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Best Type of place of worship of All Time

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    1
    Friends meeting house

    Friends meeting house

    • Places of worship of this type: Upper Dublin Friends Meeting House
    A Friends meeting house is a meeting house of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), where meeting for worship may be held. Quakers do not believe that meeting for worship should take place in any special place. They believe that "where two or three meet together in my name, I am there among them" (Revised English Bible, Matthew, Ch 18, v 20). Therefore meeting for worship may take place in any place. Early Quakers often met for worship outdoors or in local public buildings. However, when the Religious Society of Friends began to grow there became a need for buildings to house their meetings. Quakers have always reserved the word church to mean the body of people who make up the worshiping community: Quakers do not use the word church to refer to the bricks and mortar of a worshiping community. George Fox, an early Quaker, spoke of places of worship that have steeples as steeple houses, and those that do not as meeting houses. This practice is shared by a number of other non-conformist Christian denominations, including Unitarians, Christadelphians, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Mennonites. Some Friends meeting houses were adapted from existing
    8.40
    5 votes
    2
    Mosque

    Mosque

    • Places of worship of this type: Hagia Sophia
    • Religion: Sunni Islam
    A mosque (/mɒsk/; Arabic:مسجد) is a place of worship for followers of Islam. The word entered English from a French word which probably derived from Italian moschea, a variant of Italian moscheta, from either Armenian mzkiṭ or Greek μασγίδιον, from Arabic masjid, meaning "place of worship" or "prostration in prayer", from the Arabic sajada, meaning "to bow down in prayer" or "worship", probably ultimately of Aramaic origin. There are strict and detailed requirements in Sunni fiqh for a place of worship to be considered a masjid, with places that do not meet these requirements regarded as musallas. There are stringent restrictions on the uses of the area formally demarcated as the masjid (which is often a small portion of the larger complex), and, in the Sharia, after an area is formally designated as a masjid, it remains so until the Last Day. Quba Mosque is the first mosque in history, and mosques have developed significantly since Quba mosque. Many mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but are now found in all inhabited continents. The mosque serves as a place where Muslims can come together for salah (prayer)
    7.80
    5 votes
    3
    Hindu temple

    Hindu temple

    • Places of worship of this type: Prambanan
    • Religion: Hinduism
    A Mandir, Kovil , Devalayam, Deul or a Hindu temple is a place of worship for followers of Hinduism. A characteristic of most temples is the presence of murtis (statues) of the Hindu deity to whom the temple is dedicated. They are usually dedicated to one primary deity, the presiding deity, and other deities associated with the main deity. However, some temples are dedicated to several deities, and others are dedicated to murtis in an iconic form. Many temples are in key geographical points, such as a hill top, near waterfalls, caves and rivers, as these are sattvik places and make it easier to contemplate God. Many Hindu temples are known by different names around the world, depending upon the language. The word mandir or mandiram is used in many languages and is derived from a Sanskrit word, mandira, for house (of a deity by implication). Temples are known as Mandir (मंदिर) in Marathi and Hindi, Gudi(గుడి), Devalayam(దేవాలయం), Devasthanam(దేవస్థానము), Kshetralayam(క్షేత్రాలయం), Punyakshetram(పుణ్యక్షేత్రం), or Punyakshetralayam(పున్యక్షేత్రాలయం) in Telugu, as Deula(ଦେଉଳ)/Mandira(ମଦିର) in Oriya, Devasthana (ದೇವಸ್ಥಾನ) in Kannada and Mondir (মন্দির) in Bengali, as Kshetram
    7.40
    5 votes
    4
    Pathi

    Pathi

    • Places of worship of this type: Ambalappathi
    • Religion: Ayyavazhi
    Pathi (Tamil :பதி - "The place where God is") is the name of the primary centres of congregational worship for the South Indian religious system of Ayyavazhi, having a relatively large structure like that of a temple. They are seven in number. The Pathis obtain their significance from the fact that Ayya Vaikundar and his religious activities were historically associated with them. There are seven Pathis, ("Seven places where God is") which appeared during the time of Ayya Vaikundar. According to Akilattirattu Ammanai the source of Ayyavazhi mythology, these Pathis are the places where Ayya Vaikundar performed the Avatara Ekanai (a means of divine revelation). These are the sacred places for the people of Ayyavazhi. These five Pathis are collectively called as Panchappathis. Some times Vakaippathi and Avatharappathi is added to this list. Generally Pathis were structurally different from Nizhal Thangals. Unlike Nizhal Thangals the Pathis were not only considered as mere worship centers but also as holy places. Also each Pathis have their own significance due to the different activities of Vaikundar at each Pathis. In addition to the panividais at Palliyarai and Sivayi Medai, in each
    8.75
    4 votes
    5
    Church

    Church

    • Places of worship of this type: Anglican Church of St. John the Evangelist
    • Religion: Catholicism
    A church is a building or structure to facilitate worship and the meeting of its members, particularly in Christianity. Originally, Jewish Christians met in synagogues, such as the Cenacle, and in one another's homes, known as house churches. As Christianity grew and became more accepted by governments, notably with the Edict of Milan, rooms and, eventually, entire buildings were set aside for the explicit purpose of Christian worship, such as the Church of the Holy Sepulcher. Traditional church buildings are often in the shape of a cross and frequently have a tower or dome. More modern church buildings have a variety of architectural styles and layouts; many buildings that were designed for other purposes have now been converted for church use; and, similarly, many original church buildings have been put to other uses. The first Christians were, like Jesus, Israelites resident in Roman Israel who worshiped on occasion in the Temple in Jerusalem and weekly in local synagogues. Temple worship was a ritual involving sacrifice, occasionally including the sacrifice of animals in atonement for sin, offered to the God of Israel. The New Testament includes many references to Jesus
    7.00
    5 votes
    6
    Abbey

    Abbey

    • Places of worship of this type: Waverley Abbey
    • Religion: Christianity
    An abbey (from Latin abbatia, derived from Latin language abbatia, from Latin abbās, derived from Aramaic language abba, "father") is a Catholic monastery or convent, under the authority of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serves as the spiritual father or mother of the community. The term can also refer to an establishment which has long ceased to function as an abbey, in some cases for centuries (for example, see Westminster Abbey below). The earliest known Christian monastic communities (see Monasticism) consisted of groups of cells or huts collected about a common center, which was usually the house of some hermit or anchorite famous for holiness or singular asceticism, but without any attempt at orderly arrangement. This arrangement probably followed the example set in part by the Essenes in Judea. In the earliest age of Christian monasticism the ascetics were accustomed to live singly, independent of one another, not far from some village church, supporting themselves by the labour of their own hands, and distributing the surplus after the supply of their own scanty wants to the poor. Increasing religious fervour, aided by persecution, drove them farther and farther away from the
    8.25
    4 votes
    7
    Minster

    Minster

    • Places of worship of this type: Bonn Minster
    Minster is an honorific title given to particular churches in England, most famously York Minster in York and Westminster in London. The term minster is first found in royal foundation charters of the 7th century; and, although it corresponds to the Latin monasterium or monastery, it then designated any settlement of clergy living a communal life and endowed by charter with the obligation of maintaining the daily office of prayer. Widespread in 10th century Anglo-Saxon England, minsters declined in importance with the systematic introduction of parishes and parish churches from the 11th century onwards; but remained a title of diginity in later medieval England for instances where a cathedral, monastery, collegiate church or parish church had originated with an Anglo-Saxon foundation. Eventually a minster came to refer more generally to "any large or important church, especially a collegiate or cathedral church". In the 21st century further minsters have been added by simply bestowing the status on existing parish churches. The word minster (Old English mynster) was simply a rendering of the Latin monasterium (monastery) which comes from the Greek word μοναστήριον - monastērion. An
    7.75
    4 votes
    8

    Kirk

    Kirk can mean "church" in general or the Church of Scotland in particular. Many place names and personal names are also derived from it. As a common noun, kirk (meaning 'church') is found in Scots, Scottish English and historically in some English dialects, attested as a noun from the 14th century onwards, but as an element in placenames much earlier. Both words, kirk and church, derive from the Koine Greek κυριακόν (δωμα) (kyriakon (dōma)) meaning Lord's (house), which was borrowed into the Germanic languages in late antiquity, possibly in the course of the Gothic missions. (Only a connection with the idiosyncrasies of Gothic explains how a Greek neuter noun became a Germanic feminine.) Whereas church displays Old English palatalisation, kirk is likely to be a loanword from Old Norse and thus has the original mainland Germanic consonants. Compare cognates: Icelandic & Faroese kirkja; Swedish kyrka; Norwegian (Nynorsk) kyrkje; Norwegian (Bokmål) & Danish kirke; German Kirche; Dutch kerk; West Frisian tsjerke; and borrowed into non-Germanic languages: Estonian kirik and Finnish kirkko. As a proper noun, The Kirk is an informal name for the Church of Scotland, the country's national
    9.67
    3 votes
    9
    Meeting house

    Meeting house

    • Places of worship of this type: Round Church
    A meeting house describes a building where a public meeting takes place. This includes secular buildings which function like a town or city hall, and buildings used for religious meetings, particularly of some non-conformist Christian denominations. In New England towns in the United States, there are meeting houses which serve as a sort of town or city hall, and are used for public meetings, voting, and town offices. A meeting house may have a dual purpose as a place of worship and public discourse, as in early American Puritan congregations. Many non-conformist Christian denominations distinguish between a Christian denominations which use the term "meeting house" to refer to the building in which they hold their worship include:
    7.50
    4 votes
    10
    Spirit house

    Spirit house

    A spirit house (Burmese: နတ်စင် or နတ်ကွန်း) or san phra phum (Thai: ศาลพระภูมิ) is a shrine to the protective spirit of a place that are found in the Southeast Asian countries of Burma, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Most houses and businesses have a spirit house placed in an auspicious spot, most often in a corner of the property. The location may be chosen after consultation with a Brahmin priest. The spirit house is normally in the form of a miniature house or temple, and is mounted on a pillar or on a dais. The house is intended to provide a shelter for spirits which could cause problems for the people if not appeased. The shrines often include images of people and animals. Votive offerings are left at the house to propitiate the spirits. More elaborate installations include an altar for this purpose. In addition to outdoor shrines, homes and businesses also have them indoors, similar to ancient Roman Lares Familiares.
    7.50
    4 votes
    11
    Christian Church

    Christian Church

    • Places of worship of this type: Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church
    The word church is used to denote both an association of people with a common set of religious beliefs, and a place of worship. The word is usually, but not exclusively, associated with Christianity. The English language word "church" developed from Old English cirice, from West Germanic kirika, from Greek kyriake (oikia) "Lord's (house)", from kyrios "ruler, lord." The Greek word kyriakon (an adjective meaning "of the Lord") was used of houses of Christian worship since c.300, especially in the East, though it was less common in this sense than ekklesia or basilike. An abbreviation of ekklesia kyriake used in the septuagint to mean congregation of the lord. The church referred to by Jesus is an organism which Paul calls in 1 Corinthians 12 "the body of Christ", and to which he gives heavenly and earthly authority (Matt 16:18-20). This group has two primary objectives: Where the term is taken to mean a denomination group with adherents of a particular creed or believers of a particular tradition, the largest church may be the global Roman Catholic Church. Various Christian churches are distinguished by their different ecclesiastical hierarchies, their creed, and their Bibles
    7.00
    4 votes
    12
    Stupa

    Stupa

    • Places of worship of this type: Bodnath
    • Religion: Buddhism
    A stupa (from Sanskrit: m., स्तूप, stūpa, Sinhalese: ස්ථූපය, Pāli: थुप "thūpa", literally meaning "heap") is a mound-like structure containing Buddhist relics, typically the ashes of deceased, used by Buddhists as a place of meditation. The term "reliquary" is sometimes used, after a Christian functional equivalent. Stupas are an ancient form of mandala. The stupa is the oldest Buddhist religious monument and was originally only a simple mound of mud or clay to cover relics of the Buddha (cetiya). After the parinirvana of the Buddha, his remains were cremated and the ashes divided and buried under eight stupas with two further stupas encasing the urn and the embers. Little is known about these early stupas, particularly since it has not been possible to identify the original ten monuments. However, some later stupas, such as at Sarnath and Sanchi, seem to be embellishments of earlier mounds. In the third century BC, after his conversion to Buddhism, the emperor Asoka had the original stupas opened and the remains distributed among the several thousand stupas he had built. Nevertheless, the stupas at the eight places associated with the life of the Buddha continued to be of
    8.33
    3 votes
    13
    Commissioners' church

    Commissioners' church

    • Places of worship of this type: All Souls Church, Langham Place
    A Commissioners' church is an Anglican church in the United Kingdom built with money voted by Parliament as a result of the Church Building Act of 1818 and 1824. They have been given a number of titles, including Commissioners' churches, Waterloo churches and Million Act churches (or "Million churches"). The 1818 Act supplied a grant of money and established the Church Building Commission to direct its use, and in 1824 made a further grant of money. In addition to paying for the building of churches, the Commission had powers to divide and subdivide parishes, and to provide endowments. The Commission continued to function as a separate body until the end of 1856, when it was absorbed into the Ecclesiastical Commission. In some cases the Commissioners provided the full cost of the new church; in other cases they provided a grant and the balance was raised locally. The first First Parliamentary Grant for churches amounted to £1 million (£49,820,000 as of 2012). The Second Parliamentary Grant of 1824 amounted to an additional £500,000, so the term "million" cannot apply to all the churches aided by the Commission. The Commission was founded on a wave of national triumph following the
    6.50
    4 votes
    14
    Derasar

    Derasar

    • Religion: Jainism
    A Jain temple is the place of worship for Jains, the followers of Jainism, Derasar is a word used for a Jain temple in Gujarat, Kutch and parts of Rajasthan. Basadi (also basti) is a Jain shrine or temple. The word is generally used in South India, including Maharashtra. Its historical use in North is preserved in the names of the Vimala Vasahi and Luna Vasahi temples of Mount Abu. The Sanskrit word is vasati, it implies an institution including residences of scholars attached to the shrine. In other parts of India, the term Jain mandir is used for all Jain temples. Jain temples are built with various architectural designs. Jain temples in North India are completely different from the Jain temples in South India, which in turn are quite different from Jain temples in West India. There are two type of Jain temples: All shikar-bandhi Jain temples have many marble pillars which are carved beautifully with Demi god posture. There is always a main deity also known as mulnayak in each derasar. The main part of Jain temple is called "Gambhara" (Garbha Graha) in which there is the stone carved God idol. One is not supposed to enter the Gambhara without taking a bath and without wearing
    6.50
    4 votes
    15
    Bahá'í House of Worship

    Bahá'í House of Worship

    • Places of worship of this type: Bahá'í House of Worship
    • Religion: Bahá'í Faith
    A Bahá'í House of Worship, sometimes referred to by its Arabic name of Mashriqu'l-Adhkár (Arabic: مشرق اﻻذكار‎, "Dawning-place of the remembrances of God"), is the designation of a place of worship, or temple, of the Bahá'í Faith. The teachings of the religion envisage Houses of Worship being surrounded by a number of dependencies dedicated to social, humanitarian, educational, and scientific pursuits, although none has yet been built to such an extent. Only eight continental Houses of Worship have been built around the world serving for continental areas (this includes one in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan that has since been destroyed), with a ninth soon to be constructed in Chile. In the Ridván Message for 2012, the Universal House of Justice announced new initiatives for future Houses of Worship, calling for the first national and locally based institutions. The first two "national Mashriqu'l-Adhkars" are to be raised up in two countries: the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Papua New Guinea. With successful growth and cluster development it was also announced that the erection of the first local Houses of Worship would be raised up. Bahá'í communities own many properties where
    8.00
    3 votes
    16
    Orthodox church

    Orthodox church

    • Places of worship of this type: Alexander Nevsky Cathedral, Tallinn
    An Orthodox church as a church building of Eastern Orthodoxy has a distinct, recognizable style among church architectures. While sharing many traditions, East and West in Christianity began to diverge from each other from an early date. Whereas the basilica, a long aisled hall with an apse at one end, was the most common form in the West, a more compact centralised style became predominant in the East. These churches were in origin 'martyria' focused on the tombs of the saints—specifically, the martyrs who had died during the persecutions, which only fully ended with the deathbed conversion of the Emperor Constantine. They copied pagan tombs and were roofed over by a dome which symbolised heaven. The central dome was then often surrounded by structures at the four points of the compass producing a cruciform shape - these were themselves often topped by towers or domes. The centralised and basilica structures were sometimes combined as in the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople. The basilican east end then allowed for the erection of an iconostasis, a screen on which icons are hung and which conceals the altar from the worshippers except at those points in the liturgy when its
    8.00
    3 votes
    17
    Jinja

    Jinja

    • Places of worship of this type: Izumo Taisha
    • Religion: Shinto
    A Shinto shrine is a structure whose main purpose is to house ("enshrine") one or more Shinto kami. (Its most important building is used for the safekeeping of sacred objects, and not for worship). Although only one word ("shrine") is used in English, in Japanese Shinto shrines may carry any one of many different, non-equivalent names like gongen, -gū, jinja, jingū, mori, myōjin, -sha, taisha, ubusuna or yashiro. (For details, see the section Interpreting shrine names.) Structurally, a shrine is usually characterized by the presence of a honden or sanctuary, where the kami is enshrined. The honden may however be completely absent, as for example when the shrine stands on a sacred mountain to which it is dedicated, and which is worshiped directly. The honden may be missing also when there are nearby altar-like structures called himorogi or objects believed capable of attracting spirits called yorishiro that can serve as a more direct bond to a kami. There may be a haiden (拝殿, hall of worship) and other structures as well (see below). Miniature shrines called hokora can occasionally be found at the side of streets. Large shrines sometimes have on their precincts miniature shrines
    7.33
    3 votes
    18
    Megachurch

    Megachurch

    • Places of worship of this type: Crystal Cathedral
    A megachurch is a church having 2,000 or more in average weekend attendance. The Hartford Institute's database lists more than 1,300 such Protestant churches in the United States. According to that data, approximately 50 churches on the list have attendance ranging from 10,000 to 47,000. While 3,000 individual Catholic parishes (churches) have 2,000 or more attendants for an average Sunday Mass, these churches are not seen as part of the megachurch movement. Globally, these large congregations are a significant development in Protestant Christianity. While generally associated with the United States, the phenomenon has spread worldwide. In 2007, five of the ten largest Protestant churches were in South Korea. The largest mega church in the United States is Lakewood Church in Houston, Texas with more than 40,000 members every weekend and the current largest megachurch in the world is South Korea's Yoido Full Gospel Church, with more than 830,000 members as of 2007. The origins of the megachurch movement, with a large number of local congregants who return on a weekly basis can be traced to the 1950s. There were large churches earlier in history, but they were considerably rarer.
    7.00
    3 votes
    19
    Cathedral

    Cathedral

    • Places of worship of this type: Kuopio Cathedral
    • Religion: Catholicism
    A cathedral (French cathédrale from Lat. cathedra, "seat" from the Greek kathedra (καθέδρα), seat, bench, from kata "down" + hedra seat, base, chair) is a Christian church which contains the seat of a bishop, thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate. Although the word "cathedral" is sometimes loosely applied, churches with the function of "cathedral" occur specifically and only in those denominations with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Orthodox, and some Lutheran and Methodist churches. In the Greek Orthodox Church, the terms kathedrikos naos (literally: "cathedral shrine") is sometimes used for the church at which an archbishop or "metropolitan" presides. The term "metropolis" (literally "mother city") is used more commonly than "diocese" to signify an area of governance within the church. There are certain variations on the use of the term "cathedral"; for example, some pre-Reformation cathedrals in Scotland now within the Church of Scotland still retain the term cathedral, despite that church's Presbyterian polity that does not have bishops. The same occurs in Germany, where Protestant churches (many with a
    6.00
    3 votes
    20
    7.50
    2 votes
    21
    Chapel

    Chapel

    • Places of worship of this type: Thorncrown Chapel
    • Religion: Catholicism
    A chapel is a religious place of fellowship, prayer and worship – most often associated with Christian, and less often Jewish, services. It may be part of a larger structure or complex, such as a church, synagogue, college, hospital, palace, prison or funeral home, located on board a military or commercial ship, or it may be an entirely free-standing building, sometimes with its own grounds. Many military installations have chapels for the use of military personnel, normally under the leadership of a military chaplain. Until the Protestant Reformation, a chapel denoted a place of worship that was either at a secondary location that was not the main responsibility of the local parish priest, or that belonged to a person or institution. Most larger churches had one or more secondary altars, which if they occupied a distinct space, would often be called a chapel. Although chapels frequently refer to Christian places of worship, they are also commonly found in Jewish synagogues and do not necessarily connote a specific denomination. Non-denominational chapels are commonly encountered as part of a non-religious institution such as a hospital, airport, university, prison or military
    7.50
    2 votes
    22
    Gurdwara

    Gurdwara

    • Places of worship of this type: Sikh Gurdwara Sahib Sacramento
    A gurdwara (Punjabi: ਗੁਰਦੁਆਰਾ, gurduārā or , gurdwārā), meaning the Gateway to the Guru, is the place of worship for Sikhs, the followers of Sikhism. A gurdwara can be identified from a distance by tall flagpoles bearing the Nishan Sahib, the Sikh flag. The most well-known gurdwara of the Sikhs is the Harmandir Sahib in Amritsar, Punjab, India. The first gurdwara was built in Kartarpur, on the banks of Ravi River in the Punjab region by the first Sikh guru, Guru Nanak Dev Ji in the year 1521. It now lies in the Narowal District of west Punjab (Pakistan). The worship centers were built as a place where Sikhs could gather to hear the Guru give spiritual discourse and sing religious hymns in the praise of Waheguru. As the Sikh population continued to grow, Guru Hargobind, the sixth Sikh guru, introduced the word 'gurdwara'. The etymology of the term 'gurdwara' is from the words 'Gur (ਗੁਰ)' (a reference to the Sikh Gurus) and 'Dwara (ਦੁਆਰਾ)' (gateway in Gurmukhi), together meaning 'the gateway through which the Guru could be reached'. Thereafter, all Sikh places of worship came to be known as gurdwaras. Some of the prominent Sikh shrines established by the Sikh Gurus are: By the early
    7.00
    2 votes
    23
    5.33
    3 votes
    24
    Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses

    Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses

    • Places of worship of this type: Zwolle - Kingdom Hall
    • Religion: Jehovah's Witnesses
    A Kingdom Hall is a place of worship used by Jehovah's Witnesses. The term was first suggested in 1935 by Joseph Franklin Rutherford, then president of the Watch Tower Society, for a building in Hawaii. Rutherford's reasoning was that these buildings would be used for preaching the "good news of the Kingdom." Jehovah's Witnesses use Kingdom Halls for the majority of their worship and Bible instruction. Witnesses prefer the term "Kingdom Hall" over "church", noting that the term often translated "church" in the Bible refers to the congregation of people rather than a structure. Kingdom Halls are typically modest, functional structures with practicality in mind. As Witnesses do not use religious symbols, such are not displayed on or in Kingdom Halls. An annual yeartext, or "theme scripture", which is the same for all congregations of Jehovah's Witnesses worldwide, is prominently displayed in each Kingdom Hall. This text can be displayed in several languages if the Hall is used by foreign language congregations. A Kingdom Hall typically has a library, contribution boxes, and a literature counter, where publications are displayed, stored and dispensed. Some Kingdom Halls have multiple
    9.00
    1 votes
    25
    Fire temple

    Fire temple

    A fire temple in Zoroastrianism is the place of worship for Zoroastrians. Zoroastrians revere fire in any form. In the Zoroastrian religion, fire (see Atar), together with clean water (see Aban), are agents of ritual purity. Clean, white "ash for the purification ceremonies [is] regarded as the basis of ritual life," which, "are essentially the rites proper to the tending of a domestic fire, for the temple [fire] is that of the hearth fire raised to a new solemnity" (Boyce, 1975:455). For, one "who sacrifices unto fire with fuel in his hand [...], is given happiness." (Yasna 62.1; Nyashes 5.7) The Zoroastrian cult of fire is much younger than Zoroastrianism itself and appears at approximately the same time as the shrine cult, first evident in the 4th century BCE (roughly contemporaneous with the introduction of Atar as a divinity). There is no allusion to a temple cult of fire in the Avesta proper, nor is there any old Persian language word for one. Moreover, Boyce suggests that the temple cult of fire was instituted in opposition to the image/shrine cults (an alien form of worship inherited from the Babylonians), and "no actual ruins of a fire temple have been identified from
    5.00
    3 votes
    26
    Roman temple

    Roman temple

    • Places of worship of this type: Roman Temple of Évora
    • Religion: Roman mythology
    Ancient Roman temples are among the most visible archaeological remains of Roman culture, and are a significant source for Roman architecture. Their construction and maintenance was a major part of ancient Roman religion. The main room (cella) housed the cult image of the deity to whom the temple was dedicated, and often a small altar for incense or libations. Behind the cella was a room or rooms used by temple attendants for storage of equipment and offerings. The English word "temple" derives from Latin templum, which was originally not the building itself, but a sacred space surveyed and plotted ritually. The Roman architect Vitruvius always uses the word templum to refer to the sacred precinct, and not to the building. The more common Latin words for a temple or shrine were aedes, delubrum, and fanum (in this article, the English word "temple" refers to any of these buildings, and the Latin templum to the sacred precinct). Public religious ceremonies took place outdoors, and not within the temple building. Some ceremonies were processions that started at, visited, or ended with a temple or shrine, where a ritual object might be stored and brought out for use, or where an
    8.00
    1 votes
    27
    Shrine

    Shrine

    • Places of worship of this type: Shrine of St. Anthony
    • Religion: Maratreanism
    A shrine (Latin: scrinium "case or chest for books or papers"; Old French: escrin "box or case") is a holy or sacred place, which is dedicated to a specific deity, ancestor, hero, martyr, saint, daemon or similar figure of awe and respect, at which they are venerated or worshipped. Shrines often contain idols, relics, or other such objects associated with the figure being venerated. A shrine at which votive offerings are made is called an altar. Shrines are found in many of the world's religions, including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Wicca, Chinese folk religion and Shinto, as well as in secular and non-religious settings such as a war memorial. Shrines can be found in various settings, such as churches, temples, cemeteries, or in the home, although portable shrines are also found in some cultures. A shrine may become a focus of a cult image. Many shrines are located within buildings designed specifically for worship, such as a church in Christianity, or a mandir in Hinduism. A shrine here is usually the centre of attention in the building, and is given a place of prominence. In such cases, adherents of the faith assemble within the building in order to venerate the
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    Vaishno Devi

    Vaishno Devi

    • Places of worship of this type: Hindu temple
    • Religion: Hinduism
    Vaishno Devi Mandir (Hindi: वैष्णोदेवी मन्दिर) is one of the holy Hindu temples dedicated to Shakti, located in the hills of Vaishno Devi, Jammu and Kashmir, India. In Hinduism, Vaishno Devi, also known as Mata Rani and Vaishnavi, is a manifestation of the Mother Goddess. The temple is near the town of Katra, in the Reasi district in the state of Jammu and Kashmir. It is one of the most revered places of worship in India. The shrine is at an altitude of 5300 feet and a distance of approximately 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) from Katra. Approximately 8 million pilgrims (yatris) visit the temple every year and it is the second most visited religious shrine in India, after Tirumala Venkateswara Temple. The Sri Mata Vaishno Devi Shrine Board maintains the shrine. A rail link from Udhampur to Katra is being built to facilitate pilgrimage. The nearest airport is Jammu Airport which has very high flight frequency. All leading domestic airlines have their services to Jammu Airport. According to a Hindu epic, Maa Vaishno Devi was born in the south of India in the home of Ratnakar Sagar. Her worldly parents had remained childless for a long time. Ratnakar had promised, the night before the birth of
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    Basilica

    Basilica

    • Places of worship of this type: Hagia Sophia
    • Religion: Catholicism
    The Latin word basilica (derived from Greek, βασιλική στοά, Royal Stoa, the tribunal chamber of a king), has three distinct applications in modern English. The word was originally used to describe a Roman public building, usually located in the forum of a Roman town. By extension it was applied to Christian buildings of the same form and continues to be used in an architectural sense to describe those buildings with a central nave and aisles. Later, the term came to refer specifically to a large and important church that has been given special ceremonial rights by the Pope. Catholic Basilicas are Catholic pilgrimage sites, receiving tens of millions of visitors per year. In December 2009 the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe set a new record with 6.1 million pilgrims during Friday and Saturday for the anniversary of Our Lady of Guadalupe. The Roman basilica was a large roofed hall erected for transacting business and disposing of legal matters. As early as the time of Augustus, a public basilica for transacting business had been part of any settlement that considered itself a city, used in the same way as the late mediaeval covered market houses of northern Europe, where the
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    Titulus

    Titulus

    • Places of worship of this type: Sant'Agnese fuori le mura
    • Religion: Catholicism
    A titular church or titulus (En.: title) is a church in Rome assigned or assignable to one of the cardinal priests. Originally, these were basilicas under the direction of a permanently appointed presbyter and corresponding to what would now be called parish churches. They were known as tituli or tituli presbyterales, distinguished from one another by the name of the founder or proprietor who held the property in custody for the Church. For instance, the Titulus Aemilianae, now the church of the Santi Quattro Coronati, drew its name from its foundress, who doubtless owned the extensive suburban Roman villa whose foundations remain under the church and whose audience hall became the ecclesiastical basilica. The most ancient reference to such a Roman church is in the Apology against the Arians of Athanasius, which speaks of a council of bishops assembled "in the place where the Presbyter Vito held his congregation". By the end of the 5th century they numbered 25, as is confirmed by the Liber Pontificalis. The same number, though with different identities, is given in the reports of councils held in Rome in 499 and 595. In 1120, the number is given as 28. Many more have received the
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    Greek temple

    Greek temple

    Greek temples (Ancient Greek: ὁ ναός, ho naós "dwelling", semantically distinct from Latin templum "temple") were structures built to house deity statues within Greek sanctuaries in Greek paganism. The temples themselves did usually not directly serve a cult purpose, since the sacrifices and rituals dedicated to the respective deity took place outside them. Temples were frequently used to store votive offerings. They are the most important and most widespread building type in Greek architecture. In the Hellenistic kingdoms of Southwest Asia and of North Africa, buildings erected to fulfill the functions of a temple often continued to follow the local traditions. Even where a Greek influence is visible, such structures are not normally considered as Greek temples. This applies, for example, to the Graeco-Parthian and Bactrian temples, or to the Ptolemaic examples, which follow Egyptian tradition. Most Greek temples were oriented astronomically. Between the 9th century BC and the 6th century BC, Ancient Greek temples developed from the small mudbrick structures into monumental double porticos buildings, often reaching more than 20 metres in height (not including the roof).
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    Monastery

    Monastery

    • Places of worship of this type: Valaam Monastery
    Monastery (plural: monasteries) denotes the building, or complex of buildings, comprising the domestic quarters and workplace(s) of monastics, whether monks or nuns, and whether living in community or alone (hermits). The monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries may vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community. These may include a hospice, a school and a range of agricultural and manufacturing buildings such as a barn, a forge or a brewery. In English usage, the term "monastery" is generally used to denote the buildings of
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    Temple

    Temple

    • Places of worship of this type: Sinheungsa
    • Religion: Maratreanism
    A temple (from the Latin word templum) is a structure reserved for religious or spiritual activities, such as prayer and sacrifice, or analogous rites. A templum constituted a sacred precinct as defined by a priest, or augur. It has the same root as the word "template," a plan in preparation of the building that was marked out on the ground by the augur. Templa also became associated with the dwelling places of a god or gods. Despite the specific set of meanings associated with the religion of the ancient Rome, the word has now become quite widely used to describe a house of worship for any number of religions and is even used for time periods prior to the Romans. Göbekli Tepe, located in southern Turkey, is the oldest-known, existing temple in the world. It was built approximately 11,000 years ago. The temple of Mesopotamia derived from the cult of gods and deities in Mesopotamian religion. It spanned several civilizations; from Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian. The most common temple architecture of Mesopotamia is the structure of sun-baked bricks called Ziggurat, having the form of a terraced step pyramid with flat upper terrace where shrine or temple stood Ancient
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    Latter Day Saints Temple

    Latter Day Saints Temple

    • Places of worship of this type: Salt Lake Temple
    • Religion: Mormonism
    In the Latter Day Saint movement, a temple is a building dedicated to be a house of God and is reserved for special forms of worship. A temple differs from a church meetinghouse, which is used for weekly worship services. Temples have been a significant part of the Latter Day Saint movement since early in its inception. Today, temples are operated by several Latter Day Saint denominations. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) has 139 operating temples worldwide to perform Endowment ceremonies, marriages, and other services for both the living and by proxy in behalf of dead ancestors with 29 more announced, some in planning stage and others under construction as of 6 October 2012 . Although the most prolific builder of temples within the Latter Day Saint movement is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, several other denominations have built or attempted to build temples. Community of Christ operates two temples in the United States, which are open to the public and are used for worship services, performances, and religious education. Other denominations with temples are the Apostolic United Brethren, the Church of Christ, the Fundamentalist Church
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    Bodaiji

    Bodaiji

    • Places of worship of this type: Tōshō-ji
    • Religion: Buddhism
    A bodaiji (菩提寺, lit. "bodhi temple"), in Japanese Buddhism is a temple which, generation after generation, takes care of a family's dead giving them burial and performing ceremonies in their soul's favor. The name is because in Japan the term bodai (菩提), which originally meant just Buddhist enlightenment (satori), has also come to mean either the care of one's dead to ensure their welfare after death or happiness in the beyond itself. Several samurai families had their bodaiji built to order, for example the Tokugawa, while others did like commoners do, and simply adopted an existing temple as family temple. Families may have more than one bodaiji. The Tokugawa clan for example had two, while the Ashikaga clan had several, both in the Kantō and in the Kansai.
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    Synagogue

    Synagogue

    • Places of worship of this type: Hurva Synagogue
    • Religion: Judaism
    A synagogue (from Greek: συναγωγή transliterated synagogē, meaning "assembly") is a Jewish or Samaritan house of prayer. This use of the Greek term synagogue originates in the Septuagint where it sometimes translates the Hebrew word for assembly, קהל kahal. In modern Hebrew a synagogue is called either a בית כנסת beyt knesset, meaning "house of assembly"; בית תפילה or beyt t'fila (also written as bet tepilla ), meaning "house of prayer", in Yiddish שול shul, from the German for "school," and in Ladino אסנוגה esnoga. In the Hebrew term bet te pilla Beth means "house" and te pilla (תּהלּה) means "prayer". "Beth Te pilla" is derived from the cognate verb, "hitpallel" (פּליל) which is also spelled as pa^li^yl (pronounced: paleel) which implies "estimate, judge, render a verdict" thus "hitpallel" means "to pray" or "to seek a judgment for oneself" or "to plead". Here the underlying meaning of "te pilla" or "prayer" is a conception of petitionary prayer that has a sense of judgment or a "plea" in the court of judgment. This reduces the word root to *P*L*L as "intervene, interpose" and the act of intervention is an act of *P'LiLah*. (Note: the first two alphabets of the word "plea" is
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    Wat

    Wat

    • Places of worship of this type: Wat Phumin
    • Religion: Buddhism
    A wat is a monastery temple in Thailand, Cambodia, or Laos. The word wat (Thai: วัด, Khmer: វត្ត, sometimes rendered vat when referring to Laos) means "school". Strictly speaking a wat is a Buddhist sacred precinct with monks' quarters, the temple proper, an edifice housing a large image of Buddha, and a structure for lessons. A Buddhist site without a minimum of three resident monks cannot correctly be described as a wat, although the term is frequently used more loosely, even for ruins of ancient temples. (As a transitive or intransitive verb, wat means to measure, to take measurements; compare templum, from which temple derives, having the same root as template.) In Cambodia, a wat is used to refer to all kinds of places of worship. Technically, wat generally refers to a Buddhist place of worship, but the technical term is វត្តពុទ្ធសាសនា (wat pootasasna). A Christian church can be referred as វិហារយេស៊ូ(vihear yeasu). Angkor Wat អង្គរវត្ត means city of temples. In everyday language in Thailand, a wat is any place of worship except a mosque (Thai สุเหร่า - su-rao; or มัสยิด - Thai rendering of masjid; a mosque may also be described as โบสถ์ของอิสลาม - bot khong Is-a-lam). Thus
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