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Best Ship of All Time

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    1
    USS Miami

    USS Miami

    USS Miami (CL-89) was one of 26 United States Navy Cleveland-class light cruisers completed during or shortly after World War II. The ship, the second US Navy ship to bear the name, was named for the city of Miami, Florida. Miami was commissioned in December 1943, and saw service in several campaigns in the Pacific. Like almost all her sister ships, she was decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, and never saw active service again. Miami was scrapped in the early 1960's. Miami was laid down 2 August 1941 by Cramp Shipbuilding Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and launched 8 December 1942, sponsored by Mrs. C. H. Reeder, wife of the mayor of Miami, Fla. She was commissioned 28 December 1943, Captain John G. Crawford in command. After shakedown in the Caribbean and training along the Atlantic coast, the new light cruiser, accompanied by her sister-ships Vincennes and Houston, departed Boston on 16 April 1944 for the Pacific, via the Panama Canal and San Diego, reaching Pearl Harbor on 6 May. Miami joined the Fast Carrier Task Force for air strikes in June against Saipan, Tinian, Rota, Guam, Pagan, and the Bonin Islands in support of the Marianas campaign. During July, Miami operated
    7.63
    8 votes
    2
    USS Herbert

    USS Herbert

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    • Ship Class: Wickes class destroyer
    USS Herbert (DD-160) was a Wickes-class destroyer. She was named for Hilary A. Herbert (1834–1919), Secretary of the Navy from 1893 to 1897. Herbert was laid down by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation at Camden in New Jersey on 9 April 1918, launched on 8 May 1919 by Mrs. Benjamin Micou, daughter of the late Hilary A. Herbert and commissioned on 21 November 1919, Lieutenant Commander E. A. Logan in command. After shakedown in South Atlantic waters, Herbert trained in the Caribbean until 1 May 1920, returning there 20 July with the Atlantic Fleet destroyer squadron. Herbert participated in torpedo practices, antiaircraft drills, and short range battle practice along the east coast. She decommissioned at Philadelphia 27 June 1922. Herbert recommissioned 1 May 1930 and joined the Scouting Fleet at Newport, Rhode Island. For the next 4 years she operated in both East and West Coast waters, playing important roles in annual fleet problems and battle practice. From 16 January 1935 until August 1939, Herbert served as a training ship for Naval Reserves and midshipmen. As war swept across Europe, she sailed to Portugal via the Azores 2 October 1939 and remained there until July
    7.83
    6 votes
    3
    USS Card

    USS Card

    • Ship builder: Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation
    USS Card (AVG-11/ACV-11/CVE-11/CVHE-11/CVU-11/T-CVU-11/T-AKV-40) was a Bogue-class escort aircraft carrier. Her hull was laid down on 27 October 1941 as a C-3 cargo ship but it was acquired from the Maritime Commission while under construction and was converted into an escort carrier. She was launched as AVG 11 (hull 178) on 27 February 1942 by Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding, Tacoma, Washington, sponsored by Mrs. J. Perry. Reclassified ACV-11 on 20 August 1942 she was commissioned 8 November 1942 with Captain J. B. Sykes in command. Departing San Diego 18 January 1943, Card arrived at Hampton Roads 1 February for training in Chesapeake Bay. She ferried aircraft and troops for the North African invasion from New York to Casablanca (14 May–1 June) returning to Norfolk 5 July. She was reclassified CVE-11 on 15 July 1943. Card steamed from Norfolk as flagship of TG 21.14, one of the hunter-killer groups formed for offensive operations against German submarines. Her first cruise from 27 July to 10 September 1943 was very successful. Her planes sank U-117 on 7 August in 39°32′N 38°21′W / 39.533°N 38.35°W / 39.533; -38.35.; U-664 on 9 August in 40°12′N 37°29′W / 40.2°N 37.483°W / 40.2;
    8.60
    5 votes
    4
    HMCS Bonaventure

    HMCS Bonaventure

    HMCS Bonaventure (CVL-22) was a Majestic class aircraft carrier. She served in the Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Forces Maritime Command from 1957 to 1970 and was the third and the last aircraft carrier to serve Canada. The ship was laid down for the British Royal Navy as HMS Powerful in November 1943. At the end of World War II, work on the ship was suspended in 1946. At the time of purchase, it was decided to incorporate new aircraft carrier technologies into the design. Bonaventure never saw action during her career having only peripheral, non-combat roles. However, she was involved in major NATO fleet-at-sea patrol during the Cuban Missile Crisis. As HMS Powerful she was laid down at Harland and Wolff in Belfast on 21 November 1943, and launched on 27 February 1945. Work was suspended after the end of World War II, and was not resumed until the ship was bought by Canada. She was acquired in the early 1950s by the Royal Canadian Navy, which was looking to replace its aging World War II–vintage light carriers Magnificent (another Majestic class carrier) and Warrior, which were deemed unsuitable for the jet age. Several surplus US and UK ships were considered, and the
    7.33
    6 votes
    5
    HMS Argyll

    HMS Argyll

    • Ship builder: Yarrow Shipbuilders
    • Ship Class: Type 23 frigate
    The third and current HMS Argyll is a Type 23 'Duke' Class frigate. She is currently the oldest serving Type 23 frigate in the Royal Navy. HMS Argyll was laid down in March 1987 by Yarrow Shipbuilders at Glasgow, launched in 1989 by Lady Wendy Levene, and commissioned in May 1991. Argyll is currently based at Devonport Dockyard. It is planned that she will retire in 2023. In 2000, Argyll was part of the Royal Navy task force - Task Group 342.01 - — comprising Illustrious, Ocean, Iron Duke, Chatham, and four RFA ships — that deployed to Sierra Leone during the civil war there. During those operations, Argyll acted as the West African Guardship and remained off West Africa until September 2000. During her deployment, Argyll saved fifty-eight lives from drowning. She was relieved by her sister-ship Iron Duke in September. During this incident Argyll, assisted by HMS Ocean, laid the foundation for the Iron Duke Community School. This is a school for orphans in Freetown. President Kabbah of Sierra Leone decreed the school be named after the crew of Iron Duke for completing the construction of the six classrooms. 2001 saw a change in command with Commander John Kingwell succeeding
    7.33
    6 votes
    6
    USS Portsmouth

    USS Portsmouth

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS Portsmouth (CL–102) was a Cleveland class light cruiser of the United States Navy, the third ship to carry the name. Portsmouth was laid down by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company of Newport News, Virginia on 28 June 1943; launched on 20 September 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Marian M. Dale and Mrs. Sarah B. Leigh, and commissioned 25 June 1945, Captain Heber B. Brumbaugh in command. Following shakedown off Cuba, Portsmouth, based at Norfolk, was employed with the Operational Development Force until the spring of 1946. In May she departed on a goodwill cruise to Africa and after visiting Cape Town, Lagos, Freetown, Monrovia, Dakar, and Casablanca, steamed into the Mediterranean for calls at Naples, and Palermo before heading home. On 25 November, Portsmouth got underway to return to the Mediterranean. Arriving at Naples on 7 December, she shifted around the peninsula to Trieste at the end of the month, and until February 1947 cruised in the politically turbulent Adriatic. The following month, she returned for another two weeks at Trieste and in April she sailed for the United States. The following November, she again steamed east to the Mediterranean, returning to
    9.50
    4 votes
    7
    USS Shamrock Bay

    USS Shamrock Bay

    USS Shamrock Bay (CVE-84) was a Casablanca-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down with the hull code ACV-84 on 15 March 1943 by the Kaiser Co., Vancouver, Washington, under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1121); re-designated CVE-84 on 10 June 1943; launched on 4 February 1944; sponsored by Mrs. James R. Dudley; and commissioned on 15 March 1944, Captain Frank T. Ward, Jr., in command. Following shakedown, Shamrock Bay remained on the west coast into June qualifying pilots in carrier landings. Then transferred to transport duty in the Atlantic, she carried Army fighter planes and Army and Navy personnel to Casablanca and brought back damaged P-40s for use in training and for salvage and aircraft engines for overhaul and salvage. Passengers on the return voyages were, for the most part, Army Air Corps personnel from the China-Burma-India theater. On 27 October, Shamrock Bay completed her second transport run at Norfolk and prepared for antisubmarine operations in the South Atlantic. However, the loss of escort carriers in the Philippine area brought a change of orders; and, on 11 November, with Composite Squadron 42 (VC-42) embarked, she sailed for
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    USS California

    USS California

    • Ship Class: Tennessee class battleship
    USS California (BB-44), a Tennessee-class battleship, was the fifth ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 31st state. Beginning as the flagship of the Pacific Fleet, she served in the Pacific her entire career. She was sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor at her moorings in Battleship Row, but was salvaged and reconstructed. She served again for the remainder of World War II before being decommissioned as obsolete in 1947. Her keel was laid down on 25 October 1916 by the Mare Island Naval Shipyard at Vallejo, California. She was launched 20 November 1919 sponsored by Mrs. R.T. (Barbara Stephens) Zane, daughter of California governor William D. Stephens; and commissioned on 10 August 1921, Captain Henry Joseph Ziegemeier in command. She immediately reported to the Pacific Fleet as flagship. For 20 years, from 1921 to 1941, California served first as flagship of the Pacific Fleet, then as flagship of the Battle Fleet (Battle Force), US Fleet. Her annual activities included joint Army-Navy exercises, tactical and organizational development problems, and fleet concentrations for various purposes. Intensive training and superior performance won her the Battle Efficiency
    6.83
    6 votes
    9
    HMAS Encounter

    HMAS Encounter

    • Ship Class: Challenger class cruiser
    HMAS Encounter was a second-class protected cruiser of the Challenger class operated by the Royal Navy (RN) and Royal Australian Navy (RAN). She was built by HM Dockyard Devonport and completed at the end of 1905. Encounter spent the first six years of her career operating with the RN's Australia Squadron, before being transferred to the newly formed RAN. During World War I, the cruiser became the first ship of the RAN to fire in anger when she bombarded Toma Ridge. Encounter operated in the New Guinea, Fiji-Samoa, and Malaya areas until 1916, when she returned to Australian waters. The ship spent the rest of the war patrolling and escorting convoys around Australia and into the Indian Ocean. In 1919, Encounter was sent to evacuate the Administrator of the Northern Territory and his family following the Darwin Rebellion. Encounter was paid off into reserve in 1920, but saw further use as a depot ship until being completely decommissioned in 1929. In 1932, the cruiser was scuttled off Sydney. Challenger class vessels had a standard displacement of 5,880 tons, a length of 376 feet 1.75 inches (114.6493 m) overall and 355 feet (108 m) between perpendiculars, a beam of 56 feet
    6.67
    6 votes
    10
    Japanese battleship Hyuga

    Japanese battleship Hyuga

    • Ship builder: Mitsubishi
    Hyūga (日向), named for Hyūga Province in Kyūshū, was an Ise-class battleship of the Imperial Japanese Navy laid down by Mitsubishi on 6 May 1915, launched on 27 January 1917 and completed on 30 April 1918. She was initially designed as the fourth ship of the Fusō-class, but was heavily redesigned to fix shortcomings. Hyūga was extensively updated and reconstructed from 1926–1928 and 1934-1936. At the outbreak of the Pacific war, Hyūga was part of the battleship force at the Combined Fleet's anchorage at Hashirajima. On 7 December she sortied for the Bonin Islands, (known in Japan as the Ogasawara Group), along with her sister ship Ise of Battle Division 3 and with the Nagato and Mutsu of Battle Division 1 as part of the reserve battle fleet for Operation Z (the attack on Pearl Harbor). The force returned to the Combined Fleet's anchorage at Hashirajima on 12 December 1941 and remained there until a 4 March raid against the Japanese base on Marcus Island (Minami Tori Shima), 1,200 miles off the coast of Japan, by Halsey and his Task Force 16 caused the IJN to sortie out in search of the American raiders. Halsey had steamed away at high speed once he recovered his aircraft and the
    7.60
    5 votes
    11
    Pommern

    Pommern

    The Pommern, formerly the Mneme (1903–1908), is a windjammer. She is a four-masted barque that was built in 1903 in Glasgow at the J. Reid & Co shipyard. The Pommern (German for Pomerania) is one of the Flying P-Liners, the famous sailing ships of the German shipping company F. Laeisz. Later she was acquired by Gustaf Erikson of Mariehamn in the Finnish Åland archipelago, who used her to carry grain from the Spencer Gulf area in Australia to harbours in England or Ireland until the start of World War II. After World War Two, she was donated to the town of Mariehamn as a museum ship. She is now a museum ship belonging to the Åland Maritime Museum and is anchored in western Mariehamn, Åland. A magnificent collection of photographs taken by Ordinary Seaman Peter Karney in 1933 showing dramatic pictures of life on a sailing ship rounding Cape Horn can be found in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich. The Pommern has a reputation of a "lucky ship". She survived both world wars unscathed, has lost only four crew members at sea on her journeys and she has won the Great Grain Races twice, 1930 and 1937. She is one of the most popular landmarks of the Åland and annually visited by
    8.75
    4 votes
    12
    USS Philippine Sea

    USS Philippine Sea

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    USS Philippine Sea (CV/CVA/CVS-47, AVT-11) was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers of the United States Navy, and the first ship to be named for the Battle of Philippine Sea. She was launched on 5 September 1945, after the end of World War II and sponsored by the wife of the Governor of Kentucky. During her career, Philippine Sea served first in the Atlantic Ocean and saw several deployments to the Mediterranean Sea as well as a trip to Antarctica as a part of Operation Highjump. Sent to the Korean Peninsula at the outbreak of the Korean War, she sent aircraft in support of United Nations ground troops, first during the Battle of Pusan Perimeter and then during the Inchon Landings and the Second Battle of Seoul. She subsequently supported UN troops during the surprise Chinese attack and the Chosin Reservoir Campaign. Philippine Sea saw three tours to Korea during the war, receiving nine battle stars for her service. For the remainder of her service, she operated primarily out of San Diego and San Francisco, seeing several deployments to the Far East and being redesignated an anti-submarine warfare carrier. She was decommissioned on 28 December 1958 and sold for scrap in
    9.67
    3 votes
    13
    USS O-1

    USS O-1

    USS O-1 (SS-62) was the lead ship of her class of submarine. Her keel was laid down on 26 March 1917 at the Portsmouth Navy Yard in Kittery, Maine. She was launched on 9 July 1918, and commissioned on 5 November 1918 with Lieutenant Commander Norman L. Kirk in command. Commissioned just before the Armistice with Germany, O-1 operated in the Atlantic coastal waters from Cape Cod to Key West, Florida, after World War I. Reclassified a second-line submarine on 25 July 1924, and first-line on 6 June 1928, O-1 was converted to an experimental vessel on 28 December 1930, and operated in this capacity out of the submarine base at New London, Connecticut, until decommissioning on 11 June 1931. She was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 18 May 1938 and sold for scrap. This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.
    7.20
    5 votes
    14
    Albert Leo Schlageter

    Albert Leo Schlageter

    The NRP Sagres is a tall ship and school ship of the Portuguese Navy since 1961. It is the third ship with this name in the Portuguese Navy, so she is also known as Sagres III. The ship is a steel-built three masted barque, with square sails on the fore and main masts and gaff rigging on the mizzen mast. Her main mast rises 42 m above the deck. She carries 22 sails totaling about 2,000 m² (21,000 ft²) and can reach a top speed of 17 knots (31 km/h) under sail. She has a sparred length of 89 m (295 ft), a width of 12 m (40 ft), a draught of 5.2 m (17 ft), and a displacement at full load of 1,755 tons. The three-masted ship was launched under the name Albert Leo Schlageter on 30 October 1937 at Blohm & Voss in Hamburg for the German navy (Kriegsmarine). The ship was named after Albert Leo Schlageter, who was executed in 1923 by French forces occupying the Ruhr area. Her first commander was Bernhard Rogge. It thus is a sister ship of the Gorch Fock, the Horst Wessel, and the Romanian training vessel Mircea. Another sister, Herbert Norkus, was not completed, while Gorch Fock II was built in 1958 by the Germans to replace the ships lost after the war. Following a number of international
    8.25
    4 votes
    15
    Japanese submarine I-21

    Japanese submarine I-21

    • Ship Class: B1 type submarine
    I-21 (伊号第二一潜水艦, I-gō Dai Nijū-ichi sensui-kan) was a Japanese Type B1 submarine which saw service during World War II in the Imperial Japanese Navy. She displaced 1,950 tons and had a speed of 24 knots (44 km/h). I-21 was the most successful Japanese submarine to operate in Australian waters, participating in the attack on Sydney Harbour in 1942 and sinking 44,000 tons of Allied shipping during her two deployments off the east coast of Australia. The submarine was laid down on 7 January 1939 at the Kawasaki shipyard, Kobe, and launched on 24 February 1940. On 15 July 1941 she was completed, commissioned and assigned to Submarine Squadron 1's Submarine Division 3 in the Sixth Fleet. I-21 was based in the Yokosuka Naval District. On 31 October 1941 Commander Matsumura Kanji was assigned as Commanding Officer, and on 10 November he attended a meeting of submarine commanders aboard the light cruiser Katori, convened by Vice Admiral Mitsumi Shimizu, to be briefed on the planned attack on Pearl Harbor. I-21 departed Yokosuka on 19 November and sailed to the rendezvous at Hitokappu Bay, Etorofu, arriving on the 22nd, and departing on the 26th for the Hawaiian Islands, acting as a lookout
    8.25
    4 votes
    16
    USS Wisconsin

    USS Wisconsin

    USS Wisconsin (BB-9), an Illinois-class battleship, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the 30th state. The keel of Battleship No. 9 was laid down on 9 February 1897 at San Francisco, California, by the Union Iron Works. She was launched on 26 November 1898, sponsored by Miss Elizabeth Stephenson, the daughter of Senator Isaac Stephenson of Marinette, Wisconsin, and commissioned on 4 February 1901, Captain George Cook Reiter in command. In command of the USS Wisconsin from its commissioning was Captain George Cook Reiter, a controversial figure since his days as a Lieutenant Commander in command of the gunboat USS Ranger. Reiter had formerly commanded the USS Panther, a banana-boat freighter converted into a troopship for Marines, during the Guantánamo Bay landings during the Spanish-American War. In 1905, Reiter would be promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral and was appointed Chairman of the United States Lighthouse Board before retiring from active duty. Departing San Francisco on 12 March 1901, Wisconsin conducted general drills and exercises at Magdalena Bay, Mexico from 17 March-11 April, before she returned to San Francisco on 15 April to be drydocked
    7.00
    5 votes
    17
    Esmeralda

    Esmeralda

    Esmeralda (BE-43) is a steel-hulled four-masted barquentine tall ship of the Chilean Navy, currently the second tallest and longest sailing ship in the world. The ship is the sixth to carry the name Esmeralda. The first was the frigate Esmeralda captured from the Spanish at Callao, Peru, by Admiral Lord Thomas Alexander Cochrane of the Chilean Navy, in a bold incursion on the night of 5 November 1820. The second was the corvette Esmeralda of the Chilean Navy which, set against superior forces, fought until sunk with colors flying on 21 May 1879 at the Battle of Iquique. These events mark important milestones for the Chilean Navy and the ship's name is said to evoke its values of courage and sacrifice. Construction began in Cádiz, Spain, in 1946. She was intended to become Spain's national training ship. During her construction in 1947 the yard in which she was being built suffered catastrophic explosions, which damaged the ship and placed the yard on the brink of bankruptcy. Work on the ship was temporarily halted. In 1950 Chile and Spain entered into negotiations in which Spain offered to repay debts incurred to Chile as a result of the Spanish Civil War in the form of
    8.00
    4 votes
    18
    USS Skate

    USS Skate

    • Ship Class: Balao class submarine
    USS Skate (SS-305) was a United States Navy Balao-class submarine named for the skate, a type of ray. Skate was laid down at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard of Vallejo, California, 1 August 1942. She was launched on 4 March 1943, sponsored by Mrs. George P. Shamer and commissioned on 15 April with Commander Eugene B. McKinney in command. Following shakedown off the California coast, Skate sailed to Pearl Harbor and on 25 September 1943, headed toward Wake Island and her first war patrol during which she performed lifeguard duty for the carriers during airstrikes against that Japanese-held island. At dawn on 6 October, the submarine was strafed by enemy aircraft, mortally wounding one of her officers as he attempted to assist wounded airmen from a liferaft. The next day, Skate closed to within 5,000 yards (4,600 m) of the beach, in the face of heavy enemy bombardment, to rescue two downed aviators. While searching for a third, she was attacked by a Japanese dive-bomber, and was forced to dive to escape. After a short return to Midway Island, Skate returned to Wake Island and rescued four additional airmen before terminating her first patrol at Midway on 29 October. On 15 November,
    9.00
    3 votes
    19
    USS R-12

    USS R-12

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    • Ship Class: United States R class submarine
    USS R-12 (SS-89) was an R-class coastal and harbor defense submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company of Quincy, Massachusetts on 28 March 1918. She was launched on 15 August 1919 sponsored by Miss Helen Mack, and commissioned at Boston, Massachusetts on 23 September 1919 with Lieutenant F. J. Cunneen in command. R-12 remained at Boston, Massachusetts until she headed down the coast on 11 March to New London, Connecticut, whence she operated until the end of May. She then continued south to Panama; transited the Panama Canal at the end of June; arrived at San Pedro, California, in July; and with the hull classification symbol "SS-89", departed the California coast for Pearl Harbor at the end of August. Arriving on 6 September 1920, she remained in Hawaiian waters, with occasional exercises on the West Coast and off Johnston Island until 12 December 1930. On that date, R-12 got underway for the East Coast and returned to New London, Connecticut on 9 February 1931. She conducted exercises with Destroyer Squadrons of the Scouting Force into the spring, then following overhaul trained personnel assigned to the Submarine School. On
    7.75
    4 votes
    20
    USS Seadragon

    USS Seadragon

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    • Ship Class: Sargo class submarine
    USS Seadragon (SS-194), a Sargo-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the seadragon. Her keel was laid on 18 April 1938 by the Electric Boat Company of Groton, Connecticut. She was christened and launched on 21 April 1939, sponsored by Mrs. J.O. Richardson (wife of the former Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet), and commissioned on 23 October 1939 with Lieutenant John G. Johns in command. Following a shakedown cruise off the east coast and in the Caribbean Sea, Seadragon returned to New England and, on 23 May 1940, departed New London, Connecticut, for the Philippine Islands. With Commander, Submarine Division 17 (ComSubDiv 17) embarked, she arrived at Cavite on 30 November and commenced training operations as a unit of the Asiatic Fleet. A year later, she prepared for overhaul; and, by 8 December 1941 (7 December east of the International Date Line), she had started her yard period at the Cavite Navy Yard. Two days later, on 10 December, she and sister ship Sealion, moored together, were caught in an enemy air raid against Cavite. Sealion took a direct hit which demolished her and damaged Seadragon. The force of the explosion ripped off part
    6.60
    5 votes
    21
    Corwith Cramer

    Corwith Cramer

    The Corwith Cramer is a tall ship (specifically a brigantine) owned by the Sea Education Association (SEA) sailing school, named after SEA's founding director. Her home port is Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA. She was designed by Wooden and Marean specifically for SEA and was constructed by ASTACE in 1987 in Bilbao, Spain. She is a 134-foot (41 m) steel brigantine built as a research vessel for operation under sail, and generally sails in the Atlantic Ocean.
    7.50
    4 votes
    22
    Gazela

    Gazela

    • Ship builder: J. M. Mendes
    • Place built: Setúbal
    Gazela is a 1901 wooden tall-ship homeported in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She serves as the maritime goodwill ambassador for the City of Philadelphia, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the Ports of Philadelphia and Camden, New Jersey. She has been featured in a number of films, and participated in domestic and international events, including OpSail 2000. The barquentine Gazela Primeiro (meaning Gazelle the First in Portuguese) was built in the shipyard of J. M. Mendes in Setúbal, Portugal in 1901. At that time the Portuguese fisheries authorities had a regulation prohibiting the construction of new vessels for the Grand Banks cod fishery. It was however permissible to modify or "rebuild" an existing vessel. The best information available indicates that the registration of a much smaller, two-masted vessel built in Cahilas in 1883, named Gazella (spelled with two Ls), was transferred by the owners to the newly built vessel in 1901. There is no evidence that any timbers from the earlier vessel were re-used in the construction of the later one; a practice which would make no sense to a commercial wooden shipbuilder in 1901. Gazela was built to carry fishermen to the Grand Banks
    7.50
    4 votes
    23
    USS Bunker Hill

    USS Bunker Hill

    • Ship builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding
    • Ship Class: Ticonderoga class cruiser
    USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) is a Ticonderoga class guided missile cruiser laid down by Litton-Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation at Pascagoula, Mississippi on 11 January 1984, launched on 11 March 1985 and commissioned on 20 September 1986. Bunker Hill is homeported at Naval Base San Diego in San Diego, California. Bunker Hill was the first Ticonderoga-class cruiser to be equipped with the Mk. 41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) in place of the previous ships' Mk. 26 twin-arm missile launchers, greatly improving the flexibility and firepower of the ships by allowing them to fire RGM-109 Tomahawk missiles. The sea dragon is an awesome beast that is both vigilant and fierce. Grasping a flaming sword, the sea dragon symbolizes the naval prowess and attack capability of today's USS Bunker Hill. The flaming sword also represents the revolutionary capability of the vertical launching system first introduced in Bunker Hill. The stars commemorate the eleven battle stars the former USS Bunker Hill (CV 17) earned in the Pacific theater during World War II. Blue and gold are the colors traditionally associated with the Navy and are symbolic of the sea and excellence. The two white bars in the chief
    7.50
    4 votes
    24
    USS Northampton

    USS Northampton

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    USS Northampton (CA-26) was a heavy cruiser in service with the United States Navy. She was the lead ship of her class and commissioned in 1930. During World War II she served in the Pacific and was sunk by Japanese torpedoes during the Battle of Tassafaronga on 30 November 1942. Northampton was laid down on 12 April 1928 by Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Mass.; launched on 5 September 1929; sponsored by Grace Coolidge (wife of the ex-President); and commissioned on 17 May 1930, Captain Walter N. Vernou in command. Joining the Atlantic Fleet, Northampton made a shakedown cruise to the Mediterranean during the summer of 1930, then participated in the fleet training schedule which took her to the Caribbean, the Panama Canal Zone, and, occasionally, into the Pacific for exercises with other cruisers and ships of all types. Redesignated CA-26 in 1931, she operated primarily in the Pacific from 1932, homeported at San Pedro, and later at Pearl Harbor. Northampton was one of six ships to receive the new RCA CXAM RADAR in 1940. Northampton was at sea with Admiral William Halsey, Jr. in Enterprise during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941,
    7.50
    4 votes
    25
    USS West Virginia

    USS West Virginia

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS West Virginia (BB-48), a Colorado-class battleship, was the second ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 35th state. Her keel was laid down on 12 April 1920 by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Virginia. She was launched on 17 November 1921 sponsored by Miss Alice Wright Mann, daughter of Isaac T. Mann, a prominent West Virginian; and commissioned on 1 December 1923, Captain Thomas J. Senn in command. As the most recent of the "super-dreadnoughts", West Virginia embodied the latest knowledge of naval architecture; the watertight compartmentation of her hull, and the scale of her armor protection, marked an advance over the design of battleships built, or on the drawing boards before the Battle of Jutland. In the months that followed, West Virginia ran her trials and shakedown and underwent post-commissioning alterations. After a brief period of work at the New York Navy Yard, the ship made the passage to Hampton Roads, although experiencing trouble with her steering gear while en route. Overhauling the troublesome gear thoroughly while in Hampton Roads, West Virginia put to sea on the morning of 16 June 1924. At 1010, while the
    8.67
    3 votes
    26
    Coryphene

    Coryphene

    The Coryphene was a clipper ship. Its existence is documented through an advertisement card in the Honeyman Collection digital library collection.
    10.00
    2 votes
    27
    Stad Amsterdam

    Stad Amsterdam

    The Stad Amsterdam (City of Amsterdam) is a three-masted clipper that was built in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, in 2000 at the Damen Oranjewerf. The ship was designed by Gerard Dijkstra who modelled her after the mid-19th century frigate Amsterdam, but she is not a replica. A major difference is that the hull is made of steel. The owners call the ship a "modern extreme clipper in historical perspective", meaning that the construction method is a combination of the best qualities of clippers of the past, outfitted and built with modern techniques but with a classic "look and feel". She is a very fast ship, with 15 knots being a normal speed. She won the 2001 Cutty Sark Tall Ships' Race. The building of the hull in 1997/98 was used as a work experience project for the unemployed (e.g. metalworking and welding). The ship was first presented to the public at the 2000 edition of SAIL Amsterdam. During the 2005 and 2010 editions of the event she was the flagship. The Stad Amsterdam is used for training and as a charter-ship for guests. The crew are mainly from the Netherlands and Denmark and the official language on board is English. Her home port is Amsterdam. In September 2009 Stad
    10.00
    2 votes
    28
    Earl of Pembroke

    Earl of Pembroke

    Earl of Pembroke is a wooden barque, currently being used as a tall ship of the 18th century for historical films. She can also be rented for excursions. She was built in Pukavik, Sweden as "Orion" in 1945 or 1948. The ship was used to haul timber in the Baltic Sea until 1974, when she was laid up in Thisted, Denmark. Square Sail Shipyard and Robin Davies purchased the ship in 1979 and began restoration in 1985. Earl of Pembroke has been used in the following films:
    6.40
    5 votes
    29
    USS Nautilus

    USS Nautilus

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    USS Nautilus (SSN-571) is the world's first operational nuclear-powered submarine. She was the first vessel to complete a submerged transit to the North Pole on 3 August 1958. Namesake of the submarine in Jules Verne's Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and named after another USS Nautilus (SS-168) that served with distinction in WWII, Nautilus was authorized in 1951 and launched in 1954. Because her nuclear propulsion allowed her to remain submerged far longer than diesel-electric submarines, she broke many records in her first years of operation, and traveled to locations previously beyond the limits of submarines. In operation, she revealed a number of limitations in her design and construction. This information was used to improve subsequent submarines. Nautilus was decommissioned in 1980 and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1982. She has been preserved as a museum of submarine history in Groton, Connecticut, where she receives some 250,000 visitors a year. In July 1951 the United States Congress authorized the construction of a nuclear-powered submarine for the U.S. Navy, which was planned and personally supervised by Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, known as the
    7.25
    4 votes
    30
    USS O-9

    USS O-9

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    USS O-9 (SS-70) was an O-class submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down on 15 February 1917 at Fore River Shipbuilding Company of Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 27 January 1918 sponsored by Mrs. Frederick J. Sherman, and commissioned on 27 July 1918 with Lieutenant Oliver M. Read, Jr. in command. During the final months of World War I, O-9 operated on coastal patrol and protected the Atlantic coast from U-boats. She departed Newport, Rhode Island, on 2 November 1918 for Britain, in order to conduct her first war patrol. However, the end of the war came before O-9 reached Europe. After the war, O-9 continued in Naval service and trained submarine crews at the Submarine School at New London, Connecticut. Proceeding to Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone, in 1924, the boat was reclassified to a second line submarine during her year there. Returning to operate at New London, O-9 reverted to a first line submarine on 6 June 1928. Sailing up to Portsmouth, New Hampshire in January 1930, the submarine returned to New London in March; the following February, she sailed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to decommission there on 25 June 1931. Remaining on the Naval
    7.25
    4 votes
    31
    USS Henry B. Wilson

    USS Henry B. Wilson

    • Ship Class: Charles F. Adams class destroyer
    USS Henry B. Wilson (DDG-7), named for Admiral Henry Braid Wilson, was a Charles F. Adams-class guided missile armed destroyer laid down by Defoe Shipbuilding Company in Bay City, Michigan on 28 February 1958, launched on 22 April 1959 sponsored by Mrs. Patrick J. Hurley, daughter of Admiral Wilson, and commissioned on 17 December 1960, CDR L. D. Caney in command. Henry B. Wilson served as plane guard for carriers on Yankee Station in the Tonkin Gulf, participated in Sea Dragon operations, patrolled on search and rescue duties and carried out naval gunfire support missions during the Vietnam War. In April 1975, she participated in Operation Eagle Pull (the evacuation of Phnom Penh, Cambodia) and in May 1975 she participated in the operation to recapture the hijacked merchant ship SS Mayaguez in Cambodian waters. Henry B. Wilson was decommissioned on 2 October 1989, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 26 January 1990 and sold for scrap on 15 April 1994. The scrap contract was terminated on 23 March 1999 and the ship was resold on 6 April 2002. She was re-acquired and sunk as a target ship 15 August 2003.
    8.33
    3 votes
    32
    USS Wake Island

    USS Wake Island

    USS Wake Island (CVE-65) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1102) on 6 February 1943 at Vancouver, Washington, by the Kaiser Shipyards; launched on 15 September 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Frederick Carl Sherman, the wife of Rear Admiral Frederick Sherman; and commissioned on 7 November 1943, with Captain Hames R. Tague in command. Following commissioning, Wake Island received supplies, ammunition, and gasoline at Astoria, Oregon, and got underway on 27 November 1943 for Puget Sound and anchored the following day at Bremerton, Washington, where she continued to load supplies and ammunition. The carrier operated in the Puget Sound area conducting structural firing tests and making stops at Port Townsend, Sinclair Inlet, and Seattle before sailing south on 6 December. She arrived at San Francisco, California on 10 December, took on fuel, and, two days later, headed for San Diego, arriving there on 14 December for shakedown and availability. Before departing, the carrier took on board the personnel and planes of Composite Squadron 69 (VC-69). On 11 January 1944, Wake Island got underway and
    6.20
    5 votes
    33
    Fragata Libertad

    Fragata Libertad

    The Fragata Libertad is the School-Ship of the Argentine Navy, and was built in the 1950's at the Rio Santiago shipyards near Buenos Aires, Argentina. It's maiden voyage was in 1962, and it continues to be the School-Ship with yearly Instruction voyages for the graduating Naval cadets. It is currently (2006) undergoing a general overhaul which includes the addition of facilities for female cadets and crew in line with current diversity policies in the Navy and the updating of the engines and navigation technology. Its main characteristics are: Length (including bowsprit): 103.75m; Beam: 14.31m; Draft: 6.60m; Displacement: 3765 Tonnes; Masts: 3; Crew: 357 souls (including 150 naval cadets). Rigging: Square rigged. Three masts (Fore, Main and Mizzen with boom) and bowsprit, with double topsails and 5 yardarms per mast, which can balance up to 45 degrees on each side. Five jibs are fixed to the bowsprit, the foremast has 5 square sails and two jibs, the mainmast has 5 square sails and 3 jibs and the mizzen has 5 square sails and a spanker. Sail area: 2.652 sq. metres; max. height of mainmast 56,2 metres. Armament: Four 47 mm cannons, 1891 model, which were transferred from
    9.50
    2 votes
    34
    HMAS Darwin

    HMAS Darwin

    • Ship builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
    • Ship Class: Adelaide class frigate
    HMAS Darwin (FFG 04), named for the capital city of the Northern Territory, is an Adelaide class guided-missile frigate of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). One of four ships ordered from the United States, Darwin entered service in 1984. During her career, she has operated in the Persian Gulf, as part of the INTERFET peacekeeping taskforce, and off the Solomon Islands. The frigate underwent a major upgrade during 2007 and 2008, and is actively serving as of 2011. Darwin was the fourth Adelaide class vessel (a derivative of the United States Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate) to be ordered, and the last to be built in the United States of America. The ship was laid down by Todd Pacific Shipyards at Seattle, Washington on 2 July 1981, to the Perry class Flight III design. The Adelaides were built as part of the United States Navy's construction program, so were assigned USN hull numbers; Darwin was FFG-44. She was launched on 26 March 1982, and commissioned into the RAN on 21 July 1984. Darwin's main weapon is the Mark 13 missile launcher located on the foredeck: this is used to fire both Harpoon and SM-2MR Standard missiles. A 76-millimetre (3.0 in) Mark 75 OTO Melara gun is located
    9.50
    2 votes
    35
    USS Thresher

    USS Thresher

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    USS Thresher (SS-200), a Tambor-class submarine, was the first United States Navy ship to be named for the thresher shark. Her keel was laid down 27 May 1939 at the Electric Boat Company of Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 27 March 1940 sponsored by Mrs. Claude A. Jones, and commissioned on 27 August 1940, with Lieutenant Commander William Lovett Anderson (Annapolis, Class of 1926) in command. Following training and sea trials, Thresher got underway from New London, Connecticut on 25 October 1940 for engineering trials in Gravesend Bay, New York, and shakedown off the Dry Tortugas. She operated along the East Coast through the end of 1940 and into 1941. She set sail on 1 May 1941 for the Caribbean Sea, en route for Pearl Harbor, transiting the Panama Canal on 9 May, stopping in San Diego, through 21 May, and arriving at Pearl Harbor on 31 May. She operated out of the Hawaiian Islands into the fall of 1941, as tensions rose in the Far East and the U.S. prepared for war in both oceans. Thresher and her sister-ship Tautog (SS-199) departed the Submarine Base Pearl Harbor on 31 October 1941 on a simulated war patrol north of Midway Island; both carried live torpedoes. Tautog
    9.50
    2 votes
    36
    Christian Radich

    Christian Radich

    • Ship builder: Framnæs shipyard
    • Place built: Sandefjord
    Christian Radich is a Norwegian full rigged ship, named after a Norwegian shipowner. The vessel was built at Framnæs shipyard in Sandefjord, Norway, and was delivered on 17 June 1937. The owner was The Christian Radich Sail Training Foundation established by a grant from an officer of that name. The vessel is a full rigged three masted steel hull, 62.5 m long, with an overall length of 73 m including the bowsprit and a maximum width of 9.7 m. She has a draught of about 4.7 meters and a displacement at full load of 1050 tons. Under engine power, the Christian Radich reaches a top speed of 10 knots, while she can make up to 14 knots under sail. The crew is 18 all together. It can accommodate 88 passengers. The Christian Radich is well known through the international release in 1958 of the Cinemiracle widescreen movie Windjammer. The Christian Radich sailed to the United States in 1976 as part of the Bicentennial Celebration, and partook in the Operation Sail parade in New York Harbor on 4 July 1976. The ship also appeared as herself in the 1970s BBC TV series The Onedin Line, as one of James Onedin's ships. The vessel was built for training sailors for the Norwegian merchant navy,
    7.00
    4 votes
    37
    HMS Vengeance

    HMS Vengeance

    • Ship builder: Swan Hunter
    • Ship Class: Colossus class aircraft carrier
    HMS Vengeance (R71) was a Colossus class light aircraft carrier built for the Royal Navy during World War II. The carrier served in three navies during her career: the Royal Navy, the Royal Australian Navy (as HMAS Vengeance, from 1952 to 1955), and the Brazilian Navy (as Minas Gerais (A 11), from 1956 to 2001). Constructed during World War II, Vengeance was one of the few ships in her class to be completed before the war's end, although she did not see any active service. The ship spent the next few years as an aircraft transport and training carrier before she was sent on an experimental cruise to learn how well ships and personnel could function in extreme Arctic conditions. In late 1952, Vengeance was loaned to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) as a replacement for the delayed aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne. She remained in Australian waters, operating as an aircraft carrier and training ship, for the majority of her three-year loan, and was returned to the Royal Navy (RN) in August 1955. Instead of returning to RN service, the carrier was sold in 1956 to Brazil, and entered service after major upgrades, which allowed the ship to operate jet aircraft. Renamed Minas Gerais, the
    7.00
    4 votes
    38
    USS Natoma Bay

    USS Natoma Bay

    USS Natoma Bay (CVE–62) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down as Begum (MC hull 1099), on 17 January 1943, by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Co., Inc., Vancouver, Washington, under Maritime Commission contract, named Natoma Bay on 22 January 1943, after a bay in the Graham Islands off the southwest coast of Alaska; launched on 20 July 1943; sponsored by Lady Halifax, wife of the United Kingdom’s ambassador to the United States; and commissioned on 14 October 1943, Captain Harold L. Meadow in command. After her shakedown cruise off the California coast, Natoma Bay performed aircraft and personnel ferrying duties between San Diego and Hawaii for Commander Fleet Air, West Coast, until 3 January 1944. Then, with squadron VC-63 embarked, she departed San Diego for Pearl Harbor, reporting to ComCarDiv 24, 5th Amphibious Force, on 10 January. On 23 January she sortied with TG 51.2 for the invasion of the Marshalls. Between 31 January and 7 February, as positions on Majuro Atoll were consolidated, CVE–62 furnished anti-submarine and combat air patrols and area searches for the attack force. On 8 February, she extended her operations to Wotje and
    7.00
    4 votes
    39
    USS Wisconsin

    USS Wisconsin

    • Ship Class: Iowa class battleship
    USS Wisconsin (BB-64), "Wisky" or "WisKy", is an Iowa-class battleship, the second ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the U.S. state of Wisconsin. She was built at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and launched on 7 December 1943 (the second anniversary of the Pearl Harbor raid), sponsored by the wife of Governor of Wisconsin, Walter Goodland. During her career, Wisconsin served in the Pacific Theater of World War II, where she shelled Japanese fortifications and screened United States aircraft carriers as they conducted air raids against enemy positions. During the Korean War, Wisconsin shelled North Korean targets in support of United Nations and South Korean ground operations, after which she was decommissioned. She was reactivated 1 August 1986, modernised and participated in Operation Desert Storm in January and February 1991. Wisconsin was last decommissioned in September 1991, having earned a total of six battle stars for service in World War II and Korea, as well as a Navy Unit Commendation for service during the January/February 1991 Gulf War. She currently functions as a museum ship operated by Nauticus, The National
    7.00
    4 votes
    40
    USS Yorktown

    USS Yorktown

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS Yorktown (CV-5) was an aircraft carrier commissioned in the United States Navy from 1937 until she was sunk at the Battle of Midway in June 1942. She was named after the Battle of Yorktown in 1781 and the lead ship of the Yorktown class which was designed after lessons learned from operations with the large converted battlecruiser Lexington class and the smaller purpose-built Ranger. She represented the epitome of U.S. pre-war carrier design. Yorktown was laid down on 21 May 1934 at Newport News, Virginia, by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co.; launched on 4 April 1936; sponsored by Eleanor Roosevelt; and commissioned at the Naval Operating Base (NOB), Norfolk, Virginia, on 30 September 1937, Capt. Ernest D. McWhorter in command. After fitting out, the aircraft carrier trained in Hampton Roads, Virginia and in the southern drill grounds off the Virginia capes into January 1938, conducting carrier qualifications for her newly embarked air group. Yorktown sailed for the Caribbean on 8 January 1938 and arrived at Culebra, Puerto Rico, on 13 January. Over the ensuing month, the carrier conducted her shakedown, touching at Charlotte Amalie, St Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands;
    7.00
    4 votes
    41
    HMS Goliath

    HMS Goliath

    • Ship Class: Canopus class battleship
    HMS Goliath was one of the six Canopus-class pre-dreadnought battleships built by the Royal Navy in the late 19th century. Commissioned in 1900, she served in the Far East on the China Station until 1905, at which time she joined the Mediterranean Fleet. In 1906, she was attached to the Channel Fleet. Having been mothballed prior to the outbreak of the First World War, she was returned to full commission. Goliath took part in operations against German East Africa, participating in the blockade of the German light cruiser SMS Königsberg in the Rufiji River. From March 1915, she was part of the Dardanelles Campaign, and and remained in support of the landings at Gallipoli in April. On 13 May 1915 Goliath was sunk in Morto Bay off Cape Helles by two torpedoes from the Turkish torpedo boat destroyer Muavenet-i Milliye, which was manned by a combined German and Turkish crew, taking 570 of the 700-strong crew to the bottom including her commanding officer, Captain Thomas Lawrie Shelford. HMS Goliath was laid down at Chatham Dockyard on 4 January 1897 and was launched on 23 March 1898. She was commissioned in March 1900. Goliath and her five sister ships were designed for service in the
    6.00
    5 votes
    42
    USS Spokane

    USS Spokane

    USS Spokane (CL-120) was a United States Navy Juneau-class light cruiser laid down on 15 November 1944 at the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company in Kearny, New Jersey; launched on 22 September 1945, sponsored by Miss Patrice Munsel; and commissioned on 17 May 1946, with Captain L. E. Crist in command. Spokane shifted to Bayonne, New Jersey, and then to Brooklyn, New York, where she sailed on 24 June for Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, for her shakedown cruise and to conduct battle practice and weapons firing. She returned to New York on 11 September. The cruiser was assigned to the 2nd Fleet for duty in European waters, and sailed for Plymouth, England, on 7 October. Spokane operated out of British ports until mid-January 1947. During her tour, she visited Scotland, Ireland, Norway, and Denmark. On 27 January, she stood out of Plymouth and proceeded to the United States via Portugal, Gibraltar, and Guantánamo Bay, where she participated in fleet exercises before arriving at Norfolk, Virginia, on 18 March. Following fleet and bombardment exercises in the Chesapeake Bay during the summer, she had a period of yard availability at the Brooklyn Navy Yard from 22 September to 14 October. The
    6.00
    5 votes
    43
    USS Tarawa

    USS Tarawa

    USS Tarawa (CV/CVA/CVS-40, AVT-12) was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during and shortly after World War II for the United States Navy. The ship was the first US Navy ship to bear the name, and was named for the bloody 1943 Battle of Tarawa. Tarawa was commissioned in December 1945, too late to serve in World War II. After serving a short time in the Far East, she was decommissioned in 1949. She was soon recommissioned after the Korean War began, serving in the Atlantic as a replacement for carriers sent to Korea. In the early 1950s, she was redesignated an attack carrier (CVA) and then an antisubmarine warfare carrier (CVS). Except for one tour in the Far East, she spent her entire second career operating in the Atlantic and Caribbean. Unlike many of her sisters, Tarawa received no major modernizations, and thus throughout her career retained the classic appearance of a World War II Essex-class ship. She was decommissioned in 1960, and while in reserve was redesignated an aircraft transport (AVT). She was sold for scrap in 1968. Tarawa was one of the "long-hull" Essex-class ships. She was laid down on 11 March 1944 at the Norfolk Navy Yard. She was launched 12 May
    6.00
    5 votes
    44
    HMAS Rankin

    HMAS Rankin

    • Ship builder: Australian Submarine Corporation
    • Ship Class: Collins class submarine
    HMAS Rankin is the sixth and final submarine of the Collins class, which are operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Named for Lieutenant Commander Robert William Rankin, the boat was laid down in 1995, and commissioned into the RAN in March 2003, following major delays. Early in her career, Rankin was the subject of a documentary series and a coffee table book. She was the first submarine since 1987 to be awarded the Gloucester Cup. Rankin was laid down by Australian Submarine Corporation on 12 May 1995. The boat was launched on 7 November 2001. She was delivered to the RAN on 18 March 2003 and commissioned on 29 March 2003, 41 months behind schedule, after major delays in the completion and fitting out of the boat due to the diversion of resources to the "fast track" submarines Dechaineux and Sheean and repeated cannibalisation for parts to repair the other five Collins-class boats. Rankin was named for Lieutenant Commander Robert William Rankin, who died when the ship he commanded, HMAS Yarra, engaged a force of five Japanese warships on 4 March 1942, to allow an Allied convoy to escape. The boat is nicknamed "The Black Knight". The Collins class is an enlarged version of
    8.00
    3 votes
    45
    Japanese battleship Fuso

    Japanese battleship Fuso

    • Ship builder: Kure Naval Arsenal
    The Japanese battleship Fusō (Japanese: 扶桑, an old name for Japan), was a part of the Imperial Japanese Navy, the lead ship of the Fusō-class. She was laid down by the Kure Kaigun Koshō on 11 March 1912, launched on 28 March 1914 and completed on 18 November 1915. Her 356 mm (14 in) main gun turrets were placed in an unorthodox 2-1-1-2 style (with her sister ship Yamashiro having her third turret reversed when compared to Fusō) and with a funnel separating the middle turret placement. This arrangement was not entirely successful as the armoured section was needlessly lengthened and the middle guns had trouble targeting. However, Fusō's relatively fine hull form allowed her to reach a speed of 22 kn (41 km/h; 25 mph). Fusō did not take part in any major action during World War I, as the majority of the Japanese Navy was engaged in escort duties and various other work which did not require the use of the battle line. Between the wars, Fusō and Yamashiro received major modifications, in common with all of the Japanese battleships in service. Fusō was lengthened by an additional 7.62 m (25 ft), the twin funnels trunked together, the original 24 mixed-firing boilers replaced by six new
    8.00
    3 votes
    46
    USS Constitution

    USS Constitution

    • Ship builder: Edmund Hartt Shipyard
    • Place built: Boston Navy Yard
    USS Constitution is a wooden-hulled, three-masted heavy frigate of the United States Navy. Named by President George Washington after the Constitution of the United States of America, she is the world's oldest commissioned naval vessel afloat. Launched in 1797, Constitution was one of six original frigates authorized for construction by the Naval Act of 1794 and the third constructed. Joshua Humphreys designed the frigates to be the young Navy's capital ships, and so Constitution and her sisters were larger and more heavily armed and built than standard frigates of the period. Built in Boston, Massachusetts, at Edmund Hartt's shipyard, her first duties with the newly formed United States Navy were to provide protection for American merchant shipping during the Quasi-War with France and to defeat the Barbary pirates in the First Barbary War. Constitution is most famous for her actions during the War of 1812 against Great Britain, when she captured numerous merchant ships and defeated five British warships: HMS Guerriere, Java, Pictou, Cyane and Levant. The battle with Guerriere earned her the nickname of "Old Ironsides" and public adoration that has repeatedly saved her from
    8.00
    3 votes
    47
    USS Newport News

    USS Newport News

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    The second USS Newport News (CA–148) was a Des Moines-class heavy cruiser in the United States Navy. Newport News was laid down 1 November 1945; launched on 6 March 1948 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia. The vessel was sponsored by Mrs. Homer L. Ferguson upon commissioning on 29 January 1949, Captain Roland N. Smoot commanding. She was the first air-conditioned surface ship in the United States Navy. In addition to annual deployments to the Mediterranean from 1950 to 1961 for duty with the Sixth Fleet, she participated in major fleet exercises and midshipman training cruises in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic. On 4 January 1956 the ship steamed for a tour of duty in the Mediterranean as flagship of Vice Admiral Ralph A. Ofstie, Commander Sixth Fleet. Vice Admiral Ofstie was relieved on board by Vice Admiral Harry Donald Felt on 12 April in Barcelona, Spain. Commander Sixth Fleet transferred his flag to the USS Salem on 21 May at Gibraltar. The ship returned to Norfolk, Va. on May 29, 1956. The ship visited the city of NEWPORT NEWS over the 4th of July holiday leaving Norfolk 2 July and returning 5 July. During the trip from Norfolk to
    8.00
    3 votes
    48
    USS Pittsburgh

    USS Pittsburgh

    • Ship Class: Baltimore class cruiser
    The third USS Pittsburgh (CA–72), originally named Albany, was a Baltimore-class heavy cruiser laid down on 3 February 1943 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation's Fore River Shipyard at Quincy, Massachusetts; launched on 22 February 1944, sponsored by Mrs Cornelius D. Scully, wife of the Mayor of Pittsburgh; and commissioned at Boston on 10 October 1944, Capt. John Edward Gingrich in command. Pittsburgh trained along the east coast and in the Caribbean until departing Boston on 13 January 1945 for duty in the Pacific. After calling in Panama and final gunnery exercises in the Hawaiians, she joined TF 58 at Ulithi on 13 February, assigned to TG 58.2 formed around the aircraft carrier Lexington (CV-16). The force sortied on 10 February to prepare the way for the assault on Iwo Jima. Carrier air strikes against airfields near Tokyo on 16 and 17 February limited Japanese air response to the initial landings on 19 February. That day planes from Pittsburgh's group began direct support to Marines fighting to overcome fierce Japanese resistance on the island. Final strikes against Tokyo's environs on 25 February and 1 March against the Nansei Shoto completed this operation. The force
    8.00
    3 votes
    49
    USS Point Cruz

    USS Point Cruz

    • Ship builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
    USS Point Cruz (CVE-119) was a Commencement Bay-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. Named Trocadero Bay until 5 June 1944, was laid down on 4 December 1944 by Todd-Pacific Shipyards Incorporated, Tacoma, Washington; launched on 18 May 1945, sponsored by Mrs. Earl R. DeLong; and commissioned on 16 October 1945, with Captain Douglas T. Day in command. Following acceptance and shakedown, she conducted pilot qualifications off the West Coast from October 1945 to March 1946. Thereafter she ferried aircraft to forward bases in WestPac. (Captain Donald S. McMahan took command 27 November 1947, serving until 22 April 1947 when he was replaced by Commander William A. Smyth.) She entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on 3 March 1947 for inactivation; was decommissioned on 30 June 1947 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Bremerton, Washington. After the start of hostilities in Korea the ship was activated and recommissioned on 26 July 1951, with Captain Horace Butterfield in command. (He was replaced by Captain J.W. Davidson in December 1951, and Captain C.C. Marcy became commanding officer in November, 1951.) Point Cruz departed Bremerton on 4 January 1953 after coastal
    8.00
    3 votes
    50
    USS Rendova

    USS Rendova

    • Ship builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
    USS Rendova (CVE-114) was a Commencement Bay class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was originally assigned the name Mosser Bay and completed as the Willamette, she was laid down by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Washington, 15 June 1944; launched 29 December 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Anna-Marie H. Kurtz; and commissioned 22 October 1945, Capt. R. W. Ruble in command. Commissioned too late for service in World War II, Rendova completed shakedown in early January 1946, and reported for duty with the 1st Fleet in February. During March, she conducted exercises off the west coast, but in April, her complement was reduced to a maintenance crew. Immobilized at San Diego for a year, she remained on the active list as the administrative headquarters for Carrier Division 15 (CarDiv 15). In the spring of 1947, she returned to full active duty and for the next year conducted training exercises off the west coast and in the Hawaiian Islands. On 1 April 1948, she departed San Francisco en route to Turkey with a cargo of AT-6 training planes for that country's air force. Steaming via the Panama Canal, she arrived at Yesilkoy 28 April, off loaded her cargo, and continued her
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    USS Somers

    USS Somers

    • Ship builder: Bath Iron Works
    • Ship Class: Forrest Sherman class destroyer
    The sixth USS Somers (DDG-34, ex-DD-947) was a Forrest Sherman-class destroyer when her keel was laid down at the Bath Iron Works on 4 March 1958, she was launched on 30 May, and commissioned on 3 April 1959. In 1961 she won the Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award. Somers was decommissioned 11 April 1966, and converted at San Francisco Naval Shipyard. On 15 March 1967 she was reclassified as a Decatur-class guided missile destroyer, and was re-commissioned 10 February 1968. She was decommissioned on 19 November 1982 and on 26 April 1988, she was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register. On 22 July 1998, she was sunk as target near Hawaii. On 1 June 1959, the destroyer sailed from Boston, Mass., to Newport, R.I., before departing the United States five days later for her maiden voyage which took her - via Argentia, Newfoundland - to the ports of northern Europe. On her itinerary were Copenhagen, Denmark; Stockholm, Sweden; Portsmouth, England; and Kiel, Germany, where she represented the Navy during the "Kiel Week" festivities. Somers took leave of Europe at Portsmouth, England, and-after stopping briefly at Bermuda and training for five days out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba-transited
    8.00
    3 votes
    52
    HMAS Collins

    HMAS Collins

    • Ship builder: Australian Submarine Corporation
    • Ship Class: Collins class submarine
    HMAS Collins (SSG 73) is the lead vessel of the six-submarine Collins class operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Named for Vice Admiral Sir John Augustine Collins, Collins was laid down in February 1990, and was the only submarine of the class to be partially constructed by Kockums' Malmo shipyard. The boat was launched in August 1993, but was not completed until ten months later. Numerous problems with the class were exposed by the lengthy sea trials period undertaken by the boat; Collins was not commissioned into the RAN until mid-1996, eighteen months behind schedule, and the submarine was not cleared for operational deployments until 2000. Collins was laid down in February 1990. The two most complex sections of the first submarine were constructed by Kockums' shipyard in Malmo, Sweden, while the other four sections and complete assembly of the submarine occurred at Australian Submarine Corporation's facility in Port Adelaide, South Australia. It was originally planned to construct the first submarine completely overseas, but by the time the tender was awarded, it had been decided to build all six submarines in Australia; the increase in cost by not building the lead
    6.75
    4 votes
    53
    HMS Canopus

    HMS Canopus

    • Ship Class: Canopus class battleship
    HMS Canopus was a pre-dreadnought battleship of the British Royal Navy and the lead ship of the Canopus-class. At the beginning of the First world war she was involved in the search for the German East Asia Squadron of Admiral Graf Spee. Too slow to follow Craddock´s cruisers, she missed the Battle of Coronel, but fired the first shots of the Battle of the Falklands. Transferred to the Mediterranean she to took part in the Naval operations in the Dardanelles Campaign. HMS Canopus was laid down at Portsmouth Dockyard on 4 January 1897, launched on 12 October 1897, and completed on 5 December 1899. She was named after the ancient city of Canopus, Egypt, where the Battle of the Nile took place. Canopus and her five sister ships were designed for service in the Far East, where the new rising power Japan was beginning to build a powerful and dangerous navy. These vesseles were intended to be able to transit the Suez Canal. They were designed to be smaller (by about 2,000 tons), lighter, and faster than their predecessors, the Majestic-class battleships, although they were slightly longer at 430 feet (131 m). In order to save weight, Canopus carried less armour than the Majestics,
    6.75
    4 votes
    54
    Japanese submarine I-25

    Japanese submarine I-25

    • Ship Class: B1 type submarine
    I-25 (イ-25) was a B1-Type (I-15 Class) submarine of the Imperial Japanese Navy that served in World War II, took part in the Attack on Pearl Harbor, and carried out the only aerial bombing on the continental United States during wartime; during the so-called Lookout Air Raid; and the Bombardment of Fort Stevens, both attacks occurring in the state of Oregon, USA. I-25, of 2,369 tonnes (2,600 tons), was 108 m (354 ft) long, with a range of 25,928 km (14,000 nmi; 16,111 mi), a maximum surface speed of 43.5 km/h (23.5 kn; 27.0 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 15 km/h (8 kn; 9 mph). She carried a two-seater Yokosuka E14Y reconnaissance floatplane, known to the Allies as "Glen". It was disassembled and stowed in the front of the conning tower. In World War II, I-25 served under the command of Lieutenant Commander Meiji Tagami who had graduated from Class 51 at Etajima, Hiroshima. 26-year-old Lieutenant Tatsuo Tsukudo was the Executive Officer(XO) on I-25. I-25 departed Yokosuka on 21 November 1941 in preparation for hostilities. I-25 and three other submarines patrolled a line 222 km (120 nmi; 138 mi) north of Oahu during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. After the Japanese
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    USS Cod

    USS Cod

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    • Ship Class: Gato class submarine
    USS Cod (SS/AGSS/IXSS-224) is a Gato-class submarine, the only vessel of the United States Navy to be named for the cod, the well-known food fish of the North Atlantic and North Pacific. Her keel was laid down by the Electric Boat Company of Groton, Connecticut on 21 July 1942. She was launched on 21 March 1943 (sponsored by Mrs. G.M. Mahoney), and commissioned on 21 June 1943 with Lieutenant Commander James C. Dempsey (Class of 1931) in command. She is now permanently moored in Cleveland, Ohio and is open to visitors. Cod arrived in Brisbane, Australia, on 2 October 1943 to prepare for her first war patrol. She sailed from there 20 days later. Penetrating the South China Sea, she contacted few targets, and launched an attack only once, on 29 November, with unobserved results. Returning to Fremantle, Western Australia, to refit from 16 December 1943 to 11 January 1944, Cod put to sea for her second war patrol in the South China Sea, off Java, and off Halmahera. On 16 February, she surfaced to sink a sampan by gunfire, and on 23 February, torpedoed a Japanese merchantman. She sent another to the bottom on 27 February and two days later attacked a third, only to be forced deep by a
    6.75
    4 votes
    56
    USS F-4

    USS F-4

    • Ship Class: F class submarine
    USS F-4 (SS-23) was a F-class submarine. Her keel was laid down by the Moran Brothers of Seattle, Washington. She was originally named Skate, making her the first ship of the United States Navy named for the skate. She was renamed F-4 on 17 November 1911. She was launched on 6 January 1912 sponsored by Mrs. M.F. Backus; and commissioned on 3 May 1913 with Lieutenant (junior grade) K.H. Donavin in command. Joining the First Submarine Group, Pacific Torpedo Flotilla, F-4 participated in the development operations of that group along the west coast, and from August 1914, in Hawaiian waters. During submarine maneuvers off Honolulu, Hawaii on 25 March 1915, she sank at a depth of 306 ft (93 m), 1.5 mi (2.4 km) from the harbor. Despite valorous efforts of naval authorities at Honolulu to locate the missing boat and save her crew, all 21 perished. F-4 was the first commissioned submarine of the U.S. Navy to be lost at sea. A diving and engineering precedent was established with the Navy's raising of the submarine on 29 August 1915. Courage and tenacity marked the efforts of divers who descended to attach cables to tow the boat into shallow water, while ingenuity and engineering skill
    6.75
    4 votes
    57
    USS Peterson

    USS Peterson

    • Ship builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding
    USS Peterson (DD-969), named for Lieutenant Commander Carl Jerrold Peterson (1936–1968), was a Spruance-class destroyer laid down by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries at Pascagoula, Mississippi. She commissioned on 9 July 1977 and decommissioned on 4 October 2002. 1979 - Persian Gulf deployment. Peterson made her first deployment which included duty as flagship for Commander, Middle East Force in the Persian Gulf and the Indian Ocean. Upon return to Norfolk, Virginia she was awarded Destroyer Squadron Ten's Battle 'E'. 1980 - Persian Gulf deployment. Peterson spent her second deployment beginning in September 1980 in the Persian Gulf. She returned home in March 1981. 1981 – Mediterranean deployment. Six months later, Peterson returned to the Mediterranean on 1 December 1981 for her third deployment in three years. 1982 - Overhaul. During a nine month overhaul starting in July 1982, Peterson's weapons systems were upgraded to include the Target Acquisition System (TAS), two 20 mm Vulcan Phalanx CIWS mounts, and an enhanced communications and electronics suite. 1984 - Mediterranean (Lebanon) deployment. Peterson was awarded the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
    6.75
    4 votes
    58
    La Amistad

    La Amistad

    La Amistad (Spanish: Friendship) was a 19th-century two-masted schooner built in Spain and owned by a Spaniard living in Cuba. While transporting African captives from Havana to Puerto Principe, Cuba in July 1839, the Africans took control of the ship. La Amistad was captured off the coast of Long Island by the Revenue Cutter USS Washington. The Africans and La Amistad were interned while court proceedings were undertaken for their disposition. The case, United States v. The Amistad, was finally decided by the Supreme Court of the United States, in the process becoming a symbol in the movement to abolish slavery. On July 2, 1839, Sengbe Pieh (later known in the United States as Joseph Cinqué) led 53 fellow African captives (49 adults and 4 children), being transported aboard La Amistad from Havana, in a revolt against their captors. In the main hold below decks, the captives found a rusty file. Freeing themselves, they quickly went up on deck and, armed with machete-like cane knives, successfully gained control of the ship. When they demanded to be returned home, the ship's navigator, Don Pedro Montez, deceived them about their course and sailed the ship north along the North
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    USS Doyle

    USS Doyle

    • Ship builder: Bath Iron Works
    USS Doyle (FFG-39) was the 30th ship to be constructed in the Oliver Hazard Perry-class of guided missile frigates of the United States Navy. The Doyle was named after Vice Admiral James Henry Doyle (1897-1982) Vice Admiral Doyle was most known for his contributions during the Korean War as Commander Amphibious Group One. Her keel was laid down by Bath Iron Works Corporation of Bath, Maine, on 23 October 1981. She was launched on 22 May 1982 and commissioned on 21 May 1983. The USS Doyle was decommissioned at Naval Station Mayport on July 29th, 2011 after completing 27 years of service. This article includes information collected from the Naval Vessel Register, which, as a U.S. government publication, is in the public domain. The entry can be found here.
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    USS Long Island

    USS Long Island

    USS Long Island (CVE-1) (originally AVG-1 and then ACV-1) was lead ship of her class and the first escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was also the second ship to be named after Long Island, New York. She was laid down on 7 July 1939, as Mormacmail, under Maritime Commission contract, by the Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Chester, Pennsylvania, launched on 11 January 1940, sponsored by Ms. Dian B. Holt, acquired by the Navy on 6 March 1941, and commissioned on 2 June 1941 as Long Island (AVG-1), Commander Donald B. Duncan in command. In the tense months before the attack on Pearl Harbor, Long Island operated out of Norfolk, Virginia, conducting experiments to prove the feasibility of aircraft operations from converted cargo ships. The data gathered by her crew greatly improved the combat readiness of later "baby flattops". Just after the Japanese attack, she escorted a convoy to Newfoundland and qualified carrier pilots at Norfolk before departing for the West Coast on 10 May 1942. Reaching San Francisco on 5 June, the ship immediately joined Admiral William S. Pye's four battleships and provided air cover while at sea to reinforce Admiral Chester Nimitz's forces
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    USS Monitor

    USS Monitor

    • Ship Class: Monitor
    USS Monitor was the first ironclad warship commissioned by the United States Navy during the American Civil War. She is most famous for her participation in the Battle of Hampton Roads on 9 March 1862, the first-ever battle fought between two ironclads. The Monitor fought the ironclad CSS Virginia (the former frigate USS Merrimack) of the Confederate States Navy. The need for an ironclad warship in the U.S. Navy began when the state of Virginia seceded from the Union and ships at the Gosport Navy Yard in Norfolk were scuttled to prevent them from falling into Confederates hands. The Merrimack was only burnt to her waterline and was successfully raised by the Confederate States Navy (CSN). Her hull, with new upper works added, including an armored casemate, began to be refitted as Virginia. When Gideon Welles, the Secretary of the Navy, found out about this, he created a board of three naval officers to review designs for an ironclad. Three ships were accepted, including USS Monitor, designed by the Swedish-born engineer and inventor John Ericsson. Monitor was innovative in several respects, including the first 360-degree rotating armored gun turret on an operational warship. The
    9.00
    2 votes
    62
    USS Quincy

    USS Quincy

    • Ship Class: Baltimore class cruiser
    USS Quincy (CA-71), a Baltimore class heavy cruiser of the United States Navy. She was the third ship to carry the name. Quincy was authorized on 17 June 1940; laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Shipbuilding Division, Quincy, Massachusetts as St. Paul on 9 October 1941; renamed Quincy on 16 October 1942 to perpetuate that name after destruction of the second Quincy at the Battle of Savo Island on 9 August 1942. She was launched on 23 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Henry S. Morgan, a daughter of Charles Francis Adams, and commissioned at the U.S. Naval Drydock, South Boston Massachusetts on 15 December 1943, with Captain Elliot M. Senn in command. The third Quincy (CA-71), a heavy cruiser, was authorized 17 June 1940; laid down by Bethlehem Steel Co., Shipbuilding Div., Quincy, Mass., as ST. PAUL 9 October 1941; renamed Quincy 16 October 1942 to perpetuate that name after destruction of the second Quincy at the Battle of Savo Island on 9 August 1942; launched 23 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Henry S. Morgan, a daughter of Charles Francis Adams; and commissioned at the U.S. Naval Drydock, South Boston, Mass., 15 December 1943, Capt. Elliot M. Senn in command. After shakedown
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    USS Guam

    USS Guam

    USS Guam (LPH-9), an Iwo Jima-class amphibious assault ship, was laid down by the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 15 November 1962; launched on 22 August 1964, sponsored by Mrs. Vaughn H. Emory Green, and commissioned on 16 January 1965, Captain N. E. Thurmon in command. She was the third US Navy ship to carry the name, after the Battle of Guam. Decommissioned in 1998, she was the last of the Iwo Jima class in service. After fitting out and builder's trials, the new amphibious assault ship joined the U.S. Atlantic Fleet on 21 April 1965 and sailed for Norfolk, her homeport. Arriving Hampton Roads the next day for training off the Virginia Capes, she departed Hampton Roads for underway training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Guam returned to Norfolk on 5 July 1965 for intensive amphibious training. She sailed from Hampton Roads on 29 November 1965 to participate in amphibious and anti-submarine warfare exercises en route to the Caribbean. On 10 December 1965, Guam joined the Amphibious Ready Squadron in the Caribbean as flagship for Amphibious Squadron 12. There she operated at peak readiness to protect the peace and security of the Caribbean and Central America. From 16 February to 28
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    USS Lake Champlain

    USS Lake Champlain

    USS Lake Champlain (CV/CVA/CVS-39) was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers completed during or shortly after World War II for the United States Navy. She was the second US Navy ship to bear the name, and was named for the Battle of Lake Champlain in the War of 1812. Commissioned in June 3-1945, Lake Champlain World War II and serve as a transport, bringing troops home from Europe as part of Operation Magic Carpet. Like many of her sister ships, she was decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, but was modernized and recommissioned in the early 1950s, and redesignated as an attack carrier (CVA). She participated in the Korean War but spent the rest of her career in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Mediterranean. In the late 1950s, she was redesignated as an antisubmarine carrier (CVS). She was the prime recovery ship for the first manned Mercury and for the third manned Gemini (Gemini V) space missions. Lake Champlain had a unique modernization history. She was the only Essex-class ship to receive the SCB-27 conversion, which was a rebuild of the superstructure, flight deck and other features, but not also receive the SCB-125 conversion, which would have given her an angled
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    USS Maddox

    USS Maddox

    • Ship builder: Bath Iron Works
    USS Maddox (DD-731), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer was named for Captain William A. T. Maddox, USMC. She was laid down by the Bath Iron Works Corporation at Bath in Maine on 28 October 1943, launched on 19 March 1944 by Mrs. Harry H. Wilhoit, granddaughter of Captain Maddox and commissioned on 2 June 1944. Maddox screened the ships of the Fast Carrier Task Force during strikes against enemy targets in the western Pacific where she was struck by an enemy Japanese kamikaze aircraft off Formosa on 21 January 1945. She also covered the Marine landings at Okinawa, operated with the 7th Fleet in support of United Nations Forces during the Korean War, and alternated operations along the west coast and in Hawaiian waters with regular deployments to the western Pacific with the Seventh Fleet. At first steaming with fast carrier groups in the Sea of Japan and the East China Sea, she headed south 18 May and established patrol off the coast of South Vietnam. During the Korean War, the Maddox participated in the Blockade of Wonsan, a 861 day siege bombardment of the city. On 31 July 1964 she commenced her first leg of a DESOTO patrol in the Tonkin Gulf. Initially a routine patrol, it would
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    USS Oregon City

    USS Oregon City

    USS Oregon City (CA-122), the lead ship of the Oregon City class of heavy cruisers, was laid down 8 April 1944 by Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts; launched 9 June 1945; sponsored by Mrs. Raymond P. Canfield, wife of the City Commissioner of Oregon City, Oregon. Newspapers showed pictures of celebrated radio, film and television personality Bing Crosby adding a bit of glamor to the launching. The Oregon City was commissioned 16 February 1946, Capt. Burtnett Kent Culver in command. The commissioning program says: "The U.S.S. Oregon City is named for that historical city in the state of Oregon that bears the same name as the state. Oregon City is the oldest seat of government in the entire West and first capital of Oregon. It is located on the banks of the Willamette River and was founded over a century ago by the noted Dr. John McLoughlin." Continuing: "The U.S.S. Oregon City, like the city it is named for believes in being a first. As the first heavy cruiser of her type and class she carries on the heritage of that great city that is noted for its historical firsts." Oregon City departed Boston 31 March 1946 for shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, then returned to Boston
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    HMAS Supply

    HMAS Supply

    • Ship builder: Harland and Wolff
    HMAS Supply (AO 195) (formerly RFA Tide Austral (A99)) was a Tide-class replenishment oiler of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) and the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Originally named Tide Austral and intended to be the first ship of a post-World War II Royal Australian Fleet Auxiliary, manpower and financial shortages meant that when the Belfast-built ship was launched in 1955, she could not be accepted into Australian service. Instead, she was loaned to the RFA until 1962, when she was commissioned into the RAN as HMAS Supply. Supply operated as part of the RAN until her decommissioning at the end of 1985. In the early 1950s, the RAN considered acquiring a fleet tanker to support their forces. It was suggested that Australia order a Tide-class replenishment oiler from the United Kingdom (the Royal Navy having ordered three ships of the design), as the backlog of Navy construction in Australian dockyards would prevent an Australian-built tanker from entering service until at least the late 1950s. The tanker was to be the first ship of a post-war Royal Australian Fleet Auxiliary, would be manned by merchant seafarers to reduce demand on RAN service personnel, and would reduce the
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    Japanese battleship Hiei

    Japanese battleship Hiei

    Hiei (比叡) was a warship of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War I and World War II. Designed by British naval architect George Thurston, she was the second launched of four Kongō-class battlecruisers, among the most heavily armed ships in any navy when built. Laid down in 1911 at the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, Hiei was formally commissioned in 1914. She patrolled off the Chinese coast on several occasions during World War I, and helped with rescue efforts following the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake. Starting in 1929, Hiei was converted to a gunnery training ship to avoid being scrapped under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty. She served as Emperor Hirohito's transport in the mid-1930s. Starting in 1937, she underwent a full-scale reconstruction that completely rebuilt her superstructure, upgraded her powerplant, and equipped her with launch catapults for floatplanes. Now fast enough to accompany Japan's growing fleet of aircraft carriers, she was reclassified as a fast battleship. On the eve of World War II, she sailed as part of Vice-Admiral Chuichi Nagumo's Combined Fleet, escorting the six carriers that attacked Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. As part of the Third
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Kaisei

    Kaisei

    • Ship builder: Interster Elbląg Shipyard
    The STS Kaisei (海星), meaning “Sea Star” in the Japanese language, is a steel-hulled brigantine designed by Zygmunt Choreń. It was built in Gdańsk, Poland in 1987. It is a two-masted vessel, square rigged on the foremast, with fore-and-aft sails on the mainmast. Originally commissioned by the Polish Yachting Association as the Zew, she was acquired by the Sail Training Association of Japan (STAJ) and delivered to Japan via the Panama Canal in 1993 following a 16-month maiden voyage under the United Nations flag in which she saw 100-knot (190 km/h) winds off the coast of Scotland and participated in the American Tall Ship Celebration in 1992. It has been suggested that the ship's name 'kaisei' could also be a play on words, with the word meaning "reform" in Japanese (written "改正"). Under the Japanese flag, she has visited 15 countries and has traveled extensively throughout the Pacific in her mission to promote the global community and bring countries and cultures together through the international language of the sea. She has covered roughly 40,000 nautical miles (around 80,000 km). In 1992 sailed with the Columbus fleet, flying the UN flag. Kaisei's maiden voyage lasted 16 months
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Lynx

    Lynx

    Lynx is a square topsail schooner based in Newport Beach, California. She is an interpretation of an American letter of marque vessel of the same name from 1812. The original Lynx completed one voyage, running the Royal Navy blockade; the British captured her in 1813 at the start of her second voyage and took her into service as HMS Mosquidobit. The replica of Lynx sailing today was designed by Melbourne Smith - International Historical Watercraft Society, based on historical data, and built by Taylor Allen and Eric Sewell of Rockport Marine at Rockport, Maine. She was launched on July 28, 2001 at Rockport, making her a new addition to the tall ship community. Her port of registry is Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Today, instead of fighting the British like her original counterpart, she serves as a sailing classroom. Lynx offers an early American history program as well as a life, earth and physical science program to schools. She teaches seamanship and history to those who step on her deck. Notably, Lynx is known for her summer program where she sails to Hawaii with students. Along the way students learn about sail handling, navigation, seamanship, leadership and learning to face
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Peking

    Peking

    • Ship builder: Blohm + Voss
    The Peking is a steel-hulled four-masted barque. A so-called Flying P-Liner of the German company F. Laeisz, it was one of the last generation of windjammers used in the nitrate trade and wheat trade around the often treacherous Cape Horn. Eking out meager existence on routes difficult to serve by steam ships that required vast amounts of coal, these tall ships and the sailors sailing them were the last of their breed. Sailed in the traditional way with few labor saving devices or safety features, her sailors worked four hours on and four hours off 24 hours a day for the entire length of the voyage, sometime for more than a hundred days in a row. Made famous by the sail training pioneer Irving Johnson, his footage filmed on board during a passage around Cape Horn in 1929 shocked experienced Cape Horn veterans and landsmen alike at the extreme conditions Peking experienced. She was in Valparaiso at the outbreak of World War I, and was awarded to Italy as war reparations. She was sold back to the original owners, the Laeisz brothers in 1923, and continued in the nitrate trade until traffic through the Panama Canal proved quicker and more economical. In 1932, she was sold for £6,250
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    USS Alabama

    USS Alabama

    USS Alabama (BB-8) was an Illinois-class pre-dreadnought style battleship in the United States Navy. She was the second ship to carry her name. Alabama was laid down on 1 December 1896 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by the William Cramp and Sons Ship and Engine Building Company. She was launched on 18 May 1898 sponsored by Miss Mary Morgan, daughter of the Honorable John T. Morgan, United States Senator from Alabama and commissioned on 16 October 1900, Captain Willard H. Brownson in command. Though assigned to the North Atlantic Station, Alabama did not begin operations with that unit until early the following year. The warship remained at Philadelphia until 13 December, when she got underway for the brief trip to New York City. She stayed at New York through the New Year and until the latter part of January 1901. Finally, on 27 January, the battleship headed south for winter exercises with the Fleet at the drill grounds in the Gulf of Mexico near Pensacola, Florida. Alabama's Navy career began in earnest with her arrival in the gulf early in February. With a single exception in 1904, each year from 1901–1907 she conducted Fleet exercises and gunnery drills in the Gulf of Mexico
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    USS Barry

    USS Barry

    • Ship builder: Bath Iron Works
    • Ship Class: Forrest Sherman class destroyer
    USS Barry (DD-933) was one of eighteen Forrest Sherman-class destroyers of the United States Navy, and was the third US destroyer to be named for Commodore John Barry. Commissioned in 1954, she spent most of her career in the Caribbean, Atlantic, and Mediterranean, but also served in the Vietnam War, for which she earned two battle stars. Another notable aspect of her service was the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. Decommissioned in 1982, she is now a museum ship at the Washington Navy Yard. Barry was laid down on 15 March 1954 at Bath, Maine, by the Bath Iron Works Corporation; launched on 1 October 1955; sponsored by Mrs. Francis Rogers, a great-grandniece of Commodore Barry; and commissioned at the Boston Naval Shipyard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, on 7 September 1956; Commander Isaac C. Kidd, Jr., in command. Barry fitted out at the Boston Naval Shipyard through November, testing her new electronics, ASW gear and gunnery systems into December. After a brief underway period in Narragansett Bay, she departed 3 January 1957 for Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, to continue her shakedown. Her training exercises were interspersed with port visits to Kingston, Jamaica; Cuelebra, Puerto Rico, and
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    USS Dogfish

    USS Dogfish

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    • Ship Class: Balao class submarine
    USS Dogfish (SS-350), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the dogfish. Her keel was laid down on 22 June 1944 by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 27 October 1945 sponsored by Mrs. A. M. Morgan, and commissioned on 29 April 1946 with Commander T. S. Baskett in command. Dogfish sailed out of New London, Connecticut, on local duties and cruised to the Caribbean Sea and Bermuda to conduct training. She was overhauled and extensively modernized at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard from August 1947 to April 1948, and then served in experimental projects as well as normal operations at New London. From 31 October to 19 November 1948 she took part in large-scale fleet exercises ranging from the waters off Florida to Davis Strait between Labrador and Greenland. She cruised to Scotland, England, and France between 4 February and 3 April 1949 and joined in a convoy exercise off Cape Hatteras in February and March 1952, and operated along the east coast and in the Caribbean Sea during the next three years. Dogfish sailed from New London on 1 March 1955 for her first tour with the Sixth Fleet in the
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    USS Louisiana

    USS Louisiana

    USS Louisiana (BB-19) was a Connecticut-class battleship of the United States Navy. She was the third ship to carry her name. Louisiana was laid down on 7 February 1903 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company of Newport News, Virginia; launched on 27 August 1904; sponsored by Miss Juanita LaLande and commissioned on 2 June 1906, Captain Albert R. Couden in command. Following her shakedown off the New England coast, Louisiana sailed 15 September for Havana in response to an appeal by Cuban President Estrado Palma for US help in suppressing an insurrection. The new battleship carried a peace commission, composed of Secretary of War William Howard Taft and Assistant Secretary of State Robert Bacon, which arranged for a provisional government of the island. Louisiana stood by while this government was set up and then returned the commission to Fortress Monroe, Virginia. Louisiana embarked President Theodore Roosevelt at Piney Point, Maryland on 8 November for a cruise to Panama to inspect work on the construction of the Panama Canal. Returning she briefly visited Puerto Rico, where the President studied the administration structure of the newly installed American colonial
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    USS Mississippi

    USS Mississippi

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    • Ship Class: Virginia class cruiser
    USS Mississippi (CGN-40), a Virginia class, nuclear fuel powered, U.S. Navy guided-missile cruiser, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 20th state admitted to the Union. Her keel was laid down by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company at Newport News, Virginia, on 22 February 1975. She was launched on 31 July 1976. The ship was commissioned on 5 August 1978 by President Jimmy Carter, then serving as the 39th President of the United States. Early deployment included escorting the carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68). She also was deployed in 1989 as a response to the capture and subsequent murder of U.S. Marine Corps Colonel William R. Higgins by terrorists. The USS Mississippi (CGN-40) was decommissioned and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 28 July 1997. The ship was prepared and then towed from Norfolk, VA to Bremerton, WA via the Panama Canal from March 1998 to May 1998. The MSC fleet tug USNS Mohawk began the tow until Mississippi was moored at Rodman Naval Station, Panama. The Pacific tow was completed by the USNS Navajo. Mississippi entered the Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program around October 2004.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    USS S-44

    USS S-44

    • Ship Class: United States S class submarine
    USS S-44 (SS-155) was a third-group (S-42) S-class submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down on 19 February 1921 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation in Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 27 October 1923 sponsored by Mrs. H.E. Grieshaber, and was commissioned on 16 February 1925 with Lieutenant A. H. Bateman in command. S-44 operated off the New England coast into the summer of 1925. In late August, she departed New London, Connecticut, for Panama and on 5 September arrived at Coco Solo to join Submarine Division (SubDiv) 19. With the division, she conducted training exercises, participated in fleet exercises and joint Army-Navy maneuvers, and made good will visits to various Caribbean and Pacific, Latin American ports until the spring of 1927. From that time to December 1930, she operated out of San Diego, California with her division, interrupting exercises off southern California twice for fleet problems in Hawaiian waters. In December 1930, the S-boat was transferred to Hawaii where her division, now SubDiv 11, was home ported for four years. The boats then returned to San Diego, California and in 1937 were shifted back to Coco Solo. In the spring
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    HMAS Fantome

    HMAS Fantome

    HMAS Fantome was an Espeigel class sloop laid down for the Royal Navy by HM Dockyard at Sheerness in Kent in 1901. HMS Fantome was operated by the Royal Navy Survey Service and conducted survey operations in Australian waters from 1907 until the outbreak of war in 1914. HMS Fantome was transferred to the Royal Australian Navy on 27 November 1914 but was paid off in February 1915. HMAS Fantome was recommissioned On 27 July 1915 as a patrol vessel armed with two 4-inch and four 12-pounder guns. From September 1915 to September 1917 she operated in the Bay of Bengal and South China Sea as part of the Far East Patrol. From late 1917 HMAS Fantome was based at Suva, Fiji and operated in the South Pacific performing police duties. HMAS Fantome paid off on 14 January 1919 and was returned to the Royal Navy in April 1920 for service as a survey ship. In this role she remained in Australian waters until she was paid off for disposal in April 1924.
    6.50
    4 votes
    79
    USS Massachusetts

    USS Massachusetts

    USS Massachusetts (Battleship No. 2) was an Indiana-class battleship and the second United States Navy ship comparable to foreign battleships of the time. Authorized in 1890 and commissioned six years later, she was a small battleship, though with heavy armor and ordnance. The ship class also pioneered the use of an intermediate battery. She was designed for coastal defense and as a result her decks were not safe from high waves on the open ocean. Massachusetts served in the Spanish–American War (1898) as part of the Flying Squadron and took part in the blockades of Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba. She missed the decisive Battle of Santiago de Cuba after steaming to Guantánamo Bay the night before to resupply coal. After the war she served with the North Atlantic Squadron, performing training maneuvers and gunnery practice. During this period she suffered an explosion in an 8-inch gun turret, killing nine, and ran aground twice, requiring several months of repair both times. She was decommissioned in 1906 for modernization. Although considered obsolete in 1910, the battleship was recommissioned and used for annual cruises for midshipmen during the summers and otherwise laid up in
    6.50
    4 votes
    80
    USS Ogden

    USS Ogden

    USS Ogden (LPD-5), an Austin-class amphibious transport dock, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Ogden, Utah. Ogden was laid down on 4 February 1963 by the New York Naval Shipyard. She was launched on 27 June 1964 sponsored by Mrs. Laurence J. Burton, and commissioned at New York City on 19 June 1965 with Captain Floyd M. Symons in command. After training off Norfolk, Ogden arrived in San Diego 29 October 1965 to join the Pacific Fleet and complete her initial training. In her first year of service she deployed twice to South Vietnam (8 February through 4 April 1966 and 16 May through 7 July 1966), bringing Marines and their equipment to the Vietnam War. On her return passages, she brought damaged vehicles home for repair. During the summer of 1966, she conducted experiments with aircraft capable of vertical or short landing and take-off. The Ogden participated in Operation Endsweep in Haiphong Harbor as a member of Task Force 78 from January 1973 through July 1973, clearing mines with Marine CH53 Helicopters. 1989 Oil Spill Task Force 2 The USS Ogden was relieved by the USS Duluth during the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill after spending 2 months onsite. She
    6.50
    4 votes
    81
    HMAS Condamine

    HMAS Condamine

    • Ship Class: River class frigate
    HMAS Condamine (K698/F698), named for the Condamine River in Queensland, was a River class frigate of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Commissioned in 1946, Condamine served in the Korean War. The ship was paid off in 1955, and sold for scrap in 1961. Condamine was laid down by the State Dockyard at Newcastle, New South Wales on 30 October 1943. She was launched on 4 November 1944, and commissioned into the RAN on 22 February 1946. During the first years of her career Condamine operated only in Australian and New Guinean waters. From August 1952 to March 1953 the ship operated in Korean waters during the Korean War. During this deployment, she conducted a number of shore bombardments and protected United Nations forces on islands off the Korean peninsular. Condamine was awarded the battle honour "Korea 1952–53" for this deployment. Following the end of the Korean War, Condamine completed a second tour of Korean waters between February and November 1955. Condamine paid off into reserve on 2 December 1955, and was sold for scrap on 21 September 1961.
    5.60
    5 votes
    82
    USS Golet

    USS Golet

    • Ship Class: Gato class submarine
    USS Golet (SS-361), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the golet, a California trout. Her keel was laid down by the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Company of Manitowoc, Wisconsin. She was launched on 1 August 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Wiley, wife of United States Senator Alexander Wiley of Wisconsin, and commissioned on 30 November 1943 with Lieutenant Commander James M. Clement in command. Golet departed Manitowoc 19 December 1943 via the Mississippi River for New Orleans, Louisiana, arriving 28 December. After shakedown training at Panama and final battle practice in Hawaiian waters, she departed Pearl Harbor on 18 March 1944 for her maiden war patrol off the Kurile Islands chain, Southern Hokkaidō and Eastern Honshū, Japan. Severe combinations of fog, rain, and ice were encountered and only one ship worth a torpedo came into view. This enemy proved too fast for Golet to close to torpedo range; she returned to Midway Island on 3 May 1944. Lieutenant James S. Clark took command of Golet, departed Midway Island on 28 May 1944 to patrol off northern Honshū, Japan, and was never heard from again. Golet had been scheduled to depart her area on 5
    5.60
    5 votes
    83
    Gorch Fock

    Gorch Fock

    The Gorch Fock is a tall ship of the German Navy (Deutsche Marine). She is the second ship of that name and a sister ship of the Gorch Fock built in 1933. Both ships are named in honour of the German writer Johann Kinau who wrote under the pseudonym "Gorch Fock" and died in the battle of Jutland/Skagerrak in 1916. The modern-day Gorch Fock was built in 1958 and has since then undertaken 146 cruises (as of October 2006), including one tour around the world in 1988. She is sometimes referred to (unofficially) as the Gorch Fock II to distinguish her from her older sister ship. Germany lost all of its school ships as war reparations after World War II to the Allies, so the (West) German Bundesmarine decided in 1957 to have a new training vessel built following the plans for the original Gorch Fock of 1933 which by that time was owned by the Soviets, and renamed to Tovarishch. The new ship was a modernized repeat of the Albert Leo Schlageter, a slightly modified sister ship of the previous Gorch Fock. The 1933 Gorch Fock had already been designed to be a very safe ship: she had a righting moment large enough to bring her back into the upright position even when heeling over to nearly
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    USS Cape St. George

    USS Cape St. George

    • Ship builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding
    USS Cape St. George (CG-71) is a Ticonderoga-class cruiser laid down by the Litton-Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation at Pascagoula, Mississippi on 19 November 1990, launched on 10 January 1992 and commissioned on 12 June 1993. Cape St. George operates out of San Diego, California, and administratively reports to Commander, Naval Surface Forces Pacific. Cape St. George is named for the World War II Battle of Cape St. George near New Ireland in Papua New Guinea where a U.S. Navy destroyer force led by Captain Arleigh Burke defeated a Japanese destroyer force on 25 November 1943. In March 2003 she was assigned to Cruiser-Destroyer Group Eight, and was operating with the U.S. Atlantic Fleet. In May 2005, Cape St. George became the first surface warship certified to use only digital nautical charts (DNC), instead of paper charts using the Voyage Management System. About 12,000 paper charts have been replaced by 29 computer discs. VMS is part of the Smart Ship Integrated Bridge System, which has been under development since 1990. On 18 March 2006, she was involved in a firefight with suspected pirates, along with the USS Gonzalez. The two U.S. warships exchanged fire with the suspected
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    USS Makin Island

    USS Makin Island

    USS Makin Island (CVE-93) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. Named for the 1942 Makin raid, she was laid down on 12 January 1944 by Kaiser Shipbuilding Company, Vancouver, Washington; launched 5 April 1944; sponsored by Mrs. B. B. Nichol; and commissioned at Astoria, Oregon, 9 May 1944, Commander W. B. Whaley in command. Following a brief west coast shakedown cruise, on the eighth of June, Makin Island left for San Diego, California, stopping at Alameda, California, to load bombs and aviation gasoline. Makin Island departed San Diego on 19 June 1944, to ferry aircraft and men to Pearl Harbor, Majuro, and Kwajalein, returning to San Diego 24 July. The escort carrier then trained out of San Diego, preparing for combat until 16 October, when she sailed for Ulithi via Pearl Harbor and Eniwetok, arriving 5 November. On 10 November, the ship got underway for Leyte, protecting convoys in transit to the invasion beachhead. Extensive air operations were conducted, but no enemy resistance was encountered. On 22 November, she sailed to Manus for the forthcoming invasion of Luzon. Flying the pennant of Rear Admiral C. T. Durgin, Commander TG 77.4, Makin Island
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Emma Mærsk

    Emma Mærsk

    • Ship Class: E-Class Ultra Panamax Container Ship
    Emma Mærsk is the first container ship in the E-class of eight owned by the A. P. Moller-Maersk Group. When she was launched in 2006, Emma Mærsk was the largest container ship ever built. As of 2010, she and her seven sister ships are the longest container ships constructed and the longest ships currently in use, after the largest ship ever built, Seawise Giant, was permanently moored in 2004 and scrapped in 2010. Officially, Emma Mærsk is able to carry around 11,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU) or 14,770 TEU depending on definition. In May 2010, the class set a record of 15,011 TEU in Tanger-Med, Tangiers on sister Ebba Mærsk. The ship was built at the Odense Steel Shipyard in Denmark. In June 2006, during construction, welding work caused a fire within her superstructure. It spread rapidly through the accommodation section and bridge, which delayed the ship by six to seven weeks. Emma Mærsk was named in a ceremony on 12 August 2006. The ship is named after Emma Mærsk, Mærsk Mc-Kinney Møller's late wife. The ship set sail on her maiden voyage on 8 September 2006 at 02:00 hours from Aarhus, calling at Gothenburg, Bremerhaven, Rotterdam, Algeciras, the Suez Canal, and arrived
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Glenlee

    Glenlee

    Glenlee is a three-masted baldheaded steel-hulled barque, launched fully rigged and seaworthy on December 3, 1896. She is now a museum ship at the Riverside Museum on Pointhouse Quay, Glasgow, known as The Tall Ship at Glasgow Harbour. Glenlee was built in 1896 at the Anderson Rodger & Company shipyard of Port Glasgow for the Glen-line of the Glasgow shipping company Archibald Sterling & Co. Ltd. and has a hull length of 245.5 ft (74.8 m), beam of 37.5 ft (11.4 m) and depth of 22.5 ft (6.9 m), the over-all length with the spike bowsprit is 282 ft (86 m). She has 1,613 GRT and 1,490 NRT. Rigged only with double topallant sails over double top sails, she was not equipped with royal sails (baldheader rigging) to save costs concerning gear and seamen. As with many baldheaded sailing ships the square sails were a little wider than the sails of a standard rigging to gain sail area for a better propulsion. On December 13, 1896, just ten days after launch, her maiden voyage brought her in ballast to Liverpool and from there with a general cargo to Portland, Oregon. For 23 years she traded as a bulk cargo carrier under the Red Ensign to Cape Horn and Australia, firstly under the ownership
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    HMS Charity

    HMS Charity

    • Ship builder: John I. Thornycroft & Company
    HMS Charity was a C-class destroyer of the Royal Navy laid down by John I. Thornycroft and Company of Woolston, Southampton on 9 July 1943. She was launched on 30 November 1944 and commissioned on 19 November 1945. She was sold to the US Navy in 1958, for transfer to the Pakistan Navy as a part of the Military Aid Program. She was badly damaged in a strike by Indian Navy missile boats during the Indo-Pakistan War of 1971, and scrapped as a result. Charity served during the Korean War. Charity was sold to the United States Navy on 16 June 1958, for further transfer to the Pakistan Navy. She was renamed Shah Jehan. She was modernized by J. Samuel White in Cowes, England under a US contract and transferred to the Pakistan Navy as part of the Military Assistance Program on 16 December 1958 where she served as PNS Shah Jahan (literally, "Emperor of the World", after Shah Jahan). During the Indo-Pakistan War of 1971, Shah Jahan was escort to the cargo ship MV Venus Challenger carrying ammunition sent by the United States for the war effort from Saigon to Karachi. On the night of 4 December 1971, the Indian Navy launched a fast naval strike called Operation Trident on the Pakistani Naval
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    USCGC Eagle

    USCGC Eagle

    • Ship builder: Blohm + Voss
    The USCGC Eagle (WIX-327) (ex-SSS Horst Wessel) is a 295-foot (90 m) barque used as a training cutter for future officers of the United States Coast Guard. She is one of only two active commissioned sailing vessels in American military service, the other being the USS Constitution. She is the seventh U.S. Navy or Coast Guard ship to bear the name in a line dating back to 1792. Each summer, Eagle conducts cruises with cadets from the United States Coast Guard Academy and candidates from the Officer Candidate School for periods ranging from a week to two months. These cruises fulfill multiple roles; the primary mission is training the cadets and officer candidates, but the ship also performs a public relations role. Often, Eagle makes calls at foreign ports as a goodwill ambassador. The Eagle began its existence as the Horst Wessel, a ship of the Gorch Fock class. Constructed and designed by John Stanley, the Horst Wessel was an improvement on the original design. She was larger in dimension and her spars were all steel, unlike Gorch Fock's wooden yards. SSS Horst Wessel began life as schiff ("ship") 508 at Blohm & Voss in Hamburg, Germany in 1936. Her keel was laid on February 15;
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    USS Birmingham

    USS Birmingham

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS Birmingham (CL-62), a light cruiser named for the city of Birmingham, Alabama, the "Steel City", was a Cleveland class light cruiser laid down at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company of Newport News in Virginia on 17 February 1941 and launched on 20 March 1942 by Mrs. Cooper Green, wife of the president of the Birmingham City Commission. She was commissioned on 29 January 1943. Birmingham was one of the "fightingest" ships of the Navy and suffered heavy damage on at least three occasions. Following her shakedown cruise, Birmingham was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet. Departing Norfolk, Virginia on 2 June, she steamed to the Mediterranean and gave gunfire support during the invasion of Sicily (10–26 July 1943). Returning to the United States on 8 August, she was reassigned to the Pacific Fleet and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 6 September. Joining the fast carrier task force screen, she took part in the raids on Tarawa (18 September 1943) and Wake Island (5–6 October). At the Solomons, she took part in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay (8–9 November), along with her sister ships Cleveland, Columbia, Montpelier, and Denver. This was the first major action by the new
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    USS Duncan

    USS Duncan

    USS Duncan (DD-874) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, the third named for Captain Silas Duncan USN (1788–1834). The ship was laid down by the Consolidated Steel Corporation at Orange, Texas on 22 May 1944, launched on 27 October 1944 by Mrs. D. C. Thayer and commissioned on 25 February 1945, Commander P. D. Williams in command. The ship was sunk in 1980. Duncan, converted to a radar picket destroyer during her post-shakedown overhaul, sailed from Norfolk on 2 June 1945 for the Pacific, and after touching at San Diego and Pearl Harbor, joined Cabot (CVL-28) for screening and plane guard duty during the strikes on Wake Island of 1 August. After calling at Eniwetok, she continued to Okinawa to join the 7th Fleet for patrol duty off the Chinese and Korean coasts during the landing of occupation troops at Tsingtao, Taku, and Incheon. Duncan served in the Far East on occupation duty until 25 March 1946 when she sailed for the west coast, arriving at San Diego on 28 April. For the next year Duncan trained along the west coast, keeping high her operational skills and readiness. In May 1947 she departed San Diego for a five-month cruise to the Far East, where she
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    USS F-3

    USS F-3

    • Ship Class: F class submarine
    USS F-3 (SS-22), was a F-class submarine. She was named Pickerel when her keel was laid down by the Moran Brothers Company of Seattle, Washington, making her the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the pickerel, a type of pike. She was renamed F-3 on 17 November 1911, launched on 6 January 1912 sponsored by Mrs. M. F. Backus, and commissioned on 5 August 1912 with Ensign K. Heron in command. F-3 completed her trials in the Puget Sound area before reporting for duty at San Francisco, California on 15 October 1912, when she joined the First Submarine Group, Pacific Torpedo Flotilla. The Flotilla operated along the coast of California, conducting constant exercises and experiments to develop the techniques of submarine warfare, and from August 1914 to November 1915, carried out similar operations in the Hawaiian Islands. F-3 was placed in ordinary at Mare Island on 15 March 1916, returning to full commission on 13 June 1917. After training her new crew, F-3 was assigned to the Coast Torpedo Force, Pacific Fleet, based at San Pedro, California. She engaged in daily operations, surfaced and submerged, training students of the submarine school. During maneuvers on 17
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    USS Reno

    USS Reno

    USS Reno (CL-96) was an updated Atlanta-class light cruiser - sometimes referred to as the "Oakland-class" - designed and built to specialize in antiaircraft warfare. She was the second warship to be named for the city of Reno, Nevada. The one other USS Reno was a destroyer named for Lt. Commander Walter E. Reno. The Reno was laid down by Bethlehem Steel Co., at San Francisco, California on 1 August 1941. She was launched on 23 December 1942, and commissioned on 28 December 1943, with Captain Ralph C. Alexander in command. The USS Reno spent her entire service life in the Pacific War, and its immediate aftermath, during 1944 though 1946. Following a shakedown cruise off the coast of San Diego, the USS Reno departed from San Francisco on 14 April 1944, steaming west to join the 5th Fleet, under the command of Admiral Raymond A. Spruance. As an active unit in Vice Admiral Marc Mitscher's Fast Carrier Task Force (Task Force 58), the sharp spearpoint of the 5th Fleet, the Reno first came in contact with the enemy while supporting minor air raids against Marcus Island on 19–20 May. Three days later, she also supported air strikes on Japanese-held Wake Island. During the months of June
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    USS Tinian

    USS Tinian

    • Ship builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
    USS Tinian (CVE-123) was a Commencement Bay-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down on 20 March 1945 at Tacoma, Washington, by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc.; launched on 5 September 1945; sponsored by Miss Grace L Woods; and accepted by the US Navy on 30 July 1946. Never commissioned, the escort aircraft carrier was assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet, 19th Fleet, at Tacoma, Washington. On 12 June 1955, the ship was reclassified as an escort helicopter aircraft carrier and re-designated CVHE-123. In early June 1958 Tinian was taken in tow at Tacoma, Washington, by the US Navy MSTS tugboat USNS Yuma (T-AF94), destined for San Diego, California. Whilst very near the Swiftsure Bank lightship, Neah Bay, Washington; at the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Yuma developed engine troubles. Yuma's distress call brought the USCGC Fir (WLM-212) to her rescue. The crew of the Swiftsure lightship went to general quarters, ready to assist. Fir then escorted Yuma and Tinian to safety. On 9 June 1958, Tinian arrived at San Diego, under tow by Yuma, and was berthed at South Tee Pier. In May 1959, she was again reclassified, this time as a cargo ship and aircraft
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    USS Whipple

    USS Whipple

    The first USS Whipple (DD-15) was a Truxtun-class destroyer in the United States Navy, named for Abraham Whipple. She was laid down on 13 November 1899 at Sparrows Point, Maryland, by the Maryland Steel Company; launched on 15 August 1901; sponsored by Miss Elsie Pope; and commissioned on 17 February 1903, Lieutenant Jehu V. Chase in command. After training in Chesapeake Bay, Whipple was assigned to the 2nd Torpedo Flotilla, Atlantic Fleet, and was based at Norfolk. The destroyer periodically served as flagship of the flotilla and operated off the east coast and in the Caribbean until she was placed in reserve at Norfolk on 5 September 1905. Returning to active service on 16 July 1906, the ship conducted tactical exercises and routine training operations through November 1907, apart from taking part in relief operations after the 1907 Kingston earthquake in Jamaica. On 2 December, Whipple stood out of Hampton Roads and headed south toward the Caribbean for goodwill visits — "showing the flag." Subsequently following in the wake of the 16 battleships of the "Great White Fleet", Whipple and her flotilla-mates called at Rio de Janeiro; rounded Cape Horn for ports on the Chilean and
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    HMAS Quadrant

    HMAS Quadrant

    HMAS Quadrant (G11/D11/F01), named for the navigational instrument, was a Q class destroyer operated by the Royal Navy as HMS Quadrant (G67/D17) during World War II, and the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) from 1945 to 1957. The ship was built during the early 1940s as one of the War Emergency Programme destroyers, and entered service in 1942. During World War II, Quadrant served as a convoy escort in the Arctic, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans, and operated with the British Eastern and British Pacific Fleets. At the war's end, the ship was decommissioned and transferred to the RAN, which operated her for two years before placing her in reserve. In 1950, the ship was docked for conversion into an anti-submarine frigate. Quadrant was recommissioned in 1953, and operated with the RAN until 1957, when she was paid off. The ship was sold for breaking in 1963. Quadrant was built to the wartime Q class design; the third flotilla of War Emergency Programme destroyers. These ships had a displacement of 1,750 tons at standard load, and 2,388 tons at full load. The destroyer was 358 feet 3 inches (109.19 m) in length overall, 339 feet 6 inches (103.48 m) long between perpendiculars, and had a
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    USS Iowa

    USS Iowa

    • Ship builder: Brooklyn Navy Yard
    • Ship Class: Iowa class battleship
    USS Iowa (BB-61) was the lead ship of her class of battleship and the fourth in the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 29th state. Owing to the cancellation of the Montana-class battleships, Iowa is the last lead ship of any class of United States battleships, and was the only ship of her class to have served in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II. During World War II, she carried President Franklin D. Roosevelt across the Atlantic to Casablanca en route to a crucial 1943 meeting in Tehran with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin. She has a bathtub — an amenity installed for Roosevelt, along with an elevator to shuttle him between decks. When transferred to the Pacific Fleet in 1944, Iowa shelled beachheads at Kwajalein and Eniwetok in advance of Allied amphibious landings and screened aircraft carriers operating in the Marshall Islands. She also served as the Third Fleet flagship, flying Adm. William F. Halsey's flag at the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay. During the Korean War, Iowa was involved in raids on the North Korean coast, after which she was decommissioned into the United States Navy reserve fleets, better known as the
    6.25
    4 votes
    98
    USS Jacob Jones

    USS Jacob Jones

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    • Ship Class: Wickes class destroyer
    USS Jacob Jones (DD-130), named for Commodore Jacob Jones USN (1768–1850), was a Wickes-class destroyer. Jacob Jones was laid down by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation at Camden, New Jersey on 21 February 1918, launched on 20 November 1918 by Mrs. Cazenove Doughton, great-granddaughter of Commodore Jones and commissioned on 20 October 1919, Lieutenant Commander P. H. Bastedo in command. Jacob Jones was decommissioned on 24 June 1922 and placed in reserve until recommissioned on 1 May 1930, and was assigned to Neutrality Patrol duties out of Charleston, South Carolina on 4 April 1940. After fitting out at Philadelphia, Jacob Jones sailed 4 December for shakedown in the Atlantic. She arrived at Pensacola, Florida, 22 December to continue her training and departed 3 January 1920 for the Pacific. Arriving San Diego 26 January, she operated along the California coast on antiaircraft and firing exercises. She entered Mare Island Navy Yard 17 August for repairs and overhaul and assumed a reserve status. Returning to duty with Destroyer Force, Pacific Fleet, 18 June 1921, she operated out of San Diego until decommissioning 24 June 1922. Recommissioned 1 May 1930, Jones trained in
    6.25
    4 votes
    99
    USS Tuscaloosa

    USS Tuscaloosa

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    • Ship Class: New Orleans class cruiser
    USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37) was a New Orleans-class heavy cruiser of the U.S. Navy. Commissioned in 1934, she spent most of her career in the Atlantic and Caribbean, participating in several European wartime operations. In early 1945, she transferred to the Pacific and assisted in shore bombardment of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. She earned 7 battle stars for her service in World War II. Never damaged in battle, she lead a charmed life compared to her six sister ships, three of which were sunk and the other three heavily damaged. She was decommissioned in early 1946 and scrapped in 1959. She was laid down on 3 September 1931 at Camden, New Jersey, by the New York Shipbuilding Co., launched on 15 November 1933, sponsored by Mrs. Thomas Lee McCann, the wife of Lieutenant Thomas L. McCann and the niece of William Bacon Oliver, the Representative of Alabama's 6th congressional district). She was commissioned on 17 August 1934, Captain John N. Ferguson in command. Tuscaloosa devoted the autumn to a shakedown cruise which took her to Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, and Montevideo, before she returned to the New York Navy Yard shortly before Christmas. She then underwent post-shakedown repairs which
    6.25
    4 votes
    100
    USS Croaker

    USS Croaker

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    • Ship Class: Gato class submarine
    USS Croaker (SS/SSK/AGSS/IXSS-246), a Gato-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the croaker, any of various fishes which make throbbing or drumming noises. Her keel was laid down on 1 April 1943 by Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 19 December 1943 (sponsored by the wife of Admiral William H. P. Blandy), and commissioned on 21 April 1944, with Commander John E. Lee in command. Croaker arrived at Pearl Harbor from New London on 26 June 1944, and on 19 July put to sea on her first war patrol, sailing to the East China and Yellow Seas. In a series of brilliantly successful attacks which won her the Navy Unit Commendation, she sank the cruiser Nagara on 7 August, and two freighters, one on 14 August and one on 17 August. During this patrol, she served as lifeguard during air strikes on the Bonin Islands. She refitted at Midway Atoll from 31 August to 23 September, when she sailed in a coordinated attack group for the same area on her second war patrol. Again successful, she sank a freighter on 9 October, and another on 23 October. She shadowed a convoy on 24 October, and sank one freighter and damaged another with
    5.40
    5 votes
    101
    HMAS Goulburn

    HMAS Goulburn

    • Ship Class: Bathurst class corvette
    HMAS Goulburn (J167/B243/A117), named for the city of Goulburn, New South Wales, was one of 60 Bathurst class corvettes constructed during World War II, and one of 36 initially manned and commissioned solely by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Goulburn was laid down by the Cockatoo Island Dockyard in Sydney, New South Wales on 10 July 1940. She was launched on 16 November 1940 by the wife of Rear Admiral John Gregory Crace, the commander of the Australian Squadron, and was commissioned on 28 February 1941. At 743 tons standard displacement, Goulburn exceeded the designed standard displacement of the Bathurst class ships by 93 tons. After entering active service, Goulburn was assigned to minesweeping duties along the east and south-east coasts of Australia, and was one of several ships attempting to locate mines deployed by the German auxiliary cruiser Pinguin and the auxiliary minelayer Passat. Although operating in this role from 23 April to 31 May 1941, the corvette located only a single mine. On 16 June, Goulburn and sister ship Burnie were assigned to the China Station and sailed to Singapore. The corvettes operated as convoy escorts, minesweepers, and anti-submarine patrol
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    HMS Jersey

    HMS Jersey

    HMS Jersey (F72) was a J-class destroyer of the Royal Navy laid down by J. Samuel White and Company at Cowes on the Isle of Wight on 20 September 1937, launched on 26 September 1938 and commissioned on 28 April 1939. Jersey struck an aircraft-dropped mine off Malta's Grand Harbour on 2 May 1941 and sank next to the Grand Harbour breakwater. Thirty-five crew members were killed.
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    HMS Valiant

    HMS Valiant

    • Ship builder: Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company
    • Ship Class: Queen Elizabeth class battleship
    HMS Valiant was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship of the British Royal Navy. She was laid down at the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Govan on 31 January 1913 and launched on 4 November 1914. She was completed in February 1916. The contract for the construction of the Valiant was given to The Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Limited. She was laid down in the same berth where the battlecruiser HMS Indomitable had been built. On the construction of Valiant by Admiralty contract, Fairfields lost £78,836. Her turbines were manufactured by Fairfields, and her armour plate was provided by William Beardmore and Company. Upon completion on 19 February 1916 under Captain Maurice Woollcombe she joined the recently formed Fifth Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet. At the Battle of Jutland she fired 288 15-inch shells at the German High Seas Fleet. Despite the severity of damage suffered by her sister ships (bar HMS Queen Elizabeth which did not take part in the battle) she suffered no damage. One of her 15-inch guns which had been in Valiant at Jutland was later removed and became one of the three guns of the Johore Battery at Singapore. However, on 24 August
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    USS Bremerton

    USS Bremerton

    • Ship Class: Baltimore class cruiser
    USS Bremerton (CA-130), named for the city of Bremerton in Washington state, was a Baltimore-class heavy cruiser laid down by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation at Camden in New Jersey on 1 February 1943, launched on 2 July 1944 by Miss Elizabeth K. McGowan and commissioned on 29 April 1945, Captain John Boyd Mallard in command. Aboard Bremerton was a complete butcher shop, shoe shop, photo lab, two barber shops, a galley, a tailor shop, a library, a laundry plant and a fresh water distillery. The ship's fuel tanks were able to carry her from the United States to Japan and back, non-stop; and depending upon her load, she displaced up to 17,500 tons. Over 1,000 men lived and worked aboard Bremerton. Included was a Marine Detachment of 45 men commanded by two Marine officers. The men aboard Bremerton represented almost all of the then 48 states, plus the then territories of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippine Islands. Bremerton left Norfolk for her shakedown cruise in the waters off Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 29 May 1945. Toward the end of the shakedown period she served as flagship for Admiral Jonas Ingram, Commander-in-Chief of the Atlantic Fleet, during his South American
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    USS Bridget

    USS Bridget

    USS Bridget (DE-1024) was a Dealey-class destroyer escort in the United States Navy. She was named for Francis Joseph Bridget, a naval aviator who served on the Commander's Staff of Patrol Wing 10 during the Japanese attack on the Philippines on 8 December 1941. He was taken prisoner with the American forces on Bataan and was killed 15 December 1944 when a Japanese prison ship in which he was embarked was sunk off Olongapo, Luzon, Philippine Islands. This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    USS Floyd B. Parks

    USS Floyd B. Parks

    USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884), named for Major Floyd B. Parks USMC (1911–1942), was a Gearing-class destroyer laid down by the Consolidated Steel Corporation at Orange, Texas on 30 October 1944, launched on 31 March 1945 by Mrs. Floyd B. Parks, widow of Major Parks and commissioned on 31 July 1945. Floyd B. Parks arrived at San Diego, her home port, 16 November 1945, and sailed 20 November for her first tour of duty in the Far East, patrolling the coast of China and operating in the Marianas Islands until her return to San Diego 11 February 1947. In the period prior to the outbreak of war in Korea, Floyd B. Parks twice more deployed to the Far East for duty with the US 7th Fleet, returning from her second such cruise 13 June 1950, just before the North Koreans crossed the 38th parallel. At once she prepared to return to duty as a standby at Pearl Harbor, available should war spread, returning to San Diego 20 August. Floyd B. Parks sailed from San Diego 19 February 1951 to join in United Nations operations in Korea. On 16 March she joined the fast carrier task force, screening them during air operations off the east coast as well as spending a total of 60 days in Wonsan Harbor on
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    USS Oklahoma

    USS Oklahoma

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    • Ship Class: Nevada class battleship
    USS Oklahoma (BB-37), the only ship of the United States Navy to ever be named for the 46th state, was a World War I-era battleship and the second of two ships in her class; her sister ship was Nevada. She, along with her sister, were the first two U.S. warships to use oil fuel instead of coal. Commissioned in 1916, Oklahoma served in World War I as a member of BatDiv 6, protecting Allied convoys on their way across the Atlantic. After years of spending time in the Pacific and the Scouting Fleets, Oklahoma was modernized from 1927 to 1929. She rescued American citizens and refugees from the Spanish Civil War in 1936; after returning to the West coast in August of that year, she spent the rest of her life in the Pacific. She was sunk by Japanese bombs and torpedoes on 7 December 1941, in the attack on Pearl Harbor, taking 429 of her crew with her as she capsized. She was uprighted in 1943, but unlike most of the other battleships damaged in the Pearl Harbor attack, she was never repaired and returned to duty. Instead, Oklahoma was stripped of her guns and superstructure, and sold for scrap. She sank while under tow to the mainland in 1947. Authorized along with her sister ship in
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    USS Sargo

    USS Sargo

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    • Ship Class: Sargo class submarine
    USS Sargo (SS-188), the lead ship of her class of submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the sargo. Her keel was laid on 12 May 1937 by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 6 June 1938 sponsored by Mrs. Chester W. Nimitz (wife of the later admiral), and commissioned on 7 February 1939, Lieutenant E. E. Yeomans in command. After shakedown along the eastern seaboard of South America, Sargo departed Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in July 1939 for duty with the Pacific Fleet. Transiting the Panama Canal, she arrived at San Diego, California, in mid-August. She operated in the eastern and mid-Pacific for the next two years, including a practice 40-day war patrol between Midway Island and the Marshall Islands in the fall of 1941. She departed Pearl Harbor on 23 October 1941, arrived in Manila on 10 November, and was there during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December. The next day (under the command of torpedo specialist Tyrell D. Jacobs, Class of 1927), the submarine got underway for her first war patrol, which took her along the coast of French Indochina and to the Netherlands East Indies. Off the major Japanese
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    HMAS Labuan

    HMAS Labuan

    • Ship Class: Balikpapan class LCH
    HMAS Labuan (L 128) is a Balikpapan class heavy landing craft of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The eight-vessel Balikpapan class was ordered as a locally-manufactured replacement for the Australian Army's LSM-1 class landing ship medium and ALC 50 landing craft. They are 44.5 metres (146 ft) long, with a beam of 10.1 metres (33 ft), and a draught of 1.9 metres (6 ft 3 in). The landing craft have a standard displacement of 316 tons, with a full load displacement of 503 tons. They are propelled by two G.M. Detroit 6-71 diesel motors, providing 675 brake horsepower to the two propeller shafts, allowing the vessels to reach 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph). The standard ship's company is 13-strong. The Balikpapans are equipped with a Decca RM 916 navigational radar, and fitted with two 7.62 millimetres (0.300 in) machine guns for self-defence. The LCHs have a maximum payload of 180 tons; equivalent to 3 Leopard 1 tanks, 13 M113 armored personnel carriers 23 quarter-tonne trucks, or four LARC-V amphibious cargo vehicles. As a troop transport, a Balikpapan class vessel can transport up to 400 soldiers between a larger amphibious ship and the shore, or embark 60 soldiers in six-berth caravans
    5.20
    5 votes
    110
    Soviet submarine K-159

    Soviet submarine K-159

    • Ship Class: November class submarine
    K-159 was a Project 627A "Kit" (NATO reporting name November class) nuclear-powered submarine of the Soviet Northern Fleet. Her keel was laid down on 15 August 1962 at the Severodvinsk "Sevmash" Shipyard No. 402. She was launched on 6 June 1963, and commissioned on 9 October 1963. On 2 March 1965, K-159 suffered an accident involving radioactive discharges into her steam generators, almost certainly primary coolant leaks from the tubes into the steam chest and thence into the turbines, contaminating her entire propulsion plant. If so, the leaking tubes were plugged, because she continued to operate for another two years before entering the shipyard from 1967 through 1968 for overhaul and to have her steam generators replaced. She returned to the shipyard from 1970 through 1972 for further repairs and refuelling, and then again from 1979 through 1980 for still more repairs. K-159 was decommissioned on 30 May 1989 and laid up in Gremikha; her reactors were not defuelled. She remained in layup with little or no maintenance for 14 years. Her outer hull rusted until in many places it had "the strength of foil". The poor condition of Russia's fleet of decommissioned nuclear submarines
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    TS Royalist

    TS Royalist

    TS Royalist is a square rig brig owned and operated as a sail training ship by the Marine Society & Sea Cadets (MSSC) of the United Kingdom. Royalist is 83 GRT and her hull is 23.32 metres (76 ft 6 in) long, with an overall length of 29.52 metres (96 ft 10 in). As well as her sails, she is equipped with two Perkins diesel engines of 110 kilowatts (150 hp) each. The engines drive twin screw propellers. Royalist was built by Groves and Guttridge, Cowes, Isle of Wight. She was designed by Colin Mudie RDI and launched on 3 August 1971 by Princess Anne. In 1992, Royalist was taken out of the water for a refit, termed as a "Mid-Life Upgrade". Royalist was re-launched by Princess Anne, (now the Princess Royal). She is built of steel, with an overall length of 29 metres (97 feet) (including the bowsprit, which adds about 6 metres onto her overall length), and has a traditional square-rigged brig layout. Due for the Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant in June and Brest International Festival of the Sea in July 2012. Almost every week of the year, 24 Sea Cadets, Combined Cadet Forces (CCF) and a single week of Air Cadets from all over the UK, join the ship and spend the week on board working as
    6.00
    4 votes
    112
    USS Gudgeon

    USS Gudgeon

    USS Gudgeon (SS-211), a Tambor-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the gudgeon). Her keel was laid down by the Mare Island Navy Yard. She was launched on 25 January 1941, sponsored by Mrs. William S. Pye, and commissioned on 21 April 1941 with Lieutenant Commander Elton W. "Joe" Grenfell in command. After shakedown along the California coast, Gudgeon sailed north on 28 August, heading for Alaska via Seattle, Washington. On her northern jaunt the new submarine inspected Sitka, Kodiak, and Dutch Harbor for suitability as naval bases. Continuing to Hawaii, she moored at the Pearl Harbor submarine base 10 October. Training exercises and local operations filled Gudgeon’s time for the next two months. During the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December she was at Lahaina Roads on special exercises, but returned to base immediately. On 11 December, Gudgeon (commanded by Elton W. "Joe" Grenfell) departed Pearl Harbor on the first American submarine war patrol of World War II. Her commanding officer was provided with explicit written orders to carry out unrestricted submarine warfare. Gudgeon made her first contact on a target in Japanese Home
    6.00
    4 votes
    113
    USS Nimitz

    USS Nimitz

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS Nimitz (CVN-68) is a supercarrier of the United States Navy, and is the lead ship of her class. She is one of the largest warships in the world. She was laid down, launched and commissioned as CVAN-68 but was redesignated CVN 68 (nuclear-powered multimission aircraft carrier) on 30 June 1975 as part of the fleet realignment of that year. The ship was named for World War II Pacific fleet commander Chester W. Nimitz, who was the Navy’s third fleet admiral. Unlike all subsequent Nimitz class aircraft carriers, Nimitz only uses her namesake's surname as is common for military officers. She is also the first carrier of her class and the most recent supercarrier not to be named for someone who held elected office in the United States. Nimitz was homeported at Naval Station Norfolk until 1987, when she was relocated to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington. Following her Refueling and Complex Overhaul in 2001, her homeport was changed to NAS North Island in San Diego, California. Nimitz home port was again changed to Everett, Washington in 2012. This move is expected to save the Navy $100 million. The keel of Nimitz was laid down 22 June 1968 by Newport News Shipbuilding
    6.00
    4 votes
    114
    USS Wasp

    USS Wasp

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    USS Wasp (CV/CVA/CVS-18) was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during World War II for the United States Navy. The ship, the ninth US Navy ship to bear the name, was originally named Oriskany, but was renamed while under construction in honor of the previous Wasp (CV-7), which was sunk 15 September 1942. Wasp was commissioned in November 1943, and served in several campaigns in the Pacific Theater of Operations, earning eight battle stars. Like many of her sister ships, she was decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, but was modernized and recommissioned in the early 1950s as an attack carrier (CVA), and then eventually became an antisubmarine carrier (CVS). In her second career she operated mainly in the Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Caribbean. She played a prominent role in the manned space program, serving as the recovery ship for three missions: Gemini VI, VII, and IX. She was retired in 1972 and sold for scrap in 1973. The ship was laid down on 18 March 1942 at Quincy, Massachusetts, by the Bethlehem Steel Company, and renamed Wasp on 13 November 1942. She was launched on 17 August 1943, sponsored by Miss Julia M. Walsh, the sister of Senator David I. Walsh
    6.00
    4 votes
    115
    HMAS Sheean

    HMAS Sheean

    • Ship builder: Australian Submarine Corporation
    • Ship Class: Collins class submarine
    HMAS Sheean (SSG 77) is the fifth of six Collins class submarines operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Named for Ordinary Seaman Edward Sheean—the only submarine of the class to be named for an enlisted sailor—the boat was laid down in 1994 and launched in 1999. Sheean and sister boat Dechaineux were modified during construction as part of the "fast track" program—an attempt to fix the problems affecting the Collins class, and put at least two fully operational submarines in service before the last Oberon class submarine was decommissioned. Sheean was laid down by Australian Submarine Corporation, on 17 February 1994, launched on 1 May 1999 by Mrs. Ivy Hayes, Teddy Sheean's sister, and commissioned into the RAN on 23 February 2001. The issues with the Collins class highlighted in the McIntosh-Prescott Report and the pressing need to have combat-ready submarines in the RAN fleet with the pending decommissioning of Otama, the final Oberon class submarine in Australian service, prompted the establishment of an A$1 billion program to bring Sheean and sister boat Dechaineux up to an operational standard as quickly as possible, referred to as the "fast track" or "get well"
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Juan Sebastián Elcano

    Juan Sebastián Elcano

    The Juan Sebastián de Elcano is a training ship for the Royal Spanish Navy. She is a four-masted topsail, steel-hulled schooner. At 113 metres (370 feet) long, she is the third-largest Tall Ship in the world. She is named after Spanish explorer Juan Sebastián Elcano, captain of Ferdinand Magellan's last exploratory fleet. The ship also carries the de Elcano coat of arms, which was granted to the family by Emperor Charles I following Elcano's return in 1522 from Magellan's global expedition. The coat of arms is a terraqueous globe with the motto "Primus Circumdedisti Me" (meaning: "First to circumnavigate me"). The Juan Sebastián de Elcano was built in 1927 in Cadiz, Spain, and her hull was designed by the Spanish naval architect and engineer Juan Antonio Aldecoa y Arias in the Echevarrieta y Larrinaga shipyard in Cadiz. After the proclamation of the Second Spanish Republic in April 1931 it became part of the Spanish Republican Navy. In 1933 under Commander Salvador Moreno Fernández's order a series of improvements were made to the ship and the bronze plate with the Latin language inscription Tu Primus Circundedisti Me was placed near the prow. At the time of the coup of July 1936
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    USS Farragut

    USS Farragut

    • Ship Class: Frigate
    USS Farragut (DDG-37), named for Admiral David Glasgow Farragut, USN (1801–1870), was a Farragut-class guided missile frigate (destroyer leader) laid down as DLG-6 by the Bethlehem Steel Corporation at Quincy, Massachusetts on June 3, 1957, launched on July 15, 1958 by Mrs. H. D. Felt, wife of the Vice Chief of Naval Operations and commissioned on December 10, 1960. Farragut was reclassified as a guided missile destroyer on June 30, 1975 and designated DDG-37. USS Farragut was decommissioned on October 31, 1989, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on November 20, 1992 and sold for scrap on December 16, 1994. On September 26, 2006 a contract to dismantle ex-Farragut was awarded to International Shipbreaking Limited of Brownsville, Texas. The ship's bell is currently being kept and preserved at Admiral Farragut Academy in St. Petersburg, Florida.
    8.00
    2 votes
    118
    USS Seawolf

    USS Seawolf

    • Ship Class: Sargo class submarine
    USS Seawolf (SS-197), a Sargo-class submarine, was the second submarine of the United States Navy named for the seawolf. Her keel was laid down on 27 September 1938 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard in Kittery, Maine. She was launched on 15 August 1939 sponsored by Mrs. Edward C. Kalbfus and commissioned on 1 December 1939, Lieutenant Frederick B. Warder (Class of 1925) in command. After fitting out, Seawolf departed Portsmouth, New Hampshire on 12 April 1940 for her shakedown cruise, which lasted until 21 June and took her as far south as the Panama Canal Zone. Seawolf was next assigned to the Pacific Fleet, home ported at San Diego, California. In the autumn of 1940, she proceeded to Manila Bay and operated from the Cavite Navy Yard. When war with Japan began, the submarine readied for sea and was on her first war patrol from 8–26 December 1941. Seawolf hunted Japanese shipping off San Bernardino Strait. On 14 December, she fired a spread of torpedoes at Sanyo Maru in Port San Vicente. One torpedo hit, but did not explode. She promptly underwent her first depth charge attack but suffered no damage. Seawolf departed Manila on 31 December 1941 for Australia and arrived at Darwin on 9
    8.00
    2 votes
    119
    HMS Perseus

    HMS Perseus

    • Ship builder: Vickers Armstrong
    • Ship Class: Colossus class aircraft carrier
    HMS Perseus was a Colossus-class light fleet aircraft carrier built for the Royal Navy during World War II. The ship was initially named Edgar, but she was renamed in 1944 when the Admiralty decided to convert her into an aircraft maintenance carrier. She was completed in 1945, after the end of World War II, and she made a trip to Australia late in the year. Upon her return to the UK in early 1946, Perseus was placed in reserve. The ship was recommissioned in 1950 to serve as the trials ship for the steam catapult then under development. Over 1,600 test launches were conducted before the catapult was removed in 1952 and she was converted for use as a ferry carrier to transport aircraft, troops and equipment overseas. She was reduced to reserve again in 1954 and sold for scrap in 1958. The Colossus-class carriers were intended to meet a shortage of naval flight decks. Their design was based on that of the Illustrious class, but modified to permit rapid construction in commercial yards. Perseus was not completed to her original design; the success of the maintenance aircraft carrier Unicorn prompted modification of the ship, whilst under construction, to an aircraft maintenance ship
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    RV Oceania

    RV Oceania

    RV Oceania, or SY Oceania, is a tall ship, owned by the Polish Academy of Sciences, and used as a research vessel. She was built in 1985 in the Gdańsk Shipyard in Poland, after the design of Zygmunt Choreń. The hull was based on plans of earlier tall ships: ORP Iskra II and Pogoria, but its rigging was different. Oceania was originally a full rigged ship, with three masts (each 32 metres high). On every mast there was only one sail, in the shape of a vertical rectangle (sometimes Oceania was classified as a frigate), but later the yards and the sail from the mizzen-mast were removed. Sails are raised and driven hydraulically. The ship is equipped with laboratories able to provide hydrographic, optic, acoustic, chemical, biological and particulate experiments and observations.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Stavros S Niarchos

    Stavros S Niarchos

    The Stavros S Niarchos is a British brig-rigged tall ship owned and operated by the Tall Ships Youth Trust. She is primarily designed to provide young people with the opportunity to undertake voyages as character-building exercises, rather than pure sail-training. She is also used for adult voyages and holidays, which help subsidise the operation of the ship. In the late 1990s the two schooners (Malcolm Miller and Sir Winston Churchill) then owned by the Tall Ships Youth Trust (then called the Sail Training Association) were showing their age and becoming increasingly expensive to maintain. These two schooners are currently used as super yachts. The hulls for the two new brigs (the Stavros and her sister ship, the Prince William) were obtained half-completed from another project in Germany. These were transported to Appledore Ship Yards in Devon, where they were modified to the TSYT's requirements, and fitted out. She was completed in January 2000. The rig was designed by Michael Willoughby, who wrote a few comments on the overall design of the brigs. Following completion of sea trials she was handed over to the STA at Avonmouth Docks. She sailed for her maiden voyage, a training
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    USS Decatur

    USS Decatur

    • Ship builder: Bath Iron Works
    • Ship Class: Arleigh Burke class destroyer
    USS Decatur (DDG-73) is an Arleigh Burke class destroyer. The fifth ship to carry the name, Decatur was laid down on 11 January 1996 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine; launched on 9 November 1996, sponsored by Mrs. Joan E. Shalikashvili, wife of John M. Shalikashvili, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; and commissioned 19 June 1998, Commander Mike Knollmann in command. She is named in honor of Stephen Decatur. Following a combination shakedown and transit cruise to the west coast, during which Decatur visited San Juan, Puerto Rico; Puerto Vallarta, Mexico she was commissioned on 19 June 1998 in Bath, Maine with the ceremony taking place 29 August 1998, at the Tom McCall Waterfront Park in Portland, Oregon. The guided-missile destroyer arrived at her new home port of San Diego on 4 September. She spent the remainder of the year conducting acoustic trials and combat system evaluations. Decatur then spent three months in a post-shakedown availability in the Southwest Marine Yard. In April 1999, the warship conducted a short cruise to the Northwest, visiting Decatur Island, Washington, and Vancouver, British Columbia, before returning to San Diego in early May. After a second visit
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    HMAS Broome

    HMAS Broome

    • Ship Class: Bathurst class corvette
    HMAS Broome (J191), named for the town of Broome, Western Australia, was one of 60 Bathurst class corvettes constructed during World War II and one of 20 built for the Admiralty but manned by personnel of and commissioned into the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Broome was laid down by Evans Deakin and Company at Brisbane on 3 May 1941, launched on 6 October 1941 by Mrs. M. J. McKew, wife of the shipyard's works manager, and commissioned on 29 July 1942. The corvette operated during World War II, and was awarded the battle honours "Pacific 1942-45" and "New Guinea 1942-44" for her service. HMAS Broome paid off on 24 August 1946, was sold to the Turkish Navy and renamed Alanya. The vessel left Turkish service in 1975. The ship's bell was recovered before the sale, and returned to Broome. It was presented to the Broome Road Board in June 1952, who then passed the bell on to Broome State School in November. The bell later ended up at the town's Returned and Services League club.
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    USS Anzio

    USS Anzio

    USS Anzio (CVE-57), was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. Originally classified as auxiliary aircraft carrier ACV-57, was laid down on 12 December 1942 by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Co., Vancouver, Washington, under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1094); named Alikula Bay on 22 January 1943; renamed Coral Sea on 3 April 1943; launched on 1 May 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Frank J. Fletcher, wife of Frank J. Fletcher; redesignated CVE-57 on 15 July 1943; and commissioned at Astoria, Oregon on 27 August 1943, Captain Herbert W. Taylor in command. On 24 September, Coral Sea got underway for shakedown in Puget Sound. She arrived at San Diego, California on 8 October to load aircraft and hold flight operations off the California coast. The carrier sailed for Hawaii on 25 October and upon arrival at Pearl Harbor, joined by sister ship Liscome Bay for exercises off Oahu. On 10 November, Coral Sea steamed southwest to join the American forces about to invade the Gilbert Islands. She launched strikes on Makin Island from 20–28 November. When Tarawa Atoll had been captured, Coral Sea headed for Pearl Harbor and arrived there on 5 December. She paused to embark
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    USS Forrest Royal

    USS Forrest Royal

    USS Forrest Royal (DD-872), named for Rear Admiral Forrest Beton Royal USN (1893–1945), was a Gearing-class destroyer laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Corporation at Staten Island in New York on 8 June 1945, launched on 17 January 1946 by Miss Katherine K. Royal, the daughter of Admiral Royal and commissioned on 29 June 1946 with Commander James M. Clute (US Naval Academy, Class of 1934) in command. Forrest Royal operated with the Seventh Fleet in support of United Nations Forces during the Korean War then alternated operations along the east coast and in the Caribbean with the 2nd Fleet with deployments to the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. Forrest Royal's operations in the period prior to the Korean War illustrated the varied capability of the modern destroyer, and the wide range of missions which such ships are assigned. She conducted special tests for the Bureau of Ships in the Caribbean, served as plane guard and escort for aircraft carriers, took part in the development of antisubmarine warfare and fired in shore bombardment exercises. Usually based at Pensacola, she visited many ports in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. On 26 September 1950, Forrest Royal sailed from
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    USS Forrestal

    USS Forrestal

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    • Ship Class: Forrestal class aircraft carrier
    The USS Forrestal (CV-59), formerly AVT-59 and CVA-59, is a supercarrier that was named after former Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal and was the lead ship of her class of aircraft carriers. The other carriers of her class were the USS Saratoga, USS Ranger and USS Independence. She superseded Shinano of World War II vintage as the largest aircraft carrier ever built by full load displacement and was the first to specifically support jet aircraft. The ship was affectionately called "The FID", because James Forrestal was the first ever Secretary of Defense, FID standing for "First In Defense". This is also the slogan on the ship's insignia and patch. She was also informally known in the fleet as the "Zippo" and "Forrest Fire" or "Firestal" because of a number of highly publicized fires on board, most notably a 1967 incident in which 134 sailors died and 161 were injured. Forrestal was launched 11 December 1954 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia, sponsored by Josephine Forrestal, widow of Secretary Forrestal; and commissioned 1 October 1955, Captain R. L. Johnson in command. The construction cost of the Forrestal just before commissioning was
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    USS Kansas

    USS Kansas

    USS Kansas (BB-21) was a US Connecticut-class battleship commissioned in 1907 and decommissioned in 1921. She was the second ship of the United States Navy named in honor of Kansas. Kansas was laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation of Camden, New Jersey. She was launched on 12 August 1905 sponsored by Miss Anna Hoch, daughter of Kansas Governor Edward W. Hoch; and commissioned in Philadelphia Navy Yard on 18 April 1907, Captain Charles E. Vreeland in command. The new battleship departed Philadelphia on 17 August 1907, for shakedown training out of Provincetown, Massachusetts, and returned home for alterations on 24 September. She joined the "Great White Fleet" at Hampton Roads on 9 December and passed in review before President Theodore Roosevelt while getting underway on the first leg of the fleet's historic world cruise. The American ships arrived Port of Spain, Trinidad on 23 December and six days later got underway for Rio de Janeiro. From there, they sailed south along the east coast of South America and transited the perilous Straits of Magellan in open order. Turning north, the fleet visited Valparaíso, Chile, and Callao Bay, Peru, en route to Magdalena Bay, Mexico,
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    USS Pompano

    USS Pompano

    USS Pompano (SS-181), a United States Porpoise-class submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for the pompano. Her keel was laid down on 14 January 1936 by the Mare Island Navy Yard in California. She was launched on 11 March 1937, sponsored by Mrs. Isaac I. Yates, and commissioned on 12 June 1937, Lieutenant Commander Lewis S. Parks in command. Six boats were built in this group, with three different diesel engine designs from different makers. Pompano was fitted with H.O.R. (Hooven-Owens-Rentschler) 8-cylinder double-acting engines that were a license-built version of the MAN auxiliary engines of the cruiser Leipzig. Owing to the limited space available within the submarines, either opposed-piston or, in this case, double-acting engines were favoured for being more compact. Pompano's engines were a complete failure and were wrecked during trials before even leaving the Mare Island Navy Yard. Pompano was laid up for eight months until 1938 while the engines were replaced. Even then the engines were regarded as unsatisfactory and were replaced by Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston engines in 1942. Pompano's engines were a unique prototype of the H.O.R.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    USS Saint Paul

    USS Saint Paul

    • Ship Class: Baltimore class cruiser
    USS Saint Paul (CA-73), a Baltimore-class cruiser, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for St. Paul, Minnesota. Her keel was laid down as Rochester on 3 February 1943 by the Bethlehem Steel Company in Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 16 September 1944 sponsored by Mrs. John J. McDonough, and commissioned on 17 February 1945, Captain Ernest H. von Heimburg in command. She was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 31 July 1978, and was sold for scrapping in January 1980. After shakedown in the Caribbean Sea, Saint Paul departed Boston, Massachusetts, on 15 May 1945 and headed for the Pacific. From 8–30 June, she underwent training out of Pearl Harbor and sailed on 2 July to join Task Force 38 (TF 38). This fast carrier striking force completed replenishment at sea on 23 July and then proceeded to launching points for strikes against Honshū, Japan's largest island. From 24 July to 10 August, Saint Paul screened the carriers as they delivered heavy air strikes on Kure, Kobe, and the Tokyo area in southern Honshū, then at Maizuru and various airfields in northern Honshū. During this period, Saint Paul also bombarded industrial targets: first on textile
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    USS Ticonderoga

    USS Ticonderoga

    • Ship builder: Brooklyn Navy Yard
    The second USS Ticonderoga was a 2526-ton Lackawanna-class screw sloop-of-war laid down by the New York Navy Yard in 1861; launched on 16 October 1862; sponsored by Miss Katherine Heaton Offley; and commissioned at New York on 12 May 1863, Commodore J. L. Lardner in command. Ticonderoga went south on 5 June 1863 for duty as flagship of the West Indies Squadron and, after stopping at Philadelphia, arrived at Cape Haitien on 12 June. She patrolled waters off the Virgin Islands, Barbados, Tobago, Trinidad, and Curaçao protecting Union commerce. Ticonderoga returned to Philadelphia for repairs in September. She was relieved as flagship of the squadron in October and sent to the Boston Navy Yard. Operating out of Boston, Ticonderoga searched unsuccessfully off Nova Scotia for the captured steamer Chesapeake from 11 to 16 December. In June 1864, she hunted Confederate commerce raiders off the New England coast, putting into Portland harbor, Maine, on 26 June. There, Ticonderoga received a telegram on 10 July ordering her to track down and destroy the marauding Confederate raider CSS Florida. Her search lasted until October and carried Ticonderoga as far south as Cabo São Roque (Cape San
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    USS Washington

    USS Washington

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    USS Washington (BB-47), a Colorado-class battleship, was the second ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 42nd state. Her keel was laid down on 30 June 1919 at Camden, New Jersey, by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation. She was launched on 1 September 1921, sponsored by Miss Jean Summers, the daughter of Congressman John W. Summers of Washington State. On 8 February 1922, two days after the signing of the Washington Naval Treaty for the Limitation of Naval Armaments, all construction work ceased on the 75.9% completed super-dreadnought. Ultimately, her incomplete hulk was towed out to sea, where she was sunk as a gunnery target on 26 November 1924 by the battleships New York and Texas. With fiscal year 1917 appropriations, bids on the four Colorados were opened on 18 October 1916; though Maryland's keel was laid on 24 April 1917, the other three battleships, including Washington were not laid down until 1919–1920. With the cancellation of the first South Dakota class, the Colorados were the last U.S. battleships to enter service for nearly two decades. They were also the final U.S. battleships to use twin gun turrets—the North Carolinas and second South Dakota
    5.75
    4 votes
    132
    Phoenix

    Phoenix

    The Phoenix was built by Hjorne & Jakobsen at Frederikshavn, Denmark in 1929 as an Evangelical Mission Schooner. Twenty years later she retired from missionary work and carried cargo until her engine room was damaged by fire. In 1974 she was bought by new owners who converted her into a Brigantine before being purchased by Square Sail in 1988. A first aid over-haul enabled her to sail back to the UK where she underwent a complete refit. During 1991 she was converted to the 15th century Caravel Santa Maria for Ridley Scott's film 1492: Conquest of Paradise. The ship was known as Santa Maria until, in 1996, due to increasing demand for period square-riggers, she was converted into a 2 masted Brig and reverted to her original name Phoenix of Dell Quay. Phoenix of Dell Quay was used as the ship Retribution in the Hornblower Series 3. Sophie, a fictional ship, was the first ship under command of Jack Aubrey in Patrick O'Brian's maritime series Master and Commander, and was modeled after the actual ship HM Sloop Speedy. Film credits include:
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    USS Arkansas

    USS Arkansas

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    USS Arkansas (BB-33), a Wyoming-class battleship was the third ship of the United States Navy named in honor of the 25th state. A dreadnought battleship, Arkansas was laid down on 25 January 1910 at Camden, New Jersey, by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation. She was launched on 14 January 1911 sponsored by Miss Nancy Louise Macon of Helena, Arkansas, daughter of Congressman Robert B. Macon. The ship was commissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 17 September 1912, Captain Roy C. Smith in command. Arkansas served in both World Wars. She was part of the U.S. battleship squadron attached to the British Grand Fleet during World War I, Battleship Division Nine. During World War II she escorted convoys in the Atlantic and bombarded shore targets during the invasions of Normandy, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. She was sunk by the underwater nuclear test BAKER at Bikini Atoll in 1946. Arkansas was laid down on 25 January 1910 at New York Shipbuilding in Camden, New Jersey. She was launched on 14 January 1911, after which fitting-out work was effected. The ship was completed by September 1912, and was commissioned into the US Navy on 17 September at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, under the command
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    USS Atule

    USS Atule

    • Ship Class: Balao class submarine
    USS Atule (SS/AGSS-403), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the atule. Her keel was laid down on 25 November 1943 by the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine. Atule was launched on 6 March 1944 sponsored by Miss Elizabeth Louise Kauffman, the daughter of Rear Admiral James L. Kauffman, and commissioned on 21 June 1944, Commander John H. Maurer in command. Following a month of shakedown training along the east coast, the submarine departed New London, Connecticut, and headed south to join the action in the Pacific. During a 15-day stopover at the Fleet Sound School in Key West, Florida, she sharpened her diving skills and fighting techniques. After transiting the Panama Canal, Atule steamed to Pearl Harbor with Jallao, training intensively en route to reach a peak of combat readiness. Upon her arrival at Pearl Harbor, Atule underwent voyage repairs and torpedo training into October. On 9 October, Atule departed Pearl Harbor on her first war patrol in company with Pintado and Jallao. Under the command of Commander Bernard Clarey in Pintado, the three boats formed a wolf pack known as "Clarey's Crushers". Atule trained with
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    USS Cone

    USS Cone

    • Ship Class: Gearing class destroyer
    USS Cone (DD-866), was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, named for Rear Admiral Hutch Ingham Cone USN (1871–1941). Cone was laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Corporation at Staten Island in New York on 30 November 1944, launched on 10 May 1945 by Mrs. H. I. Cone and commissioned on 18 August 1945. Cone alternated operations along the east coast and in the Caribbean with the 2nd Fleet with deployments with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, and participated in Sea Dragon and Market Time operations, patrolled on search and rescue duties and carried out Naval Gunfire Support missions during the Vietnam War. Cone's first cruise, between 12 February and 9 April 1946, was a visit to Portsmouth, England. After a week at Newport, R.I., she sailed again on an extensive goodwill tour to ports of both northern and southern Europe, welcoming visitors at each city, returning to Newport 24 October. She operated along the east coast and in the Caribbean from her home port, Norfolk, until the summer of 1947, when she carried midshipmen on a training cruise to northern Europe. Continuing training and service activities along the east coast and in the Caribbean when not deployed,
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    USS Lynde McCormick

    USS Lynde McCormick

    • Ship Class: Charles F. Adams class destroyer
    USS Lynde McCormick (DDG-8) was a Charles F. Adams-class destroyer in the United States Navy. Lynde McCormick (DDG-8) was laid down 4 April 1958 by Defoe Shipbuilding Company, Bay City, Michigan; launched 28 July 1959; sponsored by Mrs. Lillian McCormick, wife of Admiral McCormick; and commissioned at Boston 3 June 1961, with Commander Ernest S. Cornwall, Jr., in command. Lynde McCormick departed Boston 23 August 1961 for her home port, San Diego, arriving 16 September. Early in 1962, she tested her missiles and antisubmarine weaponry in the Pacific missile range. Exercises and experiments continued in preparation for deployment to the western Pacific, for which she sailed 19 November 1962. She arrived at Yokosuka on 6 December and within a week was on station with a 7th Fleet task group, taking up her part in the schedule of readiness training and exercises. Returning to San Diego 15 June 1963, she proceeded to Sacramento to help initiate its new deepwater port. All‑encompassing refresher training followed overhaul and modification at Hunters Point early in 1964, increasing her antiair warfare capabilities. A high state of readiness had been achieved when the Gulf of Tonkin
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    USS Princeton

    USS Princeton

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    The fourth USS Princeton (CVL-23) was a United States Navy Independence-class aircraft carrier active in the Pacific Ocean during World War II. It was launched in 1941 and lost at the Battle of Leyte Gulf in 1944. The ship was laid down as the Cleveland-class light cruiser Tallahassee (CL-61) by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, 2 June 1941. She was reclassified as the Independence-class light carrier CVL-23 on 16 February 1942, renamed Princeton 31 March 1942, launched 18 October 1942, sponsored by Margaret Dodds (wife of Princeton University president Harold Dodds), and commissioned at Philadelphia 25 February 1943, Capt. George R. Henderson in command. Following shakedown in the Caribbean, and reclassification to CVL-23 on 15 July 1943, Princeton, with Air Group 23 embarked, got underway for the Pacific. Arriving at Pearl Harbor 9 August, she sortied with TF 11 on the 25th and headed for Baker Island. There she served as flagship, TG 11.2 and provided air cover during the occupation of the island and the construction of an airfield there, 1–14 September. During that time her planes downed Japanese Emily reconnaissance planes and, more importantly,
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    USS Windham Bay

    USS Windham Bay

    USS Windham Bay (CVE-92) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1129) on 5 January 1944 at Vancouver, Washington, by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Co.; launched on 29 March 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Henry M. Cooper; and commissioned on 3 May 1944, Captain Charles W. Oexle in command. Following commissioning, Windham Bay conducted shakedown training in Puget Sound and then headed for San Diego on 6 June. There, she conducted air qualifications and catapult trials before taking on a load of Hawaii-bound aircraft and passengers. She departed San Diego on 12 June and arrived in Pearl Harbor on the 19th. Trading her cargo of aircraft and passengers for a similar one bound for the Marshall Islands, Windham Bay stood out of the harbor on 25 June and arrived at Majuro on 2 July. After unloading her aircraft, she moved on to Kwajalein where she loaded planes and men of Marine Night Fighter Squadron 532 (VMF(N)-532) and headed for the Marianas. The Marines flew off near Saipan, and Windham Bay put into Garapan anchorage to unload the squadron's gear. Afterward, the escort carrier took on a load of captured
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Japanese battleship Haruna

    Japanese battleship Haruna

    Haruna (榛名), named after Mount Haruna, was a warship of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War I and World War II. Designed by the British naval engineer George Thurston, she was the fourth and last battlecruiser of the Kongō class, among the most heavily armed ships in any navy when built. Laid down in 1912 at the Kawasaki Shipyards in Kobe, Haruna was formally commissioned in 1915 on the same day as her sister ship, Kirishima. Haruna patrolled off the Chinese coast during World War I. During gunnery drills in 1920, an explosion destroyed one of her guns, damaged the gun turret, and killed seven men. During her life, Haruna underwent two major reconstructions. Beginning in 1926, the Imperial Japanese Navy rebuilt her as a battleship, strengthening her armor and improving her speed and power capabilities. In 1933, her superstructure was completely rebuilt, her speed was increased, and she was equipped with launch catapults for floatplanes. Now fast enough to accompany Japan's growing carrier fleet, Haruna was reclassified as a fast battleship. During the Second Sino-Japanese War, Haruna transported Imperial Japanese Army troops to mainland China before being redeployed to the
    5.50
    4 votes
    140
    USS Manchester

    USS Manchester

    USS Manchester (CL-83), a Cleveland class light cruiser of the United States Navy, was laid down 25 September 1944 by the Fore River Shipyard, Bethlehem Steel Corp., Quincy, Mass.; launched 5 March 1946; sponsored by Mrs. Ernest J. Gladu; and commissioned 29 October 1946, Capt. Peter G. Hale in command. Manchester completed her shakedown cruise in the Caribbean and returned to Boston, her home port, 26 March 1947. There she was equipped with an experimental plastic cover for her bridge to be tested on her first transatlantic crossing. On 18 April, she steamed for the Mediterranean to lend visible support to the Truman Doctrine of 12 March. Returning to the East Coast for two weeks in June, she conducted a Naval Reserve training cruise out of Newport, R.I. She resumed her Mediterranean cruise 25 June, returning to Boston 30 November. Manchester completed two more deployments with the 6th Fleet (9 February to 26 June 1948, 3 January to 4 March 1949) before departing Philadelphia 18 March for assignment with the Pacific Fleet. She arrived at Long Beach 3 April and departed two weeks later for the politically volatile Far East, entering the harbor at Tsingtao, China, 15 May. The
    5.50
    4 votes
    141
    USS Missouri

    USS Missouri

    USS Missouri (BB-11), a Maine-class battleship, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the 24th state. Missouri was laid down on 7 February 1900 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Company of Newport News, Virginia. She was launched on 28 December 1901 sponsored by Mrs. Edson Galludet, daughter of United States Senator Francis Marion Cockrell of Missouri, and commissioned on 1 December 1903, Captain William S. Cowles in command. Assigned to the North Atlantic Fleet, Missouri left Norfolk, Virginia on 4 February 1904 for trials off the Virginia Capes and fleet operations in the Caribbean Sea. On 13 April, during target practice, a flareback from the port gun in her after turret ignited a powder charge and set off two others. No explosion occurred but the rapid burning of the powder suffocated 36 of the crew. Prompt action prevented the loss of the warship and three of her crew earned Medals of Honor for extraordinary heroism. After repairs at Newport News, Missouri sailed on 9 June for duty in the Mediterranean Sea from which she returned to New York on 17 December. Fleet operations along the east coast and in the Caribbean during the next years
    5.50
    4 votes
    142
    USS San Jacinto

    USS San Jacinto

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    The second USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) of the United States Navy was an Independence-class light aircraft carrier that served during World War II. She was named for the Battle of San Jacinto during the Texas Revolution. U.S. President George H.W. Bush served aboard the ship during World War II. Originally laid down as the light cruiser Newark (CL-100), on 26 October 1942 by the New York Shipbuilding Co., Camden, New Jersey; redesignated CV-30 and renamed Reprisal on 2 June 1942; renamed San Jacinto on 30 January 1943, converted, while building, to a light aircraft carrier and reclassified as CVL-30; launched on 26 September 1943; sponsored by Mary Gibbs Jones (wife of U.S. Commerce Secretary Jesse H. Jones); and commissioned on 15 November 1943, Capt. Harold M. Martin, in command. After shakedown in the Caribbean, San Jacinto sailed, via the Panama Canal, San Diego, and Pearl Harbor, for the Pacific war zone. Arriving at Majuro, Marshall Islands, she joined Vice Admiral Marc Mitscher's Task Force 58/38, the fast carrier striking force of the Pacific Fleet. There, San Jacinto embarked Air Group 51, whose fighters and torpedo planes would be the ship's chief weapons in battle. After
    5.50
    4 votes
    143
    HMAS Latrobe

    HMAS Latrobe

    • Ship Class: Bathurst class corvette
    HMAS Latrobe (J234/M234), named for the town of Latrobe, Tasmania, was one of 60 Bathurst class corvettes constructed during World War II, and one of 36 initially manned and commissioned solely by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Latrobe was laid down by Mort's Dock and Engineering Company at Balmain, New South Wales on 27 January 1942. As the ship was built in a dock it was floated clear on 19 June 1942, with the ceremony officiated by the Reverend A. G. Rix. The ship was commissioned into the RAN on 6 November 1942. Latrobe’s dimensions differed from the Bathurst class design: she was shorter (180 ft 10 in (55.12 m) compared to 186 ft (57 m)) and had a slightly wider beam (31 ft 2 in (9.50 m) compared to 31 ft (9.4 m)). After entering active service, Latrobe initially served as a convoy escort ship, first between Queensland and New Guinea, then between Darwin and Thursday Island. On 12 February 1943, the corvette unsuccessfully attacked a Japanese submarine. In July, a Darwin-bound convoy escorted by Latrobe was attacked twice by Japanese aircraft, and in December, a lone Japanese bomber attempted to attack the corvette. In June 1944, Latrobe was reassigned to New Guinea
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    HMAS Shoalhaven

    HMAS Shoalhaven

    HMAS Shoalhaven (K535/M535/F535), named for the Shoalhaven River in New South Wales, was a River class frigate laid down by Walkers Limited at Maryborough, Queensland on 18 December 1943, launched on 14 December 1944 by Senator Dorothy Tangney and commissioned at Urangan Pier in Hervey Bay in Queensland on 2 May 1946. The ship operated during the Korean War, and received the battle honour "Korea 1950". HMAS Shoalhaven paid off to reserve on 19 December 1955, and was sold to H. C. Sleigh and Company, acting on behalf of Mitsubishi Australia Propriety Limited, in January 1962.
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    USS Arleigh Burke

    USS Arleigh Burke

    • Ship builder: Bath Iron Works
    • Ship Class: Arleigh Burke class destroyer
    The USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51), named for Admiral Arleigh A. Burke, USN (1901–1996), is the lead ship of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers. She was laid down by the Bath Iron Works company at Bath, Maine, on 6 December 1988, and launched on 16 September 1989 by Mrs. Arleigh Burke. The Admiral himself was present at her commissioning ceremony on 4 July 1991, which was held on the waterfront in downtown Norfolk, Virginia. The Arleigh Burke's designers incorporated many lessons learned by the Royal Navy during the Falklands campaign and from the USS Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers. The Ticonderoga-class cruisers were supposedly becoming too expensive to continue building, and were supposedly too difficult to upgrade. The Arleigh Burke's design includes what is now better known as stealth technology, which improves the ship's ability to evade anti-ship missiles. Furthermore, her all-steel construction provides good protection for her superstructure, while her Collective Protection System allows her to operate in environments contaminated by chemical, biological, or radiological materials. Even before the USS Arleigh Burke was commissioned, the Commander,
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    USS Ethan Allen

    USS Ethan Allen

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    USS Ethan Allen (SSBN-608), lead ship of her class, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for American Revolutionary War hero Ethan Allen. Ethan Allen's keel was laid down by the Electric Boat Corporation of Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 22 November 1960, sponsored by Mrs. Robert H. Hopkins, great-great-great-granddaughter of Ethan Allen. The ship was commissioned on 8 August 1961, with Captain Paul L. Lacy, Jr., commanding Blue Crew and Commander W. W. Behrens, Jr., commanding the Gold Crew. Ethan Allen (Navy hull design SCB-180) was the first submarine designed as a ballistic missile launch platform. (The earlier George Washington class were converted attack submarines.) She was constructed from HY80 steel (high yield, 80,000 psi (550,000 kPa) yield strength), and was fitted with the Mark 2 Mod 3 Ships Inertial Navigation System (SINS). At launch, she was outfitted with Polaris A-2 (UGM-27B) submarine launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs) and Mark 16 Mod 6 torpedoes; the torpedo firecontrol system was the Mark 112 Mod 2. The A-2s would be retrofitted with Polaris A-3s and their gas/steam ejection launch gear and Mark 80 firecontrol systems during
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    USS Shark

    USS Shark

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    • Ship Class: United States Porpoise class submarine
    USS Shark (SS-174) was a Porpoise-class submarine, the fifth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the shark. Her keel was laid down by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut, on 24 October 1933. She was launched on 21 May 1935 (sponsored by Miss Ruth Ellen Lonergan, 12-year-old daughter of United States Senator Augustine Lonergan of Connecticut), and commissioned on 25 January 1936, Lieutenant C.J. Carter in command. Following shakedown in the North Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea, Shark transited the Panama Canal and arrived at San Diego, California on 4 March 1937. She spent the next year and one-half in training exercises and Army-Navy war problems as a unit of Submarine Squadron 6 (SubRon 6). Following a regular overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California, Shark got underway from San Diego on 16 December 1938 bound for Pearl Harbor and reassignment to SubRon 4. Following two years of operations in the Hawaii area, Shark set sail from Pearl Harbor on 3 December 1940 to join the Asiatic Fleet based at Manila, where she engaged in fleet tactics and exercises until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Departing Manila on 9 December 1941, under command
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    Alexander von Humboldt

    Alexander von Humboldt

    Alexander von Humboldt is a German ship originally built in 1906 by the German shipyard AG Weser at Bremen as Reserve Sonderburg. She was operated throughout the North and Baltic Seas until being retired in 1986. Subsequently she was converted into a three masted barque by the German shipyard Motorwerke Bremerhaven and was re-launched in 1988 as Alexander von Humboldt. Planned and ordered in 1906 as a reserve lightvessel (to stand in for other lightvessels during scheduled yard maintenance), the ship was launched on 10 September 1906 at AG Weser with construction serial number 155 as the first of its class. Her hull was based on a sailing ship, as was common in this class. There is no clear record if she was christened Reserve Fehmarnbelt (after her first station) or Reserve Sonderburg, as both names are documented. On the ship's bell appears Reserve; a first home port at Sonderburg (today Sønderborg, Denmark) is most likely. From 1920 to 1945 the ship was home ported at Kiel-Holtenau and served in many locations, but mainly along Baltic shores. She was installed in 1945 as a permanent replacement for the bombed and damaged light vessel Kiel. In the spring of 1957 she was rammed by
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Elissa

    Elissa

    The tall ship Elissa is a three-masted barque. She is currently moored in Galveston, Texas, and is one of the oldest ships sailing today. Elissa was built in Aberdeen, Scotland as a merchant vessel in a time when steamships were overtaking sailing ships. She was originally launched on October 27, 1877. According to the descendants of Henry Fowler Watt, Elissa's builder, she was named for the Queen of Carthage, Elissa (more commonly called Dido), Aeneas' tragic lover in the epic poem The Aeneid. Elissa also sailed under Norwegian and Swedish flags. In Norway she was known as the Fjeld of Tønsberg and her master was Captain Herman Andersen. In Sweden her name was Gustav of Gothenburg. In 1918, she was converted into a two-masted brigantine and an engine was installed. She was sold to Finland in 1930 and reconverted into a schooner. In 1959, she was sold to Greece, and successively sailed under the names Christophoros, in 1967 as Achaeos, and in 1969 as Pioneer. In 1970, she was rescued from destruction in Piraeus after being purchased for the San Francisco Maritime Museum. However, she languished in a salvage yard in Piraeus until she was purchased for $40,000, in 1975, by the
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    HMAS Napier

    HMAS Napier

    • Ship builder: Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company
    • Ship Class: J, K and N class destroyer
    HMAS Napier (G97/D15) was an N class destroyer serving in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) during World War II. Built During 1939 and 1940, the destroyer was commissioned into the RAN, although she was ordered and owned by the British government. During 1941, Napier operated in the Mediterranean, before being transferred to the British Eastern Fleet at the start of 1942, then to south Atlantic operations in early 1944. In 1945, Napier was assigned to the British Pacific Fleet, and spent the rest of World War II in the fight against Japan. After the war's end, the destroyer was decommissioned and returned to the British. She was sold off in 1955, and broken up in 1956. The N class destroyer had a displacement of 1,760 tons at standard load, and 2,353 tons at full load. Napier was 356 feet 6 inches (108.66 m) long overall and 229 feet 6 inches (69.95 m) long between perpendiculars, had a beam of 35 feet 8 inches (10.87 m), and a maximum draught of 16 feet 4 inches (4.98 m). Propulsion was provided by Admiralty 3-drum boilers connected to Parsons geared steam turbines, which provided 40,000 shaft horsepower to the ship's two propellers. Napier was capable of reaching 36 knots (67 km/h;
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    HMAS Nestor

    HMAS Nestor

    • Ship builder: Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company
    • Ship Class: J, K and N class destroyer
    HMAS Nestor (G02) was an N class destroyer of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Built in Scotland, Nestor was commissioned in February 1941; although manned by Australians and commissioned as an Australian warship, she remained the property of the Royal Navy. Entering service in 1941, Nestor spent most of her career as a patrol and escort vessel in the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean, and the Far East. In December 1941, the destroyer located and sank the German submarine U-127. In June 1942, Nestor sailed as part of the Operation Vigorous escort force, protecting a supply convoy to Malta. On the evening of 15 June, the ship was heavily damaged by air attack. Despite attempts to tow the ship to base, Nestor was abandoned and scuttled off Crete the next morning. Nestor is the only ship of the RAN that never operated in Australian waters. The N class destroyer had a displacement of 1,773 tons at standard load, and 2,550 tons at full load. Nestor was 356 feet 6 inches (108.66 m) long overall and 229 feet 6 inches (69.95 m) long between perpendiculars, had a beam of 35 feet 8 inches (10.87 m), and a maximum draught of 16 feet 4 inches (4.98 m). Propulsion was provided by Admiralty
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    HMAS Ovens

    HMAS Ovens

    • Ship Class: Oberon class submarine
    HMAS Ovens (S 70) is an Oberon class submarine formerly of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) which is now preserved as a museum ship. The Oberon class was based heavily on the preceding Porpoise class of submarines, with changes made to improve the vessels' hull integrity, sensor systems, and stealth capabilities. Eight submarines were ordered for the RAN, in two batches of four. The first batch (including Ovens) was approved in 1963, and the second batch was approved during the late 1960s, although two of these were cancelled before construction started in 1969, with the funding redirected to the Fleet Air Arm. This was the fourth time the RAN had attempted to establish a submarine branch. The submarine is 295.2 feet (90.0 m) long, with a beam of 26.5 feet (8.1 m), and a draught of 18 feet (5.5 m) when surfaced. At full load displacement, she displaces 2,030 tons when surfaced, and 2,410 tons when submerged. The two propeller shafts are each driven by an English Electric motor providing 3,500 brake horsepower and 4,500 shaft horsepower; the electricity for these is generated by two Admiralty Standard Range supercharged V16 diesel generators. The submarine could travel at up to 12
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    HMAS Psyche

    HMAS Psyche

    • Ship Class: Pelorus class cruiser
    HMAS Psyche (formerly HMS Psyche) was a Pelorus class light cruiser built for the Royal Navy at the end of the 19th century. Initially operating on the North America and West Indies Station, the cruiser was transferred to the Australian Squadron in 1903, and remained there until the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) took over responsibility in 1913. After a stint in New Zealand waters and involvement in the Occupation of German Samoa, Psyche was paid off in 1915. At the recommendation of the Australian government, the ship was commissioned into the RAN in 1915, and assigned to patrol the coast of Burma, in response to the threat of a German-instigated uprising. Psyche operated in the Bay of Bengal and around Sumatra until 1916, when she was docked at Hong Kong for refit. During this, personnel from the ship were used to commission and man the river gunboat HMS Moorhen. After the refit's conclusion, Psyche patrolled in Chinese waters, before returning to the Bay of Bengal. Psyche returned to Sydney and was paid off in October 1917, but recommissioned a month later for patrols in Australia's norther waters. She was decommissioned for the final time in early 1918. The ship was sold for use
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    HMS Resolution

    HMS Resolution

    HMS Resolution (pennant number 09) was a Revenge-class battleship of the Royal Navy. She was laid down at Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow on 29 November 1913, launched on 14 January 1915, and commissioned on 30 December 1916. From 1916 to 1919, Resolution served in the 1st Battle Squadron (United Kingdom) of the Grand Fleet. Between the Wars, she served in the Atlantic Fleet, with the exception of a short refit in 1930-1931. On the outbreak of World War II, Resolution was part of the Home Fleet, and carried out convoy escort duties in the Atlantic. Whilst supporting the Narvik campaign in May 1940, Resolution was struck by a bomb at Tjeldsundet. In June, 1940 she joined Force H at Gibraltar, and took part in the destruction of the French Fleet at Mers-el-Kebir on 3 July 1940. In September 1940, Resolution joined Force M at Freetown, shelling French warships at the Battle of Dakar on 24 September 1940. The next day, Resolution was torpedoed by the French submarine Bévéziers and badly damaged. Following repairs in the United States, Resolution departed in February 1942 for Colombo, and served in the Indian Ocean during 1942 and 1943. She returned to England in September
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    USS Palau

    USS Palau

    • Ship builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
    USS Palau (CVE–122) was a Commencement Bay class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down by the Todd-Pacific Shipyards Inc., Tacoma, Washington, 19 February 1945; launched 6 August 1945; sponsored by Mrs. J. P. Whitney; and commissioned 15 January 1946, Capt. W. E. Cleaves in command. Commissioned as the Navy began its post-war demobilization, Palau completed shakedown off California, transited the Panama Canal, underwent post shakedown availability at Boston, and on 11 May moved down the coast to Norfolk where she was immobilized until May 1947. On 22 May she steamed south to Cuba for refresher training, after which she headed north to Norfolk and New York, whence she steamed to Recife, thence to West Africa. She returned to the east coast 16 August and after another availability at Boston was again immobilized at Norfolk, December 1947–March 1948. During the spring of 1948 she conducted operations off the east coast and on 3 June departed for the Mediterranean to deliver planes, under the Turkish Aid Program, to representatives of that country at Yesilkoy. During this mission the ship and crew helped in the evacuation of U.N. delegation and officials from
    8.00
    1 votes
    156
    USS Philadelphia

    USS Philadelphia

    • Ship Class: Brooklyn class cruiser
    USS Philadelphia (CL-41), a Brooklyn class light cruiser of the United States Navy. She was the fifth ship named for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In the 1950s, she was commissioned into the Brazilian Navy as Almirante Barroso. Philadelphia was laid down on 28 May 1935 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard; launched on 17 November 1936; sponsored by Mrs. George H. Earle, first lady of Pennsylvania; and commissioned at Philadelphia on 23 September 1937, Captain Jules James in command. After fitting out, the cruiser departed Philadelphia on 3 January 1938 for shakedown in the West Indies followed by additional alterations at Philadelphia and further sea trials off the Maine coast. Philadelphia called at Charleston, South Carolina on 30 April and hosted President Franklin Delano Roosevelt the first week of May for a cruise in Caribbean waters. The President debarked at Charleston on 8 May, and Philadelphia resumed operations with Cruiser Division 8 (CruDiv 8) off the Atlantic coast. She was designated flagship of Rear Admiral F.A. Todd, Commander CruDiv 8 (ComCruDiv 8), Battle Force on 27 June. In the following months, she called at principal ports of the West Indies, and at New York, Boston,
    8.00
    1 votes
    157
    USS Salem

    USS Salem

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    • Ship Class: Des Moines class cruiser
    The third USS Salem (CA-139) is a Des Moines-class heavy cruiser, formerly commissioned in the United States Navy. The world's last all-gun heavy cruiser to enter commission, she is currently open to the public as a museum ship in Quincy, Massachusetts. Salem was laid down on 4 July 1945 by the Bethlehem Steel Co.'s Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Mass.; launched on 25 March 1947; sponsored by Miss Mary G. Coffey; and commissioned on 14 May 1949, Captain J. C. Daniel in command. Her main battery held the world's first automatic 8" guns and were the first 8" naval guns to use cased ammunition instead of shell and bag loading. After a visit to Salem, Mass., on 4 July 1949, Salem underwent three months of shakedown at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, between July and October 1949, followed by post-shakedown repairs at the Boston Navy Yard. She then made two cruises to Guantanamo in November and December 1949, and participated in maneuvers with the Atlantic Fleet in early 1950. Salem departed the east coast on 3 May 1950; and, on 17 May, relieved Newport News (CA-148) as flagship of the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean. During this, the first of seven deployments to the Mediterranean as fleet
    8.00
    1 votes
    158
    HMAS Melbourne

    HMAS Melbourne

    • Ship builder: Vickers Armstrong
    • Ship Class: Majestic class aircraft carrier
    HMAS Melbourne (R21) was a Majestic-class light aircraft carrier of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Operating from 1955 until 1982, she was the third and final conventional aircraft carrier to serve in the RAN. Melbourne was the only British Commonwealth naval vessel to sink two friendly warships in peacetime collisions. The ship was laid down for the British Royal Navy as the lead ship of the Majestic class in April 1943, and was launched as HMS Majestic (R77) in February 1945. At the end of World War II, work on the ship was suspended until she was purchased by the RAN in 1947. At the time of purchase, it was decided to incorporate new aircraft carrier technologies into the design, making Melbourne the third ship to be constructed with an angled flight deck. Delays in construction and integrating the enhancements meant that the carrier was not commissioned until 1955. Melbourne never fired a shot in anger during her career, having only peripheral, non-combat roles in relation to the Indonesia-Malaysia confrontation and the Vietnam War. However, she was involved in two major collisions with allied vessels. On the evening of 10 February 1964, Melbourne collided with and sank
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    HMS Hermione

    HMS Hermione

    • Ship Class: Frigate
    HMS Hermione was a 32-gun fifth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She was notorious for having the bloodiest mutiny in British naval history, which saw her captain and most of the officers killed. The mutineers then handed the ship over to the Spanish, where she remained for two years, before being cut-out and returned to Royal Navy service under the names Retaliation and then Retribution. HMS Hermione was the lead ship of a six ship class of frigates designed by Edward Hunt, termed the Hermione class. She was launched on 9 September 1782 from Teast's of Bristol, having cost £11,350.14s.4d (equal to £1,089,728.88 today) to build, with a further £4,570.2s.2d (equal to £438,754.62 today) spent on dockyard expenses, and £723.16s.9d (equal to £69,492.45 today)} on fitting out. She was commissioned initially under Captain Thomas Lloyd, who commanded her until she was paid off in April 1783. She recommissioned that same month under Captain John Stone, who sailed her to Nova Scotia on 17 October, after which she was paid off in 1785. Hermione may have then been recommissioned under Captain William H. Ricketts during the Spanish Armament of 1790, though this is uncertain. She did however
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    2 votes
    160
    INS Vikrant

    INS Vikrant

    • Ship builder: Vickers Shipbuilding and Engineering Ltd
    INS Vikrant (R11) (Hindi: विक्रान्‍त) (formerly HMS Hercules (R49)) was a Majestic class aircraft carrier of the Indian Navy. She played a key role in enforcing the naval blockade on East Pakistan during the Indo-Pakistan War of 1971. India purchased the INS Vikrant from the United Kingdom in 1957. Upon her completion in 1961, she was commissioned as the first aircraft carrier of the Indian Navy. After a distinguished service, she was decommissioned in January 1997. She has since been preserved as a maritime museum in Cuff Parade, Mumbai. INS Vikrant was ordered as the HMS Hercules (R49) by the Royal Navy. She was laid down on 12 November 1943 by Vickers-Armstrong on the River Tyne. She was launched on 22 September 1945. However, with the end of World War II, her construction was suspended in May 1946 and she was laid up for possible future use. In January 1957 she was sold to India. She was towed to Belfast to complete her construction and for modifications by Harland and Wolff. A number of improvements to the original design were ordered by the Indian Navy, including an angled deck, steam catapults and a modified island. INS Vikrant (R11) was commissioned into the Indian Navy by
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    2 votes
    161
    USS Los Angeles

    USS Los Angeles

    The third USS Los Angeles (CA-135) was a Baltimore class heavy cruiser, laid down by the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, on 28 July 1943 and launched on 20 August 1944. She was sponsored by Mrs. Fletcher Bowron and commissioned on 22 July 1945, with Capt. John A. Snackenberg in command. After shakedown out of Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, Los Angeles sailed on 15 October for the Far East via the west coast and arrived at Shanghai, China, on 3 January 1946. During the next year she operated with the 7th Fleet along the coast of China and in the western Pacific to the Marianas. She returned to San Francisco, California, on 21 January 1947, and was decommissioned at Hunters Point on 9 April 1948, and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Los Angeles was recommissioned on 27 January 1951, Capt. Robert N. McFarlane in command. In response to the American efforts to thwart Communist aggression in the Republic of Korea, she sailed for the Far East 14 May and joined naval operations off the eastern coast of Korea on 31 May as flagship for Rear Adm. Arleigh A. Burke's CRUDIV 5. During the next six months she ranged the coastal waters of the Korean Peninsula from Hungnam in the east to Haeju in
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    USS Maryland

    USS Maryland

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS Maryland (BB-46), also known as "Old Mary" or "Fighting Mary" to her crewmates, was a Colorado-class battleship during World War II. She was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the seventh state. She was commissioned in 1920 and, serving as the flagship of the fleet, cruised to Australia, New Zealand and Brazil. She is most notable for her service in World War II. She was present on Battleship Row during the Attack on Pearl Harbor, and was lightly damaged by Japanese torpedoes. Returning to duty in 1942, she saw service in the Pacific War, first supporting the rest of the fleet at the Battle of Midway, and then patrolling the Fiji Islands to guard against Japanese incursion. Next, she went on the offensive, commencing shore bombardments in the Battle of Tarawa and later in the Battle of Kwajalein. During the Battle of Saipan she took torpedo damage to her bow, necessitating repairs and refits. She then participated in the Battle of Leyte Gulf where she was hit by a kamikaze. She took another kamikaze hit at the Battle of Okinawa, and was in for repairs at the end of WWII. After service in Operation Magic Carpet, she was decommissioned in 1947 and
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    2 votes
    163
    USS Okinawa

    USS Okinawa

    USS Okinawa (LPH–3) was the second Iwo Jima-class amphibious assault ship of the United States Navy. She was the second Navy ship assigned the name "Okinawa", in honor of the World War II Battle of Okinawa. Okinawa was laid down on 1 April 1960 (15th anniversary of the invasion of Okinawa) by the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; launched on 19 August 1961; sponsored by Mrs. John L. McClellan, wife of Arkansas Senator John L. McClellan; and commissioned on 14 April 1962, Captain William E. Lemos in command. Following commissioning and sea trials, Okinawa departed Philadelphia on 20 June 1962 for her homeport, Norfolk, Va., where she spent a month fitting out. After a six-week shakedown cruise out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and another month in Norfolk, the amphibious assault ship began participation in her first fleet exercise in the Caribbean, 15 October. Shortly thereafter the Cuban missile crisis arose and Okinawa remained in the area, lending force to the United States’ stand, until 3 December, when she returned to Norfolk. The first half of 1963 was spent in availability at the Philadelphia and Norfolk Naval Shipyards and further trial operations in the
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    2 votes
    164
    USS Rochester

    USS Rochester

    The third USS Rochester (CA-124), an Oregon City-class heavy cruiser, was laid down 29 May 1944 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass.; launched 28 August 1945; sponsored by Mrs. M. Herbert Eisenhart, wife of the president of Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., Rochester, N.Y.; and commissioned 20 December 1946 at the Boston Navy Yard, Capt. Harry Aloysius Guthrie in command. Rochester departed Provincetown, Mass., 22 February 1947 for shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. By the end of April, she was at Philadelphia, ready to commence nine extended naval reserve training cruises which took her north to Casco Bay and south to the Caribbean. Upon completion of her ninth reserve training cruise in the second week of January 1948, Rochester prepared for Mediterranean service. Departing Philadelphia 20 February, she arrived at Gibraltar 1 March, and became flagship for Adm. Forrest Sherman, Commander, 6th Fleet. In addition to calling at several ports, the cruiser waited out the events of the Palestinian crisis, at Suda Bay on the northern coast of Crete. She completed her tour June 14; Admiral Sherman shifted his flag to light cruiser Fargo (CL-106), and Rochester departed for Philadelphia the
    7.00
    2 votes
    165
    USS Springfield

    USS Springfield

    USS Springfield (CL-66/CLG-7/CG-7) was one of 27 Cleveland-class light cruisers built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was the third US Navy ship to be named after Springfield, Illinois. Commissioned in 1944, she served briefly in the Atlantic before transferring to the Pacific. There she served with fast carrier task forces, primarily in an anti-aircraft role, but also in a shore bombardment role in the last stages of the Pacific War. She earned two battle stars for wartime service. Like all but one of her sister ships, she was decommissioned and laid up soon after the end of World War II. In the late 1950s she was one of three Cleveland-class ships to be converted into Providence-class guided missile cruisers. As part of this conversion, she was modified to become a flagship, which involved expanding her forward superstructure and removing most of her forward armament. She was recommissioned in 1960 as CLG-7 (later redesignated as CG-7). In her second career, she served entirely in the Atlantic and Mediterranean. She was decommissioned for the final time in 1974 and was scrapped shortly thereafter. Springfield was laid down on 13 February 1943 by Bethlehem
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    2 votes
    166
    USS Tucson

    USS Tucson

    USS Tucson (CL-98) was a modified Atlanta-class light cruiser, sometimes referred to as "Oakland-class". She was laid down on 23 December 1942 in San Francisco, California by the Bethlehem Steel Corporation; launched on 3 September 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Emmett S. Claunch, Sr.; and commissioned on 3 February 1945, Captain Arthur D. Ayrault in command. She was named after Tucson, Arizona. Following outfitting at San Francisco and shakedown out of San Diego, Tucson sailed for the western Pacific on 8 May. She stopped at Pearl Harbor on 13 May for three weeks of additional training before resuming her voyage west on 2 June. She stopped overnight at Ulithi on 13 June and 14 June, then continued on to the Philippines, and reached Leyte on 16 June. The cruiser was assigned to the screen of the Task Force 38 (TF 38), specifically to that of Rear Admiral Gerald F. Bogan's Task Group 38.3 (TG 38.3) built around Essex, Ticonderoga, Randolph, Monterey, and Bataan. Tucson joined the fast carriers just in time to participate in their final rampage against the Japanese Empire and its inner defenses. On 1 July, she sortied from Leyte Gulf with TF 38 and headed north to the Japanese home islands.
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    2 votes
    167
    USS United States

    USS United States

    USS United States (CC-6) was planned to be one of six Lexington-class battlecruisers of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down 25 September 1920 by the Philadelphia Navy Yard; however, her construction was halted on 8 February 1922 when the vessel was only 12.1 percent complete. Under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty for the Limitation of Naval Armaments of 1922, the unfinished hulk of United States was sold on 25 October 1923 for scrap. This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.
    7.00
    2 votes
    168
    USS Vermont

    USS Vermont

    USS Vermont (BB-20), a Connecticut-class battleship, was the second ship of the United States Navy named for the 14th state. Vermont was laid down on 21 May 1904 at Quincy, Massachusetts, by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company. She was launched on 31 August 1905 sponsored by Miss Jennie Bell, the daughter of Governor Charles J. Bell of Vermont, and commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard on 4 March 1907, Captain William P. Potter in command. After her shakedown cruise off the eastern seaboard between Boston, Massachusetts and Hampton Roads, Virginia, Vermont participated in maneuvers with the 1st Division of the Atlantic Fleet and, later, with the 1st and Second Squadrons. Making a final trial trip between Hampton Roads and Provincetown, Massachusetts from 30 August – 5 September, Vermont arrived at the Boston Navy Yard on 7 September and underwent repairs until late November 1907. Departing Boston on 30 November, she coaled at Bradford, Rhode Island, received "mine outfits and stores" at Newport, Rhode Island, and picked up ammunition at Tompkinsville, New York, arriving at Hampton Roads on 8 December. There, she made final preparations for the globe-girdling cruise of the Atlantic
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    2 votes
    169
    USS Virginia

    USS Virginia

    • Ship Class: Virginia class battleship
    USS Virginia (BB-13) was a United States Navy battleship, the lead ship of her class of five. She was the fifth ship to carry her name. Virginia was laid down on 21 May 1902 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia; launched on 6 April 1904; sponsored by Miss Gay Montague, daughter of the Virginia Governor Andrew Jackson Montague; and commissioned on 7 May 1906, Captain Seaton Schroeder in command. Virginia was the only ship of her class to be fitted with inward-turning propellers, in an attempt to improve the steering by increasing the prop wash against the rudder. After fitting out, Virginia conducted her shakedown cruise in Lynnhaven Bay, Virginia, off Newport, Rhode Island, and off Long Island, New York before she put into Bradford, Rhode Island for coal on 9 August. After running trials for the standardization of her screws off Rockland, Maine, the battleship maneuvered in Long Island Sound before anchoring off President Theodore Roosevelt's home, Oyster Bay, Long Island from 2–4 September for a Presidential review. Virginia then continued her shakedown cruise before she coaled again at Bradford. Meanwhile, events were occurring in the Caribbean
    7.00
    2 votes
    170
    USS White Plains

    USS White Plains

    USS White Plains (CVE-66) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down on 11 February 1943 at Vancouver, Washington, by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company, Inc., under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1103) as Elbour Bay (ACV-66); renamed White Plains on 3 April 1943; redesignated CVE-66 on 15 July 1943; launched on 27 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Marc A. Mitscher; delivered to the Navy on 15 November 1943 at Astoria, Oregon; and commissioned that same day, Captain Oscar A. Weller in command. The USS White Plains completed her outfitting at Astoria, Oregon, on 4 December 1943, and then she began shakedown training on 8 December. At the conclusion of her initial cruise, the warship entered San Diego on 21 December. On 30 December, she returned to sea, bound for the Gilbert Islands. She arrived at Tarawa Atoll on 11 January 1944 and unloaded the aircraft she had transported. On 17 January, the ship headed back to Oahu, arriving in Pearl Harbor six days later. Following a four-day turnaround period, the White Plains again set course for the Central Pacific to provide aircraft logistics support for the Marshall Islands operation. By the
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    2 votes
    171
    Belem

    Belem

    • Ship builder: Dubigeon Shipyard
    • Place built: Nantes
    Belem is a three-masted barque from France. She was originally a cargo ship, transporting sugar from the West Indies, cocoa, and coffee from Brazil and French Guiana to Nantes, France. By chance she escaped the eruption of the Mount Pelée in Saint-Pierre de la Martinique on 8 May 1902. All Saint Pierre roads were full of vessels, no place to anchor the ship. Captain Julien Chauvelon angrily decided to anchor some miles further on in a beach - sheltered from the exploding volcano. She was sold in 1914 to Hugh Grosvenor, 2nd Duke of Westminster, who converted her to his private luxurious pleasure yacht, complete with two auxiliary Bolinder Diesel engines 300 HP each. In 1922 she became the property of the beer baron Sir Arthur Ernest Guinness, who renamed her the Fantôme II (French spelling) and revised the rig from a square rigger. Hon. A.E. Guinness was Rear Commodore of the Royal St. George Yacht Club, in Kingstown, Ireland from 1921-1939. He was Vice Commodore from 1940- 1948. Hon. A.E. Guinness took the Fântome II on a great cruise in 1923 with his daughters Aileen, Maureen, and Oonagh. They sailed the seven seas in making a travel round the world via the Panama and Suez Canals
    6.00
    3 votes
    172
    USS S-4

    USS S-4

    • Ship Class: United States S class submarine
    USS S-4 (SS-109) was an S-class submarine of the United States Navy. In 1927, she was sunk by being accidentally rammed by a Coast Guard destroyer with the loss of all hands but was raised and restored to service until stricken in 1936. Her keel was laid down on 4 December 1917 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard in Kittery, Maine. She was launched on 27 August 1919 sponsored by Mrs. Herbert S. Howard, and commissioned on 19 November 1919 with Lieutenant Commander Percy K. Robottom in command. Following acceptance trials, a visit to Havana, Cuba from 14-19 January 1920, and subsequent operations along the Gulf of Mexico and New England coasts, S-4 departed New London, Connecticut on 18 November to rendezvous off New Hampshire with her assigned unit — Submarine Divisions 12 (SubDiv 12) — and SubDiv 18. The two divisions were about to embark on a historic voyage which, at that time, was to be the longest cruise undertaken by American submarines. Assigned to Submarine Flotilla 3 of the Asiatic Fleet at Cavite in the Philippine Islands, they sailed via the Panama Canal and Pearl Harbor and arrived at Cavite on 1 December 1921. S-4 operated out of the Cavite Naval Station, with occasional
    6.00
    3 votes
    173
    HMAS Castlemaine

    HMAS Castlemaine

    • Ship Class: Bathurst class corvette
    HMAS Castlemaine (J244/M244/A248), named for the city of Castlemaine, Victoria, was one of 60 Bathurst class corvettes constructed during World War II, and one of 36 initially manned and commissioned solely by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Launched in 1941 and commissioned in 1942, Castlemaine operated during World War II in the waters of Australia, New Guinea, and Timor. She remained in service until 1945, when she was decommissioned into reserve and converted into an immobilised training ship. In 1973, Castlemaine was presented to the Maritime Trust of Australia for conversion of a museum ship. She is one of two surviving examples of the Bathurst class. Castlemaine was laid down by HMA Naval Dockyard in Williamstown, Victoria on 17 February 1941. She was launched on 7 August 1941 by Dame Pattie Menzies, wife of the then Prime Minister of Australia, Sir Robert Menzies. The corvette was commissioned into the RAN at Melbourne on 17 June 1942. After commissioning, Castlemaine sailed to Sydney, where she was involved in training exercises and convoy escort along the east coast of Australia. On the night of 11 August 1942, the corvette collided with a Manly ferry, requiring a week
    5.00
    4 votes
    174
    Kaskelot

    Kaskelot

    Kaskelot is the flagship of the Square Sail fleet and is based out of her homeport of Charlestown, Cornwall, UK (though registered to Bristol). She is a three-masted barque and one of the largest remaining wooden ships in commission. The Kaskelot was built in 1948 by J. Ring-Andersen for the Royal Greenland Trading Company and brought supplies to remote coastal settlements in East Greenland. During the 1960s, Kaskelot worked as a support vessel for fisheries in the Faroe Islands. Square Sail purchased her in 1981, then renovated her, redesigning and re-rigging her to replicate the Terra Nova. She has since been used in several TV series and films, and is also used for sail training programmes. Kaskelot has appeared in the following film and television productions:
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    4 votes
    175
    USS Mobile

    USS Mobile

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS Mobile (CL-63) was Cleveland-class light cruiser of the United States Navy. She was the third ship named for Mobile, Alabama. She was laid down on 14 April 1941 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia; launched on 15 May 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Harry T. Hartwell; and commissioned on 24 March 1943, Captain Charles J. Wheeler in command. Following a Chesapeake Bay shakedown and a brief training cruise to Casco Bay, Mobile departed for the Pacific, arriving Pearl Harbor on 23 July 1943 for a month of further training. On 22 August, she sailed west, joining Task Force 15 (TF 15) the following day for a raid on Marcus Island on 31 August. She participated in two more carrier raids from Hawaii before joining the 5th Fleet for the Gilberts campaign. She screened the ships of TF 15 as they struck at Tarawa Atoll on 18 September, and the ships of TF 14 hitting Wake on 5–6 October. On 21 October, she sailed west again in Task Group 53.3 (TG 53.3). By 8 November, she was off Bougainville Island covering reinforcement landings. Thence she steamed to Espiritu Santo, where she joined TG 53.7 for the assault and occupation of Tarawa. From the landings at Betio on
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    4 votes
    176
    HMS Ocelot

    HMS Ocelot

    • Ship Class: Oberon class submarine
    HMS Ocelot (S17) was an Oberon-class diesel-electric submarine laid down by HM Dockyard at Chatham in Kent on 17 November 1960, launched on 5 May 1962 and commissioned on 31 January 1964. She joined the 3rd Flotilla based at HMNB Clyde, in Faslane. HMS Ocelot was the last submarine built for the Royal Navy at Chatham Dockyard, although three more 'O' class submarines—Ojibwa, Onondaga and Okanagan—were built for the Royal Canadian Navy. HMS Ocelot was paid off in August 1991 as the conventional submarine fleet of the RN began to decline, making way for the nuclear fleet. She was sold in 1992 and preserved as a fully tourable museum in Chatham Historic Dockyard. Ocelot was 50 years old on the 5th May 2012 and the Historic Dockyard Chatham marked the occasion with celebrations! Media related to HMS Ocelot (S17) at Wikimedia Commons 50th birthday is on 5th May 2012
    5.67
    3 votes
    177
    USS Astoria

    USS Astoria

    The third USS Astoria (CL-90) was a Cleveland-class light cruiser of the United States Navy. The ship was laid down on 6 September 1941 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by the William Cramp and Sons Shipbuilding Co. as the USS Wilkes-Barre. It was subsequently renamed to Astoria in honor of the heavy cruiser of the same name which was sunk on 9 August 1942 during the Battle of Savo Island. Astoria was launched on 6 March 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Robert Lucas (wife of the editor of the Astorian-Budget), and commissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 17 May 1944, Captain George Carroll Dyer in command. Astoria conducted shakedown training in the vicinity of Bermuda between 6 June and 23 July 1944 and returned to Philadelphia on the latter day for post-shakedown overhaul. She departed Philadelphia on 19 September, bound for the Pacific. Steaming via the Panama Canal, Astoria arrived in San Diego on 3 October. Later in the month, she moved to the Mare Island Navy Yard and got underway for Hawaii on the 25th. She arrived at Oahu on the 31st and remained at Pearl Harbor until 16 November. On that day, she got underway for Ulithi Atoll in the Western Carolines. She made a stop at Eniwetok
    5.67
    3 votes
    178
    USS Kalinin Bay

    USS Kalinin Bay

    USS Kalinin Bay (CVE-68) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She originally designated an AVG, was classified ACV-68 on 20 August 1942; laid down under a Maritime Commission contract 26 April 1943 by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Co., Inc., Vancouver, Washington; reclassified CVE-68 on 15 July 1943; launched 15 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Anna Mary Updegraff; and commissioned 27 November at Astoria, Oregon, Captain C. R. Brown in command. The USS Kalinin Bay was named after a bay on the northern shore of Kruzof Island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska. After shakedown along the Pacific Coast, Kalinin Bay departed San Diego 3 January 1944 for replenishment duty in the Pacific. Laden with troops and a cargo of planes, she steamed via Pearl Harbor for the Gilbert Islands, arriving off Tarawa Atoll 24 January to supply 5th Fleet carriers then engaged in the conquest of the Marshalls. For more than 2 weeks she provided logistic support from Tarawa to Majuro Atoll before returning to Alameda, California, 24 February. With Composite Squadron 3 (VC-3) embarked 9 April, Kalinin Bay reached Majuro, Marshalls, 23 April; conducted ASW air patrols
    5.67
    3 votes
    179
    USS S-5

    USS S-5

    • Ship Class: United States S class submarine
    USS S-5 (SS-110) was a "Government-type" S-class submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down on 4 December 1917 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard of Kittery, Maine. She was launched on 10 November 1919 sponsored by Mrs. Glenn S. Burrell, and commissioned on 6 March 1920 with Lieutenant Commander Charles M. "Savvy" Cooke, Jr., in command. Following builder's trials, outfitting, and crew training, S-5 departed Boston Navy Yard on 30 August 1920 to undergo full-power trials 55 mi (89 km) off the Delaware Capes. At 13:00 on 1 September, she commenced a dive for a submerged test run. Water unexpectedly entered the submarine through the main air induction system, pouring into the control room, engine room, torpedo room, and the motor room. Normal procedure was to leave the main air induction valve open until the engines had a chance to come to a full stop, this operation being so timed as to occur just prior to complete submergence. In the case of S-5, however,the Chief of the Boat, Gunner's Mate Percy Fox, the man responsible for operating this valve, was momentarily distracted. Noticing the mistake, he grabbed the valve lever and jerked hard, causing the valve to jam
    5.67
    3 votes
    180
    Grand Turk

    Grand Turk

    • Place built: Marmaris
    The Grand Turk was a three-masted sixth-rate frigate, designed to represent a generic Nelson-age warship, with her design greatly inspired by HMS Blandford (1741). The ship was built in Marmaris, Turkey, in 1996 to provide a replica of a frigate for the production of the ITV series adapted from the novels about Royal Navy officer Horatio Hornblower by C. S. Forester. Nowadays the tall ship is used mainly in sailing events, for corporate or private charter, and for receptions in her spacious saloon or on her deck. Since 2010 the ship has been based at Saint-Malo, Brittany, and has been renamed Étoile du Roy ("King's Star"). The frigate was designed by Michael Turk of Turks Shipyard Ltd. of Chatham, which was established in 1710. She was constructed of iroko planking over laminated mahogany frames. She has an overall length of 152 ft (46 m), and is 97 ft (30 m) at the waterline, with a beam of 34 ft (10 m) and a draught of 10 ft (3.0 m). The frigate is square-rigged on three masts with a sail area of 8,500 sq ft (790 m), and has two 400 hp (298 kW) Kelvin TAS8 diesel engines, and a 60 hp (45 kW) bow thruster, as well as four AC generators for electrical power. The ship was originally
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    HMAS Ararat

    HMAS Ararat

    • Ship Class: Bathurst class corvette
    HMAS Ararat (K34/M34), named for the city of Ararat, Victoria, was one of 60 Bathurst class corvettes constructed during World War II, and one of 36 initially manned and commissioned solely by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Ararat is the only ship of the Bathurst class to carry a pennant number with the flag superior 'K': to honour Flower class corvette lead ship HMS Gladiolus, which was sunk in October 1941. Ararat was laid down by Evans Deakin & Co in Brisbane on 6 July 1942. She was launched on 20 February 1943 by the wife of Arthur Fadden, then leader of the Australian Country Party and the Federal Opposition, and commissioned on 16 June 1943. Ararat entered active service in August 1943 escorting convoys firstly along the east coast of Australia, and later between Queensland and New Guinea. She continued in this role until March 1944, when she was transferred to Langemak, New Guinea for two months, performing escort and patrol duties in the waters of New Guinea and New Britain. During this time, she was the first ship of her class to visit several recently-recaptured areas in New Britain. The corvette was under refit in Melbourne from May until July 1944, and on completion
    6.50
    2 votes
    182
    K-141 Kursk

    K-141 Kursk

    • Ship Class: Oscar class submarine
    K-141 Kursk was an Oscar-II class nuclear-powered cruise missile submarine of the Russian Navy, lost with all hands when it sank in the Barents Sea on 12 August 2000. Kursk, full name Атомная подводная лодка «Курск», which, translated, means the nuclear powered submarine "Kursk" [АПЛ "Курск"] in Russian, was a Project 949A Антей (Antey, Antaeus, also known by its NATO reporting name of Oscar II). It was named after the Russian city Kursk, around which the largest tank battle in military history, the Battle of Kursk, took place in 1943. One of the first vessels completed after the end of the Soviet Union, it was commissioned into the Russian Navy's Northern Fleet. Work on building Kursk began in 1990 at Severodvinsk, near Arkhangelsk. Launched in 1994, it was commissioned in December of that year. It was the penultimate Oscar II class submarine designed and approved in the Soviet era. At 154 m (505 ft 3 in) long and four stories high, she was the largest attack submarine ever built. The outer hull, made of high-nickel, high-chrome content stainless steel 8.5 millimetres (0.33 in) thick, had exceptionally good resistance to corrosion and a weak magnetic signature which helped prevent
    6.50
    2 votes
    183
    USS Oakland

    USS Oakland

    USS Oakland (CL-95), was a modified Atlanta-class light cruiser, the first of a group of four sometimes referred to as the "Oakland class". She was laid down by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco, California on 15 July 1941; launched on 23 October 1942; sponsored by Dr. Aurelia H. Reinhardt; and commissioned on 17 July 1943, Captain William K. Phillips in command. She was named for the city of Oakland, California. Like the Atlanta class, the Oakland class was designed as an anti-aircraft cruiser, with a main battery of dual-purpose guns. The Oakland class omitted the wing 5 in (127 mm)/38 cal gun turrets of the Atlanta class. Oakland sustained three casualties during World War II. Following a shakedown and training cruise off San Diego in the summer of 1943, Oakland sailed for Pearl Harbor arriving on 3 November. Joining with three heavy cruisers and two destroyers, she linked up with Task Group 50.3 (TG 50.3) near Funafuti in the Ellice Islands, for support of Operation Galvanic, the amphibious push into the Gilbert Islands. The carriers launched initial air strikes on 19 November, and in retaliation, a wave of Japanese torpedo bombers attacked the formation on the afternoon of
    6.50
    2 votes
    184
    USS Pasadena

    USS Pasadena

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    • Ship Class: Cleveland class cruiser
    USS Pasadena (CL–65), a Cleveland-class light cruiser of the United States Navy, the second vessel to carry the name. Pasadena was laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass. on 6 February 1943 and launched on 28 December 1943. She was sponsored by Mrs. C.G. Wopschall, and commissioned on 8 June 1944, Captain Richard B. Tuggle in command. Commissioned just before the thrust into the Mariana Islands, Pasadena completed shakedown and training during the summer of 1944, and on 25 September got underway for the Pacific theater. On 3 November she crossed the International Date Line and, continuing on, joined TF 38, the fast carrier force, at Ulithi at mid-month. Through the remainder of the year she participated in that force’s operations against Luzon and Formosa in support of the Philippine campaign. In mid-January 1945, as the assault on Luzon pressed forward, the force sailed into the South China Sea and hit Japanese installations and shipping along the Indo-China coast and on Formosa. In February, the ships, now TF 58, moved against the Japanese home islands, then swung southeast to cover the landings on Iwo Jima, during which Pasadena added her guns to the bombardment
    6.50
    2 votes
    185
    HMAS Advance

    HMAS Advance

    • Ship Class: Attack class patrol boat
    HMAS Advance (P 83) was an Attack class patrol boat of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Constructed during 1967 and commissioned into the RAN in 1968, Advance operated from Darwin and patrolled northern Australian waters. During her career, the patrol boat shadowed a Soviet trawler, survived Cyclone Tracy, was used for filming of the television series Patrol Boat, and participated in the RAN's first anti-terrorism patrol of the North West Shelf. Advance was replaced in 1980, but continued to operate as a training ship until she was decommissioned in 1988. Advance was donated to the Australian National Maritime Museum, which have maintained her in an operational condition. The vessel remains part of the museum's collection as of 2011. The Attack class was ordered in 1964 to operate in Australian waters as patrol boats (based on lessons learned through using the Ton class minesweepers on patrols of Borneo during the Indonesia-Malaysia Confrontation, and to replace a variety of old patrol, search-and-rescue, and general-purpose craft. Initially, nine were ordered for the RAN, with another five for Papua New Guinea's Australian-run coastal security force, although another six ships
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    HMS Illustrious

    HMS Illustrious

    • Ship builder: Swan Hunter
    • Ship Class: Invincible class aircraft carrier
    HMS Illustrious is the second of three Invincible-class light aircraft carriers built for the Royal Navy in the late 1970s and early 1980s. She is the fifth warship and second aircraft carrier to bear the name Illustrious, and is affectionately known as "Lusty" to her crew. The vessel just missed the Falklands Conflict, but was deployed to Iraq and Bosnia in the 1990s and to Sierra Leone in 2000. An extensive re-fit in 2002 meant that she missed the Iraq War, but she was finished in time to assist British citizens trapped by the 2006 Lebanon War. Following the retirement of her fixed-wing Harrier II aircraft in 2010, Illustrious now operates as one of two Royal Navy helicopter carriers. She is the oldest ship in the active fleet and it is envisaged that she will be withdrawn from service in 2014 (after 32 years service) and will not be replaced until HMS Queen Elizabeth is commissioned in 2016. The UK Ministry of Defence announced on 10 September 2012 that once she is decommissioned, Illustrious will be preserved for the nation. Illustrious, the second of the planned three Invincible class aircraft carriers, was laid down at Swan Hunter on the River Tyne in 1976 and launched in
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    USS Grayback

    USS Grayback

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    USS Grayback (SS-208), a Tambor-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the lake herring. Her keel was laid down by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 31 January 1941 sponsored by Mrs. Wilson Brown, wife of Rear Admiral Wilson Brown, Superintendent of the United States Naval Academy, and commissioned on 30 June 1941 with Lieutenant Willard A. Saunders in command. Attached to the Atlantic Fleet Grayback conducted her shakedown cruise in Long Island Sound out of Newport, New London, and New York City. In company with Grampus (SS-207) she departed New London, Connecticut, on 8 September for patrol duty in the Caribbean Sea and Chesapeake Bay; then arrived Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on 30 November for overhaul. With the United States's entry into the war, Grayback sailed for Pearl Harbor on 8 February. Grayback’s first war patrol from 15 February to 10 April took her along the coast of Saipan and Guam. There she had a four-day encounter with an enemy submarine; the enemy I-boat fired two torpedoes at Grayback on the morning of 22 February, then continued to trail her across the Pacific. Grayback spotted the enemy
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    USS Idaho

    USS Idaho

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    • Ship Class: New Mexico class battleship
    USS Idaho (BB-42), a New Mexico-class battleship, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the 43rd state. Her keel was laid down by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation of Camden, New Jersey. She was launched on 30 June 1917 sponsored by Miss Henrietta Amelia Simons, granddaughter of Idaho Governor Moses Alexander; and commissioned on 24 March 1919, Captain Carl Theodore Vogelgesang in command. Idaho sailed on 13 April 1919 for shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, and after returning to New York City received President of Brazil Epitácio Pessoa for the voyage to Rio de Janeiro. Departing on 6 July with her escort, the battleship arrived Rio on 17 July. From there she set course for the Panama Canal, arriving Monterey, California, in September to join the Pacific Fleet. She joined other dreadnoughts in training exercises and reviews, including a Fleet Review by President of the United States Woodrow Wilson on 13 September. In 1920, the battleship carried Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and the Secretary of the Interior (either Franklin K. Lane or John B. Payne) on an inspection tour of Alaska. Upon her return from Alaska on 22 July 1920, Idaho took
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    USS Paul Jones

    USS Paul Jones

    • Ship Class: Clemson class destroyer
    USS Paul Jones (DD-230/AG–120) was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the third ship named for John Paul Jones. Paul Jones was laid down 23 December 1919 and launched 30 September 1920 from William Cramp & Sons; sponsored by Miss Ethel Bagley; and commissioned 19 April 1921. After shakedown, Paul Jones joined the Atlantic Fleet for maneuvers, training, and coastal operations until transferred to the Pacific in 1923. She crossed the Pacific and joined the Asiatic Fleet in protecting American interest in the troubled Far East. Paul Jones participated in the Yangtze River Patrol and was assigned other patrol duties along the China coast, while making occasional voyages to and from Manila. As flagship of Destroyer Squadron 29, Asiatic Fleet, she received the news of the attack on Pearl Harbor 8 December 1941, at Tarakan, Borneo, and immediately prepared for action. She got underway with Marblehead, Stewart, Barker, and Parrott for Makassar Strait and for the remainder of December acted as picket boat in the vicinity of Lombok Strait and Soerabaja Harbor, Java. Her first war orders were to contact Dutch] Naval Units for instructions
    7.00
    1 votes
    190
    USS Shreveport

    USS Shreveport

    The first USS Shreveport (PG-131/PF-23) was a Tacoma-class frigate of the United States Navy. She was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1434) on 8 March 1943 by Walter Butler Shipbuilders, Inc., in Superior, Wisconsin; reclassified PF-23 on 15 April 1943; launched on 15 July 1943, sponsored by Miss Nell Querbes; and commissioned on 24 April 1944 at Algiers, Louisiana, with Commander H. A. Morrison, USCG, in command. Following shakedown off Bermuda, Shreveport arrived at Boston, Massachusetts, on 9 November 1944. Conversion to a weather ship followed (the after 3-inch gun was removed and a weather balloon hangar was added); and on 2 March 1945, she departed Boston and headed north to assume weather reporting and aircraft lifeguard duties in the North Atlantic. Operating on stations between Newfoundland and Iceland, she completed her North Atlantic service in the fall and moved south, to Recife, Brazil, whence she conducted similar patrols from December 1945 until March 1946. She sailed for the United States on 8 March; was transferred to the operational control of the Coast Guard while en route; arrived at Boston on the 23rd; then, steamed to Charleston, South
    7.00
    1 votes
    191
    USS Vella Gulf

    USS Vella Gulf

    • Ship builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
    USS Vella Gulf (CVE-111) (ex-Totem Bay) was a Commencement Bay-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down as Totem Bay on 7 February 1944 at Tacoma, Washington by the Todd-Pacific Shipyards. She was renamed Vella Gulf on 26 April 1944 and launched on 19 October 1944, sponsored by Mrs. Donald F. Smith. On 9 April 1945, she was commissioned with Captain Robert W. Morse in command. Following initial local operations in Puget Sound, Vella Gulf sailed for San Diego and arrived there on 4 May to pick up the initial increment of her assigned Marine air group. After embarking them at the naval air station, the escort aircraft carrier conducted shakedown off the southern California coast and embarked the remainder of her group during this period. At the completion of a post-shakedown availability, she departed the west coast on 17 June, bound for Hawaii. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on 25 June and conducted 11 days of intensive training operations. Vella Gulf departed Pearl Harbor on 9 July, stopped at Eniwetok in the Marshalls on the 16th to refuel, and proceeded on to Guam, where she arrived four days later. On the 23rd, she sailed for the Marianas to conduct air
    7.00
    1 votes
    192
    USS Vincennes

    USS Vincennes

    USS Vincennes (CA-44) was a United States Navy New Orleans-class heavy cruiser sunk at the Battle of Savo Island in 1942. She was the second ship to bear the name. She was laid down on 2 January 1934 at Quincy, Massachusetts, by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company's Fore River plant, launched on 21 May 1936, sponsored by Miss Harriet Virginia Kimmell (daughter of Joseph Kimmell, mayor of Vincennes, Indiana), and commissioned on 24 February 1937, Captain Burton H. Green in command. The new cruiser departed from Boston on 19 April 1937 for her shakedown cruise which took her to Stockholm, Sweden; Helsinki, Finland; Le Havre, France; and Portsmouth, England. Early in January 1938, Vincennes was assigned to Cruiser Division 7 (CruDiv 7), Scouting Force, and steamed through the Panama Canal to San Diego, California. In March, the ship participated in Fleet Problem XIX in the Hawaiian area before returning to San Pedro, California for operations off the west coast for the remainder of the year. Following an overhaul at the Mare Island Navy Yard which lasted through April 1939, the cruiser returned east, transited the Panama Canal on 6 June, in company with Quincy, Tuscaloosa, and San
    7.00
    1 votes
    193
    HMAS Bayonet

    HMAS Bayonet

    • Ship Class: Attack class patrol boat
    HMAS Bayonet (P 101) was an Attack class patrol boat of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The Attack class was ordered in 1964 to operate in Australian waters as patrol boats (based on lessons learned through using the Ton class minesweepers on patrols of Borneo during the Indonesia-Malaysia Confrontation, and to replace a variety of old patrol, search-and-rescue, and general-purpose craft. Initially, nine were ordered for the RAN, with another five for Papua New Guinea's Australian-run coastal security force, although another six ships were ordered to bring the class to twenty vessels. The patrol boats had a displacement of 100 tons at standard load and 146 tons at full load, were 107.6 feet (32.8 m) in length overall, had a beam of 20 feet (6.1 m), and draughts of 6.4 feet (2.0 m) at standard load, and 7.3 feet (2.2 m) at full load. Propulsion machinery consisted of two 16-cylinder Paxman YJCM diesel engines, which supplied 3,460 shaft horsepower (2,580 kW) to the two propellers. The vessels could achieve a top speed of 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph), and had a range of 1,200 nautical miles (2,200 km; 1,400 mi) at 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph). The ship's company consisted of three
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    USS F-1

    USS F-1

    • Ship builder: Union Iron Works
    • Ship Class: F class submarine
    USS F-1 (SS-20) was an F-class submarine. She was named Carp when her keel was laid down by Union Iron Works of San Francisco, California, making her the first ship of the United States Navy named for the carp. She was launched on 6 September 1911 sponsored by Ms. J. Tynan, renamed F-1 on 17 November 1911, and commissioned on 19 June 1912, Lieutenant, junior grade J.B. Howell in command. Assigned to the First Submarine Group, Pacific Torpedo Flotilla, F-1 operated in the San Francisco, California area on trials and tests through 11 January 1913, when she joined the Flotilla for training at sea between San Diego, California and San Pedro, California, then in San Diego Harbor. In late 1912, the boat — which then held the world's record for deep diving to a depth of 283 ft (86 m) — slipped her mooring at Port Watsonville in Monterey Bay, California, and grounded on a nearby beach. While most of the crew of 17 safely evacuated, two men died in the incident. From 21 July 1914-14 November 1915, the Flotilla based at Honolulu, Hawaii for development operations in the Hawaiian Islands. F-1 was in ordinary from 15 March 1916-13 June 1917. When she returned to full commission, she served
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    USS Lagarto

    USS Lagarto

    USS Lagarto (SS-371), a Balao-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the lagarto, a lizard fish. Her keel was laid down on 12 January 1944 by the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Company of Manitowoc, Wisconsin. She was launched on 28 May 1944 sponsored by Emily Taft Douglas, Congresswoman from Illinois, and later United States Senator from Illinois, and commissioned on 14 October 1944 with Commander Frank D. Latta in command. Latta was a veteran of nine war patrols and holder of the Navy Cross, earned while commanding officer of Narwhal (SS-167). Floated high and dry in a floating drydock down the Mississippi River, among the islands and channels of which her captain had first “felt the call of the sea” as “a mere youth,” Lagarto departed New Orleans, Louisiana, on 12 November 1944, for Panama, escorted by the submarine chaser SC-512. Releasing her escort on 15 November, Lagarto reported to Commander, Panama Sea Frontier, to begin her shakedown two days later. Captain John G. Johns supervised the boat’s training during the period between 20 November and 5 December 1944. Sadly, during that period, on 3 December, Chief Machinist’s Mate Pat Cole died of
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    USS O-5

    USS O-5

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    USS O-5 (SS-66) was an O-class submarine. Her keel was laid down on 8 December 1916 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company of Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 11 November 1917, and commissioned on 8 June 1918 with Lieutenant George A. Trever in command. She sank by collision, with three lives lost, in the Panama Canal Zone 28 October 1923. During the final months of World War I, O-5 operated along the Atlantic coast and patrolled from Cape Cod to Key West, Florida. She departed Newport, Rhode Island on 3 November with a 20-submarine contingent bound for European waters; however, hostilities had ceased before the vessels reached the Azores. After the Armistice with Germany, O-5 operated out of the Submarine School at New London, Connecticut until 1923. O-5 then sailed to Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone, for a brief tour. On 28 October, as O-5 entered Limon Bay, preparatory to transiting the Panama Canal, she was rammed by the United Fruit Company steamer Abangarez and sank in less than a minute. Three men died; 16 others escaped Two crewmembers, Henry Breault and Lawrence Brown, were trapped in the forward torpedo room, which they sealed against the flooding of the submarine.
    6.00
    2 votes
    197
    USS S-27

    USS S-27

    • Ship Class: United States S class submarine
    USS S-27 (SS-132) was a S-class submarine of the United States Navy. Her construction was authorized in March 1917, and her keel was laid down on 11 April 1919 by the Fore River Plant, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 18 October 1922 sponsored by Mrs. Frank Baldwin, and commissioned at Groton, Connecticut, on 22 January 1924, Lieutenant Theodore Waldschmidt in command. Based at New London, Connecticut through 1924, S-27 was transferred to the Pacific in 1925, and, after exercises in the Hawaiian Islands during the spring of that year, she arrived at her new homeport, San Diego, California in June. She remained based in southern California through the decade and, except for fleet maneuvers, operated primarily off that coast. Fleet maneuvers, exercises, and problems took her to the west coast of Central America; to the Panama Canal Zone; into the Caribbean Sea and to Hawaii. In 1931, she was transferred to Hawaii; and on 23 February, she arrived at Pearl Harbor, whence she operated until mid-1939. On 16 June 1939, she sailed east; and on 27 June, she arrived at San Diego and resumed operations off the southern California coast. For the
    6.00
    2 votes
    198
    HMAS Success

    HMAS Success

    • Ship Class: Durance class tanker
    HMAS Success (OR 304) is a Durance class multi-product replenishment oiler serving in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Built at Cockatoo Island Dockyard in Sydney, Australia, during the 1980s, she is the only ship of the class to be constructed outside of France, and the only one to originally not serve in the Marine Nationale (French Navy). The ship was part of the Australian contribution to the 1991 Gulf War, and was deployed to East Timor in response to incidents in 1999 and 2006. The ship was fitted with a double hull during the first half of 2011, to meet International Maritime Organisation standards. Seeing a need to replace the ageing oiler HMAS Supply, the RAN placed an order in 1971 for a combat support ship-a replenishment vessel capable of supplying ammunition and stores in addition to fuel-to be named HMAS Protector. However, concerns about the cost of construction prompted the order's cancellation in 1974. Instead, the Directions Techniques Des Constructions Naval was approached about constructing a Durance class replenishment oiler for the RAN, and a design contract was awarded to the Government of France in 1977. The $68.4 million (in 1978 prices) construction
    5.00
    3 votes
    199
    USS Vancouver

    USS Vancouver

    • Ship builder: Brooklyn Navy Yard
    • Ship Class: Raleigh class amphibious transport dock
    USS Vancouver (LPD-2) was a Raleigh-class amphibious transport dock, named after the city of Vancouver, Washington which was in turn named after the explorer George Vancouver. Her keel was laid down on 19 November 1960 at Brooklyn, New York by the New York Naval Shipyard. She was launched on 15 September 1962 sponsored by Mrs. Stuart Symington, and commissioned on 11 May 1963 with Captain Thomas C. Harbert, Jr., in command. After completing builder's trials at New York City and shakedown training out of Norfolk, Virginia, the amphibious transport dock ship departed the latter port on 14 August and laid a course for the west coast. She transited the Panama Canal on 20 August and after making a side trip to Acapulco, Mexico, to assist a disabled fishing vessel arrived in San Diego, California, her permanent home port, on 31 August. Late in September and early in October, Vancouver made the traditional visit to her namesake city, Vancouver, Washington, and then returned to San Diego for seven weeks of training. Underway training occupied the first four weeks while amphibious training took up the last three. In mid-December, she welcomed on board the newly appointed Secretary of the
    5.00
    3 votes
    200
    Irving Johnson

    Irving Johnson

    The twin brigantines Irving Johnson and Exy Johnson are the flagships of the Los Angeles Maritime Institute's (LAMI) TopSail Youth Program, a non-profit organization created as a character building organization to help at risk youth prepare for life through the discipline and teamwork required to safely handle a tall ship. They join LAMI's topsail schooners the Swift of Ipswich and the Bill of Rights in introducing youths to the subtle but profound influence presented by the sea. Named for sail training pioneers Irving and Electa "Exy" Johnson, the brigantines take on a proud history initiated by their namesakes. Seven time veteran circumnavigators of the world on board two different boats both named Yankee, each trip with a new crew of boys and girls armed only with a sense of adventure and curiosity. For 25 years beginning in the late 1930s, Irving and Exy did what was thought impossible, and lived a life now legendary. As the Yankee was home to the Johnsons and their family of fellow shipmates, TopSail was envisioned after that model to become a second home to the many youths who come on board where they can safely dream and discover, learn and grow as they pass through
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    USS Corregidor

    USS Corregidor

    USS Corregidor (CVE-58) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down as Auguilla Bay (AVG-58), was reclassified ACV-58 on 20 August 1942 and launched as Corregidor on 12 May 1943 by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company, of Vancouver, Washington, under a Maritime Commission contract; sponsored by Mrs. J. Hallett. She was reclassified CVE-58 on 15 July 1943, acquired by the Navy on 31 August 1943; and commissioned the same day, Captain R. L. Bowman in command. Clearing San Diego, California on 26 October 1943, Corregidor joined Carrier Division 24 (CarDiv 24) at Pearl Harbor for air strikes in the Gilbert Islands invasion from 10 November-6 December. She returned to San Diego to undergo repairs and load aircraft and men, then resumed operations out of Pearl Harbor with her division. From 22 January-3 March 1944, she sailed in the Marshall Islands operation, providing air cover for the invasion of Kwajalein. Corregidor put to sea on 11 March 1944 for Guadalcanal, arriving there on 21 March. With the 3rd Fleet, she sortied on 30 March to provide air cover for the landings on Emirau Island, returning to Port Purvis on 14 April. Two days later, she
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    USS F-2

    USS F-2

    • Ship builder: Union Iron Works
    • Ship Class: F class submarine
    USS F-2 (SS-21), an F-class submarine, was named Barracuda when her keel was laid down by Union Iron Works of San Francisco, California, but was renamed on 17 November 1911. She was launched on 19 March 1912 sponsored by Miss A. R. Rolph, daughter of James Rolph, the mayor of San Francisco, and commissioned on 25 June 1912 with Lieutenant (junior grade) F. L. Chew in command. F-2 joined the 1st Submarine Group, Pacific Torpedo Flotilla, in operations between San Diego, California, and San Pedro, California, the Flotilla's base. She continued to play an important part in developing tactics and coordinating the use of undersea craft with the fleet during an extended training period in the Hawaiian Islands from August 1914-November 1915. After lying in ordinary at Mare Island Naval Shipyard from 16 March 1916-13 June 1917, F-2 became flagship of Division 1, Submarine Force, Pacific Fleet. Returning to operations out of San Pedro, she participated in surface and submerged exercises, torpedo-proving practice, experiments in balancing at various depths, and trained prospective crews of new submarines. On 18 September 1919, she was placed in reserve commission at San Pedro to be used in
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    USS Liberty

    USS Liberty

    USS Liberty (AGTR-5) was a Belmont-class technical research ship that was attacked by Israel Defense Forces (IDF) during the 1967 Six-Day War. A Victory Ship, her keel was laid down on 23 February 1945, as Simmons Victory, a Maritime Commission-type (VC2-S-AP3) hull, under a Maritime Commission contract at Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation of Portland, Oregon. She was delivered to the Maritime Commission on 4 May 1945, and chartered to the Pacific Far East Line of San Francisco. She operated in commercial trade until 1958, Simmons Victory was returned to the Maritime Administration for layup in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at Olympia, Washington. In February 1963, the Navy acquired Simmons Victory and converted her to a "Miscellaneous Auxiliary" ship at Willamette Iron and Steel of Portland. On 8 June she was renamed the Liberty and given hull classification symbol AG-168. On 1 April 1964, she was reclassified a Technical Research Ship (AGTR-5). She was commissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington, in December. In February 1965, Liberty steamed from the west coast to Norfolk, Virginia, where she was further outfitted (cost: US$20 million) to suit her for
    5.50
    2 votes
    204
    USS New York

    USS New York

    USS New York (BB-34) was a United States Navy battleship, the lead ship of her class of two (Texas being the other). She was the fifth ship to carry her name. New York was laid down on 11 September 1911 by Brooklyn Navy Yard of New York City. She was launched on 30 October 1912 sponsored by Elsie Calder, and commissioned on 15 April 1914, Captain Thomas S. Rodgers in command. New York saw action in both World Wars, providing gunfire support for amphibious landings at Casablanca in the European Theater, and Iwo Jima and Okinawa in the Pacific Theater. She was decommissioned in 1946 and sunk as a target after surviving two atomic bombs tests in 1946. Ordered south soon after commissioning, New York was flagship for Rear Admiral Frank Friday Fletcher, commanding the fleet occupying and blockading Veracruz until resolution of the crisis with Mexico in July 1914. New York then headed north for fleet operations along the Atlantic coast as war broke out in Europe. Upon the entry of the United States into World War I, under the command of Captain Edward L. Beach, Sr., New York sailed as flagship with Battleship Division 9 (BatDiv 9), commanded by Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman to strengthen the
    5.50
    2 votes
    205
    Cuauhtémoc

    Cuauhtémoc

    • Ship Class: Barque
    ARM Cuauhtémoc is a sail training vessel of the Mexican Navy, named for the last Aztec Emperor Cuauhtémoc who was captured and executed in 1525. She is the last of four sister ships built by the Naval Shipyards of Bilbao, Spain, in 1982, all built to a design similar to the 1930 designs of the German firm Blohm & Voss, like Gorch Fock, USCGC Eagle and the NRP Sagres. Like her sister ships, the Colombia's Gloria, Ecuador's Guayas and Venezuela's Simón Bolívar, Cuauhtémoc is a sailing ambassador for her home country and a frequent visitor to world ports, having sailed over 400,000 nautical miles (700,000 km) in her 23 years of service, with appearances at the Cutty Sark Tall Ships' Races, ASTA Tall Ships Challenges, Sail Osaka, and others.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    HMAS Brunei

    HMAS Brunei

    • Ship Class: Balikpapan class LCH
    HMAS Brunei (L 127) is a Balikpapan class heavy landing craft operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The eight-vessel Balikpapan class was ordered as a locally-manufactured replacement for the Australian Army's LSM-1 class landing ship medium and ALC 50 landing craft. They are 44.5 metres (146 ft) long, with a beam of 10.1 metres (33 ft), and a draught of 1.9 metres (6 ft 3 in). The landing craft have a standard displacement of 316 tons, with a full load displacement of 503 tons. They are propelled by two G.M. Detroit 6-71 diesel motors, providing 675 brake horsepower to the two propeller shafts, allowing the vessels to reach 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph). The standard ship's company is 13-strong. The Balikpapans are equipped with a Decca RM 916 navigational radar, and fitted with two 7.62 millimetres (0.300 in) machine guns for self-defence. The LCHs have a maximum payload of 180 tons; equivalent to 3 Leopard 1 tanks, 13 M113 armored personnel carriers 23 quarter-tonne trucks, or four LARC-V amphibious cargo vehicles. As a troop transport, a Balikpapan class vessel can transport up to 400 soldiers between a larger amphibious ship and the shore, or embark 60 soldiers in six-berth
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    USS Cabot

    USS Cabot

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    USS Cabot (CVL-28/AVT-3) was an Independence-class aircraft carrier in the United States Navy, the second ship to carry the name. Cabot was commissioned in 1943 and served until 1947. She was recommissioned as a training carrier from 1948 to 1955. From 1967 to 1989, she served in Spain as Dédalo. After futile attempts to preserve her, she was scrapped in 2002. USS Cabot was laid down as Wilmington (CL-79), redesignated CV-28 on 2 June 1942, renamed Cabot on 23 June 1942 and converted while building. She was launched on 4 April 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Company, Camden, New Jersey; sponsored by Mrs. A. C. Read. She was reclassified CVL-28 on 15 July 1943 and commissioned on 24 July 1943, with Captain Malcolm Francis Schoeffel in command. Cabot sailed from Naval Air Station Quonset Point, Rhode Island with Air Group 31 aboard, on 8 November 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she arrived on 2 December. Clearing for Majuro on 15 January 1944, she joined TF 58 to begin the consistently high quality of war service which was to win her a Presidential Unit Citation. From 4 February to 4 March 1944, she launched her planes in strikes on Roi, Namur, and the island stronghold of Truk, aiding in
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    USS Constitution

    USS Constitution

    • Ship Class: Lexington class battlecruiser
    The keel of a Lexington-class battlecruiser, to have been named USS Constitution (CC-5), was laid down at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in September 1920. Her construction was suspended in February 1922 by the Washington Naval Treaty and she was formally canceled in August 1923, with her hull being scrapped on the building ways. Constitution was some 13.4 percent complete at the time of her cancellation. During this period the original Constitution was renamed Old Constitution to free the name for the new battle cruiser.
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    USS Leyte

    USS Leyte

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS Leyte (CV/CVA/CVS-32, AVT-10) was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during and shortly after World War II for the United States Navy. The ship was the third US Navy ship to bear the name. Leyte was commissioned in April 1946, too late to serve in World War II. She spent most of her career in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Mediterranean, but also saw service in the Korean War, in which she earned two battle stars. She was reclassified in the early 1950s as an attack carrier (CVA), then as an Antisubmarine Aircraft Carrier (CVS), and finally (after inactivation) as an aircraft transport (AVT). Unlike most of her sister ships, Leyte received no major modernizations, and thus throughout her career retained the classic appearance of a World War II Essex-class ship. She was decommissioned in 1959 and sold for scrap in 1970. Leyte was one of the "long-hull" Essex-class ships. She was laid down as Crown Point on 21 February 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia, and renamed Leyte on 8 May 1945 to commemorate the recent Battle of Leyte Gulf. She was launched on 23 August, sponsored by Mrs. James M. Mead, and commissioned on 11 April 1946,
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    USS Puget Sound

    USS Puget Sound

    • Ship builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
    USS Puget Sound (CVE–113) was a Commencement Bay-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down on 12 May 1944 at Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Washington; launched on 20 November 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Bert A. Teats of Sheridan, Oreg.; and commissioned on 18 June 1945 at Tacoma, Captain Charles F. Coe in command. After trials and fitting out in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Puget Sound steamed south on 6 July 1945 for shakedown out of San Diego, Calif., where she embarked Marine Air Group 6. She departed San Diego on 8 September for brief training in the Hawaiian Islands before proceeding to support the occupation of Japan. Puget Sound entered Tokyo Bay on 14 October 1945. Her aircraft joined in the show of strength and conducted antimine patrols in support of the landings of the 10th Army at Matsuyama and Nagoya. Thence tactical training took her to the Philippines, Hong Kong, and the Marianas. Loading surplus aircraft in Apra Harbor, Guam, she put to sea on 6 January 1946 en route to Pearl Harbor, where she offloaded the surplus aircraft. At San Diego on 23 January, Marine Air Group 6 was detached and Puget Sound prepared to serve as a "Magic
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    USS Quincy

    USS Quincy

    USS Quincy (CA-39) was a United States Navy New Orleans-class heavy cruiser sunk at the Battle of Savo Island in 1942. Quincy, the second ship to carry the name, was laid down by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts on 15 November 1933, launched on 19 June 1935, sponsored by Mrs. Henry S. Morgan, and commissioned at Boston on 9 June 1936, Captain William Faulkner Amsden in command. Soon after being assigned to Cruiser Division 8 (CruDiv8), Atlantic Fleet, Quincy was ordered to Mediterranean waters on 20 July 1936, to protect American interests in Spain during the height of the Spanish Civil War. Quincy passed through the Straits of Gibraltar on 26 July and arrived at Málaga, Spain on 27 July to assume her duties. While in Spanish waters, she operated with an international rescue fleet that included Deutschland, Admiral Graf Spee, and Admiral Scheer. Quincy evacuated 490 refugees to Marseille and Villefranche, France, before being relieved by Raleigh on 27 September. Quincy returned to the Boston Navy Yard on 5 October for refit preparatory to final acceptance trials which were held from 15–18 March 1937. She got underway for the Pacific on 12 April to join
    6.00
    1 votes
    212
    USS Stark

    USS Stark

    • Ship builder: Todd Pacific Shipyards
    • Ship Class: Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate
    USS Stark (FFG-31), 23rd ship of the Oliver Hazard Perry class of guided-missile frigates, was named for Admiral Harold Rainsford Stark (1880–1972). Ordered from Todd Pacific Shipyards, Seattle, Washington, on 23 January 1978, as part of the FY78 program, Stark was laid down on 24 August 1979, launched on 30 May 1980, and commissioned on 23 October 1982, CDR Terence W. Costello commanding. In 1987, an Iraqi jet fired a missile at the Stark, killing 37 U.S. sailors on board. It is the only successful anti-ship missile attack on a U.S. Navy warship. Decommissioned on 7 May 1999, Stark was scrapped in 2006. The USS Stark was deployed to the Middle East Force in 1984 and 1987. Captain Glenn R. Brindel was the commanding officer during the 1987 deployment. The ship was struck on 17 May 1987, by two Exocet antiship missiles fired from an Iraqi Mirage F1 (although some believe it to be a Falcon) aircraft during the Iran–Iraq War. The plane had taken off from Shaibah at 8 pm and had flown south into the Persian Gulf. The pilot fired the first Exocet missile from a range of 22.5 nautical miles (41.7 km), and the second from 15.5 nautical miles (28.7 km), just about the time Stark issued a
    6.00
    1 votes
    213
    USS Toledo

    USS Toledo

    • Ship builder: New York Shipbuilding
    USS Toledo (CA-133) was a Baltimore-class heavy cruiser of the United States Navy active during the Korean War. Toledo was laid down on 13 September 1943 at Camden, New Jersey, by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, launched on 6 May 1945, sponsored by Mrs Edward J. Moan, and commissioned at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 27 October 1946, Captain August J. Detzer, Jr., in command. On 6 January 1947, the heavy cruiser got underway for a two-month training cruise in the waters of the West Indies. After completing shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, she visited St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands; Kingston, Jamaica; and Port-au-Prince, Haiti, before returning north to Philadelphia and a three-week post-shakedown availability. On 14 April, she departed Philadelphia and shaped a course across the Atlantic. Toledo steamed through the Mediterranean, transited the Suez Canal, crossed the Indian Ocean, and arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, on 15 June. Toledo remained in the Far East visiting Japanese and Korean ports in support of occupation forces until October. On the 21st, she stood out of Yokosuka for her first transpacific voyage and steamed via Pearl Harbor to Long Beach,
    6.00
    1 votes
    214
    USS R-14

    USS R-14

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    USS R-14 (SS-91) was an R-class coastal and harbor defense submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company, in Quincy, Massachusetts on 6 November 1918. She was launched on 10 October 1919 sponsored by Ms. Florence L. Gardner and commissioned on 24 December 1919, with Lieutenant Vincent A. Clarke, Jr., in command. After shakedown off the New England coast, R-14 moved to New London, Connecticut, where she prepared for transfer to the Pacific Fleet. In May, she headed south. Given hull classification symbol "SS-91" in July, she transited the Panama Canal in the same month and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 6 September. There, for the next nine years, she assisted in the development of submarine and anti-submarine warfare tactics, and participated in search and rescue operations. R-14 — under acting command of Lieutenant Alexander Dean Douglas – ran out of usable fuel and lost radio communications in May 1921 while on a surface search mission for the sea-going tug Conestoga about 100 nmi (120 mi; 190 km) southeast of the island of Hawaii. Since the submarine's electric motors did not have enough battery power to propel her to Hawaii, the
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    2 votes
    215
    Victoria

    Victoria

    Victoria (or Nao Victoria, as well as Vittoria) was a Spanish carrack and the first ship to successfully circumnavigate the world. The Victoria was part of a Spanish expedition commanded by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, and after his demise during the voyage, by Juan Sebastián Elcano. The expedition began with five ships but the Victoria was the only ship to complete the voyage. Magellan was killed in the Philippines. This ship, along with the four others, was given to Magellan by King Charles I of Spain. Victoria was named after the church of Santa Maria de la Victoria de Triana, where Magellan took an oath of allegiance to Charles V in order to be granted full access to the Spice Islands. Victoria was an 85 tons ship with a crew of 42. The four other ships were Trinidad (110 tons, crew 55), San Antonio (120 tons, crew 60), Concepcion (90 tons, crew 45), and Santiago (75 tons, crew 32). Trinidad, Magellan's flagship, Concepcion, and Santiago were wrecked or scuttled; San Antonio deserted the expedition before the Straits of Magellan and returned to Europe on her own. Victoria was rated a carrack or nao (ship), as were all the others except Trinidad, which was a
    5.00
    2 votes
    216
    HMAS Waller

    HMAS Waller

    • Ship builder: Australian Submarine Corporation
    • Ship Class: Collins class submarine
    HMAS Waller (SSG 75) is the third of six Collins class submarines operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Named for Captain Hector Waller, the boat was laid down in 1992, and launched in 1997. Despite the RAN initially refusing to accept the submarine for service, Waller has demonstrated the capabilities of the Collins class against surface and submarine targets during several international wargames. Waller was laid down by Australian Submarine Corporation (ASC) on 7 February 1992, launched on 14 March 1997, and commissioned into the RAN on 10 July 1999. During sea trials, the number of problems and defects with Waller were significantly fewer that with the previous two submarines, indicating that problems with earlier submarines were being fixed in the latter boats during construction. Despite this, the RAN initially refused to accept Waller into service until all defects in the submarine were repaired, unlike Collins and Farncomb, which had been provisionally accepted while defects were fixed. Although ASC believed that all problems with Waller had been rectified, the Defence Acquisition Organisation refused to accept the boat. In response, ASC began to charge the Australian
    4.00
    3 votes
    217
    French aircraft carrier Béarn

    French aircraft carrier Béarn

    Béarn was a unique aircraft carrier which served with the Marine nationale (French Navy) in World War II and beyond. Béarn was commissioned in 1927 and was the only aircraft carrier produced by France until after World War II. She was to be an experimental ship and should have been replaced in the 1930s by two new ships of the Joffre class. She was generally comparable to other early carriers developed by the major navies of the world. However, France did not produce a further replacement and as naval aviation lagged in France, Béarn continued to serve past her time of obsolescence. In 1939, she ended her career as an experimental ship but after the defeat of France in June 1940 she took refuge in Martinique where she remained for the next four years. Eventually she was sent to the United States for a refit which ended in March 1945, allowing her to serve briefly before the end of the war as an aircraft transport. Her career ended in 1967 when she was finally dismantled. Over the course of her long career, Béarn never launched her aircraft in combat. She was named after the historic French province of Béarn. Béarn was originally designed as a Normandie-class battleship; she was
    4.50
    2 votes
    218
    HMAS Adroit

    HMAS Adroit

    • Ship Class: Attack class patrol boat
    HMAS Adroit (P 82) was an Attack class patrol boat of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The Attack class was ordered in 1964 to operate in Australian waters as patrol boats (based on lessons learned through using the Ton class minesweepers on patrols of Borneo during the Indonesia-Malaysia Confrontation, and to replace a variety of old patrol, search-and-rescue, and general-purpose craft. Initially, nine were ordered for the RAN, with another five for Papua New Guinea's Australian-run coastal security force, although another six ships were ordered to bring the class to twenty vessels. The patrol boats had a displacement of 100 tons at standard load and 146 tons at full load, were 107.6 feet (32.8 m) in length overall, had a beam of 20 feet (6.1 m), and draughts of 6.4 feet (2.0 m) at standard load, and 7.3 feet (2.2 m) at full load. Propulsion machinery consisted of two 16-cylinder Paxman YJCM diesel engines, which supplied 3,460 shaft horsepower (2,580 kW) to the two propellers. The vessels could achieve a top speed of 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph), and had a range of 1,200 nautical miles (2,200 km; 1,400 mi) at 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph). The ship's company consisted of three
    4.50
    2 votes
    219
    Amerigo Vespucci

    Amerigo Vespucci

    The Amerigo Vespucci is a tall ship of the Marina Militare, named after the explorer Amerigo Vespucci. Its home port is Livorno, Italy, and it is in use as a school ship. In 1925, the Regia Marina ordered two school ships to a design by General Lieutenant Francesco Rotundi of the Italian Navy Engineering Corps, inspired by the style of large late 18th century 74-cannon ships of the line (like the neapolitan ship "Monarca"). The first, the Cristoforo Colombo, was put into service in 1928 and was used by the Italian Navy until 1943. After World War II, this ship was handed over to the USSR as part of the war reparations and was shortly afterwards decommissioned. The second ship was the Amerigo Vespucci, built in 1930 at the (formerly Royal) Naval Shipyard of Castellammare di Stabia (Naples). She was launched on February 22, 1931, and put into service in July of that year. The vessel is a full rigged three-masted steel hull 82.4 m (270.34 ft) long, with an overall length of 101 m (331 ft) including the bowsprit and a maximum width of 15.5 m (51 ft). She has a draught of about seven metres (23 ft) and a displacement at full load of 4146 tons. Under auxiliary diesel-electric propulsion
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    USS Tunny

    USS Tunny

    • Ship builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding
    USS Tunny (SSN-682), a Sturgeon-class attack submarine, was the second submarine of the United States Navy to be named for the tunny, any of several oceanic fishes resembling the mackerel. The contract forTunny's construction was awarded on 25 June 1968 and her keel was laid down on 22 May 1970 at Pascagoula, Mississippi, by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries. She was launched on 10 June 1972, sponsored by Mrs. Lola Aiken, and commissioned on 26 January 1974 at her home port, Charleston, South Carolina, with Commander Dennis Y. Sloan in command. Tunny remained at Charleston until March 1974, when she moved to Groton, Connecticut, for two weeks of in-port training at the submarine base. Between March and June 1974, she conducted shakedown training in the West Indies and along the United States East Coast. From June to August 1974, she conducted operations out of Charleston before heading north to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard at Kittery, Maine, where she began post-shakedown overhaul on 12 August 1974. She completed repairs on 5 October 1974 and headed back to Charleston, where she resumed normal training operations. In February 1975, Tunny began preparations for
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    HMAS Tarakan

    HMAS Tarakan

    • Ship Class: Balikpapan class LCH
    HMAS Tarakan (L 129), named after the Australian landing at Tarakan during World War II, is a Balikpapan class heavy landing craft of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The eight-vessel Balikpapan class was ordered as a locally-manufactured replacement for the Australian Army's LSM-1 class landing ship medium and ALC 50 landing craft. They are 44.5 metres (146 ft) long, with a beam of 10.1 metres (33 ft), and a draught of 1.9 metres (6 ft 3 in). The landing craft have a standard displacement of 316 tons, with a full load displacement of 503 tons. They are propelled by two G.M. Detroit 6-71 diesel motors, providing 675 brake horsepower to the two propeller shafts, allowing the vessels to reach 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph). The standard ship's company is 13-strong. The Balikpapans are equipped with a Decca RM 916 navigational radar, and fitted with two 7.62 millimetres (0.300 in) machine guns for self-defence. The LCHs have a maximum payload of 180 tons; equivalent to 3 Leopard 1 tanks, 13 M113 armored personnel carriers 23 quarter-tonne trucks, or four LARC-V amphibious cargo vehicles. As a troop transport, a Balikpapan class vessel can transport up to 400 soldiers between a larger
    4.00
    2 votes
    222
    HMS Kelvin

    HMS Kelvin

    HMS Kelvin (F37) was a K-class destroyer of the Royal Navy laid down by the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Limited, at Govan in Scotland on 5 October 1937, launched on 19 January 1939 and commissioned on 27 November 1939. She fought in several theatres during the war. In September 1940, as part of the 5th Destroyer Flotilla she scuttled HMS Ivanhoe, which had struck a mine off Texel during the Texel Disaster. In October 1940, she escorted HMS Revenge when she shelled Cherbourg. A year later, under Admiral James Somerville, she was involved at the action off Cape Spartivento on 27 November 1940, and for the next two years she was employed heavily in the Mediterranean, being involved in several major actions as well as several minor engagements. In May 1941, she bombarded Benghazi in company with HM destroyers Jackal, Kashmir, Kelly and Kipling before heading to Crete on 20 May 1941. She survived the withdrawal with comparatively light casualties, but required repairs and was sent to Bombay during which time her crew had sufficient time to tour India as far north as the Khyber Pass. By March 1942 she was back in the Mediterranean escorting convoy MW10 which took
    4.00
    2 votes
    223
    USS Barb

    USS Barb

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    • Ship Class: Gato class submarine
    USS Barb (SS-220), a Gato-class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the barbus. The craft compiled one of the outstanding submarine records of World War II. During the seven war patrols she conducted in the Pacific between March 1944-August 1945, Barb is officially credited with sinking 17 enemy vessels totaling 96,628 tons, including the Japanese aircraft carrier Unyo. In recognition of one outstanding patrol, Commander Fluckey was awarded the Medal of Honor and Barb received the Presidential Unit Citation. On the sub's 12th and final patrol of the war, Barb landed a party of carefully selected crew members who blew up a railroad train. This is notable as the only ground combat operation that took place on the Japanese home islands. Her keel was laid down on 7 June 1941 by the Electric Boat Company of Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 2 April 1942 (sponsored by Mrs. Charles A. Dunn, wife of Rear Admiral Dunn), and commissioned on 8 July 1942, Lieutenant Commander John R. Waterman in command. Barb's war operations spanned the period from 20 October 1942-2 August 1945, during which time she completed 12 war patrols. During her first patrol
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    2 votes
    224
    USS Monaghan

    USS Monaghan

    • Ship Class: Farragut class destroyer
    USS Monaghan (DD-354) was the last ship built of the Farragut class destroyers. She was named for Ensign John R. Monaghan. The Monaghan was laid down 21 November 1933 at Boston Navy Yard, and launched 9 January 1935. She was sponsored by Miss Mary F. Monaghan, niece of Ensign Monaghan and commissioned 19 April 1935, Commander R. R. Thompson in command. During the next few years Monaghan operated primarily in the North Atlantic, training US Navy personnel who served in World War II. Monaghan was present during the Pearl Harbor raid in 1941, participated in the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Midway in 1942, and was eventually sunk in a typhoon east of the Philippines in 1944. On 7 December 1941, Monaghan was a ready duty destroyer in Pearl Harbor, and at 07:51 was ordered to join Ward, who had just sunk an unidentified submarine off the entrance to Pearl Harbor. Four minutes later, before Monaghan could get underway, the Japanese air attack began. Monaghan opened fire, and at 08:27 was underway to join Ward when notified of the presence of a Ko-hyoteki class midget submarine in the harbor. Monaghan headed for the trespasser, rammed it glancingly, then sank it with two
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    2 votes
    225
    Escuela Naval Militar

    Escuela Naval Militar

    The Escuela Naval Militar de Oficiales (ENM) at Marín, Pontevedra, in north-western Spain, is the Spanish institution in charge of training the Spanish Navy's officer class, as well as other naval personnel. It has been established here since 1943, when it was moved from its previous location at San Carlos near San Fernando, Cadiz. Virtually all Spanish naval officers are trained here. According to an unwritten tradition, the Director of the ENM is always promoted to Admiral. The nearby naval stations of Ferrol and La Graña have “Escuelas Militares” where almost all of the sub-officers, technicians, sailors and crew of the Spanish Navy are trained.
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    1 votes
    226
    USS Cobia

    USS Cobia

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    • Ship Class: Gato class submarine
    USS Cobia (SS/AGSS-245) is a Gato-class submarine, formerly of the United States Navy, named for the cobia, a food fish found in warm waters. Cobia (SS-245) was laid down on 17 March 1943 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn. She was launched on 28 November 1943 (sponsored by Mrs. C. W. Magruder), and commissioned on 29 March 1944, Lieutenant Commander Albert L. Becker in command. Cobia reached Pearl Harbor from New London 3 June 1944. On 26 June, she put to sea on her first war patrol, bound for the Bonin Islands. On 13 July, 17 July, and 18 July she sank Japanese freighters. The last, Nisshu Maru, was a troop transport carrying a Japanese tank regiment to Iwo Jima. Even though only two tank crewmen of the 26th Tank Regiment died, all of the regiment's 28 tanks went to the bottom of the sea. It would be December before 22 replacements were provided. On 20 July Cobia sank three small armed ships in a running gun battle. One of them rammed Cobia, causing minor damage, but the submarine continued her mission, sinking a converted yacht of 500 tons on 5 August. A survivor from the yacht was rescued as Cobia's first prisoner of war. After refitting at Majuro from 14 August to 6 September
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    USS S-51

    USS S-51

    • Ship Class: United States S class submarine
    USS S-51 (SS-162) was a fourth-group (S-48) S-class submarine of the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down on 22 December 1919 by the Lake Torpedo Boat Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut. She was launched on 20 August 1921 sponsored by Mrs. R.J. Mills, and commissioned on 24 June 1922 with Lieutenant W. S. Haas in command. The new submarine was based at New London, Connecticut on 1 July 1922 as a unit of Submarine Division 4 (SubDiv 4) and followed a normal peacetime training cycle, operating out of her home port with visits to Newport, Rhode Island, and Providence, Rhode Island. She departed from New York City on 4 January 1924 for the Panama Canal Zone to participate in winter fleet maneuvers off Panama and in the Caribbean Sea. During this cruise, she visited Trinidad, Guantanamo Bay, Culebra, and St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. After returning to New York City on 30 April, she resumed type training off Block Island and in New England coastal waters. On the night of 25 September 1925, S-51 was operating on the surface near Block Island, with her running lights on. The merchant steamer City of Rome spotted a single white masthead light but were unable to determine its course,
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Concordia

    Concordia

    Concordia was a steel-hulled barquentine that was built in Poland in 1992 for the West Island College, Montreal, Canada. She served as a sail training ship until she capsized and sank on 17 February 2010. Concordia was built by Colod of Szczecin, Poland in 1991, and completed in April 1992. She was 57.50 metres (188 ft 8 in) long, with a beam of 9.44 metres (31 ft 0 in) and a draft of 4.00 metres (13 ft 1 in). She was 35.00 metres (114 ft 10 in) to the top of the highest mast. Her hull was made of steel, and she was rigged as a barquentine. As well as sails, she was propelled by a MAN diesel engine, which could propel her at 9 knots (17 km/h). Concordia was designed by Ryszard Langer and owned by the West Island College Class Afloat program. Her port of registry was Bridgetown, Barbados but she was based in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. On 5 December 1996, an explosion on board during battery charging resulted in the death of a crewmember. On 17 February 2010, SV Concordia encountered what the vessel's Captain called a microburst some 550 kilometres (300 nmi) southeast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in rough seas and high winds. The vessel was knocked onto its side within 15 seconds and
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    0 votes
    229
    Empire Sandy

    Empire Sandy

    The Empire Sandy is a tall ship providing chartered tours for the public from Toronto, Canada. She was built as a Englishman/Larch Deep Sea class tugboat for war service by the British Government in 1943. After the war she was renamed to Ashford and then Chris M, before reverting to the original name of Empire Sandy and being converted to a schooner. The Empire Sandy was one of 1,464 Empire ships built or acquired for war service by the British Government. Built in England in 1943 as a deep sea tugboat, she was tasked with Royal Navy work and salvaging merchant ships damaged in the Battle of the Atlantic and other naval engagements during the Second World War. She served in the North Atlantic Ocean from Iceland to Sierra Leone, Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean and the Bay of Bengal during World War II. The Empire Sandy's WWII 'Official Log-Books' documenting all her WWII voyages are now available for viewing on www.empiresandy.com click on WWII History . Of notable interest are the complete particulars of the crew, names, addresses, ages, next of kin etc. The oldest is the Master, E Thomas, 63 and the youngest is the Cabin Boy, Kenneth Lewis 15. These are in 'Log Book 014'. Another
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    0 votes
    230
    HMAS Balikpapan

    HMAS Balikpapan

    • Ship Class: Balikpapan class LCH
    HMAS Balikpapan (L 126) is the lead ship of the Balikpapan class of heavy landing craft (LCH). Ordered in 1969, Balikpapan entered service with the Australian Army Water Transport Squadron in late 1971. After this, the decision to place all seagoing Army vessels under the control of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) saw Balikpapan transferred and commissioned in 1974; the last of the eight-vessel class to enter RAN service. Balikpapan was placed in reserve in 1985, but was reactivated three years later. During late 1999 and early 2000, the vessel was part of the INTERFET peacekeeping taskforce, and made additional deployments to East Timor in 2001 and 2006. As of 2012, Balikpapan is active in RAN service. The eight-vessel Balikpapan class was ordered as a locally-manufactured replacement for the Australian Army's LSM-1 class landing ship medium and ALC 50 landing craft. They are 44.5 metres (146 ft) long, with a beam of 10.1 metres (33 ft), and a draught of 1.9 metres (6 ft 3 in). The landing craft have a standard displacement of 316 tons, with a full load displacement of 503 tons. They are propelled by two G.M. Detroit 6-71 diesel motors, providing 675 brake horsepower to the two
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    0 votes
    231
    HMAS Dechaineux

    HMAS Dechaineux

    • Ship builder: Australian Submarine Corporation
    • Ship Class: Collins class submarine
    HMAS Dechaineux (SSG 76) is the fourth of six Collins class submarines operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Named for Captain Emile Dechaineux, the boat was laid down in 1993 and launched in 1998. Dechaineux and sister boat Sheean were modified during construction as part of the "fast track" program—an attempt to fix the problems affecting the Collins class, and put at least two fully operational submarines in service before the last Oberon class submarine was decommissioned. In 2003, a seawater pipe burst while Dechaineux was submerged deep, nearly resulting in the loss of the submarine. Dechaineux was laid down by the Australian Submarine Corporation on 4 March 1993, launched on 12 March 1998, and commissioned into the RAN on 23 February 2001. The issues with the Collins class highlighted in the McIntosh-Prescott Report and the pressing need to have combat-ready submarines in the RAN fleet with the pending decommissioning of Otama, the final Oberon class submarine in Australian service, prompted the establishment of an A$1 billion program to bring Dechaineux and sister boat Sheean up to an operational standard as quickly as possible, referred to as the "fast track" or
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    232
    HMAS Katoomba

    HMAS Katoomba

    • Ship Class: Bathurst class corvette
    HMAS Katoomba (J204/M204), named after the tourist resort of Katoomba, New South Wales, was one of 60 Bathurst class corvettes constructed during World War II, and one of 36 initially manned and commissioned solely by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Katoomba was laid down by Poole & Steel at Balmain, New South Wales on 9 September 1940. She was launched on 16 April 1941 by Mrs. Lloyd, then deputy mayoress of Katoomba, and was commissioned into the RAN on 17 December 1941. Katoomba entered active service with an assignment to Darwin, where she arrived on 19 December 1941. The next day, Katoomba, along with sister ships HMAS Deloraine and HMAS Lithgow, and the United States destroyer USS Edsall, was involved in the prosecution and successful sinking of Japanese submarine I-124, the first enemy submarine sunk in Australian waters. Katoomba was present during the Japanese bombing of Darwin on 19 February, but was not significantly damaged. At the end of June, Katoomba was reassigned as a convoy escort and anti-submarine patrol ship in the waters of northern Queensland and New Guinea. On 14 August, Katoomba was sent to assist United States submarine USS S-39, which had run aground on a
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    233
    HMS Montrose

    HMS Montrose

    • Ship builder: Yarrow Shipbuilders
    • Ship Class: Type 23 frigate
    The current HMS Montrose is the eighth of the sixteen ship Type 23 or 'Duke' class of frigates, of the Royal Navy, named after the Duke of Montrose. She was laid down in November 1989 by Yarrow Shipbuilders on the Clyde, and was launched on 31 July 1992 by Lady Rifkind (when, as Mrs Edith Rifkind, her husband Sir Malcolm Rifkind was Secretary of State for Defence). She commissioned into service in June 1994. Montrose is part of the Devonport Flotilla, based in Devonport Dockyard in Plymouth. There has only been one previous ship built with the same name, which was HMS Montrose (D01), the first of eight Admiralty-type destroyer leaders, sometimes known as the Scott class. However, whichever tender was attached to the Tay Division of the Royal Naval Reserve was always renamed HMS Montrose in honour of James Graham, 6th Duke of Montrose, who founded the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve in 1903; the last ship that was so named was the Ton class minesweeper HMS Stubbington. All of HMS Montrose battle honours were won by her WW2-era predecessor, and are as follows: Atlantic (1939-1940) Dunkirk (1940) Arctic (1942-1943) North Sea (1942-1944) English Channel (1943-1944) Normandy (1944) The
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    234
    HMS Surprise

    HMS Surprise

    • Place built: Lunenburg
    HMS Surprise is a modern tall ship, built at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, Canada as Rose in 1970 to a Phil Bolger design based on the original 18th-century British Admiralty drawings. She is a replica of HMS Rose, a 20 gun sixth-rate frigate built in 1757. The ship was inspected and certified by the United States Coast Guard and operated as a sail training vessel in the 1980s and 1990s, run by the HMS Rose Foundation based in Bridgeport, Connecticut, United States. Although she is known by the national prefix HMS, meaning Her (or His) Majesty's Ship, she is not technically entitled to it as she does not hold a royal warrant. She was sold to the 20th Century Fox film studio in 2001 to be used in the making of the film Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, in which she portrayed the Royal Navy frigate Surprise with a story based on several of the books by Patrick O'Brian. After the film was complete, the ship was leased and then purchased by the Maritime Museum of San Diego which has restored her to sailing condition as of September 2007. The ship has officially been reregistered as HMS Surprise in honour of her role in the film. She sails several times a year, often with the
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    235
    James Craig

    James Craig

    • Ship builder: Bartram, Haswell, & Co.
    • Place built: Sunderland
    The James Craig is a three-masted, iron-hulled barque restored and sailed by the Sydney Maritime Museum. Built in 1874 in Sunderland, England, by Bartram, Haswell, & Co., she was originally named Clan Macleod. She was employed carrying cargo around the world, and rounded Cape Horn 23 times in 26 years. In 1900 she was acquired by Mr J J Craig, renamed James Craig in 1905, and began to operate between New Zealand and Australia until 1911. Unable to compete profitably with freight cargo, in later years James Craig was used as a collier. Like many other sailing ships of her vintage, she fell victim to the advance of steamships, and was first laid up, then used as a hulk, until eventually being abandoned at Recherche Bay in Tasmania. In 1932 she was sunk by fishermen who blasted a 3-metre hole in her stern. Restoration of James Craig began in 1972, when volunteers from the 'Lady Hopetoun and Port Jackson Marine Steam Museum' (now the Sydney Heritage Fleet) refloated her and towed her to Hobart for initial repairs. Brought back to Sydney under tow in 1981, her hull was placed on a submersible pontoon to allow work on the hull restoration to proceed. Over a number of years the vessel was
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    236
    Khersones

    Khersones

    The Khersones or Chersones (Ukrainian: Херсонес) is a Ukrainian three-mast tall ship, a full rigged ship. It was built in 1989 in Gdańsk Shipyard, Poland, in a series of six sister ships (among which also the Mir), after the designs of Zygmunt Choreń. The ship is named after the city of Kherson on the North coast of the Black Sea. Today Khersones is a training ship for the Kerch Marine Technological Institute. Like many Eastern European training ships she also takes on board paying passengers. She partakes in many windjammer regattas.
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    237
    Prince William

    Prince William

    PNS Rah Naward is a sail training ship of the Pakistan Navy. She was commissioned in 2001 as Prince William for the Tall Ships Youth Trust and sold in 2010 to the Pakistan Navy and renamed Rah Naward ("Swift Mover"). Rah Naward has the callsign ARNR and the IMO number 9222326. Rah Naward was built as Prince William, one of two tall ships commissioned by the Tall Ships Youth Trust (formerly the Sail Training Association), obtained half-completed from another project in Germany. They were transported to Appledore Ship Yards in Devon, where they were modified to the TSYT's requirements, and fitted out. The TSYT's ships are two-masted brigs, with the rig designed by Michael Willoughby. The hulls were built in Germany as cruise ships for the West Indies, designed to carry masts and sails and use them from time to time, but not to be serious sailing vessels. This project was cancelled and the part-finished hulls were bought in 1997 by the TSYT. They were then modified by Appledore Shipbuilders to take the strains of a full sailing rig and to improve their sailing properties, including the addition of a new deeper keel holding fifty tons of ballast. Prince William's rig was designed
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    238
    Soviet aircraft carrier Varyag

    Soviet aircraft carrier Varyag

    Varyag (Russian: Варяг) was to be an Admiral Kuznetsov class multirole aircraft carrier of the Soviet Union. She was known as Riga when her keel was laid down at Shipyard 444 (now Nikolayev South) in Nikolayev December 6, 1985. Design of the carrier was undertaken by the Nevskoye Planning and Design Bureau. She was launched December 4, 1988, but she was renamed Varyag (Varangian) in late 1990, after the famous Russian cruiser. Construction stopped by 1992, with the ship structurally complete but without electronics. With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, ownership was transferred to Ukraine; the ship was laid up, unmaintained, then stripped. In early 1998, she lacked engines, a rudder, and much of her operating systems, and was put up for auction. It was purchased at auction for US$20 million by Chong Lot Travel Agency, a company widely believed to be a front for Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN). Chong Lot stated that the ship would become a floating entertainment center and casino in the Chinese SAR of Macau. This was proven false as the ship was docked in Dalian and painted PLAN grey. Defense news and intelligence sources indicated that the ship had been refitted
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    239
    USS Admirable

    USS Admirable

    USS Admirable (AM-136) was the lead ship of her class of minesweeper built for the United States Navy during World War II. In 1945, she was transferred to the Soviet Navy under Lend-Lease as T-521. The Soviets scrapped T-521 in 1954, never returning her to U.S. custody. Because of the Cold War, the U.S. Navy was unaware of this fate and the vessel remained on the American Naval Vessel Register until she was struck on 1 January 1983. Admirable was laid down on 8 April 1942 at Tampa, Florida, by the Tampa Shipbuilding Company. She was launched on 18 October 1942, sponsored by Mrs. Ann Pillsbury Fehr, daughter of Commander Horace W. Pillsbury; and commissioned on 20 April 1943, with Lieutenant Commander A. M. White, USNR, in command. The minesweeper departed Tampa on 23 April and conducted shakedown training in the Gulf of Mexico before heading for Hampton Roads, Virginia, on 23 June. Admirable operated out of the Little Creek amphibious base for five months of training in antisubmarine warfare (ASW), mine-laying, and minesweeping techniques. After upkeep and outfitting, she departed Norfolk on 28 November in company with Luzon for duty in the Pacific. Transiting the Panama Canal on 8
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    240
    USS Anzio

    USS Anzio

    • Ship builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding
    USS Anzio (CG-68) is a Ticonderoga-class cruiser guided missile cruiser of the United States Navy, named for the site of a beachhead invasion of Italy by Allied troops from 22 January to 23 May 1944. Her keel was laid down by the Litton-Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation at Pascagoula, Mississippi on 21 August 1989, she was launched on 2 November 1990 and commissioned on 2 May 1992. Anzio operates out of Norfolk in Virginia. The ship is named for the battle of Anzio in Italy, the site of an Allied amphibious assault during Operation Shingle as part of the Italian Campaign of World War II. One other ship, an escort aircraft carrier, had been named USS Anzio. On 6 April 2000, the Anzio, along with another cruiser and the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower was participating in an exercise in the Eastern Mediterranean, about 250 miles off the coast of Israel. In an unannouced missile test, the Israel Defense Forces fired a Jericho-1 medium-range ballistic missile from a test facility in Yavne, which landed 40 miles from the ship. The missile was detected by the ship's radar, and the crew briefly thought that they were under attack. On 9 January 2003 Anzio was pre-deployed in
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    241
    USS Birmingham

    USS Birmingham

    • Ship builder: Fore River Shipyard
    USS Birmingham (CL-2), named for the city of Birmingham, Alabama, was a Chester-class cruiser laid down by the Fore River Shipbuilding Company at Quincy, Massachusetts on 14 August 1905; launched on 29 May 1907; sponsored by Mrs L. Underwood; and commissioned on 11 April 1908, Commander Burns Tracy Walling in command. Birmingham served with the Atlantic Fleet until 27 June 1911, and went into reserve at Boston three days later. One of her sailors, Chief Electrician William E. Snyder, received the Medal of Honor for rescuing a shipmate from drowning on 4 January 1910. From Birmingham's deck, civilian pilot Eugene Ely made the first airplane take-off from a warship on 14 November 1910 in a Curtiss Model D biplane designed by Glenn Curtiss. Recommissioned on 15 December 1911, she made a short cruise to the West Indies and then reverted to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Philadelphia on 20 April 1912. From 19 May – 11 July, she was in commission for service on the Ice Patrol and then returned to the Philadelphia Reserve Group. Recommissioned on 1 October 1913, Birmingham carried the Panama-Pacific Exposition Commissioners on a South American tour from 3 October – 26 December, and was
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    242
    USS Duluth

    USS Duluth

    • Ship Class: Austin class amphibious transport dock
    USS Duluth (LPD-6), an Austin-class amphibious transport dock, is the second ship of the United States Navy named for the city in Minnesota. Duluth was laid down on December 18, 1963 by the New York Naval Shipyard. She was launched on August 14, 1965 and commissioned on December 18, 1965. She was the last ship to be launched from the Brooklyn Navy Yard before it was closed. The ship sailed to Danang, Republic of Vietnam, in May 1965 to operate with Amphibious Ready Group, U.S. 7th Fleet in the Vietnam War. On June 15, 1966, a Sikorsky H-34 from HC-4 made the first helicopter landing on board. In 1967, from the months of May until November the Duluth operated with Amphibious Ready Group, Seventh Fleet, in South China Sea. Conducted amphibious landing operations Bear Claw and Beacon Guide at Hue (June 7), Chu Lai (June 12), Cue Viet (July 3, 27), and Phu Loc (July 21). Took part in Operations Beacon Gate at Song Cua Dai and Chu Lai (August 7–16) and Beacon Point off Thua Thien province. The LPD then steamed off Quang Nam and Quang Tin provinces during Operation Ballistic Charge (September 16–28). After refitting at Subic Bay, Duluth participated in helicopter-centered Operation
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    243
    USS J. Fred Talbott

    USS J. Fred Talbott

    • Ship Class: Wickes class destroyer
    USS J. Fred Talbott (DD-156), named for Joshua Frederick Cockey Talbott (1843–1918), Representative from Maryland Second District from 1879 to 1885, from 1893 to 1895 and again from 1903 to 1918, was a Wickes-class destroyer. Talbott was laid down by the William Cramp and Sons Ship and Engine Building Company at Philadelphia in Pennsylvania on 8 July 1918, launched on 14 December 1918 by Mrs. Robert L. Bates, niece of Representative Talbott and commissioned on 30 June 1919, Commander T. G. Ellyson in command. J. Fred Talbott departed Newport, Rhode Island 10 July for the Mediterranean, where she acted as a station ship at various ports providing an element of stability in Europe during the first troubled months of postwar adjustment and reconstruction. Upon her return to the United States 21 June 1920, the ship took part in Neutrality Patrol duty on the East Coast and engaged in fleet exercises before decommissioning at Philadelphia 18 January 1923. Talbott recommissioned 1 May 1930, Lieutenant C. H. Cobb in command, and immediately began shakedown training in Delaware Bay. For the 10 years that followed, the ship operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean engaging in
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    244
    USS Merrill

    USS Merrill

    • Ship builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding
    USS Merrill (DD-976), named for Rear Admiral Aaron Stanton Merrill USN (1890–1961), was a Spruance-class destroyer laid down 16 June 1975 by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries at Pascagoula, Mississippi.She was launched 1 September 1976 and commissioned 11 March 1978. USS Merrill had the distinction of being the test ship for the installation of the Tomahawk cruise missile system aboard the SPRUANCE Class units. On 21 August 1980, while on a Western Pacific Ocean deployment, Merrill rescued 62 Vietnamese refugees, over 200 miles southeast of Saigon. During the next years, Merrill served as the Navy's test platform for the Tomahawk Cruise Missile Program, earning the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation. In this function, the ship did not participate in the Pacific Fleet's deployment rotation. In 1989, Merrill stood out on a deployment to the Middle East. Serving as a unit of Joint Task Force Middle East, the ship conducted operations in support of Operation Earnest Will and was back in San Diego in 1990. Assigned to the USS Abraham Lincoln carrier battle group, Merrill again deployed to the Middle East in 1991. Arriving in the region after the ceasefire of the
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    245
    USS Ranger

    USS Ranger

    • Ship builder: Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
    USS Ranger (CC-4) would have been a Lexington-class battlecruiser, but was cancelled before completion. Ranger was named on 10 December 1917. Laid down 23 June 1921 by Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Company, Newport News, Virginia, construction of the battlecruiser was canceled on 17 August 1923 under the terms of the Treaty Limiting Naval Armaments. The hull, 4 percent completed, was sold for scrap to Steel Scrap Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 8 November 1923. This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.
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    USS S-36

    USS S-36

    • Ship Class: United States S class submarine
    USS S-36 (SS-141) was a S-class submarine in the United States Navy. Her keel was laid down on 10 December 1918 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation of San Francisco, California. She was launched on 3 June 1919 sponsored by Miss Helen Russell, and commissioned on 4 April 1923 with Lieutenant Leon C. Alford in command. Following trials, S-36 operated along the West Coast with interruptions for exercises in Alaskan waters in June 1923 and for fleet maneuvers in the Caribbean Sea during the winter of 1924, until the following summer. Then assigned to the Asiatic Fleet, she moved west in mid-September and arrived at the Submarine Base, Cavite, Philippines, on 4 November. For the next sixteen years, she remained in the western Pacific, conducting exercises and patrols and undergoing overhauls in the Philippines during the winter and operating off the China coast, out of Tsingtao, during the summer months. With the increase of hostilities on the mainland, however, summer deployments were shortened and individual patrols were extended throughout the Philippines, into the South China Sea, and, in 1938, to the Netherlands East Indies. From April to June 1940, the S-boat conducted her
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    247
    USS Steamer Bay

    USS Steamer Bay

    • Ship Class: Casablanca class escort carrier
    USS Steamer Bay (CVE-87) was a Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was laid down on 4 December 1943 at Vancouver, Washington, by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company; launched on 26 February 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Henry S. Kendall; and commissioned on 4 April 1944, Captain Steadman Teller in command. Steamer Bay held sea trials in Puget Sound and sailed for San Diego on 2 May. On the 14th, she headed for the New Hebrides, carrying the men and aircraft of Marine Air Group (MAG) 61. She arrived at Espiritu Santo on the 30th, unloaded, and began her return voyage to San Diego on 2 June. The carrier was on the west coast from 20 June to 19 July when she again steamed west, with 298 marines and 72 aircraft, bound for the Marshall Islands. Steamer Bay arrived at Majuro on 1 August to discharge her cargo and passengers. She was routed back to Pearl Harbor and attached to the 3d Fleet as a carrier of replacement aircraft. Seventy-two planes were loaded on board; and the ship steamed for Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island, on 21 August. During the next two and one-half months, the carrier supplied replacement aircraft and pilots to Task Force (TF) 38 which was supporting
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    248
    USS Tambor

    USS Tambor

    • Ship builder: Electric Boat Corporation
    USS Tambor (SS-198), the lead ship of her class of submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the tambor. Her keel was laid down on 16 January 1939 by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 20 December 1939 sponsored by Miss Lucia Ellis, and commissioned on 3 June 1940 with Lieutenant Commander John M. Murphy, Jr. (Class of 1925), in command. After fitting out at New London, Tambor got underway on 6 August 1940 for her shakedown cruise which took her to New York City, Washington, D.C., Morehead City, North Carolina, and Houston, Texas. Following further training off Colón, Panama, the submarine returned to New London, Connecticut, before holding her acceptance trials and undergoing a post-shakedown overhaul at the Portsmouth Navy Yard in Kittery, Maine. After conducting live-fire trials on the effectiveness of depth charges, the first of their kind in the U.S. Navy, Tambor reported in May 1941 to the Submarine Force, Pacific Fleet, and the command of Rear Admiral Thomas W. Withers, Jr. (COMSUBPAC). Tambor began a routine peacetime patrol of Wake Island in late November 1941 and, when World War II broke out, she began her
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    USS Tripoli

    USS Tripoli

    USS Tripoli (LPH-10), an Iwo Jima-class amphibious assault ship, was laid down on 15 June 1964 at Pascagoula, Mississippi, by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation; launched on 31 July 1965; sponsored by Mrs. Jane Cates, the wife of General Clifton B. Cates, former Commandant of the Marine Corps; and commissioned on 6 August 1966 at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Capt. Henry Suerstedt, Jr., in command. She was named for the Battle of Tripoli Harbor. Following three months fitting out at Philadelphia, the amphibious assault ship put to sea on 6 November 1966, bound for the west coast. She transited the Panama Canal at mid-month and arrived at her home port, San Diego, on 22 November 1966. Final acceptance trials, shakedown training, and post-shakedown availability at Long Beach occupied the warship until she embarked Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron (HMH) 463, elements of Marine Observation Squadron (VMO) 6, and some members of the staff of the Commander, Amphibious Squadron (ComPhibRon) B on 1 May 1967 and departed San Diego, bound for the western Pacific. She served on three deployments to Vietnamese waters during the Vietnam War, participating in numerous operations. Except for
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    250
    USS Wahoo

    USS Wahoo

    • Ship Class: Gato class submarine
    USS Wahoo (SS-238) was a Gato-class submarine, the first United States Navy ship to be named for the wahoo, a dark blue food fish of Florida and the West Indies. Her keel was laid down 28 June 1941 at the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California. She was launched on 14 February 1942 (sponsored by Mrs. William C. Barker, Jr.), and commissioned on 15 May 1942 with Lieutenant Commander (Lt. Cmdr.) Marvin G. "Pinky" Kennedy (Class of 1929) in command. Following fitting out and initial training along the California coast (which took her as far south as San Diego), Wahoo departed Mare Island on 12 August for Hawaii. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on 18 August and underwent exercise training until 21 August. On 23 August 1942 Wahoo got underway for her first war patrol, seeking Japanese shipping in waters west of Truk, particularly in the area between the Hall Islands and the Namonuito Atoll. On 6 September, her third day in the area, Wahoo fired three torpedoes at her first target, a lone freighter; all torpedoes missed because the ship turned toward Wahoo, apparently with the intent to ram. The submarine dodged, fearful of counterattack from the air. She continued to patrol the Truk area
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