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Best Slovakia of All Time

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    1
    Trenčín Region

    Trenčín Region

    The Trenčín Region (Slovak: Trenčiansky kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. It consists of 9 districts (okresy). The region was established in 1996, before it has been a part of West-Slovakian region (Západoslovenský kraj) and partly central Slovakian region (Stredoslovenský kraj). Industry is a main branch of region economy. It is located in the north-western Slovakia, has an area of 4,502 km² and a population of 600,386 (2005). The Danubian Lowland reaches the region to Nové Mesto nad Váhom and Partizánske areas. There are several mountain ranges in the region: a small part of the Little Carpathians in the south-west, White Carpathians in the north-west, Javorníky in the north, Strážovské vrchy mountains in the centre, Považský Inovec in the south, Vtáčnik in the south-east and Žiar in the east. Small parts of Lesser Fatra and of the Kremnické vrchy mountains also stretch to the region. Major rivers are the Váh in the westerm part of the region, creating so-called Váh Basin and Nitra in the south-east and east, creating the Upper Nitra Basin. The Myjava River springs in the west, but flows into the Trnava Region. The region borders Žilina Region in the
    7.25
    8 votes
    2
    Trenčín

    Trenčín

    Trenčín (German: Trentschin; Hungarian: Trencsén) is a city in western Slovakia of the central Váh River valley near the Czech border, around 120 km (75 mi) from Bratislava. It has a population of more than 56,000, which makes it the ninth largest municipality of the country and is the seat of the Trenčín Region and the Trenčín District. It has a medieval castle, standing on a rock above the city. Trenčín  pronunciation (help·info) was first mentioned under the Greek name Leukaristos (Λεθκαριστοσ), depicted on the Ptolemy world map around 150 CE. During the course of the Marcomannic Wars between the Roman Empire and Germanic Quadi, the Romans carved an inscription on the rock under the present-day castle in 179 CE and the place was mentioned as Laugaricio. It is the northernmost known presence of the Romans in Central Europe. The first written mentions in the Middle Ages are from 1111 (as Treinchen) and 1113 (adjective Trenciniensis). The German and Hungarian forms are Trentschin and Trencsén, respectively. The site of Trenčín has been inhabited since time immemorial. Trenčín Castle, a typical medieval fortified castle is situated high on a rock above the city. Trenčín is best
    8.33
    6 votes
    3
    Levoča

    Levoča

    Levoča ( pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Lőcse, German: Leutschau, Polish: Lewocza) is a town in the Prešov Region of eastern Slovakia with a population of 14,600. The town has a historic center with a well preserved town wall, a Renaissance church with the highest wooden altar in World, carved by Master Paul of Levoča, and many other Renaissance buildings. On 28 June 2009, Levoča was added by UNESCO to its World Heritage List. Levoča is located in the historical region of Spiš (formerly Szepes), which was inhabited as early as the Stone Age. In the 11th century, this region was conquered and, subsequently, became part of the Kingdom of Hungary and remained such until 1918. After the Mongol invasions of 1241/1242, the area was also settled by Germans. The town became the capital of the Association of Spiš Germans, with a form of self-rule within the Kingdom of Hungary. The oldest written reference to the city of Levoča dates back to 1249. In 1317, Levoča (at that time generally known by the German name of Leutschau - see Chronology below for lists of changing names) received the status of a royal town. In 1321 a wide storing right was granted enticing merchants, craftsmen and
    8.17
    6 votes
    4
    Bretka

    Bretka

    Bretka (Hungarian: Beretke) is a village and municipality in the Rožňava District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia.
    8.00
    6 votes
    5
    Dunajská Streda

    Dunajská Streda

    Dunajská Streda (Slovak: Dunajská Streda,  pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Dunaszerdahely; German: Niedermarkt) is a town in southern Slovakia (Trnavský kraj). Dunajská Streda is the most important town of the Žitný ostrov region. It has a Hungarian ethnic majority and its population is 23,562 (2004 census) The name of Zerda was first mentioned in 1250 in a document issued by Palatinus Lórant. Other early orthographic forms of the name were Svridahel (1254), Zeredahely (1270), Zerdahel (1283) and Zredahel (1358). Szerdahely means "Wednesday (market)place" in Hungarian and it indicates the town had the privilege to hold a market on Wednesdays (although it was later changed to Fridays). The word szerda itself has Slavic roots; the word streda means Wednesday in Slovak, with related words existing in other Slavic languages, as it is the middle (stred) day in the week. The attribute Duna- (Dunajská; i.e. Danubian) was added in the 19th century to distinguish it from other towns with similar names (in accordance with the "one town, one name" policy of Austria-Hungary). The German name Niedermarkt means "Lower Market". According to archeological evidence the territory was inhabited
    7.67
    6 votes
    6
    Žilina Region

    Žilina Region

    The Žilina Region (Slovak: Žilinský kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions and consists of 11 districts (okresy) and 315 municipalities, from which 18 have a town status. The region was established in 1923, however, in its present borders exists from 1996. It is more industrial region with several large towns. Žilina is region administrative center and a strong cultural environment is in Martin. It is located in northern Slovakia and has an area of 6,804 km² and a population of 688,851 (2011). The whole area is mountainous, belonging to the Western Carpathians. Some of the mountain ranges in the region include Javorníky, the Lesser Fatra and the Greater Fatra in the west, Oravská Magura, Chočské vrchy, Low Tatras and Western Tatras in the east. Whole area belongs to the Váh river basin. Some of its left tributaries are Turiec and Rajčanka rivers and it's right tributaries Belá, Orava and Kysuca. National parks on the region's territory are the Lesser, Greater Fatra, Low Tatras and Tatra; landscape protected areas are Strážovské vrchy, Kysuce and Horná Orava. The region borders Prešov Region in the east, Banská Bystrica Region in the south, Trenčín Region in the
    5.88
    8 votes
    7
    Stupava

    Stupava

    Stupava (German: Stampfen; Hungarian: Stomfa) is a small town in western Slovakia. It is situated in the Malacky District, Bratislava Region. The town is located in the Záhorie lowland, under the Little Carpathians, around 15 km (9 mi) north of Bratislava at an altitude of 182 metres. It has 8,400 inhabitants as of 2005 and has a land area of 67.17 km (26 sq mi). Except the main part Stupava, it also has part Mást (German: Maaßt; Hungarian: Mászt) located south of the town. However, traces of habitation go back to the Bronze Age, and the first known inhabitants were Celts. The Romans built a military station as a part of the near Limes Romanus on the Danube. The first written mention about the town was in 1269 in a document of the King Béla IV of Hungary under name Ztumpa. In the second half of the 13th century the now-ruined Pajštún Castle in the Little Carpathians was built. It was developing mainly as an agricultural and trading settlement. The name of the town comes from the pressing mills called stupa on the Stupavský potok brook, which were used for extracting oil from flax and hemp. According to the 2001 census, the town had 8,063 inhabitants. 96.7% of inhabitants were
    7.50
    6 votes
    8
    Ilava

    Ilava

    Ilava (German: Illau, Hungarian: Illava) is a town in the Trenčín Region, northwestern Slovakia. It is located in the Ilava Basin near the Váh river at the foothills of Strážovské vrchy mountains, near the cities of Považská Bystrica and Trenčín. In addition to the main settlement, it also has "boroughs" of Iliavka and Klobušice (both since 1969, latter with a Classic castle). The first written reference to the town dates from 1332/1337, the town charter stems from 1339. The settlement developed below a Gothic castle (bearing the same name) from the 13th century, turned into a Renaissance fortification in the 16th century, into a monastery in 1693 and finally, in 1856, into a prison. A concentration camp was in the prison in 1938. According to the 2001 census, the town had 5,441 inhabitants. 98.1% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 0.9% Czechs and 0.1% Roma and Hungarians. The religious makeup was 87.2% Roman Catholics, 7.9% people with no religious affiliation, and 1.2% Lutherans. It is the birthplace of two-time Stanley Cup Champion and current Florida Panthers left winger Tomáš Kopecký.
    8.60
    5 votes
    9
    Čamovce

    Čamovce

    Čamovce (before 1948 Čoma;Hungarian: Csoma, (during WWII) Csomatelke ) is a village and municipality in the Lučenec District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. The village arose in the 12th century. It was first mentioned in 1240 (Chama) . It belonged to Hajnáčka and, successively, to the families Feledyi, Lorantfy, Vecsény and Vay. It suffered under Turkish attacks; the Turks imposed to the village to pay taxes in the form of wood and horseshoes. Turkish incursion ended only in 1683, when the Turks burned the village down. From 1938 to 1944 it belonged to Hungary under the First Vienna Award.
    7.17
    6 votes
    10
    Thailand

    Thailand

    Thailand ( /ˈtaɪlænd/ TY-land or /ˈtaɪlənd/; Thai: ประเทศไทย, RTGS: Prathet Thai), officially the Kingdom of Thailand (Thai: ราชอาณาจักรไทย, RTGS: Ratcha Anachak Thai; IPA: [râːt.tɕʰā ʔāːnāːtɕàk tʰāj] ( listen)), formerly known as Siam (Thai: สยาม; RTGS: Sayam), is a country located at the centre of the Indochina peninsula in Southeast Asia. It is bordered to the north by Burma and Laos, to the east by Laos and Cambodia, to the south by the Gulf of Thailand and Malaysia, and to the west by the Andaman Sea and the southern extremity of Burma. Its maritime boundaries include Vietnam in the Gulf of Thailand to the southeast, and Indonesia and India in the Andaman Sea to the southwest. The country is a constitutional monarchy, headed by King Rama IX, the ninth king of the House of Chakri, who, having reigned since 1946, is the world's longest-serving head of state and the longest-reigning monarch in Thai history. The king of Thailand is titled Head of State, Head of the Armed Forces, the Upholder of the Buddhist religion, and the Defender of all Faiths. Thailand is the world's 51st-largest country in terms of total area, with an area of approximately 513,000 km (198,000 sq mi), and is
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    Nitra

    Nitra

    Nitra ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Neutra ( pronunciation (help·info)); Hungarian: Nyitra / Nyitria [archaic]; Turkish: Litra) is a city in western Slovakia, situated at the foot of Zobor Mountain in the valley of the river Nitra. With a population of about 83,572, it is the fifth largest city in Slovakia. Nitra is also one of the oldest cities in Slovakia and the country's earliest political and cultural center. Today, it is a seat of a kraj (Nitra Region) and an okres (Nitra District). The first mention of Nitra dates back to 880 (other variations: 826 as Nitrawa, 880 as Nitra, and in 1111, 1113 as Nitra, Nitria). The name of the city is derived from the river Nitra. The name might originate in the Germanic word Nitrahwa, meaning "flowing water". Inhabited for 6,000 years, Nitra has been a city of extraordinary historic importance. A large Celtic settlement was founded in the 4th century BCE in the locality Martinský vrch. Nitra is later (396 CE) mentioned in connection to the Germanic tribe of Quadi, as their possible capital. The first Slavs arrived in the 5th century. After more than 200 years of Avar rule, Nitra became the capital of the Principality of Nitra in the
    7.80
    5 votes
    12
    Hlohovec

    Hlohovec

    Hlohovec (German: Freistadt(l) an der Waag, Hungarian Galgóc) is a town in southwestern Slovakia, with a population of 22,192. The first written evidence of its existence is from 1113, when a town with the name Galgocz was mentioned in the so-called Second Zobor Document. In 1362 Hlohovec obtained town privileges. Ottoman troops captured city and annexed it to the sanjak of Uyvar as the Holok eyalet in 1663. Austrian troops retook it in 1685. The dominant building is a Renaissance-Baroque castle built in 1720. The castle is built on the place of a pre-existing Slavic settlement and a medieval castle. In the castle area is the Empire theatre built in 1802, a riding school from the 18th century, and a Baroque garden pavilion. In the middle of St. Michael Square stands the Gothic church of St. Michael with its highly decorated portal. Next to the church is the Chapel of Saint Anna from the 18th century. In the northern border of the central part of the town is the Franciscan church and monastery built in 1492. Part of the monastery premises nowadays occupies the Museum of National History and Geography. The most visited and beautiful natural part of town is the castle park with its
    6.67
    6 votes
    13
    Borová

    Borová

    Borová is a municipality of Trnava District in the Trnava region of Slovakia.
    7.40
    5 votes
    14
    Blhovce

    Blhovce

    Blhovce (Hungarian: Balogfala, earlier Balogfalva) is a village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of southern Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1244 (1244 Bolug, 1427 Balogfalva) . In 1427 it belonged to the paladin Juraj of Ratold. In the 16th century it belong to Feledyi and Perényi families. During the 16th century it suffered because of Turks and during the 17th century due to the Polish-Lithuanian War. In the 18th century it passed to the Koháry family and to several zemans.
    8.50
    4 votes
    15
    Ďumbier

    Ďumbier

    Ďumbier (2,043 m or 6,703 ft) is the highest mountain in the Low Tatra range, in central Slovakia. Despite the remains of medieval mines (gold, iron, antimony), the massif is now protected as a part of the Low Tatras National Park. The easily accessible summit offers a scenic view of High Tatra, Liptov and the valley of Hron. A chalet called Chata M. R. Štefánika is situated under the summit (1,740 m). Ďumbier, as well as the nearby Chopok mountain, can be reached following the hiking trails either from the north (from the Demänovská dolina and Jánska dolina valleys) or from the south (from the bus stop Trangoška).
    7.20
    5 votes
    16
    Banská Bystrica Region

    Banská Bystrica Region

    The Banská Bystrica Region (Slovak: Banskobystrický kraj) is one of the Slovak regions in the country of Slovakia in Europe. It is the largest of all Slovak regions by area. It was estabished in 1923 and from 1996 exists in its present borders. Banská Bystrica region consists of 514 municipalities, from which 24 have a status of towns. Administrative center is its seat Banská Bystrica, the largest district town. Another important towns are Zvolen and Brezno. It is located in the central part of Slovakia and has an area of 9,455 km². The region is prevailingly mountains, with several ranges within the area. The highest of them are the Low Tatras in the north, where the highest point, Ďumbier, is located. Some of the mountain ranges in the west include Kremnica Mountains, Vtáčnik and Štiavnica Mountains. The Javorie and Krupina Plain ranges are located in the centre. The Slovak Ore Mountains are running from the central areas to the east, along with its subdivisions (e.g. Poľana, Veporské vrchy, Muránska planina and Spiš-Gemer Karst). Lower lying areas are located in the south, represented by the Southern Slovak Basin, running along the borders with Hungary. Major rivers are the Hron
    8.25
    4 votes
    17
    Bojnice Castle

    Bojnice Castle

    Bojnice Castle (Slovak: Bojnický zámok) is a medieval castle in Bojnice, Slovakia. It is a Romantic castle with some original Gothic and Renaissance elements built in the 12th century. Bojnice Castle is one of the most visited castles in Slovakia, receiving hundreds of thousands of visitors every year and also being a popular filming stage for fantasy and fairy-tale movies. Bojnice Castle was first mentioned in written records in 1113, in a document held at the Zobor Abbey. Originally built as a wooden fort, it was gradually replaced by stone, with the outer walls being shaped according to the uneven rocky terrain. Its first owner was Máté Csák, who received it in 1302 from the King Ladislaus V of Hungary. Later, in the 15th century, it was owned by King Matthias Corvinus, who gave it to his illegitimate son John Corvinus in 1489. Matthias liked to visit Bojnice and it was here that he worked on his royal decrees. He used to dictate them under his beloved linden tree, which is now known as the "Linden tree of King Matthias". After his death the castle became the property of the Zapolya family (see John Zapolya). The Thurzos, the richest family in the northern Kingdom of Hungary
    6.17
    6 votes
    18
    Beluša

    Beluša

    Beluša (German rare Bellusch, Hungarian Bellus) is a large village and municipality in Púchov District in the Trenčín Region of north-western Slovakia. It is located in the northern parts of the Ilava Basin and is one of the largest communities of the Považie region. The archaeological evidence shows that the village has been inhabited already in the Neolithic and early Bronze Age. It was mentioned for the first time in a written document in 1330. There is a Romanesque St Anne chapel from the mid-13th century in the village. This was already mentioned in the Papal documentation in 1332 which makes the rectory one of oldest one on the river Váh. The little church can be still found in the village center. The main church located right next to it has been dedicated to St. Elizabeth and it was built in 1560. The newest church standing in Belusa Hloza is known as Our Lady of Sorrows church and was built in 1990. It is clearly visible from the D1 freeway. Finally, in Belusa part Hloza on the Trencianska Street can be also found a small St. John of Nepomuk chapel. This one has been standing there since 1766. The close proximity to the river Váh as well Pruzinka creek brought several times
    7.00
    5 votes
    19
    Brestovany

    Brestovany

    Brestovany is a municipality with about 2000 inhabitants of Trnava District in the Trnava region of Slovakia. The name of the village may be derived from brest, the Slovak word for elm, a tree which used to be common in the area. Brestovany was first mentioned in a document called Zoborská listina from 1113, where it is referred-to as Bristem. In 1241 the village had to face an invasion of Tatars. Another difficulty came in 1271 when the Czech army conquered Trnava and its surrounding for some time. Brestovany became hereditary property of the town Trnava as of 1280, rendering its inhabitants serfs till the 1848 abolition of serfdom. In 1533 the village was invaded by the Ottoman empire, who plundered and burned it to the ground. In 18th century the Chapel of Saint Martin and the Church of Saint John the Baptist were built there. In 1811 and 1818 fires seriously destroyed large parts of the village. As of 1824 Brestovany belonged to Polish count Jozef Saryusz Zamoyski, who had built a neoclassical mansion there, which now houses a primary school. Later it belonged to another Polish noble, Albert Wielopolski. Both noblemen are buried at the local cemetery. There are several
    7.00
    5 votes
    20
    Budikovany

    Budikovany

    Budikovany is a village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of southern Slovakia. Village is situated on the north-east shore of Teplý Vrch (warm hill) lake where river Blh and Drienok creek meet. Today it is a small farming village and a popular place for visitors and outdoors enthusiasts. The village now prifits from the proximity of Teplý vrch lake. In 18th century the village as the property of Muráň castle owners, In 1773 had Budikovany 41 homesteads, in 1828 36 houses. Locals had been engaged in agriculture, wax production, weaving, and fruit growing.
    8.00
    4 votes
    21
    Medzilaborce

    Medzilaborce

    Medzilaborce (Hungarian: Mezőlaborc, Ukrainian: Меджилабірці, Medzhylabirtsi, Rusyn: Меджильабірці, Medžilabirci) is a town in northeastern Slovakia close to the border with Poland, located near the towns of Sanok and Bukowsko (in southeastern Małopolska). Its population is approximately 6,600. It is an administrative and cultural centre of the Laborec Region. A train line connects it with the town of Humenné to the south and with Poland to the north. The private sector and service industries are developing quickly in the town at the moment. It is home to the Andy Warhol Museum of Modern Art, opened in 1991, which contains many artworks and effects of Andy Warhol and of his brother Paul and nephew James Warhola. Warhol's mother, Julia Warhola, was born and lived with her husband in the village of Miková, 17 km to the west. Medzilaborce is situated in one of the least developed regions of Slovakia. There are three churches in the town. City parts: The town of Medzilaborce lies in the valley of the Laborec river in north-eastern Slovakia. The hills of the surrounding Laborec Highlands are typical of this countryside. The oldest written record connected with Medzilaborce dates back to
    6.80
    5 votes
    22
    Babie

    Babie

    Babie is a village and municipality in the Vranov nad Topľou District in the Prešov Region of Slovakia.
    7.75
    4 votes
    23
    Námestovo

    Námestovo

    Námestovo (Hungarian: Námesztó; Polish: Namiestowo) is a town in northern Slovakia. It is the capital and largest town of Námestovo District in the Žilina Region. As of 2005 its population was 8,094. The town is located under the Orava Highlands at the shores of the Orava reservoir, not far from the Polish border, around 15 km (9.32 mi) from Tvrdošín and 30 km (18.64 mi) from Dolný Kubín. The town was mentioned in the 16th century, when the massive colonisation of Orava took place. It was growing quickly, thanks to its favourable location on the trade route to Poland. The town was burned down at the end of the World War II. The construction of the Orava reservoir affected the way of life in the town, as two-thirds of the town were inundated, including the town centre. Boom of the industry and the following apartment construction in the 1970s contributed to the growth of the town. Meteorite Magura Meteorite Magura According to the 2001 census, the town had 8,135 inhabitants. 98.65% of inhabitants were Slovaks and 0.65% Czechs. The religious makeup was 92.12% Roman Catholics, 4.95% people with no religious affiliation and 0.84% Lutherans.
    7.75
    4 votes
    24
    Stropkov

    Stropkov

    Stropkov (Yiddish: סטראפקאוו, Hebrew: סטרופקוב‎, Hungarian: Sztropkó) is a town in Stropkov District, Prešov Region, Slovakia. Stropkov is an economical, social and cultural centre of north Zemplín. It was established on left bank of river Ondava in beautiful scenery of central part in Ondava uplands. For its origins as an ancient Slovak settlement we have to look back (and many archaeologists and historians agree in this case) before the 13th century. The character of the main square is a proof that Stropkov used to belong to the royal lands and there are also some similarities with the development of another town, called Bardejov. First authentic written data about the town is from 1404 (Stropko), when Stropkov was already labeled as oppidum—townlet. German guests and soltys too were obtained with the same privileges as their fellows in Bardejov and other towns. The first owner of the town after the king was Ladislav Svatojursky. The other landlords in order were Balickovci, Perinskovci, Peteovci. In 1408 town's toll and castle—castellum—were mentioned for the first time. The development of the town and its whole economic expansion was supported by the law of thirty and market in
    7.75
    4 votes
    25
    Uzh River

    Uzh River

    The Uzh (Ukrainian: Уж; translit. Uzh; Slovak: Uh; Hungarian: Ung, Polish: Uż) is a river in Ukraine and Slovakia. Its name comes from the ancient west slavic dialect word už, meaning "Snake", (lat. "Serpentes"). It is 127 km (79 mi) long, out of which 21.3 km (13.2 mi) are in Slovakia. It flows into the Laborec river near the city of Drahňov in the Michalovce District (okres). The Ukrainian city of Uzhhorod and the semi-ruined Nevitske Castle are situated by the Uzh. The river forms part of the Slovakia–Ukraine border for about 1.5 km (0.93 mi) near the village Pinkovce.
    7.75
    4 votes
    26
    Bojnice

    Bojnice

    Bojnice (Hungarian: Bajmóc, German: Weinitz) is a small town in central Slovakia at the upper Nitra river, near the city of Prievidza. It has population of 4,983 (2005). Bojnice is best known for its tourist attractions: the oldest zoo in Slovakia, the most visited castle, and one of the oldest spa towns in Slovakia. The town is situated below the Bojnice Castle, which is built on travertine rock with a natural cave. The castle has appeared in many international films and a well-known international festival of spectres takes place there every year. The town lies at the upper Nitra river valley, under the Strážov Mountains. It is very close to Prievidza (4 km), sharing the public transport system. Other major cities nearby include Žilina to the north (60 km) and Trenčín to the west (65 km). The town's history is closely connected to that of Bojnice Castle. It was first mentioned in 1113, when it was mentioned as a settlement under the castle. It has town privileges since 1966. The town is most known for its tourist attractions: the Bojnice Castle, first mentioned in 1113 and originally built as a wooden fort, it was over time built as a stone castle and in the 20th century in the
    5.83
    6 votes
    27
    Danube

    Danube

    The Danube (English pronunciation: /ˈdænjuːb/ DAN-yoob) is a river in Central Europe, the continent's second longest after the Volga. Classified as an international waterway, it originates in the town of Donaueschingen which is in the Black Forest of Germany at the confluence of the rivers Brigach and Breg. The Danube then flows southeast for 2,872 km (1,785 mi), passing through four Central European capitals before emptying into the Black Sea via the Danube Delta in Romania and Ukraine. Once a long-standing frontier of the Roman Empire, the river passes through or touches the borders of ten countries: Romania (29.0% of basin area), Hungary (11.6%), Serbia (10.2%), Austria (10.0%), Germany (7.0%), Slovakia (5.9%), Bulgaria (5.9%), Croatia (4.4%), Ukraine (3.8%), and Moldova (1.6%), more than any other. Its drainage basin extends into nine more. The Danube was known in Latin as Danubius, Danuvius, Ister, in Ancient Greek as Ἴστρος (Istros). The Dacian/Thracian name was Τάναις/Donaris/Donaris (upper Danube) and Istros (lower Danube). Its Thraco-Phrygian name was Matoas, "the bringer of luck". The name Dānuvius is presumably a loan from Celtic (Gaulish), or possibly Iranic. It is one
    5.67
    6 votes
    28
    Čičmany

    Čičmany

    Čičmany (Hungarian: Csicsmány, German: Zimmermannshau) is a village and municipality in Žilina District in the Žilina Region of northern Slovakia. It is known as the first folk architecture reserve in the world (founded in 1977). The first preserved reference to the village dates from 1272. After a great fire in 1921, the village was restored to its original appearance with generous contributions by the state. Until the mid-20th century, the village was a centre of sheep raising. The municipality lies at an altitude of 655 metres and covers an area of 25.611 km². It has a population of about 204 people. Timbered houses with ridge roofs, galleries and pointed or linear wall decorations have been preserved in Čičmany. Of particular interest are the very specific white patterns which are painted on the exterior walls of the houses to decorate them. The local folk music, special folk costumes and folk dances of the village have been preserved as well.
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    Martin

    Martin

    Martin ( pronunciation (help·info); Slovak: Turčiansky Svätý Martin until 1950, Hungarian: Turócszentmárton, German: Turz-Sankt Martin, Latin: Sanctus Martinus / Martinopolis) is a city in northern Slovakia, situated on the Turiec river, between the Malá Fatra and Veľká Fatra mountains, near the city of Žilina. The population numbers approximately 58,000, which makes it the eighth largest city in Slovakia. It is the center of the Turiec region and the District of Martin. From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. The first recorded reference to Martin in written sources is dated to 1284 under the name of Vila Sancti Martini. In the turbulent 15th century, Martin suffered from many disasters, for example from the attack of the Hussites in 1433, when the town was burned down. Just 10 years later, it was destroyed again by an earthquake and Martin started to be slowly degraded from royal to the privileged town and under direct influence of the Révay family. Since the 18th century, Martin became centre of the Turóc county. The town became the foremost Slovak cultural center in the 19th century. Several cultural institutions (including
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    Sliač

    Sliač

    Sliač is a small spa town located in central Slovakia, on the Hron river, between Banská Bystrica and Zvolen. The town is known for its healing hot springs and for an airport which has been used for military as well as civil purposes. Sliač has a population of less than 5,000. The town arose through a merger of two villages, Hájniky and Rybáre, in 1959 and was given the name "Sliač". However, both original settlements are much older. The Gothic church in Hájniky was mentioned for the first time in 1263 and there is archaeological evidence of Slavic settlers living in the area since the 6th century. Some evidence also indicates that the history of the settlement stretches to 2000 B.C. The airport, formerly known as Letisko Tri Duby ("The Three-Oaks Airport") due to the name of the area it was located in, played the key strategic role during the Slovak National Uprising. In 2005, Sliač had a population of 4,812. According to the 2001 census, 96.1% of inhabitants were Slovaks and 2.3% Czechs. The religious make-up was 46.1% Roman Catholics, 26.7% people with no religious affiliation, and 22.1% Lutherans.
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    Vrútky

    Vrútky

    Vrútky (German: Ruttek (rare); Hungarian: Ruttka) is a town in northern Slovakia, close to the city of Martin. It lies in the historic Turiec region. The town lies at the confluence of Váh and the Turiec, in the Turčianska kotlina, near the Malá Fatra mountain range. It is located 3 km (2 mi) north of the city of Martin, with which it shares a public transport system, and 25 km (16 mi) from Žilina. The town was first mentioned in 1255 as villa Vrutk. However, a settlement had previously existed, and had the old Slavic name vrutok. By the end of the 13th century, the settlement had been divided into Dolné Vrútky and Horné Vrútky. By 1332, the settlement gained independence and in 1809, had the town almost 300 inhabitants. The construction of the Košice-Bohumín Railway in 1870 and and the Salgotarján in 1872, brought economic development and Vrútky gained the status of being a key railway junction. This new status was also reflected in the increased number of inhabitants, which rose from 915 in 1869, to 1,944 in 1880 and 4,345 in 1900. Between the years 1949-1954 and 1971-1990 the town was amalgamated with Martin under the name Martin-Vrútky. Vrútky regained independence in the year
    7.50
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    32
    Babia Góra-Babia Hora

    Babia Góra-Babia Hora

    Babia Góra [ˈbabja ˈɡura] (in Polish), or Babia hora (in Slovak), literally Old Wives' or Witches' Mountain, is a massif situated on the border between Poland and Slovakia in the Western Beskidy Mountains. The name is also applied to the culmination of the massif, Diablak ("Devil's Peak"), which is also the highest peak of this part of the Carpathian Mountains, at 1,725 metres (5,659 ft) above sea level. Babia Góra was first mentioned in the 15th century chronicle of Jan Długosz. It was first plotted on a map in 1558. Until the end of the 17th century most of the available information on the mountain came from folklore. According to folk tales, the mountain was the location of the witches' sabbath. The first known ascent was made in 1782 by the court astronomer of King Stanisław August Poniatowski, Jowin Fryderyk Bończa Bystrzycki. The period of scientific investigations began in the second half of the 19th century. Gentle from the south, steep from the north, Babia Góra is home to bear, lynx, wolf and other species; as well as alpine flora endemic at this altitude. The first attempts to protect the area were made in the 1930s. In 1933 the Nature Reserve of Babia Góra was
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    Čachtice Castle

    Čachtice Castle

    The Čachtice Castle (Slovak pronunciation: [tʃaxtʲɪtse]) (Slovak: Čachtický hrad, Hungarian: Csejte vára) is a castle ruin in Slovakia next to the village of Čachtice. It stands on a hill featuring rare plants, and has been declared a national nature reserve for this reason. The castle was a residence and later the prison of the Countess Elizabeth Báthory, who is alleged to have been the world's most prolific female serial killer. Čachtice was built in the mid-13th century by Kazimir as a sentry on the road to Moravia. Later, it belonged to Matúš Csák, the Stibor family, and then to the famous Bloody Lady Elizabeth Báthory. Čachtice, its surrounding lands and villages, was a wedding gift from the Nádasdy family upon Elizabeth's marriage to Ferenc Nádasdy in 1575. Originally, Čachtice was a Romanesque castle with an interesting horseshoe shaped residence tower. It was turned into a Gothic castle later and its size was increased in the 15th and 16th centuries. A Renaissance renovation followed in the 17th century. Finally, in 1708 the castle was captured and plundered by the rebels of Ferenc II Rákoci. It has been in decay since. Along with Orava Castle, Čachtice Castle was used as
    8.67
    3 votes
    34
    Čadca

    Čadca

    Čadca ( pronunciation (help·info); until 1918 Čatca, Czača) is a district town in northern Slovakia, near the border with Poland and the Czech Republic. It is located south of the Jablunkov Pass, surrounded by the Javorníky, Kysucké Beskydy and Turzovská vrchovina mountain ranges. It lies in the valley of the Kysuca river, around 30 km north of Žilina and is part of the historic region of Kysuce. A Goral minority lives in the surroundings. The town was established in the 17th century, the first written reference dates back to 1565 as Tzaczcka. The town charter was granted in 1778. According to the 2010 census, the town had 24,959 inhabitants with 2.2% Czech and 0.4% Roma. The religious make-up was 82.97% Roman Catholics, and 0.36% Lutherans, most of others stated no religious affiliation. Čadca railway station is the town's main station. It forms part of the cross border Žilina–Čadca–Svrčinovec zastávka–Mosty u Jablunkova railway (to the Czech Republic), and is also a junction station for two other lines, one of them also cross border (to Poland). The station offers services to several destinations in the two cross border countries. For the Czech Republic, there are many trains to
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    Čabradský Vrbovok

    Čabradský Vrbovok

    Čabradský Vrbovok (Hungarian: Csábrágvarbók) is a village and municipality in the Krupina District of the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. The village is best known for the ruins of Čabraď Castle. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1135 (1135 Werbouch, 1262 Werbouk Inferior, 1285 Warabuk, 1342 Werbok). In 1256 King Bela IV established here colonists from Hontianske Nemce. It belonged to the Čabraď Castle and to Hunt family. In the 15th century it began a royal property, and, in 1513 it belonged to the feudatory Tamas Bakóczy. After on, it belonged to Erdődy and Pálffy families. From 1547 to 1549 it passed to noble Melichar Balassa, in 1584 to local family Illésházy and in 1622 to yeomen Koháry. In the 15th century it was besieged by the Bohemian Jiskra. In 1817 it belonged to Coburg family.
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    5 votes
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    Dobšiná

    Dobšiná

    Dobšiná (German: Dobschau; Hungarian: Dobsina; Latin: Dobsinium) is a town in the Slovenské rudohorie mountains (Slovak Ore Mountains) in Slovakia, on the Slaná River, north-west of Košice. It is situated between Revúcka vrchovina and Volovské vrchy in the Carpathians, and lies to the south of the beautiful Stratená valley, watered by the river Hnilec, and enclosed on all sides by mountains. The well-known ice cave Dobšinská Ice Cave (discovered in 1870) can be found in that valley and belongs to the territory of the village. The first written reference to the settlement occurred in 1326; the text mentions that ethnic German mining experts had settled here. It received a town charter in 1417, becoming a major town for the minority of Carpathian Germans. The town was a center of mining (gold, silver, nickel, later iron, cobalt, copper, mercury etc.) and iron processing in the past. In the vicinity are mines of various materials, some of them very ancient. According to the 2001 census, the town had 4,896 inhabitants. 88.58% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 9.01% Roma, 0.63% Hungarians and 0.27% Czechs. The religious make-up was 35.23% Roman Catholics, 33.58% people with no religious
    8.33
    3 votes
    37
    Ružomberok

    Ružomberok

    Ružomberok ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Rosenberg; Hungarian: Rózsahegy; Polish: Rużomberk) is a town in northern Slovakia, in the historical Liptov region. It has a population of around 30,000(45,000 with nearby villages) It is situated at the westernmost reaches of the Sub-Tatra Basin, more exactly its subdivision Liptov Basin, surrounded by the mountain ranges of Chočské vrchy, Greater Fatra and Low Tatras. Rivers flowing through the town are Váh, from east to west, Revúca, a left tributary from the south, on the way to Banská Bystrica and Likavka brook from the north, on the way to Dolný Kubín. The town is located around 65 km from Žilina, 190 km from Košice and 260 km from Bratislava (by road). Besides the main settlement, it also has "city parts" of Biely Potok, Černová, Hrboltová and Vlkolínec. The climate is moderate, varies from hot in summer, to very cold in winter. There are four distinct seasons: spring (wet, moderate warm), summer (hot, very wet), autumn (dry) and winter (very cold). Ružomberok is located in the rain shadow of the mountain ranges of Greater Fatra and Chočské vrchy. Total annual precipitation is 727 mm. Annual average of days with snow cover is
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    Ipeľ

    Ipeľ

    Ipeľ (Slovak) or Ipoly (Hungarian) (German: Eipel, archaic Slovak: Jupoľ ) is a 232 km long river in Slovakia and Hungary, tributary to the river Danube. Its source is in central Slovakia in the Slovenské rudohorie Mountains. It flows south to the Hungarian border, and then southwest, west and again south along the border until it flows into the Danube near Szob. Ipeľ flows through or makes border of Banská Bystrica and Nitra regions in Slovakia, and Nógrád and Pest counties in Hungary.
    6.20
    5 votes
    39
    Zvolen Castle

    Zvolen Castle

    Zvolen Castle (Slovak: Zvolenský zámok or incorrectly Zvolenský hrad, Hungarian: zólyomi vár) is a medieval castle located on a hill near the center of Zvolen, in central Slovakia. The original seat of the region was above the confluence of Slatina and Hron rivers on a steep cliff in a castle from the 12th century, known today as Pustý hrad (meaning "Deserted castle"). Its difficult access had consequence in relocation of the seat to the new-built Zvolen castle, which was ordered by Louis I the Great as a hunting residence of Hungarian kings. The future queen regnant Mary of Hungary and emperor Sigismund celebrated their wedding there in 1385. Gothic architecture of the castle built between 1360 and 1382 was inspired by Italian castles of the fourteenth century. Italian masons also contributed to a Renaissance reconstruction in 1548. The last major reconstruction occurred in 1784, when the chapel was rebuilt into the Baroque style. Zvolen Castle hosts a regional branch of the Slovak National Gallery with an exposition of old European masters, including works by P. P. Rubens, Paolo Veronese, and William Hogarth. There is also a popular tea room located in the castle. Zvolen castle
    6.20
    5 votes
    40
    Becherov

    Becherov

    Becherov is a municipality (village) in Slovakia in the Bardejov Districtin the Prešov Region near the border with Poland. It had 284 inhabitants in 2006 (274 according to the 2001 census, out of which 133 Ruthenians, 82 Slovaks and 45 Ukrainians). It covers an area of 1909 ha. The village features:
    7.00
    4 votes
    41
    Nitra River

    Nitra River

    The Nitra (-Slovak, German: Neutra, Hungarian: Nyitra) is a 197 km long river in western Slovakia. It flows into the Váh river close to its confluence with the Danube in Komárno. Its source is in the Malá Fatra (Lesser Fatra) mountains north of Prievidza. The river Nitra passes through the towns of Bojnice, Topoľčany, Nitra and Nové Zámky.
    7.00
    4 votes
    42
    Nové Zámky

    Nové Zámky

    Nové Zámky ( pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Érsekújvár, German: Neuhäus[e]l, Turkish: Uyvar, Latin: Novum Castrum) is a town in southwestern Slovakia. The town is located on the Danubian Lowland, on the Nitra River, at an altitude of 119 metres. It is located around 100 km from Bratislava and around 25 km from the Hungarian border. It is a road and railway hub of southern Slovakia. The town lies in the temperate zone and has a continental climate. Annual average temperature reaches around 10 °C (50.0 °F), with the warmest month being July with an average of 20 °C (68 °F) and the coldest January with −2 °C (28 °F). Average annual precipitation is 556 mm. The town has a distinguished history. From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. A fortress was built, against the Ottoman Turks, on the site of an older settlement in the years 1573-81. The town developed around the fortress. The huge new fortress was one of the most modern fortresses in Europe when it was built, a prime example of the star fortress which was considered to be adapted to the advance in artillery in the preceding centuries. (In fact, the Hungarian name means
    7.00
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    43
    Vráble

    Vráble

    Vráble is a small town in the Nitra District, Nitra Region, western Slovakia. It is located in the Danubian Hills on the Žitava river, about 20 km south-east-east from Nitra. The cadastral area of the town has an altitude from 140 to 240 m ASL. There's a small dam called Vodná nádrž Vráble west of the town. The town has three parts: Vráble proper, and the former villages of Dyčka and Horný Ohaj (both annexed 1975). The oldest evidence of the settlement of Vráble comes from the Neolithic age (6000-2000 BC). The first written reference is from 1265 as Verebel. In Vráble, there was the oldest post-station. The city kept an agricultural character in the 19th and 20th centuries. Economic development has influenced the architecture of the city. After break-up of Austria-Hungary in 1918, the town became part of Czechoslovakia and received status of the district capital (until 1960). After the First Vienna Award, the town was from 1938 to 1945 part of Hungary. The town had Hungarian majority in the 17th century according to the Turkish tax census. According to the 2001 census, the town had 9,493 inhabitants. 93.32% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 4.69% Hungarians, 0.78% Roma and 0.55% Czechs.
    7.00
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    44
    Ardovo

    Ardovo

    Ardovo (Hungarian: Pelsőcardó) a village and municipality in the Rožňava District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1243. The village lies at an altitude of 138 metres and covers an area of 18.464 km (7.13 sq mi). It has a population of about 835 people. The population is about 99% Slovak in ethnicity. The village has a small public library, a post office, a football pitch and a food store.
    8.00
    3 votes
    45
    Baldovce

    Baldovce

    Baldovce is a village and municipality in Levoča District in the Prešov Region of central-eastern Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1272. The municipality lies at an altitude of 430 metres and covers an area of 2.204 km (0.85 sq mi) . It has a population of about 200 people.
    8.00
    3 votes
    46
    Bytča

    Bytča

    Bytča (Hungarian: Nagybiccse) is a town in northwestern Slovakia. It is located at the Váh river near the cities of Žilina and Považská Bystrica. It belongs to Upper Váh region of tourism. The town arose in 1946 by a merger of the settlements Malá Bytča (including Beňov and Mikšová), Veľká Bytča and Hliník nad Váhom. The first written reference to the town's main part Veľká Bytča dates from 1234 as terra Bycha. The settlement got its town charter in 1378. It was the seat of a feudal dominion and later a town with many craftsmen. In Hungarian, it was known as Biccse. The town features a famous castle built as a water castle in the 13th century and rebuilt in the 16th century in Renaissance style. The town also houses the Wedding Palace from 1601, which is the only building of this kind in Slovakia, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical bourgeoisie houses, an archive, and a museum (in the Wedding Palace). According to the 2001 census, the town had 11,150 inhabitants. 98.27% of inhabitants were Slovaks and 0.58% Czechs. The religious make-up was 90.87% Roman Catholics, 4.35% people with no religious affiliation and 1.51% Lutherans. Today, the town is home to machine (Kinex), textile,
    8.00
    3 votes
    47
    Cinobaňa

    Cinobaňa

    Cinobaňa is a village and municipality in the Poltár District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. It belongs to the largest municipalities in Poltár District, together with Málinec. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1279 as a miner village (1276 Villa Suine, 1342 Schiuina, 1393 Zennabanya, 1460 Zwinyebanya). It belonged to Šommoška Castle. From 1554 to 1594 it was occupied by Turks. Part of Cinobaňa muncipality are also villages Katarínska Huta and Turičky and the settlements Hrnčiarky and Žihľava. In Katarínska Huta was in 1836 glasswork constructed, which was overtaken by Ján Kožuch in 1854. Ján Kožuch established here in 1847 a small steelwork, which was in 1854 overtaken by Kuchyňka family. Both factories still exist, but a part of the larger companies. The village is popular for organising several sport festivals and events.
    8.00
    3 votes
    48
    Prešov Region

    Prešov Region

    The Prešov Region (Slovak: Prešovský kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. It consists of 13 districts. Region was established in 1996, in 1923 it were two separate regions on a present region territory and in 1960 was the region part of a larger region with a center in Košice. The region is the most populous of all regions in Slovakia, however population density is under Slovak average. It is located in north-eastern Slovakia and has an area of 8,975 km². The region has diverse types of landscapes occurring in Slovakia, but mostly highlands and hilly lands dominate the area. The Tatras are located in the north-west, along with its subdivisions, High Tatras and Belianske Tatras, including the highest point of Slovakia - Gerlachovský štít (2,654 ASL). A small part of the Low Tatras reaches into the region. Basins in the western part are Podtatranská kotlina and Hornadská kotlina, and other ranges include Pieniny and Levoča Hills. The central part is composed of the Šarišská vrchovina, Čergov, Ondavská vrchovina, Slanské vrchy and others and the Košice Basin around Prešov. The eastern part is composed of the upper reaches of the Eastern Slovak Lowland, highland
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    Žiar nad Hronom

    Žiar nad Hronom

    Žiar nad Hronom (German: Heiligenkreuz, Hungarian: Garamszentkereszt, until 1920 Svätý Kríž and until 1955 Svätý Kríž nad Hronom) is a town in Banská Bystrica Region, Slovakia. It is located in the Žiar Basin, on the Hron river, around 40 km from Banská Bystrica and 170 km from Bratislava. In addition to the main settlement with in 1969 annexed Horné Opatovce village, the town also has "parts" of Šášovské Podhradie (annexed 1971) The first written record about area was in 1075 in a document of Benedictine abbey in Hronský Beňadik. A settlement with name Cristur was first mentioned in 1237, which became a town in 1246. The town was renamed from Svätý Kríž nad Hronom to its current name in 1955. The main employer is the metallurgy factory company Slovalco, formerly called Závody Slovenského národného povstania ("Slovak National Uprising Works"), built in the 1950s. According to the 2001 census, the town had 19,945 inhabitants. 94.27% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 1.97% Roma, 0.95% Czechs and 0.69% Hungarians. The religious make-up was 62.07% Roman Catholics, 25.54% people with no religious affiliation and 3.19% Lutherans.
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    Humenné

    Humenné

    Humenné ( pronunciation (help·info); Ukrainian: Гуменне; German: Homenau; Hungarian: Homonna) is a town in the Prešov Region ("kraj") in eastern Slovakia and the second largest town of the historic Zemplín region. It lies at the volcanic Vihorlat mountains and at the confluence of the Laborec and Cirocha Rivers. Humenné is a center of one of the easternmost districts ("okres") in Slovakia. Its life is rich in cultural and sports events. The town is a starting point for tourism, because there are numerous opportunities in the picturesque countryside of the East Carpathians, though this field still requires an intensification of business activities and funding. The most attractive places are the Vihorlat Mountains boasting of their Morské oko lake, and the Poloniny (Wooden Carpathians) at the border of Slovakia, Poland, and Ukraine, which are part of the National Park Poloniny. The surroundings of Humenné, with their romantic ruins of medieval castles and an open-air museum of architecture situated in the town park, are a source of knowledge and relaxation. Castles and mansions in the surroundings of Humenné: The Laborec river and the Carpathian mountains predetermined the
    6.75
    4 votes
    51
    Orava

    Orava

    Orava Castle (Slovak: Oravský hrad, German: Arwaburg, Hungarian: Árva vára), is situated on a high rock above Orava river. It is considered to be one of the most beautiful castles in Slovakia. The castle was built in the thirteenth century. Many scenes of the 1922 film Nosferatu were filmed here, although until recently it was thought to have been shot in Transylvania. Orava Castle stands on the site of an old wooden fortification, built after the Tartar invasion of 1241. Its history since then reveals a familiar pattern of construction, destruction, reconstruction, fire, various ownerships and territorial squabbles. The original design was in Romanesque and Gothic style; it was later reconstructed as a Renaissance and Neo-Gothic structure, hugging the shape of the 520-metre spur on which it perches. The mining magnate Thurzo family, who took charge in the mid 16th century, were responsible for a great deal of rebuilding work, although its present form was not finalised until 1611. It burnt down again in 1800, after which the Pálffys occupied the castle. And then, after a period of dilapidation and World War II, the castle became a national monument. The natural rock formation
    6.75
    4 votes
    52
    Sabinov

    Sabinov

    Sabinov (Hungarian: Kisszeben, German: Zeben, Latin: Cibinium) is a small town located in the Prešov Region (north-eastern Slovakia), approximately 20 km from Prešov and 55 km from Košice. The population of Sabinov is 12,378. The first written record about Sabinov is from the year 1248. Sabinov was inhabited only by Slovaks until German settlers came in the middle of the 13th century. In 1299 Sabinov received municipal privileges, and in 1405 it was declared a free royal town by king Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor. In the 15th century Sabinov joined the Pentapolitana, an alliance of five towns of northeastern Kingdom of Hungary (Bardejov, Levoča, Košice, Prešov and Sabinov). The 16th and 17th century was the era of Sabinov's development and economic growth followed by the years of recession. In 1740, an important secondary school was established by the Piarists. The history of Sabinov is very similar to the history of other towns in this region. According to the 1910 census the town had 3288 inhabitants, 1640 Slovaks, 1168 Hungarians, 341 Germans and 120 Romanians. According to the 2001 census, the town had 12,290 inhabitants. 90.62% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 6.40% Roma, 0.48%
    6.75
    4 votes
    53
    Žilina

    Žilina

    Žilina ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Sillein, Hungarian: Zsolna, names in other languages) is a city in north-western Slovakia, around 200 kilometres (120 mi) from the capital Bratislava, close to both the Czech and Polish borders. It is the third largest city of Slovakia with a population of approximately 85,000, an important industrial center, the largest city on the Váh river, and the seat of a kraj (Žilina Region) and of an okres (Žilina District). It belongs to Upper Váh region of tourism. The area around today's Žilina was inhabited in the late Stone Age (about 20,000 BC). In the 5th century Slavs started to move into the area. However, the first written reference to Žilina was in 1208 as terra de Selinan. From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. In the middle of the 13th century terra Sylna was the property of the Cseszneky de Milvány family. The city started to develop around year 1300, and according to records in 1312 it was already a town. In 1321, King Charles I made Žilina a free royal town. On 7 May 1381 King Louis I issued Privilegium pro Slavis which made the Slav inhabitants equal to the Germans by allocating
    6.75
    4 votes
    54
    Rimavská Sobota

    Rimavská Sobota

    Rimavská Sobota ( pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Rimaszombat, German: Großsteffelsdorf) is a town in southern Slovakia, in the Banská Bystrica Region, on the Rimava river. It has 24,374 inhabitants (2006). The town is a historical capital of the Gömör-Kishont county (from 1850 to 1922). It is located around 250 km east of Bratislava and around 100 km from Banská Bystrica. The town, along with the district lies in the Rimava river valley in the Slovenské rudohorie mountains, in the Southern Slovak Basin. There are two protected areas close to the town in the district, Cerová vrchovina to the south and Muránska planina National Park to the north. The town is composed of 11 parts/boroughs: Bakta, Dúžava, Kurinec, Mojín, Nižná Pokoradz, Rimavská Sobota, Sabová, Sobôtka, Včelinec, Vinice and Vyšná Pokoradz. The first traces of settlement in the town's territory come from the Neolithic. Other archaeological discoveries are dated to the middle and late Bronze Age and Iron Age. Several tribes have passed through the area, including Celts, Germanic tribes and several others during the Migration Period. The Slavs have settled here most likely the 7th and 8th centuries. The old
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    2 votes
    55
    Štrbské Pleso

    Štrbské Pleso

    Štrbské Pleso with its large glacial mountain lake is a favorite ski, tourist, and health resort in the High Tatras, Slovakia. With extensive parking facilities and a stop on the Tatra trolley and rack railway, it is a starting point for a host of popular hikes including to Kriváň and Rysy. Štrbské Pleso is part of the municipal lands of the village of Štrba. It was incorporated in the municipality of Vysoké Tatry from 1947 until 2007. The ownership reverted to Štrba on 1 Jan. 2008 when the Supreme Court's decision of 14 Aug. 2007 took effect. Štrbské Pleso comprises the commercial and residential buildings in the vicinity of the glacial lake of Štrbské pleso (spelled with a lower-case p in Slovak) and the nearby small, man-made pond of Nové Štrbské pleso built in 1900. It has about 200 inhabitants. The future resort began to emerge in 1872 when Jozef Szentiványi ("of St. John". 1817-1906, from a noble family with roots in the nearby village of Liptovský Ján, originally: Sv. Ján, "St. ohn") built a hunting lodge on the banks of Štrbské pleso. Access to the High Tatras was made easier the year before when the railroad reached Poprad in their foothills. Szentiványi rented the lot
    9.00
    2 votes
    56
    Bottovo

    Bottovo

    Bottovo is a village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In the village is gym hall, foodstuff store, public library and a football pitch.
    7.67
    3 votes
    57
    Kežmarok

    Kežmarok

    Kežmarok (German: Kesmark/Käsmark, Hungarian: Késmárk, Polish: Kieżmark, Latin: Kesmarkium) is a town in the Spiš region of eastern Slovakia (population 17,000), on the Poprad River. Settlement at Kežmarok dates back to the Upper Stone Age. In the 13th century the region contained a community of Saxons, a Slovak fishing village, a Hungarian border post and a Carpathian German settlement. Its Latin name was first mentioned in 1251 as Villa (Saxonum apud Ecclesiam) Sancte Elisabeth. In 1269 Kežmarok received its town charter. It also had the right to organize a cheese market (hence the German name Kesmark ("Käsemarkt" - "cheese market"). The terms Nobilissimus (most noble) and nobilissima familia (most noble family) have been used since the 11th century for the King of Hungary and his family, but it were then only a few, among them also Job Zabroczky de Kesmark in the year 1340, which were mentioned in official documents as such. In 1433 the town was severely damaged by a Hussite raid. After 1440, the count of Spiš had a seat in Kežmarok. In the 15th century (and then once more in 1655), Kežmarok became a free royal town. The town was a stronghold of the noble Thököly family. The
    7.67
    3 votes
    58
    Košice

    Košice

    Košice (Slovak pronunciation: [ˈkɔʃɪt͡sɛ] ( listen), German: Kaschau, Hungarian: Kassa, Hungarian pronunciation: [’kɒʃːɒ] ( listen)) is a city in eastern Slovakia. It is situated on the river Hornád at the eastern reaches of the Slovak Ore Mountains, near the border with Hungary. With a population of approximately 240,000, Košice is the second largest city in Slovakia after the capital Bratislava. Being the economic and cultural center of eastern Slovakia, Košice is the seat of the Košice Region and Košice Self-governing Region, the Slovak Constitutional Court, three universities, various dioceses, and many museums, galleries, and theaters. Košice is an important industrial center of Slovakia, and it accounts for about 9% of the country's GDP. The U.S. Steel Košice steel mill is the biggest employer in the region. The town has good railway connections and an international airport. The city has a well preserved historical center, which is the largest among Slovak towns. There are many heritage protected buildings in Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, and Art Nouveau styles with Slovakia's largest church: the St. Elisabeth Cathedral. The long main street, rimmed with aristocratic palaces,
    7.67
    3 votes
    59
    Kremnica

    Kremnica

    Kremnica ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Kremnitz, Hungarian: Körmöcbánya) is a town in central Slovakia. It has some 5,700 inhabitants. The well-preserved medieval town built above important gold mines is the site of the oldest still-working mint in the world. Kremnica was among the major mining towns of the world during the Middle Ages and in Modern Times due to the abundant gold ore deposits in the Kremnica Mountains. However, the first evidence of sub-surface mining activities comes from the 9th century. In the 13th century the inhabitants of this area were affected by the invasion of the Mongols. Following that difficult period, Hungarian kings invited new colonists from Germany to settle in the region to help replenish the decimated population. They went on to restore the mining activities in the town. The first written reference to the town dates back to 1328, when it was granted royal town privileges by King Charles I of Hungary. The town's mint was already in existence at the time of the granting of royal privileges. Starting in 1335 the mint produced golden florins and later the famous "Kremnica ducats", which were used as an international means of payment as a
    7.67
    3 votes
    60
    Štúrovo

    Štúrovo

    Štúrovo (Hungarian: Párkány, German: Gockern, Turkish: Ciğerdelen) is a town in Slovakia, situated on the River Danube. Its population in 2005 was 11,172. The town is situated opposite the Hungarian city of Esztergom. The Mária Valéria bridge connects the settlements. The bridge was destroyed in 1944 during World War II, but reconstructed in 2001. For centuries, until 1920 when northern Hungary was annexed to a newly formed Czechoslovakia following the Treaty of Trianon which cost Hungary 2/3 of its territory and created a large ethnic Hungarian community in Slovakia and in the new countries that border present-day Hungary, the town was named Párkány. Later, until 1948, the town was known as Parkan in Slovak. It was given its current name after World War II and is named after the 19th century Slovak national leader, Ľudovít Štúr. Despite the Benes Decrees and other anti-Hungarian pograms, the town remains majority Hungarian and there was an attempt to return the old name in a 1991 referendum; however, the government refused to rename the town. The town was inhabited in the prehistoric ages, thanks to its favourable location. At one time, it was an important river crossing, and part
    7.67
    3 votes
    61
    Bardejov

    Bardejov

    Bardejov ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Bartfeld, Hungarian: Bártfa, Polish: Bardiów) is a town in North-Eastern Slovakia. It is situated in the Šariš region on a floodplain terrace of the Topľa River, in in the hills of the Beskyd Mountains. It exhibits numerous cultural monuments in its completely intact medieval town center. The town is one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites and currently maintains a populations of about 30,000 inhabitants. The name of the town comes from the Hungarian word "bárd" (English: "chopper"), which indicated an amount of forested territory which could be chopped down by one man in one day. In the Hungarian name (Bártfa), the "fa" (English: "tree") suffix came later, and it also changed the last letter of "bárd" to "bárt", for easier pronunciation. The territory of present-day Bardejov has attracted settlers since the Stone Age. Traces of human settlements in Bardejov can be traced back to around 20,000 B.C. However, the first written reference to the town dates back to the 1247, when monks from Bardejov complained to Béla IV about a violation of the town’s borders by Prešov, a neighboring city. Mention of German settlers coming up from Prešov is
    10.00
    1 votes
    62
    Belina

    Belina

    Belina (before 1948 Beňa, Biena; Hungarian: Béna) is a village and municipality in the Lučenec District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1371 (Bezin). The territory of the village however was first mentioned as terra Baldun in 1240. In 1371, it belonged to the knight Ratold, in the 15th century to the noble family Derencsény and in the late 16th century to the Lorántfy family.
    10.00
    1 votes
    63
    Blatnica

    Blatnica

    Blatnica (1927–1946 Turčianska Blatnica) is a village and municipality in the Turiec region of Slovakia. Administratively it is a part of the Martin District in the Žilina Region. The village is situated under the Greater Fatra Range, at the opening of the spectacular karst Gader and Blatnica valleys. The ruins of the Blatnica Castle lie on a low ridge over the village. Blatnica is an important archaeological site, where Slavic tumuli with many precious artifacts (such as the famous Blatnica Sword) from the 8th and 9th centuries have been found. The site gave name to the Blatnica-Mikulčice Horizon archaeological culture. The first written mention stems from 1230, however, the castle was built at the end of the 13th century. The first Slovak female botanist Izabela Textorisová lived in Blatnica and her rich herbarium contains plants of the nearby Tlstá mountain. Both Textorisová's house and a museum dedicated to the ethnographer, filmmaker, and photographer Karol Plicka are open to the public. Other places of interest include two manor houses from the 18th century, a classicist Lutheran church and many well-preserved rural houses. Blatnica has a population of 881 (as of December 31,
    10.00
    1 votes
    64
    Šahy

    Šahy

    Šahy (until 1927 "Ipolské Šiahy", Hungarian: Ipolyság, rarely German: Eipelschlag) is a town in southern Slovakia, The town has an ethnic Hungarian majority and its population is 7,971 people (2005), with an average age of 42.5. It is located at the eastern reaches of the Danubian Lowland on the river Ipeľ at the Hungarian border, on the E77 road from Budapest to Kraków. Besides the main settlement, it also has two "boroughs" of Preseľany nad Ipľom (4 km (2.49 mi) west of centre, annexed 1980) and Tešmák (3 km (1.86 mi) east of centre, annexed 1986). From 1980 to 1996 it also had now independent village of Hrkovce. The first written mention is from 1237 in a document of King Béla IV under name Saag. It got character of a small town in the 14th century. It was part of Ottoman Empire between 1541–1595 and 1605–1685 and was known as "Şefradi". It was also sanjak centre in Uyvar eyalet between 1663-1685. Before break-up of Austria-Hungary in 1918/1920 and incorporation into Czechoslovakia, it was part of the Hont County, and was from 1806 its capital. It was part of Hungary from 1938 to 1945 as a result of the First Vienna Award. According to the 2001 census, the town had 8,061
    10.00
    1 votes
    65
    Šaľa

    Šaľa

    Šaľa ( pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Vágsellye, German: Schelle) is a town in south-western Slovakia. The town is located on the Danubian Lowland, on both banks of the Váh River, around 65 km from Bratislava and 30 km from Nové Zámky. Except the town itself, it has also the borough of Veča on the left bank of the river and settlements of Hetméň and Kilič. The town lies in the warm climatic zone. The town was first mentioned in 1002 in a document of Pannonhalma abbey. It was promoted in 1536 into a market town. It was also ruled by Ottomans between 1663 and 1686 as part of Uyvar Eyalet. The railway, built in 1850 between Vienna and Budapest speeded development. After 1918, the town was part of Czechoslovakia, belonging for a short time between 1938 and 1945 to Hungary before being returned to Czechoslovakia. According to the 2011 census, the town had 23.554 inhabitants. 69% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 12% Hungarians,and 19% others nationality. According to the 2001 census, the town had 24,564 inhabitants. 79.72% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 17.88% Hungarians, 0.48% Czechs and 0.40% Roma. The religious make-up was 66.63% Roman Catholics, 23.62% people with no religious
    10.00
    1 votes
    66
    Svätý Anton

    Svätý Anton

    Svätý Anton (translation: St. Anthony) is a village in Banská Štiavnica District in the Banská Bystrica Region of central Slovakia. It is situated near the historic town of Banská Štiavnica. During the period of Communist Czechoslovakia, the village had to use a "non-religious" name Antol. The first mention of Svätý Anton in written sources is dated to 1266, when the village was owned by the Hunt family of the Čabraď Castle. The last private owner was Ferdinand I of Bulgaria. The manor house was originally built in baroque style as a two-wing building with arcades surrounding an open courtyard with a baroque stone fountain. In the middle of 18th century, Earl Andrej Kohary completed the process of re-building the manor house into a wealthy four-wing noble residence. The Kohary and Coburg families made an essential contribution in the history of the manor house. Here, they concentrated beautiful pieces of artwork and crafts from various parts of the world (18th – 20th centuries). The manor house has served the purpose of a museum since 1962; currently it is a museum of art, history and hunting. A park that melts into a forest is part of the manor house estate. Currently, remnants of
    10.00
    1 votes
    67
    Bulhary

    Bulhary

    Bulhary (Hungarian: Bolgárom) is a village and municipality in the Lučenec District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1435 (Bolgarom), it is however much older. In the early 16th century it belonged to Filakovo town and afterwards to the landowners Bebek, Serény, Balassa, and Vécsey. From 1554 to 1595 was occupied by Turks. Then it passed to the families Török, Révay, Berchtold and Coburg. From 1939 to 1944 it belonged to Hungary under the First Vienna Award.
    6.50
    4 votes
    68
    Modra

    Modra

    Modra (-Slovak, German: Modern, Hungarian: Modor, Latin: Modur) is a city and municipality in the Bratislava Region in Slovakia. It has a population of 8,704 as of 2005. It nestles in the foothills of the Malé Karpaty (Little Carpathian mountains) and is an excellent centre of hiking. Modra is famous for its pottery industry. Its blue-and-white porcelain is famous throughout Slovakia. It is also known as one of the most important viticulture centres in the Little Carpathians region. Besides the main town, there are also other adjacent settlements incorporated in the municipality: former vassalage viticulture village Kráľová and two recreational hamlets of Harmónia and Piesok (also known as Zochova Chata), both located in the woods of Little Carpathians mountains. The first traces of habitation go back into the 3rd millennium BCE and the first permanent habitation comes from the time of Great Moravia, when the Slavs were living there. The first mention about Modra was in 1158 in a document of the Géza II of Hungary, when it belonged to the bishop of Nitra. After the Mongol invasion of 1241 the settlement was reconstructed by the German colonists. The first mention about vineyards
    6.50
    4 votes
    69
    Petržalka

    Petržalka

    Petržalka (German: Engerau / Audorf; Hungarian: Pozsonyligetfalu) is the largest borough of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia. Situated on the right bank of the river Danube, it is home to approximately 150,000 people. Historical records of Petržalka exist from 1225. The settlement was originally inhabited by Pecheneg mercenaries on guard duty. The name Petržalka first appeared in the 1920s and refers to vegetables and herbs that were grown there (peteršílj means "parsley"). The older German name is Engerau or Ungerau. The Hungarian name is Pozsonyligetfalu, short form Ligetfalu. Petržalka is divided into three official parts, Dvory, Lúky and Háje, and further into unofficial parts, Ovsište, Janíkov dvor, Kopčany, Zrkadlový háj, Starý háj, and Kapitulský dvor. As of 2008, Petržalka is connected to Bratislava by five bridges. It is the most densely populated residential district in Central Europe. Petržalka is primarily a residential area, with most people living in blocks of flats called paneláks, a neologism for buildings built from concrete panels joined together to form the structure, which were widely deployed throughout the Eastern Bloc during the communist era. As the
    6.50
    4 votes
    70
    Romania

    Romania

    Romania (/roʊˈmeɪniə/ roh-MAY-nee-ə; dated: Roumania; or Rumania; Romanian: România [romɨˈni.a] ( listen)) is a country located at the intersection of Central and Southeastern Europe, bordering on the Black Sea. Romania shares a border with Hungary and Serbia to the west, Ukraine and Moldova to the northeast and east, and Bulgaria to the south. At 238,400 square kilometers (92,000 sq mi), Romania is the ninth largest country of the European Union by area, and has the seventh largest population of the European Union with over 19 million people. Its capital and largest city is Bucharest, the tenth largest city in the EU, with a population of around two million. The United Principalities emerged when the principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia were united under Prince Alexander Ioan Cuza in 1859. In 1881, Carol I of Romania was crowned, forming the Kingdom of Romania. Independence from the Ottoman Empire was declared on 9 May 1877, and was internationally recognized the following year. At the end of World War I, Transylvania, Bukovina and Bessarabia united with the Kingdom of Romania. Greater Romania emerged into an era of progression and prosperity that would continue until the eve
    6.50
    4 votes
    71
    Svit

    Svit

    Svit is a small town and municipality in Poprad District in the Prešov Region in northern Slovakia. It lies 8 km (5 mi) west of the city of Poprad, at the foothills of the High Tatras. Svit is one of the youngest Slovak towns. It was established in 1934 by business industrialist Jan Antonín Baťa of Zlín, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic) through his organization Baťa a.s., Zlin in accordance with his policy of setting up villages around the country for his workers. As a boy, Jan Baťa saw the poverty and sickness of his fellow countrymen. He wanted to change this by creating cities full of the most modern factories and filled with the best (and happiest) workers in Europe. The Baťa System under Jan's administration brought propserity first to Moravia, and later Slovakia and Bohemia. It was Jan's policy for full employment that drove him to create each Baťa town for a different purpose: Shoes, Rubber and Tires, Textiles, Airplanes, Chemicals, Plastics, Media, Stockings, Leather, Machinery. Jan Baťa's business were all successful, as he had planned and have brought prosperity to the whole country until this day. When the Second World war came, Jan's policy was to secretly fund the
    6.50
    4 votes
    72
    Trstená

    Trstená

    Trstená (Hungarian Trsztena; Polish Trzciana; Middle German B[r]ingenstadt) is a city in Tvrdošín District, Žilina Region, central Slovakia. It was first mentioned historically in 1371. It is a town that is nestled along the Orava River in the Slovak region of Orava. Trstená lies only a few kilometres from the Polish border. The Tatra Mountains loom to the east over rolling hills of open fields bordered by dense forests. The town lies on a road that leads directly to Poland and has a steady flow of semi-trucks from all over Europe. A major employer of Trstená is the Matsushita Corporation. They manufacture components for Panasonic in a new state-of-the-art facility. Trstená had suffered some damage during the Second World War from the approaching Russians who shelled the town before taking it from the Germans. The town had a Jewish Community before the War which is no longer present. The only remaining signs of their existence are an overgrown Jewish cemetery outside of Trstená, and an old Synagogue that is now a shoe store. The town has enjoyed an economic surge since cross-border commerce has picked up with Slovakia and Poland both becoming members in the European
    5.60
    5 votes
    73
    Chopok

    Chopok

    Chopok (2,024 m) is the third highest peak of the Low Tatra range (just after the neighboring Ďumbier and Štiavnica mountains) in central Slovakia. The peak offers a panoramatic view of High Tatra, Liptov and the valley of Hron. There is a chalet (called Kamenná chata) located near the summit. Chopok is situated on the E8 European walking route, between the Ďumbier and Dereše peaks. In addition to this east-west trail, the mountain can be also reached following the hiking trails either from the north (from the Demänovská Dolina valley) or from the south (from the bus stops Trangoška and Srdiečko). The highest points accessible by a chair lift are Chopok úboč (1834 m) on the northern slope and Kosodrevina (1494 m) on the southern slope. The average temperature is -1°C (30°F), with the highest temperature recorded 18°C (66°F) and the lowest recorded temperature -27°C (-18°F). The average temperature in January is -8°C (17°F) and in July 6°C (44°F). Chopok is the windiest place with a weather station in Slovakia. The northern and southern slopes rank among the best skiing terrains in Slovakia. There are three ski areas on the northern slope, with 21 km of prepared skiing tracks, a
    8.50
    2 votes
    74
    Ábelová

    Ábelová

    Ábelová (earlier also Abelová, Jabelová; Hungarian: Ábelfalva, before 1907 Abellehota, before 1873 Abelova) is a village and municipality in the Lučenec District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. The village arose in the early 13th century. In historical records, it was first mentioned in 1275 (Abelfeuld). It belonged to Halič and until the 16th century partly also to Divín. °http://www.e-obce.sk/obec/abelova/abelova.html
    7.33
    3 votes
    75
    Alekšince

    Alekšince

    Alekšince is a village and municipality in the Nitra District in western Slovakia, in the Nitra Region. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1156. The village lies at an altitude of 160 metres and covers an area of 15.072 km (6 sq mi). It has a population of 1689 people. The village is approximately 98% Slovak. The village has a public library, a gym, and a football pitch.
    7.33
    3 votes
    76
    Baloň

    Baloň

    Baloň (Hungarian: Balony, Hungarian pronunciation:[’bɒloɲ]) is a village and municipality in the Dunajská Streda District in the Trnava Region of south-west Slovakia. The municipality lies at an altitude of 111 metres (364 ft) and covers an area of 16.073 km (6.206 sq mi). It has a population of about 756 people. In the 9th century, the territory of Baloň became part of the Kingdom of Hungary. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1252. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovak troops occupied the area, later acknowledged internationally by the Treaty of Trianon. Between 1938 and 1945 Baloň once more became part of Miklós Horthy's Hungary through the First Vienna Award. From 1945 until the Velvet Divorce, it was part of Czechoslovakia. Since then it has been part of Slovakia.
    7.33
    3 votes
    77
    Boľ

    Boľ

    Boľ (Hungarian: Boly) is a village and municipality in the Trebišov District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia.
    7.33
    3 votes
    78
    Boľkovce

    Boľkovce

    Boľkovce (before 1948 also Bolyk; Hungarian: (Ipoly) bolyk ) is a village and municipality in the Lučenec District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1320 and 1435 as Bolk (1467 Bwlyk, 1481 Bolyk). In 1481, it belonged to Divín Castle lords and later on to the Somoskő lords. In the mid-16th century it was occupied and destroyed by the Ottoman Turks, from 1938 to 1945 by Hungary.
    7.33
    3 votes
    79
    Dolná Krupá

    Dolná Krupá

    Dolná Krupá is a village and municipality of Trnava District in the Trnava region of Slovakia. It is located in the Danubian Hills at around 12 km from the city of Trnava. The important sights in the village are: The Dolná Krupá mansion was one of the residences of the Chotek family. It was the place of the Dolná Krupá rosarium created by countess Marie Henrieta Chotek.
    7.33
    3 votes
    80
    Partizánske

    Partizánske

    Partizánske ( pronunciation (help·info); meaning approximately partisan town, formerly: Baťovany) is a town in Trenčín Region, Slovakia. It is located in the northern part of the Danubian Hills around 55 km (34.18 mi) from Nitra, on the Nitra River, near the Tribeč mountains. Partizánske is a relatively young town. Its history starts in 1938–1939, when Jan Antonin Bata of Zlin Czech Republic and his powerful network of companies built a shoe factory in the cadastral area of Šimonovany municipality. The newly created settlement for workers carried the name of Baťovany and was part of Šimonovany. With the growth of the factory, so grew the settlement. The whole municipality was renamed to Baťovany in 1948 and given town status. As a sign of recognition of local inhabitants fighting in the Slovak National Uprising, the town was renamed Partizánske on 9 February 1949. The factory was renamed by communists to Závody 29. augusta (29 August works) and it produced 30 million pairs of shoes and employed around 10,000 people. However, after a failed privatisation in the 1990s, only fraction is left now. According to the 2001 census, the town had 24,907 inhabitants. 97.71% of inhabitants were
    7.33
    3 votes
    81
    Poprad

    Poprad

    Poprad ( pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Poprád, German: Deutschendorf) is a city in northern Slovakia at the foot of the High Tatra Mountains famous for its picturesque historic centre and as a holiday resort. It is the biggest town of the Spiš region and the tenth largest city in Slovakia with a population of approximately 55,000. The Poprad-Tatry Airport is an international airport located just outside the city. Poprad is also the starting point of the Tatra Electric Railway (known in Slovak as Tatranská elektrická železnica), a set of special narrow-gauge trains (trams) connecting the resorts in the High Tatras with each other and with Poprad. Main line trains link Poprad to other destinations in Slovakia and beyond; in particular, there are through trains running from Poprad to Prague in the Czech Republic. The territory belonged to the Kingdom of Hungary since the 10th century and was probably originally inhabited by Slavic settlers. It was colonized in the 13th century by German settlers and became the largely German town Deutschendorf meaning 'Germans' village'. From 1412 to 1770, as one of the Szepes towns, Poprad was pawned by the Kingdom of Hungary to the Kingdom
    7.33
    3 votes
    82
    České Brezovo

    České Brezovo

    České Brezovo (Cžeska Brezowa in 1773) is a village and municipality in the Poltár District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was surely mentioned in 1435 (Brezow, Bryzow), but the existence of the village in the area is recorded from 1334 as belonging to Zach, Bošňák and Szentivány families. In 1834 Juraj Zahn based a glasswork in Zlatno settlement. In České Brezovo was born Bohuslav Tablic, one of the leaders of Slovak classicism. Village commemorates him with a memory plaque on a public library.
    6.25
    4 votes
    83
    Prievidza

    Prievidza

    Prievidza ( pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Privigye, German: Priwitz) is a city in the central-western Slovakia. With 49,400 inhabitants it is one of the biggest municipalities in the Trenčín Region. Prievidza is a centre for many institutions of regional importance - governmental as well as commercial. It is commonly called the "green city". The most prominent sporting clubs include the BC Prievidza (basketball; last champion of Czechoslovakia before separation and later champion of Slovakia); of certain notoriety are also Prievidza Football Club and the ice hockey Club, both of which compete in the appropriate second national leagues. Prievidza has 6 boroughs: Staré mesto (Old Town in English), Píly, Necpaly, Kopanice, Zápotôčky and Žabník and there are three adjoining villages that are an administrative part of Prievidza: Hradec, Malá Lehôtka and Veľká Lehôtka. The city was first mentioned in 1113 as Preuigan. It was promoted to a royal free town in 1383. Since the 16th century, craftsmanship was developing in Prievidza. From the 16th to the first third of the 17th century, the Thurzo family controlled the town. Ottomans approached Prievidza from the south and burned it
    6.25
    4 votes
    84
    Slovakia

    Slovakia

    The Slovak Republic (short form: Slovakia /sloʊˈvɑːkiə/ or /sləˈvækiə/; Slovak:  Slovensko (help·info), long form  Slovenská republika (help·info)) is a landlocked state in Central Europe. It has a population of over five million and an area of about 49,000 square kilometres (19,000 sq mi). Slovakia is bordered by the Czech Republic and Austria to the west, Poland to the north, Ukraine to the east and Hungary to the south. The largest city is the capital, Bratislava, and the second largest is Košice. Slovakia is a member state of the European Union, NATO, United Nations, OECD and WTO among others. The official language is Slovak, a member of the Slavic language family. The Slavs arrived in the territory of present-day Slovakia in the 5th and 6th centuries during the migration period. In the course of history, various parts of today's Slovakia belonged to Samo's Empire (the first known political unit of Slavs), Principality of Nitra (as independent polity, as part of Great Moravia and as part of Hungarian Kingdom), Great Moravia, Kingdom of Hungary, the Austro-Hungarian Empire or Habsburg Empire, and Czechoslovakia. A separate Slovak state briefly existed during World War II, during
    6.25
    4 votes
    85
    Boheľov

    Boheľov

    Boheľov (Hungarian: Bögellő, Hungarian pronunciation:[’bøɡɛlløː]) is a village and municipality in the Dunajská Streda District in the Trnava Region of south-west Slovakia. In the 9th century, the territory of Boheľov became part of the Kingdom of Hungary. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovak troops occupied the area, later acknowledged internationally by the Treaty of Trianon. Between 1938 and 1945 Boheľov once more became part of Miklós Horthy's Hungary through the First Vienna Award. From 1945 until the Velvet Divorce, it was part of Czechoslovakia. Since then it has been part of Slovakia.
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    Čerenčany

    Čerenčany

    Čerenčany (earlier Cšerencšány, is a village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of southern Slovakia. During the past years the village recorded population growth and new houses and condominiums were built. The village is becoming a satellite village of Rimavská Sobota. Most important sightseeing is classical evangelical church from 1831.
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    Dolný Kubín

    Dolný Kubín

    Dolný Kubín ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Unterkubin, Hungarian: Alsókubin) is a town in northern Slovakia in the Žilina Region. It is the historical capital of the Orava region. Dolný Kubín lies at an altitude of 468 metres (1,535 ft) above sea level and covers an area of 55.055 square kilometres (21.3 sq mi). It is located in northern Slovakia on the Orava River, between the Lesser Fatra, Oravská Magura and Chočské vrchy mountains. It is located around 15 km (9.32 mi) from Ružomberok, 45 km (27.96 mi) from the Polish border and 270 km (167.77 mi) from Bratislava. The town is composed of 10 boroughs: Banisko, Beňova Lehota, Brezovec, Kňažia, Malý Bysterec, Medzihradné, Mokraď, Staré mesto, Veľký Bysterec and Záskalie. The first written reference of the town of Dolný Kubín dates from 1314. It was founded in the 14th century and initially belonged to the Orava Domain. It was granted town privileges (town status, town charter) in 1632, and its importance was further strengthened in 1633 when the town was granted the right to hold markets. In 1683 the town became the seat of the Orava county and in 1776 also the seat of a processus district. In the 19th century Dolný Kubín was
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    Kolárovo

    Kolárovo

    Kolárovo (before 1948: Guta; Hungarian: Gúta or earlier Guta) is a town in the south of Slovakia near the town of Komárno. It is an agricultural center with 11,000 inhabitants. The town of Kolárovo is located in the Podunajská nížina (Danubian Lowland) at the confluence of the Váh and Little Danube Rivers. The western part of the plane land is on Žitný ostrov, the medium part on boggy flats of the Little Danube, Váh, and Váh Danube Rivers, the eastern part with many old shoulders and inland embankments at the flat of the Váh and Nitra Rivers. The town comprises 6 neighborhoods: center, Částa (Császta), Kráľka (Királyrét), Veľký Ostrov (Nagysziget), Örtény and Pačérok (Pacsérok). About 11,000 inhabitants live between the dams at the Little Danube, of whom 82.6% are of Hungarian ethnicity, 16% of Slovak ethnicity, and the rest 1.4% of other ethnicities. Kolárovo belongs to the largest towns of the lower part of the Žitný ostrov. The village was mentioned for the first time in 1268 and during its existence it has changed its name several times (Old Guta, Big Guta, Little Guta). According to a local tradition, the Árpáds populated the surrounding abandoned villages by the Iazyges from
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    89
    Prešov

    Prešov

    Prešov ( pronunciation (help·info) is a city in eastern Slovakia. It is the seat of the administrative Prešov Region (Slovak: Prešovský kraj). With a population of approximately 91,000, it is the third-largest city in the country. Historically, the city has been known in German as Eperies (between 1938 and 1945 also Preschau), Eperjes in Hungarian, Fragopolis in Latin, Preszów in Polish, Peryeshis in Romany, Пряшев (Pryashev) in Russian and Пряшів (Priashiv) in Rusyn and Ukrainian. The city is a showcase of Baroque, Rococo and Gothic architecture. In the historical center, the main street is lined with churches and other buildings built in these styles. In the suburbs, however, the Soviet influence is clearly evident through the massive concrete panel buildings (paneláky) of the housing estates (sídliska) and the Sekčov district. More Soviet-style architecture is seen in the government buildings near the city center. Significant industries in the city include mechanical and electrical engineering companies and the clothing industry. Solivary, the only salt mining and processing company in Slovakia, also operates in the city. The city is a seat of a Greek Catholic metropolitan see.
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    90
    Šamorín

    Šamorín

    Šamorín (Hungarian: Somorja, German: Sommerein) is a small town in western Slovakia, southeast of Bratislava. The town is located on the Danubian Flat at the Žitný ostrov island, near the Gabčíkovo dam on the Danube. It is located around 17 km southeast of Bratislava and 25 km west of Dunajská Streda. Administratively, the town belongs to the Trnava Region, Dunajská Streda District. In the 9th century, the territory of Šamorín became part of the Kingdom of Hungary. The town was mentioned for the first time in 1238 as ecclesia Sancte Mariae and was a prominent port on the Danube during the Middle Ages. Agriculture also played a major role in the town's development. As a result of this prosperity, its citizens enjoyed a brisk trade in the new technologies and many shipyards on the Danube. However, with rise of Pressburg (now Bratislava), the importance of the town began declining. Šamorín eventually lost its right to the status of royal free city granted in 1405 during the reign of King Sigismund. In the sixteenth century, the city became notable again because of the witch trials held there. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovak troops occupied
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    91
    Sereď

    Sereď

    Sereď (Hungarian: Szered, Hungarian pronunciation:[’sɛrɛd]) is a town in southern Slovak Republic near Trnava, on the right bank of the Váh River on the Danubian Lowland. It has аpproximately 17,000 inhabitants. It has a hotel, cinema, culture house, many restaurants and confectioner's shops. Sereď lies at an altitude of 129 metres (423 ft) above sea level and covers an area of 30.454 square kilometres (11.8 sq mi). It is located in the Danubian Lowland on the Váh river, around 20 kilometres (12 mi) south-east of Trnava, 33 kilometres (21 mi) west of Nitra and around 55 kilometres (34 mi) east from Bratislava. The closest mountain ranges are the Little Carpathians to the west and Považský Inovec to the north. The town was first mentioned in 1313 as Zereth. In the Middle Ages, it lay on the trade route called "Bohemian Road" which ran from Buda to Prague on the right bank of the Váh river. Thanks to its location, livestock and grain markets were held in the town and thousands of cattle moved through the town each year. Its commercial importance ended in 1846, when the Pozsony-Nagyszombat (now: Bratislava-Trnava) railway was built. However, the Seredian market tradition survived and
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    92
    Tisovec

    Tisovec

    Tisovec (German: Theissholz, Latin: Taxovia) is a town in central Slovakia. Its current population is approximately 4,000. Tisovec is situated in the valley of the river Rimava, at the foots of the Muránska planina plateau. The landscape there gives the impression of a small town in the mountains. Some other towns close to it are Brezno, Hnúšťa and Revúca. The first settlement in the area dates all the way to the Bronze Age. The first written evidence of the town comes from the year 1334 during the reign of King Charles I of Hungary as Tizolc. The name "Tisovec" comes from the yew tree (in Slovak "tis"), which can be found in the hills around the town. Tisovec received its charter as a town at the end of the 15th century. The development of the town was halted by raids of the Ottoman Turks in the 16th and 17th centuries. The town's renaissance came in 1780, when Maria Theresia renewed its market privileges. According to the 2001 census, the town had 4,215 inhabitants. 95.75% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 2.87% Roma, 0.78% Czechs and 0.43% Hungarians. The religious makeup was 34.59% people with no religious affiliation, 32.91% Lutherans and 29.54% Roman Catholics. Nowadays, there are
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    Bellova Ves

    Bellova Ves

    Bellova Ves (Hungarian: Vitény, Hungarian pronunciation:[’viteːɲ]) is a village and municipality in the Dunajská Streda District in the Trnava Region of south-west Slovakia. Census 2011: 229 inhabitants 122 slovaks, 56 hungarians and 51 others nationality The municipality lies at an altitude of 119 metres and covers an area of 6.929 km². The village has food shop and a public library.
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    Hnilec River

    Hnilec River

    The Hnilec (Hungarian: Gölnic), German: Göllnitz) is a river in Slovakia. Its source is located below the Kráľova hola hill. It flows into the Hornád river near Margecany. The Palcmanská Maša dam is located on the river near Dobšiná. Places of interest along the river include the Dobšinská Ice Cave and the Slovak Paradise.
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    Váh

    Váh

    The Váh (German: Waag; Hungarian: Vág; Polish: Wag) is the longest river in Slovakia. A left tributary of the Danube river, the Váh is 406 km long, including its Čierny Váh branch. Its two sources, the Biely Váh (White Váh) and the Čierny Váh (Black Váh), are located in the High Tatras and Low Tatra mountains, respectively, and it flows over northern and western Slovakia and finally feeds into the Danube near Komárno. The left tributaries are Demänovka, Revúca, Ľubochnianka, Turiec, Rajčanka and Nitra rivers, and the right tributaries are Belá, Orava, Varínka, Kysuca, Biela voda, Vlára, Dubová, Dudváh and Malý Dunaj rivers. In late medieval time it was a property of Stibor of Stiboricz and his son Stibor of Beckov of the Clan of Ostoja. It includes canals, artificial dams (Čierny Váh, Liptovská Mara, Bešeňová, Krpeľany, Žilina, Hričov, Nosice, Sĺňava, Madunice, Kráľová and Selice) and 16 hydropower stations, whose construction started in the 1930s and increased after World War II. The main Slovak limited-access motorway is situated along the Váh (Bratislava - Trenčín - Považská Bystrica - Žilina and Ružomberok - Poprad), as well as the main railway Bratislava - Žilina -
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    Bajany

    Bajany

    Bajany (1370 Bajanhaza, 1439 Bayan, 1556 Rejdowa, 1786 Bonyesty, 1686 Resdowa) (German: Wajon; Hungarian: Bajánháza) is a village and municipality in the Michalovce District in the Košice Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1370.From 1939 to 1944 it belonged to Hungary. The village lies at an altitude of 107 metres and covers an area of 5.546 km (2.14 sq mi). It has a population of about 495 people.
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    Breziny

    Breziny

    Breziny is a village and municipality of the Zvolen District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia
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    Leopoldov

    Leopoldov

    Leopoldov (before 1948 Mestečko; German: Leopold-Neustadtl; Hungarian: Lipótvár) is a town in the Trnava Region of Slovakia, near the Váh river. It has a population of 4,083. The city is the location of Leopoldov Prison a high-security correctional institution. The town was founded in 1664-1669 as a fortress against the Ottoman Turks on the initiative of Emperor Leopold I (hence the name). It was granted town status in 1669. The fortress has served as a state prison since 1855. A village called "Leopold" (German also: Leopoldstadt, Hungarian since 1873: Lipótvár) was made part of Leopoldov in 1882. In modern Slovakia, Leopoldov is an important transfer point of railway tracks. Leopoldov was founded on fields of old villages of Červeník (former 'Verešvár') and Šulekovo (former Beregsek).
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    Poprad River

    Poprad River

    The Poprad (Hungarian: Poprád, German: Popper) is a river in northern Slovakia and southern Poland, and a tributary of the Dunajec River near Stary Sącz, Poland. It has a length of 170 kilometres (63 km of which, are within the Polish borders, making it Poland's 22nd longest river) and a basin area of 2,077 km², (1,594 km² of which is in Slovakia, and 483 km² in Poland). Much of the Polish part of its basin is included in the protected area called Poprad Landscape Park featuring the Poprad River Gorge, a popular tourist destination between the towns of Piwniczna and Rytro. Poprad is the only large Slovakian river flowing north into southern Poland. The Poprad flows through the Slovak administrative districts of Poprad, Kežmarok and Stará Ľubovňa and then forms for 31.1 km the Polish-Slovakian border. The river flows through Slovakian towns of Poprad, Kežmarok, Stará Ľubovňa, and through Polish towns of Krynica-Zdrój, Muszyna, Piwniczna-Zdrój, Rytro, Stary Sącz, and Żegiestów among others.
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    100
    Revúca

    Revúca

    Revúca (formerly Veľká Revúca in Slovak; German: Groß-Rauschenbach; Hungarian: Nagyrőce) is a town in Banská Bystrica Region, Slovakia. Revúca is the seat of Revúca District. The earliest written record of the existence of the town is from 1357. The iron industry was developing for more than 500 years. During the second half of the 19th century, Revúca became a centre of Slovak national revival. The first high school teaching in the Slovak language was founded in Revúca in 1862, but it was closed down by the Hungarian authorities in 1874 (see Magyarization). Both the original building of the high school (with the historical exposition) and the new building are the National Cultural Monuments. During the short period of its existence, the high school attracted many activists, writers, and politicians (Štefan Marko Daxner, Ján Francisci, Július Botto, Samuel Ormis, August Horislav Škultéty, Ivan Branislav Zoch) to the town. The late Gothic Roman Catholic church of Saint Lawrence (Slovak: Kostol svätého Vavrinca) has a deacon built in the second half of the 15th century and a pre-built tower. Originally, the church had two towers, but the lower onewas dismantled after the fire in
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    101
    Svidník

    Svidník

    Svidník (rarely German: Oberswidnik, Ukrainian: Свидник, Hungarian: Felsővízköz, before 1907 Felsöszvidnik) is a town in eastern Slovakia, acting as the capital of Svidník District in Prešov Region. It has a population of 12,384 (2005). It is located in the Ondava Highlands, at the confluence of Ondava and Ladomírka rivers, located around 20 km (12.43 mi) from the Dukla Pass (Polish border) and around 55 km (34.18 mi) north-east of Prešov. The town arose in 1944 by merger of two formerly independent municipalities of Nižný (eng: Lower) Svidník and Vyšný (eng: Upper) Svidník. The first written mention stems from 1355 as Scyuidnyk According to the 2001 census, the town had 12,428 inhabitants. 79.60% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 13.04% Rusyns, 4.07% Ukrainian, 1.50% Roma and 0.39% Czechs. The religious make-up was 41.10% Greek Catholics, 25.82% Orthodox, 24.13% Roman Catholics,5.17% people with no religious affiliation and 0.93% Lutherans.
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    Abrahám

    Abrahám

    Abrahám (Hungarian: Ábrahám) is a village and municipality in Galanta District of the Trnava Region of south-west Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1266. The municipality lies at an elevation of 125 metres and covers an area of 15.78 km (6 sq mi). It has a population of about 1075 people.
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    103
    Bajerovce

    Bajerovce

    Bajerovce (Hungarian: Bajorvágás) is a village and municipality in Sabinov District in the Prešov Region of north-eastern Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1366. Ruthenians, settled here in the 1570s, were the main inhabitants of the village in recent centuries. The municipality lies at an altitude of 679 metres and covers an area of 11.897 km (4.59 sq mi). It has a population of about 354 people (293 Slovaks and 60 Ruthenians) in 2001.
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    Beňuš

    Beňuš

    Beňuš (German: Beneschhau; Latin: Benesium) is a village and municipality in Brezno District, in the Banská Bystrica Region of central Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1380 (Beneshawa) as a mining village, in 1563 it is mentioned as a free woodmen’s village. In the 14th century, some Germans established here (from I. Lasslob "Deutsche Ortsnamen in der Slowakei"). In 1563 it belonged to Banská Bystrica’s Mining Chamber.
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    Bodrog

    Bodrog

    The Bodrog is a river in eastern Slovakia and north-eastern Hungary. It is a tributary to the river Tisza. The Bodrog is formed by the confluence of the rivers Ondava and Latorica near Zemplin (village) in eastern Slovakia. It crosses the Slovak–Hungarian border at the village of Felsőberecki (near Sátoraljaújhely) in Hungary, and Streda nad Bodrogom in Slovakia, where it is also the lowest point in Slovakia (94.3 m AMSL), and continues its flow through the Hungarian county Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén, until it meets the river Tisza in Tokaj. A town along its course is Sárospatak, in Hungary. Its length is 67 km (15 in Slovakia, 52 in Hungary). Its watershed area is 13,579 km² of which 972 km² is in Hungary. The river is rich in fish.
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    Michael Strank

    Michael Strank

    Michael Strank (Slovak: Michal Strenk;Rusyn: Mykhal Strenk) (November 10, 1919 – March 1, 1945) was a Sergeant in the United States Marine Corps during World War II. He was photographed raising the flag atop Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima. The leader of the group in the famous picture was Strank, who got the order to climb Mt. Suribachi to lay telephone wire. Accompanying him were Corporal Harlon Block, Pfc Ira Hayes and Pfc Franklin Sousley. About halfway up the mountain, they were joined by Pfc Rene Gagnon, who was carrying a larger flag to the summit to replace the smaller one which had been raised earlier in the day. Upon reaching the summit, Strank took the flag from Gagnon, and explained to Lieutenant Harold Schrier that "Colonel Johnson wants this big flag run up high so every son of a bitch on this whole cruddy island can see it." Strank, along with his aforementioned men and Navy Corpsman John Bradley (who was already on the summit of Mt. Suribachi), raised the second flag. Michael Strank was born in Jarabina, a small Rusyn-inhabited village in Czecho-Slovakia, nowadays in Slovakia. He was the son of Vasil Strank and Martha Grofikova, natives of the village.
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    Morava River

    Morava River

    The Morava (German: March, Hungarian: Morva) is a river in Central Europe. It is the most important river of Moravia, which derives its name from it. The river originates on the Králický Sněžník mountain in the northeastern corner of Pardubice Region, near the border between the Czech Republic and Poland and has a vaguely southern trajectory. The lower part of the river's course forms the border between the Czech Republic and Slovakia and then between Austria and Slovakia. The lowlands formed by the river are the Upper Moravian Vale or Hornomoravský úval and then the Lower Moravian Vale or Dolnomoravský úval in Moravia, the Moravian Field or Marchfeld (the plain between the northeast of Vienna and the Morava river) in Lower Austria, and the Záhorie Lowland or Záhorská nížina (the plain between Moravia and Bratislava) in Slovakia. The only major cities along the river are Olomouc in Moravia and the Slovak capital Bratislava. After approximately 354 km, the Morava flows into the Danube at Bratislava-Devín, with an average discharge rate of 120 m³/s. The Morava river is unusual in that it is a European blackwater river. The river's most important tributary is the Thaya (in German) or
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    Myjava

    Myjava

    Myjava (historically also Miava, German: Miawa) is a town in Trenčín Region, Slovakia. It is located in the Myjava Hills at the foothills of the White Carpathians and nearby the Little Carpathians. The river Myjava flows through the town. It is 10 km (6.21 mi) away from the Czech border, 35 km (21.75 mi) from Skalica and 100 km (62.14 mi) from Bratislava. The settlement was established in 1533 and was colonized by two groups of inhabitants: refugees fleeing from the Ottomans in southern Upper Hungary (present Slovakia) and inhabitants from north-western and northern Upper Hungary. During the Revolutions of 1848, the first Slovak National Council met in the town as a result of the Slovak Uprising. Today, the house of their meeting is now part of the Museum of the Slovak National Councils, a part of the Slovak National Museum network. According to the 2001 census, the town had 13,142 inhabitants. 95.5% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 1.5% Czechs and 0.4% Roma. The religious makeup was 51.4% Lutherans, 28.2% people with no religious affiliation and 14.2% Roman Catholics.
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    110
    Basil Hopko

    Basil Hopko

    Basil or Vasiľ Hopko (April 24, 1904, Hrabské — July 23, 1976) was a priest and bishop of the Slovak Greek Catholic Church. He was beatified by Pope John Paul II for his martyrdom under Communist occupation. Hopko was born in the Rusyn village of Hrabské, Austria-Hungary in county Šariš, presently in eastern Slovakia. His parents, Basil and Anna née Petrenko, were landless peasants. While Hopko was still an infant, his father was struck by lightning and died. His mother left him in care of her father, while she emigrated to the United States in search of work. When Hopko was 7 he was sent to live with his uncle Demeter Petrenko, a Greek Catholic priest. He attended the Evangelical gymnasium in Prešov, then Czechoslovakia, graduating with honors in 1923. Hopko studied at the Eparchial Seminary in Prešov. He had dreams of joining his mother in America, and of pursuing his priestly vocation there, but the cost of recurring health problems left him unable to afford to travel. He later wrote that when he finally decided to stay and to serve in his homeland, he was suddenly cured, and realized he had been given a sign about his calling. He was ordained a Greek Catholic priest on 3
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    111
    Sajó

    Sajó

    The Sajó (Slovak: Slaná) is a river in Slovakia and Hungary. Its length is 229 km, of which 110 km is in Slovakia. Its source is in the Stolica Mountains range of the Slovak Ore Mountains. It flows through the Slovak town Rožňava and the Hungarian city Miskolc. In Hungary it flows through the county of Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén. It flows into the River Tisza near Tiszaújváros.
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    112
    Bánovce nad Bebravou

    Bánovce nad Bebravou

    Bánovce nad Bebravou (German: Banowitz, Hungarian: Bán) is a town in Slovakia, in the Trenčín Region. It is located at the northernmost edge of the Danubian Hills, at the foothills of the Strážovské vrchy mountains at the confluence of the Radiša and Bebrava rivers. It is 25 km away from Prievidza, 30 km from Trenčín and 50 km from Nitra. The oldest settlement stems from the Bronze Age. The eldest inscription mentioning the city as villa Ben dates back to 1232. The town was promoted in 1376 into free royal town. In the Middle Ages, Bánovce became an important trade centre - for shoemakers, carpenters, smiths, butchers, weavers and others. In 1633, the Ottomans encroaching from the south plundered the town. The first elementary school was opened in the 17th century. During the first Czechoslovak republic, it was an agricultural-crafting town. After World War II, automobile, furniture and textile industries developed. In total, there are 15 cultural memorials in the town and its boroughs inscribed in the central inventory of culture memorials in Bratislava. The Bánovská parenica(the most famous cycling race in region)is regularly organized every year on 6 September and it goes
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    113
    Kavečany

    Kavečany

    Kavečany (Hungarian: Kavocsán) is a city part of Košice, Slovakia. Before 1976, it was a separate municipality. It's known mostly as a place for recreation and relaxation. Kavečany is famous for its ski center, bobsleigh track, and has the largest zoo in Central Europe.
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    Andovce

    Andovce

    Andovce (Hungarian: Andód) is a municipality and village in the Nové Zámky District of the south-west of Slovakia, in the Nitra Region. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1424. The village lies at an altitude of 113 metres and covers an area of 10.778 km (4 sq mi). It has a population of about 1295 people. The population is about 32% Slovak and 68% Hungarian.
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    Beloveža

    Beloveža

    Beloveža is a village and municipality in Bardejov District, in the Prešov Region of north-east Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1355. The Catholic church of St. Michael the Archangel of 1778 can be found in the village. The municipality lies at an altitude of 290 metres and covers an area of 10.153 km². It has a population of about 785 people, 703 Slovaks and 82 Ruthenians, mostly members of the Greek Catholic Church.
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    Betliar

    Betliar

    Betliar is a village and municipality in the Rožňava District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia, known for its manor house. It belongs to the most beautiful manor houses in the country. The village of Betliar lies in a valley of the river Slaná, 5 km northwest of Rožňava. The first written description of the village is from the year 1330, when it is mentioned under the name Bethler. It belonged to the Bebek family and later the Andrássy family. The inhabitants lived on mining, agriculture and forestry. The mining heritage of the village, historically interesting places and the beauty of the Volovské vrchy (hills) has turned Betliar into a destination that is popular with tourists. The most well-known place in the village is the manor house, built on the site of a small Bebek’s castle from the 15th century. It is situated in the beautiful surroundings of an English park, designed by the famous architect H. Nebbiem. The mansion has been rebuilt many times, most recently by the Andrassy family in the year 1880. Since that time its appearance has been preserved with minor changes and renovations; currently it serves as an exposition of the Slovak National Museum. In the year
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    117
    Boleráz

    Boleráz

    Boleráz is a municipality of Trnava District in the Trnava region of Slovakia.
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    Bratislava

    Bratislava

    Bratislava (Slovak pronunciation: [ˈbracɪslava] ( listen), English pronunciation: /ˌbrætɨˈslɑːvə/ or /ˌbrɑːtɨˈslɑːvə/; German: Pressburg formerly Preßburg, Hungarian: Pozsony, formerly Slovak Prešporok) is the capital of Slovakia and, with a population of about 460,000, the country's largest city. Bratislava is in southwestern Slovakia on both banks of the Danube River and on the left bank of Morava river. Bordering Austria and Hungary, it is the only national capital that borders two independent countries. Bratislava is the political, cultural, and economic centre of Slovakia. It is the seat of the Slovak president, the parliament, and the Slovak Executive. It is home to several universities, museums, theatres, galleries and other important cultural and educational institutions. Many of Slovakia's large businesses and financial institutions also have headquarters there. The history of the city has been strongly influenced by people of different nations and religions, namely by Austrians, Czechs, Germans, Hungarians, Slovaks, and Jews. The city was the capital of the Kingdom of Hungary, a part of the larger Habsburg Monarchy territories, from 1536 to 1783 and has been home to many
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    Bulgaria

    Bulgaria

    Bulgaria /bʌlˈɡɛəriə/ (Bulgarian: България, IPA: [bɤ̞ɫˈɡarijɐ]), officially the Republic of Bulgaria, is a country located in Southeastern Europe. It is bordered by Romania to the north, Serbia and Macedonia to the west, Greece and Turkey to the south and the Black Sea to the east. With a territory of 110,994 square kilometres (42,855 sq mi), Bulgaria is Europe's 14th-largest country. Its location has made it a historical crossroad for various civilisations and as such it is the home of some of the earliest metalworking, religious and other cultural artifacts in the world. Prehistoric cultures began developing on Bulgarian lands during the Neolithic period. Its ancient history saw the presence of the Thracians, and later by the Greeks and Romans. The emergence of a unified Bulgarian state dates back to the establishment of the First Bulgarian Empire in 681 AD, which dominated most of the Balkans and functioned as a cultural hub for Slavic peoples during the Middle Ages. With the downfall of the Second Bulgarian Empire in 1396, its territories came under Ottoman rule for nearly five centuries. The Russo-Turkish War of 1877–1878 created the Third Bulgarian State, which became
    7.50
    2 votes
    120
    Čierny Potok

    Čierny Potok

    Čierny Potok is a village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of southern Slovakia. The village arose in 1955 by separation from Hodejov. During Hungarian occupation in WWII, many inhabitants were deported to concentration camps.
    7.50
    2 votes
    121
    Michalovce

    Michalovce

    Michalovce ( pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Nagymihály, German: Großmichel, Romani: Mihalya, Yiddish: Mikhaylovets or Mykhaylovyts) is a town on the Laborec river in eastern Slovakia, with a population around 40,000. It is the biggest town of the Michalovce District (okres) in the Košice Region. The town lies in the Košice Region, in the Eastern Slovak Lowland on the Laborec river, historically belonging to the Zemplén county. The town is about 48 km east of Košice and 30 km west of Uzhhorod, Ukraine. Geographical features nearby include the Vihorlat Mountains and the Zemplínska šírava lake. The first known settlers in the area around Michalovce were in the Neolithic. The Slavs arrived in the area in the fifth century. The area was part of the Great Moravian empire in the ninth century. Michalovce is the legendary place of Laborec death. From the tenth century onwards, the region had been part of Hungary. After the Ottoman conquest in south central Hungary in the sixteenth century, Hungary was divided, and present-day Michalovce became part of the Eastern Hungarian Kingdom, and later Royal Hungary. The town grew significantly in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Spišská Nová Ves

    Spišská Nová Ves

    Spišská Nová Ves ( pronunciation (help·info); German: (Zipser) Neu(en)dorf; Hungarian: Igló; Polish: Nowa Wieś Spiska; is a town in the Košice Region of Slovakia. The town is located southeast of the High Tatras in the Spiš region, and lies on both banks of the Hornád River. It is the biggest town of the Spišská Nová Ves District (okres). As of 2006 the population was 38,357. Tourist attractions nearby include the medieval town of Levoča, Spiš Castle and the Slovak Paradise National Park. A biennial music festival, Divertimento musicale, is held here, attracting amateur music ensembles from all over Slovakia. Settlement in the town's region dates to the Neolithic age. There is evidence of a prosperous society that was familiar with copper mining and processing. When the Celts arrived they brought with them advanced iron technology. Celtic coins have been found in the region. During the 6th century, the period known as the Great Migration, Slavic tribes appeared in the Spiš region. During the 10th century the structure of their settlements stabilized and important communication roads were established. The settlement was included within the state of Great Moravia. By the 12th century
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Velký Lopeník

    Velký Lopeník

    Velký Lopeník (-in Czech, Veľký Lopeník in Slovak; Hungarian: Nagy Lopenik) is the second highest mountain in White Carpathians, in the Zlín Region of the Czech Republic, on border with Slovakia. Its elevation is 911 meters. The area around the mountain, Moravian Kopanice (Moravské kopanice or Kopanice), was hilly region of primitive agriculture and small, scattered farms. Nearest villages are Lopeník, Březová (Czech Republic) and Nová Bošáca (in Slovakia). Several view-towers has been built on the top of the mountain. The first built in 1944 caught fire in 1946, another one fell down in 1972. During 2004 - 2005 a new, 22 meters high wooden tower has been erected. It was placed directly on the border as a symbol of friendship among Czechs and Slovaks. Due to insufficient tourist infrastructure the mountain and surrounding area is rather hard to access. However, this shortage makes the place preferred to those who avoid such amenities.
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Stará Ľubovňa

    Stará Ľubovňa

    Stará Ľubovňa (German: Altlublau; Hungarian: Ólubló; Latin: Lublovia; Polish: Lubowla) is a town with approximately 16,000 inhabitants in northeastern Slovakia. The town consists of the districts Podsadek and Stará Ľubovňa. Stará Ľubovňa is situated on the Poprad River 15 km south of the Polish border and 30 km east of the High Tatras. It is one of the oldest towns in the Spiš, an historic administrative county (comitatus) of the Kingdom of Hungary, and is today the administrative capital of the district of Stará Ľubovňa in the Prešov Region. In 1292 Stará Ľubovňa is first mentioned as Libenow. Until it became a free royal town in 1364 the town fell under the jurisdiction of the castle. In 1412 it belonged to the 16 Spiš towns given by the Hungarian King Sigismund of Luxemburg as a deposit to King Władysław II of Poland. The pledge was part of the Treaty of Lubowla and was thought to be only for a short time, but it finally lasted for 360 years. Only in the course of the first Partition of Poland in 1772 during the reign of Maria Theresa of Austria the territory came back to the Kingdom of Hungary. The pledge was actually an advantage for the towns concerned because they did not
    4.80
    5 votes
    125
    Brekov

    Brekov

    Brekov is a village and municipality in the Humenné District in the Prešov Region of north-east Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1314. The municipality lies at an altitude of 145 metres and covers an area of 9.725 km². It has a population of about 1,265 people.
    6.33
    3 votes
    126
    Bzovík

    Bzovík

    Bzovík (Hungarian: Bozók) is a village and municipality in the Krupina District of the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1135 (Bozouk) when the noble Lampert of Hunt-Poznan founded a Cistercian abbey here. In 1433 Bzovík was destroyed by Hussites and in the mid-15th century by commanders from the Krupina Castle. From 1530 to 1567 it belonged to Žigmund Balaša (Hungarian: Zsigmond Balassa). 1567 – 1658 it belonged to the landowners Fánchy and in 1678 it passed to the Jesuits of Esztergom. Iesha smithDb }}
    6.33
    3 votes
    127
    Chvalová

    Chvalová

    Chvalová is a village and municipality in Revúca District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1343 when it passed from local Lords Szkárosy to noble Soldosy family. It was destroyed from Turks in the 16th century. From 1938 to 1945 it was annexed by Hungary.
    6.33
    3 votes
    128
    Číž

    Číž

    Číž (Hungarian: Csiz) is a spa village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of southern Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1274 (as Chyz). It first belonged to the Tukovci (Tuky) family and later to several zeman families. In 1566 and 1682, the village was destroyed by the Turks. From 1938 to 1945, Číž was occupied by Hungary under the First Vienna Award.
    6.33
    3 votes
    129
    Košice-Barca

    Košice-Barca

    Barca is a city part of Košice, Slovakia. It was originally a village in its own right. The first written record about Barca dates back to 1215. One of the principal features within Barca's catastral territory is Košice International Airport, which is the second largest in Slovakia.
    6.33
    3 votes
    130
    Liptovský Hrádok

    Liptovský Hrádok

    Liptovský Hrádok (German: Neuhäusel in der Liptau; Hungarian: Liptóújvár) is a town in northern Slovakia, in the region of Liptov. First mentioned in 1341, Liptovský Hrádok was named after the nearby castle. The castle, also known as Liptovský Hrádok, was built originally for use of the forestry commission, hunters of the area and the Catholic Church. The castle was later modified and furnished in the style of Louis XVI. The name of the town and the castle literally means "little castle of Liptov". A salt processing facility was constructed in 1728 to collect salt for the Solivar Salt Works which now is part of Prešov, a Slovak city further to the East. This helped Liptovský Hrádok rise to some prominence in the region. The population centre of the town was the main street, which runs from the castle to the south continuing along to the Váh River and the hamlet of Prekážka. The region of Liptovský Hrádok is bordered by the Low Tatras to the south and partially bordered by the West and High Tatras. The town is situated in the middle of the Liptov Basin created by the Váh River. It is in the centre of northern Liptov and lies on the confluence of the rivers Váh and Belá. The average
    6.33
    3 votes
    131
    Mochovce

    Mochovce

    Mochovce (Hungarian: Mohi) is a former village in western Slovakia, best known for its nuclear power plant. It is situated in Nitra Region, ca 8 miles northwest of Levice. The village inhabitants were relocated and the village was destroyed to make place for the power plant. A late baroque church and a cemetery are the only remaining structures. In contrast, the power plant construction has brought an economic and demographic boom to the nearby town of Levice in the 1980s.
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    Orava River

    Orava River

    The Orava (Hungarian: Árva) is a 60.9 km long river in north-western Slovakia passing through a picturesque country, in the Orava county. Its source is nowadays the Orava water reservoir whose waters flooded the confluence of Biela (White) Orava and Čierna (Black) Orava in 1953. It flows into the river Váh near the village of Kraľovany.
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Skalica

    Skalica

    Skalica (German: Skalitz, Hungarian: Szakolca, Latin: Sakolcium) is the largest city in Skalica District in western Slovakia in the Záhorie region. Located near the Czech border, Skalica has a population of 14,963 (as of 2005). The site has been inhabited since 4000 BC and was part of the Great Moravian Empire. From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. The first written record of Skalica was made in 1218 as Zaculcza; the name refers to the cliffs the inhabitants built their settlement over. The settlement developed around a triangular plaza, which was rare during the Middle Ages. Its town privileges were conferred in 1372 by King Louis I of Hungary. In 1428 Skalica became a bastion for the Hussites; during the Hussite Wars, the majority of its then predominantly German-speaking populace fled or was exiled. Many Habaners (adherents of a sect similar to Anabaptism) settled in Skalica in the 16th century. For eight days in 1918 Skalica was the seat of a Czechoslovak delegation which unsuccessfully tried to negotiate the removal of Hungarian troops from Upper Hungary (today Slovakia). After World War II, the town tried to take advantage
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Veľké Kapušany

    Veľké Kapušany

    Veľké Kapušany (Hungarian: Nagykapos) is a small town on the eastern plains of Slovakia, not far from the Ukrainian border. The name "Kapušany" is probably derived from the Hungarian word kapu, meaning "gate". The territory of the town has been settled since time immemorial (findings from the Neolithic period). From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. The first written references to the settlement stems from 1211 ("Kapos") and 1214 ("Copus"). The settlement was awarded town status in 1430. The town was the second largest settlement (after Uzhhorod) of the Ung County and frequently served as a temporary or permanent station for migrants (Germans, Rusyns, Poles, Hungarians etc.) from the east to the west. In the town square there is a garden with a plaque commemorating the day the Germans marched into Veľké Kapušany in 1944. This is significant as both Jews and Romas were persecuted and murdered by the Nazis during World War II. At that time, Veľké Kapušany was part of Hungary (based on the First Vienna Award). The Hungarian government allied with the Germans deported approximately 500,000 Jews living in towns like Nagykapos in the
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Brezno

    Brezno

    Brezno ( pronunciation (help·info); 1927 - 1948 Brezno nad Hronom, German: Bries(en)) is a town in central Slovakia, with a population of 22,279 (2005). Brezno is located within the Horehronské podolie basin. Brezno lies between Low Tatras mountain range and the Slovak Ore Mountains. The river Hron flows through town. The city of Banská Bystrica is approximately 45 km west. The local climate in the basin is rather cold, with an annual average of 6.6 °C and an annual precipitation of 700–750 mm. The place has been inhabited since prehistoric times, but the current town arose from an old Slovak settlement, next to which newly arrived German miners erected a typical square market in the early 13th century. The first written evidence of the town's existence is dated 1265 when King Béla IV of Hungary issued a charter for the hunters from the area of Liptov allowing them to use woods around the settlement, known as Berezuno. The name is derived from the Slovak word "breza" for birch. In the nineteenth century Brezno was a typical almost purely Slovak town and was one of the centres of the Slovak national movement. After the Second World War the town has developed into an industrial town
    4.60
    5 votes
    136
    Biely Kostol

    Biely Kostol

    Biely Kostol is a village and municipality of Trnava District in the Trnava region of Slovakia.
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Devičie

    Devičie

    Devičie (Hungarian: Devicse) is a village and municipality in the Krupina District of the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. Settlements from the Bronze Age and Thracian and Hallstatt finds have been made here. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1256 when King Bela IV resettled persons from Devičie to Hontianske Nemce. In the 16th century it belonged to Čabraď castle (Kőváry and Terjény families).
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Empire of Japan

    Empire of Japan

    The Empire of Japan, officially the Empire of Great Japan or simply Great Japan (Dai Nippon), was an empire and world power that existed from the Meiji Restoration on 3 January 1868 to the enactment of the post-World War II Constitution of Japan on 3 May 1947. Imperial Japan's rapid industrialization and militarization under the slogan Fukoku Kyōhei (富国強兵, "Enrich the Country, Strengthen the Army") led to its emergence as a world power, eventually culminating in its membership in the Axis alliance and the conquest of a large part of the Asia-Pacific region. At the height of its power in 1942, the Japanese Empire ruled over a land area spanning 7,400,000 square kilometres (2,857,000 sq mi), making it one of the largest maritime empires in history. After several large-scale military successes during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) and the Pacific War, the Empire of Japan also gained notoriety for its war crimes against the peoples of the countries it conquered. After suffering many defeats and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, however, the Empire of Japan surrendered to the Allies on 2 September 1945. A period of occupation by the Allies followed the surrender,
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Komárno

    Komárno

    Komárno (Hungarian: Komárom, colloquially Révkomárom, Öregkomárom, Észak-Komárom, German: Komorn, Serbian: Komarno/ Комарно) is a town in Slovakia at the confluence of the Danube and the Váh rivers. Komárno was formed from part of a historical town in Hungary situated on both banks of the Danube. Following World War I, the border of the newly created Czechoslovakia cut the historical, unified town in half, creating two new towns. The smaller part, based on the former suburb of Újszőny, is in present-day Hungary as Komárom (the historical Hungarian town had the same name). Komárno and Komárom are connected by the Elizabeth bridge, which used to be a border crossing between Slovakia and Hungary until border checks were lifted due to the Schengen Area rules. Komárno is Slovakia's principal port on the Danube. It is also the center of the Hungarian community in Slovakia, which makes up roughly 60% of the town's population. The town is the historic seat of the Serbian national minority in Slovakia. One disputed record of the name of the settlement can be dated back to 1075 as Camarum. Further documents mention the settlement as Kamarn(iensis) / Komarn(iense) (1218), Kamarum (1266),
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    M. R. Štefánik Airport

    M. R. Štefánik Airport

    M. R. Štefánik Airport (Slovak: Letisko M. R. Štefánika) (IATA: BTS, ICAO: LZIB), also called – especially in English – Bratislava Airport (Slovak: Letisko Bratislava) or Bratislava-Ivanka, located 9 km (5.6 mi) northeast of Bratislava Castle in Bratislava is the main international airport of Slovakia. Scheduled and non-scheduled domestic and international air connections are provided to destinations in Europe, Middle East and North Africa. The scheduled flights are operated by DanubeWings, Sun d'Or (operated by El Al), Ryanair and UTair. Travel Service Airlines also sells some seats on its charters as scheduled through its Smart Wings affiliate. The airport is named after general Milan Rastislav Štefánik (since 1993), whose aircraft crashed near Bratislava in 1919. The airport is run by the Letisko M. R. Štefánika - Airport Bratislava, a.s. (BTS) a public limited company. Until May 2004, the airport was run by the state-run entity Slovenská správa letísk (Slovak Airport Administration). In 2010, the airport served 1,585,064 passengers equating to an average 19% annual increase every year since 2000 (but a gradual decrease from 2008 – see table below). It currently serves as a base
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Šariš Castle

    Šariš Castle

    Šariš Castle (Slovak: Šarišský hrad) are the ruins of a castle situated at top of a hill, 6-7 km north-west from Prešov, Slovakia in the traditional region Šariš (named after this castle). The castle is one of the oldest castles and biggest in Slovakia. It was permanently settled from the Neolithic to the 4th century AD, then from the 10th to the 12th century, and finally a new castle was built in the 13th century. This castle burned down in 1678. Under the hill there is a small town called Veľký Šariš (literally Great or Big Šariš). Media related to Šarišský hrad at Wikimedia Commons
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Svätý Jur

    Svätý Jur

    Svätý Jur (German: Sankt Georgen, Hungarian: Szentgyörgy) is a small town northeast of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia. The name means Saint George. Between 1960 and 1990, the Communist government forced the town to use a "non-religious" name Jur pri Bratislave. Svätý Jur has a population of almost 5,000. Svätý Jur is situated in the Pezinok District of the Bratislava Region in southwestern Slovakia. The surrounding areas include large vineyards in the nearby Little Carpathians and the unique Šúr swamps, a protected area. The archaeological excavations date the settlement back to the Hallstatt period and the Quadi period. In the 9th century, a Great Moravian castle was built there. Svätý Jur was first mentioned in a written source in 1209 and received a town charter in 1299. It became a royal free town in the Kingdom of Hungary in 1647. Despite a construction of the city walls between 1603 and 1664, Svätý Jur was devastated by the Ottoman Turks in 1663. The Ottoman troops also destroyed the White Castle (Slovak: Biely Kameň), which had been an important administrative center of the region until then. In the 18th and 19th centuries and into the 20th century, the population was
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Turčianske Teplice

    Turčianske Teplice

    Turčianske Teplice (German: Bad Stuben; Hungarian: Stubnyafürdő) is a town in central Slovakia in the Žilina Region. It is about halfway between Martin and Kremnica. As of 2005 the town's population was 6,941. The town was the historic center of the Upper Turiec subregion within the Turiec region (comitatus), and now enjoys the status of a capital of the Turčianske Teplice District. The town is one of the oldest spa towns in Europe, and was originally known as Štubnianske Teplice. It was first mentioned in text dating from 1281 when King Ladislaus IV of Hungary granted the lands surrounding the springs to a Count Peter. The spa became popular with royalty, including King Sigismund of Hungary and Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico. The recuperative abilities of the spa were first studied by the University of Halle medical student Jan Lisschoviny. Štubnianske Teplice was renamed Turčianske Teplice in 1946. In 1951 the town merged with the community of Vieska. Turčianske Teplice lies at an altitude of 520 metres (1,706 ft) above sea level and covers an area of 33.483 square kilometres (12.9 sq mi). It lies in the Turiec Basin and is surrounded in proximity by the Greater Fatra, Kremnica,
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Hriňová

    Hriňová

    Hriňová (German: Hrinau; Hungarian: Herencsvölgy) is a town in the Detva District of central Slovakia. The town is located on the Slatina river, under the Poľana mountains. It is located app. 13 km (8.08 mi) from Detva and 40 km (24.85 mi) from Zvolen. A dam is located above the town. At first, the town was a part of Detva municipality, which arose in the 17th century. In 1891, Hriňová became a separate municipality from Detva. It has town status since 1 January 1989. According to the 2001 census, the town had 8,289 inhabitants. 98.56% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 0.42% Czechs and 0.35% Roma. The religious make-up was 88.85% Roman Catholics, 6.19% people with no religious affiliation and 2.10% Lutherans.
    5.25
    4 votes
    145
    Spišské Podhradie

    Spišské Podhradie

    Spišské Podhradie (German: Kirchdorf; Hungarian: Szepesváralja) is a town in Spiš in the Prešov Region of Slovakia. Its population is 3,826. Spišské Podhradie is situated at the foot of the hill of Spiš Castle. It had a Zipser German settlement, with its own church and priest, in 1174. Just above, and adjacent to, the town is the ecclesiastical settlement of Spišská Kapitula (hence the town's German name of Kirchdorf, meaning "church town"). The town contains a number of Renaissance merchants' houses. It also has one of the few remaining synagogue buildings (now disused) in the region.
    5.25
    4 votes
    146
    Abovce

    Abovce

    Abovce (Hungarian: Abafalva) is a village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. The village retains its agricultural character. Most important sightseeing is village manor house. In 2010 had been the settlement from the Bronze Age. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1339 (Abafalwa) when it belonged to the local noble family Abaffy. In 1380 name of the village is Hanua. In 15th and 16th centuries it suffered devastation and afterwards many epidemics beat its inhabitants. From 1938 to 1945 it belonged to Hungary under the First Vienna Award. In the village are community centre, mourning house, elementary school, kindergarten, espresso bar and petrol station.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Banská Belá

    Banská Belá

    Banská Belá (German: Dilln; Hungarian: Bélabánya) is a village and municipality in Banská Štiavnica District, in the Banská Bystrica Region of central Slovakia. It has a population of 1,234. The village arose by separation from Banská Štiavnica, but it was part of Banská Štiavnica again from 1873 to 1954. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1228 (flumen Bela) in connection with its silver mines. In 1331, King Bela IV invited German miners from Banská Štiavnica and the village got the German name Dilln (Dyln, Dilln, Dylen). The village suffered from Turkish raids during the Ottoman wars.
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Dargov

    Dargov

    Dargov (1948-1964 Drahov; Hungarian: Dargó) is a village and municipality in the Trebišov District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia. The village was first mentioned as Dorgo in a charter in 1458. It belonged to several owners: the nobles Semsey and Széchy, the castle of Sečovce (Csapy family), and a part to the town of Trebišov. In the 19th century it belonged to the noble landowners Andrássy, Berzeviczy and Forgách. In 1944 it was burned down by the German Army.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Detva

    Detva

    Detva is a town in central Slovakia with a population of 15,000. It is situated on the mountain, Poľana. Detva was created as a village of bondage in a deep-forested area belonging to Zvolenská Slatina and Očová upon instruction of the owner of the Vígľaš dominion Ladislav Čáky resp. Ladislaus Csáky in 1636-1638. The first settlers were coal producers from Ľubietová, followed by Walachian-type settlers from northern and eastern parts of Slovakia and immigrants from other surrounding villages. In 1787, Ján Vagač founded the first known manufactory producing bryndza cheese. The settlement became an oppidum (market town) in 1811 and a town in 1965. In 1996 the town of Detva became the seat of new Detva district. It was developed as a large newly cleared land and this character has been preserved up to present, despite the fact that a part of the newly cleared lands were separated from Detva - Hriňová (before 1863), Detvianska Huta (in ?), Korytárky (in 1955; part of Kriváň until 1993) and Kriváň (in 1955). Logging and wood processing, sheep breeding and peasantry had been the main source of bread and butter of the Detvans. Hard living conditions at distant isolated newly cleared lands
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Divín

    Divín

    Divín (German: Diwein; Hungarian: Devény) is a village and municipality in the Lučenec District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1329 as a parish and a castle (1329 castrum Dyun' villa sub eodem castro, 1393 Dyen, Dyuen, 1497 Dywyn, 1473 Dewen). Many noble families ruled the village and lived in the castle: Tomay, Lossonczy, Balassa, Zichy. In 1575 the fortress was occupied by Turks up to 1593. In 1604, it passed to nobles Bocskay, and after to Balassa family again. In 1674, the castle was destroyed by General Strassoldo.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Hornád

    Hornád

    Hornád (Slovak) or Hernád (Hungarian) is a river in eastern Slovakia and north-eastern Hungary. It is a tributary to the river Sajó, which is itself a tributary to the river Tisza. The source of the Hornád is in the Low Tatra mountains under the Kráľova hoľa hill, southwest of Poprad. It flows through the Slovak regions Spiš and Abov, and the Hungarian county Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén. It is 286 km long, 193 km located on territory of Slovakia. Cities along its course are Spišská Nová Ves and Košice, both in Slovakia and its tributaries include Hnilec River and Torysa. It flows into the river Sajó (Slovak Slaná) southeast of Miskolc.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Pezinok

    Pezinok

    Pezinok (Hungarian: Bazin; German: Bösing) is a city in southwestern Slovakia. It is roughly 20 km (12.43 mi) northeast of Bratislava and has a population of 23,044, as of December 2010. Pezinok lies near the Little Carpathians and thrives mainly on viticulture and agriculture, as well as on brick making and ceramic(s) production. From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. Pezinok, or at least its surroundings, was for the first time mentioned in 1208 under name "terra Bozin". During the next few centuries, the town changed from a mining settlement to a vineyard town. It gained status of a free royal town on 14 June 1647. Pezinok had its most glorious era of wealth and prosperity in the 17th and 18th centuries, when it was also one of the richest towns in the Kingdom of Hungary. Its wealth was based on production of quality wines. In the 19th century, the town slowly began to industrialize: the first sulphuric acid factory in Hungary or the known brick works were established here. It boomed further after it was connected to railway. After break-up of Austria-Hungary in 1918/1920, the town became part of newly created Czechoslovakia.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Piešťany

    Piešťany

    Piešťany ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Pistyan; Hungarian: Pöstyén, Polish: Pieszczany) is a town in Slovakia. It is located in the western part of the country within the Trnava Region and is the seat of its own district. It is the biggest and best known spa town in Slovakia and has around 30,000 inhabitants. The first human settlement in the area is dated to the prehistoric times, about 80,000 years ago. People were attracted to the site by abundance of game in the vicinity of the thermal springs that did not freeze in winter. A small female statue called Venus of Moravany was found in the nearby village Moravany nad Váhom. It is made of mammoth ivory and is dated to 22,800 BC. It currently resides in the Bratislava Castle museum. In another nearby village, Krakovany-Stráže, a treasure consisting of luxury items made of glass, bronze, silver, and gold was discovered in three graves from 200 - 300 AD. The surroundings of Piešťany also include the Great Moravian castle of Ducové. Piešťany was first mentioned in written records in 1113 (under the name Pescan). At that time it consisted of several smaller settlements. The medicinal springs were already popular in the Middle
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    Poprad-Tatry Airport

    Poprad-Tatry Airport

    Poprad-Tatry Airport (Slovak: Letisko Poprad-Tatry) (IATA: TAT, ICAO: LZTT), is an airport in the Slovak ski resort town of Poprad. It is the airport with the highest elevation in Central Europe, at 718 m, which is 150 m higher than Innsbruck Airport, Austria. The airport serves schedule and charter airline operations, is a base for search and rescue air services, and handles general aviation. Facilities in the airport terminal include a snack bar, car rental desk, travel office and currency exchange. Charter flights are mainly operated in winter to destinations in Ukraine and Russia. Medical flights, VIP flights, ad-hoc charters and ACMI flight also operate from the airport.
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    2 votes
    156
    Rožňava

    Rožňava

    Rožňava (Hungarian: Rozsnyó, German: Rosenau, Latin: Rosnavia) is a town in Slovakia, approximately 71 km by road from Košice in the Košice Region, and has a population of 19,120. The town is an economic and tourist center of the Gemer. Rožňava is now a popular tourist attraction with a beautiful historic town centre. The town is an episcopal seat. It has above all food, textile and remnants of mining industries. Archaeological finds show that the region was densely settled by miners as early as around 1200. The first written mention stems from 1291, the royal free town status from 1410. The Roman Catholic diocese of Rožňava was founded in 1776. In the Middle Ages, Rožňava was a prosperous mining town for gold, silver, and iron. Mining activities stagnated from the 16th century (when territories to the south of the town were conquered by Ottoman Turks). Mining - this time mainly of iron ore - was renewed around 1800 and was present in the town throughout the 20th century. The name of the town probably derives from the German and/or Hungarian word for rose (Rose and Rózsa). On 13 September 2003, Rožňava was visited by Pope John Paul II. According to the 2001 census, the town had
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    2 votes
    157
    Topoľčany

    Topoľčany

    Topoľčany ( pronunciation (help·info); Slovak: Veľké Topoľčany before 1920; Hungarian: Nagytapolcsány; is a town in the Nitra Region of Slovakia. The population as of 2006 was 28,685. The town's population is nicknamed Žochári (sing. Žochár) ("peasants"; or producers, or owners of "mosses"). The name Topoľčany was assumed to be derived from topoľ, Slovak for poplar tree. Groves of these trees were once abundant on the banks of the Nitra River. However recent studies have shown that the name is derived from the Old Slavonic word topol meaning "warm, hot", for there were hot springs in the region in early medieval times. The Nitra river flows through a wide valley between the two mountain ranges which are visible from the town - Tribeč (east) and Považský Inovec (west). Founded in the 9th century, Topoľčany was a regional market centre during the Middle Ages located on the western bank of the Nitra River and on a crossroads of trade routes. Topoľčany Castle was built in the 13th century 18 km to the NW of the town; this considerable distance was due to the lowland location of Topoľčany. The castle lies on slopes of Považský Inovec. During the 12th and 13th centuries, Topoľčany was
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    158
    Nová Dubnica

    Nová Dubnica

    Nová Dubnica (German: Neudubnitz; Hungarian: Újtölgyes) is a town in Trenčín Region, Slovakia. It is located in the Ilava Basin at the foothills of the Strážovské vrchy mountains. The town was established in the 1950s originally for the purpose of housing workers of the local heavy machinery factory Závody ťažkého strojárstva. Therefore it can be described as a bedroom community. Construction started in 1951, and became separate from Dubnica nad Váhom and from parts of cadastral areas of Trenčianske Teplice and Veľký Kolačin municipalities in 1957 and was named Nová Dubnica and received town rights in 1960. In 1971 municipality of Kolačín made of Malý Kolačín and Velký Kolačín was annexed to the town. According to the 2001 census, the town had 12,358 inhabitants. 95.6% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 1.8% Czechs and 0.2% German and Hungarians. The religious makeup was 70.8% Roman Catholics, 20.7% people with no religious affiliation, and 3.4% Lutherans.
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    159
    Gerlachov Peak

    Gerlachov Peak

    Gerlachovský štít ( Slovak pronunciation (help·info), translated into English as Gerlach Peak) is the highest peak in the High Tatras, in Slovakia, and in the whole 1,500 km (930 mi) long Carpathian mountain chain, as well as in northern and eastern Central Europe. Usually listed at 2,655 metres AMSL (8,711 ft), its exact elevation is actually 0.6 metres (2 ft) lower. The pyramidal shape of the massif is marked by a huge cirque. Despite its relatively low elevation, the about 2,000 m vertical rise from the valley floor makes Gerlachovský štít soar. Mistaken for an average mountain in the rugged High Tatras range in the more distant past, it has since played a symbolic role in the eyes of the rulers and populations of several Central European nations, to the point that between the 19th and mid-20th century, it had four different names with six name reversals. It managed to be the highest mountain of the Kingdom of Hungary, and of the countries of Czechoslovakia and Slovakia within the span of only about two decades of the 20th century. Gerlachovský štít shares its geology and ecology with the rest of the High Tatras, but provides a worthwhile environment for biologists as the
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    4 votes
    160
    Bátka

    Bátka

    Bátka (earlier Batka; Hungarian: Bátka, c. 1895 - 1907 Alsóbátka és Felsöbátka) is a village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of southern Slovakia. The municipality arose in the late 19th century by a merge of Dolná Bátka (Alsóbátka) and Horná Bátka (Felsöbátka). The two villages formed one common village (Batka) before the mid-14th century, as well. In historical records, Dolná Bátka was first mentioned in 1294 (Bathka). It belonged to the Kállay noble family in the 15th and 16th century. Horná Bátka arose in 1294 (as a part of Dolná Batka) as a royal donation to the knight Tumpold Krispin. In 1411 it passed to local landowners Bátky.From 1938 to 1944 it belonged to Hungary.
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    161
    Belža

    Belža

    Belža is a small municipality (village) in Slovakia in the Košice-okolie District. It arose after 1877 by a merge of the municipalities Stredná Belža, Šándorova Belža and Vyšná Belža. All about village is on the http://belza.yw.sk/ All about village is on the http://belza.yw.sk/ All about village is on the http://belza.yw.sk/
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    162
    Čekovce

    Čekovce

    Čekovce (Hungarian: Csákóc) is a village and municipality in the Krupina District of the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1391 (Cheke). It belonged to Bzovík, and in the 17th century to Esztergom' Seminary.
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    163
    Kriváň

    Kriváň

    Kriváň ( pronunciation (help·info)) is a mountain in the High Tatras, Slovakia, that dominates the upper part of the former Liptov County. Multiple surveys among nature lovers have ranked it as the country's most beautiful peak. Readily accessible along maintained marked trails and with the exceptional vistas afforded from its summit, it is the hikers' favorite mountain in the western part of the High Tatras. Kriváň has also been a major symbol in Slovak ethnic and national activism for the past two centuries. It has been referenced in works of art from 19th-century literature, through paintings, film documentaries, to a Polish rock track. A country-wide vote in 2005 selected it to be one of the images on Slovakia's euro coins. The name Kriváň, first recorded as Kriwan in 1639, is derived from the root kriv- meaning "bent" or "crooked" (the words do not have the secondary negative meanings of their English equivalents). It reflects the angled appearance of its shape when viewed from the west and south, characterized in the work from 1639 as an "oxtail" (cauda bubula in the Latin original). The Slovak name is used in other languages including in Polish, rather than its potential
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    164
    Tisza

    Tisza

    The Tisza or Tisa is one of the main rivers of Central Europe. It rises in Ukraine, and is formed near Rakhiv by the junction of headwaters White Tisa, whose source is in the Chornohora mountains and Black Tisa, which springs in the Gorgany range. It flows roughly along the Romanian border and enters Hungary at Tiszabecs; after passing through Hungary it flows into the Danube in north Serbia (Vojvodina). There, it forms the boundary between the regions of Bačka and Banat. The river also forms short portions of the border between Hungary and Ukraine and between Hungary and Serbia. Once it was called "The most Hungarian river" as until 1920 it flowed within Hungary for its entire length (from source to draining). The Tisza drains an area of about 156,087 km (60,266 sq mi) and has a length of 965 km (600 mi)—the biggest catchment and length of any of Danube tributaries. With the mean annual discharge of 792 m/s (28,000 cu ft/s), its contribution to the Danube's total runoff is about 13%. Names for the river in the countries it flows through are: The river was known as the Tisia in antiquity, and Latin names for it included Tissus, Tisia, Pathissus (Pliny, Naturalis historia, 4.25). In
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    3 votes
    165
    Bodíky

    Bodíky

    Bodíky (Hungarian: Nagybodak, Hungarian pronunciation:[’nɒɟbodɒk]) is a village and municipality in the Dunajská Streda District in the Trnava Region of south-west Slovakia. It has a public water-supply system and sewage system connected to sewage disposal plant. There is a football playground and a public library in the village. Until the end of World War I, it was part of Hungary. In the 15th century, the village belonged to the Pressburg Castle. After the 17th century the Amadé, Kánya, Cseszneky and Pálffy families were the most important land-owners in the village. The village administratively fell within the Dunaszerdahely district of Pozsony County in the Kingdom of Hungary. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovakian troops occupied the area. Under the Treaty of Trianon of 1920, it became officially part of Czechoslovakia and fell within Bratislava County until 1927. In November 1938, the First Vienna Award granted the area to Hungary and it was held by Hungary until 1945. After Soviet occupation in 1945, Czechoslovakian administration returned and the village became officially part of Czechoslovakia by the Paris Peace Treaties in 1947.
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    166
    Snina

    Snina

    Snina is a town in Slovakia located at the confluence of the Cirocha river and the small river Pčolinka in the valley between the Beskydy foothills and the mountain of Vihorlat. It is the closest town with rail and bus connections to the Poloniny National Park. The oldest written records mentioning Snina date back to 1343. Snina as an oppidum (small town) is mentioned in port records ("porta" means the gate into a courtyard) beginning in 1585. In 1598 the first census of houses was made and there were 75 houses in the town at that time. Between 1570 and 1630, it is evident from port records that Snina was the seat of the regional krajňa, or administrative district for the surrounding villages. In 1646 Snina was called "Szinna Varossa" and later "Civitas Szinna" in the archives. In 1785 Snina had 195 houses and 1,430 inhabitants. The town's rulers from 1321 to 1684 were from the Drugeth family, who came from Salerno near Naples. Later, the owner of the lordship of Snina was Terézia van Dernáthová, who was the granddaughter of Žigmung Drugeth. After her death in 1799, her five sons sold all the property to a businessman from Gemer named Jozef Rholl. His children developed the region
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    167
    Belín

    Belín

    Belín is a village and municipality in the Rimavská Sobota District of the Banská Bystrica Region of southern Slovakia. In the village is foodstuff store, public library and football pitch. Important sightseeing is late-classical church. The village arose in the late 12th century. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1349. In 1823 had been in the village 23 houses. Locals were engaged in agriulture and a hand made production of brooms and brushes.
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    168
    Bratislava Castle

    Bratislava Castle

    Bratislava Castle (Slovak:  Bratislavský hrad (help·info), German: Pressburger Schloss, Hungarian: Pozsonyi Vár) is the main castle of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia. The massive rectangular building with four corner towers stands on a quite isolated rocky hill of the Little Carpathians directly above the Danube river in the middle of Bratislava. It is an outstanding feature of the city. It provides an excellent view of Bratislava, of Austria and, when there is good weather, of Hungary. Many legends are connected with the history of the castle. For a short summary of this article see Bratislava The castle site includes the following: The castle building includes 4 towers (one on each corner) and a courtyard with an 80 m deep water well. The biggest tower is the Crown Tower in the south-east from the 13th century, which housed the crown jewels (see History). The outside walls and inside corridors contain fragments of old Gothic and Renaissance construction elements. To the east of the main entrance, one can see the walled up entrance gate from the 16th century. Behind the entrance, there is an arcade corridor and then the big Baroque staircase, which leads to the expositions of
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    169
    Galanta

    Galanta

    Galanta (Hungarian: Galánta, German: Gallandau) is a small town (about 16,000 inhabitants) in Slovakia. It is situated 50 km due east from the Slovak capital Bratislava. Galanta lies in the Danubian Lowland (Podunajská nížina), the warm southern part of Slovakia. There are many agricultural fields around Galanta, where wheat, corn, and other vegetables and fruits are grown. The land around Galanta has almost continuously been inhabited since the neolithic. From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. The first written record of Galanta was made in 1237 in a Royal Decree by Béla IV of Hungary. Through the years, the settlement was under the lordship of various noble families. Beginning in 1421, the Eszterházy family ruled the town and the surrounding area. In 1613 or 1614, Galanta was promoted to a free market town. After break-up of Austria-Hungary in 1918/1920, the town became part of newly created Czechoslovakia. As a result of the First Vienna Award, it returned to Hungary between 1938 and 1945. Galanta is an old town where most historical buildings have unfortunately been damaged or destroyed in World War II. During the Communist
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    170
    Senec

    Senec

    Senec (Hungarian: Szenc) is a town in the Bratislava Region of south-western Slovakia. It is a well known summer tourism and recreation center. The town is attractive not only because of the proximity of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, but also because of the healthy environment and summer resort "Slnečné jazerá" ("Sunny Lakes"). The town was first mentioned in 1252 as "Synci". The contemporary name Senec, used since the first half of the 20th century, is derived from the historic names Zemch and Szempcz. A German historic name was Wartberg. In the 9th century, the territory of Senec became part of the Kingdom of Hungary. In the second half of the 15th century, Hungarian king Matthias Corvinus gave Senec privileges and it got the right of organizing a fair around 1480. In the 19th century, it started to develop after the Pressburg - Budapest railway which runs through the town had been built. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovak troops occupied the area, later acknowledged internationally by the Treaty of Trianon. Between 1938 and 1945 Senec once more became part of Miklós Horthy's Hungary through the First Vienna Award. In 1945, it was
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    171
    Spišské Vlachy

    Spišské Vlachy

    Spiśské Vlachy (Hungarian: Szepesolaszi, German: Wlachi, Wlachy or Wallendorf, Latin: Villa Latina) is a town in eastern Slovakia. It is in the Spiš region (Szepes in Hungarian or Zips in German). It is now administratively in the district of Spišská Nová Ves, which is part of the Košice Region. The adjective "Spišské" is used to distinguish it from 6 other towns listed as "Olasz" or "Olaszi" in an 1828 Hungarian property tax list. Two “Town wards” (suburbs) belong to Spišské Vlachy: It is situated just north of the Hornád River, near its confluence with the Margencanka stream. It is about 20 km east of Spišská Nová Ves and about 42 km northwest of Košice. It is 389 meters above sea level and is located at 48 degrees 57 minutes North and 20 degrees 48 minutes East. It has a temperate climate. Its average temperature is about 6 degrees. The annual rainfall is 650 millimeters. The soil is favorable for meadows with more fertile land to the south. The southern outskirts have caves and small lakes on the Svätojanský (English: Saint John's) stream.
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    172
    Turiec River

    Turiec River

    The Turiec is a river (66 km) in north-western Slovakia. It is a tributary to the Váh, into which it flows near the city of Martin. Its source is in the Veľká Fatra Mountains. The Turiec county is named after this river.
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    173
    Veľký Šariš

    Veľký Šariš

    Veľký Šariš (German: Groß-Scharosch; Hungarian: Nagysáros) is a small town near Prešov in eastern Slovakia. The town is known as the site of the largest brewery in Slovakia - Šariš Brewery. The first written mention of Veľký Šariš dates back to 1217. Veľký Šariš lies at an altitude of 269 metres (883 ft) above sea level and covers an area of 25.73 square kilometres (9.9 sq mi). It is located on the Torysa river, 6 kilometres (4 mi) north-north-west from Prešov. There is also ruins of a big castle here. According to the 2001 census, the town had 4,018 inhabitants. 91.69% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 6.07% Roma, 0.60% Ukrainians and 0.55% Czechs. The religious makeup was 84.59% Roman Catholics, 4.55% people with no religious affiliation, 4.31% Greek Catholics and 2.56% Lutherans.
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    174
    Kysuca River

    Kysuca River

    The Kysuca River (Hungarian: Kiszuca) is a 66.3 km long river in northern Slovakia and it's a right tributary to Váh. The river gives name to the informal Kysuce region. Its source is near the village of Makov. At first, the river flows in northwestern direction, where it flows around Javorníky on the right and Kysucké Beskydy mountains on the left side, passing through the town of Turzovka until the town of Čadca, where it turns south, between Javorníky on the right and Kysucká vrchovina mountains on the left side, passing Horelica, Krásno nad Kysucou, Kysucké Nové Mesto until it pours to Váh in Žilina. In the valley of Kysuca south of Čadca, a railway and an international road (currently E75, in the future D3) passes through it.
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    3 votes
    175
    Senica

    Senica

    Senica (German: Senitz, Hungarian: Szenice) is a town in Trnava Region, western Slovakia. It is located in the north-eastern part of the Záhorie lowland, close to the Little Carpathians. Senica's history is closely related with the Branč castle, built in 1251–1261. It was first mentioned in 1256 and received its city privileges in 1396, confirmed in 1463 and 1492. The city was affected by Turkish wars, anti-Habsburg uprisings and reformation and counter-reformations in the 17th century. In 1746, it became seat of the district within the Nitra county. According to the 2001 census, the city had 21,253 inhabitants. 96.40% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 1.56% Czechs, 0.84% Roma and 0.14 Hungarians. The religious makeup was 47.28% Roman Catholics, 31.18% people with no religious affiliation, and 17.03% Lutherans. A significant silk-making company is based in Senica. The company was established in 1954. Senica is twinned with: In Senica is 4junior school.
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    3 votes
    176
    Liptovský Mikuláš

    Liptovský Mikuláš

    Liptovský Mikuláš ( pronunciation (help·info); until 1952 Liptovský Svätý Mikuláš, German: Liptau-Sankt-Nikolaus; Hungarian: Liptószentmiklós) is a town in northern Slovakia, on the Váh River. It lies in the Liptov region, in Liptov Basin near the Low Tatra and Tatra mountains. The town, known as Liptovský Svätý Mikuláš (or Liptovský Saint Nicholas) before communist times, is also renowned as a town of guilds and culture. From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. The town of Mikuláš (Liptószentmiklós) was first mentioned in the royal deed of King Ladislaus IV in 1286. The first written record mentioning the Church of Saint Nicolaus which was to become the founding element of a larger settlement dates back to 1299. The Church of Saint Nicolaus is the oldest building in the town of Liptovský Mikuláš. Mikuláš was one of the most important centres of crafts in the Liptov region. The craftsmen formed guilds. The oldest guild was the shoemaker's guild mentioned in 1508. There were also other guilds: the guild of smiths, furriers, tailors, hatters and butchers. In 1677, Liptovský Mikuláš (Liptószentmiklós) became the seat of the local
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    4 votes
    177
    Banská Bystrica

    Banská Bystrica

    Banská Bystrica ( Slovak pronunciation (help·info); German: Neusohl; Hungarian: Besztercebánya) is a key city in central Slovakia located on the Hron River in a long and wide valley encircled by the mountain chains of the Low Tatras, the Veľká Fatra, and the Kremnica Mountains. With 78 327 inhabitants, Banská Bystrica is the sixth most populous municipality in Slovakia. It started as a permanent settlement in the 9th century and obtained the municipal privileges of a Hungarian royal town in 1255. The copper mining town acquired its present picturesque look in the Late Middle Ages when the prosperous burghers built its central churches, mansions, and fortifications. It is the capital of the kraj (Banská Bystrica Region) and the okres (Banská Bystrica District). It is also the home of Matej Bel University. As a historical city with an easy access to the surrounding mountains, Banská Bystrica is a popular winter and summer tourist destination. The Slovak name (Banská Bystrica) includes two distinct roots: the adjective Banská (from Slovak baňa – "mine") and the name of the local river Bystrica (from Slavic bystrica – "a swift stream"). The river lent its name to the town as early as
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    2 votes
    178
    Devín Castle

    Devín Castle

    Devín Castle (Slovak: hrad Devín or Devínsky hrad, Hungarian: dévényi vár, German: Burg Theben) is a castle in Devín, which is a borough of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia. Owing to its strategic position, the cliff (altitude of 212 meters) at the confluence of the Danube and Morava rivers was an ideal place for a fort. Its owner could control the important trade route along the Danube as well as one branch of the Amber Road. That is why the site has been settled since the Neolithic and fortified since the Bronze and Iron Age. Later, both the Celts and the Romans built strong fortresses there. In the Roman ruins, the first Christian church located North of the Danube has been identified. The castle stands just inside Slovak territory on the frontier between Slovakia (previously part of Czechoslovakia) and Austria. The border runs from west to east along the Morava River and subsequently the Danube. Prior to 1989, the Iron Curtain between the Eastern Bloc and the West ran just in front of the castle. Although the castle was open to the public, the area surrounding it constituted a restricted military zone, and was heavily fortified with watchtowers and barbed wire. After the
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    2 votes
    179
    Dolná Streda

    Dolná Streda

    Dolná Streda (Hungarian: Alsószerdahely) is a village and municipality in the Galanta District of the Trnava Region of western Slovakia. Oficiálna stránka obce: http://www.dolnastreda.sk/
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    2 votes
    180
    Šaca

    Šaca

    Šaca (Hungarian: Saca) is a borough of Košice, Slovakia. The first written record about Šaca dates back to 1275. Since 1427 the landowners of Šaca were the family of Semsey which built a castle here in the 15th century, however, it was pulled down on the order of the King Matthias Corvinus. Water mills worked in Šaca since the Middle Ages until 1950. After World War II the village became a residential district for builders of a new steelworks company - Východoslovenské železiarne Košice (VSŽ Košice - "Eastern Slovak Iron Works in Košice"). In January 1960 construction started on more than 8 square kilometres of land. In 1965 the first blast furnace was fired up and production in the hot rolling mill and coke plant was started. In four decades the Košice mill has developed into a steel-producing plant that has managed to reach the markets and achieve a position among the significant steel producers. It has been accepted as a member of prestigious international organizations associating iron and steel producers and has become a partner of renowned foreign firms in joint ventures. The new phase in the history of the factory started on November 24, 2000 when the metallurgy production
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    2 votes
    181
    Trenčianske Teplice

    Trenčianske Teplice

    Trenčianske Teplice (German: Trentschinteplitz; Hungarian: Trencsénteplic) is a health resort and small spa town in western Slovakia, in the valley of the river Teplička, at the foothills of the Strážovské vrchy mountains. The town is renowned for its sulphuric and thermal springs. It is a center of recreation and tourism and of various cultural events (e.g. the Summer Festival of Music).The spa provides treatment of rheumatism and post-traumatic disorders. In the middle of the 13th century as terra Teplicza it was property of the Cseszneky de Milvány family. It has been a spa site since the 14th century. As early as the 16th century, the spa was known all over Europe, and was mentioned as the most important of the Kingdom of Hungary. The spa was owned by the Illésházy, an aristocratic family of the Kingdom of Hungary, from 1582 onwards. In 1835, it was bought by the Viennese financier Jozef Sina, who developed the area. The spa was nationalised after the Second World War. A hydroelectric power station (it was producing polyphase AC of 5250 V) was built between 1886–1888 and supplied the town's streetlights as well as surrounding communities (Trenčianska Teplá, Košeca, Ladce) with
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    2 votes
    182
    Trnava

    Trnava

    Trnava ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Tyrnau; Hungarian: Nagyszombat, Latin: Tyrnavia) is a city in western Slovakia, 47 km to the north-east of Bratislava, on the Trnávka river. It is the capital of a kraj (Trnava Region) and of an okres (Trnava District). It is the seat of a Roman Catholic archbishopric (1541–1820 and then again since 1977). The city has a historic center. Because of the many churches within its city walls, Trnava has often been called "parva Roma", i.e. "Little Rome", or more recently, the "Slovak Rome". The name of the city is derived from the Slovak word tŕnie ("thornbush") which characterized the river banks in the region. The Hungarian name (first mentioned in 1238 in the form of Zumbotel) originates from the Hungarian word szombat ("Saturday"), referring to the weekly market fairs held on Saturdays. Permanent settlements on the city's territory are known from the Neolithic period onwards. During the Middle Ages, an important market settlement arose here at the junction of two important roads – from Bohemia to Hungary and from the Mediterranean to Poland. The first written reference to Trnava dates from 1211. In 1238, Trnava was the first town in
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    2 votes
    183
    Vrbové

    Vrbové

    Vrbové (German: Vrbau (modernized:Werbau); Hungarian: Verbó) is a town in the Trnava Region of Slovakia. It has a population of 6,309 as of 2005. The town lies around 8 km (5 mi) northwest from Piešťany. The town features an originally Gothic church from 1397, an Evangelical Lutheran church from 1928-1929 (on the site of an older Protestant church of 1784), a baroque curia from the 17th century, an oriental-style synagogue from 1883, and a modern St. Gorazd Church. The Čerenec Dam (0.46 km²), situated to the northwest of the town, is a recreation area. The present-day town is a very old settlement. In Slavic languages the town's name means willow. The first written reference to the town stems from 1332. at that time it was part of the Čachtice Castle domain . Vrbové received its town charter in 1437, and was devastated by Turkish troops in 1599. The town was famous for its grain markets, promoted mainly by Jews, who made up a large part of the town's population. In the late 20th century, the town was home to clothing (Trikota works), trading and wood-processing industries. Vrbové is infamous for its past as a Jewish ghetto. During World War II, the entire town of Vrbové was a
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    184
    Zvolen

    Zvolen

    Zvolen ( pronunciation (help·info); Hungarian: Zólyom, German: Altsohl is a town in central Slovakia, situated on the confluence of Hron and Slatina rivers, close to Banská Bystrica. With its ancient castle, the town has a historical center, which represents the seat of an okres (Zvolen District). Zvolen has been inhabited since the Paleolithic. In the 9th century, a Slavic settlement (today the Môťová neighborhood) became a regional center of what is now central Slovakia. Zvolen remained the capital of Zólyom county until the 1760s. In the 11th and 12th centuries, one of the largest medieval castles in Europe, Pustý hrad, was constructed. The town, originally built under the castle, lay on an important trade route (Via Magna) from Buda to Kraków. Zvolen was granted town privileges by King Béla IV in the 1230s - as one of the first towns in the Kingdom of Hungary. The privileges were confirmed on December 28, 1243, after the original document was destroyed in war. Later, King Louis I the Great built a new castle, which became a popular hunting resort of the Hungarian kings. The future queen regnant Mary of Hungary and emperor Sigismund celebrated their wedding there in 1385. In
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    185
    Detvianska Huta

    Detvianska Huta

    Detvianska Huta (Mikulášova Huta, 1880 Mikulássowá) is a village and municipality in Detva District, in the Banská Bystrica Region of central Slovakia. It arose in the late 18th century by a merge of villages Komárno and Brakovica and a glass works settlement (Detvianska Huta literally means "Detva (Glass) Works"). Glass works stoped its production at the end of 19th century and from 1920 the village bears its present name.
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    186
    Little Danube

    Little Danube

    The Little Danube (Slovak: Malý Dunaj, Hungarian: Kis-Duna, German: Kleine Donau) is a branch of the river Danube in Slovakia. It splits from the main river near Bratislava, and flows more or less parallel to the Danube until it flows into the river Váh in Kolárovo. Its length is about 128 km. The part of the Váh between Kolárovo and its confluence with the Danube in Komárno is also called Váh Danube (Slovak: Vážsky Dunaj, Hungarian: Vág-Duna). The island between the Danube, the Little Danube and the Váh Danube rivers is Žitný ostrov.
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    187
    Andrejová

    Andrejová

    Andrejová (Ukrainian: Андрійова, Andriyova) is a village and municipality in Bardejov District in the Prešov Region of Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1355. The predominant religion is the Greek Catholic Church with 4.9% Eastern Orthodox. The Catholic Church of Virgin Mary the Protectrice of 1893 can be found in the village. The village lies at an altitude of 325 metres and covers an area of 11.679 km². It has a population of about 362 inhabitants. The village is about 51% Slovak, 20% Ruthenian, 16% Romany and 11% Ukrainian with minorities. The village used to have public library. There is a football pitch and volleyball playground.
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    Bodva

    Bodva

    The Bodva (Hungarian: Bódva, German: Bodwa) is a 110-km long river in Slovakia and Hungary. Its source is in the Slovak Ore Mountains Mountains. The river crosses the border with Hungary near Turňa nad Bodvou, and it flows into the river Sajó in Boldva, north of Miskolc. Two of its tributaries are the Turňa and the Ida. The Bodva flows on the eastern edge of a karstic rock system, therefore it has an unsymmetrical drainage pattern. Up to Medzev, where the river reaches the karst region, and on its left side the Bodva river has a typical treelike river system.
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    189
    Budiná

    Budiná

    Budiná (Hungarian: Budaszállás) is a village and municipality in the Lučenec District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1393 (1393 Brtolehutaya, 1467 Budalehotha). It belonged to Divín castle. From 1554 to 1595 it suffered Turkish occupation.
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    190
    Dunajec River

    Dunajec River

    The Dunajec is a river running through southern Poland. It is the right tributary of the Vistula River. It begins in Nowy Targ at the junction of two short mountain rivers, Czarny Dunajec and Biały Dunajec (Black and White Dunajec). Dunajec forms a border between Poland and Slovakia for 27 kilometers in the Pieniny Środkowe (Slovak: Centrálne Pieniny) range, east of the Czorsztyn reservoir. It is the only river taking waters from the Slovak territory to the Baltic Sea. The Dunajec is 274 kilometers long, running through southern Poland for 247 kilometers, which makes it Poland's fourteenth longest river. It has a basin area of 6,804 square kilometres (4,852 in Poland, and 1,952 in Slovakia). On the Slovak/Polish border, it flows through the Zamagurie region, with attractions such as the Dunajec River Gorge, the Trzy Korony massif with a 500 metres (1,600 ft) precipice, Červený Kláštor, and two Pieniny castles in Czorsztyn and Niedzica. Below the two source streams Dunajec flows through a broad valley called Nowotarska Basin. It then supplies the waters of the dam in Niedzica (Jezioro Czorsztyńskie Lake) and the dam in Sromowce Wyżne (Sromowce Wyżne reservoir). Flowing through the
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    191
    Kysucké Nové Mesto

    Kysucké Nové Mesto

    Kysucké Nové Mesto (German: Kischützneustadt / Oberneustadl; Hungarian: Kiszucaújhely) is a town in Žilina Region, Slovakia, near the city of Žilina. The first written record to the Kysuce region, which was relatively uninhabited at that time, was in 1244, and to the town in 1325 under name Congsberg. The inhabitants were living from agriculture, handicraft and trade. Kysucké Nové Mesto lies at an altitude of 358 metres (1,175 ft) above sea level and covers an area of 26.414 square kilometres (10.2 sq mi). It is located in the Kysuca river valley, between the Javorníky and Kysucká vrchovina mountains, about 10 km (6.21 mi) north of Žilina. According to the 2001 census, the town had 16,558 inhabitants. 95.13% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 1.02% Czechs and 0.79% Roma and Germans. The religious make-up was 86.20% Roman Catholics, 6.79% people with no religious affiliation and 0.47% Lutherans.
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    192
    Lučenec

    Lučenec

    Lučenec ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Lizenz; Hungarian: Losonc; Latin: Lutetia Hungarorum) is a town in the Banská Bystrica Region of south-central Slovakia. Historically, it was part, and in the 18th century the capital, of the Nógrád county of the Kingdom of Hungary. In 1918, as a result of the Treaty of Trianon, it became a part of Czechoslovakia. The town has a large abandoned synagogue, built in 1924, which served a large Jewish population before World War II. Lučenec is the economic centre of the whole Novohrad region, which includes districts Rimavská Sobota, Poltár and Veľký Krtíš. Lučenec and its surroundings were inhabited in the Stone Ages. Slavs moved to this area in the 6th and 7th century as the first permanent settlers and the Hungarians joined them in the 10th century. The first indirect mention of Lučenec was in 1128, when Lambert built a chapel in honour of Virgin Mary. The first direct mention of Lučenec was in 1247 under the name Luchunch, but until the first half of the 15th century it was only a village, and was located off the main trade routes. In 1442, Lučenec was conquered by the Hussites troops under command of John Jiskra of Brandýs and in 1451
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    193
    Nazi Germany

    Nazi Germany

    Nazi Germany, also known as the Third Reich, is the common name for Germany when it was a totalitarian state ruled by Adolf Hitler and his National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP). On 30 January 1933 Hitler became Chancellor of Germany, quickly eliminating all opposition to rule as sole leader. The state idolized Hitler as its Führer ("leader"), centralizing all power in his hands. Historians have emphasized the hypnotic effect of his rhetoric on large audiences, and of his eyes in small groups. Kessel writes, "Overwhelmingly...Germans speak with mystification of Hitler's 'hypnotic' appeal..." Under the "leader principle", the Führer's word was above all other laws. Top officials reported to Hitler and followed his policies, but they had considerable autonomy. The government was not a coordinated, cooperating body, but rather a collection of factions struggling to amass power and gain favor with the Führer. In the midst of the Great Depression, the Nazi government restored prosperity and ended mass unemployment using heavy military spending and a mixed economy of free-market and central-planning practices. Extensive public works were undertaken, including the construction
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    Nitra Region

    Nitra Region

    The Nitra Region (Slovak: Nitriansky kraj) is one of the administrative regions of Slovakia. It was first established in 1923 and from 1996 exists in its present borders. It consists of seven districts /okresy/ and 354 municipalities, from which 15 have a town status. The economy of the region focuses more on agriculture, than in other Slovakian regions. Nitra is its seat, largest city and cultural and economic center. This region with a long history is situated in the southwest of Slovakia, mostly in the eastern part of the Danubian Lowland. It is divided into two sub-units: the Danubian Flat in the south-west, with eastern part of the Žitný ostrov island, and the Danubian Hills in the north, centre and east. Mountain ranges reaching into the region are: Považský Inovec in the north-west, where the region's highest point, Veľký Inovec, is located, Tribeč in the north from Nitra, Pohronský Inovec in the north-east and Štiavnické vrchy in the east. Major rivers are the Danube in the south, Váh in the south-west, Nitra in the western-central part, Hron in the east and Ipeľ in the south-east. As for administrative divisions, the region borders Trenčín Region in the north, Banská
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    Sobrance

    Sobrance

    Sobrance (German: Sobranz, Hungarian: Szobránc) is a town in Košice Region, Slovakia, around 15 km from Uzhhorod, Ukraine, and 22 km east of Michalovce. Located in the Eastern Slovak Lowland not far from the Vihorlat Mountains, it is the easternmost town in Slovakia. The first written record comes from 1344, when Sobrance gained town status in 1351. In these times 1910 the town had 1216 inhabitants, 538 Hungarians and 577 Slovaks. Before First World War town was part of Austria-Hungary. After the First World War as result of the Treaty of Trianon town became part of newly founded Czechoslovakia and became the capital city of its own district. During the Slovak-Hungarian War Sobrance became the part of Hungary. During Second World War town was heavily damaged and after the war town became part of Czechoslovakia again, but did not immediately regain its district status. Since the Dissolution of Czechoslovakia, Sobrance has been part of Slovakia. It regained its district town status in 1996. The first reference to Jewish residents appears in the May 15, 1739 Jewish Conscription of Ung County which recorded only one Jewish family. The head of the household was Marko Joseffovics (Marko
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    196
    Belá nad Cirochou

    Belá nad Cirochou

    Belá nad Cirochou is a large village and municipality in Snina District in the Prešov Region of north-eastern Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1451. The municipality lies at an altitude of 207 metres and covers an area of 17.356 km². It has a population of about 3315 people.
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    197
    Diakovce

    Diakovce

    Diakovce (Hungarian: Deáki) is an old village and municipality in Šaľa District, in the Nitra Region of southwest Slovakia. The village lies at an altitude of 118 metres and covers an area of 26.28 km². In the 9th century, the territory of Diakovce became part of the Kingdom of Hungary. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1002 meaning that it is one of the oldest recorded villages in Slovakia. In 1001, Stephen I of Hungary deployed Benedictines here. From that time, the area was the property of the abbey of Pannonhalma. In 1228 a twin-towered Romanesque cathedral, the oldest monument in Slovakia, ever built. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovak troops occupied the area, later acknowledged internationally by the Treaty of Trianon. Between 1938 and 1945 Diakovce once more became part of Miklós Horthy's Hungary through the First Vienna Award. From 1945 until the Velvet Divorce, it was part of Czechoslovakia. Since then it has been part of Slovakia. It has a population of about 2235 people. The village is about 72% Magyar and 28% Slovak. The village has a public library, a gym a swimming pool and a football pitch.
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    198
    Ťahanovce

    Ťahanovce

    Ťahanovce [pronunciation: 'tyahanoutse] is a city part of Košice, Slovakia. The first written mention about Ťahanovce is dated back to 1263. It was an independent village until 1969 when it was connected with Košice. Ťahanovce is home to approximately 2,000 (prevailingly elder) people and it is closely connected with the city part Sídlisko Ťahanovce.
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    199
    Trebišov

    Trebišov

    Trebišov (Hungarian: Tőketerebes; German: Trebischau) is a small industrial town in the easternmost part of Slovakia, with a population of around 23,000. The town is an administrative, economic and cultural center with machine (Vagónka) and building materials industries. The first archaeological findings are from the Neolithic. Tombs were found from the Otomani Culture of the early Bronze Age and the building structures from Hallstatt Culture from late Bronze Age. The name of Trebišov is first mentioned in 1219 as Terebus, later in 1254 as Terebes, and in 1341 as Therebes, in 1441 the sources depict as Felse Terebes, Also Terebes (Upper and Lower Trebišov). The village is also mentioned in 1330, when it received town status for the first time. The castle and the village became one settlement in the 14th century. The first written reference to the castle stems from 1254. This castle of Parič (Párics) stood at the border of the village. The village originally was established to serve the castle. The castle was built by "Terebesi" family from "Kaplyon" nobility. Károly Róbert has conquered the castle in 1317 during the fight with Petenye fia Péter and granted the land as gift to Fülöp
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    200
    Tvrdošín

    Tvrdošín

    Tvrdošín (German: Turdoschin (rare); Hungarian: Turdossin; Polish: Twardoszyn) is a town in central Slovakia. The town is located at the confluence of the Orava and Oravica rivers, 12 km (7 mi) from the Polish borders and cca. 32 km (20 mi) from Dolný Kubín. It consists of the boroughs of Krásna Hôrka, Medvedzie, and Tvrdošín. The town was mentioned in the Zobor documents in 1111 and in the document of Béla III of Hungary in 1183. It received royal free town privileges in 1369. According to the 2001 census, the town had 9,544 inhabitants. 99.03% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 0.53% Czechs and 0.19% Polish. The religious make-up was 92.10% Roman Catholics, 4.84% people with no religious affiliation and 1.18% Lutherans.
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    Vlkolínec

    Vlkolínec

    Vlkolínec, Slovakia, is a picturesque village under the administration of the town of Ružomberok. Historically, however, it was a separate village. The first written mention of the village came from 1376 and after 1882 it became part of Ružomberok. Its name is probably derived from the Slovak word "vlk", i. e. wolf. Vlkolínec has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1993, and is one of ten Slovak villages that have been given the status of a folk architecture reservations. This status was granted because the village is an untouched and complex example of folk countryside architecture of the region of the Northern Carpathians. Vlkolínec, situated in the centre of Slovakia, is a remarkably intact settlement with the traditional features of a central European village. It is the region’s most complete group of these kinds of traditional log houses, often found in mountainous areas. The village consists of more than 45 log houses each of them made up of two or three rooms. A wooden belfry from the 18th century as well as the baroque chapel has also been preserved. Houses No. 16 and 17 are turned into the folk museum with all the instruments of daily life and work.
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    202
    Vranov nad Topľou

    Vranov nad Topľou

    Vranov nad Topľou (Slovak before 1927 and from 1944-1969: Vranov; German: Frö(h)nel / Vronau an der Töpl (rare); Hungarian: Varannó) is a city of approximately 23,000 inhabitants in eastern Slovakia, situated near Košice and Prešov, and between the Topľa River and the Ondava River. Parts: Vranov nad Topľou (proper); Čemerné Vranov nad Toplou occupies the northwest bulge of the Eastern Slovak Lowland (Východoslovenská nížina) in the upper part of the region called Zemplín between the rivers Topľa and Ondava. First archaeological finds stem from the Migration Period. The earliest inhabitants of the area may have been Celtic tribes, especially the Boii which arrived in what is now Slovakia in 150-100 B.C. In about 380 A.D. the Huns arrived in what is now Hungary, and their empire flourished until 455 A.D. The Gepidi, a Celtic tribe lived in the area from 260-567 when they were conquered by the Lombards and Avars. Asian Avars arrived in the mid 6th century. Some slavs entered the area from the north but were assimilated by the Avars after 560 A.D. Ostragoths, Franks, Bulgarians also conquered the area prior to the re-arrival of the Huns 896 when they crossed the surrounding Carpathian
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    203
    Želiezovce

    Želiezovce

    Želiezovce (Hungarian: Zselíz, (formerly) Zseliz, (til 1895) Zeliz, Zeléz, German: Zelis (rare)) is a town in Slovakia in the Nitra Region, in the Levice District, near the Hron river. The territory of the settlement was inhabited as early as the Bronze Age, the Quadi period and the Great Moravian period. The town was first mentioned in 1274. It was heavily damaged at the end of World War II. The town gave name to the archeological Želiezovce group (named after a find in Veľký Pesek, now part of the village Sikenica, which was part of Želiezovce in 1986-1992). According to the 2001 census, the town had 7,522 inhabitants. 51.25% of inhabitants were Hungarians, 47.10% Slovaks, 0.55% Roma and 0.49% Czechs. The religious make-up was 61.27% Roman Catholics, 18.43% people with no religious affiliation, and 6.37% Lutherans. The town is known for a former Neoclassical residence of Count Johann Karl Esterházy, where the Austrian composer Franz Schubert taught music to the Count's daughters Maria and Karoline in the summers of 1818 and 1824. Apart from a nice large park, there is another important building: the Schubert House or Owl Chateau (Slovak: Soví zámoček, Magyar: Baglyosház), where
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    Blatná na Ostrove

    Blatná na Ostrove

    Blatná na Ostrove (Hungarian: Sárosfa, Hungarian pronunciation:[’ʃaːroʃfɒ]) is a village and municipality in the Dunajská Streda District in the Trnava Region of south-west Slovakia. It has a post-office, a food store and a petrol station. There is also a football playground and a public library in the village. In the 9th century, the territory of Blatná na Ostrove became part of the Kingdom of Hungary. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovak troops occupied the area, later acknowledged internationally by the Treaty of Trianon. Between 1938 and 1945 Blatná na Ostrove once more became part of Miklós Horthy's Hungary through the First Vienna Award. From 1945 until the Velvet Divorce, it was part of Czechoslovakia. Since then it has been part of Slovakia.
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    Bratislava Region

    Bratislava Region

    The Bratislava Region (Slovak: Bratislavský kraj) is one of the administrative regions of Slovakia. Its capital is Bratislava. The region was first established in 1923 and in its present borders exists from 1996. It is the richest region in Slovakia, the region with the highest level of urbanisation, 85% and according to 2012 statistics it is with €41,800 GDP per capita the fifth richest EU region. It is also the smallest of the eight regions of Slovakia. The region is located in the south-western part of Slovakia and has an area of 2,053 km² and a population of 622,706 (2009). The region is split by the Little Carpathians which start in Bratislava and continue north-eastwards; these mountains separate two lowlands, the Záhorie lowland in the west and the fertile Danubian Lowland in the east, which grows mainly wheat and maize. Major rivers in the region are the Morava River, the Danube and the Little Danube; the last of these, together with the Danube, encircle the Žitný ostrov in the south-east. There are three protected landscape areas in the region: the Little Carpathians, Záhorie and Dunajské luhy. The region borders Trnava Region in the north and east, Győr-Moson-Sopron
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    Brzotín

    Brzotín

    Brzotín (Hungarian: Berzéte) is a village and municipality in the Rožňava District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia.
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    208
    Bučany

    Bučany

    Bučany is a municipality of Trnava District in the Trnava region of Slovakia.
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    209
    Čierny Balog

    Čierny Balog

    Čierny Balog (until 1927 also „Balog“, or „Čierny Hronec) is a municipality in Brezno District, in the Banská Bystrica Region of central Slovakia. The village arose after 1882 (1888 mentioned as Feketebalog) by a merge of 13 villages (e.g. Balog, Krám, Dobroč, Dolina). It played an important role during World War II, as one of the centers of the anti-Nazi Slovak National Uprising.
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    210
    Gelnica

    Gelnica

    Gelnica (German: Göllnitz, Hungarian: Gölnicbánya) is a town in the Košice Region of Slovakia. It has a population of 6,171. It is located in the northern part of the Slovak Ore Mountains, in the Hnilec river valley, which flows few kilometres downstream into Hornád. The town lies at the both banks of Hnilec, has an altitude of 375 m, and is located around 38 km (23.61 mi) from Košice. Carpathian Germans chiefly from Bavaria began to settle the formerly Slavic settlement during the 13th century. By 1264 it was an established mining town and became a royal mining town of the Kingdom of Hungary by 1276, from where the first mentioned is recorded (as "Gelnic"). For many years Gelnica was a chief mining town in the Spiš region of Slovakia. Silver, copper, but also gold, quicksilver, lead and iron ore were mined in the mines. The German name Göllnitz comes from the Slavic "Gnilec" (Hnilec), from which the new Slovak name Gelnica is derived. The Hungarian Gölnicbánya indicated mining activity in the town. The town includes the ruins of a medieval castle, destroyed by a fire in 1685. Other attractions include a Gothic church and Renaissance town hall, both remodelled along Baroque lines,
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    Hungary

    Hungary

    Hungary /ˈhʌŋɡəri/ (Hungarian: Magyarország [ˈmɒɟɒrorsaːɡ] ( listen)) is a landlocked country in Central Europe. It is situated in the Carpathian Basin and is bordered by Slovakia to the north, Ukraine, and Romania to the east, Serbia, and Croatia to the south, Slovenia to the southwest and Austria to the west. The country's capital, and largest city, is Budapest. Hungary is a member of the European Union, NATO, the OECD, the Visegrád Group, and is a Schengen state. The official language is Hungarian, also known as Magyar, which is part of the Finno-Ugric group and is the most widely spoken non-Indo-European language in the European Union. Following a Celtic (after c. 450 BC) and a Roman (AD 9 – c. 430) period, the foundation of Hungary was laid in the late 9th century by the Hungarian prince Árpád, whose great-grandson Saint Stephen I was crowned with a crown sent by the pope from Rome in 1000 AD. The Kingdom of Hungary existed for 946 years, and at various points was regarded as one of the cultural centres of the Western world. After about 150 years of partial Ottoman occupation (1541–1699), Hungary was integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy, and later constituted half of the
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    212
    Považská Bystrica

    Považská Bystrica

    Považská Bystrica ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Waagbistritz; Hungarian: Vágbeszterce) is a town in northwestern Slovakia. It is located on the Váh river, around 30 km from the city of Žilina. It belongs to Upper Váh region of tourism. Považská Bystrica is situated in a fold of mountain ranges Strážovské vrchy (1213 m) and Javorníky (1071 m a.s.l.). Mountains offer an attractive experience to trekkers and mountain-bikers in summer season, cross-country and skiing opportunities in winter season. Veľký Manín mountain (890 m a.s.l.) dominates the town skyline providing views from most places in the town. On the hill next to the town on the opposite side of the river Váh lies the ruins of Považský hrad castle with two manor houses beneath, to which towns history is closely bounded. Another popular tourist attraction close to the town is a breath-taking canyon Manínska tiesňava. Canyon splits Veľký and Malý Manín mountains. It is an internationally sought-after place-to-die for rock climbers. It is also less known as one of the filming sites for The NeverEnding Story (film) in 1984. Just a few kilometers away lies another highly challenging reef formation: Súľovské skaly. To sum
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    Kráľova hoľa

    Kráľova hoľa

    Kráľova hoľa (German: Königsberg; Hungarian: Király-hegy, literally "King's Bald Mountain") is the highest mountain (1,946 m) of the eastern part of the Low Tatras in central Slovakia. Four rivers rise at its foot: Čierny Váh, Hnilec, Hornád, and Hron. The summit, easily accessible by hiking trails from Telgárt as well as by a paved road from Šumiac (inaccessible by motor cars, except for the mountain rescue service and maintenance workers of the TV transmitter on the summit), offers a panoramic view of Spiš, the Tatras, Liptov, and the Upper Hron Valley. Largely deforested by exploitative timber harvesting in the early 19th century, its timberline was restored to its natural elevation of about 1,650 m (5,413 ft.) through the efforts of Ludwig Greiner in the second half of that century. Kráľova hoľa is often depicted in Slovak folklore and Romantic poetry as a safe refuge of heroes and highwaymen, namely Juraj Jánošík. As a metaphor of homeland in folk ballads (such as Na Kráľovej holi) and particularly in one of the best-known Slovak poems The Death of Jánošík (1862) by Ján Botto, the mountain has become one of informal Slovak national symbols along with Kriváň. During the
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    214
    Rysy

    Rysy

    Rysy (Slovak: Rysy, Polish pronunciation: [ˈrɨsɨ]; German: Meeraugspitze, Hungarian: Tengerszem-csúcs) is a mountain in the crest of the High Tatras, lying on the border between Poland and Slovakia. Rysy has three peaks: the middle at 2,503 m (8,212 ft); the north-western at 2,499 m (8,199 ft); and the south-eastern at 2,473 m (8,114 ft). The north-western peak is the highest point of Poland; the other two peaks are on the Slovak side of the border, in the Prešov Region. Experts assume that the Polish and Slovak name Rysy, meaning "scratches" or "crevices", refers to a series of gullies, either those on the western slopes of Żabie Ridge or the very prominent 500 m (1,600 ft) high gully and numerous smaller ones on the northern side. A folk explanation on the Slovak side says that the name comes from the plural word rysy meaning "lynxes", although the habitat of the lynx does not extend above the timberline. The Hungarian name Tengerszem-csúcs and the German name Meeraugspitze mean "eye-of-the-sea peak", from the glacial lake at the northern foot of the mountain, called "eye of the sea" (Morskie Oko in Polish). The first known ascent was made in 1840, by Ede Blásy and his guide Ján
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    Banská Štiavnica

    Banská Štiavnica

    Banská Štiavnica ( pronunciation (help·info); German: Schemnitz, Hungarian: Selmecbánya - often the short form is used: Selmec; Turkish: Şelmec Ban'a) is a town in central Slovakia, in the middle of an immense caldera created by the collapse of an ancient volcano. For its size, the caldera is known as Štiavnica Mountains. Banská Štiavnica has a population of more than 10,000. It is a completely preserved medieval town. Because of their historical value, the town and its surroundings were proclaimed by the UNESCO to be a World Heritage Site on December 11, 1993. The fate of Banská Štiavnica has been closely linked to the exploitation of its abundant resources of silver ore. According to evidence from excavations, the site was settled during the Neolithic period. The first mining settlement was founded by Celts in the 3rd century BC. It was probably occupied by the Celtic Cotini tribe. Roman authors mentioned mining activities of the Cotini, who had lived in present-day central Slovakia until they were deported to Pannonia within the Marcomannic Wars by Rome. The site was also settled by early Slavs and a Slavic fortified settlement was situated here in the 10th and 11th century. The
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    Biel

    Biel

    Biel (Hungarian: Bély) is a village and municipality in the Trebišov District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia. The village is about 75% Hungarian.
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    Brdárka

    Brdárka

    Brdárka (Hungarian: Berdárka) is a village and municipality in the Rožňava District in the Košice Region of eastern Slovakia.
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    Croatia

    Croatia

    Croatia (/kroʊˈeɪʃə/ kroh-AY-shə; Croatian: Hrvatska pronounced [xř̩ʋaːtskaː]), officially the Republic of Croatia (Croatian: Republika Hrvatska  listen (help·info)), is a unitary democratic parliamentary republic in Europe at the crossroads of Central Europe, the Balkans, and the Mediterranean. Its capital and largest city is Zagreb. The country is divided into 20 counties and the city of Zagreb. Croatia covers 56,594 square kilometres (21,851 square miles) and has diverse, mostly continental and Mediterranean climates. Croatia's Adriatic Sea coast contains more than a thousand islands. The country's population is 4.29 million, most of whom are Croats, with the most common religious denomination being Roman Catholicism. In the early 7th century the Croats arrived in the area of present-day Croatia. They organised the state into two duchies by the 9th century. Tomislav became the first king by 925 AD, elevating Croatia to the status of a kingdom. The Kingdom of Croatia retained its sovereignty for nearly two centuries, reaching its peak during the rule of Kings Peter Krešimir IV and Dmitar Zvonimir. Croatia entered a personal union with Hungary in 1102. In 1527, faced with Ottoman
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    Dechtice

    Dechtice

    Dechtice is a municipality of Trnava District in the Trnava region of Slovakia.
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    Kasprowy Wierch-Kasprov vrch

    Kasprowy Wierch-Kasprov vrch

    Kasprowy Wierch (Polish pronunciation: [kasˈprɔvɨ ˈvjɛrx]) or Kasprov vrch (in Slovak) is a mountain in the Western Tatras. From 1910 onwards Kasprowy Wierch became very popular among ski tourists so much so a Aerial tramway(cabin aerial ropeway) or téléphérique, reaching almost to the summit, was built between 1935-1936 as such it is one of the oldest in Europe. As part of its modernization, the cabin aerial ropeway was closed for a period until December 2007. In 1938 meteorological and astronomical observatories were built here. Users of the cable car have to change cars midway at Myślenicke Turnie mount. At the top station there are restaurants and information offices with further ski lifts just outside. The cable cars are extremely popular and tourists regularly have to wait up to 3 hours to buy tickets - roughly the same time it would take to ascend the mountain on foot. The cable car service has caused environmental concerns and protest both in 1935 and 2006. In 1961-1962 and in 1967-1968 chairlifts were built on the slopes of the mountain and they run in two sections. The mountain delineates the border between Poland and the Slovak Republic and it is possible to cross the
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    Košice Region

    Košice Region

    The Košice Region (Slovak: Košický kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. The region was first established in 1923 and in its present borders exists from 1996. It consists of 11 districts (okresy) and 440 municipalities, from which 17 have a town status. About one third of the region population lives in the aglomeration of Košice, which is undoubtfully its main economic and cultural center. It is located in the southern part of eastern Slovakia and covers an area of 6,752 km². The western part of the region is composed of the eastern part of the Slovak Ore Mountains, including its subdivisions: Slovak Karst, Slovak Paradise, Volovské vrchy, Čierna hora. The Hornád Basin is located in the north-west. The area between Slovak Ore Mountains and Slanské vrchy is covered by the Košice Basin, named after the city. Area east of Slanské vrchy is covered by the Eastern Slovak Lowland and there is a volcanic range of Vihorlat Mountains in the north-east, close to the Ukrainian border. Bigger rivers include Slaná in the south-west, Hornád in the west and centre, Uh and Bodrog in the east, along with a small part of the Tisza river in the extreme south-east. As for
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    Krompachy

    Krompachy

    Krompachy (German: Krompach, Hungarian: Korompa) is a town in Slovakia, with a rich mining and metallurgical history, well-known both in Slovakia and in its close neighboring countries for its Plejsy ski center. It is believed that the town was founded at some point in the mid 14th century. From then onwards, it was a centre of mining and metallurgy until the end of the 20th century, particularly focussed on the iron and copper industries. At the start of the 20th century, the Krompachy Ironworks (Krompašská železiareň) had around 3,500 employees and was the biggest ironworks of its time in the Kingdom of Hungary. The Ironworks closed after World War I. In 1921, there was a bloody uprising, known as the Krompachy Uprising (Slovak: Krompašská vzbura) in the town. Since 1991, following the industrial decline and as a result of large scale investment, Plejsy became an internationally visited alpine ski centre and became known as a holiday destination. As well as the skiing centre at Plejsy, Krompachy is known for its scenery of hills, valleys and fields. This, together with a number of local natural and cultural sites, have made the town a year-round tourist destination. Krompachy is
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    223
    Malacky

    Malacky

    Malacky (-Slovak, German: Malatzka, Hungarian: Malacka) is a town and municipality in western Slovakia around 35 km north from capital Bratislava. From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. The name of the city, which was first mentioned in writing in 1206, refers to the Hungarian word "Malacka" which means "piglet" in Hungarian and because the town seal features a pig, although some Slovaks deny the Hungarian origin of the name and argue that it refers to a local stream. It is one of the centres of the region "Záhorie", between the Little Carpathians in the east and Morava River in the west and a cultural and economic hub for nearby villages such as Gajary, Kostolište, Veľké Leváre and Jakubov. The town is located on the large Prague-Brno-Bratislava highway, and many residents commute daily to Bratislava. The Little Carpathians mountain range with its network of signposted trails provides excellent opportunities for mountain biking. The most prominent sites in Malacky include the Franciscan church of the Immaculate Conception of Mary, the so-called "Palffy Palace" and the renovated synagogue. The church includes a precise from 1653
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    Rajčanka

    Rajčanka

    Rajčanka or Rajčianka (Hungarian: Rajcsánka) is a 47,5 km long river in northern Slovakia springing in Strážovské vrchy near Čičmany and pouring into Váh in Žilina. It forms the border of Lúčanská Malá Fatra Mountains and of Strážovské vrchy. 32 km of its length are navigable. Cities along its course are: Rajec, Rajecké Teplice, Žilina.
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    Slatina River

    Slatina River

    Slatina is the name of a 55 km (32 mi) long river in Slovakia. Its source is located in Poľana, its mouth in Zvolen. It is a left tributary of the Hron.
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    Trnava Region

    Trnava Region

    The Trnava Region (Slovak: Trnavský kraj) is one of the eight Slovak administrative regions. It was established in 1996, from 1923 were Trnava Region districts mostly part of Bratislava Region. It consists of 251 municipalities, from which 16 have a town status. It is the second most densely populated region in Slovakia. It is the second most densely populated region in Slovakia. It is located in the middlewest part of Slovakia and forms a territorial band between the Bratislava Region and the rest of Slovakia, between Austrian and Czech borders in the north and Hungarian border in the south. The part north of the Little Carpathians is part of the Záhorie Lowland, with its two subdivisions: hilly Chvojnická pahorkatina and flat Borská nížina. In addition to these, the Myjava Hills and the White Carpathians reach into the area. The fertile Danubian Lowland is located south of the Little Carpathians, again with two subdivisions: the Danubian Flat in the south, containing river island of Žitný ostrov (Rye Island) and the Danubian Hills in the north, where it also borders the Považský Inovec range app. on the line Hlohovec - Piešťany - border with the Trenčín Region. Major rivers are
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    Vysoké Tatry

    Vysoké Tatry

    Vysoké Tatry (literally, High Tatras), informally Mesto Vysoké Tatry (literally, The Town of High Tatras), is a town at the feet of the Slovak part of High Tatras in Slovakia including all the major resorts in that region. It was created in 1990, and its official name from 1990 to 1999 was Starý Smokovec, which is the name of one of its major settlements. The town of Vysoké Tatry is special in many respects. It is not a true town, but a conglomerate of separate and different settlements (originally separate villages), whose only common feature is that they are the main tourist resorts in the Slovak High Tatras, while being connected through a common railway network (the Tatra Railway). After the country's capital, the town is Slovakia's major tourist destination. On December 31, 2004, it had 4953 inhabitants, excluding tourists. It is located at an elevation of 1,010 m (3,310 ft) above sea level. Covering 380.216 km (146.8 sq mi), it is Slovakia's largest urban area. The local authority, cultural centre, and main shops are located in the settlement of Starý Smokovec. The town consists of three cadastral areas, which consist of 14 settlements: The present-day town was created in
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    Chlmec

    Chlmec

    Chlmec is a village and municipality in Humenné District in the Prešov Region of north-east Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1451. The municipality lies at an altitude of 234 metres and covers an area of 7.916 km². It has a population of about 562 people.
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    Čakany

    Čakany

    Čakany (Hungarian: Pozsonycsákány, Hungarian pronunciation:[’poʒoɲtʃaːkaːɲ], "Pozsony" meaning "Pressburg", "csákány" meaning "pickaxe") is a village and municipality in the Dunajská Streda District in the Trnava Region of south-west Slovakia. In the 9th century, the territory of Čakany became part of the Kingdom of Hungary. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovak troops occupied the area, later acknowledged internationally by the Treaty of Trianon. Between 1938 and 1945 Čakany once more became part of Miklós Horthy's Hungary through the First Vienna Award. From 1945 until the Velvet Divorce, it was part of Czechoslovakia. Since then it has been part of Slovakia.
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    Cerovo

    Cerovo

    Cerovo (earlier Čerové, Čerowo; Hungarian: Ceri) is a village and municipality in the Krupina District of the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. The village was first mentioned as Chery in a charter in 1273, its name is derived from Old Slavic "cěrъ"/Slovak "cer"/Hungarian "cser" (the Hungarian word is derived from the Slavic one), which means Turkey oak. It had Slovak inhabitants. Scarce ruins of old Litava castle can be found south-west of Cerovo on northern end of Pustý hrad mountain. The Litava Castle was built by Hunt or his son, Big Derž (Derš, Hungarian: Ders) from the Hunt-Poznan family. The castle was first mentioned in 1276. In this year, the grandchildren of Lambert, of the Hunt-Poznan family, Small Derž (Ders) and Demeter captured Litava and robbed values of 3000 marks and charters. Therefore the king sentenced them loss of property, and gave their property to Big Derž from the Hunt-Poznan family. Before 1307 Nicholas Túri Kövér, son of Big Derž of the Hunt-Poznan, exchanged castle Litava with his relatives, Derž and Demeter of Hunt. In 1318 master Tomáš, son of Derž of Hunt-Poznan, protested against the occupation of Litava by Matthew Csák. The castle perished not
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    Ducové

    Ducové

    Ducové (Hungarian: Ducó) is a municipality (village) situated in western Slovakia, near the spa town of Piešťany. It was part of the municipality Moravany nad Váhom from 1976 to 1992. The village lies under the Váh Inovec. Ducové has area of 2.63 km² and population of 357 (as of 2004). Ducové is famous for an archaeological site on the Kostolec hill, where an important Great Moravian castle has been unearthed. The castle, including a small palace, a Christian rotunda church, and a graveyard of local nobles, served as the administrative center of the Váh river valley (the Trenčín county) during the 9th century and the first half of the 10th century. It was founded after the nearby Nitrian castle in Pobedim was destroyed during unification of Great Moravia by Mojmír I. Ducové castle was destroyed itself by Magyar invaders around 955. Some parts of the castle (such as its palisades) have been reconstructed by archaeologists. Excavations of older settlements from the Stone Age, Bronze Age and the Roman era indicate that Ducové benefited from its location on the Amber Road well before the Great Moravian era.
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    Dudince

    Dudince

    Dudince (before 1927 Ďudince, Hungarian: Gyűgy, rarely German: Dudintze) is a spa town in southern Slovakia, with a population of 2,000. It is known for its healing mineral waters and spas. In Dudince is nowdays small thermal pool and spa. It is located at the foothills of the Krupina Plain in the valley of the Štiavnica river, around 27 km south-west from Krupina and 15 km north from Šahy. Besides the main settlement, it also has a formerly independent village Merovce (annexed 1960). In town and near surround you can found travertine piles and "Romish" spa (see image gallery). Archaeological discoveries show that the town was inhabited in the Neolithic. The first written acknowledgement dates back to 1284 as Dyud. The oldest mentioned about hot springs was in 1551. According to the 2001 census, the town had 1,500 inhabitants. 95.67% of inhabitants were Slovaks, 3.53% Hungarians and 0.20% Roma. The religious make-up was 55.67% Roman Catholics, 28.93% Lutherans and 11.27% people with no religious affiliation.
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    Hron

    Hron

    Hron (Slovak: Hron, German: Gran, Hungarian: Garam, Latin: Granus) is a 298 km long left tributary of the Danube and the second longest river in Slovakia. It flows from its source located in the Low Tatra mountains (under Kráľova hoľa) through central and southern Slovakia, pouring into the Danube near Štúrovo and Esztergom. Major cities and towns situated on the Hron are Brezno, Banská Bystrica, Sliač, Zvolen, Žiar nad Hronom, Žarnovica, Nová Baňa, Tlmače, Levice, Želiezovce, and Štúrovo. The river's basin covers approximately 11% of Slovakia's territory. The name of the river was mentioned for the first time in 170, when Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius wrote his Meditations at the Hron (Latin: Granus) river. The first recorded medieval name was Gron (1075). From the 17th century until the 1930s, the river was used for wood transport.
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    Púchov

    Púchov

    Púchov (German: Puchau; Hungarian: Puhó) is an industrial town in the centre of Púchov District in Slovakia, with a population close to 20,000. It is located on the main train line between Bratislava and Košice. It is half way between Trenčín and Žilina, two major Slovak cities, approximately 30 minutes train from both cities. The Váh river crosses Púchov, and there is a small dam open to public crossing. The health resort Nimnica (until 1990 part of Púchov) is situated in the vicinity and is a starting point for tours to Javorníky and White Carpathians mountains. Parts: The nearness of the Váh river and town`s strategic location contributed to create cultural and social relations, which were a part of its history.The first written reference dates back to 1243, when Béla IV., King of Hungary, signed his gift certificate to Vychlap Bechend. In this reference are also mentioned Leustrak`s son and Puch from his immediate vicinities. The word „puch“ is of Indo-European origin and it can be translated as „puffed up“, „haughty“ and „ov“ is a possessive suffix, therefore this name can be translated as a former „land of Puch“. There exist another version, that origin of town`s name
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    Zlaté Moravce

    Zlaté Moravce

    Zlaté Moravce (1776 Morawce, German: Goldmorawitz) is a town in south-western Slovakia. It is the capital and the biggest town of Zlaté Moravce District. It is approximately 120 km from the Slovak capital Bratislava and 32 km from Nitra. The town is situated on the banks of the river Žitava, in the northern part of the Podunajská Heights. Nowadays, it also includes the area of formerly separate boroughs Chyzerovce and Prílepy. Thanks to its favourable location on the natural terrace of the river Žitava, the traces of the continuous settlement of this area go back to the Paleolithic Age. The rich archeological findings in the town area also prove intensive Great Moravian settlement in the 9th-10th century. A unique finding – a golden pectoral cross – is associated with this settlement. The origin of the oldest name of the borough "Morowa" in the Charter of Zobor of 1113 is related to that time as well. This charter is the oldest written proof of the existence of Moravce as Zobor Monastery’s property. The borough that was situated on the important route to Tekov was already in the 13th century dominated by a small Roman church surrounded by a cemetery, which was located on the site
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    Adidovce

    Adidovce

    Adidovce is a village and municipality in Humenné District in the Prešov Region of north-east Slovakia. The mayor is Milan Koromház (Smer - SD). In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1568. The municipality lies at an altitude of 204 metres and covers an area of 20.765 km (8.017 sq mi). In 31 December 2011, it had a population of 202 people.
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    Báč

    Báč

    Báč (Hungarian: Bacsfa, Hungarian pronunciation:[’bɒcsafɒ]) is a village and municipality in the Dunajská Streda District in the Trnava Region of south-west Slovakia. In the 9th century, the territory of Báč became part of the Kingdom of Hungary. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1319. After the Austro-Hungarian army disintegrated in November 1918, Czechoslovak troops occupied the area, later acknowledged internationally by the Treaty of Trianon. Between 1938 and 1945 Báč once more became part of Miklós Horthy's Hungary through the First Vienna Award. From 1945 until the Velvet Divorce, it was part of Czechoslovakia. Since then it has been part of Slovakia. The municipality lies at an altitude of 126 metres and covers an area of 3.923 km². It has a population of about 525 people.
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    Bacúch

    Bacúch

    Bacúch (German: Batzuch, Watzuch) is a village and municipality in the Brezno District, in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1563 as a part of the mining district of Brezno. It belonged to the Schaffer and Gaismair families from Banská Bystrica. The nickname of Bacúch is Zázrakovo 'place of wonder'.
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    Borský Svätý Jur

    Borský Svätý Jur

    Borský Svätý Jur (Hungarian:Búrszentgyörgy, German:Bur Sankt Georgen) is a village and municipality in Senica District in the Trnava Region of western Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1393. It is mentioned in a deed wherebye Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor granted Elesko castle and its demesnes to the Polish nobleman Stibor as a reward for his service. The Hungarian name probably stems from the churches patron Saint George. The church predates the 1394 mention. It is later called by the names Zenthgwrt in 1466, and Zenthgergh in 1564. The village had a post stop in the 18th century. In the 19 century it belonged to the éleskő-szentjánosi estate. In the 1910 census it had 2047 inhabitants, majority ethnic Slovak. Before the Treaty of Trianon it was in the Malacka district of Pozsony county (comitatus) in the Kingdom of Hungary. A Roman Catholic church of Saint George was built in 1676, and a chateau in 1844. The municipality lies at an altitude of 168 metres and covers an area of 39.719 km². It has a population of about 1550 people.
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    Chropov

    Chropov

    Chropov is a village and municipality in Skalica District in the Trnava Region of western Slovakia. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1262. The municipality lies at an altitude of 246 metres and covers an area of 17.794km². It has a population of about 355 people.
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    Dekýš

    Dekýš

    Dekýš (1920-1927 Ďekýš; Hungarian: Gyökös, before 1913 Gyekés) is a village and municipality in Banská Štiavnica District, in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. Settlements from the Paleolithic period and from the Roman period have been excavated here. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1270 (1270 Gukes, 1388 Gykys). In 1388 it belonged to Levice town and later on to the Mining Chamber. In 1944 men of age from 16 to 40 years were deported to Germany.
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    Diaková

    Diaková

    Diaková is a village and municipality in Martin District in the Žilina Region of northern Slovakia. Coordinates: Latitude: 49° 2' 60"N, Longitude: 18° 58' 0"E. In historical records the village was first mentioned in 1327. The municipality lies at an altitude of 420 metres and covers an area of 2.421km². It has a population of about 240 people.
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    Dobrá Voda

    Dobrá Voda

    Dobrá Voda (literally "good water") is a municipality of Trnava District in the Trnava region of Slovakia.
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    Fiľakovo

    Fiľakovo

    Fiľakovo (Hungarian: Fülek, German: Fülleck, Turkish: Filek) is a town in the Banská Bystrica Region of south-central Slovakia. Historically it was part of the Nógrád (Novohrad) region. It is located in the Cerová vrchovina mountains, in the valley of the Belina river, located around 20 km (12.43 mi) from the Hungarian city of Salgótarján, 85 km (52.82 mi) from Banská Bystrica, about 150 km (93.21 mi) from Košice and around 220 km (136.70 mi) from Bratislava. The first written record of the town, along with the Fiľakovo Castle is from 1242, where the castle withstood the Mongol invasions. It is mentioned in 1246 as Filek. In 1423 the town received municipal privileges. In 1553 the town with castle fell to the Turks and was seat of a sanjak until 1593, when it was reconquered by the Imperial troops. However, it fell once more to the Turks in 1669 and the town along with the castle was burned down in 1682 by troops of Imre Thököly. After the Treaty of Trianon in 1920 the town came under the rule of Czechoslovakia. It belonged to Hungary again in years 1938–1945 after the First Vienna Award. According to the 2001 census, ethnic groups included 64.40% Hungarians, 30.19% Slovaks, and
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    Finland

    Finland

    Finland (/ˈfɪnlənd/;  Finnish: Suomi (help·info); Swedish: Finland), officially the Republic of Finland, is a Nordic country situated in the Fennoscandian region of Northern Europe. It is bordered by Sweden in the west, Norway in the north and Russia in the east, while Estonia lies to its south across the Gulf of Finland. An estimated 5.4 million people live in Finland, the majority concentrated in the southern region. It is the eighth largest country in Europe in terms of area and the most sparsely populated country in the European Union. Finland is a parliamentary republic with a central government based in Helsinki and local governments in 336 municipalities, and an autonomous region of the Åland Islands. About one million residents live in the Greater Helsinki area, which consists of Helsinki, Espoo, Kauniainen and Vantaa, and a third of the country's GDP is produced there. Other larger cities include Tampere, Turku, Oulu, Jyväskylä, Lahti and Kuopio. Finland was a part of Sweden from the 12th to 19th century, and from 1809 to 1917 was an autonomous Grand Duchy within the Russian Empire. The Finnish Declaration of Independence from Russia in 1917 was followed by a civil war in
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    Halič

    Halič

    Halič (German: Geschatz; Hungarian: Gács) is a village and municipality in the Lučenec District in the Banská Bystrica Region of Slovakia. In historical records, the village was first mentioned in 1299 (Gach) as the location of a very important castle. From 1554 to 1594 it was occupied by Turks. From 1938 to 1945 it belonged to Hungary. The first appearance in literature of the castle in Halič is from the year 1450. Halič the village was first mentioned as a settlement surrounding this castle in 1299 and titled Holuch, Gach but the castle was only mentioned in passing. The castle was built without any royal permission by magister Tamas from Lučenec. In the years 1450-51 it belonged to the Jiskras, later to János Hunyady before becoming inhabited by King Matthias Corvinus in 1462. In the first half of the 16th century it was in property of Istvan Losonczy from Lučenec. The castle was reconstructed, again without royal permission, by him and was damaged in 1544 during a siege. After the death of Štefan Lučenský, his daughter Anne inherited the county and married Zsigmund Forgách. The Forgáčs were one of the oldest Hungarian aristocratic family being descendants of the Great Moravian
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    Levice

    Levice

    Levice (Slovak pronunciation: [lɛvit͡sɛ] ( listen); Hungarian: Léva, Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈleːvɒ]; German: Lewenz; Turkish: Leva) is a town in western Slovakia. The town lies on the left bank of the lower Hron river. The Old Slavic name of the town was Leva, which means "the Left One". The town is located in the north-eastern corner of the Danubian Lowland (Podunajská nížina), 110 km east of Bratislava, 40 km south-east of Nitra, 32 km south-west of Banská Štiavnica, 55 km south-west of Zvolen and 25 km from the border with Hungary. It is the capital of the Levice District, which is the largest district in Slovakia at 1,551 km². The town's heraldic animal is lion (in Slovak lev), and the town's colours are green and yellow. Levice is first mentioned as Leua, one of the villages belonging to the parish of St. Martin's Church in Bratka (Hungarian: Baratka) in 1165. It was part of the comitatus Tekov (Bars). First attacked by the Turks in 1544, the town was set on fire while the castle was left unharmed. The town was held by the Turks for two decades from 1663 to 1685. Under the Ottoman administration Leva was the center of a sandjak, which was part of the Uyvar eyalet. Ottoman
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    Nové Mesto nad Váhom

    Nové Mesto nad Váhom

    Nové Mesto nad Váhom (German: Neustadt an der Waag, Neustadtl, Waag-Neustadtl, Waagneustadtl, Waag-Neustadt; Hungarian: Vágújhely, Vág-Újhely) is a town in the Trenčín Region of Slovakia. District town located at the northern edge of the Danubian Hills at the foothills of the northern end of the White Carpathians, on the Váh river. Other mountains nearby are the White Carpathians and the Považský Inovec. It is situated 27 km from Trenčín and 100 km from Bratislava and has a population of 21,629 (1996) with an area of 32.583 km². the Town parts: Mnešice, Izbice, Javorinaská, Hájovky, Samoty, Luka, Centrum, Rajková(northern city), Záhumenice Lands in the place of today's Nové Mesto nad Váhom were inhabited in the prehistoric ages, as many artefacts from the Stone and Bronze Ages were discovered. In the local part Mnešice a prehistoric settlement was discovered. The first written record about Nové Mesto nad Váhom was in 1263, when King Bela IV granted freedoms for the loyalty during the Mongol invasions. It belonged to the Benedictine order, later to the Matúš Csák and others. It received its town privileges in 1550. Industry developed in the 19th century and was mainly focused at
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    Spiš Castle

    Spiš Castle

    The ruins of Spiš Castle (Slovak:  Spišský hrad (help·info), Hungarian: Szepesi vár, German: Zipser Burg) in eastern Slovakia form one of the largest castle sites in Central Europe. The castle is situated above the town of Spišské Podhradie and the village of Žehra, in the region known as Spiš (Hungarian: Szepes, German: Zips, Polish: Spisz, Latin: Scepusium). It was included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1993 (together with the adjacent locations of Spišská Kapitula, Spišské Podhradie and Žehra). This is one of the biggest European castles by area (41 426 m²). Spiš Castle was built in the 12th century on the site of an earlier castle. It was the political, administrative, economic and cultural centre of Szepes (Spiš) County of the Kingdom of Hungary. Before 1464, it was owned by the kings of Hungary, afterwards (until 1528) by the Zápolya family, the Thurzó family (1531–1635), the Csáky family (1638–1945), аnd (since 1945) by the state of Slovakia. Originally a Romanesque stone castle with fortifications, a two-story Romanesque palace and a three nave Romanesque-Gothic basilica were constructed by the second half of the 13th century. A second extramural settlement
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    Šurany

    Šurany

    Šurany (until 1927 Veľké Šurany, Hungarian: Nagysurány, German: Schuran, Turkish: Şuran) is a town and a railroad hub in the Nové Zámky District, Nitra Region, southern Slovakia. Alongside the main settlement, it has the boroughs of Kostolný Sek and Nitriansky Hrádok, both annexed 1976. Archaeological discoveries show that the site of the present-day town was inhabited in the Neolithic. The town was first mentioned under name villa Suran in a document of Hungarian king Béla II in 1138. There was a castle existing since the second half of the 15th century. The town was occupied by the Turks in 1663–84. The castle was torn down in 1725. In 1832 the town was made a royal town with market rights. A sugar factory was established in 1854 (closed in 2000). The town was part of Hungary until 1920 and in 1938–45 as a consequence of the First Vienna Award. Šurany lies at an altitude of 123 metres (404 ft) above sea level and covers an area of 59.812 square kilometres (23.1 sq mi). It is located in the Danubian Lowland near the Nitra River, 13 kilometres (8 mi) away from Nové Zámky and around 100 kilometres (62 mi) from Bratislava. According to the 2001 census, the town had 10,491
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