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Best U.S. Congressperson of All Time

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    1
    George W. Andrews

    George W. Andrews

    For the Canadian politician see George William Andrews (Canadian politician) George William Andrews (December 12, 1906 – December 25, 1971) was a U.S. Representative from Alabama, husband of Elizabeth Bullock Andrews. Born in Clayton, Alabama, Andrews attended the public schools. He was graduated from the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa in 1928. He was admitted to the bar in 1928 and commenced practice in Union Springs, Alabama. He served as district attorney for the third judicial circuit of Alabama 1931-1943. During the Second World War served as a lieutenant (jg.) in the United States Naval Reserve from January 1943 until his election to Congress, at which time he was serving at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Andrews was elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-eighth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Henry B. Steagall. He was reelected to the fourteen succeeding Congresses and served from March 14, 1944, until his death in Birmingham, Alabama, December 25, 1971. He was interred in Oak Hill Cemetery, Union Springs, Alabama. The George W. Andrews Lake and George W. Andrews Federal Building are named for him.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites
    7.71
    7 votes
    2
    Michele Bachmann

    Michele Bachmann

    Michele Marie Bachmann (/ˈbɑːkmən/; née Amble; born April 6, 1956) is an American Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Minnesota's 6th congressional district, a post she has held since 2007. The district includes several of the northern suburbs of the Twin Cities, such as Woodbury, and Blaine as well as Stillwater and St. Cloud. She was a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2012 U.S. presidential election, winning the Ames Straw Poll in August 2011 but dropping out in January 2012 after finishing in sixth place in the Iowa caucuses. Bachmann previously served in the Minnesota State Senate and is the first Republican woman to represent the state in Congress. She is a supporter of the Tea Party movement and a founder of the House Tea Party Caucus. Bachmann was born Michele Marie Amble in Waterloo, Iowa "into a family of Norwegian Lutheran Democrats"; her family moved from Iowa to Minnesota when she was 13 years old. After her parents divorced, Bachmann's father, David John Amble, moved to California, and Bachmann was raised by her mother, Arlene Jean (née Johnson), who worked at the First National Bank in Anoka, Minnesota. Her
    7.71
    7 votes
    3
    Ed Zschau

    Ed Zschau

    Edwin Van Wyck Zschau ( /ˈɛdwɪn ˈvæn wɪk ˈʃaʊ/; born January 6, 1940) represented California's 12th District in the United States House of Representatives from 1983-1987. In 1986 he ran as the Republican candidate for a seat in the United States Senate. He defeated conservative Bruce Herschensohn in the primary but then lost to incumbent Democrat Alan Cranston by a narrow margin. Zschau briefly re-entered the political arena as the vice presidential running mate to former Colorado Governor Dick Lamm, a Democrat, who challenged Ross Perot for the Reform Party presidential nomination in 1996. Zschau was born in Omaha, Nebraska. Zschau is currently a Visiting Lecturer with rank of Professor at Princeton University in the Departments of Electrical Engineering, Operations Research and Financial Engineering, and in the Center for Innovation in Engineering Education. Prior to his current post at Princeton, from 1997–2000, he was Professor of Management at the Harvard Business School and a Visiting Professor at Princeton University. Zschau's business experience is extensive. He founded and served from 1968-1981 as CEO of System Industries, a computer products company. During the 1960s,
    7.57
    7 votes
    4
    Maryon Pittman Allen

    Maryon Pittman Allen

    Maryon Pittman Allen (born November 30, 1925) is an American journalist who served as United States Senator from Alabama for five months in 1978, after her husband, Senator James B. Allen, died in office. Maryon Pittman was born in Meridian, Mississippi, in 1925. The following year the family moved to Birmingham, Alabama, where her father established a tractor dealership and where she grew up and attended public school. From 1944 to 1947, she studied journalism at the University of Alabama but did not graduate. In 1946, while a student, she married Joshua Mullins. The couple had three children, who were still young in 1959 when the marriage ended in divorce. Following her divorce, she went to work, first as an insurance agent and later as the editor of the women's sections for five weekly newspapers in the Birmingham area. That experience led to a position as a staff writer for the Birmingham News. It was in that capacity that she met James "Jim" Allen, then lieutenant governor of Alabama, in 1964 when she interviewed him in connection with a speech he had delivered to the Alabama Federation of Women’s Clubs. She and Allen, a widower with two children, were attracted to each other
    9.75
    4 votes
    5
    James Allen

    James Allen

    James Browning Allen (December 28, 1912 – June 1, 1978) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from Gadsden, Alabama. The Gadsden native attended the University of Alabama and the University of Alabama School of Law, both located in Tuscaloosa. At the University of Alabama he was a member of Alpha Sigma Phi. He practiced law in Gadsden from 1935 to 1968 and was a member of the Alabama House of Representatives from 1938 to 1942. He resigned from the state legislature to enter active duty in the United States Naval Reserve from 1943 to 1946. He again ran for office after World War II and was a member of the Alabama Senate from 1946 to 1950. He was the 17th and 20th Lieutenant Governor of Alabama from 1951 to 1955 and again from 1963 to 1967. In 1968, Allen was elected to succeed the retiring Democratic U.S. Senator J. Lister Hill of Montgomery. Allen won 638,774 (76 percent) to 201,227 (24 percent) for his Republican opponent, Perry O. Hooper, Sr.. Like his Republican Senate colleague, Jesse Helms of North Carolina, Allen was a master of parliamentary procedure. He was considered to have revived the filibuster rule during his nearly nine years as a senator. Allen was known as one of the most
    9.50
    4 votes
    6
    William F. Aldrich

    William F. Aldrich

    William Farrington Aldrich (March 11, 1853 – October 30, 1925) was a U.S. Representative from Alabama, brother of Truman Heminway Aldrich and great-great-grandfather of William J. Edwards. Born in Palmyra, New York, Aldrich attended the public schools of his native city. He moved with his father to New York City in 1865. He attended several schools, and was graduated from Warren's Military Academy in Poughkeepsie, New York, in 1873. He moved to Alabama in 1874. He engaged in mining and manufacturing. Built up the town that bears his name. He successfully contested as a Republican the election of Gaston A. Robbins to the Fifty-fourth Congress and served from March 13, 1896, to March 3, 1897. He successfully contested the election of Thomas S. Plowman to the Fifty-fifth Congress and served from February 9, 1898, to March 3, 1899. He again successfully contested the election of Gaston A. Robbins to the Fifty-sixth Congress and served from March 8, 1900, to March 3, 1901. He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1900. He was editor, owner, and publisher of the Birmingham (Alabama) Times. He served as delegate to the Republican National Convention at Chicago in 1904. He engaged
    8.00
    5 votes
    7
    Robert Rhett

    Robert Rhett

    Robert Barnwell Rhett, Sr. (December 21, 1800 – September 14, 1876), was a United States secessionist politician from South Carolina. He owned the Charleston Mercury. Born Robert Barnwell Smith in Beaufort. His name was originally Smith, but after entering public life he changed it for that of a prominent colonial ancestor Colonel William Rhett. He studied law and became a member of the South Carolina legislature in 1826. His great-uncle was Congressman Robert Barnwell the father of Congressman Robert Woodward Barnwell. A cousin of the Barnwells was the wife of Alexander Garden (soldier). After his state legislative service, Rhett was the South Carolina attorney general (1832), U.S. representative (1837–1849), and U.S. senator (1850–1852). Extremely pro-Southern in his views, he split (1844) with John C. Calhoun to lead the Bluffton Movement for separate state action on the Tariff of 1842. Rhett was one of the leading fire-eaters at the Nashville Convention of 1850, which failed to endorse his aim of secession for the whole South. When South Carolina passed (1852) an ordinance that merely declared a state's right to secede, Rhett resigned his U.S. Senate seat. He continued to
    7.80
    5 votes
    8
    David Baird

    David Baird

    David Baird, Sr. (April 7, 1839 – February 25, 1927) was a U.S. Senator from New Jersey. A Scots-Irishman born in County Londonderry, Ireland, Baird immigrated to the United States in 1856 and entered the lumber business in Port Deposit, Maryland. He moved in 1860 to Camden, New Jersey, where he continued in the lumber business and also engaged in banking. He was a member of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Camden County from 1876 to 1880. He also served as the sheriff of Camden County, New Jersey from 1887 to 1889, and again from 1895 to 1897. He was a member of the State board of assessors in 1895 and from 1901 to 1909. Baird was an unsuccessful candidate for election to the United States Senate in 1910, but he was appointed on February 23, 1918 to the Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of William Hughes. He was subsequently elected as a Republican on November 5, 1918 and until March 4, 1919, when he did not run for reelection. He resumed his former business pursuits in Camden, where he died and was interred in Harleigh Cemetery. Baird was the father of David Baird, Jr., also a Senator from New Jersey.
    7.60
    5 votes
    9
    William A. Ashbrook

    William A. Ashbrook

    William Albert Ashbrook (July 1, 1867 – January 1, 1940) was an American businessman, newspaper publisher, and Democratic politician from Ohio. He was born near Johnstown, Licking County, Ohio, and attended the local public schools. Later, he studied business in Lansing, Michigan. In 1884 he founded a newspaper, The Johnstown Independent. He also engaged in banking. From 1893 to 1897 he served as postmaster of Johnstown. He entered politics as a Democrat and won a seat to the Ohio House of Representatives in 1904. In 1906 he was elected to the U.S. House, where he served until he was defeated in the 1920 elections. Returning home, he resumed his newspaper publishing and banking career in Johnstown. He married Marie Swank and they had a son, John M. Ashbrook, in 1928. He ran in a successful comeback campaign for Congress in 1934, and served there until his death. His son John would later succeed him in that congressional seat from 1961 to 1982 as a Republican.
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    Nelson W. Aldrich

    Nelson W. Aldrich

    Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (November 6, 1841 – April 16, 1915) was a prominent American politician and a leader of the Republican Party in the Senate, where he served from 1881 to 1911. Because of his impact on national politics and central position on the pivotal Senate Finance Committee, he was referred to by the press and public alike as the "General Manager of the Nation", dominating all tariff and monetary policies in the first decade of the 20th century. In a career that spanned three decades, Aldrich helped to create an extensive system of tariffs that protected American factories and farms from foreign competition, while driving the price of consumer goods artificially high—which hurt many workers and farmers. He was a party to the re-structuring of the American financial system through the institution of the federal income tax amendment, which he originally opposed, and the Federal Reserve System. He stated that he believed these reforms would lead to greater efficiency. Aldrich became wealthy with investments in street railroads, sugar, rubber and banking. His son Richard Steere Aldrich became a U.S. Representative, and his daughter, Abby, married John D. Rockefeller, Jr.,
    8.75
    4 votes
    11
    Chris Van Hollen

    Chris Van Hollen

    Christopher "Chris" Van Hollen, Jr. (born January 10, 1959) is the U.S. Representative for Maryland's 8th congressional district, serving since 2003. He is a member of the Democratic Party. The district includes most of Montgomery County, an affluent suburban county adjacent to Washington, D.C., as well as parts of Prince George's County, another Washington suburb. Speaker Nancy Pelosi created a new leadership post, Assistant to the Speaker, in 2006 so that Van Hollen could be present at all leadership meetings. After the Democrats regained control of the House in the 2006 elections, Van Hollen became the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the fifth-ranking position among House Democrats. In this post, Van Hollen was responsible for leading efforts to get more Democrats elected to Congress. After the Democratic losses in 2010, Van Hollen did not run for re-election to chair of the DCCC. Van Hollen instead chose to run for the top Democratic spot on the House Budget Committee, which was being vacated by outgoing chairman John Spratt who had been defeated for re-election. Van Hollen was elected as the ranking member on the Budget Committee on November 17,
    8.50
    4 votes
    12
    Henry Justin Allen

    Henry Justin Allen

    Henry Justin Allen (September 11, 1868 – January 17, 1950) was the 21st Governor of Kansas (1919–1923) and U.S. Senator from Kansas (1929–31). Allen was born in Warren County, Pennsylvania to John and Rebecca Elizabeth (Goodwin) Allen. His family moved to Kansas in 1870, where they settled in Clay County. Before becoming active in politics, Allen acquired ownership of newspapers throughout Kansas, beginning with the Manhattan Nationalist in Manhattan, Kansas in 1894. He owned the Topeka State Journal with Arthur J. Carruth, Jr and William P. Snyder. Generally forward-looking in his outlook, he hired Frank Lloyd Wright to design his home in Wichita, Kansas. Allen's home is the only residence designed by Wright in Kansas. Allen was in France with William Allen White inspecting the facilities provided to Kansas soldiers of the American Expeditionary Force during World War I when his party nominated him for the office of governor. During the campaign in 1918, Allen never spent any of his own money and learned about his nomination from a Paris newspaper. Allen expressed some admiration for Benito Mussolini's policies in the 1920s and pushed through a similar industrial court provision.
    8.50
    4 votes
    13
    Todd Akin

    Todd Akin

    William Todd Akin (born July 5, 1947) is the U.S. Representative for Missouri's 2nd congressional district, serving since 2001. He is a member of the Republican Party. Akin won the 2012 Republican primary for the U.S. Senate seat in a crowded field. He will challenge Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill in the general election. In describing his pro-life position in August 2012, Akin stated that women who are victims of what he called "legitimate rape" rarely get pregnant. The comment led to widespread calls for him to withdraw from the Senate race, as well as support from pro-life advocates. Akin apologized for his remarks and stated that he would continue his campaign. Akin was born in New York City, New York, and raised in the St. Louis, Missouri area. He is the son of Nancy Perry (née Bigelow) and Paul B. Akin. Akin's father is a third-generation graduate of Harvard University who served as an officer in the Navy during World War II, and who later succeeded his own father, William Akin, as president of the Laclede Steel Corporation of St. Louis. Todd's great grandfather Thomas Russell Akin founded Laclede in 1911. Todd Akin graduated from the John Burroughs School, a private
    9.67
    3 votes
    14
    Enid Greene

    Enid Greene

    Enid Greene Mickelsen, formerly Enid Greene Waldholtz (born June 5, 1958) is a politician from the state of Utah who served one term in the United States House of Representatives. She was the third woman and first Republican woman elected to congress from Utah. Since her retirement in 1997 no woman has served in Congress from Utah (although Mia Love is currently, as of April 2012, the Republican nominee in the race for the new Utah 4th congressional district). Greene was born in San Rafael, California. She graduated from East High School and earned her B.A. from the University of Utah in 1980. She received her law degree from Brigham Young University in 1983. She worked as a lawyer for software company Novell and then at a Salt Lake City law firm. She was deputy chief of staff for Governor Norman H. Bangerter. As a young Republican, Enid met Joe Waldholtz and they were soon in a relationship. Greene ran for the House of Representatives in 1992 against Karen Shepherd for the Utah Second District, which was entirely contained in Salt Lake County at that time, losing by four percentage points. Greene married Waldholtz in 1993. After her marriage, Greene took the name Enid Greene
    7.20
    5 votes
    15
    John Archer

    John Archer

    John Archer (May 5, 1741 – September 28, 1810) was a U.S. Congressman from Maryland, representing the sixth district for three terms from 1801–1807. His son, Stevenson Archer and grandson Stevenson Archer II were also Congressmen from Maryland. Archer was born near Churchville, Maryland, and attended the West Nottingham Academy in Cecil County, Maryland, later graduating from Princeton College in 1760. He studied theology, but owing to a throat affection, he abandoned his studies in that area and began the study of medicine. He graduated as a physician from the College of Philadelphia in 1768, receiving the first medical diploma issued on the American continent. In 1769, Archer commenced the practice of law in Harford County, Maryland. He was a member of the Revolutionary committee from 1774 to 1776, and later raised a military company during the American Revolutionary War. He was a member of the first state constitutional convention of 1776, and served in the Maryland House of Delegates from 1777 to 1779. During the Revolutionary War, Archer was volunteer aide-de-camp to General Anthony Wayne at Stony Point. On June 1, 1779, Archer was made a captain and subsequently a major in
    8.25
    4 votes
    16
    William Anderson

    William Anderson

    William Robert Anderson (June 17, 1921 – February 25, 2007) was an officer in the United States Navy, and a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1965 to 1973. Anderson was born in Humphreys County, Tennessee in the rural community of Bakerville, south of Waverly. He attended primary school in Waynesboro, Tennessee where his father ran a sawmill. He graduated from the former Columbia Military Academy in Columbia, Tennessee in 1938, and from the United States Naval Academy as a member of the Class of 1943, which graduated early in 1942. Anderson's service in World War II was distinguished. He was awarded the Bronze Star and several other combat decorations from participation in a total of eleven combat submarine patrols. He was selected by Admiral Hyman G. Rickover to be the second skipper of the first working nuclear submarine to be placed into service, the USS Nautilus, and was its commander from 1957 to 1959. Anderson and his crew received international notice when the Nautilus became the first submarine to sail successfully under the polar ice cap surrounding the North Pole. That transit was completed under direct orders of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, under extreme
    8.25
    4 votes
    17
    Robert G. Allen

    Robert G. Allen

    Robert Gray Allen (August 24, 1902 – August 19, 1963) was an American businessman and a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. Allen was born in Winchester, Massachusetts. He moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1906. He was graduated from Phillips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts, in 1922 and later attended Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He moved to Greensburg, Pennsylvania in 1929 and was a salesman and sales manager for a valve and fittings manufacturing business until 1937. He was district administrator of the Works Progress Administration in 1935 and 1936. Allen was elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-fifth and Seventy-sixth Congresses. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1940. He became president of the Duff-Norton Manufacturing Company in Pittsburgh, from 1940 to 1943. He was commissioned a major in the Ordnance Corps of the United States Army in July 1942 and was promoted to lieutenant colonel in February 1943. He served until his discharge in January 1945. After his time in Congress and the Army, he served in a variety of business positions: He retired from business activities in 1962 and moved from Milwaukee, to
    7.00
    5 votes
    18
    Fred G. Aandahl

    Fred G. Aandahl

    Fred George Aandahl (April 9, 1897 – April 7, 1966) was a Republican politician from North Dakota. He served as the 23rd Governor of North Dakota from 1945 to 1951 and as a U.S. Representative from 1951 to 1953. Aandahl was born in Litchville, Barnes County, North Dakota, the son of Norwegian emigrants Soren "Sam" J. and Mamie C. (Lawry) Aandahl. He graduated from Litchville High School, and then from the University of North Dakota in 1921 and became a farmer. He was a schoolteacher, a principal, and then superintendent of Litchville's schools from 1922 to 1927. On June 28, 1926 he married Luella Brekke, and they had three daughters, Louise, Margaret, and Marilyn. In 1931, 1939 and 1941 Aandahl was member of the North Dakota State Senate. From 1945 to 1951 he was governor of the state, and during his tenure, natural resources were protected and conservation programs were promoted. He was elected as a Republican to the Eighty-second United States Congress (January 3, 1951-January 3, 1953). He was not a candidate for the Eighty-third Congress in 1952, but was an unsuccessful candidate for the United States Senate, losing 58%-42% to incumbent William Langer in the Republican Primary.
    9.33
    3 votes
    19
    Isaac N. Arnold

    Isaac N. Arnold

    Isaac Newton Arnold (November 30, 1815, Hartwick, New York - April 24, 1884, Chicago) was an attorney, American politician, and biographer who made his career in Chicago. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives (1860-1864) and in 1864 introduced the first resolution in Congress proposing a constitutional amendment to abolish slavery in the United States. After returning to Chicago in 1866, he practiced law and wrote biographies of Abraham Lincoln and Benedict Arnold. Born in Hartwick, New York, Arnold was the son of Sophia M. and Dr. George Washington Arnold, natives of Rhode Island who had migrated to New York after the Revolutionary War. He attended common schools, followed by the Hartwick Seminary in 1831-1832. There he joined the Philophronean Society, who debated the issues of the day, including the abolition of slavery. From 1832-1835, Arnold taught school in Otsego County. He studied law with Richard Cooper, and later with Judge E. B. Morehouse of Cooperstown. Admitted to the bar in 1835 at the age of 20, Arnold became a partner of Morehouse. Excited by other possibilities, in 1836 Arnold moved to Chicago, a small village developing as population
    9.33
    3 votes
    20
    Steve Austria

    Steve Austria

    Stephen Clement "Steve" Austria (born October 12, 1958) is the U.S. Representative for Ohio's 7th congressional district, serving since 2009. He is a member of the Republican Party. The district stretches from Springfield to the southern suburbs of Columbus. In December 2011, Austria announced his intention to not run for re-election for the 113th Congress in the 2012 elections. Austria was born in Cincinnati, the son of Jean C. (née Brockman), a nurse, and Dr. Clement G. Austria. He grew up in Xenia, the eldest of nine children. He graduated from Carroll High School in 1977. His mother was of German descent, and his father was from Tiaong, Quezon, Philippines, and had moved to Ohio to attend medical school. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Marquette University in 1982 and began a career as a financial advisor. The Austria family was named the 1984 "Ohio Family of the Year" and was later presented with one of nine "The Great American Family" awards by First Lady Nancy Reagan. Austria was a member of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1998 until 2000. Austria won re-election in 2004 against Democratic challenger Charlie Hart in the general election with 65% of the
    8.00
    4 votes
    21
    John B. Anderson

    John B. Anderson

    John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) is a former United States Congressman and Presidential candidate from Illinois. He was a U.S. Representative from the 16th Congressional District of Illinois for ten terms, from 1961 through 1981. Anderson was a Republican but ran as an independent candidate in the 1980 presidential election. He has been a political reform leader, including serving 12 years as chair of the board of FairVote. Anderson was born in Rockford, Illinois, where he grew up, the son of Mabel Edna (née Ring) and E. Albin Anderson, a Swedish immigrant. In his youth, he worked in his family's grocery store. He graduated as the valedictorian of his class at Rockford Central High School. He attended the University of Illinois, but his education was interrupted by World War II, when he enlisted in the Army in 1943. He served as a staff sergeant in the U.S. Field Artillery until the end of the war, receiving four battle stars. After the war, Anderson returned to complete his education, eventually earning a Juris Doctor (J.D.) from the University of Illinois College of Law in 1946. He was admitted to the Illinois bar the same year, and practiced law in Rockford. Soon
    6.80
    5 votes
    22
    Butler Ames

    Butler Ames

    Butler Ames (August 22, 1871 – November 6, 1954) was an American politician, engineer, soldier and businessman. He was the son of Adelbert Ames and grandson of Benjamin Franklin Butler, both decorated generals in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Born in Lowell, Massachusetts, Ames attended the public schools and Phillips Exeter Academy, in Exeter, New Hampshire, and graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1894. He resigned from the United States Army after appointment as second lieutenant to the Eleventh Regiment, United States Infantry; took a postgraduate course at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was a member of Theta Xi fraternity, and graduated in 1896 as a mechanical and electrical engineer. Ames engaged in manufacturing; served as a member of the common council of Lowell in 1896; enlisted during the Spanish–American War and was commissioned lieutenant and adjutant of the Sixth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry; appointed acting engineer officer of the Second Army Corps under General Graham, in addition to his duties as adjutant. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in August 1898; served as civil administrator of the
    9.00
    3 votes
    23
    D. Wyatt Aiken

    D. Wyatt Aiken

    David Wyatt Aiken (March 17, 1828 – April 6, 1887) was a Confederate army officer during the American Civil War and a postbellum five-term United States Congressman from South Carolina. Aiken was born in Winnsboro, South Carolina, and received his early education under private tutors. He attended the Mount Zion Institute in Winnsboro and graduated from South Carolina College in Columbia in 1849. He taught college for two years before marrying Mattie Gaillard in 1852 and engaging in agricultural pursuits, owning a plantation and travelling extensively in Europe and throughout the United States. He became the editor of the Winnsboro News and Herald, and was married a second time to Miss Smith of Abbeville, where Aiken settled and continued to farm. With South Carolina's secession and the advent of the Civil War, Aiken enlisted in the Confederate Army as a private in the 7th South Carolina Infantry. He was later appointed adjutant of the regiment and in 1862 was elected its colonel. He led it in the Peninsula and Northern Virginia Campaigns. He was severely wounded by a shot through his lungs at the Battle of Antietam in September 1862. After his lengthy recovery, he commanded his
    9.00
    3 votes
    24
    Gary Ackerman

    Gary Ackerman

    Gary Leonard Ackerman (born November 19, 1942) is the U.S. Representative for New York's 5th congressional district, serving since a special election in 1983. He is a member of the Democratic Party. The district encompasses the North Shore of Long Island, including West and Northeast Queens and Northern Nassau County along with Corona, Flushing, Jamaica Estates, Bayside, Whitestone, Douglaston, and Little Neck in Queens, Floral Park, as well as Great Neck, Sands Point, Port Washington, Searingtown, Albertson, Manhasset, and Roslyn in Nassau County. On March 15, 2012, Ackerman announced that he will retire at the end of the 112th Congress on January 3, 2013 after fifteen terms, and will not seek re-election in November 2012. Ackerman was born in Brooklyn, the son of Eva (née Barnett) and Max Ackerman. His grandparents were Jewish immigrants from Russia. He was raised in Flushing, Queens. He attended local public schools, Brooklyn Technical High School and graduated from Queens College in 1965. After college, Ackerman became a New York City School teacher where he taught social studies, mathematics, and journalism to junior high school students in Queens. Following the birth of his
    9.00
    3 votes
    25
    William B. McKinley

    William B. McKinley

    William Brown McKinley (September 5, 1856 – December 7, 1926) was a United States Representative from the State of Illinois. He was born near Petersburg, Illinois. After graduating from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, McKinley became a drug clerk in Springfield. He returned to Champaign to become a banker. In 1902, he was elected a trustee of the university. McKinley ran for U.S. House of Representatives in 1905, winning his first of four consecutive terms. In 1913, he ran for the U.S. Senate against Lawrence Yates Sherman and lost. He ran for Congress again in 1914 and won, serving from 1915 until 1921. In 1920, McKinley ran against Sherman for the Senate, this time winning. In 1926, he ran for re-election and lost to Frank L. Smith (who ultimately was denied the seat by the Senate on the grounds of fraud and corruption in his campaign), but died on December 7, 1926, aged 70, shortly before his term would have ended. McKinley was also chief executive of the Illinois Traction System. The McKinley Bridge between Venice, Illinois and St Louis, Missouri was named for him. The McKinley Health Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is also named for
    9.00
    3 votes
    26
    Ted Kennedy

    Ted Kennedy

    Edward Moore "Ted" Kennedy (February 22, 1932 – August 25, 2009) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. He was the second most senior member of the Senate when he died and was the fourth-longest-serving senator in United States history, having served there for almost 47 years. As the most prominent living member of the Kennedy family for many years, he was also the last surviving son of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr.; the youngest brother of President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, both victims of assassination, and Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., killed in action in World War II and the father of Congressman Patrick J. Kennedy. Kennedy entered the Senate in a November 1962 special election to fill the seat once held by his brother John. He was elected to a full six-year term in 1964 and was reelected seven more times before his death. The controversial Chappaquiddick incident on July 18, 1969, resulted in the death of his automobile passenger Mary Jo Kopechne. Kennedy pleaded guilty to a charge of leaving the scene of an accident and the incident significantly damaged his chances of ever becoming President of the United States. His one
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    J. Frank Allee

    J. Frank Allee

    James Frank Allee (December 2, 1857 – October 12, 1938) was an American merchant and politician from Dover, in Kent County, Delaware. He was a member of the Republican Party who served in the Delaware General Assembly and as U.S. Senator from Delaware. He was known by his middle name. Allee was born in Dover, Delaware. Following his education he learned the trade of jeweler and watchmaker from his father, whom he succeeded in business. He worked in the jewelry business throughout his life, as well as engaging in the fruit and vegetable canning industry. He married January 18, 1882 to Lizzie Stevens and they were members of the Christ Episcopal Church in Dover. Allee was chairman of the Republican Party State committee from 1886 until 1896 and was a State Senator for three sessions from the 1899/1900 session through the 1903/04 session. Elections at this time were often decided by which candidate was best able to assist certain voters in the payment of their poll tax. This was especially true in 1894, as the country was in the midst of an economic depression, the effects of which were particularly bad in Delaware, and comparable to the Great Depression of the 1930s. As chairman of
    6.60
    5 votes
    28
    Wilbur L. Adams

    Wilbur L. Adams

    Wilbur Louis Adams (October 23, 1884 – December 4, 1937) was an American lawyer and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. He was a member of the Democratic Party, who served as U.S. Representative from Delaware. Adams was born in Georgetown, Delaware, son of William Dunning Adams and Sarah Lavinia (Thompson) Adams. He attended Delaware College in Newark and Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. In 1907 he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Law at Philadelphia, was admitted to the Delaware Bar, and began the practice of law in Wilmington. Adams was an unsuccessful candidate for election as state Attorney General in 1924. Unlike the rest of the nation, Delaware had no Democratic landslide in 1932, but the incumbent Republican U.S. Representative, Robert G. Houston was involved in an intra-party dispute over prohibition and failed to win the Republican nomination. As a result, Adams was able to win a narrow victory, and was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1932, defeating Republican Reuben Satterthwaite, Jr. During this term, he served with the Democratic majority in the 73rd Congress. In the U.S. House, Adams voted with
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    David J. Baker

    David J. Baker

    David Jewett Baker (September 7, 1792 – August 6, 1869) was a United States Senator from Illinois. Born in East Haddam, Connecticut, he moved with his parents to Ontario County, New York and attended the common schools. In 1816 he graduated from Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. He studied law, and was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1819. The first place he practiced law was Kaskaskia, Illinois. He was probate judge of Randolph County from August 1827 to December 6, 1830 when he resigned to become a Senator; he was appointed as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of John McLean and served from November 12, 1830, to December 11, 1830, when a successor was elected and qualified. He thus is one of only a few people who have served in congress for less than a month. Baker was not a candidate for election in 1830 to fill the vacancy, and was appointed United States Attorney for the district of Illinois in 1833 and served until 1841. He resumed the practice of law, and died in Alton, and was interred in City Cemetery.
    7.50
    4 votes
    30
    Joseph W. Babcock

    Joseph W. Babcock

    Joseph Weeks Babcock (March 6, 1850, Swanton, Vermont – April 27, 1909, Washington, D.C.) was a seven-term Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Wisconsin. Babcock was the grandson of Joseph Weeks, Congressman from Vermont. He grew up in Butler County, Iowa, where he started his lumber career working at his father's lumberyard. In 1881 he moved to Necedah, Wisconsin, where he amassed a fortune during his 17 years as manager and secretary of the Necedah Lumber Company, and served in the Wisconsin State Assembly from 1888-1892. In 1892, Babcock was elected to Congress from Wisconsin's 3rd congressional district. In 1893, he helped organize the Republican Congressional Campaign Committee; he was credited with helping achieve Republican successes in the 1894 House elections, and was chairman of the committee for the next ten years. He was a candidate for Speaker of the House in 1902, but lost to Joseph Cannon. He was defeated for reelection in 1906 by Democrat James William Murphy. He continued to live in Washington, where in 1909 he died at age 59 after suffering for several weeks from liver and kidney problems.
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    Mark Warner

    Mark Warner

    Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician and businessman, currently serving as the junior United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Virginia. He is a member of the Democratic Party. Warner was the 69th governor of Virginia from 2002 to 2006 and is the honorary chairman of the Forward Together PAC. Warner delivered the keynote address at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. Apart from politics, Warner is also known for his involvement in telecommunications-related venture capital during the 1980s; he founded the firm Columbia Capital. In 2006 he was widely expected to pursue the Democratic nomination in the 2008 U.S. presidential elections; however, he announced in October 2006 that he would not run, citing a desire not to disrupt his family life. Warner was considered to be a potential vice presidential candidate, but upon receiving the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate, he announced that he "will not accept any other opportunity." He is expected to become the state's senior senator when Jim Webb retires from the Senate in January 2013. Warner was born in Indianapolis, Indiana; he is the son of Marjorie (née Johnston) and Robert F.
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Alfred G. Allen

    Alfred G. Allen

    Alfred Gaither Allen (July 23, 1867 – December 9, 1932) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio. Born on a farm near Wilmington, Ohio, Allen attended the public schools. He was graduated from Wilmington High School in 1886 and from the Cincinnati Law School in 1890, where he was Phi Delta Phi. He was admitted to the bar in 1890 and commenced practice in Cincinnati, Ohio. He served as United States commissioner 1896-1900, as delegate to the Democratic State conventions at Columbus in 1901 and 1908. He was a member of the city council 1906-1908, and a member of the board of the sinking-fund trustees of Cincinnati 1908-1910. Allen was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-second, Sixty-third, and Sixty-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1911-March 3, 1917). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1916, and resumed the practice of his profession in Cincinnati. He served as delegate to the Democratic National Convention at San Francisco in 1920. He served as president of the Cincinnati Bar Association in 1925 and 1926. He died in Cincinnati, Ohio, December 9, 1932. He was interred in Sugar Grove Cemetery, Wilmington, Ohio. On December 10, 1901, Allen married Clara B. Forbes at St. Louis,
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    William L. Armstrong

    William L. Armstrong

    William Lester "Bill" Armstrong (born March 16, 1937) is an American businessman and politician. He is a member of the Republican party and served as a United States Representative and Senator from Colorado. Armstrong was born in Fremont, Nebraska and graduated from Lincoln Northeast High School. After attending Tulane University and the University of Minnesota without receiving a degree, he served in the United States National Guard from 1957 to 1963. In 1972, Armstrong was elected a United States Representative to the 93rd Congress. He was reelected to the 94th and 95th Congresses (January 3, 1973–January 3, 1979). In 1978, Armstrong was elected to the United States Senate, defeating Democratic incumbent Floyd K. Haskell. He was reelected in 1984 and served from January 3, 1979, to January 3, 1991. While serving in the United States Senate, Armstrong was the chairman of the Republican Policy Committee (99th through 101st Congresses). Armstrong opted to retire and did not seek reelection in 1990. Armstrong is currently the president of Colorado Christian University, having served in that position since 2006. He is on the Board of Directors for Campus Crusade for Christ.
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Jacob A. Ambler

    Jacob A. Ambler

    Jacob A. Ambler (February 18, 1829 – September 22, 1906) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Ambler attended the local schools of Allegheny City and also received private instruction. He moved to Salem, Ohio, and studied law in his brother's law office. He was admitted to the bar on March 27, 1851, and commenced practice in Salem, Ohio. Ambler was elected to the State house of representatives in 1857 and served two terms. He was appointed judge of the ninth judicial district in 1859 and served until 1867. Ambler was elected as a Republican to the Forty-first and Forty-second Congresses (March 4, 1869-March 3, 1873). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1872. He resumed the practice of law and also became interested in various business enterprises in Salem, Ohio. He served as vice president of a bank and of a steel and wire nail mill corporation and also as president of a publishing company. He served as delegate to every Republican National Conventions between 1876 and 1896. He was appointed a member of the United States Tariff Commission by President Arthur in 1882. He retired from the general practice of law in 1898 but continued
    10.00
    2 votes
    35
    Stephen Mallory II

    Stephen Mallory II

    Stephen Russell Mallory, Jr. (November 2, 1848 – December 23, 1907) was a U.S. Senator and U.S. Representative from Florida who served as a Democrat. He was the son of U.S. Senator Stephen Russell Mallory. Born in Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; during the American Civil War he entered the Confederate Army in the fall of 1864; appointed midshipman in the Confederate Navy in the spring of 1865 and served until the end of the war; graduated from Georgetown College, Washington, D.C., in 1869, where he then served as instructor in Latin and Greek until 1871; studied law; admitted to the bar in Louisiana in 1872 and commenced practice in New Orleans; moved to Pensacola, Florida, in 1874 and continued the practice of law; member, Florida House of Representatives 1876; member, Florida Senate 1880, and reelected in 1884; elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-second United States Congress and Fifty-third United States Congress (March 4, 1891-March 3, 1895); was not a candidate for renomination in 1894; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1897, subsequently appointed and then elected to the Senate in 1903, and served from May 15, 1897, until his death in Pensacola,
    10.00
    2 votes
    36
    Clinton Presba Anderson

    Clinton Presba Anderson

    Clinton Presba Anderson (October 23, 1895 – November 11, 1975) was an American politician. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as a U.S. Representative from New Mexico (1941–45), the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture (1945–48), and a U.S. Senator from New Mexico (1949–73). Anderson was born in Centerville, South Dakota, on October 23, 1895. He was educated in the public school system of South Dakota, attended Dakota Wesleyan University 1913-1915, and the University of Michigan 1915-1916, though he never received a degree from either institution. After his father broke his back in 1916, Anderson left the University of Michigan to go home to help support his family. He worked for several months for a newspaper in Mitchell, South Dakota, until he became seriously ill with tuberculosis. He was not aware of his illness until he attempted to join the military in 1917 upon America's entrance into World War I. Doctors gave him six months to live. One gave him the advice to check himself into the Methodist Sanitarium in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He promptly did so, and while recovering there, occasionally wrote for the Herald of the Wells County. In 1919, as soon as he was well enough to
    6.40
    5 votes
    37
    Edward Dickinson Baker

    Edward Dickinson Baker

    Edward Dickinson Baker (February 24, 1811 – October 21, 1861) was an English-born American politician, lawyer, and military leader. In his political career, Baker served in the U.S. House of Representatives from Illinois and later as a U.S. Senator from Oregon. A long-time close friend of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, Baker served as U.S. Army colonel during both the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. Baker was killed in the Battle of Ball's Bluff while leading a Union Army regiment, becoming the only sitting senator to be killed in the Civil War. Born in London in 1811 to schoolteacher Edward Baker and Lucy Dickinson Baker, poor but educated Quakers, the boy Edward Baker and his family left England and immigrated to the United States in 1816, arriving in Philadelphia, where Baker's father established a school. Ned attended his father's school before quitting to apprentice as a loom operator in a weaving factory. In 1825, the family left Philadelphia and traveled to New Harmony, Indiana, a utopian community on the Ohio River led by Robert Owen and sought to follow communitarian ideals. The family left New Harmony in 1826 and moved to Belleville in Illinois
    6.40
    5 votes
    38
    George Ainslie

    George Ainslie

    George Ainslie (October 30, 1838 in Cooper County, Missouri – May 19, 1913 in Oakland, California) was a lawyer, mining investor, and Congressional delegate from Idaho Territory. George Ainslie was born in Boonville, Cooper County, Missouri. George’s grandfather and father had served in the Scottish regiments of the British Army. Also, his uncle, Colonel William Ainslie, served with the 93rd Regiment of Foot (the “Sutherland Highlanders”). The exploits of "The Sutherlands" during the Crimean War gave rise to the stirring phrase, “The Thin Red Line” … later applied to British Army infantry in general. George’s parents, John and Mary, moved to Missouri around two years before he was born. His father became a wealthy landowner, and also operated a salt works. The family went back to Scotland for a time while George was an infant, but returned in 1844. His father drowned in the Missouri River in June of that year. In his late teens, Ainslie read law under experienced lawyers and a judge in St. Louis. He also attended courses at what is now St. Louis University. George attained a law degree and was admitted to the Missouri bar in 1860. After a few months practicing law in Missouri, he
    6.40
    5 votes
    39
    Neil Abercrombie

    Neil Abercrombie

    Neil A. Abercrombie (born June 26, 1938) is an American politician who has been the seventh Governor of Hawaii since December 2010. Previously he was the Democratic U.S. Representative of the First Congressional District of Hawaii, which comprises urban Honolulu. He served in Congress from 1986 to 1987 and from 1991 to 2010, when he resigned to successfully run for governor. He was also a state legislator and member of the Honolulu City Council. Abercrombie was born in Buffalo, New York, the son of Vera June (née Grader) and George Donald Abercrombie. His ancestry includes English, Irish, and German. Upon graduating from Williamsville High School (now Williamsville South High School), he went on to pursue studies in sociology at Union College in Schenectady, New York. There, Abercrombie obtained his bachelor's degree in 1959. He arrived in Honolulu, Hawaii, a month after statehood in September 1959 to study at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa where he earned a master's degree in sociology and later a doctorate in American Studies. At the university he befriended and attended classes with the parents of President Barack Obama, Ann Dunham and Barack Obama, Sr. Abercrombie first
    6.40
    5 votes
    40
    Scotty Baesler

    Scotty Baesler

    Henry Scott Baesler (born July 9, 1941 in Lexington, Kentucky) is a Democratic politician and former Representative from Kentucky. Baesler graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1963 and from law school there in 1966. While at the University, Baesler played basketball under legendary coach Adolph Rupp. Over his final two seasons, Baesler maintained a per game average of 10.3 points, 4 rebounds, 3 assists, while shooting 83% from the foul line. After graduating from law school, Baesler practiced law and served as an administrator for Legal Aid, Inc., a nonprofit entity that provides free legal services to indigent persons facing criminal charges. He later served as a District Court Judge in Fayette County for some years before serving as mayor of Lexington from 1982 to 1993. In 1991, Baesler ran for governor in the Democratic primary and was narrowly defeated by Brereton Jones, who won the general election. In 1992, Baesler was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives for the 6th Congressional district of Kentucky after 14-year Republican incumbent Larry Hopkins retired; Hopkins had never recovered from being heavily defeated by Jones in the 1991 governor's race. He served
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    William C. Adamson

    William C. Adamson

    William Charles Adamson (August 13, 1854 – January 3, 1929) was a U.S. Representative from Georgia and a Judge for the United States Customs Court. Adamson was born on August 13, 1854, in Bowdon, Georgia. Adamson attended the common schools. He received an Artium Baccalaureus degree from Bowdon College in 1874. He read law and was admitted to the bar in 1876 and commenced practice in Carrollton, Georgia. He served as judge of the city court of Carrollton from 1885 to 1889. He served as an attorney for the city of Carrollton for a number of years. He served as delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1892. Adamson was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-fifth and to the ten succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1897, until December 18, 1917, when he resigned. He served as chairman of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce (Sixty-second through Sixty-fifth Congresses). On September 20, 1917, President Wilson nominated Adamson to serve as a Member of the Board of General Appraisers, to the seat vacated by Henderson M. Somerville. He was confirmed by the Senate on September 20, 1917, and received his commission on September 24, 1917. On May 28, 1926, he was
    6.40
    5 votes
    42
    John Patrick Williams

    John Patrick Williams

    John Patrick "Pat" Williams (b. October 30, 1937, Helena, Montana) is a former Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Montana during the years 1979 to 1997. Williams attended the University of Montana in Missoula, William Jewell College and the University of Denver, Colorado, earning a B.A. In 1961–1969 he was a member of the National Guard in Colorado and Montana and was a teacher in Butte, Montana. In 1966 Williams was elected to the Montana House of Representatives in District 23 of Silver Bow County, winning reelection in 1968. During the years 1969–1971 he served as the executive assistant to Montana Representative John Melcher. Williams was a member of the Governor's Employment and Training Council from 1972 to 1978 and served on the Montana Reapportionment Commission from 1972 to 1973. In 1974 Williams ran an unsuccessful primary election campaign against now Senator Max Baucus for the Democratic Party nomination for Montana's U.S. House 1st District Representative. Baucus would win the November elections defeating Republican Dick Shoup. In 1978 Williams ran a successful primary campaign against Dorothy Bradley to win the Democratic
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Josiah William Bailey

    Josiah William Bailey

    Josiah William Bailey (September 14, 1873 – December 15, 1946) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1931 and 1946. Born in Warrenton, NC, he grew up in Raleigh and graduated from Wake Forest College (now Wake Forest University). Before turning to a career in law, Bailey was editor of the Biblical Recorder, a newspaper for North Carolina Baptists. Elected to the U.S. Senate in 1930 by defeating longtime Democratic Senator Furnifold McLendel Simmons, Bailey earned a reputation as a conservative while in office. In 1937, he co-authored the bi-partisan Conservative Manifesto, a document criticizing President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal and proposing more conservative alternatives. Among other things, the Manifesto called for lower taxes and less spending.() During his time in office, he served as chairman of two different committees: the Committee on Claims and later the Committee on Commerce. Bailey died in office in 1946. Well known for his quotes, two of the most famous of which are most likely: "They who forgive most, shall be most forgiven." "Since we humans have the better brain, isn't it our responsibility to protect our fellow creatures from,
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    William Clayton Anderson

    William Clayton Anderson

    William Clayton Anderson (December 26, 1826 – December 23, 1861) was a United States Representative from Kentucky. William C. Anderson was a son of Simeon H. Anderson and nephew of Albert G. Talbott. He was born in Lancaster, Kentucky, where he attended private schools. He graduated from Centre College, Danville, Kentucky in 1845. He then studied law and was admitted to the bar, commencing his practice in Lancaster. In 1847 he moved to Danville and continued practicing law. Anderson served as a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives from 1851 to 1853. He was a presidential elector on the American Party ticket of Millard Fillmore in 1856. Anderson was an unsuccessful candidate for the Thirty-fifth Congress, but two years later was elected as an Opposition Party representative to the Thirty-sixth Congress, seving between March 4, 1859 and March 3, 1861. He chose not seek re-election and instead was elected as a Unionist to the Kentucky House of Representatives. He died during the 1861 session, at Frankfort, Kentucky. Anderson was buried in Bell View Cemetery, Danville, Kentucky.
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    William D.B. Ainey

    William D.B. Ainey

    William David Blakeslee Ainey (April 8, 1864 – September 4, 1932) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. He was born in New Milford, Pennsylvania. He attended the State Normal School at Mansfield, Pennsylvania, and Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania in 1887. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1887 and commenced practice in Montrose, Pennsylvania. He served as district attorney for Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania from 1890 to 1896. He organized Company G of the Pennsylvania National Guard and served as captain from 1889 to 1894. Ainey was elected as a Republican to the Sixty-second Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of George W. Kipp. He was reelected to the Sixty-third. He was not a candidate for reelection in 1914. Ainey was a delegate to the International Parliamentary Union for International Peace held at Geneva, Switzerland, in 1912, and at The Hague in 1913. He served as secretary and president of the Japanese-American group of interparliamentarians and delegate in 1914 to Tokyo, Japan, and to Stockholm, Sweden. He resumed the practice of law in Montrose. He was appointed a member of the Public Service
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    William V. Allen

    William V. Allen

    William Vincent Allen (January 28, 1847 – January 12, 1924) was a jurist and twice a U.S. Senator from Nebraska. Allen was born in Midway, Ohio. He moved with his parents to Iowa in 1857, where he attended the common schools and Upper Iowa University at Fayette, Iowa. He served as a private with the 32nd Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the Civil War; he then studied law at West Union, Iowa and was admitted to the bar in 1869. Allen practiced in Iowa until 1884, when he moved to Madison, Nebraska. He served as judge of the district court of the ninth judicial district of Nebraska from 1891-1893. Allen was the permanent chairman of the Populist State conventions in 1892, 1894 and 1896. Allen was elected as a Populist to the United States Senate by the Nebraska State Legislature and served from March 4, 1893, to March 4, 1899. During his term, he served as the chairman of the Committee on Forest Reservations and Game Protection (Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Congresses). Allen championed various bills for public buildings and drought relief along the Missouri River Valley and authored the bill that would establish the 1898 Trans-Mississippi Exposition in Omaha, Nebraska. He was
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Clarence Emir Allen

    Clarence Emir Allen

    Clarence Emir Allen (8 September 1852 – 9 July 1932) was a U.S. Representative from Utah. Born in Girard Township Pennsylvania, Allen attended the district school and Girard (Pennsylvania) Academy. He graduated from Western Reserve College, then at Hudson, Ohio, in 1877. He moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, in August 1881 and was an instructor in Salt Lake Academy until 1886, when he resigned to engage in mining pursuits. He served as member of the Territorial house of representatives in 1888, 1890, and again in 1894. Allen was elected county clerk of Salt Lake County in August 1890 and served until 1 January 1893. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1893 and commenced practice in Salt Lake City. He was an unsuccessful Liberal candidate for election in 1892 as a Delegate to the Fifty-third Congress. He served as delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1892 and 1896. Upon the admission of Utah as a State into the Union was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fourth Congress and served from January 4, 1896, to March 3, 1897. He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1896. He resumed his former mining pursuits until 1922, when he retired from active business
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Dave Weldon

    Dave Weldon

    David Joseph Weldon, (known as Dave Weldon) (born August 31, 1953, Amityville, New York) is an American politician and physician. He was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Florida's 15th congressional district, and was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican nomination in Florida's 2012 U.S. Senate race. Weldon was born on Long Island, New York to Anna and Dave Weldon, Sr. His father was a combat-decorated WWII veteran. After graduating Phi Beta Kappa from SUNY Stony Brook in 1978, he earned his M.D. degree in biochemistry at the University at Buffalo School of Medicine in 1981. He was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha. Weldon served in the United States Army from 1981 to 1987 and the United States Army Reserve from 1987 until 1992. He practiced as a physician in Florida after becoming an MD. Weldon decided to run in Florida's 15th congressional district, vacated by Democrat U.S. Congressman Jim Bacchus. He was one of seven Republicans to file for the primary. On September 8, he ranked first with 24% of the vote, but failed to reach the 50% threshold to win outright. In the October 4 run-off election, he defeated Carole Jean Jordan
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Leo E. Allen

    Leo E. Allen

    Leo Elwood Allen (October 5, 1898 – January 19, 1973), American politician, was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives for fourteen terms, 1933–1961, representing the 13th District of Illinois 1933–1949, and the 16th District of Illinois 1949–1961. He was born in Elizabeth, Illinois and was educated at University of Michigan. Allen was the Jo Daviess County, Illinois Court clerk and also taught school in Galena and practiced law before being elected to the 73rd Congress in 1932. Allen retired to Galena and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery (Galena, Illinois)
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Edward P. Allen

    Edward P. Allen

    Edward Payson Allen (October 28, 1839 – November 25, 1909) was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. Allen was born in Sharon Township, Michigan and attended the district and select schools. He graduated from the State normal school (now Eastern Michigan University) in 1864. After graduating near the end of the American Civil War, Allen enlisted and helped to raise a company for the Twenty-ninth Regiment, Michigan Volunteer Infantry. He was commissioned first lieutenant in September 1864 and later, captain. He mustered out with his regiment in September 1865. Allen graduated from the law school of University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in March 1867 and was admitted to the bar. He commenced practice in Ypsilanti. He became assistant assessor of internal revenue in 1869 and prosecuting attorney of Washtenaw County in 1872. He was alderman of Ypsilanti 1872-1874 and was elected to the Michigan State House of Representatives in 1876 and again in 1878, at which time he was elected speaker pro tempore. He was mayor of Ypsilanti in 1880 and was appointed United States Indian agent for Michigan in August 1882, serving until December 1885. Allen lost his first election for the United
    6.20
    5 votes
    51
    George Edmund Badger

    George Edmund Badger

    George Edmund Badger (April 17, 1795 – May 11, 1866) was a Whig U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina. Badger was born on April 17, 1795 in New Bern, North Carolina. Following a partial college education at Yale University, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1814. Badger practiced law in North Carolina, was active in state politics, and served as a state superior court judge. A supporter of Andrew Jackson from the 1820s, he separated with him in the mid-1830s, became a leader of the Whig party and helped carry the Whigs to victory in the 1840 Presidential election. Upon taking office, President William Henry Harrison appointed Badger as his Secretary of the Navy, and he continued in that post when John Tyler succeeded to the Presidency upon Harrison's death. Badger's brief term as Secretary was marked by efforts to strengthen the Navy in the face of tension with Great Britain, the establishment of the Home Squadron and continued interest in steamships. Badger resigned in September 1841, during a general cabinet shakeup. He was elected to the Senate in 1846 to fill the unexpired term of William Henry Haywood, Jr. and remained a Senator until 1855. He was nominated
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    Henry Alexander Baldwin

    Henry Alexander Baldwin

    Henry Alexander Baldwin or Harry Alexander Baldwin (1871–1946) was a sugarcane plantation manager, and politician who served as Congressional Delegate to the United States House of Representatives representing the Territory of Hawaii. He was one of the earliest leaders of the Hawaii Republican Party. Alexander & Baldwin, one of the "Big Five" corporations that dominated Hawaii economics in the early twentieth century, was started by his father Henry Perrine Baldwin and uncle Samuel Thomas Alexander in 1869. His father was son of early missionary Dwight Baldwin, and his mother Emily Whitney Alexander was daughter of early missionary William P. Alexander. Born January 12, 1871 on the Baldwin house at the Paliuli sugar mill in the Kingdom of Hawaii on the island of Maui, between the towns of Pāʻia and Makawao, Hawaii. Baldwin was educated in Honolulu at Punahou School. His parents sent him to Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts from which he graduated in 1889. In 1894, Baldwin obtained a degree at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was a member of the Chi Phi Fraternity. He returned to work for his father and uncle on the Haiku sugarcane plantation. From 1897
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    John Ashcroft

    John Ashcroft

    John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) is an American politician who served as the 79th U.S. Attorney General (2001-05), in the George W. Bush Administration. Ashcroft previously served as the 50th Governor of Missouri (1985–93) and as a U.S. Senator from Missouri (1995–2001). Ashcroft was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Grace P. (née Larsen) and James Robert Ashcroft. His father was a minister in an Assemblies of God congregation, served as president of Evangel University (1958–74), and jointly as President of Central Bible College (1958–63). He later served as president of Valley Forge Christian College. His mother was a housewife whose parents immigrated from Norway. Ashcroft went to school in Springfield, Missouri. He attended Yale University, where he was a member of Sigma Tau Gamma and the St. Elmo Society, graduating in 1964. He received a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Chicago School of Law (1967). After law school, Ashcroft briefly taught Business Law and worked as an administrator at Southwest Missouri State University. During the Vietnam War, he received six student draft deferments and one occupational deferment because of his teaching work. In 1972,
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Joseph Abbott

    Joseph Abbott

    Joseph "Jo" Abbott (January 15, 1840 – February 11, 1908) was a member of the Confederate States Army and a member of the United States House of Representatives from Texas. Abbott was born January 15, 1840 in Morgan County, Alabama near Decatur and attended the public schools. He moved with his parents to Freestone County, Texas, in 1853. During the American Civil War, he served as a first lieutenant in the Twelfth Regiment of the Texas Cavalry. He later studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1866. He began his legal practice in Springfield, Limestone County, Texas. He later moved to Hillsboro, Texas where he continued his legal career. He was a member of the Texas House of Representatives in 1870 and 1871. He was appointed a district judge in the Twenty-Eighth judicial district by Governor Oran M. Roberts. In 1880, he was elected for a full four-year term for that position. In 1887, he was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives, and served in that capacity through the end of Fifty-Fourth Congress in 1897. Upon leaving Congress, he resumed his legal career in Hillsboro, Texas, where he died on February 11, 1908.
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Charles H. Adams

    Charles H. Adams

    Charles Henry Adams (April 10, 1824 – December 15, 1902) was an American lawyer, manufacturer and politician from New York. Born in Coxsackie, he attended the public schools, studied law, was admitted to the bar about 1845, and commenced practice in New York City. He moved to Cohoes in 1850 and in 1851 was appointed with rank of colonel to Governor Washington Hunt's staff in 1851. He was a Know Nothing member of the New York State Assembly (Albany Co., 4th D.) in 1858. He engaged in the manufacture of knit underwear, and in banking. He retired from active business in 1870 and served as first Mayor of Cohoes, holding office from 1870 to 1872. He was a delegate to the 1872 Republican National Convention, and a member of the New York State Senate (13th D.) in 1872 and 1873. Adams was United States commissioner from New York to the Vienna Exposition in 1873, and was elected as a Republican to the 44th United States Congress, holding office from March 4, 1875, to March 3, 1877. He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1876 and resumed banking in Cohoes until 1892, when he retired from active business pursuits and moved to New York City, where he died in 1902. Interment was
    6.00
    5 votes
    56
    Edward Douglass White

    Edward Douglass White

    Edward Douglass White, Jr. (November 3, 1844 – May 19, 1921), American politician and jurist, was a United States senator, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court and the ninth Chief Justice of the United States. He was best known for formulating the Rule of Reason standard of antitrust law. He also sided with the Supreme Court majority in the 1896 decision of Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), which upheld the legality of segregation in the United States, though he did write for a unanimous court in Guinn v. United States (1915), which struck down many Southern states' grandfather clauses that disenfranchised blacks. White was born on his parents' plantation near the town of Thibodeauxville (now Thibodaux) in Lafourche Parish in south Louisiana. He was the son of Edward Douglass White, Sr., a former governor of Louisiana, and grandson of Dr. James White, a U.S. representative, physician, and judge. On his mother's side, he was the grandson of U.S. Marshal Tench Ringgold, and related to the Lee family of Virginia. The White family's large plantation cultivated sugar cane and refined it into a finished product. White's paternal ancestors were of Irish descent, and he was a
    6.00
    5 votes
    57
    William Allen

    William Allen

    William Allen (December 18 or 27, 1803– July 11, 1879) was an Democratic Representative, Senator and 31st Governor of Ohio. Allen was born in Edenton, North Carolina and moved to Chillicothe, Ohio in 1819, after his parents death. He was of Quaker ancestry. Allen and his sister Mary Granberry Allen lived in Chillicothe together. His sister married Reverend Pleasant Thurman, and their son, Allen G. Thurman, followed in his uncle's footsteps, becoming a lawyer and politician. Allen attended Chillicothe Academy before studying law with Colonel Edward King. He was admitted to the bar in Ohio at age 21. He began his career as a politician in the Democratic Party at a young age. Allen supported "popular sovereignty" and the presidential candidacy of Lewis Cass, identifying himself as a "Peace Democrat" and opposing the U.S. Civil War. Allen served as United States Representative from Ohio from 1832 to 1834, losing his bid for re-election. He served as United States Senator from Ohio from 1837 to 1849, losing a bid for a third term in 1848. While in the Senate, Allen was one of a group of Western Democrat expansionists who asserted that the U.S. had a valid claim to the entire Oregon
    6.00
    5 votes
    58
    Les AuCoin

    Les AuCoin

    Walter Leslie "Les" AuCoin ( /oʊˈkɔɪn/ oh-KOYN; born October 21, 1942), is an American politician and the first Democrat elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Oregon's 1st congressional district since it was formed in 1882. The seat has been held by a Democrat ever since. AuCoin’s 18-year tenure—from the 94th United States Congress through the 102nd—is the sixth-longest in Oregon history. In his career, AuCoin took a prominent role in abortion rights, local and national environmental issues, multiple use management of federal forests, and national security. During the presidency of Ronald Reagan, he wrote the ban to stop Interior Secretary James Watt's plan to open the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf to oil exploration. AuCoin was an early advocate of diplomatic relations with The People's Republic of China and arms control with the Soviet Union, and a critic of U.S. support for the Nicaraguan Contras and the rightist government of El Salvador in the 1980s. At the time of his retirement in 1993, he was 84th in overall House seniority, dean of the Oregon House delegation, a majority whip-at-large, and a veteran member of the House Appropriations Committee. AuCoin
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Robert Adams, Jr.

    Robert Adams, Jr.

    Robert Adams, Jr. (February 26, 1849 – June 1, 1906) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. Robert Adams, Jr. was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He attended Doctor Fairies Physical Institute in Philadelphia and was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia in 1869, where he was a member of St. Anthony Hall. He was a member of the United States Geological Survey during the explorations of Yellowstone National Park (1871–1875). Adams served as a member of the State militia from 1881 to 1895. He served in the Pennsylvania State Senate from 1883 to 1886. He was graduated from the Wharton School of Economy and Finance of the University of Pennsylvania in 1884. He was appointed United States Minister to Brazil on April 1, 1889, and served until June 1, 1890, when he resigned. He was elected to Congress as a Republican to the 53rd Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Charles O'Neill in 1893. He served from December 19, 1893, until his death in Washington, D.C.. Adams committed suicide by shooting himself after heavy losses in stock speculation.
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Robert Aderholt

    Robert Aderholt

    Robert Brown Aderholt (born July 22, 1965) is the U.S. Representative for Alabama's 4th congressional district, serving since 1997. He is a member of the Republican Party. The district includes most of the far northern suburbs of Birmingham, as well as the southern suburbs of Huntsville and Decatur. Aderholt was born in Haleyville, where he still lives, to Mary Frances Brown and Bobby Ray Aderholt. Aderholt's father, a part-time minister for a small group of Congregational churches in northwest Alabama, was a circuit judge for more than 30 years, and his wife's father was a state commissioner and senator. He attended the University of North Alabama and then Birmingham-Southern College where he graduated. During college, Aderholt was a member of Kappa Alpha Order. Aderholt received his J.D. from the Samford University Cumberland School of Law and practiced law after graduation. In 1992, Aderholt was appointed Haleyville municipal judge, and in 1995 become the top aide to Governor Fob James. With that experience, he won the Republican primary in the race to succeed 15-term Democratic incumbent Tom Bevill, who retired from Congress in 1996. Aderholt also endorsed a candidate for
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Robert Badham

    Robert Badham

    Robert Edward Badham (June 9, 1929 – October 21, 2005) was an American politician. He was born in Los Angeles, California, graduated from Beverly Hills High School in 1947, and Stanford University in 1951. He served in the California assembly from 1963–1976, as well as the United States House of Representatives from California's 40th congressional district from 1977 to 1989, which included the Newport Beach area. He died in Newport Beach, California, and is buried at the Riverside National Cemetery in Riverside, California.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Herman Badillo

    Herman Badillo

    Herman Badillo (born August 21, 1929) is a Bronx, New York politician who has been a borough president, United States Representative, and candidate for Mayor of New York City. He was the first Puerto Rican to be elected to these posts and be a mayoral candidate in the continental United States. Badillo was born in Caguas, Puerto Rico. When he was 11 years old, both of his parents died of tuberculosis and he was sent to live with his aunt in New York City. After graduating from the public school system at Haaran High School , Badillo attended and earned a Bachelor's degree from the City College of New York in 1951. In 1954, he received an LL.B. from Brooklyn Law School graduating first in his class. The next year he was admitted to the New York State Bar. In 1956, he also became a certified public accountant. In 1958, Badillo joined the "Caribe Democratic Club" and has since then held various offices within the City and State, including Bronx Borough President in 1965. Prior to becoming the Borough President, he served as New York Commissioner of Housing Preservation and Development. In 1970, Badillo was elected to the United States House of Representatives from New York's 21st
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Zach Wamp

    Zach Wamp

    Zachary Paul "Zach" Wamp (born October 28, 1957) is the former U.S. Representative for Tennessee's 3rd congressional district, serving from 1995 to 2011. He is a member of the Republican Party. The district is based in Chattanooga and includes large parts of East Tennessee, including Oak Ridge. Wamp was born in Fort Benning, Georgia and grew up in East Ridge, Tennessee, a community adjacent to Chattanooga, where his father worked as an architect. He attended The Lutheran School, a Lutheran elementary school. Later, with his two brothers, he attended the McCallie School, a boy's boarding and day school in Chattanooga, as a day student, from the age of 11 until he graduated in 1976. He was president of the student council, active in athletics and was the MVP of the varsity basketball team at McCallie in 1976. He was baptized, raised and confirmed in the Lutheran Church. He spent his first freshman year at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1977–78 and briefly returned in 1979–80 after his sophomore year at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville between (1978–79). However, he graduated from neither and struggled with drug and alcohol problems as a student before
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Brian Baird

    Brian Baird

    Brian Norton Baird (born March 7, 1956) is a former U.S. Representative for Washington's 3rd congressional district, serving from 1999 until 2011. He is a member of the Democratic Party. The district comprises the counties of Thurston, Lewis, Pacific, Wahkiakum, Cowlitz, Clark, and Skamania. Baird was born in Chama, New Mexico to Edith S. and William N. (“Bill”) Baird, a town councilman and mayor. Dr. Baird received his B.S. from the University of Utah, graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1977. He continued on to the University of Wyoming, receiving his M.S. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology. Dr. Baird is the former chairman of the Department of Psychology at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington, and a licensed clinical psychologist. He has published a number of journal articles and has authored two books. He had previously been a member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, the House Science Committee, the House Budget Committee, and the House Select Committee on Continuity in Government. He served as a senior regional whip and on the Democratic Steering Committee. He was elected president of the 1998 Democratic Freshman Class. Baird was a member of the
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Joseph H. Acklen

    Joseph H. Acklen

    Joseph Hayes Acklen (May 20, 1850 – September 28, 1938) was a U.S. Representative from Louisiana. Acklen was born in Nashville, Tennessee, to Adelicia and Joseph Alexander Smith Acklen, a wealthy couple whose summer home was located in Nashville, while he also grew up on plantations in Louisiana. During the American Civil War Joseph Hayes Acklen's parents sided with the Confederacy, and the father fled to the family's Louisiana plantation, where he died in 1863. Joseph Hayes Acklen was educated by private tutors. He attended Burlington Military College, near Burlington, New Jersey, in 1864 and 1865, and graduated from two foreign institutions (École de Neuilly, Paris, and Swiss University, Vevey). Joseph Hayes Acklen returned to the United States and graduated from Cumberland School of Law, Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1871. Acklen commenced practicing law in Nashville and later practiced in Memphis, Tennessee, but abandoned the practice of law and moved to Louisiana to superintend the family's sugar plantations near Pattersonville (now Patterson) in Saint Mary Parish. He served as colonel in the Louisiana Militia in 1876. In November of that year, claiming voting fraud, Acklen and other
    5.80
    5 votes
    66
    George Allen

    George Allen

    George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952) is a former United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the son of former NFL head coach George Allen. Allen served Virginia in the state legislature, as the 67th Governor, and in both bodies of the U.S. Congress, winning election to the Senate in 2000. Allen's re-election in the 2006 race seemed likely until he was accused of using a racist epithet when referring to a staffer of his opponent, Democrat Jim Webb. Allen lost the election to Webb by fewer than 10,000 votes. Allen now serves on the Reagan Ranch Board of Governors of Young America's Foundation where he is a Reagan Ranch Presidential Scholar. Allen is the Republican candidate in the 2012 election for the U.S. Senate seat he previously held. Allen was born in Whittier, California. Allen's father, George Herbert Allen, was a legendary NFL coach who was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2002. During the 2006 senatorial campaign it was revealed that Allen's mother, Henrietta Lumbroso, was born to Sephardic Jewish parents in Tunisia. He has a younger sister, Jennifer, an author and correspondent for NFL Network, and two brothers, including Bruce Allen, the
    10.00
    1 votes
    67
    John Adams

    John Adams

    John Adams (October 30, 1735 (O.S. October 19, 1735)  – July 4, 1826) was the second President of the United States (1797–1801), having earlier served as the first Vice President of the United States. An American Founding Father, he was a statesman, diplomat, and a leader of American independence from Great Britain. Well educated, he was an Enlightenment political theorist who promoted republicanism. Adams came to prominence in the early stages of the American Revolution. A lawyer and public figure in Boston, as a delegate from Massachusetts to the Continental Congress, he played a leading role in persuading Congress to declare independence. He assisted Thomas Jefferson in drafting the Declaration of Independence in 1776, and was its primary advocate in the Congress. Later, as a diplomat in Europe, he helped negotiate the eventual peace treaty with Great Britain, and was responsible for obtaining vital governmental loans from Amsterdam bankers. A political theorist and historian, Adams largely wrote the Massachusetts Constitution in 1780, which together with his earlier Thoughts on Government, influenced American political thought. One of his greatest roles was as a judge of
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    John Armstrong, Jr.

    John Armstrong, Jr.

    John Armstrong, Jr. (November 25, 1758 – April 1, 1843) was an American soldier and statesman who was a delegate to the Continental Congress, U.S. Senator from New York, and Secretary of War. Armstrong was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the younger son of General John Armstrong and Rebecca (Lyon) Armstrong. John Armstrong, Sr., was a renowned Pennsylvania soldier born in Ireland of Scottish descent. John Jr.'s older brother was James Armstrong, who became a physician and U.S. Congressman. After early education in Carlisle, John Jr. studied at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). He broke off his studies in Princeton in 1775 to return to Pennsylvania and join the fight in the Revolutionary War. He service record is sometimes confused with several other John Armstrongs in the war, including his father. The young Armstrong joined a Pennsylvania militia regiment, but the following year became aide-de-camp to General Hugh Mercer in the Continental Army. In this role, he carried the wounded and dying General Mercer from the field at the Battle of Princeton. After the general died on January 12, 1777, Armstrong became an aide to General Horatio Gates. He stayed with
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Joseph Carter Abbott

    Joseph Carter Abbott

    Joseph Carter Abbott (July 15, 1825 – October 8, 1881) was a Union Army colonel during the American Civil War who was awarded the grade of brevet brigadier general of volunteers and a Republican United States Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1868 and 1871. During his career in private life he was a lawyer, newspaper editor and businessman. He also served as collector of the port of Wilmington, inspector of posts along the eastern line of the southern coast during the Rutherford B. Hayes Administration, and special agent of the United States Treasury Department. Abbott was born in Concord, New Hampshire, and graduated from Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, in 1846, having studied there and under private auspices. He studied law at Concord, and was admitted to the bar in 1852. From 1852 to 1857, Abbott was the owner and editor of the Daily American newspaper, in Manchester, New Hampshire. His success with it led to his being given the position of editor of the Boston Atlas and Bee, which he held from 1859 through 1861. He served as adjutant general for New Hampshire from 1855–61, reorganizing the state militia during that time. He was also a member of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Mike Arcuri

    Mike Arcuri

    Michael Angelo "Mike" Arcuri (born June 11, 1959) is the former U.S. Representative for New York's 24th congressional district. He is a member of the Democratic Party. He lost re-election on November 2, 2010, to Republican Richard L. Hanna. The district encompasses a large swath of central New York, including Utica, Auburn, Rome and most of the suburbs of Binghamton. Arcuri's father was Carmen Arcuri. His mother, Elizabeth, retired as a stenographer. Arcuri graduated from Thomas R. Proctor High School, in Utica, New York in 1977. In 1981, Arcuri graduated from the State University of New York at Albany where he majored in history and minored in economics. In 1984, he graduated from New York Law School in New York City and was admitted to practice law in New York state in 1985. Arcuri returned to Utica to open a law office in 1986. A member of the moderate Blue Dog Coalition, Arcuri was named by the National Review (March 2010) as one of the most Centrist members of the House, with a voting record of 50.2% liberal and 49.8% conservative, a distinction he shares with only one other member of Congress. In 1993, Arcuri was elected District Attorney of Oneida County, home to Utica. He
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Spencer Bachus

    Spencer Bachus

    Spencer Thomas Bachus III (born December 28, 1947) is the U.S. Representative for Alabama's 6th congressional district, serving since 1993. He is a member of the Republican Party and the senior member of the Alabama U.S. House delegation. The district includes most of the wealthier portions of Birmingham and Tuscaloosa, along with most of their suburbs. In 2012, his record of stock and option trades (including during the 2008 financial crisis) drew scrutiny and accusations of insider trading, charges that he was subsequently cleared of by the Office of Congressional Ethics. Bachus was born in Birmingham to Edith Wells and Spencer Thomas Bachus, Jr. He currently lives in Vestavia Hills, a Birmingham suburb. He graduated from Auburn University in 1969 where he became a member of the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. He served in the Alabama National Guard from 1969 to 1971, during the Vietnam War, while attending law school; he earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Alabama Law School in 1972. Prior to his political career, he owned a sawmill and practiced law until 1992. Bachus was elected to the Alabama Senate in 1982, but served only one year as new legislative elections were
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    John Alexander Anderson

    John Alexander Anderson

    John Alexander Anderson (June 26, 1834 – May 18, 1892) was a six-term U.S. Congressman from Kansas (1879–1891), and the second President of Kansas State Agricultural College (1873–1879). Anderson was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania in 1834, and graduated from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, in 1853. His father, William Caldwell Anderson, served as the fourth President of Miami University during this time, holding that position from 1849 to 1854. Future U.S. President Benjamin Harrison was his roommate for a time in college. Following graduation, John Anderson entered the Presbyterian ministry, and was ordained four years later. His first charge was located in Stockton, California, where he served until 1862 when he was appointed chaplain of the Third regiment, California volunteer infantry. In this capacity, he accompanied General Patrick Edward Connor and the regiment on its expedition to Salt Lake City, Utah. Alexander resigned from this role in the spring of 1863, and he was subsequently appointed relief agent, United States Sanitary Commission, a post he held until 1865. In 1868 Anderson came to Kansas as pastor of the First Presbyterian church in Junction City. He
    6.50
    4 votes
    73
    John B. Allen

    John B. Allen

    John Beard Allen (May 18, 1845 – January 28, 1903) was an American politician from the state of Washington. He was a Republican. Allen was born in Crawfordsville, Indiana. He served as a private in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He earned a law degree from the University of Michigan and passed the bar in 1869. He moved to Washington in 1870, and started a law practice in Olympia. He served as United States attorney (1875–1885), and as reporter for the supreme court for the Territory of Washington from 1878 to 1885. He was a Republican Delegate to the United States House of Representatives in 1889, and after Washington achieved statehood, he was elected and served in the United States Senate from 1889 to 1893. After the legislature failed to select a Senator for the following term, Allen was appointed by the Governor of Washington, but was not seated by the Senate. After leaving public office, Allen went into private law practice in Seattle, Washington, where he died of cardiovascular disease in 1903 aged 57. John B. Allen Elementary School was dedicated in 1904, part of the Seattle School District. Seattle School District architect, James Stephens, designed the
    6.50
    4 votes
    74
    John F. Andrew

    John F. Andrew

    John Forrester Andrew was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. He was born to John Albion Andrew and Eliza Jane (Hersey) Andrew in Hingham on November 26, 1850. He attended private schools, including Phillips School and Brooks School. He graduated from Harvard University in 1872 and from Harvard Law School in 1875. He was admitted to the Suffolk bar and commenced practice in Boston. He was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. and served in the Massachusetts State Senate. He also served as Boston commissioner of parks. He was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Governor in 1886. Andrew was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-first and Fifty-second Congresses (March 4, 1889 - March 3, 1893). He served as Chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Reform in the Civil Service (Fifty-second Congress). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1892 to the Fifty-third Congress. Andrew resumed the practice of his profession, and died in Boston on May 30, 1895. His interment was in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge.
    6.50
    4 votes
    75
    Lewis D. Apsley

    Lewis D. Apsley

    Lewis Dewart Apsley (September 29, 1852 – April 11, 1925) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. Born in Northumberland, Pennsylvania, Apsley moved with his parents to Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, in 1861. He attended public and private schools.He moved to Philadelphia and engaged in business. Apsley identified himself with the rubbergoods trade. He moved to Massachusetts in 1877 and became a manufacturer of rubber clothing in Hudson in 1885. He served as president of the Apsley Rubber Co., succeeded by the Firestone Apsley Rubber Co.. He served as president of the Hudson Board of Trade and a director of the Hudson National Bank. Apsley was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-third and Fifty-fourth Congresses (March 4, 1893-March 3, 1897). He served as chairman of the Committee on Manufactures (Fifty-fourth Congress). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1896. He resumed his former business pursuits in Hudson, Massachusetts. He served two terms as vice chairman of the Republican National Congressional Committee. He died in Colon, Panama, April 11, 1925. He was interred in Forestvale Cemetery, Hudson, Massachusetts.  This article incorporates public domain material
    6.50
    4 votes
    76
    Nathan Appleton

    Nathan Appleton

    Nathan Appleton (October 1, 1779 – July 14, 1861) was an American merchant and politician. Appleton was born in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, the son of Isaac Appleton and his wife Mary Adams. Appleton's father was a church deacon, and Nathan was brought up in "strictest form of Calvinistic Congregationalism." He was educated in the New Ipswich Academy. He then entered Dartmouth College in 1794, however, that same year he left college to begin mercantile life in Boston, Massachusetts in the employment of his brother, Samuel Appleton (1766–1853), a successful and benevolent man of business, with whom he was in partnership from 1800 to 1809. Appleton married Maria Theresa Gold on April 13, 1806. Two months later, he hired the artist Gilbert Stuart to paint portraits of the newlyweds. The couple had five children: Thomas Gold Appleton (1812–1884); Mary "Molly" Appleton (1813-?), who married Robert James Mackintosh; Charles Sedgwick Appleton (1815–1835); Frances "Fanny" Elizabeth Appleton (1817–1861), who married the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; George William Appleton (1826–1827), who died in infancy. The Appletons attended Federal Street Church. In 1813 Appleton co-operated with
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    Philip Allen

    Philip Allen

    Philip Allen (September 1, 1785 – December 16, 1865) was an American politician. He was the 22nd Governor of Rhode Island (1851–1853) and a United States Senator (1853–1859). Born in Providence, Rhode Island on September 1, 1785 to Zachariah Allen and Nancy Crawford Allen, Allen graduated from the College of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (the former name of Brown University) at Providence in 1803. In 1814, he married Phoebe Aborn. He served as a member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives from 1819 to 1821 and was elected as the Democratic Governor of Rhode Island in 1851. He served as Governor until 1853, when he resigned that office after being elected to represent Rhode Island in the United States Senate. In 1859 he retired from politics. He died in Providence on December 16, 1865, and is buried in the North Burial Ground.
    5.60
    5 votes
    78
    Henry P. Baldwin

    Henry P. Baldwin

    Henry Porter Baldwin (February 22, 1814 – December 31, 1892), a descendant of pilgrim father Nathaniel Baldwin, was the 15th Governor of Michigan and U.S. Senator from the state of Michigan. Baldwin was born to John and Margaret (Williams) Baldwin in Coventry, Rhode Island and attended the common schools. He worked as a store clerk in Pawtucket from age 12 to age 20, after which he engaged in his own business for several years in Woonsocket. In 1835, he married Harriet M. Day (deceased 1862). He married his second wife, Sibyle Lambard, in 1864, who survived him. Baldwin moved to Detroit, Michigan, where he established a wholesale business in boots and shoes in 1838. He was a member of the convention which organized the U.S. Republican Party in Jackson, Michigan in 1854. He was influential in organizing the sixth Episcopal parish in the northern outskirts of Detroit on December 27, 1858, and in building St. John's Episcopal Church for the parish. Baldwin donated the church lot and underwrote a large portion of the cost of building a chapel to seat 125 persons (completed November 1859) and paid for the construction of the rectory. He also contributed in large part to the building of
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Stephen Adams

    Stephen Adams

    Stephen Adams (October 17, 1807 – May 1, 1857) was a United States Representative and Senator from Mississippi. Born in Pendleton, South Carolina, he moved with his parents to Franklin County, Tennessee in 1812. He attended the public schools, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1829, and was a member of the Tennessee Senate in 1833-1834. He moved to Aberdeen, Mississippi in 1834 and commenced the practice of law; he was circuit court judge from 1837 to 1845, and was elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-ninth Congress, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1847. He again became judge of the circuit court in 1848, was a member of the Mississippi House of Representatives in 1850, and was a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1851. Adams was elected to the U.S. Senate on February 19, 1852, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Jefferson Davis and served from March 17, 1852, to March 4, 1857; while in the Senate he was chairman of the Committee on Retrenchment (Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth Congresses). He moved to Memphis, Tennessee and resumed the practice of law; he died there in 1857, and was interred in Elmwood Cemetery.
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    James Abdnor

    James Abdnor

    E. James Abdnor (February 13, 1923 – May 16, 2012) was a Republican Senator from the state of South Dakota. Abdnor was born in Kennebec, South Dakota, the son of Mary (née Wehby) and Samuel J. Abdnor. Abdnor served in the United States Army during World War II and then graduated from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in 1945 where he became a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. He was a member of the South Dakota Senate from 1957 to 1969. A common, decent, plain spoken man," he was affectionately known as "the people's Senator." He was also described as a "nice-guy public servant" with a "down-home, warm and fuzzy way. His staff considered him to be a friend as well as an honorable mentor and public servant. Like his South Dakota Congressional colleague James Abourezk, he was a second-generation Lebanese-American. He died on May 16th, 2012 at the age of 89. Abdnor was the 30th Lieutenant Governor of South Dakota in 1969 to 1971, and unsuccessfully sought the nomination for House of Representatives in 1970. In 1972 he was elected to the House of Representatives as a Republican. Abdnor ran in the 1980 election against George McGovern for the United States Senate. Abdnor claimed
    7.33
    3 votes
    81
    Joshua W. Alexander

    Joshua W. Alexander

    Joshua Willis Alexander (January 22, 1852 in Cincinnati, Ohio – February 27, 1936) was United States Secretary of Commerce from December 16, 1919 - March 4, 1921 in the administration of President Woodrow Wilson. He attended Christian University in Canton, Missouri and later moved to Gallatin, Missouri, where he served as mayor and then as a representative in the Missouri General Assembly (1882–1887). He served as a judge on Missouri's 17th Circuit until 1905. Alexander,a member of the United States Democratic Party, served as a United States Representative from Missouri from 1907 until his resignation to become Commerce Secretary in 1919. He served as chairman of the House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries and took a lead role in shaping wartime shipping legislation, which drew him to the attention of President Wilson. He also gained prominence for his service as Chairman of the United States Commission to the international conference on the safety of life at sea in London in 1913. After his tenure as Secretary of Commerce, Alexander returned to the practice of law in Missouri. He served as a delegate to the state's constitutional convention in 1922-23. Joshua W.
    7.33
    3 votes
    82
    Spencer Abraham

    Spencer Abraham

    Edmund Spencer Abraham (born June 12, 1952) is a former United States Senator from Michigan. He served as the tenth United States Secretary of Energy, serving under President George W. Bush. Abraham is one of the founders of the Federalist Society. Abraham was born in East Lansing, Michigan and a graduate of East Lansing High School. Of Lebanese descent, Abraham is married to Jane Abraham (current co-chairwoman of the Michigan Republican Party) and has three children: a son and twin girls, Betsy and Julie. He holds a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree from Harvard University, and is a 1974 Honors College graduate of Michigan State University. In 1978, while at Harvard Law School, Abraham helped found the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy. It became one of the official journals of the Federalist Society, which was founded in 1982. Before his election to the Senate, Abraham was a law professor at Thomas M. Cooley Law School. He was elected chairman of the Michigan Republican Party from 1983 to 1990. He was deputy chief of staff for Vice President Dan Quayle from 1990 to 1991. He later served as co-chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) from 1991 to 1993 and
    7.33
    3 votes
    83
    Glenn M. Anderson

    Glenn M. Anderson

    Glenn Malcolm Anderson (February 21, 1913 – December 13, 1994) was an American politician. He was the 37th Lieutenant Governor of California and later as congressman. He was a member of the Democratic Party. Anderson was born on February 21, 1913 in Hawthorne, California. He received a Bachelor of Arts from University of California, Los Angeles in 1936. He worked as a real estate developer and served in the United States Army. Anderson was mayor of Hawthorne, California from 1940 to 1943 and a member of the California State Assembly from 1943 to 1951. He served as Lieutenant Governor of California from 1959 to 1967 but was defeated in a bid for a third term by Republican Robert Finch. Anderson was first elected to the 91st Congress in 1968 and served 12 terms from 1969 to 1993. In Congress he became chair of the Committee on Public Works and Transportation. He decided not to run for re-election in 1992. Anderson died on December 13, 1994 in Los Angeles, California, at the age of 81. He is interred in Green Hills Memorial Park, Rancho Palos Verdes, California. The Interstate 105 in South Los Angeles is named in his honor as the "Glenn M. Anderson Freeway," but that name is rarely
    6.25
    4 votes
    84
    John Denison Baldwin

    John Denison Baldwin

    John Denison Baldwin (September 28, 1809 – July 8, 1883) was an American politician, Congregationalist minister, newspaper editor, and popular anthropological writer. He was a member of the Connecticut State House of Representatives and later a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts. Baldwin briefly studied law, but graduated with a degree in theology from Yale Divinity School in 1834. He became a Congregationalist minister and preached in West Woodstock, North Branford, and North Killingly, all in Connecticut. In 1839 Yale awarded him an honorary Master of Arts degree. He became a member of the Connecticut State House of Representatives in 1847. Baldwin was active in the Free Soil and anti-slavery movements. He edited anti-slavery journals the "Republican" (published in Hartford) and the "Commonwealth" (published in Boston), and from 1859 became the owner and editor of the "Worcester Spy," what George Frisbie Hoar called "one of the most influential papers in New England." From this time onwards Baldwin was resident in Worcester, Massachusetts. He was a delegate to the 1860 Republican National Convention, where Abraham Lincoln was nominated as Republican
    6.25
    4 votes
    85
    Alvin Baldus

    Alvin Baldus

    Alvin James Baldus (born April 27, 1926) is an American Democratic politician and former member of Congress. Born in Garner, Iowa, Baldus graduated from high school in Elkton, Minnesota and went to Riverland Community College (formerly Austin Junior College) in Austin, Minnesota. He served in the United States House of Representatives from 1975-1981 representing Wisconsin's 3rd congressional district. He ran unsuccessfully for reelection in 1980, losing to Republican Steve Gunderson. He was in the United States Merchant Marine and the United States Army. Alvin Baldus served in the Wisconsin State Assembly from 1966–1975 and again from 1989-1997.
    5.40
    5 votes
    86
    Daniel Kahikina Akaka

    Daniel Kahikina Akaka

    Daniel Kahikina Akaka (/əˈkɑːkə/; born September 11, 1924) is the junior United States Senator from Hawaii and a member of the Democratic Party. He is the first U.S. Senator of Native Hawaiian ancestry and is currently the only member of the Senate who has Chinese ancestry. Born in Honolulu, he served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers during World War II. He attended the University of Hawaii, where he received his bachelor's and master's degrees. Originally a high school teacher, he went on to serve as a principal for six years. In 1969, he was hired by the Department of Education as a chief program planner. In the 1970s he served in various governmental positions. He was first elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1976 to represent Hawaii's Second Congressional District, and he served for 13 years. In 1990 he was appointed to the U.S. Senate to succeed the deceased Spark Matsunaga. Akaka would later be re-elected to three full terms. In March 2011 he announced that he will not run for re-election in 2012. Akaka was born in Honolulu, the son of Annie (née Kahoa) and Kahikina Akaka. His paternal grandfather was born in China. His brother was Rev. Abraham Akaka.
    7.00
    3 votes
    87
    David H. Armstrong

    David H. Armstrong

    David Hartley Armstrong (October 21, 1812 – March 18, 1893) was a United States Senator from Missouri. Born in Nova Scotia, Canada, he attended Maine Wesleyan Seminary and taught school in New Bedford, Massachusetts from 1833 to 1837. He moved to St. Louis, Missouri in 1837, and then to Lebanon, Illinois, where he taught at McKendree University. He returned to Missouri and was principal of the public school at Benton from 1838 to 1847, comptroller of St. Louis from 1847 to 1850, postmaster of St. Louis from 1854 to 1858 and a member of the board of police commissioners from 1873 to 1876. Armstrong served as a member of the board of freeholders which framed the charter of St. Louis in 1876, and was appointed as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Lewis V. Bogy, serving from September 29, 1877, to January 26, 1879, when a successor was elected and qualified. Armstrong was not a candidate for reelection in 1879; and in 1893 died in St. Louis. Interment was in Bellefontaine Cemetery.
    7.00
    3 votes
    88
    George Madison Adams

    George Madison Adams

    George Madison Adams (December 20, 1837 – April 6, 1920) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky, nephew of Green Adams. Born in Barbourville, Kentucky, Adams received private instruction from his father and studied law at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky. He served as clerk of the circuit court of Knox County, Kentucky from 1859 to 1861. During the Civil War, he raised a company of volunteers and was captain of Company H, 7th Regiment Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, from 1861 to 1863. In 1863 was commissioned paymaster with the rank of captain. Adams was elected as a Democrat to the Fortieth and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1867-March 3, 1875). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1874 to the Forty-fourth Congress. Adams was elected Clerk of the House of Representatives December 6, 1875, during the Forty-fourth Congress, and served until the commencement of the Forty-seventh Congress, December 5, 1881. He was appointed register of the Kentucky land office by Gov. J. Proctor Knott and served from 1884 to 1887. He was appointed secretary of state for Kentucky by Gov. Simon B. Buckner and served from 1887 to 1891. He was appointed State railroad
    7.00
    3 votes
    89
    Henry B. Anthony

    Henry B. Anthony

    Henry Bowen Anthony (April 1, 1815 – September 2, 1884) was a United States newspaperman and political figure. He served as the editor and later part owner of the Providence Journal and later was the 21st Governor of Rhode Island between 1849 and 1851, as a member of the Whig Party. The son of William Anthony and Mary Kennicut Greene, Anthony was born in Rhode Island. He attended Brown University, graduating in 1833 at the age of 18. After his graduation, he went to work as a broker in his brother's cotton products firm, sometimes residing in Savannah, Georgia. He later invested in the firm when his father died in 1845 and made a substantial income. He become editor of the Providence Journal in 1838. In 1840, he was admitted into the partnership, the paper then being published under the name of Knowles, Vose & Anthony until the death of Vose in 1848, when it was continued under the name of Knowles & Anthony until 1 January 1863, when it became Knowles, Anthony & Danielson. He also wrote poetry. As editor of the Journal, Anthony was a conservative, supporting law and order, property requirements for voting, and restrictions on political power of immigrants. In 1849, and again in
    7.00
    3 votes
    90
    James L. Alcorn

    James L. Alcorn

    James Lusk Alcorn (November 4, 1816 – December 19, 1894) was a prominent American political figure in Mississippi during the 19th century. He was a leading southern white Republican or "scalawag" during Reconstruction in Mississippi, where he served as governor and U.S. Senator. A moderate Republican, he had a bitter rivalry with Radical Republican carpetbagger Adelbert Ames, who defeated him in the 1873 Mississippi gubernatorial race. He briefly served as a brigadier general of Mississippi state troops at times in Confederate States Army service during the early part of the American Civil War. Only James Longstreet had been a higher-ranking Confederate general among those who joined in the post-Civil War Republican Party. Born near Golconda, Illinois, to a Scots-Irish family, he attended Cumberland College in Kentucky and served as deputy sheriff of Livingston County, Kentucky, from 1839 to 1844. He served in the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1843 before moving to Mississippi. In 1844, he set up a law practice in Panola County, Mississippi. As his law practice flourished and his property holdings throughout the Mississippi Delta increased, he became a wealthy man. By 1860,
    7.00
    3 votes
    91
    Josiah Gardner Abbott

    Josiah Gardner Abbott

    Josiah Gardner Abbott (November 1, 1814 – June 2, 1891) was an American politician who served in the Massachusetts General Court and as a member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts. Abbott was born in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and attended the Chelmsford Academy in Concord. He graduated from Harvard University in 1832 with an LL.D. degree, and then attended Williams College in Williamstown. Following his schooling, Abbott worked as a teacher and a lawyer, then became a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1836 and a member of the Massachusetts State Senate from 1841 to 1842. He was an aide to Governor Marcus Morton in 1843. From 1850 to 1855 he was a master in chancery. He also served as a member of the Massachusetts state constitutional convention, justice of the superior court for Suffolk County, an overseer of Harvard University, and several times was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for United States Senator. In 1860, Abbott declined an appointment to the United States Supreme Court, and in 1861 declined the Democratic nomination for state attorney general. He finally was victorious as a Democratic
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    Robert Franklin Armfield

    Robert Franklin Armfield

    Robert Franklin Armfield (9 July 1829 – 9 November 1898) was the Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina from 1875 to 1876, and a U.S. Representative from North Carolina between 1879 and 1883. Armfield, born near Greensboro, North Carolina in 1829, attended the common schools and later graduated from Trinity College (now Duke University). After reading law with John A. Gilmer, he was admitted to the bar in 1845 and practiced law in Yadkinville. In 1861, at the outbreak of the American Civil War, Armfield enlisted in the Confederate States Army. He served as lieutenant and later as lieutenant colonel of the Thirty-eighth Regiment of North Carolina state troops. After the war, Armfield moved to Statesville and resumed his law practice. While on furlough from the Army after being wounded in 1862, Armfield was state solicitor for the sixth district, until he was removed in 1865 by Governor William Woods Holden. He was elected to the North Carolina Senate in 1874 and 1875; during the 1874 session, he was Senate President. Armfield was chosen Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina and served in that post from 1875 to 1876. In 1878, Armfield was elected to the United States House of
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Thomas Allen

    Thomas Allen

    Thomas Allen (August 29, 1813 – April 8, 1882) was a railroad builder and later a member of the United States House of Representatives from Missouri. Allen was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, to Jonathan and Eunice Larned Allen, and was grandson to Rev. Thomas Allen, a noted American revolutionary. He attended Pittsfield Academy and Berkshire Gymnasium, graduated from Union College in 1832, where he obtained his degree with Phi Beta Kappa honors and was an early member of The Kappa Alpha Society. He then studied law and was admitted to the New York bar in 1835. In 1837, he moved to Washington, D.C., where he founded the newspaper The Madisonian, a Democratic newspaper. He was the printer of the United States House of Representatives from 1837 to 1839, and printer to the United States Senate from 1839 to 1842. In 1842 Allen married Ann Russell and moved to St. Louis, Missouri. He was elected to the Missouri State Senate in 1850, remaining a member of that body through 1854. In 1851 he became president of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway, and in 1852 took the first steam locomotive to cross the Mississippi River. He was also the organizer of the banking house
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    William Aiken

    William Aiken

    William Aiken, Jr. (January 28, 1806 – September 6, 1887) was the 61st Governor of South Carolina. He served from 1844 to 1846. He was the son of William Aiken, the first president of the pioneering South Carolina Canal and Rail Road Company. Unfortunately, William Sr. was killed in a Charleston carriage accident and never saw his namesake town of Aiken, SC. Aiken's first cousin, D. Wyatt Aiken served as a Confederate States Army officer and five-term U.S. Congressman. Aiken Jr. was married to Harriet Lowndes Aiken. He was a successful businessman and planter and lived in Charleston, South Carolina. His house, the Aiken-Rhett House, is part of the Historic Charleston foundation.
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    De Witt C. Badger

    De Witt C. Badger

    De Witt Clinton Badger (August 7, 1858 – May 20, 1926) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio. Born near London, Ohio, Badger attended the country schools in Madison County and Mount Union College, Alliance, Ohio. He taught school from 1875 to 1880. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1881 and commenced practice in London, Ohio. He served as prosecuting attorney of Madison County 1882-1885. He moved to Columbus, Ohio, and was elected judge of the court of common pleas in 1893. He was reelected in 1897 and served until 1903, when he resigned, having been elected to Congress. Badger was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-eighth Congress (March 4, 1903-March 3, 1905). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1904. He resumed the practice of law in Columbus, Ohio. He served as mayor of Columbus 1906-1908. He died in Columbus, Ohio, May 20, 1926. He was interred in Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Badger married Sidney Slaughter, and had children named Clinton and Minnie.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
    6.00
    4 votes
    96
    John DeWitt Clinton Atkins

    John DeWitt Clinton Atkins

    John DeWitt Clinton Atkins (June 4, 1825 – June 2, 1908) was an American politician and a member of both the United States House of Representatives and Confederate Congress from Tennessee. Atkins was born at Manly's Chapel, Tennessee, in Henry County. He attended a private school in Paris, Tennessee, graduated from East Tennessee University at Knoxville in 1846, and studied law. He was admitted to the bar, but he did not practice, instead engaging in agricultural pursuits. Atkins was a member of the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1849 to 1851. He served in the Tennessee Senate from 1855 to 1857. He was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-fifth Congress by Tennessee's 9th congressional district. He served from March 4, 1857 to March 3, 1859, but he was not a successful candidate for re-election to the Thirty-sixth Congress. During the Civil War, he served as lieutenant colonel of the Fifth Tennessee Regiment in the Confederate Army in 1861. He was a delegate to the Confederate Provisional Congress in November 1861. He then was elected to the First Confederate Congress and was reelected in 1863 to the Second Confederate Congress. Following the war, he was elected as a
    6.00
    4 votes
    97
    Adelbert Ames

    Adelbert Ames

    Adelbert Ames (October 31, 1835 – April 12, 1933) was an American sailor, soldier, and politician. He served with distinction as a Union Army general during the American Civil War. As a Radical Republican and a Carpetbagger, he was military governor, Senator and civilian governor in Reconstruction-era Mississippi. In 1898 he served as a United States Army general during the Spanish-American War. Ames was the last general officer of the American Civil War from either side of the conflict to die, dying at age 97 in 1933. Adelbert ( /əˈdɛlbərt/ ə-DEL-bərt) Ames was born in 1835 in the town of Rockland, located in Knox County, Maine. He was the son of a sea captain named Jesse Ames. Adelbert Ames also grew up to be a sailor, becoming a mate on a clipper ship, and also served briefly as a merchant seaman on his own father's ship. On July 1, 1856, he entered the United States Military Academy at West Point, and was still there when the American Civil War began in 1861. Ames graduated from the United States Military Academy on May 6, 1861, standing fifth in his class of 45. On that same date he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Artillery. Eight days later he was
    8.00
    2 votes
    98
    Arthur P. Bagby

    Arthur P. Bagby

    Arthur Pendleton Bagby (1794 – September 21, 1858) was the tenth Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1837 to 1841. Born in Louisa County, Virginia in 1794, he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1819, practicing in Claiborne, Alabama. He was a member of the Alabama State House of Representatives in 1821, 1822, 1824, and 1834–1836, serving as the youngest-ever speaker in 1822 and 1836, and he served in the Alabama State Senate in 1825. He served in the U.S. Senate from November 21, 1841, when he was elected to fill the vacancy caused by Clement C. Clay's resignation, to June 16, 1848, when he resigned to become Minister to Russia from 1848 to 1849. During his time in the Senate, he was chairman of the Committee on Territories, the Committee on Claims, and the Committee on Indian Affairs. As a Senator, he supported the annexation of Texas. Bagby died in 1858 in Mobile, Alabama, and he is interred in Magnolia Cemetery there. During Bagby's administration, the country was plagued by economic depression as a result of the Panic of 1837. Bagby introduced measures to assist the state banks but the state legislature rejected most measures. All the state banks were closed by
    8.00
    2 votes
    99
    Charles O. Andrews

    Charles O. Andrews

    Charles Oscar Andrews (March 7, 1877 – September 18, 1946) was a Democratic Party politician from Florida, who represented Florida in the United States Senate from 1936 until 1946. Born in Ponce de Leon, Florida; attended the public schools and the South Florida Military Institute at Bartow, Florida; graduated from the Florida State Normal School at Gainesville, Florida in 1901 and the University of Florida at Gainesville in 1907; during the Spanish-American War served in the Florida National Guard; captain in the Florida National Guard 1903 – 1905; secretary of the Florida State Senate 1905 – 1907 and 1909 – 1911; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1907 and commenced practice in DeFuniak Springs, Florida; judge of the criminal court of record of Walton County, Florida 1910 – 1911; assistant attorney general of Florida 1912 – 1919; circuit judge of the seventeenth judicial circuit 1919 – 1925; general counsel of the Florida Real Estate Commission 1925 – 1928; member of the Florida House of Representatives in 1927; attorney for Orlando, Florida 1926 – 1929; State supreme court commissioner 1929 – 1932; elected on November 3, 1936, as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill
    8.00
    2 votes
    100
    David Atwood

    David Atwood

    David Atwood (December 15, 1815 – December 11, 1889) was a nineteenth century politician, publisher, editor and printer from Wisconsin. Born in Bedford, New Hampshire, Atwood attended the public schools as a child. He moved Hamilton, New York in 1832 where he was apprenticed as a printer and later became publisher of the Hamilton Palladium. He moved to Freeport, Illinois in 1845 and engaged in agricultural pursuits before moving to Madison, Wisconsin in 1847 and for forty-two years was editor and publisher of the Wisconsin Journal. Atwood was commissioned a major general in the Wisconsin Militia by Governor Alexander W. Randall in 1858, was a member of the Wisconsin State Assembly in 1861, was an United States assessor for four years and served as mayor of Madison, Wisconsin in 1868 and 1869. In 1870, he was elected a Republican to the United States House of Representatives to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Benjamin F. Hopkins. He took over representing Wisconsin's 2nd congressional district in the 41st Congress serving until 1871 and declining to be a candidate for renomination in 1870 to the 42nd Congress. Afterwards, Atwood resumed activities in the newspaper business,
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    David Vitter

    David Vitter

    David Bruce Vitter (born May 3, 1961) is the junior United States Senator from Louisiana and a member of the Republican Party. Formerly a member of the United States House of Representatives, first elected in 1999, representing the suburban Louisiana's 1st congressional district, Vitter was elected to the Senate in 2004. Vitter was born and reared in New Orleans. He attended Harvard University for his undergraduate studies and Tulane University for law school in addition to winning a Rhodes Scholarship to University College, Oxford. He served as a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives before entering the U.S. House. Vitter has identified himself as a political conservative throughout his political career. His legislative agenda includes positions ranging from pro-life to pro-gun rights while legislating against gambling, same-sex marriage, federal funding for abortion providers, increases in the State Children's Health Insurance Program, the United Nations, and amnesty for America's illegal immigrants. Vitter's stated positions include a balanced budget constitutional amendment, abolishing the federal and state estate tax, increasing local police forces, and an
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Elijah Babbitt

    Elijah Babbitt

    Elijah Babbitt (July 29, 1795 – January 9, 1887) was a Republican United States Representative from Pennsylvania. Babbitt was born in Providence, Rhode Island. He moved with his parents to New York State in 1805. He received an academic education and moved to Milton, Pennsylvania, in 1816. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in March 1824 and commenced practice in Milton. He moved to Erie, Pennsylvania, in 1826 and continued the practice of law. He served as attorney for the borough and subsequently for the city of Erie. He was prosecuting attorney for Erie County, Pennsylvania, in 1833 and served as deputy attorney general for the State in 1834 and 1835. He was a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1836 and 1837 and served in the Pennsylvania State Senate from 1843 to 1846. Babbitt was elected as a Republican to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses. He was not a candidate for reelection in 1862. He resumed the practice of law and died in Erie in 1887. Interment in Erie Cemetery.
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Joe Baca

    Joe Baca

    Joseph N. "Joe" Baca (born January 23, 1947) is the U.S. Representative for California's 43rd congressional district, serving since 2003. He is a member of the Democratic Party. The district, numbered as the 42nd from 1999 to 2003, is located in southwestern San Bernardino County and includes Fontana, Rialto, Ontario and parts of the city of San Bernardino. Baca was born in Belen, New Mexico in 1947, the youngest of 15 children in a primarily Spanish-speaking household. His father was a railroad laborer. The family moved to Barstow, California when Joe was young, where he shined shoes at age 10, delivered newspapers, and later worked as a laborer for the Santa Fe Railroad, until he was drafted in 1966. He served in the U.S. Army until 1968. He did not serve in Vietnam. Following military service, Baca attended Barstow Community College and went on to receive his bachelor's degree in sociology from California State University, Los Angeles. He worked for 15 years in community relations with General Telephone and Electric. In 1979, he was the first Latino elected to the Board of Trustees for the San Bernardino Valley College District. He was elected to the State Assembly in 1992, and
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    John Armstrong

    John Armstrong

    John Armstrong (October 13, 1717 – March 9, 1795) was an American civil engineer and soldier who served as a major general during the Revolutionary War. He was a delegate to the Continental Congress for Pennsylvania. Armstrong County, Pennsylvania is named in his honor. Armstrong was born on October 13, 1717, in Brookeborough, County Fermanagh, in the Kingdom of Ireland, to James Armstrong and Jane Campbell. John was educated in Ireland and became a civil engineer before emigrating to Pennsylvania. Armstrong came to Pennsylvania as a surveyor for the Penn family, the proprietary owners of the colony. In 1750 he laid out the first plat or plan for the town of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and was one of its first settlers. He was later appointed surveyor for the newly established Cumberland County. In 1756 he led the Kittanning Expedition. In 1758, Colonel Armstrong led 2,700 Pennsylvania provincial troops on the Forbes expedition, the approach of which compelled the French to vacate and blow up Fort Duquesne. Armstrong became a good friend to the other militia commander in this expedition, Colonel George Washington. In the early stages of the American Revolutionary War, Armstrong was a
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Joseph Weldon Bailey

    Joseph Weldon Bailey

    Joseph Weldon Bailey, Sr. (October 6, 1862 – April 13, 1929) was a United States Senator, United States Representative, lawyer, and a Populist political figure. He served as a Congressional Representative between 1891 and 1901, and as the House minority leader from 1897 until 1899. In 1901, he was elected to the United States Senate, serving until 1913. Born in Mississippi, Bailey attended the University of Mississippi where he joined the prestigious Delta Psi fraternity ( AKA St. Anthony Hall) in 1879. Bailey was admitted to the barin Mississippi in 1883. He moved to Gainesville, Texas in 1885, where he continued to practice law. He had been politically active as a Democrat in both Mississippi and his new home and had a reputation as an excellent public speaker. He was elected to the House in 1891, and to the Senate in 1901. As the Minority leader of the United States House of Representatives in the 1890s he was very influential on his colleagues. His political career was tarnished by an assault against Senator Albert J. Beveridge, and subsequent investigations brought to light suspicious income and financial ties to the oil industry. Although he was regarded as a great populist
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Leslie Cornelius Arends

    Leslie Cornelius Arends

    Leslie Cornelius Arends (September 27, 1895 – July 17, 1985) was a Republican statesman from Illinois. Born in Melvin, Illinois, Arends was the youngest of 10 children born to George Teis Arends and Talea (née Weiss) Arends. His father was born in Peoria to parents who were both natives of Germany; his mother was born in Hanover, Germany. Arends served in the United States Navy during World War I and earned a law degree while attending Oberlin College in Ohio and Illinois Wesleyan University. Arends was the longest-serving whip in U.S. House of Representatives history, ranking second in the party in the House. He alternately served as majority whip and minority whip for House Republicans from 1943 to 1974. Arends was noted for his generally conservative voting record, his successful re-election as whip amid Republican in-fighting after the 1964 election, and his unwavering loyalty to President Richard M. Nixon at all stages of the Watergate scandal. Arends represented a heavily Republican, largely rural downstate Illinois district in the US Congress from 1935 to 1975. A conservative but pragmatic Republican, he opposed much of the New Deal and remained a staunch isolationist until
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Lucien Lester Ainsworth

    Lucien Lester Ainsworth

    Lucien Lester Ainsworth (June 21, 1831 – April 19, 1902) was a one-term Democratic U.S. Representative from Iowa's 3rd congressional district in northeastern Iowa. Born in New Woodstock, New York, Ainsworth attended the public schools, and the Oneida Conference Seminary, Cazenovia, New York. After studying law, he was admitted to the bar in Madison County, New York, in 1854. He moved to Belvidere, Illinois, and commenced practice the same year. In 1855, he moved to Iowa and continued the practice of law in West Union. He served as member of the Iowa Senate from 1860 to 1862, representing Bremer and Fayette Counties. During the Civil War entered the Union Army in 1862 as captain of Company C, 6th Regiment Iowa Volunteer Cavalry, and served three years in areas of conflict with Native American tribes in the northern Great Plains. He and his Company participated in the Battle of Whitestone Hill in Dakota Territory. After leaving the Army, he returned to West Union and resumed the practice of law. He served as member of the Iowa House of Representatives from 1871 to 1873. In 1874, Ainsworth ran as a Democrat to represent Iowa's 3rd congressional district in the U.S. House. Becoming the
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Santiago Iglesias

    Santiago Iglesias

    Santiago Iglesias Pantín (February 22, 1872 – December 5, 1939), a supporter of statehood for Puerto Rico, was the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico in the U.S. Congress from 1933 to 1939, a period that saw significant political turbulence in Puerto Rico, both by Puerto Ricans seeking more freedom and autonomy, and by the military governor in the Island, Blanton Winship, seeking to clamp down on those seeking autonomy and independence. Santiago Iglesias was born in La Coruña, Galicia, Spain, where he attended the common schools, and was apprenticed as a cabinet maker. At a young age he stowed away on a ship which landed in Cuba. There he organized workers and, beginning in 1889 was secretary of the Workingmen Trades Circle in Havana. Iglesias subsequently moved to Puerto Rico, and was the founder and editor of three labor papers: He was a very active labor organizer in Puerto Rico and was often arrested and jailed for his activities, and was considered American Federation of Labor (AFL) president Samuel Gompers' ally on the island. In fact, Gompers appointed him general organizer of the American Federation of Labor for the districts of Puerto Rico and Cuba in 1901. In 1915, he
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Spiro Agnew

    Spiro Agnew

    Spiro Theodore Agnew (pronunciation: /ˈspɪroʊ ˈæɡnjuː/; November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the 39th Vice President of the United States (1969–1973), serving under President Richard Nixon, and the 55th Governor of Maryland (1967–1969). He was the first Greek American to hold these offices. During his fifth year as Vice President, in the late summer of 1973, Agnew was under investigation by the United States Attorney's office in Baltimore, Maryland, on charges of extortion, tax fraud, bribery and conspiracy. In October, he was formally charged with having accepted bribes totaling more than $100,000 while holding office as Baltimore County Executive, Governor of Maryland, and Vice President of the United States. On October 10, 1973, Agnew was allowed to plead no contest to a single charge that he had failed to report $29,500 of income received in 1967, with the condition that he resign the office of Vice President. Nixon replaced him by appointing by then House Minority Leader Gerald R. Ford to the office of Vice President. Agnew is the only Vice President in United States history to resign because of criminal charges. Ten years after leaving office, in January 1983, Agnew
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Thomas Abernethy

    Thomas Abernethy

    Thomas Gerstle Abernethy (May 16, 1903 – June 11, 1998) was a member of the United States House of Representatives. He was born in Eupora, Mississippi. He attended the local public schools. He studied at the University of Alabama, and the University of Mississippi, and graduated from Cumberland University in 1924. He was then admitted to the bar and started practicing in his home town through 1929, when he moved to Okolona, Mississippi. He served as the district attorney for the third judicial district of Mississippi from 1936 through 1942. In 1942, he was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives, where he served through 1973. He retired to live in Okolona, Mississippi, and Jackson, Mississippi, until he died in 1998. President Richard Nixon in a telephone call with his wife on 2 July 1971 referred to Congressman Abernethy. He noted that he had been at a White House function the previous night and stated that he had been in the Congress for 29 years and that Congressman Abernethy had said to him "did you know that this is the first time in 29 years that I have ever had a bite to eat at the White House". Mr Nixon described him as a "nice man".
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    William McKinley

    William McKinley

    William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1897 until his assassination in September 1901. McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish–American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals. Though McKinley's administration ended with his assassination, his presidency marked the beginning of a period of dominance by the Republican Party that lasted for more than a third of a century. McKinley was the last President to have served in the Union Army during the American Civil War, beginning as a private and ending as a brevet major. After the war, he settled in Canton, Ohio, where he practiced law and married Ida Saxton. In 1876, he was elected to Congress, where he became the Republican Party's expert on the protective tariff, which he promised would bring prosperity. His 1890 McKinley Tariff was highly controversial; which together with a Democratic redistricting aimed at gerrymandering him out of office, led to his defeat in the Democratic landslide of 1890. He was elected Ohio's governor in
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    William Willet, Jr.

    William Willet, Jr.

    William Forte Willett, Jr. (November 27, 1869 – February 12, 1938) was a U.S. Representative from New York. William Willett was born in Brooklyn, New York on November 27, 1869. He attended the public schools of his native city and graduated from the law department of New York University, New York City, in 1895. He was admitted to the bar the following year and commenced the practice of his profession in New York City. Willett was elected as a Democrat to the Sixtieth and Sixty-first Congresses (March 4, 1907 - March 3, 1911). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1910. On January 18, 1909, Congressman Willett denounced President Theodore Roosevelt in a speech that was so outrageous that he was ordered to sit down, and the House voted 126 to 78 against allowing him to continue. On January 27, the House, by voice vote, expunged the speech from the Congressional Record for "language improper and in violation fo the privileges of debate". He engaged in the real estate business. He died in New York City, on February 12, 1938 and was interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York.
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Charles Francis Adams, Sr.

    Charles Francis Adams, Sr.

    Charles Francis Adams, Sr. (August 18, 1807 – November 21, 1886) was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat and writer. He was the grandson of President John Adams and Abigail Adams and the son of President John Quincy Adams and Louisa Adams. He was born in Boston, and attended Boston Latin School and Harvard College, where he graduated in 1825. He then studied law with Daniel Webster, and practiced in Boston. He wrote numerous reviews of works about American and British history for the North American Review. Adams was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1841, served in the state senate 1844–1845, founded and edited the journal Boston Whig in 1846, and was the unsuccessful nominee of the Free Soil Party for Vice President of the United States in 1848. In 1872, he was again nominated for Vice President, this time by the so-called "Straight-Out Democrats," who were Democrats alienated by the Presidential candidacy of Horace Greeley. Beginning in the 1840s, Charles Francis Adams, Sr. became one of the finest historical editors of his era. He developed this expertise in part because of the example of his father, who in 1829 had turned from politics (after his
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    David Rice Atchison

    David Rice Atchison

    David Rice Atchison (August 11, 1807 – January 26, 1886) was a mid-19th century Democratic United States Senator from Missouri. He served as President pro tempore of the United States Senate for six years. He is best known for the claim that for one day (March 4, 1849) he may have been Acting President of the United States. Atchison, owner of many slaves and a plantation, was a prominent pro-slavery activist and Border Ruffian leader, deeply involved with violence against abolitionists and other free-staters during the "Bleeding Kansas" events. Atchison was born to William Atchison in Frogtown (later Kirklevington), which is now part of Lexington, Kentucky. He was educated at Transylvania University in Lexington, where his classmates included five future Democratic senators (Solomon Downs of Louisiana, Jesse Bright of Indiana, George W. Jones of Iowa, Edward Hannegan of Indiana, and Jefferson Davis of Mississippi). Atchison was admitted to the Kentucky bar in 1829. In 1830 he moved to Liberty in Clay County in western Missouri, and set up practice there, where he also farmed. Atchison's law practice flourished, and his best-known client was Mormon leader Joseph Smith, Jr.. Atchison
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Levi Ankeny

    Levi Ankeny

    Levi Ankeny (August 1, 1844 – March 29, 1921) was a Republican United States Senator from the state of Washington. He was born in Buchanan County, Missouri near St. Joseph, but crossed the plains to Oregon in 1850 with his parents and settled in Portland. He attended the rural schools and later Kingsley Academy in Portland. He worked in business in Lewiston, Idaho; Orofino, Idaho; and Florence, Idaho. He also became the mayor of Lewiston. He moved to Walla Walla, Washington and engaged in banking. He was appointed a member of the Pan-American Exposition Commission and became its chairman. In 1902 he was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate, and served from March 4, 1903 to March 4, 1909. He failed to be renominated in 1908. He was chairman of the Committee on Coast and Insular Survey (Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth Congresses). In 1867 he married Pauline Nesmith, daughter of Oregon Senator James W. Nesmith: they had five children. He worked in banking in Walla Walla until his death on March 29, 1921 and was interred at the Masonic Cemetery.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Oakes Ames

    Oakes Ames

    Oakes Ames (January 10, 1804 – May 8, 1873) was an American manufacturer, capitalist, and member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts. As a congressman, he is credited by many historians as being the single most important influence in the building of the Union Pacific portion of the transcontinental railroad. He is also noted for the subsequent scandal that alleged the improper sale of stock of the railroad's construction company. Ames was born in Easton, Massachusetts, the son of Oliver Ames, Sr., a blacksmith who had built a business of making shovels and became nicknamed "King of Spades". In his youth, he obtained a public school education and later worked in the family workshops to learn each step of the manufacturing process. He eventually became a partner in the business, and with his brother Oliver Ames, Jr. he established the firm Oliver Ames & Sons. Driven by the settlement of the Midwest, by the discovery of gold in California and Australia, as well as by railroad construction, the shovel manufacturing business boomed. During the Civil War, the firm prospered with contracts for swords, shovels and other tools. Ames made a large fortune. He was
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    William B. Anderson

    William B. Anderson

    William Black Anderson is a former member of the US House of Representatives from Illinois. Born April 2, 1830 in Mount Vernon, Illinois, he attended McKendree College and studied law. Despite being admitted to the bar, he never practiced law, instead pursuing agricultural works. From 1856-58, he served in the Illinois House of Representatives. During the American Civil War, Anderson served the Union army, eventually rising to the rank of brigadier general. In 1871, he was elected to the Illinois Senate and then to the US House in 1875. After one term, he left politics, eventually taking a job with the IRS. He died in Chicago on August 28, 1901.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Bruce Alger

    Bruce Alger

    Bruce Reynolds Alger (born June 12, 1918) is an American politician and a former Republican U.S. representative from Texas, the first to have represented a Dallas district since Reconstruction. He served from 1955 until 1965. He was born in Dallas but was reared in Webster Groves, Missouri, a small suburb of St. Louis, Missouri. Alger was born to David Bruce Alger, a bank representative, and Clare Alger (née Freeman), an aspiring poet and writer, in Dallas, Texas, in 1918. Alger attended Princeton University in New Jersey on a scholarship. He studied philosophy, art, and music, and was a center for the football team. After his graduation in 1940, he went to work for the RCA Corporation as a field representative. With the coming of World War II, he joined the United States Army, assigned to Squadron 5 at the Army Air Corps Advanced Flying School at Kerry Field, Texas. He flew bombers and attained the rank of captain, claiming to be among the first American troops in Japan after the conclusion of the war in August 1945. He received the Distinguished Flying Cross. On returning to civilian life, RCA refused to rehire him on the grounds that he had been out of television production for
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Carl G. Bachmann

    Carl G. Bachmann

    Carl G. Bachmann (May 14, 1890 – January 22, 1980) was a United States Congressman from Wheeling, West Virginia. Bachmann was born in Wheeling as the son of Charles F. and Sophia Bachmann. In 1908 he graduated from Linsly Institute. He went to college first at Washington and Jefferson College for two years, and later graduated West Virginia University. He later graduated from law school at West Virginia University in 1915. On July 14, 1914, he married Susan Louise Smith. They had three children: Charles F., Gilbert S. and Susan Jane. In 1915, Bachmann began to practice law in Wheeling, and in 1917 he was appointed assistant prosecuting attorney for Ohio County. In 1920 he was elected prosecuting attorney, serving from January 1921 to December 1924. In November 1924 he was elected to the United States House of Representatives as a Republican, to serve in the First Congressional District of West Virginia. From 1931 to 1933 Bachmann was the Minority Whip. He served as a Congressman until he was defeated in 1934. He was later elected Mayor of Wheeling in 1947 and served until 1951. He died in Wheeling and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery.
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Ernest F. Acheson

    Ernest F. Acheson

    Ernest Francis Acheson (September 19, 1855 – May 16, 1917) was a newspaper editor and a representative to the United States House of Representatives. He was born in Washington, Pennsylvania in 1855. He attended the public schools there, and then went on Washington and Jefferson College in 1875. He was admitted to the bar in 1877 and practiced law until 1879. He purchased the newspaper Washington Weekly Observer, of which he was editor. In 1889, he established a daily edition of the same paper. He was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives in 1894, and continued to serve until 1909, having been an unsuccessful candidate for the nomination in 1908. He returned to editorial work until his retirement in 1912. He died in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1917.
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Hazel Abel

    Hazel Abel

    Hazel Hempel Abel (July 10, 1888 – July 30, 1966) was an American politician and member of the United States Senate. She was born in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, and attended the public schools of Omaha, Nebraska. She graduated from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1908, and became a high school mathematics teacher and principal in Papillion, Nebraska, Ashland, Nebraska, and Crete, Nebraska. In 1954, she was elected to be the Vice Chairman of the State Republican Central Committee. In 1954, she was elected to complete the unexpired term of Dwight Griswold, who had died in office. She became the first woman elected from Nebraska to serve in the Senate, as well as the first woman to follow another woman in a Senate seat, as Eva Bowring had previously been appointed to the seat to serve until an election was held. She served from November 8, 1954, until her own resignation on December 31, 1954. In 1957 she was named American Mother of the Year. She also served as the President and founder of the Nebraska Federation of Republican Women. She died in Lincoln, Nebraska, on July 30, 1966.
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Lemuel H. Arnold

    Lemuel H. Arnold

    Lemuel Hastings Arnold (January 29, 1792 – June 27, 1852) was the 12th Governor of the State of Rhode Island, as well as a U.S. Congressman. He was born in St. Johnsbury, Vermont to Dr. Jonathan & Cynthia (Hastings) Arnold. A member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives from 1826 to 1831, he was then elected Governor of Rhode Island and served in that position from 1831 to 1833. Arnold also served as a member of the Rhode Island Executive Council during the Dorr Rebellion from 1842 to 1843. Following an unsuccessful attempt for a seat in the United States Senate in 1845, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives as a member of the Whig Party and served one term from 1845 to 1847. After leaving politics, he practiced law in South Kingstown, Rhode Island until his death. He was buried in Swan Point Cemetery in Providence. His son, Richard Arnold, was a brigadier general in the Union Army during the Civil War. His daughter, Sally Lyman Arnold, was married to Union Brig. Gen. Isaac P. Rodman, who was mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam.
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Rodney Alexander

    Rodney Alexander

    Rodney McKinnie Alexander (born December 5, 1946) is the U.S. Representative for Louisiana's 5th congressional district, serving since 2003. He is a member of the Republican Party. The district covers twenty-two parishes in roughly the northeast quadrant of the state. As of the start of the 112th Congress, he is the dean of Louisiana's House delegation. Alexander was born in the village of Bienville, in Bienville Parish to the former Mary Crawford and James Earl Alexander. In 1964, he graduated from Jonesboro-Hodge High School in Jonesboro in Jackson Parish. He then attended Louisiana Tech University but left school to work for his family construction company so his wife could earn a degree. Alexander was an insurance agent prior to entering Congress. He also owned a construction company from 1964–1981. He served his country in the U.S. Air Force Reserve from 1965–1971. He was a member of the Jackson Parish Police Jury (equivalent to county commission in other states) from 1972–1988. Alexander left the police jury to represent District 13 in the Louisiana House of Representatives from 1988 until his election to Congress. While in the House, he served as the chairman of the House
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Sherman Adams

    Sherman Adams

    Llewelyn Sherman Adams (January 8, 1899 – October 27, 1986) was an American politician, best known as White House Chief of Staff for President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the culmination of a relatively short (18-year) political career that also included a stint as Governor of New Hampshire. He lost his White House position in a scandal over a vicuña fur coat. Born in East Dover, Vermont, Adams was educated in Providence, Rhode Island public schools, graduating from Hope High School. He received an undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College (1920), having taken time off briefly for a six-month World War I stint in the United States Marine Corps. He then went into the lumber business, first in Headville, Vermont (1921), then to a combined lumber and paper business in Lincoln, New Hampshire. He also was involved in banking. Adams entered state politics as a Republican legislator (1941–44; Speaker of the House, 1944). He served a term in the United States House of Representatives (1945–47), making a failed effort to capture the 1946 Republican gubernatorial nomination in New Hampshire. He lost to incumbent Charles M. Dale; he later won this office in 1948. When Adams took office as
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Thomas Lilbourne Anderson

    Thomas Lilbourne Anderson

    Thomas Lilbourne Anderson (December 8, 1808 – March 6, 1885) was a practicing lawyer who served in the United States House of Representatives from Missouri. He was born in Bowling Green, Kentucky, and was admitted to the Kentucky bar in 1828. He began the practice of law in Franklin, Kentucky, later moving to Palmyra, Missouri, in 1830. He was elected to the Missouri House of Representatives in 1840, and remained a member of that body through 1844. He also served as a member of the Missouri Constitutional Convention of 1845. He was first elected to the United States Congress in 1857 as a member of the American Party, winning reelection in 1859 as an Independent Democrat. He also served as a presidential elector for the Whig Party in 1844, 1848, 1852, and 1856. He died in Palmyra in 1885.
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Jonathan Arnold

    Jonathan Arnold

    Jonathan Arnold (December 3, 1741 – February 1, 1793) was an American physician and statesman from New England. He was born in Providence, Rhode Island. Arnold served in the Continental Army as a surgeon, and directed the army hospital at Providence. He represented Rhode Island as a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1782 and 1783. He moved to a farm in St. Johnsbury, Vermont in 1787, and later served as a judge. He also served as a clerk in the colony of Rhode Island in 1767. He would write the voucher to the recipient ordering payment from Joseph Clarke Esquire with the General Treasury of the Colony of Rhode Island. He was the father of Lemuel Hastings Arnold and great-great-grandfather of Theodore Francis Green.
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    Charles Albright

    Charles Albright

    Charles Albright (December 13, 1830 – September 28, 1880) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. Charles Albright was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He attended Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1852 and commenced practice in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania. He moved to the Territory of Kansas in 1854 and participated in its early development. He returned to Pennsylvania and resumed the practice of law in Mauch Chunk in 1856. He was a delegate to the Republican National Conventions in 1860 and 1872. During the American Civil War, Albright served in the Union Army and was promoted through the ranks to colonel of the One Hundred and Thirty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Honorably mustered out May 24, 1865. He was recommissioned colonel of the Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Militia July 3, 1863, and honorably mustered out August 10, 1863. He was recommissioned colonel of the Two Hundred and Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, September 4, 1864. On March 7, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Albright to the honorary grade of brevet brigadier general, U.S.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Frank Annunzio

    Frank Annunzio

    Frank Annunzio (January 12, 1915 – April 8, 2001) was an American politician from Chicago, Illinois. Annunzio, an Italian-American, was born in Chicago, where he remained for his entire childhood and much of his adult life. He attended Crane Technical High School and DePaul University. He then had careers as a high school teacher and labor leader of the United Steelworkers of America. Under governor Adlai Stevenson II, he served as the state's Secretary of Labor from 1949 to 1952. In 1964, Annunzio was elected to the United States House of Representatives from a district in Chicago as a member of the United States Democratic Party. He was reelected 13 times and served from 1965 to 1993, deciding not to run for reelection in 1992. He was chairman of several committees including the House Administration Committee during his later terms in congress, and was particularly notable for serving on a subcommittee for consumer affairs. In 1989 he urged people to burn credit cards in order to drive down interest rates and stop themselves from going into debt. Annunzio died in Chicago from complications arising from Parkinson's disease and was interred in the Queen of Heaven Cemetery.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Fred Upton

    Fred Upton

    Frederick Stephen "Fred" Upton (born April 23, 1953) is the U.S. Representative for Michigan's 6th congressional district, serving since 1987. He is a member of the Republican Party and Chairman of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. The district stretches along the Michigan-Indiana border in the southwestern part of the state. Upton was born in St. Joseph, Michigan, the son of Elizabeth B. (née Vial) and Stephen Edward Upton. Upton earned a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Michigan in 1975. He was a member of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, Peninsular Chapter and became a sports editor at The Michigan Daily and thought he might someday cover the Chicago Cubs. He served on the congressional staff of U.S. Congressman David Stockman (R-MI) from 1976 to 1980. He was in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under Ronald Reagan from 1981 to 1985, while David Stockman was OMB Director. A protege of OMB director and former U.S. Congressman Dave Stockman, he ran in Michigan's 4th congressional district against incumbent Republican U.S. Congressman Mark Siljander, Stockman's successor. Upton won the Republican primary 55%-45%. He won the general election with 62% of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    John D. Ashmore

    John D. Ashmore

    John Durant Ashmore (August 18, 1819 – December 5, 1871) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina, and a cousin of Robert T. Ashmore. Born in Greenville District, South Carolina, Ashmore attended the common schools. He studied law and was admitted to the bar but never practiced. He engaged in agricultural pursuits. Ashmore served as member of the South Carolina House of Representatives 1848–1853 and as Comptroller General of South Carolina 1853–1857. Ashmore was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-sixth Congress and served from March 4, 1859, until his resignation on December 21, 1860 upon the attempted secession of South Carolina from the United States of America. He served as chairman of the Committee on Mileage (Thirty-sixth Congress). During the Civil War, Ashmore was elected colonel of the Fourth South Carolina Regiment, but resigned before the regiment was called into service. He engaged in mercantile pursuits in Greenville, South Carolina. He died in Sardis, Mississippi, December 5, 1871. He was buried in Black Jack Cemetery, near Sardis, in Panola County, Mississippi.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Timothy T. Ansberry

    Timothy T. Ansberry

    Timothy Thomas Ansberry (December 24, 1871 – July 5, 1943) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio. Born in Defiance, Ohio, Ansberry attended the public schools. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana, in June 1893. He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Defiance, Ohio. He was in the Justice of the Peace 1893-1895. He served as prosecuting attorney of Defiance County 1895-1903. He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1904 to the Fifty-ninth Congress. Ansberry was elected as a Democrat to the Sixtieth and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1907, until January 9, 1915, when he resigned to accept a judicial position. He served as chairman of the Committee on Elections No. 1 (Sixty-second Congress). He was appointed associate judge of the Ohio Court of Appeals, in which capacity he served until his resignation in 1916. He served as delegate to the 1920 Democratic National Convention at San Francisco and the 1924 Democratic National Convention at New York. He moved to Washington, D.C., in 1916 and engaged in the practice of law until his death. He died in New York City, July 5, 1943. He was interred in Mount Olivet
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Douglas Applegate

    Douglas Applegate

    Douglas "Doug" Applegate (born March 27, 1928) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Ohio. Applegate is a Democrat. Born in Steubenville, Ohio, he attended local public schools, and graduated from Steubenville High School in 1947, after which he engaged in the real estate business. In 1960, Applegate was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives, and was reelected in 1962, 1964 and 1966. By 1968, he had moved up to the Ohio Senate, and was reelected once more in 1972. In 1976, Congressman Wayne Hays opted to retire, and Applegate was looked upon as the frontrunner to replace him. He went on to win that November. He would go on to serve a total of nine terms in the United States House of Representatives. By 1994, Applegate had served almost two decades in the House, and opted to retire. He was succeeded by Bob Ney. Following his tenure, Applegate retired, and has not sought elected office since. The United States Post Office at 150 N. 3rd Street, Steubenville was designated the "Douglas Applegate Post Office" on July 9, 1997.
    5.50
    4 votes
    133
    Peter F Welch

    Peter F Welch

    Peter F. Welch (born May 2, 1947) is the U.S. Representative for Vermont's At-large congressional district, serving since 2007. He is a member of the Democratic Party. He previously served in the Vermont Senate where he was the Minority Leader and President pro tempore. Welch was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1947. He attended local Catholic schools there (Holy Name Grammar School and Cathedral High School). Welch attended College of the Holy Cross, graduating magna cum laude in 1969. In 1973 he earned a law degree from Boalt Hall, the law school of the University of California, Berkeley. He was a partner for 30 years in the personal injury law firm Welch, Graham & Manby, White River Junction, Vermont. Welch is married to Margaret Cheney, a member of the Vermont House of Representatives. His first wife, Joan Smith, died of cancer in 2004. Welch had five stepchildren from his first marriage and now has three stepchildren in his second. In 1980, Welch was elected to the Vermont Senate as a representative from Windsor County. In his second term, Welch was chosen as the Minority Leader, and after Democrats gained control of the Senate, Welch was chosen as President pro
    5.50
    4 votes
    134
    A. Leonard Allen

    A. Leonard Allen

    Asa Leonard Allen (January 5, 1891 – January 5, 1969) was an educator, attorney, and member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Louisiana. He served eight terms as a Democrat from 1937–1953, having represented the now defunct Eighth Congressional District, centered about Alexandria. Allen was born in a log cabin near Winnfield, the seat of Winn Parish, to Asa L. Allen and the former Sophronia Perkins. He was a younger brother of Governor Oscar Kelly Allen. He was educated in the Winn Parish public schools and received a bachelor's degree from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge in 1914. The next year, he married the former Lottie Mae Thompson, and they had two sons, Harwell L. Allen, who became a district judge, and Lyndon Blaine Allen. Allen taught in the rural schools of neighboring Grant Parish from 1914-1917. He was a principal in schools in Georgetown and Verda near Montgomery. Thereafter, he became the superintendent of the Winn Parish system, 1917-1922. He studied law on his own, was admitted to the bar in 1922, and practiced in Winnfield, where he was city attorney for a time. Allen was a prominent Baptist, who served a stint as
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Nathan L. Bachman

    Nathan L. Bachman

    Nathan Lynn Bachman (August 2, 1878 – April 23, 1937) was a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1933 until his death. He was a member of the Democratic Party. Bachman was born in East Tennessee. He attended several colleges, including the former Southwestern Presbyterian University in Clarksville, Tennessee (the predecessor institution to the current Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee; the campus is the current setting of Austin Peay State University), Central University in Richmond, Kentucky (now merged with Centre College in Danville, Kentucky), and Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. He then returned home, attending the former law school of the former University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) before actually graduating from the law school of the University of Virginia in 1903. He began the practice of law in Chattanooga that same year. Bachman was Chattanooga city attorney from 1906 to 1908 and circuit court judge from 1912 to 1918. In 1918 he became an Associate Justice of the Tennessee Supreme Court, resigining in 1924 to run for the U.S. Senate. His 1924 campaign was unsuccessful and he returned to the practice of
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Peleg Arnold

    Peleg Arnold

    Peleg Arnold (1751–1820) was a lawyer, tavern-keeper, jurist, and statesman from Smithfield, Rhode Island (now North Smithfield). He represented Rhode Island as a delegate to the Continental Congress in the 1787–1788 session. He later served as the Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court from 1795 to 1812. Arnold was born on June 10, 1751 at Smithfield (now North Smithfield), the ninth of the fifteen children of Thomas Arnold. His mother was Patience Cook of Newport who was Thomas' third wife. After starting in the common schools, he graduated from Brown University in Providence. Like many of his generation he prospered in a number of careers at the same time, and combined these with a government service and civic efforts. Arnold read law, was admitted to the bar and practiced at Smithfield. He opened and kept the Peleg Arnold Tavern, which still stands at 4 Woonsocket Hill Road in North Smithfield, Rhode Island. Arnold built his home in Union Village, which is now part of North Smithfield. During the Revolutionary War he was the colonel of the 2nd regiment of the Providence County Militia. When the need for additional troops led to the re-formation of the 1st Rhode Island
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Samuel Beach Axtell

    Samuel Beach Axtell

    Samuel Beach Axtell (October 14, 1819 – August 7, 1891). Notable for being the most controversial Chief Justice of the New Mexico Territorial Supreme Court; corrupted administration as Governor of New Mexico; brief tenure as Governor of Utah; and two term Congressman from California. Axtell was born in Franklin County, Ohio, to a family of farmers. An ancestor was an officer in the American Revolutionary army and his grandfather was a Colonel of a New Jersey regiment during the war of 1812. He married Adaline S. Williams of Summit County, Ohio, September 20, 1840 and moved to Mt. Clemens, Michigan in 1843. Axtell was a graduate of the Western Reserve College at Oberlin, Ohio and was admitted to the bar in Ohio in the 1830s. In 1851, Axtell was caught up in the last days of the California Gold Rush. He moved to California and engaged in gold mining along the American River - in which he had little success. Upon the organization of California's counties he became interested in Politics and was elected district attorney of Amador County, holding this office for three terms. He moved to San Francisco in 1860, and was elected to the United States Congress as a Democrat, Representing
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Theodorus Bailey

    Theodorus Bailey

    Theodorus Bailey (October 12, 1758 – September 6, 1828) was an American lawyer and politician from Poughkeepsie, New York. He represented New York in both the U.S. House and Senate. Served in the New York Militia during the American Revolution and postwar in the State Militia 1786-1805. Bailey was born near Fishkill, New York on October 12, 1758 where he attended the rural schools and studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1778 and commenced practice in Poughkeepsie, New York. He served with the New York Militia during the Revolutionary War. He also served in the State militia from 1786 until 1805 and attained the rank of Brigadier General Bailey ran for Congress in March 1789, but was defeated by Federalist Egbert Benson. Bailey was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the 3rd and the 4th United States Congresses, serving from March 4, 1793, to March 4, 1797. He was elected again to the 6th United States Congress, serving from March 4, 1799, to March 4, 1801. In April 1801, he was elected to the New York State Assembly, but vacated his seat before the State Legislature convened, because he was elected to the 7th United States Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Abram Andrew

    Abram Andrew

    Abram Piatt Andrew Jr. (February 12, 1873 – June 3, 1936) was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. Born in La Porte, Indiana, he attended the public schools and the Lawrenceville School. He graduated from Princeton College in 1893, was a member of the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1893 to 1898, and pursued postgraduate studies in the Universities of Halle, Berlin, and Paris. He moved to Gloucester, Massachusetts, and was instructor and assistant professor of economics at Harvard University from 1900 to 1909. He was an expert assistant and editor of publications of the National Monetary Commission from 1908 to 1911, and Director of the United States Mint in 1909 and 1910. From 1910 to 1912 he was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. He organized the American Field Service and in December 1914 sailed to France. He served in France continuously for four and a half years during the First World War (first with the French Army and later with the United States Army.) He was commissioned a major in the United States National Army in September 1917 and promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1918. For his service he was awarded the Legion of Honor by
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Benjamin Adams

    Benjamin Adams

    Benjamin Adams (December 16, 1764 – March 28, 1837) was an American lawyer and politician. Adams was born in Mendon, Massachusetts in 1764. Benjamin Adams grew up in Mendon, which was then a rural agricultural community. He was well educated by existing public schools in that community. He graduated from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island in 1788, where he studied law. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar, and began the practice of the law in Uxbridge, Massachusetts. He was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1809, later winning election to the Massachusetts Senate in 1814 through 1815. In 1816, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts, serving in that body until 1821. He was then reelected to the Massachusetts State Senate, and served there through 1825. He died in Uxbridge in 1837. The Benjamin Adams House is on the National Register of Historic Places in Uxbridge. The house is located at 85 North Main Street, near the "Uxbridge Common Historic District". Benjamin Adams is buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetery, next to the historic Capron Mill in downtown Uxbridge. Another elected Congressman is buried here,
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    John M. Ashbrook

    John M. Ashbrook

    John Milan Ashbrook (September 21, 1928 – April 24, 1982) was an American politician of the Republican Party who served in the United States House of Representatives from Ohio from 1961 until his death. His father was William A. Ashbrook, a newspaper editor, businessman, and U.S. representative. After graduating from Harvard University in 1952 and from Ohio State University's law school in 1955, Ashbrook became publisher of his late father's newspaper, the Johnstown Independent. He was elected to the Ohio House of Representatives in 1956 and served two terms. In 1960 his father's old seat in the U.S. House of Representatives was vacated; Ashbrook ran for and won it. With William Rusher and F. Clifton White, associates from the Young Republicans in the 1950s, Ashbrook was involved in the start-up of the Draft Goldwater movement in 1961. In the 1972 presidential election, Ashbrook ran against incumbent Richard Nixon in some state primaries as an alternative conservative candidate. His slogan "No Left Turns" was illustrated by a mock traffic symbol of a left-turn arrow with a superimposed No symbol. It was meant to symbolize the frustration of some conservatives with Nixon, whom they
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Pete Visclosky

    Pete Visclosky

    Peter John "Pete" Visclosky (born August 13, 1949) is the U.S. Representative for Indiana's 1st congressional district, serving since 1985. He is a member of the Democratic Party. The District lies in Northwest Indiana and includes all of Lake, Newton, Jasper and Benton counties, as well as a major portion of Porter County. Redistricting passed by the Indiana General Assembly in 2011 will change the district's boundaries, effective January 2013, to include all of Lake and Porter counties as well as the western and northwestern townships of LaPorte County, while shifting Benton, Newton and Jasper counties out of the district. Much of the population is based in the Chicago Metropolitan Area. Visclosky was born in Gary, Indiana, the son of John and the late Helen (née Kauzlaric) Visclosky. He is of Slovak descent. He was educated at Andrean High School in Merrillville, Indiana. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Accounting at Indiana University Northwest in Gary, Indiana and went on to earn his juris doctor from Notre Dame Law School. At Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., Visclosky earned a Master of Laws in International and Comparative Law. He worked as a lawyer and staff
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Stephen Mallory

    Stephen Mallory

    Stephen Russell Mallory (1812 – November 9, 1873) served in the United States Senate as, Senator (Democrat) from Florida from 1850 to the secession of his home state and the outbreak of the American Civil War. For much of that period, he was chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs. This was a time of rapid naval reform, and he insisted that the ships of the United States Navy should be as capable as those of Great Britain and France, the foremost navies in the world at that time. He also wrote a bill and guided it through Congress that provided for compulsory retirement of officers who did not meet the standards of the profession. Although he was not a leader in the secession movement, Mallory followed his state out of the Union. When the Confederate States of America was formed, he was named Secretary of the Navy in the administration of President Jefferson Davis. He held the position throughout the existence of the Confederacy. Because of indifference to naval matters by most others in the Confederacy, Mallory was able to shape the Confederate Navy according to the principles he had learned while serving in the US Senate. Some of his ideas, such as the incorporation of armor
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Tom Udall

    Tom Udall

    Thomas Stewart "Tom" Udall (born May 18, 1948) is the junior United States Senator from New Mexico and a member of the Democratic Party. He had represented New Mexico's 3rd congressional district as a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1999. Udall was born in Tucson, Arizona, to Ermalee Lenora (née Webb) and Stewart Udall, the Secretary of the Interior from 1961 to 1969. He attended Prescott College and was graduated with a pre-law degree in 1970. In 1975, he was graduated from Cambridge University in England with a Bachelor of Law degree. That fall, he enrolled in the University of New Mexico School of Law and was graduated with a Juris Doctor in 1977. Following that graduation, Udall was a law clerk to Chief Judge Oliver Seth of the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. His legal career then included appointments as Assistant U.S. Attorney in the criminal division and Chief Counsel to the Department of Health and Environment. In 1982, Udall ran for Congress in the newly-created 3rd district, based in the state capital, Santa Fe and most of north of the state, however, he lost the Democratic primary to Bill Richardson. In 1989, he ran for Congress again in a
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Clifford Allen

    Clifford Allen

    Clifford Robertson Allen (January 6, 1912 – June 18, 1978) was a Tennessee attorney and Democratic politician. Allen was born in Jacksonville, Florida, and graduated from Friends High School (now Sidwell Friends) in Washington, D.C. He graduated from the Cumberland School of Law in Lebanon, Tennessee in 1931 and was admitted to the Tennessee bar the same year. He was elected to a first term in the Tennessee State Senate in 1948. In 1950 he first ran for governor of Tennessee in the Democratic primary against incumbent governor Gordon Browning and was defeated in a very close election where Allen's main issue was that the state should start providing free school textbooks to all school children. Running again in 1952 he was again defeated, running third (Frank G. Clement was the winner, with Browning finishing second). Allen was seen by some as the representative of the urban and progressive forces as opposed to those whose support was largely rural, such as Clement. He was also a staunch opponent of Boss Crump of Memphis, and was invariably opposed by the Crump political machine. The rivalry between Allen and Clement was such that on one occasion, health inspectors shut down a
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    David Baird, Jr.

    David Baird, Jr.

    David Baird, Jr. (October 10, 1881 – February 28, 1955) was a U.S. Senator from New Jersey. Born in Camden, New Jersey to Senator David Baird, Baird Jr. graduated from Lawrenceville School in 1899 and from Princeton University in 1903. Like his father, he engaged in the lumber business and banking in Camden from 1903 to 1929. On November 30, 1929, Baird was appointed as a Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Walter E. Edge. He served from November 30, 1929 to December 2, 1930, when a duly elected successor was qualified. Baird was not a candidate for election to the vacancy in 1930. Baird was an unsuccessful candidate for Governor of New Jersey in 1931, after which he resumed former business pursuits. He was appointed by the Governor to the Delaware River Joint Commission to fill an unexpired term in 1938. He then worked as insurance broker, and died in Camden in 1955, aged 73. He was interred in Harleigh Cemetery.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Goldsmith Bailey

    Goldsmith Bailey

    Goldsmith Fox Bailey (July 17, 1823 – May 8, 1862) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. Born in Westmoreland, New Hampshire. When he was three years old, his widowed mother moved with him to Fitchburg. Bailey attended the public schools of Fitchburg, Massachusetts. When he was 17 Bailey started work as an apprentice for the Bellows Falls Gazzette. By 1844 Bailey became editor and publisher of the newspaper. In 1845 Bailey began to study law, first with William C. Bradley in Westminster, VT and later with the firm of Torrey and Wood in Fitchburg. Bailey was admitted to the bar in 1848 and commenced practice in Fitchburg, Massachusetts as a partner in the law firm of N. Wood & Co. Bailey served on the Fitchburg, Massachusetts school committee from 1849 to 1854. Bailey was appointed postmaster of Fitchburg on May 3, 1851 and served until May 4, 1853, when his successor was appointed. Bailey served as member of the Massachusetts house of representatives in 1857. Bailey served in the Massachusetts State Senate 1858-1860. Bailey was the Republican Party candidate for congress in Massachusetts' ninth congressional district in the 1860 election. Bailey was elected as a Republican
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Henry Baldwin

    Henry Baldwin

    Henry Baldwin (January 14, 1780 – April 21, 1844) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from January 18, 1830, to April 21, 1844. Descended from an aristocratic British family dating back to the seventeenth century, Baldwin was born in New Haven, Connecticut, the son of Michael Baldwin and Theodora Walcott. He is the half-brother of Abraham Baldwin. He attended Hopkins School, and received a B.A at age 17 from Yale College in 1797, he attended Litchfield Law School and read law in 1798. He was a Deputy state attorney general of Allegheny County and eventually Crawford County, Pennsylvania (after its founding in 1800) from 1799 to 1801. He was also the publisher of The Tree of Liberty, a Republican newspaper. After the death of his first wife, Marana Norton, Baldwin married Sally Ellicott, and they established a residence in Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Baldwin was elected to the United States Congress as a member of the Democratic-Republican Party in 1816, representing Pennsylvania, but resigned after six years because of his declining health and failing finances. He strongly supported the election of Andrew Jackson in the election of 1828. On January
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Howard Baker

    Howard Baker

    Howard Henry Baker, Jr. (born November 15, 1925) is a former Senate Majority Leader, Republican U.S. Senator from Tennessee, White House Chief of Staff, and a former United States Ambassador to Japan. Known in Washington, D.C. as the "Great Conciliator", Baker is often regarded as one of the most successful senators in terms of brokering compromises, enacting legislation, and maintaining civility. A story is sometimes told of a reporter telling a senior Democratic senator that privately, a plurality of his Democratic colleagues would vote for Baker for President of the United States. The senator is reported to have replied, "You're wrong. He'd win a majority." Baker was born in Huntsville, in Scott County, Tennessee, the son of Dora Ann (née Ladd) and Howard H. Baker, Sr. His father served as a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from 1951 until 1964, representing a traditionally Republican district in East Tennessee. Baker attended The McCallie School in Chattanooga, and after graduating he attended Tulane University in New Orleans. During World War II, he trained at a U.S. Navy facility on the campus of the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Jason Altmire

    Jason Altmire

    Jason Altmire (born March 7, 1968) is the U.S. Representative for Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district, serving since 2007. He is a member of the Democratic Party. Altmire was born in Kittanning, Pennsylvania, and grew up in Lower Burrell, Pennsylvania, raised by his single mother, Arlene L. Altmire. His ancestry includes German, Scottish-Irish, and Polish. He was a record-breaking two-sport letterman at Burrell High School. He set a school record in track and field that stood for many years and was recognized as an all-star wide receiver in football. A serious knee injury kept him off the athletic field as a high school senior, and in 1986 he matriculated at Florida State University, in Tallahassee. Following a lengthy rehabilitation of his knee injury, he tried out for and made the Seminole football team as a walk on. He graduated in 1990 with a B.S. in Political Science and worked in the Tallahassee campaign office of Douglas "Pete" Peterson, then a candidate for Congress in Florida's Second Congressional District. He later earned a Master's in Health Administration from George Washington University in Washington, DC. After Peterson won the 1990 congressional race against
    6.00
    3 votes
    151
    Joseph Anderson

    Joseph Anderson

    Joseph Inslee Anderson (November 5, 1757 – April 17, 1837) was an American soldier, judge, and politician, who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1799 to 1815, and later as the first Comptroller of the United States Treasury. He also served as one of three judges of the Southwest Territory in the 1790s, and was a delegate to the Tennessee state constitutional convention in 1796. Anderson was born at White Marsh, near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of William Anderson and Elizabeth Inslee. In 1776, following the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, he enlisted in the 3rd New Jersey Regiment of the Continental Army, and rose to the rank of captain and paymaster in less than two years. Anderson fought at the Battle of Monmouth, and was with the army during its difficult 1777 wintering at Valley Forge. In 1781, he transferred to the 1st New Jersey Regiment, and fought with this unit at the Battle of Yorktown. At the end of the war, Anderson was discharged with the rank of major. Having studied law prior to the war, he was admitted to the Delaware bar, and practiced law in Delaware from 1784 to 1791. In 1791, President George Washington appointed Anderson
    6.00
    3 votes
    152
    Robert T. Ashmore

    Robert T. Ashmore

    Robert Thomas Ashmore (February 22, 1904 – October 5, 1989) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina, cousin of John D. Ashmore. Born on a farm near Greenville, South Carolina, Ashmore attended the public schools of Greenville. He graduated from Furman University Law School, Greenville, South Carolina, in 1927. While a student he engaged in agricultural work, retail sales, and as a substitute rural mail carrier. He was admitted to the bar in January 1928 and engaged in the practice of law in Greenville, South Carolina. He served as solicitor of Greenville County Court 1930–1934, and then as solicitor of the thirteenth judicial circuit of South Carolina 1936–1953. During World War II, while on official leave from duties as solicitor, Ashmore volunteered for service in the United States Army in December 1942, serving in the United States and overseas until discharged from active duty in May 1946, as a lieutenant colonel in the United States Army Reserve. He was promoted to colonel in 1955. Ashmore was elected as a Democrat to the Eighty-third Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Joseph R. Bryson. He was reelected to the Eighty-fourth and to the six succeeding
    6.00
    3 votes
    153
    William B. Allison

    William B. Allison

    William Boyd Allison (March 2, 1829 — August 4, 1908) was an early leader of the Iowa Republican Party, who represented northeastern Iowa for four consecutive terms in the U.S. House before representing his state for six consecutive terms in the U.S. Senate. He died soon after overcoming his principal hurdle to election for a record seventh term in the Senate. Born in Perry, Ohio, Allison was educated at Wooster Academy. Afterward, he spent a year at Allegheny College in Pennsylvania, then graduated from Western Reserve College (then located in Hudson, Ohio) in 1849. He then studied law and began practicing in Ashland, Ohio. While practicing law there from 1852 until 1857, he was a delegate to the 1855 Ohio Republican Convention and an unsuccessful candidate for district attorney in 1856. In 1857, he moved to Dubuque, Iowa, which would serve as his hometown for the last fifty years of his life. After his arrival in Dubuque, Allison took a prominent part in the politics of the nascent Republican Party. Allison was a delegate to the 1860 Republican National Convention in Chicago, which nominated Abraham Lincoln for President of the United States. During the subsequent Civil War, he
    6.00
    3 votes
    154
    Henry Dixon Allen

    Henry Dixon Allen

    Henry Dixon Allen (June 24, 1854 – March 9, 1924) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky. Born near Henderson, Kentucky, Allen moved with his parents to Morganfield, Union County, in 1855. He attended the common schools and Morganfield Collegiate Institute. He taught school in Union County 1869-1875. He studied medicine and was graduated from the Missouri Medical College, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1877. Practiced medicine in Union County from 1877 to 1878. Abandoned medicine and studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1878 and commenced practice in Morganfield, Kentucky. County school commissioner 1879-1881. He served as prosecuting attorney of Union County 1882-1891. Allen was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-sixth and Fifty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1899-March 3, 1903). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1902. He resumed the practice of law. He also engaged in banking and agricultural pursuits. He died in Morganfield, Kentucky, March 9, 1924. He was interred in Masonic Cemetery.
    5.00
    4 votes
    155
    William Reynolds Archer, Jr.

    William Reynolds Archer, Jr.

    William Reynolds “Bill” Archer, Jr. (born on March 22, 1928 in Houston, Texas) is a former American lawyer and politician. Archer served two terms, from 1967 to 1971, in the Texas House of Representatives — changing from the Democratic to the Republican party in 1969 — and later represented Texas in the United States House as a Republican for 30 years, from 1971 until 2001, serving for his last six years as Chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee. After graduating from St. Thomas High School, Archer attended Rice University and then transferred to the University of Texas at Austin where he obtained his bachelor's (B.B.A.) and law degrees (LL.B.). At the University of Texas he was a member of the Texas Rho Chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Upon graduating from law school in 1951, Archer was admitted to the State Bar of Texas and started up his practice in Houston, Texas. Within months, Archer was drafted and served as a captain in the United States Air Force after the onset of the Korean War. Returning from service in 1953, Archer became the president of Uncle Johnny Mills, Inc. and stayed there until 1963. Meanwhile, Archer started his career as a politician. He
    5.00
    4 votes
    156
    Elmer Thomas

    Elmer Thomas

    John William Elmer Thomas (September 8, 1876 – September 19, 1965) was a Representative and a Senator from Oklahoma. Born on a farm near Greencastle, Indiana, he attended the common schools; graduated from the Central Normal College (now Canterbury College), Danville, Indiana, in 1897 and from the graduate department of DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, in 1900. He studied law; admitted to the Indiana bar in 1897 and to the Oklahoma bar in 1900, and commenced practice in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; moved to Lawton, Oklahoma, in 1901 and continued the practice of law; member, State senate 1907–1920, serving as president pro tempore 1910–1913; founded the town of Medicine Park, Oklahoma 1908; unsuccessful candidate for election in 1920 to the Sixty-seventh Congress; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-eighth and Sixty-ninth Congresses (March 4, 1923–March 3, 1927). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1926, having become a candidate for United States Senator; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1926; reelected in 1932, 1938 and 1944 and served from March 4, 1927, to January 3, 1951; unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1950; chairman, Committee on
    5.67
    3 votes
    157
    Samuel W. Arnold

    Samuel W. Arnold

    Samuel Washington (Wat) Arnold (September 21, 1879 – December 18, 1961) was a U.S. Representative from Missouri. Born on September 21, 1879 on a farm near Downing in Schuyler County, Missouri, he was the son of Cumberland Wilson Arnold and Mary Elizabeth (Hill) Arnold. He attended the Coffey, Missoui rural school, then advanced to the North Missouri Normal School (now known as Truman State University) in Kirksville, Missouri, graduating in 1902. After a brief career as a teacher and superintendent in several rural northeast Missouri schools, Mr. Arnold moved to St. Louis, Missouri in 1904 for employment with the internal revenue office. It was also in 1904, on Christmas Eve, that Sam married his wife Myra Gertrude Mills. The following year, 1905, the Arnolds moved to Atlanta, Missouri where he began a fifty-plus year career as a lumberman. Seeking a larger customer base Arnold moved his family to Kirksville in 1908 and established the Arnold Lumber Company. It continued to be a fixture of the Kirksville business community for the next seventy-five years. Mr. Arnold was elected as a Republican to the Seventy-eighth, Seventy-ninth, and Eightieth Congresses (January 3, 1943-January 3,
    5.67
    3 votes
    158
    Elizabeth B. Andrews

    Elizabeth B. Andrews

    Elizabeth Bullock Andrews (February 12, 1911 – December 2, 2002) was a U.S. Representative from Alabama, wife of congressman George William Andrews, and the first woman to represent Alabama in the United States House of Representatives. Born Leslie Elizabeth Bullock in Geneva, Alabama, Andrews attended Geneva public schools. She earned a B.S. from Montevallo College (now the University of Montevallo), Montevallo, Alabama, in 1932. She was a teacher. She married George William Andrews on November 25, 1936; the marriage lasted more than 35 years until December 25, 1971 (his death). Andrews was elected as a Democrat by special election to the Ninety-second Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of her husband, United States Representative George W. Andrews and served the remainder of that Congress (April 4, 1972 – January 3, 1973). She was not a candidate for reelection to the Ninety-third Congress in 1972. She remained the only woman elected to represent Alabama in either House of Congress until the elections of Representatives Martha Roby and Terri Sewell in 2010. She died on December 2, 2002, in Birmingham, Alabama. She was interred in Oak Hill Cemetery, Union Springs,
    6.50
    2 votes
    159
    John Adler

    John Adler

    John Herbert Adler (August 23, 1959 – April 4, 2011) was a U.S. Representative for New Jersey's 3rd congressional district, serving from 2009 until 2011. He was a member of the Democratic Party. He was formerly a member of the New Jersey Senate from 1992 to 2009, where he represented the 6th Legislative District. The district stretches from the suburbs of Philadelphia to Ocean County. He lost the 2010 congressional election to former football player Jon Runyan (of the Philadelphia Eagles) and died the following year. In 2012 Adler's widow, Shelley Adler, announced her candidacy for the seat. Shelley Adler is running for Congress in New Jersey’s Third Congressional District. Adler was born in Philadelphia, the son of Mary Louise (née Beatty) and John Herbert Adler. His ancestry included German (including Bavarian), English, and Irish. He moved to Haddonfield, New Jersey when he was two years old. His father owned a small dry cleaning store. When Adler was in high school, his father died after a series of heart attacks. Adler and his mother lost the family business, and survived off his father's Social Security benefits for widows and minors. He attended Haddonfield Memorial High
    6.50
    2 votes
    160
    John Baldacci

    John Baldacci

    John Elias Baldacci (born January 30, 1955) is an American politician who served as the 73rd Governor of the U.S. state of Maine from 2003 until 2011. A Democrat, he also served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 2003. Born in Bangor, Maine, Baldacci grew up with seven siblings in a Lebanese-Italian family. As a child, he worked in the family business, Mama Baldacci's restaurant in Bangor. A 1973 graduate of Bangor High School, he received a B.S. degree in History from the University of Maine at Orono in 1986. Baldacci was first elected to public office in 1978 at the age of 23, when he served on the Bangor City Council. He continued in politics, winning election to the Maine Senate in 1982. Baldacci served as a State Senator for 12 years. In 1994, following the retirement of his cousin, United States Senator George J. Mitchell, Baldacci won election to the U.S. House of Representatives from Maine's Second District, replacing Olympia Snowe, who had moved on to Mitchell's open Senate seat. He was reelected to Congress in the elections of 1996, 1998, and 2000, serving on the House Agriculture Committee and the Committee on Transportation and
    6.50
    2 votes
    161
    Theron Akin

    Theron Akin

    Theron Akin (May 23, 1855 – March 26, 1933) was a U.S. Representative from New York. Born in Johnstown, New York, Akin attended the common schools of Amsterdam, New York, and also was privately tutored at home. He engaged in agricultural pursuits. He was graduated from the New York Dental College and practiced for twelve years in Amsterdam, New York. He moved to Akin (later Fort Johnson), New York, and engaged in agricultural pursuits in Montgomery County. He served as president of the village of Fort Johnson, New York. Akin was elected as a Progressive Republican to the Sixty-first Congress (March 4, 1910-March 3, 1912). He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination on the Progressive ticket in 1912. He resumed agricultural pursuits. He was an unsuccessful candidate for election to the Sixty-fourth Congress on the Progressive ticket in 1914. He served as mayor of Amsterdam, New York from 1920 to 1924. He resumed his former pursuits. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican and Democratic mayoralty nomination in 1927. He died in Amsterdam, New York, March 26, 1933. He was interred in Pine Grove Cemetery, Tribes Hill, New York.
    6.50
    2 votes
    162
    William P. Baker

    William P. Baker

    William Pond Baker (born June 14, 1940, in Oakland, California) is a former United States Congressman from California. He attended San Jose State University, from which he earned a business degree. Baker served as a member of the United States Coast Guard reserve from 1957 to 1965. After graduating from college, Baker worked as a budget analyst for a large financial corporation. He then took a similar job with the California Department of Finance, which he held for four years. Baker worked as the vice president of a Taxpayers Association until he successfully ran for a seat in the California State Assembly as a Republican in 1980. He served six terms in a district that included portions of Contra Costa and Alameda Counties. In 1992, Baker ran for Congress and served two terms in the House before losing reelection in 1996 to Ellen Tauscher. Baker was a fiscal and social conservative.
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    William Appleton

    William Appleton

    William Appleton (November 16, 1786 – February 15, 1862) was a congressman from Massachusetts from 1851 to 1855 and briefly during the Civil War. Born in Brookfield, Massachusetts, the son of the Reverend Joseph Appleton, he attended schools in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, Francestown, New Hampshire and Tyngsborough, Massachusetts. At fifteen years of age he started work at a country store in Temple, New Hampshire and later moved to Boston, Massachusetts in 1807 to engaged in mercantile pursuits. He became President of the Boston Branch of the United States Bank in 1832 and served until 1836. He was also at one time president of the Provident Institution for Savings and Massachusetts General Hospital. He gave $30,000 to the latter institution, and was noted for his benevolence. In 1850, Appleton was elected a Whig to the 32nd Congress to represent Massachusetts's first district. He won reelection to the 33rd Congress, this time representing Massachusetts's fifth district, however lost the elections to the two following congresses in 1854 and 1856. He was later re-elected to the congress in 1860 as a Constitutional Unionist and started in 1861, but resigned later the same year due to
    4.75
    4 votes
    164
    Dick Armey

    Dick Armey

    Richard Keith "Dick" Armey (/ˈɑrmi/; born July 7, 1940) is a former U.S. Representative from Texas' 26th congressional district (1985–2003) and House Majority Leader (1995–2003). He was one of the engineers of the "Republican Revolution" of the 1990s, in which Republicans were elected to majorities of both houses of Congress for the first time in four decades. Armey was one of the chief authors of the Contract with America. Armey is also an author and former economics professor. After his congressional career, he worked as a consultant, advisor, and lobbyist. Armey was born in the farming town of Cando, North Dakota, the son of Marion (née Gutschlag) and Glenn Armey. He grew up in a rural area. He graduated from Jamestown College with a B.A. and then received an M.A. from the University of North Dakota and a PhD in economics from the University of Oklahoma. Armey is a member of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. Armey served on the economics faculty at the University of Montana from 1964 to 1965, was an Assistant Professor of economics at West Texas State University from 1967 to 1968, an Assistant Professor of economics at Austin College from 1968 to 1972, an Associate Professor of
    7.00
    1 votes
    165
    James C. Allen

    James C. Allen

    James Cameron Allen (January 29, 1822 – January 30, 1912) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois. Born in Shelby County, Kentucky, Allen attended the public schools. He moved to Indiana in 1830. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1843 and commenced practice in Sullivan, Indiana. He served as prosecuting attorney for the seventh judicial district of Indiana 1846-1848. He moved to Palestine, Illinois, in 1848 and continued the practice of law. He served as member of the State house of representatives in 1850 and 1851. Allen was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-third Congress (March 4, 1853-March 3, 1855). Presented credentials as a Member-elect to the Thirty-fourth Congress and served from March 4, 1855, to July 18, 1856, when the House decided he was not entitled to the seat. Allen was subsequently elected to fill the vacancy thus caused and served from November 4, 1856, to March 3, 1857. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1856. Clerk of the House of Representatives in the Thirty-fifth Congress 1857-1859. He was an unsuccessful candidate for Governor in 1860. Allen was elected circuit court judge in April 1861 and served until he resigned in 1863. Allen was
    7.00
    1 votes
    166
    John G. Alexander

    John G. Alexander

    John Grant Alexander (July 16, 1893 – December 18, 1971) was a Representative to the U.S. Congress from Minnesota; born in Texas Valley, Cortland County, New York; attended the public schools; was graduated from the law department of Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, in 1916; was admitted to the New York bar the same year; moved to Redwood Falls, in 1916; was admitted to the Minnesota bar in 1917 and commenced practice in Lynd; engaged in the banking business 1917 – 1923; during the First World War served as a private in the Three Hundred and Eighty-sixth Ambulance Company in 1918; engaged in the insurance business and in real estate management in Minneapolis, in 1924; member of the Minnesota National Guard 1927 – 1937; elected as a Republican to the 76th congress, (January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1941); unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1940; unsuccessful candidate for Governor in 1942; resumed the business of real estate management and insurance; resided in Minneapolis, where he died December 8, 1971; interment in Lakewood Cemetery.
    7.00
    1 votes
    167
    Jonathan Williams

    Jonathan Williams

    Jonathan Williams (May 20, 1751 – May 16, 1815), American businessman, military figure, politician and writer. He became Chief of Engineers of the Army Corps of Engineers, was the first superintendent of United States Military Academy, and was elected to the Fourteenth United States Congress. Williams was born in Boston, Massachusetts and attended Harvard University. Williams, a grandnephew of Benjamin Franklin, spent most of the period from 1770 to 1785 in England and France, where he assisted Franklin with business affairs and served as a commercial agent for the U.S. Navy in Nantes. Back in the United States, he joined the American Philosophical Society in 1788 and published articles on scientific subjects. President John Adams appointed Williams a major in the Corps of Artillerists and Engineers in February 1801 and President Thomas Jefferson made him the Army's Inspector of Fortifications and assigned him to serve as the first superintendent of West Point in December 1801. The following year Jefferson also appointed him to concurrently command the separate Corps of Engineers established by Congress on March 16, 1802. He vacated (not resigned) his Superintendent position in
    7.00
    1 votes
    168
    Richard Baker

    Richard Baker

    Richard Hugh Baker (born May 22, 1948), an American politician, is a lobbyist and former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, having represented the 6th District of Louisiana from 1987 to 2008. The son of a Methodist minister, Baker was born in New Orleans and graduated from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He stayed in Baton Rouge after graduation and founded a real estate agency there. In 1971, just a year out of school, he was elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives as a Democrat from a predominantly blue-collar district in Baton Rouge and served eight terms, eventually becoming chairman of the Transportation Committee. In 1986, Baker switched to the Republicans because of a long-running feud with Governor Edwin Edwards. Soon afterwards, 6th District Republican Congressman Henson Moore, announced that he was running for the Senate seat being vacated by the retiring Russell B. Long. (Moore was defeated in that race by 7th District Democratic Congressman John Breaux). Moore encouraged Baker to run for the seat, which is based in Baton Rouge and includes most of that city's suburbs. Baker (51 percent) defeated Democrats Tommy Hudson
    7.00
    1 votes
    169
    Robert B. Van Valkenburg

    Robert B. Van Valkenburg

    Robert Bruce Van Valkenburgh (September 4, 1821 – August 1, 1888) was a United States Representative from New York, officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War, and subsequent US Minister Resident to Japan. Born in Prattsburgh, Steuben County, New York, he attended Franklin Academy there. He studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in Bath. He was a member of the New York State Assembly (Steuben Co., 1st D.) in 1852, 1857 and 1858. In 1858, he was the Republican candidate for Speaker, but was defeated by Democrat Thomas G. Alvord on the 53rd ballot. Van Valkenburgh was in command of the recruiting depot in Elmira and organized seventeen regiments early in the Civil War. He was elected as a Republican to the 37th and 38th United States Congresses, holding office from March 4, 1861, to March 3, 1865. While in the House he was Chairman of the Committee on Militia (37th and 38th Congresses). He served as colonel of the One Hundred and Seventh Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, and was its commander at the Battle of Antietam. Following the war, he was Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs in 1865. He was appointed Minister Resident to Japan on January
    7.00
    1 votes
    170
    Samuel Adams

    Samuel Adams

    Samuel Adams (September 27 [O.S. September 16] 1722 – October 2, 1803) was an American statesman, political philosopher, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. As a politician in colonial Massachusetts, Adams was a leader of the movement that became the American Revolution, and was one of the architects of the principles of American republicanism that shaped the political culture of the United States. He was a second cousin to President John Adams. Born in Boston, Adams was brought up in a religious and politically active family. A graduate of Harvard College, he was an unsuccessful businessman and tax collector before concentrating on politics. As an influential official of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and the Boston Town Meeting in the 1760s, Adams was a part of a movement opposed to the British Parliament's efforts to tax the British American colonies without their consent. His 1768 circular letter calling for colonial cooperation prompted the occupation of Boston by British soldiers, eventually resulting in the Boston Massacre of 1770. To help coordinate resistance to what he saw as the British government's attempts to violate the British
    7.00
    1 votes
    171
    Charles Laban Abernethy

    Charles Laban Abernethy

    Charles Laban Abernethy (18 March 1872 – 23 February 1955) was a Democratic U.S. Congressman from North Carolina between 1922 and 1935. Born in Rutherford College, North Carolina, Abernethy attended local public schools and Rutherford College before moving to Beaufort, North Carolina in 1893. There, he founded the Beaufort Herald newspaper. Abernethy studied law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and was admitted to the bar in 1895. Practicing law in Beaufort, he was solicitor of the third (later the fifth) judicial circuit for twelve years, and a member of the executive committee of the North Carolina Democratic Party between 1898 and 1900. Abernethy moved to New Bern, North Carolina in 1913, and continued to practice law there. In 1922, he was chosen, in a special election, to fill the seat vacated by the death of Rep. Samuel M. Brinson; he was re-elected to five more terms, serving between November 7, 1922 and January 3, 1935, before being defeated for re-election in 1934. After leaving Congress, he resumed his law practice, retiring in 1938. Abnernethy died in 1955 in New Bern and is buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery.
    5.33
    3 votes
    172
    Elisha Hunt Allen

    Elisha Hunt Allen

    Elisha Hunt Allen (1804–1883) was an American congressman, lawyer, diplomat, and judge and diplomat for the Kingdom of Hawaii. Elisha Hunt Allen was born January 28, 1804 in New Salem, Massachusetts. His father was Massachusetts minister, lawyer, and politician Samuel Clesson Allen (1772–1804) and mother was Mary Hunt. He attended New Salem Academy and graduated from Williams College in 1823. Allen was admitted to the bar in 1825 and commenced practice in Brattleboro, Vermont. In 1828 he married Sarah Elizabeth Fessenden. They had four children, but she died in 1845. In 1830 he moved to Bangor, Maine and entered into practice with John Appleton (born 1804), who would subsequently become Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Court. Appleton would also marry Allen's sister Sarah in 1834. Allen was a member of Bangor's first City Council, from 1834, and from 1835 to 1840 was a member of the Maine House of Representatives, representing Bangor. He served as its Speaker in 1838. From 1841 until 1843, he served in the U.S. House of Representatives as a member of the Whig party, but his district (Maine's 8th congressional district) was eliminated before the next election based on census data.
    5.33
    3 votes
    173
    Jerome Ambro

    Jerome Ambro

    Jerome Anthony Ambro, Jr. (June 27, 1928 – March 4, 1993) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1975 to 1981. Born in Brooklyn, New York, he attended Brooklyn public elementary schools and graduated from Grover Cleveland High School, Queens, New York in 1946. Ambro earned a B.A. from New York University in 1955. He served in the United States Army as a member of the Military Police from 1951-1953 where he attained the rank of sergeant. He served the town of Huntington as a budget office and purchasing and personnel director from 1960–1967. Later, served on the Suffolk County, New York Board of Supervisors from 1968–1969. From 1968-1974 he was served four terms as Supervisor for the town of Huntington. He was simultaneously chairman of Huntington's Urban Renewal Agency, as well as president of Freeholders and Commonalty of the Town of Huntington. In 1970, he challenged Basil Paterson for the Democratic nomination for Lieutenant Governor of New York, but was defeated in the primary election. He was elected as a Democrat to the 94th, 95th and 96th United States Congresses, and served from January 3, 1975, to January 3, 1981. After leaving Congress, Ambro
    5.33
    3 votes
    174
    John Baptista Ashe

    John Baptista Ashe

    John Baptista Ashe (1748 – November 27, 1802) was an American planter, soldier, and statesman from North Carolina. He was born in Rocky Point township of Pender County, North Carolina in 1748, the son of Samuel Ashe. During the American Revolutionary War, he served in the North Carolina Line of the Continental Army, rising to the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was at Valley Forge and fought in the Battle of Eutaw Springs. Ashe was elected to the North Carolina House of Commons and served as Speaker of that body. He was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1787. In 1789, Ashe was a delegate and Chairman of the Committee of the Whole of the state convention that ratified the U.S. Constitution. That same year, he served in the North Carolina Senate. Ashe was elected to the First United States Congress and the Second United States Congress as an "Anti-Administration" (what became Anti-Federalist or Democratic-Republican) candidate, serving from 1790 to 1793. In 1802, the North Carolina General Assembly elected Ashe Governor, but he died before he could take office. He is buried in Halifax. His namesake and nephew, John Baptista Ashe, served in Congress as a Representative from
    5.33
    3 votes
    175
    Pete Wilson

    Pete Wilson

    Peter Barton “Pete” Wilson (born August 23, 1933) is an American politician from California. Wilson, a Republican, served as the 36th governor of California (1991–1999), the culmination of more than three decades in the public arena that included eight years as a United States Senator (1983–1991), eleven years as Mayor of San Diego (1971–1982) and four years as a California State Assemblyman (1967–1971). Peter Barton Wilson was born on August 23, 1933, in Lake Forest, Illinois, a suburb north of Chicago. His parents were James Boone Wilson and Margaret Callaghan Wilson. His father was originally a jewelry salesman who later became a successful advertising executive. The Wilson family moved to St. Louis, Missouri when Pete was in junior high school. There, he attended the St. Louis Country Day School, an exclusive private high school, where he won an award in his senior year for combined scholarship, athletics, and citizenship. In the fall of 1952, Pete Wilson enrolled at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, where he received a U.S. Navy (Marine Corps) ROTC scholarship, majored in English, and earned his Bachelor of Arts degree. After graduating from Yale, Wilson served for
    5.33
    3 votes
    176
    Sherlock James Andrews

    Sherlock James Andrews

    Sherlock James Andrews (November 17, 1801 – February 11, 1880) lawyer and congressman born in Wallingford, Connecticut to Dr. John Andrews and Abigail Atwater. He graduated from Union College, Schenectady, New York, in 1821 and studied law at Yale. He married Ursula McCurdy Allen on December 1, 1828 and settled in Cleveland, Ohio. He was an intricate part of the early development of Cleveland as the first president of the city council and the public library board. He advocated for and promoted the building of the Cleveland & Pittsburgh Railway. In 1840 he was elected to the Twenty-seventh Congress on the Whig platform. In 1842 health issues compelled him not to seek nomination for a second term. He was appointed Judge of the superior court of Cleveland which he served from 1848 to 1850. Lost election in 1851 to the Ohio Supreme Court. He was a delegate in the Ohio constitutional convention from 1850-1851. In 1859 at Wellington, Ohio he was one of the attorneys defending the men who rescued John Price from “slave catchers”. His political career ended serving as a delegate on the constitutional convention of 1873. "Andrews, Sherlock James." Dictionary of American Biography. Vol. 1,
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    Alexander O. Anderson

    Alexander O. Anderson

    Alexander Outlaw Anderson (November 10, 1794 – May 23, 1869) was an American attorney who represented Tennessee in the United States Senate, and later served in the California State Senate, and on the California Supreme Court. The son of longtime U.S. Senator Joseph Anderson, he was born at his father's home, "Soldier's Rest", in Jefferson County (now Hamblen County), Tennessee. As a youth he graduated from Washington College in Greeneville, Tennessee. He volunteered for service in the War of 1812 and fought under Andrew Jackson in the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. Later that year he was admitted to the bar and began a practice in Dandridge, Tennessee. Afterwards he moved to Knoxville, and then served as the superintendent of the United States Land Office in Alabama in 1836. He was an agent in the Indian removals of 1838 for Alabama and Florida. He was elected to the United States Senate by the Tennessee General Assembly to the vacancy caused by the resignation of Senator Hugh Lawson White, a member of the Whig party whose resignation was orchestrated by Governor James K. Polk so that a Democratic senator could be appointed. Anderson served in that body from February 26, 1840, to
    6.00
    2 votes
    178
    George Ashmun

    George Ashmun

    George Ashmun (December 25, 1804 – July 16, 1870) was a Whig member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts. Ashmun was born in Blandford, Massachusetts to Eli P. Ashmun and Lucy Hooker. He graduated from Yale in 1823 and was married to Martha E. Hall in 1828. He served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1833 to 1837, and the Massachusetts Senate from 1838 to 1840. In 1841, he returned to the Massachusetts House where he served as Speaker. Ashmun was elected to the U.S. Congress from the Sixth District of Massachusetts in 1844, held office from 1845 to 1851 and was a member of the committees on the judiciary, Indian affairs, and rules. He opposed the Mexican-American War, and was a strong supporter of Daniel Webster. After leaving Congress, Ashmun moved to Springfield, Massachusetts where he spent the rest of his life. There he met newspaper publisher Samuel Bowles (journalist), with whom he helped to found the U.S. Republican Party. Immediately, Ashmun joined the Republican Party, and presided over the Republican Party's convention in 1860 that nominated Abraham Lincoln for President. George Ashmun died in Springfield, Massachusetts on July 16,
    6.00
    2 votes
    179
    Samuel George Andrews

    Samuel George Andrews

    Samuel George Andrews (1796–1863) was an American politician from New York. He was Mayor of Rochester, New York in 1840 and 1856. He was Clerk of the New York State Senate in 1840 and 1841. He was elected as a Whig to the 35th United States Congress, holding office from March 4, 1857, to March 3, 1859.
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    Wendell Anderson

    Wendell Anderson

    Wendell Richard "Wendy" Anderson (born February 1, 1933) is an American politician and was the 33rd Governor of Minnesota from January 4, 1971 to December 29, 1976. In late 1976, he resigned the governor's office in order to be named U.S. Senator to replace Walter Mondale, who had been elected Vice President of the United States. He served in the U.S. Senate from December 30, 1976 until his term ended on December 29, 1978. Anderson was born in Saint Paul in 1933. He attended Johnson High School and went on to the University of Minnesota, where he received a B.A. in 1954. He later served in the United States Army during 1956 and 1957 and earned his law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1960. Anderson played defense for the University of Minnesota from 1951 to 1954, and was a member of the U.S. hockey team that won a silver medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics. Long after his on-ice career ended, he was drafted by the Minnesota Fighting Saints in the inaugural World Hockey Association draft of 1972, in what was seen as a publicity stunt. (Not to be outdone, another WHA team selected Soviet premier Alexei Kosygin.) While flattered, he chose to remain
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    William Evans Arthur

    William Evans Arthur

    William Evans Arthur (March 3, 1825 – May 18, 1897) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky. William E. Arthur was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on March 3, 1825. He was the son of William and Eliza (Parsons) Arthur. In 1832, the family moved Covington, Kentucky. Two years later, Arthur's father died. Arthur received his early education in private schools and from private tutors in Covington and Harford County, Maryland. He then studied law under John W. Stevenson and James Turner Morehead. He was admitted to the bar in 1850 and commenced practice in Covington. In 1855, Arthur married Addie Southgate, daughter of former Congressman William Wright Southgate. His first wife died in 1858, and in December 1860, Arthur married her younger sister Etha Southgate. The couple had two children – a son named Sidney and a daughter named May. In 1856, Arthur was elected Commonwealth's Attorney for the ninth judicial district for a term of six years. He served as presidential elector on the Democratic ticket of John C. Breckinridge and Joseph Lane in the 1860 presidential election. In 1866, Arthur was elected criminal judge of the ninth circuit served until 1868, when he resigned. He was elected to
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Edward Douglass White Sr.

    Edward Douglass White Sr.

    Edward Douglass White, Sr. (March 3, 1795 – April 18, 1847) was the tenth Governor of Louisiana and a member of the United States House of Representatives. He served five nonconsecutive terms in Congress as an adherent of Henry Clay of Kentucky and the Whig Party. White was born in Maury County, Tennessee, the illegitimate son of James White. (Although his parents apparently never married, his father acknowledged him, and the circumstances of his birth did not impede his education or future success.) While a young boy, he moved to Louisiana with his father. In 1815, he graduated from the former University of Nashville, afterward beginning a law practice in Donaldsonville, Louisiana, the seat of Ascension Parish south of Baton Rouge. He was appointed by Governor Henry S. Johnson, also of Donaldsonville, as an Associate Judge of the New Orleans Municipal Court in 1825. Elected to the 21st United States Congress, White served three terms from 1829 until his resignation in 1834. He then served a single term as governor (1835–1839) and was elected to Congress again and served two more terms from 1839 until 1843. He died in New Orleans and was buried at St. Joseph's Catholic Cemetery in
    5.00
    3 votes
    183
    George Aiken

    George Aiken

    George David Aiken (August 20, 1892 – November 19, 1984) was an American farmer and politician. A member of the Republican Party, he was the 64th Governor of Vermont (1937–1941) before serving in the United States Senate for 34 years, from 1941 to 1975. At the time of his retirement, he was the most senior member of the Senate. George Aiken was born in Dummerston, Vermont, to Edward Webster and Myra (née Cook) Aiken. In 1893, he and his parents moved to Putney, where he received his early education at local public schools and graduated from Brattleboro High School in 1909. Aiken, who developed a strong interest in agriculture at an early age, became a member of the Putney branch of the Grange in 1906. In 1912, he borrowed $100 to plant a patch of raspberries; within five years, the land grew to five hundred acres and included a nursery. In 1926, Aiken became engaged in the commercial cultivation of wildflowers. He published Pioneering With Wildflowers in 1933 and Pioneering With Fruits and Berries in 1936. He also served as president of the Vermont Horticultural Society (1917–1918) and of the Windham County Farm Bureau (1935–1936). In 1914, Aiken married Beatrice Howard, to whom he
    5.00
    3 votes
    184
    James Benjamin Aswell

    James Benjamin Aswell

    James Benjamin Aswell, Sr. (December 23, 1869 – March 16, 1931), was a prominent educator and a Democratic U.S. representative from Louisiana, who served from 1913 until his death, which occurred twelve days into his tenth term. Aswell was born in the Vernon community in rural Jackson Parish in north Louisiana to Benjamin W. Aswell and the former Elizabeth A. Lyles. He attended local schools and graduated with teaching credentials in 1892 from Peabody College, a division of Vanderbilt University (then Peabody Normal College) in Nashville, Tennessee. In 1893, he received the Bachelor of Arts degree from the former University of Nashville. In 1894, he received his Master of Arts degree from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville; in 1907, he obtained his law degree from the same institution. He was twice married: (1) to the former Mary Lee Wright by whom he had his daughter Corinne, and (2) to the former Ella Foster of Mineral Wells, Texas, and thereafter Shreveport, by whom he had his son, James B. Aswell, Jr. (1906–1955), an author based in Natchitoches. He began his educational career as a teacher in country schools and high schools. He was a state school administrator before
    5.00
    3 votes
    185
    John Allison

    John Allison

    John Allison (August 5, 1812 – March 23, 1878) was an American politician, most notably serving in the U.S. House as a Representative of Pennsylvania during the 1850s. Allison was born in Beaver, Pennsylvania and grew up to study law. He was the son of James Allison, Jr. He was admitted to the bar, but did not practice, instead establishing a hat factory. He served in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1846, 1847, and 1849; he ran successfully for the U.S. House as a Whig in the 1850 election. He lost his bid for re-election in 1852, but won back the seat in 1854. He then retired from the House in 1856. After retiring from the House, he was active in the politics of the nascent Republican Party; he served as a delegate to their 1856 convention, where he nominated Abraham Lincoln for Vice President. On April 3, 1869, Allison was appointed Register of the U.S. Treasury, a post he held until his death. He was interred in Beaver Cemetery.
    5.00
    3 votes
    186
    Thomas Samuel Ashe

    Thomas Samuel Ashe

    Thomas Samuel Ashe (19 July 1812 – 4 February 1887) was a U.S. Congressman from North Carolina between 1873 and 1877. He had previously served in the Confederate Congress. Born in Hawfields, Orange County, North Carolina, he attended Bingham's Academy in Hillsborough, then the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, graduating in 1832. He was admitted to the bar in 1834 and began to practice law in Wadesboro, North Carolina in 1835. In 1842, Ashe was elected to a single term in the North Carolina House of Commons, from 1847 to 1851 he was solicitor of the fifth judicial district of North Carolina, and in 1854, he served in the North Carolina Senate. During the American Civil War, Ashe served in the Confederate House of Representatives from 1861 to 1864, and was elected to the Confederate Senate in 1864, but the war concluded before he was able to serve. In 1866, Ashe was state counselor for North Carolina, and in 1868, he ran unsuccessfully for Governor. He was elected for two terms in the United States House of Representatives, serving from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1877. Although he chose not to run again in 1876, he was elected an associate justice of the North Carolina
    5.00
    3 votes
    187
    Gordon L. Allott

    Gordon L. Allott

    Gordon Llewellyn Allott (January 2, 1907 – January 17, 1989) was a Republican American politician. Born in Pueblo, Colorado, Allott graduated from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1927 and from its law school in 1929. He was admitted to the bar in 1929 and commenced practice in Pueblo. He moved to Lamar, Colorado in 1930 and continued practicing law. Allott was the county attorney of Prowers County, Colorado in 1934 and from 1941 to 1946. He was also the director of the First Federal Savings & Loan Association of Lamar from 1934 to 1960. He became Lamar's city attorney in 1937, and served in this position until 1941. During World War II, Allott served as a major in the United States Army Air Corps from 1942 to 1946. After the war he became a district attorney in the fifteenth judicial district from 1946 to 1948. He was the vice chairman of the Colorado Board of Paroles from 1951 to 1955, and he served as the 33rd Lieutenant Governor of Colorado from 1951 to 1955. Allott was elected to the United States Senate in 1954. He was reelected in 1960 and again in 1966, and served from January 3, 1955 to January 3, 1973. There he was Chairman of the Republican Policy Committee.
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Isaac Anderson

    Isaac Anderson

    Isaac Anderson (November 23, 1760 – October 27, 1838) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. Isaac Anderson was born at “Anderson Place,” in then Charlestown Township, Pennsylvania now Schuylkill Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, the son of Patrick Anderson. As a youth was the carrier of dispatches between the headquarters of the Revolutionary Army under General George Washington at Valley Forge and the Congress then in session at York, Pennsylvania. He served three terms of service in the American Revolutionary War before attaining the age of eighteen and ultimately became an ensign in the Fifth Battalion of Chester County Militia. He was commissioned on May 24, 1779, as first lieutenant, Fifth Battalion, Sixth Company. He served as justice of the peace in Charlestown Township for several years, and was a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1801. Anderson was elected as a Republican to the Eighth and Ninth Congresses. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1806. He was engaged in agricultural pursuits and sawmilling. He died at “Anderson Place” in 1838. Interment in the family burying
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    James Mitchell Ashley

    James Mitchell Ashley

    James Mitchell Ashley (November 14, 1824 – September 16, 1896) was a U.S. congressman, territorial governor of Montana and railroad president. Ashley was born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, to John and Mary A. (Kilpatrick) Ashley. He married Emma Jane Smith in 1851 and together they had four children. He is the great-grandfather of U.S. Representative Thomas W. L. Ashley and a number of other descendants, including James Ashley IV, a portraitist living in Chicago. James IV recently completed a portrait of his great-grandfather, which will soon be permanently installed at the University of Toledo Law School. Ashley was mostly self-taught in elementary subjects. His early employment included clerking on Ohio and Mississippi River boats. In 1848, he settled in Portsmouth, Ohio, where he became editor of the Portsmouth Democrat. In 1849, he was admitted to the Ohio Bar but did not practice. About this time he moved to Toledo, Ohio, and got involved in the wholesale drug business. James Ashley was an active abolitionist who traveled with John Brown's widow on the date of Brown's execution and reported the event in the still-extant local newspaper, the Toledo Blade. In 1858, he was
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    James Patton Anderson

    James Patton Anderson

    James Patton Anderson (February 16, 1822 – September 20, 1872) was an American physician, lawyer, and politician, most notably serving as a United States Congressman from the Washington Territory, a Mississippi state legislator, and a delegate at the Florida state secession convention to withdraw from the United States. He also served in the American Civil War as a general in the Confederate States Army, serving in the Army of Tennessee. "Patton" Anderson was born near Winchester in Franklin County, Tennessee. As a young boy, he moved with his family to Kentucky in 1831, where he lived for most of his childhood, and then to Mississippi in 1838. He attended the medical school of Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania in 1840, before a family financial crisis forced him to withdraw a short time before graduation in 1842. Soon after his return home, Anderson began practicing medicine. He studied law at Montrose Law School in Frankfort, Kentucky, and was admitted to the bar in 1843, establishing a practice in Hernando in DeSoto County, Mississippi. He also entered the state's militia forces with the rank of captain in 1846. He later served in the Mexican-American War, commanding
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Mo Udall

    Mo Udall

    Morris King "Mo" Udall (June 15, 1922 – December 12, 1998) was an American politician who served as a U.S. Representative from Arizona from May 2, 1961 to May 4, 1991. A former professional basketball player with the old National Basketball League Denver Nuggets, noted for his liberal views, Udall was a tall (6'5"), Lincolnesque figure with a self-deprecating wit and easy manner. Because of his wit, columnist James J. Kilpatrick deemed him "too funny to be president", which also ended up being the title of his autobiography in the 1980s. Udall earned a law degree from the University of Arizona in 1949. He was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Udall was born in St. Johns, Apache County, Arizona, a son of Louisa (née Lee) and Levi Stewart Udall. He lost his right eye to a friend's pocket knife at the age of 6, while the two were attempting to cut some string, and wore a glass eye for the rest of his life. He attempted to enlist in the Army early in World War II, and almost succeeded, by covering his glass eye each time he was told to alternate during the eye exam. After he was medically cleared, another potential enlistee complained that he had been
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Nancy Kassebaum Baker

    Nancy Kassebaum Baker

    Nancy Landon Kassebaum Baker (born July 29, 1932) represented the State of Kansas in the United States Senate from 1978 to 1997. She is the daughter of Alf Landon, who was Governor of Kansas from 1933 to 1937 and the 1936 Republican nominee for president. She was the first woman ever elected to a full term in the Senate without her husband having previously served in Congress. Baker was born Nancy Landon in Topeka, Kansas, the daughter of Theo (née Cobb) and Governor Alf Landon. She attended Topeka High School and graduated in 1950. She graduated from the University of Kansas in Lawrence in 1954, where she was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta. In 1956 she received a master's degree in diplomatic history from the University of Michigan, where she met her first husband, Philip Kassebaum, whom she married in 1956. They settled in Maize, Kansas, where they raised four children. They separated in 1975, and divorced in 1979. Baker went by Nancy Landon Kassebaum while serving in the Senate. She was the first female senator not elected to the political office held by her husband (Margaret Chase Smith of Maine was first elected to the House of Representatives to fill her husband's vacancy, but
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Warren Austin

    Warren Austin

    Warren Robinson Austin (November 12, 1877 – December 25, 1962) was an American politician and statesman; among other roles, he served as Senator from Vermont. Born in Highgate Center in Franklin County, Vermont, he attended public schools, Bakersfield Academy, and then the University of Vermont, from which he graduated in 1899. He then studied law and entered practice in 1902. In 1904 he was appointed State's attorney of Franklin County, a position he held for two years. In his first few years in politics, he served in a number of roles, including chairman of the Vermont Republican State Convention in 1908, Mayor of St. Albans in 1909, a delegate to the Congress of the Mint in 1912, and a member of the United States Court for China in 1917. During this period, he also served as a commissioner for the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit from 1907 to 1915. His rising prominence led to his appointment as a trustee of the University of Vermont in 1914, a position he would retain until 1941. He also served as a special counsel for Vermont in a dispute over the exact border between Vermont and the neighboring state of New Hampshire from 1925 to 1937. He was elected to
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Abraham Baldwin

    Abraham Baldwin

    Abraham Baldwin (November 22, 1754 – March 4, 1807) was an American politician, Patriot, and Founding Father from the U.S. state of Georgia. Baldwin was a Georgia representative in the Continental Congress and served in the United States House of Representatives and Senate after the adoption of the Constitution. After attending a local village school, Abraham graduated from Yale University in nearby New Haven, Connecticut in 1772. Three years later, he became a minister and tutor at the college. He held that position until 1779, when he served as a chaplain in the Connecticut Contingent of the Continental Army. He did not see combat while with the Continental troops. Two years later, he declined an offer from Yale for a divinity professorship. Instead of resuming his ministerial or educational duties after the war, he turned to the study of law and in 1783 was admitted to the bar at Fairfield. After Baldwin turned down a prestigious teaching position as professor of divinity at Yale, Georgia governor Lyman Hall persuaded him to accept the responsibility of creating an educational plan for both secondary and higher education in the state, believing that the development of the state
    4.67
    3 votes
    195
    John Quincy Adams

    John Quincy Adams

    John Quincy Adams /ˈkwɪnzi/ (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was the sixth president of the United States (1825–1829). He served as an American diplomat, Senator, and Congressional representative. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties. Adams was the son of former President John Adams and Abigail Adams. As a diplomat, Adams played an important role in negotiating many international treaties, most notably the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. As Secretary of State, he negotiated with the United Kingdom over America's northern border with Canada, negotiated with Spain the annexation of Florida, and authored the Monroe Doctrine. Historians agree he was one of the greatest diplomats and secretaries of state in American history. As president, he sought to modernize the American economy and promoted education. Adams enacted a part of his agenda and paid off much of the national debt. He was stymied by a Congress controlled by his enemies, and his lack of patronage networks helped politicians eager to undercut him. He lost his 1828 bid for re-election to Andrew Jackson. In doing so, he became
    4.67
    3 votes
    196
    Aníbal Acevedo Vilá

    Aníbal Acevedo Vilá

    Aníbal Salvador Acevedo Vilá (born 13 February 1962) is a Puerto Rican politician and lawyer. He served as the eighth Governor of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, a Commonwealth of the United States, from 2005 to 2009. He is a Harvard University alumnus (LL.M. 1987) and a graduate of the University of Puerto Rico School of Law, where he obtained his Juris Doctor degree. Acevedo Vilá has held various public service positions in the Puerto Rico government under the Popular Democratic Party, serving as a member of the House of Representatives of Puerto Rico (1993–2001) and Resident Commissioner (2001–2005), before he was sworn in as Governor on 2 January 2005. Acevedo Vilá was also a member of the National Governors Association, the Southern Governors' Association and the Democratic Governors Association, and a collaborator of President Barack Obama's presidential campaign. On 27 March 2008, Acevedo Vilá was indicted in the U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico on 19 counts of campaign finance violations. He subsequently organized a press conference, where he claimed that he is innocent of all charges presented against him. On 19 August 2008, he was charged with five
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Charles G. Atherton

    Charles G. Atherton

    Charles Gordon Atherton (July 4, 1804 – November 15, 1853) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from New Hampshire. The son of Charles Humphrey Atherton and Mary Ann Toppan-Atherton, Charles G. Atherton was born in Amherst, New Hampshire on 4 July 1804. He was tutored in the classics by the inventor Samuel Abbot, and graduated from Harvard University in 1822 where he studied law. After graduation, Atherton was admitted to the bar in 1825 and commenced practice in Dunstable, New Hampshire (now Nashua). He married Ann Clark in 1828. Atherton was elected as a member of the State house of representatives in 1830 and 1833–1835 and served as Speaker from 1833-1835. He was Elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-fifth United States Congress and the two succeeding Congresses (4 March 1837-3 March 1843) and did not seek reelection in 1842, having become a candidate for Senator. After winning his election bid, Atherton was elected to the United States Senate as a Democrat in 1843, and served from 4 March 1843, to 3 March 1849. While in the Senate, Atherton served as Chairman of the Committee on Printing (Twenty-ninth Congress), the Committee on Roads and Canals (Twenty-ninth Congress),
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Chester A. Arthur

    Chester A. Arthur

    Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was the 21st President of the United States (1881–1885). Becoming President after the assassination of President James A. Garfield, Arthur struggled to overcome suspicions of his beginnings as a politician from the New York City Republican machine, succeeding at that task by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy for, and enforcement of, the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration. Born in Fairfield, Vermont, Arthur grew up in upstate New York and practiced law in New York City. He devoted much of his time to Republican politics and quickly rose in the political machine run by New York Senator Roscoe Conkling. Appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant to the lucrative and politically powerful post of Collector of the Port of New York in 1871, Arthur was an important supporter of Conkling and the Stalwart faction of the Republican Party. In 1878 he was replaced by the new president, Rutherford B. Hayes, who was trying to reform the federal patronage system in New York. When James Garfield won the Republican nomination for President in 1880, Arthur was nominated for Vice
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Fisher Ames

    Fisher Ames

    Fisher Ames (April 9, 1758 – July 4, 1808) was a Representative in the United States Congress from the 1st Congressional District of Massachusetts. Ames was born in Dedham, Massachusetts. His father, a physician, died when Fisher was but six years old, but his mother resolved, in spite of her limited income, to give the boy a classical education. At the age of six he began the study of Latin, and at the age of twelve, he was sent to Harvard College graduating in 1774 when he began work as a teacher. While teaching school Ames also studied law. He was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in Dedham in 1781. His father, Dr. Nathaniel Ames was the author of the Ames almanack, "which were the inspiration for the Poor Richard's Almanacs." In 1788, he served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives. He became a member of the Massachusetts convention that ratified the United States Constitution that same year. Ames was elected to the First United States Congress, having beat Samuel Adams for the post. He also served in the Second and Third Congresses and as a Federalist to the Fourth Congress. He served in Congress from March 4, 1789 to March 3, 1797. During the First Congress,
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    200
    James Abourezk

    James Abourezk

    James George Abourezk (born February 24, 1931) is a former Democratic United States Representative and United States Senator, and was the first Arab-American to serve in the United States Senate. He represented South Dakota in the U.S. Senate from 1973 until 1979. Abourezk was born in Wood, South Dakota, the son of Lena (née Mickel), a homemaker, and Charles Abourezk, an owner of two general stores. His parents were Christian Lebanese, who had emigrated from the southern Lebanese village of EI-Kfeir. He grew up near Wood and lived in South Dakota most of his life. Between 1948 and 1952, Abourezk served in the United States Navy during the Korean War. Back in the U.S., he received a degree in civil engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines in Rapid City in 1961. He earned an advanced degree from University of South Dakota School of Law in Vermillion in 1966. He passed the bar, and began a legal practice in Rapid City. Abourezk was elected as a Democrat to the House of Representatives, and served from 1971 to 1973. He then was elected to the U.S. Senate, where he served until 1979. As a senator, he criticized the Office of Public Safety (OPS), a U.S. agency linked to the
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    201
    John Adair

    John Adair

    John Adair (January 9, 1757 – May 19, 1840) was an American pioneer, soldier and statesman. He was the eighth Governor of Kentucky and represented the state in both the U.S. House and Senate. A native of South Carolina, Adair enlisted in the state militia and served in the Revolutionary War, where he was held captive by the British for a period of time. Following the war, he was elected as a delegate to South Carolina's convention to ratify the United States Constitution. Adair moved to Kentucky in 1786 and participated in the Northwest Indian War, including a skirmish with the Miami chief Little Turtle near Fort St. Clair in 1792. Popular for his service in two wars, Adair entered politics in 1792 as a delegate to Kentucky's constitutional convention. After Kentucky's separation from Virginia, Adair was elected to a total of eight terms in the state House of Representatives between 1793 and 1803. He served as Speaker of the Kentucky House in 1802 and 1803, and was a delegate to the state's second constitutional convention in 1799. He ascended to the United States Senate to fill the seat vacated when John Breckinridge resigned to become Attorney General of the United States, but
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    202
    John Appleton

    John Appleton

    John Appleton (February 11, 1815 – August 22, 1864) was born in Beverly, Massachusetts and raised in Cumberland County, Maine, USA. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1834, also studied at Cambridge Law School, and was admitted to the Cumberland County bar in 1837, commencing practice in Portland, Maine. He also did editorial work on the Eastern Argus and became editor in 1838. He later became a register of probate for Cumberland County in 1840 and again from 1842 to 1844. His wife, Susan Appleton, gave birth to their son, Eben Dodge Appleton, on September 8, 1843. Appleton became Chief Clerk of the United States Navy Department in 1845 serving to 1848. He was then transferred to the United States State Department under the same position, serving from January to April 1848. He then served as United States Minister to Bolivia from 1848 to 1849. In 1850 he was elected to the 32nd United States Congress serving from 1851 to 1853, not running for re-election in 1852. In 1855 he served as Secretary of the Legation in London, England from February 19 to November 16. He resumed practicing law until he was appointed Assistant Secretary of State in 1857 serving to 1860 when he resigned to
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    203
    Lamar Alexander

    Lamar Alexander

    Andrew Lamar Alexander, Jr. (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee. He was previously the Conference Chair of the Republican Party from 2007 to 2012, the 45th Governor of Tennessee from 1979 to 1987, United States Secretary of Education from 1991 to 1993 under President George H. W. Bush and candidate for the Republican Presidential nomination in 1996 and 2000. Alexander was born in Maryville, Tennessee, where he was raised, to Genevra Floreine (née Rankin) and Andrew Lamar Alexander, a high school principal. In high school he was elected Governor of Tennessee Boys State. Alexander graduated with a B.A. from Vanderbilt University where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Chi Fraternity in 1962 and from the New York University School of Law in 1965. After graduating from law school, Alexander clerked for United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit judge John Minor Wisdom in New Orleans from 1965 to 1966. In 1969 Alexander married Honey Buhler, who grew up in Victoria, Texas, and graduated from Smith College of Massachusetts. They had met during a softball game for Senate staff members; he was then a staffer for Senator Howard Baker of
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    204
    Martin C. Ansorge

    Martin C. Ansorge

    Martin Charles Ansorge (January 1, 1882 – February 4, 1967) was a United States Representative from New York. Ansorge was born in Corning, Steuben County, New York on January 1, 1882 to Mark Perry Ansorge and Jennie Bach. He attended the public schools and the College of the City of New York. He graduated from Columbia College of Columbia University in 1903 and from the Columbia Law School in 1906. It is rumored that Ansorge was also a founding member of the Columbia University Bowling Team. Ansorge was admitted to the bar in 1906 and commenced practice in New York City. He then pursued a political career which resulted in his election to the 67th United States Congress. After his political career, he resumed his activity as a lawyer. Ansorge died in New York City, February 4, 1967 and was interred in Temple Israel Cemetery, Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. Ansorge was the unsuccessful Republican candidate for election to Congress in 1912, 1914, and 1916. In his bid for the 21st Congressional Seat in 1916, Ansorge's campaign slogan was "Feed America First", advocating the necessity of an embargo upon shipment abroad of foodstuffs needed for the consumption of American people, taking a
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    205
    Warren O. Arnold

    Warren O. Arnold

    Warren Otis Arnold (June 3, 1839 – April 1, 1910) was a U.S. Representative from Rhode Island. Born in Coventry, Rhode Island, Arnold attended the common schools. He engaged in mercantile pursuits at Coventry from 1857 to 1864. He was a manufacturer of cotton goods in Chepachet and Westerly, Rhode Island, until 1866, when he began the manufacture of woolen goods. Arnold was elected as a Republican to the Fiftieth and Fifty-first Congresses (March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1891). He was a candidate for reelection in 1890 to the Fifty-second Congress, but as neither candidate received a majority the general assembly ordered a new election, in which he declined to be a participant. Arnold was elected to the Fifty-fourth Congress (March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1897). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1896. He continued his former manufacturing pursuits until his death in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, April 1, 1910. He was interred in Acotes Hill Cemetery, Chepachet, Rhode Island.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
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    206
    William Carlile Arnold

    William Carlile Arnold

    William Carlile Arnold (July 15, 1851 – March 20, 1906) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. William C. Arnold was born in Luthersburg, Pennsylvania. He attended the public schools and Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, and practiced in Curwensville and Du Bois, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. Arnold was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Congresses. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1898. He resumed the practice of law in Clearfield County and died in Muskegon, Michigan, while on a business trip. Interment in Oak Hill Cemetery in Curwensville.
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    207
    George A. Bagley

    George A. Bagley

    George Augustus Bagley (July 22, 1826 – May 12, 1915) was a United States Representative from New York. Born in Watertown, Jefferson County, he received an academic training, studied law, was admitted to the New York bar in 1847 and commenced practice in Watertown. He retired from the practice of his profession in 1853 to engage in the manufacture of iron, and was president of the village of Watertown in 1866. He was town supervisor from 1865 to 1868, and was elected as a Republican to the Forty-fourth and Forty-fifth Congresses, holding office from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879. He resumed the manufacture of iron and in 1915 died in Watertown; interment was in Brookside Cemetery.
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    208
    Henry F. Ashurst

    Henry F. Ashurst

    Henry Fountain Ashurst (September 13, 1874 – May 31, 1962) was an American Democratic politician and one of the first two Senators from Arizona. Largely self-educated, he served as a district attorney and member of the Arizona Territorial legislature before fulfilling his childhood ambition of joining the United States Senate. During his time in the Senate, Ashurst was chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs and the Judiciary Committee. Called "the longest U.S. theatrical engagement on record" by Time, Ashurst's political career was noted for a self-contradictory voting record, the use of a sesquipedalian vocabulary, and for a love of public speaking that earned him a reputation as one of the Senate's greatest orators. Among the sobriquets assigned to him were "the Dean of Inconsistency", "Five-Syllable Henry", and the "Silver-Tongued Sunbeam of the Painted Desert". Ashurst was born on September 13, 1874 in a covered wagon near Winnemucca, Humboldt County, Nevada to William and Sarah Ashurst, the second of ten children. His family moved to a ranch near Williams, Arizona when he was two, and he attended school in Flagstaff. At the age of ten he showed his ambition to be a
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    209
    LeRoy H. Anderson

    LeRoy H. Anderson

    LeRoy Hagen Anderson (February 2, 1906 – September 25, 1991) was a U.S. Representative from Montana. Born in Ellendale, North Dakota, Anderson moved with his parents to Conrad, Montana, in 1909. He graduated with a B. S. degree from Montana State College in 1927, and went on to do postgraduate work in mathematics and physical chemistry in 1935-1938 at California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. He later worked as a wheat and cattle rancher. During the Second World War he served as commander of armored task force in the European Theater of Operations in combat from Normandy to the Elbe River. He was separated from the service as a lieutenant colonel in 1945. For his service, he received the Silver Star and Croix de Guerre Medal with Palm. He served as a Major general in Army Reserve, commanding the Ninety-sixth Infantry Division Reserve from 1948 through 1962. He served as member of the Montana House of Representatives in 1947 and 19J48 and the Montana State Senate from 1949 through 1956, serving as Democratic floor leader 1954-1956. He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1954 to the Eighty-fourth Congress. Anderson was elected as a Democrat to the Eighty-fifth and
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    210
    William W. Arnold

    William W. Arnold

    William Wright Arnold (October 14, 1877 – November 23, 1957) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois. Born in Oblong, Illinois, Arnold attended the country schools of his native county and Austin College, Effingham, Illinois. He was graduated from the law department of the University of Illinois at Urbana in 1901. He was admitted to the bar the same year and commenced the practice of law in Robinson, Illinois. He was continuously engaged in the practice of his chosen profession until elected to Congress. Arnold was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-eighth and to the six succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1923, until his resignation, effective September 16, 1935, having been appointed July 29, 1935, a member of the United States Board of Tax Appeals (now the United States Tax Court). He was reappointed in 1944 and served until his retirement June 30, 1950. He owned and operated two large farms. He served as director of the Second National Bank, Farmers and Producers Bank, and the First National Bank of Robinson. He died in Robinson, Illinois, November 23, 1957. He was interred in New Cemetery.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents
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    211
    Brock Adams

    Brock Adams

    Brockman "Brock" Adams (January 13, 1927 – September 10, 2004) was an American politician and member of Congress. Adams was a Democrat from Washington and served as a U.S. Representative, Senator, and United States Secretary of Transportation before retiring in January 1993. Adams was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and attended the public schools in Portland, Oregon. He attended the University of Washington at Seattle where in 1948 he was elected president of the student government (ASUW) and was the first student to both serve in that post and receive the President’s Medal of Excellence as the University’s top scholar. He graduated in 1949 and was admitted to Harvard Law School, where he earned his law degree in 1952. Adams served in the U.S. Navy from 1944 to 1946, and was admitted to the Washington state bar in 1952, opening a private practice in Seattle. Adams taught law at the American Institute of Banking from 1954 to 1960, and served as United States Attorney for the Western District of Washington from 1961 to 1964. Adams was elected as a Democrat to the House and served six terms beginning January 3, 1965. He was chairman of the newly created Budget Committee during the 94th
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    212
    Harrison H. Atwood

    Harrison H. Atwood

    Harrison Henry Atwood (August 26, 1863 – October 22, 1954) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. He was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1896, 1915, 1917, 1918, 1923, 1924, 1927, and 1928. Born at the home of his grandmother in North Londonderry, Vermont, Atwood attended the public schools of Boston, Massachusetts. He studied architecture and engaged in that profession in Boston. Atwood was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fourth Congress (March 4, 1895-March 3, 1897). Atwood defeated incumbent Democrat Michael J. McEttrick. Atwood was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1896 to the Fifty-fifth Congress. He resumed his former profession in Boston. He was again a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1915, 1917, 1918, 1923, 1924, 1927, and 1928. He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1918 to the Sixty-sixth Congress. He resumed his profession as an architect in Boston, Massachusetts. He moved to Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts, in April 1938. He died in Boston, Massachusetts, October 22, 1954. He was interred in Forest Hills Cemetery.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents
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    213
    Sydenham Elnathan Ancona

    Sydenham Elnathan Ancona

    Sydenham Elnathan Ancona (November 20, 1824 – June 20, 1913) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. Sydenham E. Ancona was born near Lititz, Pennsylvania. He moved to Berks County, Pennsylvania, in 1826 with his parents, who settled near Sculls Hill, Pennsylvania. He attended public and private schools, and taught school. He moved in 1856 to Reading, Pennsylvania, where he entered the employ of the Reading Company. He served as a member of the board of education. Ancona was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-seventh, Thirty-eighth, and Thirty-ninth Congresses. He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1866. He became engaged in the trust, fire-insurance, and relief-association businesses in Reading. He was a delegate to the 1880 Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati, Ohio. During a visit to the Capitol at Washington, D.C., in 1912 he was tendered a reception on the floor of the House of Representatives, because he was at the time the last surviving Member of the Thirty-seventh Congress which had been assembled at the extraordinary session called by Abraham Lincoln on July 4, 1861. He was engaged in banking and in the
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    214
    Alva B. Adams

    Alva B. Adams

    Alva Blanchard Adams (October 29, 1875 – December 1, 1941) was a Democratic politician who represented Colorado in the United States Senate from 1923 until 1924 and again from 1933 to 1941. Adams was born in Del Norte, Colorado and graduated from Phillips Academy in 1893, Yale University in 1896, and Columbia Law School in 1899. He became a county attorney in Pueblo County, Colorado in 1909, a regent of the State University of Colorado in 1911, and Pueblo city attorney in 1911. During World War I, Adams served as a major in the Judge Advocate General's department in 1918 and 1919. In 1923, he was appointed to fill the vacancy in the United States Senate caused by the death of Samuel D. Nicholson. He served until a special election in November 1924 (in which he did not run). He ran, but did not win, in the regular election in 1924 for Colorado's other U.S. Senate seat. He ran successfully in 1932 with Oscar L. Chapman managing his campaign, and again in 1938. He died in office from a myocardial infarction in Washington, D.C. in 1941. The Alva B. Adams Tunnel under Rocky Mountain National Park is named for him. The Alva B. Adams tunnel is the key component of the largest
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    215
    Augustus Octavius Bacon

    Augustus Octavius Bacon

    Augustus Octavius Bacon (October 20, 1839 – February 14, 1914) was a U.S. politician. He served as a Democratic Party senator from Georgia. Augustus Octavius Bacon was born in Bryan County, Georgia. He graduated in 1859 from the University of Georgia (UGA) in Athens, Georgia, and from the University of Georgia School of Law in its inaugural class of graduates in 1860. While at UGA, he was a member of the Phi Kappa Literary Society. He once remarked "all the blood in me comes from English ancestors". He considered himself an Anglophile but did not want America to become an Imperial Power along the same lines as Great Britain and was opposed to the Spanish-American War and the subsequent occupation of the Philippines. He was a soldier in the army of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War, and then, after Georgia returned to the United States, he served in the Georgia State House of Representatives from 1871 to 1886, for much of that time as House speaker. Bacon was elected as one of Georgia's United States Senators in 1894 and was re-elected to three subsequent terms. Bacon held several committee chairmanships (Committee on Engrossed Bills, Committee on
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    216
    Ernest R. Ackerman

    Ernest R. Ackerman

    Ernest Robinson Ackerman (June 17, 1863 – October 18, 1931) was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jersey's 5th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1919 to 1931. Ackerman was born in New York City and moved with his parents to Plainfield, New Jersey very shortly thereafter. He was educated at public and private schools and graduated from Plainfield High School in 1880. Employed in cement manufacturing, Ackerman was a member of the Plainfield common council in 1891 and 1892. Ackerman was as a member of the New Jersey Senate from 1905 to 1911, serving as president in 1911. He was a delegate to the Republican National Conventions at Chicago in 1908 and in 1916 and a member of the board of trustees of Rutgers College, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 1916-1920. He was a Federal food administrator for Union County, New Jersey during the First World War and a member of the New Jersey Board of Education 1918-1920. In September 1907, Ackerman and his wife Nora attended the maiden voyage of the Cunard liner RMS Lusitania from Liverpool to New York. Ackerman was a member of the New Jersey Geological Survey and associate of the American
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    217
    John W. Allen

    John W. Allen

    John William Allen (August, 1802 – October 5, 1887) was a lawyer and politician from Ohio. John W. Allen was born in Litchfield, Connecticut in August, 1802. He was the son of Representative John Allen. He attended preparatory schools and moved to Chenango County, New York in 1818. He received a classical education and studied law. Allen moved to Cleveland, Ohio in 1825, and studied law under judge Samuel Cowles and became a leader of the bar. He was president of the village 1831-1835, a member of the board of directors of the Commercial Bank of Lake Erie in 1832, and one of the incorporators of the Cleveland and Newburgh Railroad Company in 1834. Allen was an organizer of the Ohio Railroad in 1836, and served in the Ohio State Senate 1836-37. He was elected to the 25th and 26th Congresses as a Whig, and served March 4, 1837-March 3, 1841. He was elected Mayor of Cleveland in 1841. In 1845, Allen was elected president of the Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati Railroad, and was a delegate to the first convention on river and harbor improvement, held in Chacago in 1847. When the Whig party dissolved in the 1850s, he joined with the Republicans. He was appointed postmaster of
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    218
    Kathryn O'Loughlin McCarthy

    Kathryn O'Loughlin McCarthy

    Kathryn Ellen O'Loughlin (April 24, 1894 - January 16, 1952) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. After her election she was married to Daniel M. McCarthy, who served in the Kansas State Senate, and thereupon served under the name of Kathryn O'Loughlin McCarthy. She was the first woman elected to Congress from Kansas. Born near Hays, Kansas, O'Loughlin attended the rural schools. She graduated from the Hays (Kansas) High School in 1913, from the Kansas State Teachers College in 1917, and from the law school of the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, in 1920. She was admitted to the bar in 1921 and commenced practice in Chicago, but returned to Kansas in 1928 and continued the practice of law in Hays. She served as delegate to the State Democratic conventions in 1930, 1931, 1932, 1934, and 1936, and to the Democratic National Conventions in 1940 and 1944. She also served as member of the Kansas House of Representatives in 1931 and 1932. O'Loughlin was elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-third Congress (March 4, 1933-January 3, 1935). She was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1934 to the Seventy-fourth Congress. Her support for the New Deal angered Kansas
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    219
    Mark Andrews

    Mark Andrews

    Mark Andrews (born May 19, 1926) is an American politician from the state of North Dakota. He is a member of the United States Republican Party. Andrews was born in Cass County, North Dakota, where he attended public school. In 1944 at the age of 18, Andrews was admitted to the United States Military Academy. He quit in 1946 after receiving a disability discharge. He then attended North Dakota State University at Fargo, North Dakota, where he became a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity, and graduated in 1949. Andrews then became a farmer. During the 1950s he began to enter politics, serving on farmers' organizations and Republican committees. In 1963 Andrews became the Republican candidate for a seat in the United States House of Representatives from North Dakota when a special election was required after the death of congressman Hjalmar Nygaard. Andrews won the election. He was reelected to a full term in 1964 and served in the House until 1981, being re-elected every two years. In 1980 Andrews decided not to run for re-election to the House. Instead, he ran for one of North Dakota's seats in the United States Senate which was being vacated by the long-serving Republican Milton
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    220
    Samuel G. Arnold

    Samuel G. Arnold

    Samuel Greene Arnold, Jr. (April 12, 1821 – February 14, 1880) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island. Born in Providence, Rhode Island, he received his early education under private tutors, and graduated from Brown University in 1841 and, in 1845, the law department of Harvard University, gaining admission to the bar that year. He was a lawyer and historian, and was trustee of Brown University from 1848 to 1880. He married his cousin, Louisa Gindrat Arnold (1828–1905), the daughter of his father's uncle, Richard J. Arnold (1796–1873). Of Louisa he wrote that "...I have brought up my cousin for years to make her my wife, for I am so fastidious & particular on that matter that I knew I never should find a lady to suit me in all respects unless I educated her for the purpose. This is an original idea to be sure..." Arnold was elected lieutenant governor of Rhode Island in 1852 and served as Acting Governor. In 1859, He was elected an Associate Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.He was a member of the peace commission held at Washington, D.C. in 1861 in an effort to devise means to prevent the impending war. In March 1861 Arnold was again elected
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    221
    Joseph Patrick Addabbo

    Joseph Patrick Addabbo

    Joseph Patrick Addabbo (March 17, 1925 – April 10, 1986) was a New York City politician who served as a Democrat in the United States House of Representatives from 1961 to 1986. As the chairman of the United States House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense in the 1980s, he was a noted critic of President Ronald Reagan's massive defense spending increases. Addabbo was born in Queens, New York and lived in the borough his entire life. He was a 1946 graduate of St. John's Law School and practiced law in Ozone Park, New York before his election to Congress in 1960. Addabbo was the Democratic nominee to replace Queens Rep. Albert H. Bosch, a Republican who left Congress to begin a judicial career. Addabbo became chairman of the defense spending subcommittee in 1979. In the post, he frequently sparred with President Reagan and was a favorite media source for accounts of the epic military spending battles in the early 1980s. Addabbo created a yearly routine of calling for deep cuts to the administration's budget. In 1983, he proposed slashing Reagan's defense spending plan by $30 billion. Though Addabbo's efforts were usually unsuccessful, he managed to eliminate funding for MX and
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    222
    Willis Joshua Bailey

    Willis Joshua Bailey

    Willis Joshua Bailey (October 12, 1854 – May 19, 1932) was a Republican United States Representative from Kansas and the 16th Governor of Kansas. Born in Carroll County, Illinois, Bailey attended the common schools, Mount Carroll High School, and the University of Illinois at Urbana. He married Ida B. Weede on June 9, 1903 and had two stepchildren. Bailey moved to Nemaha County, Kansas, in 1879, and became a successful farmer, rancher, and banker. He and his father founded the town of Baileyville, Kansas in 1880. He served as member of the Kansas House of Representatives from 1888 to 1890. He was president of the Republican State League in 1893. He served as member of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture from 1895 to 1899. Bailey was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1899 – March 3, 1901). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1900 to the Fifty-seventh Congress. In 1902 Bailey won the Republican gubernatorial nomination and the general election and served as Governor of Kansas from 1903 to 1905. During his tenure, construction on the state capitol was completed, railroad commissioners and the office of state printer became elective positions, and a
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    223
    Carl Albert

    Carl Albert

    Carl Bert Albert (May 10, 1908 – February 4, 2000) was a lawyer and a Democratic American politician from Oklahoma. Albert represented the southeastern portion of Oklahoma (Congressional District 3) as a Democrat for 30 years, starting in 1947. He is best known for his service as Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1971 to 1977. At 5 feet 4 inches tall, Albert was often affectionately known as the "Little Giant from Little Dixie", and held the highest political office of any Oklahoman in American history. Albert was born in McAlester, Oklahoma. Shortly after his birth his family moved to a small town just north of McAlester called Bugtussle. He was the son of a coal miner and farmer and grew up in a log cabin on his father's farm. In high school he excelled in debate, was student body president, and won the national high school oratorical contest, earning a trip to Europe. During this time he was an active member of his local Order of DeMolay chapter. Albert later petitioned his local Masonic Lodge and became an active Freemason. He entered the University of Oklahoma in 1927, where he majored in political science, and won the National Oratorical Championship
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    224
    Cathy McMorris Rodgers

    Cathy McMorris Rodgers

    Cathy McMorris Rodgers (born May 22, 1969) is the U.S. Representative for Washington's 5th congressional district, serving since 2005. The district, based in Spokane, includes most of the eastern third of the state. She is a member of the Republican Party. She is one of two female U.S. Representatives from her state, the other being Jaime Herrera Beutler, who worked as a legislative analyst for McMorris Rodgers in her first term. She is the highest ranking Republican woman in Congress, serving as the Vice-Chairman of the House Republican Conference (caucus). With her appointment in 2008 to that post, Washington's 5th Congressional District has the distinction of being one of the few districts in the country to have been home to two high-ranking members of Congress from both parties: former Democratic House Speaker Tom Foley in 1989-95 and now McMorris Rodgers. Cathy McMorris was born in Salem, Oregon on May 22, 1969 and raised on a farm. She worked in the family owned and operated business, the Peachcrest Fruit Basket Orchard and Fruit Stand, in Kettle Falls, Washington for 13 years. She is the descendant of pioneers who traveled the Oregon Trail in the early 1850s to the Pacific
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    225
    Charles Henry Martin

    Charles Henry Martin

    Charles Henry Martin (October 1, 1863 – September 22, 1946) was an American Army officer and later politician in the state of Oregon. A native of Illinois, he had a 40-year career in the military including serving in conflicts from the Spanish-American War to World War I before retiring as a major general. A Democrat, he was the U.S. Representative for Oregon's 3rd congressional district from 1931 to 1935 and then was the state's 21st Governor from 1935 to 1939. Charles Martin was born near Albion, Illinois, on October 1, 1863. He attended Ewing College (Ewing, Illinois) for two years until he was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy. He would actively serve in the Spanish-American War, Philippine-American War, and Boxer Rebellion after graduating from West Point in 1887. In 1920, when the army's authority to maintain Jim Crow regulations seemed threatened, Martin wrote that "...the negro is of very little importance... the average negro is not by any means equal to the average white man." Martin was later a division commander of the famous Blackhawk Division and the U.S. V Corps in the Argonne during World War I and served as the U.S. Army Assistant Chief of Staff from 1922 to
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    226
    Dale Alford

    Dale Alford

    Thomas Dale Alford, Sr. (January 28, 1916 – January 25, 2000) was an ophthalmologist and politician from the U.S. state of Arkansas who served as a conservative Democrat in the United States House of Representatives from Little Rock from 1959 to 1963. Alford was born to Thomas H. Alford and the former Ida Womack in tiny New Hope near Murfreesboro in Pike County in southwestern Arkansas. He attended public schools at Rector in Clay County in far northeastern Arkansas. He graduated from high school in 1932, a year ahead of schedule. Alford attended Arkansas State College in Jonesboro in eastern Arkansas, the Arkansas State Teachers College in Conway, and received his medical degree in 1939 from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences at Little Rock. He served his internship at St. Anthony's Hospital in Oklahoma City and his residency in general surgery at Missouri Pacific Hospital in Little Rock. He received post-graduate training at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. While he was in college, Alford was a radio sportscaster who covered the American football games of the Southwest Conference. He turned down an opportunity to become a national broadcaster to
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    227
    James E. Bailey

    James E. Bailey

    James Edmund Bailey (August 15, 1822 – December 29, 1885) was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1877 to 1881. Bailey was born in Montgomery County, Tennessee. He attended the Clarksville Academy and the former University of Nashville. He then studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1843, starting a practice in Clarksville, Tennessee. In 1853 he was elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives as a Whig. During the Civil War he served in the 49th Tennessee as a colonel. He was appointed by governor of Tennessee John C. Brown to the Court of Arbitration in 1874. He was elected by the Tennessee General Assembly as a Democrat to the balance of the unexpired term of the late Andrew Johnson, serving from January 19, 1877 to March 4, 1881. In the 46th Congress he was chairman of the Senate Committee on Education and Labor. His efforts to effect his reelection were unsuccessful, and upon the expiry of his term he returned to the practice of law in Clarksville. He died in Clarksville and is buried in that city's Greenwood Cemetery.
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    228
    Les Aspin

    Les Aspin

    Leslie "Les" Aspin, Jr. (July 21, 1938 – May 21, 1995) was a United States Representative from 1971 to 1993, and the United States Secretary of Defense under President Bill Clinton from January 21, 1993 to February 3, 1994. Aspin was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He graduated from Shorewood High School. He attended Yale University, where he was admitted to the Zeta Psi fraternity, and graduated summa cum laude in 1960 with a Bachelor of Arts in history. In 1962, he received his Master of Arts in economics from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and his Ph.D in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1966. As an officer in the U.S. Army from 1966 to 1968, he served as a systems analyst in the Pentagon under Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, serving in the Office of Systems Analysis. Before his election as a Democrat to Congress in 1970, Aspin had been active in Wisconsin politics and had taught economics at Marquette University. Aspin ran as a peace candidate in 1970, opposing the Vietnam War. In the Democratic primary he was opposed by Doug LaFollette, who was endorsed by the party. After losing the initial count by a few dozen votes, he
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    229
    Robert L. Bacon

    Robert L. Bacon

    Robert Low Bacon (July 23, 1884 – September 12, 1938) was a banker, Lieutenant Colonel, and congressman from New York. Born in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, the son of Martha Waldron Cowdin and future Secretary of State Robert Bacon, he received a common school education as a child. Bacon went on to graduate from Harvard University in 1907 and from Harvard Law School in 1910. That same year, he was employed at the United States Treasury Department, where he worked until, in 1911, he moved to Old Westbury, New York to engage in banking in New York City. In 1916, he worked with the New York National Guard at the Texas border. Bacon then went to fight in World War I where he attained the rank of major and was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal. In 1919, he was commissioned to the United States Officers’ Reserve Corps with a promotion to lieutenant colonel and later to colonel in 1923. Bacon was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in Chicago, Illinois in 1920. He was elected a Republican to the sixty-eighth congress in 1922 and served from 1923 until his death in 1938 though still continuing his military career in the Officers' Reserve Corps during his years in the
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    Silas Adams

    Silas Adams

    Silas Adams (February 9, 1839 – May 5, 1896) was a lawyer and politician from Kentucky. He was born in Pulaski County, Kentucky on February 9, 1839, and moved to Casey County with his parents in 1841. He attended Kentucky University at Harrodsburg, Transylvania University, and Lexington Law School. He entered the Union Army during the Civil War as a first lieutenant, First Regiment, Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry and was later promoted to captain, lieutenant colonel, and colonel of the regiment. He was mustered out December 31, 1864. His experiences in the cavalry are recorded in the book The Wild Riders of the First Kentucky Cavalry by Eastham Tarrant. Following the war he entered Lexington Law School in 1867; he was admitted to the bar and practiced law. He served two terms as county attorney and later served as a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives from 1889-1892. He led an unsuccessful campaign as a Republican candidate for the United States Senate in 1892. He was later elected as a Republican to the 53rd US Congress (March 4, 1893-March 3, 1895). He followed as an unsuccessful independent candidate for reelection in 1894 to the 54th US Congress, and thereafter returned
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    231
    Truman H. Aldrich

    Truman H. Aldrich

    Truman Heminway Aldrich (October 17, 1848 in Palmyra, New York – April 28, 1932 in Birmingham, Alabama) was a civil engineer, a mining company executive, and a paleontologist, and briefly served in the United States House of Representatives and as Postmaster of Birmingham. Aldrich was born in Palmyra and suffered from poor health as a young boy. He attended public schools and a military academy at Westchester, Pennsylvania before enrolling at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. He graduated in 1869 with a degree in mining and civil engineering and took a job with the railroads in New York and New Jersey. In 1870 he married Anna Morrison of Newark. Aldrich's career was characterized by innovation and long-term vision. His strength was in finding new resources, developing them and then moving on to the next discovery. He was an honorable man in science as well as in business. In 1872, Aldrich became a partner in a banking enterprise in Selma, Alabama. While in the region, he investigated the existing coal-mining operations at Montevallo and around the Cahaba coalfield. The next year he secured a lease on the Montevallo coal mines and set to work extracting coal
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    232
    Bella Abzug

    Bella Abzug

    Bella Savitsky Abzug (July 24, 1920 – March 31, 1998) was an American lawyer, Congresswoman, social activist and a leader of the Women's Movement. In 1971, Abzug joined other leading feminists such as Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan to found the National Women's Political Caucus. She notably declared "This woman’s place is in the House—the House of Representatives" in her successful 1970 campaign to join that body. She was later appointed to chair the National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year and to plan the 1977 National Women's Conference by President Gerald Ford and led President Jimmy Carter's commission on women. Bella Savitsky was born on July 24, 1920, in New York City. Both of her parents were Russian-Jewish immigrants. Her mother, Esther, was a homemaker and her father, Emanuel ran the Live and Let Live Meat Market. When her father died, Abzug, then 13, was disallowed to say the Mourner's Kaddish for her father in synagogue, where that privilege was reserved for sons of the deceased. However, she did so as one of her first feminist actions because her father had no son. Abzug graduated from Walton High School in New York City, where she was class
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    233
    Charles Wilson

    Charles Wilson

    Charles "Charlie" Nesbitt Wilson (June 1, 1933 – February 10, 2010) was a United States naval officer and former 12-term Democratic United States Representative from Texas's 2nd congressional district. Wilson is best known for leading Congress into supporting Operation Cyclone, the largest-ever Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) covert operation which, under the Reagan administration, supplied military equipment including anti-aircraft weapons such as Stinger antiaircraft missiles and paramilitary officers from their Special Activities Division to the Afghan Mujahideen during the Soviet war in Afghanistan. His behind-the-scenes campaign was the subject of the non-fiction book Charlie Wilson's War by George Crile and a subsequent film adaptation starring Tom Hanks as Wilson. Wilson was born in the small town of Trinity, Texas, to Charles Edwin Wilson, an accountant for a local timber company, and Wilmuth Wilson, a local florist, on June 1, 1933. Wilson had one younger sister, Sharon Wilson Allison, former chair of Planned Parenthood and president of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, who currently resides in Waco, Texas. Growing up, Wilson attended Trinity public
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    234
    Chester Ashley

    Chester Ashley

    Chester Ashley (June 1, 1790 – April 29, 1848) was an American politician who represented Arkansas in the U.S. Senate from 1844 until his death. Ashley was born in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1790; while a child he moved with his parents to Hudson, New York. He was a graduate, with honors, of Williams College; following this, he took a course in law in Litchfield, Connecticut. Ashley moved west upon completion of his education, going first to Illinois, and thence to Missouri. In 1820 he arrived in Little Rock, Arkansas, soon becoming one of the best and most prominent lawyers in the Arkansas Territory; for a time, his partner in practice was Robert Crittenden. Together, Ashley and Crittenden founded Rose Law Firm. For some twenty years Ashley's practice was the largest in the state, and he became a wealthy man. This led him to try his hand at politics; in 1844 he canvassed the state campaigning for James K. Polk for president; the Democrats were victorious, and Ashley was elected by the state legislature to fill a vacancy in the Senate. Soon after entering, he was made the Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee; in 1846, he was reelected to the Senate. Two years later he was
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    235
    Claude I. Bakewell

    Claude I. Bakewell

    Claude Ignatius Bakewell (August 9, 1912 – March 18, 1987) was a lawyer, U.S. Representative from Missouri's 11th congressional district, and U.S. Postmaster for St. Louis, Missouri. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, Bakewell was one of the five children of Paul Bakewell, Jr. and Mary Morgan Fullerton Bakewell. When she was to be married to Paul, Mary was reportedly "the richest girl" in St. Louis; she was also a grand-niece of J. P. Morgan. Claude Bakewell's grandfather Paul Bakewell was a patent and trademark lawyer in the firm Bakewell & Church whose wife was a granddaughter of the first Missouri governor Alexander McNair, and Claude's great-grandfather was Missouri judge Robert Armytage Bakewell, who was married to Nancy de Laureal. Claude Bakewell graduated from St. Louis University High School and then in 1932 from Georgetown University. In 1935, he graduated from St. Louis University School of Law and became a lawyer in private practice. In the 25th Ward, he served as member of the board of aldermen of St. Louis, Missouri from 1941 to 1945 and was chairman of the legislation committee. From 1944 to 1946, Bakewell served in the United States Navy. Bakewell sat on the House
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    236
    George W. Atkinson

    George W. Atkinson

    George Wesley Atkinson (June 29, 1845 – April 4, 1925) of Ohio County was the tenth Governor of West Virginia. He also served in the U.S. House of Representatives and was a judge on the Court of Claims. In 1870, Atkinson graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with an A.B.. He received an M.A. there in 1873, and an LL.B. from Howard University in 1874. He served as toll collector on the Kanawha River Board from 1869 to 1871 and was appointed postmaster of Charleston in 1871. He was defeated for election to the West Virginia Legislature in 1876. He was an Internal Revenue agent from 1879 to 1881; his success at interfering with moonshiners lead to his appointment as a United States Marshall, serving until 1885. In 1888, he ran for Congress as a Republican against John O. Pendleton. The election was contested, and although Pendleton had presented his credentials and served in the seat for nearly a year, Atkinson was eventually declared the winner and seated. Atkinson defeated Democratic party candidate Cornelius Clarkson Watts in the 1896 election for Governor of West Virginia and served until 1901. He was later appointed United States District Attorney for the Southern District of
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    Gibson Atherton

    Gibson Atherton

    Gibson Atherton (January 19, 1831 – November 10, 1887) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio. Born near Newark, Ohio, Atherton attended Denison University, Granville, Ohio, and graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1853. He served as Principal of the local academy at Osceola, Missouri, in 1853 and 1854. Later he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1855 and commenced practice in Newark, Ohio where he also served as president of the board of education of Newark for fifteen years. Atherton was elected prosecuting attorney of Licking County in 1857 and reelected in 1859 and 1861. While serving as mayor of Newark 1860-1864, he was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for the State senate in 1863. He ran for judge of the court of common pleas in 1866, but was unsuccessful. Other local and national political service included time as member of the city council of Newark for two years and a delegate to the Democratic National Convention at St. Louis in 1876. Atherton was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-sixth and Forty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1879-March 3, 1883), but afterwards chose not to seek renomination. Atherton was appointed to the Ohio Supreme Court by
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    238
    Hugh Joseph Addonizio

    Hugh Joseph Addonizio

    Hugh Joseph Addonizio (January 31, 1914, in Newark, New Jersey – February 2, 1981, in Red Bank, New Jersey) was an Italian-American Democratic Party politician, who was the 33rd Mayor of Newark, New Jersey, from 1962 to 1970, and a Congressman for 13 years prior to that. He graduated from Fordham University in New York City in 1939 and went to work for A&C Clothing Company in Newark where he became vice president in 1946. During World War II he had served in the United States Army earning the Silver Star. He served in North Africa, Italy and France. Among the first Americans drafted in 1940 a year before Pearl Harbor, he rose from the rank of private and was discharged with the rank of captain and named to the Fort Benning Officer Candidate School Hall of Fame. In 1948, Addonizio ran for and won a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democrat, representing New Jersey's 11th congressional district. He resigned his seat on June 30, 1962, to run for mayor of Newark. He ran on a reform platform, defeating what he characterized as the corrupt political machine of Leo P. Carlin, who had been mayor since 1953. Addonizio served as mayor from 1962 until 1970 when he lost his
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    J.C. Watts

    J.C. Watts

    Julius Caesar "J. C." Watts, Jr. (born November 18, 1957) is an American politician from Oklahoma who was a college football quarterback for the Oklahoma Sooners and professionally in the Canadian Football League. Watts served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1995 to 2003 as a Republican, representing the 4th congressional district in south-central Oklahoma. After leaving Congress he established a lobbying and consulting firm, served on corporate boards, and worked as a political commentator. Watts was born and raised in Eufaula, Oklahoma, in a rural impoverished neighborhood. After being one of the first children to attend an integrated elementary school, he became a high school quarterback and gained a football scholarship for the University of Oklahoma. He graduated 1981 with a degree in journalism and became a football player in the Canadian Football League until his retirement in 1986. Watts became a Baptist minister and was elected in 1990 to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission as the first African American in Oklahoma to win statewide office. He successfully ran for Congress in 1994 and was reelected to three additional terms with increasing vote margins. Watts
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    240
    Jack Z. Anderson

    Jack Z. Anderson

    John Zuinglius Anderson (March 22, 1904 – February 9, 1981) was a U.S. Representative from California. Born in Oakland, California, Anderson moved with his parents to Santa Cruz, California, the same year, and to San Jose, California, in 1913, attended the public schools. He was graduated from San Jose High School in 1923. He moved to San Juan Bautista, California, in 1925 and engaged in agricultural pursuits and fruit growing. Anderson was elected as a Republican to the Seventy-sixth and to the six succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1939-January 3, 1953). He was a strong supporter of forcing Japanese-American citizens from the Pacific Coast states during WWII, stating in 1945: "As a member of the California congressional delegation I have consistently opposed the return of the Japanese-Americans to the Pacific coast while the war against Japan in the Pacific is in progress. I was one of those who as early as Dec. 8, 1941, advocated the immediate removal of all persons of Japanese descent from restricted and prohibited areas in California, Oregon and Washington." He was not a candidate for renomination in 1952. He served as member of board of directors of Bank of America. He served
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    James Wilson

    James Wilson

    James "Tama Jim" Wilson (August 16, 1835 – August 26, 1920) was a Scotland-born United States politician who served as United States Secretary of Agriculture for sixteen years during three presidencies, from 1897 to 1913. He holds the record as the longest-serving United States Cabinet member, and is one of only three Cabinet members along with James J. Davis and Andrew W. Mellon to serve in the same post under three consecutive Presidents Wilson was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, on August 16, 1835. One of 14 children, he grew up in a farming community near the birthplace of Robert Burns. His family emigrated to America in 1852, settling in Connecticut before moving to Iowa in 1855, establishing a farm near Traer in Tama County. He attended the public schools and Iowa College (now Grinnell College) in Grinnell, Iowa. Wilson was elected to the Iowa House of Representatives in 1867, and served as speaker from 1870 to 1871 before becoming a professor of agriculture at what is now Iowa State University, where he encouraged the work of George Washington Carver. Wilson was also appointed to the Board of Trustees (now Regents) of Iowa's public higher educational institutions, serving from
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    242
    Jean Spencer Ashbrook

    Jean Spencer Ashbrook

    Jean Spencer Ashbrook (born Emily Jean Spencer in Cincinnati, Ohio on September 21, 1934) is the widow of Congressman John M. Ashbrook, Republican of Ohio. She is also a former Member of Congress herself, having completed her late husband's final term of office, also as a Republican. She attended Central School, Newark, Ohio, and graduated from Newark High School in 1952. She went on to graduate with a B.S. from Ohio State University in 1956. She married John Ashbrook in 1974. After her husband's death on April 24, 1982, she won the special election for the seat in Congress he had occupied; it is relatively common in American politics of the last several decades for widows to succeed their late husbands in office, if only to complete their husbands' terms. She served for the remainder of the 97th Congress and represented Ohio's 17th congressional district from June 29, 1982 to January 3, 1983. She currently resides in Newark, Ohio.
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    John Alsop

    John Alsop

    John Alsop (1724 – November 22, 1794) was an American merchant and politician from New York City during the American Revolution. He was a delegate for New York to the Continental Congress from 1774 to 1776. John Alsop, born in 1724 in New Windsor, Orange County, New York. He was the son of John Alsop, Sr., a lawyer first of New Windsor, New York, where he was largely interested in real estate. A few years later he removed to New York City and there practiced his profession for many years. He was a son of Capt. Richard Alsop and Hannah Underhill (December 2, 1666 – August 23, 1757) the daughter of Captain John Underhill (c. 1609 – September 21, 1672) and Elizabeth Feake, who was the daughter of Lt. Robert Feake and Elizabeth Fones. Captain Richard Alsop first settled in New York during the 1650s. He had served as a major in Oliver Cromwell's army, but after a disagreement with the Lord Protector, he fled to the obscurity of colonial life. John's mother was Abigail Sackett, 1695–1752, the daughter of Captain Joseph Sackett and Elizabeth Betts, the daughter of Capt. Richard Betts and Joanna Chamberlayne She married John Alsop, Sr. in 1718 and they were the parents of four children. As
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    244
    Landaff Andrews

    Landaff Andrews

    Landaff Watson Andrews (February 12, 1803 – December 23, 1887) was a United States Representative from Kentucky. Born in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, he graduated from the law department of Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky in 1826 and was admitted to the bar the same year. Andrews commenced practice in Flemingsburg, Kentucky. Andrews was the prosecuting attorney of Fleming County, Kentucky, 1829–1839, and a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives, 1834-1838. He was elected as a Whig to the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1839-March 3, 1843) but was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1842 to the Twenty-eighth Congress. After leaving Congress, he served in the Kentucky Senate as an independent candidate in 1857 and was again elected a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives, in 1861, and served until 1862, when he resigned. After leaving the state legistlature, Andrews was the judge of the circuit court 1862-1868. He resumed the practice of law in Flemingsburg, Kentucky where he died in 1887. He was buried in Fleming County Cemetery.  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical
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    Lucien Baker

    Lucien Baker

    Lucien Baker (June 8, 1846 – June 21, 1907) was a United States Senator from Kansas. Baker was born near Cleveland, Ohio and moved with his parents to Morenci, Michigan. There he attended the public schools and graduated from Adrian College and from the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. He was admitted to the bar in 1868 and commenced practice in Leavenworth, Kansas in 1869. From 1872 to 1874, he was a city attorney of Leavenworth. From 1893 to 1895, he was a member of the State Senate and was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate. He served from March 4, 1895 to March 3, 1901 but was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination. He was the chairman of the Committee on Civil Service and Retrenchment (Fifty-sixth Congress) Afterward his term in the Senate, he resumed the practice of law in Leavenworth, where he died on June 21, 1907; he is interred in Mount Muncie Cemetery. He was the brother of John Harris Baker.
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    246
    Russell A. Alger

    Russell A. Alger

    Russell Alexander Alger (February 27, 1836 – January 24, 1907) was the 20th Governor and U.S. Senator from the state of Michigan and also U.S. Secretary of War during the Presidential administration of William McKinley. He was supposedly a distant relation of Horatio Alger; although Russell Alger lived his own "rags-to-riches" success tale, eventually becoming a financier, lumber baron, railroad owner, and government official in several high offices. Alger was born on February 27, 1836, in Lafayette Township in Medina County, Ohio. His parents were Russell and Caroline (Moulton) Alger. He was orphaned at age 13 and worked on a farm to support himself and two younger siblings. He attended Richfield Academy in Summit County, Ohio, and taught country school for two winters. He studied law in Akron, Ohio, and was admitted to the bar in March 1859. He first began to practice law in Cleveland and moved to Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1860, where he engaged in the lumber business. On April 2, 1861, he married Annette H. Henry of Grand Rapids. They had six children; Fay, Caroline, Frances, Russell Jr., Fred and Allan. He was the scion of a prominent family, many of whom became involved in
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    247
    W. Frank James

    W. Frank James

    William Francis James, more often known as W. Frank James, (May 23, 1873 – November 17, 1945) was a soldier and politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. James was born in Morristown, New Jersey and moved with his parents to Hancock, Michigan, in 1876, where he attended the public schools. He attended Albion College in Albion, Michigan, in 1890 and 1891. James was treasurer of Houghton County, Michigan, 1900–1904, and engaged in the real estate and insurance business. He served as a private in Company F of the Thirty-fourth Regiment, Michigan Volunteer Infantry, during the Spanish-American War. He was a member of the board of aldermen of Hancock, 1906–1908, and was mayor of Hancock in 1908 and 1909. He was member of the Michigan Senate, 1910-1914. In 1914, James defeated incumbent Democrat William J. MacDonald to be elected as a Republican from Michigan's 12th congressional district to the 64th United States Congress. He was subsequently re-elected to the nine succeeding Congresses, serving from March 4, 1915 to January 3, 1935. He was chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs in the 71st Congress. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1934 and 1936, losing both
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    248
    Wayne Allard

    Wayne Allard

    Alan Wayne Allard (born December 2, 1943) is a member of the Republican Party, and was a United States Senator from Colorado. He did not seek re-election in 2008. Allard was born in Fort Collins, Colorado, the son of Sibyl Jean (née Stewart) and Amos Wilson Allard. He is descended from immigrants from Canada and Scotland. He was raised on a ranch near Walden, Colorado. He received a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Colorado State University in 1968. Allard continued to run a veterinary practice full-time, while representing Larimer and Weld Counties in the Colorado State Senate, from 1983 to 1990. During his tenure he was a strong supporter of fiscal responsibility and the preservation of a citizen legislature. Allard's influence on local politics is still felt today as he is the sponsor of Colorado's law limiting state legislative sessions to 120 days. Allard served in the United States House of Representatives from Colorado's Fourth Congressional District from 1991 to 1997. As a Colorado Representative, Allard served on the Joint Committee on Congressional Reform, which recommended many of the reforms included in the Contract with America. These reforms became some of
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    249
    William Allen

    William Allen

    William Allen (August 13, 1827 – July 6, 1881) was an United States Representative from Ohio during the early part of the American Civil War. Allen was born near Hamilton, Ohio, where he attended the public schools. As a young man, he taught school, then studied law. Allen was admitted to the bar in 1849 and commenced practice in Greenville, Ohio, in 1850. He was the prosecuting attorney of Darke County from 1850 until 1854. Allen was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1859–March 3, 1863), where he served as chairman, Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Interior (Thirty-seventh Congress). He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1862 and resumed the practice of law. He became affiliated with the Republican Party at the close of the Civil War and was appointed judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the second judicial district in 1865. He declined the Republican nomination for election to the Forty-sixth Congress in 1878 because of failing health. He was interested in banking until his death in Greenville, Ohio in 1881. He was buried in Greenville Cemetery.
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    250
    William S. Archer

    William S. Archer

    William Segar Archer (March 5, 1789 – March 28, 1855) was a politician and lawyer from Virginia who served in the United States Senate from 1841 to 1847. He was the nephew of Joseph Eggleston. Born at "The Lodge" in Amelia County, Virginia, received a private education and graduated from The College of William & Mary in 1806. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1810, commencing practice in Amelia and Powhatan Counties. He served four terms in the Virginia House of Delegates between 1812 and 1819 and was elected to the United States House of Representatives to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of James Pleasants, reelected in 1820, 1824, 1826, 1828, 1830 and 1832, serving from 1820 to 1835. There, he served as chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs from 1829 to 1835 and was defeated for reelection in 1834. Archer was elected a Whig to the United States Senate in 1840, serving one full term from 1841 to 1847. There, he served as chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations from 1841 to 1845 and of the Committee on Naval Affairs from 1841 to 1843. He was also a key member of the committee who drafted the Missouri compromise on which he exerted great
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