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Best Slovenian urban commune of All Time

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    1
    Novo Mesto

    Novo Mesto

    Novo Mesto ( pronunciation (help·info)) (Slovene: Novo mesto, German: Neustadtl) is the city on a bend of the Krka River in the City Municipality of Novo Mesto in southeastern Slovenia, close to the border with Croatia. The town is traditionally considered the economic and cultural centre of the historic Lower Carniola region. Novo Mesto (literally "New Town") has been settled since pre-history. The city is one of the most important archeological sites of the Hallstatt culture (Early Iron Age) and has been nicknamed the "City of Situlas" after numerous situlas found in the area. Graben Castle down the Krka River, ancestral seat of the noble House of Graben von Stein, was first mentioned in a 1170 deed. The town itself was founded by the Habsburg archduke Rudolf IV of Austria on 7 April 1365 as Rudolfswerth (Slovene: Rudolfovo). The Austrian Habsburgs received the Carniolan March from the hands of Emperor Louis IV in 1335 and in 1364 Rudolf "the Founder" proclaimed himself a Duke of Carniola. Following World War I and the dissolution of Austria-Hungary, the city passed to the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and was officially renamed Novo mesto although it had been informally known as such
    7.50
    6 votes
    2
    Maribor

    Maribor

    Maribor ( pronunciation (help·info) German: Marburg an der Drau, Italian: Marburgo) is the second largest city in Slovenia with 95,200 inhabitants as of 2011. Maribor is also the largest city of the traditional region of Lower Styria and the seat of the City Municipality of Maribor. Maribor is, jointly with Guimarães in Portugal, the 2012 European Capital of Culture. In November 2010, The European Youth Forum announced that Maribor will be the 2013 European Youth Capital. In 1164, a castle known as the Marchburch (Middle High German for "March Castle") was documented in Styria. It was first built on Piramida Hill, which is located just above the city. Maribor was first mentioned as a market near the castle in 1204, and received town privileges in 1254. It began to grow rapidly after the victory of Rudolf I of Habsburg over Otakar II of Bohemia in 1278. Maribor withstood sieges by Matthias Corvinus in 1480 and 1481 and by the Ottoman Empire in 1532 and 1683, and the city remained under the control of the Habsburg Monarchy until 1918. Maribor, previously in the Catholic Diocese of Graz-Seckau, became part of the Diocese of Lavant on 1 June 1859, and the seat of its Prince-Bishop. The
    7.33
    3 votes
    3
    Ptuj

    Ptuj

    Ptuj ( pronunciation (help·info)) (German: Pettau; Latin: Poetovio) is a city and one of 11 urban municipalities in Slovenia. Traditionally the area was part of the Lower Styria region. The municipality is now included in the Podravje statistical region. It has about 23,000 inhabitants. The nearest airports are Ptuj Sport Airfield (Moškanjci), which is seven kilometers away, and Maribor Edvard Rusjan Airport, which is eighteen kilometers away. Ptuj is the oldest city in Slovenia. There is evidence that the area was settled in the Stone Age. In the Late Iron Age it was settled by Celts. By the 1st century BC, the settlement was controlled by Ancient Rome. In 69 AD, Vespasian was elected Roman Emperor by the Danubian legions in Ptuj, and the first written mention of the city of Ptuj is from the same year. The city of Poetovio was the base-camp of Legio XIII Gemina in Pannonia. The name originated in the times of Emperor Trajan, who granted the settlement city status and named it Colonia Ulpia Traiana Poetovio in 103. The city had 40,000 inhabitants until it was plundered by the Huns in 450. In 570 the city was occupied by Eurasian Avars and Slavic tribes. Ptuj became part of the
    5.25
    4 votes
    4
    Velenje

    Velenje

    Velenje (German: Wöllan) ( pronunciation (help·info)) is the fifth largest town in Slovenia. It is the centre of the City Municipality of Velenje. It is located on the Paka River in the eastern part of the Šalek Valley in northern Slovenia. After World War II, it rapidly advanced and developed into a modern city. Velenje Castle is located on a hill to the west of the town. The Old Velenje (Slovene: Staro Velenje), the downtown at the foot of the castle, is first mentioned in written documents dating to 1264 and 1374 as a small market town and was a center of handicraft and trade. The lignite mining industry in the area contributed to the expansion of the town, especially before World War II. The modern city of Velenje was planned and built in the 1950s, in the time of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia. In 1960, the manufacturer of household appliances Gorenje moved its headquarters to the town from the nearby village of Gorenje. From 1981 until 1990, the town had the name Tito Velenje (Titovo Velenje), after the revolutionary and the statesman Josip Broz Tito. The central square in Velenje is named Tito Square. It was officially opened on 20 September 1959 and features the highest
    9.50
    2 votes
    5
    Koper - Capodistria

    Koper - Capodistria

    Koper ( pronunciation (help·info)) (Italian: Capodistria; Croatian: Kopar) is a city in southwestern Slovenia, with the other Slovenian coastal towns Ankaran, Izola, Piran, and Portorož, situated along the country's 47-kilometer coastline, approximately five kilometers from its border with Italy. Having a unique ecology and biodiversity, it is considered an important national natural resource. With only one percent of Slovenia having a coastline, the influence that the city's Port of Koper, which is also the major contributor to the economy of the eponymous city municipality, has on tourism was a factor in deciding Ankaran to leave the municipality. Koper is the main urban center of the Slovenian Istria with a population of about 25,000. The city of Koper is officially bilingual, with both Slovene and Italian as official languages. Sights in Koper include the 15th-century Praetorian Palace and Loggia in Venetian Gothic style, the 12th century Carmine Rotunda church, and the Cathedral of St Nazarius, with its 14th-century tower. Koper is also one of the main road entry points into Slovenia from Italy, which lies to the north of the municipality. The main motorway crossing is at
    9.00
    2 votes
    6
    Murska Sobota

    Murska Sobota

    Murska Sobota ( pronunciation (help·info), German: Olsnitz, Hungarian: Muraszombat, Prekmurje dialect: Mürska Subouta) is a city in northeastern Slovenia. It is the centre of the City Municipality of Murska Sobota near the Mura River in the region of Prekmurje and is the regional capital. Officially, the city is known as Murska Sobota, although informally it is usually simply referred as Sobota. The traditional German name of the city is Olsnitz, which is derived from the old Slovene name Olšnica. The modern Slovene name is a translation of the Hungarian name Muraszombat, which was the official name of the city until 1919. In Hungarian, szombat means 'Saturday', referring to the city's practice of holding fairs every week on that day. Murska Sobota was a district (Hungarian: járás) city of Vas County in the Kingdom of Hungary until 1918. It was occupied by Hungary again during World War II, from 1941 to 1944. Between 1944 and 1945 it was under Nazi German occupation and it was liberated by Soviet troops in May 1945. It was also part of the Balatin Sanjak, which belonged at first to the Budin Eyalet, later the Kanije Eyaleti, before the Treaty of Karlowitz. Murska Sobota used to be
    5.00
    3 votes
    7
    Kranj

    Kranj

    Kranj ( /ˈkraŋ/ (help·info)) (known in historic sources at various times as Carnium, Creina, Chreina or Krainburg) is the fourth largest city in Slovenia, with a population of 54,500 (2010). It is located approximately 20 km north-west of Ljubljana. The centre of the City Municipality of Kranj and of the traditional region of Upper Carniola (northwestern Slovenia) is a mainly industrial city with significant electronics and rubber industries. The historical region of Carniola (Kranjska) is named after the town, which was its provincial capital in the early Middle Ages. The nucleus of the city is a well-preserved medieval old town, built at the confluence of the Kokra and the Sava rivers. The city lies on the busy Ljubljana - Jesenice - Villach (Austria) - Munich (Germany) railway (served by Kranj's railway station) and highway. Slovenia's national airport, Ljubljana Jože Pučnik Airport (in Brnik) is also very close to Kranj, considerably more so than its nominal client, Ljubljana. The St. Cantianius and Companions Parish Church (Župnijska cerkev sv. Kancijana in tovarišev) is the largest church in Kranj and also the seat of the Kranj Parish and Deaconates. It was built in the 14th
    10.00
    1 votes
    8
    Celje

    Celje

    Celje ( listen (help·info)) is the third largest town in Slovenia. It is a regional center of Lower Styria and the administrative seat of the Urban Municipality of Celje (Slovene: Mestna občina Celje). The town of Celje is located under Upper Celje Castle (407 m (1,335 ft)) at the confluence of the Savinja, Hudinja, Ložnica, and Voglajna rivers in the lower Savinja Valley, and at the crossing of the roads connecting Ljubljana, Maribor, Velenje, and the Central Sava Valley. It lies 241 m (791 ft) above mean sea level (MSL). The Celje region is frequently shaken by minor earthquakes. In the local Slovene dialect, Celje is called Cjele or Cele. The first settlement in the area of Celje appeared during the Hallstatt era. The settlement was known in the Celtic times and to Ancient Greek historians as Kelea; findings suggest that Celts coined Noric money in the region. Once the area was incorporated in the Roman Empire in 15 BC, it was known as Civitas Celeia. It received municipal rights in AD 45 under the name municipium Claudia Celeia during the reign of the Roman Emperor Claudius (41-54). Records suggest that the town was rich and densely populated, secured with the walls and towers,
    6.50
    2 votes
    9
    Slovenj Gradec

    Slovenj Gradec

    Slovenj Gradec (German: Windischgrätz, after about 1900 Windischgraz) is a town in northern Slovenia. It is the centre of the City Municipality of Slovenj Gradec. It is part of the historic Lower Styria region, since 2005 it belongs to the NUTS-3 statistical region of Carinthia. It is located in the Mislinja Valley at the eastern end of the Karawanks mountain range, about 45 km (28 mi) west of Maribor and 65 km (40 mi) northeast of Ljubljana. Gradec, Slovene for 'little castle', was first mentioned in a 1091 deed, then part of the Imperial March of Styria. From 1180 until 1918 it belonged to the Duchy of Styria, since 1804 a crown land of the Austrian Empire. It was the ancestral seat of the Windisch-Graetz noble family first documented in 1220. Upon the dissolution of Austria-Hungary in 1918, with the rest of Lower Styria, it was included in the newly established Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. Between the mid-19th century and 1945, the town was a German-speaking island in a Slovene-speaking area. In a 1880 census, the town of Slovenj Gradec, or Windischgrätz (see: Wends) as it was called to distinguish it from the Styrian capital Graz, was 75 percent German-speaking
    6.50
    2 votes
    10
    Ljubljana

    Ljubljana

    Ljubljana (locally: [lʲubˈlʲana] ( listen); Lə-yoob—Lə-YAnah; German: Laibach, Italian: Lubiana, Latin: Labacum or Aemona) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia and its only centre of international importance. It is located in the centre of the country in the Ljubljana Basin, and is the centre of the City Municipality of Ljubljana. With approximately 272,000 inhabitants, it classifies as the only Slovenian large town. Throughout its history, it has been influenced by its geographic position at the crossroads of the Slavic world with the Germanic and Latin cultures. For centuries, Ljubljana was the capital of the historical region of Carniola. Now it is the cultural, educational, economic, political and administrative centre of Slovenia, independent since 1991. Its transport connections, concentration of industry, scientific and research institutions and cultural tradition are contributing factors to its leading position. The origin of the city's name is unclear. In the Middle Ages, both the river and the town were also known by the German name Laibach, which was in official use until 1918. For most scholars, the problem has been in how to connect the Slovene and the German
    6.00
    2 votes
    11
    Nova Gorica

    Nova Gorica

    Nova Gorica (pronounced [ˈnɔʋa ɡɔˈɾitsa]; population: 13,852 (town); 21,082 (incl. suburbs); 31,000 (municipality)) is a town and a municipality in western Slovenia, on the border with Italy. Nova Gorica is a new town, built after 1948 when the Paris Peace Treaty established a new border between Yugoslavia and Italy, leaving nearby Gorizia outside the borders of Yugoslavia, thus cutting off the Soča Valley, Vipava Valley, and the northwestern Karst Plateau from their traditional regional centre. Nova Gorica is the principal urban centre of the traditional region of Goriška in the Slovenian Littoral. Since May 2011, Nova Gorica has been joined together with Gorizia and Šempeter-Vrtojba in a common trans-border metropolitan zone, administered by a joint administration board. The name Nova Gorica can be interpreted as New Gorizia. However, the origin of the name Gorizia/Gorica is Slavic. The common local term for the town is Gorica (i.e., 'Gorizia'), while they refer to the neighboring Italian town as Stara Gorica (meaning Old Gorizia). This use is also reflected in Slovenian license plates (GO for Gorica), the name of the local association football club ND Gorica, and the local
    9.00
    1 votes
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