing units at an average density of 73.5/sq mi (28.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.80% White, 1.41% African American, 0.09% Native American, and 0.70% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.53% of the population. There were 475 households out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 26.3% of all
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    227
    Cheat Lake

    Cheat Lake

    Cheat Lake is a census-designated place (CDP) in Monongalia County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 7,988 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Morgantown, West Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. Cheat Lake is located at 39°40′0″N 79°51′10″W / 39.666667°N 79.85278°W / 39.666667; -79.85278 (39.666538, -79.852683). According to the United States Census Bureau, the Cheat Lake CDP has a total area of 15.8 square miles (41.0 km²), of which 14.3 square mile (37.1 km²) is land and 1.5 square miles (3.9 km²) (10.3%) is water. Cheat Lake is typically viewed as an affluent suburb of nearby Morgantown, though in terms of per capita income, it ranks as fourth-highest in West Virginia. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,396 people, 2,511 households, and 1,822 families residing in the community. The population density was 442.9 people per square mile (171.0/km²). There were 2,802 housing units at an average density of 194.0/sq mi (74.9/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 95.61% White, 1.20% African American, 0.09% Native American, 1.88% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.05% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race
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    228
    Chester

    Chester

    Chester is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States. The population was 20,987 at the 2010 census. Chester's original "downtown" was a stop on the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad. The Chester Station was the scene of a battle during the American Civil War. Chester today is a bedroom community along State Route 10. Recent commercial development in Chester has emerged at the sprawling intersection of SR 10 and U.S. Route 1 (Jefferson Davis Highway) near the on-ramp to Interstate 95. Wrexham Hall is said to be haunted by the "Lady in Red," probably one of the most famous spirits in Chester. The area was damaged by Hurricane Isabel in 2003. Chester is located at 37°21′12″N 77°26′9″W / 37.35333°N 77.43583°W / 37.35333; -77.43583 (37.353449, -77.435767). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 13.3 square miles (34.4 km). 13.2 square miles (34.1 km) of it is land, and 0.12 square miles (0.3 km) of it (0.90%) is water. At the 2000 census, there were 17,890 people, 6,727 households and 5,119 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 531.7/km² (1,377.1/mi²). There were 6,951 housing units at an
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    229
    Claryville

    Claryville

    Claryville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Campbell County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 2,588 at the 2000 census. Claryville is located at 38°55′44″N 84°24′6″W / 38.92889°N 84.40167°W / 38.92889; -84.40167 (38.928983, -84.401744). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.0 square miles (18 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,588 people, 942 households, and 725 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 371.1 people per square mile (143.4/km²). There were 993 housing units at an average density of 142.4/sq mi (55.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 99.11% White, 0.27% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.46% of the population. There were 942 households out of which 38.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.4% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.0% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The
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    230
    Coal Fork

    Coal Fork

    Coal Fork is an unincorporated census-designated place in Kanawha County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,233 at the 2010 census. Coal Fork is located at 38°19′2″N 81°31′37″W / 38.31722°N 81.52694°W / 38.31722; -81.52694 (38.317216, -81.526864). According to the United States Census Bureau, the Coal Fork CDP has a total area of 5.1 square miles (13.3 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,350 people, 581 households, and 415 families residing in the community. The population density was 262.8 people per square mile (101.4/km²). There were 614 housing units at an average density of 119.5/sq mi (46.1/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 98.67% White, 0.30% African American, 0.15% Native American, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.67% of the population. There were 581 households out of which 24.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.4% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The
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    231
    Covedale

    Covedale

    Covedale is a census-designated place (CDP) in Hamilton County, Ohio, United States. The population was 6,360 at the 2000 census. The CDP represents the part of the former village of Covedale, Ohio that was not annexed by the city of Cincinnati in the 1890s. Most of the CDP is in Green Township, but a small fragment extends into Delhi Township. The area of the former village located inside the City of Cincinnati is considered a sub-neighborhood of West Price Hill. Covedale is located at 39°7′34″N 84°37′41″W / 39.12611°N 84.62806°W / 39.12611; -84.62806 (39.126113, -84.627964). It lies near I-74, and is within the I-275 loop, about eight miles west of downtown Cincinnati. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.8 square miles (7.3 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,360 people, 2,432 households, and 1,826 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,274.3 people per square mile (877.0/km²). There were 2,505 housing units at an average density of 895.8/sq mi (345.4/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.58% White, 0.35% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.20% from other races, and
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    232
    Dumbarton

    Dumbarton

    Dumbarton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. The population was 7,879 at the 2010 census. Dumbarton is located at 37°36′33″N 77°30′22″W / 37.60917°N 77.50611°W / 37.60917; -77.50611 (37.609295, -77.506031). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.9 square miles (4.9 km), of which 1.9 square miles (4.9 km) is land and 0.019 square miles (0.049 km), or 0.99%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,674 people, 3,515 households, and 1,507 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,191.8 people per square mile (1,232.9/km²). There were 3,782 housing units at an average density of 1,808.7/sq mi (698.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 60.41% White, 28.93% African American, 0.27% Native American, 5.63% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 2.20% from other races, and 2.53% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.09% of the population. There were 3,515 households out of which 19.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 25.7% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 57.1% were non-families.
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    233
    Fairfield CDP

    Fairfield CDP

    Fairfield is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Fairfield in Somerset County, Maine, United States. The population was 2,569 at the 2000 census. Fairfield is located at 44°35′19″N 69°35′58″W / 44.58861°N 69.59944°W / 44.58861; -69.59944 (44.588701, -69.599716). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.8 km²), all land. Fairfield is drained by the Kennebec River. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,569 people, 1,102 households, and 689 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,398.4 people per square mile (539.1/km²). There were 1,223 housing units at an average density of 665.7/sq mi (256.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.63% White, 0.23% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.51% Asian, 0.04% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.19% of the population. There were 1,102 households out of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.1% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.4% were non-families. 30.2% of all households were made up of
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    234
    Fieldale

    Fieldale

    Fieldale is a census-designated place (CDP) in Henry County, Virginia, United States. The population was 929 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area. The area was first settled in 1760 by planter George Waller, an officer in the state militia who was later promoted to Colonel, and his wife Ann Winston (Carr), first cousin of statesman Patrick Henry, as a protected ford across the Smith River. The local militia trained on Col. Waller's acreage. The settlement was subsequently known as Waller's Ford for over a century. A Virginia Historical Highway Marker unveiled in September 2007 marks the location of Col. Waller's plantation. In 1916, Marshall Field & Company purchased the site from the Waller heirs and established Fieldcrest Mills, the town of Fieldale, and an 8,500-square-foot (790 m) company clubhouse, all completed in 1919. Fieldale was the first town in southwestern Virginia with sidewalks, electric lighting, and municipal water and sewer. Fieldale is located at 36°41′59″N 79°56′22″W / 36.69972°N 79.93944°W / 36.69972; -79.93944 (36.699850, -79.939482). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of
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    235
    Flat

    Flat

    Flat is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 Census, the population of the CDP was 0. Prospectors John Beaton and W.A. Dikeman discovered gold on Otter Creek on 25 December 1908. News of the discovery spread slowly, but a some miners arrived in the summer of 1909 and built a small camp they called Flat City. More gold was discovered on nearby Flat Creek and more miners arrived in 1910. Beaton, Peter Miscovich, Lars Ostnes, and David Strandberg were prominent early arrivals who mined successfully long after the initial "boomtown" faded. By 1914, the community had grown to about 6,000 people, complete with an elementary school, a telephone system, two stores, a hotel, restaurant, pool hall, laundry and jail. However, by 1930, the population had declined to 124. No plat was filed for Flat, and the town site rests on mining claims, so the existence of Flat may contravene the law, but the U.S. Post Office acknowledged the community and served its few residents with an office until the year 2000. Between 1986 and 2000, the Primary year-round residents were a small family of five who worked together to maintain and upkeep the
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    236
    Franconia

    Franconia

    Franconia is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 18,245 at the 2010 census, down from 31,907 in 2000 due to the splitting off of part of it to form Kingstowne CDP. Located just southwest of Alexandria, Franconia has existed as a community since the 1870s, when a station by that name opened on the RF&P Railroad; however, like most of the surrounding area, it only began to develop into its present, suburban form in the 1950s. The CDP extends further south to the border of Fort Belvoir, encompassing most of Kingstowne and other neighborhoods such as Hayfield, Manchester Lakes and Windsor Park. Street addresses have Alexandria ZIP codes 22310 and 22315. Franconia is located at 38°45′48″N 77°09′01″W / 38.763351°N 77.150328°W / 38.763351; -77.150328 (38.763351, -77.150328). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.2 square miles (18.5 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 31,907 people, 13,284 households, and 8,182 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 4,465.3 people per square mile (1,723.0/km). There were 13,509 housing units at an average density of
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    237
    Gilbert Creek

    Gilbert Creek

    Gilbert Creek is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mingo County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 1,090 at the 2010 census. Gilbert Creek is located at 37°34′56″N 81°54′7″W / 37.58222°N 81.90194°W / 37.58222; -81.90194 (37.582191, -81.902044). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 11.6 square miles (30.0 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,582 people, 640 households, and 474 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 62.2 people per square mile (24.0/km²). There were 706 housing units at an average density of 27.8/sq mi (10.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.99% White, 0.38% African American, and 0.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.13% of the population. There were 640 households out of which 34.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.6% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 23.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average
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    238
    Graniteville-East Barre

    Graniteville-East Barre

    Graniteville-East Barre is a former census-designated place (CDP) defined for the 2000 census in the town of Barre, Washington County, Vermont, United States. The population of the CDP was 2,136 at the 2000 census. The CDP consisted of three unincorporated villages in the town: Graniteville, East Barre, and Websterville. For the 2010 census, the three areas have been split into separate CDPs in accordance with the 2010 criterion of not aggregating multiple places into one CDP. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP had a total area of 18.1 km² (7.0 mi²), of which 18.0 km² (7.0 mi²) was land and 0.1 km² (0.04 mi²) (0.29%) was water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,136 people, 843 households, and 599 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 118.5/km² (306.8/mi²). There were 880 housing units at an average density of 48.8/km² (126.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.57% White, 0.23% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.33% from other races, and 1.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.73% of the population. There were 843 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living
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    239
    Lake Barcroft

    Lake Barcroft

    Lake Barcroft is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 8,906 at the 2000 census. It is also the name of the privately-owned lake around which this population is located. The lake is named for Dr. John W. Barcroft, who owned and operated a mill on Holmes Run during the mid-19th century. Lake Barcroft is located at 38°51′5″N 77°9′20″W / 38.85139°N 77.15556°W / 38.85139; -77.15556 (38.851412, −77.155654). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km²), of which, 2.5 square miles (6.4 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.6 km²) of it (8.15%) is water. Lake Barcroft is located in a suburb of Washington, D.C. The local high school is J.E.B. Stuart. As of the census of 2000, there were 8,906 people, 3,589 households, and 2,415 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,602.5 people per square mile (1,392.2/km²). There were 3,673 housing units at an average density of 1,485.7/sq mi (574.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 75.98% White, 9.59% Asian, 4.92% African American, 4.84% from other races, 4.35% from two or more races, 0.26% Native American, and
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    240
    Montclair

    Montclair

    Montclair is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 15,728 at the 2000 census. Montclair is a residential community surrounding a man-made lake and golf course. Development began in the late 1960s and new home construction for the most part ended in the 1990s. Traditionally, residents of Montclair used the mailing address and ZIP code of Dumfries, although the town of Dumfries is several miles from Montclair. More recently, the United States Postal Service allowed residents to use "Montclair, VA" in their mailing address and on July 1, 2005, Montclair was given a separate ZIP code (22025). Montclair is located at 38°36′57″N 77°20′35″W / 38.61583°N 77.34306°W / 38.61583; -77.34306 (38.615881, -77.343042). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.2 square miles (16.0 km²), of which, 6.0 square miles (15.6 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²) of it (2.11%) is water. The heart of Montclair is Lake Montclair, which was created by damming the waters of Powell's Creek. The lake branches out in a forked pattern to accommodate the flow from storm drains. The lake is 25' deep off
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    241
    Niskayuna

    Niskayuna

    Niskayuna is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Schenectady County, New York, United States. The population was 4,859 at the 2010 census. The hamlet of Niskayuna is in the town of Niskayuna. Niskayuna is located at 42°49′2″N 73°53′51″W / 42.81722°N 73.8975°W / 42.81722; -73.8975 (42.817226, -73.897575). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km). None of the area is covered with water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,892 people, 1,940 households, and 1,435 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 4,817.4 per square mile (1,851.8/km²). There were 1,983 housing units at an average density of 1,952.8/sq mi (750.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.66% White, 1.04% Black or African American, 0.06% Native American, 2.60% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.57% of the population. There were 1,940 households out of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.1% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families.
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    242
    Pine Point

    Pine Point

    Pine Point is a census-designated place (CDP) in Becker County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 338 at the 2010 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.1 square miles (11 km), of which 3.6 square miles (9.3 km) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km) of it (12.65%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 337 people, 100 households, and 88 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 29.0 people per square mile (11.2/km²). There were 110 housing units at an average density of 9.5/sq mi (3.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 5.64% White, 93.47% Native American, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.30% of the population. There were 100 households out of which 57.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 23.0% were married couples living together, 51.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.0% were non-families. 9.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.37 and the average family size was 3.31. In the CDP the population was spread
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    243
    Shady Spring

    Shady Spring

    Shady Spring is a census-designated place (CDP) in Raleigh County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 2,998 at the 2010 census. It is a family oriented community, with a low crime rate. Shady Spring is close to the Resort at Glade Springs, Flat Top Lake, Winterplace Ski Resort, and the city of Beckley. The county school board upgraded its middle and high schools to deal with the increased student volume. Shady Spring is located at 37°42′13″N 81°5′27″W / 37.70361°N 81.09083°W / 37.70361; -81.09083 (37.703737, -81.090907). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.1 square miles (15.9 km²), of which, 6.1 square miles (15.7 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.2 km²) is water. The community takes its name from a spring. “The ‘Shady Spring’ was an enduring landmark, never known to ‘run dry’ and served as a focal point for the community, especially for the women, many of whom would come bearing washtubs…,” according to “A History of Shady Spring District." The first business in Shady was the Pioneer Inn and Tavern, established in 1832 by Henry Hull and his brothers. The first official post office was established on Aug. 25, 1925,
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    244
    Switzer

    Switzer

    Switzer is a census-designated place (CDP) in Logan County, West Virginia, United States. The population was 595 at the 2010 census. Switzer is located at 37°47′37″N 81°59′15″W / 37.79361°N 81.9875°W / 37.79361; -81.9875 (37.793612, -81.987386), along Island Creek and West Virginia Route 44. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.4 square miles (6.1 km²); 2.3 square miles (6.1 km²) of this is land, and 0.02 square miles (0.06 km²) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,138 people, 466 households, and 322 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 118.3 people per square mile (45.7/km²). There were 537 housing units at an average density of 55.8/sq mi (21.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.78% White, 3.08% African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.09% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.97% of the population. There were 466 households out of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.9% were married couples living together, 17.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.9% were non-families. 27.3% of all
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    Tuckahoe

    Tuckahoe

    Tuckahoe is a census-designated place in Henrico County, Virginia, United States. It is a northwestern suburb of Richmond. The population of Tuckahoe was 44,990 at the 2010 census. Tuckahoe is located at 37°35′45″N 77°34′33″W / 37.59583°N 77.57583°W / 37.59583; -77.57583 (37.595896, -77.575937). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 21.8 square miles (56.4 km), of which 20.5 square miles (53.0 km) is land and 1.3 square miles (3.4 km), or 6.08%, is water. The western boundary of Tuckahoe is formed by Tuckahoe Creek, a large undeveloped swampy creek which forms part of the boundary between Goochland County and Henrico County. As of the census of 2000, there were 43,242 people, 18,126 households, and 11,963 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,102.7 people per square mile (811.7/km²). There were 18,647 housing units at an average density of 906.7/sq mi (350.0/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 88.79% White, 5.78% African American, 0.17% Native American, 3.43% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.67% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.13% of the population. There were
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    Vansant

    Vansant

    Vansant is a census-designated place (CDP) in Buchanan County, Virginia, United States. The population was 989 at the 2000 census. Vansant is located at 37°13′36″N 82°5′56″W / 37.22667°N 82.09889°W / 37.22667; -82.09889 (37.226587, -82.098787). The town is located at the intersection of U.S. Route 460 and State Route 83 directly on the banks of the Levisa Fork. Vansant is located in the coalfields of the Appalachian Mountains. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 7.8 square miles (20.3 km²), all of it land. At the 2000 census, there were 989 people, 436 households and 309 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 125.9 per square mile (48.6/km²). There were 500 housing units at an average density of 63.7/sq mi (24.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.89% White, 0.61% Asian, and 0.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.30% of the population. There were 436 households of which 24.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.1% were non-families. 25.9% of all households were made up
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    West Springfield

    West Springfield

    West Springfield is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. The population was 22,460 at the 2000 census. West Springfield is located at 38°47′18″N 77°13′58″W / 38.78833°N 77.23278°W / 38.78833; -77.23278 (38.788436, -77.232802). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 6.8 square miles (17.7 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 22,460 people, 10,289 households, and 7,840 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 4,158.7 people per square mile (1,606.6/km²). There were 10,425 housing units at an average density of 1,527.7/sq mi (590.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 75.31% White, 4.89% African American, 0.28% Native American, 13.91% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 2.55% from other races, and 3.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.33% of the population. There were 10,289 households out of which 36.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.4% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.5% had
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    248
    Whitley City

    Whitley City

    Whitley City is a census-designated place (CDP) in McCreary County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 1,111 at the 2000 census. Despite its name, it is not an incorporated city; however, it is the county seat of McCreary County. Whitley City is one of two non-city county seats in Kentucky the other being Burlington in Boone County. This is due to McCreary County not having any cities. Whitley City is located at 36°43′28″N 84°28′13″W / 36.72444°N 84.47028°W / 36.72444; -84.47028 (36.724389, -84.470342). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km), of which, 2.3 square miles (6.0 km) of it is land and 0.43% is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,111 people, 458 households, and 296 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 481.5 people per square mile (185.7/km²). There were 516 housing units at an average density of 223.7 per square mile (86.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.92% White, 0.72% Native American, 0.09% from other races, and 0.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.54% of the population. There were 458 households out of which 32.3% had children
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    249
    York Harbor

    York Harbor

    York Harbor is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of York in York County, Maine, United States. The population was 3,321 at the 2000 census. York Harbor is a distinguished former Gilded Age summer colony noted for its resort architecture. It is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area. York was a prosperous seaport in the 18th-century. Its harbor, then known as Lower Town, was lined with wharves and warehouses to which upriver settlers brought their goods for trade and shipping. The tongue of land at the mouth of the York River was called Gallows Point, where criminals at the Royal Gaol in York Village were hanged. At high tide the tongue became an island, from which a ferry licensed in 1652 crossed to Seabury. During the Revolution, fishermen and their families abandoned the Isles of Shoals off the coast and floated their homes to the Lower Town waterfront, where they were rebuilt. They hauled their boats at Lobster Cove and dried their catch on fish flakes, after which the tongue would be named Stage Neck. In 1807, President Thomas Jefferson's embargo crippled local mercantile trade, and by the Civil War, Stage Neck had
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    Yorkshire

    Yorkshire

    Yorkshire is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 6,732 at the 2000 census. Yorkshire is located at 38°47′17″N 77°27′12″W / 38.78806°N 77.45333°W / 38.78806; -77.45333 (38.787928, -77.453236). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.4 square miles (6.1 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 6,732 people, 2,266 households, and 1,663 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,835.2 people per square mile (1,096.7/km²). There were 2,332 housing units at an average density of 982.1/sq mi (379.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 75.73% White, 8.53% African American, 0.42% Native American, 2.39% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 8.33% from other races, and 4.50% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.87% of the population. There were 2,266 households out of which 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.6% were non-families. 18.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.9% had someone living
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