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Best Sports League Season of All Time

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    1
    1955 New York Yankees season

    1955 New York Yankees season

    The 1955 New York Yankees season was the team's 53rd season in New York, and its 55th season overall. The team finished with a record of 96-58, winning their 21st pennant, finishing 3 games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they were defeated by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts In game one on September 28, Elston Howard became the sixth player in the history of the World Series to hit a home run in his first World Series at bat. NL Brooklyn Dodgers (4) vs. AL New York Yankees (3) All-Star Game LEAGUE CHAMPIONS:
    5.30
    10 votes
    2
    2009 New York Yankees season

    2009 New York Yankees season

    The 2009 New York Yankees season was the 107th season for the New York Yankees franchise. The Yankees opened their new Yankee Stadium on April 3, 2009, when they hosted an exhibition game against the Chicago Cubs. The new stadium hosted its first regular-season game on April 16, when the Yankees played the Cleveland Indians and their first playoff game against the Minnesota Twins in the ALDS on October 7, 2009. The Yankees swept the Twins in three games to win the divisional series. They won their 40th American League pennant on October 25, 2009, defeating the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in six games to advance to the World Series, where they defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in six games to win their 27th World Series on November 4, 2009. George Steinbrenner stepped down as the main decision maker for the team on November 20, as Major League Baseball's owners approved passing control to his youngest son, 39-year-old Hal Steinbrenner. The patriarch of the Yankees success over three and a half decades since buying the team from CBS in 1973 had been in failing health, and had been reducing his role in the ownership the last several seasons. Despite his limited role, he remained as
    8.33
    6 votes
    3
    1920 Green Bay Packers season

    1920 Green Bay Packers season

    The 1920 Green Bay Packers season was their second season of competition. Mostly playing other independent professional teams in Wisconsin, the club posted a 9-1-1 record under player/coach Curly Lambeau. Playing games from late September to late November the Packers lost only one game, tied another and won nine times. The offense scored more than 20 points per game while the defense posted shutouts in eight out of the eleven games. Overall the team finished second among Wisconsin teams for the second consecutive year. In 1920 the Packers continued playing home games at Hagemeister park. That year the city built stands on one side of the field. This was the first time the Packers were able to charge an admission. The Packers played ten home games in the 1920 season winning nine times and tying once. In the first year of professional Thanksgiving Football, the Packers played and defeated the Stambaugh Miners 14-0 in Green Bay. This would be the first of only two occasions when the Packers would play at home on Thanksgiving, out of 33 total Thanksgiving games. Over the offseason, Green Bay added eight players to the roster and lost six. In total, twenty-seven players competed for the
    7.00
    7 votes
    4
    1986 San Francisco 49ers season

    1986 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1986 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 37th year with the National Football League. January 4, 1987 at Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey Attendance: 76,034
    7.67
    6 votes
    5
    1997 NCAA Division I-A football season

    1997 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 1997 NCAA Division I-A football season, play of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division I-A level, began in late summer 1997 and culminated with the major bowl games in early January 1998. The national championship was split for the third time in the 1990s. The Michigan Wolverines finished the season atop the AP Poll after completing a 12–0 campaign with a Big Ten Conference championship and a victory in the Rose Bowl over Washington State. The Nebraska Cornhuskers garnered the top ranking in the Coaches' Poll with a 13–0 record, a Big 12 Conference championship, and a win over Tennessee in the Orange Bowl. Michigan's Charles Woodson, who played primarily at cornerback, but also saw time on offense as a wide receiver and on special teams as a punt returner, won the Heisman Trophy, becoming the first primarily defensive player to win the award. The 1997 season was the third and final season in which the major bowl games were organized under the Bowl Alliance system. The Bowl Championship Series was instituted the following year. In Tom Osborne's last season as head coach, Nebraska took over the #1 ranking in
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    1990 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1990 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1990 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 15, 1990, and ended with the championship game on April 2 in Denver, Colorado. A total of 63 games were played. UNLV, coached by Jerry Tarkanian, won the national title with a 103-73 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski. Anderson Hunt of UNLV was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament is also remembered for an emotional run by Loyola Marymount in the West Regional. In the semifinals of the West Coast Conference tournament, Lions star forward Hank Gathers collapsed and died due to a heart condition. The WCC tournament was immediately suspended, with the regular-season champion Lions given the conference's automatic bid. The team defeated New Mexico State, then laid a 34-point thrashing on defending national champion Michigan, and defeated Alabama in the Sweet Sixteen (the only game in which Loyola Marymount did not score 100 or more points in the tournament) before running into eventual champion UNLV in the regional final.
    8.60
    5 votes
    7
    1978 NCAA Division I-A football season

    1978 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first season of Division I-A football; Division I-A was created in 1978 from the splitting of Division I for football only. The season came down to a rare #1 vs. #2 post-season meeting as #1 Penn State and #2 Alabama met in the New Year's Day Sugar Bowl. The game is most remembered for Alabama's goal line stand with four minutes left in the game. On fourth down and a foot, Alabama managed to keep Penn State out of the end zone and went on to win 14-7. Keith Jackson, who did the play by play for ABC, called it the greatest game he'd ever seen. 76,824 people packed the Louisiana Superdome, which was tremendously loud. Alabama's only loss that year was 24-14 in Birmingham to Southern California. Both schools claim this year as a national title year. Alabama claimed the national title because it defeated top-ranked Penn State on the field. USC claimed the title because it defeated Alabama in the regular season and also finished with only one loss. The AP Poll and most other voting outlets crowned Alabama as national champion, while the UPI coaches' poll selected USC. This was the first year of the Pacific-10 Conference, as the Pac 8
    8.40
    5 votes
    8
    2004 Boston Red Sox season

    2004 Boston Red Sox season

    The Boston Red Sox 2004 season was the 103rd Major League Baseball season for the Boston Red Sox franchise. Managed under Terry Francona, the team finished with a 98–64 record (three games behind the New York Yankees in the American League East Division). The Red Sox played in Fenway Park to a local attendance of 2,837,294 fans. They clinched the AL wild card to assure a berth in the 2004 post-season. They swept the Anaheim Angels in the first round to enter the ALCS against the Yankees for the second straight year. As Boston entered the fourth game of the ALCS, they had fallen three games behind the Yankees, including a Game Three loss by the score of 19–8. Trailing 4-3 in the 9th inning of Game 4, they embarked upon an unprecedented (in baseball) comeback from a three-game deficit to defeat the New York Yankees in the series. After the ALCS, the Red Sox swept the Cardinals to win their first World Series since 1918 (86 years). During the 2003–04 off season, the Red Sox acquired another ace pitcher, Curt Schilling, and a closer, Keith Foulke. Many visitors at their Spring Training at Fort Myers, Florida were very enthusiastic about the 2004 Red Sox team. Expectations once again
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    2008–09 WHL season

    2008–09 WHL season

    The 2008–09 WHL season was the 43rd season of the Western Hockey League (WHL). The regular season began on September 18, 2008, and ended on March 15, 2009. The WHL Playoffs commenced on March 20, 2009, and the 2008 ADT Canada Russia Challenge series, featuring Team WHL versus the Russian Selects, took place from November 26–27, 2008. The Kelowna Rockets won the Ed Chynoweth Cup as WHL champions. WHL Commissioner, Ron Robison, dedicated the 2008–09 season to Ed Chynoweth. The Commissioner of the Western Hockey League, Ron Robison, dedicated the 2008–09 season to Ed Chynoweth, who died on April 22, 2008. His death occurred just over a year after the WHL Championship trophy was changed in his honour. Ed Chynoweth was the principle builder of Major Junior hockey in Canada as President of the WHL and CHL over the past four decades. Throughout the entire 2008–09 season, the helmets of all the players and officials will display an "EC" decal, representing Ed’s initials. The Western Hockey League opened its 43rd regular season on September 18, 2008 in Cranbrook, British Columbia between defending Memorial Cup Champions, Spokane Chiefs and the Kootenay Ice. This season, the WHL is planning
    9.50
    4 votes
    10
    1976 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1976 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1976 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 13, 1976, and ended with the championship game on March 29 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A total of 32 games were played, including a national third place game. Indiana, coached by Bob Knight, won the national title with a 86–68 victory in the final game over Michigan, coached by Johnny Orr. Kent Benson of Indiana was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Notably, this was the first time that two teams from the same conference (the Big Ten) played in the title game. Also, this was the last men's Division I tournament to date to feature two unbeaten teams, as both Indiana and Rutgers entered the tournament unbeaten. To date, Indiana is the last team to go the entire season undefeated. Both advanced to the Final Four, with Indiana winning the title and Rutgers losing to Michigan in the semifinals and UCLA in the third-place game.
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    2005 NFL season

    2005 NFL season

    • Championship: Super Bowl XL
    The 2005 NFL season was the 86th regular season of the National Football League. With the New England Patriots as the defending league champions, regular season play was held from September 8, 2005 to January 1, 2006. The regular season also saw the first ever regular season game played outside the United States, as well as the New Orleans Saints being forced to play elsewhere due to damage to the Superdome and the entire New Orleans area by Hurricane Katrina. The playoffs began on January 7. New England was eliminated in the Divisional Playoff Round, and eventually the NFL title was won by the Pittsburgh Steelers, who defeated the Seattle Seahawks 21–10 in Super Bowl XL at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan on February 5 for their fifth Super Bowl win. The season formally concluded with the Pro Bowl, the league's all-star game, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on February 12. This marked the final season that ABC held the rights to televise Monday Night Football after thirty-six years of airing the series. When the TV contracts were renewed near the end of the season, the rights to broadcast Monday Night Football were awarded to Disney-owned corporate sibling ESPN. NBC bought the
    7.00
    6 votes
    12
    1890 Rochester Broncos season

    1890 Rochester Broncos season

    The 1890 Rochester Broncos season was the team's only season in Major League Baseball. In 1889, the team had played in the minor league International Association as the Rochester Jingoes. The Broncos went 63-63 during the season and finished 5th in the American Association. They went 40-22 at home, but 23-41 on the road. After the season, the team returned to the minor leagues, moving to the Eastern Association as the Rochester Hop Bitters. Harry Lyons led the league in at bats and in outs. Sandy Griffin was tied for 4th in the league in doubles. Jimmy Knowles was 4th in RBIs. Ted Scheffler was 2nd in stolen bases, 4th in hit by pitches, and tied for 4th in bases on balls. Bob Barr was 1st in the league in walks issued and tied for 1st in games lost. Barr was 2nd in the league in games pitched, games started, complete games, batters faced, hits allowed, earned runs and innings pitched. He was 4th in wins and in wild pitches. He was 5th in strikeouts and tied for 5th in shutouts. The team had the third best ERA in the league. At 17, Henry Blauvelt was the league's youngest player. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs;
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    1926 New York Yankees season

    1926 New York Yankees season

    The 1926 New York Yankees season was the team's 24th season in New York, and its 26th season overall. The team finished with a record of 91-63, winning their fourth pennant, finishing three games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they lost in 7 games to the St. Louis Cardinals, with the series ending with Babe Ruth being caught stealing second in the bottom of the 9th inning in game 7. Note: Pos = position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
    9.00
    4 votes
    14
    2006 New York Giants season

    2006 New York Giants season

    The 2006 New York Giants season began with the team trying to improve on their 11–5 record in 2005, which saw them win the NFC East. They did not win the NFC East or improve on that record, falling to 8-8 on the season after starting 6-2. However, head coach Tom Coughlin became the first Giants head coach since Bill Parcells to lead the team to consecutive playoff berths as the team qualified as one of two NFC wild card teams. In the 2006 off-season, the Giants acquired 3 time Pro Bowl linebacker LaVar Arrington as a free agent. Arrington previously played for the Redskins for six seasons. The Giants also acquired cornerback Sam Madison as a free agent. Madison played nine seasons with the Dolphins and went to the Pro Bowl four straight times from 1999–2002. Other notable free agent signings for the Giants included free safety Will Demps from the Ravens, cornerback R.W. McQuarters from the Lions, and linebacker Brandon Short from the Panthers. In the 2006 NFL Draft, the Giants used their first pick (acquired from the Pittsburgh Steelers) on Boston College DE Mathias Kiwanuka. They then used their next pick (acquired from the Baltimore Ravens) on University of Miami(FL) WR Sinorice
    5.86
    7 votes
    15
    1892 English cricket season

    1892 English cricket season

    The 1892 English cricket season was the third year in which the County Championship was held, and Surrey set a record amount of wins with 13 out of 16. George Lohmann and Bill Lockwood took over 100 wickets each in the 16 Championship matches. Points system:
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    1985 San Francisco 49ers season

    1985 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1985 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 36th year with the National Football League. 49ers running back Roger Craig became the first player in NFL history to record both 1,000 rushing yards and 1,000 receiving yards in the same season. Craig rushed for 1,050 yards, and had 1,016 receiving yards. December 29, 1985 (Sat) at Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey Attendance: 75,842
    7.60
    5 votes
    17
    FA Cup 2006–07

    FA Cup 2006–07

    • Championship: FA Cup Final 2007
    The FA Cup 2006–07 was the 126th staging of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup. This season's edition was the first to be entitled "The FA Cup sponsored by E.On". The competition started on 18 August 2006 with the first of the record number of 687 teams entering in the Extra Preliminary Round and concluded on 19 May 2007 with the Final, held at the new Wembley Stadium. For information on the matches played from the Extra Preliminary Round to the final Qualifying Round, see FA Cup 2006-07 Qualifying Rounds. Chelsea F.C. claimed this season's FA Cup with a hard-fought 1–0 victory over Manchester United, with Didier Drogba scoring the winning goal in the dying minutes of extra-time. Manchester United had played against top-flight opponents in each round, matching their effort from 1948, but losing out this time. The results below detail the results from the First Round Proper onwards. Matches played on weekend of Saturday, 11 November 2006. The draw was made by Will Greenwood and Neil Back, adjudicated by Trevor Brooking. Matches played on weekend of Saturday, 2 December 2006. The draw was made on 12 November by Graham
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    1979 New York Yankees season

    1979 New York Yankees season

    The 1979 New York Yankees season was the 77th season for the franchise in New York and its 79th season overall. The season was marked by the death of their starting catcher, Thurman Munson, on August 2. The team finished with a record of 89-71, finishing fourth in the American League East, 13.5 games behind the Baltimore Orioles, ending the Yankees' three-year domination of the AL East. New York was managed by Billy Martin, and Bob Lemon. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In January 1979, the Yankees attempted to acquire first baseman Rod Carew from the Minnesota Twins in exchange for Chris Chambliss, Juan Beniquez, Dámaso García, and Dave Righetti, but the deal fell through. Carew was later traded to the California Angels. On August 6, the Yankees flew to Ohio to attend Thurman Munson's memorial service, then flew back to New York play the Orioles on Monday Night Baseball. Bobby Murcer hit a three run home run in the bottom of the seventh inning, then drove in two more runs in the ninth with a single off former Yankee Tippy Martinez to account for all five Yankee runs in a 5-4 win. After the game, Murcer gave the bat to Munson’s widow. On September 12, Carl Yastrzemski of the
    6.33
    6 votes
    19
    1983 San Francisco 49ers season

    1983 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1983 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 34th year with the National Football League. December 31, 1983 at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, California Attendance: 58,286 January 8, 1984 at RFK Stadium, Washington, DC Attendance: 55,363
    6.33
    6 votes
    20
    2007 Formula One season

    2007 Formula One season

    The 2007 Formula One season was the 58th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 2007 FIA Formula One World Championship, which began on 18 March and ended on 21 October after seventeen events. The Drivers' Championship was won by Ferrari driver Kimi Räikkönen by one point at the final race of the season, making Räikkönen the third Finnish driver to take the title. An appeal by McLaren regarding the legality of some cars in the final race could have altered the championship standings, but on 16 November, the appeal was reportedly rejected by the International Court of Appeal, confirming the championship results. Räikkönen entered the final race in third position in the drivers' standings, but emerged as champion after the chequered flag, a feat first accomplished by Giuseppe Farina in 1950. It has since been accomplished again, by Sebastian Vettel, in 2010. A major talking point of the season had been an espionage controversy involving Ferrari and McLaren, which led to McLaren being excluded from the Constructors' Championship. As a result, Ferrari clinched the championship at the Belgian Grand Prix. The 2007 season was significant in that it heralded the end of the
    9.67
    3 votes
    21
    1888 New York Giants season

    1888 New York Giants season

    The 1888 New York Giants season was the franchise's 6th season. Claiming six future Hall of Famers (Roger Connor, Mickey Welch, Buck Ewing, Tim Keefe, Jim O'Rourke, and John Montgomery Ward), the team won the National League pennant by nine games and defeated the St. Louis Browns in the "World's Championship." Keefe led the league in several major statistical categories, including wins, winning percentage, strikeouts, and ERA. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned Run Average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned Run Average; SO = Strikeouts The Giants beat the American Association champion St. Louis Browns in the World Series, six games to four.
    8.25
    4 votes
    22
    1905 Boston Americans season

    1905 Boston Americans season

    The 1905 Boston Americans season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Americans finishing fourth in the American League with a record of 78 wins and 74 losses. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    1956 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1956 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1956 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1956, and ended with the championship game on March 24 on Northwestern University's campus in Evanston, Illinois. A total of 29 games were played, including a third-place game in each region and a national third-place game. This was the first NCAA tournament in which the four regionals were given distinct names, although the concept of four regional winners advancing to a single site for the "Final Four" had been introduced in 1952. San Francisco, coached by Phil Woolpert, won the national title with an 83–71 victory in the final game over Iowa, coached by Bucky O'Connor. Hal Lear of Temple was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 40 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 9, 1979, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in Salt Lake City. A total of 40 games were played, including a national third place game. Michigan State, coached by Jud Heathcote, won the national title with a 75-64 victory in the final game over Indiana State, coached by Bill Hodges. Indiana State came into the game without a loss all season, but couldn't win their final game. Magic Johnson of Michigan State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Michigan State's victory over Indiana State was its first over a number one ranked team, and remained its only victory over a number one ranked team until 2007 (Wisconsin). The final game marked the beginning of the rivalry between future Hall of Famers Johnson and Larry Bird. To this day, it remains the highest-rated game in the history of televised college basketball. Both Johnson and Bird would enter the NBA in the fall of 1979, and the rivalry between them and their teams (respectively, the Los Angeles Lakers
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    1983 New York Yankees season

    1983 New York Yankees season

    The New York Yankees' 1983 season was the 81st season for the Yankees. The team finished in third place in the American League Eastern Division with a record of 91-71, finishing 7 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Billy Martin. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. For the fourth straight spring training, the Yankees played an exhibition game at the Louisiana Superdome. On March 27, 1983, the Yankees beat the Toronto Blue Jays 2 to 1 behind six shutout innings from Doyle Alexander. Attendance was 15,129 for the game. The Pine Tar Game refers to a controversial incident that took place in an American League baseball game played between the Kansas City Royals and New York Yankees on July 24, 1983. Playing at New York's Yankee Stadium, the Royals were trailing 4-3 with two outs in the top of the ninth and U L Washington on first base. In the on deck circle, George Brett was heard remarking to a teammate, "Watch this baby fly" as he shook his bat. He then came to the plate and connected off Yankee reliever Rich "Goose" Gossage for a two-run home run and a 5-4 lead. As Brett crossed the plate, New York manager Billy Martin approached home plate
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    1998 NCAA Division I-A football season

    1998 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 1998 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first of the Bowl Championship Series, which saw Tennessee win the national championship, one year after star quarterback Peyton Manning left for the NFL. The Volunteers defeated the Florida State Seminoles 23-16 in the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl in Tempe, Arizona to secure the inaugural BCS National Championship. The BCS combined elements of the old Bowl Coalition and the Bowl Alliance it replaced. The agreement existed between the Rose, Fiesta, Sugar, and Orange Bowls, the Cotton Bowl Classic diminishing in status since the breakup of the Southwest Conference. Like the Bowl Alliance, a national championship game would rotate between the four bowls, with the top two teams facing each other. These teams were chosen based upon a BCS poll, combining the AP poll, the Coaches poll, and a third computer component. The computer factored in things such as strength of schedule, margin of victory, and quality wins without taking into account time (in other words a loss in October and a loss in November were on equal footing). However, like the Bowl Coalition, the bowls not hosting the national championship would retain their traditional tie-ins.
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    2000 in NASCAR

    2000 in NASCAR

    The 2000 NASCAR Winston Cup Season began on Sunday February 13 and ended on Sunday November 20. Joe Gibbs Racing driver Bobby Labonte was crowned champion at season's end. The NASCAR Manufacturers' Championship was won by Ford when they captured 14 wins and 234 points to better Pontiac's 11 wins and 213 points. Chevrolet finished third with 9 wins and 199 points. The Bud Shootout, NASCAR's race for all Pole Award winners from the previous season, was held February 13 at Daytona International Speedway. Ricky Rudd suffered a spectacular flip at the checkered flag when he was tapped by Sterling Marlin when Marlin ran into Bobby Labonte. Everyone involved walked away uninjured. Mark Martin drew the pole. Top Ten Results The Gatorade Twin 125s were run on February 17 at Daytona International Speedway. Dale Jarrett and Ricky Rudd were the polesitters for races one and two, respectively. Race One Top Ten Results Race Two Top Ten Results The 2000 Daytona 500 was held February 20 at Daytona International Speedway. Dale Jarrett won the pole. This was the last Daytona 500 to be televised by CBS, and thus the last 500 broadcast for Buddy Baker and Ned Jarrett. Due to his failure to qualify,
    6.80
    5 votes
    28
    2007 Boston Red Sox season

    2007 Boston Red Sox season

    The Boston Red Sox' 2007 season began with the Boston, Massachusetts-based Major League Baseball team trying to rebound after a disappointing 2006 season, in which they finished third in the American League East behind the New York Yankees and the Toronto Blue Jays, and missed the postseason for the first time since 2002. They rebounded from the disappointment of 2006 by posting the best record in the league, winning the American League East division with a lead they never relinquished since April 18, and winning the American League Pennant. Advancing to the World Series, the Red Sox beat the Rockies in four straight games, winning their second Championship in four years. On November 14, 2006, Major League Baseball announced that the Red Sox had competed for the rights to negotiate a contract with Japanese pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka. Boston won with a bid of US$51.1 million and had 30 days to complete a deal. On December 13, 2006, the day before the deadline, Matsuzaka signed a six-year contract worth $52 million. It was initially announced that closer Jonathan Papelbon would become a starter in 2007, partially to protect his arm from the injury that sidelined him for the final
    6.80
    5 votes
    29
    2008–09 Boston Bruins season

    2008–09 Boston Bruins season

    The 2008–09 Boston Bruins season is the Bruins' 85th season in the National Hockey League (NHL). Their regular season began on the road on October 9, 2008, in Denver versus the Colorado Avalanche and concluded on April 12, 2009, against the New York Islanders. The Bruins looked to improve upon the accomplishments of the 2007–08 season, which included Boston's return to the NHL playoffs for the first time since the 2003–04 season. Marc Savard again led the team in scoring for the regular season, his 88 points good for ninth in the league. Tim Thomas led all goaltenders in both save percentage and goals against at season's end, while sophomore sensation David Krejci took home the League's Plus-Minus award, narrowly beating out rookie team-mate Blake Wheeler. The Bruins claimed their first division title since 2004 and clinched top seed in the East for the first time since 2002. Arguably the two biggest events to occur during the Bruins' offseason were the acquisition of Canadiens forward Michael Ryder, a noted 30 goal scorer, and Blake Wheeler, a promising 21-year-old from the University of Minnesota. 12-year veteran Stephane Yelle was another strong addition to the roster. Added to
    9.00
    3 votes
    30
    1895 New York Giants season

    1895 New York Giants season

    Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    1921 New York Yankees season

    1921 New York Yankees season

    The 1921 New York Yankees season was the 19th season for the Yankees in New York and their 21st overall. The team finished with a record of 98-55, winning their first pennant in franchise history, winning the American League by 4½ games over the previous year's champion, the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds. With star slugger Babe Ruth hitting 59 home runs, setting a new major league home run record for the third consecutive year, while also having his greatest overall season statistically, the Yankees appeared to be the team to beat in the World Series. Their landlords, the New York Giants, had rebuilt after slipping a bit in the late 1910s, and had won the National League pennant. For the first time, all the games of a World Series would be held in the same ballpark. The best-5-of-9 Series (its last before returning to the best-4-of-7 format) saw the Yankees take a 3 games to 1 lead, but Ruth suffered a serious injury that took him out of the remaining games, save for one pinch-hit appearance, and the Giants rallied to win the Series 5 games to 3. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H =
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    1969 New York Yankees season

    1969 New York Yankees season

    The 1969 New York Yankees season was the 67th season for the team in New York, and its 69th season overall. The team finished in fifth-place in the newly-established American League East with a record of 80-81, 28½ games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. On Mickey Mantle Day, June 8, 1969, in addition to the retirement of his uniform number 7, Mantle was given a plaque that would hang on the center field wall at Yankee Stadium, near the monuments to Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Miller Huggins. The plaque was given to him by Joe DiMaggio, and Mantle then gave DiMaggio a similar plaque, telling the crowd, "His should be just a little bit higher than mine." Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; R = Runs scored; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in; SB = Stolen bases Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; R = Runs scored; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in; SB = Stolen bases Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; BB = Walks allowed; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP =
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 17, 1994, and ended with the championship game on April 4 in Charlotte, North Carolina. A total of 63 games were played. Arkansas, coached by Nolan Richardson, won the national title with a 76–72 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski. Corliss Williamson of Arkansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Bill Clinton, President of the United States and former governor of Arkansas, was in attendance for the Final Four, as well as the regionals that were held in Dallas the previous week. (Clinton was already scheduled to be in Dallas for the wedding of his brother Roger and added the basketball games to his plans.) On television, CBS Sports covered all 63 games of the tournament, with regional splits until the Regional Finals followed by national telecasts. Westwood One had exclusive national radio coverage.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    1927 New York Yankees season

    1927 New York Yankees season

    The 1927 New York Yankees season was their 25th season. The team finished with a record of 110-44, winning their fifth pennant and finishing 19 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Pittsburgh Pirates. This Yankee team is known for their feared lineup, which was nicknamed "Murderers' Row". This team is widely considered to be the best baseball team ever. The Yankees' 110 victories broke the previous American League mark of 105 (set by the 1912 Boston Red Sox) and would stand as the American League single-season record until it was broken by the Cleveland Indians in 1954. This was the first year the Yankees acknowledged their team nickname on their uniforms, albeit their road uniforms. Their home uniforms remained free of any kind of logo except for the "NY" on their caps. The roster included seven future Hall of Famers: Pitchers Herb Pennock and Waite Hoyt, Infielders Lou Gehrig and Tony Lazzeri, outfielders Babe Ruth and Earle Combs and Manager Miller Huggins. With the race long since decided, the nation's attention turned to Babe Ruth's pursuit of his own home
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    1944 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1944 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1944 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 24, 1944, and ended with the championship game on March 28 in New York City. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Utah, coached by Vadal Peterson, won the national title with a 42-40 victory in the final game over Dartmouth, coached by Earl Brown. Arnie Ferrin of Utah was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Utah became the first team to play in both the NIT and NCAA tournament in the same season. Utah was given a second chance to play in the NCAA Tournament after an automobile accident injured two players on the Arkansas team.
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    1967 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1967 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1967 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1967, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 27 games were played, including a third-place game in each region and a national third-place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 79-64 victory in the final game over Dayton, coached by Don Donoher. Lew Alcindor (later named Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This was the first of seven consecutive NCAA titles for UCLA and the first of three consecutive Most Outstanding Player awards for Alcindor.
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    2008 San Diego Chargers season

    2008 San Diego Chargers season

    The 2008 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 49th overall season and their 39th in the NFL. While they completed the regular season with only an 8–8 record, they nonetheless captured their third consecutive AFC West championship. In the first round of the playoffs, the Chargers upset the Indianapolis Colts, but they were eliminated the following week during their divisional round game on the road against the eventual Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh Steelers. The Chargers became the first team to go 8–8 and win their division since 1985, and by winning their Wild Card playoff game against the Indianapolis Colts, became the first team in NFL history to actually go an entire season without having a winning record until after the first round of the playoffs. They also became the first team in NFL history to start the season 4–8, yet make the playoffs. On October 26, the Chargers had a game against the New Orleans Saints in London, England, where the Saints were the designated home team. i.e. They were playing their home game in London. This was the second NFL game played in London in as many years. * NFL overseas game in England. New Orleans is the designated home team. **
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    1925 New York Yankees season

    1925 New York Yankees season

    The 1925 New York Yankees season was the team's 23rd season in New York and its 25th overall. The team finished with a record of 69-85, in 7th place, 30 games behind the Washington Senators. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. This season was marred by Babe Ruth's infamous "stomach ache" that kept him out a good portion of the season. It was the club's lowest finish, in both percentage and place in the standings, since their 7th place finish in 1913. It was also the first time they had finished below .500 since 1918. The Yankees would regroup and it would be 40 years before they would finish below .500 again. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average;
    10.00
    2 votes
    39
    1989 San Francisco 49ers season

    1989 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1989 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th season in the National Football League. The 49ers franchise cemented their reputation as the best team of the decade. After going 14-2 in the regular season, the 49ers completed the season with the most dominant playoff run in NFL history, outscoring opponents 126-26 and winning their fourth Super Bowl victory. In 2007, ESPN.com's Page 2 ranked the 1989 49ers as the greatest team in Super Bowl history. Quarterback Joe Montana had one of the greatest passing seasons in NFL history in 1989. Montana set a then-NFL record with a passer rating of 112.4, with a completion percentage of 70.2%, and a 26/8 touchdown-to-interception ratio. In the playoffs, Montana was even more dominant, with a 78.3% completion percentage, 800 yards, 11 touchdowns, no interceptions, and a 146.4 rating. Cold Hard Football Facts calls Montana's 1989 season "the one by which we must measure all other passing seasons." The 49ers offense was just as dominating as it was during the previous regular season. Quarterback Joe Montana threw for 3,512 yards, 26 touchdowns, and only 8 interceptions, giving him what was then the highest quarterback rating in NFL
    6.40
    5 votes
    40
    2004 Miami Dolphins season

    2004 Miami Dolphins season

    The 2004 Miami Dolphins season was the team's 39th as a member of the National Football League. The Dolphins were unable to improve upon their previous season's output of 10–6, instead only going 4–12 after starting the season 0–6. The team was adversely affected by the premature (drug-related) retirement of their star running back, Ricky Williams.
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    1987 San Francisco 49ers season

    1987 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1987 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 38th year with the National Football League. The 49ers won the division for the second consecutive season, and ended the season as the top seed in the NFC playoffs. The season ended with an upset loss to the Minnesota Vikings in the divisional round of the playoffs. The 49ers lost the first game of the season to Pittsburgh. It appeared that they were going to start the season 0-2, down by 6 points with just seconds to play. But quarterback Joe Montana threw a 25-yard pass to wide receiver Jerry Rice as time expired. The 49ers used the victory as a springboard to a 13-1 run to end the season with the best record in the NFL. The 49ers scored 459 points, the most in the NFL in 1987; they also scored 206 more points than they allowed, best in the league as well. The 49ers gained the most total yards (5,987), the most rushing yards (2,237) and second most passing yards (3,750) in the NFL in 1987. Wide receiver Jerry Rice was named NFL Offensive Player of the Year and the Bert Bell Award (for Player of the Year). Rice caught 22 touchdown passes in a strike-shortened 12 games, a record that stood for twenty years. Rice led the league in
    5.50
    6 votes
    42
    1923 New York Giants season

    1923 New York Giants season

    Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts October 10, 1923 at Yankee Stadium in New York, New York October 11, 1923 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in New York, New York October 12, 1923 at Yankee Stadium in New York, New York October 13, 1923 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in New York, New York October 14, 1923 at Yankee Stadium in New York, New York October 15, 1923 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in New York, New York
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    1938-39 Boston Bruins season

    1938-39 Boston Bruins season

    The 1938–39 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' 15th season in the NHL, and they were coming off of a very successful regular season in 1937–38, winning the American Division with a record of 30–11–7, however, they lost to the Toronto Maple Leafs in the Stanley Cup semi-finals. This season, the Bruins would meet the Maple Leafs in a rematch, and win the series 4–1 to win the Stanley Cup for the second time, and the first time in 10 years. In the off-season, the NHL would lose a franchise, as the Montreal Maroons would fold, leaving the league with seven teams, and eliminating the American and Canadian Division format the league had been using since 1926. The Bruins would make a key acquisition, acquiring Roy Conacher from the Kirkland Lake Hargreaves of the NOHA. Boston would see goaltender Tiny Thompson get injured during an early season game, forcing the club to sign Frank Brimsek, who played for the Providence Reds of the IAHL. Brimsek stepped in and played great hockey, and when Thompson came back from his injury, the Bruins decided to deal him to the Detroit Red Wings for Norm Smith. Brimsek would help lead the Bruins to 1st place in the NHL standings, as they finished the
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    1969-70 QMJHL season

    1969-70 QMJHL season

    The 1969–70 QMJHL season was the first season in the history of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. Eleven teams formed the new league, ten from Quebec and one from Ontario. Eight teams came from the Quebec Junior Hockey League, the Drummondville Rangers, Quebec Remparts, Saint-Jérôme Alouettes, Shawinigan Bruins, Sherbrooke Castors, Sorel Éperviers, Trois-Rivières Ducs and Verdun Maple Leafs; two from the Metropolitan Montreal Junior Hockey League, the Rosemont National and Laval Saints; and the Cornwall Royals from the Central Junior A Hockey League. The teams played 56 games each in the schedule. The Quebec Remparts finished first place in the regular season, and won the President's Cup, defeating the Saint-Jérôme Alouettes in the finals. The Remparts then defeated the P.E.I. Islanders from the Maritimes, then competed for the George Richardson Memorial Trophy, losing to the Montreal Junior Canadiens 3 games to 0 for the Eastern Canada title. Note: GP = Games played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; Pts = Points; GF = Goals for; GA = Goals against Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalties in Minutes Guy Lafleur was the leading scorer of the
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    1971 San Francisco 49ers season

    1971 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1971 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 22nd year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second consecutive year. The team moved into a new home, Candlestick Park.
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 15, 1975, and ended with the championship game on March 31 in San Diego, California. A total of 36 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won his 10th and last national title with a 92–85 victory in the final game over Kentucky, coached by Joe B. Hall. Richard Washington of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The Bruins again had an advantage by playing the Final Four in their home state. It marked the last time a team won the national championship playing in its home state. There were two memorable games in the 1975 tournament. Number 2 ranked Kentucky upset previously unbeaten Indiana 92-90 in their regional final. The Hoosiers, coached by Bob Knight, were undefeated and the number one team in the nation, when leading scorer Scott May suffered a broken arm in a win over arch-rival Purdue. This was the only loss Indiana would suffer between March 1974 and December 1976. In
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    2007 New York Yankees season

    2007 New York Yankees season

    The New York Yankees' 2007 season was the Yankees' 105th in New York and their 107th overall dating back to their origins in Baltimore. The season started with the Yankees trying to win the AL East championship, a title they had won every season since after the 1997 season, but ultimately they came in second place to the Boston Red Sox. The Yankees instead won the American League wild card, beating out the Seattle Mariners and the Detroit Tigers. The offseason started with news of the unexpected death of Cory Lidle, who was an occupant in his own plane that crashed into a Manhattan high rise shortly after the Yankees were eliminated in the 2006 ALDS. The Yankees made news by trading right fielder Gary Sheffield to the Detroit Tigers in exchange for pitching prospects. The Yankees also traded away pitcher Jaret Wright to the Baltimore Orioles in exchange for reliever Chris Britton. On December 21, 2006, Andy Pettitte signed as a Free Agent with the Yankees. However, no offseason move was bigger for the team than trading Randy Johnson back to the Arizona Diamondbacks, the team who he was with when he won the 2001 World Series against the Yankees, for pitcher Luis Vizcaíno and three
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    2005 San Francisco 49ers season

    2005 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 2005 San Francisco 49ers season was the 60th year for the team overall, and their 56th season in the NFL. They improved their two-win 2004 season by two games Former head coach Dennis Erickson had been fired just after the end of the 2004 season, and Mike Nolan (son of former Niners head coach Dick Nolan) took the helm. Despite having a better record than the 2-14 Texans and 3-13 Saints, statistics site Football Outsiders calculated that the 49ers were actually, play-for-play, not only the worst team in the NFL in 2005, but the worst team they've ever tracked. According to the site, the 49ers offense in 2005 is the third-worst they'd ever tracked. The 49ers 3,587 total offensive yards were the fewest of any team in 2005, and their 239 points scored were third-worst in the NFL. Despite finishing with the worst record in 2004, the 49ers ended up playing the second-toughest schedule that season as they played eight games against playoff teams which includes games against the top seeds in both conferences, the Seattle Seahawks and the Indianapolis Colts, and games against the Chicago Bears and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, both teams that the 49ers played due to finishing last in the
    6.20
    5 votes
    49
    2008 New York Giants season

    2008 New York Giants season

    The 2008 New York Giants season was the franchise's 84th season in the National Football League (NFL) as the team looked to defend its Super Bowl XLII title. They improved upon their 10–6 record from 2007, becoming NFC East champions and finished with the #1 seed in the NFC playoffs with a 12-4 record. However, they lost to the Philadelphia Eagles in the divisional round of the playoffs, becoming the second team in as many years to lose as the NFC's top seed (the Dallas Cowboys, whom the Giants beat on their way to the Super Bowl, were the first). The Giants qualified for the postseason for the fourth consecutive year, marking the first time in club history that they had accomplished that. This was also the first time that the Giants made the playoffs the year after making the Super Bowl, after missing the playoffs in 1987 (following win in Super Bowl XXI), 1991 (following win in Super Bowl XXV), and 2001 (following loss in Super Bowl XXXV). The 2008 Giants became the fifth team in NFL history with two players to rush for more than 1,000 yards: Brandon Jacobs (1,089) and Derrick Ward (1,025). On February 29, the first day of free-agency, Giants free agent linebacker Kawika Mitchell
    6.20
    5 votes
    50
    1729 English cricket season

    1729 English cricket season

    The 1729 English cricket season is the one in which Samuel Johnson played at Oxford University. The season is also noted for the earliest known innings victory and the earliest known surviving cricket bat. There is a bat in The Oval pavilion which belonged to John Chitty of Knaphill, Surrey. Dated 1729, it is the oldest known bat. It looks more like a field hockey stick than a modern cricket bat but its curvature was to enable the batsman to play a ball that was always rolled, as in bowls, never pitched. Pitching began about 30 years later and the straight bats used nowadays were invented in response to the pitched delivery. Dr Samuel Johnson attended Oxford University from October 1728 until the following summer and later told James Boswell that cricket matches were played there. Boswell mentioned this in his Life of Samuel Johnson. A local game in Gloucester on Monday 22 September is the earliest known reference to cricket in Gloucestershire.
    9.50
    2 votes
    51
    1888 Boston Beaneaters season

    1888 Boston Beaneaters season

    Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    1978 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1978 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1978 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1978, and ended with the championship game on March 27 in St. Louis, Missouri. A total of 32 games were played, including a national third place game. The process of seeding the bracket was first used in this tournament. 16 conference winners with automatic bids were seeded 1 through 4 in each region. At-large teams were seeded 1 through 4 in each region separately. There were in fact only 11 true at-large teams in the field, as the remaining 5 teams were conference winners with automatic bids who were seeded as "at-large." The practice of distinguishing between automatic and at-large teams was ended after the tournament, and the expanded field of 40 was simply seeded from 1 to 10 in the 1979 tournament. Kentucky, coached by Joe B. Hall and dominant throughout the entire regular season, won the national title with a closer than it appears 94-88 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Bill E. Foster. Jack Givens of Kentucky was named the tournament's Most Outstanding
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    1998 Dallas Cowboys season

    1998 Dallas Cowboys season

    The 1998 Dallas Cowboys season would mark their 39th in the NFL and team owner Jerry Jones would hire former Pittsburgh Steelers offensive coordinator Chan Gailey to be the fourth head coach of the Dallas Cowboys franchise. Gailey would revitalize the Cowboys offense, particularly the running game, which had seen a recent decline despite the presence of running back Emmitt Smith. The trio of Smith, Troy Aikman, and Michael Irvin helped the Cowboys be the first ever NFC East team to sweep their division en route to capturing the NFC East title, the team's sixth of the 90's. The Cowboys would later encounter the Arizona Cardinals for the third time that season in the NFC Wild Card Game, but would lose in a stunning upset in the first round at Texas Stadium. Ironically, Cornerback Deion Sanders would suffer an injury to his toe in a regular season victory over Arizona and made a surprise return against the same team in the playoff loss. It was an outstanding season for Sanders, who played so well on defense and special teams during a win over the New York Giants that a "primetime" award for him. Troy Aikman was injured in a week two loss at Denver and missed the next 5 games. Future
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    1998 San Francisco 49ers season

    1998 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1998 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 49th year with the National Football League. at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, CA For the first time in the Brett Favre era the 49ers pulled off a victory over the Packers. After a late Packers touchdown the Niners trailed 27-23 and a continuing issue during the game was dropped passes by receiver Terrell Owens. In the final ten seconds Steve Young dropped back in the Packers redzone, stumbled but stayed on his feet, then heaved the ball to the endzone where Owens caught it, landed in the endzone with four seconds left, and the Niners had pulled out one of the most dramatic wins in their history. at the Georgia Dome, Atlanta, GA
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    1916 Boston Red Sox season

    1916 Boston Red Sox season

    The 1916 Boston Red Sox season involved the Red Sox finishing 1st in the American League with a record of 91 wins and 63 losses. They defeated the Brooklyn Robins in 5 games in the World Series. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts AL Boston Red Sox (4) vs. NL Brooklyn Robins (1)
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    1923 New York Yankees season

    1923 New York Yankees season

    The 1923 New York Yankees season was the 23rd season for this American League franchise and its 21st season in New York. Manager Miller Huggins led the team to their third straight pennant with a 98-54 record, 16 games ahead of the second place Detroit Tigers. The Yankees moved into the now famous Yankee Stadium. In the 1923 World Series, they avenged their 1921 and 1922 losses by defeating the New York Giants in 6 games, 4 games to 2. The Yankees began their first World Championship Season on April 18 as they opened Yankee Stadium. Babe Ruth christened the new stadium, with a home run in the Yankees' 4-1 victory over the Boston Red Sox. The stadium would later be called "the House that Ruth Built". On May 5, the Yankees beat the Philadelphia Athletics 7-2 at Yankee Stadium to regain first place, the Yankees would never fall back in the standings for the rest of the season. Babe Ruth set a Yankees record for highest batting average in one season by hitting .393. Ruth also finished the season with 41 home runs and 131 RBIs. Ruth’s average was not enough to win the batting title, as Ruth finished in second place to Detroit’s Harry Heilmann who batted .403. Ruth reached base safely
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    1990 San Francisco 49ers season

    1990 San Francisco 49ers season

    The San Francisco 49ers entered the 1990 season heavily favoured to win their third consecutive Super Bowl. The season was highlighted by their defeat of the New York Giants on Monday Night Football. Throughout the season, the 49ers and the Giants were the two best teams in the NFL. The 49ers would face off against the Giants in the NFC Championship Game. Between 1988 and 1990, the 49ers set a league record with 18 consecutive road victories. Jerry Rice had a career year by becoming the fourth receiver in the history of American football to have at least 100 receptions in one season. The 49ers won their fifth consecutive NFC West Division Title. Dating back to 1989, the 49ers completed a fifteen game unbeaten streak in the regular season (5 victories in the last 5 games of 1989 and 10 victories in the first ten games of 1990). Following the 1990 season, the 49ers left team stalwarts Roger Craig and Ronnie Lott unprotected and let them go to the Los Angeles Raiders via Plan B free agency. Just like the regular season game between the two teams won by the 49ers 7-3 the championship game was mostly a defensive battle. San Francisco running back Roger Craig's fumble with 2:36 left in
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    FA Cup 2007–08

    FA Cup 2007–08

    • Championship: 2008 FA Cup Final
    The 2007–08 FA Cup was the 127th season of the world's oldest football knockout competition, The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. A record 731 clubs' entries were accepted for the competition. The competition culminated with the FA Cup Final, held at Wembley Stadium, London on 17 May 2008. The match was contested by Portsmouth and Cardiff City, with Portsmouth taking the title 1 – 0, Nwankwo Kanu scoring the winning goal. This was the last FA Cup to be broadcast by the BBC and Sky Sports in the United Kingdom, before coverage was handed over to ITV and Setanta starting in August 2008. For information on the matches played from the Extra Preliminary Round to the Fourth Round Qualifying, see FA Cup 2007-08 Qualifying Rounds. This round is the first in which Football League teams from League One and League Two compete with non-league teams. This round marks the first time Championship and Premier League (top-flight) teams play. Matches were played on the weekend of Saturday, 5 January 2008. The draw was made on 2 December 2007 at 15:15 GMT by Kevin Beattie and Sammy Nelson, adjudicated by Sir Trevor Brooking. Involved in the Third Round draw for the first time
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    Liga Nacional de Fútbol de Honduras 2009-10 Apertura

    Liga Nacional de Fútbol de Honduras 2009-10 Apertura

    The 2009-10 Apertura was the first part of the 2009-10 season of the Liga Nacional de Fútbol de Honduras, the first division national football league in Honduras. The season started on 2009-07-18 and finished on 2009-11-25. It followed the 2008-09 Clausura season. Marathón as winner will compete in the 2010-11 CONCACAF Champions League. Atlético Gualala achieved promotion to first division on 2008-09, however before the start of the tournament they choose to merged with Real Juventud who had recently relegated the same season, and then decided to stay with the name Real Juventud. As of 2009-11-04 As of 2009-11-25
    7.00
    4 votes
    61
    1984 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1984 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1984 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 53 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 13, 1984, and ended with the championship game on April 2 in Seattle, Washington. A total of 52 games were played. This was the last tournament in which some teams earned first round byes as the field expanded to 64 teams beginning in the 1985 field when each team played in the first round. Georgetown University, coached by John Thompson, won the national title with a 84–75 victory in the final game over Houston, coached by Guy Lewis. Patrick Ewing of Georgetown was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Thompson became the first African-American head coach to lead his team to the title.
    6.00
    5 votes
    62
    1890 Boston Beaneaters season

    1890 Boston Beaneaters season

    Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    1906 college football season

    1906 college football season

    The 1906 college football season was the first in which the forward pass was permitted. Although there was no national championship, there were two teams that had won all nine of their games as the 1906 season drew to a close, the Princeton Tigers and the Yale Bulldogs, and on November 17, 1906, they played to a 0-0 tie. St. Louis University finished at 11-0-0. The Helms Athletic Foundation, founded in 1936, declared retroactively that Princeton had been the best college football team of 1906. The American Intercollegiate Football Rules Committee met at the Murray Hill Hotel in New York City beginning January 12, 1906, to create measures “for squelching brutality and all forms of unnecessary roughness.” Numerous changes were made, the primary one being the legalization of the forward pass. Various persons are given credit for the suggestion. Georgia Tech coach John Heisman had seen the play attempted in 1895 in a Georgia vs. North Carolina game, and lobbied for its legalization starting in 1903. John C. Bell, Sr., and Dr. J. William White were later credited with designing rules that would permit a pass, yet still be acceptable to a majority on the rules committee. Among the other
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    1950 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1950 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1950 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 23, 1950, and ended with the championship game on March 28 in New York City, New York. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. CCNY, coached by Nat Holman, won the national title with a 71-68 victory in the final game over Bradley, coached by Forddy Anderson. Irwin Dambrot of CCNY was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. CCNY became the only team to ever win both the NIT and NCAA tournaments in the same year. Because of participation changes, this currently cannot happen. CCNY is also the only championship team which is not currently a member of Division I, having dropped down to Division III following the CCNY point shaving scandal. The 1950 tournament was the last tournament to feature eight teams. The field would expand to sixteen teams the next year.
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    1995 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1995 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1995 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 16, 1995, and ended with the championship game on April 3 at the Kingdome in Seattle, Washington. A total of 63 games were played. UCLA, coached by Jim Harrick, won its record 11th NCAA Men's Basketball Championship and its first since the John Wooden era by defeating the University of Arkansas, who came up one game short in their bid to repeat as champions. Games marked with an "*" went into overtime. A final shot in the second round at The Boise State Pavilion is one of the most memorable moments in NCAA history. UCLA's Tyus Edney dashed the length of the 94-foot court in just over 4 seconds to make a layup that gave the Bruins a 75-74 win over Missouri, which sustained UCLA's run to a national title that year.
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    2007–08 Chicago Bulls season

    2007–08 Chicago Bulls season

    The 2007–08 Chicago Bulls season was the 42nd season of NBA basketball in Chicago, Illinois. Key dates: The Bulls made the following free agent transactions for the 2007 off-season. *Total for entire season including previous team(s) The Bulls were involved in the following transactions during the 2007-08 season.
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    1974 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1974 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1974 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It was the first tournament to officially be designated as a Division I championship—previously, NCAA member schools had been divided into the "University Division" and "College Division". The NCAA created its current three-division setup, effective with the 1973–74 academic year, by moving all of its University Division schools to Division I and splitting the College Division members into Division II (fewer scholarships) and Division III (no athletic scholarships allowed). Previous tournaments would retroactively be considered Division I championships. The tournament began on March 9, 1974, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in Greensboro, North Carolina. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. North Carolina State, coached by Norm Sloan, won the national title with a 76-64 victory in the final game over Marquette, coached by Al McGuire. This result ended UCLA's record streak of seven consecutive titles. David
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    1999 New York Yankees season

    1999 New York Yankees season

    The New York Yankees' 1999 season was the 97th season for the Bronx based professional baseball team. The team finished with a record of 98-64 finishing 4 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the playoffs, they got to the World Series and ended up beating the Atlanta Braves in 4 games to win their 25th World Series title. July 18, Yankee Stadium, New York, New York Following lung cancer surgery on October 14, 1998, Joe DiMaggio fell into an 18-hour coma on December 11. The coma forced his lawyer, Morris Engelberg, to admit that the positive reports he had been feeding to the press were greatly exaggerated. He claimed Joe made him promise not to tell even his family about his condition. Joe was finally taken home on January 19, 1999. Days later, NBC broadcast a premature obituary; Engelberg claimed he and DiMaggio were watching TV and saw it. His last words, according to Engelberg, were "I'll finally get to see Marilyn." However, the day after DiMaggio's death, a hospice worker who cared for him gave a radically different account to The New York Post. DiMaggio finally died on March 8, 1999. He was buried on
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    1954 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1954 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1954 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 24 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1954, and ended with the championship game on March 20 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 28 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. La Salle, coached by Ken Loeffler, won the national title with a 92-76 victory in the final game over Bradley, coached by Forddy Anderson. Tom Gola of La Salle was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Of note, Kentucky, the top-ranked team in the nation (with a record of 25-0) did not participate in any post-season tournament. Since several key players had technically graduated the year before (when Kentucky was banned from playing a competitive schedule due to the point-shaving scandal a few years earlier), those players were ruled ineligible for the NCAA tournament. Despite the wishes of the players, Adolph Rupp ultimately decided his team wouldn't play. LSU represented the Southeastern Conference in the tournament. It would be the Bayou Bengals' last appearance until 1979,
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    1954 New York Giants season

    1954 New York Giants season

    The 1954 New York Giants season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Giants won the National League pennant with a record of 97 wins and 57 losses and then defeated the Cleveland Indians in the World Series. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts The New York Giants swept the Cleveland Indians in what would be their final World Series win in New York. It was the first time the Cleveland Indians had been swept in a World Series. The only highlight for the Indians was that they kept the Yankees from winning their sixth straight series. The last time the Yankees had not won the series or pennant beforehand was 1948, when, again, the Indians kept them out (although that
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. This was the first year the field was expanded to 64 teams, from 53 in the previous year's tournament. It began on March 14, 1985, and ended with the championship game on April 1 in Lexington, Kentucky. A total of 63 games were played. Eight-seed Villanova, coached by Rollie Massimino, won the national title with a 66–64 victory in the final game over Georgetown, coached by John Thompson. Ed Pinckney of Villanova was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The game is often cited among the greatest upsets in college basketball history. This Villanova team remains the lowest-seeded team to win the tournament. The game is also notable as the last played without a shot clock. This year's Final Four saw an unprecedented and unmatched three teams from the same conference, with Big East members Villanova and Georgetown joined by St. John's. The only "interloper" in the Big East party was Memphis State, then of the Metro Conference. (Memphis State's 1985 Final Four appearance was vacated due to
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    1998 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1998 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1998 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1998, and ended with the championship game on March 30 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. A total of 63 games were played. Kentucky, coached by Tubby Smith, won the national title with a 78–69 victory in the final game over Utah, coached by Rick Majerus. Jeff Sheppard of Kentucky was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Kentucky came back from double-digit deficits in each of its last three games in the tournament, including a 17 point second half comeback against the hated Blue Devils of Duke, leading to the school's fans dubbing the team the "Comeback Cats". This was Kentucky's third straight championship game appearance.
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    2000 San Francisco 49ers season

    2000 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 2000 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 51st year with the National Football League. Jerry Rice entered the 2000 season as the oldest player in the league at the Wide Receiver position.
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season

    2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season

    The 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season, or the college football season, began on August 28, 2008, progressing through the regular season and bowl season, and (aside from all-star exhibition games that followed) concluded with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game in Miami Gardens, Florida on January 8, 2009, where the #2 Florida Gators, defeated the #1 Oklahoma Sooners, 24–14, of which the teams were determined by the BCS Ranking. The Gators were declared national champions by the BCS and most major polls. Western Kentucky University moves up from Division I-AA and becomes a I-A Independent. The NCAA football rules committee made several rule changes for 2008, and includes the following: If a conference does not have enough eligible teams to fill all of its contracted bowl slots, and an affected bowl does not have a contingency agreement with another conference (e.g., the Poinsettia Bowl, which has a contract with the WAC to take one of its teams if the Pac-10 does not have enough eligible teams), the bowl "left out" can select an at-large team. By NCAA rule, an at-large bowl slot must be filled by a team with at least 7 wins, if available. Two new
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    1961 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1961 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1961 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 24 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 14, 1961, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 28 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Cincinnati, coached by Ed Jucker, won the national title with a 70-65 victory in the final game over state rival Ohio State, coached by Fred Taylor. Jerry Lucas of Ohio State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The national third place game, won by St. Joseph's over Utah by the score of 127-120 in four overtimes, tied the record for the longest game in NCAA Division I tournament history, set in 1956 in a first-round game between Canisius and North Carolina State. As of the regional finals of the 2009 tournament, no NCAA Division I tournament games since then have gone to a fourth overtime period. Saint Joseph's victory was later vacated because of a gambling scandal.
    5.80
    5 votes
    76
    1966 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1966 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1966 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 22 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 7, 1966, and ended with the championship game on March 19 in College Park, Maryland. A total of 26 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Texas Western, coached by Don Haskins, won the national title with a 72–65 victory in the final game over Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp. Coach Haskins started five black players for the first time in NCAA Championship history. Jerry Chambers of Utah was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The 2006 film Glory Road is based on the story of the 1966 Texas Western team. The Tournament is most remembered for the all-black starting five of Texas Western defeating an all-white starting five for Kentucky in the championship game. In the 1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, Loyola started four African-Americans and Cincinnati started three. That was the first time that a majority of African-Americans participated in the championship game. Clem Haskins and Dwight Smith
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    1971 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1971 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1971 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 13, 1971, and ended with the championship game on March 27 in Houston, Texas. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 68-62 victory in the final game over Villanova, coached by Jack Kraft. Howard Porter of Villanova was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. However, Villanova was disqualified after the tournament for having an ineligible player, Howard Porter, who had signed with an agent prior to the tournament. Having lost to undefeated, second-ranked Penn (coached by Dick Harter) twice before, Porter did not think they would make past the regionals where third-ranked South Carolina was also in their path. However, Penn vanquished South Carolina by 17 and then had their worst game of the year against Villanova in the East Regional final, losing 90-47. Villanova's first place finish in the east regional was relinquished to Penn, with the
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    2005 New York Giants season

    2005 New York Giants season

    This article chronicles the New York Giants 2005 season. In the 2005 off–season the Giants acquired former Steelers' wide receiver Plaxico Burress as a free agent. Also, during the 2005 Draft, the Giants used their first pick on Louisiana St. Cornerback Corey Webster. They then used their next pick on Notre Dame Defensive End Justin Tuck. The rest of their picks included Southern Illinois Running Back Brandon Jacobs and Florida St. Defensive End Eric Moore. The Giants won their first two games of the season, against the Arizona Cardinals (42–19) and a second game at the Meadowlands against the New Orleans Saints. The game was originally slated to be a home game for the Saints but had to be moved since the city of New Orleans was still recovering from Hurricane Katrina, and the Louisiana Superdome was untenable after being used as an emergency shelter for locals displaced by the hurricane. Despite the Saints wearing their home colors and the Saints colors and logo being painted in one of the end zones, the game was a de facto home game for the Giants who won easily, 27–10. The Giants lost to the Chargers the following week, 45–23, in a game which was marked by Chargers fans booing
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    2007–08 PBA season

    2007–08 PBA season

    The 2007-08 PBA Season was the 33rd season of the Philippine Basketball Association. The season was formally opened on October 14, 2007 at the Araneta Coliseum. The league started the season with the Philippine Cup, or the traditional All-Filipino Conference, while capping off the season with the import-laiden Fiesta Conference. Renauld "Sonny" Barrios was appointed as commissioner while serving as an officer in charge of the league until a replacement for former commissioner Noli Eala will be found. The first activity of the season was the 2007 PBA Draft last August 19 at the Market Market in Taguig City. The season began on October 14 with the Magnolia Beverage Masters defeating the Air21 Express, 121-112. The muses for the participating teams are as follows: Legend: GB = games behind; PCT = winning percentage. A game was held for the benefit of the PBA Players' Educational Trust Fund at the Araneta Coliseum featuring players from UAAP archrivals Ateneo and La Salle. Studio 23 aired the event with ABS-CBN Sports producing. Legend: GB = games behind; PCT = winning percentage. The 2008 PBA All-Star Weekend was held from April 25 to April 27 at Bacolod City, Negros Occidental. The
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    2008 Philadelphia Eagles season

    2008 Philadelphia Eagles season

    The 2008 Philadelphia Eagles season was the team's 76th season as a franchise in the National Football League. The Eagles improved upon their 8–8 record and fourth-place finish in the NFC East in the 2007 season by going 9–6–1 and earning the 6th seed in the NFC Playoffs. The team lost in the Conference Championship game. 2008 was Andy Reid's tenth season as the coach of the Eagles. Despite their low-seeding in the NFC playoffs, Football Outsiders calculated that the 2008 Eagles were the best team in the league, play-for-play. Though the Eagles finished the 2007 season strong, winning their final three games, they finished 8–8 and in last place in a tough division. In the off-season, the Eagles made noise by signing star cornerback Asante Samuel from the New England Patriots on February 29, 2008, the first day that he became available. Samuel, signed to a six-year, $57 million contract, was considered the top player available in free agency, and was Philadelphia's biggest signing since Terrell Owens in 2004. The Eagles also signed defensive end Chris Clemons, and gave him a sizable signing bonus, but he struggled with injuries in the preseason, and barely made the team. Oft-injured
    7.67
    3 votes
    81
    2008–09 Chicago Bulls season

    2008–09 Chicago Bulls season

    The 2008–09 Chicago Bulls season is the 43rd season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Bulls re-signed Luol Deng to a 6 year $71 million contract on July 30, 2008. Ben Gordon signed a 1 year contract on October 2, 2008. The Bulls were having a meager year floating under .500 and on February 18, 2009 they made their first of several trades sending Andres Nocioni, Drew Gooden, Cedric Simmons, Michael Ruffin to the Sacramento Kings for Brad Miller and John Salmons. Then on February 19, 2009, the NBA trade deadline, the Bulls traded Larry Hughes to the New York Knicks for Tim Thomas, Jerome James, and Anthony Roberson. Later that day the Bulls made the third trade in a span of less than 24 hours sending swingman Thabo Sefolosha to the Oklahoma City Thunder for a 2009 first round pick. The trades brought a late-season push for the Bulls, which finally clinched a playoff berth on April 10, 2009, their fourth in the last five years. Then on April 13, 2009 they clinched the 7th place in the east by beating the Detroit Pistons and remained .5 game ahead of Philadelphia 76ers for the 6th spot with one game remaining. The Bulls though lost their last game to
    7.67
    3 votes
    82
    1882 English cricket season

    1882 English cricket season

    The 1882 English cricket season is memorable for the match which gave rise to the Ashes. Further details can be found in the articles History of Test cricket (to 1883) and The Ashes.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    1920 New York Yankees season

    1920 New York Yankees season

    The 1920 New York Yankees season was the 18th season for the Yankees in New York and their 20th overall. The team finished with a record of 95-59, just 3 games behind the American League champion Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Home games were played at the Polo Grounds. The Yankees of 1920 were the first team in the history of Major League Baseball to have an attendance of more than one million fans. The year started with a bang on January 5, when the Boston Red Sox sold their star pitcher-turned-outfielder Babe Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000. The sub-headline in The New York Times the next day read, "Highest Purchase Price in Baseball History Paid for Game's Greatest Slugger." This deal would live in infamy for generations of Boston fans, and would vault the Yankees from respectability (80 wins in 1919) to pennant contention. The Indians won the pennant despite a horrific incident at the Polo Grounds on August 16. Yankees pitcher Carl Mays, another of several ex-Red Sox players who had come the Yankees' way, used a "submarine" (underhand) pitching style. He threw one up and in on Cleveland shortstop Ray Chapman, who tended to crowd the plate and
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    1951 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1951 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1951 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 16 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 20, 1951, and ended with the championship game on March 27 at Williams Arena in Minneapolis, Minnesota. A total of 18 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp, won the national title with a 68-58 victory in the final game over Kansas State, coached by Jack Gardner. The tournament was the first to introduce a 16-team field. Only the championship and third place games were held in Minneapolis, while the semifinals were held in the respective regional sites. In this sense, the 1951 tournament did not feature a true "Final Four." This would have to wait until the 1952 tournament.
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    1978-79 QMJHL season

    1978-79 QMJHL season

    The 1978–79 QMJHL season was the tenth season in the history of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. The QMJHL unveils a new logo for its tenth anniversary, using the letters of league's French acronym shaped as an ice skate. Ten teams played 72 games each in the schedule. The Trois-Rivières Draveurs finished first overall in the regular season winning their second consecutive Jean Rougeau Trophy, and defended their President's Cup title defeating the Sherbrooke Castors in the finals. Note: GP = Games played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; Pts = Points; GF = Goals for; GA = Goals against Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalties in minutes J. F. Sauve was the leading scorer of the playoffs with 38 points (19 goals, 19 assists).
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    1980 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1980 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1980 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 48 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 6, 1980, and ended with the championship game on March 24 in Indianapolis, Indiana. A total of 48 games were played, including a national third place game. Louisville, coached by Denny Crum, won the national title with a 59-54 victory in the final game over UCLA, coached by Larry Brown. Darrell Griffith of Louisville was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Structurally speaking, this was the first tournament of the modern era. For the first time: 1. An unlimited number of at-large teams could come from any conference (From 1975-1979, conferences were only allowed one at-large entry). 2. The bracket was seeded to make each region as evenly competitive as possible (previously, geographic considerations had trumped this). 3. All teams were seeded solely based on the subjective judgment of the committee (in 1979, seeding was also partially based on the prior performance of a conference winner's conference). In the second year the tournament field was seeded, no number one
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 18, 1993, and ended with the championship game on April 5 in New Orleans, Louisiana. A total of 63 games were played. North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith, won the national title with a 77–71 victory in the final game over Michigan, coached by Steve Fisher. Donald Williams of North Carolina was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The most memorable play in the championship game came in the last seconds as Michigan's Chris Webber tried to call a timeout when double-teamed by North Carolina. Michigan had already used all of its timeouts, so Webber's gaffe resulted in a technical foul. Michigan subsequently vacated its entire 1992-93 schedule, including its six NCAA Tournament games, after it emerged that Webber had received under-the-table payments from a booster. In a game that featured two great individual battles (one between Jason Kidd and Bobby Hurley, and the other between Lamond Murray and Grant Hill), two time defending champion Duke was upset in the second
    10.00
    1 votes
    88
    1994 San Francisco 49ers season

    1994 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1994 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 49th season in the National Football League, and was highlighted by a victory in Super Bowl XXIX. The championship made San Francisco the first team to win five Super Bowls. After losing to the Dallas Cowboys in the previous two conference championship games, the 49ers made significant acquisitions in the 1994 free agent market. This included the signing of two-sport star Deion Sanders and Cowboys linebacker Ken Norton, Jr.. Sanders had a major impact on the team's success, winning the NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award and recording six interceptions. Quarterback Steve Young had his best NFL season and won his second MVP award. Steve Young set what was, at the time, the NFL record for highest passer rating in a season -- 112.8. Cold Hard Football Facts states that Young's 1994 season is the second greatest passing season in NFL history. For the third consecutive season, the 49ers met the Cowboys in the NFC Championship Game. From the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s, the AFC was widely regarded as the NFL's inferior conference. Thus, this meeting between the NFC's perennial powerhouses was dubbed by many as "the real Super Bowl."
    10.00
    1 votes
    89
    2006 NCAA Division I-A football season

    2006 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2006 NCAA Division I FBS football season, or the college football season, began on August 31, 2006 and, aside from all-star exhibition games that followed, concluded with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game on January 8, 2007 in Glendale, Arizona, where the No. 2 Florida Gators defeated the No. 1 Ohio State Buckeyes 41–14 to win the 2006 BCS National Championship. Many publications release their predictions of the number one team prior to the beginning of the season. Following is a list of some publications' No. 1 pick. There are several rules that have changed for the 2006 season. Following are some highlights: For the ninth year, the Bowl Championship Series selected the No. 1 and No. 2 teams to play in the championship game on January 8. The year 2006 marked a change for the BCS, as the added National Championship Game began as a separate entity, played after the other bowls. Rotating between the four sites, just like the old format of the National Championship, the first BCS Championship game was played in Tempe, Arizona, the week after the Fiesta Bowl had been played there, and was telecast on FOX. Ohio State was ranked No. 1 in all of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    90
    1941–42 in Scottish football

    1941–42 in Scottish football

    The 1941–42 season was the third season of special wartime football in Scotland during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in Scotland. Many footballers signed up to fight in the war and as a result many teams were depleted, and fielded guest players instead. The Scottish Football League and Scottish Cup were suspended and in their place regional league competitions were set up. Appearances in these tournaments do not count in players' official records. League competition was split into two regional leagues, the Southern League and the North-Eastern League. No country-wide cup competition took place, the Glasgow Cup continued and Southern and North-Eastern League Cups were competed for, the Southern League Cup would later form the basis of the League Cup. Due to the war official international football was suspended and so officially the Scotland team was inactive. However unofficial internationals featuring scratch teams representing Scotland continued. Appearances in these matches are not, however, included in a players total international caps. Scotland faced England in a wartime international on 4 October 1941 at Wembley Stadium in front
    6.50
    4 votes
    91
    1942–43 in Scottish football

    1942–43 in Scottish football

    The 1942–43 season was the fourth season of special wartime football in Scotland during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in Scotland. Many footballers signed up to fight in the war and as a result many teams were depleted, and fielded guest players instead. The Scottish Football League and Scottish Cup were suspended and in their place regional league competitions were set up. Appearances in these tournaments do not count in players' official records. League competition was split into two regional leagues, the Southern League and the North-Eastern League. No country-wide cup competition took place, the Glasgow Cup continued and Southern and North-Eastern League Cups were competed for, the Southern League Cup would later form the basis of the League Cup. Due to the war official international football was suspended and so officially the Scotland team was inactive. However unofficial internationals featuring scratch teams representing Scotland continued. Appearances in these matches are not, however, included in a players total international caps. Scotland faced England in a wartime international on 10 October 1942 at Wembley Stadium in
    6.50
    4 votes
    92
    1951 San Francisco 49ers season

    1951 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1951 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's second season in the NFL, and were coming off a 3-9-0 record in 1950. The 49ers would win their first ever road game on October 14 against the Pittsburgh Steelers after losing their first 7 in team history. The Niners would be in playoff contention all year long, finishing 7-4-1, just a half game out of first place in the National Conference. Their biggest win of the season was a 44-17 victory over their Californian rivals, the Los Angeles Rams. Frankie Albert and Y.A. Tittle would split time at quarterback, with Albert throwing for 1116 yards, while Tittle would lead the club with 8 TD's and completing 55.3% of his passes. Joe Perry would once again lead the team in rushing, with 677 yards, and add 3 TD's, and wide receiver Gordie Soltau would lead the club with 59 completions for 826 yards and 7 TD's. San Francisco's players selected for the Pro Bowl:
    6.50
    4 votes
    93
    1991 San Francisco 49ers season

    1991 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1991 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 42nd year with the National Football League. The franchise did not qualify for the postseason for the first time since the strike-shortened 1982 season. Joe Montana would miss the entire season with an elbow injury, paving the way for Steve Young to take over as the team's starting quarterback. Following the 1990 season, the 49ers left team stalwarts Roger Craig and Ronnie Lott unprotected and allowed them go to the Los Angeles Raiders via Plan B free agency. In 1991, the 49ers announced a prototype for a new logo and helmet design. Instead of the traditional "SF" oval, this new logo featured a stylized "49ers" in white with black and red shadows. However, fan reaction was so overwhelmingly negative that the idea was scrapped the next day. The only change to the uniform would be the switching from red socks with three white stripes to plain solid red socks. With Joe Montana out for the season with an elbow injury, Steve Young became the starting quarterback. The season opener, a rematch of the previous year's NFC Championship with the New York Giants, was the first loss suffered by the 49ers in a road game in nearly 3 years,
    6.50
    4 votes
    94
    1923 VFL season

    1923 VFL season

    Results and statistics for the Victorian Football League season of 1923. In 1923, the VFL competition had nine teams of 18 on-the-field players each, with no "reserves", although any of the 18 players who had left the playing field for any reason could later resume their place on the field at any time during the match. Each team played each other twice in a home-and-away season of 18 rounds (i.e., 16 matches and 2 byes). Once the 18 round home-and-away season had finished, the 1923 VFL Premiers were determined by the specific format and conventions of the amended "Argus system".
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    1991 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1991 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1991 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 14, 1991, and ended with the championship game on April 1 in Indianapolis, Indiana. A total of 63 games were played. Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski, won a rematch of the previous year's national final matchup against undefeated UNLV 79-77 in the semifinal, then won the national title with a 72–65 victory in the final game over Kansas, coached by Roy Williams. This was the first National Championship game for Williams as a head coach. Kansas defeated Williams' mentor Dean Smith and North Carolina in the semifinal. Kansas made its first trip to the National Championship game since 1988 when they defeated Oklahoma, making it their second trip to the Championship game in four seasons. Christian Laettner of Duke was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament adopted the NBA's 10ths-second timer during the final minute of each period in all arenas. For the first time, CBS Sports showed all 63 tournament games. In the first three rounds, games were shown on a
    8.50
    2 votes
    96
    1992 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1992 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1992 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 19, 1992, and ended with the championship game on April 6 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. A total of 63 games were played. Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski, defeated the Michigan Wolverines, coached by Steve Fisher, 71–51 to claim their second consecutive national championship. Bobby Hurley of Duke was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Michigan subsequently vacated its final two tournament games as part of the University of Michigan basketball scandal. This tournament is best remembered for the East regional final pitting Duke and Kentucky at The Spectrum in Philadelphia. With 2.1 seconds remaining in overtime, Duke trailed 103–102. Grant Hill threw a pass the length of the court to Christian Laettner, who dribbled once, turned, and hit a jumper as time expired for the 104-103 win. Sports Illustrated deemed it the greatest college basketball game of all time , and ESPN included it as number 17 on its list of top 100 sports moments of the past 25 years (see ESPN25). It is
    8.50
    2 votes
    97
    2001 New York Yankees season

    2001 New York Yankees season

    The New York Yankees' 2001 season was the 99th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 95-65 finishing 13.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. Roger Clemens had sixteen straight wins, tying an American League mark shared by Walter Johnson, Lefty Grove, Schoolboy Rowe, and Smoky Joe Wood. Clemens would finish the season with the AL Cy Young Award and become the first pitcher to win six Cy Young Awards. Another chapter was written in the story of the Yankee-Red Sox rivalry. On September 2, 2001, Mike Mussina came within one strike of a perfect game before surrendering a bloop single to Carl Everett. This was Mussina's third time he has taken a perfect game to or beyond the 8th inning. Coincidentally, it would have been the 3rd perfect game in for the Yankees in a span of 4 seasons and could have been the 4th perfect game in franchise history. In the emotional times of October 2001 in New York City, following the September 11 attack on New York's World Trade Center, the Yankees defeated the Oakland A's three games to two in the ALDS, and then the Seattle Mariners, who had won 116 games, four
    8.50
    2 votes
    98
    1981 San Francisco 49ers season

    1981 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1981 San Francisco 49ers season was their 32nd season in the National Football League. Under third-year head coach Bill Walsh, the team finished the regular season with a 13–3 record.The season would be one of the franchise's most successful seasons to that point. The 49ers won Super Bowl XVI by defeating the AFC Champion Cincinnati Bengals. It was the first of five Super Bowl victories in franchise history. Quarterback Joe Montana began the 1981 season as San Francisco's starting quarterback. Montana produced two fourth-quarter comeback victories. Montana's signature game of the season was the NFC Championship Game, which culminated in "The Catch," a last-minute touchdown pass from Montana to Dwight Clark, propelling the 49ers to victory over Dallas, and a berth in their first Super Bowl. A turning point for the franchise was the drafting of safety Ronnie Lott from the University of Southern California. Lott would be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. With the offense in good shape, Walsh and the 49ers focused on overhauling the defense in 1981. Walsh took the highly unusual step of overhauling his entire secondary with rookies and untested players, bringing on board
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    2001 NCAA Division I-A football season

    2001 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the University of Miami winning the national title for the fifth time. The Hurricanes were led by Larry Coker, who was in his first year as head coach after five years as Miami's offensive coordinator under Butch Davis. Coker had the benefit of inheriting a star-studded program that Davis had rebuilt in the aftermath of NCAA sanctions in the mid-to-late 90s. Miami completed a perfect 12-0 season, which culminated in a 37-14 win over Nebraska in the Rose Bowl BCS National Championship Game. In yet another controversial season for the BCS, #4 Nebraska was chosen as the national title opponent despite not having even played in the Big 12 championship game. The Huskers went into their last regularly scheduled game at Colorado undefeated, but left Boulder having lost the game by a score of 62-36. The Buffaloes went on to win the Big 12 championship game. However, the BCS computers didn't take into account time of loss, so one-loss Nebraska came out ahead of two-loss #3 Colorado and one-loss, #2 Oregon. Some fans chanted "number 4" at the title game held at the Rose Bowl. Florida State did not win the ACC championship for the first
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    2007 San Francisco 49ers season

    2007 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 2007 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 62nd season. They ended their season with a disappointing record of 5-11 in 2007, failing to improve upon their 7-9 record from 2006. The 49ers offense struggled all season long as offensive coordinator Jim Hostler was subject to much scrutiny and criticism regarding his playcalling and starting quarterback Alex Smith injured his shoulder early in the season. Head coach Mike Nolan entered his third year with the 49ers. After a late coaching change in which offensive coordinator Norv Turner was hired by the San Diego Chargers to become their new head coach, the 49ers were forced to replace him with an in-house assistant coach. Quarterbacks coach Jim Hostler was promoted to offensive coordinator marking the third offensive coordinator in three seasons for Nolan. Nolan was also joined by defensive coordinator Greg Manusky and special teams coordinator Al Everest. The 49ers addressed their problems in the secondary with the signing of veteran cornerback Nate Clements from the Buffalo Bills. The contract was worth $80 million for 8 years, the largest contract given to a defensive player in NFL history. They also signed strong
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    UEFA Champions League 2010–11

    UEFA Champions League 2010–11

    • Championship: 2011 UEFA Champions League Final
    The 2010–11 UEFA Champions League was the 56th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 19th under the current UEFA Champions League format. The final was held at Wembley Stadium in London on 28 May 2011, where Barcelona defeated Manchester United 3–1. Internazionale were the defending champions, but were eliminated by Schalke 04 in the quarter-finals. The winner - Barcelona, earned a berth to the 2011 UEFA Super Cup and 2011 FIFA Club World Cup. A total of 76 teams participated in the 2010–11 Champions League, from 52 UEFA associations (Liechtenstein organises no domestic league competition). Associations were allocated places according to their 2009 UEFA league coefficient, which took into account their performance in European competitions from 2004–05 to 2008–09. Inter Milan were the defending champions but were knocked out by Schalke 04 after losing 7-3 Below is the qualification scheme for the 2010–11 UEFA Champions League: Since the winners of the 2009–10 UEFA Champions League, Internazionale, obtained a place in the group stage through their domestic league placing, the reserved title holder spot in the group stage was effectively
    7.33
    3 votes
    102
    6.25
    4 votes
    103
    1959 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1959 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1959 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 7, 1959, and ended with the championship game on March 21 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 27 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. California, coached by Pete Newell, won the national title with a 71-70 victory in the final game over West Virginia, coached by Fred Schaus. Jerry West of West Virginia was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.25
    4 votes
    104
    1961 New York Yankees season

    1961 New York Yankees season

    The 1961 New York Yankees season was the 59th season for the team in New York, and its 61st season overall. The team finished with a record of 109-53, eight games ahead of the Detroit Tigers, and won their 26th American League pennant. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Cincinnati Reds in 5 games. The 1961 Yankees are often mentioned as a candidate for the unofficial title of greatest baseball team in history. The 1961 season was notable for the race between center fielder Mickey Mantle and right fielder Roger Maris to break Babe Ruth's record of 60 home runs in a season (set in 1927). Maris eventually broke the record, hitting his 61st home run on October 1, the season's final day. During the season, Maris had seven multi-home run games; in a doubleheader against the Chicago White Sox, he hit four home runs. Nineteen sixty-one was an expansion year, with the American League increasing from eight to ten teams, the first expansion in the 61-year history of the league. The old schedule of 154 games (seven opponents multiplied by 22 games apiece) was replaced by 162 games (nine opponents
    6.25
    4 votes
    105
    2000 San Francisco Giants season

    2000 San Francisco Giants season

    The San Francisco Giants, an American baseball team, won the National League West Championship. The team played their first season in newly opened Pacific Bell Park. Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In New York wins series, 3-1.
    6.25
    4 votes
    106
    1972 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1972 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1972 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA University Division (the predecessor to today's Division I) college basketball. It began on March 11, 1972, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in Los Angeles, California. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 81–76 victory in the final game over Florida State, coached by Hugh Durham. Bill Walton of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. In a historically significant note, the University of Southwestern Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns made the tournament in their first season of eligibility for postseason play. No school would repeat this feat in the men's tournament until North Dakota State in 2009. Southwestern Louisiana also made the tournament in 1973, but due to major infractions that resulted in the basketball program receiving the NCAA death penalty both appearances have since been vacated and the records expunged.
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    1984 San Francisco 49ers season

    1984 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1984 San Francisco 49ers season was their 39th season in the National Football League. The season was highlighted by their second Super Bowl victory. The franchise had their best season ever with a record of 15 wins and only 1 loss. Quarterback Joe Montana would be awarded the Super Bowl’s Most Valuable Player Award for the second time in his career, joining Bart Starr and Terry Bradshaw as the only two time MVP’s. The 1984 49ers were the first team to win fifteen games in the NFL's regular season. The 49ers advanced to their second Super Bowl in team history after becoming the first team ever to win 15 regular season games since the league expanded to a 16-game schedule in 1978. Much of the hype surrounding the team was their offense, which boasted 5 Pro Bowlers. Quarterback Joe Montana recorded 279 out of 432 completions for 3,630 yards, 28 touchdowns, and only 10 interceptions. Running back Roger Craig was one of the 49ers' major weapons, both rushing and receiving. Craig was the team's second leading rusher with 649 rushing yards and 7 touchdowns, and also caught 71 passes for 675 yards. Pro Bowl running back Wendell Tyler, who had rushed for a team record 1,262 yards
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    2003 NCAA Division I-A football season

    2003 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with an abundance of controversy, resulting in a split national championship. This was the first split title since the inception of the BCS, something the BCS intended to eliminate. At season's end, three major conference teams finished the regular season with one loss, with only two spots available in the BCS National Championship Game. Three non-BCS teams also finished with one loss, TCU, Boise State and Miami (OH), stirring the debate of the BCS being unfair to mid-major teams. USC had lost a triple overtime thriller at California on September 27, LSU lost at home to Florida on October 11, and Oklahoma, which had been #1 in every BCS rating, AP and Coaches' Poll of the season, lost to Kansas State in the Big 12 Championship Game, 35-7 on December 6. Although USC, then 11-1, finished ranked #1 in both the AP and Coaches' Polls, with LSU (12-1) ranked #2 and Oklahoma (12-1) #3, Oklahoma surpassed both USC and LSU on several BCS computer factors. Oklahoma's schedule strength was ranked 11th to LSU's 29th and USC's 37th. Oklahoma's schedule rank was 0.44 to LSU's 1.16 and USC's 1.48. As such, despite the timing of Oklahoma's loss
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    2009 Philadelphia Eagles season

    2009 Philadelphia Eagles season

    The 2009 Philadelphia Eagles season was the 77th season for the team in the National Football League. After advancing to their fifth NFC Championship game in eight years, the Eagles improved upon their 9–6–1 record and second-place finish in the NFC East in their 2008 campaign. For head coach Andy Reid, this is his 11th season as the coach of the Eagles. RFA: Restricted free-agent, UFA: Unrestricted free-agent, ERFA: Exclusive rights free agent The Eagles began their season at Bank of America Stadium for a Week 1 duel with the Carolina Panthers. Philadelphia trailed early in the first quarter as Panthers running back DeAngelo Williams ran 11 yards for a Carolina touchdown on their first drive. The Eagles would answer with a 49-yard field goal from kicker David Akers. In the second quarter, Philadelphia exploded with points as defensive end Victor Abiamiri returned a fumble 2 yards for a touchdown, wide receiver DeSean Jackson returned a punt 85 yards for a touchdown, and quarterback Donovan McNabb completed a 9-yard TD pass to tight end Brent Celek and a 4-yard touchdown pass to running back Brian Westbrook. Carolina would end the period with kicker John Kasay booting a 22-yard
    7.00
    3 votes
    110
    1944–45 in Scottish football

    1944–45 in Scottish football

    The 1944–45 season was the sixth season of special wartime football in Scotland during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in Scotland. Many footballers signed up to fight in the war and as a result many teams were depleted, and fielded guest players instead. The Scottish Football League and Scottish Cup were suspended and in their place regional league competitions were set up. Appearances in these tournaments do not count in players' official records. League competition was split into two regional leagues, the Southern League and the North-Eastern League. No country-wide cup competition took place, the Glasgow Cup continued and Southern and North-Eastern League Cups were competed for, the Southern League Cup would later form the basis of the League Cup. Due to the war official international football was suspended and so officially the Scotland team was inactive. However unofficial internationals featuring scratch teams representing Scotland continued. Appearances in these matches are not, however, included in a players total international caps. Scotland faced England in a wartime international on October 14 1944 at Wembley in front of
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    1940 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1940 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1940 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the participating champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 20, 1940, and ended with the championship game on March 30 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 8 games were played, including a single third place game in the West region. Indiana, coached by Branch McCracken, won the tournament title with a 60-42 victory in the final game over Kansas, coached by Phog Allen. Marvin Huffman of Indiana was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season

    2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season

    The 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season, or the college football season, began on August 30, 2007, progressed through the regular season and bowl season, and (aside from all-star exhibition games that followed) concluded with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game in New Orleans, Louisiana on January 7, 2008, where the top ranked Ohio State Buckeyes were defeated by the second ranked Louisiana State University Tigers, who became the BCS National Champions and undisputed national champions (topping all the major year-end football polls). For the first time since 2003, and only the second time in BCS history, no teams finished the season undefeated. Only one conference change in 2007, Temple left the Independent ranks to become the 13th member of the MAC. Many publications release their predictions of the top teams prior to the beginning of the season. For 2007, numerous publications chose the University of Southern California as the top ranked team. These included; Real Football 365, ESPN, Rivals.com College Football News. They were also ranked first in the Coaches Poll and AP Poll. The Coaches' Poll plays an important part in the season because the final
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    1968 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1968 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1968 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1968, and ended with the championship game on March 23 in Los Angeles, California. A total of 27 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 78-55 victory in the final game over North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith. Lew Alcindor of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This UCLA team, composed of three All-Americans, Player of the Year Alcindor, Lucius Allen, and Mike Warren, along with dead eye pure shooter Lynn Shackleford (most of his shots would be 3 pointers today) and burly senior power forward Mike Lynn is considered to be the greatest men's team in college basketball history. The NCAA semi-final match between the Houston Cougars and UCLA Bruins was a re-match of the college basketball Game of the Century held in January at the Astrodome, in the Cougars home city. The match was historic, the first nationally syndicated college basketball
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    1973 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1973 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1973 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA University Division (the predecessor to today's Division I, which would be created later in 1973) college basketball. It began on March 10, 1973, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in St. Louis, Missouri. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 87–66 victory in the final game over Memphis State, coached by Gene Bartow. This gave UCLA their 7th consecutive title. Bill Walton of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This year's Final Four marked the first time the championship game was televised on a Monday night in prime time, a practice which continues as of 2012. The UCLA - Memphis State championship game made USA Today's list of the greatest NCAA tournament games of all time at #18. Bill Walton set a championship game record, hitting 21 of 22 shots and scoring 44 points. The 1973 NC State Wolfpack team averaged 93 ppg, led the nation in win margin (21.8 ppg), and
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    1990 New York Yankees season

    1990 New York Yankees season

    The New York Yankees' 1990 season was the 88th season for the Yankees. The team finished in seventh place in the American League East with a record of 67-95, finishing 21 games behind the Boston Red Sox. It was the Yankees' first last-place finish in 24 years, and the first in the two-division era. New York was managed by Stump Merrill and Bucky Dent. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. Multi-time former Yankees manager Billy Martin was working as a special consultant to Yankees owner George Steinbrenner when he was killed in a one-car crash in Binghamton, New York, on Christmas Day (December 25) in 1989. Martin had been drinking heavily with his friend, William Reedy, who was driving a pickup truck at the time of the accident. When Martin was killed, the media reported that he was a passenger in Reedy's pickup. However, Peter Golenbock, in his book Wild, High, and Tight: The Life and Death of Billy Martin, makes the case that Martin was the driver and that his wife and Reedy covered up the truth. According to the HBO TV series Autopsy, forensic pathologist Dr. Michael Baden performed the autopsy on Martin and investigated the accident scene, including the pick-up truck in which
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    2005 New England Patriots season

    2005 New England Patriots season

    The 2005 New England Patriots season was the 36th season for the team in the National Football League and 46th season overall. They finished with a 10–6 record and the division title before losing in the playoffs to the Denver Broncos. Two weeks after earning a victory in Super Bowl XXXIX, linebacker Tedy Bruschi suffered a stroke and initially planned on missing the entire season; Bruschi returned to the field against the Buffalo Bills on October 30. Cornerback Ty Law was released in the offseason, and injuries at cornerback, as well as a season-ending injury to safety Rodney Harrison in Week 3, forced the Patriots to start a number of players in the secondary early in the season. Overall, injuries caused the Patriots to start 45 different players at one point or another during the season, an NFL record for a division champion (breaking the record of 42 set by the Patriots in 2003). Beginning the season with a 4–4 record, the Patriots lost their first game at home since 2002 against the San Diego Chargers in Week 4. The team ended the season on a 5–1 run to finish 10–6, earning their third straight AFC East title. With the fourth seed in the AFC playoffs, the Patriots defeated the
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    2009–10 Los Angeles Lakers season

    2009–10 Los Angeles Lakers season

    The 2009–10 Los Angeles Lakers season is the 64th season of the franchise, 62nd in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and 50th in Los Angeles. Coming off a championship in 2009, the Lakers successfully defended their title. They spent the most money of any team on player salaries this season, totaling $112.7 million ($91.3 million on player salaries and $21.4 million on luxury tax). The Lakers once again sold out all 41 home games for the season at Staples Center. The Lakers clinched the Pacific Division for the 31st time in franchise history. Despite winning eight games less than the previous season, they still held the top seed in the Western Conference playoffs and made it to the NBA Finals for the third straight season. In the 2010 NBA Finals the Lakers defeated the Boston Celtics in a rematch of the 2008 NBA Finals won by the Celtics. This time, the Lakers won the series 4-3 for their 16th NBA title and handed Boston its first Game 7 loss in an NBA Finals in team history. Kobe Bryant won his second consecutive NBA Finals MVP. On July 14, 2009, Phil Jackson won the 2010 ESPY Awards for Best Coach/Manager while Kobe Bryant won for Best NBA Player. The Lakers came into
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    1896 Chicago Colts season

    1896 Chicago Colts season

    Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    1986 New York Mets season

    1986 New York Mets season

    The 1986 New York Mets season was the Mets' 25th season in the National League. They began the season looking to equal or improve upon their 98–64 record from 1985 and to try to win the National League East Division. They finished the season with a franchise record 108–54 record, giving them the division title. They went on to defeat the Houston Astros in six games in the NLCS and the American League champion Boston Red Sox in seven games in the World Series. This is their last championship to date. Darryl Strawberry made his debut in 1983, followed by Dwight Gooden, Ron Darling, Sid Fernandez and Lenny Dykstra in 1984. That was the year that the Mets hired Davey Johnson to manage the ballclub. The Mets would finish in 2nd-place for two years in a row. In the 1985-86 offseason, general manager Frank Cashen brought in Tim Teufel, a right-handed hitting infielder from the Minnesota Twins and Bob Ojeda, a left-handed pitcher from the Boston Red Sox. The Mets added them to an existing veteran core including along with former MVPs George Foster and Keith Hernandez, veteran catcher Gary Carter and speedsters Wally Backman and Mookie Wilson. In their Spring Training, Davey Johnson said,
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    1989 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1989 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1989 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 16, 1989, and ended with the championship game on April 3 in Seattle, Washington. A total of 63 games were played. Michigan, coached by Steve Fisher, won the national title with a 80–79 overtime victory in the final game over Seton Hall, coached by P.J. Carlesimo. Glen Rice of Michigan set an NCAA tournament record by scoring 184 points in six games and was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Just prior to the start of this tournament, Michigan coach Bill Frieder had announced that he would accept the head coaching position at Arizona State University at the end of the season. Michigan athletic director Bo Schembechler promptly fired Frieder and appointed top assistant Fisher as interim coach, stating, famously, that "a Michigan man is going to coach a Michigan team." Two 16-seeded teams came within one point of victory in the first round, and a third came with six points. This tournament was also unusual in that all four 11-seeds advanced out of the first round. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    121
    1997 Boston Red Sox season

    1997 Boston Red Sox season

    The 1997 Boston Red Sox season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Red Sox finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 78 wins and 84 losses. This was the last time Boston had a losing regular season record until 2012. Wally the Green Monster is the official mascot for the Boston Red Sox. His name is derived from the Green Monster nickname of the 37-foot wall in left field at Fenway Park. Wally debuted in 1997 to the chagrin of many older Red Sox fans. Although he was a hit with children, the older fans did not immediately adopt him as part of the franchise. According to the Red Sox promotions department, Wally was a huge Red Sox fan who decided to move inside the left field wall of Fenway Park since it "eats up" hits that would easily be home runs at other parks in 1947. Apparently, he was very shy and lived the life of a hermit for 50 years. On the 50th anniversary of the Green Monster in 1997, he came out of the manual scoreboard and has been interacting with players and fans ever since. Thanks to former Red Sox second baseman and current broadcaster Jerry Remy, those older fans have adored him. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At Bats;
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    2003 Tennessee Titans season

    2003 Tennessee Titans season

    The 2003 Tennessee Titans season was the team's 44th season and their 34th in the National Football League. At 12–4 the Titans posted the 15th season with at least ten wins in the franchise's history dating to their Houston Oilers days. Quarterback Steve McNair threw for 3,215 yards and 24 touchdowns to just seven interceptions; he also rushed for 138 yards and four touchdowns, all despite missing two games to injury, and was named the NFL's co-MVP with Peyton Manning of the Titans' division arch-rival Indianapolis Colts. Eddie George rushed for 1,031 yards and five touchdowns while Derrick Mason had 1,303 receiving yards and eight touchdowns. Justin McCareins had 586 punt/kick return yards and a return touchdown. In a rematch of the 2002 AFC Title Game the Titans got a measure of revenge in a game that featured 28 combined penalties (17 by the notoriously penalty-prone Raiders). The Titans took an early 9–3 lead on a Tyrone Calico touchdown catch (with a missed PAT) and 50-yard field goal from ex-Raider Joe Nedney while the kicker who replaced Nedney in Oakland, Sebastian Janikowski, drilled a 47-yarder in the first quarter. Nedney himself was injured during the game, so Craig
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    2008 Major League Baseball season

    2008 Major League Baseball season

    • Championship: 2008 American League Championship Series
    The 2008 Major League Baseball season began on March 25, 2008 in Tokyo, Japan with the 2007 World Series champion Boston Red Sox defeating the Oakland Athletics at the Tokyo Dome 6–5 (in 10 innings) in the first game of a two-game series, and ended on September 30 with the host Chicago White Sox defeating the Minnesota Twins in a one-game playoff to win the AL Central division. The Civil Rights Game, an exhibition, in Memphis, Tennessee took place March 29 when the New York Mets beat the Chicago White Sox, 3–2. The All-Star Game was played on July 15 at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, New York City, with the AL winning 4 to 3 in 15 innings. For the eighth straight season, a defending World Champion – the Boston Red Sox – failed to defend their championship. The Philadelphia Phillies won the World Series 4 games to 1 over the Tampa Bay Rays. This was Philadelphia's second championship, and also the first World Series appearance for the Rays. Note: Major League Baseball's playoff format automatically seeds the Wild Card team 4th. Normally, the No. 1 seed plays the No. 4 seed in the Division Series. However, MLB does not allow the No. 1 seed to play the 4th seed/Wild Card winner in the
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    UEFA Champions League 2009–10

    UEFA Champions League 2009–10

    • Championship: 2010 UEFA Champions League Final
    The 2009–10 UEFA Champions League was the 55th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 18th under the current UEFA Champions League format. The final was played on 22 May 2010, at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, home ground of Real Madrid, in Madrid, Spain. The final was won by Italian club Internazionale, who beat German side Bayern Munich 2–0. Internazionale went on to represent Europe in the 2010 FIFA Club World Cup, beating Congolese side TP Mazembe 3–0 in the final, and played in the 2010 UEFA Super Cup against Europa League winners Atlético Madrid, losing 2–0. Barcelona were the defending champions, but were eliminated by eventual winners Internazionale in the semi-finals. A total of 76 teams participated in the 2009–10 Champions League, from 52 UEFA associations (Liechtenstein organises no domestic league competition). Associations are allocated places according to their 2008 UEFA league coefficient, which takes into account their performance in European competitions from 2003–04 to 2007–08. Below is the qualification scheme for the 2009–10 UEFA Champions League: Since the winners of the 2008–09 UEFA Champions League, Barcelona, obtained
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    1907 Boston Americans season

    1907 Boston Americans season

    The 1907 Boston Americans season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Americans finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 59 wins and 90 losses. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    1943–44 in Scottish football

    1943–44 in Scottish football

    The 1943–44 season was the fifth season of special wartime football in Scotland during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in Scotland. Many footballers signed up to fight in the war and as a result many teams were depleted, and fielded guest players instead. The Scottish Football League and Scottish Cup were suspended and in their place regional league competitions were set up. Appearances in these tournaments do not count in players' official records. League competition was split into two regional leagues, the Southern League and the North-Eastern League. No country-wide cup competition took place, the Glasgow Cup continued and Southern and North-Eastern League Cups were competed for, the Southern League Cup would later form the basis of the League Cup. Due to the war official international football was suspended and so officially the Scotland team was inactive. However unofficial internationals featuring scratch teams representing Scotland continued. Appearances in these matches are not, however, included in a players total international caps. Scotland faced England in a wartime international on 16 October 1943 at Maine Road, Manchester
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    1958 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1958 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1958 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 24 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 11, 1958, and ended with the championship game on March 22 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 28 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp, won the national title with a 84-72 victory in the final game over Seattle, coached by John Castellani. Elgin Baylor of Seattle was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    1963 New York Mets season

    1963 New York Mets season

    The 1963 New York Mets season was the second regular season for the Mets. They went 51-111 and finished 10th in the NL, 48 games behind the World Series Champion Los Angeles Dodgers. They were managed by Casey Stengel. They played their home games at the Polo Grounds, the second and final season there for the Mets before moving to Shea Stadium the following season. On June 14, Duke Snider of the Mets hit his 400th home run against the Cincinnati Reds. The opposing pitcher was Bob Purkey. The homer came in the 6,783rd at bat of his career. Snider became the ninth player to reach 400 homers. Along with Eddie Mathews, Snider became part of the first duo to reach the 400-plateau in the same season. Afterwards, Mets outfielder Jimmy Piersall told Snider that he could get more publicity for his 100th home run. Nine days later, on June 23, Piersall ran the bases backward after hitting the 100th home run of his career off Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Dallas Green. He was released by the Mets one month later, with that home run being the only one he hit in a Mets uniform. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    1976 New York Yankees season

    1976 New York Yankees season

    The 1976 New York Yankees season was the 74th season for the Yankees in New York, and the 76th season overall for the franchise. The team finished with a record of 97-62, finishing 10½ games ahead of the Baltimore Orioles to win their first American League East title. In the ALCS, the Yankees defeated the Kansas City Royals in 5 games. Chris Chambliss's walk-off home run in Game 5 clinched the pennant for the Yankees. In the World Series, they were defeated in a four-game sweep by the defending champion Cincinnati Reds, marking only the second time that the Yankees had ever been swept in a World Series in their history (following the 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers). New York was managed by Billy Martin. The Yankees returned to the newly-renovated Yankee Stadium. The Yankees returned to their home stadium in The Bronx after a two-year absence. The team had played home games at Shea Stadium in Queens, the home of the New York Mets, while renovations to Yankee Stadium were completed. The 1975 club had finished in third place in the AL East with a record of 83-79, finishing 12 games behind the division winning Boston Red Sox. The club was beginning their first full season under manager Billy
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    1977 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1977 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1977 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 American schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the National Champion of Men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1977, and ended with the championship game on March 28 in Atlanta, Georgia. A total of 32 games were played, including a national third place game. This was the final tournament in which teams were not seeded. Marquette, coached by Al McGuire, won the national title with a 67–59 victory in the final game over North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith. Butch Lee of Marquette was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Publicly announcing his retirement during the middle of the season, McGuire retired as head coach immediately after the game. UNLV and Charlotte (at that time known by a longer abbreviation of its full name, UNC Charlotte) were third and fourth place, respectively. Cole Field House - College Park, Maryland Marriott Center - Provo, Utah Rupp Arena - Lexington, Kentucky Myriad Convention Center - Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Omni Coliseum - Atlanta, Georgia
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    1980 Philadelphia Eagles season

    1980 Philadelphia Eagles season

    The 1980 Philadelphia Eagles season resulted in an appearance in the Super Bowl. After going 11–5 in the 1979 season and making the playoffs again as a wildcard team, the Eagles found themselves looking to improve through the NFL Draft again. The 1980 NFL Draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 29–30, 1979. As was started with the 1977 NFL Draft, this would be 12 rounds. ESPN would cover all 12 rounds live for the first time. This would be over 2 days. The Philadelphia Eagles would get the 23rd to the 25th pick in the 12 rounds. The Eagles would draft 10 players in the this year's draft. The draft began with first overall pick of 1978 Heisman Trophy winner, as a Jr. in college, Billy Sims, Running Back from University of Oklahoma, by the Detroit Lions. The table shows the Eagles selections and what picks they had that were traded away and the team that ended up with that pick. It is possible the Eagles' pick ended up with this team via another trade the Eagles made. Not shown are acquired picks that the Eagles traded
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    1999 Dallas Cowboys season

    1999 Dallas Cowboys season

    The 1999 Dallas Cowboys season would mark their 40th in the NFL. The season would begin at Washington with a dramatic come-from-behind victory over the hated division rival Washington Redskins. After trailing by three touchdowns in the second half, free agent acquisition Rocket Ismail would pay immediate dividends for the team by hauling in the winning touchdown catch in overtime while Troy Aikman would throw for a franchise record five touchdowns in a single game (since matched by Tony Romo). The team would start out strong with a 3–0 record, but a week 4 injury to wide receiver Michael Irvin against the Philadelphia Eagles eventually forced him into retirement. Afterwards, Dallas would struggle down the stretch as age and injury would begin to take its toll. The team would again make the playoffs despite an 8–8 season, but would lose once more in the first round to the Minnesota Vikings. Despite leading the team to consecutive playoff berths and seemingly re-igniting the Dallas offense, owner Jerry Jones would fire head coach Chan Gailey after the season. Notable additions to the team was fan favorite linebacker Dat Nguyen, the only (to date) Vietnamese-American to play in the
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    2003–04 Los Angeles Lakers season

    2003–04 Los Angeles Lakers season

    The 2003-2004 Los Angeles Lakers reached the 2004 NBA Finals, losing in 5 games to the Detroit Pistons. Template:2003-04 NBA West standings (2) Los Angeles Lakers vs. (7) Houston Rockets: Lakers win series 4–1 Last Playoff Meeting: 1999 Western Conference First Round (Los Angeles won 3-1) (2) Los Angeles Lakers vs. (3) San Antonio Spurs: Lakers win series 4–2 Last Playoff Meeting: 2003 Western Conference Semifinals (San Antonio won 4-2) (1) Minnesota Timberwolves vs. (2) Los Angeles Lakers: Lakers win series 4–2 Last Playoff Meeting: 2003 Western Conference First Round (Los Angeles won 4-2) The Finals were played using a 2-3-2 site format, where the first two and last two games are held at the team with home court advantage. This is only used in the Finals, all other playoff games are held in a 2-2-1-1-1 format (the team with home court advantage starts). The Lakers had a lineup of stars such as Karl Malone, Gary Payton, Kobe Bryant, and Shaquille O'Neal - their offensive capability was expected to overpower Detroit's defensive-based gameplan. Payton and Malone also added to the publicity of the Finals. Perennial All-Stars who had both previously reached the Finals, Payton had led
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    2010 Women's Professional Soccer season

    2010 Women's Professional Soccer season

    The 2010 Women's Professional Soccer season was the second season for the WPS, the top level professional women's soccer league in the United States. Regular season champion FC Gold Pride won the WPS Championship on September 26 with a 4-0 victory over the Philadelphia Independence. 2010 schedule Blue denotes team has clinched regular season championship. Green denotes team has spot in 2010 Women's Professional Soccer Playoffs. Minimum 60 minutes played per game average WPS announced its end-of-year awards on September 16. WPS All-Star 2010 took place on June 30, a midseason date as opposed to the previous year's postseason All-Star game. It was played at the new Kennesaw State University Soccer Stadium in Kennesaw, Georgia, home to the Atlanta Beat;. The United States Coast Guard once again presented the game, which aired on Fox Soccer Channel again as well. The all-star selection process was the same as in the previous year, although twice as many players were selected. The top US vote-getter, Abby Wambach, and the top international vote-getter, Marta, then chose between the remaining 20 voted-on players to create their teams, with the 14 at-large selections being distributed by
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    1972 San Francisco 49ers season

    1972 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1972 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 23rd year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the playoffs for the third consecutive year, each time being eliminated by the Dallas Cowboys.
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    1948 New York Yankees season

    1948 New York Yankees season

    The 1948 New York Yankees season was the team's 46th season in New York and its 48th overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 2.5 games behind the Cleveland Indians and 1.5 games behind the second-place Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. The fractional games-behind came about due to the frenzied pennant race, which saw the Yankees, Red Sox and Indians all battling it out to the end. The Yankees fell just a little short, and the Red Sox and Indians finished in a tie for first at 96–58. They held a one-game playoff, which counted as part of the regular season, so the Indians' victory raised their record to 97–58, and dropped the Red Sox to 96–59. The Yankees did not renew Bucky Harris' contract after the season, opting instead to hire Casey Stengel starting in 1949. This move raised some eyebrows, but Stengel had just led the Oakland Oaks to the Pacific Coast League pennant in 1948, demonstrating that with good talent, he had a good chance to succeed. The Yankees were about to begin the most dominating stretch of their long dynasty. On July 26, 1948, Babe Ruth attended the premiere of the
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    1960 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1960 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1960 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 7, 1960, and ended with the championship game on March 19 in Daly City, California (immediately south of San Francisco). A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Ohio State, coached by Fred Taylor, won the national title with a 75-55 victory in the final game over California, coached by Pete Newell. Jerry Lucas of Ohio State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    2004-05 NHL season

    2004-05 NHL season

    The 2004–05 NHL season was the National Hockey League's 88th season of operation. The entire 1,230-game schedule, that was to begin in October, was officially canceled on February 16, 2005 due to an unresolved lockout that began on September 16, 2004. The loss of the 2004–05 season's games made the NHL the first North American professional sports league to lose an entire season of games because of a labor dispute. It was the first time since 1919 when a Spanish flu pandemic canceled the playoffs that the Stanley Cup was not awarded. This canceled season was later acknowledged with the words "2004–05 Season Not Played" engraved on the Cup. According to the International Ice Hockey Federation, 388 NHL players were on teams overseas at some point during the season, spread across 19 European leagues. Many of these players had a contract clause to return to the NHL when the league started up again, even if it was during the current season. Key rule changes which would dominate after the lockout were established as a result of a meeting between the NHL and its top minor league, the American Hockey League. On July 5, 2004, the AHL announced publicly the 2004–05 rule changes, many of which
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    2007 Green Bay Packers season

    2007 Green Bay Packers season

    The 2007 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 89th overall and 87th season in the National Football League. The Packers finished the regular season with an impressive 13–3 record. They received a bye for the first round of the playoffs, won their divisional round playoff game, and lost in the NFC Championship game to the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants. This was the last season for quarterback Brett Favre as a Green Bay Packer. This season also marked the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Packers' home stadium of Lambeau Field. The Packers' tenure at Lambeau, now at 55 seasons, is the longest in NFL history at a single stadium, breaking the Chicago Bears' previous record of 50 seasons at Wrigley Field (1921–1970). On February 2, 2007, Brett Favre announced that he would return for the 2007 season. "I am so excited about coming back," the 37-year-old quarterback said on the website of The Sun Herald in Biloxi, Mississippi. He also commented, "We have a good nucleus of young players. We were 8–8 last year, and that's encouraging." Ted Thompson, Green Bay's general manager, confirmed the news, saying, "The Packers are excited by his decision and look forward
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    2009 Boston Red Sox season

    2009 Boston Red Sox season

    The Boston Red Sox' 2009 season was the 109th in the team's history. The Red Sox came in off a loss in the American League Championship Series during their 2008 season. The team is in the 97th season at Fenway Park, the oldest active ballpark in Major League Baseball. The Red Sox opened the season with a postponement due to rain. However, on April 7, the season began at Fenway with the first pitch being thrown by Edward Kennedy. The Red Sox got off to a slow start, going 2–6 in the first eight games. However, the Sox won 11 straight games beginning on April 15. The win streak was Boston's longest since 2006 when they had a 12-game win streak. A highlight of the streak was Jacoby Ellsbury's steal of home on April 26 to cap off a three-game sweep of the New York Yankees. They finished April with a record of 14–8 and tied with the Toronto Blue Jays for the division lead. Also, Jerry Remy, NESN color commentator, had surgery to remove a small area of cancer on his lung. While recovering he also got pneumonia. He also was suffering from fatigue and depression. These are the people who filled in for him. Dennis Eckersley Dave Roberts Buck Martinez Tony Massarotti Rance Mulliniks Rex
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    1907 VFL season

    1907 VFL season

    Results and statistics for the Victorian Football League season of 1907. In 1907, the VFL competition consisted of eight teams of 18 on-the-field players each, with no "reserves", although any of the 18 players who had left the playing field for any reason could later resume their place on the field at any time during the match. Each team played each other twice in a home-and-away season of 14 rounds. Once the 14 round home-and-away season had finished, the 1907 VFL Premiers were determined by the specific format and conventions of the amended "Argus system". Carlton defeated South Melbourne 6.14 (50) to 6.9 (45). (For an explanation of scoring see Australian rules football).
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    1919 Green Bay Packers season

    1919 Green Bay Packers season

    The 1919 Green Bay Packers season was their first season of competitive football. The club was formed by Curly Lambeau and George Calhoun with help from the Indian Packing Company. The club posted a 10-1 record against other teams in Wisconsin and Michigan. According to traditional accounts, Curly Lambeau, a standout high school football player, made Knute Rockne's varsity Notre Dame team in his freshman year, only to resign after a severe case of tonsillitis. Still wanting to play football, a casual conversation with George Calhoun, editor of the Press-Gazette, in the Summer of 1919 convinced him to organize his own team. In the succeeding weeks, Calhoun ran advertisements in the Press-Gazette inviting prospective players to join the team. On August 11, local athletes came together in the editorial room at the Press-Gazette building and formed the team that would become the Green Bay Packers. Since the team needed funds for uniforms and equipment, Lambeau entered an agreement with his employer, the Indian Packing Company. The company provided $500 and Lambeau agreed to name the team after it. At first the team was denoted the "Green Bay Indians" but by the end of the year the
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    1945–46 in Scottish football

    1945–46 in Scottish football

    The 1945–46 season was the seventh and final season of special wartime football in Scotland during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in Scotland. Many footballers signed up to fight in the war and as a result many teams were depleted, and fielded guest players instead. The Scottish Football League and Scottish Cup were suspended and in their place regional league competitions were set up. Appearances in these tournaments do not count in players' official records. In contrast to previous wartime seasons a single league, the Southern League, operated for Scotland with two divisions (although its membership did not include all the pre-war Scottish league clubs). No country-wide cup competition took place, although the Glasgow Cup continued and a Southern League Cup was competed for, a competition which later formed the basis of the League Cup. In keeping with the other wartime seasons the Scotland national football team went on official hiatus, although unofficial games, appearances for which do not count towards the final caps totals of participants, continued. Scotland faced England in one such match on 13 April 1946 at Hampden Park. In
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    1957 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1957 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1957 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1957, and ended with the championship game on March 23 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 27 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. North Carolina, coached by Frank McGuire, won the national title with a 54-53 triple-overtime victory in the final game over Kansas, coached by Dick Harp. Wilt Chamberlain of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. North Carolina won two consecutive triple overtime games to win the championship. The North Carolina - Michigan State semi final game and North Carolina - Kansas final game both made USA Today's list of the greatest NCAA tournament games of all time at 11 and 6 respectively.
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    2000 NCAA Division I-A football season

    2000 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the Oklahoma Sooners claiming their first national championship and their first conference championship since the departure of head coach Barry Switzer. Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops was in his second season as head coach, having been the defensive coordinator of Steve Spurrier's 1996 National Champion Florida Gators, and also having helped Bill Snyder turn the Kansas State Wildcats around in the early 1990s. Stoops erased a three-game losing streak against rival Texas by a score of 63–14, one of the worst defeats in Texas' football history. Despite the lopsided victory, this game marked a return of the Red River Shootout to a rivalry game with national title implications. The BCS title game was not without controversy, as the system shut fourth-ranked Washington out of the championship game, despite being the only team who had beaten each #2 Miami and #5 Oregon State and having the same 10-1 record as #3 Florida State during the regular season. 10–1 Miami, who handed #3 Florida State their only loss, was ranked higher in both the AP Writers' Poll and the ESPN/USA Today Coaches' Poll, and had the same record as the Seminoles, was
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    2002 NCAA Division I-A football season

    2002 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season ended the season with what most consider an exciting double overtime national championship game. Ohio State and Miami both came into the Fiesta Bowl undefeated. The underdog Buckeyes defeated the Hurricanes 31–24, ending Miami's 34 game winning streak. Jim Tressel won the national championship in only his second year as head coach. Rose Bowl officials were vocally upset over the loss of the Big Ten champ from the game. Former New England Patriots coach Pete Carroll returned the USC Trojans to a BCS bid in only his second season as head coach. Notre Dame also returned to prominence, as Tyrone Willingham became the first coach in Notre Dame history to win 10 games in his first season. The only conference move during this season saw the University of Central Florida leave the Independent ranks to join the Mid-American Conference as its 14th member. Beginning with the 2002 season, teams were allowed to schedule twelve regular season games instead of eleven leading to additional revenues for all teams and allowing players the enhanced opportunity to break various statistical records. The Rose Bowl normally features the champions of the Big Ten
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    2007–08 Los Angeles Lakers season

    2007–08 Los Angeles Lakers season

    The 2007–08 Los Angeles Lakers season was the 62nd season of the franchise, 60th in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and 48th in Los Angeles. The team celebrated their 60th anniversary, thus the Laker jerseys wore the 60th anniversary patches on the leftmost part. They finished the regular season with 57 wins, finishing with the most wins in the tightest conference race in NBA history. The Lakers clinched the top seed in the playoffs for the 29th time in franchise history. This 15-game turnaround from the prior season has been attributed to the progress of the team's bench players and the mid-season trade for Pau Gasol. The Lakers sold out all 41 home games for the season. After 12 seasons in the NBA, Kobe Bryant was named the 2008 NBA Most Valuable Player for the first time in his career. The Lakers post-season ended by losing the NBA Finals to the Boston Celtics in six games. Following the 2006-07 NBA Season, their offseason was marred with surgeries to their two key players. The first of which was Lamar Odom having shoulder surgery which made him miss the first five games of the 2007–08 NBA season. The other was Kwame Brown having shoulder surgery also. The Lakers'
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    1897 Boston Beaneaters season

    1897 Boston Beaneaters season

    The 1897 Boston Beaneaters won the National League pennant. It was their fourth of the decade and their seventh overall. After the season, the Beaneaters played in the Temple Cup for the first time. They lost the series to the second-place Baltimore Orioles, 4 games to 1. This team has been cited (along with the 1880s St. Louis Browns and the 1890s Baltimore Orioles) as one of the greatest of the 19th century. It featured five Hall of Famers: manager Frank Selee, pitcher Kid Nichols, third baseman Jimmy Collins, and outfielders Billy Hamilton and Hugh Duffy. In just 132 games, the Beaneaters scored 1025 runs to lead the league (Hamilton had 152 of them to win individual honors). They also allowed the fewest, on the way to a .705 winning percentage. Nichols was one of the premier pitchers in the league, leading the NL with 31 wins. His 2.64 ERA ranked second. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average;
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    1924-25 NHL season

    1924-25 NHL season

    The 1924–25 NHL season was the eighth season of the National Hockey League. The NHL added two teams this season, a second team in Montreal, the Montreal Maroons and the first U.S. team, the Boston Bruins. Six teams each played 30 games. The NHL regular-season champion Hamilton Tigers did not participate in the playoffs, as their players demanded to their owner, Percy Thompson, that they would not participate in the NHL championship series unless they received an additional $200 each for the extra six games played that year. Under their contracts, the Tigers players were to receive the same amount of money no matter how many games they played from December 1, 1924 to March 31, 1925 (even though the season started on November 29, 1924). NHL President Frank Calder was not amused, stating that the players would be fined or suspended if they did not play in the final series, but the players stated that they would rather retire than advantage be taken of them. The day of the final game of the Semi-Final, Tiger Shorty Green met with Calder to try to reach an agreement, but to no avail. The players were all suspended and fined $200 each, therefore eliminating themselves from the playoffs.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 9, 1963, and ended with the championship game on March 23 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Loyola University Chicago, coached by George Ireland, won the national title with a 60-58 victory in the final game, over the University of Cincinnati, coached by Ed Jucker. Art Heyman, of Duke University, was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament marked the last time that a city was host to two straight Final Fours. In the Loyola vs. Mississippi State game in the regional semifinal, Mississippi State, an all-white team, played despite protests from the governor and state police of Mississippi. Mississippi State overcame a state prohibition against playing integrated teams. Loyola beat Mississippi State and went on to the Mideast Region Championship game. In the National Championship game, Loyola started four African-Americans and Cincinnati
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1965, and ended with the championship game on March 20 in Portland, Oregon. A total of 27 games were played, including a third-place game in each region and a national third-place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 91–80 victory in the final game over Michigan, coached by Dave Strack. Bill Bradley of Princeton was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. UCLA finished the season with 28 wins and two defeats. In the championship game, the Bruins shot 56.9% with Gail Goodrich's 42 points and Kenny Washington's 17 points to become the fifth team to win consecutive championships.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    1970 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1970 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1970 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 7, 1970, and ended with the championship game on March 21 in College Park, Maryland. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 80-69 victory in the final game over Jacksonville, coached by Joe Williams. Sidney Wicks of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    1972 Miami Dolphins season

    1972 Miami Dolphins season

    The 1972 Miami Dolphins season was the team's seventh, and third in the National Football League. The 1972 Dolphins are the only National Football League team to win the Super Bowl with a perfect season. The undefeated campaign was led by coach Don Shula and notable players Bob Griese, Earl Morrall, and Larry Csonka (among many others). The 1972 Dolphins went 14–0 in the regular season and won all three post-season games, including Super Bowl VII against the Washington Redskins, to finish 17–0. The team remains the only NFL team to complete an entire season undefeated and untied from the opening game through the Super Bowl (or championship game). In addition, the Dolphins continued their winning streak to 18 straight games (regular season and post-season), before losing in the second week of the 1973 season. During the 1972 season, Bob Griese's ankle was broken in Week 5 as he was sacked by San Diego Chargers defensive tackle Ron East and defensive end Deacon Jones. He was replaced by veteran Earl Morrall for the rest of the regular season. Griese returned to the field as a substitute during the AFC Championship game versus the Pittsburgh Steelers and then started for Miami in
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    1982 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1982 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1982 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 48 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1982, and ended with the championship game on March 29 in New Orleans, Louisiana. A total of 47 games were played. North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith, won the national title with a 63-62 victory in the final game over Georgetown, coached by John Thompson. James Worthy of North Carolina was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament was the first to eliminate the national third place game, which had been held every year since the 1947 tournament. It was also the first tournament to be televised by CBS after it acquired the broadcasting rights from NBC. Gary Bender and Billy Packer (also from NBC Sports) called the Final Four and National Championship games. The 1982 NCAA Division 1 Championship Game was between the Georgetown Hoyas, led by Patrick Ewing and Eric "Sleepy" Floyd, versus the North Carolina Tar Heels, led by James Worthy, Sam Perkins, and a young Michael Jordan. The championship matchup was tightly contested throughout, with no team ever
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    1992 San Francisco 49ers season

    1992 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1992 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 43rd year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second time in three seasons. This would be the last season the Niners would have with Joe Montana. His last game as a 49er was on the December 28 MNF game against the Lions. January 9, 1993 (Sat) at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, CA January 17, 1993 at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, CA
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    1996 San Francisco Giants season

    1996 San Francisco Giants season

    Lou Seal is the official mascot of the San Francisco Giants. "Born" on July 25, 1996, Luigi Francisco Seal has been a regular part of the Giants baseball home games and events around San Francisco, and the United States. The name is a play on the name "Lucille." Todd Schwenk, an Oakland Athletics Fan, named the mascot in a KNBR Sports Radio phone-in contest. Schwenk named Lou for the Seals always hanging out on the wharfs at Fisherman's Wharf. It also refers to the San Francisco Seals, the baseball club which was a mainstay of the Pacific Coast League from 1903 until 1957. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In All-Star Game
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    2000 Major League Baseball season

    2000 Major League Baseball season

    • Championship: 2000 World Series
    The 2000 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees defeating the New York Mets in Game 5 of the World Series, known as the Subway Series because fans could take the Subway to and from every game of the Series. An all-time record 5,693 home runs were hit during the regular season in 2000. Ten teams hit at least 200 home runs each.   Click on any series score to link to that series' page. Higher seed has home field advantage during Division Series and League Championship Series. The American League Champion has home field advantage in the World Series as a result of the pre-2003 "alternating years" rule.
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    2003 Boston Red Sox season

    2003 Boston Red Sox season

    The Boston Red Sox' 2003 season included the Red Sox attempting to win the American League East division, the ALDS, and the American League. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In Game 1: Oakland 5 – Boston 4 Game 2: Oakland 5 – Boston 1 Game 3: Boston 3 – Oakland 1 Game 4: Boston 5 – Oakland 4 Game 5: Boston 4 – Oakland 3 New York wins the series, 4–3
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    2008 New York Mets season

    2008 New York Mets season

    The 2008 New York Mets season was the franchise's 47th season. The Mets finished the season with an 89–73 record, second place in the National League East, three games behind the Philadelphia Phillies, and one game worse than the wild card winners, the Milwaukee Brewers. The Mets were eliminated from postseason play on their last day of the regular season by the Florida Marlins for the second straight year. 2008 was the Mets' 45th and final year at Shea Stadium. They moved to Citi Field in 2009. After dropping 12 out of their final 17 games of the 2007 season to lose the National League East to the Philadelphia Phillies on their last day of the regular season, the Mets front office was expected to make big moves in the offseason to give hope for the next season. Needing to make a decision within five days after the Mets' last game, Tom Glavine declined his $13 million player option. He eventually signed with his former team, the Atlanta Braves, agreeing to a one-year contract worth $8 million on November 18. On October 31, the Mets took care of two of their own potential free agents. Left fielder Moisés Alou's option year on his contract was picked up for $7.5 million despite Alou
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    2009 Kansas City Chiefs season

    2009 Kansas City Chiefs season

    The 2009 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 50th season, and first with head coach Todd Haley at the helm. It was also the first season with Scott Pioli as the team's general manager. The Chiefs attempted to improve on their 2–14 record from 2008 with the third overall selection in the 2009 NFL Draft. In 2009, the Chiefs also honored the induction of Derrick Thomas, the team's former linebacker from 1989 to 1999, into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Thomas' jersey number 58 was officially retired by the franchise after having been unissued since Thomas' death in 2000. The fate of head coach Herman Edwards and his staff remained uncertain after the end of the 2008 season in which the Chiefs finished with a franchise-worst 2–14 record. The team was 6–26 in the past two years under Edwards, who had one year left on a four-year, $12 million contract and was lobbying to be allowed another year to get his rebuilding movement off the ground. Team owner Clark Hunt voiced his support of Edwards, but he had also said the new general manager Scott Pioli would have "significant input" into the decision on whether to retain him. On January 23, the Chiefs fired Edwards, and on February
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season

    2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season

    The 2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season, or the college football season, began on September 2, 2009, progressed through the regular season and bowl season, and (aside from all-star exhibition games that followed the bowl games) concluded with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game in Pasadena, California on January 7, 2010, featuring the Alabama Crimson Tide,defeating the Texas Longhorns for the National Championship by the score of 37–21. This season saw two milestones related to the Heisman Trophy: The NCAA football rules committee proposed several rule changes for 2009. Before these rules were officially adopted, these proposals had to be approved by the Playing Rules Oversight Panel. The rule changes include the following: Two FBS teams opened new stadiums on September 12: One unusual aspect of this season was that every conference in Division I FBS, even those that did not contest a championship game, had an undisputed champion. This last happened in 1983. In July 2011, the NCAA released its findings in a 2 year investigation into allegations of a Georgia Tech player receiving $321 of clothing from a runner for an agent. While, no conclusive
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    1981 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1981 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1981 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 48 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1981, and ended with the championship game on March 30 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A total of 48 games were played, including a national third place game (the last in the NCAA tournament). Indiana, coached by Bob Knight, won the national title with a 63-50 victory in the final game over North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith. Isiah Thomas of Indiana was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. NOTES: 1. This was the last tournament that a third place game was staged prior to the national championship. 2. Both the third place and national championship games were delayed following the assassination attempt by John Hinckley, Jr. on President Ronald Reagan.
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    1983 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1983 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1983 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 52 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 2, 1983, and ended with the championship game on April 4 at The Pit, then officially known as University Arena, on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. A total of 51 games were played. North Carolina State, coached by Jim Valvano, won the national title with a 54-52 victory in the final game over Houston, coached by Guy Lewis. The ending of the final is one of the most famous in college basketball history, with Lorenzo Charles' dunk at the buzzer off a high, arching air ball from 30 feet out by Dereck Whittenburg providing the final margin. This contributed to the nickname given to North Carolina State, the "Cardiac Pack", a reference to their often close games that came down to the wire — in fact, the team won 7 of its last 9 games after trailing with a minute left in the game. Both Charles' dunk and Valvano's running around the court in celebration immediately after the game have been staples of NCAA tournament coverage ever since. North Carolina State's
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    2007–08 Boston Celtics season

    2007–08 Boston Celtics season

    The 2007–08 Boston Celtics season was the 62nd season of the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Powered by the acquisitions of perennial All-Stars Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen in the offseason, the Celtics finished with a record of 66–16 and posted the best single-season turnaround in NBA history, improving by 42 wins from the previous season. They finished 1st in both the Atlantic Division and the Eastern Conference, and had the league's best record. The 66 wins were also the second-most in franchise history, behind the 1985-86 Celtics' 67 wins. Kevin Garnett was named NBA Defensive Player of the Year, while Danny Ainge, who executed "the most dramatic NBA turnaround ever", was named NBA Executive of the Year. The Celtics also sold out all 41 regular-season home games. Their two-year absence from the playoffs came to an end as they met the Atlanta Hawks in the first round of the 2008 NBA Playoffs. Eventually, they advanced to the NBA Finals for the first time in 21 years, where they met the Los Angeles Lakers. The Celtics won 4–2, capturing their first championship since 1986, and 17th all-time. However, they had a far more difficult path to this
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    2008 Pittsburgh Steelers season

    2008 Pittsburgh Steelers season

    The 2008 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the franchise's 76th season in the National Football League (NFL). The season concluded with the team winning Super Bowl XLIII to become the first franchise in the NFL with six Super Bowl titles. The Steelers entered the season as defending champions of the AFC North Division, coming off a 10–6 record in 2007. Based on the previous season's results, the team faced the most difficult schedule in over 30 years; however, they were called Super Bowl contenders by ESPN. The Steelers opened their regular season on September 7, with a win over the Houston Texans en route to a 12–4 record, and a second straight AFC North Division title. In his second season as head coach Mike Tomlin was selected in fan balloting as the Motorola Coach of the Year. Linebacker James Harrison was named the NFL's Defensive Player of the Year after leading a defense which set the standard for the league in nearly every defensive category, including total yardage allowed, points allowed, passing yardage allowed, first downs allowed, yards per play, and yards per pass, among others. The playoffs began on January 11, 2009, with a win over the San Diego Chargers. The following
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    1955 San Francisco 49ers season

    1955 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1955 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's sixth season in the NFL, and were coming off a 7-4-1 record in 1954, finishing in 3rd place in the Western Conference. For the 1955 season the 49ers wore RED helmets, not the silver helmets as illustrated here. San Francisco would replace head coach Buck Shaw, who had been the only head coach of the club. The new coach would be Red Strader, who had previously been the head coach of the New York Yanks from 1950-1951, where he had a record of 8-14-2 in his 2 seasons there. The 49ers started the year with 2 losses at home, but would rebound with 2 road victories and sat with a .500 record after 4 games. San Francisco would split their next 2 games at home and have a 3-3 record. The team would then fall into a slump, and lose their next 5 games, before winning their final game of the season, and finish the season with a 4-8-0 record, their worst season since the team's first season in the NFL in 1950, when they finished 3-9-0. Offensively, Y.A. Tittle threw for 2185 yards, completing 51.2% of his passes, and had a league high 17 TD passes. However, Tittle would have 28 passes that were intercepted. Billy Wilson was Tittle's favorite
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    1972 New York Yankees season

    1972 New York Yankees season

    The 1972 New York Yankees season was the 70th season for the Yankees in New York, and the 72nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 79-76, finishing 6½ games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: West Haven
    5.67
    3 votes
    168
    1979 San Francisco 49ers season

    1979 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1979 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 30th year with the National Football League. The season is noted for being O.J. Simpson’s final year and Joe Montana’s first season in the NFL, as well as the first year head coaching the 49ers for Bill Walsh. The 1979 49ers are the only team in NFL history to lose 12 games in which they held a lead at one point in the game.
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    1992 NCAA Division I-A football season

    1992 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first year of the Bowl Coalition, and ended with Alabama's first national championship in thirteen years—their first since the departure of Bear Bryant. One of Bryant's players, Gene Stallings, was the head coach, and he used a style similar to Bryant's, a smashmouth running game combined with a tough defense. The members of the Bowl Coalition were the Sugar Bowl, Orange Bowl, Cotton Bowl Classic, and Fiesta Bowl. Under the agreement the Sugar Bowl, Orange Bowl, and Cotton Bowl Classic hosted the Southeastern Conference, Big 8, and Southwest Conference champions, respectively, and then a pool of at large teams was formed between the Atlantic Coast Conference champ, the Big East champ, Notre Dame, and two conference runner ups from the Big 8, SWC, ACC, Big East and Pac-10. The highest ranked host team would play the highest ranked at-large team. If the two highest ranked teams were both at-large teams, the championship game would be hosted by the Fiesta Bowl. So for this year, (host) SEC champ Alabama played (at-large) Big East Champ Miami-FL, the Orange Bowl featured (host) Big-8 champ Nebraska and (at-large) ACC champ Florida St.,
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    1943 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1943 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1943 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 24, 1943, and ended with the championship game on March 30 in New York City. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Wyoming, coached by Everett Shelton, won the national title with a 46-34 victory in the final game over Georgetown, coached by Elmer Ripley. Ken Sailors of Wyoming was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    1952 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1952 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1952 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 16 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 21, 1952, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in Seattle, Washington. A total of 18 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kansas, coached by Phog Allen, won the national title with a 80-63 victory in the final game over St. John's, coached by Frank McGuire. Clyde Lovellette of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament was the first to have a true "Final Four" format, with the winners at four regional sites advancing to the final site—although the four regionals did not receive distinct names until the 1956 tournament. It was also the first to have regional television coverage.
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    1955 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1955 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1955 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 24 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1955, and ended with the championship game on March 19 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 28 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. San Francisco, coached by Phil Woolpert, won the national title with a 77-63 victory in the final game over La Salle, coached by Ken Loeffler. Bill Russell of San Francisco was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    1987 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1987 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1987 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1987, and ended with the championship game on March 30 in New Orleans, Louisiana. A total of 63 games were played. Indiana, coached by Bob Knight, won the national title with a 74-73 victory in the final game over Syracuse, coached by Jim Boeheim. Keith Smart of Indiana, who hit the game-winner in the final seconds, was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The tournament also featured a "Cinderella team" in the Final Four, as Providence College, led by a then-unknown Rick Pitino, made their first Final Four appearance since 1973. This was also the last tournament in which teams were allowed to have home court advantage: Syracuse (2E), DePaul (3MW), Arizona (10W) and UAB (11SE) all opened the tournament playing on their home courts. The 1987 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament was also the first tournament to utilize the Three-Point Shot.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1999, and ended with the championship game on March 29 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. A total of 63 games were played. This year's Final Four was the first—and so far, only—to be held in a baseball-specific facility, as Tropicana Field is home to the Tampa Bay Rays (then known as the Devil Rays). Connecticut, coached by Jim Calhoun, won the national title with a 77-74 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski. The 1998–99 Duke team nonetheless tied the record for most games won during a single season, with 37, which they co-held until Memphis' 38-win season in 2007-08 (which has since been vacated due to violations). Richard "Rip" Hamilton of Connecticut was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This was a significant victory for the program, as it cemented Connecticut's reputation as a true basketball power after decades of barely missing the Final Four. This tournament is also historically notable as the coming-out party for
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    2007 New York Mets season

    2007 New York Mets season

    The New York Mets' 2007 season was the 46th regular season for the Mets. The Mets were defending their first divisional championship since 1988. While the Atlanta Braves were counted as possible competition, the Philadelphia Phillies were predicted as the front-runners, albeit by their own star shortstop, Jimmy Rollins. Ultimately, Rollins' prediction rang true, as the Phillies won the NL East Division title on the last day of the regular season. With a seven-game lead on September 12, the Mets suffered a historic collapse by losing 12 of their last 17 games and missing the postseason. It is regarded as one of the worst collapses in MLB history. The Mets’ high hopes for the 2006 postseason were thwarted on September 29, 2006 when it was announced that ace Pedro Martínez was done for the remainder of the year due to a left calf muscle strain. Later it was announced that Pedro would have to undergo rotator cuff surgery and would miss a sizable portion of the 2007 season. On October 3, the day before his game 1 NLDS start, it was announced that Orlando Hernández tweaked his right calf muscle while jogging in the outfield at Shea. He wouldn’t be able to pitch again until the 2007
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    2008 Dallas Cowboys season

    2008 Dallas Cowboys season

    The 2008 Dallas Cowboys season was the 49th season for the team in the National Football League. The season was most noted for week 17, when the Cowboys were blown out by the Philadelphia Eagles 44–6, their worst loss since the 1985 Chicago Bears came to Texas Stadium and beat the Cowboys 44–0. It was the last season that the Cowboys played at Texas Stadium; they moved to Cowboys Stadium in 2009. Despite entering the last month of the season three games above .500, they failed to make the playoffs, finishing with a 9–7 record. The Cowboys arrived in Oxnard, California for training camp on July 24. HBO and NFL Films filmed the Cowboys for the fourth season of Hard Knocks which premiered on August 6. The Cowboys began camp with all but three players: Felix Jones, Mike Jenkins, and Terry Glenn. Jones and Jenkins both signed contracts the next day, and flew out to California to report. Soon afterward, Terry Glenn was released to waivers. Owner Jerry Jones explained that, "I think at the end of the day, it had more to do with where we are right now, the managing of how he got to the field, the aspect of concentrating on the what ifs and how it might've impacted how we give our young
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    2009 New York Mets season

    2009 New York Mets season

    The 2009 New York Mets season was a season in American baseball. It was the franchise's 48th season, and the team's first year at Citi Field, which opened on April 13 against the San Diego Padres. The Mets finished with a 70–92 record, as the season was plagued by many injuries. Looking to improve the bullpen after the struggles of the 2008 season, the Mets signed closer Francisco Rodriguez to a three year, $37 million contract on December 10, 2008. Immediately after, the team acquired reliever J. J. Putz from the Seattle Mariners in a three team trade involving the Mariners and the Cleveland Indians, giving the Mets a setup man for Rodriguez. New York shipped reliever Aaron Heilman, outfielder Endy Chávez, pitcher Jason Vargas and three minor leaguers to Seattle for Putz, center fielder Jeremy Reed and reliever Sean Green, while Mets reliever Joe Smith was acquired by Cleveland. On December 12 the Mets traded Scott Schoeneweis to the Arizona Diamondbacks for Connor Robertson. On January 12, the Mets signed RHP Tim Redding to a one-year contract. The Mets signed Alex Cora to a one-year $2 million dollar contract. The Mets signed Freddy Garcia and Rob Mackowiak to minor league
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    UEFA Champions League 2005–06

    UEFA Champions League 2005–06

    • Championship: 2006 UEFA Champions League Final
    The 2005–06 UEFA Champions League was the 51st staging of UEFA's premier European club football tournament, the UEFA Champions League and the 14th since it was rebranded from the European Cup in 1992. 74 teams from 50 football associations took part, starting with the first qualifying round played on 12 July 2005. The tournament ended with a final between Arsenal and Barcelona at Stade de France, Paris, on 17 May 2006. Barcelona won 2–1 with Juliano Belletti scoring a late winner. Arsenal had taken the lead through a Sol Campbell header in the 37th minute, despite Jens Lehmann being sent off in the 18th minute. Samuel Eto'o brought Barcelona back on level terms in the 76th minute before Belletti scored the winner five minutes later. The defending champions Liverpool were eliminated by Benfica in the first knockout round. Title-holders Liverpool, as well as 23 league champions from countries ranked 27 or lower on the 2004 UEFA ranking, were drawn against each other and played two matches, home and away, with the winners advancing to the second qualifying round. Though they finished fifth in the Premier League in 2004–05 (usually only four English teams are allowed in), Liverpool
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    1999 San Francisco 49ers season

    1999 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1999 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 50th year with the National Football League. This would also be Steve Young's last season as he was forced to retire due to a concussion. San Francisco started the season with a 3-1 record, before losing eleven of their final twelve games. It was the first time the 49ers had missed the postseason since 1991, their second time missing the postseason in 17 seasons, and their first losing season in a non-strike year (as well as their first season without at least 10 wins) since 1980.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    2006 Indianapolis Colts season

    2006 Indianapolis Colts season

    The 2006 Indianapolis Colts season was the 54th season for the team in the National Football League and 23rd in Indianapolis. The 2006 Colts season began with the team trying to maintain or improve on their regular season record of 14–2 from the 2005 season, and advance farther into the playoffs. They finished the season 12–4, a record that was also obtained by the Colts in 2003 and 2004. The Colts won at least 12 games for the fourth consecutive season. They also won the AFC South Division Championship for the fourth time in a row, and won the American Football Conference Championship title against the New England Patriots on January 21, 2007 by a score of 38–34 to advance to Super Bowl XLI and play against the Chicago Bears. Indianapolis defeated the Chicago Bears 29–17 on February 4, 2007 at Dolphin Stadium to win the franchise's first Super Bowl since Super Bowl V in 1970, and first ever since relocating to Indianapolis. The 2006 Colts surrendered 5.33 rushing yards-per-attempt, by far the worst since the merger, and seventh-worst in NFL history. Still, the Colts managed to win a championship with the help of the most statistically efficient offense in the league. The offseason
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    1901 Boston Americans season

    1901 Boston Americans season

    The 1901 Boston Americans season was a season in American baseball. It was the first for the franchise which eventually became known as the Boston Red Sox, being the first season of play for the American League. It resulted in the Americans finishing second in the AL with a record of 79 wins and 57 losses, 4 games behind the Chicago White Stockings. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds. The Americans were led by Buck Freeman, who hit 12 home runs and drove in 114 runs while leading the team with a .339 average. Their longest winning streak of the season came between June 14 and June 22 when they defeated the Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Stockings, and Cleveland Blues until succumbing on the 23rd to the Blues. Their longest losing streak was between May 11 and May 16, when they fell to the Washington Senators and Baltimore Orioles, until defeating the O's on May 17. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP =
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    1982 Green Bay Packers season

    1982 Green Bay Packers season

    The 1982 Green Bay Packers season was their 62nd season in the National Football League and shortened due to a players strike. The club posted a 5–3–1 record under coach Bart Starr. Due to the strike, the NFL ignored division standing and placed eight teams from each conference into the playoffs. The Packers finished the season in third place which earned them a playoff berth. The Packers beat the Cardinals 41–16 in the first round, but lost to the Dallas Cowboys 37–26 in the second. Their playoff berth was the first for the Packers in ten seasons. The strike also prevented the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league. Green Bay quarterback Lynn Dickey threw for 260 yards and 4 touchdowns en route to a 41-16 win. The Packers scored four touchdowns on four consecutive possessions. It was their first playoff victory since Super Bowl II. The Cowboys scored touchdowns on two 80-yard drives while cornerback Dennis Thurman had 3 interceptions, including a 39-yard touchdown and one to clinch the victory. Packers quarterback Lynn Dickey threw for a franchise postseason record 332 yards and a
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    1946 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1946 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1946 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 21, 1946, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in New York City. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Oklahoma A&M, coached by Henry Iba, won the national title with a 43-40 victory in the final game over North Carolina, coached by Ben Carnevale. Bob Kurland of Oklahoma A&M was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This was the first tournament to have four teams advance to the final site, though not the first to have a true "Final Four" format (that would not occur until 1952). The two regional losers played in the national third-place game, while the two winners played for the championship. The third place game would continue through the 1981 tournament.
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    1964 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1964 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1964 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 9, 1964, and ended with the championship game on March 21 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 98–83 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Vic Bubas. Walt Hazzard of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The title was the first in the history of the UCLA program, and was a sign of things to come as the Bruins would go on to win nine more championships in the next eleven seasons. All locations were in the USA.
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    2002 San Francisco Giants season

    2002 San Francisco Giants season

    The 2002 San Francisco Giants season was the 120th in franchise history, and the franchise's 45th season in San Francisco. The season ended with the Giants winning the National League pennant but losing to the Anaheim Angels in the 2002 World Series. The Giants finished the regular season with a record of 95–66, 2 ⁄2 games behind the Arizona Diamondbacks in the National League West standings. By virtue of having the best record among second-place teams in the National League, they won the NL wild card to earn a postseason berth. In the postseason, the Giants faced the Atlanta Braves in the National League Division Series. After being brought to the brink of elimination, the Giants won Games 4 and 5 to clinch the series, three games to two. They went on to defeat the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series by a series score of four games to one to win the franchise's 20th NL championship and its third in San Francisco. Then, in the World Series, they brought the Angels to the brink of elimination before the Angels came from behind to win Games 6 and 7. 2002 was manager Dusty Baker's tenth and final season managing the Giants. Following the season he departed
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    2009 Dallas Cowboys season

    2009 Dallas Cowboys season

    The 2009 Dallas Cowboys season is the 50th season for the team in the National Football League. It is the team's first season playing at Cowboys Stadium. Their victory over the Oakland Raiders on November 26 extended their Thanksgiving winning streak to four in a row and also ended a three game losing streak to the Raiders. They also ended the Saints' bid for a perfect season after a 13–0 start with a 24–17 victory on December 19, 2009. The Cowboys punched their ticket to the playoffs on December 27 beating the Washington Redskins 17–0. On January 3, 2010, the Cowboys clinched their division with a win over the Philadelphia Eagles, 24–0. In the wild-card opening round of the playoffs, the Dallas Cowboys, once again, beat the Eagles, 34–14, to score their first playoff win since 1996 and sweep all three games played against Philadelphia this season. They lost to the Minnesota Vikings in the divisional round of the playoffs, 34–3. The 2009 NFL draft was one of the worst in the history of the Dallas Cowboys, with a lot of experts comparing it unfavorably to the 1995 "backup draft". This draft is infamously known as the "special teams draft", but it was so terrible, that as the years
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    5.00
    3 votes
    188
    1800 English cricket season

    1800 English cricket season

    The 1800 English cricket season is one of the more difficult years for analysis because of several matches involving prominent town clubs like Rochester, Woolwich, Homerton, Richmond, Storrington, Montpelier and Thames Ditton. All of these were marginal in terms of important status.
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    1886 New York Giants season

    1886 New York Giants season

    The 1886 New York Giants season was the franchise's 4th season. The team had a record of 75-44, finishing third in the National League, 12.5 games behind the Chicago White Stockings. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    1952 New York Yankees season

    1952 New York Yankees season

    The 1952 New York Yankees season was the 50th season for the Yankees in New York and their 52nd overall, going back to their origins in Baltimore. The team finished with a record of 95-59, winning their 19th pennant, finishing 2 games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. This was their fourth consecutive World Series win, tying the record they had set during 1936-1937-1938-1939. It was also the first season that the Yankees aired their games exclusively on WPIX-TV which would last until the end of the 1998 season. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA =
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    2007 Chicago Bears season

    2007 Chicago Bears season

    The 2007 Chicago Bears season was the team's 88th regular season in the National Football League. The season officially began on September 9, 2007 against the San Diego Chargers, and concluded on December 30 against the New Orleans Saints. The Bears entered the 2007 season as the National Football Conference Champions and had hopes of returning to the Super Bowl, but instead finished the season with a disappointing 7-9 record. One of the biggest stories in the Bears’ off-season was Tank Johnson’s jail sentence. In December 2006, Johnson came under increased scrutiny after police entered his house in Gurnee, Illinois, and found several guns and weapon paraphernalia. The situation was further complicated when Johnson’s friend, William Posey, was murdered the following evening while defending Johnson at a nightclub. On March 15, 2007, a judge in Skokie, Illinois sentenced Johnson to a 120 days in jail and fined him $2,500 dollars. He was released from jail on May 13, 2007, due to good behavior. Johnson also faced an additional eight-game suspension from the NFL. The league ultimately suspended Johnson for half of the regular season on June 4. Despite vowing the amend his ways, Johnson
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    1879 Boston Red Caps season

    1879 Boston Red Caps season

    Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned Run Average; SO = Strikeouts
    6.00
    1 votes
    193
    1939 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1939 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1939 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship. It was the first NCAA basketball national championship tournament. It began on March 17, 1939, and ended with the championship game on March 27 on Northwestern University's campus in Evanston, Illinois. A total of 8 games were played, including a single third place game in the West region. The East region did not hold a third place game until the 1941 tournament, and there was no national third place game until the 1947 tournament. Oregon, coached by Howard Hobson, won the national title with a 46-33 victory in the final game over Ohio State, coached by Harold Olsen. Jimmy Hull of Ohio State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.00
    1 votes
    194
    1942 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1942 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1942 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 20, 1942, and ended with the championship game on March 28 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Stanford, coached by Everett Dean, won the national title with a 53-38 victory in the final game over Dartmouth, coached by O. B. Cowles. Howie Dallmar of Stanford was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Everett Dean remains, to this day, the only coach to have never lost an NCAA tournament game, going 3-0 in his lone appearance.
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    1948 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1948 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1948 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 19, 1948, and ended with the championship game on March 23 in New York City. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp, won the national title with a 58-42 victory in the final game over Baylor, coached by Bill Henderson. Alex Groza of Kentucky was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    1954 San Francisco 49ers season

    1954 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1954 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's fifth season in the NFL, and were coming off a 9-3-0 record in 1953, finishing one game behind the Detroit Lions for a spot in the Championship game. For the 1954-1956 seasons, the 49ers wore RED helmets, not the silver helmets illustrated here. The 49ers would get off to a strong start, beginning the season with a 4-0-1 record, as they were trying to finish on top of the conference for the 1st time in team history. The Niners would lose their next 2 games against the Chicago Bears and Los Angeles Rams by close scores, however, they still found themselves in the playoff race as no team was running away with the conference. The 4-2-1 Niners had a huge game against the 5-1-0 Detroit Lions, which was a must-win game for San Francisco. The Lions though had other ideas, demolishing the 49ers 48-7, as they fell to a 4-3-1 record. San Francisco would finish the season with 3 wins in their final 4 games, and finished the year in 3rd place with a 7-4-1 record. Offensively, Y.A. Tittle had another strong season, throwing for 2205 yards and 9 TD's, while completing 57.6% of his passes. Billy Wilson led the club with 60 receptions and 830
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    1957 San Francisco 49ers season

    1957 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1957 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's eighth season in the NFL, and were coming off a 5-6-1 record in 1956, however, they ended the season with a 5 game unbeaten streak. San Francisco would continue their late season success from the previous year, and would win 5 of their first 6 games and sit in 1st place in the Western Conference. The Niners would then lose 3 in a row on the road to drop to a 5-4-0 record, however, a 3 game winning streak to close out the season would see San Francisco finish with an 8-4-0 record, their best season since 1953. The 49ers finished tied with the Detroit Lions at the top of the Western Conference, which would set up a tie-breaking playoff game at Kezar Stadium, with the winner of the game to face the Cleveland Browns for the NFL Championship. The Lions would win a very close game by a 31-27 score and end the 49ers season and their quest for their first title. Sadly, 49ers owner Anthony J. (Tony) Morabito died of a heart attack, during the second quarter of the October 27 game against the Chicago Bears at Kezar. The team was notified of his death at halftime, and with tears in their eyes, they went back out and won a come-from-behind
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    1982 NCAA Division I-A football season

    1982 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 1982 NCAA Division I-A football season saw Paul "Bear" Bryant retire as head coach at Alabama with 323 career victories in 38 seasons. The Penn State Nittany Lions won their first consensus national championship, closing out an 11-1 season by defeating Georgia and Heisman Trophy winner Herschel Walker in the Sugar Bowl 27-23, and edging out undefeated SMU for the National Championship. It was Joe Paterno's first national championship, after three undefeated non-championship seasons. UCLA moved from the LA Coliseum to the Rose Bowl and fulfilled a promise made by coach Terry Donahue by closing out their season there as well, beating Michigan in the post-season Rose Bowl game, 24-14. It is also the year of “The Play”, a near impossible finish to the annual rivalry game between Cal and Stanford. The Aloha Bowl premiered in Honolulu, Hawaii. This was the first season the Ivy League competed at the I-AA (FCS) level. Through the 2009 season, the Ivy League has yet to participate in the post-season tournament, despite an automatic bid, citing academic concerns. The pre season poll had a top 5 of 1. Pittsburgh, 2. Washington, 3. Nebraska, 4. Alabama, and 5. North Carolina. Penn State
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    1993-94 QMJHL season

    1993-94 QMJHL season

    The 1993–94 QMJHL season was the 25th season in the history of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. The QMJHL unveils a special logo/patch for its 25th anniversary. The league expands northward, granting an expansion franchise in Val-d'Or, Quebec. Thirteen teams played 72 games each in the schedule. The Laval Titan finished first overall in the regular season winning the Jean Rougeau Trophy. The Chicoutimi Saguenéens won their second President's Cup, defeating Laval in the finals. Note: GP = Games played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; Pts = Points; GF = Goals for; GA = Goals against Note: GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; PIM = Penalties in Minutes The leading scorers of the playoffs were Danny Beauregard (16 goals, 27 assists) and Alexei Lojkin (9 goals, 34 assists) with 43 points each. Note: GP = Games played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; Pts = Points; GF = Goals for; GA = Goals against Chicoutimi Saguenéens defeated Sherbrooke Faucons in a one-game playoff to determine 4th place in the round-robin standings. List of First/Second/Rookie team all-stars
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    1997 New York Yankees season

    1997 New York Yankees season

    The New York Yankees' 1997 season was the 95th season for the Yankees. New York was managed by Joe Torre and played at Yankee Stadium. The team finished with a record of 96-66 finishing 2 games behind of the Baltimore Orioles in the American League East. They entered the postseason as the American League Wild Card, but lost the Division Series in 5 games to the Cleveland Indians. Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In September 30, Yankee Stadium October 2, Yankee Stadium October 4, Jacobs Field October 5, Jacobs Field October 6, Jacobs Field
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    1950 San Francisco 49ers season

    1950 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1950 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's first season in the NFL, after playing the previous four years in the All-America Football Conference, which folded after the 1949 season. The 49ers, Baltimore Colts, and Cleveland Browns all joined the NFL from the AAFC. San Francisco's first ever NFL game was at Kezar Stadium on September 17 against the New York Yanks, as the 49ers fell short, losing by a score of 21-17. They would start the season 0-5 before recording their first NFL victory in a close 28-27 victory over the Detroit Lions at home. The Niners would play better after the 0-5-0 start, going 3-4-0 in their remaining 7 games to finish the season 3-9-0, and fail to qualify for the playoffs. Quarterback Frankie Albert would complete 50.7% of his passes, while throwing for 14 touchdowns and 23 interceptions. Running back Joe Perry would rush for a team high 647 yards and 5 touchdowns, while wide receiver Alyn Beals caught 22 passes for 315 yards, and 3 touchdowns. San Francisco's players selected for the Pro Bowl:
    5.00
    2 votes
    202
    1969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1969, and ended with the championship game on March 22 in Louisville, Kentucky. Including consolation games in each of the regions and an overall consolation game, a total of 29 games were played. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 92-72 victory in the final game over Purdue, coached by George King. Lew Alcindor of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. In the game, John Vallely, the "Money Man", scored 29 points and Alcindor had 25 points, to give UCLA a win over Purdue, which is Wooden's alma mater. Purdue was hampered due to injuries to starting point guard Billy Keller and forward Herm Gilliam; Purdue had also lost 7'0" center Chuck Bavis to a broken collarbone during the Mideast Regionals against Miami, (OH). Wooden was an outstanding guard for the Boilermakers.
    5.00
    2 votes
    203
    5.00
    2 votes
    204
    1993 San Francisco 49ers season

    1993 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1993 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second consecutive season and for the third time in four seasons. January 15, 1994 (Sat) at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, CA January 23, 1994 at Texas Stadium, Irving, TX
    5.00
    2 votes
    205
    UEFA Champions League 2004-05

    UEFA Champions League 2004-05

    • Championship: 2005 UEFA Champions League Final
    The 2004–05 UEFA Champions League was the 50th season of UEFA's premier European club football tournament, and the 13th since it was rebranded as the UEFA Champions League in 1992. The competition was won by Liverpool, who beat Milan on penalties in the final, having come back from 3–0 down at half-time. Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard was named as UEFA's Footballer of the Year for his key role in the final and throughout the Champions League season. The final, played at the Atatürk Olympic Stadium in Istanbul, Turkey, is often regarded as one of the best in the history of the tournament. With eight goals, Manchester United's Ruud van Nistelrooy was the top scorer for the third time in four seasons. As it was their fifth European Cup title, Liverpool were awarded the trophy permanently, and received the UEFA Badge of Honour. A new trophy was made for the 2005–06 season. Porto were the defending champions, but were eliminated by Internazionale in the first knockout round. 16 winners from the third qualifying round, 10 champions from countries ranked 1–10, and six second-placed teams from countries ranked 1–6 were drawn into eight groups of four teams each. The top two teams in each
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    1949 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1949 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1949 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 18, 1949, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in Seattle, Washington. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp, won the national title with a 46-36 victory in the final game over Oklahoma A&M, coached by Henry Iba. Alex Groza of Kentucky was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    4.50
    2 votes
    207
    2007 Kansas City Chiefs season

    2007 Kansas City Chiefs season

    The 2007 Kansas City Chiefs season began with the team looking to improve on their 9-7 record in 2006 and attempting to secure the franchise's first back-to-back playoff berth since 1995. The season ended with a nine game losing streak, the team's first since 1987 and a 4-12 record. It was the Chiefs' first season with twelve losses since 1978. Considered a year of transition, the 2007 season marked the Chiefs' forty-fifth season in Kansas City, Missouri, and final before renovations began at Arrowhead Stadium. Quarterback Trent Green was traded to the Miami Dolphins, leaving the door open for second-year quarterback Brodie Croyle or back-up quarterback Damon Huard to win the starting job. Huard was named starting quarterback on August 25 for the team's first game of the season, but Croyle replaced him after Huard was injured in the game against Denver in Week 10. Five different running backs were used after Larry Johnson was injured in Week 9 against Green Bay. The team also had no stability at quarterback with Croyle and Huard, who both nursed injuries throughout the season, while their offensive line depleted following the retirement of their former Pro Bowl guard Will Shields.
    4.50
    2 votes
    208
    1886 Boston Beaneaters season

    1886 Boston Beaneaters season

    Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In
    5.00
    1 votes
    209
    1903 Boston Americans season

    1903 Boston Americans season

    The 1903 Boston Americans season was a season in American baseball. The team finished first in the American League with a record of 91 wins and 47 losses. They went on to participate in the first World Series held between the American League and National League champions. They won the 1903 World Series in 8 games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played their home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds. The 1903 Boston Americans won the American League championship by finishing 14½ games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. The Americans were led by Buck Freeman, who hit 13 home runs and drove in 104 runs, his third straight 100-RBI campaign for the Boston club. Meanwhile, they won 10 straight games in early June to put themselves in the AL lead for good. They met the Pittsburgh Pirates in the first modern World Series, an agreement between the AL and the NL as a post-season tournament. The "Amerks" won the series in 8 games, winning the 8th game at Huntington Avenue Grounds to clinch the championship. Note: Pos = position; G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In Note: G = Games pitched;
    5.00
    1 votes
    210
    1912 Boston Red Sox season

    1912 Boston Red Sox season

    The 1912 Boston Red Sox season involved the Red Sox finishing 1st in the American League with a record of 105 wins and 47 losses. Behind center fielder Tris Speaker and pitcher Smoky Joe Wood, they led the league in runs scored and fewest runs allowed. Speaker was third in batting and was voted league MVP. Wood won 34 games, including a record 16 in a row. They defeated the New York Giants in 8 games in the 1912 World Series. One of the deciding plays was a muffed fly ball by Giants outfielder Fred Snodgrass (known as the $30,000 muff, the 30,000 referring to the prize money for the winner). The pitching staff was good, but there were no stars besides Wood. The starting lineup featured no stars other than Speaker. Little-known third baseman Larry Gardner was the next best hitter. Future Hall of Famer Harry Hooper had a poor offensive season. Fenway Park opened on April 20, the same day as Navin Field in Detroit. It was supposed to be opened on April 18 (like Navin Field) but it rained in both cities on that day. On April 26, Hugh Bradley became the first player to hit a home run over the Green Monster at Fenway Park. It was his only home run of the 1912 season, and one of only two
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
    1917-18 NHL season

    1917-18 NHL season

    The 1917–18 NHL season was the first season of the National Hockey League (NHL) professional ice hockey league. The league was formed after the suspension of the National Hockey Association (NHA). Play was held in two halves, December 19 to February 4, and February 6 to March 6. The Canadiens won the first half, and Toronto the second half. The Montreal Wanderers withdrew early in January 1918 after their rink, the Westmount Arena, burned down. Toronto won the NHL playoff and then won the Stanley Cup by defeating the PCHA's Vancouver Millionaires three games to two in a best-of-five series In November 1917, the owners of the NHA, apparently unwilling to continue the league with Toronto NHA owner Eddie Livingstone, decided to suspend the NHA and form a new league, the NHL, without Livingstone. The events transpired in the following way: On October 19, a meeting of the NHA board of directors was held. Livingstone did not attend, sending lawyer Eddie Barclay. Barclay was informed by the directors that Toronto would not play in the 1917–18 season due to the difficulty of operating a five-team league, both in scheduling and availability of players during wartime. Livingstone then
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    1932 New York Yankees season

    1932 New York Yankees season

    The 1932 New York Yankees season was the team's 30th season in New York, and its 32nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 107-47, winning their seventh pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by future Hall of Famer Joe McCarthy. A record nine future Hall of Famers played on the team (Earle Combs, Bill Dickey, Lou Gehrig, Lefty Gomez, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, Red Ruffing, Babe Ruth, Joe Sewell). The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Chicago Cubs. On May 30, 1932, the Yankees dedicated a monument to their former manager, Miller Huggins. Huggins was the first of many Yankees personnel granted this honor. The monument was placed in front of the flagpole in center field at Yankee Stadium. an area which eventually became "Monument Park," dedicated in 1976. The monument calls Huggins "A splendid character who made priceless contributions to baseball." Note: Pos = position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    1962 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1962 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1962 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 12, 1962, and ended with the championship game on March 24 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game, which was won by Wake Forest. Cincinnati, coached by Ed Jucker, won the national title with a 71–59 victory in the final game over Ohio State, coached by Fred Taylor. Paul Hogue of Cincinnati was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The total attendance for the tournament was 177,469, a new record.
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    1986 New York Yankees season

    1986 New York Yankees season

    The New York Yankees' 1986 season was the 84th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 90-72, finishing in second-place, 5.5 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Lou Piniella. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. 1986 was the first time since 1904 that the Yankees finished second in the standings to the Red Sox. On August 10, 1986, the Yankees retired Martin's uniform number 1 and dedicated a plaque in his honor for Monument Park at Yankee Stadium. The plaque contains the words, There has never been a greater competitor than Billy. Martin told the crowd, "I may not have been the greatest Yankee to put on the uniform, but I am the proudest." On 24 May 1986, on the season finale of Saturday Night Live, co-host Martin was "fired" by executive producer Lorne Michaels for being "drunk" in a skit, slurring his lines. During the goodnights, Martin "sets fire" to the dressing room in retaliation. (Only three cast members would be re-hired the next season.) In 1988, on Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update, comedian Dennis Miller opened the sports with, "In Calgary tonight, Katarina Witt won the gold medal in figure skating, prompting Yankees owner
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    2004 NCAA Division I-A football season

    2004 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with several undefeated teams vying for a spot in the national title game, triggering controversy. In the 2003 season, no team finished the regular season unbeaten, and five teams finished the season with one loss. In 2004, the situation became even more complicated, as five teams went without losing, a record in the BCS era (this record was tied in 2009, when five teams also went undefeated and a sixth, Florida, lost to undefeated Auburn in the SEC title game). USC of the Pac-10, Oklahoma of the Big 12, Auburn of the SEC, Utah of the MWC, and Boise State of the WAC all finished the regular season undefeated. USC and Oklahoma started the season ranked #1 and #2, respectively, but the other three teams were handicapped by starting out of the top 15. Thus USC and OU played for the BCS National Championship, while Auburn, Utah, and Boise State had to content themselves with other bowl games. The Orange Bowl proved a rout with USC defeating Oklahoma 55-19, which earned the Trojans their second consecutive AP title and first BCS title. This game, USC's victory over rival UCLA, and the BCS title were later vacated as part of the sanctions
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    2005 Pittsburgh Steelers season

    2005 Pittsburgh Steelers season

    The 2005 Pittsburgh Steelers season began with the team trying to improve on their 15–1 record from 2004 in which they lost to the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship Game at Heinz Field. The Steelers, with the sixth and final seed to the playoffs, became just the second team ever (and the first in 20 years) to win three road games on their way to the Super Bowl. After becoming the first sixth seed ever to win both a Divisional Playoff game and a Conference Championship, they defeated the NFC Champion Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XL to secure their league-tying fifth Super Bowl title. In doing so, they also became the first team since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger to win a Super Bowl without playing a single home playoff game. See: 2006 Pro Bowl
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    2008–09 Los Angeles Lakers season

    2008–09 Los Angeles Lakers season

    The 2008–09 Los Angeles Lakers season was the franchise's 63rd season, 61st in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and 49th in Los Angeles. The Lakers won their division for the 31st time and appeared in the Western Conference Finals for the 39th time. With 65 wins they recorded the third most wins in franchise history, the most since 2000, and improved on their 2007-08 record by eight wins. The Lakers sold out all 41 home games for the season, led the NBA in money earned from overall ticket sales, and had the 5th highest increase in gate receipts from the previous season. On May 29, the Lakers beat the Denver Nuggets to advance to the NBA Finals for the second consecutive year and 30th time in franchise history, extending their NBA record for most Finals appearances. On June 14, the Los Angeles Lakers beat the Orlando Magic 4-1 in the best of seven series to become the 2009 NBA Champions, the 15th Championship for the franchise. Kobe Bryant was awarded the 2009 NBA Finals MVP. On July 15, 2009, the Los Angeles Lakers won the 2009 ESPY Awards for Best Team and Best Coach/Manager for Phil Jackson. Following the 2007–08 NBA season, the Lakers faced two key injuries in the
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    2009 Major League Baseball season

    2009 Major League Baseball season

    • Championship: 2009 American League Championship Series
    The 2009 Major League Baseball season began on Sunday, April 5, 2009 with the Atlanta Braves defeating the 2008 World Series champion Philadelphia Phillies 4–1. The regular season ended on October 6, extended two days for a one-game playoff between the Detroit Tigers and the Minnesota Twins to decide the American League Central Division champion. The postseason began the next day with the Division Series. The 2009 World Series began on October 28, and ended on November 4, with the New York Yankees defeating the Philadelphia Phillies in six games; and for the ninth year in a row, the defending World Series champion (the Phillies) failed to repeat the previous year's run. This was the second time the season was completed in November. The only other occasion was the 2001 World Series, that because of the delaying of the end of that season because of the September 11 attacks as November baseball would be guaranteed when Game 4 was played on Sunday, November 1. The American League champion had home field advantage for the World Series by virtue of winning the All-Star Game on July 14 at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri, 4–3. In addition, the annual Civil Rights Game became a regular
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    1953 San Francisco 49ers season

    1953 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1953 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's fourth season in the NFL, and were coming off a 7-5-0 record in 1952. The 49ers would play consistent football all season long, never losing consecutive games throughout the season en route to a franchise best 9-3-0 record. However, the 49ers would lose both games against the Detroit Lions, who finished the season 10-2-0 to win the Western Conference and earn a spot in the NFL Championship game. Offensively, San Francisco was led by quarterback Y.A. Tittle, who threw for 2121 yards and 20 TD's while completing 57.5% of his passes. Running back Joe Perry had another great season, rushing for 1018 yards along with 10 TD's, while Hugh McElhenny rushed for 503 yards and 3 TD's, and caught 30 passes for 474 yards and 6 TD's. Wide receiver Billy Wilson would catch a team high 51 passes for 840 yards and 10 TD's. San Francisco's players selected for the Pro Bowl:
    4.00
    2 votes
    220
    1997 San Francisco 49ers season

    1997 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1997 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 48th year with the National Football League. The franchise appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the fifth time in the 1990s and is their last appearance in the NFC title game until the 2011 season. The 49ers opened the 1997 season with high hopes. With new coach Steve Mariucci and half back Garrison Hearst, the 49ers seemed to have shored up their one major weakness from the season before. Also, additions Kevin Gogan to the offensive line and Rod Woodson to the defense were clear improvements over last season's roster. However, in the first game of the season at Tampa Bay the greatest disaster the 49ers could have imagined occurred: both quarterback Steve Young and receiver Jerry Rice went down with injuries. Rice appeared to be out for the season with a serious knee injury and Young, with yet another concussion, had discussed and considered retirement. However, Young eventually came back, as did Rice for one and a half quarters (before getting another unrelated injury to his knee), and the team, with the league's number one defense leading the way, pulled together and finished strongly at 13-3. Towards the end of the season
    4.00
    2 votes
    221
    1922 New York Yankees season

    1922 New York Yankees season

    The 1922 New York Yankees season was the 20th season for the Yankees in New York and their 22nd overall. The team finished with a record of 94 wins and 60 losses, to win their second pennant in franchise history, by a single game over the St. Louis Browns. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds. In the 1922 World Series, the Yankees again lost to their landlords, the New York Giants, 4 games to none with one tied game. The final game of the Series was also the Yankees' final game as a tenant in the Polo Grounds. During the season, they had begun construction of their new home, Yankee Stadium, which would open in 1923. The Yankees started the season without their star, Babe Ruth, who was serving a suspension due to breaking the rule (along with several other Yankees) against World Series participants barnstorming. Although Commissioner Landis refused to back down on his enforcement of the rule, he did repeal the seemingly absurd rule by the end of the 1922 season. Note: Pos = position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits;
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    1945 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1945 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1945 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 22, 1945, and ended with the championship game on March 27 in New York City. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Oklahoma A&M, coached by Henry Iba, won the national title with a 49-45 victory in the final game over NYU, coached by Howard Cann. Bob Kurland of Oklahoma A&M was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
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    1952 San Francisco 49ers season

    1952 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1952 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's third season in the NFL, and were coming off a 7-4-1 record in 1951. The 49ers would start off the season strong, winning their first 5 games, winning every game by at least 2 touchdowns, and had visions of playing in their first ever NFL Championship game. However, the 49ers season would hit a roadblock, as the team would lose 5 of their final 7 games to finish the year at 7-5-0, and in 3rd place in the NFC. Y.A. Tittle would emerge as the starting quarterback job, as he would have a completion rate of 51.0% along with 11 TD's and 1407 yards. Frankie Albert also had some action, completing 55.0% of his passes, along with 8 TD's and 964 yards. Joe Perry would rush for a team high 725 yards and 8 TD's, while Hugh McElhenny wouldn't be too far behind with 684 yards on only 98 attempts (7.0 yards/carry), along with 6 rushing TD's, while he caught 26 passes for 367 yards and earned another 3 TD's. Gordie Soltau would lead the club with 55 receptions for 774 yards, and 7 TD's. San Francisco's players selected for the Pro Bowl:
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    224
    1967 San Francisco 49ers season

    1967 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1967 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 18th year with the National Football League. The 49ers had their first round picks and drafted Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurrier with one of those draft picks. DB Kermit Alexander, LB Ed Beard, G/C/DE Bruce Bosley, QB John Brodie, C Joe Cerne, G Elmer Collett, HB/TE John Crow, RB Doug Cunningham, K Tommy Davis, DB George Donnelly, DB Goose Gonsoulin, LB Bob Harrison, LB Matt Hazeltine, T Dave Hettema, DE/DT Stan Hindman, DE Tom Holzer, DB/HB Jim Jackson, DT Charlie Johnson, CB/WR * Jimmy Johnson, DE Walter Johnson, RB Dave Kopay, DT/DE Charlie Krueger, DT/DE/T Roland Lakes, RB Gary Lewis, DE Clark Miller, QB George Mira, G Howard Mudd, WR Chip Myers, LB Frank Nunley, LB/TE Dave Olerich, WR/TE Dave Parks, DB Mel Phillips, E/WR Sonny Randle, DB Al Randolph, T/DT Walt Rock, T Len Rohde, QB/P Steve Spurrier, TE Monty Stickles, DB/WR Wayne Swinford, G/T/LB John Thomas, DB Wayne Trimble, RB Bill Tucker, LB * Dave Wilcox, RB Ken Willard, TE Bob Windsor, WR/TE Dick Witcher
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    225
    1988 San Francisco 49ers season

    1988 San Francisco 49ers season

    The San Francisco 49ers 1988 season was their 43rd season in the National Football League. The season was highlighted by their third Super Bowl victory. In 1988, the 49ers struggled. At one point, they were 6-5 and in danger of missing the playoffs but rose to defeat the Washington Redskins on a Monday night, eventually finishing the season at 10-6. They gained a measure of revenge by thrashing the Minnesota Vikings 34-9 in the first round. The 49ers then traveled to Chicago's Soldier Field, where the chill factor at gametime was 26 degrees below zero. They defeated the Chicago Bears 28-3 in a NFC Championship game upset. For the 49ers, it was their first Super Bowl appearance since they defeated the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl XIX. They had made the playoffs in the three seasons between Super Bowl XIX and Super Bowl XXIII, but were eliminated each time in the first round, primarily because of the poor performances by their offensive stars in those games; quarterback Joe Montana, receiver Jerry Rice and running back Roger Craig all failed to produce a single touchdown. 1988 Team Starters Offense Defense Kicking Team In the 1988 season, San Francisco won the NFC West with a 10-6
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    226
    1996 San Francisco 49ers season

    1996 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1996 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 51st since its inception. In commemoration, the 49ers wore a special 50th anniversary patch. They also wore a new uniform reminiscent of the 1994 throwback uniforms with white pants and shadowed numbers, but with a darker shade of red and an updated logo. The franchise tied for first place in the NFC West with a 12-4 record, but lost the division title to the Carolina Panthers on the division-record tiebreaker (the Panthers had swept the Niners in the season). The Niners were 3rd in the league in points scored and 4th in fewest points allowed. Although the team was competitive the entire season, nagging and recurring injuries to offensive players and an inconsistent running game contributed to a what was considered a disappointing season. After a 14-0 Wild Card victory over the Philadelphia Eagles, the 49ers were defeated by the Green Bay Packers in the divisional playoffs 35-14. It would be George Seifert's final season as the 49ers' head coach. After the 1995 season, concerns about the 49ers' running game loomed largely for San Francisco. The 49ers were able to sign running back Terry Kirby by the fifth week of the season, but
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    227
    2005 NCAA Division I-A football season

    2005 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the least amount of controversy surrounding the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) title game in many years. To an extent it was a return to classic football. All eight BCS teams were traditional powerhouses, many of the schools having worn the same uniforms for half a century, and Penn State and Florida State having the same coaches for nearly half a century. Alabama was back in the mix for the SEC title, shaking off the residual effects of NCAA sanctions, and though Penn State is a relative newcomer to the Big Ten, Ohio State and Michigan were still in the running for the conference title until the last game. The BCS saw good fortune as two teams, the USC Trojans and the Texas Longhorns, went wire to wire as #1 and #2, respectively—the second year in a row that had happened—and finished as Division I-A's only undefeated teams after the regular season. As a result, there was no dispute over the choice of teams selected for the BCS title game (there were five undefeated teams in the 2004 regular season: Oklahoma, USC, Auburn, Utah, and Boise State). The game was played at the Rose Bowl, where Texas edged the favored, defending
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    228
    2007 New England Patriots season

    2007 New England Patriots season

    The 2007 New England Patriots season was the 38th season for the team in the National Football League and 48th season overall. They became the first team in NFL history to finish the regular season with a perfect 16–0 record; nonetheless they lost to the New York Giants in Super Bowl XLII. The Patriots entered the offseason following a close loss to the rival Indianapolis Colts in the AFC Championship. After having lost their two starting wide receivers in the previous offseason, the Patriots added Donté Stallworth in free agency and traded for Wes Welker and Randy Moss in the spring; Welker would lead the NFL in receptions in 2007 while Moss would set an NFL record with 23 touchdown catches. The season began with controversy, when in Week 2 head coach Bill Belichick and the Patriots were penalized by the NFL for their involvement in the videotaping of opponents' defensive signals from an unauthorized location in their Week 1 game against the New York Jets, referred to in the press as Spygate. Despite the media scrutiny, the Patriots continued to gain momentum, winning mid-season games by scores such as 52–7 and 56–10, as quarterback Tom Brady iterated the team's desire to blow out
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    2007 New York Giants season

    2007 New York Giants season

    The 2007 New York Giants season was the 83rd season for the New York Giants in the National Football League. The Giants finished the regular season 10–6 and in second place in the NFC East, improving upon their 8–8 record in 2006 in which they finished third in their division. They qualified for the playoffs as a wild-card team as the #5 seed, and beat the #4 seed Tampa Bay Buccaneers (9–7), the top-seeded Dallas Cowboys (13–3), and the #2 seed Green Bay Packers (13–3) to become the National Football Conference representative in Super Bowl XLII. There, they defeated the heavily favored and previously undefeated 18–0 New England Patriots and spoiled their perfect season. The 2007 New York Giants became the 9th wild card team in NFL history to reach the Super Bowl and the 5th wild card team to win the Super Bowl. They were the third team in history to win three road playoff games en route to a Super Bowl and set a league record for most consecutive road wins in a single season (11). It was the 7th league championship season for the New York Giants and their first since they won Super Bowl XXV in 1990. 2007 marked the third consecutive season that the Giants made the playoffs, which
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    2009–10 NBA season

    2009–10 NBA season

    The 2009–10 NBA season was the 64th season of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The 1,230-game regular season (82 games for each of the 30 teams) began on Tuesday, October 27, 2009, and ended on Wednesday, April 14, 2010. The 2009 NBA Draft was held on June 25, 2009, and Blake Griffin was selected first overall by the Los Angeles Clippers. The Dallas Mavericks hosted the 59th Annual All-Star Game at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas on February 14, 2010. For the second time in NBA history, all eight Western Conference playoff teams won at least 50 games, and only 7 wins separated the Western Conference #1 seed from #8 seed. Both of these events first occurred in 2008. Cleveland's league-leading 61 wins was the lowest win total to lead the league since the Indiana Pacers won 61 games in 2003–04. The New Jersey Nets became just the fifth team in NBA history to lose 70 games in a season. June July September October November December January February NBA All-Star Break The 2010 NBA All-Star Game was played at Cowboys Stadium, in Texas, on February 14, 2010, with the East winning in a closely contested game, 141–139, and the Miami Heat's Dwyane Wade being named the MVP. The
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    231
    2010 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series

    2010 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series

    The 2010 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series season was the 62nd season of professional stock car racing in the United States. Beginning at Daytona International Speedway, the season included 36 races and two exhibition races. The season concluded with the 2010 Ford 400 at Homestead Miami Speedway. During the 2009 off season, NASCAR announced a few calendar changes, including a standardized start time. Rick Hendrick won the Owners' Championship, while Jimmie Johnson won the Drivers' Championship with a second finish at the final race of the season. Chevrolet won the Manufacturers' Championship with 261 points. The 2009 No. 55 team number was changed to No. 56 to match the number Truex and his father used in the NASCAR K&N Pro Series and predecessor series. Roush Fenway's No. 26 due to the five-team to four-team limit. It appears the No. 26 owner points have been transferred to the new Latitude 43 Motor Sports. The No. 07 Owner Points transferred to the 78 Furniture Row Racing with a technical alliance from Richard Childress Racing. The No. 44 Owner Points transferred to the 98 Richard Petty Motorsports. The No. 96 and No. 98 Owner Points transferred to the 37 and 38 from Front Row
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    1847 English cricket season

    1847 English cricket season

    The 1847 English cricket season saw Kent recover the title with Felix, Hillyer, Pilch and Mynn all enjoying good seasons N Felix was the leading runscorer with 591 @ 28.14 Other leading batsmen were: F Pilch, OC Pell, J Dean, A Haygarth, A Mynn, W Clarke, WR Hillyer, T Box WR Hillyer was the leading wicket-taker with 134 Other leading bowlers were: A Mynn, FW Lillywhite, J Dean, W Clarke, J Wisden, JM Lee, C Arnold
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    233
    1896 New York Giants season

    1896 New York Giants season

    Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
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    1951 New York Yankees season

    1951 New York Yankees season

    The 1951 New York Yankees season was the 49th season for the team in New York, and its 51st season overall. The team finished with a record of 98-56, winning their 18th pennant, finishing five games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the New York Giants in 6 games. This year was noted for a "changing of the guard" for the Yankees, as it was Joe DiMaggio's final season and Mickey Mantle's first. The 1951 season also marked the first year of Bob Sheppard's long tenure as Yankee Stadium's public address announcer. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts AL New York
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    1953 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1953 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1953 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 22 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 10, 1953, and ended with the championship game on March 18 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 26 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Indiana, coached by Branch McCracken, won the tournament title with a 69-68 victory in the final game over Kansas, coached by Phog Allen. B. H. Born of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
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    1956 San Francisco 49ers season

    1956 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 1956 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's seventh season in the NFL, and were coming off a 4-8-0 record, finishing in 5th place in the Western Conference. For the 1956 season the 49ers wore RED helmets, not silver helmets as illustrated here. San Francisco would bring in a new head coach for the 2nd straight season, as Red Strader was replaced with former 49ers quarterback Frankie Albert, who played with the team from their AAFC days in 1946 until 1952. The Niners would get off to a rough start, winning only 1 of their first 7 games to sit in last place in the Western Conference. San Francisco would go unbeaten in their final 5 games, and finish the year with a 5-6-1, and in 3rd place in the Conference. Offensively, Y.A. Tittle threw for a team high 1641 yards and 7 TD's, and had 56.9% of his passes completed. Hugh McElhenny rushed for a team best 916 yards and 8 TD's, while Billy Wilson would catch a club high 60 receptions for 889 yards, along with 5 TD's. Bob St. Clair blocked ten Field Goal attempts.
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    237
    1974 New York Yankees season

    1974 New York Yankees season

    The 1974 New York Yankees season was the 72nd season for the team in New York and its 74th overall dating from its origins in Baltimore. The team finished with a record of 89-73, finishing 2 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Bill Virdon. The Yankees played at Shea Stadium due to the ongoing renovation of Yankee Stadium. The off-season became controversial when George Steinbrenner and Gabe Paul sought to hire former Oakland Athletics manager Dick Williams, who had resigned immediately after leading the team to its second straight World Series title. However, because Williams was still under contract to Oakland, A's owner Charlie Finley sought to block the move, the subsequent legal wrangling prevented the Yankees from hiring him. On the first anniversary of the team's ownership change, the Yankees hired former Pittsburgh Pirates manager Bill Virdon to lead the team on the field. Mickey Mantle and former teammate Whitey Ford were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame together in 1974, Mantle in his first year of eligibility, Ford in his second. Ford's number 16 was retired as well. Although Ford wore number 19 in his rookie season, following his return from
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    238
    1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 13, 1986, and ended with the championship game on March 31 in Dallas, Texas. A total of 63 games were played. Louisville, coached by Denny Crum, won the national title with a 72-69 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski. Pervis Ellison of Louisville was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The 1986 NCAA Men's Basketball Championship Tournament was the first tournament to use a shot clock limiting the amount of time for any one offensive possession by a team prior to taking a shot at the basket. Beginning with the 1986 tournament, the shot clock was set at 45 seconds, which it would remain until being shortened to 35 seconds beginning in the 1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. LSU's 1985-86 team is tied for the lowest-seeded team (#11) to ever make the Final Four (with George Mason's 2005–2006 team and VCU's 2010-2011 team). LSU began its run to the Final Four by winning two games on its home court, leading to a change two years
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    239
    1988 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1988 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    The 1988 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 17, 1988, and ended with the championship game on April 4 returning to Kansas City, Missouri for the 10th time. A total of 63 games were played. Kansas, coached by Larry Brown, won the national title with an 83–79 victory in the final game over Big Eight Conference rival Oklahoma, coached by Billy Tubbs. As of 2012, this was the last national championship game to feature two schools from the same conference. Danny Manning of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Kansas was considered a long shot against the top rated Sooners, who had previously defeated the Jayhawks twice that season, even though the Final Four was contested only 40 miles from the KU campus in Lawrence, Kansas. After this upset, the 1988 Kansas team was remembered as "Danny and the Miracles." (*) Kentucky was later stripped of its two NCAA tournament wins due to an ineligible player. (*) Kentucky was later stripped of its two NCAA tournament wins due to an ineligible player.
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    1993 New York Yankees season

    1993 New York Yankees season

    The New York Yankees' 1993 season was the 91st season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 88-74 finishing 7 games behind the Toronto Blue Jays. New York was managed by Buck Showalter. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. With the exception of 2008, the Yankees have made the playoffs in every non-strike season since. Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts
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    241
    1999 NCAA Division I-A football season

    1999 NCAA Division I-A football season

    The 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season saw Florida State named national champions, defeating Virginia Tech in the BCS Sugar Bowl. Florida State became the first team in history to start out preseason #1 and remain there through the entire season. Their 12-0 season gave them 109 victories in the 90's, the most for any decade. Virginia Tech also had a remarkable season behind freshman quarterback Michael Vick, who was being touted as college football's best player. Vick was outshined in the national championship game by Florida State Wide Receiver Peter Warrick. Warrick had early problems with the law, charged with a misdemeanor he sat out two games early in the season. But he scored three touchdowns in the title game, earning MVP honors. The BCS adopted a new rule after the previous season, nicknamed the "Kansas State Rule," which stated that any team ranked in the top four in the final BCS poll is ensured of an invitation to a BCS bowl game. A lot of teams faced debacles. East Carolina faced Hurricane Floyd, and in that same week, faced the #9 Miami Hurricanes. The Pirates were down 23-3, but scored 24 unanswered points to win the football game, 27-23. Kansas State finished 6th
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    242
    2002 Boston Red Sox season

    2002 Boston Red Sox season

    The 2002 Boston Red Sox season involved the Red Sox finishing 2nd in the American League East with a record of 93 wins and 69 losses. Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In
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    243
    2005 in NASCAR Busch Series

    2005 in NASCAR Busch Series

    The 2005 season of the NASCAR Busch Series began with the Hershey's Take 5 300 at Daytona International Speedway and concluded with the Ford 300 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Martin Truex Jr. of Chance 2 Motorsports was crowned champion. The year saw at least two significant changes: List of teams which competed throughout 2005. These entries completed nearly the entire schedule with relatively few changes The Hershey's TAKE 5 300 was held February 19 at Daytona International Speedway. Joe Nemechek was the polesitter. Top Ten Results Failed to qualify: Skip Smith (#67), Brent Sherman (#58), Larry Hollenbeck (#62), Tim Sauter (#56), Mark Green (#26), Kevin Conway (#03), Justin Ashburn (#16), Keith Murt (#79), Matt Kenseth (#17), Jeff Kendall (#70), Shane Hall (#52), Kim Crosby (#24) With his victory in the race, Tony Stewart became the ninth driver in NASCAR history to win a race in all three of its top series, needing only a Busch Series victory to complete this milestone. He would also be the first of seven drivers to accomplish the feat in 2005 alone and the only one to do it having needed a Busch Series victory. The Stater Brothers 300 was held February 26 at California Speedway.
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    244
    2006 Formula One season

    2006 Formula One season

    The 2006 Formula One season was the 57th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 2006 FIA Formula One World Championship which began on 12 March and ended on 22 October after eighteen races. The Drivers' Championship was won by Fernando Alonso of Renault F1 for the second year in a row, with Alonso becoming the youngest ever double world champion at the time. Then-retiring multiple world champion Michael Schumacher of Scuderia Ferrari finished runner-up, 13 points behind. Renault retained the Constructors' Championship, beating Ferrari by only five points. The season was highlighted by the rivalry between Alonso and Schumacher, who each won seven races. Renault and Ferrari drivers dominated the field, victorious in all but one race, and the four second-place finishes not achieved by these two teams were accomplished by McLaren Mercedes. During this season for the first time since the 1956 season no British constructor won any race. The calendar was initially announced as the same as for 2005, with the Belgian Grand Prix scheduled for 17 September. However, on 8 February, the FIA announced that the Belgian National Sporting Authority (RACB) were withdrawing
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    2007 CFL season

    2007 CFL season

    • Championship: 95th Grey Cup
    The 2007 CFL season was the 54th season of modern Canadian professional football. Officially, it was the 50th season of the league, and many special events were held to commemorate the event. Regular-season play began on June 28, 2007 at the Rogers Centre in Toronto, Ontario and concluded on Saturday, November 3, 2007. The playoffs began on Sunday, November 11, 2007, and ended with the championship game, the 95th Grey Cup, at the Rogers Centre in Toronto, on November 25, 2007, with the Saskatchewan Roughriders as champion. On February 14, 2007, the CFL announced the game schedule for the 2007 season, introducing a 19-week schedule that included 18 regular-season games and one bye week for each team. Bye weeks were taken consecutively by each division beginning with the East in Week 8, creating two weeks of divisional rivalry games. The year's regular-season schedule kicked off on Canada Day weekend and included the CFL's annual traditional rivalries — highlighted by the Labour Day and Thanksgiving Classics. The Canadian Football Hall of Fame game returned to Ivor Wynne Stadium on induction weekend and featured the Winnipeg Blue Bombers and the Hamilton Tiger-Cats on September
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    246
    2007 San Diego Chargers season

    2007 San Diego Chargers season

    The 2007 San Diego Chargers season began with the team trying to equal their 2006 regular season success (14–2) and avoid another early departure in the playoffs. After a disappointing start under new head coach Norv Turner (1–3), they finished the regular season strong, with six straight wins, an overall record of 11–5, and the AFC West title. More important, they went further in the playoffs than the previous year, but fell again to the New England Patriots, this time in the AFC Championship game. For the second consecutive season, star running back LaDainian Tomlinson led the NFL in rushing with 1,474 yards. After a postseason loss to the New England Patriots, offensive and defensive coordinators Cam Cameron and Wade Phillips left for new coaching jobs with the Miami Dolphins and Dallas Cowboys respectively. Marty Schottenheimer, after originally being told he would stay as head coach, was fired in February. Replacing Schottenheimer was Norv Turner, who was signed to take over the helm later in the month. Turner, who installed the Chargers current offensive set when he was the Chargers' offensive coordinator in 2001, was selected to be the head coach largely due to the fact that
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    247
    2008 Kansas City Chiefs season

    2008 Kansas City Chiefs season

    The 2008 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 49th season, and third with head coach Herman Edwards at the helm. The Chiefs failed to improve on their 4–12 record from 2007 with the youngest team in the NFL as part of their "youth movement". The season turned out to be the worst in the franchise's history, by tallying 13 losses for the first time ever. The Chiefs' final 2–14 record was the worst in franchise history. Entering the season, the Chiefs were unsure if injury-prone quarterback Brodie Croyle could be their quarterback of the future. The Chiefs reorganized their offense to focus around Croyle, but his season-ending injury in Week 7 led to a new spread offense gameplan focused around Tyler Thigpen. The Chiefs implemented the spread offense to help Thigpen play to the best of his abilities and also following the absence of RB Larry Johnson due to suspension. The Chiefs made a huge gamble by doing so, as most in the NFL believe that a spread offense cannot work in professional football, and also head coach Herman Edwards was traditionally in favor of more conservative, run-oriented game plans. Prior to the Chiefs implementing the spread offense, Thigpen had been
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    248
    2008 San Francisco 49ers season

    2008 San Francisco 49ers season

    The 2008 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 63rd season. Although they failed to reach the playoffs for the straight 6th year, the team improved on their disappointing 5-11 record from the 2007 season, and ended the season on a high note. Despite a disappointing season in 2007, Mike Nolan was retained as head coach. With the 49ers offense struggling the previous season, offensive coordinator Jim Hostler was fired and replaced by Mike Martz. In addition, Scot McCloughan was promoted from vice president of player personnel to general manager. Mike Nolan was fired after a 29-17 loss to the New York Giants in Week 8. UFA: Unrestricted free agent; RFA: Restricted free agent; ERFA: Exclusive rights free agent The 49ers began their 2008 campaign at home against their NFC West foe, the Arizona Cardinals. In the first quarter, the Niners trailed early as Cardinals kicker Neil Rackers got a 25-yard field goal. San Francisco responded with RB Frank Gore getting a 41-yard TD run. In the second quarter, Arizona regained the lead with QB Kurt Warner completing a 1-yard TD pass to WR Larry Fitzgerald. San Francisco tied the game with kicker Joe Nedney getting a 39-yard fied goal. In
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    249
    2009 New York Giants season

    2009 New York Giants season

    The 2009 New York Giants season was the 85th season for the team in the National Football League. It was the team's final season in Giants Stadium; In 2010, the Giants moved into New Meadowlands Stadium. The Giants hoped to improve upon their 12–4 record, avenge their divisional round loss to the Philadelphia Eagles and make the playoffs for the fifth straight year. Despite starting 5–0 to begin the season, they went 3–8 in their next 11 games and finished 3rd in the NFC East. They were eliminated from playoff contention in Week 16. They played teams from the NFC South and AFC West as per the schedule rotation, as well as their regular games with their NFC East rivals. For head coach Tom Coughlin, this was his 6th season as the coach of the Giants. The Giants signed free-agent defensive end Chris Canty, formerly of the Dallas Cowboys, on March 1, 2009. Canty moved to defensive tackle in the Giants' 4–3 scheme. On April 3, 2009, the Giants released WR Plaxico Burress. After finishing the 2008 season with a 12–4 record, the Giants held the 29th selection in the 2009 NFL Draft. With the pick they closed the gap left by Plaxico Burress in the roster, selecting wide receiver Hakeem
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    250
    Major League Soccer 1996 season

    Major League Soccer 1996 season

    The 1996 Major League Soccer season was the 84th season of FIFA-sanctioned soccer, the 18th with a national first-division league, in the United States and Canada, and the inaugural season of MLS. Major League Soccer had originally intended to begin competitive action in 1995. Various difficulties forced the league to postpone its first season until 1996. In preparation for its first season, the league began signing what it called marque players, beginning with Tab Ramos on January 3, 1995. Beginning in October 1995, the league apportioned the marque players in the 1996 MLS Inaugural Allocations. Each team received two national team and two foreign players in the allocation. The league then invited about 250 players to a tryout the second week of January 1996 on the campus of UC Irvine. On February 6 and 7, 1996, the league held its 1996 MLS Inaugural Player Draft in which the ten teams selected 160 players over sixteen rounds. The Columbus Crew selected Brian McBride with the first pick of the draft. On March 4, 1996, the league then held the 1996 MLS College Draft followed by the 1996 MLS Supplemental Draft later that day. Despite the numerous drafts, the teams were not obligated
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