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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Tea of All Time

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    1
    Vietnamese lotus tea

    Vietnamese lotus tea

    • Regions where grown: Vietnam
    Vietnamese lotus tea (Vietnamese: trà sen, chè sen, or chè ướp sen) is a type of green tea produced in Vietnam that has been flavored with the scent of Nelumbo nucifera. It is a specialty product of the Vietnamese tea industry and is consumed as part of celebratory events or festivals. The tea is made by allowing the green tea to absorb the flower's natural scent. This is done through several methods, either by: These steps can be repeated multiple times to increase the floral scent in the tea leaves. In the case of higher quality teas, one thousand lotus flowers per kilogram of tea are needed to complete this ancient process. Many modern production tend towards flavoring or perfumes to scent the tea. Lotus teas are typically very potent and are best brewed for under 2 minutes using cooler brewing temperatures (160°F/70°C). Some fanciers will brew 3-4 times from one set of leaves.
    6.44
    9 votes
    2
    Chun Mee tea

    Chun Mee tea

    • Regions where grown: Zhejiang
    Chun Mee (珍眉) is a popular green tea. It has a dusty appearance and is generally more acidic and less sweet than other green teas. It was originally produced only in the Jiangxi province, but is now grown elsewhere. It is often referred as "9371". Chun mee tea, together with Assam Bukial tea, has been studied to observe the rate of infusion of caffeine. The study found that caffeine diffusion through the tea leaves is a greatly hindered process.
    9.20
    5 votes
    3

    White monkey paw

    White Monkey Paw (Chinese: 白毛猴; pinyin: báimáohóu) is technically a green tea made from the top two leaves and the bud of new season growth (late March / early April). It originates from the Wuyi Mountains in Fujian Province, China. These delicate leaves are gently and gingerly steamed and dried. The dried leaf is said to look like that of a monkey's paw. The leaves still show the "hairy down" on them which indicates that these leaves were plucked very early in the morning and within the first two weeks of the new season of growth. Even though this is a green tea, the visual appearance and cup liquor is so delicate that this is known as a white tea.
    7.50
    6 votes
    4
    Darjeeling tea

    Darjeeling tea

    • Regions where grown: Darjeeling
    Darjeeling tea is a tea from the Darjeeling district in West Bengal, India. It is available as black, white or oolong. When properly brewed, it yields a thin-bodied, light-colored infusion with a floral aroma. The flavor can include a tinge of astringent tannic characteristics, and a musky spiciness sometimes described as "muscatel". Although Darjeeling teas are marketed commercially as "black teas", almost all of them have incomplete oxidation (
    7.17
    6 votes
    5
    Genmaicha

    Genmaicha

    • Regions where grown: East Asia
    Genmaicha (玄米茶, "brown rice tea") is the Japanese name for green tea combined with roasted brown rice. It is sometimes referred to colloquially as "popcorn tea" because a few grains of the rice pop during the roasting process and resemble popcorn. This type of tea was originally drunk by poor Japanese, as the rice served as a filler and reduced the price of the tea; which is why it is also known as the "people's tea." It was also used by those persons fasting for religious purposes or who found themselves to be between meals for long periods of time. Today it is consumed by all segments of society. Tea steeped from these tea leaves has a light yellow hue. Its flavor is mild and combines the fresh grassy flavor of green tea with the aroma of the roasted rice. The water to steep this tea should typically be about 80–85 °C (176–185 °F). A steeping time of 3–5 minutes is recommended, depending on desired strength and the source of the tea - some sources recommend as little as one minute of brewing time. Genmaicha is also sold with matcha (powdered green tea) added to it. This product is called Matcha-iri genmaicha (抹茶入り玄米茶) (lit. Genmaicha with added powdered tea). Matcha-iri genmaicha
    8.00
    5 votes
    6
    Bai Mu Dan tea

    Bai Mu Dan tea

    • Regions where grown: Fujian
    Bai Mudan (Chinese: 白牡丹; literally "white peony") is a type of white tea made from plucks each with one leaf shoot and two immediate young leaves. Bai Mudan is sometimes preferred by white tea drinkers for its fuller flavor and greater potency than the other major type of white tea, Bai Hao Yinzhen. The latter is made purely with leaf shoots, and so it is comparatively softer and more subtle. The typical taste of Bai Mudan is a result of both the processing and the tea plant cultivars employed in the production. The family of tea cultivars used in producing Bai Mudan are the "Dai Bai" varieties. In eastern Fujian, the cultivar Fuding Dai Bai is used. In northern Fujian, the Zhenghe Dai Bai cultivar is used. The differences in the plant yield two distinct styles of Bai Mudan: the Fuding variety and the Zhenghe variety. Genuine Bai Mudan is a white tea, therefore, it is a slightly oxidized tea. The plucks are sun-withered for an extended period of time and then piled briefly for oxidation, during which enzymes of the tealeaves interact with other constituents to form new materials that result in the final taste and aroma character of the tea. Depending on the weather, conditions of
    7.60
    5 votes
    7
    Gunpowder tea

    Gunpowder tea

    • Regions where grown: Zhejiang
    Gunpowder tea (珠茶; pinyin: zhū chá) is a form of green Chinese tea produced in Zhejiang Province of China in which each leaf has been rolled into a small round pellet. It is believed to take its English name from the fact that the tea resembles blackpowder grains. This rolling method of shaping tea is most often applied either to dried green tea (the most commonly encountered variety outside China) or Oolong tea. Gunpowder tea production dates back to the Tang Dynasty (618–907) but it was first introduced to Taiwan in the 19th century. Gunpowder tea leaves are withered, steamed, rolled, and then dried. Although the individual leaves were formerly rolled by hand, today most gunpowder tea is rolled by machines (though the highest grades are still rolled by hand). Rolling renders the leaves less susceptible to physical damage and breakage and allows them to retain more of their flavor and aroma. In addition, it allows certain types of oolong teas to be aged for decades if they are cared for by being occasionally roasted. When buying gunpowder tea it is important to look for shiny pellets, which indicate that the tea is relatively fresh. Pellet size is also associated with quality,
    7.40
    5 votes
    8
    Longjing

    Longjing

    • Regions where grown: Zhejiang
    Longjing tea, sometimes called by its literal translated name Dragon Well tea, is a variety of pan-fried green tea from Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China where it is produced mostly by hand and has been renowned for its high quality, earning the China Famous Tea title. Like most other Chinese green tea, Longjing tea leaves are roasted early in processing (after picking) to stop the natural "fermentation" process, which is a part of creating black and oolong teas. In the world of tea, the term "fermentation" refers to the actions of natural enzymes, present in the leaves, on the juices and tissues of the leaf; this is not fermentation in the true sense of the term (as, for example, the action of yeast in producing beer). The actions of these enzymes is stopped by 'firing' (heating in pans) or by steaming the leaves before they completely dry out. As is the case with other green teas (and 'white teas'), Longjing tea leaves are therefore "unfermented." When steeped, the tea produces a yellow-green color. The tea contains Vitamin C, amino acids, and, like most finer Chinese green teas, has one of the highest concentrations of catechins among teas. For best infusion results, water at
    7.20
    5 votes
    9

    Dong Fang Mei Ren tea

    Dongfang meiren tea (Chinese: 東方美人茶; literally "oriental beauty tea"), also marketed as white tip oolong tea, is a heavily fermented, non-roasted, tip-type oolong tea produced in Hsinchu County, Taiwan. This tea has natural fruity aromas and produces a sweet tasting bright-reddish orange tea liquor without a strong bitterness. Dried leaves of high quality should exhibit a pleasant aroma with leaf coloration of dark purple and brown tones with white hairs. Dongfang meiren is the chhiⁿ-sim tōa-phàⁿ (青心大冇) cultivar grown without pesticides to encourage a common pest, the tea green leafhopper (Jacobiasca formosana), to feed on the leaves, stems, and buds. These insects suck the phloem juices of the tea stems, leaves, and buds, producing monoterpene diol and hotrienol which give the tea its unique flavor. The buds then turn white along the edges which gives the tea its alternate name, white tip oolong. The insect bites start the oxidation of the leaves and tips and add a sweet note to the tea. This process has inspired makers of other types of tea such as dongding oolong tea and the east coast black teas of Hualien and Taitung Counties to withhold pesticide use in order to replicate
    6.60
    5 votes
    10
    Ying De Hong

    Ying De Hong

    • Regions where grown: Guangdong Province
    Yingdehong tea (英德红茶; pinyin: Yīngdé hóngchá) is a black tea from Yingde, Guangdong province, China. First produced mechanically in 1959. The tea tasted good and the best kind is "Ying Hong NO.9", and much of the tea is exported. Some quality varieties are produced, which often look like leaf Oolong. The tea should have a cocoa-like aroma and like most Chinese black teas a sweet aftertaste.
    6.60
    5 votes
    11
    Huang Guanyin tea

    Huang Guanyin tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Huang Guan Yin is a Wuyi Oolong with a creamy taste. It can be either tightly rolled like Anxi Oolongs or in strips like conventional Wuyi Oolong.
    7.75
    4 votes
    12
    Chai

    Chai

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    6.40
    5 votes
    13
    Dong Ding tea

    Dong Ding tea

    • Regions where grown: Taiwan
    Tung-ting, also known as Dongding, is an Oolong tea from Taiwan. The original leaves were taken from a much older tea plant in China's Wuyi Mountains in Fujian Province. The name "Dongding" means "Frozen Summit", which is the name of the mountain in Taiwan on which the original tea plants taken from the Wuyi Mountains were planted. For many oolong lovers, Dong Ding is THE PREMIUM Taiwanese wulong. Fact is Dong Ding quality varies. The original Dong Ding is from Luku region in Nantou province in Taiwan. However this area has long been used for tea cultivation. Production is now scarce and quality varies. Many Dong Ding nowadays are produced from other Nantou high mountain tea and follow the traditional Dong Ding production method. Dong Ding is typially medium roasted (about 30%). Oolong is reputed to help digestion. It is very popular amongst those who are seeking better health and body shape. Dong Ding is still hand picked primarily. It is either charcoal or machine roasted.
    7.50
    4 votes
    14

    Gyokuro

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Gyokuro (Japanese: 玉露, "jewel dew") is a type of shaded green tea from Japan. It differs from the standard sencha (a classic unshaded green tea) in being grown under the shade rather than the full sun. Gyokuro also differs from another shaded tea called kabusecha (lit., "covered tea"), in the length of time it undergoes the final growth under the shade (gyokuro is shaded for approximately three weeks, while kabusecha is shaded for approximately one week). The name "gyokuro" translates as "jewel dew" (or "jade dew", referring to the pale green colour of the infusion). While most sencha is from the Yabukita (薮北) cultivar of Camellia sinensis, gyokuro is often made from a specialized variety such as Asahi, Okumidori, Yamakai, and Saemidori. Merchants selling Japanese green tea typically recommend a unique method for brewing gyokuro which differs from typical tea brewing: Since gyokuro is typically steeped at such a low temperature, sources may recommend preheating both the pot and cup to maintain the warmth of the tea as one drinks it. One usually drinks gyokuro very slowly to savor its distinctive flavor. Though it is categorized as a type of sencha according to production methods,
    7.25
    4 votes
    15
    Maccha

    Maccha

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Matcha (抹茶, pronounced [mat.tɕa]), also maccha, refers to finely milled or fine powder green tea. The Japanese tea ceremony centers on the preparation, serving, and drinking of matcha. In modern times, matcha has also come to be used to flavour and dye foods such as mochi and soba noodles, green tea ice cream and a variety of wagashi (Japanese confectionery). Matcha is a fine ground, powdered, high quality green tea and not the same as tea powder or green tea powder. Blends of matcha are given poetic names called chamei ("tea names") either by the producing plantation, shop or creator of the blend, or by the grand master of a particular tea tradition. When a blend is named by the grand master of some tea ceremony lineage, it becomes known as the master's konomi, or favoured blend. In Tang Dynasty China (618–907), tea leaves were steamed and formed into tea bricks for storage and trade. The tea was prepared by roasting and pulverizing the tea, and decocting the resulting tea powder in hot water, adding salt. In the Song Dynasty (960–1279), the method of making powdered tea from steam-prepared dried tea leaves, and preparing the beverage by whipping the tea powder and hot water
    7.25
    4 votes
    16
    Huang Mei Gui tea

    Huang Mei Gui tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Huang Mei Gui Oolong tea (Chinese: 黃玫瑰; pinyin: huáng méiguī; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: n̂g-môe-kùi) is a very new Wuyi Oolong tea, developed circa 2002. It has a highly aromatic fragrance and a lighter floral taste than most other Wuyi Oolongs. The colour of the steeped leaves is a very light green, much greener than other Wuyi teas.
    8.67
    3 votes
    17
    7.00
    4 votes
    18
    Flowering tea

    Flowering tea

    Flowering tea or blooming tea (Chinese: 香片, 工艺茶, or 开花茶) consist each of a bundle of dried tea leaves wrapped around one or more dried flowers. These are made by binding tea leaves and flowers together into a bulb and are then set to dry. When steeped, the bundle expands and unfurls in a process that emulates a blooming flower, while the flowers inside emerge as the centerpiece. Typically they are sourced from the Yunnan province of China. Flowers commonly used in flowering teas include globe amaranth, chrysanthemum, jasmine, lily, hibiscus, and osmanthus. It remains uncertain whether flowering tea was a modern creation or was a much older invention of China. Flowering tea is generally served in containers made of glass, or other transparent material, so that the flowering effect can be seen. The bundles can usually be reused two or three times without the tea becoming bitter. Media related to Flowering tea at Wikimedia Commons
    8.33
    3 votes
    19
    Ceylon tea

    Ceylon tea

    • Regions where grown: Nuwara Eliya
    Ceylon White tea is grown on the island of Sri Lanka and is highly prized, mentioned in a recent BBC article, is grown and harvested by hand. The move towards producing White tea shows a clear line between organically farmed tea that is fair and rewarding to the farmers and drinkers and the monopoly of mass produced tea. Prices per kilogram of Ceylon White tea are significantly higher than other teas from the region. Grown, harvested and rolled by hand with the leaves dried and withered in the sun in the Nuwara Eliya region of Sri Lanka near Adam's Peak between 2200 - 2500 metres above sea level. Has a delicate, very light liquoring with notes of pine & honey and a golden coppery infusion. 'Virgin White Tea' is also grown near Galle in the south of Sri Lanka.The history of this tea is that the tea was specially made for the Chinese Emperor and was only cut by virgins with golden shears onto golden plates and was never touched by hand. The anti oxidants are over 10% which make it one of the highest in the World.
    6.75
    4 votes
    20
    Earl Grey tea

    Earl Grey tea

    Earl Grey tea, sometimes misspelled Earl Gray, is a tea blend with a distinctive flavour and aroma derived from the addition of oil extracted from the rind of the bergamot orange, a fragrant citrus fruit. Traditionally, the term "Earl Grey" has applied only to black teas that contain oil of bergamot as a flavouring. The Earl Grey blend is named after the 2nd Earl Grey, British Prime Minister in the 1830s and author of the Reform Bill of 1832, who reputedly received a gift, probably a diplomatic perquisite, of tea flavoured with bergamot oil. Bergamot orange (Citrus bergamia) is a small citrus tree which blossoms during the winter and is grown commercially in Italy. It is likely a hybrid of Citrus limetta and Citrus aurantium. According to one legend, a grateful Chinese mandarin whose son was rescued from drowning by one of Lord Grey's men first presented the blend to the Earl in 1803. The tale appears to be apocryphal, as Lord Grey never set foot in China and the use of bergamot oil to scent tea was then unknown in China. However, this tale is subsequently told (and slightly corrected) as on the Twinings website, as "having been presented by an envoy on his return from
    6.75
    4 votes
    21

    Kukicha

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Kukicha (茎茶), or twig tea, also known as bōcha (棒茶), is a Japanese blend made of stems, stalks, and twigs. It is available as a green tea or in more oxidized processing. Kukicha has a unique flavor and aroma among teas, due to its being composed of parts of the tea plant that are excluded from most other teas. Regular Kukicha material comes from production of Sencha or Matcha. When coming from Gyokuro's production, it takes the name of Karigane (雁ヶ音 / かりがね) or Shiraore (白折 / しらおれ). Kukicha has a mildly nutty, and slightly creamy sweet flavor. It is made of four sorts of stems, stalks and twigs of Camellia sinensis. For best results, kukicha is steeped in water between 70°C to 80°C (155°F - 180°F). Green varieties are best steeped for less than one minute (oversteeping or steeping too hot, as with all green teas, will result in a bitter, unsavoury brew). It is common to steep kukicha for three or four infusions. Recommended steep durations: First infusion: 40 sec, 2nd: 15 sec, 3rd: 30 sec. Kukicha is also one of the preferred teas of the macrobiotic diet. Kukicha can also be added to juice to make a children's drink.
    6.50
    4 votes
    22
    Qi Lan tea

    Qi Lan tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Qilan (simplified Chinese: 奇兰; traditional Chinese: 奇蘭; pinyin: qílán; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: kî-lân) is a very mild Wuyi Oolong tea, it has an obvious sweet and nutty aroma.
    6.50
    4 votes
    23
    Hojicha

    Hojicha

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Hōjicha (Houjicha) (ほうじ茶) is a Japanese green tea that is distinguished from others because it is roasted in a porcelain pot over charcoal; Japanese tea is usually steamed. The tea is fired at high temperature, altering the leaf colour tints from green to reddish-brown. The process was first performed in Kyoto, Japan in the 1920s and its popularity persists today. Hōjicha is often made from bancha (番茶, "common tea"), tea from the last harvest of the season, however other varieties of Hōjicha also exist, including a variety made from sencha, and Kukicha, tea made from the twigs of the tea plant rather than the leaves. Hōjicha infusions have a light- to reddish-brown appearance, and are less astringent due to losing catechins during the high temperature roasting process. The roasted flavours are extracted and predominate this blend: the roasting replaces the vegetative tones of standard green tea with a toasty, slightly caramel-like flavour. The roasting process used to make Hōjicha lowers the amount of caffeine in the tea. Because of its mildness, Hōjicha is a popular tea to serve during the meal or after the evening meal before going to sleep and even preferred for children and
    6.25
    4 votes
    24
    Keemun tea

    Keemun tea

    • Regions where grown: Qimen County
    Keemun (simplified Chinese: 祁门红茶; traditional Chinese: 祁門紅茶; pinyin: qímén hóngchá; literally "Qimen red tea") is a black Chinese tea with a winy and fruity taste, designated as a China Famous Tea. Keemun is produced in the Qimen County of Huangshan City, in Anhui (Anhwei) province. ("Keemun" has been the English spelling for "Qimen" since the colonial era.) Keemun has a relatively short history. It was first produced in 1875 by a failed civil servant, Yu Quianchen, after he traveled to Fujian province to learn the secrets of black tea production. Prior to that, only green tea was made in Anhui. The result exceeded his expectations, and the excellent Keemun tea quickly gained popularity in England, and became the most prominent ingredient of the English Breakfast tea blend. The aroma of Keemun is fruity, with hints of pine, dried plum and floweriness (but not at all as floral as Darjeeling tea) which creates the very distinctive and balanced taste. It also displays a hint of orchid fragrance and the so-called "China tea sweetness." The tea can have a more bitter taste and the smokiness can be more defined depending on the variety and how it was processed. In China, Keemun is
    6.25
    4 votes
    25
    Lei cha

    Lei cha

    Lei cha (Chinese: 擂茶; pinyin: léi chá; literally "pounded tea") or ground tea is a traditional Hakka tea-based beverage or gruel. Lei cha is very traditional among Hakkas in Mainland China, especially Southern China. It is also popular in Taiwan, Malaysia, and any locales with a substantial Hakka diaspora population. The custom began in the Three Kingdoms period. It is not the same as Chinese tea because there are always other ingredients. Pounded tea is consists of a mix of tea leaves and herbs that are ground or pounded together with various roasted nuts, seeds, grains, and flavorings. Although commercially prepared and prepackaged Lei cha can be bought, the drink is usually made "from scratch" just as it is about to be consumed. Pounded tea is a varying mix of: The ingredients are ground in a food processor, or with a mortar and pestle, or in a large earthenware basin with a wooden stick. The mix should be reduced to a powder that resembles fine cornmeal. The powder is then placed into a serving bowl and hot water is stirred into it such that a thin soup-like beverage is produced. The tea is drunk for breakfast or on cold winters as a tasty and healthy restorative. Lei cha may
    7.67
    3 votes
    26

    Darjeeling tea

    • Regions where grown: Darjeeling
    Darjeeling Oolong is a type of tea produced in Darjeeling, India, in the style of Oolong. Darjeeling Oolong has two distinct characters: one is Clonal type and the other is China type. The China type is more similar to Taiwan Oolong and the Clonal type is totally different from it. Darjeeling Oolong is lighter than usual Darjeeling black tea during First Flush, as it is semi-oxidized. The cup looks light orange and infusion remains green. Darjeeling Oolong in second flush is more accepted worldwide. It is more thick in cup and dark orange in liquor with distinct Muscatel flavours. The China type oolong has very rare muscatel flavour and sells somewhere around US$40–200 per kg. Clonal Oolong has distinct flowery or spicy taste and not much accepted as Darjeeling Oolong Worldwide. All Darjeeling Gardens are not qualified to produce Darjeeling Oolong maintaining all the factors. Gardens with the following conditions are capable of making Darjeeling Oolong - Lower Elevation garden can only make the look but they will be far away in flavour which is the main characteristics of Oolong tea. Lower elevation Oolong can be considered as fake darjeeling oolong. Darjeeling Oolong teas are made
    9.00
    2 votes
    27
    9.00
    2 votes
    28

    Kabusecha tea

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Kabusecha (冠茶), literally "covered tea," is a type of Japanese Sencha. Its name describes the fact that, about a week before the tea leaf buds are picked in the spring, the plantation is covered with a screen to cut out the direct sunlight. This shading produces a milder tea than standard sencha. The shaded tea known as gyokuro differs from kabusecha in that it is shaded for a longer period: about 20 days. Special nets (kabuse) are hung over the plants to obtain a natural shade without completely letting out sunlight. Kabusecha Sencha has a mellower flavor and more subtle color than Sencha grown in direct sunlight.
    7.00
    3 votes
    29

    Lu'an Guapian

    Liuan Guapian , Lu'an Guapian, or Liu An Gua Pian, "六安瓜片" in Chinese, also called guanpian, is a special green tea made in Liuan county and the nearby mountain areas of Anhui province in China. The tea leaf's shape looks like 'melon seeds' in English or 'Guapian' in Chinese pinyin.
    7.00
    3 votes
    30
    Shou Mei tea

    Shou Mei tea

    • Regions where grown: China
    Shoumei (simplified Chinese: 寿眉; traditional Chinese: 壽眉) is a white tea that is produced from naturally withered upper leaf and tips, with a stronger flavor reminiscent of lighter Oolong teas. It is mostly grown in the Fujian Province or Guangxi Province in China. Because it is plucked later than Bai Mudan, the tea may be darker in color, but it should still have a proportionate green color. Some lower grades of Shou Mei may be golden in color with a lot of black and red leaves, making a darker brew with more depth. Technically this tea, being a fourth grade tea, is a by-product of Bai Hao Yinzhen tea production and uses Da Bai or Large White leaves. The tea can be brewed very differently and you will find that there are many combinations that yield interesting results, but it is important to use good mineral water to bring out the sweetness and aroma of the tea and not to overbrew or make a bitter and very strong brew.
    6.67
    3 votes
    31
    Mao Feng tea

    Mao Feng tea

    • Regions where grown: Anhui
    Huangshan Maofeng tea (黄山毛峰) is a green tea produced in south eastern interior Anhui province of China. The tea is one of the most famous teas in China and can almost always be found on the China Famous Tea list. The tea is grown near Huangshan (Yellow Mountain), which is home to many famous varieties of Green Tea. Huangshan Mao Feng Tea's English translation is "Yellow Mountain Fur Peak" due to the small white hairs which cover the leaves and the shape of the processed leaves which resemble the peak of a mountain. The best teas are picked in the early Spring before China's Qingming Festival. When picking the tea, only the new tea buds and the leaf next to the bud are picked. It is said by local tea farmers that the leaves resemble orchid buds. According to local legend, there was a young scholar and a beautiful local girl fell madly in love. A local landowner saw the girl picking tea and wanted her for himself. He forced the girl's parents to make their daughter marry him. On the night before the wedding, the young girl snuck out of the landowners house only to find that the landowner had murdered the scholar. She went to his grave and cried until she became the rain. The
    10.00
    1 votes
    32
    Shui Jin Gui tea

    Shui Jin Gui tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Shui Jin Gui (simplified Chinese: 水金龟; traditional Chinese: 水金龜; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: chúi-kim-ku) is a very characteristic Wuyi Oolong tea, whose name literally means Golden Marine Turtle. The tea produces a bright green color when steeped and is much greener than most other Wuyi Oolong teas. It is one of the four famous bushes of Wuyi, a Si Da Ming Cong.
    10.00
    1 votes
    33
    Da Hong Pao tea

    Da Hong Pao tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Dà Hóng Páo (Chinese: 大红袍; pinyin: dà​hóng páo; literally "Big Red Robe") is a prestigious Wuyi oolong tea. It is a premium variety of the Wu Yi Yan Cha (武夷岩茶, Wuyi Rock Tea) group of oolong. According to legend, the mother of a Ming Dynasty emperor was cured of an illness by a certain tea, and that emperor sent great red robes to clothe the four bushes from which that tea originated. Three of these original bushes, growing on a rock on Mount Wuyi and reportedly dates back to the Song Dynasty, still survive today and are highly venerated. Known for its highly expensive value, Da Hong Pao can sell up to 30,000 US dollars per kilogram. One (possibly apocryphal) story claims that in 1972, US President Nixon received 50g of Dà Hóng Páo, at the estimated cost of 250,000 US Dollars in 2011 money. In recent years, a number of companies have invested in preserving the interest in this tea and other so-called "artisan" teas, which typically are of very high quality and have rich histories as is true with Da Hong Pao. These have an initially high cost of production (and typically are only considered authentic when grown in their place of origin), but, as they have quickly become popular in
    8.00
    2 votes
    34
    Darjeeling white tea

    Darjeeling white tea

    • Regions where grown: Darjeeling
    Darjeeling White Tea is an Indian tea and has a delicate aroma and brews to a pale golden cup with a mellow taste and a hint of sweetness. Darjeeling white tea leaves are very fluffy and light; therefore, it is recommended to use more (by volume) when preparing it than one would of other teas. The tea is hand picked and rolled by hand and then withered in the sun, making it a rare and popular tea. It is grown in the rainy and cold climate of Darjeeling in India at altitudes of 2000 metres.
    8.00
    2 votes
    35
    Fo Shou tea

    Fo Shou tea

    Ethan Fo Shou (佛手; pinyin: fó shǒu; literally "Buddha's hand") is a Yongchun (永春; pinyin: Yǒng Chūn) and Wuyi Oolong tea with a light and somewhat peculiar taste. It is also produced in Taiwan. According to Babelcarp (citation below), Ethan Fo Shou is an alternate name for xiāng yuán (香橼).
    8.00
    2 votes
    36
    Bai Ji Guan tea

    Bai Ji Guan tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Bai Ji Guan (simplified Chinese: 白鸡冠; traditional Chinese: 白雞冠; pinyin: bái jī guān; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: pe̍h-ke-koan, pe̍h-koe-koan) is a Si Da Ming Cong and a very light Wuyi tea. It is named after a rooster who gave up its life whilst protecting a child. Legend has it that the name of this tea (White Cockscomb) was given by a monk in memorial of a courageous rooster that sacrificed his life while protecting his baby from an eagle. Touched by the display of courage and love, the monk buried the rooster and from that spot, the Bai Ji Guan tea bush grew. Unlike most Wuyi teas the leaves of this tea are yellowish rather than green or brown.
    6.33
    3 votes
    37
    Green tea

    Green tea

    Green tea is made solely from the leaves of Camellia sinensis that have undergone minimal oxidation during processing. Green tea originates in China and has become associated with many cultures throughout Asia. It has recently become more widespread in the West, where black tea is traditionally consumed. Green tea has become the raw material for extracts which are used in various beverages, health foods, dietary supplements, and cosmetic items. Many varieties of green tea have been created in countries where they are grown. These varieties can differ substantially due to variable growing conditions, horticulture, production processing, and harvesting time. Over the last few decades green tea has been subjected to many scientific and medical studies to determine the extent of its long-purported health benefits, with some evidence suggesting that regular green tea drinkers may have a lower risk of developing heart disease and certain types of cancer. Although green tea does not raise the metabolic rate enough to produce immediate weight loss, a green tea extract containing polyphenols and caffeine has been shown to induce thermogenesis and stimulate fat oxidation, boosting the
    7.50
    2 votes
    38
    Jin Fo tea

    Jin Fo tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Jin Fo is a very new Wuyi Oolong tea, developed around 10 years ago at the Wuyi Shan Tea Researching Center located in Fujian Province, China. It is a medium Wuyi Oolong showing both creaminess and a floral aftertaste. The tea leaves have a uniform emerald green colour.
    7.50
    2 votes
    39
    Rize Tea

    Rize Tea

    • Regions where grown: Rize Province
    Rize tea or çay is the black tea used for Turkish tea. Produced in Rize Province on the eastern Black Sea coast of Turkey which has a mild climate with high precipitation and fertile soil, when brewed it is mahogany in color. People throughout Turkey may drink tea at any time of the day. In addition to being consumed at home, it is served in Turkish cafés by a çaycı (tea-waiter), in small, narrow-waisted glasses. It can be taken strong ("demli" dark) or weak ("açık" light), and is traditionally accompanied by two or three lumps of beetroot sugar. When the Ottoman Empire collapsed in 1923, the Turks lost Mocha in Yemen, and coffee became an expensive import. They turned to tea instead.
    7.50
    2 votes
    40
    Shincha tea

    Shincha tea

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Shincha (新茶), literally "new tea", represents the first month's harvest of Sencha, a Japanese green tea. Basically, it is the same as ichibancha (一番茶), "the first-picked tea," and is characterized by its fresh aroma and sweetness. Use of the term "ichibancha" rather than "shincha" generally infers its difference from "nibancha" ("the second-picked tea") and "sanbancha" ("the third-picked tea"). Use of the term "shincha" generally is to emphasize that it is that year's earliest tea, and is timely and seasonal. The opposite term is kocha (古茶), or "old tea," referring to tea left over from the previous year. Tea-picking in Japan begins from Kagoshima and that warm, southern region, and like the northward movement of the "front line" of the blooming of the cherry trees, gradually moves north to the colder regions. During the winter, tea plants store nutrients, and the tender new leaves which sprout in the spring contain concentrated nutrients. Shincha represents these tender new leaves. In Japan, it has traditionally been said that if one drinks tea made of the new leaves picked on the 88th day after the spring equinox (February 4), one can enjoy a year of good health. Besides the
    7.50
    2 votes
    41
    Ceylon tea

    Ceylon tea

    • Regions where grown: Sri Lanka
    Ceylon black tea is black tea that is grown in Sri Lanka (which was known as Ceylon before 1972). It has a crisp aroma reminiscent of citrus, and is used both unmixed and in blends. It is grown on numerous estates which vary in altitude and taste. The production of black tea in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) began after a deadly fungus called Coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix) destroyed most of the coffee crop on the island. This fungal outbreak was first noticed in 1856 and had ended Ceylon coffee production by the 1880s. The coffee plantation owners realized that they needed to diversify. The Loolecondera Estate had long been interested in producing tea in Sri Lanka. James Taylor, one of the fathers of Ceylon Tea, had recently arrived on the Estate and wanted to be there for the sowing of the first tea crops in 1867. It was done on 19 acres (77,000 m) of land. James Taylor was already experienced in tea cultivation. He had acquired his knowledge in North India. He carried out different experiments on cultivating tea on the verandah of his estate. He rolled the leaves by hand and fired the oxidized leaves on clay stoves over a charcoal fire. The tea that James Taylor made was delicious and
    6.00
    3 votes
    42
    Jin Suo Chi tea

    Jin Suo Chi tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Jin Suo Chi (金鎖匙; literally "Golden Key") is a very rare Wuyi Oolong with a light taste.
    6.00
    3 votes
    43

    Kamairicha tea

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Kamairicha (釜炒り茶) is a Japanese tea that does not undergo the usual steam treatments of Japanese tea and does not have the characteristic bitter taste of most Japanese tea. After a short withering, they are fired in hot iron pans of up to 300°C with repeated agitation to prevent charring. The different rolling techniques used produce teas of different leaf form. Kamairicha is processed as a pelleted or flat leaf. Regions: Several southern regions are known for making fine Kamairicha. Sechibaru in Nagasaki Prefecture and Ureshino in Saga Prefecture are two of the most respected for their pan-fried manufacturing process. Popularity: Kamairicha is generally not available in the West, however a few specialist tea merchants are making this tea more well known. Flavor/Aroma: This Kamairi process develops sweet, mildly roasted flavors, which are very similar to the pan-fried teas produced in China today. It is sometimes referred to as ‘Chinese green tea’ by the Japanese owing to the pan-frying processing of this richly flavored tea.
    9.00
    1 votes
    44
    Orange Pekoe

    Orange Pekoe

    • Regions where grown: Sri Lanka
    Orange pekoe (/pɛk.oʊ/ or /piː.koʊ/), also spelled pecco, or OP is a term used in the Western tea trade to describe a particular genre of black teas (orange pekoe grading). Despite a purported Chinese origin, these grading terms are typically used for teas from Sri Lanka, India and countries other than China; they are not generally known within Chinese-speaking countries. The grading system is based upon the size of processed and dried black tea leaves. The tea industry uses the term orange pekoe to describe a basic, medium-grade black tea consisting of many whole tea leaves of a specific size; however, it is popular in some regions (such as North America) to use the term as a description of any generic black tea (though it is often described to the consumer as a specific variety of black tea). Within this system, the teas that receive the highest grades are obtained from new flushes. This includes the terminal leaf bud along with a few of the youngest leaves. Grading is based on the 'size' of the individual leaves and flushes, which is determined by their ability to fall through the screens of special meshes ranging from 8–30 mesh. This also determines the 'wholeness', or level of
    5.67
    3 votes
    45
    Assam tea

    Assam tea

    • Regions where grown: Assam
    Assam (Assamese: অসম, Hindi: आसाम, and also Hindi: असम) is a black tea named after the region of its production, Assam, in India. Assam tea (Assamese: অসমীয়া চাহ, Hindi: असमिया चाय) is manufactured specifically from the plant Camellia sinensis var. assamica (Masters). This tea, most of which is grown at or near sea level, is known for its body, briskness, malty flavor, and strong, bright color. Assam teas, or blends containing Assam, are often sold as "breakfast" teas. English Breakfast tea, Irish Breakfast tea, and Scottish Breakfast Tea are common generic names. The state of Assam is the world's largest tea-growing region, lying on either side of the Brahmaputra River, and bordering Bangladesh and Burma (Myanmar). This part of India experiences high precipitation; during the monsoon period, as much as 10 to 12 inches (250–300 mm) of rain per day. The daytime temperature rises to about 103F (40 °C), creating greenhouse-like conditions of extreme humidity and heat. This tropical climate contributes to Assam's unique malty taste, a feature for which this tea is well known. Though Assam generally denotes the distinctive black teas from Assam, the region produces smaller quantities
    7.00
    2 votes
    46
    Bai Hao Yinzhen tea

    Bai Hao Yinzhen tea

    • Regions where grown: Fujian
    Baihao Yinzhen (simplified Chinese: 白毫银针; traditional Chinese: 白毫銀針), also known as White Hair Silver Needle, is a white tea produced in Fujian Province in China. Amongst white teas, this is the most expensive variety and the most prized, as only top buds (leaf shoots) are used to produce the tea. Genuine Silver Needles are made from cultivars of the Da Bai (Large White) tea tree family. It is important to point out that there are other productions that look similar with downy leaf shoots but most are green teas, and as green teas, they taste differently and have a different biochemical potency than the genuine white tea Silver Needle. It is commonly included among the China famous teas. A genuine Silver Needle is a white tea, and as a white tea, it is only lightly oxidized. The best productions are from the first flushes, which generally take place between late March to early April, when the year's first new buds "flush". For the production of Silver Needle, only the leaf shoots, i.e. the leaf buds before opening, are plucked. Unlike the plucking of green tea, the ideal time and weather for plucking white tea is a sunny morning when the sun is high enough to have dried any
    7.00
    2 votes
    47

    Bohea Tea

    Bohea (Chinese: 武夷茶; pinyin: wǔyí chá, a word derived from the Wuyi Mountains in northern Fujian, China), a kind of oolong, or, in the 18th and early 19th centuries, black tea generally, as in Pope's line, "So past her time 'twixt reading and bohea.", or from Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1896 book 'A Lady Of Quality': "One may be sure that...many dishes of Bohea were drunk." In Lady Audley's Secret by Mary Braddon, published in 1862, there is a famous scene in which Lady Audley serves tea: "The floating mists from the boiling liquid in which she infuses the soothing herbs; whose secrets are known to her alone, envelope her in a cloud of scented vapor, through which she seems a social fairy, weaving potent spells with Gunpowder and Bohea." In later times the name 'bohea' has been applied to an inferior quality of tea grown late in the season. Wuyi oolong is characteristically strip shaped and heavily fermented. The dried leaf is almost black in colour. The word is attested by Rev. Robert Morrison (1782-1834) in his Chinese dictionary (1819), as one of the seven sorts of black tea "commonly known by Europeans", along with pekoe and other varieties: "The sorts commonly known to Europeans
    7.00
    2 votes
    48
    Lapsang souchong

    Lapsang souchong

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Lapsang souchong (Chinese: 拉普山小種/正山小种,; pinyin: lāpǔshān xiǎozhǒng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: l a̍p-pho·-san sió-chéng; literally "Small plant from Lapu mountain"; cantonese: làaipóusàan síujúng) is a black tea (Camellia sinensis) originally from the Wuyi region of the Chinese province of Fujian. It is sometimes referred to as smoked tea (熏茶). Lapsang is distinct from all other types of tea because lapsang leaves are traditionally smoke-dried over pinewood fires, taking on a distinctive smoky flavour. Lapsang souchong is the first black tea in history, even earlier than the famous Keemun tea. After the lapsang souchong tea was used for producing black tea so called Min Hong (meaning "Black tea produced in Fujian"), people started to move the tea bush to different places like Keemun, India and Ceylon. The name means "sub-variety". Lapsang souchong is a member of the Bohea family of teas ("Bohea" is the pronunciation in Minnan dialect for Wuyi Mountains, which is the mountain area producing a large family of tea in South-East China). The story goes that the tea was created during the Qing era when the passage of armies delayed the annual drying of the tea leaves in the Wuyi Mountain. Eager to
    7.00
    2 votes
    49

    Bancha tea

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Bancha (番茶) is a Japanese green tea. It is harvested from the second flush of sencha between summer and autumn. (The first flush is harvested for shincha.) Bancha is harvested from the same tree as sencha grade, but it is plucked later than sencha is, giving it a lower market grade. It is considered to be the lowest grade of green tea. There are 22 grades of bancha. Its flavour is unique, it has a stronger organic straw smell. It is often used as a daily consumption of liquid for the Macrobiotic Diet. Infuse at approximately 80 degrees Celsius (176 degrees Fahrenheit) – this can be achieved by using an electric water boiler with an 80 degrees setting, or by adding 1 quarter of the volume of room temperature water to the boiling water before adding the leaves. Infusing at a higher temperature will cause the tea to taste bitter. Allow the tea to infuse for 30 seconds to 3 minutes.
    8.00
    1 votes
    50
    Hou Kui tea

    Hou Kui tea

    • Regions where grown: Anhui
    Taiping Houkui (Chinese: 太平猴魁; pinyin: tàipíng hóukuí lit. "peaceful monkey leader") tea is grown at the foot of Huangshan (黄山) in Taiping County, Anhui. The tea has been produced since the beginning of the 20th century and is produced around the small village of Hou Keng (猴坑). It won the "King of Tea" award in China Tea Exhibition 2004 and is sometimes listed as a China Famous Tea. The best Tai Ping Hou Kui is grown in the villages of Houkeng, Hougang and Yanjiachun. Teas produced in the surrounding areas are called by the same name, but costs much less. It's renowned for its "two knives and one pole": two straight leaves clasping the enormous bud with white hairs. The oven-made leaves are deep green in color with red veins underneath. The tea shoots can be as long as 15 centimeters. They are plucked from the Shi Da Cha, a large leaf-variety found only in Anhui Province. Falsification is rampant. Factories can produce symmetrical looking Hou Kui tea that looks even better than the authentic handmade variety.
    8.00
    1 votes
    51
    Oolong

    Oolong

    Oolong (simplified Chinese: 乌龙; traditional Chinese: 烏龍; pinyin: wūlóng) is a traditional Chinese tea (Camellia sinensis) produced through a unique process including withering under the strong sun and oxidation before curling and twisting. Most oolong teas, especially those of fine quality, involve unique tea plant cultivars that are exclusively used for particular varieties. The degree of oxidation can range from 8% to 85%, depending on the variety and production style. This tea category is especially popular with tea connoisseurs of south China and Chinese expatriates in Southeast Asia, as is the tea preparation process that originated from this area: gongfu tea-making, or the gongfu tea infusion approach. In Chinese tea culture, semi-oxidised oolong teas are collectively grouped as qīngchá (Chinese: 青茶; literally "teal tea"). The taste of oolong ranges hugely amongst various subvarieties. It can be sweet and fruity with honey aromas, or woody and thick with roasted aromas, or green and fresh with bouquet aromas, all depending on the horticulture and style of production. Several subvarieties of oolong, including those produced in the Wuyi Mountains of northern Fujian, such as Da
    8.00
    1 votes
    52
    White tea

    White tea

    White tea (Chinese: 白茶; pinyin: báichá) is a lightly oxidized tea grown and harvested primarily in China, mostly in the Fujian province. More recently it is grown in both Taiwan and now in Northern Thailand. White tea comes from the buds and leaves of the Chinese Camellia sinensis plant. The leaves and buds are allowed to wither in natural sunlight before they are lightly processed to prevent oxidation or further tea processing. The name "white tea" derives from the fine silvery-white hairs on the unopened buds of the tea plant, which gives the plant a whitish appearance. The beverage itself is not white or colourless but pale yellow. Scholars and tea merchants generally disagree as to when the first production of white tea (as it is understood in China today) began. What is today known as white tea may have come into creation in the last two centuries. White tea may have first appeared in English publication in 1876, where it is categorized as a black tea because it is not initially cooked like a green tea, to deactivate internal enzymes and external microbes. White tea is often being sold as Silvery Tip Pekoe, a form of its traditional name, and now also under the simple
    8.00
    1 votes
    53
    Da Fang tea

    Da Fang tea

    • Regions where grown: Anhui
    Dafang tea (Chinese: 大方茶) is grown at the south of Huangshan in Xi County of Anhui Province, in China. It has similarities to Longjing and a nutty aroma.
    6.50
    2 votes
    54
    Gohyah tea

    Gohyah tea

    • Regions where grown: Brazil
    Gohyah tea is an infusion made from dried slices of the bitter melon. It is sold as a medicinal tea, and a culinary vegetable. A typical commercial package will make a claim similar to the following: Gohyah is not listed in the Grieve's herbal database, the MPNA database at Michigan University or in the Phytochemical Database of the USDA - ARS - NGRL. Nevertheless it has been lauded the world over for its strong medicinal properties.
    6.50
    2 votes
    55
    Ku Ding Tea

    Ku Ding Tea

    Kuding tea (Chinese: 苦丁茶; pinyin: kǔdīng chá; literally "bitter nail tea") is a particularly bitter-tasting Chinese tisane which due to their similarities in appearance is derived from several plant species. Two most common plants used to make Ku Ding tea, being the wax tree species Ligustrum robustum and the holly species Ilex kudingcha plant, the former being more commonly grown in Sichuan and Japan while the latter is most commonly grown and used in the rest of China. The traditional Chinese medicinal properties associated with Ku Ding (and many other plants) include its ability to disperse wind-heat, clear the head and the eyes, and resolve toxin, thus being used for common cold, rhinitis, itching eyes, red eyes, and headache. It is also said to calm fidgets and alleviate thirst, especially when one is suffering from a disease that causes fever or severe diarrhea. It transforms phlegm and alleviates coughing, thus used in treating bronchitis. Finally, it is said to invigorate digestion and improve mental focus and memory. Some research may suggest that the herb, derived from either Ilex or Ligustrum, promotes blood circulation, lowers blood pressure, and lowers blood lipids,
    6.50
    2 votes
    56
    Rou Gui

    Rou Gui

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Rou Gui (Chinese: 肉桂; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: bah-kuì) is a Wuyi Oolong tea; the name literally means Cinnamon. The tea can be difficult to prepare but its distinctive sweet aroma can be brought out up to 7 steepings. It was first developed during the Qing Dynasty. This tea may be traditionally processed producing a dark dry leaf and a rich smell or processed according to new consumer standards, giving it a leaf of mixed color and a more fruity aroma. Rou Gui is also the name of a commonly used herb in Chinese herbal medicine, made from the outer bark of the tree which cinnamon comes from (not necessarily the cinnamon that most consumers are used to buying).
    6.50
    2 votes
    57
    Huoshan Huangya tea

    Huoshan Huangya tea

    • Regions where grown: Anhui
    Huoshan Huangya (simplified Chinese: 霍山黄芽; traditional Chinese: 癨山黃芽) is a yellow tea from Anhui Province in China, it is the Imperial Tribute Tea and dates back to the Ming Dynasty. The dry tea leaves have a shiny appearance and are very similar to Huang Shan Mao Feng tea. When steeped the leaves reveal a very peppery and fresh taste accompanied by an unusual green-yellow color of the brew. As with all mostly bud teas the color and fragrance are slight.
    5.00
    3 votes
    58
    Dian Hong tea

    Dian Hong tea

    • Regions where grown: Yunnan
    Dianhong tea is a type of Chinese black tea, used as a relatively high end gourmet black tea and sometimes used in various tea blends. The main difference between Dianhong and other Chinese black teas is the amount of fine leaf buds, or "golden tips," present in the dried tea. Fermented with lychee, rose and longan, Dianhong teas produces a brew that is brassy golden orange in colour with a sweet, gentle aroma and no astringency. Cheaper varieties of Dianhong produce a darker brownish brew that can be very bitter. Teas grown in the Yunnan Province of China prior to the Han dynasty were typically exported in a compressed form similar to modern pu-erh tea. Dian hong is a relatively new product from Yunnan that began production in the early 20th century. The word "Diān" (滇) is the short name for the Yunnan region while "hóng" (紅) means "red (tea)"; as such, these teas are sometimes simply referred to as Yunnan red or Yunnan black. However, such references are often confusing due to the other varieties of teas produced in Yunnan as well as the ambiguous nature of the color classifications. Dianhong teas are best brewed with porcelain gaiwan or yixing teaware using freshly boiled water
    6.00
    2 votes
    59
    Pu-erh tea

    Pu-erh tea

    • Regions where grown: Yunnan
    Pu-erh tea, also spelled as Pu'er tea is a variety of post-fermented tea produced in Yunnan province, China.Post-fermentation is a tea production style in which the tea leaves undergo a microbial fermentation process after they are dried and rolled. This is a Chinese specialty and is sometimes referred to as dark, or black tea (this type of tea is completely different from what in West is known as "black tea", which in China is called "red tea"). There are a few different provinces, each with a few regions, producing dark teas of different varieties. Those produced in Yunnan are generally named Pu'er, referring to the name of Pu'er county which used to be a trading post for dark tea during imperial China. Pu'er is available as loose leaf or in various compressed forms as a tea brick. There is also the differentiation of ripened (shou) and raw (sheng) types. The shou type refers to those varieties that have gone through an accelerated post-fermentation process, while the sheng types are those in the process of gradual darkening through exposure to the environmental elements. Certain selections from either type can be stored for maturity before consumption. That is why some are
    6.00
    2 votes
    60

    Golden needle tea

    Golden needle tea is a black tea composed of pure buds from ancient tea trees in Yunnan, China. The leaves are golden in color and yield an amberish infusion. It is a high-quality subset of Dian hong tea.
    7.00
    1 votes
    61

    Guapian tea

    Liuan Guapian tea (Chinese: 六安瓜片) is a Green tea from Liu An County in China's Anhui Province. This is a famous Green Tea and is listed on virtually all China Famous Tealists. The literal translation for Liuan Guapian Tea is Liuan Melon Seed Tea. Its name is derived from the shape of the processed tea leaves, which are flat and oval and resemble a melon seed. Unlike most green teas which utilize the new buds in making tea, Liuan Guapian uses the second leaf on the branch. Each leaf's central vein is removed and the leaves are pan fried and shaped to stop oxidizing emzymes and dry the tea.
    7.00
    1 votes
    62
    Mecha tea

    Mecha tea

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    The name of Mecha (芽茶) tea derives from the early leaf buds needed to make this special green tea. Mecha is harvested in spring and made as rolled leaf teas that are graded somewhere between Gyokuro and Sencha in quality. Mecha are made from a collection of leaf buds and tips of the early crops. Sushi restaurants in Japan serve Mecha, known as Agari, with the meal. Mecha's bitter qualities make it a good tea to drink after meals to cleanse the palate. Mecha is renowned for its depth of flavor, considerable astringency and bitter green aftertaste. The distinctive, sharp flavor and aroma of Mecha is often regarded as being as good as the best Sencha. The best Mecha produces an aromatic tea with a clear, soft yellow appearance.
    7.00
    1 votes
    63

    Piluochun tea

    Dongting Piluochun (simplified Chinese: 洞庭碧螺春; pinyin: dòngtíng bìluóchūn) is a Green tea designated China Famous Tea from Jiangsu. Bi Luochun is one of the Green Teas, which makes it an ideal if you are trying Green Tea for the first time, or prefer a slightly softer taste. Bi Luo Chun from Dong Shan (East Mountain) is considered the best. If you are a Bi Luo Chun lover, you know that real Bi Luo Chun is from Dong Ting, Jiang Su. If you are a devoted Bi Luo Chun lover, you perhaps are obsess with the never ending search of Dong Shan (East Mountain) Bi Luo Chun. Bi Luo Chun tea is also grown in Zhejiang and Sichuan provinces. These are fake teas that are produced from other tea plant species. Their leaves are larger and less uniform (may contain yellow leaves). They taste more nutty than fruity and smooth. Bi Luo Chun needs to be plucked in spring. Pre-Ming Bi Luo Chun are the best. It is normally made of one leave and one bud. 500g high grade Bi Luo Chun can be made from around 70,000 tea buds! High grade Bi Luo Chun leaves are fine and hairy. Bi Luo Chun is featured by strong fragrance, delicate mellowness and bright green liquid, which given "the best fragrance in Chinese Tea".
    7.00
    1 votes
    64

    Sencha

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    Sencha (煎茶) is a Japanese green tea, specifically one made without grinding the tea leaves. The word "sencha" means "decocted tea," referring to the method that the tea beverage is made from the dried tea leaves. This is as opposed, for example, to matcha (抹茶), powdered Japanese green tea, in which case the green tea powder is mixed with hot water and therefore the leaf itself is included in the beverage. Among the types of Japanese green tea prepared by decoction, "sencha" is distinguished from such specific types as gyokuro and bancha. It is the most popular tea in Japan, and represents about 80 percent of the tea produced in Japan. The flavor depends upon the season and place where it is produced, but it is considered that the most delicious sencha is that from the first flush of the year, the shincha "new tea." The shincha season, depending upon the region of the plantation, is from early April to late May (around the 88th day after the spring equinox). It is considered that the ideal color of the sencha beverage is a greenish golden color. Depending upon the temperature of the water in which it is decocted, the flavor will be different, and this also is the appeal of sencha.
    7.00
    1 votes
    65
    Tieguanyin

    Tieguanyin

    • Regions where grown: Anxi County
    Tieguanyin (simplified Chinese: 铁观音; traditional Chinese: 鐵觀音; Mandarin Pinyin: tiěguānyīn; Jyutping: tit3 gwun1 yam1; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Thih-koan-im; literally "Iron Guanyin") is a premium variety of Chinese oolong tea originated in the 19th century in Anxi in Fujian province. Tieguanyin produced in different areas of Anxi have different gastronomic characteristics. Production has since extended to many regions even outside of China, including Taiwan. The tea is named after the Chinese Goddess of Mercy Guanyin, who is known in Japan as Kannon and in Korea as Guam-eum. Guanyin is a female embodiment of Avalokiteśvara Bodhisattva The name of the Chinese tea is translated in English as "Iron Guanyin", and sometimes as "Iron Goddess of Mercy." These two names are accurate. The deity has long been given a female identity in Chinese folk culture, although the original Chinese name carries no suggestion of the male-or-female-nature. A more accurate translation of the reference to the deity should be (the One) Observing the Voice of the People. Other spellings and names include "Ti Kuan Yin," "Tit Kwun Yum," "Ti Kwan Yin," "Iron Buddha," "Iron Goddess Oolong," and "Tea of the Iron
    7.00
    1 votes
    66
    Bu Zhi Chun tea

    Bu Zhi Chun tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Bu Zhi Chun (不知春, literally: "Knows not of Spring") is a Wuyi Oolong with a light taste.
    5.50
    2 votes
    67
    Shui Hsien tea

    Shui Hsien tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Shui Hsien (Chinese: 水仙; pinyin: shuǐ xiān; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: chúi-sian) meaning narcissus or water sprite is an Oolong tea from Mount Wuyi, it has a heavy honey fragrance. Cheaper varieties are grown elsewhere in Fujian and have a burnt taste and are very popular with Chinese restaurants. The infused color is very dark brown showing that the tea is a very dark Oolong. This tea is also grown in Taiwan.
    5.00
    2 votes
    68
    Bi Luo Chun tea

    Bi Luo Chun tea

    • Regions where grown: Jiangsu
    Biluochun (Chinese: 碧螺春) is a famous green tea originally grown in the Dong Ting mountain of Tai Hu, Jiangsu Province, China. Also known as Pi Lo Chun, it is renowned for its delicate appearance, fruity taste, floral aroma, showy white hairs and early cropping. The name Biluochun literally means "Green Snail Spring". It is called so because it is a green tea that is rolled into a tight spiral, resembling snail meat, and is cropped early spring. Its original name is Xia Sha Ren Xiang (simplified Chinese: 吓煞人香; traditional Chinese: 嚇煞人香; pinyin: xiàshàrénxiāng; "scary fragrance"). Legend tells of its discovery by a tea picker who ran out of space in her basket and put the tea between her breasts instead. The tea, warmed by her body heat, emitted a strong aroma that surprised the girl. According to the Qing Dynasty chronicle Ye Shi Da Guan, Emperor Kangxi visited Tai Hu in the 38th year of his rule. At that time, because of its rich aroma, local people called it "Scary Fragrance". Kangxi decided to give it a more elegant name - "Green Snail Spring". Chinese tea experts regard it very highly. Zhen Jun (1857 to 1918 A.D.), author of tea encyclopedia Cha Shuo, ranked it first among
    6.00
    1 votes
    69
    Ceylon tea

    Ceylon tea

    • Regions where grown: Uva Province
    Ceylon green tea is a type of green tea mainly made from Assamese tea stock. These teas generally have the fuller body and the more pungent, rather malty, nutty flavour characteristic of the teas originating from Assamese seed stock. The tea grade names of most Ceylon green teas reflect traditional Chinese green tea nomenclature, such as tightly rolled gunpowder tea, or more open leaf tea grades with Chinese names like Chun Mee. Overall, the green teas from Sri Lanka have their own characteristics at this time - they tend to be darker in both the dry and infused leaf, and their flavour is richer; this could change in the future as market demand preferences change the Ceylon green tea producers start using more of the original Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese and Brazilian seed base, which produces the very light and sparkling bright yellow colour and more delicate, sweet flavour with which most of the world market associates green teas. At this time, Sri Lanka remains a very minor producer of green teas and its green teas, like those of India and Kenya, remain an acquired taste.
    6.00
    1 votes
    70
    Junshan Yinzhen tea

    Junshan Yinzhen tea

    • Regions where grown: China
    Junshan Yinzhen (simplified Chinese: 君山银针; traditional Chinese: 君山銀針; pinyin: jūn shān yín zhēn, lit. "Silver Needle(s) of the Gentleman Mountain") is a Yellow tea from Junshan Island of the Hunan Province in China. It is one of Chinese Famous Teas. Although the same kind of tea trees are also planted around Dongting Lake, where Junshan Island is located, those teas should not be called Junshan Yinzhen. The tea resembles the White tea Yinzhen known as Bai Hao Yinzhen. Junshan Yinzhen, allegedly the preferred tea of Chairman Mao Zedong, is a rare tea sometimes sold as White tea.
    6.00
    1 votes
    71

    Golden Monkey tea

    Golden Monkey tea (Chinese: 金猴茶; pinyin: jīn hóu chá) is the name of a black tea originating from the Fujian and Yunnan provinces in China. Only the bud and first leaf are picked, and the tea leaves are characterized by the pale gold threading. Golden Monkey tea is a black tea counterpart of Silver Needle white tea. The flavor profile of golden monkey tea is characterized by light, honeyed peach notes, and its lack of astringency. This tea is highly prized, as evidenced by its second-place finish in the Signature Famous Teas – Hot Tea Class of the 2009 World Tea Championship. According to legend, this particular tea grows in lofty and precipitous peaks making it difficult to pluck the leaves so local people trained monkeys to pluck the tea leaves, hence the name. The needle in silver needle refers to a type or style of tea leaf (whole leaf/bud, tightly rolled, straight). Golden monkey does not employ this style of leaf. If looking for the black/red tea equivalent of silver needle see golden needle.
    5.00
    1 votes
    72

    Hyson

    • Regions where grown: China
    Hyson, or Lucky Dragon Tea, is a Chinese green tea that comes from the Anhui province of China. It is made from young leaves that are thinly rolled to have a long, twisted appearance that unfurls when brewed. The name Hyson is likely a Chinese name meaning "flourishing spring." However, some believe it was named after an English tea merchant, Phillip Hyson. Hyson is graded into the following three categories: Mi Si, Cheng Si and Fu Si. While hyson tea is often thought of as a low-grade or mediocre quality tea, young hyson is considered high quality. It is harvested earlier, "before the rains," and has a full-bodied, pungent taste and is golden in color. Young hyson tea is subdivided into Chun Mee (a hard, small, twisted leaf), Foong Mee (a long, large, curly leaf), Saw Mee (a small, non-hard, twisted leaf), and Siftings. It is also sometimes classified as First, Second, and Third Young Hyson. The Chinese name for young hyson is Yu Chin Ch'a and is categorized as the following: Mi Yu, O Yu, I Yu, Ya Yu as well as Si Yu. To brew, use 1 teaspoon per 6 oz cup, use water that is below the boiling point, and steep for 2–3 minutes. Hyson tea has been described as light, warm, smooth,
    5.00
    1 votes
    73
    Tieluohan tea

    Tieluohan tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Tieluohan (Chinese: 铁罗汉) is a Si Da Ming Cong and a light Wuyi tea. Tie Luo Han, all but unknown abroad, is the cultivar responsible for one of the four most famous yan cha, the great "rock teas" grown on cliffs in the Wuyi Shan area of Northern Fujian. Legend tells that this tea was created by a powerful warrior monk with golden-bronze skin, hence the name Tie Luo Han, which means "Iron Warrior Monk". The color of the leaf is very green and the resulting tea is of a lighter color. The taste of the tea should be full-bodied and supple, with gentle floral notes and the traditional long-lasting finish.
    5.00
    1 votes
    74

    Kahwah

    Kahwah (Urdu: قہوہ, also spelled qehwa, kehwa or kahwa) is a traditional green tea consumed in Afghanistan, northern Pakistan, some regions of Central Asia as well as the Kashmir Valley. In Pakistan, it is made in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Gilgit-Baltistan regions. It is a popular breakfast tea among Kashmiri's generally accompanied with special Kashmiri bakery items like girda. Kashmiri Pandit migrants living in the North Indian Plains, particularly in the urban agglomeration of Delhi, have also contributed to the tea's popularity among non-Kashmiri Indians. The Arabic word qahwah (قهوة) may have been the root for kahwah or kehwa. However, whereas qahwah is used for coffee beans, the BMC kehwa is a green aromatic tea. Even though exact origins of kehwa are still unclear, most Kashmiris believe that the aromatic traditional drink kehwa dates back to times immemorial & has been a part of local consumption for ages. Certain sources also trace the origins of the drink to the Yarkand valley in Xinjiang Area (Areas of Kashmir & Xinjiang were part of the Kushan Empire during the 1st & 2nd century AD. It is likely that use of kehwa & its spread from one region to another was facilitated
    4.00
    1 votes
    75

    Nepal tea

    • Regions where grown: Nepal
    Nepal, a landlocked country in South Asia, sandwiched between China (in the north) and India (in the south), produces tea that is a cousin of Darjeeling tea in its appearance, aroma and fruity taste. Nepal tea if often referred to as the comparable, "classic" Darjeeling tea, and a great alternative from the "more expensive" Darjeeling tea. The reason for the similarity of Nepal Tea with the well-known Darjeeling tea is that the eastern zones of Nepal, which are the main tea producing regions of Nepal, have more or less the same geographical and topographical conditions as the Darjeeling. Nevertheless, Nepal tea does stand apart from the Darjeeling tea, despite being introduced to the world much later than the Darjeeling tea. Tea connoisseurs consider some of the teas from Nepal to be much better than the Darjeeling tea in its aroma, fusion, taste and colour. However, Nepal tea has not been that successful in capturing limelight in the world tea market, mainly due to the lack of sufficient quantities of tea, that often fails to meet the demand. Since its inception, Nepal tea is characterized by two types of tea, which are Orthodox tea and CTC (Crush, Tear, Curl) tea. Orthodox tea
    4.00
    1 votes
    76
    Pouchong

    Pouchong

    • Regions where grown: Fujian
    Pouchong (Chinese: 包種茶; pinyin: Bāozhŏngchá; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: pau-chióng-tê) or light oolong, it is a lightly fermented (oxidized) tea, twist shape, with floral notes, and usually not roasted, somewhere between green tea and what is usually considered Oolong tea (Chinese: 烏龍; pinyin: wūlóng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: o͘-liông; literally "Black Dragon"), though often classified with the latter due to its lack of the sharper green tea flavours. It is produced mainly in Fujian, China, and in Pinglin Township near Taipei, Taiwan. Its name in Chinese, literally "the wrapped kind", refers to a practice of wrapping the leaves in paper during the drying process that has largely been discontinued due to advancement in tea processing. At its best, Pouchong gives off a floral and melon fragrance and has a rich, mild taste. Usually around the end of March, begins picking of this famous Taiwan "spring tea" (春茶). Pouchong is a popular choice with producers of scented tea, with rose pouchong a particular favourite. Together with green tea, oolong tea, and black tea, Pouchong tea has been shown to have antioxidant activity and antimutagenic properties. Tea catechins are important antioxidants and one study found
    4.00
    1 votes
    77
    Ban Tian Yao tea

    Ban Tian Yao tea

    • Regions where grown: Wuyi Mountains
    Ban Tian Yao (Chinese: 半天腰,; literally "Waist Halfway to the Sky") is a very rare Wuyi Oolong with a light smokey taste.
    0.00
    0 votes
    78
    Chrysanthemum tea

    Chrysanthemum tea

    • Regions where grown: Tongxiang
    Chrysanthemum tea (Chinese: 菊花茶; pinyin: júhuā chá) is a flower-based tisane made from chrysanthemum flowers of the species Chrysanthemum morifolium or Chrysanthemum indicum, which are most popular in East Asia. To prepare the tea, chrysanthemum flowers (usually dried) are steeped in hot water (usually 90 to 95 degrees Celsius after cooling from a boil) in either a teapot, cup, or glass; often rock sugar is also added, and occasionally also wolfberries. The resulting drink is transparent and ranges from pale to bright yellow in color, with a floral aroma. In Chinese tradition, once a pot of chrysanthemum tea has been drunk, hot water is typically added again to the flowers in the pot (producing a tea that is slightly less strong); this process is often repeated several times. Chrysanthemum tea was first drunk during the Song Dynasty (960–1279). Several varieties of chrysanthemum, ranging from white to pale or bright yellow in color, are used for tea. These include: The flower is called kek-huai in Thai, from kiok-hoe, Min Nan for júhuā. In Tamil it is called saamandhi. Of these, the first two are most popular. Some varieties feature a prominent yellow flower head while others do
    0.00
    0 votes
    79
    Kombucha

    Kombucha

    Kombucha is an effervescent fermentation of sweetened tea that is used as a functional food. Sometimes referred to as a "mushroom", the kombucha culture is actually a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast (SCOBY). The kombucha culture is a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast, comprising Acetobacter (a genus of acetic acid bacteria) and one or more yeasts. These form a zoogleal mat. In Chinese, this microbial culture is called haomo, or jiaomu in Mandarin, (Chinese: 酵母; literally "yeast"). A kombucha culture may contain one or more of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. Alcohol production by the yeast(s) contributes to the production of acetic acid by the bacteria. Alcohol concentration also plays a role in triggering cellulose production by the bacterial symbionts. Although the bacterial component of a kombucha culture comprises several species, it almost always includes Gluconacetobacter xylinus (formerly Acetobacter xylinum), which ferments the alcohols produced by the yeast(s) into acetic acid. This increases the acidity while limiting the
    0.00
    0 votes
    80
    Mao Jian tea

    Mao Jian tea

    • Regions where grown: Henan
    Xinyang Maojian tea (simplified Chinese: 信阳毛尖; traditional Chinese: 信陽毛尖; pinyin: Xìnyángmáojiān) is a green tea produced in Xinyang, Henan. It is designated as a China Famous Tea. Xinyang Maojian is one type of green tea that originally was produced in northern China. The name can be divided into two parts that are associated with two aspects: "Xin Yang", the first part, is the place in China that produces this type of tea. "Mao Jian" are the words to depict the shape of the leaves. Throughout two thousand years of history, Xinyang Maojian has been considered one of the ten top teas in China. It has a wide market and popularity in Henan province, where people like to drink it as a relaxing beverage after a busy day. Located in southern Henan Province, Xinyang is a place with a mild climate and good conditions for growing trees that produce the tea's unique quality: Xinyang tea trees are planted at high altitudes where the weather is clearly divided by four distinct seasons. Many high mountains, such as Mt. Cheyun, Mt. Jiyun, and Mt. Tianyun, also surround the location in order to support environmental humidification and moisture. Moreover, there is an abundance of forests, clouds,
    0.00
    0 votes
    81
    Matcha latte

    Matcha latte

    A matcha latte is a drink, often found in coffee and tea cafes, that is made of matcha (finely ground tea leaf powder) that is combined with either regular milk or soy milk.
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    0 votes
    82
    Nilgiri tea

    Nilgiri tea

    • Regions where grown: The Nilgiris District
    Nilgiri tea is generally described as being a dark, intensely aromatic, fragrant and flavoured tea grown in the southern portion of the Western Ghats mountains of Southern India. It is grown in the hills of the Nilgiris district of Tamil Nadu, though there are numerous other tea-growing districts in South India as well, including Munnar and Central Travancore, further south in Kerala state. Nilgiri tea plantations are represented by the Nilgiri Planters' Association, which is an organizational member of the United Planters Association of South India (UPASI), headquartered in Coonoor. UPASI is the peak body representing plantation owners in South India. However, plantations only account for around 30% of tea production in Nilgiri District. The vast majority of production is undertaken by small growers, who typically own less than one hectare each. The majority of Nilgiri tea small growers are the Badagas, a local community of agriculturists. Tea plantations in Nilgiri District (as in other growing districts of India) typically own and operate their own processing factories. Small growers sell their tea as green leaf to "bought leaf factories", which are independently owned.
    0.00
    0 votes
    83
    Sayama Tea

    Sayama Tea

    Sayama Tea (狭山茶, Sayama-cha) is a type of green tea leaves produced mainly in the southwestern region of Saitama Prefecture and a small neighboring area in Northwestern Tokyo. In comparison to teas from other tea-growing regions in Japan, Sayama Tea is characterized with its thick leaves. This is because the region is considered to be fairly north, and the cool climate, which sometimes causes frost in winter, makes trees unable to survive without thick leaves. Through selective breeding, efforts to develop tea trees strong in cold weather have been undertaken for many years. As a result, trees of Sayama Tea evolved to have thick leaves that can withstand cold weather. Tea extracted from such thick leaves resulted in a distinct sweet and rich flavor. The Musashino Plateau on which Sayama Tea is grown is suitable for tea growing. The plateau consists of two layers. The lower layer consists of conglomerates and sandstones that were brought to this region by rivers. The upper layer is made of a reddish loam created by the accumulation of volcanic ash. Together, these two layers make the region unsuitable for growing rice but suitable for tea growing, which requires high precipitation
    0.00
    0 votes
    84
    Tamaryokucha

    Tamaryokucha

    • Regions where grown: Japan
    The tamaryokucha (Japanese: 玉緑茶, coiled tea) is a fine Japanese green tea, also commonly known as guricha (ぐり茶, curly tea). It has a tangy, berry-like taste, with a long almondy aftertaste and a deep aroma with tones of citrus, grass, and berries. It can be processed in one of two ways to destroy the enzymes: pan fried (rarely used in Japan, it's the Chinese process), or steamed (as most Japanese teas). Many believe that steaming preserves the vitamins and antioxidants better than pan-frying. The taste varies between the two as well. The pan-fried version has more of an aroma of cooked vegetables. In both cases, the leaves are then rolled into "comma" shapes (instead of being kneaded into "needle" shapes, like sencha teas). It is produced in the Kyūshū area. The tea is golden yellow and it should be steeped at 70°C for about 2 minutes or 80°C for about 1 minute. The caffeine level is normal for green tea and it can be drunk throughout the day. It can be reinfused, with a slightly different taste. The name tama-ryoku-cha means "coiled-green-tea" (tama being "ball, jewel" but becoming the attributive "coiled, rolled" here), and guri-cha means "curly-tea" (guri being the name of a
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