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Best The Real Wonder Women of All Time

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    1
    Marie Louise Trichet

    Marie Louise Trichet

    Blessed Marie Louise Trichet also known as Marie-Louise de Jésus was a French Catholic figure who, with Saint Louis de Montfort, founded the Congregation of religious women called Daughters of Wisdom and since the age of seventeen devoted her life to caring for the poor and the sick. She is also referred to as the First Daughter of Wisdom. She was beatified by Pope John Paul II and currently awaits canonizaton. She was born in Poitiers, on the Clain River in west central France on May 7, 1684 and baptized at the church of St. Etienne. Her father Julien was a court magistrate in Poitiers and her mother Françoise Lecocq was deeply religious, as was most of her family. She was the fourth child, and had seven siblings. Her younger brother Alexis, born just one year earlier, was ordained a priest in 1710 and later died because he volunteered to minister to plague striken inmates in a prison camp. The youngest of her sisters later joined the Daughters of Wisdom. Marie Louise grew up in an atmosphere of religion and education, and when seven years old, was sent to the boarding school at Poitiers run by the Sisters of St. Jeanne de Lestonac to acquire the social qualifications suitable for
    8.83
    6 votes
    2
    Pearl S. Buck

    Pearl S. Buck

    Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973), also known by her Chinese name Sai Zhenzhu (Chinese: 賽珍珠; pinyin: Sài Zhēnzhū), was an American writer who spent most of her time until 1934 in China. Her novel The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction book in the U.S. in 1931 and 1932, and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932. In 1938, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, "for her rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her biographical masterpieces." Pearl Buck was born in Hillsboro, West Virginia, to Caroline Stulting (1857–1921) and Absalom Sydenstricker. Her parents, Southern Presbyterian missionaries, traveled to China soon after their marriage on July 8, 1880, but returned to the United States for Pearl's birth. When Pearl was three months old, the family returned to China to be stationed first in Zhenjiang (then often known as Jingjiang or, in the Postal Romanization, Tsingkiang), (this is near Nanking). Pearl was raised in a bilingual environment, tutored in English by her mother and in classical Chinese by a Mr. Kung. The Boxer Uprising greatly affected Pearl and family; their Chinese friends deserted them, and Western visitors
    7.57
    7 votes
    3
    Scholastica

    Scholastica

    Scholastica (c. 480 – 10 February 547) is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches. Born in Italy, she was the twin sister of St. Benedict of Nursia. St. Gregory the Great, in his Dialogues, tells us that she was a nun and leader of a community for women at Plombariola, about five miles from Benedict's abbey at Monte Cassino. We do not know what rule this community followed, although it seems most likely it was the Rule of St. Benedict. Scholastica was dedicated to God from a young age (some tellings of her story indicate that she preceded Benedict in godliness, and he came to holiness after she did). The most commonly told story about her is that she would, once a year, go and visit her brother at a place near his abbey, and they would spend the day worshiping together and discussing sacred texts and issues. She also is the founder of women's branch of Benedictine Monasticism like her brother Benedict of Nyssa who found the Benedictine Missionary movement whose headquarter is in Monte Cassino. One year at the end of the day, they had supper and continued their conversation. When Benedict indicated it was time for him to leave, she protested, and
    8.50
    6 votes
    4
    Aida M. Alvarez

    Aida M. Alvarez

    Ms. Alvarez is the former Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration and was a member of President Clinton's Cabinet from 1997 to 2001. She was the founding Director of the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight, the financial regulator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, from 1993 to 1997. Ms. Alvarez was a vice president in public finance at First Boston Corporation and Bear Stearns & Co., Inc. prior to 1993. She is presently Chair of the Latino Community Foundation of San Francisco and a director of UnionBanCal Corporation. Ms. Alvarez also serves on the diversity advisory board for Deloitte & Touche LLP. Ms. Alvarez has been a member of the Board since 2006. 
    7.43
    7 votes
    5
    Christina Domecq

    Christina Domecq

    For nearly a decade, Christina has founded and run three businesses in technology-based and management services. In 2006, she won the prestigious Ernst and Young UK Entrepreneur of the Year and the Ernst and Young Science and Technology Entrepreneur of the Year and also serves on the boards of several businesses.
    7.43
    7 votes
    6

    Keshia Knight Pulliam

    Keshia Knight Pulliam (born April 9, 1979) is an American actress. She is most recognized for her childhood role as Rudy Huxtable on the long-running NBC sitcom The Cosby Show and as reformed con artist Miranda Lucas-Payne on the TBS comedy-drama Tyler Perry's House of Payne. Keshia Knight Pulliam was born in Newark, New Jersey. She is the daughter of Denise and James Pulliam, Sr., a manager. She has three younger brothers. Pulliam attended Rutgers Preparatory School in Somerset, New Jersey. After The Cosby Show ended her family moved to Virginia, where Pulliam attended the Potomac School in McLean, Virginia and Foxcroft School in Middleburg, Virginia. She received a bachelor of arts degree in Sociology from Spelman College in 2001. Pulliam is a member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority, initiated through the Eta Kappa chapter. She currently resides in Atlanta, Georgia. Pulliam became the youngest actress ever to be nominated for an Emmy at age six for best supporting actress. Even before that – at age three – she played "Keshia" on Sesame Street. She also played in the movie Pollyanna with Phylicia Rashad. Her character on The Cosby Show, "Rudy", was known for being the "baby" of the
    8.33
    6 votes
    7
    Ida B. Wells

    Ida B. Wells

    • Subject of: The Approaching 100th Anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance (part 1)
    Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931) was an African-American journalist, newspaper editor and, with her husband, newspaper owner Ferdinand L. Barnett, an early leader in the civil rights movement. She documented lynching in the United States, showing how it was often a way to control or punish blacks who competed with whites. She was active in the women's rights and the women's suffrage movement, establishing several notable women's organizations. Wells was a skilled and persuasive rhetorician, and traveled internationally on lecture tours. Ida B. Wells was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862, just before President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Her father James Wells was a carpenter and her mother was Elizabeth "Lizzie" Warrenton Wells. Both parents were enslaved until freed under the Proclamation, one year after she was born. Ida’s father James was a master at carpentry and known as a "race man", someone who worked for the advancement of blacks. He was very interested in politics, and was a member of the Loyal League. He attended public speeches and campaigned for local black candidates, but he never ran for office. Her mother
    8.17
    6 votes
    8
    Cat Cora

    Cat Cora

    Catherine "Cat" Cora (born January 1, 1968) is a Greek-American professional chef best known for her featured role as an "Iron Chef" on the Food Network television show Iron Chef America and as co-host of Around the World in 80 Plates on Bravo. Cora, a Greek American, was born in Jackson, Mississippi, where she was raised in a Greek community. Her grandfather and father were both restaurateurs. When she was 15 years old, she brought a business plan to her father and grandfather, knowing they could help her. Cora's style of cooking was influenced by Julia Child, Barbara Tropp, M.F.K. Fisher and her grandmother, Alma. After receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Physiology and Biology at the University of Southern Mississippi, she enrolled at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Cora has appeared on Simplify Your Life. She was also a co-host of the Food Network show Kitchen Accomplished. In January 2005 Cora co-founded Chefs For Humanity, which describes itself as "a grassroots coalition of chefs and culinary professionals guided by a mission to quickly be able to raise funds and provide resources for important emergency and humanitarian aid,
    6.25
    8 votes
    9
    Anne-Marie Javouhey

    Anne-Marie Javouhey

    Blessed Anne-Marie Javouhey (November 10, 1779 – July 15, 1851) was a French nun who founded the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Cluny. She is venerated in the Roman Catholic Church. She is known as the Liberator of the Slaves in the New World, and as the mother of the town of Mana, French Guiana. She was born in the commune of Jallanges, Côte-d'Or, the fifth of ten children of a local wealthy farm couple, Balthazar and Claudine Javouhey. When she was very young, she smelled wine and was about to drink the wine when one of the servants saw her and asked her not to drink the wine. She always added water to her wine for the rest of her life. Through her teen years, she helped to hide and care for a number of priests persecuted by the French Revolution, including keeping watch for them as they said Mass. She made a private vow when she was nineteen years old, but was not able to become a nun because the revolutionary government had closed convents and churches. Later on, she joined the Sisters of Charity at Besançon. While there is reported to have a vision of St. Teresa of Avila entrusting children of different races to her. She did not understand its meaning at the time, but it would
    8.00
    6 votes
    10
    Stephanie Cutter

    Stephanie Cutter

    Stephanie Cutter (born October 22, 1968) is a political consultant who currently serves as deputy campaign manager for President Barack Obama's 2012 reelection campaign. She has previously worked in campaign and communications roles for other Democrats including Ted Kennedy, John Kerry and Michelle Obama. Cutter was born in Taunton, Massachusetts and raised in nearby Raynham, Massachusetts. She graduated from Bridgewater-Raynham Regional High School in 1986. She graduated from Smith College and Georgetown Law School. In the 1990s, she worked as a junior aide to Mario Cuomo and also worked for the Environmental Protection Agency. She worked for Bill Clinton as Deputy Communications Director at the White House during his administration and as Associate Administrator for Communications at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Beginning in 2001, she served as Communications Director for Senator Ted Kennedy. In July 2003 was named Communications Director for the Democratic National Committee. In November 2003, she was named communications director for the John Kerry campaign, at Kennedy's recommendation. During that campaign, she was criticized for having a surly and difficult
    7.67
    6 votes
    11
    Soleil Moon Frye

    Soleil Moon Frye

    Soleil Moon Frye ( /soʊˈleɪ/; born August 6, 1976) is an American actress, director and screenwriter. Frye is best known for her childhood role as the title character in sitcom Punky Brewster, and as Roxie King in Sabrina, the Teenage Witch. Frye was born in Glendora, California. Her father is actor Virgil Frye, and her mother is talent agent Sondra (Londy) Peluce. She has two half-brothers, Sean Frye and Meeno Peluce, both former child actors. Frye's parents divorced when she was two. Frye made her acting debut in the 1982 television movie Missing Children: A Mother's Story. At the age of eight, she starred in the title role of Punky Brewster, a sitcom that aired on NBC and in syndication from 1984 to 1988. She also voiced the lead role in the animated series It's Punky Brewster. After the series ended in 1986, Frye landed the lead role in the short lived 1988 sitcom Cadets. During the 1990s, she guest starred on several television series including The Wonder Years, Saved by the Bell, and Friends, and voiced characters for the animated series Tiny Toon Adventures and The Cartoon Cartoon Show. In addition to her television work, Frye has appeared in the films The Liars' Club (1993)
    7.50
    6 votes
    12
    Veronica Rayne

    Veronica Rayne

    Veronica Rayne (born November 29, 1976) is a retired American pornographic actress and star of the Fox Reality Channel TV show My Bare Lady 2:Open For Business. While working in a night club (where she was the manager) she met Jack Vegas, who was the head of security. Rayne started her adult entertainment career in 2005 when she had a chance meeting with industry legend Ron Jeremy while dancing in Boston. On August 25, 2008 Rayne and Vegas opened a restaurant and lounge in Tarzana entitled Oxygen. In November 2008, Rayne's starred in Fox Reality Channel TV show My Bare Lady 2: Open For Business! My Bare Lady 2 featured Veronica in the cast of adult stars trying their hand at business ventures. The show’s season consisted of eight episodes. Veronica will be making an appearance in an upcoming mainstream movie, Bob Gosse’s I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell. A short video clip of Rayne on the set can be found on The Star Factory’s YouTube page She retired in January 2010.
    7.50
    6 votes
    13

    Ann McGlone Burke

    Anne Marie McGlone Burke, SMOM (born February 3, 1944) is an Illinois Supreme Court Justice for the First Judicial District (Cook County, Illinois) and, along with other notables including Eunice Kennedy, is a founder of the Special Olympics. Judge Burke was first appointed by the Illinois Supreme Court in 1995 and then was elected to the Appellate Court in 1996. Burke was born and raised on Chicago's South Side, graduating from Maria High School. While raising her children, she returned to school and received a bachelor's degree from DePaul University in 1976 and a law degree from Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1983. She was admitted to the Illinois bar and federal Northern District of Illinois in 1983, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit in 1985. She was certified for the Northern District's trial bar in 1987. The same year, Illinois Governor James R. Thompson appointed her a judge of the Illinois Court of Claims, and she was reappointed by Governor Jim Edgar in 1991. Burke was the first woman to serve on the Illinois Court of Claims. In April 1994, she was appointed special counsel to the Governor for Child Welfare Services. In August 1995, she was appointed to the
    8.40
    5 votes
    14
    Maha Al-Ghunaim

    Maha Al-Ghunaim

    Maha Al-Ghunaim co-founded Kuwait's Global Investment House in 1998. She is currently the Chairperson and Managing Director.  She built up the business that now manages more than 7 billion in assets. She graduated from San Francisco State University in 1982, Al-Ghunaim earned the degree Bachelor of Science in Mathematics.
    7.17
    6 votes
    15
    Jennifer Lopez

    Jennifer Lopez

    • Web Link(s): MusicMoz page for Jennifer Lopez
    Jennifer Lynn Lopez (born July 24, 1969) is an American actress, businesswoman, dancer and recording artist. Often referred to as J.Lo, she is reportedly the highest earning actress of Latin American descent. Born and raised in The Bronx, New York, she enrolled in singing and dancing classes as a child and grew up in a musically influenced household. She started her career as a fly girl on the television comedy program In Living Color and a back-up dancer for Janet Jackson. Lopez gained recognition in the action-thriller Money Train (1995). Her first leading role was in the biographical film Selena (1997), which was her breakthrough role, earning her an ALMA Award for Outstanding Actress and Golden Globe nomination. She earned her second ALMA Award for her performance in Out of Sight (1998), which made her the highest-paid Latin actress. She has since appeared in various films including The Cell (2000), The Wedding Planner (2001), Maid in Manhattan (2002), Shall We Dance? (2004), Monster-in-Law (2005), The Back-up Plan (2010) and What to Expect When You're Expecting (2012). In 1998, Lopez began recording her debut album and released On the 6 (1999), which spawned the hit singles
    8.20
    5 votes
    16
    Mena Grabowski Trott

    Mena Grabowski Trott

    Mena Grabowski Trott (born Mena Grabowski on (1977-09-16) September 16, 1977 (age 35) is a co-founder of Six Apart, creator of Movable Type and TypePad. The company name originates from the fact that Trott and co-founder/husband Benjamin Trott were born six days apart. Trott was president of Six Apart. She remains on the Board of Directors after the merger which resulted in the formation of Say Media. She made her first efforts in weblogging at dollarshort.org in 2001. Movable Type was originally developed by Mena Trott and Benjamin Trott during a period of unemployment in late 2001 for Mena's personal blogging use. Trott was named one of the People of the Year by PC Magazine in 2004. That same year, she was named a member of the TR100 by MIT Technology Review magazine, as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35. Mena Trott now operates the blog "The Sew Weekly" at sewweekly.com. The blog encourages people to "sew one garment a week." Each week, Mena develops a theme, such as "tickled pink" (garments made from pink fabric) and "celebrating mothers" (garments which our mothers wore). Community members may upload pictures of their completed projects along with
    8.00
    5 votes
    17
    Susan L. Lindquist

    Susan L. Lindquist

    Dr. Lindquist was elected to the Board of Directors in 2004 and is a member of the Science & Technology Advisory Committee and the Public Policy
    8.00
    5 votes
    18
    6.00
    7 votes
    19
    Susanne Klatten

    Susanne Klatten

    Susanne Klatten (born Susanne Hanna Ursula Quandt on 28 April 1962 in Bad Homburg, Germany) is the daughter of Herbert and Johanna Quandt. As of 2011, she is worth $14.6 billion, and is the richest woman in Germany and the 44th richest person in the world. After gaining a degree in business finance, Susanne Klatten worked for the advertising agency Young & Rubicam in Frankfurt from 1981 to 1983. This was followed by a course in marketing and management at the University of Buckingham, and an MBA from IMD in Lausanne specialising in advertising. She gained further business experience in London with Dresdner Bank, the Munich branch of management consultants McKinsey and the bank Reuschel & Co. Recognising that her wealth is sometimes a problem, she often worked incognito under the name Susanne Kant. Police prevented an attempt to kidnap her in 1978. On her father's death she inherited his 50.1% stake in pharmaceutical and chemicals manufacturer Altana. She sits on Altana's supervisory board and helped transform it into a world-class corporation in the German DAX list of 30 top companies. In 2006 Altana AG sold its pharmaceutical activities to Nycomed for €4.5 billion, leaving only
    9.00
    4 votes
    20
    Helen Keller

    Helen Keller

    Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. A prolific author, Keller was well traveled, and was outspoken in her anti-war convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women's suffrage, labor rights, socialism, and other radical left causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame in 1971. Helen Adams Keller was born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Her family lived on a homestead, Ivy Green, that Helen's grandfather had built decades earlier. Helen's father, Arthur H. Keller, spent many years as an editor for the Tuscumbia North Alabamian and had served as a captain for the Confederate Army. Helen's paternal grandmother was the second cousin of Robert E. Lee. Helen's mother, Kate
    7.60
    5 votes
    21
    Clara Barton

    Clara Barton

    Clarissa Harlowe "Clara" Barton (December 25, 1821 – April 12, 1912) was a pioneer American teacher, patent clerk, nurse, and humanitarian. She was the founder of the American Red Cross. Clara Barton was the youngest child of Stephen Barton, veteran of the Indian Wars in Ohio and Michigan and a selectman in Oxford, Massachusetts; and his wife, Sarah. Her siblings were Dorothy, Sally, Stephen and David. Barton always had a passion for being a nurse. She took care of her dog when he hurt his leg. But the best example was her brother, David Barton. When Clara was 11, David was fixing the barn roof and fell off. The doctor said that he would die in time. But young Clara was determined to save him, and nursed him back to health. Clara Barton became a school teacher in 1837 teaching in the area for a dozen years in schools at Oxford, N. Oxford, Charlton, and West Millbury. In 1850, Barton decided to further her education by pursuing writing and languages at the Clinton Liberal Institute in New York. Following these studies, Barton opened a free school in New Jersey. The attendance under her leadership grew to 600 but instead of hiring Barton to head the school, the board hired a man
    8.50
    4 votes
    22

    Catherine McAuley

    The Venerable Mother Catherine Elizabeth McAuley (born on 29 September 1778, at Stormanstown House, in Dublin, Ireland – died 11 November 1841, at the House of Mercy she had built on Baggot Street, Dublin) was an Irish nun, who founded the Sisters of Mercy in 1831. The Order has always been associated with teaching, especially in Ireland, where the nuns taught Catholics (and at times Protestants) at a time when education was mainly reserved for members of the established Church of Ireland. Having lost her father as a small child, Catherine became orphaned at 18 with the death of her mother. By this time the family had little money so Catherine and her two siblings moved to live with relatives. Unfortunately her relatives also struggled financially, and so Catherine went to live with wealthy friends of her relatives, the Callaghans. Catherine spent her time learning about her religion, praying, and serving the needy. When Mr Callaghan died, he left his entire fortune to Catherine. She inherited a considerable fortune at the age of 48, she chose to use it to build a house where she and other compassionate women could take in homeless women and children to provide care and an
    6.33
    6 votes
    23

    Louise Arbour

    Louise Arbour, CC GOQ (born February 10, 1947) is the former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, a former justice of the Supreme Court of Canada and the Court of Appeal for Ontario and a former Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. She has since July 2009 served as President and CEO of the International Crisis Group. Born in Montreal, Quebec to Bernard Arbour and Rose Ravary, the owners of a hotel chain. She attended convent school, during which time her parents divorced. As editor of the school magazine, she earned a reputation for irreverence. In 1967, she graduated from College Regina Assumpta, and proceeded to the Université de Montréal where she completed an LL.L. with distinction in 1970. She became the Law Clerk for Mr. Justice Louis-Philippe Pigeon of the Supreme Court of Canada in 1971-1972 while completing graduate studies at the Faculty of Law (Civil Section) of the University of Ottawa. She was called to the Bar of Quebec in 1971 and to the Law Society of Upper Canada in 1977. She was made a Companion to the Order of Canada in 2007 "for her contributions to the Canadian justice system and for her dedication to
    6.33
    6 votes
    24
    Gloria Steinem

    Gloria Steinem

    Gloria Marie Steinem (born March 25, 1934) is an American feminist, journalist, and social and political activist who became nationally recognized as a leader of, and media spokeswoman for, the women's liberation movement in the late 1960s and 1970s. A prominent writer and political figure, Steinem has founded many organizations and projects and has been the recipient of many awards and honors. She was a columnist for New York magazine and co-founded Ms. magazine. In 1969, she published an article, "After Black Power, Women's Liberation" which, along with her early support of abortion rights, catapulted her to national fame as a feminist leader. In 2005, Steinem worked alongside Jane Fonda and Robin Morgan to co-found the Women's Media Center, an organization that works to amplify the voices of women in the media through advocacy, media and leadership training, and the creation of original content. Steinem currently serves on the board of the organization. She continues to involve herself in politics and media affairs as a commentator, writer, lecturer, and organizer, campaigning for candidates and reforms and publishing books and articles. Steinem was born in Toledo, Ohio. Her
    9.67
    3 votes
    25
    Meg Hourihan

    Meg Hourihan

    Meg Hourihan is the cofounder of Pyra Labs, the company that launched the Blogger personal blogging software that was acquired by Google. She published weblogs at Megnut.com and meg.hourihan.com. She co-founded Kinja along with Nick Denton of Gawker Media. She is the co-author of We Blog: Publishing Online with Weblogs (ISBN 0-7645-4962-6), and a frequent speaker at technical conferences concerning online journalism and the role of women in technology. In 2003, she was named to the MIT Technology Review TR100 as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35. PC Magazine named Evan Williams, Paul Bausch, and Hourihan — the Blogger team — as People of the Year in 2004. She was a member of the RSS Advisory Board from 2006 to 2007. Hourihan married fellow blogger Jason Kottke on March 25, 2006. Their son, Ollie, was born on July 3, 2007. Their daughter, Minna, was born September 21, 2009.
    9.67
    3 votes
    26
    Rita Levi-Montalcini

    Rita Levi-Montalcini

    Rita Levi-Montalcini (Italian pronunciation: [ˈrita ˈlɛvi montalˈtʃini]; born 22 April 1909), Knight Grand Cross, is an Italian neurologist who, together with colleague Stanley Cohen, received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF). Since 2001, she has also served in the Italian Senate as a Senator for Life. Today, Levi-Montalcini is the oldest living Nobel laureate and the first ever to reach a 100th birthday. On 22 April 2009, she was feted with a 100th birthday party at Rome's city hall. Born in Turin to a Jewish family, together with her twin sister Paola she was the youngest of four children. Her parents were Adamo Levi, an electrical engineer and gifted mathematician, and Adele Montalcini, a painter. Levi-Montalcini decided to attend medical school after seeing a close family friend die of cancer, overcoming the objections of her father who believed that "a professional career would interfere with the duties of a wife and mother". She enrolled in the Turin medical school in 1930. After graduating in 1936, she went to work as Giuseppe Levi's assistant, but her academic career was cut short by Benito Mussolini's 1938
    7.00
    5 votes
    27
    Bridget of Sweden

    Bridget of Sweden

    Bridget of Sweden (1303 – 23 July 1373; also Birgitta of Vadstena, Saint Birgitta (Swedish: den heliga Birgitta or Birgitta Birgersdotter), was a mystic and saint, and founder of the Bridgettines nuns and monks after the death of her husband of twenty years. She was also the mother of Catherine of Vadstena. She is one of the six patron saints of Europe, together with Benedict of Nursia, Saints Cyril and Methodius, Catherine of Siena and Edith Stein. The most celebrated saint of Sweden was the daughter of the knight, Birger Persson of the family of Finsta, governor and lawspeaker of Uppland, and one of the richest landowners of the country, and his wife, a member of the so-called Lawspeaker branch of the Folkunga family. Through her mother, Ingeborg, Birgitta was related to the Swedish kings of her era. In 1316, when she was 14 she married Ulf Gudmarsson of the family of Ulvåsa, Lord of Närke, to whom she bore eight children, four daughters and four sons. All of them survived infancy, which was very rare at that time. One of them was afterwards honored as St. Catherine of Sweden. Birgitta’s saintly and charitable life soon made her known far and wide; she gained, too, great
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    Carol W. Greider

    Carol W. Greider

    Carolyn Widney "Carol" Greider (born April 15, 1961) is an American molecular biologist. She is Daniel Nathans Professor and Director of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Johns Hopkins University. She discovered the enzyme telomerase in 1984, when she was a graduate student of Elizabeth Blackburn at the University of California, Berkeley. Greider pioneered research on the structure of telomeres, the ends of the chromosomes. She was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, along with Blackburn and Jack W. Szostak, for their discovery that telomeres are protected from progressive shortening by the enzyme telomerase. Greider was born in San Diego, California. Her father, Kenneth Greider, was a physics professor. Her family moved from San Diego to Davis, California, where she spent many of her early years and graduated from Davis Senior High School in 1979. She graduated from the College of Creative Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, with a B.A. in biology in 1983. During this time she also studied at the University of Göttingen and made significant discoveries there. She completed her Ph.D. in molecular biology in 1987 at the University of
    8.00
    4 votes
    29

    Ethel Percy Andrus

    Ethel Percy Andrus (September 21, 1884 – July 13, 1967) was a long-time educator and the first woman high school principal in California. She was also the founder of AARP in 1958. In 1995 she was designated a Women's History Month Honoree by the National Women's History Project. She earned a bachelor of philosophy (S.B. or Scientiæ Baccalaureus) degree from the University of Chicago in 1903 and a bachelor of science degree from Lewis Institute (now Illinois Institute of Technology) in 1918. She then went on to receive her master's (1928) and doctoral (1930) degrees from the University of Southern California. While teaching at the Lewis Institute, she volunteered at Jane Addam's Hull House. Andrus founded a separate organization, the National Retired Teachers Association (NRTA) in 1947. She realized that retired teachers were living on incredibly small pensions, often without any health insurance. She approached more than 30 companies to offer health insurance to retired teachers, before she found someone willing to take a chance on NRTA members in 1956. The organization expanded its membership to all retirees and became AARP in 1958. In 1954 she moved to Ojai, California, to start
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Eva Longoria

    Eva Longoria

    Eva Jacqueline Longoria (born March 15, 1975) is an American actress, best known for portraying Gabrielle Solis on the ABC television series Desperate Housewives. Longoria received a nomination for the 2006 Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Comedy Series for her performance on Desperate Housewives. Longoria first rose to fame on television for portraying Isabella Braña on the CBS soap opera The Young and the Restless from 2001 to 2003. She became nationally recognized in the 2000s after appearing in several high-profile advertising campaigns and numerous men's magazines, reaching #14 in the FHM "Sexiest Women 2008" poll, and having appeared on the cover of various international women's magazines including Vogue, Marie Claire and Harper's Bazaar. Longoria has also starred in films such as Harsh Times (2005), The Sentinel (2006) and Over Her Dead Body (2008). Eva Jacqueline Longoria was born in Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, the youngest of four daughters born to Mexican-Americans Enrique Longoria, Jr. and Ella Eva Mireles. The first of Longoria’s ancestors to arrive in the New World came from Spain in 1603. She was raised Roman Catholic. She received her Bachelor of
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Henriette DeLille

    Henriette DeLille

    Venerable Henriette DeLille (1813–1862) founded the Catholic order of the Sisters of the Holy Family in New Orleans, which was composed of free women of color. The order provided nursing care and a home for orphans, later establishing schools as well. In 1989 the order formally opened its cause with the Vatican in the canonization of Henriette DeLille. She was declared venerable in 2010. Henriette Delille was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1813. Her father Jean-Baptiste Lille Sarpy (var. de Lille) was born about 1758 in Fumel, Lot-et-Garonne, France. Her mother, Marie-Josèphe "Pouponne" Díaz, a free quadroon, was a Creole of color of French, Spanish and African ancestry and born in New Orleans. Their union was a common-law marriage typical of the contemporary plaçage system. Her maternal grandparents were Juan José (var. Jean-Joseph) Díaz, a Spanish merchant, and Henriette (Dubreuil) Laveau, a Créole of color. Her paternal grandfather was Jean-Baptiste Lille Sarpy Sr., who had been born at Fumel to Charles Sarpy and Susanne Trenty. Her maternal great-grandmother is said to be Cécile Marthe Basile Dubreuil; she is considered to be a daughter of Claude Villars Dubreuil, born in
    8.00
    4 votes
    32
    Jackie M. Ward

    Jackie M. Ward

    Jackie M. Ward, is the Retired Chairman and CEO of Computer Generation Incorporated, a telecommunications company based in Atlanta, Georgia that she co- founded, from 1968 until it was acquired by Intec Telecom Systems in December 2000.
    8.00
    4 votes
    33
    Caterina Fake

    Caterina Fake

    Caterina Fake is an American businesswoman. She is best known for co-founding the websites Flickr and Hunch. Fake was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to an American father, and a Filipina mother who is a naturalized citizen. Fake graduated from Choate Rosemary Hall, attended Smith College, and graduated from Vassar College in 1991. In the 1990s, Fake was Art Director at Salon.com, and heavily involved in the development of online community, social software and personal publishing. In 1997, she took a job managing the community forums of Netscape. In the summer of 2002, Fake co-founded Ludicorp in Vancouver with Stewart Butterfield. The company developed a massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Game Neverending. The game did not launch but Fake and Butterfield started a new product called Flickr that became one of the world's most popular photosharing websites. Flickr was then acquired by Yahoo! in 2005. Flickr became part of a vanguard of so-called Web 2.0 sites, integrating features such as social networking, community open APIs, tagging, and algorithms that surfaced the most popular content. After the acquisition, Fake took a job at Yahoo!, where she ran the
    9.00
    3 votes
    34

    Christy Walton

    Christy Ruth Walton (born 1955) is the widow of John T. Walton, one of the sons of Sam Walton, the founder of Wal-Mart. After John's death in June 2005, she inherited his fortune of US$15.7 billion. According to Forbes, she is the 6 richest person in the United States, and the 10th richest person in the world, as of March 2012. Forbes reported that she was the richest woman in the world for seven years running, and still held the title in March 2012. However, by May 2012 BRW estimated that Australian mining magnate Gina Rinehart had exceeded Walton's wealth. As of August 2012, she and her family had an estimated net worth of $29.9 billion, the bulk of which comes from her shares in Wal-Mart, but also from First Solar, in which her husband invested. She resides in Jackson, Wyoming and has one son, Lukas. Facesofphilanthropy.com references Condé Nast Portfolio magazine as ranking her the highest female philanthropist, according to the amount she gives as a percentage of her wealth. Between 2002 and 2006, she contributed billions from her then $16.3 billion net worth towards philanthropic efforts. Non-profit organizations in which Walton is actively serving include the national
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Kathryn C. Turner

    Kathryn C. Turner

    Kathryn C. Turner, 61, founder, chairperson and CEO of Standard Technology, Inc., a management and technology solutions firm with a focus in the healthcare sector, since 1985. Also a director of Carpenter Technology Corporation, Schering-Plough Corporation and Tribune Company. Lives in Bethesda, Md.
    7.75
    4 votes
    36

    Rachael Ray

    Rachael Domenica Ray (born August 25, 1968) is an American television personality, businesswoman, celebrity chef and author. She hosts the syndicated talk and lifestyle program Rachael Ray, and three Food Network series, (30 Minute Meals, Rachael Ray's Tasty Travels and $40 a Day). Ray wrote cookbooks based on the 30 Minute Meals concept, and launched a magazine, Every Day with Rachael Ray, in 2006. Ray's television shows have won two Daytime Emmy Awards. Rachael Ray was born in Glens Falls, New York. Her parents are Elsa Scuderi, an Italian (Sicilian) American, and James Ray, who is of French, Scottish and Welsh descent. She moved to Cape Cod, Massachusetts where her family owned four restaurants. When Ray was 8, her family moved to Lake George, New York. Her mother managed restaurants in upstate New York. In 1995 Ray moved to New York City. One of her first jobs there was at the candy counter at Macy's, where she eventually managed the fresh foods department. She later helped open a New York City market. Moving back to upstate New York, Ray managed Mister Brown's Pub at The Sagamore, a hotel on Lake George. From there, she became a buyer at Cowan & Lobel, a gourmet market in
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Patricia Russo

    Patricia Russo

    Patricia F. Russo (born 1953 in Trenton, New Jersey) is an American businessperson most widely known for having served as chief executive officer of Lucent Technologies and its successor, Alcatel-Lucent, a large communications equipment manufacturer. She currently serves on the board of directors of HP, General Motors, Merck & Co. and ALCOA, Inc. She serves as Chairman of the nonprofit organization Drugfree.org Forbes magazine rated Russo as the tenth on its list of the most powerful women in 2006. Russo joined Lucent's predecessor in 1982. In 1992 she became the president of its Business Communications Systems division, moving in 1997 to become its executive VP of corporate operations, and in 1999 to its executive VP and CEO of the Service Provider Networks Group She left in August 2000, after a reorganization, but returned in January 2002 to become its CEO. After "cutting costs and focusing on sales of wireless equipment, Russo was credited with returning Lucent to profitability in 2004, after three years of red ink." On April 2, 2006 it was announced that Russo would assume the CEO role of a new combined company resulting from the merger of the French communications company
    6.60
    5 votes
    38

    Elizabeth Ann Seton

    Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton, S.C., (August 28, 1774 – January 4, 1821) was the first native-born citizen of the United States to be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church (September 14, 1975). She established the first Catholic school in the nation, at Emmitsburg, Maryland, where she founded the first American congregation of Religious Sisters, the Sisters of Charity. Elizabeth Ann Bayley was born on August 28, 1774, the second child of a socially prominent couple, Dr. Richard Bayley and Catherine Charlton of New York City. The Bayley and Charlton families were among the earliest colonial settlers of the New York area. Her father's parents were prominent French Huguenots living in New Rochelle, New York. He later served as the Chief Health Officer for the Port of New York. Her mother was the daughter of an Episcopal minister, who served as Rector of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church on Staten Island for 30 years; Elizabeth was raised in the Episcopal Church. Her mother, Catherine, died in 1777, when Elizabeth was three years old. This was possibly a result of childbirth, as their youngest child, also Catherine, died early the following year. Bayley then married Charlotte Amelia Barclay,
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Gabriela Mistral

    Gabriela Mistral

    Gabriela Mistral (1889–1957) was the pseudonym of Lucila Godoy Alcayaga, a Chilean poet, educator, diplomat, and feminist who was the first Latin American (and, so far, the only Latin American woman) to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1945. Some central themes in her poems are nature, betrayal, love, a mother's love, sorrow and recovery, travel, and Latin American identity as formed from a mixture of Native American and European influences. Her portrait also appears on the 5,000 Chilean peso bank note. Mistral was born in Vicuña, Chile, but was raised in the small Andean village of Montegrande, where she attended the Primary school taught by her older sister, Emelina Molina. She respected her sister greatly, despite the many financial problems that Emelina brought her in later years. Her father, Juan Gerónimo Godoy Villanueva, was also a schoolteacher. He abandoned the family before she was three years old, and died, long since estranged from the family, in 1911. Throughout her early years she was never far from poverty. By age fifteen, she was supporting herself and her mother, Petronila Alcayaga, a seamstress, by working as a teacher's aide in the seaside town of Compañia
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Gerty Cori

    Gerty Cori

    Gerty Theresa Cori (née Radnitz; August 15, 1896 – October 26, 1957) was an American biochemist who became the third woman—and first American woman—to win a Nobel Prize in science, and the first woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Cori was born in Prague (then in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, now the Czech Republic). Growing up at a time when women were marginalized in science and allowed few educational opportunities, she gained admittance to medical school, where she met her future husband Carl Ferdinand Cori; upon their graduation in 1920, they married. Because of deteriorating conditions in Europe, the couple emigrated to the United States in 1922. Gerty Cori continued her early interest in medical research, collaborating in the laboratory with Carl. She published research findings coauthored with her husband, as well as publishing singly. Unlike her husband, she had difficulty securing research positions, and the ones she obtained provided meager pay. Her husband insisted on continuing their collaboration, though he was discouraged from doing so by the institutions that employed him. With her husband Carl and Argentine physiologist Bernardo Houssay,
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Liliane Bettencourt

    Liliane Bettencourt

    Liliane Bettencourt (French pronunciation: [li.li.jan be.tɑ̃.kuːʁ]; born Liliane Henriette Charlotte Schueller; 21 October 1922) is a French heiress, socialite, businesswoman and philanthropist. She is one of the principal shareholders of L'Oréal and, with a fortune estimated at US$23.5 billion, is one of the wealthiest people in the world. Bettencourt was born in Paris, France, the only child of Louise Madeleine Berthe (née Doncieux) and Eugène Schueller, the founder of L'Oréal, one of the world's largest cosmetics and beauty companies. Her mother died in 1927 when Liliane was 5 years old, and she formed a close bond with her father, who later married Liliane's British governess. At the age of 15, she joined her father’s company as an apprentice, mixing cosmetics and labelling bottles of shampoo. In 1950, she married French politician André Bettencourt, who served as a cabinet minister in French governments of the 1960s and 1970s and rose to become deputy chairman of L’Oréal. Bettencourt had been a member of La Cagoule, a violent French fascist group that Liliane's father had funded and supported in the 1930s and that collaborated with the Nazis during World War II. After the war,
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Arabella Huntington

    Arabella Huntington

    Arabella Yarrington "Belle" Huntington (c.1850-1924) was the second wife of American railway tycoon and industrialist Collis P. Huntington, and then the second wife of Henry E. Huntington. She was once known as the richest woman in America, and as the force behind the art collection that is housed at the Huntington Library. Arabella Huntington was the second wife of Collis P. Huntington. After his death, she married his nephew Henry E. Huntington, who was also a railway magnate and the founder of the famous Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, in San Marino, California. She had a son, Archer Milton Huntington. Compared to her famous family, information about Arabella is scarce. She was apparently born in 1850 or 1851, probably in Richmond, Virginia (see Wark, p. 312). Her first husband was a Mr. Worsham, of New York, who died shortly after they were married, leaving her with a young son, named Archer. (some other sources have suggested that they were not actually married, but that she was his mistress). (It has also been suggested that Archer's father was actually Collis Huntington, who legally adopted the boy when he was a teenager.). In 1877 she was able to
    10.00
    2 votes
    43

    Joyce L. Kennard

    Joyce Luther Kennard (born May 6, 1941) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of California. Appointed by Governor George Deukmejian in 1989 she is the longest-serving justice sitting on the Court, having been retained by California's voters three times—first to fill the unexpired term in 1990, followed by second and third consecutive twelve-year terms in 1994 and 2006. Kennard was born in the province of West Java in Indonesia, to a Dutch-Indonesian father and a Chinese-Indonesian mother. English is not her native language; she speaks it with a strong Dutch accent. Her father died in a Japanese concentration camp when she was just one year old. Kennard immigrated to Los Angeles in 1961. In 1970, she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts magna cum laude in German from the University of Southern California, where she also graduated in 1974 with a Master of Public Administration and a Juris Doctor from the USC Gould School of Law. Born to a family of modest means, Kennard worked as a secretary to pay for her education. Kennard's rise within the California court system is often described as "meteoric." Appointed to the Los Angeles Municipal Court in 1986, Kennard was elevated to
    6.40
    5 votes
    44

    Cathy Rigby

    Cathleen Roxanne Rigby (born December 12, 1952), best known as Cathy Rigby, is a speaker, actress and former gymnast. Rigby was born in Los Alamitos, California in 1952. She has an older brother, Steve Rigby; older sister, Michelle; younger brother Jeff, and a younger sister Jill. She is the daughter of Anita and Paul Rigby. Rigby's participation in the 1968 Summer Olympics as the highest-scoring American gymnast made her a favorite with American television audiences and helped to popularize gymnastics in America. She was U.S. National Gymnastic Champion in 1970 and 1972. Her greatest accomplishment was to become the first American woman to win a medal at a World Gymnastics Championships, the silver medal on the balance beam at the 1970 Championships. She also competed in the 1972 U.S. Olympic Gymnastics Team, but was hampered by injury. Prior to the games, she had been working on a move for the balance beam that was quite risky for the time: an aerial walkover, in which she somersaulted forwards. Because she was injured, she did not attempt this move during the competition and did not win a medal. Rigby retired from gymnastics after the 1972 Summer Olympics. She married
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Hilla von Rebay

    Hilla von Rebay

    Hildegard Anna Augusta Elizabeth Freiin Rebay von Ehrenwiesen, Baroness Hilla von Rebay, or simply Hilla Rebay (31 May 1890, Strasbourg, Alsace-Lorraine – 27 September 1967, Greens Farms, Connecticut), was a notable woman abstract painter in the early 20th century. After immigrating to the United States in 1927, she may be best known for helping Solomon R. Guggenheim collect the art that formed the basis of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and for selecting Frank Lloyd Wright to design the new museum, which became a modernist icon in New York. She achieved recognition for abstract works and modern styles such as collage and biogmorphic linear oil paintings. Rebay is remembered for being a key person in first exposing the American public to avant-garde art. Hilla von Rebay was born in 1890 into a German aristocratic family in Strasbourg, Alsace-Lorraine, then part of Prussia. She studied and lived in Berlin, where she started painting and working as an artist. In 1927, von Rebay immigrated to the United States and settled in New York, which was a center of arts and culture. An avid art collector, she became a friend and confidante of Solomon R. Guggenheim, and helped guide his
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Margaret C. Norton

    Margaret C. Norton

    Margaret Cross Norton (July 7, 1891 – May 21, 1984) served as the first State Archivist of Illinois from 1922 to 1957 and co-founded the Society of American Archivists in 1936, where she served as the first vice president from 1936–1937 and president from 1943-1945. She also served as editor of the American Archivist from 1946-1949. Norton was recently recognized in the December 1999 American Libraries article naming "100 of the most important leaders we had in the 20th century" for her influence and forward-thinking for the future direction and scope of the archival industry. Norton promoted the establishment of archives as a profession separate from history or library science and developed the American archival tradition to emphasize an administrator/archivist rather than an historian/archivist. She encouraged learning through experimentation, practical usage, and community discussion. While editor of The American Archivist she emphasized technical rather than scholarly issues, believing that these issues were more pertinent to the daily issues an archivist faced. By stressing the legal authority of government records, Norton believed archives could gain funding and government
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Mary Lou Jepsen

    Mary Lou Jepsen

    Mary Lou Jepsen (born 1965) is founder and CEO of Pixel Qi, a manufacturer of low-cost, low-power LCD screens for laptops. She was the first chief technology officer of One Laptop per Child (OLPC). Jepsen studied Studio Art and Electrical Engineering at Brown. She received a Master of Science in Holography from the MIT Media Lab, and then returned to Brown to receive a Ph.D. in Optical Sciences. Her contributions have had worldwide adoption in head-mounted display, HDTV and projector products. Her PhD work combined rigorous theoretical coupled-wave analysis with lab work, in which she created large-scale, embossed surface-relief diffraction gratings with liquid crystal-filled grooves with high diffraction efficiency in un-polarized illumination. Jepsen has created some of the largest ambient displays ever. In Cologne, Germany she built a holographic replica of pre-existing buildings in the city's historic district...and created a holographic display encompassing a city block. She also conceived, built mathematical models of, resolved the fundamental engineering issues, and solved some of the logistics - to create what would have been the largest display ever for mankind: images
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Giuliana Benetton

    Giuliana Benetton

    Giuliana Benetton and her brothers Luciano, Carlo and Gilberto founded the clothing retailer The Benetton Group in 1965. The company started from Guiliana's knitting sweaters with her brothers helping distribute her products.   She is now a director of the Benetton Group and Edizione Holding. 
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Judith L. Estrin

    Judith L. Estrin

    Judith "Judy" L. Estrin is an American business executive. She is currently the CEO of JLabs (formerly called Packet Design Management Company), through which she pursues a broad range of advisory activities including sitting on corporate and advisory boards and speaking engagements. Judy is the author of "Closing the Innovation Gap: Reigniting the Spark of Creativity in a Global Economy" (McGraw-Hill; Hardcover, September 2008), a general interest book that challenges national, academic and business leaders to work together to make USA competitive again. Estrin is a technology entrepreneur who co-founded seven companies with Bill Carrico and was the CTO of Cisco Systems from 1998 to 2000. Estrin serves on the Board of Directors of the Walt Disney Company (since 1998) and the FedEx Corporation (since 1989). Formerly, she served on the boards of Rockwell Automation and Sun Microsystems. She also serves on the advisory boards of Stanford’s School of Engineering and Bio-X interdisciplinary program, and is a member of the University of California President’s Science and Innovation Advisory Board. Estrin received a bachelor's degree in mathematics and computer science from UCLA, where
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Catherine de Castelbajac

    Catherine de Castelbajac

    Catherine "Kate" de Castelbajac (born Katherine Lee Chambers in Santa Barbara, California) is a former model and fashion journalist who now works as an image consultant and educator. She is currently the founder of CdeC Academy of Santa Barbara, and is affiliated with the Association of Image Consultants International. Kate Chambers was born in Santa Barbara, California, to William Joseph Chambers and Lillian Chambers, and graduated from Foothill High School in Santa Ana, California. While a senior at Barnard College, where she would earn a BA in English Literature, Chambers was discovered by the photographer Jean Pagliuso and the editors of Mademoiselle. She became the subject of an article in the September 1975 issue entitled "The Makings of a Model", in which she was transformed from student to model. The Mademoiselle feature helped launch Chambers into a career in high fashion, as she began working with the Ford Modeling Agency and such photographers as Arthur Elgort and Patrick de Marchallier, appearing in magazines like Harper's Bazaar. Eileen Ford then sent her to Paris, where, in October 1976, she met fashion designer Jean-Charles de Castelbajac. The two were married in
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    Susan Fennell

    Susan Fennell

    Susan Fennell is the mayor of Brampton, Ontario, Canada. She was also the Founder and Commissioner of the National Women's Hockey League. In 1953, Susan Fennell was born in Saint-Laurent, a borough of Montreal, Quebec. She completed an Honours Bachelor of Science in environmental science from the University of Toronto at Mississauga in 1977. She and her husband John have two adult children, Michael and Joey. Before entering politics she worked for 11 years for Toledo Scale. Fennell's first foray into politics was with her 1988 election to Brampton City Council for Ward 3. That same year she was first elected to the Board of Governors of Sheridan College, where she served as one of the directors until 1995. During her time as a city councillor, Fennell was actively involved in several committees, including those for Economic Development and Official Plan Review. This period also saw Fennell active on the Airport Tri-Municipal Committee, the Brampton Board of Trade, and the Downtown Business Improvement Area. In 1991, Fennell was elected to Peel Regional Council to represent Wards 3 and 4. Her first term as a regional councillor saw her chair the Brampton Budget Committee and saw the
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    Jayde Nicole

    Jayde Nicole

    Jayde Nicole (born February 19, 1986) is a Canadian model. She was Playboy′s Playmate of the Month for January 2007 and was named the 2008 Playmate of the Year in the June issue of the men's magazine. She is the first Canadian Playmate of the Year in 26 years, and the third overall, the previous two being Dorothy Stratten and Shannon Tweed. Nicole began modeling for catalogs and fashion shows at the age of six. The following year, Nicole's family moved from Scarborough to Port Perry. When she turned 11, she stopped modeling for a time, as she was finding herself becoming "too mature to be doing kid's jobs." When she was 15, a scout from a Toronto modeling agency spotted her outside the Air Canada Centre as she was leaving a concert and offered her an opportunity to return to modeling. Since then, Nicole has appeared in numerous publications and fashion shows. She created and owns her own agency, "A Touch of Class", based in Port Perry. Nicole studied hotel management at George Brown College in Toronto, but dropped out to pursue a modeling career. Her mother handed Nicole her first issue of Playboy and suggested she pose for the magazine. A prominent feature of Nicole's body is a
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Octavia Hill

    Octavia Hill

    Octavia Hill (3 December 1838 – 13 August 1912) was an English social reformer, whose main concern was the welfare of the inhabitants of cities, especially London, in the second half of the nineteenth century. Born into a family with a strong commitment to alleviating poverty, she herself grew up in straitened circumstances owing to the financial failure of her father. With no formal schooling, she worked from the age of 14 for the welfare of working people. Hill was a moving force behind the development of social housing, and her early friendship with John Ruskin enabled her to put her theories into practice with the aid of his initial investment. She believed in self-reliance, and made it a key part of her housing system that she and her assistants knew their tenants personally and encouraged them to better themselves. She was opposed to municipal provision of housing, believing it to be bureaucratic and impersonal. Another of Hill's concerns was the availability of open spaces for poor people. She campaigned against development on existing suburban woodlands, and helped to save London's Hampstead Heath and Parliament Hill Fields from being built on. She was one of the three
    6.00
    5 votes
    54
    Kim Polese

    Kim Polese

    Kim Karin Polese (born November 13, 1961) is a previous CEO of SpikeSource, and was one of the most prominent Silicon Valley executives during the dot-com era. In 1997, she made Time Magazine's list of "The 25 Most Influential Americans". She received a BA degree in biophysics in 1984 from the University of California, Berkeley and studied Computer Science at the University of Washington. Polese is a fellow at Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Engineered Innovation. After a stint at Intellicorp, Ms. Polese spent more than seven years with Sun Microsystems, where she was the original Java product manager who influenced the transition of its internal name of "Oak" to "Java". After leaving Sun in 1996 she co-founded Marimba, a Java-based business, where she served as CEO until 2000, leading Marimba through its public offering in 1999 and bringing it to profitability. In July 2000, she was replaced as CEO by John Olsen, who in turn was replaced in a year by Rich Wyckoff, who led the sale of Marimba to BMC Software for $239 million in 2004. Since September 2004 and until recently , Polese has been CEO of SpikeSource, a provider of business-ready open source solutions. The company
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Lucille Ball

    Lucille Ball

    Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an American comedian, film, television, stage and radio actress, model, film and television executive, and star of the sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy–Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show, Here's Lucy and Life with Lucy. One of the most popular and influential stars in the United States during her lifetime, with one of Hollywood's longest careers, especially on television, Ball began acting in the 1930s, becoming both a radio actress and B-movie star in the 1940s, and then a television star during the 1950s. She was still making films in the 1960s and 1970s. In 1962, Ball became the first woman to run a major television studio, Desilu, which produced many successful and popular television series. Ball was nominated for an Emmy Award thirteen times, and won four times. In 1977 Ball was among the first recipients of the Women in Film Crystal Award. She was the recipient of the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1979, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Kennedy Center Honors in 1986 and the Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 1989. In 1929, Ball landed work as a model and later began her
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Shirin Ebadi

    Shirin Ebadi

    Shirin Ebadi (Persian: شيرين عبادى‎ Širin Ebādi; born 21 June 1947) is an Iranian lawyer, a former judge and human rights activist and founder of Defenders of Human Rights Center in Iran. On 10 October 2003, Ebadi was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her significant and pioneering efforts for democracy and human rights, especially women's, children's, and refugee rights. She was the first ever Iranian to receive the prize. In 2009, Ebadi's award was allegedly confiscated by Iranian authorities, though this was later denied by the Iranian government. If true, she would be the first person in the history of the Nobel Prize whose award has been forcibly seized by state authorities. Ebadi lives in Tehran, but she has been in exile in the UK since June 2009 due to the increase in persecution of Iranian citizens who are critical of the current regime. In 2004, she was listed by Forbes magazine as one of the "100 most powerful women in the world". She is also included in a published list of the "100 most influential women of all time." Ebadi was born in Hamadan from an ethnic Persian family, Iran. Her father, Mohammad Ali Ebadi, was the city's chief notary public and a professor of
    8.00
    3 votes
    57

    Sigrid Undset

    Sigrid Undset (20 May 1882 – 10 June 1949) was a Norwegian novelist who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1928. Undset was born in Kalundborg, Denmark, but her family moved to Norway when she was two years old. In 1924, she converted to Roman Catholicism. She fled Norway for the United States in 1940 because of her opposition to Nazi Germany and the German occupation, but returned after World War II ended in 1945. Her best-known work is Kristin Lavransdatter, a trilogy about life in Scandinavia in the Middle Ages portraying the life of a woman from birth until death. The book was published from 1920 to 1922 in three volumes. Undset was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature partly for this trilogy, as well as her four-volume work about Olav Audunssøn known as The Master of Hestviken tetralogy, published in 1925 and 1927. Sigrid Undset was born on 20 May 1882, in the small town of Kalundborg, Denmark, at the childhood home of her mother, Charlotte Undset, born Anna Maria Charlotte Gyth (1855–1939). Sigrid was the eldest of three daughters. She came to Norway at the age of two. She grew up in Kristiania, the Norwegian capital (the name was changed back to Oslo in 1924).
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Kat Von D

    Kat Von D

    Katherine von Drachenberg, best known under her registered trademark Kat Von D (born March 8, 1982), is a Mexican-American tattoo artist, model and television personality. She is best known for her work as a tattoo artist on the TLC reality television show LA Ink, which premiered August 7, 2007, in the United States and ran four seasons. Kat Von D was born in Montemorelos, Nuevo León, Mexico. Her missionary parents, father René and mother Sylvia or Silvia Galeano, were born in Argentina, of German descent and Italian and Spanish descent, respectively. Von D has a sister, Karoline and a brother, Michael. She moved with her family to the Los Angeles area at age 4 and grew up in Colton, California. Von D was classically trained in piano beginning at age 6. She particularly appreciates Ludwig van Beethoven. Von D credits her grandmother, Clara von Drachenberg, as an inspiration for her in music and art, and the Latino culture of Los Angeles as a major influence on her tattoo art and style. She began listening to the Ramones, Misfits and other punk rock bands at the age of 12. She got her first tattoo at 14 and quit school at 16 to become a tattoo artist. Von D was asked to work at 305
    5.17
    6 votes
    59

    Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk

    Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk (born December 20, 1950 in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania) is an American architect and urban planner of Polish aristocratic roots based in Miami, Florida. She received her undergraduate degree in architecture and urban planning from Princeton and her master's degree in architecture from the Yale School of Architecture. In 1977, Plater-Zyberk was co-founder of the Miami firm Arquitectonica, with her husband Andrés Duany, Bernardo Fort-Brescia, Laurinda Hope Spear, and Hervin Romney. Arquitectonica became famous for its signature style, a dramatic, expressive "high-tech" modernism. The firm's Atlantis Condominium was featured prominently in the opening credits of Miami Vice. Duany and Plater-Zyberk founded Duany Plater Zyberk & Company (DPZ) in 1980, with its headquarters in Miami. DPZ became a leader in the national movement called the New Urbanism and distinguished itself by designing traditional towns and retrofitting livable downtowns into existing suburbs. The firm first received international recognition in the 1980s as the designer of Seaside, Florida, and has completed designs and codes for over two hundred new towns, regional plans, and community
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Esther Dyson

    Esther Dyson

    Esther Dyson (born 14 July 1951) is a former journalist and Wall Street technology analyst who is a leading angel investor, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and commentator focused on breakthrough innovation in healthcare, government transparency, digital technology, biotechnology, and space. Dyson is currently focusing her career on preemptive healthcare and continues to invest in health technology. On 7 October 2008, Space Adventures announced that Dyson had paid to train as a back-up spaceflight participant for Charles Simonyi's trip to the International Space Station aboard the Soyuz TMA-14 mission which took place in 2009. Esther Dyson's father is the physicist Freeman Dyson; her mother is mathematician Verena Huber-Dyson; and her brother is digital technology historian George Dyson. In childhood she received, for alliterative purposes only, the nickname "Dodo" (pronounced dough-dough); there does not appear to be, however, significant use of this nickname beyond her primary school experience. After graduating from Harvard with a degree in economics, she joined Forbes as a fact-checker and quickly rose to reporter. In 1977, she joined New Court Securities as "the research
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Judith M. O'Brien

    Judith M. O'Brien

    Judy O'Brien is involved in all corporate matters, including strategic partnerships, intellectual property and international expansion at Obopay. In her 20 years as a partner at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, Judy was the business lawyer for many of Silicon Valley's premier high tech companies, including Juniper Networks, KLA-Tencor, Sun Microsystems and LSI Logic. She worked with many startups from incorporation through venture capital financings, joint venture relationships in the U.S. and abroad, initial public offerings and mergers and acquisitions. For the past six years, Judy was a Managing Director at Incubic Venture Fund which she co-founded in 2001. Judy brings her love of start-ups, her years of experience, her dealmaking skills and her network of relationships with venture and other financial firms to Obopay as it goes from successful launch to growth and expansion in the U.S. and globally.
    6.75
    4 votes
    62
    Rigoberta Menchú

    Rigoberta Menchú

    Rigoberta Menchú Tum (born 9 January 1959) is an indigenous Guatemalan, of the K'iche' ethnic group. Menchú has dedicated her life to publicizing the plight of Guatemala's indigenous peoples during and after the Guatemalan Civil War (1960–1996), and to promoting indigenous rights in the country. She received the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize and Prince of Asturias Award in 1998. She is the subject of the testimonial biography I, Rigoberta Menchú (1983) and the author of the autobiographical work, Crossing Borders. Menchú is a UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador. She has also become a figure in indigenous political parties and ran for President of Guatemala in 2007. Rigoberta Menchú was born to a poor indigenous family near Laj Chimel, a small town in the north-central Guatemalan province of El Quiché. Menchú received a primary-school education as a student at several Catholic boarding schools. After leaving school, she worked as an activist campaigning against human rights violations committed by the Guatemalan armed forces during the country's civil war, which lasted from 1960 to 1996. Her father, Vicente Menchú was a member of the guerrilla movement Guerrilla Army of the Poor and died in 1980
    6.75
    4 votes
    63
    Thérèse Rein

    Thérèse Rein

    Thérèse Rein ( /təˈreɪz ˈreɪn/) (born 17 July 1958) is an Australian entrepreneuse and founder of Ingeus, an international employment and business psychology services company. Rein is the wife of Kevin Rudd, who held office as Prime Minister of Australia from 2007 to 2010. She was the first Australian Prime Minister's wife to remain in the paid workforce while her husband was in office. She was awarded the Human Rights Medal by the Australian Human Rights Commission in December 2010 for her long-term dedication to human rights, especially the rights of people with disability. Rein was born on 17 July 1958 in Adelaide, South Australia. Her father, John Rein, was a Royal Australian Air Force navigator who had suffered severe spinal cord damage during a plane crash. He later became an aeronautical engineer and represented Australia as a paralympian, his achievements playing a pivotal role in inspiring his daughter. He met his future wife Elizabeth at a rehabilitation hospital in Sydney where she was working as the head of physiotherapy. Rein attended St Peter's Collegiate Girls' School in Adelaide and Firbank Grammar School in Melbourne. She studied arts at the Australian National
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Tomoko Namba

    Tomoko Namba

    Tomoko Namba (南場智子), born April 21, 1962, is a Japanese entrepreneur, and the former CEO of DeNA Co., Ltd.. Namba founded DeNA in 1999. DeNA is one of the largest mobile social network and mobile game companies in Japan. She stepped down in 2011 to focus on her family and personal life. Namba received an MBA from Harvard Business School and was the third Japanese woman to become a partner at McKinsey & Co.. She started DeNA after working on a consulting assignment with Sony's So-net while she was a consultant at Mckinsey.
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    Dolores Huerta

    Dolores Huerta

    Dolores Clara Fernandez Huerta (born April 10, 1930) is a labor leader and civil rights activist who, along with César Chávez, co-founded the National Farmworkers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers (UFW). Huerta has received numerous awards for her community service and advocacy for workers', immigrants', and womens' rights, including the Eugene V. Debs Foundation Outstanding American Award, the United States Presidential Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Human Rights and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. As a role model to many in the Latin community, Huerta is the subject of many corridos (ballads) and murals. Born on April 10, 1930, in the mining town of Dawson, New Mexico, Huerta was the daughter of Juan Fernandez—a miner, field/farm worker, union activist and state assemblyman—and Alicia Chavez. Huerta was the couple's second child and only daughter; the couple divorced when Huerta was three years old. Chavez raised Huerta and her two brothers, in the central California farm worker community of Stockton, California. Huerta's mother was known for her kindness and compassion towards others and was active in community affairs, numerous civic organizations, and the
    9.00
    2 votes
    66
    Maria Merkert

    Maria Merkert

    Maria Merkert (born in Neiße, Prussian Silesia (present-day Nysa, Opole Voivodeship) on September 21, 1817; died November 14, 1872) was the co-Foundress and first Superior General of the Congregation of St Elizabeth. Her father died when she was an infant and her mother died in 1842. Along with her sister she devoted herself to the poor. She was declared venerable in 2004. Her beatification was held on September 30, 2007 in Nysa.
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Mary McAleese

    Mary McAleese

    Mary Patricia McAleese ( /mækəˈliːs/; née Leneghan; Irish: Máire Pádraigín Mhic Ghiolla Íosa; born 27 June 1951) served as the eighth President of Ireland from 1997 to 2011. She was the second female president and was first elected in 1997 succeeding Mary Robinson, making McAleese the world's first woman to succeed another as president. She was re-elected unopposed for a second term in office in 2004. McAleese is the first President of Ireland to have come from either Northern Ireland or Ulster. McAleese graduated in Law from Queen's University Belfast. In 1975, she was appointed Professor of Criminal Law, Criminology and Penology at Trinity College, Dublin and in 1987, she returned to her Alma Mater, Queen's, to become Director of the Institute of Professional Legal Studies. In 1994, she became the first female Pro-Vice Chancellor of Queen's University. She worked as a barrister and also worked as a journalist with RTÉ. McAleese used her time in office to address issues concerning justice, social equality, social inclusion, anti-sectarianism and reconciliation. She described the theme of her Presidency as "Building Bridges". This bridge-building materialised in her attempts to
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Amy Poehler

    Amy Poehler

    Amy Meredith Poehler ( /ˈpoʊlər/; born September 16, 1971) is an American actress, comedian, producer and writer. She was a cast member on the NBC television entertainment show Saturday Night Live from 2001 to 2008. In 2004, she had a minor role in the film Mean Girls with Tina Fey, with whom she worked again in Baby Mama in 2008. She is currently the lead of NBC's comedy Parks and Recreation. She has been nominated twice for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series for her performance on Saturday Night Live, and three times for the Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for her performance in Parks and Recreation. For the latter series, she also received a 2012 Golden Globe Award nomination. Poehler is also a member of the renowned comedy troupe the Upright Citizens Brigade (UCB), who had their own sketch series on Comedy Central from 1998 to 2000. Poehler and the UCB went on to found the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater, which has since become one of the most visible and influential breeding grounds for improvisational comedy since they opened in 1999. The UCB now operate theaters in both New York and Los Angeles, where they also
    7.67
    3 votes
    69

    Bonnie Nettles

    Bonnie Lu Nettles née Truesdale (1927 - January 20, 1985) later known as Ti was co-leader of a group with Marshall Applewhite which would later become the Heaven's Gate group after Nettles's death. Nettles died of liver cancer in 1985 in Dallas, Texas, 12 years before the cult's mass suicide in 1997. Born in 1927, Nettles was raised in a Baptist family for all of her life until adulthood. After becoming a nurse, Nettles married a businessman and remained with him for 23 years, having four children with him. Their marriage remained mostly stable, until 1972 brought an end to it. Though there could be multiple reasons for this break between Nettles and her husband, according to the New York Times, what finally dissolved their marriage was an overpopulation of spirits. This refers to Nettles' belief that Brother Francis, a 19th century monk, frequently spoke with her, giving her instructions. Furthermore, Nettles often conducted seances with mediums in order to contact other deceased spirits. A circle group was held every Wednesday at her house in relation to this. Also, in 1972, Nettles went to see multiple fortunetellers, who told her that she was soon to meet a mysterious man who
    7.67
    3 votes
    70
    Leah Culver

    Leah Culver

    Leah Culver (born November 5, 1982) is a programmer. Culver is a 2006 computer science graduate of the University of Minnesota. In 2007, she co-founded the micro-blogging site Pownce, acquired by Six Apart in December 2008. She left Six Apart in February 2010. She co-founded Convore, focused on real time chat in 2011. In 2012, Convore added a new product, Grove.io which focuses on hosted real-time chat for companies and announced that Convore service will be discontinued on April 1, 2012. On September 15, Grove.io announced that it will cease service on October 13, 2012. Culver was named among the Most Influential Women in Web 2.0 by Fast Company Magazine in November 2008.
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Maggie L. Walker

    Maggie L. Walker

    Maggie Lena Walker (July 15, 1867(4-7)-December 15, 1934) was an African American teacher and businesswoman. Walker was the first female bank president and the first woman to charter a bank in the United States. As a leader, she achieved successes with the vision to make tangible improvements in the way of life for African Americans and women. Disabled by paralysis and limited to a wheelchair later in life, Walker also became an example for people with disabilities. Walker's restored and furnished home in the historic Jackson Ward neighborhood of Richmond, Virginia has been designated a National Historic Site, operated by the National Park Service. According to biographical material she supplied, Walker was born as Maggie Lena Mitchell in Richmond, Virginia to William Mitchell and Elizabeth Draper Mitchell 2 years and 2 months after the end of the American Civil War. Census information, as well as a diary passage saying that she was four years old on her mother's wedding on May 1868, set the date back to 1864 or 1865. Her mother was a former slave and assistant cook in the Church Hill mansion of Elizabeth Van Lew, who had been a spy in the Confederate capital city of Richmond for
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Mary Tyler Moore

    Mary Tyler Moore

    Mary Tyler Moore (born December 29, 1936) is an American actress, primarily known for her roles in television sitcoms. Moore is best known for The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970–77), in which she starred as Mary Richards, a 30-something single woman who worked as a local news producer in Minneapolis, and for her earlier role as Laura Petrie (Dick Van Dyke's wife) on The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961–66). She also appeared in a number of films, most notably 1980's Ordinary People, in which she played a role that was the polar opposite of the television characters she had portrayed, and for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress. Moore has also been active in charity work and various political causes, particularly around the issues of animal rights and Diabetes mellitus type 1. Mary Tyler Moore was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes early in the run of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and also dealt with alcoholism, which was treated in the 1980s. In May 2011, Moore underwent elective brain surgery to remove a benign meningioma. Mary Tyler Moore was born in the Brooklyn Heights section of Brooklyn, New York, to George Tyler Moore, a clerk, and his wife Marjorie (née Hackett).
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Ruth Bader Ginsburg

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg

    Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Ginsburg was appointed by President Bill Clinton and took the oath of office on August 10, 1993. She is the second female justice (after Sandra Day O'Connor) and the first Jewish female justice. She is generally viewed as belonging to the liberal wing of the Court. Ginsburg spent a considerable portion of her legal career before becoming a judge as an advocate for the advancement of women's rights as a constitutional principle. She advocated as a volunteer lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsel in the 1970s. She was a professor at Rutgers School of Law–Newark and Columbia Law School. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Ruth Joan Bader was the second daughter of Nathan and Celia (née Amster) Bader. The family nicknamed her "Kiki". They belonged to the East Midwood Jewish Center, where she took her religious confirmation seriously. At age thirteen, Ruth acted as the "camp rabbi" at a
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Amelia Earhart

    Amelia Earhart

    Amelia Mary Earhart (/ˈɛərhɑrt/ AIR-hart; July 24, 1897 – disappeared 1937) was an American aviation pioneer and author. Earhart was the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She received the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross for this record. She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. Earhart joined the faculty of the Purdue University aviation department in 1935 as a visiting faculty member to counsel women on careers and help inspire others with her love for aviation. She was also a member of the National Woman's Party, and an early supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment. During an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 in a Purdue-funded Lockheed Model 10 Electra, Earhart disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island. Fascination with her life, career and disappearance continues to this day. Amelia Mary Earhart, daughter of German American Samuel "Edwin" Stanton Earhart (born March 28, 1867) and Amelia "Amy" Otis Earhart (1869–1962), was born in Atchison, Kansas, in the home of her maternal
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    Beverley McLachlin

    Beverley McLachlin, PC (born 7 September 1943) is the 17th and current Chief Justice of Canada, and the first woman to hold this position. She also serves as Deputy of the Governor General of Canada. Born Beverley Gietz in Pincher Creek, Alberta, the eldest child of Ernest Gietz and Eleanora Kruschell, she received a B.A. and a M.A. in philosophy and an LL.B. degree (winning the gold medal as top student and serving as Editor-in-Chief of the Alberta Law Review) from the University of Alberta. She was called to the Bar of Alberta in 1969 and to the Bar of British Columbia in 1971. She practiced law from 1969 until 1975. From 1974-1981, she was an Associate Professor and Professor with tenure at the University of British Columbia. She has one son from her first marriage to Roderick McLachlin. Her first husband died in 1988 and she remarried in 1992 to Frank McArdle. In 1981, she was appointed to the County Court of Vancouver and then to the Supreme Court of British Columbia. In 1985 she was appointed to the British Columbia Court of Appeal, three years later in 1988 she was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of British Columbia. She was appointed to the Supreme Court of
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin

    Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin

    Dorothy Mary Hodgkin, OM, FRS (12 May 1910 – 29 July 1994), née Crowfoot, was a British chemist, credited with the development of protein crystallography. She advanced the technique of X-ray crystallography, a method used to determine the three dimensional structures of biomolecules. Among her most influential discoveries are the confirmation of the structure of penicillin that Ernst Boris Chain had previously surmised, and then the structure of vitamin B12, for which she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In 1969, after 35 years of work and five years after winning the Nobel Prize, Hodgkin was able to decipher the structure of insulin. X-ray crystallography became a widely used tool and was critical in later determining the structures of many biological molecules such as DNA where knowledge of structure is critical to an understanding of function. She is regarded as one of the pioneer scientists in the field of X-ray crystallography studies of biomolecules. Dorothy Mary Crowfoot was born on 12 May 1910 in Cairo, Egypt, to John Winter Crowfoot (1873–1959), archaeologist and classical scholar, and Grace Mary née Hood (1877–1957). For the first four years of her life she lived
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Elinor Ostrom

    Elinor Ostrom

    Elinor Ostrom (born Elinor Claire Awan; August 7, 1933 – June 12, 2012) was an American political economist. She was awarded the 2009 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, which she shared with Oliver E. Williamson, for "her analysis of economic governance, especially the commons". She was the first, and to date, the only woman to win the prize in this category. Her work was associated with the new institutional economics and the resurgence of political economy. Ostrom lived in Bloomington, Indiana, and served on the faculty of both Indiana University and Arizona State University. She held the rank of Distinguished Professor at Indiana University and was the Arthur F. Bentley Professor of Political Science and Co-Director of the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis at Indiana University in Bloomington, as well as Research Professor and the Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Institutional Diversity at Arizona State University in Tempe. She was a lead researcher for the Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management Collaborative Research Support Program (SANREM CRSP), managed by Virginia Tech and funded by
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Emmeline Pankhurst

    Emmeline Pankhurst

    Emmeline Pankhurst (born Emmeline Goulden) (15 July 1858 – 14 June 1928) was a British political activist and leader of the British suffragette movement which helped women win the right to vote. In 1999 Time named Pankhurst as one of the 100 Most Important People of the 20th Century, stating: "she shaped an idea of women for our time; she shook society into a new pattern from which there could be no going back." She was widely criticized for her militant tactics, and historians disagree about their effectiveness, but her work is recognized as a crucial element in achieving women's suffrage in Britain. Born Emmeline Goulden and raised in Moss Side, Manchester, England by politically active parents, Pankhurst was introduced at the age of 8 to the women's suffrage movement. Although her parents encouraged her to prepare herself for life as a wife and mother, she attended the École Normale de Neuilly in Paris. In 1878 she married Richard Pankhurst, a barrister 24 years her senior known for supporting women's right to vote; they had five children over the next ten years. He also supported her activities outside the home, and she quickly became involved with the Women's Franchise League,
    10.00
    1 votes
    79

    Helen Greiner

    Helen Greiner (born December 6, 1967) is a co-founder of iRobot and currently CEO of CyPhyWorks. She is a Trustee of the Museum of Science (Boston); on the Computer Science Advisory Board of Worcester Polytechnic Institute; and a Director of the National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA). Greiner holds a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and a master's degree in computer science, both from MIT. She also holds an honorary doctor of engineering degree from WPI. She has worked at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. In 1990, along with Rodney Brooks and Colin Angle, Greiner co-founded iRobot, a robotics company headquartered in Bedford, Massachusetts. The company delivers robots into the industrial, consumer and military markets. She was one of three people to design the first version of the iRobot Roomba. On October 22, 2008, Greiner announced her resignation as Chairman of the Board of iRobot. She was replaced by CEO Colin Angle, who stated: “Helen will continue to serve on iRobot’s board of directors as a non-employee director while pursuing other interests and opportunities within the robot industry.” She is currently CEO
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Iris Fontbona

    Iris Fontbona

    Iris Fontbona is the widow of Andronico Luksic. Left in control of Antofagasta (Copper Mine) and holding a big position in Quineco, Fontbona is listed as one of 2009 Forbes Billionaires.
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Jane Frances de Chantal

    Jane Frances de Chantal

    Saint Jane Frances de Chantal (Jeanne-Françoise Frémiot, Baronne de Chantal, 28 January 1572 – 13 December 1641) is a Roman Catholic Saint, who founded a religious order after the death of her husband. Jane Frances was born in Dijon, France on 28 January 1572. The mother of six children (three died shortly after they were born), she was widowed at the age of 28. She met Saint Francis de Sales when he preached at the Sainte Chapelle in Dijon. They became intimate friends. She was inspired to start a religious order for women, the Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary with his support, an order for women who were rejected by other orders because of poor health or age. When people criticized her, she famously said, "What do you want me to do? I like sick people myself; I'm on their side." She died on 13 December 1641 at the age of 69, at the Visitation Convent in Moulins, one of those she founded, and was buried in Annecy. She was beatified on 21 November 1751 by Pope Benedict XIV, and canonized on 16 July 1767 by Pope Clement XIII. Saint Jane Frances's feast day is currently celebrated in the Roman Catholic Calendar of saints on 12 August. When in 1769 it was for the first time
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Juliette Gordon Low

    Juliette Gordon Low

    Juliette Gordon Low (born Juliette Magill Kinzie Gordon in Savannah, Georgia, October 31, 1860 – January 17, 1927) was an American youth leader and the founder of the Girl Scouts of the USA in 1912. Juliette Gordon Low's mother's family came from Chicago. Her father William Washington Gordon II was a Confederate Captain in the American Civil War, and a Brigadier General in the United States Army during the Spanish-American War. Among her friends and family, Juliette was always called by her nickname "Daisy". The families of Confederate officers were required to leave Savannah after the December 1864 surrender to General William T. Sherman. Four-year-old Daisy went with her mother, Eleanor "Nellie" Kinzie Gordon, and her sisters, six-year-old Eleanor and one-year-old Alice, to the Chicago home of Eleanor's parents, John H. Kinzie and Juliette Augusta Magill Kinzie. Daisy loved to hear the family stories of her great-grandmother, Eleanor Lytle McKillip Kinzie, who had been captured by Native Americans at the age of nine. Even though she was a captive, she was always joyful, so the Native Americans started calling her "Little-Ship-Under-Full-Sail." She was the adopted daughter of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Madeline Sophie Barat

    Madeline Sophie Barat

    Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat, R.S.C.J., (December 12, 1779 – May 25, 1865) was a French saint of the Catholic Church and was the foundress of the Society of the Sacred Heart. Madeleine Sophie was born on the night of December 12, 1779, in Joigny, France, in the raging fire. The stress and terror of the fire caused Sophie’s mother, Madame Madeleine Fouffé Barat (1740–1822), then pregnant with her third child, to go into labor. Born two months premature, Madeleine Sophie was considered so fragile that early the next morning, she was baptized in St. Thibault Church, located just a few yards from the Barat family home. Although her parents had arranged godparents in advance, there was no time to call them to the church, and so at 5:00 a.m. on December 13, 1779, Louise-Sophie Cédor, a local woman on her way to early Mass, and Sophie’s older brother, Louis, stood in as her godparents. Madeleine Sophie was born into a financially comfortable family whose ancestors had lived in Joigny for generations and were proud of their roots in the Bourgogne. Her father, Jacques Barat (1742–1809), was a barrel maker and wine-grower. Both of these professions were considered to be noble trades, with
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Patricia Soltysik

    Patricia Soltysik

    Patricia "Mizmoon" Monique Soltysik (May 17, 1950 - May 17, 1974) was one of the founders of the Symbionese Liberation Army. She was the daughter of a pharmacist, the third of seven children, the oldest of five girls. She grew up in Goleta, California, and graduated from Dos Pueblos High School in 1968 in the top 10 percent of her class and was the student body treasurer of her high school. She enrolled in the University of California, Berkeley on a state scholarship in 1968. While at Berkeley she became embittered by the "Bloody Thursday" incident where a protester was killed. Drifting into radical groups she became a radical feminist and self avowed revolutionary. When her brother asked about her plans of becoming a lawyer, she replied, "Sisters, none of us are free until we are all free." In 1971 she attached herself to the radical ex-convict group United Prisoners Union and dropped out of school. She and her neighbor, Camilla Hall, became lovers, and it was Hall who gave Soltysik the name "Mizmoon." On March 5, 1973, Donald DeFreeze escaped prison and future SLA members Russell Little and Willy Wolfe took him to Soltysik's house because unlike their other associates, Soltysik
    10.00
    1 votes
    85

    Rosalie Abella

    Rosalie Silberman Abella, FRSC (born July 1, 1946) is a Canadian jurist. She was appointed in 2004 to the Supreme Court of Canada, becoming the first Jewish woman to sit on the Canadian Supreme Court bench. Rosalie Silberman Abella was born in a displaced persons camp in Stuttgart, Germany, where her father, a lawyer, was defence counsel for displaced persons in the Allied Zone of Southwest Germany. She moved to Canada with her family in 1950. She attended the University of Toronto, where she obtained a B.A. in 1967 and an LL.B in 1970. Abella practised civil and family law until 1976, when at the age of 29 she was appointed to the Ontario Family Court (now part of the Ontario Court of Justice), becoming both the youngest and first pregnant judge in Canadian history. She was appointed to the Ontario Court of Appeal in 1992. She has acted as chair of the Ontario Labour Relations Board, the Ontario Study into Access to Legal Services by the Disabled and the Ontario Law Reform Commission, and as a member of the Ontario Human Rights Commission and of the judicial inquiry into the Donald Marshall case. She is considered one of Canada's foremost experts on human rights law, and has
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Saint Humility

    Saint Humility

    Saint Humility (Humilitas; Italian: Umiltà) (c. 1226 – May 22, 1310) was a founder of Vallumbrosan convents, and is considered the founder of the Vallumbrosan Nuns. Born Rosanna Negusanti to a noble family from Faenza, she was married at the age of fifteen to a nobleman named Ugoletto (Ugonotto) dei Caccianemici (d. 1256). She bore two children, both of whom died in infancy. In 1250, Ugoletto became a monk upon recovering from an illness that nearly killed him. Rosanna entered the same double monastery of canonesses named Saint Perpetua, near Faenza, becoming a nun and taking the name Humilitas. She became an anchoress in a cell attached to the Vallumbrosan church of Saint Apollinaris in Faenza, where she lived as a hermit or recluse for twelve years. However, at the request of the abbot-general she founded a monastery outside Faenza and became its abbess. Blessed Margherita became one of her disciples. In 1282, she founded a second convent at Florence, where she died in 1310 of natural causes. She left a number of mystical writings. She was canonized on January 27, 1720, by Pope Clement XI. Her feast day is celebrated on May 22. The relics of Humility and her disciple Margherita
    10.00
    1 votes
    87

    Betty Ballantine

    Betty Ballantine (born September 25, 1919) is a publisher who, with her husband Ian Ballantine, formed Bantam Books in 1945 and Ballantine Books in 1952. They became freelance publishers in the 1970s. Their son Richard is an author and journalist specialising in cycling topics. Ballantine received a Special Committee Award from L.A.con IV in 2006. In 2007 she received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the World Fantasy Awards. She is a 2008 inductee into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. In 1956, radio humorist/improvisational monologist Jean Shepherd perpetrated a major literary hoax, telling his listeners to ask in bookstores for a non-existent book by a non-existent author: I, Libertine, by "Frederick R. Ewing." The requests and publishing mystery reached such a level that Ian Ballantine asked science fiction author Theodore Sturgeon, working with Shepherd, to write such a book, and he did. It's said that Sturgeon fell asleep before finishing it and that Betty Ballantine wrote the final chapter. It was published in September 1956, mostly in paperback, and sold several hundred thousand copies. There is a hardcover edition (also by Ballantine Books), as well as British hardcover
    6.50
    4 votes
    88
    Françoise Barré-Sinoussi

    Françoise Barré-Sinoussi

    Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (born 30 July 1947) is a French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unité de Régulation des Infections Rétrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur in Paris, France. Born in Paris, France, Barré-Sinoussi performed some of the fundamental work in the identification of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the cause of AIDS. In 2008, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, together with her former mentor, Luc Montagnier, for their discovery of HIV. Barré-Sinoussi joined the Pasteur Institute in Paris in the early 1970s. She received her PhD in 1975 and interned at the U.S. National Institutes of Health before returning to the Pasteur Institute. Barré-Sinoussi's research quickly turned to a particular group of viruses, the retroviruses. Her knowledge in this field led her to discover HIV in 1983. This discovery revealed an urgent need for diagnostic tests to aid in controlling the spread of the disease. Barré-Sinoussi started her own laboratory at the Pasteur Institute in 1988. Among Barré-Sinoussi's many recent research contributions are studies of various aspects of the adaptive immune response to
    6.50
    4 votes
    89
    Julie Billiart

    Julie Billiart

    Saint Julie Billiart (12 July 1751 — 8 April 1816) was a French religious leader who founded, and was the first Superior General of, the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. She was born on 12 July 1751, at Cuvilly, Picardy, Beauvais, Oise, France, the sixth of seven children of Jean-François Billiart and Marie-Louise-Antoinette (née Debraine). By the age of seven, she knew the catechism by heart, and used to gather her companions around her to hear her recite it and to explain it to them. Her education was confined to the rudiments obtained at the village school kept by her uncle, Thibault Guilbiert. In spiritual things her progress was so rapid that the parish priest, Father Dangicourt, allowed her to make her First Communion and to be confirmed aged 9. She took a vow of chastity five years later. She was held in very high esteem for her virtue and piety, and was commonly called, "the saint of Cuvilly". When twenty-two years old, a nervous shock, occasioned by a pistol-shot fired at her father by an unknown enemy, brought on a paralysis of the lower limbs. Within a few years she was confined to her bed, and remained incapacitated for 22 years. During this time,
    6.50
    4 votes
    90

    Amy Crawford

    Amy Crawford was a member of WCW's Nitro Girls. Amy Crawford graduated from Jacksonville State University and formed a company called Excel Cheerleading and Dance, Inc. She still owns the company and teaches dance, cheerleading and gymnastics. Amy was a cheerleader for the Atlanta Falcons for two years and then became a founding member of WCW's dance team, The Nitro Girls, in 1997. She went by the name A.C. Jazz. She left the group and WCW in 1999 when she refused to wrestle. Crawford, AmyCrawford, AmyCrawford, AmyCrawford, AmyCrawford, AmyCrawford, Amy
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Edith Cowan

    Edith Cowan

    Edith Dircksey Cowan (née Brown), MBE (2 August 1861 – 9 June 1932) was an Australian politician, social campaigner and the first woman elected to an Australian parliament. Edith Brown was born and raised in Glengarry (HI) Station near Geraldton, Western Australia on 2 August 1861. The second daughter of Kenneth Brown and Mary Eliza Dircksey née Wittenoom, she was born into an influential and respected family that included her grandfathers Thomas Brown and John Burdett Wittenoom, and an uncle, Maitland Brown. When she was seven years old her mother died in childbirth, and her father sent her to a Perth boarding school run by the Cowan sisters, whose brother James she would later marry. Her father remarried, but the marriage was unhappy and he began to drink heavily. When Edith was fifteen, her father shot and killed his second wife, and was subsequently hanged for the crime. After her father's death, Edith Brown left her boarding school and moved to Guildford, probably to live with her grandmother. There, she attended the school of Canon Sweeting, a former headmaster of Bishop Hale's School who had taught a number of prominent men including John Forrest and Septimus Burt. According
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Franciszka Siedliska

    Franciszka Siedliska

    Blessed Franciszka (Frances) Siedliska (12 November 1842–21 November 1902), also known as Mother Mary of Jesus the Good Shepherd, was the founder of a Roman Catholic religious institute, the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. In 1842, Franciszka Siedliska was born to a Polish noble family in Roszkowa Wola, Congress Poland. Franciszka was educated privately by governesses, remaining indifferent to religion until she met a zealous Capuchin priest, who prepared her for her first Holy Communion, at which time she offered herself completely to God. She strongly desired a religious vocation, but because her father opposed the idea, she had to wait to execute her mission of founding a new religious congregation. Having submitted a petition on 1 October 1873, Siedliska founded her new congregation in Rome on the first Sunday of Advent in 1875, having received the blessing of Pope Pius IX. Siedliska named her order after the Holy Family, viewing it as the perfect model of total abandonment to the love of God. The congregation spread rapidly to Poland, England, France, and, in 1885, the United States. Siedliska led eleven sisters to found a community in Des Plaines, moving to Pittsburgh
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Linda McMahon

    Linda McMahon

    Linda Marie McMahon (née Edwards; born October 4, 1948) is an American professional wrestling magnate and a Republican Party politician. She is notable for her career developing the WWE with her husband Vince McMahon. She left WWE in 2009 to run unsuccessfully for a seat in the United States Senate from Connecticut, losing to Democratic Party nominee Richard Blumenthal in the general election. McMahon is the 2012 Republican nominee for Connecticut's other Senate seat to replace retiring Senator Joe Lieberman in the general election in November 2012 and is running against U.S. Congressman Chris Murphy. McMahon was active with the WWE, renamed from the original WWF in 2002, from 1980 to 2009. During this time, the company grew from a small regional business in New York to a large multinational. McMahon and her husband became wealthy through the WWE's success, and the McMahon family name is now synonymous with the wrestling industry. As President and later CEO of the company, she negotiated business deals, launched wrestling merchandise, signed wrestler contracts, and managed and wrote for WWE publications. She also started the company's civic programs, Get REAL and Smackdown Your
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Mary Ward

    Mary Ward

    The Venerable Mary Ward, I.B.V.M., (23 January 1585 – 30 January 1645) was an English Catholic Religious Sister who founded the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary, also known as the Loreto Sisters (not to be confused with the Sisters of Loretto). She was declared "Venerable" by Pope Benedict XVI on 19 December 2009; this is the first of three steps on the path to being declared a saint. She was born to Marmaduke Ward and Ursula Wright. Mary's first word was "Jesus", which was a sign of things to come. Mary was born at a time of great conflict for Roman Catholics in England. She was born in Ripon and in 1595 saw her family home burned down in anti-Catholic rioting. As the home was burning, Mary and her sisters knelt down and prayed for the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary; the children were saved by their father. In 1599 she moved to the house of Sir Ralph Babthorpe at Osgodby, Selby. It was there at the age of 15 that Mary felt called to the religious life. She entered a monastery of Poor Clares at Saint-Omer in northern France, then in Spanish Flanders, as a lay sister in 1606 and the following year she founded a new monastery of the Order for English women at nearby
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Nano Nagle

    Nano Nagle

    Honora "Nano" Nagle (1718 – 26 April 1784) founded the "Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary" (PBVM) in Ireland (also known as the "Presentation Sisters"). Of the many schools founded by the Presentation Sisters - a number are named after Nano Nagle. At the time of Nagle's birth, English supremacy in Ireland had been consolidated by force, and English determination to hold what had been gained lay behind the long series of laws which sought to destroy Irish Catholic identity, whether that identity found expression in land ownership, civic position, culture or religion. The great houses, traditional source of civic and social leadership, were for the most part destroyed. Exile of bishops, priests, religious, left the Church equally without leadership. Without legal right to exist, forbidden to worship, forbidden to teach, it was a Church seemingly without hope of future. In an economy controlled for the benefit of the powerful, the poor sank into sub-human conditions, beyond the touch of hope. In Ireland's County Cork, on the road which runs between Fermoy and Mallow lies Blackwater Valley with views of the distant Nagle Mountains. Much of this region was once the
    8.50
    2 votes
    96
    Aung San Suu Kyi

    Aung San Suu Kyi

    Aung San Suu Kyi MP AC (Burmese: ; MLCTS: aung hcan: cu. krany, /aʊŋˌsæn.suːˈtʃiː/, Burmese pronunciation: [àʊɴ sʰáɴ sṵ tɕì]; born 19 June 1945) is a Burmese opposition politician and chairperson of the National League for Democracy (NLD) in Burma. In the 1990 general election, the NLD won 59% of the national votes and 81% (392 of 485) of the seats in Parliament. She had, however, already been detained under house arrest before the elections. She remained under house arrest in Burma for almost 15 of the 21 years from 20 July 1989 until her most recent release on 13 November 2010, becoming one of the world's most prominent (now former) political prisoners. Suu Kyi received the Rafto Prize and the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought in 1990 and the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991. In 1992 she was awarded the Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding by the government of India and the International Simón Bolívar Prize from the government of Venezuela. In 2007, the Government of Canada made her an honorary citizen of that country; at the time, she was one of only four people ever to receive the honor. In 2011, she was awarded the Wallenberg Medal. On 1 April 2012, her
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Catherine Booth

    Catherine Booth

    Catherine Booth (17 January 1829 – 4 October 1890) was the wife of the founder of The Salvation Army, William Booth. Because of her influence in the formation of The Salvation Army she was known as the 'Mother of The Salvation Army'. She was born as Catherine Mumford in Ashbourne, Derbyshire, England, the daughter of John Mumford and Sarah Milward. Her father was a coach builder. Her family later moved to Boston, Lincolnshire, and later lived in Brixton, London. From an early age, Catherine was a serious and sensitive girl. She had a strong Christian upbringing and was said to have read the Bible through eight times before the age of 12. At age 14, she was seriously ill and spent a great deal of time in bed. She kept herself busy, however, and was especially concerned about the problems of alcohol. She wrote articles for a temperance magazine, which encouraged people not to drink. Catherine was a member of the local Band of Hope and a supporter of the national Temperance Society. She met William Booth, a Methodist minister, when he came to preach at her church in 1852. They soon fell in love and became engaged. During their three year engagement, Catherine constantly wrote letters
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Hildegard Burjan

    Hildegard Burjan

    Hildegard Burjan, born Hildegard Freund (January 30, 1883 in Görlitz, Germany – June 11, 1933, in Vienna, Austria) was the founder of a Catholic religious congregation for women and an Austrian politician. She was beatified by the Catholic Church in 2012. Hildegard Freund was born into a liberal Jewish family in Germany. She studied literature, philosophy and sociology in Switzerland and Berlin and obtained a Ph.D. in 1908. In 1907, she married the Hungarian entrepreneur Alexander Burjan. In 1909 she was surprisingly healed from a grave sickness, which prompted her conversion to Catholicism. She moved with her husband to Vienna, where she bore her only daughter Elisabeth, even though the pregnancy had at times threatened her life. The industrialist's wife soon started to interest herself in the social issues of the day, especially concerning the working conditions and spiritual welfare of the poor.{fact} In 1912, she founded the "Society of Christian women working at home" and in 1918 the "Society for Social Help". Her main achievement however remains the founding of a religious congregation for serving the poor. On October 4, 1919, Hildegard Burjan founded the congregation of
    7.33
    3 votes
    99

    Linda Ellerbee

    Linda Ellerbee (born August 15, 1944) is an American journalist who is most known for several jobs at NBC News, including Washington, DC correspondent, host of the Nickelodeon network's Nick News, which was recognized by the jurors of the duPont Columbia Awards as "possibly the best written and most intelligent news program ever." Ellerbee was born Linda Jane Smith in Bryan, Texas. She attended River Oaks Elementary School, Lanier Middle School, and Lamar High School in Houston. She also attended Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, although she quit in 1964 without graduating. Ellerbee traveled around the country for some time afterward, working itinerant jobs in radio. In her own words: After a stint working for Terry Miller, majority leader of the Alaska Senate, she was hired by the Dallas bureau of the Associated Press to write copy. She claims to have been fired after writing a catty personal letter on the AP's word processors and accidentally sending the letter out on the wire. The letter brought her to the attention of CBS television affiliate KHOU-TV, which hired her to replace Jessica Savitch in January 1973. Within several months she was hired by New York's
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Anne Cox Chambers

    Anne Cox Chambers

    Anne Beau Cox Chambers (born December 1, 1919, in Dayton, Ohio) is a media proprietor, who is primary owner of Cox Enterprises, a privately held media empire that includes newspapers, television, radio, cable television, and other businesses. She is the daughter of James M. Cox, a newspaper publisher and 1920 Democratic Presidential nominee, and his second wife, Margaretta Parker Blair. She owns and controls her father's business interests, through Cox Enterprises. For 33 years she co-owned the family company with her sister, Barbara Cox Anthony, who died on May 28, 2007. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia. Her net worth has been estimated by Forbes at $12.4 billion in September 2010, based principally on her equity interest in Cox Enterprises. She is the 20th-richest person in the United States and 53rd-richest person in the world. Cox-Chambers has homes in Atlanta's Buckhead, an apartment on Sutton Place in New York, a 17th century estate in Provence France and a plantation estate in South Carolina. Anne Cox was born to Margaretta Blair and James Middleton Cox. She attended Finch College in New York. She was married to Louis G. Johnson by whom she had two children: Katharine Ann
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    Nadine Gordimer

    Nadine Gordimer

    Nadine Gordimer (born 20 November 1923) is a South African writer, political activist and recipient of the 1991 Nobel Prize in Literature, when she was recognised as a woman "who through her magnificent epic writing has – in the words of Alfred Nobel – been of very great benefit to humanity". Gordimer's writing has long dealt with moral and racial issues, particularly apartheid in South Africa. Under that regime, works such as July's People were banned. She was active in the anti-apartheid movement, joining the African National Congress during the days when the organization was banned. She has recently been active in HIV/AIDS causes. Gordimer was born near Springs, Gauteng, an East Rand mining town outside Johannesburg, the daughter of Jewish immigrants. Her father, Isidore Gordimer, was a watchmaker from Lithuania near the Latvian border, and her mother, Hannah "Nan" (Myers) Gordimer, was from London, England. Gordimer's early interest in racial and economic inequality in South Africa was shaped in part by her parents. Her father's experience as a Jewish refugee in czarist Russia helped form Gordimer's political identity, but he was neither an activist nor particularly sympathetic
    6.25
    4 votes
    102
    Tan Le

    Tan Le

    Tan Le (born 1977), a Vietnamese-Australian telecommunications entrepreneur, is a co-Founder of Emotiv. She was named the 1998 Young Australian of the Year. Born in Vietnam, Tan migrated to Australia as a refugee with her family in 1982. Tan began university studies at the age of 16 and went on to complete a Bachelor's degree in law and commerce in 1998 at Monash University. As president of the Vietnamese Community of Footscray Association, she made a number of contributions to charities and newspapers throughout Melbourne. Tan co-founded and ran SASme, a pioneer in providing SMPP platforms to telecommunication carriers and content aggregators, and one of the companies responsible for the creation of Australia's SMS application market. Tan helped grow SASme to thirty-five employees and multiple locations worldwide. Tan has also worked with one of Australia's leading law firms, Freehills. In 1998, Tan was named Young Australian of the Year and voted one of Australia's 30 Most Successful Women Under 30. Tan was a Special Ambassador to the United Kingdom as a guest of the British High Commission and Foreign Commonwealth Office, a Goodwill Ambassador for Australia in Asia, and a Patron
    6.25
    4 votes
    103
    Anne Wojcicki

    Anne Wojcicki

    Anne E. Wojcicki ( /woʊˈdʒɪtski/ woh-JIT-skee; born July 28, 1973) is an American biotech analyst, biologist, and the co-founder of 23andMe. Wojcicki is the daughter of Esther Wojcicki, a Jewish American educator, and Stanley Wojcicki, a Polish American physics professor at Stanford University. She graduated from Yale University with a B.S. in biology in 1996. After graduating, Wojcicki worked 10 years overseeing healthcare investments, focusing on biotechnology companies. In 2006, she left the investing world to co-found 23andMe with Linda Avey. Wojcicki married Google co-founder Sergey Brin in May 2007. They have a son, Benji, born in December 2008.
    4.67
    6 votes
    104
    Alicia Keys

    Alicia Keys

    • Web Link(s): MusicMoz page for Alicia Keys
    Alicia Augello Cook (born January 25, 1981), known by her stage name Alicia Keys, is an American R&B singer-songwriter, record producer and actress. She attended Professional Performing Arts School and graduated at 16 as valedictorian. Keys released her debut album with J Records, having had previous record deals first with Columbia and then Arista Records. Keys' debut album, Songs in A Minor, was a commercial success, selling over 12 million copies worldwide. She became the best-selling new artist and best-selling R&B artist of 2001. The album earned Keys five Grammy Awards in 2002, including Best New Artist and Song of the Year for "Fallin'". Her second studio album, The Diary of Alicia Keys, was released in 2003 and was also another success worldwide, selling eight million copies. The album garnered her an additional four Grammy Awards in 2005. Later that year, she released her first live album, Unplugged, which debuted at number one in the United States. She became the first female to have an MTV Unplugged album to debut at number one and the highest since Nirvana in 1994. She also produced 3 Billboard Year-End Hot 100 singles top 3 hits, "Fallin'", "If I Ain't Got You" and "No
    7.00
    3 votes
    105

    Jan Crouch

    Janice Wendell Bethany "Jan" Crouch (born March 14, 1938) is a religious broadcaster and, with her husband Paul, co-founder of the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN). Jan is the daughter of Reverend and Mrs. Paul Bethany, and grew up in Columbus, Georgia. Her father served as a pastor in the Assemblies of God denomination, and was the founding president of Southeastern University (Florida). While attending Evangel Bible College in Springfield, Missouri, Jan met Paul F. Crouch. They married in 1957, and have two sons, Paul Jr. and Matthew, both of whom are high-ranking officials and program hosts on TBN. In 1973, Paul and Jan Crouch founded The Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN). In 1974, TBN purchased its first TV station, KLXA-TV (channel 40, now KTBN-TV) in Southern California, and began distribution through cable systems in 1978. Under the leadership of the Crouch family, Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) has grown to become the United States' largest Christian television network, offering 24 hour commercial-free programming, and TBN is currently third largest over-the-air Station Group in the United States, with CBS, Fox, and NBC holding the 4th, 5th and 6th place, according
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Amanda Levette

    Amanda Levette

    Amanda Levete (born 17 November 1955, Bridgend) is a Welsh architect, principal of Amanda Levete Architects (known as AL_A). Formerly married to Jan Kaplický with whom she had a son, for 20 years they were co-partners at Future Systems. Levete trained at the Architectural Association and worked for Richard Rogers before joining Future Systems as a partner in 1989. Levette was credited with the ability to make Future Systems' organic, conceptual designs marketable. One of the most innovative practices of its time, Future Systems completed buildings including Selfridges department store in Birmingham and the, Lord's Media Centre which won the coveted Royal Institute of British Architects Stirling Prize. Levete formed AL_A in 2009, following the death of Kaplicky. In 2011 AL_A won a competition to design a new entrance and extension for London's Victoria & Albert Museum. She is visiting professor at the Royal College of Art and a trustee of Artangel. She has been on the Board of Trustees of The Architecture Foundation. Levete is a regular TV and radio broadcaster and she writes a column for Building magazine. Levete was expelled from school at the age of 16 for sunbathing naked.
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    Ann Winblad

    Ann Winblad

    Ann L. Winblad (born on November 1, 1950 in Red Wing, Minnesota) is a partner of Hummer Winblad Venture Partners. Ann L. Winblad was born on November 1, 1950 in Red Wing, Minnesota. She learned "that patience and focus is a very good balance with overall efficiency; and that’s served me well as an entrepreneur." In 1989 with John Hummer, she co-founded the venture capital firm Hummer Winblad Venture Partners. To be a successful venture capitalist, she says, "we have to look at the glass as half full….we have to slurp up that Kool-Aid for an instant, but we can’t get addicted." Lambert, Laura. (2005). "Ann Winblad." in The Internet: A Historical Encyclopedia. Part 1, Biographies. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. p. 238-242.
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Shelley Day

    Shelley Day

    Shelley Day is a former producer of children's video games. She founded Humongous Entertainment with colleague Ron Gilbert. She created the famous Putt-Putt character as a bedtime story for her son, Travis, which became a series of popular children's video games. In 1999 she was listed on Time Magazine as one the of the "Cyber Elite". She also founded Humongous' subsidiary, Cavedog Entertainment. After leaving Humongous, she founded Hulabee Entertainment in 2001 to provide online games for kids, taking most of Humongous' staff with her. On December 2, 2005, she was sentenced to 30 months in prison for defrauding Asia Europe Americas Bank of Seattle of over $1.5 million. She falsely claimed to the bank loan officer that Disney Interactive was buying part of Hulabee and she presented forged documents to support that claim.
    6.00
    4 votes
    109
    Anne Berkowitch

    Anne Berkowitch

    As Co-founder and CEO, Anne Berkowitch leads the SelectMinds Board of Directors and management team. Since the company’s inception in 2000, Anne has played a key role in the development of SelectMinds’ client relationships and the evolution of the company into a leading provider of Corporate Social Networking solutions and services. Previously, Anne was a management consultant with Booz Allen & Hamilton, working primarily with service businesses out of both the New York and London offices. While at the firm, she was also very active in the recruitment and development of senior staff and went on to start her own boutique executive search firm specializing in placement of senior consultants, before co-founding SelectMinds. Anne has an MBA in finance from MIT’s Sloan School of Management and a BSC in Applied Math and Biology from Brown University.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Gertrude B. Elion

    Gertrude B. Elion

    Gertrude Belle Elion (January 23, 1918 – February 21, 1999) was an American biochemist and pharmacologist, and a 1988 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Working alone as well as with George H. Hitchings, Elion developed a multitude of new drugs, using innovative research methods that would later lead to the development of the AIDS drug AZT. Born in New York City to immigrant parents, she graduated from Hunter College in 1937 and New York University (M.Sc.) in 1941. Unable to obtain a graduate research position, she worked as a lab assistant and a high school teacher. Later, she left to work as an assistant to George H. Hitchings at the Burroughs-Wellcome pharmaceutical company (now GlaxoSmithKline). She never obtained a formal Ph.D., but was later awarded an honorary Ph.D from Polytechnic University of New York in 1989 and honorary SD degree from Harvard university in 1998. She attended Polytechnic University of New York but did not graduate. Rather than relying on trial-and-error, Elion and Hitchings used the differences in biochemistry between normal human cells and pathogens (disease-causing agents) to design drugs that could kill or inhibit the reproduction
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Herta Müller

    Herta Müller

    Herta Müller (born 17 August 1953) is a Romanian-born German novelist, poet, essayist and recipient of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Niţchidorf, Timiş County in Romania, her native language is German. Since the early 1990s she has been internationally established, and her works have been translated into more than twenty languages. Müller is noted for her works depicting the effects of violence, cruelty and terror, usually in the setting of Communist Romania under the repressive Nicolae Ceauşescu regime which she has experienced herself. Many of her works are told from the viewpoint of the German minority in Romania and are also a depiction of the modern history of the Germans in the Banat, and Transylvania. Her much acclaimed 2009 novel The Hunger Angel (Atemschaukel) portrays the deportation of Romania's German minority to Stalinist Soviet Gulags during the Soviet occupation of Romania for use as German forced labor. Müller has received more than twenty awards to date, including the Kleist Prize (1994), the Aristeion Prize (1995), the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award (1998) and the Franz Werfel Human Rights Award (2009). On 8 October 2009, the Swedish
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Jody Williams

    Jody Williams

    Jody Williams (born 1950) is an American political activist known around the world for her work in banning antipersonnel landmines, her defense of human rights – and especially those of women, and her efforts to promote new understandings of security in today’s world. She was laureated with the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for her work for the banning and clearing of anti-personnel mines. She served as the founding coordinator of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL) from early 1992 until February 1998. Prior to that work, she spent eleven years on various projects related to the wars in Nicaragua and El Salvador. In an unprecedented cooperative effort with governments, UN bodies and the International Committee of the Red Cross, she served as a chief strategist and spokesperson for the ICBL, which she developed from two non-governmental organizations (NGOs) with a staff of one – herself – to an international powerhouse of 1,300 NGOs in ninety countries. From its small beginning and official launch in 1992, Williams and the ICBL dramatically achieved the campaign’s goal of an international treaty banning antipersonnel landmines during a diplomatic conference held in Oslo
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Mary Kay Ash

    Mary Kay Ash (May 12, 1918 – November 22, 2001) was an American businesswoman and founder of Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc. Mary Kay Ash, born Mary Kathlyn Wagner in Hot Wells, Harris County, Texas, was the daughter of Edward Alexander and Lula Vember Hastings Wagner. She attended Reagan High School in Houston, and graduated in 1934. Ash married Ben Rogers at age 17. They had three children. While her husband served in World War II, she sold books door-to-door. After her husband's return in 1945, they divorced. Ash went to work for Stanley Home Products. Frustrated when passed over for a promotion in favor of a man that she had trained, Ash retired in 1963 and intended to write a book to assist women in business. The book turned into a business plan for her ideal company, and in the summer of 1963, Mary Kay Ash and her new husband, George Arthur Hallenbeck, began Mary Kay Cosmetics with a $5,000 investment. Before the company could open its original storefront operation in Dallas, her second husband died, and her son, Richard Rogers, took his place. The store opened in 1963, but grew rapidly, particularly after Ash was interviewed for CBS's 60 Minutes in 1979. Ash was widely respected.
    8.00
    2 votes
    114

    Alice Walton

    Alice Louise Walton (born October 7, 1949) is an American heiress to the fortune of Walmart Stores, Inc. She is the daughter of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton and Helen Walton, and sister of S. Robson Walton and Jim Walton. In September 2011, her estimated net worth was US$20.9 billion, making her the second-richest American woman and the tenth-richest American. Walton was born in Newport, Arkansas. She graduated from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, with a B.A. in economics and finance. She began her career in finance as an equity analyst and money manager for First Commerce Corporation and later served as vice chairperson and head of all investment-related activities at the Arvest Bank Group. In 1988, Walton founded Llama Company, an investment bank engaged in corporate finance, public and structured finance, real estate finance and sales and trading. She served as President, Chairperson and CEO. For a time, she was a broker for E.F. Hutton. She was the first chairperson and driving force behind the Northwest Arkansas Council. This community development organization played a major role in securing the development of the Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport. In the late 1990s
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    Louise Charron

    Louise Charron (born March 2, 1951 in Sturgeon Falls, Ontario) is a Canadian jurist. She was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada in October, 2004, and is the first native-born Franco-Ontarian Supreme Court judge. (This distinction has sometimes been attributed to Louise Arbour, but Arbour was born and raised Québécoise.) Charron received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Carleton University in 1972, her Bachelor of Law degree from the University of Ottawa in 1975, and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1977. She practiced civil litigation before joining the Crown Attorney's office in 1980. She then became a law professor at the University of Ottawa. She was appointed to the District Court of Ontario in 1988 and to the Court of Appeal for Ontario in 1995. Though she was eligible to sit on the bench until 2026, her retirement was announced in May 2011, and became effective August 30, 2011.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Louise de Marillac

    Louise de Marillac

    Saint Louise de Marillac, D.C., (August 12, 1591 - March 15, 1660) was the co-founder, with St. Vincent de Paul, of the Daughters of Charity. She is venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church. Louise de Marillac was born out of wedlock on August 15, 1591 near Le Meux, in the Department of Oise, in the Picardy region of France. She never knew her mother. Louis de Marillac claimed her as his natural daughter yet not his legal heir. Louis was a member of the prominent de Marillac family and was a widower at the time of Louise’s birth. His brother, Michel de Marillac, was a major figure in the court of Queen Marie de' Medici and, though Louise was not a member of the Queen’s court, she lived and worked among the French aristocracy. Thus Louise grew up amid the affluent society of Paris, but without a stable home life. When her father married his new wife, Antoinette Le Camus, she refused to accept Louise as part of their family. Nevertheless, Louise was cared for and received an excellent education at the royal monastery of Poissy near Paris, where her aunt was a Dominican nun. Louise was schooled among the country’s elite and was introduced to the arts and humanities as well as
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    Rose Hawthorne Lathrop

    Mother Mary Alphonsa (May 20, 1851 – July 9, 1926) was an American Roman Catholic religious sister and social worker. Mother Alphonsa was born on May 20, 1851 to Nathaniel Hawthorne and his wife Sophia Hawthorne, and baptised as Rose Hawthorne. She lived in Massachusetts, Liverpool, England, then London, Paris, Rome, and Florence, Italy. The family returned to Concord, Massachusetts in 1860. Her mother and the family moved to Germany, then England. She married author George Parsons Lathrop in 1871; both converted to Roman Catholicism in 1891. In 1876, the couple had a son, Francis, who died of diphtheria at the age of five. Afterwards Rose and George separated permanently in 1895. After her father's death in 1864, she tried to become an author, like him. She wrote book of poems, Along the Shore, which was published in 1888. She later decided to rededicate her life to restoring her family's reputation after her brother's illegal activities and prostitution attempts. She was known for her service near and within New York City, caring for impoverished cancer by founding St. Rose's Free Home for Incurable Cancer in the Lower East Side. After George's death in 1898, she became a nun,
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

    Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

    Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (October 26, 1874 – April 5, 1948) was a prominent American socialite and philanthropist and the second-generation matriarch of the renowned Rockefeller family. Referred to as the "woman in the family", she was especially noteworthy for being the driving force behind the establishment of the Museum of Modern Art, on 53rd Street in New York, in November 1929. She was born Abigail "Abby" Greene Aldrich in Providence, Rhode Island, the daughter of the influential Senator Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich, chairman of the powerful Senate Finance Committee, and the former Abby Pearce Truman Chapman, a distant descendant of the fourth signer of the Mayflower Compact. Her sister, Lucy Aldrich, who was nearly completely deaf (at the time thought because of a childhood bout of scarlet fever, now believed to be the result of waardenburg syndrome, a genetic anomaly found in several generations of the Aldrich family), would be one of her closest friends throughout their lives, and is believed to have fostered Abby's interest in American folk art. Her early education came at the hands of Quaker governesses. In 1891, aged 18, she enrolled at the Miss Abbott's School for Young
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Angie Hicks

    Angie Hicks

    Knowing that the frustrations she and her friends had finding good contractors were not unique, in 1995, Angie Hicks literally set out door-to-door in Columbus, OH, recruiting members and collecting reports from friends and neighbors to start what would become Angie’s List. Taking the “ask-your-neighbor” approach to a higher level, Angie used the detailed feedback from members as the basis for providing up-to-date, reliable, unbiased ratings and reviews on local services. After the first year, with more than 1,000 members throughout Columbus, Angie had laid the foundation for what would become one of the fastest growing companies in the U.S. Over these last 12 years, she has led the list’s expansion from a 100 square foot office to an operation that now covers more than 120 major cities across the U.S., serves more than 600,000 consumers and was placed for three years in a row – 2002, 2003 and 2004 – among the Inc. 500 by Inc. magazine, a list of the fastest-growing privately held companies in the nation. All the while, Angie’s keen sense of business and common sense have helped Angie’s List remain a locally-focused service that members say they wouldn’t live without. Over the years, consumers have come to trust Angie to help make the hiring process easier, as well as raise the level of service they can expect from local companies and contractors. A working mother herself, Angie has ensured Angie’s List continues to evolve to meet the ever-changing, dynamic needs of today’s families and homeowners. She knows that Angie’s List members are challenged each day to fit work, family and at-home time into already busy schedules. With this in mind, Angie’s List puts reliable information and resources at the fingertips of its members, so they can access it anytime they need help finding a good contractor or service company – whether it’s for a major home renovation, an emergency car repair, or even find a clown for their kid’s birthday party. With more consumers across the U.S. turning to Angie’s List each day, Angie regularly contributes to national and local consumer news stories across the country, including for CNN, The Washington Post, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Redbook, Real Simple, USA Weekend, Parade magazine, Good Housekeeping, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, Home Magazine and the Wall Street Journal. Angie’s official title at Angie’s List is Founder and Chief Marketing Officer. She holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and a bachelor’s degree in economics from DePauw University, in Greencastle, IN, which named her a 2007 Distinguished Alumni for Management and Entrepreneurship.
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Eleanor Roosevelt

    Eleanor Roosevelt

    Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (/ˈɛlɨnɔr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was the longest serving First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945. She supported the New Deal policies of her husband, distant cousin Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and became an advocate for civil rights. After her husband's death in 1945, Roosevelt continued to be an international author, speaker, politician, and activist for the New Deal coalition. She worked to enhance the status of working women, although she opposed the Equal Rights Amendment because she believed it would adversely affect women. In the 1940s, Roosevelt was one of the co-founders of Freedom House and supported the formation of the United Nations. Roosevelt founded the UN Association of the United States in 1943 to advance support for the formation of the UN. She was a delegate to the UN General Assembly from 1945 and 1952, a job for which she was appointed by President Harry S. Truman and confirmed by the United States Senate. During her time at the United Nations she chaired the committee that drafted and approved the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. President Truman called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    Gudrun Ensslin

    Gudrun Ensslin

    Gudrun Ensslin (German pronunciation: [ˈɡuːdʁuːn ˈɛnsliːn]; 15 August 1940 – 18 October 1977) was a founder of the German militant group Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion, or RAF, also known as the Baader-Meinhof Gang). After becoming involved with co-founder Andreas Baader, Ensslin was influential in the politicization of Baader's voluntaristic anarchistic beliefs. Ensslin was perhaps the intellectual head of the RAF. She was involved in five bomb attacks, with four deaths, was arrested in 1972 and died on 18 October 1977 in what has been called Stammheim Prison's Death Night. Ensslin, the fourth of seven children, was born in the village of Bartholomä in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Her father, Helmut, was a pastor of the Evangelical Church in Germany. Ensslin was a well-behaved child who did well at school and enjoyed working with the Evangelical Girl Scouts, and doing parish work such as organizing Bible studies. In her family, the social injustices of the world were often discussed, and Gudrun is said to have been sensitized to social problems in West Germany and the world as a whole. At age eighteen, Ensslin spent a year in the United States of America, where she attended
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Hunter Lovins

    Hunter Lovins

    L. Hunter Lovins (née Sheldon, born 1950) is an author and a promoter of sustainable development for over 30 years, is president of Natural Capitalism Solutions, a 501(c)3 non-profit in Longmont, Colorado and the Chief Insurgent of the Madrone Project. She teaches sustainable business management at Bainbridge Graduate Institute in Seattle, Washington, and Denver University and was a founding professor at Presidio Graduate School's MBA in Sustainable Management program (2002-2010). She also has taught at various universities, consulted for many citizens’ groups, governments and corporations. She co-founded with her then-husband Amory Lovins the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) which she led for 20 years. In demand as a speaker and consultant, she has addressed the World Economic Forum, the U.S. Congress, the World Summit on Sustainable Development, and hundreds of major conferences. Named a "green business icon" by Newsweek, a millennium "Hero of the Planet" by Time Magazine, she has also received the Right Livelihood Award, the Leadership in Business Award and dozens of other honors. Lovins received her undergraduate degree in sociology and political science from Pitzer College, in
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Doris Lessing

    Doris Lessing

    Doris May Lessing CH (née Tayler; born 22 October 1919) is a British novelist, poet, playwright, librettist, biographer and short story writer. Her novels include The Grass Is Singing (1950), the sequence of five novels collectively called Children of Violence (1952–69), The Golden Notebook (1962), The Good Terrorist (1985), and five novels collectively known as Canopus in Argos: Archives (1979–1983). Lessing was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature. In doing so the Swedish Academy described her as "that epicist of the female experience, who with scepticism, fire and visionary power has subjected a divided civilisation to scrutiny". Lessing was the eleventh woman and the oldest ever person to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature. In 2001, Lessing was awarded the David Cohen Prize for a lifetime's achievement in British Literature. In 2008, The Times ranked her fifth on a list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945". Lessing was born in Iran, then known as Persia, on 22 October 1919, to Captain Alfred Tayler and Emily Maude Tayler (née McVeagh), who were both English and of British nationality. Her father, who had lost a leg during his service in World War I, met his
    5.75
    4 votes
    124

    Monika Treut

    Monika Treut (born April 6, 1954 in Mönchengladbach) is a German filmmaker. Monika Treut was born on April 6, 1954 in Mönchengladbach, North Rhine-Westphalia, in what was then West Germany. She attended high school at an all-girls state school. She studied German and Political Science at university. After passing the state examination she graduated in 1978. During her studies at university in the mid-1970s she began working with video. She worked as a media associate in Marburg, Frankfurt, and Berlin. In 1984, Treut earned her doctorate degree in philology from the University of Marburg. That same year she founded Hyena Filmproduktion together with Elfi Mikesch, and began producing, writing, and directing independent feature films. The following year Treut made her feature film debut with Seduction: The Cruel Woman, a film that explored sadomasochistic sex practices. Treut also spent time in America during the 1980s. Traveling and working in San Fancisco and New York City, Treut met and worked with Annie Sprinkle and Werner Schroeter while producing some of her own films. These relationships led to the films Annie (documentary short), My Father is Coming and Encounter with Werner
    5.75
    4 votes
    125

    Nelly Sachs

    Nelly Sachs (10 December 1891 – 12 May 1970) was a Jewish German poet and playwright whose experiences resulting from the rise of the Nazis in World War II Europe transformed her into a poignant spokeswoman for the grief and yearnings of her fellow Jews. Her best-known play is Eli: Ein Mysterienspiel vom Leiden Israels (1950); other works include the poems "Zeichen im Sand" (1962), "Verzauberung" (1970), and the collections of poetry In den Wohnungen des Todes (1947), Flucht und Verwandlung (1959), Fahrt ins Staublose (1961), and Suche nach Lebenden (1971). Born Leonie Sachs in the Schöneberg district of Berlin, Germany in 1891, to a wealthy manufacturer, she was educated at home because of frail health. She showed early signs of talent as a dancer, but her protective parents did not encourage her to pursue a profession. She grew up as a very sheltered, introverted young woman and never married. She pursued an extensive correspondence with, and was friends with, Selma Lagerlöf and Hilde Domin. As the Nazis took power, she became increasingly terrified, at one point losing the ability to speak, as she would remember in verse: "When the great terror came/I fell dumb." Sachs fled with
    5.75
    4 votes
    126

    Alison Weir

    Alison Weir is an American writer-speaker-analyst on Israel-Palestine. She is executive director of If Americans Knew who speaks and writes about Israel-Palestine, with particular focus on US media coverage of this issue. In February 2001 Weir resigned her position as editor of the Sausalito, California community newspaper, and traveled to the West Bank and Gaza as a freelance reporter. She found a situation largely the reverse of what was being reported by the American media. Disturbed that American citizens were being "misinformed and uninformed on one of the most significant issues affecting them today, and discovering the problem to be systemic, she founded an organization to be directed by Americans without bias and ethnic ties to the region who would research and actively disseminate accurate information to the American public." The organization has conducted six statistical studies of US media organizations, and found that in every case the newspaper or primetime television broadcast entity had reported on Israeli deaths at rates far higher than Palestinian deaths. Other organizations such as Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting and Stanford-based media monitoring
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Amy Muller

    Amy Muller

    Amy is a co-founder and Chief Community Officer of Get Satisfaction, the company that's bringing community to customer service and re-introducing companies to one of their biggest assets: their customers. Amy brings over a decade of project management, front-end development, and entrepreneurial experience to Get Satisfaction. After stints at Brightwire, Violet.com, Prophet Communications, and Frog Design, Amy founded her own freelance consultancy and then founded Rubyred Labs with partners Thor Muller and Jonathan Grubb, where she served as Lead Project Manager and Director of Operations.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Elfriede Jelinek

    Elfriede Jelinek

    Elfriede Jelinek (German: [ɛlˈfʀiːdə ˈjɛlinɛk]; born 20 October 1946) is an Austrian playwright and novelist. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2004 for her "musical flow of voices and counter-voices in novels and plays that, with extraordinary linguistic zeal, reveal the absurdity of society's clichés and their subjugating power." Jelinek was born on 20 October 1946 in Mürzzuschlag, Styria, Austria, the daughter of Olga Ilona (née Buchner), a personnel director, and Friedrich Jelinek. She was raised in Vienna by her Romanian-German Catholic mother and Czech Jewish father (whose surname "Jelinek" means "little deer" in Czech). Her father was a chemist, who managed to avoid persecution during the Second World War by working in strategically important industrial production. However, several dozen family members became victims of the Holocaust. Her mother, with whom she shared the household even as an adult, and with whom she had a difficult relationship, was from a formerly prosperous Vienna family. As a child, Elfriede suffered from what she considered an over-restrictive education in a Roman Catholic convent school in Vienna. Her mother planned a career for her as a
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Laura Poretzky

    Laura Poretzky

    Born in France and then raised in Paris, Rio de Janeiro, and New York, Laura Poretzky debuted her collection Abaete in 2004.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Maria Göppert-Mayer

    Maria Göppert-Mayer

    Maria Goeppert-Mayer (June 28, 1906 – February 20, 1972) was a German-born American theoretical physicist, and Nobel laureate in Physics for proposing the nuclear shell model of the atomic nucleus. She is the second female laureate in physics, after Marie Curie. Maria Goeppert was born in Kattowitz (now Katowice, Poland), within the German Empire's Prussian Province of Silesia. Her family moved to Göttingen in 1910 when her father Friedrich was appointed Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Göttingen. On her father's side, Goeppert-Mayer was supposedly a seventh-generation professor. From a young age, she was surrounded by the students and lecturers from the university, intellectuals including the future Nobel winners Enrico Fermi, Werner Heisenberg, Paul Dirac and Wolfgang Pauli. In 1924, Goeppert passed the abitur, making her eligible to enter university, and enrolled at Göttingen university in the fall. Among her professors at Göttingen were three future Nobel prize winners: Max Born, James Franck and Adolf Otto Reinhold Windaus. Goeppert completed her Doctor of Philosophy degree (Ph.D.) at the University of Göttingen in 1930, and in that same year, she married Dr.
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Phyllis George

    Phyllis George

    Phyllis Ann George Brown (born 25 June 1949) is an American businesswoman, actress and a former sportscaster. She is a former Miss Texas 1970 and Miss America 1971. George was born to Diantha Cogdell and James George in Denton, Texas. She attended the University of North Texas for three years until crowned Miss Texas in 1971. At that time, Texas Christian University awarded scholarships to Miss Texas honorees. As a result, Phyllis left UNT and enrolled at TCU for several weeks until winning the Miss America crown later that fall. She is a member of Zeta Tau Alpha sorority. George won the 1971 Miss America pageant. In her year-long stint as Miss America, George appeared on numerous talk shows, including three interviews on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. CBS Sports producers approached George to become a sportscaster in 1974. The following year, she joined the cast of The NFL Today, co-hosting live pregame shows before National Football League (NFL) games. She was one of the first females to have a nationally prominent role in television sports coverage. Another duty George had with CBS Sports was working on horse racing events, including the Preakness Stakes and the
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Shirley Chisholm

    Shirley Chisholm

    Shirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm (November 30, 1924 – January 1, 2005) was an American politician, educator, and author. She was a Congresswoman, representing New York's 12th Congressional District for seven terms from 1969 to 1983. In 1968, she became the first African-American woman elected to Congress. On January 25, 1972, she became the first major-party black candidate for President of the United States and the first woman to run for the Democratic presidential nomination (Margaret Chase Smith had previously run for the Republican presidential nomination). She received 152 first-ballot votes at the 1972 Democratic National Convention. Shirley Anita St. Hill was born in Brooklyn, New York, of immigrant parents. Her father, Charles Christopher St. Hill, was born in British Guiana and arrived in the United States via Antilla, Cuba, on April 10, 1923, aboard the S.S. Munamar in New York City. Her mother, Ruby Seale, was born in Christ Church, Barbados, and arrived in New York City aboard the S.S. Pocone on March 8, 1921. At age three, Chisholm was sent to Barbados to live with her maternal grandmother, Emaline Seale, in Christ Church; where she attended the Vauxhall Primary School.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Wisława Szymborska

    Wisława Szymborska

    Wisława Szymborska-Włodek [viˈswava ʂɨmˈbɔrska] (2 July 1923 – 1 February 2012) was a Polish poet, essayist, translator and recipient of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Prowent, which has since become part of Kórnik, she later resided in Kraków until the end of her life. She was described as a "Mozart of Poetry". In Poland, Szymborska's books have reached sales rivaling prominent prose authors: although she once remarked in a poem, "Some Like Poetry" ("Niektórzy lubią poezję"), that no more than two out of a thousand people care for the art. Szymborska was awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in Literature "for poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality". She became better known internationally as a result of this. Her work has been translated into English and many European languages, as well as into Arabic, Hebrew, Japanese and Chinese. Wisława Szymborska was born on 2 July 1923 in Prowent, Poland (present-day Bnin, Kórnik, Poland), the daughter of Wincenty and Anna (née Rottermund) Szymborski. Her father was at that time the steward of Count Władysław Zamoyski, a Polish patriot and charitable
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Zhang Xin

    Zhang Xin

    Zhang Xin (simplified Chinese: 张欣; traditional Chinese: 張欣; pinyin: Zhāng Xīn, born 1965) is a Chinese businesswoman. Presently, she is the CEO of SOHO China, the largest commercial real estate developer in Beijing. In the 1950s, her Burmese Chinese parents left Burma and relocated to China, working as translators at the Bureau of Foreign Languages. They separated during the Cultural Revolution. Born in Beijing in 1965, Zhang Xin moved to Hong Kong at age of 14 with her mother and lived in a room just big enough for two bunk beds. She worked for five years in small factories that make garment and electronic products to save for education abroad. She has described the 'conditions there were similar to those in mainland China today'. By 19, she had saved enough for airfare to London and supporting herself for English study at secretarial school. Later, she studied Economics at the University of Sussex. In 1992, she graduated with a Master’s Degree in Development Economics from Cambridge University. Upon graduation, she was hired by Barings Plc to work in Hong Kong. She soon moved to Goldman Sachs and started working for the investment bank in New York City. In 1994 she switched to
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Afeni Shakur

    Afeni Shakur

    Afeni Shakur Davis (born Alice Faye Williams: January 22, 1947) is an African American music businesswoman, philanthropist, former political activist and ex-Black Panther. She is the mother of Tupac Shakur. She acted as her own criminal defense attorney after being accused of taking part in numerous bombings as a member of the Panthers. Shakur was born in Lumberton, North Carolina on January 22, 1947. Exactly one year following Tupac's death, with the money made from Tupac's posthumous albums, Afeni founded the Georgia-based Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation, which provides art programs for young people, and Amaru Entertainment, the holding company for all Tupac's unreleased material. She has also since launched a fashion clothing line, Makaveli Branded; all proceeds go to his charity, the Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation. Shakur was reportedly in Federal Court on July 20, 2007, to file an injunction to prevent Death Row Records from selling any unreleased material from Tupac after the company failed to prove that the unreleased songs were not part of its bankruptcy settlement. She created a record label named Amaru Records to release Tupac's unreleased recordings. Afeni Shakur won her
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    Elizabeth Blackburn

    Elizabeth Blackburn

    Professor Elizabeth Helen Blackburn, AC, FRS, FRSN (born 26 November 1948 in Hobart, Tasmania) is an Australian-born American biological researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, who studies the telomere, a structure at the end of chromosomes that protects the chromosome. Blackburn co-discovered telomerase, the enzyme that replenishes the telomere. Blackburn recalls: Carol had done this experiment, and we stood, just in the lab, and I remember sort of standing there, and she had this -- we call it a gel. It's an autoradiogram, because there was trace amounts of radioactivity that were used to develop an image of the separated DNA products of what turned out to be the telomerase enzyme reaction. I remember looking at it and just thinking, ‘Ah! This could be very big. This looks just right.’ It had a pattern to it. There was a regularity to it. There was something that was not just sort of garbage there, and that was really kind of coming through, even though we look back at it now, we'd say, technically, there was this, that and the other, but it was a pattern shining through, and it just had this sort of sense, ‘Ah! There's something real here.’ For this work, she
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Mary White Ovington

    Mary White Ovington

    Mary White Ovington (April 11, 1865 – July 15, 1951) was an American suffragette, Republican, Unitarian, journalist, and co-founder of the NAACP. Mary White Ovington was born April 11, 1865 in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents, members of the Unitarian Church were supporters of women's rights and had been involved in anti-slavery movement. Educated at Packer Collegiate Institute and Radcliffe College, Ovington became involved in the campaign for civil rights in 1890 after hearing Frederick Douglass speak in a Brooklyn church. In 1895 she helped found the Greenpoint Settlement in Brooklyn. Appointed head of the project the following year, Ovington remained until 1904 when she was appointed fellow of the Greenwich House Committee on Social Investigations. Over the next five years she studied employment and housing problems in black Manhattan. During her investigations she met W.E.B. Du Bois, from Harvard University and was introduced to the founding members of the Niagara Movement. Influenced by the ideas of William Morris, Ovington joined the Republican Party in 1905, where she met people including Daniel De Leon, Asa Philip Randolph, Floyd Dell, Max Eastman and Jack London, who
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Sima Samar

    Sima Samar

    Sima Samar (Persian: سیما سمر‎) (born 3 February 1957) is a politician in Afghanistan, who served as Minister of Women's Affairs of Afghanistan from December 2001 to 2003. She is currently the Chairperson of the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) and, since 2005, United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Sudan. In 2011, she was part of the newly founded Truth and Justice party. Samar was born in Jaghori, in Ghazni Province of Afghanistan, on 3 February 1957. She belongs to the ethnic Hazara group. She obtained her degree in medicine in February 1982 from Kabul University. She practiced medicine at a government hospital in Kabul, but after a few months was forced to flee for her safety to her native Jaghori, where she provided medical treatment to patients throughout the remote areas of central Afghanistan. She was an active member Hazara group under the leadership of Baba Mazari, a Hazara leader who was fighting against Racial injustice, and promoting unity and brotherhood of all ehtnicities, therefore equal rights in Afghanistan; she is head of human rights commission in Afghanistan. Baba Mazari was a remarkable supporter of Women
    6.33
    3 votes
    139

    Claire L'Heureux-Dubé

    Claire L'Heureux-Dubé, CC GOQ (born September 7, 1927) served as a justice on the Supreme Court of Canada from 1987 to 2002. She was the first woman from Quebec and the second woman appointed to this position. She was born Claire L'Heureux in Quebec City in 1927. She was the oldest of four girls raised by a mother who spent forty years in a wheel chair as a result of multiple sclerosis. In 1947, she completed her B.A. from McGill University and in 1951, she graduated from the law faculty of Université Laval and entered private practice in Quebec. She was appointed as a judge to the Quebec Superior Court in 1973 and to the Quebec Court of Appeal in 1979. She married Arthur Dubé in 1957 and gave birth to a son and a daughter. Her husband committed suicide in 1978, which later became a focus of public attention in the very public debate with Alberta Court of Appeal Justice John McClung over the ruling in R. v. Ewanchuk. Her son died in 1994. She was made a Companion of the Order of Canada in 2003. In 2004, she was made a Grand Officer of the National Order of Quebec. She is currently active as the Chair of the Steering Committee of the Maison de justice de Québec, a pilot project in
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Fay Gillis Wells

    Fay Gillis Wells

    Fay Gillis Wells (October 15, 1908 – December 2, 2002) was a pioneer aviator, globe-trotting journalist and distinguished broadcaster. In 1929 she was the first woman pilot to bail out of an airplane to save her life and helped found the Ninety-Nines, the international organization of licensed women pilots. As a journalist she corresponded from the Soviet Union in the 1930s, covered wars and pioneered overseas radio broadcasting with her husband, the noted reporter Linton Wells, and was a White House correspondent from 1963 to 1977. During the 1930s and 40s she and her husband carried out sensitive government missions in Africa. For many years she actively promoted world friendship through flying. Born in Minneapolis, she grew up in various towns in the US and Canada following her father, Julius H. Gillis, a mining engineer. She graduated from Battin High School in Elizabeth, New Jersey in 1925, and studied at Michigan State University, but left before graduation to pursue other interests. In August 1929 she began flying. On September 1st, 1929 she became the first woman pilot to be a member of the Caterpillar Club (bailing out of an airplane to save her life) when her plane
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

    Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

    Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (January 9, 1875 – April 18, 1942) was an American sculptor, art patron and collector, and founder in 1931 of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. She was a prominent social figure and hostess, who was born into the United States Vanderbilt family and married into the Whitney family. Gertrude Vanderbilt was born in New York City on January 9, 1875. She was the eldest surviving daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt II (1843–1899) and Alice Claypoole Gwynne (1852–1934) and a great-granddaughter of "Commodore" Cornelius Vanderbilt. Gertrude Vanderbilt spent her summers in Newport, Rhode Island, at the family's mansion, The Breakers, where she kept up with the boys in all their rigorous sporting activities. Educated by private tutors and at the exclusive Brearley School in New York City, at age 21 she married the extremely wealthy sportsman Harry Payne Whitney (1872–1930). A banker and investor, Whitney was the son of William C. Whitney, and his mother was the daughter of a Senator, and sister of a Standard Oil Company magnate. Harry Whitney inherited a fortune in oil and tobacco as well as interests in banking. Gertrude and Harry Whitney had
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Irène Joliot-Curie

    Irène Joliot-Curie

    Irène Joliot-Curie (12 September 1897-17 March 1956) was a French scientist, the daughter of Marie Skłodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie and the wife of Frédéric Joliot-Curie. Jointly with her husband, Joliot-Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935 for their discovery of artificial radioactivity. This made the Curies the family with most Nobel laureates to date. Both children of the Joliot-Curies, Hélène and Pierre, are also esteemed scientists. Curie was born in Paris, France. After a year of traditional education, which began when she was 10 years old, her parents realized her obvious mathematical talent and decided that Irène’s academic abilities needed a more challenging environment. Marie joined forces with a number of eminent French scholars, including the prominent French physicist Paul Langevin to form “The Cooperative,” a private gathering of some of the most distinguished academics in France. Each contributed to educating one another’s children in their respective homes. The curriculum of The Cooperative was varied and included not only the principles of science and scientific research but such diverse subjects as Chinese and sculpture and with great emphasis
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Mary Lasker

    Mary Lasker

    Mary Woodard Lasker (November 30, 1900 – February 21, 1994) was an American health activist and philanthropist. She worked to raise funds for medical research, and founded the Lasker Foundation. Born in Watertown, Wisconsin, Lasker attended the University of Wisconsin, Madison and graduated from Radcliffe College with a major in Art History. Her mother, Sarah Woodard, who was an active civic leader instilled upon her the values of urban beautification while growing up. Lasker worked as an art dealer at Reinhardt Galleries in New York City. She married the owner Paul Reinhardt. After divorcing she created a fabric company Hollywood Patterns. In 1938 she became the president of the Birth Control Federation of America, the precursor of the Planned Parenthood Federation. Her second marriage was to Lord and Thomas advertising executive Albert Lasker until his death in the early 1950s of colon cancer. Ironically, her husband's ad agency had promoted smoking with the slogan, "L.S.M.F.T.—Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco" back when the dangers of smoking were not well known. The Laskers supported National Health Insurance under Truman. After its failure Mary Lasker saw research funding
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Oprah Winfrey

    Oprah Winfrey

    Oprah Winfrey (born Orpah Gail Winfrey; January 29, 1954) is an American media proprietor, talk show host, actress, producer, and philanthropist. Winfrey is best known for her self-titled, multi-award-winning talk show, which has become the highest-rated program of its kind in history and was nationally syndicated from 1986 to 2011. She has been ranked the richest African-American of the 20th century, the greatest black philanthropist in American history, and was for a time the world's only black billionaire. She is also, according to some assessments, the most influential woman in the world. Winfrey was born into poverty in rural Mississippi to a teenage single mother and later raised in an inner-city Milwaukee neighborhood. She experienced considerable hardship during her childhood, claiming to be raped at age nine and becoming pregnant at 14; her son died in infancy. Sent to live with the man she calls her father, a barber in Tennessee, Winfrey landed a job in radio while still in high school and began co-anchoring the local evening news at the age of 19. Her emotional ad-lib delivery eventually got her transferred to the daytime-talk-show arena, and after boosting a third-rated
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Risa Stack

    Risa Stack

    Risa Stack joined Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers in 2003. Risa specializes in the development of life science companies. She was the founding CEO and is currently a board member of several companies including CardioDx, Nodality, and an incubation in the personalized medicine area. She is a board observer at Codon Devices, Xdx, Orexigen (OREX), Tethys, and Pacific Biosciences.

    Prior to joining KPCB, Risa was a Principal at J.P. Morgan Partners in the life science practice for 6 years. While at J.P. Morgan Partners she sponsored a series of investments including Acurian, AlgoRx (now Anesiva), Connetics, Diatide, Ilex Oncology, Illumina, Praecis Pharmaceuticals and Triangle Pharmaceuticals.

    Prior to working in the venture capital industry, Risa worked as a Derivative Specialist on the Chicago Board of Trade where she traded futures and options on government securities. As an intern at ARCH Development Corporation she participated in the development of several companies based on the research of University of Chicago scientists. At Abbott Laboratories, Risa worked to develop a new Hepatitis C assay system and researched new procedures for evaluating patient samples for HIV and Hepatitis B.

    Risa received her B.S. in Genetics and Development with distinction from the University of Illinois and her Ph.D. in Immunology from the University of Chicago. She was also a member of the second class of Kauffman Fellows.

    Risa was named as one of the 100 Most Influential Women in Business by the San Francisco Business Times in 2004.
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Selma Lagerlöf

    Selma Lagerlöf

    Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈsɛlma ˈlɑːɡərˌløːv] ( listen); 20 November 1858 – 16 March 1940) was a Swedish author. She was the first female writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, and most widely known for her children's book Nils Holgerssons underbara resa genom Sverige (The Wonderful Adventures of Nils). Born at Mårbacka (now in Sunne Municipality) an estate in Värmland in western Sweden, Lagerlöf was the daughter of Lieutenant Erik Gustaf Lagerlöf and Louise Lagerlöf née Wallroth. The couple's fourth child, she was born with a hip injury. An early sickness left her lame in both legs, although she later recovered. She was a quiet child, more serious than others her age, with a deep love of reading. The sale of Mårbacka following her father's illness in 1884 had a serious impact on her development. Lagerlöf worked as a country schoolteacher at a high school for girls in Landskrona from 1885 to 1895 while honing her story-telling skills, with particular focus on the legends she had learned as a child. Through her studies at the Royal Women's Superior Training Academy in Stockholm, Lagerlöf reacted against the realism of contemporary Swedish language
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Sharon Percy Rockefeller

    Sharon Percy Rockefeller

    Sharon Percy Rockefeller, was elected a director of PepsiCo in 1986. She is President and Chief Executive Officer of WETA public stations in Washington, D.C., a position she has held since 1989, and was a member of the Board of Directors of WETA from 1985 to 1989.

    In October of 1994, Rockefeller was named a recipient of the Charles Frankel Prize by the National Endowment for the Humanities in recognition of her outstanding achievements in promoting the arts and humanities in her public broadcasting career. She has also received the Distinguished Broadcaster Award and was named a Washingtonian of the Year by Washingtonian magazine. Most recently, Rockefeller was honored with the Women of Vision Award from the Women in Film and Video and the CINE Lifetime Achievement Award.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Sonia Sotomayor

    Sonia Sotomayor

    Sonia Maria Sotomayor (English pronunciation: /ˈsoʊnjə ˌsoʊtoʊmaɪˈjɔr/, Spanish: [ˈsonja sotomaˈʝor]; born June 25, 1954) is an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving since August 2009. Sotomayor is the Court's 111th justice, its first Hispanic justice, and its third female justice. Sotomayor was born in The Bronx, New York City and is of Puerto Rican descent. Her father died when she was nine, and she was subsequently raised by her mother. Sotomayor graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1976 and received her J.D. from Yale Law School in 1979, where she was an editor at the Yale Law Journal. She was an advocate for the hiring of Latino faculty at both schools. She worked as an assistant district attorney in New York for five years before entering private practice in 1984. She played an active role on the boards of directors for the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, the State of New York Mortgage Agency, and the New York City Campaign Finance Board. Sotomayor was nominated to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York by President George H. W. Bush in 1991, and her nomination was confirmed in 1992. In
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Theresia Gouw Ranzetta

    Theresia Gouw Ranzetta

    Theresia has been with Accel Partners since 1999. She focuses primarily on software and internet investments with specific interest in security, Vertical Media/Search and online media and advertising.
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Alice Waters

    Alice Waters

    Alice Louise Waters (born April 28, 1944, Chatham, New Jersey) is a US chef, restaurateur, activist, and author. She is the owner of Chez Panisse, a Berkeley, California restaurant famous for its organic, locally-grown ingredients and for pioneering California cuisine. Waters opened the restaurant in 1971. It has consistently ranked among the World's 50 Best Restaurants. Waters has been cited as one of the most influential figures in food in the past 50 years, and has been called the mother of American food. She is currently one of the most visible supporters of the organic food movement, and has been a proponent of organics for over 40 years. Waters believes that eating organic foods, free from herbicides and pesticides, is essential for both taste and the health of the environment and local communities. In addition to her restaurant, Waters has authored several books on food and cooking, including Chez Panisse Cooking (with Paul Bertolli) and The Art of Simple Food. She is one of the most well-known food activists in the United States and around the world. She founded the Chez Panisse Foundation in 1996, and created the Edible Schoolyard program at the Martin Luther King Middle
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    2 votes
    151
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    2 votes
    152

    Anita Roddick

    Dame Anita Roddick, DBE (23 October 1942 – 10 September 2007) was a British businesswoman, human rights activist and environmental campaigner, best known as the founder of The Body Shop, a cosmetics company producing and retailing beauty products that shaped ethical consumerism. The company was one of the first to prohibit the use of ingredients tested on animals and one of the first to promote fair trade with third world countries. Roddick was involved in activism and campaigning for environmental and social issues, including involvement with Greenpeace and The Big Issue. In 1990, Roddick founded Children On The Edge, a charitable organisation which helps disadvantaged children in eastern Europe and Asia. In 2003, Queen Elizabeth II appointed Roddick a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. In 2004, Roddick was diagnosed with liver cirrhosis due to long-standing hepatitis C. After she revealed this to the media in February 2007, she promoted the work of the Hepatitis C Trust, and campaigned to increase awareness of the disease. Roddick was born in a bomb shelter in Littlehampton, [[in an Italian immigrant community, one of four siblings. Her family had fled Naples just
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Anne Mitchell

    Anne Mitchell

    Anne focuses on investment opportunities in enterprise technologies and communications. Anne is currently on the board of directors of Asset Control, eCredit, Teliris and Xoom and also serves as a board observer at Managed Objects. At Fidelity Ventures Anne led Fidelity Ventures investments in AireSpace (acquired by Cisco Systems), Oakley Networks (acquired by Raytheon), ONI Systems (IPO, subsequently acquired by Ciena) and Service Metrics, Inc. (acquired by Exodus). She was also integral to the investments in Nexabit Networks (acquired by Lucent), Nuance Communications (NASDAQ: NUAN), InterNAP (NASDAQ: INAP), and Webspective Software (acquired by Inktomi).

    Before joining Fidelity Ventures in 1996, Anne was an equity analyst with Fidelity Investments, where she covered the technology sector. In this role she was responsible for making investment decisions representing over $2 billion in Fidelity's holdings. Anne received a BA from Harvard College.

     

    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Donna Reed

    Donna Reed

    Donna Reed (January 27, 1921 – January 14, 1986) was an American film and television actress. With appearances in over 40 films, Reed received the 1953 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Lorene in the war drama From Here to Eternity. She is noted for her role in the perennial Christmas favorite It's a Wonderful Life (1946). She worked extensively in television, notably as Donna Stone, an American middle class mother in the sitcom The Donna Reed Show (1958–1966), in which she played a more prominent role than many other television mothers of the era and for which she received the 1963 Golden Globe Award for Best TV Star - Female. Later in Reed's career she replaced Barbara Bel Geddes as Miss Ellie in 1984 season of the television melodrama, Dallas, and sued the production company for breach of contract when she was abruptly fired upon Bel Geddes' decision to return to the show. Reed was born Donna Belle Mullenger on a farm near Denison, Iowa, the daughter of Hazel Jane (née Shives; 1899–1975) and William Richard Mullenger (1893–1981). The eldest of five children, she was raised as a Methodist. After graduating from Denison High School, Reed planned to
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Elizabeth Blackwell

    Elizabeth Blackwell

    Elizabeth Blackwell (3 February 1821 – 31 May 1910) was the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States, as well as the first woman on the UK Medical Register. She was the first openly identified woman to graduate from medical school, a pioneer in promoting the education of women in medicine in the United States, and a social and moral reformer in both the United States and in England. Elizabeth Blackwell was born in a house on Counterslip Street in Bristol, England, to Samuel Blackwell, a sugar refiner, and his wife Hannah (Lane) Blackwell. She had two older siblings, Anna and Marian, and would eventually have six younger siblings: Samuel (married Antoinette Brown), Henry (married Lucy Stone), Emily, Ellen, Howard, and George. Four maiden aunts, Barbara, Ann, Lucy, and Mary, also lived with the Blackwells during Blackwell's childhood. Blackwell's earliest memories were of her time living at a house on 1 Wilson Street, off Portland Square, Bristol. Her childhood at Wilson Street was a happy one. Blackwell especially remembered the positive and loving influence of her father. Samuel Blackwell was somewhat liberal in his attitudes towards, not only child rearing, but
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    2 votes
    156
    Ellen Swallow Richards

    Ellen Swallow Richards

    Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (December 3, 1842 – March 30, 1911) was the foremost female industrial and environmental chemist in the United States in the 19th century, pioneering the field of home economics. Richards graduated from Westford Academy (2nd oldest secondary school in Massachusetts). She was the first woman admitted to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and its first female instructor, the first woman in America accepted to any school of science and technology, and the first American woman to earn a degree in chemistry. Richards was a pragmatic feminist, as well as a founding ecofeminist who believed that women's work within the home was a vital aspect of the economy. Born as Ellen Henrietta Swallow in Dunstable, Massachusetts to Fanny Taylor and Peter Swallow (who were members of old families of modest means that prized education) she was the first woman admitted to Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ellen Swallow taught, tutored, and cleaned for years, finally saving to enter Vassar College in 1868, earning her bachelor's degree two years later. After failing to find suitable employment as an industrial chemist after graduation, she entered MIT to
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    2 votes
    157
    Emma Samms

    Emma Samms

    Emma Samms (born Emma E. W. Samuelson; 28 August 1960) is a British television actress best known for her role as Holly Sutton on the American daytime soap opera General Hospital and for replacing Pamela Sue Martin as Fallon Carrington Colby on the prime time soap opera Dynasty. Samms was born in Willesden, London, England, the daughter of Madeleine U. (née White), a ballet dancer, and Michael E. W. Samuelson, who owned a film equipment rental company. Her grandfather, G. B. Samuelson, was a pioneer of British cinema. Samms was raised in the Jewish religion. She trained as a ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet School but stopped dancing at 15 after a hip injury. Next training as an actress, she changed her name to "Emma Samms" as there was already an "Emma Samuelson" registered at the actors union Equity. Samms first played Holly Sutton Scorpio on the ABC daytime soap opera General Hospital from 1982 to 1985. With Samms choosing to leave the series amicably to go to ABC's prime time hit Dynasty, her character Holly seemingly perished in a plane crash. On May 15, 1985, Samms appeared in the fifth season finale "Royal Wedding" as Fallon Carrington Colby, a role originated by Pamela Sue
    7.00
    2 votes
    158

    Fiona Wood

    Fiona Melanie Wood, AM (born 2 February 1958) is a British born plastic surgeon working in Perth, Western Australia. She is the director of the Royal Perth Hospital burns unit and the Western Australia Burns Service. In addition, Wood is also a Clinical Professor with the School of Paediatrics and Child Health at the University of Western Australia and Director of the McComb Research Foundation. Wood was born in Yorkshire, England, and attended Ackworth School near Pontefract, West Yorkshire. She was athletic as a child and hoped for a career as an Olympic sprinter, before training at a university and then St Thomas's Hospital Medical School in London, graduating from there in 1981. Wood worked at a major British hospital before marrying Western Australian born surgeon Tony Keirath and migrating to Perth with their first two children in 1987. She completed her training in plastic surgery between having four more children. In October 2002, Wood was propelled into the media spotlight when the largest proportion of survivors from the 2002 Bali bombings arrived at Royal Perth Hospital. She led a team working to save 28 patients suffering from between 2 and 92 per cent body burns,
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Joan Antidea Thouret

    Joan Antidea Thouret

    Joan Antidea Thouret (in French Jeanne Antide) was a nun and is a Roman Catholic saint. She founded the Sisters of Divine Charity congregation. Joan Antidea was born in 1765. When she was 22 she joined the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul in Paris but during the French Revolution she was in exile in Switzerland and Germany. In 1797, she returned to France where she founded a school for poor girls. In 1799, she founded a new congregation, the Sisters of Charity, with the support of Letizia Ramolino, Napoleon's mother. In 1819, her institute was approved by Pope Pius VII who gave canonical privileges to her convents. She died at Regina Coeli monasterium, Naples, in 1828.
    7.00
    2 votes
    160

    Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard

    Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard (born October 20, 1942 in Magdeburg) is a German biologist who won the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research in 1991 and the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1995, together with Eric Wieschaus and Edward B. Lewis, for their research on the genetic control of embryonic development. The experiments that earned Nüsslein-Volhard and Wieschaus their Nobel prize aimed to identify genes involved in the development of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) embryos. At this point (the late 1970s and early 1980s) little was known about the genetic and molecular mechanisms by which multicellular organisms develop from single cells to morphologically complex forms during embryogenesis. Fruit flies have long been an important model organism in genetics due to their small size and quick generation time, which makes even large numbers of them relatively easy to maintain and observe in the laboratory. Nüsslein-Volhard and Wieschaus identified genes involved in embryonic development by a series of genetic screens. They generated random mutations in fruit flies using a chemical. Some of these mutations affected genes involved in the development of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
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    3 votes
    162
    Toni Morrison

    Toni Morrison

    Toni Morrison (born Chloe Ardelia Wofford; February 18, 1931) is an American novelist, editor, and professor. Her novels are known for their epic themes, vivid dialogue, and richly detailed characters. Among her best known novels are The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon and Beloved. She also was commissioned to write the libretto for a new opera, Margaret Garner, first performed in 2005. She won the Nobel Prize in 1993 and in 1987 the Pulitzer Prize for Beloved. On 29 May 2012, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Toni Morrison was born in Lorain, Ohio, to Ramah (née Willis) and George Wofford. She is the second of four children in a working-class family. As a child, Morrison read fervently; among her favorite authors were Jane Austen and Leo Tolstoy. Morrison's father told her numerous folktales of the black community (a method of storytelling that would later work its way into Morrison's writings). In 1949 Morrison entered Howard University, where she received a B.A. in English in 1953. She earned a Master of Arts degree in English from Cornell University in 1955, for which she wrote a thesis on suicide in the works of William Faulkner and Virginia Woolf. After
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Katie Couric

    Katie Couric

    Katherine Anne "Katie" Couric (born January 7, 1957) is an American journalist and author. She serves as special correspondent for ABC News, contributing to ABC World News, Nightline, 20/20, Good Morning America, This Week and primetime news specials. Since September 10, 2012, she has hosted Katie, a syndicated daytime talk show produced by Disney-ABC Domestic Television. She has anchored the CBS Evening News, reported for 60 Minutes, and hosted Today and reported for Dateline NBC. She was the first solo female anchor of a weekday evening news program on one of the three traditional USA broadcast networks. Couric's first book, The Best Advice I Ever Got: Lessons from Extraordinary Lives was a New York Times best-seller. As of May 2012, Couric also has a web show for ABC News, entitled Katie's Take, airing weekly on Yahoo. Couric was born in Arlington, Virginia, the daughter of Elinor Tullie (née Hene), a homemaker and part-time writer, and John Martin Couric Jr., a public relations executive and news editor at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the United Press in Washington, D.C. Her mother was Jewish, but Couric was raised Presbyterian. Couric's maternal grandparents, Bert Hene
    5.00
    4 votes
    164
    Kim Kardashian

    Kim Kardashian

    Kimberly Noel "Kim" Kardashian (born October 21, 1980) is an American socialite, reality television star, model and occasional actress. She is known for starring in Keeping Up with the Kardashians, the E! reality series that she shares with her family, and its spin-offs including Kourtney and Kim Take New York. Prior to the development of her career as a reality television star, Kardashian gained notoriety as the subject of a sex tape that subsequently resulted in a court awarding her $5 million. She has been involved in the production of several lines of clothing and fragrances. In 2010, she was the highest earning reality star, with estimated earnings of $6 million. In August 2011, Kardashian married basketball player Kris Humphries in a widely publicized ceremony. In October 2011, Kardashian filed for divorce. Kardashian was born in Los Angeles, California, the daughter of attorney Robert Kardashian and his wife Kris Kardashian (née Houghton). Her father was a third generation Armenian American. Her paternal great-grandparents, Sam and Harom Kardaschoff, were ethnic Armenian Molokan Jumpers from Karakale, Kars, Russian Empire (now Turkey). They migrated to the United States in
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    Betty Williams

    Betty Williams

    Betty Williams (born 22 May 1943) in the city of Belfast in Northern Ireland, is a co-recipient with Mairead Corrigan of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1976 for her work as a cofounder of Community of Peace People, an organisation dedicated to promoting a peaceful resolution to The Troubles in Northern Ireland. She heads the Global Children's Foundation and is the President of the World Centre of Compassion for Children International. She is also the Chair of Institute for Asian Democracy in Washington D.C. and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Nova Southeastern University. In 2006, Williams was one of the founders of the Nobel Women's Initiative along with sister Nobel Peace Laureates Mairead Corrigan Maguire, Shirin Ebadi, Wangari Maathai, Jody Williams and Rigoberta Menchu Tum. Six women representing North America and South America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa decided to bring together their experiences in a united effort for peace with justice and equality. It is the goal of the Nobel Women's Initiative to help strengthen work being done in support of women's rights around the world. Betty Williams was drawn into the public arena after witnessing the death of three
    6.50
    2 votes
    166

    Cheryl Crawford

    Cheryl Crawford (September 24, 1902 – October 7, 1986) was an American theatre producer and director. Born in Akron, Ohio, Crawford majored in drama at Smith College. Following graduation, she moved to New York City and enrolled at the Theatre Guild's school. By then she knew that she didn't want to pursue an acting career, but saw no other way to gain access to the organization producing the highest quality theatre of its time. Finishing their training in 1927, she was hired by Theresa Helburn, the Guild's Executive Director, as a casting secretary. She then worked her way through various backstage jobs, including assistant stage manager, to assistant to the “Board of Managers,” an importantant administrative job. While working at the Guild, she met Harold Clurman and Lee Strasberg who had also been working there as play reader and actor, respectively. She was impressed with these two young men and joined their animated discussions about the need for a radically new form of American theatre. In 1930 Crawford urged Clurman to start giving semi-public talks to groups of like-minded actors. After he followed her suggestion and the talks attracted more people than could fit in
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    2 votes
    167
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver

    Eunice Kennedy Shriver

    Eunice Mary Kennedy Shriver, DSG (July 10, 1921 – August 11, 2009) a member of the Kennedy family, sister of President John F. Kennedy and Senators Robert F. Kennedy and Edward Kennedy. Eunice Kennedy Shriver was the founder in 1962 of Camp Shriver which started on her Maryland farm known as Timberlawn and, in 1968 evolved into the Special Olympics. Her husband, Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr., was United States Ambassador to France and the Democratic vice presidential candidate in the 1972 U.S. presidential election. Their daughter, Maria Shriver, was married to actor and former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Born Eunice Mary Kennedy in Brookline, Massachusetts, she was the fifth of nine children of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. and Rose Fitzgerald. She was educated at the Manhattanville College on the Upper West Side of Manhattan (the school later moved to Purchase, New York). After graduating from Stanford University with a Bachelor of Science degree in sociology in 1943, she worked for the Special War Problems Division of the U.S. State Department. She eventually moved to the U.S. Justice Department as executive secretary for a project dealing with juvenile delinquency. She
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    2 votes
    168
    Hillary Rodham Clinton

    Hillary Rodham Clinton

    • Subject of: President Barack Obama and the Message Beyond the Photograph
    Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton ( /ˈhɪləri daɪˈæn ˈrɒdəm ˈklɪntən/; born October 26, 1947) is the 67th United States Secretary of State, serving in the administration of President Barack Obama. She was a United States Senator for New York from 2001 to 2009. As the wife of the 42nd President of the United States, Bill Clinton, she was the First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001. In the 2008 election, Clinton was a leading candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination. A native of Illinois, Hillary Rodham first attracted national attention in 1969 for her remarks as the first student commencement speaker at Wellesley College. She embarked on a career in law after graduating from Yale Law School in 1973. Following a stint as a Congressional legal counsel, she moved to Arkansas in 1974 and married Bill Clinton in 1975. Rodham cofounded the Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families in 1977 and became the first female chair of the Legal Services Corporation in 1978. Named the first female partner at Rose Law Firm in 1979, she was twice listed as one of the 100 most influential lawyers in America. First Lady of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981 and 1983 to 1992 with husband Bill
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    2 votes
    169
    Jackie Joyner-Kersee

    Jackie Joyner-Kersee

    Jacqueline "Jackie" Joyner-Kersee (born March 3, 1962) is a retired American athlete, ranked among the all-time greatest athletes in the women's heptathlon as well as in the women's long jump. She won three gold, one silver, and two bronze Olympic medals, in those two events at four different Olympic Games. Sports Illustrated for Women magazine voted Joyner-Kersee the Greatest Female Athlete of the 20th century, just ahead of Babe Didrikson Zaharias. After retiring as a competitive athlete, Joyner-Kersee has been involved with many philanthropic efforts and has joined the Board of Directors for USA Track & Field (USATF), the national governing body of the sport. Jacqueline Joyner was born March 3, 1962, in East St. Louis, Illinois, and was named after Jackie Kennedy. Her brother, Al Joyner, is also an Olympic gold medalist. As a high school athlete at East St. Louis Lincoln High School, she qualified for the finals in the Long Jump at the 1980 Olympic Trials, finishing 8th behind another high schooler, Carol Lewis. She was inspired to compete in multi-disciplinary track & field events after seeing a 1975 made-for-TV movie about Babe Didrikson Zaharias. Interestingly, Didrikson, the
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Jane Addams

    Jane Addams

    Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) was a pioneer settlement worker, founder of Hull House in Chicago, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in woman suffrage and world peace. Beside presidents such as Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, she was the most prominent reformer of the Progressive Era and helped turn the nation to issues of concern to mothers, such as the needs of children, public health, and world peace. She said that if women were to be responsible for cleaning up their communities and making them better places to live, they needed the vote to be effective in doing so. Addams became a role model for middle-class women who volunteered to uplift their communities. She is increasingly recognized as a member of the American pragmatist school of philosophy. In 1931 she became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Born in Cedarville, Illinois, Jane Addams was the youngest of nine children born into a prosperous northern Illinois family of English-American descent which went back to colonial New England; her father was politically prominent. Three of her siblings died in infancy, and another died at sixteen, leaving only
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    2 votes
    171
    Marian Wright Edelman

    Marian Wright Edelman

    Marian Wright Edelman (born June 6, 1939) is an American activist for the rights of children. She is president and founder of the Children's Defense Fund. Marian Wright was born June 6, 1939 in Bennettsville, South Carolina In 1953, her father died when she was 14, urging in his last words, "Don't let anything get in the way of your education." She attended Marlboro Training High School in Bennettsville, and went on to Spelman College and traveled the world on a Merrill scholarship and studied in the Soviet Union as a Lisle fellow. She also became involved in the Civil Rights Movement, and after being arrested for her activism, she decided to study law and enrolled at Yale Law School where she earned a Juris Doctor in 1963. Edelman was the first African American woman admitted to the The Mississippi Bar. She began practicing law with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.'s Mississippi office, working on racial justice issues connected with the civil rights movement and representing activists during the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964. She also helped establish a Head Start program in her community. Edelman moved in 1968 to Washington, D.C. where she continued her
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    2 votes
    172

    Melinda Gates

    Melinda French Gates (born Melinda Ann French; August 15, 1964) is an American businesswoman and philanthropist. She is the wife of Bill Gates. She is the co-founder and co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and a former unit manager for several Microsoft products such as Publisher, Microsoft Bob, Encarta, and Expedia. Melinda was born in 1964 Dallas, Texas. She was the second of four children born to Raymond Joseph French Jr., an engineer, and Elaine Agnes Amerland, a homemaker. She has an older sister and two younger brothers. Gates, a Roman Catholic, attended St. Monica Catholic School, where she was the top student in her class year. She graduated as valedictorian from Ursuline Academy of Dallas in 1982. Gates earned a bachelor's degree in computer science and economics from Duke University in 1986 and an MBA from Duke's Fuqua School of Business in 1987. Shortly thereafter, she joined Microsoft and participated in the development of many of Microsoft’s multimedia products including Publisher, Microsoft Bob, Encarta, and Expedia. In 1994, she married Bill Gates in a private ceremony held in Lanai, Hawaii. Shortly thereafter, she left Microsoft to focus on starting and
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    2 votes
    173
    Nellie Tayloe Ross

    Nellie Tayloe Ross

    Nellie Tayloe Ross (November 29, 1876 – December 19, 1977) was an American politician, the 14th Governor of Wyoming from 1925 to 1927, and director of the United States Mint from 1933–1953. She was the first woman to be elected governor of a US state. To date, she remains the only woman to have served as governor of Wyoming. She was a staunch supporter of prohibition during the 1920s. Nellie Davis Tayloe was born near Amazonia, in Andrew County, Missouri (now part of the St. Joseph Metropolitan Statistical Area) to James Wynn Tayloe, a native of Stewart County, Tennessee, and his wife, Elizabeth Blair Green, who owned a plantation on the Missouri River. In 1884, when Nellie Ross was seven years of age, her family moved to Miltonvale in Cloud County in northern Kansas. The relocation happened after their Andrew County home burned, and the sheriff was about to foreclose on the property. After she graduated from Miltonville High School in 1892, her family moved to Omaha, Nebraska. During this time she taught private piano lessons, and also attended a teacher-training college for two years. She then taught kindergarten for four years. Nellie was sent on a trip to Europe in 1896 by two
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    2 votes
    174
    Angela Beesley

    Angela Beesley

    Angela Beesley Starling (born 3 August 1977 in Norwich, England) is a co-founder of Wikia, and its former vice president for community relations. Involved in Wikipedia since 2003, Beesley was elected to the Board of Trustees of the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation in 2004, and re-elected in 2005. During this time, she was active in editing content and setting policy, such as privacy policy, within the Foundation. She resigned from the board in July 2006. In October 2004, Beesley founded a for-profit Wiki hosting service with Jimmy Wales called Wikia. She also sits on the advisory board of the media archive Ourmedia. Since 21 February 2006, she has been a member of the Communications Committee of the Wikimedia Foundation. She is a member of the Foundation's Advisory Board. She contributed a chapter to the book Wikis: Tools for Information Work and Collaboration. Beesley grew up in Maidstone and Colchester and has a degree in psychology from Aston University. Before joining the board of the Wikimedia Foundation, she had worked at the Aston Dyslexia and Developmental Assessment Centre and the National Foundation for Educational Research, based in Berkshire. On 23 November 2008, she
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    1 votes
    175
    E. Nesbit

    E. Nesbit

    Edith Nesbit (married name Edith Bland; 15 August 1858 – 4 May 1924) was an English author and poet whose children's works were published under the name of E. Nesbit. She wrote or collaborated on over 60 books of fiction for children, several of which have been adapted for film and television. She was also a political activist and co-founded the Fabian Society, a precursor to the modern Labour Party. Nesbit was born in 1858 at 38 Lower Kennington Lane in Kennington, Surrey (now part of Greater London), the daughter of an agricultural chemist, John Collis Nesbit, who died in March 1862, before her fourth birthday. Her sister Mary's ill health meant that the family moved around constantly for some years, living variously in Brighton, Buckinghamshire, France (Dieppe, Rouen, Paris, Tours, Poitiers, Angoulême, Bordeaux, Arcachon, Pau, Bagnères-de-Bigorre, and Dinan in Brittany), Spain and Germany, before settling for three years at Halstead Hall in Halstead in north-west Kent, a location which later inspired The Railway Children (this distinction has also been claimed by the Derbyshire town of New Mills). When Nesbit was 17, the family moved again, this time back to London, living
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Luisa Diogo

    Luisa Diogo

    Luísa Dias Diogo (born 11 April 1958) was Prime Minister of Mozambique from February 2004 to January 2010. She replaced Pascoal Mocumbi, who had been Prime Minister for the previous nine years. Before becoming Prime Minister, she was Minister of Planning and Finance, and she continued to hold that post until February 2005. She was the first female Prime Minister of Mozambique. Diogo represents the party FRELIMO, which has ruled the country since independence in 1975. Diogo studied economics at Maputo's Eduardo Mondlane University. She graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1983. She went on to obtain a master's degree in financial economics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London in 1992. In 1980, she began working in Mozambique's Finance Ministry. She became a department's head in 1986 and in 1989 became national budget director. Then she worked for the World Bank as program officer in Mozambique. In 1994 she joined the FRELIMO government as Deputy Minister of Finance. In September 2005, she was the international guest speaker at the British Labour Party Conference. Diogo has urged the African health ministers to offer reproductive and sexual health
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Martha Stewart

    Martha Stewart

    Martha Stewart (née Kostyra; born August 3, 1941) is an American business magnate, author, magazine publisher, and television personality. As founder of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, she has gained success through a variety of business ventures, encompassing publishing, broadcasting, merchandising, and electronic commerce. She has written numerous bestselling books, is the publisher of the Martha Stewart Living magazine, and her syndicated talk show, Martha, is broadcast internationally. In 2004, Stewart was entangled in the ImClone insider trading affair and there was speculation that the incident would effectively be the end of her media empire. She began a comeback campaign in 2005 and her company returned to profitability in 2006. Stewart rejoined the board of directors of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia in 2011 and became chairman of her namesake company again in 2012. Martha Stewart was born in Jersey City, New Jersey. She is the second of six children born to middle-class Polish Americans Edward "Eddie" Kostyra (1912 – 1979) and Martha Ruszkowski Kostyra (1914 – 2007). When Stewart was three years old, the family moved to Nutley. She adopted the name "Grace" for her
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Phyllis Schlafly

    Phyllis Schlafly

    Phyllis McAlpin Stewart Schlafly ( /ˈfɪlɨs ˈʃlæfli/; born August 15, 1924) is a constitutional lawyer, politically conservative activist and author who founded the Eagle Forum. She is known for her opposition to modern feminism and for her campaign against the proposed Equal Rights Amendment. Her self-published book, A Choice, Not An Echo, was published in 1964 from her home in Alton, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from her native St. Louis. She formed Pere Marquette Publishers company. She has co-authored books on national defense and was highly critical of arms-control agreements with the former Soviet Union. Schlafly founded the Eagle Forum in the 1970s and the Eagle Forum Education & Legal Defense Fund, St. Louis. As of 2012, she is still the president of the organizations, and also has a presence on the lecture circuit. Since 1967, she has published a newsletter, the Phyllis Schlafly Report. Schlafly's great-grandfather Stewart, a Presbyterian, came from Scotland to New York in 1851 and moved westward through Canada before settling in Michigan. Her grandfather, Andrew F. Stewart, was a master mechanic with the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway. Schlafly's father, John Bruce
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    Rhonda MacLean

    Rhonda MacLean

    Rhonda MacLean has spent more than 25 years in the information technology industry. As Global CISO for Bank of America from 1996 to 2005, Rhonda was responsible for a number of company-wide initiatives designed to protect sensitive customer and company information. Under her leadership the bank's corporate information security organization has been an innovator, filing for numerous U.S. Patents in the areas of infrastructure, risk management, and information security. Immediately before joining Bank of America, Rhonda spent 14 years at The Boeing Company where she was the Senior Information Security Manager for Boeing's proprietary and government programs.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Shannon MacMillan

    Shannon MacMillan

    Shannon MacMillan (born October 7, 1974) is a former American professional soccer player. She was a member of the U.S. Women's National Team that won the gold medal at the 1996 Summer Olympics and at the 1999 Women's World Cup. She was US Soccer's Female Athlete of the Year for 2002. In 2007, MacMillan became an assistant coach for the UCLA women's soccer team. MacMillan was born in Syosset, New York. She attended San Pasqual High School in Escondido, California. MacMillan played for the University of Portland, where she won the Hermann Trophy for the best female collegiate soccer player of the 1995 season. She earned All-America honors from 1992-95. MacMillan was one of the founding players of the Women's United Soccer Association, playing three seasons for the San Diego Spirit. While still in college, MacMillian joined the US National Team in 1994 as a midfielder. By 2000, she moved to forward. In the Olympic semifinal against Norway in 1996, she scored the game-winning goal in overtime. In the Olympic final against China, she collected a Mia Hamm shot that rebounded off the post and put it in for the first goal of the match. She was a "super-sub" on the US WNT's 1999 Women's
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Gina Bianchini

    Gina Bianchini

    Gina Bianchini was CEO of Ning, which she co-founded with Marc Andreessen. Since leaving Ning in March 2010, she has been an executive in residence at the Andreesen Horowitz venture firm. Bianchini re-emerged in September of 2011 as head of a privately-funded Palo Alto start-up called MightyBell, which is offering a social networking app designed for creators of "experiences" to offer step-by-step directions to those who might want to accomplish goals such as running marathons or going on survival expeditions. Prior to Ning, Bianchini was co-founder and president of Harmonic Communications which was acquired by Dentsu. She has also held positions at CKS Group and Goldman Sachs & Co. Bianchini holds a B.A. from Stanford University and an M.B.A from Stanford Business School.
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Jessica Livingston

    Jessica Livingston

    Jessica Livingston is an author and a founding partner of the seed stage venture firm Y Combinator. She also organizes Startup School. She has a B.A. in English from Bucknell University. In early 2007, Livingston released Founders at Work: Stories of Startups' Early Days (published by Apress), a collection of interviews with famous startup founders, including Steve Wozniak, Mitch Kapor, Ray Ozzie, and Max Levchin. In 2008, she married fellow Y Combinator co-founder Paul Graham.
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Leah Ward Sears

    Leah Ward Sears

    Leah Ward Sears (born June 13, 1955) is an American jurist and former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia. Sears was the first African-American female Chief Justice in the United States. When she was first appointed as justice in 1992 by Governor Zell Miller, she became the first woman and youngest person to sit on the Georgia's Supreme Court. Leah Ward Sears was born in Heidelberg, Germany to United States Army Colonel Thomas E. Sears and Onnye Jean Sears. The family eventually settled in Savannah, Georgia, where she attended and graduated from Savannah High School. Sears received a B.S. from Cornell University in 1976, her Juris Doctor from Emory University School of Law in 1980, and a Master of Laws from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1995. At Cornell, Sears was a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority and the Quill and Dagger society. She holds honorary degrees from Morehouse College, Clark-Atlanta University, LaGrange College, Piedmont College, and Spelman College. After graduating from law school, Sears was an attorney from 1980 until 1985 with the Atlanta law firm Alston & Bird. For many years she was also an adjunct Professor of Law at Emory University
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Linda Avey

    Linda Avey

    Linda has over 20 years of sales and business development experience in the biopharmaceutical industry in San Francisco, Boston, San Diego, and Washington, D.C. Prior to starting 23andMe, she developed translational research collaborations with academic and pharmaceutical partners for Affymetrix and Perlegen Sciences. Linda also spent time at Spotfire helping scientists understand the power of data visualization and at Applied Biosystems during the early days of the human genome project. The advent of high density genome-wide scanning technologies brought huge potential for significant discoveries. However, the lack of sufficient funding to enable adequate studies prompted Linda to think of a new research model. These ideas led to the formation of 23andMe. Her primary interest is the acceleration of personalized medicine, using genetic profiles to target the right drug to the right person at the correct dose. Linda graduated from Augustana College with a B.A. in biology.
    5.33
    3 votes
    187
    5.33
    3 votes
    188

    Betsey Johnson

    Betsey Johnson (born August 10, 1942) is an American fashion designer best known for her feminine and whimsical designs. Many of her designs are considered "over the top" and embellished. She also is known for doing a cartwheel at the end of her fashion shows. Johnson is the second of three 3 children born to Lena and John Johnson. She has an older sister, Sally, and a younger brother, Robert. Johnson took many dance classes, which inspired her love of costumes. Following her graduation from high school, Johnson studied at the Pratt Institute and then later graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Syracuse University where she was a member of the Alpha Xi Delta women's fraternity. After graduation, she spent a summer as an intern at Mademoi mselle magazine. Johnson's fashion career started after she entered and won the Mademoiselle Guest Editor Contest. Within a year, she was the in-house designer for Manhattan boutique Paraphernalia. Johnson became part of both the youthquake fashion movement and Andy Warhol's underground scene, along with The Velvet Underground, Edie Sedgwick and Lou Reed. In 1969, she opened a boutique called Betsey Bunky Nini on New York's Upper East Side. Edie Sedgwick
    6.00
    2 votes
    189

    Kathleen Kennedy

    Kathleen Kennedy (born June 5, 1953) is an American film producer. In 1981 she co-founded Amblin Entertainment with her husband, Frank Marshall, and Steven Spielberg. She is known for producing the Jurassic Park films, and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Kennedy is the second-most successful film producer of all time (after Steven Spielberg) in terms of domestic box office receipts with totals at just over $5 billion. Kennedy was born in Berkeley, California, the daughter of Dione Marie "Dede" (née Dousseau), a one-time theater actress, and Donald R. Kennedy, a judge and attorney. Kennedy graduated from Shasta High School in Redding, California, in 1971. She continued her education at San Diego State University where she graduated, majoring in telecommunications and film. In her final year, Kennedy got a job at a local San Diego TV station, KCST, taking on various roles and posts including camera operator, video editor, floor director and finally KCST news production coordinator. After her employment with KCST, she then went on to produce a local talk show, entitled You're On, for the station for four years before moving to Los Angeles. In Los Angeles Kennedy secured her first film
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Kelly Link

    Kelly Link

    Kelly Link (born 1969) is an American editor and author of short stories. While some of her fiction falls more clearly within genre categories, many of her stories might be described as slipstream or magic realism: a combination of science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, and realism. Among other honors, she has won a Hugo award, three Nebula awards, and a World Fantasy Award for her fiction. Link is a graduate of Columbia University in New York and the MFA program of UNC Greensboro. In 1995, she attended the Clarion East Writing Workshop. Link and husband Gavin Grant manage Small Beer Press, based in Northampton, Massachusetts. The couple's imprint of Small Beer Press for intermediate readers is called Big Mouth House. They also co-edit St. Martin's Press's Year's Best Fantasy and Horror anthology series with Ellen Datlow. (The couple inherited the "fantasy" side from Terri Windling in 2004.) Link was also the slush reader for Sci Fiction, edited by Datlow. Link taught at Lenoir-Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina, with the Visiting Writers Series for spring semester 2006. She has taught or visited at a number of schools and workshops including Bard College,
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Mary McLeod Bethune

    Mary McLeod Bethune

    Mary Jane McLeod Bethune (July 10, 1875 – May 18, 1955) was an American educator and civil rights leader best known for starting a school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida, that eventually became Bethune-Cookman University and for being an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Born in South Carolina to parents who had been slaves and having to work in fields at age five, she took an early interest in her own education. With the help of benefactors, Bethune attended college hoping to become a missionary in Africa. When that did not materialize, she started a school for African-American girls in Daytona Beach. From six students it grew and merged with an institute for African-American boys and eventually became the Bethune-Cookman School. Its quality far surpassed the standards of education for African-American students, and rivaled those of schools for white students. Bethune worked tirelessly to ensure funding for the school, and used it as a showcase for tourists and donors, to exhibit what educated African-Americans could do. She was president of the college from 1923 to 1942 and 1946 to 1947, one of the few women in the world who served as a college
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Mother Teresa

    Mother Teresa

    Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta, born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu (Albanian: [aˈɲɛs ˈɡɔɲdʒa bɔjaˈdʒiu]) and commonly known as Mother Teresa of Calcutta (26 August 1910 – 5 September 1997), was an Albanian-born Indian Roman Catholic nun. "By blood, I am Albanian. By citizenship, an Indian. By faith, I am a Catholic nun. As to my calling, I belong to the world. As to my heart, I belong entirely to the Heart of Jesus." In late 2003, she was beatified, the third step toward possible sainthood. A second miracle credited to Mother Teresa is required before she can be recognized as a saint by the Catholic church. Mother Teresa was fluent in five languages: Bengali, the local language of the people of Kolkata, Albanian, Serbo-Croatian, English, and Hindi. Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation, which in 2012 consisted of over 4,500 sisters and is active in 133 countries. Members of the order must adhere to the vows of chastity, poverty and obedience, and the fourth vow, to give "Wholehearted and Free service to the poorest of the poor". The Missionaries of Charity at the time of her death had 610 missions in 123 countries including hospices
    6.00
    2 votes
    193

    Suzy Chaffee

    Suzanne "Suzy" Chaffee (born November 29, 1946, Rutland, Vermont) is a former Olympic alpine ski racer and actress. Following her racing career, she modelled in New York with Ford Models and then became the pre-eminent freestyle ballet skier of the early 1970s. She is perhaps best known by the sobriquet, Suzy Chapstick, from the 1970s, when she was a spokesperson for ChapStick lip balm. Chaffee's mother, who taught her to ski at the age of 3, would have been an alternate for the US ski team at the 1940 Winter Olympics. At age 19, Chaffee tried out for, and won a spot on the first US Ski Team while a freshman at the University of Denver. She finished fifth in the downhill at the 1966 World Championships. Despite a season-ending crash in 1967 at Vail in the World Cup Series, she ended the season as the 10th ranked in Women's downhill skier, and the 16th ranked Women's All-Around skier. Chaffee was named captain of the US Women's team and was one of the favorites in the downhill at the 1968 Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France. She finished 28th in the downhill, blaming her poor showing on using the wrong wax, but she made a global impression with her skin-tight silver racing suit. She
    6.00
    2 votes
    194

    Tamara Mellon

    Tamara Mellon, OBE is the former Chief Creative Office and co-founder of Jimmy Choo, a luxury brand that offers designer shoes, handbags and a range of accessories . She stepped down from the brand in November 2011. Mellon was born in London, on 7 July 1967, the daughter of Tom Yeardye, a successful entrepreneur and Ann (Davis) Yeardye, a former Chanel model. She was educated in Berkshire at Heathfield St Mary's School, in Beverly Hills and in Switzerland. Mellon began her career at Phyllis Walters Public Relations, Mirabella, and followed as accessories editor for British Vogue in 1990. Recognizing the potential for development of high-end designer accessories, Mellon approached bespoke shoe-maker Mr Jimmy Choo with the idea of launching a ready-to-wear shoe company. As co-founder of the Jimmy Choo Company, Tamara secured funding from her father, for the creation of her business, and sourced factories in Italy. In addition, she set up an office in Italy to handle production, quality control and shipping. By 2001, Jimmy Choo had over 100 wholesale clients including Harrods, Harvey Nichols, Saks Fifth Avenue and Bergdorf Goodman, and the collections accounted for over 50% of the
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    Trae Vassallo

    Trae Vassallo

    Trae Vassallo is a Partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers. Since joining the firm in 2002, Trae has put her technical and entrepreneurial background to work with new portfolio companies across several areas including wireless, consumer media, security, and green technology. Trae works closely with the management teams of Aggregate Knowledge, a stealth energy company, Digital Chocolate, Podshow and 3vr among others. Currently, Trae focuses primarily on new opportunities in consumer media, mobility, and green technologies.

    Prior to KPCB, Trae was a co-founder of Good Technology, a KPCB portfolio company (acquired by Motorola) that provides an end-to-end wireless corporate email solution. While at Good, Trae helped orchestrate the development of the G100 handheld device. Prior to Good Technology, Trae worked as a design engineer at IDEO Product Development where she developed a range of products including the PalmV, the Dell Latitude Docking station, and many others. Trae holds 13 patents.

    Trae earned a Bachelor's and Master's in Mechanical Engineering with honors from Stanford University and an MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Trae is passionate about new technology, good design, and spending time with her husband and two children.
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Dina Kaplan

    Dina Kaplan

    Dina Kaplan is a co-founder and COO of blip.tv , a Web 2.0 media company that makes it easy for anyone to create a grassroots TV show on the Internet. Dina is also an Emmy-winning broadcast journalist and a founding member of the Women's Media Center . Links |Blip.tv blip.tv Women's Media Centre
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Elizabeth Prout

    Elizabeth Prout

    Servant of God Sister Elizabeth Prout, known as Mother Mary Joseph of Jesus, (September 2, 1820 - January 11, 1864). Founder of the Roman Catholic religious institute originally called the Institute of the Holy Family, but known later as the Passionist Sisters or the Sisters of the Cross and Passion. Elizabeth Prout was born in Coleham, Shrewsbury on September 2, 1820. Little is known of her early life, save that she was born to an Anglican mother and a father who was a lapsed Catholic (both of whom later converted to Catholicism) and in her early twenties converted to Catholicism under the influence of the Passionist missionary to England, Blessed Dominic Barberi, as well as another Passionist, Father Gaudentius Rossi. Her conversion was met with great negativity by her parents who had earlier relocated the family to Stone, where the Passionists were working at the time. Elizabeth began to feel a strong attraction to the religious life and Father Gaudentius advised her to join the Sisters of the Infant Jesus in Northampton. In 1848 Elizabeth joined this community where she initially found great happiness, her health however was poor and the sisters did not think her strong enough
    5.00
    3 votes
    198
    Irmgard Möller

    Irmgard Möller

    Irmgard Möller (also spelled Irmgard Moeller) (born May 13, 1947, Bielefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia) is a German militant and a former member of the Red Army Faction (RAF). Her father was a high school teacher and before joining the RAF, she was a student of German studies. According to prison reports, she attempted suicide by stabbing herself in the chest on the morning of October 18, 1977. Of the imprisoned RAF leaders, only Möller survived what is widely assumed (following extensive inquiries) to have been the result of a suicide pact by the group. The other Red Army members Andreas Baader, Gudrun Ensslin and Jan-Carl Raspe died by gunshot or hanging. With the successful Mogadishu raid there was no more chance to escape jail. During the height of the German Autumn the nature of these suicides was believed by supporters and sympathizers to be suspicious given their location in a maximum security prison; Möller herself has always maintained that she did not attempt suicide and that there was no pre-arranged suicide pact between the prisoners. Möller was released from prison in 1995. Today she lives in anonymity.
    5.00
    3 votes
    199
    Ada Yonath

    Ada Yonath

    Ada E. Yonath (Hebrew: עדה יונת‎, pronounced [ˈada joˈnat]) (born 22 June 1939) is an Israeli crystallographer best known for her pioneering work on the structure of the ribosome. She is the current director of the Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Center for Biomolecular Structure and Assembly of the Weizmann Institute of Science. In 2009, she received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan and Thomas A. Steitz for her studies on the structure and function of the ribosome, becoming the first Israeli woman to win the Nobel Prize out of ten Israeli Nobel laureates, the first woman from the Middle East to win a Nobel prize in the sciences, and the first woman in 45 years to win the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. However, she said herself that there was nothing special about a woman winning the Prize. Yonath (née Lifshitz) was born in the Geula quarter of Jerusalem. Her parents, Hillel and Esther Lifshitz, were Zionist Jews who immigrated to Palestine from Łódź (Poland) in 1933 before the establishment of Israel. Her father was a rabbi and came from a rabbinical family. They settled in Jerusalem and ran a grocery, but found it difficult to make ends meet. They lived
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Ann N. Reese

    Ann N. Reese

    Ann N. Reese spent over 25 years in a career in finance. Formerly the CFO of ITT, she also worked with such companies as Mobil Oil, Union Carbide, Bankers Trust and Clayton, Dubilier & Rice. She has an MBA from New York University and a BA from the University of Pennsylvania. Ann is a director of Jones Apparel Group, Kmart, Merrill Lynch and Xerox. She is an Executive Director of CAP.
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    Carol Realini

    Carol Realini

    Carol Realini is an imaginative pioneer whose foresight and business acumen have built companies that have changed the landscape of our daily lives. TECHNOLOGY VISIONARY In 2005, Carol Realini founded Obopay to meet the need for an industry leader in mobile payments technology. In only a few business quarters, Carol secured $29 million in funding and finalized deals with every major cellular network in the United States. Today Obopay is defining an emerging industry and quickly gathering the market share necessary to ensure longevity. Carol was inspired to found Obopay when she traveled to Africa and saw, first hand, the opportunities that mobile payments would bring to both industrialized and developing nations. Obopay fulfills Carol’s interest in industry-changing advancements and her desire to support social and economic development throughout the world, bringing financial services millions of under- and unbanked people. HISTORY OF SUCCESS Before founding Obopay, Carol was Chairman and CEO of Chordiant Software, a leader in one-to-one marketing and customer interaction software. During her tenure, Carol Realini raised more than $30 million in VC financing and played a key leadership role in the start-up, development, and successful IPO of the company. Prior to her success at Chordiant, Carol was the CEO and President of J. Frank Consulting, a consulting firm dedicated to helping corporations achieve breakthrough business results through successful applications of enterprise-wide client/server solutions. As CEO/President, Carol Realini guided the Company through significant growth, ending in her orchestrating the firm’s sale to MCI. As Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Legato Systems, a network storage software innovator, Carol launched the company's first series of products and established key strategic business relationships. Carol also served as Director of Product Marketing at Ingres Corporation, a commercially supported, open-source relational database management system, where she was responsible for product strategy, planning, and marketing. Carol began her career with Amdahl Corporation (now Fujitsu) a supplier of hardware, software, and operational consulting throughout the world. There, Carol developed new operating system software and worked with Amdahl’s largest clients on successful implementations. Carol holds a B.A with Honors in Mathematics from the University of California, Santa Cruz and a Masters of Science in Computer Science from California State University, San Jose. Additionally, Carol successfully completed the Executive Management Program at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. RECOGNIZED ACHIEVEMENT In 2007, Obopay, was awarded the Fierce Wireless Fierce 15 Award, bestowed on the “most innovative private companies set to take the industry to another level.” In 2000, Call Center Magazine awarded Carol Call Center Pioneer Award, signifying achievements that have had a significant impact on the call center industry. Peppers and Rogers One-To-One Marketing Group named Carol a One-To-One Pioneer and McGraw Hill recognized her with a prestigious listing in the Top 100 Women in Computing. MAKING A DIFFERENCE Carol is a trustee for Search for Common Ground and European Centre for Common Ground, a not-for-profit organization that operates in the field of conflict prevention and resolution. In 2003, Carol led SFCG’s Global Marshall Plan Conference, where public and private sector thought leaders from all parts of the globe discussed a new vision for meeting contemporary development challenges. Carol also served on the board of The GlobalGiving Foundation, which is dedicated to enabling individuals, companies, and other groups to find and support high quality grassroots social and economic development projects around the world and the Anita Borg Institute of Women and Technology, a group whose mission is to increase the impact of women on all aspects of technology. Carol’s passion is education. She and her husband provide scholarships for women in Sierra Leone and Liberia and AIDS orphans in Uganda.
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    Chu Lam Yiu

    Chu Lam Yiu

    Chu Lam Yiu founded a flavorings and fragrance business at the age of 27. The company is now called Huabao International Holdings. After taking a chunk of it public in 2006, she became a billionaire and is now one of the richest people in China and youngest Billionaires in the world. Chu holds several leadership positions in local industry groups.  Chu is currently the Deputy Director of the China Association of Fragrance Flavor and Cosmetic Industry, Deputy Director of China Food Additive production application Industry Association and a member of the Fourth Chinese People's Political Consutlative Conference Committee (Shenzhen, Guangdont province).
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    Jane Stanford

    Jane Stanford

    Jane Lathrop Stanford (August 25, 1828 - February 28, 1905) was the co-founder of Stanford University together with her husband, Leland Stanford. They founded the university in 1891 as a memorial to their only child, Leland Stanford Jr. After her husband's death in 1893, she funded and operated the university almost single-handedly until her death in 1905. Born Jane Eliza Lathrop in Albany, New York, she was the daughter of shopkeeper Dyer Lathrop and Jane Anne (Shields) Lathrop. She attended The Albany Academy for Girls, the longest running girls' day school in the country. She married Leland Stanford on September 30, 1850, and went to live with him in Port Washington, Wisconsin, where he had practiced law since 1848. The Stanfords lived in Port Washington until 1852 when his law library and other property were lost to fire; they then returned to Albany. Stanford went to California to join his brothers in mercantile businesses related to the California Gold Rush, while Jane remained in Albany with her family. He returned in 1855, and the following year they moved to San Francisco, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits on a large scale. Stanford was a co-founder of the Central
    5.50
    2 votes
    204
    Jeanne M. Sullivan

    Jeanne M. Sullivan

    Jeanne has had an email address since 1980. She is proud of being part of the technology revolution over the last 24 years and working with some of the world's greatest high tech companies. Jeanne likes to say, "I have participated with some of the most successful companies of our times, seen great CEO's and teams in action and learned how to and how not to build a great company…" She represents StarVest on several technology company boards.

    Prior to StarVest, Jeanne's 30-year business career includes 24 years in the information technology field and fourteen years in the venture capital business as a Managing Director for Olivetti Ventures. These U.S.-based funds invested in 40 early and growth-stage information technology companies. From 1981 to 1990, Jeanne was with AT&T and gained many years of operating experience as Product Director for a Bell Laboratories venture business unit. From 1971 to 1978, she was with Bozell Worldwide, in business marketing roles.

    Bringing a full grasp of the issues facing growth-stage companies today, Jeanne contributes in the areas of marketing, channel development, product and strategic direction for technology companies. She helped build the New York New Media Angel Investors Program and served as Chair of the selection program. She is a frequent guest lecturer on the subject of investing in technology companies.

    5.50
    2 votes
    205
    Judy Woodruff

    Judy Woodruff

    Judy Woodruff (born November 20, 1946) is an American television news anchor and journalist. She is also a writer. During her career, Woodruff has worked at television organizations including CNN, NBC News and PBS. She is a board member at the International Women's Media Foundation and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Woodruff had her first taste of the limelight when at age 17 she won a hometown beauty pageant and was crowned Miss Augusta Junior Miss 1963. After high school, she attended Meredith College and Duke University, where she earned a degree in political science and was involved in the Student Union, the Publications Board, the Alpha Delta Pi sorority and the Associated Students of Duke University (precursor to Duke Student Government). She began her journalism career at local CBS affiliate WAGA-TV, in Atlanta, Georgia, where she served as a news anchor from 1970 to 1975. Woodruff joined NBC News in 1975 and was originally based in Atlanta, where she covered the 1976 U.S. presidential campaign of then-Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter. She served as the chief White House correspondent for NBC News from 1977 to 1982, and covered Washington
    5.50
    2 votes
    206
    Bertha von Suttner

    Bertha von Suttner

    Bertha Felicitas Sophie Freifrau von Suttner (Baroness Bertha von Suttner, Gräfin (Countess) Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau; 9 June 1843 – 21 June 1914) was an Austrian novelist, radical (organizational) pacifist, and the first woman to be a Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Suttner was born in Prague, Bohemia, the daughter of an impoverished Austrian Field Marshal, Franz-Josef Graf Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau, and wife Sophie von Körner, and governess to the wealthy Suttner family from 1873. She had an older brother, Arthur Franz Graf Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau. She became engaged to engineer and novelist Arthur Gundaccar Freiherr von Suttner (who died on 10 December 1902), but his family opposed the match, and she answered an advertisement from Alfred Nobel in 1876 to become his secretary-housekeeper at his Paris residence. She only remained a week before returning to Vienna and secretly marrying Arthur on 12 June 1876. Suttner became a leading figure in the peace movement with the publication of her novel, Die Waffen nieder! ("Lay Down Your Arms!") in 1889 and founded an Austrian pacifist organization in 1891. She gained international repute as editor of the international
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    207
    Linda B. Buck

    Linda B. Buck

    Linda Brown Buck (born January 29, 1947) is an American biologist best known for her work on the olfactory system. She was awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, along with Richard Axel, for their work on olfactory receptors. In their landmark paper published in 1991, Buck and Axel cloned olfactory receptors, showing that they belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. By analyzing rat DNA, they estimated that there were approximately one thousand different genes for olfactory receptors in the mammalian genome. This research opened the door to the genetic and molecular analysis of the mechanisms of olfaction. In their later work, Buck and Axel have shown that each olfactory receptor neuron remarkably only expresses one kind of olfactory receptor protein and that the input from all neurons expressing the same receptor is collected by a single dedicated glomerulus of the olfactory bulb. Born in Seattle, Washington, Buck received her B.S. in psychology and microbiology in 1975 from the University of Washington, Seattle and her Ph.D. in immunology in 1980 from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. She did her post-doctoral work at
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    208
    Mindy Marin

    Mindy Marin

    Mindy Marin (born February 15, 1960 in Greenwich, Connecticut) is a casting director, producer, and writer based in Santa Monica, California. Marin is predominantly known for her casting in film and television. This career path began at Paramount Television in 1978 as a casting assistant for Taxi (TV series). Subsequently she worked at Warner Bros. for four years, ultimately becoming the Manager of Talent and Casting. In 1989 Marin left to found her own company, Casting Artists, Inc. Since founding her own company she has cast over 70 films including Cliffhanger (film), Clear and Present Danger, Face/Off, Juno, and Thank You for Smoking, which she also co-produced. She has been nominated for four Artios awards and one Emmy. In 1991 Marin founded the production company Bluewater Ranch Entertainment and in 1996 the film 2 days in the valley was released, marking her first production working as an associate producer. She has also been an associate producer on The Deep End (film), a co-producer on Thank You for Smoking, The Family Stone, and The Alibi, and an executive producer on Night at the Golden Eagle. In addition to Bluewater Ranch Entertainment Marin founded Bluewater Ranch
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    209

    Saira Shah

    Saira Shah (born 5 October 1964) is an author, reporter and documentary filmmaker. She produces, writes and narrates current affairs films. Shah was born in London and raised in Kent, England. She was educated at Bryanston School and read Arabic and Persian at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, graduating in 1986. Her father was the late Idries Shah, an Afghan writer of books on Sufism. Part of his family was originally from Paghman, Afghanistan. Her mother is half-Parsee and half-English. The author Tahir Shah is her brother and she also has a sister, Tahir's twin, Safia Shah. Her first trip to Afghanistan was when she was 21 years old. She worked for 3 years in Peshawar as a reporter covering the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. She has also worked as a journalist for Channel 4 News, which she left in 2001. She married and divorced (after 5 years) a Swiss reporter, whom she met in Peshawar. Shah worked with James Miller on several projects including the films Beneath the Veil (2001), Unholy War (2001), both Channel 4 Dispatches films for the UK documentary company Hardcash Productions, and Death in Gaza (2004), for their own TV company Frostbite
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    210
    Barbara McClintock

    Barbara McClintock

    Barbara McClintock (June 16, 1902 – September 2, 1992), the 1983 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine, was an American scientist and one of the world's most distinguished cytogeneticists. McClintock received her PhD in botany from Cornell University in 1927, where she was a leader in the development of maize cytogenetics. The field remained the focus of her research for the rest of her career. From the late 1920s, McClintock studied chromosomes and how they change during reproduction in maize. Her work was groundbreaking: she developed the technique for visualizing maize chromosomes and used microscopic analysis to demonstrate many fundamental genetic ideas, including genetic recombination by crossing-over during meiosis—a mechanism by which chromosomes exchange information. She produced the first genetic map for maize, linking regions of the chromosome with physical traits, and demonstrated the role of the telomere and centromere, regions of the chromosome that are important in the conservation of genetic information. She was recognized amongst the best in the field, awarded prestigious fellowships, and elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1944. During the
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    211
    Gloria Vanderbilt

    Gloria Vanderbilt

    Gloria Laura Vanderbilt (born February 20, 1924) is an American artist, author, actress, heiress, and socialite most noted as an early developer of designer blue jeans. She is a member of the prominent Vanderbilt family of New York and the mother of CNN's Anderson Cooper. Vanderbilt was born in New York City, the only child of railroad heir Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt (1880–1925) and his second wife, Gloria Morgan (1904–1965). She was christened in the Episcopal church as Gloria Laura Vanderbilt (and after her father's death, confirmed in the Catholic Church, to which her mother belonged). From her father's first marriage to Cathleen Neilson, she had a half-sister, Cathleen Vanderbilt (1904–1944). She became heiress to a half share in a five-million-dollar trust fund upon her father's death from cirrhosis when she was 18 months old. The rights to control this trust fund while Vanderbilt was a minor belonged to her mother, who traveled to and from Paris for years, taking her daughter with her. They were accompanied by a beloved nanny, whom young Gloria had named "Dodo", who would play a tumultuous part in the child's life, and her mother's identical twin sister, Thelma, who was
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    212

    Jill Scott

    • Web Link(s): Points to the discogs page for this artist
    Jill Scott (born April 4, 1972) is a Grammy-winning American poet, actress, and singer-songwriter. Since 1999, Scott has made a reputation for being a classic, thought provoking artist gained by her 2000 multi-platinum selling debut, Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds Vol. 1. Their followups Beautifully Human: Words and Sounds Vol. 2 released in 2004, and The Real Thing: Words and Sounds Vol. 3 released in 2007 both achieved gold status. She made her cinematic debut in the films Hounddog and Tyler Perry's Why Did I Get Married? in 2007. She also appeared as the lead role in the BBC/HBO series The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency. Scott grew up an only child in a North Philadelphia neighborhood, raised by her mother, Joyce Scott, and her grandmother. She indicated in an interview with Jet Magazine that she had a happy childhood and was "very much a loved child". Scott was raised as a Jehovah's Witness and attended the Philadelphia High School for Girls. After graduating from high school, Scott attended Temple University while simultaneously working two jobs. She studied secondary education for three years and, at one time, planned to become a high school English teacher. However,
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    213

    Patty Wetterling

    Patty Wetterling (born November 2, 1949) is a U.S. advocate of children's safety, particularly focused on protecting children from abduction and abuse. Her advocacy began after her son Jacob was abducted in 1989. She was a candidate for the Minnesota Sixth District seat in the United States House of Representatives as the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party candidate in 2004 and 2006, losing to Republicans Mark Kennedy and Michele Bachmann respectively. Born in Omaha, Nebraska, Wetterling grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota and later moved to St. Joseph, where she raised four children with her husband Jerry. On October 22, 1989, their son Jacob, then 11 years old, was abducted at gunpoint by a masked man. An extensive search was carried out, but Jacob and the abductor have not yet been found. Four months after the abduction, the Wetterlings founded the Jacob Wetterling Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to child safety education. Recently, Wetterling sent a scathing letter to then Attorney General Alberto Gonzales decrying the dilution of sex offender registration laws and demanding that Congress and the Justice Department fix the flaws that their overzealousness caused. On June
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    214
    Elle Macpherson

    Elle Macpherson

    Elle Macpherson (born 29 March 1963) is an Australian businesswoman, television host, model and actress. She is well known for her record five cover appearances for the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue beginning in the 1980s, leading to her nickname "The Body". She is also known as the founder primary model and creative director for a series of business ventures, including Elle Macpherson Intimates, a lingerie line, and The Body, a line of skin care products. In 2010, she became the host and executive producer of Britain & Ireland's Next Top Model. She is currently the host and an executive producer NBC's Fashion Star. Macpherson was born Eleanor Nancy Gow, in the Killara neighbourhood of Sydney, the daughter of entrepreneur and sound engineer Peter Gow, a former president of a Sydney rugby league team, the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks. Her mother Frances worked as a nurse before she married. Macpherson grew up in East Lindfield, a North Shore suburb of Sydney, and she attended Killara High School. Macpherson has a sister, businesswoman and environmentalist Mimi Macpherson, also known as Miriam Frances Gow. Macpherson’s parents divorced when she was 10 years old, and she moved with
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    215

    Jacqueline Mars

    Jacqueline Mars (born October 10, 1940) is the daughter of Forrest Edward Mars, Sr., and granddaughter of Frank C. Mars, founders of the American candy company Mars, Incorporated. She attended and graduated from the boarding school Miss Hall's School in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College in 1961 with a degree in anthropology. She married David H. Badger in 1961. They had three children: Alexandra Badger born 1966/1967 (age 45–46), Stephen Mills Badger born c.1969 (age 42–43), and Christa Badger born c.1975 (age 36–37). She divorced Badger in 1984. She married Hank Vogel in 1986; they divorced in 1994. As a member of the Mars family, her share of the company and other assets were worth US$10 billion in September 2010, making her the 52nd richest person in the world and the 26th richest person in America, according to Forbes; she is also the fourth richest American woman.
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    Alva Myrdal

    Alva Myrdal (née Reimer; 31 January 1902 – 1 February 1986) was a Swedish sociologist and politician. She received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1982. She married Gunnar Myrdal in 1924. Born in Uppsala, she first came to public notice in the 1930s, and was one of the main driving forces in the creation of the Swedish welfare state. She coauthored with Gunnar Myrdal the book entitled Crisis in the Question of Population (Swedish: Kris i befolkningsfrågan, 1934). The basic premise of Crisis in the Question of Population is to find what social reforms are needed to allow for individual liberty (especially for women) while also promoting child-bearing, and encouraging Swedes to have children. While heralding many sweeping social reforms seen as positive for Sweden, the book also incorporated some of the zeitgeist of the 1930s, in its promotion of the idea of racism, eugenics and compulsory sterilization programs. With architect Sven Markelius she designed Stockholm's cooperative Collective House in 1937 with an eye towards developing more domestic liberty for women. A long-time prominent member of the Swedish Social Democratic Party, in the late 1940s she became involved in international
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    217

    Catherine Doherty

    Ekaterina Fyodorovna Kolyschkine Doherty, better known as Catherine Doherty, CM, Servant of God (August 15, 1896–December 14, 1985) was a social activist and foundress of the Madonna House Apostolate. A pioneer of social justice and a renowned national speaker, Doherty was also a prolific writer of hundreds of articles, best-selling author of dozens of books, and a dedicated wife and mother. Her cause for canonization as a saint is under consideration by the Catholic Church. Doherty was born Ekaterina Fyodorovna Kolyschkine (Екатерина Фёдоровна Колышкина) in Nizhny Novgorod, Russian Empire. Her parents, Fyodor and Emma Kolyschkine, belonged to the minor nobility and were devout members of the Russian Orthodox Church who had their child baptized in St. Petersburg on September 15, 1896. She was not baptized on the same day that she was born because her mother was worried she might get a disease as she had been born on a train. Schooled abroad due to her father's job, she and her family returned to St. Petersburg in 1910, where she was enrolled in the prestigious Princess Obolensky Academy. In 1912, aged 15, she made what turned out to be a disastrous marriage with her first cousin,
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    218
    Clare of Assisi

    Clare of Assisi

    Clare of Assisi (sometimes spelled Clair, Claire, etc.) (July 16, 1194 – August 11, 1253), born Chiara Offreduccio, is an Italian saint and one of the first followers of Saint Francis of Assisi. She founded the Order of Poor Ladies, a monastic religious order for women in the Franciscan tradition, and wrote their Rule of Life—the first monastic rule known to have been written by a woman. Following her death, the order she founded was renamed in her honor as the Order of Saint Clare, commonly referred to today as the Poor Clares. Clare was born in Assisi, Italy, as the eldest daughter of Favorino Scifi, Count of Sasso-Rosso and his wife Ortolana. Ortolana was a very devout woman who had undertaken pilgrimages to Rome, Santiago de Compostela and the Holy Land. Later on in her life, Ortolana entered Clare's monastery, together with Agnes, Clare's sister. Clare was always devoted to prayer as a child. When she turned 15 her parents wanted her to marry a young and wealthy man but she originally wanted to wait until she was 18. But when she was 18 she had heard Francis's preachings. Those preachings were beginning to change her life. He told her she was a chosen soul from God. Soon on
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    219

    Denise Brown

    Denise Brown (born July 29, 1957) is the older sister of Nicole Brown Simpson, who was found murdered along with her friend Ronald Goldman. Nicole's former husband, O.J. Simpson, was accused of the murder, but was found not guilty and acquitted. Born in Germany to an American serviceman father and German mother, Brown grew up in Garden Grove, California along with her younger sisters Nicole, Dominique, and Tanya Brown. Denise Brown "led a life remarkable only in its normalcy until June 12, 1994, when her sister Nicole Brown Simpson was murdered" (statement from Nicole Brown Foundation). She is also committed to raising awareness against domestic violence. In 1994, Brown established The Nicole Brown Charitable Foundation in Nicole's memory, to assist victims of domestic violence. Since early 1995, Brown has traveled the world speaking on domestic violence. She has addressed university student bodies, men in prison and in batterers' treatment programs, women at risk, church groups, and various educational and legislative forums. She has helped raise funds for local shelters all across the country with her appearances, and has assisted in the success of a major project called the Vine
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    220
    Emily Greene Balch

    Emily Greene Balch

    Emily Greene Balch (January 8, 1867 – January 9, 1961) was an American academic, writer, and pacifist who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946 (the prize that year was shared with John Mott), notably for her work with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). Born in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston into an affluent family, she was amongst the first graduates of Bryn Mawr College in 1889. She continued to study sociology and economics in Europe and the United States, and, in 1896, she joined the faculty of Wellesley College, becoming a full professor of economics and sociology in 1913. During the World War I, she helped to found the WILPF League and campaigned against America's entry into the conflict. When her contract was terminated by Wellesley because of her pacifist activities, she became an editor of The Nation, a well-known liberal news magazine, acted as secretary of the WILPF (a second term in 1934 without salary for a year and a half), and did much work for the League of Nations. Balch converted from Unitarianism and became a Quaker in 1921. She never married. She died the day after her 94th birthday.
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    221

    Geraldine Laybourne

    Geraldine Laybourne (born 1947) founded Oxygen Media and served as its chairman and chief executive officer until it was sold in 2007 to NBC Universal. Oxygen was launched in 2000 to fill a void in the television landscape—creating a television network targeted to younger women. During her tenure there, Oxygen, available in more than 70 million cable households, was the only women-owned and operated cable network. Laybourne was born Geraldine Bond on May 19, 1947 in Martinsville, New Jersey, a rural community of about 400. She is the second of four children, born to a former soap opera writer/actress and a local businessman. Laybourne earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Vassar College. After graduation, she went to work for an architectural firm in Philadelphia. Eventually, she earned a Master of Science degree in Elementary Education from the University of Pennsylvania. She met her husband, Kit Laybourne when he was a senior at Wesleyan College, but it wasn't until five years later that they ran into each other again. Six months later, they married. In 1979, Kit convinced her to start a children's television production company with him, Early Bird Productions. One
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    222
    Kim Campbell

    Kim Campbell

    Avril Phædra Douglas "Kim" Campbell, PC CC OBC QC (born March 10, 1947) is a Canadian politician, lawyer, university professor, diplomat, and writer. She served as the 19th Prime Minister of Canada, from June 25, 1993 to November 4, 1993. Campbell was the first and to date the only female Prime Minister of Canada, the first baby boomer to hold that office, and the only PM to have been born in British Columbia. Campbell was born in Port Alberni, British Columbia to George Thomas Campbell (1920–2002) and Phyllis "Lisa" Cook. Her mother left the family when Campbell was 12, leaving Kim and her sister Alix to be raised by their father. As a teenager, Campbell permanently nicknamed herself Kim, perhaps for actress Kim Novak. While in her pre-teens, Campbell was a host and reporter on the CBC children's program Junior Television Club. Campbell and her family moved to Vancouver, where she attended Prince of Wales Secondary School, and was a top student. She became the school's first female student president, and graduated in 1964. She earned an honours B.A. degree in Political Science from the University of British Columbia, graduating in 1969. She was active in the student government and
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    223
    Rosalia Mera

    Rosalia Mera

    Rosalía Mera Goyenechea (born 1944) is one of the richest people in the world. She began designing gowns and lingerie in her home with her then-husband, Amancio Ortega Gaona. The couple parlayed their work into a multi-billion-dollar corporation, Inditex, and the Zara line of clothing stores. Despite her divorce from Ortega, Mera retains a 7% stake in the company. Mera also owns interests in a company which make fingerprinting identification kits for infants and another company (Zeltia) which carries out research into cancer fighting compounds of both synthetic and natural origin and particularly those bioactive compounds originating in the ocean. She is also the president of the Paideia Foundation, a charitable organization. The foundation has become involved in Spanish media, most notably as a producer of the Internet-themed game show Terceira rede (Third Network). Her venture capital firm Rosp Corunna is also a share holder in Continental Prods, a Galician media company. She also has a share of Milou Films and of Tornasol Films.
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    224
    Rosalyn Sussman Yalow

    Rosalyn Sussman Yalow

    Rosalyn Sussman Yalow (July 19, 1921 – May 30, 2011) was an American medical physicist, and a co-winner of the 1977 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (together with Roger Guillemin and Andrew Schally) for development of the radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique. She was the second American woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize Physiology or Medicine after Gerty Cori. Born in Manhattan to Simon and Clara (née Zipper) Sussman, she attended Walton High School. Knowing how to type, she won a part-time position as secretary to Dr. Rudolf Schoenheimer, a leading biochemist at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons. Not believing that any good graduate school would admit and provide financial support to a woman, she took a job as a secretary to Michael Heidelberger, another biochemist at Columbia, who hired her on the condition that she studied stenography. She graduated from Hunter College in January 1941. In mid-February of that aforementioned year she received an offer of a teaching assistantship in physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with the primary reason being that World War II commenced and many men went off to war and the university decided
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    225
    Angelica Kauffmann

    Angelica Kauffmann

    Maria Anna Angelika/Angelica Katharina Kauffman (30 October 1741 – 5 November 1807) was a Swiss-Austrian Neoclassical painter. Kauffman (not Kauffmann) is the preferred spelling of her name; it is the form she herself used most in signing her correspondence, documents and paintings. She was born at Chur in Graubünden, Switzerland, but grew up in Schwarzenberg in Vorarlberg/Austria where her family originated. Her father, Joseph Johann Kauffman, was a relatively poor man but a skilled painter, who was often traveling for his work. It was he who taught his precocious daughter. Angelica rapidly acquired several languages from her mother, Cleophea Lutz, read incessantly and showed talent as a musician, but her greatest progress was in painting, and by her twelfth year she had become a notability, with bishops and nobles for her sitters. In 1754 her father took her to Milan. Later visits to Italy of long duration followed. In 1763 she visited Rome, returning again in 1764. From Rome she passed to Bologna and Venice, everywhere feted for her talents and charm. Writing from Rome in August 1764 to his friend Franke, Winckelmann refers to her popularity. (She was then painting his picture,
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    226

    Birgit Rausing

    Birgit Rausing (born 1924) is a Swedish art historian and philanthropist, and the widow of Gad Rausing (1922–2000). She is the daughter of Swedish landscape painter Henry Mayne (1891–1975). In 1944 her father-in-law Ruben Rausing (1895–1983) founded Tetra Pak, which revolutionized the packaging of liquids such as juices and milk. The company was inherited by his sons Gad and Hans. In 1996, Gad bought his brother's half of the company. When Gad died in 2000, his wife Birgit and their three children inherited packaging giant Tetra Laval. Birgit Rausing and her family had an estimated net worth of US$13.0 billion in 2010. She is the third wealthiest person in Sweden, according to Forbes magazine.
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    227
    Cyan Banister

    Cyan Banister

    Zivity is Cyan's brainchild. Her dream to connect the social web with sexy photos is the kernel that became Zivity. Cyan's idea is a damn good one; that's why Zivity is the first company in the "adult space" to be backed by Silicon Valley investment. Cyan brings more than ten years of management experience to Zivity; from scaling operational infrastructure to building teams and championing company culture. Cyan held a senior management role at IronPort where she supervised throngs of employees and oversaw a slew of departments. Her mission for Zivity is putting models first and creating an environment that nurtures artistic freedom. "Freedom of expression without judgment" is her motto.
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    228
    Grazia Deledda

    Grazia Deledda

    Grazia Deledda (September 27, 1871 – August 15, 1936) was an Italian writer whose works won her the Nobel Prize for Literature for 1926. Born in Nuoro, Sardinia into a bourgeois family, she attended elementary school and then was educated by a private tutor (a guest of one of her relatives) and moved on to study literature on her own. She first published some novels in the magazine L'ultima moda when it still published works in prose and poetry. Nell'azzurro, published by Trevisani in 1890 might be considered as her first work. Still between prose and poetry are, among the first works, Paesaggi sardi, published by Speirani in 1896. In 1900, after having married Palmiro Madesani, functionary of the Ministry of War met in Cagliari in the October 1899, the writer moved to Rome and after the publishing of Anime oneste in 1895 and of Il vecchio della montagna in 1900, plus the collaboration with magazines La Sardegna, Piccola rivista and Nuova Antologia, her work began to gain critical interest. In 1903 she published Elias Portolu that confirmed her as a writer and started her work as a successful writer of novels and theatrical works: Cenere (1904), L'edera (1908), Sino al confine
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    229

    Linda Tripp

    Linda Rose Tripp (née Carotenuto; born November 24, 1949) is a former US civil servant who figured in the Monica Lewinsky scandal of 1998/99 that led to the impeachment of U.S. President Bill Clinton. Tripp's action in secretly recording Lewinsky's confidential phone-calls about her relationship with the President caused a sensation, with their links to the earlier Jones v. Clinton lawsuit, and the disclosing of notably intimate details. But Tripp claimed that her motives were purely patriotic, and she was able to avoid a wiretap charge in exchange for handing in the tapes. She then claimed that her sacking from the Pentagon at the end of the Clinton administration was vindictive, though it was shown to be a standard routine. But she was able to claim generous compensation for unauthorised revelations about her security clearance. Today, Tripp works with her husband in the retail business in Middleburg, Virginia. Tripp was born in Jersey City, New Jersey. She graduated in 1968 from Hanover Park High School in East Hanover, New Jersey. Tripp was an Army Intelligence secretary at Fort Meade before being transferred to the Pentagon in 1987. Two years later she became an assistant for
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    230
    Olga Drahonowska-Małkowska

    Olga Drahonowska-Małkowska

    Olga Drahonowska-Małkowska (January 9, 1888, Krzeszowice, Poland — January 15, 1979, Zakopane, Poland), with her husband, founded scouting in Poland. Olga Drahonowska-Małkowska was born in Krzeszowice, the second daughter of Zofia and Karol Drahonowski. Her father, Karol, whose background was Armenian, was a trustee of a farm for a Polish baron. Although she has Czech origins, she always emphasized her Polish nationality. She finished her primary and secondary school extramural (at home) with very good grades. After baccalaureate she started studies in the Music Conservatory of Lwów, when she discovered talents in poetry and sculpture. She was also an instructor of physical education in Sokół, and a member of the Eleusis organization, where she met Andrzej Małkowski. He convinced her to join Zarzewie, a Polish independence organization, where she became an Lieutenant. Olga Drahonowska was introduced to Scouting by her friend, and later husband, Andrzej Juliusz Małkowski. She became Scoutmaster (harcmistrzyni) of the 3rd Lwów Girl Scout Company (the 1st, 2nd and 4th Companies were Boy Scouts). This consisted of about twenty girls aged between 15 and 20 years. She was also first
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    231
    Xochi Birch

    Xochi Birch

    Xochi is a native Californian who grew tired of the sun so moved to London. 8 years with no sun was the breaking point, so Xochi with her family moved back to California.

    She returned with 2 children and 1 husband. She now lives in San Francisco not too far from the small town she grew up in. Now back in the fog of San Francisco, can't seem to get away from the dreary weather. As you can tell she can't stop talking about the weather so she is also a true nationalized Brit.

    Xochi can be found with her many relatives in the bay area, at home with her children cleaning up after them or at the office posting a new ffART on a friend's white board.

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    232

    Abigail Johnson

    Abigail Pierrepont (Abby) Johnson (born December 19, 1961) is an American businesswoman. Johnson is President of Fidelity Investments Personal and Workplace Investing. Fidelity is led by her father, Edward C. (Ned) Johnson III. University Of British Columbia After a brief stint as a consultant at Booz Allen & Hamilton from 1985–86 and her MBA, she joined her father's company, Fidelity Investments, as an equity portfolio manager from 1988 until 1997. She was promoted to an executive role in Fidelity Management and Research (FMR) in 1997 and has held various senior executive posts inside FMR, Fidelity Institutional Retirement Services and Fidelity Investments since then. Johnson currently serves as a member of the Committee on Capital Markets Regulation. She is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA). According to Forbes, she is the 22nd richest person in the United States and 48th in the world, with a net worth of $11.3 billion in September 2010. During the same period, her father was 33rd in the U.S. and 85th in the world with net worth of $7.1 billion.
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    233
    Alexis Herman

    Alexis Herman

    Alexis Margaret Herman (born July 16, 1947 in Mobile, Alabama) was the 23rd U.S. Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton. Prior to her appointment, she was Assistant to the President and Director of the White House Office of Public Engagement. The daughter of politician Alex Herman and schoolteacher Gloria Caponis, Alexis grew up in a Catholic home in Mobile and earned her high school diploma in 1965 from the Heart of Mary High School. She briefly attended Edgewood College in Madison, Wisconsin, and Spring Hill College in Mobile, but transferred to Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans, where she became an active member of the Gamma Alpha Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta sorority and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology in 1969. Herman was Queen of Carnival for the Mobile Area Mardi Gras Association (Mobile's African-American Mardi Gras umbrella organization) in 1974. Her Carnival king, Douglas Wicks, would go on to become the first African-American elected to the Mobile County Commission since Reconstruction. After college, Herman worked for Catholic Charities and other agencies, advocating for minority women employment. Jimmy Carter met the young
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    Arianna Huffington

    Arianna Huffington

    Arianna Huffington (formerly Stassinopoulos; born Greek: Αριάννα Στασινοπούλου; July 15, 1950) is an American author and syndicated columnist. She is best known for her news website The Huffington Post. A popular conservative commentator in the mid-1990s, she adopted liberal political beliefs in the late 1990s. She is the ex-wife of former Republican congressman Michael Huffington. In 2003, she ran as an independent candidate for Governor in the California recall election. In 2009, Huffington was named as number 12 in Forbes' first-ever list of the Most Influential Women In Media. She has also moved up to number 42 in The Guardian's Top 100 in Media List. In 2011, AOL acquired The Huffington Post for US$315 million and made Huffington president and editor in chief of The Huffington Post Media Group, which included The Huffington Post and then-existing AOL properties such as Engadget, AOL Music, Patch Media, and StyleList. Huffington was born Arianna Stasinopoúlou in Athens, Greece, the daughter of Konstantinos (a journalist and management consultant) and Elli (née Georgiadi) Stasinopoulos, and is the sister of Agapi (an author, speaker and performer). She moved to the United
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    235

    Armi Ratia

    Armi Ratia (13 July 1912, Pälkjärvi – 3 October 1979) was the founder of the Finnish textile and clothing company Marimekko Oy. She is among Finland's most famous female entrepreneurs. She was born in Pälkjärvi in Ladogan Karelia.
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    236
    Diane von Fürstenberg

    Diane von Fürstenberg

    Diane von Fürstenberg, formerly Diane, Princess of Fürstenberg (German: Diane Prinzessin zu Fürstenberg), (born 31 December 1946) is a Belgian-American fashion designer best known for her iconic wrap dress. She initially rose to prominence when she married into the German princely House of Fürstenberg, as the wife of Prince Egon of Fürstenberg. Following their divorce in 1972, she has continued to use his family name, although she is no longer entitled to use the title princess following her divorce and subsequent remarriage in 2001. She re-launched her fashion company, Diane von Fürstenberg (DvF), in 1997, with the reintroduction of her famous wrap dress. The company is now a global luxury lifestyle brand offering four complete collections a year. DvF is available in over 70 countries and 45 free-standing shops worldwide. The company’s headquarters and flagship boutique are located in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District. In 2005, the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) awarded her the Lifetime Achievement Award and the following year named her as their president, a position she has held since 2006. Diane Simone Michelle Halfin was born in Brussels, Belgium. Her father was
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    237

    Julia Wolfe

    Julia Wolfe (born December 18, 1958) is an American composer. She was born in Philadelphia, holds degrees from the University of Michigan, Princeton and Yale, and currently works in New York. Wolfe's music is rhythmically vigorous and often clangorously dissonant. As a composer associated with the downtown style of new music she is not averse to drawing on rock and minimalism as primary influences. Her music, however, shows a good deal more rhythmic complexity than is generally found in these genres, hence her music can properly be considered and described as postminimalist. In 1987, Wolfe co-founded Bang on a Can together with composers David Lang and Michael Gordon, her husband. She was awarded a grant in 2000 from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists Award. In 2010, Wolfe was nominated as a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Music. In 2003, she joined the composition faculty of the Manhattan School of Music. Currently she is Director of Music Composition at New York University in the Steinhardt School. Amber Waves of Grain (1988) - 8 minute(s) Orchestration 2(pic).222/432+btbn.1/4perc/hp/str Cruel Sister (2004) - 35 minute(s) Orchestration str (min 65431) Tell
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    238
    Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw

    Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw

    Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw (Kannada: ಕಿರಣ್ ಮಜುಮ್ದರ್ ಷ; born 23 March 1953) is an Indian entrepreneur. She is the Chairman & Managing Director of Biocon Limited a biotechnology company based in Bangalore (Bengaluru), India. Mazumdar-Shaw completed her schooling from the city’s Bishop Cotton Girl’s High School (1968). She wanted to join medical school but instead took up biology and completed her BSc Zoology Honours course from Mount Carmel College, Bangalore University (1973). She later did her post-graduation in Malting and Brewing from Ballarat College, Melbourne University (1975). She worked as a trainee brewer in Carlton and United Breweries, Melbourne and as a trainee maltster at Barrett Brothers and Burston, Australia. She also worked for some time as a technical consultant at Jupiter Breweries Limited, Calcutta and as a technical manager at Standard Maltings Corporation, Baroda between 1975 and 1977. She started Biocon in 1978 and spearheaded its evolution from an industrial enzymes manufacturing company to a fully integrated bio-pharmaceutical company with a well-balanced business portfolio of products and a research focus on diabetes, oncology and auto-immune diseases. She also
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    239
    Madame C. J. Walker

    Madame C. J. Walker

    Madam C.J. Walker (December 23, 1867 – May 25, 1919), born Sarah Breedlove, was an American businesswoman, entrepreneur and philanthropist, commonly regarded as the first African-American millionaire. She made her fortune by developing and marketing a successful line of beauty and hair products for black women under the company she founded, Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company. Madam C.J. Walker was born Sarah Breedlove, on December 23, 1867 in Delta, Louisiana to Owen and Minerva Breedlove. She was one of six children; she had a sister Louvenia and four brothers: Alexander, James, Solomon, and Owen, Jr. Her parents and elder siblings were slaves on Madison Parish plantation owned by Robert W. Burney . She was the first child in her family born into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. Her mother died, possibly from cholera, in 1872. Her father remarried and died shortly afterward. Madam C. J. Walker moved in with her older sister, and brother-in-law, Willie Powell. At the age of 14, she married Moses McWilliams to escape Powell's abuse. Three years later her daughter, Lelia McWilliams (A'Lelia Walker) was born. When Sarah was 20, her husband died. Lelia was
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    240
    Mairead Corrigan

    Mairead Corrigan

    Mairead Maguire (born 27 January 1944), also known as Mairead Corrigan Maguire and formerly as Mairéad Corrigan, is a Northern Irish peace activist. She co-founded, with Betty Williams and Ciaran McKeown, the Community of Peace People, an organisation dedicated to encouraging a peaceful resolution of the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Maguire and Williams were awarded the 1976 Nobel Peace Prize. Maguire has also won several other awards. In recent years, she has criticized the Israeli government's policy towards Gaza, in particular to the naval blockade. In June 2010, Maguire went on board the MV Rachel Corrie as part of a flotilla that unsuccessfully attempted to breach the blockade. Maguire was born into a Roman Catholic community in Belfast, Northern Ireland, the second of seven children – five sisters and two brothers. Her parents were Andrew and Margaret Corrigan. She attended St. Vincent's Primary School, a private Catholic school, until the age of 14, at which time her family could no longer pay for her schooling. After working for a time as a babysitter at a Catholic community center, she was able to save enough money to enroll in a year of business classes at Miss Gordon's
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    241
    Marguerite Bourgeoys

    Marguerite Bourgeoys

    Saint Marguerite Bourgeoys (17 April 1620 – 12 January 1700) was the founder of the Congregation of Notre Dame of Montreal in the colony of New France, now part of Canada. She lived in Ville-Marie (Montreal) as of 1653, educating young girls, the poor, and natives until her death at the turn of the 18th century. She is also significant for developing one of the first uncloistered religious communities in the Catholic Church. Saint Marguerite Bourgeoys was born in Troyes (France), on 17 April 1620. The daughter of Abraham Bourgeoys and Guillemette Garnier, she was the sixth of their twelve children.. Marguerite came from a middle-class and socially connected background, her father being a candle maker and coiner. Her father ultimately died when she was young, and her mother soon followed when Marguerite was 19. In her early years, Marguerite had never held much of an interest in joining the Congregation Notre-Dame, which had been founded earlier in France in 1598 and had a major convent in her hometown. The nuns present in this external congregation helped the poor but remained cloistered and did not have the right teach outside of the convent. However, it is said that she had a
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    242
    Marie Curie

    Marie Curie

    Marie Skłodowska-Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a French-Polish physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris (La Sorbonne), and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris. She was born Maria Salomea Skłodowska (pronounced [ˈmarja salɔˈmɛa skwɔˈdɔfska]) in Warsaw, in what was then the Kingdom of Poland. She studied at Warsaw's clandestine Floating University and began her practical scientific training in Warsaw. In 1891, aged 24, she followed her older sister Bronisława to study in Paris, where she earned her higher degrees and conducted her subsequent scientific work. She shared her 1903 Nobel Prize in Physics with her husband Pierre Curie and with the physicist Henri Becquerel. She was the sole winner of the 1911 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Her achievements included a theory of radioactivity (a term that she coined), techniques for isolating radioactive isotopes, and the discovery of two elements,
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    243
    Nicole Miller

    Nicole Miller

    Nicole Miller (born 1952) is an American fashion designer, businesswoman who was born in Texas and raised in Lenox, Massachusetts. Miller attended the Rhode Island School of Design where she earned a BFA in Apparel Design. She studied for a year at L'Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne where she was trained to drape fabric and study the classical techniques of couture. Miller described her Parisian training as "intense," but explained that it gave her training in fabric manipulation, which became a signature of her designs. Miller's first shop opened in 1986 on Madison Avenue. The brand has grown to 20 boutiques in major cities across the United States. and is sold in a number of high-end department stores. Miller designs an extensive collection for J.C. Penney and a home furnishing collection for Bed, Bath and Beyond. Of her style, the designer has said: "I've always been downtown and uptown. I've had a lot of artist friends and I was always a little bit of a renegade." Her modern design aesthetic is known for its bright prints and patterns. Born in Fort Worth, Texas, Miller was raised in Lenox, Massachusetts. Her father and Parisian-born mother, met in World
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    244
    Rona Segev-Gal

    Rona Segev-Gal

    Rona Segev-Gal joined Pitango as a Partner in mid 2005 to head the Enterprise Software sector.

    Formerly a Partner at Evergreen, she brings with her a great deal of expertise in the software investments, as well as strong Venture Capital experience. During her tenure at Evergreen, Rona led investments in and served on the boards of: Traiana, Identify (acquired by BMC), Actona (acquired by Cisco), Varonis, Item Field (acquired by Informatica), Aduva (acquired by Sun).

    Prior to that, Ms. Segev served as Vice-President of Business Development at BRM Technologies, and on the investment committee of Koor Technologies. Rona also founded and managed Kidum Multimedia, a software company focused on 3-D technologies, that was acquired by SEA in 1997.

    Rona holds B.A. degrees with honors in Psychology and Philosophy from The Hebrew University.

    Rona currently serves on the Board of Directors of Traiana Technologies, Varonis Systems Ltd. and fring.

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    245
    Sandra Day O'Connor

    Sandra Day O'Connor

    Sandra Day O'Connor (born March 26, 1930) is a retired United States Supreme Court justice. She served as an Associate Justice from her appointment in 1981 by Ronald Reagan until her retirement from the Court in 2006. She was the first woman to be appointed to the Court. Prior to O'Connor's appointment to the Court, she was an elected official and judge in Arizona. On July 1, 2005, she announced her intention to retire effective upon the confirmation of a successor. Samuel Alito was nominated to take her seat in October 2005, and joined the Court on January 31, 2006. O'Connor tended to approach each case narrowly without arguing for sweeping precedents. She most frequently sided with the court's conservative bloc. In the latter years of her tenure, she was regarded as having the swing vote in many cases as the court grew more conservative. O'Connor was Chancellor of The College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, and currently serves on the board of trustees of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Several publications have named O'Connor among the most powerful women in the world. On August 12, 2009, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of
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    246
    Susan Kare

    Susan Kare

    Susan Kare (born 1954) is an artist and graphic designer who created many of the interface elements for the Apple Macintosh in the 1980s. She was also one of the original employees of NeXT (the company formed by Steve Jobs after leaving Apple in 1985), working as the Creative Director. Kare was born in Ithaca, New York and is the sister of aerospace engineer Jordin Kare. She graduated from Harriton High School in 1971, received her B.A., summa cum laude, in Art from Mount Holyoke College in 1975 and her Ph.D. from New York University in 1978. She next moved to San Francisco and worked for the Museum of Modern Art. Kare joined Apple Computer, Inc. after receiving a call from her high school friend, Andy Hertzfeld, in the early 1980s. Susan Kare worked at Apple Computer starting in 1982 (Badge #3978). She was originally hired into the Macintosh software group to design user interface graphics and fonts; her business cards read "HI Macintosh Artist". Later, she was a Creative Director in Apple Creative Services working for the Director of that organization, Tom Suiter. She is the designer of many typefaces, icons, and original marketing material for the original Macintosh operating
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    247
    Tina Knowles

    Tina Knowles

    Celestine Ann "Tina" Knowles (née Beyincé; born January 4, 1954) is an American fashion designer known for her House of Deréon and Miss Tina by Tina Knowles fashion brands. She is perhaps best known as the mother of singers Beyoncé Knowles and Solange Knowles, and was the wife of Mathew Knowles, who managed Destiny's Child and then Beyoncé and Kelly Rowland until 2011. She was born in Galveston, Texas, the daughter of Agnès (née DeRouen) and Lumis Albert Beyincé. Her ancestry includes African, French, and Irish; she is a descendant of Acadian leader Joseph Broussard. Tina's rise to prominence came as costume designer for Destiny's Child. In the early days of her daughter's career, when money was limited, she created outfits that the members wore on-stage and to events. As the group grew more successful, Knowles' work enjoyed a greater level of visibility and success. Inspired by the legacy of Knowles' mother, seamstress Agnéz Deréon, she and Beyoncé decided to form a production company and create a fashion label. Initially, they launched House of Deréon, a young contemporary line, in 2005. In 2006, they launched Deréon, a casual lifestyle collection, but in 2012 it was discontinued
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    248
    Ulrike Meinhof

    Ulrike Meinhof

    Ulrike Marie Meinhof (7 October 1934 – 9 May 1976) was a German left-wing militant. She co-founded the Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion) in 1970 after having previously worked as a journalist for the monthly left-wing magazine Konkret. She was arrested in 1972, and eventually charged with numerous murders and the formation of a criminal association. Before the trial concluded, Meinhof was found hanged in her cell in 1976. Ulrike Meinhof was born in 1934 in Oldenburg, Germany. In 1936, her family moved to Jena when her father, art historian Dr. Werner Meinhof, became director of the city's museum. Her father died of cancer in 1940, causing her mother to take in a boarder, Renate Riemeck, to make money. In 1946, the family moved back to Oldenburg because Jena fell under Soviet rule as a result of the Yalta agreement. Ulrike's mother, Dr. Ingeborg Meinhof, worked as a teacher after World War II and died 8 years later from cancer. Renate Riemeck took on the role of guardian for Ulrike and her elder sister. In 1952, she took her Abitur at a school in Weilburg. She then studied philosophy, sociology, education and German at Marburg where she became involved with reform movements. In
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    249
    Wangari Maathai

    Wangari Maathai

    Wangari Muta Maathai (1 April 1940 – 25 September 2011) was a Kenyan environmental and political activist. She was educated in the United States at Mount St. Scholastica and the University of Pittsburgh, as well as the University of Nairobi in Kenya. In the 1970s, Maathai founded the Green Belt Movement, an environmental non-governmental organization focused on the planting of trees, environmental conservation, and women's rights. In 1986, she was awarded the Right Livelihood Award, and in 2004, she became the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for "her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace." Maathai was an elected member of Parliament and served as assistant minister for Environment and Natural Resources in the government of President Mwai Kibaki between January 2003 and November 2005. Furthermore she was an Honorary Councillor of the World Future Council. In 2011, Maathai died of complications from ovarian cancer. On 1 April 1940, Maathai was born in the village of Ihithe, Nyeri District, in the central highlands of the colony of Kenya. Her family was Kikuyu, the most populous ethnic group in Kenya, and had lived in the area for several
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    250

    Yvette Fielding

    Yvette Fielding (born 23 September 1968) is a British broadcaster, producer and actress. She is best known for being the presenter of the TV shows Blue Peter, Most Haunted, Most Haunted Live!, and Ghosthunting With.... Yvette Fielding was educated at Pownall Green Primary School and Bramhall High School in Bramhall, Stockport, Greater Manchester. She also attended Hillcrest Grammar School, Davenport and Dane Bank College in Crewe (studying drama). Fielding's first major role came in 1983 when she was cast in the children's BBC series Seaview. The comedy-drama show centred around a teenage girl called Sandy Shelton (played by Fielding), growing up living at her parents' guest house in Blackpool. The show ran for two series and secured Fielding's popularity with younger audiences. After this, Fielding made a guest appearance in an episode of Juliet Bravo. In 1987 Yvette Fielding became a presenter on the BBC children's show, Blue Peter. To date Fielding still holds the record of being the youngest presenter on Blue Peter, starting on 29 June 1987 three months before her 19th birthday. While on the series Fielding also had an acting role in Last of the Summer Wine (making an
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