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Best Theater Director of All Time

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    1
    Charles Grodin

    Charles Grodin

    • Plays Directed: Lovers and Other Strangers
    Charles Grodin (born April 21, 1935) is an American actor, comedian, author, and former cable talk show host. Grodin began his acting career in the 1960s appearing in TV serials including The Virginian. He had a small part as an obstetrician in Roman Polanski's Rosemary's Baby in 1968. In the 1970s he moved into film acting, including playing the lead in The Heartbreak Kid and a supporting role in Catch-22. He became a familiar face as a supporting actor in many 1980s Hollywood comedies, including Midnight Run, Taking Care of Business, Seems Like Old Times, The Great Muppet Caper, The Woman in Red, The Lonely Guy, Ishtar and The Couch Trip. He is probably best known for his role as George Newton in the 1990s John Hughes comedy franchise Beethoven. Grodin has won several acting awards, including American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture for 1993's Dave, Best Actor at the 1988 Valladolid International Film Festival (for Midnight Run). He was nominated for Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for The Heartbreak Kid in 1972. He also shared a 1978 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music or Comedy
    8.57
    7 votes
    2
    Theodore Mann

    Theodore Mann

    • Plays Directed: Anna Karenina
    Theodore Mann, birth name Goldman, (May 13, 1924 – February 24, 2012) was an American theatre producer and director and the Artistic Director of the Circle in the Square Theatre School. Mann co-founded Circle in the Square Theatre, widely regarded as the birth of the off-Broadway theatre movement, with Jose Quintero in 1951. Ten years later, he established the Circle in the Square Theatre School to provide training for aspiring actors. It presently offers a two-year program including courses in scene study, text analysis, speech, dance, and singing technique. Mann produced and/or directed more than two hundred productions starring such luminaries as Al Pacino, Dustin Hoffman, Jason Robards, Geraldine Page, Colleen Dewhurst, James Earl Jones, Kevin Kline, Maureen Stapleton, Rip Torn, George C. Scott, and Jane Alexander. In addition to his Broadway and off-Broadway credits, he directed The Turn of the Screw for the New York City Opera, La Boheme for the Juilliard School, and The Night of the Iguana for Moscow's Maly Theater. Mann received a Tony Award, as producer of the 1957 revival of Long Day's Journey Into Night. He was nominated for twelve additional Tonys and seven Drama Desk
    6.75
    8 votes
    3

    Terry Kinney

    • Plays Directed: Reasons to Be Pretty
    Terry Kinney (born January 29, 1954) is an American actor and theatre director, and is a founding member of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company, with Gary Sinise and Jeff Perry. Best known for his role as Emerald City creator Tim McManus on HBO's prison drama Oz Kinney was born in Lincoln, Illinois, the son of Elizabeth L. (née Eimer), a telephone operator, and Kenneth C. Kinney, a tractor company supervisor. He attended Illinois State University, in Normal, Illinois, where he became friends with Jeff Perry, who took him to see a performance of Grease featuring Gary Sinise, bringing the three Steppenwolf Theatre Company co-founders together for the first time. Kinney has been involved in theatre since 1974, when he, Gary Sinise and Jeff Perry founded the Steppenwolf Theatre Company. He has directed several plays (see below) and performed in several. In 1985 he performed in the Drama Desk Award winning play Balm in Gilead by Lanford Wilson. In 1996 Kinney played Tilden in the Sam Shepard play Buried Child directed by Gary Sinise in New York City. During a performance of Buried Child Kinney had a "terrible, horrible, screaming panic attack" and stayed offstage for several years, only
    8.00
    6 votes
    4
    Clinton D. Powell

    Clinton D. Powell

    Reportedly born in Reidsville, Georgia, Clinton D. Powell grew up in Savannah, where he graduated from Alfred E. Beach High School and participated in the Upward Bound Program at Savannah State University. He later studied at both Tuskegee University in Alabama and again at Savannah State. He is one of he most popular spoken word artists and creative arts advocates to come out of Savannah, Georgia.
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    Gary Sinise

    Gary Sinise

    • Plays Directed: Buried Child
    Gary Alan Sinise ( /səˈniːs/; born March 17, 1955) is an American actor, film director, and musician. During his career, Sinise has won various awards including an Emmy and a Golden Globe Award and was nominated for an Academy Award. In 1992, Sinise directed, and played the role of George Milton in the successful film adaptation of Of Mice and Men. Sinise was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1994 for his role as Lt. Dan Taylor in Forrest Gump. He won a Golden Globe Award for his role in Truman, as Harry S. Truman. In 1996, he played a corrupt police officer in the dramatic hit Ransom, Detective Jimmy Shaker. In 1998, Sinise was awarded an Emmy Award for the television film George Wallace, a portrayal of the late George C. Wallace. Since 2004, Sinise has starred in CBS's CSI: NY as Detective Mac Taylor. Sinise was born in Blue Island, Illinois, the son of Mylles S. (née Alsip; b. 1932) and Robert L. Sinise (b. 1931), the latter of whom was a film editor. He is of part Italian ancestry (from his paternal grandfather). He attended Highland Park High School in Highland Park, Illinois. In 1974, Sinise and two friends, Terry Kinney and Jeff Perry, founded the
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    John Gielgud

    John Gielgud

    • Plays Directed: Ivanov
    Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH, Kt (/ˈɡiːlɡʊd/; 14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000) was an English actor, director, and producer. A descendant of the renowned Terry acting family, he achieved early international acclaim for his youthful, emotionally expressive Hamlet which broke box office records on Broadway in 1937. He was known for his beautiful speaking of verse and particularly for his warm and expressive voice, which his colleague Sir Alec Guinness likened to "a silver trumpet muffled in silk". Gielgud is one of the few entertainers who have won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award. John Gielgud was born in South Kensington in London to Katie Terry and Frank Gielgud. He had a theatrical lineage - on his father's side his great grandmother Aniela Aszpergerowa, had been a well known Lithuanian actress,- and on his mother's side, being the grandson of actress Kate Terry, whose actor-siblings included Ellen Terry, Marion Terry and Fred Terry. Gielgud's Catholic father, Franciszek Giełgud, born in 1880, was a descendant of a Polish noble family residing at a manor in a town called Giełgudyszki (now Gelgaudiškis in Marijampolė County, Lithuania). In his autobiography, Gielgud states
    8.40
    5 votes
    7

    George Axelrod

    • Plays Directed: Once More, with Feeling
    George Axelrod (June 9, 1922 – June 21, 2003) was an American screenwriter, producer, playwright and film director, best known for his play, The Seven Year Itch (1952), which was adapted into a movie of the same name starring Marilyn Monroe. He was nominated for an Academy Award for his 1961 adaptation of Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's and also adapted Richard Condon's The Manchurian Candidate (1962). Axelrod was born in New York City, New York, the son of Beatrice Carpenter, a silent film actress, and Herman Axelrod, who worked in real estate. His mother was of Scottish and English descent and his father Russian Jewish. He is the father of lawyer Peter Axelrod, painting contractor and writer Steven Axelrod, actress Nina Axelrod and stepfather of screenwriter Jonathan Axelrod (who married the actress Illeana Douglas). After serving in the Army Signal Corps during World War II, the New York-born Axelrod found work writing scripts for radio programs, including The Shadow, Midnight and Grand Ole Opry, eventually branching into television. He said he contributed to or collaborated on more than 400 TV and radio scripts and wrote for top comedians, including Jerry Lewis and Dean
    6.29
    7 votes
    8
    Sam Shepard

    Sam Shepard

    • Plays Directed: Fool For Love
    Sam Shepard (born Samuel Shepard Rogers IV; November 5, 1943) is an American playwright, actor, and television and film director. He is the author of several books of short stories, essays, and memoirs, and received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for his play Buried Child. Shepard was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of pilot Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff (1983). Shepard received the PEN/Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater Award as a master American dramatist in 2009. Born Samuel Shepard Rogers IV in Fort Sheridan, Illinois, he worked on a ranch as a teenager. His father, Samuel Shepard Rogers, Jr., was a teacher and farmer who served in the United States Army Air Forces as a bomber pilot during World War II. His mother, Jane Elaine (née Schook), was a teacher and a native of Chicago, Illinois. After high school, Shepard briefly attended college, but dropped out to join a travelling theater group. He was also a drummer for the eccentric late-1960s rock band The Holy Modal Rounders, featured in the movie Easy Rider (1969). Shepard became involved in New York City's Off-Off-Broadway theater scene beginning at the age of
    9.50
    4 votes
    9
    Donald McKayle

    Donald McKayle

    • Plays Directed: Raisin
    Donald McKayle (born July 6, 1930, New York City) is an African American modern dancer, choreographer, teacher, director and writer best known for creating socially conscious concert works during the 1950s and 60s that focus on expressing the human condition and more specifically, the black experience in America. He was, "Among the first black men to break the racial barrier by means of modern dance,". His talents extend beyond the concert stage as McKayle has also performed and choreographed for Broadway musicals, theatre, television, and film. He has worked with many choreographers such as Martha Graham, Alvin Ailey, Anna Sokolow, and Merce Cunningham. A Tony Award and Emmy Award nominee, McKayle is currently a Professor of Dance, Modern Technique and Choreography, at UC Irvine, in the Claire Trevor School of the Arts Dance Department. He has served on the faculties of Connecticut College, Sarah Lawrence College, and Bennington College. McKayle was born in New York City on July 6, 1930 and grew up in a racially mixed, East Harlem community of African American, Puerto Rican, and Jewish immigrants. He was the second child of a middle class, immigrant family of Jamaican
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Simon Callow

    Simon Callow

    • Plays Directed: Shirley Valentine
    Simon Phillip Hugh Callow, CBE (born 15 June 1949) is an English actor, musician, writer and theatre director. Callow was born in Streatham, London, England, UK, the son of Yvonne Mary (née Guise), a secretary, and Neil Francis Callow, a businessman. His father was of English and French descent and his mother was of Danish and German ancestry. He was brought up Roman Catholic. Callow attended the London Oratory School and then went on to study at Queen's University Belfast ('Queen's') in Northern Ireland before giving up his degree course to go into acting at the Drama Centre London. Callow's immersion in the theatre began after he wrote a fan letter to Sir Laurence Olivier, the Artistic Director of the National Theatre, and received a response suggesting he join their box office staff. It was while watching actors rehearse that he realised he wanted to act. Callow made his stage debut in 1973, appearing in The Thrie Estates at the Assembly Rooms Theatre, Edinburgh. In the early 1970s he joined the Gay Sweatshop theatre company and performed in Martin Sherman's critically acclaimed Passing By. In 1977 he took various parts in the Joint Stock Theatre Company's production of Epsom
    9.25
    4 votes
    11

    Cyril Ritchard

    • Plays Directed: The Jockey Club Stakes
    Cyril Ritchard (1 December 1897 – 18 December 1977) was an Australian stage, screen and television actor, and director. He is probably best remembered today for his performance as Captain Hook in the Mary Martin musical production of Peter Pan. He was born Cyril Trimnell-Ritchard in Surry Hills, Sydney, Australia, to Sydney-born parents, Herbert Trimnell-Ritchard, a Protestant grocer, and his wife Marguerite, a devout Roman Catholic who ensured her son was raised as a Roman Catholic. Educated by the Jesuits at St Aloysius' College, Cyril was a lifelong devout Catholic who attended Sunday Mass wherever he happened to be. Early in his career, Ritchard played in numerous musical comedies, including Yes, Uncle! and Going Up, both in 1918 with actress Madge Elliott (who later became his wife). He achieved star status in 1954 as Captain Hook in the Broadway production of Peter Pan co-starring Mary Martin, with whom he shared the same birthday (1 December). For his work in the show, Ritchard received a Tony Award as Best Featured Actor in a Musical. Both Ritchard and Martin reprised their roles in the NBC television productions of the musical, beginning with a live color telecast in 1955.
    8.00
    5 votes
    12

    Deborah Warner

    • Plays Directed: Medea
    Deborah Warner CBE (born 12 May 1959) is a British director of theatre and opera known for her interpretations of the works of Shakespeare, Bertolt Brecht, Georg Büchner, and Henrik Ibsen, and for her long-term working relationship with the Irish actress Fiona Shaw. Warner was born in Oxfordshire, England to antiquarians, Roger Harold Metford Warner and Ruth Ernestine Hurcombe. She studied theatre and stage management at drama school, and then in 1980 founded the KICK theatre company for young talented amateur actors when she was 21. Warner was raised as a Quaker but no longer practices the faith. In 1987 Warner joined the Royal Shakespeare Company, where she would later direct Titus Andronicus. At the RSC she began her long-time collaboration with Fiona Shaw. The two women have collaborated on plays including Electra (RSC); The Good Person of Sezuan (1989, National Theatre); Hedda Gabler (1991, The Abbey Theatre and BBC2); the controversial Richard II, with Shaw in the title role, also at the National Theatre (1995) and televised by BBC2; Footfalls, whose radical staging so enraged the Beckett estate that the production was pulled during its run; The PowerBook, at the National
    8.00
    5 votes
    13

    George Abbott

    • Plays Directed: On Your Toes
    George Francis Abbott (June 25, 1887 – January 31, 1995) was an American theater producer and director, playwright, screenwriter, and film director and producer whose career spanned more than nine decades. Abbott was born in Forestville, New York, and later moved to the town of Salamanca, which twice elected his father mayor. In 1898, his family moved to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he attended Kearney Military Academy. Within a few years, his family returned to New York, and he graduated from Hamburg High School in 1907. Four years later, he obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Rochester, where he wrote his first play, Perfectly Harmless, for the University Dramatic Club. Abbott then went to Harvard University, where he studied playwriting under George Pierce Baker. Under his tutelage, he wrote The Head of the Family, which was performed at the Harvard Dramatic Club in 1912. He then worked for a year as assistant stage manager at the Bijou Theatre in Boston, where his play The Man in the Manhole won a contest. While acting in several plays in New York City, he began to write; his first successful play was The Fall Guy (1925). Abbott acquired a reputation as an
    8.00
    5 votes
    14
    Arthur Allan Seidelman

    Arthur Allan Seidelman

    • Plays Directed: Billy
    Arthur Allan Seidelman is an award-winning American television, film, and theatre director and an occasional writer, producer, and actor. Born in New York City, he received his B.A. from Whittier College and an M.A. in Theatre from UCLA.  He subsequently studied with Sanford Meisner, who became a lifelong friend and mentor. Seidelman made his screen directorial debut with Hercules in New York, a 1970 comedy-action film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. Additional credits include The Caller, Walking Across Egypt, Puerto Vallarta Squeeze, The Sisters, The Awakening of Spring and Children of Rage (which he also wrote).  While researching that film, he lived extensively in the Middle East, including in refugee camps in Lebanon, where at one point, he was taken hostage by extremists.  The film went on to be screened for major international bodies around the world, including the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the United Nations. He has directed over fifty motion pictures and one hundred stage productions. Most of Seidelman's career has been spent in television directing movies such as Macbeth, Like Mother Like Son: The Strange Story of Sante and Kenny Kimes, Poker
    9.00
    4 votes
    15

    Walter Kerr

    • Plays Directed: Goldilocks
    For the RN admiral see Lord Walter Kerr Walter Francis Kerr (July 8, 1913 – October 9, 1996) was an American writer and Broadway theater critic. He also was the writer, lyricist, and/or director of several Broadway plays and musicals. Kerr was born in Evanston, Illinois and earned both a B.A. and M.A. from Northwestern University. He taught speech and drama at The Catholic University of America. After writing criticism for Commonweal he became a theater critic for the New York Herald Tribune in 1951. When that paper ended, he then began writing theater reviews for the New York Times in 1966, writing for the next seventeen years. He married Jean Kerr (née Collins) on August 9, 1943. She was also a writer. Together, they wrote the musical Goldilocks (1958), which won two Tony Awards. They also collaborated on Touch and Go (1949) and King of Hearts (1954). He was portrayed pseudonymously by David Niven in the 1960 film Please Don't Eat the Daisies, based on Jean Kerr's best-selling collection of humorous essays. Some of the shows he panned over his long career included the musically ambitious shows of Stephen Sondheim. Of Sondheim's Company, Kerr wrote that the show was too cold,
    6.67
    6 votes
    16
    June Havoc

    June Havoc

    • Plays Directed: Marathon '33
    June Havoc (November 8, 1912 – March 28, 2010) was a Canadian-born American actress, dancer, writer, and theater director. Havoc was a child Vaudeville performer under the tutelage of her mother. She later acted on Broadway and in Hollywood, and stage directed, both on and off-Broadway. She last appeared on television in 1990 on General Hospital. Havoc was the younger sister of burlesque entertainer Gypsy Rose Lee. She was born as either "Ellen Evangeline Hovick" or "Ellen June Hovick," in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, probably in 1912, although some sources indicate 1913. She herself was uncertain of the year – according to The New York Times obituary, her mother forged several birth certificates. (Her mother reportedly had five birth certificates for her.) Her lifelong career in show business began when she was a child, billed as "Baby June". Her only full sibling, Rose Louise Hovick (1911–1970), was called "Louise" by her family members. Their parents were Rose Thompson Hovick (1890–1954) and John Olaf Hovick, a Norwegian American, who worked as a newspaper advertising man. Following their parents' divorce, the two sisters earned the family's income by appearing in
    8.75
    4 votes
    17

    Abe Burrows

    • Plays Directed: Can-Can
    Abe Burrows (December 18, 1910 – May 17, 1985) was an American humorist, author, and director for radio and the stage. He won a Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize. Born Abram Solman Borowitz in New York City, Burrows graduated from New Utrecht High School in Brooklyn and later attended both City College and New York University. He began working as a runner on Wall Street while at NYU, and he also worked in an accounting firm. After he met Frank Galen in 1938, the two wrote and sold jokes to an impressionist who appeared on the Rudy Vallée radio program. His radio career gained strength when he collaborated with Ed Gardner, the writer and star of radio legend Duffy's Tavern. The two created the successful series after Gardner's character, Archie, premiered on the earlier radio program, This Is New York. Burrows was made the show's head writer in 1941, and he credited the experience with investing the Runyonesque street characters he fashioned for Guys and Dolls. "The people on that show," Burrows once said about Duffy's Tavern, "were New York mugs, nice mugs, sweet mugs, and like (Damon) Runyon's mugs they all talked like ladies and gentlemen. That's how we treated the characters in Guys
    7.40
    5 votes
    18

    Dan Jones

    • Plays Directed: Going Dark
    Dan Jones is a BAFTA award winning composer and sound designer working in film and theatre. He read music at the University of Oxford, studied contemporary music theatre at the Banff Centre for the Arts and studied electro-acoustic composition and programming at the Centro Ricerche Musicali in Rome. Having explored various means of generating music algorithmically, he is the author of one of the earliest pieces of software for generating fractal or self-similar music. His scores for feature films include Shadow of the Vampire (starring John Malkovich, Willem Dafoe), Jericho Mansions (starring James Caan) and Menno Meyjes' Max (starring John Cusack), for which he received the Ivor Novello Award for Best Film Score 2004. He also scored Meyjes' follow up film "Manolete" (starring Adrien Brody and Penelope Cruz). He has written for all the major British television broadcasters and his work includes Sir David Attenborough's The Life of Mammals, the BBC series Strange, Pawel Pawlikowski's drama "Twockers", Charlie Brooker's Channel 4 horror series "Dead Set" and Francesca Joseph's "Tomorrow La Scala", Channel 4's three part documentary " Visions of Heaven and Hell" shown in 1994. He
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Joshua Logan

    Joshua Logan

    • Plays Directed: Middle of the Night
    Joshua Lockwood Logan III (October 5, 1908 – July 12, 1988) was an American stage and film director and writer. Logan was born in Texarkana, Texas, the son of Susan (née Nabors) and Joshua Lockwood Logan. When he was three years old his father committed suicide. Logan, his mother, and younger sister, Mary Lee, then moved to his maternal grandparents’ home in Mansfield, Louisiana, which Logan used forty years later as the setting for his play The Wisteria Trees. Logan's mother remarried six years after his father's death and he then attended Culver Military Academy in Culver, Indiana, where his stepfather served on the staff. At school, he experienced his first drama class and felt at home. After his high school graduation he attended Princeton University. At Princeton, he was involved with the intercollegiate summer stock company, known as the University Players, with fellow student James Stewart and also non-student Henry Fonda. During his senior year he served as president of the Princeton Triangle Club. Before his graduation he won a scholarship to study in Moscow with Constantin Stanislavsky, and Logan left school without a diploma. Logan began his Broadway career as an actor
    5.57
    7 votes
    20
    Joel Grey

    Joel Grey

    • Plays Directed: The Normal Heart
    Joel Grey (born April 11, 1932) is an American stage and screen actor, singer, and dancer, known for his role as the Master of Ceremonies in both the stage and film adaptation of the Kander & Ebb musical Cabaret. He has won the Academy Award, Tony Award and Golden Globe Award. He also originated the role of the Wizard in the musical Wicked. Grey is featured in the Broadway revival of Anything Goes as Moonface Martin, which opened on April 7, 2011. Grey was born as Joel David Katz in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Goldie "Grace" (née Epstein) and Mickey Katz, an actor, comedian, and musician. Grey started his career as a child actor in the Cleveland Play House. He attended Alexander Hamilton High School in Los Angeles. Grey originated the role of the Master of Ceremonies in the Broadway musical Cabaret in 1966 for which he won the Tony Award. Additional Broadway credits include Come Blow Your Horn (1961), Stop the World - I Want to Get Off (1962), Half a Sixpence (1965), George M! (1968), Goodtime Charley (1975), The Grand Tour (1979), Chicago (1996), Wicked (2003), and Anything Goes (2011). In November 1995, he performed as the Wizard in The Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Come True a
    6.33
    6 votes
    21
    Sam Wanamaker

    Sam Wanamaker

    • Plays Directed: A Case of Libel
    Samuel Wanamaker (June 14, 1919 – December 18, 1993) was an American film director and actor and is credited as the person most responsible for the modern recreation of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre in London. He was the father of actress Zoë Wanamaker. Wanamaker was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Ukrainian Jewish immigrants from Nikolayev, tailor Maurice Wattenmacker (Manus Watmakher) and Molly Bobele. He was the younger of two brothers, the elder being William Wanamaker, long time cardiologist at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. Wanamaker trained at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago and began working with summer stock theatre companies in Chicago and northern Wisconsin, where he helped build the stage of the Peninsula Players Theatre in 1937. Wanamaker began his acting career in traveling shows and later worked on Broadway. In 1940, he married Charlotte Holland, a Canadian radio soap star of the 1940s and later an actress. In 1943, Wanamaker was part of the cast of the play Counterattack at the National Theatre, Washington D.C.. During the play he became enamored of the ideals of Communism and joined the American Communist Party. He attended Drake University prior to
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    Alfred Lunt

    Alfred Lunt

    • Plays Directed: Quadrille
    Alfred Lunt (August 12, 1892 – August 3, 1977) was an American stage director and actor, often identified for a long-time professional partnership with his wife, actress Lynn Fontanne. Broadway's Lunt-Fontanne Theatre was named for them. Lunt received two Tony Awards, an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor for 1931's The Guardsman and an Emmy Award for the Hallmark Hall of Fame's production of The Magnificent Yankee. He became a star in 1919 as the buffoonish lead in Booth Tarkington's play, Clarence, but soon distinguished himself in a variety of roles. The roles ranged from the Earl of Essex in Maxwell Anderson's Elizabeth the Queen, to a song-and-dance man touring the Balkans in Robert E. Sherwood's Idiot's Delight, a megalomaniacal tycoon in S. N. Behrman's Meteor and Jupiter himself in Jean Giraudoux's Amphitryon 38. His appearances in classical drama were infrequent, but he scored successes in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew and Chekhov's The Seagull (in which Lunt played Trigorin, his wife played Arkadina, and Uta Hagen made her Broadway debut in the role of Nina). He was described by director and critic Harold Clurman as "universally acclaimed the finest American
    7.00
    5 votes
    23
    Eric Thompson

    Eric Thompson

    • Plays Directed: Jeeves
    Eric Norman Thompson (9 November 1929 – 30 November 1982) was an English actor, television presenter and producer. He was best known for narrating The Magic Roundabout. Thompson was born in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England, the son of George Henry and Anne Thompson, and grew up Rudgwick, Sussex, attending Collyer's School, Horsham. He trained to be an actor at the Old Vic acting school in London and joined the Old Vic theatre company in 1952. He worked mostly for the BBC, and was a presenter of the children's television programme Play School in the 1960s. He was best known as the narrator of The Magic Roundabout, for which he wrote the English-language scripts, using the visuals from the French Le Manège Enchanté. These were transmitted between October 1965 and January 1977. Thompson rarely worked on television after his voice became well-known, but occasionally appeared in programmes such as Doctor Who in the serial The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve in 1966. On 30 November 1982 Thompson died of a pulmonary embolism in London three weeks after his 53rd birthday. His death was widely reported as he was well known for his voice acting and narration. In 1992, ten years after
    7.00
    5 votes
    24

    Jim Simpson

    • Plays Directed: Heresy
    James "Jim" Simpson (born February 21, 1956 in Hawaii) is a theater and film director, known for a commitment to avant-garde work. He is the founder of The Flea Theater in New York City. He is married to the actress Sigourney Weaver and the couple have one daughter, Charlotte. He is of Scottish descent. In 2002, Simpson directed the film The Guys starring his wife, Sigourney Weaver.
    9.33
    3 votes
    25

    James Whale

    • Plays Directed: Journey's End
    James Whale (22 July 1889 – 29 May 1957) was an English film director, theatre director and actor. He is best remembered for his work in the horror film genre, having directed such classics as Frankenstein (1931), The Old Dark House (1932), The Invisible Man (1933) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935). Whale directed over a dozen films in other genres, including what is considered the definitive film version of the musical Show Boat (1936). He became increasingly disenchanted with his association with horror, but many of his non-horror films have fallen into obscurity. Born into a large family in Dudley, England, Whale early discovered his artistic talent and studied art. With the outbreak of World War I, Whale enlisted in the British Army and became an officer. He was captured by the Germans and during his time as a prisoner of war he realized he was interested in drama. Following his release at the end of the war he became an actor, set designer and director. His success directing the 1928 play Journey's End led to his move to the United States, first to direct the play on Broadway and then to Hollywood to direct motion pictures. Whale lived in Hollywood for the rest of his life,
    6.80
    5 votes
    26
    John Crowley

    John Crowley

    • Plays Directed: The Pillowman
    John Crowley (born 1969) is an Irish television, theatre and film director. He is perhaps best known for his feature film debut Intermission (2003). Crowley earned a B.A. in philosophy from University College Cork. Crowley became involved in theatre as a student, seeing it as a stepping stone to directing film. He began directing plays in Dublin in the early 90s, reached London's West End by 1996 and eventually become an associate director at the Donmar Warehouse. In 2000, he directed Come and Go as part of the Beckett on Film series and made his feature debut Intermission (2003) a comedy drama set in Dublin, starring Colin Farrell, Cillian Murphy and Kelly MacDonald, based on a screenplay by playwright Mark O'Rowe. In May 2005 Crowley, along with Danny Boyle, launched the UK Film Council Development Fund's "25 Words or Less: Director’s Cut" scheme to develop a feature film project, stating that he wanted particularly to "create a contemporary 'rebirth' or transformation story about a man or woman who begins as someone that spreads coldness." In 2007, he reteamed with O'Rowe for the thought-provoking BAFTA-winning drama Boy A, about a young man's return to civilian life after
    6.80
    5 votes
    27

    Moisés Kaufman

    • Plays Directed: Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo
    Moisés Kaufman (born November 21, 1963) is a playwright, director and founder of Tectonic Theater Project. He is best known for writing The Laramie Project with other members of Tectonic Theater Project. He is also the author of Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde and 33 Variations. He was born and raised in Caracas, Venezuela and moved to New York City in 1987. Kaufman is of Romanian and Ukrainian Jewish descent. He described himself in an interview as "I am Venezuelan, I am Jewish, I am gay, I live in New York. I am the sum of all my cultures. I couldn’t write anything that didn’t incorporate all that I am." Kaufman was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002. He made his Broadway directing debut in the 2004 production of I Am My Own Wife by Doug Wright, for which he received a Tony Award nomination for Best Direction of a Play.
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    Alan Ayckbourn

    Alan Ayckbourn

    • Plays Directed: Jeeves
    Sir Alan Ayckbourn CBE (born 12 April 1939) is a prolific English playwright. He has written and produced more than seventy full-length plays in Scarborough and London and was, between 1972 and 2009, the artistic director of the Stephen Joseph Theatre in Scarborough, where all but four of his plays have received their first performance. More than 40 have subsequently been produced in the West End, at the Royal National Theatre or by the Royal Shakespeare Company since his first hit Relatively Speaking opened at the Duke of York's Theatre in 1967. Major successes include Absurd Person Singular (1975), The Norman Conquests trilogy (1973), Bedroom Farce (1975), Just Between Ourselves (1976), A Chorus of Disapproval (1984), Woman in Mind (1985), A Small Family Business (1987), Man Of The Moment (1988), House & Garden (1999) and Private Fears in Public Places (2004). His plays have won numerous awards, including seven London Evening Standard Awards. They have been translated into over 35 languages and are performed on stage and television throughout the world. Ten of his plays have been staged on Broadway, attracting two Tony nominations, and one Tony award. Ayckbourn was born in
    7.75
    4 votes
    29

    Jed Harris

    • Plays Directed: The Heiress
    Jed Harris (born Jacob Hirsch Horowitz in Lviv, Austria-Hungary) (February 25, 1900 - November 15, 1979) was a renowned Austrian-American theater producer and director, and writer of film. Jed Harris was born in Vienna, Austria, on February 25, 1900. By the time he was 28, Harris had produced a record four consecutive Broadway hits, over the course of eighteen months. Harris was married three times, first to Anita Green (December 11, 1925–1929), then to Louise Platt (1939–1941) — with whom he collaborated on The Traitor and Spring Dance, and finally to Beatrice Allen (April 1, 1957 – December 1957). His romances included one with the American fashion designer Pauline Fairfax Potter, and he had a son, Jones, with renowned actress and playwright Ruth Gordon born in 1929. He also had a daughter, Abigail, with Louise Platt in 1943. He had a relationship with Henry Fonda's first wife Margaret Sullavan around 1932/4. Jed Harris produced and directed 31 shows between 1925 and 1956. His productions garnered 7 awards, including a Tony award and Pulitzer Prize for playwright Thornton Wilder. Harris directed four actors in award-winning roles in Child of Fortune, The Crucible, The Traitor,
    7.75
    4 votes
    30
    Laurence Olivier

    Laurence Olivier

    • Plays Directed: Hamlet
    Sir Laurence Kerr Olivier, The Baron Olivier, OM, Kt ( /ˈlɒrəns ɵˈlɪvi.eɪ/; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an English actor, director, and producer. One of the most famous and revered actors of the 20th century, he was the youngest actor to be knighted as a Knight Bachelor and the first to be elevated to the peerage. He was married three times, to actresses Jill Esmond, Vivien Leigh, and Joan Plowright. Actor Spencer Tracy once stated that Olivier was "the greatest actor in the English-speaking world". Olivier played a wide variety of roles on stage and screen from Greek tragedy, Shakespeare and Restoration comedy to modern American and British drama. He was the first artistic director of the National Theatre of Great Britain and its main stage is named in his honour. He is regarded by some to be the greatest actor of the 20th century, in the same category as David Garrick, Richard Burbage, Edmund Kean and Henry Irving in their own centuries. Olivier's AMPAS acknowledgments are considerable: twelve Oscar nominations, with two awards (for Best Actor and Best Picture for the 1948 film Hamlet), plus two honorary awards including a statuette and certificate. He was also awarded five
    7.75
    4 votes
    31

    Mary Zimmerman

    • Plays Directed: Metamorphoses
    Mary Zimmerman (born 23 August 1960) is an American theatre director and playwright from Nebraska. She is an ensemble member of the Lookingglass Theatre Company, the Manilow Resident Director at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, Illinois, and also serves as the Jaharis Family Foundation Professor of Performance Studies at Northwestern University. Although Zimmerman was born in Lincoln, Nebraska she spent much of her childhood in Europe, splitting time between her parents' home outside London in Hampstead Garden, England and in Paris, France. Both of her parents were academics at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, her father a physics professor and her mother a professor of comparative literature who studied the author Georges Sand. Zimmerman studied theatre and performance studies at Northwestern University, where received a BS in theatre (1982) in addition to an MA (1985) and PhD (1994) in performance studies. She is currently a faculty member in the Performance Studies department at Northwestern. She has earned national and international recognition in the form of numerous awards, including the prestigious John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship (1998). She has received more
    7.75
    4 votes
    32

    Jack Hofsiss

    • Plays Directed: The Shadow Box
    Jack Hofsiss (born 1950) is an American theatre, film and television director. He received a Tony Award for his direction of The Elephant Man on Broadway, the youngest director to have ever received it at the time. The production also garnered him the Drama Desk Award, Outer Critics Circle Award, an Obie Award and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. Hofsiss grew up in New York City as a Catholic and served as an altar boy, which he claims was his "first experience of theatre." He is a 1971 graduate of Georgetown University. After a directing stint at the Folger Theatre in Washington, D.C., he became a casting director in New York for several years. He then directed The Best of Families, a mini-series, for television in 1977. He also directed for TV Out of Our Father's House (1978), 3 by Cheever: The Sorrows of Gin (1979), The Elephant Man (1982), "Family Secrets (1984), and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1985). In 1982 he directed the film I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can. In 1985, Hoffsiss dived into a pool and suffered a spinal cord injury, and he now uses a wheelchair. Hofsiss appeared in the documentary The Needs of Kim Stanley in 2005.
    6.60
    5 votes
    33
    Stephen Schwartz

    Stephen Schwartz

    • Plays Directed: Working
    Stephen Lawrence Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is an American musical theatre lyricist and composer. In a career spanning over four decades, Schwartz has written such hit musicals as Godspell (1971), Pippin (1972) and Wicked (2003). He has also contributed lyrics for a number of successful films, including Pocahontas (1995), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), Pippi Longstocking (1997), The Prince of Egypt (1998; music and lyrics) and Enchanted (2007). Schwartz has won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lyrics, three Grammy Awards, three Academy Awards and has been nominated for six Tony Awards. Schwartz was born in New York City, the son of Sheila Lorna (née Siegal), a teacher, and Stanley Leonard Schwartz, who worked in business. He grew up in the Williston Park area of Nassau County, New York, where he graduated from Mineola High School in 1964. He also studied piano and composition at the Juilliard School while attending high school. Schwartz graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in 1968 with a BFA in drama. Upon returning to New York City, Schwartz went to work as a producer for RCA Records, but shortly thereafter began to work in the Broadway theatre. He was asked to be
    6.60
    5 votes
    34

    Burt Shevelove

    • Plays Directed: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
    Burt Shevelove (September 19, 1915 - April 8, 1982) was an American musical theater playwright, lyricist, librettist, and director. Born in Newark, New Jersey, he graduated from Brown University and Yale (Master's degree). At Brown in 1935, he acted in the first ever Brownbrokers musical titled Something Bruin. After serving as a volunteer ambulance driver in WWII, he began working as a writer, director and producer for radio and television. At the time of his death he had lived in London for many years. His Broadway career started in 1948 with writing material, co-producing and directing for the revue Small Wonder. Among his successes were A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum and No, No, Nanette, for which he won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Book of a Musical.
    7.50
    4 votes
    35

    Franco Zeffirelli

    • Plays Directed: The Lady of the Camellias
    Franco Zeffirelli, KBE (Italian pronunciation: [ˈfraŋko dzeffiˈrɛlli]; born 12 February 1923) is an Italian director and producer of films and television. He is also a director and designer of operas and a former senator (1994–2001) for the Italian centre-right Forza Italia party. He is principally known for his 1968 version of Romeo and Juliet, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award, although his 1967 version of The Taming of the Shrew (with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton) remains the best-known film adaptation of that play as well. His mini-series Jesus of Nazareth won acclaim and is still shown on Easter weekend in many countries. He was the first Italian national to receive an honorary knighthood from the British government when he was created a Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire. He was awarded the Premio Colosseo in 2009 by the city of Rome. Zeffirelli was born in Florence as Gianfranco Corsi, the illegitimate son of a mercer, Ottorino Corsi, and his mistress, Adelaide Garosi, a dressmaker. When he was six years old, his mother died and he subsequently grew up under the auspices of the English expatriate community and was particularly involved
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Geoffrey Holder

    Geoffrey Holder

    • Plays Directed: Timbuktu!
    Geoffrey Richard Holder (born 1 August 1930) is a Trinidadian actor, choreographer, director, dancer, painter, costume designer, singer and voice-over artist. Born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, Holder is of African descent. He is known for his height (6'6"), "hearty laugh" and heavily-accented bass voice. One of four children, Holder attended Tranquillity School and then secondary school at Queen's Royal College in Port-of-Spain. At the age of seven, he began dancing in the company of his brother, Boscoe Holder. Holder is a Tony Award-winning stage director and costume designer. In 1952, the choreographer Agnes de Mille saw Holder dance on Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. She invited him to New York; he would teach at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance for two years. He was a principal dancer with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet in New York from 1955-1956. In 1955, Holder married dancer Carmen De Lavallade, whom he met when both were in the cast of House of Flowers, a musical by Harold Arlen (music and lyrics) and Truman Capote (lyrics and book). They were the subject of a 2004 film, Carmen & Geoffrey. They live in New York City and have one son, Leo Anthony Lamont. Holder's
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Larry Blyden

    Larry Blyden

    Larry Blyden (June 23, 1925 – June 6, 1975) was an American actor and game show host, best known for his appearances on Broadway and as the host of the game show What's My Line? Born Ivan Lawrence Blieden in Houston, Texas, Blyden, a practicing Jew, he was married to actress and dancer Carol Haney (1925–1964) between 1955 and 1962. The couple had two children: Joshua, born in 1957, and Ellen, born in 1960. Their relationship was tempestuous, and they divorced two years before her death. Blyden and Haney resided in the historic Achenbach House in Saddle River, New Jersey, which they believed to be haunted by the spirit of its builder. The house was later sold to tour operator Mario Perillo and was destroyed by fire in 2004. Blyden's career had three distinct phases. For most of his career, he was known as both a good, solid character actor on television and a highly in-demand Broadway actor. Other television work he did included his starring in one situation comedy, Harry's Girls, which ran on NBC for fifteen episodes from 1963 to 1964. In this adaptation of the Robert E. Sherwood play Idiot's Delight, Blyden starred as Harry, a vaudeville style performer constantly getting into
    8.67
    3 votes
    38

    Robert Douglas

    • Plays Directed: The Ponder Heart
    Robert Douglas (9 November 1909 - 11 January 1999) was born as Robert Douglas Finlayson in Fenny Stratford, Buckinghamshire. He was a successful stage and film actor, a television director and producer. He studied at RADA and made his screen debut at Bournemouth in 1927. A year later he made his first appearance on stage in Many Waters at the Ambassadors Theatre and went into films the following year. He was gently mannered with a well modulated speaking voice, who delivered his lines in clipped fashion. He could portray the sinister, conniving rogue as easily as the forthright military officer. He was married twice, including the actress Dorothy Hyson (1914–1996) and Suzanne Weldon (1921–1995), fathering two children, Lucinda and Robert (Giles). He died from natural causes in Leucadia, Encinitas, California, aged 89. His ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean.
    8.67
    3 votes
    39

    Alfred Ryder

    • Plays Directed: A Far Country
    Alfred Ryder (born Alfred Jacob Corn; January 5, 1916 – April 16, 1995) was an American film, radio and television actor. Ryder may best be remembered for appearing in over one hundred television shows, including the 1959 starring role as a British criminal who could not be killed in Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond episode 'The Devil's Laughter'. In 1966 he was Professor Robert Crater in the first Star Trek episode "The Man Trap". Ryder appeared as one of the alien leaders in the TV series The Invaders, as well as the ghost of a World War I German U-boat captain in two episodes of the TV series Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. In films he is perhaps best known as the defense attorney who cross-examines John Wayne in True Grit. He began acting at the age of eight and later went on to study with the likes of Robert Lewis and Lee Strasberg as a young adult. During the heyday of American network radio comedy, Ryder had two memorable regular roles, as Molly Goldberg's son Sammy in The Goldbergs; and, as Carl Neff in Easy Aces. During World War II he served in the United States Army Air Forces and appeared in the Air Forces' Broadway play and film Winged Victory. He appeared in Anthony
    10.00
    2 votes
    40

    Daniel Mann

    • Plays Directed: Come Back, Little Sheba
    Daniel Mann, also known as Daniel Chugerman (August 8, 1912 – November 21, 1991), was an American film and television director. Daniel Mann was born in Brooklyn, New York. He was a stage actor since childhood, and attended Erasmus Hall High School, New York's Professional Children's School and the Neighborhood Playhouse. He entered films in 1952 as a director, evincing very little flair for visual dynamics but an excellent ear for dialogue. Most of Mann's films were adaptations from the stage (Come Back Little Sheba, The Rose Tattoo, The Teahouse of the August Moon) and literature (BUtterfield 8, The Last Angry Man). Daniel Mann died of heart failure in Los Angeles, California in November 1991.
    10.00
    2 votes
    41

    Jane Wagner

    • Plays Directed: The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe
    Jane Wagner (born February 26, 1935) is an American writer, director and producer. Wagner is best known as Lily Tomlin's comedy writer, collaborator and life partner. She is the author of The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, The Incredible Shrinking Woman and other Tomlin vehicles. Wagner was born and raised in Morristown, Tennessee, where she quickly developed a penchant for writing. She attended Morristown High School, where she wrote for the school newspaper. At 17, she left the hills of East Tennessee to pursue an acting career in New York City, where she also studied painting and sculpture at the School of Visual Arts and piano. Early in her life she toured with the Barter Theatre of Abingdon, Virginia, and later became a designer for such firms as Kimberly-Clark and Fieldcrest. She made her writing debut with the CBS afternoon special J.T. (1969), for which she won the Peabody Award – and drew the attention of Tomlin, who was looking for someone to help develop the Laugh-In character Edith Ann. It was the beginning of a collaboration that continues to this day. Wagner has been nominated for Grammy Awards, with Tomlin, for the comic’s recorded albums, and
    10.00
    2 votes
    42

    Adam Rapp

    • Plays Directed: Through the Yellow Hour
    Adam Rapp (born June 15, 1968) is an American novelist, playwright, screenwriter, musician and film director. His play, Red Light Winter, was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2006. The son of Mary Lee (née Baird) and Douglas Rapp, he was born and raised in Joliet, Illinois, with his brother, actor Anthony Rapp, and sister, Anne. His parents divorced when Rapp was five, and he and his siblings were raised by their mother, who died in 1997 from cancer. He graduated from St. John's Military Academy in Delafield, Wisconsin and Clarke College in Dubuque, Iowa, where he played varsity basketball. He had dreams of becoming a professional basketball player until he took a poetry writing class in college, where he discovered he had a talent for creating stories. He also completed a two-year playwriting fellowship at The Juilliard School. Rapp attended the O'Neill Playwrights Conference in 1996. His play Finer Noble Gases was staged by the Eugene O'Neill Theatre in 2000, by Actors Theatre of Louisville in 2001, by Carolina Actors Studio Theatre in Charlotte in 2003, and by Rattlestick Theatre in New York City in 2004. In 2001, Nocturne was premiered by the New York Theatre Workshop. It has also
    6.40
    5 votes
    43

    H. C. Potter

    • Plays Directed: Anne of the Thousand Days
    Henry Codman Potter (sometimes II or Jr; November 13, 1904 – August 31, 1977) was an American theatrical producer/director and a motion picture director. H.C. Potter was born in New York City, the grandson of the Right Rev. Henry Codman Potter, Episcopal Bishop of New York, and son of Alonzo Potter, New York investment banker. He attended St. Marks School and graduated from Yale University in 1936, where he was a member of the Yale Dramatic Association and Scroll and Key. He attended the Yale School of Drama in the era of George Pierce Baker, and with George Haight founded the Hampton Players, one of the first summer theaters in America, based in Southampton, Long Island 1927–33. With Haight as producer, he directed numerous Broadway productions 1927–35, then moved to Hollywood where he directed over 20 feature films, earning a reputation as a specialist in "gag" comedy. He married Lucilla Annie Wylie in 1926. Their three sons were Daniel J. Potter M.D., Robert A. Potter and Earl Wylie Potter. The films he directed include Beloved Enemy (1936), Wings Over Honolulu (1937), Romance in the Dark, The Cowboy and the Lady, and The Shopworn Angel (1938), The Story of Vernon and Irene
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Michael Bennett

    Michael Bennett

    • Plays Directed: Twigs
    Michael Bennett (April 8, 1943 – July 2, 1987) was an American musical theater director, writer, choreographer, and dancer. He won seven Tony Awards for his choreography and direction of Broadway shows and was nominated for an additional eleven. Bennett choreographed Promises, Promises, Follies and Company. In 1976, he won the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical and the Tony Award for Best Choreography for the Pulitzer Prize–winning phenomenon A Chorus Line. Bennett, under the aegis of producer Joseph Papp, created A Chorus Line based on a precedent-setting workshop process which he pioneered. He also directed and co-choreographed Dreamgirls with Michael Peters. Bennett was born Michael Bennett DiFiglia in Buffalo, New York, the son of Helen (née Ternoff), a secretary, and Salvatore Joseph DiFiglia, a factory worker. His father was Roman Catholic and Italian American and his mother was Jewish. He studied dance and choreography in his teens and staged a number of shows in his local high school before dropping out to accept the role of Baby John in the US and European tours of West Side Story. Bennett's career as a Broadway dancer began in the 1961 Betty Comden–Adolph
    7.25
    4 votes
    45

    David Hare

    • Plays Directed: The Year of Magical Thinking
    Sir David Hare (born 5 June 1947) is an English playwright and theatre and film director. Hare was born in St Leonards-on-Sea, Hastings, East Sussex, the son of Agnes (née Gilmour) and Clifford Hare, a sailor. He was educated at Lancing, an independent school in West Sussex, and at Jesus College, Cambridge. While at Cambridge, he was the Hiring Manager on the Cambridge University Amateur Dramatic Club Committee, 1968. Hare worked with the Portable Theatre Company from 1968 - 1971. His first play, Slag, was produced in 1970. He was Resident Dramatist at the Royal Court Theatre, London, from 1970–71, and in 1973 became resident dramatist at the Nottingham Playhouse, a major provincial theatre. In 1975, Hare co-founded the Joint Stock Theatre Company with David Aukin and Max Stafford-Clark. Hare began writing for the National Theatre and in 1978 his play Plenty was produced at the National Theatre, followed by A Map of the World in 1983, and Pravda in 1985, co-written with Howard Brenton. David Hare became the Associate Director of the National Theatre in 1984, and has since seen many of his plays produced, such as his trilogy of plays Racing Demon, Murmuring Judges, and The Absence
    8.33
    3 votes
    46

    Franklin Schaffner

    • Plays Directed: Advise and Consent
    Franklin James Schaffner (May 30, 1920 – July 2, 1989) was an American film director best known for such films as Planet of the Apes (1968), Patton (1970), Papillon (1973), and The Boys from Brazil (1978). Schaffner was born in Tokyo, Japan, the son of missionaries Sarah (née Swords) and Paul Franklin Schaffner, and was raised in Japan. He returned to the United States and graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he was active in drama. He studied law at Columbia University in New York City but his education was interrupted by service with the United States Navy in World War II during which he served with American amphibious forces in Europe and North Africa. In the latter stages of the war he was sent to the Pacific Far East to serve with the United States Office for Strategic Services. Returning home after the war, he found work in the television industry with March of Time and then joined the CBS network. He won directing Emmys for his work on the original 1954 CBS teleplay, Twelve Angry Men. Schaffner earned two more Emmy awards for his work on the 1955 TV adaptation of the Broadway play, The Caine Mutiny Court Martial, shown on the anthology
    8.33
    3 votes
    47

    A. J. Antoon

    • Plays Directed: The Rink
    A. J. Antoon (December 7, 1944 – January 22, 1992) was an American theatre director. He attended the Yale School of Drama. Beginning in 1971, Antoon directed numerous plays at the New York Shakespeare Festival over a period of nearly 20 years. In 1973, Antoon became one of the few directors to have been nominated for two Tony Awards in the same category in the same year. In addition to winning the Tony Award with one of his nominations, Antoon was also the winner of a Drama Desk Award, a New York Drama Critics' Circle Award, and an Obie Award. His career lasted until 1991; he died less than a year later from AIDS-related lymphoma. Alfred Joseph Antoon was born in Methuen, Massachusetts, on December 7, 1944. His parents were Alfred J. Antoon, Sr. and Josephine Antoon (née Saba). Antoon attended Lawrence Central Catholic High School in nearby Lawrence, Massachusetts. After high school he studied for priesthood at the Shadowbrook Jesuit seminary in Lenox, Massachusetts while also attending Boston College. He later dropped out from the seminary and earned his Bachelor's Degree from Boston College in 1968. He went on to attend the Yale School of Drama for a year and a half before
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Ann Reinking

    Ann Reinking

    • Plays Directed: Fosse
    Ann Reinking (born November 10, 1949) is an American actress, dancer, and choreographer. She has worked extensively in musical theatre, both as a dancer and choreographer, as well as appearing in film. Reinking was born in Seattle, Washington, where she originally trained as a ballet dancer. She studied with Marian and Illaria Ladre, a professional ballet couple who had danced for years with the Ballets Russes which later became the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. After working as a chorus girl in Coco, Wild and Wonderful, and Pippin, Reinking came to critical notice in the role of Maggie in Over Here! (Theatre World Award). Reinking went on to originate roles in Goodtime Charley (for which she received Tony Award and Drama Desk nominations for Best Actress in a Musical) and Bob Fosse's Dancin' (Tony nomination). She also took over leads in A Chorus Line (1976), Chicago in 1977, and Sweet Charity (1986). After retiring from performing, Reinking returned to the stage as Roxie Hart in the revival of Chicago in 1996. In 1996, she was asked to create the choreography ("in the style of Bob Fosse") for an all-star four-night-only concert staging of Chicago for City Center's annual Encores!
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Austin Pendleton

    Austin Pendleton

    • Plays Directed: The Little Foxes
    Austin Pendleton (born March 27, 1940) is an American film, television, and stage actor, a playwright, and a theatre director and instructor. Pendleton was born in Warren, Ohio, the son of Frances Manchester Pendleton, a professional actress, and Thorn Pendleton, who ran a tool company. Pendleton is a graduate of Yale University, where he was a member of Scroll and Key Society. As a stage actor, he has appeared in The Last Sweet Days of Isaac (for which he won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Performance and an Obie Award ), The Diary of Anne Frank, Grand Hotel, Goodtime Charley, The Little Foxes, The Sunset Limited, Fiddler on the Roof, and Up from Paradise. Pendleton penned the plays Uncle Bob, Booth, and Orson's Shadow, all of which were staged off-Broadway. His direction of Elizabeth Taylor and Maureen Stapleton in Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes garnered him a Tony Award nomination. Additional directing credits include Spoils of War by Michael Weller, The Runner Stumbles by Milan Stitt, and The Size of the World by Charles Evered. Pendleton served as Artistic Director for Circle Repertory Company with associate artistic director Lynne Thigpen. Pendleton is an ensemble
    9.50
    2 votes
    50

    Blake Edwards

    • Plays Directed: Victor / Victoria
    Blake Edwards (William Blake Crump July 26, 1922 – December 15, 2010) was an American film director, screenwriter and producer. Edwards' career began in the 1940s as an actor, but he soon turned to writing radio scripts at Columbia Pictures. He used his writing skills to begin producing and directing, with some of his most well-known films including Experiment in Terror, The Great Race, and the hugely successful Pink Panther film series with the British comedian Peter Sellers. Often thought of as primarily a director of comedies, he also directed drama films, including Breakfast at Tiffany's and Days of Wine and Roses. His greatest successes, however, were his comedies, and most of his films were either musicals, melodramas, slapstick comedies, or thrillers. In 2004, he received an Honorary Academy Award in recognition of his writing, directing and producing an extraordinary body of work for the screen. Born William Blake Crump in Tulsa, Oklahoma. His grandfather was J. Gordon Edwards, a director of silent movies, and his stepfather, Jack McEdwards, became a film production manager after moving his family to Los Angeles in 1925. In an interview with Village Voice in 1971, he said
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    Harold Scott

    Harold Scott

    • Plays Directed: The Mighty Gents
    Harold Russell Scott, Jr. (6 September 1935 – 16 July 2006) was an American stage director, actor and educator, who broke racial barriers in American theatre. Scott first became known for his work as an electrifying stage actor with a piercing voice, and later as an innovative director of numerous productions throughout the country, from Broadway to the Tony Award-winning regional theatre, the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, where he was the first African-American artistic director in the history of American regional theatre. Scott was born in Morristown, New Jersey. His mother was a housewife and his father, Harold Russell Scott, Sr., was a general practitioner. Scott was educated at Philips Exeter Academy and Harvard. He had a career as a stage director on Broadway and Off Broadway, but began as an actor of note, performing in Jean Genet's The Blacks and an acclaimed production of the premiere of The Death of Bessie Smith by Edward Albee. Winner of the Obie Award for acting in Jean Genet's Deathwatch in 1959, Scott also played on Broadway in The Cool World. Scott was chosen by Elia Kazan to be an original member of the Repertory Theatre of Lincoln Center, where he performed in
    9.50
    2 votes
    53

    William Baker

    • Plays Directed: The Hurly Burly Show - Naughty But Nice!
    William Baker (born 1973 in Manchester, England) is a fashion designer, stylist and author and theatre director, best known for his work with musician Kylie Minogue. Baker attended the Manchester Grammar School, where he was taught by the current head of Religious Studies Dennis Brown, and was the inspiration for Manchester indie band The Man From Delmonte's song "Pink". Baker was studying Theology at King's College London and working as a sales assistant for Vivienne Westwood in London when he met the singer Kylie Minogue and her photographer Katerina Jebb. Baker met Kylie when she came into the shop he was working in, Vivienne Westwood's flagship boutique on Conduit Street. He was said to have bombarded her with ideas and soon after meeting Minogue he became her stylist and creative director. William Baker is the one responsible for those famous Gold hotpants and the notorious white catsuit from the video for 'Can't Get You Out of My Head'. He worked with the designer Alan Macdonald on Minogue's 2001 Fever tour, and in 2003 launched the Love Kylie lingerie range with Minogue. Baker also co-authored the book Kylie: La La La with her as well as worked as producer and director on
    9.50
    2 votes
    54

    Simon McBurney

    • Plays Directed: The Chairs
    Simon Montagu McBurney, OBE (born 25 August 1957) is an English actor, writer and director. He is the founder and artistic director of Théâtre de Complicité in England, now called Complicite. McBurney was born in Cambridge, England. His father, Charles McBurney, was an American archaeologist and academic. Charles McBurney was the grandson of the American surgeon Charles McBurney (who was credited with describing McBurney's point). His mother, Anne Francis Edmondstone (née Charles), was a British secretary of English, Scottish, and Irish ancestry; his parents were distant cousins who met during World War II. McBurney studied English literature at Peterhouse, Cambridge, graduating in 1980. After his father died, he went to France and trained for the theatre at the Jacques Lecoq Institute in Paris. McBurney is a founder and artistic director of the UK-based theatre company Complicite, which performs throughout the world. He directed their productions of Street of Crocodiles (1992), The Three Lives of Lucie Cabrol (1994), Mnemonic (1999) and The Elephant Vanishes (2003), “A Disappearing Number” (2007), “A Dog’s Heart” (2010), "The Master and Margarita” (2011). A Disappearing Number was
    6.00
    5 votes
    55

    Kathleen Marshall

    • Plays Directed: Nice Work If You Can Get It
    Kathleen Marshall (born 1962) is an American choreographer, director, and creative consultant. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Marshall graduated from Taylor Allderdice High School in 1980 and Smith College in 1985. She worked in the Pittsburgh theatre scene when she was younger, performing with such companies as Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera. She began her Broadway career as assistant to her brother Rob, the choreographer of Kiss of the Spider Woman, in 1993. The two also collaborated on She Loves Me (1993), Damn Yankees (1994), Victor/Victoria (1995), and Seussical (2000). She was the artistic director for the Encores! Series of staged musical revivals from 1996 through 2000. During that time, she choreographed The Boys from Syracuse, Li'l Abner and Call Me Madam and both directed and choreographed Babes in Arms and Wonderful Town. Marshall served as a judge on the NBC reality series Grease: You're the One That I Want. Viewer votes selected the stars of the August 2007 Broadway revival of Grease, which she directed and choreographed. The Encores! production of Wonderful Town transferred to Broadway in November 2003 and ran until January 2005, with both direction and choreography
    8.00
    3 votes
    56

    Neil Armfield

    • Plays Directed: Exit the King
    Neil Geoffrey Armfield AO (born 22 April 1955) is an Australian director of theatre, film and opera. Born in Sydney, Armfield was the youngest of three boys. The son of a factory worker at the nearby Arnott's Biscuits factory, he was brought up in the suburb of Concord adjacent to Exile Bay. He was educated at the (then) selective publicly funded Homebush Boys High School and the University of Sydney, graduating in 1977, and became Co-Artistic Director of the Nimrod Theatre Company in 1979. He joined South Australia's Lighthouse Theatre before returning to Sydney in 1985, where he was involved in the purchase of Belvoir St Theatre and the formation of Company B, becoming its first Artistic Director in 1994. In April 2008 he was selected as a participant in the Towards a creative Australia strand of the Australia 2020 Summit. Armfield announced in 2009 that the 2010 season would be his last as Belvoir Artistic Director, but he has subsequently directed under the new Artistic Director Ralph Myers. For Company B, he has directed
    8.00
    3 votes
    57

    Jonathan Miller

    • Plays Directed: King Lear
    Sir Jonathan Wolfe Miller CBE (born 21 July 1934) is a British theatre and opera director, actor, author, television presenter, humorist and sculptor. Trained as a physician in the late 1950s, he first came to prominence in the early 1960s with his role in the comedy revue Beyond the Fringe with fellow writers and performers Peter Cook, Dudley Moore and Alan Bennett. Despite having seen few operas and not knowing how to read music, he began stage-directing them in the 1970s and has since become one of the world's leading opera directors with several classic productions to his credit. His best-known production is probably his 1982 "Mafia"-styled Rigoletto set in 1950s Little Italy, Manhattan. In its early days he was an associate director at the Royal National Theatre and later he ran the Old Vic Theatre. He has also become a well-known television personality and familiar public intellectual in Britain and the United States of America. Miller grew up in St John's Wood, London, in a well-connected Jewish family. His father Emanuel (1892–1970), who suffered from severe rheumatoid arthritis, was a military psychiatrist, and subsequently a paediatric psychiatrist in Harley House. His
    6.75
    4 votes
    58

    Roy Marsden

    • Plays Directed: Volcano
    Roy Marsden (born on 25 June 1941 in Stepney, London) is an English actor, who is probably best known for his portrayal of Adam Dalgliesh in the Anglia Television dramatisations of P. D. James's detective novels. Marsden attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) and spent four terms there. He attempted to unionise the students but was thwarted. After one argument he poured a bottle of ink down the front of the director's suit. Marsden recalled, "Two weeks later, he phoned me up and asked if I'd got a job or an agent. I said no, so he arranged for me to start work at a theatre in Nottingham, and who should be the student assistant manager there but Anthony Hopkins. I persuaded him to go to RADA." In the early 1960s, Marsden worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company and began to accumulate an extensive list of theatrical credits that include everything from Anton Chekhov and Henrik Ibsen to contemporary Soviet playwright Alexander Vampilov. His preference was for the alternative experimental theatres of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Cambridge and Birmingham over London's commercial theatre. Appearances include Crispen in The Friends, 1970; Casca and Lucilius in Julius Caesar, 1972;
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Bill T. Jones

    Bill T. Jones

    • Plays Directed: Fela!
    Bill T. Jones (born February 15, 1952) is an American artistic director, choreographer and dancer. Jones was born in Bunnell, Florida, and his family moved North as part of the Great Migration in the first half of the twentieth century. They settled in Wayland, New York, where Jones attended Wayland High School. He began his dance training at Binghamton University, where he studied classical ballet and modern dance. Jones choreographed and performed worldwide as a soloist and duet company with his late partner, Arnie Zane, before forming the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company in 1982. Creating more than 100 works for his own company, Jones has also choreographed for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, AXIS Dance Company, Boston Ballet, Lyon Opera Ballet, Berlin Opera Ballet and Diversions Dance Company, among others. In 1995, Jones directed and performed in a collaborative work with Toni Morrison and Max Roach, Degga, at Alice Tully Hall, commissioned by Lincoln Center’s "Serious Fun" Festival. His collaboration with Jessye Norman, How! Do! We! Do!, premiered at New York’s City Center in 1999. In 1990, Jones choreographed Sir Michael Tippett’s New Year under the direction of
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    Frank Dunlop

    Frank Dunlop

    • Plays Directed: Habeas Corpus
    Frank Dunlop (born 15 February 1927) is a British theatre director. Dunlop was born in Leeds, England to Charles Norman Dunlop and Mary Aarons. He was educated at Beauchamp College, read English at University College London where he is now a Fellow, and studied with Michel Saint-Denis at the Old Vic theatre school in London. Dunlop was appointed CBE in 1977 and received the Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Literature presented to him by the French government in 1987. Dunlop founded and directed his own young theatre company, The Piccolo Theatre in Manchester (1954), and directed The Enchanted at the Bristol Old Vic in 1955 where, a year later, he became its resident director, writing and staging Les Frere Jacques. He made his West End debut at the Adelphi Theatre in 1960 with a production of The Bishop's Bonfire. He took over the helm at the Nottingham Playhouse from 1961–1964, including the inaugural season of the newly-built theatre in 1963, and then directed several plays in London, Oklahoma and Edinburgh. In 1966 he founded The Pop Theatre Company at the Edinburgh Festival, with productions of The Winter's Tale (also seen in Venice and London) and The Trojan Women. Dunlop
    9.00
    2 votes
    61

    Hilton Edwards

    • Plays Directed: Lovers
    Hilton Edwards (2 February 1903 – 18 November 1982) was an English-born Irish actor and theatrical producer. He was the son of Thomas George Cecil Edwards and Emily Edwards (born Murphy). Edwards was born in London. He appeared in 15 films, including Captain Lightfoot (1955), David and Goliath (1960), Victim (1961) and Half a Sixpence (1967). He also wrote and directed Orson Welles's Return to Glennascaul (1951). However, he was primarily known for his theatre work; he was nominated for a Tony Award in 1966 for Best Director of a Drama for Philadelphia, Here I Come! Along with his romantic partner, Micheál MacLiammóir, Edwards co-founded the Gate Theatre in Dublin. In 1961, he became the first Head of Drama at Telefís Éireann and, a year later, he won a Jacob's Award for his television series, Self Portrait. Edwards and MacLiammoir were the subject of a biography, titled The Boys by Christophor Fitz-Simon. Hilton Edwards died in Dublin, Ireland.
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Roger Michell

    Roger Michell

    • Plays Directed: Some Americans Abroad
    Roger Michell (born 5 June 1956) is an English theatre, television and film director. He was born in Pretoria, South Africa but spent significant parts of his childhood in Beirut, Damascus and Prague as his father was a diplomat. He was educated at Clifton College where he became a member of Brown's house in 1968. He studied at Cambridge University and in 1977, he won the prestigious Royal Shakespeare Company Buzz Goodbody Award, named after the acclaimed British female director Buzz Goodbody, who committed suicide at the age of 29. Michell graduated from Cambridge in 1977. He was married to the actress Kate Buffery, but they are now divorced. He has two children, daughter, actress Rosie and son Harry. His partner is Anna Maxwell Martin, with whom he has a daughter. After graduating from Cambridge in 1977, he moved to London and began an apprenticeship at the Royal Court Theatre and worked as assistant director to noted British playwright John Osborne and Irish playwright Samuel Beckett. During this period, he also worked with stage manager Danny Boyle, who would also go on to a successful directing career with his international hit, Trainspotting. In 1979 he left the Royal Court
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Alan Rickman

    Alan Rickman

    • Plays Directed: My Name Is Rachel Corrie
    Alan Sidney Patrick Rickman (born 21 February 1946) is an English actor of stage and screen. He is a renowned stage actor in modern and classical productions and a former member of the Royal Shakespeare Company. His breakout performance was as the Vicomte de Valmont in Les Liaisons Dangereuses, for which he was nominated for a Tony Award. Rickman is known for his film performances as Hans Gruber in Die Hard, Severus Snape in the Harry Potter film series, Éamon de Valera in Michael Collins, and Metatron in Dogma. Rickman has also had a number other notable film roles such as Sheriff of Nottingham in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, Jamie in Truly, Madly, Deeply, P.L. O'Hara in An Awfully Big Adventure and Colonel Brandon in Ang Lee's 1995 film Sense and Sensibility. More recently, he played Judge Turpin in the film adaptation of Stephen Sondheim's musical of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. Rickman was born in South Hammersmith, London, to a working-class family, the son of Margaret Doreen Rose (née Bartlett), a housewife, and Bernard Rickman, a factory worker. Rickman's mother was from Wales and a Methodist, and his father was of Irish Catholic background. He has one
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    Barry Humphries

    Barry Humphries

    • Plays Directed: Dame Edna: Back with a Vengeance!
    John Barry Humphries, AO, CBE (born 17 February 1934) is an Australian comedian, satirist, Dadaist, artist, author and character actor. He is best known for his on-stage and television alter egos Dame Edna Everage, a Melbourne housewife and "gigastar", and Sir Les Patterson, Australia's foul-mouthed cultural attaché to the Court of St. James's. Humphries is a film producer and script writer, a star of London's West End musical theatre, an award-winning writer and an accomplished landscape painter. For his delivery of Dadaist and absurdist humour to millions, biographer Anne Pender described Humphries in 2010 as not only "the most significant theatrical figure of our time … [but] the most significant comedian to emerge since Charlie Chaplin". Humphries' characters, especially Dame Edna Everage, have brought him international renown, and he has appeared in numerous films, stage productions and television shows. Originally conceived as a dowdy Moonee Ponds housewife who caricatured Australian suburban complacency and insularity, Edna has evolved over four decades to become a satire of stardom, the gaudily dressed, acid-tongued, egomaniacal, internationally feted Housewife Gigastar,
    7.67
    3 votes
    65

    Danny Simon

    • Plays Directed: Catch a Star
    Danny Simon (December 18, 1918, New York City – July 26, 2005, Portland, Oregon) was an American television writer and comedy teacher. He was also older brother to acclaimed American playwright Neil Simon. The elder Simon wrote for television shows including Your Show of Shows, The Colgate Comedy Hour, The Phil Silvers Show, Make Room for Daddy, My Three Sons, The Carol Burnett Show, Kraft Music Hall, Diff'rent Strokes, and The Facts of Life. He later became a comedy teacher. Woody Allen said about Simon, "I've learned a couple of things on my own since and modified things he taught me, but everything, unequivocally, that I learned about comedy writing I learned from him". Jimmy Boyd, "Being around Danny always makes me and everyone else happy. He is always up and positive, and he sees humor in absolutely everything. It is endless funny one-liners. In rehearsal I could read the same comedy line a hundred times, and Danny would be laughing". Simon was married to Arlene Friedman from 1953 to 1962. The couple had two children, Michael and Valerie. In 2011, Michael Simon was appointed by President Barack Obama to be a judge on the United States District Court for the District of
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    George C. Scott

    George C. Scott

    • Plays Directed: On Borrowed Time
    George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 – September 22, 1999) was an American stage and film actor, director and producer. He was best known for his stage work, as well as his portrayal of General George S. Patton in the film Patton, as General Buck Turgidson in Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove, and as Ebeneezer Scrooge in Clive Donner's adaptation of A Christmas Carol. George Campbell Scott was born in Wise, Virginia, the son of Helena Agnes (née Slemp; 1904–1935) and George Dewey Scott (1902–1988). His mother died just before his eighth birthday, and he was raised by his father, an executive with Buick. Scott's original ambition was to be a writer like his favorite author, F. Scott Fitzgerald; while attending Redford High School in Detroit, he wrote many short stories, none of which was ever published. As an adult, he tried on many occasions to write a novel, but was never able to complete one to his satisfaction. Scott joined the US Marines, serving from 1945-49. He was assigned to 8th and I Barracks in Washington, D.C., in which capacity he taught English literature and radio speaking/writing at the Marine Corps Institute. He later claimed his duties at Arlington led to his
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    José Ferrer

    José Ferrer

    • Plays Directed: The Andersonville Trial
    José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintrón (January 8, 1912 – January 26, 1992), best known as José Ferrer, was a Puerto Rican actor, as well as a theater and film director. He was the first Puerto Rican, as well as the first Hispanic actor, to win an Academy Award (in 1950, for Cyrano de Bergerac). To honor his roots, he donated his Oscar award to the University of Puerto Rico. The prolific and distinguished thespian also won several Tony Awards. In 1947, he won the Tony Award for his theatrical performance of Cyrano de Bergerac, and then in 1952, he won the Distinguished Dramatic Actor Award for The Shrike, and also the Outstanding Director Award for directing all three of The Shrike, The Fourposter, and Stalag 17. Jose Ferrer's contributions to American theater were recognized in 1981, when he was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame. Another huge honor came in 1985 when he was awarded the National Medal of Arts. Ferrer was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, the son of Maria Providencia Cintron, a woman who came from the small mountain town of Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, and Rafael Ferrer, an attorney and writer from the capital city of the island, San Juan, Puerto Rico. He studied
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Joshua Shelley

    • Plays Directed: Come live with me
    Joshua Shelley (27 January 1920 - 16 February 1990) was one of the actors blacklisted by movie studios as a result of the House Un-American Activities Committee's (HUAC) investigation of the Communist Party in Hollywood in 1952. He did not begin to again work regularly in Hollywood until 1973 when his career restarted. Shelley's film appearances include Yes Sir That's My Baby (1949).
    7.67
    3 votes
    69

    Roger Rees

    • Plays Directed: Peter and the Starcatcher
    Roger Rees (born 5 May 1944) is a Welsh actor. He is best known to American audiences for playing the characters Robin Colcord on the American television sitcom show Cheers and Lord John Marbury on the American television drama The West Wing. He won a Tony Award for his performance as the lead in The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby. Rees was born in Aberystwyth, Wales, the son of Doris Louise (née Smith), a shop clerk, and William John Rees, a police officer. Rees started his career with the Royal Shakespeare Company and attended the Slade School of Fine Arts. He played Malcolm in the acclaimed Trevor Nunn 1976 stage and 1978 television production of Macbeth. Rees created the title role in the original production of the play The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, winning both an Olivier Award and a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play in 1982. He also starred in the original production of The Real Thing by Tom Stoppard in London in 1984. Rees began to work in television during the 1970s, appearing opposite Laurence Olivier in The Ebony Tower (1984). From 1988 to 1991 he starred in the late 80s/early 90s British sitcom Singles, with actress and co-star Judy Loe. From
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    Roscoe Lee Browne

    • Plays Directed: A Hand is on the Gate
    Roscoe Lee Browne (May 2, 1925 – April 11, 2007) was an American actor and director, known for his rich voice and dignified bearing. Browne was the fourth son of a Baptist minister, Sylvanus S. Browne, and his wife Lovie (née Lovie Lee Usher). Born in Woodbury, New Jersey, Browne first attended historically black Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, where he became a member of Omega Psi Phi fraternity and graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1946. He undertook postgraduate work at Middlebury College in Vermont, Columbia University in New York City, and at the University of Florence in Italy. Also an outstanding middle-distance runner, Browne won the Amateur Athletic Union 1,000-yard national indoor championship in 1949. He occasionally returned to Lincoln University between 1946 to 1952 to instruct classes in comparative literature, French, and English. Upon leaving academia he earned a living for several years selling wine for Schenley Import Corporation. Despite his limited amateur acting experience, in 1956 he stunned guests at a party – among them opera singer Leontyne Price – when he announced his intention to quit his secure job with Schenley to become a full-time
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Bob Balaban

    Bob Balaban

    • Plays Directed: The Exonerated
    Robert Elmer "Bob" Balaban (born August 16, 1945) is an American actor, author, and director. Balaban was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Eleanor (née Pottasch) and Elmer Balaban, who owned several movie theatres and later was a pioneer in cable television. His mother acted under the name Eleanor Barry. His uncles were dominant forces in the theatre business; they founded the Balaban and Katz Theatre circuit in Chicago, a chain which included the Chicago and Uptown Theatres. Balaban and Katz operated some of the most beautiful movie palaces in the United States beginning in the 1920s. Bob Balaban's father and his uncle Harry founded the H & E Balaban Corporation in Chicago. H & E Balaban Corporation operated their own movie palaces including the Esquire Theatre in Chicago. They later owned a powerful group of television stations and cable television franchises. His uncle Barney Balaban was president of Paramount Pictures for nearly 30 years from 1936 to 1964. His maternal grandmother's second husband, Sam Katz, was a vice president at MGM beginning in 1936. Sam had early partnered with Bob's uncles Abe, Barney, John, and Max to form Balaban and Katz. Sam also served as
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Mel Ferrer

    Mel Ferrer

    • Plays Directed: Cyrano de Bergerac
    Mel Ferrer (August 25, 1917 – June 2, 2008) was an American actor, film director and film producer. Ferrer was born Melchor Gastón Ferrer in the Elberon section of Long Branch, New Jersey, of Cuban and Irish descent. His father, Dr. José María Ferrer (1857–1920), was born in Cuba, was an authority on pneumonia and served as chief of staff of St. Vincent's Hospital in New York City. His American mother, the former Mary Matilda Irene O'Donohue (1878–1967), was a daughter of coffee broker Joseph J. O'Donohue, New York's City Commissioner of Parks, a founder of the Coffee Exchange, and a founder of the Brooklyn-New York Ferry. An ardent opponent of Prohibition, Irene Ferrer was named, in 1934, the New York State chairman of the Citizens Committee for Sane Liquor Laws. Ferrer had three siblings. His elder sister was Dr. M. Irené Ferrer, a cardiologist and educator, who helped refine the cardiac catheter and electrocardiogram. His brother, Dr. Jose M. Ferrer, was a surgeon. His other sister, Teresa (Terry) Ferrer, was the religion editor of The New York Herald Tribune and education editor of Newsweek. The family is not related to actors José or Miguel Ferrer. His mother's family, the
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Theodore J. Forstmann

    Theodore J. Forstmann

    Theodore Joseph "Ted" Forstmann (February 13, 1940 – November 20, 2011) was one of the founding partners of Forstmann Little & Company, a private equity firm, and chairman and CEO of IMG, a global sports and media company. A billionaire, Forstmann was a Republican and a philanthropist. He supported school choice and funded scholarship programs for the disadvantaged. Forstmann grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut, the second of six children. His father, Julius, ran a wool business that went bankrupt in 1958. Julius Forstmann had inherited Forstmann Woolen Co. from his own father, one of the world's richest men. Forstmann was a graduate of Greenwich Country Day School and Phillips Academy. He then played goalie on the ice hockey team at Yale University where he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. Forstmann later attended Columbia Law School where he earned a juris doctorate, which he financed through gambling proceeds. Forstmann, an attorney, founded Forstmann Little in 1978 with his younger brother Nicholas, and Brian Little. Forstmann's second brother, J. Anthony Forstmann, founded ForstmannLeff. Under Forstmann's leadership, Forstmann Little & Company made 31 acquisitions
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Charles Laughton

    Charles Laughton

    • Plays Directed: Major Barbara
    Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English-born American stage and film actor and director. Laughton was trained in London at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) and first appeared professionally on the stage in 1926. He played a wide range of classical and modern parts, making a big impact in Shakespeare at the Old Vic. His film career took him to Hollywood, but he also collaborated with Alexander Korda on some of the most notable British films of the era, including The Private Life of Henry VIII. Among Laughton's biggest movie-hits were The Barretts of Wimpole Street, Mutiny on the Bounty, Ruggles of Red Gap, Jamaica Inn, The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Big Clock. In his later career, he took up stage directing, notably in the Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, and Bernard Shaw's Don Juan in Hell, in which he also starred. In 1927, he had been cast in a play with his future wife Elsa Lanchester, with whom he lived and worked until his death. Their childless marriage was the subject of much gossip, with some speculation about Laughton's sexuality. Laughton was born in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, the son of Robert Laughton and his wife Elizabeth (née
    6.50
    4 votes
    75
    David Garrick

    David Garrick

    David Garrick (19 February 1717 – 20 January 1779) was an English actor, playwright, theatre manager and producer who influenced nearly all aspects of theatrical practice throughout the 18th century and was a pupil and friend of Dr Samuel Johnson. He appeared in a number of amateur theatricals, and with his appearance in the title role of Shakespeare's Richard III audiences and managers began to take notice. Impressed by his portrayals of Richard III and a number of other roles, Charles Fleetwood engaged Garrick for a season at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. He remained with the Drury Lane company for the next five years and purchased a share of the theatre with James Lacy. This purchase inaugurated twenty-nine years of Garrick's management of the Drury Lane, during which time it rose to prominence as one of the leading theatres in Europe. At his death, three years after his retirement from Drury Lane and the stage, he was given a lavish public funeral at Westminster Abbey where he was laid in Poets' Corner. As an actor, Garrick promoted realistic acting that departed from the bombastic style that was entrenched when Garrick first came to prominence. His acting delighted many
    6.50
    4 votes
    76

    Harry Kupfer

    • Plays Directed: Mozart!
    Harry Kupfer (born 12 August 1935) is a German opera director. He studied theatre in Leipzig and directed his first opera, Antonín Dvořák's Rusalka, in 1958. Kupfer was a protégé of Walter Felsenstein at the Komische Oper Berlin. From 1981 to 2002, Kupfer was chief director of the Komische Opera. Since the 1970s, he has also directed productions of Richard Wagner at the Bayreuth Festival, including Der Ring des Nibelungen. Kupfer co-wrote the libretto with composer Krzysztof Penderecki of Penderecki's opera The Black Mask. He directed the 1986 world premiere production in Salzburg and the US premiere production at Santa Fe Opera in 1988. Kupfer and his late wife, the music teacher and soprano Marianne Fischer-Kupfer, have a daughter, Kristiane, an actress. Among his productions available on DVD:
    6.50
    4 votes
    77

    Jim Sharman

    • Plays Directed: The Rocky Horror Show
    James "Jim" Sharman (born 12 March 1945 in Sydney, Australia), the son of boxing tent entrepreneur Jimmy Sharman, is a director and writer for film and stage with over 70 productions to his credit. He is renowned in Australia for his work as a theatre director from the 1960s to the present, but is probably best known internationally as the director of the 1973 theatrical hit The Rocky Horror Show, The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) and its follow-up Shock Treatment (1981). James David Sharman was born in 1945 in Sydney, Australia, to James Michael Sharman (1912–2006) and Christina McAndleish Sharman (1914–2003). Sharman was educated in Sydney, though his upbringing included time spent on Australian showgrounds where his father and grandfather ran a travelling sideshow of popular legend: Jimmy Sharman's Boxing Troupe. This brought him into contact with the world of circus and travelling vaudeville. Developing an interest in theatre, he graduated from the production course at the National Institute of Dramatic Art in Sydney in 1966. Sharman created a series of ground-breaking productions of experimental theatre, many for the Old Tote Theatre Company, culminating in a controversial
    6.50
    4 votes
    78

    Peter Dews

    • Plays Directed: Hadrian VII
    Peter Dews (26 September 1929, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England – 25 August 1997) was an English stage director. Born and educated in Wakefield, Yorkshire he then took an M.A. at University College, Oxford. After two years teaching history he joined the BBC, in Birmingham, working first in radio (it is thought that he was the director of the episode of The Archers which featured the death of Grace Archer in a fire, a spoiler for the opening of independent television) and then television, as a director. He won the BAFTA 'Best Director' Award in 1960 for An Age of Kings, a television adaptation of Shakespeare's history plays. He subsequently directed Shakespeare's Roman plays in the series The Spread of the Eagle. After a period of freelance theatre work he joined the Birmingham Repertory Theatre as Artistic Director in the autumn of 1965, in its original building - the first purpose built repertory theatre in the UK - and remained in that post until the company moved to the new venue in 1971, leaving in 1972, his last production there being the double-bill of Sophocles Oedipus the King and Sheridan's The Critic with Derek Jacobi in both play's leading roles. Previously his productions
    6.50
    4 votes
    79

    Steven Berkoff

    • Plays Directed: Metamorphosis
    Steven Berkoff (born 3 August 1937) is an English actor, writer and director. He is best known for his performance as General Orlov in the James Bond film Octopussy, and is typically cast in villanous roles, such as Lt. Col Podovsky in Rambo: First Blood Part II, Victor Maitland in Beverly Hills Cop, and Adolf Hitler in the epic mini-series War and Remembrance. Berkoff was born Leslie Steven Berks, in Stepney, in the East End of London, on 3 August 1937, the son of Pauline (Hyman), a housewife, and Alfred Berks (Berkovitch), a tailor. His family was of Romanian Jewish background. He attended Raine's Foundation Grammar School (1948–50), Hackney Downs School, the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art (1958), and L'École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq (1965). As well as being an actor, Berkoff is a playwright and director. He joined the Repertory Company at Her Majesty's Theatre in Barrow-in-Furness for approximately two months in 1962. His earliest plays are adaptations of works by Franz Kafka: The Metamorphosis (1969); In the Penal Colony (1969); and The Trial (1971); these complex psychological plays are said to be nightmarish and to create a disturbing sense of
    6.50
    4 votes
    80

    Cy Feuer

    • Plays Directed: Walking Happy
    Cy Feuer (January 15, 1911 – May 17, 2006) was an American theatre producer, director, composer, musician, and half of the celebrated, legendary producing duo Feuer and Martin. He was the winner of three competitive Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre and a Lifetime Achievement Tony Award. Born Seymour Arnold Feuerman in Brooklyn, New York,he studied trumpet privately with Max Schlossberg (personal communication...2006), he became a professional trumpeter at the age of fifteen, working at clubs on weekends to help support his family while attending New Utrecht High School. It was there he first met Abe Burrows, who in later years he would hire to write the book for Guys and Dolls. Having no interest in mathematics, science, or sports, he dropped out of school and found work as a trumpeter on a political campaign truck. He later studied at the Juilliard School before joining the orchestras at the Roxy Theater and later Radio City Music Hall. In 1938, he toured the country with Leon Belasco and His Society Orchestra, eventually ending up in Burbank, California. Following a ten-week stint there, the orchestra departed for Minneapolis, but he opted to remain in
    8.50
    2 votes
    81

    Howard Da Silva

    • Plays Directed: Purlie Victorious
    Howard Da Silva (May 4, 1909 – February 16, 1986) was an American actor. He was born Howard Silverblatt in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Bertha (née Sen) and Benjamin Silverblatt, a dress cutter. His parents were both Yiddish speaking Jews born in Russia. He had a job as a steelworker before beginning his acting career on the stage. He changed his surname to the Portuguese Da Silva, despite not having any relationship with Portugal or Brazil (the name is sometimes misspelled Howard De Silva). Da Silva appeared in a number of Broadway musicals, including the role of "Larry Foreman" in the legendary first production of Marc Blitzstein's musical, The Cradle Will Rock (1937). Later, he costarred in the original 1943 stage production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma!, playing the role of the psychopathic "Jud Fry". He was the easygoing Ben who opposed Tammany Hall in the Pulitzer winning musical Fiorello!. In 1969, Da Silva originated the role of Benjamin Franklin in the musical 1776. Four days before the show opened on Broadway, he suffered a minor heart attack but refused to seek medical assistance because he wanted to make sure critics saw his performance. After the four official
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Lillian Hellman

    Lillian Hellman

    • Plays Directed: Another Part of the Forest
    Lillian Florence "Lilly" Hellman (June 20, 1905 – June 30, 1984) was an American author of plays, screenplays, and memoirs and throughout her life, was linked with many left-wing political causes. Lillian Hellman was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, into a Jewish family. Her mother was Julia Newhouse of Demopolis, Alabama and her father was Max Hellman, a New Orleans shoe salesman. Julia Newhouse's parents were Sophie Marx, of a successful banking family, and Leonard Newhouse, a Demopolis liquor dealer. During most of her childhood she spent half of each year in New Orleans, in a boarding home run by her aunts, and the other half in New York City. She studied for two years at New York University and then took several courses at Columbia University. On December 31, 1925, Hellman married Arthur Kober, a playwright and press agent, although they often lived apart. In 1929, she traveled around Europe for a time and settled in Bonn to continue her education. She felt an initial attraction to a Nazi student group that advocated "a kind of socialism" until their questioning about her Jewish ties made their anti-Semitism clear, and she returned immediately to the United States. Years later
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Marcia Milgrom Dodge

    Marcia Milgrom Dodge

    • Plays Directed: Ragtime
    Marcia Milgrom Dodge (born April 28, 1955) is an American director, choreographer and writer for the stage. After working in regional theatre, off-Broadway and elsewhere for thirty years, Dodge directed and choreographed her first Broadway production, a revival of Ragtime in 2009. The production received 7 Tony Award Nominations including one for Dodge for Best Director of a Musical. Her Kennedy Center production of Ragtime received four 2010 Helen Hayes Awards including one for her for Best Director, Resident Musical. Dodge was born in Detroit, Michigan, grew up in Southfield, Michigan and attended Vandenberg and Adlai Stevenson Elementary Schools and Birney Junior High graduating from Southfield-Lathrup High School in 1973. As a child, she took dance lessons at the Julie Adler School of Dance in Oak Park, Michigan. She is the daughter of Myron and Jacqueline Milgrom, and her sisters are Carole Lasser, Paula Milgrom and Marianne Milgrom Bloomberg. Dodge received her degree in Speech Communication and Theatre at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, graduating in 1977. Upon graduation, Dodge moved to New York City pursuing a career as a choreographer. Dodge is the
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    Mbongeni Ngema

    • Plays Directed: Sarafina!
    Mbongeni Ngema (born 10 May 1955) is a South African writer, lyricist, composer and director, born in Verulam, KwaZulu-Natal (near Durban). He started his career as a theatre backing guitarist. He is married to actress Leleti Khumalo. Leleti who received a 1988 Tony Award nomination for Best Actress in a Musical for Sarafina!; as well as starring as the leading role in South Africa's first Oscar-nominated film/move, Yesterday. He co-wrote the multi-award winning Woza Albert!. In some sectors of South African society, Ngema is considered a racist because of his controversial song, AmaNdiya (about racism that Blacks in KwaZulu-Natal have suffered at the hands of Indians). It was banned in the country soon after it was released in 2002, and even Nelson Mandela had asked Ngema to apologize but Ngema refused. Mbongeni Ngema has participated in a song called Take this song, recorded in featuring with the Reggae band Third World.
    8.50
    2 votes
    85

    Nicholas Hytner

    • Plays Directed: One Man, Two Guvnors
    Sir Nicholas Robert Hytner (born 7 May 1956) is an English film and theatre producer and director. He has been Director of London's National Theatre since 2003. Hytner was born in Manchester to a Jewish family, the son of barrister, Benet Hytner, QC, and his wife, Joyce. He attended Manchester Grammar School and read English at Trinity Hall, Cambridge. His first theatre productions were at the Northcott Theatre, Exeter. He then directed a series of productions at the Leeds Playhouse, and in 1985 became an Associate Director of the Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester. His productions included Shakespeare’s As You Like It, Marlowe’s Edward II, Schiller’s Don Carlos, Wycherley’s The Country Wife and Robin Glendinning’s Mumbo Jumbo. He directed three productions for the Royal Shakespeare Company: Measure For Measure (1987), The Tempest (1988) and King Lear (1990). From 1990 to 1997 he was an Associate Director of the National Theatre, where he directed Ghetto by Joshua Sobol (1989), The Wind in the Willows adapted by Alan Bennett (1990), The Madness of George III by Alan Bennett (1991), The Recruiting Officer by George Farquhar (1992), Carousel by Rodgers and Hammerstein (1992), The
    8.50
    2 votes
    86

    Vinnette Justine Carroll

    • Plays Directed: Your Arms Too Short to Box with God
    Vinnette Justine Carroll (March 11, 1922 — November 5, 2002) was an American playwright, and the first African-American woman to direct on Broadway, with the 1972 musical Don't Bother Me, I Can't Cope. Born Vinnette Justine Carroll in New York City, to Edgar Edgerton, a dentist, and Florence (Morris) Carroll. She and her family moved to Jamaica when she was three and she spent much of her childhood there as well as in the West Indies. She returned to New York, where she received a B.A. from Long Island University in 1944 and an M.A. from New York University in 1946. Carroll’s father encouraged his daughters to become physicians, and as a compromise, she chose psychology. She later completed doctoral work in psychology at Columbia University and she worked as a clinical psychologist with the NYC Bureau of Child Guidance before pursuing acting. She left the field of psychology to study theater, and in 1948, she accepted a scholarship to attend Erwin Piscator’s Dramatic Workshop at the New School for Social Research and studied with Lee Strasberg, Stella Adler, Margaret Barker, and Susan Steele. She made her professional stage debut at the Falmouth Playhouse acting in Androcles and
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Elia Kazan

    Elia Kazan

    • Plays Directed: After the Fall
    Elia Kazan (IPA: [eˈlia kaˈzan]; September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was an American director, producer, writer and actor, described by The New York Times as "one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history". He was born in Constantinople, Ottoman Empire, to Greek parents. After studying acting at Yale, he acted professionally for eight years, later joining the Group Theater in 1932, and co-founded the Actors Studio in 1947. With Lee Strasberg, he introduced Method acting to the American stage and cinema as a new form of self-expression and psychological "realism". Kazan acted in only a few films, including City for Conquest (1940). Kazan introduced a new generation of unknown young actors to the movie audiences, including Marlon Brando and James Dean. Noted for drawing out the best dramatic performances from his actors, he directed 21 actors to Oscar nominations, resulting in nine wins. He became "one of the consummate filmmakers of the 20th century" after directing a string of successful films, including, A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), On the Waterfront (1954), and East of Eden (1955). During his career, he won two Oscars as Best Director
    7.33
    3 votes
    88

    Jerry Mitchell

    • Plays Directed: Legally Blonde: The Musical
    Jerry Mitchell is an American theatre director and choreographer. Born in Paw Paw, Michigan, Mitchell later moved to St. Louis where he pursued his acting, dancing and directing career in theatre. He graduated from the Fine Arts college at Webster University in St. Louis. Today, Mitchell resides in New York City and St. Louis. Mitchell's early Broadway credits were as a dancer in The Will Rogers Follies and revivals of Brigadoon and On Your Toes. He is openly gay. Mitchell's first production as sole choreographer was the 1999 revival of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown, which he followed with The Full Monty. Mitchell created and for many years directed the annual Broadway Bares benefit for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. In addition to the theatre, he has choreographed for films such as Camp, In & Out and Drop Dead Gorgeous. He garnered an Emmy Award nomination for his work on The Drew Carey Show. In 2003 Mitchell was named one of Dance Magazine's "25 to Watch". His most recent project, for which he serves as both director and choreographer, is Legally Blonde: The Musical, which opened in April 2007, and currently serves as a mentor on Bravo's reality competition Step It Up and
    7.33
    3 votes
    89

    Joe Dowling

    • Plays Directed: Tartuffe
    Joe Dowling (born 27 September 1948) is the Artistic Director for the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. He is also well known for his work as Artistic Director of the Abbey Theatre in Ireland, and has directed plays in all the major theatres in Ireland as well as theatres in London, New York, Washington D.C., Montreal, and Alberta. Educated at the Catholic University School, Colaiste na Rinne and at University College Dublin, Dowling has been long connected with Irish theatre having founded Ireland's premier drama school, the Gaiety School of Acting, served as artistic director of the Irish Theatre Company and the Peacock theatre and founded the Young Abbey, Ireland's first theater-in-education group. He became the Guthrie's Artistic Director in 1995 and has directed productions of A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Playboy of the Western World, Much Ado About Nothing, The Importance of Being Earnest, Julius Caesar, Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth and Amadeus. He directed Hamlet, the Guthrie's last production in its original location next to the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. Hamlet was also the first play produced by the Guthrie in 1963, directed by Sir
    7.33
    3 votes
    90

    John Schlesinger

    • Plays Directed: Timon of Athens
    John Richard Schlesinger, CBE (16 February 1926 – 25 July 2003) was an English film and stage director and actor. Schlesinger was born in London into a middle-class Jewish family, the son of Winifred Henrietta (née Regensburg) and Bernard Edward Schlesinger, a physician. After St Edmund's School, Hindhead, Uppingham School and Balliol College, Oxford, he worked as an actor. Schlesinger's acting career began in the 1950s and consisted of supporting roles in British films such as The Divided Heart and Oh... Rosalinda!!, and British television productions such as BBC Sunday Night Theatre and The Vise. He began his directorial career in 1956 with the short documentary Sunday in the Park about London's Hyde Park. In 1959 he was credited as exterior or second unit director on 23 episodes of the TV series The Four Just Men and four 30-minute episodes of the series Danger Man. By the 1960s, he had virtually given up acting to concentrate on a directing career, and another of his earlier directorial efforts, the British Transport Films' documentary Terminus (1961), gained a Venice Film Festival Gold Lion and a British Academy Award. His first two fiction movies, A Kind of Loving (1962) and
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    Richard Maltby, Jr.

    • Plays Directed: Fosse
    Richard Eldridge Maltby, Jr. (born October 6, 1937) is an American theatre director and producer, lyricist, and screenwriter. He is also well known as a constructor of cryptic crossword puzzles. He has done this for Harper's Magazine, sometimes in collaboration with E. R. Galli (prior to 1995), since the January 1976 issue. Maltby was born in Ripon, Wisconsin, the son of Virginia (née Hosegood) and Richard Maltby, Sr., a well-known orchestra leader. He has conceived and directed the only two musical revues to ever win the Tony Award for Best Musical: Ain't Misbehavin' (1978: Tony, N.Y. Drama Critics, Outer Critics, Drama Desk Awards, also Tony Award for Best Director) and Fosse (1999: Tony, Outer Critics, Drama Desk Awards). He was director/co-lyricist for the American version of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Song and Dance, (1986) starring Bernadette Peters. He was co-lyricist for Miss Saigon (Evening Standard Award 1990; Tony nomination: Best Score, 1991). Maltby and David Shire started working together as students at Yale University (where he was a member of Manuscript Society; their first Broadway credit was in 1968, when their song "The Girl of the Minute" was used in the revue New
    7.33
    3 votes
    92

    Dore Schary

    • Plays Directed: The Devil's Advocate
    Isadore "Dore" Schary (August 31, 1905, Newark, New Jersey - July 7, 1980, New York City) was an American motion picture director, writer, and producer, and playwright who became head of production at Metro-Goldwyn Mayer and eventually president of the studio. He graduated from Central High School in Newark, New Jersey (class of 1923). Schary had his first success as a writer when a play he wrote, Too Many Heroes, ran on Broadway for 16 performances in the fall of 1937. He worked in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, and in 1938 won the Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Story as co-writer of the screenplay for Boys Town. He was with RKO Pictures when in 1948 he became chief of production at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios. Schary and studio chief and founder Louis B. Mayer were constantly at odds over philosophy; Mayer favoring splashy, wholesome entertainment and Schary leaning toward what Mayer derided as "message pictures". The glory days of MGM as well as other studios were coming to an end due to United States v. Paramount Pictures, Inc. (1948), a Supreme Court decision that severed the connection between film studios and the theaters that showed their films. In addition,
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Erwin Piscator

    Erwin Piscator

    Erwin Friedrich Maximilian Piscator (17 December 1893 – 30 March 1966) was a German theatre director and producer and, along with Bertolt Brecht, the foremost exponent of epic theatre, a form that emphasizes the socio-political content of drama, rather than its emotional manipulation of the audience or on the production's formal beauty. Erwin Friedrich Max Piscator was born on December 17, 1893 in the village of Greifenstein-Ulm, son of Carl Piscator, a merchant, and his wife Antonia Laparose. His family was descended from Johannes Piscator, a Protestant theologian who produced an important translation of the Bible in 1600. The family moved to Marburg where Piscator attended the Gymnasium Philippinum. In 1913, he enrolled at University of Munich to study German, philosophy and art history. Piscator also took Arthur Kutscher's famous seminar in theatre history which Bertolt Brecht was also later to attend. He began his acting career in 1914, in small unpaid roles at the Munich Court Theatre, under the directorship of Ernst von Possart. In 1896, Carl Lautenschläger had installed one of the world's first revolving stages at that theatre. During the First World War Piscator was drafted
    6.25
    4 votes
    94

    Michael Attenborough

    • Plays Directed: King Lear
    The Honourable Michael John Attenborough (born 13 February 1950) is an English theatre director. His parents are the actors Richard Attenborough and Sheila Sim (Lord and Lady Attenborough). Since he is the child of a peer, he is entitled to the courtesy title The Honourable. He is the recipient of two Honorary Doctorates, from the Universities of Leicester and Sussex, where he is also Honorary Professor of English. Attenborough was educated at Westminster School and the University of Sussex He has been Artistic Director of the Almeida Theatre in London since 2002. Previously, he was associate director of the Mercury Theatre Colchester 1972-74, the Leeds Playhouse (now West Yorkshire Playhouse) 1974 to 1979, the Young Vic 1979 to 1980, then artistic director of the Palace Theatre, Watford, 1980 to 1984, artistic director of Hampstead Theatre 1984 to 1989 and principal associate director of the Royal Shakespeare Company from 1990 to 2002. He continues to be an honorary associate artist of the RSC. In 2012 Attenborough was presented with the Award for Excellence in International Theatre by The International Theatre Institute. He is represented by United Agents, London. Attenborough
    6.25
    4 votes
    95

    Michael Smuin

    • Plays Directed: Shogun: The Musical
    Michael Smuin (October 13, 1938 – April 23, 2007) was a ballet dancer, choreographer and theatre director. He was co-founder and director of his own dance company, the Smuin Ballet in San Francisco. Born in Missoula, Montana, Smuin was a principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre and the San Francisco Ballet, for which he served as co-artistic director from 1973 through 1985. He also choreographed for the Dance Theatre of Harlem, Washington Ballet, Pacific Northwest Ballet, and Milwaukee Ballet, among others. Smuin's Broadway credits included Little Me (1962) as a dancer, Anything Goes (1987) as a choreographer, and Sophisticated Ladies (1981) and Shogun: The Musical (1990) as choreographer and director. He also choreographed the 1995 West End production of Mack and Mabel. Smuin's film credits included The Fantasticks, A Walk in the Clouds, The Joy Luck Club, The Cotton Club, and Rumble Fish. Smuin collapsed and died of a heart attack while teaching company class in San Francisco.
    6.25
    4 votes
    96

    Paul Giovanni

    • Plays Directed: The Crucifer of Blood
    Paul Giovanni (1933 – June 17, 1990) was an American playwright, actor, director, singer and musician. New Yorker Giovanni is best known for writing the music for the 1973 British horror film The Wicker Man. The soundtrack, which was eventually released by itself in 2002, incorporates folk song, a setting of a poem by Robert Burns and new material composed by Giovanni, who also contributed some lyrics. The music was played by folk-rock group Magnet using a combination of traditional and modern (electric) instrumentation; some parts of the soundtrack were augmented by brass instruments. After this Giovanni returned to New York where his play The Crucifer of Blood was performed. It was later filmed for TV. Giovanni also composed a musical entitled Shot Through The Heart, which is yet to be performed. He did graduate studies at The Catholic University of America Speech and Drama Department under Rev. Gilbert V. Hartke, OP. He died from AIDS on June 17, 1990.
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    Robert Drivas

    • Plays Directed: Little Me
    Robert Drivas (November 21, 1938 – June 29, 1986) was an American actor and theatre director. Drivas was born Robert Choromokos in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Hariklia (née Cunningham-Wright) and James Peter Choromokos. Drivas studied at the University of Chicago and the University of Miami. After further training at the Greek Playhouse in Athens, Greece and with the Coconut Grove Playhouse in Miami, he made his New York City debut in the role of Rameses in 1958 in the play The Firstborn, starring Anthony Quayle as Moses. He continued to perform on stage with One More River (1960), The Wall (1960), The Irregular Verb to Love (1963), and And Things That Go Bump in the Night (1965), which he also directed. In 1963 he won a Theatre World Award for his performance in Mrs. Dally Has a Lover (opposite Estelle Parsons). Drivas was associated with many well-known theatrical figures of his time. These included playwrights Terrence McNally, whose play The Ritz he directed in 1975, and Edward Albee, who directed Drivas in the 1983 premiere of Albee's harshly received play The Man Who Had Three Arms. Other directing credits include Bad Habits, for which he won an Obie Award, Legend,
    6.25
    4 votes
    98

    Bill Irwin

    • Plays Directed: Largely New York
    William Mills "Bill" Irwin (born April 11, 1950) is an American actor and clown noted for his contribution to the renaissance of American circus during the 1970s. He is known for his vaudeville-style stage acts, but has made a number of appearances on film and television and won a Tony Award for a dramatic role on Broadway. He is known by children as Mr. Noodle on Sesame Street's Elmo's World. Irwin was born in Santa Monica, California, the son of Elizabeth (née Mills), a teacher, and Horace G. Irwin, an aerospace engineer. He graduated from Oberlin College in 1973 with a degree in theater arts, and from the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Clown College the following year. In 1975, he helped found the Pickle Family Circus in San Francisco, California. He left the company in 1979, and decided to pursue stage work. Irwin created a run of highly regarded stage shows that incorporated elements of clowning, often in collaboration with composer Doug Skinner. These works included The Regard of Flight (1982), Largely New York (1989), Fool Moon (1993), The Harlequin Studies (2003), and Mr. Fox: A Rumination (2004). Mr. Fox is a production that Irwin has worked on for years, a
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    David Esbjornson

    David Esbjornson

    • Plays Directed: The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?
    David Esbjornson is an award-winning director and producer who has worked throughout the United States in regional theatres and on Broadway, and has established strong and productive relationships with some of the profession’s top playwrights, actors, and companies. Esbjornson was the artistic director of Seattle Repertory Theatre in Seattle, Washington, but left that position in summer 2008. For seven years (1992–1999) he was artistic director of New York’s Classic Stage Company, and since leaving that post he has become one of country’s most sought after freelance directors. With a list of production credits steeped in the classics from those years at CSC and as a guest director in such leading regional theatres as the Guthrie Theater, Esbjornson has also established himself as an interpreter of choice for playwrights such as Tony Kushner, Edward Albee, and Arthur Miller. Esbjornson has staged Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing (starring Jimmy Smits, Kirsten Johnson, and Sam Waterston) in Central Park and Larry Kramer’s The Normal Heart, both at New York’s Joseph Papp Public Theater. Other recent credits include the world premieres of Edward Albee’s Tony Award-winning play The
    7.00
    3 votes
    100

    Michael Cacoyannis

    • Plays Directed: Zorba
    Michael Cacoyannis (Greek: Μιχάλης Κακογιάννης; 11 June 1922 – 25 July 2011) was a prominent Greek Cypriot filmmaker from Cyprus, best known for his 1964 film Zorba the Greek. He directed the 1983 Broadway revival of the musical based on the film. Much of his work was rooted in classical texts, especially those of the Greek tragedian Euripides. He was nominated for an Academy Award five times, a record for any Greek Cypriot film artist. He received Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Film nominations for Zorba the Greek, and two nominations in the Foreign Language Film category for Electra and Iphigenia. Michalis (or Mikhalis) Kakogiannis was born in 1922 in Limassol, Cyprus as Μιχάλης Κακογιάννης. In 1939, he was sent by his father, Sir Panayotis Loizou Cacoyannis, to London to become a lawyer. However, after producing Greek-language programs for the BBC World Service during World War II, He ended up at the Old Vic school, and enjoyed a brief stage career there under the name Michael Yannis before he began working on films. After having trouble finding a directing job in the British film industry, Cacoyannis moved to Greece, and in 1953 he made his first film, Windfall
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    Trevor Nunn

    • Plays Directed: Oklahoma 1998 West End
    Sir Trevor Robert Nunn, CBE (born 14 January 1940) is an English theatre, film and television director. Nunn has been the Artistic Director for the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal National Theatre, and, currently, the Theatre Royal, Haymarket. He has directed musicals and dramas for the stage, as well as opera. His well-known musicals are Cats (1981) and Les Misérables (1985). His dramas include Nicholas Nickleby and Macbeth. He has been nominated for the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical, the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play, the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Director, and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Director of a Musical, winning the Tony Award (Musical) for Cats and Les Misérables and the Olivier Award for Summerfolk / The Merchant of Venice / Troilus and Cressida; and The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby. Nunn was born in Ipswich, England, to Robert Alexander Nunn, a cabinetmaker, and Dorothy May Piper. He was educated at Northgate Grammar School, Ipswich and Downing College, Cambridge, where he began his stage career. He won a Director's Scholarship, becoming a trainee director at the Belgrade Theatre in Coventry in 1962. In 1964 Nunn
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Vince Waldron

    Vince Waldron

    • Plays Directed: American Splendor
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    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    William Ball

    • Plays Directed: The Taming of the Shrew
    William Gormaly Ball (29 April 1931 – 30 July 1991) was an American stage director and founder of the American Conservatory Theatre (ACT). He was awarded the Drama Desk Vernon Rice Award in 1959 for his production of Chekhov's Ivanov and was nominated for a Tony Award in 1965 for his production of Molière's Tartuffe, starring Michael O'Sullivan and Rene Auberjonois. He was also a noted director of operas. William Ball was born in Chicago, Illinois on April 29, 1931. His parents were Russell Ball and Catherine Gormaly. He attended Iona Preparatory School and Fordham University. From 1953 through 1955, he studied acting, design, and directing at Carnegie Mellon University. Ball founded the American Conservatory Theatre in Pittsburgh in 1965. This was a company of up to 30 full-time paid actors who studied all disciplines of the theatre arts during the day and performed at night. Ball had a falling out with ACT's financial benefactors in Pittsburgh and took the company on the road. His 1966 productions of Albee's Tiny Alice, Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author, and others at the Stanford University Summer Festival led a group of financiers to offer his company a home in
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Agnes de Mille

    Agnes George de Mille (September 18, 1905 – October 7, 1993) was an American dancer and choreographer. Agnes de Mille was born in New York City into a well-connected family of theater professionals. Her father William C. deMille and her uncle Cecil B. DeMille were both Hollywood directors. She was the granddaughter of playwright Henry Churchill de Mille and the economist Henry George. She had a love for acting and originally wanted to be an actress, but was told that she was 'not pretty enough', so she turned her attention to dance. As a child, she had longed to dance, but dance at this time was considered more of an activity, rather than a viable career option, so her parents refused to allow her to dance. When de Mille's younger sister was prescribed ballet classes to cure her flat feet, de Mille joined her. De Mille lacked flexibility and technique, though, and did not have a dancer's body. Classical ballet was the most widely known dance form at this time, and de Mille's apparent lack of ability limited her opportunities. She taught herself from watching film stars on the set with her father in Hollywood; these were more interesting for her to watch than perfectly turned out
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    Harold Pinter

    Harold Pinter

    • Plays Directed: Otherwise Engaged
    Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (10 October 1930 – 24 December 2008) was a Nobel Prize-winning English playwright, screenwriter, director and actor. One of the most influential modern British dramatists, his writing career spanned more than 50 years. His best-known plays include The Birthday Party (1957), The Homecoming (1964), and Betrayal (1978), each of which he adapted to film. His screenplay adaptations of others' works include The Servant (1963), The Go-Between (1970), The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981), The Trial (1993), and Sleuth (2007). He also directed or acted in radio, stage, television, and film productions of his own and others' works. Pinter was born and raised in Hackney, east London, and educated at Hackney Downs School. He was a sprinter and a keen cricket player, acting in school plays and writing poetry. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art but did not complete the course. He was fined for refusing National Service as a conscientious objector. Subsequently, he continued training at the Central School of Speech and Drama and worked in repertory theatre in Ireland and England. In 1956 he married actress Vivien Merchant and had a son, Daniel born in 1958. He
    6.00
    4 votes
    106

    Des McAnuff

    • Plays Directed: Jesus Christ Superstar
    Desmond McAnuff CM (born 19 June 1952) is the American-Canadian former artistic director of the Stratford Shakespeare Festival and director of musical theatre of such Broadway productions as Big River, The Who's Tommy and Jersey Boys. Born in Princeton, Illinois to John Nelson and Ellen Boyd, McAnuff is a citizen of United States and Canada. He lived briefly in Guelph, Ontario attending grade 4 at St. George's Public School. His family then moved to Scarborough, Ontario, at the time a suburb of Toronto, and attended high school at Woburn Collegiate Institute where he made his first theatrical appearance in the school's production of The Sound of Music, playing the role of Kurt. Later, with the help of two friends, he wrote the music and lyrics to a rock musical called Urbania, which was performed by the high school drama club. He attended Ryerson University although never completed his degree. In June 2011, McAnuff was awarded an honourary degree by the Ryerson Theatre School. McAnuff worked with the Toronto Free Theatre as a director, and after several plays that had limited success, he left the Canadian scene for New York City. There, McAnuff co-founded the Dodger Theatre Company
    8.00
    2 votes
    107

    George Roy Hill

    • Plays Directed: Look Homeward, Angel
    George Roy Hill (December 20, 1921 – December 27, 2002) was an American film director. He is most noted for directing such films as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting, which both starred the acting duo Paul Newman and Robert Redford. Other notable films are Slaughterhouse-Five, The World According to Garp, The World of Henry Orient, Hawaii, Thoroughly Modern Millie, The Great Waldo Pepper, Slap Shot, Funny Farm, A Little Romance with Laurence Olivier, and The Little Drummer Girl. He was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to George Roy and Helen Frances (Owens) Hill, part of a well-to-do Roman Catholic family with interests in the newspaper business; the family owned the Minneapolis Tribune. Hill was no relation to George W. Hill, director and cinematographer of numerous silent movies and early sound films in the 1920s and early 1930s. He was educated at The Blake School, one of Minnesota's most prestigious private schools. He had a love of flying. After school, he liked to visit the airport and his hobby was to memorize the records of World War I flying aces. He idolized U.S. pilot Speed Holman who, Hill once explained, "used to make his approach to the spectators at
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Leigh Holman

    Leigh Holman

    • Plays Directed: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat
    Professional Stage and Opera Director (born 1964 Trenton, TN) Currently: Director of Opera and Resident Stage Director at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Opera Colorado: Director of the Young Artists Program and Director of Education. Director of Opera and Voice Studies at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Eastman School of Music Opera Fellowship. Directed or Performed (mezzo-soprano) with Opera Colorado, Portland Opera, Nashville Opera and Central City Opera/CU Artist Tour, National Opera.
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Patrick Garland

    Patrick Garland

    • Plays Directed: My Fair Lady
    Patrick Garland (born 10 April 1935) is a British actor, writer, and director. Garland started Poetry International in 1963 with Ted Hughes and Charles Osborne. He was a director and producer for the BBC's Music and Arts Department (1962–1974), and worked on its Monitor series. In 1964, he directed the Monitor film, "Down Cemetery Road," about Philip Larkin, in which John Betjeman also appeared. He served as the Artistic Director for the Chichester Festival Theatre twice, 1981–1985 and 1990–1994, where he directed over 20 productions. His 1971 television film of The Snow Goose won a Golden Globe for "Best Movie made for TV," and was nominated for both a BAFTA and an Emmy. He was made an Hon D Litt University of Southampton 1994; Honorary Fellow of St Edmund Hall, Oxford in 1997. Garland's appearances as an actor included An Age of Kings, where he played Prince John in Henry IV, part 2 and Clarence in Richard III, among others. In 1978 Patrick directed Under the Greenwood Tree at Salisbury Playhouse. This production transferred to the Vaudeville Theatre in the Strand London West End in the spring of 1979. In 1980, Garland was responsible for the York Mystery Plays. He directed the
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Peter Brook

    Peter Brook

    • Plays Directed: A Midsummer's Night Dream
    Peter Stephen Paul Brook CH, CBE (born 21 March 1925) is an English theatre and film director and innovator, who has been based in France since the early 1970s. Brook was born in London in March 1925, the son of Simon Brook and his wife Ida (Jansen), two Jewish immigrants. He was educated at Westminster School, Gresham's School and Magdalen College, Oxford. He directed Dr Faustus, his first production, in 1943 at the Torch Theatre in London, followed at the Chanticleer Theatre in 1945 with a revival of The Infernal Machine. In 1947, he went to Stratford-upon-Avon as assistant director on Romeo and Juliet and Love's Labour's Lost. From 1947 to 1950, he was Director of Productions at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. His work there included a highly controversial staging of Strauss’ Salome with sets by Salvador Dalí and also an effective re-staging of Puccini’s La Boheme using sets dating from 1899. A proliferation of stage and screen work as producer and director followed. In 1951, Brook married the actress Natasha Parry; the couple have a daughter. In 1970, with Micheline Rozan, Brook founded the International Centre for Theatre Research, a multinational company of actors,
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Peter Ustinov

    Peter Ustinov

    • Plays Directed: Photo Finish
    Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov CBE ( /ˈjuːstɪnɒf/ or /ˈuːstɪnɒf/; 16 April 1921 – 28 March 2004) was an English actor, writer and dramatist. He was also renowned as a filmmaker, theatre and opera director, stage designer, author, screenwriter, comedian, humourist, newspaper and magazine columnist, radio broadcaster and television presenter. A noted wit and raconteur, he was a fixture on television talk shows and lecture circuits for much of his career. He was also a respected intellectual and diplomat who, in addition to his various academic posts, served as a Goodwill Ambassador for UNICEF and President of the World Federalist Movement. Ustinov was the winner of numerous awards over his life, including two Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor, Emmy Awards, Golden Globes and BAFTA Awards for acting, a Grammy Award for best recording for children, as well the recipient of governmental honours from, amongst others, the United Kingdom, France and Germany. He displayed a unique cultural versatility that has frequently earned him the accolade of a Renaissance man. Miklós Rózsa, composer of the music for Quo Vadis and of numerous concert works, dedicated his String Quartet No. 1, Op. 22
    8.00
    2 votes
    112

    Tommy Tune

    • Plays Directed: Grand Hotel
    Thomas James "Tommy" Tune (born February 28, 1939) is an American actor, dancer, singer, theatre director, producer, and choreographer. Over the course of his career, he has won nine Tony Awards and the National Medal of Arts. Tune was born in Texas to oil rig worker, horse trainer, and restaurateur, Jim Tune, and Eva Mae Clark (the family name was shortened from "Tunesmith"). He attended Lamar High School in Houston and the Methodist-affiliated Lon Morris College in Jacksonville, Texas. He studied dance with Patsy Swayze in Houston. He went on to earn his Bachelor's degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1962, and take graduate courses at the University of Houston. Tune later moved to New York to start his career. In 1965, Tune made his Broadway debut as a performer in the musical Baker Street. His first Broadway directing and choreography credits were for the original production of The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas in 1978. He has gone on to direct or choreograph, or both, some eight Broadway musicals. He directed a new musical titled Turn of the Century, which premiered at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago on September 19, 2008 and closed on November 2,
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Glen Byam Shaw

    • Plays Directed: Ross
    Glen Byam Shaw (13 December 1904 – 29 April 1986) was an English actor and theatre director, known for his dramatic productions in the 1950s and his operatic productions in the 1960s and later. In the 1920s and 1930s Byam Shaw was a successful actor, both in romantic leads and in character parts. He worked frequently with his old friend John Gielgud. After working as co-director with Gielgud at the end of the 1930s, he preferred to direct rather than act. He served in the armed forces during the Second World War, and then took leading directorial posts at the Old Vic, the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre and Sadler's Wells (later English National) Opera. Among his best-known collaborators were Peggy Ashcroft, Laurence Olivier, Charles Laughton and Michael Redgrave in the theatre, and Colin Davis and Reginald Goodall in the opera house. Shaw was born Glencairn Alexander Byam Shaw in London, the fourth in the family of four sons and one daughter of the artist John Byam Liston Shaw and his wife, also an artist, (Caroline) Evelyn Eunice Pyke-Nott (1870–1959). He was educated at Westminster School where his contemporaries included his elder brother James Byam Shaw, later a well-known art
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    James Maxwell

    • Plays Directed: An Ideal Husband
    James Maxwell (23 March 1929 – 18 August 1995) was an American actor, theatre director and writer, particularly associated with the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester. He was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, but spent most of his career in the United Kingdom and died in London. He came to England at the age of 20 to train at the Old Vic theatre school. While there he met fellow students Casper Wrede and Richard Negri (co-founders of the Royal Exchange 25 years later). After seasons at the Bristol Old Vic and the Piccolo Theatre in Manchester he started to collaborate with the directors Michael Elliott and Casper Wrede, initially with the 59 Theatre Company. He translated Georg Buchner’s Danton's Death for the opening production at the Lyric Theatre (Hammersmith). Elliott and Wrede went on to run the Old Vic company and Maxwell joined them to act in several of the productions including The Merchant of Venice and Measure for Measure. The group then joined with Braham Murray in Manchester to form the 69 Theatre Company. Maxwell adapted Daniel Deronda; directed by Elliott and starring Vanessa Redgrave it was subsequently televised. He acted in many productions for the company
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    Maria Aitken

    • Plays Directed: Man and Boy
    Maria Penelope Katharine Aitken (born 12 September 1945) is an English theatre director, teacher, actress and writer. Aitken was born in Dublin, the daughter of Sir William Aitken, a Conservative MP, and Penelope Aitken, whose father was John Maffey, 1st Baron Rugby. She is a great-niece of newspaper magnate and war-time minister Lord Beaverbrook. She attended Sherborne School for Girls in Dorset and St Anne's College, Oxford, where she graduated with an M.A. in English Language and Literature. She has directed several plays in the West End and on Broadway. Her production of THE 39 STEPS, which is still running in London after 5 years, played 3 years on Broadway and won Olivier and Tony Awards. In 2011 she directed Frank Langella in MAN AND BOY on Broadway. She is a Visiting Lecturer at Yale, NYU and Juilliard drama schools. Her extensive acting career includes leading roles at the Royal National Theatre, the Royal Shakespeare Company and in the West End. She has played more Noel Coward leads than any actress. She was nominated for a BAFTA award for her performance in A Fish Called Wanda. Aitken is married to the novelist Patrick McGrath and they live together in New York and
    9.00
    1 votes
    116

    Sam Mendes

    • Plays Directed: Richard III
    Samuel Alexander "Sam" Mendes, CBE (born 1 August 1965) is an English stage and film director. He is best known for directing American Beauty (1999), which earned him the Academy and Golden Globe Award for Best Director, crime film Road to Perdition (2002), the 23rd James Bond movie Skyfall (2012), and his dark re-inventions of the stage musicals Cabaret (1994), Oliver! (1994), Company (1996) and Gypsy (2003). His contribution to cinema and theatre saw him awarded a CBE in 2000, and a Directors Guild Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005. Mendes has a child with his former wife, Kate Winslet. Mendes was born in Reading, Berkshire, the only child of Valerie Helene (née Barnett), an author of children's books, and Jameson Peter Mendes, a university professor. His father is from Trinidad of ethnic Portuguese descent, and his mother an English Jew. His grandfather is the Trinidadian writer Alfred Mendes. Mendes' parents divorced when he was a child. He grew up in Oxfordshire and attended Magdalen College School and Peterhouse, Cambridge where he graduated with a first in English. While at Cambridge, he was a member of the Marlowe Society and directed several plays, including a critically
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    Tony Richardson

    • Plays Directed: Look Back in Anger
    Cecil Antonio "Tony" Richardson (5 June 1928 – 14 November 1991) was an English theatre and film director and producer. He was married form 1962 to 1967 to Vanessa Redgrave, fathering actresses Natasha and Joely Richardson. He had a five-decade film career. He died from AIDS at 63 in 1991. Richardson was born in Shipley, Yorkshire in 1928, the son of Elsie Evans (Campion) and Clarence Albert Richardson, a chemist. He was Head Boy at Ashville College, Harrogate and attended Wadham College, Oxford, where his contemporaries included Kenneth Tynan, Lindsay Anderson and Gavin Lambert. He had the unprecedented distinction of being elected President of both the Oxford University Dramatic Society and the Experimental Theatre Club (the ETC), in addition to being theatre critic for the university magazine Isis. In 1955, in his directing début, Richardson produced Jean Giraudoux's The Apollo of Bellac for Television with Denholm Elliott and Natasha Parry in the main roles. Around the same time he began to be active in Britain's Free Cinema movement, co-directing the non-fiction short Momma Don't Allow (also 1955) with Karel Reisz. Part of the British "New Wave" of directors, he was involved
    9.00
    1 votes
    118

    Bill Kenwright

    • Plays Directed: Blood Brothers
    Bill Kenwright CBE (born 4 September 1945, in Liverpool, Merseyside, England) is a leading West End theatre producer and film producer. He is also the Chairman of Everton Football Club. He attended Booker Avenue County Primary School, and then Liverpool Institute High School from 1957 to 1964 and appeared in school productions (including Shylock in The Merchant of Venice) on the stage in the Mount St. building (predecessor to LIPA). He was also treasurer of the Christian Union at school. In 2007 Kenwright was a judge in the BBC1 television series "Any Dream Will Do." Kenwright is one of the UK's most successful theatre producers, best known for the long-running West End hit Blood Brothers and the record breaking tour of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Other recent productions have included West End runs of Whistle Down The Wind at the Palace Theatre, Festen in London, on a UK tour and now on Broadway, The Big Life, Elmina's Kitchen, Scrooge - The Musical, The Night Of The Iguana, A Few Good Men, A Man For All Seasons alongside UK tours of Jesus Christ Superstar, Tommy, Whistle Down The Wind, Tell Me On A Sunday, and This Is Elvis. He produced the London revival of
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Cate Blanchett

    Cate Blanchett

    • Plays Directed: They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?
    Catherine Élise "Cate" Blanchett (/ˈblɑːntʃ.ət/; born 14 May 1969) is an Australian actress. She came to international attention for her role as Elizabeth I of England in the 1998 biopic film Elizabeth, for which she won British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) and Golden Globe Awards, and earned her first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Blanchett appeared as the elf lady Galadriel in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings trilogy from 2001 to 2003. In 2004, Blanchett's portrayal of Katharine Hepburn in Martin Scorsese's The Aviator brought her numerous awards, including an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Blanchett's other films include Babel (2006), Notes on a Scandal (2006), Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008), and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008). Blanchett's work has earned her several accolades, including a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, two BAFTAs, and an Academy Award. Blanchett and her husband, Andrew Upton, are currently artistic directors of the Sydney Theatre Company. Blanchett was born in the Melbourne suburb of Ivanhoe. Her mother, June (née
    6.67
    3 votes
    120

    Francesca Zambello

    • Plays Directed: The Little Mermaid
    Francesca Zambello (born 1956) is a leading American opera and theatre director. Zambello lived in Europe when she was a child, learning to speak French, Italian, German and Russian. Zambello is of Italian descent, the daughter of Jean (née Sincere), an actress and Charles C. Zambello, a former actor who became head of flight entertainment at TWA. She attended Moscow University in 1976 and graduated from Colgate University in 1978. Zambello is openly lesbian. An internationally recognized director of opera and theater, Francesca Zambello's American debut took place at the Houston Grand Opera with a production of Fidelio in 1984. She debuted in Europe at Teatro la Fenice in Venice with Beatrice di Tenda in 1987 and has since staged new productions at major theaters and opera houses in Europe and the USA. Collaborating with outstanding artists and designers and promoting emerging talent, she takes a special interest in new music theater works, innovative productions, and in producing theater and opera for wider audiences. Francesca Zambello has recently been awarded the Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres by the French government for her contribution to French culture and the Russian
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Gene Kelly

    Gene Kelly

    • Plays Directed: Flower Drum Song
    Eugene Curran "Gene" Kelly (August 23, 1912 – February 2, 1996) was an American dancer, actor, singer, film director and producer, and choreographer. Kelly was known for his energetic and athletic dancing style, his good looks and the likeable characters that he played on screen. Although he is known today for his performances in Singin' in the Rain and An American in Paris, he was a dominant force in Hollywood musical films from the mid 1940s until this art form fell out of fashion in the late 1950s. His many innovations transformed the Hollywood musical film, and he is credited with almost single-handedly making the ballet form commercially acceptable to film audiences. Kelly was the recipient of an Academy Honorary Award in 1953 for his career achievements. He later received lifetime achievement awards in the Kennedy Center Honors, and from the Screen Actors Guild and American Film Institute; in 1999, the American Film Institute also numbered him 15th in their Greatest Male Stars of All Time list. Kelly was born in the Highland Park neighborhood of Pittsburgh. He was the third son of Harriet Catherine (née Curran) and James Patrick Joseph Kelly, a phonograph salesman. His father
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Geraldine Fitzgerald

    Geraldine Fitzgerald

    • Plays Directed: Mass Appeal
    Geraldine Fitzgerald (24 November 1913 – 17 July 2005) was an Irish-American actress and a member of the American Theatre Hall of Fame. Fitzgerald was born in Greystones, County Wicklow, south of Dublin, the daughter of Edith and Edward Fitzgerald, who was an attorney. Her father was Catholic and her mother a Protestant who converted to Catholicism. She studied painting at the Dublin School of Art and inspired by her aunt, the actress/director Shelah Richards, Geraldine Fitzgerald began her acting career in 1932 in theatre in her native Dublin before moving to London where she studied painting at the Polytechnic School of Art in London and was taken to Twickenham Studios (London) where she played a small role in a British film 1934. She quickly came to be regarded as one of the British film industry's most promising young performers and her most successful film of this period was The Mill on the Floss (1937). Her success led her to America and Broadway in 1938, and while appearing opposite Orson Welles in the Mercury Theatre production of Heartbreak House, she was seen by the film producer Hal B. Wallis who signed her to a seven-year film contract. She achieved two significant
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Julianne Boyd

    Julianne Boyd

    • Plays Directed: Eubie!
    Julianne Boyd (born December 22, 1944) is an American theater director. Boyd received a BA in Theater and Education in 1966 from Beaver College in Pennsylvania (now known as Arcadia University). She earned a doctorate in Theater from the City University of New York. Boyd is perhaps best known for founding the Berkshire-based Barrington Stage Company in 1995; the company, which was originally based in Sheffield, Massachusetts, moved to Pittsfield, Massachusetts in 2006. Barrington Stage Company produced the world premiere of William Finn and Rachel Sheinkin's new musical, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee in 2004, before the show was transferred to the Second Stage Theatre in New York City. Subsequently, the show moved to Broadway's Circle in the Square Theater, where it garnered six Tony Award nominations, of which it won two. Boyd has also directed on Broadway - notably a 1978 production of Eubie!, a musical revue based on the works of Eubie Blake which she also conceived. The production starred Gregory Hines and Maurice Hines, and received three Tony Award nominations. Boyd has also directed at regional theaters nationwide. She served as a member of the board of the
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Melvin Van Peebles

    Melvin Van Peebles

    • Plays Directed: Don't Play Us Cheap
    Melvin "Block" Van Peebles (born August 21, 1932) is an American actor, director, screenwriter, playwright, novelist and composer. He is most famous for creating the acclaimed film Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song, which heralded a new era of African-American focused films. He is the father of actor and director Mario Van Peebles. Van Peebles was born in Chicago, Illinois to a black tailor. He joined the Air Force in 1954, thirteen days after graduating (B.A., 1953) from Ohio Wesleyan University, staying for three and a half years. He married a German woman, Maria Marx. They lived in Mexico for a brief period, where he painted portraits, before coming back to the United States, where he started driving cable cars in San Francisco. Van Peebles began writing about his experiences as a cable car driver. What evolved from an initially small article and a series of photographs was Van Peebles' first book, The Big Heart. One day, a passenger suggested that Van Peebles should become a filmmaker. He shot his first short film, Pickup Men for Herrick, in 1957. He made two more short films during the same period. According to Van Peebles, "I thought they were features. Each one turned out to
    6.67
    3 votes
    125

    Gregory Mosher

    • Plays Directed: Boy's Life
    Gregory Mosher is a long time director and producer of stage productions – at the Lincoln Center and Goodman Theatres, on and off-Broadway, at the Royal National Theatre, and in the West End. He is also a film and television director, producer, and writer. He is currently a professor at Columbia University. Born 1949 in New York, New York, Mosher attended Oberlin College, Ithaca College and the Juilliard School where he was the school's first directing student. After leaving Juilliard in his third year, he moved to Chicago to assist William Woodman, head of the Goodman Theatre, who appointed him to lead the newly formed Goodman Stage 2, one of the pioneering theatres of the 1970s Chicago theatre scene. Three years later, after Woodman's resignation, he became director of the Goodman. Beginning with a new version of Richard Wright’s Native Son, and focusing on new work, the Goodman soon gained wide national attention. After seven seasons at the Goodman, Mosher was invited by former New York City mayor John V. Lindsay to head the theatre at Lincoln Center, which, despite the leadership of such theatre giants as Elia Kazan and Joseph Papp, had faltered through much of its twenty year
    5.75
    4 votes
    126
    Twyla Tharp

    Twyla Tharp

    • Plays Directed: Come Fly Away
    Twyla Tharp (born July 1, 1941) is an American dancer and choreographer, who lives and works in New York City. Tharp was born in 1941 on a farm in Portland, Indiana, and was named after Twila Thornburg, the "Pig Princess" of the 89th Annual Muncie Fair in Indiana. When Tharp was a young child she spent a few months each year living with her Quaker grandparents on their farm in Indiana. In 1950 Tharp's family—younger sister Twanette, twin brothers Stanley and Stanford, mother Lecile and father William—moved to Rialto, California. Her parents opened a drive-in movie theater, where Tharp worked from the time she was 8 years old. The drive-in was on the corner of Acacia and Foothill, the major east–west artery in Rialto and the path of Route 66. She attended Pacific High School in San Bernardino and studied at the Vera Lynn School of Dance. Tharp, a "devoted bookworm," admits that this schedule left little time for a social life. Tharp attended Pomona College in California but later transferred to Barnard College in New York City, where she graduated with a degree in Art History in 1963. It was in New York that she studied with Martha Graham and Merce Cunningham. In 1963 Tharp joined
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    Will Adamsdale

    Will Adamsdale

    • Plays Directed: The Victorian In The Wall
    Will Adamsdale (born 1974) is an English actor. Adamsdale was educated at Eton College and the Oxford School of Drama. In 2004, he starred in a self-penned one man show called Jackson's Way at the Edinburgh Fringe. The intended run for the production was ten days, before the intervention of comedian Stewart Lee. Lee was so impressed by Adamsdale's work that he reportedly threw his full support behind Jackson's Way, lobbying for an extension of the run and using his clout within the industry to garner notice from critics and award committees. Adamsdale secured the Perrier Comedy Award for comedy. Adamsdale has since created several new shows: The Receipt, The Human Computer, and The Summer House. The Receipt, a collaboration with sonic artist Chris Branch, used innovative sound effects to punctuate a story about the little man in the big city. It ran at the Edinburgh Fringe 2006, winning a Fringe First and a Total Theatre Award. It subsequently toured nationally, and internationally to the Melbourne Comedy Festival and 59E59 Theatres in New York. In The Human Computer, Adamsdale, a self-confessed technophobe, explored the world of computers. The show premiered in the new Traverse 3
    5.75
    4 votes
    128

    Baz Luhrmann

    • Plays Directed: La Bohème
    Mark Anthony "Baz" Luhrmann (/ˈbæz ˈlʊərmən/; born 17 September 1962) is an Australian film director, screenwriter, and producer best known for The Red Curtain Trilogy, which includes his films Strictly Ballroom, William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge!. In 2008, he released his film Australia, starring Hugh Jackman and Nicole Kidman. Luhrmann was born in Sydney, Australia to a mother, Barbara, who was a ballroom dance teacher and dress shop owner, and Leonard Luhrmann, a farmer. He was raised in Herons Creek, a tiny rural settlement in northern New South Wales, where his father ran a petrol station and a movie theatre, both of which would influence his son's film-making career. He attended St. Joseph's Hasting Regional School, Port Macquarie 1975–1978 and Balgowlah Boys Campus in Sydney's North Beaches. He attended Year 11 at Narrabeen Sports High School in Sydney, performing in the school's version of Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1. His nickname was given to him because of a perceived resemblance to the character Basil Brush. Luhrmann first auditioned for the National Institute of Dramatic Art in 1980 but didn't get into the prestigious drama school. He successfully
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    Gene Frankel

    • Plays Directed: Indians
    Eugene V. "Gene" Frankel (December 23, 1919 – April 20, 2005) was an American actor, theater director, and acting teacher especially notable in the founding of the off-Broadway scene. Frankel served in the Army during WWII in entertainment and as a member of an aerial crew. Frankel's direction of the off-Broadway production of Jean Genet's The Blacks was regarded as a crucial production in promoting African-American theater during the civil-rights movement which opened in 1961 and ran for more than 1,400 performances at the St. Mark's Theatre. He began his own career as an actor and was one of the earliest members of the Actors' Studio. He moved behind the scenes and became a theater director on and off Broadway. His most notable Broadway production was Arthur Kopit's Indians starring Stacy Keach, who won the 1970 Tony Award as Best Actor for his portrayal of Buffalo Bill. The production was also nominated for a Tony Award for best play of 1970. His other Broadway productions included A Cry of Players (1968), Kurt Weill's Lost in the Stars (1972) and Harry Chapin's The Night That Made America Famous (1975). His off-Broadway productions included Brecht on Brecht, (starring Viveca
    7.50
    2 votes
    130

    George C. Wolfe

    • Plays Directed: The Normal Heart
    George Costello Wolfe (born September 23, 1954) is an American playwright and director of theater and film. He won a Tony Award in 1993 for directing Angels in America: Millennium Approaches and another Tony Award in 1996 for his direction of the musical, Bring in 'da Noise/Bring in 'da Funk. Wolfe was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, the son of Anna (née Lindsey), an educator, and Costello Wolfe, a government clerk. He attended an all-black private school where his mother taught. After a family move, he began attending the integrated Frankfort public school district. He attended Frankfort High School where he began to pursue his interest in the theatre arts, and wrote poetry and prose for the school's literary journal. After high school, Wolfe enrolled at the historically black Kentucky State University, the alma mater of his parents. Following his first year, he transferred to Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he pursued a BA in theater. Wolfe taught for several years in Los Angeles at the Inner City Cultural Center and later in New York. He earned an MFA in dramatic writing and musical theater at New York University in 1983. In 1977, Wolfe gave C. Bernard Jackson, the
    7.50
    2 votes
    131

    Harold Prince

    • Plays Directed: A Little Night Music
    Harold Smith "Hal" Prince (born January 30, 1928) is an American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. He has garnered twenty-one Tony Awards, more than any other individual, including eight for directing, eight for producing the year's Best Musical, two as Best Producer of a Musical, and three special awards. Prince was born in New York City to Milton A. Prince, a stockbroker, and Blanche Stern. He entered the University of Pennsylvania at age 16, where he followed a liberal arts curriculum and graduated three years later. He later served two years with the United States Army in post-WWII Germany. Prince began work in the theatre as an assistant stage manager to theatrical producer and director George Abbott. Along with Abbott, he co-produced The Pajama Game, which won the 1955 Tony Award for Best Musical. He went on to direct his own productions in 1962 beginning with A Family Affair and hit a series of unsuccessful productions. He almost gave up musical theater right before he hit success with Cabaret in 1966. 1970 marked the start of his greatest collaboration, with composer/lyricist
    7.50
    2 votes
    132

    Jason Robert Brown

    • Plays Directed: 13
    Jason Robert Brown (born June 20, 1970 in Ossining, New York) is an American musical theater composer, lyricist, and playwright. Brown's music sensibility fuses pop-rock stylings with theatrical lyrics. An accomplished pianist, Brown has often served as music director, conductor, orchestrator, and pianist for his own productions. Brown grew up in the suburbs of New York City, and attended the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York for 2 years. During summer, he attended French Woods Festival of the Performing Arts in Hancock, New York. He said Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street and Sunday in the Park with George were two of his biggest influences, and had it not been for them, he would have joined a rock band and tried to be Billy Joel. When Brown was 23, he and a friend were invited to see a musical by Stephen Sondheim himself. At the show, they sat in front of the New York Times' Frank Rich. They went to dinner, and after twenty minutes, Sondheim asked them what they thought of the show: they both were silent. Brown described the dinner after that moment as "many extremely awkward silences punctuated by bursts of frantic, desperate conversation about anything
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Jerome Robbins

    Jerome Robbins

    • Plays Directed: Peter Pan
    Jerome Robbins (October 11, 1918 – July 29, 1998) was an American theater producer, director, and choreographer known primarily for Broadway Theater and Ballet/Dance, but who also occasionally directed films and directed/produced for television. His work has included everything from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. Among the numerous stage productions he worked on were On the Town, Peter Pan, High Button Shoes, The King And I, The Pajama Game, Bells Are Ringing, West Side Story, Gypsy: A Musical Fable, and Fiddler on the Roof. Robbins is a five time Tony Award winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors. He also received two Academy Awards, including the 1961 Academy Award for Best Director with Robert Wise for West Side Story. A documentary about his life and work, Something to Dance About, featuring excerpts from his journals, archival performance and rehearsal footage and interviews with Robbins and his colleagues, premiered on PBS in 2009. Robbins was born Jerome Wilson Rabinowitz, exactly one month before the end of World War I, in the Jewish Maternity Hospital in the heart of Manhattan’s Lower East Side – a neighborhood populated by many immigrants.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Lindsay Anderson

    Lindsay Anderson

    • Plays Directed: Home
    Lindsay Gordon Anderson (17 April 1923 – 30 August 1994) was an Indian-born, British feature film, theatre and documentary director, film critic, and leading light of the Free Cinema movement and the British New Wave. He is most widely remembered for his 1968 film if...., which won the Grand Prix at Cannes Film Festival and was Malcolm McDowell's cinematic debut. He is also notable, though not a professional actor, for playing a minor role in the Academy Award winning film Chariots of Fire. Malcolm McDowell produced a stage presentation now available on DVD about his experiences with Lindsay Anderson, "Never Apologize." The title comes from dialogue of a John Ford film. Of Scottish parentage, Anderson was the son of a British Army officer. He was born in Bangalore, South India, and educated at Saint Ronan's School in Worthing, West Sussex, and at Cheltenham College, where he met his lifelong friend and biographer, the screenwriter and novelist Gavin Lambert; Wadham College, Oxford, where he studied classics; and Magdalen College, Oxford where he studied English literature. After graduating, Anderson worked for the final year of World War II as a cryptographer for the Intelligence
    7.50
    2 votes
    135

    Milton Katselas

    • Plays Directed: Butterflies Are Free
    Milton Katselas (December 22, 1933 – October 24, 2008) was an American film director and famous Hollywood coach for The Beverly Hills Playhouse. He taught such stars as Gene Hackman, Jason Beghe, Jenna Elfman, George Clooney, Alec Baldwin, Giovanni Ribisi, Tom Selleck, Michelle Pfeiffer, Ted Danson, Tony Danza, Jeffrey Tambor, Gene Reynolds, Tyne Daly, Mel Harris, Catherine Bell, Sofia Milos, Elizabeth Sung, Doris Roberts, Sheetal Sheth and others. Milton George Katsalas was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Greek immigrant parents, who owned a small restaurant outside the gates of a Westinghouse Electric plant. When Milton was 14 years old, his father went into the movie theater business and ran a local theater company of Greek actors. Milton Katsalas later adjusted his surname to Katselas. After high school, he set off for Pittsburgh's Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie Mellon) to study theater. On a visit to New York, he sneaked in to watch Lee Strasberg's acting class where he also saw renowned director Elia Kazan on the street and chased him down. "I talked to him in Greek, and he talked with me"... [H]e told me, `When you finish college, come see me.'", Katselas recalled.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Rip Torn

    Rip Torn

    • Plays Directed: Look Away
    Elmore Rual "Rip" Torn (born February 6, 1931), is an American actor of stage, screen and television. Torn received an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor for his role in the 1983 film Cross Creek. His work includes the role of Artie, the producer, on The Larry Sanders Show, for which he was nominated for six Emmy Awards, winning in 1996. Torn also won an American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Male in a Series, and two CableACE Awards for his work on the show, and was nominated for a Satellite Award in 1997 as well. Torn was born Elmore Rudolph Torn (his middle name was later changed) in Temple, Texas, the son of Thelma Mary (née Spacek) and Elmore Rual Torn, an agriculturalist and economist. Being given the name "Rip" is a family tradition of men in the Torn family for several generations. He was a member of the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets and is a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity. Following graduation from the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied drama with B. Iden Payne, Torn relocated from his native Texas to Hollywood, making his debut in the 1956 film Baby Doll. Torn then headed to New York where he studied at the Actors Studio under Lee
    7.50
    2 votes
    137

    Sarah Cameron Sunde

    • Plays Directed: A Summer Day
    Sarah Cameron Sunde is an American theatrical director and translator based in New York City. She is a graduate of the UCLA School of Theater Film and Television, and is a Lincoln Center Directors Lab alum. She has directed plays in New York City, California and Great Britain. In 2004 she translated and directed Jon Fosse’s Night Sings Its Songs at the Culture Project in New York City, and the following year she directed The Asphalt Kiss by Nelson Rodrigues at the Off-Broadway 59E59 Theaters. She directed her translation of Fosse's deathvariations in 2006 and SaKaLa in 2008. In 2009 she directed the world premiere of Sarah Dickey's THE AMISH PROJECT at the Rattlestick Playwrights Theater. Sarah Cameron Sunde is a co-founder of both Oslo Elsewhere and the Translation Think Tank.
    7.50
    2 votes
    138

    Michael Schultz

    • Plays Directed: Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?
    Michael Schultz (born November 10, 1938) is an American director and producer of film and television. Schultz was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the son of Katherine Frances (née Leslie), a factory worker, and Leo Schultz, an insurance salesman. After his undergraduate work at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and Marquette University, he attended Princeton University, where in 1966 he directed his first play, a production of Waiting for Godot. He joined the Negro Ensemble Company in 1968, which brought him to Broadway in 1969. His breakthrough was directing Lorraine Hansberry's To Be Young, Gifted and Black, which he restaged for television in 1972. Schultz' earliest film projects combined low comedy with profound social comment (Honeybaby, Honeybaby and Cooley High), reaching a peak with the ensemble comedy Car Wash (1976) and Which Way is Up? (1977), starring Richard Pryor. In 1978, Schultz took the reins of the musical Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band with the largest budget ever entrusted to an African-American film director to that date. However, upon its release, the project was a commercial and critical failure. Schultz would go on to churn out profitable efforts
    5.50
    4 votes
    139

    Herb Gardner

    • Plays Directed: The Goodbye People
    Herbert George Gardner (December 28, 1934 – September 25, 2003), better known as Herb Gardner, was an American commercial artist, cartoonist, playwright and screenwriter. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Gardner was the son of a bar owner. Gardner's brother, R. Allen Gardner, is a professor of comparative psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno and is famous for teaming with his wife on Project Washoe, the attempt to teach American Sign Language to a chimpanzee named Washoe. Gardner was educated at New York's High School of Performing Arts, Carnegie-Mellon University and Antioch College. While a student at Antioch, he began drawing The Nebbishes. The comic strip was picked up by the Chicago Tribune and syndicated to 60-75 major newspapers from 1959 to 1961. Even before syndication, the Gardner characters were a national craze, marketed on statuettes, studio cards, barware (including cocktail napkins), wall decorations and posters. In 1960, after "the balloons were getting larger and larger, and there was hardly any drawing left", he dropped it and began writing plays. Gardner is best known for his 1962 play A Thousand Clowns, which ran for two years. He received an Oscar nomination
    6.33
    3 votes
    140

    Michael Wilson

    • Plays Directed: The Best Man
    Michael Wilson (born 1964) is an American stage director working extensively in regional theatre, Broadway, and Off-Broadway. He is devoted to American artists and recently completed a ten-year retrospective of the known and neglected works of Tennessee Williams at Hartford Stage, where he was the company's Artistic Director from 1998 to 2011. Mr. Wilson has also furthered new play development by nurturing and commissioning works by both renowned and emerging artists as a director and through Hartford Stage's Brand:NEW Festival of New Works and American Voices, a reading series spotlighting American artists of color. As Artistic Director from 1998 to 2011, Mr. Wilson oversaw forty-five new productions for the theatre, as well as seven SummerStage programs. He directed seventeen productions for Hartford Stage, including the premiere of Enchanted April (which subsequently transferred to Broadway, garnering a 2003 Best Play Tony nomination, and 9 Outer Critics Circle nominations, including Best Director); and the premieres of Horton Foote’s The Carpetbagger’s Children (2002 Best Play, American Theater Critics Award) and Eve Ensler’s Necessary Targets; Williams’s The Glass Menagerie
    6.33
    3 votes
    141

    Patrick Marber

    • Plays Directed: Closer
    Patrick Albert Crispin Marber (born 19 September 1964) is an English comedian, playwright, director, puppeteer, actor and screenwriter. Marber was born in London, England, the son of Brian Marber, a leading and highly-regarded technical analyst, and was raised in Wimbledon. He was educated at St Paul's School, Cranleigh School and Wadham College, Oxford. After working for a few years as a stand-up comedian, Marber was a writer and cast member on the radio shows On the Hour and Knowing Me, Knowing You, and their television spinoffs The Day Today and Knowing Me, Knowing You... with Alan Partridge. Amongst other roles, Marber portrayed the hapless reporter Peter O'Hanrahahanrahan in both On the Hour and The Day Today, and was involved in a dispute with the comedians Stewart Lee and Richard Herring, who had written for On the Hour, about who had invented the character. Lee and Herring's TV show Fist of Fun would later make several references to their ongoing feud with Marber, calling him a "Cornish playwright" and "Cornish curmudgeon". In Stewart Lee's 2010 book, How I Escaped My Certain Fate, Marber is referred to as a "new Shakespeare". Marber reunited with the Knowing Me, Knowing
    6.33
    3 votes
    142

    Peter Hall

    • Plays Directed: Amadeus
    Sir Peter Reginald Frederick Hall, CBE (born 22 November 1930) is an English theatre and film director. Hall founded the Royal Shakespeare Company (1960–68) and directed the National Theatre (1973–88). He has also been prominent in defending public subsidy of the arts in Britain. Hall was born at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, England, the son of Grace Florence (née Pamment) and Reginald Edward Arthur Hall, a stationmaster. Hall attended The Perse School in Cambridge and after securing a scholarship to read English at university there, but first had to fulfil a brief National Service where he was posted to the RAF Headquarters for Education in Bückerberg, Germany. He produced and acted in several productions while at the University of Cambridge, was on the Cambridge University Amateur Dramatic Club Committee 1952-3, and graduated in 1953 from St Catharine's College. During the same year, he staged his first professional play at the Theatre Royal, Windsor. From 1954 to 1955 he was at the Oxford Playhouse where he directed several notable young actors such as Ronnie Barker and Roderick Cook and the stage play of Gigi starring French dancer and film actress Leslie Caron. In August 1955,
    6.33
    3 votes
    143

    Richard Eyre

    • Plays Directed: Mary Poppins
    Sir Richard Charles Hastings Eyre CBE (born 28 March 1943) is an English film, theatre, television and opera director. Eyre was educated at Sherborne School, an independent school for boys in the market town of Sherborne in north-west Dorset in south-west England, followed by Peterhouse at the University of Cambridge and Lincoln College at the University of Oxford. Eyre became the first President of Rose Bruford College in July 2010. He lives in Brook Green, West London. Eyre was Associate Director at the Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh from 1967 to 1972. He won STV Awards for the Best Production in Scotland in 1969, 1970 and 1971. He was artistic director of Nottingham Playhouse from 1973-78 where he commissioned and directed many new plays, including Trevor Griffith's Comedians. Eyre was director of the National Theatre (which became the Royal National Theatre during his time there) between 1987 and 1997, having previously directed a noted revival of Guys and Dolls for the venue in 1982 with Olivier Award-winner Julia McKenzie and Bob Hoskins. He repeated this production in 1996 with Imelda Staunton and Joanna Riding. His diaries during this time have been published as National
    6.33
    3 votes
    144

    Alan Arkin

    • Plays Directed: The Sunshine Boys
    Alan Wolf Arkin (born March 26, 1934) is an American actor, director, musician and singer. He is known for starring in such films as Wait Until Dark, The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Catch-22, The In-Laws, Edward Scissorhands, Glengarry Glen Ross, Marley & Me, and Little Miss Sunshine, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 2006. He is the father of actors Adam Arkin, Anthony Arkin, and Matthew Arkin. Arkin was born in Brooklyn, New York City, the son of Beatrice (née Wortis), a teacher, and David I. Arkin, a painter and writer who mostly worked as a teacher. Arkin was raised in a Jewish family with "no emphasis on religion"; his grandparents were immigrants from Odessa, Ukraine, Russia, and Germany. The family moved from Brooklyn to Los Angeles when Arkin was 11 years old, but an eight-month Hollywood strike cost Arkin's father a set designer job he had wanted to take. During the 1950s Red Scare, Arkin's parents were accused of being Communists, which led to David losing his job when he refused to answer questions about his political affiliation. David challenged the dismissal and was ultimately vindicated, but
    8.00
    1 votes
    145

    Athol Fugard

    • Plays Directed: Blood Knot
    Athol Fugard (born 11 June 1932) is a South African playwright, novelist, actor, and director who writes in English, best known for his political plays opposing the South African system of apartheid and for the 2005 Academy-Award winning film of his novel Tsotsi, directed by Gavin Hood. He is an adjunct professor of playwriting, acting, and directing in the Department of Theatre and Dance at the University of California, San Diego. For academic year 2000–2001, he was the IU Class of 1963 Wells Scholar Professor at Indiana University, in Bloomington, Indiana. The recipient of many awards, honors, and honorary degrees, including the 2005 Order of Ikhamanga in Silver "for his excellent contribution and achievements in the theatre" from the government of South Africa, he is also an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Athol Fugard was born as Harold Athol Lanigan Fugard, in Middelburg, Eastern Cape, South Africa, on 11 June 1932, to Irish and Afrikaner parents; his mother, Elizabeth Magdalena (née Potgieter), an Afrikaner, operated first a general store and then a lodging house; his father, Harold, was a disabled former jazz pianist of Irish, English and French Huguenot
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Bartlett Sher

    • Plays Directed: Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown
    Bartlett Sher (born March 27, 1959), also "Bart", is an American theatre director. He received both the 2008 Tony Award and the Drama Desk Award for his direction of the Broadway revival of South Pacific. The New York Times has described him as "one of the most original and exciting directors, not only in the American theater but also in the international world of opera". Sher has been nominated for Tony awards in 2005, 2006, 2008 (winning) and 2009. Sher was born in San Francisco, California, USA, the son of Aird (Stewart) and Joseph Sher. He had six siblings, including a twin brother. He was raised Catholic (during his teenage years, he found out that his Lithuanian-born father was Jewish). Sher attended St. Ignatius College Preparatory and later the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. He returned to St. Ignatius to teach English and run the theatre program. During the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games he was influenced by the arts programs associated with the Games, particularly by the work of Polish director Tadeusz Kantor. Sher served as associate artistic director at Hartford Stage (Hartford, Connecticut) and company director at the Guthrie Theater
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    Herbert Ross

    • Plays Directed: Chapter Two
    Herbert David Ross (May 13, 1927 – October 9, 2001) was an American film director, producer, choreographer and actor. Born Herbert David Ross in Brooklyn, New York, he made his stage debut as Third Witch with a touring company of Macbeth in 1942. His Broadway credits as a performer included Something for the Boys (1943), Laffing Room Only (1944), Beggar's Holiday (1946), and Look, Ma, I'm Dancin'! (1948). His career as a choreographer began with the American Ballet Theatre in 1950; the following year he choreographed his first Broadway production, the Arthur Schwartz-Dorothy Fields musical adaptation of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. His first film assignment was as uncredited choreographer on Carmen Jones in 1954. He choreographed the dance numbers for the Cliff Richard films The Young Ones (1961) and Summer Holiday (1963). In 1968, Ross worked with Barbra Streisand as choreographer and director of musical numbers for the film Funny Girl. The following year, he made his motion picture directorial debut with a musical version of the classic Goodbye, Mr. Chips, starring Peter O'Toole and Petula Clark. Other movies followed for Ross, including The Owl and the Pussycat, Funny Lady (both
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    John Houseman

    John Houseman

    • Plays Directed: Clarence Darrow
    John Houseman (born Jacques Haussmann; September 22, 1902 – October 31, 1988) was a Romanian-born British-American actor and film producer who became known for his highly publicized collaboration with director Orson Welles from their days in the Federal Theatre Project through to the production of Citizen Kane. He is perhaps best known for his role as Professor Charles Kingsfield in the 1973 film The Paper Chase, for which he won a best supporting actor Oscar. He reprised his role as Kingsfield in the subsequent TV series adaptation of The Paper Chase. Houseman was also known for his commercials for the brokerage firm Smith Barney. He had a distinctive Mid-Atlantic English accent, in common with many actors of his generation. Houseman was born in Bucharest, Romania in 1902, the son of May (née Davies) and Georges Haussmann, who ran a grain business. His mother was British, from a Christian family of Welsh and Irish descent. His father was an Alsatian-born Jew. He was educated in England at Clifton College, became a British subject and worked in the grain trade in London before emigrating to the United States in 1925, where he took the stage name of John Houseman. He became a U.S.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149

    Jules Dassin

    • Plays Directed: Illya Darling
    Julius "Jules" Dassin (18 December 1911 – 31 March 2008) was an American film director, with Jewish-Russian origins. He was a subject of the Hollywood blacklist in the McCarthy era, and subsequently moved to France, where he revived his career. One of eight children of Berthe Vogel and Samuel Dassin, a Russian-Jewish barber in Middletown, Connecticut, Dassin grew up in Harlem and went to Morris High School in the Bronx. He joined the Communist Party USA in the 1930s and left it after the Hitler–Stalin Pact in 1939. He started as a Yiddish actor with the ARTEF (Yiddish Proletarian Theater) company in New York. He collaborated on a film with Jack Skurnick that was incomplete because of Skurnick's early death. In 1937 he married Beatrice Launer, with whom he had three children. In May 1955 he met Melina Mercouri at the Cannes Film Festival. At about the same time, he discovered the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. These two elements created a bond with Greece. He divorced Launer in 1962 and married Mercouri in 1966. The couple had to leave Greece after the colonels' coup in 1967. In 1970, they were accused of having financed an attempt to overthrow the dictatorship, but the
    8.00
    1 votes
    150

    Robert Lewis

    • Plays Directed: The Teahouse of the August Moon
    Robert Lewis (March 16, 1909 – November 23, 1997) was an American actor, director, teacher, author and founder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. In addition to his accomplishments on Broadway and in Hollywood, Lewis' greatest and longest lasting contribution to American theater may be the role he played as one of the foremost acting and directing teachers of his day. He was an early proponent of the Stanislavski System of acting technique and a founding member of New York's revolutionary Group Theatre in the 1930s. In the 1970s, he was the Head of the Yale School of Drama Acting and Directing Departments. Robert (Bobby) Lewis was born in Brooklyn in 1909 to a middle class working family. Encouraged in the arts by his mother, a former contralto, Lewis acquired an early and lifelong interest in music, particularly opera. He studied cello and piano as a child but these eventually gave way to his love of acting. In 1929, he joined Eva Le Gallienne's Civic Repertory Theatre in New York City. His musical background proved invaluable later when he became a director of operas and filmed musicals in Hollywood. In 1931, Lewis became one of the 28 original (and youngest)
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Robert Montgomery

    Robert Montgomery

    • Plays Directed: The Desperate Hours
    Robert Montgomery (May 21, 1904 – September 27, 1981) was an American actor and director. Montgomery was born Henry Montgomery, Jr. in Beacon, New York, then known as "Fishkill Landing", the son of Mary Weed (née Barney) and Henry Montgomery, Sr. His early childhood was one of privilege, since his father was president of the New York Rubber Company. After his own father committed suicide in 1922, jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge, the family's fortune was gone. Montgomery went to New York City to try his hand at writing and acting. He established a stage career, and became popular enough to turn down an offer to appear opposite Vilma Bánky in the film This Is Heaven. Sharing a stage with George Cukor gave him an in to Hollywood, where, in 1929, he debuted in So This Is College. Montgomery entered the moving picture industry during the revolution of the talkies, which made it more difficult to impress the studio. One writer claimed that Montgomery was able to establish himself because he "proceeded with confidence, agreeable with everyone, eager and willing to take suggestions". During the production of So This Is College, he learned from and questioned crew members from several
    8.00
    1 votes
    152

    Michael Kidd

    • Plays Directed: The Goodbye Girl
    Michael Kidd (August 12, 1915 – December 23, 2007) was an American film and stage choreographer. Born Milton Greenwald in New York City on the Lower East Side, the son of Abraham Greenwald, an immigrant barber, and his wife Lillian, Michael Kidd moved to Brooklyn with his family and attended New Utrecht High School there. Becoming interested in dance after attending a modern dance performance, he went on to study under Blanche Evan, a dancer and choreographer who was a pioneer in the development of dance therapy. Nonetheless, he pursued chemical engineering at the City College of New York, which he attended from 1936 to mid-1937 before being granted a scholarship to the School of American Ballet. His work for the 1954 film Seven Brides for Seven Brothers was noted for a series of energetic dances depicting ordinary frontier activities, including a barn raising. He also choreographed Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse in the celebrated Girl Hunt Ballet from the 1953 musical film The Band Wagon as well as the 1969 musical Hello, Dolly! He was both director and choreographer for the musical comedy film Merry Andrew, starring Danny Kaye. Kidd's brother was celebrated psychotherapist Dr.
    5.25
    4 votes
    153
    Arlene Phillips

    Arlene Phillips

    • Plays Directed: The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber
    Arlene Phillips OBE (born 22 May 1943) is an English choreographer, theatre director, talent scout, TV presenter, TV judge and former dancer, who has worked in many fields of entertainment. For many years she was most noted as the choreographer of numerous West End and Broadway musicals, films and television shows, but she has since achieved mainstream fame as a judge on television talent shows including Strictly Come Dancing and So You Think You Can Dance. On 15 April 2010, she made her first appearance as a panellist for the ITV1 television series Loose Women. Phillips was born in 1943 and grew up in Prestwich, Lancashire, England. She is Jewish and has a brother, Ian and a sister, Karen. She attended Broughton Preparatory School, Cheetham Hill, Manchester, Beaver Road Primary School, Didsbury and Manchester Central High School for Girls after passing the Eleven plus exam. When Phillips was 15, her mother, who had been suffering from leukaemia, died aged 43. Her father who had been barber with his own shop died of Alzheimer's at age 89. Phillips originally wanted to be a ballet dancer and began dance classes at the age of three, studying ballet and tap dance at the Muriel Tweedy
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Brian Macdonald

    • Plays Directed: The Mikado
    Brian Macdonald, CC (born May 14, 1928) is a Canadian dancer, choreographer, director of opera, theatre and musical theatre. Born in Montreal, Macdonald was an original member of the National Ballet of Canada. As a choreographer, he created works for the Royal Winnipeg Ballet and was artistic director of the Royal Swedish Ballet (1964–67), Harkness Ballet (1967–68), Israel's Batsheva Dance Theatre (1971–72) and Les Grands Ballet Canadiens (1974–77). Among his ballets during this period were the popular "Time Out of Mind" for the Joffrey Ballet and Harkness Ballet's "Canto Indio." Macdonald's Broadway theatre credits include Maggie Flynn (1968) and The Mikado (1987), for which he was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Choreography and Best Direction of a Musical. In 1967, Macdonald was made an Officer of the Order of Canada and was promoted to Companion in 2001. In 2008, he received the Governor General's Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement.
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    David Cromer

    David Cromer

    • Plays Directed: The House of Blue Leaves
    David Cromer (born October 17, 1964) is an American theatre director and stage actor. He has received recognition for his work Off-Broadway and in his native Chicago. Cromer has won or been nominated for numerous awards, including winning the Lucille Lortel Award and Obie Award for his direction of Our Town. He was nominated for the Drama Desk Award and the Outer Critics Circle Award for his direction of The Adding Machine. Born the third of four sons to Richard and Louise Cromer, David was raised in Skokie, Illinois. He dropped out of high school his junior year (later acquiring a GED), and attended Columbia College Chicago. He was nominated for or won the Joseph Jefferson Award for his work in Chicago productions, winning for Angels in America Parts I and II in 1998, The Price in 2002, and The Cider House Rules in 2003. In 2005, Cromer made his Off-Broadway debut directing Austin Pendleton's Orson's Shadow at the Barrow Street Theatre. The production originated at the Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago. His 2008 production of a musical adaptation of The Adding Machine also moved to Off-Broadway from Chicago and received wide critical acclaim, receiving six Lucille Lortel
    7.00
    2 votes
    156

    Henry Kaplan

    • Plays Directed: Any Wednesday
    Henry Kaplan (1924-September 14, 2005) was a television director known for his works on Dark Shadows, Ryan's Hope, The Doctors and All My Children. He also directed seven episodes of the sitcom The Adventures of Aggie.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157

    Howard Lindsay

    Howard Lindsay, born Herman Nelke, (March 29, 1889 - February 11, 1968) was an American theatrical producer, playwright, librettist, director and actor. He is best known for his writing work as part of the collaboration of Lindsay and Crouse, and for his performance, with his wife Dorothy Stickney, in the long-running play Life with Father. Lindsay graduated from Boston Latin School in 1907. The 1957 Rodgers and Hammerstein television musical Cinderella, recently revived by PBS, featured Lindsay and Stickney playing the roles of the King and Queen, one of the few times a Lindsay performance has been captured on film. Together with Russel Crouse, Lindsay won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the 1946 play State of the Union, which was adapted into a film directed by Frank Capra two years later. In 1960, the team won the Tony Award for Best Musical for The Sound of Music. They also collaborated on Happy Hunting and Mr. President.
    7.00
    2 votes
    158

    John Madden

    • Plays Directed: Wings
    John Philip Madden (born 8 April 1949) is an English director of theatre, film, television, and radio. Madden was educated at Clifton College. He was in the same house as friend and fellow director Roger Michell. He began his career in British independent films, and graduated from the University of Cambridge (Sidney Sussex) in 1970 with a B.A. in English literature. He started work in television including directing Prime Suspect 4 and episodes of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (ITV, 1984-1994) and Inspector Morse. Perhaps his most notable achievement to date was directing Shakespeare in Love, which won the Oscar for Best Picture in 1998, and for which he was also nominated as Best Director; he lost to Steven Spielberg for Saving Private Ryan. The film also won the Silver Bear at the 49th Berlin International Film Festival. Madden is also a Jury Member for the digital studio Filmaka, a platform for undiscovered filmmakers to show their work to industry professionals. Plays he has directed include Arthur Kopit's Wings. Radio dramas he has directed include the radio versions of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope and Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. Before it was produced
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    John William Van Druten

    John William Van Druten

    • Plays Directed: The King and I
    John William Van Druten (1 June 1901 – 19 December 1957) was an English playwright and theatre director, known professionally as John Van Druten. He began his career in London, and later moved to America becoming a U.S. citizen. He was known for his plays of witty and urbane observations of contemporary life and society. Van Druten was born in London in 1901, son of a Dutch father, Wilhelmus van Druten and his English wife Eva. He was educated at University College School and read Law at the University of London. Before commencing his career as a writer he practised law for a while as a solicitor and university lecturer in Wales. He first came to prominence with Young Woodley, a slight but charming study of adolescence, which was produced in New York in 1925, but was banned in London by the Lord Chamberlain's office. In England, it was first produced privately (by Phyllis Whitworth's Three Hundred Club) and then at the Arts Theatre in 1928. When the ban was lifted, it had a successful run at the Savoy Theatre in the West End with a cast including Frank Lawton, Derrick De Marney and Jack Hawkins. The play was filmed twice. It was revived at the Finborough Theatre, London, in
    7.00
    2 votes
    160

    Justin Bond

    • Plays Directed: Kiki and Herb: Alive on Broadway
    Justin Vivian Bond (born May 9, 1963), formerly simply Justin Bond, is an American singer-songwriter, performance artist, occasional actor and Radical Faerie. Described as a "fixture of the New York avant-garde", Bond arose to notability playing the role of Kiki DuRayne in the drag cabaret act Kiki and Herb from the early 1990s through to 2004. Born physically male, Bond is transgender and eschews gender-specific honorifics and pronouns, preferring "Mx." and "V" respectively. Born in Hagerstown, Maryland, Bond went on to study theater at Adelphi University before moving to San Francisco after graduating in 1985. It was here that v met Kenny Mellman, and they began a cabaret act together, which would eventually lead to them creating the characters of Kiki and Herb. Bond designed Kiki to be an elderly alcoholic woman who would perform covers of pre-existing songs in her own distinct style. Bond decided to bring an end to the Kiki character in 2004, subsequently embarking on a solo career, and starring in John Cameron Mitchell's film Shortbus (2006) as vself before releasing vs first EP, Pink Slip (2009), and then an album, Dendrophile (2011). That same year also saw the publication
    7.00
    2 votes
    161

    Martin Charnin

    • Plays Directed: Cafe Crown
    Martin Charnin (born November 24, 1934) is an American lyricist, writer, and theatre director. Charnin's best-known work is as conceiver, director and lyricist of the musical Annie. He won the Tony Award for Best Original Score for Annie. Born in New York City, Charnin graduated from The High School of Music & Art and then from The Cooper Union, where he earned a BFA. Charnin began his theatrical career as a performer, appearing as "Big Deal", one of the Jets in the original production of West Side Story. He played the role for 1000 performances on Broadway and on the road. He wrote music and lyrics for numerous Off-Broadway and cabaret revues, many of them for Julius Monk. He then went on to write, direct, and produce nightclub acts for Dionne Warwick, Nancy Wilson, Mary Travers, Larry Kert, Jose Ferrer, and Leslie Uggams. The first Broadway musical for which he wrote the lyrics was the 1963 musical Hot Spot starring Judy Holliday, with music by Mary Rodgers. He contributed lyrics to Vernon Duke's musical Zenda which ran in California in 1963 but did not reach Broadway. In 1967, he wrote the lyrics for Mata Hari, which was produced by David Merrick but closed out-of-town. He wrote
    7.00
    2 votes
    162

    Ned Sherrin

    • Plays Directed: Side by Side by Sondheim
    Edward George "Ned" Sherrin CBE (18 February 1931 – 1 October 2007) was an English broadcaster, author and stage director. He qualified as a barrister and then worked in independent television before joining the BBC. He appeared in a variety of radio and television satirical shows and theatre shows, some of which he also directed. Born in a farming family at Low Ham in the Somerset Levels, Sherrin attended Sexey's School, in Bruton, Somerset. Although he read law at Exeter College, Oxford and subsequently qualified as a barrister, he became involved in theatre at Oxford and joined British television at the founding of independent television in 1956, producing shows for ATV in Birmingham. Sherrin joined the BBC in 1957 as a temporary production assistant, then began working for them as a producer in "Television Talks" in 1963. Specialising in satirical shows, he worked extensively in film production and television. In 1962 he was responsible for the first satirical television series That Was The Week That Was starring David Frost and Millicent Martin and its successors Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life and BBC-3. His other shows and films included Up Pompeii!, Up the
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Richard Foreman

    Richard Foreman

    • Plays Directed: The Threepenny Opera
    Richard Foreman (born in New York on 10 June 1937) is an American playwright and avant-garde theater pioneer. He is the founder of the Ontological-Hysteric Theater. Richard Foreman graduated from Brown University (B.A. 1959), and received an MFA in Playwriting from Yale School of Drama in 1962. As an undergraduate, he was instrumental in the formation of Production Workshop, Brown University's student theatre group, while taking part in other student theatre, including set-designing Brownbrokers' 1958 production of Down to Earth. In 1993, Brown presented him with an honorary doctorate. In 1968 he founded the Ontological-Hysteric Theater, which began as an art-oriented project in the New York district of Soho, and later moved to a semi-permanent "home" at Joseph Papp's Public Theater. From 1992 to 2010, the non-profit organization was in residence at the theater at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery. Foreman's dramatic works are driven by the notion of a constant reawakening of the audience; he is one of the major artists creating substantial works in the avant garde performance movement, now largely referred to as post-dramatic theater. Instead of focusing on conflict to shape his
    7.00
    2 votes
    164

    David Wheeler

    • Plays Directed: The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel
    David Wheeler is a film and television actor. His best known role to date is his brief (three episodes) but very memorable portrayal of Selto Durka on the television series Farscape.
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Woody Harrelson

    Woody Harrelson

    • Plays Directed: Bullet For Adolf
    Woodrow Tracy "Woody" Harrelson (born July 23, 1961) is an American actor. Harrelson's breakout role came in the television sitcom Cheers as bartender Woody Boyd. Some notable film characters include basketball hustler Billy Hoyle in White Men Can't Jump, serial killer Mickey Knox in Natural Born Killers, magazine publisher Larry Flynt in The People vs. Larry Flynt, country singer Dusty in A Prairie Home Companion, bounty hunter Carson Wells in No Country for Old Men, zombie killer Tallahassee in Zombieland, blind piano player/meat salesman Ezra Turner in Seven Pounds, conspiracy nut Charlie Frost in 2012, delusional man who believes he is a superhero named Defendor in Defendor, and Cpt. Tony Stone in The Messenger. For The People vs. Larry Flynt and The Messenger, Harrelson earned Academy Award nominations for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor, respectively. He also appeared as Haymitch Abernathy in the The Hunger Games (2012). Harrelson was born in Midland, Texas, the son of Diane Lou (née Oswald) and Charles Voyde Harrelson, who divorced in 1964; he has two brothers, Jordan and Brett. Harrelson's father, who was a contract killer, was arrested for the killing of Federal Judge
    6.00
    3 votes
    166

    Anne Bogart

    • Plays Directed: Trojan Women (After Euripides)
    Anne Bogart (born September 25, 1951) is a prolific and award-winning American theatre and opera director. She is currently one of the Artistic Directors of SITI Company, which she founded with Japanese director Tadashi Suzuki in 1992. She is a Professor at Columbia University where she runs the Graduate Directing Concentration and is the author of three books: A Director Prepares, The Viewpoints Book and And Then, You Act. Conversations with Anne, a collection of interviews she has conducted with various notable artists was published in March 2012. Bogart’s influence is felt throughout the contemporary theatre: through the widespread use of SITI’s training methods of Viewpoints and Suzuki, her oeuvre of groundbreaking productions, and her guidance at Columbia University of such diverse talents as Pavol Liska, Diane Paulus, Kim Weild, Jay Sheib, Darko Tresnjak and many others. In addition to her books and essays, she publishes a monthly essay for her blog on SITI Company’s website http://siti.groupsite.com/blog. Bogart earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Bard College in 1974, followed by a Master of Arts degree from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts in 1977. She
    5.67
    3 votes
    167

    Frank Silvera

    • Plays Directed: The Amen Corner
    Frank Alvin Silvera (July 24, 1914 – June 11, 1970) was an American actor and theatrical director. Silvera was an African-American actor born in Kingston, Jamaica, to a Spanish Jewish father and Jamaican mother. His family later emigrated to the United States, settling in Boston, where Silvera attended English High School and Northeastern Law School. Silvera later studied acting at the Actors Studio. Due to his light complexion, Silvera was cast in a wide variety of ethnic roles in films, and was cast without regard to his color in the theater. He played the father of Ben Gazzara and Anthony Franciosa on Broadway in Michael V. Gazzo's A Hatful of Rain (a role portrayed by Lloyd Nolan on screen). Until the 1960s, Silvera played "white" characters on Broadway, such as his Tony-nominated performance as the father Monsieur Duval in The Lady of the Camellias in 1963. He threw off color-blind casting in 1965, when he financed his own production of The Amen Corner by the African-American writer James Baldwin. He was the founder of The Theatre of Being, a Los Angeles-based theater dedicated to helping black actors get a foothold in show business. In films and on television, he was also
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    John Malkovich

    John Malkovich

    • Plays Directed: A Celebration of Harold Pinter
    John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an American actor, producer, director and fashion designer with his label Technobohemian. Over the last 25 years of his career, Malkovich has appeared in more than 70 motion pictures. For his roles in Places in the Heart and In the Line of Fire, he received Academy Award nominations. He has also appeared in critically acclaimed films such as Empire of the Sun, The Killing Fields, Dangerous Liaisons, Of Mice and Men, Con Air, Being John Malkovich, and Red. He will produce the film version of the book The Perks of Being a Wallflower. Malkovich was born in Christopher, Illinois. His paternal grandparents were Croatian, natives of Ozalj. His mother was of Scottish and German ancestry. He grew up in Benton, Illinois, in a large house on South Main Street. His father, Daniel Leon Malkovich, was a state conservation director and publisher of Outdoor Illinois, a conservation magazine. His mother, Joe Anne (née Choisser), owned the Benton Evening News as well as Outdoor Illinois. Malkovich has three younger sisters and an older brother. Malkovich attended Logan Grade School, Webster Junior High, and Benton Consolidated High School. During his
    5.67
    3 votes
    169

    Joseph Anthony

    • Plays Directed: Rhinoceros
    Joseph Anthony (May 24, 1912 – January 20, 1993) was an American playwright, actor, and director. He made his film acting debut in the 1934 film Hat, Coat, and Glove and his theatrical acting debut in a 1935 production of Mary of Scotland. On five occasions he was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Direction. Joseph Anthony was born as Joseph Deuster in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on May 24, 1912. His parents were Leonard Deuster and Sophie Deuster (née Hertz). Anthony attended the University of Wisconsin. He married Perry Wilson. He prepared for the stage at the Pasadena Playhouse from 1931 through 1935 and at the Daykarhanova School from 1935 through 1937. Anthony served in the United States Army in World War II from 1942 through 1946. On January 20, 1993, Joseph Anthony died at the age of 80 in a nursing home in Hyannis, Massachusetts. Joseph Anthony, then appearing under his given name of Joseph Deuster, made his professional acting debut in 1935 playing the role of Rizzio in a production of Mary of Scotland In 1937 he appeared in the touring production of "Dead End". He went on to make his first New York City appearance two years later with the Federal Theatre Project Company
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Tom O'Horgan

    Tom O'Horgan

    • Plays Directed: Jesus Christ Superstar
    Tom O'Horgan (May 3, 1924 – January 11, 2009) was an American theatre and film director, composer, actor and musician. He is best known for his Broadway work as director of the hit musicals Hair and Jesus Christ Superstar. During his career he sought to achieve a form of "total theater" described by the New York Times as “wittily physical,” and which earned him a reputation as the “Busby Berkeley of the acid set.” Born in Chicago, Illinois, O'Horgan was introduced to theater by his father, a newspaper owner and sometimes actor, who took him to shows and built him footlights and a wind machine. As a child he sang in churches and wrote operas, including one entitled "Doom of the Earth" at age 12. O'Horgan received his degree from DePaul University where he learned to play dozens of musical instruments. After graduating he worked in Chicago as a harpist and also performed with the Second City, the Chicago improvisational theater company. He moved to New York City and began acting downtown at places like Judson Memorial Church. During this time he developed a night club act where he performed improvisational humor as he accompanied himself on the harp. O'Horgan thought of his work as
    5.67
    3 votes
    171

    Gower Champion

    • Plays Directed: 42nd Street
    Gower Carlyle Champion (June 22, 1919 – August 25, 1980) was an American actor, theatre director, choreographer, and dancer. Champion was born in Geneva, Illinois, the son of John W. Champion and Beatrice Carlisle. He was raised in Los Angeles, California, where he graduated from Fairfax High School. He studied dance from an early age and, at the age of fifteen, toured nightclubs with friend Jeanne Tyler billed as "Gower and Jeanne, America's Youngest Dance Team." In 1939, "Gower and Jeanne" danced to the music of Larry Clinton and his Orchestra in a Warner Brothers & Vitaphone film short-subject, "The Dipsy Doodler" (released in 1940). During the late 1930s and early 1940s, Champion worked on Broadway as a solo dancer and choreographer. After serving in the U.S. Coast Guard during World War II, Champion met Marjorie Belcher, who became his new partner, and the two were married in 1947. In the early 1950s, Marge and Gower Champion made seven film musicals: Mr. Music (1950, with Bing Crosby), the 1951 remake of Show Boat (with Howard Keel and Kathryn Grayson), 1952's Lovely to Look At (a remake of Roberta, also with Keel and Grayson), the autobiographical Everything I Have Is Yours
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Rob Marshall

    Rob Marshall

    • Plays Directed: Little Me
    Rob Marshall (born October 17, 1960) is an American theater director, film director and choreographer. He is a six-time Tony Award nominee, Academy Award nominee, Golden Globe nominee and four-time Emmy winner whose most noted work is the 2002 Academy Award for Best Picture winner Chicago. Marshall was born in Madison, Wisconsin and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Taylor Allderdice High School in 1978 and was inducted into their alumni hall of fame in 2012. He attended Carnegie Mellon University and worked in the Pittsburgh theatre scene, performing with such companies as Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera. He debuted in the film industry with the Emmy Award-winning TV adaptation of the musical Annie by Charles Strouse and Martin Charnin. After that he went on to direct the much anticipated adaptation of the Kander and Ebb musical Chicago in 2002 for which he was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Director. His next feature film was the drama Memoirs of a Geisha based on the best-selling book of the same name by Arthur Golden starring Zhang Ziyi, Gong Li, Michelle Yeoh and Ken Watanabe. The film went on to win three Academy Awards and gross $162,242,962 at the
    6.50
    2 votes
    173

    Robert Moore

    • Plays Directed: Woman of the Year
    Robert Moore (February 1, 1927 – May 10, 1984) was an American stage, film and television director. Born in Detroit, Michigan, Moore is best known for his direction of the ground-breaking play The Boys in the Band, his Broadway productions (which garnered him five Tony Award nominations), and his collaborations - three plays and three films - with Neil Simon, including the classic detective spoof, Murder By Death. As an actor, he played a disabled gay man opposite Liza Minnelli in the 1970 drama Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon, appeared in two episodes of Valerie Harper's sitcom Rhoda (for which he also directed 26 episodes), in one episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show (as Phyllis' brother) and was a regular on Diana Rigg's short-lived 1973 sitcom. His other television directing credits include The Bob Newhart Show and the 1976 production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof with Natalie Wood, Robert Wagner, Laurence Olivier, and Maureen Stapleton. Moore died of AIDS-related pneumonia in New York City.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    Ron Field

    • Plays Directed: Applause
    Ronald Field (1934 – February 6, 1989) was an American choreographer, director, and dancer. Field was born in New York City, New York where he made his Broadway debut as a child in Lady in the Dark (1941) with Gertrude Lawrence. He later danced in the ensembles of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1949), Kismet (1954), and The Boy Friend (1955) before deciding to concentrate on choreography. His first two efforts Nowhere But Up (1962) and Cafe Crown (1964) were flops, but in 1966 he won his first Tony Award for his dazzling work in the smash hit Cabaret, the first of several noteworthy successes. During rehearsals for Stephen Sondheim's trouble-plagued Merrily We Roll Along in 1981, Field was unceremoniously dismissed from the creative team. It wasn't until a revival of Cabaret in 1987 that he would have another Broadway success. In addition to his work on Broadway, Field staged such diverse projects as Las Vegas nightclub acts, the 44th Annual Academy Awards telecast in 1972, a Hollywood Bowl concert and television special with Bette Midler in 1977, the opening ceremonies for the 1986 Los Angeles Olympics, and an acclaimed revival of Kiss Me, Kate in London's West End. He also
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Stephen Daldry

    • Plays Directed: Billy Elliot: The Musical
    Stephen David Daldry, CBE (born 2 May 1960) is an English theatre and film director and producer, as well as a three-time Academy Award nominated and Tony Award winning director. He is also notable for having all of his feature films that he has directed go on to be nominated for Best Director or Best Picture at the Academy Awards, the films of which are Billy Elliot (2000), The Hours (2002),The Reader (2008) and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2011). Daldry was born in Dorset, England, the son of bank manager Patrick Daldry and singer Cherry (née Thompson). The family moved to Taunton, Somerset, where when Daldry was aged 14, his father died of cancer After this, Daldry joined a youth theatre group in Taunton, and then aged 18 won a Royal Air Force scholarship to University of Sheffield to study English, where he became chairman of SuTCo (Sheffield University Theatre Company). After graduation, he spent a year travelling through Italy, where he became a clown's apprentice. Returning to Sheffield, he became an apprentice at the Crucible Theatre from 1985-1988. He then trained as an actor at East 15 Acting School, London. Daldry began his career at the Sheffield Crucible with
    6.50
    2 votes
    176

    Arthur Laurents

    • Plays Directed: West Side Story
    Arthur Laurents (July 14, 1917 – May 5, 2011) was an American playwright, stage director and screenwriter. After writing scripts for radio shows after college and then training films for the U.S. Army during World War II, Laurents turned to writing for Broadway, producing a body of work that includes West Side Story (1957), Gypsy (1959), Hallelujah, Baby! (1967) and La Cage Aux Folles (1983), and directing some of his own shows and other Broadway productions. His early film scripts include Rope (1948) for Alfred Hitchcock, followed by Anastasia (1956), Bonjour Tristesse (1958), The Way We Were (1973) and The Turning Point (1977). Born Arthur Levine, Laurents was the son of middle-class Jewish parents, a lawyer and a schoolteacher who gave up her career when she married. He was born and raised in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, a borough of New York City, New York, the elder of two children, and attended Erasmus Hall High School. His sister Edith suffered from chorea as a child. His paternal grandparents were Orthodox Jews, and his mother's parents, although born Jewish, were atheists. His mother kept a kosher home for her husband's sake, but was lax about attending synagogue and
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Barry Morse

    Barry Morse

    • Plays Directed: Staircase
    Herbert "Barry" Morse (10 June 1918 – 2 February 2008) was an Anglo-Canadian actor of stage, screen, and radio best known for his roles in the ABC television series The Fugitive and the British sci-fi drama Space: 1999. His performing career spanned seven decades and he had thousands of roles to his credit, including work for the British Broadcasting Corporation and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Born to a Cockney family, Morse was a 15 year old school dropout and errand boy when he won a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. He performed the role of the Lion in Androcles and the Lion and as a result came to know George Bernard Shaw, a patron of the academy. His first paid job as an actor while still a student was in If I Were King. At graduation he starred in the title role of Shakespeare's Henry V, presented as a Royal Command Performance for King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. Upon graduation, Morse won the BBC's Radio Prize which led to several parts and a leading role in The Fall of the City. Later he played the lead in William Shakespeare's Hamlet and starred as Paul Temple in the radio series Send for Paul Temple Again, among dozens of other roles. He
    7.00
    1 votes
    178

    Ian Richardson

    • Plays Directed: My Fair Lady
    Ian William Richardson CBE (7 April 1934 – 9 February 2007) was a Scottish actor best known for his portrayal of the Machiavellian Tory politician Francis Urquhart in the BBC's House of Cards trilogy. He was also a leading Shakespearean stage actor. Richardson was born in Edinburgh, the son of Margaret (née Drummond) and John Richardson. He was educated in the city, at Balgreen Primary School, Tynecastle High School and George Heriot's School. He first appeared on stage at the age of fourteen, in an amateur production of A Tale of Two Cities. The director encouraged his talent, but warned that he would need to lose his Scottish accent to progress as an actor. His mother arranged elocution lessons and he became a stage manager with the semi-professional Edinburgh People's Theatre. After National Service in the Army (part of which he spent as an announcer and drama director with the British Forces Broadcasting Service) he obtained a place at the College of Dramatic Arts in Glasgow. After a period at the Birmingham Repertory Theatre he appeared with the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), of which he was a founding member, from 1960 to 1975. Although he later achieved fame in film and
    7.00
    1 votes
    179

    James Lapine

    • Plays Directed: The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
    James Lapine (born January 10, 1949) is an American stage director and librettist. He has won the Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical three times, for Into the Woods, Falsettos, and Passion. He has frequently collaborated with Stephen Sondheim and William Finn. Lapine was born in Mansfield, Ohio and graduated from Franklin and Marshall College in 1971. He did graduate study in both photography and graphic design at the California Institute of the Arts. He was a photographer, graphic designer, and architectural preservationist and taught design at the Yale School of Drama. At Yale University he wrote an adaptation and directed the Gertrude Stein play Photograph, which was produced Off-Broadway at the Open Space in SoHo in 1977. He proceeded to write and direct Off-Broadway plays and musicals, working with composer William Finn on March of the Falsettos in 1981 as director; the musical won the Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Off-Broadway Play. Frank Rich, the New York Times theatre critic, noted "Mr. Lapine's wildly resourceful staging." In 1982 he was introduced to Stephen Sondheim,and they decided to work on a musical together, which became Sunday in the Park With George,
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    James Naughton

    • Plays Directed: Our Town
    James Naughton (born December 6, 1945) is an American director, theater, film and television actor. Naughton was born in Middletown, Connecticut, the son of Rosemary (née Walsh) and Joseph Naughton, both of whom were teachers He is the brother of actor David Naughton. He graduated from Conard High School. Naughton graduated from Brown University and Yale Drama School. His acting career began when he appeared in a series of Broadway dramas and musicals. He has since become an accomplished actor in both starring and supporting film and television roles. His largest fame and first love has been the legitimate theater. He won the Theatre World Award for his performance in Long Day's Journey Into Night in 1971. He went on to star with Geneviève Bujold in Antigone which was later made into a film in 1974. He starred in the musical I Love My Wife in 1977 and in the drama Whose Life is it Anyway? opposite Mary Tyler Moore in 1980. He won his first Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical in 1990 for City of Angels. In 1997 he won a second Tony Award with his portrayal of lawyer Billy Flynn in the musical Chicago. He created the lead role of Willy Brandt, Chancellor of West Germany, in the
    7.00
    1 votes
    181

    Karel Reisz

    Karel Reisz (21 July 1926 – 25 November 2002) was a Czech-born British filmmaker who was active in post–war Britain, and one of the pioneers of the new realist strain in 1950s and 1960s British cinema. Reisz was a Jewish refugee, one of the 669 rescued by Sir Nicholas Winton. His father was a lawyer. He came to England in 1938, speaking almost no English, but eradicated his foreign accent as quickly as possible. After attending Leighton Park School, he joined the Royal Air Force towards the end of the war; his parents died at Auschwitz. Following his war service, he read Natural Sciences at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and began to write for film journals, including Sight and Sound. He co-founded Sequence with Lindsay Anderson and Gavin Lambert in 1947. Reisz was a founder member of the Free Cinema documentary film movement. His first short film, Momma Don't Allow (1955), co-directed with Tony Richardson, was included in the first Free Cinema programme shown at the National Film Theatre in February 1956. His film We Are the Lambeth Boys (1958) was a naturalistic depiction of the members of a South London boys' club, which was unusual in showing the leisure life of working-class
    7.00
    1 votes
    182

    Moss Hart

    • Plays Directed: Camelot (Original Broadway Production)
    Moss Hart (October 24, 1904 – December 20, 1961) was an American playwright and theatre director, best known for his interpretations of musical theater on Broadway. Hart was born in New York City and grew up at 74 East 105th Street in Manhattan, “a neighborhood not of carriages and hansom cabs, but of dray wagons, pushcarts, and immigrants.” He was also raised, in relative poverty, by his English-born Jewish immigrant parents in the Bronx, New York, and in the Seagate area of Brooklyn, near Coney Island. Early on he had a strong relationship with his Aunt Kate, with whom he later lost contact due to a falling out between her and his parents, and her weakening mental state. She piqued his interest in the theater and took him to see performances often. Hart even went so far as to create an "alternate ending" to her life in his book Act One. He writes that she died while he was working on out-of-town tryouts for The Beloved Bandit. Later, Kate became eccentric and then disturbed, vandalizing Hart's home, writing threatening letters and setting fires backstage during rehearsals for Jubilee. But his relationship with her was formative. He learned that the theater made possible "the art
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    Noël Coward

    Noël Coward

    • Plays Directed: High Spirits
    Sir Noël Peirce Coward (16 December 1899 – 26 March 1973) was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise". Born in Teddington, a suburb of London, Coward attended a dance academy in London as a child, making his professional stage début at the age of eleven. As a teenager he was introduced into the high society in which most of his plays would be set. Coward achieved enduring success as a playwright, publishing more than 50 plays from his teens onwards. Many of his works, such as Hay Fever, Private Lives, Design for Living, Present Laughter and Blithe Spirit, have remained in the regular theatre repertoire. He composed hundreds of songs, in addition to well over a dozen musical theatre works (including the operetta Bitter Sweet and comic revues), poetry, several volumes of short stories, the novel Pomp and Circumstance, and a three-volume autobiography. Coward's stage and film acting and directing career spanned six decades, during which he starred in many of his own works. At the outbreak of World War II, Coward volunteered for
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    Preston Sturges

    • Plays Directed: Carnival in Flanders
    Preston Sturges (29 August 1898 – 6 August 1959), originally Edmund Preston Biden, was an American playwright, screenwriter and film director born in Chicago, Illinois. In 1941 he won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for the film The Great McGinty, his first of three nominations in the category. Sturges took the screwball comedy format of the 1930s to another level, writing dialogue that, heard today, is often surprisingly naturalistic, mature, and ahead of its time, despite the farcical situations. It is not uncommon for a Sturges character to deliver an exquisitely turned phrase and take an elaborate pratfall within the same scene. A tender love scene between Henry Fonda and Barbara Stanwyck in The Lady Eve was enlivened by a horse, which repeatedly poked its nose into Fonda's head. In recent years, film scholars such as Alessandro Pirolini have also argued that Sturges' cinema anticipated more experimental narratives by contemporary directors such as Joel and Ethan Coen, Robert Zemeckis, and Woody Allen, along with prolific The Simpsons writer John Swartzwelder: "Many of [Sturges'] movies and screenplays reveal a restless and impatient attempt to escape codified
    7.00
    1 votes
    185

    Sidney Kingsley

    • Plays Directed: Darkness at Noon
    Sidney Kingsley (22 October 1906 - 20 March 1995) was an American dramatist. He received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for his play Men in White in 1934. Kingsley was born Sidney Kirschner in New York. He studied at Cornell University, where he began his career writing plays for the college dramatic club. He joined the Group Theater for the production of his first major work. In 1933 the company performed his play Men in White. Set in a hospital, the play dealt with the issue of illegal abortion, 1930s medical and surgical practices and the struggle of one promising physician who must choose to dedicate his life to medicine or devote himself to his fiancee. The play was a box-office smash. Kingsley followed this success with the play Dead End in 1935. A story about slum housing and its connection to crime, the piece was also fairly successful, eventually spawning the Dead End Kids. The two plays which followed, the anti-war Ten Million Ghosts of 1936 and The World We Make of 1939, were flops and had short runs. But in 1943 Kingsley returned to his previous success with the historical drama The Patriots. This play, which told the story of Thomas Jefferson and his activities in the
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Trey Parker

    Trey Parker

    • Plays Directed: The Book of Mormon
    Trey Parker (born Randolph Severn Parker III; October 19, 1969) is an American actor, voice artist, animator, screenwriter, director, producer and musician, best known for being the co-creator of South Park along with his creative partner and best friend Matt Stone. Parker started his film career in 1992, making a holiday short titled Jesus vs. Frosty. His first success came from Cannibal! The Musical. From there he made another short titled Jesus vs. Santa, which led him and college friend Stone to create South Park, which began airing on television in 1997. He has won four Emmy Awards for his role in South Park, winning for both "Outstanding Programming More Than One Hour" and "Outstanding Programming Less Than One Hour". He co-wrote and co-directed the 2011 multi-Tony Award winning musical The Book of Mormon. Parker was born in Denver, Colorado, the son of Randy (a geologist) and Sharon (an insurance broker). The two share the first names and occupations of South Park characters Randy and Sharon Marsh. He has an older sister named Shelley, which is also the name of Stan Marsh's older sister. In the sixth grade, Parker wrote a sketch titled The Dentist and appeared in his
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    George S. Kaufman

    George S. Kaufman

    • Plays Directed: Romanoff and Juliet
    George Simon Kaufman (November 16, 1889 – June 2, 1961) was an American playwright, theatre director and producer, humorist, and drama critic. In addition to comedies and political satire, he wrote several musicals, notably for the Marx Brothers. One play and one musical that he wrote won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama: You Can't Take It With You (1937, with Moss Hart), and Of Thee I Sing (1932, with Morrie Ryskind and Ira Gershwin). He also won the Tony Award as a Director, for the musical Guys and Dolls. Born to a Jewish family in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he graduated from high school in 1907 and "tried law school for three months" but grew disenchanted and took on a series of odd jobs, including "selling hatbands". Kaufman then began his career as a journalist and drama critic; he was the drama editor for The New York Times from 1917 through 1930. Kaufman took his editorial responsibilities very seriously. According to legend, on one occasion a press agent asked: "How do I get our leading lady’s name in the Times?" Kaufman: "Shoot her." Kaufman's Broadway debut was September 4, 1918 at the Knickerbocker Theatre, with the premiere of the melodrama Someone in the House. He
    5.33
    3 votes
    188
    Stanley Tucci

    Stanley Tucci

    • Plays Directed: Lend Me a Tenor
    Stanley Tucci (born January 11 or November 11, 1960; sources differ) is an American actor, writer, film producer and film director. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for performance in The Lovely Bones (2009), and won an Emmy Award for his performance in Winchell. He also was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children, for The One And Only Shrek. Tucci, an Italian American, was born in Peekskill, New York, the son of Joan (née Tropiano), a secretary and writer, and Stanley Tucci, Sr., an art teacher at Horace Greeley High School in Chappaqua, New York. His sister is actress Christine Tucci, and his cousin is the screenwriter Joseph Tropiano. He grew up in Katonah, New York, and attended John Jay High School. Tucci played on the John Jay soccer team and baseball teams; his main interest lay in the school's drama club, where he and fellow actor and high school buddy, Campbell Scott, son of actor George C. Scott, gave well-received performances at many of John Jay's drama club productions. Tucci attended SUNY Purchase, and completed his B.F.A. degree after four years in the school's Conservatory of Theatre Arts. Tucci made his
    4.50
    4 votes
    189
    Susan Stroman

    Susan Stroman

    • Plays Directed: The Scottsboro Boys
    Susan Stroman (born October 17, 1954) is an American theatre director, choreographer, film director, and performer. She has won the Tony Award for both her choreography and direction, notably for the stage musical The Producers. Stroman was born in Wilmington, Delaware, to Frances and Charles Stroman. She was exposed to show tunes by her piano-playing salesman father. She began studying dance, concentrating on jazz, tap, and ballet at the age of five. She studied under James Jamieson at the Academy of the Dance in Wilmington. She majored in English at the University of Delaware. She performed, choreographed and directed at community theaters in the Delaware and Philadelphia area. After graduating in 1976, she moved to New York City. Her first professional appearance was in Hit the Deck at the Goodspeed Opera House in 1977. Her first Broadway credit was as an ensemble member in the 1979 musical Whoopee!. In 1980 she was assistant director, assistant choreographer, and dance captain for Musical Chairs. Wanting to direct and choreograph instead of perform, Stroman concentrated on creating for the theater. She worked in small venues as a director and choreographer in various industrial
    4.50
    4 votes
    190

    John-Michael Tebelak

    • Plays Directed: Godspell
    John-Michael Tebelak (September 17, 1949—April 2, 1985) was an American playwright and director. He was most famous for creating the musical Godspell based on the Gospel of Saint Matthew. The music was by Stephen Schwartz. Some of the lyrics are original, with others taken from either the Bible or traditional hymns in the 1940 Episcopal Hymnal. Tebelak originally produced Godspell at age 22 as his masters thesis project, under the tutelage of Lawrence Carra, at Carnegie Mellon University in December 1970. He had been studying Greek and Roman mythology, with the deadline for his thesis two weeks away, but became fascinated by the joy he found in the Gospels. He attended an Easter Vigil service in 1970 at Pittsburgh's St. Paul Cathedral, wearing his usual overalls and T-shirt. A police officer frisked him for drugs after the service. He wrote of this experience, "I left with the feeling that, rather than rolling the rock away from the Tomb, they were piling more on. I went home, took out my manuscript, and worked it to completion in a non-stop frenzy." Though he never completed his coursework at the university, Carnegie Mellon nevertheless awarded him a degree. Subsequently, Tebelak
    6.00
    2 votes
    191

    Matthew Warchus

    • Plays Directed: Boeing Boeing
    Matthew Warchus (born 24 October 1966) is a British director and dramatist. He is married to Lauren Ward, who originated the role of Miss Honey in the Stratford-upon-Avon and London productions of Matilda the Musical. Warchus studied music and drama at Bristol University. He has directed for the National Youth Theatre, Bristol Old Vic, Donmar Warehouse, Royal Shakespeare Company, Royal National Theatre, Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse, Welsh National Opera, English National Opera and in the West End. He won the Globe's Most Promising Newcomer Award for Much Ado About Nothing in the West End, the Evening Standard Best Director award, and Olivier Award nominations for Henry V and Volpone. Productions include: Sejanus his Fall (Edinburgh), Master Harold and the Boys (Bristol Old Vic), The Suicide, Coriolanus (National Youth Theatre), Life is a Dream, Plough and the Stars, True West (Donmar Warehouse), Henry V, The Devil is an Ass, Hamlet (RSC), Volpone (RNT), Troilus and Cressida (Opera North), Rake's Progress (Welsh National Opera), Falstaff (Opera North & ENO), and Art (West End & Broadway). His recent productions of Hamlet at the Barbican Theatre and Falstaff at the English
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    Michael Grandage

    • Plays Directed: Evita
    Michael Grandage CBE (born 2 May 1962) is an award-winning British theatre director and producer. He is currently Artistic Director of the Michael Grandage Company. From 2002 to 2012 he was Artistic Director of the Donmar Warehouse in London. Grandage was born in Yorkshire, England, and raised in Penzance, Cornwall where his parents ran a family business. He was educated at the Humphry Davy Grammar School before training as an actor at Central School of Speech and Drama through 1984. He spent twelve years working as an actor for companies such as the Royal Exchange and the Royal Shakespeare Company before turning to directing. He made his directorial debut in 1996 with a production of The Last Yankee at the Mercury Theatre, Colchester. In 1998 he was invited to Sheffield to direct Twelfth Night, his first Shakespeare production. He lives in London and Cornwall with his partner, the award-winning British theatre designer Christopher Oram. From 1999 to 2005 he was Artistic Director of Sheffield Theatres where his high-profile productions included Edward II with Joseph Fiennes, Richard III with Kenneth Branagh, Suddenly Last Summer with Diana Rigg and Victoria Hamilton, The Tempest
    6.00
    2 votes
    193

    Arthur Penn

    • Plays Directed: Fortune's Fool
    Arthur Hiller Penn (September 27, 1922 – September 28, 2010) was an American film director and producer with a career as a theater director as well. Penn amassed a critically acclaimed body of work throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Penn was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Sonia Greenberg, a nurse, and Harry Penn, a watchmaker. He was the younger brother of Irving Penn, the successful fashion photographer. During the 1920s, he moved in with his mother after she divorced Penn's father. Some time after, he came back to his sickly father, leading him to run his father's watch repair shop. At 19 he was drafted into the army. Stationed in Britain, he became interested in theater. He started to direct and take part in shows being put on for the soldiers around England at the time. As Penn grew up, he further became interested in film, especially after he saw the Orson Welles film Citizen Kane. After making a name for himself as a director of quality television dramas, Penn made his feature debut with a western, The Left Handed Gun (1958). A retelling of the Billy the Kid legend, it was distinguished by Paul Newman's sharp portrayal of the outlaw as a psychologically troubled
    5.00
    3 votes
    194

    Dan Fields

    Currently living in New York City, Dan Fields (Director/Producer) was Resident Director of Disney¬タルs Broadway production of The Lion King, where he assisted director Julie Taymor from its inception. In Seattle, as Resident Director at Annex Theatre, he directed the world premiᅢᄄres of A Little Heap of Beckett, The 20th Century, This End Up, and Betty in Bondage. He assistant directed the original productions of Conversations With My Father (Seattle Repertory Theater), Randy Newman¬タルs Faust (La Jolla Playhouse and the Goodman Theater), as well as other productions at Intiman Playhouse and The Empty Space Theater. At Williamstown Theater Festival he was Assistant Director for a production of Chekhov¬タルs The Seagull featuring Christopher Walken, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Blythe Danner. He served as Artistic Associate at Manhattan Theatre Club where he produced the Broadway premieres of Richard Greenberg's The Violet Hour and Donald Margulies' Sight Unseen. Fields has been a member of the Lincoln Center Theater Directors Lab since 1996. He is the founding Artistic Director of Finesilver Shows, a New York-based theatrical production company. He adapted and directed Finesilver Shows¬タル
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    George Bernard Shaw

    George Bernard Shaw

    • Plays Directed: Pygmalion
    George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950) was an Irish playwright and a co-founder of the London School of Economics. Although his first profitable writing was music and literary criticism, in which capacity he wrote many highly articulate pieces of journalism, his main talent was for drama, and he wrote more than 60 plays. He was also an essayist, novelist and short story writer. Nearly all his writings address prevailing social problems, but have a vein of comedy which makes their stark themes more palatable. Issues which engaged Shaw's attention included education, marriage, religion, government, health care, and class privilege. He was most angered by what he perceived as the exploitation of the working class. An ardent socialist, Shaw wrote many brochures and speeches for the Fabian Society. He became an accomplished orator in the furtherance of its causes, which included gaining equal rights for men and women, alleviating abuses of the working class, rescinding private ownership of productive land, and promoting healthy lifestyles. For a short time he was active in local politics, serving on the London County Council. In 1898, Shaw married Charlotte
    5.50
    2 votes
    196

    Howard Davies

    • Plays Directed: A Moon for the Misbegotten
    Stephen Howard Davies CBE (born 26 April 1945) is a British theatre and television director. Davies, the son of a miner, was born in Durham, England and studied at Durham University and Bristol University, where he developed an appreciation for the works of Bertolt Brecht. In the early 1970s, Davies worked extensively with the Bristol Old Vic and the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, and he has served as an associate director for both the Royal Shakespeare Company, where he directed Les liaisons dangereuses, Macbeth, and Troilus and Cressida. He also did much work for the Royal National Theatre, where his projects included Hedda Gabler, The House of Bernarda Alba, Pygmalion, The Crucible, The Shaughraun, and Paul., and where he is currently directing Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard which opens in May 2011. On 30 June 2011 (and varying dates internationally) National Theatre Live will broadcast The Cherry Orchard live to cinemas around the world. This spirited new version of Chekhov’s last play starring Zoe Wanamaker follows Andrew Upton’s acclaimed adaptations of Philistines and The White Guard. At the Almeida Theatre he has directed Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and The Play About the
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    John Clark

    John Clark

    • Plays Directed: Shakespeare for My Father
    Ivan John Clark (born 1 November 1932) is an English actor, director, producer and writer with dual U.S. and Canadian citizenship. He is also known as the ex-husband of actress Lynn Redgrave, to whom he was married for 33 years. Clark grew up in the English village of Chipperfield, Hertfordshire and attended Watford Grammar School. His acting career started in 1944 when a neighbour, who was a BBC producer, asked him to play schoolboy D'arcy Minor as a one off in BBC Radio's The Will Hay Programme. But he was asked to stay for the series, and later went on to the variety version at the Victoria Palace in London's West End during the V-2 scare. Just 4 days before VE Day, the act was performed at the Life Guards Barracks in Windsor for the last time, at a British variety show for the Royal Family at midnight, 4 May 1945. Following that, he became a star as the original Just William both on stage and radio in 1947, and was the BBC's stock juvenile in radio plays such as Worzel Gummidge and Vice Versa. Then he starred in Treasure Island with Harry Welchman at the St. James's Theatre. Prior to entering his national service, Clark made guest appearances around Britain in plays featuring
    5.50
    2 votes
    198

    Terry Hands

    • Plays Directed: The Merchant of Venice
    Terence David "Terry" Hands (born 9 January 1941) is an English theatre director. He ran the Royal Shakespeare Company for two decades during one of the company's most successful periods. Hands was born at Aldershot, Hampshire, England. He studied at Woking Grammar School, University of Birmingham and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. In 1964 he established the Liverpool Everyman. Hands joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1966 to run the Company's touring group, Theatregoround. He become joint Artistic Director with Trevor Nunn in 1978, and in 1986 chief executive. In 1997, Hands became been director of Clwyd Theatr Cymru which presents much of its work on tour in Wales and the rest of the UK. He was appointed CBE in the 2007 Queen's New Years Honors List for his services to drama. In October 2001 he resigned from his position as an advisory director of the RSC. Hands was married to soprano Dame Josephine Barstow (1964–1967) and actress Ludmila Mikaël with whom he had a daughter, actress Marina Hands. He had two sons, Sebastian and Rupert Hands (the latter has performed in two Clwyd Theatr Cymru productions) with actress and dancer Julia Lintott. His current wife is the
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Charles Nelson Reilly

    Charles Nelson Reilly

    • Plays Directed: The Gin Game
    Charles Nelson Reilly (January 13, 1931 – May 25, 2007) was an American actor, comedian, director and drama teacher known for his comedic roles in stages, films, children's television, cartoons, and the game show's panelist of Match Game. Reilly was born in The Bronx, New York City, the son of Charles Joseph Reilly, an Irish Catholic commercial artist, and Signe Elvera Nelson, a Swedish Lutheran. When young he would often make his own puppet theater to amuse himself. His mother, foreshadowing his future as an entertainer, often would tell him to "save it for the stage." At age 13, he escaped the Hartford Circus Fire where over a hundred people died, and as a result, he never sat in an audience again through the remainder of his life. As a boy, Reilly developed a love for opera and desired to become an opera singer. He entered the Hartt School of Music as a voice major but eventually abandoned this pursuit when he came to the realization that he lacked the needed natural vocal talent to have a major career. However, opera remained a lifelong passion and after he achieved celebrity he was a frequent guest on opera-themed radio programs, including the Metropolitan Opera radio
    6.00
    1 votes
    200

    Clifford Williams

    • Plays Directed: Breaking the Code
    Clifford Williams (1926 – 20 August 2005) was a Welsh theatre director and stage actor. He was born in Cardiff, Wales and died in London, England. Clifford Williams (1926–2005) Theatre Director and Actor. Born Cardiff, United Kingdom, son of George F. Williams and Florence (Gapper). From 1945 to 1948 Served in British Army Ordnance Corps (RAOC). Married (1) Joanna Douglas 1956, no children, marriage dissolved 1959. Married (2) Josiane Peset, 1962. Children: Anouk and Tara. Fellow of Trinity College of Music (London) and the Welsh College of Music and Drama (on Board of Governors from 1980). Founder, 1994: (Director and Playwright) Mime Theatre London. 1950-1953: Artistic Director, Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury, 1956 Queen’s Theatre Hornchurch, 1957 Arts Theatre, London. 1963 to 1980, Associate Director, Royal Shakespeare Company, U.K.. From 1963: Artistic Directorships at: National Theatre, U.K., also the national theatres of: Spain, Yugoslavia, Mexico, Finland, Bulgaria, France, Denmark, Sweden, USSR, Canada, Japan Germany. In the United States, his Broadway productions included: The Comedy of Errors, Soldiers, Sleuth, Emperor Henry IVth, As You Like It, A Pack of Lies, Aren’t We
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    David Mamet

    David Mamet

    • Plays Directed: Race
    David Alan Mamet ( /ˈmæmɨt/; born November 30, 1947) is an American playwright, essayist, screenwriter, and film director. Best known as a playwright, Mamet won a Pulitzer Prize and received a Tony nomination for Glengarry Glen Ross (1984). He also received a Tony nomination for Speed-the-Plow (1988). As a screenwriter, he received Oscar nominations for The Verdict (1982) and Wag the Dog (1997). Mamet's books include: The Old Religion (1997), a novel about the lynching of Leo Frank; Five Cities of Refuge: Weekly Reflections on Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy (2004), a Torah commentary with Rabbi Lawrence Kushner; The Wicked Son (2006), a study of Jewish self-hatred and antisemitism; and Bambi vs. Godzilla, a commentary on the movie business. Mamet was born in 1947 in Chicago to Jewish parents, Lenore June (Silver), a teacher, and Bernard Morris Mamet, an attorney. One of his first jobs was as a busboy at Chicago's The Second City. He was educated at the progressive Francis W. Parker School and at Goddard College in Plainfield, Vermont. Mamet is a founding member of the Atlantic Theater Company; he first gained acclaim for a trio of off-Broadway plays in 1976,
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Garson Kanin

    Garson Kanin

    • Plays Directed: Years Ago
    Garson Kanin (November 24, 1912 – March 13, 1999) was a prolific American writer and director of plays and films. Garson Kanin began his show business career as a jazz musician, burlesque comedian, and actor. He graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City and made his Broadway debut in 1933's "Little Ol' Boy". In 1935, Kanin was cast in a George Abbott play and soon became Mr. Abbott's assistant. Kanin made his Broadway debut as a director in 1936, at the age of twenty-four, with "Hitch Your Wagon". His 1946 play Born Yesterday, which he also directed, ran for 1,642 performances. Kanin worked, uncredited, on the screenplay of the 1950 film adaptation. His other stage work includes directing The Diary of Anne Frank (1955), which ran for 717 performances, and the musical Funny Girl (1964), which ran for 1,348 performances. Mr. Kanin wrote and directed his last play, "Peccadillo", in 1985, the year he was inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame. His first film as a director was A Man to Remember (1938), which The New York Times considered one of the ten best films of 1938. Kanin was twenty-six at the time. Other directing credits include "The Great Man Votes "
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Jay Presson Allen

    Jay Presson Allen

    • Plays Directed: Tru
    Jay Presson Allen (March 3, 1922 – May 1, 2006) was an American screenwriter, playwright, stage director, television producer and novelist. Known for her withering wit and sometimes-off-color wisecracks, she was one of the few women making a living as a screenwriter at a time when women were a rarity in the profession. "You write to please yourself," she said, "The only office where there’s no superior is the office of the scribe." Allen was Jacqueline Presson in San Angelo, Texas, the only child of May (née Miller), a buyer, and Albert Jeffrey Presson, a department store merchant. She was "never particularly fond of her given name", and decided to use her first initial when writing. According to the Dictionary of Literary Biography the more elaborate form, Jay, is the work of a Social Security Clerk. She would spend every Saturday and Sunday in the movie house, from one o’clock until somebody dragged her out at seven. From that time on movies became very important to her, and Allen knew she wouldn't be staying in West Texas. Allen attended Miss Hockaday’s School for Young Ladies in Dallas for a couple of years, but came away with, in her words, as "having had no education to speak
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Joe Wright

    Joe Wright

    • Plays Directed: Trelawny of the Wells
    Joe Wright (born 25 August 1972) is an English film director best known for Pride & Prejudice, Atonement, Hanna, and Anna Karenina. Wright was born on 25 August 1972 in London, where his parents founded the Little Angel Theatre, a puppet theatre in Islington. Wright always had an interest in the arts, especially painting. He would also make films on his Super 8 camera as well as spend time in the evenings acting in a drama club. Wright is dyslexic. He left school without any GCSEs. He began his career working at his parents' puppet theatre. He also took classes at the Anna Scher Theatre School and acted professionally on stage and camera. He spent an art foundation year at Camberwell College of Arts, before taking a degree in fine art and film at Central St Martins. In his last year of studies he received a scholarship to make a short film for the BBC that won some awards. On the success of the short, he was offered the script for the serial Nature Boy. He followed this up with the serials Bodily Harm with Timothy Spall, and the highly acclaimed Charles II: The Power and The Passion with Rufus Sewell which won the BAFTA Award for Best Drama Serial. During the 1990s he worked at Oil
    6.00
    1 votes
    205

    Kathryn Hunter

    • Plays Directed: My Perfect Mind
    Kathryn Hunter (born Aikaterini Hadjipateras, 9 April 1957) is an award-winning English actress and theatre director. Hunter was born in New York to Greek parents but brought up in the UK. She trained at RADA where she is now an associate, and regularly directs student productions. In her stage work, Hunter is particularly associated with physical theatre and has worked with renowned companies in that field including Shared Experience and Complicite. She won an Olivier Award in 1990 for playing the millionairess in Friedrich Durrenmatt's The Visit. Hunter was the first British actress to play King Lear professionally and has played a number of other male characters including in The Bee, directed by Hideki Noda, which played at the Soho Theatre in June 2006. She has toured internationally in the first English-language production of Fragments a collection of short plays by Samuel Beckett, directed by Peter Brook. In 2008, she was made an Artistic Associate at the Royal Shakespeare Company. In January to March 2009, she directed a touring RSC production of Othello at the Warwick Arts Centre, Hackney Empire, Northern Stage, Oxford Playhouse and Liverpool Playhouse. Her husband is
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Bill Bryden

    Bill Bryden

    • Plays Directed: Uncle Vanya
    William Campbell Rough Bryden CBE (born 12 April 1942, Greenock, Scotland) is a British stage- and film director and screenwriter. He has worked as a director at the Royal Court Theatre (1967–1971), the Royal Lyceum Theatre (1972–1975), the National Theatre (1975–1985); and as a visiting director in Glasgow and New York. In 1990, he directed Leoš Janáček's The Cunning Little Vixen, at the Royal Opera House. He has also done work for film and television, as screenwriter, director and executive producer. He married Deborah Morris, a potter, in 1970 and they had two children. The couple divorced in 1988. In 1988, he met actress Angela Douglas at a dinner party arranged by mutual friend Marsha Hunt. They have lived together in west London since, and were married at City Hall, New York City in February 2009.
    5.00
    2 votes
    207

    Bob Fosse

    • Plays Directed: Pippin
    Robert Louis “Bob” Fosse (June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987) was an American actor, dancer, musical theater choreographer, director, screenwriter, film editor and film director. He won an unprecedented eight Tony Awards for choreography, as well as one for direction. He was nominated for an Academy Award four times, winning for his direction of Cabaret (beating Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather). His third wife, Broadway legend Gwen Verdon, helped to define and perfect his unique and distinct style simply referred to today as "Fosse." Fosse was born in Chicago, Illinois, to a Norwegian American father, Cyril K. Fosse, and Irish-born mother, Sara Alice (Stanton), the second youngest of six . He teamed up with Charles Grass, another young dancer, and began a collaboration under the name The Riff Brothers. They toured theatres throughout the Chicago area. After being recruited, Fosse was placed in the variety show Tough Situation, which toured military and naval bases in the Pacific. Fosse moved to New York with the ambition of being the new Fred Astaire. His appearance with his first wife and dance partner Mary Ann Niles (1923–1987) in Call Me Mister brought him to the
    5.00
    2 votes
    208

    Mark Bramble

    • Plays Directed: 42nd Street
    Mark Bramble (born December 7, 1950) is an American theatre director, author, and producer. He has been nominated for the Tony Award three times, for the Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical for Barnum and 42nd Street (1981) and Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical, 42nd Street (2001). Mark Bramble has been involved in the writing, directing and producing of stage musicals all over the world. He began his theatrical career working as an apprentice in David Merrick's office in 1971, and for whom he worked on many Broadway productions. As author, his work includes the 1980 musical Barnum, which introduced Glenn Close as a musical theatre actress, with songs by Cy Coleman and Michael Stewart. He wrote the book for The Three Musketeers (1984) with music of Rudolph Friml. He directed and was co-librettist for the 2001 revival of 42nd Street with songs by Harry Warren and Al Dubin, and was the co-author of the book for the original 42nd Street in 1980, which was produced by David Merrick. He directed many productions of 42nd Street, in London, Sydney, Shanghai, Tokyo, Amsterdam and Vienna. He has collaborated with Michael Stewart on many shows, including The Grand Tour (1978) with
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Matthew Bourne

    Matthew Bourne

    • Plays Directed: Swan Lake
    Matthew Bourne OBE (born 13 January 1960) is a British choreographer. His work includes contemporary dance and musical theatre. He has received multiple awards and award nominations, including the Laurence Olivier Award, Tony Award and Drama Desk Award, and he has also received several Honorary Doctorates of Arts from UK universities. Matthew Bourne was born in Hackney, London in 1960. He went to William Fitt and Sir George Monoux School in Walthamstow, London. From the ages of 14 to 16 he was an avid autograph hunter, attending most West End opening nights and waiting outside Stage Doors and top London Hotels. In 1978 he left full-time education and worked in various jobs at the BBC (filing clerk), Keith Prowse Theatre Agents (selling theatre tickets) and The National Theatre (bookshop and ushering). Despite having never done a dance class, he ran and directed various amateur Dance Companies in his teenage years. In 1982 he enrolled at the Laban Centre for Movement and Dance (now simply Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance) in Deptford, southeast London, where he was awarded a B.A. in Dance Theatre. For his final year (1986) he danced with the Laban Centre's Transitions
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Michael Engler

    Michael Engler

    • Plays Directed: I Hate Hamlet
    Michael Engler is an American theatre director, and television director and producer. His Broadway credits include Eastern Standard and I Hate Hamlet. His direction of the 2003 off-Broadway production of the Alan Bennett play Talking Heads garnered him a nomination for the Outer Critics Circle Award. Engler began his television career in 1990 with the HBO series Dream On. Among his many small screen credits are Sisters, My So-Called Life, Chicago Hope, The West Wing, Profit, Party of Five, Once and Again, Sex and the City, Six Feet Under, Deadwood, Keen Eddie, and 30 Rock. Engler has been nominated for the Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Direction of a Comedy Series three times and the Emmy Award for Outstanding Direction of a Comedy Series twice.
    5.00
    2 votes
    211

    Mike Nichols

    • Plays Directed: Social Security
    Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky; November 6, 1931) is a German-born American television, stage and film director, writer, producer and comedian. He began his career in the 1950s as one half of the comedy duo Nichols and May, along with Elaine May. In 1968 he won the Academy Award for Best Director for the film The Graduate. His other noteworthy films include Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Carnal Knowledge, Working Girl, Closer and the TV mini-series Angels in America. He also staged the original theatrical productions of Barefoot in the Park, Luv, The Odd Couple and Spamalot. Nichols is one of a small group of people who have won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Award. His other honors include the Lincoln Center Gala Tribute in 1999, the National Medal of Arts in 2001, the Kennedy Center Honors in 2003 and the AFI Life Achievement Award in 2010. Mike Nichols was born Michael Igor Peschkowsky in Berlin, Germany, the son of Brigitte (née Landauer) and Paul Peschkowsky, a physician. His father was born in Vienna, Austria, to a Russian Jewish immigrant family; Nichols' father's family had been wealthy and lived in Siberia, leaving after the Russian Revolution, and
    5.00
    2 votes
    212

    Mike Ockrent

    • Plays Directed: Crazy for You
    Mike Ockrent (18 June 1946 - 2 December 1999) was a British stage director, well-known both for his Broadway musicals and smaller niche plays. He was educated at Highgate School. Through directing Educating Rita and Follies, he became an established figure in London theatre. In 1986 he made a successful transition to New York with Me and My Girl that earned several Tony Award nominations. In later life Ockrent worked in film, mainly straight-to-TV movies. In 1992 Ockrent worked with Susan Stroman on Crazy for You and other productions. They were married in 1996 and remained so until Ockrent's death from leukemia in New York in 1999. A charitable trust now exists in his name. The trust aims to give access to theatre for children with cancer, involving nights at the theatre with visits backstage afterwards. It also funds leukaemia research, "both mainstream and 'alternative'".
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Julie Taymor

    Julie Taymor

    • Plays Directed: Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark
    Julie Taymor (born December 15, 1952) is an American director of theater, opera and film. Taymor's work has received many accolades from critics, and she has earned two Tony Awards out of four nominations, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design, an Emmy Award and an Academy Award nomination for Original Song. She is widely known for directing the stage musical, The Lion King, for which she became the first woman to win the Tony Award for directing a musical, in addition to a Tony Award for Original Costume Design. She was the director of the Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark but left in March 2011, following artistic differences with the producers. Taymor was born in Newton, Massachusetts, the daughter of Elizabeth (née Bernstein), a political science teacher, and Melvin Lester Taymor, a gynecologist. Taymor's interest in theatre took root early in her life. At the age of seven, she was already drawing her sister into stagings of children's stories for her parents. By age nine, she was entranced by the Boston Children's Theatre and became involved with them. Being the youngest member of theatre groups became common. By 11, she was taking trips to Boston by
    4.00
    3 votes
    214
    Douglas Turner Ward

    Douglas Turner Ward

    • Plays Directed: Home
    Douglas Turner Ward (May 5, 1930) is an American playwright, actor, director and theatrical producer best known as a founder and artistic director of the Negro Ensemble Company (NEC). Turner was born in Burnside, Louisiana. In 1967, he was one of the founders of the Negro Ensemble Company and served for many years as its artistic director. As an actor, he made his Broadway debut in a small role in A Raisin in the Sun. However, his first significant artistic achievement would be as a playwright. Happy Ending/Day of Absence, a program of two one-act plays premiered at the St. Mark's Playhouse in Manhattan on November 15, 1965 and ran for 504 performances. Ward received a Drama Desk Award for his playwrighting.
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Ruben Santiago-Hudson

    Ruben Santiago-Hudson

    • Plays Directed: The Piano Lesson
    Ruben Santiago-Hudson (born November 24, 1956) is an American actor and playwright, who has won national awards for his work in both areas. From 2009 to 2011, he played Captain Roy Montgomery in ABC's Castle. In November 2011 he appeared on Broadway in Lydia Diamond's play Stick Fly. Santiago-Hudson was born in Lackawanna, New York, the son of Alean Hudson and Ruben Santiago, a railroad worker. His father was Puerto Rican and his mother was African American. He went to Lackawanna High school, earned his bachelor's degree from Binghamton University, and his master's degree from Wayne State University. He received an honorary doctorate of letters from Buffalo State College. In 2003 Ruben Santiago-Hudson was the reader in Volume 13 of the HBO film Unchained Memories: Readings from the Slave Narratives. The series was narrated by Whoopi Goldberg. He wrote Lackawanna Blues, an autobiographical play in which he portrayed himself and some twenty different characters from his past, which was produced in New York. He adapted it for a highly acclaimed, award-winning 2005 HBO film, in which the parts would be played by different people, that won him the Humanitas Prize and earned Emmy and
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Adam McKay

    Adam McKay

    • Plays Directed: You're Welcome America
    Adam McKay (born April 17, 1968) is an American screenwriter, director, comedian, and actor. McKay is most famous for his partnership with comedian Will Ferrell, with whom he co-wrote the films Anchorman, Talladega Nights, and The Other Guys. Ferrell and McKay also founded their comedy website Funny or Die through their production company Gary Sanchez Productions. McKay was born in Long Island, New York, graduated from Great Valley High School in Malvern, Pennsylvania, in 1986, and attended Penn State and Temple universities. He is one of the founding members of the Upright Citizens Brigade improv comedy group and a former performer at Chicago's Improv Olympic, where he was a member of the improv group, The Family, whose members included Matt Besser, Ian Roberts, Neil Flynn, Miles Stroth, and Ali Farahnakian, and Child's Play Touring Theatre. While a member of the mainstage cast at Second City, he wrote and performed in that company's landmark revue, Pinata Full of Bees. In several politically charged sketches, McKay played characters like Noam Chomsky as a substitute kindergarten teacher, and a hapless personnel manager trying to inform a corporate vice president (Scott Adsit) of
    5.00
    1 votes
    217

    Adrian Noble

    • Plays Directed: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
    Adrian Keith Noble (born 19 July 1950) is a theatre director, and was also the artistic director and chief executive of the Royal Shakespeare Company from 1990 to 2003. Noble was born in Chichester, Sussex, England. After leaving Chichester High School, he studied at the University of Bristol, where he studied English. He began his professional career as a director at Drama Studio London. In 1976 he moved on to the Bristol Old Vic and worked at the same time for the TV. From 1980 till 1981 he worked at the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester, producing the Duchess of Malfi, which won him the London Drama Critics' Award and the Circle Theatre Award (also for his production of Doktor Faust, and as Best Director for A Doll's House in 1980). During his career, he received over 20 Olivier Award nominations. In 1980 he became assistant director at the RSC where his first production was Ostrowski's Two Sisters. In 1988 he was promoted to director, but in 1989 he took a break and left the company. He then worked for the Peter Hall Company, directing the Fairy Queen. He also worked at the Manhattan Theatre Club, Kent Opera and directed a production of Giovanni in a Paris circus tent. After
    5.00
    1 votes
    218

    Edward Albee

    • Plays Directed: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
    Edward Franklin Albee III ( /ˈɔːlbiː/ AWL-bee; born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright who is known for works such as The Zoo Story (1958), The Sandbox (1959), Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1962), and a rewrite of the book for the unsuccessful musical Breakfast at Tiffany's an adaptation of Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's (1966). His works are considered well-crafted, often unsympathetic examinations of the modern condition. His early works reflect a mastery and Americanization of the Theatre of the Absurd that found its peak in works by European playwrights such as Samuel Beckett, Eugène Ionesco, and Jean Genet. Younger American playwrights, such as Paula Vogel, credit Albee's daring mix of theatricality and biting dialogue with helping to reinvent the post-war American theatre in the early 1960s. Albee continues to experiment in works, such as The Goat: or, Who Is Sylvia? (2002). According to Magill's Survey of American Literature (2007), Edward Albee was born somewhere in Virginia (the popular belief is that he was born in Washington, D.C.). He was adopted two weeks later and taken to Larchmont, New York in Westchester County, where he grew up. Albee's adoptive
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    219
    Krister Henriksson

    Krister Henriksson

    • Plays Directed: Doktor Glas
    Jan Krister Allan Henriksson (born 12 November 1946) is a Swedish actor. He is best known for playing Kurt Wallander in a series of television films based on the novels by Henning Mankell. Henriksson was born in Grisslehamn, and made his breakthrough in 1973 at Stockholm City Theatre with the lead role in Peer Gynt. In 1993 he joined the cast of the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm. In 1997 he was honoured with the Eugene O'Neill Award and he has twice received the Swedish Film Award Guldbagge for the best male lead. In 1998 for his portrayal of a cancer-stricken actor in the film Veranda för en tenor, and in 2005 for Sex, hope and love. Both films were directed by Lisa Ohlin. He also received the Swedish Theatre Award Guldmasken for the one-man play Doktor Glass of Hjalmar Söderberg in 2007. He is co-owner of Vasateatern in Stockholm and taught at the Stockholm School of Theater Scenic Design. Henriksson lives with the Swedish actress Cecilia Nilsson in Stockholm. He has two daughters and a son.
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    220
    Martin Scorsese

    Martin Scorsese

    • Plays Directed: The Act
    Martin Charles Scorsese ( /skɔrˈsɛsɛ/; born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, actor, and film historian. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest directors of all time. In 1990 he founded The Film Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to film preservation, and in 2007 he founded the World Cinema Foundation. He is a recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award for his contributions to the cinema, and has won an Academy Award, a Palme d'Or, Grammy Award, Emmys, Golden Globes, BAFTAs, and DGA Awards. Scorsese's body of work addresses such themes as Italian American identity, Roman Catholic concepts of guilt and redemption, machismo, modern crime, and violence. Scorsese is hailed as one of the most significant and influential filmmakers of all time, directing landmark films such as Mean Streets (1973), Taxi Driver (1976), Raging Bull (1980), and Goodfellas (1990) – all of which he collaborated on with actor and close friend Robert De Niro. He won the Academy Award for Best Director for The Departed (2006), having been nominated a previous six times. Martin Scorsese grew up in New York City. His father, Charles Scorsese (1913–1993),
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    221

    Michael Peters

    • Plays Directed: Leader of the Pack
    Michael Douglas Peters (August 6, 1948 – August 29, 1994) was an American choreographer. Peters was born in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, in New York City to an African American father and Jewish mother. His first major breakthrough came when he did choreography for Donna Summer's "Love to Love You Baby" in 1975. He went on to stage other memorable dance sequences for music videos, including Pat Benatar's "Love Is a Battlefield" (in which he has a brief cameo) and Lionel Richie's "Hello" (in which he also has a brief cameo as the dance instructor of Lionel Richie's blind love interest). However, he was most recognized for his choreography work in Michael Jackson's videos. Especially the smash hit "Thriller", directed by John Landis, and "Beat It" directed by Bob Giraldi, which is vaguely reminiscent of West Side Story: Peters co-stars as one of two gang leaders who prepare for a dramatic showdown/knifefight, which is averted at the last moment by Jackson. Peters is dressed all in white, and wears sunglasses during the piece. Peters choreographed Diana Ross' landmark July 1983 Central Park concert, "For One & For All", during which, he dances with Ross during her "Maniac" & "Pieces of
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    222
    Robert Helpmann

    Robert Helpmann

    • Plays Directed: Duel of Angels
    Sir Robert Helpmann CBE (9 April 1909 – 28 September 1986) was an Australian dancer, actor, theatre director and choreographer. He was born Robert Murray Helpman (spelled with one "n") in Mount Gambier, South Australia, and was known as "Bobby" by those close to him. He was the eldest of three children of James "Sam" Murray Helpman (1881–1927), a Victorian-born stock and station agent, and his wife Mary "Maytie", née Gardiner, born in South Australia. Sam Helpman was born in Warracknabeal, Victoria, the son of Walter Stephen Helpman and Isabella Murray; Isabella's brother was Jack Murray the 23rd Premier of Victoria. Robert was educated at Prince Alfred College, Adelaide, but left school at 14. From childhood, Helpman had a strong desire to be a dancer. This was an unusual ambition in provincial Australia of the 1920s. In a 1974 interview he recalled that he was taught the moves and dances of a girl because his dance teacher had no prior experience teaching boys. In the Margot Fonteyn biography, he is described as being dark haired, pale, and having large dark eyes. Helpman had a younger sister Sheila Mary Helpman, and a younger brother Max, or Maxwell Gardiner Helpman, and he
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    223

    Joan Littlewood

    • Plays Directed: Oh! What a Lovely War
    Joan Maud Littlewood (6 October 1914 – 20 September 2002) was an English theatre director, noted for her work in developing the left-wing Theatre Workshop. She has been called "The Mother of Modern Theatre". Littlewood and her company lived and slept in the Theatre Royal while it was restored. Productions of The Alchemist and Richard II, the latter of which starred Harry H. Corbett as the King, established the reputation of the company. She also conceived and developed along with architect Cedric Price the Fun Palace, an experimental model of participatory social environment that, although never realized, has become an important influence in Architecture of the 20th and 21st Centuries. Littlewood was born at Stockwell, London, England, and trained as an actress at RADA but left after an unhappy start and moved to Manchester in 1934, where she met folksinger Jimmie Miller, who would later become known as Ewan MacColl. After joining his troupe, Theatre of Action, Littlewood and Miller were soon married. After a brief move to London, they returned to Manchester and set up the Theatre Union in 1936. In 1941, Littlewood was banned from broadcasting on the BBC. The ban was lifted two
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    224
    Burgess Meredith

    Burgess Meredith

    • Plays Directed: Ulysses in Nighttown
    Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907 – September 9, 1997), known professionally as Burgess Meredith, was an American actor in theatre, film, and television, who also worked as a director. Active for more than six decades, Meredith has been called "a virtuosic actor" who was "one of the most accomplished actors of the century." Meredith won several Emmys, was the first man to win the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor twice, and was nominated for Academy Awards. Meredith was born in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Ida Beth (née Burgess) and Canadian-born William George Meredith, M.D. He graduated from Hoosac School in 1926 and then attended Amherst College as a member of the Class of 1931. Meredith served in the United States Army Air Forces in World War II, reaching the rank of captain. He was discharged in 1944 to work on the movie The Story of G.I. Joe, in which he starred as the popular war correspondent Ernie Pyle. In 1933, he became a member of Eva Le Gallienne's Civic Repertory Theatre company in New York City. Although best known to the larger world audience for his film and television work, Meredith was an influential actor and director for the stage. He made his
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    225

    Gene Saks

    • Plays Directed: Barrymore
    Gene Saks (born November 8, 1921) is an American stage and film director. Saks was born in New York City, the son of Beatrix (née Lewkowitz) and Morris J. Saks. Saks studied at Cornell University and trained for acting at the Dramatic Workshop of The New School in New York with the influential German director Erwin Piscator. Saks has shared a long-term professional relationship with playwright/comedy writer Neil Simon, directing his plays Biloxi Blues, Brighton Beach Memoirs, Jake's Women, Rumors, Lost in Yonkers, Broadway Bound, The Odd Couple, and California Suite. Additional Broadway credits include Enter Laughing; Half a Sixpence; Mame; I Love My Wife; Same Time, Next Year; and Rags. Among Saks' screen credits are Cactus Flower, which won Goldie Hawn the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, Barefoot in the Park, The Last of the Red Hot Lovers, The Odd Couple, Mame, So I Married an Axe Murderer (uncredited), and the 1995 television production of Bye Bye Birdie. Saks made his acting debut on Broadway in South Pacific in 1949. On stage he also appeared in A Shot in the Dark, The Tenth Man, and A Thousand Clowns, in the role of Leo "Chuckles The Chipmunk" Herman, which he
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    226

    Harold Clurman

    • Plays Directed: The Waltz Of The Toreadors
    Harold Edgar Clurman (September 18, 1901 – September 9, 1980) was a visionary American theatre director and drama critic, "one of the most influential in the United States". He was most notable as one of the three founders of the New York City's Group Theatre (1931–1941). He directed more than 40 plays in his career and, during the 1950s, was nominated for a Tony Award as director for several productions. In addition to his directing career, he was drama critic for The New Republic (1948–52) and The Nation (1953–1980), helping shape American theater by writing about it. Clurman wrote seven books about the theatre, including his memoir The Fervent Years: The Group Theatre And The Thirties (1961). Clurman was born on the Lower East Side of New York City to Jewish immigrant parents from eastern Europe. His parents took him at age six to Yiddish theater, here Jacob Adler's performances in Yiddish translations of Karl Gutzkow's Uriel Acosta and Gotthold Ephraim Lessing's Nathan the Wise fascinated him, although he did not understand Yiddish. [Adler, 1999, p. 333 (commentary)]. He attended Columbia and, at the age of twenty, moved to France to study at the University of Paris. There he
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    227
    Rouben Mamoulian

    Rouben Mamoulian

    • Plays Directed: Oklahoma 1943 Broadway
    Rouben Zachary Mamoulian (pronounced: roo-BEN ma-mool-YAN; October 8, 1897 – December 4, 1987) was an Armenian American film and theatre director. Mamoulian was born in Tbilisi, Georgia (ruled at that time by imperial Russia) to an Armenian family. His mother, Virginia (née Kalantarian), was a director of the Armenian theater, and his father, Zachary Mamoulian, was a bank president. Mamoulian relocated to England and started directing plays in London in 1922. He was brought to America the next year by Vladimir Rosing to teach at the Eastman School of Music and was involved in directing opera and theatre. In 1925, Mamoulian was head of the School of Drama, where Martha Graham was also working at the time. Among other performances, together they produced a short two-color film called The Flute of Krishna, featuring Eastman students. Mamoulian left Eastman shortly thereafter and Graham chose to leave also, even though she was asked to stay on. In 1930, Mamoulian became a naturalized citizen of the United States. Mamoulian began his Broadway director career with a production of DuBose Heyward's Porgy, which opened on October 10, 1927. He directed the revival of that show in 1929 along
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    228
    Sidney Lumet

    Sidney Lumet

    • Plays Directed: Caligula
    Sidney Arthur Lumet ( /luːˈmɛt/ loo-MET; June 25, 1924 - April 9, 2011) was an American director, producer and screenwriter with over 50 films to his credit. He was nominated for the Academy Award as Best Director for 12 Angry Men (1957), Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982). He did not win an individual Academy Award, but he did receive an Academy Honorary Award and 14 of his films were nominated for various Oscars, such as Network, which was nominated for 10, winning 4. The Encyclopedia of Hollywood states that Lumet was one of the most prolific directors of the modern era, making more than one movie per year on average since his directorial debut in 1957. He was noted by Turner Classic Movies for his "strong direction of actors", "vigorous storytelling" and the "social realism" in his best work. Film critic Roger Ebert described him as having been "one of the finest craftsmen and warmest humanitarians among all film directors." Lumet was also known as an "actor's director," having worked with the best of them during his career, probably more than "any other director." Sean Connery, who acted in five of his films, considered him one of his favorite
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    229

    Bob Crowley

    • Plays Directed: Tarzan
    Bob Crowley (born June 10, 1955) is a theatre designer (scenic and costume), and theatre director. Born in Cork, Ireland, he is the brother of director John Crowley. He has received multiple Tony Award nominations, and has won six times, for designing the Broadway productions of Carousel (1994), Aida (2000), The History Boys (2006), Mary Poppins (2007), The Coast of Utopia (2007) and Once (2012). He is a recipient of the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Set Design and a three-time recipient of the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design. He is a frequent collaborator of Nicholas Hytner and as well as Broadway has worked extensively at the Royal National Theatre in London and with England's Royal Shakespeare Company. Crowley designed set and costume for Mary Poppins, which played in both the West End and on Broadway. He designed and directed the Phil Collins musical Tarzan. He is the set and costume designer for Andrew Lloyd Webber's Love Never Dies, and the costume designer of the 2008/9 version of The Little Mermaid.
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    230
    Brad Mays

    Brad Mays

    • Plays Directed: Joan
    Brad Mays (born May 30, 1955) is an independent filmmaker and stage director, living and working in Los Angeles, California. During the early 1970s, Brad Mays became involved in the Baltimore experimental theater scene and, at the age of eighteen, began directing at the Corner Theatre ETC. Upon completion of theatre arts studies at Towson University, Mays was formally hired by the Baltimore Theatre Project. In 1982, Mays moved to New York City, where he began working off-Broadway and, ultimately, produced and directed his first independent feature film, Stage Fright. In 2006, Mays filmed the documentary feature SING*ularity (2008), which explores the cutting-edge training of classical singers at the world-renowned OperaWorks program in Southern California. Other films include a free-form adaptation of Euripides' The Bacchae (2002), and his first feature, Stage Fright, a semi-autobiographical piece, co-written with his friend and fellow Corner Theatre alum, Stanley Keyes, which depicts the trials and tribulations of a late '60's theatre company and had its inaugural screenings at the 1989 Berlin International Film Festival under the auspices of American Independents In Berlin and
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    231

    Brian Bedford

    • Plays Directed: The Importance of Being Earnest
    Brian Bedford (born 16 February 1935) is an English actor. He has appeared on the stage and in film, and is known for both acting in and directing Shakespeare. Bedford was born in Morley, West Riding of Yorkshire, the son of Ellen (née O'Donnell) and Arthur Bedford, a postman. Bedford attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London from 1952–1954 and was in the same class as Albert Finney, Alan Bates and Peter O'Toole. Primarily a stage actor, he is known for his English-speaking interpretations of the French playwright Molière, including Tony Award nominated performances in Tartuffe, The Molière Comedies (a double bill of the short plays The School for Husbands and The Imaginary Cuckold) and The School for Wives, for which he received the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play. He has done a great deal of Shakespearean work, notably as Ariel in The Tempest opposite John Gielgud's Prospero in 1958, Angelo in Measure for Measure at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in 1975 and 1976, and The Public Theater's New York Shakespeare Festival Shakespeare in the Park productions of As You Like It (as Orlando), and Timon of Athens (as Timon), the latter based on
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    232

    Conor McPherson

    • Plays Directed: The Seafarer
    Conor McPherson (born August 6, 1971) is an Irish playwright and director. McPherson was born in Dublin, . He was educated at University College Dublin, McPherson began writing his first plays there as a member of UCD Dramsoc, the college's dramatic society, and went on to found Fly by Night Theatre Company which produced several of his plays. He is considered one of the best contemporary Irish playwrights; his plays have attracted good reviews, and have been performed internationally (notably in the West End and on Broadway). The Weir opened at the Royal Court before transferring to the West End and Broadway. It won the Laurence Olivier Award for Best New Play for 1999. His 2001 play, Port Authority tells of three interwoven lives. The play was first produced by the Gate Theatre of Dublin but premiered at the New Ambassadors Theatre in London in February 2001, before moving to the Gate Theatre in April of that year. The production was directed by McPherson himself. New York's Atlantic Theater Company staged a production of the play in spring of 2008, starring Brian d'Arcy James, and Tony Award winners John Gallagher Jr. and Jim Norton. Says New York Times critic Ben Brantley, “I
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    233

    Debra Monk

    • Plays Directed: Pump Boys and Dinettes
    Debra Monk (born February 27, 1949) is an American actress, singer, and writer. Monk was born in Middletown, Ohio. She was voted "best personality" by the graduating class at Wheaton High School in Silver Spring, Maryland. She graduated from Frostburg State University in 1973. In 1975, Monk received a Master of Fine Arts degree from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. "Pump Boys & Dinettes" was an Off Broadway musical!
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    234
    Don Scardino

    Don Scardino

    • Plays Directed: A Few Good Men
    Don Scardino (born February 17, 1948) is an American television director and producer and a former actor. Born in New York City, Scardino began his career as an actor. His first Broadway credit was as an understudy in The Playroom in 1965. Additional Broadway acting credits include Johnny No-Trump, Godspell, and King of Hearts. Off-Broadway he appeared in The Rimers of Eldritch, The Comedy of Errors, Moonchildren, and I'm Getting My Act Together and Taking It on the Road, he was also the lead in a cult classic B horror movie titled Squirm in 1976. He served as Artistic Director at Playwrights Horizons from 1991-96. On television he appeared on the daytime soap operas The Guiding Light, All My Children, Love Is a Many Splendored Thing, and Another World and the primetime series The Ghost & Mrs. Muir and The Name of the Game. Feature film credits include Rip-off, Homer, Squirm and Cruising. Following his acting on the network soap operas, Scardino began to direct them. He directed episodes of Another World, One Life to Live, and All My Children. He went on to direct plays on and off-Broadway, including the world premiere of Aaron Sorkin's A Few Good Men. He has directed extensively
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    235

    Fred Coe

    • Plays Directed: A Thousand Clowns
    Fred Coe (December 13, 1914 – April 29, 1979), nicknamed Pappy, was a television producer and director most famous for The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse in 1948-1955 and Playhouse 90 from 1957 to 1959. Among the live TV dramas he produced were Marty and The Trip to Bountiful for Philco-Goodyear, Peter Pan for Producers' Showcase, and Days of Wine and Roses for Playhouse 90. Born in Alligator, Mississippi, Coe attended high school in Nashville, Tennessee, and college in Nashville at Peabody College, now part of Vanderbilt University, before studying at the Yale Drama School. Coe made his mark in the early years of network television when Lights Out moved from radio to TV on July 3, 1946. Variety reviewed: Coe was known as a patron saint of writers, discovering or advancing the careers of Paddy Chayefsky, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, JP Miller, David Swift, N. Richard Nash, A.E. Hotchner, Herb Gardner, David Shaw, and many others. Numerous important actors appeared on Coe's shows, which were directed by, among others, Delbert Mann and Arthur Penn. Coe also was a significant producer on Broadway. His plays include The Trip to Bountiful, The Miracle Worker, Two for the Seesaw, All
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    236

    George Faison

    George Faison (born December 21, 1945) is an African-American dancer and choreographer. Faison was born in Washington, D.C. where he studied dance with the Jones-Haywood Capitol Ballet and Carolyn Tate of Howard University while attending Dunbar High School, and appeared with The American Light Opera Company in Showboat. He entered Howard to study dentistry in 1964, but left in 1966, after a performance by the Alvin Ailey company inspired him to pursue a career in dance. Faison moved to New York City and became an immediate success in the dance world. That same year, he was chosen as Lauren Bacall's dance partner in a television special. Faison joined the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 1967 as a dancer and remained there through 1969. He left Ailey to begin his own group, George Faison Universal Dance Experience, in 1971. The company's roster of dancers included Debbie Allen, Renee Rose, Gary DeLoatch, and Al Perryman. Faison served as dancer and choreographer, creating original work for the company. One of Faison's best-known works is Suite Otis (1971), set to the music of Otis Redding. The dance is for five couples and combines elements of ballet and contemporary dance.
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    237

    Hal Holbrook

    • Plays Directed: Mark Twain Tonight!
    Harold Rowe "Hal" Holbrook, Jr. (born February 17, 1925) is an American actor. His television roles include Abraham Lincoln in the 1976 TV series Lincoln, Hays Stowe on The Bold Ones: The Senator and Capt. Lloyd Bucher on Pueblo. He is also known for his role in the 2007 film Into the Wild, for which he was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award and an Academy Award. He has also performed a one-man show as Mark Twain since 1954. Holbrook was born in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Aileen Davenport Holbrook, a vaudeville dancer, and Harold Rowe Holbrook, Sr. He was raised in South Weymouth, Massachusetts. He graduated from the Culver Academies and Denison University, where an honors project about Mark Twain led him to develop the one-man show for which he is best known, a series of performances called Mark Twain Tonight (for which he won both a Tony and a Drama Desk Award). Holbrook served in the U.S. Army in World War II and was stationed in Newfoundland, where he performed in theatre productions such as the play Madam Precious. According to Playbill, Holbrook's first solo performance as Twain was at Lock Haven State Teachers College in Pennsylvania in 1954. Ed Sullivan saw him and
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    238
    Ivan Reitman

    Ivan Reitman

    • Plays Directed: Merlin
    Ivan Reitman, OC (born October 27, 1946) is a Canadian film producer and director, best known for his comedy work, especially in the 1980s and 1990s. He is the owner of The Montecito Picture Company, founded in 2000. Reitman was born in Komárno, Czechoslovakia (now Slovakia), the son of Clara and Leslie Reitman. Reitman's parents were Jewish; his mother survived the Auschwitz concentration camp and his father was an underground resistance fighter. His family came to Canada as refugees in 1950. Reitman attended Oakwood Collegiate in Toronto and was a member of the Twintone Four singing group. He is the father of film director Jason Reitman. Reitman's first producing job was with the then-new station CITY-TV in Toronto. CITY was also the home of the first announcing job of his later friend and collaborator Dan Aykroyd. However, Reitman's tenure at CITY was short and he was fired during his first year by station owner Moses Znaimer. Spellbound (1972), directed by Ivan Reitman, with music by Howard Shore, magic by Doug Henning and co-starring actress Jennifer Dale, a musical that combined an intense storyline and Henning's magic tricks. The show opened in Toronto and broke box office
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    239

    Jerry Zaks

    • Plays Directed: Sister Act the Musical
    Jerry Zaks (born September 7, 1946) is a German-born American stage and television director, and actor. He won the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play and Drama Desk Award for directing The House of Blue Leaves, Lend Me A Tenor, and Six Degrees of Separation and the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical and Drama Desk Award for Guys and Dolls. Zaks was born in Stuttgart, Germany, the son of Holocaust survivors. His family emigrated to the United States in 1948, finally settling in Paterson, New Jersey. He graduated from Dartmouth College and received a Master of Fine Arts from Smith College. He made his Broadway acting debut in the original production of Grease as "Kenickie" and appeared in Tintypes in 1980. He made his directing debut in 1981 with the off-Broadway production of Christopher Durang's Beyond Therapy. He has directed many Broadway productions, both musicals and dramas. He has also directed many Off-Broadway productions, several at Playwrights Horizons and the Public Theatre. He directed the City Center Encores! productions of Girl Crazy (November 2009), Stairway to Paradise (May 2007), and Bye Bye Birdie (May 2004). He was the director of the new musical 101
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    240

    Joe Mantello

    • Plays Directed: Wicked
    Joseph Mantello (born 27 December 1962) is an American actor and director best known for his work on Broadway productions of Wicked, Take Me Out and Assassins, as well as earlier in his career being one of the original Broadway cast of Angels in America. Mantello directed The Ritz, his sixth production with playwright Terrence McNally, in 2007. Mantello was born in Rockford, Illinois and studied at the North Carolina School of the Arts; he started the Edge Theater in New York City with actress Mary-Louise Parker and writer Peter Hedges. He is a member of the Naked Angels theater company and an associate artist at the Roundabout Theatre Company. Mantello began his theatrical career as an actor in Keith Curran's Walking the Dead and Paula Vogel's The Baltimore Waltz. On the transition from acting to directing, Mantello said, "I think I've become a better actor since I started directing, although some people might disagree. Since I've been removed from the process I see things that actors fall into. Now there's a part of me that's removed from the process and can stand back." Mantello directs a variety of theatre works, as the New York Times noted: "Very few American directors -- Jack
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    241
    John Rich

    John Rich

    John Rich (1692–1761) was an important director and theatre manager in 18th century London. He opened the New Theatre at Lincoln's Inn Fields (1714) and then the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden (1732) and began putting on ever more lavish productions. He introduced pantomime to the English stage and played a dancing and mute Harlequin himself from 1717–60 under the stage name of "Lun." Rich's theatre specialized in what contemporaries called "spectacle." Today we might call them "special effects." His stagings would endeavour to present actual cannon shots, animals, and multiple illusions of battle. By 1728, Rich was synonymous with lavish (and successful) productions. Lewis Theobald was working for Rich on writing pantomimes. When Alexander Pope wrote the first version of The Dunciad, and even more in the second and third editions, Rich appears as a prime symptom of the disease of the age and debasement of taste. In his Dunciad Variorum of 1732, he makes John Rich the angel of the goddess Dulness: The battle between Cibber's Drury Lane and Rich's Lincoln's Inn Fields Pope summarizes as, Yet, at the same time, 1728 was the year that Rich produced John Gay's Beggar's Opera, and the
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    242

    Joseph Papp

    • Plays Directed: In the Boom Boom Room
    Joseph Papp (June 22, 1921 – October 31, 1991) was an American theatrical producer and director. Papp established The Public Theater in what had been the Astor Library Building in downtown New York (still located there as of 2011). "The Public," as it is known, has many small theatres within it. There, Papp created a year-round producing home to focus on new creations, both plays and musicals. Among numerous examples of these creations were the works of David Rabe, Ntozake Shange's For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf, Charles Gordone's No Place to Be Somebody (the first off-Broadway play to win the Pulitzer Prize), and Papp's production of Michael Bennett's Pulitzer-Prize winning musical, A Chorus Line. At Papp's death, The Public Theatre was renamed The Joseph Papp Public Theatre. Papp was born Joseph Papirofsky in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Yetta (née Miritch), a seamstress, and Samuel Papirofsky, a trunkmaker. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Russia. He was a high school student of Harlem Renaissance playwright Eulalie Spence. Papp founded the New York Shakespeare Festival in 1954, with the aim of making Shakespeare's works
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    243

    Luis Valdez

    • Plays Directed: Zoot Suit
    Luis Valdez (born June 26, 1940) is an American playwright, writer and film director. He is regarded as the father of Chicano theater in the United States. Valdez was born in Delano, California to migrant farm worker parents. His brother is the actor Daniel Valdez. Luis Valdez graduated from James Lick High School in San Jose and went on attend San Jose State University (SJSU) on a scholarship for math and physics. He later switched his major and earned a degree in English in 1964. According to Valdez, when he was six years old, he watched a teacher use part of a paper bag to make paper-mâché masks for a theater production. This experience transformed him and would have a lasting effect. In college, it helped lead him to the theater. Valdez's first full-length play, The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa, debuted at SJSU in 1963. After graduation, Valdez spent the next few months with The San Francisco Mime Troupe, where he was introduced to agitprop theatre. In 1965, Valdez returned to Delano, where he formed El Teatro Campesino, a farm worker's theater troupe. Valdez's teatro was influential, according to Gale Resources, "Thanks to Valdez and El Teatro Campesino. What began as a farm
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    244

    Paul Benedict

    • Plays Directed: Frankie and Johnny in the Claire de Lune
    Paul Benedict (September 17, 1938 – December 1, 2008) was an American actor who made numerous appearances in television and movies beginning in 1965. He was known for his roles as The Number Painter on the popular PBS children's show Sesame Street, and as the quirky English neighbor Harry Bentley on the CBS sitcom The Jeffersons. Benedict was born in Silver City, New Mexico, the son of Alma Marie (née Loring), a journalist, and Mitchell M. Benedict, a doctor. He grew up in Massachusetts. As a young man, he suffered from acromegalia, a pituitary disorder that affects the extremities and face, which accounted for his slightly oversized jaw and large nose. Benedict was best known for his role as Harry Bentley on the television show The Jeffersons. He played this role from 1975 when the show began until 1981, and then returned in 1983 and remained until the end of the show in 1985. His character was an Englishman who lived in the apartment next door to George and Louise Jefferson. He worked at the United Nations as a translator and was a bachelor. He was liked by all of the other characters on the show except for George Jefferson, who found him annoying, but they became more friendly
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    Ronald Eyre

    • Plays Directed: London Assurance
    Ronald Eyre (13 April 1929 – 8 April 1992) was an English theatre director, actor and writer. Eyre was born at Mapplewell, near Barnsley, Yorkshire and he taught at Giggleswick School. He became a leading director for the cinema, opera, television and the theatre. He was nominated for Broadway's 1975 Tony Award as Best Director (Dramatic) for "London Assurance".
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    Rosie Malek-Yonan

    Rosie Malek-Yonan

    • Plays Directed: Soft Dude
    Rosie Malek-Yonan (born July 4, 1965) is an Assyrian actress, author, director, public figure and human rights activist. Born in Tehran, Iran, Rosie Malek-Yonan is a descendant of one of the oldest and most prominent Assyrian families, tracing her Assyrian roots back nearly 11 centuries. The Malek family or tribe came from the Assyrian village of Geogtapah, Urmi (also known as Urmia), a region in northwestern Iran. Geogtapa was the largest Assyrian Christian village in the region and much of it belonged to the Malek-Yonan family with the oldest plot in the family graveyard dating back to 1,100 AD. Rosie's father, George Malek-Yonan (born 1924), an international attorney in Iran, was personally responsible for negotiating and procuring a seat for the Assyrians as a recognized Christian minority in the Iranian Parliament or Majlis of Iran, a huge accomplishment for a people who had been without a formal country since the fall of the Assyrian Empire. Rosie's mother, Lida Malek-Yonan(1928–2002) regarded as an activist and humanitarian, was equally influential in demanding recognition for Assyrian women in Iran by launching and presiding over the Assyrian Women's Organization which was
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    247

    Slava Polunin

    • Plays Directed: Slava's Snowshow
    Vyacheslav Ivanovich “Slava” Polunin PAR (Russian: Вячеслав Иванович (Слава) Полунин) (born 12 June 1950) is a Russian performance artist and clown. He is the creator of the stage spectacles, Asisyai-revue, Slava's Snowshow and Diabolo. Polunin was born in the town of Novosil, Oryol Oblast, Russia into the family of a shop assistant. He was successful in his school theatre, imitating Charlie Chaplin, but was refused entry to the Leningrad Theater Institute due to poor pronunciation. After a few years' study at an engineering school, he graduated from the Leningrad Institute for Soviet Culture, where he later taught. In 1968, Polunin started the semi-professional pantomime theater, Litsedeyi (Russian for "mummers" or literally "people who make faces"). In 1981, his first very successful television performance took place on the New Year's Eve program Goluboy Ogonyok (Голубой огонёк). It was a part of his now famous Asisyai-revue. In 1982, in Leningrad he organized a mime parade in which more than 800 mime artists from the Soviet Union took part. It was an unheard of event featuring semi-underground artists at a time of strict Communist control of all artistic events. In 1985, during
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    248
    Tyrone Guthrie

    Tyrone Guthrie

    • Plays Directed: A Life in the Sun
    Sir William Tyrone Guthrie (2 July 1900 – 15 May 1971) was an English theatrical director instrumental in the founding of the Stratford Festival of Canada, the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota and the Tyrone Guthrie Centre, at his family's ancestral home, Annaghmakerrig, near Newbliss in County Monaghan, Ireland. Guthrie was born in Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England, the son of Dr Thomas Guthrie (a grandson of the Scottish preacher Thomas Guthrie) and Norah Power. His mother Norah was the daughter of Sir William James Tyrone Power, Commissary-General-in-chief of the British Army from 1863 to 1869 and Martha, daughter of Dr. John Moorhead of Annaghmakerrig House and his Philadelphia-born wife, Susan (née Allibone) Humphreys. His great-grandfather was the Irish actor Tyrone Power. He was also a second cousin of the Hollywood actor Tyrone Power. His sister, Susan Margaret, married his close university friend, fellow Anglo-Irishman Hubert Butler. Butler translated the text for Guthrie's 1934 production of Anton Chekhov's Cherry Orchard, for perhaps its first English-language production. He received a degree in history at Oxford University, where he was active in student theatre,
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    Walter Bobbie

    • Plays Directed: Venus in Fur
    Walter Bobbie (born November 18, 1945) is an American theatre director, choreographer, and occasional actor and dancer. Bobbie has directed both musicals and plays on Broadway and Off-Broadway, and was the Artistic Director of the New York City Center Encores! concert series. He directed the long-running revival of the musical Chicago. Bobbie was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania. He attended the University of Scranton and did graduate work at The Catholic University of America. Bobbie explains what inspired him to work in theater: "My first Broadway show was How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, maybe in 1964. I came in to New York from college in Pennsylvania for the World's Fair...I remember sitting there -- I practically had to be held down in my seat -- and I had never seen anything like it. That day it was clear to me that I wanted to come back to New York, and theater was what I wanted to do. It was transforming the time of life and will one day grow up to become a famous director of Chicago ." As a performer, Bobbie created the role of "Roger" in the original Broadway production of Grease in 1972. He was featured in the 1976 Broadway revival of Going Up and he also
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    250
    Wilson Milam

    Wilson Milam

    • Plays Directed: The Lieutenant of Inishmore
    Wilson Milam is an American theatre director from Bellevue, Washington. He is a founding member and Artistic Director of The Hired Gun Theatre Company. Nominated for a Tony Award for Best Director of a Play for Martin McDonagh's The Lieutenant of Inishmore, Milam helmed the show's UK premiere, as well as the Off-Broadway production which transferred to Broadway. He also directed Patrick Marber's Closer at the Berkeley Rep in San Francisco and The Wexford Trilogy at the Tricycle Theatre. His production of David Rabe's Hurlyburly for the Peter Hall Company at the Old Vic and Queen's theatres, London, was nominated for two Olivier Awards including one for Best Play. Milam studied history at the University of Washington and began his career as an actor. Chicago credits include Pot Mom at Steppenwolf; The Caine Mutiny Court Martial at A Red Orchid Theatre; Skeleton at Shattered Globe Theatre, and Killer Joe at the Next Lab Theatre, a production that moved to the Traverse Theatre in Edinburgh where it won the Scotsman Fringe First Award. In New York, he directed Killer Joe at 29th Street Rep in 1994 and Soho Playhouse in 1998, and the staged reading of The Glory of Living for New Plays
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