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Best Theater Character of All Time

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    1
    Quasimodo

    Quasimodo

    • Plays Appears In: Notre-Dame de Paris
    Quasimodo is a fictional character in the novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831) by Victor Hugo. Quasimodo was born with a hunchback and feared by the townspeople as a sort of monster but he finds sanctuary in an unlikely love that is fulfilled only in death. The role of Quasimodo has been played by many actors in film and stage adaptations, including Lon Chaney, Sr. (1923) and Charles Laughton (1939), as well as the 1996 Disney animated adaptation. In 2010, a British researcher found evidence suggesting there was a real-life hunchbacked stone carver who worked at Notre Dame during the same period Victor Hugo was writing the novel and they may have even known one another. Quasimodo is described as "hideous" and a "creation of the devil." He was born with a hunchback, and a giant wart that covers his right eye. He is found abandoned in Notre Dame (on the foundlings' bed, where orphans and unwanted children are left to public charity) on Quasimodo Sunday, the first Sunday after Easter, by Claude Frollo, the Archdeacon of Notre Dame, who adopts the baby, names him after the day the baby was found, and brings him up to be the bell-ringer of the Cathedral. Due to the loud ringing of
    6.00
    9 votes
    2
    Wardrobe

    Wardrobe

    • Plays Appears In: Beauty and the Beast
    Wardrobe is a fictional character in the Disney film Beauty and the Beast.
    8.00
    6 votes
    3
    Sycorax

    Sycorax

    • Plays Appears In: The Tempest
    Sycorax  /ˈsɪkəræks/ an unseen character in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest (1611), is a powerful witch and the mother of Caliban, one of the few native inhabitants of the island on which Prospero, the hero of the play, is stranded. According to the backstory provided by the play, Sycorax, while pregnant with Caliban, was banished from her home in Algiers to the island on which the play takes place. Memories of Sycorax, who dies several years before the main action of the play begins, define several of the relationships in the play. Relying on his filial connection to Sycorax, Caliban claims ownership of the island. Prospero constantly reminds Ariel of Sycorax's cruel treatment in order to maintain the sprite's service. Scholars generally agree that Sycorax, a foil for Prospero, is closely related to the Medea of Ovid's Metamorphoses. Postcolonialist writers and critics see Sycorax as giving voice to peoples, particularly women, recovering from the effects of colonization. Later versions of The Tempest, beginning with William Davenant's eighteenth-century adaptation, have given Sycorax a vocal role in the play, but maintained her image as a malevolent antagonist to
    7.50
    6 votes
    4
    Prince Escalus

    Prince Escalus

    • Plays Appears In: Romeo and Juliet
    Prince Escalus, fictional Prince of Verona, is the mediator of the feuding families in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. Escalus is the voice of authority in Verona. He appears only three times within the text and only to administer justice following major events in the feud between the Capulet and Montague families. He first punishes Capulet and Montague in I.i for the quarrel between Tybalt, Benvolio that results in the 3rd civil brawl between the two families, and a handful of servants. He returns in III.i, too late to stop the fatal brawls between Tybalt and Mercutio and, subsequently, Tybalt and Romeo. Escalus is prepared to execute Romeo for his offence – Romeo killing Tybalt – but lightens the sentence to lifetime banishment from Verona when Benvolio insists that Tybalt started the quarrel by murdering Mercutio, a kinsman to the Prince. He returns in the final scene — V.III — following the death of Paris, a kinsman to the Prince, and the double suicide of Romeo and Juliet and at last orders the masters of the feuding families to make peace.
    8.60
    5 votes
    5
    Lancelot

    Lancelot

    • Plays Appears In: Camelot
    Sir Lancelot (or Launcelot) du Lac ( /ˈlænsələt/, /ˈlɔːnsələt/, /ˈlænsəlɒt/, or /ˈlɔːnsəlɒt/; and /djuːˈlæk/ or /djuːˈlɑːk/) was one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. He was the most trusted of King Arthur's knights and played a part in many of Arthur's victories. Lancelot is best known for his love affair with Arthur's wife Guinevere and the role he played in the search for the Holy Grail. He is also known as the most loyal friend of Arthur's nephew, Sir Gawaine. His first appearance as a main character is in Chrétien de Troyes' Le Chevalier de la Charette, or "Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart," which was written in the 12th century. In the 13th century, he was the main focus in the lengthy Vulgate Cycle, where his exploits are recounted in the section known as the Prose Lancelot. Lancelot's life and adventures have been featured in several medieval romances, often with conflicting back-stories and chains of events. Lancelot's literary origins are mysterious. Prior to his appearance in the works of Chrétien de Troyes, Lancelot is virtually unknown. Scholar Roger Sherman Loomis suggests that Lancelot is related to the Welsh hero Llwch Llenlleawg ("Llwch of
    7.33
    6 votes
    6
    Antigone

    Antigone

    • Plays Appears In: Antigone
    In Greek mythology, Antigone (pronunciation: /ænˈtɪɡəniː/ an-TI-gə-nee; Ἀντιγόνη) is the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta, Oedipus' mother. The name has been suggested to mean "opposed to motherhood", "in place of a mother". It may also mean "against men" since men were dominant in the Ancient Greek family structure, and Antigone clearly defied masculine authority, or "anti-generative", from the root gonē, "that which generates" (related: gonos, "-gony"; seed, semen). Antigone is a daughter of the accidentally incestuous marriage between King Oedipus of Thebes and his mother Jocasta. She is the subject of a popular story in which she attempts to secure a respectable burial for her brother Polynices, even though he was a traitor to Thebes and the law forbids even mourning for him, on pain of death. The oldest version of the story, the burial of Polynices takes place during Oedipus' reign in Thebes, before Oedipus marries Jocasta. However, in the best-known versions, Sophocles' tragedies Oedipus at Colonus and Antigone, it occurs in the years after Oedipus' banishment and death, and Antigone has to struggle against Creon. In Sophocles' version, both of Antigone's brothers are killed
    6.67
    6 votes
    7
    Ariadne

    Ariadne

    • Plays Appears In: The Frogs
    Ariadne ( /æriˈædniː/; Ἀριάδνη; Latin: Ariadna; "most holy", Cretan Greek αρι [ari] "most" and αδνος [adnos] "holy"), in Greek mythology, was the daughter of Minos king of Crete, and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios, the Sun-titan. She is mostly associated with mazes and labyrinths, due to her involvement in the myths of the Minotaur and Theseus. Her father put her in charge of the labyrinth where sacrifices were made as part of reparations (either to Poseidon or to Athena, depending on the version of the myth); however, she would later help Theseus in overcoming the Minotaur and saving the would-be sacrificial victims. In other stories, she became the bride of the god Dionysus, with the question of her background as being either a mortal or a goddess varying in those accounts. Since ancient Greek myths were passed down through oral tradition, many variations of this and other myths exist. According to an Athenian version of the legend, Minos attacked Athens after his son was killed there. The Athenians asked for terms, and were required to sacrifice seven young men and seven maidens every seven or nine years to the Minotaur. One year, the sacrificial party included Theseus,
    7.60
    5 votes
    8
    Cordelia

    Cordelia

    • Plays Appears In: King Lear
    Cordelia is a fictional character in William Shakespeare’s tragic play, King Lear. She is the youngest of King Lear’s three daughters. After her elderly father offers her the opportunity to profess her love to him in return for one third of the land in his kingdom, she refuses and is banished for the majority of the play. Shakespeare had numerous resources to consult while writing King Lear. The oldest source in print was Geoffrey of Monmouth’s, The History of the Kings of Britain, c.1136. This is the earliest written record of Cordelia. Here she is depicted as Queen Cordelia. In Shakespeare’s King Lear, Cordelia is briefly on stage during the first act, to return only in Act 4, scene 4. Her exile is a result of her honest, yet unacceptable response to her father’s question in Act 1, scene 1. When Lear is dividing the land of his kingdom, Cordelia's sisters, Goneril and Regan, give deceitfully lavish speeches professing their love, a demonstration in which Cordelia will not partake (she sees right through her sister's professions). She will not give a superfluous answer, the one she presents ("Love, and be silent" 1.1.62) being deemed too simple, notwithstanding its depth. Lear
    7.60
    5 votes
    9
    Friar Lawrence

    Friar Lawrence

    • Plays Appears In: Romeo and Juliet
    Friar Laurence (is also seen/written as Friar Lawrence) is a fictional character in William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet. Friar Laurence plays the part of an adviser to Romeo and Juliet, along with aiding in major plot developments. Alone, he foreshadows the later, tragic events of the play with his soliloquy about plants and their similarities to humans. When Romeo requests that the Friar marry him to Juliet, he is shocked, because only days before, Romeo had been infatuated with Rosaline, a woman who did not return his love. Nevertheless, Friar Laurence decides to get Romeo and Juliet married in the attempt to end the civil feud between the Capulets and the Montagues. When Romeo is banished for killing Tybalt and flees to Mantua, Friar Laurence tries to help the two lovers get back together using a death-emulating potion to fake Juliet's death. The friar sends a letter to Romeo explaining the situation, but it does not reach him because the people of Mantua suspect the messenger came from a house infected with the plague, and the Friar is unable to arrive at the Capulet's monument in time. Romeo kills Count Paris, whom he finds weeping near Juliet's corpse, then commits
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    Sancho Panza

    Sancho Panza

    • Plays Appears In: Man of La Mancha
    Sancho Panza [ˈsantʃo ˈpanθa] is a fictional character in the novel Don Quixote written by Spanish author Don Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra in 1605. Sancho acts as squire to Don Quixote, and provides comments throughout the novel, known as sanchismos, that are a combination of broad humour, ironic Spanish proverbs, and earthy wit. "Panza" in Spanish means "belly" (cf. English "paunch," Italian "pancia"). Sancho Panza is not a servant of Alonso Quijano before his madness turns him into Don Quixote, but a peasant living in the same unnamed village. When the novel begins Sancho has been married for a long time to a woman named Teresa Cascajo and has a daughter, María Sancha (also named Marisancha, Marica, María, Sancha and Sanchica), who is said to be old enough to be married. Sancho's wife is described more or less as a feminine version of Sancho, both in looks and behaviour. When Don Quixote proposes Sancho to be his squire, neither he nor his family strongly oppose it. Sancho is illiterate and proud of it but by influence of his new master he develops considerable knowledge about some books. Sancho instead provides the earthly wisdom of Spanish proverbs, surprising his master.
    7.60
    5 votes
    11
    Jonathan Harker

    Jonathan Harker

    • Plays Appears In: Dracula
    Jonathan Harker is a fictional character and one of the protagonists of Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula. His journey to Transylvania and encounter with Count Dracula and the Brides of Dracula at Castle Dracula constitutes the dramatic opening scenes in the novel and most of the film adaptations. Harker is a recently admitted solicitor from England, who is deputed by his employer, Mr. Peter Hawkins, of Exeter, to act as an estate agent for a foreign client named Count Dracula who wishes to move to England. Harker discovers in Carfax Abbey, near Purfleet, Essex, a dwelling which suits the client's requirements and travels to Transylvania by train in order to consult with him about it. At Bistritz Harker takes a coach to the Borgo Pass where at midnight another coach drawn by four black horses, waits to take him to Castle Dracula high in the Carpathian Mountains. At the castle Harker is greeted by the mysterious and ominous Count Dracula and finalises the property transaction. Soon, however Harker realises he has been made a prisoner by his host who is revealed as a vampire. Harker also has a dangerous encounter with the three seductive Brides of Dracula, whose designs
    8.75
    4 votes
    12
    Heracles

    Heracles

    • Plays Appears In: Heracles
    Heracles ( /ˈhɛrəkliːz/ HERR-ə-kleez; Ancient Greek: Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklēs, from Hēra, "Hera", and kleos, "glory"), born Alcaeus (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon and great-grandson (and half-brother) of Perseus. He was the greatest of the Greek heroes, a paragon of masculinity, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae (Ἡρακλεῖδαι) and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modern West, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman Emperors, in particular Commodus and Maximian, often identified themselves. The Romans adopted the Greek version of his life and works essentially unchanged, but added anecdotal detail of their own, some of it linking the hero with the geography of the Central Mediterranean. Details of his cult were adapted to Rome as well. Extraordinary strength, courage, ingenuity, and sexual prowess with both males and females were among his characteristic attributes. Although he was not as clever as the likes of Odysseus or Nestor, Heracles used his wits on several occasions when his strength did not
    6.50
    6 votes
    13
    John Seward

    John Seward

    • Plays Appears In: Dracula
    John Seward, M.D. is a fictional character appearing in Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula. Seward is the administrator of an insane asylum not far from Count Dracula's first English home, Carfax. Throughout the novel, Seward conducts ambitious interviews with one of his patients, Renfield, in order to understand better the nature of life-consuming psychosis. As a psychiatrist, Seward enjoys using the most up-to-date equipment, including using a recording phonograph to record his interviews with his patients and his own notes. Several chapters of the novel consist of transcriptions of Seward's phonograph recordings. He is best friends with Quincey Morris and Arthur Holmwood. All three propose to Lucy Westenra the same day. Although Lucy turns down Seward's marriage proposal, his love for her remains, and he dedicates himself to her care when she suddenly takes ill. He calls in his mentor, Abraham Van Helsing, to help him with her illness, and he helps Seward to realize that Lucy has been bitten by a vampire and is doomed to become one herself. After she is officially destroyed and her soul can go to Heaven, Seward is determined to destroy Dracula. The novel's epilogue mentions that
    7.20
    5 votes
    14
    Queen of Hearts

    Queen of Hearts

    • Plays Appears In: Wonderland: Alice's New Musical Adventure
    The Queen of Hearts is a character from the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by the writer and mathematician Lewis Carroll. She is a foul-tempered monarch, that Carroll himself pictured as "a blind fury", and who is quick to decree death sentences at the slightest offense. Her most famous line, one which she repeats often, is "Off with their heads!" The Queen is referred to as a card from a pack of playing cards by Alice, yet somehow she is able to talk and is the ruler of the lands in the story, alongside the King of Hearts. She is often confused with the Red Queen from the sequel, Through the Looking-Glass, although the two are very different. Alice observes three playing cards painting white roses red. They drop to the ground face down at the approach of the Queen of Hearts, whom Alice has never met. When the Queen arrives and asks Alice who is lying on the ground (since the backs of all playing cards look alike), Alice tells her that she does not know. The Queen then becomes frustrated and commands that her head be severed. She is deterred by her comparatively moderate husband by being reminded that Alice is only a child. Generally, however, as we are told by Carroll: One
    7.20
    5 votes
    15
    Sir Dinadan

    Sir Dinadan

    • Plays Appears In: Camelot
    Sir Dinadan is a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. He is the son of Sir Brunor Senior, the 'Good Knight without Fear,' and brother of Sirs Breunor le Noir and Daniel. A close friend of Tristan, Dinadan is known for his good humor and joking nature. Unlike most other knights in Arthurian romance, Dinadan prefers to avoid fights and considers courtly love a waste of time, though he is a brave fighter when he needs to be. In one notable exploit, he writes a slanderous ballad about King Mark and sends a troubador to play it at Mark's court. In another, he loses a joust when Lancelot catches him off guard by wearing a dress over his armor; Lancelot then puts the dress on his unconscious opponent. He is more sociable than most of the knights, and is often a useful companion because of it. In Le Morte d'Arthur, he is one of the few knights to be able to recognize his fellows from their faces in addition to their shields; in one instance Tristan does not recognize his own King until Dinadan tells him who it is. Like Palamedes and Lamorak, Dinadan was an invention of the Prose Tristan, and appeared in later retellings including the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Sir Thomas Malory's Le
    7.20
    5 votes
    16
    Prospero

    Prospero

    • Plays Appears In: The Tempest
    Prospero ( /ˈprɒspəroʊ/ PROS-pər-oh) is the protagonist in The Tempest, a play by William Shakespeare. Prospero is the rightful Duke of Milan, who (with his young daughter, Miranda) was put to sea on "a rotten carcass of a butt [boat]" to die by his usurping brother, Antonio, twelve years before the play begins. Prospero and Miranda survived, and found exile on a small island. He has learned sorcery from books secretly given to him (referred to as his "Art" in the play), and uses it while on the island to protect Miranda and control the other characters. On the island, he becomes master of the monster Caliban (the son of Sycorax, a malevolent witch), and Ariel, an elemental who has become enslaved by Prospero after he is freed from his prison inside a tree. However, at the end of the play, Prospero intends to drown his book and renounce magic. In the view of the audience, this may have been required to make the ending unambiguously happy, as magic smacked too much of diabolical works; he will drown his books for the same reason that Doctor Faust, in an earlier play by Christopher Marlowe, promised in vain to burn his books. The final soliloquy and epilogue in The Tempest is
    6.17
    6 votes
    17
    Pope Joan

    Pope Joan

    • Plays Appears In: Top Girls
    Pope Joan was a legendary female Pope who allegedly reigned for a few years some time during the Middle Ages. The story first appeared in 13th-century chronicles, and was subsequently spread and embellished throughout Europe. It was widely believed for centuries, though modern religious scholars consider it fictitious, perhaps deriving from historicized folklore regarding Roman monuments or from anti-papal satire. The first mention of the female pope appears in the chronicle of Jean Pierier de Mailly, but the most popular and influential version was that interpolated into Martin of Troppau's Chronicon Pontificum et Imperatorum, later in the 13th century. Most versions of her story describe her as a talented and learned woman who disguises herself as a man, often at the behest of a lover. In the most common accounts, due to her abilities, she rises through the church hierarchy, eventually being elected pope. However, while riding on horseback she gives birth, thus exposing her gender. In most versions, she dies shortly after, either being killed by an angry mob or from natural causes. Her memory is then shunned by her successors. The earliest mention of the female pope appears in
    7.00
    5 votes
    18
    Blanche DuBois

    Blanche DuBois

    • Plays Appears In: A Streetcar Named Desire
    Blanche DuBois (married name Grey) is a fictional character in Tennessee Williams' 1947 Pulitzer Prize-winning play A Streetcar Named Desire. The role is challenging and controversial in that the former Southern belle has a lurid past (a marriage to a young homosexual who committed suicide when she discovered his secret; notorious sexual promiscuity; ongoing alcoholism, etc.) as well as genuine spiritual idealism and refinement. Jessica Tandy received a Tony Award for her performance as Blanche in the original Broadway production. By report (no filmed record exists), her performance stressed Blanche's high-class affectations, and the audience often sided with the adversarial brother-in-law, Stanley Kowalski, viewing her, as he does, as an alien threatening his home and marriage. Uta Hagen took over the role of Blanche for the national tour. The tour was directed not by Elia Kazan, who had directed the Broadway production, but by Harold Clurman, and it has been reported, both in interviews by Miss Hagen and observations by contemporary critics, that the Clurman-directed interpretation shifted the focus of audience sympathy back to Blanche and away from Stanley (where the
    8.00
    4 votes
    19
    Yorick

    Yorick

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    Yorick is a fictional character in William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. He is the deceased court jester whose skull is exhumed by the gravedigger in Act 5, Scene 1, of the play. The sight of Yorick's skull evokes a monologue from Prince Hamlet on the vile effects of death: Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? Your gambols? Your songs? Your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? (Hamlet, V.i) The opening words are very commonly misquoted as "Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him well." It has often been suggested that Shakespeare intended his audience to connect Yorick with the Elizabethan comedian Richard Tarlton, a star performer of the pre-Shakespearian stage, who had been dead for around the same time as Yorick in the play. The contrast between Yorick as "a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy" and his grim remains is a variation on the theme of earthly vanity (cf Vanitas): death being unavoidable,
    8.00
    4 votes
    20
    Morgan le Fay

    Morgan le Fay

    • Plays Appears In: Camelot
    Morgan le Fay /ˈmɔrɡən lə ˈfeɪ/, alternatively known as Morgan le Faye, Morgane, Morgaine, Morgana and other names, is a powerful sorceress in the Arthurian legend. Early works featuring Morgan do not elaborate her character beyond her role as a fay or magician. She became much more prominent in the later cyclical prose works such as the Lancelot-Grail and the Post-Vulgate Cycle, in which she becomes an antagonist to King Arthur and Queen Guinevere. She is said to be the daughter of Arthur's mother, the Lady Igraine, and her first husband, Gorlois, Duke of Cornwall, so that Arthur (son of Igraine and Uther Pendragon) is her half-brother. The early accounts of Geoffrey of Monmouth and Gerald of Wales refer to Morgan in conjunction with the Isle of Apples (later Avalon) to which the fatally wounded Arthur was carried. To the former, she was an enchantress, one of nine sisters; to the latter, she was the ruler and patroness of an area near Glastonbury and a close blood-relation of King Arthur. In the early romances of Chrétien de Troyes, also, she figures as a healer. Though in later stories, she becomes an adversary of the Round Table when Guinevere discovers her adultery with one of
    6.80
    5 votes
    21
    Captain Hook

    Captain Hook

    • Plays Appears In: Peter Pan
    Captain James Hook (his name sometimes shortened to 'Jas') is the main antagonist of J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up and its various adaptations. The character is a villainous pirate captain of the Jolly Roger brig, and lord of the pirate village/harbour in Neverland, where he is widely feared. Most importantly, he is the archenemy of Peter Pan. It is said that Hook was Blackbeard's boatswain, and that he was the only man Long John Silver ever feared. His only two fears are the sight of his own blood (which is supposedly an unnatural colour) and one fateful crocodile. Hook wears a big iron hook in place of his right hand, which was cut off by Peter Pan and eaten by a saltwater crocodile, who liked the taste so much that he follows Hook around constantly, hoping for more. Luckily for Hook, the crocodile also swallowed a clock, so Hook can tell from the ticking when he is near. Hook hates Peter obsessively due to his cockiness (and the removing of his hand), as well as the way he always seems to have "good form" without trying or even realizing, which is the best "form" of all, and lives for the day he can make Peter and all his Lost Boys walk the
    9.00
    3 votes
    22
    Cassandra

    Cassandra

    • Plays Appears In: The Oresteia
    In Greek mythology, Cassandra (Greek Κασσάνδρα, also Κασάνδρα, also known as Alexandra) was the daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy. Her beauty caused Apollo to grant her the gift of prophecy. In an alternative version, she spent a night at Apollo's temple, at which time the temple snakes licked her ears clean so that she was able to hear the future (this is a recurring theme in Greek mythology, though sometimes it brings an ability to understand the language of animals rather than an ability to know the future). When Cassandra of Troy told him she wanted to stay a virgin, Apollo placed a curse on her so that she and all her descendants' predictions would not be believed. She is a figure both of the epic tradition and of tragedy, where her combination of deep understanding and powerlessness exemplify the ironic condition of humankind. Cassandra was the daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba and the twin sister of Helenus. She was said to have had red hair kept in curls, blue eyes, and fair skin and she was very beautiful, intelligent, charming, desirable, elegant, friendly, and gentle, but she was considered to be insane. Cassandra was described as the "second most
    7.75
    4 votes
    23
    Miranda

    Miranda

    • Plays Appears In: The Tempest
    In Shakespeare's play The Tempest, Miranda is the beautiful daughter of the old Duke Prospero. The character of Miranda resolves itself into the very elements of womanhood. She is beautiful, modest, and tender, and she is these only; they comprise her whole being, external and internal. She is so perfectly unsophisticated, so delicately refined, that she is all but ethereal. Let us imagine any other woman placed beside Miranda — even one of Shakespeare's own loveliest and sweetest creations — there is not one of them that could sustain the comparison for a moment; not one that would not appear somewhat coarse or artificial when brought into immediate contact with this pure child of nature, this "Eve of an enchanted Paradise." However, even though she is thought typically as a naïve girl, she also displays moments of great strength. For example in these lines—which many editors have transferred to Prospero—she sheds her usual passive role, scolding Caliban: Miranda also challenges her father when she begs for the life of those on the ship, telling him: "Had I been any great god of power, I would have sunk the sea within the earth, or ere the good ship so have swallowed, and the
    5.83
    6 votes
    24
    Maenad

    Maenad

    In Greek mythology, maenads (Greek: μαινάδες, mainádes) were the female followers of Dionysus (Bacchus in the Roman pantheon), the most significant members of the Thiasus, the god's retinue. Their name literally translates as "raving ones". Often the maenads were portrayed as inspired by him into a state of ecstatic frenzy, through a combination of dancing and drunken intoxication. In this state, they would lose all self-control, begin shouting excitedly, engage in uncontrolled sexual behavior, and ritualistically hunt down and tear to pieces animals — and, at least in myth, sometimes men and children — devouring the raw flesh. During these rites, the maenads would dress in fawn skins and carry a thyrsus, a long stick wrapped in ivy or vine leaves and tipped by a cluster of leaves; they would weave ivy-wreaths around their heads, and often handle or wear snakes. German philologist Walter Friedrich Otto writes that The maddened Hellenic women of real life were mythologized as the mad women who were nurses of Dionysus in Nysa: Lycurgus "chased the Nurses of the frenzied Dionysus through the holy hills of Nysa, and the sacred implements dropped to the ground from the hands of one and
    6.60
    5 votes
    25
    Polynices

    Polynices

    • Plays Appears In: Seven Against Thebes
    In Greek mythology, Polynices or Polyneices (Greek: Πολυνείκης, transl. Polyneíkes, "manifold strife") was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta. His wife was Argea. His father, Oedipus, was discovered to have killed his father and married his mother, and was expelled from Thebes, leaving his sons Eteocles and Polynices to rule. Because of a curse put on them by their father, Oedipus, the sons, Polynices and Eteocles, did not share the rule peacefully and died as a result by killing each other in a battle for the control of Thebes. In the Thebaid, the brothers were cursed by their father for their disrespect towards him on two occasions. The first of these occurred when they served him using the silver table of Cadmus and a golden cup, which he had forbidden. The brothers then sent him the haunch of a sacrificed animal, rather than the shoulder, which he deserved. Enraged, Oedipus prayed to Zeus that the brothers would die by each other's hand. However, in Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus, Oedipus desired to stay in Thebes but was expelled by Creon. His sons argued over the throne, but Eteocles gained the support of the Thebans and expelled Polynices, who went to Oedipus to ask for his
    6.60
    5 votes
    26
    7.50
    4 votes
    27
    Talthybius

    Talthybius

    • Plays Appears In: The Trojan Women
    Talthybius (Greek: Ταλθύβιος) was herald and friend to Agamemnon in the Trojan War. He was the one who took Briseis from the tent of Achilles. Preceding the duel of Menelaus and Paris, Agamemnon charges him to fetch a sheep for sacrifice. He died at Aegium in Achaia. Talthybius appears in Euripides’ Hecuba and The Trojan Women. In addition, he has a small role in The Iliad. In The Iliad, Agamemnon orders Talthybius to fetch the medic Machaon after Menelaus was wounded with an arrow shot by Pandarus. In Hecuba and The Trojan Women, Talthybius seems to always be the bearer of bad news. In The Trojan Women, he tells Hecuba that all of the women are being divided up and given to different Greek Heroes as slaves. He says that Cassandra will be given to Agamemnon and that Hecuba herself will be given to Odysseus. Furthermore, Talthybius is the one who tells Andromache of the Greeks’ plan to kill Astyanax, her son by Hector. The plan is to throw Astyanax (who is only a small child) from the towers of Troy because it would not be wise to let the son of a Trojan hero reach adulthood. In Hecuba, Talthybius brings an order from Agamemnon to Hecuba, telling her to bury her daughter, Polyxena,
    8.67
    3 votes
    28
    Sally Brown

    Sally Brown

    • Plays Appears In: You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown
    Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. She was first mentioned in early 1959 and throughout a long series of strips before her first appearance in August 1959. Sally Brown has blonde hair with a curly fringe. She wears pink or blue polka dotted dresses with matching colored socks and she also wears white shoes with black laces. In late 1965, she wore an eyepatch over her left eye. She had been diagnosed with lazy eye, which Linus immediately recognizes as Amblyopia ex anopsia. She wears the patch for a short while, and once she's told she can stop wearing it, gives it to Snoopy (who uses it to pretend that he is a pirate). Sally has blonde hair with curly bangs and sometimes a bow in front, and she wears a polka dot dress, usually pink or light blue. In the winter, and most of the time in the later years of the strip, she switched to a shirt and pants. She has a "take it easy" approach to life, preferring to slide by while doing as little work as possible. Her favorite pastime is sitting in her beanbag chair watching TV. In a series of strips from 1982, Sally actually went to "beanbag camp", which consisted of nothing but
    10.00
    2 votes
    29
    Apemantus

    Apemantus

    Apemantus is a character in the play Timon of Athens by William Shakespeare. He is a cynical and misanthropic philosopher. Early in the play, when Timon is wealthy, Apemantus attends Timon's banquet in order to insult him and his guests. He is the only character at the time who treats Timon badly. The rest of the city highly respects him for his wealth and generosity. Apemantus has several witty exchanges with Timon, in which he argues that mankind is untrustworthy and that they are merely Timon's friends because of his money. Timon eventually loses all of his money and is abandoned by his friends. He turns his back on Athens to live in a cave, and takes the same opinions about mankind which Apemantus had. Apemantus visits him to accuse Timon of copying his ideals. The two of them then proceed to elaborately insult each other. The best known contemporary Apemantus is Norman Rodway, who played the role both for BBC television and for The Arkangel Shakespeare audiobook. His performance in these differ significantly, as neither the rest of the cast nor the interpretation is the same.
    6.40
    5 votes
    30
    Javert

    Javert

    • Plays Appears In: Les Misérables
    Javert (French pronunciation: [ʒavɛʁ]; c. 1775-1832) is a fictional character from the novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. He is a prison guard, and later policeman, who devotes his life to the law. He is always referred to simply as "Javert" or "Inspector Javert" by the narrator and other characters throughout the novel; his first name is never mentioned. Javert is the main antagonist of the novel, to Jean Valjean, the novel's protagonist. Some consider Javert misguided rather than evil, although his inflexibility and cruelty throughout the novel moves in parallel to Jean Valjean's kindness. Those who consider Javert misguided believe that the distinction of pure evil in the novel more appropriately belongs to the greedy and treacherous Thénardiers. Javert may also be regarded as one who seeks only blind justice. Javert refuses to acknowledge repentance and will imprison those that break the law or parole, as Jean Valjean did. Others consider the Thénardiers dishonest, petty criminals, whose actual negative impact on the protagonists is minor compared to the significant levels of spite and mercilessness Javert inflicts on those he encounters. Javert was born c. 1780 (he is said
    6.40
    5 votes
    31
    Prince Hamlet

    Prince Hamlet

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    Prince Hamlet is a fictional character, the protagonist in Shakespeare's tragedy Hamlet. He is the Prince of Denmark, nephew to the usurping Claudius and son of the previous King of Denmark, Old Hamlet. Throughout the play he struggles with whether, and how, to avenge the murder of his father, and struggles with his own sanity along the way. By the end of the tragedy, Hamlet has caused the deaths of Polonius, Laertes, Claudius and his two childhood friends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. He is also indirectly involved in the deaths of his love Ophelia (drowning) and of his mother Gertrude (poisoned by mistake). Hamlet himself is the final character to die in the play. Perhaps the most straightforward view sees Hamlet as seeking truth in order to be certain that he is justified in carrying out the revenge called for by a ghost that claims to be the spirit of his father. The 1948 movie with Laurence Olivier in the title role is introduced by a voiceover: "This is the tragedy of a man who could not make up his mind." T. S. Eliot offers a similar view of Hamlet's character in his critical essay, "Hamlet and His Problems" (The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism). He states, "We
    5.50
    6 votes
    32
    Desdemona

    Desdemona

    • Plays Appears In: Othello
    Desdemona is a character in William Shakespeare's play Othello (c.1601 – 1604). Shakespeare's Desdemona is a Venetian beauty who enrages and disappoints her father, a Venetian senator, when she elopes with Othello, a man several years her senior. When her husband is deployed to Cyprus in the service of the Republic of Venice, Desdemona accompanies him. There, her husband is manipulated by his ensign Iago into believing she is an adulteress, and, in the last act, she is murdered by her estranged spouse. The role has attracted notable actresses through the centuries and has the distinction of being the role performed by Margaret Hughes, the first actress to appear on an English public stage. Desdemona becomes the title character in a 2011 play written by Toni Morrison, revolving around Desdemona's relationship with the African nurse who raised her. The play arose from a collaboration between Morrison, director Peter Sellars, and musician Rokia Traoré. Othello has its source in the 1565 tale, "Un Capitano Moro" in Gli Hecatommithi by Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio. While no English translation of Cinthio was available in print during Shakespeare's lifetime, it is possible that
    7.25
    4 votes
    33
    Devil

    Devil

    • Plays Appears In: The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus
    The Devil appears frequently as a character in works of literature and popular culture. In Christianity, the figure of the Devil, or Satan, personifies evil. The musical interval of an augmented fourth, or tritone, was called the Devil's Chord (Latin: Diabolus in musica – the Devil in music) and was banned by the Roman Catholic Church in the Middle Ages. Composers avoided the interval, and although it is sometimes found in secular music of the time, it was used in religious music only in very specific circumstances until the existing system of keys came into use. The Devil is featured as a character in many musical representations from the Middle Ages to modern times. Hildegard of Bingen's 11th-century Ordo Virtutum features him, as do several baroque oratorios by composers such as Carissimi and Alessandro Scarlatti. During the 19th century, Gounod's Faust, in which the Devil goes by the name Mephistopheles, was a staple of opera houses around the world. Highly virtuosic violin music was sometimes associated with the Devil. Tartini's Devil's Trill sonata and Paganini's Devil's Laughter caprice are examples. The theme is taken up by Stravinsky in the "Devil's Dance" from The
    7.25
    4 votes
    34
    Hermia

    Hermia

    • Plays Appears In: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Hermia is a fictional character from Shakespeare's play, A Midsummer Night's Dream. The dialogue makes it clear that she is shorter than Helena. She is caught in a romantic accident where she loves one man, Lysander, but is loved by Demetrius, whose feelings she does not return. Hermia loves Lysander, but her father, Egeus, wants her to marry Demetrius. Hermia's refusal of her father's command would result in her death sentence or residence at a nunnery by Athenian law. Therefore Lysander and Hermia run away into the forrest. On the way they meet Demetrius' former fiance and Hermia's best friend Helena, whom Demetrius abandoned to woo Hermia. Helena is still hopelessly in love, but Hermia tells her not to worry, as Lysander and she will flee and Demetrius will no longer see her face. Helena tells Demetrius, hoping that he will realize her love for him if she tells him the truth, but Demetrius pursues Hermia and Lysander into the forest with Helena following. After a scene in which Demetrius tries to get Helena to stop following him and Helena declares her love, Oberon (Fairy King), who has been watching the whole time, being invisible to humans, orders his sprite, Puck, to place a
    7.25
    4 votes
    35
    Prince Eric

    Prince Eric

    • Plays Appears In: The Little Mermaid
    Prince Eric is the hero of the animated Disney film The Little Mermaid. He later appears in the spin-off prequel television series and in the direct-to-video sequel The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea. The character is based on the "prince" character of Hans Christian Andersen's story "The Little Mermaid" but adapted by writer Roger Allers for Disney's film. The character is voiced by Christopher Daniel Barnes in the original film and the Kingdom Hearts video games, by Jeff Bennett in the prequel television series, and by Rob Paulsen in the direct-to-video sequel. In the 2007 Broadway musical version, the role was originated by Sean Palmer. Despite being of royalty, Eric is an accomplished mariner who is often seen partaking in various duties aboard ships in his own fleet. Eric is also displayed to be a skilled helmsman as he is seen steering ships in both the 1989 film and its sequel, the former his skill displayed where he skewers through Ursula in a split second hard turn to port in a derelict ship. He is often out at sea going on voyages ranging from a fishing expedition to battles at sea. He is often accompanied by Grimsby, his servant and personal confidant. Eric is the
    7.25
    4 votes
    36
    Robin Hood

    Robin Hood

    • Plays Appears In: Twang!!
    Robin Hood was a heroic outlaw in English folklore, a highly skilled archer and swordsman. Although not part of his original character, since the begining of the 19th century he has become known for "robbing from the rich and giving to the poor", assisted by a group of fellow outlaws known as his "Merry Men". Traditionally, Robin Hood and his men are depicted wearing Lincoln green clothes. The origin of the legend is claimed by some to have stemmed from actual outlaws, or from ballads or tales of outlaws. Robin Hood became a popular folk figure in the medieval period continuing through to modern literature, films and television. In the earliest sources, Robin Hood is a yeoman, but he was often later portrayed as an aristocrat wrongfully dispossessed of his lands and made into an outlaw by an unscrupulous sheriff. In popular culture, Robin Hood and his band of "merry men" are usually portrayed as living in Sherwood Forest, in Nottinghamshire, where much of the action in the early ballads takes place. So does the very first recorded Robin Hood rhyme, four lines from the early 15th century, beginning: "Robyn hode in scherewode stod." However, the overall picture from the surviving
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    Angelo

    Angelo

    Angelo is a character in Shakespeare's play Measure for Measure. Angelo is the deputy to Vincentio, the Duke of Vienna, who begins the play by departing the city under mysterious circumstances and leaves the straight-laced Angelo in power. Angelo's first act is to begin the enforcement of an old law that makes fornication out of wedlock punishable by death, but proves himself a hypocrite when Isabella, the sister of Claudio, the first man sentenced under the law, comes to plead for her brother's life. Angelo agrees to commute the sentence only if she will sleep with him. Angelo is ultimately duped by being set up with Mariana, a woman he was once betrothed to, who masquerades as Isabella at the assignation. And after Angelo thinks he has attained the object of desire, he covers his tracks by ordering the execution of Claudio after all. But before the scheme is revealed to him, he admits his angst over his behaviour: "This deed unshapes me quite, makes me unpregnant And dull to all proceedings. A deflower'd maid! And by an eminent body that enforced The law against it! But that her tender shame Will not proclaim against her maiden loss, How might she tongue me! Yet reason dares her
    8.33
    3 votes
    38
    Chip

    Chip

    • Plays Appears In: Beauty and the Beast
    Chip is a fictional character in the Disney film Beauty and the Beast.
    8.33
    3 votes
    39
    Edmund

    Edmund

    • Plays Appears In: King Lear
    Edmund or Edmond is a fictional character and the main antagonist in William Shakespeare's King Lear. He is the illegitimate son of the Earl of Gloucester, and the younger brother of Edgar, the Earl's legitimate son. Early on in the play, Edmund resolves to get rid of his brother, then his father, and become Earl in his own right. He later flirts with both Goneril and Regan and attempts to play them off against each other. Shakespeare's source for the subplot of Edmund, Edgar and Gloucester was a tale from Philip Sidney's Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia of a blind Paphlagonian king and his two sons, Leonatus and Plexitrus. The name "Edmund" itself means "wealth protector" or "protector of wealth". The artist and critic James Gillick said that the subplot of Gloucester, Edgar and Edmund is supposed to echo Lear's predicament with his daughters. Gloucester’s younger, illegitimate son is an opportunistic, short-sighted character whose ambitions lead him to form a union with Goneril and Regan. The injustice of Edmund’s situation fails to justify his subsequent actions, although at the opening of the play when Gloucester explains Edmund's illegitimacy (in his hearing) to Kent, with
    8.33
    3 votes
    40
    Captain Phoebus

    Captain Phoebus

    • Plays Appears In: Notre-Dame de Paris
    Captain Phoebus de Châteaupers is a fictional character and one of the main antagonists in Victor Hugo's 1831 novel, The Hunchback of Notre-Dame. He is the Captain of the King's Archers. His name comes from Phoebus, the Greek god of the sun (also called Apollo). In the original novel, Phoebus is an antagonist. Despite being of noble birth and very handsome, he is also vain, untrustworthy, and a womanizer. He saves Esmeralda from Quasimodo and she falls in love with him. Phoebus makes a convincing show of returning her affections, but merely wants a night of passion. Esmeralda arranges to meet Phoebus and tells him of her love for him, and he convinces her that he feels the same way about her. He is in fact engaged to another woman, the spiteful socialite Fleur-De-Lys. Not only that, he has agreed to let Claude Frollo spy on his meeting with Esmeralda. This decision proves his undoing, since as the couple prepare to have sex, the jealous Claude Frollo attacks Phoebus by stabbing him in the back. Frollo makes a quick get-away and Phoebus is presumed dead by homicide. Esmeralda, being the only one present, is presumed to be the killer. Phoebus, however, is not dead and soon recovers
    6.20
    5 votes
    41
    Phaedra

    Phaedra

    • Plays Appears In: Phèdre
    In Greek mythology, Phaedra (Greek Φαίδρα - Fedra) is the daughter of Minos and Pasiphaë, sister of Ariadne, wife of Theseus and the mother of Demophon of Athens and Acamas. Phaedra's name derives from the Greek word φαιδρός (phaidros), which meant "bright". Though married to Theseus, Phaedra fell in love with Hippolytus, Theseus' son born by either Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons, or Antiope, her sister. Euripides placed this story twice on the Athenian stage, of which one version survives. According to some sources, Hippolytus had spurned Aphrodite to remain a steadfast and virginal devotee of Artemis, and Aphrodite made Phaedra fall in love with him as a punishment. He rejected her. In one version, Phaedra's nurse told Hippolytus of her love, and he swore he would not reveal her as a source of information. In revenge, Phaedra wrote Theseus a letter that claimed Hippolytus raped her. Theseus believed her and cursed Hippolytus with one of the three curses he had received from Poseidon. As a result, Hippolytus' horses were frightened by a sea monster and dragged their rider to his death. Alternatively, after Phaedra told Theseus that Hippolytus had raped her, Theseus killed his son
    6.20
    5 votes
    42
    Count Paris

    Count Paris

    • Plays Appears In: Romeo and Juliet
    Count Paris (or County Paris) is a fictional character in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. He is a suitor of Juliet Capulet. He is handsome, wealthy, and is a kinsman of Prince Escalus. Luigi da Porto adapted the story as Giulietta e Romeo and included it in his Historia novellamente ritrovata di due Nobili Amanti published in 1530. Da Porto drew on Pyramus and Thisbe and Boccacio's Decameron. He gave it much of its modern form, including the names of the lovers, the rival families of Montecchi and Capuleti, and the location in Verona. He also introduces characters corresponding to Shakespeare's Mercutio, Tybalt, and Paris. Da Porto presents his tale as historically true and claims it took place in the days of Bartolomeo II della Scala (a century earlier than Salernitano). Montecchi and Capuleti were actual 13th-century political factions, but the only connection between them is a mention in Dante's Purgatorio as an example of civil dissention. Paris makes his first appearance in Act I, Scene II, wherein he offers to make Juliet his wife and the mother of his children. Juliet's father, Lord Capulet, demurs, telling him to wait until she is older. Capulet invites Paris to
    9.50
    2 votes
    43
    Sir Andrew Ague-Cheek

    Sir Andrew Ague-Cheek

    • Plays Appears In: Twelfth Night, or What You Will
    Sir Andrew Aguecheek (also spelled Ague-cheek) is a comic character in William Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night, or What You Will. Sir Andrew is a stereotypical fool, who is goaded into unwisely duelling with Cesario and who is slowly having his money pilfered by Sir Toby Belch. His role in the play not only provides comedy through his pathetic situation and his slow speech, but also by his distinct, long-faced appearance and garish dress sense. Sir Andrew Aguecheek first appears in the third scene of Act I, as the so-called friend of Sir Toby Belch. Sir Andrew is a guest at the home of Sir Toby's niece Lady Olivia, where Sir Toby, a drunkard and glutton, resides. Although we are not made aware of Sir Andrew's family or connections, it is said that his annual income is 3,000 ducats, a significant amount and roughly equal to that of a skilled craftsman of the period, leading us to assume that he is a gentleman of some leisure. Ineptly, Sir Andrew attempts to court Olivia, and her rejection of him, in favour of dashing Cesario, prompts Sir Andrew to challenge Cesario to a duel. His slow-witted nature allows Sir Toby perfect opportunity to take advantage of him, even openly admitting
    9.50
    2 votes
    44
    Mordred

    Mordred

    • Plays Appears In: Camelot
    Mordred or Modred (/ˈmoʊdrɛd/; Welsh: Medraut, Medrod, etc.) is a character in the Arthurian legend, known as a notorious traitor who fought King Arthur at the Battle of Camlann, where he was killed and Arthur fatally wounded. Tradition varies on his relationship to Arthur, but he is best known today as Arthur's illegitimate son by one of his half-sisters, Morgan le Fay or Morgause. In earlier literature, he was considered the legitimate son of Morgause, also known as Anna, with her husband King Lot of Orkney. His brothers or half-brothers are Gawain, Agravain, Gaheris, and Gareth, along with a few other half brothers or sisters. The name (from either Old Welsh Medraut, Cornish Modred, or Old Breton Modrot) is ultimately derived from Latin Moderātus. Mordred appears very early in Arthurian literature. The first mention of him, as Medraut, occurs in the Annales Cambriae entry for the year 537: The Annales themselves were completed between 960 and 970, though their authors drew on older material. Mordred was associated with Camlann even at that early date, but as Leslie Alcock points out, this brief entry gives no information as to whether he killed or was killed by Arthur, or even
    7.00
    4 votes
    45
    Noah

    Noah

    • Plays Appears In: Two by Two
    Noah ( /ˈnoʊ.ə/; or Noé, Noach; Hebrew: נֹחַ,‎ נוֹחַ, Modern Noaẖ Tiberian Nōăḥ; Arabic: نُوح‎ Nūḥ; Ancient Greek: Νῶε) was the tenth and last of the antediluvian Patriarchs. The story of Noah and the ark is told in chapters 6–9 of the book of Genesis, and also told in chapter 71 of the Quran. The Biblical account is followed by the story of the Curse of Ham. Outside Genesis his name is mentioned in Ezekiel, Isaiah and Chronicles. He was the subject of much elaboration in later Abrahamic traditions, including the Qur'an. Noah was the tenth of the pre-Flood Patriarchs. His father Lamech named him nûaḥ (the final ḥ is a more guttural sound than the English h), saying, "This same shall comfort us in our work and in the toil of our hands, which cometh from the ground which the LORD hath cursed." This connects the future patriarch's name with nāḥam, "comfort", but it seems better related to the word nûaḥ, meaning "rest", and is more a play on words than a true etymology. In his five hundredth year Noah had three sons, Shem, Ham and Japheth. In his six hundredth year God, saddened at the wickedness of mankind, sent a great deluge to destroy all life, but because Noah was "righteous in
    7.00
    4 votes
    46
    6.00
    5 votes
    47
    Agamemnon

    Agamemnon

    • Plays Appears In: The Oresteia
    In Greek mythology, Agamemnon (English pronunciation: /æɡəˈmɛmɒn/; Ancient Greek: Ἀγαμέμνων; modern Greek: Αγαμέμνονας, "very steadfast") was the son of King Atreus and Queen Aerope of Mycenae, the brother of Menelaus, the husband of Clytemnestra, and the father of Electra and Orestes. Mythical legends make him the king of Mycenae or Argos, thought to be different names for the same area. When Helen, the wife of Menelaus, was abducted by Paris of Troy, Agamemnon commanded the united Greek armed forces in the ensuing Trojan War. On Agamemnon's return from Troy he was murdered (according to the fullest version of the oldest surviving account, Odyssey 11.409–11) by Aegisthus, the lover of his wife Clytemnestra. In old versions of the story: "The scene of the murder, when it is specified, is usually the house of Aegisthus, who has not taken up residence in Agamemnon's palace, and it involves an ambush and the deaths of Agamemnon's followers too". In some later versions Clytemnestra herself does the killing, or they do it together, in his own home. Hittite sources mention Akagamunaš, ruler of Ahhiyawa (land of Achaeans) in the 14th century BC. This is a possible prototype of the
    8.00
    3 votes
    48
    Roderick Spode

    Roderick Spode

    • Plays Appears In: By Jeeves
    Roderick Spode, Bt, 7th Earl of Sidcup, often known as Spode or Lord Sidcup, is a recurring fictional character from the Jeeves novels of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being an "amateur Dictator" and the leader of a fictional fascist group in London called The Black Shorts. In the 1990s television series, Jeeves and Wooster, he is portrayed by John Turner and depicted as having a rather Hitleresque appearance. Spode is a large and intimidating figure, appearing "as if Nature had intended to make a gorilla, and had changed its mind at the last moment". He is constantly in love with Madeline Bassett, and though he intended to remain a bachelor during his career as a dictator, he nevertheless attempted to protect her from men "playing fast and loose"; to this end, he threatened on several occasions to beat Bertie Wooster and Gussie Fink-Nottle to a jelly. He marches his followers around London and the countryside, preaching loudly to the public on the dissoluteness of modern society until a heckler hits him in the eye with a potato. Spode is modelled after Sir Oswald Mosley, leader of the British Union of Fascists, who were nicknamed the blackshirts. Spode was at first an
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Scarecrow

    Scarecrow

    • Plays Appears In: The Wiz
    The Scarecrow is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum and illustrator William Wallace Denslow. In his first appearance, the Scarecrow reveals that he lacks a brain and desires above all else to have one. In reality, he is only two days old and merely ignorant. Throughout the course of the novel, he demonstrates that he already has the brains he seeks and is later recognized as "the wisest man in all of Oz," although he continues to credit the Wizard for them. He is, however, wise enough to know his own limitations and all too happy to hand the rulership of Oz, passed to him by the Wizard, to Princess Ozma, to become one of her trusted advisors, though he typically spends more time playing games than advising. In Baum's classic 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the living scarecrow encounters Dorothy Gale in a field in the Munchkin Country while she is on her way to the Emerald City. He tells her about his creation and of how he at first scared away the crows, before an older one realised he was a straw man, causing the other crows to start eating the corn. The old crow then told the Scarecrow of the importance of brains. The
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    Shrek

    Shrek

    • Plays Appears In: Shrek the Musical
    Shrek is a fictional ogre character created by American Author, William Steig and adapted by Dreamworks Animation. He is the main protagonist of the book and the movies. The name "Shrek" is derived from the German and Yiddish word "Schreck"/"Shreck", literally meaning "Fear" or "Terror." Shrek is voiced by Mike Myers, although was planned to be voiced by Chris Farley before his death in 1997, and played by Brian d'Arcy James in the musical. On May 21, 2010, Shrek received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles. In June 2010, Entertainment Weekly named him one of the 100 Greatest Characters of the Last 20 Years. Shrek a large, green, physically intimidating ogre, with an accent described by Mike Myers as "a Scottish guy who's lived in Scarborough for 40 years". Even though his background is something of a mystery, in the musical, it is revealed that on his seventh birthday Shrek was sent away by his parents because it was an ogre tradition(like in the book where his parent send him away). He is seen traveling alone, either being screamed at or teased by passers-by. The only time he receives a pleasant greeting is a wave from a young Fiona, who is promptly led away by
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    Brabantio

    Brabantio

    • Plays Appears In: Othello
    Brabantio (sometimes called Brabanzio) is a character in William Shakespeare's Othello (c.1601–1604). He is a Venetian senator and the father of Desdemona. He has entertained Othello is his home countless times before the play opens, thus giving Othello and Desdemona opportunity to fall in love. He is furious upon learning they have eloped, and Desdemona's decision is reported to be the cause of his death in the last act. The character has no counterpart in Shakespeare's source material for the play but is apparently the Bard's complete invention. He appears in the first act only and is mentioned in the fifth. Othello has its source in the 1565 tale "Un Capitano Moro" from Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio's Gli Hecatommithi, a collection of 100 tales in the vein of Boccacio's Decameron. While no English translation of Cinthio was available in Shakespeare's lifetime, it is possible Shakespeare knew both the Italian original and Gabriel Chappuy's 1584 French translation. He may have had access to an English translation in manuscript. Cinthio's tale may have been based on an actual incident occurring in Venice about 1508. While the principal characters in Shakespeare's play have
    6.75
    4 votes
    52
    Gavroche

    Gavroche

    • Plays Appears In: Les Misérables
    Gavroche (French pronunciation: [ɡavʁoʃ]) is a fictional character from the novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. Gavroche is the eldest son of M. and Mme Thénardier. He has two sisters, Éponine and Azelma, and two unnamed younger brothers. He is also technically unnamed; the reader is told he chooses the name for himself, but is not provided with his real name. Mme. Thénardier only loves her daughters, and M. Thénardier shows no affection for any of his children. Gavroche is told by his parents to live in the street, because he would have a better life there. The Thénardiers sell (or rent) their two youngest sons to a woman named Magnon. Due to a freak accident, the two boys are separated from Magnon without identification, and encounter Gavroche purely by chance. They are unaware of their identities, but Gavroche invites them to live with him and takes care of them. They reside in the hollow cavity of a giant elephant statue, the Elephant of the Bastille conceived by Napoleon as a fountain, but abandoned unfinished. This was no imaginary construction; located at the Place de la Bastille, it had been designed by Jean-Antoine Alavoine. The two boys soon leave him the next morning.
    6.75
    4 votes
    53
    Christine Daaé

    Christine Daaé

    • Plays Appears In: The Phantom of the Opera
    Christine Daaé is a fictional character and the female protagonist of Gaston Leroux's 1910 novel The Phantom of the Opera. She is a young singer with whom the main character Erik, The Phantom of the Opera falls in love. Christine Daaé is born just outside the Swedish town of Uppsala on the 27th October. Her mother dies when Christine is six years old, and she is brought up by her father, traveling to fairs where he plays the violin and she sings. They are discovered at one of these fairs by Professor Valérius, who takes them to Gothenburg and then to Paris, providing for Christine's education. Christine is extremely close to her father, who tells her Scandinavian fairy-tales; a tale of the "Angel of Music" is her favorite. Christine's father dies, leaving her disconsolate, despite the loving care of her adoptive mother Mme. Valérius, bedridden wife of the late Professor. Christine enters the Paris Conservatory and trains for four years to become a professional singer to please her father and Mamma Valérius, but has lost all passion for singing. When Christine arrives at the Opera Garnier, she is described as "sounding like a rusty hinge", but one person finds the beauty hidden in
    9.00
    2 votes
    54
    Cinderella

    Cinderella

    • Plays Appears In: Into the Woods
    Cinderella is a fictional character and is the main protagonist from Disney's twelfth animated film Cinderella (1950) and its two sequels. In the original film she is voiced by the late Ilene Woods. In the two sequels, she was voiced by Jennifer Hale. The Disney version of the character was based on the French version of the tale by Charles Perrault, written in 1634 in Histoires ou Contes du Temps Passé. She is the second in the Disney Princess lineup. Cinderella was voiced by Ilene Woods in the original film with Jennifer Hale taking over in the sequels. Cinderella is made a servant in her own home and is constantly derided by her evil stepmother Lady Tremaine and two stepsisters. Although she is shy and romantic, she maintains hope through her dreams and always waits for her prince to come. She is hopeful to the idea that someday her wishes of happiness will come true. When her evil stepsisters and stepmother prevent her from going to the ball, she is unhappy and fears that her dreams will never come true. However, her Fairy Godmother appears and restores hope. In her childhood, she hardly went to play with other children because of her forced servitude. She adores the mice and
    9.00
    2 votes
    55
    Electra

    Electra

    • Plays Appears In: Electra
    In Greek mythology, Electra (Greek: Ἠλέκτρα, Ēlektra) was the daughter of King Agamemnon and Queen Clytemnestra, and thus princess of Argos. She and her brother Orestes plotted revenge against their mother Clytemnestra and stepfather Aegisthus for the murder of their father, Agamemnon. Electra is the main character in two Greek tragedies, Electra by Sophocles and Electra by Euripides, and has inspired other works. In psychology, the Electra complex is also named after her. Electra's parents were King Agamemnon and Queen Clytemnestra. Her sisters were Iphigeneia and Chrysothemis, and her brother was Orestes. In the Iliad, Homer is understood to be referring to Electra in mentioning "Laodice" as a daughter of Agamemnon. Electra was absent from Mycenae when her father, King Agamemnon, returned from the Trojan War to be murdered, either by Clytemnestra's lover Aegisthus, by Clytemnestra herself, or by both. Clytemnestra had held a grudge against her husband Agamemnon for murdering their eldest daughter, Iphigenia, as sacrifice to Artemis, so he could send his ships to fight Troy for the Trojan war(disputed). When he cam back he brought with him his war prize, who had already bore his
    9.00
    2 votes
    56
    King Arthur

    King Arthur

    • Plays Appears In: Camelot
    King Arthur is a legendary British leader of the late 5th and early 6th centuries, who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the early 6th century. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians. The sparse historical background of Arthur is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin. The legendary Arthur developed as a figure of international interest largely through the popularity of Geoffrey of Monmouth's fanciful and imaginative 12th-century Historia Regum Britanniae (History of the Kings of Britain). Some Welsh and Breton tales and poems relating the story of Arthur date from earlier than this work; in these works, Arthur appears either as a great warrior defending Britain from human and supernatural enemies or as a magical figure of folklore, sometimes associated with the Welsh Otherworld, Annwn. How much of Geoffrey's Historia (completed in 1138) was adapted from
    9.00
    2 votes
    57
    Miss Yvonne

    Miss Yvonne

    • Plays Appears In: The Pee-Wee Herman Show
    Miss Yvonne is a character from Pee-wee's Playhouse, played by Lynne Marie Stewart. The role was of a woman literally obsessed with being beautiful, even going as far as to say that beauty is her life and that beauty is her work. She often flirted with Pee-wee Herman, Ricardo, the World's Strongest Man, and Cowboy Curtis, as well as several other men throughout the series. Miss Yvonne liked to go to Puppetland a lot, as she was given the prestigious title "the most beautiful woman in Puppetland" by the puppet characters, especially Mr. Window, who would usually introduce her before she came into the Playhouse door. Some of the character's trademarks were a big poofy mop of brown to orange hair (actually a wig over Stewart's real hair), her poodle skirt dresses, and her theme music (played whenever she appeared in the show). She also appeared in The Pee-wee Herman Show, a precursor to Pee-wee's Playhouse, but the character was given a much sexier undertone than in Pee-wee's Playhouse. In the episode "Rebarella," it is revealed that Miss Yvonne was a charm school graduate. In the episode "Playhouse in Outer Space", an alien version of the character named Yvona appeared, also played
    9.00
    2 votes
    58
    Mrs. Bennet

    Mrs. Bennet

    • Plays Appears In: Pride and Prejudice
    Mrs. Bennet (nᅢᄅe Gardiner) is a fictional character created by Jane Austen in the novel Pride and Prejudice. The mother of the protagonist, Elizabeth Bennet, her main concern and motivation throughout the novel is ensuring the marriage of her five daughters to suitable husbands, and she makes many mistakes and displays much social impropriety in her attempts to set the girls up with eligible men. Mrs. Bennet is characterised in the novel as something of a querulous, highly-strung and silly woman, who is constantly complaining about the effects of any pressure on her 'nerves', and as such is a figure of amusement to both her daughter Elizabeth and her husband. Unlike her husband, who choses to distance himself from his family, Mrs. Bennet is all too aware of the unfortunate circumstances that await her daughters should they not be married - as their property is entail to a male heir, they will be impoverished and homeless upon Mr. Bennet's death. As a result, she makes numerous efforts to set her daughters up with eligible bachelors in order to secure their future. Unfortunately, whilst she demonstrates the foresight and pragmatic awareness of what is necessary to secure her
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    Principal dancer

    Principal dancer

    A principal dancer (often shortened to principal) is a dancer at the highest rank within a professional dance company, particularly a ballet company. A principal may be male or female. The position is similar to that of soloist; however, principals are hired by (or promoted from within) a company to regularly perform not only solos, but also pas de deux. It is a coveted position in the company and the most prominent position a dancer can receive. The term is used mostly in ballet but can be used in other forms as well, such as modern dance. The terms prima ballerina, premier danseur, and première danseuse have been used to denote similar levels of prominence. They are usually the star of the ballet. The term senior principal dancer is sometimes used as well.
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    The Wizard

    The Wizard

    • Plays Appears In: Wicked
    The Wizard of Oz, known during his reign as The Great and Powerful Oz, is the epithet of Oscar Zoroaster Phadrig Isaac Norman Henkel Emmannuel Ambroise Diggs, a fictional character in the Land of Oz, created by American author L. Frank Baum. The character was further popularized by the classic 1939 movie, wherein his full name is not mentioned. The Wizard is one of the characters in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Unseen for most of the novel, he is the ruler of the Land of Oz and highly venerated by his subjects. Believing he is the only man capable of solving their problems, Dorothy Gale and her friends travel to the Emerald City, the capital of Oz, to meet him. Oz is very reluctant to meet them, but eventually each is granted an audience, one by one. On each of these occasions, the Wizard appears in a different form, once as a giant head, once as a beautiful fairy, once as a ball of fire, and once as a horrible monster. When, at last, he grants an audience to all of them at once, he seems to be invisible—nothing but a disembodied voice. Eventually, it is revealed that Oz is actually none of these things, but rather a kind, ordinary man from Omaha, Nebraska, who has been using a lot
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer

    • Plays Appears In: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
    Thomas "Tom" Sawyer is the title character of the Mark Twain novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876). He appears in three other novels by Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), Tom Sawyer Abroad (1894), and Tom Sawyer, Detective (1896). Sawyer also appears in at least three unfinished Twain works, Huck and Tom Among the Indians, Schoolhouse Hill, and Tom Sawyer's Conspiracy. While all three uncompleted works were posthumously published, only Tom Sawyer's Conspiracy has a complete plot, as Twain abandoned the other two works after finishing only a few chapters. The fictional character's name may have been derived from a jolly and flamboyant fireman named Tom Sawyer with whom Twain was acquainted with in San Francisco, California, while Twain was employed as a reporter at the San Francisco Call. Twain used to listen to Sawyer tell stories of his youth, "Sam, he would listen to these pranks of mine with great interest and he'd occasionally take 'em down in his notebook. One day he says to me: ‘I am going to put you between the covers of a book some of these days, Tom.’ ‘Go ahead, Sam,’ I said, ‘but don’t disgrace my name.’" Twain himself said the character sprung from three
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    Калибан

    Калибан

    • Plays Appears In: The Tempest
    Caliban ( /ˈkælɨbæn/ KAL-ə-ban) is one of the primary antagonists in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest. After his island becomes occupied by Prospero and his cohort, Caliban is forced into servitude. While he is referred to as a calvaluna or mooncalf, a freckled monster, he is the only human inhabitant of the island that is otherwise "not honour'd with a human shape“ (Prospero, I.2.283). In some traditions he is depicted as a wild man, or a deformed man, or a beast man, or sometimes a mix of fish and man, stemming from the confusion of two of the characters about what he is, found lying on a deserted island. Caliban is the son of Sycorax by (according to Prospero) a devil. Banished from Algiers, Sycorax was left on the isle, pregnant with Caliban, and died before Prospero's arrival. Caliban refers to Setebos as his mother's god. Prospero explains his harsh treatment of Caliban by claiming that after initially befriending him, Caliban attempted to rape Miranda. Caliban confirms this gleefully, saying that if he hadn't been stopped he would have peopled the island with a race of Calibans - "Though dist prevent me, I had peopled else this isle with Calibans"(Act I:ii). Prospero
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Baucis and Philemon

    Baucis and Philemon

    • Plays Appears In: Metamorphoses
    In Ovid's moralizing fable (Metamorphoses VIII), which stands on the periphery of Greek mythology and Roman mythology, Baucis and Philemon were an old married couple in the region of Tyana, which Ovid places in Phrygia, and the only ones in their town to welcome disguised gods Zeus and Hermes (in Roman mythology, Jupiter and Mercury respectively), thus embodying the pious exercise of hospitality, the ritualized guest-friendship termed xenia, or theoxenia when a god was involved. Zeus and Hermes came disguised as ordinary peasants, and began asking the people of the town for a place to sleep that night. They were rejected by all before they came to Baucis and Philemon's simple rustic cottage. Though the couple were poor, their generosity far surpassed that of their rich neighbours, at whose homes the gods found "all the doors bolted and no word of kindness given, so wicked were the people of that land." After serving the two guests food and wine (which Ovid depicts with pleasure in the details), Baucis noticed that, although she had refilled her guest's beechwood cups many times, the pitcher was still full. Realising that her guests were gods, she and her husband "raised their hands
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    Florizel

    Florizel

    • Plays Appears In: The Winter's Tale
    Florizel is a fictional character in Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale. Florizel is the son of Polixenes – King of Bohemia. He falls in love with Perdita, and wishes to marry her. His father objects to the marriage, however, and warns Florizel that his inheritance will be revoked if he ever seeks Perdita again. Polixenes objects to the marriage because he believes Perdita is a shepherdess and therefore unworthy of a royal marriage with Florizel. In spite of this, Florizel remains in love with Perdita. With the intervention of Camillo, the dilemma is resolved because Perdita is actually of royal origin (the daughter of King Leontes).
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Leir of Britain

    Leir of Britain

    • Plays Appears In: King Lear
    Leir is a legendary ancient king of the Britons, as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. His story is told in a modified form by William Shakespeare in the play King Lear. In the drama, some names are identical to those of the legend (e.g. Goneril, Regan, Cordelia), and the events are very similar. It is often claimed that there is a link between Leir and the Welsh and Irish sea-gods Llyr and Ler (derived from Common Celtic *Leros "Sea"), but the names are not etymologically related. According to Geoffrey, Leir is the eponymous founder of Leicester (Legra-ceaster or Ligora-ceaster in Anglo-Saxon), called Cair Leir in Old Welsh, where Leir (along with Anglo-Saxon Legra or Ligora) is a hydronym derived from Brittonic *Ligera or *Ligora. In Geoffrey's Historia Regum Britanniae, Leir followed his father, King Bladud who had died while using wings he fashioned, to the kingship of Britain and had the longest reign of all the kings at sixty years. The date of his reign is not clear, but Geoffrey says that Leir's father lived at the same time as the Biblical prophet Elijah. He built the city of Kaerleir (Leicester) along the banks of the River Soar, which the British called Caerleir. Unlike
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Orlando

    Orlando

    • Plays Appears In: As You Like It
    Orlando is a fictional character and the romantic male lead in the comedy As You Like It (1600?) by William Shakespeare. Orlando is the youngest son of the deceased Sir Rowland de Boys and a brother to Oliver. He is a brave, chivalrous, tender, modest, smart, strong, handsome and beloved by all. He resents the harsh treatment he receives at Oliver's hands and complains that Oliver neglects to educate him; Orlando feels that he is being kept like livestock. Despite this neglect, Orlando's talents and his aristocratic nature reveal themselves, and he becomes his father's favorite. He has a will to attain knowledge and wanted to go to school. Nevertheless, he is not successful in expressing his love to Rosalind. Orlando is in the beginning of the play complaining because his brother is not giving him a fair share of their father's money. He is portrayed as exceptionally strong in both body and in his devotion to love. It is these qualities that make Rosalind fall for him as well. After angering Oliver's crony Duke Frederick, Orlando flees his familiar surroundings to live in exile in the Forest of Arden. There, he is accepted into the circle of the usurped Duke Senior and is
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Sebastian

    Sebastian

    • Plays Appears In: The Little Mermaid
    Sebastian the lobster (full name "Horatio Thelonious Ignatius Crustaceous Sebastian") is a Disney character who first appears in Disney's 1989 feature film The Little Mermaid. He is one of the main characters of the film, and has since appeared in the prequel television series The Little Mermaid, the direct-to-video sequel The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea and direct-to-video prequel The Little Mermaid: Ariel's Beginning. In all the above animated material, Sebastian is voiced by Samuel E. Wright. Sebastian appears in the Kingdom Hearts series of games, in which he is voiced by Kōichi Yamadera in its original Japanese version, and by Kevin Michael Richardson in the English-language version. In international dubs of the original film, Sebastian has been voiced by Henri Salvador (French original dub), Christophe Peyroux (French re-dub), Ronald France (Quebec, speaking voice), Michel Comeau (Quebec, singing voice). Sebastian the lobster, a sidekick for The Little Mermaid's protagonist Ariel, is a character developed solely for the film, and is not derived from the original Hans Christian Andersen story. Aside from being a red lobster, Sebastian is also known for his Caribbean
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Tinkerbell

    Tinkerbell

    • Plays Appears In: Peter Pan
    Tinker Bell (often misspelled as Tinkerbell, also referred to as Tink for short), is a fictional character from J. M. Barrie's 1904 play Peter Pan and its 1911 novelization Peter and Wendy. She has appeared in multiple film and television adaptations of the Peter Pan stories, in particular the 1953 animated Walt Disney picture Peter Pan. She also appears in the official sequel Peter Pan in Scarlet by Geraldine McCaughrean and commissioned by Great Ormond St Hospital as well as the "Peter and the Starcatchers" book series by Ridley Pearson and Dave Barry. At first only a supporting character described by her creator as "a common fairy", her animated incarnation was a hit and has since become a widely recognized unofficial mascot of The Walt Disney Company, and the centerpiece of its Disney Fairies media franchise including the direct-to-DVD film series Tinker Bell. In her animated form she leaves a trail of twinkling pixie dust. Tinker Bell was described by Barrie as a fairy who mended pots and kettles, like an actual tinker. Her speech consists of the sounds of a tinkling bell, which is understandable only to those familiar with the language of the fairies. In the original stage
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    Anne Shirley

    Anne Shirley

    • Plays Appears In: Anne & Gilbert
    Anne Shirley is a fictional character introduced in the 1908 novel Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Montgomery wrote in her journal that the idea for Anne's story came from relatives who, planning to adopt an orphaned boy, received a girl instead. Anne Shirley's appearance was inspired by a photograph which Montgomery clipped from the Metropolitan Magazine and kept, unaware of the model's identity as the notorious 1900s Gibson Girl Evelyn Nesbit. Anne was born in Bolingbroke, Nova Scotia and spent the earliest years of her childhood there. She was orphaned as an infant of three months, when her parents, schoolteachers Walter and Bertha Shirley (née Willis), died of typhoid fever. Without any other relations, Anne was taken in by Mrs. Thomas, who had done housework for the Shirleys. After Mr. Thomas died, Anne went to live with the Hammond family for some years and was treated as little more than a servant until Mr. Hammond died, whereupon Mrs. Hammond divided her children amongst relatives and Anne was sent to the orphanage at Hopetown. She considered herself as "cursed" by twins — Mrs. Hammond had three sets of twins whom Anne helped raise. She is sent from the
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Bianca Minola

    Bianca Minola

    • Plays Appears In: The Taming of the Shrew
    Bianca Minola is a character in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew (c.1590-1594). She is the younger daughter of Baptista Minola and the sister of Kate, the "shrew" of the title. The lovely Bianca has several admirers in the play, but Baptista has refused to allow her to marry until his shrewish daughter Kate has found a husband. When Kate marries, Bianca is united with her lover, Lucentio. Theatrically, Bianca is the ingenue in Shrew and the female lead in the play's subplot. The basic elements of the play are present in Don Juan Manuel's 14th-century Castilian tale of the "young man who married a very strong and fiery woman". The play's subplot, involving the characters Bianca and Lucentio, derives from Ludovico Ariosto's I Suppositi, either directly or through George Gascoigne's English version Supposes (performed 1566, printed 1573). Bianca Minola is the younger daughter of Baptista Minola and sister to Katerina (Kate) Minola. Unlike Kate, Bianca is very obedient and sweet-tempered, causing her to have a good number of suitors. Her father however declares that none may marry Bianca until Kate is wed. Desperate to win Bianca's hand in marriage, one of her suitors Hortensio
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Emilia

    Emilia

    • Plays Appears In: Othello
    Emilia is a character in the tragedy Othello by William Shakespeare. The character's origin is traced to the 1565 tale, "Un capitano Moro" from Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio's Gli Hecatommithi. There, the character is described as young and virtuous, is referred to simply as the ensign's wife, and becomes Desdemona's companion in Cyprus. In Shakespeare, she is named Emilia, is the wife of Othello's ensign, Iago, and is an attendant to Othello's wife, Desdemona. While considered a minor character in the drama, she has been portrayed by several notable actresses on film, with one receiving an Academy Award nomination for her performance. Othello has its source in the 1565 tale, "Un Capitano Moro" from Gli Hecatommithi by Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio. While no English translation of Cinthio was available in Shakespeare's lifetime, it is probable that Shakespeare knew both the Italian original and Gabriel Chappuy's 1584 French translation. Cinthio's tale may have been based on an actual incident occurring in Venice about 1508. The only named character in Cinthio's story is "Desdemona". Other characters are identified only as the Moor, the squadron leader, the ensign, and the
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Imogen

    Imogen

    • Plays Appears In: Cymbeline
    Imogen was the daughter of King Cymbeline in Shakespeare's play Cymbeline. She was described by William Hazlitt as "perhaps the most tender and the most artless" of all Shakespeare's women. According to some modern editions of Shakespeare's plays, notably the 1986 Oxford Edition, the correct name is in fact Innogen, and the spelling "Imogen" is an error which arose when the manuscripts were first committed to print. The name Innogen is mentioned as a ghost character in early editions of Much Ado About Nothing as the wife of the Leonato character. Imogen in Cymbeline is paired with a character with the epithet "Leonatus". Imogen is princess of Britain, and the virtuous wife of the exiled Posthumus, whose praise of her moral purity incites Posthumus's acquaintance Iachimo to bet Postumus that he can seduce her. When he fails, Iachimo hides in her bedchamber and uncovers her body while she sleeps, observing details of a mole on her breast which he then describes to Posthumus as proof that he had slept with her. Posthumus plots to kill his wife, but the designated killer reveals the plot to Imogen and advises her to hide; she escapes to the woods dressed as a man and falls in with a
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    Isabella of Valois

    Isabella of Valois

    • Plays Appears In: Richard II
    Isabella of France (9 November 1389 – 13 September 1409) was Queen consort of England as the second spouse of King Richard II. Her parents were King Charles VI of France and Isabella of Bavaria-Ingolstadt. Isabella's younger sister, Catherine of Valois, was Queen consort of England from 1420–1422, as the wife of King Henry V of England and mother of Henry VI, King of England. Isabella lived during a period of political tension between France and England known as the Hundred Years War, the situation exacerbated by the mental instability of her father. On 31 October 1396, at the age of six, Isabella married the widower King Richard II of England in a move for peace with France. Although the union was political, Richard II and the child Isabella developed a mutual respectful relationship. The Queen was moved to Porchester Castle for protection while Richard went on a military campaign in Ireland. When Richard II was imprisoned and murdered on his return to England, Queen Isabella was ordered by the new King Henry IV to move out of Windsor Castle and to settle in the Bishop of Salisbury's Thameside palace at Sonning. King Henry IV then decided Queen Isabella should marry his son, the
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Kate

    Kate

    • Plays Appears In: The Taming of the Shrew
    Katherina Minola (also called Kate or occasionally Katherine) is a fictional character and the female romantic lead in the comedy The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. Kate is the elder outspoken daughter of Baptista Minola and the sister of apparently sweet-tempered Bianca. Kate's headstrong ways and sharp tongue initially make her poor material for a wife but Baptista refuses to allow his younger daughter to marry until Kate has a husband. Bianca's suitors find a fortune seeker called Petruchio willing to take the shrew in marriage. Once the two are wed, the comedy follows the couple as Kate's antagonistic behaviour (and latent kindness) is "tamed" by her husband. The play, character, Petruchio's methods and Kate's fifth act soliloquy have caused considerable controversy among feminists and modern critics. Katherina is witty, smart, clever and independent, but she has a sharp tongue. She has a bad attitude and is jealous of Bianca's boyfriends. The role of Kate has been interpreted by notable actresses including Elizabeth Taylor in a 1967 film directed by Franco Zeffirelli, with Taylor's then husband Richard Burton opposite her as Petruchio.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Medusa

    Medusa

    • Plays Appears In: Xanadu
    In Greek mythology Medusa (Greek: Μέδουσα (Médousa), "guardian, protectress") was a monster, a Gorgon, generally described as having the face of a hideous human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Gazing directly upon her would turn onlookers to stone. Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto, though the author Hyginus (Fabulae, 151) interposes a generation and gives Medusa another chthonic pair as parents. Medusa was beheaded by the hero Perseus, who thereafter used her head as a weapon until he gave it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield. In classical antiquity the image of the head of Medusa appeared in the evil-averting device known as the Gorgoneion. The three Gorgon sisters—Medusa, Stheno, and Euryale—were all children of the ancient marine deities Phorcys (or Phorkys) and his sister Ceto (or Keto), chthonic monsters from an archaic world. Their genealogy is shared with other sisters, the Graeae, as in Aeschylus's Prometheus Bound, which places both trinities of sisters far off "on Kisthene's dreadful plain": Near them their sisters three, the Gorgons, winged With snakes for hair— hated of mortal man— While ancient Greek
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Mufasa

    Mufasa

    • Plays Appears In: The Lion King
    Mufasa is a protagonist who first appeared in Disney's popular 1994 animated feature film The Lion King. In the film, Mufasa is a lion who rules a Serengeti-like location called the Pride Lands. People also know him as the father of the film's main character named Simba. Mufasa was voiced by James Earl Jones in The Lion King, its sequel and mid-quel, and video game adaptations. Mufasa's name is taken from the Swahili language, meaning "king". In the opening of the film, the animals of Mufasa's kingdom migrate to Mufasa's home called Pride Rock to greet and honor the birth of his newborn son and their next king, Simba. One person who refuses to show up at the ceremony is Mufasa's jealous younger brother named Scar, who is enraged that he has lost his place as Mufasa's immediate successor upon the birth of the prince. Out of jealousy, Scar formulates a plan to kill his older brother and Simba, so that he could rule the Pride Lands. Scar's plan is partially fulfilled when he kills Mufasa after Mufasa saves Simba from a stampede of wildebeest that was initiated by Scar's three hyena henchmen. After making Simba believe that Mufasa's death was his own fault, Scar orders his hyenas to
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Oberon

    Oberon

    • Plays Appears In: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Oberon (also spelled Auberon) is a king of the fairies in medieval and Renaissance literature. He is best known as a character in William Shakespeare's play, A Midsummer Night's Dream, in which he is Consort to Titania, Queen of the Fairies. Oberon's status as king of the fairies comes from the character of Alberich (from Old High German alb- "elf" and -rîh-, "ruler", "king"), a sorcerer in the legendary history of the Merovingian dynasty. In the legend, he is the otherworldly "brother" of Merowech, whose name is the eponym of the Merovingians. Alberich wins for his eldest son Walbert the hand of a princess of Constantinople. In the Nibelungenlied, a Burgundian poem written around the turn of the 13th century, Alberich guards the treasure of the Nibelungen, but is overcome by Siegfried. The name Oberon got its literary start in the first half of the 13th century from the fairy dwarf Oberon that helps the hero in the chanson de geste, titled Les Prouesses et faitz du noble Huon de Bordeaux. When Huon, son of Seguin count of Bordeaux, passed through the forest where he lives, he was warned against Oberon by a hermit, but his courtesy had him answer Oberon's greetings, and so gain his
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Lichas

    Lichas

    • Plays Appears In: The Trachiniae
    In Greek mythology, Lichas ( /ˈlaɪkəs/) was Hercules' servant, who brought the poisoned shirt from Deianira to Hercules because of her jealousy of Iole, killing him. The story is recounted in Sophocles’ Women of Trachis and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Cape Lichada is said to be where Hercules flung Lichas into the sea: So, in his frenzy, as he wandered there, he chanced upon the trembling Lichas, crouched in the close covert of a hollow rock. Then in a savage fury he cried out, “Was it you, Lichas, brought this fatal gift? Shall you be called the author of my death?” Lichas, in terror, groveled at his feet, and begged for mercy--“Only let me live!” But seizing on him, the crazed Hero whirled him thrice and once again about his head, and hurled him, shot as by a catapult, into the waves of the Euboic Sea. While he was hanging in the air, his form was hardened; as, we know, rain drops may first be frozen by the cold air, and then change to snow, and as it falls through whirling winds may press, so twisted, into round hailstones: even so has ancient lore declared that when strong arms hurled Lichas through the mountain air through fear, his blood was curdled in his veins. No moisture left
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    Merlin

    Merlin

    • Plays Appears In: Camelot
    Merlin is a legendary figure best known as the wizard featured in the Arthurian legend. The standard depiction of the character first appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae, written c. 1136, and is based on an amalgamation of previous historical and legendary figures. Geoffrey combined existing stories of Myrddin Wyllt (Merlinus Caledonensis), a North Brythonic prophet and madman with no connection to King Arthur, with tales of the Romano-British war leader Ambrosius Aurelianus to form the composite figure he called Merlin Ambrosius (Welsh: Myrddin Emrys). Geoffrey's rendering of the character was immediately popular, especially in Wales. Later writers expanded the account to produce a fuller image of the wizard. Merlin's traditional biography casts him as a cambion: born of a mortal woman, sired by an incubus, the non-human wellspring from whom he inherits his supernatural powers and abilities. The name of Merlin's mother is not usually stated but is given as Adhan in the oldest version of the Prose Brut. Merlin matures to an ascendant sagehood and engineers the birth of Arthur through magic and intrigue. Later authors have Merlin serve as the king's advisor
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    Portia

    Portia

    • Plays Appears In: The Merchant of Venice
    Portia is the heroine of William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. A rich, beautiful, and intelligent heiress, she is bound by the lottery set forth in her father's will, which gives potential suitors the chance to choose between three caskets composed of gold, silver and lead. If they choose the right casket – the casket containing Portia's portrait – they win Portia's hand in marriage. If they choose the wrong casket, they must leave and never seek another woman in marriage. Portia favours Bassanio, but is not allowed to give him any clues to assist in his choice. Later in the play, she disguises herself as a man, then assumes the role of a lawyer's apprentice whereby she saves the life of Bassanio's friend, Antonio, in court. Portia is one of the most prominent of Shakespeare's heroines in his mature romantic comedies. She is beautiful, gracious, rich, intelligent, and quick-witted, with high standards for her potential romantic partners. She obeys her father's will while steadfastly seeking to obtain Bassanio. She demonstrates tact to the Princes of Morocco and Aragon, who unsuccessfully seek her hand. In the court scenes, Portia finds a technicality in the bond, thereby
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    Tiresias

    Tiresias

    • Plays Appears In: The Bacchae
    In Greek mythology, Tiresias (Greek: Τειρεσίας, also transliterated as Teiresias) was a blind prophet of Thebes, famous for clairvoyance and for being transformed into a woman for seven years. He was the son of the shepherd Everes and the nymph Chariclo. Tiresias participated fully in seven generations at Thebes, beginning as advisor to Cadmus himself. Eighteen allusions to mythic Tiresias, noted by Luc Brisson, fall into three groups: one, in two episodes, recounts Tiresias' sex-change and his encounter with Zeus and Hera; a second group recounts his blinding by Athena; a third, all but lost, seems to have recounted the misadventures of Tiresias. Tiresias was a prophet of Apollo. According to the mythographic compendium Bibliotheke, different stories were told of the cause of his blindness, the most direct being that he was simply blinded by the gods for revealing their secrets. An alternate story told by the poet Pherecydes was followed in Callimachus' poem "The Bathing of Pallas"; in it, Tiresias was blinded by Athena after he stumbled onto her bathing naked. His mother, Chariclo, a nymph of Athena, begged Athena to undo her curse, but the goddess could not; instead, she cleaned
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Lucy Westenra

    Lucy Westenra

    • Plays Appears In: Dracula
    Lucy Westenra is a fictional character in the novel Dracula (1897) by Bram Stoker. She is the 19-year-old daughter of a wealthy family. Her father is not mentioned in the novel and her elderly mother is simply stated as being Mrs. Westenra. Lucy is introduced as Mina Murray's best friend. In the 1931 Universal production, she is called Lucy Weston. In the 1958 Hammer horror production, she is called Lucy Holmwood and is engaged to Jonathan Harker. Lucy Westenra is a vivacious young woman who is much praised for her beauty, purity and sweet nature. These qualities earn her three suitors, all of whom propose to her on the same day: (Arthur Holmwood, wealthy son of Lord Godalming; Quincey Morris, an American cowboy; and Doctor John Seward, an asylum psychiatrist.) Lucy accepts Arthur's proposal, but soon begins suffering from severe anemia. She has in fact become the victim of Count Dracula, who is slowly draining her of blood. Despite the best efforts of Dr. Seward and Dr. Abraham Van Helsing, Lucy's condition rapidly deteriorates. Dr. Van Helsing correctly identifies the true cause of her illness, and puts up garlic around her sickbed to repel Dracula. Even after four blood
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    Phaëton

    Phaëton

    • Plays Appears In: Metamorphoses
    In Greek mythology, Phaëton or Phaethon ( /ˈfeɪ.ətən/ or /ˈfeɪ.əθən/; Ancient Greek: Φαέθων "shining") was the son of Helios and the Oceanid Clymene. Alternate, less common genealogies make him a son of Clymenus by Merope, of Helios and Rhode (thus a full brother of the Heliadae) or of Helios and Prote. Phaëton's best friend and lover was Cycnus, the king of Liguria. Perhaps the most famous version of the myth is given us through Ovid in his Metamorphoses (Book II). Phaeton seeks assurance that his mother, Clymenē, is telling the truth that his father is the sun god Helios (as her husband is Merops, a mortal king). When Phaeton obtains his father's promise to drive the sun chariot as proof, he fails to control it and the Earth is in danger of burning up when Phaeton is killed by a thunderbolt from Zeus to prevent further disaster. The name "Phaëton", which means "shining", is also an epithet of Eosphoros, the Morning Star Venus. Phaethon is also the name of another minor Greek deity, the god of the wandering star Dios (the planet Jupiter). In the version of the myth told by Ovid in the Metamorphoses, Phaeton ascends into heaven, the home of his suspected father. His mother Clymene
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Simba

    Simba

    • Plays Appears In: The Lion King
    Simba is a title character and the protagonist of Disney's most successful animated feature film, The Lion King. He is the son of Mufasa and Sarabi, nephew of Scar, mate of Nala, and father of Kiara. He has golden fur and when he grows into an adult, he has an auburn mane. The name "Simba" comes from the Swahili word for lion. Simba is the prince of the Pride Lands, born to King Mufasa and Queen Sarabi. Simba anticipates becoming the king of Pride Rock one day, much to the chagrin of his envious uncle Scar, who desires to become the king one day himself. Simba is a playful cub who dreams of reigning over the Pride Lands and spends his days romping around with his close friend Nala, but is oblivious to his uncle's strong hatred of him and is unaware of Scar's plans to kill him so he can become the heir to the throne. Admiring the extraordinary courage possessed by his father, Simba tries to prove himself as brave as Mufasa by venturing into an known an "Elephant Graveyard" with his closest friend Nala and, to his annoyance, the hornbill Zazu, who tracks him them down. However, the graveyard is the territory of Scar's three hyena comrades, Shenzi, Banzai, and Ed, who attempt to
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Dulcinea

    Dulcinea

    • Plays Appears In: Man of La Mancha
    "Dulcinea del Toboso" (real name Aldonza Lorenzo) is a fictional character who is referred to (but does not appear) in Miguel de Cervantes' novel Don Quixote. Seeking the traditions of the knights-errant of old, Don Quixote finds a true love whom he calls Dulcinea. She is a simple peasant in his home town, but Quixote imagines her to be the most beautiful of all women. At times, Quixote goes into detail about her appearance, though he freely admits that he has seen her only fleetingly and has never spoken with her. Don Quixote describes her appearance in the following terms: "... her name is Dulcinea, her country El Toboso, a village of La Mancha, her rank must be at least that of a princess, since she is my queen and lady, and her beauty superhuman, since all the impossible and fanciful attributes of beauty which the poets apply to their ladies are verified in her; for her hairs are gold, her forehead Elysian fields, her eyebrows rainbows, her eyes suns, her cheeks roses, her lips coral, her teeth pearls, her neck alabaster, her bosom marble, her hands ivory, her fairness snow, and what modesty conceals from sight such, I think and imagine, as rational reflection can only extol,
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Fagin

    Fagin

    • Plays Appears In: Oliver!
    Fagin ( /ˈfeɪɡɪn/) is a fictional character who appears as an antagonist of the Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist, referred to in the preface of the novel as a "receiver of stolen goods", but referred to more frequently within the actual story as the "merry old gentleman" or simply the "Jew". Born in London, Fagin is described as "grotesque" to look at. He is the leader of a group of children, the Artful Dodger and Charley Bates among them, whom he teaches to make their livings by pickpocketing and other criminal activities in exchange for a roof over their heads. A distinguishing trait is his constant—and thoroughly insincere—use of the phrase "my dear" when addressing others. At the time of the novel, he is said by another character, Monks, to have already made criminals out of "scores" of children who grow up to live—or die—committing the same crimes as adults. Bill Sikes, one of the major villains of the novel, is hinted to be one of Fagin's old pupils, and Nancy, Sikes' prostitute, clearly was. Whilst portrayed as relatively humorous, he is nonetheless a self-confessed miser who, despite the amount he has acquired over the years from the work of others, does very little to
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Gertrude

    Gertrude

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    In William Shakespeare's play Hamlet, Gertrude is Hamlet's mother and Queen of Denmark. Her relationship with Hamlet is somewhat turbulent, since he resents her for marrying her husband's brother Claudius after he murdered the King (young Hamlet's father, King Hamlet). Gertrude reveals no guilt in her marriage with Claudius after the recent murder of her husband, and Hamlet begins to show signs of jealousy towards Claudius. According to Hamlet, she scarcely mourned her husband's death before marrying Claudius. Gertrude is first seen in Act 1 Scene 2 as she tries to cheer Hamlet over the loss of his father, begging him to stay at home rather than going back to school in Wittenberg. Her worry over him continues into the second act, as she sides with King Claudius in sending Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to raise the spirits of her son. Also, rather than ascribing Hamlet's sudden madness to Ophelia's rejection (as thought by Polonius), she believes the cause to be his father, King Hamlet's death and her quick, subsequent marriage to Claudius: "I doubt it is no other but the main; His father's death and our o'erhasty marriage." In Act three, she eagerly listens to the report of
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Ophelia

    Ophelia

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    Ophelia is a fictional character in the play Hamlet by William Shakespeare. She is a young noblewoman of Denmark, the daughter of Polonius, sister of Laertes, and potential wife of Prince Hamlet. As one of the few female characters in the play, she is used as a contrasting plot device to Hamlet's mother, Gertrude. In Ophelia's first speaking appearance in the play, she is seen with her brother, Laertes, who is leaving for France. Laertes warns her that Hamlet, the heir to the throne of Denmark, does not have the freedom to marry whomever he wants. Ophelia's father, Polonius, enters while Laertes is leaving, and also forbids Ophelia to pursue Hamlet, whom he fears is not earnest about her. In Ophelia's next appearance, she tells Polonius that Hamlet rushed into her room with his clothing askew, and with a "hellish" expression on his face, and only stared at her and nodded three times, without speaking to her. Based on what Ophelia tells him, about Hamlet acting in such a "mad" way, Polonius concludes that he was wrong to forbid Ophelia to see Hamlet, and that Hamlet must be mad because of lovesickness for Ophelia. Polonius immediately decides to go to Claudius (the new King of
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Philoctetes

    Philoctetes

    • Plays Appears In: Philoctetes
    Philoctetes (Greek: Φιλοκτήτης, Philoctētēs; English pronunciation:  /ˌfɪləkˈtiːtiːz/, stressed on the third syllable, -tet-), or Philocthetes, was, according to Greek mythology, the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. He was a Greek hero, famed as an archer, and was a participant in the Trojan War. He was the subject of at least two plays by Sophocles, one of which is named after him, and one each by both Aeschylus and Euripides. However, only one Sophoclean play survives—Aeschylus' Philoctetes, Euripides' Philoctetes and Sophocles Philoctetes at Troy are all lost except for some fragments. He is also mentioned in Homer's Iliad; Book 2 describes his exile on the island of Lemnos, his wound by snake-bite, and his eventual recall by the Greeks. The recall of Philoctetes is told in the lost epic Little Iliad, where his retrieval was accomplished by Odysseus and Diomedes. Philoctetes killed three men at Troy. Philoctetes was the son of King Poeas of the city of Meliboea in Thessaly. He was considered one of the lovers of the hero Heracles, and when Heracles wore the shirt of Nessus and built his funeral pyre, no one would light it for him except for Philoctetes or in other
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Three Witches

    Three Witches

    • Plays Appears In: Macbeth
    The Three Witches or Weird Sisters are characters in William Shakespeare's play Macbeth (c. 1603–1607). Their origin lies in Holinshed's Chronicles (1587), a history of England, Scotland and Ireland. Other possible sources influencing their creation aside from Shakespeare's own imagination include British folklore, contemporary treatises on witchcraft including King James I and VI's Daemonologie, Scandinavian legends of the Norns, and ancient classical myths concerning the Fates, the Greek myths of the Moirai and the Roman myths of the Parcae. Portions of Thomas Middleton's play The Witch were incorporated into Macbeth around 1618. Shakespeare's witches are prophets who hail the general Macbeth early in the play with predictions of his rise as king. Upon committing regicide and taking the throne of Scotland, Macbeth hears the trio deliver ambiguous prophecies threatening his downfall. The witches' dark and contradictory natures, their "filthy" trappings and activities, as well as their intercourse with the supernatural all set an ominous tone for the play. In the eighteenth century the witches were portrayed in a variety of ways by artists such as Henry Fuseli. Since then, their
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Falstaff

    Falstaff

    • Plays Appears In: The Merry Wives of Windsor
    Sir John Falstaff is a fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare. In the two Henry IV plays, he is a companion to Prince Hal, the future King Henry V. A fat, vain, boastful, and cowardly knight, Falstaff leads the apparently wayward Prince Hal into trouble, and is ultimately repudiated after Hal becomes king. Falstaff also appears in The Merry Wives of Windsor. Though primarily a comic figure, Falstaff still embodies a kind of depth common to Shakespeare's tricky comedy. In Act II, Scene III of Henry V, his death is described by the character "Hostess", possibly the Mistress Quickly of Henry IV, who describes his body in terms that parody Plato's description of the death of Socrates. He appears in the following plays: His death is mentioned in Henry V but he has no lines, nor is it directed that he appear on stage. However, many stage and film adaptations have seen it necessary to include Falstaff for the insight he provides into King Henry V's character. The most notable examples in cinema are Laurence Olivier's 1944 version and Kenneth Branagh's 1989 film, both of which draw additional material from the Henry IV plays. There are several works about
    6.25
    4 votes
    92
    Ghost of Hamlet's father

    Ghost of Hamlet's father

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    The ghost of Hamlet's late-father is a character from William Shakespeare's play Hamlet, also known as The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. In the stage directions he is referred to as "Ghost." He is loosely based on a legendary Jutish chieftain, named Horwendill, who appears in Chronicon Lethrense and in Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum. According to legend, the Ghost was originally played by Shakespeare himself. King Hamlet appears as a Ghost four times in the play: in Act I Scenes i, iv, and v, and Act III Scene iv. The ghost arrives at 1.00 a.m. in at least two of the scenes, and in the other scene all that is known is that it is night. The Ghost appears first to a duo of soldiers—Barnardo and Marcellus—and a visitor to Denmark, Horatio. Francisco never sees the Ghost having the immediate preceding watch to Barnardo and Marcellus. The men draw their swords and stand in fear, requesting that Horatio, as a scholar, address the ghost. Horatio asks the ghost to speak, and reveal its secret. It is about to do so when the cock crows, signaling morning, and the ghost instead disappears. In this scene, the Ghost is clearly recognized by all present as the King, dressed in his full
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    Iago

    Iago

    • Plays Appears In: Aladdin, Jr.
    Iago (Arabic: ياغو‎) is a fictional character in Disney's Aladdin franchise, starting out as a secondary antagonist and comic relief of the first film, and later supporting protagonist of the film's sequels and TV series. He is nominally part of a royal menagerie in fictional Arabian city, Agrabah. Iago is voiced by Gilbert Gottfried. Iago's animator Will Finn tried to incorporate some aspects of Gottfried's appearance into Iago's design, specially his semi-closed eyes and the always-appearing teeth. Gilbert Gottfried has said that his voiceover career really began after voicing the character in the 1992 film. “... that has been one of those things that lives on,” he said. “That seemed to open the door for other voiceover jobs.” Gottfried's unique onstage persona led to him being cast as the wise-cracking Iago. Gottfried is often referred to as "the Iago guy" and similar terms, being more known by his voice role than by name. Iago resembles a Scarlet macaw. He can speak fluent English and has the ability to perfectly mimic other characters' voices. He also possesses knowledge of various tricks learned from Jafar. He is easily frustrated and openly vocalizes his frustrations, and
    6.25
    4 votes
    94
    Tin Man

    Tin Man

    • Plays Appears In: The Wizard of Oz
    The Tin Woodman, sometimes referred to as the Tin Man or (incorrectly) the Tin Woodsman, (the third name appears only in adaptations, the first—and in rare instances, the second—was used by Baum), is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. Baum's Tin Woodman first appeared in his classic 1900 book, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and reappeared in many other Oz books. In late 19th century America, men made out of various tin pieces were used in advertising and political cartoons. Baum, who was editing a magazine on decorating shop windows when he wrote The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, was reportedly inspired to invent the Tin Woodman by a figure he had built out of metal parts for a shop display. In the books, the origins of the character are rather gruesome. Originally an ordinary man by the name of Nick Chopper (the name first appearing in The Marvelous Land of Oz), the Tin Woodman used to make his living chopping down trees in the forests of Oz, as his father had before him. The Wicked Witch of the East enchanted his axe to prevent him from marrying the girl that he loved, after being bribed by the old woman who kept the girl as a servant, and
    6.25
    4 votes
    95
    Jeeves

    Jeeves

    • Plays Appears In: By Jeeves
    Reginald Jeeves is a fictional character in the short stories and novels of P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975), being the valet of Bertie Wooster (Bertram Wilberforce Wooster). Created in 1915, Jeeves continued to appear in Wodehouse's work until his final completed novel Aunts Aren't Gentlemen in 1974. He was Wodehouse's most famous character. The name "Jeeves" comes from Percy Jeeves (1888–1916), a Warwickshire cricketer killed in the First World War. Both the name "Jeeves" and the character of Jeeves have come to be thought of as the quintessential name and nature of a valet or butler inspiring many similar characters (as well as the name of the Internet search engine Ask Jeeves). A "Jeeves" is now a generic term in references such as the Oxford English Dictionary. In a conversation with a policeman in "Jeeves and the Kid Clementina," Jeeves refers to himself as both a "gentleman's personal gentleman" and a "personal gentleman's gentleman." This means that Jeeves is a valet, not a butler—that is, he serves a man and not a household. However, Bertie Wooster has lent out Jeeves as a butler on several occasions, and notes: "If the call comes, he can buttle with the best of them." The
    5.40
    5 votes
    96
    Banquo

    Banquo

    • Plays Appears In: Macbeth
    Banquo is a character in William Shakespeare's 1606 play Macbeth. In the play, he is at first an ally to Macbeth (both are generals in the King's army) and they are together when they meet the Three Witches. After prophesying that Macbeth will become king, the witches tell Banquo that he will not be king himself, but that his descendants will be. Later, Macbeth in his lust for power sees Banquo as a threat and has him murdered; Banquo's son, Fleance, escapes. Banquo's ghost returns in a later scene, causing Macbeth to react with alarm during a public feast. Shakespeare borrowed the character of Banquo from Holinshed's Chronicles, a history of Britain published by Raphael Holinshed in 1587. In Chronicles Banquo is an accomplice to Macbeth in the murder of the king, rather than a loyal subject of the king who is seen as an enemy by Macbeth. Shakespeare may have changed this aspect of his character in order to please King James, who was thought at the time to be a descendant of the real Banquo. Critics often interpret Banquo's role in the play as being a foil to Macbeth, resisting evil where Macbeth embraces it. Sometimes, however, his motives are unclear, and some critics question
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Celia Fiennes

    Celia Fiennes

    Celia Fiennes (7 June 1662 – 10 April 1741) was an English traveller. Born at Newton Tony, Wiltshire, she was the daughter of an English Civil War Parliamentarian colonel, who was in turn the second son of William Fiennes, 1st Viscount Saye and Sele. Celia Fiennes died in Hackney in 1741. Fiennes never married. In 1691 she moved to London, where she had a married sister. She travelled around England on horseback between 1684 and about 1703, "to regain my health by variety and change of aire and exercise" (Journeys). At this time the idea of travel for its own sake was still novel, and Fiennes was exceptional as an enthusiastic woman traveller. Sometimes she travelled with relatives, but she made her "Great Journey to Newcastle and Cornwall" of 1698 accompanied only by one or two servants. Her travels continued intermittently until at least 1712 and took her through most of England. She had worked up her notes into a travel memoir in 1702, which she never published, intending it for family reading. It provides a vivid portrait of a still largely unenclosed countryside with few and primitive roads, although signposts ("posts and hands pointing to each road with the names of the great
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York

    Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York

    • Plays Appears In: Richard II
    Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, 1st Earl of Cambridge, Order of the Garter, (5 June 1341 – 1 August 1402) was a younger son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, the fourth of the five sons who lived to adulthood, of this Royal couple. Like so many medieval princes, Edmund gained his identifying nickname from his birthplace of Langley, now Kings Langley in Hertfordshire. He was the founder of the House of York, but it was through the marriage of his younger son, Richard, that the Yorkist faction in the Wars of the Roses made its claim on the throne (the other party in the Wars of the Roses, the Lancasters, being the male descendants of his elder brother, John of Gaunt). On the death of his godfather, the Earl of Surrey, Edmund was granted the Earl's lands north of the Trent, primarily in Yorkshire. In 1359 he joined his father King Edward III on an unsuccessful military expedition to France and in 1361 was made a knight of the Garter. In 1362, at the age of twenty-one, he was created Earl of Cambridge by King Edward. Some argue that Edmund had little aptitude for war, but he took part in several military expeditions to France in the 1370s, and when his tomb
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Ismene

    Ismene

    • Plays Appears In: Oedipus at Colonus
    Ismene (Ancient Greek: Ἰσμήνη, Ismênê) is the name of two women of Greek mythology. The more famous is a daughter and half-sister of Oedipus, daughter and granddaughter of Jocasta, and sister of Antigone, Eteocles, and Polynices. She appears in several plays of Sophocles: at the end of Oedipus the King, in Oedipus at Colonus and in Antigone. She also appears at the end of Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes. When Oedipus stepped down as King of Thebes, he gave the kingdom to Eteocles and Polynices, who both agreed to alternate the throne every year. However, after the first year, Eteocles refused to step down and Polynices attacked Thebes with his supporters (the Seven Against Thebes). Both brothers died in the battle. King Creon, who ascended to the throne of Thebes, decreed that Polynices was not to be buried, but left to rot on pain of death. However, Antigone defied the order and was caught. In the opening scene of the play when Antigone is about to perform the burial rituals on Polynices, Ismene serves as the compassionate but rational and prudent counterpart to Antigone's headstrong style of decision-making with no regard for consequence. While Antigone resolves to honor her
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Stanley Kowalski

    Stanley Kowalski

    • Plays Appears In: A Streetcar Named Desire
    Stanley Kowalski is a fictional character in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire. Stanley lives in the working class Faubourg Marigny neighborhood of New Orleans with his wife, Stella (née Dubois), and is employed as a factory parts salesman. He was an Army engineer in WWII, having served as a Master Sergeant. He has a vicious temper, and fights often with his wife, leading to instances of domestic violence. Near the beginning of the play, Stanley announces that Stella is pregnant. Stanley's life becomes more complicated when Stella's sister Blanche shows up at their door for a seemingly indefinite "visit." The two despise each other almost on sight; the spoiled, aristocratic Blanche openly looks down upon Stanley, whom she derides as an "ape", and she often calls him a Polack, while Stanley is enraged at what he sees as a constant reminder that he is not good enough for Stella. His resentment grows almost unbearable when Blanche starts dating his friend, Mitch, and lets Stella briefly take refuge with her after an argument in which he hits her. Stanley starts asking questions of a street merchant who knew Blanche in her old life, and finds out that Blanche is staying
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Virgilia

    Virgilia

    • Plays Appears In: Coriolanus
    Virgilia is the wife of Coriolanus in William Shakespeare's play Coriolanus (1607–1610), in which same play Volumnia is his mother. With respect to the legendary figure Gaius Marcius Coriolanus, some accounts (Brewer 1898) say that his wife's name was actually Volumnia, probably following the Roman historian Livy. However, in the very influential account of his life, and one familiar to Shakespeare, namely, Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans, the wife's name is Virgilia, or in John Dryden's translation, Vergilia. Virgilia is described by John Ruskin as "perhaps loveliest" of Shakespeare's female characters.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    The Artful Dodger

    The Artful Dodger

    • Plays Appears In: Oliver!
    Jack Dawkins, better known as the Artful Dodger, is a character in the Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist. Dodger is a pickpocket, so called for his skill and cunning in that respect. As a result he has become the leader of the gang of child criminals, trained by the elderly Fagin. He becomes Oliver's closest friend (although he betrays him when Oliver is mistakenly caught) and he tries to make him a pickpocket, but soon realizes that Oliver won't, and feels sorry for him, saying "What a pity ain't a prig!" He also has a close relationship with Charley Bates. Ultimately the Dodger is caught with a stolen silver snuff box and presumably sent to a penal colony in Australia (only alluded to in the novel). The Dodger chooses to consider himself a "victim of society," roaring in the courtroom "I am an Englishman; where are my rights?" The judge has little patience with the Dodger's posturing, and orders him out of the courtroom immediately after the jury convicts him of the theft. Dickens describes him this way: "With these last words, the Dodger suffered himself to be led off by the collar, threatening, till he got into the yard, to make a parliamentary business of it, and then
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    Victor Frankenstein

    Victor Frankenstein

    • Plays Appears In: Frankenstein - A New Musical
    Victor Frankenstein is a fictional character, the protagonist of the 1818 novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, written by Mary Shelley. He is a scientist who, after studying chemical processes and the decay of living beings, gains an insight into the creation of life and gives life to his own creature (often referred to as Frankenstein's monster, or incorrectly as Frankenstein). Victor was born in Naples, Italy, and is the son of Alphonse Frankenstein and Caroline Beaufort, who died of scarlet fever when Victor was young. He describes his ancestry thus: "I am by birth a Genevese; and my family is one of the most distinguished of that republic. My ancestors had been for many years counsellors and syndics; and my father had filled several public situations with honour and reputation." Victor has two younger brothers — William, the youngest, and Ernest, the middle child. Victor falls in love with Elizabeth Lavenza, who became his adoptive "cousin" and, eventually, his fiancée. As a young man, Frankenstein is interested in the works in alchemists such as Cornelius Agrippa, Paracelsus, and Albertus Magnus, and he longs to discover the fabled elixir of life. He loses interest
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Clytemnestra

    Clytemnestra

    • Plays Appears In: The Oresteia
    Clytemnestra or Clytaemnestra (pronounced /ˌklaɪtəmˈniːstrə/; Greek: Κλυταιμνήστρα, [klytai̯mnɛ̌ːstra]), in ancient Greek legend, was the wife of Agamemnon, king of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Mycenae or Argos. In the Oresteia by Aeschylus, she was a femme fatale who murdered her husband, Agamemnon – said by Euripides to be her second husband – and the Trojan princess Cassandra, whom he had taken as war prize following the sack of Troy; however, in Homer's Odyssey, her role in Agamemnon's death is unclear and her character is significantly more subdued. The name form Κλυταιμνήστρα (Klytaimnēstra) is commonly glossed as "famed for her suitors". However, this form is a later misreading motivated by an erroneous etymological connection to the verb μνάoμαι 'woo, court'. The original name form is believed to have been Κλυταιμήστρα (Klytaimēstra), without the -mn-, and the modern form with -mn- does not occur before the middle Byzantine period. Aeschylus, in certain wordplays on her name, appears to assume an etymological link with the verb μήδoμαι, 'scheme, contrive'. Clytemnestra was the daughter of Tyndareus and Leda, the king and queen of Sparta. According to the myth, Zeus appeared
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Dragon

    Dragon

    • Plays Appears In: Shrek the Musical
    Dragon is a fictional character from the computer animated Dreamworks film Shrek as well as its spin-offs and sequels. Dragon resembles most classical interpretations of European dragons. She has keeled, ruby-colored scales, leathery bat-like wings, long crested ears, bony spikes along her jawline, a row of dorsal spines, slitted eye pupils, and a long, spade-tipped, prehensile tail to aid in counterbalance. Dragon does not speak, but does employ physically expressive body language to communicate. Like her mate Donkey, Dragon is never given a proper name in the films. In the first film, Dragon had the task of guarding Princess Fiona in her isolated castle. The number of charred skeletons clearly visible indicates her success in this endeavor. While Shrek attempted to rescue the princess, Donkey found himself at the mercy of Dragon. Upon learning that his captor is female (due to stereotypical feminine features like long eyelashes and facial markings that look much like human cosmetics) Donkey began spouting flattery in order to distract her. Dragon then became infatuated with the smooth talker, despite the fact that her love was unrequited. As a result, she picks him up in her
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Sir Lionel

    Sir Lionel

    • Plays Appears In: Camelot
    Sir Lionel is the younger son of King Bors of Gaunnes (or Gaul) and Evaine and brother of Bors the Younger in Arthurian legend. He is a double cousin of Lancelot and cousin of Lancelot's younger half-brother Ector de Maris (not to be confused with the older Sir Ector, who was King Arthur's foster-father). When their father dies in battle against King Claudas, Lionel and Bors are rescued by the Lady of the Lake and raised in her underwater kingdom alongside her foster-son Lancelot. Like all his family, Lionel becomes a Knight of the Round Table. While traveling with Lancelot as a young man, Lionel is captured by the rogue knight Turquine, who whips him with briars and throws him in the dungeon. The scenario repeats itself later while he is on the Quest for the Holy Grail, where he proves very unworthy of the blessed object by trying to kill his brother for not rescuing him. Bors had seen Lionel getting beaten and led away, but had to make a decision to save either him or a young girl being dragged in the opposite direction. He saves the girl, and fears Lionel dead. But Lionel escapes, and attacks Bors the next time they meet. Bors proves himself worthy of the Grail when he refuses
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Wendy Darling

    Wendy Darling

    • Plays Appears In: Peter Pan
    Wendy Moira Angela Darling is a fictional character, the female protagonist of Peter and Wendy by J. M. Barrie, and in most adaptations in other media. Her exact age is not specified in the original play or novel by Barrie, though she is implied to be 12 or 13 years old or younger, as she is "just Peter's size" and he still has all his baby teeth. Her hair colour has variously been blonde, brown, or black. Wendy is portrayed in the Disney movie with a blue ribbon in her hair and blue nightdress. Wendy expresses an innocent adoration for Peter as soon as they meet, and is honest to herself and company throughout the entire book, play or movie. As a girl who is beginning to "grow up", she stands in contrast to Peter Pan, a boy who refuses to do so, the major theme of the Peter Pan stories. In the beginning, Wendy hesitates to escape to the Neverland, to take care of her brothers and accompany her mother, but in time, she shows passion for magical events and adventures. In the novel Peter Pan, and its cinematic adaptations, she is an Edwardian schoolgirl. The novel states that she attends a "kindergarten school" with her younger brothers, meaning a school for pre-adolescent children.
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Aladdin

    Aladdin

    • Plays Appears In: Aladdin
    Aladdin (Arabic: علاء الدين‎) is a fictional character and the protagonist of Walt Disney Pictures' 1992 animated feature film, Aladdin (1992), and its two direct-to-video sequels, The Return of Jafar (1994) and Aladdin and the King of Thieves (1996). He also stars in the animated television series based on the film. In all animated appearances, Aladdin is voiced by American actor Scott Weinger, while his singing voice is provided by Brad Kane. When Aladdin is introduced initially, he is 18 years old. He never received a formal education, and has only learned by being on the streets of Agrabah. He steals to survive, making him a sort of Robin Hood-type thief. Aladdin was born 18 years prior to the events in the first film. He was born to Cassim and his wife. When Aladdin was only an infant, his father left him and his mother in order to find a better life for his family. When Aladdin was two, his mother was captured by bandits and was presumed dead. Aladdin's parents were too poor to provide clothing for their son. When Aladdin was seven, he had his first encounter with Razoul, the new captain of the Sultan's guard. Aladdin had stolen an apple from a fruit stand. Initially, the
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Arthur Holmwood

    Arthur Holmwood

    • Plays Appears In: Dracula
    Sir Arthur "Art" Holmwood (later Lord Godalming) is a fictional character in Bram Stoker's novel Dracula. He is engaged to Lucy Westenra, and is best friends with the other two men who proposed to her on the very same day—Quincey Morris and Doctor John Seward. In the novel he is the one who drives a wooden stake into Lucy after she becomes a vampire and helps hunt down Count Dracula. In the middle of the story Holmwood's father dies and he succeeds his father as Lord Godalming. It is mentioned in the note at the end of the novel written seven years after Dracula's death, that Holmwood is now happily married. It is of interest to note that Holmwood and Jonathan Harker exchange personality types depending on whose significant other is being terrorized by the Count. In the beginning, Holmwood is emotional and prone to fits of depression while Jonathan attempts to maintain a strong will and recovery after his time in Dracula's castle. After the death of Holmwood's father, he gains a somewhat stronger will, befitting on his new title, while Jonathan is constantly breaking down as his wife is terrorized by the Count. Though a major character in the novel, Arthur Holmwood has often been
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Empress Elisabeth of Austria

    Empress Elisabeth of Austria

    Elisabeth of Austria (24 December 1837 – 10 September 1898) was the wife of Franz Joseph I, and therefore both Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary. She also held the titles of Queen of Bohemia and Croatia, among others. From an early age, she was called Sisi by family and friends. Although Elisabeth had a limited (but significant) influence on Austro-Hungarian politics, she became an historical icon. The Empress is now thought to have been a non-conformist who abhorred conventional court protocol, as well as a free spirit, who valued an individual sense of freedom above anything else. Following the suicide of her son Rudolf, she withdrew from public life. She was murdered by an anarchist in Geneva, Switzerland in 1898. Elisabeth is the longest serving consort of Austria. Born Her Royal Highness Duchess Elisabeth Amalie Eugenie on 24 December 1837 in Munich, Bavaria, she was the fourth child of Duke Maximilian Joseph in Bavaria and Princess Ludovika of Bavaria. Maximilian was considered to be rather peculiar; he had a childish love of circuses and traveled the Bavarian countryside to escape his duties. The family home was at Possenhofen Castle, far from the protocols of court.
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Iago

    Iago

    • Plays Appears In: Othello
    Iago is a fictional character in Shakespeare's Othello (c. 1601–04). The play's main antagonist, Iago is the husband of Emilia, who is in turn the attendant of Othello's wife Desdemona. Iago hates Othello (who is also known as "The Moor") and devises a plan to destroy him by making him believe that his wife is having an affair with his lieutenant, Michael Cassio. The role is thought to have been first played by Robert Armin, who typically played intelligent clown roles like Touchstone in As You Like It or Feste in Twelfth Night. The character's source is traced to Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio's tale "Un Capitano Moro" in Gli Hecatommithi (1565). There, the character is simply "the ensign". Iago is a soldier and Othello's ancient (ensign or standard bearer). Othello has its source in the 1565 tale, "Un Capitano Moro" from Gli Hecatommithi by Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio. While no English translation of Cinthio was available in Shakespeare's lifetime, it is possible Shakespeare knew the Italian original, Gabriel Chappuy's 1584 French translation, or an English translation in manuscript. Cinthio's tale may have been based on an actual incident occurring in Venice about 1508.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Menelaus

    Menelaus

    • Plays Appears In: The Trojan Women
    In Greek mythology, Menelaus (Ancient Greek: Μενέλαος, Menelaos) was a legendary king of Mycenaean (pre-Dorian) Sparta, the husband of Helen of Troy, and a central figure in the Trojan War. He was the son of Atreus and Aerope, and brother of Agamemnon king of Mycenae and, according to the Iliad, leader of the Spartan contingent of the Greek army during the War. Prominent in both the Iliad and Odyssey, Menelaus was also popular in Greek vase painting and Greek tragedy; the latter more as a hero of the Trojan War than as a member of the doomed House of Atreus. Although early authors such as Aeschylus refer in passing to Menelaus' early life, detailed sources are quite late, post-dating 5th-century BC Greek tragedy. According to these sources, Menelaus' father Atreus had been feuding with his brother Thyestes over the throne of Mycenae. After a back-and-forth struggle that featured adultery, incest and cannibalism, Thyestes gained the throne after his son Aegisthus murdered Atreus. As a result, Atreus’ sons, Menelaus and Agamemnon, went into exile. They first stayed with King Polyphides of Sicyon, and later with King Oeneus of Calydon. But when they thought the time was ripe to
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Mr. Bennet

    Mr. Bennet

    • Plays Appears In: Pride and Prejudice
    Mr. Bennet is a fictional character in the novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. He is the father of Elizabeth Bennet, the heroine of the story. Mr. Bennet possesses an estate in Hertfordshire. He is married with five daughters, a circumstance relevant to his legacy. The terms of Mr. Bennet's inheritance require a male heir. Because he has no son, upon his death his property is to be inherited by his closest male relative, Mr. Collins, a clergyman with whom he has had a poor relationship. Mr. Bennet, a gentle and caring man, is very close to his two elder daughters, Jane and Elizabeth, and favors "Lizzy" above the rest. However, he has a poor opinion of the intelligence and sensibility of his wife and his three younger daughters, frequently declaring them "silly" and visiting them with insulting remarks as well as gentle teasing. "Mr. Bennet's expectations were fully answered. His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened to him with the keenest enjoyment." (page 71-72 in the illustrated novel)This quotation shows Mr. Bennet¬タルs character. Mr. Bennet is a very amiable man but he has a bitingly sarcastic humour. He is possessed of a quick wit and he uses it as
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Scarlett O'Hara

    Scarlett O'Hara

    • Plays Appears In: Gone With The Wind
    Scarlett O' Hara (born Katie Scarlett O'Hara; credited as Scarlett O' Hara – Hamilton – Kennedy – Butler) is the protagonist in Margaret Mitchell's 1936 novel Gone with the Wind and in the later film of the same name. She also is the main character in the 1970 musical Scarlett and the 1991 book Scarlett, a sequel to Gone with the Wind that was written by Alexandra Ripley and adapted for a television mini-series in 1994. During early drafts of the original novel, Mitchell referred to her heroine as "Pansy", and did not decide on the name "Scarlett" until just before the novel went to print. Katie Scarlett, or Scarlett as everyone but her father calls her (she is named for his mother, chapter 2, Gone With the Wind) has dark hair, and a slim face and frame. She is an a typical protagonist, especially as a female romantic lead in fiction. When the novel opens, Scarlett is sixteen. She is vain, self-centered, somewhat spoiled, can be insecure, and has an intelligent, bright mind. She stands out in that she is smarter than and very much unlike the typical party-going belles around her. She can be a high-strung busybody, but for someone so smart, with men she loves, she can go into a mode
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Oenone

    Oenone

    • Plays Appears In: Phèdre
    In Greek mythology, Oenone ( /ɨˈnoʊniː/; Greek: Oinōnē - Οἰνώνη "wine woman") was the first wife of Paris of Troy, whom he abandoned for the queen Helen of Sparta. Oenone was a mountain nymph (an oread) on Mount Ida in Phrygia, a mountain associated with the Mother Goddess Cybele, alternatively Rhea. Her father was Cebren, a river-god. Her very name links her to the gift of wine. Paris, son of the king Priam and the queen Hecuba, fell in love with Oenone when he was a shepherd on the slopes of Mount Ida, having been exposed in infancy (owing to a prophecy that he would be the means of the destruction of the city of Troy) but rescued by the herdsman Agelaus. The couple married, and Oenone gave birth to a son, Corythus. When Paris later abandoned her to return to Troy and sail across the Aegean to kidnap Helen, the queen of Sparta, Oenone predicted the Trojan War. Out of revenge for Paris' betrayal, she sent Corythus to guide the Greeks to Troy. Another version has it that she used her son to drive a rift between Paris and Helen, but Paris, not recognizing his own son, killed him. The only extensive surviving narration of Oenone and Paris is Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, book
    5.00
    5 votes
    116
    Beast

    Beast

    • Plays Appears In: Beauty and the Beast
    The Beast is a fictional character and one of the main protagonists of Disney's 1991 animated film Beauty and the Beast. As the film is based on the traditional fairy tale of the same name, the Beast is based on the corresponding character from that fairy tale. He has also appeared in two direct-to-video midquels, Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas and Beauty and the Beast: Belle's Magical World. The character also appears in the Beauty and the Beast musical. He also appears in all three installments of the Disney/Square video game series, Kingdom Hearts, and has appeared numerous times in the ABC series House of Mouse. He is featured in Mickey's Magical Christmas: Snowed in at the House of Mouse. The Beast also appears at the Walt Disney Parks and Resorts as a meetable character. The Beast is voiced in all of his movie and video appearances, as well as in the Kingdom Hearts series, by Robby Benson. While his true name is never mentioned in the media franchise, it has been confirmed by the CD-ROM tie-in game The D Show that his real name is Prince Adam. Director Kirk Wise mentioned that the Beast was challenging to design, saying that he and co-director Gary Trousdale
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Éponine Thénardier

    Éponine Thénardier

    • Plays Appears In: Les Misérables
    Éponine Thénardier ( /ˈɛpɵniːn tɨˈnɑrdi.eɪ/; French: [epɔnin tenaʁdje]; c.1815-1832), also referred to as the "Jondrette girl", is a fictional character in the 1862 novel Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. As children, Éponine and her younger sister Azelma are described as pretty, well-dressed, charming and a delight to see. They are pampered and spoiled by their parents the Thénardiers. Following their parents' example, they tease and mistreat Cosette. As an adolescent, Éponine and her family descend into poverty due to the bankruptcy of her parents' inn. Éponine becomes a "pale, puny, meagre creature," with a hoarse voice like "a drunken galley slave’s" due to it being "roughened by brandy and by liquors." She now wears dirty and tattered clothing that consists of a chemise and a skirt. She also has missing teeth, mangled hair, bony shoulders, heavy brooding drooping eyes, and a premature-aging face with only a trace of beauty lingering. Éponine brings Marius and Cosette together, even though she herself is in love with him and envious of Cosette. Éponine is the elder daughter of M. and Mme Thénardier, who run an inn in the town of Montfermeil. A woman named Fantine and her
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Michael Cassio

    Michael Cassio

    • Plays Appears In: Othello
    Michael Cassio, or simply Cassio, is a fictional character in William Shakespeare's Othello. The source of the character is the 1565 tale "Un Capitano Moro" by Cinthio; Cassio is unnamed in Cinthio but referred to as "the squadron leader". In the play, Cassio is a young and handsome lieutenant under Othello's command who becomes one of Iago's several victims in a plot to ruin Othello. Othello has its source in the 1565 tale "Un Capitano Moor" from Gli Hecatommithi by Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio. While no English translation of Cinthio was available in Shakespeare's lifetime, it is probable that Shakespeare knew both the Italian original and Gabriel Chappuy's 1584 French translation. Cinthio's tale may have been based on an actual incident occurring in Venice about 1508. Cassio is based upon Cinthio's squadron leader. Cassio is a Florentine gentleman soldier, a man of high manners and theoretical learning, and one of Othello's chief lieutenants. There is a supposed rivalry between Cassio and the play's villain, Iago. Iago claims to resent Cassio because Othello chose Cassio rather than Iago as his lieutenant, in spite of the fact that Cassio has no practical knowledge of
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Nala

    Nala

    • Plays Appears In: The Lion King
    Nala is a Disney lioness character who first appeared in Disney's popular 1994 animated feature film The Lion King. Her name is of Tanzanian origin and means "dream". Nala's main animators were Bob Bryan and Gilda Palinginis and her supervising animators were Aaron Blaise (cub) and Anthony de Rosa (adult). During early production Nala was given a younger brother named Mheetu. He is mentioned in the book The Art of The Lion King where he is referred to as "Mee-Too". He was designed by Thom Enriquez. Nala is first seen in the film as a cub being held by her mother Sarafina in the cave where the pride sleeps. Nala is next seen being bathed by her mother, then Simba arrives and tells her that he knows of a "really cool place", not knowing that Scar is tricking him into visiting the dangerous Elephant Graveyard. After lying and saying that they are going to the waterhole, the cubs gain permission and are allowed to go provided that Zazu goes with them. Simba and Nala lose Zazu and travel to the Elephant Graveyard where they are attacked by the three hyenas Shenzi, Banzai and Ed, who were instructed by Scar to kill Simba. The cubs are eventually rescued by Mufasa. Nala is not seen again
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    The Grinch

    The Grinch

    • Plays Appears In: Seussical
    The Grinch is a fictional character created by Dr. Seuss. He first appeared as the main protagonist in the 1957 children's book, How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The devious, anti-holiday spirit of the character has led to the term Grinch coming to refer to a person opposed to Christmas time celebrations or to someone with a coarse, greedy attitude. In fact, a document in the live-action film (the Book of Who) stated that "The term Grinchy shall apply when Christmas spirit is in short supply". The Grinch has since become an icon of the winter holidays, despite the character's hatred of the season, and has appeared on various forms of memorabilia such as Christmas ornaments, plush dolls, Halloween costumes, and various clothing items. In 2002, TV Guide ranked The Grinch number 5 on its "50 Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Time" list. Although the animated film and all subsequent visual media depict the Grinch as green with creme colored eyes, in the original Seuss book he, like everything else, is printed in black, white, and shades of red, his appearance is mainly described to look like a giant, green, mutated chimpanzee. He lives in an isolated cave near Whoville, the town in
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Tootles

    Tootles

    • Plays Appears In: Peter Pan
    Peter Pan's Lost Boys are characters in J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up and subsequent adaptations and extensions to the story. They are boys who fall out of their prams when the nurse is not looking and were lost by their nannies in places such as Kensington Gardens. Having gone unclaimed for seven days, they were whisked off to Neverland, where they live with Peter Pan. There are no "lost girls", because (as Peter explains) girls are much too clever to fall out of their prams and be lost in this manner. The Lost Boys play smaller roles and are less characterized in the Disney movie, appearing more as a group than individually. In some related Disney material, they are named with the inspired animal costumes: Foxy/Slightly, Rabbit/Nibs, Skunk/Tootles, Cubby/Curly and the Raccoons/Twins, while in Return to Neverland, they are again named as their book counterparts (with the exception of Cubby/Curly). Tootles is the only Lost Boy not to speak in either of the films, in Return to Neverland he communicates with a pad and pencil. Cubby/Curly is voiced by Robert Ellis, Slightly is voiced by Stuffy Singer, Nibs is voiced by Jeffery Silver, and the Twins are
    5.75
    4 votes
    122
    Astyanax

    Astyanax

    In Greek mythology, Astyanax ( /əˈstaɪ.ənæks/; Ancient Greek: Ἀστυάναξ – Astyánax, gen.: Ἀστυάνακτος) was the son of Hector, Crown Prince of Troy and Princess Andromache of Cilician Thebe. His birth name was Scamandrius (in Greek Σκαμάνδριος or Σκάμανδρος, after the river Scamander), but the people of Troy nicknamed him Astyanax (i.e. high king, or overlord, of the city), because he was the son of the city's great defender (Iliad VI, 403) and the heir apparent's firstborn son. During the Trojan War, Andromache hid the child in Hector's tomb but the child was discovered, and his fate was debated by the Greeks, for if he were allowed to live, it was feared he would avenge his father and rebuild Troy. In the version given by the Little Iliad and repeated by Pausanias (x 25.4), he was killed by Neoptolemus (also called Pyrrhus), who threw the infant from the walls. Another version is given in Iliou persis. It has also been depicted in some Greek vases that Neoptolemus kills Priam, who has taken refuge near a sacred altar, using Astyanax's dead body to club the old king to death, in front of horrified onlookers. In Ovid's Metamorphoses, the child is thrown from the walls by the Greek
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Belle

    Belle

    • Plays Appears In: Beauty and the Beast
    Belle is a fictional character and the female protagonist of Walt Disney Pictures' thirtieth animated feature film Beauty and the Beast (1991). She subsequently appears in the film's two direct-to-video midquels, Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas (1997) and Belle's Magical World (1998), as well as a live-action/animated direct-to-video spin-off, Belle's Tales of Friendship (1999). A live-action version of the character appears in Sing Me a Story with Belle, a spin-off television series based on the film. From 1991 to 2011, Belle was voiced by American actress Paige O'Hara in all film appearances and merchandise. In 2011, O'Hara was replaced by American actress Julie Nathanson. Belle is the fifth member of the Disney Princess line-up. The only daughter of an inventor named Maurice, with whom she lives in a small town in France, Belle, though perceived by her fellow villagers as the most beautiful girl in town, is simultaneously considered "strange" because of her love of reading and non-conformity. In the first film, Belle dreams of leaving her provincial village life and having adventures "in the great wide somewhere", like the ones she reads about in her books.
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Erik, the Phantom of the Opera

    Erik, the Phantom of the Opera

    • Plays Appears In: The Phantom of the Opera
    Erik (also known as The Phantom of the Opera, commonly referred to as The Phantom) is a title character from Gaston Leroux's 1910 novel The Phantom of the Opera. He is also the protagonist and antagonist of many film adaptations of the novel, notably the 1925 film adaptation starring Lon Chaney, Sr., and Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical. In the original novel, few details are given regarding Erik's past, although there is no shortage of hints and implications throughout the book. Erik himself laments the fact that his mother was horrified by his appearance (and is said to have abandoned him), and that his father, a master mason, never saw him. It is also revealed that "Erik" was not, in fact, his birth name, but one that was given or found "by accident", as Erik himself says within the work. Leroux sometimes calls him "the man's voice"; Erik also refers to himself as "The Opera Ghost", "The Angel of Music", and attends a masquerade as the Red Death. Most of the character's history is revealed by a mysterious figure, known through most of the novel as The Persian or the Daroga, whom had been a local police chief in Persia, following Erik to Paris; other details are discussed in the
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Goneril

    Goneril

    • Plays Appears In: King Lear
    Goneril, or Gonerill, is a fictional character in William Shakespeare’s King Lear. She is the eldest of King Lear's daughters. Along with her sister Regan, Goneril is considered a wicked character. She is obsessed with power and overthrowing her elderly father as ruler of the kingdom. She is an aggressive woman, a rare trait for a female character in Elizabethan literature. The earliest example of her deceitful tendencies is in the first act. Lear is dividing his kingdom among his three daughters, as long as they express their true love to him. Knowing her response will get her closer to the throne, Goneril says, “Sir, I love you more than words can wield the matter,” (1.1. 53). She has no reservations while lying to her father. She finally begins to show her true colors when Lear asks to stay with her and her husband. She tells him to send away his knights and servants because they are too loud and too numerous. Livid that he is being disrespected, Lear curses her and leaves. Goneril, the wife of the Duke of Albany, has an intimate relationship with Edmund, one that may have been played up in the earlier editions of King Lear. She writes a note encouraging Edmund to kill her
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Helena

    Helena

    • Plays Appears In: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Helena is one of the iconic four young lovers in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and is a very desperate woman. She is generally interpreted as being tall, slim and blonde - her best friend Hermia calls her a "painted maypole" during an argument. Although she does not see herself as attractive, she is just as pretty as Hermia. Helena comes from a rich family in Athens and, with regards to status, is towards the higher end of the social hierarchy. Helena and Demetrius were previously betrothed. Demetrius is known to not care about who he is with. He was first engaged to Helena, but was told to marry Hermia. He was fine with that, but Helena wasn't. She wishes to have his love again. In act I, Scene I, Lysander says "Demetrius, I'll avouch it to his head, Made love to Nedar's daughter, Helena" showing us that Demetrius is a fickle lover. When she hears that Lysander and Hermia have planned to elope, she informs Demetrius in the hope that this will make him love her. However, her plan didn't go as she intended for it to go... Instead, Demetrius insists on following Lysander and Hermia, in the hope of winning Hermia's love. Eventually, all four lovers find themselves
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Jafar

    Jafar

    • Plays Appears In: Aladdin, Jr.
    Jafar (Arabic: جعفر Ja'far) is a fictional character featured as the primary antagonist in the Disney film Aladdin and its sequel, The Return of Jafar. He is an evil sorcerer and the former Grand Vizier of the Sultan of Agrabah. He does not appear in Aladdin and the King of Thieves since he is permanently defeated in the sequel, but he is mentioned by the Genie. Jafar has a pet parrot named Iago in the first film; the bird normally perches on Jafar's shoulders or his staff. He is voiced by Jonathan Freeman. Patrick Stewart was originally offered the role of Jafar, but scheduling conflicts with Star Trek: The Next Generation forced him to turn down the role. He has said in interviews that this is his biggest regret in his career, and in the top three of biggest regrets of his life. Jafar's name may be a derivative of Jafar or Giafar (Arabic: جعفر‎) from tales of the Arabian Nights. Giafar was the protagonist of many stories in Arabian Nights, but he was never presented as a villain. The original tale of Aladdin, a Syrian story not originally attached to the Arabian Nights, features two characters who correspond to Disney's Jafar: an unnamed Vizier who is jealous of Aladdin but does
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    Mabel "Madea" Simmons

    Mabel "Madea" Simmons

    • Plays Appears In: I Can Do Bad All By Myself
    Mabel Simmons, commonly known as Madea, is a comedic, fictional character created and portrayed by Tyler Perry. The character is a towering, massive, elderly woman, with a fiercely vindictive nature about her, quick to not only stand up for herself but get even as well; in fact, when asked why she felt the need to get somebody all the time, Madea answered: "Well when you gettin' got and somebody done got you and you go get them, when you get em', everybody's gon' get got." To add to that, Madea's insanely overreactive, willing to threaten the use of weapons, drive through buildings, use physical violence, as well as use any and all means necessary to show up a wrongdoer or offending party. Incorrigible in her overreactive ways, Madea is constantly landing herself in court, anger management classes, house arrest, and even prison. Despite all of her reckless and unruly behavior, the character is used to teach a lesson. She has an accent, with catchphrases such as "Heller, how ya dern?" or "Halleluyer praise da lort!" Although Madea is featured as a costarring role in most of Perry's plays and films, including Diary of a Mad Black Woman, Madea's Family Reunion, Meet the Browns, Madea
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    129
    Miles Gloriosus

    Miles Gloriosus

    • Plays Appears In: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
    Miles Gloriosus (literally, "braggart-soldier", in Latin) is a stock character of a boastful soldier from the comic theatre of ancient Rome, and variations on this character have appeared in drama and fiction ever since. The character derives from the alazôn or "braggart" of the Greek Old Comedy (e.g. Aristophanes). The term "Miles Gloriosus" is occasionally applied in a contemporary context to refer to a posturing and self-deceiving boaster or bully. In the play Miles Gloriosus by Plautus, the term applies to the main character Pyrgopolynices. This foolish Miles Gloriosus brags openly and often about his supposed greatness, while the rest of the characters feign their admiration and secretly plot against him. Heavily borrowing from Plautus, the Stephen Sondheim-Burt Shevelove-Larry Gelbart musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum features a warrior named Miles Gloriosus. Shakespeare uses the type most notably with the worthless Captain Parolles in All's Well That Ends Well and with Falstaff in Henry IV, Part 1 and Part 2 and The Merry Wives of Windsor. In Commedia dell'arte, the figure of Il Capitano is a miles gloriosus. In music, the title role of Háry János by
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    130
    Princess Ariel

    Princess Ariel

    • Plays Appears In: The Little Mermaid
    Ariel is a fictional character and the lead protagonist of Walt Disney Pictures' twenty-eighth animated film The Little Mermaid (1989). She subsequently appears in the film's prequel television series, direct-to-video sequel The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea (where her daughter takes over as the protagonist, while Ariel is a secondary character instead) and direct-to-video prequel The Little Mermaid: Ariel's Beginning. Ariel is voiced by Jodi Benson in all animated appearances and merchandise. She is fourth in the Disney Princess lineup and the only princess to become a mother. Ariel has a very distinctive appearance, with her long, flowing red hair, blue eyes, green tail and a purple seashell bikini top. In the films and television series she is the youngest daughter of King Triton and Queen Athena of an underwater kingdom of Merfolk. She is often rebellious, and in the first film longs to be a part of the human world. She marries Prince Eric, whom she rescued from a shipwreck, and together they have a daughter, Melody. The character is based on the protagonist of Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid" story, but was developed into a different personality for the
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    131
    Pylades

    Pylades

    • Plays Appears In: The Oresteia
    In Greek mythology, Pylades ( /ˈpaɪlədiːz/; Greek: Πυλάδης) is the son of King Strophius of Phocis and of Anaxibia, daughter of Atreus and sister of Agamemnon and Menelaus. He is mostly known for his strong friendship with his cousin Orestes, son of Agamemnon. Orestes had been sent to Phocis during his mother Clytemnestra's affair with Aegisthus. There he was raised with Pylades, and so considered him to be like a brother. While Orestes was away, Clytemnestra killed her husband, Orestes' father Agamemnon. As an adult, Orestes returns to Mycenae/Argos seeking revenge for the death of Agamemnon. With his friend Pylades' assistance, Orestes murders mother Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus. While Pylades seems to be a very minor character, he is arguably the most vital piece of Orestes' plan to avenge his father. In The Libation Bearers, the second play of Aeschylus' trilogy Orestia, Pylades speaks only once. His lines come at the moment Orestes begins to falter and second guess his decision to kill his mother. It is Pylades who convinces Orestes to follow through with his plan for revenge and carry out the murder. The significance of Pylades' lines has invited speculation into
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    132
    Schroeder

    Schroeder

    • Plays Appears In: You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown
    Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. He is distinguished by his precocious skill at playing the toy piano, as well as by his love of classical music and the composer Ludwig van Beethoven in particular. Schroeder is also the catcher on Charlie Brown's baseball team, though he is always seen walking back to the mound with the baseball, never throwing it—admitting in one strip he didn't want the other team to discover his lack of ability. He is also the object of the unrequited infatuation of Lucy van Pelt, who constantly leans on Schroeder's piano. Charlie Brown, Sally Brown, Peppermint Patty, Frieda and Snoopy are also occasionally depicted as leaning on Schroeder's piano. After Linus and Snoopy, Schroeder is probably Charlie Brown's closest friend; he once angrily berated Violet for giving Charlie Brown a used valentine well after Valentine's Day had come and gone, only to be undercut when Charlie Brown eagerly accepted it. Schroeder also joined Linus in dressing down the girls (Lucy, Patty, Violet and Frieda) and Snoopy in Charlie Brown's All-Stars, when it was discovered Charlie Brown wouldn't sacrifice the
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    2 votes
    133
    Catherine of Aragon

    Catherine of Aragon

    • Plays Appears In: Henry VIII
    The representation in fiction of the actual Catherine of Aragon, Queen Consort of England and first wife of Henry VIII.
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    134
    Andromache

    Andromache

    • Plays Appears In: Andromache
    In Greek mythology, Andromache (/ænˈdrɒməkiː/; Ancient Greek: Ἀνδρομάχη) was the wife of Hector and daughter of Eetion, and sister to Podes. She was born and raised in the city of Cilician Thebe, over which her father ruled. The name means "battle of a man", from ἀνδρός (andros) "of a man" and μάχη (machē) "battle". During the Trojan War, Hector was killed by Achilles, and their son Astyanax was thrown from the city walls by the Greek Herald Talthybius. Neoptolemus took Andromache as a concubine and Hector's brother, Helenus, as a slave. By Neoptolemus, she was the mother of Molossus, and according to Pausanias, of Pielus and Pergamus. When Neoptolemus died, Andromache married Helenus and became Queen of Epirus. Pausanias also implies that Helenus' son, Cestrinus, was by Andromache. Andromache eventually went to live with Pergamus in Pergamum, where she died of old age. Homer's rendering of Andromache portrays her as a perfect wife, giving Hector sound advice regarding the defense of Troy which he disregards in favor of meeting the Greeks in the field of battle. When she hears of Hector's death, she is embroidering flowers into a purple cloak, demonstrating her distinction from
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    135
    Eurydice

    Eurydice

    • Plays Appears In: Eurydice
    Eurydice ( /jʊˈrɪdɨsiː/; Εὐρυδίκη, Eurudikē) in Greek mythology, was an oak nymph or one of the daughters of Apollo (the god of light). She was the wife of Orpheus, who tried to bring her back from the dead with his enchanting music. Eurydice was the wife of Orpheus, who loved her dearly; on their wedding day, he played joyful songs as his bride danced through the meadow. One day, a satyr saw and pursued Eurydice, who stepped on a venomous snake, dying instantly. Distraught, Orpheus played and sang so mournfully that all the nymphs and gods wept and told him to travel to the Underworld and retrieve her, which he gladly did. After his music softened the hearts of Hades and Persephone, his singing so sweet that even the Erinyes wept, he was allowed to take her back to the world of the living. In another version, Orpheus played his lyre to put Cerberus, the guardian of Hades, to sleep, after which Eurydice was allowed to return with Orpheus to the world of the living. Either way, the condition was attached that he must walk in front of her and not look back until both had reached the upper world. However, soon he began to doubt that she was there and that Hades had deceived him. Just
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    136
    Lady Macbeth

    Lady Macbeth

    • Plays Appears In: Macbeth
    Lady Macbeth is a character in Shakespeare's Macbeth (c.1603–1607). She is the wife to the play's protagonist, Macbeth, a Scottish nobleman. After goading him into committing regicide, she becomes Queen of Scotland, but later suffers pangs of guilt for her part in the crime. She dies off-stage in the last act, an apparent suicide. The character's origins lie in the accounts of Kings Duff and Duncan in Holinshed's Chronicles (1587), a history of Britain familiar to Shakespeare. Shakespeare's Lady Macbeth appears to be a composite of two separate and distinct personages in Holinshed's work: Donwald's nagging, murderous wife in the account of King Duff, and Macbeth's ambitious wife in the account of King Duncan. Lady Macbeth is a powerful presence in the play, most notably in the first two acts. Following the murder of King Duncan, however, her role in the plot diminishes. She becomes an uninvolved spectator to Macbeth's plotting, and a nervous hostess at a banquet dominated by her husband's hallucinations. Her fifth act sleepwalking scene is a turning point in the play, and her line, "Out, damned spot!," has become a phrase familiar to most speakers of the English language. The
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    137
    Maria

    Maria

    • Plays Appears In: Twelfth Night, or What You Will
    Maria is a fictional character in the play Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare. She is a servant in Olivia's household.
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    138
    Pozzo

    Pozzo

    • Plays Appears In: Waiting for Godot
    Pozzo is a character from Samuel Beckett's play Waiting for Godot. His name is Italian for "well" (as in "oil well"). On the surface he is a pompous, sometimes foppish, aristocrat (he claims to live in a manor, own many slaves and a Steinway piano), cruelly using and exploiting those around him (specifically his slave, Lucky and, to a lesser extent, Estragon). He wears similar clothes to Vladimir and Estragon (i.e. a bowler and suit), but they are not in the dire condition theirs are. He sometimes wears a heavy "greatcoat" that is usually carried by Lucky. His props include a whip, a pipe, a monocle, a breath freshener, and a pocket watch. Beckett indicates in the stage directions that he is completely bald, although this direction is rarely taken in most productions of the play. While by no means a villain in a conventional sense of the word, Pozzo is sometimes considered (nominally) the "antagonist" of Waiting for Godot. Although he is not technically in opposition to the so-called heroes of the play (Vladimir and Estragon) he does bring chaos into their sheltered world. Upon his first entrance, he immediately goes about attempting to exert authority on the hapless "Didi" and
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    139
    Cadmus

    Cadmus

    Cadmus or Kadmos (Ancient Greek: Κάδμος), in Greek mythology was a Phoenician prince, the son of king Agenor and queen Telephassa of Tyre and the brother of Phoenix, Cilix and Europa. He was originally sent by his royal parents to seek out and escort his sister Europa back to Tyre after she was abducted from the shores of Phoenicia by Zeus. Cadmus founded the Greek city of Thebes, the acropolis of which was originally named Cadmeia in his honor. Cadmus was credited by the ancient Greeks (Herodotus is an example) with introducing the original Alphabet or Phoenician alphabet -- phoinikeia grammata, "Phoenician letters" -- to the Greeks, who adapted it to form their Greek alphabet. Herodotus estimates that Cadmus lived sixteen hundred years before his time, or around 2000 BC. Herodotus had seen and described the Cadmean writing in the temple of Apollo at Thebes engraved on certain tripods. He estimated those tripods to date back to the time of Laius the great-grandson of Cadmus. On one of the tripods there was this inscription in Cadmean writing, which as he attested, resembled Ionian letters: Ἀμφιτρύων μ᾽ ἀνέθηκ᾽ ἐνάρων ἀπὸ Τηλεβοάων ("Amphitryon dedicated me [don't forget]the spoils
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    140
    Cruella de Vil

    Cruella de Vil

    • Plays Appears In: 101 Dalmatians Musical
    Cruella de Vil is a fictional character and the villain of Dodie Smith's 1956 novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians, Disney's 1961 animated film adaptation One Hundred and One Dalmatians, and Disney's live-action film adaptations 101 Dalmatians and 102 Dalmatians. In all her incarnations, Cruella kidnaps Dalmatian puppies for their fur. In the live-action version, it is revealed that the reason Cruella chooses to skin puppies is that when short-haired dogs grow older, their fur becomes very coarse, which does not sell as well in the fur fashion industry as the fine, soft fur of puppies. Cruella de Vil ranked 39th on AFI's list "100 Years...100 Heroes and Villains". Cruella's name is a play on the words cruel and devil to turn them into a French-sounding woman's name, an allusion which is emphasized by having her country house nicknamed "Hell Hall". In some translations, Cruella De Vil is known as "Cruella De Mon" to change the play on the word "devil" to one on "demon" because the word "devil" in some languages does not have a clear meaning. An example is Italy, where she is called "Crudelia De Mon" (a pun on "crudele", cruel, and "demone", demon). In the French translation of the
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    141
    Juliet Capulet

    Juliet Capulet

    • Plays Appears In: Romeo and Juliet
    Juliet is one of the title characters in William Shakespeare's tragedy Romeo and Juliet, the other being Romeo. She is the daughter of old Capulet, head of the house of Capulet. The story has a long history that precedes Shakespeare himself. The play takes place over a time span of four days. Within these few days, Juliet is thrust into adulthood quickly—where she must deal with issues of life, love, passion, and even death. During the play she is courted by a potential husband (Count Paris), falls in love with another (Romeo), marries Romeo secretly, experiences the death of her cousin Tybalt, has one brief passionate night with her new husband before he is forced to leave the city, is threatened by her father and nearly disowned by both of her parents for refusing to marry the man they have chosen for her, she is emotionally betrayed by the nurse who raised her from infancy, spends nearly two days drugged to unconsciousness, is widowed, and ultimately commits suicide near the body of her dead husband. Shakespeare's Juliet is a headstrong and intelligent character in spite of her young age, though she often seems timid to the audience because of her young age. She is considered by
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    142
    Lucy van Pelt

    Lucy van Pelt

    • Plays Appears In: You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown
    Lucille "Lucy" van Pelt is a fictional character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. She is the main bully and the older sister of Linus and Rerun. Lucy is a crabby and cynical eight-year-old girl, and often bullies the other characters in the strip, particularly Linus and Charlie Brown. She is often referred to as the world's greatest fussbudget, mostly by her mother. Lucy was introduced into the strip on March 3, 1952, as a wide-eyed baby who constantly tormented her parents. She soon grew into her familiar persona of a bossy, crabby, manipulative and selfish girl. Very early on, Schulz eliminated the circles around her eyes and allowed her to mature to the age of the other characters; she does have tiny half circles around her eyes (as do the other van Pelt siblings). Lucy wears a blue dress with white and black saddle shoes for most of the strip's original run. However, in later years, towards its end, she was seen more often in T-shirts and pants, until her dress was phased out altogether. Perhaps Lucy's most famous gimmick in her long existence as a character is the one in which she pulls the football away from Charlie Brown right as he
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    143
    Lumiere

    Lumiere

    • Plays Appears In: Beauty and the Beast
    Lumière is a fictional character and supporting protagonist from Disney's 1991 American animated film, Beauty and the Beast. He was voiced by the late Jerry Orbach and later by Jeff Bennett. Lumiere is the kind-hearted maître d' and Head-Servant of the Beast's castle, transformed into a candelabrum when his master, Prince Adam, was turned into a hideous Beast by an Enchantress as punishment for his cold-heart. Lumiere, however, at the time of the movie, is the polar opposite of his master: while the Beast strictly forbids people from entering his castle, Lumiere takes kindly to visitors, and is even willing to bend the Beast's rules in the most serious of ways, much to the dismay of his best friend, Cogsworth, the majordomo who was turned into a clock. This often causes friction between the two, the point that they fight or even stop speaking to each other temporarily. Lumiere first appears in the film when Belle's father, Maurice, enters the castle after being stranded in the wolf-infested forest by his horse. While Lumiere welcomes him warmly and even sits him in the Beast's private chair in the lounge, the Beast arrives and locks Maurice in the tower as punishment for
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    144
    Neoptolemus

    Neoptolemus

    • Plays Appears In: Philoctetes
    Neoptolemus ( /ˌniːəpˈtɒlɨməs/; Greek: Νεοπτόλεμος, Neoptolemos, "new war"), also called Pyrrhus ( /ˈpɪrəs/; Πύρρος, Purrhos, "red", for his red hair), was the son of the warrior Achilles and the princess Deidamia in Greek mythology, and also the mythical progenitor of the ruling dynasty of the Molossians of ancient Epirus. Achilles' mother foretold many years before Achilles' birth that there would be a great war. She saw that her only son was to die if he fought in the war. She sought a place for him to avoid fighting in the Trojan War, due to a prophecy of his death in the conflict. She disguised him as a woman in the court of Lycomedes, the King of Scyros. During that time, he had an affair with the princess, Deidamea, who then gave birth to Neoptolemus. Neoptolemus was originally called Pyrrhus, because the female version of that name, Pyrrha, had been taken by his father while disguised as a woman. The Greeks captured the Trojan seer, Helenus, and forced him to tell them under what conditions could they take Troy. Helenus revealed to them that they could defeat Troy if they could acquire the poisonous arrows of Heracles (then in Philoctetes' possession); steal the Palladium
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    145
    Romeo Montague

    Romeo Montague

    • Plays Appears In: Romeo and Juliet
    Romeo is one of the title characters in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. Romeo is the son of old Montague and his wife, who secretly loves and marries Juliet, a member of the rival House of Capulet. Forced into exile by his slaying of Tybalt, Juliet's cousin, in a duel, Romeo commits suicide upon hearing falsely of Juliet's death. The character's origins can be traced as far back as Pyramus, who appears in Ovid's Metamorphoses, but the first modern incarnation of Romeo is Mariotto in the 33rd of Masuccio Salernitano's Il Novellino (1476). This story was adapted by Luigi da Porto as Giulietta e Romeo (1530), and Shakespeare's main source was an English verse translation of this text by Arthur Brooke. Although both Salernitano and da Porto claimed that their stories had historical basis, there is little evidence that this is the case. Romeo is one of the most important characters of the play, and has a consistent presence throughout it. His role as an idealistic lover has led the word "Romeo" to become a synonym for a passionate male lover in various languages. Although often treated as such, it is not clear that "Montague" is a surname in the modern sense. The earliest tale
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    146
    Shylock

    Shylock

    • Plays Appears In: The Merchant of Venice
    Shylock is a fictional character in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. Because of the character's notable request of a "pound of flesh" for security interest, individuals considered to charge excessive interest on loans are sometimes called "Shylock." In The Merchant of Venice, Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who agrees to lend money to Bassanio on the credit of Antonio, Shylock's Christian rival. Shylock, suspicious of Antonio, sets the security as a pound of Antonio's flesh. When Antonio's merchant ventures fail and he cannot come up with the money to pay off Bassanio's loan, Shylock demands the pound of flesh, which will surely kill Antonio. Shylock insists that his debt be paid; he wants revenge on Antonio because not only does Antonio lend money without interest (thus making Shylock lose business), he also spits on Shylock, verbally and physically abuses him, and turns his friends against him and inflames his enemies towards him. Shylock also becomes obsessed with collecting his debt because of his grief: his only daughter, Jessica, has fled his house, taking his money and jewels, to elope with Antonio's friend Lorenzo and convert to Christianity. At the time this play was
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    147
    White Rabbit

    White Rabbit

    • Plays Appears In: Wonderland: Alice's New Musical Adventure
    The White Rabbit is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll's book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. He appears at the very beginning of the book, in chapter one, wearing a waistcoat, and muttering "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!" Alice follows him down the rabbit hole into Wonderland. Alice encounters him again when he mistakes her for his housemaid Mary Ann and she becomes trapped in his house after growing too large. The Rabbit shows up again in the last few chapters, as a herald-like servant of the King and Queen of Hearts. In his article "Alice on the Stage," Carroll wrote "And the White Rabbit, what of him? Was he framed on the "Alice" lines, or meant as a contrast? As a contrast, distinctly. For her 'youth,' 'audacity,' 'vigour,' and 'swift directness of purpose,' read 'elderly,' 'timid,' 'feeble,' and 'nervously shilly-shallying,' and you will get something of what I meant him to be. I think the White Rabbit should wear spectacles. I'm sure his voice should quaver, and his knees quiver, and his whole air suggest a total inability to say 'Boo' to a goose!" Overall, the White Rabbit seems to shift back and forth between pompous behavior toward his underlings, such as
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    148
    Ariel

    Ariel

    • Plays Appears In: The Tempest
    Ariel ( /ˈæriəl/) is a spirit who appears in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest. Ariel is bound to serve the magician Prospero, who rescued him from the tree in which he was imprisoned by Sycorax, the witch who previously inhabited the island. Prospero greets disobedience with a reminder that he saved Ariel from Sycorax's spell, and with promises to grant Ariel his freedom. Ariel is Prospero's eyes and ears throughout the play, using his magical abilities to cause the tempest in Act One which gives the play its name, and to foil other characters' plots to bring down his master. The source of Ariel's name and character is unknown, although several critics have pointed out his similarities to the Ariel mentioned in Isaiah chapter 29 in the Bible. The name means "Lion of the Lord", in this sense. Ariel may also be a simple play on the word "aerial". Scholars have compared him to sprites depicted in other Elizabethan plays, and have managed to find several similarities between them, but one thing which makes Ariel unique is the human edge and personality given him by Shakespeare. Since the stage directions in The Tempest are so precise, critics and historians are better able to see
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    149
    Herodias

    Herodias

    • Plays Appears In: Salome
    Herodias (c. 15 BC-after 39 AD) was a Jewish princess of the Herodian Dynasty. Asteroid 546 Herodias is named after her. Herod II (born - ca. 27 BC; died - 33 AD) was the son of Herod the Great and his third wife Mariamne II, who was the daughter of Simon Boethus the High Priest (Mark 6:17). For a brief period he was his father's heir. Some writers call him Herod Philip I (not to be confused with Philip the Tetrarch, whom some writers call Herod Philip II). Herod was the first husband of Herodias, and because the Gospel of Mark states that Herodias was married to Philip, some scholars have argued that his name was actually Herod Philip. Many scholars dispute this, however, and believe the Gospel writer was in error, a suggestion supported by the fact that the later Gospel of Luke drops the name Philip. Because he was the grandson of the high priest Simon Boethus he is sometimes described as Herod Boethus, but there is no evidence he was actually called this. Herod the Great's execution of his Hasmonean sons, Alexander and Aristobulus IV in 7 BC, left the latter's daughter Herodias an orphaned minor. Herod engaged her to Herod II, her half-uncle, and her connection to the Hasmonean
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    150
    Iphigeneia

    Iphigeneia

    • Plays Appears In: Iphigeneia in Tauris
    Iphigenia ( /ɪfɨdʒɨˈnaɪ.ə/; Ancient Greek: Ἰφιγένεια, Iphigeneia) is a daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra in Greek mythology. In Attic accounts, her name means "strong-born", "born to strength", or "she who causes the birth of strong offspring." Artemis punished Agamemnon after he killed a deer in a sacred grove and boasted he was the better hunter. On their way to Troy to participate in the Trojan War, Agamemnon's ships were suddenly motionless, as Artemis stopped the wind in Aulis (ancient Greece). The soothsayer, Calchas, revealed an oracle that appeased Artemis, so that the Achaean fleet could sail. This much is in Homer, who does not discuss the aspect of this episode in which other writers explain that the only way to appease Artemis was to sacrifice Iphigenia to her. According to the earliest versions he did so, but other sources claim that Iphigenia was taken by Artemis to Tauris in Crimea to prepare others for sacrifice, and that the goddess left a deer or a goat (the god Pan transformed) in her place. The Hesiodic Catalogue of Women called her Iphimede (Ἰφιμέδη) and told that Artemis transformed her into the goddess Hecate. Antoninus Liberalis said that Iphigenia was
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    4 votes
    151
    Jacob Marley

    Jacob Marley

    • Plays Appears In: Scrooge: The Musical
    Jacob Marley is a fictional character who appears in Charles Dickens' 1843 novella A Christmas Carol. In life, Marley was the business partner of Ebenezer Scrooge. As teenagers, both men had been apprenticed in business and met as clerks in another business. The firm of Scrooge and Marley was a nineteenth century financial institution, probably a counting house, as Marley refers to their offices as 'our money-changing hole'. They have become successful bankers, with seats on the London Stock Exchange. In A Christmas Carol, Marley is said to have died seven years earlier on Christmas Eve (as the setting is Christmas Eve 1843, this would have made the date of his passing December 24, 1836). It would be his ghost who would be Scrooge's first visitor (before the three other spirits to come). Marley preys upon Scrooge's mind in many different ways. First, his face appears in place of Scrooge's door-knocker as Scrooge approaches his lodgings; secondly, Scrooge gets the impression of a hearse ascending the stairs before him as he climbs; thirdly his face replaces each of the engraved images in the hearth and mantel of Scrooge's bedroom fireplace; then every bell in the house rings
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    152
    Pentheus

    Pentheus

    In Greek mythology, Pentheus ( /ˈpɛnˌθuːs/ or /ˈpɛnˌθjuːs/) was a king of Thebes. His father was Echion, the strongest of the Spartes. His mother was Agave, the daughter of Cadmus, the founder of Thebes, and the goddess Harmonia. Much of what is known about the character comes from Euripides' tragic play, The Bacchae. Cadmus, the king of Thebes, abdicated due to his old age in favor of his grandson Pentheus. Pentheus soon banned the worship of the god Dionysus, who was the son of his aunt Semele, and did not allow the women of Cadmeia to join in his rites. An angered Dionysus caused Pentheus' mother Agave and his aunts Ino and Autonoë, along with all the other women of Thebes, to rush to Mount Cithaeron in a Bacchic frenzy. Because of this, Pentheus imprisoned Dionysus, thinking the man simply a follower, but his chains fell off and the jail doors opened for him. Dionysus lured Pentheus out to spy on the Bacchic rites disguised as a woman, and Pentheus expected to see sexual activities. The daughters of Cadmus saw him in a tree and thought him to be a wild animal. They pulled Pentheus down and tore him from limb from limb (as part of a ritual known as the sparagmos). When his true
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    153
    King Claudius

    King Claudius

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    King Claudius is a character and the antagonist from William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. He is the brother to King Hamlet, second husband to Gertrude and uncle to Hamlet. He obtained the throne of Denmark by murdering his own brother with poison and then marrying the late king's widow. He is loosely based on the Jutish chieftain Feng who appears in Chronicon Lethrense and in Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum. Claudius is seen at the beginning of the play to be a capable monarch as he deals diplomatically with such issues as the military threat from Norway and Hamlet's depression. It is not until the appearance of King Hamlet's ghost that it is revealed that Claudius may have poisoned the old king in his sleep in order to usurp both his throne and his wife. During the play's progression he takes a turn for the worse by first resorting to spying, and, when that fails, murder. It is in Act III scene 3, when Claudius forestalls Hamlet's revenge by confessing his sins to God in his own private chapel, that the audience can be sure of his guilt. He is shown to be discontent and unhappy with the events taking place. The young prince spies him brooding about his wrongdoings and trying to pray
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    154
    Mina Harker

    Mina Harker

    • Plays Appears In: Dracula
    Wilhelmina "Mina" Harker (née Murray) is a fictional character and the protagonist of Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula. She begins the story as Miss Mina Murray, a young school mistress who is engaged to Jonathan Harker, and best friends with Lucy Westenra. She visits Lucy in Whitby on July 24 of that year, when schools would have closed for the summer. After her fiancé Jonathan escapes from Count Dracula's castle, Mina travels to Budapest and joins him there. Mina cares for him during his recovery from his traumatic encounter with the vampire and his brides, and the two return to England as husband and wife. Back home, they learn that Lucy has died from a mysterious illness stemming from severe blood loss as the result of repeated attacks by an unknown, blood-drinking animal; — the animal, they learn, was none other than Dracula taking a different shape. Mina and Jonathan join the coalition around Abraham Van Helsing, and turn their attentions to destroying the Count. After Dracula learns of this plot against him, he takes revenge by visiting — and biting — Mina at least three times. Dracula also feeds Mina his blood, destining her to become a vampire at her death.
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    155
    Nick Bottom

    Nick Bottom

    Nick Bottom is a character in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream who provides comic relief throughout the play, and is famously known for getting his head transformed into that of an ass by the elusive Puck within the play. Bottom and Puck are the only two characters who interact and progress the three central stories in the whole play, Puck is the one who is first introduced in the fairies story and creates the drama of the lover's story by messing up who loves who, as well as placing the ass on Bottom's head in his story. Similarly Bottom is performing in a play in his story intending it to be presented in the lover's story as well as interacting with Titania in the fairies' story. Nick Bottom is a member of the group within the play commonly known as the Mechanicals, a troupe of foolish/clumsy men, all of whom are craftsmen in Athens. The Mechanicals include:Bottom, the weaver; Snout, the tinker; Snug, the joiner; Starveling, the tailor; Flute, the bellows-mender; and Quince, the carpenter. The Mechanicals - sometimes called the Hempen Homespuns - led by Peter Quince, are rehearsing a play, Pyramus and Thisbe (written by Peter Quince) in hopes of performing for Duke Theseus
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    156
    Orpheus

    Orpheus

    • Plays Appears In: Eurydice
    Orpheus ( /ˈɔrfiːəs/ or /ˈɔrfjuːs/; Ancient Greek: Ὀρφεύς) was a legendary musician, poet, and prophet in ancient Greek religion and myth. The major stories about him are centered on his ability to charm all living things and even stones with his music, his attempt to retrieve his wife, Eurydice, from the underworld, and his death at the hands of those who could not hear his divine music. As an archetype of the inspired singer, Orpheus is one of the most significant figures in the reception of classical mythology in Western culture, portrayed or alluded to in countless forms of art and popular culture including poetry, opera, and painting. For the Greeks, Orpheus was a founder and prophet of the so-called "Orphic" mysteries. He was credited with the composition of the Orphic Hymns, a collection of which survives. Shrines containing purported relics of Orpheus were regarded as oracles. Some ancient Greek sources note Orpheus's Thracian origins. The earliest literary reference to Orpheus is a two-word fragment of the sixth-century BCE lyric poet Ibycus: onomaklyton Orphēn ("Orpheus famous-of-name"). He is not mentioned in Homer or Hesiod. Most ancient sources accept his historical
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    157
    Otto Frank

    Otto Frank

    • Plays Appears In: The Diary of Anne Frank
    Ben Kingsley played Otto Frank in Anne Frank: The Whole Story.
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    158
    Pongo

    Pongo

    • Plays Appears In: 101 Dalmatians Musical
    Pongo is a character from the Disney animated movie "One Hundred and One Dalmatians". He is a dalmatian. His "pet," Roger, is depressed about being single. Pongo helps him meet a woman and marries her. The woman also has a dalmatian dog, a female, Perdita, and she and Pongo also marry. They soon have 15 puppies. But those puppies are kidnapped along with 84 others by Cruella De Vil, who wants to kill them all to make a fur coat out of their skin. Pongo and Perdita work with other dogs using the "Twilight Bark" to rescue them and defeat Cruella. Since the other puppies were from pet stores and are now homeless, they all move in with Pongo and Perdita's "pets" Roger and Anita as one big happy family to create their Dalmation Plantation He appears as a guest in "House of Mouse". He appears in the videogame "Kingdom Hearts", where the 99 puppies are scattered across the worlds, so Sora, Goofy and Donald must rescue them. In the live action remake of the original movie, he is poratrayed by a real dog.
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    159
    Princess Jasmine

    Princess Jasmine

    • Plays Appears In: Aladdin, Jr.
    Princess Jasmine (Arabic: لاميرة ياسمين‎) is a fictional character of Disney's 1992 animated feature film, Aladdin. She subsequently appears the film's two direct-to-video sequels, The Return of Jafar (1994) and Aladdin and the King of Thieves (1996), and in the animated television series based on the film. In the first film, Jasmine's speaking voice is provided by American actress Linda Larkin, who also voices the character in the sequels and television series, while her singing voice is provided by Filipina-American singer and actress Lea Salonga. Salonga is replaced by actress Liz Callaway in the sequels. Jasmine is the sixth official Disney Princess, and the first to be of Arabian heritage. In the first film, Jasmine, the beautiful princess of Agrabah, is being forced to marry a prince by her father, the Sultan. Jasmine, however, has grown tired of her controlled palace life, and dreams of abandoning it in preference for a life of adventure in which she is free to marry whomever she chooses. Jasmine is based on Princess Badroulbadour from the One Thousand and One Nights tale of "Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp". The character has received generally mixed to positive reception,
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    160
    Sarabi

    Sarabi

    • Plays Appears In: The Lion King
    Sarabi is a fictional lioness character who first appeared in Disney's popular 1994 animated feature film The Lion King. Sarabi means "mirage" in Swahili. She was voiced by the late Madge Sinclair. Due to Sinclair's death, Sarabi's character was not featured in future installments of the The Lion King film series. Sarabi is the queen of Mufasa, the sister-in-law of Scar, the mother of Simba and grandmother of Kiara. At the beginning of the film, she is seen cradling a very young Simba before Rafiki presents him to the crowd of animals gathered at Pride Rock. Later she is seen as Simba rouses his father Mufasa to take him to the top of Pride Rock to show him the kingdom. Her next appearance is when she is snoozing on a rock next to Nala's mother Sarafina as Simba comes running along to tell Nala about the elephant graveyard. Both Simba and Nala plead with Sarabi and Sarafina to allow them to go exploring. The wise Sarabi allows the cubs to explore the Pride Lands on the condition that Zazu accompanies them. Then she is seen as the lionesses are mourning the deaths of Mufasa and Simba (who is not dead, but exiled by Scar). She appears again, years later as Scar demands that she
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    161
    Alcestis

    Alcestis

    • Plays Appears In: Alcestis
    Alcestis (Ἄλκηστις) is a princess in Greek mythology, known for her love of her husband. Her story was popularised in Euripides's tragedy Alcestis. She was the daughter of Pelias, king of Iolcus, and either Anaxibia or Phylomache. In the story, many suitors appeared before King Pelias, her father, when she became of age to marry. It was declared she would marry the first man to yoke a lion and a boar (or a bear in some cases) to a chariot. The man who would do this, King Admetus, was helped by Apollo, who had been banished from Olympus for 9 years to serve as a shepherd to Admetus. With Apollo's help, Admetus completed the king's task, and was allowed to marry Alcestis. After the wedding, Admetus forgot to make the required sacrifice to Artemis, and found his bed full of snakes. Apollo again helped the newly wed king, this time by making the Fates drunk, extracting from them a promise that if anyone would want to die instead of Admetus, they would allow it. Since no one volunteered, not even his elderly parents, Alcestis stepped forth. Shortly after, Heracles rescued Alcestis from Hades, as a token of appreciation for the hospitality of Admetus. Admetus and Alcestis had a son,
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    162
    Deianira

    Deianira

    • Plays Appears In: The Trachiniae
    Deïanira or Dejanira (pronounced /ˌdeɪ.əˈnaɪərə/, Greek, Δηϊάνειρα, [dɛːiáneːra], or Δῃάνειρα; Deïaneira "man-destroyer" or "destroyer of her husband") is a figure in Greek mythology, best known for being Heracles' third wife and, in the late Classical story, unwittingly killing him with the Shirt of Nessus. She is the main character in the play Women of Trachis by Sophocles. Deianira is also the name of a second character in Greek mythology, an Amazon killed by Heracles during his ninth labour, the quest for the girdle of Hippolyta. Deianira is the daughter of Althaea and Oeneus ("wine-man" and thus civilized), the king of Calydon, and the sister of Meleager. She also was said to have become the mother of Macaria (who saved the Athenians from defeat by Eurystheus). One version of a late Classical tale relates that she was of such striking beauty that both Heracles and Achelous wanted to marry her and there was a contest to win her hand. Her father had already betrothed her to the fearsome river god Achelous, horned and bull-like. Deianira was not passive, however. "This Deianira drove a chariot and practiced the art of war", noted the Bibliotheca (book i, 8:1), but she wanted
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    163
    General Tom Thumb

    General Tom Thumb

    • Plays Appears In: Barnum
    General Tom Thumb was the stage name of Charles Sherwood Stratton (January 4, 1838 – July 15, 1883), a little person who achieved great fame under circus pioneer P.T. Barnum. Stratton was a son of a Bridgeport, Connecticut, carpenter named Sherwood Edward Stratton. Sherwood was the son of Seth Sherwood Stratton and Amy Sharpe. Sherwood married his first cousin Cynthia Thompson, daughter of Joseph Thompson and Mary Ann Sharpe. Charles Stratton's maternal and paternal grandmothers, Amy and Mary Ann Sharpe, were allegedly small twin girls born on 11 July 1781/83 in Oxford, New Haven, Connecticut. Born in Bridgeport to parents who were of medium height, Charles was a relatively large baby, weighing 9 pounds 8 ounces (4.3 kg) at birth. He developed and grew normally for the first six months of his life, at which point he was 25 inches (64 cm) tall and weighed 15 pounds (6.8 kg). Then he stopped growing. His parents became concerned when, after his first birthday, they noticed he had not grown at all in the previous six months. They showed him to their doctor, who said there was little chance Charles would ever grow to, or reach normal height. By late 1842, Stratton had not grown an inch
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    164
    Perdita

    Perdita

    • Plays Appears In: The Winter's Tale
    Perdita (pronounced /ˈpɜrdɪtə/ PUR-di-tə) is one of the heroines of William Shakespeare's play The Winter's Tale. She is the daughter of Leontes, King of Sicilia, and his wife Hermione. Perdita is born in prison, where her father has sent her mother because he wrongly believes she has been unfaithful to him. Paulina takes the baby to Leontes to try to convince him that it is his daughter, but he refuses to believe it. He thinks instead that she is the result of an affair between Hermione and Polixenes, King of Bohemia. He sends Antigonus to leave the infant Perdita on the seacoast of Bohemia. In a dream, Hermione appears to Antigonus and tells him to name her child Perdita, which means "the lost she" in Latin and, in Italian, "loss". He takes pity on her, but is chased away and eaten by a bear. Luckily, Perdita is rescued by a shepherd who takes her in and raises her with his son. Early in the play, Perdita is described as being a beauty of conception. Sixteen years later, Perdita has grown into a beautiful young woman, unaware of her royal heritage. Prince Florizel, the prince of Bohemia, falls in love with her and plans to marry her. His father, however, disapproves of the
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    165
    Scar

    Scar

    • Plays Appears In: The Lion King
    Scar is a Disney character and the main antagonist in Walt Disney Pictures' popular 1994 animated movie The Lion King. He was voiced by Jeremy Irons in the English version of The Lion King and his supervising animator was Andreas Deja. He is also one of the three characters to not have a Swahili name. Scar is one of four Disney characters to be nominated for "Best Villain" in the MTV Movie Awards (the other three being the White Witch, Captain Barbossa and Davy Jones), and is also the only animated character to have achieved this. Scar is the younger brother of Mufasa, the uncle of Simba, and second in line to the throne after Simba is born. Scar is jealous of Simba's position as the next king of the Pride Lands, so he plots to kill his brother and nephew, in order to seize the throne. To carry out his plans, Scar recruits three spotted hyenas; Shenzi, Banzai and Ed — who gladly do his bidding in exchange for food. At first, there seem to be only three hyenas, but eventually it becomes apparent that he has influenced an entire army of them. Mufasa foils their first attempt to kill Simba, so Scar calls up his troops and promises that when he is king the hyenas will "never go hungry
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    166
    Scuttle

    Scuttle

    • Plays Appears In: The Little Mermaid
    Scuttle was the name of a fictional seagull that first appeared in the 1989 Walt Disney Studios feature film ''The Little Mermaid''. Being both a creature of the sea and of the surface world, the mermaid Ariel considered Scuttle an expert on the trinkets she collected from the human world, though his identifications were often completely wrong. He wrongly named a fork a dinglehopper and said it was used as a comb and a smoking pipe a snarfblatt while claiming it worked like a trumpet. We later hear Ariel invoke these contrived terms in her song "Part of Your World", where she refers to her collected relics from the human world as "whatsits", "whozits", "gadgets", "gizmos", and "thing-a-mabobs." The voice of the goofy seagull was provided by Buddy Hackett in The Little Mermaid and in the direct-to-video sequel, The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea, in 2000. For the 1992-1994 cartoon series, the House of Mouse TV series, and since Hackett's death in 2003, Scuttle has been voiced by voice actor Maurice LaMarche. He also had a brief appearance in episode "Scuttle" in The Little Mermaid television series. Scuttle also had a minor role near the climax of the first movie. While
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    167
    Wicked Witch of the West

    Wicked Witch of the West

    • Plays Appears In: The Wiz
    The Wicked Witch of the West is a fictional character and the most significant antagonist in L. Frank Baum's children's book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. In Baum's subsequent Oz books, it is the Nome King who is the principal villain; the Wicked Witch of the West is rarely even referred to again after her death in the first book. The witch's most popular depiction was in the classic 1939 movie based on Baum's book. In that film adaptation, as in Gregory Maguire's revisionist Oz novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West and its musical adaptation Wicked, the Witch of the West is the sister of the Wicked Witch of the East, although this is neither stated nor implied in the original novel. The Wicked Witch of the West leagued together with the Wicked Witch of the East, Mombi and the Wicked Witch of the South, to conquer the Land of Oz and divide it among themselves, as recounted in L. Frank Baum's Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz. W. W. Denslow's illustrations for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz depict her as a paunched old woman with three pigtails and an eye-patch. L. Frank Baum himself specified that she only had one eye, but that it "was as powerful as a telescope",
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    168
    Mrs. Lovett

    Mrs. Lovett

    Mrs. Lovett is a fictional character appearing in many adaptations of the story Sweeney Todd. She is most commonly referred to as Nellie, although Margery, Maggie, Sarah, Shirley, Wilhemina and Claudetta are other names she has been given. First appearing in the penny dreadful serial The String of Pearls, it is debated if she was based on an actual person or not. The character also appears in modern media related to Sweeney Todd including the Stephen Sondheim musical and its 2007 film adaptation. In every version of the story in which she appears, Mrs. Lovett is the business partner and accomplice of barber/serial killer Sweeney Todd; in some versions, she is also his lover. She makes and sells meat pies made from Todd's victims. Usually, Mrs. Lovett is depicted as a childless widow, although in some depictions (but very rarely) Mr. Albert Lovett is shown. Before she goes into business with Todd, she is on the verge of poverty, with her premises being filthy and infested with vermin. In the musical she has resorted to using a rather revolting substitute for meat, and laments her pies are the worst ones in London. She also appears to have a rivalry (or at least in her mind) with
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    169
    Pygmalion

    Pygmalion

    • Plays Appears In: Pygmalion and Galatea
    Pygmalion is a legendary figure of Cyprus. Though Pygmalion is the Greek version of the Phoenician royal name Pumayyaton, he is most familiar from Ovid's Metamorphoses, X, in which Pygmalion was a sculptor who fell in love with a statue he had carved. Pumayyaton means "the gift of Pumay" or "Pumay has given as a gift/blessing," referring to a Phoenician god whose name appears on a stone in Nora. In Alimo's narrative, Pygmalion was a Cypriot goldsmith who was interested in sculpture; he carved a woman out of ivory. According to Ovid, after seeing the Propoetides prostituting themselves (more accurately, they denied the divinity of Venus and she thus "reduced" them to prostitution), he was "not interested in women", but his statue was so fair and realistic that he fell in love with it. In time, Venus' festival day came, and Pygmalion made offerings at the altar of Venus. There, too scared to admit his desire, he quietly wished for a bride who would be "the living likeness of my ivory girl". When he returned home, he kissed his ivory statue and found that its lips felt warm. He kissed it again and touched her breasts with his hand and found that the ivory lost its hardness. Venus had
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    170
    Aeacus

    Aeacus

    • Plays Appears In: The Frogs
    Aeacus (also spelled Eacus, Greek: Αἰακός) was a mythological king of the island of Aegina in the Saronic Gulf. He was son of Zeus and Aegina, a daughter of the river-god Asopus. He was born on the island of Oenone or Oenopia, to which Aegina had been carried by Zeus to secure her from the anger of her parents, and whence this island was afterwards called Aegina. According to some accounts Aeacus was a son of Zeus and Europa. Some traditions related that at the time when Aeacus was born, Aegina was not yet inhabited, and that Zeus changed the ants (μύρμηκες) of the island into men (Myrmidons) over whom Aeacus ruled, or that he made men grow up out of the earth. Ovid, on the other hand, supposes that the island was not uninhabited at the time of the birth of Aeacus, and states that, in the reign of Aeacus, Hera, jealous of Aegina, ravaged the island bearing the name of the latter by sending a plague or a fearful dragon into it, by which nearly all its inhabitants were carried off, and that Zeus restored the population by changing the ants into men. These legends seem to be a mythical account of the colonization of Aegina, which seems to have been originally inhabited by Pelasgians,
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    171
    Cogsworth

    Cogsworth

    • Plays Appears In: Beauty and the Beast
    Cogsworth is a fictional character in the Disney film Beauty and the Beast. He is featured as a guest in House of Mouse and Mickey's Magical Christmas: Snowed in at the House of Mouse. Under the spell cast by the enchantress at the beginning of the film, he has taken the form of a pendulum clock, the hands of which do not tell the time but instead form a moustache, and whose arms are formed from the golden ornamentation at the clock's sides. A pendulum can be seen through his glass-fronted stomach. Cogsworth views himself as the leader of the cursed servants, but to the audience he acts as a restrained, conservative foil to the candlestick Lumiere, his best friend, who is more of a comedian. Cogsworth also happens to be the most noticeably informed of the cursed servants. When Belle first arrives to the enchanted castle, it is Cogsworth who takes it upon himself to give her a heavily descriptive tour of the castle. During this tour, he is able to make several well-educated references to various architecture in the castle. Looking at Cogsworth's dialogue throughout the movie, it is understood that Lumière and Cogsworth had known each other for a long time, presumably longer than
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    172
    Count Dracula

    Count Dracula

    • Plays Appears In: Dracula
    Count Dracula is the title character and primary antagonist of Bram Stoker's 1897 Gothic horror novel Dracula. He is described as an archetypal vampire. Some aspects of the character are inspired by the 15th century Romanian general and Wallachian Prince Vlad III the Impaler. The character appears frequently in popular culture, from films to animated media to breakfast cereals. In Bram Stoker's novel, Count Dracula's characteristics, powers, abilities and weaknesses are narrated in a piecemeal way by multiple narrators, from different perspectives. The most informative of these narrators are Jonathan Harker, John Seward, and Mina Harker. Count Dracula is a centuries-old vampire, sorcerer, and Transylvanian nobleman, who claims to be a Székely descended from Attila the Hun. He inhabits a decaying castle in the Carpathian Mountains near the Borgo Pass. Unlike the vampires of Eastern European folklore, which are portrayed as repulsive, corpse-like creatures, Dracula exudes a veneer of aristocratic charm. In his conversations with Jonathan Harker, he reveals himself as deeply proud of his boyar heritage and nostalgic for the past times, which he admits have become only a memory of
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    173
    Esmeralda

    Esmeralda

    • Plays Appears In: Camino Real
    Esmeralda, or La Esmeralda (French: Esméralda), born Agnes, is a fictional character in Victor Hugo's 1831 novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (or Notre Dame de Paris). She is a French Gypsy girl (near the end of the book, it is revealed that her biological mother was a French woman). She constantly attracts men with her seductive dances, and is rarely seen without her clever goat Djali. She is around 16 years old. Esmeralda's birth-name was Agnes. She is the illegitimate daughter of Paquette Guybertaut, nicknamed 'la Chantefleurie', an orphaned minstrel's daughter who lives in Rheims. Paquette has become a prostitute after being seduced by a young nobleman, and lives a miserable life in poverty and loneliness. Agnes's birth makes Paquette happy once more, and she lavishes attention and care upon her adored child: even the neighbours begin to forgive Paquette for her past behaviour when they watch the pair. Tragedy strikes, however, when Gypsies kidnap the young baby, leaving a hideously deformed child (the infant Quasimodo) in place. The townsfolk come to the conclusion that the Gypsies have cannibalised baby Agnes; the mother flees Reims in despair, and the Gypsy child is exorcised
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    174
    Penthesilea

    Penthesilea

    • Plays Appears In: Penthesilea
    Penthesilea (Greek: Πενθεσίλεια) or Penthesileia was an Amazonian queen in Greek mythology, the daughter of Ares and Otrera and the sister of Hippolyta, Antiope and Melanippe. Quintus Smyrnaeus explains more fully than pseudo-Apollodorus how Penthesilea came to be at Troy: Penthesilea had killed Hippolyta with a spear when they were hunting deer; this accident caused Penthesilea so much grief that she wished only to die, but, as a warrior and an Amazon, she had to do so honorably and in battle. She therefore was easily convinced to join in the Trojan War, fighting on the side of Troy's defenders. Penthesilea arrives in Troy at the start of Posthomerica the night before the fighting is due to recommence for the first time after Hector's death and funeral. She came to Troy for two reasons: firstly, to prove to others that her people, the Amazons, are great warriors and can share the hardships of war and, secondly, to appease the Gods after she accidentally killed her sister, Hippolyta, while hunting. She arrived with twelve companions and promised the Trojans that she would kill Achilles. On her first, and only, day of fighting, Penthesilea kills many men and clashes with Telamonian
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    175
    Petruchio

    Petruchio

    • Plays Appears In: The Taming of the Shrew
    Petruchio (an anglicisation of the Italian name Petruccio; Italian pronunciation: [peˈtruttʃo]) is the male romantic lead in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew (c. 1590–1594). Petruchio is a fortune seeker who enters into a marriage with a strong-willed young woman named Kate and then proceeds to "tame" her temperamental spirit. The character, the play, Petruchio's methods, and Kate's fifth act soliloquy have excited controversy among feminists and modern critics. The role has attracted notable performers. In the play, Petruchio comes to the town of Padua in the hopes of marrying a wealthy woman. Hortensio suggests that he marry Kate Minola, as she is very rich and her marriage will allow her sister to marry as well. Petruchio takes an interest in Kate, owing to the dowry he could potentially receive, and agrees. During his first encounter with Kate, he matches her fierce temper and manages to convince her father that she passionately loves him but only pretends to hate him in public. The two are married, with Petruchio arriving at the wedding late and forcing Kate to leave the ceremony feast early. Petruchio then starts to try to "tame" his wife in a variety of ways. He
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    176
    Tiny Tim

    Tiny Tim

    Timothy Cratchit, called "Tiny Tim", is a fictional character from the 1843 novella A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. He is a minor character, the young son of Bob Cratchit, and is seen only briefly, but serves as an important symbol of the consequences of the protagonist's choices. It is claimed that the character is based on the invalid son of a friend of Dickens who owned a cotton mill in Ardwick, Manchester. When Scrooge is visited by The Ghost of Christmas Present he is shown just how ill Tim really is, and that Tim will die unless he receives treatment (which the family cannot afford due to Scrooge's miserliness). When visited by The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come all he sees of Tim is his crutch, as Tim has died. This, and several other visions, led Scrooge to reform his ways. At the end of the story, Dickens makes it explicit that Tim did not die, and Scrooge became a "second father" to him. In the story, Tiny Tim is known for the statement, "God bless us, every one!" which he offers as a blessing at Christmas dinner. Dickens repeats the phrase at the end of the story. This is symbolic of Scrooge's change in heart. Dickens did not reveal what Tiny Tim's illness was.
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    177
    Ulla

    Ulla

    • Plays Appears In: The Producers
    Ulla Inga tor Hansen Benson Yansen Tallen Hallen Svaden Swanson Bloom is a fictional character by Mel Brooks from his 1968 film The Producers (MGM), which was remade as a Broadway musical in 2001 and as a film in 2005 (Universal). In the 1968 film, she is played by Lee Meredith, in the 2001 musical by Cady Huffman, and in the 2005 film by Uma Thurman. In the 1968 film, Ulla is introduced as a "toy" that Max found in the local library, and is a symbol of his new found affluence. She can speak little English, but is a jiggly dancer, and can dance better than type. She also constantly says "God dag på dig", which literally means "good day on/to you", (though, with an extreme non-Swedish accent) and provides a sexier counterpoint to Max's older girlfriends. Lee Meredith reprised the dance for the 2002 DVD extras. In the musical play adapted from the 1968 film, Ulla introduces herself as a Swedish actress looking for a part in Max Bialystock and Leo Bloom's production Springtime for Hitler. She is a stereotypical Swedish woman: tall and beautiful with lovely blonde hair. She performs a song she wrote called "When You Got It, Flaunt It". She decided to audition when a "crazy man" (Max)
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    178
    Cowardly Lion

    Cowardly Lion

    • Plays Appears In: The Wiz
    The Cowardly Lion is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. He is a Lion, but he talks and interacts with humans. Since lions are supposed to be "The Kings of Beasts," the Cowardly Lion believes that his fear makes him inadequate. He does not understand that courage means acting in the face of fear, which he does frequently. Only during the aftereffects of the Wizard's gift, when he is under the influence of an unknown liquid substance that the Wizard orders him to drink (perhaps gin) is he not filled with fear. He argues that the courage from the Wizard is only temporary, although he continues to do brave deeds while openly and embarrassedly fearful. The Cowardly Lion makes his first appearance in the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He is the last of the companions Dorothy befriends on her way to the Emerald City. When he tries to bite Toto, Dorothy calls him a coward, and he admits that he is. The Cowardly Lion joins her so that he can ask The Wizard for courage, being ashamed that, in his cultural role as the King of the Beasts, he is not indeed brave. Despite outward evidence that he is unreasonably fearful, The Cowardly Lion displays
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    179
    Cthulhu

    Cthulhu

    • Plays Appears In: A Shoggoth on the Roof
    Cthulhu is a fictional cosmic entity who first appeared in the short story "The Call of Cthulhu", published in the pulp magazine Weird Tales in 1928. The character was created by writer H. P. Lovecraft. Cthulhu has also been spelled as Tulu, Clulu, Clooloo, Cthulu, Cthullu, C'thulhu, Cighulu, Cathulu, C'thlu, Kathulu, Kutulu, Kthulhu, Q’thulu, K'tulu, Kthulhut, Kulhu, Kutunluu, Ktulu, Cuitiliú, Thu Thu, and in many other ways. It is often preceded by the epithet Great, Dead, or Dread. Lovecraft transcribed the pronunciation of Cthulhu as "Khlûl'-hloo" (IPA: [ˈχɬʊl.ɬuː] ?). S. T. Joshi points out, however, that Lovecraft gave several differing pronunciations on different occasions. According to Lovecraft, this is merely the closest that the human vocal apparatus can come to reproducing the syllables of an alien language. Long after Lovecraft's death, the pronunciation /kəˈθuːluː/kə-THOO-loo became common, and the game Call of Cthulhu endorsed it. H. P. Lovecraft's initial short story, "The Call of Cthulhu", was published in Weird Tales in 1928 and established the character as a malevolent entity hibernating within an underwater city in the South Pacific called R'lyeh. Described as
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    180
    Elizabeth Bennet

    Elizabeth Bennet

    • Plays Appears In: Pride and Prejudice
    Elizabeth Bennet (later Elizabeth Darcy) is the protagonist in the 1813 novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. She is often referred to as Eliza or Lizzy by her friends and family. Elizabeth has been portrayed by Greer Garson in the 1940 film adaptation of the novel, by Elizabeth Garvie in the 1980 BBC mini-series, by Jennifer Ehle in the 1995 television series, and by Keira Knightley in the 2005 film adaptation. Elizabeth is the second child in a family of five daughters. Though the circumstances of the time and environment require her to seek a marriage of convenience for economic security, Elizabeth wishes to marry for love. Elizabeth is regarded as the most admirable and endearing of Austen's heroines. She is considered one of the most beloved characters in British literature because of her complexity. Austen herself described Lizzy as "as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print." Elizabeth is the second eldest of the five Bennet sisters of the Longbourn estate, situated near the fictional market village of Meryton in Hertfordshire, England. She is 20 years old at the beginning of the novel. Elizabeth is described as an intelligent young woman, with "a lively,
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    181
    Good Witch of the North

    Good Witch of the North

    • Plays Appears In: The Wiz
    The Good Witch of the North is a fictional character in the Land of Oz, created by American author L. Frank Baum. She is the elderly and mild-mannered Ruler of the Gillikin Country. Her only significant appearance in Baum's work is in Chapter 2 of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900), in which she introduces Dorothy to Oz and sends her to meet the Wizard, after placing a protective kiss on her forehead. She makes a brief cameo appearance at Princess Ozma's birthday party in The Road to Oz (1909), but is otherwise only mentioned elsewhere in the series. L. Frank Baum presented her as an extremely kind and gentle character who stood against the oppression and subjugation of people. She became the Ruler of the Gillikin Country in the North after freeing the Gillikins from the clutches of Mombi, the erstwhile Wicked Witch of the North. However, the character's kindness and magnanimity of spirit was not confined to her own domain, and she was loved not only by her own subjects but also by other people in Oz, such as the Munchkins. Although she wasn't as powerful as the Wicked Witch of the East and was hence unable to depose her the way she deposed Mombi, the Good Witch of the North was
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    182
    Puck

    Puck

    • Plays Appears In: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Puck, also known as Robin Goodfellow, is a character in William Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream that was based on the ancient figure in English mythology, also called Puck. Numerous people that have read A Midsummer Night's Dream appear confused about whether Puck's intentions are deliberately done to try to mock and insult others for his own amusements, or because he is generally careless. Puck is a clever, mischievous elf or sprite that personifies the trickster or the wise knave. In the play, Shakespeare introduces Puck as the "shrewd and knavish sprite" and "that merry wanderer of the night" in some scenes it would seem that he is longing for freedom and he is also a jester to Oberon, the fairy king. Puck and ""Bottom"" are the only two characters who interact and progress the three central stories in the whole play, Puck is the one who is first introduced in the fairies story and creates the drama of the lover's story by messing up who loves whom, as well as placing the ass on Bottom's head in his story. Similarly Bottom is performing in a play in his story intending it to be presented in the lover's story as well as interacting with Titania in the fairies' story
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    183
    Stephano

    Stephano

    • Plays Appears In: The Tempest
    Stephano ( /ˈstɛfənoʊ/ STEF-ə-noh) is a boisterous and often drunk butler of King Alonso in William Shakespeare's play, The Tempest. He, Trinculo and Caliban plot against Prospero, the ruler of the island on which the play is set and the former Duke of Milan in Shakespeare's fictional universe. In the play, he wants to take over the island and marry Prospero's daughter, Miranda. Caliban believes Stephano to be a god because he gave him wine to drink which Caliban believes healed him. Boisterous and often drunk, Stephano is willing to be regarded as a Lord by Caliban, although for much of the play Caliban appears to be in control, specifically Tmp/M/Scene/3.2 Tmp 3.2 M. Stephano is rather gullible. He believes, particularly in the aforementioned scene, everything Caliban says. As shown in Tmp/M/Scene/4.1 Tmp 4.1 M, he is easily distracted. (see 'The Plan' below). He makes false promises to Trinculo and Caliban, but in his intoxicated state he usually believes the promises himself. The plan Stephano, Trinculo and (mostly) Caliban formulate is to wait for Prospero to take his afternoon sleep, then steal his magic books so he cannot fight back. He is weak without them. They then plan
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    184
    King Duncan

    King Duncan

    • Plays Appears In: Sleep No More
    King Duncan is a fictional character in Shakespeare's Macbeth. He is the father of two youthful sons (Malcolm and Donalbain), and the victim of a well-plotted regicide in a power grab by his trusted captain Macbeth. The origin of the character lies in a narrative of the historical Duncan I of Scotland in Raphael Holinshed's 1587 The Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland, a history of Britain familiar to Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Unlike Holinshed's incompetent King Duncan (who is credited in the narrative with a "feeble and slothful administration"), Shakespeare's King Duncan is crafted as a sensitive, insightful, and generous father-figure whose murder grieves Scotland and is accounted the cause of turmoil in the natural world. King Duncan is a father-figure who is generous but firm ("No more that Thane of Cawdor shall deceive / Our bosom interest. Go pronounce his present death / And with his former title greet Macbeth."), insightful ("There's no art / To find the mind's construction in the face."), and sensitive ("This castle hath a pleasant seat. The air / Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself / Unto our gentle senses."). However, the role is full of irony; he is
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    185
    Erysichthon

    Erysichthon

    • Plays Appears In: Metamorphoses
    In Greek mythology, Erysichthon or Erisichthon can refer to two different personages:
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    186
    Hippolytus

    Hippolytus

    • Plays Appears In: Hippolytus
    In Greek mythology, Hippolytus (Greek Ἱππόλυτος meaning "unleasher of horses") was a son of Theseus and either Antiope or Hippolyte. He was identified with the Roman forest god Virbius. The most common legend regarding Hippolytus states that he was killed after rejecting the advances of Phaedra, his stepmother, the second wife of Theseus. Spurned, Phaedra deceived Theseus saying that his son had raped her. Theseus, furious, used one of the three wishes given to him by Poseidon to curse Hippolytus. Poseidon sent a sea-monster—or, alternatively, Dionysus sent a wild bull—to terrorize Hippolytus's horses, who dragged their rider to his death. Two versions of this story appear in Euripides' play Hippolytus and Seneca the Younger's play Phaedra. Additional depictions such as the surviving version of Euripides and the French dramatist Racine, stated that Phaedra's nurse told Hippolytus of Phaedra’s love. Hippolytus swore that he would not reveal the nurse as a source of information – even after Phaedra killed herself and falsely accused him of raping her in a suicide note, which Niall read. Alternatively, it is stated that Phaedra simply killed herself out of guilt for Hippolytus’ death
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    187
    Jane Eyre

    Jane Eyre

    • Plays Appears In: Jane Eyre
    Jane Eyre is the heroine of Charlotte Brontë's 1847 novel of the same name. One evening when Jane is out for a walk, she meets a mysterious man when his horse slips and he falls – and, of course, this is Mr. Rochester. Jane and Rochester are immediately interested in each other. She is fascinated by his rough, craggy, dark appearance as well as his abrupt, almost rude manners, which she thinks are easier to handle than polite flattery. He is very interesting in figuring out how Jane is herself, comparing her to an elf or sprite and admiring her unusual strength and stubbornness. Rochester quickly learns that he can rely on Jane in a crisis – one evening, Jane finds Rochester asleep in his bed with all the curtains and bedclothes on fire, and she puts out the flames and rescues him. Jane and Rochester find that they can have interesting and in-depth conversations, and both fall steadily in love with each other. However, Rochester soon invited some of his acquaintances to Thornfield, including the beautiful Blanche Ingram. Rochester lets Blanche flirt with him constantly in front of Jane to make her jealous and encourages rumors that he’s engaged to Blanche. During the week-long
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    188
    Malvolio

    Malvolio

    • Plays Appears In: Twelfth Night, or What You Will
    Malvolio is the steward of Olivia's household in William Shakespeare's comedy, Twelfth Night, or What You Will. He is often portrayed as the main antagonist. Malvolio's ethical values are commonly used to define his appearance. In the play, Malvolio is defined as a kind of Puritan. He despises all manner of fun and games, and wishes his world to be completely free of human sin, yet he behaves very foolishly against his stoic nature when he believes that Olivia loves him. This leads to major conflicts with characters such as Sir Toby Belch, Sir Andrew Aguecheek, and Maria, mistress of the household. Much of the play's humour comes from Maria, Feste, Toby Belch, and Andrew Aguecheek tormenting Malvolio with drinking, joking, and singing. Later on in the play Maria devises a way to have revenge upon Malvolio, and proposes it to Sir Toby, Sir Andrew and Feste. Maria composes a letter in Olivia's handwriting, and leaves it so Malvolio will find it. The letter convinces Malvolio that Olivia loves him, and leads Malvolio to think that Olivia wishes him to smile, wear yellow stockings and cross garters. Olivia is in mourning for her brother's death, and finds smiling offensive, and yellow
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    189
    Old Deuteronomy

    Old Deuteronomy

    • Plays Appears In: Cats
    Old Deuteronomy is a character in T. S. Eliot's Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats and its musical adaptation, Cats. In Eliot's original poem, Old Deuteronomy is described as an ancient, wise cat who has "lived many lives in succession" and is respected by the other cats and humans (and perhaps even dogs) in his environment. His name derives from Deuteronomy, the fifth book of the Old Testament of the Bible, which shares the central element of law with the character (who is a magistrate). Cats expands on the theme of wisdom by depicting Deuteronomy as the leader of the show's Jellicle tribe, providing comfort and guidance to the other characters. Deuteronomy also has the task of making the "Jellicle Choice" and choosing the cat who can ascend to the Heaviside Layer (Also spelled "Heavyside"). Much of Cats' plot is fueled by this; several characters perform and try to convince Deuteronomy to choose them. At the end of the show, Deuteronomy is kidnapped by Macavity and restored by Mr. Mistoffelees. He then persuades the other cats to listen to the outcast Grizabella, selects her to be reborn, and escorts her to the Heaviside Layer. More has been revealed about Old Deuteronomy's past
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    190
    Polymestor

    Polymestor

    • Plays Appears In: Hecuba
    In Greek mythology, Polymestor was a King of Thrace. His wife was Ilione, the eldest daughter of King Priam. Polymestor appears in Euripides' play, Hecuba and in the Ovidian myth "Hecuba, Polyxena and Polydorus" Polymestor was also a Greek king of Arcadia. During the Trojan War, King Priam was frightened for his youngest son Polydorus's safety since Polydorus could not fight for himself. Priam sent the child, along with gifts of jewelry and gold, to the court of King Polymestor to keep him away from the fighting. After Troy fell, Polymestor betrayed Priam and threw Polydorus into the ocean in order to keep the treasure for himself. Hecuba, Polydorus' mother, found the body and discovered the treachery. She asked Agamemnon to bring Polymestor to her. Agamemnon complied, motivated by the love of Cassandra, another of Hecuba's children. Hecuba baits Polymestor by drawing him in with treasure. Hecuba has the other Trojan women kill Polymestor's sons, and blinds Polymestor by scratching his eyes out. Polymestor is humiliated at having been blinded and made childless at the hands of slave women. Polymestor is given a trial against Hecuba by Agamemnon. Polymestor claims to be working in
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    191
    Theseus

    Theseus

    • Plays Appears In: The Two Noble Kinsmen
    For other uses, see Theseus (disambiguation) Theseus /ˈθiːsiːəs/ (Ancient Greek: Θησεύς Greek: [tʰɛːsěu̯s]) was the mythical founder-king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, both of whom Aethra had slept with in one night. Theseus was a founder-hero, like Perseus, Cadmus, or Heracles, all of whom battled and overcame foes that were identified with an archaic religious and social order. As Heracles was the Dorian hero, Theseus was the Athenian founding hero, considered by them as their own great reformer: his name comes from the same root as θεσμός ("thesmos"), Greek for "institution". He was responsible for the synoikismos ("dwelling together")—the political unification of Attica under Athens, represented emblematically in his journey of labours, subduing highly localized ogres and monstrous beasts. Because he was the unifying king, Theseus built and occupied a palace on the fortress of the Acropolis that may have been similar to the palace that was excavated in Mycenae. Pausanias reports that after the synoikismos, Theseus established a cult of Aphrodite Pandemos ("Aphrodite of all the People") and Peitho on the southern slope of the
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    192
    Viola

    Viola

    • Plays Appears In: Twelfth Night, or What You Will
    Viola is a fictional character from the play Twelfth Night, written by William Shakespeare around 1599 or 1600. Viola's actions produce all of the play's momentum. She is a young woman of Messaline, a fictional country invented by Shakespeare, although some believe that this country really did exist. In the beginning Viola is found shipwrecked on the shores of Illyria and separated from her twin brother, not knowing whether he is alive or dead, the Sea Captain that tells her that this place is ruled by the Duke Orsino, who is in love with the Countess Olivia. Viola wants to serve her, but, finding this impossible, she has the Sea Captain dress her up like a eunuch, so she can serve the Duke instead. Viola chooses the name Cesario, which in Italian means 'little Caesar', and secures a position as a page working for the Duke. He then entrusts Cesario (Viola) to express his love for Olivia. Cesario continues to pass messages back and forth between the Duke and Olivia, but this eventually places her in somewhat of a quandary: she is forced by duty to do her best to plead Orsino’s case to Olivia, but an internal conflict of interest arises when she falls in love with Orsino, and
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    193
    Big Bird

    Big Bird

    Big Bird is a protagonist of the children's television show Sesame Street. Officially performed by Caroll Spinney since 1969, he is an eight-foot two-inch (249 cm) tall bright primrose-yellow bird. He can roller skate, ice skate, dance, sing, write poetry, draw and even ride a unicycle. But despite this wide array of talents, he is prone to frequent misunderstandings, on one occasion even singing the alphabet as one big long word (from the song called "ABC-DEF-GHI," pronounced "ab-keddef-gajihkel-monop-quristuv-wixyz"), pondering what it could ever mean. He lives in a large nest behind the 123 Sesame Street brownstone and has a teddy bear named Radar. As Muppeteer Caroll Spinney has aged, the show has gradually started to train new performers to play Big Bird. These apprentices include both Rick Lyon in the opening theme song of the show's 33rd season on, and Matt Vogel in the show's Journey to Ernie segment. Caroll Spinney was sick during the taping of a few first-season episodes, so Daniel Seagren performed Big Bird in those episodes. He also performed Big Bird when he appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1969 and on The Hollywood Squares in the 1970s. According to The Story of
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    194
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    195
    Glinda

    Glinda

    • Plays Appears In: Wicked
    Glinda (in full, Glinda the Good Witch of the South) is a fictional character in the Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum. She is the most powerful sorceress of Oz, ruler of the Quadling Country south of the Emerald City, and protector of Princess Ozma. Baum's 1900 children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz refers to Glinda as the Good Witch of the South. She finally gets Dorothy home by telling her of the power of the silver slippers. She gets the Golden Cap from Dorothy, and uses it to get the Scarecrow back to the Emerald city, the Tin Man to the land of the Winkies, and the Lion to a nearby forest, areas which the characters have been made rulers of. Later books call her a "Sorceress" rather than a "witch." Baum's writings make clear that he did not view witches as inherently wicked or in league with the Devil, so this change was probably meant to signal that Glinda's knowledge and command of magic surpassed that of a witch. In the books, Glinda is depicted as a beautiful young woman with long, rich red hair and blue eyes, wearing a pure white dress. She is much older than her appearance would suggest, but "knows how to keep young in spite of the many years she
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    196
    Hecuba

    Hecuba

    • Plays Appears In: The Trojan Women
    Hecuba (also Hekábe, Hecabe, Hécube; Ancient Greek: Ἑκάβη) was a queen in Greek mythology, the wife of King Priam of Troy during the Trojan War, with whom she had 19 children. These children included several major characters of Homer's Iliad such as the warriors Hector and Paris and the prophetess Cassandra. Ancient sources vary as to the parentage of Hecuba. According to Homer, Hecuba was the daughter of King Dymas of Phrygia, but Euripides and Virgil write of her as the daughter of the Thracian king Cisseus. The mythographers Pseudo-Apollodorus and Hyginus leave open the question which of the two was her father, with Pseudo-Apollodorus adding a third alternate option: Hecuba's parents could as well be the river god Sangarius and Metope. Some versions from non-extant works are summarized by a scholiast on Euripides' Hecuba: according to those, she was a daughter of Dymas or Sangarius by the Naiad Euagora, or by Glaucippe the daughter of Xanthus (Scamander?); the possibility of her being a daughter of Cisseus is also discussed. A scholiast on Homer relates that Hecuba's parents were either Dymas and the nymph Eunoe or Cisseus and Telecleia; the latter option would make her a full
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    197
    Helen

    Helen

    • Plays Appears In: The Trojan Women
    In Greek mythology, Helen of Troy (in Greek, Ἑλένη, Helénē), also known as Helen of Sparta, was the daughter of Zeus and Leda (or Nemesis), step-daughter of King Tyndareus, wife of Menelaus and sister of Castor, Polydeuces and Clytemnestra. Her abduction by Paris brought about the Trojan War. The etymology of Helen's name has been a problem for scholars until the present. Georg Curtius related Helen (Ἑλένη) to the moon (Selene Σελήνη). Émile Boisacq considered Ἑλένη to derive from the noun ἑλένη meaning "torch". It has also been suggested that the λ of Ἑλένη arose from an original ν, and thus the etymology of the name is connected with the root of Venus. Linda Lee Clader, however, says that none of the above suggestions offers much satisfaction. If the name has an Indo-European etymology, it is possibly a suffixed form of a root *wel- "to turn, roll", or of *sel- "to flow, run". The latter possibility would allow comparison to the Vedic Sanskrit Saraṇyū, a character who is abducted in Rigveda 10.17.2. This parallel is suggestive of a Proto-Indo-European abduction myth. Saraṇyū means "swift" and is derived from the adjective saraṇa ("running", "swift"), the feminine of which is
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    198
    Mary Jane Watson

    Mary Jane Watson

    • Plays Appears In: Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark
    Mary Jane Watson, often shortened to MJ, is a fictional supporting character appearing originally in Marvel comic books and later in multiple spin-offs and dramatizations of the Spider-Man titles as the best friend, love interest, and one-time wife (as Mary Jane Watson-Parker) of Peter Parker, the alter ego of Spider-Man. This was after the tragic death of Gwen Stacy, and initially upon her introduction, she had a friendly rivalry with Gwen for Peter's affections. Created by writer Stan Lee and artist John Romita, Sr., after a few partial appearances and references, her first full appearance was in The Amazing Spider-Man #42 (November 1966). She was ranked 43rd in Comics Buyer's Guide's "100 Sexiest Women in Comics" list. In the 2002-2007 Spider-Man trilogy, Mary Jane was played by actress Kirsten Dunst as Spider-Man's main love interest. Mary Jane is depicted as an extremely beautiful, green-eyed redhead, and has been the primary romantic interest of Peter Parker for the last twenty years, although initially competing with others for his affection, most prominently with Gwen Stacy and the Black Cat. Mary Jane's relatively unknown early life was eventually explored in The Amazing
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    199
    Peter Pan

    Peter Pan

    • Plays Appears In: Peter Pan
    Peter Pan is a character created by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie. A mischievous boy who can fly and who never ages, Peter Pan spends his never-ending childhood adventuring on the small island of Neverland as the leader of his gang the Lost Boys, interacting with mermaids, Native Americans, fairies, pirates, and occasionally ordinary children from the world outside of Neverland. In addition to two distinct works by Barrie, the character has been featured in a variety of media and merchandise, both adapting and expanding on Barrie's works. Peter Pan first appeared in a section of The Little White Bird, a 1902 novel written by Barrie for adults. The character's best-known adventure debuted on 27 December 1904, in the stage play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up. The play was adapted and expanded somewhat as a novel, published in 1911 as Peter and Wendy (later as Peter Pan and Wendy, and still later as Peter Pan). Following the highly successful debut of the 1904 play, Barrie's publishers, Hodder and Stoughton, extracted chapters 13–18 of The Little White Bird and republished them in 1906 under the title Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, with the addition of
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    200
    Regan

    Regan

    • Plays Appears In: King Lear
    Regan is a fictional character in William Shakespeare's tragic play, King Lear. She is the middle child of King Lear's daughters and is married to the Duke of Cornwall. Similarly to her older sister, Goneril, Regan is attracted to Edmund. Both sisters are eager for power and even convince their father with false flattery to hand over his kingdom. "Sir, I am made Of the self same metal that my sister is, And prize me at her worth. In my true heart, I find she names my very deed of love; Only she comes too short, that I profess Myself an enemy to all other joys, Which the most precious square of sense possesses, And find I am alone felicitate In your dear highness' love." -Regan's falsely flattering speech to King Lear, King Lear 1.1.67-74. Later in the play, Lear leaves his kingdom to live with Goneril. She rejects him. After Lear leaves Goneril’s house, he asks Regan to take him in. She tells him he has too many servants and knights, just as Goneril had. Unwilling to budge, Regan drives Lear out into the storm. In the final Act, Goneril poisons Regan’s drink after learning that they share a desire for Edmund. Regan cries, “Sick, O sick!” to which Goneril replies in an aside, “If
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    201
    Orestes

    Orestes

    • Plays Appears In: Orestes
    In Greek mythology, Orestes (/ɒˈrɛstiːz/; Greek: Ὀρέστης [oˈrestɛːs]) was the son of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon. He is the subject of several Ancient Greek plays and of various myths connected with his madness and purification, which retain obscure threads of much older ones. Orestes has a root in ὄρος (óros), "mountain". The metaphoric meaning of the name is the person "who can conquer mountains". In the Homeric story, Orestes was a member of the doomed house of Atreus which is descended from Tantalus and Niobe. Orestes was absent from Mycenae when his father, Agamemnon, returned from the Trojan War with the Trojan princess Cassandra as his concubine, and thus not present for Agamemnon's murder by his wife, Clytemnestra, in retribution for his sacrifice of their daughter Iphigenia to obtain favorable winds during the Greek voyage to Troy. Seven years later, Orestes returned from Athens and with his sister Electra avenged his father's death by slaying his mother and her lover Aegisthus. In the Odyssey, Orestes is held up as a favorable example to Telemachus, whose mother Penelope is plagued by suitors. According to Pindar, the young Orestes was saved by his nurse Arsinoe (Laodamia)
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    202
    Theramenes

    Theramenes

    • Plays Appears In: Phèdre
    Theramenes ( /θɨˈræmɨniːz/; Greek: Θηραμένης; floruit 411–404 BC) was an Athenian statesman, prominent in the final decade of the Peloponnesian War. He was particularly active during the two periods of oligarchic government at Athens, as well as in the trial of the generals who had commanded at Arginusae in 406 BC. A moderate oligarch, he often found himself caught between the democrats on the one hand and the extremist oligarchs on the other. Successful in replacing a narrow oligarchy with a broader one in 411 BC, he failed to achieve the same end in 404 BC, and was executed by the extremists whose policies he had opposed. Theramenes was a central figure in four major episodes of Athenian history. He appeared on the scene in 411 BC as one of the leaders of an oligarchic coup, but, as his views and those of the coup's other leaders diverged, he began to oppose their dictates and took the lead in replacing the narrow oligarchy they had imposed with a more broadly based one. He served as a general for several years after this, but was not reelected to that office in 407 BC. After the Battle of Arginusae, in which he served as a trierarch, he was assigned to rescue Athenian sailors
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    203
    Bill Sikes

    Bill Sikes

    • Plays Appears In: Oliver!
    William "Bill" Sikes (sometimes Sykes) is a fictional character in the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. He is one of Dickens's most vicious characters and a very strong force in the novel when it comes to having control over somebody or harming others. He is portrayed as a rough and barbaric man. He is a career criminal associated with Fagin, and an eventual murderer. He is very violent and aggressive, prone to sudden bursts of extreme behaviour. He owns a bull terrier named Bull's Eye, whom he beats until the dog needs stitches. Dickens describes his first appearance: The man who growled out these words, was a stoutly-built fellow of about five-and-thirty, in a black velveteen coat, very soiled drab breeches, lace-up half boots, and grey cotton stockings which enclosed a bulky pair of legs, with large swelling calves—the kind of legs, which in such costume, always look in an unfinished and incomplete state without a set of fetters to garnish them. He had a brown hat on his head, and a dirty belcher handkerchief round his neck: with the long frayed ends of which he smeared the beer from his face as he spoke. He disclosed, when he had done so, a broad heavy countenance with a
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    204
    Donkey

    Donkey

    • Plays Appears In: Shrek the Musical
    Donkey is a fictional talking donkey from the Shrek series of films, voiced by Eddie Murphy. The character has also featured in the original story Shrek!. He currently has six Dronkey children, with his wife, Dragon. Donkey is seen as being euphoric, annoying, talkative, donkey-like, and sensitive. He enjoys such foods as waffles, parfait and "upside-down coconut soufflé with mango chutney sauce." In a scene about Merlin's bonfire, Donkey's sweet tooth gets the best of him, for he sees only a fudge torte on it in the enchanted smoke. Eddie Murphy called Donkey "a really positive character. He's always looking at the bright side of everything, trying to work it out. A happy-go-lucky donkey." Donkey was modeled after Pericles (born 1994; also known as Perry), a real miniature donkey from Barron Park, Palo Alto, California. Donkey first makes his debut at a sale of animal or mythical characters from beloved fairy-tales being sold to the evil Lord Farquaad's knights. An old woman attempts to sell Donkey, but magic pixie dust accidentally is unleashed upon him from a caged fairy, thus giving him the temporary ability to fly, he flies off saying "You might have seen a housefly, maybe
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    205
    Gaston

    Gaston

    • Plays Appears In: Beauty and the Beast
    Gaston is a canonical fictional leading character and the main villain in Disney's Beauty and the Beast. Introduced in the 1991 Disney animated classic, Gaston's desire to marry Belle leads him to evolve from a narcissistic but harmless and humorous buffoon to a menacing, murderous villain and the primary antagonist of the film. Gaston is a champion hunter who is arrogant, self-centered, and rude. He spends his time fighting, drinking, and spitting, things at which he is the town champion. He believes that it is unnecessary for women to read books or think, and would be of better use as "little wives". He believes that Belle would best suit as his wife based only on her looks. Gaston is frequently seen in the company of his subservient henchman, LeFou. He is also admired by both the local barflies and his fan girls, the three "Silly Girls." Gaston was not a character in the original fairy tale. Disney claims to have added him to the film in order to create a heightened sense of danger as well as to showcase the theme of inner versus outer beauty. Supervising animator Andreas Deja's initial drawings of Gaston were as an arrogant, burly, mustached man with a small brow and a large
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    206
    Horatio

    Horatio

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    Horatio is a character from William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. A friend of Prince Hamlet from Wittenberg University, Horatio's origins are unknown, though he is evidently poor and was present on the battlefield when Hamlet's father defeated 'the ambitious Norway'. Horatio is evidently not directly involved in the intrigue at the Danish court; thus, he makes a good foil or sounding board for Hamlet. He is often not identified as any specific court position, but simply as "friend to Hamlet." Horatio is Hamlet's most trusted friend, to whom Hamlet reveals all his plans. Horatio swears himself to secrecy about the ghost and Hamlet's pretense of madness, and conspires with Hamlet to prove Claudius's guilt in the mousetrap play. He is the first to know of Hamlet's return from England, and is with him when he learns of Ophelia's death. At the end of the play, Horatio proposes to finish off the poisoned drink which was intended for Hamlet, saying that he is 'more an antique Roman than a Dane', but the dying prince implores Horatio not to drink from the cup and bids his friend to live and help put things right in Denmark; "If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart, / Absent thee from
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    207
    Igor

    Igor

    • Plays Appears In: Young Frankenstein
    Igor (or sometimes Ygor) is the traditional stock character or cliché hunch-backed assistant or butler to many types of villain, such as Count Dracula or a mad scientist, familiar from many horror movies and horror movie parodies, the Universal Studios Frankenstein series and the film Van Helsing in particular. Dwight Frye's hunch-backed lab assistant in the first film of the Frankenstein series (1931) is the main source for the "Igor" of public imagination, though this character was actually named "Fritz". The sequels Son of Frankenstein (1939) and The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942) featured a character named "Ygor", played by Bela Lugosi; this character, however, is neither a hunchback nor a lab assistant, but an insane blacksmith with a broken neck and twisted back. He reanimates the Monster as an instrument of vengeance against the townspeople who attempted to hang him for graverobbing. He survives a near-fatal gunshot and appears in the next film, in which his brain is placed in the Monster's body. Universal Pictures would actively cement the idea of the hunchbacked assistant to the "mad scientist " in the Frankenstein film series House of Frankenstein (1944) with J. Carrol
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    208
    Oliver Twist

    Oliver Twist

    • Plays Appears In: Oliver!
    Oliver Twist is a title character and the protagonist of the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. He was the first child protagonist in an English language novel. In the novel, Oliver is born in a parish workhouse, in an unnamed town, but his mother died in labour. Old Sally, who was at the birth and death, takes from the dying woman a locket and ring. Bumble, the Beadle, names the boy Oliver Twist. Oliver is sent to an infant farm, run by Mrs. Mann, until he is nine years old, when he is returned to the workhouse. The orphans at the workhouse are starving because of their cruel treatment. They cast lots to decide who will ask for more gruel for them and Oliver is chosen. At evening supper, once the gruel is dished out, Oliver goes to Bumble and makes his famous request, "Please Sir. I want some more." He is then branded as a troublemaker and is offered as an apprentice to anyone willing to take him and he is apprenticed to the undertaker, Sowerberry. Oliver fights with Noah Claypole, an older boy at the undertakers, because Noah mocked Oliver's dead mother. Oliver is then beaten for the offence, but he manages to escape and runs away to London. In London Oliver meets Jack
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    209
    Othello

    Othello

    • Plays Appears In: Othello
    Othello is a character in Shakespeare's Othello (c.1601–1604). The character's origin is traced to the tale "Un Capitano Moro" in Gli Hecatommithi by Giovanni Battista Giraldi Cinthio. There, he is simply referred to as the Moor. Othello is a brave and competent soldier of advanced years and Moorish background in the service of the Venetian Republic. He elopes with Desdemona, the beautiful daughter of a respected Venetian senator. After being deployed to Cyprus, Othello is manipulated by his Ancient (pronounced Ensign) Iago, into believing Desdemona is an adultress. Othello murders her and, upon discovering Iago's deceit, kills himself. Othello was first mentioned in a Revels account of 1604 when the play was performed on 1 November at Whitehall Palace with Richard Burbage almost certainly Othello's first interpreter. Modern notable performers of the role include Paul Robeson, Orson Welles, Richard Burton, James Earl Jones, and Laurence Olivier. Othello is a Moorish prince living in Venice, an ambassador of the Moors. After time in Venice, Othello is appointed general in the Venetian Army. His officer Iago tricks him into believing that his wife Desdemona is having an affair with
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    210
    Timon

    Timon

    • Plays Appears In: The Lion King
    Timon and Pumbaa are an animated meerkat and warthog duo introduced in Disney's popular 1994 animated film The Lion King. Timon was portrayed through his many appearances by Nathan Lane (in all three films and early episodes of the show), Max Casella (the original actor in The Lion King Broadway musical), Kevin Schon (in certain episodes of the show), Quinton Flynn (in certain episodes of the show), Bruce Lanoil in the Wild About Safety shorts and Kingdom Hearts II, while Pumbaa is voiced by Ernie Sabella (in all of his animated speaking appearances), and was portrayed by Tom Alan Robbins in the original cast of the Broadway musical. Nathan Lane and Ernie Sabella first came to audition for the roles of the hyenas, but when the producers saw how well they worked together they decided to cast them as Timon and Pumbaa. Lyricist Tim Rice however was pulling for Rik Mayall (for Timon) and Adrian Edmondson (for Pumbaa) to play the roles, as he got the idea for the lyrics to Hakuna Matata by watching their show Bottom. As with many characters in Lion King, Pumbaa's name derives from the East African language Swahili. In Swahili, pumbaa (v.) means "to be foolish, silly, weakminded,
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    211
    Titania

    Titania

    • Plays Appears In: A Midsummer Night's Dream
    Titania is a character in William Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream. In the play, she is the queen of the fairies. Due to Shakespeare's influence, later fiction has often used the name "Titania" for fairy queen characters. In traditional folklore, the fairy queen has no name. Shakespeare took the name "Titania" from Ovid's Metamorphoses, where it is an appellation given to the daughters of Titans. Shakespeare's Titania is a very proud creature and as much of a force to contend with as her husband Oberon. The marital quarrel she and Oberon are engaged in over which of them should have the keeping of an Indian changeling boy is the engine that drives the mix ups and confusion of the other characters in the play. Due to an enchantment cast by Oberon's servant Puck, Titania magically falls in love with a 'rude mechanical' (a lower class labourer), Nick Bottom the Weaver, who has been given the head of an ass by Puck, who feels it is better suited to his character. It has been argued that this incident is an inversion of the Circe story. In this case the tables are turned on the character and, rather than the sorceress turning her lovers into animals, she is made to love an
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    212
    Maid Marian

    Maid Marian

    • Plays Appears In: Twang!!
    Maid Marian is the love interest of the legendary English outlaw Robin Hood. Stemming from another, older tradition, she became associated with Robin Hood only in the 16th century. The earliest medieval Robin Hood stories gave him no female companion. Maid Marian was originally a character in May Games festivities (held during May and early June, most commonly around Whitsun) and is sometimes associated with the Queen or Lady of May of May Day. Indeed, Marian remained associated with such celebrations long after the fashion of Robin Hood had faded again. She became associated with Robin Hood in this context, as Robin Hood became a central figure in May Day, associated as he was with the forest and archery. Both Robin and Marian were certainly associated with May Day festivities in England (as was Friar Tuck); these were originally two distinct types of performance — Alexander Barclay, writing in c.1500, refers to "some merry fytte of Maid Marian or else of Robin Hood" — but the characters were brought together. The Marian of the May Games is likely derived from the French tradition of a shepherdess named Marion and her shepherd lover Robin (not Robin Hood). The best known example
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    213
    Ashley Wilkes

    Ashley Wilkes

    • Plays Appears In: Gone With The Wind
    George Ashley Wilkes is a fictional character in the Margaret Mitchell's 1936 novel Gone with the Wind and the later film of the same name. The character also appears in the 1991 book Scarlett, a sequel to Gone with the Wind written by Alexandra Ripley, and in Rhett Butler's People by Donald McCaig. Ashley is the man with whom Scarlett O'Hara is obsessed. Gentlemanly yet indecisive, he loves Scarlett, but finds he has more in common with Melanie, his distant cousin and later his wife. But he is tormented by his obsession with Scarlett. Unfortunately for him and Scarlett, his failure to deal with his true feelings for her ruins any chance she has for real happiness with Rhett Butler. Ashley is a complicated character. He is not sympathetic to the cause of the North. However, he isn't an ardent Confederate patriot, either. What Ashley loves about the South is the serene, peaceful life that he and his dear ones know at Twelve Oaks, and similar plantations. At one point (following the war) he comments to Scarlett that "had the war not come he would have spent his life happily buried at Twelve Oaks." In short, Ashley loves the South, but not necessarily the Confederacy. And he hates
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    214
    Little John

    Little John

    • Plays Appears In: Twang!!
    Little John was a legendary fellow outlaw of Robin Hood, and was said to be Robin's chief lieutenant and second-in-command of the Merry Men. He appears in the earliest recorded Robin Hood ballads and stories. He also appears in the earliest chronicle references to Robin Hood, by Andrew of Wyntoun in about 1420 and by Walter Bower in about 1440, neither of which refer to any other of the Merry Men, suggesting that Little John was particularly associated with him. In the early tales, Little John is shown to be intelligent and highly capable. In A Gest of Robyn Hode, he captures the sorrowful knight and, when Robin Hood decides to pay the knight's mortgage for him, accompanies him as a servant. In Robin Hood's Death, he is the only one of the Merry Men that Robin takes with him. He is also known to have disagreements with Robin Hood. In the 15th-century ballad most commonly called "Robin Hood and the Monk", after being ill-treated by Robin, Little John leaves in anger. When Robin Hood is captured, it is Little John who plans his leader's rescue. In thanks, Robin offers Little John leadership of the band, but John refuses. Later depictions of Little John portray him as somewhat less
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    215
    Mrs. Potts

    Mrs. Potts

    • Plays Appears In: Beauty and the Beast
    Mrs. Potts is a fictional character in the Disney film Beauty and the Beast and the subsequent films. Under a spell cast by an enchantress at the beginning of the film, Mrs. Potts, a kindly castle housekeeper, is enchanted into the form of an anthropomorphic teapot. Mrs. Potts, being the only mother in the entire franchise, takes upon herself to be a motherly figure to both Belle and the Beast. Mrs. Potts has a son called Chip, who under the enchantment is teacup. However, there are numerous other teacups shown in the movie, often referred to as Chip's "brothers and sisters" called "siblings". Chip, like his name, has a chip in his china.
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    216
    Princess Snow White

    Princess Snow White

    • Plays Appears In: Into the Woods
    Snow White is a fictional character and the main protagonist from Walt Disney's first animated feature film 1937's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The character of Snow White was derived from a fairy tale known from many countries in Europe, the best known version being the Bavarian one collected by the Brothers Grimm. Snow White was voiced by Adriana Caselotti in the original film with various others taking over the role since. Snow White is the first Disney Princess. Walt Disney had difficulty finding a suitable voice for Snow White. A casting director for Disney phoned a well-known voice coach named Guido Caselotti, to help him. Overhearing the conversation, Caselotti's daughter Adriana got on the phone and sang and spoke in a young girl's voice. Embarrassed, Guido ordered his daughter to get off the phone, but the casting director had already invited her to audition. After Walt heard her, he cast her immediately. In the beginning of the film (when she is a servant to the Queen), Snow White wears a worn brown bodice and a tattered tan skirt covered in red-and-blue patches. She also wears wooden clogs and a blue hair ribbon tied in a bow. For the rest of the film, Snow White
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    217
    Midas

    Midas

    • Plays Appears In: Midas
    Midas is the name of at least three members of the royal house of Phrygia. The most famous King Midas is popularly remembered in Greek mythology for his ability to turn everything he touched into gold. This came to be called the Golden touch, or the Midas touch. The Phrygian city Midaeum was presumably named after this Midas, and this is probably also the Midas that according to Pausanias founded Ancyra. According to Aristotle, legend held that Midas died of hunger as a result of his "vain prayer" for the gold touch. The legends told about this Midas and his father Gordias, credited with founding the Phrygian capital city Gordium and tying the Gordian Knot, indicate that they were believed to have lived sometime in the 2nd millennium BC well before the Trojan War. However, Homer does not mention Midas or Gordias, while instead mentioning two other famed Phrygian kings, Mygdon and Otreus. Another King Midas ruled Phrygia in the late 8th century BC, up until the sacking of Gordium by the Cimmerians, when he is said to have committed suicide. Most historians believe this Midas is the same person as the Mita, called king of the Mushki in Assyrian texts, who warred with Assyria and its
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    218
    Pumbaa

    Pumbaa

    • Plays Appears In: The Lion King
    Pumbaa is a fictional character from Disney's 1994 animated feature The Lion King.
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    219
    The Gravediggers

    The Gravediggers

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    The Gravediggers (or Clowns) are examples of Shakespearean fools (also known as clowns or jesters), a recurring type of character in Shakespeare's plays. Like most Shakespearean fools, the Gravediggers are peasants or commoners that use their great wit and intellect to get the better of their superiors, other people of higher social status, and each other. The Gravediggers appear briefly in Shakespeare's tragedy Hamlet, making their one and only appearance at the beginning of Act v, Scene i. They are first encountered as they are digging a grave for the newly deceased Ophelia, discussing whether she deserves a Christian burial after having killed herself. Soon, Hamlet enters and engages in a quick dialogue with the first Gravedigger. The beat ends with Hamlet's speech regarding the circle of life prompted by his discovery of the skull of his father's beloved jester, Yorick. The penultimate scene of the play begins with the two clowns digging a grave for the late Ophelia. They debate whether she should be allowed to have a Christian burial, because she committed suicide. This quickly leads them into a discussion of the impact of politics on the decision, and the two parody lawyer
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    220
    Myrrha

    Myrrha

    • Plays Appears In: Metamorphoses
    Myrrha (Greek: Μύρρα), also known as Smyrna (Greek: Σμύρνα), is the mother of Adonis in Greek mythology. She was transformed into a myrrh tree after having had intercourse with her father and gave birth to Adonis as a tree. Although the tale of Adonis has Semitic roots, it is uncertain from where the myth of Myrrha emerged, though it was likely from Cyprus. The myth details the incestuous relationship between Myrrha and her father, Cinyras. Myrrha falls in love with her father and tricks him into sexual intercourse. After discovering her identity, Cinyras draws his sword and pursues Myrrha. She flees across Arabia and, after nine months, turns to the gods for help. They take pity on her and transform her into a myrrh-tree. While in plant form, Myrrha gives birth to Adonis. According to legend, the aromatic exudings of the myrrh-tree are Myrrha's tears. The most familiar form of the myth was recounted in the Metamorphoses of Ovid. Several alternate versions appeared in the Bibliotheca, the Fabulae of Hyginus, and the Metamorphoses of Antoninus Liberalis, with major variations depicting Myrrha's father as the Assyrian king Theias or depicting Aphrodite as having engineered the tragic
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    221
    Polonius

    Polonius

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    Polonius is a character in William Shakespeare's Hamlet. He is King Claudius's chief counsellor, and the father of Ophelia and Laertes. Polonius connives with Claudius to spy on Hamlet. Hamlet unknowingly kills Polonius, provoking Ophelia's fit of madness and death and the climax of the play: a duel between Laertes and Hamlet. Generally regarded as wrong in every judgement he makes over the course of the play, Polonius is described by William Hazlitt as a "sincere" father, but also "a busy-body, [who] is accordingly officious, garrulous, and impertinent." In Act II Hamlet refers to Polonius as a "tedious old fool" and taunts him as a latter day "Jeptha". Father of Ophelia and Laertes, and Lord Chamberlain to King Claudius, he is described as a windbag by some and a rambler of wisdom by others. It has also been suggested that he only acts like a "foolish prating knave" in order to keep his position and popularity safe and to keep anyone from discovering his plots for social advancement. It is important to note that throughout the play, Polonius is characterized as a typical Renaissance "new man", who pays much attention to appearances and ceremonious behaviour. Some adaptations show
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    222
    Princess Fiona

    Princess Fiona

    • Plays Appears In: Shrek the Musical
    Princess Fiona is a fictional character from DreamWorks' 2001 computer-animated feature film, Shrek, and its three theatrically-released sequels, Shrek 2 (2004), Shrek the Third (2007) and Shrek Forever After (2010). In all film appearances, Fiona is voiced by American actress Cameron Diaz. Princess Fiona is a cursed princess who spent her entire life locked in a dragon-guarded castle, waiting for a handsome prince to come rescue her and break her enchantment. She is the daughter of King Harold and Queen Lillian of the kingdom of Far Far Away. In the first film of the series, Fiona first appears as an option for a princess bride selected by Lord Farquaad, who desires to become a king in order to access dominant authority, in order to accomplish this dream. Ignoring warnings of a secret possessed by Fiona, Farquaad proceeds with his plan and decides to search for the woman so he may marry her and become a king, though she is soon encountered by Donkey and Shrek, and at first the group holds hateful feelings towards one another. However, late one night, Donkey learns that because of a magical spell that had been cast on her years before, Fiona transforms into an ogress every night,
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    223
    Rhett Butler

    Rhett Butler

    • Plays Appears In: Gone With The Wind
    Rhett Butler is a fictional character and one of the main protagonists of Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. In the beginning of the novel, we first meet Rhett at the Twelve Oaks Plantation barbecue, the home of John Wilkes and his son Ashley and daughters Honey and India Wilkes. The novel describes Rhett as "a visitor from Charleston"; a black sheep, who was expelled from West Point and is not received by any family with reputation in the whole of Charleston, and perhaps all of South Carolina. Rhett's enthrallment with Scarlett O'Hara begins when he overhears her declaration of love for Ashley in the library while the rest of the "proper" girls take a nap. He recognizes that she is willful and spirited and that they are alike in many ways, including their disgust for the impending, and later ongoing, war with the Yankees. They meet again when Scarlett has already lost her first husband, Charles Hamilton, while she is staying with Charles' sister Melanie and their Aunt Pittypat in Atlanta during the war. Rhett, the daring and infamous blockade runner, creates a stir when he outbids (with $150 in gold) ($3,880 as of 2012) the other gentlemen in order to dance with Scarlett,
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    224
    Robin Starveling

    Robin Starveling

    Robin Starveling is a character in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream (1596), one of the Rude Mechanicals who plays the part of Moonshine in their performance of Pyramus and Thisbe. His part is often considered one of the more humorous in the play, as he uses a lantern in a failed attempt to portray Moonshine and is wittily derided by his audience. His use of the lantern as a symbol for the Moon is an example of synecdoche, or the part symbolizing the whole. Scholars have argued that his amateur performance communicates many of the problems Shakespeare would have been familiar with in the theatre: heckling, lack of adequate props, and amateur acting abilities. In A Midsummer Night's Dream, Theseus, the Duke of Athens, is preparing to marry Hippolyta. He decides to entertain her and hires a group of actors nicknamed the Rude Mechanicals to perform Pyramus and Thisbe, a love story. Robin is one of the Rude Mechanicals, the tailor, who gathers with his colleagues to prepare their production. Robin at first is told to play the part of Thisbe's mother, but Peter Quince points out that a love story needs moonlight shining on the lovers to have any real effect on the
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    225
    Tom Snout

    Tom Snout

    Tom Snout is a fictional character in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. He is a tinker, and one of the "mechanicals", amateur players in Pyramus and Thisbe, a play within the play. In the play-within-a-play, Tom Snout plays the wall which separates Pyramus' and Thisbe's gardens. In Pyramus and Thisbe, the two lovers whisper to each other through Snout's fingers (representing a chink in the wall). Snout has eight lines under the name of Tom Snout, and two lines as The Wall. He is the Wall for Act V-Scene 1. Tom Snout was originally set to play Pyramus's father, but the need for a wall was greater, so he discharged The Wall. Snout is often portrayed as a reluctant actor and very frightened, but the other mechanicals, (except Bottom and Quince) are usually much more frightened than Tom Snout.
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    226
    Ajax

    Ajax

    • Plays Appears In: Ajax
    Ajax or Aias (/ˈeɪdʒæks/ or /ˈaɪ.əs/; Ancient Greek: Αἴας, gen. Αἴαντος) was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea, and king of Salamis. He plays an important role in Homer's Iliad and in the Epic Cycle, a series of epic poems about the Trojan War. To distinguish him from Ajax, son of Oileus (Ajax the Lesser), he is called "Telamonian Ajax," "Greater Ajax," or "Ajax the Great". In Etruscan mythology, he is known as Aivas Tlamunus. Ajax is the son of Telamon, who was the son of Aeacus and grandson of Zeus, and his first wife Periboea. He is the cousin of Achilles, the most remembered Greek warrior, and is the elder half-brother of Teucer. Many illustrious Athenians, including Cimon, Miltiades, Alcibiades and the historian Thucydides, traced their descent from Ajax. The Italian scholar Maggiani recently showed that on an Etruscan tomb dedicated to Racvi Satlnei in Bologna (5th century BC) there is a writing that says: "aivastelmunsl = family of Ajax Télamon". In Homer's Iliad he is described as of great stature, colossal frame and strongest of all the Achaeans. Known as the 'bulwark of the Mycenaeans', he was trained by the centaur Chiron (who had trained his
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    227
    Anne Frank

    Anne Frank

    • Plays Appears In: The Diary of Anne Frank
    Hannah Taylor-Gordon played Anne Frank in Anne Frank: The Whole Story.
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    228
    Guinevere

    Guinevere

    • Plays Appears In: Camelot
    Guinevere /ˈɡwɪnɨvɪər/ was the legendary Queen consort of King Arthur. In tales and folklore, she was said to have had a love affair with Arthur's chief knight Sir Lancelot. This story first appears in Chrétien de Troyes' Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart, and reappears as a common motif in numerous cyclical Arthurian literature, starting with the Lancelot-Grail Cycle of the early 13th century and carrying through the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. Guinevere and Lancelot's betrayal of Arthur was often considered as having led to the downfall of the kingdom. The Welsh form Gwenhwyfar, which seems to be cognate with the Irish name Findabair, can be translated as The White Enchantress, or alternately The White Fay/Ghost, from Proto-Celtic *Uindo- "white, fair, holy" + *seibarV (V=vowel) "magic" (cf. Old Irish síabar "magic"). Some have suggested that the name may derive from "Gwenhwy-fawr" or Gwenhwy the Great, contrasting the character to "Gwenhwy-fach" or Gwenhwy the less; Gwenhwyfach appears in Welsh literature as a sister of Gwenhwyfar, but Welsh scholars Melville Richards and Rachel Bromwich, both dismiss this etymology (with Richards suggesting that
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    229
    Lord Farquaad

    Lord Farquaad

    • Plays Appears In: Shrek the Musical
    Lord Farquaad is the main antagonist from the 2001 animated feature film Shrek. He is voiced by John Lithgow. Lord Farquaad is the comically short-in-stature, ruthless ruler of Duloc. Several times in the film it is commented that, in his capital city Duloc's towering height, Farquaad may be compensating for something. His birthday is April 15th. In his pursuit of perfection, Farquaad attempts to rid his Kingdom of Fairy Tale creatures, offering a bounty for their capture and then exiling imprisoned creatures to Shrek's swamp. However, because Farquaad is not of royal stock, he cannot become a king until he marries a princess. He decides that Princess Fiona will be the perfect wife and queen, but she first must be rescued from her tower which is guarded by a fire-breathing dragon. Unwilling to perform the rescue himself, Farquaad holds a tournament to discover the knight who will rescue Princess Fiona. Shrek and Donkey arrive at Duloc during the tourney and become involved. They defeat the knights, so Farquaad decides to send Shrek on the quest. Farquaad agrees to move the Fairy Tale creatures out of Shrek's swamp if Shrek rescues Fiona. Shrek delivers Fiona to Farquaad and
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    230
    Lucky

    Lucky

    • Plays Appears In: Waiting for Godot
    Lucky is a character from Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. He is a slave to the character Pozzo. Lucky is unique in a play where most of the characters talk incessantly: he only utters two sentences (one of which is more than seven hundred words long (the monologue). Lucky suffers at the hands of Pozzo willingly and without hesitation. He is "tied" (a favourite theme in Godot) to Pozzo by a ridiculously long rope in the first act, and then a similarly ridiculous short rope in the second act. Both tie around his neck. When he is not serving Pozzo, he usually stands in one spot drooling or sleeping, if he stands there long enough. His props include a picnic basket, a coat, and a suitcase full of sand. Lucky's place in Waiting for Godot has been heavily debated. Even his name is somewhat elusive. Some have marked him as "lucky" because he is "lucky in the context of the play": he does not have to search for things to occupy his time, which is a major pastime of the other characters. Pozzo tells him what to do, he does it, and is therefore lucky because his actions are determined absolutely. Beckett asserted, however, that he is lucky because he has "no expectations". Another
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    Mechanical

    Mechanical

    A mechanical is any of six characters in A Midsummer Night's Dream who perform the play-within-a-play Pyramus and Thisbe. Named for their occupations as skilled manual laborers, they are a group of Amateur (mostly incompetent) actors from around Athens, looking to make names for themselves by having their production chosen among several acts as the courtly entertainment for the royal wedding party of Theseus and Hippolyta. The biggest ham among them, Bottom, becomes the unlikely object of interest for love-potion-charmed fairy queen Titania after he is cursed with the head and ears of an ass by the servant-spirit Puck. These kinds of characters (see also the grave diggers from Hamlet) were traditionally portrayed by clowns, which most Elizabethan theatres had in their employ.
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    Rosalind

    Rosalind

    • Plays Appears In: As You Like It
    Rosalind is a fictional character and the romantic female lead in the play.As You Like It (1600) by William Shakespeare. She is the daughter of the exiled Duke Senior and niece to his usurping brother Duke Frederick. Her father is banished from the kingdom which breaks her heart. She then meets Orlando and falls in love with him. After angering her uncle, she leaves his court for exile in the Forest of Arden. There, she lives disguised as a shepherd named Ganymede with her sweet and devoted cousin, Celia, disguised as his sister, Aliena and her uncle's fool Touchstone. Eventually, Rosalind is reunited with her father and married to her faithful lover, Orlando. Rosalind is one of Shakespeare's most recognized heroines. Admired for her intelligence, quick wit, and beauty, Rosalind is a vital character in "As You Like It." Most commonly seen next to her beloved cousin Celia, Rosalind is also a faithful friend, leader, and schemer. She stays true to her family and friends throughout the entire story, no matter how dangerous the consequences. Rosalind dominates the stage. Her true decision-making skills can be seen in the last scene of Act V where she has to present herself as Rosalind
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    Ursula

    Ursula

    • Plays Appears In: The Little Mermaid
    Ursula is an animated villainess who first appears in the 1989 Disney animated feature film, The Little Mermaid. She is voiced by Pat Carroll in the film, the spin-off television series and the Kingdom Hearts video games. Ursula is based on the "sea witch/sorceress" character in Hans Christian Andersen's story "The Little Mermaid". In the original story the sea witch is a neutral enabler, but for Disney's animated adaptation, the character was modified into a full-fledged antagonist and plays a larger role in the overall story. Ursula is a cecaelia sea witch who "helps" unfortunate merfolk to achieve her own goals. Her appearance is of an obese purple-skinned, white-haired female human with a facial mole, but from the waist down she has six black tentacles. Her overall design is based on the drag queen Divine. During planning for the film, Ursula was not originally designed as a cecaelia. It was thought that she would be another sea creature, such as a rockfish-like mermaid. The production team then saw a documentary about octopodes, and decided that their multiple arms and overall imposing appearance would be perfect for the character they were creating. Pat Carroll, who was cast
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    Aegeus

    Aegeus

    • Plays Appears In: Medea
    In Greek mythology, Aegeus ( /ˈɛdʒˌjuːs/; Ancient Greek: Αἰγεύς) or Aegeas ( /ˈiːdʒiəs/; Αιγέας), was an archaic figure in the founding myth of Athens. The "goat-man" who gave his name to the Aegean Sea was, next to Poseidon, the father of Theseus, the founder of Athenian institutions and one of the kings of Athens. Upon the death of the king his father, Pandion II, Aegeus and his three brothers, Pallas, Nisos, and Lykos, took control of Athens from Metion, who had seized the throne from Pandion. They divided the government in four but Aegeus became king. Aegeus' first wife was Meta, and his second wife was Chalciope. Still without a male heir, Aegeus asked the oracle at Delphi for advice. Her cryptic words were "Do not loosen the bulging mouth of the wineskin until you have reached the height of Athens, lest you die of grief." Aegeus did not understand the prophecy and was disappointed. This puzzling oracle forced Aegeus to visit Pittheus, king of Troezen, who was famous for his wisdom and skill at expounding oracles. Pittheus understood the prophecy and introduced Aegeus to his daughter, Aethra, when Aegeus was drunk. They lay with each other, and then in some versions, Aethra
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    Aegisthus

    Aegisthus

    • Plays Appears In: The Oresteia
    In Greek mythology, Aegisthus (Ancient Greek: Αἴγισθος ; also transliterated as Aegisthos) was the son of Thyestes and of Thyestes' daughter, Pelopia. Thyestes felt he had been deprived of the Mycenean throne unfairly by his brother, Atreus. The two battled back and forth several times. In addition, Thyestes had an affair with Atreus' wife, Aerope. In revenge, Atreus killed Thyestes' sons and served them to him unknowingly. After eating his own sons' corpses, Thyestes asked an oracle how best to gain revenge. The advice was to father a son with his own daughter, Pelopia, and that son would kill Atreus. When Aegisthus was born, his mother was ashamed of her incestuous act. She abandoned him and he was raised by shepherds and suckled by a goat, hence his name Aegisthus (from αἴξ, buck). Atreus, not knowing the baby's origin, took Aegisthus in and raised him as his own son. In the night in which Pelopia had shared the bed of her father, she had taken from him his sword which she afterwards gave to Aegisthus. This sword became the means by which the incestuous intercourse between her and her father was discovered, whereupon she put an end to her own life. Atreus in his enmity towards
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    Alice

    Alice

    • Plays Appears In: Wonderland: Alice's New Musical Adventure
    Alice is a fictional character in the literary classic, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass. She is a young girl from Victorian-era Britain. The character has been said to be based on Alice Liddell, a child friend of Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll). Dodgson said several times that his "little heroine" was not based on any real child, but was entirely fictional. Alice is portrayed as a quaintly logical girl, sometimes even pedantic, especially with Humpty Dumpty in the second book. According to the sequel, she is seven and a half years old, but seems to conduct herself like a somewhat older child. The first book takes place on 4 May, Alice Liddell's birthday. The second takes place on 4 November, her half-birthday (and Alice states that she is "seven and a half exactly.") In April 1887, Carroll wrote in "Alice on the Stage:" Alice is popularly depicted wearing a pale blue knee-length dress with a white pinafore overtop, although the dress originally was yellow in The Nursery "Alice", the first coloured version of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In the illustrations for Through the Looking-Glass her hair is held back with a wide ribbon, and in
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    Antonio

    Antonio

    • Plays Appears In: The Merchant of Venice
    Antonio is the title character in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice. He is a middle-aged bachelor and merchant by trade who has his financial interests tied up in overseas shipments when the play begins. He is kind, generous, honest and confident, and is loved and revered by all the Christians who know him. Even Portia, who sees Antonio as a rival for her husband’s affections, reveres his character and appreciates — with reservations — his willingness to die for Bassanio. Antonio manifests his piety by cursing and spitting at Shylock (anti-semitism was common in Europe in Shakespeare's day). Act 1 When we first see him commiserating with his friends Solano and Salerio he is pondering the unknown source of his depressive state: In sooth I know not why I am so sad. It wearies me, you say it wearies you; But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, What stuff ‘tis made of, where of it is born, I am to learn And such a want-wit sadness makes of me That I have much ado to know myself. (MOV 1.1.1-7)' His friends try to guess the origin and nature of his condition by questioning him. First they inquire as to whether or not he is worried about his investments. When he insists that is
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    Big Bad Wolf

    Big Bad Wolf

    • Plays Appears In: Into the Woods
    The Big Bad Wolf is a fictional wolf appearing in several precautionary folkloric stories, including some of Aesop's Fables and Grimm's Fairy Tales. Versions of this character have appeared in numerous works, and has become a generic archetype of a menacing predatory antagonist, sometimes referred to as the Big Bad. Little Red Riding Hood, Three Little Pigs, The Wolf and the Seven Young Kids, the Russian tale Peter and the Wolf, reflect the theme of the ravening wolf and of the creature released unharmed from its belly, but the general theme of restoration is very old. The dialog between the wolf and Little Red Riding Hood has its analogies to the Norse Þrymskviða from the Elder Edda; the giant Þrymr had stolen Mjölner, Thor's hammer, and demanded Freyja as his bride for its return. Instead, the gods dressed Thor as a bride and sent him. When the giants note Thor's unladylike eyes, eating, and drinking, Loki explains them as Freyja not having slept, or eaten, or drunk, out of longing for the wedding. Folklorists and cultural anthropologists such as P. Saintyves and Edward Burnett Tylor saw Little Red Riding Hood in terms of solar myths and other naturally occurring cycles, stating
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    Dorothy Gale

    Dorothy Gale

    • Plays Appears In: The Wizard of Oz
    Dorothy Gale is the protagonist of many of the Oz novels by American author L. Frank Baum, and the best friend of Oz's ruler Princess Ozma. Dorothy first appears in Baum's classic children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and reappears in most of its sequels. She also is the main character in various adaptations, notably the classic 1939 movie adaptation of the book, The Wizard of Oz. Even when she does not appear in a sequel (as in the case of The Marvelous Land of Oz), she is arguably the most important character in the series, as it is she, through her actions in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, who sparked later events. Dorothy's adventures continue. In later books, Oz steadily becomes more familiar to her than her homeland of Kansas. Indeed, Dorothy eventually goes to live in an apartment in the Emerald City, but only once her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry have settled in a farmhouse on its outskirts, unable to pay the mortgage on their house in Kansas. An influence on the creation of Dorothy appears to be the Alice books of Lewis Carroll. Although he found their plots incoherent, Baum identified their source of popularity as Alice herself, a child with whom the child readers could
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    Duncan I of Scotland

    Duncan I of Scotland

    • Plays Appears In: Macbeth
    Donnchad mac Crinain (Modern Gaelic: Donnchadh mac Crìonain; anglicised as Duncan I, and nicknamed An t-Ilgarach, "the Diseased" or "the Sick"; ca. 1001 – 14 August 1040) was king of Scotland (Alba) from 1034 to 1040. He was son of Crínán, hereditary lay abbot of Dunkeld, and Bethoc, daughter of king Malcolm II of Scotland (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda). Unlike the "King Duncan" of Shakespeare's Macbeth, the historical Duncan appears to have been a young man. He followed his grandfather Malcolm as king after the latter's death on 25 November 1034, without apparent opposition. He may have been Malcolm's acknowledged successor or tánaise as the succession appears to have been uneventful. Earlier histories, following John of Fordun, supposed that Duncan had been king of Strathclyde in his grandfather's lifetime, between 1018 and 1034, ruling the former Kingdom of Strathclyde as an appanage. Modern historians discount this idea. An earlier source, a variant of the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba (CK-I), gives Duncan's wife the Gaelic name Suthen. Whatever his wife's name may have been, Duncan had at least two sons. The eldest, Malcolm III (Máel Coluim mac Donnchada) was king from 1058 to
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    Ebenezer Scrooge

    Ebenezer Scrooge

    • Plays Appears In: Scrooge: The Musical
    Ebenezer Scrooge is the principal character in Charles Dickens's 1843 novel, A Christmas Carol. At the beginning of the novel, Scrooge is a cold-hearted, tight-fisted and greedy man, who despises Christmas and all things which give people happiness. Dickens describes him thus: "The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, made his eyes red, his thin lips blue, and he spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice ..." His last name has come into the English language as a byword for miserliness and misanthropy, traits displayed by Scrooge in the exaggerated manner for which Dickens is well-known. The tale of his redemption by the three Ghosts of Christmas (Ghost of Christmas Past, Ghost of Christmas Present, and Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come) has become a defining tale of the Christmas holiday. Scrooge's catchphrase, "Bah, humbug!" is often used to express disgust with many of the modern Christmas traditions. In his diaries, Dickens states that Scrooge stems from a grave marker which he saw in 1841, while taking an evening walk in the Canongate Kirkyard in Edinburgh. The headstone was for the vintner Ebenezer Lennox Scroggie, a relative of Adam Smith, who had won
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    Erzulie

    Erzulie

    • Plays Appears In: Once On This Island
    In Haitian Vodou or Vodou, Erzulie (sometimes spelled Ezili) is a family of lwa, or spirits. Erzulie Fréda Dahomey, the Rada aspect of Erzulie, is the spirit of love, beauty, jewelry, dancing, luxury, and flowers. She wears three wedding rings, one for each husband - Damballa, Agwe and Ogoun. Her symbol is a heart, her colours are pink, blue, white and gold, and her favourite sacrifices include jewellery, perfume, sweet cakes and liqueurs. Coquettish and very fond of beauty and finery, Erzulie Freda is femininity and compassion embodied, yet she also has a darker side; she is seen as jealous and spoiled and within some vodoun circles is considered to be lazy. When she mounts a serviteur she flirts with all the men, and treats all the women as rivals. In Christian iconography she is often identified with the Mater Dolorosa. She is conceived of as never able to attain her heart's most fervent desire. For this reason she always leaves a service in tears. Her syncretic iconographical depiction is usually based on that of the Virgin and Child, because she is the mother of Ti. Common syncretizations include Our Lady of Lourdes because she is usually depicted as light-skinned. In her
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    Laertes

    Laertes

    • Plays Appears In: Hamlet
    Laertes ( /leɪˈɜrtiːz/) is a character in William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. His name is taken from the father of Odysseus in Homer's Odyssey. Laertes is the son of Polonius and the brother of Ophelia. In the final scene, he kills Hamlet with a poisoned sword to avenge the deaths of his father and sister, for which he blamed Hamlet. While dying of the same poison, he implicates King Claudius. The Laertes character is thought to be originally from Shakespeare, as there is no equivalent character in any of the known sources for the play. In the first Act, Laertes is seen warning Ophelia against Hamlet's romantic pursuit of her, saying Hamlet will soon lose his desire for her, and that it is not Hamlet's own choice but the king's as to whom he will marry. Before Laertes returns to France (he had returned to attend the coronation of King Claudius), his father, Polonius, gives him advice to behave himself in France. During Laertes's absence, Hamlet kills Polonius in Gertrude's parlor. Laertes, informed of his father's death, returns to Denmark, and leads a mob to storm and take the castle. Laertes confronts the King, thinking he was responsible for Polonius' death. The King explains to
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    Mad Hatter

    Mad Hatter

    • Plays Appears In: Wonderland: Alice's New Musical Adventure
    The Hatter (called Hatta in Through the Looking-Glass) is a fictional character in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and the story's sequel Through the Looking-Glass. He is often referred to as the Mad Hatter, though this term was never used by Carroll. The phrase "mad as a hatter" pre-dates Carroll's works and the characters the Hatter and the March Hare are initially referred to as "both mad" by the Cheshire Cat, with both first appearing in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, in the seventh chapter titled "A Mad Tea-Party". The Hatter explains to Alice that he and the March Hare are always having tea because, when he tried to sing for the Queen of Hearts at her celebration, she sentenced him to death for "murdering the time," but he escapes decapitation. In retaliation, Time (referred to as a "Him") halts himself in respect to the Hatter, keeping him and the March Hare stuck at 6:00 forever. As such, he exclaims "Tea Time!" at random occasions. The tea party, when Alice arrives, is characterised by switching places on the table at any given time, making short, personal remarks, asking unanswerable riddles and reciting nonsensical poetry, all of which eventually
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    Melanie Wilkes

    Melanie Wilkes

    • Plays Appears In: Gone With The Wind
    Melanie Hamilton Wilkes is a fictional character first appearing in the novel Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. In the 1939 film she was portrayed by Olivia de Havilland. Melanie is Scarlett O'Hara's sister-in-law and eventually her best friend. Born Melanie Hamilton around 1844, she and her brother Charles Hamilton are among the last members left of the relatively affluent Hamilton family. The family has always valued education and sought to provide its members with the finest available. As a result, they have gained a reputation for producing a fair number of intellectuals and several noted lawyers. For several generations they have intermarried with the like-minded Wilkes family. Unfortunately, this practice of apparent inbreeding has eventually resulted in the birth of progressively sicklier children. Melanie and Charles' parents die when their children are still young. Their father, Col. William R. Hamilton, was described as a hot-tempered, fiery soldier "with a ramrod for a backbone". The two siblings are placed under the joint guardianship of Henry Hamilton and Sarah Jane "Pittypat" Hamilton, their father's brother and sister. Neither Henry nor Pittypat is married and
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    Nurse

    Nurse

    • Plays Appears In: Romeo and Juliet
    The Nurse is a major character in William Shakespeare's classic drama Romeo and Juliet. It is revealed later in the play by Lord Capulet that the Nurse's real name might be Angelica (as the line could also be addressed to Lady Capulet). She is the personal servant, guardian (and former wet nurse) of Juliet Capulet, and has been since Juliet was born. She had a daughter named Susan who died in infancy, and then became wetnurse to Juliet. As the primary person to like, she is therefore Juliet's foremost confidante. She is one of the few people, along with Friar Laurence, to be made aware of the blossoming romance between Romeo and Juliet. Her personal history outside of the Capulet estate is unknown, other than that she once had a husband and a daughter, Susan, both of which are deceased. Juliet is considered by many, historians and fans alike, to be her surrogate daughter in many respects because she took care of Juliet as a baby in Lady Capulet's absence. The Nurse is a character in Arthur Brooke's poem The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet, as Shakespeare's main source text. She is like family to the Capulets. The Nurse plays a similar role in the poem by Brooke, though she is
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    Oedipus

    Oedipus

    • Plays Appears In: Oedipus at Colonus
    Oedipus (US  /ˈɛdɨpəs/ or UK /ˈiːdɨpəs/; Ancient Greek: Οἰδίπους Oidípous meaning "swollen foot") was a mythical Greek king of Thebes. A tragic hero in Greek mythology, Oedipus fulfilled a prophecy that said he would kill his father and marry his mother, and thereby brought disaster on his city and family. The story of Oedipus is the subject of Sophocles's tragedy Oedipus the King, which was followed by Oedipus at Colonus and then Antigone. Together, these plays make up Sophocles's three Theban plays. Oedipus represents two enduring themes of Greek myth and drama: the flawed nature of humanity and an individual's powerlessness against the course of destiny in a harsh universe. Oedipus was born to King Laius and Queen Jocasta. In the most well-known version of the myth, Laius wished to thwart a prophecy saying that his child would grow up to murder his father and marry his mother. Thus, he fastened the infant's feet together with a large pin and left him to die on a mountainside. The baby was found by shepherds and raised by King Polybus and Queen Merope in the city of Corinth. Oedipus learned from the oracle at Delphi of the prophecy, but believing he was fated to murder Polybus
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    Pinocchio

    Pinocchio

    • Plays Appears In: Shrek the Musical
    Pinocchio is a supporting character in the Shrek series. He has been given a recurring role and he is voiced by Cody Cameron (who also voices The Three Little Pigs). So far, he has appeared in all Shrek films and he will return for Shrek Forever After. He is a puppet who wants to be a real boy who can grow his nose whenever he lies. He is based on the fairy-tale character, Pinocchio. His creator Geppetto was seen in the film when he sold Pinocchio (who the guard calls "the possessed toy"). Geppetto received five shillings for him. Pinocchio was a fairy tale creature who was sold along with Donkey. Later, he is banished into Shrek's swamp among the others by Lord Farquaad. He has a small role only. Pinocchio becomes one of Shrek's best friends prior to the events of the film. He helps Shrek and Princess Fiona in guarding their swamp while they visit Far Far Away. He is later seen, watching the Royal Far Far Away Ball and when Shrek (in his human form) is thrown into a police truck. Once seeing this, Pinocchio and the others travel to Far Far Away to free Shrek, Puss in Boots and Donkey. While there, he accidentally reveals that he wears thongs. After that, they managed to get into
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    Polyxena

    Polyxena

    • Plays Appears In: Hecuba
    In Greek mythology, Polyxena ( /pəˈlɪksɨnə/; Greek: Πολυξένη) was the youngest daughter of King Priam of Troy and his queen, Hecuba. She is considered the Trojan version of Iphigenia, daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. Polyxena is not in Homer's Iliad, appearing in works by later poets, perhaps to add romance to Homer's austere tale. An oracle prophesied that Troy would not be defeated if Polyxena's brother, Prince Troilus, reached the age of twenty. During the Trojan War, Polyxena and Troilus were ambushed when they were attempting to fetch water from a fountain, and Troilus was killed by the Greek warrior Achilles, who soon became interested in the quiet sagacity of Polyxena. Achilles, still recovering from Patroclus' death, found Polyxena's words a comfort and was later told to go to the temple of Apollo to meet her after her devotions. Achilles seemed to trust Polyxena—he told her of his only vulnerability: his vulnerable heel. It was later in the temple of Apollo that Polyxena's brothers, Paris and Deiphobus, ambushed Achilles and shot him in the heel with an arrow, supposedly guided by the hand of Apollo himself, steeped in poison. Some claimed Polyxena committed suicide
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    Volumnia

    Volumnia

    • Plays Appears In: Coriolanus
    Volumnia is a character in William Shakespeare's play Coriolanus, the mother of Caius Martius Coriolanus'. She plays a large role in Coriolanus' life, encouraging him in his military success and urging him to seek political office. When the people of Rome put her son in exile and he joins their military enemies, she manages to persuade him not to besiege Rome and becomes a heroine to the city. Scholars have noted her profound control over her son and her effect on his attitude towards life throughout the play. Rather than offering nourishment, Volumnia constantly urges her son towards aggression. Psychoanalytic literary scholars even suggest that she protects him as if he were her sexual partner, even keeping Coriolanus' own wife away from him. Performance of the role has changed over time as focus shifted from male roles to female roles. During the Romantic Period, she was portrayed as a stately, calm woman. More recently roles have made her much more emotive. Volumnia first appears in Act one Scene three, with her daughter-in-law, Virgilia. Coriolanus recently joined the war against the Volscians, and while the two sit at home sewing, they discuss their fears about him. Virgilia
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