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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Trade union of All Time

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    1

    Visakha Steel Workers Union

    Visakha Steel Workers Union, a trade union of steel workers at Visakhapatnam Steel Plant, in Visakhapatnam, India. VSWU is affiliated with the All India Trade Union Congress. In March 2008 VSWU, contesting union elections in coalition with the CITU-affiliated Steel Plant Employees Union, regained the union recognition at the plant. The AITUC-CITU front won 6,597 votes against 4,361 votes for the INTUC-affiliated Visakha Steel Employees' Congress. The general secretary of VSWU is D. Adinarayana.
    8.00
    8 votes
    2

    Swedish Graphic Workers' Union

    The Swedish Graphic Workers' Union (GF) was a trade union in Sweden. It was founded in 1973 and was merged with Swedish Forest and Wood Workers' Union June 1, 2009 into GS and had by that time 23,000 members. GF represented workers in locations ranging from printing works and newspapers to advertising, web- and media companies and others working in packaging-, envelope- and wallpaper factories. GF was affiliated with the Swedish Trade Union Confederation.
    7.00
    8 votes
    3

    North Wales Quarrymen's Union

    The North Wales Quarrymen's Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It was founded on 27 April 1864 at the Queen's Hotel, Caenarfon after a month of discussions between quarrymen from Dinorwic and other supporters. Initially the union was not led by miners but radical Liberals who later became supporters of David Lloyd George's Cymru Fydd It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1923.
    8.80
    5 votes
    4

    Utility Workers Union of America

    The Utility Workers Union of America (UWUA) is a labor union in the United States. It has a membership of 50,000 and is affiliated with the AFL-CIO. The union has over 50,000 members working in the electric, gas, water, and nuclear industries across the United States. Represents Utility Workers in municipal, as well as publicly traded Utilities. Fields include power generation (power plants), power distribution (transmission and distribution), call/service center employees, as well as natural gas and water utilities.
    6.57
    7 votes
    5
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    8.40
    5 votes
    7

    South Indian Film Artistes' Association

    • Professions represented: Actor
    The South Indian Film Artistes' Association (SIFAA), also known as the Nadigar Sangam, is an Indian organization consisting of film actors and actresses from the Tamil film industry in Tamil Nadu, India. Formed in 1952, the group has organized several events due industry-related issues and, more recently, social issues. The current president of the association is actor R. Sarathkumar.
    6.83
    6 votes
    8
    7.80
    5 votes
    9
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    7.60
    5 votes
    11

    All Ceylon United Motor Workers' Union

    The All Ceylon United Motor Workers Union is a trade union which organises workers in the passenger bus sector in Sri Lanka. It is affiliated to the Ceylon Federation of Labour (CFL). Omnibus transport first began in Sri Lanka as an owner-operated service. There was no regulation, so when more than one bus operated on a single route there was a scramble for the load, which might end in fisticuffs or even stabbings. The setting up of the limited liability omnibus companies by the British around 1940 was the first meaningful step to regularise public passenger transport in this country. The employees were treated abominably: one owner allegedly tied a bus conductor to a tree and spanked the poor man for failing to bring in the targeted collection for the day. Trade union work was an uphill task and members of the Lanka Sama Samaja Party (LSSP) had to proceed in secret, disguising themselves to avoid company thugs. J. Wanigatunga was one of the union agents so deployed. In February 1936 the LSSP was able to take leadership in a spontaneous island-wide 2-day strike of motor workers that took place against the motor laws which provided for the cancellation of driving licences for
    8.75
    4 votes
    12

    Nepal Independent Workers Union

    The Nepal Independent Workers Union (NIWU) was a Nepalese trade union formed in 1979 as the labour wing of Communist Party of Nepal (Marxist-Leninist). It was created following a General Strike in Balaju Industrial District, Kathmandu existed as a separate entity until 1989 when it helped form the General Federation of Nepalese Trade Unions.
    8.75
    4 votes
    13
    8.75
    4 votes
    14

    Shearers and Rural Workers' Union

    The Shearers and Rural Workers' Union is an Australian industrial union that is not registered with the Australian Industrial Relations Commission and is also not affiliated with the Australian Council of Trade Unions. They formed on 1 May 1994 in Victoria when members of the Australian Workers Union split away due to the declining membership of the AWU; the increase in AWU dues; and, a perceived anti-democratic bureaucracy in the AWU.
    6.50
    6 votes
    15

    British Actors' Equity Association

    • Professions represented: Actor
    Equity (formerly known as the British Actors' Equity Association) is the trade union for actors, stage managers and models in the United Kingdom. It was formed in 1930 by a group of West End performers. Equity was the last of the closed shop unions in the UK. This was criticised in 1981 and made illegal in 1988, with the result that it is no longer a requirement that a professional actor be a member of Equity. Equity requires its members to have unique professional names. Like many other British trade unions, Equity operated a closed shop policy - it was not possible for someone to join unless they had had sufficient paid work, and most jobs were reserved for Equity card holders. In order to allow new members to join, there were a limited number of non-card holding jobs on regional productions. Whilst working on these productions, actors held a provisional membership card, and, on completing the requisite number of weeks, could apply for full membership, and thereafter work in the West End, or on film and television. In 1976, Equity introduced a policy of refusing to sell programming to the South African Broadcasting Corporation, an action that led to a virtual blackout of British
    7.40
    5 votes
    16
    7.40
    5 votes
    17

    Amalgamated Marine Workers' Union

    The Amalgamated Marine Workers' Union was a trade union of sailors, firemen and ship-board service personnel which existed in the United Kingdom between 1922 and 1926. It was a merger of the British Seafarers' Union and the National Union of Ship's Stewards, both of which were opposed to the principal trade union in the shipping industry, the National Sailors' and Firemen's Union. At the outset, the AMWU expressed an ambition to replace the NSFU and ultimately to become part of the recently-established Transport and General Workers Union. But a number of factors limited the union's effectiveness. It faced resistance from both the NSFU and the Shipping Federation, which collaborated through the National Maritime Board to control access to employment in the shipping industry. The AMWU also suffered from severe internal divisions. In 1923 and 1925, the AMWU once again found itself unsuccessfully resisting wage reductions. In the latter instance, its effectiveness was limited by the refusal of its general secretary (Joe Cotter) to sign cheques, and the consequent impossibility of accessing union funds. The union also lost ground at this time to the Seamen's Section of the National
    8.50
    4 votes
    18

    Bank and General Workers Union

    The Bank and General Workers Union (BGWU), a former trade union in Trinidad and Tobago, was formed on 17 April 1974 and represented workers in over 60 companies, including all the workers at the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago. It merged with the Bank Employees Union on 21 February 2003 to form the Banking, Insurance and General Workers Union.
    6.33
    6 votes
    19

    Scottish Commercial Motormen's Union

    The Scottish Commercial Motormen's Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1971. The union was founded in 1898 as the Scottish Carters' Association, and was later renamed the Scottish Horse and Motormen's Association. In 1902, its membership stood at only 300, and the union was heavily indebted, but by 1929, it had 10,000 members and a considerable surplus.
    6.33
    6 votes
    20

    Texas Farm Workers Union

    The Texas Farm Workers Union ("TFWU") was established by Antonio Orendain in August 1975, nearly ten years after he began organizing farm workers for the United Farm Workers in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. Orendain worked for Cesar Chavez in the Chicago UFW national grape and lettuce boycott office. After returning to South Texas Orendain left the UFW to devote himself to organizing Texas agricultural workers under a separate banner much like those who founded Obreros Unidos in Wisconsin, and the Farm Labor Organizing Committee in Ohio. It appears that there were conflicts between the United Farm Workers and the Texas Farm Workers Union. In 1975, a group of Rio Grande Valley farmworkers supported the foundation of the TFWU under Orendain's leadership. Because of the tensions between Chavez and Orendain, the union had a difficult time establishing itself. The TFWU faced opposition from the growers and never gained the support of the United Farm Workers Union and the AFL-CIO. Like its California counterpart the United Farm Workers, the TFWU pressed the state of Texas to establish a Texas Agricultural Board. This effort failed in Texas where no Agricultural Board was
    6.33
    6 votes
    21

    Graphical, Paper and Media Union

    The Graphical, Paper and Media Union (GPMU) was a trade union in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland between 1992 and 2005. Having been formed from the merger of SOGAT and the National Graphical Association, it claimed to be the world's largest media union, and had over 200,000 members working in the print, publishing, paper, IT and media industries. The sole General Secretary of the GPMU was Tony Dubbins, the Deputy General Secretary of the GPMU was Tony Burke. Facing a decline in membership, in February 2004, GPMU opened merger negotiations with Amicus. In August 2004, results of a ballot of all members were released, showing 86% of members in favour of merger. The formal merger took place in early 2005, and GPMU became the semi-autonomous Graphical, Paper and Media industrial sector of Amicus. Tony Dubbins became the Deputy General Secretary of Amicus and Tony Burke became Assistant General Secretary of Amicus. Tony Dubbins was also the Chair of TULO. He retired in October, 2008. Amicus merged with the Transport & General Workers Union in May 2007 to form Unite The Union.
    7.20
    5 votes
    22

    Gambia Workers' Union

    The Gambia Workers' Union (GWU) is a trade union centre in The Gambia. It is affiliated with the International Trade Union Confederation.
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    8.25
    4 votes
    24

    Powerloom Workers Union

    Powerloom Workers Union, a trade union of powerloom workers in Andhra Pradesh, India. PWU is affiliated to the All India Trade Union Congress. The president of PWU is S. Mallesham.
    8.25
    4 votes
    25

    Community and Youth Workers' Union

    The Community and Youth Workers Union (CYWU) was a British trade union created in 1938 by ten female voluntary sector workers. It is now a section of the Transport and General Workers' Union. Today its members are mainly made up of youth workers, workers in youth theatre, community education, outdoor education, play workers and personal advisers/mentors. It produces a regular magazine for members, Rapport. It had not authorised any national strike action prior to 2004, although the CYWU is the majority union of the Joint Negotiating Committee (JNC) for youth and community workers. The CYWU voted to join the TGWU at its 2005 Conference. The merger was confirmed on 13 September 2006, following a vote amongst the unions membership (with 82% in favour on a 26% turnout) and approved by the Trades Union Certification Officer on January 8, 2007. The General Secretary of CYWU is Doug Nicholls, who is also is secretary of Trade Unionists Against the EU Constitution (UK). In 2009 the first full history of the union was published Building Rapport: a brief history of the Community and Youth Workers' Union, by Doug NIcholls. This is available from the CYWU section office of Unite the union.
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    8.00
    4 votes
    28

    Starbucks Workers Union

    The Starbucks Workers Union is a union formed by the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) to organize retail employees of Starbucks. The union has members at Starbucks locations in New York City; Chicago; Grand Rapids, Michigan; Cincinnati, Ohio; Quebec City; Bloomington, Minnesota, and Omaha, Nebraska. On May 17, 2004, Starbucks's workers at the 36th and Madison store in midtown Manhattan organized the first Starbucks barista union in the United States. The union drive had its origins in barista's complaints that a starting wage of $7.75 an hour was not a living wage in New York City and that Starbucks refused to guarantee regularity of hours per week. The union has also joined with Global Exchange in calling on Starbucks to purchase at least 5% of the store's coffee from fair trade certified sources. The 12 workers submitted union cards to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) for a certification election. Prior to the election, Starbucks filed an appeal with the NLRB, asking that the election be extended to several stores, not the single store that filed for an election. The NLRB agreed to review the appeal and impound the ballots at the Madison Avenue store. The IWW
    8.00
    4 votes
    29

    National Workers' Union of Afghanistan

    The National Workers' Union of Afghanistan (NUWA) was the sole labour body of Afghanistan, from 1990 until the Mujahideen rose to power in 1992. Previous to 1990 the Central Council of Afghan Trade Unions (CCATU) fulfilled the same role. There are currently no reports of collective bargaining mechanisms, strikes, or other organized industrial activity in the country.
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    6.60
    5 votes
    33
    6.60
    5 votes
    34
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    7.50
    4 votes
    36

    Operative Bricklayers' Society

    The Operative Bricklayers' Society (OBS) was a British New Model Trade Union based in London. The society was founded in 1818 as the London Bricklayers' Society, but by 1829 had developed into a national operative union. By the 1840s the union had about 1,400 members, roughly 2% of the total number of bricklayers in the country at the time. In 1859 the union became embroiled in a dispute with employers over the introduction of a nine-hour working day, and was lead in strike action by George Howell. The OBS was defeated, and subsequently only developed very gradually outside of London. By 1900 the union had 38,830 members, but roughly half were based in London. In 1921 the OBS merged with the Manchester Unity of Operative Bricklayers' Society and the Operative Society of Masons, Quarrymen and Allied Trades of England and Wales to form the Amalgamated Union of Building Trade Workers (AUBTW).
    7.50
    4 votes
    37

    Swedish Forest and Wood Workers' Union

    The Swedish Forest and Wood Workers' Union (Skogs- och Träfacket) was a trade union in Sweden. It had a membership of 55,000 before it was merged with Swedish Graphic Workers' Union to form GS. It was formed in 1998 by the merger of the Swedish Forest Workers' Union, and the Swedish Wood Workers' Union. Skogs- och Träfacket was affiliated with the Swedish Trade Union Confederation.
    7.50
    4 votes
    38

    Inland Revenue Staff Federation

    The Inland Revenue Staff Federation (IRSF) was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The Union was born in the late 19th Century, when a group of tax clerks met together to fight for higher pay, higher status and better conditions. At that time clerks were hired by surveyors of taxes, they were usually employed on a temporary basis, paid low wages and denied sick leave, holidays or promotion. Clerks who asked for better conditions were branded as agitators and sacked. So it took courage when a group of clerks met on January 8, 1892 and agreed a draft constitution to set up the Association of Tax Clerks another of the Federation's parent unions. The Federation was founded on January 1, 1936 with the merger of the Association of Officers of Taxes, the National Association of Assessors and Collectors of Taxes and the Valuation Office Clerical Association. Its Assistant Secretary from 1936 until World War II was future Prime Minister of the United Kingdom James Callaghan. In 1937, the Federation, which represented taxes and collection staff, was joined by valuation staff. The roots of the Federation go back to 1883 and the founding of the London Association of Assessors and Collectors,
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    8.67
    3 votes
    40

    Banking, Insurance and General Workers Union

    The Banking, Insurance and General Workers Union (BIGWU) is a trade union in Trinidad and Tobago. It was formed on 21 February 2003 out of a merger between the Bank and General Workers Union and the Bank Employees Union. The two prior Unions were both formed in 1974. As its name suggests, most of its members are employed in the finance sector but in particular at the First Citizens Bank, the Republic Bank, the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago and credit unions. It is the largest union in finance sector in Trinidad and Tobago.
    10.00
    2 votes
    41

    Municipal Employees' Association

    The Municipal Employees' Association was a British trade union. Founded in 1894 as the London County Council Employees' Protection Association to represent the newly formed London County Council's workers, the union was initially led by William Anderson. In 1899 it was renamed the National Association of County Authority Employees, and it grew considerably after the collapse of the National Municipal Labour Union in 1900, and in 1901 it became the "Municipal Employees Association". In 1907, long-term General Secretary Albin Taylor was dismissed by the union's General Council. The following year, he set up a break-away National Union of Corporation Workers. Nevertheless, by 1910, the Association had 13,500 members. In 1924, the Association merged with the National Union of General Workers and the National Amalgamated Union of Labour to form the National Union of General and Municipal Workers.
    10.00
    2 votes
    42

    National Union of Ships' Clerks, Grain Weighers and Coalmeters

    The National Union of Ships' Clerks, Grain Weighers and Coalmeters was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The union was in existence by 1912, at which time it had branches in central London, Grays, Millwall, Southampton, Surrey Docks and Tilbury. At the time, it was based in Plaistow and its secretary was G. N. Richmond. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1922.
    10.00
    2 votes
    43

    Telecommunications Workers Union

    The Telecommunications Workers Union (TWU) is a trade union in Canada for people working for telephone and cable companies. Although the TWU has members from Shaw Cable in the Vancouver area of British Columbia, Canada, the majority of TWU members are employees of Telus (formerly BC Tel in British Columbia). Labour organization at BC Tel (at the time called the New Westminster and Burrard Inlet Telephone Company) began when a group of Vancouver linemen and telephone workers met in the fall of 1901 and decided to organize as a branch of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. This branch became chartered as IBEW Local 213 and branches were soon formed among telephone workers in New Westminster and Victoria. The entirely female operator staff joined in 1902 in what was one of the earliest successful efforts to organize women workers in Vancouver. Strike action in this year, supported finally by Vancouver's business community exasperated with the continuing instability of service and stubbornness of the company's negotiating position, succeeded in bringing formal recognition to the union, sick pay and pay increases for the workers and several other benefits. Further
    10.00
    2 votes
    44
    6.40
    5 votes
    45
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    7.25
    4 votes
    49

    Barbados Workers' Union

    The Barbados Workers' Union is a trade union in Barbados. It was established in October, 1941. It has 25,000 members and represents them directly, negotiating with individual companies in each sector. LeRoy Trotman, the general secretary, is a former president of the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions.
    8.33
    3 votes
    50

    Free Workers' Union of Germany

    The Free Workers' Union of Germany (German: Freie Arbeiter Union Deutschlands; FAUD) was an anarcho-syndicalist trade union in Germany. It stemmed from the Free Association of German Trade Unions (FDVG) which combined with the Ruhr region's Freie Arbeiter Union on September 15, 1919. The FAUD was involved in the revolution in Germany from 1918–1923, and continued to be involved in the German labor movement after the FAUD began to decline in 1923. After 1921, the FAUD added an "AS" to their name, signifying a full transition from simple syndicalism to anarcho-syndicalism. This also led to further difficulties between the intellectual elites of the FAUD (AS), such as Rudolf Rocker, and the rank and file workers, mostly in the Ruhr, who were more worried about "bread and butter" issues than political activities. These workers, the majority of the FAUD-(AS) members, formed the Gelsenkircherichtung (Gelsenkirche tendency) within the movement, and given the movements federalist structure, began to drift away from the FAUD-(AS) intellectually and organizationally. Eventually, those workers who had joined during the revolution left the movement and the remaining FAUD-(AS) members came from
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Swedish Municipal Workers' Union

    Swedish Municipal Workers' Union

    The Swedish Municipal Workers' Union, Svenska Kommunalarbetareförbundet, is the largest trade union in Sweden with 570 000 members as of 2005, it was created 1910. It is commonly referred to as Kommunal ("Municipal"). The majority of members are employed by varying local level municipalities. Farm workers and co-operatives are also commonly found in this union. Some professions that this union represents are: The union leader since 1996 is Ylva Thörn. As of 2005, 80% of the union's members are female. A third is under 30 years of age. This is attributed to the representation of welfare jobs such as child and elderly care workers. In recent history, this union has called two major strikes. Kommunal is a member of International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF), International Union of Food, Agricultural, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers' Association (IUF) and Public Services International (PSI).
    8.33
    3 votes
    53

    Moroccan Workers' Union

    The Moroccan Workers' Union (UMT) is the oldest national trade union center in Morocco. It was formed in 1955. With a membership of 306,000 the UMT represents workers in both the private and public sectors of the economy. In 1960 the General Union of Moroccan Workers (UGTM) split from the UMT. In 1963 the UMT itself lapsed its membership in the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, after the formation of the All-African Trade Union Federation, as a result of the AATUF's opposition to African membership in non-African organisations. In 1990 the UMT re-affiliated itself to the ICFTU (now the International Trade Union Confederation).
    6.20
    5 votes
    54
    6.20
    5 votes
    55
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    National Socialist Industrial Workers Union

    National Socialist Industrial Workers Union

    National Socialist Industrial Workers Union (Swedish: Nationalsocialistiska Industriarbetarförbundet, NSIAF) was the trade union wing of the National Socialist Workers Party (NSAP) in Sweden. In 1938 NSIAF changed name to Swedish-Socialist Industrial Workers Union (Svensksocialistiska Industriarbetarförbundet, SSIAF). SSIAF was active during the hotel workers strike that year. It credited itself with having 30% higher subsidies to striking workers than the mainstream LO. Later it changed name to Trade Union Struggle Organization of Sweden (Sveriges Fackliga Kamporganisation).
    9.50
    2 votes
    57

    National Workers' Union of Mali

    The National Workers' Union of Mali (UNTM) is a national trade union center in Mali. The UNTM, formed in 1963, initially was closely supervied by the Keïta and Traoré regimes. However, in the 1990s the relationship between the union and government deteriorated. In 1997 the police occupied the UNTM headquarters and sealed the general secretary's office. The UNTM is affiliated with the International Trade Union Confederation.
    9.50
    2 votes
    58
    Colored national union

    Colored national union

    The Colored National Labor Union arrived shortly after the development of the National Labor Union, which happened to be the first major organization founded by Andrew Cameron in 1866. The National Labor Union was dedicated with helping unions such as construction and other skilled groups and even sometimes towards farmers. At this point in time African Americans were struggling to be noticed and taken seriously in the work field and in society they felt that if they started their own national union it would help their position in society because they were not given any help from the National Labor Union. The only thing that the National Union offered to African Americans was to encourage them to organize and separate that could be affiliated with the National Labor Union, but this plan was clearly not designed to help with racial unity because it left black workers only fighting for an entry into the union. In 1869, African Americans came together as one to form the Colored National Labor Union and appointed Isaac Myers as their president, Myers stated that the CNLU was a "safeguard for the colored man…the white and color must come together and work." Unfortunately, the CNLU was
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    7.00
    4 votes
    61
    International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union

    International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union

    • Industry: Clothing
    • Professions represented: Seamstress
    The International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union was once one of the largest labor unions in the United States, one of the first U.S. unions to have a primarily female membership, and a key player in the labor history of the 1920s and 1930s. The union, generally referred to as the "ILGWU" or the "ILG," merged with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union in 1995 to form the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE). UNITE merged with the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union (HERE) in 2004 to create a new union known as UNITE HERE. The two unions that formed UNITE in 1995 represented only 250,000 workers between them, down from the ILGWU's peak membership of 450,000 in 1969. The ILGWU was founded in 1900 in New York City by seven local unions, with a few thousand members between them. The union grew rapidly in the next few years but began to stagnate as the conservative leadership favored the interests of skilled workers, such as cutters. This did not sit well with the majority of immigrant workers, particularly Jewish workers with a background in Bundist activities in Tsarist Russia, or with Polish and Italian workers, many of whom had
    8.00
    3 votes
    62

    National Amalgamated Stevedores' and Dockers' Society

    The National Amalgamated Stevedores and Dockers (NASD), sometimes referred to as the National Amalgamated Stevedores' and Dockers' Society, was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The Amalgamated Stevedores' Labour Protection League was formed in 1872. It was involved in the negotiations which led to the formation of the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1922, but its members voted not to join the amalgamation. Instead it amalgamated with disaffected members of the Amalgamated Society of Watermen, Lightermen and Bargemen who were unhappy about that union's participation in the formation of the T&G to form the National Amalgamated Stevedores, Lightermen, Watermen and Dockers. In 1925 the watermen and lightermen considered joining the T&G, but instead decided to form their own union, the Watermen, Lightermen, Tugmen and Bargemen's Union. When this was formed in 1927 the remaining part of the union renamed itself the National Amalgamated Stevedores and Dockers. The NASD had a longstanding rivalry with the T&G, but finally amalgamated with it in 1982.
    8.00
    3 votes
    63

    National Union of Ship's Stewards

    The National Union of Ship's Stewards, Cooks, Butchers and Bakers was the principal trade union for service personnel serving aboard British merchant ships between 1909 and 1921. It was formed in Liverpool in 1909 by Joe Cotter, a former Cunard steward. Over the years which followed it developed a strong following in the liner ports of Southampton, Glasgow, London, Bristol and Hull. In 1911 the union supported the seamen's strikes which broke out in all major British ports. In 1921, the National Maritime Board imposed wage reductions for marine workers with the support and assistance of the principal seamen's union, the National Sailors' and Firemen's Union. The National Union of Ship's Stewards refused to endorse this move and instead supported attempts to resist the reductions. Much weakened by these efforts, the Stewards' Union amalgamated at the end of 1921 with the British Seafarers' Union to form the Amalgamated Marine Workers' Union.
    8.00
    3 votes
    64

    Workers' Union of Ireland

    The Workers' Union of Ireland (WUI), later the Federated Workers' Union of Ireland, was an Irish trade union formed in 1924. In 1990, it merged with the Irish Transport and General Workers Union to form the Services, Industrial, Professional and Technical Union (SIPTU). The WUI was formed in 1924 as a consequence of the clashes between James Larkin and the incumbent leadership of the ITGWU, subsequent to his 1923 release from Sing Sing and return to Ireland in April 1923. Larkin, still officially general secretary of the ITGWU, clashed bitterly with William X. O'Brien, who had taken leadership of the ITGWU, the Irish Labour Party and the Irish Trade Union Congress. During Larkin's absence at the 1924 Comintern congress (and possibly against his wishes), his brother Peter led their supporters out of the ITGWU, forming the WUI. The new union quickly grew, gaining the allegiance of about two thirds of the Dublin membership of the ITGWU and of a smaller number of rural members. It affiliated to the pro-Soviet Red International of Labour Unions, but during the 1930s gradually entered the mainstream of the Irish trade union movement, being admitted to the Dublin Trades Council in 1936
    8.00
    3 votes
    65

    File Grinders' Society

    The File Grinders' Society was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1975.
    6.75
    4 votes
    66

    Gas Workers Union, Local 18007

    The Gas Workers Union, Local 18007 is a labor organization in the city of Chicago, Illinois. Local 18007 is the exclusive bargaining agent for approximately 900 field and support employees of the regulated public utility Peoples Gas (formerly Peoples Gas Light and Coke Company, Peoples Energy). Established in 1855, Peoples Gas is the main supplier of natural gas service to approximately 830,000 residential, commercial and industrial customers in Chicago. Ownership of Peoples Gas was acquired by the Integrys Energy Group holding company on February 21, 2007. The employment duties of Local 18007 members include responding to natural gas emergencies, maintainence and repair of over 4,300 miles of gas main and other utility infrastructure, and regulatory compliance tasks. The Gas Workers Union, Local 18007 was formed and affiliated with the American Federation of Labor (now AFL-CIO) on March 19, 1928. The organization joined the Building Service Employees International Union (BSEIU, now SEIU) by charter on February 14, 1964. A jurisdiction agreement between the Service Employees International Union and the Utility Workers Union of America (UWUA) led to Local 18007 joining the UWUA by
    6.75
    4 votes
    67

    Major League Baseball Players Association

    • Professions represented: Baseball player
    The Major League Baseball Players Association (or MLBPA) is the union of professional major-league baseball players. The MLBPA was not the first attempt to unionize baseball players. Earlier attempts had included: The MLBPA was created in 1953. In 1966, the union hired Marvin Miller from the United Steel Workers of America to head the organization, serving as Executive Director until 1983. In 1968, Miller negotiated the first collective bargaining agreement (CBA) with the team owners, which raised the minimum salary from $6,000 to $10,000 per year. The 1970 CBA included arbitration to resolve disputes. In 1972 the major leagues saw their first player strike, in opposition to the owners' refusal to increase player pension funds. In 1974, when owner Charlie Finley failed to make a $50,000 payment into an insurance annuity as called for in Catfish Hunter's contract, the MLBPA took the case to arbitration. The arbitrator ruled that Hunter could be a free agent. During Miller's tenure, base salaries, pension funds, licensing rights and revenues were increased, laying the groundwork that helped create what is widely considered one of the strongest unions in the country. Miller challenged
    6.75
    4 votes
    68

    Scottish Farm Servants' Union

    The Scottish Farm Servants' Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The union was registered in 1913 with a membership of 7,477, increasing to 10,817 in 1926. The union's secretary in 1919 was J. F. Duncam, and its office was in Aberdeen. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1933.
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    6.75
    4 votes
    70

    Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union

    The Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union (AEEU) was a British trade union. It merged with the MSF to form Amicus in 2001. The history of the union can be traced back to the formation of the "Old Mechanics" of 1826, which grew into the Amalgamated Society of Engineers in 1851. Many local and regional unions joined the ASE in subsequent years and in 1920, after the acquisition of nine fresh member unions, the name of the organisation was changed to the Amalgamated Engineering Union. The AEU continued to grow and absorb smaller unions. Its largest membership growth came during the Second World War when its all-male membership voted to admit women for the first time and 100,000 joined almost immediately. However, the AEU also lost its overseas branches in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, who became independent unions. The AEU merged with the foundry workers union NUFW in 1967 and the draughtsmen's union DATA in 1971 to form the Amalgamated Union of Engineering Workers, AUEW. That merger was torn apart by political and industrial differences between the blue- and white-collar sections and the former DATA became Technical, Administrative and Supervisory Section, TASS
    9.00
    2 votes
    71

    Grimsby Steam and Diesel Fishing Vessels Engineers' and Firemen's Union

    The Grimsby Steam and Diesel Fishing Vessels Engineers' and Firemen's Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The union was affiliated to the National Federation of Enginemen, Stokers and Kindred Trade Societies. The union's membership was recorded as 1,232 in 1912, declining to 809 in 1926. The fishing industry based in Grimsby, once the largest fishing port in the world, declined dramatically towards the end of the 20th century. The union merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1976.
    9.00
    2 votes
    72

    Swedish Food Workers' Union

    The Swedish Food Workers' Union (LIVS) is a trade union in Sweden. It has a membership of 48,000 (January 1, 2006) and is affiliated with the Swedish Trade Union Confederation.
    9.00
    2 votes
    73

    Watermen, Lightermen, Tugmen and Bargemen's Union

    The Watermen, Lightermen, Tugmen and Bargemen's Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The union was formed in 1925 when the watermen and lightermen belonging to the National Amalgamated Stevedores, Lightermen, Watermen and Dockers decided to secede and form their own union. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1971.
    9.00
    2 votes
    74

    General Workers' Union of Saguia el-Hamra and Río de Oro

    Sahrawi Trade Union, also known as UGTSARIO, (Spanish abbreviation for Union General de Trabajadores de Saguia el Hamra y Río de Oro) is the labor organization of the Polisario Front. While started to work in 1973 (before the Spanish withdrawal from Western Sahara), its official foundation was in 1975. Initially an important part of POLISARIO, as much of the Sahrawis who joined the movement in the first years were Fos Bucraa workers, its importance has diminished as a result of the mass exodus of Sahrawis, mostly in the 1975-76 period, at the beginning of the Western Sahara War. There is little need for a labor union in the refugee camps of Tindouf, Algeria, where unemployment is near total, and what work exists is organized by the camp administration. The movement therefore appears largely dormant in its labor union role until an independent Western Sahara would provide it with a normally functioning labor market again. It remains a part of the POLISARIO structure, though, and has internal representation at several levels. The general secretary (elected in the UGTSARIO congresses) is also member of the Polisario Front National Committee. The organization is directed by the
    5.80
    5 votes
    75

    Andorran Workers' Union

    The Andorran Workers' Union is a Trade union in the Principality of Andorra. It was established in 1990, and claimed several hundred members. Its current status is unknown.
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    7.67
    3 votes
    77

    Confederation of All Indonesian Workers' Union

    The Confederation of All Indonesian Workers' Union (KSPSI) is a national trade union center in Indonesia. It was formed from the All-Indonesia Union of Workers, which was the only legally registered trade union centre in Indonesia during the Suharto era.
    7.67
    3 votes
    78

    Directors Guild of Great Britain

    • Professions represented: Film Director
    The Directors Guild of Great Britain (DGGB) is a professional organization which represents directors across all media, including film, television, theatre, radio, opera, commercials, music videos, corporate film/video and training, documentaries, multimedia and "new technology". It has evolved to become an independent trade union and a non-profit limited company asset-linked to the Directors Guild Trust. The DGGB was founded in 1983 by a group of leading British directors who were dissatisfied by poor representation by technical trade unions. The first meeting was at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in London, where they agreed directors needed an independent voice and that directors would be best represented by their own organization of directors. Guild members have an interest in the broad nature of the directing profession and the guild reflects this diversity in the nature of its members and in their training events. The Guild has championed understanding and respect for the work of directors both within their own industry and throughout the public at large. It sponsors workshops, master classes, seminars, one-on-one mentoring, as well as conducting screenings, gala events and
    7.67
    3 votes
    79

    Directors Guild of Japan

    • Professions represented: Film Director
    The Directors Guild of Japan (日本映画監督協会, Nihon Eiga Kantoku Kyōkai) is a trade union created to represent the interests of film directors in the film industry in Japan. It was founded in 1936, with Minoru Murata serving as the first president, and has continued to this day apart from a period between 1943 and 1949 when it was disbanded at first on orders from the government. It is particularly concerned with protecting the copyright and other rights the director has over the work, defending freedom of expression, and promoting the economic interests of its members. For instance, it has issued protests against efforts to prevent screenings of such films as Yasukuni and The Cove. The Guild also produced the film Eiga kantoku tte nan da (What Is a Film Director?) on the occasion of its 70th anniversary to promote its view that the director possesses the copyright of a film. It also gives out an annual New Directors Award. The current president is Yōichi Sai, and past presidents include Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujirō Ozu, Heinosuke Gosho, Nagisa Ōshima, and Yōji Yamada. Directors Guild of Japan Official site
    7.67
    3 votes
    80

    1199: The National Health Care Workers' Union

    1199: The National Health Care Workers' Union (originally known as the Drug, Hospital, and Health Care Employees Union-District 1199) was a labor union originally founded by Leon J. Davis for pharmacists in New York City in 1932. The union organized all workers in drug stores on an industrial basis, including pharmacists, clerks, and soda jerks. The union led pioneering pickets and strikes against racial segregation and racially discriminatory hiring in Harlem and elsewhere in New York City during the 1930s. Since 1199 was a "left-led" union, its leadership was investigated by the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1948 for Communist "infiltration." 1199 was a tiny local at the time, however, and during the expulsions of large left-led unions from the CIO in the 1940s, 1199 as a local eventually found shelter under the auspices of the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union. In the late 1950s, the drugstore-based union launched large-scale organizing drives at voluntary hospitals in New York, mobilizing a heavily African-American and Puerto Rican-American workforce in the first flush of the postwar Civil Rights Movement. Martin Luther King, Jr. famously described 1199
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    10.00
    1 votes
    82

    Fritz Hansen

    • Professions represented: Product design
    Fritz Hansen, also known as Republic of Fritz Hansen is a Danish furniture design company. Designers who have worked for Fritz Hansen include: Arne Jacobsen (1902–1971), Poul Kjærholm (1929–1980), Hans J. Wegner (1914–2007), and Piet Hein (1905–1996). Fritz Hansen also collaborates with contemporary furniture architects including Hiromichi Konno, Cecilie Manz, and Kasper Salto. Fritz Hansen was founded in 1872, when Fritz Hansen, a Danish carpenter, founded his own furniture company and in 1915 introduced his first chair in steam bent wood. In 1934, Fritz Hansen began his collaboration with Arne Jacobsen resulting in some of the famous, classic icons of Danish Design including the 'Ant' (1952), the 'Series 7' (1955), the 'Grand Prix' (1957) the 'Swan' (1958), and the 'Egg' (1958). Other famous collaborations have resulted in Piet Hein's super-elliptical table from 1968 and in 1982 Fritz Hansen acquired the rights to a major part of Poul Kjærholm's furniture collection. Since the 1980s continuing into the new millennium, Fritz Hansen has added new designs to the collection including the Essay table by Cecilie Manz, T-NO1 by Todd Bracher, RIN by Hiromichi Konno, Plano tables by
    10.00
    1 votes
    83

    Kenya Plantation and Agricultural Workers Union

    The Kenya Plantation and Agricultural Workers Union (KPAWU) is a trade union which represents 200,000 agriculture sector workers (2005 estimate) in Kenya, including tea, coffee, and flower workers. The KPAWU was established in 1963 when several unions were amalgamated. Its head office is in Nakuru, a regional centre. The KPAWU is affiliated to the Central Organization of Trade Unions. The KPAWU is engaged with a number of labour issues. Some of its work is focused on the elimination of child labour in Kenya's agricultural sector. Where plantation owners are seeking Fair Trade certification for their produce, the KPAWU plays a role in the implementation of international labour standards required under the Fair Trade rules. The KPAWU is opposed to mechanization of plantations on the grounds that the introduction of machines is a threat to jobs. For example, in 2006 it threatened strike action against a plantation owner which sought to introduce tea-picking machines.
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    10.00
    1 votes
    85

    National Union of Dock Labourers

    The National Union of Dock Labourers (NUDL) was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It was formed in Glasgow in 1889 but moved its headquarters to Liverpool within a few years and was thereafter most closely associated with Merseyside. The union retained a strong presence in a number of Scottish ports but closed its Glasgow branch in 1910 and was replaced locally by the Scottish Union of Dock Labourers, which was formed during the seamen's and dockers strikes of 1911. In Ireland, the NUDL was largely replaced by the Irish Transport and General Workers' Union after 1908. The NUDL, by this time renamed the National Union of Dock, Riverside and General Workers in Great Britain and Ireland, joined the Transport and General Workers' Union before the end of 1922, although its membership had originally voted not to join the amalgamation earlier in the year. It was therefore not actually a founder member of the TGWU, although it is often falsely credited as being one.
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    10.00
    1 votes
    88

    Sheffield Amalgamated Union of File Trades

    The Sheffield Amalgamated Union of File Trades was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It was formed in 1915 by the merger of the Machine File Forgers' Union and the Machine File Cutters' Union. In 1917, it merged with the hand-file forgers and file hardeners unions. From 1918, it admitted all workers in the file trade who were not eligible to join other unions. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1970.
    10.00
    1 votes
    89
    6.50
    4 votes
    90

    Communication Workers Union

    The Communication Workers Union (CWU) is a trade union in South Africa. It was formed in May, 1996 by the merger of the Post Office Employees Association (PEASA),the Post and Telecommunication Workers Association (POTWA) and the South African Post Telecommunication Employees Association (SAPTEA). CWU is an affiliate of the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU).
    6.50
    4 votes
    91

    Saint Lucia Workers' Union

    The Saint Lucia Workers' Union (WU) is a trade union in Saint Lucia. It is affiliated with the International Trade Union Confederation. Formed in 1939 as the Saint Lucia Workers' Co-operative Union, it was renamed in 1956. It provided a source from which St Lucia's political Parties emerged.
    6.50
    4 votes
    92
    Actors' Equity Association

    Actors' Equity Association

    • Professions represented: Actor
    The Actors' Equity Association (AEA), commonly referred to as Actors' Equity or simply Equity, is an American labor union representing the world of live theatrical performance, as opposed to film and television performance. However, performers appearing on live stage productions without a book or through-storyline (vaudeville, cabarets, circuses) may be represented by the American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA). As of 2010, Equity represented over 49,000 theatre artists and stage managers. At a meeting held at the Pabst Grand Circle Hotel in New York City, on May 26, 1913, Actors' Equity was founded by 112 professional theater actors, who established the association's constitution and elected Francis Wilson as president. Leading up to the establishment of the association, a handful of influential actors—known as The Players—held secret organizational meetings at Edwin Booth's old mansion on Gramercy Square. The Players included Frank Gillmore, who from 1918 to 1929 was the Executive Secretary of Actors' Equity and its eventual President, a position he held from 1929 to 1937. Actors' Equity joined the American Federation of Labor in 1919, and called a strike seeking recognition of
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    8.50
    2 votes
    96
    8.50
    2 votes
    97
    8.50
    2 votes
    98

    Public Works and Constructional Operatives' Union

    The Public Works and Constructional Operatives' Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It was founded in 1889 by John Ward (who remained general secretary throughout its existence) as the Navvies, Bricklayers' Labourers and General Labourers' Union and renamed in 1920. Losing members to other unions throughout the 1920s, its Staffordshire district merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1929 and it disappeared altogether in 1933.
    8.50
    2 votes
    99

    Swedish Paper Workers' Union

    The Swedish Paper Workers' Union (Pappers) is a trade union in Sweden. It has a membership of 25,000 and represents workers in the pulp and paper industry with 70 local affiliates, one at each mill. Pappers is affiliated with the Swedish Trade Union Confederation, and the International Federation of Chemical, Energy, Mine and General Workers' Unions (ICEM).
    8.50
    2 votes
    100

    National Workers' Union

    The National Workers' Union (NWU) is a trade union in Saint Lucia. It was founded in 1973 and has a membership of 3200. The NWU is a general union, and is affiliated with the International Trade Union Confederation.
    7.33
    3 votes
    101

    New Zealand Meat & Related Trades Workers Union

    The New Zealand Meat & Related Trades Workers Union is a trade union in New Zealand. It represents workers in the New Zealand meat industry. This includes workers in Freezing works, Tanneries, Fertiliser plants, halal slaughtermen, small meat processing plants and small goods. The NZ Meat Workers has a membership of 22,000 during peak season, and is affiliated with the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions. It is also directly organised with the Meat Union Aotearoa.
    7.33
    3 votes
    102

    Northern Amalgamated Workers' Union

    The Northern Amalgamated Workers' Union (AWUNZ) is a trade union in New Zealand. It is one of three autonomous unions, with the Southern Amalgamated Workers' Union, and the Central Amalgamated Workers' Union, who operate nationally as the Amalgamated Workers' Union. The AWUNZ is a member of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
    7.33
    3 votes
    103
    7.33
    3 votes
    104
    6.25
    4 votes
    105
    6.25
    4 votes
    106
    7.00
    3 votes
    107

    Confederation of Health Service Employees

    The Confederation of Health Service Employees (COHSE) was a United Kingdom trade union representing workers primarily in the National Health Service. It was founded in 1946 with the merger of the Mental Hospital and Institutional Workers Union and the Hospital and Welfare Services Union, with the aim of having one union to represent workers in the National Health Service on its formation. Major COHSE campaigns include 1948 Nursing Students Pay 1959 Unofficial Overtime ban 1962 Nurses Pay (Lets twist again) 1972-73 Ancillary Pay strikes (Low pay) 1974 Nurses Pay (Halsbury) 1974 ? Private Patients Dispute 1979 Public Sector Pay (Winter of Discontent) 1982 NHS Staff Pay campaign (12%claim) 1988 Nurses Pay (Clinical Grading) 1989-1990 Ambulance Dispute In 1993, COHSE merged with two other trade unions - NUPE (the National Union of Public Employees) and NALGO (the National Association of Local Government Officers) - to form UNISON, the largest public sector trade union in the UK.
    7.00
    3 votes
    108

    Directors Guild of Canada

    • Professions represented: Film Director
    The Directors Guild of Canada is a Canadian labour union, founded in 1962, which represents more than 3,700 professionals from 48 different occupations in the Canadian film and television industry. The DGC represents directors, assistant directors, location managers, production assistants and more.
    7.00
    3 votes
    109

    Free Luxembourger Workers' Union

    The Free Luxembourger Workers' Union (Luxembourgish: Freie Lëtzebuerger Arbechterverband, abbreviated 'FLA') was a national trade union centre in Luxembourg, active between 1945 and 1965. FLA was founded in 1945, after a split in the Lëtzebuerger Arbechterverband (LAV). The founders of FLA revolted against the anti-communist stance of the LAV leadership. Several of the FLA leaders were also members of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Luxembourg, including the FLA president Nic Momper and general secretary Jos Grandgenet. The opponents of FLA accused it of being a communist front. LAV charged that the founding of FLA had been an idea hatched by the communist leader Dominique Urbany. FLA was affiliated to the World Federation of Trade Unions. At the time of its foundation FLA had around 10-11 000 members. As of 1946, FLA was the largest trade union centre amongst blue-collar workers. It was the majority union in metal industries and mines (with the exception of the mines at Dudelange, were LAV retained their prominence). However, it began to decline with the onset of the Cold War. From 1949 onwards the influence of FLA declined. An important factor contributing to this
    7.00
    3 votes
    110

    National Union of Knitwear, Footwear & Apparel Trades

    The National Union of Knitwear, Footwear & Apparel Trades (KFAT) was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It was formed in 1991 through the amalgamation of the National Union of Hosiery and Knitwear Workers and the National Union of the Footwear, Leather and Allied Trades. It organised a range of clothing-related workers and was particularly strong in areas of the East Midlands including Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Northamptonshire, with other members in Lancashire textile regions and the Yorkshire leather-producing industry. The union was notable for its high proportion of female members - roughly half of its members in 2004 being women. In 2004 the union merged with the Iron and Steel Trades Confederation to form Community.
    7.00
    3 votes
    111

    Relief Camp Workers' Union

    The Relief Camp Workers' Union (RCWU) was the union into which the inmates of the Canadian government relief camps were organized in the early 1930s. It was affiliated with the Workers' Unity League, the trade union umbrella of the Communist Party of Canada. The organization is best known for organizing the On-to-Ottawa Trek during the Great Depression. RCWU organizers worked covertly in building the union because they faced being blacklisted the camps, which were run by the Department of National Defence under the command of General Andrew McNaughton. Grievances about the camp system were numerous, from the poor quality food, the lack of leisure facilities (bathrooms and showers), and that the men were only paid twenty cents per day. Consequently, the RCWU's numbers quickly swelled. Much of the organizing drive for the RCWU took place in Vancouver at 52½ West Cordova Street. In addition to serving as the union's headquarters, this is also where men just arriving in town were directed to go before they signed up for relief camp work. Organizers would recruit these men into the union if they were amenable to the idea, and they were often given propaganda to smuggle into the
    7.00
    3 votes
    112

    Transport Workers' Union

    The Transport Workers Union is an Australian trade union representing 85,000 men and women working in aviation, oil, waste management, gas, road transport, passenger vehicles and freight logistics. They are affiliated with the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), the International Transport Federation (ITF) and the Australian Trucking Association (ATA).
    7.00
    3 votes
    113
    5.20
    5 votes
    114
    6.00
    4 votes
    115

    Amalgamated Workers Union

    The Amalgamated Workers Union (AWU) is a trade union in Trinidad and Tobago. The bulk of its members are employed by the Port of Spain City Corporation.
    8.00
    2 votes
    116

    Bahrain Workers' Union

    The Bahrain Workers' Union is a trade union in Bahrain. It is affiliated with the World Federation of Trade Unions, however ICTUR notes that the union does not appear to have any real presence in the country.
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    8.00
    2 votes
    118

    Motion Picture Editors Guild

    • Professions represented: Film Editor
    The Motion Picture Editors Guild (MPEG) is the guild that represents freelance and staff motion picture film and television editors and other post-production professionals and story analysts throughout the United States. The Motion Picture Editors Guild (Union Local 700) is a part of the 500 affiliated local unions of IATSE (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees), a national labor organization with a 115-plus year old history of bargaining for better wages and working conditions for its 104,000-plus members. Currently there are more than 6,000 members of the nearly 75 year old Editors Guild. The MPEG negotiates collective bargaining agreements (union contracts) with producers and major motion picture movie studios and enforces existing agreements with employers involved in post-production. The MPEG provides assistance for securing better working conditions, including but not limited to salary, medical benefits, safety (particularly "turnaround time") and artistic (assignment of credit) concerns. The Society of Motion Picture Film Editors was created in 1937 by I. James Wilkinson, Ben Lewis and Philip Cahn when film editors earned a mere $100 per week. Initial
    8.00
    2 votes
    119

    National Union of Public Employees

    The National Union of Public Employees (NUPE) was a British trade union which represented public sector workers. The union was founded in 1908 as the National Union of Corporation Workers, which split from the Municipal Employees Association, following Albin Taylor's dismissal as General Secretary. The union became NUPE in 1925. In 1993, NUPE merged with NALGO (the National and Local Government Officers Association) and COHSE (the Confederation of Health Service Employees) to form UNISON.
    8.00
    2 votes
    120

    Screen Actors Guild

    • Professions represented: Actor
    The Screen Actors Guild‐American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) is an American labor union representing over 150,000 film and television principal and background performers worldwide. The current organization is the result of the March 30, 2012 merger of the Screen Actor's Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. According to SAG's Mission Statement, the Guild seeks to: negotiate and enforce collective bargaining agreements that establish equitable levels of compensation, benefits, and working conditions for its performers; collect compensation for exploitation of recorded performances by its members, and provide protection against unauthorized use of those performances; and preserve and expand work opportunities for its members. The Guild was founded in 1933 in an effort to eliminate exploitation of actors in Hollywood who were being forced into oppressive multi-year contracts with the major movie studios that did not include restrictions on work hours or minimum rest periods, and often had clauses that automatically renewed at the studios' discretion. These contracts were notorious for allowing the studios to dictate the public
    8.00
    2 votes
    121
    9.00
    1 votes
    122

    MCF Workers' Union

    MCF Workers' Union, a trade union at the Mangalore Chemicals and Fertilisers, in Karnataka, India. MCFWU is affiliated to Indian National Trade Union Congress. MCFWU is the dominant union at MCF. The president of MCFWU is N. M. Adyanthaya. Vice-presidents of MCFWU are P.V. Subraya and M. Nagesh.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    9.00
    1 votes
    124

    Typographical Association

    The Typographical Association was a British trade union. The National Typographical Association collapsed in 1848, and delegates from across Yorkshire and Lancashire met at Angel Street in Sheffield to found the Provincial Typographical Association, intended to recreate the former Northern Typographical Union and to focus on paying benefits to members on strike. The union grew gradually from 481 members at the end of 1849 to 5,300 in 1877. In that year, it merged with a related relief association and dropped "Provincial" from its title. Based in Manchester, the union focussed on demanding members serve a seven-year apprenticeship. In 1894, it began admitting women. In the 1910s, the Association established a branch in London, but the Trades Union Congress instituted arbitration which restricted it from a fifteen-mile radius of central London, the rival London Society of Compositors having rights to organise in the city. In 1964, the Association merged with the London Typographical Society to create the National Graphical Association.
    9.00
    1 votes
    125

    American Federation of Television and Radio Artists

    The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) was a performers' union that represented a wide variety of talent, including actors in radio and television, radio and television announcers and newspersons, singers and recording artists (both royalty artists and background singers), promo and voice-over announcers and other performers in commercials, stunt persons and specialty acts - as the organisation itself publicly states, "AFTRA's membership includes an array of talent". With the information presently available, the union can lay claim to 65,182 members throughout the United States (with a figure of 131 000 quoted in early 2012). On March 30, 2012, it was announced that the members of AFTRA and of SAG had voted to merge and that the name of the new organization is SAG-AFTRA AFTRA is located at 5757 Wilshire Blvd, 7th Floor, Los Angeles, California. There are also offices in New York City, Chicago, and several other American cities. The federation as a whole has 804 employees and total assets worth $30,403,661.00. AFTRA works in the interests of its members, primarily in the areas of contract negotiation and enforcement, advocacy (including lobbying, legislation
    6.67
    3 votes
    126

    International Fur & Leather Workers Union

    The International Fur and Leather Workers Union (IFLWU), was a labor union that represented workers in the fur and leather trades. The IFLWU was founded in 1913 and affiliated with the American Federation of Labor (AFL). Radical union organizers, including Communists, played a role in the union from its early years. One radical and long-time dissident, Ben Gold, became union president in 1935. In 1937, the IFLWU left the AFL and joined the new Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), led by John L. Lewis. Between 1949 and 1950, with Cold War tensions rising, the CIO expelled the IFLWU and 10 other unions that it accused of being "communist dominated." In 1955, the union dissolved into the Amalgamated Meat Cutters union.
    6.67
    3 votes
    127

    Methil Pilots

    The Methil Pilots was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1945.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128

    National Union of Co-operative Insurance Society Employees

    The National Union of Co-operative Insurance Society Employees was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The union split from the recently-formed National Union of Distributive and Allied Workers in 1922. It affiliated with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1933, merging in 1982.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    National Workers Union

    The National Workers Union is a general trade union in Jamaica. The National Workers Union was founded on 2 April 1952 emerging as a result of a split within the Trade Union Congress and factional alignments within the People's National Party (PNP). The NWU became the main trade union of the PNP. The NWU was a founding member of the Jamaica Confederation of Trade Unions.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    6.33
    3 votes
    134

    Guyana Agricultural and General Workers' Union

    The Guyana Agricultural and General Workers' Union (GAWU) is the largest trade union in Guyana. It was founded in 1946 as the Guiana Industrial Workers' Union. After failing in the 1950s it was reformed as the Guyana Sugar Workers' Union in 1961, but changed its name to Guyana Agricultural Workers' Union in 1962 before becoming the GAWU later that decade. The GAWU is affiliated with the World Federation of Trade Unions.
    6.33
    3 votes
    135

    Irish Mental Hospital Workers' Union

    The Irish Mental Hospital Workers' Union was a trade union in Ireland. It was formed in 1912 as a split from the National Asylum Workers' Union, and it merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1926. The Irish Mental Hospital Workers' Union (Known at first as the Irish Asylum Workers' Union) was founded in 1917 in Dublin.. Its peak years of activity were between 1917-1921. Amongst its greatest achievements was the negotiation of national minimum conditions of employment in 1920. Under this agreement asylum workers' hours were reduced to 56 hours a week (in some cases staff had been working up to 90 hours a week)and a minimum wage of £60 for men and £46 for women was introduced. Ultimately the union began to fracture from 1922 with onset of the post War slump. Some branches amalgamated with the Irish Transport and General Worker's Union whilst others later joined the Amalgamated Transport and General Workers' Union. By 1926 the last of these amalgamations had occurred.
    6.33
    3 votes
    136

    Irish Transport and General Workers' Union

    The Irish Transport and General Workers Union, an Irish trade union, was founded by James Larkin in 1908 as a general union. Initially drawing its membership from branches of the Liverpool-based National Union of Dock Labourers, from which Larkin had been expelled, it grew to include workers in a range of industries. The ITGWU logo was the Red Hand of Ulster, which is synonymous with ancient Gaelic Ulster. The ITGWU was at the centre of the Dublin Lockout in 1913 and the events left a lasting impression on the ITGWU and hence on the Irish Labour Movement. After Larkin's departure for the United States in 1914 in the wake of the Lockout, William X. O'Brien became the union's leading figure. He later served as general secretary for many years. In 1924, Larkin's brother Peter formed a new union, the Workers' Union of Ireland, to which many of the ITGWU's Dublin members affiliated. The ITGWU nevertheless remained the dominant force in Irish trade unionism, especially outside the capital. William O'Brien and James Larkin remained bitter personal enemies, and when Larkin and his supporters were readmitted into the Labour Party in the early 1940s, O'Brien engineered a split in the party,
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    6.33
    3 votes
    138

    National Union of Dyers, Bleachers and Textile Workers

    The National Union of Dyers, Bleachers and Textile Workers (NUDBTW) was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The union was founded in 1936 with the merger of the National Union of Textile Workers, which was the main union representing workers in the woollen and worsted industries, the Amalgamated Society of Dyers, Finishers and Kindred Trades, and the Operative Dyers, Bleachers and Finishers Association, which represented workers in Lancashire. The NUDBTW represented a membership of 85,500 in 1939, of whom 25,500 were women. Dyeing and finishing were predominantly male trades, and thus had a greater union presence than other sections of the British textile industry. The woollen and worsted industries, by contrast, were poorly organised. Closed shop agreements covered the majority of workers employed in textile finishing. In 1980, the Yorkshire Society of Textile Craftsmen and the Huddersfield and District Healders and Twisters Trade and Friendly Society both merged into the NUDBTW.The NUDBTW merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1982.
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    Service & Food Workers Union

    Service & Food Workers Union

    The Service & Food Workers Union Nga Ringa Tota (SFWU) is a trade union in New Zealand. It is affiliated with the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions. The SFWU is organised into five industry sectors:
    6.33
    3 votes
    140

    Union of Kodak Workers

    The Union of Kodak Workers was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1974.
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    5.25
    4 votes
    142
    8.00
    1 votes
    143

    Coimbatore District Textile Workers Union

    Coimbatore District Textile Workers Union, a trade union in the textile industry in Coimbatore District, Tamil Nadu, India. CDTWU is affiliated to the Hind Mazdoor Sabha. The general secretary of CDTWU is A. Subramaniam and the president is Rajamani (state secretary of HMS).
    8.00
    1 votes
    144

    Independent Workers Union of Ireland

    The Independent Workers Union of Ireland is a trade union in Ireland with its headquarters in Cork City. It was formed by Irish workers dissatisfied with the trade union movement in Ireland which it states, has "become nothing more than an arm of the state and management." It has 1,000 paying members organised in 7 Branches in Ireland and is affiliated to the ideals of early Irish trade unionists such as James Connolly and Jim Larkin. It is not affiliated to the main Trade Union Umbrella body the ICTU. The IWU and its members campaigned against the Lisbon Treaty.
    8.00
    1 votes
    145

    National Emergency Medical Services Association

    • Industry: Emergency medical services
    • Professions represented: EMS Professional
    The National Emergency Medical Services Association (NEMSA or National EMS Association) is a registered labor union and California non-profit mutual benefit corporation. The bulk of NEMSAs membership consists of emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics and critical care nurses (CCT-RN) however NEMSA also represents EMS Dispatchers and Call Takers, Vehicle Service Technicians and other EMS related support staff. The National Emergency Medical Services Association or NEMSA was founded when dissatisfaction of union representation led to the creation of an all EMS Union. NEMSA's first bargaining unit was made up of Paramedics and EMTs at Oak Valley Hospital District Ambulance in Oakdale California. NEMSA's second bargaining unit was made up of Paramedics in San Mateo California. NEMSA supporters claim that rather than a large union that paid no attention to EMS, they wanted an EMS Union. NEMSA has continued to represent EMS Professionals and has represented members working for various ambulance companies in CA, OR, WA, PA, IN, KY, CT, ME, MA, NH. On September 26, 2012 over 1600 members in California voted out NEMSA. On September 29, 2012 another 500 members from New England
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Port of London Deal Porters' Union

    The Port of London Deal Porters' Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1938. The union represented deal porters, who handled baulks of imported softwood at the Port of London, principally around the Surrey Commercial Docks at Rotherhithe.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    8.00
    1 votes
    148

    Society of Authors

    • Professions represented: Writer
    The Society of Authors (UK) is a trade union for professional writers that was founded in 1884 to protect the rights of writers and fight to retain those rights, with particular attention to copyright protection and, later, the establishment of Public Lending Right. It has counted amongst its members and presidents numerous notable writers and poets including Tennyson (first president), George Bernard Shaw, John Galsworthy, John Edward Masefield, Thomas Hardy, H. G. Wells, J. M. Barrie and E. M. Forster. Bernard Shaw was an early member who took a prominent part in action and discussions, founding the League of Dramatists in 1931 as part of the Society. The Authors' Lending and Copyright Society was also formed after much action by the Society. Its youngest member is Edward Pinnegar, who published his first book in 2010, whilst aged 14. In 1958 the Translators Association (TA) was established as a specialist group within the Society of Authors. Prizes for fiction and non-fiction administered by the Society include: The Society also administers a number of literary translation prizes, including:
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    7.00
    2 votes
    150

    Danish Food and Allied Workers' Union

    The Danish Food and Allied Workers' Union (NNF) (in Danish: Nærings- og Nydelsesmiddelarbejder Forbundet) is a trade union in Denmark. It is an affiliate of the Danish Confederation of Trade Unions.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    General Workers Union in Côte d'Ivoire

    General Workers Union in Côte d'Ivoire (in French: Union Générale des Travailleurs de Côte d'Ivoire), a national trade union federation in Côte d'Ivoire. UGTCI was created in 1962 by PDCI, and was to become the sole legal trade union centre of the country for many years.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152

    Korean Teachers & Education Workers' Union

    The Korean Teachers and Education Workers Union (KTU) (Korean: 전국교직원노동조합) is a labor union of teachers in South Korea. The organization has 77,000 members (down from 94,000) among the 360,000 public and private school teachers in the country. The KTU was founded in 1989 under opposition from the South Korean government. In response to its founding several thousand members were subsequently fired by the education authorities. The KTU finally received official recognition in 1999 after the election of Kim Dae-Jung and many of the dismissed teachers were allowed to return to their former positions. A major contributor to the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, the KTU is criticized for promoting pro-North Korea ideology as well as disseminating "anti-American" propaganda. By 2009, the KTU's ranks had dwindled, possibly due to parental and public opposition to its non-education related political activities. A series of scandals also deeply undermined the union's credibility, including the attempted cover up of a sexual assault on one of its members, as well as the sexual harassment of trainee teachers by KTU members. In July 2009, the KTU's offices were raided by police on charges of
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Southern African Clothing and Textile Workers Union

    The Southern African Clothing and Textile Workers Union (SACTWU) is the biggest union in the clothing, textile and leather industry, with more than 100 000 members. It negotiates wages for the vast majority of workers in the clothing, textile and leather industry in South Africa, and the agreements cover over 150 000 workers. SACTWU is the 6th largest affiliate of the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU). The union was born through the merger of ACTWUSA and GAWU in September 1989.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union

    The United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union was established in 1945 in British Columbia through the merger of the United Fishermen's Federal Union and the Fish, Cannery and Reduction Plant and Allied Workers Union. It represented fishers, shoreworkers, and workers in fish processing and transport, and fought for improved wages and working conditions in the industry as well as the imposition of fishing quotas and licensing requirements. The union survived raiding wars with the British Columbia Gillnetter's Association in 1952 and the Seafarers' International Union in 1953. Suspected of being under communist influence, it was suspended by the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada in 1953 and refused admittance to the Canadian Labour Congress until 1972. For example, a longtime president of the UFAWU, Homer Stevens, ran as the Communist Party candidate in the Burnaby-Richmond-Delta riding in the 1970s. The union also had a section in Nova Scotia. The UFAWU joined the Canadian Auto Workers in 1996.
    7.00
    2 votes
    156

    Vegetable Market Workers Union

    Vegetable Market Workers Union, a trade union in Andhra Pradesh, India. VMWU is affiliated to the All India Trade Union Congress. The president of VMWU is Moulana.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    All Trinidad Sugar Estates and Factory Workers Union

    All Trinidad Sugar Estates and Factory Workers Union, founded by Adrian Cola Rienzi was the major sugar workers' trade union and the predominant Indo-Trinidadian voice in organised labour in Trinidad and Tobago between the 1930s and 1970s. Leadership of the trade union passed from Rienzi to Bhadase Sagan Maraj, and later to Krishna Gowandan. The ATSEFWU was displaced by the All Trinidad Sugar and General Workers' Trade Union led by Basdeo Panday.
    6.00
    3 votes
    158

    Belfast Breadservers' Trade Union

    The Belfast Breadservers' Trade Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1924, when it had about 500 members. However, it kept its identity within the TGWU. The union is usually referred to in TGWU documents as the Belfast Breadservers' Association, although its 1923 rulebook gives the correct name as Belfast Breadservers' Trade Union, a name which it was still using in the late 1960s.
    6.00
    3 votes
    159

    Southern Amalgamated Workers' Union

    The Southern Amalgamated Workers' Union (AWUNZ) is a trade union in New Zealand. It is one of three autonomous unions, with the Northern Amalgamated Workers' Union, and the Central Amalgamated Workers' Union, who operate nationally as the Amalgamated Workers' Union. The AWUNZ is a member of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
    6.00
    3 votes
    160

    Australian Workers' Union

    The Australian Workers' Union (AWU) is one of Australia's largest and oldest trade unions. It traces its origins to unions founded in the pastoral and mining industries in the 1880s, and currently has approximately 135,000 members. It has exercised an influence on the Australian trade union movement, and on the Australian Labor Party throughout its history. The AWU grew from a number of earlier unions, notably the Australasian Shearers Union, founded by William Spence and David Temple in Creswick, Victoria in 1886. This union joined with shearers' unions in Bourke and Wagga in New South Wales to form the Amalgamated Shearers Union of Australia in 1887. In 1894 this union amalgamated with the General Labourers Union, which had formed in 1891, to form the Australian Workers' Union. The Queensland Shearers Union, formed in 1887, and the Queensland Workers Union merged in 1891 to form the Amalgamated Workers Union of Queensland. In 1904 the AWUQ amalgamated with the AWU, to form a union with a combined membership of 34,000. The AWU later absorbed a number of other unions in the pastoral, mining and timber industries notably the Amalgamated Workers Association of Queensland in 1913, and
    5.67
    3 votes
    161

    Civil and Public Services Association

    The Civil and Public Services Association (CPSA) was a trade union in the United Kingdom, representing civil servants. The union was founded in 1921, when the Civil Service Clerical Union and the Clerical Officers' Association merged to form the Civil Service Clerical Association. It affiliated with the Trades Union Congress (TUC) and the Labour Party and had around 16,000 members. Its Dublin branch left the following year, to form the Civil and Public Services Union. Following the 1926 United Kingdom general strike, the Trade Disputes and Trade Unions Act 1927 was passed, requiring government employees to disaffiliate from political parties and trades union confederations, compelling the union to leave the Labour Party and the TUC. It rejoined the TUC in 1946. In 1969, the union renamed itself as the "Civil and Public Services Association". In 1973, the Ministry of Labour Staff Association joined the CPSA, while in 1974 the Court Officers Association joined. In 1980, the CPSA published a history of its first 75 years, entitled "From Humble Petition to Militant Action". In 1985, the union's Postal and Telecommunications Group left to merge with the Post Office Engineering Union,
    5.67
    3 votes
    162

    Punjab Breweries Workers Union

    Punjab Breweries Workers Union, a trade union of brewery workers in Punjab, India. PBWU is affiliated to the All India Trade Union Congress. The president of PBWU is gurbir singh and the general secretary Kishan Chand.
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    6.50
    2 votes
    164

    Central Amalgamated Workers' Union

    The Central Amalgamated Workers' Union (CAWU) is a trade union in New Zealand. It is one of three autonomous unions, with the Northern Amalgamated Workers' Union, and the Southern Amalgamated Workers' Union, who operate nationally as the Amalgamated Workers' Union (AWUNZ). The AWUNZ is a member of the New Zealand Council of Trade Unions.
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Free Workers' Union

    Free Workers' Union

    The Free Workers' Union (German: Freie Arbeiterinnen- und Arbeiter-Union or Freie ArbeiterInnen-Union; abbreviated FAU) is a small anarcho-syndicalist union in Germany. It is the German section of the International Workers Association (IWA), to which the larger and better known Confederación Nacional del Trabajo in Spain also belongs. Because of their membership in the IWA the name is also often abbreviated as FAU-IAA or FAU/IAA. The FAU sees itself in the tradition of the Free Workers' Union of Germany (German: Freie Arbeiter Union Deutschlands; FAUD), the largest anarcho-syndicalist union in Germany until it disbanded in 1933 in order to avoid repression by the nascent National Socialist regime, and to illegally organize resistance against it. The FAU was then founded in 1977 and has grown consistently all through the 1990s. Now, the FAU consists of just under 40 groups, organized locally and by branch of trade. Because it rejects hierarchical organizations and political representation and believes in the concept of federalism, most of the decisions are made by the local unions. The federalist organization exists in order to coordinate strikes, campaigns and actions and for
    6.50
    2 votes
    166

    General Workers' Union

    The General Workers' Union (GWU) is a national trade union center in Malta. The GWU was founded in 1943 and has been politically identified with the Labour Party (Malta) as the trade union is the major left-wing trade union in Malta. The two were statutorily fused from 1978 to 1992, and continue to share many common objectives as is common in several European States namely Britain. The GWU is the largest trade union movement in Malta and organised in a confederation format of 8 Sections each to an extent autonomous in conducting industrial relations. It is one of the two trade union centers recognised by the European Trade Union Confederation and the employees representative delegation at the International Labour Organisation. The sections cover the manufacturing, services and the public sector of the Maltese labour market and thus organise a wide cross section of interests. The union is affiliated to the International Trade Union Confederation and the European Trade Union Confederation as well as various sectoral international and European trade union federations covering the same sectors the GWU is organised therein. The 8 Sections of the Union covering most sectors of the
    6.50
    2 votes
    167

    North of England Trimmers' and Teemers' Association

    The North of England Trimmers' and Teemers Association was a trade union in the United Kingdom. Trimmers and teemers were employed in loading coal onto ships from staithes. Teemers would open the trapdoors on rail waggons which had been positioned above the ships' hoppers. The trimmers would then distribute the coal evenly around the hopper using shovels. The union was formed in 1871 and had 1,500 members in 1908, increasing to 1,913 in 1915. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1922.
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    6.50
    2 votes
    170

    United General Workers Union

    United General Workers Union, a central trade union organization in Belize. Founded in 1979 through the merger of Belize General Development Workers' Union and the Southern Christian Union. During the 1980s UGWU was seen as the most leftist trade union organization in the country.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    6.50
    2 votes
    172

    Amalgamated Carters, Lurrymen and Motormen's Union

    The Amalgamated Carters, Lurrymen and Motormen's Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1922. Until 1968, when its members were fully integrated, the union formed the North of England Commercial Section within the TGWU, retaining a great deal of autonomy and in many ways effectively functioning as a separate union, even being registered separately with the Registrar of Friendly Societies. It had previously had a similar arrangement with the United Vehicle Workers, another union which joined the merger which formed the TGWU. "Lurry" was an old-fashioned spelling of lorry, and the spelling "lorrymen" is also seen in the union's documents.
    7.00
    1 votes
    173

    Industrial and Commercial Workers' Union

    The Industrial and Commercial Union (ICU) was a trade union and mass based popular political movement in Southern Africa. The ICU was founded in Cape Town in 1919 with the aim of 'creating one great union' (on the model of the Industrial Workers of the World, which dockworkers in Cape Town had learned about from visiting black American sailors). Its membership grew throughout South Africa until by 1927 it could boast a membership of 100,000 - the largest trade union ever to have taken root in the continent of Africa. No movement before or since has succeeded in mobilizing the rural poor on that scale. The movement also succeeded in mobilizing shack dwellers in Durban on a large scale. Helen Bradford's detailed study describes it as "one of the most radical movements ever seen in Southern Africa." The movement spread beyond the borders of South Africa and across Southern Africa. In the 1920s the movement took on a millenarian aspect in the rural Eastern Cape where predictions of airborne liberation by black Americans captured the imagination of thousands of people. At the same time an outbreak of militant strikes spread through the big cities, reaching their climax in 1920 when
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    British Seafarers' Union

    The British Seafarers' Union (BSU) was a trade union which organised sailors and firemen in the British ports of Southampton and Glasgow between 1911/1912 and 1922. Although of considerable local importance, the organisation remained much smaller and less influential at a national level than the National Sailors' and Firemen's Union, (NSFU). The BSU was formed in Southampton on 6 October 1911, as a breakaway from the NSFU. In August 1912, a second breakaway took place in Glasgow, and a branch of the BSU was established in that port. The cause of the split was ostensibly the same in both ports: the rebels claimed that the NSFU was reckless and extravagant with its funds, that members had little control over the direction of the organisation, and that its leading officials were unaccountable. The NSFU itself vigorously denied these allegations. It accused the BSU of sectionalism, and of being the product of the political ambitions of its leading officials, Tommy Lewis and Manny Shinwell. In June 1912, the BSU took part in the national dock strike of 1912. The NSFU, although affiliated to the body which had called the strike, the National Transport Workers' Federation, refused to
    4.50
    4 votes
    177

    A.P. Mica Mine Workers Union

    A.P. Mica Mine Workers Union, a trade union of mica mine labourers in the Gudur minesfields in Andhra Pradesh, India. APMMU is affiliated to All India Trade Union Congress. APMMU claims a membership of 1200 out of a total of 7000 workers. Andhra Pradesh is one of the three leading areas where mica is mined in India. India produces roughly 62% of the world's mica but in recent years other materials substituting mica in its main applications (such as electronics) have impacted the price and mining of mica in India.
    6.00
    2 votes
    178

    Communication Workers Union

    The Communication Workers Union is a trade union in Trinidad and Tobago which has the bulk of its members in the Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago (TSTT).
    6.00
    2 votes
    179

    Financial Sector Union of Sweden

    • Industry: Commercial bank
    The Financial Sector Union of Sweden (Swedish: Finansförbundet) is a trade union in Sweden. Finansförbundet has a membership of 33,000 and represents workers in: Finansförbundet is affiliated with the Swedish Confederation of Professional Employees.
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    6.00
    2 votes
    181

    Post Office Engineering Union

    The Post Office Engineering Union (POEU) was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It represented engineering staff in the Post Office, mostly working in telecommunications. The union was founded in 1915 when the Post Office Engineering and Stores Association and the Amalgamated Society of Telephone Employees to form the Post Office Amalgamated Engineering and Stores Association. In 1922, following the establishment of the Irish Free State, the union's Irish section split away to form the Irish Post Office Engineering Union. In 1925, the Post Office Telegraph Mechanicians' Society joined the union. However, by 1939, membership was only 39,000. By 1983, the POEU was the twentieth largest union in the UK, with membership around 130,000. In 1985, it merged with the Postal and Telecommunications Group of the Civil and Public Services Association, forming the National Communications Union.
    6.00
    2 votes
    182

    Iron and Steel Trades Confederation

    The Iron and Steel Trades Confederation was a British trade union for metal-workers and allied groups. It was formed on 1 January 1917 as a merger of existing steel-workers' unions and it is now part of Community. In 1917 Minister of Labour, John Hodge passed the Trade Unions' Amalgamation Act, which simplified the process whereby Trade Unions merged, amalgamated or federated. This was in response to both the difficulty of mergers under the previous legislation (requiring two-third majorities in favor in all participant unions), as well as a desire to push craft unions into general trade unions to cover entire industries Trade unions that have amalgamated with or transferred engagements to the ISTC and year it occurred; The resultant union was named the Iron and Steel Trades Confederation. Both the Amalgamated Association of Steel and Iron Workers of Great Britain and the Tin and Sheet Millmens' Association balloted their members unsuccessfully in 1916 but were later successful. The Wire Workers Union amalgameted in 1922 but left in 1924, rejoining in 1991. In later years the union also built up representation amongst workers in the electronics industry, plastics and glass, the
    5.00
    3 votes
    183

    Labour Protection League

    The Labour Protection League was a trade union organising dockers and stevedores in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1871, the League was inspired by the North East Nine Hours League. After winning several small strikes over wages in its first year, the union grew to 30,000 members. The organisation split in the aftermath of the London Dock Strike of 1889, most members leaving to form the Amalgamated Stevedores' Labour Protection League. Meanwhile, Harry Quelch founded the South Side Labour Protection League, which was later named the Labour Protection League again. This was one of the unions which came together to form the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1922.
    5.00
    3 votes
    184
    5.50
    2 votes
    185
    5.50
    2 votes
    186

    Chemical Workers' Union

    The Chemical Workers' Union was a trade union in the Czechoslovakia. The union was led by Josef Hais. The union published Dělnik ('Worker'). As of 1921, the Chemical Workers' Union had a membership of 76,978. The Chemical Workers' Union was affiliated with the Odborové sdružení československé (OSČ). However, within OSČ the Chemical Workers' Union represented a leftist position. Hais upled the line of 'non-compromising socialism'. Overall, the chemical industry workers were amongst the lowest paid workers in Czechoslovakia at the time, a fact that contributed to the radicalization of their union. The OSČ rightwing branded Hais as a 'communist', and in February 1921 a rightist splinter union was formed under the leadership of Karel Piták. In June 1922, communist trade unionists were expelled from the Metalworkers' Union (a union which was firmly controlled by Social Democrats). They then formed the 'Opposition Committee of Metalworkers'. The Opposition Committee was provisionally accepted into the Chemical Workers' Union. On 25 June 1922, a conference of revolutionary trade unionists was held in Brno. The conference staked out plans for a new trade union centre. At the conference an
    5.50
    2 votes
    187

    Fish, Food and Allied Workers union

    The Fish, Food and Allied Workers (FFAW) is a union based in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador. It has 20,000 members, most of whom are fish harvesters or plant workers, but it also has members in the hotel, hospitality, brewing, metal fabrication, window manufacturing and oil industries. It was founded in 1971 and is affiliated with the Canadian Auto Workers. http://www.ffaw.nf.ca/WhoWeAre.asp
    5.50
    2 votes
    188

    Swedish Transport Workers' Union

    The Swedish Transport Worker's Union (abbreviated to Transport) was created in 1897 and is today part of the Swedish Trade Union Confederation (referred to as LO in Sweden). The union has today (as of 2005) 72 000 members who work in many different fields, such as: The union's motto is: The collective agreement defends you if you defend the collective agreement! (Kollektivavtalet försvarar dig om du försvarar kollektivavtalet!) There are 30 local chapters around Sweden that assists members. The union leader is Per Winberg. The headquarters are located on Olof Palmes street 29, right across from the so called LO-castle around Norra Bantorget in Stockholm. The union also support an active international union cooperation and is a member of several international labor organizations:
    5.50
    2 votes
    189

    London Trades Council

    The London Trades Council was an early labour organisation, uniting London's trade unionists. Its modern successor organisation is the Greater London Association of Trades (Union) Councils Leading figures in the London trade union movement convened occasional meetings of the "Metropolitan Trades Delegates" from 1848, meeting at the Old Bell Inn by the Old Bailey. The London builders' strike of 1859 required ongoing co-ordination, and it was determined to organise a trades council. The formation of the London Trades Council was organised at George Potter's Building Trades Conference and led by George Odger's Operative Bricklayers' Society. The unions agreed to demand a maximum working day of nine hours from their employers. The employers refused, resulting in strike action and a lockout. Eventually the unions conceded, but the solidarity built prompted the formation of a city-wide body able to co-ordinate future action. The London Trades Council was founded in May 1860, and it may well have been the fourth such organisation in the country, after the Sheffield Trades Council and Glasgow Trades Council (both founded in 1858) and the Edinburgh Trades Council (founded in 1859). As the
    4.67
    3 votes
    190
    GCSU Sri Lanka

    GCSU Sri Lanka

    The Government Clerical Service Union (GCSU) is a trade union of clerical workers who work in the public sector in Sri Lanka. This was formed in the 1920s when Sri Lanka (Ceylon) was under British colonial rule. It is a politically independent trade union but the majority of the activists were Communists early in its history. British colonialists who ruled Sri Lanka (Ceylon) from March 1815 educated the Sri Lankan people to work in the public sector because it was very difficult to bring sufficient administrative staff from the UK to administer the colony. The schools formed by Christian missionaries taught the English language to the students and they were employed in the public sector because of their knowledge of the English language. After 1815 the British colonial rulers started educating Sri Lanka's public workers about the administration rules and regulations. They also held examinations for the clerical workers to upgrade their working level. The famous manual among the public sector workers named Administration Rules and Regulations (ARR) is still used in Sri Lanka. An examination was held for the administration officers called the Ceylon Administrative Service (CAS) exam.
    4.00
    4 votes
    191

    Christian Workers' Union

    The Christian Workers' Union is a trade union in Belize. It was founded in 1963. As of 2006, CWU claimed a membership of 2,500. It was a member of the International Trade Union Confederation, but withdrew in November 2009.
    6.00
    1 votes
    192
    Directors Guild of America

    Directors Guild of America

    • Professions represented: Film Director
    Directors Guild of America (DGA) is an entertainment guild which represents the interests of film and television directors in the United States motion picture industry and abroad. Founded as the Screen Directors Guild in 1936, the group merged with the Radio and Television Directors Guild in 1960 to become the modern Directors Guild of America. As a union that seeks to organize an individual profession, rather than multiple professions across an industry, the DGA is a craft union. It represents directors and members of the directorial team (assistant directors, unit production managers, stage managers, associate directors, production associates, technical coordinators, and location managers (New York & Chicago only)) in film, television, documentaries, news, sports, commercials and new media production. The Guild has various training programs whereby successful applicants are placed in various productions and can gain experience working in the film or television industry. As of 2011, its 75th anniversary, the guild had about 14,500 members. The DGA headquarters are located on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, with satellite offices in New York and Chicago and coordinating committees
    6.00
    1 votes
    193

    Equatorial Guinea Workers' Union

    The Equatorial Guinea Workers' Union (UST) is an unregistered trade union in Equatorial Guinea. The Government has refused to register the UST, and it cannot operate openly in the country.
    6.00
    1 votes
    194

    General Workers' Union

    British Honduras Workers and Tradesmen's Union, the first central trade union organization in the Central American country Belize. Founded in 1939 by Antonio Soberanis Gómez. Registered as a legal trade union in 1943. Shortly thereafter it changed its name to General Workers Union (GWU). GWU played an important role in the anticolonial movement. It reached its peak in 1955. Thereafter it declined rapidly.
    6.00
    1 votes
    195

    National Minority Movement

    The National Minority Movement was a British organisation, established in 1924 by the Communist Party of Great Britain, which attempted to organise a radical presence within the existing trade unions. The organization was headed by longtime unionist Tom Mann and future General Secretary of the CPGB Harry Pollitt. The National Minority Movement (NMM) was established at a convention held August 23–24, 1924, attended by 271 delegates, claiming to represent 200,000 workers. By the time of the NMM's formation in 1924, the Comintern had abandoned strategies based on the prospect of an imminent world revolution in favour of slow, gradual working within established institutions, including "pure and simple" reformist trade unions. The aim of the National Minority Movement was to convert the revolutionary minority of the working class into a majority. The NMM would organise workers who were dissatisfied with the existing unions but not willing to join the Communist Party, as well as those who were already CP members. In this way the Communists would increase their influence in amongst workers without splitting the existing organisations. The NMM was affiliated to the Red International of
    6.00
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    196

    National Union of Agricultural and Allied Workers

    The National Union of Agricultural and Allied Workers was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It was established as the Eastern Counties Agricultural Labourers & Small Holders Union at a conference of Norfolk agricultural workers at the Angel Hotel, North Walsham on 20 July 1906. Its first President was George Nicholls, its Secretary (on 13 shillings a week) was George Edwards and its Treasurer was Richard Winfrey. The other members of its Executive Committee were J. Binder, J. Sage, William G. Codling, Herbert Day, J. Bly, C. Holman and J. Stibbins. The first three branches of the union were in Norfolk at St Faith's (former stronghold of Joseph Arch's old National Agricultural Labourers Union) and Kenninghall and Shipham. In 1910 major strikes and disputes broke out in the Norfolk villages of Trunch, Knapton and St Faith's. At St Faith's, the 105 union men were on strike from May 1910 until February 1911 for 1 shilling a week extra. The organisation changed its name in 1910 to the "National Agricultural Labourers and Rural Workers Union". Edwards stood down as Secretary in 1913, but then took up the post of President. In 1920, the union became the "National Union of Agricultural
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    197
    6.00
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    198

    Scottish Busmen's Union

    The Scottish Busmen's Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1934.
    6.00
    1 votes
    199

    South Wales Miners' Federation

    • Industry: Coal Mining
    The South Wales Miners' Federation (SWMF), nicknamed "The Fed", was a trade union for miners in South Wales. The union was founded on 24 October 1898, following the defeat of the South Wales miners' strike of 1898. It affiliated to the Miners' Federation of Great Britain (MFGB) in 1899. In the early twentieth century, a layer of activists in the union were radicalised by such events as the Cambrian Combine Dispute and Tonypandy Riot of 1910 and the hunger marches during the Depression. During this period, its leadership were aligned with the Labour Party or the Communist Party of Great Britain, and gave support to the National Unemployed Workers Movement. The South Wales Miners' Industrial Union, a non-political union set up in 1926 and backed by colliery owners. After a series of strikes in the 1930s by the SWMF it was disbanded in 1938. In 1940, the SWMF also started representing miners in the Forest of Dean. In 1945, the MFGB became the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM), and the Fed became the NUM (South Wales Area), with less autonomy than before. In 1960, the South Wales Area was expanded to include the Somerset coalfield.
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    200
    4.33
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    201
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    202

    National Transport Workers' Federation

    The National Transport Workers' Federation was an association of British trade unions. It was formed in 1910 to co-ordinate the activities of various organisations catering for dockers, seamen, tramwaymen and road transport workers. Its affiliates included: The NTWF laid the foundations for the creation of the Transport and General Workers Union in 1922, though it continued to exist after that date. It had some success as an organisational tool and as a symbol of trade union unity, but since its member unions retained full control over their own affairs it was not always able to have a direct influence on trade disputes. In 1912, it called a National Dock Strike in support of London dockers which was observed only in a few centres, and which ended within a week. This was regarded as an embarrassing setback, and led the Federation to adopt a more cautious approach in subsequent years. In 1921 it was criticised for failing to bring out its members in support of the miners in the Black Friday crisis.
    5.00
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    203
    National Typographical Association

    National Typographical Association

    The National Typographical Association was an early British trade union, operating on a national basis. The union was founded in 1830 as the Northern Typographical Union, a federation of small, local societies in England and the Isle of Man, including the well-established Manchester Typographical Society. Led by John Backhouse, the Association aimed to co-ordinate the activities of its member organisations. By 1840, the union had 44 member societies, representing more than 1,000 members. During the early 1840s, the union began organising typographers in southern towns, but suffered setbacks due to a recession. As a result, it reconstituted itself as the "National Typographical Association" in 1844. By 1846, the organisation had 74 branches and 5,418 members. The London Union of Compositors had reconstituted itself as the South East Region, and the General Typographical Association of Scotland as the Northern Region. However, the organisation had insufficient income to cover disputes, and following a major strike in Edinburgh during 1848, it was forced to dissolve. The Association's South East Region re-established itself as the London Society of Compositors, while several societies
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    204
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    205
    4.50
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    206
    4.50
    2 votes
    207

    Antigua Workers' Union

    The Antigua Workers' Union (AWU) or (ABWU) is a national Trade union centre of Antigua and Barbuda. It was formed in 1967 after a split from the ATLU. The AWU created the Progressive Labour Movement (UPP) in 1970. The AWU is led by Senator David Massiah as general secretary. Senator Chester Hughes is president of the union.
    5.00
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    208
    5.00
    1 votes
    209
    5.00
    1 votes
    210

    National Association for the Protection of Labour

    The National Association for the Protection of Labour was one of the first attempts at creating a National Trade union in the United Kingdom. The organization was established in July, 1830 by John Doherty, after an apparently unsuccessful attempt to create a similar national presence with the National Union of Cotton-spinners. Doherty was the first secretary, and the Association quickly enrolled approximately 150 unions. These consisted mostly of textile related unions, but also included mechanics, blacksmiths, and various others. Within the first nine months, Webb estimates that membership was between 10,000 and 20,000 individuals spread across the five counties of Lancashire, Cheshire, Derby, Nottingham, and Leicester. As a part of establishing awareness and legitimacy, union officials started an unsuccessful weekly paper, the United Trades Co-operative Journal. This was soon followed in 1831 by a larger publication, the Voice of the People, having the declared intention "to unite the productive classes of the community in one common bond of union." With notable exceptions, the association continued to grow and expand, reaching 100,000 members and a circulation of 30,000 for the
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    211
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    1 votes
    212
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    1 votes
    213
    4.00
    1 votes
    214

    Chemical Workers' Union

    The Chemical Workers' Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1971. Its General Secretary from 1947 until 1971 was Robert Edwards.
    4.00
    1 votes
    215
    4.00
    1 votes
    216
    4.00
    1 votes
    217

    International Molders and Foundry Workers Union of North America

    International Molders and Foundry Workers Union of North America is an affiliated trade union of the AFL-CIO. The union traces its roots back to the formation of the Iron Molders' Union of North America, established in 1859 to represent craftsmen who cast wrought iron metal products. In the years prior to the American Civil War existing organization of workers in the iron industry was established on the basis of independent local groups. In 1859, there came a move to forming a national organization in the United States, and the Iron Molders' Union was established at a convention held in Philadelphia on July 5. The first national convention was attended by 35 delegates, representing local iron molders organizations located throughout the Northeast and as far West as St. Louis. William C. Rea of Missouri was elected the first president of the organization and a committee of five headed by William H. Sylvis of Pennsylvania was appointed to prepare a declaration to the iron workers of America. The Molders' Union initially took the form of a loose federation of already existing local organizations, each retaining almost complete autonomy. Initial dues were set by the organization at $10
    4.00
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    218

    London Typographical Society

    The London Typographical Society was a British trade union. The union was founded as the London Union of Compositors in 1834 by the merger of the London Trade Society of Compositors and the London General Trade Society of Compositors. The following year, it was joined by the News Society of Compositors. In 1845, the union was officially dissolved, its members designating it the South Eastern District of the National Typographical Association. The national organisation collapsed, and the London group re-established itself as the London Society of Compositors The union had a membership of over 10,000 by 1910, and attempted to expand outside London, but the Trades Union Congress instituted arbitration which limited it to a fifteen-mile radius of central London, the Typographical Association having rights to organise in the remainder of England. In 1955, the Society merged with the Printing Machine Managers' Trade Society and was renamed the "London Typographical Society". In 1964, it merged with the Typographical Association to form the National Graphical Association.
    4.00
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    219

    National Communications Union

    The National Communications Union was a trade union in the United Kingdom. The union was founded in 1985 when the Post Office Engineering Union and the Postal and Telecommunications Group of the Civil and Public Services Association merged. In 1995, it merged with the Union of Communication Workers to form the Communication Workers Union
    4.00
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    220
    4.00
    1 votes
    221

    Patiala Aviation Club Workers Union

    Patiala Aviation Club Workers Union, a trade union organizing workers at the Patiala Aviation Club in Patiala, Punjab, India. PACWU is affiliated to the All India Trade Union Congress. The president of PACWU is Balinder Kumar Sharma. In the period of 1999-2001 PAC workers were not paid salaries for over two years, something that was highlighted by the PACWU.
    4.00
    1 votes
    222

    Public Services, Tax and Commerce Union

    The Public Services, Tax and Commerce Union (PTC) was a short-lived trade union in the United Kingdom. The union was formed in January 1996, when the Inland Revenue Staff Federation merged with the National Union of Civil and Public Servants. The general secretaries of the two former unions, Clive Brooke and John Sheldon respectively, became joint general secretaries of the new union. The union's primarily worked in the Civil Service, but also in other public organisations. In March 1998, the union joined with the Civil and Public Services Association (CPSA), forming the Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS).
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    223
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    224
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    0 votes
    225
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    226

    Canadian Actors' Equity Association

    • Professions represented: Actor
    Canadian Actors' Equity Association is an association of performers in English Canada who are engaged in live performances before paying audiences in theatre, opera and dance. It negotiates agreements and working conditions for its membership, and represents about 5,500 professional artists, which includes actors, dancers, and opera singers, as well as theatre directors, choreographers, fight directors and stage managers. Stage actors in Canada had been represented informally by ACTRA since the 1940's, but at the time of the founding of the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in 1953, they sought their own union representation. As a result of meetings in Montreal between the Canadian Council of Authors and Artists (an umbrella organization) and the American Actors' Equity Association, AEA, the actors worked under AEA contracts. The first meeting of the Canadian branch was held in Toronto in February 1955. In 1972 the Canadian government called upon Equity members to decide their tax status, and members voted by a narrow margin in favour of independent contractor status, thereby foregoing the benefits of being employees. By 1974, a survey revealed that the membership wanted to form its
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    227
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    228
    Confederación Nacional del Trabajo/Translation

    Confederación Nacional del Trabajo/Translation

    The Confederación Nacional del Trabajo (CNT; "National Confederation of Labour") is a Spanish confederation of anarcho-syndicalist labour unions affiliated with the International Workers Association (IWA; Spanish: AIT – Asociación Internacional de los Trabajadores). When working with the latter group it is also known as CNT-AIT. Historically, the CNT has also been affiliated with the Federación Anarquista Ibérica (Iberian Anarchist Federation – FAI). In this capacity it was referred to as the CNT-FAI. Throughout its history, it has played a major role in the Spanish labor movement. Founded in 1910 in Barcelona from groups brought together by the trade union Solidaridad Obrera, it significantly expanded the role of anarchism in Spain, which can be traced to the creation of the Federación de Trabajadores de la Región Española, the successor organization to the Spanish chapter of the IWA. Despite several decades when the organization was illegal in Spain, today the CNT continues to participate in the Spanish worker's movement, focusing its efforts on the principles of workers' self-management, federalism, and mutual aid. The CNT says of its membership, "We make no distinction at the
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    229

    Dock, Wharf, Riverside and General Labourers' Union

    The Dock, Wharf, Riverside and General Labourers Union (1889–1922) was a British trade union. It emerged in response to the outbreak of the London Dock Strike in 1889 and rapidly became the principal union for dockworkers in London, Bristol, Cardiff, and other ports in the south and south-west. In South Wales it attracted a large following amongst metal-workers. It was one of the prominent New Unions of unskilled workers that emerged in the late 1880s. The DWRGLU was a constituent of the National Transport Workers' Federation and a founder member of the Transport and General Workers Union in 1922. Its General Secretary was Ben Tillett. Ernest Bevin was a prominent official from 1910 onwards.
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    230

    General Workers' Union

    The General Workers' Union (Spanish: Unión General de Trabajadores; abbreviated UGT) was an Argentine national labor confederation from 1903 to 1909. It was founded in 1903 as a rival to the country's first national labor confederation, the Argentine Workers' Federation (FOA), known as the Argentine Regional Workers' Federation (FORA) from 1905. Around this time, the FOA had become more openly anarchist, leading to tension between the socialist syndicalists and the anarchists in the federation. The UGT was thus founded by the former and it was more moderate than its predecessor. Unlike the FOA, it did not discourage participation in elections and encouraged its members to become Argentine citizens - as the majority of the Argentine working class at the time consisted of European immigrants who were thus disenfranchised. Nonetheless, it claimed that general strike "can be an effective means of struggle", but rejected starting it for "violent ends". This position became more radical in the following years as the relations between the syndicalists in the UGT and the Socialist Party became more strained, and in 1906 the UGT declared that the general strike was "an arm of struggle of
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    231
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    232

    Iron, Steel and Wood Barge Builders and Helpers Association

    The Iron, Steel and Wood Barge Builders and Helpers Association was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It was founded in 1872 as the Barge Builders Trade Union, also known as the River Thames Barge Builders Trade Union, and adopted this title in 1940. Its initial membership was about 90 and rose to 400 by 1890. The General Secretary from 1879 to 1908 was William Charles Steadman. The Association merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in 1973.
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    233

    Malta Workers' Union

    The Malta Workers' Union (UHM) is a national trade union center in Malta. It was founded on 29 September 1966, under the name Malta Government Clerical Union (MGCU), and changed its name in 1978 to UHM. The union has members in both the private and public sectors, and emphasizes its political independence. This derives from the polarisation of the political set-up that affects trade unionism in Malta. Amongst the founder members of the Malta Workers Union (UHM), Salvino Spiteri and Maurice Agius respectively were the Union's first President and Secretary General. The UHM is affiliated with the Confederation of Malta Trade Unions (CMTU), which is in turn affiliated to the International Trade Union Confederation. It represents Maltese workers in various fora including Malta Council of Economic and Social Development (MCESD) and Malta European Steering and Action Committee (MEUSAC). The Union Haddiema Maghqudin (UHM) was founded on 29 September 1966, under the name of Malta Government Clerical Union (MGCU) with membership restricted to clerical employees in the Public Service. The Union was very well received by clerical employees and its membership immediately was encouraging. Its
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    234
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    235
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    236

    National Education, Health and Allied Workers' Union

    The National Education, Health and Allied Workers' Union (NEHAWU) is a trade union in South Africa. With a membership of 235,000 it is the largest public sector union in the country. It organizes State, Health, Education and Welfare workers. The NEHAWU is affiliated with the Congress of South African Trade Unions, and Public Services International.
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    237
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    238
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    239

    National Labor Union

    The National Labor Union (NLU) was the first national labor federation in the United States. Founded in 1866 and dissolved in 1873, it paved the way for other organizations, such as the Knights of Labor and the AFL (American Federation of Labor). It was led by William H. Sylvis. The National Labor Union followed the hiNational Labor Union sought instead to bring together all of the national labor organizations in existence, as well as the "eight-hour leagues" established to press for the eight-hour day, to create a national federation that could press for labor reforms and help found national unions in those areas where none existed. The new organization favored arbitration over strikes and called for the creation of a national labor party as an alternative to the two existing parties. The NLU drew much of its support from construction unions and other groups of skilled employees, but also invited the unskilled and farmers to join. On the other hand, it campaigned for the exclusion of Chinese workers from the United States and made only halting, ineffective efforts to defend the rights of women and blacks. African-American workers established their own Colored National Labor Union
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    240

    National Union of British Fishermen

    The National Union of British Fishermen was a trade union in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1917 in Grimsby by Captain Bingham, a retired fishing skipper, its chief rival, in terms of membership and blacklegging during disputes, was the National Union of Seamen. Although Bingham considered amalgamating with the NUS in 1919, he decided to maintain the independence of the union, which eventually collapsed due to low membership and the economic difficulties of the fishing industry in 1922. The union was officially merged with the Transport and General Workers' Union in the same year.
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    241
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    243

    South African Municipal Workers' Union

    The South African Municipal Workers' Union (SAMWU) is the largest Local Government Trade Union in South Africa. It was founded in 1987 and has a membership of 150,000. Membership of the union is open to South African workers employed directly or indirectly, in the local authority, water utilities and allied undertakings of the economy whether in the public, private or voluntary sector. Including; Public Administrative Services in Municipalities and Local Authorities, Health and Social Services, Libraries, cultural and other community services, Water and Sanitation, Solid Waste Management and Environmental Services, Road Construction and Storm water drainage, Electricity Generation and Distribution, Public Transportation and Traffic Control, Telecommunication and Information Services, Scientific and Technical Services, Parks and Recreation. The SAMWU is affiliated with the Congress of South African Trade Unions, and Public Services International.
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    244

    South African Transport and Allied Workers Union

    The South African Transport and Allied Workers Union (SATAWU) is a trade union in South Africa. It was founded in May, 2000 and has a membership of 82,000. SATAWU is an affiliate of the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU), and the International Transport Workers' Federation. In May 2008, the An Yue Jiang, a ship from the People's Republic of China bearing a large amount of Chinese-manufactured weapons that were bound for Zimbabwe, had docked in Durban harbor; but the dock employees, who were all members of SATAWU, refused to unload the ship of its inventory. SATAWU and COSATU supported the refusal of the cargo, and trade union federations in other southern African countries also refused to unload the ship when it subsequently redocked in other harbors, such as Walvis Bay and Luanda.
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    245
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    246

    Union of Insurance Staffs

    The Union of Insurance Staffs was a trade union in the United Kingdom for workers in the insurance industry. It was founded in 1919 as the Guild of Insurance Officials, and merged with the Association of Scientific, Technical and Management Staff in 1970.
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    247

    Works and Hydraulics Industrial Workers Union

    The Works and Hydraulics Industrial Workers Union was a trade union in Trinidad and Tobago that merged in 1957 with the Government Farm and Nursery Workers Trade Union and the Industrial and Railway Employees Trade Union to form the National Union of Government Employees
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