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Best Theater Designer of All Time

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    1

    J. Kevin Draves

    J Kevin Draves was nominated for the 2001 Primetime Emmy for "Sex & The City" and designed the costumes for Off Broadway's Boobs! The Musical with designer Robert Pease. Kevin was also assistant costume designer on "The Boy From Oz" starring Hugh Jackman. Also costume designs for the "Broadway Cares" benefits. Costume Designer Jones,Kenneth http://www.playbill.com/news/article/80950.html Lortel Archives http://www.lortel.org/LLA_archive/index.cfm?search_by=people&first=J%2E&middle=Kevin&last=Draves Kevin Draves: Internet Movie Database http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0237240/ Kevin Draves: Internet Broadway Database http://ibdb.com/person.php?id=117660
    7.11
    9 votes
    2

    John Napier

    – John Napier (born 1 March 1944, London) is a set designer for Broadway and London theatrical performances. John Napier studied at Hornsey College of Art and the Central School of Arts and Crafts, studying under notable set designer Ralph Koltai. Napier earned a position as an Associate Designer at the Royal Shakespeare Company. He has designed for the National Theatre, notably the production of Peter Shaffer's Equus, Trelawny of the Wells, An Enemy of the People and Candide. John Napier has also designed for the Royal Opera House, for Glyndebourne, for the English National Opera and others. He designed Children of Eden, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Jesus Christ Superstar in London's West End. He reworked his original designs for Equus (2007 London production). In the United States, in addition to numerous Broadway productions, he designed and co-directed the show for illusionists Siegfried & Roy at The Mirage, Las Vegas. He also designed the Captain EO video starring Michael Jackson for Disney and the Steven Spielberg film Hook. Napier's design awards include the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Set Design for King Lear, Lohengrin, and Burning Blue. Napier has won Tony
    7.75
    8 votes
    3
    7.25
    8 votes
    4
    Julie Taymor

    Julie Taymor

    Julie Taymor (born December 15, 1952) is an American director of theater, opera and film. Taymor's work has received many accolades from critics, and she has earned two Tony Awards out of four nominations, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design, an Emmy Award and an Academy Award nomination for Original Song. She is widely known for directing the stage musical, The Lion King, for which she became the first woman to win the Tony Award for directing a musical, in addition to a Tony Award for Original Costume Design. She was the director of the Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark but left in March 2011, following artistic differences with the producers. Taymor was born in Newton, Massachusetts, the daughter of Elizabeth (née Bernstein), a political science teacher, and Melvin Lester Taymor, a gynecologist. Taymor's interest in theatre took root early in her life. At the age of seven, she was already drawing her sister into stagings of children's stories for her parents. By age nine, she was entranced by the Boston Children's Theatre and became involved with them. Being the youngest member of theatre groups became common. By 11, she was taking trips to Boston by
    8.17
    6 votes
    5

    William and Jean Eckart

    William and Jean Eckart were a husband-and-wife team of theatre designers in the 1950s and '60s. They designed sets, costumes, and lighting for many productions, including Mame, Here's Love, Damn Yankees, Once Upon a Mattress, The Fig Leaves Are Falling, and The Golden Apple. William Eckart was born October 21, 1920 in New Iberia, Louisiana and died on January 24, 2000 in Dallas, Texas, aged 79. His wife Jean was born on August 18, 1921 in Glencoe, Illinois and died on September 6, 1993, aged 72. The couple received three Tony Award nominations: for Best Scenic Design of a Musical for Fiorello! and Best Musical (as producers) for Once Upon a Mattress in 1960 and for Best Scenic Design for Mame in 1966. The couple taught at Southern Methodist University after their Broadway careers ended. In 2006, a book entitled The Performing Set: The Broadway Designs of William and Jean Eckart by Andrew Harris was published. It includes sketches from every show the Eckarts designed.
    7.00
    7 votes
    6

    Kevin Rigdon

    Kevin Rigdon (born February 17, 1956 in Pontiac, Michigan, USA) is a scenic designer, lighting designer. He teaches at the University of Houston, and is the Associate Director/Design for Houston ’s Alley Theatre. Rigdon's career in theatre began in 1974, when he joined fellow classmates Gary Sinise and Jeff Perry as the resident designer for the newly formed Steppenwolf Theatre Company. Since then, Rigdon has designed over 345 productions including several productions for Broadway, Alley Theatre, and several other theaters around the world. Rigdon has been honored with two Tony Award nominations, seven Joseph Jefferson Awards, four Drama Desk Awards, 1986; 1990 American Theatre Wing Design Awards, and a Drama-Logue Award. In 2003, his designs for American Buffalo were exhibited in Prague, Czech Republic as a part of the United States National Exhibit of the Prague Quadrennial Sceneography Exposition. Rigdon is a member of United Scenic Artists Local 829.
    7.83
    6 votes
    7

    Es Devlin

    Esmeralda Devlin (born 24 September 1971) is a multi-award-winning international stage and costume designer whose work crosses a range of genres: opera, dance, film, theatre, TV and concerts. She also works as creative director for number of pop / rock / rap artists. Devlin designed the London 2012 Olympic Closing Ceremony. Devlin studied music at the Royal Academy of Music from age 12 as a Junior Exhibitioner while attending Cranbrook School in Kent. She went on to gain a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English Literature at Bristol University, writing her final dissertation on the work of the American poet Adrienne Rich. A fine art foundation course followed at Central St Martins College of Art and Design before she was accepted to study set design on the Motley Theatre Design Course in London where she was taught by the designers Percy Harris, Alison Chitty and Kandis Cook. While studying Devlin worked as a stage hand for Le Cirque Invisible – the circus created by Victoria Chaplin and Jean-Baptiste Thierrée. She also assisted the artist Damien Hirst on Agongo, an installation at the Richard de Marco Gallery in Edinburgh in 1992. Devlin was born in Kingston upon Thames to author,
    8.80
    5 votes
    8

    David Hersey

    David Hersey (born November 30, 1939) is a lighting designer who has designed the lighting for over 250 plays, musicals, operas, and ballets. His work has been seen in most corners of the globe and his many awards include the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design for Evita, Cats, and Les Misérables, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for Cats, Miss Saigon, and Equus, and the 1996 Laurence Olivier Award for Lighting Design. Hersey has been the lighting designer for many National Theatre, Royal Shakespeare Company and West End productions, as well as opera at the English National Opera (among others) and ballet at the Royal Ballet. He has been the lighting designer for many Broadway productions, starting with Evita in 1980 through Equus in 2008. Hersey has also been active in the world of theme parks in Florida and Italy, as well as lighting extravaganzas at The Mirage, Treasure Island Hotel and Casino, and Bellagio hotels in Las Vegas. He is the founder of DHA Design, which concentrates on the design of specialist lighting. For ten years he was lighting consultant to the Royal National Theatre and is a past chairman of the Association of Lighting Designers. David
    8.20
    5 votes
    9

    Jane Cox

    Jane Cox is an English actress well known for her part in ITV's Emmerdale as farmer's wife Lisa Dingle. She lives in the former mill town of Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire and trained at Rose Bruford College. She has also starred in episodes of Coronation Street, Hetty Wainthrop Investigates and The Bill. Her most notable pre-Emmerdale role was as the leading female in the children's entertainment series Allsorts, which aired at 12:10 when ITV used to broadcast children's programmes such as Rosie & Jim, Rod, Jane and Freddy and Rainbow between 1990-1992. When Carlton Television replaced Thames Television in 1991, it announced in 1992 that all of these shows - and thus the lunchtime strand of pre-school programmes - would be axed, to make way for an extended version of This Morning. Come 1993, when Carlton first aired in London, they were gone. She also spent two years with the Royal Shakespeare Company. In 1996, Cox made her first appearance in British soap Emmerdale as fictional character Lisa Dingle. Before starting in Emmerdale Jane used to work as a drama school teacher. Nominated - British Soap Award (Best Actress) Pending - TV Quick Awards (Best Soap Actress)
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    7.80
    5 votes
    12

    Chris Parry

    Chris Parry (Born 23 May 1952 in the United Kingdom – died 16 January 2007 in San Diego, California) was a theatrical lighting designer. He worked on several Broadway and West End productions and was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design three times, winning for The Who's Tommy. He also won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design three times. Parry’s credits include more than 150 designs worldwide including productions for the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Royal National Theatre in the UK, and designs for the Los Angeles Opera, Welsh National Opera, Opera Theatre of Lucca in Italy, as well as many regional theatres. In 1993, he received the Lighting Designer of the Year Award from Lighting Dimensions magazine. Parry was known for using the Gel "Rosco 68 - Skye Blue". After his death, Rosco renamed the gel "Parry Sky Blue". He was a teacher of lighting design for many years at the University of California, San Diego and had one son, Richard Parry.
    9.00
    4 votes
    13

    Melly Still

    Melly Still (born August 1962) is a British director, designer and choreographer. She has worked as designer and co-director on many productions including the RSC's version of Tales from Ovid and Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie at the Royal National Theatre. She often works closely with the designer Ti Green and also the British director Tim Supple. Coram Boy was nominated for 4 Olivier Awards in London and 6 Tony awards on Broadway. She was nominated for best director in each award ceremony.
    6.67
    6 votes
    14

    Peter Kaczorowski

    Peter Kaczorowski (born 1956) in Buffalo, New York is a theatrical lighting designer. He is credited with lighting designs for Broadway and off-Broadway shows, as well extensive work in opera. He has been nominated five times for Tony Awards and won the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design for The Producers and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for Contact. He is also the recipient of Outer Critics, Drama-Logue and Hewes design awards. He was recently nominated (in 2012) for the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a Play for The Road to Mecca. He has more than 45 Broadway plays and musicals to his credit including "Nice Work If You Can Get It", "Venus in Fur", "Wit", "Anything Goes", "A View From the Bridge", The Pajama Game, Seascape, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Wonderful Town, Anna in the Tropics, and revivals of The Music Man and Kiss Me, Kate. His recent Off-Broadway work includes How I Learned to Drive for 2nd Stage, Twelfth Night, All's Well, Measure for Measure (Delacorte), School For Lies at CSC, Russian Transport for the The New Group, and The Brother/Sister Trilogy" at the Public. He continues to work for Lincoln Center Theater, NYSF, MTC, CTG,
    6.67
    6 votes
    15
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    8.75
    4 votes
    17

    Jeremy Herbert

    Jeremy Herbert, (b. 1960) from London, is an international multi-media artist specializing in theatre design. He trained under Margaret Harris on the Motley Theatre Design Course. Jeremy Herbert's credits include both premieres of 4.48 Psychosis and Cleansed written by Sarah Kane at the Royal Court Theatre. He won the 2000 Barclays Theatre Award for Best Designer for 4.48 Psychosis. He has also staged Sexual Perversity in Chicago, Laurence Boswell's dark adaptation of Beauty and the Beast, Up for Grabs, Treats, and recently The Ugly One for the Royal Court Theatre. He frequently works with directors Ian Rickson, Ramin Gray and Laurence Boswell. He is the nephew of actor and comedian Michael Palin. He has two young children with vocalist Melanie Pappenheim.
    6.50
    6 votes
    18
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    8.50
    4 votes
    20

    Roger K. Furse

    Roger Kemble Furse (11 September 1903 - 19 August 1972) was an English art director and costume designer of stage and film. The son of Lieutenant General Sir William Furse, Roger Furse was educated at Eton and the Slade School of Fine Arts. A frequent collaborator with Laurence Olivier, Furse won two Oscars in 1948 for his art direction and costume design of Olivier's version of “Hamlet”. His other film credits include “Henry V” (1945), “Odd Man Out” (1947), “Ivanhoe” (1952) and “The Roman Spring of Mrs Stone” (1961). In 1946 he created the sets for the ballet Adam Zero at Covent Garden. He was also nominated for a Tony Award in 1961 for his set design of the Broadway hit drama, Duel of Angels. Furse's portrait of his wife, Margaret, an Academy Award-winning costume designer, is included in the permanent collection of the National Portrait Gallery in London. Ralph Furse's sister was actress Judith Furse.
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    6.33
    6 votes
    22
    9.67
    3 votes
    23

    Paul Arditti

    Paul Arditti is a theatre sound designer, working mainly in the UK and the US. He specialises in designing sound scores for plays and sound systems for musicals. He has won awards for his work in both categories, including the 2006 Olivier Award for Billy Elliot the Musical. He holds the record for most wins of the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Sound Design, with three to his credit. Paul studied Drama and English at The University of Hull, graduating in 1983. He has designed the sound for many Broadway productions, starting with Orpheus Descending (1989), well as other New York venues, such as The Cherry Orchard at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and off-Broadway. In the UK, he has designed sound at the Royal Court, Royal National Theatre, Royal Shakespeare Company, and West End.
    7.20
    5 votes
    24
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    6.17
    6 votes
    26

    Lizzy Gardiner

    Lizzy Gardiner (born 1966) is an Australian costume designer, who has been working in Hollywood since the early 1990s. Noted for her originality, she is best known for her American Express gold card dress which she wore to collect her Academy Award for Best Costume Designer at the 67th Academy Awards in 1995 for her work on The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. Her highest profile film was Mission: Impossible II in 2000 for which she designed the costumes. Gardiner was born in the rural city of Dubbo in western New South Wales and lived there until she was sent to boarding school for six years. She left Australia after finishing high school and moved to Italy, where she studied fashion and costume design for three years at the Accademia di Italiana in Florence. After graduating she returned to Australia and began working in the Australian film and TV industry, working on the soap opera E Street. Whilst working on E Street in 1993, she began working with Tim Chappel. Together they designed outlandish costumes for Stephan Elliott's Australian LGBT comedy film The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. Amongst the bizarre costumes she designed for the film was a
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    8.00
    4 votes
    28

    Paule Constable

    Paule Constable is a British lighting designer who won the 2005, 2006, and 2009 Laurence Olivier Award for Best Lighting Design. She was also a nominee for four further productions and for a 2007 Tony Award on Broadway. In 2011 she won the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a play for War Horse. Paule read English and Drama at Goldsmiths' College London and she trained in lighting design while working in the music business. Opera includes many designs for the Royal Opera, English National Opera, Glyndebourne, Opera North, Scottish Opera and Welsh National Opera. Abroad she has worked in Paris, Salzburg, Strasbourg, Berlin, Brussels, New Zealand, Dallas and Houston. She has created fifteen productions at the National Theatre, including Paul. Her lighting designs are regularly seen at the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Donmar, the Royal Court and the Theatre de Complicité. In the West End she lit Evita, Don Carlos, The Weir and Amadeus (also Broadway, 1999 LA Critics' Award winner). Theatre-Dance productions in Britain and abroad include productions for Matthew Bourne, Will Tuckett and Adam Cooper. Paule Constable was the lighting designer for the 2010 25th Anniversary Touring
    6.80
    5 votes
    29

    Christine Jones

    Christine Jones is a scenic designer on Broadway. Her best known designs include Spring Awakening and American Idiot. She is a professor at New York University and a Lecturer at Princeton University. Jones earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design for Theatre at Concordia University in 1989. She later earned her Master of Fine Arts at New York University. Jones has designed for many productions off Broadway,: Jones made her Broadway scenic design debut in 2000 with her design for The Green Bird, directed by Julie Taymor. Jones designed the set for the 2007 Tony Award winning musical Spring Awakening. She was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Scenic Design but lost to Bob Crowley for Mary Poppins. Most recently, Jones designed the set for the 2010 musical American Idiot, for which she earned her first Tony Award. Jones has said "It's just great to be recognized for doing something that you love, with people you love." Jones is set to design the upcoming musical revival of "On A Clear Day You Can See Forever" starring Harry Connick Jr. Jones is married to actor Dallas Roberts. They have two children.
    9.00
    3 votes
    30

    Beverly Emmons

    Beverly Emmons (b. December 12, 1943) is a lighting designer for the stage, dance and opera. Emmons graduated from Sarah Lawrence College in 1965 and then worked as an assistant to Jules Fisher. Her first credit as a lighting designer was with the Off-Broadway play Sensations in 1970. Emmons first Broadway work was A Letter for Queen Victoria in 1975. She has been the lighting designer for many Broadway plays and musicals since then, most recently the revival of Annie Get Your Gun in 1999 and Stick Fly in 2011. She has worked for ballet companies, including the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, and also for choreographers such as Martha Graham, Bill T. Jones and Trisha Brown. Her work for opera includes the Robert Wilson and Phillip Glass opera Einstein on the Beach in November 1976 at the Metropolitan Opera House, and the Robert Wilson opera The Civil Wars: A Tree Is Best Measured When It Is Down, performed in 1986 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. She was on the graduate theater faculty of Columbia University, was the artistic director of the Lincoln Center Institute from 1997 to 2002, and is currently on the faculty of Sarah Lawrence College.
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Jo Mielziner

    Jo Mielziner

    Joseph "Jo" Mielziner (March 19, 1901, in Paris - March 15, 1976, in New York City) was an American theatrical scenic, and lighting designer born in Paris, France. He is "the most successful set designer of the Golden era of Broadway", and worked on both stage plays and musicals. He was the son of artist Leo Mielziner, Sr. (son of a rabbi), and Ella (née Friend), a writer, and brother of actor-director Kenneth MacKenna. He studied at the Art Students League and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Mielziner was considered one of the most influential theatre designers of the 20th century, designing the scenery and often the lighting for more than 200 productions, many of which became American classics. He "pioneered 'selective realism' in scenic design". According to his obituary, he was perhaps "praised most often...for his sweeping canvas of people under the Brooklyn Bridge, used as a backdrop for Maxwell Anderson's Winterset. After his education and spending 13 months in Europe "absorbing the revolutionary changes occurring in traditional stage design", in 1923 he worked for the Theatre Guild in New York as an assistant stage manager and bit actor. Mielziner's Broadway
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    6.60
    5 votes
    33

    Paul Pyant

    Paul Pyant (born 22 July 1953) is a British lighting designer, whose designs have been featured in the West End, on Broadway and in opera houses around the world. Pryant's parents are Leonard Vincent Pyant, a business executive, and Jean Phoebe née Frampton, a medical secretary. He graduated from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London in 1973 and is an associate of the Academy. His credits in Britain include numerous West End productions and many productions with Royal National Theatre (RNT) in London. He was nominated for Olivier Awards for his designs for The Wind in the Willows (RNT 1991), Hamlet (2001), A Streetcar Named Desire (2003), All's Well that Ends Well (2005) and the musical The Lord of the Rings (2008). The RNT production of Othello played an engagement in Brooklyn, New York in 1998. Ben Brantley, in The New York Times, wrote that Pyant's lighting for this production was "exquisite". His lighting design for the 2010 West End production of Waiting for Godot was called "lyrical". He has also designed lighting for productions of the Donmar Warehouse in London since its opening. For the Royal Shakespeare Company, he has designed lighting for productions of Richard
    7.50
    4 votes
    34

    Brian MacDevitt

    Brian MacDevitt is a lighting designer for theatrical productions. He has worked extensively on Broadway and Off Broadway, as well as touring, Regional theatre, and Industrial productions. A Long Island, New York, native, Brian graduated from SUNY Purchase with a degree in Lighting Design from the Department of Design/Technology of the Division of Theatre Arts & Film. After graduation Brian spent a decade honing his craft with Off Broadway and other productions, and also developed a reputation as a teacher of design. He began teaching at Purchase as a visiting professor in 1986. He continued to balance his teaching career while breaking into Broadway in 1994 with What's Wrong With This Picture? Brian started to achieve notice with the Terrence McNally play Love! Valour! Compassion! in 1995. His success continued through the 1990s, and eventually culminated with a Tony Award for Best Lighting Design in 2002 for the revival of Into the Woods. He won again in 2005 for The Pillowman, in 2007 for The Coast of Utopia, sharing the award with Kenneth Posner and Natasha Katz (The three also won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for Utopia'.') Brian won the Tony in 2009
    8.67
    3 votes
    35

    Gregory Gale

    Gregory Gale is a New York-based costume designer. Gale is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology and is well known for his character-driven designs. In 2008, Gale was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Costume Design of a Play for his work on Cyrano de Bergerac. In 2007 Gale won the Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Costume Design for his work on The Voysey Inheritance. He was also nominated that same year for his work on The Milliner. In 2009, he was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Costume Design of a Musical for Rock of Ages, a musical that uses the classic rock hits from the 1980s. Gale has designed for numerous Broadway and Off-Broadway productions. Some of the most notable are:
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    10.00
    2 votes
    38

    Paul Tazewell

    Paul Tazewell is a costume designer for the theatre, dance, and opera. He has received three Tony Award nominations for costume design, the Helen Hayes Awards Resident Design for Outstanding Costume Design in 1993, two Lucille Lortel Award nominations, and the Theater Development Fund's Irene Sharaff Award in 1997. Born in Akron, Ohio, Tazewell graduated from the North Carolina School of the Arts and NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. Tazewell is resident artist and associate professor of Costume Design at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Tazewell has designed costumes for over a dozen Broadway productions, starting with Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk in 1996 (receiving the Tony Award nomination) and, in 2009, the musicals Guys and Dolls (Revival) and Memphis. His off-Broadway work as a costume designer includes Elaine Stritch at Liberty (2001) and Boston Marriage (2002), both at the Public Theatre. In regional theatre he has designed costumes for, among many, Arena Stage (The Women, 1999, and Polk County, 2002), The Guthrie Theatre, The Goodman Theatre, and La Jolla Playhouse. His work for ballet companies includes the Boston Ballet, and for opera
    10.00
    2 votes
    39

    Theoni V. Aldredge

    Theoni V. Aldredge (August 22, 1922 – January 21, 2011) was a Greek-American stage and screen costume designer. Born Theoni Athanasiou Vachlioti in Thessaloniki in 1922, Aldredge received her training at the American School in Athens. She emigrated to the United States in 1949 and attended the Goodman Theatre at DePaul University, Chicago on a scholarship. Her first Broadway assignment was designing costumes for Geraldine Page in Tennessee Williams' Sweet Bird of Youth in 1959; her most recent was the 2006 revival of A Chorus Line. For 20 years she was the principal designer for Joseph Papp and also designed several musicals for Michael Bennett. One of the most honored costume designers of the American theatre, Aldredge received three Tony Awards (for Annie, Barnum, and La Cage aux Folles), as well as 11 other Tony nominations, including such iconic productions as A Chorus Line, 42nd Street, and Dreamgirls. She received numerous honors from the Drama Desk awards and other theatrical groups. In 2002, she received the Irene Sharaff Lifetime Achievement Award from the Theatre Development Fund. Aldredge worked extensively in film and television as well. Her productions included
    10.00
    2 votes
    40

    Angus Strathie

    Angus Strathie is an Australian costume designer. Angus Strathie has had a long professional career in costume design. A friend and longtime colleague of Baz Luhrmann and Catherine Martin, one of his earliest projects was the cult favourite Strictly Ballroom, a romantic comedy produced in 1992. Strathie went on to design the costumes for a TV production of the famous Puccini opera La Boheme before his work on the famous Moulin Rouge an achievement that won him an Academy Award in 2001 for Best Costume Design.
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    6.40
    5 votes
    42
    7.25
    4 votes
    43

    Jules Fisher

    Jules Fisher (born November 12, 1937) is a lighting designer and producer. He is credited with lighting designs for more than 200 productions over the course of his 45 year career in Broadway and off-Broadway shows, as well extensive work in film, ballet, opera, television, and rock and roll concert tours. He has been nominated 18 times for Tony Awards (as a lighting designer) and won eight Tony awards for Lighting Design, more than any other lighting designer. Fisher was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania and is a graduate of Carnegie Institute of Technology. He is married to choreographer-director Graciela Daniele. He has been in a professional partnership with lighting designer Peggy Eisenhauer since 1985, and they formed Third Eye Ltd, a firm specializing in entertainment and theatre lighting. He is also a principal in the theatre consulting firm Fisher Dachs Associates, architectural lighting firm Fisher Marantz Stone, and teaches at The New School. Fisher has worked with many popular musicians on their concerts and tours including: Fisher has designed theatrical lighting for many film features. Designs include: Fisher can be seen as himself lighting a show in Bob Fosse's All
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    7.25
    4 votes
    45

    Dan Jones

    Dan Jones is a BAFTA award winning composer and sound designer working in film and theatre. He read music at the University of Oxford, studied contemporary music theatre at the Banff Centre for the Arts and studied electro-acoustic composition and programming at the Centro Ricerche Musicali in Rome. Having explored various means of generating music algorithmically, he is the author of one of the earliest pieces of software for generating fractal or self-similar music. His scores for feature films include Shadow of the Vampire (starring John Malkovich, Willem Dafoe), Jericho Mansions (starring James Caan) and Menno Meyjes' Max (starring John Cusack), for which he received the Ivor Novello Award for Best Film Score 2004. He also scored Meyjes' follow up film "Manolete" (starring Adrien Brody and Penelope Cruz). He has written for all the major British television broadcasters and his work includes Sir David Attenborough's The Life of Mammals, the BBC series Strange, Pawel Pawlikowski's drama "Twockers", Charlie Brooker's Channel 4 horror series "Dead Set" and Francesca Joseph's "Tomorrow La Scala", Channel 4's three part documentary " Visions of Heaven and Hell" shown in 1994. He
    8.33
    3 votes
    46

    John Bury

    John Bury (27 January 1925 - 12 November 2000) was a British set designer, costume designer and lighting designer who designed in theatre in the UK, West End and Broadway and international opera. He had a long creative relationship with director Peter Hall. Together they made Amadeus, which Bury was nominated for Tony Awards for scenery, costumes and lighting and received the award for scenery and lighting. He was also nominated for 5 more Tony Awards including his first show on Broadway, Harold Pinter's The Homecoming in 1967. He worked for many years with director Joan Littlewood at the Theatre Workshop which resided in the Theatre Royal.
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    8.33
    3 votes
    48

    Ming Cho Lee

    Ming Cho Lee (born October 3, 1930, Shanghai, China) is a Chinese-born American theatrical set designer and a longtime professor at the Yale School of Drama. Lee, whose father (Lee Tsu Fa) was a Yale University graduate (1918), moved to the United States in 1949 and attended Occidental College. He first worked on Broadway as a second assistant set designer to Jo Mielziner on The Most Happy Fella in 1956. Lee's first Broadway play as Scenic Designer was "The Moon Besieged" in 1962; he went on to design the sets for over 20 Broadway shows, including Mother Courage and Her Children, King Lear, The Glass Menagerie, The Shadow Box, and For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf. He has won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design, a Helen Hayes Award, and in 1983 he received a Tony Award for Best Scenic Design for K2. He has also designed sets for opera, ballet, and regional theatres such as Arena Stage, the Mark Taper Forum, and the Guthrie Theater. He designed over 30 productions for Joseph Papp at The Public Theater, including the original Off-Broadway production of Hair (musical). Since 1969, Lee has taught at the Yale School of Drama, where he is
    8.33
    3 votes
    49

    Neil Patel

    Neil Patel (Born: Bangor, Gwynedd) is an award winning scenic designer. He is a graduate of Yale College and the University of California, San Diego. Patel has designed productions for theater, opera and dance throughout the world. He designed Warren Leight’s Tony Award winning play Side Man on Broadway, London's West End, and the Kennedy Center; 'night, Mother, Oleanna and (title of show) on Broadway and Donald Margulies' Pulitzer Prize winning Dinner With Friends off-Broadway and on national tour. Patel has designed at the Guthrie Theater, the Tokyo Bunka Kaikan, the Steppenwolf Theater, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Gate Theatre, the Edinburgh International Festival, and the Brooklyn Academy of Music among many regional companies in the United States and abroad. Since 1997 he has been a member of Anne Bogart’s SITI Company. His designs for opera include the world premieres of Bright Sheng’s Madame Mao at the Santa Fe Opera and David Carlson’s Anna Karenina at the Florida Grand Opera. Both directed by Colin Graham. Designs for television include the Peabody Award winning series In Treatment for HBO. Patel has received the Helen Hayes Award, numerous Drama Desk Award
    8.33
    3 votes
    50

    Timothy O'Brien

    Timothy O’Brien RDI, (born 1929, India) is a British theatre designer. [1] Educated at Cambridge University 1949-52 and as a Henry Fellow at the Yale School of Drama 1952-3, his career began in television at the BBC in 1954. From 1956-65, he was Head of Design of ABC Television, working largely on the Armchair Theatre and at the same time designed for the London stage, mostly new plays by Shaffer, Orton, Saunders and others. As an Associate Artist and Honorary Associate Artist of the Royal Shakespeare Company from 1966, he has designed 31 productions for the company, notably Troilus and Cressida, and Richard II, directed by John Barton; The Merry Wives of Windsor, Pericles, Prince of Tyre and Love's Labour's Lost, directed by Terry Hands and Enemies, Summerfolk, Lower Depths and the Zykovs all by Maxim Gorky, directed by David Jones. His designs for the National Theatre include Next of Kin, directed by Harold Pinter; John Gabriel Borkman, directed by Peter Hall and Tales from the Vienna Woods, directed by Maximilian Schell. He designed his first opera, The Flying Dutchman, in 1958 for Sadler's Wells and has since designed operas for Covent Garden, ENO, the Vienna State Opera, the
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    William Ivey Long

    William Ivey Long

    William Ivey Long (born August 30, 1947) is an American costume designer for stage and film. His most notable work includes The Producers, Hairspray, Nine, Crazy for You, Grey Gardens and Young Frankenstein. Long was born in Seaboard, North Carolina on August 30, 1947 to William Ivey Long, Sr., a Winthrop University professor and stage director, and his wife Mary, who was a high school theatre teacher, actress and playwright. His father was the founder of the Winthrop University theatre department. William grew up in Manteo, North Carolina and Rock Hill, South Carolina. Upon graduation from high school Long attended the College of William and Mary where he studied history and graduated in 1969, after spending many of his high school and undergraduate summers with his family at Manteo, North Carolina, where Mary, William, Robert, and Laura worked for Paul Green's outdoor drama, The Lost Colony. He then attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to pursue a Ph.D. in art history. At Chapel Hill he met visiting professor Betty Smith who suggested he apply to the design program at Yale University. He left UNC and went to the Yale School of Drama to study set design. It was
    6.20
    5 votes
    53
    9.50
    2 votes
    54

    Oliver Smith

    Oliver Smith (February 13, 1918 - January 23, 1994) was an American scenic designer. Born in Waupun, Wisconsin, Smith attended Penn State, after which he moved to New York City and began to form friendships that blossomed into working relationships with such talents as Leonard Bernstein, Jerome Robbins, Carson McCullers, and Agnes de Mille. In his early 20s he lived at February House in Brooklyn with a coterie of famous people centered around George Davis and W. H. Auden. He tended the furnace, washed the dishes, and soothed the tempers of both residents and visitors. His career was launched with his designs for Léonide Massine's ballet Saratoga in 1941 and de Mille's Rodeo in 1942. Smith designed dozens of Broadway musicals, films (Guys and Dolls, The Band Wagon, Oklahoma!, Porgy and Bess), and operas (La Traviata). His association with the American Ballet Theatre began in 1944, when he collaborated with Robbins and Bernstein on Fancy Free, which served as the inspiration for On the Town. The following year, he became Co-Director of ABT with Lucia Chase, a position he held until 1980. He designed the sets for ABT's complete 1967 production of Swan Lake, the first full-length
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    7.00
    4 votes
    56

    Derek McLane

    Derek McLane (born June 14, 1958, in London, England) is an American set designer for theatre, opera, and musical theatre). He graduated with a BA from Harvard College and an MFA from the Yale School of Drama. Derek McLane is an award winning set designer who has worked on productions at most of the major resident theatres and operas in the United States. His Broadway credits include: 33 Variations (2008), Grease (2007), The Pajama Game (2006 Tony Award, Best Revival); The Threepenny Opera; Little Women; I Am My Own Wife (Tony Award, Best Play); Barefoot in the Park; Lestat; The Women; Present Laughter; London Assurance; Holiday; Honour; Summer and Smoke; Three Sisters. Off-Broadway credits include: The Scene, The Voysey Inheritance, Two Trains Running, Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Macbeth (Shakespeare in the Park); Hurlyburly; Abigail’s Party Modern Orthodox; The Great American Trailer Park Musical; Aunt Dan and Lemon; The Creadeux Canvas; "Rafta, Rafta". McLane designed the entire Sondheim Celebration at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. He has also worked in London, Dublin, Glasgow, Moscow, Kraków, Caracas, Sydney, and Warsaw. He has collaborated for many years with renowned
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    George Tsypin

    George Tsypin

    George Tsypin (b.1954 in Kazakhstan (former Soviet Union) is an American stage designer, sculptor and architect. He studied architecture in Moscow and theater design in New York. Tsypin has worked for many years with renowned directors and composers, such as Julie Taymor, Peter Sellars, Francesca Zambello, Pierre Audi, Jurgen Flimm, Phillip Glass, John Adams, Kaija Saariaho and Andrey Konchalovsky. He has a longstanding creative association with the conductor Valery Gergiev. He has won many awards, including the International Competition of "New and Spontaneous Ideas for the Theater for Future Generations" at Georges Pompidou Center in Paris. His designs for opera have been produced all over the world, including Salzburg Festival, Opera de Bastille in Paris, Covent Garden in London, La Scala]] in Milan, Mariinsky Theater in Saint Petersburg, Bolshoi Theater in Moscow and Metropolitan Opera in New York. Tsypin has worked in all major theaters in the United States, as well as in film and television. His sculpture received its first one-man gallery show in 1991 at the Twining Gallery in New York. He created the Planet Earth Gallery, one of the Millennium Projects in England: a major
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    7.00
    4 votes
    61

    Albert Wolsky

    Albert Wolsky (born November 24, 1930) is an American costume designer. He has worked both on stage shows as well as for film, and has received two Academy Awards. Wolsky was born in Paris, France, but during World War II, he and the rest of his family fled to the United States to escape the German occupation. After graduating from the City College of New York, he served in the army from 1953–56, spending most of his enlistment in Japan. Once he returned to the United States, he began working in his father's travel agency. However, he decided to change careers and took an assistant's job with notable costume maker Helene Pons. Wolsky became a well regarded costume designer, working both on Broadway and in the motion picture industry. Wolsky worked on many films including Harry and Tonto, The Turning Point, Grease and Manhattan. He worked with Bob Fosse, a leading Broadway director, on All That Jazz and won his first Academy Award. He won his second Academy Award for Bugsy in 1991 and has been nominated five other times, most recently for his work on Julie Taymor's Beatles-inspired musical Across the Universe (2007) and Sam Mendes's Revolutionary Road (2008). He began his career as
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    8.00
    3 votes
    63

    Anthony Ward

    Anthony Ward is a British set and costume designer who has designed many of the most high-profile and successful plays and musicals of the last few years. He was awarded the 1996 Laurence Olivier Award for Best Costume Design for A Midsummer's Night Dream at the Barbican Theatre. Other awards include the 1999 Laurence Olivier Award for Best Set Design for Oklahoma! and nominations for Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and My Fair Lady, and Broadway's 1996 Tony Award for Best Scenic Design for A Midsummer Night's Dream.
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Matt Graham

    Matt Graham

    Matthew Graham (born in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American professional poker player from Houston, Texas, who is a two time World Series of Poker bracelet winner, He won his first bracelet at the 2008 World Series of Poker in the $1,500 Limit Hold'em Shootout event and then the next year at the 2009 World Series of Poker he won his second in the $10,000 World Championship Pot Limit Omaha event. Graham in a member of Team UB as a sponsored professional poker player at the online cardroom Ultimate Bet. As of 2010, his total live tournament winnings exceed $1,700,000.
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    8.00
    3 votes
    68

    Rouben Ter-Arutunian

    Rouben Ter-Arutunian (July 24, 1920 - October 17, 1992) was a costume and scenic designer for dance, opera, theater and television. Born in Tiflis, Georgia, he attended the Reimann Art School (Berlin) from 1939 to 1941, studied film music at the Hochschule fur Musik (Berlin) and took courses at the Friedrich-Wilhelm University (Berlin), 1941–43, and at the University of Vienna, 1943-44. He first designed costumes for dancers of the Berlin Staatsoper in 1940, going on to design for the Dresden Opera and the Vienna State Opera. He moved to New York in 1951. In 1964 he designed the sets for the New York City Ballet production of The Nutcracker. He worked with the New York City Opera company, Hamburg State Opera, La Scala in Milan, the Opera-Comique in Paris and the Spoleto Festival in Italy. He designed either costumes or sets, sometimes both, for 24 Broadway productions. His first production on Broadway was Measure for Measure in 1957, and his last was Goodbye Fidel in 1980. He won the 1959 Tony Award for Best Costume Design for the musical Redhead, and was nominated for the Tony Award three times for Scenic Design and one other Tony for Costume Design. The Rouben Ter-Arutunian
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    6.75
    4 votes
    70

    Pat Collins

    Pat Collins is an American lighting designer. Collins made her Broadway debut with a 1976 revival of Threepenny Opera. Her additional New York City credits include Ain't Misbehavin', King of Hearts, I'm Not Rappaport, Execution of Justice, The Heidi Chronicles, Conversations with My Father, The Sisters Rosensweig, Proof, Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, and Doubt. In 1986, Collins won the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design for I'm Not Rappaport and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for Execution of Justice.
    9.00
    2 votes
    71

    Paul Gallo

    For the radio host of the same name, see Paul Gallo (radio personality). Paul Gallo is an award-winning American theatrical lighting designer. Born in The Bronx, Gallo attended Ithaca College on an acting scholarship but soon discovered his aptitude for stagecraft, in particular lighting. He then attended the Yale School of Drama. He has designed the lighting for some 50 Broadway productions, starting with Passione in 1980. Additional credits include The Mystery of Edwin Drood, The House of Blue Leaves, City of Angels, Lend Me a Tenor, I Hate Hamlet, Crazy for You, Titanic, 45 Seconds from Broadway, Birds of Paradise, and the 2008 revival of Pal Joey. He also has designed many off-Broadway productions and has worked extensively with Playwrights Horizons and the Public Theatre. He recently designed the lights to the La Jolla Playhouse's 2010 production of Limelight: The Story of Charlie Chaplin. Gallo has received eight nominations for the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design and ten nominations for the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design, which he won for the 1992 revival of Guys and Dolls. He won the Henry Hewes Design Award, Collaborative Design Achievement-Lighting
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Boris Aronson

    Boris Aronson

    Boris Aronson (October 15, 1898 – November 16, 1980) was an American scenic designer for Broadway and Yiddish theatre. He won the Tony Award for Scenic Design six times in his career. The son of a Rabbi, Aronson was born in Kiev, in the Russian Empire now Ukraine, and enrolled in art school during his youth. Aronson became an apprentice to the designer Aleksandra Ekster, who introduced him to the directors Vsevolod Meyerhold and Alexander Tairov, who influenced him. These three theatre and art veterans were advocates of the Constructivist school in Russia, as opposed to Stanislavski's form of Realism, and they convinced Aronson to embrace the Constructivist style. Aronson worked for some years in Moscow and Germany. In Berlin he exhibited at the seminal Van Diemen Gallery "First Exhibition of Russian Art", alongside the Constructivists El Lissitzky and Naum Gabo, which introduced Constructivism to the West. He wrote two books in Berlin, on Marc Chagall and Jewish graphic art, before he obtained an immigration visa for America in 1923. He moved to the Lower East Side in New York City and began designing sets and costumes for the more experimental of the city's Yiddish theatres,
    5.80
    5 votes
    73
    5.80
    5 votes
    74
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Charles Ricketts

    Charles Ricketts

    Charles de Sousy Ricketts (2 October 1866 - 7 October 1931) was a versatile English artist, illustrator, author and printer, and is best known for his work as book designer and typographer from 1896 to 1904 with the Vale Press, and his work in the theatre as a set and costume designer. Ricketts was born in Geneva to a French mother and an English father. He grew up mainly in France and Italy. He began his studies in art at the City and Guilds Technical Art School in Lambeth, in 1882, after both his parents had died. According to William Rothenstein, "Ricketts, with his pale, delicate features, fair hair and pointed red-gold beard, looked like a Clouet drawing. Half French, he had the quick mind and the rapid speech of a southerner." At the Art School he met Charles Shannon (1863–1937), painter and lithographer, who would be his lifelong partner in both his artistic and personal life. On the advice of Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, they settled in England rather than abroad. They founded The Dial, a magazine, which had five issues from 1889 to 1897, and the Vale Press, named after their house, The Vale, in Chelsea, London. "The portrait of Ricketts by Shannon was painted two years after
    7.67
    3 votes
    77

    J. Roy Helland

    J. Roy Helland (born January 28, 1943) is a make-up artist. He has done the hair and make-up for Meryl Streep in all of her movies since Sophie's Choice in 1982. On January 24, 2012, he was nominated for an Academy Award for the movie The Iron Lady, which he won on February 26, 2012.
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    7.67
    3 votes
    79

    Thomas R Skelton

    Thomas R. Skelton (September 24, 1927–August 9, 1994) was a lighting designer. In a career spanning more than four decades, he was best known for his lighting designs for ballet and Broadway theatre productions. Born in North Bridgeton, Maine, Skelton graduated from Middlebury College, Theatre Department. He pursued an interest in modern dance after moving to New York, studying dance with Martha Graham and José Limón. His lighting career started as an apprentice to Jean Rosenthal at the American Dance Festival. He worked for Robert Joffrey's new dance company as a lighting designer and stage manager. By the 1950s he was published regularly in Dance Magazine with his lighting methods. He taught at both Yale University and New York Studio and Forum of Stage Design. Most of his work was within the world of dance, particularly ballet. He designed lighting for, among others, the American Ballet Theatre, The Joffrey Ballet, the New York City Ballet and the Ohio Ballet, for which he was Associate Director. His method was published as 'The Handbook for Dance Stagecraft' between October 1955 and December 1956 in Dance Magazine. He also designed lighting for some 63 Broadway productions,
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    Michael Yeargan

    Michael H. Yeargan is an American set designer for theatre and opera. Yeargan is a professor of Stage Design at the Yale School of Drama and has designed for opera companies all over the world, including the Washington Opera and the Dallas Opera. His scenic designs for Broadway include South Pacific, Cymbeline, Awake and Sing!, Seascape, The Light in the Piazza, The Gershwins' Fascinating Rhythm, Ah, Wilderness!, Hay Fever, It Had to Be You, A Lesson from Aloes, Dirty Linen & New-Found-Land, Something Old, Something New, Me Jack, You Jill, The Ritz, Bad Habits, and Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. Yeargan also designed sets for A Day in the Death of Joe Egg and The Illusion at the Dallas Theatre Center.
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    6.50
    4 votes
    87

    Anthony Powell

    Anthony Powell (born 2 June 1935, Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester, England) is an English costume designer for stage and screen.
    8.50
    2 votes
    88

    Catherine Martin

    Catherine Martin (born 26 January 1965, in Lindfield, New South Wales) is an Australian costume designer, production designer, set designer, and film producer. Catherine Martin went to school at North Sydney Girls High School. She did a Diploma Design Course at the National Institute of Dramatic Arts in Sydney, where she started collaborating with her collegemate Baz Luhrmann (now her husband). She designed sets and costumes for his one-act stage precursor of Strictly Ballroom. After completing studies, she worked as a designer on Luhrmann's production of "Lake Lost" (1988). In 1989, she designed the sets for an Australian stage production of Diary of a Madman starring Geoffrey Rush. She worked on Luhrmann's La Bohème (1990) and A Midsummer Night's Dream. She recreated her designs for screen-version of Strictly Ballroom (1992), for which she won two Australian Film Institute Awards (Best Production design and Best Costume design). She won an Oscar nomination (as a production designer) for Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet (1996). She also made her debut as an associate producer for the same. She married Luhrmann on her 32nd birthday, 26 January 1997. Their third
    8.50
    2 votes
    89

    Gareth Owen

    Gareth Owen is a sound designer specialising in musical theatre and plays. He was nominated for a Tony Award in 2010 for his Broadway production of Trevor Nunn's musical, A Little Night Music starring Catherine Zeta-Jones and Angela Lansbury. Gareth was also nominated for an Olivier Award for his West End production of Terry Johnson's musical, End of the Rainbow starring multi-award winning Tracie Bennett as Judy Garland. He has worked on over a hundred commercial sound designs throughout the world including: Aspects of Love, Footloose, Flashdance, Carousel, Fiddler on the Roof, Fame and Saturday Night Fever. When not designing musical theatre, Gareth mixes Ronnie Wood from the Rolling Stones.
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    8.50
    2 votes
    91

    Maria Bjornson

    Maria Björnson (16 February 1949, Paris – 13 December 2002, London) was an acclaimed theatre stage designer, born in Paris to Norwegian and Romanian parents. Björnson worked for many theatres around the world, designing sets and costumes both for straight drama and for opera. Some of her more notable commissions were for the Royal Shakespeare Company, Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera, which won her the Tony Award for Best Scenic Design, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design, and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design, and the Trevor Nunn production of Aspects of Love. Björnson also worked as a tutor at Central St Martins College Of Art & Design. She was course director for "Theatre Design". In 2006, the refurbished Young Vic opened a new theatre named The Maria in recognition of the designers achievements and remarkable commitment to developing and enhancing the careers of younger theatre practitioners. The first performance in The Maria was Love and Money by Dennis Kelly, directed by Matthew Dunster and designed by Anna Fleischle. Her great-grandfather was the Nobel prize-winning Norwegian playwright Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson. Maria Björnson at the
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    8.50
    2 votes
    93

    Dennis Parichy

    Dennis Parichy is an award-winning American lighting designer. Parichy has designed lights for more than 15 Broadway productions since 1976, including: The Price, The Tenth Man, Coastal Disturbances, Penn & Teller, Burn This, The Nerd, As Is, Angels Fall, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, Duet for One, Crimes of the Heart, The Water Engine, and Knock Knock. Parichy has been nominated three times for a Tony Award for his work on Redwood Curtain, Fifth of July, and Talley's Folly, for which he won a Drama Desk Award. He was resident lighting designer for Circle Repertory Company where he worked with director Marshall Mason on the first productions of plays by many American playwrights, most notably Lanford Wilson. He lit many productions for The Manhattan Theatre Club ("Ashes", "End of Play", "Valley Song", "Playland", "The Last Yankee", and "Eleemosynary" among others) and continues to design for regional theatres throughout the country. These include The Arizona Theatre Company, The Pioneer Theatre, The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Pittsburgh Public Theatre, The Mark Taper Forum, The McCarter Theatre, The Guthrie Theatre, Seattle Rep and People's Light and Theatre Company,
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    7.33
    3 votes
    96

    Richard Pilbrow

    Richard Pilbrow (born April 28, 1933 in Beckenham, Kent, England) is an internationally renowned stage lighting designer, author, theatre consultant, and theatrical producer, film producer and television producer. He was the first British lighting designer on the Broadway stage in the musical Zorba. In the 1950s, Pilbrow entered the Central School of Speech and Drama in London as a stage management student after serving two years in the Royal Air Force. In 1957, Pilbrow co-founded the lighting rental company Theatre Projects with Bryan Kendall, which expanded to include a production company in 1963 to produce and mount the London production of A Funny Thing Happened On the Way to the Forum with set designer Tony Walton and American Producer Hal Prince. Now called Theatre Projects Consultants, which designs theaters and performing arts buildings, the company has gone on to design world renowned spaces such as the Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago, the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, onwhich he wrote a book. Pilbrow is now Chairman Emeritus of the firm. Pilbrow worked on Broadway for the first time as the projection
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    6.25
    4 votes
    100

    Sue Blane

    Susan Margret Blane is best known for her costume designs for both The Rocky Horror Show and The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Blane studied costume design at Wolverhampton College of Art and Central School of Art and Design, finishing in 1971. Before Rocky in 1972, Blane had already met Tim Curry in 1971 at the Citizen's Theatre in Glasgow, Scotland, where they were both involved in a production of Jean Genet's The Maids. Blane also designed the costumes for other Rocky productions, including the 1975 Broadway production and film. Blane also created the costume designs for the sequel, Shock Treatment (1981). Since the Rocky film was released, fans have been recreating the designs as part of the cult audience participation. Also, any time any character in the film says the word "blame," audience members shout, "No, Sue's to Blane!" Blane also created the costume designs for Jonathan Miller's The Mikado for the English National Opera. Other opera credits include David McVicar's Carmen for Glyndebourne, Keith Warner's Lohengrin for the Bayreuth Festival, Lulu at the New National Theatre, Tokyo, Disney's Hunchback of Notre-Dame (Berlin): Love for Three Oranges (Opera North/ENO); Three
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    8.00
    2 votes
    108

    Christopher Oram

    Christopher Oram is a British theatre set and costume designer. He trained at the West Sussex College of Art and Design (latterly Northbrook College). Early assisting work for designers Anthony Ward and Ian MacNeil, included "Assassins" at the Donmar Warehouse, "Oliver!" at the London Palladium and "An Inspector Calls" and "Machinal" at the National Theatre. Having designed extensively on the fringe in London, he began a long term creative collaboration with the director Michael Grandage whom he met in 1995 when they first worked together on Arthur Miller's "The Last Yankee" in Colchester. Their subsequent professional partnership at the Crucible Theatre, Sheffield includes "As You Like It" with Victoria Hamilton (also Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith); "A Midsummer Night’s Dream" and "Richard III" with Kenneth Branagh; "Edward II" with Joseph Fiennes; "Suddenly Last Summer" with Victoria Hamilton and Diana Rigg (also Albery Theatre); "The Tempest" with Derek Jacobi (also Old Vic) and "Don Carlos" with Derek Jacobi (also Gielgud Theatre). Collaborations at the Donmar Warehouse include "Good" with Charles Dance; "Passion Play", "Privates on Parade" with Roger Allam, "Caligula" with
    8.00
    2 votes
    109

    Howell Binkley

    Howell Binkley is a professional lighting designer in New York City. He received the 2006 Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a musical for Jersey Boys. Binkley attended East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina where he started his career working with dance programs. He has lit a plethora of major Broadway shows, including many for the prolific Hal Prince and is a frequent collaborator with director Des McAnuff. He is also a collaborator and co-founder of David Parsons's Parsons Dance Company. He has worked at regional theaters such as La Jolla, San Diego, California, Shakespeare Theatre DC, Old Globe Theatre, the Guthrie Theater, The Goodman Theatre, and Hartford Stage. Binkley is well known for his use of saturated color, accompanied by white or slightly cool highlights. He frequently uses smoke or haze to draw attention to his use of angle. His designs are partly based upon Craig Miller and Tom Skelton's use of cross focussing to make diamond effects.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Inigo Jones

    Inigo Jones

    Inigo Jones (or Íñigo Jones) (15 July 1573 – 21 June 1652) is the first significant British architect of the modern period, and the first to bring Italianate Renaissance architecture to England. He left his mark on London by single buildings, such as the Banqueting House, Whitehall, and in area design for Covent Garden square which became a model for future developments in the West End. He also made major contributions to stage design by his work as theatrical designer for several dozen masques, most by royal command and many in collaboration with Ben Jonson. Beyond the fact that he was born in Smithfield in central London, the son of a Welsh Catholic cloth worker, and christened at the church of St Bartholomew-the-Less, little is known about Jones's early years. Jones did not approach the architectural profession in the traditional way, namely either by rising up from a craft or through early exposure to the Office of Works, although there is evidence that Sir Christopher Wren obtained information that recorded Inigo Jones as an apprentice joiner in St Paul's Churchyard. Regardless, he unquestionably appears in the household accounts of the Earl of Rutland in 1603 as “Henygo
    8.00
    2 votes
    111

    Rick Fisher

    Rick Fisher is an American lighting designer, known for his work with Stephen Daldry on Billy Elliot the Musical and An Inspector Calls. He is from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and attended Dickinson College, but has been based in the UK for the last 30 years. He has done the lighting design for many opera companies, including Covent Garden and New York City Opera. He has been designing for the Santa Fe Opera for seven seasons; for the 2007 season he did three productions. Fisher received the Live Design Outstanding Designer of The Year in 2008. He is the chairman of the British Association of Lighting Designers.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    Hugh Vanstone

    Hugh Vanstone is a leading British lighting designer whose freelance career began in 1991. He won the 1999, 2001 and 2004 Laurence Olivier Award for Best Lighting Design and was nominated for a Tony Award in 2005 and 2009. He has designed lighting for plays, musicals and operas in London, New York and around the world as well as concerts, industrial theatre and architectural lighting projects. Hugh Vanstone trained at the Northcott Theatre, Exeter. He has designed lighting for numerous London productions, including Desperately Seeking Susan; Howard Katz (Royal National Theatre) and The Caretaker (Comedy Theatre), both directed by Patrick Marber; Mouth To Mouth, directed by Ian Rickson (Royal Court and Albery Theatres); The Graduate, directed by Terry Johnson (Gielgud Theatre); Dr Dolittle (Apollo, Hammersmith) and Antony and Cleopatra (Royal Shakespeare Company), both directed by Steven Pimlott; Orpheus Descending (Donmar Warehouse) and The Lady In the Van (Queen’s Theatre), both directed by Nicholas Hytner; The Cherry Orchard directed by Trevor Nunn (Royal National Theatre); Juno and the Paycock directed by John Crowley (Donmar Warehouse); Art (Wyndham’s and Whitehall Theatres),
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    John Lee Beatty

    John Lee Beatty is an American scenic designer. He was born in Palo Alto, California and grew up in Claremont. His father was dean of students at Pomona College and his mother had also work in academia. While he was English major at Brown University, he also directed, wrote, acted and drew posters and scenery for college productions. After graduating Brown, he entered Yale School of Drama where he was trained by Ming Cho Lee, as well as Donald Oenslager and Jo Mielziner. In New York, he was an assistant of Douglas Schmidt and started making scenery for Broadways. One year later, he joined the old Circle Repertory Company where his first Broadway show Knock Knock in 1976, had appeared. Beatty has designed sets for more than seventy Broadway productions since 1973 including The Apple Tree, Losing Louie, Heartbreak House, The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, Rabbit Hole, The Color Purple, Crimes of the Heart, The Odd Couple, Doubt, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Twentieth century, Wonderful Town, Dinner at Eight, Morning's at Seven, Proof, Footloose, Ivanov, The Little Foxes, Once Upon a Mattress, Chicago, A Delicate Balance, The Heiress, Redwood Curtain, A Small Family Business, The
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    Nicky Gillibrand

    Nicky Gillibrand is a theatrical costume designer who was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Costume Design for Billy Elliot the Musical. She won the Gold Medal for Costume Design at the 2003 Prague Quadrenale for the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream Gillibrand has worked on many international productions with such companies as the Royal Opera House, the Young Vic Theatre, and the Royal National Theatre in London, the Bavarian State Opera in Munich, and the Paris Opera. She also designed the costumes for the 2003 revival of Tom Stoppard's Jumpers for the West End and Broadway and İnstitute Benjamenta. Billy Elliott was her first assignment for musical theatre. "When I first heard that they were going to be doing a musical version of Billy Elliot, I thought that this would be the musical I would like to do," she said, "and it landed right in my lap." One of her sources was a photographer who spent a year documenting a miner's strike in Durham. "I had some amazing character studies of people, very spot on,” she says. “What it brought home was how old fashioned it was up there, because I'm from the north of England as well. It was quite
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
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    119

    Roger Kirk

    Roger Kirk is an Australian costume designer primarily for stage and film. He won the Tony Award for Best Costume Design and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design for The King and I and was nominated for 42nd Street. Kirk began his career in television in Australia, working as a stagehand and floor manager in the Sydney ABC studios, and next worked in the West End for three years doing props. Upon returning to Australia, he worked in the costume department at ABC, and then did the costumes for the stage musical Chicago. Kirk designs costumes for stage musicals, most recently for the 2006 arena production of The Boy From Oz. He has also designed sets for Elton John's 1986 Australian tour, sets and costumes for the Australian TV version of Gladiators, and awards shows such as the Australian Film Institute. His work for the opera includes the costumes for the Victoria State Opera production of Manon in 1997.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120

    Santo Loquasto

    Santo Richard Loquasto (born July 26, 1944, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) is a Sicilian-Italian-American production designer, scenic designer and costume designer for stage, film, and dance. He is a descendant of Libertino lo Guasto of Serradifalco, Caltanissetta, Sicily. Indy race car driver Al Loquasto was his first cousin. Santo Loquasto's work includes the productions of the ballet Don Quixote, the film Don't Drink the Water, Great Performances Dance in America: Fosse, and the television show TriBeCa. He has worked on some 61 Broadway productions, either as scenic or costume designer, frequently both, starting with Sticks and Bones in 1972 and with his most recent production, Waiting for Godot in 2009. He has received 15 Tony Award nominations for his work as either costumer or scenic designer, and won three times, and he also has won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design three times and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design once. Santo Loquasto has been a production designer for many Woody Allen films, and has been nominated for the Academy Award for his production design for Allen's Bullets Over Broadway and Radio Days, and for costume design for Zelig.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
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    122
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    5 votes
    123
    Cecil Beaton

    Cecil Beaton

    Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton, CBE (14 January 1904 – 18 January 1980) was an English fashion and portrait photographer, diarist, painter, interior designer and an Academy Award-winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre. He was named to the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame in 1970. Beaton was born on 14 January 1904 in Hampstead the son of Ernest Walter Hardy Beaton (1867–1936), a prosperous timber merchant, and his wife Etty Sissons (1872–1962). His grandfather, Walter Hardy Beaton (1841–1904), had founded the family business of Beaton Brothers Timber Merchants and Agents, and his father followed into the business. Ernest Beaton was also an amateur actor and had met his wife, Cecil's mother, when playing the lead in a play. She was the daughter of a Cumbrian blacksmith named Oldcorn who had come to London to visit her married sister. It is through this connection that Cecil is related to the Blessed Father Edward Oldcorne who was involved in the Gunpowder Plot. They had four children — in addition to Cecil there were two daughters Nancy (1909–99) and Baba (1912–73), and another son Reggie (1905–33). Nancy married Sir Hugh Smiley (1905–90) and Baba
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    6.67
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    125

    Howard Bay

    Howard Bay (May 3, 1912– November 21, 1986, New York City, New York) was an American scenic, lighting and costume designer for stage, opera and film. He won the Tony Award for Best Scenic Design twice. Howard Bay was born in Centralia, Washington to parents who were teachers; his father was an art teacher. Over 50 years he designed the sets and lighting, as well as occasionally the costumes, for some 105 Broadway plays and musicals as well as operas and television shows. Bay designed sets for the Federal Theatre Project in New York City, for four operas for the National Orchestral Association, performed at Carnegie Hall, 1939–40 and for the operas Capriccio and Natalya Petrovna for the New York City Opera, 1965. Bay first designed the sets for Broadway for the play Chalk Dust in 1936. In the field of musicals, he designed, among others, sets and lighting for Show Boat (1946), The Music Man (1957) and Finian's Rainbow (1955 [sets], 1960). He designed the original sets, lighting and costumes for Man of La Mancha in 1965 and all revivals. For dramas, for example, he designed the sets and lighting for The Little Foxes (1967), My Mother, My Father and Me (1963), and Toys in the Attic
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    3 votes
    126
    6.67
    3 votes
    127

    Tim Hatley

    Tim Hatley (born February 28, 1967) is a British set and costume designer for theater and film. He is the winner of the Tony Award, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design, and the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Set Design. Hatley was educated at Bearwood College, Berkshire and trained in Theatre Design at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London from 1986 to 1989. He has designed for Theatre de Complicite, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal National Theatre, the West End, and Broadway. He has done the costumes and/or scenic design for seven Broadway productions, both musicals and dramas, starting with Stanley in 1997 through Shrek the Musical in 2008. For Shrek he also designed the puppets. The Variety Seattle review noted: "Set and costume designer Tim Hatley ("Monty Python’s Spamalot") has created a wonderland of swamps, forests and castles populated by colorful fairy-tale creatures and puppets great and small." Film production/ costume design Stage Beauty 2003 (dir. Richard Eyre) Closer 2004 (dir. Mike Nichols) Notes on a Scandal 2006 (dir. Richard Eyre). For the West End he was costume and
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    Ann Roth

    Ann Roth (born October 30, 1931) is an American costume designer for films and Broadway theatre. Born in Hanover, Pennsylvania, Roth was a Carnegie Mellon graduate who began her career as a scenery painter for the Pittsburgh Opera. She intended to remain in the field of production design until she met Irene Sharaff at the Bucks County Playhouse. Sharaff invited her to California to assist her with costumes on the film Brigadoon and suggested Roth apprentice with her for five films and five Broadway productions before setting out on her own. Roth won the Academy Award for Best Costume Design for The English Patient and was nominated for Places in the Heart, The Talented Mr. Ripley, and The Hours. Her more than one hundred screen credits include The World of Henry Orient, Midnight Cowboy, Klute, The Day of the Locust (for which she won the BAFTA Award for Best Costume Design), Working Girl, Silkwood, The Unbearable Lightness of Being, The Mambo Kings, The Birdcage, Primary Colors, Cold Mountain, Closer, Freedomland, The Good Shepherd, Margot at the Wedding, and Evening. Roth's dozens of stage credits include The Odd Couple, The Star-Spangled Girl, Purlie, Seesaw, They're Playing Our
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Beni Montresor

    Beni Montresor

    Beni Montresor (born March 31, 1926 in Bussolengo, Italy -- died October 11, 2001 in Verona, Italy) was a versatile Italian artist, opera and film director, set designer, author and children's book illustrator. He won the Caldecott Medal in 1965 for May I Bring a Friend?. The Italian government knighted him in 1966 for his contributions to the arts. Montresor was particularly known in the United States as a designer of sets, lighting and costumes for opera. He designed sets and costumes for the American premiere of Gian Carlo Menotti's opera, The Last Savage at the Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston, South Carolina. He also designed the evocative and ephemeral scenery and lighting for the Washington Opera/New York City Opera revival of the Montemezzi opera The Love of Three Kings in 1981. He was the Artistic Director of the Teatro dell'Opera di Roma in 1988-1989. He directed two films,"Pilgrimage" (1972), starring Cliff De Young and"La Messe Doree" (1975), starring Lucia Bose. He was also a stage and film set designer with commissions from La Scala, Spoleto, the Glyndebourne Festival, the New York City Opera and the Metropolitan Opera for productions like La Gioconda, Esclarmonde,
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    2 votes
    131

    Bob Crowley

    Bob Crowley (born June 10, 1955) is a theatre designer (scenic and costume), and theatre director. Born in Cork, Ireland, he is the brother of director John Crowley. He has received multiple Tony Award nominations, and has won six times, for designing the Broadway productions of Carousel (1994), Aida (2000), The History Boys (2006), Mary Poppins (2007), The Coast of Utopia (2007) and Once (2012). He is a recipient of the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Set Design and a three-time recipient of the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design. He is a frequent collaborator of Nicholas Hytner and as well as Broadway has worked extensively at the Royal National Theatre in London and with England's Royal Shakespeare Company. Crowley designed set and costume for Mary Poppins, which played in both the West End and on Broadway. He designed and directed the Phil Collins musical Tarzan. He is the set and costume designer for Andrew Lloyd Webber's Love Never Dies, and the costume designer of the 2008/9 version of The Little Mermaid.
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    2 votes
    132
    Brothers Quay

    Brothers Quay

    Stephen and Timothy Quay ( /ˈkweɪ/ KWAY; born June 17, 1947) are American identical twin brothers better known as the Brothers Quay or Quay Brothers. They are influential stop-motion animators. They are also the recipients of the 1998 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design for their work on the play The Chairs. The Quay Brothers reside and work in England, having moved there in 1969 to study at the Royal College of Art, London after studying illustration at the Philadelphia College of Art, now the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. In England they made their first short films, which no longer exist after the only print was irreparably damaged. They spent some time in the Netherlands in the 1970s and then returned to England where they teamed up with another Royal College student, Keith Griffiths, who produced all of their films. The trio formed Koninck Studios in 1980, which is currently based in Southwark, south London. The Quay Brothers' works (1979–present) show a wide range of often esoteric influences, starting with the Polish animators Walerian Borowczyk and Jan Lenica and continuing with the writers Franz Kafka, Bruno Schulz, Robert Walser and Michel de
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    2 votes
    133

    David Van Tieghem

    David Van Tieghem is an American composer, musician, percussionist, drummer, keyboardist, performance artist, video artist and actor, notorious for his philosophy of applying any available object as a percussion instrument and his collaborations with Experimental rock artist Laurie Anderson. David Van Tieghem was born on April 21, 1955, in Washington, DC. He studied percussion with Justin DiCioccio, of NYC's LaGuardia High School of Performing Arts. He later attended Manhattan School of Music as a student of modern percussion pioneer Paul Price. Since 1977 he has been presenting his solo percussion-theater performances in venues throughout the world, including Carnegie Hall, the Composers Showcase series and the Serious Fun! Festival at Lincoln Center. As a free-lance percussionist, he has worked with Steve Reich, Laurie Anderson, Brian Eno, Talking Heads, David Byrne, Jerry Harrison, Pink Floyd, Steve Nicks, Nona Hendryx, Peter Gordon and the Love of Life Orchestra (LOLO), Arthur Russell, Howard Shore, Robert Fripp, Deborah Harry & Chris Stein of Blondie, Nick Rhodes & Simon LeBon of Duran Duran, Adrian Belew, Chris Spedding, Robert Gordon, John Cale, Michael Oldfield, Tracy
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    2 votes
    134
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    135
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    136
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    2 votes
    137

    Ken Billington

    Ken Billington (born 29 December 1946) is an American lighting designer. He began his career in New York City working as an assistant to Tharon Musser. He was born in White Plains, New York, the son of Kenneth Arthur (an automobile dealer) and Ruth (Roane) Billington. Billington has 96 Broadway productions to his credit including Copperfield, Checking Out, Moon Over Buffalo, Grind, Hello Dolly!, Meet Me in St. Louis, On the Twentieth Century, Side by Side by Sondheim, Lettice and Lovage, Tru, The Scottsboro Boys, and Sweeney Todd. Off-Broadway productions include Sylvia, London Suite, Annie Warbucks, Lips Together, Teeth Apart, The Lisbon Traviata, What the Butler Saw, and Fortune and Men's Eyes. Billington was the principal lighting designer for Radio City Music Hall from 1979 - 2004, where he created the lighting for the world-famous Christmas and Easter Spectaculars. While there, he also created the lighting for the stage adaption of the 1937 animated musical film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Other projects include lighting the 1975/76 season for the American Shakespeare Festival at Stratford, Connecticut as well as projects such as Turandot at the Vienna State Opera, to
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    2 votes
    138

    Patricia Zipprodt

    Patricia Zipprodt (February 24, 1925 — July 17, 1999) was an American costume designer. She was known for her technique of painting fabrics and thoroughly researching a project's subject matter, especially when it was a period piece. During a career that spanned four decades, she worked with such Broadway theatre legends as Jerome Robbins, Hal Prince, Gower Champion, David Merrick, and Bob Fosse. Born in Chicago, Illinois, Zipprodt attended Bradford Junior College for her freshman year and then transferred to Wellesley College, where she abandoned her plan to become a medical illustrator and concentrated on psychology and sociology. After graduation she moved to New York City and, after seeing a performance by the New York City Ballet, decided to use her artistic talent for a career in costume design. She studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology and apprenticed with Charles James and Irene Sharaff. Her first Broadway credit was The Potting Shed, a play by Graham Greene, in 1957. She went on to design more than 50 productions over the next 43 years. In 1992, she was inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame. She also designed for the New York City Ballet, the Joffrey Ballet, the
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    2 votes
    139

    Toni-Leslie James

    Toni-Leslie James is an American costume designer of stage, television and film productions. James was awarded the National Black Theatre Festival's 2011 Outstanding Costume Designer of the Year Award, and the 2009 Obie for Sustained Excellence in Costume Design. She received a BFA in costume design from The Ohio State University and is the Director of Costumes at Virginia Commonwealth University. Toni-Leslie James' Broadway credits include the costume designs for The Scottsboro Boys (Hewes Design Award Nomination), Finian's Rainbow, Chita Rivera: The Dancer's Life, Ma Rainey's Black Bottom, King Hedley II, One Mo’ Time, The Wild Party (FANY Award), Marie Christine (FANY Nomination), Footloose, The Tempest (Drama Desk Nomination), Twilight…Los Angeles 1992, ''Angels in America: Millennium Approaches & Perestroika, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, and Jelly’s Last Jam (Hewes Design Award, Tony Award Nomination and Drama Desk Nomination). Off Broadway and regionally she has designed productions for various productions, including; the City Center Encores! series, Lincoln Center Theatre, The Public Theatre, The Vineyard Theatre, Second Stage, Playwrights Horizons, Arena Stage, The
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    2 votes
    140

    Annie Baker

    Annie Baker (born 1981) is an American playwright. Baker grew up in Amherst, Massachusetts, and graduated from the Department of Dramatic Writing at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. She earned her MFA from Brooklyn College. Her play Body Awareness was staged Off-Broadway by the Atlantic Theater Company in May and June 2008. The play featured JoBeth Williams and was nominated for a Drama Desk Award and an Outer Critics Circle Award. Circle Mirror Transformation premiered Off-Broadway at Playwrights Horizons in October 2009. and received Obie Awards for Best New American Play and Performance, Ensemble. The play has been nominated for the Drama Desk Award, Outstanding Play and Outstanding Director of a Play, and the cast has been awarded a special Drama Desk Award, Outstanding Ensemble Performances. Her play, The Aliens, which premiered Off-Broadway at Rattlestick Playwrights Theater in April 2010, was a finalist for the 2010 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and shared the 2010 Obie Award for Best New American Play with Circle Mirror Transformation. Her adaptation of Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" will premiere at Soho Rep in the summer of 2012. She teaches in the MFA program at
    5.50
    4 votes
    141

    Paul Groothuis

    Paul Groothuis is an award-winning sound designer who has had a long and prolific career on the London stage. Groothuis was born in Holland and moved to the UK in 1979 to study Stage Management at the Central School of Speech and Drama. He joined the National Theatre on the South Bank in 1984 and has designed sound for more than 120 productions at the NT. Some of his recent productions are Her Naked Skin, Rafta, Rafta..., The Man of Mode, The Life of Galileo, The Royal Hunt of the Sun, Once in a Lifetime, His Dark Materials, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum and Stuff Happens. He has also designed sound for musicals at the NT, including Sunday in the Park with George, Sweeney Todd, A Little Night Music, Lady in the Dark and Guys and Dolls. In 1999, he won Live! Magazine Sound Designer of the Year Award for his work on Oklahoma! and Oh, What a Lovely War!. Groothuis has been visiting lecturer at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts. He is also a sound consultant for the Kingston Theatre.
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    3 votes
    142
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    1 votes
    143
    Edward Gorey

    Edward Gorey

    Edward St. John Gorey (February 22, 1925 – April 15, 2000) was an American writer and artist noted for his macabre illustrated books. Edward St. John Gorey was born in Chicago. His parents, Helen Dunham (née Garvey) and Edward Lee Gorey, divorced in 1936 when he was 11, then remarried in 1952 when he was 27. One of his stepmothers was Corinna Mura (1909–1965), a cabaret singer who had a small role in the classic film Casablanca as the woman playing the guitar while singing "La Marseillaise" at Rick's Café Américain. His father was briefly a journalist. Gorey's maternal great-grandmother, Helen St. John Garvey, was a popular 19th century greeting card writer and artist, from whom he claimed to have inherited his talents. Gorey attended a variety of local grade schools and then the Francis W. Parker School. He spent 1944 to 1946 in the Army at Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, and then attended Harvard University from 1946 to 1950, graduating in the class of 1950, where he studied French and roomed with poet Frank O'Hara. In the early 1950s, Gorey, with a group of recent Harvard alumni including Alison Lurie (1947), John Ashbery (1949), and Donald Hall (1951), Frank O'Hara, amongst
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    1 votes
    144
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    145
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    146

    Tom Piper

    Tom Piper (b. 1964-11-24) is a British theatre designer who regularly collaborates with director Michael Boyd. He became an Associate Designer with the Royal Shakespeare Company in 2004. Piper, born in London on 24 November 1964, was educated at Magdalen College School, Oxford. In 1984 he entered Trinity College, Cambridge to read biology, but in mid-course switched to art history. From 1988 to 1990 he attended the Slade School of Art postgraduate course in theatre design. In 1990 he spent six months with Peter Brook's theatre company in Paris, working on Brook's visionary production of The Tempest, before becoming a freelance designer working at the Nottingham Playhouse, Hampstead Theatre and the Royal Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh and winning the London Fringe Best Design Award for Cat in the Ghetto, staged at the Tabard Theatre, Chiswick, West London. He first worked with Michael Boyd at the Tron Theatre in Glasgow with his design for the 1991 production of the pantomime Jack and the Beanstalk, since when their careers have been closely linked. Piper claims he first got into theatre design almost by accident. He had wanted to be a biologist and was studying natural sciences at
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    Alexandra Byrne

    Alexandra Byrne is a costume designer. She trained on the Motley Theatre Design Course under Margaret Harris before embarking on her career as a costume designer in film. She has designed the costumes for twelve films in her career, earning Academy Award nominations for four of them—Elizabeth , the 2007 sequel Elizabeth: The Golden Age , Hamlet and Finding Neverland ; and considerable acclaim for three others—Persuasion, Captain Corelli's Mandolin, and The Phantom of the Opera. She won the Academy Award for Elizabeth: The Golden Age. She was also nominated for the Tony Award in 1990 for Best Scenic Design for Some Americans Abroad. She is married to actor Simon Shepherd with four children.
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    2 votes
    148
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    149
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    150
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    2 votes
    151

    George Jenkins

    George Clarke Jenkins (19 November 1908 – 6 April 2007) was an American production designer and three-time Tony Award nominee. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, he studied architecture at University of Pennsylvania before leaving to build sets. One Tony nomination was for his set for the 1959 Broadway drama The Miracle Worker. He shared his Academy Award with George Gaines for the 1976 film All the President's Men. He later taught at University of California, Los Angeles. Jenkins died at his home in Santa Monica, California.
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    2 votes
    152
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    153

    Jess Goldstein

    Jess Goldstein is an American costume designer. He has designed over 30 Broadway shows, including Jersey Boys, Take Me Out and Proof. He received a Tony Award for Best Costume Design for his work on the play The Rivals, in 2005. He teaches at the Yale School of Drama.
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    2 votes
    154
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    155

    Natasha Katz

    Natasha Katz is a lighting designer for the theatre, dance, and opera. She was educated at Oberlin College and did an internship with Roger Morgan. Her first job on Broadway was as lighting designer for the play Pack of Lies in 1985, and she has gone on to design the lighting for 38 Broadway plays and musicals, including the Disney musical The Little Mermaid (2008) and The Addams Family (2010). Her first Tony Award nomination was for Beauty and the Beast in 1994. Other nominations and awards include: Katz has also designed the lighting at Niketown in New York City and London, and for The Big Bang at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Additional work includes lighting design for several productions of the American Ballet Theatre, and work for various opera companies including the New York City Opera.
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    2 votes
    156
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    159
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    160

    Susan Hilferty

    Susan Hilferty is an American costume designer for theatre, opera, and film. She received the 2001 Obie Award for Sustained Excellence in Costume Design. Hilferty's Broadway credits include the costumes for Wicked (Tony, Drama Desk, and Outer Critics Circle awards), Lestat (Tony nomination), Spring Awakening (Tony nomination), Radio Golf, Assassins, the revival of Into the Woods (Tony nomination, Hewes Award), Jitney, Dirty Blonde, and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying. Hilferty has collaborated often with playwright Athol Fugard and has designed for the New York Shakespeare Festival, Manhattan Theatre Club, Second Stage, New York Theatre Workshop, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Lincoln Center Theater, Playwrights Horizons, Classic Stage Company, and the Roundabout. Regional theaters employing Hilferty's costumes have included the Guthrie Theater, La Jolla Playhouse, Goodman Theatre, Court Theatre, Berkeley Rep, Yale Rep, McCarter Theatre, Alliance Theatre, Indiana Rep, Kennedy Center, Williamstown Theatre Festival, and American Conservatory Theater. Hilferty also has designed ballet costumes for dances by Eliot Feld, Alvin Ailey, and Jennifer Muller. Hilferty leads the
    7.00
    2 votes
    161

    Tony Straiges

    Tony Straiges (b. 1942) is a scenic designer for the stage and ballet. He has designed the sets for some 17 Broadway musicals, plays and specials. His sets "often have a sparse elegance or sense of fantasy about them." Robert Brustein said of Straiges: "Today, he is considered one of the visual poets of the stage." Straiges attended Yale University. His first Broadway production was Timbuktu! in 1978, and recently he designed the sets for Enchanted April in 2003. He provided the scenic supervision for the 1985 concert version of Follies. Off-Broadway productions include Chasing Manet at Primary Stages in 2009. His first off-Broadway production was Glance of a Landscape in 1975, at Playwrights Horizons. He designed the sets for the stage musical Meet Me in St. Louis at the Irish Repertory Theatre in 2006. Straiges designed the set for Sunday in the Park with George (1984), and won both the 1984 Tony Award, Best Scenic Design, and Drama Desk Award, Outstanding Set Design for his work. Frank Rich wrote that the set was "fantastic", and "What Mr. Lapine, his designers and the special-effects wizard Bran Ferren have arranged is simply gorgeous." Straiges designed the set for Into the
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
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    3 votes
    163
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    164
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    165

    Martin Pakledinaz

    Martin Pakledinaz (September 1, 1953 – July 8, 2012) was an American costume designer for stage and film. He won his Tony Awards for designing the costumes for Thoroughly Modern Millie and the 2000 revival of Kiss Me, Kate, which also earned him the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design. His most recent costume designs were for the Broadway shows Nice Work If You Can Get It (2012); Man and Boy (Revival, 2011); Master Class (Revival 2011) and The Normal Heart. He worked on the 1995 production of Holiday at the Circle in the Square Theatre. He designed costumes for plays for the leading regional theatres of the United States, and the Royal Dramatic Theatre of Sweden. Opera credits include works at the New York Metropolitan Opera (Lucia di Lammermoor, Rodelinda, Iphigénie en Tauride) and the New York City Opera, as well as opera houses in Seattle, Los Angeles, St. Louis, Sante Fe, Houston, and Toronto. European houses include Salzburg, Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels, Helsinki, Gothenburg, and others. He also designed for dance companies, working with Mark Morris for many years. Pakledinaz died from brain cancer on July 8, 2012 at the age of 58. Pakledinaz received a B.F.A. from
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    3 votes
    166
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    3 votes
    167

    Tony Walton

    Tony Walton (born Anthony John Walton, 24 October 1934) is an English set and costume designer. Walton was born in Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, England. He began his career in 1957 with the stage design for Noël Coward's Broadway production of Conversation Piece. Throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s he designed for the New York and London stage. He entered motion pictures as costume designer and visual consultant for Mary Poppins in 1964, for which he received an Oscar nomination. His awards include an Oscar for All That Jazz in 1980 and an Emmy for the acclaimed 1985 TV version of Death of a Salesman. He has received many Oscar, Emmy and other nominations, including BAFTA nominations for costume and set design for Murder on the Orient Express in 1975 and Oscar nominations for both costume design and set direction/art direction for the motion picture version of The Wiz in 1979. In December, 2005, for their annual birthday celebration to 'The Master', The Noël Coward Society invited Walton as the guest celebrity to lay flowers in front of Coward's statue at New York's Gershwin Theatre, thereby commemorating the 106th birthday of Sir Noel. More recently, Walton has diversified into
    6.00
    3 votes
    168

    Brian Thomson

    Brian Thomson is an Australian theatre, opera and film designer. He has been active in Australian stage design for over three decades. Thomson began a long and successful collaboration with director Jim Sharman after they met at Heavenburgers on Sydney's Oxford Street in 1969; they worked together on a series of groundbreaking productions for the Old Tote Theatre Company and worked together on a string of hugely successful musical productions including the Melbourne production of Hair, the original Australian and London productions of Jesus Christ Superstar and The Rocky Horror Show. Other musical credits include the most recent Broadway production of The King and I (1996 Tony Award for Best Scenic Design), Dame Edna – Back with a Vengeance and more recently in Australia Company, The Boy from Oz Arena Tour with Hugh Jackman (2007 Helpmann Award for Best Design), and Priscilla: Queen of the Desert the Musical. He has designed for all the major Australian theatre companies. His credits include Holding the Man for Griffin Theatre Company, Keating! for (three 2007 Helpmann Awards), The Gates of Egypt, Capricornia, Stuff Happens, Run Rabbit Run, Buried Child, My Zinc Bed, The Laramie
    5.67
    3 votes
    169

    Christopher Akerlind

    Christopher Akerlind (b. May 1, 1962, in Hartford, Connecticut) is an American lighting designer for theatre, opera, and dance. He won the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for Light in the Piazza and an Obie Award for sustained excellence for his work Off-Broadway. He attended Boston University and the Yale School of Drama, training with Jennifer Tipton. He was Head of Lighting Design and Director of the Design & Production Programs at the CalArts School of Theater. He has designed many Broadway and Off-Broadway productions, working on both musicals and straight plays. He is noted for his work for director Lloyd Richards on the first productions of the plays of August Wilson, including The Piano Lesson (1990) and Seven Guitars (1996). He was the Resident Lighting Designer for twelve years at the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis. Akerland was a Visiting Associate Professor and Director of Production at the University of Southern California, School of the Arts (appointed in 2007) and has guest taught at New York University, the University of Connecticut, the Broadway Lighting Master Classes and Yale.
    5.67
    3 votes
    170

    John Leonard

    John Leonard (born 1951) is a theater and exhibition sound designer working in the United Kingdom, Europe and the United States Of America. Occasionally uses his middle initial A (for Anthony) to differentiate him from others in the entertainment field with the same name. Born in Bristol, United Kingdom in 1951, he was educated at Bristol Grammar School and The Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. The youngest of four children, he was influenced in his choice of career by his brother David Leonard and his father, a keen radio ham. In 1971 he joined the staff of The Theatre Royal, Bristol and became part of the sound department in 1972. He ran the department on his own until 1976, providing soundtracks for the three theaters in the Bristol Old Vic's stable; The Theatre Royal, The New Vic Studio and The Little Theatre. During his time at the Bristol Old Vic, he co-designed and built what was to become one of the first sound mixing boards designed exclusively for theater, marketed as the Libra Theater Desk. This was awarded the Association of British Theatre Technicians Product of the Year for 1979. In 1978, he was invited to join the Royal Shakespeare Company and in 1984 he was made the
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    3 votes
    173
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    Kenneth Posner

    Kenneth Posner is an American theatrical lighting designer, working on Broadway, Off-Broadway, and in American regional theatre. His most notable designs include the musicals Wicked and Hairspray, two highly regarded musicals of the early 21st century. He has been nominated for the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design for Merchant of Venice (2011), The Coast of Utopia (2007), Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (2005), Wicked (2004), Hairspray (2003), and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (2001). He won the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a Play and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for The Coast of Utopia in 2007. He also has received an Obie Award for Sustained Excellence in Lighting. He also designed the lights for Little Women. Posner was educated at SUNY Purchase, where Brian MacDevitt also attended. He is a 1983 graduate of Eastchester High School in Eastchester, New York. He also attended Boston University's School of Fine Arts. Posner is a resident of Verona, New Jersey.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Kevin Adams

    For the NHL player, see Kevyn Adams. Kevin Adams is an American theatrical lighting designer. He has earned three Tony Awards for lighting design. Adams grew up in Texas and attended the University of Texas where he received a B.F.A. in scenery design, then attended the California Institute for the Arts where he received a master's degree, also in scenic design. He toured with Rachel Rosenthal, a performance artist, for 5 years, and also worked as a set designer at various theaters and in film in California, before moving to New York. In 2007 he received the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a Musical for Spring Awakening. In 2008 he received the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a Play and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for The 39 Steps. In 2010 he received his third Tony Award (for light design of a musical) for his work on "American Idiot". Other productions include Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Passing Strange, Next to Normal, the 2009 revival of Hair, Take Me Out, Everyday Rapture", solo shows for Anna Deveare Smith, Eve Ensler, Eric Bogosian and John Leguizamo, concerts for Audra McDonald, Patti Lupone, Sandra Bernhard and The Magnetic Fields.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    6.50
    2 votes
    177

    Todd Rosenthal

    Todd Rosenthal is an American scenic designer. He won the 2007 Tony Award for Best Scenic Design and the 2008 Laurence Olivier Award for Best Set Design for Steppenwolf Theatre Company's August: Osage County. A native of Longmeadow, Massachusetts, Rosenthal received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Colgate University and a Master of Fine Arts from the Yale School of Drama, where he received the Donald M. Oenslager Scholarship for Stage Design. He also studied at the Art Students League of New York and Moore College of Art. Rosenthal made his Broadway debut with August: Osage County. He considered the three-level set, which he called a juxtaposition of the "gothic and the whimsical," to be a central character in the play. Of it he said, "It's immovable, an indelible image ... people move out, but the house never changes." Rosenthal's regional theatre credits include productions for the Goodman Theatre, Steppenwolf Theatre Company, Centerstage in Baltimore, Alley Theatre in Houston, the Philadelphia Theatre Company, San Jose Repertory Theatre, Alliance Theatre in Atlanta, Yale Repertory Theatre, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., the Papermill Playhouse in
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    7.00
    1 votes
    181

    Ti Green

    Ti Green is an American costume designer for stage and film. Green grew up in Kew, south-west London in the 1970s where she attended Queens School. In 1980 she was bridesmaid to Phil Lynott and Caroline Crowther, the daughter of British comedian Leslie Crowther.
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    5.33
    3 votes
    184

    Jenny Beavan

    Jenny Beavan (born 1950 in London, England) is a British costume designer. Beavan has won an Academy Award and has been nominated eight times, most recently for The King's Speech. She also received a Tony Award nomination for Best Costume Design for the play Private Lives. Beavan has one daughter, Caitlin, born in 1985.
    5.33
    3 votes
    185

    John Wulp

    John Wulp (b. May 31, 1928) is an American scenic designer, producer, and director. Wulp won a Tony Award for Best Revival for his production of Dracula in 1978. He also received a Tony Award nomination and won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design for his designs in the 1979 production of The Crucifer of Blood. The show also was performed at the Royal Haymarket Theatre in London and at the Ahmanson Theater in Los Angeles for which Wulp won an Outer Circle Critics Award, and a Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award. For Wulp's first play, The Saintliness of Margery, he won a Rockefeller Grant, and for his direction of Red Eye of Love, produced off Broadway, he won an OBIE Award. Wulp's other Broadway credits include Passione, Bosoms and Neglect, and Gorey Stories. Wulp is the founder and was for several years the director of the Playwrights Horizons Theater School at New York University. He currently resides in Vinalhaven, Maine where he taught drama at the North Haven Community School for many years. Wulp retired from teaching in 2005 and is a former U.S. Marine.
    5.33
    3 votes
    186

    Dale Ferguson

    Dale Ferguson is an Australian theatrical scenic and costume designer who was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Costume Design, the Tony Award for Best Scenic Design, and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design for the 2009 Broadway revival of Exit the King. Ferguson graduated from the National Institute of Dramatic Art in Sydney in 1989. The following year he became resident designer for the Queensland Theatre Company, a post he held until 1994, after which he joined the Melbourne Theatre Company, remaining with them until 1998. Ferguson's credits include The Marriage of Figaro, The Winter's Tale, And a Nightingale Sang, Twelfth Night, The Heidi Chronicles, and A Month in the Country for Queensland Theatre; The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui, Amy's View, The Balcony, and Three Sisters for Melbourne Theatre; The Marriage of Figaro, Eugene Onegin, and Ariadne auf Naxos for Opera Australia and the Welsh National Opera; productions of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Titanic, and The Rocky Horror Show in Sydney; productions of August: Osage County, The Seagull, and The History Boys in Melbourne; Antigone, Peribáñez and the Commander of Ocaña, and The Chairs for
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    David Rockwell

    David Rockwell is an American architect and designer, who is the founder and CEO of Rockwell Group, based in New York with satellite offices in Madrid and Dubai. Rockwell has long been fascinated with immersive environments. Born in Chicago, Illinois, Rockwell also spent part of his childhood in Deal, New Jersey and Guadalajara, Mexico. He was a child of the theater as his mother worked as a vaudeville dancer and choreographer. She sometimes cast him in community repertory productions. Rockwell brought his passion for theater and an eye for the color and spectacle of Mexico to his architecture training at Syracuse University, where he received a BA. He also studied at the Architectural Association in London. These formative influences continue to shape his practice. Rockwell began his work with other firms, but in 1984 founded his own design firm, the Rockwell Group. With a multi-disciplinary staff, he has led numerous design projects of retail and restaurant interiors, hospitals, theatres and museums, as well as set designs.
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    5.00
    3 votes
    190
    5.00
    3 votes
    191
    5.00
    3 votes
    192

    Allen Moyer

    Allen Moyer (born 1958) is an American set designer particularly known for his work in operas and Broadway musicals. He grew up in Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania and holds a MFA degree from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts where he studied under John Conklin. His designs have appeared in celebrated productions at the New York City Opera, the San Francisco Opera, the Santa Fe Opera, the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, and the Seattle Opera. He notably staged the world premiere of Stewart Wallace's Harvey Milk at the Houston Grand Opera in 1995 and the world premiere of Ricky Ian Gordon's The Grapes of Wrath at the Minnesota Opera in 2007. He designed his first set for the Metropolitan Opera for their new production of Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice which premiered on May 2, 2007. Moyer worked for the first time on Broadway for the 1996 revival of Tartuffe. He has since designed sets for ten more Broadway shows, notably winning an Obie Award and garnering Tony Award and Drama Desk Award nominations for his work on the 2006 musical Grey Gardens. He was also nominated for a Drama Desk Award in 1999 for his set design in the play That Championship Season. Allen Moyer at the
    5.50
    2 votes
    193

    Gregg Barnes

    Gregg Barnes is an American costume designer for stage and film. Barnes won the Tony Award for Best Costume Design, the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design and the Outer Critics Circle Award for his work on the 2006 Broadway production of The Drowsy Chaperone. Barnes grew up in the San Diego, California, area and credits seeing the ice shows, the circus, and a production of As You Like It in San Diego as a youth as inspiring him. He taught at New York University in the Graduate School for 20 years. He was the resident costume designer for the Paper Mill Playhouse, Millburn, New Jersey.
    5.50
    2 votes
    194

    John Gromada

    John Gromada (b.1964) is a prolific, award-winning composer and sound designer. He is best known for his many scores for theatrical productions in New York on and off-Broadway and in regional theatres. Broadway plays he has scored include Gore Vidal's,The Best Man (play), Seminar (play) by Theresa Rebeck,Next Fall (play), Chazz Palminteri's A Bronx Tale, David Auburn's "The Columnist", and Proof, Lisa Kron's Well, Rabbit Hole, and A Few Good Men ; revivals of Prelude to a Kiss, Summer and Smoke, Twelve Angry Men and A Streetcar Named Desire. His score for the nine hour production of Horton Foote's The Orphans' Home Cycle was featured at the Hartford Stage Company and Signature Theatre in New York. Gromada also designed the sound for the Broadway production of Bruce Norris' Tony award-winning play, Clybourne Park Gromada first emerged on the theatre scene in the late 1980s creating powerful soundscores blending original music and abstract sound design. His industrial music score for Sophie Treadwell's Machinal at the New York Shakespeare Festival earned him a Village Voice Obie Award in 1991. In 1996 he won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Sound Design for his musique concrète
    5.50
    2 votes
    195

    Michael McDonald

    Michael McDonald (born c. 1963) is an American costume designer who was nominated for both a Tony Award and a Drama Desk Award in 2009 for his work on the Broadway revival of the musical Hair. McDonald was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania in the United States. He is a 1981 graduate of William Allen High School. In 1984, he became involved in theatre at Allentown's Civic Theatre. While attending Muhlenberg College, he took his first costume design course and subsequently worked on several of the school's theatrical productions. In the early 1990s, he relocated to New York City, where he worked on productions including The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (Broadway, 2000), The Goat, or Who is Sylvia? (Broadway, 2002) and Take Me Out (Broadway, 2003). In 2009, his work on the Broadway revival of Hair earned him nominations for both the Tony Award for Best Costume Design and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Costume Design.
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    Eric Harriz

    J. Eric Harriz is a two-time Daytime Emmy Award winner for set designer of The City in 1996 and All My Children in 2000. Harriz also designed three productions of Boobs! The Musical: the workshop at The Pulse Theatre and the Off-Broadway hit productions at the Triad Theater and the transfer to Dillon's Reprise Room.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    4.33
    3 votes
    205
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    5.00
    2 votes
    207

    Kim Weild

    Kim Weild is a Drama Desk Award nominated theatre director, choreographer, actor, writer and educator, living and working in New York. As an actor and dancer, Kim Weild has performed extensively in both Europe and the United States. Among her many collaborators and associates are Anne Bogart (SITI Co.), Diane Paulus, Tina Kronis and Richard Algers, George Balanchine, Caryl Churchill, Max Stafford-Clark, Simon Curtis, André Gregory, Judith Malina, Larry Moss, Mike Nichols, George Morrison, Sabrina Peck, Abraham Pulido, Richard Schechner, Paul Sills, Tadashi Suzuki and Robert Wilson. Kim Weild studied for ten years at The School of American Ballet, during which time she frequently performed with the New York City Ballet. In 2004 Kim began graduate work at Columbia University’s three-year MFA directing program. Her directorial work includes the 2010 Drama Desk nominated production of Charles L. Mee's "Fêtes de la Nuit" for Unique Theatrical Experience which also garnered 7 New York Innovative Theatre Award nominations winning two, Mee's "Big Love", the Off-Broadway world premiere of Luigi Creatore's "An Error of the Moon", "Uncle Vanya" (Official selection Prague Quadrennial),
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Bobby Pearce

    Bobby Pearce

    Bobby Pearce is a Tony Award nominated American costume designer for stage, film and television. Bobby Pearce (born February 15, 1961) was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Costume Design and the Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Costume Design for the 2003 production of Taboo starring Boy George. He also designed; Sign, Sealed, Delivered at the Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas, the award-winning production of The Syringa Tree (New York and London), the National Tour of Tommy, three gowns for Liza Minnelli's appearance in Michael Jackson's 30th Anniversary Celebration, The Rosie O'Donnell Show, (Halloween 1999-2001) and Broadway's Betrayal starring Juliette Binoche (Associate Costume Designer). In addition he designed the films Let It Snow starring Bernadette Peters and The Big Gay Musical. Pearce also designed Chita Rivera's concert tour Chita, And All That Jazz and Off-Broadway's Behind the Beat starring Vicki Sue Robinson. Pearce designed the wigs and costumes for the long running Off-Broadway Hit The Marvelous Wonderettes which has numerous regional productions. His work has often received critical acclaim, The Washington Post commented that his costume design for
    5.00
    1 votes
    209
    5.00
    1 votes
    210
    Costume Designer

    Costume Designer

    A costume designer or costume mistress/master is a person who designs costumes for a film or stage production. This role is an important part of the production team. The costume designer works alongside the director, scenic, lighting designer, sound designer, and other creative personnel. The costume designer may also collaborate with hair stylist, wig master, or makeup artist. In European theatre, the role is different, as the theatre designer usually designs both costume and scenic elements. Costume designers typically seek to enhance a character's personality, and to create an evolving plot of colour, changing social status, or period through the visual design of garments and accessories. They may distort or enhance the body—within the boundaries of the director's vision. The designer must ensure that the designs let the actor move as the role requires. The actor must execute the director's blocking of the production without damaging the garments. Garments must be durable and washable, particularly in extended runs. The designer must consult not only with the director, but the set and lighting designers to ensure that all elements of the overall production design work together.
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
    Cynthia Rowley

    Cynthia Rowley

    Cynthia Rowley (born 29 July 1958) is an American fashion designer based in the West Village of New York City. A native of Barrington, Illinois (an affluent northwestern suburb of Chicago), she is one of three children born to Ed Rowley, a former science teacher, and his wife, Clementine. She graduated from Barrington High School (1976) and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1981). Known for what The New York Times has called "flirty, vibrantly colored dresses and tops in wispy materials" that have "a whiff of the carefree, simple spirit" of Claire McCardell, Rowley launched her business in 1981 or 1983 with $3,000 in seed money from one of her grandmothers. "Several months later, she held a fashion show in her apartment, inviting every important fashion editor in New York, as well as Andy Warhol and a smattering of movie stars -- none of whom she knew and none of whom attended." Since then the Cynthia Rowley Collection, incorporated in 1988, has grown to include women's wear, shoes, handbags, eyewear, belts, dishes, legwear, hats, color cosmetics, and fragrance. Rowley introduced menswear in 1998 as well as a women's secondary line, Rowley by Cynthia Rowley, both licensed
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    5.00
    1 votes
    214

    Eiko Ishioka

    Eiko Ishioka (石岡 瑛子, Ishioka Eiko, July 12, 1938, Tokyo – January 21, 2012, Tokyo) was an Oscar-winning costume designer, known for her work in stage, screen, advertising, and print media, and has been called "Japan’s leading art director and graphic designer." Eiko Ishioka graduated from the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. Ishioka's work is included in the permanent collection of museums throughout the world, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In 1999 she designed costumes for Richard Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen at the Dutch Opera. She designed costumes for Cirque du Soleil: Varekai, which premiered in 2002, as well as Julie Taymor's Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, which premiered in 2011. She also directed the music video for Björk's "Cocoon" in 2002, and designed costumes for the "Hurricane" tour of singer Grace Jones in 2009. In 2003 she designed the logo for the Houston Rockets. Ishioka was the costume designer for the Beijing-2008 Olympics. In addition to her Oscar-winning work on Bram Stoker's Dracula, Ishioka has designed costumes for all of Tarsem Singh's films, including The Cell. Eiko was discovered by Tsuji Masuda who
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    5.00
    1 votes
    219

    Robin Wagner

    Robin Wagner (born August 31, 1933) is an American scenic designer. Born Robin Samuel Anton Wagner in San Francisco, he attended art school and started his career in theatres in that city with designs for Don Pasquale, Amahl and the Night Visitors, Tea and Sympathy, and Waiting for Godot, among others. In 1953, he relocated to New York City, where he worked on numerous off-Broadway productions before making his Broadway debut as an assistant designer for the Hugh Wheeler play Big Fish, Little Fish in 1961. His first solo project was a short-lived 1966 production of The Condemned of Altona by Jean-Paul Sartre. Wagner's many Broadway credits include Hair, The Great White Hope, Promises, Promises, Jesus Christ Superstar, Seesaw, Mack & Mabel, A Chorus Line, Ballroom, On the Twentieth Century, 42nd Street, Dreamgirls, Song and Dance, City of Angels, Angels in America: Millennium Approaches, Angels in America: Perestroika, The Producers, The Boy from Oz, and Young Frankenstein. His work in London's West End includes Crazy For You and Chess. Wagner's other theatrical work ranges from off-Broadway and regional theatre productions to ballet and opera, including sets for the Metropolitan
    5.00
    1 votes
    220

    Scott Pask

    Scott Pask is an American scenic designer. He has worked primarily on stage productions in the United States, on Broadway and Off-Broadway, and in regional theatre, as well as in the United Kingdom. He won the Tony Award for his work on The Pillowman, The Coast of Utopia and The Book of Mormon. Pask was born and raised in Yuma, Arizona with his twin brother Bruce. Pask earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Arizona and a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University. Bruce is a noted stylist and men's fashion director at T: The New York Times Style Magazine. His Broadway credits include Les Liaisons Dangereuses, Urinetown, The Coast of Utopia, The Vertical Hour, Martin Short: Fame Becomes Me, Kiki and Herb: Alive on Broadway, The Wedding Singer, La Cage aux Folles, Amour, Sweet Charity, Little Shop of Horrors, Take Me Out, Nine, The Pillowman, and A Steady Rain. He made his Metropolitan Opera debut with his design for Benjamin Britten's Peter Grimes. Pask designed the original production of The Pillowman and its subsequent UK tour for the National Theatre. Additional credits include On an Average Day (West End) and Tales From Hollywood (Donmar Warehouse) both
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    4.00
    1 votes
    222

    Ian MacNeil

    Ian MacNeil (born 1960) is a British scenic designer. He won the 1994 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design for An Inspector Calls and the 2009 Tony Award for Best Scenic Design of a Musical for Billy Elliot The Musical. The son of news anchor and journalist Robert MacNeil, he became interested in design at an early age, playing with toy theaters and creating puppet shows with his sister in their yard. "I still remember the pleasure I took in creating those little worlds - complete environments with characters I could manipulate," he recalled in a 1995 interview. MacNeil studied at the Croydon School of Art and later with Ming Cho Lee in New York City. He spent a decade designing productions in Birmingham, Worcester, York, and Manchester before moving to London, where he made his West End debut with Death and the Maiden in 1991. MacNeil has designed for many London venues, including the National Theatre, the English National Opera, the Almeida Theatre, the Young Vic, the Lyric Hammersmith, the Barbican Theatre, and the Royal Court Theatre. He has won the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Set Design twice, for An Inspector Calls and Ariodante. In 1999, MacNeil staged the
    4.00
    1 votes
    223

    Motley Theatre Design Group

    Motley was the name of the theatre design firm made up of three English designers, sisters Margaret Harris (known as "Percy") (1904–2000) and Sophie Harris (1900–1966), and Elizabeth Montgomery Wilmot (1902–1993). The name derives from the word 'Motley' as used by Shakespeare. The group won two Tony Awards for costume design and was nominated seven additional times. They met at art school in the 1920s and went on to great success as John Gielgud's designers during the 1930s. They started teaching theatre design at Michel Saint-Denis's London Theatre Studio (1936–1939), the first time a design course had been incorporated into a drama school in the UK. Margaret Harris and Elizabeth Montgomery spent World War II in the United States, designing for Broadway, and Harris also worked with Charles Eames on his moulded plywood airplane parts. Sophie Harris, now married to George Devine, and mother of their child Harriet, stayed in the UK designing for stage and screen. After the war Margaret Harris returned to the UK, and both sisters once again joined Saint-Denis, teaching design at the Old Vic Theatre School (1947–1953). Elizabeth Montgomery stayed in the United States designing for many
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    4.00
    1 votes
    226

    Andrew Bridge

    Andrew Bridge is a Broadway and West End lighting designer, who has worked on many Broadway productions, including The Phantom of the Opera. He has won the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design three times: in 1988 for The Phantom of the Opera, 1995 for Sunset Boulevard, and in 1999 for Fosse. In December 2010 he became the 12th ever 'Fellow of the ALD'. This was awarded to him for his outstanding contribution to the art of lighting design.
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    0 votes
    227
    0.00
    0 votes
    228

    Anna Louizos

    Anna Louizos (born June 24, 1957) is an American scenic designer and art director. She is best known for her Tony Award-nominated sets for the musicals In the Heights and High Fidelity, as well as the London, Broadway, Las Vegas, and touring productions of Avenue Q. Louizos is currently represented on Broadway with Baby It's You! at the Broadhurst Theatre. Louizos was born and grew up in Yuba City, California. She saw her first Broadway musical, Applause with Lauren Bacall, at age fifteen. Interested in performing as an actress, Louizos studied at Mills College, Oakland, before transferring to New York University to complete a degree in acting. "Instructors recognized her talent as a visual artist, and progressively her post-graduate focus shifted to design," wrote Andy Smith of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. She used to live in the East Village, Manhattan, New York City. She received an MFA in Scenic design from NYU Tisch School of the Arts. Louizos served as art director at the 47th Tony Awards in 1993, and was associate scenic designer for the Broadway musical The Red Shoes in December of that year. She continued as an associate designer with the Broadway production of The
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    229
    Brad Mays

    Brad Mays

    Brad Mays (born May 30, 1955) is an independent filmmaker and stage director, living and working in Los Angeles, California. During the early 1970s, Brad Mays became involved in the Baltimore experimental theater scene and, at the age of eighteen, began directing at the Corner Theatre ETC. Upon completion of theatre arts studies at Towson University, Mays was formally hired by the Baltimore Theatre Project. In 1982, Mays moved to New York City, where he began working off-Broadway and, ultimately, produced and directed his first independent feature film, Stage Fright. In 2006, Mays filmed the documentary feature SING*ularity (2008), which explores the cutting-edge training of classical singers at the world-renowned OperaWorks program in Southern California. Other films include a free-form adaptation of Euripides' The Bacchae (2002), and his first feature, Stage Fright, a semi-autobiographical piece, co-written with his friend and fellow Corner Theatre alum, Stanley Keyes, which depicts the trials and tribulations of a late '60's theatre company and had its inaugural screenings at the 1989 Berlin International Film Festival under the auspices of American Independents In Berlin and
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    230
    0.00
    0 votes
    231

    Catherine Zuber

    Catherine Zuber is a costume designer for the Broadway theater and opera, among other venues. She is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama, and has been referred to as "one of theater's most sought-after costume designers on both coasts." Zuber was born in England, and came with her family to New York City when she was 9 years old. Her first choice of career was photography, but she switched to costume design because she found photography to be "a lonely art form," and enjoyed the collaborative nature of working in the theatre. Zuber's Broadway credits include How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (Tony nomination), Born Yesterday (Tony nomination), Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, South Pacific (Tony Award), The Coast of Utopia (Tony Award), The Light in the Piazza (Tony Award), Edward Albee's Seascape (Tony nomination), Awake and Sing! (Tony Award), Joe Turner's Come and Gone (Outer Critics Circle nomination), The Royal Family (Tony Award, Outer Critics Circle nomination), Oleanna, A Man for All Seasons, Cry-Baby, Mauritius, Doubt, Little Women, Dracula, Frozen, Dinner at Eight (Tony, Outer Critics Circle and Drama Desk nominations), Twelfth Night (Tony and
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    232
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    0.00
    0 votes
    234

    Constanza Romero

    Constanza Romero (born 1958) is an American artist and theater designer who lives in Seattle, Washington. Romero's parents divorced in 1969, when she was 11. Her mother found a teaching job in Fresno, California, and moved there with Romero and her younger sister and two younger brothers. In 1972 her mother died of breast cancer, and the four children went to live with a maternal aunt and uncle near Fresno. Romero met August Wilson in 1990 when her Yale School of Drama teachers assigned her to design costumes for his new play, The Piano Lesson. Wilson and Romero married in 1994. They had a daughter, Azula Carmen Wilson, prior to Wilson's death in October 2005.
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    235
    David Gallo

    David Gallo

    David Gallo (born January 10, 1966) is an American scenic designer and projection designer for Broadway, off-Broadway, regional, and international theatre venues. He won the Tony Award for Best Scenic Design and the Drama Desk Award, Outer Critics Circle Award, and Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Set Design in 2006 for The Drowsy Chaperone. David Gallo designed the Tony Award winning musicals Memphis and Thoroughly Modern Millie. Also known for his long time collaboration with playwright August Wilson, Gallo designed the Broadway premieres of all his later works, including Jitney, King Hedley II, Gem of the Ocean, Radio Golf, and the revival of Ma Rainey's Black Bottom. Gem of the Ocean and Radio Golf earned the designer two additional Tony Award nominations.Gallo was honored to design the Kennedy Center’s tribute production of August Wilson’s Twentieth Century. David Gallo has designed for regional theaters throughout the United States, including Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, Pittsburgh Public Theater, Goodspeed Opera House and La Jolla Playhouse, working with notable directors Kenny Leon, Ed Stern, Christopher Ashley, Keith Glover and Marion McClinton.
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    236

    Donald Holder

    Donald Holder is an American lighting designer in theatre, opera, and dance based in New York. He has been nominated for eight Tony Awards, winning the 1998 Tony Award for Best Lighting Design as well as the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Lighting Design for The Lion King. He won a second Tony in 2008 for the revival of South Pacific. His lighting design for Ragtime has been nominated for a 2010 Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a Musical. Additional Broadway credits include: Arcadia, The Motherf**cker With The Hat, Promises, Promises, Les Liaisons Dangereuses, Radio Golf, The Little Dog Laughed, Movin' Out, The Times They Are a-Changin', A Streetcar Named Desire, Holiday,Cyrano de Bergerac, Prelude to a Kiss, and Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. Holder studied forestry at the University of Maine, where he graduated from in 1980. He also worked for the Portland Stage Company in Maine. He holds a Masters of Fine Arts from the Yale School of Drama and is a student of Jennifer Tipton. He was the head of lighting design from 2006-2010 in the School of Theater at the California Institute of the Arts. He is currently the theatrical lighting designer for the NBC-Universal Television
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    237
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    238

    Eugene Lee

    Eugene Lee (Scenic Designer) was born in Beloit, Wisconsin, 1939. He attended Beloit Memorial High School. He has been resident designer at Trinity Rep since 1967. He has BFA degrees from the Art Institute of Chicago and Carnegie Mellon University, an MFA from Yale Drama School and three honorary Ph.Ds. Mr. Lee has won Tony Awards for Bernstein’s Candide, Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd, and Wicked, as well as the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Set Design. He is the production designer for NBC’s Saturday Night Live. Other New York theatre work includes Alice in Wonderland, The Normal Heart, Agnes of God, Ragtime, Uncle Vanya, Ruby Sunrise, Bounce, and A Number. Film credits include Coppola’s Hammett, Huston’s Mr. North and Malle’s Vanya on 42nd Street. Mr. Lee is an adjunct professor at Brown University and lives with his wife Brooke in Providence, where they raised their two sons. Perhaps his most notable recent credit is the set design for The Pirate Queen. He worked with lighting designer Kenneth Posner both on Wicked and The Pirate Queen. His work on the musical Candide at the Chelsea Theater Center of Brooklyn and on Broadway are chronicled in great detail in Davi Napoleon's book,
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    Jane Greenwood

    Jane Greenwood (born 30 April 1934) is a costume designer for the stage, television, film, opera, and dance. Born in Liverpool, England, she works both in England and the United States. She has been nominated for the Tony Award for costume design sixteen times. Greenwood attended Liverpool Art School and the Central School of Arts and Crafts (now Central St. Martins College of Art and Design), and then started working at the Oxford Playhouse, in charge of the costume department. She started working in the Ray Diffen costume shop in New York City in 1962. In New York, she met and married scenic designer and producer Ben Edwards. Greenwood's work includes designing for over 100 productions, The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (1963), her first Broadway play, to Hamlet with Richard Burton (1964), 70, Girls, 70 (1971), Romantic Comedy (1979), The Sisters Rosensweig (1993), and Stephen Sondheim's Passion (1994). In addition to her many Broadway credits, she has designed costumes for many productions for the Manhattan Theatre Club, recently Accent on Youth (2009), Lincoln Center Theatre, recently Belle Epoque, 2005, and The Roundabout Theatre Company, Waiting for Godot (2009), A Month in the
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    Mark Henderson

    Mark Henderson is a British lighting designer who won the 2006 Tony Award for Best Lighting Design for The History Boys. Henderson began his Broadway career with a 1986 comedy revue starring Rowan Atkinson. His Broadway credits include revivals of The Merchant of Venice (1989), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1990), Hamlet (1995), The Iceman Cometh (1999), The Real Thing (2000), Faith Healer (2006), and A Moon for the Misbegotten (2007), and the original productions of Indiscretions (1995), Copenhagen (2000), Decocracy (2004), Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (2005), and Deuce (2007). In the UK, Henderson has worked at the Almeida Theatre, the Donmar Warehouse, the Royal National Theatre, and the Old Vic. He has designed projects for the Really Useful Group, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal Opera, the English National Opera, the Welsh National Opera, the Scottish Opera, and the Royal Ballet, among others. He was involved in the refurbishment of the Royal Court Theatre and has designed for Madame Tussauds in London, New York City, and Las Vegas. Henderson's West End productions include Arsenic and Old Lace, Grease, West Side Story, Spend Spend Spend, Follies, Carmen Jones, and Three Sisters.
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    Neil Peter Jampolis

    Neil Peter Jampolis is a light designer, set designer, and stage director. He is best known for the light designing he did for the Royal Shakespeare Theatre’s 1975 production of Sherlock Holmes for which he won a Tony Award and a Drama Desk Award. Jampolis went on to win an American Theatre Wing Hewes Design Award in 1982 and three more Tony Award nominations for The Innocents, Black and Blue, and Orpheus Descending. He also won a Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award for lighting Lily Tomlin and Jane Wagner's Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe. Jampolis has also worked as either a light designer, set designer, or stage director with Pilobolus Dance Theatre the Vienna State Opera, La Scala, the Metropolitan Opera, the Santa Fe Opera, Opera Pacific, the New York City Opera, Pasadena Playhouse, and Hollywood's Matrix Theatre among others. He is currently one of the main light designers for the Seattle Opera and a distinguished professor of theatre at UCLA's School of Theatre, Film, and Television. He also occasionally works as a stage director and set designer for Seattle Opera as well.
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    Robert Wierzel

    Robert Wierzel (born July 1, 1956) is an American lighting designer. Mr. Wierzel has worked with artists, directors and designers from diverse disciplines and backgrounds in theatre, dance, contemporary music, museums and opera on stages throughout the United States and abroad. He has a long collaboration (26 years) with choreographer & director Bill T. Jones and the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company (several Bessie Awards, along with productions at the Lyon Opera Ballet and Berlin Opera Ballet). Mr. Wierzel is also well known for his extensive work in the American regional theatre. Mr. Wierzel's work has been seen with the following companies: Glimmerglass Festival, New York City Opera, Boston Lyric Opera, Canadian Opera, Chicago Opera Theater, Florida Grand Opera, Folk Opera of Sweden, Gotham Chamber Opera, Houston Grand Opera, Lincoln Center Great Performances, Lyric Opera of Chicago, L'Operade of Montreal, Manhattan School of Music, Minnesota Opera, Nashville Opera, Opera Cleveland, Opera Columbus, Opera Omaha, Pittsburgh Opera, Portland Opera, San Diego Opera, San Francisco Opera, Seattle Opera, Tokyo Opera, Utah Opera and Symphony, Vancouver Opera, Virginia Opera,
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