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Best Sports League Championship Event of All Time

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    1
    FA Cup Final 2001

    FA Cup Final 2001

    • Runner-up: Arsenal F.C.
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2001 FA Cup Final was a football match held at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff on Saturday, 12 May 2001 and was the first final to be played outside of England. The game had an attendance of 72,000. The final was contested between Arsenal and Liverpool, with Liverpool winning 2–1, after Arsenal had led 1–0. It was the second trophy of Liverpool's treble-winning season of 2000–01. They had won the Football League Cup in late February and would win the UEFA Cup the following week. It was their sixth FA Cup triumph to date, their previous triumph coming nine years earlier. Arsenal, who had also finished runners-up in the league, were "double runners-up" for the second season running, having been runners-up in the league and the UEFA Cup a year earlier. It was the first FA Cup Final in which the managers of both teams were from outside the British Isles. Liverpool were intent on adopting a counter-attacking approach, allowing Arsenal space and possession until they reached the danger area. Arsenal dominated the opening exchanges, but first half ended as a stalemate despite Arsenal's dominance. Liverpool's Emile Heskey was involved in the first contentious moment after six
    7.14
    7 votes
    2
    1949 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1949 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball
    The 1949 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 18, 1949, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in Seattle, Washington. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp, won the national title with a 46-36 victory in the final game over Oklahoma A&M, coached by Henry Iba. Alex Groza of Kentucky was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    7.00
    7 votes
    3
    FA Cup Final 2007

    FA Cup Final 2007

    • Runner-up: Manchester United F.C.
    • Champion: Chelsea F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2007 FA Cup Final was played on Saturday, 19 May 2007 between Chelsea and Manchester United, who had come up against Premier League opposition in every round. It was the 126th FA Cup Final and the first to be played at the new Wembley Stadium. Chelsea won the match 1–0 through Didier Drogba's extra time goal, completing a domestic cup double for the Blues in the 2006–07 season, as they had already won the Carling Cup Final in February. United were playing for a double of their own as they had recently beaten Chelsea to the Premier League title two weeks earlier. The game was widely considered to be a disappointment by pundits and fans alike. As a result of Manchester United and Chelsea were having already guaranteed qualification for the UEFA Champions League, the UEFA Cup entry for the FA Cup winner/runner-up went instead to the highest positioned Premier League team who hadn't already qualified for Europe: Bolton Wanderers. The match had an attendance of 89,826, the largest for an FA Cup Final since Wimbledon's famous 1–0 win over Liverpool in the 1988 final, when 98,203 attended. Chelsea became only the third club to complete the domestic cup double – Arsenal did it in 1993
    7.83
    6 votes
    4
    1945 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1945 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Oklahoma A&M Aggies Men's Basketball
    The 1945 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 22, 1945, and ended with the championship game on March 27 in New York City. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Oklahoma A&M, coached by Henry Iba, won the national title with a 49-45 victory in the final game over NYU, coached by Howard Cann. Bob Kurland of Oklahoma A&M was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.71
    7 votes
    5

    1972 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: New York Knicks
    • Champion: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1972 NBA World Championship Series was played at the conclusion of the 1971–72 NBA season. The Western Conference Champion Los Angeles Lakers defeated the Eastern Conference Champion New York Knicks in five games. The Los Angeles Lakers got their first NBA championship since the Lakers moved to Los Angeles from Minneapolis. This season's edition of the Los Angeles Lakers had won a NBA-record 69 regular season games, including 33 wins in a row. They were led by Wilt Chamberlain, the NBA's top rebounder and shot blocker that season. Guards Gail Goodrich and Jerry West were each among the NBA's top ten scorers that season, spearheading the NBA's top offense at 121 points per game. West also led the NBA in assists. The Lakers as a team led all NBA teams in rebounds and assists that season. Los Angeles had swept a solid 57-win Chicago Bulls team in the playoff's opening round, then defeated the defending champion Milwaukee Bucks who won 63 games in six games to win the Western Conference. That historic series had matched Chamberlain against Kareem Abdul Jabbar, and West against Oscar Robertson. Having defeated tough Milwaukee, 48-win New York figured to be an easy formality for the
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    Ed Chynoweth Trophy

    Ed Chynoweth Trophy

    • Runner-up: Calgary Hitmen
    • Champion: Kelowna Rockets
    The Ed Chynoweth Trophy is awarded to the leading scorer at the Memorial Cup tournament. It was first awarded in 1996. In the case of a tie in points, the award is given to the player with the fewest games played. If they have played the same number of games, the award goes to the player with the most goals scored. The current holder is Andrew Shaw who scored seven points in the 2011 Memorial Cup tournament. No player has won the award twice. Amongst the three leagues, a player from the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL) has won the award seven times, while players representing the Ontario Hockey League (OHL) has won it five times and Western Hockey League (WHL) has won the award four times. The WHL's Vancouver Giants and QMJHL's Hull/Gatineau Olympiqes have twice had one of their players win the award. Christian Dube's 13 points in 1997 is the highest winning total for the award, though it falls short of the tournament record of 16 points set by Jeff Larmer of the Kitchener Rangers in 1982 and Guy Rouleau of the Olympiques in 1986. The trophy is named after Ed Chynoweth, who was the president of the WHL from 1972 to 1996. He helped create the Canadian Hockey League (CHL)
    7.33
    6 votes
    7

    1962 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1962 NBA Finals was the championship series of the 1961-62 season, and was the conclusion of the 1962 NBA Playoffs. The best-of-seven series was played between the Western Conference champion Los Angeles Lakers and Eastern Conference champion Boston Celtics. This was the Celtics' 6th straight trip to the Finals, and they won the best-of-seven series in Game 7, 110-107 in overtime. It was the second (and last) time in NBA history that Game 7 of an NBA Finals had gone into overtime (the only other one being in 1957). Boston Celtics defeated Los Angeles Lakers, 4 games to 3 During the series, Lakers forward Elgin Baylor scored a Finals record 61 points in Game 5. Celtics center Bill Russell set a still-standing record for rebounds in a 7-game series with 189, and tied his own record for rebounds in a single game with 40 in Game 7. In the last 5 seconds of regulation in Game 7, Laker Frank Selvy missed an open 12-footer from the baseline that would have won the championship for Los Angeles and ended the Celtics dynasty. Instead, the game went into OT which the Celtics won the game and the title. For the Lakers, it would start the pattern of not winning the big games in the NBA
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    European Cup 1980-81

    European Cup 1980-81

    • Runner-up: Real Madrid
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    The 1980–81 season of the European Cup football club tournament was won for a third time by Liverpool in the final against Real Madrid. In the 11 seasons up to and including this one, there were only four winners of the European Cup (Ajax, Bayern Munich, Nottingham Forest and Liverpool), but there were eleven different runners-up. This record would have continued into the next year as well, but Bayern lost to first-time finalists Aston Villa. Nottingham Forest, the defending champions, were eliminated by CSKA Sofia in the first round. Budapest Honvéd won 11–0 on aggregate. Aberdeen won 1–0 on aggregate. Liverpool won 11–2 on aggregate. CSKA Sofia won 2–0 on aggregate. Szombierki Bytom won 4–2 on aggregate. Bayern Munich won 7–2 on aggregate. Ajax won 3–0 on aggregate. Baník Ostrava won 2–1 on aggregate. Dynamo Berlin won 4–2 on aggregate. Spartak Moscow won 9–0 on aggregate. Esbjerg won 3–2 on aggregate. Real Madrid won 7–2 on aggregate. Budapest Honvéd won 3–0 on aggregate. Nantes won 3–0 on aggregate. Internazionale won 3–1 on aggregate. Basel won 5–1 on aggregate. Red Star Belgrade won 7–3 on aggregate. Liverpool won 5–0 on aggregate. CSKA Sofia won 5–0 on aggregate. Bayern
    8.00
    5 votes
    9
    1970 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1970 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Jacksonville Dolphin men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1970 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 7, 1970, and ended with the championship game on March 21 in College Park, Maryland. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 80-69 victory in the final game over Jacksonville, coached by Joe Williams. Sidney Wicks of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    7.80
    5 votes
    10

    1967 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Golden State Warriors
    • Champion: Philadelphia 76ers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1967 NBA World Championship Series was the championship series of the 1966-67 National Basketball Association season, and was the conclusion of the 1967 NBA Playoffs. The best-of-seven series was played between the Western Conference champion San Francisco Warriors and the Eastern Conference champion Philadelphia 76ers. This was the first championship series in 11 years without the Boston Celtics, who were defeated in the Division Finals by Philadelphia. The 76ers won the series over the Warriors, 4-2. 76ers win series 4-2 * denotes overtime
    6.67
    6 votes
    11
    1962 FIFA World Cup qualification

    1962 FIFA World Cup qualification

    A total of 56 teams entered the 1962 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. Chile, as the hosts, and Brazil, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition. As with previous World Cups, the rules of the qualification rounds were quite confusing. Moreover, the winners of the four weakest continental zones: North America (NAFC), Central America and Caribbean (CCCF), Africa (CAF) and Asia (AFC), were not guaranteed direct spots in the final tournament. Instead, each of them had to enter a play-off against a team from either Europe (UEFA) or South America (CONMEBOL), with the winners of the three play-offs qualifying. The 16 spots available in the 1962 World Cup would be distributed among the continental zones as follows: A total of 49 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 92 qualifying matches were played, and 325 goals were scored (an average of 3.53 per match). Listed below are the dates and results of the qualification rounds. The 30 teams were divided into 10 groups. The groups had different rules, as follows: Sweden and Switzerland finished level on points, and a
    8.75
    4 votes
    12
    1906 World Series

    1906 World Series

    • Runner-up: Chicago Cubs
    • Champion: Chicago White Sox
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1906 World Series featured a crosstown matchup between the Chicago Cubs, who had posted the highest regular-season win total (116) and winning percentage (.763) in the major leagues since the advent of the 154-game season; and the Chicago White Sox. The White Sox, known as the "Hitless Wonders" after finishing with the worst team batting average (.230) in the American League, beat the Cubs in six games for one of the greatest upsets in Series history. The teams split the first four games; then the Hitless Wonders exploded for 26 hits in the last two games. True to their nickname, the White Sox hit only .198 as a team in winning the series but it bettered the .196 average produced by the Cubs. In Game 3, Ed Walsh struck out twelve Cubs, breaking the previous record of eleven set by Bill Dinneen in 1903. AL Chicago White Sox (4) vs. NL Chicago Cubs (2) Tuesday, October 9, 1906 at West Side Grounds in Chicago, Illinois Cubs hurler Mordecai Brown was sent to continue the dominance against Nick Altrock. Both pitchers pitched a perfect game through three innings. The Cubs had a runner at second, but couldn't score in the fourth. In the top of the fifth, George Rohe tripled to lead
    6.50
    6 votes
    13
    1968 European Cup Final

    1968 European Cup Final

    • Runner-up: SL Benfica
    • Champion: Manchester United F.C.
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 1968 European Cup Final was the 13th European Cup Final and the culmination of the 1967–68 European Cup, a club football tournament for the champions of European leagues. The match was held at Wembley Stadium, London, on 29 May 1968, between Manchester United of England and Benfica of Portugal. United beat the Portuguese champions 4–1 after extra time. The first half passed without incident, but, eight minutes into the second half, Bobby Charlton opened the scoring for Manchester United with a rare headed goal. However, the lead only lasted for 22 minutes before Jaime Graça scored for Benfica. The score remained at 1–1 until the end of normal time, forcing the match into extra time, but it might not have ended that way had Alex Stepney not made a crucial save when one-on-one with Eusébio. The temperature was clearly playing a part in the players' fitness, and Benfica's players were clearly flagging when George Best put United in the lead again three minutes into extra time. Picking up the ball 25 yards from goal after the Benfica players failed to deal with Stepney's long kick downfield, Best broke into the penalty area and dribbled round the goalkeeper and rolled the ball into
    7.40
    5 votes
    14
    2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup

    2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup

    The 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup was the fifth edition of the Gold Cup, the football championship of North America, Central America and the Caribbean (CONCACAF). It was held in the United States, in Los Angeles, Miami, and San Diego. The format of the tournament changed from 1998; it was expanded to twelve teams, split into four groups of three. The top two teams in each group would advance to the quarterfinals. Peru and Colombia were invited from CONMEBOL, and the Republic of Korea were invited from AFC. With all three games in Group D ending in ties and Canada tied with the Republic of Korea on every tiebreaker, a coin toss was used. Canada won and advanced to the quarter-finals. They went on to win the championship, upsetting defending champions Mexico in golden goal extra time 2–1. They defeated Trinidad and Tobago in the semi-finals 1–0 after Craig Forrest saved a first-half penalty, and, already assured as CONCACAF champions, topped invitees Colombia 2–0 in the final. North American zone qualified automatically: Caribbean zone qualified through 1998 Caribbean Cup: Central American zone qualified through UNCAF Nations Cup 1999: Qualified through playoff (played in the United States
    7.40
    5 votes
    15

    1949 BAA Finals

    • Runner-up: Washington Capitols
    • Champion: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1949 BAA Finals was the championship round of the Basketball Association of America's 1948–49 season. Basketball Association of America (BAA) would eventually become the National Basketball Association (NBA). 6'10" George Mikan and the Minneapolis Lakers proved dominant in the last BAA finals. They routed the Washington Capitols in 6 games. The was the first of several successive NBA titles for the Lakers. It was the beginning of the George Mikan and the Lakers Dynasty. Lakers win series 4-2
    8.50
    4 votes
    16
    15

    15

    • Champion: Wangaratta Rovers Football Club
    15 (fifteen) is the natural number following 14 and preceding 16. In English, it is the smallest natural number with seven letters in its spelled name. In speech, the numbers 15 and 50 are often confused. When carefully enunciated, they differ in which syllable is stressed: 15 /fɪfˈtiːn/ vs 50 /ˈfɪfti/. However, in dates such as 1500 ("fifteen hundred") or when contrasting numbers in the teens, the stress generally shifts to the first syllable: 15 /ˈfɪftiːn/. Fifteen is a triangular number, a hexagonal number, a pentatope number and the 4th Bell number. Fifteen is the double factorial of 5. It is a composite number; its proper divisors being 1, 3 and 5. With only two exceptions, all prime quadruplets enclose a multiple of 15, with 15 itself being enclosed by the quadruplet (11, 13, 17, 19). 15 is also the number of supersingular primes. 15 is the 4th discrete semiprime (3.5) and the first member of the (3.q) discrete semiprime family. It is thus the first odd discrete semiprime. The number proceeding 15; 14 is itself a discrete semiprime and this is the first such pair of discrete semiprimes. The next example is the pair commencing 21. The aliquot sum of 15 is 9, a square prime 15
    8.25
    4 votes
    17
    AMA Supercross Championship

    AMA Supercross Championship

    Supercross is a motorcycle racing sport involving off-road motorcycles on an artificially-made dirt tracks consisting of steep jumps and obstacles. Professional supercross contest races are held almost exclusively within professional baseball and football stadia. Supercross was derived of Motocross. While Motocross and Supercross are similar in many respects, there are significant differences as well. For example, the Supercross races are heavily advertised and televised motorsports events held within major cities. Also supercross tracks are more technical, not as fast as motocross but with a much higher difficulty level, further adding to the injury risk factor. The sport Supercross is tailored to the TV spectator, as result of widespread television coverage, as its target market. The term "Supercross" was coined as the event name for the first organized motocross race that was successfully held inside a stadium in the United States. In 1972, racing promoter Michael Goodwin staged what he called the "Super Bowl of Motocross" inside the Los Angeles Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. This event was won by Marty Tripes at the age of 16. That initial contest featured many of the top
    8.25
    4 votes
    18
    Memorial Cup

    Memorial Cup

    • Champion: Medicine Hat Tigers
    The Memorial Cup is a junior ice hockey club championship trophy awarded annually to the Canadian Hockey League (CHL) champion. It is awarded following a four-team, round-robin tournament between a host team and the champions of the CHL's three member leagues: the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL) and Western Hockey League (WHL). Fifty-nine teams are eligible to compete for the Memorial Cup, representing nine provinces and four American states. The Shawinigan Cataractes are the current champions, defeating the OHL Champion London Knights 2-1 in overtime of the 2012 championship final on May 27, 2012. The trophy was originally known as the OHA Memorial Cup and was donated by the Ontario Hockey Association (OHA) in 1919 to be awarded to the junior champion of Canada. From its inception until 1971, the Memorial Cup was open to all Junior A teams in the country and was awarded following a series of league, provincial and regional playoffs culminating in an east-west championship. The three-league tournament format began in 1972 when the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association divided the Junior A rank into two tiers, naming the Memorial Cup as the
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    2012 UEFA Champions League Final

    2012 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: FC Bayern Munich
    • Champion: Chelsea F.C.
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2012 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match which took place on Saturday, 19 May 2012 between Bayern Munich of Germany and Chelsea of England at the Allianz Arena in Munich, Germany. The match was to decide the winner of the 2011–12 season of the UEFA Champions League, Europe's premier club football tournament. Bayern were making their ninth appearance in the competition's final, having won four and lost four, most recently losing in 2010. Chelsea were appearing in their second final, having lost their last in 2008. It was the first Champions League final to be held at the Allianz Arena (known as "Fußball Arena München" for the final). As tenants of the Arena, this meant Bayern were the first finalists to have home advantage since 1984. Both teams progressed to the knockout stages by finishing top of their group. Bayern then beat Basel, Marseille and Real Madrid to reach the final, while Chelsea knocked out Napoli, Benfica and defending champions Barcelona. Bayern took the lead late in the second half through Thomas Müller, but Didier Drogba equalised for Chelsea five minutes later to take the game to extra time. The teams stayed level at 1–1 and the match went to a
    7.00
    5 votes
    20
    1944 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1944 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Utah Utes men's basketball
    The 1944 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 24, 1944, and ended with the championship game on March 28 in New York City. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Utah, coached by Vadal Peterson, won the national title with a 42-40 victory in the final game over Dartmouth, coached by Earl Brown. Arnie Ferrin of Utah was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Utah became the first team to play in both the NIT and NCAA tournament in the same season. Utah was given a second chance to play in the NCAA Tournament after an automobile accident injured two players on the Arkansas team.
    9.33
    3 votes
    21
    2004 UEFA Champions League Final

    2004 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: AS Monaco FC
    • Champion: FC Porto
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2004 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match played at the Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on 26 May 2004, to decide the winner of the 2003–04 UEFA Champions League. French club Monaco faced Portugal's Porto, who won the match 3–0, with Carlos Alberto, man of the match Deco and Dmitri Alenichev scoring the goals. Before 2004, Porto's last triumph in the competition had been in 1987 – although they had won the UEFA Cup the previous season – while Monaco were playing in their first ever Champions League final. Both teams started their UEFA Champions League campaigns in the group stage and defeated former European champions on their way to the final. Porto beat 1968 and 1999 winners Manchester United while Monaco defeated nine-time champions Real Madrid. Both teams were considered underdogs in the competition before the final stages and were led by young coaches: Monaco had former France national football team star Didier Deschamps and Porto were led by rising star José Mourinho, who left the team for Chelsea after the final. Monaco finished second in the French Ligue 1 the previous season, meaning that they entered the Champions League at the group stage.
    9.33
    3 votes
    22

    1964 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Golden State Warriors
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1964 NBA Finals was the championship series of the 1963-64 National Basketball Association season, and was the conclusion of the 1964 NBA Playoffs. The best-of-seven series was played between the Western Conference champion San Francisco Warriors and the Eastern Conference champion Boston Celtics. This was the Celtics' 8th straight trip to the championship series, and they won the series over the Warriors, 4-1. Celtics won series 4-1
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Villanova Wildcats men's basketball
    The 1985 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. This was the first year the field was expanded to 64 teams, from 53 in the previous year's tournament. It began on March 14, 1985, and ended with the championship game on April 1 in Lexington, Kentucky. A total of 63 games were played. Eight-seed Villanova, coached by Rollie Massimino, won the national title with a 66–64 victory in the final game over Georgetown, coached by John Thompson. Ed Pinckney of Villanova was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The game is often cited among the greatest upsets in college basketball history. This Villanova team remains the lowest-seeded team to win the tournament. The game is also notable as the last played without a shot clock. This year's Final Four saw an unprecedented and unmatched three teams from the same conference, with Big East members Villanova and Georgetown joined by St. John's. The only "interloper" in the Big East party was Memphis State, then of the Metro Conference. (Memphis State's 1985 Final Four appearance was vacated due to
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    1966 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1966 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: UTEP Miners men's basketball team
    The 1966 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 22 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 7, 1966, and ended with the championship game on March 19 in College Park, Maryland. A total of 26 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Texas Western, coached by Don Haskins, won the national title with a 72–65 victory in the final game over Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp. Coach Haskins started five black players for the first time in NCAA Championship history. Jerry Chambers of Utah was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The 2006 film Glory Road is based on the story of the 1966 Texas Western team. The Tournament is most remembered for the all-black starting five of Texas Western defeating an all-white starting five for Kentucky in the championship game. In the 1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, Loyola started four African-Americans and Cincinnati started three. That was the first time that a majority of African-Americans participated in the championship game. Clem Haskins and Dwight Smith
    6.80
    5 votes
    25
    1983 Cricket World Cup

    1983 Cricket World Cup

    • Champion: India national cricket team
    The 1983 ICC Cricket World Cup (also known as Prudential World Cup) was the third edition of the ICC Cricket World Cup tournament. It was held from 9 June to 25 June 1983 in England and was won by India. Eight countries participated in the event.The 1983 World Cup was full of dramatic cricket right from the start. Teams like India and Zimbabwe who were not playing well at those times scored upset victories over the West Indies and Australia respectively. England, Pakistan, India and tournament favourites West Indies qualified for the semi-finals. The preliminary matches were played in two groups of four teams each, and each country played the others in its group twice. The top two teams in each group qualified for the semi-finals. The matches consisted of 60 overs per team and were played in traditional white clothing and with red balls. They were all played during the day. The format of the 1983 world cup was 2 groups of four teams, each team playing each other twice. The top two team from each group then advance to the Semi Finals where the winners then advance to the finals. and every game was of 60 overs with all day matches. The following 8 teams qualified for the final
    6.80
    5 votes
    26
    1950 FIFA World Cup qualification

    1950 FIFA World Cup qualification

    A total of 34 teams entered the qualification rounds of the 1950 FIFA World Cup, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. Brazil, as the hosts, and Italy, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition. The remaining 32 teams were divided into 10 groups, based on geographical considerations, as follows: However, due to the withdrawals of India, Scotland and Turkey after qualifying, only 13 teams actually competed in the final tournament. A total of 19 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 26 qualifying matches were played, and 121 goals were scored (an average of 4.65 per match). Listed below are the dates and results of the qualification rounds. The 10 groups had different rules, as follows: England qualified. Scotland also qualified, but declined to travel. Syria withdrew, and remaining match was not played. Turkey advanced to the Final Round. Austria withdrew, so Turkey qualified automatically. But Turkey later also withdrew, and FIFA offered the place to Portugal, the runner-up of Group 6, but they declined. FIFA decided not to allow anyone else to qualify, leaving the World Cup two teams
    6.60
    5 votes
    27
    1990 World Series

    1990 World Series

    • Runner-up: Oakland Athletics
    • Champion: Cincinnati Reds
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1990 World Series matched the defending champions and heavily-favored Oakland Athletics against the Cincinnati Reds, with the Reds sweeping the Series in four games. It was the most recent National League sweep of the American League. It is remembered for Billy Hatcher's seven consecutive hits. The sweep extended the Reds world series winning streak to 9 games. This also was the second World Series meeting between the two clubs (Oakland won four games to three in 1972). Athletics manager Tony La Russa and Reds manager Lou Piniella were old friends and teammates from their Tampa American Legion Post 248 team. The Cincinnati Reds won the National League West division by five games over the Los Angeles Dodgers. They set an NL record by staying in first place in the division for the entire season or "wire-to-wire", which had been done only one other time, the (1984 Detroit Tigers). The Reds then defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates, four games to two, in the National League Championship Series. The strength of the Cincinnati Reds bullpen and timely hitting led them to a quick sweep of the AL champions. The Reds' bullpen had three primary members—Norm Charlton, Randy Myers, and Rob
    6.60
    5 votes
    28
    2008 Swedish Rally

    2008 Swedish Rally

    • Championship: World Rally Championship
    The 2008 Swedish Rally, officially 57th Uddeholm Swedish Rally, was the second round of 2008 World Rally Championship season. It was the season's first and only event held on snow- and ice-covered gravel roads. The rally took place during February 7–10, beginning with Super Special Stage placed in rallybase, Karlstad. The rally was also the first round of Production Car World Rally Championship this season. Even though it snowed before the rally, eliminating the threat of calling the event off, the mild temperatures caused cancellation of stages 12 and 18, shortening the overall competitive kilometers count. The rally was won by BP Ford World Rally Team's 22-year-old Jari-Matti Latvala. With his debut win, Latvala became the youngest winner in the history of the World Rally Championship, breaking Henri Toivonen's record from the 1980 RAC Rally. Latvala's team-mate and compatriot Mikko Hirvonen was second and Stobart VK M-Sport Ford's Gigi Galli completed an all-Ford podium. Subaru World Rally Team's Petter Solberg was fourth, followed by Andreas Mikkelsen, Dani Sordo, Toni Gardemeister, Juho Hänninen, Mads Østberg and Jari Ketomaa. Fifth-placed Matthew Wilson ran into technical
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    1987 World Series

    1987 World Series

    • Runner-up: St. Louis Cardinals
    • Champion: Minnesota Twins
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1987 World Series pitted the Minnesota Twins versus the St. Louis Cardinals. Minnesota was victorious in a World Series that was the first in which the home team won every game. This happened again in 1991 (also a Twins championship) over Atlanta and 2001 (Arizona defeated New York (AL)). The World Series win was the first for the Twins franchise since 1924, when the team was located in Washington, D.C., and was known as the Washington Senators. The 1987 Series was remarkable in several regards: It featured the first World Series games played in an indoor stadium (the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome) and the final Series game to start earlier than prime time in the eastern United States (Game 6, with a 4 p.m. ET start), and was the first World Series in which all games were won by the home team. (Four previous series had the home team winning the first six games.) The 1987 Twins set the record for the worst (full 162 game) regular season win-loss record of any World Series championship team (85–77, .525). This record stood until broken in 2006 by the Cardinals themselves, who won the World Series after going 83–78 (.516). Besides setting a record for the worst ever regular season
    7.50
    4 votes
    30
    2003 Cricket World Cup

    2003 Cricket World Cup

    • Runner-up: India national cricket team
    • Champion: Australian cricket team
    The 2003 ICC Cricket World Cup was the eighth ICC Cricket World Cup and was played in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Kenya from 9 February to 24 March. 2003 was the first time that the Cricket World Cup had been held in Africa. The tournament featured 14 teams and 54 matches, the most in the tournament history up to that time. The tournament followed the format introduced in the 1999 ICC Cricket World Cup with the teams divided into 2 groups, and the top three in each group qualifying for the Super Sixes stage. The tournament saw upsets in the first round with co-host and tournament favourite South Africa, Pakistan, West Indies and England, who forfeited their pool match with Zimbabwe due to the political unrest in the country, failing to make it to Super Sixes stage while Zimbabwe and Kenya made it to Super Sixes stage and Kenya, a non-Test playing nation, made the semi-finals of the tournament. The tournament was won by the defending champions Australia, who defeated India in the final, making them the first country to win more than 2 World Cups since the inception of the tournament in 1975. 14 teams played in the 2003 ICC Cricket World Cup, the largest number of teams to play in a
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    2003 Rugby World Cup

    2003 Rugby World Cup

    The 2003 Rugby World Cup was the fifth Rugby World Cup and was won by England. Originally planned to be co-hosted by Australia and New Zealand, all games were shifted to Australia following a contractual dispute over ground signage rights between the New Zealand Rugby Football Union and Rugby World Cup Limited. The pre-event favorites were England, regarded by many at the time as the best team in the world after defeating all of the traditional southern hemisphere teams and also after winning the grand slam in the 2003 Six Nations Championship and New Zealand, with France, South Africa and defending champions Australia all expected to make strong showings. The tournament began with host nation Australia defeating Argentina 24–8 at Telstra Stadium in Sydney. Australia went on to defeat New Zealand 22–10 in the semifinal, to play England in the final. Along with a try to Jason Robinson, Jonny Wilkinson kicked four penalties and then a drop-goal in extra time to win the game 20–17 for England, who became the first northern hemisphere team to win the Webb Ellis Cup and become world champions for the first time. The following 20 teams, shown by region, qualified for the 2003 Rugby World
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    2008 FA Cup Final

    2008 FA Cup Final

    • Runner-up: Cardiff City F.C.
    • Champion: Portsmouth F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2008 FA Cup Final was a football match held at Wembley Stadium on 17 May 2008 and was the final match of the 2007–08 FA Cup competition. The match was the 127th FA Cup Final, and the second to be held at the new Wembley Stadium since its redevelopment. The match was contested by Portsmouth and Cardiff City, with Portsmouth winning 1–0. This was the first time that the two sides have ever met in the competition, as both teams were aiming to win the FA Cup for the second time, Cardiff having won it in 1927 and Portsmouth in 1939. Had Cardiff won, they would have been the first club from outside the top division of English football to have won the competition since West Ham United in 1980. The winning team received £1 million in prize money. As in the past few years, the players voted Player of the Round in every round from the First Qualifying Round to the Semi-finals will be present and given VIP hospitality for themselves and a guest. Although Cardiff City are considered a Welsh club and only hold associate membership with the Football Association, should they have won the 2008 FA Cup they would have been allowed to compete in the 2008–09 UEFA Cup. It enabled Portsmouth to
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    1958 FIFA World Cup qualification

    1958 FIFA World Cup qualification

    A total of 55 teams entered the 1958 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. Sweden as the hosts and West Germany, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition. The qualification rounds for the four previous World Cups were very confusing, with controversial rules and many withdrawals. From this tournament onwards, FIFA decided to divide the teams into several continental zones, assign a pre-determined number of places in the final tournament to each zone, and delegate the organization of the qualifying tournaments to its confederations: UEFA of Europe, CONMEBOL of South America, NAFC of North America, CCCF of Central America and Caribbean, CAF of Africa and AFC of Asia (and OFC of Oceania after it was formed later). This led to a more organized qualification process with clearer rules, but not yet withdrawal-proof. The 16 spots available in the 1958 World Cup would be distributed among the continental zones as follows: However, FIFA also imposed a rule that no team would qualify without playing at least one match because many teams qualified for previous World Cups without playing
    10.00
    2 votes
    34
    1956 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1956 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: San Francisco Dons men's basketball
    The 1956 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1956, and ended with the championship game on March 24 on Northwestern University's campus in Evanston, Illinois. A total of 29 games were played, including a third-place game in each region and a national third-place game. This was the first NCAA tournament in which the four regionals were given distinct names, although the concept of four regional winners advancing to a single site for the "Final Four" had been introduced in 1952. San Francisco, coached by Phil Woolpert, won the national title with an 83–71 victory in the final game over Iowa, coached by Bucky O'Connor. Hal Lear of Temple was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    7.25
    4 votes
    35
    1957 World Ice Hockey Championships

    1957 World Ice Hockey Championships

    • Runner-up: Soviet national ice hockey team
    • Champion: Swedish National Men's Ice Hockey Team
    The 1957 Men's Ice Hockey World Championships were held between 24 February and 5 March 1957 at the Palace of Sports of the Central Lenin Stadium in Moscow, USSR. This was the last World Championships played on natural ice; and were the first World Championships held in the USSR and they are remembered for the political circumstances surrounding the games. Hungary had been recently occupied by the Soviet Army (to suppress a revolution in October and November 1956), and as a result, the United States and Canada boycotted the World Championships in protest. Joining them were Norway, West Germany, Italy and Switzerland. East Germany was participating for the first time. With the boycott, the home team USSR was heavily favoured to win the tournament, but Sweden surprised the world by pulling off an upset. The first step was taken in their third game, when they beat Czechoslovakia 2-0. This important victory was saved by the head of Leksands IF defenseman Vilgot Larsson. He literally headed the puck away from the Swedish net to save a goal, and in the days before mandatory helmets, received several stitches for his heroics. In the final game, Sweden opened with two goals, but the
    7.25
    4 votes
    36
    1976 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1976 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Indiana Hoosiers men's basketball
    The 1976 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 13, 1976, and ended with the championship game on March 29 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A total of 32 games were played, including a national third place game. Indiana, coached by Bob Knight, won the national title with a 86–68 victory in the final game over Michigan, coached by Johnny Orr. Kent Benson of Indiana was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Notably, this was the first time that two teams from the same conference (the Big Ten) played in the title game. Also, this was the last men's Division I tournament to date to feature two unbeaten teams, as both Indiana and Rutgers entered the tournament unbeaten. To date, Indiana is the last team to go the entire season undefeated. Both advanced to the Final Four, with Indiana winning the title and Rutgers losing to Michigan in the semifinals and UCLA in the third-place game.
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    1920 World Series

    1920 World Series

    • Runner-up: Brooklyn Robins
    • Champion: Cleveland Indians
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1920 World Series, the Cleveland Indians beat the Brooklyn Dodgers, then known interchangeably as the Robins in reference to their manager Wilbert Robinson, in seven games, five games to two. This series was a best-of-nine series, like the first World Series in 1903 and the World Series of 1919 and 1921. The only World Series triple play, the first World Series grand slam and the first World Series home run by a pitcher all occurred in Game 5 of this Series. The Indians won the series in memory of their former shortstop Ray Chapman, who had been killed earlier in the season when struck in the head by a pitched ball. The triple play was unassisted and turned by Cleveland's Bill Wambsganss in Game 5. Wambsganss, playing second base, caught a line drive off the bat of Clarence Mitchell, stepped on second base to put out Pete Kilduff, and tagged Otto Miller coming from first base. It was the second of fifteen (as of 2009) unassisted triple plays in major-league baseball history, and it remains the only one in postseason play. Mitchell made history again in the eighth inning by hitting into a double play, accounting for five outs in two straight at-bats. The fifth game also saw
    8.33
    3 votes
    38
    2008 Rally Japan

    2008 Rally Japan

    • Championship: World Rally Championship
    The 2008 Rally Japan was the fourteenth and penultimate round of the 2008 World Rally Championship season. The event saw Sébastien Loeb clinch his fifth consecutive world drivers title with his drive to a third place finish. The event was won by Mikko Hirvonen in a Ford Focus, who led the event from start to finish to claim his third win of the season. Second place went to Hirvonen's team mate Jari-Matti Latvala, his fifth podium of the year and his first since the Rally of Turkey back in June. Stobart M-Sport Ford's François Duval crashed out from second place during the sixth stage. Duval was not injured in the crash, but his co-driver Patrick Pivato sustained a fractured pelvis and tibia. He was rushed to the hospital, and internal bleeding was discovered during surgery. On day two of the rally, after a second operation, his condition was described as critical but stable. On the 19th stage, Toni Gardemeister took the Suzuki World Rally Team's first-ever stage win. Suzuki also had their most successful rally to date with Gardemeister finishing sixth and team mate Per-Gunnar Andersson recording his best ever finish of fifth position. The event was originally planned to run on
    6.20
    5 votes
    39
    2011 Rugby World Cup

    2011 Rugby World Cup

    The 2011 Rugby World Cup was the seventh Rugby World Cup, a quadrennial international rugby union competition inaugurated in 1987. The International Rugby Board (IRB) selected New Zealand as the host country in preference to Japan and South Africa at a meeting in Dublin on 17 November 2005. The tournament was won by New Zealand, who defeated France 8–7 in the final. The defending champions, South Africa, were eliminated by Australia 11–9 in the quarter-finals. It was the largest sporting event ever held in New Zealand, eclipsing the 1987 Rugby World Cup, 1990 Commonwealth Games, 1992 Cricket World Cup and the 2003 America's Cup. Overseas visitors to New Zealand for the event totalled 133,000, more than the 95,000 that the organisers expected. However there was a drop in non-event visitors, meaning the net increase in visitors over the previous year was less than 80,000. The games ran over six weeks commencing with the Rugby World Cup 2011 Opening Ceremony showcasing New Zealand's vast history and diverse cultures on 9 September 2011. The final was played on Sunday 23 October 2011, a date chosen because it fell on a long weekend caused by the New Zealand public holiday of Labour Day
    9.50
    2 votes
    40

    1968 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1968 NBA World Championship Series pitted the Boston Celtics from the East, against the Los Angeles Lakers from the West, for the sixth time in ten years. The Celtics won their tenth NBA Championship in twelve seasons, by defeating the Lakers in six games. Significantly, Game Six of the 1968 NBA Finals marked the first time that any NBA competition had taken place during the month of May. Celtics win series 4-2
    7.00
    4 votes
    41

    1978 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Seattle Supersonics
    • Champion: Washington Wizards
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1978 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the 1977-78 NBA season. The Seattle SuperSonics had a disappointing start to the season, going 5–17 to begin with. Bob Hopkins, who replaced former Boston Celtics center Bill Russell as coach, was fired and Lenny Wilkens returned for a second tour of duty. The Sonics were led by center Jack Sikma, forwards Fred Brown, Paul Silas and John Johnson, and guards Dennis Johnson and Gus Williams. With Wilkens' experience being a key factor, the Sonics turned their season around, finishing with 47 wins and the fourth seed in the West. In the playoffs, they defeated the Los Angeles Lakers in a three-game miniseries, then upset the top-seeded and defending champion Portland Trail Blazers in six games, before announcing their finals debut with a six-game win over the Denver Nuggets. The Washington Bullets franchise have made the finals twice in the 1970s, but were swept on both occasions, first by the Milwaukee Bucks in 1971 when they were still in Baltimore, and then by the Cinderella Golden State Warriors in 1975. The Bullets kept some of the personnel from that 1975 team, including All-Stars Wes Unseld and Elvin Hayes,
    7.00
    4 votes
    42
    UAAP Season 70 judo championships - Women's Division

    UAAP Season 70 judo championships - Women's Division

    The Women's division of the Judo championships of UAAP Season 70 is being contested from October 6 to October 7, 2007 at the Ateneo Blue Eagle Gym. The UP Lady Judokas were the champions going into the championships and successful defended this crown by almost sweeping the tournament, winning six of the seven gold medals in store. Other divisions
    7.00
    4 votes
    43
    1947 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1947 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Holy Cross Crusaders men's basketball
    The 1947 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 19, 1947, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in New York City. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Holy Cross, coached by Doggie Julian, won the national title with a 58-47 victory in the final game over Oklahoma, coached by Bruce Drake. George Kaftan of Holy Cross was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.00
    5 votes
    44
    1954 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1954 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: La Salle Explorers Basketball
    The 1954 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 24 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1954, and ended with the championship game on March 20 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 28 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. La Salle, coached by Ken Loeffler, won the national title with a 92-76 victory in the final game over Bradley, coached by Forddy Anderson. Tom Gola of La Salle was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Of note, Kentucky, the top-ranked team in the nation (with a record of 25-0) did not participate in any post-season tournament. Since several key players had technically graduated the year before (when Kentucky was banned from playing a competitive schedule due to the point-shaving scandal a few years earlier), those players were ruled ineligible for the NCAA tournament. Despite the wishes of the players, Adolph Rupp ultimately decided his team wouldn't play. LSU represented the Southeastern Conference in the tournament. It would be the Bayou Bengals' last appearance until 1979,
    6.00
    5 votes
    45
    1977 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1977 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Marquette Golden Eagles men's basketball
    The 1977 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 American schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the National Champion of Men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1977, and ended with the championship game on March 28 in Atlanta, Georgia. A total of 32 games were played, including a national third place game. This was the final tournament in which teams were not seeded. Marquette, coached by Al McGuire, won the national title with a 67–59 victory in the final game over North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith. Butch Lee of Marquette was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Publicly announcing his retirement during the middle of the season, McGuire retired as head coach immediately after the game. UNLV and Charlotte (at that time known by a longer abbreviation of its full name, UNC Charlotte) were third and fourth place, respectively. Cole Field House - College Park, Maryland Marriott Center - Provo, Utah Rupp Arena - Lexington, Kentucky Myriad Convention Center - Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Omni Coliseum - Atlanta, Georgia
    6.00
    5 votes
    46
    1981 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1981 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Indiana Hoosiers men's basketball
    The 1981 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 48 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1981, and ended with the championship game on March 30 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A total of 48 games were played, including a national third place game (the last in the NCAA tournament). Indiana, coached by Bob Knight, won the national title with a 63-50 victory in the final game over North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith. Isiah Thomas of Indiana was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. NOTES: 1. This was the last tournament that a third place game was staged prior to the national championship. 2. Both the third place and national championship games were delayed following the assassination attempt by John Hinckley, Jr. on President Ronald Reagan.
    6.00
    5 votes
    47
    1910 World Series

    1910 World Series

    • Runner-up: Chicago Cubs
    • Champion: Philadelphia Athletics
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1910 World Series featured the Philadelphia Athletics and the Chicago Cubs, with the Athletics winning in five games to earn their first championship. Jack Coombs of Philadelphia won three games and Eddie Collins supplied timely hitting. The greatest Cubs team in history closed out its glory years, only ten years into the new century. AL Philadelphia Athletics (4) vs. NL Chicago Cubs (1) Monday, October 17, 1910 at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Chief Bender allowed the Cubs just three hits and one unearned run. Tuesday, October 18, 1910 at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Jack Coombs, pitching an erractic game in which he allowed eight hits and walked nine but still picked up the win. The Cubs left 14 men on base, a Series record at that time. The A's combed Mordecai Brown for 13 hits, including four doubles in a six-run eighth that put the game away. Thursday, October 20, 1910 at West Side Grounds in Chicago, Illinois Saturday, October 22, 1910 at West Side Grounds in Chicago, Illinois The Cubs were trailing 3–2 in the bottom of the ninth, then they tied it on a triple by Frank Chance, then won it in the tenth on a base hit by Jimmy Sheckard. Sunday, October
    8.00
    3 votes
    48
    1917 World Series

    1917 World Series

    • Runner-up: New York Giants
    • Champion: Chicago White Sox
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1917 World Series, the Chicago White Sox beat the New York Giants four games to two. The Series was played against the backdrop of World War I, which dominated the American newspapers that year and next. The strong Chicago White Sox club had finished the 1917 season with a 100–54 record: their first and only one-hundred-win season in franchise history as of 2009. The Sox's next World Series winner in 2005 would finish the regular season with a 99–63 record. The Sox won Game 1 of the Series in Chicago 2–1 behind a complete game by Eddie Cicotte. Happy Felsch hit a home run in the fourth inning that provided the winning margin. The Sox beat the Giants in Game 2 by a score of 7–2 behind another complete game effort by Red Faber to take a 2–0 lead in the Series. Back in New York for Game 3, Cicotte again threw a complete game, but the Sox could not muster a single run against Giants starter Rube Benton and lost 2–0. In Game 4 the Sox were shut out again 5–0 by Ferdie Schupp. Faber threw another complete game, but the Series was even at 2–2 going back to Chicago. Reb Russell started Game 5 in Chicago, but only faced three batters before giving way to Cicotte. Going into the
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Super Bowl V

    Super Bowl V

    • Runner-up: Dallas Cowboys
    • Champion: Baltimore Colts
    • Championship: Super Bowl
    Super Bowl V was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Baltimore Colts and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Dallas Cowboys to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1970 season. The Colts defeated the Cowboys by the score of 16–13. The game was played on January 17, 1971, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida, the first Super Bowl game played on artificial turf. This was the first Super Bowl played after the completion of the AFL-NFL Merger. As per the merger agreement, all 26 AFL and NFL teams were divided into 2 conferences with 13 teams in each of them. Along with the Colts, the Cleveland Browns and the Pittsburgh Steelers agreed to join the 10 AFL teams to form the AFC. The remaining 13 NFL teams formed the NFC. This explains why the Colts represented the NFL in Super Bowl III, but not the NFC for Super Bowl V. Baltimore advanced to Super Bowl V after posting an 11-2-1 regular season record. Meanwhile, the Cowboys were making their first Super Bowl appearance after posting a 10-4 regular season record. The game is sometimes called the "Blunder Bowl" or the "Stupor Bowl" because it was filled with poor
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    1960 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1960 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Ohio State Buckeyes men's basketball
    The 1960 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 7, 1960, and ended with the championship game on March 19 in Daly City, California (immediately south of San Francisco). A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Ohio State, coached by Fred Taylor, won the national title with a 75-55 victory in the final game over California, coached by Pete Newell. Jerry Lucas of Ohio State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.75
    4 votes
    51
    1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 15, 1975, and ended with the championship game on March 31 in San Diego, California. A total of 36 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won his 10th and last national title with a 92–85 victory in the final game over Kentucky, coached by Joe B. Hall. Richard Washington of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The Bruins again had an advantage by playing the Final Four in their home state. It marked the last time a team won the national championship playing in its home state. There were two memorable games in the 1975 tournament. Number 2 ranked Kentucky upset previously unbeaten Indiana 92-90 in their regional final. The Hoosiers, coached by Bob Knight, were undefeated and the number one team in the nation, when leading scorer Scott May suffered a broken arm in a win over arch-rival Purdue. This was the only loss Indiana would suffer between March 1974 and December 1976. In
    6.75
    4 votes
    52
    1978 World Series

    1978 World Series

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Dodgers
    • Champion: New York Yankees
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1978 World Series matched the defending champion New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a rematch of the 1977 Series, with the Yankees winning in six games to repeat as champions. 1978 was the first of ten consecutive years that saw ten different teams win the World Series, a string unprecedented in Major League Baseball history. The Los Angeles Dodgers would break the string with a World Series win in 1988 (as they won in the 1981 World Series). This Series had two memorable confrontations between Dodger rookie pitcher Bob Welch and the Yankees' Reggie Jackson. In Game 2, Welch struck Jackson out in the top of the ninth with two outs and the tying and go-ahead runs on base to end the game. Jackson would get his revenge in Game 6 by smashing a two-run homer off Welch in the seventh to increase the Yankees' lead from 5–2 to 7–2 and put a final "exclamation point" on the Yankees' victory. It wasn’t easy for these two teams to repeat as their respective league’s champions, both scrambling back to the Fall Classic late in the season. The New York Yankees were as far back as fourteen games behind the Boston Red Sox at mid-July suffering from injuries to pitchers Catfish
    6.75
    4 votes
    53
    2008–09 Football League Championship

    2008–09 Football League Championship

    • Runner-up: Birmingham City F.C.
    • Champion: Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C.
    • Championship: Football League Championship
    The Football League 2008–09 (called Coca-Cola Football League for sponsorship reasons), was the seventeenth season under its current league division format. It began in August 2008 and concluded on 25 May 2009, with the promotion play-off finals. The winners of the Championship in 2009 were Wolverhampton Wanderers. Promoted to Premier League Relegated to League One Relegated from Premier League Promoted from League One Updated to games played on 3 May 2009 Source: The Football League Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored. Crystal Palace were give a one-point deduction for using an ineligible player during a match against Sheffield United on 3 May 2009. Southampton were given a ten-point deduction for breaching insolvency regulations, regarding their holding company. As they finished in the bottom three this season, the points deduction will be applied next season. (C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round. Only applicable when the season is not finished: (Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular
    6.75
    4 votes
    54
    2012 ICC World Twenty20

    2012 ICC World Twenty20

    • Runner-up: Sri Lankan cricket team
    • Champion: West Indian cricket team
    • Championship: ICC World Twenty20
    The 2012 ICC World Twenty20 is the fourth ICC World Twenty20 competition, an international Twenty20 cricket tournament that is being held in Sri Lanka from September 18 to October 7, 2012 and was won by the West Indies . The schedule has been posted by International Cricket Council (ICC). This is the first World Twenty20 tournament held in an Asian country, the last three having being held in South Africa, England and the West Indies. Sri Lankan pacer Lasith Malinga has been chosen as the event ambassador of the tournament by ICC. The format has four groups of three teams in a preliminary round. India and England are in the same group and were joined by the runner up of the ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier, Afghanistan. The champions of the ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier, Ireland, are in a group with West Indies and Australia. Sri Lanka, South Africa and Zimbabwe, and Pakistan, New Zealand and Bangladesh are the other two groups. Match fixtures were announced on 21 September 2011 by ICC. On the same date, the ICC also unveiled the logo of the tournament, named "Modern Spin". The 2012 World Twenty20 is the fourth edition of the Twenty20 tournament. The first was hosted by South Africa in
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    Campeonato Brasileiro Série A 2008

    Campeonato Brasileiro Série A 2008

    • Runner-up: Grêmio Foot-Ball Porto Alegrense
    • Champion: São Paulo Futebol Clube
    • Championship: Campeonato Brasileiro Série A
    The 38th season of the Campeonato Brasileiro began on May 8 and ended on December 7. For the first time, one club has won the championship three times in a row. Also, São Paulo has been crowned the biggest winner in the history of the competition, winning it six times since its establishment in 1971. The first goal of the tournament was scored by Cruzeiro's Marcelo Moreno on the first minute of the 2-0 win against Vitória. On the same day, holders São Paulo had a bad start, losing to Grêmio 1-0 at home. One day later, Portuguesa and Figueirense tied 5-5 in match with the highest scoring in the competition. Flamengo took the lead on round 5 and kept it until round 14, when Grêmio thrased Figueirense 1-7 in the biggest win of the season. In the end of the first half of the championship, Grêmio had a six-point lead over second place Cruzeiro. One week later, Grêmio beat São Paulo again by 1-0, increasing the difference between both clubs to eleven points. São Paulo was the fifth place at that time, and that would be their last defeat in the tournament. During the second half of the season, five teams were alternating positions inside the top five clubs in the table. Palmeiras took the
    6.75
    4 votes
    56
    Copa Libertadores 2005

    Copa Libertadores 2005

    • Runner-up: Clube Atlético Paranaense
    • Champion: São Paulo Futebol Clube
    • Championship: Copa Libertadores de América
    The 2005 Copa Libertadores was the 46th edition of the Copa Libertadores. The champion also qualified for the 2005 FIFA Club World Championship. It was the first time ever that two teams from the same country reached the final. This year's tournament was also the first Copa Libertadores to employ the away goals rule in knockout ties. São Paulo won the tournament, becoming the first Brazilian team to win the cup on three occasions. 12 teams from 11 football associations dispute 6 places in the Group Stage. Team #1 was home in the first leg. The six winners from the preliminary round join the other twenty-six teams in the group stage. The top 2 teams in each group advanced to the knockout stage. Tiebreakers, if necessary, are applied in the following order: The teams seeded 1 to 8 (first placed teams of each group) and 9 to 16 (second placed teams of each group) and the ties were 1 vs 16, 2 vs 15, etc. First leg matches were played between May 17, 2005 and May 19, 2005. Second leg matches were played between May 24, 2005 and May 26, 2005. First leg matches were played on June 1, 2005 and June 2, 2005. Second leg matches were played between June 14, 2005 and June 16, 2005. First leg
    6.75
    4 votes
    57
    UAAP Season 71 men's basketball tournament

    UAAP Season 71 men's basketball tournament

    • Champion: Ateneo Blue Eagles
    The UAAP Season 71 men's basketball tournament is the 2008-09 season of the University Athletic Association of the Philippines (UAAP) Basketball Championship, with University of the Philippines, Diliman as the season host, to coincide with the centennial celebrations of the University of the Philippines System. The Ateneo de Manila University Blue Eagles swept their arch rivals De La Salle University-Manila Green Archers in two games to clinch their first UAAP title since 2002, and to give head coach Norman Black his first collegiate championship. Ateneo's Rabeh Al-Hussaini was named Most Valuable Player (MVP) of the season, while Nonoy Baclao was named as the Finals MVP. Ryan Buenafe won the Rookie of the Year honors, also for the Ateneo. Aboy Castro succeeds Joe Lipa as the new head coach of the UP Fighting Maroons, after Lipa led his team to a 0–14 record in Season 70. Castro was an assistant coach of Glenn Capacio for the Far Eastern University (FEU) Tamaraws, and of Chot Reyes for the Philippines men's basketball national team, the San Miguel Beermen and Talk 'N Text Phone Pals. Newly crowned World Boxing Council lightweight and super featherweight champion Manny Pacquiao and
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    1985 World Series

    1985 World Series

    • Runner-up: St. Louis Cardinals
    • Champion: Kansas City Royals
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1985 World Series began on October 19, 1985 and ended October 27. The American League champion Kansas City Royals played against the National League champion St. Louis Cardinals, winning the series four games to three. The Series was popularly known as the "Show-Me Series", or the "I-70 Showdown Series," as both cities are in Missouri, connected by Interstate 70. The Cardinals won the National League East division by three games over the New York Mets, then defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers, four games to two, in the National League Championship Series. The Royals won the American League West division by one game over the California Angels then defeated the Toronto Blue Jays, four games to three, in the American League Championship Series. The Cardinals were seeking to win their NL-leading tenth World Series title, while the Royals were seeking to become the first AL expansion team to win the World Series. This was the first World Series in which all games were played at night. This was also the first World Series that featured commentator Tim McCarver, who called the 1985 World Series with Al Michaels and Jim Palmer for ABC. Howard Cosell was originally supposed to be in the
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    2003 UEFA Champions League Final

    2003 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: Juventus F.C.
    • Champion: A.C. Milan
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2003 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match that took place at Old Trafford in Manchester, England on 28 May 2003 to decide the winner of the 2002–03 UEFA Champions League. The match was contested by two Italian teams in the shape of Juventus and Milan. The match made history as the first time two clubs from Italy had faced each other in the final. It was also the second intra-national final of the competition, following the all-Spanish 2000 UEFA Champions League Final three years earlier. Milan won the match via a penalty shootout after the game had finished 0–0 after extra time. It gave Milan their sixth success in the European Cup. Juventus went into the Champions League final as champions of Italy for the 27th time. Milan came fourth in the league, finishing with sixteen fewer points than Juventus, and had to qualify for the third qualifying round. ln the Serie A games between the two sides in the 2001–02 season, Milan drew 1–1 at San Siro under Carlo Ancelotti on 9 December 2001, while Juventus won 1–0 at Stadio delle Alpi on 14 April 2002 under Marcello Lippi. They also met in the Coppa Italia games, where Juventus won 3–2 on aggregate in the semi-finals. Milan
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    2006 NBA Finals

    2006 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Dallas Mavericks
    • Champion: Miami Heat
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 2006 NBA Finals was the championship series of the 2005–06 National Basketball Association season. The Miami Heat won the championship in six games over the Dallas Mavericks, winning the final game at the American Airlines Center in Dallas, and becoming the third team to win a championship after trailing 0–2 in the series. This was Dallas' and Miami's first appearance in the finals, as well as the second matchup of teams from Florida and Texas (with the Houston Rockets and Orlando Magic participating in the 1995 NBA Finals). Heat guard Dwyane Wade was named Most Valuable Player of the series. It was also the first Finals not to have either the Los Angeles Lakers or San Antonio Spurs since 1998. It also marked the first time since 1971 that the Finals featured both teams playing in their first NBA Finals series. To date, it is also the last Finals loss by a team from Texas (the Rockets lost in 1981 and 1986) against seven championships (four by the Spurs, two by the Rockets, and one by the Mavericks, who won a rematch of this Finals in 2011). The Dallas Mavericks franchise joined the NBA in the 1980–81 season. During the mid-1980s they rose to become contenders in the Western
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    UNCAF Nations Cup 1999

    UNCAF Nations Cup 1999

    The 1999 UNCAF Nations Cup was a UNCAF Nations Cup held in San Jose, Costa Rica in March 1999. The host team won the tournament's final group. Costa Rica then qualified automatically, alongside second-placed Guatemala and third-placed Honduras for the 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup. played in San José, Costa Rica
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    1966 World Series

    1966 World Series

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Dodgers
    • Champion: Baltimore Orioles
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1966 World Series matched the Baltimore Orioles against the defending champion Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Orioles sweeping the Series in four games to capture their first championship in franchise history. It was also the last World Series played before MLB introduced the Commissioner's Trophy the following year. Despite the general consensus that the Orioles were short of pitching when compared to the likes of Don Drysdale and Sandy Koufax, Orioles pitching allowed only two runs in the entire series and ended up with a 0.50 team ERA, the second lowest in World Series history. The Orioles scored more runs in the first inning of the first game than the Dodgers would score in the whole series. The Dodgers' young Jim Barbieri became the first player to play in both a Little League World Series and also the Major League World Series when he pinch-hit for a Dodger relief pitcher in Game 1 of the series. A strikeout, it was the final appearance of his brief career. AL Baltimore Orioles (4) vs. NL Los Angeles Dodgers (0) Wednesday, October 5, 1966 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California In the top of the first inning, after Luis Aparicio flied to right, Drysdale walked Russ
    5.80
    5 votes
    63
    1909 World Series

    1909 World Series

    • Runner-up: Detroit Tigers
    • Champion: Pittsburgh Pirates
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1909 World Series featured the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Detroit Tigers. The Pirates won the Series in seven games to capture their first championship of the modern Major League Baseball era and the second championship in the club's history. They had won the pennant in 1909 behind the brilliant play of Honus Wagner, who led the league with a .339 batting average and 100 RBI. Detroit returned for their third consecutive Fall Classic determined to erase the memories of their previous efforts. The Tigers were also backed up by the heavy bat of Ty Cobb (who had just won his third consecutive American League batting title) and a formidable pitching staff. They might have finally won the Series in their third try had it not been for Pirates rookie Babe Adams. Manager Fred Clarke started him, on a hunch, in Game 1. Adams won that game and two more, setting a World Series record. The Tigers thus became the first AL team to win three consecutive pennants and the first team to lose three straight World Series (the New York Giants would lose three straight Series during 1911–1913). The Pirates ran at will against the weak Detroit catching corps, stealing 18 bases in seven games. Ty Cobb
    7.67
    3 votes
    64

    1948 BAA Finals

    • Runner-up: Philadelphia Warriors
    • Champion: Baltimore Bullets
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1948 BAA Finals was the championship round of the Basketball Association of America's 1947–48 season. Basketball Association of America (BAA) would eventually become the National Basketball Association (NBA). Bullets win series 4-2
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Michigan Wolverines men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1965 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1965, and ended with the championship game on March 20 in Portland, Oregon. A total of 27 games were played, including a third-place game in each region and a national third-place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 91–80 victory in the final game over Michigan, coached by Dave Strack. Bill Bradley of Princeton was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. UCLA finished the season with 28 wins and two defeats. In the championship game, the Bruins shot 56.9% with Gail Goodrich's 42 points and Kenny Washington's 17 points to become the fifth team to win consecutive championships.
    7.67
    3 votes
    66

    1990 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Portland Trail Blazers
    • Champion: Detroit Pistons
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1990 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1989-90 NBA season. The series pitted the Detroit Pistons (the previous year's champions) against the Portland Trail Blazers. This was the first NBA Finals since 1979 not to involve either the Lakers or the Celtics, effectively marking the end of an era for both franchises. The Pistons became the just the third franchise in NBA history to win back-to-back championships, joining the Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics. Renowned Pistons announcer George Blaha narrated the season-ending documentary "Pure Pistons" for NBA Entertainment, with MC Hammer's "U Can't Touch This" being the closing song. The Portland Trail Blazers last made the NBA Finals when they won the NBA championship in 1977. In between finals appearances, the Blazers made the playoffs every year except 1982, but most of the time were eliminated in the first or second round. During this period the Blazers had excellent draft choices in Clyde Drexler, Terry Porter and Jerome Kersey in addition to game-changing deals such as trading for Buck Williams and Kevin Duckworth, but also had poor selections such as 1984 No. 2 pick Sam Bowie and 1978 top pick Mychal Thompson,
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Super Bowl XLIII

    Super Bowl XLIII

    • Runner-up: Arizona Cardinals
    • Champion: Pittsburgh Steelers
    • Championship: Super Bowl
    Super Bowl XLIII was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Pittsburgh Steelers and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Arizona Cardinals to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2008 season. The Steelers defeated the Cardinals by the score of 27–23. The game was played on February 1, 2009, at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. With this win, the Steelers became the first team to win six Super Bowls. Pittsburgh, who finished the regular season with a 12–4 record, also won their second Super Bowl in four years after winning Super Bowl XL at the end of the 2005 season. The Cardinals entered the game seeking their first NFL title since 1947, the longest championship drought in the league. The club became an unexpected winner during the regular season, compiling a 9–7 record, and the playoffs with the aid of head coach Ken Whisenhunt, who was the Steelers' offensive coordinator in Super Bowl XL, and the re-emergence of quarterback Kurt Warner, who was the Super Bowl MVP in Super Bowl XXXIV with his former team, St. Louis Rams. Pittsburgh jumped to a 17–7 halftime lead, aided by linebacker James Harrison's
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    1955 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1955 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: San Francisco Dons men's basketball
    The 1955 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 24 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1955, and ended with the championship game on March 19 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 28 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. San Francisco, coached by Phil Woolpert, won the national title with a 77-63 victory in the final game over La Salle, coached by Ken Loeffler. Bill Russell of San Francisco was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    10.00
    1 votes
    69

    1965 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1965 NBA World Championship Series was the championship series of the 1964-65 National Basketball Association season, and was the conclusion of the 1965 NBA Playoffs. The best-of-seven series was played between the Western Conference champion Los Angeles Lakers and the Eastern Conference champion Boston Celtics. This was the Celtics' 9th straight trip to the championship series, and they won the series over the Lakers, 4-1. Celtics win series 4-1 Boston beat the Lakers 112 to 99. In the closing minutes of the game, ABC cut away to a previously scheduled program. This event was likened to NBC cutting away from the World Series with the home team ahead 10 runs in the ninth inning.
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    1969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Purdue Boilermakers basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1969 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1969, and ended with the championship game on March 22 in Louisville, Kentucky. Including consolation games in each of the regions and an overall consolation game, a total of 29 games were played. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 92-72 victory in the final game over Purdue, coached by George King. Lew Alcindor of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. In the game, John Vallely, the "Money Man", scored 29 points and Alcindor had 25 points, to give UCLA a win over Purdue, which is Wooden's alma mater. Purdue was hampered due to injuries to starting point guard Billy Keller and forward Herm Gilliam; Purdue had also lost 7'0" center Chuck Bavis to a broken collarbone during the Mideast Regionals against Miami, (OH). Wooden was an outstanding guard for the Boilermakers.
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    1987 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1987 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Indiana Hoosiers men's basketball
    The 1987 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1987, and ended with the championship game on March 30 in New Orleans, Louisiana. A total of 63 games were played. Indiana, coached by Bob Knight, won the national title with a 74-73 victory in the final game over Syracuse, coached by Jim Boeheim. Keith Smart of Indiana, who hit the game-winner in the final seconds, was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The tournament also featured a "Cinderella team" in the Final Four, as Providence College, led by a then-unknown Rick Pitino, made their first Final Four appearance since 1973. This was also the last tournament in which teams were allowed to have home court advantage: Syracuse (2E), DePaul (3MW), Arizona (10W) and UAB (11SE) all opened the tournament playing on their home courts. The 1987 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament was also the first tournament to utilize the Three-Point Shot.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    1994 Copa Libertadores

    1994 Copa Libertadores

    • Championship: Copa Libertadores de América
    The Copa Libertadores 1994 was won by Vélez Sársfield against São Paulo Futebol Clube in the penalty shootout. Vélez's goalkeeper José Chilavert scored one of the penalty kicks and saved another one. Legend: Pts: Points; P: Played games; W: Won games; D: Drawn games; L: Lost games; F: Goals in favor; A: Goals against; D: Difference.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    1994 FIBA World Championship

    1994 FIBA World Championship

    • Championship: FIBA World Championship
    The 1994 FIBA World Championship was an international basketball competition hosted by Canada from August 4 to August 14, 1994. The tournament was held at SkyDome and Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto as well as at Copps Coliseum in Hamilton. The hosting duties were originally awarded to Belgrade, Yugoslavia, but after United Nations imposed a trade embargo on the Balkan country, Toronto stepped in as a replacement option in 1992. The tournament was won by the United States – Dream Team II, who beat Russia 137–91 in the Final. The United States finished with a perfect 8–0 record (8 wins and 0 losses). The bronze medal was won by Croatia who beat Greece 78–60 in the bronze-medal game. Three stadia were used during the tournament: The following national teams competed: The top two teams from each group remain in medal contention. August 4, 1994 August 5, 1994 August 7, 1994 August 4, 1994 August 5, 1994 August 6, 1994 August 4, 1994 August 5, 1994 August 6, 1994 August 4, 1994 August 5, 1994 August 7, 1994 The top two finishers from Groups A and B advance to the medal round. August 9, 1994 August 10, 1994 August 11, 1994 August 12, 1994 August 8, 1994 August 10, 1994 August 11,
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Arkansas Razorbacks men's basketball
    The 1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 17, 1994, and ended with the championship game on April 4 in Charlotte, North Carolina. A total of 63 games were played. Arkansas, coached by Nolan Richardson, won the national title with a 76–72 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski. Corliss Williamson of Arkansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Bill Clinton, President of the United States and former governor of Arkansas, was in attendance for the Final Four, as well as the regionals that were held in Dallas the previous week. (Clinton was already scheduled to be in Dallas for the wedding of his brother Roger and added the basketball games to his plans.) On television, CBS Sports covered all 63 games of the tournament, with regional splits until the Regional Finals followed by national telecasts. Westwood One had exclusive national radio coverage.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    2008 Monte Carlo Rally

    2008 Monte Carlo Rally

    • Championship: World Rally Championship
    The 2008 Monte Carlo Rally, officially 76ème Rallye Automobile de Monte-Carlo, was the 76th Monte Carlo Rally and the first round of the 2008 World Rally Championship season. The rally took place during January 24–27, 2008, beginning with two stages driven in darkness throughout on Thursday and ending with a short super special around the harbour area of the Grand Prix circuit in Monaco on Sunday. Sébastien Loeb took a record fifth Monte Carlo win for the Citroën Total World Rally Team. Ford's Mikko Hirvonen was second and Subaru's Chris Atkinson third, after a tight battle with François Duval; drivers finished the final Super Special Stage with exact same times and ended the event with just above 1s time gap between them. Petter Solberg was fifth, followed by Gigi Galli, Jean-Marie Cuoq, Per-Gunnar Andersson, Henning Solberg and Matthew Wilson. Dani Sordo and Jari-Matti Latvala both retired from day three, but continued under the SupeRally rules and finished 11th and 12th respectively.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    UEFA Champions League 1998-99

    UEFA Champions League 1998-99

    • Champion: Manchester United F.C.
    The 1998–99 UEFA Champions League was the 44th season of the UEFA Champions League, Europe's premier club football tournament, and the seventh since it was renamed from the "European Champion Clubs' Cup" or "European Cup". The competition was won by Manchester United, coming back from a goal down in the last two minutes of injury time to defeat Bayern Munich 2–1 in the final. Teddy Sheringham and Ole Gunnar Solskjær scored United's goals after Bayern had hit the post and the bar. They were the first English club to win Europe's premier club football tournament since 1984 and were also the first English club to reach a Champions League final since the Heysel Stadium disaster and the subsequent banning of English clubs from all UEFA competitions between 1985 and 1990. Manchester United also completed the Treble, becoming the fourth side in Europe to do so and in the process preventing Bayern Munich from achieving the feat themselves, Bayern eventually finished runners-up in their domestic cup two weeks later. The Red Devils won the trophy without losing a single game, despite having competed in a group with Bayern Munich, Barcelona and Brøndby plus two highly-rated Italian clubs in
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    1927 World Series

    1927 World Series

    • Runner-up: Pittsburgh Pirates
    • Champion: New York Yankees
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1927 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in four games. This was the first sweep of a National League team by an American League team. That year, the Yankees led the American League in runs scored, hits, triples, home runs, base on balls, batting average, slugging average and on base percentage. It featured legends Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig at their peaks. The team won a then-league record 110 games, finished with a 19-game lead over second place, and are considered by many to be the greatest team in the history of baseball. The 1927 Pittsburgh Pirates, with MVP Paul Waner, led the National League in runs, hits, batting average and on base percentage. The 1927 New York Yankees had perhaps the most feared line-up in the history of baseball. Nicknamed "Murderers Row," their batting order boasted the all-time great Babe Ruth at the top of his considerable powers, hitting .356 with a then-record 60 home runs and 164 RBI that year. He was complemented by future Hall of Famers Lou Gehrig at first base, who hit .373 with 47 home runs and a league-leading 175 RBI, Tony Lazzeri at second base who drove in 102 runs with a .309 average, and center fielder
    6.50
    4 votes
    78
    1962 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1962 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Cincinnati Bearcats men's basketball
    The 1962 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 12, 1962, and ended with the championship game on March 24 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game, which was won by Wake Forest. Cincinnati, coached by Ed Jucker, won the national title with a 71–59 victory in the final game over Ohio State, coached by Fred Taylor. Paul Hogue of Cincinnati was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The total attendance for the tournament was 177,469, a new record.
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    2002 UEFA Champions League Final

    2002 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: Bayer Leverkusen
    • Champion: Real Madrid
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2002 UEFA Champions League Final was the final match of the 2001–02 UEFA Champions League, Europe's primary club football competition. The show-piece event was contested between Bayer Leverkusen of Germany and Real Madrid of Spain at the Hampden Park in Glasgow, on Wednesday, 15 May 2002, to decide the winner of the Champions League. Leverkusen appeared in the final for the first time, whereas Real Madrid appeared in their 12th final. Each club needed to progress through the group stages, second group stages, and the knockout rounds to reach the final. Bayer Leverkusen finished second in their group behind Barcelona and progressed to the second group stage. There, they won their group, beating the likes of Liverpool and Manchester United to progress to the final. Real Madrid won their group stage and moved into the second group stage, which they also won, before facing Bayern Munich and Barcelona in the knockout stages. Before the match, a minute of silence was held in honour of Ukrainian manager Valeriy Lobanovskyi, who died two days earlier. Real Madrid were regarded as favorites before the match and took the lead in the eighth minute through Raúl. However, it took only five
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    CONCACAF Championship

    CONCACAF Championship

    The CONCACAF Championship was an association football (soccer) tournament that regularly took place between 1963 and 1989. The competition is sometimes referred to as CONCACAF Campeonato de Naciones or the NORCECA tournament, taking its name from the acronym of regions entering the tournament (North America, Central America and the Caribbean). The first CONCACAF Championship took place in 1963. The tournament format was suspended in 1971 and the top team of World Cup Qualifying was declared the CONCACAF Champions from 1973 until 1989 before the formation of the CONCACAF Gold Cup tournament in 1990. In the ten Championships, only six nations have won the title. Costa Rica and Mexico are the most successful CONCACAF teams, having won the tournament three times each. The other former champions are Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, and Canada with one title each. Prior to the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) being formed in 1961, association football in the region was divided into smaller, regional divisions. The two main bodies consisted of the Confederación Centroamericana y del Caribe de Fútbol (CCCF) founded in 1938 (consisting of
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    1930–31 La Liga

    1930–31 La Liga

    The 1930-31 La Liga season started December 7, 1930 and finished April 5, 1931. It was composed of the following clubs:
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    1980 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1980 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Louisville Cardinals men's basketball
    The 1980 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 48 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 6, 1980, and ended with the championship game on March 24 in Indianapolis, Indiana. A total of 48 games were played, including a national third place game. Louisville, coached by Denny Crum, won the national title with a 59-54 victory in the final game over UCLA, coached by Larry Brown. Darrell Griffith of Louisville was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Structurally speaking, this was the first tournament of the modern era. For the first time: 1. An unlimited number of at-large teams could come from any conference (From 1975-1979, conferences were only allowed one at-large entry). 2. The bracket was seeded to make each region as evenly competitive as possible (previously, geographic considerations had trumped this). 3. All teams were seeded solely based on the subjective judgment of the committee (in 1979, seeding was also partially based on the prior performance of a conference winner's conference). In the second year the tournament field was seeded, no number one
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    1990 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1990 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: UNLV Runnin' Rebels men's basketball
    The 1990 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 15, 1990, and ended with the championship game on April 2 in Denver, Colorado. A total of 63 games were played. UNLV, coached by Jerry Tarkanian, won the national title with a 103-73 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski. Anderson Hunt of UNLV was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament is also remembered for an emotional run by Loyola Marymount in the West Regional. In the semifinals of the West Coast Conference tournament, Lions star forward Hank Gathers collapsed and died due to a heart condition. The WCC tournament was immediately suspended, with the regular-season champion Lions given the conference's automatic bid. The team defeated New Mexico State, then laid a 34-point thrashing on defending national champion Michigan, and defeated Alabama in the Sweet Sixteen (the only game in which Loyola Marymount did not score 100 or more points in the tournament) before running into eventual champion UNLV in the regional final.
    8.50
    2 votes
    84

    1999 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: New York Knicks
    • Champion: San Antonio Spurs
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1999 NBA Finals was the championship round of the shortened 1998–99 NBA season or the 1999 season. The San Antonio Spurs of the Western Conference took on the New York Knicks of the Eastern Conference for the title, with the Spurs holding home court advantage. The series was played under a best-of-seven format, with the first team to collect four game victories winning the series. Will Lyman narrated the season-ending documentary Go Spurs Go! for NBA Entertainment. The 1999 NBA season was shortened due to a labor dispute that led to a lockout, canceling the first 3 months of the season, literally making this the 1999 NBA Season & Finals (as all games were played in the year 1999). The NBA would have teams play 50 games in the regular season or 61% of regular 82 games, and a normal playoffs; many teams never even played each other. This was the second year of the "Twin Towers" pairing of David Robinson and second year star forward Tim Duncan, who switched from his natural center position in college to power forward to play alongside Robinson in San Antonio; the two had been teammates since the Spurs drafted Duncan with the first overall pick in the 1997 NBA Draft- a pick they
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    2000 AFC Asian Cup

    2000 AFC Asian Cup

    The Asian Football Confederation's 2000 AFC Asian Cup finals were held in Lebanon between October 12 and October 29. Japan defeated defending champion Saudi Arabia in the final match in Beirut. 42 teams participated in a preliminary tournament. It was divided into 10 groups and the first-placed team of each group thus qualified. A total of 84 games were held, starting with the Oman versus Kyrgyzstan game on August 3, 1999. The other 10 qualifying teams were: All times are Lebanon summer time (UTC+3) At the end of the first stage, a comparison was made between the third placed teams of each group. The two best third-placed teams advanced to the quarter-finals. Korea Republic (best third-place) and Qatar (second best third-place) qualified for the quarter-finals. All times are Lebanon summer time (UTC+3) Extra times were played under the golden goal rule.
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    2001 UEFA Super Cup

    2001 UEFA Super Cup

    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    The 2001 UEFA Super Cup was a football match between German team Bayern Munich and English team Liverpool on 24 August 2001 at Stade Louis II, the annual UEFA Super Cup contested between the winners of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup. Bayern were appearing in the Super Cup for the third time, their two previous appearances in 1975 and 1976 had ended in defeat. Liverpool were appearing in their fourth Super Cup, they won the competition in 1977, and lost twice in 1978 and 1984. The teams had qualified for the competition by winning the two seasonal European competitions. Both Bayern and Liverpool beat Spanish teams in the finals of the competitions. Bayern won the 2000–01 UEFA Champions League, defeating Valencia 5–4 in a penalty shoot-out after the match had finished 1–1. Liverpool won the 2000–01 UEFA Cup, beating Alavés 5–4. Watched by a crowd of 13,824, Liverpool took the lead in the first half when John Arne Riise scored. Liverpool extended their lead before half-time when Emile Heskey scored. Liverpool scored immediately after the start of the second-half to lead the match 3–0 after Michael Owen scored. Hasan Salihamidžić and Carsten Jancker scored in the second half,
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    1929 La Liga

    1929 La Liga

    The 1929 Primera División season started February 10, 1929 and finished June 23, 1929. A total of 10 teams participated in the league. 10th-placed Primera División team Racing faced 1st-placed 1929 Segunda División team Sevilla FC for a two-legged play-off. Racing won 3 – 2 on aggregate, thus retaining their spot in the Primera División for the next season. Racing wins 3 – 2 on aggregate. Source: Almanacco Illustrato del Calcio - La Storia 1898-2004, Panini Edizioni, Modena, September 2005 (Italian) The home team is listed in the left-hand column. Colours: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win. For coming matches, an a indicates there is an article about the match.
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    1939 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1939 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Oregon Ducks men's basketball
    The 1939 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship. It was the first NCAA basketball national championship tournament. It began on March 17, 1939, and ended with the championship game on March 27 on Northwestern University's campus in Evanston, Illinois. A total of 8 games were played, including a single third place game in the West region. The East region did not hold a third place game until the 1941 tournament, and there was no national third place game until the 1947 tournament. Oregon, coached by Howard Hobson, won the national title with a 46-33 victory in the final game over Ohio State, coached by Harold Olsen. Jimmy Hull of Ohio State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    1954 World Series

    1954 World Series

    • Runner-up: Cleveland Indians
    • Champion: New York Giants
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1954 World Series matched the National League champion New York Giants against the American League champion Cleveland Indians. The Giants swept the Series in four games to win their first championship since 1933, defeating the heavily favored Indians, who had won an AL-record 111 games in the regular season. The Series is perhaps best-remembered for "The Catch", a sensational running catch made by Giants center fielder Willie Mays in Game 1, snaring a long drive by Vic Wertz near the outfield wall with his back to the infield. It is also remembered for utility player Dusty Rhodes' clutch hitting in three of the four games. Giants manager Leo Durocher won his only title among the three pennants he captured in his career. After moving West, the San Francisco Giants would not win a World Series until the 2010 season. This was the first time the Cleveland Indians had been swept in a World Series and the first time the New York Giants had swept an opponent without qualification. They had won four games without a loss in the 1922 World Series, but there was also one tie. Game 4 was the last World Series and playoff game at Cleveland Stadium; the Indians did not return to the World
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    1992 Cricket World Cup

    1992 Cricket World Cup

    The 1992 Cricket World Cup (Benson & Hedges World Cup) was the fifth edition of the tournament and was held from 22 February to 25 March 1992 in Australia and New Zealand. It was a complete round-robin, with all nine teams playing each other, replacing the two qualifying groups that were present earlier competitions. The participants included Australia, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, West Indies and Zimbabwe. In this tournament, for the first time, Man of the Series was awarded and it went to Martin Crowe from New Zealand. It was sponsored by Benson and Hedges, and was won by Pakistan, who defeated England in the final. "Who'll rule the World?" was the theme song for the World Cup. The 1992 World Cup was the first to feature coloured player clothing, white cricket balls and black sightscreens with a number of matches being played under floodlights. These innovations had been increasingly used in One Day Internationals since World Series Cricket introduced them in the late 1970s, but they were not a feature of the first four World Cups. The 1992 World Cup was also the first to be held in Southern hemisphere. It was also the first World Cup to include
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    2010 UEFA Champions League Final

    2010 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: FC Bayern Munich
    • Champion: F.C. Internazionale Milano
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2010 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match played at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, home of Real Madrid, on Saturday, 22 May 2010, to determine the winners of the 2009–10 UEFA Champions League. It was the first Champions League final to be played on a Saturday, rather than the traditional Wednesday. The match was won by Internazionale, who beat Bayern Munich 2–0 to complete the Treble, a feat never before achieved by any team from either Italy or Germany. The refereeing team came from England and was led by Howard Webb. The win gave Inter their third European Cup title, and their first since 1965; moreover, it was their first appearance in the final since 1972, and they were the first Italian team to appear since Milan won the competition in 2007. Meanwhile, Bayern had won the competition as recently as 2001 – their most recent final appearance – although they were the first German side to reach the final since Bayer Leverkusen in 2002. The 2010 final was the first not to feature an English side since Porto beat AS Monaco in 2004. The Santiago Bernabéu Stadium had previously hosted three European Cup finals: in 1957, 1969 and 1980. As the winners, Inter played
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    European Challenge Cup

    European Challenge Cup

    • Champion: Connacht Rugby
    The European Challenge Cup, currently known for sponsorship reasons as the Amlin Challenge Cup, is one of two annual rugby union competitions organised by European Rugby Cup. The cup was known as the Parker Pen Shield from 2001 to 2003 and Parker Pen Challenge Cup from 2003 to 2005. The European Challenge Cup is the second tier competition to the Heineken Cup. It is contested by teams from England, France, Wales, Ireland, Italy, Romania, and on some occasions, Spain and Portugal, on a pool, and then knock-out, basis. Because of the demise of their third professional side, Scotland's representation in the competition stopped. Today, the two surviving Scottish sides, Edinburgh and Glasgow Warriors, receive automatic Heineken Cup places, but may parachute into the Challenge Cup if they finish 3rd, 4th or 5th best runners up in the Heineken Cup pool stages. The European Challenge Cup is the equivalent competition of the UEFA Europa League in football, whereas the Heineken Cup in the equivalent to the higher level UEFA Champions League. European rugby competition began with the launch of the Heineken Cup in the summer of 1995 The Challenge Cup began as the 'European Conference' (later
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    FIVB World League 2007

    FIVB World League 2007

    • Runner-up: Russia men's national volleyball team
    • Champion: Brazil men's national volleyball team
    • Championship: Volleyball World League
    The 2007 FIVB Volleyball World League was the 18th edition of the annual men's international volleyball tournament, played by 16 countries from 25 May to 15 July 2007. The Final Round was held in Katowice, Poland. May 25, 2007 May 26, 2007 May 27, 2007 June 1, 2007 June 2, 2007 June 3, 2007 June 8, 2007 June 9, 2007 June 15, 2007 June 16, 2007 June 22, 2007 June 23, 2007 June 24, 2007 June 29, 2007 June 30, 2007 May 26, 2007 May 27, 2007 June 1, 2007 June 2, 2007 June 3, 2007 June 8, 2007 June 9, 2007 June 10, 2007 June 15, 2007 June 16, 2007 June 17, 2007 June 22, 2007 June 23, 2007 June 24, 2007 June 29, 2007 June 30, 2007 July 1, 2007 July 6, 2007 July 8, 2007 May 25, 2007 May 26, 2007 May 27, 2007 June 1, 2007 June 2, 2007 June 8, 2007 June 9, 2007 June 10, 2007 June 16, 2007 June 17, 2007 June 22, 2007 June 23, 2007 June 24, 2007 June 29, 2007 July 1, 2007 May 25, 2007 May 26, 2007 May 27, 2007 June 1, 2007 June 3, 2007 June 9, 2007 June 10, 2007 June 16, 2007 June 17, 2007 June 23, 2007 June 24, 2007 June 29, 2007 June 30, 2007 July 1, 2007
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    1903 World Series

    1903 World Series

    • Runner-up: Pittsburgh Pirates
    • Champion: Boston Americans
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1903 World Series was the first modern World Series to be played in Major League Baseball. It matched the Boston Americans of the American League against the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League in a best-of-nine series, with Boston prevailing five games to three, winning the last four. Pittsburgh pitcher Sam Leever injured his shoulder while trap-shooting, so his teammate Deacon Phillippe had to pitch five complete games for Pittsburgh. Phillippe won three of his games, but it was not enough to overcome the club from the new American League. Boston pitchers Bill Dinneen and Cy Young led Boston to victory. Due to overflow crowds at the Exposition Park games, if a batted ball rolled under a rope in the outfield that held spectators back, a "ground-rule triple" would be scored. Seventeen ground-rule triples were hit in the four games played at the Exposition Park. In Game 1, Phillippe set a World Series record by striking out ten Boston batters. That record lasted barely one day, as Dinneen struck out eleven Pittsburgh batters in Game 2. Honus Wagner, bothered by injuries, batted only 6 for 27 (.222) in the Series and committed six errors. The shortstop was deeply distraught
    6.25
    4 votes
    95

    1947 BAA Finals

    • Runner-up: Chicago Stags
    • Champion: Philadelphia Warriors
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1947 BAA Finals was the championship round of the Basketball Association of America's 1946–47 season. Basketball Association of America (BAA) would eventually become the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Philadelphia Warriors of the Eastern Division faced the Chicago Stags of the Western Division for the inaugural championship, with the Philadelphia having home court advantage. Hall of Fame inductee Joe Fulks played for the Warriors in the series. Warriors win series 4-1 Around 7,900 people attended Game 1. The Warriors lead at halftime 34-20. Fulks then scored 29 points in the second half, including 21 in the fourth quarter. Angelo Musi, a guard out of Temple University, scored 19 points himself for Philadelphia as well. The Stags took an astouding 129 shots, but only knocked down 26 of them, a 20.2 percent shooting percentage which made it easy for the Warriors to win, 84-71. Fulks wasn't the scorer he was in Game 1, but he didn't have to be, because five other Warrior players scored in double figures, including 18 points from forward Howie Dallmar and 16 from guard/forward Fleishman. Chicago did take a brief 69-68 lead until Philadelphia center Art Hillhouse came
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    UEFA Champions League 1996-97

    UEFA Champions League 1996-97

    • Runner-up: Juventus F.C.
    • Champion: Borussia Dortmund
    The 1996–97 UEFA Champions League was the 42nd season of UEFA's premier European club football tournament, the fifth since its rebranding as the UEFA Champions League, and the last involving only clubs that were champions of their domestic leagues. The tournament was won by Borussia Dortmund in a surprise 3–1 final victory against defending champions Juventus. It was their only title in the tournament to date, and the first title for Germany since its reunification. The two sides had also met in the final of the UEFA Cup in 1993, when the Italians won 6–1 on aggregate. The winners of each tie in the preliminary round entered the Champions League group stage, whilst the losers entered the UEFA Cup First Round. Atlético Madrid, Auxerre, Fenerbahçe, Rapid Wien and Widzew Łódź made their debut in the group stage. The top scorers from the 1996–97 UEFA Champions League (excluding qualifying round) are as follows:
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    1968 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1968 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1968 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 8, 1968, and ended with the championship game on March 23 in Los Angeles, California. A total of 27 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 78-55 victory in the final game over North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith. Lew Alcindor of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This UCLA team, composed of three All-Americans, Player of the Year Alcindor, Lucius Allen, and Mike Warren, along with dead eye pure shooter Lynn Shackleford (most of his shots would be 3 pointers today) and burly senior power forward Mike Lynn is considered to be the greatest men's team in college basketball history. The NCAA semi-final match between the Houston Cougars and UCLA Bruins was a re-match of the college basketball Game of the Century held in January at the Astrodome, in the Cougars home city. The match was historic, the first nationally syndicated college basketball
    5.40
    5 votes
    98

    1971 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Baltimore Bullets
    • Champion: Milwaukee Bucks
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1971 NBA World Championship Series was played at the conclusion of the NBA's 25th Anniversary season of 1970-71. The Western Conference Champion Milwaukee Bucks, who were founded just three years earlier, swept the Eastern Conference Champion Baltimore Bullets in four games. Baltimore had dethroned the 1969-70 NBA Champion New York Knicks to get to their only NBA Finals appearance in Baltimore. This was the first NBA Finals not played in the state of California in 10 years. It would also be the last time that both participants were playing in their first NBA Finals until the Dallas Mavericks and Miami Heat got together in the 2006 NBA Finals. The series was the second (and last) time in NBA history that the teams alternated home games, the other being in 1956. Most other series were held in the 2-2-1-1-1 or 2-3-2 format. It was also the last NBA Championship Series completed before May 1. Oddly, the Bullets were forced to play Game No. 1 on a Wednesday night, just 48 hours after having defeated New York in Game 7 of the 1971 Eastern Conference Finals, then had to wait four days before playing Game 2. The series was broadcast by ABC with Chris Schenkel and Jack Twyman providing
    5.40
    5 votes
    99

    1950 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Syracuse Nationals
    • Champion: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1950 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the National Basketball Association's first season, the 1949–50 season. 6'8" Dolph Schayes of Syracuse led his team out to the finals after a 16.8 ppg average during the regular season. George Mikan, however, averaged 27.4 ppg and led the league. Mikan would lead the Lakers past Syracuse in 6 games, providing Minneapolis with the first NBA Championship. This would be the Lakers 2nd of 5 titles in Minneapolis. Lakers win series 4-2 In Game 1, The Lakers won on a buzzer beating shot by sub Bob "Tiger" Harrison.
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    1953 World Ice Hockey Championships

    1953 World Ice Hockey Championships

    • Runner-up: West German national ice hockey team
    • Champion: Swedish National Men's Ice Hockey Team
    The 1953 Men's Ice Hockey World Championships were held between March 7 and March 15, 1953 in Basel and Zurich, Switzerland. This was the first world championship tournament with only European teams. On January 12, 1953, Canadian Amateur Hockey Association president W.B. George stated Canada would not be sending a team to the 1953 World Championships. George told the press: "Every year we spend $10,000 to send a Canadian hockey team to Europe to play 40 exhibition games. All these games are played to packed houses that only enrich European hockey coffers. In return we are subjected to constant, unnecessary abuse over our Canadian style of play." Also absent were the Soviets, it was hoped that the USSR would participate but they did not, sending observers, including legendary coach Anatoli Tarasov to scout the tournament. It is believed that an injury to their star player Vsevolod Bobrov was the reason behind the decision. Czechoslovakia withdrew from the tournament when it became obvious that their President, Klement Gottwald, was going to die from pneumonia he contracted at Stalin's funeral. General František Janda, the Chairman of the State Committee for the Physical Education
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    1966 FIFA World Cup qualification

    1966 FIFA World Cup qualification

    A total of 74 teams entered the 1966 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. England, as the hosts, and Brazil, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition. The 16 spots available in the 1966 World Cup would be distributed among the continental zones as follows: A total of 51 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 127 qualifying matches were played, and 393 goals were scored (an average of 3.09 per match). Listed below are the dates and results of the qualification rounds. To see the dates and results of the qualification rounds for each continental zone, click on the following articles: The following 16 teams qualified for the 1966 FIFA World Cup: (h) - qualified automatically as hosts (c) - qualified automatically as defending champions
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    1978 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1978 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball
    The 1978 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1978, and ended with the championship game on March 27 in St. Louis, Missouri. A total of 32 games were played, including a national third place game. The process of seeding the bracket was first used in this tournament. 16 conference winners with automatic bids were seeded 1 through 4 in each region. At-large teams were seeded 1 through 4 in each region separately. There were in fact only 11 true at-large teams in the field, as the remaining 5 teams were conference winners with automatic bids who were seeded as "at-large." The practice of distinguishing between automatic and at-large teams was ended after the tournament, and the expanded field of 40 was simply seeded from 1 to 10 in the 1979 tournament. Kentucky, coached by Joe B. Hall and dominant throughout the entire regular season, won the national title with a closer than it appears 94-88 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Bill E. Foster. Jack Givens of Kentucky was named the tournament's Most Outstanding
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    1983 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Champion: Philadelphia 76ers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1983 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the 1982–83 NBA season. This was the third Finals meeting in four years between the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers. The Lakers won the first two meetings in 1980 and 1982 with Magic Johnson earning Finals MVP awards each time. But Johnson wasn't the only problem the 76ers faced. While Julius Erving played superbly in both series, their frontcourt of Darryl Dawkins, Caldwell Jones and Bobby Jones couldn't neutralize Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. So in the off-season, the 76ers acquired Moses Malone from the Houston Rockets in an effort to solve Kareem, in addition to providing some offense and rebounding to the team. They parted ways with Caldwell Jones, Dawkins, and Lionel Hollins before the season, while giving greater responsibility to high-scoring guard Andrew Toney and backup playmaker Clint Richardson, and adding forwards Clemon Johnson and rookie Marc Iavaroni. Malone's acquisition paid dividends, as the 76ers won 65 games in the 1982–83 NBA season. Prior to the playoffs, Malone predicted a clean playoff sweep for the 76ers, ending it with the statement Fo, Fo, Fo. The 76ers would steamroll through the
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    1993 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Phoenix Suns
    • Champion: Chicago Bulls
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1993 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1992-93 NBA season, featuring the Chicago Bulls, led by Michael Jordan, and the Phoenix Suns, winners of 62 games and led by regular season MVP Charles Barkley. The Bulls became the first team since the legendary Boston Celtics of the 1960s to win three consecutive championship titles, clinching the "three-peat" with John Paxson's game-winning 3-pointer that gave them a 99-98 victory in Game 6. This series was also notable in that the road team won each game, with the exception of Chicago in Game 4. This series was aired on NBC with Marv Albert, Bob Costas (hosts), Mike Fratello, Magic Johnson, Quinn Buckner (analysts), Ahmad Rashad (Bulls sideline) and Hannah Storm (Suns sideline) (reporters) calling the action. The 1993 NBA championship documentary, Three-Peat, marked the first time since 1982 that NBA Entertainment used film in on-court or off-court action, although most of it used videotape. It was narrated by Hal Douglas, who narrated the NBA Championship documentaries of 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997. Michael Jordan and Charles Barkley were part of the 1984 NBA Draft class, with Jordan drafted 3rd by the Chicago
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Campeonato Brasileiro Série B 2008

    Campeonato Brasileiro Série B 2008

    • Champion: Sport Club Corinthians Paulista
    • Championship: Campeonato Brasileiro Série B
    The Campeonato Brasileiro Série B, namely the second level of Brazilian football league system, was contested by 20 teams in 2008. Giants Corinthians played Série B for the first time after its poor season in Série A in 2007. Also, former Série A champions Bahia returned from Série C. The tournament started on May 9 and Corinthians begun defeating CRB 3-2 in São Paulo. Due to its tradition and huge number of supporters, Corinthians attracted most of the attention from the media. The club won the first six matches and never left the top of the table. Promotion came on round 32 - six matches before the end of season - after defeating Ceará 2-0 in São Paulo. They were crowned champions two rounds later, beating Criciúma 2-0 as visitors. Avaí was the second team to reach Série A as they defeated Brasiliense 1-0 on Round 35. One week later, Santo André also reached promotion after their 3-2 win as visitors against Ceará. Finally, Barueri completed the G4 (as the group of promoted teams are called) on Round 37 after beating América de Natal 3-0 at home. On the other side of the table, CRB's poor record caused the club relegation on Round 33. Gama saw their hope comes to an end three
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    1991 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1991 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Duke Blue Devils men's basketball
    The 1991 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 14, 1991, and ended with the championship game on April 1 in Indianapolis, Indiana. A total of 63 games were played. Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski, won a rematch of the previous year's national final matchup against undefeated UNLV 79-77 in the semifinal, then won the national title with a 72–65 victory in the final game over Kansas, coached by Roy Williams. This was the first National Championship game for Williams as a head coach. Kansas defeated Williams' mentor Dean Smith and North Carolina in the semifinal. Kansas made its first trip to the National Championship game since 1988 when they defeated Oklahoma, making it their second trip to the Championship game in four seasons. Christian Laettner of Duke was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament adopted the NBA's 10ths-second timer during the final minute of each period in all arenas. For the first time, CBS Sports showed all 63 tournament games. In the first three rounds, games were shown on a
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    1948 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1948 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball
    The 1948 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 19, 1948, and ended with the championship game on March 23 in New York City. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp, won the national title with a 58-42 victory in the final game over Baylor, coached by Bill Henderson. Alex Groza of Kentucky was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    1975 Cricket World Cup

    1975 Cricket World Cup

    The 1975 Cricket World Cup (officially called the Prudential Cup) was the first edition of the International Cricket Council's (ICC) Cricket World Cup. It was held from 7 to 21 June 1975 in England. The tournament was sponsored by Prudential Assurance Company and had 8 participating countries. These were the 6 Test playing teams of that time (namely Australia, England, India, New Zealand, Pakistan & West Indies) and Sri Lanka & East Africa. The preliminary matches were played in 2 groups of 4 each. The top two teams from each group then played the knock-out rounds of semi-finals and final. The matches were played as 60 overs per team in traditional white clothing and with red balls. They were all played during the day and, hence, started early. One of the most bizarre batting efforts in one-day history was made by Indian legend Sunil Gavaskar. England scored 334 (4 wickets, 60 overs) with Dennis Amiss (137 from 147 balls, 18 fours) scoring the first ever World Cup century, nobly supported by Keith Fletcher (68 from 107 balls, 4 fours, 1 six). The response of Gavaskar (36 from 174 balls, 1 four) was to bat through the 60 overs for 36 not out. The Prudential Cup was lifted by Clive
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    1982 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1982 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball
    The 1982 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 48 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1982, and ended with the championship game on March 29 in New Orleans, Louisiana. A total of 47 games were played. North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith, won the national title with a 63-62 victory in the final game over Georgetown, coached by John Thompson. James Worthy of North Carolina was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament was the first to eliminate the national third place game, which had been held every year since the 1947 tournament. It was also the first tournament to be televised by CBS after it acquired the broadcasting rights from NBC. Gary Bender and Billy Packer (also from NBC Sports) called the Final Four and National Championship games. The 1982 NCAA Division 1 Championship Game was between the Georgetown Hoyas, led by Patrick Ewing and Eric "Sleepy" Floyd, versus the North Carolina Tar Heels, led by James Worthy, Sam Perkins, and a young Michael Jordan. The championship matchup was tightly contested throughout, with no team ever
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    1984 World Series

    1984 World Series

    • Runner-up: San Diego Padres
    • Champion: Detroit Tigers
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1984 World Series began on October 9 and ended on October 14, 1984. The American League champion Detroit Tigers played against the National League champion San Diego Padres, with the Tigers winning the series four games to one. This was the first World Series that Peter Ueberroth presided over as commissioner. Ueberroth began his tenure on October 1, succeeding Bowie Kuhn. Ueberroth had been elected as Kuhn's successor prior to the 1984 season, but did not take over until the postseason as he was serving as the chairman of the 1984 Summer Olympics, which ran from July 28 through August 12. This was the last NBC-broadcast World Series to air before General Electric acquired RCA, NBC's parent company. The San Diego Padres won the National League West division by twelve games over both the Atlanta Braves and the Houston Astros, then defeated the Chicago Cubs, three games to two, in the National League Championship Series. The Detroit Tigers won the American League East division by fifteen games over the Toronto Blue Jays, then swept the Kansas City Royals, three games to none, in the American League Championship Series. The 1984 World Series was a rematch between managers Sparky
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    1986 World Series

    1986 World Series

    • Runner-up: Boston Red Sox
    • Champion: New York Mets
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1986 World Series pitted the New York Mets against the Boston Red Sox. It was cited in the legend of the "Curse of the Bambino" to explain the error by Bill Buckner in Game 6 that allowed the Mets to extend the series to a seventh game. The NL champion Mets eventually beat the AL champion Red Sox, four games to three. The New York Mets finished the regular season with a franchise record 108–54, winning the National League East division by 21 ⁄2 games over division rival Philadelphia Phillies. They then won a tightly contested 1986 National League Championship Series, four games to two, over the Houston Astros, clinching the series in a sixteen-inning Game 6. The talent of the team was colored by controversy during much of the season, with scrappy players both on and off the field. On July 19, 1986, Mets infielder Tim Teufel and pitchers Rick Aguilera, Bobby Ojeda, and Ron Darling were arrested after fighting with policemen outside a bar in Houston. Just three days later, they played a game which became a microcosm of their season when two Mets were ejected after a bench-clearing brawl. A total of three ejections in the game forced starting catcher Gary Carter to play third
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball
    The 1993 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 18, 1993, and ended with the championship game on April 5 in New Orleans, Louisiana. A total of 63 games were played. North Carolina, coached by Dean Smith, won the national title with a 77–71 victory in the final game over Michigan, coached by Steve Fisher. Donald Williams of North Carolina was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The most memorable play in the championship game came in the last seconds as Michigan's Chris Webber tried to call a timeout when double-teamed by North Carolina. Michigan had already used all of its timeouts, so Webber's gaffe resulted in a technical foul. Michigan subsequently vacated its entire 1992-93 schedule, including its six NCAA Tournament games, after it emerged that Webber had received under-the-table payments from a booster. In a game that featured two great individual battles (one between Jason Kidd and Bobby Hurley, and the other between Lamond Murray and Grant Hill), two time defending champion Duke was upset in the second
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Copa América 2001

    Copa América 2001

    The Copa América 2001 was held in Colombia, from July 11 to July 29, 2001. It was organised by CONMEBOL, South America's football governing body. There is no qualifying for the final tournament. CONMEBOL's ten South American countries participate, along with two more invited countries, making a total of twelve teams competing in the tournament. Originally, Mexico and CONCACAF Champions Canada were invited. Prior to the tournament, three meetings were held by CONMEBOL authorities who were concerned about potential security issues in Colombia. They announced the cancellation of the tournament. Venezuela offered to host the competition, but at the last minute, CONMEBOL decided to return the organization to Colombia, and the tournament was held on schedule. Complaining about the sudden reversal, and claiming that Argentine players had received death threats from terrorist groups, the Argentine Football Association decided to withdraw from the competition, in spite of long days of debate, during which Colombian authorities proposed to implement additional protection measures. Despite the general disappointment of the Argentine people, most Argentines considered that their reasons were
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Ice hockey at the 2006 Winter Olympics

    Ice hockey at the 2006 Winter Olympics

    • Runner-up: Finnish National Men's Ice Hockey Team
    • Champion: Swedish National Men's Ice Hockey Team
    Ice hockey at the 2006 Winter Olympics was held at the Torino Palasport Olimpico and the Torino Esposizioni in Turin, Italy. The men's competition, held from 15 to 26 February, was won by Sweden, and the women's competition, held from 11 to 20 February, was won by Canada. The format was changed from the version used in the 1998 and 2002 tournaments.This format is used in 1992 and 1994, the number of teams was reduced from 14 to 12 and the preliminary and final group stages were combined to form two six-team groups with the top four from each group advancing to the quarterfinals. These changes had the following effects: Twelve places were allotted for the men's ice hockey tournament. The first eight were awarded to the top eight teams in the International Ice Hockey Federation ranking following the 2004 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships. Those teams were: The teams that automatically qualified include the same "Super Six" teams that were automatically qualified for the final group stage in the two previous tournaments, plus Slovakia and Germany which (IIHF rankings notwithstanding) are often regarded as the seventh and eighth best teams. The ninth place was given to the host
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Scottish Premier League 2007-08

    Scottish Premier League 2007-08

    • Runner-up: Rangers F.C.
    • Champion: Celtic F.C.
    • Championship: Scottish Premier League
    The 2007–08 Scottish Premier League season was the tenth season of the Scottish Premier League. It began on 4 August 2007 and was originally due to end on 18 May 2008. Due to the death of Phil O'Donnell and extremely poor weather causing the postponement of fixtures during the winter, as well as a backlog of Rangers fixtures and their progression to the UEFA Cup Final, the SPL decided to move the final round of fixtures forward four days to 22 May 2008. It was the first season under the sponsorship of the Clydesdale Bank. Gretna were promoted from the First Division the previous season and played in the SPL for the first time, replacing Dunfermline Athletic. Gretna did not play at their home stadium Raydale Park as it did not meet the SPL stadia criteria of 6,000 and instead used Motherwell's Fir Park for all but one of their games; that match was at Livingston's Almondvale Stadium. Champions Celtic qualified directly for the Champions League, while second-placed Rangers qualified for the Second qualifying round. Third-placed Motherwell qualified for the UEFA Cup and Hibernian qualified for the Intertoto Cup. First Division side Queen of the South also qualified for the UEFA Cup
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    1916 World Series

    1916 World Series

    • Runner-up: Brooklyn Robins
    • Champion: Boston Red Sox
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1916 World Series, the Boston Red Sox beat the Brooklyn Robins (a.k.a. Dodgers) four games to one. Casey Stengel shone on offense for the Robins in the 1916 Series but the Red Sox pitching core ultimately proved too much for the denizens of Flatbush. The Sox's Babe Ruth pitched thirteen shutout innings in Game 2, starting a consecutive scoreless innings streak that would reach 29 in 1918. As with the 1915 Series, the Red Sox played their home games at the larger Braves Field, and it paid off as they drew a then-record 42,620 people for the final game. Brooklyn fielded some strong teams under their manager and namesake Wilbert Robinson in the late 1910s. The Robins, also interchangeably called the Dodgers, would win the pennant again in 1920, but the American League teams were generally stronger during that interval. It would be 39 years before the Dodgers would win their first World Series title in 1955. The Series had the longest game in World Series History until Game 3 of the 2005 World Series. AL Boston Red Sox (4) vs. NL Brooklyn Robins (1) Saturday, October 7, 1916 at Braves Field in Boston, Massachusetts Monday, October 9, 1916 at Braves Field in Boston,
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    1919 World Series

    1919 World Series

    • Runner-up: Chicago White Sox
    • Champion: Cincinnati Reds
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1919 World Series matched the American League champion Chicago White Sox against the National League champion Cincinnati Reds. Although most World Series have been of the best-of-seven format, the 1919 World Series was a best-of-nine series (along with 1903, 1920, and 1921). Baseball decided to try the best-of-nine format partly to increase popularity of the sport and partly to generate more revenue. The events of the series are often associated with the Black Sox Scandal, when several members of the Chicago franchise conspired with gamblers to throw (i.e., intentionally lose) World Series games. The 1919 World Series was the last World Series to take place without a Commissioner of Baseball in place. In 1920, the various franchise owners installed Kenesaw Mountain Landis as the first "Commissioner of Baseball." In 1921, eight players from the White Sox—including superstar Shoeless Joe Jackson—were banned from organized baseball for fixing the series (or having knowledge about the fix). The Chicago White Sox of 1919 were one of baseball's glamour teams. Using most of the same players, they had won the 1917 World Series over the New York Giants in a convincing manner, by four
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    1940 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1940 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Indiana Hoosiers men's basketball
    The 1940 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the participating champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 20, 1940, and ended with the championship game on March 30 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 8 games were played, including a single third place game in the West region. Indiana, coached by Branch McCracken, won the tournament title with a 60-42 victory in the final game over Kansas, coached by Phog Allen. Marvin Huffman of Indiana was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    1951 Copa Rio

    1951 Copa Rio

    • Champion: Sociedade Esportiva Palmeiras
    The Copa Rio (Rio Cup) was arguably the first intercontinental soccer club tournament. Brazilian press, at the time, dubbed it as "club world cup", a title that would later be applied to the Toyota Cup. Copa Rio presented a format resembling the one adopted by FIFA in the very first edition of FIFA Club World Cup held in 2000. The two editions of Copa Rio took place in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Brazil and were organized by the Brazilian Football Confederation, and endorsed by FIFA. In 1951, Palmeiras, from Brazil, was the winner of the tournament, while Fluminense, also from Brazil, won this title in 1952. The competition was succeeded by another tournament, named Torneio Octogonal Rivadavia Corrêa Meyer, which was won by Vasco da Gama, of Brazil. This tournament which succeeded Copa Rio had a different format, with the predominance of Brazilian teams (five Brazilian sides, and three foreign clubs), thus, losing its intercontinental aspect. In December 2007, in a negative response to a Palmeiras' request, FIFA decided that the first World Club Cup was played in 2000, thus not recognizing Copa Rio as an official FIFA competition. All matches played at Estádio do Maracanã. All
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    1952 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1952 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Kansas Jayhawks Men's Basketball
    The 1952 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 16 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 21, 1952, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in Seattle, Washington. A total of 18 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kansas, coached by Phog Allen, won the national title with a 80-63 victory in the final game over St. John's, coached by Frank McGuire. Clyde Lovellette of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament was the first to have a true "Final Four" format, with the winners at four regional sites advancing to the final site—although the four regionals did not receive distinct names until the 1956 tournament. It was also the first to have regional television coverage.
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Michigan State Spartans men's basketball
    The 1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 40 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 9, 1979, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in Salt Lake City. A total of 40 games were played, including a national third place game. Michigan State, coached by Jud Heathcote, won the national title with a 75-64 victory in the final game over Indiana State, coached by Bill Hodges. Indiana State came into the game without a loss all season, but couldn't win their final game. Magic Johnson of Michigan State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Michigan State's victory over Indiana State was its first over a number one ranked team, and remained its only victory over a number one ranked team until 2007 (Wisconsin). The final game marked the beginning of the rivalry between future Hall of Famers Johnson and Larry Bird. To this day, it remains the highest-rated game in the history of televised college basketball. Both Johnson and Bird would enter the NBA in the fall of 1979, and the rivalry between them and their teams (respectively, the Los Angeles Lakers
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    1980 World Series

    1980 World Series

    • Runner-up: Kansas City Royals
    • Champion: Philadelphia Phillies
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1980 World Series matched the Philadelphia Phillies against the Kansas City Royals, with the Phillies winning in six games to capture the first of two World Series titles in franchise history to date. It is remembered for Game 6, which ended with Tug McGraw striking out Willie Wilson at 11:29 p.m. Wilson set a World Series record by striking out twelve times (after getting 230 hits in the regular season) in the six-game set. The Phillies became the last of the original AL and NL franchises to win a World Series title. The Kansas City Royals became the second expansion team, and the first American League expansion team, to appear in the World Series. The AL would have to wait until 1985 before one of their expansion teams—the Royals themselves—would win a World Series. This was the first World Series played entirely on artificial turf. It was also the first World Series since 1920, and the last to date, to feature two franchises that had never previously won a championship. The Philadelphia Phillies won the National League East division by one game over the Montreal Expos then defeated the Houston Astros, three games to two, in the National League Championship Series. The Kansas
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    1981 World Series

    1981 World Series

    • Runner-up: New York Yankees
    • Champion: Los Angeles Dodgers
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1981 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, marking their third meeting in the Series in five years as well as a record eleventh Series meeting overall and last Series meeting to date. The Dodgers won the Series in six games for their first title since 1965, and their first victory over the Yankees since 1963 and third over them overall. This is the last World Series that a team won after losing the first two games on the road. The Los Angeles Dodgers won the National League West division (first half) over the Cincinnati Reds then defeated the Houston Astros, three games to two, in the National League Division Series then defeated the Montreal Expos, three games to two, in the National League Championship Series. The New York Yankees won the American League East division over the Baltimore Orioles (first half) then defeated the Milwaukee Brewers, three games to two, in the American League Division Series, then defeated the Oakland Athletics, three games to none, in the American League Championship Series. Baseball was marred this summer by a two month player's strike starting at 12:30 a.m. on June 12 finally resuming play on August 10. In
    9.00
    1 votes
    125

    2004 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Champion: Detroit Pistons
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 2004 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 2003–04 National Basketball Association season. The Finals were between the Los Angeles Lakers of the Western Conference and the Detroit Pistons of the Eastern Conference; the Lakers held home court advantage. The series was played under a best-of-seven format, so the first team to collect four game victories would win the series. Although the Lakers were the heavy favorite, the Pistons won the series four games to one to win their first title since 1990 and their fifth overall (three NBA Championships, two NBL Championships). The Pistons were so dominant in the series that it came to be known as a "five-game sweep." Piston point guard Chauncey Billups was named the Most Valuable Player of the series. The series was noted for the perceived underdog, the Pistons, dominating a Laker team that had four future Hall of Famers. The Lakers' collapse resulted in only one of the stars, Kobe Bryant remaining on the team for the next season. Pistons owner William Davidson became the first owner in sports history to win two championships in one year. Eight days earlier, the other team that Davidson owned, the Tampa Bay Lightning of the
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    2006 MLS Cup

    2006 MLS Cup

    • Runner-up: New England Revolution
    • Champion: Houston Dynamo
    • Championship: MLS Cup
    MLS Cup 2006, the 11th edition of Major League Soccer's championship match, was played between the New England Revolution and the Houston Dynamo to decide the champion of the 2006 season. The game was played at Pizza Hut Park in Frisco, Texas on November 12, 2006. Houston won 4-3 on penalty kicks, after a 1-1 draw following extra time. It was the first penalty shootout in MLS Cup history. For the first time ever, the MLS Cup Final matched teams which did not win their respective conferences in the regular season. In every final since the inaugural season of 1996, at least one of the teams led its division after the regular-season campaign. On three occasions, the MLS Cup matched two conference regular-season winners (1999, D.C. United vs. Los Angeles Galaxy; 2000, Kansas City Wizards vs Chicago Fire; 2003, San Jose Earthquakes vs. Chicago Fire). Houston and New England were separated by just two points during the regular season. The Revolution finished with 12 wins, 8 losses, and 12 draws for 48 points. Houston went 11-8-13 for 46 points. It was the narrowest margin between the finalists since 2003, when the Chicago Fire and San Jose Earthquakes were just two points apart in their
    9.00
    1 votes
    127
    FA Cup Final 2006

    FA Cup Final 2006

    • Runner-up: West Ham United F.C.
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2006 FA Cup Final was the final and deciding match of the 2005-06 FA Cup. It took place on 13 May 2006 at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, the last FA Cup Final to be held there, as the new Wembley Stadium neared completion. The match saw the 2001 cup winners Liverpool beat London club West Ham United after a penalty shootout. West Ham were ahead 2–0 and then 3–2 but Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard scored a goal in the last minute from over 30 yards to take the game to extra-time and they eventually triumphed on penalties. It was widely regarded as one of the greatest cup finals in the history of the tournament. Liverpool had won the FA Cup on six previous occasions (1965, 1974, 1986, 1989, 1992 and 2001) – four of those coming since West Ham last won the trophy. As well as 1980, West Ham also won the Cup in 1964 and 1975. The Hammers took part in the first FA Cup final to be played at the newly-built Wembley Stadium in 1923. Coincidentally, Liverpool played in the first FA Cup final in Cardiff, which was in 2001. The newly-rebuilt Wembley Stadium was expected to be ready for this final, but delays in building meant that the final would take place in Cardiff, as it had done
    9.00
    1 votes
    128
    Super Bowl XLIV

    Super Bowl XLIV

    • Runner-up: Indianapolis Colts
    • Champion: New Orleans Saints
    • Championship: Super Bowl
    Super Bowl XLIV was an American football game between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion New Orleans Saints and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Indianapolis Colts to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2009 season. The Saints defeated the Colts by a score of 31–17, earning their first Super Bowl win. The game was played at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida on February 7, 2010 for the fifth time (and in South Florida for the tenth time), the latest calendar date for a Super Bowl yet. This was the Saints' first Super Bowl appearance and the fourth for the Colts franchise. The Saints entered the game with a 13–3 record for the 2009 regular season, compared to the Colts' 14–2 record. In the playoff games, both teams placed first in their respective conferences, marking the first time since Super Bowl XXVIII (16 years previously) that both number one seeds have reached the Super Bowl. The Colts entered the Super Bowl off victories over the Baltimore Ravens and New York Jets, while the Saints advanced after defeating the previous year's runners up the Arizona Cardinals in their first game and the Minnesota Vikings in the
    9.00
    1 votes
    129
    1936 NFL Championship Game

    1936 NFL Championship Game

    • Runner-up: Boston Redskins
    • Champion: Green Bay Packers
    The 1936 NFL Championship Game was the 4th championship game played in the history of the National Football League. The game took place on December 13, 1936, at Polo Grounds in New York City, making it the first NFL title game held on a neutral field. The Eastern Division champion Boston Redskins' owner George Preston Marshall moved the game out of Boston's Fenway Park to New York, as he had previously announced plans to move his team to Washington, D. C. the following year. This was the first championship game for both the Redskins and the Western Division champion Green Bay Packers. The game was the first NFL title contest won by the Packers under coach Curly Lambeau, after winning league championships awarded by league standing in 1929, 1930 and 1931.
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    1954 FIFA World Cup qualification

    1954 FIFA World Cup qualification

    A total of 45 teams entered the 1954 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. Switzerland, as the hosts, and Uruguay, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition. 37 teams were divided into 13 groups, based on geographical considerations, as follows: A total of 33 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 57 qualifying matches were played, and 208 goals were scored (an average of 3.65 per match). Listed below are the dates and results of the qualification rounds. The 13 groups had different rules, as follows: details West Germany qualified. details Belgium qualified. details This group was also the 1953-1954 British Home Championship. England and Scotland qualified. details France qualified. details Austria qualified. details Spain and Turkey finished level on points, and a play-off on neutral ground was played to decide who would qualify. Turkey qualified after drawing lots. A 14 year old local (i.e. Roman) boy whose father worked at the stadium, Luigi Franco Gemma, picked Turkey's name from the lots with his eyes blindfolded. Poland withdrew, so Hungary qualified
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    1983 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1983 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Houston Cougars men's basketball
    • Champion: NC State Wolfpack basketball
    The 1983 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 52 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 2, 1983, and ended with the championship game on April 4 at The Pit, then officially known as University Arena, on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. A total of 51 games were played. North Carolina State, coached by Jim Valvano, won the national title with a 54-52 victory in the final game over Houston, coached by Guy Lewis. The ending of the final is one of the most famous in college basketball history, with Lorenzo Charles' dunk at the buzzer off a high, arching air ball from 30 feet out by Dereck Whittenburg providing the final margin. This contributed to the nickname given to North Carolina State, the "Cardiac Pack", a reference to their often close games that came down to the wire — in fact, the team won 7 of its last 9 games after trailing with a minute left in the game. Both Charles' dunk and Valvano's running around the court in celebration immediately after the game have been staples of NCAA tournament coverage ever since. North Carolina State's
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    2000 FIFA Club World Championship

    2000 FIFA Club World Championship

    • Champion: Sport Club Corinthians Paulista
    The 2000 FIFA Club World Championship was the first edition of the FIFA Club World Championship held in Brazil from 5 January to 14 January 2000. The first Club World Championship consisted of eight qualifiers: the six continental champions, the 1998 Intercontinental Champions and the host nation champions. The tournament was controversial, most notably in England where Manchester United chose to withdraw from a national cup competition, the FA Cup, in order to compete. The launch of the competition was understood by some to be part of a struggle between FIFA and UEFA, who were competing for control of international club football: the existing Intercontinental Cup was outside of FIFA's jurisdiction. The final was competed between the two Brazilian sides and the winner was Sport Club Corinthians Paulista in a penalty shoot-out over Club de Regatas Vasco da Gama. The clubs that qualified for the tournament were: The following venues were used for the tournament: For a list of the squads at the 2000 FIFA Club World Championship, see 2000 FIFA Club World Championship squads. Matches were played in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. The teams were organised in two groups of four teams, with
    6.67
    3 votes
    133
    2006 UEFA Champions League Final

    2006 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: Arsenal F.C.
    • Champion: FC Barcelona
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2006 UEFA Champions League Final was an association football match between Barcelona of Spain and Arsenal of England at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, Paris, France, on Wednesday, 17 May 2006. It was the final match of the 2005–06 season of Europe's primary cup competition, the UEFA Champions League. Barcelona were appearing in their fifth final, they had won the competition once in 1992, and lost the other three finals. Arsenal were appearing in the final for the first time and in doing so became the first club from London to feature in the final. Each club needed to progress through the group stage and knockout rounds to reach the final, playing 12 matches in total. Barcelona won their group and progressed to the final after beating Chelsea, Benfica and Milan, respectively. Arsenal won their group to move into the knockout stage, and progressed without conceding a goal against Real Madrid, Juventus and Villarreal, respectively. Watched by a crowd of 79,500, Arsenal had Jens Lehmann sent off early in the first half, however they took the lead through Sol Campbell towards the end of the first half. Barcelona equalised through Samuel Eto'o near the end of the second half,
    6.67
    3 votes
    134
    2007 Rugby World Cup

    2007 Rugby World Cup

    The 2007 Rugby World Cup was the sixth Rugby World Cup, a quadrennial international rugby union competition inaugurated in 1987. Twenty nations competed for the Webb Ellis Cup in the tournament, which was hosted by France from 7 September to 20 October. France won the hosting rights in 2003, beating a bid from England. The competition consisted of 48 matches over 44 days; 42 matches were played in ten cities throughout France, as well as four in Cardiff, Wales, and two in Edinburgh, Scotland. The eight quarter-finalists from 2003 were granted automatic qualification, while 12 other nations gained entry through the regional qualifying competitions that began in 2004 – of them, Portugal was the only World Cup debutant. The top three nations from each pool at the end of the pool stage qualified automatically for the 2011 World Cup. The competition opened with a match between hosts France and Argentina on 7 September at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, outside Paris. The stadium was also the venue of the final match between England and South Africa on 20 October, which South Africa won by 15 points to 6, their second World Cup title. Both England and France bid to host the
    6.67
    3 votes
    135
    1918 World Series

    1918 World Series

    • Runner-up: Chicago Cubs
    • Champion: Boston Red Sox
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1918 World Series featured the Boston Red Sox, who defeated the Chicago Cubs four games to two. The Series victory for the Red Sox was their fifth in five tries, going back to 1903. The Red Sox scored only nine runs in the entire Series; the fewest runs by the winning team in World Series history. Along with the 1906 and 1907 World Series, the 1918 World Series is one of only three Fall Classics where neither team hit a home run. The 1918 Series was played under several metaphorical dark clouds. The Series was held early in September because of the World War I "Work or Fight" order that forced the premature end of the regular season on September 1, and remains the only World Series to be played entirely in September. The Series was marred by players threatening to strike due to low gate receipts. The Chicago home games in the series were played at Comiskey Park, which had a greater seating capacity than Weeghman Park, the prior home of the Federal League Chicago Whales that the Cubs were now using and which would be rechristened Wrigley Field in 1925. The Red Sox had played their home games in the 1915 and 1916 World Series in the more expansive Braves Field, but they returned
    5.75
    4 votes
    136
    1929 World Series

    1929 World Series

    • Runner-up: Chicago Cubs
    • Champion: Philadelphia Athletics
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1929 World Series, the Philadelphia Athletics beat the Chicago Cubs in five games. The famous "Mack Attack" occurred in 1929, named for manager of the Athletics, Connie Mack, in which the Athletics overcame an eight-run deficit by scoring ten runs in the seventh inning of Game 4. The inning featured an infamous Cubs moment when center fielder Hack Wilson lost Mule Haas' fly ball in the sun resulting in a bases-clearing, inside-the-park home run, although the A's still trailed 8–7 at that point. Because seven of the eight regulars in the Cubs' batting order hit right-handed, the only exception being first baseman Charlie Grimm, Athletics manager Connie Mack decided that he would start only right-handed pitchers against the Cubs, and keep his left-handers in the bullpen, even though two of his best starters, Lefty Grove and Rube Walberg, were southpaws. Accordingly, Game 1 featured a surprise start by aging A's pitcher Howard Ehmke, whose record thirteen strikeouts bested Ed Walsh's record from 1906 by one, and stood until Carl Erskine broke it by one in 1953. Ehmke would also start Game 5, but failed to get out of the fourth inning in that one. AL Philadelphia Athletics (4)
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    1939 NFL Championship Game

    1939 NFL Championship Game

    • Runner-up: New York Giants
    • Champion: Green Bay Packers
    The 1939 National Football League Championship game was held on December 10, 1939 at Wisconsin State Fair Park in West Allis near Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This was the seventh NFL championship game played. The Green Bay Packers defeated the New York Giants to win their fifth title—two more than any other franchise. The Western Division champion Packers (9–2) played the Eastern Division champions Giants (9–1–1). By beating the Giants, Green Bay avenged its 1938 title game loss to New York and scored the first shutout in NFL playoff history. The Packers moved the game from Green Bay to the larger city of Milwaukee in hopes of increasting attendance; 32,279 would pay to watch. The gross gate receipts of $83,510.35 set a new record. The gate was distributed as follows:
    7.50
    2 votes
    138

    1976 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Phoenix Suns
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1976 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round for the 1975-76 NBA season. The Phoenix Suns entered the NBA in the 1968–69 season. Prior to 1976, they only made the playoffs once, losing to the Los Angeles Lakers in the first round of the 1970 NBA Playoffs. Before that Suns lost a coin flip to the Milwaukee Bucks that determined the fate of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's new team prior to the 1969 NBA Draft. They ultimately selected Neal Walk, who became a bust. They redeemed themselves in the 1975 NBA Draft by selecting Alvan Adams fourth overall. With Adams fortifying the center position, and with new addition Paul Westphal and Dick Van Arsdale providing the scoring punch, the Suns reached the playoffs for only the second time, finishing with 42 wins. The Suns defeated the Seattle SuperSonics in six games of the conference semifinals, before achieving a major upset in dethroning the previous year's champions the Golden State Warriors in seven games. The Suns made it to their first NBA Finals. The Boston Celtics were seeking to make up for the lost opportunity they squandered in the 1975 NBA Playoffs. That year, they finished with 60 wins, but lost to the Washington
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    1988 World Series

    1988 World Series

    • Runner-up: Oakland Athletics
    • Champion: Los Angeles Dodgers
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1988 World Series matched the Oakland Athletics against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Dodgers upsetting the heavily favored A's to win the Series in five games (the exact opposite result of their 1974 meeting, which also went five games). The most memorable moment of the 1988 World Series occurred when injured Dodgers MVP Kirk Gibson, who could barely walk due to injuries suffered during the National League Championship Series, hit a pinch-hit, walk-off home run against Athletics closer Dennis Eckersley in Game 1. The Los Angeles Dodgers won the National League West division by seven games over the Cincinnati Reds then upset the New York Mets, four games to three, in the 1988 NLCS. The Oakland Athletics won the American League West division by thirteen games over the Minnesota Twins then swept the Boston Red Sox, four games to none, in the American League Championship Series. This was the first World Series to have the series logo on the players' uniforms. The Dodgers' team batting did not finish in the top five in any offensive statistical category except batting average (fifth), at .248—no regular or backup hit over .300 or drove in over 90 runs. Kirk Gibson’s 25 home
    7.50
    2 votes
    140

    1989 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Champion: Detroit Pistons
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1989 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1988–89 NBA season. The series was a rematch of the previous year's championship round between the Detroit Pistons and the Los Angeles Lakers. During the season, the Lakers had won their division, with Magic Johnson collecting his second MVP award. The team swept the first three playoff series (Pacific Division foes: Portland, Seattle, and Phoenix), resulting in a rematch with the Detroit Pistons in the Finals. Johnson and Byron Scott were injured, with Scott suffering a hamstring injury in practice before Game 1 and Johnson pulling a hamstring during Game 2. The Lakers had won two straight NBA championships in 1987 and 1988. The Pistons had dominated the Eastern Conference, winning 63 games during the regular season. After sweeping the Boston Celtics and Milwaukee Bucks, the Pistons beat the Chicago Bulls in six games, earning a second straight trip to the NBA Finals. In the season before, the Lakers had beaten them in a tough, seven-game series. The Pistons won the series in a four-game sweep, marking the first time a team (Lakers) swept the first three rounds of the playoffs, and then be swept in the finals. For their rough
    7.50
    2 votes
    141

    1991 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Champion: Chicago Bulls
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1991 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1990–91 NBA season. It was also the first NBA Finals broadcast by NBC after 17 years with CBS. The documentary "Learning to Fly" recaps Chicago's successful first championship season, narrated by Jeff Kaye (who is also the narrator for NFL Films). The theme song is "Learning to Fly" by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. The Chicago Bulls of the East Conference took on the Los Angeles Lakers of the Western Conference for the title, with Chicago having home court advantage. This Finals was Michael Jordan's first NBA Finals appearance, Magic Johnson's last one and the last NBA Finals trip of the Lakers until 2000. The Bulls would win the series 4-1. Jordan averaged 31.2 points on 56% shooting, 11.4 assists, 6.6 rebounds, 2.8 steals and 1.4 blocks on route to his first NBA Finals MVP Award. The finals series was Jim Durham's only appearance as the Bulls' radio announcer (he also announced Bulls games on television via simulcast during the regular season and playoffs). He would later announce several NBA Finals games on ESPN Radio. Neil Funk succeeded Durham the following season and was the radio voice on five NBA Finals involving the
    7.50
    2 votes
    142

    1994 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: New York Knicks
    • Champion: Houston Rockets
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1994 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1993–94 National Basketball Association season, featuring the Western Conference's Houston Rockets defeating the Eastern Conference's New York Knicks. This matchup was Hakeem Olajuwon's second NBA Finals series appearance, his other being in 1986, where Larry Bird and the Boston Celtics defeated the Houston Rockets four games to two. The series was Patrick Ewing's first NBA Finals appearance. The Rockets came in with strong determination to win not only the franchise's first NBA championship, but the city's first championship in a league that still existed, all while the Knicks were looking to add a third NBA championship trophy, as the Knicks' last trophy came from the 1973 NBA Finals. The Knicks also hoped to impress their new owners Viacom, who had just bought Paramount Communications (formerly Gulf+Western), their longtime owners (after the series however, Viacom sold the Knicks and the rest of the Madison Square Garden properties). The series was hailed as a meeting of the two great centers who had previously played for a championship in college. In 1984 while Olajuwon was with the University of Houston and Ewing was with
    7.50
    2 votes
    143

    1996 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Seattle Supersonics
    • Champion: Chicago Bulls
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1996 NBA Finals was the championship series of the 1995-96 NBA season of the National Basketball Association. The Seattle SuperSonics (64–18) of the Western Conference took on the Chicago Bulls (72–10) of the Eastern Conference, with the Bulls holding home court advantage. The series was played under a best-of-seven format. Chicago won the series 4 games to 2, a fitting conclusion after a record breaking 72–10 standing during the regular season. Michael Jordan was named Finals MVP. NBC Sports used Ahmad Rashad (Bulls sideline) and Hannah Storm (SuperSonics sideline). Hal Douglas narrated the season-ending documentary Unstopabulls for NBA Entertainment. In the playoffs, the Bulls lost only three games in four series, defeating Gary Payton, Shawn Kemp, head coach George Karl and their Seattle SuperSonics in the NBA Finals to win the NBA Championship. The Bulls won the first three games of the best-of-seven series, but the Sonics rallied back to win the next two at home. Eventually, the more experienced Bulls proved to be too much as the Bulls captured their fourth title (after a two-year hiatus). For his performance in the series against Seattle, Michael Jordan was named the
    7.50
    2 votes
    144
    2005 FIFA Confederations Cup

    2005 FIFA Confederations Cup

    • Championship: FIFA Confederations Cup
    The 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup football tournament was the seventh FIFA Confederations Cup. It was held in Germany between 15 June and 29 June 2005. The tournament was won by 2002 FIFA World Cup winners Brazil, who defeated Argentina 4–1 in the final Waldstadion in Frankfurt. The final was a rematch of the Copa América final also won by Brazil. It was Brazil's second win at the Confederations Cup. Argentina were awarded a spot in the competition because Brazil had won both the 2002 FIFA World Cup and the 2004 Copa América. Since both competitions award their winners a place in the Confederations Cup, the runners-up in the Copa América 2004 was called to play. All five venues were reused for the 2006 FIFA World Cup. For a list of all squads that appeared in the final tournament, see 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup squads
    7.50
    2 votes
    145
    2008 Rally Catalunya

    2008 Rally Catalunya

    • Championship: World Rally Championship
    The 2008 Rally Spain, officially 44º Rally RACC Catalunya - Costa Daurada, was the 44th Rally Catalunya and the 12th round of the 2008 World Rally Championship season. The rally took place during October 2-5 2008 and consisted of 18 special stages. The rally was won by Citroën Total World Rally Team's Sébastien Loeb ahead of his teammate Dani Sordo. This was Citroën's third double win in a row, after previous one-two finishes in Germany and New Zealand. BP Ford World Rally Team's Mikko Hirvonen and François Duval took comfortable third and fourth positions, although only battled with each other and never managed to challenge the Citroëns. Duval eased off in one stage to let Hirvonen, who continued his fight for the drivers' title with Loeb, to take the third place and one extra point. Subaru World Rally Team's Petter Solberg fought for fifth place with Urmo Aava until the penultimate stage, when Aava retired after making a mistake and braking his Citroën C4 WRC's suspension. The battle for sixth place went down to the wire, with Stobart M-Sport Ford's Jari-Matti Latvala edging out Subaru's Chris Atkinson by 1.1 seconds. Andreas Mikkelsen drove his privateer Ford Focus RS WRC 07 to
    7.50
    2 votes
    146
    2009 FIFA Confederations Cup

    2009 FIFA Confederations Cup

    • Championship: FIFA Confederations Cup
    The 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup was the eighth Confederations Cup, and was held in South Africa from 14 June to 28 June 2009 as a prelude to the 2010 FIFA World Cup. The draw was held on 22 November 2008 at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg. The opening match was played at Ellis Park Stadium in Johannesburg. The tournament was won by Brazil, who retained the trophy they won in 2005 by defeating the United States 3–2 in the final. The draw for the competition was held on 22 November 2008 at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg. Each team was represented in the draw by its competitor in the Miss World 2008 competition, except for Iraq, which was represented by Miss World 2007, Zhang Zilin, from the People's Republic of China. The teams were divided into two pots: Teams from the same confederation were not drawn into the same group, therefore Egypt was drawn into Group B. Also as result, Italy and Spain were drawn into different groups. The official match ball for the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup was the Adidas Kopanya. The name means "join together" in Southern Sesotho, one of the 11 official languages of South Africa. The panel configuration of the ball is the
    7.50
    2 votes
    147
    2009 Women's European Volleyball Championship

    2009 Women's European Volleyball Championship

    • Championship: European Volleyball Championship
    The 2009 Women's European Volleyball Championship was the 26th edition of the European Volleyball Championship, organised by Europe's governing volleyball body, the Confédération Européenne de Volleyball. The cities that hosted matches were Bydgoszcz, Łódź, Katowice and Wrocław in Poland, from September 25 to October 4, 2009. The tournament was played at four venues in four cities throughout Poland. Each city hosted a group stage. Łódź and Katowice hosted the two Playoff Rounds. Łódź also concluded the Championship with the Semifinals & Final. A drawing of lots determined, which group-winner plays which runner-up in the semifinals.
    7.50
    2 votes
    148
    Copa América 1999

    Copa América 1999

    The 1999 Copa América was a football tournament held in Paraguay, from June 29 to July 18, 1999. It was organised by CONMEBOL, South America's football governing body. There is no qualifying for the final tournament. All South American countries (10 countries) participate, along with two more invited countries Japan (from AFC) and Mexico (from CONCACAF), making a total of twelve teams competing in the tournament. Japan became the first non-American team to participate. Uruguay attended with a youth team. As with previous tournaments, all ten members of CONMEBOL participated in the competition. In order to bring the number of competing teams to twelve, CONMEBOL invited Mexico from the CONCACAF and Japan from the AFC, this was the fourth time Mexico accepted the invitation and Japan's first time in the tournament. A total of four host cities hosted the tournament. The opening and final game were hosted by Estadio Defensores del Chaco. For a complete list of participating squads see: Copa América 1999 squads Paraguay was chosen to be the venue by defeating Colombia by seven votes to three The teams were divided into three groups of four teams each. The formation of the groups was made
    7.50
    2 votes
    149
    FA Cup Final 2003

    FA Cup Final 2003

    • Runner-up: Southampton F.C.
    • Champion: Arsenal F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2003 FA Cup Final, the 122nd final of the FA Cup, the world's oldest domestic football cup competition. The final took place on Saturday 17 May 2003 at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, in front of a crowd of 73,726. It was the third consecutive year the final was played at the Millennium Stadium, due to the ongoing reconstruction of Wembley Stadium, the final's usual venue. The clubs contesting the final were Arsenal, the holders of the competition and Southampton. This was Arsenal's 17th appearance in a final and Southampton's fourth. As Premier League clubs, both entered the FA Cup in the third round. Arsenal had won the FA Cup on eight previous occasions (1930, 1936, 1950, 1971, 1979, 1993, 1998, and 2002). Three of these wins had yielded a League / FA Cup "double" (1971, 1998, and 2002), and one win yielded an FA Cup/League Cup "double" (1993). Southampton had won the FA Cup on one previous occasion (1976), and reached the final in 1900 and 1902. The 2002–03 season saw Arsenal finish second and Southampton eighth in the Premier League. The two Premiership matches played between the clubs that season resulted in a home win each time. Southampton had beaten Arsenal 3–2 at
    7.50
    2 votes
    150
    1957 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1957 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball
    The 1957 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1957, and ended with the championship game on March 23 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 27 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. North Carolina, coached by Frank McGuire, won the national title with a 54-53 triple-overtime victory in the final game over Kansas, coached by Dick Harp. Wilt Chamberlain of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. North Carolina won two consecutive triple overtime games to win the championship. The North Carolina - Michigan State semi final game and North Carolina - Kansas final game both made USA Today's list of the greatest NCAA tournament games of all time at 11 and 6 respectively.
    5.50
    4 votes
    151

    1958 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Boston Celtics
    • Champion: Atlanta Hawks
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1958 NBA World Championship Series pitted the Western Champion St. Louis Hawks against the Eastern Champion Boston Celtics. The Hawks won the series in six games to become the National Basketball Association champions. Hawks win series 4-2 After suffering a heartbreaking loss to the Celtics in Game 7 of the 1957 NBA Finals, St. Louis survived rough times in the 1957-58 NBA season, coming back to the NBA Finals to face the Celtics once more. The teams split the first 2 games and were tied 49-49 in the third game when the series' decisive play occurred. Bill Russell soared high to block a shot by Bob Pettit, landed heavily on his right ankle and collapsed in a heap on the floor with a severe sprain. He was through for almost the rest of the playoffs and, as a result, so were the Celtics. Boston won just one more game, the fourth, as the Hawks gained revenge with a six-game series victory that gave them their first and (to date) only NBA championship. It was also the first of two world championships won by a St. Louis pro sports team in any sport other than the MLB Cardinals. The sixth game was sweet vindication for Bob Pettit, and that's an understatement. Before a cheering,
    5.50
    4 votes
    152
    1934 FIFA World Cup qualification

    1934 FIFA World Cup qualification

    The 1934 FIFA World Cup was the first World Cup where the teams had to qualify, since the first edition in 1930 had no qualification rounds (the participating teams were invited by FIFA). This time, a total of 32 teams entered the competition, so FIFA had to organize qualification (or preliminary) rounds to reduce the field to 16 teams for the final tournament. Even Italy, the host of the World Cup, had to qualify (the only time the hosts had to qualify, and one of only two occasions the hosts have ever taken part in the qualification process), while the defending champions Uruguay refused to participate and defend their title because many European nations declined to take part in the 1930 World Cup held in Uruguay. The 32 teams were divided into 12 groups, based on geographical considerations, as follows: A total of 27 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 27 qualifying matches were played, and 141 goals were scored (an average of 5.22 per match). Listed below are the dates and results of the qualification rounds. The 12 groups had different rules, as follows: Estonia v Lithuania was not played, since neither team could qualify with a win. Sweden qualified. Spain
    6.33
    3 votes
    153
    1959 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1959 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: California Golden Bears men's basketball
    The 1959 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 7, 1959, and ended with the championship game on March 21 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 27 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. California, coached by Pete Newell, won the national title with a 71-70 victory in the final game over West Virginia, coached by Fred Schaus. Jerry West of West Virginia was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.33
    3 votes
    154

    1981 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Houston Rockets
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1981 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the 1980-81 NBA season, pitting the Boston Celtics against the Houston Rockets. For the 1980-81 season Houston Rockets (head coached by Del Harris), Moses Malone practically carried the Rockets to the NBA finals. Meanwhile, Calvin Murphy, the shortest player in the league, set two NBA records, sinking 78 consecutive free throws to break Rick Barry's mark of 60 set in 1976 and achieving a free-throw percentage of .958, breaking Rick Barry's record set with the Rockets in 1979. Other members of the 80-81 team were Rudy Tomjanovich, Robert Reid, Mike Dunleavy, Sr., Allen Leavell, Billy Paultz, Bill Willoughby, Calvin Garrett, Tom Henderson, and Major Jones. Houston tied with Kansas City for second place in the Midwest behind San Antonio with a regular season record of 40-42. Houston's playoff run began by drawing the defending NBA-champion Los Angeles Lakers and Magic Johnson in the first round. The Rockets upset Los Angeles, two games to one, with the Rockets winning both games in Los Angeles. The Western Conference Semifinals matchup featured the San Antonio Spurs and multi-year scoring champion George Gervin in a
    6.33
    3 votes
    155
    1991 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships

    1991 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships

    • Runner-up: Canadian National Men's Hockey Team
    • Champion: Swedish National Men's Ice Hockey Team
    The 1991 Ice Hockey World Championships took place in Finland 19 April - 4 May. The games were played in Turku, Helsinki and Tampere. The main venue was Turkuhalli. Eight teams took part, with each team playing each other once. The four best teams then played each other once more. This was the 55th World Championships, and at the same time was the 66th and last Ice Hockey European Championships. Sweden became world champions for the fifth time, and the Soviet Union won their 27th European title. In the European Championships, only matches between European teams in the first round were counted towards scoring. There were three significant 'lasts' in this years championships. This would be the last year that a separate European title would be awarded. It seems fitting that the Soviets captured it yet again, in their final appearance as a united nation. Their position in Group A would be inherited by Russia, with Belarus, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, and the Ukraine all beginning play in 1993 in qualification tournaments for Group C.The tournament itself would change significantly after this year as well. This was the last time the top level was contested by eight teams.
    6.33
    3 votes
    156
    2000 UEFA Champions League Final

    2000 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: Valencia CF
    • Champion: Real Madrid
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2000 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match that took place on 24 May 2000. The match was played at Stade de France in Saint-Denis, France, to determine the winner of the 1999–2000 UEFA Champions League. The final pitted Spanish teams Real Madrid and Valencia. It was the first time since the advent of the European Cup/UEFA Champions League in 1955 that two clubs from the same country competed in the final. The match was a one-sided affair as a headed goal from Fernando Morientes and a spectacular Steve McManaman volley put Real Madrid 2–0 ahead, before Raúl sealed the win with a breakaway third goal, rounding Santiago Cañizares after Real had cleared a Valencia corner. The win was Madrid's eighth European Cup Championship overall and their second in three years, and was notable for being Vicente Del Bosque's first title as manager. It was also a landmark for being the first final played between two teams from the same nation, as well as for having Englishman McManaman become the first player from his nation, to win the tournament with a foreign club. Source: UEFA Champions League Final 2000 Full-Time Report
    6.33
    3 votes
    157
    2005 UEFA Champions League Final

    2005 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: A.C. Milan
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2005 UEFA Champions League Final was the final match of the 2004–05 UEFA Champions League, Europe's primary club football competition. The showpiece event was contested between Liverpool of England and Milan of Italy at the Atatürk Stadium in Istanbul, Turkey on 25 May 2005. Liverpool, who had won the competition four times, were appearing in their sixth final, and their first since 1985. Milan, who had won the competition six times, were appearing in their second final in three years and tenth overall. Each club needed to progress through the group stage and knockout rounds to reach the final, playing 12 matches in total. Liverpool finished second in their group behind 2004 runners-up Monaco and subsequently beat Bayer Leverkusen, Juventus and Chelsea to progress to the final. Milan won their group ahead of Barcelona and faced Manchester United, Internazionale and PSV Eindhoven before reaching the final. Milan were regarded as favourites before the match and took the lead within the first minute through captain Paolo Maldini. Milan striker Hernán Crespo added two more goals before half-time to make it 3–0. In the second half Liverpool launched a comeback and scored three goals
    6.33
    3 votes
    158
    European Cup 1977-78

    European Cup 1977-78

    • Runner-up: Club Brugge
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    The 1977–78 season of the European Cup football club tournament was won by defending champions Liverpool in the final against Club Brugge. The game finished 1–0, starting a run of six consecutive finals that finished 1–0 after ninety minutes, five of them won by English clubs. Celtic won 11–1 on aggregate. Wacker won 3–2 on aggregate. Red Star Belgrade won 6–0 on aggregate. Borussia Mönchengladbach won 4–1 on aggregate. Benfica 0–0 Torpedo Moscow on aggregate. Benfica won on penalties. Boldklubben 1903 won 2–1 on aggregate. Dynamo Dresden won 3–2 on aggregate. Levski-Spartak won 5–2 on aggregate. Ajax won 4–2 on aggregate. Glentoran won 2–1 on aggregate. Juventus won 5–0 on aggregate. Club Brugge won 9–2 on aggregate. Panathinaikos won 5–1 on aggregate. Dukla Prague 1–1 Nantes. Nantes won on away goals. Atlético Madrid won 3–2 on aggregate. Wacker won 4–2 on aggregate. Borussia Mönchengladbach won 8–1 on aggregate. Benfica won 2–0 on aggregate. Liverpool won 6–3 on aggregate. Ajax won 4–2 on aggregate. Juventus won 6–0 on aggregate. Club Brugge won 2–1 on aggregate. Atlético Madrid won 3–2 on aggregate. Wacker 3–3 Borussia Mönchengladbach on aggregate. Borussia Mönchengladbach won
    6.33
    3 votes
    159
    1928 Stanley Cup Finals

    1928 Stanley Cup Finals

    • Runner-up: Montreal Maroons
    • Champion: New York Rangers
    • Championship: Stanley Cup
    The 1928 Stanley Cup Final NHL championship series was contested by the New York Rangers and the Montreal Maroons. It was the first appearance by the Rangers in the Finals and was their first victory of the Stanley Cup in only their second season. The Rangers defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates in the quarter-finals total-goals series 6–4. They then defeated the Boston Bruins in the semi-finals total-goals series 5–2 to reach the Final. The Montreal Maroons defeated the Ottawa Senators in the quarter-finals total-goals series 3–1. And they then defeated the Montreal Canadiens in the semi-finals total-goals series 3–2 to reach the Final. The Series had to be played in Montreal, as the circus had taken over New York's Madison Square Garden. †† The Rangers lost their goalie Lorne Chabot to eye injury in the second game. In one of the most famous incidents in hockey history, 44-year-old coach Lester Patrick took over with the recorded words "Boys, don't let an old man down," and his efforts inspired the Rangers to a 2–1 victory in overtime. Patrick became the oldest person to play in the Stanley Cup finals (44 years-3 months-10 days old), a record which remains unsurpassed to this day.
    8.00
    1 votes
    160
    1982 European Cup Final

    1982 European Cup Final

    • Runner-up: FC Bayern Munich
    • Champion: Aston Villa F.C.
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 1982 European Cup Final was played on 26 May 1982. English champions Aston Villa defeated West German league winners Bayern Munich 1–0 at De Kuip in Rotterdam, Netherlands to win the European Cup for the first, and so far only, time, and continue the streak of English teams winning the competition, being the sixth consecutive victory by an English side. It represented a huge success in his first season as manager for Tony Barton. He had only taken over as Villa boss before the quarter-finals after the shock resignation of Villa boss Ron Saunders. One of the most memorable incidents of the final occurred after 10 minutes when veteran goalkeeper Jimmy Rimmer suffered a repeat of a recurring shoulder injury. His replacement, Nigel Spink, subsequently made only his second first team appearance for the club. His performance in helping prevent Bayern from scoring throughout the match was subsequently highly praised, and is seen by many as the making of a player who would be Villa's first choice goalkeeper for the following 10 seasons. Also memorably Bayern Munich did find the net with three minutes of play remaining, although the goal was ruled offside. Villa also got the ball in the
    8.00
    1 votes
    161
    1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Duke Blue Devils men's basketball
    • Champion: Connecticut Huskies men's basketball
    • Championship: NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship
    The 1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1999, and ended with the championship game on March 29 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. A total of 63 games were played. This year's Final Four was the first—and so far, only—to be held in a baseball-specific facility, as Tropicana Field is home to the Tampa Bay Rays (then known as the Devil Rays). Connecticut, coached by Jim Calhoun, won the national title with a 77-74 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski. The 1998–99 Duke team nonetheless tied the record for most games won during a single season, with 37, which they co-held until Memphis' 38-win season in 2007-08 (which has since been vacated due to violations). Richard "Rip" Hamilton of Connecticut was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This was a significant victory for the program, as it cemented Connecticut's reputation as a true basketball power after decades of barely missing the Final Four. This tournament is also historically notable as the coming-out party for
    8.00
    1 votes
    162
    2008 Rally GB

    2008 Rally GB

    • Championship: World Rally Championship
    The 2008 Rally GB was the fifteenth and final round of the 2008 World Rally Championship season and was held between December 5–7, 2008. The event was again held in Wales, with Cardiff being the host of the ceremonial start and finish, and Swansea providing the service park. The special stages took place on gravel roads on private land, owned either by the Forestry Commission (for the special stages run on Friday and Sunday, and the Resolfen stage on Saturday) or the Army (for the remaining Saturday stages). The event saw a return to the mid Wales stages of Hafren, Sweet Lamb, and Myherin for the first time since 2000. The rally was won by Sébastien Loeb in a Citroën C4. This was his eleventh win of the season - breaking his own previous record set in 2005. Second place went to Ford driver Jari-Matti Latvala who was just 12.7 seconds behind. The final podium position was filled by Loebs teammate Dani Sordo. With this result Citroën clinched the manufacturers championship. The event was supported by the usual works entries from Citroën, Ford, Subaru, Stobart Ford, and Suzuki, plus regular privateers Conrad Rautenbach in his Citroën C4 and Mads Ostberg in a Subaru Impreza WRC. A
    8.00
    1 votes
    163
    8.00
    1 votes
    164
    1951 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1951 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball
    The 1951 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 16 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 20, 1951, and ended with the championship game on March 27 at Williams Arena in Minneapolis, Minnesota. A total of 18 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp, won the national title with a 68-58 victory in the final game over Kansas State, coached by Jack Gardner. The tournament was the first to introduce a 16-team field. Only the championship and third place games were held in Minneapolis, while the semifinals were held in the respective regional sites. In this sense, the 1951 tournament did not feature a true "Final Four." This would have to wait until the 1952 tournament.
    5.25
    4 votes
    165
    1915 World Series

    1915 World Series

    • Runner-up: Philadelphia Phillies
    • Champion: Boston Red Sox
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1915 World Series, the Boston Red Sox beat the Philadelphia Phillies four games to one. In their only World Series before 1950, the Phillies won Game 1 before being swept the rest of the way. It was 65 years before the Phillies won their next Series game. The Red Sox pitching was so strong in the 1915 series that the young Babe Ruth was not used on the mound and only made a single pinch-hitting appearance. Arrangements for the Series were made on October 2, 1915 in a meeting of the team owners, league presidents, and National Commission at The Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. Red Sox owner Joseph Lannin lost the coin toss and Phillies owner William F. Baker chose to have the first two games of the Series in Philadelphia. The league presidents selected the umpires and it was announced that J. G. Taylor Spink would be one of the official scorers. One controversy surrounded the allocation of tickets to the Red Sox' Royal Rooters fan club. Each visiting team was allocated 200 tickets; the Red Sox requested an additional 400 on behalf of their supporters. The Phillies' Baker Bowl sat only 20,000 and William Baker refused to allocate additional tickets for visiting fans.
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    1981 Copa Libertadores

    1981 Copa Libertadores

    • Runner-up: Cobreloa
    • Champion: Clube de Regatas do Flamengo
    • Championship: Copa Libertadores de América
    The 1981 edition of the Copa Libertadores saw Flamengo (BRA) as the champions after defeating Cobreloa (CHI) in the finals. Nacional bye to the second round as 1980 title holders.
    7.00
    2 votes
    167
    2001 FIFA Confederations Cup

    2001 FIFA Confederations Cup

    • Championship: FIFA Confederations Cup
    The 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup was the fifth FIFA Confederations Cup and the third to be organised by FIFA. The tournament was played in May and June 2001 and co-hosted by South Korea and Japan, who were also hosts for the 2002 FIFA World Cup finals. It was won by France, beating hosts Japan 1–0, with a goal from Patrick Vieira. By winning the tournament, France became the second team to simultaneously be World Cup champions, continental champions and Confederations Cup winners, after Brazil in 1997. The eight teams were split into two groups of four, in which each team plays each of the others once, with the top two in each group advancing to the semi-finals. For a list of all squads that appeared in the final tournament see, 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup squads
    7.00
    2 votes
    168
    2001 UEFA Champions League Final

    2001 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: Valencia CF
    • Champion: FC Bayern Munich
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2001 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match that took place at San Siro in Milan, Italy, on 23 May 2001, to decide the winner of the 2000–01 UEFA Champions League. The match pitted Bayern Munich against Valencia. The match finished in a 1–1 draw, but Bayern clinched their fourth title by winning 5–4 on penalties. This was also their first European title in a quarter-century, also representing Valencia's second consecutive final defeat (2000 and 2001). Due to all the goals scored and the penalty shootout needed to decide the winner, this UEFA Champions League match became an "all-penalty" final and the only one ever to happen to this day. This was the sixth European Cup final to be decided on penalties, and the second under the Champions League format). This was Héctor Cúper's third consecutive European final defeat (after his Mallorca side lost the 1999 Cup Winners' Cup Final and Valencia lost to Real Madrid in the 2000 Champions League final) while Ottmar Hitzfeld claimed his second Champions League title after he won it with Borussia Dortmund in 1997. He became the second coach in European Cup history, after Ernst Happel, to win the competition with two different
    7.00
    2 votes
    169
    FA Cup 2006–07

    FA Cup 2006–07

    • Runner-up: Manchester United F.C.
    • Champion: Chelsea F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The FA Cup 2006–07 was the 126th staging of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup. This season's edition was the first to be entitled "The FA Cup sponsored by E.On". The competition started on 18 August 2006 with the first of the record number of 687 teams entering in the Extra Preliminary Round and concluded on 19 May 2007 with the Final, held at the new Wembley Stadium. For information on the matches played from the Extra Preliminary Round to the final Qualifying Round, see FA Cup 2006-07 Qualifying Rounds. Chelsea F.C. claimed this season's FA Cup with a hard-fought 1–0 victory over Manchester United, with Didier Drogba scoring the winning goal in the dying minutes of extra-time. Manchester United had played against top-flight opponents in each round, matching their effort from 1948, but losing out this time. The results below detail the results from the First Round Proper onwards. Matches played on weekend of Saturday, 11 November 2006. The draw was made by Will Greenwood and Neil Back, adjudicated by Trevor Brooking. Matches played on weekend of Saturday, 2 December 2006. The draw was made on 12 November by Graham
    7.00
    2 votes
    170
    FA Cup Final 2002

    FA Cup Final 2002

    • Runner-up: Chelsea F.C.
    • Champion: Arsenal F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2002 FA Cup Final was the final match of the 2001–02 FA Cup competition. It was an all-London affair between Arsenal and Chelsea at the Millennium Stadium on 4 May 2002. Arsenal won 2–0, with goals by Ray Parlour and Freddie Ljungberg. Chelsea were led onto the field by Roberto Di Matteo, who had been forced to retire from football earlier in the season due to a serious injury. Ljungberg, having also scored in the 2001 final, became the first man to score goals in successive FA Cup finals since Tottenham Hotspur's Bobby Smith, who scored in 1961 and 1962. The match took place with one week remaining in the Premier League calendar for the 2001–02 season. Arsenal were in first position, but still needed a point from their final two games to secure the championship, which they achieved in their next match with victory over second-placed Manchester United. Chelsea had to win their remaining fixture to confirm the position of fifth they held at the start of the match; they lost again and finished in sixth. In the league fixtures between the two clubs, Arsenal had the upper hand, with a 1–1 draw at Chelsea's Stamford Bridge on 8 September 2001 and a 2–1 win at Highbury on Boxing
    7.00
    2 votes
    171
    1938 FIFA World Cup qualification

    1938 FIFA World Cup qualification

    A total of 37 teams entered the 1938 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. For the first time the title holders and the host country were given automatic qualification. Therefore, France, as the hosts, and Italy, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition. Due to the Spanish Civil War, Spain withdrew from the competition. The remaining 34 teams were divided into 12 groups, based on geographical considerations, as follows: However, due to the withdrawal of Austria after qualifying (they had been annexed by Germany), only 15 teams actually competed in the final tournament. FIFA did not offer participation to the runner-up of the group that Austria had played in, Latvia. A total of 21 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 22 qualifying matches were played, and 96 goals were scored (an average of 4.36 per match). The 12 groups had different rules, as follows: Key: Germany and Sweden qualified. Norway qualified. Poland finished above Yugoslavia on goal average, and thus qualified. Egypt withdrew, so Romania qualified automatically. Switzerland qualified. Greece
    6.00
    3 votes
    172

    1980 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Philadelphia 76ers
    • Champion: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1980 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the 1979–80 NBA season. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was the league's MVP. But midway through Game 5, the Laker center suffered a severely sprained ankle. He managed to come back in the game in the 4th quarter to lead the Lakers to victory and a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven series. But the Lakers still had to travel to Philadelphia for Game 6. Abdul-Jabbar was listed as out of game 6, although 76er coach Billy Cunningham was quoted as saying "I won't believe he's not playing until their plane lands and he's not on it." As it turned out, Kareem did not make the trip and was listed as doubtful if Game 7 had been needed. In game 6, Magic Johnson played what may have been the greatest game of his career. Playing on the road in Philadelphia, Magic (a 6'9" point guard) started the game at center and eventually played all 5 positions in a dominating performance. Scoring a game-high 42 points and grabbing a game-high 15 rebounds—and handing out 7 assists—Magic Johnson led the Lakers to the NBA crown. The Lakers also received strong performances from Jamaal Wilkes with 37 points and 10 rebounds, and Norm Nixon. Jim Chones played
    6.00
    3 votes
    173
    FA Cup Final 1973

    FA Cup Final 1973

    • Runner-up: Leeds United A.F.C.
    • Champion: Sunderland A.F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 1973 FA Cup Final took place on 5 May 1973 at Wembley Stadium. It was the 92nd final and the 45th to be played at Wembley, which was celebrating its 50th anniversary year. The final was contested between the previous season's winners Leeds United, who were one of the dominant teams at the time, and Sunderland, a second division side. The result was one of the biggest shocks in the history of the competition, with Sunderland winning 1–0, becoming the first Second Division side to lift the Cup since West Bromwich Albion in 1931. It remains Sunderland's only major trophy since the Second World War. Sunderland established their tactics immediately from the kick off, tackling fiercely and defiantly with an unremitting determination. Leeds looked anxious, lacking their usual composure. The match itself was decided by two crucial moments that would be talked about for years to come. After 31 minutes Sunderland took the lead when Vic Halom chested down a corner from Billy Hughes. Assisted by Dave Watson between two defenders, the deflected high ball was controlled by Ian Porterfield who shot home from 12 yards. Leeds, shocked, battled back with predictable determination. Sunderland’s
    6.00
    3 votes
    174
    1970 FIFA World Cup qualification

    1970 FIFA World Cup qualification

    A total of 75 teams entered the 1970 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. Hosts Mexico and defending champions England qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition. For the first time, the winners of both the African zone and the Asian and Oceanian zone were guaranteed a direct place in the final tournament. The 16 spots available in the 1970 World Cup would be distributed among the continental zones as follows: A total of 68 teams played in at least one qualifying match. A total of 172 qualifying matches were played, and 542 goals were scored (an average of 3.15 per match). Listed below are the dates and results of the qualification rounds. Key: FIFA rejected the entry of Albania. The remaining 29 teams were divided into 8 groups of 3 or 4 teams each (three groups with 3 teams and five groups with 4 teams). The teams played against each other on a home-and-away basis. The group winners would qualify. Romania qualified. Czechoslovakia and Hungary finished level on points, and a play-off on neutral ground was played to decide who would qualify. Czechoslovakia qualified. Italy qualified. Soviet Union
    5.67
    3 votes
    175
    1984 European Cup Final

    1984 European Cup Final

    • Runner-up: A.S. Roma
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 1984 European Cup Final was an association football match between Liverpool of England and Roma of Italy on 30 May 1984 at the Stadio Olimpico, Rome, Italy. It was the final match of the 1983–84 season of Europe's premier cup competition, the European Cup. Liverpool were appearing in their fourth final, having won the competition in 1977, 1978 and 1981. Roma were appearing in their first European Cup final. Each club needed to progress through four rounds to reach the final. Matches were contested over two legs, with a match at each team's home ground. Liverpool's matches ties ranged from close affairs to comfortable victories. They beat Athletic Bilbao by a single goal in the second round, while they beat Benfica 5–1 on aggregate in the quarter-finals. Roma's matches were all close affairs, winning their ties up to the semi-final by two goal margins. They beat Dundee United 3–2 on aggregate in the semi-finals, although it was later revealed that Roma attempted to bribe the referee in the second leg of the semi-final. As the final was held at Roma's home ground they went into the match as favourites, despite Liverpool's previous record in the competition. Watched by a crowd of
    5.67
    3 votes
    176
    1939 Stanley Cup Finals

    1939 Stanley Cup Finals

    • Runner-up: Toronto Maple Leafs
    • Champion: Boston Bruins
    • Championship: Stanley Cup
    The 1939 Stanley Cup Final NHL championship series was contested by the Boston Bruins and the Toronto Maple Leafs. It was Boston's first appearance in the Final since 1930; Toronto had appeared in the 1938 Final. Boston would win the series 4–1 to win their second Stanley Cup. It was the first best-of-seven Stanley Cup Final series. Boston defeated New York Rangers in a best-of-seven 4–3 to advance to the final. The Maple Leafs had to play two best-of three series; winning 2–0 against New York Americans, and 2–1 against the Detroit Red Wings. Frank Brimsek held Toronto to just six goals in the 5 games.
    6.50
    2 votes
    177

    1961 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: St. Louis Hawks
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1961 NBA Finals was the championship series of the 1960-61 National Basketball Association season, and was the conclusion of the 1961 NBA Playoffs. The best-of-seven series was played between the Western Conference champion St. Louis Hawks and the Eastern Conference champion Boston Celtics. This was the Celtics' 5th straight trip to the championship series, and they won the series against the Hawks, 4-1. Celtics win series 4-1
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    2006 Winter Olympics

    2006 Winter Olympics

    The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, was a winter multi-sport event which was celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. This marked the second time Italy hosted the Olympic Winter Games, the first being the VII Olympic Winter Games in Cortina d'Ampezzo in 1956. Italy also hosted the Games of the XVII Olympiad in Rome in 1960. Turin was selected as the host city for the 2006 games in 1999. The official logo displayed the name "Torino", the Italian name of the city; the city is known as "Turin" in both English and the local traditional language, Piedmontese. The Olympic mascots of Torino 2006 were Neve ("snow" in Italian), a female snowball, and Gliz, a male ice cube. The official motto of the XX Olympic Winter Games was "Passion lives here". Turin was chosen as the host of the Olympics in 1999 at Seoul, South Korea in the 109th IOC Session. This was after the IOC had adopted new election procedures during the 108th Extraordinary IOC Session in light of the corruption scandals surrounding the votes for the 1998 and 2002 Winter Olympics. Since IOC members were forbidden from visiting the candidate cities (in the
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    1913 World Series

    1913 World Series

    • Runner-up: New York Giants
    • Champion: Philadelphia Athletics
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1913 World Series, the Philadelphia Athletics beat the New York Giants four games to one. The A's pitching gave the edge to a closer-than-it-looked Series in 1913. The great Christy Mathewson lost his Series swan song in the final game to an old college rival and eventual fellow Baseball Hall of Fame member, Eddie Plank. The Giants thus became the first National League team since the Chicago Cubs (1906–1908) to win three consecutive pennants. They were also the second club (following the Detroit Tigers (1907–1909) to lose three consecutive World Series; and, as of 2011, the last to do so. The Series itself was an ironic face-off, as the Giants and A's would eventually become crosstown rivals. The A's would win again in a four-game sweep in the 1989 World Series, famous for the earthquake that struck before Game 3, which would be the last World Series victory for the A's. AL Philadelphia Athletics (4) vs. NL New York Giants (1) Tuesday, October 7, 1913 at Polo Grounds (IV) in Manhattan, New York In the opener, Home Run Baker drove in three runs with three hits, including a home run. Frank apparently liked his nickname and wanted to hang on to it. Wednesday, October 8, 1913 at
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    1923 World Series

    1923 World Series

    • Runner-up: New York Giants
    • Champion: New York Yankees
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1923 World Series, the New York Yankees beat the New York Giants in six games. This would be the first of the Yankees' 27 World Series championships (as of 2011). The home field alternated each game, a noted difference to the 2–3–2 format. The Yankees opened their new Yankee Stadium in April on a home run by Babe Ruth, setting the tone for the season and this Series, in which Ruth hit three home runs along with drawing eight walks. In Game 2, second baseman, Aaron Ward hit a home run. The Giants' one bright spot was "Old Casey" Stengel, who hit game-winning homers in each of the two Giants' victories. In typically eccentric Stengel fashion, one of them was inside-the-park at the cavernous Yankee Stadium, and his shoe came loose during his run around the bases. Stengel was traded after the season, leading him to quip later in life, "It's a good thing I didn't hit three homers in three games, or McGraw would have traded me to the Three-I League!". A quarter century later, Stengel would take on the role of Yankees manager, and would guide the Bronx Bombers through one of their most successful eras. In Game 6, The Yankees overcame the 4–1 deficit by staging a five-run rally in
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    1942 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1942 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Stanford Cardinal men's basketball
    The 1942 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 20, 1942, and ended with the championship game on March 28 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Stanford, coached by Everett Dean, won the national title with a 53-38 victory in the final game over Dartmouth, coached by O. B. Cowles. Howie Dallmar of Stanford was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Everett Dean remains, to this day, the only coach to have never lost an NCAA tournament game, going 3-0 in his lone appearance.
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    1977 World Series

    1977 World Series

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Dodgers
    • Champion: New York Yankees
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1977 World Series was the 83rd edition of Major League Baseball's (MLB) championship series. The best-of-seven playoff was contested between the New York Yankees, champions of the American League (AL) and defending American League champions, and the Los Angeles Dodgers, champions of the National League (NL). The Yankees defeated the Dodgers, four games to two, to win the franchise's 21st World Series championship, their first since 1962, and the first under the ownership of George Steinbrenner. The Series was played between October 11 and October 18, broadcast on ABC. Home field advantage for the Series went to the Yankees on the basis of their superior regular season record. During this series, Reggie Jackson earned his nickname "Mr. October" for his heroics. Billy Martin won what would be his only World Series title as a manager after guiding the Yankees to a second straight pennant. The New York Yankees returned to the Fall Classic after being swept by the Cincinnati Reds the previous year. In free agency, the Yankees signing slugging right fielder Reggie Jackson for $2.96 million ($12,089,263 in current dollar terms) over five years and pitcher Don Gullett for $2 million
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    2008 Rally Argentina

    2008 Rally Argentina

    • Championship: World Rally Championship
    The 2008 Rally Argentina, officially 28º Rally Argentina, is the fourth round of 2008 World Rally Championship season; it is a second gravel round of the championship and also the second round of the Production World Rally Championship. The event began with a ceremonial start on Thursday, March 27 in Córdoba and ended after a Super Special Stage and ten minutes service "E" in Villa Carlos Paz. Some stages of the rally, especially the ones from final day, similarly to those seen on the Mexican event, are held in the mountainous area of the country, thus drivers climb up to 2100 meters above sea levels. The event, however, is more varied and some competitive kilometers lead through vast Argentinian plains. The rally began in rainy and muddy conditions. Mikko Hirvonen was the first on the road as the championship leader and managed to open up a 48-second gap to Jari-Matti Latvala and a 50-second gap to Sébastien Loeb. However, the BP Ford drivers soon dropped out of contention. On the second stage, Latvala spun off and lost about nine minutes, and on the fifth stage, Hirvonen and Stobart VK M-Sport Ford's Henning Solberg damaged their cars while hitting rocks and retired from the
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    2011 UEFA Champions League Final

    2011 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: Manchester United F.C.
    • Champion: FC Barcelona
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2011 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match played on 28 May 2011 at Wembley Stadium in London that decided the winner of the 2010–11 season of the UEFA Champions League. The winners received the European Champion Clubs' Cup (the European Cup). The 2011 final was the culmination of the 56th season of the tournament, and the 19th in the Champions League era. The final was contested by Barcelona of Spain and Manchester United of England, a repeat of the 2009 final held in Rome which Barcelona won 2–0. The match kicked-off at 19:45 BST. The referee for the match was Viktor Kassai from Hungary. The venue, the new Wembley Stadium, hosted its first European Cup final, having opened in 2007. The old Wembley Stadium hosted the finals in 1963, 1968, 1971, 1978 and 1992. Both teams entered the competition having won it three times previously, Manchester United in 1968, 1999 and 2008; Barcelona in 1992, 2006 and 2009. To reach the final, in the knockout phase Barcelona beat Arsenal, Shakhtar Donetsk and lastly Real Madrid in the 212th El Clásico derby, while Manchester United beat Marseille, Chelsea and Schalke. Manchester United and Barcelona entered the final as champions of
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    FA Cup Final 2005

    FA Cup Final 2005

    • Runner-up: Manchester United F.C.
    • Champion: Arsenal F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2005 FA Cup Final was held at the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff on 21 May 2005 between Arsenal and Manchester United. In a tense but surprisingly one-sided encounter, Arsenal ran out winners after 120 goalless minutes despite being outplayed throughout the game, becoming the first club to win the cup on penalties. It was the first goalless draw in an FA Cup final since 1912. The match took place for the fifth consecutive year at the Millennium Stadium, due to the ongoing reconstruction of Wembley Stadium, the final's usual venue. The match was refereed by Rob Styles, who was aided by assistant referees Jim Devine, Paul Canadine and fourth official Neale Barry. The game was the 17th appearance for both teams in an FA Cup Final, a record that Manchester United surpassed in 2007. It was Arsenal's tenth FA Cup win and their most recent major trophy to date. Only Manchester United have won the trophy more times, with eleven. The match was the fifth meeting between the two clubs in the 2004–05 season. Despite finishing six points ahead of Manchester United in the league, Arsenal had lost both league fixtures between the clubs, as well as a League Cup quarter-final tie, which was played
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    UAAP Season 70 judo championships - Men's Division

    UAAP Season 70 judo championships - Men's Division

    The Men's division of the Judo championships of UAAP Season 70 is being contested from October 6 to October 7, 2007 at the Ateneo Blue Eagle Gym. The UP Tiger Judokas were the defending champions. After the tournament, the UP Maroon Judokas won the crown over the other teams to take their fourth UAAP title, and one-half of the double crown that made it 14 total for the University of the Philippines (UP). Other divisions
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    1999 Cricket World Cup

    1999 Cricket World Cup

    • Runner-up: Pakistani cricket team
    • Champion: Australian cricket team
    The 1999 ICC Cricket World Cup, the seventh edition of the tournament, was hosted primarily by England, with some games being hosted in Ireland, Wales, Scotland and the Netherlands. The World Cup was won by Australia, who beat Pakistan by 8 wickets at Lord's Cricket Ground in London. New Zealand and South Africa were the other semifinalists. The 12 contesting teams were divided into 2 groups; each team played all the others in their group during the league stage. The top three from each group advanced to the Super Sixes, a new concept for the 1999 World Cup, where each qualifier from group A played each qualifier from group B. The teams also carried forward their points from the games against the other qualifiers from their group. The top four in the Super Sixes contested the semifinals. The following teams contested: The results of all the games seen in the 1999 Cricket World Cup: Points Carried Forward (PCF) only applied to the 6 teams which progressed from the Group Stage of the tournament, those points were the number of points scored against their fellow qualifiers from their respective groups. Points carried forward did not change once in the Super Sixes. Lance Klusener of
    5.33
    3 votes
    188
    FA Premier League 2006-07

    FA Premier League 2006-07

    • Champion: Manchester United F.C.
    The 2006–07 FA Premier League was the fifteenth season of the FA Premier League since its establishment in 1992. The season started on 19 August 2006 and concluded on 13 May 2007. Manchester United ended the season as Premiership champions for the ninth time in fifteen years, after Chelsea failed to win against Arsenal at the Emirates Stadium. This left them seven points behind United, with two games to go, confirming the Manchester club as champions once more. The three relegation spots were occupied by Watford and Sheffield United who each lasted one season in the league, along with Charlton Athletic who went down after eight seasons. Source: Barclays Premier League Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored. For further information on European qualification see Premier League – Qualification for European competitions. (C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round. Only applicable when the season is not finished: (Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.
    5.33
    3 votes
    189
    1914 World Series

    1914 World Series

    • Runner-up: Philadelphia Athletics
    • Champion: Boston Braves
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1914 World Series, the Boston Braves beat the Philadelphia Athletics in a four-game sweep. A contender for greatest upset of all time, the "Miracle Braves" were in last place on July 4, then roared on to win the National League pennant by 10 ⁄2 games and sweep the stunned Athletics. The Braves' relatively unknown starting trio of pitchers, with a combined career record of 285–245, outperformed the Athletics vaunted rotation (929–654) in all four games. Hank Gowdy hit .545 (6 of 11) with five extra-base hits and also drew five walks for Boston in the series and was the difference maker in Games 1 and 3. Adding to their supposed disadvantages, the Braves arguably lacked a notable home-field advantage. They had abandoned their 43-year-old home field South End Grounds in August 1914, choosing to rent from the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park while awaiting construction of Braves Field (1915). Thus their home games in this Series were also at Fenway. This was the first four-game sweep in World Series history. The Cubs had defeated the Tigers four games to none in 1907, but Game 1 had ended in a tie before the Cubs won the next four in a row. At least one publication, To Every Thing
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    1938 NFL Championship Game

    1938 NFL Championship Game

    • Runner-up: Green Bay Packers
    • Champion: New York Giants
    The 1938 NFL Championship Game was the 6th championship game played in the history of the National Football League. The game was on December 11, 1938, at Polo Grounds in New York City. The game attendance was 48,120 a record crowd for a title game. The game matched the champions of the Eastern Division, New York Giants (8-2-1) against the Western Division champion Green Bay Packers (8-3-0). This was the Giants 4th championship game appearance, while the Packers were making their 2nd. With the victory, the Giants became the first team to win two championship games since the league split into two divisions in 1933. Their previous victory was in the famous Sneakers game of 1934. New York also had won the 1927 NFL title when the championship was awarded to the team with the best season record. The victory earned each winning Giant $900.00 and each Packer $700.00.
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    1946 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1946 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Oklahoma A&M Aggies Men's Basketball
    The 1946 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 21, 1946, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in New York City. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Oklahoma A&M, coached by Henry Iba, won the national title with a 43-40 victory in the final game over North Carolina, coached by Ben Carnevale. Bob Kurland of Oklahoma A&M was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This was the first tournament to have four teams advance to the final site, though not the first to have a true "Final Four" format (that would not occur until 1952). The two regional losers played in the national third-place game, while the two winners played for the championship. The third place game would continue through the 1981 tournament.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Loyola Ramblers men's basketball
    The 1963 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 9, 1963, and ended with the championship game on March 23 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Loyola University Chicago, coached by George Ireland, won the national title with a 60-58 victory in the final game, over the University of Cincinnati, coached by Ed Jucker. Art Heyman, of Duke University, was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This tournament marked the last time that a city was host to two straight Final Fours. In the Loyola vs. Mississippi State game in the regional semifinal, Mississippi State, an all-white team, played despite protests from the governor and state police of Mississippi. Mississippi State overcame a state prohibition against playing integrated teams. Loyola beat Mississippi State and went on to the Mideast Region Championship game. In the National Championship game, Loyola started four African-Americans and Cincinnati
    6.00
    2 votes
    193

    1974 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Milwaukee Bucks
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1974 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the 1973-74 NBA season. The Milwaukee Bucks returned to the NBA Finals after a three-year absence. Some of the cast from the 1971 championship team, such as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (formerly Lew Alcindor), Jon McGlocklin, Bob Dandridge and the retiring Oscar Robertson, return for another title run. However Lucius Allen, a key bench player from that team, was injured and couldn't play in the series. The Bucks eliminated the Los Angeles Lakers and the Chicago Bulls in five and four games, respectively, to advance to the Finals. The Lakers series marked the final games of Jerry West's career. The Boston Celtics won a franchise record 68 games in the 1972–73 season, but a shoulder injury to John Havlicek quashed their title hopes, as they lost in seven games to the New York Knicks in the conference finals. Havlicek returned healthier for the 1973–74 season, and with Dave Cowens, Paul Silas and Jo Jo White entering the prime of their careers, the Celtics appear poised for another title run. The Celtics, though winning 12 games less than the previous season, still made the Finals, defeating the Buffalo Braves in six games
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Louisville Cardinals men's basketball
    The 1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 13, 1986, and ended with the championship game on March 31 in Dallas, Texas. A total of 63 games were played. Louisville, coached by Denny Crum, won the national title with a 72-69 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski. Pervis Ellison of Louisville was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The 1986 NCAA Men's Basketball Championship Tournament was the first tournament to use a shot clock limiting the amount of time for any one offensive possession by a team prior to taking a shot at the basket. Beginning with the 1986 tournament, the shot clock was set at 45 seconds, which it would remain until being shortened to 35 seconds beginning in the 1994 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. LSU's 1985-86 team is tied for the lowest-seeded team (#11) to ever make the Final Four (with George Mason's 2005–2006 team and VCU's 2010-2011 team). LSU began its run to the Final Four by winning two games on its home court, leading to a change two years
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    2005 UEFA Super Cup

    2005 UEFA Super Cup

    • Runner-up: PFC CSKA Moscow
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    • Championship: European Super Cup
    The 2005 UEFA Super Cup was an association football match between Liverpool of England and CSKA Moscow of Russia on 26 August 2005 at Stade Louis II, Monaco, the annual UEFA Super Cup contested between the winners of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup. Liverpool were appearing in the Super Cup for the fifth time, having won the competition in 1977 and 2001. CSKA Moscow were appearing in the Super Cup for the first time, the first Russian team to appear in the competition. The teams had qualified for the competition by winning the two seasonal European competitions. Liverpool won the 2004–05 UEFA Champions League, defeating Italian team A.C. Milan 3–2 in a penalty shootout after the match had finished 3–3. CSKA Moscow won the 2004–05 UEFA Cup, beating Portuguese team Sporting CP 3–1. Watched by a crowd of 17,042, CSKA took the lead in the first half when Daniel Carvalho scored. Liverpool did not respond until the 82nd minute when substitute Djibril Cissé scored. The score remained 1–1 until the end of the 90 minutes to send the match into extra-time. Cissé scored again in the 103rd minute to give Liverpool the lead, which was later extended by Luis García. Liverpool held out
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Premier League 2007-08

    Premier League 2007-08

    • Champion: Manchester United F.C.
    The 2007–08 Premier League season (known as the Barclays Premier League for sponsorship reasons) was the sixteenth since its establishment. The first matches of the season were played on 11 August 2007, and the season ended on 11 May 2008. Manchester United went into the 2007–08 season as the Premier League's defending champions, having won their ninth Premier League title and sixteenth league championship overall the previous season. This season was also the third consecutive season to see the "Big Four" continue their stranglehold on the top four spots and places in the UEFA Champions League. The first goal of the season was scored by Michael Chopra, who scored a 94th minute winner for Sunderland against Tottenham in the early kick-off. The first red card of the season was given to Reading's Dave Kitson after a challenge on Patrice Evra in their opening game against Manchester United. The first hat-trick was scored by Emmanuel Adebayor in the match between Arsenal and Derby County. On 29 September 2007, Portsmouth beat Reading 7–4 in the highest scoring match in Premier League history. On 15 December 2007, both Roque Santa Cruz (Blackburn Rovers) and Marcus Bent (Wigan Athletic)
    6.00
    2 votes
    197
    1921 World Series

    1921 World Series

    • Runner-up: New York Yankees
    • Champion: New York Giants
    • Championship: World Series
    The much-anticipated 1921 World Series featured John McGraw's New York Giants, dedicated practitioners of the dead-ball era's "inside game", and the New York Yankees, who relied on the "power game" exemplified by Babe Ruth, who was coming off of what was arguably his best year ever statistically. The Series was a closely contested matchup which ended on a double play featuring a baserunning miscue. The Series was the last of the experimental best-five-of-nine series, which the Giants won five games to three. Eight games took place at the Polo Grounds in Manhattan, New York, with teams alternating "home team" designations, due to the fact that the Yankees had sub-leased the stadium from the Giants for the 1913 through 1922 seasons. This marked the first time in World Series history that the series occurred at a single site. For New Yorkers, this was the first Subway Series in World Series history. The Series was also the first to be broadcast on radio, with Grantland Rice covering the games live through KDKA (which was rebroadcast on WBZ). Announcer Tommy Cowan also recreated the games over Westinghouse-owned WJZ in Newark by listening to phoned-in reports from the stadium. Because
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    1941 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1941 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball
    The 1941 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 21, 1941, and ended with the championship game on March 29 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Wisconsin, coached by Bud Foster, won the national title with a 39-34 victory in the final game over Washington State, coached by Jack Friel. John Kotz of Wisconsin was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    5.50
    2 votes
    199

    1975 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Washington Wizards
    • Champion: Golden State Warriors
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1975 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the 1974-75 NBA season of the National Basketball Association. The Golden State Warriors (48-34) of the Western Conference played against the Washington Bullets (60-22) of the Eastern Conference. The series was played under a best-of-seven format. The Warriors' home games were played at the Cow Palace in Daly City (near San Francisco) due to scheduling conflicts at their normal home court of Oakland Arena during the week of May 19-26. In addition, an odd scheduling format had to be used because Golden State could not secure the Cow Palace for Memorial Day Weekend (May 24-26). A Sports Illustrated article about the series reported that Washington, which held home court advantage, was given the option of a 1-2-2-1-1 scheduling format due to Golden State's problems or, if they wished, opening on the road and then having Games 2, 3, and 4 at home. Washington opted for the 1-2-2-1-1 format not out of a sense of fairness, but because they wanted to open the series at home. The series is notable as it was the first championship game or series in any of the four North American major professional sports leagues to feature
    5.50
    2 votes
    200

    1985 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Boston Celtics
    • Champion: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1985 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the 1984–85 NBA season. The Boston Celtics were looking to repeat as NBA Champions for the first time since the 1968–69. The Celtics had homecourt advantage for the second year in a row as they finished the regular season with a 63-19 record while the Los Angeles Lakers compiled a 62-20 record. The Lakers looked to bounce back from the previous year's painful loss to the Celtics in the championship series, and were still seeking to beat Boston for the first time ever in NBA Finals history. Also for the first time, the Finals went to a 2-3-2 format with Games 1 and 2 in Boston while the next three games were in Los Angeles. The final two games of the series would be played in Boston, if required. This change of format came after David Stern had a conversation with Celtics legend Red Auerbach in 1984, who didn't like the frequent traveling between games. The Los Angeles Lakers defeated the Celtics four games to two to defeat the Celtics for the first time in Laker history in the NBA Finals. It would mark the last time the NBA World Championship Series branding would be in use as the NBA Finals branding would replace
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    1992 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1992 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Duke Blue Devils men's basketball
    The 1992 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 19, 1992, and ended with the championship game on April 6 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. A total of 63 games were played. Duke, coached by Mike Krzyzewski, defeated the Michigan Wolverines, coached by Steve Fisher, 71–51 to claim their second consecutive national championship. Bobby Hurley of Duke was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Michigan subsequently vacated its final two tournament games as part of the University of Michigan basketball scandal. This tournament is best remembered for the East regional final pitting Duke and Kentucky at The Spectrum in Philadelphia. With 2.1 seconds remaining in overtime, Duke trailed 103–102. Grant Hill threw a pass the length of the court to Christian Laettner, who dribbled once, turned, and hit a jumper as time expired for the 104-103 win. Sports Illustrated deemed it the greatest college basketball game of all time , and ESPN included it as number 17 on its list of top 100 sports moments of the past 25 years (see ESPN25). It is
    5.50
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    202
    1995 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1995 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Arkansas Razorbacks men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1995 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 16, 1995, and ended with the championship game on April 3 at the Kingdome in Seattle, Washington. A total of 63 games were played. UCLA, coached by Jim Harrick, won its record 11th NCAA Men's Basketball Championship and its first since the John Wooden era by defeating the University of Arkansas, who came up one game short in their bid to repeat as champions. Games marked with an "*" went into overtime. A final shot in the second round at The Boise State Pavilion is one of the most memorable moments in NCAA history. UCLA's Tyus Edney dashed the length of the 94-foot court in just over 4 seconds to make a layup that gave the Bruins a 75-74 win over Missouri, which sustained UCLA's run to a national title that year.
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    2006-07 Ashes series

    2006-07 Ashes series

    The 2006–07 cricket series between Australia and England for the Ashes was played in Australia from 23 November 2006 to 5 January 2007. Australia won the series and regained the Ashes that had been lost to England in the 2005 series. The five Tests of the series were played at Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth, Melbourne and Sydney. In winning, Australia completed a 5–0 "whitewash", the first time this had happened in an Ashes series since 1920–21. The series was also notable for the retirement of several significant Australian players, namely Justin Langer, Damien Martyn, Glenn McGrath, and Shane Warne. Ricky Ponting was named Player of the Series. During lunch on the third day of the First Test in Brisbane, The Cricket Show on Channel 9 in Australia revealed that the winner of the Ashes would lift a larger, crystal model of the Ashes urn at the end of the series, rather than a replica of the small Ashes urn. Ricky Ponting found himself criticised by journalists on his captaincy and performances in the 2005 series during the run-up to the first Test. When questioned in a press conference on this subject, he said "We didn't perform the way we would have liked and probably I didn't score
    5.50
    2 votes
    204
    2009 FA Cup Final

    2009 FA Cup Final

    • Runner-up: Everton F.C.
    • Champion: Chelsea F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2009 FA Cup Final was the 128th final of the world's oldest domestic football cup competition, the FA Cup. The final was played at Wembley Stadium in London on 30 May 2009 and marked the third time that the final has been staged at the stadium since it was rebuilt. The match was contested by Chelsea, who beat Arsenal 2–1 in their semi-final, and Everton who beat Manchester United 4–2 on penalties after a 0–0 draw after extra time. After Louis Saha opened the scoring after just 25 seconds, the fastest ever goal in an FA Cup Final, Didier Drogba equalised in the 21st minute before Frank Lampard scored the winner with 19 minutes left to play to give Chelsea their fifth FA Cup success. Chelsea went into the match as four-time FA Cup winners, having previously won in 1970, 1997, 2000 and 2007, while Everton had won the competition five times previously, having won in 1906, 1933, 1966, 1984 and 1995. Coincidentally, both teams' most recent titles came in the FA Cup, both teams beating Manchester United in the final; Everton in 1995 and Chelsea in 2007. The two teams drew 0–0 in both meetings during the 2008–09 Premier League season, at Goodison Park in December and at Stamford Bridge
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    205
    European Cup 1976-77

    European Cup 1976-77

    • Runner-up: Borussia Mönchengladbach
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    The 1976–77 season of the European Cup football club tournament was won for the first time by Liverpool in the final against Borussia Mönchengladbach. Three-time defending champions Bayern Munich were knocked out by Dynamo Kyiv in the quarter-finals. It was only the second time an English side won the tournament, but it started a run of six consecutive wins by English clubs and an eight-year run during which the trophy was won by English clubs on seven occasions. Including this one, Liverpool reached five finals in nine years, of which they won four. TPS progressed to the Second round on away goals. Zürich beat Rangers 2–1 on aggregate. TPS beat Sliema Wanderers 2–2 on away goals. Ferencváros beat Jeunesse Esch 11–3 on aggregate. Dynamo Dresden beat Benfica 2–0 on aggregate. Saint-Étienne beat CSKA September Flag 1–0 on aggregate. PSV beat Dundalk 7–1 on aggregate. Trabzonspor beat ÍA 6–3 on aggregate. Liverpool beat Crusaders 7–0 on aggregate. Baník Ostrava beat Viking 3–2 on aggregate. Bayern Munich beat Køge 7–1 on aggregate. Dynamo Kyiv beat Partizan 7–1 on aggregate. PAOK beat Omonia 3–1 on aggregate. Torino beat Malmö FF 3–2 on aggregate. Borussia Mönchengladbach beat
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    206
    European Cup 1983-84

    European Cup 1983-84

    • Runner-up: A.S. Roma
    • Champion: Liverpool F.C.
    The 1983–84 season of the European Cup football club tournament was won for a fourth time by Liverpool in a penalty shootout in the final against Roma. The game had finished 1–1. Phil Neal had scored for Liverpool and Roberto Pruzzo for Roma. It was the seventh title in eight seasons for English clubs. Liverpool goalkeeper Bruce Grobbelaar put his name into football history for making key saves and distracting his opponents during the penalty shootout with his leg-wobbling antics. Hamburg, the defending champions, were eliminated by Dinamo București in the second round. It was the seventh time in eight years that the trophy had been won by an English side. Liverpool won 6–0 on aggregate. Athletic Bilbao won 4–2 on aggregate. Olympiacos won 2–0 on aggregate. Benfica won 6–2 on aggregate. Rába ETO Győr won 4–1 on aggregate. Dinamo Minsk won 3–2 on aggregate. Dinamo Bucharest won 4–0 on aggregate. Bohemians Prague won 5–0 on aggregate. Rapid Wien won 4–3 on aggregate. Roma won 4–2 on aggregate. CSKA Sofia 4–4 Omonia on aggregate. CSKA Sofia won on away goals. Standard Liege won 11–4 on aggregate. Dynamo Berlin won 6–1 on aggregate. Partizan won 5–1 on aggregate. Dundee United won 6–0
    5.50
    2 votes
    207
    1953 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1953 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Indiana Hoosiers men's basketball
    The 1953 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 22 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 10, 1953, and ended with the championship game on March 18 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 26 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Indiana, coached by Branch McCracken, won the tournament title with a 69-68 victory in the final game over Kansas, coached by Phog Allen. B. H. Born of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    4.67
    3 votes
    208
    1924 World Series

    1924 World Series

    • Runner-up: New York Giants
    • Champion: Minnesota Twins
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1924 World Series, the Washington Senators beat the New York Giants in seven games. The Giants became the first team to play in four consecutive World Series, winning in 1921–1922 and losing in 1923–1924. Their long-time manager, John McGraw, made his ninth and final World Series appearance in 1924. This was the second extra-inning World Series-deciding game (1912) and the last until 1991. The winning team of the 1991 World Series was the very same franchise, then (and now) known as the Minnesota Twins. Walter Johnson, after pitching his first 20-victory season (23) since 1919, was making his first World Series appearance, at the age of 36, while nearing the end of his storied career with the Senators. He lost his two starts, but the Senators battled back to force a Game 7, giving Johnson a chance to redeem himself when he came on in relief in that game. Johnson held on to get the win and give Washington its first and only championship. The seventh game is widely considered to be one of the most dramatic games in Series history. Johnson struck out twelve Giants batters in Game 1 in a losing cause. Although that total matched Ed Walsh's number in the 1906 World Series, it
    6.00
    1 votes
    209

    1954 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Syracuse Nationals
    • Champion: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    Lakers win series 4-3
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    1958 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1958 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball
    The 1958 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 24 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 11, 1958, and ended with the championship game on March 22 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 28 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Kentucky, coached by Adolph Rupp, won the national title with a 84-72 victory in the final game over Seattle, coached by John Castellani. Elgin Baylor of Seattle was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
    6.00
    1 votes
    211

    1959 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Champion: Boston Celtics
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1959 NBA World Championship Series was the championship series of the 1958–59 National Basketball Association season, and was the conclusion of the 1959 NBA Playoffs. The best-of-seven series was played between the Western Conference champion Minneapolis Lakers and the Eastern Conference champion Boston Celtics. It was Boston's third trip to the NBA Finals and Minneapolis's sixth. The Boston Celtics swept the Lakers 4–0. That was the start of the Celtics' 8 consecutive championships, from 1959–1966. To date, this is the most recent time that an NBA team from Minnesota appeared in an NBA Finals, as well as the first of two times in NBA history that a team with a losing record makes the NBA Finals. Celtics win series 4–0
    6.00
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    212
    2005 Ashes series

    2005 Ashes series

    • Runner-up: Australian cricket team
    • Champion: English cricket team
    The 2005 Ashes series was that year's edition of the long-standing and storied cricket rivalry between England and Australia. Starting on 21 July 2005, England and Australia played five Tests, with the Ashes held by Australia as the most recent victors. The final result was a 2–1 series win for England, who succeeded (for the first time since 1987) in their biennial attempt to win the urn. In March, Australia's captain, Ricky Ponting, said that this Ashes series would be the closest since Australia's dominance began in 1989. Since 1989, when Australia started their winning Ashes streak, England had only come within one match of the title once, in 1997: Australia were the pre-eminent side in the world, whilst England had dropped from being the top-rated in 1981 to sixth for much of the Nineties. They reached a low point in 1999 with a series loss to New Zealand leaving them bottom of the unofficial Wisden Cricketers' Almanack rankings. However, since the previous series in 2002–03, England had improved on their fifth place in the official rankings, and were second before this series. Australia were still top-ranked, but England had won 14 and drawn three of their 18 previous Test
    6.00
    1 votes
    213
    2008 Rally México

    2008 Rally México

    • Championship: World Rally Championship
    The 2008 Rally México, officially 22º Corona Rally México, was the third round of the 2008 World Rally Championship season. The rally was held on February 29 — March 2 and began with a ceremonial start on Thursday, February 28. It was the first gravel event of the season and also the opening round of the Junior World Rally Championship this season. The rally consisted of 20 special stages, one of which was cancelled due to safety reasons, as there were too many spectators gathered around the road. Also five of the stages were Super Special Stages. Some of the sections were placed as high as 2700 meters over sea level, causing significant engine power loss due to lower air pressure. The event was won by the previous edition's winner, Sébastien Loeb. Before the rally there was some controversy with Citroën Team changing the engine in his car after a major malfunction during the shakedown, but the team reverted back to the original unit and avoided a five minutes penalty. The first rally leader was Jari-Matti Latvala, but after having to be the opening driver on the second day's stages and suffering from the broken intercooler pipe, causing the turbo to overheat and break, he dropped
    6.00
    1 votes
    214
    2010 European Men's Handball Championship

    2010 European Men's Handball Championship

    • Runner-up: Croatia national handball team
    • Champion: France national handball team
    • Championship: European Men's Handball Championship
    The 2010 EHF European Men's Handball Championship (9th tournament) was held in Austria from 19–31 January, in the cities of Vienna, Graz, Innsbruck, Linz and Wiener Neustadt. 5 Austrian cities have been selected to host the 2010 Championship. The venues in Linz, Graz and Wiener Neustadt were only used during the preliminary round. The fourth venue to be used in this round was located in Innsbruck, and was also one of the two venues in the main round. The other being Wiener Stadthalle in Vienna, which was the only venue to be used in the final round. Qualification matches were played in 2008 and in 2009. For the first time, in qualification round all teams are included, except host Austria and defending champion Denmark. Teams were divided in 7 groups and top two teams from each group qualifyd to European Championship. The draw for the final tournament took place 19:00 CET on 24 June 2009 at the Liechtenstein Museum in Vienna. In the following tables: The teams placed first, second and third (shaded in green) qualified to the main round. All times are Central European Time (UTC+1) All times are Central European Time (UTC+1) All times are Central European Time (UTC+1) All times are
    6.00
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    215
    FA Cup Final 2004

    FA Cup Final 2004

    • Runner-up: Millwall F.C.
    • Champion: Manchester United F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2004 FA Cup Final was the 123rd final the FA Cup and the fourth final to be played at the Millennium Stadium, the Welsh national stadium in Cardiff, due to the ongoing reconstruction of the usual venue, London's Wembley Stadium. The match took place on 22 May 2004 and it was contested by Manchester United, who had finished third in the Premier League that season, and Millwall, who had finished tenth in Division One. Manchester United secured a record eleventh FA Cup victory with a headed goal from Cristiano Ronaldo and a brace from Ruud van Nistelrooy which included a penalty kick. In contrast, it was Millwall's first appearance in a final of either the FA Cup or the Football League Cup. At the trophy presentation afterward, the Manchester United players wore shirts labelled "Davis 36" in memory of midfielder Jimmy Davis, who wore United shirt number 36, and who had died in a car crash in August 2003. The match was refereed by Jeff Winter. Tony Green and Roger East were Winter's assistants and Matt Messias was the fourth official. Manchester United were appearing in their sixteenth FA Cup final and had won it on ten of their previous fifteen appearances. Two of these victories
    6.00
    1 votes
    216
    Scottish Premier League 1999-00

    Scottish Premier League 1999-00

    • Runner-up: Celtic F.C.
    • Champion: Rangers F.C.
    • Championship: Scottish Premier League
    The 1999–2000 Scottish Premier League was the second season of the Scottish Premier League. It began in on 31 July 1999. Rangers, the defending champions, retained their title and became Scottish top flight champions for the 49th time. They also retained the Scottish Cup, while neighbours Celtic (who enduring a disappointing season in the league and suffered a humiliating early exit from the Scottish Cup) won the League Cup which Rangers had won a year earlier. The 1999–2000 Scottish Premier League was won by Rangers for the second successive year, finishing 21 points ahead of nearest rivals Celtic. As the SPL was being expanded to 12 teams, the bottom finishing side were to face the second and third finishing sides from the first division, in a three team play-off. However, due to Falkirk's stadium not meeting SPL requirements, the playoff did not take place with Dunfermline being promoted automatically from second position. As champions, Rangers qualified for the Champions League while Celtic and third-placed Hearts qualified for the UEFA Cup. Celtic entered the season under new management with former Liverpool player John Barnes taking charge in June 1999. It proved to be a
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    217
    2006 FIFA World Cup qualification

    2006 FIFA World Cup qualification

    A total of 197 teams entered the qualification process for the 2006 FIFA World Cup, competing for a total of 32 spots in the final tournament. Germany, as the host, qualified automatically, leaving 31 spots open for competition. Starting with these qualifiers, the defending champion was not granted automatic qualification, as France's disappointing performance and first round elimination in the previous tournament was considered to be due to lack of preparation that the Qualifiers could have provided. The final distribution was as follows: Each .5 indicates a place in inter-confederation matchups for the last two spots, namely playoffs between AFC and CONCACAF and between CONMEBOL and OFC. A total of 194 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 847 qualifying matches were played, and 2464 goals were scored (an average of 2.91 per match). For the first time ever, the defending champion (Brazil) did not qualify automatically. The hosts (Germany) retained their automatic spot. In 1934, the defending champions (Uruguay) declined to participate and the hosts (Italy) had to qualify, but in the tournaments between 1938 and 2002 (inclusive), the hosts and the defending
    4.33
    3 votes
    218
    1974 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1974 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Marquette Golden Eagles men's basketball
    • Champion: NC State Wolfpack basketball
    The 1974 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It was the first tournament to officially be designated as a Division I championship—previously, NCAA member schools had been divided into the "University Division" and "College Division". The NCAA created its current three-division setup, effective with the 1973–74 academic year, by moving all of its University Division schools to Division I and splitting the College Division members into Division II (fewer scholarships) and Division III (no athletic scholarships allowed). Previous tournaments would retroactively be considered Division I championships. The tournament began on March 9, 1974, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in Greensboro, North Carolina. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. North Carolina State, coached by Norm Sloan, won the national title with a 76-64 victory in the final game over Marquette, coached by Al McGuire. This result ended UCLA's record streak of seven consecutive titles. David
    5.00
    2 votes
    219
    1954 FIBA World Championship

    1954 FIBA World Championship

    • Championship: FIBA World Championship
    The 1954 FIBA World Championship (also called the 2nd World Basketball Championship – 1954) was an international basketball tournament held by the International Basketball Federation in Ginásio do Maracanãzinho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from October 22 to November 5, 1954. Twelve nations participated in the tournament. All teams play one game against each other for a total of three games. All teams play one game against each other for a total of seven games. The teams with the best records are awarded medals. The tie between Canada, Formosa and Uruguay was broken by the goal averages of the games between those three teams, considering both had 1–1 records against each other.
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    220
    FA Cup 2007–08

    FA Cup 2007–08

    • Runner-up: Cardiff City F.C.
    • Champion: Portsmouth F.C.
    • Championship: FA Cup
    The 2007–08 FA Cup was the 127th season of the world's oldest football knockout competition, The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. A record 731 clubs' entries were accepted for the competition. The competition culminated with the FA Cup Final, held at Wembley Stadium, London on 17 May 2008. The match was contested by Portsmouth and Cardiff City, with Portsmouth taking the title 1 – 0, Nwankwo Kanu scoring the winning goal. This was the last FA Cup to be broadcast by the BBC and Sky Sports in the United Kingdom, before coverage was handed over to ITV and Setanta starting in August 2008. For information on the matches played from the Extra Preliminary Round to the Fourth Round Qualifying, see FA Cup 2007-08 Qualifying Rounds. This round is the first in which Football League teams from League One and League Two compete with non-league teams. This round marks the first time Championship and Premier League (top-flight) teams play. Matches were played on the weekend of Saturday, 5 January 2008. The draw was made on 2 December 2007 at 15:15 GMT by Kevin Beattie and Sammy Nelson, adjudicated by Sir Trevor Brooking. Involved in the Third Round draw for the first time
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    2 votes
    221
    1997 FIFA Confederations Cup

    1997 FIFA Confederations Cup

    • Championship: FIFA Confederations Cup
    The 1997 FIFA Confederations Cup was the first Confederations Cup to be organised by FIFA. The tournament had been previously been played in 1992 and 1995 as the King Fahd Cup. This edition of the tournament was hosted by Saudi Arabia, as with the previous editions, in December 1997 and was the first to feature representatives from all of the FIFA confederations. It was won by Brazil, who beat Australia 6–0 in the final. After winning the 1997 tournament, Brazil became the first country to be the reigning champion of both major FIFA tournaments (the World Cup and the Confederations Cup), as well as champion of their respective confederation by winning the 1997 Copa América. This feat has since been accomplished once by France, victorious in the 1998 FIFA World Cup, UEFA Euro 2000 and the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup. Germany, the UEFA Euro 1996 winner, declined to take part. United Arab Emirates was awarded a spot in the competition because Saudi Arabia had won the 1996 AFC Asian Cup. All matches were played in: See 1997 FIFA Confederations Cup squads
    5.00
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    222
    2002 NBA Finals

    2002 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Brooklyn Nets
    • Champion: Los Angeles Lakers
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 2002 NBA Finals was the National Basketball Association (NBA) championship series for the 2001–02 season. The best-of-seven playoff was contested between the Los Angeles Lakers, champions of the Western Conference and two-time defending NBA champions, and the New Jersey Nets, champions of the Eastern Conference. The Lakers swept the Nets, four games to none, to win the franchise's 14th NBA championship. The 56th edition of the championship series was played between June 5 and June 12 and was broadcast on NBC. Shaquille O'Neal, who averaged 36 points and 12 rebounds in the Finals, was named the NBA Finals Most Valuable Player. Lakers coach Phil Jackson won his ninth ring, tying him with Red Auerbach for most all-time. During the series, he surpassed Pat Riley for most career playoffs wins with 156. Will Lyman narrated the season-ending documentary for NBA Entertainment. The Finals were played using a 2-3-2 site format, where the first two and last two games are held at the team with home court advantage. The NBA, after experimenting in the early years, restored this original format for the Finals in 1985. Game 1 - 18,997 Game 2 - 18,997 Game 3 - 19,215 Game 4 - 19,296 The Los
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    223
    2006 National League Championship Series

    2006 National League Championship Series

    • Championship: National League Championship Series
    The 2006 National League Championship Series (NLCS), the second round of the 2006 National League playoffs, began on October 12 and ended on October 19; it was scheduled to begin on October 11, but was postponed a day because of inclement weather. The St. Louis Cardinals upset the heavily-favored New York Mets in seven games to advance to the 2006 World Series against the Detroit Tigers. The Cardinals and Mets took the series to the limit, reaching the ninth inning of Game 7 tied at 1–1, but the Cardinals benefited from Yadier Molina's two-run home run in the ninth to win the game, 3–1, and earn their second pennant in three years. St. Louis captured the seventeenth NL pennant in club history, placing them one behind the New York/San Francisco Giants and the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers for the most in the league in the modern era (since 1903). The Cardinals were making their third consecutive appearance in the NLCS; manager Tony La Russa, who led St. Louis to the 2004 pennant and previously won AL titles with the Oakland Athletics from 1988–90, became the first manager in history to win multiple pennants in both leagues. The Mets had defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers three games to
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    1 votes
    224
    2007 UEFA Champions League Final

    2007 UEFA Champions League Final

    • Runner-up: Liverpool F.C.
    • Champion: A.C. Milan
    • Championship: UEFA Champions League
    The 2007 UEFA Champions League Final was an association football match between A.C. Milan of Italy and Liverpool F.C. of England on 23 May 2007 at the Olympic Stadium, Athens, Greece. The showpiece event was the final match of the 2006–07 season of Europe's premier cup competition, the UEFA Champions League. The teams were appearing in the final two years after facing each other in the 2005 final which Liverpool won 3–2 in a penalty shootout after the match finished 3–3. Both teams had to pass through five rounds before they reached the final. They both entered in the third qualifying round and won their respective groups before they reached the knockout stage, where matches were contested over two legs, with a match at each team's home ground. Milan's victories varied from close affairs to comfortable victories. They defeated Celtic by a single goal over two legs, while they beat Manchester United 5–3 on aggregate in the semi-final. Liverpool's matches were mainly all close affairs; they beat defending champions Barcelona on the away goals rule in the first knockout round and beat Chelsea in a penalty shootout in the semi-finals, although they did record a 4–0 aggregate win over
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    225
    2009 World Baseball Classic

    2009 World Baseball Classic

    • Championship: World Baseball Classic
    The 2009 World Baseball Classic was an international baseball competition. It is the only international baseball tournament to feature a large number of players from the major leagues of North America and Asia. It began on March 5 and finished March 23. Japan emerged victorious for the second straight Classic, defeating rival South Korea 5–3 in 10 innings in the final. Daisuke Matsuzaka won his second World Baseball Classic MVP Award. As was the case for the 2006 tournament, the sixteen teams were split into four pools of four teams each. Whereas previously the teams played in round-robin competition in Rounds 1 and 2, this time they took part in a double-elimination format, similar to the USA's College World Series sponsored by the NCAA. Under the new format, teams were only guaranteed to play two games. This change was made to eliminate the complicated tiebreaking procedures, which were required for one of the pools in each of Rounds 1 and 2 in 2006. After Round 1, the tournament was held on American soil. The top two teams from each of the four pools—seeded from the final game in their respective pools—went to Round 2, with the teams from Pools A and B meeting at Petco Park in
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    226
    FIBT World Championships 2008

    FIBT World Championships 2008

    • Championship: FIBT World Championships
    The FIBT World Championships 2008 ran February 11–24, 2008 in Altenberg, Germany for the fifth time, having done so in 1991 (bobsleigh), 1994 (skeleton), 1999 (skeleton), and 2000 (men's bobsleigh). It is the first time Altenberg has hosted all of the events at one championship. Training for the events took place February 12–14 for two-man and two-woman bobsleigh, and February 19–20 for skeleton and four-man bobsleigh. February 16–17, 2008. 30 sleds were scheduled to compete. 26 sleds finished with one team disqualifed after the first run, one team not finishing the second run, and two teams not starting after the third run. Lange and Kuske won their third two-man world championship and fifth overall. February 23–24, 2008. 24 sleds competed with 20 finishing. Lange swept both events with the fastest times in each heat. It was his second sweep at the FIBT World Championships, having done so in 2003 and his third overall, counting the 2006 Winter Olympics. February 15–16, 2008. 25 sleds were scheduled to compete. 23 sleds actually did with one withdrawing after the first run, one withdrawing after the second run, and two crashing out during the fourth run. This event marks the first
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    227
    UAAP Season 70 judo championships

    UAAP Season 70 judo championships

    The Judo championships of UAAP Season 70 was contested from October 6 to October 7, 2007 at the Ateneo Blue Eagle Gym. There were three titles given, one for each division: Men's, Women's, Boys' (Juniors). The Juniors division awarded its first formal championship trophy after being a demonstration sport the previous year (UAAP Season 69, 2006–07). Ateneo de Manila High School (AHS) Blue Eaglets won the championship that year. The UST Tiger Judokas and the UP Lady Judokas were the defending champions in Men's and Women's divisions. Interestingly, both had record-setting nine UAAP titles under their belts. After the tournament, the UP Maroon & Lady Judokas won the double crown and set a league-leading 14 total titles. The AHS Blue Eaglets took the first UAAP title by winning the Junior's division. Coaches: Emmanuel R. Jingco and Marc San Valentin -60 kg (Extra Light) 1. Vicente Nonoy L. Fernandez (Noy) 2. -------------------------- -66 kg (Half Light) 1. Marc Enriquez 2. Raphael Antonio Paguio (Anton) -73 kg (Light) 1. John Mari M. Mangahas (Jeon) 2. Edgar J. Ordillas -81 kg (Half Middle) 1. Gabriel A. Pangalangan (Gab) 2. Robby Alejandro L. Solis (Robby) -90 kg (Middle) 1. Viktor
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    228
    Campeonato Brasileiro Série A 2006

    Campeonato Brasileiro Série A 2006

    • Runner-up: Sport Club Internacional
    • Champion: São Paulo Futebol Clube
    • Championship: Campeonato Brasileiro Série A
    The 36th season of the Campeonato Brasileiro began on April 15, 2006, and reached its end on December 3, 2006. The format was similar to the 2005 edition, though fielding two fewer teams. 20 teams competed, each team playing the other in a home-and-away format. At the season finale, the team with the most accumulated points (3 for each win, 1 for a draw, none for a loss) was declared champion. From April 15 through June 4, 10 rounds were played. From June 9 until July 9, the tournament was suspended for the FIFA World Cup 2006. Play resumed on July 12 and continued until December 3. Several teams had their attentions divided between other tournaments over the same duration: To read this table, the home team is listed in the left-hand column.
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    229
    Scottish Premier League 1998-99

    Scottish Premier League 1998-99

    • Runner-up: Celtic F.C.
    • Champion: Rangers F.C.
    • Championship: Scottish Premier League
    The 1998–99 Scottish Premier League season was the inaugural season of Scottish Premier League football. It began on 1 August 1998. Rangers finished the season as Scottish Premier League champions, gaining them their 48th Scottish top division title. Dunfermline Athletic were relegated in bottom place, being replaced by Scottish Division One champions Hibernian. The 1998–99 Scottish Premier League season ended in success for Rangers who, managed by Dutchman Dick Advocaat, won the title by six points from nearest rivals Celtic.Dunfermline Athletic were relegated after three seasons in the top division. As champions, Rangers qualified for the Champions League while Celtic were joined by St. Johnstone in qualifying for the UEFA Cup. Fourth placed Kilmarnock also gained a UEFA Cup place via the UEFA Fair Play ranking. The season began on 1 August 1998 with the first SPL goal scored by Aberdeen's Eoin Jess as they defeated newly promoted Dundee 2–0 at Dens Park. Also on the first day of the season, Craig Burley scored the SPL's first hat-trick as defending champions Celtic defeated Dunfermline Athletic 5–0 at Celtic Park. 1998–99 saw the introduction of a three week break during
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    1961 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1961 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Cincinnati Bearcats men's basketball
    The 1961 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 24 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 14, 1961, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 28 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. Cincinnati, coached by Ed Jucker, won the national title with a 70-65 victory in the final game over state rival Ohio State, coached by Fred Taylor. Jerry Lucas of Ohio State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The national third place game, won by St. Joseph's over Utah by the score of 127-120 in four overtimes, tied the record for the longest game in NCAA Division I tournament history, set in 1956 in a first-round game between Canisius and North Carolina State. As of the regional finals of the 2009 tournament, no NCAA Division I tournament games since then have gone to a fourth overtime period. Saint Joseph's victory was later vacated because of a gambling scandal.
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    231
    2006 Volleyball World Championship

    2006 Volleyball World Championship

    • Runner-up: Poland national volleyball team
    • Champion: Brazil men's national volleyball team
    • Championship: Volleyball World Championship
    The 2006 FIVB Men's Volleyball World Championship was held in Japan from 17 November 2006 to 3 December 2006. Like the previous edition, 24 teams participated in the tournament. Brazil won the Tournament (retaining their championship title), defeating Poland 3:0 in the final match. Bulgaria placed 3rd, defeating Serbia and Montenegro 3:1 in 3rd place match.
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    232
    1912 World Series

    1912 World Series

    • Runner-up: New York Giants
    • Champion: Boston Red Sox
    • Championship: World Series
    In the 1912 World Series, the Boston Red Sox beat the New York Giants four games to three (with one tie). This dramatic series showcased great pitching from Giant Christy Mathewson and from Boston fireballer Smoky Joe Wood. Wood won two of his three starts and pitched in relief in the final game. In the deciding game, Boston rallied for two runs in the tenth inning thanks to two costly Giants fielding misplays. Nearly all of the games were close. Four games in this Series were decided by one run. A fifth ended in a tie. A sixth was decided by two runs. Game 7 was the only one with a margin greater than three runs. Two games, including the decisive Game 8, went to extra innings. In Games 1 and 3, the losing team had the tying and winning runs on base when the game ended. This was one of only four World Series to go to eight games, and the only best-of-seven Series to do so. While the 1912 Series was extended to eight games due to a tie game being called on account of darkness, the 1903, 1919 and 1921 World Series were all best-of-nine affairs that happened to run eight games. AL Boston Red Sox (4) vs. NL New York Giants (3) Tuesday, October 8, 1912 at Polo Grounds (IV) in Manhattan,
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    233
    1943 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1943 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Wyoming Cowboys men's basketball
    The 1943 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 24, 1943, and ended with the championship game on March 30 in New York City. A total of 9 games were played, including a third place game in each region. Wyoming, coached by Everett Shelton, won the national title with a 46-34 victory in the final game over Georgetown, coached by Elmer Ripley. Ken Sailors of Wyoming was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.
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    1950 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1950 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: CCNY Beavers men's basketball
    The 1950 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 23, 1950, and ended with the championship game on March 28 in New York City, New York. A total of 10 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. CCNY, coached by Nat Holman, won the national title with a 71-68 victory in the final game over Bradley, coached by Forddy Anderson. Irwin Dambrot of CCNY was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. CCNY became the only team to ever win both the NIT and NCAA tournaments in the same year. Because of participation changes, this currently cannot happen. CCNY is also the only championship team which is not currently a member of Division I, having dropped down to Division III following the CCNY point shaving scandal. The 1950 tournament was the last tournament to feature eight teams. The field would expand to sixteen teams the next year.
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    1955 NBA Finals

    • Runner-up: Fort Wayne Pistons
    • Champion: Syracuse Nationals
    • Championship: NBA Finals
    The 1955 NBA World Championship Series was the championship round of the 1954-55 NBA season. The best-of-seven series was won by the Syracuse Nationals, who defeated the Fort Wayne Pistons in the final game when Syracuse's George King made a free throw with 12 seconds left to put the Nationals up 92-91. King then stole the ball from Fort Wayne's Andy Phillip with three seconds remaining to clinch the victory for Syracuse. Because of the arena not believing Fort Wayne would make the NBA Finals, the arena was booked and not available, and the Fort Wayne home games were played in Indianapolis. It has been alleged that some Fort Wayne players conspired with gamblers to throw the series to Syracuse. The suspicious nature of the seventh game in particular has raised concerns about the legitimacy of the series. Fort Wayne led Syracuse 41-24 early in the second quarter, then allowed the Nationals to rally to win the game. Andy Phillip, who turned the ball over with three seconds left in the game, was believed by at least one of his teammates, George Yardley, to have thrown the game. "There were always unwholesome implications about that ball game," Yardley told the author Charley Rosen.
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    236
    1964 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1964 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Duke Blue Devils men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1964 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball in the United States. It began on March 9, 1964, and ended with the championship game on March 21 in Kansas City, Missouri. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 98–83 victory in the final game over Duke, coached by Vic Bubas. Walt Hazzard of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The title was the first in the history of the UCLA program, and was a sign of things to come as the Bruins would go on to win nine more championships in the next eleven seasons. All locations were in the USA.
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    237
    1967 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1967 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Dayton Flyers men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1967 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1967, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in Louisville, Kentucky. A total of 27 games were played, including a third-place game in each region and a national third-place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 79-64 victory in the final game over Dayton, coached by Don Donoher. Lew Alcindor (later named Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This was the first of seven consecutive NCAA titles for UCLA and the first of three consecutive Most Outstanding Player awards for Alcindor.
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    1971 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1971 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Villanova Wildcats men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1971 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 13, 1971, and ended with the championship game on March 27 in Houston, Texas. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 68-62 victory in the final game over Villanova, coached by Jack Kraft. Howard Porter of Villanova was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. However, Villanova was disqualified after the tournament for having an ineligible player, Howard Porter, who had signed with an agent prior to the tournament. Having lost to undefeated, second-ranked Penn (coached by Dick Harter) twice before, Porter did not think they would make past the regionals where third-ranked South Carolina was also in their path. However, Penn vanquished South Carolina by 17 and then had their worst game of the year against Villanova in the East Regional final, losing 90-47. Villanova's first place finish in the east regional was relinquished to Penn, with the
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    239
    1972 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1972 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Florida State Seminoles basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1972 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA University Division (the predecessor to today's Division I) college basketball. It began on March 11, 1972, and ended with the championship game on March 25 in Los Angeles, California. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 81–76 victory in the final game over Florida State, coached by Hugh Durham. Bill Walton of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. In a historically significant note, the University of Southwestern Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns made the tournament in their first season of eligibility for postseason play. No school would repeat this feat in the men's tournament until North Dakota State in 2009. Southwestern Louisiana also made the tournament in 1973, but due to major infractions that resulted in the basketball program receiving the NCAA death penalty both appearances have since been vacated and the records expunged.
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    1973 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1973 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Memphis Tigers men's basketball
    • Champion: UCLA Bruins men's basketball
    The 1973 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA University Division (the predecessor to today's Division I, which would be created later in 1973) college basketball. It began on March 10, 1973, and ended with the championship game on March 26 in St. Louis, Missouri. A total of 29 games were played, including a third place game in each region and a national third place game. UCLA, coached by John Wooden, won the national title with a 87–66 victory in the final game over Memphis State, coached by Gene Bartow. This gave UCLA their 7th consecutive title. Bill Walton of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This year's Final Four marked the first time the championship game was televised on a Monday night in prime time, a practice which continues as of 2012. The UCLA - Memphis State championship game made USA Today's list of the greatest NCAA tournament games of all time at #18. Bill Walton set a championship game record, hitting 21 of 22 shots and scoring 44 points. The 1973 NC State Wolfpack team averaged 93 ppg, led the nation in win margin (21.8 ppg), and
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    241
    1983 World Series

    1983 World Series

    • Runner-up: Philadelphia Phillies
    • Champion: Baltimore Orioles
    • Championship: World Series
    The 1983 World Series matched the American League champion Baltimore Orioles against the National League champion Philadelphia Phillies, with the Orioles winning four games to one. "The I-95 Series"—like the World Series two years later, also took its nickname from the Interstate that it took for the teams and fans to travel on—I-95 in this case. This was the last World Series that Bowie Kuhn presided over as commissioner. It was also the last World Series aired on ABC before the network was taken over by Capital Cities Communications (coincidentally, that company's flagship station was Philadelphia's ABC affiliate, WPVI-TV—also the network's first affiliate) The Philadelphia Phillies won the National League East division by six games over the Pittsburgh Pirates then defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers, three games to one, in the National League Championship Series. The Baltimore Orioles won the American League East division by six games over the Detroit Tigers then defeated the Chicago White Sox, three games to one, in the American League Championship Series. The Orioles won the American League East rather comfortably while the Phillies needed a 22–7 record in September to break open
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    1984 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1984 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Georgetown Hoyas Men's Basketball
    The 1984 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 53 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 13, 1984, and ended with the championship game on April 2 in Seattle, Washington. A total of 52 games were played. This was the last tournament in which some teams earned first round byes as the field expanded to 64 teams beginning in the 1985 field when each team played in the first round. Georgetown University, coached by John Thompson, won the national title with a 84–75 victory in the final game over Houston, coached by Guy Lewis. Patrick Ewing of Georgetown was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Thompson became the first African-American head coach to lead his team to the title.
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    1988 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1988 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Kansas Jayhawks Men's Basketball
    The 1988 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 17, 1988, and ended with the championship game on April 4 returning to Kansas City, Missouri for the 10th time. A total of 63 games were played. Kansas, coached by Larry Brown, won the national title with an 83–79 victory in the final game over Big Eight Conference rival Oklahoma, coached by Billy Tubbs. As of 2012, this was the last national championship game to feature two schools from the same conference. Danny Manning of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Kansas was considered a long shot against the top rated Sooners, who had previously defeated the Jayhawks twice that season, even though the Final Four was contested only 40 miles from the KU campus in Lawrence, Kansas. After this upset, the 1988 Kansas team was remembered as "Danny and the Miracles." (*) Kentucky was later stripped of its two NCAA tournament wins due to an ineligible player. (*) Kentucky was later stripped of its two NCAA tournament wins due to an ineligible player.
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    1989 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1989 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Champion: Michigan Wolverines men's basketball
    The 1989 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 16, 1989, and ended with the championship game on April 3 in Seattle, Washington. A total of 63 games were played. Michigan, coached by Steve Fisher, won the national title with a 80–79 overtime victory in the final game over Seton Hall, coached by P.J. Carlesimo. Glen Rice of Michigan set an NCAA tournament record by scoring 184 points in six games and was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Just prior to the start of this tournament, Michigan coach Bill Frieder had announced that he would accept the head coaching position at Arizona State University at the end of the season. Michigan athletic director Bo Schembechler promptly fired Frieder and appointed top assistant Fisher as interim coach, stating, famously, that "a Michigan man is going to coach a Michigan team." Two 16-seeded teams came within one point of victory in the first round, and a third came with six points. This tournament was also unusual in that all four 11-seeds advanced out of the first round. The
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    1998 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    1998 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament

    • Runner-up: Utah Utes men's basketball
    • Champion: Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball
    • Championship: NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship
    The 1998 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 12, 1998, and ended with the championship game on March 30 at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. A total of 63 games were played. Kentucky, coached by Tubby Smith, won the national title with a 78–69 victory in the final game over Utah, coached by Rick Majerus. Jeff Sheppard of Kentucky was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. Kentucky came back from double-digit deficits in each of its last three games in the tournament, including a 17 point second half comeback against the hated Blue Devils of Duke, leading to the school's fans dubbing the team the "Comeback Cats". This was Kentucky's third straight championship game appearance.
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    2006 American League Championship Series

    2006 American League Championship Series

    • Runner-up: Oakland Athletics
    • Champion: Detroit Tigers
    • Championship: American League Championship Series
    The 2006 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was the second round of the 2006 American League playoffs; it began on October 10 and ended on October 14. The Detroit Tigers defeated the Oakland Athletics four games to none to advance to the 2006 World Series, and became the fourth AL team to win ten pennants, joining the New York Yankees (39), Athletics (15) and Boston Red Sox (11). Magglio Ordóñez's game-winning walk-off home run in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 4 sealed the pennant for the Tigers. This ALCS marked the fifth different AL pennant winner in as many years (2006 Tigers, 2005 White Sox, 2004 Red Sox, 2003 Yankees, and 2002 Angels). The Athletics had defeated the Minnesota Twins, three games to none, in AL Division Series, and the Tigers had defeated the Yankees, three games to one. The Tigers faced the National League champion St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series, but fell to them, four games to one. Oakland had home-field advantage (despite Detroit having a better record) because Oakland was a division champion, but they effectively lost the advantage by losing Games 1 and 2 at home. Detroit hosted Games 3 and 4. The Athletics were seeking their first
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    2006 College World Series

    2006 College World Series

    • Championship: College World Series
    The 2006 College World Series was held June 16-26 in Omaha, Nebraska; it was the 60th College World Series and the 57th series held in Omaha. Eight NCAA Division I college baseball teams met after having advanced through a 64-team bracket to play at historic Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium. The official host for the event was nearby Creighton University and Oregon State won the national title. After winning the regional and super regional rounds of the 2006 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament, eight teams advanced to Omaha. Clemson, Georgia Tech, North Carolina, Cal State Fullerton, Oregon State, Rice, Georgia, and Miami all won their super-regionals and made the trip to the 2006 College World Series. Five national seeds advanced to Omaha: Clemson (1), Rice (2), Cal State Fullerton (5), Georgia (7), and Georgia Tech (8). Third-seeded Texas and sixth-seeded Nebraska both fell in the regionals, while the fourth seed Alabama lost in super regional play. The first pitch of the 2006 CWS was Friday, June 16, at 1:00 PM CDT (18:00 UTC). The 2006 tournament was only the second time in CWS history in which 16 games were played (the other being the 2003 College World Series). After losing their
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    2009 Men's European Volleyball Championship

    2009 Men's European Volleyball Championship

    • Championship: European Volleyball Championship
    2009 Men's European Volleyball Championship was held from September 3 to September 13, 2009 in İzmir and Istanbul, Turkey. Poland claimed their first Men's European Volleyball Championship title with an undefeated run. The final was concluded with a 3-1 victory against France. Bulgaria captured the bronze medal after defeating Russia 3-0. Poland's Piotr Gruszka was named the tournament's most valuable player. The İzmir Halkapınar Sport Hall in İzmir hosted Pools A, C, and E. Istanbul's Abdi İpekçi Arena hosted Pools B, D, and F. İzmir also hosted the Semifinals & Final.
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    2010 IWFL World Championship

    2010 IWFL World Championship

    • Runner-up: Sacramento Sirens
    • Champion: Boston Militia
    • Championship: IWFL World Championship
    The 2010 Independent Women's Football League (IWFL) Championship was held on July 22, 23, 24, and 25 in Round Rock, Texas at RRISD Stadium. It consisted of 3 games - North American Championship - Tier II (July 24), World Championship - Tier I (July 24), and 2010 All Star Game (July 25). The Boston Militia won the Tier I World Championship and the Montreal Blitz were the North American Tier II Champions.
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    Super Bowl XXXIII

    Super Bowl XXXIII

    • Runner-up: Atlanta Falcons
    • Champion: Denver Broncos
    • Championship: Super Bowl
    Super Bowl XXXIII was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Atlanta Falcons to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1998 season. The Broncos defeated the Falcons by the score of 34–19, winning their second consecutive Super Bowl. The game was played on January 31, 1999, at Pro Player Stadium in Miami, Florida. The defending Super Bowl champion Broncos entered the game with an AFC-best 14-2 regular season record. The Falcons, under former Denver head coach Dan Reeves, were making their first Super Bowl appearance after also posting a 14-2 regular season record. Aided by quarterback John Elway's 80-yard touchdown pass to receiver Rod Smith, Denver scored 17 unanswered points to build a 17-3 lead in the second quarter that Atlanta could not recover from. At 38 years old, Elway became the oldest player ever to be named Super Bowl MVP. As the final game of his career, he completed 18 of 29 passes for 336 yards, with one touchdown and one interception, and also scored a 3-yard rushing touchdown. Elway retired on May 2 before the following season. NFL owners
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