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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Textile of All Time

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    1

    Gloria

    Diagonal twilled weave of wool, silk, and cotton; strong and durable; sometimes called zanella cloth. Used chiefly for umbrellas.
    7.25
    8 votes
    2
    Foulard

    Foulard

    A foulard is a lightweight fabric, either twill or plain-woven, made of silk or a mix of silk and cotton. Foulards usually have a small printed design of various colors. Foulard can also refer by metonymy to articles of clothing, such as scarves and neckties, made from this fabric. Foulard is believed to have originated in the Far East. The word comes from the French word foulard, with the same proper and metonymic meanings. In modern French, foulard is the usual word for a scarf or neckerchief. Home decor use of foulard fabric: "Wall coverings are check, tattersalls, and foulards."
    6.83
    6 votes
    3

    Fustian

    • Weave: Pile
    Fustian (also called Fustanum and bombast) is a term for a variety of heavy woven cloth, cotton fabrics, that are chiefly prepared for menswear. It is also used to refer to pompous, inflated or pretentious writing or speech, from at least the time of Shakespeare. This literary use is because the cloth type was often used as padding, hence, the purposeless words are 'bombast'. It embraces plain twilled cloth known as jean, and cut fabrics similar to velvet, known as velveteen, moleskin, corduroy etc. The original medieval fustian was a stout but respectable cloth with a cotton weft and a linen warp, possibly derived from El-Fustat, the name of a suburb of Cairo where cloth was manufactured. The term seems to have quickly become less precise, and was applied to a coarse cloth made of wool and linen, and in the reign of Edward III of England, the name was given to a woolen fabric. By the early 20th century, fustians were usually of cotton dyed various colors. In a petition to Parliament during the reign of Mary I, "fustian of Naples" is mentioned. In the 13th and 14th centuries priests' robes and women's dresses were made of fustian, but though dresses are still made from some kinds,
    6.83
    6 votes
    4

    Karakul Cloth

    Made in imitation of Persian lambskin; some imitations closely resemble the real lambskin, which has short hair tightly curled to the body. Used for women and children's coats and for muffs and stoles.
    7.60
    5 votes
    5
    Tartan

    Tartan

    Tartan is a pattern consisting of criss-crossed horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colours. Tartans originated in woven wool, but now they are made in many other materials. Tartan is particularly associated with Scotland. Scottish kilts almost always have tartan patterns. Tartan is one of the patterns known as plaid in North America, but in Scotland, a plaid is a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder, or a blanket. Tartan is made with alternating bands of coloured (pre-dyed) threads woven as both warp and weft at right angles to each other. The weft is woven in a simple twill, two over — two under the warp, advancing one thread each pass. This forms visible diagonal lines where different colours cross, which give the appearance of new colours blended from the original ones. The resulting blocks of colour repeat vertically and horizontally in a distinctive pattern of squares and lines known as a sett. The Dress Act of 1746 attempted to bring the warrior clans under government control by banning the tartan and other aspects of Gaelic culture. When the law was repealed in 1782, it was no longer ordinary Highland dress, but was adopted instead as the symbolic national dress of
    8.75
    4 votes
    6
    Felt

    Felt

    For the British alternative rock band, see Felt (band). Felt is a non-woven cloth that is produced by matting, condensing and pressing woollen fibres. While some types of felt are very soft, some are tough enough to form construction materials. Felt can be of any colour, and made into any shape or size. Many cultures have legends as to the origins of feltmaking. Sumerian legend claims that the secret of feltmaking was discovered by Urnamman of Lagash. The story of Saint Clement and Saint Christopher relates that while fleeing from persecution, the men packed their sandals with wool to prevent blisters. At the end of their journey, the movement and sweat had turned the wool into felt socks. Feltmaking is still practised by nomadic peoples (Altaic people) in Central Asia and northern parts of East Asia (Mongols), where rugs, tents and clothing are regularly made. Some of these are traditional items, such as the classic yurt (Gers), while others are designed for the tourist market, such as decorated slippers. In the Western world, felt is widely used as a medium for expression in textile art as well as design, where it has significance as an ecological textile. Felt is made by a
    7.20
    5 votes
    7

    Tussah

    Wool warp with mohair woof, which gives a luster; light in weight. Used for dresses and suits.
    7.00
    5 votes
    8
    Astrakhan

    Astrakhan

    A woolen or silk material with a long, closely curled pile in imitation of real astrakhan. A most desirable material, producing considerable warmth. Used for coats for men, women, and children; also, for caps, muffs, scarfs.
    8.25
    4 votes
    9
    Chenille

    Chenille

    • Weave: Pile
    Chenille may refer to either a type of colored yarn or fabric made from it. Chenille, the French word for caterpillar, is typically used to describe a type of fabric. Many fabrics, such as mohair and wool, get their names from the fibres with which they are made. Chenille, however, is named from the unique process by which it is made. According to textile historians, chenille-type yarn was produced as far back as the 18th century. Back then the yarn was actually made by weaving a "leno" fabric and then cutting the fabric into strips to make the chenille yarn. In the 1920s and 30s, Dalton in Northwest Georgia became the tufted bedspread capital of the US thanks to Catherine Evans (later adding Whitener) who initially revived the handcraft technique in the 1890s. Hand-tufted bedspreads with an embroidered appearance became increasingly popular and were referred to as "chenille" a term which stuck. With effective marketing, chenille bedspreads appeared in city department stores and tufting subsequently became important to the economic development of North Georgia, maintaining families even through the Depression era. Merchants organised "spread houses" where products tufted on farms
    8.00
    4 votes
    10

    Henrietta

    A fine diagonal twilled dress fabric similar to cashmere, but with a little harder, coarser weave. Used the same as cashmere.
    6.60
    5 votes
    11

    Beaver Cloth

    A cloth resembling beaver fur. This may sometimes be purchased cut in circles just large enough for a hat.
    7.75
    4 votes
    12

    Camel hair

    Camel hair is, variously, the hair of a camel; a type of cloth made from camel hair; or a substitute for authentic camel hair; and is classified as a specialty hair fibre. The outer protective fur (guard hair) is coarse and inflexible and can be woven into haircloth. Guard hair can be made soft and plush by blending it, especially with wool. The camel's pure undercoat is very soft, gathered when camels molt in the warmer seasons, and is frequently used for coats. Camel hair is collected from the two-humped Bactrian camel, found from Turkey east to China and north to Siberia. Significant supplier countries of camel hair are: Mongolia, Iran, Afghanistan, Russia, China, and Australia. A camel can produce around 5 pounds of hair a year. The specialty animal fibre is collected by a number of methods including combing, shearing, and collecting the hair shed naturally during the moulting season. During the moulting season the hair falls off first from the neck, then the mane and lastly the body hair. The moulting season occurs in late spring and is a process that takes six to eight weeks. There are five primary steps to the production of camel hair; collection, sorting, dehairing,
    7.75
    4 votes
    13
    Ottoman

    Ottoman

    Smooth, ribbed weave, similar to panama. Used for dresses and light-weight suits.

    A corded silk-like faille, but much coarser.
    7.75
    4 votes
    14
    Khaki

    Khaki

    For places in Iran, see Khaki, Iran. Khaki (UK  /ˈkɑːkiː/, US /ˈkækiː/, in Canada /ˈkɑrkiː/) is a color, a light shade of yellow-brown similar to tan or beige. Khaki is a loanword incorporated from Hindustani ख़ाकी and Urdu خاکی (both meaning "soil-colored") and is originally derived from the Persian: خاکی [xɒːˈkiː] (khâk, literally meaning "soil"), which came to English from British India via the British Indian Army. It has been used by many armies around the world for uniforms, including camouflage. It has been used as a color name in English since 1848. In Western fashion, it is a standard color for smart casual dress trousers for civilians. However, the name is sometimes also used to describe a drab green color. In the mid-twentieth century as many Western militaries adopted an olive drab instead of the older, more brownish khaki, the two color names became associated with each other. In French, and German, for example, "khaki" refers to a much darker olive drab-style military green. In 1846 Sir Harry Lumsden raised a Corps of Guides for frontier service from British Indian recruits at Peshawar. Lumsden was of the view that the border troops were best dressed in their native
    9.00
    3 votes
    15
    Muslin

    Muslin

    Muslin (/ˈmʌslɨn/ or /ˈmjuːslɨn/) is a loosely-woven cotton fabric which originated in Bangladesh, which was introduced to Europe from the Middle East in the 17th century. It became very popular at the end of the 18th century in France. Muslin is most typically an unbleached or white cloth, produced from carded cotton yarn. It is often used to make sewing patterns, such as for clothing, curtains, or upholstery. Because air moves easily through muslin, muslin clothing is suitable for hot, dry climates. Muslin clothes were traded by ancient Greeks from the Indian port town Machilipatnam, which was called Maisolos or Masalia in ancient times. Some believe that the name muslin originated from the name Maisolos. Marco Polo, the famous traveller, visited the Kakatiya kingdom in which Machilipatnam was located and praised the muslins available there. In 1298, Marco Polo described the cloth in his book The Travels. He said that it was made in Mosul, Iraq. Although this view has the fabric named after the city where Europeans first encountered it (Mosul), the fabric is believed to have originated in Dhaka, which is now the capital of Bangladesh. In the 9th century, an Arab merchant named
    9.00
    3 votes
    16

    Ratine

    A loosely woven fabric, the woof threads of which are looped to give a rough, uneven weave. Used for dresses and suits.
    7.25
    4 votes
    17

    Sicilienne

    Material with cotton warp and wool or mohair woof, which gives a wiry finish. Used for men's dusters and summer coats. Also used for women's wear.
    8.67
    3 votes
    18
    Terrycloth

    Terrycloth

    Terrycloth, terry cloth, terry towelling, terry, or simply towelling is a fabric with loops that can absorb large amounts of water. It can be manufactured by weaving or knitting.Towelling is woven on special looms that have two beams of longitudinal warp through which the filler or weft is fired laterally. There are two types of terry fabrics: It is the length of loops that determines how much fluid is absorbed by the cloth as longer loops provide more surface area to absorb and come in contact with the fluid. Items that may be made from terrycloth include babies’ nappies (UK English) or reusable diapers (US English), towels, bathrobes, bedlinen, and sweatbands for the wrist or head. Terrycloth is also sometimes used to make sweat jackets. Terry towelling hats with a shallow brim were once popular with cricketers (like English wicketkeeper Jack Russell) but are no longer in fashion. An alternative fabric used for towels is waffle fabric. A modern synthetic alternative is microfiber.
    7.00
    4 votes
    19
    Barathea

    Barathea

    Fine, soft, close weave in imitation pebble effect. Excellent for dresses and light-weight suits.
    8.33
    3 votes
    20
    Rep

    Rep

    Rep, Repp, or Reps is a cloth made of silk, wool, or cotton. The name is said to have been adapted from the French reps, a word of unknown origin; it has also been suggested that it is a corruption of rib. It is woven in fine cords or ribs across the width of the piece. In silk it is used for dresses, neckties, and, to some extent, for ecclesiastical vestments. In wool and cotton it is used for various upholstery purposes.
    8.33
    3 votes
    21

    Merino

    Fine French all-wool dress fabric; twilled on both sides. Excellent for women's dresses.
    5.80
    5 votes
    22
    Damask

    Damask

    • Weave: Jacquard weaving
    Damask (Arabic: دمسق‎) is a reversible figured fabric of silk, wool, linen, cotton, or synthetic fibres, with a pattern formed by weaving. Damasks are woven with one warp yarn and one weft yarn, usually with the pattern in warp-faced satin weave and the ground in weft-faced or sateen weave. Twill damasks include a twill-woven ground or pattern. Damasks used one of the five basic weaving techniques of the Byzantine and Islamic weaving centres of the early Middle Ages, and derive their name from the city of Damascus, which at the time was a large city active in both trading, as part of the silk road, and manufacture. Damasks were scarce after the ninth century outside of Islamic Spain, but were revived in some places in the thirteenth century. The word "damask" is first seen in a Western European language in the mid-14th century in French. By the fourteenth century, damasks were being woven on draw looms in Italy. From the fourteenth to the sixteenth century, most damasks were woven in a single colour, with a glossy warp-faced satin pattern against a duller ground. Two-colour damasks had contrasting colour warps and wefts, and polychrome damasks added gold and other metallic threads
    6.75
    4 votes
    23

    Challis

    Light-weight woolen material in smooth weave. Has beautiful plain and printed color combinations; wears satisfactorily; and is easily cleaned. An excellent material for dresses and negligees.
    8.00
    3 votes
    24
    8.00
    3 votes
    25

    Madras

    Madras is a lightweight cotton fabric with typically patterned texture and plaid design, used primarily for summer clothing—pants, shorts, dresses and jackets. The fabric takes its name from the former English name of the city of Chennai, India. This cloth also was identified by the colloquial name, "Madrasi checks." Madras today is available as plaid patterns in regular cotton, seersucker and as patchwork madras. Patchwork madras is fabric that is derived from cutting several madras plaid fabrics into strips, and sewing them back together as squares of 3 inch sizes, that form a mixed pattern of various plaids criss - crossing. As a fabric, it is notable because the front and back of the fabric are indistinguishable. One style popular during the 1960s was called bleeding Madras. It used dyes that were not colorfast in a typically plaid design, resulting in bleeding and fading colors that yielded a new look to the fabric each time it was laundered. In contemporary fashion, it is used for men's shirts, women's skirts and pants, golf apparel, children's wear and for accessories. The fabric is mentioned many times in the S.E. Hinton book The Outsiders as a favored pattern of shirts and
    8.00
    3 votes
    26

    Venetian

    Similar to broadcloth, but not so glossy nor so satisfactory. Woven with a fine diagonal twilled face. Used for dresses, skirts, and suits.

    8.00
    3 votes
    27

    Doeskin

    A compact, twilled woolen with a texture that is pliable without being flimsy. Used for gloves, skirts, coats, hats, wraps, and for linings in heavy fur coats.
    5.60
    5 votes
    28
    Chinchilla

    Chinchilla

    Very fine, closely woven pile fabric in imitation of chinchilla fur. The cheaper qualities rough up and soon appear shabby. Used for heavy coats and for men's overcoats.
    9.50
    2 votes
    29
    Gingham

    Gingham

    Gingham is a medium-weight balanced plain-woven fabric made from dyed cotton or cotton-blend yarn. The name originates from an adjective in the Malay language, genggang, meaning striped. Some sources say that the name came into English via Dutch. When originally imported into Europe in the 17th century it was a striped fabric, though now it is distinguished by its checkered pattern. From the mid 18th century, when it was being produced in the mills of Manchester, England, it started to be woven into checked or plaid patterns (often blue and white). Checked gingham became more common over time, though striped gingham was still available in the late Victorian period. Gingham is made of carded or combed, medium or fine yarns, where the coloring is on the warp yarns and always along the grain (weft). Gingham has no right or wrong side with respect to color. Along with muslin, gingham is often used as a test fabric while designing fashion, or used for making an inexpensive fitting shell prior to making the clothing in fashion fabric. Dorothy Gale wore a blue gingham dress in the Wizard of Oz book and film. Bill Hicks made reference to gingham in his famous stand-up comedy routine in
    9.50
    2 votes
    30
    Lamé

    Lamé

    Lamé is a type of fabric woven or knit with thin ribbons of metallic yarns, as opposed to guimpé, where the ribbons are wrapped around a fibre yarn. It is usually gold or silver in color; sometimes copper lamé is seen. Lamé comes in different varieties, depending on the composition of the other threads in the fabric. Common examples are tissue lamé, hologram lamé and pearl lamé. An issue with lamé is that it is subject to seam or yarn slippage, making it less than ideal for garments with frequent usage. Lamé is often used in evening and dress wear and in theatrical and dance costumes. It was, at one time, ubiquitous as a favourite material in futuristic costumes for science fiction television and films. Lamé is also used for its conductive properties in the sport of fencing to make the overjackets (called lamés) that allow touches to be scored. Lamé was used in the making of the ephod.
    9.50
    2 votes
    31

    Linsey-woolsey

    Linsey-woolsey (less often, woolsey-linsey or in Scottish English, wincey) is a coarse twill or plain-woven fabric woven with a linen warp and a woollen weft. Similar fabrics woven with a cotton warp and woollen weft in Colonial America were also called linsey-woolsey or wincey. The name derives from a combination of lin (an archaic word for flax, whence "linen") and wool. This textile has been known since ancient times; known as Shatnez in Hebrew, the Torah and hence Jewish religious law explicitly forbid wearing it. The coarse fabric called stuff woven at Kidderminster from the 17th century, originally a wool fabric, may have been of linsey-woolsey construction later on. Linsey-woolsey was an important fabric in the Colonial America due to the relative scarcity of wool in the colonies. Many sources say it was used for whole-cloth quilts, and when parts of the quilt wore out the remains would be cut up and pieced into patchwork quilts. Some sources dispute this and say that the material was too rough and would have been used instead for clothing and occasionally for light blankets. It was also used as a ground fabric for needlepoint. Linsey-woolsey was valued for its warmth,
    6.50
    4 votes
    32
    Flannel

    Flannel

    Flannel is a soft woven fabric, of various fineness. Flannel was originally made from carded wool or worsted yarn, but is now often made from either wool, cotton, or synthetic fibre. Flannel may be brushed to create extra softness or remain unbrushed. The brushing process is a mechanical process where a fine metal brush rubs the fabric to create fine fibers from the loosely spun yarns. Typically, flannel has either a single- or double-sided nap. Double-napped flannel refers to a fabric that has been brushed on both sides. If the flannel is not napped, it gains its softness through the loosely spun yarn in its woven form. Flannel is commonly used to make tartan clothing, blankets, bed sheets, and sleepwear. The origin of the word is uncertain, but a Welsh origin has been suggested as fabric similar to flannel can be traced back to Wales, where it was well known as early as the 16th century. The French term flanelle was used in the late 17th century, and the German Flanell was used in the early 18th century. Flannel has been made since the 17th century, gradually replacing the older Welsh plains, some of which were finished as "cottons" or friezes, which was the local textile
    7.67
    3 votes
    33

    Alpaca

    Strong, elastic, wiry fabric with a glossy brightness of silk. Used for men's summer suits and coat linings, and for women's tailored skirts.
    6.25
    4 votes
    34

    Eiderdown

    A soft, twilled, cotton-filled fabric with a long-wool nap, sometimes on just one side and sometimes on both sides, the former being called single-faced and the latter, double-faced. Used extensively for children's garments; also, for lounging and bath robes.
    6.25
    4 votes
    35

    Armure

    Similar to alpaca and used for the same purposes. Woven in bird's-eye and diamond effect, sometimes in two colors.

    A weave producing a fine pebble surface. Armure silk in black is used a great deal in mourning wear.
    9.00
    2 votes
    36

    Batiste

    Batiste is the softest of the lightweight opaque fabrics. It is made of cotton, wool, polyester, or a blend. Batiste is a balanced plain weave, a fine cloth made from cotton or linen such as cambric. Batiste was often used as a lining fabric for high-quality garments. Batiste is also used for handkerchiefs (cotton batiste) and lingerie (batiste de soie). Lightweight opaque fabrics are very thin and light but not as transparent as sheer fabrics. The distinction between the two is not always pronounced. End uses include apparel and furnishings. Organdy (a sheer fabric), lawn, and batiste begin as the same gray goods. They differ from one another in the way they are finished. Lawn and batiste do not receive the acid finish and, thus, remain opaque. Better quality fabrics are made of combed yarns.
    9.00
    2 votes
    37
    Gore-Tex

    Gore-Tex

    Gore-Tex is a waterproof/breathable fabric, and a registered trademark of W. L. Gore and Associates. It was co-invented by Wilbert L. Gore, Rowena Taylor, and Gore's son, Robert W. Gore. Robert Gore was granted U.S. Patent 3,953,566 on April 27, 1976, for a porous form of polytetrafluoroethylene (the chemical constituent of Teflon) with a micro-structure characterized by nodes interconnected by fibrils. Robert Gore, Rowena Taylor, and Samuel Allen were granted U.S. Patent 4,194,041 on March 18, 1980 for a "waterproof laminate." For its invention, Robert W. Gore was inducted into the US National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2006. In 1966, John W. Cropper of New Zealand developed and constructed a machine for producing stretched polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape. Rather than file for a patent, however, Cropper chose to keep the process of creating expanded PTFE as a closely held trade secret and required his producer and its employees to sign confidentiality agreements. In 1969, Bob Gore independently discovered expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and introduced it to the public under the trademark Gore-Tex, for which he promptly applied for and obtained U.S. Patent 3,953,566,
    9.00
    2 votes
    38
    7.33
    3 votes
    39

    Chiffon

    • Weave: Plain
    Chiffon, French pronunciation: [ʃi.fɔ̃], from the French word for a cloth or rag, is a lightweight, balanced plain-woven sheer fabric woven of alternate S- and Z-twist crepe (high-twist) yarns. The twist in the crepe yarns puckers the fabric slightly in both directions after weaving, giving it some stretch and a slightly rough feel. Chiffon is made from cotton, silk or synthetic fibres. Chiffon can be dyed to almost any shade, but chiffon made from polyester can be difficult to dye. Under a magnifying glass it resembles a fine net or mesh which gives chiffon some see-through properties. When sewing chiffon, many crafters layer tissue paper in between the two pieces being sewn together. The tissue paper helps keep the fabric together, with the rough surface of the tissue holding the chiffon in place while it is handled. After sewing, the tissue paper can be carefully ripped out. Chiffon is also pinnable, as it will spring back, concealing pin marks. As a general rule, sewers should work slowly and steadily with this fabric, taking care not to run it through a sewing machine too quickly or it will bunch and gather. Chiffon is most commonly used in evening wear, especially as an
    7.33
    3 votes
    40
    7.33
    3 votes
    41
    Matelasse

    Matelasse

    Wool or wool-and-silk material having raised designs similar to quilting. Used for suits and coats and as trimmings.

    A weave showing a very small, dainty quilted effect. The word is derived from the French word matelas, meaning quilt.
    7.33
    3 votes
    42

    Percale

    Percale or Percalcos is a closely woven plain-weave fabric often used for bed covers. The term describes the weave of the fabric, not its content, so percale could be a blend of 50% cotton and 50% polyester, 100% cotton, or a blend of other fabrics in any ratio. A percale weave has a thread count of about 200 or higher, and is noticeably tighter than the standard type of weave used for bed-sheets. It has medium weight, is firm and smooth with no gloss, and warps and washes very well. It is made from both carded and combed yarns. Percale fabrics are made in both solid colors and printed patterns. The finish of the fabric is independent of its weave, so it can be either printed or unprinted. Percale was originally imported from India in the 17th and 18th centuries, then manufactured in France. The word may originate from the Persian, pargālah meaning rag, although the Oxford English Dictionary (as of December 2005) has traced it only as far as 18th-century French. The dictionary of the Institut d'Estudis Catalans describes pexal and perxal as some kind of silk fabric in the year 1348 in Valencia. The etymological dictionary of Catalan explains perxal as derived from Perche in France.
    7.33
    3 votes
    43

    Mirror Velvet

    Is produced by pressing the nap of velvet flat. The pressing must be done in one direction only. Usually this is done with steam and a roller, but at home a hot iron may be used.
    6.00
    4 votes
    44
    Burlap

    Burlap

    • Fiber: Jute
    Hessian ( /ˈhɛsi.ən/), or burlap in the US, is a woven fabric usually made from skin of the jute plant or sisal fibres, or may be combined with other vegetable fibres to make rope, nets, and similar products. Gunny cloth is similar. Hessian, a dense woven fabric, has been historically produced as a coarse fabric, but more recently it is being used in a refined state known simply as jute as an ecofriendly material for bags, rugs, and other products. The name "burlap" appears to be of unknown origin. The name "hessian" is attributed to the use of the fabric, initially, as part of the uniform of soldiers from the German state of Hesse who were called "Hessians." Hessian was first exported from India in the early 19th century. It was traditionally used as backing for linoleum, rugs and carpet. Hessian is often used to make sacks and bags to ship goods like coffee beans; these can be described as gunny sacks. It is breathable and thus resists condensation and associated spoilage of the contents. It is also durable enough to withstand rough handling in transit; these properties have also led to its use for temporary protection as wet covering to prevent rapid moisture loss in setting of
    8.50
    2 votes
    45

    Grenadine

    Loosely woven material; sometimes in striped effect, and sometimes made of silk and cotton. Used for dresses.
    8.50
    2 votes
    46

    Lawn cloth

    Lawn cloth or lawn is a plain weave textile, originally of linen but now chiefly cotton. Lawn is designed using fine, high count yarns, which results in a silky, untextured feel. The fabric is made using either combed or carded yarns. When lawn is made using combed yarns, with a soft feel and slight luster, it is known as "nainsook". The term lawn is also used in the textile industry to refer to a type of starched crisp finish given to a cloth product. The finish can be applied to a variety of fine fabrics, prints or plain. Lawn is a lightweight, sheer cloth, crisper than voile but not as crisp as organdy. Lawn is known for its semi-transparency, which can range from gauzy or sheer to an almost opaque effect, known as lining or utility lawn. The finish used on lawn ranges from soft to semi-crisp to crisp, but the fabric is never completely stiff. Lawn can be white, or may be dyed or printed. The term "lawn" derives from "Laon", a city in France, which produced large quantities of linen lawn. Lawn cloth commonly is used for dresses, blouses, nightwear, underwear, lingerie, curtains, collar cuffs, shirting, infant wear, and handkerchiefs. It is also commonly used in liturgical
    8.50
    2 votes
    47
    Sateen

    Sateen

    Sateen, not to be confused with satin, is a type of fabric often found in bed sheets. Sateen is a term usually applied to cotton, or sometimes rayon. Better qualities are mercerized to give a higher sheen. Some are only calendered to produce the sheen but this disappears with washing and is not considered genuine sateen. Sateen may be bleached, dyed, or printed. It is difficult to make good bound buttonholes on it as it has a tendency to slip at the seams. Sateen produces the sheen and softer feel through the use of a different structure in the weaving process. The sateen structure is four over, one under, placing the most threads on the surface, making it extremely soft, though slightly less durable than other weaves. Standard non-sateen weaves use a one-over, one-under structure. Satin also uses this structure; however, materials such as silk, polyester, etc., are used instead of cotton. Sateen was also used for Vintage dress shirts and other Vintage type clothes.
    8.50
    2 votes
    48
    10.00
    1 votes
    49
    10.00
    1 votes
    50

    Nun's Veiling

    Soft, light-weight fabric, in plain weave. Sometimes called wool batiste; coarser weaves called nun's cloth. Very satisfactory for shirred dresses, as it drapes well.
    10.00
    1 votes
    51

    Panama

    Hard twisted yarn, in plain weave. Used extensively for skirts; sometimes for suits.
    10.00
    1 votes
    52
    Polar fleece

    Polar fleece

    • Weave: Pile
    Polar fleece, usually referred to simply as "fleece," is a soft napped insulating synthetic fabric made from Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or other synthetic fibers. One of the first forms was Polar Fleece created in 1979 by Malden Mills, now Polartec LLC., a new, light and strong pile fabric meant to mimic and in some ways surpass wool. Fleece has some of wool's finest qualities but weighs a fraction of the lightest available woolens. Polar fleece is used in casual jackets, hats, sweaters, jogging bottoms/sweatpants, gym clothes, hoodies, inexpensive throw blankets, and high-performance outdoor clothing, and can be a vegan alternative to wool. It can be made partially from recycled plastic bottles and is very light, soft and easy to wash. Aaron Feuerstein intentionally declined to patent Polar fleece, allowing the material to be produced cheaply and widely by many vendors, leading to the material's quick and wide acceptance. Fleece garments traditionally come in different thickness: micro, 100, 200, and 300, with 300 being the thickest and least flexible. Fleece is a soft, lightweight, warm and comfortable fabric. It is hydrophobic, holding less than 1% of its weight in water,
    10.00
    1 votes
    53
    Bedford Cord

    Bedford Cord

    Bedford cord, named after the town of Bedford in England, is a durable fabric that resembles corduroy. The weave has faint lengthwise ridges, but without the filling yarns that make the distinct wales characteristic of corduroy. Trousers made with Bedford cord are sometimes called "Bedford cords". A water-repellent cotton version of Bedford cord called Jungle Cloth was used by the U.S. Navy for flight clothing during the 1920s-1940s era.
    7.00
    3 votes
    54
    7.00
    3 votes
    55

    Mistral

    Twisted warp-and-woof threads woven to give a crepe effect. Used for dresses.
    7.00
    3 votes
    56
    Chintz

    Chintz

    Chintz (from the plural of chint) are glazed calico cloths printed with flowers and other patterns in different colours. Unglazed calico is called "cretonne". The word calico is derived from the name of the Indian city Calicut (Kozhikkode in native Malayalam) to which it had a manufacturing association. Chintz was originally a woodblock printed, painted or stained calico produced in India from 1600 to 1800 and popular for bed covers, quilts and draperies. Around 1600, Portuguese and Dutch traders were bringing examples of Indian chintz into Europe. These early fabrics were extremely expensive and rare. By 1680 more than a million pieces of chintz were being imported into England per year, and a similar quantity was going to France and Holland. With imported chintz becoming so popular with Europeans during the late 17th century, French and English mills grew concerned, as they could not make chintz. In 1686 the French declared a ban on all chintz imports. In 1720 England's Parliament enacted a law that forbade "the Use and Warings in Apparel of imported chintz, and also its use or Wear in or about any Bed, Chair, Cushion or other Household furniture". Even though chintz was
    6.67
    3 votes
    57
    Etamine

    Etamine

    Soft, light-weight woolen in plain open weave. Used for shirred and plaited dresses.
    6.67
    3 votes
    58
    6.67
    3 votes
    59

    Panne Velvet

    This velvet has a longer pile than ordinary velvet, pressed flat, producing a lustrous finish.
    6.67
    3 votes
    60

    Bengaline

    Wool-and-silk material with a heavy, filled crosswise cord of wool that is covered with threads of silk and wool. Used for skirts and suits.

    A heavy silk woven with cords running from selvage to selvage. The cords are of wool and cotton, the silk being woven to conceal these cords entirely. This silk is very attractive in black and dark shades.
    8.00
    2 votes
    61

    Camlet

    Camlet, also commonly known as camelot or camblet, is a woven fabric that might have originally been made of camel or goat's hair, now chiefly of goat's hair and silk, or of wool and cotton. The original form of this cloth was very valuable; the term later came to be applied to imitations of the original eastern fabric. In the 18th century, England, France, Holland, and Flanders were the chief places of its manufacture; Brussels exceeded them all in the beauty and quality of its camlets, followed by England. A variety of terms have been used for camlet in different forms: Manufacturers of camlets had to take care not to introduce any unnecessary pleats in the fabric, as they were almost impossible to undo. This difficulty was so notorious, that a proverb existed, stating that someone "is like a camlet—he has taken his pleat." The origin of the term is uncertain. While certain authors reference camlets as originally being made of camel hair, others believe it is from the Arabic seil el kemel, the Angora goat. According to Chambers's Encyclopaedia, it comes from Arabic chamal, meaning fine. Ménage derived the word from zambelot, a Levantine term for stuffs made with the fine hair of
    8.00
    2 votes
    62
    Satin Soleil

    Satin Soleil

    A smooth crosswise weave in satin finish. Used considerably for dresses and light-weight suits.
    8.00
    2 votes
    63
    Poplin

    Poplin

    Poplin, also called tabinet (or tabbinet), is a strong fabric in a plain weave of any fiber or blend, with crosswise ribs that typically gives a corded surface. Poplin traditionally consisted of a silk warp with a weft of worsted yarn. As the weft is in the form of a stout cord the fabric has a ridged structure, like rep, which gave depth and softness to the lustre of the silky surface. It is now made with wool, cotton, silk, rayon, or any mixture of these, though originally made from silk. The ribs run across the fabric from selvage to selvage. Poplins are used for dress purposes, and for rich upholstery work. They are formed by using coarse filling yarns in a plain weave. Shirts made from this material are easy to iron and do not wrinkle easily. The term poplin originates from papelino, a fabric made at Avignon, France in the 15th century, named for the papal (pope's) residence there, and from the French papelaine a fabric, normally made with silk, of the same period. Common usage of poplin until about the 20th century was to make silk, cotton or heavy weight wool dresses, suitable for winter wear. Poplin was also a popular upholstery fabric.
    5.50
    4 votes
    64

    Bast

    Bast are the strong fibers in the phloem of a number of dicotyledonous plants, in particular jute, hemp, flax, ramie, kenaf, roselle hemp, etc. They support the conductive cells of the phloem and provide strength to the stem. The bast of some plants are commercially important fiber crops. Bast fibers are often called skin fibers, since the fiber is extracted from the "skin" of the plant. Bast fibers are processed for use in carpet yarn, rope, geotextile (netting or matting), traditional carpets, hessian or burlap, paper, sacks, etc. Bast fibers are also used in the non-woven, moulding, and composite technology industries for the manufacturing of non-woven mats and carpets, composite boards as furniture materials, automobile door panels and headliners, etc. From prehistoric times through at least the early 20th century, Bast shoes were woven from bast strips in the forest areas of Eastern Europe.
    6.33
    3 votes
    65
    Chino cloth

    Chino cloth

    Chino cloth is a twill fabric, originally made of 100% cotton. Today it is also found in cotton-synthetic blends. Developed in the mid-19th century for British and French military uniforms, it has since migrated into civilian wear. Trousers of such a fabric gained popularity in the U.S. when Spanish-American War veterans returned from the Philippines with their twill military trousers.
    6.33
    3 votes
    66

    Homespun

    A loose, rough material of plain weave and coarse yarn. Formerly made on hand looms at home; now imitated by machine. The soft, even warp and woof threads lend themselves to tailoring. Used for outing suits and men's clothes.
    6.33
    3 votes
    67
    Moleskin

    Moleskin

    • Fiber: Cotton
    • Weave: Pile
    Moleskin, originally referring to the short, silky fur of a mole, is heavy cotton fabric, woven and then sheared to create a short, soft pile on one side. The word is also used for clothing made from this fabric, as well as adhesive pads stuck to the skin to prevent blisters. Clothing made from moleskin is noted for its softness and durability. Some variants of the cloth are so densely woven as to be windproof. The majority of manufacturers of this cloth are British mills. The fabric, in a grayish olive-drab color, was used for West German Army (Bundeswehr) uniforms from the 1960s until the early 1990s, when it was replaced by a polyester-cotton blend twill printed with a camouflage pattern called Flecktarn. German moleskin was not sheared and thus had a flat, smooth outer side, differing from British moleskin. It was nonetheless a tough, densely woven material strongly resistant against wind and abrasion. Its chief weakness was its weight and lack of water resistance. Moleskin can be coated with an adhesive backing and used to prevent or treat friction injuries of the feet. In the case of a blister, the moleskin is cut with a hole in the center so the fabric does not adhere to the
    6.33
    3 votes
    68
    Serge

    Serge

    • Fiber: Wool
    • Weave: Twill
    Serge is a type of twill fabric that has diagonal lines or ridges on both sides, made with a two-up, two-down weave. The worsted variety is used in making military uniforms, suits, great coats and trench coats. Its counterpart, silk serge, is used for linings. French serge is a softer, finer variety. The word is also used for a high quality woolen woven. The name is derived from Old French serge, itself from Latin serica, from Greek σηρικος (serikos), meaning "silken". The early association of silk serge, Greece, and France is shown by the discovery in Charlemagne's tomb of a piece of silk serge dyed with Byzantine motifs, evidently a gift from the Byzantine Imperial Court in the 8th or 9th century AD. From early Saxon times, most English wool ("staples") was exported. In the early sixteenth century it went mainly to a Royal monopoly at Calais (then an English possession) and was woven into cloth in France or the Low Countries. However, with the capture of Calais by the French on 7 January 1558, England began expanding its own weaving industry. This was greatly enhanced by the European Wars of Religion (Eighty Years' War, French Wars of Religion); in 1567 Calvinist refugees from
    6.33
    3 votes
    69

    Lansdowne

    A very fine, wiry, silk-and-wool material in plain weave. Used mostly for women's dresses.
    9.00
    1 votes
    70
    Organza

    Organza

    • Weave: Plain
    Organza is a thin, plain weave, sheer fabric traditionally made from silk. Many modern organzas are woven with synthetic filament fibers such as polyester or nylon. Silk organza is woven by a number of mills along the Yangtze River and in the province of Zhejiang in China. A coarser silk organza is woven in the Bangalore area of India. Deluxe silk organzas are woven in France and Italy. Organza is used for bridalwear and eveningwear. In the interiors market it is used for effects in bedrooms and between rooms. Double-width organzas in viscose and acetate are used as sheer curtains.
    9.00
    1 votes
    71
    9.00
    1 votes
    72
    Whipcord

    Whipcord

    Whipcord is the name for either a fabric or a form of braided cord. The fabric whipcord is a strong worsted or cotton fabric made of hard-twisted yarns with a diagonal cord or rib. The weave used for whipcord is a steep-angled twill, essentially the same weave as a cavalry twill or a steep gabardine. However, the ribs of whipcord are usually more pronounced than in either of those fabrics, and the weft (filling) may be visible between the ribs on the right side, which is usually not the case for gabardines. In practice, marketing considerations, rather than technical details, determine when the specific term whipcord is used. Whipcord is usually found in durable outdoor clothing (typically pants, sometimes jackets) as a 16 to 18oz (ounce per square yard fabric weight) wool, or in durable workers' clothing (typically overalls) as a 9 to 12oz cotton. In the latter case, whipcord is an alternative to duck, which has a different weave. Whipcord should not be confused with corduroy. Whipcord has a hard smooth finish with diagonal ribs. Corduroy is fuzzy with vertical ribs. The cord form of whipcording is also sometimes called Interlocking. It is made by plaiting together four strands to
    9.00
    1 votes
    73
    Velour

    Velour

    Velour or velours is a plush, knitted fabric or textile. It is usually made from cotton but can also be made from synthetic materials such as polyester. Velour is used in a wide variety of applications, including clothing and upholstery. Examples such as car seats, or leotards. Velour is a knitted fabric, allowing it to stretch. It combines the stretchy properties of knits, often containing spandex with the rich appearance and feel of velvet. Velour is used in dance wear for the ease of movement it affords, and is also popular for warm, colorful, casual clothing. When used as upholstery, velour often is substituted for velvet. The velour widely used in the manufacture of theater drapes and stage curtains, is manufactured using the same weaving process as velvet: two sets of warps and wefts woven at the same time, with additional threads that will become the nap in between, then cut apart to produce the two separate tufted fabrics. Cotton velours used for this range from 16oz per linear yard to 32oz per linear yard, synthetic versions typically run 13oz to 32oz per linear yard. In the last decade, velour has been used for pillow covers and mattress coverings. Luxury memory foam
    5.25
    4 votes
    74
    Velvet

    Velvet

    • Weave: Pile
    Velvet is a type of woven tufted fabric in which the cut threads are evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it a distinctive feel. The word 'velvety' is used as an adjective to mean "smooth like velvet". Velvet can be either synthetic or natural. Velvet is woven on a special loom that weaves two thicknesses of velvet at the same time. The two pieces are then cut apart to create the pile effect, and the two lengths of fabric are wound on separate take-up rolls. Velvet was expensive to make before industrial power looms became available. Velvet is difficult to clean because of its pile, but modern dry cleaning methods make cleaning more feasible. Velvet pile is created by warp or vertical yarns and velveteen pile is created by weft or fill yarns. Velvet can be made from many different kinds of fibres, traditionally silk. Velvet made entirely from silk has market prices of several hundred US dollars per yard. Cotton can also be used, though this often results in a slightly less luxurious fabric. Velvet can also be made from fibers such as linen, mohair, and wool. A cloth made by the Kuba people of the Democratic Republic of Congo from raffia is often referred to as "Kuba
    5.25
    4 votes
    75
    Dimity

    Dimity

    Dimity is a lightweight, sheer cotton fabric having at least two warp threads thrown into relief to form fine cords. It is a cloth commonly employed for bed upholstery and curtains, and usually white, though sometimes a pattern is printed on it in colors. It is stout in texture, and woven in raised patterns. Originally dimity was made of silk or wool, but since the 18th century it has been woven almost exclusively of cotton. A palampore is a dimity made in India and used for bed coverings Dimity is also a girls' name, which, while still uncommon, is most popular in Australia. A dimity was a bit of draping worn by performers of the Poses Plastiques, which was an early form of strip tease. Performers wore flesh colored silk body stockings and a dimity to give the illusion of modesty.
    7.50
    2 votes
    76

    Granite

    Hard twisted woolen yarn woven in armure effect; light in weight and very durable. Used for skirts and suits. Requires care in tailoring.
    6.00
    3 votes
    77
    6.00
    3 votes
    78
    Velvetine

    Velvetine

    • Weave: Pile
    Velveteen is a cloth made in imitation of velvet. Normally cotton, the term is sometimes applied to a mixture of silk and cotton. Some velveteens are a kind of fustian, having a rib of velvet pile alternating with a plain depression. This fabric has a pile that is short (never more than 3mm deep), and is closely set. It has a firm hand, and a slightly sloping pile. Compared to true velvet, velveteen has greater body, does not drape as easily, and has less sheen. The velveteen trade varies with the fashions that control the production of velvet.
    6.00
    3 votes
    79

    Albatross

    Soft, loosely woven material in black, white, and colors; also made in fancy weaves. Closely related to nun's veiling or chiffon batiste. Used for shirred and draped dresses.
    7.00
    2 votes
    80

    Batavia Cloth

    A straw cloth woven either with silk and cotton warp and often in lacy design. Used to drape hats.
    7.00
    2 votes
    81
    Brilliantine

    Brilliantine

    Wiry silk-wool fabric, like alpaca, but usually of higher luster; made from Angora-goat hair. Used the same as alpaca.
    7.00
    2 votes
    82

    Crinoline

    • Fiber: Horsehair
    Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830, but by 1850, the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman's dress into the required shape. In form and function it is very similar to the earlier farthingale. The name crinoline was invented by one of the fabric's manufacturers, who combined the Latin words crinis (meaning "hair") and lin (meaning "flax"). An alternative origin for the word is sometimes given: the combination of the French words crin (specifically meaning "horse-hair") and lin (again, meaning "flax"). The crinoline was not the first accessory designed to support the wearer's skirts in a fashionable shape; the farthingale in its various forms was worn from the late fifteenth century through the early seventeenth century, and panniers throughout the eighteenth century. Many of these were formal and elaborate styles, often worn at royal courts and by mid to higher levels of society. By mid-1780, England had supplanted France as the influential fashion house in the Western world, exchanging
    7.00
    2 votes
    83

    Covert Cloth

    Material of firm, diagonal twilled weave. Usually in light tan; wears well and tailors nicely. Used chiefly for outing suits and wraps.
    5.67
    3 votes
    84

    Faille

    A soft ribbed fabric of dull finish. Makes excellent mourning wear.
    5.67
    3 votes
    85
    5.67
    3 votes
    86
    Albert Cloth

    Albert Cloth

    Reversible, double-faced material, each side a different color. Used for coats, suits, and wraps.
    8.00
    1 votes
    87
    8.00
    1 votes
    88
    Brocade

    Brocade

    • Weave: Jacquard weaving
    Brocade is a class of richly decorative shuttle-woven fabrics, often made in colored silks and with or without gold and silver threads. The name, related to the same root as the word "broccoli," comes from Italian broccato meaning "embossed cloth," originally past participle of the verb broccare "to stud, set with nails," from brocco, "small nail," from Latin broccus, "projecting, pointed." Brocade is typically woven on a draw loom. It is a supplementary weft technique, that is, the ornamental brocading is produced by a supplementary, non-structural, weft in addition to the standard weft that holds the warp threads together. The purpose of this is to give the appearance that the weave actually was embroidered on. In Guatemala, brocade is the most popular technique used to decorate fabric woven by Maya weavers on backstrap looms. Ornamental features in brocade are emphasized and wrought as additions to the main fabric, sometimes stiffening it, though more frequently producing on its face the effect of low relief. In some, but not all, brocades, these additions present a distinctive appearance on the back of the material where the supplementary weft or floating threads of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    89
    Crepe

    Crepe

    A soft, even crepe weave suitable for draped dresses.

    A cloth having small grain effect and slightly crinkled surface. In silk and cotton.
    8.00
    1 votes
    90

    Prunella

    Fine, closely woven twilled fabric. Used for dresses, light-weight suits, and clergymen's robes.
    8.00
    1 votes
    91
    Shag

    Shag

    • Weave: Pile
    A shag is a rug or carpet that has a deep pile, giving it a shaggy appearance. People like walking on it because it is so soft and bouncy. However, the problem with it is that it is hard to keep clean because dust gets caught in between the shags. Carpet rakes were available in the heyday of shag pile carpets to help remove dirt and restore a uniform appearance. Shag carpeting and the wide use of the colors avocado and harvest gold is sometimes evoked as an example of the esthetic from the culture of the 1970s in the United States and United Kingdom. In recent years, shag carpeting has seen a resurgence of popularity.
    8.00
    1 votes
    92
    Gauze

    Gauze

    Gauze is a thin, translucent fabric with a loose open weave. Gauze was traditionally woven in Palestine and the English word is said to derive from the place name for Gaza (Arabic: غزة‎ ghazza), a center of weaving in the region. Despite a prohibition on trade with non-Christians from religious authorities in medieval Europe, a fine type of silk known as gazzatum was imported from Gaza as early as the 13th century. Though members of religious orders in Europe were forbidden to wear it, the fabric won a place for itself and emerged into modern life as gauze. According to the French government's online etymology dictionary, the English form of the word derived from the French gaze, whose ultimate origin is uncertain, but is often attributed to the Arabic and Persian word qazz meaning "raw silk", which itself derived from the name of Gaza. The same source says the existence of "an ancient textile industry in Gaza is not assured," and it is not known how the word entered into widespread use in European languages, with examples of first usages cited being the medieval latin forms garza in Bologna in 1250 and gazzatum in Budapest in 1279. Gauze was originally made of silk and was used
    6.50
    2 votes
    93

    Jean

    A twilled, undressed cloth with cotton warp and woolen woof, or sometimes in all cotton, and referred to, in the plural, as jeans. Used for trousers, boys' suits, and women's outing suits.
    6.50
    2 votes
    94
    6.50
    2 votes
    95
    Nomex

    Nomex

    • Fiber: Aramid
    Nomex (styled NOMEX) is a registered trademark for flame-resistant meta-aramid material developed in the early 1960s by DuPont and first marketed in 1967. Nomex and related aramid polymers are related to nylon, but have aromatic backbones, and hence are more rigid and more durable. Nomex is the premier example of a meta variant of the aramids (Kevlar is a para aramid). Unlike Kevlar, Nomex cannot align during filament formation and has poorer strength. However, it has excellent thermal, chemical, and radiation resistance for a polymer material. The polymer is produced by condensation reaction from the monomers m-phenylenediamine and isophthaloyl chloride. It is sold in both fiber and sheet forms and is used as a fabric wherever resistance from heat and flame is required. Nomex sheet is actually a calendered paper and made in a similar fashion. Nomex Type 410 paper is the original and one of the larger grade types made, mostly for electrical insulation purposes. Nomex fiber is made in the USA and in Spain (Asturias). Wilfred Sweeny (1926-2011), the DuPont scientist responsible for discoveries leading to Nomex, earned a DuPont Lavoisier Medal partly for this work in 2002. The paper
    6.50
    2 votes
    96
    Sea silk

    Sea silk

    Sea silk is an extremely fine, rare and valuable fabric that is made from the long silky filaments or byssus secreted by a gland in the foot of pen shells (particularly Pinna nobilis). The byssus is used by the clam to attach itself to the sea bed. Sea silk was produced in the Mediterranean region from the large marine bivalve mollusc, Pinna nobilis until early in the 20th century. The shell, which is sometimes almost a metre long, adheres itself to rocks with a tuft of very strong thin fibres, pointed end down, in the intertidal zone. These byssus or filaments (which can be up to 6 cm long) are then spun and, when treated with lemon juice, turn a golden colour, which never fades. The cloth produced from these filaments can be woven even finer than silk, and is extremely light and warm; however, it attracts clothes moths, the larvae of which will eat it. It was said that a pair of women's gloves could fit into half a walnut shell and a pair of stockings in a snuffbox. The mollusc is also sought for its flesh and occasionally has pearls of fair quality. The Greek text of the (196 BCE) Rosetta Stone records that Ptolemy V reduced taxes on priests, including one paid in byssus cloth,
    5.33
    3 votes
    97
    Broadcloth

    Broadcloth

    Broadcloth is a dense woollen cloth. Modern broadcloth can be composed of cotton, silk, or polyester, but traditionally broadcloth was made solely of wool. The dense weave lends sturdiness to the material. It was made in several parts of England at the end of the medieval period. The raw material was short staple wool, carded and spun into yarn and then woven on a broad loom to produce cloth 1.75 yards wide. It was then fulled, usually in a fulling mill. When fulled, the fibres of the cloth would felt together, resulting in a smooth surface. Broadcloth - the English term - was first prodcued in Flanders from the 11th century and throughout the medieval period. Around 1500, broadcloth was made in a number of districts of England, including Essex and Suffolk in southern East Anglia, the West Country Clothing District (Gloucestershire, Wiltshire, east Somerset - sometimes with adjacent areas), at Worcester, Coventry, Cranbrook in Kent and some other places. This was the best English cloth, and large quantities were exported by the merchants of the Company of Merchant Adventurers of London, principally to Antwerp as white (i.e. undyed) cloth. It was finished and dyed in Flanders, and
    6.00
    2 votes
    98
    6.00
    2 votes
    99
    6.00
    2 votes
    100

    Charmeuse

    Charmeuse (French: [ʃaʁmøːz]) is a lightweight fabric woven with a satin weave, where the warp threads cross over three or more of the backing (weft) threads. The front side of the fabric has a satin finish—lustrous and reflective—whereas the back has a dull finish. It can be made of silk or a synthetic lookalike such as polyester. Silk charmeuse is more expensive and delicate but is softer and a better insulator. Polyester charmeuse is cheaper and can often withstand machine washing, but it does not breathe as well as silk. Charmeuse differs from plain satin in that charmeuse is softer and lighter in weight. The luster and delicate hand make charmeuse suited to lingerie, flowing evening gowns, and drapey blouses. Bridal gowns sometime use charmeuse, however, the fabric does not hold a shape well, so it is not used for full, flared skirts; the charmeuse tends to cling and hang against the body. It is best suited to a more fluid, slinky bias cut, and is too fragile and flimsy for more tailored clothing. Its uses in menswear include the lining of jackets and slacks, handkerchiefs, ties, and underwear such as charmeuse boxer shorts. It is one of the more challenging fabrics to sew and
    7.00
    1 votes
    101

    Eponge

    A fabric having a rough surface something similar to terry cloth.
    7.00
    1 votes
    102
    Kevlar

    Kevlar

    • Fiber: Aramid
    Kevlar is the registered trademark for a para-aramid synthetic fiber, related to other aramids such as Nomex and Technora. Developed at DuPont in 1965, this high strength material was first commercially used in the early 1970s as a replacement for steel in racing tires. Typically it is spun into ropes or fabric sheets that can be used as such or as an ingredient in composite material components. Currently, Kevlar has many applications, ranging from bicycle tires and racing sails to body armor because of its high tensile strength-to-weight ratio; by this measure it is 5 times stronger than steel on an equal weight basis. It is also used to make modern drumheads that hold up withstanding high impact. When used as a woven material, it is suitable for mooring lines and other underwater applications. A similar fiber called Twaron with roughly the same chemical structure was developed by Akzo in the 1970s; commercial production started in 1986, and Twaron is now manufactured by Teijin. Poly-paraphenylene terephthalamide – branded Kevlar – was invented by Polish-American chemist Stephanie Kwolek while working for DuPont, in anticipation of a gasoline shortage. In 1964, her group began
    4.67
    3 votes
    103

    Nainsook

    Nainsook is a fine, soft muslin fabric, often to used to make babies' clothing. Nainsook Cotton was often used to make Bias Tape in the 50's and 60's.
    4.67
    3 votes
    104

    Habutai

    Habutai or Habotai is one of the most basic plain weaves. While it was traditionally woven in Japan, most Habutai is today woven in China. It is normally a lining silk but can also be used for T-shirts, lampshades, summer blouses or very light lingerie. It is quite easy to dye and can be found in many stores.
    5.50
    2 votes
    105

    Mockado

    • Weave: Pile
    Mockado (also moquette, moucade) is a woollen pile fabric made in imitation of silk velvet from the mid-sixteenth century. Mockado was usually constructed with a woollen pile on a linen or worsted wool warp and woollen weft, although the ground fabric could be any combination of wool, linen, and silk. Mockado was used for furnishings and carpeting, and also for clothing such as doublets, farthingales, and kirtles. Mockado was introduced to England from Flanders in the mid-sixteenth century. Dutch and Walloon weavers fleeing Spanish rule in the Low Countries were creating mockadoes and other fabrics combining silk and linen with combed woollens in the weaving center of Norwich by 1571. Varieties included plain, with an even pile, and "tuft" or voided mockado. Mockadoes were woven in solid or changeable colours, and were sometimes stamped with patterns in imitation of more expensive Utrecht velvets Mockado was always a rough fabric, and by the 1580s, the term "mockado" was synonymous with "inferior" or "tawdry". In discussing the old English tradition of new clothes at Easter, folklorist Peter Opie cites Thomas Lodge's 1596 pamphlet Wits Miserie : "The farmer that was contented in
    5.50
    2 votes
    106
    Plush

    Plush

    • Weave: Pile
    Plush (from French pelouche) is a textile having a cut nap or pile the same as fustian or velvet. Originally the pile of plush consisted of mohair or worsted yarn, but now silk by itself or with a cotton backing is used for plush, the distinction from velvet being found in the longer and less dense pile of plush. The soft material is largely used for upholstery and furniture purposes, and is also much employed in dress and millinery. Modern plush are commonly manufactured from synthetic fibres such as polyester. One of the largest uses of this fabric is in the production of stuffed toys, with small stuffed animals made from plush fabric, such as teddy bears. Plush is also one of the main materials for the construction of designer toys.
    5.50
    2 votes
    107
    Tweed

    Tweed

    • Weave: Herringbone
    Tweed is a rough, unfinished woollen fabric, of a soft, open, flexible texture, resembling cheviot or homespun, but more closely woven. It is made in either plain or twill weave and may have a check or herringbone pattern. Subdued, interesting colour effects (heather mixtures) are obtained by twisting together differently coloured woollen strands into a two- or three-ply yarn. Tweeds are desirable for informal outerwear, being moisture-resistant and durable. Tweeds are commonly worn for outdoor activities such as shooting and hunting, in both Ireland and the United Kingdom. "Lovat" is the name given to the green used in traditional Scottish tweed. In Ireland, tweed manufacturing is most associated with County Donegal in the Province of Ulster. Tweed is also commonly found covering vintage or retro guitar amplifiers, such as the Fender Tweed. Tweed has recently come back to fashion with high end stores and designers using it often. The original name of the cloth was tweel, Scots for twill, it being woven in a twilled rather than a plain pattern. A traditional story has the name coming about almost by chance. About 1830, a London merchant received a letter from a Hawick firm about
    5.50
    2 votes
    108
    6.00
    1 votes
    109
    Denim

    Denim

    • Fiber: Cotton
    • Weave: Twill
    Denim (which gets its name from the French city of Nîmes (de Nîmes)) is a rugged cotton twill textile, in which the weft passes under two (twi- "double") or more warp threads. This twill weaving produces the familiar diagonal ribbing of the fabric, which distinguishes denim from cotton duck. It is characteristic of any indigo denim that only the warp threads are dyed, whereas the weft threads remain plain white. As a result of the warp-faced twill weaving, one side of the fabric shows the blue warp threads, the other side shows the white weft threads. This is why jeans are white from the inside and what makes their fading characteristics so unique compared to every other fabric. (One can only assume that this was done in the first place to make the jeans less expensive, because less indigo is needed to dye the fabric.) Denim has been used in America since the late 18th century. The word comes from the name of a sturdy fabric called serge, originally made in Nîmes, France, by the André family. Originally called Serge de Nîmes, the name was soon shortened to denim. Denim was traditionally colored blue with indigo dye to make blue "jeans", though "jean" then denoted a different,
    6.00
    1 votes
    110

    Jersey

    Woolen or silk mixed stockinette weave. Used chiefly for undergarments and petticoats.
    6.00
    1 votes
    111

    Longcloth

    Longcloth refers to a plain cotton cloth originally made in comparatively long pieces. The name was applied particularly to cloth made in India. Longcloth, which is now commonly bleached, comprehends a number of various qualities. It is heavier than cambric, and finer than medium or Mexican. In the early 1900s, as it was used principally for underclothing and shirts, most of the longcloth sold in Great Britain passed through the hands of the shirt and underclothing manufacturers, who sold it to the shopkeepers, though there was still a considerable if decreasing retail trade in piece-goods. In the UK in the early 1900s the lower kinds of longcloth, which were made from American cotton, corresponded in quality to the better kinds of shirting made for the East, but the best longcloths were made from Egyptian cotton, and were fine and fairly costly goods. Nowadays, longcloth (or long cloth) designates a cotton fabric which is of high quality, very soft, coarsely woven, and very often used to make underwear and infants' clothing.
    6.00
    1 votes
    112
    6.00
    1 votes
    113

    Cheviot

    Diagonal cord weave with slight nap; usually heavy weight. Used for suits and coats. Requires much care in tailoring, especially in pressing.
    4.50
    2 votes
    114
    Duvetene

    Duvetene

    The body of the material of a weave similar to flannel, and which, with a short, soft nap, is used for children's coats and women's suits and coats.
    4.50
    2 votes
    115
    Baize

    Baize

    • Weave: Pile
    Baize is a coarse woollen (or in cheaper variants cotton) cloth. Baize is most often used on snooker and billiards tables to cover the slate and cushions, and is often used on other kinds of gaming tables such as those for blackjack, baccarat, craps and other casino games. The surface finish of baize is not very fine (and thus increases friction, perceptibly slowing the balls down, from a player's perspective). Baize is available with and without a perceptible nap. Snooker, in which understanding of the effects of the nap is part of the game, uses the nappy variety, while pool (pocket billiards) and carom billiards use the napless type. Table baize is available in many grades, with pool halls preferring smooth, "fast" worsted woollen baize, while rather more fuzzy, "slow" cloth is commonly used for bar/pub pool. For gaming use, baize is traditionally dyed green, in mimicry of a lawn (see Cue sport, "History"), thus the common phrase "the green baize", a synecdochal way to refer to snooker itself. Today, a wide variety of colours are now used for tables (for other uses such as clothing it has always been available in other colours). At one time, "the green baize door" (a door to
    5.00
    1 votes
    116
    5.00
    1 votes
    117
    Mohair

    Mohair

    Mohair /ˈmoʊhɛər/ usually refers to a silk-like fabric or yarn made from the hair of the Angora goat. The word "mohair" was adopted into English before 1570 from the Arabic: مخير mukhayyar, a type of haircloth, literally 'choice', from khayyara, 'he chose'. Mohair fiber is approximately 25–45 microns in diameter. It is one of the oldest textile fibers in use. It is both durable and resilient. It is notable for its high luster and sheen, which has helped give it the nickname the "Diamond Fiber," and is often used in fiber blends to add these qualities to a textile. Mohair takes dye exceptionally well. Mohair is warm in winter as it has great insulating properties, while remaining cool in summer due to its moisture wicking properties. It is durable, naturally elastic, flame resistant, crease resistant, and does not felt. It is considered to be a luxury fiber, like cashmere, angora and silk, and is usually more expensive than most wool that comes from sheep. Mohair is composed mostly of keratin, a protein found in the hair, wool, horns and skin of all mammals. While it has scales like wool, the scales are not fully developed, merely indicated. Thus, mohair does not felt as wool
    5.00
    1 votes
    118

    Stretch fabric

    Stretch fabric is a term that refers to synthetic fabrics which stretch. Stretch fabrics are split into two categories: 2-way stretch and 4-way stretch. 2-way stretch fabrics stretch in one direction, usually from selvedge to selvedge (but can be in other directions depending on the knit). 4-way stretch fabrics, such as spandex, stretches in both directions, crosswise and lengthwise. Stretch fabrics evolved from the scientific effort to make fibres using neoprene. From this research, in 1958 commercial stretch fabrics ('elastomerics') such as spandex or elastane (widely branded as 'Lycra') were brought to the market. Stretch fabrics simplify the construction of clothing. First used in swimsuits and women's bras, fashion designers began using them as early as the mid-1980s. They entered the mainstream market in the early 1990s, and are widely used in sports clothing. On a larger scale, the materials have also been adapted to many artistic and decorative purposes. Stretch fabric structures create contemporary and modern looking design elements that have many uses in corporate theatre and event production.
    5.00
    1 votes
    119

    Voile

    • Fiber: Cotton
    Voile is a soft, sheer fabric, usually made of 100% cotton or cotton blends including linen or polyester. The term comes from French, and means veil. Because of its light weight, the fabric is mostly used in soft furnishing. Full-length curtains in hot countries are made with voile and used as window treatments, mosquito nets etc. When used as curtain material they are similar to net curtains. Voiles are available in a range of patterns and colours (unlike net curtains which are generally white or off-white). Because of their semi-transparent quality, voile curtains are made using specially manufactured heading tape that is less easily noticeable through the fabric. Voile fabric is also used in dress-making, either in multiple layers or laid over a second material. Voile is very similar to chiffon, which is also used in dress-making. When it comes to country style bedrooms, gingham and printed fabrics can be employed on the voile. Light sheer voile curtain are perfect to allow natural light for those areas,where more privacy is needed. Whereas heavy vibrant colored curtains and drapes,complete with swags and tails build a deluxe ambience,that would accentuate a traditional period
    5.00
    1 votes
    120

    Kersey

    Kersey is a kind of coarse woollen cloth that was an important component of the textile trade in Medieval England. It derives its name from kersey yarn and ultimately from the village of Kersey, Suffolk, having presumably originated in that region. However the cloth was made in many places. It was being woven as early as 1262 in Andover, Hampshire, where regulations prohibited the inclusion of Spanish wool in kerseys. By 1475, the West Riding of Yorkshire including Calderdale was also a major producer. Kersey was a lighter weight cloth than broadcloth. English kerseys were widely exported to central Europe and other places: a surviving business letter from the end of the 16th century recommends to trade kerseys for good wine on the Canary Islands. Kersey yarns were spun in large gauges (thicknesses) from inferior carded wool, and made thick and sturdy cloth. Kersey was a warp-backed, twill-weave cloth woven on a four-treadle loom. As a rule, half the relatively small, numerous and closely set warp ends [threads] were struck with a big kersey weft in a two-and-two, unbalanced and highly prominent twill. The rest of the ends were simultaneously struck in a one-and-three twill, so
    4.00
    1 votes
    121

    Zibeline

    • Weave: Pile
    Zibeline ( /ˈzɪbəlɪn/ or /ˈzɪbəlaɪn/) is a thick, soft fabric with a long nap. It is usually made of wool, such as mohair or alpaca, but can also be made from the hair of other animals, such as camels. Zibeline can also refer to either the sable (Martes zibellina) or its pelt, which zibeline was originally made from. Zibeline can also refer to a heavy silk fabric with a twill weave, very similar to Mikado.
    4.00
    1 votes
    122

    Boucle

    Similar to astrakhan, but more loosely woven and lighter in weight; has only parts of the surface covered with the curly loops of yarn. Used for coats and capes.
    0.00
    0 votes
    123
    Corduroy

    Corduroy

    • Weave: Tufting
    Corduroy is a textile composed of twisted fibers that, when woven, lie parallel (similar to twill) to one another to form the cloth's distinct pattern, a "cord." Modern corduroy is most commonly composed of tufted cords, sometimes exhibiting a channel (bare to the base fabric) between the tufts. Corduroy is, in essence, a ridged form of velvet. The word corduroy probably originates as a compound of the words cord and obsolete duroy (a name of a coarse fabric made in England). The interpretation of the word as corde du roi (from French, the cord of the King) is a folk etymology. As a fabric, corduroy is considered a durable cloth. Corduroy is found in the construction of trousers, jackets and shirts. The width of the cord is commonly referred to as the size of the "wale" (i.e. the number of ridges per inch). The lower the "wale" number, the thicker the width of the wale (i.e., 4-wale is much thicker than 11-wale). Corduroy’s wale count per inch can vary from 1.5 to 21, although the traditional standard falls somewhere between 10 and 12. Wide wale is more commonly used in trousers and furniture upholstery (primarily couches); medium, narrow, and fine wale fabrics are usually found
    0.00
    0 votes
    124

    Cravenette

    Fine twilled fabric similar to serge and filled from the wrong side with a sizing that renders the material moisture-proof. Used for coats, capes, and ulsters.
    0.00
    0 votes
    125
    0.00
    0 votes
    126
    Gabardine

    Gabardine

    • Weave: Twill
    Gabardine is a tough, tightly woven fabric used to make suits, overcoats, trousers, uniforms, windbreakers, and other garments. The word gabardine has been used to refer to a "dress, covering" since the 1950s. It has been used to mean "closely woven cloth" since 1904. The fibre used to make the fabric is traditionally worsted wool, but may also be cotton, texturized polyester, or a blend. Gabardine is woven as a warp-faced steep or regular twill, with a prominent diagonal rib on the face and smooth surface on the back. Garbardine always has many more warp than weft yarns. Cotton gabardine is sometimes used by bespoke tailors to make pocket linings for business suits, where the pocket's contents would quickly wear holes in the usual flimsy pocket lining material. Clothing made from gabardine is generally labeled as being suitable for dry cleaning only, as is typical for wool textiles. Gabardine may also refer to the twill-weave used for gabardine fabric, or to a raincoat made of this fabric. Gabardine was invented in 1879 by Thomas Burberry, founder of the Burberry fashion house in Basingstoke, and patented in 1888. The original fabric was water-proofed before weaving and was
    0.00
    0 votes
    127

    Melton

    Thick, heavy, felted material, finished without pressing or glossing. Usually made in dark blue and black; does not clean well. Used for outing suits and overcoats.
    0.00
    0 votes
    128
    Taffeta

    Taffeta

    • Fiber: Silk
    • Weave: Plain
    Taffeta ( /ˈtæfɨtə/; archaically spelled taffety) is a crisp, smooth plain woven fabric made from silk or synthetic fibres. The word is Persian in origin, and means "twisted woven." It is considered to be a "high end" fabric, suitable for use in ball gowns, wedding dresses, and in interiors for curtains or wallcovering. There are two distinct types of silk taffeta: yarn-dyed and piece-dyed. Piece-dyed taffeta is often used in linings and is quite soft. Yarn-dyed taffeta is much stiffer and is often used in evening dresses. Shot silk taffeta was one of the most sought-after forms of Byzantine silk, known in Latin as purpura. Taffeta was then woven in Italy and France and until the 1950s in Japan. Today most raw silk taffeta is produced in India and Pakistan. Originally this was produced on handlooms, but since the 1990s, it has been produced on mechanical looms in the Bangalore area. From the 1970s until the 1990s, the Jiangsu province of China produced some fine silk taffetas. They were less flexible than the Indian mills that now dominate production. Other countries in Southeast Asia and the Middle East are weaving silk taffeta, but not yet either at the quality or competitiveness
    0.00
    0 votes
    129

    Twaron

    • Fiber: Aramid
    Twaron is the brandname of Teijin Aramid for a para-aramid. It is a heat-resistant and strong synthetic fibre developed in the early 1970s by the Dutch company AKZO, division ENKA, later Akzo Industrial Fibers. The research name of the para-aramid fibre was originally Fiber X, but it was soon called Arenka. Although the Dutch para-aramid fiber was developed only a little later than DuPont's Kevlar, introduction of Twaron as a commercial product came much later than Kevlar due to financial problems at the AKZO company in the 1970s. This is a chronology of the development of Twaron: Twaron is a p-phenylene terephtalamide (PpPTA), the simplest form of the AABB para polyaramide. PpPTA is a product of p-phenylene diamine (PPD) and terephtaloyl dichloride (TDC). To dissolve the aromatic polymer Twaron used a co-solvent of N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) and an ionic component (calcium chloride CaCl2) to occupy the hydrogen bonds of the amide groups. Prior to the invention of this process by Leo Vollbracht, working at the Dutch chemical firm AKZO, no practical means of dissolving the polymer was known. The use of this system by DuPont led to a patent war between AKZO and DuPont as Dupont
    0.00
    0 votes
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