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Best Steam locomotive wheel configuration of All Time

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    1

    2-6-6-6

    The 2-6-6-6 (in Whyte notation) is an articulated locomotive type with 2 leading wheels, two sets of six driving wheels and six trailing wheels. Only two classes of the 2-6-6-6 type were built. One was the "Allegheny" class, built by the Lima Locomotive Works. The name comes from the locomotive's first service with the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway beginning in 1941. The other was the "Blue Ridge" class for the Virginian Railway. These were the heaviest reciprocating steam locomotives ever built. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 1CC3 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 130+033 Turkish classification: 34+36 Swiss classification: 3/4+3/6 The UIC classification is refined to (1'C)C3' for Mallet locomotives. Two classes of 2-6-6-6 locomotives were built; the sixty H-8 "Allegheny" class locomotives for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) between 1941 and 1948, and the eight AG "Blue Ridge" class locomotives for the Virginian Railway in 1945. (The locomotives were Series AG on the Virginian, which was thought to be an abbreviation for Allegheny, but that referred to their being Articulated, Series G.) All were
    7.33
    6 votes
    2

    0-10-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-10-2 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, ten powered and coupled driving wheels on five axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle (usually in a trailing truck). Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: E1 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 051 Turkish classification: 56 Swiss classification: 5/6 In the US, this type is known as the Union after the only US railroad to have new locomotives built in this arrangement. These were ten 0-10-2s built for the Union Railroad in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. They were used as heavy duty transfer locomotives rather than switchers. In Greenville, Pennsylvania, one is on static display lettered for the Duluth Missabe and Iron Range Railway #604 (Upon dieselization, the Union RR sold all of theirs to the DM&IR) . The Chicago & North Western Railway converted two 2-10-2 locomotives formerly owned by subsidiary Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha into 0-10-2 locomotives in 1944. They were classified J-1 both before and after conversion. One was scrapped in 1950 and the other in
    7.17
    6 votes
    3
    2-6-6

    2-6-6

    In the Whyte notation for describing steam locomotive wheel arrangement, a 2-6-6 is a locomotive with a two-wheeled leading truck, six driving wheels, and a six-wheeled trailing truck. All the locomotives produced of this arrangement have been tank locomotives, and the vast majority in the United States. It was a popular arrangement for the larger Mason Bogies, as well as some of the largest suburban tank locomotives. Other equivalent classifications are:
    7.17
    6 votes
    4
    2-6-4

    2-6-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 2-6-4 locomotive has two leading wheels, six coupled driving wheels and four trailing wheels. This arrangement is commonly called Adriatic. Other equivalent classifications are: With three known exceptions, the wheel arrangement was usually used on tank locomotives. The earliest known example was the South African Class 6Z, designed by Cape Government Railways (CGR) Chief Locomotive Superintendent H.M. Beatty in 1901. The first of the class were modified 2-6-2 Prairie locomotives that were equipped with two axle trailing bogies. In 1902 more were placed in service, built with the 2-6-4 wheel arrangement. The latter were the first tender locomotives in the world to be built with this wheel arrangement. Two Austrian express locomotive types were also of the same wheel arrangement, the Class 210 of 1908 and Class 310 of 1911, both designed by Karl Gölsdorf. The type therefore became known as the Adriatic arrangement, named for the Adriatic Sea which bordered Austria-Hungary until 1918. Tank engines with the 2-6-4 wheel arrangement were produced for many different railway systems worldwide and were mainly used for
    6.00
    7 votes
    5
    0-10-0

    0-10-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-10-0 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, ten powered and coupled driving wheels on five axles, and no trailing wheels. The lack of leading and trailing wheels makes this arrangement unstable at speed, and is a type confined to fairly low-speed work, such as switching, transfer runs, slow-speed drag freight, or running over mountainous terrain. In the United Kingdom, this type is known as a decapod (a name which in the United States is applied to 2-10-0 types). Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: E (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 050 Turkish classification: 55 Swiss classification: 5/5 In 1899 Karl Gölsdorf introduced his famous 180.00 class for the Austrian State Railway, an 0-10-0 for mountain regions that had a remarkably low weight per axle. It employed the Gölsdorf axle system and had the drive, unusually, on the fourth axle. The class existed both as simples and as two-cylinder compounds, and they later worked in Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Romania and France. Three 0-10-0s were owned by the Canadian Pacific
    8.20
    5 votes
    6
    2-10-2

    2-10-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-10-2 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, usually in a leading truck, ten powered and coupled driving wheels on five axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle, usually in a trailing truck. In the United States and elsewhere the 2-10-2 is known as the Santa Fe type, after the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway that first used the type in 1903. Other equivalent classifications are: The 2-10-2 wheel arrangement evolved from the ATSF 2-10-0 Decapod. The ATSF’s existing 2-10-0 locomotives, used as pushers up Raton Pass, encountered problems reversing back down the grade for their next assignments. The 2-10-0s were unable to track around curves at speed in reverse and had to run very slowly to avoid derailing. Consequently, the ATSF added a trailing wheel to the engines, allowing them to operate successfully in both directions. These first 2-10-2 locomotives became the forerunners to the entire 2-10-2 family. Like all ten-coupled designs, the long rigid wheelbase of the driving wheels presented a problem on curves, requiring blind drivers, lateral motion devices and much play on the
    8.00
    5 votes
    7
    2-6-6-2

    2-6-6-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, a 2-6-6-2 is a locomotive with one pair of unpowered leading wheels, followed by two sets of three pairs of powered driving wheels, and one pair of trailing wheels. The wheel arrangement was principally used on Mallet-type articulated locomotives, although some tank locomotive examples were also built. A Garratt type locomotive with the same wheel arrangement is classified as 2-6-0+0-6-2. Other equivalent classifications are: Under the UIC classification the wheel arrangement is referred to as (1'C)C1' for Mallet locomotives. The 2-6-6-2 wheel arrangement was most often used for articulated compound steam Mallet locomotives. In a compound Mallet, the rear set of coupled wheels are driven by the smaller high pressure cylinders, from which spent steam is then fed to the larger low pressure cylinders that drive the front set of coupled wheels. This type of locomotive was commonly used in North America on logging railroads. The 2-6-6-2 wheel arrangement was also used in the Soviet Union and in South Africa. The Serbian Government used a Mallet articulated compound locomotive for freight service
    6.67
    6 votes
    8

    4-6-6-4

    In Whyte notation, a 4-6-6-4 is a railroad steam locomotive that has four leading wheels followed by six coupled driving wheels, a second set of six driving wheels and four trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2CC2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 230+032 Turkish classification: 35+35 Swiss classification: 3/5+3/5 The UIC classification is refined to (2'C)C2' for Mallet locomotives. This wheel arrangement was used by the Challenger class of locomotives on the Union Pacific Railroad. One locomotive of this class, Union Pacific 3985 is still operable, and it is currently the largest operable steam locomotive in the world. Another example, Union Pacific 3977 is on static display in North Platte, Nebraska. Though originally intended for freight service, many units could be found leading passenger consists as well. Railroads that used the Challenger type locomotive include:
    6.50
    6 votes
    9
    0-8-8-0

    0-8-8-0

    In the Whyte notation for classifying the wheel arrangement of steam locomotives, an 0-8-8-0 is a locomotive with two sets of eight driving wheels and neither leading wheels nor trailing wheels. Two sets of driving wheels would give far too long a wheelbase to be mounted in a fixed locomotive frame, so all 0-8-8-0s have been articulated locomotives of the Mallet type, whether simple or compound. In the UIC classification, this arrangement would be, refined to Mallet locomotives, (D)D. The type was sometimes called Angus in North America. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: DD (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 040+040 Turkish classification: 44+44 Swiss classification: 4/4+4/4 The lack of leading and trailing wheels to assist the tracking and stability of the locomotive means that the 0-8-8-0 type is not suited to high speeds. The vast majority have seen use as very heavy switchers (generally for hump yard work), transfer locomotives for hauling cuts of cars between rail yards, or pushers for assistance on grades. Most locomotives of this arrangement were built and served in North America, but there were
    8.75
    4 votes
    10
    0-8-4

    0-8-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-8-4 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles (usually in a trailing bogie). Other equivalent classifications are: All examples of this wheel arrangement were tank locomotives; there are no 0-8-4 tender locomotives recorded. The tank locomotives were themselves rare. Two separate classes were built in the UK, by two different railway companies. Both of these had their origins with an 0-8-0 tender design. Both classes were designed as powerful, but slow-speed, locomotives for heavy shunting. They did not require high speed or long range, so had no need for a leading truck or the greater coal capacity of a tender. Other than this though, they were quite distinct. The first example was the Great Central Railway Class 8H of 1907. These were designed for hump shunting and so required high tractive effort, good adhesion and traction for starting from rest. Although developed from the 8A tender class, and having some interchangeable parts in their running gear, they also had three cylinders rather than two. The
    7.20
    5 votes
    11
    4-4-4

    4-4-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-4-4 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles. In the United States, this arrangement was named the Reading type, since the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad was the first to use it. In Canada, this type was known as the Jubilee. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2B2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 222 Turkish classification: 26 Swiss classification: 2/6 A single, experimental 4-4-4, classified as S 2/6, was built for the Royal Bavarian State Railway Company in 1906 by the firm of J.A. Maffei. It was successful in an experimental sense but was too light to haul passenger trains of useful capacity. It was fast, attaining 154 km/h (96 mph) on test, and was semi-streamlined with a pointed nosecone and fairings around the cylinders, stack and dome, and slanted-back cab windows. It inspired the later Bavarian S 3/6 4-6-2 "Pacifics". It passed to the Deutsche Reichseisenbahnen when the German railways were centralised,
    7.00
    5 votes
    12
    4-8-4

    4-8-4

    Under the Whyte notation classification of steam locomotives, 4-8-4 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles (usually in a leading truck), eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles (usually in a trailing truck). Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2D2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 242 (also known as Spanish classification) Turkish classification: 48 Swiss classification: 4/8 Russian classification: 2-4-2 The type is sometimes called Northern. The 4-8-4 was an obvious progression from the 4-8-2 "Mountain" and, like the 2-8-4 "Berkshire" and 4-6-4 "Hudson" types, an example of the "Super Power" concept in steam locomotive design. It combined the stability at speed of the 4-6-4 and 4-8-2 due to the 4-wheel lead truck, the greater adhesive weight of the 2-8-4 and 4-8-2 (leading to greater traction, and allowing a larger, more powerful locomotive) and the larger firebox supported by the 4-wheel trailing truck common to 2-8-4s and 4-6-4s (allowing for freer steaming, particularly at speed). The 4-8-4 was first used by the Northern
    9.67
    3 votes
    13
    0-4-2

    0-4-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-4-2 represents the wheel arrangement with no leading wheels, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle. The configuration was often used for tank engines, which is noted by adding letters to the configuration, such as 0-4-2T for a conventional side-tank locomotive, 0-4-2ST for a saddle-tank locomotive and 0-4-2WT for a well-tank locomotive. In the 1880s and 1890s the type was also used for some famous tender locomotives. Other equivalent classifications are: The earliest recorded 0-4-2 locomotives were three goods engines built by Robert Stephenson and Company for the Stanhope and Tyne Railway in 1834. The first locomotive built in Germany in 1838, the Saxonia, was also an 0-4-2. In the same year Todd, Kitson & Laird built two examples for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, one of which, LMR 57 Lion, has been preserved. Over the next quarter of a century the type was adopted by many early British railways for freight haulage since it afforded greater adhesion than the contemporary 2-2-2 passenger configuration, although in time they were also used for mixed
    7.25
    4 votes
    14
    4-4-2

    4-4-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, 4-4-2 represents a configuration of four leading wheels on two axles, usually in a leading bogie, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle, usually in a trailing truck. This wheel arrangement is commonly known as the Atlantic type. Other equivalent classifications are: The tank locomotive version of the 4-4-2 Atlantic type first made its appearance in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1880, when William Adams designed the 1 Class 4-4-2T of the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway (LT&SR). The 4-4-2T is the tank equivalent of a 4-4-0 American tender locomotive, but with the frame extended to allow for a fuel bunker behind the cab. This necessitated the addition of a trailing truck to support the additional weight at the rear end of the locomotive. As such, the tank version of the 4-4-2 wheel arrangement appeared earlier than the tender version. The tender version of the 4-4-2 originated in the United States of America, evolving from the less stable 2-4-2 Columbia wheel arrangement, and was built especially for mainline passenger express services. One
    8.67
    3 votes
    15
    0-4-0

    0-4-0

    • Locomotive classes: GWR 1101 Class
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-4-0 represents one of the simplest possible types, that with two axles and four coupled wheels, all of which are driven. In normal circumstances, the wheels on each end of the axles are connected with coupling rods to form a single driven set. In Britain the Whyte notation of wheel arrangement was also often used for the classification of electric and diesel-electric locomotives with side-rod coupled driving wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: In the UIC classification used in Europe and, in more recent years, in simplified form in the United States, an 0-4-0 is classified as B (German and Italian) if the axles are connected by side rods or gearing and 020 (French), independent of axle motoring. The UIC's Bo classification indicates that the axles are independently motored, which would be 0-2-2-0 in the Whyte notation. 0-4-0 locomotives were built as tank locomotives as well as tender locomotives. The former was more common in Europe and the latter in the United States, except in the tightest of situations such as that of a shop switcher where overall length was a concern. The terms four-wheeled and
    7.00
    4 votes
    16
    0-3-0

    0-3-0

    0-3-0 is a type of wheel arrangement for a monorail steam locomotive. This most unusual wheel arrangement was only used for specialised monorails. The Lartigue Monorail locomotives used on the Listowel and Ballybunion Railway were of 0-3-0 wheel arrangement, although they also required non-load-bearing guide wheels. These locomotives were built by the Hunslet Engine Company, Leeds in 1888. Four locomotives were built with this wheel arrangement in 1907 for the Patiala State Monorail Trainways, a monorail line in Patiala, India. They had double flanged driving wheels and the locomotives had an outrigger wheel that ran on the ground. The builder was Orenstein & Koppel of Berlin, one locomotive is preserved in working order at the Indian National Railway Museum, New Delhi. Also, in the Russian notation that counts axles instead of wheels, 0-3-0 is identical to Whyte's 0-6-0.
    8.33
    3 votes
    17
    4-2-4

    4-2-4

    In Whyte notation, a 4-2-4 is a steam locomotive that has a four-wheel leading truck, one powered driving axle and a four-wheel unpowered trailing truck. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2A2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 212 Turkish classification: 15 Swiss classification: 1/5 This most unusual wheel arrangement was limited to tank locomotives. The type appears to have first been used on 14 locomotives supplied to the broad gauge Bristol and Exeter Railway in 1853. They were designed by James Pearson, and featured single large flangeless driving wheels and two supporting bogies. The water was carried in both well and back tanks. Three classes were distinguished by the size of driving wheel; the original 9-foot-diameter (2.7 m) wheels were replaced by smaller ones on later designs. The type was also used on an experimental locomotive by William Dean of the Great Western Railway 1881. It did little work and was prone to derailment. It was rebuilt as a 2-2-2 tender locomotive in 1884. Dugald Drummond of the London and South Western Railway built a 4-2-4T LSWR F9 class combined locomotive and inspection
    8.33
    3 votes
    18
    2-2-2

    2-2-2

    • Locomotive classes: GWR Prince Class
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-2-2 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle two powered driving wheels on one axle, and two trailing wheels on one axle. The wheel arrangement both provided more stability and enabled a larger firebox than the earlier 0-2-2 and 2-2-0 types. This configuration was introduced in 1834 on Robert Stephenson's 'Patentee locomotive' but it was later popularly named Jenny Lind, after the Jenny Lind locomotive which in turn was named after the popular singer. They were also sometimes described as Singles, although this name could be used to describe any kind of locomotive with a single pair of driving wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: The 2-2-2 configuration appears to have been developed by Robert Stephenson and Company in 1834, as an enlargement of their 2-2-0 Planet configuration, offering more stability and a larger firebox. The new type became known as Stephenson's Patentee locomotive. Adler, the first successful locomotive to operate in Germany, was a Patentee supplied by Robert Stephenson and company in component form in December, 1835 was one of the earliest examples. Other
    6.75
    4 votes
    19
    2-8-4

    2-8-4

    In the Whyte notation, a 2-8-4 is a steam locomotive that has one unpowered leading axle, usually in a leading truck, followed by four powered and coupled driving axles, and two unpowered trailing axles, usually mounted in a bogie. This locomotive type is most often referred to as a Berkshire, though the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway used the name Kanawha for their 2-8-4s. In Europe, this wheel arrangement was mostly seen in main line passenger express locomotives and, in certain countries, in tank locomotives. Other equivalent classifications are: In the United States of America the 2-8-4 wheel arrangment was a further development of the enormously successful United States Railroad Administration (USRA) 2-8-2 Mikado. It resulted from the requirement for a locomotive with even greater steam heating capacity. To produce more steam, a solution was to increase the size of the locomotive's firebox, but the 2-8-2 wheel arrangement with its single axle trailing truck limited the permissible increased axle loading from a larger firebox. The most practical solution was to add a second trailing axle to spread the increased weight of a larger firebox. The first American 2-8-4s were built for
    6.75
    4 votes
    20

    0-8-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-8-0 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and no trailing wheels. Locomotives of this type are also referred to as Eight Coupled. Other equivalent classifications are: Examples of the 0-8-0 wheel arrangement were constructed both as tender locomotives and tank locomotives. The earliest locomotives were built for mainline haulage, particularly for freight, but later the configuration was also often used for large switcher (shunter) types. The wheel arrangement provided a powerful layout, with all weight as adhesive weight and thus tractive effort and factor of adhesion were maximised. The layout was generally too large for smaller and lighter railways, where the more popular 0-6-0 wheel arrangement would often be found performing similar duties. Two 0-8-0 locomotives were delivered from Andre Koechlin & Cie in Mulhouse to the Austrian Southern Railway in 1862. They were later sent to Italy and worked over the Apennines between Bologna and Pistoja. Freight engines with an 0-8-0 wheel arrangement were once very popular in Germany. The
    8.00
    3 votes
    21
    2-6-0

    2-6-0

    • Locomotive classes: LNER Class K5
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-6-0 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, usually in a leading truck, six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles, and no trailing wheels. This arrangement is commonly called a Mogul. Other equivalent classifications are: In the United States and Europe the 2-6-0 wheel arrangement was principally used for tender locomotives. This type of locomotive was widely built in the USA from the early 1860s to the 1920s. Although examples were built as early as 1852–53 by two Philadelphia manufacturers, Baldwin Locomotive Works and Norris Locomotive Works, these first examples had their leading axles mounted directly and rigidly on the frame of the locomotive, rather than on a separate truck or bogie. In these early 2-6-0 locomotives the leading axle was merely used to distribute the weight of the locomotive over a larger number of wheels. It was therefore essentially an 0-8-0 with the lead axle unpowered and the leading wheels did not serve the same purpose as, for example, the leading trucks of the 4-4-0 Americans or 4-6-0 Ten-Wheelers that, at the time, had been in use for at
    9.50
    2 votes
    22
    0-6-4-0

    0-6-4-0

    In the UIC classification, the Co-Bo or Co′Bo′ wheel arrangement features two uncoupled bogies. The "Co" bogie has three driven axles and the "Bo" bogie has two. The British Rail Class 28 is the first (and only) UK locomotive with a Co-Bo wheel arrangement. Other examples worldwide include the class DE10 and DE11 diesel-hydraulic locomotives in Japan. Some Engerth steam locomotives were built to the Fink system, with the four trailing wheels driven by a crankshaft and connecting rods, thus making them 0-6-4-0Ts instead of 0-6-4Ts. BoCo is a fictional Co-Bo locomotive, a British Rail Class 28. The locomotive appeared in the Thomas the Tank Engine book Main Line Engines.
    5.00
    5 votes
    23
    2-10-0

    2-10-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-10-0 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, ten powered and coupled driving wheels on five axles, and no trailing wheels. This arrangement was often named Decapod, especially in the United States, although this name was sometimes applied to locomotives of 0-10-0 "Ten-Coupled" arrangement. Other equivalent classifications are: These locomotives were popular in Europe, particularly in Germany, and in Russia; British use of the type was confined to the period during and after World War II. In the United States, the 2-10-0 was not popular but was a favorite of a small number of railroads, mostly in mountainous terrain. The 2-10-0's main advantage was that five out of six of its axles were powered, meaning almost all the weight was available for traction rather than being distributed over pilot and trailing wheels. The long rigid wheelbase caused problems on tightly curved track, so blind drivers were the norm, either on the central axle, and/or on the second and/or fourth axles. Often lateral motion devices were attached to the leading drive axle. The wheel arrangement's disadvantages
    7.33
    3 votes
    24

    4-14-4

    A 4-14-4, in the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, is a locomotive with four leading wheels, fourteen coupled driving wheels (seven axles) in a rigid frame, and four trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2G2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 272 Turkish classification: 711 Swiss classification: 7/11 Russian classification: 2-7-2 A single example of this type, called the AA20-1, was built by the Soviet Union. The designation stands for Andrey Andreev (who sponsored its construction), 20 ton axle load. While some builders had produced twelve-coupled (six driving axles) designs, no one had ever built a fourteen-coupled engine. The AA20-1 holds two records: the largest number of coupled axles on a locomotive, and being the longest rigid frame locomotive in Europe. It was the largest rigid frame locomotive in the world until 1939, when the PRR S1 was unveiled. The large number of driving axles were meant to spread out the locomotive's weight, reducing the axle load and the resulting stress on the track. A group of Soviet locomotive engineers had
    7.33
    3 votes
    25

    0-6-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-6-4 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles. Other equivalent classifications are: The 0-6-4 wheel arrangement appears to have only been used on tank engines. The earliest known example was the Moel Tryfan narrow gauge locomotive built for use on the North Wales Narrow Gauge Railways. It was a single Fairlie type built by the Vulcan Foundry near Manchester in 1875. It was followed by the R class and S class, built by the Avonside Engine Company of England for the New Zealand Railways Department between 1878 and 1881. After the electrification of the Mersey Railway in England, four of its 0-6-4T locomotives were sold to J. & A. Brown of New South Wales, Australia, where one, number 5, is preserved at the New South Wales Rail Transport Museum, Thirlmere, New South Wales. Three members of New Zealand's S class were also sold to the Western Australian Government Railways in 1891. New Zealand’s R class and S class Single Fairlies were popular with crews and capable of all duties from express passenger trains
    9.00
    2 votes
    26

    2-6-6-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, a 2-6-6-0 is a locomotive with one pair of unpowered leading wheels, followed by two sets of three pairs of powered driving wheels, and no trailing wheels. The wheel arrangement was principally used on Mallet-type articulated locomotives, although some tank locomotive examples were also built. Other equivalent classifications are: The 2-6-6-0 wheel arrangement was most often used for articulated compound steam Mallet locomotives. In a compound Mallet, the rear set of coupled wheels are driven by the smaller high pressure cylinders, from which spent steam is then fed to the larger low pressure cylinders that drive the front set of coupled wheels. The sole NZR E class locomotive of 1906 was the only 2-6-6-0 tank locomotive ever built for and used by the New Zealand Railways Department. It was built at the Petone Workshops in Wellington and was designed for use on the world famous Rimutaka Incline. Numbered 66, making it E 66, it spent the first part of its working life in the Wellington region hauling trains up and down the Rimutaka Incline. It was eventually transferred to the
    5.75
    4 votes
    27

    0-8-6

    An 0-8-6, in the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, is a locomotive with no leading wheels, eight driving wheels (4 axles) fixed in a rigid frame, and six trailing wheels (normally mounted in a trailing truck). Examples of this type of locomotive were built by Wilhelm von Engerth. Other equivalent classifications are:
    7.00
    3 votes
    28
    2-6-6-4

    2-6-6-4

    In the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotive wheel arrangement, a 2-6-6-4 is a locomotive with a two-wheel leading truck, two sets of six driving wheels, and a four-wheel trailing truck. All 2-6-6-4s have been articulated locomotives, of the Mallet or related simple articulated type. Other equivalent classifications are: The UIC classification is refined to (1'C)C2' for Mallet locomotives. The 2-6-6-4 was a fairly late development, a product of the superpower steam concept, introduced by the Lima Locomotive Works, which encouraged the use of large fireboxes supported by four-wheel trailing trucks. Such a firebox could sustain a rate of steam generation to meet any demands of the locomotive's cylinders, even at high speed. High speeds were certainly among the design goals for a 2-6-6-4; most of the type were intended for use on fast freight trains. The first 2-6-6-4s built in the United States were for the Pittsburgh & West Virginia Railroad, and these were not high speed locomotives but rather heavy mountain luggers. They received three in 1934 and four more in 1937. The next of the type were a successful class of ten ordered by the Seaboard Air Line in 1935 and
    7.00
    3 votes
    29
    4-12-2

    4-12-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-12-2 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels, twelve coupled driving wheels, and two trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: AAR wheel arrangement: 2-F-1 UIC classification: 2′F1′ (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 261 Turkish classification: 69 Swiss classification: 6/9 This arrangement was named the Union Pacific type, after the only railroad to use it. Only one type of 4-12-2 was built, the Union Pacific Railroad's 9000-series locomotives, 88 of which were built by ALCO between 1926 and 1930. These locomotives were used to increase the speed of freight trains in flat country, and were fairly successful, but were maintenance nightmares, largely because of their use of an inaccessible third cylinder driving a cranked second driving axle between the frames. There was no inaccessible valve gear to worry about, however. ALCO had obtained permission to use the conjugated valve gear invented by Sir Nigel Gresley. This system used two hinged levers connected to the outer cylinder's valves to operate the inner cylinder's valve. The
    7.00
    3 votes
    30
    4-4-6

    4-4-6

    A 4-4-6, in the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, is a locomotive with: An example of this wheel arrangement was the Thuile locomotive. Other equivalent classifications are:
    8.50
    2 votes
    31

    6-8-6

    In Whyte notation, a 6-8-6 is a steam locomotive with: Other equivalent classifications are: The S2 steam turbine locomotive, built for the Pennsylvania Railroad, was the only one ever to use this 6-8-6 wheel arrangement. The engine built in 1944, used a direct-drive steam turbine, which ensured a smooth uniform power flow (torque or tractive effort) at all speeds. As the locomotive did not use cylinders, there was no rail hammering as with reciprocating engines, so that the wheels only required counter-balances for the coupling rods. Consequently, the wheel diameter was small at 68 inches (1727 mm). The turbines drove the two middle axles via a series of reduction gears, however high pressure steam hits the blades at speeds up to 2,000 "miles per hour" [sic] which in turn generated about 6,900 horsepower (5.1 megawatts). The output exceeded all conventional steam locomotives as well as diesels rated at 6,000 hp (4,500 kW), above 40 mph (64 km/h). At speeds less than 30 mph (48 km/h) steam consumption was high, but above that speed, its steam consumption was well below normal locomotives. Turbine maintenance was a major problem and the engine only ran until 1949. Some of its
    5.50
    4 votes
    32

    0-12-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-12-0 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, twelve powered and coupled driving wheels on six axles, and no trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: The only known 0-12-0 was the Pennsylvania, designed by Jame Milholland for the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad and built at its own shops in 1863. It weighed fifty tons and was, at the time, the heaviest steam locomotive in the world. It was intended to haul Pennsylvania coal trains. Ellis, Hamilton (1968). Pictorial encyclopaedia of railways. London: Hamlyn. ISBN 0-600-37585-4.  White, John H., Jr. (1972). Early Locomotives. New York: Dover. ISBN 0-486-22772-3.
    6.67
    3 votes
    33
    0-2-2

    0-2-2

    An 0-2-2, in the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, is one that has two coupled driving wheels followed by two trailing wheels, with no leading wheels. The configuration was briefly built by Robert Stephenson and Company for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway Other equivalent classifications are: The 0-2-2 or Northumbrian wheel arrangement was briefly used by Robert Stephenson and Company on locomotives for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway from 1829, but quickly became superseded by the 2-2-0 Planet and the 2-2-2 Single configurations as locomotives grew larger. The most famous 0-2-2 is Stephenson's Rocket of 1829. Eight subsequent Stephenson locomotives for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway were of the 0-2-2 type; these were Meteor, Comet, Dart, Arrow, Phoenix, North Star, Northumbrian, and Majestic, following which Stephenson locomotives switched to the 2-2-0 type. The Rocket's fellow competitor in the Rainhill Trials, John Ericsson and John Braithwaite's Novelty, was also an 0-2-2 well tank locomotive. In Novelty's case both the driving wheels and trailing wheels were the same size. In the 20th Century a number of railmotors
    6.67
    3 votes
    34
    2-8-8-2

    2-8-8-2

    . A 2-8-8-2, in the Whyte notation for describing steam locomotive wheel arrangements, is an articulated locomotive with a two-wheel leading truck, two sets of eight driving wheels, and a two-wheel trailing truck. The equivalent UIC classification is, refined to Mallet locomotives, (1'D)D1'. These locomotives usually employ the Mallet principles of articulation--with the rear engine rigidly attached to the boiler and the front engine free to rotate--and compounding. The 2-8-8-2 was a design largely limited to American locomotive builders. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 1DD1 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 140+041 Turkish classification: 45+45 Swiss classification: 4/5+4/5 The first 2-8-8-2 was built in 1909 by Baldwin, who sold two to the Southern Pacific Railroad (classified MC-1), and then three each to the Union Pacific Railroad and UP-owned Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company. Baldwin conceived the type as an expansion of the 2-6-6-2 permitting a greater tractive effort. The next order for the type was from the Southern Pacific; these differed in being cab forward locomotives, so that the crew
    6.67
    3 votes
    35
    4-2-0

    4-2-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-2-0 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, two powered and coupled driving wheels on one axle, and no trailing wheels. This type of locomotive, often called a Jervis type, was common on American railroads from the 1830s through the 1850s. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2′A (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 210 Turkish classification: 13 Swiss classification: 1/3 The first 4-2-0 built was the Experiment (later named Brother Jonathan) for the Mohawk and Hudson Railroad in 1832. It was built by the West Point Foundry based on a design by John B. Jervis. Having little else to reference, the manufacturers patterned the boiler and valve gears after locomotives built by Robert Stephenson of England. In England, it had developed from the 2-2-2 design of Stephenson's first Long Boiler locomotive, around 1840, which he had altered to place two pairs of wheels at the front with the outside cylinders between them to improve stability. A few examples of Stephenson locomotives were already in operation in America,
    6.67
    3 votes
    36
    0-6-6-0

    0-6-6-0

    In Whyte notation, a 0-6-6-0 is a railroad steam locomotive that has two articulated sections, each with six coupled driving wheels, without any leading wheels or trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: The first Mallet locomotive built in the United States, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad #2400 (Class O), was of this type. The Kansas City Southern used them as freight engines, with pilots, and had the most at 12 locomotives. 0-6-6-0's were also used, in limited amounts, on logging railroads and in mountain terminals. The only example of this type of engine in the UK was the Leader. It was originally commissioned by the Southern Railway but it was completed by British Railways in 1949. It was effectively a Meyer locomotive since both sets of drivers were articulated. In UIC classification this would be written C'C'. Córas Iompair Éireann No. CC1, generally known as the Turf Burner, was a prototype 0-6-6-0 articulated steam locomotive designed by Oliver Bulleid CC1 shared some of the characteristics of Bulleid's previous attempt to develop a modern steam locomotive, the Leader. CC1 had a relatively short career and was never used in front-line service. The only compound
    10.00
    1 votes
    37

    0-8-6-0

    An 0-8-6-0, in the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, is a locomotive with no leading wheels, eight driving wheels (4 axles) fixed in a rigid frame, six driving wheels (3 axles) and no trailing wheels. Six locomotives with this wheel arrangement were built by Kitson & Co. as Kitson Meyers for the Transandine Railway, three of which survive today.
    10.00
    1 votes
    38

    4-8-8-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 4-8-8-2 is a locomotive with four leading wheels, two sets of eight driving wheels, and a two-wheel trailing truck. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2DD1 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 240+041 Turkish classification: 46+45 Swiss classification: 4/6+4/5 The equivalent UIC classification is refined to (2'D)D1' for Mallet locomotives. A locomotive of that length must be an articulated locomotive; all had a joint between the first and second groups of driving wheels. All examples of this type were cab forwards. Normally, the leading truck sits under the smokebox and the trailing truck under the firebox. On a cab-forward the leading truck supports the firebox and the trailing truck and smokebox are at the rear next to the tender. A 4-8-8-2 is effectively a 2-8-8-4 that always runs in reverse. Although commonly called Mallets these cab-forwards were built with simple expansion cylinders. The name stuck because the original classes of Southern Pacific cab-forwards were built as compound Mallets, though these were also eventually
    10.00
    1 votes
    39
    0-4-6

    0-4-6

    An 0-4-6, in the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, is a locomotive with no leading wheels, four driving wheels fixed in a rigid frame, and six trailing wheels (normally mounted in a trailing truck). Examples of this type of locomotive were built by Wilhelm von Engerth. Other equivalent classifications are: This wheel arrangement was used on Engerth articulated steam locomotives, widely used on Alpine railways. One early example was Genf built by Maschinenfabrik Esslingen in 1858 for the Swiss Central Railway.
    8.00
    2 votes
    40

    2-8-6

    In the Whyte notation for describing steam locomotive wheel arrangement, a 2-8-6 is a locomotive with a two-wheel leading truck, eight driving wheels, and a six-wheel trailing truck. All 2-8-6 locomotives constructed have been 2-8-6T tank locomotives of the Mason Bogie pattern. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 1D3 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 143 Turkish classification: 48 Swiss classification: 4/8 In the UIC classification as applied in Germany and Italy, a rigid-framed locomotive of this arrangement would be 1'D3', and the Mason bogie (1'D)'3'. Three Mason Bogies of this type were built for the Denver, South Park and Pacific Railroad; #25 Alpine, #26 Rico, #27 Roaring Fork and #28 Denver. They were narrow gauge locomotives of 3 ft  (914 mm) gauge. Some were later sold to the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad.
    5.25
    4 votes
    41
    0-4-4-2

    0-4-4-2

    In Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, an 0-4-4-2 is a locomotive that has no leading wheels, two sets of four driving wheels and two trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: 0-4-4-2Ts were built for Indonesia until 1962, becoming some of the last Mallets built in the world.
    7.50
    2 votes
    42

    2-8-8-8-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 2-8-8-8-4 has two leading wheels, three sets of eight driving wheels, and four trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 1DDD2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 140+040+042 Turkish classification: 45+44+46 Swiss classification: 4/5+4/4+4/6 The equivalent UIC classification is to be refined to (1'D)D(D2') for these engines. Only one 2-8-8-8-4 was ever built, a Mallet-type for the Virginian Railway in 1916. Built by Baldwin Locomotive Works, it became the only example of their class XA, so named due to the experimental nature of the locomotive. Like the same railroad's large articulated electrics and the Erie Railroad 2-8-8-8-2s, it was nicknamed "Triplex". An overview of Triplex engineering is given at Triplex (locomotive). The XA was unable to sustain a speed greater than five miles an hour, since the six cylinders could easily consume more steam than the boiler could produce. The tender had a four-wheel truck at the rear to help guide the locomotive into curves when drifting back downhill after pushing a train over the
    7.50
    2 votes
    43
    4-4-0

    4-4-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, 4-4-0 represents the arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, usually in a leading bogie, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and no trailing wheels. Almost every major railroad that operated in North America in the first half of the 19th century owned and operated locomotives of this type. Due to the large number of the type that were produced and used there, the 4-4-0 is most commonly known as the American type, but the type subsequently also became popular in the United Kingdom, where large numbers were produced. Other equivalent classifications are: The first use of the name American to describe locomotives of this wheel arrangement was made by Railroad Gazette in April 1872. Prior to that, this wheel arrangement was known as a Standard or Eight-Wheeler. This locomotive type was so successful on railroads in the United States of America (USA) that many earlier 4-2-0 and 2-4-0 locomotives were rebuilt as 4-4-0s by the middle of the 19th century. Several 4-4-0T tank locomotives were built, but the vast majority of locomotives of this wheel arrangement were tender
    6.00
    3 votes
    44
    0-4-4-0

    0-4-4-0

    In the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotive wheel arrangement, a 0-4-4-0 is a locomotive with no leading truck, two sets of four driving wheels, and no trailing truck. Examples of this type were constructed as Mallet, Meyer and Double Fairlie locomotives. A similar configuration was used on some Garratts, but it is referred to as 0-4-0+0-4-0. Other equivalent classifications are: The UIC classification is refined to B'B for a Mallet locomotive or B'B' for a Meyer locomotive. The first Fairlie 0-4-4-0 was built for the Neath and Brecon Railway in 1866, but the design came to prominence in 1869 with Little Wonder for the Festiniog Railway in North Wales followed by five others. One locomotive was supplied to the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad in 1872. The type was also used in Mexico, New Zealand and Russia on Transcaucasian Railway. There are three examples of surviving Fairlie 0-4-4-0 locomotives on the Ffestiniog Railway the last of which was built in 1992. "Josephine", a Vulcan Foundry-built Double Fairlie survives as a static exhibit in Dunedin, New Zealand. Eritrean Railways used many 0-4-4-0Ts. The last was built in their own shops in 1963, making it the
    9.00
    1 votes
    45
    2-12-0

    2-12-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-12-0 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle (usually in a leading truck), twelve powered and coupled driving wheels on six axles, and no trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: While standard German freight train steam locomotives were 2-10-0 types, between 1917 and 1924 the Esslingen locomotive works produced 44 units of the so-called Class K for the Royal Württemberg State Railways (later renumbered to class 59 by the Deutsche Reichsbahn). With a top speed of only 60 km/h these locomotives were designed for heavy duty in mountainous areas such as the Geislinger Steige, with special attention on low load per axle (16 t). During World War II, after electrification of that line the units were used on the Semmering railway in Austria, then part of the German Reich. The last four units were in service until 1957.
    7.00
    2 votes
    46

    2-4-4-2

    In Whyte notation, 2-4-4-2 refers to a railroad steam locomotive that has two leading wheels followed by four coupled driving wheels, a second set of four coupled driving wheels, and two trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: The UIC classification is refined to (1'B)B1' for a Mallet locomotive. This articulated wheel arrangement was rare in North America. Most were built as logging locomotives, presumably to better negotiate the uneven (and often temporary) trackwork that characterized such operations. The added mechanical complexity was found to be of dubious value, as reflected in their limited production and use. Built by ALCO, this locomotive is a Mallet Compound engine, built for the Taupo Totara Timber Co for use on their 51 mile private tramway system, the Mokai Tramway between Putaruru and Mokai in the North Island. It is now preserved on the Glenbrook Vintage Railway, near Auckland, New Zealand and now carries the number 4. The engine is currently out of service awaiting overhaul, but can still be seen at the railway's Pukeoware workshops.
    7.00
    2 votes
    47

    4-10-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, 4-10-2 represents the arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, usually in a leading bogie, ten powered and coupled driving wheels on five axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle, usually in a trailing truck. In South Africa, where the wheel arrangement was first used, the type was known as a Reid Tenwheeler. In the United States of America (USA) it was known as a Southern Pacific on the Southern Pacific Railroad and as an Overland on the Union Pacific Railroad. Other equivalent classifications are: This wheel arrangement was first used on the Natal Government Railways (NGR) in South Africa in 1899, on a 4-10-2T tank locomotive that was designed to meet the requirement for a locomotive that could haul at least one and a half times as much as an NGR Dübs A 4-8-2T locomotive. In the USA a simple expansion (simplex) version of the type was used only on the Southern Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads. Baldwin Locomotive Works built an experimental compound expansion 4-10-2 in 1926, but since the weight and length of this engine was too much for all but the heaviest and straightest
    7.00
    2 votes
    48
    4-4-4-4

    4-4-4-4

    A 4-4-4-4 steam locomotive, in the Whyte notation for describing locomotive wheel arrangements, has a four-wheel leading truck, two sets of four driving wheels, and a four-wheel trailing truck. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2BB2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 2222 Turkish classification: 2424 Swiss classification: 2/4+2/4 up to the early 1920s, later 4/8 While it would be possible to make an articulated locomotive of this arrangement, the only 4-4-4-4s ever built were duplex locomotives—with two sets of cylinders driving two sets of driven wheels in one rigid frame. The first locomotive built with this arrangement was the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's sole class N-1 #5600 George H. Emerson. To reduce the fixed wheelbase, this locomotive had the two sets of cylinders at opposite ends, so that the rear pair were beside the firebox. This proved to be a poor design, as it restricted the firebox size and exposed the cylinders to dust and dirt, causing premature wear. The locomotive was not considered successful enough to duplicate. Next were the Pennsylvania Railroad's 52 class T1 locomotives. These had
    5.33
    3 votes
    49
    2-2-0

    2-2-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-2-0 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, two powered driving wheels on one axle, and no trailing wheels. This configuration, which became very popular during the 1830s, was commonly called the Planet type after the first locomotive, Robert Stephenson's Planet of 1830. Other equivalent classifications are: After early experience with the 0-2-2 configuration on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, Robert Stephenson decided to build a locomotive with cylinders inside the frames, for which a 2-2-0 was preferable. The first such locomotive was Planet, built in 1830 and the company went on to build a further eighteen examples for the railway. In 1835 five examples were supplied to the London and Greenwich Railway. After 1836 Edward Bury built sixty-nine bar frame 2-2-0 locomotives for the London and Birmingham Railway. Tom Thumb, the first American-built steam locomotive used on a common-carrier railroad, built by Peter Cooper in 1830 was a belt-driven 2-2-0, but the type was not perpetuated. The Dublin and Kingstown Railway used 2-2-0 in 1834 including Hibernia designed by Richard
    8.00
    1 votes
    50
    2-8-2

    2-8-2

    • Locomotive classes: GWR 7200 Class
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-8-2 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, usually in a leading truck, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle, also usually in a trailing truck. This configuration of steam locomotive is most often referred to as a Mikado, frequently shortened to Mike, but at times it was also referred to on some railroads in the United States of America as the McAdoo Mikado and, during World War II, the MacArthur. Other equivalent classifications are: The notation 2-8-2T indicates a tank locomotive of this wheel arrangement on which the water is carried in tanks mounted on the locomotive, rather than in an attached tender. The 2-8-2 wheel arrangement allows the locomotive's firebox to be placed behind instead of above the driving wheels, thereby allowing a larger firebox that could be both wide and deep. This supported a greater rate of combustion and thus a greater capacity for steam generation, allowing for more power at higher speeds. Allied with the larger driving wheel diameter that is possible when they do not impinge on the firebox, this
    8.00
    1 votes
    51

    2-8-8-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 2-8-8-4 is a steam locomotive with two leading wheels, two sets of eight driving wheels, and a four-wheel trailing truck. Other equivalent classifications are: The equivalent UIC classification is, refined for Mallet locomotives, (1′D)D2′. Such a long locomotive must be an articulated locomotive, and all the examples produced were of the Mallet type, having a hinged joint between the first and second groups of driving wheels, and having the superstructure of the locomotive rigidly attached to the rearmost set, with the forward set and leading truck allowed to swing laterally on curves. The type was generally named the Yellowstone, a name given it by the first owner, the Northern Pacific Railway, whose lines run near Yellowstone National Park. Seventy-two Yellowstone type locomotives were built for four different US railroads. The 2-8-8-4 was the common choice of arrangement for the very largest steam locomotives at moderate speeds. All classes of Yellowstone had fairly small drivers of 63 to 64 inches (1.60 to 1.63 m). For greater speeds, the Union Pacific Railroad chose a four-wheel leading truck and 68 inches
    8.00
    1 votes
    52
    4-10-0

    4-10-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-10-0 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels, ten powered and coupled driving wheels, and no trailing wheels. Central Pacific Railroad's El Gobernador, built in 1883, was the only locomotive with this wheel arrangement to operate in the United States. The name "Mastodon" has also been applied to this type, though this nickname has also been used for the 4-8-0 arrangement (Mastodon was the unofficial nickname of the Central Pacific's No. 229, the first 4-8-0 ever built), leading to some confusion. The Bulgarian State Railways operated a group of 3-cylinder 4-10-0s, their class 11. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2E (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 250 Turkish classification: 57 Swiss classification: 5/7
    8.00
    1 votes
    53

    4-8-6

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 4-8-6 locomotive would have had four leading wheels, eight coupled driving wheels and six trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: This wheel arrangement was proposed by Lima Locomotive Works in 1949 as a continuation of their "Super Power" concept, essentially an expansion of the 4-8-4. A larger firebox similar to the ones on the 2-6-6-6 locomotives built by Lima would have been fitted, allowing for greater power at speed. Despite promotion by Lima, there is no firm evidence that an example of this type was ever built and no nickname was ever assigned to the arrangement. In 1949, few railroads were interested in new steam locomotives due to steady improvements in diesel-electric locomotives. It is possible that CB&Q 4-8-4 5601 was experimentally equipped with a six wheel trailing truck to allow use on branch lines with lighter rail, but the experiment was unsuccessful. Photographic evidence is said to have existed in the 1950s, but no photos are known to exist at present. Despite there being no documented full size examples built, there have been some 4-8-6s built for model railroads. Reference:
    8.00
    1 votes
    54
    6-4-4-6

    6-4-4-6

    A 6-4-4-6 steam locomotive, in the Whyte notation for describing locomotive wheel arrangements, is one with six leading wheels, two sets of four driving wheels, and six trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 3BB3 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 3223 Turkish classification: 2525 Swiss classification: 2/5+2/5 up to the early 1920s, later 4/10 Only one was produced, the Pennsylvania Railroad's sole class S1 of 1939. It was a duplex locomotive, the longest and heaviest rigid frame reciprocating steam locomotive ever built, and is referred to as the Pennsylvania Type. This experimental locomotive was exhibited at the 1939 New York World's Fair, and was afterward placed in limited service between Chicago, Illinois, and Crestline, Ohio. The locomotive was too large to work elsewhere in the system. Pennsylvania Railroad executives hoped that the locomotive could haul 1,000 tons at 100 miles per hour, but this goal was not reached. It was capable of very high speeds however, although no documentary evidence has so far surfaced to add credence to stories of record-breaking performance.
    8.00
    1 votes
    55

    0-8-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-8-2 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle (usually in a trailing truck). Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification (also known as German classification and Italian classification): D1, French classification: 041, Turkish classification: 45, Swiss classification: 4/5. This has been a relatively unusual wheel arrangement on mainline railways In the United Kingdom, a number of tank locomotive designs were built of the 0-8-2 type, including the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) R1 class, designed by Henry A. Ivatt and built originally for the Great Northern Railway as their class L1. These locomotives were intended for suburban passenger service, but did not prove satisfactory, so they ended up on freight service. Other examples include the LNWR 1185 Class and the Port Talbot Railway 0-8-2T (Cooke) and Port Talbot Railway 0-8-2T (Sharp Stewart). The 0-8-2 was not a common wheel arrangement. In North America, its use was confined to 2-8-2 "Mikado" types assigned to switcher roles; the
    6.50
    2 votes
    56

    2-12-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-12-2 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle (usually in a leading truck), twelve powered and coupled driving wheels on six axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle (usually in a trailing truck). Other equivalent classifications are: This wheel arrangement is infrequently called "Javanic", after the use of large 2-12-2Ts in Java.
    6.50
    2 votes
    57
    2-8-0

    2-8-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-8-0 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, usually in a leading truck, eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and no trailing wheels. In the United States and elsewhere this wheel arrangement is commonly known as a Consolidation. Other equivalent classifications are: Of all the locomotive types that were created and experimented with in the 19th century, the 2-8-0 was a relative latecomer. The first locomotive of this wheel arrangement was possibly built by the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR). Like the first 2-6-0s, this first 2-8-0 had a leading axle that was rigidly attached to the locomotive's frame, rather than on a separate truck or bogie. To create this 2-8-0, PRR master mechanic John P. Laird modified an existing 0-8-0, the Bedford, between 1864 and 1865. The 2-6-0 "Mogul", first created in the early 1860s, is often considered as the logical forerunner to the 2-8-0. However, there is also a claim that the first true 2-8-0 engine evolved from the 0-8-0 and was ordered by the USA’s Lehigh and Mahanoy Railroad, who named all its engines. The name given to the new
    6.00
    2 votes
    58
    4-6-4

    4-6-4

    • Locomotive classes: ATSF 3450 class
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-6-4 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles (usually in a leading truck), six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles (usually in a trailing truck). Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2C2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 232 Turkish classification: 37 Swiss classification: 3/7 Russian classification: 2-3-2 The type is sometimes called the Hudson or Baltic. The 4-6-4 tender locomotive is best seen as combining the basic nature of the 4-6-2 'Pacific' type with an improved boiler and larger firebox that required extra support at the rear of the locomotive. Generally the available tractive effort was little different from that of the Pacific, but steam-raising ability was increased, giving more power at speed. 4-6-4s were best suited to high-speed running across flat country. The type has fewer driving wheels than carrying wheels and thus a smaller percentage of the locomotive's weight is available for traction compared to other types. For starting heavy trains
    6.00
    2 votes
    59

    2-8-8-8-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 2-8-8-8-2 has two leading wheels, three sets of eight driving wheels, and two trailing wheels. Because of its length, such a locomotive must be an articulated locomotive. It is not longer than a normal articulated; the third set of drivers is located under the tender. All of the examples produced were of the Mallet type. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 1-D-D-D-1 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) AAR classification: 1-D-D-D-1 French classification: 140+040+041 Turkish classification: 45+44+45 Swiss classification: 4/5+4/4+4/5 The equivalent UIC classification is to be refined to (1'D)D(D1') for these Triplexes. Baldwin built the only three examples of the type for the Erie Railroad between 1914 and 1916. The first was named Matt H. Shay, after a beloved employee of that road. It could pull 650 freight cars. All three, as well as the lone 2-8-8-8-4 and several Virginian Railway electrics, shared the nickname "Triplex" because of their three sets of drivers. (Compare Duplexes, which had two sets.) An overview of Triplex engineering is given at Triplex
    4.67
    3 votes
    60
    2-12-4

    2-12-4

    In Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, a 2-12-4 is a locomotive with one pair of unpowered leading wheels, followed by six pairs of powered driving wheels, and two pairs of unpowered trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: There are only 20 standard gauge (1,435 mm (4 ft 8 ⁄2 in)) engines with this wheel arrangement that were built for and ran in Europe - class 46 of the Bulgarian State Railways (BDZ). They were ordered by BDZ and built according to its specification by two different manufacturers: 12 engines by Cegielski in Poznań (Poland) in 1931, and 8 by Schwarzkopf in Berlin (Germany) in 1943. Although there is a major difference between the two batches — the first 12 engines are type 1'F2'h2Gt - tank-engine for freight service, 2-cylinder system with simple steam expansion (Zwilling) with superheating, while the remaining 8 are 1'F2'h3Gt - 3-cylinder (Drilling) — all were put into the same class 46 and numbered 46.01 - 46.12 and 46.13 - 46.20. They were designed to haul heavy coal trains on mountainous lines with gradients of about 28‰ (1 in 35.7) and more, and they coped with this hard task very well. Bulgarian
    7.00
    1 votes
    61

    2-8-8-0

    In the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, a 2-8-8-0 is a locomotive with a two-wheel leading truck, two sets of eight driving wheels, and no trailing truck. Other equivalent classifications are: The UIC classification is refined to (1'D)D for Mallet locomotives. The Great Northern Railway and the Union Pacific Railroad operated this type; and it was called the "Bull Moose" by Union Pacific crews.
    7.00
    1 votes
    62
    4-2-2

    4-2-2

    • Locomotive classes: Bristol and Exeter Railway 4-2-2 locomotives
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-2-2 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, two powered driving wheels on one axle, and two trailing wheels on one axle. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2A1 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 211 Turkish classification: 14 Swiss classification: 1/4 Like other steam locomotive types with single pairs of driving wheels, they were also known as singles. The 4-2-2 configuration offered designers eight wheels to spread the weight of a larger locomotive, but prior to the introduction of bogies, created a long rigid wheelbase with limited adhesion. As a result, the type was relatively rare until the 1870s. The first steam locomotive made by Borsig of Berlin in 1841, the Borsig No 1, was an 4-2-2, but the company quickly reverted to the more common 2-2-2 configuration. The London and North Western Railway No. 3020 Cornwall was built as 4-2-2 at Crewe in 1847, but was extensively rebuilt, and converted to a 2-2-2 in 1858. The one area where the type proved to be useful was on broad gauge locomotives where sharp
    7.00
    1 votes
    63
    4-6-2

    4-6-2

    4-6-2, in the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles (usually in a leading truck), six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle (usually in a trailing truck). These locomotives are also known as Pacifics. On many railways, Pacific steam locomotives provided the motive power for express passenger trains throughout much of the early to mid 20th century before either being superseded by larger types in the late 1940s or 1950s or else replaced by diesel and electric locomotives during the 1950s and 1960s. Nevertheless new Pacific designs continued to be built until the mid 1950s. Other equivalent classifications are: The introduction of the 4-6-2 design in 1901 has been described as 'a veritable "milestone" in locomotive progress'. The type, is generally considered to be an enlargement of the 'Atlantic' 4-4-2, although it also had a direct relationship to the Ten-Wheeler (4-6-0) as well. The success of the type can be attributed to a combination of its four-wheel leading truck (which provided better stability at speed than a 2-6-2); six driving wheels
    7.00
    1 votes
    64
    4-8-8-4

    4-8-8-4

    In the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, a 4-8-8-4 is a locomotive with a four-wheel leading truck, two sets of eight driving wheels, and a four-wheel trailing truck. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2DD2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 240+042 Turkish classification: 46+46 Swiss classification: 4/6+4/6 The equivalent UIC classification is refined to (2′D)D2′ for Mallet locomotives. The only 4-8-8-4 steam locomotives were the Union Pacific 4000 "Big Boy" Class. The UP Big Boys were an expansion of the 4-6-6-4 "Challenger" type articulated locomotive. Although their wheels were an inch (25 mm) smaller than those of the Challengers, they were still able to sustain high speeds. Adding four driving wheels increased the pulling power of the locomotive and reduced the need for helper locomotives over steep grades. Other American railroads considered buying 4-8-8-4s, including the Western Pacific Railroad, which already rostered large 2-8-8-2s and 4-6-6-4s, but diesel locomotives were gaining popularity and soon were able to displace these monster locomotives.
    7.00
    1 votes
    65
    2-10-4

    2-10-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 2-10-4 locomotive has two leading wheels, ten driving wheels (in other words, five driven axles), and four trailing wheels. These were referred to as the Texas type in most of the United States, the Colorado type on the Burlington Route and the Selkirk type in Canada. Other equivalent classifications are: The 2-10-4 originated and was principally used in the USA. The evolution of this locomotive type began as a 2-10-2 "Santa Fe" type with a larger four wheeled trailing truck that would allow an enlarged firebox. A subsequent development was as a longer 2-8-4 "Berkshire" type that required extra driving wheels to remain within axle loading limits. Examples of both of these evolutionary progressions can be found. Some 2-10-4 tank locomotives also existed in eastern Europe. One bizarre experimental 2-10-4, built in the Soviet Union, had an opposed piston drive system. Outside North America, the 2-10-4 was rare. The Central Railway of Brazil, however, ordered seventeen narrow gauge (metre gauge) 2-10-4 locomotives, ten from Baldwin which were delivered in 1940, and another seven from the American Locomotive Company
    5.00
    2 votes
    66
    0-6-0

    0-6-0

    • Locomotive classes: British Rail Class 04
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-6-0 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles, and no trailing wheels. This was the most common wheel arrangement used on both tender and tank locomotives, in versions with both inside and outside cylinders. In Britain the Whyte notation of wheel arrangement was also often used for the classification of electric and diesel-electric locomotives with side-rod coupled driving wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: In the UIC classification popular in Europe, the same arrangement is written as C if the wheels are coupled with rods or gears, or Co if they are independently driven. The 0-6-0 configuration was the most widely used wheel arrangement for both tender and tank steam locomotives. The type was also widely used for diesel switchers (shunters). Because they lack leading and trailing wheels, locomotives of this type have all their weight pressing down on their driving wheels and consequently have a high tractive effort and factor of adhesion, making them comparatively strong engines for their size, weight and fuel consumption. One the
    4.50
    2 votes
    67
    0-6-2

    0-6-2

    • Locomotive classes: GNR Class N2
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-6-2 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle. Some locomotives of this arrangement had tenders while others carried their own coal and water tanks and were designated 0-6-2T. Other equivalent classifications are: Finland used 2 classes of 0-6-2T locomotive Vr2 and the Vr5. The Vr2s were numbered 950-965. The following examples are preserved in Finland No 950 Joensuu, 951 Tuuri, 953 Haapamäki, 961 Jyväskylä, 964 Veturimuseo at Toijala The class Vr5s were numbered 1400-1423. No 1422 is preserved at Haapamäki. Three classes of narrow gauge 2-6-2T locomotives were supplied to German South-West Africa between 1904 and 1908. Fifteen locomotives were built by the Arnold Jung Lokomotivfabrik in 1904, two of which were later converted into 2-6-0 tender engines by south African Railways (SAR). Ten locomotives were supplied by Henschel & Son in 1904 and one survivor became SAR Class Ha. A further fifteen locomotives supplied by Henschel 1905-1908 became SAR Class Hb. In the United Kingdom, the type was only ever used
    4.50
    2 votes
    68
    2-10-10-2

    2-10-10-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotive wheel arrangements, a 2-10-10-2 is a locomotive with two leading wheels, two sets of ten driving wheels, and a pair of trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 1EE1 (also known as German classification and Swiss classification) Italian and French classification: 150+051 Turkish classification: 56+56 Swiss classification: 5/6+5/6 The equivalent UIC classification is refined to (1′E)E1′ for Mallet locomotives. All 2-10-10-2 locomotives have been articulated locomotives, Mallet locomotives in particular. This wheel arrangement was rare. Only two classes of 2-10-10-2 locomotives have been built; the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway's 3000 class, and the Virginian Railway's class AE. This class of ten 2-10-10-2 locomotives were actually rebuilt from more conventional 2-10-2 Baldwin-built locomotives by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway in 1911. Although they appeared to have exceedingly long boilers, the barrel in front of the rear set of cylinders actually contained first a primitive firetube superheater for further heating the steam before use; the steam was carried
    5.00
    1 votes
    69
    2-4-2

    2-4-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-4-2 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle. The type is sometimes named "Columbia" after an early locomotive of 2-4-2 arrangement. Other equivalent classifications are: The equivalent UIC classification is 1'B1', if the leading and trailing wheels are in swivelling trucks. While a number of 2-4-2 tender locomotives were built, larger types soon became dominant. The vast majority of 2-4-2s have been tank locomotives, designated 2-4-2T. The symmetrical arrangement suits a tank locomotive, which may travel in either direction. The wheel arrangement was widely used on passenger tank locomotives during the last three decades of the nineteenth, and the first decade of the twentieth, centuries. In 1877, when the New Zealand Railway needed new motive power, the road turned to the Rogers Locomotive Works, who supplied eight 2-4-2 tender engines that were designated as the "K" class. These were the first American-built engines in New Zealand, and had been quite successful. The earliest UK use of the
    5.00
    1 votes
    70

    2-6-8-0

    A 2-6-8-0 steam locomotive, in the Whyte notation for describing locomotive wheel arrangements, has two leading wheels, a set of six driving wheels, a set of eight driving wheels, and no trailing wheels. These locomotives usually employ the Mallet principle of articulation, with a swinging front engine and a rigidly attached rear engine. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 1CD (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 130+040 Turkish classification: 34+44 Swiss classification: 3/4+4/4 The UIC classification is refined to (1'C)D for Mallet locomotives. This type of articulated locomotive is unusual in having different numbers of driving axles in each set. The Great Northern Railway and the Southern Railway, both in the United States, were the sole users of this type of locomotive. Great Northern received 35, numbered 1950–1984, designated class M-1, from Baldwin in 1910. In 1926 and 1927 the M1s were rebuilt to use simple expansion and were redesignated class M-2. Most of the M-2s did not last long, being converted to class O-7 2-8-2s between 1929 and 1931; the thirteen exceptions were not retired until
    5.00
    1 votes
    71

    4-6-4-4

    In Whyte notation, a 4-6-4-4 is a railroad steam locomotive that has four leading wheels followed by six coupled driving wheels, a second set of four driving wheels and four trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2CB2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 2322 Turkish classification: 3524 Swiss classification: 3/5+2/4 up to the early 1920s, later 5/9 The sole example of this arrangement was the PRR Q1. This locomotive was essentially a prototype in the development of the PRR Q2, a 4-4-6-4.
    5.00
    1 votes
    72

    2-2-4

    In Whyte notation, a 2-2-4T is a railroad steam locomotive that has two leading wheels followed by two coupled driving wheels and four trailing wheels. This was an unusual wheel arrangement, only used on a few specialised locomotives. Other equivalent classifications are: In the United Kingdom, the North Eastern Railway, had four tank locomotives of this wheel arrangement, all of which had previously been rebuilt from other types. They were: No. 66 Aerolite rebuilt as a 2-2-4T in 1902 and later known as in LNER class X1; No. 957, which had been rebuilt from a BTP class 0-4-4T in 1903 and later classified as X2 class. NER 190 Class, later class X3 had two members, nos. 190 and 1679, both rebuilt from 2-2-2 tender locomotives. All four were inherited by the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at the time of its formation on 1 January 1923, and withdrawn from service between 1931 and 1937. No. 66 Aerolite has been preserved at the National Railway Museum in York.
    4.00
    1 votes
    73
    4-8-0

    4-8-0

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-8-0 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles (usually in a leading truck), eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and no trailing wheels. The type was nicknamed the Mastodon or Twelve-wheeler in North America. Mastodon (No. 229) was the unofficial name of Central Pacific Railroad's first 4-8-0, which was built in 1882 at the Sacramento Locomotive Works. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2′D (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 240 Turkish classification: 46 Swiss classification: 4/6 Russian classification: 2-4-0 The very first 4-8-0 is believed to be the Centipede, a "Winans Camel" built in 1855 for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. It entered service in 1864 and ran on the B&O for nearly 20 years. The 4-8-0 saw service in Australia from 1900. In Tasmania the privately owned Emu Bay Railway ordered 4 4-8-0 tendered locomotives for their narrow gauge (1,066 mm/3 ft 6.0 in) system. In 1910 another locomotive was delivered from the now reformed North British Coy. Two examples of these engines are
    4.00
    1 votes
    74
    4-8-2

    4-8-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-8-2 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles (usually in a leading truck), eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles, and two trailing wheels on one axle (usually in a trailing truck). This type of steam locomotive is also known as the Mountain type. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2′D1′ (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 241 (also known as Spanish classification) Russian classification: 2-4-1 Turkish classification: 47 Swiss classification: 4/7 Both the tank engine and tender engine versions of this wheel arrangement were designed in South Africa and built in the UK. The first 4-8-2 tank locomotive was designed by William Milne, locomotive superintendent of the Natal Government Railways in 1887. One hundred examples were built by Dübs and Company. They later became SAR Class A, and twenty-one were later converted into tender locomotives. Twenty five further tank engines were designed by Milne's successor, David Hendrie, and built by Dübs for the same railway in 1904 later becoming SAR Class
    4.00
    1 votes
    75
    6-2-0

    6-2-0

    In the Whyte notation, a 6-2-0 is a railroad steam locomotive that has an unpowered three-axle leading truck followed by a single powered driving axle. This wheel arrangement is associated with the Crampton locomotive type, and in the USA the single class were sometimes referred to as Cramptons. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 3A (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 310 Turkish classification: 14 Swiss classification: 1/4 The 6-2-0 was a most unusual wheel arrangement, where the bulk of the locomotive's weight was on the unpowered leading wheels rather than the powered driving wheels, therefore giving poor adhesion. The type was only practicable on the Crampton locomotive with a low boiler and large driving wheels placed behind the firebox. The only British 6-2-0 was the locomotive Liverpool built in 1848 by Bury, Curtis, and Kennedy for the London and North Western Railway. It was exhibited at The Great Exhibition in 1851 but was only moderately successful and no more were built. On a trip to England, Robert L. Stevens, president of the Camden and Amboy (C&A) railroad, saw demonstrations of 6-2-0s on the
    4.00
    1 votes
    76
    0-4-4

    0-4-4

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-4-4 represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and four trailing wheels on two axles. This type was only used for tank locomotives. In American cities, the type known as a Forney locomotive, was used on on the narrow curves of elevated railways and other rapid transit lines . In the UK 0-4-4 tanks were mainly used for suburban or rural passenger duties. Other equivalent classifications are: The Class F1 entered service with SVR in 1885 were used until 1835. One example is preserved at the Finnish Railway Museum. In the UK the earliest 0-4-4's were well tanks. Both John Chester Craven of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway and James Cudworth of the South Eastern Railway (UK) introduced classes in 1866. They were followed by Matthew Kirtley on the Midland Railway(26 locomotive built 1869-70) and Patrick Stirling on the Great Northern Railway (48 locomotive built 1873-81). The more common side-tank version was introduced on the Great Eastern Railway by Samuel W. Johnson in 1872, and was soon afterwards adopted by most mainline railways in
    0.00
    0 votes
    77
    2-4-0

    2-4-0

    • Locomotive classes: GWR Metropolitan Class
    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-4-0 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels on one axle, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and no trailing wheels. The notation 2-4-0T indicates a tank locomotive of this wheel arrangement (its water is carried in tanks mounted on the locomotive, rather than in an attached tender). Other equivalent classifications are: Because of its popularity for a period with English railways, noted railway author C Hamilton Ellis considered the 2-4-0 designation to have the nickname (under the Whyte notation) of 'Old English'. The 2-4-0 configuration was developed in the late 1830s or early 1840s as an enlargement of the 2-2-0 and 2-2-2 types, giving better adhesion. The type was initially designed for freight haulage. The type was used on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, the Birmingham and Gloucester Railway, the North Midland Railway and the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) before 1846. One of the earliest examples was the broad-gauge GWR Leo Class, designed by Daniel Gooch and built by R and W Hawthorn and Company, Fenton, Murray and Jackson, and Rothwell and Company during
    0.00
    0 votes
    78
    2-4-4

    2-4-4

    In Whyte notation, a 2-4-4 is a steam locomotive with two unpowered leading wheels followed by four powered driving wheels and four unpowered trailing wheels. Other equivalent classifications are: The equivalent UIC classification is 1'B2' (or (1'B)'2' for a Mason Bogie). This unusual wheel arrangement does not appear to have been used on the mainline railways in the UK. It was however one of the configurations used on the Mason Bogie articulated locomotives, in the USA during the 1870s and 1880s. Five examples were constructed at the Mason Machine Works for the narrow gauge Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn Railroad 1883-1887. The railway subsequently received twenty-one further examples between 1900 and 1914, constructed by the Taunton Locomotive Manufacturing Company, Manchester Locomotive Works, and ALCO. Developmentally, there are two logical ways of reaching this wheel formula: to add a forward axle to a Forney locomotive to improve its ability to negotiate curves, or to add a second trailing axle to a Columbia design, notably in a 2-4-4(T) configuration to expand its coal capacity. Four 2-4-4T passenger locomotives were built by the Czechoslovak Škoda for Lithuania in 1932 and
    0.00
    0 votes
    79
    2-6-2

    2-6-2

    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-6-2 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels, six coupled driving wheels and two trailing wheels. This arrangement is commonly called a Prairie. Other equivalent classifications are: The majority of American 2-6-2s were tender locomotives, but in Europe tank locomotives, described as 2-6-2T, were more common. The first 2-6-2 tender locomotives built for a North American customer, were built by Brooks Locomotive Works in 1900 for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, for use on the Midwestern prairies. The type was thus nicknamed the Prairie in North American practice. This name was often also used for British locomotives with this wheel arrangement. As with the 2-10-2, the major problem with the 2-6-2 is that these engines have a symmetrical wheel layout, wherein the centre of gravity is almost over the center driving wheel. The reciprocation rods, when working near the center of gravity, induce severe side-to-side nosing, which results in severe instability if unrestrained either by a long wheelbase or by the leading and trailing trucks. Though some engines had the connecting rod aligned
    0.00
    0 votes
    80

    4-4-6-4

    A 4-4-6-4, in the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, is one that has four leading wheels followed by four coupled driving wheels, a second set of six coupled driving wheels and four trailing wheels. The Pennsylvania Railroad's Q2 class were the only locomotives ever to use this arrangement. These were duplex locomotives, in which both sets of driving wheels were mounted in a common, rigid locomotive frame. This locomotive design was a further development of the highly successful 2-10-4. The divided drive, or duplex arrangement, allowed for higher speeds with less damage to the track. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2BC2 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 2232 Turkish classification: 2435 Swiss classification: 2/4+3/5 up to the early 1920s, later 5/9
    0.00
    0 votes
    81

    4-6-6-2

    In Whyte notation, a 4-6-6-2 is a steam locomotive with four leading wheels (two axles) in an unpowered bogie at the front of the locomotive followed by two sets of driving wheels with six wheels each (three axles each), followed by two unpowered trailing wheels (one axle) at the rear of the locomotive. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2CC1 (also known as German classification and Italian classification) French classification: 230+031 Turkish classification: 35+34 Swiss classification: 3/5+3/4 This locomotive wheel arrangement was used in only a very limited number of locomotives in North America, most notably as class MM-2 cab forward locomotives on the Southern Pacific Railroad. These were effectively 2-6-6-4s running in reverse. They were originally built as 2-6-6-2s but were refitted with a four-wheel leading truck to increase stability at speed.
    0.00
    0 votes
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