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Best U.S. National Register of Historic Places of All Time

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    1
    St. Johnsbury Athenaeum

    St. Johnsbury Athenaeum

    The St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, is significant because of its construction, the American landscape paintings and books from its original role as a public library and free art gallery, and funding by Horace Fairbanks, manufacturer of the world's first platform scale. The art collection contains a number of Hudson River School paintings. This building retains a strong, Victorian (French Second Empire) flavor of the 19th century. It is one of about ten athenaeums in the United States. When the library opened, the collection consisted of 9,000 books selected by bibliographer William F. Poole. In 1873, Fairbanks added a small art gallery. This is now one of the few art galleries in the United States that features late 19th century Victorian-style design which highlights intricate paint/stencil schemes, detailed moldings, creative natural lighting, and unique painting installations. The walls and floor are black walnut. The art gallery is lighted naturally from an arched skylight in the ceiling. Cases on two sides of the room contain art books in tooled leather bindings. Gilt-framed paintings are displayed. One hundred works of art are displayed. Besides originals
    7.29
    7 votes
    2
    Yerba Buena Light

    Yerba Buena Light

    Yerba Buena Lighthouse is a lighthouse in California, United States, in the San Francisco Bay on Yerba Buena Island, California The island’s lighthouse connection began in 1873 when the Lighthouse Service moved the district's depot from Mare Island to the southeast side of Yerba Buena Island. In 1875 construction was completed on the 25 foot tower with a fifth order Fresnel lens. In 1886 another fifth order lens replaced the previous one. In 1933, a tunnel was bored through Yerba Buena Island to serve as a link between the east and west sections of the Oakland Bay Bridge. The light was automated by the United States Coast Guard in 1958. It is currently an active aid to navigation and not open to the public. Now that the lighthouse is automated, the former keeper’s quarters are now the home of the Coast Guard District Commander.
    6.25
    8 votes
    3
    Meridian Hill Park

    Meridian Hill Park

    Meridian Hill Park is a structured urban park located in the Washington, D.C. neighborhood of Columbia Heights in the United States. The park is also unofficially known as "Malcolm X Park" by some city residents. The 12 acre (49,000 m²) formally landscaped site is maintained by the National Park Service as part of Rock Creek Park, but is not contiguous with that much larger nearby park. Meridian Hill Park is bordered by 15th, 16th, W, and Euclid Streets NW, and sits on a prominent hill 1.5 miles (2.42 km) due north of the White House. In 1819, Commodore David Porter erected a mansion on the grounds and called it "Meridian Hill" because it was located on the "White House meridian" (see Washington meridian). During the 19th century the land just to the east of Meridian Hill became the location of Columbian College (1821), later renamed George Washington University. Columbia Road was named for the college, and formed the northern boundary of the original campus. Prior to the Civil War, the mansion grounds became a pleasure park for the area. During the war, Union troops encamped there in Camp Cameron "on Georgetown Heights". In 1883, the writer Joaquin Miller built a cabin to the west
    7.00
    7 votes
    4
    San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

    San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

    The San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge (known locally as the Bay Bridge) is a pair of bridges spanning San Francisco Bay of California, in the United States. As part of Interstate 80 and the direct road route between San Francisco and Oakland, it carries approximately 270,000 vehicles per day on its two decks. It has one of the longest spans in the world. The toll bridge was conceived as early as the gold rush days, but construction did not begin until 1933. Designed by Charles H. Purcell, and built by American Bridge Company, it opened for traffic on November 12, 1936, six months before the Golden Gate Bridge. It originally carried automobile traffic on its upper deck, and trucks and trains on the lower, but after the closure of the Key System, the lower deck was converted to road traffic as well. In 1986, the bridge was unofficially dedicated to James B. Rolph. The bridge consists of two main spans of roughly equal length, a western span connecting downtown San Francisco to Yerba Buena Island and an eastern span connecting the island to Oakland. The main part of the western span is a suspension bridge while the main part of the eastern span is a cantilever bridge. During the 1989
    7.83
    6 votes
    5
    Mayflower Hotel

    Mayflower Hotel

    The Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, known locally as simply The Mayflower, is a historic hotel in downtown Washington, DC located on Connecticut Avenue NW, two blocks north of Farragut Square (one block north of the Farragut North Metro station). It is the largest luxury hotel in the U.S. capital and the longest continuously operating hotel in the Washington D.C. area, and a rival of the nearby Willard InterContinental and Hay-Adams Hotels. The Mayflower is known as Washington, D.C.’s “Second Best Address” (second to the White House at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.), a reference attributed to President Harry Truman during his stay at the hotel during White House renovations. The Mayflower was built by Allen E. Walker, the land developer behind Brookland and other residential neighborhoods of Washington. Nicknamed the "Grande Dame of Washington" at its opening in 1925, the hotel was said to contain more gold trim than any other building except the Library of Congress. An extensive renovation completed in 1988 uncovered decorative effects, including a skylight, which had been covered up due to blackout regulations during World War II. Shortly after opening, the Mayflower hosted a ball for the
    7.67
    6 votes
    6
    Arts and Industries Building

    Arts and Industries Building

    The Arts and Industries Building is the second oldest of the Smithsonian museums on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Initially named the National Museum, it was built to provide the Smithsonian with its first proper facility for public display of its growing collections. The building, designed by architects Adolf Cluss and Paul Schulze, opened in 1881, hosting an inaugural ball for President James A. Garfield. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1971. The museum is currently closed to the public as the building undergoes renovation. The Arts and Industries Building was designed to house exhibits from the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition, using much the same style as the buildings of that event. After the closure of a "permanent exhibition" in Philadelphia, the foreign exhibits were sent to the District of Columbia Armory Building in Washington, at the corner of 7th Street SW and Independence Avenue in the expectation that they were to be displayed in Washington. A bill was introduced in Congress by the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian to build a suitable structure. The bill included plans developed by General Montgomery C. Meigs, which were based on the
    8.80
    5 votes
    7
    General Benjamin Lincoln House

    General Benjamin Lincoln House

    The General Benjamin Lincoln House is a National Historic Landmark at 181 North Street in Hingham, Massachusetts, USA. It was the birthplace and principal residence of Continental Army Major General Benjamin Lincoln (1733-1810), a well-respected military leader of the American Revolutionary War. The house has portions that may date to the 1630s, with significant additions made principally during the 18th century. The last major modifications to the house were probably undertaken by General Lincoln in the late 18th century. The house remains, as of 2009, in the hands of Lincoln family descendants, and is not normally open to the public. Changes to the interior and exterior are authorized only in consultation with Historic New England, a major regional historic preservation society. Like many early American houses, the Benjamin Lincoln House has gone through a number of phases, and the dates of work on the house are at times uncertain. Family history places the initial construction of part of the house as early as 1637, by Thomas Lincoln "the cooper" (so designated to differentiate him from numerous other Thomas Lincolns who also settled in Hingham), although there is no visible
    8.80
    5 votes
    8
    Addison Baptist Church

    Addison Baptist Church

    The Addison Community Baptist Church meets in a classic white clapboard Meeting House built in 1816 at the town center of Addison, Vermont. The church sits next to the former Addison Town Hall, at the Junction of Vermont Route 22A and Vermont Route 17. In 1978, the Church was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    6.71
    7 votes
    9
    William Westerfeld House

    William Westerfeld House

    The William Westerfeld House sits across the street from the northwest corner of Alamo Square at 1198 Fulton Street (at Scott St.) in San Francisco. Constructed in 1889 at a cost of $9,985, the home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is San Francisco Landmark Number 135. William Westerfeld, a German-born confectioner, arrived in San Francisco in the 1870s. By the 1880s he had established a chain of bakeries. He hired builder Henry Geilfuss to design for his family of six a 28-room mansion with an adjoining rose garden and carriage house. When Westerfeld died in 1895, the home was sold to John Mahoney, noted for building the St. Francis Hotel and the Palace Hotel after the 1906 earthquake. Mr. Mahoney replaced the rose garden with flats to meet the city's dire need for housing.
    8.40
    5 votes
    10
    William C. Nell House

    William C. Nell House

    The William C. Nell House, now a private residence, was a boarding home located in 3 Smith Court in the Beacon Hill neighbourhood of Boston, Massachusetts, in front of what it was the African Meeting House, now Museum of African American History. It is a National Historic Landmark having been the residence of William Cooper Nell. He was an abolitionist, highly responsive to pressing concerns facing Boston’s and the nation’s black community, especially the struggle for equal school rights.
    6.29
    7 votes
    11
    Framingham Railroad Station

    Framingham Railroad Station

    Framingham Railroad Station built is 1885 is an historic Boston and Albany Railroad station located in Framingham, Massachusetts. Designed by noted American architect H. H. Richardson, it was one of the last in his series of Northeastern United States railroad stations. Today, it has been converted into a Brazilian steakhouse, though much of the external structure remains intact. Additionally, a small building on the site has been converted into a bank ATM. Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority use the nearby Framingham MBTA station. The station was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.
    7.17
    6 votes
    12
    Oliver Hastings House

    Oliver Hastings House

    The Oliver Hastings House is an historic house in the Greek Revival style, located at 101 Brattle Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is a National Historic Landmark. The house was constructed in 1844 for local builder Oliver Hastings adjacent to the home of poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (now the Longfellow House–Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site). It was later the home of William Lawrence, professor and Dean of the Episcopal Theological School and subsequently Bishop of Massachusetts. The house now forms part of the Episcopal Divinity School campus. The house consists of two main dwelling stories topped by a much smaller, inconspicuous third floor. It is architecturally notable mainly for its front facade, with its central, rounded portico set off by a single, full-height window at either side. Iron grillwork forms accents to the second floor exterior.
    8.20
    5 votes
    13
    Charlotte Forten Grimké House

    Charlotte Forten Grimké House

    The Charlotte Forten Grimké House is a historic home in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Northwest Washington, D.C., United States. From 1881 to 1886, the house was owned by Charlotte Forten Grimké (1837–1914), one of the first Northern educators who entered Union-controlled areas of the South during the American Civil War. Grimké was the first African American to teach former slaves in the South and co-founder of the Colored Women's League in 1894. She was known as an abolitionist, supporter of women's rights, writer, and teacher. The house, located at 1608 R Street NW, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.
    9.25
    4 votes
    14
    St. Elizabeths Hospital

    St. Elizabeths Hospital

    St. Elizabeths Hospital is a psychiatric hospital operated by the District of Columbia Department of Mental Health. It was the first large-scale, federally run psychiatric hospital in the United States. Housing several thousand patients at its peak, St. Elizabeths had a fully functioning medical-surgical unit and offered accredited internships and psychiatric residencies. It has since fallen into disrepair and the grounds are mostly abandoned, although the east campus is still operational and it opened a new facility in 2010. The Department of Homeland Security announced in March 2007 plans to relocate its headquarters, along with most of its Washington, D.C.-area facilities, to the abandoned federally owned western campus of St. Elizabeths, beginning in 2010. The hospital was founded by the United States Congress in 1852, largely as the result of the efforts of Dorothea Dix, a pioneering advocate for people living with mental illnesses. It opened in 1855 as the Government Hospital for the Insane, and rose to prominence during the Civil War when it was converted temporarily into a hospital for wounded soldiers. During this time, the hospital temporarily housed animals which were
    7.80
    5 votes
    15
    USS Albacore

    USS Albacore

    USS Albacore (AGSS-569) was a unique research submarine that pioneered the American version of the teardrop hull form (sometimes referred to as an "Albacore hull") of modern submarines. The revolutionary design was derived from extensive hydrodynamic and wind tunnel testing, with an emphasis on underwater speed and maneuverability. She was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for the albacore, a small tuna found in temperate seas throughout the world. Her keel was laid down on 15 March 1952 by the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard of Kittery, Maine. She was launched on 1 August 1953, sponsored by Mrs. J.E. Jowers, the widow of Chief Motor Machinist's Mate Arthur L. Stanton, lost with the second Albacore (SS-218), and commissioned on 6 December 1953 with Lieutenant Commander Kenneth C. Gummerson in command. The effectiveness of submarines in World War II convinced both the Soviets and the United States Navy that undersea warfare would play an even more important role in coming conflicts and dictated development of superior submarines. The advent of nuclear power nourished the hope that such warships could be produced. The effort to achieve this goal involved the development
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    Percy W. Bridgman House

    Percy W. Bridgman House

    The Percy W. Bridgman House is an historic house located at 10 Buckingham Place, Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is a National Historic Landmark. The house is notable for its associations with former resident Dr. Percy Williams Bridgman, a physicist, Nobel Prize winner, and Harvard University professor. It is now part of the Buckingham Browne & Nichols Lower School campus. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975.
    9.00
    4 votes
    17
    Little Rock Central High School

    Little Rock Central High School

    Little Rock Central High School is a comprehensive public high school in Little Rock, Arkansas, United States. Central High School was the site of forced school desegregation during the American Civil Rights Movement. Central is located at the intersection of Daisy L. Gatson Bates Drive (named for the civil rights leader and formerly known as 14th Street) and Park Street. Central can trace its origins back to 1869 when the Sherman School operated in a wooden structure at 8th and Sherman streets, which produced its first graduating class on June 13, 1873. In 1885 the Sherman School was moved to 14th and Scott streets and was aptly named Scott Street School but was more commonly called City High School. Five years later in 1890, the Peabody School was constructed at West Capitol and Gaines streets. It was named in honor of philanthropist George Peabody from US$200,000 received via the Peabody Education Fund. In 1905, the city founded Little Rock High School at the intersection of 14th and Cumberland streets, and shuttered the Peabody and Scott Street schools to serve as the city's sole public high school. In 1927 at a cost of US$1.5 million, the city completed construction on the
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    Old Executive Office Building

    Old Executive Office Building

    The Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB), formerly known as the Old Executive Office Building (OEOB) and as the State, War, and Navy Building, is an office building in Washington, D.C., just west of the White House. The building is maintained by General Services Administration and occupied by the White House Office of Administration/Executive Office of the President. It is on 17th Street NW, between Pennsylvania Avenue and New York Avenue, and West Executive Drive. The building is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Many White House employees have their offices in this structure. The first White House executive buildings were built in the late 1790s, as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson readied the new capital for the government that was set to move there in December 1800. Future President John Adams suggested placing the executive buildings near the Capitol, to be near Congress, but at George Washington's insistence, they were built near the White House. George Hadfield, who had worked on the United States Capitol, provided a design for an executive building in 1798. The design was used to build four identical buildings, two on each side of the White House. The building
    6.67
    6 votes
    19
    Ford's Theatre

    Ford's Theatre

    Ford's Theatre is a historic theatre in Washington, D.C., used for various stage performances beginning in the 1860s. It is also the site of the assassination of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. After being shot, the fatally wounded president was carried across the street to the Petersen House, where he died the next morning. The theatre was later used as a warehouse and office building, and in 1893 part of it collapsed, causing 22 deaths. It was renovated and re-opened as a theatre in 1968. During the 2000s it was renovated again, opening on February 12, 2009, in commemoration of Lincoln's bicentennial. A related "Center for Education and Leadership" museum experience opened February 12, 2012 next to Petersen House. The Petersen House and the theatre are preserved together as Ford's Theatre National Historic Site, administered by the National Park Service; programming within the theatre and the "Center for Education" is overseen separately by the Ford's Theatre Society in a public-private partnership. Ford's Theatre is located at 511 10th Street, NW. The site was originally a house of worship, constructed in 1833 as the second meeting house of the First Baptist
    8.75
    4 votes
    20
    McElroy Octagon House

    McElroy Octagon House

    The McElroy Octagon House, also known as the Colonial Dames Octagon House, is an historic octagonal house now located at 2645 Gough Street at Union Street in the Cow Hollow section of San Francisco, California. William C. McElroy built it in 1861 across the street from its present location. It was vacant and neglected in 1951 when the Colonial Dames of America in California bought, moved it across the street and began its restoration. In 1971 it became San Francisco Landmark 17. It and the Feusier Octagon House are the only two remaining octagon houses in the city. On February 23, 1972, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    Mary Church Terrell House

    Mary Church Terrell House

    Mary Church Terrell House was a home of civil rights leader Mary Church Terrell in Washington, D.C.. Terrell was the first black woman to serve on an American school board, in 1896. She led the fight to integrate eating places in Washington, D.C., at age 86. Her home in the LeDroit Park section of Washington, DC was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975. The building is a contributing property in the LeDroit Park Historic District. While the home looks as if an adjoining house was once adjacent to it, no house was ever constructed next to it. Her house was built to allow this but it never occurred. Since the house has been unoccupied for a number of years, the condition was degrading and apparent to even a casual observer. In the summer of 2008 a restoration was started primarily supported in by a grant from the National Park Service Save America's Treasures program. Additional support include: Howard University, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, DC Office of Planning and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Based on outside observation, it appears the brick work was repaired and re-pointing, major structural problems on outside porches, windows
    6.33
    6 votes
    22
    Washington Navy Yard

    Washington Navy Yard

    The Washington Navy Yard is the former shipyard and ordnance plant of the United States Navy in Southeast Washington, D.C. It is the oldest shore establishment of the U.S. Navy. The Yard currently serves as a ceremonial and administrative center for the U.S. Navy, home to the Chief of Naval Operations, and is headquarters for the Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Historical Center, the Department of Naval History, the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General's Corps, Naval Reactors, Marine Corps Institute, the United States Navy Band, and other more classified facilities. In 1998, the yard was listed as a Superfund site due to environmental contamination. The history of the yard can be divided into its military history and cultural and scientific history. The land was purchased under an Act of Congress on July 23, 1799. The Washington Navy Yard was established on October 2, 1799, the date the property was transferred to the Navy. It is the oldest shore establishment of the U.S. Navy. The Yard was built under the direction of Benjamin Stoddert, the first Secretary of the Navy, under the supervision of the Yard's first commandant, Commodore Thomas Tingey, who served in that capacity for 29
    6.33
    6 votes
    23
    Silk Covered Bridge

    Silk Covered Bridge

    The Silk Covered Bridge is located northwest of Bennington, Vermont. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. On August 28, 2011 the Silk bridge was damaged by flood waters as a result of Hurricane Irene. At this time the extent of damage or whether the bridge is open is not known.
    9.33
    3 votes
    24
    Charles Evans Hughes House

    Charles Evans Hughes House

    Charles Evans Hughes House is a historic home located at 2223 R Street, NW in the Sheridan-Kalorama neighborhood of Washington, D.C.. Charles Evans Hughes was a leader in the Progressive Era and 1916 presidential candidate. He held office as Associate Justice and Chief Justice of the United States, as well as multiple executive positions under several Presidents. He lived in this house from 1930 until his death in 1948. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1972 and is a contributing property to the Sheridan-Kalorama Historic District. In 1972, the building was purchased by the Union of Burma. It currently serves as the residence of the Burmese ambassador, Linn Myaing.
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Ether Dome

    Ether Dome

    The Ether Dome is an amphitheater in the Bulfinch Building at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. It served as the hospital's operating room from its opening in 1821 until 1867. It was the site of the first public demonstration of the use of inhaled ether as a surgical anesthetic on 16 October 1846. Crawford Long, a surgeon in Georgia, had previously administered ether, but this went unpublished until 1849. The Ether Dome event occurred when William Thomas Green Morton, a local dentist, used ether to anesthetize Edward Gilbert Abbott. John Collins Warren, the first dean of Harvard Medical School, then painlessly removed a tumor from Abbott's neck. After Warren had finished, and Abbott regained consciousness, Warren asked the patient how he felt. Reportedly, Abbott said, "Feels as if my neck's been scratched". Warren then turned to his medical audience and uttered "Gentlemen, this is no Humbug". This was presumably a reference to the unsuccessful demonstration of nitrous oxide anesthesia by Horace Wells in the same theater the previous year, which was ended by cries of "Humbug!" after the patient groaned with pain. The Ether Dome is now used for medical conferences and
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    Lexington Battle Green

    Lexington Battle Green

    The Lexington Battle Green, properly known as Lexington Common, is the site of the opening shots of the American Revolution in 1775 during the Battle of Lexington. The Common had been purchased by subscription of some of the town's leading citizens in 1711. In 1775 local militiamen emerged from Buckman Tavern adjacent to the common and formed two rows on the common to oppose British forces.The militiamen suffered the first casualties of the American Revolution when the British troops opened fire. The Battle Green is located at the center of Lexington, Massachusetts, and serves as the main staging area for the annual reenactment of the Battle of Lexington and Concord. A statue representing Captain John Parker, the leader of the Lexington minutemen, stands at the eastern edge of the Common. It was erected in 1900 at the bequest of Francis Brown Hayes, and was sculpted by well-known Massachusetts artist Henry Hudson Kitson.
    6.00
    6 votes
    27
    Chestnut Street District

    Chestnut Street District

    The Chestnut Street District is a historic district bounded roughly by Broad, Flint, Federal, and Summer Streets in Salem, Massachusetts. , also known as the McIntyre Historic District that was created in 1981 and containing 407 buildings and is the city's largest district. This historic district is named after Samuel McIntire. Samuel McIntire had a house and workshop that was located 31 Summer Street, at the intersection of Chestnut Street where many grand mansions designed by McIntire and others display the profits of the Old China Trade. The first of these great brick Federal houses to be constructed was the Thomas Saunders House of 1805 at number 39 Chestnut, later remodeled by Arthur Little (1893). Saunders also built the famous McIntire-designed double house next door at numbers 41-43, in 1810, as a wedding present for his daughters Mary Elizabeth and Caroline, who married brothers Leverett and Nathaniel Saltonstall. Leverett Saltonstall I was Salem's first elected mayor. Some other examples of notable Salem architecture within or just outside the district are listed below. A short 10 minute walk from the Chestnut Street District, the Salem Maritime National Historic Site
    6.80
    5 votes
    28
    Decatur House

    Decatur House

    Decatur House is a historic home in Washington, D.C., named after its first owner and occupant Stephen Decatur. The house (built, 1818) is located northwest of Lafayette Square, at the southwest corner of Jackson Place and H Street, near the White House. A museum, it now serves as the National Center for White House History, of the White House Historical Association. Decatur House is one of the oldest surviving homes in Washington, D.C., and one of only three remaining houses in the country designed by neoclassical architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. Completed in 1818 for naval hero Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan, the Federal Style house is prominently located across Lafayette Square from the White House. It was successively home to Henry Clay, Martin Van Buren, Judah P. Benjamin, who collectively made Decatur House the unofficial residence of the Secretary of State from 1827 to 1833, each renting the house while they served in that post. In 1836 John Gadsby and his wife Providence moved into the house and brought their house slaves. They built a two-story structure at the back which became the slave quarters for those workers, who previously lived in the main house. This
    9.00
    3 votes
    29
    Congregation Beth Israel of Portland, Oregon

    Congregation Beth Israel of Portland, Oregon

    Beth Israel is a Reform congregation and Jewish synagogue in Portland, Oregon, United States. The congregation was founded in 1858, while Oregon was still a territory, and built its first synagogue in 1859. The congregation's first building was a modest, single story, pitched-roof, wood-framed, clapboard building with Gothic, pointed-arch windows and door. This early structure was replaced by an 1888 synagogue building, which was destroyed by fire in December 1923. The building, called Moorish revival in some sources, is elsewhere described as a combination of eclectic and Gothic revival styles, with two towers topped by bulbous domes. It was replaced in 1928 by a notable Neo-Byzantine synagogue building that continues to serve the congregation. It was listed as Temple Beth Israel on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. It is considered one of the finest examples of Byzantine-style architecture on the west coast, and was inspired by the Alte Synagoge (Steelerstrasse Synagogue) in Essen, Germany. The interior of Steelerstrasse, the first modern synagogue in Germany, was praised as Germany's most beautiful; it was destroyed during Kristallnacht.
    7.75
    4 votes
    30
    Gardiner-Pingree House

    Gardiner-Pingree House

    Gardner-Pingree House is a National Historic Landmark at 128 Essex Street in Salem, Massachusetts in the Downtown Salem District. The house was built in 1804 by Samuel McIntire in a Federal style for John and Sarah (West) Gardner. John bought the lot from his father (John Gardner, Sr) whose cousin (John Gardner III) was the grandfather of John Lowell Gardner I. John and Sarah sold the house to her brother, Nathaniel West, to cover shipping losses related to events leading up to the War of 1812. The house was sold, in 1814, to Capt. Joseph White. David Pingree bought the house in 1834. It was added to the National Historic Register in 1970. The house is owned by the Peabody Essex Museum as part of the Essex Institute, and is open for guided tours. It features 18th and early 19th century furnishings. The house was the site of the notorious 1830 murder of Capt. Joseph White, whose death prompted a famous trial prosecuted by Daniel Webster. The trial inspired Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne. The house was one of the filming locations for the 1979 Merchant Ivory film adaptation of Henry James' novel The Europeans.
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    National Portrait Gallery

    National Portrait Gallery

    The National Portrait Gallery is a historic art gallery, located at Eighth and F Streets, Northwest, Washington, D.C., administered by the Smithsonian Institution. Its collections focus on images of famous individual Americans. It resides in the National Historic Landmarked Old Patent Office Building (now renamed the Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture), located just south of Chinatown in the Penn Quarter district of downtown Washington. The third oldest federal building in the city, constructed between 1836 and 1867, the marble and granite museum has porticoes modeled after the Parthenon in Athens, Greece. The building was used as a hospital during the American Civil War. Walt Whitman worked there and used his experiences as a basis for The Wound Dresser. The Bureau of Indian Affairs moved into the building after the war ended. Whitman used to work as a clerk for the bureau until 1867, when he was fired after a manuscript of Leaves of Grass was found in his desk. It was spared from demolition by President Dwight Eisenhower in 1958, and given to the Smithsonian, which renovated the structure and opened the National Museum of American Art (later renamed the
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    St. Theodosius Russian Orthodox Cathedral

    St. Theodosius Russian Orthodox Cathedral

    St. Theodosius Russian Orthodox Cathedral is a Russian Orthodox parish located on Starkweather Avenue in the Tremont neighborhood, on the near West Side of Cleveland, Ohio. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. St. Theodosius is perhaps best known for its appearance in the 1978 film, The Deer Hunter with Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, and Meryl Streep.
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Windmill Hill

    Windmill Hill

    Windmill Hill is an historic site on Windmill Hill Road in Dublin, New Hampshire. The site was built in 1934 and added to the National Historic Register in 1983.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Longfellow National Historic Site

    Longfellow National Historic Site

    The Longfellow House–Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site, also known as the Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House and, until December 2010, Longfellow National Historic Site, is a historic site located at 105 Brattle Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. For almost fifty years, it was the home of noted American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. For a time, it had previously served as the headquarters of George Washington. The house was built in 1759 for John Vassall, who fled the Cambridge area at the beginning of the American Revolutionary War because of his loyalty to the king of England. George Washington used the abandoned home as his first official headquarters as commander of the Continental Army; the home served as his base of operations during the Siege of Boston until he moved out in July 1776. Andrew Craigie, Washington's Apothecary General, was the next person to own the home for a significant period of time. After purchasing the house in 1791, he instigated the home's only major addition. Craigie's financial situation at the time of his death in 1819 forced his widow Elizabeth Craigie to take in boarders. It was as a boarder that Henry Wadsworth Longfellow came
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    Reginald A. Daly House

    Reginald A. Daly House

    The Reginald A. Daly House is a historic house located at 23 Hawthorn Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is a National Historic Landmark. The house is notable for its associations with former resident Reginald Aldworth Daly, an eminent geologist, Penrose Medal winner, and Harvard University professor.
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Trinity Rectory

    Trinity Rectory

    Trinity Rectory is an historic building at the corner of Clarendon Street and Newbury Street in Boston, Massachusetts. It is a brick building built in 1880 by Henry Hobson Richardson and features flower-shaped reliefs carved directly into the brick exterior. The building was added to the National Historic Register in 1972. Traditionally the residence of the pastor of the Trinity Church, Boston, it has now been renovated to church office space when the current pastor decided to live in a private residence.
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Nathaniel Bowditch House

    Nathaniel Bowditch House

    The Nathaniel Bowditch House (circa 1805), sometimes called by Bowditch-Osgood House or Nathaniel Bowditch Home, is a historic house located at 9 North Street in the Federal Street District in Salem, Massachusetts. It was once the home of Nathaniel Bowditch, the founder of modern navigation, and is now a National Historic Landmark and listed in the National Register of Historic Places. It currently serves as the home of Historic Salem, Inc. The Bowditch House is significant both architecturally and historically. It is a three-story, low-hipped, clapboarded house in the Federal style, with a recessed front doorway (added circa 1825) and a recently restored roof balustrade, originally built for the Corwin family, famous for their part in the Salem Witch Trials. It was owned by Bowditch from 1811 to 1823. Subsequent owners included the Massachusetts General Hospital and Joseph B. F. Osgood, a Salem lawyer, judge, and mayor. The house was originally located at 312 Essex Street, but in 1944 was moved to its current site and restored (along with the adjacent Corwin "Witch House") when street widening threatened the house. The Nathaniel Bowditch House was declared a National Historic
    10.00
    2 votes
    38
    Golden Gate Park

    Golden Gate Park

    Golden Gate Park, located in San Francisco, California, is a large urban park consisting of 1,017 acres (412 ha) of public grounds. Configured as a rectangle, it is similar in shape but 20% larger than Central Park in New York, to which it is often compared. It is over three miles (5 km) long east to west, and about half a mile north to south. With 13 million visitors annually, Golden Gate is the third most visited city park in the United States after Central Park in New York City and Lincoln Park in Chicago. In the 1860s, San Franciscans began to feel the need for a spacious public park similar to Central Park that was taking shape in New York. Golden Gate Park was carved out of unpromising sand and shore dunes that were known as the “outside lands” in an unincorporated area west of then-San Francisco’s borders. Although the park was conceived under the guise of recreation, the underlying justification was to attract housing development and provide for the westward expansion of The City. The tireless field engineer William Hammond Hall prepared a survey and topographic map of the park site in 1870 and became commissioner in 1871. He was later named California's first State
    6.40
    5 votes
    39
    6.40
    5 votes
    40
    Swedenborgian Church

    Swedenborgian Church

    Swedenborgian Church is a Swedenborgian church significant for its architecture in the Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco, California. It is regarded as one of California's earliest pure Arts and Crafts buildings. The first pastor of the church the Reverend Joseph Worcester bought the land and worked with the architects to design the church. It remains essentially the same as when it was built. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 2004. 3. Building with Nature: Inspiration for the Arts & Crafts Home (Gibbs Smith, Nov. 2005), Chapter 3 is devoted to the church.
    7.25
    4 votes
    41
    Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

    Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

    The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum or Fenway Court, as the museum was known during Isabella Stewart Gardner's lifetime, is a museum in the Fenway-Kenmore neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, located within walking distance of the Museum of Fine Arts and near the Back Bay Fens. The museum houses an art collection of world importance, including significant examples of European, Asian, and American art, from paintings and sculpture to tapestries and decorative arts. It is the only private art collection in which the building, collection, and installations are the creation of one individual. Today, the museum hosts exhibitions of historic and contemporary art, as well as concerts, lectures, family and community programs, and changing courtyard displays. In honor of its founder, the museum offers free admission and occasional special events for anyone named Isabella. In addition, visitors receive free admission to the museum on their birthday. The museum was established in 1903 by Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924), an American art collector, philanthropist, and patron of the arts. It is housed in a building designed to emulate a 15th-century Venetian palace, drawing particular
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    Rogerson's Village Historic District

    Rogerson's Village Historic District

    Rogersons Village Historic District is a historic mill village in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, United States. Rogerson's Village was built by Robert Rogerson, a native of England. He acquired the Clapp Mill in 1817, established on the Mumford River circa 1810, in Uxbridge, Massachusetts. This was the oldest cotton mill built in Uxbridge. It appears that he was the husband of Ann Rogerson. Roger Rogerson then built two cotton mills at the Mumford River in Uxbridge circa 1823-1827. The mills became known as the Crown and Eagle Mills. The Crown and Eagle Mills have been written up as an architectural masterpiece of an early New England Mill Village. The Boston Globe published a summary of the Mill village in a 1971 edition. The Crown and Eagle Mills were burned around 1975. They have been restored to their former beauty and converted into Senior Housing. Rogersons village, built by Robert Rogerson is now part of the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor. The Crown Mill was named for Robert Rogerson's homeland, England, and the Eagle Mill for his adopted nation, the U.S. The mill village, the dream of Robert Rogerson, spared no expense for the mill, mansion, company store and
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Cape Cod National Seashore

    Cape Cod National Seashore

    The Cape Cod National Seashore (CCNS), created on August 7, 1961 by President John F. Kennedy, encompasses 43,500 acres (176 km) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. It includes ponds, woods and beachfront of the Atlantic coastal pine barrens ecoregion. The CCNS includes nearly 40 miles (64 km) of seashore along the Atlantic-facing eastern edge of Cape Cod, in the towns of Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet, Eastham, Orleans and Chatham. The CCNS is run by the National Park Service, with the dual goal of protecting precious, ecologically fragile land, while allowing the public to enjoy a unique resource. Notable sites encompassed by the CCNS include Marconi Station, site of the first two-way transatlantic radio transmission, and the Highlands Center for the Arts, formerly the North Truro Air Force Station. The glacial erratic known as Doane Rock is also located on the grounds. As part of the NPS Centennial Initiative, the Herring River estuary will be restored to its natural state through removal of dikes and drains that date back to 1909. The former United States Coast Guard station at the Seashore is now operated as a 42 bed youth hostel by Hostelling International USA.
    9.50
    2 votes
    44
    Ashburton House

    Ashburton House

    Ashburton House, also known as St. John's Church Parish House or British Legation, is a house on Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C.. It was the site of 10 months of U.S.-British negotiations leading to the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842. This settled U.S.-Canada border disputes and ended the Aroostook War. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1973.
    7.00
    4 votes
    45
    Elbridge Gerry House

    Elbridge Gerry House

    Elbridge Gerry House is a historic house at 44 Washington Street in Marblehead, Massachusetts that was home to statesman Elbridge Gerry. The house was built in 1730 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.
    7.00
    4 votes
    46
    Gilman Garrison House

    Gilman Garrison House

    Gilman Garrison House is a historic house at 12 Water Street in Exeter, New Hampshire owned by Historic New England, which operates the home as a house museum. Councillor John Gilman, a proprietor of sawmills and member of a prominent early Exeter family involved in shipping, built the log house around 1700 and fortified it for protection. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.
    6.00
    5 votes
    47
    Charles Street Jail

    Charles Street Jail

    The Charles Street Jail (built 1851) or "Suffolk County Jail" is a historic former jail (now a luxury hotel) located at 215 Charles Street, Boston, Massachusetts. It is listed in the state and national Registers of Historic Places. The jail was proposed by Mayor Martin Brimmer in his 1843 inaugural address as a replacement for the Leverett Street Jail which had been built in 1822. Normally jails of this sort were county institutions, but, since Boston, then and now, dominates Suffolk County, Mayor Brimmer was a key player in the jail's planning and development. The jail was constructed between 1848-1851 to plans by architect Gridley James Fox Bryant and the advice of prison reformer, Rev. Louis Dwight, who designed it according to the 1790s humanitarian scheme pioneered in England known as the Auburn Plan. The original jail was built in the form of a cross with four wings of Quincy granite extending from a central, octagonal rotunda with a 90-foot-tall atrium. The wings allowed segregation of prisoners by sex and category of offense, and thirty arched windows, each 33 feet high, provided ventilation and natural light. The original jail contained 220 granite cells, each 8 feet by 10
    8.00
    3 votes
    48
    Forrest-Marbury House

    Forrest-Marbury House

    The Forrest-Marbury House, located at 3350 M Street NW in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., and not far from the Francis Scott Key Bridge over the Potomac River, was the site of a March 29, 1791, meeting between President George Washington and local land-owners to discuss the federal government's purchase offer of land needed to build a new capital city for the young United States of America. The meeting was a success and the land was soon acquired. The Forrest-Marbury house itself dates to 1788 and is one of the District of Columbia's most historic sites. It was originally home to Uriah Forrest, mayor of the Town of George at the time. The house's next owner was real estate investor William Marbury, who occupied it in 1800 while he purchased large tracts in the District's Anacostia section. Marbury's battle with President Thomas Jefferson over President John Adams's federal appointments resulted in the landmark 1803 U. S. Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison, written by Chief Justice John Marshall and decided against Marbury, that first established the right of judicial review of executive and legislative branch acts of government. The house remained in Marbury's family throughout
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Massachusetts General Hospital

    Massachusetts General Hospital

    Massachusetts General Hospital (Mass General or MGH) is the primary teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and a biomedical research facility located in the West End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. With the opening of the Lunder Building in 2011, it is the largest hospital in New England with 1,051 beds. It has most recently been ranked as the top hospital overall in the United States by U.S. News & World Report. It is ranked nationally in all adult specialties as well as four pediatric specialties. MGH was the original teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and is currently one of over a dozen hospitals affiliated with HMS. MGH is owned by Partners HealthCare, which was formed by MGH and Brigham and Women's Hospital in 1994. MGH is also a member of the consortium which operates Boston MedFlight. MGH is affiliated with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute through Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care and the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. Founded in 1811, the original hospital was designed by the famous American architect Charles Bulfinch. It is the third-oldest general hospital in the United States, only Pennsylvania Hospital (1751) and NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    Lorraine Park Cemetery Gate Lodge

    Lorraine Park Cemetery Gate Lodge

    The Lorraine Park Cemetery Gate Lodge is a historic gatehouse located near Woodlawn, Baltimore County, Maryland, United States. It is a 1⁄2-story, Queen Anne–style stone-and-frame building designed by Baltimore architect Henry F. Brauns that was constructed in 1884. Adjacent to the house are the ornate cast-iron and wrought-iron Lorraine Cemetery gates. The Lorraine Park Cemetery Gate Lodge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.
    6.75
    4 votes
    51
    Bennington Battle Monument

    Bennington Battle Monument

    The Bennington Battle Monument is a 306 ft (93 m) stone obelisk located at 15 Monument Circle, in Bennington, Vermont. The monument commemorates the Battle of Bennington during the Revolutionary War. In that battle, on August 17, 1777, Brigadier General John Stark and 1,400 New Hampshire men, aided by Colonels Warner and Herrick of Vermont, Simonds of Massachusetts, and Moses Nichols of New Hampshire, defeated two detachments of General Burgoyne's British army, who were apparently seeking to capture a store of weapons and food maintained where the monument now stands. While the battle is termed the Battle of Bennington, it actually occurred about 10 miles (16 km) away, in New York; the Bennington Battlefield, a U.S. National Historic Landmark, is entirely within New York State. In 1877 a local historical society began to plan a monument for the battle's centenary, and considered many designs. One which called for a slender stone column only 100 feet (30 m) tall was showcased during the battle's centennial celebration, which was attended by President Rutherford B. Hayes. The committee eventually accepted J. Phillip Rinn's design with some changes. The monument's cornerstone was laid
    9.00
    2 votes
    52
    Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

    Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

    The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park located in the District of Columbia and the states of Maryland and West Virginia. The park was established as a National Monument in 1961 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in order to preserve the neglected remains of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal along the Potomac River along with many of the original canal structures. The canal and towpath trail extends from Georgetown, Washington, D.C. to Cumberland, Maryland, a distance of 184.5 miles (296.9 km). Construction on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal (also known as "the Grand Old Ditch" or the "C&O Canal") began in 1828 but was not completed until 1850. Even then, the canal fell far short of its intended destination of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Instead, the canal terminated at Cumberland for a total distance of approximately 184.5 miles. The canal was already considered obsolete by the time it was completed because a railroad line had arrived in Cumberland eight years before the canal was finally finished. The C&O Canal operated from 1831 to 1924 and served primarily as a means to transport coal from the Allegheny Mountains to Washington
    9.00
    2 votes
    53
    Johnstown Flood National Memorial

    Johnstown Flood National Memorial

    Johnstown Flood National Memorial commemorates the approximately 2,200 people who died in the Johnstown Flood of 1889, caused by a break in the South Fork Dam. Clara Barton successfully led the American Red Cross in its first disaster relief effort. The memorial is located at 733 Lake Road near South Fork, Pennsylvania, about 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Johnstown. The memorial preserves the remains of the dam and portions of the former Lake Conemaugh bed. The United States Congress authorized the national memorial on August 31, 1964.
    9.00
    2 votes
    54
    Massachusetts State House

    Massachusetts State House

    The Massachusetts State House, also known as the Massachusetts Statehouse or the "New" State House, is the state capitol and house of government of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, located in the Beacon Hill neighborhood of Boston. The building houses the Massachusetts General Court (state legislature) and the offices of the Governor of Massachusetts. The building is situated on 6.7 acres (27,000 m²) of land on top of Beacon Hill in Boston, adjacent to the Boston Common on Beacon Street. It was built on land once owned by John Hancock, Massachusetts's first elected governor. Before the current State House was completed during 1798, Massachusetts's government house was the Old State House on Court Street. For his design for the building, architect Charles Bulfinch was inspired by two buildings of London: William Chambers's Somerset House, and James Wyatt's Pantheon. A major expansion of the original building was completed in 1895. The architect for the annex was Bostonian Charles Brigham. During 1917 the east and west wings were completed. Designed by architects Sturgis, Chapman & Andrews. The original wood dome, which leaked, was covered with copper in 1802 by Paul Revere's
    9.00
    2 votes
    55
    Old Schwamb Mill

    Old Schwamb Mill

    The Old Schwamb Mill is the oldest continuously operating mill site in the United States. There has been a mill operating at this site since c.1650. The current mill is a well-preserved 19th-century woodworking factory. It is located at 17 Mill Lane, Arlington, Massachusetts. The mill was built in 1861, and purchased by brothers Charles and Frederick Schwamb in 1864 for the manufacture of circular and elliptical picture frames. It remained within the family's ownership and continued to operate, more or less unchanged in both equipment and processes, until 1969. Two wings were added during this time, however: one by 1881, and the other between that date and 1898. The mill still contains operational equipment and four preserved power systems.
    9.00
    2 votes
    56
    Crowninshield House

    Crowninshield House

    The Crowninshield House is an historic house designed by Henry Hobson Richardson, located at 164 Marlborough Street in Boston, Massachusetts. Commissioned by Benjamin W. Crowninshield, the house was designed in 1868 and built in 1870 by H.H. Richardson. It is the earliest, still surviving, example of Richardson's private residence work. Unlike many of his later works in the signature Romanesque style that he would develop, this house owes more to the Second Empire style. It is entirely in brick and features black brick trims and decorative green and blue tiles. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. Benjamin William Crowninshield (1837–1892) was a member of the Boston Brahmin Crowninshield family. He attended Harvard College, graduating in 1858, along with classmates H.H. Richardson and Henry Adams. Adams' Education of Henry Adams (1918) includes descriptions of his friendship with Crowninshield. Crowninshield pursued the study of history, publishing and speaking on various topics, such as yachting and military history. Published works include A History of the First Regiment of Massachusetts Cavalry Volunteers (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co.,
    5.80
    5 votes
    57
    Vermont State House

    Vermont State House

    The Vermont State House, located in Montpelier, is the state capitol of Vermont, United States and the seat of the Vermont General Assembly. The current Greek Revival structure is the third building on the same site to be used as the State House. Designed by Thomas Silloway in 1857-1858, it was occupied in 1859. A careful restoration of the Vermont State House began in the early 1980s led by curator David Schütz and the Friends of the Vermont State House, a citizens' advisory committee. The general style of the building is Neoclassical and Greek Revival and is furnished in American Empire, Renaissance Revival, and Rococo Revival styles. Some rooms have been restored to represent latter 19th century styles including the "Aesthetic Movement" style. The Vermont State House is located on State Street on the western edge of downtown Montpelier, a block north of the Winooski River. Set against a wooded hillside (which was open pasture land earlier during much of its history), the building and its distinctive gold leaf dome are easily visible while approaching Montpelier, the smallest city to serve as capital of a U.S. state. The current structure was designed by architect Thomas Silloway
    5.80
    5 votes
    58
    Coit Tower

    Coit Tower

    Coit Tower, also known as the Lillian Coit Memorial Tower, is a 210-foot (64 m) tower in the Telegraph Hill neighborhood of San Francisco, California. The tower, in the city's Pioneer Park, was built in 1933 using Lillie Hitchcock Coit's bequest to beautify the city of San Francisco; at her death in 1929 Coit left one-third of her estate to the city for civic beautification. The tower was proposed in 1931 as an appropriate use of Coit's gift. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 29, 2008. The art deco tower, built of unpainted reinforced concrete, was designed by architects Arthur Brown, Jr. and Henry Howard, with fresco murals by 27 different on-site artists and their numerous assistants, plus two additional paintings installed after creation off-site. Although an apocryphal story claims that the tower was designed to resemble a fire hose nozzle due to Coit's affinity with the San Francisco firefighters of the day, the resemblance is coincidental. Coit Tower was paid for with money left by Lillie Hitchcock Coit, a wealthy socialite who loved to chase fires in the early days of the city's history. The tower took five years to construct. Before
    7.67
    3 votes
    59
    Haskell Free Library and Opera House

    Haskell Free Library and Opera House

    The Haskell Free Library and Opera House is a neoclassical building that straddles the international border in Rock Island (now part of Stanstead, Quebec) and Derby Line, Vermont. The Opera House opened on June 7, 1904, and was built on the border between Canada and the United States. The library collection and the opera stage are located in Stanstead, but the door and most opera seats are located in Derby Line. Because of this, the Haskell is sometimes called "the only library in the U.S.A. with no books" and "the only opera house in the U.S.A. with no stage". Its two addresses are 93 Caswell Avenue, Derby Line, Vermont and 1 Church Street, Stanstead, Quebec. A thick black line runs beneath the seats of the opera house and diagonally across the center of the library's reading room to mark the international boundary. The stage and half of the seats are in Canada, the remainder of the opera hall is in the US. The library has a collection of more than 20,000 books in French and English, and is open to the public 38 hours a week. The building is recognized as a historic site in both countries. In the United States, it has been registered in the National Register of Historic Places
    7.67
    3 votes
    60
    Hildene

    Hildene

    Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home located in Manchester in the U.S. state of Vermont, was the summer home of Robert Todd Lincoln and his wife Mary Harlan Lincoln. He was the eldest son of President Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd Lincoln and the only child of the president to live to adulthood. Robert Todd Lincoln first visited Manchester, Vermont at age 20 in the summer of 1863 when he, his brother Tad, and their mother stayed at the nearby Equinox House to escape the heat of Washington. The name Hildene is from the old English words meaning hill and valley with stream. Completed in 1905 in the Georgian Revival style, the house is located on a 300 foot promontory overlooking the Battenkill Valley. Approximately half of the 412 acre estate is located at the lower level of the valley and includes meadows and wetlands. A formal garden in the form of a cathedral's stained glass window was planted in 1907. The window pattern is defined by privet hedge and filled with mixed borders of annual and perennial flowering plants providing the multicolored "stained glass." The garden is especially noted for its collection of over 1,000 herbaceous peonies. In 1908 an Æeolian pipe organ was
    10.00
    1 votes
    61
    Presidio of San Francisco

    Presidio of San Francisco

    The Presidio of San Francisco (originally, El Presidio Real de San Francisco or Royal Presidio of San Francisco) is a park and former military base on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula in San Francisco, California, and is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. It had been a fortified location since September 17, 1776, when New Spain established it to gain a foothold on Alta California and the San Francisco Bay. It passed to Mexico, which in turn passed it to the United States in 1848. As part of a 1989 military reduction program, Congress voted to end the Presidio's status as an active military installation. On October 1, 1994, it was transferred to the National Park Service, ending 219 years of military use and beginning its next phase of mixed commercial and public use. In 1996, the United States Congress created the Presidio Trust to oversee and manage the interior 80% of the park's lands, with the National Park Service managing the coastal 20%. In a first-of-its-kind structure, Congress mandated that the Presidio Trust make the Presidio financially self-sufficient by 2013, which it achieved 8 years earlier. The park is characterized by many wooded
    10.00
    1 votes
    62
    Arnold Arboretum

    Arnold Arboretum

    The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University is an arboretum located in the Jamaica Plain and Roslindale sections of Boston, Massachusetts. It was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and is the second largest "link" in the Emerald Necklace. The Arboretum was founded in 1872 when the President and Fellows of Harvard College became trustees of a portion of the estate of James Arnold (1781–1868). In 1842, Benjamin Bussey (1757–1842), a prosperous Boston merchant and scientific farmer, donated his country estate Woodland Hill and a part of his fortune to Harvard University "for instruction in agriculture, horticulture, and related subjects". Bussey had inherited land from fellow patriot Eleazer Weld in 1800 and further enlarged his large estate between 1806 and 1837 by acquiring and consolidating various farms that had been established as early as the seventeenth century. Harvard used this land for the creation of the Bussey Institute, which was dedicated to agricultural experimentation. The first Bussey Institute building was completed in 1871 and served as headquarters for an undergraduate school of agriculture. Sixteen years after Bussey's death, James Arnold, a New Bedford,
    6.50
    4 votes
    63
    Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area

    Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area

    The Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area is a National Recreation Area situated among the islands of Boston Harbor of Boston, Massachusetts, USA. The area is made up of a collection of islands, together with a former island and a peninsula, many of which are open for public recreation and some of which are very small and best suited for wildlife. The area is run by the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. It includes the Boston Harbor Islands State Park, managed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Twenty-one of the 34 islands in the area are also included in the Boston Harbor Islands Archeological District. Attractions include hiking trails, beaches, the Civil War-era Fort Warren on Georges Island and Boston Light on Little Brewster Island, the oldest lighthouse in the United States. Georges Island and Spectacle Island are served seasonally by ferries to and from Boston and Quincy, connecting on weekends and summer weekdays with a shuttle boat to several other islands, Hull, and Hingham. In 1996, there was a project proposal by Boston's mayor Tom Menino and Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Clifford A. Goudey to revitalize the aquaculture and fish population
    6.50
    4 votes
    64
    Bullocks Wilshire

    Bullocks Wilshire

    Bullocks Wilshire, located at 3050 Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles, California, is a 230,000-square-foot (21,000 m) Art Deco building. The building was designed by Los Angeles architects John and Donald Parkinson; the interior design was by Eleanor Lemaire and Jock Peters of the Feil & Paradise Company; the ceiling mural of the porte cochere was painted by Herman Sachs. The building was completed in 1929 as a luxury department store for owner John G. Bullock (owner of the more mainstream Bullock's in Downtown Los Angeles). The exterior is notable for its 241-foot (73 m) tower whose top is sheathed in copper, tarnished green. At one time, the tower peak had a light that could be seen for miles around. Bullocks Wilshire's innovation was that it was one of the first department stores in Los Angeles to cater to the burgeoning automobile culture. It was located in a then-mostly residential district, its objective to attract shoppers who wanted a closer place to shop than Downtown Los Angeles. Traditional display windows faced the sidewalk, but they were decorated to catch the eyes of motorists. Since most customers would arrive by vehicle, the most appealing entrance was placed in the
    6.50
    4 votes
    65
    Central Embarcadero Piers Historic District

    Central Embarcadero Piers Historic District

    The Central Embarcadero Piers Historic District is a Registered Historic District in the City of San Francisco, California, United States. It consists of Piers 1, 1½, 3 and 5, is one of the largest surviving pier complexes along San Francisco's Embarcadero. The Central Embarcadero Piers Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places on November 20, 2002. With construction spanning over a decade in length, led by Chief Engineer of the State Harbor Commission, Frank G. White, Piers 1, 1½, 3 and 5 opened in 1918. Unlike the piers south of the Ferry Building that were designed in the Mission and Gothic Revival styles, the piers north of the Ferry Building were built in the Beaux-Arts architecture style, similar to New York City's Chelsea Piers. The timber-frame bulkhead buildings, covered in stucco, are each two stories high, punctuated by two-story arches. Behind these formal building are the areas more closely associated with the functioning of the port—the piers and transit sheds. Concrete or timber piers extend east behind the bulkhead buildings, connected to the system of wharves upon which the bulkhead buildings rest. Steel truss and timber frame
    6.50
    4 votes
    66
    Dumbarton House

    Dumbarton House

    Dumbarton House is a Federal style house located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C.. It was completed around 1800. Its first occupant was Joseph Nourse, the first Register of the Treasury. The home was purchased by the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in 1928 and opened to the public in 1932.
    6.50
    4 votes
    67
    Naval Hospital Boston Historic District

    Naval Hospital Boston Historic District

    Naval Hospital Boston Historic District is a historic district at the south end of Broadway in Chelsea, Massachusetts. The district encompasses the area around the former Chelsea Naval Hospital. The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.
    6.50
    4 votes
    68
    Samuel Gridley and Julia Ward Howe House

    Samuel Gridley and Julia Ward Howe House

    The Samuel Gridley and Julia Ward Howe House is a historic building built in 1804 and located at 13 Chestnut Street in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, especially important as the home from 1863-1866 to Julia Ward Howe and Samuel Gridley Howe. The building is a four-story brick row house with Georgian elements, one of three adjoining “Swan Houses” built by a wealthy widow for her daughters. It was designed by the noteworthy architect Charles Bulfinch. Julia Ward Howe was an abolitionist who became prominent for composing "The Battle Hymn of the Republic", and later gained prominence as a suffragist. Samuel Howe was a reformer as well and founded the Perkins School for the Blind. The Howes lived in this home from 1863 to 1866, shortly after Mrs. Howe had composed her "Battle Hymn of the Republic" in November 1861. The property was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. The building is currently a private residence and not open to the public.
    6.50
    4 votes
    69
    Thomas Law House

    Thomas Law House

    The Thomas Law House was built in 1796 near present day 6th and N Streets, Southwest in Washington, D.C. Originally inhabited by Thomas Law and Elizabeth Parke Custis, oldest granddaughter of Martha Washington. In 1816, the home was purchased by former Congressman Richard Bland Lee and his wife Elizabeth (Collins) Lee. During the Civil War, it was the Mt. Vernon Hotel. Starting around 1913, it was the Washington Sanitarium’s Mission Hospital. Dr. Henry G. Hadley operated a clinic from 1923 to 1961.
    6.50
    4 votes
    70
    American Antiquarian Society

    American Antiquarian Society

    The American Antiquarian Society (AAS), located in Worcester, Massachusetts, is both a learned society and national research library of pre-twentieth century American History and culture. Its main building, known also as Antiquarian Hall, is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. The mission of the AAS is to collect, preserve and make available for study all printed records of what is now known as the United States of America. This includes printed records from first European settlement through the year 1876. The AAS offers programs for professional scholars, pre-collegiate, undergraduate and graduate students, educators, professional artists, writers, genealogists, and the general public. AAS has many digital collections available, including A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1788–1824 which includes the election data gathered by AAS employee Phil Lampi. The Library collection of the AAS contains over three million books, pamphlets, newspapers, periodicals, graphic arts materials and manuscripts as well as books from all fifty U.S. states, most of Canada and the British West Indies are included in their repository. The Society has two thirds of the books printed in the
    8.50
    2 votes
    71
    Blanche K. Bruce House

    Blanche K. Bruce House

    The Blanche K. Bruce House is a historic house in Washington, D.C.. It was a home of slave-born Blanche K. Bruce (1 March 1841 – 17 March 1898), who represented Mississippi as a U.S. Senator from 1875 to 1881 and was the first African-American to serve a full term in the U.S. Senate. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975. The building includes seven bedrooms and four bathrooms and was assessed at $1,383,450 in 2008.
    8.50
    2 votes
    72
    Samuel Gompers House

    Samuel Gompers House

    Samuel Gompers House is a house in Washington, D.C.. Samuel Gompers was president of the American Federation of Labor from 1886 until his death in 1924. Gompers helped found the AFL, and vigorously pursued its three goals of higher wages, shorter hours, and better working conditions for American workers. He lived in this three-story brick rowhouse from 1902 to 1917. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 19??.
    8.50
    2 votes
    73
    Chester Harding House

    Chester Harding House

    The Chester Harding House is an historic building located at 16 Beacon Street in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, across from the Massachusetts State House in Beacon Hill. The four-story town house was built in the Federal architectural style as a private home by real estate developer Thomas Fletcher in 1808, at a time when Park Street and Beacon Street were lined by run-down public buildings. State officials decided to build replacements in other parts of the city, financing the construction of the new public buildings from the sale of the Park Street lots. In 1826, the famous American portrait painter Chester Harding bought the house, which he occupied until 1830. According to the Lawyers Pictorial Register, published by the Boston Bar Association in 1981, in the middle of the 19th century, the building was bought by Dr. Henry C. Angell, an art collector. As the neighborhood began to change from residential to commercial, many old houses were torn down and replaced by larger buildings which dwarfed the Chester Harding House. One such building is the 1884 six-floor Claflin Building. In 1919, the house was given by Martha B. Angell to the American Unitarian Association, which
    7.33
    3 votes
    74
    First Congregational Church of Bennington

    First Congregational Church of Bennington

    The First Congregational Church of Bennington is located on Monument Avenue in Bennington, Vermont. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. It is also known as the Old First Church. The congregation was organized in 1762 and the current meeting house was built in 1805. The seating capacity is six hundred fifty. The adjacent cemetery was designated by the Vermont legislature as "Vermont's Sacred Acre".
    7.33
    3 votes
    75
    Round Church

    Round Church

    Round Church, also known as Old Round Church, built in 1812-1813 in Richmond, Vermont, USA, is a rare, well-preserved example of a sixteen-sided meeting house. It was built to serve as the meeting place for the town as well as five Protestant congregations. Today it is maintained by the Richmond Historical Society and is open to the public during the summer and early fall, It is also available for weddings and other events. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1996. Media related to Old Round church, Vermont at Wikimedia Commons
    7.33
    3 votes
    76
    Alma

    Alma

    Alma is an 1891-built scow schooner, which is now preserved as a National Historic Landmark at the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park in San Francisco, California. Alma is a flat-bottomed scow schooner built in 1891 by Fred Siemer at his shipyard at Hunters Point in San Francisco. Like the many other local scow schooners of that time, she was designed to haul goods on and around San Francisco Bay but now hauls people. Able to navigate the shallow creeks and sloughs of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Delta, the scows' strong, sturdy hulls could rest safely and securely on the bottom and provided a flat, stable platform for loading and unloading. While principally designed as sailing vessels, scow schooners could also be hauled from the bank or poled in the shallows of the delta. Until 1918, Alma hauled a variety of cargo under sail, including hay and lumber. Thereafter she was demasted and used as a salt-carrying barge. In 1926 a gasoline engine was installed, and Alma became an oyster dredger, remaining in this trade until 1957. While built and operated on San Francisco Bay, Alma is in many ways indistinguishable from scows that were launched and sailed on
    6.25
    4 votes
    77
    Mount Orne Covered Bridge

    Mount Orne Covered Bridge

    The Mount Orne Bridge is a wooden Howe truss bridge over the Connecticut River located between Lancaster, New Hampshire and Lunenburg, Vermont. The most recent rededication of the bridge took place on November 23, 1983. The Mount Orne Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
    6.25
    4 votes
    78
    Northumberland Apartments

    Northumberland Apartments

    The Northumberland Apartments is a historic apartment building at 2039 New Hampshire Avenue, NW in the U Street Corridor of Washington, D.C. The Classical Revival building was constructed in 1909-10 by local real estate developer Harry Wardman and Albert H. Beers. In 1980, the building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Northumberland Apartments occupies a significant lot on New Hampshire Avenue, N.W. The irregular shape of the lot, created by the intersection of this major diagonal avenue and the grid of L'Enfant's 1791 plan for the Federal City, dictated the shape of the building. The Northumberland's eclectic, classical facade blends harmoniously with the buildings in the area and contributes to the visual variety and richness of the New Hampshire Avenue streetscape between Sixteenth Street and Florida Avenue. The building remains an unaltered element in a neighborhood identity created by Victorian rowhouses, large apartment buildings, and churches and institutional buildings. The variety of building types and styles, and the unusual spatial configuration of the short blocks and irregularly-shaped lots, creates a richness of streetscape seldom found so
    6.25
    4 votes
    79
    Woodrow Wilson House

    Woodrow Wilson House

    The Woodrow Wilson House was the residence of the Twenty-Eighth President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson after he left office. It is at 2340 S Street NW on Washington, D.C.'s Embassy Row. On February 3, 1924, Wilson died in an upstairs bedroom. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964. The National Trust for Historic Preservation owns the house and operates it as a museum. President Woodrow Wilson bought the home on Embassy Row in the last months of his second term as President of the United States as a gift to his wife, Edith Bolling Wilson. He presented her the deed in December 1920, although he had never seen the house. The former president and his wife moved into the home on Inauguration Day, which in 1921 was March 4 (not the current date of January 20). Wilson made several modifications to the house, including: a billiard room, "stacks" for his library of over 8,000 books, and a one-story brick garage. It was from the balcony of the house that Wilson addressed a crowd on November 11, 1923, as his last public appearance. While the Wilsons had few guests, former British Prime Minister David Lloyd George and former French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau did
    5.40
    5 votes
    80
    Beth Israel Synagogue

    Beth Israel Synagogue

    Beth Israel Synagogue is an historic Jewish synagogue at 238 Columbia Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The synagogue was built in 1901 by Nathan Douglass. Congregation Anshai Sfard merged into it in 1957. In 1962 Beth Israel and Temple Ashkenaz merged to form Temple Beth Shalom of Cambridge and the new congregation chose to use the Temple Ashkenaz building on Tremont Street in Cambridge. The Beth Israel building, no longer used as a synagogue, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. The former synagogue building currently houses condominium units.
    7.00
    3 votes
    81
    Codman-Davis House

    Codman-Davis House

    The Codman-Davis House is a four-story, red brick, 1906, classical revival house in Washington, D.C. at 2145 Decatur Place NW (in the Kalorama neighborhood). It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The house is the residence of the Ambassador of Thailand.
    7.00
    3 votes
    82
    Columbia Cemetery

    Columbia Cemetery

    The Columbia Cemetery in Columbia, Missouri has been in use as a cemetery since 1820. The cemetery historically contains Caucasian, African-American, and Jewish sections. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.
    7.00
    3 votes
    83
    Coolidge Homestead

    Coolidge Homestead

    The Coolidge Homestead, also known as Calvin Coolidge Homestead District or President Calvin Coolidge State Historical Site, was the childhood home of the thirtieth President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge and the place where he took the presidential oath of office. Located in Plymouth Notch, Vermont, Coolidge lived there from age four in 1876 to 1887, when he departed for Black River Academy for education. The home, itself, was bought by his father, John Coolidge, who expanded the home from a simple 1 ⁄2-story farm house to its present size and appearance today. Despite living most of his life in Northampton, Massachusetts, Coolidge often returned to the homestead to visit his family and was staying there when President Warren G. Harding, died. Coolidge was sworn in by his father in the family parlor after taking the Oath of Office for the presidency. Due to his father's refusal to modernize the house, it remains to this day in the same condition, and in some cases with the same furnishings, as it was the night Coolidge took the oath. The Inaugural Room itself is behind glass, but a visitor can stand in an alcove and see the lamp, Bible, and table that were used in the
    7.00
    3 votes
    84
    Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge

    Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge

    The Cornish–Windsor Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Connecticut River between Cornish, New Hampshire and Windsor, Vermont. It was the longest covered bridge still standing in the United States until the Smolen–Gulf Bridge opened in Ohio in 2008. While the Old Blenheim Bridge had and Bridgeport Covered Bridge has longer clear spans, and the Smolen-Gulf Bridge is longer overall, with a longest single span of 204 feet (62 m), the Cornish-Windsor Bridge still has the longest single covered span to carry automobile traffic (Blenheim was and Bridgeport is pedestrian only). The bridge is approximately 449 feet (137 m) long and 24 feet (7.3 m) wide. It has a Town lattice type truss. The bridge was originally built in 1866, and rebuilt in 1988. It was designated a National Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) in 1970. The bridge is owned and maintained by the State of New Hampshire, and though often associated with Windsor, is in fact part of the town of Cornish, since the defined boundary between New Hampshire and Vermont is at the western high-water mark of the river. When one drives onto the bridge from the Windsor side of the
    7.00
    3 votes
    85
    Dog Team Tavern

    Dog Team Tavern

    The Dog Team Tavern was a restaurant that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was located on Dog Team Road, off U.S. Route 7, roughly four miles north of the town of Middlebury, Vermont. The restaurant burned down in early September 2006, destroying artifacts of the Sir Wilfred Grenfell Mission and Labrador handicrafts. The building was originally a mission house that was started by Grenfell and his wife in 1931. In the 1940s the building became the Dog Team Tavern. The rustic restaurant was a local landmark known for its sizable portions (most notably the prime rib) and the "relish wheel," which typically contained corn relish, apple butter, horseradish cottage cheese, beets, and sauerkraut. Also, the restaurant's famous sticky buns were always served at the beginning of each meal. The restaurant was very popular among students from the nearby Middlebury College, who often flocked there with family during the college's fall family weekends. The Dog Team Tavern was originally constructed in the 1920s by Sir Wilfred and Lady Anne Grenfell. The Dog Team Tavern was opened in 1936 as a tea house and outlet for handicrafts from Newfoundland and Labrador. Earlier
    7.00
    3 votes
    86
    Gladstone and Hawarden Apartment Buildings

    Gladstone and Hawarden Apartment Buildings

    The Gladstone and Hawarden Apartment Buildings are historic apartment buildings located at 1423 and 1419 R Street, NW, respectively, in the Logan Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Built in 1900–1901, the Gladstone and Hawarden were designed in the Romanesque Revival architectural style by George S. Cooper. On September 7, 1994, the Gladstone and Hawarden were added to the National Register of Historic Places.
    7.00
    3 votes
    87
    Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site

    Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site

    Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, New Hampshire, preserves the home, gardens, and studios of Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1848–1907), one of America's foremost sculptors. This was his summer residence from 1885 to 1897, his permanent home from 1900 until his death in 1907, and the center of the Cornish Art Colony. There are two hiking trails that explore the park's natural areas. Original sculptures are on exhibit. The National Historic Site was authorized by Congress on August 31, 1964, and established on May 30, 1977. Besides the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, this is the only National Park Service site in New Hampshire. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1962 and administratively listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966. It is located on Saint-Gaudens Road in Cornish, 0.5 miles off New Hampshire Route 12A.
    7.00
    3 votes
    88
    Bank of Italy Building

    Bank of Italy Building

    The Bank of Italy Building, also known as Clay-Montgomery Building, is a building in San Francisco, California. This eight-story building became the headquarters of A. P. Giannini's Bank of Italy (precursor of the Bank of America) in 1908 after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire destroyed the original bank building on Montgomery Avenue (now Columbus Avenue) in nearby North Beach. Following the destruction of the original headquarters, the Bank of Italy was briefly run from two locations, one on the Washington Street wharf and the other from the home of Giannini's brother on Van Ness Avenue. Shortly thereafter, more permanent accommodations were found in a building on Montgomery Avenue near the site of the original headquarters. During this period, Giannini and the bank directors decided to construct their own bank building. A parcel of land was purchased for $125,000 at the corner of Clay and Montgomery Streets. Due to demands on the bank's funds following the fires, construction was not started for nearly a year after the land purchase. The building opened on August 17, 1908 and served as the headquarters of the Bank of Italy until 1921 when operations were moved to a
    6.00
    4 votes
    89
    First National Bank Building

    First National Bank Building

    The First National Bank Building is a Romanesque Revival building in Ann Arbor, Michigan designed by the local architectural firm of Fry and Kasurin. It stands at 210-205 South Main Street in downtown Ann Arbor. The high-rise was built in 1927, and completed in 1929. It stands at 10 floors in height, and is designed with an interesting blend of Art Deco and Art moderne architectural styles. It is composed of primarily steel and terra cotta.
    6.00
    4 votes
    90
    Gen. Artemas Ward Homestead

    Gen. Artemas Ward Homestead

    The General Artemas Ward House is a historic property in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. Commonly known as the "Artemas Ward House", it is the lifelong home of Artemas Ward, American Major General in the American Revolutionary War and a Congressman from Massachusetts. The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The house has stood at 786 Main Street since it was built by Ward's father, Nahum, in 1727. Its location is along the original Boston Post Road, and an original mile marker of that road is still visible across Main Street on the Dean Park side. Many additions were made to the house over the years and the main structure was occupied by Ward family members until 1909. From 1909 until 1954 descendants of the general lived in a second structure situated behind the colonial home. The home is now a museum preserved by Harvard University and it is open to the public for limited hours during the summer months. The property also includes a four story barn, the largest structure of its kind in New England.
    6.00
    4 votes
    91
    Hills Memorial Library

    Hills Memorial Library

    Hills Memorial Library is the former public library of Hudson, New Hampshire in the United States. It was erected in memory of Ida Virginia Hills by her husband, Dr. Alfred Hills, and her mother, Mary Field Creutzborg. The land had been previously donated by Kimball Webster for the express purpose of building a public library. The new building was designed by architect Hubert G. Ripley, built during the winter of 1908-09 and opened to the public on June 12, 1909. The building itself was added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 7, 1984. The town of Hudson closed the facility on May 18, 2009 as the collection was moved to the new George H. and Ella M. Rodgers Memorial Library. Hudson's first free public library was established in March 1893 by unanimous vote at that year's town meeting. Kimball Webster, Henry O. Smith and Oswald P. Baker were appointed trustees soon after. Later that same year, the town received a bequest from Dr. Adoniram Greeley, whose will provided five hundred volumes for a free library in the town of Hudson to be selected from his personal library of 3000 volumes. The cooperation of his heirs eventually raised the total number acquired from this
    6.00
    4 votes
    92
    North Philadelphia station

    North Philadelphia station

    North Philadelphia, formerly Germantown Junction Station, is a railroad station on the Northeast Corridor in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. It is an above-ground station at 2900 North Broad Street in the city's North Philadelphia section. The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority's (SEPTA) Regional Rail accounts for most of the station's service, and five Amtrak trains stop each weekday. The station is 4.4 miles from upper level 30th St Station via the outbound track, or 4.5 miles via the inbound. It is immediately northeast of where SEPTA's Chestnut Hill West Line diverges from the Northeast Corridor, which carries SEPTA's Trenton Line. Platforms for the two lines are a short distance apart. Two high-level island platforms serve three of the four Northeast Corridor tracks. The Trenton Line trains make regular stops at these platforms. The station and tracks are owned by Amtrak, and five of their trains stop at this station each weekday. On the SEPTA-owned Chestnut Hill West line, two low-level platforms serve Chestnut Hill West trains, which normally treat North Philadelphia as a flag stop. The station is within a few blocks of the North Broad station on
    6.00
    4 votes
    93
    Alcatraz Island

    Alcatraz Island

    Alcatraz Island is located in the San Francisco Bay, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) offshore from San Francisco, California, United States. Often referred to as "The Rock," the small island was developed with facilities for a lighthouse, a military fortification, a military prison (1868), and a federal prison from 1933 until 1963. Beginning in November 1969, the island was occupied for more than 19 months by a group of Aboriginal Peoples from San Francisco who were part of a wave of Native activism across the nation with public protests through the 1970s. In 1972 Alcatraz became a national recreation area and received designation as a National Historic Landmark in 1986. Today, the island's facilities are managed by the National Park Service as part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area; it is open to tours. Visitors can reach the island by ferry ride from Pier 33, near Fisherman's Wharf, San Francisco. Hornblower Cruises and Events, operating under the name Alcatraz Cruises, is the official ferry provider to and from the island. Hornblower launched the nation's first hybrid propulsion ferry in 2008, the Hornblower Hybrid, which now serves the island, docking at the Alcatraz Wharf. It is
    8.00
    2 votes
    94
    Brooklyn Bridge

    Brooklyn Bridge

    The Brooklyn Bridge is a bridge in New York City and is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. With a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m), it was the longest suspension bridge in the world from its opening until 1903, and the first steel-wire suspension bridge. Originally referred to as the New York and Brooklyn Bridge and as the East River Bridge, it was dubbed the Brooklyn Bridge, a name from an earlier January 25, 1867, letter to the editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, and formally so named by the city government in 1915. Since its opening, it has become an icon of New York City, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964 and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1972. The Brooklyn Bridge was initially designed by German immigrant John Augustus Roebling, who had previously designed and constructed shorter suspension bridges, such as Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct in Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania, Waco Suspension Bridge in Waco, Texas, and the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge in Cincinnati, Ohio. While conducting surveys for the bridge project,
    8.00
    2 votes
    95
    General Post Office

    General Post Office

    The General Post Office, also known as the Tariff Commission Building, is a building in Washington, D.C. that is currently used as the Hotel Monaco. Robert Mills designed the General Post Office, completed in 1842. Thomas U. Walter oversaw the General Post Office's expansion from in 1855 to 1866. The General Post Office moved out in 1897. The General Land Office was a tenant from 1897 to 1917. The National Selective Service Board was a tenant in 1919. The Tariff Commission was a tenant from 1932 to 1988. The building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1971. In 2002, Michael Stanton Architecture in partnership with the Kimpton Group was selected by the General Services Administration to convert the building into a 184-room hotel, known as the Washington Monaco Hotel. The Washington Monaco Hotel was honored with the Washington DC Mayor's Award for Historic Preservation, the Business Week / Architectural Record Award, the GSA Heritage Award for Adaptive Use, and the GSA Heritage Award for Conservation and Restoration.
    8.00
    2 votes
    96
    Hancock-Clarke House

    Hancock-Clarke House

    The Hancock-Clarke House is a historic American Revolutionary War site on Hancock Street in Lexington, Massachusetts. It played a prominent role in the Battle of Lexington and Concord as both John Hancock and Samuel Adams, leaders of the colonials, were staying in the house before the battle. The House is operated as a museum by the Lexington Historical Society. It is open weekends starting April 16 and daily from May 30–October 30. An admission fee is charged. The Reverend John Hancock, grandfather of the American revolutionary leader of the same name, purchased this site in 1699. The house he originally built on the site does not survive. The current house was built in 1737. Rev. Hancock's son, Thomas, a wealthy Boston merchant, is said to have financed the construction. The front or main portion of the house consists of the 2½-story structure with central chimney, a short center hall, two rooms on each of the two floors, and an attic. The small rear ell, 1½ stories high with gambrel roof contains a kitchen and tiny study downstairs and two low-studded chambers upstairs. As confirmed by tree-ring dating (dendrochronology), both portions of the house were built at the same time.
    8.00
    2 votes
    97
    John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge

    John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge

    The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge spans the Ohio River between Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky. When the first pedestrians crossed on December 1, 1866, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world at 1,057 feet (322 m) main span. Today, many pedestrians use the bridge to get between the arenas in Cincinnati (Paul Brown Stadium, Great American Ball Park, and U.S. Bank Arena) and the hotels, bars, restaurants, and parking lots in Northern Kentucky. The bar and restaurant district at the foot of the bridge on the Kentucky side is known as Roebling Point. Ramps were constructed leading directly from the bridge to the Dixie Terminal building used for streetcars. These provided Covington-Cincinnati streetcars "with a grade separated route to the center of downtown, and the terminal building was originally intended to connect, via underground pedestrian passages, with the never-built Fountain Square Station of the infamous Cincinnati Subway." When streetcar service ceased in the 1950s the terminal was converted to use as a diesel bus terminal. The ramps were removed in 1998 when it ceased being used as a bus terminal. In the decades before 1856, want and need of a
    8.00
    2 votes
    98
    Ladd-Gilman House

    Ladd-Gilman House

    Ladd-Gilman House, also known as Cincinnati Memorial Hall, is a house in Exeter, New Hampshire. The home was built about 1721 by Nathaniel Ladd as one of the state's first brick houses, and was subsequently clapboarded three decades later. The home was purchased in in 1747 by Col. Nathaniel Gilman, a prominent Exeter merchant. It served as the state treasury during the Revolutionary War when two members of the Gilman family, Col. Nicholas Gilman and his son John Taylor Gilman, later the state's governor, served as treasurers of the state. Also born in the house was Nicholas Gilman, Jr., a signer of the United States Constitution and United States Senator from New Hampshire. The Ladd-Gilman House was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1973. It has been maintained since 1902 by the Society of the Cincinnati, in which organization the Gilman family took a prominent role. The Ladd-Gilman House and its grounds are part of the campus of Exeter's American Independence Museum. It is located at 1 Governors Lane in Exeter.
    8.00
    2 votes
    99
    Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site

    Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site

    Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site is a National Historic Site in the city of Washington, D.C. Established on September 30, 1965, the site is roughly bounded by Constitution Avenue, 15th Street NW, F Street NW, and 3rd Street NW. The historic district includes a number of culturally, aesthetically, and historically significant structures and places, including Pennsylvania Avenue NW from the White House to the United States Capitol, the Treasury Building, Freedom Plaza, Federal Triangle, Ford's Theatre, the Old Patent Office Building, the Old Pension Office Building (which now houses the National Building Museum), Judiciary Square, and the Peace Monument. Pennsylvania Avenue, the heart of the historic site, is recognized by many as "America's Main Street." The avenue plays a significant part in American political culture as well. "Since its creation in the head of L'Enfant, from the time Jefferson planted Lombardy poplars along its edge, this has been the most important avenue in Washington," noted author Jeffrey F. Meyer. "It is the corridor of power, linking the legislative, judicial, and executive branches." Professor of architecture Michael J. Bednar, commenting on the
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    Robert Frost Homestead

    Robert Frost Homestead

    The Robert Frost Farm in Derry, New Hampshire, was the home of poet Robert Frost from 1900 to 1911. Today it is a New Hampshire state park in use as a historic house museum. The property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as the Robert Frost Homestead. Frost lived in the house between the fall of 1900 until it was sold in November 1911. The majority of the poems collected in his first two books, A Boy's Will and North of Boston, were written here. Many of the poems in his 1916 collection Mountain Interval were also written at the Derry farm. Frost once said, "There was something about the experience at Derry which stayed in my mind, and was tapped for poetry in the years that came after." Elliott, first son of Frost and his wife Elinor, died on the farm in 1900 at age four, likely due to influenza. The other children were educated at home by their parents. Lesley Frost later recalled she was "taught the alphabet on a typewriter... My mother taught the organized subjects, reading (the phonetic method), writing (then known as penmanship), geography, spelling. My father took on botany and astronomy." A hired man named Carl Burrell (and, occasionally, Burrell's
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    The Mount

    The Mount

    The Mount (1902) is a country house in Lenox, Massachusetts, the home of noted American author Edith Wharton, who designed the house and its grounds and considered it her "first real home." The estate, located in The Berkshires, is open to the public from May to October. Visitors are offered tours of the house and gardens. The Mount's main house was inspired by the 17th-century Belton House in England, with additional influences from classical Italian and French architecture. Edith Wharton used the principles described in her first book, The Decoration of Houses (co-authored with Ogden Codman, Jr.), when she designed the house. She thought that good architectural expression included order, scale, and harmony. Its west (entry) elevation is three stories; on the garden side it is two stories with an opening out to a large, raised, stone terrace overlooking the grounds. The house exterior is a striking white stucco, strongly set off by dark green shutters, and rises from a quasi-rustic foundation of coarse field stone. Clusters of gables and white chimneys rise from the roof, which is capped with a balustrade and cupola. This main house is augmented by Georgian Revival gatehouse and
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Yucca House National Monument

    Yucca House National Monument

    Yucca House National Monument is a United States National Monument located in Montezuma County, Colorado between the towns of Towaoc (headquarters of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe) and Cortez, Colorado. Yucca House is a large, unexcavated Ancestral Puebloan archaeological site. Yucca House National Monument is located in the Montezuma Valley at the foot of Sleeping Ute Mountain, called "mountain with lots of yucca growing on it" by the Ute people, and inspiration for the name of the national monument. The site is one of many Ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi) village sites located in the Montezuma Valley occupied between AD 1100 and 1300 by 13,000 people. Two unexcavated settlement areas covered in vegetation include: Nearby were the ancient pueblo village of Mud Springs at the head of McElmo Canyon and Navajo Springs, was the original site of the Ute Mountain Indian Agency south of Sleeping Ute Mountain in the early 1900s. Like other nearby Ancient Pueblo peoples, the Yucca House pueblo dwellers abandoned their homes, but because a major excavation has not been completed it is not known when, or if there is a relationship between these people and those of nearby pueblo settlements. The
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Adams Memorial

    Adams Memorial

    The Adams Memorial is a grave marker located in Section E of Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C., featuring a cast bronze allegorical sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The shrouded figure is seated against a granite block which forms one side of a hexagonal plot, designed by architect Stanford White. Erected in 1891, the monument was commissioned by author/historian Henry Adams (a member of the Adams political family) as a memorial to his wife, Marian "Clover" Hooper Adams. Marian Adams, suffering from depression, had died by suicide through the ingestion of potassium cyanide, which she otherwise used to retouch photographs. Adams advised Saint-Gaudens to contemplate iconic images from Buddhist devotional art. One such subject, Kannon (also known as Guan Yin, the Bodhisattva of compassion), is frequently depicted as a seated figure draped in cloth. In particular, a painting of Kannon by Kanō Motonobu, in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and shown to Saint-Gaudens by John LaFarge, is said to have played a major role in influencing the conception and design of this sculpture. Henry Adams, who traveled to Japan with LaFarge ostensibly to find inspiration for this
    9.00
    1 votes
    104
    Edward Bellamy House

    Edward Bellamy House

    The Edward Bellamy House is a National Historic Landmark at 91-93 Church Street in Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts. The house was built in 1852 and was the home of journalist Edward Bellamy. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1971.
    9.00
    1 votes
    105
    Kennedy-Warren Apartment Building

    Kennedy-Warren Apartment Building

    The Kennedy-Warren is a historic 11-story apartment house in Washington, D.C. It is located at 3131-3133 Connecticut Avenue, NW between the Cleveland Park and Woodley Park neighborhoods. The Art Deco building, which constructed from 1931, overlooks the National Zoological Park and Klingle Valley Park. The original main building was built between 1930 and 1931 with 210 apartments. The architect's plans called for a northeast wing and a south wing as well, but construction was delayed because of the onset of the Great Depression. The northeast wing was added in 1935 with 107 additional apartments as economic conditions improved in Washington. The B. F. Saul Company, owner of the building since 1935, added the south wing between 2002 and 2004. The architect of the northeast wing was A.H. Sonneman and of the south wing was Hartman-Cox. The current total number of apartments, ranging from efficiencies to three-bedroom units, is 425. The Kennedy-Warren is considered the largest and best example of an Art Deco building in Washington, D.C. In 1989, the building was listed as a District of Columbia Historic Landmark, and in 1994 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The
    9.00
    1 votes
    106
    Naulakha

    Naulakha

    Naulakha, also known as Rudyard Kipling House, is a Shingle Style home in Dummerston, Vermont where author Rudyard Kipling wrote Captains Courageous. Kipling also wrote The Jungle Books, A Day's Work, and The Seven Seas, and did work on Kim and The Just So Stories here. Kipling had named the house after the Naulakha Pavilion, situated inside Lahore Fort. Etymologically Naulakha means nine lakhs or nine hundred thousand being the amount of rupees incurred for the cost of construction of the building. Another prominent example of similar use of the name is Naulakha Temple in Deoghar, Baidyanathdham (Jharkhand). The Mughal architecture of the monument had inspired him during his earlier stay (between 1882–1887) in Lahore. The house was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1993. It can be rented by the night ($275–$425) or week ($1,350-$2,300) and sleeps eight. There is also a tennis court.
    9.00
    1 votes
    107
    Timberline Lodge

    Timberline Lodge

    Timberline Lodge is a mountain lodge on the south side of Mount Hood in Oregon, about 60 miles (97 km) east of Portland. Built in the late 1930s, this National Historic Landmark sits at an elevation of 5,960 feet (1,817 m), within the Mount Hood National Forest and is accessible through the Mount Hood Scenic Byway. It is a popular tourist attraction, drawing more than a million visitors annually. It is noted in film for serving as the exterior of the Overlook Hotel in The Shining. The lodge was constructed between 1936 and 1938 as a Works Progress Administration (WPA) project during the Great Depression. Workers used large timbers and local stone, and placed intricately carved decorative elements throughout the building. President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the Lodge on September 28, 1937. In his remarks, he commented on the reasons for the project: The dedication ceremony was five months before completion of the lodge interior February 1938, when it opened to the public. It took extra expense and effort to make the lodge appear presentable for the dedication. Roosevelt's vision of winter sports at Timberline Lodge took hesitant steps the following year. A portable rope tow
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    Wardman Row

    Wardman Row

    Wardman Row is a block of historic apartment buildings at 1416-1440 R Street, NW in Washington, D.C. The buildings, located in the Greater Fourteenth Street Historic District were designed in 1911 by Harry Wardman and Albert Beers. In 1984, the buildings were placed on the National Register of Historic Places.
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Zalmon Richards House

    Zalmon Richards House

    Zalmon Richards House was a home of Zalmon Richards, founder of the National Education Association. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Brattleboro Retreat

    Brattleboro Retreat

    The Brattleboro Retreat is a private, not-for-profit mental health and addictions hospital that provides comprehensive inpatient, outpatient, partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient services for children, adolescents and adults. Located just north of downtown Brattleboro, Vermont, the Retreat is situated on more than 1,000 acres (4.0 km) of land along the Retreat Meadows inlet of the West River. Founded in 1834, the Retreat was "the first facility for the care of the mentally ill in Vermont, and one of the first ten private psychiatric hospitals in the United States." It is considered a pioneer in the field of mental health care in the United States. The Retreat is a member of the Ivy League Hospitals. The Brattleboro Retreat was founded in 1834 as the Vermont Asylum for the Insane through a $10,000 bequest left by Anna Hunt Marsh for the establishment of a hospital that would exist independently and in perpetuity for the welfare of the mentally ill. The institution was renamed as the Brattleboro Retreat in the late 19th century in order to eliminate confusion with the state-run Vermont State Asylum for the Insane. Taking its inspiration from the York Retreat in England,
    6.67
    3 votes
    111
    Fort Sewall

    Fort Sewall

    Fort Sewall is a historic fort on Fort Sewall Promontory in Marblehead, Massachusetts. The fort was founded in 1644 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. The fort: ...was first established in 1644 as a defensive breastwork on Gale's Head, one of this area's rocky headlands. The fort was enlarged in 1742 for defense against the French, and further construction including a magazine and barracks occurred in 1794 and, again, at the time of the Civil War. A company mustered at the fort during the War of 1812, and in 1814 the fort was named in honor of Judge Samuel Sewall, a town benefactor during and after the Revolution, who later became a Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court. The fort was deeded by the US government to the town of Marblehead in 1890. Fort Sewall is now operated as a public park.
    6.67
    3 votes
    112
    Mount Philo State Park

    Mount Philo State Park

    Mount Philo State Park is a state park located in Charlotte, Vermont. The 168-acre (0.68 km) park protects the area around Mount Philo (968 feet high) and provides views of Lake Champlain and the Adirondack Mountains to the west. The Green Mountains (including Camel's Hump in the winter) can be seen to the east and south. It is accessed by trail or steep narrow car road (seasonal). From the late 19th century to 1924, Mt. Philo was a popular destination for guests of the Mt. Philo Inn. It was accessed by carriage road and had a wooden observation tower at its summit. The State Park was established in 1924 when Francies Humphreys of Brookline, Massachusetts, owner of the adjacent Mt. Philo Inn, donated the land to the State of Vermont for recreational use. This land would become Vermont's first State Park. In 1929 the carriage road was improved and a summit picnic area was created. From 1935-1937, C.C.C. (Civilian Conservation Corps) crews further enhanced the road and picnic area and built a ranger cabin and camping sites. From September to November, Mt. Philo is an excellent viewpoint for migrating raptors. Three main types can be viewed: 1) falcons such as the Kestrel or Merlin,
    6.67
    3 votes
    113
    Folger Coffee Company Building

    Folger Coffee Company Building

    The Folgers Coffee Company Building is a mid-rise office building on the National Register of Historic Places located in downtown San Francisco. On August 2, 2011, The Folger Building was purchased by the University of San Francisco, marking a return to the university’s downtown roots.
    7.50
    2 votes
    114
    Franklin Pierce Homestead

    Franklin Pierce Homestead

    The Franklin Pierce Homestead was the childhood home of the fourteenth President of the United States, Franklin Pierce. Located in Hillsborough, New Hampshire, the home was built in 1804 by Pierce's father, Benjamin Pierce. The home is one of Franklin Pierce's probable places of birth, the other now lying beneath the nearby impoundment of Franklin Pierce Lake. Pierce lived at the homestead until 1834 when he married, with the exception of a seven-year span spent away for school, college, and law study. The home remained in the Pierce family until 1925, when it was procured by the state of New Hampshire. Notables such as Daniel Webster have stayed there. Today, it is operated by the Hillsborough Historical Society and has been designated a state park. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1961. It is located on the east side of Washington Road (New Hampshire Route 31), about 100 yards north of its intersection with (New Hampshire Route 9), in the Lower Village area of Hillsborough.
    7.50
    2 votes
    115
    Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

    Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

    The Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, administered by the National Park Service, is located at 1411 W St., SE in Anacostia, a neighborhood east of the Anacostia River in Southeast Washington, D.C.. Established in 1988 as a National Historic Site, the site preserves the home and estate of Frederick Douglass, one of the most prominent African Americans of the 19th century. Douglass lived in this house, which he named Cedar Hill, from 1877 until his death in 1895. Perched high on a hilltop, the site also offers a sweeping view of the U.S. Capitol and the Washington D.C. skyline. The Frederick Douglass National Historic Site is located about a ten-minute walk from the Anacostia Metro station, though walking from the station is often discouraged by National Mall information workers and tourist guide books, who recommend taking a taxi. The site of the Frederick Douglass home was originally purchased by John Van Hook c. 1855. Van Hook built the main portion of the present house soon after taking possession of the property. For a portion of 1877 the house was owned by the Freedom Savings and Trust Company. Later that year Douglass purchased it and eventually expanded its 14 rooms
    7.50
    2 votes
    116
    Man Enters the Cosmos

    Man Enters the Cosmos

    Man Enters the Cosmos is a cast bronze sculpture by Henry Moore located on the Lake Michigan lakefront outside the Adler Planetarium in the Museum Campus area of downtown Chicago in Cook County, Illinois, United States. The planetarium, which is both a National Historic Landmark and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is located in the Near South Side community area of Chicago. Moore's sculpture is a functional bowstring equatorial sundial created in 1980 measuring approximately 13 feet (4.0 m). The sundial was formerly located slightly further south at the steps of the main entry plaza to the Planetarium, but it now sits directly on the lakefront. The work is a later copy of a composition first created in the 1960s for the offices of The Times newspaper at Printing House Square in London, and according to the Henry Moore Foundation is titled Sundial 1965-66 . The sundial has two plaques on its base. The one on the left is a commemorative one discussing the benefactor and purpose of the sculpture. The benefactor of the sculpture was the B.F. Ferguson Monument fund, which has commissioned several works of art throughout Chicago. Many of the Ferguson fund's
    7.50
    2 votes
    117
    Old Corner Bookstore

    Old Corner Bookstore

    The Old Corner Bookstore is a historic building in the center of Boston, Massachusetts. It is located at the corner of Washington and School Streets, along the Freedom Trail of revolutionary and early American historic sites. The site was formerly the home of Anne Hutchinson, who was expelled from Massachusetts in 1638 for heresy. Thomas Crease purchased the home in 1708, though it burned down in the Great Boston Fire on October 2, 1711. Crease constructed a new building on the site in 1712 as a residence and apothecary shop. For generations, various pharmacists used the site for the same purpose: the first floor was for commercial use and the upper floors were residential. In 1817, Dr. Samuel Clarke, father of future minister James Freeman Clarke, bought the building. The building's first use as a bookstore dates to 1828, when Timothy Harrington Carter leased the space from a man named George Brimmer. Carter spent $7,000 renovating the building's commercial space, including the addition of projecting, small-paned windows on the ground floor. From 1832 to 1865, it was home to Ticknor and Fields, a publishing company founded by William Ticknor, later renamed when he partnered with
    7.50
    2 votes
    118
    Waybury Inn

    Waybury Inn

    The Waybury Inn is an inn located in Middlebury, Vermont, United States in the Green Mountains region. The inn was built in 1810 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The inn maintains a tradition in which, in room 9, there is an antique desk with a secret drawer. Following the lead of a couple who found the drawer in 1987, guests often put notes in the drawer. The Waybury Inn was also used as a location for exterior shots on the Bob Newhart television series, Newhart, from 1982 to 1990. Featured as the Stratford Inn, the Waybury Inn was painted white for the show. After the show went off the air in 1990, the inn was repainted green to match the nearby Green Mountains.
    7.50
    2 votes
    119
    Baldwin House

    Baldwin House

    The Baldwin House, also known as the Loammi Baldwin Mansion, is a fine Colonial American mansion located at 2 Alfred Street in Woburn, Massachusetts. On October 7, 1971, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. It is currently a restaurant called Sichuan Garden and is in a state of disrepair. There was debate about using the property as a restaurant but ultimately the plans were approved as being sufficiently respectful of the historical nature of the site. The historic 1790 House was across the Middlesex Canal. The original Baldwin House was built in 1661 by Henry Baldwin, one of Woburn's first settlers. In 1803 his great-grandson, noted engineer Col. Loammi Baldwin, greatly enlarged the house to its current form. (This younger Baldwin, known as the Father of American Civil Engineering, created the Middlesex Canal, and lent his name to the Baldwin apple, discovered nearby.) At that time its grounds were 212 acres (0.86 km) in extent. On the south, between the house and the canal, was formerly a beautiful garden, with walks and trees, superior to anything in the region. All traces have long since disappeared under suburban sprawl. All told, six generations of
    5.50
    4 votes
    120
    Francis Scott Key Bridge

    Francis Scott Key Bridge

    The Francis Scott Key Bridge, more commonly known as the Key Bridge, is a six-lane reinforced concrete arch bridge conveying U.S. Route 29 traffic across the Potomac River between the Rosslyn neighborhood of Arlington County, Virginia and the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Completed in 1923, it is Washington's oldest surviving bridge across the Potomac River. The Classical Revival bridge was designed by architect Nathan C. Wyeth and engineer Max C. Tyler. It was built by the United States Army Corps of Engineers between 1917 and 1923, and was named after Francis Scott Key, author of The Star Spangled Banner. The northern terminus of the bridge is just east of the site of Key's Georgetown home, which was dismantled in the late 1940s; near that site, there is now a community park honoring Key. The Key Bridge replaced the Aqueduct Bridge. The Aqueduct Bridge was originally built to carry the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal across the Potomac to connect with the Alexandria Canal. After the Alexandria Canal was abandoned, the bridge was converted into a roadway. The Washington abutment still survives and is located west of the Key Bridge. One pier remains and is located in the
    5.50
    4 votes
    121
    Lincoln Memorial

    Lincoln Memorial

    The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon, the sculptor of the primary statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French, and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. It is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address and his Second Inaugural Address. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, delivered on August 28, 1963 during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Like other monuments on the National Mall – including the nearby Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, and National World War II Memorial – the memorial is administered by the National Park Service under its National Mall and Memorial Parks group. It has been listed on the
    5.50
    4 votes
    122
    Pilgrim Hall Museum

    Pilgrim Hall Museum

    The Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts is the oldest public museum in the United States in continuous operation, having opened in 1824. The Pilgrim Society, established in 1820, runs the museum. The museum tells the story of the Pilgrims and Plymouth Colony. Architect Alexander Parris designed the museum building, which opened in 1824. ‎Russell Warren constructed a wooden portico in 1834. The top part of Plymouth Rock sat in front of the building from the 1830s to 1880s until it was reunited with the bottom half in the Plymouth waterfront. The museum was extensively upgraded in the 1880s. In 2008, an addition was added to the museum along with a new sign, activities, and advertising throughout the downtown area. The Pilgrim Hall Museum contains artifact collections, artwork, a library and archives. Prominent pieces include original Pilgrim era artifacts, such as the original Brewster Chair and a 1651 portrait of Edward Winslow, the only known Pilgrim portrait. The museum owns the 1626 shipwreck of the Sparrow Hawk, the only known remains of a trans-Atlantic 17th century ship, but the ship is currently (2009) displayed at the Cape Cod Maritime Museum.
    5.50
    4 votes
    123
    Chesterwood

    Chesterwood

    Chesterwood was the summer estate and studio of American sculptor Daniel Chester French (1850–1931) in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. The estate covers 122 acres (0.5 km) of forest and field in the Berkshires, with French's summer home, studio, and garden dating from the 1920s. His studio and barn contain sculptural studies for a number of his works, most notably: The estate is located at 4 Williamsville Road in Stockbridge. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965 and is now a house museum of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, open for tours during the warmer months.
    6.33
    3 votes
    124
    Elihu Benjamin Washburne House

    Elihu Benjamin Washburne House

    The Elihu Benjamin Washburne House is a Greek Revival house in the city of Galena, Illinois, USA. Constructed in 1844–45, the building was built for and owned by Elihu B. Washburne a nationally significant politician and Galena resident. The Washburne House was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The Elihu Benjamin Washburne House was constructed in 1844–45 as a 1 ⁄2-story Greek Revival home for important Galena resident Elihu Benjamin Washburne. Washburne was a congressman and served a short stint as U.S. Secretary of State during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. The house's present appearance is the result of a major remodeling and enlarging in 1859. The Elihu B. Washburne House represents a good example of late Greek Revival architecture. The house was built in the style of Greek temples and features a 2-story porch with four fluted Doric columns. The Elihu B. Washburne House is administered by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency and is open to the public for tours. The Washburne House is a declared Illinois State Historic Site. The house is open for guided tours of the first floor and two second-floor bedrooms. Tours emphasize Elihu
    6.33
    3 votes
    125
    Goffstown High School

    Goffstown High School

    Goffstown High School, located in Goffstown, New Hampshire, USA, serves the towns of Goffstown, New Boston and Dunbarton. Goffstown High School had 1,232 students enrolled as of January 2, 2012. The high school was formerly located at 12 Reed Street in the center of Goffstown. The structure, built in 1925, became the Upper Elementary School when the new high school was built. Following the construction of Mountain View Middle School, the former high school building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was converted into senior housing, and is now known as The Meetinghouse at Goffstown. The present high school was built in 1963 to the designs of Alexander John Majeski. The school's principal is Francis J. McBride. The assistant principal is Kimberly McCann. The Dean of Students is Todd Lavallee. The Special Education Facilitator is Linda Hatchett. The Director of Athletics is Steve Fountain. Goffstown High School has many extracurricular groups, ranging from the National Honor Society to a Gay and Lesbian club. Other clubs include: Goffstown High School competes in NHIAA Division 2. The following sports are offered at GHS:
    6.33
    3 votes
    126
    Halcyon House

    Halcyon House

    Halcyon House is a Federal-style home in Washington, D.C. Located in the heart of Georgetown, the house was built beginning in 1787 by the first Secretary of the Navy, Benjamin Stoddert. Its gardens were designed by Pierre L'Enfant, and for several decades in the early 19th century Halcyon House was the center of much of Washington's social life. After the death of his wife and his finances declining, Stoddert transferred ownership of Halcyon House in 1802 to his daughter, Elizabeth Ewell, and her husband, Thomas. Thomas and Elizabeth's sixth child, Richard S. Ewell, was born in the house in 1817, and he went on to become a noted Confederate general during the American Civil War under Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. The Ewells vacated the home in 1818. A succession of owners had possession of the house over the next 80 years. Halcyon House was sold in 1900 to Albert Clemens, a nephew of Mark Twain. The original structure was heavily altered over the next 38 years as Clemens renovated the house and added structures. Clemens believed that perpetually rebuilding the house would extend his life. The coach house was joined to the building, the north face and rear of the house added
    6.33
    3 votes
    127
    Jethro Coffin House

    Jethro Coffin House

    Jethro Coffin House, also known as the Oldest House, is a saltbox house built in 1686 and located on Sunset Hill Road in Nantucket, Massachusetts, is the oldest house on Nantucket in its original location and is the only surviving structure from the island's 17th Century English settlement. It is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Because of the brick design on its chimney, it is also called the Horseshoe House. The house was built in 1686 as a wedding gift for Jethro Coffin and his bride, Mary Gardner (granddaughter of Thomas Gardner). Jethro Coffin was a grandson of Tristram Coffin, one of the island's original proprietors. It was abandoned by a later owner during the Civil War. The Nantucket Historical Association (NHA) acquired the property in 1923. The house was struck by lightning in 1987 and nearly cut in half, but was carefully restored by the NHA. It was declared a National Historic Landmark and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1968. It is located on Sunset Hill Road, in Sunset Hill, Nantucket.
    6.33
    3 votes
    128
    Justin Smith Morrill Homestead

    Justin Smith Morrill Homestead

    Justin Smith Morrill Homestead is the historic Carpenter Gothic home of United States Senator Justin Smith Morrill in Strafford, Vermont, and was one of the first declared National Historic Landmarks, in 1960. It is located on the east side of Morrill Highway, south of the village green of Strafford. The Justin Smith Morrill Homestead is a Vermont State Historic Site administered by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation, a state agency.
    6.33
    3 votes
    129
    Ohio City

    Ohio City

    Ohio City is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Cleveland, Ohio. It is located immediately west of the Cuyahoga River. The City of Ohio became an independent municipality on March 3, 1836, splitting from Brooklyn Township. The city grew from a population of 2,400 people in the early 1830s to over 4,000 in 1850. The municipality was annexed by Cleveland on June 5, 1854. James A. Garfield, who became the 20th president of the United States, frequently preached at Franklin Circle Christian Church in 1857. Franklin Circle Christian Church is located at the intersection of Franklin Avenue and Fulton Road. The modern focal point of Ohio City is the historic West Side Market, built in 1912. The European-styled market, located at the intersection of Lorain Avenue and West 25th Street, draws an estimated one million visitors annually. Founded in 1886, Saint Ignatius High School is located in Ohio City just blocks from the West Side Market. Located at 1911 W. 30th Street, the school provides young men with a college preparatory education in the Jesuit tradition, encouraging service to the surrounding community. It has a reputation for academic excellence, as well as nationally recognized
    6.33
    3 votes
    130
    Old Naval Observatory

    Old Naval Observatory

    Old Naval Observatory is an historic site in Northwest, Washington, D.C.. The observatory operated from 1844 to 1893 when it was closed in favor of a new U.S. Naval Observatory facility on Massachusetts Avenue. The building and grounds were retained by the U.S. Navy, which first used it to house the Naval Museum of Hygiene from 1894 to 1902. Beginning in 1903, the Naval Medical Hospital was constructed on the grounds, and it remained in use until 1942, when hospital operations were transferred to the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965. The Washington meridian passed through the Observatory. Today, the facility houses the Navy's Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The grounds and observatory are closed to the public. The entire Navy Hill is being transferred to the United States Department of State due to Base Realignment and Closure, and the Navy will be moving out. The Central Intelligence Agency's forerunner, the Office of Strategic Services was a tenant on the Hill during World War II, and the United States Public Health Service had a hospital there.
    6.33
    3 votes
    131
    Shelburne Farms

    Shelburne Farms

    Shelburne Farms is a nonprofit education center for sustainability, 1,400 acres (570 ha) working farm, and National Historic Landmark on the shores of Lake Champlain in Shelburne, Vermont. Shelburne Farms was created in 1886 by Dr. William Seward Webb and Eliza Vanderbilt Webb as a model agricultural estate. They commissioned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted to guide the layout of 3,800 acres (1,500 ha) of farm, field and forest, and New York architect Robert Henderson Robertson, to design the buildings. Shelburne Farms was incorporated as a nonprofit educational organization in 1972. Nearly 400 acres (160 ha) of sustainably managed woodlands received Green Certification from the Forest Stewardship Council in 1998. The Shelburne Farms grass-based dairy supports a herd of 125 purebred, registered Brown Swiss cows. Their milk is made into an award-winning farmhouse cheddar cheese. The farm serves as an educational resource by practicing rural land use that is environmentally, economically and culturally sustainable. Visitors may enjoy the walking trails, children’s farmyard, inn, restaurant, property tours and special events.
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    Socialist labor party hall

    Socialist labor party hall

    The Socialist Labor Party Hall at 46 Granite Street, Barre, Vermont was constructed in 1900. It was the leading place were debates took place among anarchists, socialists, and union leaders over the future direction of the labor movement in United States in the early 20th century. Located in the former Italian section of Barre, the Socialist Labor Party Hall is a two story flat-roofed brick structure with a gambrel-roofed single story rear hall. It is associated with Barre's rich ethnic heritage, specifically the vital Italian community that immigrated to Barre at the end of the 19th century. The direct association of this property with the labor movement, community, and the immigration of Italians makes it one of Barre's most important buildings. Its design reflects no particular architectural style, but its form does illustrate the building's function as an assembly hall. The exterior is simply ornamented with Barre granite details. The most important of these is a carved medallion depicting an arm bearing a hammer, the symbol of the Socialist Labor Party, and the initials SLP. The building was constructed in 1900 by volunteers of the Italian community as a meeting hall for the
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Temple Beth El

    Temple Beth El

    Temple Beth El, also known as Temple Beth-El, is a Reform synagogue currently located in Bloomfield Township, Michigan. Beth El was founded in 1850 in the city of Detroit, and is the oldest Jewish congregation in Michigan. In 1982, its two former buildings in Detroit, at 3424 and 8801 Woodward Avenue, were listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1850, Sarah and Isaac Cozens arrived in Detroit and moved into a house near the corner of Congress and St. Antoine street. At the time, there were only 60 Jews in Detroit (out of a population of over 21,000) and no synagogues. Sarah urged her co-religionists to establish a congregation, and on September 22, 1850, twelve Jewish families came together at the Cozens's home to found the "Bet El Society" (a Michigan Historical Marker now commemorates this site). The congregation engaged the services of Rabbi Samuel Marcus of New York. Rabbi Marcus conducted services in the Orthodox mode, first in the Cozens's home and later in a room above a store on Jefferson Avenue. In 1851, the congregation was legally incorporated, and the next year, the first Constitution was adopted. In 1854, Rabbi Marcus died of cholera, and Rabbi Leibman
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Atherton Bridge

    Atherton Bridge

    Atherton Bridge is a historic iron truss bridge on Bolton Road in Lancaster, Massachusetts, spanning the South Branch of the Nashua River. It is a rare example of a hybrid pony truss that is similar to the 19th century truss design of Simeon S. Post. It was built by J.H. Cofrode & Co. of Philadelphia in 1870. It was the first iron bridge to be constructed in the town. It was closed to vehicular traffic in 1975 and replaced by a modern highway bridge in the 1980s. The bridge was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. The Atherton Bridge has iron compression posts that incline inward towards the center of the span and diagonal tension rods that incline outward towards the abutments. Unusual features include double end posts with adjustable turnbuckles, channeled castings to join the lower chord bars, and patented "Phoenix" columns for all inclined posts. This bridge does not make use of Simeon Post's patented joints. The floor beams support a wood plank deck. The bridge is 72 feet long and 18½ feet wide, and is composed of eight panels. It rests on granite abutments. The bridge was photographed in 1979 by Jet Lowe of the Historic American Engineering Record, and
    8.00
    1 votes
    135
    Conservatory of Flowers

    Conservatory of Flowers

    The Conservatory of Flowers is a greenhouse and botanical garden that houses a collection of rare and exotic plants in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California. With construction completed in 1878, it remains the oldest building in the park, and the oldest municipal wooden conservatory remaining in the United States. It is also one of the first municipal conservatories constructed in the country. For these distinctions and for its associated historical, architectural, and engineering merits, the Conservatory of Flowers is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the California Register of Historical Places, is a California Historical Landmark, and a San Francisco Designated Landmark. The Conservatory of Flowers is an elaborate Victorian greenhouse with a central dome rising nearly 60 feet (18 m) high and arch-shaped wings extending from it for an overall length of 240 feet (73 m). It sits atop a gentle slope overlooking Conservatory Valley. The structural members are articulated through one predominant form, a four-centered or Tudor arch. The Conservatory of Flowers consists of a wood structural skeleton with glass walls set on a raised masonry foundation. The entire
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    Gold Brook Covered Bridge

    Gold Brook Covered Bridge

    Gold Brook Covered Bridge, also known as Stowe Hollow Bridge or Emily's Bridge, is a small wooden covered bridge in the town of Stowe, Lamoille County, Vermont, running Covered Bridge Road over Gold Brook. Built in 1844, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. Several stories explain the name "Emily's Bridge." In one, Emily was to have met her lover (of whom her parents did not approve) at the bridge so they could elope. Emily waited at the bridge, but her guy never showed up. Brokenhearted, she hanged herself from a rafter. Another says Emily, on her way to her wedding, was run down by a runaway team of horses (or her horse threw her and she plunged to the rocks below the bridge). Or, homely Emily was pregnant by her boyfriend, who hanged himself on the bridge when her father demanded marriage. After the birth of twins, Emily did the same. One woman said she made up the story to keep her children from crossing the bridge. Regardless which story is to be believed, there are various accounts of first-hand experiences with Emily's ghost, said to be quite threatening (many people refuse to cross the bridge alone or at night); there are just as many debunks of
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    John B. Angier House

    John B. Angier House

    John B. Angier House is a historic house at 129 High Street in Medford, Massachusetts. The house was built in 1842 by Alexander Jackson Davis in a Gothic Revival style. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    John Paul Jones House

    John Paul Jones House

    The John Paul Jones House was the home of Captain Gregory Purcell and his wife in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The house was built in 1758 by the master housewright Hopestill Cheswell, a successful African-American builder in the city. Purcell lived there until his death in 1776. Afterward, his widow took in boarders. The American naval hero John Paul Jones rented a room at the widow Purcell's during 1781-1782, while supervising construction of the ship America. This is the only surviving building in the United States known to have been associated with John Paul Jones. The house is located at Middle and State Streets. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1972.
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Mount Feake Cemetery

    Mount Feake Cemetery

    Mount Feake Cemetery is a historic cemetery at 203 Prospect Street in Waltham, Massachusetts. The cemetery was founded in 1857 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Pasadena Playhouse

    Pasadena Playhouse

    The Pasadena Playhouse is an historic performing arts venue located 39 S El Molino Avenue in Pasadena, California. The 686-seat auditorium produces a variety of cultural and artistic events, professional shows, and community engagements each year. Beginning around 1912, the period known as the Little Theatre Movement developed in cities and towns across the United States. The artistic community that founded the Pasadena Playhouse was started in 1916 when actor-director Gilmor Brown began producing a series of plays at a renovated burlesque theatre with his troupe "The Gilmore Brown Players". Brown established the Community Playhouse Association of Pasadena in 1917 that would later become the Pasadena Playhouse Association, which necessitated a new venue for productions. The community theatre organization quickly grew and in May 1924, the citizens of Pasadena raised funds to build a new theatre in the city center at 39 South El Molino Avenue. Completed in 1925, the theater was designed in a Spanish Colonial Revival style by Pasadena artist and architect Elmer Grey. Its non-professional, community beginnings and the tremendous amount of local support for the project led George
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Rundlet-May House

    Rundlet-May House

    The Rundlet-May House in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USA, was built in 1807 by James Rundlet, who acquired his wealth in the textile trade. Rundlet imported his wallpapers from England and purchased his furniture from local cabinetmakers, whose work was noted for its fine craftsmanship and striking use of veneer. Rundlet also saw to it that his house was equipped with the latest technologies. The kitchen boasts both a Rumford roaster and a Rumford range, as well as a set kettle and an elaborate venting system that services a smoke room on the third floor. There is an early coal-fired central heating system and an indoor well. The house is now operated as a museum by Historic New England and contains many of its original furnishings, as well as some pieces added by later generations. The formal gardens, orchard, and attached outbuildings (including two privies) remain as first used by Rundlet.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Shrine Church of St. Stanislaus

    Shrine Church of St. Stanislaus

    St. Stanislaus Church was established in 1873 by immigrants from Poland. They established a church and school for the growing Pol-Am (or Polish-American) Community of Cleveland. The Alliance of Poles on Broadway Avenue was allied with the St. Stanislaus Parish Community. As St. Stanislaus Church grew they decided to build a new church. The church, built in 1886, is a historic building, located at 3649 East 65th Street in the historic Slavic Village neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio. It has been operated by the Order of Friars Minor since its founding. It is in European Gothic style with flying buttresses. At the time of construction, it cost the parish $250,000 to build the church. In 1894, Cleveland's Polish-American community established Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish on Lansing Avenue, leading to a schism between Polish Catholics in Cleveland. A tornado on April 21, 1909 destroyed the twin spires at the front of the church. They were rebuilt within the year. On June 22, 1976, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Saint Stanislaus original height was 232-feet, but currently is 122-feet. In 1962, St. Stanislaus built a new parish social center and gym complex
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    William Cullen Bryant Homestead

    William Cullen Bryant Homestead

    The William Cullen Bryant Homestead 155 acres (0.63 km) is the boyhood home and later summer residence of William Cullen Bryant (1794–1878), one of America's foremost poets and newspaper editors. It is located at 205 Bryant Road in Cummington, Massachusetts, currently operated by the non-profit Trustees of Reservations, and open to the public on weekends in summer and early fall. An admission fee is charged. The Homestead was originally built in 1785. It was purchased by Bryant's grandfather, Ebenezer Snell, in 1789. The Homestead is set on a hillside above the Westfield River valley with views of the Hampshire Hills. Bryant bought back the family home in 1865 and renovated it extensively after it had been out of the family for about 30 years. The house is filled with Bryant's furnishings and mementoes. The site includes a stand of old-growth forest, a grove of 150-foot (46 m) pine trees, and nearly 200-year-old sugar maple trees. The Homestead was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1962.
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    John B. Gough House

    John B. Gough House

    John B. Gough House is a National Historic Landmark at 215 Main Street in Boylston, Massachusetts. The Gough house was built in 1848 in an Italianate style. It was added to the National Historic Register in 1974. It was the home of temperance orator John B. Gough.
    5.25
    4 votes
    145
    Bartonsville Covered Bridge

    Bartonsville Covered Bridge

    The Bartonsville Covered Bridge was a wooden covered bridge in the village of Bartonsville, in Rockingham, Vermont, United States. Built in 1870 by Sanford Granger, the bridge was a lattice truss style with a 151 foot span across the Williams River. In 2011, it was destroyed in flooding caused by Hurricane Irene, but it is expected to be rebuilt. The bridge was built after the great flood of 1869 that changed the course of the river replacing another covered bridge about 1/4 mile up the road where the river used to flow. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was located on Lower Bartonsville Road, a paved road a short distance north from Vermont Route 103. Nearby, to the east, is the Worrall Covered Bridge, also built by Granger. In the 1960s, a Town of Rockingham gravel truck fell through the bridge cutting off cars from Lower Bartonsville Village from the direct link to Vermont Route 103 until the floor was replaced. In the early 1980s extensive renovations were conducted on the bridge, including replacing the abutment on the north side of the bridge, reinforcing the original stone abutments on the south side of the bridge, and replacing the roof
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Bedell Covered Bridge

    Bedell Covered Bridge

    The Bedell Bridge was a Burr truss covered bridge that spanned the Connecticut River between Newbury, Vermont and Haverhill, New Hampshire. Until its most recent destruction in 1979, it was the second longest covered bridge in the United States. So far, there have been five bridges on this site. The first was built in 1805 and heavily damaged in 1823. Quickly rebuilt that year, it was washed away in 1841. A third bridge was carried away by a spring flood in 1862. The fourth bridge was destroyed in a storm on July 4, 1866. The final bridge, so far, was built that same year. It was in service for over a hundred years until it was closed to traffic in 1968. It was scheduled for demolition in 1973 due to heavy damage that year. A Save the Bedell Bridge Committee raised $250,000 to rebuild the bridge, which was completed by 1978 with the associated Bedell Bridge State Park. The bridge was rededicated on July 22, 1979 only to be blown away again by a windstorm on September 14, 1979. The state park, as well as the abutments and a pier in the river, are all that remains.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Christian Heurich Mansion

    Christian Heurich Mansion

    Heurich House, also known as the Brewmaster's Castle, is a Gilded Age mansion in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington D.C. The house was built in 1892-94 by German immigrant and American beer baron Christian Heurich. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The first two floors of the house are preserved intact, and include all of the original furnishings and architectural detail. Landmarks preservation regulations protect the exterior, but not the Eastlake interior of the house. In 1955, Heurich's widow deeded the house to the Historical Society of Washington, D.C.. In 2003 the Historical Society moved out of the house, deeding it to the Heurich House Foundation.
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Embassy Gulf Service Station

    Embassy Gulf Service Station

    The Embassy Gulf Service Station is a service station in Washington, D.C., located on P Street near Dupont Circle and at the entrance to the Georgetown neighborhood. Constructed in 1937, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. The station was designed in 1936 for the Gulf Oil Corporation, and was the product of company architect P. L. R. Hogner. The building and its setting were part of an aesthetic directive on the part of the company, in which it was decided to create buildings that looked less like gas stations and more like banks and libraries; consequently, the designs incorporated details, materials, and massing which were more commonly associated with such buildings. By the time the Embassy Gulf Service Station was constructed, Gulf Oil owned sixty other stations within the city of Washington, and the new structure was part of the company's corporate expansion in the city. The siting proved somewhat difficult, however; as the building was to be built adjacent to Rock Creek Park, its design had to meet the approval of the Commission of Fine Arts; it was also the subject of a review by the National Park Service and the National Capital Park and
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    General Federation of Women's Clubs Headquarters

    General Federation of Women's Clubs Headquarters

    General Federation of Women's Clubs Headquarters, also known as Miles Mansion, is a social clubhouse headquarters in Washington, D.C.. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1991. Tours of the headquarters provide information about the activities of the General Federation of Women's Clubs (GFWC) and several historic rooms, including the 1734 entryway, the Julia Ward Howe Drawing Room, the dining room, music room and the GFWC International President’s office. The headquarters also features changing exhibits of art, photographs and artifacts from its collections. Tours must be arranged in advance.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    George D. Birkhoff House

    George D. Birkhoff House

    The George D. Birkhoff House is a historic house located at 22 Craigie Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is a National Historic Landmark. The house is notable for its associations with former resident Dr. George David Birkhoff, an eminent mathematician and Harvard University professor. Among other things, Birkhoff solved Poincaré's last geometric theorem. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Hancock Cemetery

    Hancock Cemetery

    Hancock Cemetery is a historic cemetery on Hancock Street in Quincy Square in Quincy, Massachusetts, United States. It is named after Reverend John Hancock (1702–1744), father of Founding Father John Hancock. The cemetery was founded in 1640 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. It was the resting place of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams before they were moved to the United First Parish Church.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    John Sullivan House

    John Sullivan House

    John Sullivan House was the Durham, New Hampshire home of American Revolutionary War General John Sullivan, who later became President (the position now called Governor) of New Hampshire. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1972.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Oscar W. Underwood House

    Oscar W. Underwood House

    The Oscar W. Underwood House, also known as the Art Department Building, George Washington University or the Washington College of Law, is a historic building located at 2000 G Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C. in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood. It is nationally significant both for its association with Oscar Underwood, and also as the home of the Washington College of Law, the first coeducational law school in Washington, D.C. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Temple Beth-El

    Temple Beth-El

    The church building at 8801 Woodward Avenue (Woodward at Gladstone) in Detroit, Michigan is a historic building. It was built in 1921 as Temple Beth-El. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. In 1921 Detroit's Temple Beth El, under Rabbi Leo M. Franklin's leadership, had outgrown its previous building at Woodward and Eliot. In addition, many members of the congregation had moved to areas such as Boston-Edison and Atkinson Avenue that did not proscribe Jewish residents. The congregation obtained a parcel of land near these neighborhoods at Woodward and Gladstone and engaged congregant Albert Kahn to design a new temple. The cornerstone for the new building was laid on September 20, 1921, with the dedication on November 10–12, 1922. The Kahn-designed temple is a classical, flat-roofed structure built from limestone. On the facade facing Woodward, eight ionic columns form an enormous porch and frame three large pairs of doors. Along the facade facing Gladstone, eight tall, narrow are framed by massive piers. In early 1974, the Beth El congregation moved again, this time to Bloomfield Hills, and the building was sold to the Lighthouse Tabernacle, becoming
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Walsh Stable

    Walsh Stable

    The Walsh Stable is a historic building located at 1523 22nd Street, NW in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. It was designed by architect Lemuel Norris in 1903 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Elmore State Park

    Elmore State Park

    The Elmore State Park is a state park located in Elmore, Vermont. The history of the park began in 1934, when the town of Elmore and several of its residents gave the state of Vermont a gift of 30 acres. This occurred during the Great Depression, and the state set the Civilian Conservation Corps to work transforming the gift of land into a park. Originally, the park consisted of only a beach and picnic shelter. Since that time, however, the park's area has grown to 755 acres (3.1 km), and the park is staffed by the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. The Elmore State Park, located along New England Interstate Route 12, now features a campground (added in 1963). The beach is arguably the largest draw, being popular with locals and visitors alike. On April 29, 2002, the Elmore State Park was placed on the National Register of Historic Places due to its creation by the CCC. It has easy access to hiking trails on Elmore Mountain. The state park is relatively close to the Stowe Recreation Path, the Trapp Family Lodge, and the Ben and Jerry's Waterbury, Vermont base of operations.
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    King's Chapel

    King's Chapel

    King's Chapel is "an independent Christian unitarian congregation affiliated with the Unitarian Universalist Association that is "unitarian Christian in theology, Anglican in worship, and congregational in governance." It is housed in what was formerly called "Stone Chapel", an 18th century structure at the corner of Tremont Street and School Street in Boston, Massachusetts. King's Chapel was founded by Royal Governor Sir Edmund Andros in 1686 as the first Anglican Church in New England during the reign of King James II. The original King's Chapel was a wooden church built in 1688 at the corner of Tremont and School Streets, where the church stands today. It was situated on the public burying ground because no resident would sell land for a non-Puritan church. In 1749, construction began on the current stone structure, which was designed by Peter Harrison and completed in 1754. The stone church was built around the wooden church. When the stone church was complete, the wooden church was disassembled and removed through the windows of the new church. The wood was then shipped to Lunenburg, Nova Scotia where it was used to construct St. John's Anglican Church. That church was
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    Robert Simpson Woodward House

    Robert Simpson Woodward House

    The Robert Simpson Woodward House is a former residence located at 1513 16th Street, NW in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. From 1904 until 1914, it was a home of geologist Robert Simpson Woodward, the first president of the Carnegie Institution. The building currently serves as the Capital Research Center headquarters. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    The Breakers

    The Breakers

    The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, United States on the Atlantic Ocean. It is a National Historic Landmark, a contributing property to the Bellevue Avenue Historic District, and is owned and operated by the Preservation Society of Newport County. The Breakers was built as the Newport summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, a member of the wealthy United States Vanderbilt family. It is built in a style often described as Goût Rothschild. Designed by renowned architect Richard Morris Hunt and with interior decoration by Jules Allard and Sons and Ogden Codman, Jr., the 70-room mansion has approximately 65,000 sq ft (6,000 m) of living space. The home was constructed between 1893 and 1895 at a cost of more than $12 million (approximately $335 million in today's dollars adjusted for inflation). The Ochre Point Avenue entrance is marked by sculpted iron gates and the 30-foot (9.1 m) high walkway gates are part of a 12-foot-high limestone and iron fence that borders the property on all but the ocean side. The 250 ft × 120 ft (76 m × 37 m) dimensions of the five-story mansion are aligned symmetrically around a central Great Hall. Part
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Mechanics Hall, Worcester

    Mechanics Hall, Worcester

    Mechanics Hall is a Concert Hall in Worcester, Massachusetts. It was built in 1857 in the Renaissance Revival style and restored in 1977. Built as part of the early nineteenth-century worker's improvement movement, it is now a concert and performing arts venue ranked as one of the top four concert halls in North America and in the top twelve between Europe and America. It also houses a recording studio. Workers in Worcester formed the Mechanics Association in 1842 to help members develop the knowledge and skills to manufacture and run machinery in the mills. In 1857 they built Mechanics Hall to house educational and cultural activities. Mechanics Hall featured a large concert hall on the third floor. Its acoustics enabled audiences to hear speakers' voices and music distinctly without benefit of the as-yet-not-invented electronic amplifier. A pipe organ was subsequently installed in 1864. Featuring meeting rooms, a library, and two halls, the building became a hub of activity, drawing speakers from Charles Dickens to Susan B. Anthony. The superb acoustics of Mechanics Hall would attract orchestras, bands, and renowned performers from Enrico Caruso to Ella Fitzgerald, Yo Yo Ma to
    5.67
    3 votes
    161
    Naumkeag

    Naumkeag

    Naumkeag is a 44 room, shingle-style country house located at 5 Prospect Hill Road, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, USA in the Berkshires. It is now operated by The Trustees of Reservations as a nonprofit museum. Naumkeag was designed by noted architect Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White in 1885 as the summer estate for Joseph Hodges Choate (1832–1917), a prominent New York City attorney and American ambassador to England from 1899 to 1905, and then his daughter, Mabel Choate. The house is built in the Shingle Style with a wood-shingled exterior featuring brick and stone towers, prominent gables and large porch, and interiors with fine woodwork. It contains the Choate family's furniture, Chinese porcelain, and artwork collected from America, Europe, and the Far East. The house sits within 8 acres (32,000 m²) of terraced gardens (including The Rose Garden, The Afternoon Garden, and The Chinese Garden) and landscaped grounds surrounded by 40 acres (162,000 m²) of woodland, meadow, and pasture. Its grounds were first designed in the late 1880s by Nathan Barrett, then replanned and expanded between 1926 and 1956 by the noted landscape designer Fletcher Steele. Barrett's original designs
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    Canterbury Shaker Village

    Canterbury Shaker Village

    Canterbury Shaker Village, is a historic site and museum in Canterbury, New Hampshire. It was one of a number of Shaker communities founded in the 19th century. It is one of the most intact and authentic surviving Shaker community sites, and was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1993. The site is operated by a non-profit organization established in 1969 to preserve the heritage of the Canterbury Shakers. Canterbury Shaker Village is an internationally-known, non-profit museum and historic site with 25 original Shaker buildings, four reconstructed Shaker buildings and 694 acres (2.81 km) of forests, fields, gardens and mill ponds under permanent conservation easement. Canterbury Shaker Village "is dedicated to preserving the 200-year legacy of the Canterbury Shakers and to providing a place for learning, reflection and renewal of the human spirit." Visitors learn about the life, ideals, values and legacy of the Canterbury Shakers through tours, programs, exhibits, research and publications. Village staff, largely volunteer, conduct tours and its restaurant serves traditional Shaker lunches and dinners spring, summer and fall. The Canterbury site was one of two communities
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Edgar Allan Poe Cottage

    Edgar Allan Poe Cottage

    The Edgar Allan Poe Cottage (or Poe Cottage) is the former home of American writer Edgar Allan Poe. It is located on Kingsbridge Road and the Grand Concourse in the The Bronx, New York, a short distance from its original location, and is now in the northern part of Poe Park. The cottage is a part of the Historic House Trust, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, has been administered by the Bronx County Historical Society since 1975, and is believed to have been built in 1797. The Poe family—which included Edgar, his wife Virginia Clemm, and her mother Maria—moved in around May 1846 after living for a short time in Turtle Bay, Manhattan. At the time, Fordham was rural and was only recently connected to the city by rail. The cottage, which then on Kingsbridge Road to the east of its intersection with Valentine Avenue, was small and simple: it had on its first floor a sitting room and kitchen and its unheated second floor had a bedroom and Poe's study. On the front porch the family kept caged songbirds. The home sat on 2 acres (8,100 m) of land and Poe paid either $5 rent per month or $100 per year. Its owner, John Valentine, had bought it from a man named Richard Corsa
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Mount Washington Hotel

    Mount Washington Hotel

    The Mount Washington Hotel is a hotel near Mount Washington, in the town of Carroll, New Hampshire. The area is better known as Bretton Woods, and includes the Bretton Woods ski resort nearby. It is located at the northern end of Crawford Notch, 6 miles (10 km) east of the village of Twin Mountain, New Hampshire, along U.S. Route 302. It is owned by the Orlando, Florida-based CNL Financial Group via its CNL Lifestyle Properties Group and is operated by Omni Hotels & Resorts under the official name of Omni Mount Washington Resort. The hotel was constructed at a cost of 1.7 million dollars ($44.6 million in 2012 dollars) by Joseph Stickney, a native of Waltham, Massachusetts who had made a fortune before the age of 30 as a Pennsylvania-based coal broker. In 1881 Stickney and a partner had purchased the Mount Pleasant Hotel nearby from lumberman John T.G. Leavitt, a large early hotel that was later demolished. Subsequently, Stickney began work on his Mount Washington Hotel. He brought in 250 Italian artisans to build it, particularly the granite and stucco masonry. Construction started in 1900 on the Y-shaped hotel, which opened July 28, 1902. At the opening ceremony, Stickney told
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Rockingham Meeting House

    Rockingham Meeting House

    The Rockingham Meeting House, also known as Old North Meeting House and First Church in Rockingham, is a historic building in Rockingham, Vermont, United States. The Meeting House was built between 1787 and 1801 and was originally used for both Congregational church meetings as well as civic and governmental meetings. Church services ceased in 1839 but town meetings continued to be held in it until 1869. After being unused for many years, it was restored by the town in 1907, and a Meeting House Association was formed in 1911 through the efforts of Professor Franklin Hooper, director of the Museum of the Brooklyn Institute. Hooper was the great-great-grandson of one of the original members of the First Church of Rockingham at its organization in 1773.. The church is available today for weddings and other events under rules established by the town. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 2000. It is located on Old North Meeting House Road, or Meeting House Road, in Rockingham.
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Salmon P. Chase Birthplace

    Salmon P. Chase Birthplace

    Salmon P. Chase Birthplace was the birthplace and childhood home of Salmon P. Chase. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975. It is located about 8 miles north of Claremont on New Hampshire Route 12A.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    South Station Headhouse

    South Station Headhouse

    South Station Headhouse is an historic building at Atlantic Avenue and Summer Street in Boston, Massachusetts. The building was constructed in 1899 by Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge with the Norcross Brothers as engineering and construction consultants. It was added to the National Historic Register in 1975.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Washington Monument

    Washington Monument

    The Washington Monument is an obelisk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate the first US president, General George Washington. The monument, made of marble, granite, and bluestone gneiss, is both the world's tallest stone structure and the world's tallest obelisk, standing 555 feet 5+⁄8 inches (169.294 m). Taller monumental columns exist, but they are neither all stone nor true obelisks. Construction of the monument began in 1848, but was halted from 1854 to 1877, and finally completed in 1884. The hiatus in construction happened because of co-option by the Know Nothing party, a lack of funds, and the intervention of the American Civil War. A difference in shading of the marble, visible approximately 150 feet (46 m) or 27% up, shows where construction was halted. Its original design was by Robert Mills, an architect of the 1840s, but his design was modified significantly when construction resumed. The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1848; the capstone was set on December 6, 1884, and the completed monument was dedicated on February 21, 1885. It officially opened October 9, 1888. Upon completion, it became the world's tallest structure, a title previously
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Brown Covered Bridge

    Brown Covered Bridge

    The Brown Covered Bridge is a wooden covered bridge in Shrewsbury, Vermont. Built in 1880 by Nichols Powers, famed Vermont Bridgewright, also builder of Blenheim Bridge, recently lost to flooding in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene. Clarendon was the hometown of Mr. Powers and it is thought the Brown was perhaps the last bridge built in a forty five year bridgewrighting career. The bridge is a Town Lattice type truss, with a 100-foot (30 m) span across the Cold River, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places It is located on the Upper Cold River Road, a seasonal dirt road a few miles from U.S. Route 7 near Rutland, Vermont.
    7.00
    1 votes
    170
    Crane and Company Old Stone Mill Rag Room

    Crane and Company Old Stone Mill Rag Room

    The Crane and Company Old Stone Mill Rag Room is a National Historic Landmark in Dalton, Massachusetts, United States. Located off Main Street, the factory was built in 1844 by Zenas Crane and is "the oldest paper manufactory...in continuous operation at one site." The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. Since 1879, the Crane Paper Company has had the exclusive government contract to manufacture the paper used in the currency of the United States.
    7.00
    1 votes
    171
    Daniel Webster Memorial

    Daniel Webster Memorial

    The Daniel Webster Memorial is a monument in Washington, D.C. honoring U.S. statesman Daniel Webster. It is located near Webster's former home at 1603 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, beside Scott Circle at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Rhode Island Avenue. The statue of Webster was given to the United States government by Stilson Hutchins, founder of the Washington Post and a fellow native of New Hampshire. An Act of Congress on July 1, 1898 authorized its erection on public grounds and appropriated $4,000 for a pedestal. The memorial was dedicated on January 19, 1900. On October 12, 2007, the Daniel Webster Memorial was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Daniel Webster Memorial consists of a 12-foot (3.7 m) bronze statue of Webster on an 18-foot (5.5 m) granite pedestal in a sober classical style. The statue was sculpted by Gaetano Trentanove. On the east and west sides of the pedestal are bronze bas-relief panels illustrating events in Webster's life: the Webster–Hayne debate; the dedication of the Bunker Hill Monument. The inscription reads: G. Trentanove F. Galli Fuseri, Firenze 1898 Italia (Front of base:) DANIEL WEBSTER LIBERTY AND
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Fort Miley Military Reservation

    Fort Miley Military Reservation

    The Fort Miley Military Reservation, in San Francisco, California sits on Point Lobos (not to be confused with Point Lobos near Carmel-by-the-Sea), one of the outer headlands on the southern side of the Golden Gate. Much of the site is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, while the grounds which were converted into a Veterans Hospital are administered by the Veterans Health Administration of the VA. In 1885, United States Secretary of War William C. Endicott, heading the Board of Fortifications, issued a report necessitating the coastal defense of San Francisco Bay. By September 1890, Colonel George Mendel, the army engineer officer in charge of defense construction in the San Francisco region, had selected for fortification a 73-acre (29.5 ha) tract of land near Point Lobos which belonged to the City of San Francisco and since 1868 had been the Golden Gate Cemetery. After much intrigue and various maneuverings, the Federal government secured in 1891 condemnation of 54 acres (21.85 ha) for $75,000. It was still some years before the army did anything with its new Point Lobos Military Reservation. The Spanish-American War of 1898 provided the needed stimulus and that
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    General John Glover House

    General John Glover House

    General John Glover House is a National Historic Landmark at 11 Glover Street in Marblehead, Massachusetts. The house was built in 1762 as the home of General John Glover. The house was added to the National Historic Register in 1972.
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac

    Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac

    Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac is located on Columbia Island in Washington, D.C. The memorial honors the 36th President of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson. The grove consists of two parts. The first area, commemorative in nature, is a Texas granite monolith surrounded by a serpentine pattern of walks and trails. The second area is a grass meadow and provides a tranquil refuge for reflection and rejuvenation of the spirit. The trails are shaded by a grove of hundreds of white pine and dogwood trees, and framed by azaleas and rhododendron. The memorial overlooks the Potomac River vista of the Capital. Visitors may listen to a recording made by Lady Bird Johnson at the entrance to the park facing The Pentagon. In the recording, the former First Lady talks about the creation of the park, the trees, and the views of major Washington D.C. landmarks. The park also contains the Navy-Merchant Marine Memorial, dedicated to the sailors and Merchant Mariners who died in the First World War. The national memorial was authorized by Congress on December 28, 1973, and administratively listed on the National Register of Historic Places the same day. The memorial was
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Margaret Fuller House

    Margaret Fuller House

    The Margaret Fuller House was the birthplace and childhood home of American transcendentalist Margaret Fuller (1810–1850). It is located at 71 Cherry Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is now a National Historic Landmark. The three-story, wooden, Federal style house was built in the early 19th century, and was Fuller's home from birth until age 16. In 1902 it became the Margaret Fuller House of Cambridge, a settlement house providing information and services to help immigrants assimilate into American culture. It is now known as the Margaret Fuller Neighborhood House. Fuller's parents, Timothy Fuller and Margaret Crane Fuller, were married in 1809. A few months after the wedding, they bought the three-story, Federal-style house on Cherry Street for the high price of $6,000. The couple's daughter Sarah Margaret Fuller was born in this home on May 23, 1810. Today, the Margaret Fuller House is being used to service the public in the community of Area 4 in Cambridge. It provides a free computer lab, computer classes, a food pantry, after-school services for children, meeting room space for various activities for the public and a daytime summer camp for children. A fundraiser is held
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Memorial Continental Hall

    Memorial Continental Hall

    Memorial Continental Hall is owned & operated by the Daughters of the American Revolution. It also serves as the organization's National Society headquarters. Memorial Continental Hall is located alongside DAR Constitution Hall, connected by a third building that houses the DAR Museum. It was also the host of the Washington Naval Conference. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1972.
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Wentworth-Gardner and Tobias Lear Houses

    Wentworth-Gardner and Tobias Lear Houses

    Wentworth-Gardner and Tobias Lear Houses is a site or historic district in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. The Wentworth-Gardner House is separately listed and is also a National Historic Landmark.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Beginning Point of the U.S. Public Land Survey

    Beginning Point of the U.S. Public Land Survey

    The Beginning Point of the U.S. Public Land Survey is a monument at the border between the U.S. states of Ohio and Pennsylvania, on the north side of the Ohio River. It is near the three-way intersection of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and the northern tip of West Virginia, in both the Pittsburgh metropolitan area and the East Liverpool micropolitan area. It is significant as being the point from which the Public Land Survey System was performed, starting in 1785, which would open what was then the Northwest Territory for settlement. The survey was "the first mathematically designed system and nationally conducted cadastral survey in any modern country" and is "an object of study by public officials of foreign countries as a basis for land reform." It was conducted in the late 18th century by Geographer of the U.S. Thomas Hutchins surveying the Seven Ranges. Built in 1881, it was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965. The area that is landmarked includes a part of Ohio and a part of Pennsylvania. A plaque at the site states that the true starting point was 1,112 feet further south. The commemorative site is located about 2 miles east of the center of East Liverpool on Ohio State
    5.33
    3 votes
    179
    Elliott Coues House

    Elliott Coues House

    Elliott Coues House was a home of Elliott Coues, a leading 19th century ornithologist. It is located at 1726 N Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C., in the Dupont Circle neighborhood. Coues led great expansions of the knowledge of North American bird life, helped found the American Ornithologists' Union in 1883, edited approximately 15 volumes of journals, memoirs, and diaries by famous Western explorers and fur traders. He lived in this house from 1887 until his death in 1899. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975.
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    San Francisco Mint

    San Francisco Mint

    The San Francisco Mint is a branch of the United States Mint, and was opened in 1854 to serve the gold mines of the California Gold Rush. It quickly outgrew its first building and moved into a new one in 1874. This building, the Old United States Mint, also known affectionately as The Granite Lady, is one of the few that survived the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake. It served until 1937, when the present facility was opened. Within the first year of its operation, the San Francisco mint turned $4 million in gold bullion into coins. The second building, completed in 1874, was designed by Alfred B. Mullett in a conservative Greek Revival style with a sober Doric order. The building had a central pedimented portico flanked by projecting wings in an E-shape; it was built round a completely enclosed central courtyard that contained a well—the features that saved it during the fire of 1906, when the heat melted the plate glass windows and exploded sandstone and granite blocks with which it was faced. The building sat on a concrete and granite foundation, designed to thwart tunneling into its vaults, which at the time of the 1906 fire held $300 million, fully a third of the United
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Asa Gray House

    Asa Gray House

    The Asa Gray House is a historic house located at 88 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is a National Historic Landmark. The house was designed in 1810 by architect Ithiel Town in the Federal style for the first head of the Harvard Botanic Garden, and has been the residence of ornithologist Thomas Nuttall and botanist Asa Gray. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Lotta's Fountain

    Lotta's Fountain

    Lotta's fountain is an historical fountain, located at the intersection of Market Street, where Geary and Kearny Streets connect in downtown San Francisco, California. It was dedicated on September 9, 1875. The cast iron fountain served as a meeting point, during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire aftermath, and a metal panel on the side of the fountain indicates this. Another panel also mentions legendary opera soprano Luisa Tetrazzini, who sang for people at the fountain on Christmas Eve, 1910. The plaque was installed in 1911. The cast pillar was donated to San Francisco by the entertainer Lotta Crabtree, in 1916. Commemorations of the earthquake, including a dwindling pool of survivors, are held every year at 5:12 a.m. on April 18 at the intersection. It was relocated in 1974. In 1999, the fountain, which had suffered neglect in the past decades, was totally refurbished to its 1875 appearance. It is painted with a metallic gold-brown paint. The lion's head-motif fountain stations located on the sides of the column flow during daytime hours.
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Mary Ann Shadd Cary House

    Mary Ann Shadd Cary House

    The Mary Ann Shadd Cary House is a historic residence located at 1421 W Street, Northwest in Washington, D.C. From 1881 to 1885, it was the home of Mary Ann Shadd Cary, a writer and abolitionist who was one of the first African American female journalists in North America, and who became one of the first black female lawyers after the American Civil War. The house was declared a National Historic Landmark on December 8, 1976 and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It also is a contributing property to the Greater U Street Historic District.
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Newton D. Baker House

    Newton D. Baker House

    Newton D. Baker House, also known as Jacqueline Kennedy House, is a house built in 1794 in Washington, D.C.. It was home of Newton D. Baker, who was Secretary of War, during 1916-1920, while "he presided over America's mass mobilization of men and material in World War I. After the assassination of president John F. Kennedy in 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy purchased the house and lived here for about a year. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976. The house has many architectural details including "a wide limestone stairway", "pink-painted lintels with keystones", "brick voussoirs", "Doric pilasters", and a "semi-elliptical fanlight".
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Ponakin Bridge

    Ponakin Bridge

    Ponakin Bridge is a historic bridge in Lancaster, Massachusetts. The bridge was built in 1871 and added to the National Historic Register in 1979.
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    San Francisco Ferry Building

    San Francisco Ferry Building

    The San Francisco Ferry Building is a terminal for ferries that travel across the San Francisco Bay, a marketplace, and also has offices, located on The Embarcadero in San Francisco, California. On top of the building is a 245-foot tall clock tower, with four clock dials, each 22 feet in diameter, which can be seen from Market Street, a main thoroughfare of the city. Designed by the New York architect A. Page Brown in the Beaux Arts style in 1892, the ferry building was completed in 1898. At its opening, it was the largest project undertaken in the city up to that time. Brown designed the clock tower after the 12th-century Giralda bell tower in Seville, Spain, and the entire length of the building on both frontages is based on an arched arcade. With decreased use after bridges were constructed across the bay to carry railroad traffic, in the 1950s, the building was adapted for office use and its public spaces were broken up in an unsympathetic manner. In 2002, a restoration and renovation were undertaken to redevelop the entire complex. The 660-foot long Great Nave was restored, together with its height and materials. A marketplace was created for the ground floor, the former
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Tudor Place

    Tudor Place

    Tudor Place is a mansion in Washington, D.C. that was originally the home of Thomas Peter and his wife, Martha Parke Custis Peter, the step-granddaughter of George Washington, who left her the $8,000 in his will that was used to purchase the property in 1805. The property, comprising one city block on the crest of Georgetown Heights, had an excellent view of the Potomac River. From George Washington's 1799 will, Martha Parke Custis Peter, Martha Washington's granddaughter and Washington's step-granddaughter, received $8,000 (equivalent to $130,000 in present day terms). Her husband, Thomas Peter, used her $8,000 inheritance to purchase the property that would become Tudor Place in 1805. They contracted with Dr. William Thornton, who also designed the United States Capitol as well as The Octagon House, to design Tudor Place. The decorations included four chair-cushions embroidered by Martha Washington in 1801 and described as "executed upon coarse canvas in a design of shells, done in brown and yellow wools, the highlights being flecked in gold-colored silk" and included a decorative cover for a bed whose trimmings also were embroidered by Martha Washington. A previous owner of the
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Wadsworth Atheneum

    Wadsworth Atheneum

    The Wadsworth Atheneum is the oldest public art museum in the United States, with significant holdings of French and American Impressionist paintings, Hudson River School landscapes, modernist masterpieces and contemporary works, as well as extensive holdings in early American furniture and decorative arts. It is located at 600 Main Street in a distinctive castle-like building in downtown Hartford, Connecticut, the state's capital. It easily accessible from I-91 and I-84, as well as by train. With 196,000 square feet (18,200 m), the museum is the largest art museum in the state of Connecticut. Susan Lubowsky Talbott became museum director on May 1, 2008. She stated that one of her top goals would be to attract visitors "who would never have otherwise thought of coming here". She previously had been director of Smithsonian Arts at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. for three years, where she was responsible for budgeting and planning for the nine arts institutions within the Smithsonian. Before that, she was director and CEO of the Des Moines Art Center from 1998 to 2005, where she was given credit for doubling attendance in her first two years. She led that museum into
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Beaver Mills

    Beaver Mills

    Beaver Mills is a complex of mills located in Keene, New Hampshire, United States. The mill complex was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1999. The Beaver Mills has housed various manufacturing operations including a saw mill, a grist mill, furniture mills, and a pail manufacturer.
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Derby Summer House

    Derby Summer House

    The Derby Summer House, also known as the McIntire Tea-house, is a summer house designed in 1793 by architect Samuel McIntire, now located on the grounds of the Glen Magna Farms, Danvers, Massachusetts. Since 1958 it has been owned by the Danvers Historical Society. Samuel McIntire designed this ornate Federal style garden house for Elias Hasket Derby's farm in Salem, Massachusetts. The structure is 20 feet square, 2½ stories high, decorated with pilasters, swags, and Grecian urns, and topped with rustic wood statues of a Reaper and Shepherdess (milkmaid). The ground floor is punctuated by central arched openings on the east and west facades, each flanked with arched windows with wooden keystones. The second floor is ornamented with swags and fluted Ionic pilasters at the corners and between windows. A young lady's diary from 1802 records her contemporary impressions: The summer house was moved to its present location in 1901, about 4 miles from its original site, where it now opens onto a walled rose garden designed by Herbert Browne. Neither of the two statues atop the house are originals. The Shepherdess was missing when the house was transported; after 20 years she was found
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Frances Perkins House

    Frances Perkins House

    Frances Perkins House was a home of Frances Perkins, who served as Secretary of Labor for president Franklin Delano Roosevelt. She was the first female U.S. cabinet member. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1991.
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Haas-Lilienthal House

    Haas-Lilienthal House

    The Haas-Lilienthal House at 2007 Franklin Street, San Francisco, California, USA is the city's only intact Victorian era home that is open regularly as a museum, complete with authentic furniture and artifacts. William Haas entrusted Bavarian architect Peter R. Schmidt and contractors McCann & Biddell to build his home in 1886. The house withstood the 1906 Earthquake with only slight damage. However, the home was threatened by the devastating fire, which followed the earthquake and destroyed about 40% of San Francisco. The Haas family watched the fire from the roof of their house, but was soon forced to evacuate by city authorities. So the family, along with most other San Francisco residents, went to the nearest public park, Lafayette Park, to camp out during the emergency. Later, they temporarily moved to a large house in Oakland while the City was reconstructed. The 1928 addition — living quarters over a garage — were built to provide needed space for the additions to the family when Billy and Madeline were brought to the Haas home. The architect of the addition, Gardner Dailey, later in life received recognition for his work on Ranch-style houses in the Bay
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Lawrence Light Guard Armory

    Lawrence Light Guard Armory

    Lawrence Light Guard Armory is a historic armory at 90 High Street in Medford, Massachusetts. It was built in 1900 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park

    Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park

    Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park in Woodstock, Vermont. The park preserves the site where Frederick Billings established a managed forest and a progressive dairy farm. The name honors Billings and the other owners of the property: George Perkins Marsh and Laurence and Mary French Rockefeller. The Rockefellers transferred the property to the federal government in 1992. It is the only unit of the United States National Park System in Vermont (except for the Appalachian Trail). Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park was awarded the first Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification of a United States national park by the Rainforest Alliance's SmartWood program in August 2005. This certification made Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller only the second United States federal land to receive such certification for sustainable forest management. Visitors can take guided tours of the 19th century George Perkins Marsh Boyhood Home, which includes displays of landscape paintings, highlighting the influence painting and photography had on the conservation movement. The gardens have also been restored.
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    National Historic Landmark

    National Historic Landmark

    A National Historic Landmark (NHL) is a building, site, structure, or object that is officially recognized by the United States government for its national-level historical significance. Out of more than 85,000 places on the National Register of Historic Places only about 2,430 are NHLs. A National Historic Landmark District (NHLD) is a historic district that has received similar recognition. The district may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties. Contributing properties may or may not also be separately listed. Prior to 1935, efforts to preserve cultural heritage of national importance were made by piecemeal efforts of the United States Congress. In 1935 Congress passed the Historic Sites Act, which authorized the Interior Secretary authority to formally record and organize historic properties, and to designate properties as having "national historical significance", and gave the National Park Service authority to administer historically significant federally-owned properties Over the following decades surveys such as the Historic American Building Survey amassed information about culturally
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    National Mall

    National Mall

    The National Mall is an open-area national park in downtown Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. The National Park Service (NPS) administers the National Mall, which is part of its National Mall and Memorial Parks unit. The term National Mall commonly includes areas that are officially part of West Potomac Park and Constitution Gardens to the west, and often is taken to refer to the entire area between the Lincoln Memorial and the United States Capitol, with the Washington Monument providing a division slightly west of the center. The National Mall receives approximately 24 million visitors each year. In his 1791 plan for the future city of Washington, D.C., Pierre (Peter) Charles L'Enfant envisioned a garden-lined “grand avenue” approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) in length and 400 feet (120 m) wide, in an area that would lie between the Capitol building and an equestrian statue of George Washington to be placed directly south of the White House (see L'Enfant Plan). The National Mall occupies the site of this planned "grand avenue", which was never constructed. The Washington Monument stands near the planned site of its namesake's equestrian statue. Mathew Carey's 1802
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Luther Place Memorial Church

    Luther Place Memorial Church

    Luther Place Memorial Church (Washington, D.C.) is a neo-Gothic church built in Washington, DC in 1873 as a memorial to peace and reconciliation following the American Civil War. Its original name was Memorial Evangelical Lutheran Church and it was designed by architects Judson York, J.C. Harkness, and Henry Davis. It is located in Thomas Circle near its namesake, a statue of Martin Luther. The statue is a replica of one in Worms, Germany, which was given to the church in 1884 by the German emperor William I. Luther Place was built in 1873 by architects Judson York, J.C. Harkness, and Henry Davis. The church, like many others, resembles the shape of a ship, symbolizing a vessel for God's work, and it is well known for its stained glass windows picturing twelve reformers: Gustavus Adolphus, John Huss, John Wycliffe, Philipp Melanchthon, Martin Luther, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Harriet Tubman, John Knox, John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, and John Wesley. The church's exterior is covered with red sandstone from the Seneca Quarry, the same quarry that provided the stone for the Smithsonian Castle. In 1904, Luther Place suffered damage from a fire, leading to
    4.67
    3 votes
    198
    American Federation of Labor Building

    American Federation of Labor Building

    The American Federation of Labor Building is a seven-story brick and limestone building located in Washington, D.C. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974. It housed the American Federation of Labor for 40 years. The National Park Service, in 1974, described it: The American Federation of Labor Building is being incorporated within a larger design for a new Washington Marriott Marquis hotel to serve the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, located across the street.
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (former headquarters), located in Washington D.C., also known as Peter Parker House, is a site significant for its association with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The organization was established by Andrew Carnegie. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974.
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Emma Willard House

    Emma Willard House

    The Emma Willard House was a home of Emma Willard, an influential pioneer in the development of women's education in the United States. It was known as the Middlebury Female Seminary when Emma Willard established a school for girls at her home in 1814. The Middlebury Female Seminary was a precursor to the Emma Willard School, an all girl, private boarding and university preparatory day school in Troy, New York. It now houses the Middlebury College Admissions Office. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965. It is located at 131 South Main Street (Vermont Route 30) in Middlebury, on the Middlebury College campus.
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Freer Gallery of Art

    Freer Gallery of Art

    The Freer Gallery of Art joins the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery to form the Smithsonian Institution's national museums of Asian art. The Freer contains art from East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Islamic world, the ancient Near East, and ancient Egypt, as well as a significant collection of American art. It is located on the south side of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., adjacent to the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. The Freer houses over 25,000 objects spanning 6,000 years of history, including but not limited to ancient Egyptian stone sculpture and wooden objects, ancient Near Eastern ceramics and metalware, Chinese paintings and ceramics, Korean pottery and porcelain, Japanese folding screens, Persian manuscripts, and Buddhist sculpture. Collections span from the Neolithic to modern eras. Over 11,000 objects from the Freer|Sackler collections are now fully searchable and available online. The Freer was featured in the Google Art Project, which gives online viewers close-up views of the gallery—in particular, the world-famous Peacock Room by American artist James McNeill Whistler--along with several artworks, including Whistler's The Princess from the Land of
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Maria Baldwin House

    Maria Baldwin House

    The Maria Baldwin House is a National Historic Landmark located at 196 Prospect Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. It is a private home, and not open to the public. The house is the northern half of a 19th-century two-family house, notable for its associations with educator Maria Louise Baldwin (1856–1922). It was her home when she served as the first female African-American principal in a Massachusetts school at Cambridge's Agassiz Grammar School (from 1916 onwards). As master, she supervised 12 teachers, all white, who presided over a 98% white student body. The Agassiz School has since been renamed the Maria Baldwin School in her honor. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Matthew Thornton House

    Matthew Thornton House

    Matthew Thornton House was the home of Matthew Thornton, a signer of the U.S. Declaration of Independence. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1971. It is located at 2 Thornton Street, at the intersection with North Main Street, in Derry, New Hampshire.
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Nantucket Historic District

    Nantucket Historic District

    Nantucket Historic District, comprising all of Nantucket Island in Nantucket, Massachusetts was designated as a National Historic Landmark on December 13, 1966. It is the largest conventional historic district in the U.S., and the largest National Historic Landmark District in the contiguous U.S..
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Sawtooth National Recreation Area

    Sawtooth National Recreation Area

    The Sawtooth National Recreation Area (SNRA) is a National Recreation Area located in central Idaho, within the Boise, Challis, and Sawtooth National Forests. The recreation area was established in 1972, is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, and includes the Sawtooth Wilderness. Activities within the roughly 778,000-acre (3,150 km) recreation area include hiking, backpacking, White water rafting, camping, rock climbing, kayaking, mountain biking, fishing, and hunting. The SNRA headquarters are about seven miles (11 km) north of Ketchum on Highway 75, and the SNRA also has a ranger station in Stanley, near its northern boundary. Much of the SNRA was heavily glaciated, especially in the Sawtooth Mountains where remnants of these glaciers exist as glacial lakes, moraines, hanging valleys, cirques, and arêtes. The Sawtooth Fault stretches 40 mi (64 km) long, and runs through the Sawtooth Valley, while the two past large earthquakes likely took place on the fault around 7,000 and 4,000 years b.p. Idaho's most famous mountain range, the Sawtooth Mountains are located within the SNRA, along with the White Cloud, Boulder, and Smoky mountains. The highest point in the SNRA is Castle Peak
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Ticonderoga

    Ticonderoga

    The steamboat Ticonderoga is America's last remaining side-paddle-wheel passenger steamer with a vertical beam engine of the type that provided freight and passenger service on America's lakes and rivers from the early 19th to the mid-20th centuries. Commissioned by the Champlain Transportation Company, Ticonderoga was built in 1906 at the Shelburne Shipyard in Shelburne, Vermont on Lake Champlain. Ticonderoga measures 220 feet in length and 59 feet in beam, with a displacement of 892 tons. Her steam-powered engine, handmade by the Fletcher Engine Company of Hoboken, New Jersey, was powered by two coal-fired boilers and could achieve a maximum speed of 17 miles per hour (27 km/h). The ship's crew numbered twenty-eight, including the captain, pilots, mate, deckhands, engineers, and firemen to operate the boat. The purser, stewardess, freight clerk, bartender, hall boys, cook, waiters, scullion, and mess boys attended to passengers and freight arrangements. Initially, Ticonderoga served a north-south route on Lake Champlain. Daily, she docked at Westport, New York, where she met the New York City evening train. The next morning she carried travelers and freight northward to St.
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts

    Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts

    The Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts is the only building actually built by Le Corbusier in the United States, and one of only two in the Americas (the other is the Curutchet House in La Plata, Argentina). Le Corbusier designed it with the collaboration of Chilean architect Guillermo Jullian de la Fuente at his 35 rue de Sèvres studio; the on-site preparation of the construction plans was handled by the office of Josep Lluís Sert, then dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He had formerly worked in Le Corbusier's atelier and had been instrumental in winning him the commission. The building was completed in 1962. During the mid-1950s, the idea of creating a place for the visual arts at Harvard began to take shape. A new department dedicated to the visual arts was created, and the need for a building to house the new department arose. A budget was set for $1.3 million, and the proposal was included in a Harvard fundraising program. The project immediately elicited a response from St. Vrain Carpenter, an alumnus who supplied $1.5 million for the proposed design center. The donation propelled the project forward, and the
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Dumbarton Bridge

    Dumbarton Bridge

    The Dumbarton Bridge, also known as the Q Street Bridge and the Buffalo Bridge, is a historic masonry arch bridge in Washington, D.C. Designed by architect Glenn Brown, It was built in 1914-15 to convey Q Street Northwest across Rock Creek Park between the city's Dupont Circle and Georgetown neighborhoods. The bridge is famed for its four buffalo sculptures by Alexander Phimister Proctor. The bridge is curved because the section of Q Street NW in Dupont Circle is slightly north of the section in Georgetown. To accommodate the bridge’s approach on the Georgetown side, the Dumbarton House was moved a few blocks westward, from its original site next to Rock Creek to its present position on the north side of the 2700 block of Q Street. The Dumbarton Bridge was added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 16, 1973.
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    First Free Will Baptist Church and Vestry

    First Free Will Baptist Church and Vestry

    First Free Will Baptist Church and Vestry (also known as "First Free Will Baptist Church" or "Miss Perkins' High School") is an historic Free Will Baptist Church at 13-15 North Main Street in Ashland, New Hampshire. The church was built in 1834 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Mission San Francisco de Asís

    Mission San Francisco de Asís

    Mission San Francisco de Asís, or Mission Dolores, is the oldest surviving structure in San Francisco and the sixth religious settlement established as part of the California chain of missions. The Mission was founded on June 29, 1776, by Lieutenant José Joaquin Moraga and Father Francisco Palóu (a companion of Father Junipero Serra), both members of the de Anza Expedition, which had been charged with bringing Spanish settlers to Alta (upper) California, and evangelizing the local Natives, the Ohlone. The settlement was named for St. Francis of Assisi, the founder of the Franciscan Order, but was also commonly known as "Mission Dolores" owing to the presence of a nearby creek named Arroyo de Nuestra Señora de los Dolores, meaning "Our Lady of Sorrows Creek." and which runs now under the 16th street of present San Francisco. A member of the Anza Expedition, Friar Font, wrote about the spot chosen for the Mission: We rode about one league to the east [from the Presidio], one to the east-southeast, and one to the southeast, going over hills covered with bushes, and over valleys of good land. We thus came upon two lagoons and several springs of good water, meanwhile encountering much
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Captain Robert Bennet Forbes House

    Captain Robert Bennet Forbes House

    The Captain Robert Bennet Forbes House, also known as the R. B. Forbes House, is a house museum located at 215 Adams Street, Milton, Massachusetts. It is now a National Historic Landmark, and is open several afternoons per week. An admission fee is charged. The house was built in 1833 for their mother by Captain Robert Bennet Forbes, John Murray Forbes, and their sisters. It was designed in an unusual Greek Revival style by Boston architect Isaiah Rogers and is now one of two surviving examples of Rogers' early domestic work, with an interior that retains many original features including an elliptical staircase rising through three stories and much original woodwork. Interior additions (1872) include tiled fireplace surrounds in the High Victorian Gothic style. The house was used by the Forbes family until 1962, and opened as a museum in 1965. Today it is furnished with the family's furniture, art, and American, European, and Old China Trade heirlooms. The museum also contains a large collection of Abraham Lincoln memorabilia collected by Captain Forbes's granddaughter, Mary Bowditch Forbes, together with a replica of Lincoln's birthplace cabin on the grounds.
    4.50
    2 votes
    212
    Folger Shakespeare Library

    Folger Shakespeare Library

    The Folger Shakespeare Library is an independent research library on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in the United States. It has the world's largest collection of the printed works of William Shakespeare, and is a primary repository for rare materials from the early modern period (1500–1750). The library was established by Henry Clay Folger in association with his wife, Emily Jordan Folger. It opened in 1932, two years after his death. The library offers advanced scholarly programs; national outreach to K–12 classroom teachers on Shakespeare education; and plays, music, poetry, exhibits, lectures, and family programs. It also has several publications and is a leader in methods of preserving rare materials. The library is privately endowed and administered by the Trustees of Amherst College. The library building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Standard Oil of New York president, then chairman of the board, Henry Clay Folger, a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Amherst College, was an avid collector of Shakespeareana. Toward the end of World War I, he and his wife Emily Jordan Folger began searching for a location for his Shakespeare library. They chose a location
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Parson Capen House

    Parson Capen House

    The Parson Capen House is a historic house in Topsfield, Massachusetts that was built in the late 17th century. It has drawn attention as an example of early colonial architecture and due to its well preserved condition compared to other houses built at that time. The Capen house was built on a 12-acre (49,000 m) lot in 1683 as the parsonage for the local Congregational Church. It is located at what is now 1 Howlett Street, next to the Topsfield Common. It was first owned by the Reverend Joseph Capen, who had moved to Topsfield from Dorchester. His wife had seen the previous parsonage and was disappointed in by its condition. The family lived there for over forty years. At the time that it was built, it was considered to be the best house in the town. The house was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960. It is one of the best preserved homes from its period in New England. The Topsfield Historical Society currently operates it as a historic house museum. The Capen house is now viewed as a predecessor of the Cape Cod style house, although it is not located near Cape Cod. It was built with English style architecture, and it bears a strong resemblance to many houses in
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    Strivers' Section Historic District

    Strivers' Section Historic District

    The Strivers' Section is a historic district located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Northwest Washington, D.C. Strivers' Section was historically an enclave of upper-middle-class African Americans, often community leaders, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It takes its name from a turn-of-the-20th-century writer who described the district as "the Striver's section, a community of Negro aristocracy." The name echoes that of Strivers' Row in Harlem, a New York City historic neighborhood of black professionals. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Strivers' Section Historic District is roughly bounded by Swann Street on the south, Florida Avenue on the north and west, the 16th Street Historic District on the east, and 19th Street on the west. The area was envisioned as part of the capital city by Pierre Charles L’Enfant's 1791 plan; by 1852, plans were drawn up for 11 squares subdivided by streets. But the rural landscape remained largely uninhabited until the latter half of the century. Development began in the 1870s, encouraged by a north-south streetcar line along nearby 14th Street, and accelerated from about 1890 to 1910. Early residents
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    Suitland Parkway

    Suitland Parkway

    The Suitland Parkway is a parkway in Washington, D.C., and Prince George's County, Maryland, maintained by the U.S. National Park Service. Conceived in 1937, it was built during World War II to provide a road connection between military facilities in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, and opened on December 9, 1944. It connected Camp Springs (now Andrews Air Force Base) in Prince George's County with Bolling Air Force Base and the Pentagon. The Suitland Parkway is 9.35 miles (15.05 km) long. Its eastern terminus is at Pennsylvania Avenue (Maryland Route 4), just outside the Capital Beltway and near Andrews Air Force Base . Its western terminus is at Interstate 295 and the northbound approach to the Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge. The parkway is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is also part of the National Highway System. The eastern half was a two-lane limited-access road, and the western half a four-lane divided limited-access road. In the early 1990s the eastern half was doubled in size to match the western half. The Suitland Parkway begins at an interchange with I-295 and South Capitol Street in Washington, D.C., heading southeast as a four-lane
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    The Fairmont San Francisco

    The Fairmont San Francisco

    The Fairmont San Francisco is a luxury hotel at 950 Mason Street, atop Nob Hill in San Francisco, California. The hotel was named after mining magnate and U.S. Senator James Graham Fair (1831-1894), by his daughters Theresa Fair Oelrichs and Virginia Fair Vanderbilt who built the hotel in his honor. The hotel was the vanguard of the Fairmont Hotels and Resorts chain. The group is now owned by Fairmont Raffles Hotels International, but all the original Fairmont hotels still keep their names. It has been featured in many films, including Petulia and The Rock. Exterior and interior shots of the hotel were used as stand-ins for the fictional St. Gregory Hotel in the 1983 television series, Hotel. The Fairmont San Francisco was added to the National Register of Historic Places (#02000373) on 17 April 2002. The hotel was nearly completed before the San Francisco earthquake of 1906. Although the structure survived, the interior was heavily damaged by fire, and opening was delayed until 1907. Architect and engineer Julia Morgan was hired to repair the building because of her then-innovative use of reinforced concrete, which could produce buildings capable of withstanding earthquakes and
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    Worrall Covered Bridge

    Worrall Covered Bridge

    The Worrall Covered Bridge (also called the Woralls Bridge) is a wooden covered bridge in Rockingham, Vermont, United States. Built in 1868 by Sanford Granger, the bridge is a lattice style with an 87 foot span across the Williams River. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Worrall bridge includes one rare feature — a wooden ramp leading up to the northwest entrance. It is located on Williams Road, a dirt road a short distance north of Vermont Route 103. Nearby, to the west, was the Bartonsville Covered Bridge, also built by Granger.
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    Old Constitution House

    Old Constitution House

    The Old Constitution House located at Windsor in the U.S. state of Vermont is the birthplace of the Vermont Republic and the Constitution of the State of Vermont. A mid-18 century building built in a simple Georgian architectural style, the Old Constitution House was originally called the Windsor Tavern, and belonged to Elijah West at the time of the signing of the constitution. The house is a Vermont State Historic Site, and is administered by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. It is also listed on National Register of Historic Places, separately since March 11, 1971 as well as a part of the Windsor Village Historic District since April 23, 1975. The land presently identified as Vermont had multiple claims upon it in the eighteenth century. British Royal governors from New Hampshire and New York claimed portions of the state, and settlers from Connecticut and Massachusetts had claimed land and begun settlement. The New Hampshire granted communities were called grants. In 1764 New York's royal governor persuaded British King George III to give authority to the New York over the New Hampshire grants. Settlers faced continuing competing claims and demands for tax from
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    Palace of Fine Arts Theatre

    Palace of Fine Arts Theatre

    The Palace of Fine Arts in the Marina District of San Francisco, California, is a monumental structure originally constructed for the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in order to exhibit works of art presented there. One of only a few surviving structures from the Exposition, it is the only one still situated on its original site. It was rebuilt in 1965, and renovation of the lagoon, walkways, and a seismic retrofit were completed in early 2009. It remains a popular attraction for tourists and locals, and is a favorite location for weddings and wedding party photographs for couples throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, and such an icon that a miniature replica of it was built in Disney's California Adventure in Anaheim. The Palace of Fine Arts was one of ten palaces at the heart of the Panama-Pacific Exhibition, which also included the exhibit palaces of Education, Liberal Arts, Manufactures, Varied Industries, Agriculture, Food Products, Transportation, Mines and Metallurgy and the Palace of Machinery. The Palace of Fine Arts was designed by Bernard Maybeck, who took his inspiration from Roman and Greek architecture in designing what was essentially a fictional ruin from another
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    Buckman Tavern

    Buckman Tavern

    Buckman Tavern is a historic American Revolutionary War site associated with the revolution's very first battle, the Battle of Lexington and Concord. It is located on the Battle Green in Lexington, Massachusetts and operated as a museum by the Lexington Historical Society. The Tavern was built about 1690 by Benjamin Muzzey (April 16, 1657 - March 28, 1735), and with license granted in 1693 was the first Public House in Lexington. Muzzey ran it for years, then his son John, and then at the time of the battle it was run by John's granddaughter and her husband John Buckman, a member of the Lexington Training Band. In those years the tavern was a favorite gathering place for militiamen on days when they trained on the Lexington Green. (Lexington, unlike other local communities, did not establish a minuteman company, instead maintaining a "training band" [an old English phrase for a militia company] for local defense). The Battle of Lexington and Concord took form before dawn on April 19, 1775 as, having received word that the regular army had left Boston in force to seize and destroy military supplies in Concord, several dozen militiamen gathered on the town common, and then eventually
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    221
    Carolands

    Carolands

    The Carolands Chateau is a 65,000 square foot (6,000  m²) mansion in Hillsborough, California. Its 75 foot (23 m)-high atrium holds the record as the largest enclosed space in an American private residence. Considered a masterpiece of American Renaissance and Second Empire Beaux-Arts design, the building is a California Historical Landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Harriet Pullman Carolan, born in 1869, was the daughter of George Pullman, the 19th century American industrialist, who became the wealthiest man in Chicago after creating the Pullman Palace railway car. Perhaps because her father was the very inventor of modern "luxury" or "first class" travel, Harriet Pullman came to expect perfection and beauty in her surroundings, and her particular tastes revolved around the French. The mansion originally occupied a 544 acre (2.2 km²) plot of land, situated at the highest local geographical point in order to "look down on the Hearsts and surpass the Crockers." The Chateau exterior was inspired by the 17th century designs of Mansart. The project was executed by San Francisco architect Willis Polk, following plans commissioned by Mrs. Carolan from the
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    Col. James Barrett Farm

    Col. James Barrett Farm

    The Col. James Barrett Farm (Barrett's Farm) is a historic farm at 448 Barrett's Mill Road in Concord, Massachusetts. It was reputed to have a cache of the town of Concord's Militia gunpowder, weapons and two pair of prized bronze cannon, according to secret British intelligence. On the morning of April 19, 1775, the British Regulars were ordered by General Thomas Gage to march from Boston to the town of Concord, about 20 miles inland, and seize the cannon and raid the arsenal at the provincial farm, which led to the Battles of Lexington and Concord that began the American Revolutionary War. The farm was built in 1705 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The farmhouse was in disrepair and is being restored. In March 2009, Congress passed legislation to add Barrett's Farm to Minute Man National Historical Park. Save Our Heritage is the current owner of the house.
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    James C. Flood Mansion

    James C. Flood Mansion

    James C. Flood Mansion, also known as Pacific-Union Club, in San Francisco, California, USA, was a townhouse for James C. Flood, a 19th century silver-baron. It was the first brownstone building built west of the Mississippi River. With The Fairmont Hotel, the only buildings on Nob Hill to structurally survive the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. It was purchased by the Pacific-Union Club after the earthquake. Located at California and Mason Streets, in San Francisco, it was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1966.
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    Kingsley Covered Bridge

    Kingsley Covered Bridge

    The Kingsley Covered Bridge (also called the Mill River Bridge) is a wooden covered bridge in Clarendon, Vermont. Built in 1836 by Timothy K. Horton, the bridge is a town lattice style with a 120-foot (37 m) span across the Mill River. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is located west of Vermont Route 103 and just under the landing strip for the Rutland Airport on East Street Extension off Gorge Road, a paved road that turns to dirt after passing the bridge. It is a single lane bridge and is right next to the Kingsley Grist Mill and Mill Houses, all beautifully restored with informational plaques. The bridge is restricted to handling 3 tons and has an eleven foot ceiling. It is a big tourist attraction with many tours and travelers stopping frequently to snap photos. The bridge is a reminder of the old Vermont and is well taken care of, a true state treasure.
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    Le Petit Trianon

    Le Petit Trianon

    Le Petit Trianon is a mansion on the grounds of De Anza College at 1250 Stevens Creek Blvd., in Cupertino, California. Built in 1892 for Charles A. Baldwin and his wife Ellen Hobart Baldwin, the mansion was once the center of their successful wine-producing estate where the couple was known to entertain lavishly. Baldwin installed a massive stone winery; built underground cellars (today part of the De Anza College grounds) and planted vines from Bordeaux and other regions of France. Under the label Beaulieu, Baldwin's wines were sold in New York, London and Central America. The design for Le Petit Trianon was drawn from classical French architectural motifs popular in America at the end of the 19th century. It is also the only example of "V" rustic redwood construction remaining in the area. The name Le Petite Trianon stems from its similarities to the architecture of "Le Grand Trianon," built for Louis XIV of France. Similar detail to this French precedent can be seen in Le Petit Trianon's columns, pilasters, windows and wood window shutters. In 1909, the mansion was sold to Harriet Pullman Carolon, daughter of George Pullman, inventor of the Pullman sleeping car. Carolon also
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    Massachusetts Historical Society Building

    Massachusetts Historical Society Building

    The Massachusetts Historical Society Building is a National Historic Landmark in Boston, Massachusetts at 1154 Boylston Street and serves as a home to the Massachusetts Historical Society. The building was constructed in 1899 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966.
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    Valley Cemetery

    Valley Cemetery

    The Valley Cemetery (or the Valley Street Cemetery) is a public cemetery located in Manchester, New Hampshire, USA. It is bounded on the east by Pine Street, on the north by Auburn Street, on the west by Willow Street, and on the south by Valley Street, from which it derives its name. It came into existence in 1840, when the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company donated 20 acres (81,000 m) of land in downtown Manchester to the city for the purpose of creating a public burial ground. In 1841, the city created the Valley Street Cemetery. It was designed as a "garden cemetery", meant to be a place where the public could stroll along its walkways, carriage paths and bridges. In this Victorian Era, "garden cemeteries", in which not only the dead resided, but the living communed with each other and with nature, were popular. By the late 1850s, the cemetery was nearly filled, and the much larger Pine Grove Cemetery was created. That cemetery lies to the west of Calef Road and to the east of the Merrimack River. A receiving tomb was built at Valley Cemetery in 1888, used to store the deceased during winter when the ground was frozen. In 1907, Mrs. Hannah Currier donated gates at Auburn and
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    Willard InterContinental Washington

    Willard InterContinental Washington

    The Willard InterContinental Washington is an historic luxury Beaux-Arts hotel located at 1401 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. Among its facilities are numerous luxurious guest rooms, several restaurants, the famed Round Robin Bar, the Peacock Alley series of luxury shops, and voluminous function rooms. It is two blocks east of the White House, and two blocks south of the Metro Center station of the Washington Metro. The first structures to be built at 1401 Pennsylvania Avenue NW were six small houses constructed by Colonel John Tayloe III in 1816. Tayloe leased the six buildings to Joshua Tennison, who named them Tennison's Hotel. The structures served as a hotel for the next three decades, the leaseholder and name changing several times: Williamson's Mansion Hotel, Fullers American House, and the City Hotel. By 1847, the structures were in disrepair and Tayloe's son, Benjamin Ogle Tayloe, was desperate to find a tenant who would maintain the structures and run them profitably. The Willard Hotel was formally founded by Henry Willard when he leased the six buildings in 1847, combined them into a single structure, and enlarged it into a four story-hotel he renamed the
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    Cairo Apartment Building

    Cairo Apartment Building

    The Cairo apartment building, located at 1615 Q Street NW in Washington, D.C., is a landmark in the Dupont Circle neighborhood and the District's tallest residential building. Designed by architect Thomas Franklin Schneider and completed in 1894 as the city's first "residential skyscraper", the 164-foot (50 m)-tall brick building spurred local regulations and federal legislation that continue to shape Washington's cityscape. Today, the Cairo is a condominium building, home to renters and owners of apartments ranging in size from small studios to multi-level two- and three-bedroom units. The Egyptian theme of the building is stamped across its Moorish and Romanesque Revival features. Gargoyles perch high above the front entrance; some are winged griffins staring down from cornices, and others are more lighthearted. Along the first floor are elephant heads, which look left and right from the stone window sills of the front windows and which interlock trunks at the corners of the entrance arch. On the fourth floor are dragon and dwarf crosses. The carved stone façade hints at more exotic Middle Eastern origins. The U-shaped building surrounds a Zen stone garden courtyard. The stone
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    Daniel Webster Family Home

    Daniel Webster Family Home

    Daniel Webster Family Home, also known as The Elms, in West Franklin, New Hampshire, is a property that was owned by the family of Daniel Webster. Webster's father, Ebenezer, bought the property in 1800, while Daniel was a student at Dartmouth College. The property passed in 1806 to Daniel's brother Ezekiel, who died in 1829, at which time Daniel bought it. The Elms served as an "experimental farm" and "vacation retreat" for Webster while he lived in Massachusetts, and the land was a gravesite for his parents, brothers and sisters. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974. It is located on South Main Street, R.F.D. #2, in West Franklin. The property is now part of the Webster Place Recovery Center, a substance abuse program of Easter Seals New Hampshire, which treats those recovering from alcohol and drug addiction.
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    David White House

    David White House

    David White House was a home of geologist David White (1862-1935). It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.
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    Eastern Slope Inn

    Eastern Slope Inn

    Eastern Slope Inn is a historic inn on Main Street in North Conway, New Hampshire. The Colonial Revival building was built in 1926 by H.E. Mason and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.
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    Fallingwater

    Fallingwater

    Fallingwater or Kaufmann Residence is a house designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935 in rural southwestern Pennsylvania, 43 miles (69 km) southeast of Pittsburgh. The home was built partly over a waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, in the Laurel Highlands of the Allegheny Mountains. Hailed by Time shortly after its completion as Wright's "most beautiful job", it is listed among Smithsonian's Life List of 28 places "to visit before you die." It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. In 1991, members of the American Institute of Architects named the house the "best all-time work of American architecture" and in 2007, it was ranked twenty-ninth on the list of America's Favorite Architecture according to the AIA. Almost forgotten at age 70, Frank Lloyd Wright was given the opportunity to re-emerge on the architectural scene with his design and construction of three buildings. His three great works of the late 1930s--Fallingwater, the Johnson Wax Building in Racine, Wisconsin, and the Herbert Jacobs house in Madison, Wisconsin--brought him back to the front of the architectural pack. Edgar Kaufmann Sr.
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    George Washington Memorial Parkway

    George Washington Memorial Parkway

    The George Washington Memorial Parkway, known to local motorists simply as the "GW Parkway", is a parkway maintained by the U.S. National Park Service. It is located mostly in Northern Virginia, although a short section northwest of the Arlington Memorial Bridge passes over Columbia Island, which is within the District of Columbia. It is separated into two sections joined by Washington Street (Virginia State Route 400) in Alexandria, Virginia. A third section, the Clara Barton Parkway, runs on the opposite side of the Potomac River in the District of Columbia and Montgomery County, Maryland. A fourth section was proposed for Fort Washington, Maryland, but never built. The parkway is designated an All-American Road. The hidden state designation for the Parkway is State Route 90005. The northern section extends from North Washington Street at First Street, at the northern end of Old Town Alexandria, to its terminus at Interstate 495, the Capital Beltway, in Fairfax County, just south of the Potomac River. It follows the Potomac River, passing through Arlington County, and serves as the primary access point to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. The parkway also provides
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    Hallidie Building

    Hallidie Building

    The Hallidie Building is an office building in the Financial District of San Francisco, California, at 130 Sutter Street, between Montgomery Street and Kearny Street. It was built around 1917-1918 and, though credited as the first American building to feature glass curtain walls, it was in fact predated by Louis Curtiss' Boley Clothing Company building in Kansas City, Missouri, completed in 1909. The building was designed by architect Willis Polk and is named in honor of San Francisco cable car pioneer Andrew Smith Hallidie. Currently it houses the San Francisco chapters of the American Institute of Architects, AIGA, Center for Architecture + Design, the U.S. Green Building Council - Northern California Chapter, Charles M Salter Associates, Inc, and Coordinated Resources, Inc (CRI). The Hallidie Building was deemed unsafe by the City of San Francisco's Department of Building Inspection in August 2010. The building's balconies and fire escapes are considered unsafe.
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    Hasty Pudding Club

    Hasty Pudding Club

    The Hasty Pudding Club is a social club for Harvard students. It was founded by Horace Binney and Nymphus Hatch, juniors at Harvard College, in 1795. The club is named for the traditional American dish (based on a British dish) that the founding members ate at their first meeting. The Hasty Pudding Club was originally established in Concordia Discors to bring together undergraduates in friendship, conversation, and camaraderie. It is the oldest collegiate social club in America. The Pudding is currently the only club on campus that is coed and has members from all four years. Membership to the social club is gained through a series of lunches, cocktail parties, and other gatherings, which are referred to as the "punch process". In the past, membership in the Pudding was obligatory to joining waiting clubs and, eventually, final clubs. This tradition is no longer upheld. The Pudding holds its social activities in a clubhouse near Harvard Square. These include weekly "Members' Nights", dinner and cocktail parties, as well as its elaborate theme parties, such as "Leather and Lace". The current clubhouse contains multiple rooms with specific purposes. Among these rooms is "The Arena",
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    Hecht Company Warehouse

    Hecht Company Warehouse

    The Hecht Company Warehouse in Washington, D.C. is a Streamline Moderne style building. Designed by engineer Gilbert V. Steel of the New York engineering firm Abbott and Merkt, and prominently located on New York Avenue, it served as the central warehouse for The Hecht Company from its construction in 1937 and expansion in 1948. The building uses glass block extensively, culminating in a twelve-pointed star-shaped cupola at the corner, which is illuminated at night. Black brick interspersed with glass block spells out "The Hecht Co" at the fifth floor. At its opening, the building featured an in-house vehicle repair shop, air conditioning for the basement and first two floors, and three railroad track platforms. A careful rehabilitation was carried out in 1992, using matching materials.
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    Hope Cemetery

    Hope Cemetery

    Hope Cemetery is an historic rural cemetery at 119 Webster Street in Worcester, Massachusetts. It was established in 1854 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. The cemetery occupies 168 acres (68 ha).
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    Josiah Bartlett House

    Josiah Bartlett House

    Josiah Bartlett House is a house in Kingston, New Hampshire. The house was built for Josiah Bartlett around 1774 and was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1971. The house is located on Main Street, opposite Town Hall, in Kingston.
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    LeDroit Park Historic District

    LeDroit Park Historic District

    LeDroit Park Historic District is a historic district in Washington, D.C.. The historic district includes the Mary Church Terrell House, a U.S. National Historic Landmark. The neighborhood was awarded a place on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.
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    MacPheadris-Warner House

    MacPheadris-Warner House

    The Warner House, also known as MacPheadris-Warner House, is one of the finest early-Georgian brick houses in New England. This structure was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960. It is located at 150 Daniel Street at the corner of Chapel Street in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
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    Meridian House

    Meridian House

    Meridian House, at 1630 Crescent Place in Washington, D.C., was built by Ambassador Irwin Boyle Laughlin. He purchased the land in 1912, two years after his friend Henry White bought the adjacent site. After a long career with the US Foreign Service, Laughlin retired in 1919 and built Meridian House, filling it with his collection of 18th century French drawings and Oriental porcelains and screens. Although he later returned to the diplomatic corps, serving as Ambassador to Greece and Spain in the 1920s and 30s, Laughlin also played an active role in Washington’s artistic and historical communities. Ambassador Laughlin was married to Therese Iselin, daughter of New York banker Adrian Iselin. Their daughter, Gertrude, who married Rear Admiral Hubert Winthrop Chanler, lived in Meridian House during her youth and from time to time after her marriage, especially when her husband was away on naval assignments. The house remained in the Laughlin family until 1958. In 1960, a newly created non-profit organization dedicated to promoting international understanding, which later became Meridian International Center, received a grant from the Ford Foundation to purchase Meridian House.
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    North Conway 5 and 10 Cent Store

    North Conway 5 and 10 Cent Store

    North Conway 5 and 10 Cent Store (also known as North Conway 5 cent to $1.00 Store) is a historic general store at 2683 Main Street in North Conway, New Hampshire. It was built in 1900 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2004.
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    Old Salem Church and Cemetery

    Old Salem Church and Cemetery

    Old Salem Church and Cemetery is a historic Lutheran Church and adjacent cemetery located at Catonsville, Baltimore County, Maryland. The main part of the 1849 Gothic Revival church building is a three bay, irregular stone structure approximately 28 feet wide and 42 feet long. It features a gable roof, a short boxy steeple, an entrance porch at the front and an apse at the rear. The interior features a gallery and organ loft has the original tracker organ, which is still hand pumped by a wooden lever on the north side of the case. From early on, the ground to the south of the church was laid out as a cemetery. The church was founded by German Lutheran immigrants. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.
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    Putnam House

    Putnam House

    The General Israel Putnam House in Danvers, Massachusetts is recorded in the National Register of Historic Places. The house is also sometimes known as the Thomas Putnam House after Lt. Thomas Putnam (1615-1686), who built the home circa 1648. His grandson, Israel Putnam, the famous general of the American Revolution, was born in the house. Lt. Thomas Putnam was the father of Sgt. Thomas Putnam Jr., (Israel's half-uncle), a notorious figure in the Salem Witch Trials. The Putnam House is now operated by the Danvers Historical Society and open by appointment. The house was built on 100 acres (40 ha) of farmland owned by Lt. Thomas Putnam, and occupied by the Putnam family for over three centuries. In 1692, Joseph Putnam, the resident of the house at that time, spoke out against the hysteria of the Salem Witch Trials. His son, Major General Israel Putnam, commander of the colonial troops at the Battle of Bunker Hill, was born in the house on January 7, 1718. In 1991 the Putnam family descendants relinquished stewardship of the home to the Danvers Historical Society. The original house has been augmented by repeated additions. Today, it consists of an irregular 2½ story frame
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    Ralph Waldo Emerson House

    Ralph Waldo Emerson House

    The Ralph Waldo Emerson House is a house museum located at 28 Cambridge Turnpike, Concord, Massachusetts, and a National Historic Landmark for its associations with American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson. The museum is open mid-April to mid-October; an admission fee is charged. The house was built in 1828 by the Coolidge family and named "Coolidge Castle". It was used as a summer house on the village outskirts, beside the Cambridge and Concord Turnpike. It is a four-square, two-story frame building in a house style common to many New England towns. While Ralph Waldo Emerson was preparing to marry Lydia Jackson (who he called "Lidian"), he told her he could not live in her home town of Plymouth, Massachusetts. "Plymouth is streets", he wrote to her, "I live in the wide champaign." He had previously lived in Concord at The Old Manse, the Emerson family home, and hoped to return to that town. In July 1835, he wrote in his journal, "I bought my house and two acres six rods of land of John T. Coolidge for 3,500 dollars." He and Jackson married on September 14 and moved in to the home the next day, along with his mother. In a contemporary letter, he writes that he is pleased to avoid
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    Sanborn Seminary

    Sanborn Seminary

    Sanborn Seminary was built in Kingston, New Hampshire, in 1883 by Major Edward S. Sanborn (died 1885) as the main building of a secular secondary boarding school. The school ran continuously until 1966 when it was sold to the Town of Kingston. The campus became known as Sanborn Regional High School and served students from the towns of Kingston, Newton, and Fremont. The last class at this campus graduated in June 2006. The Seminary building was designed in the Victorian Gothic style popular at the time of its construction. The architect is unknown. In preparation for the building's 100th anniversary in 1983, an exterior restoration project was completed, and the building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Seminary is the centerpiece of a campus complex that originally included five additional wood frame structures and a beach recreation area on nearby Greenwood Pond. The bell tower was removed from the building's roof and located on the East Lawn until 2006, when it was relocated to the new Sanborn Regional High School atrium. A new building for Sanborn Regional High School opened on August 28, 2006. The Seminary and other campus buildings are expected to
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    U.S. Capitol Gatehouses and Gateposts

    U.S. Capitol Gatehouses and Gateposts

    The U.S. Capitol Gatehouses and Gateposts — designed circa 1827 by celebrated architect Charles Bulfinch — originally stood on the grounds of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. Two of the gatehouses are listed on the National Register of Historic Places in their new locations. One gatehouse and three of the gateposts now stand at 15th Street and Constitution Avenue within the President's Park South historic district. The other gatehouse is at 17th and Constitution, also within the PPS. Four other gateposts have been relocated to the main entrance of the National Arboretum at New York Avenue NE and Springhouse Road NE. Bulfinch designed the structures as part of the original Capitol design. The gatehouses stood at the base of Capitol Hill on the west side at a carriage entrance to the grounds. The gatehouses were removed from the Capitol grounds in 1874 as part of landscaping renovations designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. In 1880, the west gatehouse was relocated at Constitution Avenue and 17th Street NW, and the east gatehouse at Constitution and 15th. They are placed to flank the White House - Washington Monument axis, which runs roughly along the axis of 16th Street,
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    Washington Aqueduct

    Washington Aqueduct

    The Washington Aqueduct is an aqueduct that provides the public water supply system serving Washington, D.C., and parts of its suburbs. One of the first major aqueduct projects in the United States, the Aqueduct was commissioned by Congress in 1852, and construction began in 1853 under the supervision of Montgomery C. Meigs and the US Army Corps of Engineers (which still owns and operates the system). Portions of the Aqueduct went online on January 3, 1859, and the full pipeline began operating in 1864. The system has been in continuous use ever since. It is listed as a National Historic Landmark, and the Union Arch Bridge within the system is listed as a Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The centerpiece of the Aqueduct is a 12-mile (19 km) pipeline which connects the system's dam at Great Falls with the Dalecarlia Reservoir on the border with Montgomery County, Maryland. The pipeline runs along what is now MacArthur Boulevard, traversing some of the higher cliffs along the Potomac River. The Union Arch Bridge carries the pipeline and MacArthur Boulevard over Cabin John Creek and the Cabin John Parkway near the community of Cabin John, Maryland. This bridge was the longest
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    Wentworth-Gardner House

    Wentworth-Gardner House

    The Wentworth-Gardner House is a historic late-Georgian house, located at 140 Mechanic Street in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1968. The house is operated as a museum by the Wentworth-Gardner and Tobias Lear Houses Association.
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