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Best Tropical cyclone season of All Time

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    1
    2007–08 South Pacific cyclone season

    2007–08 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Daman
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Daman
    The 2007–08 South Pacific cyclone season was one of the least active tropical cyclone seasons on record, with only four tropical cyclones occurring within the South Pacific basin to the east of 160°E. The season officially ran from November 1, 2007 until April 30, 2008, although the first cyclone, Tropical Depression 01F, developed on October 17. The most intense tropical cyclone of the season was Severe Tropical Cyclone Daman, which reached a minimum pressure of 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) as it affected Fiji. After the season had ended, the names Daman, Funa, and Gene were retired from the tropical cyclone naming lists. During the season, tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) in Nadi, Fiji, and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre (TCWC) in Wellington, New Zealand. Throughout the season the United States Navy and Air force also monitored the basin and issued unofficial warnings, through its Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). Tropical cyclones that were located between 160°E and 120°W as well as the Equator and 25°S were monitored by RSMC Nadi while any that were located to the south of 25°S between 160°E and 120°W were
    7.00
    8 votes
    2
    1994 Pacific typhoon season

    1994 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane John
    The 1994 Pacific typhoon season was an active season in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation in the Western North Pacific, with a total of 41 tropical cyclones during the course of the season. The season had no official bounds and it ran year-round in 1994, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. Tropical storms that formed west of the date line were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The World Meteorological Organization-designated Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre for tropical cyclones for the region is the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions that entered or formed in the Philippine area of responsibility were assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This resulted in some storms having two names. The season started on January 4 with the formation of Tropical Depression One-W to the west of Yap, with the first tropical storm developing a few months later on April 1, and ended near the end of the year when Tropical Storm Bobbie dissipated in the open Pacific on December 25. During the season, 25 systems
    7.71
    7 votes
    3
    1996 Pacific hurricane season

    1996 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Cesar-Douglas
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Cesar-Douglas
    The 1996 Pacific hurricane season was an event in tropical cyclone formation and the third least active Pacific hurricane season in recorded history, behind 1977 and 2010. It officially began May 15, 1996 in the eastern north Pacific and on June 1, 1996 in the central north Pacific. It ended on November 30, 1996. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The season begun slightly early, however, when tropical storm One-E formed on May 13. Few storms formed this season, but it was very eventful. Twelve tropical cyclones formed during this season, of which five made landfall and two other impacted land areas. Two tropical cyclones that formed in other basins entered the eastern north Pacific Ocean. Early in the season three tropical cyclones impacted Mexico in a ten day span, while the first cyclone of the season formed before it officially began. Hurricane Douglas was the strongest storm, reaching Category 4 intensity on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale and had its beginnings in the Atlantic as Hurricane Cesar. This hurricane season officially started on May 15, 1996 in the eastern Pacific, and on
    8.33
    6 votes
    4

    1997 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Erika
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Danny
    The 1997 Atlantic hurricane season is the most recent Atlantic hurricane season to feature no tropical cyclones in August. The season officially began on June 1, 1997, and lasted until November 30, 1997. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1997 season was inactive, with only seven named storms forming, with an additional tropical depression and an unnumbered subtropical storm. It was the first time since the 1961 season that there were no active tropical cyclones in the Atlantic basin during the entire month of August. A strong El Niño is credited with reducing the number of storms in the Atlantic, while increasing the number of storms in the Eastern and Western Pacific basin to 19 and 29 storms, respectively. As is common in El Niño years, tropical cyclogenesis was suppressed in the tropical latitudes, with only two becoming tropical storms south of 25°N. The most notable storm was Hurricane Danny, which killed nine people and caused an estimated $100 million (1997 USD, $145 million 2012 USD) in damage when it made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River and the Mobile Bay area. Hurricane
    9.20
    5 votes
    5
    1986 Pacific hurricane season

    1986 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Roslyn
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Roslyn
    The 1986 Pacific hurricane season was a moderately active Pacific hurricane season. As of 2012, it officially started May 15, 1986 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1986 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1986. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. A total of 17 tropical storm and hurricane formed in 1986, which is slightly above average. Several storms in 1986 affected land. For example, Hurricane Estelle passed south of Hawaii, resulting in $2 million in damage and two deaths. Hurricanes Newton, Paine, and Roslyn also struck Northwestern Mexico. While damage was minimal from these three systems near the location of landfall, Paine caused major flooding in the Great Plains of the United States, especially in Oklahoma. The overall flooding event resulted in $350 million in damage (1986 USD). Activity in the Eastern Pacific Hurricane Center's (EPHC) area of responsibility was above average. There were 25 tropical depressions, one short of the record set in 1982, which had 26 depressions. The season began with the formation of Hurricane Agatha on May 22 and the dissipation of
    7.00
    7 votes
    6

    1955 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Janet
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Connie
    The 1955 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 15, 1955, and lasted until November 15, 1955. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1955 season was active, with twelve tropical storms forming. Three hurricanes hit North Carolina in 1955: Connie, Diane and Ione. Hurricane Connie swamped the Outer Banks and Hurricane Diane caused millions of dollars in damages. Hurricane Janet was one of the most intense storms ever recorded in the Atlantic basin; it struck Belize as a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, killing hundreds and causing catastrophic damage. On January 1, there was already a tropical cyclone located in the central Atlantic Ocean, having developed on December 30 of the previous year. Operationally it was first observed as a hurricane on January 1, which resulted in it being named Alice. The hurricane passed through the Leeward Islands on January 2. Alice reached peak winds of 80 mph (130 km/h) before encountering cold air and turning to the southeast. It dissipated on January 6 over the southeastern Caribbean Sea. Alice produced heavy rainfall and moderately
    7.83
    6 votes
    7
    1975 Pacific typhoon season

    1975 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Nina
    The 1975 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1975, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1975 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 25 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 20 became tropical storms. 14 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 3 reached super typhoon strength. Tropical Cyclone
    6.57
    7 votes
    8
    1997–98 South Pacific cyclone season

    1997–98 South Pacific cyclone season

    The 1997–98 South Pacific cyclone season was one of the most active and the longest tropical cyclone seasons on record, with 16 tropical cyclones occurring within the South Pacific Ocean basin between 160°E and 120°W. The season started earlier than normal with 3 systems developing before the official start of the season on November 1, 1997, while the final system of the season dissipated on May 3, 1998. During the season 50 people died, with the deadliest being Cyclone Martin with 27 known deaths. The strongest tropical cyclones during the season were Cyclone Ron and Cyclone Susan as both were estimated to have minimum pressures of 900 hPa (26.58 inHg), and were the most intense tropical cyclones on record in the South Pacific Ocean until Cyclone Zoe in 2002–03. After the season ended, 10 names had their names either removed or retired from the lists of names, after they caused significant impacts to South Pacific islands. During the season, tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) in Nadi, Fiji and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centers in Brisbane, Australia and Wellington, New Zealand. The United States Armed Forces
    9.50
    4 votes
    9
    1989 Pacific hurricane season

    1989 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Raymond
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Kiko
    The 1989 Pacific hurricane season officially started May 15, 1989 in the Eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1989 in the Central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1989. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. A total of 17 storms and 9 hurricanes formed, which was near long-term averages. Four hurricanes reached major hurricane status (Category 3 or higher) on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale) Notable storms include Hurricanes Cosme, Kiko, and Raymond. Cosme crossed over Mexico and killed 30 people. Hurricane Kiko made landfall on the Gulf of California side of the Baja California Peninsula. Hurricane Raymond was the strongest storm of the season, but weakened significantly before landfall. Overall, the season continued the general trend in the 1980s of near to above-average seasons in the East Pacific. Seventeen cyclones formed. Eight peaked at tropical storm strength. Nine systems became hurricanes, of which four were major hurricanes at Category 3 intensity or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. On August 28, three systems were active, one of a few times when there has been three
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    1990 Atlantic hurricane season

    1990 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Gustav
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Diana
    The 1990 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season since 1969. It officially began on June 1, 1990, and lasted until November 30, 1990. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. One tropical depression did form before the season officially started, however. Though very active, the season featured relatively weak systems, most of which stayed at sea. The 1990 season was unusual in that no tropical cyclone of at least tropical storm strength made landfall in the United States, although Tropical Storm Marco weakened to a depression just before landfall. 1962 was the last season prior to this one when no storm of at least tropical storm strength made landfall in the US. There have been a total of 6 such seasons in which no storms have made landfall in the United States at at least tropical storm strength. 1853, 1862, 1864, 1922, 1962 and 1990. Two of the season's hurricanes were notable. Hurricane Diana killed an estimated 139 in the Mexican states of Veracruz and Hidalgo; property damage estimates are unavailable, but damage was widespread. Hurricane Klaus brought flooding to
    8.20
    5 votes
    11
    1997–98 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1997–98 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1997–98 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It ran from November 15, 1997 to April 30, 1998, except for Mauritius and the Seychelles, where it ran until May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. The first advisory by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center was released on January 18, while the cyclone was inland over Mozambique. Some ships reported gale-force winds from the center and was forecast to intensify. By 1200 UTC January 18, winds had decreased to 35 mph (55 km/h) and became a tropical low. The next day, the low moved southward and started to strengthen again to a 40 mph (60 km/h) minimal tropical storm. The low turned eastsouthward and scraped the Mozambique coastline and re-entered the channel. Even though the low was over open waters, the system did not strengthen and the JTWC discontinued warnings on January 23. Torrential rains poured in Mozambique and Malawi, which destroyed
    8.20
    5 votes
    12
    1971 Pacific typhoon season

    1971 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Rose
    The 1971 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1971, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1971 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 38 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 35 became tropical storms. 24 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 6 reached super typhoon strength. The season had an
    8.00
    5 votes
    13
    1993 Pacific hurricane season

    1993 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Lidia
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Gert
    The 1993 Pacific hurricane season was a moderately active Pacific hurricane season with seven named storms directly impacting land. The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1 in the central Pacific, and ended on November 30; these dates conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The first tropical cyclone developed on June 11, over a month after the traditional start of the season. The final named storm of the season, Tropical Storm Norma, dissipated on October 14. The Central Pacific Ocean saw very little tropical activity, with only one cyclone, Hurricane Keoni, developing in that particular basin. However, many storms out of the season crossed the threshold into the Central Pacific, many as hurricanes, and even major hurricanes. The season produced fifteen named storms, which was slightly below the average of sixteen named storms per season. However, the total of eight hurricanes during the season was slightly above average, and the total of nine major hurricanes was significantly higher than the average of three. The most intense cyclone of the season was Hurricane Lidia, a
    8.00
    5 votes
    14
    1979 Pacific hurricane season

    1979 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1979 Pacific hurricane season officially started May 15, 1979 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1979 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1979. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeast Pacific Ocean. With ten storms, less than two-thirds of the average of seventeen, this season was very inactive. There were six hurricanes, also below average. Of those hurricanes, four were major by reaching Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. As of the 2012 Pacific hurricane season, 1979 remains the most recent year without any tropical cyclones active in the Central Pacific. A tropical disturbance formed on May 29 south of Manzanillo, Mexico and moved slowly southwestward. On May 31, the storm was upgraded to tropical depression status based on satellite data. Shortly after becoming a depression, the storm turned northward over cooler waters where it rapidly weakened and dissipated 370 mi (600 km) southwest of Manzanillo. The only effects from the tropical depression was from a ship which reported heavy rainfall. A depression formed on May 31, In early June, it became a hurricane,
    6.83
    6 votes
    15
    2007 Atlantic hurricane season

    2007 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Dean
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Dean
    The 2007 Atlantic hurricane season was an active Atlantic hurricane season that produced 17 tropical cyclones, 15 tropical storms, six hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. It officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean. The first tropical cyclone, Subtropical Storm Andrea, developed on May 9, while the last storm, Tropical Storm Olga, dissipated on December 13. The most intense hurricane, Dean, is tied for the seventh most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded as well as the third most intense Atlantic hurricane at landfall. The season was one of only four on record for the Atlantic with more than one Category 5 storm. It was the second on record in which an Atlantic hurricane, Felix, and an eastern Pacific hurricane, Henriette, made landfall on the same day. September had a record-tying eight storms, although the strengths and durations of most of the storms were low. Aside from hurricanes Dean and Felix, none of the storms in the season exceeded Category 1 intensity. Pre-season forecasts by the Colorado State University (CSU) called for 14 named storms and
    7.80
    5 votes
    16
    2009–10 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2009–10 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2009–10 South-West Indian Ocean tropical cyclone year officially started on July 1, 2009, and ended on June 30, 2010, after incorporating the tropical cyclone season which ran from November 1 to April 30 for all areas except for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it ended on May 15, 2010. In this basin which officially runs from 30 to 90E and is to the south of the equator, the main warning center is the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center on La Reunion Island; however they delegate the naming of Cyclones to the Meteorological services of Mauritius and Madagascar. It was predicted by the Mauritius Meteorological service that there would be between nine and eleven named storms in the South West Indian Ocean during the season. Their further assessment that there was a good probability of a named storm forming in November was justified when Tropical Cyclone Anja formed on November 14. Early on August 17, the JTWC reported that an area of disturbed weather had formed about 1200 kilometres, (750 miles), to the east of Diego Garcia. The convection had a developed low level circulation center, however convection had not started to consolidate around it and was in an area
    7.80
    5 votes
    17

    1979 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane David
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Frederic
    The 1979 Atlantic hurricane season was the first in which the Atlantic hurricane naming list included both male and female names. It officially began on June 1 and lasted until November 30, and there was tropical cyclone activity in every month. The dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. Hurricane Frederic hit 4 countries and 2 states. The most notable storm of 1979 was Hurricane David, a Category 5 storm on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale that killed over 2,000 people, mostly in the Dominican Republic, and caused nearly 1.5 billion dollars in damage (1979 USD). Hurricane Frederic, which caused $2.3 billion (1979 US dollars and became the most expensive hurricane in United States history when it made landfall near the border between Mississippi and Alabama. The 1979 season was an average but destructive season with 27 depressions, with nine reaching tropical storm strength. The notable cyclones include Tropical Depression One which caused one of Jamaica's worst natural disasters. Tropical Storm Claudette became one of the most destructive tropical storms of all time and created a 24-hour rainfall
    6.67
    6 votes
    18
    1978 Pacific typhoon season

    1978 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1978 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1978, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1978 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 32 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 29 became tropical storms. 15 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 1 reached super typhoon strength. Many of the storms
    8.75
    4 votes
    19
    2003 Atlantic hurricane season

    2003 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Isabel
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Isabel
    The 2003 Atlantic hurricane season was an active Atlantic hurricane season with tropical activity before and after the official bounds of the season – the first such occurrence in 50 years. The season produced 21 tropical cyclones, of which 16 developed into named storms; seven cyclones attained hurricane status, of which three reached major hurricane status. With sixteen storms, the season was tied for the sixth most active Atlantic hurricane season on record. The strongest hurricane of the season was Hurricane Isabel, which reached Category 5 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale northeast of the Lesser Antilles; Isabel later struck North Carolina as a Category 2 hurricane, causing $3.6 billion in damage (2003 USD, $4.55 billion 2012 USD) and a total of 51 deaths across the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The season began with Subtropical Storm Ana on April 20, prior to the official start of the season; the bounds of the season are from June 1 to November 30, which conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. In early September, Hurricane Fabian struck Bermuda as a Category 3 hurricane, where it was the
    8.75
    4 votes
    20
    1992 Pacific hurricane season

    1992 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Tina
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Iniki
    The 1992 Pacific hurricane season was the most active Pacific hurricane season on record. The most notable storm was Hurricane Iniki, which caused billions of dollars of damage to the Hawaiian Islands. Hurricanes Lester, Virgil, Winifred, and Orlene also made landfall and killed several people, but were significantly less destructive. Hurricane Darby and Tropical Storm Agatha brought rains and more destruction to Mexico, without making landfall. Hurricane Tina was the longest-lasting Pacific hurricane at the time. Also of note are Hurricane Ekeka and Tropical Storm Hali, which formed in late January and late March, respectively. The season officially started on May 15, 1992 in the Eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1992 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1992. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern and north-central Pacific Ocean. However, the season wildly exceeded these bounds, as climatological effects including an El Niño caused Hurricane Ekeka to form on January 26. Ekeka's formation marks a record for the earliest formation of a tropical cyclone in either the Eastern or Central
    6.50
    6 votes
    21

    1951 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Easy
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Charlie
    The 1951 Atlantic hurricane season was moderately active, starting with an pre-season hurricane and lasting until late October. The season officially started on June 15, when the United States Weather Bureau began its daily monitoring for tropical cyclone activity; the season officially ended on November 15. It was the first year since 1937 in which no hurricanes made landfall on the United States; as Tropical Storm How was the only tropical storm to hit the nation, the season had the least tropical cyclone damage in the United States since the 1939 season. Like the 1950 season, names from the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet were used to name storms this season. The first hurricane of the season, Able, was the earliest major hurricane in Atlantic hurricane history. It formed on May 15 and executed a counterclockwise loop over the Bahamas; later it brushed the North Carolina coastline. Hurricane Charlie was a powerful hurricane that struck Jamaica, killing hundreds and becoming the worst disaster in over 50 years. The hurricane later struck Mexico twice, producing deadly flooding outside of Tampico, Tamaulipas. The strongest hurricane, Easy, spent its duration over the open
    7.40
    5 votes
    22
    2001 Pacific hurricane season

    2001 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Juliette
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Juliette
    The 2001 Pacific hurricane season was an event in tropical cyclone meteorology. The most notable storm that year was Hurricane Juliette, which caused devastating floods in Baja California, leading to 12 fatalities and $400 million (2001 USD; $5.25 billion 2012 USD) worth of damage. No other tropical cyclones in the 2001 Pacific hurricane season were notable. The season officially began on May 15, 2001 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 2001 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 2001. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in this part of the Pacific Ocean. The first storm developed on May 25, while the last storm dissipated on November 3. The 2001 Pacific hurricane season officially started May 15, 2001 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 2001 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 2001. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In practice, however, the season lasted from May 25, the formation date of its first system, to November 3, the dissipation date of the last. There were fifteen tropical storms in the
    7.40
    5 votes
    23
    2006 Atlantic hurricane season

    2006 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Gordon
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Alberto
    The 2006 Atlantic hurricane season was significantly less active than the record previous season. It marked the first since 2001 in which no hurricanes made landfall in the United States, and was the first since 1994 that no tropical cyclones formed during October. Following the intense activity of 2005, forecasters predicted that the 2006 season would be only slightly less active. Instead a rapidly forming moderate El Niño event in 2006, activity was slowed by the presence of the Saharan Air Layer over the tropical Atlantic and the steady presence of a robust secondary high pressure area to the Azores high centered around Bermuda. There were no tropical cyclones after October 2. Tropical Storm Alberto was indirectly responsible for two deaths when it made landfall in Florida. Hurricane Ernesto caused heavy rainfall in Haiti, and directly killed at least seven in Haiti and the United States. Four hurricanes formed after Ernesto, including the strongest storms of the season, Hurricanes Helene and Gordon. In total, the season was responsible for 14 deaths and $500 million (2006 USD; $576 million 2012 USD) in damage. The calendar year 2006 also saw Tropical Storm Zeta, which arose in
    7.40
    5 votes
    24
    1957 Pacific typhoon season

    1957 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1957 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1957, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1957 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Fleet Weather Center on Guam. Twenty-two tropical storms developed in 1957 in the Northwestern Pacific. Tropical depressions were likely, but no records are known to exist that would mention any. Eighteen storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 8 reached super typhoon strength. An additional storm, Della, came across the Dateline from the Central Pacific, therefore it is not taken account in the total number of storms. The first tropical cyclone of the 1957 season, classified as Tropical Storm 01W by the JTWC, was initially identified early on January 3
    8.50
    4 votes
    25
    2005–06 South Pacific cyclone season

    2005–06 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Larry
    The 2005–06 South Pacific cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 1, 2005 and ended on April 30, 2006. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the southern Pacific Ocean east of 160°E. Additionally, the regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, and the "tropical cyclone year" runs from July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006. Tropical cyclones between 160°E and 120°W and north of 25°S are monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service in Nadi. Those that move south of 25°S are monitored by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Wellington, New Zealand. During October 2005, both RSMC Nadi and New Zealand's National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research both issued seasonal forecasts which contained information on what was expected to occur during the 2005-06 tropical cyclone season. Both agencies expected that the season would see a near average amount of tropical cyclone activity due there being no El Niño or La Nina. As a result of these conditions RSMC Nadi predicted that between 7-9 tropical
    8.50
    4 votes
    26
    1916 Atlantic hurricane season

    1916 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1916 Texas Hurricane
    The 1916 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and the first half of fall in 1916. The season is one of only two in which two major hurricanes were reported before the month of August, the other being the 2005 season. 1916 was a fairly active season, especially for the time. Fifteen tropical cyclones formed during the course of the year. Ten hurricanes formed, and five of those were major hurricanes. On May 13, a tropical depression formed south of the Cuban coast. It quickly crossed the island and moved over the Straits of Florida. On May 14, it slowly strengthened to a minimal tropical storm, and it made landfall near Key Vaca, Florida with winds of 40 mph (65 km/h). It entered the Florida peninsula near Cape Sable, moving northward across the state. Gale force winds were reported east of the center. It transitioned to an extratropical cyclone on May 16. Initially, the cyclone was not included in the Atlantic hurricane database. A tropical disturbance organized into a tropical storm on June 29 in the southwest Caribbean Sea. It moved to the north-northwest, brushing the coast of Honduras before strengthening into a hurricane on July 2. The hurricane continued to
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    1990 Pacific hurricane season

    1990 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Diana
    The 1990 Pacific hurricane season is the fifth most active season on record. The 1990 season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. However, these bounds were slightly exceeded when Hurricane Alma formed on May 12. Hurricane Alma became the third earliest tropical cyclone in the Eastern Pacific basin since the satellite era began in 1966, while Trudy is the third strongest October eastern Pacific hurricane on record. Overall, the impact of this season was minimal. Tropical Storm Rachel made two landfalls in Mexico and brought rain to the United States. Hurricane Boris brought light showers to California. The 1990 eastern North Pacific hurricane season was active in terms of number of storms that attained at least tropical storm intensity and of Accumulated Cyclone Energy. All of the tropical cyclones of this year developed from westward-moving African tropical waves. The season established several tropical storm records for this basin and was marked by several strong
    8.25
    4 votes
    28
    1996–97 South Pacific cyclone season

    1996–97 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Keli
    The 1996–97 South Pacific cyclone season was one of the most active tropical cyclone seasons on record, with 12 tropical cyclones officially occurring within the South Pacific Ocean basin between 160°E and 120°W. The season officially started on November 1, 1997 with the first tropical cyclone developing on November 23 while the season ended later than normal on June 17, when Cyclone Keli dissipated. The strongest tropical cyclones during the season was Cyclone Gavin which had a minimum pressure of 925 hPa (27.32 inHg). After the season had ended 4 tropical cyclone names were retired from the naming lists, after the cyclones had caused significant impacts to South Pacific islands. During the season, tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) in Nadi, Fiji and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center in Wellington, New Zealand. Throughout the season the United States Navy also monitored the basin and issued unofficial warnings, through its Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and Naval Pacific Meteorology and Oceanography Center (NPMOC). Tropical cyclones that were located between 160°E and 120°W as well as the Equator and 25S were
    8.25
    4 votes
    29
    2004 Atlantic hurricane season

    2004 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Ivan
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Charley
    The 2004 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 2004, and lasted until November 30, 2004. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 2004 season exceeded these conventional limits slightly, as Tropical Storm Otto formed on the day before the last day of the season and lasted three days into December. Ironically, although a weak El Nino was emerging during the summer, the season was well above average in activity, with fifteen named storms and one of the highest Accumulated Cyclone Energy totals ever observed. Minus a very slow start, with the first storm forming almost two months after the season began, the season was highly active. A record 8 storms formed in the month of August, which ties a few other seasons with the amount of storms that formed in month, the majority of them in September, such as September 2007, which had 8 named storms. The season was unusual, in the fact that a weak El Nino was in place throughout the season, which hinted the late start, but the season was actually above average, even though historically El Nino limits the development of storms in the Atlantic
    7.00
    5 votes
    30

    1944 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: 1944 Great Atlantic Hurricane
    • Tropical cyclones: 1944 Great Atlantic Hurricane
    The 1944 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1944, and lasted until October 31, 1944. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1944 season was near average. A Category 1 hurricane hit North Carolina. A Category 3 hit Jamaica. Another Category 3 hit Florida late in the season. A Category 1 hurricane and a tropical storm hit Mexico. Another tropical storm hit Grand Isle, Louisiana. The first storm of the season formed on July 13 and moved northwest, paralleling the Bahamas, slowly strengthening. It recurved once in the Gulf Stream off the Georgia coast and became a hurricane shortly thereafter. The storm passed between the US and Bermuda and became extratropical as it entered the north Atlantic. A tropical storm moved through the Lesser Antilles on July 24. It continued through the Caribbean Sea, and dissipated on July 28 over the Western Caribbean. The storm caused some damage on southern Hispaniola, but no deaths were reported. On July 30, a tropical storm was located in the eastern Bahamas. It moved northwestward, becoming a hurricane the next day. The hurricane moved inland over
    9.33
    3 votes
    31
    1975 Pacific hurricane season

    1975 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Unnamed Hurricane
    The 1975 Pacific hurricane season officially started May 15, 1975 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1975 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1975. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeast Pacific Ocean. The 1975 Pacific hurricane season was near average, with 17 tropical storms forming. Of these, 9 became hurricanes, and 4 became major hurricanes by reaching Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The only notable storms are Hurricane Olivia, which killed 30 people, caused $30 million (1975 USD) in damage, and left thousands homeless when it made landfall in October; and an unnamed hurricane that developed at very high latitude, but had no effect on land. Hurricane Denise was the strongest storm of the year. Hurricanes Lily and Katrina passed close to Socorro Island and Tropical Storm Elanor made landfall in Mexico. Hurricane Agatha sunk a ship. The season began with the formation of Tropical Depression One on June 2 and ended with the extratropical transition of Tropical Storm Priscilla on November 7. No named systems formed in May, two in June, four in July, six in August,
    8.00
    4 votes
    32
    2007–08 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2007–08 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Ivan
    The 2007–08 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 15, 2007, and ended on April 30, 2008, with the exception for Mauritius and the Seychelles, which ended May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. On July 26, a tropical disturbance developed within a near-equatorial trough. The next day, convection began to develop around the low while located about 1,500 kilometres (930 mi) east of Diego Garcia. Moderate wind shear temporarily caused the convection to become displaced from the center on July 27. However, later that day, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) assessed the chances of the low developing into a tropical cyclone as "fair". By July 29 the low was designated as Tropical Disturbance 01 while located near the edge of Météo-Frances area of responsibility. With developing banding features, increasing convection and very warm sea-surface temperatures (exceeding
    8.00
    4 votes
    33
    1994 Atlantic hurricane season

    1994 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Florence
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Alberto
    The 1994 Atlantic hurricane season produced seven named tropical cyclones and three hurricanes, a total below the Atlantic hurricane season average. It officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally limit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean. The first tropical cyclone, Tropical Storm Alberto, developed on June 30, while the last storm, Hurricane Gordon, dissipated on November 21. During the year, a total of seven named storms and three hurricanes formed. The season was unusual in that it produced no major hurricanes, which are those of Category 3 status or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The most intense hurricane, Hurricane Florence, peaked as a Category 2 storm with winds of 110 mph (180 km/h). Aside from Chris, Florence, and Gordon, none of the storms exceeded tropical storm intensity. Tropical Storm Alberto produced significant rainfall and flooding in the Southeastern United States, damaging or destroying over 18,000 homes. In August, Tropical Storm Beryl produced heavy rainfall in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, with moderate to heavy rainfall throughout several other
    6.00
    6 votes
    34
    1986 Pacific typhoon season

    1986 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Wayne
    A total of 32 tropical depressions formed in 1986 in the Western Pacific over an eleven month time span. Of the 32, 30 became tropical storms, 19 storms reached typhoon intensity, and 3 reached super typhoon strength. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center considered Vera as two tropical cyclones, when all the warning centers treated Vera as one in real time, while another, Georgette, originated in the Eastern Pacific. Six of the tropical cyclones formed in August, which was the busiest month of the season. Eight tropical cyclones moved through the Philippines this season. Most of the deaths attributed to typhons in 1986 were caused by Peggy and Wayne The 1986 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1986, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine
    6.80
    5 votes
    35
    1963 Pacific typhoon season

    1963 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1963 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1963, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1963 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 43 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 25 became tropical storms. 19 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 8 reached super typhoon strength. On July 27 Tropical
    9.00
    3 votes
    36
    2009 Pacific typhoon season

    2009 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Kujira
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Depression Auring
    The 2009 Pacific typhoon season was the period that tropical cyclones formed in the Western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout the year during 2009, with most tropical cyclones forming between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. Tropical storms that form in the entire Western Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions that form in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones (including tropical depressions) that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines. During the season, 39 Tropical depressions developed within the Western Pacific, whilst 2 formed outside the region before moving into the Western Pacific. Each season several national meteorological services and scientific agencies forecast either the expected amount tropical cyclones, tropical
    9.00
    3 votes
    37
    1999 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1999 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone 05B
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone 05B
    The 1999 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The North Indian Ocean cyclone season has no official bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Indian Ocean in the Northern Hemisphere, east of the Horn of Africa and west of the Malay Peninsula. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean – the Arabian Sea to the west of the Indian subcontinent, abbreviated ARB by the India Meteorological Department (IMD); and the Bay of Bengal to the east, abbreviated BOB by the IMD. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. The tropical cyclone scale for this basin is detailed on the right. On average, 4 to 6 storms form in this basin every season. The season produced an average number of storms but there was an above average number of intense cyclones. In May, a Category 3
    5.83
    6 votes
    38
    1941 Atlantic hurricane season

    1941 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1941 Florida hurricane
    The 1941 Atlantic hurricane season was the period during 1941 in which tropical cyclones formed in the Atlantic Basin. It was a relatively inactive hurricane season, with only six known storms. It officially began on June 16, 1941 and lasted until November 1, 1941. These dates delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones tend to form in the Atlantic basin. Of the six cyclones, four attained hurricane status, and two became major hurricanes. The season had an abnormally late start; the first system formed on September 11, nearly two months after the official beginning date. The season was also short-lived, as all six storms developed in rapid succession. On September 23, three hurricanes existed simultaneously in the Atlantic basin. In total, the season resulted in about 63 fatalities and over $10 million in damages. The first and last storms of the season were largely insignificant, although the second, fourth, and fifth storms had considerable effects. One hurricane struck Texas and Louisiana in late September, disrupting the Louisiana Maneuvers. Among the most significant storms to impact the United States was Hurricane Five, which made landfall in Florida at
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    1958 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Helene
    The 1958 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 15, 1958, and lasted until November 15, 1958. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The season was average, with ten storms forming, but had a disproportionate number of strong storms with seven hurricanes and five major hurricanes. Notable 1958 storms include Hurricane Cleo which reached Category 5 intensity on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale while remaining in the open Atlantic Ocean; Hurricane Ella, which dumped considerable amounts of rain in southern Texas; Tropical Storm Gerda, which killed three in Puerto Rico; and Hurricane Helene, which caused $7 million in damage (1958 dollars) when it skimmed past Cape Fear, Cape Lookout (North Carolina), and Cape Hatteras. The season's activity was reflected with a cumulative accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) rating of 121. ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that last a long time, as well as particularly strong hurricanes, have high ACEs. ACE is only calculated for full advisories on tropical systems at or exceeding
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    1997 Pacific typhoon season

    1997 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Ivan
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Paka
    The 1997 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1997, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. This was the most active tropical cyclone season ever recorded, with a record ten Category 5 storms forming and with an ACE of 594.11. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the International Date Line. Storms that form east of the Date Line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1997 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. The season was unusual in the number of super typhoons
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    2008 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2008 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Nargis
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Nisha
    The 2008 North Indian cyclone season was an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The North Indian cyclone season has no official bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. The scope of this basin is north of the Equator and west of the Malaysian Peninsula. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) and Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) monitor tropical cyclones in this basin. This basin is divided into two different seas by India; the Arabian Sea to the west, abbreviated ARB by the IMD, and the Bay of Bengal to the east, abbreviated BOB by the IMD. On average, about 4 to 6 storms form in this basin every season. The 2008 North Indian Ocean season was average in activity, but was very eventful. This season ranks as the costliest and one of the deadliest seasons on record, with about 12 billion dollars in damage and over 138,000 deaths. Cyclone Nargis was the most notable storm of the season. It caused the worst natural disaster in Myanmar's history, and caused the majority of the
    7.50
    4 votes
    42
    2008–09 South Pacific cyclone season

    2008–09 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Depression 04F
    The 2008–09 South Pacific cyclone season began on December 1, 2008 with the formation of Tropical Disturbance 01F. This was 30 days after the season had officially begun on November 1, 2008. The season officially ended on April 30, 2009. Tropical cyclones that were between 160°E and 120°W and north of 25°S were monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service. Those that moved south of 25°S were monitored by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre (TCWC) in Wellington, New Zealand. During the season, there were 15 Tropical Disturbances with 12 of them intensifying into Tropical Depressions, which were monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in Nadi, Fiji, which is a part of the Fiji Meteorological Service. Only five of the Tropical Depressions intensified into Tropical Cyclones which were named Hettie, Innis, Joni, Ken, and Lin. Both Cyclone Innis and Cyclone Hettie had peak wind speeds of 75 km/h (45 mph) which made them Category One cyclones on the Australian Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale, whilst Cyclone Ken had wind speeds of 95 km/h (60 mph). Cyclones Joni and Lin had peak wind speeds of 100 km/h (65 mph) and 110 km/h, (70 mph) respectively which made them
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    1959 Pacific typhoon season

    1959 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Vera
    The 1959 Pacific typhoon season was regarded as one of the most devastating years for Pacific typhoons on record, with China, Japan and the Philippines sustaining catastrophic losses. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the International Date Line. Storms that form east of the Date Line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1959 Pacific hurricane season. All typhoons were assigned a name and number. Tropical storms and tropical depressions formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name and number by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, but the latter was not added if no reconnaissance missions were assigned. Systems handled by the responsibility of the USWB and FWB featured no number. The 1959 Pacific typhoon season featured 24 tropical cyclones, though operationally 59 total areas of investigation were classified by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC); three systems were handled by the responsibility of FWB at Pearl Harbor and the USWB at Honolulu. Three systems were questionable due to lack of reconnaissance aircraft use. In total, the season featured 65 tropical cyclones and areas of
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    1981 Pacific typhoon season

    1981 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Irma
    The 1981 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1981, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. A total of 35 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 29 became tropical storms. Of the 29, 13 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 2 reached super typhoon strength. Seven tropical cyclones moved through the Philippines this season. The first tropical cyclone formed on March 11, with the final tropical cyclone dissipating December 28. Tropical cyclones only accounted for 12 percent of the rainfall in Hong Kong this season, the lowest percentage for the protectorate since 1972. The
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    2009 Atlantic hurricane season

    2009 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Bill
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Bill
    The 2009 Atlantic hurricane season was a below average Atlantic hurricane season that produced eleven tropical cyclones, nine named storms, three hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. It officially began on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates that conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones develop in the Atlantic basin. The season's first tropical cyclone, Tropical Depression One, developed on May 28, while the final storm, Hurricane Ida, dissipated on November 10. The most intense hurricane, Bill, was a powerful Cape Verde-type hurricane that affected areas from the Leeward Islands to Newfoundland. The season featured the lowest number of tropical cyclones since the 1997 season, and only one system, Claudette, made landfall in the United States. Forming from the interaction of a tropical wave and an upper level low, Claudette made landfall on the Florida Panhandle with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph (75 km/h) before quickly dissipating over Alabama, killing two people and causing $228,000 (2009 USD) in damage. Pre-season forecasts issued by Colorado State University (CSU) called for fourteen named storms and seven hurricanes, of which three
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    1911 Atlantic hurricane season

    1911 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1911 Atlantic hurricane season was relatively inactive, with only six known tropical cyclones forming in the Atlantic during the summer and fall. There were three suspected tropical depressions, including one that began the season in February and one that ended the season when it dissipated in December. Three storms intensified into hurricanes, two of which attained Category 2 status on the modern-day Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale. Storm data is largely based on the Atlantic hurricane database, which underwent a thorough revision for the period between 1911 and 1914 in 2005. Most of the cyclones directly impacted land. A westward-moving hurricane killed 17 people and severely damaged Charleston, South Carolina, and the surrounding area in late August. A couple of weeks earlier, the Pensacola, Florida area suffered from a storm in the Gulf of Mexico that produced winds of 80 mph (130 km/h) over land. The fourth storm of the season struck the coast of Nicaragua, killing 10 and causing extensive damage. The Atlantic hurricane database (HURDAT) officially recognizes six tropical cyclones from the 1911 season. Only three attained hurricane status, with winds of 75 mph (121 km/h) or
    10.00
    2 votes
    47

    1974 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Carmen
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Carmen
    The 1974 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1974, and lasted until November 30, 1974. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The season had near average activity, with eleven total storms and four hurricanes forming. The most notable storms of the season were Hurricane Carmen, which made landfall on the Yucatán Peninsula and in Louisiana, causing at least $150 million (1974 US dollars) in damages; and Hurricane Fifi, which killed 8,000 people as it skimmed along the northern coast of Honduras. The season's activity was reflected with a cumulative accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) rating of 61. ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that last a long time, as well as particularly strong hurricanes, have high ACEs. ACE is only calculated for full advisories on tropical systems at or exceeding 34 knots (39 mph, 63 km/h) or tropical storm strength. In early May, a tropical disturbance emerged out of the Intertropical Convergence Zone near Trinidad. This system tracked across the Caribbean Sea over the following
    10.00
    2 votes
    48
    1984 Pacific typhoon season

    1984 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Ike
    The 1984 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. A total of 30 tropical depressions formed in 1984 in the Western Pacific, of which 27 became tropical storms, 16 reached typhoon intensity, and two reached super typhoon strength. Eight tropical cyclones moved into mainland China, four struck Vietnam, four moved through the Philippines, and one cyclone moved into South Korea. The second consecutive typhoon season with a late start, all of the season activity was contained between June and December, with August and October the most active months, contributing to half of the seasonal tropical
    6.40
    5 votes
    49

    1986 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Charley
    The 1986 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1986, and lasted until November 30, 1986. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. During the 1986 season, the first subtropical depression formed in the first week of June, while the last tropical cyclone dissipated at the end of the third week of November. The 1986 season had lower than average activity because of an ongoing El Niño event, and was the least active season in the North Atlantic since the 1983 Atlantic hurricane season. This was also the first season since 1972 to have no major hurricanes. Earl was the strongest hurricane of the season, reaching Category 2 status. Few storms caused significant damage; Hurricane Bonnie caused heavy rains and flooding across southeast Texas when it made landfall near Sea Rim State Park. Hurricane Charley caused limited damage in North Carolina and Massachusetts, but crossed the Atlantic as an extratropical cyclone and caused considerable damage in the British Isles. Dr. William M. Gray of Colorado State University issued forecasts on May 29 and July 28 indicating within both forecasts the
    6.40
    5 votes
    50
    2002 Pacific typhoon season

    2002 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Pongsona
    The 2002 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2002, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the International Date Line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2002 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Tokyo Typhoon Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. The season began quickly with the first storm's development on January 10, east of the Philippines. In March, Typhoon Mitag became the first super typhoon on record in the month. In June, Typhoon Chataan
    6.40
    5 votes
    51
    2009–10 South Pacific cyclone season

    2009–10 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Tomas
    The 2009–10 South Pacific cyclone season began on December 3, 2009 with the formation of Tropical Disturbance 01F. This was 32 days after the season had officially begun on November 1, 2009 and ended on April 30, 2010. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the southern Pacific Ocean east of 160°E. Additionally, the regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season; the "tropical cyclone year" began on July 1, 2009 and will end on June 30, 2010. Tropical cyclones between 160°E and 120°W and north of 25°S are monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service. Those that move south of 25°S are monitored by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Wellington, New Zealand. The first tropical disturbance of the season formed on December 3, about 1015 km (700 mi) to the north of Suva, Fiji. RSMC Nadi released their seasonal prediction on October 21, 2009, and reported that the El Niño conditions for this season indicated that tropical cyclone activity would be near normal with eight to eleven tropical cyclones predicted to form within the South Pacific compared to an
    5.50
    6 votes
    52
    1970 Pacific hurricane season

    1970 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Norma
    The 1970 Pacific hurricane season began on May 15, 1970 in the east Pacific, and on June 1, 1970 in the central Pacific. It ended on November 30, 1970. These dates conventionally delimit the period of time when tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific Ocean. This season had an above average number of storms. There were twenty-one tropical cyclones, of which eighteen reached tropical storm strength. Four storms became hurricanes, of which none reached major hurricane strength. In the central Pacific, one hurricane and one tropical depression formed. One of the depressions crossed the dateline to become a typhoon. An area of low pressure lacked strong convection until May 30, when it strengthened into Tropical Depression One-E. On May 31, the storm further intensified into Tropical Storm Adele, the first named storm and Hurricane of the season. Adele tracked westward, as it strengthened into a hurricane on June 1. It reached its peak intensity later that day. As Adele moved west, A hostile environment caused it to weaken into a Tropical Storm. Adele further weakened, and it was downgraded into a depression on June 7. It was degenerated into an open trough, and it dissipated
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    2003–04 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2003–04 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Gafilo
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Gafilo
    The 2003-04 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation. It started on November 15, 2003 and ended on April 30, 2004. For Mauritius and the Seychelles, the season continued until May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. This early out-of-season storm formed on September 29 and dissipated on October 4. It formed at a very low latitude but threatened no land. The name was contributed by Tanzania. It first formed on November 9 and intensified to an intense cyclone, winds reaching 100 kts. It weakened below tropical disturbance status on November 15. It intensified again on November 18 and reached a secondary peak of 70 kts, before dissipating on November 22. Formed on December 5 and became extratropical on December 21. It crossed Madagascar, but caused little if any damage. Throughout Madagascar at least 150 mm (5.9 in) of rain fell, with northern areas receiving totals in excess of 300 mm (12 in). Parts of
    7.25
    4 votes
    54
    2010 Atlantic hurricane season

    2010 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Igor
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Julia
    The 2010 Atlantic hurricane season was the third most active Atlantic hurricane season on record, tying with the 1887 Atlantic hurricane season, 1995 Atlantic hurricane season and the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season. It had the most number of named storms since the 2005 season and also ties with the 1969 Atlantic hurricane season for the second largest number of hurricanes. In addition, the activity in the north Atlantic in 2010 exceeded the activity in the northwest Pacific Typhoon season. The only other known time this event happened was in 2005. The season began with Hurricane Alex, a Category 2 storm on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale, which struck the Yucatán Peninsula as a tropical storm and northeastern Mexico south of the Texas border at peak intensity. Following Alex, a series of relatively weak systems occurred into the month of July and early August. In the latter part of August and September, the season became much more active with the formation of eleven named storms in about 40 days, six of which were Cape Verde-type storms. Four of those Cape Verde storms (Danielle, Earl, Igor and Julia) each reached Category 4 intensity and a fifth in the Bay of Campeche (Karl)
    7.25
    4 votes
    55

    1965 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Betsy
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Betsy
    The 1965 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1965, and lasted until November 30, 1965. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. As a whole the 1965 season was inactive, with only six tropical storms forming. The most notable storm of the season was Hurricane Betsy. Betsy was one of the worst storms on record in the United States, killing 76 and causing $1.42 billion in damage (the first storm ever to reach the US$1 billion mark, equivalent to $8.5 billion in 2005 USD) in south Florida and Louisiana. In early June, an area of low pressure associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone was pulled northward across Central America and Mexico by a cut off low over the Gulf of Mexico. Tracking northward into the Gulf, the low struggled to develop amidst wind shear. By June 13, aircraft reconnaissance found gale-force winds associated with the system; however, the storm was poorly organized and lacked a defined circulation center. Turning northeastward and accelerating in response to an approaching trough on June 14, the system attained winds of 50 mph (85 km/h). The following day, the system
    8.33
    3 votes
    56

    1969 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Camille
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Camille
    The 1969 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1969, and lasted until November 30, 1969. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The season was among the most active on record, with 18 tropical cyclones, 12 of which reached hurricane status. Despite the high activity, most of the storms either stayed at sea or made landfall with minimal strength. The most notable storm of the season was Hurricane Camille, the seventh-strongest storm recorded in the Atlantic basin and the second-strongest to make landfall in the United States. Camille made landfall near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, killing 256 and causing $1.4 billion ($9.2 billion in 2005 dollars) in property damage. Other notable storms include Hurricane Francelia, which caused serious flooding in Belize that killed 100; Hurricane Inga, which lasted almost 25 days and was at the time the second longest-lasting hurricane; and Hurricane Martha, which caused flooding and landslides in Costa Rica and Panama. The 1969 season once held the record for the most hurricanes (12 in
    8.33
    3 votes
    57

    1991 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Claudette
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Bob
    The 1991 Atlantic hurricane season was the first season in over 24 years in which no hurricanes developed from tropical waves, which are the source for most North Atlantic tropical cyclones. The hurricane season officially began on June 1, and ended on November 30. It was the least active in four years due to higher than usual wind shear across the Atlantic Ocean. The first storm, Ana, developed on July 2 off the southeast United States and dissipated without causing significant effects. Two other tropical storms in the season – Danny and Erika – did not significantly affect land. Danny dissipated east of the Lesser Antilles, and Erika passed through the Azores before becoming extratropical. In addition, there were four non-developing tropical depressions. The second depression of the season struck Mexico with significant accompanying rains. The most significant storm of the season was Hurricane Bob, which at the time was among the ten costliest United States hurricanes. After brushing the Outer Banks of North Carolina and Long Island in New York, the hurricane made landfall on Rhode Island. It caused $1.5 billion in damage (1991 USD), mostly in Massachusetts, and 17 fatalities.
    8.33
    3 votes
    58
    2002–03 South Pacific cyclone season

    2002–03 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Zoe
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Zoe
    The 2002–03 South Pacific cyclone season was the most active tropical cyclone season since 1998-99 with ten tropical cyclones developing within the South Pacific basin to the east of 160°E. The season officially ran from November 1, 2002, to April 30, 2003, but the first disturbance of the season formed on July 3 and the last dissipated on June 9. This is the period of the year when most tropical cyclones form within the South Pacific Ocean. Within the South Pacific, tropical cyclones were monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) in Nadi, Fiji, and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center (TCWC) in Wellington, New Zealand. Tropical cyclones that moved to the west of 160°E were monitored as a part of the Australian region by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. RSMC Nadi attaches a number and an F suffix to tropical disturbances that form in or move into the South Pacific. The United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) also issued unofficial warnings within the South Pacific, designating tropical cyclones with a number and a P suffix. RSMC Nadi and TCWC Wellington both use the Australian Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale, and measure windspeeds over a
    8.33
    3 votes
    59
    2004 Pacific hurricane season

    2004 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Javier
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Javier
    The 2004 Pacific hurricane season had twelve named storms – the fewest in a season since 1999. It officially started on May 15, 2004 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 2004 in the central Pacific. The season officially ended on November 30, 2004, in both portions of the Pacific Ocean. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Few tropical cyclones in the East Pacific this year were notable, as this season was the first since 1990 to result in no deaths. Hurricane Javier, the strongest storm of the season, caused moderate damage in Mexico and dropped rainfall as far north as North Dakota. In addition, Hurricane Howard produced high tides along the California coastline on Labor Day weekend, resulting in more than 1,000 lifeguard rescues. A tropical wave, combined with a stationary trough of low pressure, developed into a tropical depression on May 22 while located 575 mi (925.4 km) south-southeast of Cabo San Lucas in the Mexican state of Baja California Sur. The depression moved to the northwest into an area of light vertical shear, and intensified into Tropical Storm Agatha shortly after
    9.50
    2 votes
    60
    1854 Atlantic hurricane season

    1854 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1854 Atlantic hurricane season was the fourth Atlantic hurricane season that was officially recorded. During the season, three known hurricanes formed; all hit land. Also, during the season, two tropical storms were recorded, of which one was located only once. The season was relatively deadly and damaging; at least 30 people died and $20,000 (1854 USD) was caused. The season's activity was reflected with a low cumulative accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) rating of 31. ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that last a long time, as well as particularly strong hurricanes, have high ACEs. ACE is only calculated for full advisories on tropical systems at or exceeding 34 knots (39 mph, 63 km/h) or tropical storm strength. Subtropical cyclones are excluded from the total. During the night of June 24, a tropical storm was found south of Lake Charles, Louisiana. It became a hurricane the next morning after 12 hours of being tracked. The hurricane, now heading due west toward the US-Mexico border. If the hurricane had kept on going, it would have made landfall near Brownsville, Texas. Instead, the
    7.00
    4 votes
    61

    1967 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Beulah
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Beulah
    The 1967 Atlantic hurricane season was the first year in which the National Hurricane Center (NHC) was in operation. The season began on June 1, which was the date when the NHC activated radar stations across the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. The season ended on November 30, which ended the conventional delimitation of the time period when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The season was near average, with eight storms forming. Hurricane Beulah was the most notable Atlantic hurricane of 1967. A Category 5 hurricane, it killed 58 people and did $217 million (1967 USD, $1.51 billion 2012 USD) in damage as it crossed the Yucatán Peninsula and then made landfall a second time near the mouth of the Rio Grande. After a quiet start to the season, the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) became very active, with four separate areas of convection exiting the coast of Africa. The first, accompanied with a tropical wave, became a tropical depression on August 28 (the second became Beulah and the fourth became Chloe). The tropical depression moved west-northward, reaching tropical storm strength on August 30. Arlene slowly strengthened over the following days, eventually
    7.00
    4 votes
    62
    1974 Pacific typhoon season

    1974 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Bess
    The 1974 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1974, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1974 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 35 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 32 became tropical storms. 16 storms reached typhoon intensity, and none reached super typhoon strength. Dinah, which
    7.00
    4 votes
    63
    1985 Pacific typhoon season

    1985 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Dot
    The 1985 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1985, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. A total of 29 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 28 became tropical storms. 17 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which one typhoon reached super typhoon strength. The strongest cyclone of the season, Dot, reached category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale to the east of the Philippines. Typhoon Cecil was the deadliest storm of the season, accounting for nearly half of the deaths from western Pacific tropical cyclones in 1985. A total of 29 tropical depressions formed this year in
    7.00
    4 votes
    64
    1898 Atlantic hurricane season

    1898 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1898 Windward Islands Hurricane
    The 1898 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and the first half of fall in 1898. The season was a fairly active one, with 11 storms forming, 5 of which became hurricanes. The first storm of the season formed on August 2 east of Florida. It crossed the state, and strengthened in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico to an 80 mph (128 km/h) hurricane. It went into Alabama and dissipated on August 3, causing flooding and minor damage. The next storm formed off the northern coast of Florida on August 30. It hit near the border of South Carolina and Georgia with 85 mph (137 km/h) winds, and dissipated on September 1, causing $400,000 in damage (1898 dollars). At Port Royal, South Carolina, this storm caused 10.82 in (275 mm) of rain over the course of a day, breaking the previous one-day record by 5.89 in (150 mm). A hurricane was first observed on September 3 over the northeastern Atlantic, likely having existed for several days prior. It headed northeastward, and became extratropical on September 5 north of the Azores. The next storm formed on September 5 off the coast of Africa. It moved westward and hit the Lesser Antilles with 110 mph (180 km/h) winds, where it caused heavy
    8.00
    3 votes
    65

    1966 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Inez
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Inez
    The 1966 Atlantic hurricane season was an above-average Atlantic hurricane season that featured a near normal number of tropical cyclones, and many affected land. There were twelve tropical storms, seven of which became hurricanes. Three of the hurricanes strengthened to the equivalent of a major hurricane, which is a Category 3 or greater on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The strongest hurricane of the season was Inez, a powerful Category 4 hurricane that devastated a large majority of the Caribbean islands and Mexico. The system was among the deadliest hurricanes on record, with over 1,000 total fatalities estimated. In addition, Inez caused $432.5 million (1966 US$) in damage, making it the deadliest and most destructive hurricane since the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane. Hurricane Faith was an intense Cape Verde-type hurricane that holds the record as having the longest track of an Atlantic hurricane and the second longest worldwide. The season officially started on June 15, although Hurricane Alma developed eleven days prior. The system later affected the island of Cuba, where 90 fatalities were reported. Tropical Depression Two later in the month followed a similar path
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    1969 Pacific typhoon season

    1969 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1969 Pacific typhoon season was the third least-active season on record. The season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1969, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1969 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 23 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 20 became tropical storms. 13 storms reached typhoon intensity, of
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    1972 Pacific typhoon season

    1972 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Ora
    The 1972 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1972, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1972 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 37 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 31 became tropical storms. 22 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 2 reached super typhoon strength. A tropical
    8.00
    3 votes
    68
    1964 Pacific typhoon season

    1964 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1964 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1964, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the International Date Line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1964 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. The 1964 Pacific typhoon season was the most active season in recorded history with 39 storms. Notable storms include Typhoon Louise, which killed 400 people in the Philippines, Typhoons Sally and
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    1979 Pacific typhoon season

    1979 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Tip
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Tip
    The 1979 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1979, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1979 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 28 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 23 became tropical storms. 13 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 4 reached super typhoon strength. Very early on
    9.00
    2 votes
    70

    2000 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Keith
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Keith
    The 2000 Atlantic hurricane season had an unusually late date for the first named storm of the season. The hurricane season officially began on June 1, and ended on November 30. It was slightly above average due to a La Niña weather pattern. The first cyclone, Tropical Depression One, developed in the southern Gulf of Mexico on June 7 and dissipated after an uneventful duration. However, it would be almost two months before the first named storm, Alberto, formed near Cape Verde; Alberto also dissipated with no effects on land. Several other tropical cyclones – Tropical Depression Two, Tropical Depression Four, Chris, Ernesto, Nadine, and an unnamed subtropical storm – did not impact land. Five additional storms – Tropical Depression Nine, Florence, Isaac, and Joyce – minimally affected land areas. The most significant storm of the season was Hurricane Keith, which caused extensive damage in Central America. After remaining nearly stationary offshore, Keith moved inland over the Yucatan Peninsula and later made a second landfall in Mexico at hurricane intensity. It caused $319 million (2000 USD) in damage and 40 fatalities, mostly in Belize. The precursor to Tropical Storm Leslie
    9.00
    2 votes
    71

    2002 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Isidore
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Gustav
    The 2002 Atlantic hurricane season was an average Atlantic hurricane season, officially starting on June 1, 2002 and ending on November 30, dates which conventionally limit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones develop in the Atlantic Ocean. The season produced 14 tropical cyclones, of which 12 developed into named storms; four became hurricanes, and two attained major hurricane status. The season officially began on June 1, although the season's first cyclone did not develop until July 14. Despite the late start, the 2002 season tied with 2004, 2007, and 2010 in which a record number of tropical cyclones, eight, developed in the month of September. It ended early however, with no tropical storms forming after October 6—a rare occurrence caused partly by El Niño conditions. The most intense hurricane of the season was Hurricane Isidore with a minimum central pressure of 934 mbar, although Hurricane Lili attained higher winds and peaked at Category 4 status on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The season was less destructive than average, causing an estimated $2.6 billion (2002 USD) in property damage and 23 fatalities, mostly due to Isidore and Lili. In
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    2007 North Indian cyclone season

    2007 North Indian cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Akash
    The 2007 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The North Indian Ocean cyclone season has no official bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Indian Ocean in the Northern Hemisphere, east of the Horn of Africa and west of the Malay Peninsula. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean — the Arabian Sea to the west of the Indian subcontinent, abbreviated ARB by the India Meteorological Department (IMD); and the Bay of Bengal to the east, abbreviated BOB by the IMD. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. The tropical cyclone scale for this basin is detailed on the right. On average, 4 to 6 storms form in this basin every season. 2007 was a busy year for this basin; it was the most destructive season in known history at this time, only for the 2008 season to
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    2007–08 Australian region cyclone season

    2007–08 Australian region cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Guba
    The 2007–08 Australian region cyclone season got off to an early start with the formation on 27 July of the first Tropical Cyclone which was not upgraded operationally to a cyclone but was later upgraded to a Cyclone during post storm analysis. This was the second time that a tropical Cyclone had formed during the month of July. The other one was Cyclone Lindsay in the 1996–1997 season. The next cyclone that formed was Cyclone Guba which formed on 13 November with TCWC Port Moresby assigning the name Guba on 14 November which was the first named storm within TCWC Port Moresby's area of responsibility since Cyclone Epi in June 2003. Guba was also the first cyclone to occur in the Queensland region in the month of November since 1977. Tropical Cyclone Lee also formed on 13 November and was named by TCWC Perth on 14 November with it moving into RSMC Réunion's area of responsibility and being renamed Ariel. The next Cyclone to form within the Australian region was Melanie which formed on 27 December and was named on the 28th by TCWC Perth. Melanie was the first storm of the season which required Cyclone watches and warnings were issued for the Pilbara coast however it had weakened into
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    1988–89 Australian region cyclone season

    1988–89 Australian region cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Herbie
    The 1988–89 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It officially started on 1 November 1988, and officially ended on 30 April 1989. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a "tropical cyclone year" separately from a "tropical cyclone season"; the "tropical cyclone year" began on 1 July 2008 and ended on 30 June 2009. On 5 November, the JTWC started to monitor a tropical disturbance, that was located about 840 km (520 mi) to the southeast of Jakarta, Indonesia. Over the next 24 hours the disturbance remained near stationary before moving slowly towards the north-west over the next few days. The JTWC then initiated advisories on Tropical Cyclone 02S during 8 November, with 1-minute sustained windspeeds equivalent to a tropical storm on the SSHS. During that day while 02S continued to move towards the west, 02S intensified quickly to obtain 1-minute sustained windspeeds of 100 km/h (65 mph). The system continued to move westwards without intensifying any further until it moved into the South-West Indian ocean during 11 November where it was named Barisaona, by the Mauritius Meteorological service. According to the
    5.80
    5 votes
    75
    2004–05 Australian region cyclone season

    2004–05 Australian region cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Ingrid
    The 2004–05 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on 1 November 2004 and ended on 30 April 2005. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, which runs from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2005. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by four Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. A tropical disturbance developed in the east of the region monitored by Réunion on 30 August, from an active monsoon band that coincided with a burst in the Madden-Julian oscillation. The system moved southeast and entered the Perth Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre's area of responsibility on 1 September. The system was upgraded to Tropical Cyclone Phoebe early on 2 September when it was about 800 km west-northwest of the Cocos Islands. Phoebe quickly reached its peak strength that day, with winds of 85 km/h, as it continued to move to the southeast. The cyclone weakened as it moved over cooler water and dissipated about 550 km from the Cocos
    5.80
    5 votes
    76

    1995 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Opal
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Opal
    The 1995 Atlantic hurricane season was a highly active year that produced nineteen tropical cyclones and named storms, as well as eleven hurricanes and five major hurricanes. The season officially began on June 1, 1995, and ended on November 30, 1995, dates which conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones develop in the Atlantic basin. The first tropical cyclone, Hurricane Allison, developed on June 2, while the season's final storm, Hurricane Tanya, dissipated on November 3. The most intense hurricane, Hurricane Opal, was a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale that struck the Florida Panhandle at Category 3 status, killing 69 people and causing $3.9 billion (1995 USD) in damage. The season was the third most active season in recorded history, tying with 1887, 2010, and 2011. Only two other Atlantic hurricane seasons, 1933 and 2005, surpassed the season's total, with 21 and 28 named storms, respectively. Totaling to $10.2 billion (1995 USD) in damage and over 100 deaths, there were also a number of destructive hurricanes during the season such as Hurricane Erin, which caused substantial damage in Florida. Felix caused
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    1998 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1998 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1998 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an active season in annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The season has no official bounds but cyclones tend to form between April and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean—the Bay of Bengal to the east of the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Sea to the west of India. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. An average of four to six storms form in the North Indian Ocean every season with peaks in May and November. Cyclones occurring between the meridans 45°E and 100°E are included in the season by the IMD. With eleven depressions and eight tropical cyclones, this was one of the most active seasons in the ocean along with 1987, 1996, and 2005. The season caused a large loss of life, most of which was from one storm. Over 10,000 people were killed in India when Tropical Cyclone 03A brought a 4.9-metre (16 ft) storm surge to the Kathiawar
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    1960 Pacific typhoon season

    1960 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1960 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1960, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1960 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin had the "W" suffix added to their number. An area of disturbed weather in the Philippine Sea moved westward, and organized into a tropical depression on April 22. It moved northwestward through the Philippines, strengthening quickly to a typhoon on the 24th due to its small size. Karen turned to the northeast, and in spite of favorable conditions, rapidly weakened until dissipation on the 26th. Karen left 56 dead in the Philippines, left 7,000 homeless, and caused $2 million (1960 USD) in
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    1989 Atlantic hurricane season

    1989 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Hugo
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Hugo
    The 1989 Atlantic hurricane season was an active season that produced fifteen tropical cyclones, eleven named storms, seven hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. The season was officially designated from June 1, 1989, to November 30, 1989, dates which conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones develop in the Atlantic basin. The season began with Tropical Storm Allison on June 24, and ended with Tropical Storm Karen, which dissipated on December 4. The most notable storm of the season was Hurricane Hugo, which caused $10 billion (1989 US$, $18.7 billion 2012 USD) in damage and 111 fatalities as it ravaged the Lesser Antilles and South Carolina of the United States. Hugo ranked as the costliest Atlantic hurricane until Hurricane Andrew in the 1992 season, and has since fallen to the eighth costliest hurricane following the even more destructive storms during the 2000s decade. Few other storms in 1989 caused significant damage; Tropical Storm Allison, Hurricane Chantal, and Hurricane Jerry combined caused extensive damage in Texas; Hurricane Dean also caused light damage in Bermuda and the Canadian province of Newfoundland. Overall, the storms of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    1994 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1994 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1994 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was the period in which tropical cyclones formed within the north Indian ocean. The season has no official bounds but cyclones tend to form within this basin between April and December. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean — the Bay of Bengal to the east of the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Sea to the west of India. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. An average of four to six storms form in the North Indian Ocean every season with peaks in May and November. Cyclones occurring between the meridans 45°E and 100°E are included in the season by the IMD. On March 18, a disturbance became Tropical Depression 01B in the southeastern Bay of Bengal, just north of Sumatra. It tracked northwestward, becoming a tropical storm on the 22nd before turning southward and dissipating on the 25th. A tropical depression formed in the southeastern Bay of Bengal on April 26. It followed a path and intensity very similar to the 1991 Bangladesh Cyclone, and became a tropical storm on the 29th.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    2005–06 Australian region cyclone season

    2005–06 Australian region cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Monica
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Larry
    The 2005–06 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on 1 November 2005 and ended on 30 April 2006. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, which runs from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2006. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by four Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. An area of convection persisted on 4 November about 560 km (345 mi) north of the Cocos Islands, associated with a tight low-level circulation. With good outflow and moderate but decreasing wind shear, conditions favored development. By early on 5 November, the system consisted of a partially exposed circulation with deep convection on its western side, tracking southwestward. At 0400 UTC that day, the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre (TCWC) in Perth issued a gale warning in association with the disturbance. Later in the day, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) classified it as Tropical Cyclone 02S, and both the JTWC and TCWC Perth
    10.00
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    82
    1976 Pacific typhoon season

    1976 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Billie
    The 1976 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1976, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1976 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 25 tropical storms formed this year in the Western Pacific. 14 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 4 reached super typhoon strength. The monsoon trough spawned a tropical depression east of the
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    2004 Pacific typhoon season

    2004 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Aere
    The 2004 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2004, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2004 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin are assigned a name by the Tokyo Typhoon Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. In storm information below, wind-speed advisories differ from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) to the JMA as the JTWC uses the United States criteria of 1-minute mean to designate maximum sustained
    6.50
    4 votes
    84

    1977 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Anita
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Anita
    The 1977 Atlantic hurricane season had the fewest named storm since the 1965 season, with only six systems reaching tropical storm status. The season officially began on June 1, 1977, and lasted until November 30, 1977. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The first tropical depression of the season developed 2 days later, on June 3, in the western Caribbean Sea. After a succession of three other tropical depressions, the first named storm of the season, Hurricane Anita, finally became a named storm on August 29 – regarded by the National Hurricane Center as "an extremely late start". The only notable tropical cyclones of this season were Hurricanes Anita and Babe. Anita struck Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane, bringing strong winds and heavy rainfall. At least 25,000 people were left homeless and 11 fatalities were reported, though the damage toll remains unknown. Babe caused coastal flooding in southeastern Louisiana, resulting in $10 million (1977 USD) in damage. After moving inland, it spawned a total of 14 tornadoes throughout Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina. In addition to Anita
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    1978 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Greta-Olivia
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Amelia
    The 1978 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1978, and lasted until November 30, 1978. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. However, the season had the earliest actual start on record due to an unusual subtropical storm in January. Tropical Storm Amelia, which killed 30 when it flooded the Guadalupe River in Texas, was the most notable storm of the season. Hurricane Greta caused moderate damage in Central America, avoiding fears that it would be a repeat of the devastating Hurricane Fifi. A very unusual subtropical storm formed in mid-January, the only storm (tropical or subtropical) to do so in the Atlantic basin during the month of January. The 1978 season was the last hurricane season when only female names were used for hurricanes and the last season before the modern hurricane naming system was developed. The season's activity was reflected with a cumulative accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) rating of 63. ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that last a long time, as well as particularly strong
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    1980 Pacific typhoon season

    1980 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1980 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1980, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical storms which formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. A total of 28 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 24 became tropical storms. Beginning in March, tropical cyclones formed in each subsequent month through December. Of the 28, 15 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 2 reached super typhoon strength. Seven tropical cyclones moved through the Philippines this season. A total of 28 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 24 became tropical storms. Of the 28, 15 storms reached typhoon
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    1984 Pacific hurricane season

    1984 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Norbert
    The 1984 Pacific hurricane season was tied for the fourth most active active hurricane season on record. The season produced 26 tropical cyclones, of which 21 developed into named storms; 13 cyclones attained hurricane status, of which three reached major hurricane status. The season officially started on May 15, 1984 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1987 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1984. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when the vast majority tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The strongest hurricane of the season was Hurricane Douglas, which attained Category 4 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale in the open Pacific. Only four tropical systems made landfall during the season. In September, Hurricane Nobert took an erratic path before making landfall on Baja California as a tropical storm, bringing flooding rains. Hurricane Odile also made landfall on Mexico during September as a tropical storm, killing 40 and severely damaging crops. Additionally, Hurricanes Genevieve and Polo struck Mexico, but as tropical depressions. There were 18 tropical storms in the eastern Pacific this season.
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    1988 Atlantic hurricane season

    1988 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Gilbert
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Gilbert
    The 1988 Atlantic hurricane season was a moderately active season that proved costly and deadly, with 15 tropical cyclones directly affecting land. The season officially began on June 1, 1988, and lasted until November 30, 1988, although activity began on May 30 when a tropical depression developed in the Caribbean Sea. The June through November dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The first cyclone to attain tropical storm status was Alberto on August 8, nearly a month later than usual. The final storm of the year, Tropical Storm Keith, became extratropical on November 24. The season produced 19 tropical depressions of which 12 attained tropical storm status. One tropical storm was operationally classified as a tropical depression but was reclassified in post-analysis. Five tropical cyclones reached hurricane status of which three became major hurricanes reaching Category 3 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The most notable cyclone of the season was Hurricane Gilbert, which at the time was the strongest Atlantic hurricane on record. The hurricane tracked through the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    1994 Pacific hurricane season

    1994 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Gilma
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane John
    The 1994 Pacific hurricane season officially started on May 15, 1994 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1994 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1994. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The first tropical cyclone formed on June 18, while the last system dissipated on October 26. This season, twenty-two tropical cyclones formed in the north Pacific Ocean east of the dateline, with all but two becoming tropical storms or hurricanes. This was the final season of the eastern north Pacific's most recent active string of hurricane seasons. Of note in this season is an unusual spree of very intense storms. Hurricanes Emilia, Gilma, John, and Olivia all reached a pressure below 930 millibars. Longevity-wise, no tropical cyclone of any basin had previously persisted for as long as Hurricane John. Elsewhere, Hurricane Rosa caused several casualties in Mexico as the basin's lone landfalling tropical storm or hurricane. This season, twenty-two tropical cyclones formed in the north Pacific Ocean east of the dateline. All but two of them became tropical storms or hurricanes. In the
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    1999 Atlantic hurricane season

    1999 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Floyd
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Floyd
    The 1999 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1999, and lasted until November 30, 1999. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1999 season ties with 1933 season and 2005 season for most Category 4 hurricanes, with five reaching that strenght. Hurricane Floyd was the deadliest United States hurricane since Hurricane Agnes in 1972, killing 57 people and causing billions in damage as it moved northward along the Atlantic coast. Hurricane Lenny killed 17 as it tracked eastward across the Caribbean, the first hurricane known to do so for an extended time. Lenny, reaching peak winds of 155 mph (249 km/h) just 13 days before the end of the season, was the second strongest Atlantic hurricane ever recorded in the month of November. The deadliest storm of the season by far, however, was a weak tropical depression in October that caused devastating floods in Mexico. The season's activity was reflected with a high cumulative accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) rating of 177. ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    2000 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2000 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: 2000 Sri Lanka Cyclone
    The 2000 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. Six tropical cyclones were observed in the basin. Of those, five reached Cyclone strength. The Indian Meteorological Department referred to this system as a cyclonic storm on March 30. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center never issued warnings even though it was likely of tropical storm intensity in its latter stages. A depression formed over the Bay of Bengal on August 23 and flooded the Andhra Pradesh coast on August 24. The storm was responsible for 131 deaths. The first tropical depression of the season formed in the Bay of Bengal on October 14. Shortly after reaching tropical storm strength, upper level shear caused it to dissipate on the 18th. On October 25, a tropical depression developed in the central Bay of Bengal. It moved northward, reaching tropical storm strength on the 27th. It hit 45 nautical miles (83 km) southeast of Calcutta as a minimal storm on the 28th, and dissipated later that day. Heavy rains
    8.50
    2 votes
    92

    2001 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Michelle
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Allison
    The 2001 Atlantic hurricane season was a fairly active Atlantic hurricane season that produced 17 tropical cyclones, 15 named storms, nine hurricanes, and four major hurricanes. The season officially lasted from June 1, 2001, to November 30, 2001, dates which by convention limit the period of each year when tropical cyclones tend to form in the Atlantic Ocean basin. The season began with Tropical Storm Allison on June 4, and ended with Hurricane Olga, which dissipated on December 6. The most intense storm was Hurricane Michelle, which attained Category 4 strength on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale. The most damaging storms of the season were Tropical Storm Allison, which caused extensive flooding in Texas, Hurricane Iris which struck Belize, and Hurricane Michelle, which affected several countries. Three tropical cyclones made landfall on the United States, three directly affected Canada, and three directly affected Mexico and Central America. Overall, the season caused 105 fatalities, and $7.1 billion (2001 USD; $9.32 billion 2012 USD) in damage. Due to their severe damage, the names Allison, Iris, and Michelle were retired by the World Meteorological Organization. The season's
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    2003–04 Australian region cyclone season

    2003–04 Australian region cyclone season

    The 2003–04 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on 1 November 2003 and ended on 30 April 2004. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, which runs from 1 July 2003 to 30 June 2004. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by four Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. Formed on 6 December and dissipated on 12 December. Formed on 16 December and dissipated on 23 December. Crossed the Northern Territory coast as a Category 3. Formed on 1 January 2004 and dissipated on 6 January. Operationally monitored Ken to have reached tropical cyclone intensity for 24 hours, but post-analysis revealed that Ken never was a tropical cyclone. Existed between 10 January to 17 January. Caused heavy rainfall across western Queensland and New South Wales. Formed on 28 January and dissipated on 1 February. A tropical low developed on 10 February in the northern Coral Sea, within an active monsoon trough. The system developed rapidly
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    1924 Atlantic hurricane season

    1924 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: 1924 Cuba hurricane
    • Tropical cyclones: 1924 Cuba hurricane
    The 1924 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and the first half of fall in 1924. The season was average with 11 storms; three became hurricanes and two others became major hurricanes. An early season tropical storm hit Belize on June 18 and Mexico on June 21. Two hurricanes formed in August and followed a similar path, forming in the tropical Atlantic, hitting the Lesser Antilles, passing west of Bermuda, becoming extratropical, and eventually hitting Nova Scotia. A hurricane also struck Florida in early September. A second tropical storm would also hit Florida later in the month. The most intense tropical cyclone of the season struck western Cuba as a Category 5 hurricane and eventually moved ashore near Marco Island, Florida with weaker winds in October. A November tropical storm hit Jamaica and Cuba, becoming a hurricane over the western Atlantic Ocean. A tropical storm was detected 75 miles (120 km) southeast of Chetumal on June 18. It made landfall on northern Belize with estimated winds near 45 mph (75 km/h). Pressures were progressively decreasing over the preceding days in the northwestern Caribbean Sea. The tropical system crossed the Yucatán Peninsula,
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    1939 Pacific typhoon season

    1939 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1939 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1939, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1939 Pacific hurricane season. Storms in the season were tracked by the United States Weather Bureau and released in the Monthly Weather Review under the header "Typhoons and Depressions over the Far East". The Monthly Weather Review only covers tropical cyclones west of 150° E. Due to lack of satellites and ship reports due to the Pacific Theatre of World War II, it is possible other tropical cyclones existed, especially if they were short-lived or of minor intensity. There were 29 known tropical cyclones, including 24 of typhoon status, of which several of the storms were deadly. A typhoon in November was the deadliest cyclone of the season, causing 49 deaths as it
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    1894 Atlantic hurricane season

    1894 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1894 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and the first half of fall in 1894. The 1894 season was a fairly inactive one, with seven storms forming, five of which became hurricanes. A tropical storm formed between Cuba and Jamaica on June 6. It moved westward, remaining weak until dissipating on June 9 over the Yucatán Channel. No damage or deaths were reported. The second storm formed on August 5 in the Gulf of Mexico and drifted northward. After reaching a peak of 60 mph (97 km/h) winds it hit southern Alabama on August 8. It turned to the west-northwest, and dissipated on August 9, bringing very heavy rainfall and tornadoes. A tropical storm developed on August 30 and lasted until September 9. It formed between Africa and South America, east of the Lesser Antilles. It stayed out at sea and did not hit any land. It dissipated in the North Atlantic. Its maximum sustained winds were at 115 mph (185 km/h). On September 18 a tropical storm was first observed and lasted until September 30. It formed to the east-southeast of the Lesser Antilles. It hit the Lesser Antilles and then the Greater Antilles, and turned north and hit Florida with 120 mph (193 km/h) winds. It
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    1968 Pacific typhoon season

    1968 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1968 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1968, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1968 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 31 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 27 became tropical storms. 20 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 4 reached super typhoon strength. No storms this
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    2001–02 South Pacific cyclone season

    2001–02 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Cyclone Trina
    The 2001–02 South Pacific cyclone season was a below-average year in which only five named storms formed or entered the South Pacific basin. It began on November 1, 2001 and ended on April 30, 2002. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the southern Pacific Ocean east of 160°E. Additionally, the regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, and the "tropical cyclone year" runs from July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002. The season's sixteen tropical depressions existed within these dates with the first developing on November 29 and the last dissipating on April 22. The South Pacific Basin, as defined by the World Meteorological Organization, is split into two sub-areas, monitored by separate agencies. The first area is between 160°E and 120°W and north of 25°S are monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS) in Nadi. Those that move south of 25°S are monitored by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Wellington, New Zealand. At the start of the season, a new naming policy was introduced by the Tropical Cyclone Committee for the South Pacific and South-
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    3 votes
    99
    2007 Pacific typhoon season

    2007 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Sepat
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Kong-rey
    The 2007 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season which featured 24 named storms and 14 typhoons, compared to the average of 27 and 17 respectively. had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2007, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2007 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire West Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their Joint Typhoon Warning Center identifier. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones (including tropical depressions) that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the
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    3 votes
    100
    2008 Pacific typhoon season

    2008 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Jangmi
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Neoguri
    The 2008 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it runs year-round in 2008, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the International Date Line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2008 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical storms formed in the entire Western North Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions formed in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones (including tropical depressions) that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines. Each season several national meteorological services and scientific agencies forecast
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    1851 Atlantic hurricane season

    1851 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1851 Atlantic hurricane season was the first Atlantic hurricane season in the official Atlantic tropical cyclone record. Six known tropical cyclones occurred during the season, the earliest of which formed on June 25 and the latest of which dissipated on October 19. These dates fall within the range of most Atlantic tropical cyclone activity. None of the cyclones existed simultaneously with another. Of the six storms, two only have a single point in their track known. Two other hurricanes were reported during the season, one near Tampico and the other near Jamaica; however, they are not in the official hurricane database. There may have been other unconfirmed tropical cyclones during the season. Meteorologist Christopher Landsea estimates between zero and six storms were missed from the official database, due to small tropical cyclone size, sparse ship reports, and relatively unpopulated coastlines. Five of the six tropical cyclones affected land, including three making landfall with winds of over 74 mph (119 km/h). The first struck Texas as a hurricane, which caused moderate to heavy damage, particularly to shipping in Matagorda Bay. One death was indirectly related to the
    6.00
    4 votes
    102
    1957 Pacific hurricane season

    1957 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1957 Pacific hurricane season was a moderately active year in which 13 tropical cyclones formed. The hurricane season ran through the summer and fall months which conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The first tropical cyclone developed on July 15. The final storm dissipated on December 6, becoming one of the few Pacific storms to exist outside of the seasonal dates. Of the season's 13 storms, five of these formed or crossed into the central Pacific. During the season, five storms impacted land. Hurricane Twelve was the deadliest, leaving eight casualties in Mazatlán and the costliest was Hurricane Nina, causing an estimated $100,000 in losses. In addition to the damage, four people were killed by Nina in Hawaii. Hurricane Six killed seven people and Hurricane Ten killed two in Mexico. The first hurricane of the season was identified by the National Weather Bureau in San Francisco, California on July 15. The previous day, the S.S. Garvel Park recorded sustained winds of 50 mph (85 km/h) when it was situated roughly 75 mi (120 km) south of Manzanillo, Mexico. Although listed as a Category 1 hurricane for
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    1969 Pacific hurricane season

    1969 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1969 Pacific hurricane season was an event in meteorology. It officially started on May 15, 1969 in the eastern Pacific and lasted until November 30, 1969. However, the first named storm, Ava, did not form until July 1, the latest date that the first named storm of a season formed. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. This season was below average in activity with ten named storms forming, of which only four reached hurricane strength, making it the third least active season, tied with the 1995 and 1979. There were no major hurricanes this year. Most of the storms that formed this season never approached land. Notable storms include Tropical Storm Emily and Hurricane Jennifer. The precursor disturbance of Tropical Storm Emily killed nine people in Mexico and left 100,000 homeless. Hurricane Jennifer was the only landfalling named storm of the season, causing one death. In this season, only three storms (Ava, Bernice, and Florence) were operationally categorized as tropical depressions at the first advisory. All other storms were operationally upgraded directly to storm strength, bypassing
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    2005 Pacific typhoon season

    2005 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Haitang
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Matsa
    The 2005 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2005, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. This season was less active than the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, the only other time this happened was in 2010. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2005 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical storms that form in the West Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. This season, the circular list of 140 names, in use since January 1, 2000, was recycled
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    2006–07 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2006–07 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Indlala
    The 2006–07 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation which started on November 15, 2006 and ended on April 30, 2007 for most areas and on May 15, 2007 for Mauritius and the Seychelles. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. On October 13, 2006, the Mauritius Meteorological Services issued their seasonal outlook for the Southwest Indian Ocean. They forecast an El Niño-positive phase for the season, meaning that normal to slightly above normal activity was likely. They also forecast a weak Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, which favoured formation of tropical storms, and noted that as 2006 Northern Hemisphere activity was slightly below normal, it might result in slightly above normal activity in the Southwest Indian Ocean. Based on regional indicators, they noted that named tropical storms would not last for short durations. Most other regional factors indicated the likelihood of a normal season. Therefore, the forecast
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    2010 Pacific hurricane season

    2010 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Celia
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Celia
    The 2010 Pacific hurricane season was the least active Pacific hurricane season, in terms of the number of named storms and hurricanes, on record, due to a moderate La Niña, unlike the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season, which was one of the most active on record. It officially started on May 15, 2010 for the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 2010 for the central Pacific, and officially ended on November 30, 2010. Unlike the 2009 season, the first storm of the 2010 season, Agatha, formed during the month of May. It developed on May 29 near the coast of Guatemala. In the second week of June, a sudden spree of tropical cyclones developed, and between June 16 and 22, four cyclones formed, including the first two major hurricanes of the season, Celia and Darby. However, following the record active June, July saw zero name storms. In August and September only 2 tropical storms and one hurricane formed. Tropical Depression Eleven-E caused a great deal of flooding in southern Mexico, causing millions of dollars in damage and causing over 50 deaths and $500 million in damage in areas of Oaxaca and Guatemala. Tropical Storm Omeka was a rare off-season storm. On May 19, 2010, the National Oceanic and
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    4 votes
    107
    1950 Pacific typhoon season

    1950 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1950 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1950, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1950 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the North Pacific Typhoon Warning Service. Typhoon Jane struck the island of Shikoku in Japan on the 3rd of September. Resulting flooding and landslides killed 539 people. Typhoon Fran was a late season storm that struck the northern Philippines killing 5 people. (Name list from 1947 to 1950) The names Helene, Jane, Kezia, Lucretia, Missatha, Ossia, and Petie were retired after this year and replaced with Helen, June, Kathy, Lorna, Marie, Olga, and Pamela. (Namelist from 1950 to 1979) The name Delilah was retired after this year.
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    2 votes
    108

    1968 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Gladys
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Gladys
    The 1968 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1968, and lasted until November 30, 1968. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. Three storms formed this June, making it one of the most active Junes on record. Despite the early season activity, the season ended relatively quietly, with eight named storms, and no major hurricanes, which goes to show that early season activity has no correlation to the entire season. Hurricane Gladys was the costliest storm of the season, causing more than $6 million (1968 USD) in damage as it moved northward through Florida, Cuba, and North Carolina. Abby was a rare and long-lived June hurricane that developed from a mid-tropospheric trough that persisted over the western Caribbean Sea in late May. When a weak cold front moved into the area, it generated convection, gaining enough organization to be called a tropical depression on June 1. The initial circulation was not embedded within the convection, but as it moved slowly north-northeastward, it was able to strengthen and become better organized, reaching tropical storm strength on June 2. It crossed the
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    109
    2001 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2001 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Vamei
    The 2001 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. Four tropical cyclones were observed, less than the average of 5-6. Of those, 1 reached Cyclone strength. A weak disturbance that formed east of Somalia was detected on May 18. By May 21 a tropical depression developed after the system formed a closed mid-level circulation. It tracked eastward across the Arabian Sea, but turned northward abruptly short of the Indian coast. Tropical Depression 01A became a tropical storm late on the 21st, and reached cyclone strength on the 22nd. While drifting northwestward on the 24th, Cyclone 01A became an intense cyclone with 125 mph winds over the open waters. Upper level shear weakened it to a tropical depression three days later. Moving northward, the storm briefly re-strengthened to a 65 mph storm before striking western India on the 28th and dissipating. Ahead of the storm, all ports in Gujarat, including Kandla, one of the largest in the country, were closed as a precautionary
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    110
    2001–02 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2001–02 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2001–02 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation. It started on November 15, 2001 and ended on April 30, 2002. For Mauritius and the Seychelles, the season continued until May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC) in Réunion. The system formed on October 5 and dissipated the next day. This system was also known as Tropical Cyclone 01S by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). On October 24, the RSMC La Reunion had noted an area of convection which was located off the southwest coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. A clockwise circulation had developed the next day based on satellite imagery, however, the centre was partially exposed. On October 26, the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre (TCWC) in Perth, Australia upgraded the low to Tropical Cyclone Alex. It then strengthened into a Category 2 tropical cyclone on the Australian scale on October 27. It crossed into RSMC La Reunion's area of responsibility (AoR) on October
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    111
    1915 Atlantic hurricane season

    1915 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: New Orleans Hurricane of 1915
    • Tropical cyclones: New Orleans Hurricane of 1915
    The 1915 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and the first half of fall in 1915. The 1915 season was not very active in terms of the number of storms but it was fairly eventful, with two powerful hurricanes hitting the Gulf Coast of the United States. The first storm hit Cape Canaveral in early August, turned northeast, and dissipated over New England. The second storm of the year was first observed in the eastern Tropical Atlantic on August 5. It tracked westward, intensifying into a hurricane on the 9th before crossing the Lesser Antilles on the 10th. As the hurricane continued through the Caribbean Sea, it passed just south of Puerto Rico and Hispaniola before crossing Jamaica on August 13 where it caused heavy damage. While south of Cuba it rapidly intensified, and it brushed the western tip of the country on August 15 as a strong Category 4 hurricane. Over the Gulf of Mexico the hurricane weakened slightly. It made landfall near Galveston, Texas as a low-end Category 4 hurricane on August 17. It turned northward, became extratropical on August 18, and dissipated on August 23. Just fifteen years after the 1900 Galveston Hurricane, this hurricane damaged the already
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    112
    1973 Atlantic hurricane season

    1973 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Gilda
    The 1973 Atlantic hurricane season was the first season to use the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, a scale developed in 1971 by Herbert Saffir and Robert Simpson used for rating the intensity of tropical cyclones. The season produced 24 tropical and subtropical cyclones, of which only 8 reached storm intensity, 4 became hurricanes, and only 1 reached major hurricane status. Although more active than the 1972 season, 1973 brought few storms of note. Nearly half of the season's storms affected land, one of which resulted in severe damage. The season officially began on June 1, 1973, and lasted until November 30, 1973. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. However, the first system formed on April 18, more than a month before the official start. Three more depressions formed before June 1; however, none attained storm intensity. The first named storm of the year was Hurricane Alice which formed on July 1 and became the first known cyclone to affect Bermuda during July. More than a month later, the second hurricane, Brenda, formed and was considered the worst storm to strike Mexico along the eastern coast of
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    113

    1982 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Debby
    • Tropical cyclones: Subtropical Storm One
    The 1982 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1982 and lasted until November 30, 1982, and was a below average season. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. Only six storms formed during this hurricane season: five named storms (this was the record for the smallest number of named cyclones in the Atlantic basin since naming began in 1950, until the following year (1983) when only 4 named storms formed) and an unnamed subtropical storm (no subtropical storms were named between 1974 and 2001). The season only produced two hurricanes (the lowest since 1925 season, and the lowest ever in the satellite era) which one of two reached major hurricane status. The season started early with Hurricane Alberto forming on the first day of the season. Alberto threatened the Southwestern Florida coast as a tropical storm, causing twenty-three fatalities in Cuba. The next storm, a subtropical storm, formed in June and affected the same area as Alberto, causing $10 million dollars in damage. Tropical Storm Beryl formed on August 28, after a quiet July in the open Atlantic Ocean. Beryl grazed Cape Verde,
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    114
    1987 Pacific typhoon season

    1987 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Nina
    The 1987 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1987, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. A total of 25 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 24 became tropical storms. Of the 24, 17 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 6 reached super typhoon strength. A total of 25 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 24 became tropical storms. Of the 24, 17 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 6 reached super typhoon strength. On January 3, a small and persistent area of thunderstorms near the International Dateline was first detected. During the
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    115
    1988 Pacific hurricane season

    1988 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Hector
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Joan-Miriam
    The 1988 Pacific hurricane season was a Pacific hurricane season that saw a below-average amount of tropical cyclones form. It officially began May 15, 1988 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1988 in the central Pacific and lasted until November 30, 1988. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The first named storm, Tropical Storm Aletta, formed on June 16, and the last-named storm, Tropical Storm Miriam, was previously named Hurricane Joan in the Atlantic Ocean before crossing Central America and re-emerging in the eastern Pacific; Miriam continued westward and dissipated on November 2. The season produced 23 tropical depressions, of which 15 attained tropical storm status. Seven storms reached hurricane status, three of which became major hurricanes. The strongest storm of the season, Hurricane Hector, formed on July 30 to the south of Mexico and reached peak winds of 145 mph (230 km/h)—Category 4 status—before dissipating over open waters on August 9; Hector was never a threat to land. Tropical Storm Gilma was the only cyclone in the season to make landfall, crossing the Hawaiian Islands,
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    116
    1998–99 South Pacific cyclone season

    1998–99 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Rona
    The 1998–99 South Pacific cyclone season was a near average tropical cyclone season, with 8 tropical cyclones occurring within the South Pacific Ocean basin between 160°E and 120°W. Despite the season starting on November 1, the first tropical system of the season did not form until December 1, while the final disturbance of the season dissipated on May 27, 1999. During the season the most intense tropical cyclone was Severe Tropical Cyclone Cora, which had a minimum pressure of 930 hPa (27.46 inHg). After the season had ended the names Cora and Dani were retired from the naming lists, after they had caused significant impacts to South Pacific islands. During the season, tropical cyclones were officially monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) in Nadi, Fiji and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center in Wellington, New Zealand. While the United States Navy also monitored the basin and issued unofficial warnings throughout the season, through its Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and Naval Pacific Meteorology and Oceanography Center (NPMOC). Tropical cyclones that were located between 160°E and 120°W as well as the Equator and 25S were monitored by TCWC Nadi
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    117
    2002 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2002 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: 2002 Oman cyclone
    The 2002 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. Four tropical cyclones were observed, less than the average of 5-6. None reached Cyclone strength. The first tropical depression of the year (excluding Vamei which persisted from 2001 to 2002) formed on May 5 in the central Arabian Sea. It moved west-northwestward, reaching tropical storm strength on the 7th. The storm reached a peak of 40 mph winds, but upper level shear caused it weaken to a tropical depression before hitting Oman on the 10th. The storm brought the heaviest rainfall totals to Dhofar in 30 years, causing flooding and creating rivers in wadis, or typically dry riverbeds. Several people drowned after their vehicles were swept away by the flooding. The storm caused locally heavy damage, totaling $25 million (2002 USD, $30 million 2008 USD). A tropical storm moved northward in the eastern Bay of Bengal in early to mid May. After reaching a peak of 40 mph winds it hit Myanmar on the 11th and dissipated on
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    118
    2003 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2003 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2003 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. Three tropical cyclones were observed, less than the average of 5-6. 1 reached Cyclone strength. The first storm of the season developed from a broad surface trough on May 8 over the southern Bay of Bengal. It moved northwestward, where it reached tropical storm strength on the 10th. Mid-level ridging pushed the storm eastward, where after reaching a peak of 70 mph winds, upper level shear weakened it to a tropical depression. It managed to re-strengthen to a 50 mph tropical storm before hitting Myanmar on the 19th. The IMD classified one depression over the Bay of Bengal on June 21 that dissipated over Bangladesh on June 22. The IMD classified one depression that formed on July 25, crossed West Bengal - Orissa coast near Baleshwar, and dissipated on July 26. This system was not classified as a tropical depression by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, but was tracked as a depression by India Meteorological Department. A
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    119
    1939 Atlantic hurricane season

    1939 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1939 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1939, and lasted until October 31, 1939. These dates mark the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1939 season had below normal activity, with only five tropical storms, of which two became hurricanes and one became a major hurricane, equivalent to Category 3 status or higher on the modern-day Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The first tropical cyclone formed on June 12, and the last dissipated on November 6. All of the storms affected land to some extent. The first three cyclones of the season made landfall along the coast of the United States, collectively causing only minor damage. Hurricane Four, the strongest of the year, took a northeastern path through the western Atlantic, striking Bermuda on October 16. The fifth and final storm was a minimal hurricane that wrought damage throughout the western Caribbean Sea, most notably in Jamaica and Cuba. The weakest known storm was Tropical Storm Three, with winds of only 45 mph (70 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 1003 mbar (hPa). The first tropical storm of the season developed in the extreme western Caribbean Sea on
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    120

    1946 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1946 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1946, and lasted until November 15, 1946. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1946 season was fairly quiet, with 6 storms forming, of which 3 became hurricanes. There was only one major hurricane, a hurricane that came up from the Western Caribbean and made landfall near Tampa as a Category 2. Damage was relatively minimal and confined to a small area where the eyewall passed over. A minimal tropical storm, first detected on June 13, moved across the northern Gulf of Mexico and hit near the Texas/Louisiana border on June 16, causing no damage. A small tropical storm over the western Atlantic made landfall on southern North Carolina on July 6. It turned northeastward, became a hurricane, and became extratropical on July 8. It dissipated on July 10. Some property damage occurred, but no deaths were reported. On August 25, a tropical storm formed in the Bay of Campeche. It moved quickly westward, hitting near Tampico, Mexico the next day and dissipating. The precursor to Hurricane Four was an area of low pressure. It became a tropical storm
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    1949 Pacific hurricane season

    1949 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1949 Pacific hurricane season was the first hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific hurricane database. Six tropical cyclones were known to have existed during the season, of which the first formed on June 11 and the final dissipated on September 30. Another tropical cyclone had formed within the basin in 1949, but was included in the Atlantic hurricane database, had it been classified operationally in the Eastern Pacific basin, would have tallied the overall season to seven tropical cyclones. In addition, there were two tropical cyclones that attained hurricane status, but none of them reached major hurricane intensity (Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale). Tropical Storm Three threatened the Baja California Peninsula, while an unnumbered hurricane crossed into the Atlantic, later becoming the 1949 Texas hurricane. Tropical cyclones were recorded in the Eastern Pacific best track database for the first time in 1949. Although official records began in the Eastern Pacific during this year, the season saw the first officially recorded Atlantic-Pacific crossover tropical cyclone. This season was also beginning of a cool phase for the Pacific Decadal
    6.67
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    122

    1972 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Agnes
    The 1972 Atlantic hurricane season had only four fully tropical named storms – the fewest since 1930. It officially began on June 1, 1972, and lasted until November 30, 1972. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The first storm, Subtropical Storm Alpha, developed on May 23 off the Southeast United States and struck Florida, causing minor damage and two fatalities. Although several other tropical depressions developed, only Tropical Depression Five is known to have affected land. The most significant storm of the season was Hurricane Agnes, which at the time was among the ten costliest United States hurricanes. After brushing the western tip of Cuba, the hurricane made landfall on the Florida Panhandle. It caused at least $2.1 billion (1972 USD) in damage and 128 fatalities, mostly from inland flooding in Pennsylvania and New York. The strongest hurricane of the season was Betty, which reached peak winds of 105 mph (165 km/h) while west of the Azores. Tropical Storm Carrie passed just offshore of Massachusetts, causing heavy rainfall, resulting in four fatalities, but only $1.78 million (1972 USD) in
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    123
    2005–06 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2005–06 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2005–06 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation. It started on November 15, 2005 and ended on April 30, 2006, with the exception for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it continued until May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. Formed on September 5 and dissipated on September 6, 2005. Tropical Disturbance 02R formed approximately 860 nautical miles (1,590 km) east of Diego Garcia on October 12. It became more organised and the JTWC upgraded it to a Tropical Cyclone with a peak intensity of 35kt between October 14 and October 15. The system never reached Tropical Storm strength based on Météo France's advisories. Due to growing wind shear, the system dissipated over water on October 15. Formed on November 6 and dissipated on November 8, 2005. TCWC Perth issued a gale warning on a Tropical Low near 8.3°S 97.1°E on November 5. According to JTWC, the low developed into a tropical cyclone and reached its
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    1852 Atlantic hurricane season

    1852 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1852 Atlantic hurricane season was one of only four Atlantic hurricane seasons in which every known tropical cyclone attained hurricane status. Five tropical cyclones were reported during the season, which lasted from late August through the middle of October; these dates fall within the range of most Atlantic tropical cyclone activity, and none of the cyclones coexisted with another. Though there were officially five tropical cyclones in the season, hurricane scholar Michael Chenoweth assessed two of the cyclones as being the same storm. There may have been other unconfirmed tropical cyclones during the season, as meteorologist Christopher Landsea estimated that up to six storms were missed each year from the official database; this estimate was due to small tropical cyclone size, sparse ship reports, and relatively unpopulated coastlines. Every tropical cyclone in the season was of hurricane status, or with winds at or exceeding 74 mph (119 km/h). In only three other seasons did every cyclone attain hurricane status; those years were 1858, 1866, and 1884. All five cyclones affected land; the strongest was the first storm, which caused severe damage and loss of life when it
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    125
    1988 Pacific typhoon season

    1988 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Roy
    The 1988 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1988, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. A total of 26 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which all became tropical storms. Of the 26, 10 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 1 reached supertyphoon strength. Nine tropical cyclones moved through the Philippines this season, making this season the most active for the archipelago so far this decade. A total of 26 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which all became tropical storms. Of the 26, 10 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 1 reached
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    126

    1948 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1948 Miami hurricane
    The 1948 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 15, 1948, and lasted until November 15, 1948. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1948 Atlantic hurricane season featured nine tropical cyclones; six storms attained hurricane status, and four storms intensified to major hurricanes with winds of at least Category 3 intensity. Operationally, ten tropical disturbances were noted; a weak tropical disturbance formed over the southeast Bahamas in May and moved northwest into the Georgia coast near Savannah, producing winds of 30 miles per hour (48 km/h). The 1948 Atlantic hurricane season was slightly below average, and it featured a total of nine storms, which fell below the climatological seasonal average of ten. All of the hurricanes formed during the latter half of the season, and the number of intense hurricanes surpassed the average of two. The season featured one tropical storm in May, and it was among eighteen tropical systems which formed during that month in the Atlantic basin. Of the ten tropical disturbances detected operationally, five struck the United States with winds of 39 miles
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    127
    1982 Pacific typhoon season

    1982 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Bess
    The 1982 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1982. On average, most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the International Date Line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes. Tropical Storms that formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. During this season, the first tropical cyclone formed on March 16, and the last one dissipated on December 10. A total of 28 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 26 became tropical storms. 19 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 2 reached super typhoon
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    1993 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1993 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1993 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was the period in which tropical cyclones formed within the north Indian ocean. The season has no official bounds but cyclones tend to form within this basin between April and December. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean — the Bay of Bengal to the east of the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Sea to the west of India. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. An average of four to six storms form in the North Indian Ocean every season with peaks in May and November. Cyclones occurring between the meridans 45°E and 100°E are included in the season by the IMD. On November 5, an area of convection organized into a tropical depression southwest of the southern tip of India. After moving towards the coast, it turned to the west, finally becoming a tropical storm on the 12th when it reached a favorable environment. After attaining cyclone strength on the 13th, it reached a peak of 90 mph winds. High vertical shear caused it to dissipate on the 16th over open waters. A category 1
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    2007 Pacific hurricane season

    2007 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Flossie
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Barbara
    The 2007 Pacific hurricane season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It officially started on May 15, 2007 in the eastern Pacific, designated as the area east of 140°W, and on June 1, 2007 in the central Pacific, which is between the International Date Line and 140°W, and lasted until November 30, 2007. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Pacific basin. The season began slowly; through the end of July, the seasonal ACE was the third lowest since the geostationary satellite era began in 1966. The inactivity continued through the next month, which was the third quietest August in terms of ACE since reliable records began in the basin in 1971. Tropical Storm Barbara in June caused $55 million (2007 USD) in crop damage in southeastern Mexico from heavy precipitation. In August, Hurricane Flossie formed in the Eastern Pacific and crossed into the Central Pacific, threatening Hawaii but causing little damage. In early September, Hurricane Henriette dropped heavy rainfall in southwest Mexico, which caused nine fatalities and $25 million (2007 USD) in damage. On May 22, 2007, NOAA released their
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    2009 Pacific hurricane season

    2009 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Rick
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Andres
    The 2009 Pacific hurricane season was the most active Pacific hurricane season since 1994. The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1 for the central Pacific, and officially ended on November 30, 2009. For the first time in ten years, no tropical depressions formed during the month of May. This inactivity continued into the early part of June and was the least active since 1994. The first named storm of the season did not develop until June 21, marking the latest start to a Pacific hurricane season in 40 years. However, according to the NHC's tropical weather summary, August 2009, with seven named storms in their region, was one of the most active Augusts on record for the basin. This level of activity had rarely occurred, if at all, in the past 41 years, since 1968, when the most active August on record for the region with eight named storms occurred. When Hurricane Rick reached Category 5 strength on October 17, 2009, it became the first Category 5 Eastern Pacific hurricane since Ioke in 2006, and the second-strongest Pacific hurricane on record, behind 1997's Linda. On May 21, 2009, NOAA released their forecast for the 2009 Eastern Pacific and
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    1938 Atlantic hurricane season

    1938 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: New England Hurricane of 1938
    • Tropical cyclones: New England Hurricane of 1938
    The 1938 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1938, and lasted until October 31, 1938. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The first storm of the season formed in the area of Antigua in early August and moved generally westward. Falling just short of hurricane strength, Storm One brushed Puerto Rico and made landfall in the Dominican Republic, dissipating over the mountains of Hispaniola. Some of the smaller islands sustained damage but the only other effects were squally weather. The first hurricane of the season formed southeast of Barbados on August 9 and moved west-northwest at a high rate of speed, strengthening into a hurricane as it passed south of Jamaica. Becoming a Category 2 storm while southeast of Cozumel, Storm Two nicked the northern tip of the Yucatan peninsula, but caused little effect, perhaps because of the storm's small size. The hurricane curved more to the northwest as it entered the Gulf of Mexico, weakening shortly before it reached the coast. Storm Two made landfall near Cameron, Louisiana as a minimal hurricane, causing moderate flooding of lowlands and
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    1996 Pacific typhoon season

    1996 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Herb
    The 1996 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1996, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1996 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. The 1996 season was very active. Forty-three tropical cyclones formed this year, of which 34 became tropical storms. Fifteen storms reached typhoon intensity, of which six reached super typhoon
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    1977 Pacific typhoon season

    1977 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Babe
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Babe
    The 1977 Pacific typhoon season was one of the least active Pacific typhoon seasons on record, with only 19 tropical storms forming. It was also the only known typhoon season during the satellite era (since 1960) to not produce a Category 5 equivalent super typhoon. The season's first storm, Severe Tropical Storm Patsy, formed on March 23 and the last, Typhoon Mary, dissipated on January 2, 1978. With Mary spanning two calendar years, it became the fourth typhoon to do so since 1945. Since then, two other typhoons have achieved this feat. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1977 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in
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    1998–99 Australian region cyclone season

    1998–99 Australian region cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Thelma
    The 1998–99 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on 1 November 1998 and ended on 30 April 1999. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, which runs from 1 July 1998 to 30 June 1999. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by four Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. This storm developed near Cocos Island. A tropical depression formed on 6 November 1998 near Cocos Island. The tropical depression rapidly strengthened into Tropical Cyclone Alison on the same day. Alison was 130 miles northeast of Cocos Island and was moving southeast. Alison passed only 25 miles south of Cocos bringing gale force winds to the island. On 11 November, Alison encountered wind shear which weakened the storm and by 13 November the storm dissipated. Billy formed on 1 December 1998 off the northwestern Australia coast. The storm moved nearly due south before making landfall near Onslow, Western Australia. Damage estimates from
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    2005 Atlantic hurricane season

    2005 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Wilma
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Katrina
    The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history, shattering numerous records. The impact of the season was widespread and ruinous with an estimated 3,913 deaths and record damage of about $159.2 billion. Of the storms that made landfall, five of the season's seven major hurricanes—Dennis, Emily, Katrina, Rita, and Wilma—were responsible for most of the destruction. The Mexican states of Quintana Roo and Yucatán and the US states of Florida and Louisiana were each struck twice by major hurricanes; Cuba, the Bahamas, Haiti, Mississippi, Texas, and Tamaulipas were each struck once and in each case brushed by at least one more. The most catastrophic effects of the season were felt on the United States' Gulf Coast, where a 30 ft (10 m) storm surge from Hurricane Katrina caused devastating flooding that inundated New Orleans, Louisiana and destroyed most structures on the Mississippi coastline; and in Guatemala, where Hurricane Stan combined with an extratropical system to cause deadly mudslides. This season was the first time that the Atlantic hurricane season was more active than the typhoon season; normally, the typhoon season is
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    2006–07 Australian region cyclone season

    2006–07 Australian region cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone George
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone George
    The 2006–07 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on 1 November 2006 and ended on 30 April 2007; however, Tropical Cyclone Pierre formed on 17 May, after the official end date. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, which runs from 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by four Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. An area of increased thunderstorm activity south of Indonesia was first spotted on 29 December 2006, when the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) noted that a weak tropical low could develop in the area. Late on 31 December, the BOM began issuing advisories on the tropical low. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert on the system early on 2 January 2007, and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Perth upgraded it to a tropical cyclone later that morning, naming it Isobel. The JTWC followed suit and designated the system Tropical Cyclone
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    1949 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1949 Florida hurricane
    The 1949 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1949, and lasted until October 31, 1949. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. 1949 was a fairly active season, with 13 storms reaching tropical storm strength, 7 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. 1949 was the last year in which Atlantic tropical cyclones were not named. Some notable storms of the 1949 season include a Category 4 hitting near West Palm Beach in August, as well as a Category 4 hurricane hitting Freeport, Texas in October; this season was one of only two, along with the 1945 season, in which two Category 4 Atlantic hurricanes hit the United States. Hurricane One formed north of the Lesser Antilles on August 21. It moved northwestward, gradually strengthening to a peak of 110 mph winds. It brushed the Outer Banks on August 24, turned east, and became extratropical on August 26. No damage was reported, although a ship recorded a minimum central pressure of 963 mbar (28.43 inHg) in the center. On August 23 a tropical storm was located northeast of the Lesser Antilles. It moved west-northwest, passing the islands to the north, and
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    1958 Pacific typhoon season

    1958 Pacific typhoon season

    The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1958 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Fleet Weather Center on Guam. At noon on December 31, a vortex was noted along the Intertropical Convergence Zone about 1,300 miles (2,100 km) south of Hawai'i. On January 7, the relatively small tropical storm struck Jaluit Atoll within the southern Marshall Islands, killing 14 people. It rapidly intensified, and reached winds of 140 mph the next day. Conditions became unfavorable, and steadily weakened to 105 mph winds. Ponape was struck on January 10, where Ophelia tore off the roof of the United States Weather Bureau office. On January 11, Truk was struck. The Weather Bureau's inflation shelter was destroyed, with other buildings on site severely damaged. On the 12th, favorable conditions allowed Ophelia to reintensify, reaching a peak of 160 mph on the 13th. Ophelia severely impacted Yap on January 13, removing the Weather Bureau office's sheet metal roof
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    139
    1960 Pacific hurricane season

    1960 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1960 Pacific hurricane season was an event in meteorology. It officially started on May 15, 1960 in the eastern Pacific and lasted until November 30, 1960. The 1960 season was the first season that Eastern Pacific Hurricanes were named. Eight tropical cyclones, seven named storms and five hurricanes formed during the 1960 season, none of the hurricanes reached beyond category 1 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Tropical Storm Annette formed on June 9 as a 45 mph (70 km/h) tropical storm south of Mexico and moved westward before dissipating on June 12. The storm never made landfall and the effects from Annette is unknown. Tropical Storm Bonny formed on June 22 southwest of Mexico and moved northwestward as a 45 mph (70 km/h) tropical storm. Bonny then turned northward and then turned westward before dissipating south of Baja California on June 26. The remnants of Hurricane Abby moved into the Eastern Pacific Ocean and intensified into a hurricane on July 20 and was named Celeste. The hurricane moved northwestward where it winds peaked at 85 mph (135 km/h) before it weakened into a tropical storm and dissipated on July 22. Hurricane Diana formed on August 16 And
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    140
    1962 Pacific typhoon season

    1962 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Karen
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Karen
    The 1962 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; there was activity in every month but January, March, and June, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. Most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The majority of the Pacific typhoons in 1962 formed in the Pacific Ocean (north of the equator and west of the International Date Line) with two exceptions: Tropical Depressions Fifty and Sixty-three formed in the Central Pacific. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1962 Pacific hurricane season. All tropical depressions are assigned a number. Most systems reaching tropical storm strength were assigned a name; all typhoons were named. Ninety tropical waves formed in the 1962 season. Only 78 of these became major easterly waves. 38 of these waves became tropical depressions, 30 became storms and 23 become typhoons. This record of 24 typhoons beat 1952 record which had 21. This record was
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    141

    1971 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Edith
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Ginger
    The 1971 Atlantic hurricane season was fairly active with several notable storms. Hurricane Edith, the strongest of the season, was a Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale, the highest category on the scale. It struck Nicaragua at peak intensity, killing dozens, and later hit southern Louisiana. Until 2003, Hurricane Ginger held the record for the longest known duration of an North Atlantic tropical cyclone, lasting 27.25 days from early September to early October; it is currently the second longest-lasting Atlantic hurricane. Ginger moved ashore in North Carolina, producing heavy rains and damaging winds. An unnamed storm in August attained hurricane status further north than any other Atlantic hurricane. The season officially began on June 1, and lasted until November 30, 1971; these dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. With thirteen tropical storms, of which six became hurricanes, the season was active. Despite the activity, damage in the United States totaled about $235 million (1971 USD, $1.35 billion 2012 USD), which National Hurricane Center forecaster Paul Hebert noted was "pretty small considering we
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    142

    1996 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Edouard
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Hortense
    The 1996 Atlantic hurricane season was the first Atlantic hurricane season since 1965 in which every tropical cyclone attained tropical storm intensity. Producing a total of thirteen named storms, nine hurricanes, and six major hurricanes, the season officially began on June 1, 1996, and ended on November 30, 1996, dates which conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The season's first tropical cyclone, Tropical Storm Arthur, developed on June 17, while the final cyclone, Hurricane Marco dissipated on November 24. The most intense hurricane, Edouard, was a powerful Cape Verde-type hurricane that affected portions of the Mid-Atlantic states and New England. The season featured four tropical cyclone landfalls, including two hurricanes, one of which was a major hurricane. In total, six major hurricanes formed during the 1996 Atlantic hurricane season—the highest number produced in a single season since 1961. There were four notable hurricanes during the 1996 Atlantic hurricane season: Bertha, Cesar, Fran, and Hortense. Hurricane Bertha made landfall as a Category 2 hurricane on the coast of North Carolina, causing a total
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    1996 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1996 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1995 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. Eight tropical cyclones were observed, this is slightly above average compared to the average of 5-6. Four reached Cyclone strength as well. An equatorial wind burst developed two tropical cyclones in early May; Jenna in the Southern Indian Ocean and Tropical Depression 1B in the Bay of Bengal, 240 nautical miles (440 km) northwest of Sumatra. It moved slowly northward without strengthening until the 7th, when it reached its peak of 45 mph (72 km/h) winds. The tropical storm made landfall on the 8th near Cox's Bazar District in Bangladesh, dissipating later that day without causing any damage. On June 9, a tropical depression formed in the Arabian Sea. It tracked west-northwestward under moderate vertical shear, and slowly strengthened to a tropical storm late on the 10th. It hit Oman that day, and dissipated on June 12. Rainfall was significant during this system, with a total of 300.3 millimetres (11.82 in) falling at
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    2009 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2009 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Aila
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Bijli
    The 2009 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. The North Indian Ocean cyclone season has no official bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Indian Ocean in the Northern Hemisphere, east of the Horn of Africa and west of the Malay Peninsula. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean — the Arabian Sea to the west of the Indian subcontinent, abbreviated ARB by the India Meteorological Department (IMD); and the Bay of Bengal to the east, abbreviated BOB by the IMD. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories. The tropical cyclone scale for this basin is detailed on the right. On average, 4 to 6 storms form in this basin every season. On April 13, an area of shower and thunderstorms became slightly organized over the central Bay of Bengal. Later that day, an
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    2008 Atlantic hurricane season

    2008 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Ike
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Dolly
    The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season was a very active hurricane season with sixteen named storms formed, including eight that became hurricanes and five that became major hurricanes. The season officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. However, the formation of Tropical Storm Arthur caused the season to start two days early. This season is the third most costly on record, behind only the 2004 and 2005 seasons, with over $47.5 billion in damage (2008 USD). It was the fourth busiest year since 1944 and the only year on record in which a major hurricane existed in every month from July through November in the North Atlantic. Bertha became the longest lived July tropical cyclone on record for the basin, the first of several long-lived systems during 2008. The season was devastating for Haiti, where over 800 people were killed by four consecutive tropical cyclones (Fay, Gustav, Hanna, and Ike), especially Hanna, in August and September. Ike was also the most destructive storm of the season, as well as the strongest, devastating Cuba as a major hurricane and
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    1917 Atlantic hurricane season

    1917 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1917 Pinar del Río hurricane
    The 1917 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and the first half of fall in 1917. It was an inactive season. Only four tropical cyclones formed this season. Two of them were hurricanes; the other was a tropical storm that stayed out to sea. The first Atlantic hurricane stayed largely out to sea. It passed about a dozen miles off Bermuda but did little else. The second hurricane was the most destructive. It kept close to the islands of the Greater Antilles, passing over Cuba as a strong Category 4 hurricane. After moving into the Gulf of Mexico, it swerved northeast toward the Florida Panhandle. It hit near Fort Walton Beach as a Category 3 hurricane and dissipated inland. The hurricane killed five people and caused $170,000 in damage in the United States. On July 6, a tropical depression formed near the island of Barbados. It strengthened to a tropical storm and attained peak winds of 50 mph (80 km/h) in the Caribbean Sea on July 8. Later, it weakened on July 9, and it degenerated into an area of low pressure prior to hitting Honduras. It transversed the Bay of Campeche, crossing the coast near Tampico, Tamaulipas and dissipating on July 14. Originally, it was not
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    147
    1966 Pacific typhoon season

    1966 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1966 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1966 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 39 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 30 became tropical storms. 20 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 3 reached super typhoon strength. 115 mph Typhoon Irma hit the eastern Samar on
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    148
    1990 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1990 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1990 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. Two tropical cyclones were observed, well below the average of 5-6. One of which reached Cyclone strength. On April 17, an area of convective activity formed to the east of Sri Lanka, and organized itself rapidly before a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert, was issued later that day. It was designated as Tropical Depression 01B by the JTWC early the next day. Strong upper-level westerlies inhibited development of the depression and brought about the rapid dissipation of the depression whilst located over water. There was no impact reported from the depression. A tropical disturbance organized into a tropical depression on May 3 in the Bay of Bengal. Unlike its predecessor, conditions were favorable for continued development, and the system became a tropical storm on the 5th. A weakness in the subtropical ridge brought the system northwestward, where it quickly intensified to a cyclone on the 7th. It reaches a peak of
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    149
    1995 Pacific hurricane season

    1995 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Juliette
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Ismael
    The 1995 Pacific hurricane season was the least active Pacific hurricane season since 1979. Of the eleven tropical cyclones that formed during the season, four affected land, with the most notable storm of the season being Hurricane Ismael, which killed at least 116 people in Mexico. The strongest hurricane in the season was Hurricane Juliette, which reached peak winds of 150 mph (240 km/h), but did not significantly affect land. The season officially started on May 15, 1995 in the Eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1995 in the Central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1995. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones forms in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The season saw eleven tropical cyclones form, of which ten became tropical storms. Seven storms attained hurricane status, of which three acquired major hurricane status. The number of tropical storms was much less than the average of 16 storms, while the number of hurricanes and major hurricanes were slightly below average. The seasonal activity during 1995 was below normal, and marked the first of several seasons with lower than normal activity, a trend that persists to this date.
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    1998–99 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1998–99 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1998–99 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation. According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center it started on July 1, 1998 and ended on June 30, 1999. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion, which considered the season to run from August 1, 1998 through July 31, 1999. See Tropical Depression H4. This storm existed from September 3 until September 6. The minimum pressure was 1002 mb, and the mean winds only reached 25 knots (46 km/h). This system was also classified as Tropical Cyclone 02S by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. This storm existed from January 4 until January 6. The minimum pressure was 996 mb, and the mean winds only reached 30 knots (56 km/h). This system was also classified as Tropical Cyclone 21S by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. This disturbance was classified as D2 by La Reunion. Once Cyclone Davina was named, it was reclassified as E1. This system was also classified as Tropical Cyclone 23S
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    151
    2003–04 South Pacific cyclone season

    2003–04 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Heta
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Heta
    The 2003–04 South Pacific cyclone season was a below-average season with only three tropical cyclones occurring within the South Pacific to the east of 160°E. The season officially ran from November 1, 2003 to April 30, 2004 with the first disturbance of the season forming on December 4 and the last disturbance dissipating on April 23. This is the period of the year when most tropical cyclones form within the South Pacific Ocean. During the season at least 16 people were killed from tropical disturbances whilst overall damage was estimated at $218 million (2004 USD; $268 million 2012 USD). The most damaging tropical disturbance was Cyclone Heta which caused at least $211 million (2004 USD; $260 million 2012 USD) in damage to six different countries and left three dead. The deadliest tropical disturbance of the season was Tropical Depression 10F, which was responsible for eleven deaths and caused $2.74 million (2004 USD; $3.37 million 2012 USD) in damage. Cyclone Ivy also caused 2 deaths and caused $4.17 million (2004 USD; $5.13 million 2012 USD) worth of damage to Vanuatu. As a result of the impacts caused by Heta and Ivy, the names were retired from the tropical cyclone naming
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    2010 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2010 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Laila
    The 2010 North Indian Ocean cyclone season was the most intense tropical cyclone season in the North Indian Ocean since 1998 with some 8 depressions and 5 named storms forming in the region due to a moderate La Niña. The official Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in this basin is the India Meteorological Department (IMD), while the Joint Typhoon Warning Center releases unofficial advisories to the Indian Ocean in the Northern Hemisphere, east of the Horn of Africa and west of the Malay Peninsula. There are two main seas in the North Indian Ocean — the Arabian Sea to the west of the Indian subcontinent, abbreviated ARB and the Bay of Bengal to the east, abbreviated BOB by the IMD. The Season officially started on May 17, 2010 with Cyclone Laila and ended on December 8, 2010. During the season, the cyclones Laila, Phet, Giri and Jal along with Bandu caused excessive life loss across the Indian Subcontinent and the Middle east. This is the only season to have 5 named storms since the 1998 North Indian Ocean cyclone season. Multiple storms together killed some 402 people wreaking damage worth at least US$ 2.985 billion. Albeit very active, no tropical storms formed between mid
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    1968 Pacific hurricane season

    1968 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Naomi
    The 1968 Pacific hurricane season ties the record for having the most active August in terms of tropical storms. It officially started on May 15, 1968 in the eastern Pacific and June 1 in the central Pacific and lasted until November 30, 1968. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Several notable systems formed during the season. Five named storms—Hyacinth, Iva, Liza, Naomi, and Pauline—had effects in the United States. Two others—Annette and Tropical Depression Two—affected Mexico, and Tropical Storm Simone made a rare landfall on Guatemala. Tropical Storm Virginia, which formed in the West Pacific, crossed into the basin at a high latitude. Twenty-five tropical cyclones formed this season, resulting in 501 advisories being issued in the East Pacific, and 30 being issued for the Central Pacific, both records at the time. Of these, six remained depressions, thirteen peaked as tropical storms, and six reached hurricane strength. There were no major hurricanes this season. Many of the tropical cyclones this season – including all six hurricanes – formed from Intertropical Convergence Zone
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    1991 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1991 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1991 Bangladesh cyclone
    The 1991 North Indian Ocean Cyclone season was the period in which tropical cyclones formed to the north of the equator in the Indian ocean. During the season tropical cyclones were monitored by the India Meteorological Department (IMD) and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The IMD assigned all depressions that it monitored with BOB followed by a number in numerical order. The JTWC also assigned a number and either the letter A or B depending on where the depression was when the first advisory was issued. During the year there were eight depressions that were monitored by the IMD while the JTWC monitored four during the year of which one was not monitored by the IMD. The first cyclone of the year formed on January 17 and had little effect on ships that were moving through the Arabian sea to take part in the Gulf War. The deadliest cyclone during the year was Super Cyclonic Storm BOB 01 which killed over 138,000 people. During January 14, the JTWC started to monitor an area of convection that had developed within the near equatorial trough of low pressure, about 900 km (560 mi) to the southeast of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Over the next couple of days the disturbance moved towards the
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    155

    1993 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Emily
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Bret
    The 1993 Atlantic hurricane season was a below average Atlantic hurricane season that produced eight tropical cyclones and tropical storms, four hurricanes, and one major hurricane. It officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean. The first tropical cyclone, Tropical Depression One, developed on May 31, while the final storm, Tropical Depression Ten, dissipated on October 1, well before the average dissipation date of a season's last tropical cyclone, the first occurrence since the 1930 season. The most intense hurricane, Emily, was a powerful Category 3 on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale that paralleled close to the North Carolina coastline causing minor damage and a few deaths before moving out to sea. The season continued the string of below average seasons started in 1991, primarily due to the continued effects of El Niño across the Atlantic basin and above average vertical wind shear, and no hurricanes were observed in the Caribbean Sea during the season, a string started in 1990. The most significant storm of the season was Hurricane Gert, a long-lived
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    2005 Pacific hurricane season

    2005 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Kenneth
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Adrian
    The 2005 Pacific hurricane season officially began on May 15, 2005 in the eastern Pacific and on June 1, 2005 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 2005. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The season got off to a quick start, with the tropical depression that would become Hurricane Adrian forming just two days into the season on May 17. It took a very rare track skirting El Salvador as a Category 1 hurricane then striking Honduras as a tropical depression. Between June and September, Dora was the only storm that posed a significant threat to land as it skirted the Mexican coast, and Kenneth came close to Hawaii as a dissipating tropical depression. Hurricane Otis appeared to be heading for an encounter with the Baja California peninsula, but turned north-northwest, paralleling the coast, before dissipating. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted a slow year, with only a 10% chance of above-average storm activity in the eastern North Pacific and a 70% chance of below-normal activity. The pre-season forecast predicted 11 to 15 tropical storms, 6 to 8
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    157

    1947 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: 1947 Fort Lauderdale Hurricane
    • Tropical cyclones: 1947 Fort Lauderdale Hurricane
    The 1947 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1947, and lasted until November 1, 1947. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1947 hurricane season was a fairly active one in terms of landfalling storms. A Category 2 hit near Tampico, a Category 1 hit near Galveston, and a Category 1 hit near the Georgia/South Carolina border. The most significant storm by far, however, was the Fort Lauderdale Hurricane which struck Fort Lauderdale as a Category 4 hurricane, then made a second landfall in Louisiana. A weak tropical storm moving northwest across the Gulf of Mexico hit just south of the Mexico/United States border on August 2. It dissipated that day after causing $2 million in damage (1947 dollars), mostly crop damage from flooding. On August 9, a tropical storm formed in the Caribbean Sea. It moved west-northwest, hitting near Cozumel, Mexico, on August 12. As it moved through the Bay of Campeche, it quickly strengthened to a peak of 110 mph (180 km/h) winds, and hit just south of Tampico on August 15. The hurricane dissipated the next day over land, causing 19 fatalities. A tropical
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    158
    1954 Atlantic hurricane season

    1954 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Hazel
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Hazel
    The 1954 Atlantic hurricane season caused over $750 million in damage, the most of any season at the time. The season officially began on June 15, and nine days later the first named storm developed. Hurricane Alice developed in the Gulf of Mexico and moved inland along the Rio Grande, producing significant precipitation and record flooding that killed 55 people. Activity was slow until late August; only Barbara, a minimal tropical storm, developed in July. In the span of two weeks, hurricanes Carol and Edna followed similar paths before striking New England as a major hurricane. The latter became the costliest hurricane in Maine's history. In late September, Tropical Storm Gilda killed 29 people after drenching northern Honduras. A tropical depression in early October was captured by a high-altitude photograph on a rocket, thus producing the first large-scale image of a tropical cyclone. The strongest and deadliest hurricane of the season was Hurricane Hazel, which killed thousands in Haiti before striking near the North Carolina/South Carolina border in October. It caused heavy damage in the United States before becoming extratropical and affecting Ontario. Intense rainfall
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    159
    1966 Pacific hurricane season

    1966 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1966 Pacific hurricane season started on May 15, 1966 and ended November 30, 1966. The season was of little note. Hurricane Blanca traveled 4,300 miles, setting a new record. During September and October of the year, Hurricane Helga and Tropical Storms Kirsten, Lorraine, and Maggie hitting Mexico. Kirsten caused 8 deaths and 5.6 million dollars in damages in Mexico (1966 USD). On the morning of June 20, the first tropical depression of the season formed south of Mexico. It initially went west-northwestward. On the afternoon of June 21, the depression strengthened into a tropical storm and was named Adele. It continued north until the evening of June 22, when it strengthened into a category 1 hurricane and sharply recurved west. It made landfall west of Manzanillo, Mexico on the evening of June 24 and dissipated that day. Extensive damage was caused by Adele in Mexico but no deaths were reported. Adele was the shortest lived hurricane of the season . . On June 28, a tropical depression formed west of Central America. It remained weak and dissipated two days later, never threatening land. Tropical Depression Two caused no reports of damages or deaths. On the evening of August
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    160

    1985 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Gloria
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Gloria
    The 1985 Atlantic hurricane season had the most U.S. landfalling tropical cyclones since 1916. The season officially began on June 1 and lasted until November 30. It was an average season, with 11 named storms developing. The first storm, Ana, developed on July 15 near Bermuda and caused minor effects in Canada while transitioning into an extratropical cyclone. Four other tropical cyclones – Claudette, Fabian, Henri, and Isabel – did not significantly affect land. Claudette developed offshore of the Southeastern United States and brushed Bermuda and the Azores. Fabian remained in the open Atlantic and Henri and Isabel were dissipating as they approached land. Additionally, three tropical depressions had minimal, if any impact on land. Although several storms caused minimal impact, there were also several tropical cyclones that caused significant impact. Hurricane Gloria, the strongest storm of the season, resulted in 8 fatalities and extensive damage in North Carolina, Virginia, Mid-Atlantic, and New England. While tracking erratically offshore and eventually inland over the Gulf Coast of the United States, Hurricane Elena caused more than $1.25 billion (1985 USD) in losses,
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    161
    2000–01 Australian region cyclone season

    2000–01 Australian region cyclone season

    The 2000–01 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on 1 November 2000 and ended on 30 April 2001. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, which runs from 1 July 2000 to 30 June 2001. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by four Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. Cyclone Sam was an intense Category 3 cyclone that did heavy damage cross northwestern Australia. The cyclone damaged a train station and knocked down trees. Operationally, the Bureau of Meteorology considered Sam to have been a Category 5 cyclone; however, post-storm analysis indicated that winds peaked at 195 km/h (120 mph), ranking the storm as a high-end Category 4. Offshore, two boats carrying a total of 167 illegal immigrants sank off the coast of Australia amidst rough seas produced by Sam. Officials confirmed the deaths of 163 of these after only four people were rescued by a Japanese tanker ship. The large loss of life ranked Sam as the
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    162
    1959 Atlantic hurricane season

    1959 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Gracie
    • Tropical cyclones: 1959 Escuminac Hurricane
    The 1959 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 15, 1959, and lasted until November 15, 1959. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The season began on May 28, before the official bounds, and had an unusual number of early-forming storms. The most notable storm of 1959 was Hurricane Gracie, which caused ten deaths when it made landfall near Beaufort, South Carolina as well as millions in damage; another eleven were killed by a tornado generated as Gracie weakened. Another notable storm was the Escuminac Hurricane, or Hurricane #3, which hit Escuminac, New Brunswick on June 19 as a hurricane, sinking 22 boats and killing 35 men. The season's activity was reflected with a cumulative accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) rating of 77. ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that last a long time, as well as particularly strong hurricanes, have high ACEs. ACE is only calculated for full advisories on tropical systems at or exceeding 34 knots (39 mph, 63 km/h) or tropical storm strength. Subtropical storms are not included
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    1970 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Celia
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Celia
    The 1970 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1970, and lasted until November 30, 1970. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The season was fairly average, with 10 total storms forming, of which five were hurricanes. Notable storms of 1970 include Hurricane Celia, which killed 20 and caused $930 million in damages as it passed over Cuba and into Corpus Christi, Texas; Tropical Storm Dorothy, which killed 51, most in Martinique; and a tropical depression that was the wettest tropical cyclone in the history of Puerto Rico. An area of disturbed weather persisted over the southwestern Caribbean Sea in the middle of May. It gradually organized, and a tropical depression formed on May 17. In response to low shear aloft and warm water temperatures, the depression rapidly strengthened on May 20, becoming a storm early in the day and a hurricane by night. However, Alma quickly weakened back to a tropical storm on May 21. Furthermore, it weakened to a tropical depression on the following day, mostly due to upper-level shear. The depression continued its general northward movement, with a
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    1975 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Gladys
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Eloise
    The 1975 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1975, and lasted until November 30, 1975. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The activity level of the season was average, after several consecutive years of below average activity, with nine storms forming of which six reached hurricane strength. The most notable storm of the season was September's Hurricane Eloise, which caused heavy damage and 80 deaths in Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and Florida. The season's activity was reflected with a cumulative accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) rating of 76. ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that last a long time, as well as particularly strong hurricanes, have high ACEs. ACE is only calculated for full advisories on tropical systems at or exceeding 34 knots (39 mph, 63 km/h) or tropical storm strength. Subtropical storms are not included, therefore, the subtropical stage of Doris is excluded from the ACE value. The first tropical cyclone of the season formed late on June 5 to the northeast of the Bahamas. Steadily
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    1991 Pacific hurricane season

    1991 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Fefa
    The 1991 Pacific hurricane season was a near-average Pacific hurricane season. The worst storm this year was Tropical Depression Five-E, which killed one person in Mexico. Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Ignacio injured forty people in Mexico, and Hurricane Fefa caused flooding in Hawaii. Hurricane Kevin was the strongest system of the season and became resulted the then longest-lasting hurricane in the eastern north Pacific basin. Hurricane Nora was the strongest November storm at that time. The season officially started on May 15, 1991 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1991 in the central Pacific. It lasted until November 30, 1991 in both basins. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. During the season, a total of sixteen tropical cyclones developed, featuring ten hurricanes, four tropical storms and two tropical depressions. These totals are close to the climatological averages established since 1966, when satellite surveillance began. However, the season was less active than 1990, which had a record 16hurricanes (more than 1991). On the oither hand, it ended late with the first November
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    1993 Pacific hurricane season

    1993 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1993 Pacific hurricane season officially started May 15, 1993 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1993 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1993. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The 1993 season officially started on May 15, 1993 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1 in the central Pacific; it lasted until November 30 in both basins. The first tropical cyclone developed on June 11, from a broad and persistent area of disturbed weather, about 960 mi (1,540 km) southwest of the Baja Peninsula. The depression attained tropical storm status on June 12, receiving the name Adrian. While drifting northwest it strengthened to Category 1 hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, though increasing wind shear subsequently weakened the storm. Adrian dissipated on June 19. The second storm of the season formed as a tropical depression on June 18. Based on ship reports of tropical-storm forced winds, the depression was quickly upgraded to Tropical Storm Beatriz. Beatriz moved northwest due to influence from the outflow from developing Tropical Storm Arlene in the Gulf of
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    2006–07 South Pacific cyclone season

    2006–07 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Cliff
    The 2006–07 South Pacific cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 1, 2006 and ended on April 30, 2007. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the southern Pacific Ocean east of 160°E. Additionally, the regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, and the "tropical cyclone year" runs from July 1, 2006 to June 30, 2007. Tropical cyclones between 160°E and 120°W and north of 25°S are monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service in Nadi. Those that move south of 25°S are monitored by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Wellington, New Zealand. In September and October 2006, as a weak to moderate El Niño developed across the Pacific ocean, both RSMC Nadi and New Zealand's National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research reported that the basin would see a significant change in the frequency and distribution of tropical cyclones in the region and beyond. They were expecting that 10 or more tropical cyclones would develop compared to an average of 8 during an average season with the greatest risk
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    2008 Pacific hurricane season

    2008 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Norbert
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Alma
    The 2008 Pacific hurricane season was an above average hurricane season. It officially started May 15, 2008 in the eastern Pacific, started on June 1, 2008 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 2008. This season is the first since 1996 to have no cyclones cross into the central Pacific. Activity this year was near average, with 16 storms forming in the Eastern Pacific proper and an additional 1 in the Central Pacific. There were 7 hurricanes, a low number compared to the typical 9, and only 2 major hurricanes, unlike the typical 5. There were only a few notable storms this year. Tropical Storm Alma made landfall along the Pacific coast of Nicaragua, becoming the first known storm to do so. It killed 9 and did $33 million in damage (2008 USD). It also became the first tropical storm to be retired in the Eastern Pacific basin. Hurricane Norbert became the strongest hurricane to hit the western side of the Baja Peninsula on record, killing 8 and causing $716.4 million (2008 USD) there, making Norbert the third-costliest Eastern Pacific hurricane on record. On May 22, 2008, NOAA released their forecast for the 2008 Eastern Pacific and Central Pacific hurricane seasons.
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    Atlantic tropical cyclone

    Atlantic tropical cyclone

    A North Atlantic hurricane is a tropical cyclone that forms in the North Atlantic Ocean, usually in the summer or fall. Tropical cyclones can be categorized by intensity. Tropical storms have one-minute maximum sustained winds of at least 39 mph (34 knots, 17 m/s, 63 km/h), while hurricanes have one-minute maximum sustained exceeding 74 mph (64 knots, 33 m/s, 119 km/h). Most Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes form between June 1 and November 30. The United States National Hurricane Center monitors the basin and issues reports, watches and warnings about tropical weather systems for the Atlantic Basin as one of the Regional Specialized Meteorological Centers for tropical cyclones as defined by the World Meteorological Organization. Tropical disturbances that reach tropical storm intensity are named from a predetermined list. Hurricanes that result in significant damage or casualties may have their names retired from the list at the request of the affected nations in order to prevent confusion should a subsequent storm be given the same name. On average, in the North Atlantic basin (from 1966 to 2009) 11.3 named storms occur each season, with an average of 6.2 becoming
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    1918 Atlantic hurricane season

    1918 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1918 Atlantic hurricane season was relatively inactive, with only six known tropical cyclones forming in the Atlantic during the summer and fall. There were four suspected tropical depressions, including one that began the season in June and one that ended the season when it dissipated in October. Four storms intensified into hurricanes, one of which attained Category 3 status on the modern-day Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Storm data is largely based on the Atlantic hurricane database, which underwent a thorough revision for the Atlantic hurricane season of 1918 in 2008. Most of the cyclones directly impacted land. A northward-moving hurricane killed 34 people and severely damaged Cameron, Louisiana, and the surrounding area in early August. A few weeks later, Honduras and Belize experienced hurricane-force winds and heavy rainfall from a storm that traversed much of the Caribbean Sea. Tropical storm-force winds were also experienced along the North Carolina coastline in late August as a hurricane brushed the Outer banks of the state. In early September, the extratropical remnants of a cyclone impacted Nova Scotia, and tropical storm conditions were observed on many of
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    171

    1943 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1943 Surprise Hurricane
    The 1943 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1943, and lasted until October 31, 1943. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1943 hurricane season was fairly quiet but was significant for one event: the Surprise Hurricane in July was the first tropical cyclone to be investigated by airplane. Two more flights were made during August into a stronger hurricane in the central Atlantic. These early flights paved the way for the Hurricane Hunters forecasters at the National Hurricane Center have come to rely. In late July, the first intentional flight into a hurricane was flown into what became known as the Surprise Hurricane. It was conducted by an Army Air Corps (now the United States Air Force) aircraft. Valuable information was gathered about hurricanes and hurricane structure. This storm formed near the Leeward Islands on August 13 and moved generally northwest for the next four days, shifting slightly more northward late on August 15. Its winds peaked at 60 mph (97 km/h) and the storm recurved to the northeast on August 18 several hundred miles southeast of Cape Fear, dissipating in
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    172

    1945 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: 1945 Southeast Florida hurricane
    The 1945 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1945, and lasted until October 31, 1945. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1945 season was an average season, with 11 tropical storms. 5 storms became hurricanes, of which 3 reached major hurricane strength. Notable storms include a Category 4 hurricane hitting Port Aransas, Texas, and another Category 4 hurricane hitting near Homestead, Florida; this season was one of only two, along with the 1949 season, in which two Category 4 Atlantic hurricanes hit the United States. The first tropical storm of the 1945 season formed in the western Caribbean Sea on June 20. It moved northward through the Yucatan Channel, and rapidly intensified to a 115 mph (185 km/h) Category 3 major hurricane on June 23. This made it one of three storms to reach major hurricane status in the month of June, and the third most intense storm to occur in June. It turned northeast over the Gulf of Mexico, and steadily weakened to a minimal hurricane at the time of its western Florida landfall near Cedar Key on June 24. It continued northeastward, hitting Cape
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    1961 Pacific typhoon season

    1961 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Nancy
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Nancy
    The 1961 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1961, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1961 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin had the "W" suffix added to their number. Typhoon Alice formed to the east of the Philippines on the 17th of May. Alice quickly strengthened and passed very near to Hong Kong with winds of 85 mph on the 18th before recurving through the Chinese Mainland. 4 people were killed and 20 people were injured in Hong Kong. 20 people were killed from heavy rain and mudslides when 90 mph Typhoon June hit southeastern Taiwan on August 6. Tropical Storm Nancy, having developed on September 7 in the open
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    1976 Pacific hurricane season

    1976 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Liza
    The 1976 Pacific hurricane season was a very deadly and costly one. Hurricanes Kathleen, Liza, and Madeline were the most notable storms this year. Hurricane Kathleen caused death and destruction in California and Arizona due to flooding. Hurricane Liza was the deadliest storm of the season when it killed over 600 people in Mexico. Hurricane Madeline is notable for being the most intense Pacific hurricane at landfall. The season officially started May 15, 1976 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1976 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1976. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In practice, the season lasted from the formation of the first storm on June 2 to the dissipation of the last on October 30. This season had a slightly below average number of tropical storms, with fourteen. The number of hurricanes was average, with eight. The season had an above-average number of major hurricanes, with five reaching Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Four of tropical depressions dissipated before they could reach tropical storm strength. There were five
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    1982 Pacific hurricane season

    1982 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Iwa
    The 1982 Pacific hurricane season officially started June 1, 1982 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1982 in the central Pacific, and lasted until October 31, 1982 in the central Pacific and until November 15, 1982 in the Eastern Pacific. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The 1982 season was an eventful one. Hurricane Paul killed over 1,000 people before it was named. Hurricanes Daniel and Gilma both briefly threatened Hawaii, while Hurricane Iwa caused heavy damage to Kauai and Niihau. The remnants of Hurricane Olivia brought heavy rain to a wide swath of the western United States. This season had nineteen tropical storms, eleven hurricanes, and five major hurricanes. Three tropical storms and one hurricane— a record number of named storms— formed in the central Pacific. This was largely due to a strong El Niño present during the season. This is the first year that named storms forming between the dateline and 140°W were given names from the Hawaiian language. Previous to this year, names and numbers from the western Pacific's typhoon list were used. After this year that it was decided to
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    2002–03 Australian region cyclone season

    2002–03 Australian region cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Inigo
    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Inigo
    The 2002–03 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on 1 November 2002 and ended on 30 April 2003. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, which runs from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by four Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. This system was classified by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. A strong low pressure system crossed near Elcho Island on 5 January 2003. It was operationally recognised as a tropical low, but post-analysis indicated that the system reached tropical cyclone intensity, with winds reaching 50 knots. It remained in the Northern Territory mainland for many days, until 21 January when it moved into the Timor Sea. It crossed the Western Australian coast near Port Hedland on 24 January. It again was treated as a tropical low at first, but it again was upgraded to tropical cyclone strength after post-analysis. Beni originated from the South Pacific region
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    2004–05 South Pacific cyclone season

    2004–05 South Pacific cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Olaf
    The 2004–05 South Pacific cyclone season was a near average tropical cyclone season, that contained nineteen tropical disturbances and nine tropical cyclones. The season got of to an early start, when Tropical Depression 01F developed near the Solomon Islands on October 28, three days before the official start of the season on November 1. The final disturbance of the season dissipated as the season was drawing to a close on May 1, 2005. Tropical cyclones between 160°E and 120°W and north of 25°S are monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service in Nadi. Those that move south of 25°S are monitored by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Wellington, New Zealand. The 2004–05 South Pacific cyclone season, got off to an early start with the first tropical depression of the season forming on October 28 about 420 km, (260 miles) to the northeast of Honiara in the Solomon Islands. This came about four days before the official start to the season. The Depression gradually moved towards the west and moved into TCWC Brisbane's area of responsibility late on October 30. The South Pacific remained quiet during November with no tropical disturbances forming. This quietness lasted until
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    1870 Atlantic hurricane season

    1870 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1870 Atlantic hurricane season lasted from mid-summer to late-fall and comprised one tropical storm and ten hurricanes, two of which became major hurricanes, (Category 3+). However, in the absence of modern satellite and other remote-sensing technologies, only storms that affected populated land areas or encountered ships at sea were recorded, so the actual total could be higher. An undercount bias of zero to six tropical cyclones per year between 1851 and 1885 and zero to four per year between 1886 and 1910 has been estimated. The Atlantic hurricane database (HURDAT) recognizes eleven tropical cyclones for the 1870 season. Ten storms attained hurricane status, with winds of 75 mph (119 km/h) or greater.Of the eleven Atlantic cyclones known for 1870 only three made landfall. Although Hurricane One caused damage in Alabama, the storm centre may not have crossed the coastline. Hurricane Nine made landfalls in both Cuba and Florida.Hurricane Two and Tropical Storm Three were both active in the first week of September but neither made landfall,although Hurricane Two did come close to the Newfoundland coastline.Later that month two more hurricanes were seen in the western
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    1980 Pacific hurricane season

    1980 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1980 Pacific hurricane season was an ongoing event in tropical cyclone meteorology. This season may be described through a series of negatives: no one was killed; no damage was inflicted; and no tropical cyclones made landfall. Indeed, this season is mostly notable due to a lack of notable tropical cyclones. The season officially started May 15, 1980 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1980 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1980. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern and central Pacific Ocean. However, due to an early system that crossed in from the western Pacific, this season actually began in April. Excluding the storm that entered from the western Pacific basin and an unnamed tropical depression, fourteen tropical storms and hurricanes formed. This total is slightly below the long-term average. All eastern Pacific systems this year formed in the eastern Pacific proper. The 1980 Pacific hurricane season began on April 5, 1980 with the crossing of the dateline by Tropical Storm Carmen and ended with the dissipation of Tropical Depression Newton on October 29. Of the sixteen tropical
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    2010 Pacific typhoon season

    2010 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Fanapi
    The 2010 Pacific typhoon season was the least active Pacific typhoon season on record, in terms of the number of named storms. The season began with Tropical Depression 01W on January 18. Unlike the other Pacific typhoon seasons, the active in the first half 2010 was very weak as Omais was the only named storm in the period. The season finally became active since July; in addition, three storms— Lionrock, Kompasu and Namtheun were active simultaneously in late August. In October, Typhoon Megi became the only super typhoon in 2010 and one of the most intense tropical cyclones on record. All of 14 named storms of the season were only active west of 150°E. Two systems of the season moved out of area. On November 1, a tropical depression crossed southern Thailand and entered the North Indian Ocean, before intensifying into Severe Cyclonic Storm Jal. On December 20, a tropical depression (or a subtropical storm) crossed the International Date Line and became Tropical Storm Omeka. Each season several national meteorological services and scientific agencies forecast how many tropical cyclones, tropical storms, and typhoons will form during a season and/or how many tropical cyclones will
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    1976 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Belle
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Belle
    The 1976 Atlantic hurricane season was an average Atlantic hurricane season, officially starting on June 1, 1976 and ending on November 30, dates which conventionally limit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones develop in the Atlantic Ocean. The season produced 23 tropical cyclones, of which ten developed into named storms; six became hurricanes, and two attained major hurricane status. The strongest hurricane of the season was Hurricane Belle, which reached Category 3 status on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale east of North Carolina; Belle later struck Long Island, New York as a Category 1 hurricane, causing $100 million in damage (1976 USD) and a total of five deaths across the New England region of the United States. The season began with Subtropical Storm One on May 21, prior to the official start of the season; the bounds of the season are from June 1 to November 30, which conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. Tropical Storm Dottie caused flooding rains in Florida that caused a total of four deaths. In early September, Hurricane Emmy caused 68 indirect deaths when a Venezuelan Air Force plane
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    1980 Atlantic hurricane season

    1980 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Allen
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Allen
    The 1980 Atlantic hurricane season was tied with 1932, 1969, and 1994 for most named storms in Atlantic Ocean during the month of November – only to be surpassed in 2001 and 2005. The season officially began on June 1, 1980, and lasted until November 30, 1980. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean. The season was fairly active, with fifteen tropical cyclones forming. It was the first time since the 1971 season that there were no active tropical cyclones in the Atlantic basin during the month of June. The season was neutral, having neither an El Niño nor a La Niña. Three tropical cyclones during in the Atlantic Ocean in 1980 were notable. Hurricane Allen was then the earliest Category 5 hurricane on record and also devastated portions of the Caribbean Sea, Mexico, and the United States. Tropical Storm Hermine caused significant flooding in Mexico, which resulted in at least 38 fatalities. Hurricane Jeanne was one of only four tropical cyclones at hurricane intensity to enter the Gulf of Mexico and not make landfall. The Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, though the first tropical
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    183

    1984 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Diana
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Diana
    The 1984 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1984, and lasted until November 30, 1984. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1984 season was an active one in terms of named storms, but most of them were weak and stayed at sea. Most of the cyclones tracked through the northwest subtropical Atlantic west of the 50th meridian to near the Eastern coast of the United States between mid-August and early October. The most damaging storm was Hurricane Diana, which caused $65.5 million (1984 dollars) in damage in North Carolina. Diana was the first hurricane to strike a nuclear power plant without incident; it was also the first major hurricane to strike the U.S. East Coast in nearly 20 years. Also of note was Hurricane Lili, which lasted well after the official end of the season. It was downgraded from a named storm on December 24. Damage overall from the tropical cyclones in 1984 totaled $66.4 million (1984 USD). Seven storms during the season had subtropical characteristics at some point in their track, those being Subtropical Storm One, Tropical Storm Cesar, Hurricane Hortense, Hurricane
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    184

    1994 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1994 Atlantic hurricane season officially began June 1, 1994, and officially ended November 30, 1994. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1994 season was very quiet, with only seven named storms, three hurricanes, and no major hurricanes. (A major hurricane is a hurricane of Category 3 status or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale.) The low seasonal activity is attributed to the presence of El Niño, which is a global coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. It was one of only 4 Atlantic hurricane seasons without major hurricanes; the others were 1968, 1972, and 1986, but records before 1944 remain incomplete. Tropical Storms Alberto and Beryl caused significant flood damage in the Southeast United States. The worst storm of the season, however, was Hurricane Gordon, which killed 1,145 people, nearly all in Haiti. Alberto formed from a north-moving tropical depression north of the Yucatán Peninsula on July 2. Tropical Storm Alberto continued north, making landfall near Destin, Florida on July 3 as a moderately strong tropical storm. The storm weakened quickly to a tropical depression, which
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    1999 Pacific typhoon season

    1999 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Dora
    The 1999 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1999, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1999 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert for a developing broad circulation which stretched out from the northwest Borneo coast early on January 4. This
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    2008–09 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2008–09 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: Cyclone Fanele
    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Dongo
    The 2008–09 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 15, 2008, and officially ended on April 30, 2009, with the exception for Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it ended on May 15, 2009. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin were monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. As predicted by the sub regional office of Mauritius ten named storms formed in this basin. It officially began on November 15, but began 1 month earlier when Tropical Storm Asma formed on October 16. Most of the storms that formed this year were weak or stayed at sea. Only two storms reached hurricane strength this year, both of which were Category 3 or higher, and only 3 storms made landfall in the entire season. Overall, the impact of this season was relatively minor, but damaging for Madagascar, due to the heavy rains from Eric, Fanele, Izilda and Jade. On October 6, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) began monitoring an area of persistent
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    2009–10 Australian region cyclone season

    2009–10 Australian region cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Ului
    The 2009–10 Australian region cyclone season was a below average tropical cyclone season, with eight tropical cyclones forming compared to an average of 12. The season began on 1 November 2009 and ran through until it end on 30 April 2010. The Australian region is defined as being to south of the equator, between the 90th meridian east and 160th meridian east. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by five Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWC's): Jakarta, Port Moresby, Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane, each of which have the power to name a tropical cyclone. The TCWC's in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane are run by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, who designate significant tropical lows with a number and the U suffix. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center also issues unofficial warnings for the region, designating significant tropical cyclones with the "S" suffix when they form west of 135°E, and the "P" suffix when they form east of 135°E. Torrential rains produced by Tropical Cyclones Olga and Paul resulted in widespread flooding and damage in northern Australia. The combined losses from these storms reached A$508 million (US$500 million). For the first time this season, the Bureau
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    1987 Atlantic hurricane season

    1987 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Emily
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Emily
    The 1987 Atlantic hurricane season was a below-average hurricane season that was limited by an ongoing El Niño. The season officially began on June 1, 1987, and lasted until November 30, 1987, although activity began on May 25 when a tropical depression developed 400 mi (640 km) in the east central Bahamas. The June through November dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The first cyclone to attain tropical storm status was an unnamed tropical storm which formed on August 9, nearly a month later than usual. The final storm of the year, Tropical Depression Fourteen, merged with a weak extratropical low on November 4. The season marked the first year tropical storm watches and warnings were issued; previously, gale watches and warnings were used for tropical storms, and this season was one of only a few seasons with no deaths in the United States; the last time this happened was in the 1981 season. During this season, 14 tropical depressions formed of which seven attained tropical storm status. One tropical storm was operationally classified as a tropical depression but was reclassified in post-analysis. Three
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    1997 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1997 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1997 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. Five tropical cyclones were observed, making 1997 an average season. However, 3 reached Cyclone strength. On May 13, a near-equatorial trough developed. The poorly organized system slowly tracked towards the north-northwest. The following day, deep convection consolidated around the center of circulation and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) classified the system as Tropical Cyclone 01B. Favorable upper-level conditions and good outflow allowed the storm to intensify. Shortly after, the cyclone attained tropical storm-force winds and turned towards the northeast. While gradually increasing in forward motion, the storm continued to strengthen. On May 17, the cyclone attained winds of 120 km/h (75 km/h), equivalent to a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. By May 18 an eye developed and the storm reached its peak intensity with winds of 215 km/h (135 mph) before making landfall near Chittagong.
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    190
    1920 Atlantic hurricane season

    1920 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1920 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and the first half of fall in 1920. The season was below average with only five tropical cyclones forming in the Atlantic Basin. It had one of the shortest seasons of duration, with the activity occurring in a 23 day period. All but one of them were hurricanes but none reached major hurricane status (Category 3 or above). The first known storm of the season was first identified on September 7 as a 40 mph (65 km/h) tropical storm over Atlantic Ocean. Traveling towards the northwest, the storm gradually intensified, attaining hurricane-status late on September 9. The following day, a ship in the vicinity of the storm recorded a pressure of 985 mbar (hPa), the lowest pressure recorded in relation to the storm. Around 1200 UTC, the hurricane turned towards the north and intensified into a modern day Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale early on September 11. The storm continued to intensify through September 12 when it reached its peak intensity with winds of 110 mph (175 km/h). After maintaining this intensity for 18 hours, the hurricane began to weaken as it turned towards the northwest. By 0000 UTC on
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    1990 Pacific typhoon season

    1990 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Mike
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Mike
    The 1990 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1990, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1990 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 35 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 32 became tropical storms. 18 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 4 reached super typhoon strength. On January 12, both the
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    192
    1992 Atlantic hurricane season

    1992 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Andrew
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Andrew
    The 1992 Atlantic hurricane season had one of the latest dates on record for the first named storm. The season officially began on 1 June 1992, and lasted until 30 November 1992. It was the least active hurricane season in nine years due to a strong El Niño which began the year before. The first storm, an unnamed subtropical storm, developed in the central Atlantic on 21 April, over a month before the official start of hurricane season. The most significant storm of the season was Hurricane Andrew, which at the time was the costliest United States hurricane. After crossing the Bahamas, the hurricane made landfall in Florida and Louisiana. It caused $26 billion (1992 US$) in damage, mostly in Florida, and 65 fatalities. Andrew was also the strongest hurricane of the season, reaching winds of 175 mph (280 km/h) while approaching Florida. Unusually, Hurricanes Bonnie and Charley produced tropical storm force winds in the Azores, and the former caused one fatality. Tropical Storm Danielle was one of few tropical cyclones known to make landfall on the Delmarva Peninsula. The storm caused minor damage and two fatalities in the Mid-Atlantic and New England regions of the United States.
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    193
    2004–05 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2004–05 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2004-05 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation. It started on November 15, 2004 and ended on April 30, 2005. For Mauritius and the Seychelles, the season continued until May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. On August 30, an area of low pressure developed near the edge of Météo-France's area of responsibility within an unseasonably active monsoonal band which coincided with the Madden-Julian oscillation. Tracking towards the southeast, the low experience strong deep-level wind shear which kept most of the convection displaced from the center of circulation. On August 31, convection managed to develop around the west and southwestern portions of the low before and was designated as Tropical Depression 01. The depression reached its peak intensity at this time with winds of 55 km/h (35 mph 10-minute winds) and a minimum pressure of 999 hPa (mbar). Shortly after, the depression entered Australian Bureau
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    194
    2006 Pacific hurricane season

    2006 Pacific hurricane season

    The 2006 Pacific hurricane season was the most active Pacific hurricane season since 2000 producing 19 tropical storms or hurricanes. Eighteen developed within the National Hurricane Center (NHC) area of warning responsibility, which is east of 140ºW, and one storm formed between 140ºW and the International Date Line, which is the area of responsibility of the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC). Of the 19 total storms, eleven became hurricanes, of which six attained major hurricane status. In addition to the named storms, three tropical depressions developed in each the NHC and CPHC regions of the basin. The season officially began on May 15 in the NHC portion of the basin, and on June 1 the season began in the CPHC portion; the season officially ended on November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific basin. Tropical activity began on May 27, when Tropical Storm Aletta formed off the southwest coast of Mexico. After no storms formed in June, the season became active in July when five named storms developed, including Hurricane Daniel which was the second-strongest storm of the season. During
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    195
    1919 Atlantic hurricane season

    1919 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: 1919 Florida Keys Hurricane
    • Tropical cyclones: 1919 Florida Keys Hurricane
    The 1919 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and the first half of fall in 1919. The first of the tropical storms formed on July 2, while the last system dissipated on November 15. The season was a below average season. Five tropical cyclones formed and only two became a hurricane. Three of the season's cyclones made landfall. The most damaging storm of the season was the 1919 Florida Keys hurricane, which killed hundreds along its path from the Florida Straits into southern Texas. The first storm of the season formed in the southeast Gulf of Mexico. This tropical storm moved northward and struck Pensacola, Florida several days later, causing US$25,000 (1919 USD) in damage. The most notable storm of the season, however, was the Florida Keys hurricane. The storm passed south of Key West as a Category 4. The storm passed over main Gulf of Mexico shipping routes as a strong Category 4 before making landfall just south of Corpus Christi, Texas as a Category 3 hurricane. Damage totaled US$22 million (1919 dollars). The death toll in Texas was officially 286, but the overall death toll of at least 600 was due to ships lost at sea during the cyclone. On September 2, a
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    196

    1952 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Fox
    • Tropical cyclones: 1952 Groundhog Day Tropical Storm
    The 1952 Atlantic hurricane season was the most recent season in which all named storms attained hurricane status, although it was the least active since 1946. The season officially started on June 15; however, a pre-season unnamed storm formed on Groundhog Day, becoming the only storm on record in the month of February. The other six tropical cyclones were named using the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet, the first of which formed on August 18. The final storm of the season dissipated on October 28, two and a half weeks before the season officially ended on November 15. Four of the tropical cyclones made landfall during the season, the first being the February tropical storm that crossed southern Florida. The first hurricane, named Able, struck South Carolina with winds of 105 mph (170 km/h), causing heavy damage near the coast and widespread power outages. It moved up most of the East Coast of the United States, leaving 3 deaths and widespread damage. As a developing tropical cyclone, Hurricane Charlie caused damaging flooding and landslides in southwest Puerto Rico. The final and strongest of the season, Hurricane Fox, struck Cuba with winds of 150 mph (240 km/h); it killed
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    197

    1957 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Audrey
    The 1957 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 15, 1957, and lasted until November 15, 1957. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The season was below average, with eight total storms and just three hurricanes forming. Three storms caused significant impact during the season. Hurricane Audrey hit Cameron, Louisiana as a Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale, demolishing the town and killing four hundred. Tropical Storm Bertha became one of the wettest tropical cyclones in Arkansas history when over 10 inches (250 mm) fell across central portions of the state. Another significant storm was Hurricane Carrie, which killed 80 people when a German sailing ship sank near the Azores. Low pressures over the Gulf of Mexico gradually organized around an area of convection, and became a tropical depression on June 8. It raced northeastward, becoming a tropical storm later that day, and hitting the Florida coastline near Apalachee Bay on June 9. It remained weak until it reached the Atlantic, when it reached a peak of 65 miles per hour (105 km/h) winds before becoming extratropical on June
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    198
    1973 Pacific hurricane season

    1973 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Ava
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Ava
    The 1973 Pacific hurricane season was an event in tropical cyclone meteorology. The most important system this year was Hurricane Ava, which was the most intense Pacific hurricane known at the time. Several other much weaker tropical cyclones came close to, or made landfall on, the Pacific coast of Mexico. The most serious of these was Hurricane Irah, which downed power and communication lines in parts of the Baja California Peninsula; the other landfalling storms caused rain and some flooding. No tropical cyclone this season caused any deaths. This season had a quick start but a slow end. Overall activity was below average, with twelve named systems in total. Of these, five were tropical storms, seven were hurricanes, of which three were major (Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale). Just one storm formed in August, one of the least active Augusts ever in the east Pacific. The season officially started May 15, 1973 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1973 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1973. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. All tropical cyclones
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    199
    1983 Pacific hurricane season

    1983 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Tico
    The 1983 Pacific hurricane season officially started May 15, 1983 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1983 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1983. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. This season, there were a record-setting 21 named storms this year. Of those storms, twelve became hurricanes. Eight hurricanes reached Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. No named storms formed in the central Pacific; however, there were two tropical depressions. A strong El Niño contributed to this level of activity. That same El Niño influenced a very quiet season in the Atlantic. The most notable storms were Hurricane Tico, Tropical Storm Octave, and Hurricane Winnie. Hurricane Tico left thousands homeless in Mazatlán; Tropical Storm Octave killed several people in one of Arizona's worst disasters; and Hurricane Winnie was a rare December cyclone. On May 21, Tropical Depression One-E formed 500 mi (800 km) southwest of Managua, Nicaragua. As the depression headed gradually west-northwestward over sea surface temperatures (SST's) of 86–88 °F (30–31 °C), it steadily
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    200
    1989 Pacific typhoon season

    1989 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Gay
    The 1989 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1989, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. Throughout 1989, several large-scale factors across the western Pacific Ocean displaced unusual characteristics that presented unique difficulties to forecasters. In their annual tropical cyclone report for 1989, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center regarded the season as one of the most challenging and unique years in their history. During much of the year, a very broad monsoon trough was present and resulted in significant diurnal fluctuations in convective activity that inhibited rapid development of many
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    1995–96 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

    1995–96 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Olivia
    The first storm of the year and most intense across the Southern Hemisphere during the 1995–96 seasons, Cyclone Daryl was first identified several hundred kilometres west of Sumatra on 16 November. Initially tracking south-eastward, the system gradually attained gale-force winds as it neared the Cocos Islands late on 17 November. Squally conditions and heavy rain impacted the islands but no damage took place. Low wind shear allowed for further strengthening; a mid-level ridge south of the system forced Daryl to turn towards the west. Early on 19 November, the storm intensified into a severe tropical cyclone and attained winds of 130 km/h (80 mph) before crossing 90°E and entering the Mauritius area of responsibility. Upon crossing this border, Daryl was assigned a second name, Agnielle, by Mauritius. Over the following days, the system further deepened, peaking in strength as a Category 5 on the Australian intensity scale with 205 km/h (125 mph) and a barometric pressure of 915 hPa (mbar; 27.02 inHg). Steady weakening took place due to markedly stronger wind shear. Cyclone Daryl-Agnielle was last noted as a weak low pressure center on 25 November over the open waters of the
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    202
    1997–98 Australian region cyclone season

    1997–98 Australian region cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Les
    The 1997–98 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It ran from 1 November 1997 to 30 April 1998. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, and the "tropical cyclone year" ran from 1 July 1997 to 30 June 1998. Tropical cyclones in this area were monitored by four Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. Entered the Australian region on 19 November (See 1997-98 South Pacific cyclone season). A low-pressure system formed over the Northern Territory in late December and moved into the Timor Sea as the monsoon trough developed near Australia. A tropical depression had formed on 26 December near Darwin, Australia. The storm reached gale force six hours after developing and was named Sid by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center in Darwin. Sid moved to the east, affecting the Northern Territory. Sid turned southestward, crossing the Northern Territory. Sid moved fully southward, in which it weakened due to wind shear. By 28 December, Sid
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    203
    2001–02 Australian region cyclone season

    2001–02 Australian region cyclone season

    The 2001–02 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the ongoing cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It officially started on 1 November 2001, and ended on 30 April 2002. However, the formation of Tropical Cyclone Alex on 26 October 2001 marked an earlier beginning to the season, and the season extended past the official end of the season when Tropical Cyclone Upia formed on 25 May 2002. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a "tropical cyclone year" separately from a "tropical cyclone season"; the "tropical cyclone year" began on 1 July 2001 and ended on 30 June 2002. The scope of the Australian region is limited to all areas south of the equator, east of 90°E and west of 160°E. This area includes Australia, Papua New Guinea, western parts of the Solomon Islands, East Timor and southern parts of Indonesia. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by five Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; TCWC Jakarta in Indonesia; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issues unofficial warnings for the region, designating tropical depressions with
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    204
    1995 Pacific typhoon season

    1995 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Kent
    The 1995 Pacific typhoon season occurred all year round, unusual in that most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1995 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 31 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 26 became tropical storms. 8 storms reached typhoon intensity, five of them achieving super typhoon strength. On July 19, Tropical Storm Faye became the first typhoon of the season, tied for the second latest date of the first typhoon with 1977, only behind Otto of 1998.
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    205

    1981 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Katrina
    The 1981 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1, 1981, and lasted until November 30, 1981. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1981 season was high in activity with 18 tropical depressions and twelve storms forming during the year. Nine of these systems made landfall. Cindy, Harvey, and Irene neither affected land directly nor indirectly. Hurricane Dennis caused millions of dollars in damage in Dade County, Florida and produced the highest rainfall totals of any tropical cyclone this season. Tropical Depression Eight caused the most damage, due to flooding in Texas at the end of August, and led to most fatalities of any tropical cyclone this season (five). Tropical Depressions Two and Eight caused a majority of the damage and fatalities this season, with both affecting Louisiana and Texas. Katrina was the only named storm with associated fatalities. The 1981 season was high in activity with eighteen tropical depressions and twelve storms forming that year. The season began early, as Tropical Storm Arlene formed on May 6. Arlene made landfall in Cuba, being absorbed by a low later.
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    2000–01 South Pacific cyclone season

    2000–01 South Pacific cyclone season

    The 2000–01 South Pacific cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It began on November 1, 2000 and ended on April 30, 2001. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the southern Pacific Ocean east of 160°E. Additionally, the regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a tropical cyclone year separately from a tropical cyclone season, and the "tropical cyclone year" runs from July 1, 2000 to June 30, 2001. Tropical cyclones between 160°E and 120°W and north of 25°S are monitored by the Fiji Meteorological Service in Nadi. Those that move south of 25°S are monitored by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre in Wellington, New Zealand. During the 2000–01 South Pacific cyclone season, only four tropical cyclones and one severe tropical cyclone formed. Compared to an average season, which generally features nine tropical cyclones and four to five severe tropical cyclones, the 2000–01 season was substantially below average. The season itself began unusually late, with the first system developing on February 20; however, according to the JTWC, a brief tropical storm existed between
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    207
    2000–01 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2000–01 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2000-01 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation. It started on November 15, 2000 and ended on April 30, 2001. For Mauritius and the Seychelles, the season continued until May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. This storm existed from August 1 until August 3. It was also classified as Tropical Cyclone 01S by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. This storm existed from November 12 until November 18. It was also classified as Tropical Cyclone 02S by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The beginnings of Ando can be traced to an area of convection within the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) about 400 km south-west of Diego Garcia. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center rated the system's potential for development as 'fair' on December 31. After 48 hours of dormancy, the disturbance gradually improved, becoming a tropical storm on January 2. JTWC numbered the system 04S and initiated warnings. At the same time, the
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    208
    1967 Pacific typhoon season

    1967 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1967 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1967, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1967 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 40 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 35 became tropical storms. 20 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 5 reached super typhoon strength. Typhoon Violet,
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    209

    1950 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Dog
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Easy
    The 1950 Atlantic hurricane season was the first year in which tropical cyclones were given official names in the Atlantic basin. Names were taken from the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet, with the first named storm being designated "Able", the second "Baker", and so on. It was an active season with sixteen tropical storms, with eleven of them developing into hurricanes. Eight of these hurricanes were intense enough to be classified as major hurricanes—a denomination reserved for storms that attained sustained winds equivalent to a Category 3 or greater on the present-day Saffir-Simpson scale. The high number of major hurricanes make 1950 the holder of the record for the most systems of such intensity in a single season. One storm, the twelfth of the season, was unnamed and was originally excluded from the yearly summary. The large quantity of strong storms during the year yielded the highest seasonal accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) of the 20th century, and 1950 held the seasonal ACE record until broken by the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. The tropical cyclones of the season produced a total of 88 fatalities and $38.5 million in property damage (1950 USD, $372 million
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    210
    1965 Pacific typhoon season

    1965 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1965 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1965, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1965 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 40 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 35 became tropical storms. 21 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 11 reached super typhoon strength. A surge in the
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    211
    1995 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1995 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 1995 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. Four tropical cyclones were observed, less than the average of 5-6. Two reached Cyclone strength. Western Pacific Tropical Depression 16W crossed over Vietnam and Myanmar, retaining tropical depression strength over the long passage. It became Tropical Depression 1B on September 13, and continued west-northwestward, slowly consolidating until reaching tropical storm strength on the 16th. It reached a peak of 50 mph (80 km/h) just before hitting the Indian coast. It dissipated 4 days later. On October 11, a tropical storm formed and began to move westward across the Arabian Sea, but met its demise from vertical shear on October 18. The monsoon westerlies spawned a tropical depression on November 5 in the eastern Bay of Bengal. It moved northwestward, becoming a tropical storm on the 5th. Just prior to its Indian landfall on the 9th it reached cyclone strength, but it dissipated over India the next day. The tropical
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    212
    1996–97 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

    1996–97 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Justin
    On 9 July, TCWC Perth reported that a tropical low had developed within the Near-equatorial trough of low pressure, located about 500 km (310 mi) to the northeast of the Cocos Islands. During that day the system moved to the southwest around a weak mid-upper level anticyclone, before it came under the starting to move southwards during 10 July. At 1000 UTC that day, TCWC Perth reported that the low had developed into a category one tropical cyclone, and named it Lindsay as the system reached its peak 10-minute sustained windspeeds of 75 km/h (45 mph). At 1500 UTC, the JTWC reported that Lindsay was becoming better organized and issued a tropical cyclone formation alert on the system. Six hours later while Lindsay was at its 1-minute peak intensity of 65 km/h (40 mph), the JTWC designated the system Tropical Cyclone 01S and started to issue warnings on it. After the JTWC had initiated warnings on the system, it began to rapidly weaken as it came under the influence of strong upper level north-westerlies. During the next day, both the JTWC and TCWC Perth issued their final advisories on Lindsay as it weakened below cyclone intensity and became extratropical. Lindsay's remnants were
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    1997 Pacific hurricane season

    1997 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Linda
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Paka
    The 1997 Pacific hurricane season was a very active hurricane season. With hundreds of deaths and billions of dollars in damage, this season was the costliest and one of the deadliest Pacific hurricane seasons. This was due to a strong El Niño. The 1997 Pacific hurricane season officially started on May 15, 1997 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1997 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1997. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when almost all tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Several storms impacted land. The first was Tropical Storm Andres which killed four people and left another two missing. In August, Tropical Storm Ignacio took an unusual path, and its extratropical remnants caused minor damage in the Pacific Northwest and California. Linda became the most intense east Pacific hurricane in recorded history. Although it never made landfall, it produced large surf in Southern California and as a result five people had to be rescued. Hurricane Nora caused flooding and damage in the Southwestern United States, while Olaf made two landfall and caused eighteen deaths and several other people were reported missing.
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    1998 Pacific typhoon season

    1998 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Zeb
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Zeb
    The 1998 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1998 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. During the 1998 season, a total of 27 tropical depressions developed across the western Pacific basin. Of those 27 depressions, a total of 18 strengthened into tropical storms of which 9 further intensified into typhoons. The
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    215
    2005 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2005 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2005 North Indian Ocean cyclone season has no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. The scope of this basin is limited to north of the Equator and west of the Malay peninsula. The IMD and JTWC monitor this basin. The Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal make up this basin, abbreviated ARB and BOB, respectively. In 2005, a total of twelve cyclonic disturbances were identified in North Indian Ocean, against a normal of fifteen. However, it was highest after 1992. Four of them became cyclonic storm in Bay of Bengal and were named, against a normal of five to six. In the second week of January, an area of convection persisted southeast of Sri Lanka. It organized into a tropical depression on January 8, but dissipated on the 10th due to vertical shear. Just behind the previous storm, a trough of low pressure developed into a tropical depression on January 13. Located a few hundred miles east-southeast of Sri Lanka, it meandered to the west, becoming a Cyclonic Storm on the 15th. Like its predecessor, Hibaru
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    216
    1973 Pacific typhoon season

    1973 Pacific typhoon season

    The 1973 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1973 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 25 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 21 became tropical storms. 12 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 3 reached super typhoon strength. Tropical Storm Bille, which developed on July
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    1909 Atlantic hurricane season

    1909 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1909 Atlantic hurricane season was an average Atlantic hurricane season, officially starting on June 1, 1909, and ending on November 30, 1909, dates which conventionally delimit the period of each year when tropical cyclones tend to form in the Atlantic basin. The season produced eleven tropical cyclones, of which all eleven became tropical storms; six became hurricanes, and four of those strengthened into major hurricanes. The seasons first storm developed on June 15, shortly after the official start of the hurricane season, and the last storm dissipated on November 14, shortly before the official end of the hurricane season. The most notable storm during the season formed in late August, while east of the Lesser Antilles. Moving west to west-northwestward, the storm quickly gained hurricane status, and traversed much of the Greater Antilles before strengthening into a Category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale and crossing the Yucatán Peninsula. Briefly weakening after its interaction with land, it strengthened into a Category 3 once again, and made landfall in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas on August 27 before rapidly dissipating the following day. The 1909
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    1953 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Carol
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Florence
    The 1953 Atlantic hurricane season was the first time an organized list of female names was used to name Atlantic storms. It officially began on June 15, and lasted until November 15, although activity occurred both before and after the season's limits. It is one of only four seasons to have a pre-season storm and a post-season storm, the others being the 1887, 2003, and 2007 seasons. The season was active with fourteen total storms, six of which developed into hurricanes; four of the hurricanes attained major hurricane status, or a Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The strongest hurricane of the season was Carol, although by the time it struck Atlantic Canada it was much weaker. Both hurricanes Barbara and Florence struck the United States; the former crossed the Outer Banks and impacted much of the east coast, and Florence struck a sparsely populated region of the Florida Panhandle without causing much damage. Bermuda was threatened by three hurricanes within two weeks. In addition to the hurricanes, Tropical Storm Alice developed in late May and left several fatalities in Cuba. The final named storm of the season, Hazel, produced additional rainfall in Florida
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    1956 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Betsy
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Betsy
    The 1956 Atlantic hurricane season was a below-average Atlantic hurricane season that featured a low number of tropical cyclones, although every tropical storm and hurricane affected land. There were eight tropical storms, half of which became hurricanes. Two of the hurricanes strengthened to the equivalent of a major hurricane, which is a Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The strongest hurricane of the season was Greta, which was also the final storm of the year; it was an unusually large storm that produced high waves from Florida to the Lesser Antilles. The most damaging storm was Hurricane Betsy, which destroyed 15,000 houses and left $40 million in damage in Puerto Rico. Betsy was also the deadliest of the season, having killed 18 in the French West Indies, 2 from a shipwreck in the Caribbean Sea, and 16 in Puerto Rico. Tropical Storm Dora struck Mexico in September and killed 27 people. The season officially started on June 15, although an unnamed storm developed three days prior in the Gulf of Mexico; the storm alleviated drought conditions in the south-central United States. Hurricane Anna developed in late July and hit Mexico. Tropical storms
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    1971 Pacific hurricane season

    1971 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Lily
    The 1971 Pacific hurricane season began on May 15, 1971 in the east Pacific, and on June 1, 1971 in the central Pacific. It ended on November 30, 1971. These dates conventionally delimit the period of time when tropical cyclones form in the east Pacific Ocean. The 1971 season was above average with 18 named storms. Twelve hurricanes formed, of which six became major hurricanes by reaching Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. At the time, this was a record number of storms. This season had six landfalls (Agatha, Bridget, Katrina, Lily, Olivia and Priscilla), the highest number of landfalling Pacific tropical cyclones in one season. On May 21, an area of low pressure developed in the very warm waters south of Tehuantepec, Mexico. Later that day, satellite images showed increasing circulation and Tropical Storm Agatha developed shortly after. Agatha continued moving to the west-northwest parallel to the Mexican coastline and strengthened into a hurricane on May 22. A U.S. Air Force weather reconnaissance aircraft flew into Agatha and found an eye and strong bands. The next day, a reconnaissance plane found winds of 85 to 90 mph (140 to 150 km/h). On May 24,
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    1977 Pacific hurricane season

    1977 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Anita
    The 1977 Pacific hurricane season was, at the time, the least active in recorded history. Only eight tropical storms formed, and four hurricanes; they would be tied and surpassed, respectively, by the 2010 Pacific hurricane season. There were no major hurricanes; the next time this happened would be the 2003 season. In addition, there was just one storm in each of May, June, July, August, and October, which is also low; the other three storms were in September. Activity in the central Pacific was zero, as no storms formed there nor moved in from the east. The low seasonal activity also occurred in the Atlantic hurricane season and in the typhoon season of the western Pacific. This was a worldwide trend; various factors inhibited tropical cyclone development throughout the northern hemisphere, resulting in a record low level of tropical cyclones worldwide. The 1977 Pacific hurricane season had the lowest number of tropical storms since reliable records began in 1949, producing 17 tropical depressions, 8 of which became tropical storms or hurricanes. The season officially started on May 15, 1977 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, the area east of 140°W and on June 1 in the Central Pacific
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    1987 Pacific hurricane season

    1987 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Eugene
    The 1987 Pacific hurricane season was the last year in which the Eastern Pacific Hurricane Center was the primary warning center for tropical cyclones in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The season officially started May 15, 1987 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1987 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1987. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when the vast majority tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Despite there being 20 named systems, 5 above the average, there were very few notable storms this year. Only four storms came anywhere near to making landfall. Hurricane Eugene was the first Pacific hurricane to make landfall in Mexico in July since the 1954 season and caused the all of the season's three deaths and $2.6 million of the seasons $4.7 million in damage. Tropical Storm Pilar and Hurricane Norma also came close to land, with the former producing record rain in Baja California Sur. The remnants of Hurricanes Ramon and Norma caused rain in the Continental United States. Elsewhere, Peke was a central north Pacific hurricane that crossed the International Dateline and became a typhoon of the 1987 Pacific typhoon
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    1999–00 Australian region cyclone season

    1999–00 Australian region cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Leon-Eline
    The 1999–00 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation and ran from 1 November 1999 to 30 April 2000. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan also defines a "tropical cyclone year" separately from a "tropical cyclone season", with the "tropical cyclone year" for this season lasting from 1 July 1999 to 30 June 2000. Two of the most notable cyclones of the season were Steve and Rosita. Cyclone Steve transversed the entire Australian continent, and although a fairly weak cyclone, caused widespread flooding in Queensland, Northern Territory and Western Australia, while Cyclone Rosita made an almost direct hit on Broome as a severe Category 4 cyclone, devastating several remote stations and the town itself. Rosita surprised many residents of its arrival, as it made landfall very late in the season. Ilsa formed to the northeast of the Cocos Islands on the 11 December 1999. The cyclone moved to the south of Christmas Island on the 13th producing a heavy swell which caused some damage. Its development was impeded by vertical windshear for a large part of its lifetime. After a long track eastwards across the Indian Ocean it
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    1999–00 South Pacific cyclone season

    1999–00 South Pacific cyclone season

    The 1999-00 South Pacific tropical cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation and ran from November 1, 1999 to April 30, 2000 in the South Pacific. It should also be noted that the regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a "tropical cyclone year" separately from a "tropical cyclone season", with the "tropical cyclone year" for this season lasting from July 1, 1999 to June 30, 2000. All of the six named storms affected land in some way, but no major damage was reported from any of the storms. A disturbance was identified on 3 January at 0600 (UTC) near Espiritu Santo in Vanuatu. The storm was difficult to locate the general centre for the next couple of days, but on 6 January, it became more organised, while displaying midget characteristics. On 7 January at 2100 (UTC), it was named Tropical Cyclone Iris, located 330 km (205 mi) northwest of Port Vila, moving southeast. In Vila, 110 km (70 mi) away from Iris's centre, recorded winds of only up to 20 knots (37 km/h), explaining the very small size of the cyclone. Iris intensified with 10-min winds increasing to 60 knots (110 km/h) on 8 January at 1200 (UTC). JTWC's estimated 1-min winds
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    2006 Pacific hurricane season

    2006 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Ioke
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Ioke
    The 2006 Pacific hurricane season was the most active since 2000, which also produced 19 tropical storms or hurricanes. Eighteen developed within the National Hurricane Center (NHC) area of warning responsibility, which is east of 140°W, and one storm formed between 140°W and the International Date Line, which is under the jurisdiction of the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC). Of the 19 total storms, eleven became hurricanes, of which six attained major hurricane status. Within the NHC portion of the basin, the season officially began on May 15, and in the CPHC portion, it started on June 1; the season officially ended on November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific basin. The strongest storm of the season was Hurricane Ioke, which reached Category 5 status on the Saffir-Simpson scale in the central Pacific Ocean; Ioke passed near Johnston Atoll and later Wake Island, where it caused heavy damage but no deaths. The deadliest storm of the season was Hurricane John, which killed six people after striking the Baja California Peninsula, and the costliest storm was Hurricane Lane, which caused
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    1780 Atlantic hurricane season

    1780 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Great Hurricane of 1780
    The 1780 Atlantic hurricane season ran through the summer and fall in 1780. The 1780 season was extraordinarily destructive, and was the deadliest Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history with over 25,000 deaths. Three different hurricanes, all in October, caused at least 1,000 deaths each; this event has never been repeated and only in the 1893 and 2005 seasons were there two such hurricanes. The season also had the deadliest Atlantic hurricane of all time, since known as the Great Hurricane of 1780. Landfalling storms affected the Lesser Antilles, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Cuba, Bermuda, Louisiana, Georgia, Florida, and the New England states. This destructive season should be seen against a backdrop of the American Revolution, which involved hostilities in the Caribbean by the fleets of Spain, France and the Dutch Republic operating against British fleets with the concomitant greater risk of loss of life due to increased exposure of warships and transports to hazardous weather conditions. This critical coincidence is at least partially responsible for the unprecedented losses of life inflicted, especially in the three fierce hurricanes that struck in
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    1942 Atlantic hurricane season

    The 1942 Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 16, 1942, and lasted until October 31, 1942. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1942 season was near average. A few storms of note were two Category 1 storms striking north and central Texas and a Category 2 hitting Belize. Most of the rest of the season's storms stayed out to sea. Only 1 major hurricane formed during the season and the only other landfall was a weak tropical storm that struck the Outer Banks as a tropical depression. A tropical storm was first observed on August 17 near the Yucatán Peninsula. It tracked northwestward, where it slowly intensified to a minimal hurricane. The hurricane made landfall on the eastern Texas coast on August 21 at Crystal Beach near the entrance to Galveston Bay, and dissipated two days later over extreme southern Missouri. The hurricane caused around $600,000 in damage. The precursor to Hurricane Two, a tropical wave, developed into a tropical storm on August 21 over the Windward Islands. This tropical storm moved westward over the Caribbean Sea, strengthening to a hurricane on August 25 south of
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    1959 Pacific hurricane season

    1959 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Patsy
    The 1959 Pacific hurricane season featured the first two Category 5 hurricanes ever recorded in the Eastern and Central Pacific basins. During the season, 15 storms developed, 5 of those became hurricanes, and 3 of those became major hurricanes. The strongest of the storms was Hurricane Patsy, which was a Category 5 but luckily stayed out to sea. Patsy reached 170 miles per hour (270 km/h) winds. The deadliest storm of the season was Hurricane Fifteen, which made landfall in Mexico at Category 5 and killed 1,800 people. A 55 mph (75 km/h) tropical storm was first located on June 9 while west of Mexico. It did not strengthen any further as it paralleled the Mexican coast. It made landfall near Los Mochis, Mexico on June 12 and dissipated shortly afterward. There are no reports of damages or deaths due to the storm. On June 25, a small tropical storm developed off the coast of Mexico. It attained winds of 45 mph at its peak. It later dissipated on June 27. After a month of inactivity, a tropical storm formed several thousands of miles south-west of the southern tip of Baja California. This tropical storm began moving north-westwards while keeping its intensity. Winds peaked at 50
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    1967 Pacific hurricane season

    1967 Pacific hurricane season

    The 1967 Pacific hurricane season started on June 1 and ended on November 30, 1967. The season was of little note except for Hurricanes Katrina and Olivia. Katrina made landfall on the Baja Peninsula, killing at least 60 and make 2,500 homeless. Olivia made landfall on the Eastern side of the Baja Peninsula as a major hurricane, becoming only one of two storms to do that. Hurricane/Typhoon Sarah formed in the Central Pacific and reached category 1 strength before crossing over to the Western Pacific. On May 18, the first tropical depression of the season formed. It remained weak and dissipated the next day far out at sea. The first tropical storm of the season formed on June 7 at peak intensity far off from any landmass. It remained at peak intensity until it was stopped being tracked on the 10th. On June 16, a tropical storm was identified south of Mexico with winds of 45 mph (70 kilometres (43 mi) /h). It weakened as it approached the Mexican mainland and dissipated later that day. The first hurricane of the season, Hurricane Carlotta formed on June 23 near the Mexican coast. The storm gradually strengthened and became the next day. The storm stayed as a hurricane until June
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    1970 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1970 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Strongest storm: 1970 Bhola cyclone
    • Tropical cyclones: 1970 Bhola cyclone
    The 1970 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but tropical cyclones in the North Indian Ocean tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. The 1970 season saw a total of seven cyclonic storms, of which three developed into severe cyclonic storms. The Bay of Bengal was more active than the Arabian Sea during 1970, with all of the three severe cyclonic storms in the season forming there. Unusually, none of the storms in the Arabian Sea made landfall this year. The most significant storm of the season was the Bhola cyclone, which formed in the Bay of Bengal and hit Bangladesh on November 12. The storm killed at least 300,000 and possibly even over half a million people, making it the deadliest tropical cyclone in recorded history. A low pressure area that developed over the southern Andaman Sea late in April moved north into the Bay of Bengal becoming the first depression of the year on May 2. The depression intensified under the influence of a high-level anticyclone and became a cyclonic storm the next day. The storm then turned to the northeast and strengthened into a severe cyclonic storm on May 4. Soon after this, it peaked with winds of
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    1970 Pacific typhoon season

    1970 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Joan
    The 1970 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1970, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between June and December. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1970 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west Pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 27 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 24 became tropical storms. 12 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 7 reached super typhoon strength. Super Typhoon Olga,
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    1972 Pacific hurricane season

    1972 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Celeste
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Celeste
    The 1972 Pacific hurricane season was an ongoing event in tropical cyclone meteorology. There were few notable storms this year. No one was killed and storm effects were generally not serious. The most notable systems were Hurricane Celeste and Joanne. Celeste was the strongest storm of the season, and caused heavy damage to Johnston Atoll. Hurricane Joanne brought gale force the Continental United States and caused flooding in Arizona and northern Mexico. The only other system to directly impact land was Hurricane Annette. The season began on May 15, 1972 in the east Pacific, and on June 1, 1972 in the central Pacific. It ended on November 30, 1972. These dates conventionally delimit the period of time when tropical cyclones form in the east Pacific Ocean. This season had a below average number of storms. There were twenty tropical cyclones, four of which were in the central Pacific. Of those, four were tropical storms, eight were hurricanes, and four were major hurricanes that reached Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. In the central Pacific, two tropical storms and two tropical depressions formed. One of the depressions and one of the storms crossed the
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    1974 Pacific hurricane season

    1974 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Fifi
    The 1974 Pacific hurricane season featured one of the most active periods of tropical cyclones on record with five storms existing simultaneously. The season officially started May 15 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeast Pacific Ocean. With seventeen storms, this season was slightly above average. At eleven, the number of hurricanes was also above average. In the central Pacific, one tropical storm formed. Very unusually, on August 26 there were six systems active: Ione, Olive, Kirsten, Lorraine, Joyce, and Maggie. Olive was a Central Pacific storm and had weakened to a tropical depression by this time. The other five were of at least tropical storm intensity simultaneously and remained so until 06Z Aug 27. Five storms were also active 18Z Aug 23-06Z Aug 24. The overall activity of the 1974 season was near normal, with 25 tropical cyclones developing. Of these storms, 18 were named, 11 became hurricanes and 4 reached major hurricane status. Although the overall number of storms was normal, an exceptionally active period
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    1978 Pacific hurricane season

    1978 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Fico
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Fico
    The 1978 Pacific hurricane season officially began May 15, 1978, in the eastern Pacific, June 1, 1978 in the central Pacific, and officially ended 30 November 1978. These dates conventionally delimit the period of time when tropical cyclones form in the eastern north Pacific Ocean. Activity this year was slightly above average, with eighteen named storms forming. Five of those were tropical storms, thirteen were hurricanes, and six were major hurricanes that reached Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. In the Central Pacific, a tropical depression and a major hurricane formed. Aletta made landfall in western Mexico as a tropical storm on May 31. Bud formed on June 17 and dissipated 3 days later without affecting land. Bud was the first East Pacific Tropical Cyclone to receive a male name. Carlotta was a category 4 hurricane that did not affect land. At the time, it was the third strongest June storm, after 1973's Ava and 1976's Annette. Daniel was a strong category three hurricane which did not affect land. It made 1978 the first season with multiple major hurricanes in June at the time; 2010 would follow. Existed between June 30 and July 2. Emilia was a
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    1981 Pacific hurricane season

    1981 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Norma
    The 1981 Pacific hurricane season was a moderately active Pacific hurricane season. The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific basin and June 1 in the central Pacific basin. Both basins' seasons ended on November 30; these dates conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The first tropical cyclone of the season was designated on May 30, and the final storm of the season, Hurricane Otis, dissipated on October 30. The season produced fifteen named storms and a total of eight hurricanes, which was near normal. However, the total of one major hurricane was below the average of three. The strongest tropical cyclone of the season was Hurricane Norma, which was a powerful Category 3 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale. The storm caused six deaths – five in Texas, and one in Mexico, due to severe flooding. Additionally, the storm caused $74 million (1981 USD) in damage, which is credited to significant crop damage and many tornadoes. However, the deadliest tropical cyclone of the season was Tropical Storm Lidia, which made two landfalls – one on the southern tip of the Baja California
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    1983 Atlantic hurricane season

    1983 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Alicia
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Alicia
    The 1983 Atlantic hurricane season was the least active Atlantic hurricane season in 53 years, during which only four tropical storms formed. The season officially began on June 1, 1983, and lasted until November 30, 1983. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most storms form in the Atlantic basin. The season had very little activity, with only seven tropical depressions, four of which reached tropical storm strength or higher. This led to the lowest Accumulated Cyclone Energy count since 1950, but not since 1900. The season began later than normal; the first tropical depression formed on July 29 and the second on July 31. Neither tropical depression strengthened and they dissipated soon thereafter. Hurricane Alicia formed as Tropical Depression Three on August 15, quickly intensified into a hurricane on August 16 and made landfall in Texas on August 18. Alicia caused over $3 billion in damage in Texas. Hurricane Barry formed on August 25, crossed Florida and strengthened into a hurricane. Barry made landfall near Brownsville, Texas and dissipated over land on August 30. Hurricane Chantal, the third of three hurricanes in 1983, formed on September 10. It
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    1983 Pacific typhoon season

    1983 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Kim
    The 1983 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Tropical storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. The season had a late start, as the first system did not form until late June for the first time since 1973. The last tropical cyclone dissipated in mid-December. A total of 26 tropical depressions formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 23 became tropical storms. Of the 26 tropical cyclones, one formed in June, three formed in July, six formed in August, three formed in September, seven formed in October, five formed in November, and two formed in December. Twelve storms reached typhoon intensity, of which four reached super typhoon
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    1985 Pacific hurricane season

    1985 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Waldo
    The 1985 Pacific hurricane season was the second most active Pacific hurricane season on record. It officially started on May 15, 1985 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 1985 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1985. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. At the time, the 1985 season was the most active on record in the eastern north Pacific, with 26 tropical cyclones forming. Of those, 24 were named, 13 reached hurricane intensity and 8 became major hurricanes by reaching Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. In addition, three additional systems formed in the central north Pacific, of which one became a hurricane and another became a typhoon before re-crossing the dateline. Despite the activity, there were few notable systems this year. The only cyclone to make landfall was Hurricane Waldo, which caused damage in Mexico and 1 indirect death in Kansas. Elsewhere, surf from Hurricane Pauline caused minor damage in Hawaii. Hurricane Nele resulted in disruption in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, while Hurricane Ignacio caused scattered showers on
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    1991 Pacific typhoon season

    1991 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Thelma
    The 1991 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1991, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1991 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 32 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 31 became tropical storms. 17 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 5 reached super typhoon strength. On March 17, a cluster
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    1992 Pacific typhoon season

    1992 Pacific typhoon season

    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Omar
    The 1992 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1992. Despite this, most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the International Date Line. Storms that formed north of the equator and east of the Date Line in 1992 are part of the 1992 Pacific hurricane season. In the West Pacific basin, tropical depressions have the "W" suffix added to their number. Storms reaching tropical storm intensity of 34 kn (63 km/h) sustained winds were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). Storms with sustained winds exceeding 64 knots (119 km/h) are called typhoons, while intense typhoons with sustained winds exceeding 130 knots (240 km/h) are designated super typhoons by the JTWC (see tropical cyclone scales). Furthermore, tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine Area of Responsibility are assigned an internal name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and
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    1993 Pacific typhoon season

    1993 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Koryn
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Koryn
    The 1993 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 1993, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 1993 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin were assigned a name by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names. 40 tropical cyclones formed this year in the Western Pacific, of which 30 became tropical storms. 15 storms reached typhoon intensity, of which 3 reached super typhoon strength. Tropical Depression 01W
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    1998 Atlantic hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Mitch
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Mitch
    The 1998 Atlantic hurricane season was an active Atlantic hurricane season that produced fourteen tropical cyclones and tropical storms, ten hurricanes, and three major hurricanes. It officially started on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean. The first tropical cyclone, Tropical Storm Alex, developed on July 27, and the season's final storm, Hurricane Nicole, dissipated on December 1. The most intense hurricane, Mitch, is tied with Hurricane Dean for the seventh most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded as well as the second deadliest Atlantic hurricane in recorded history. Additionally, the system dropped tremendous amounts of rainfall in Guatemala, becoming the wettest tropical cyclone at that location on record. The season was the first to feature a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale since Hurricane Andrew in the 1992 season. Several storms made landfall or directly affected land. Hurricane Bonnie made landfall in southeastern North Carolina as a Category 2 hurricane in late August killing five people and causing about $1 billion (1998 USD)
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    1998 Pacific hurricane season

    1998 Pacific hurricane season

    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Isis
    The 1998 Pacific hurricane season was a moderately active Pacific hurricane season with seven tropical cyclones directly affecting land. The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1 in the central Pacific, and ended on November 30; these dates conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The first tropical cyclone developed on June 11, which was about ten days later than the normal start of the season. The final storm of the year, Hurricane Madeline, dissipated on October 20. Storm activity in the Central Pacific Ocean was low, with just one tropical depression forming in the basin. Two tropical cyclones from the Eastern Pacific, Darby and Estelle, also entered the central Pacific, with the former entering as a hurricane. The season produced 13 named storms, which was slightly below the average of 16 named storms per season. However, the total of nine hurricanes during the season was equal to the average, and the total of six major hurricanes surpassed the average. The most notable tropical cyclone of the year was Hurricane Isis which killed fourteen people when it made landfall on
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    1999 Pacific hurricane season

    1999 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Dora
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Dora
    The 1999 Pacific hurricane season was a well below-average Pacific hurricane season with nine developing tropical cyclones recorded. The season officially began on May 15 in the Eastern Pacific, and on June 1 in the Central Pacific, and ended on November 30; these dates conventionally delimit the period during which most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific basin. The first tropical cyclone of the season, Hurricane Adrian, developed on June 18, while the final storm of the season, Tropical Storm Irwin, dissipated on October 11. No storms developed in the Central Pacific during the season. However, two storms from the Eastern Pacific, Dora and Eugene, entered the basin, with the former entering as a hurricane. The season produced fourteen tropical cyclones and nine named storms, which was well below the average of sixteen named storms per season. However, the total of six hurricanes and two major hurricanes during the season was near the averages of eight and three, respectively. The deadliest tropical cyclone of the year was Hurricane Greg which killed ten people when it made landfall on southern Baja California in early September. The precursor to the hurricane
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    1999–00 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    1999–00 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Leon-Eline
    The 1999-00 South-West Indian Ocean tropical cyclone season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation and ran from November 1, 1999 to April 30, 2000 in the South-West Indian Ocean, with the exception of Mauritius and the Seychelles, for which it ran until May 15. Cyclone Leon-Eline was one of the most notable storms of the season, existing for 22 days while transversing the whole southern Indian Ocean, and causing severe flooding in South Africa, Mozambique and Madagascar. On December 24, 1999, a low formed about 240 nmi (440 km) southeast of Diego Garcia and moved westward. The disturbance was upgraded to tropical depression status on December 25, 1800 hours (UTC), and upgraded to moderate tropical storm intensity on December 26 and named Astride. It moved to the west south-west and reached severe tropical storm intensity on December 27, 0000 (UTC) with 10-min MSW near 50 knots (93 km/h), located 190 nmi (350 km) north-east of St. Brandon. Astride slowed its forward motion while intensifying (JTWC estimated 1-min winds of 65 kt). Astride began to slowly weaken from early December 28. On December 30 Astride intensified and was upgraded again to severe tropical
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    2000 Pacific hurricane season

    2000 Pacific hurricane season

    • Strongest storm: Hurricane Carlotta
    • Tropical cyclones: Hurricane Carlotta
    The 2000 Pacific hurricane season was an event in tropical cyclone meteorology. There were few notable storms this year. Tropical Storms Miriam, Norman, and Rosa all made landfall in Mexico with minimal impact. Hurricane Daniel briefly threatened the US state of Hawaii while weakening. Hurricane Carlotta was the strongest storm of the year and the second strongest June hurricane in recorded history. It killed 18 people when it sank a freighter. The 2000 Pacific hurricane season officially started on May 15, 2000 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1, 2000 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 2000. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. This season had an above average number of storms. However, it had a below average number of hurricanes and major hurricanes. There were also two tropical depressions that did not reach storm strength. In the central Pacific, two tropical storms formed. The first storm formed on May 22 and the last storm dissipated on November 8. A tropical wave crossed Central America and entered the Gulf of Tehuantepec on May 20. Deep convection developed near a
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    2002–03 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2002–03 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

    The 2002-03 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation. It started on November 15, 2002 and ended on April 30, 2003. For Mauritius and the Seychelles, the season continued until May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion. The first report of a tropical disturbance was released on August 27 in a Tropical Weather Outlook by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The disturbance was located about 80 nmi (150 km) ENE of Diego Garcia and was accompanied by an LLCC and deep convection. Development was poor by the next Tropical Weather Outlook. The disturbance remained disorganized and was considered no longer a threat or further development by September 4. However, on that day, at 1241 UTC, a QuickScat showed a weak circulation near Diego Garcia and on September 5, the JTWC released an interim Tropical Weather Outlook to upgrade its potential to fair. Infrared imagery and a mid-level analysis showed a well-organized mid-level
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    2004 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    2004 North Indian Ocean cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Cyclone Agni
    The 2004 North Indian Ocean cyclone season had no bounds, but cyclones tend to form between April and December, with peaks in May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northern Indian Ocean. In 2004, RSMC New Delhi identified one Very Severe Cyclonic Storm and three Severe Cyclonic Storms. Out of the four cyclonic storms, three developed over the Arabian Sea and only one formed over the Bay of Bengal. Joint Typhoon Warning Center identified one more tropical cyclones(4A) in Arabian sea. The notable features is that the Arabian sea was more active than the Bay of Bengal during 2004. The Arabian sea severe cyclone “Agni” in November formed very close to the equator near latitude 1.5N. Cyclogenesis over the north Indian Ocean at such low latitudes has not occurred in the past. The coexistence of cyclonic disturbances over the Arabian sea and the Bay of Bengal as occurred in June 2004 is also not common. This had however helped the progress of the southwest monsoon across the country during the onset phase. This was the first North Indian season that featured the naming of storms, though only two storms received
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    2006 Pacific typhoon season

    2006 Pacific typhoon season

    • Strongest storm: Typhoon Yagi
    • Tropical cyclones: Typhoon Chanchu
    The 2006 Pacific typhoon season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2006, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2006 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire West Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones (including tropical depressions) that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines. In storm information below, windspeed advisories differ from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center to the Japan Meteorological Agency as the JTWC uses the
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    2008–09 Australian region cyclone season

    2008–09 Australian region cyclone season

    • Tropical cyclones: Tropical Storm Bernard
    The 2008–09 Australian region cyclone season was an event in the cycle of tropical cyclone formation. It officially started on 1 November 2008, and officially ended on 30 April 2009. The regional tropical cyclone operational plan defines a "tropical cyclone year" separately from a "tropical cyclone season"; the "tropical cyclone year" began on 1 July 2008 and ended on 30 June 2009. The scope of the Australian region is limited to all areas south of the equator, east of 90°E and west of 160°E. This area includes Australia, Papua New Guinea, western parts of the Solomon Islands, East Timor and southern parts of Indonesia. Tropical cyclones in this area are monitored by five Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs): the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Darwin, and Brisbane; TCWC Jakarta in Indonesia; and TCWC Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issues unofficial warnings for the region, designating tropical depressions with the "S" suffix when they form west of 135°E, and the "P" suffix when they form east of 135°E. On 26 September 2008 the New Zealand National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research issued a seasonal forecast for the whole
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