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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Ship Designer of All Time

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    1
    7.22
    9 votes
    2
    7.75
    8 votes
    3
    6.71
    7 votes
    4

    Bruce Farr

    • Boats Designed: KZ1
    Bruce K. Farr OBE (born 1949 in Auckland, New Zealand) is a designer of racing and cruising yachts. Farr began building boats at 13 in Warkworth near Auckland,New Zealand. His first boats were plywood hard chine Moth class designs. He later designed and built variants of Cherubs and especially Flying 18s. His early designs were built in plywood with focus on light weight with good planning shapes. By his late teens he was designing successful small lightweight keel boats. Boats designed by Farr Yacht Design competed in every Whitbread Round the World Race after 1981, and won the 1986, 1990, 1994 and 1998 races. The first Bruce Farr yacht in the Whitbread Race was the Farr-designed Ceramco New Zealand, which competed in the 1980 Whitbread Race and won the Sydney to Hobart the same year. Farr's design proved exceedingly fast, and Ceramco would have won the Round the World Race, save for an unfortunate dismasting on the first leg, a trans-Atlantic crossing. The deltas for the rest of the legs would have put Ceramco 30 hours ahead of her next competitor. This yacht was helmed and captained by New Zealand's most famous yachtsman Sir Peter Blake. In 2001 the event was renamed the Volvo
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    Nathanael Herreshoff

    Nathanael Herreshoff

    • Boats Designed: Reliance
    Nathanael Greene Herreshoff I (March 18, 1848 – June 2, 1938), was an American naval architect-mechanical engineer. "Captain Nat," as he was known, revolutionized yacht design, and produced a succession of undefeated America's Cup defenders between 1893–1920. He was born on March 18, 1848 in Bristol, Rhode Island and was named after General Nathanael Greene. He had as brothers Lewis Herreshoff and John Brown Herreshoff. He graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1870 with a 3-year degree in mechanical engineering. After graduation, he took a position with the Corliss Steam Engine Company in Providence, Rhode Island. At the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he oversaw operation of the Corliss Stationary Engine, a 40-foot tall, 1400-horsepower dynamo that powered the exhibition's machinery. In 1878 Herreshoff returned to Bristol where he and his older brother, John Brown Herreshoff, formed the Herreshoff Manufacturing Company. While Captain Nat provided the engineering expertise, J.B., as his brother was known, contributed genius-level business acumen. Despite going blind at the age of 14, J.B. suffered under no handicap when it came to
    7.50
    6 votes
    6
    William Fife

    William Fife

    • Boats Designed: Shamrock III
    William Fife III OBE (1857–1944), also known as Wm. Fife, Jr., was the third generation of a family of Scottish yacht designers and builders. Fife was born in the small village of Fairlie on the Firth of Clyde. His father William Fife II (1821–1902) and grandfather William Fife I (1785–1865) had also been designers and boatbuilders in Fairlie. The family business operated from a yard on the beach in the village. Fife began building yachts in 1890 and soon surpassed the achievements of his father and grandfather and became known as one of the premier yacht designers of the day. As the third generation of a venerable Scottish boat building family, William Fife inherited a rich legacy but was quick to establish his own reputation as one of the top designers in the yachting world. Often dominating his chief competitors, Fife was a master of his trade who received commissions from European royalty and from clients as far away as Australia. Following on the heels of the success of his design Dragon (1888), Fife adopted a stylized Chinese dragon as his trademark. Thereafter, those yachts that took shape on the shingle at Fairlie were known throughout the yachting world by this distinctive
    6.29
    7 votes
    7
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    5.25
    8 votes
    9
    Josiah Fox

    Josiah Fox

    • Boats Designed: USS Chesapeake
    Josiah Fox (1763–1847) was a British naval architect noted for his involvement in the design and construction of the first significant warships of the United States Navy. Fox was born in Falmouth, Cornwall, United Kingdom in 1763, and completed the apprenticeship at the Royal Dockyard, Plymouth, where he later served as a shipwright. In 1793 he traveled to the United States to survey timber resources and was there engaged to teach drafting to the sons of Jonathan Penrose, an American shipwright. In 1794 he was employed by the US Navy as a draftsman working under Naval Constructor Joshua Humphreys, the designer of the first Navy frigates. Fox and Humphreys disagreed over design issues, the former believing that the designs were too long and had too sharp a bow, among other problems. This disagreement caused significant animosity between the two, with arguments over credit for the design continuing in the press as late as 1827. In 1798, Fox was appointed Master Constructor of the frigate Chesapeake, 38, which was to be built in Norfolk. Fox apparently altered Humphreys’ design to his own liking, though this may have been partially the result of a timber shortage. The Chesapeake
    7.40
    5 votes
    10
    Leslie Geary

    Leslie Geary

    • Boats Designed: MV Westward
    • Ship classes designed: Geary 18
    L.E."Ted" Geary (1885 - May 19, 1960) was a naval architect who grew up in Seattle, Washington. He designed and raced numerous competitive sailing vessels, and also designed commuter yachts, fishing boats, tug boats, and wooden hulled freighters. Geary was born in 1885, in Atchison, Kansas, and moved to Seattle with his parents in 1892. He exhibited an early attraction to water-related activities. In 1899, at age 14, he, along with a friend, designed and built the 24-foot centerboard racing sloop Empress. Four years later, with lifelong friends Dean and Lloyd Johnson, Geary designed and built Empress II, another 24-foot centerboard racing sloop. With Geary at the helm, she was never defeated in local races. While a sophomore at the University of Washington, he designed Spirit, a 42-foot LOA (Length Over All) racing sloop for the Seattle Yacht Club. Spirit would successfully challenge the Canadian Yacht Alexandra for the Dunsmir Cup in 1907. Geary’s success attracted the attention of several prominent Seattle businessmen who at Geary’s suggestion would finance his education as a naval architect at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Geary would design several more competitive
    7.40
    5 votes
    11
    Phineas Pett

    Phineas Pett

    • Boats Designed: HMS Sovereign of the Seas
    Phineas Pett (1 November 1570 – August 1647) was a shipwright and a member of the Pett dynasty. Phineas left a memoir of his activities which is preserved in the British Library and was published in 1918. Born at "Deptford Strond", he was the second son of Peter Pett of Deptford, his elder brother being named Joseph. Thomas Fuller, in his Worthies of England states: "I am credibly informed that the mystery of Shipwrights for some descents hath been preserved successfully in families, of whom the Petts about Chatham are of singular regard." It is likely that Robert Holborn, cited as working with Peter Pett of Deptford at this time was a relative of Richard Hoborn, ‘Cousin of Commissioner Pett’. Peter Pett of Deptford was the son of Peter of Harwich (d.1554). His sister married John Chapman, Master Shipwright, whose own son Richard was born in 1620 and Master Shipwright of Woolwich and Deptford. the shipwright who was to build the Ark, raised in the Pett household, "as in all probability was Mathew Baker" with whom, from 1570, Peter Pett was associated in the works at Dover.’ Phineas's father's first wife, Elizabeth Paynter, had given him a daughter, Lydia, and four sons; their
    7.40
    5 votes
    12
    Thomas Andrews

    Thomas Andrews

    • Boats Designed: RMS Titanic
    Thomas Andrews, Jr. (7 February 1873 – 15 April 1912) was an Irish businessman and shipbuilder; managing director and head of the drafting department for the shipbuilding company Harland and Wolff in Belfast, Ireland. Andrews was the naval architect in charge of the plans for the ocean liner RMS Titanic. He was travelling on board the Titanic during its maiden voyage when it hit an iceberg on 14 April 1912 and was one of the 1,507 people who perished in the disaster. Thomas Andrews was born at Ardara House, Comber, County Down, in Ireland, to The Rt. Hon. Thomas Andrews, a member of the Privy Council of Ireland, and Eliza Pirrie. His siblings included John Miller Andrews, the future Prime Minister of Northern Ireland, and Sir James Andrews, the future Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland. Thomas Andrews lived with his family in Ardara, Comber. In 1884, Andrews began attending the Royal Belfast Academical Institution until 1889 when, at the age of sixteen, he began a premium apprenticeship at Harland and Wolff where his uncle, the Viscount Pirrie, was part owner. At Harland and Wolff, he began with three months in the joiners' shop, followed by a month in the cabinetmakers' and
    8.50
    4 votes
    13
    Alain Thébault

    Alain Thébault

    • Boats Designed: Hydroptère
    Alain Thébault (born 19 September 1962 in Dijon) is a French yachtsman and skipper of l'Hydroptère. With Éric Tabarly, he participated in the conception of a multihull on hydrofoils, named l'Hydroptère, with a team of engineers, many of them from the aeronautics industry. The project started in 1975 and a model on a one-third scale was expermented between 1987 and 1992. L'hydroptère was launched in 1994 and reaches 35 knots the same year. Since 2005, with the support of Swiss banker, Thierry Lombard of Geneva, he modified his yacht for an attempt to reach the speed of 50 knots. In September 2009, in Hyères, France, Alain Thébault and his crew managed to break the outright speed record on 500m with 51.36 knots.
    8.25
    4 votes
    14
    8.25
    4 votes
    15

    William Shaw

    • Ship classes designed: Pearson Renegade
    Bill Shaw (d. Aug. 20, 2006) was an American born yacht designer known for his long tenure at Pearson Yachts as their Chief Naval Architect. Shaw graduated from the United States Merchant Marine Academy of Kings Point, NY in 1947. He went on to serve in the US Navy and Korean War. He joined the renowned firm of Sparkman & Stephens Naval Architects and Marine Engineers in October 1952 as a designer. He became a manager of Products of Asia in 1961, and was the chief designer of America’s Cup defender, Columbia. Bill Shaw joined Pearson Yachts in 1964 as Chief Architect. During his 27 years at Pearson, he and his team designed over 40 different sail and power boats. During his tenure at Pearson Yachts he received numerous awards, and Pearson became a world renowned leader in the boat building industry for quality fiberglass cruising and racing sailboats.
    8.25
    4 votes
    16
    8.00
    4 votes
    17
    6.60
    5 votes
    18
    John Ericsson

    John Ericsson

    • Boats Designed: USS Monitor
    John Ericsson (July 31, 1803 – March 8, 1889) was a Swedish-American inventor and mechanical engineer, as was his brother Nils Ericson. He was born at Långbanshyttan in Värmland, Sweden, but primarily came to be active in England and the United States. He is remembered best for designing the steam locomotive Novelty (in partnership with engineer John Braithwaite) and the ironclad ship USS Monitor. John's and Nils's father Olaf Ericsson who worked as the supervisor for a mine in Värmland had lost money in speculations and had to move his family from Värmland to Forsvik in 1810. There he worked as a 'director of blastings' during the excavation of the Swedish Göta Canal. The extraordinary skills of the two brothers were discovered by Baltzar von Platen, the architect of the Göta Canal. The two brothers were dubbed cadets of mechanics of the Swedish Royal Navy and engaged as trainees at the canal enterprise. At the age of fourteen, John was already working independently as a surveyor. His assistant had to carry a footstool for him to reach the instruments during surveying work. At the age of seventeen he joined the Swedish army in Jämtland, serving in the Jämtland Field Ranger
    6.40
    5 votes
    19

    Joshua Humphreys

    • Boats Designed: USS Constitution
    Joshua Humphreys (June 17, 1751 – January 12, 1838) was an influential and successful ship builder in the United States. Humphreys was born in Haverford, Pennsylvania and died in the same place. He was the son of Joshua Humphreys and Sarah Williams, grandson of Daniel Humphreys and Hannah Wynne (daughter of Dr. Thomas Wynne). He was brother to Charles Humphreys. His residence, Pont Reading, is still a private residence. As a youth, Humphreys was apprenticed to a shipbuilder in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. During the American Revolutionary War he was active as a designer, and played a major part in planning Randolph, a frigate, and a 74-gun ship which was never built. After the war Humphreys became a shipbuilder in Philadelphia. When Congress in 1794 passed the Naval Act of 1794 providing for the construction of six frigates, it called on him to design them. He was appointed Naval Constructor 28 June 1794 and began work on these ships, the beginnings of the U.S. Navy. Reputedly, one of the inspirations for his frigate designs was the South Carolina. United States was built by Humphreys in Philadelphia, and was the first of the new ships to be launched on 10 May 1797. These vessels
    9.00
    3 votes
    20
    7.50
    4 votes
    21
    6.20
    5 votes
    22

    Bruce Nelson

    • Boats Designed: Young America
    Bruce Nelson is a University of Michigan graduate in Naval Architecture. He has been most notable as a principal yacht designer for the America’s Cup contenders and America One challenge. Nelson is a veteran America's Cup racer as well as designer, he teamed with Dennis Conner on three Stars & Stripes boats (12-meter, catamaran, and IACC) from 1985 to 1995 as both a racer and designer. In 1995, he was the principal designer for the PACT 95 defense syndicate yacht Young America, which was ultimately chosen to be the defender. Nelson is also an Etchells 22 sailor of some note, having won many local regattas in the San Diego fleet at the National level. Bruce Nelson and Bruce Marek were the principles of a prolific San Diego California yacht design team, Nelson Marek, formed in 1979. Their first custom design was the incredibly successful One Ton "RUSH". Built in just 72 days, and launched 3 hours before the San Diego Yachting Cup, it's lived up to its name. It was the most successful racing yacht in the U.S. in 1980 winning 21 races including the North American One Tons, Chicago to Mackinac, Port Huron to Mackinac, and Great Lakes champion. Nelson continues to operate Nelson Marek,
    7.25
    4 votes
    23
    William Symonds

    William Symonds

    • Ship classes designed: Albion class ship of the line
    Sir William Symonds CB FRS (24 September 1782, Bury St Edmunds – 30 March 1856, aboard the French steamship Nil, Strait of Bonifacio, Sardinia) was Surveyor of the Navy in the Royal Navy from 9 June 1832 to October 1847, and took part in the naval reforms instituted by the Whig First Lord of the Admiralty Sir James Robert George Graham in 1832. He was the second son of a naval captain, Thomas Symonds (?-1793) and his second wife, and first went to sea on, HMS London, in September 1794. Serving in Lord Bridport's fleet at the Battle of Groix on 23 June 1795 and during the 1797 Spithead mutiny, he was promoted to lieutenant on 14 October 1801. However, despite service at sea for the whole duration of the Napoleonic Wars (in which experiences of being outsailed by French ships left him with an obsession for speed, wide beams and sharp design in his later designs for sailing ships) and showing fine seamanship, he was promoted no further (though between 1819 and 1825 he was captain of the port at Malta). Using a minor legacy from Admiral Sir William Cornwallis (who left his estate to his best friend's widow, Symonds' sister), in 1821 Symonds built an experimental yacht, which was copied
    7.25
    4 votes
    24
    7.00
    4 votes
    25
    7.00
    4 votes
    26
    Edward Burgess

    Edward Burgess

    • Boats Designed: Gossoon
    Edward Burgess (1848–1891) was an American yacht designer, born June 30, 1848 in West Sandwich, Massachusetts. Edward is fifth son of Benjamin Franklin Burgess (1818–1876) and Cordelia Williams Ellis(1821–1876). The Burgess family were merchants who made their money in the West Indies trade and lost it in 1879. They had a summer residence in Beverly, Massachusetts. Edward was educated at Harvard, graduating in 1871, and became secretary of the Boston Society of Natural History, in which capacity he edited the publications of the society, and published several memoirs on anatomical subjects. In 1879 he became instructor in entomology at Harvard, remaining until 1883. He traveled in Europe, and, in an amateur way, studied the principles of naval architecture, bringing his knowledge and judgment to the practical test of designing and building vessels for his own use. His success in this line was so marked that when, in 1883, a reverse of fortune threw him upon his own resources for a livelihood, he naturally turned to the designing of sailing yachts. Several of his boats won fame in the waters of the eastern United States, and when, in 1884, it became necessary to build a large sloop
    7.00
    4 votes
    27
    7.00
    4 votes
    28
    7.00
    4 votes
    29
    7.00
    4 votes
    30
    10.00
    2 votes
    31
    9.50
    2 votes
    32
    Donald McKay

    Donald McKay

    Donald McKay (September 4, 1810 – September 20, 1880) was a Canadian-born American designer and builder of sailing ships. He was born in Jordan Falls, Shelburne County on Nova Scotia's South Shore. In 1826 he moved to New York, working for shipbuilders Brown & Bell and Isaac Webb. In 1841, he opened his first yard in Newburyport and moved to East Boston in 1845, building substantial packet ships for the Atlantic emigrant route. McKay later designed and built some of the most successful clippers ever built. His house in East Boston is on the National Register of Historic Places. He was the great-great-grandfather of the American actor, author, and artist Gardner McKay (1932–2001). McKay's designs were characterized by a long fine bow with increasing hollow and waterlines. He was perhaps influenced by the writings of John W. Griffiths, designer of the China clipper Rainbow in 1845. The long hollow bow helped to penetrate rather than ride over the wave produced by the hull at high speeds, reducing resistance as hull speed is approached. Hull speed is the natural speed of a wave the same length as the ship, in knots, , where LWL = Length of Water Line in feet. His hulls had a shorter
    5.60
    5 votes
    33

    John W. Griffiths

    • Boats Designed: Sea Witch
    John Willis Griffiths (October 6, 1809 – April 29, 1882) was an American naval architect who designed the first true clipper ship. His first ship, the Rainbow, was viewed with shock as a difference in design, until she made the round trip from New York to Canton in 180 days instead of the normal year. Biography: Larrie D. Ferreiro (2007), “A Biographical Sketch of John Willis Griffiths from Primary and Archival Sources”, Nautical Research Journal 52/4 pp. 221–228
    6.50
    4 votes
    34

    Laurie Davidson

    • Boats Designed: NZL 32
    Laurie Davidson (born 1927) of New Zealand is an internationally renowned sailing yacht designer. He is most notable for his International America's Cup Class sailboats which successfully challenged and defended the America's Cup sailing trophy. He was inducted into the America's Cup Hall of Fame in 2007.
    6.50
    4 votes
    35
    Uffa Fox

    Uffa Fox

    • Ship classes designed: Pegasus Dinghy
    Uffa Fox, CBE (15 January 1898 – 26 October 1972) was an English boat designer and sailing enthusiast. Uffa Fox was born on the Isle of Wight and was raised in East Cowes. He lived for a while in Puckaster on the Isle of Wight. He was responsible for many of the developments which have contributed to the modern popularity of Dinghy sailing. He first introduced the technique of planing to dinghy racing, and was influential in the introduction of trapezing. In about 1943 he designed a 27 ft lifeboat to be dropped from Vickers Warwick aircraft when rescuing downed aircrew or mariners. An example of this craft and of others built and/or designed by Uffa Fox are in the collections of the Classic Boat Museum at East Cowes, Isle of Wight. These boats could be released from under the aeroplane retarded by six 32 ft diameter parachutes. Although initially adapted for the Warwick, the lifeboat was subsequently also carried by Air-Sea Rescue Lancasters and B-17 Flying Fortresses. The museum also holds a large collection of photographs by and about Uffa Fox He became a friend of the Duke of Edinburgh in 1949 and they raced together at Cowes Week on many occasions. He also took the Royal
    6.50
    4 votes
    36

    Hans Groop

    • Ship classes designed: H-boat
    Hans Groop, born 1932 in Vaasa is a Finnish yacht designer based in Helsinki. He has designed more than a hundred yachts and motorboats, the most famous being the H-boat, one of the most popular yacht classes in the world. Hans Groop has been a lifelong member of the HSS - a leading yachtclub for smaller keelboats in the Nordics. The club initiated the H-boat in 1967 in order to replace the popular but by then outmoded Hai-boat. Some of his other designs are the H-35, H-40, H-star, H-323, Targa 42, Targa 96, Finnsailor 34 and 29, Degerö 33, Joe 17, Joe 34, Netta, IS 400, Artina 29 and Artina 33 as well as a lot of one-off boats.
    7.67
    3 votes
    37
    7.67
    3 votes
    38
    Hubert Scott-Paine

    Hubert Scott-Paine

    • Ship classes designed: British Power Boat Company Type Two 63 ft HSL
    Hubert Scott-Paine (11 March 1891 – 14 April 1954) was a British aircraft and boat designer, record-breaking power boat racer, entrepreneur, inventor, and sponsor of the winning entry in the 1922 Schneider Trophy. Hubert Paine was born in Shoreham, England, on 11 March 1891, to Henry Paine and Rosannah (née Scott). He was educated at Shoreham Grammar School. Scott-Paine worked for Noel Pemberton Billing dealing in yachts, eventually in 1913 forming Pemberton-Billing Ltd (with 'Supermarine' as the telegraphic address), with Hubert the factory manager at Woolston, Hampshire. In 1916 Scott-Paine bought the company and renamed it the Supermarine Aviation Company Limited, building flying boats for the British Admiralty. Reginald Mitchell (of Spitfire fame) was employed at this time and the company greatly expanded. Hubert married Alice Brenda Hockey in 1917, having 4 children. By this time he had changed his surname by hyphenating his parent's surnames to create Scott-Paine. In February 1919 Scott-Paine started the first cross-channel flying boat service, between Woolston and the Channel Islands and Le Havre, using converted Supermarine AD Flying Boats. His company was named the British
    9.00
    2 votes
    39

    Paul Bert Elvstrøm

    • Ship classes designed: H-boat
    Paul Bert Elvstrøm (born February 25, 1928 in Copenhagen) is a yachtsman from Denmark. He has won four gold medals at the Olympic Games and won world championships eleven times in eight different types of boat, including Snipe, Soling, Star, Flying Dutchman and Finn. He competed in eight Olympic Games from 1948 to 1988, being one of only four persons ever (the others are sailor Ben Ainslie and athletes Carl Lewis in the long jump and Al Oerter in the discus) to win four consecutive individual gold medals (1948, '52, '56, '60), first time in a Firefly, subsequently in Finns. In his last two Olympic games he sailed the very high performance Tornado Catamaran class, which is normally sailed by two fit young men, with his daughter Inge Trine Elvstrøm as forward hand. Elvstrøm is also noted as a developer of sails and sailing equipment. One of his most successful innovations was a new type of self-bailer. The design is still in production under the Andersen brand and has been widely copied. The new features were a wedge shaped venturi that closes automatically if the boat grounds or hits an obstruction, and a flap that acts as a non return valve to minimise water coming in if the boat
    9.00
    2 votes
    40
    Peter Pett

    Peter Pett

    • Boats Designed: HMS Leopard
    Peter Pett, (6 August 1610 – ? 1672) was an English Master Shipwright, and Second Resident Commissioner of Chatham Dockyard. He is noted for the incident concerning the protection of his scale models and drawings of the King's Fleet during the Dutch Raid on the Medway, in Kent in June 1667, during the Second Anglo-Dutch War. Pett was the son of the King's Master Shipwright Captain Phineas Pett. He was introduced to King Charles I of England in 1634 and was ordered to construct a new Thgird Rate ship of 500 tons at Woolwich Dockyard, to be named the Leopard. With the construction of the Leopard underway, Charles decided that he would have a ship built larger and more ornate than any of her predecessors. In June 1634 whilst at Woolwich and on the Leopard with the King, Phineas Pett, Peter's father, relates: "His Highness, calling me aside, privately acquainted me of his princely resolution for the building of a great new ship, which he would have me undertake...." Under the watchful eye of his father Phineas, who had drawn up the plans for this great ship Peter Pett so built 'HMS Sovereign of the Seas' at Woolwich Dockyard. One of the largest ship in the world at that time, the
    9.00
    2 votes
    41
    6.25
    4 votes
    42
    Ben Lexcen

    Ben Lexcen

    • Boats Designed: Australia II
    Ben Lexcen AM born Robert Miller (19 March 1936 – 1 May 1988) was an Australian yachtsman and marine architect. He is famous for the winged keel design applied to Australia II which, in 1983, became the first non-American yacht to win the prestigious America's Cup in 132 years. Born in the coastal town of Newcastle in the Hunter Valley region of New South Wales, he left school at age 14 to pursue a locomotive mechanic's apprenticeship but soon found his attention turning to sailboats. At 16, he designed his first sailboat The Comet with his friend William Bennett in Hamilton, NSW, and began to make a name for himself in local competition. With friend Craig Whitworth, he founded a boatbuilding, sailmaking and shipchandlery firm (Miller and Whitworth) and designed boats part-time as well. One of his lasting early successes was the design that became the International Contender. It was selected in 1967, in multi boat trials, as a potential Olympic successor to the Finn dinghy. The Contender was awarded International status in 1968 and now has fleets in more than twelve countries throughout the world. Miller competed in the 1972 Munich Olympics representing Australia in the Soling
    7.33
    3 votes
    43

    United States Maritime Commission

    • Ship classes designed: Liberty ship
    The United States Maritime Commission was an independent executive agency of the U.S. federal government that was created by the Merchant Marine Act of 1936, passed by Congress on June 29, 1936, and replaced the United States Shipping Board which had existed since World War I. It was intended to formulate a merchant shipbuilding program to design and build five hundred modern merchant cargo ships to replace the World War I vintage vessels that comprised the bulk of the United States Merchant Marine, and to administer a subsidy system authorized by the Act to offset the cost differential between building in the U.S. and operating ships under the American flag. It also formed the United States Maritime Service for the training of seagoing ship's officers to man the new fleet. The purpose of the Maritime Commission was multifold as described in the Merchant Marine Act's Declaration of Policy.The first role was to formulate a merchant shipbuilding program to design and then have built over a ten year period 500 modern fast merchant cargo ships which would replace the World War I-vintage vessels which made up the bulk of the U.S. Merchant Marine prior to the Act. Those ships were
    7.33
    3 votes
    44

    Hercules Linton

    • Boats Designed: Cutty Sark
    Hercules Linton (1 January 1837 - 15 May 1900) was a Scottish surveyor, designer, shipbuilder, antiquarian and local councillor, best known as the designer of the Cutty Sark and partner in the yard of Scott and Linton which built her. He was born in Inverbervie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. On his nineteenth birthday in 1855 Hercules Linton was apprenticed to Alexander Hall and Sons who at the time, were the leading shipbuilders in Aberdeen and whose schooner Scottish Maid (1839) with its sharp bow and entry helped coin the term Aberdeen Bow. Linton progressed through his apprenticeship and eventually rose to a senior position at Alexander Hall and Sons. Eventually he left Alexander Hall and Sons to become a Lloyd's Register Surveyor based at the Lloyds offices in Liverpool and subsequently moved to the Liverpool Underwriters Registry where from early in 1862 he was assisting John Jordan who was the Chief Surveyor. It is thought that he left the Liverpool Underwriters Association in May 1864 but still associated on a free-lance basis. In May 1868, Linton entered into a shipbuilding partnership with William Dundas Scott to form the firm of Scott & Linton, shipbuilders of Dumbarton, on
    8.50
    2 votes
    45
    Phil Bolger

    Phil Bolger

    • Boats Designed: HMS Surprise
    Philip C. Bolger (December 3, 1927–May 24, 2009), prolific boat designer, was born and lived in Gloucester, Massachusetts. He began work full-time as a draftsman for boat designers Lindsay Lord and then John Hacker in the early 1950s. Bolger also cites being influenced by mentors L.F. Herreshoff, Nicholas Montgomery, Howard Chapelle and his own brother Bill Bolger. Bolger's first boat design was a 32-foot (9.75 m) sportfisherman published in the January 1952 issue of Yachting magazine. He subsequently designed more than 668 different boats, making him one of the most prolific boat designers of the 20th century, from the solidly conventional to extremely innovative, from a 114-foot-10-inch (35 m) replica of an eighteenth-century naval warship, the frigate Surprise (ex-Rose), to the 6-foot-5-inch (1.96 m) plywood box-like dinghy Tortoise. Although his designs ranged through the full spectrum of boat types, Bolger tended to favor simplicity over complexity. Many of his hulls are made from sheet materials — typically plywood — and have hard chines. A subclass of these designed in association with Harold Payson called Instant Boats were so named because they were intended to be easily
    8.50
    2 votes
    46

    William Doughty

    • Boats Designed: USS Frolic
    William Doughty was a United States naval architect who designed many of the sailing 74s. He designed the President, Independence, United States 74s, Peacock class, Erie class, Java and Guerrier, North Carolina 74s class, Brandywine 44s Class, brigs, revenue cutters, and Baltimore Clipper model.
    8.50
    2 votes
    47
    10.00
    1 votes
    48
    10.00
    1 votes
    49
    Jacques-Noël Sané

    Jacques-Noël Sané

    • Ship classes designed: Annibal class ship of the line
    Jacques-Noël Sané (18 February 1740 - 22 August 1831) was a French naval engineer, one of the most successful shipbuilders of the Age of Sail. Sané studied under Duhamel du Monceau. His designs were so successful that he was nicknamed "The Naval Vauban". His new design expressed itself fully with the Océan, built in 1790: the hull was simple with straight lines, minimal ornaments, and curved sides. The stern was almost integrated in the hull. The performance of his ships of the line were almost comparable to those of a frigate. English shipyards of the time often copied the lines of French vessels which had been taken. The masts were both thinner and higher, but also stronger than the 18th century designs. The aft sail plan on the mizzen had taken its definitive shape around 1780; Topgallant sails were common, which allowed for varying the area of sail presented to the wind with more subtlety. This allowed to the ships to point further into the wind. The hull shape did not improve as much as sail design and the speed was not improved as much as became possible with later clipper hull designs which reduced leeway. The French navy of the time was organised around three ranks : Under
    10.00
    1 votes
    50

    Ole Aanderud Larsen

    • Boats Designed: Endurance
    Ole Aanderud Larsen (December 18, 1884 – October 6, 1964) was a ship designer and businessman from Norway. He was born in Tønsberg, and died in Sandefjord, in the county of Vestfold. Larsen is best known for designing the Endurance, the three-masted barquentine in which Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed for the Antarctic on the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition in 1914. He was the first chairman and one of the founders of Jotun Group Private Ltd., a company started in Sandefjord to sell specialized paints and coatings to the shipping industry that has expanded worldwide and now sells a diverse range of paints and coatings for all kind of industries.
    10.00
    1 votes
    51
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    3 votes
    52
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    3 votes
    53
    7.00
    3 votes
    54
    École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

    École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

    The École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) is one of the two Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology and is located in Lausanne, Switzerland. The school was founded by the Swiss Federal Government with the stated mission to: The sister institution in the German-speaking part of Switzerland is the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETH Zürich or ETHZ). Associated with several specialised research institutes, the two sister institutes form the ETH Domain, which is directly dependent on the Federal Department of Home Affairs. EPFL is ranked among the top universities in the world. Founded in 1853 as a private school under the name École Spéciale de Lausanne, it became the technical department of the public Académie de Lausanne in 1869. When the latter was reorganized and acquired the status of a university in 1890, the technical faculty changed its name to École d'Ingénieurs de l'Université de Lausanne. In 1946, it was renamed the École polytechnique de l'Université de Lausanne (EPUL). In 1969, the EPUL was separated from the rest of the University of Lausanne and became a federal institute under its current name. EPFL, like ETHZ, is thus directly controlled by the
    7.00
    3 votes
    55
    7.00
    3 votes
    56
    7.00
    3 votes
    57

    Carl Alberg

    • Ship classes designed: Bristol 27
    Carl Alberg (1900 – 31 August 1986) was a Swedish born yacht designer known for his influence in early fiberglass boats. He moved to the United States in 1925 where he began working as a rigger then later as a spar maker. Alberg was then hired by John Alden as a designer. His successful career and current fame as a designer however can be linked back to his partnership with Pearson Yachts and early fiberglass yacht construction. Their first collaboration was the Pearson Triton, a 28 foot fiberglass yacht which today is still frequently seen sailing oceans around the world. Alberg later designed several other models for Pearson yachts. He also designed the first model for Bristol yachts. One of his most famous and popular designs is also one of his earliest, the Alberg 30 which was built by Whitby Boatworks in Canada as a one design club racer. Though this boat had a record breaking production run of over 750 boats spanning 22 years and proved a good platform for ocean cruising. Another successful partnership was with Cape Dory Yachts who produced 10 different models designed by Alberg.
    8.00
    2 votes
    58
    6.67
    3 votes
    59
    Samuel Hartt Pook

    Samuel Hartt Pook

    • Boats Designed: Ocean Telegraph
    Samuel Hartt Pook (January 17, 1827 – March 30, 1901) was a Boston-based American naval architect noted for designing very fast clipper ships. Pook designed several very fast clippers, including the Surprise, Witchcraft, Herald of the Morning and Northern Light, all of which made passages, prior to 1861, from an American East Coast port to San Francisco, via Cape Horn in fewer than 100 days, a speedy passage for the period. He was involved in the design of the 1850 clipper barque Race Horse. Pook also designed the 1853 clipper Challenger and the Red Jacket, a holder of the speed record for the New York-Liverpool and Liverpool-Melbourne passages. Pook was less successful in his design for the Civil War-era ironclad Galena, which was found, in combat conditions, to suffer from ineffective armoring. Pook's father was the naval architect Samuel Moore Pook, who designed the far more successful City-class Ironclads of the same period.
    6.67
    3 votes
    61
    German Frers

    German Frers

    • Boats Designed: Il Moro di Venezia
    Germán Frers (born July 4, 1941 in Argentina) is a naval architect renowned for designing successful racing yachts. He designed his first yacht in 1958. There is a design team consisting of Germán Frers and his son, also named Germán Frers, supported by a team of engineers, architects and designers, some of whom have been with the company for more than 25 years. The company has designed more than 1,000 yachts. The designs range from exotic super yachts to no-nonsense racing hulls. Yachts designed by the Frers team have won many different yachting events around the world including: the Admiral’s Cup, Onion Patch, Bermuda Race, Transpacific, Whitbread Round the World Race, Sardinia Cup, Buenos Aires-Rio Race, S.O.R.C. (Southern Ocean Racing Circuit), Kenwood Cup, Copa del Rey, San Francisco Big Boat Series, Giraglia Race, Settimana delle Bocche, Two Ton Cup World Championship, Martini Middle Sea Race and the Maxi World Championship. Successful yachts designed by Frers include: Scaramouche I and II, Noryema X, Recluta, Hitchhiker, Retaliation I and II, Ragamuffin IV and V, Congere, Morning Star 45', Morning Star 50', Bribon IV and V, Nitissima, Enteara, Volcano, Kodiak, Flyer,
    5.50
    4 votes
    62
    9.00
    1 votes
    63
    Éric Tabarly

    Éric Tabarly

    • Boats Designed: Hydroptère
    Éric Tabarly (July 24, 1931 in Nantes – June 14, 1998) was a notable French yachtsman. A former officer in the French navy who is often considered the father of French yachting. Tabarly was a record-setting distance sailor who won several notable races aboard his boats, all named Pen Duick. His achievements inspired many French sailors, including Alain Colas, Olivier de Kersauson, Gérard Petitpas, Éric Loizeau, Marc Pajot, Daniel Gilard, Titouan Lamazou, Philippe Poupon, Michel Desjoyeaux, Jean Le Cam to compete in long distance solo sailing. He was lost at sea when struck by a gaff during heavy swell and knocked overboard from his yacht near Wales while on his way to the Fife Regatta in Scotland. His body was recovered five weeks later off the coast of Ireland by a French fishing trawler. Tabarly was a two-time champion of the OSTAR, winning in 1964 — for which he was awarded the Légion d'honneur — and 1976. He also competed twice in the Whitbread Round the World Race, finishing second in 1973 and seventh in 1993. Media related to The Pen Duick at Wikimedia Commons
    9.00
    1 votes
    64
    9.00
    1 votes
    65

    Frank Bethwaite

    • Ship classes designed: 3000
    Frank Bethwaite DFC, OAM (1920, Wanganui, New Zealand – May 12, 2012) was an award-winning boat designer, author and Olympic meteorologist. Bethwaite built his first boat (a 16 ft sailing canoe) as a teenager. He joined the Royal New Zealand Air Force at the outbreak of the Second World War, becoming a flight instructor and test pilot before flying bombing missions over the Pacific during 1944 and 1945. He rose to the rank of Squadron Leader and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. After the war he became a commercial airline pilot for Tasman Airways (later Air New Zealand). Bethwaite had four children with his wife Nel: Christine, Mark (an Olympic and World Championship competitor), Nicola (also an Olympic and World Championship competitor) and Julian (World Championship Competitor and boat designer). After settling in Sydney, Bethwaite designed a small boat suitable for his youngest children to use to learn how to sail. This became known as the Northbridge Junior (now known as the 9er). Bethwaite is most well known for designing the Tasar and Laser 2 Dinghy Classes. He was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 2000 for his services to sport. In 2006 he won an
    9.00
    1 votes
    66

    John Laurent Giles

    • Boats Designed: Yacht Lutine (C&N 60')
    • Ship classes designed: Jolly Boat
    John ('Jack') Laurent Giles (1901-1969) was a famous yacht designer . He and his company designed more than 1000 boats from cruisers and racing yachts to "megayachts". He is best known for his design of displacement sailing yachts like the famous 7.6 meter Vertue of which 230 boats made, or Wanderer III. His famous Myth of Malham, a revolutionary small displacement yacht, was inspired by developments in aeronautics; the novel design helped win the Fastnet race in 1947 and 1949. The updated Miranda IV of 1951 had a rudder separate from the aft of the keel which heralded the arrival of the modern period of yacht design. Laurent Giles described as part of his design philosophy that a yacht should have His boats were designed to maintain a steady course with minimal action by the helmsman but respond instantly to the helm if the need arose.. He was awarded the honour of Royal Designer for Industry in 1951.
    9.00
    1 votes
    67

    Knud Olsen

    • Ship classes designed: OK
    Knud Olsen (1919 - 2010) Præstø, Denmark) is a Danish builder and designer of boats, who was the designer of one of the most popular sailing dinghies in use over the past 50 years, the OK Dinghy, which became an ISAF International Class in 1974. The 50th anniversary of the design of the dinghy was marked by the largest ever OK Dinghy World Championships held at Leba on the Polish coast in July 2007. Olsen was born in 1919 in Præstø, Denmark. In 1939, he and his brother, Bjørn, formed a boatbuilding business and designed and built several boats until a shortage of boatbuilding material caused by World War II ended the business. In the early 1950s, he joined the Danish company, A. P. Botved, who were producing speedboats, and worked there until he started his own business in Bandholm in 1961. He designed and built a number of boats including the Bandholm 26, the Bianca 27 and the Great Dane 28, which were the first Danish boats to be built using fibreglass hulls, the Bandholm 20, Bandholm 30, the Mariboat and the Bandholm 24. In 1956, Danish architect, Axel Damgaard Olsen, asked Olsen to create a design for a light, fast, single-handed sailing dinghy that could be built and sailed by
    9.00
    1 votes
    68

    Bruce Kirby

    • Ship classes designed: Laser
    Bruce Robert William Kirby (born 2 February 1929) is a Canadian-born yacht designer, dinghy and offshore racer and journalist. His designs span boats from the extremely popular single crew Laser (sailboat) to America's Cup challengers. He continues his design work in his American company Bruce Kirby Marine. Bruce Kirby was born and raised in Ottawa and began sailing as a member of the Britannia Yacht Club on Lac Deschenes with his father and older brother David. He likes to say he was late getting started because he was born in January and didn't get sailing until June. When he was 8 and his brother was 10 their father designed and built them a 12-foot double ended sloop; with a self bailing cockpit. The boat performed well and gave the youngsters a boat to use when they were not crewing aboard the family's 24-foot Velvet. By World War II the boys were actively racing a 14-foot Peterborough catboat, which had been left to them by a family friend who had been sent overseas. From there it was a small but significant step to the International 14 Class, and by war's end the Kirby boys, now teenagers, were crewing in this hot dinghy class, and borrowing boats from absent owners whenever
    6.33
    3 votes
    69
    6.33
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    70
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    3 votes
    71
    6.33
    3 votes
    72
    Axis Group Yacht Design

    Axis Group Yacht Design

    Axis Group Yacht Design is an Italian naval architecture and marine engineering design company specialized in the over 40 meter luxury motoryacht market. Axis designed the first worldwide hybrid superyacht below 50 meter to achieve the Platinum level of RINA’s Green Plus class notation. Founded in USA in 1996, by naval architect & marine engineer Horacio Bozzo, Axis Group Yacht Design has moved to Viareggio, Italy in 2001. Since then, it has established tight collaboration with the most renowned shipyards, such as Perini Navi, Benetti, Azimut, Codecasa, Sanlorenzo, Kingship, among others. In 2011 Axis has opened a new overseas representative office in Shanghai, which will be based at the Jin Mao Tower, the fifth tallest building in the world. Among Axis Group Yacht Design recent engineering projects: the 55 meter (180 ft) Ice Class Motoryacht Vitruvius Picchiotti by Perini Navi, the 40 meter (131 ft) 40Alloy Sanlorenzo and the Green Voyager, an innovative 44 meter (144 ft) Hybrid motoryacht by Kingship. In occasion of the Monaco Boat Show on September 2009, it has been assigned three Green Plus certifications to three megayachts built in Italy, whereas in China, the Green Voyager,
    7.50
    2 votes
    73

    Barry Bucknell

    • Ship classes designed: Mirror
    Barry Bucknell (Robert Barraby Bucknell; 26 January 1912 London – 21 February 2003 St Mawes, Cornwall, UK) was a BBC TV presenter who popularised Do It Yourself (DIY) in the United Kingdom. Bucknell served an apprenticeship with Daimler, after which he joined his father's building and electrical firm in St Pancras, London. He was a conscientious objector in World War II and worked instead as a London fireman during a period which included the blitz. He later served as a Labour member of St Pancras council. After his first child was born, Bucknell was asked by a BBC radio producer to give a talk on becoming a parent. It was after this that he was asked to demonstrate home improvements on TV. Initially, he was one of a number of experts answering viewers' questions, but his manner, both magisterial and welcoming, was so much liked he was given his own spot on About The Home in 1956, showing Joan Gilbert how to put up shelves or make a tool box. A generation of women who had worked in wartime factories or served in the forces appreciated Bucknell's humorous and uncondescening manner over jobs that, before the war, were regarded as "not for women". Male viewers learned how to save
    7.50
    2 votes
    74

    Charles Mower

    • Ship classes designed: R-class racing sloop
    Charles Drown Mower of New York was a noted yacht designer and author, and was at one time design editor of the Rudder magazine and a contributing author to Motor Boating magazine. He starting studying yacht design in 1895 with Arthur Binney and later Bowdoin B. Crowninshield, moving on to a partnership with Thomas D. Bowes in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1911. During the first World War he served as a lieutenant commander in the Construction Corps, Naval Reserve. After the war Mower worked either alone or in partnership as Mower and Humphries Ltd. He was also a chief naval architect at Henry B. Nevins, Inc., at City Island, New York, and in 1937 was associated with the office of Nelson & Reid, Inc. He was also official measurer of the Manhasset Bay Yacht Club, the Cruising Club of America and the New York Yacht Club. His wife was Francis Petriken Mower, who died in August 1967. His son, Charles Petriken Mower, (Born 12/28/1920 Died 7/31/01) married Jane Stilwell Mower (Born 4/18/1924 Died 1/8/2001), who was daughter of John Stilwell and niece of Joseph Stilwell, the noted WWII general. His grand children are Mildred Pastula 11/06/1954 to present and Charles Stilwell Mower
    7.50
    2 votes
    75
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    2 votes
    76
    7.50
    2 votes
    77

    George O'Day

    • Ship classes designed: Day Sailer
    George O'Day (19 May 1923 – 26 July 1987) was an American sailor, Olympic champion and world champion, and boat designer. O'Day received a gold medal in the 5.5 Metre class at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome. He won the world champion title twelve times in various classes. Together with the English boat designer Uffa Fox, O'Day co-designed the sailboat called "Day Sailer". The boat was inducted into the American Sailboat Hall of Fame in 2003.
    6.00
    3 votes
    78
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    3 votes
    79
    7.00
    2 votes
    80
    Farr Yacht Design

    Farr Yacht Design

    • Ship classes designed: Farr 40
    Farr Yacht Design, founded by Bruce Farr in Auckland, New Zealand, is a racing yacht design firm now based in Annapolis, Maryland, United States. Though Bruce Farr and Russel Bowler both still work for the company as Vice Presidents, the firm is now led by Patrick Shaughnessy. Its yachts measure from 25 feet (7.6 m) to 125 feet (38 m). Farr develops custom and production yachts, including: interiors, sails, and hull design. Farr uses outside research and development with tank testing and wind tunnels. Farr-designed yachts have won and placed well in a broad range of races. Bruce Farr first achieved acclaim as a sailboat designer in the highly competitive 18 ft Skiff class, popular in Australia and New Zealand. Farr designs won the 18ft Skiff Giltinan World title several times in the early 70s. Starting in 1973, Bruce was able to focus full time on designing sailboats. Another New Zealander active as both a designer and sailor in the 18ft fleet, Russel Bowler, a civil engineer by training, introduced the fibreglass-foam sandwich construction technique to the 18 ft class in 1977 with a boat 1/3 lighter and possessing a lower wetted area than the competition. Starting in 1976, Bowler
    7.00
    2 votes
    81
    7.00
    2 votes
    82

    Robert Perry

    • Ship classes designed: Valiant 40 sailboat
    Robert H. Perry is a U.S. yacht designer based in Seattle, Washington. Among his designs are some of the most successful cruising yachts in modern cruising such as the Tayana 37 and Valiant 40. Through his career he has designed boats for many well recognized names in the yachting industry, such as Tayana, Cheoy Lee, Valiant, Baba, Ta Shing, Islander, Passport and Saga. Perry has taught yacht design at Evergreen State College. In 1957 when Robert H. Perry was twelve, he and his family moved from Sydney, Australia to Vancouver, British Columbia. He writes that the trip made a lasting impression on him and spurred his interest in yacht design. At the beginning of his ninth-grade year, his family moved to Mercer Island, Washington, an area renowned for its school system. Here, his interest in sailboats really clicked. He met famous designer William Garden, joined the local yacht club, and excelled at mechanical drawing. Perry graduated with a 1.69 GPA from Mercer Island High School in 1964. The only local college that would accept him (and on a probationary status) was Seattle University. He enrolled as a mechanical engineering student. After four years, he dropped out of college.
    7.00
    2 votes
    83
    Thomas Slade

    Thomas Slade

    • Boats Designed: HMS Tartar
    • Ship classes designed: Arrogant class ship of the line
    Sir Thomas Slade (1703/4–1771) was an English naval architect, most famous for designing HMS Victory, Lord Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Like many who rose to the pinnacle of the design of British sailing warships, Thomas Slade began as a shipwright in the Royal Dockyards. His uncle Benjamin Slade was Master Shipwright at Plymouth Dockyard (a master shipwright was responsible for all ship construction and repair at the dockyard in which he served). In 1744 Thomas became Deputy Master Shipwright at Woolwich Dockyard. On 22 November 1750 he replaced his uncle, who had died that year, as Master Shipwright at Plymouth. On 27 May 1752 he was transferred temporarily back to Woolwich Dockyard as Master Shipwright, and from there to Chatham Dockyard on 17 June 1752 and subsequently on 15 March 1753 to Deptford Dockyard, where he remained until 5 August 1755. He was appointed Surveyor of the Navy in August 1755 by George Anson, First Lord of the Admiralty, serving until his death in February 1771. For the first decade, he shared the appointment with William Bately, formerly the Deputy Surveyor of the Navy, until the latter's retirement in June 1765. On Bately's
    7.00
    2 votes
    84
    8.00
    1 votes
    85

    Jack Holt

    • Ship classes designed: Jacksnipe
    Jack Holt, OBE (1912–1995) was a prolific designer of sailing dinghies. His pioneering designs of dingies using plywood did much to popularise the sport of sailing in the period immediately following World War II. Born in Hammersmith, London near the River Thames Holt designed more than 40 boats, many of which are listed below. He worked for many years with fellow sailing enthusiast and businessman Beecher Moore. Jack Holt was awarded an OBE in 1979 for his services to sailing. Jack Holt has been associated with several sailing clubs. His premises were next door to Ranelagh Sailing Club, and he designed the Merlin Rocket and his National 12 designs there. In 1956 he was a co-founder of Wraysbury Lake Sailing Club He was closely associated with the London Corinthian Sailing Club, very close to his Putney premises A selection of Jack Holt plans are held in the archives of the National Maritime Museum Cornwall. In addition to designing boats, Jack was also a boatbuilder. His fittings business was in the loft above the boatbuilding workshop. Naturally he built all the boats he designed, but he also built boats designed by others, including the Albacore Jack collaborated with Glen and
    8.00
    1 votes
    86
    8.00
    1 votes
    87
    William Starling Burgess

    William Starling Burgess

    • Boats Designed: Ranger
    William Starling Burgess (December 25, 1878 – March 19, 1947) was a yacht designer, aviation pioneer, and naval architect. William Starling Burgess was one of the great, restless geniuses of American design, making his mark across an extraordinary range of fields, from aviation, naval architecture, and automotive design, to poetry, and perhaps typography. He was awarded the highest prize in aviation, the Collier Trophy in 1915, just two years after Orville Wright won it. In 1933 he partnered with Buckminster Fuller to design and build the radical Dymaxion Car. Between 1930 and 1937 he created three America's Cup-winning J-Class yachts, Enterprise, Rainbow and Ranger (the latter in partnership with Olin Stephens). Burgess was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Christmas day, 1878, the son of yacht designer Edward Burgess and Caroline "Kitty" Sullivant, a legendary beauty and the daughter of William Starling Sullivant, an eminent natural scientist. Both of Burgess' parents died within weeks of each other when he was 12, leaving him and his 3 year old brother to be raised by relatives. Like his father, Starling had a great mechanical and mathematical ability and a refined sense of line,
    8.00
    1 votes
    88
    5.67
    3 votes
    89

    Charles Ernest Nicholson

    • Boats Designed: Istria
    • Ship classes designed: Redwing
    Charles Ernest Nicholson (1868 - February 26, 1954) was a British yacht designer. He was born in 1868. Nicholson's first design of note was the Redwing class. The Bembridge sailing club met in October 1896 to agree the need for a shallow draughted yacht - to allow for the shoal waters of Bembridge Harbour - which could be sailed single-handed, to replace the expensive half racers. Nicholson designed the yacht in ten days, and by 1898 the fleet consisted of 16 boats, all built by the Camper & Nicholsons shipyard. In the early 1900s Nicholson developed a new powered craft which would enable the owners to come from their "big-boats" before and after the competitions. Named the Gelyce class, the name derived from the combined first and last letter of their respective wives: Gertie, Lucy, and Constance. In 1912, Nicholson introduced the 15mR design Istria with a Marconi rig, the first yacht in the world with a lightweight, laminated wood construction. This led to further developments and growing expertise in the use of lightweight materials which saw its fruition in the use of plywood in deck construction. This ultimately led to arguably Nicholson's most beautiful sailing creation, the
    6.50
    2 votes
    90

    Ian Proctor

    • Ship classes designed: Kestrel
    Ian Douglas Ben Proctor, FRSA, known as Ian Proctor, (12 July 1918-23 July 1992) was a prolific designer of both sailing dinghies and cruisers. His pioneering aluminium mast designs also revolutionised the sport of sailing. Proctor had more than one hundred designs to his credit, from which 65,000 boats were built. Some of his designs are listed below. Proctor was a son of Douglas McIntyre Proctor and Mary Albina Louise Proctor (née Tredwen). He was educated at Gresham's School in Holt, Norfolk. After leaving school, he studied at the University of London. In 1943, he married Elizabeth Anne Gifford Lywood, the daughter of Air Vice-Marshal O. G. Lywood, CB, CBE. They had three sons. From 1942 to 1946, during World War II, Proctor was a Flying Officer in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. From 1947 to 1948, he was Managing Director of Gosport Yacht Co., then, from 1948 to 1950, he was joint editor of Yachtsman Magazine. Ian Proctor first began to design dinghies professionally in 1950. The National 12 was soon followed by the Merlin Rocket. Proctor's early designs were met with immediate success, winning championships from 1950 to 1952. His design of Proctor Spars revolutionised
    6.50
    2 votes
    91
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    92
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    93

    Phil Morrison

    • Ship classes designed: Laser 2000
    Phil Morrison (born November 1946) is a British boat designer and racer rendered notable by the success of his many designs in many classes since 1967 as well as his own distinguished yacht racing career. He was born in Eastbourne, England. His designs embrace dinghies, yachts, rowing boats, and multihulls; he has been successful in a yacht and dinghy racing career since the late 1960s. He is noted for blending innovation with elegant well engineered structures and high performance, whilst also delivering users controllability and sailability. Morrison grew up in Eastbourne, during the late fifties and sixties. Joining the nearby Pevensey Bay Sailing Club he learnt to sail the National 12 Class racing dinghy. The National 12 is a development class were anyone can design and build new boats within specific restrictions, such as length, beam, weight and sail area. At the age of 18 he designed his first racing dinghy, a National 12 called "China Doll" (1967) which was built by "Spud" (Peter) Rowsell in Exmouth, commencing a long association between the designer and that Devon town. Morrison sailed China Doll with Pete Wargent very successfully and the design became popular, making his
    6.50
    2 votes
    94
    5.33
    3 votes
    95

    Angus Primrose

    • Boats Designed: Gipsy Moth IV
    Angus Primrose (missing at sea, 1980) was a designer and naval architect whose best known designs for around the world races included the Gypsy Moth IV of Sir Francis Chichester and Galway Blazer II (1969) of Commander Bill King. Primrose is presumed to have drowned during a gale "some 180 miles off the South Carolina coast" which sunk his 33 ft yacht (a Moody 33), the Demon of Hamble. Primrose is notable for his contribution to designs that changed some of the thinking behind cruising yachts. His Moody 33 (mk 1) centre cockpit design originated from his work in 1973 with A H Moody & Sons Ltd at Swanwick near Southampton. The boats were built in production by Marine Projects (Plymouth) Ltd, and led to the development of successive models: Moody 30, 36 and 39, all built at Plymouth. The custom Moody 42 was built by Moody's firm in Swanwick, with a centre cockpit and aft cockpit/deck saloon variants. In 1972 Angus Primrose designed the Warrior 35, built by Trident Marine Ltd. The long keel hull was also developed in various forms as the aft cockpit Challenger 35 and the deck saloon version the Voyager 35. Obituary courtesy of the Old Rendcombian Society newsletter 1981. Angus
    6.00
    2 votes
    96
    Bowdoin B. Crowninshield

    Bowdoin B. Crowninshield

    • Boats Designed: Adventuress
    Bowdoin Bradlee Crowninshield (1867–1948) was an American naval architect who specialized in the design of racing yachts. Born October 13, 1867 in New York, Crowninshield grew up in Marblehead, Massachusetts, into the wealthy Crowninshield family with long-standing ties to the sea. The family estate Crowninshield House was built by his father in 1870. His father was Benjamin Williams Crowninshield (1837–1892) and mother was Katherine May Bradlee (1844–1902). Through his paternal grandmother Sarah Gool Putnam (1810–1880) he was distant cousin of architect J. Pickering Putnam (1847–1917). His great-grandfather Benjamin Williams Crowninshield (1772–1851) had served as Secretary of the Navy, and his great-granduncle George Crowninshield Jr. (1766–1817) built the first luxury yacht in the United States, Cleopatra's Barge in 1816. His younger brother Francis Boardman Crowninshield (22 APR 1869– 19 MAY 1950), married heiress Louise Evelina du Pont (03 AUG 1877– 11 JUL 1958). His cousin once removed was Frederick Josiah Bradlee, Jr. (1892–1970) whose son was Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee (born 1921). Because of his many relations, he was known as "B.B." Crowninshield. After graduating
    6.00
    2 votes
    97
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    98
    Henri Dupuy de Lôme

    Henri Dupuy de Lôme

    • Boats Designed: French battleship La Gloire
    Stanislas Charles Henri Dupuy de Lôme (15 October 1816 – 1 February 1885) was a French naval architect. He was the son of a naval officer and was born in Ploemeur near Lorient, Brittany, in western France. He was educated at the École Polytechnique AND AT THE ENSTA. He was particularly active during the 1840–1870 period. After finishing his professional education, he went to England about 1842, and made a thorough study of iron shipbuilding and steam navigation. He wrote a report, subsequently published under the title of Mémoire sur la construction des bâtiments en Fer in 1844. After his return from England, Dupuy de Lôme started work at the arsenal in Toulon. At the time the only armed steamships in the French Navy were propelled by paddle-wheels, and there was great opposition to the introduction of steam power into line-of-battle ships. The paddle-wheel was seen to be unsuited to such large fighting vessels, and there was no confidence in the screw; while the great majority of naval officers in France, as well as in England, were averse to any decrease in sail spread. Dupuy de Lôme had carefully studied the details of Great Britain, which he had seen building at Bristol, and
    6.00
    2 votes
    99
    Isambard Kingdom Brunel

    Isambard Kingdom Brunel

    • Boats Designed: SS Great Britain
    Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (/ˈɪzəmbɑrd bruːˈnɛl/; 9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859), was an English mechanical and civil engineer who built bridges and dockyards, the Great Western Railway, a series of steamships including the first propeller-driven transatlantic steamship and numerous important bridges and tunnels. His designs revolutionised public transport and modern engineering. Though Brunel's projects were not always successful, they often contained innovative solutions to long-standing engineering problems. During his short career, Brunel achieved many engineering "firsts", including assisting in the building of the first tunnel under a navigable river and development of SS Great Britain, the first propeller-driven ocean-going iron ship, which was at the time (1843) also the largest ship ever built. Brunel set the standard for a very well built railway, using careful surveys to minimise grades and curves. This necessitated expensive construction techniques and new bridges and viaducts, and the two-mile-long Box Tunnel. One controversial feature was the wide gauge, a "broad gauge" of 7 ft 0 ⁄4 in (2,140 mm), instead of what was later to be known as 'standard gauge' of
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    William Henry White

    William Henry White

    • Ship classes designed: Alarm class torpedo gunboat
    Sir William Henry White (2 February 1845 – 27 February 1913) was a prolific British warship designer and Chief Constructor at the Admiralty. He was born in Devonport and became an apprentice at the naval dockyard there in 1859. In 1863 he obtained a scholarship to enter the newly formed Royal School of Naval Architecture in South Kensington, in London. After his apprenticeship he worked for the Admiralty on specifications and calculations for new ships, and became secretary to the then Chief Constructor of the Admiralty, Edward Reed, until the latter's resignation on 9 July 1870. He was then appointed instructor on naval design at the Royal School of Naval Architecture, and in 1872 became secretary of the Council of Construction which oversaw all Royal Navy ship construction. From 1872–1873 he worked at Pembroke and Portsmouth Dockyards. In March 1875 he was promoted to Assistant Constructor and married later in that year. He also published his A Manual of Naval Architecture. For the use of Officers of the Royal Navy, Shipbuilders. He resigned from the Admiralty in April 1883 and joined Sir William Armstrong's company as designer and manager of their warship construction. He
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    Samuel M. Pook

    • Ship classes designed: City Class Ironclad
    Samuel Moore Pook (1804 – 1878) was a Boston-based American naval architect and father of Samuel Hartt Pook, the noted clipper ship naval architect. In 1861, at the outbreak of the American Civil War, he designed the City class ironclads for James B. Eads. The City class ironclads, also known as "Pook Turtles" due to their distinctive shape, were the backbone of the naval flotilla deployed by the United States Navy on the Mississippi River System during the American Civil War.
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    Colin Archer

    Colin Archer

    • Boats Designed: Fram
    Colin Archer (22 July 1832 – 8 February 1921) was a Norwegian naval architect and shipbuilder from Larvik, Norway. His parents had immigrated to Norway from Scotland in 1825. Prior to his career as a naval architect in Norway, he spent time in Queensland, Australia, with several of his brothers, including Thomas. While there, he sailed with a cargo up the Fitzroy River, Queensland "when it was almost if not quite unknown". He and his shipyard were known for building durable and safe ships. The most notable single ship built by Colin Archer was the Fram, which participated in expeditions to the North Pole and, later, in Roald Amundsen's historic first expedition to the South Pole; Fram is now preserved in the Fram Museum on Bygdøy, Oslo, Norway. Archer also designed a sturdy sailing vessel class for the Redningsselskapet (The Norwegian Lifeboat institution), which was used for many years and now is referred to as a Colin Archer; the prototype rescue lifeboat, "Colin Archer RS 1", is still afloat and in use as a floating museum. Several other original vessels Redningsselskapet are still sailing including the Frithjof Wiese RS40. Archer spent much time calculating how an efficient
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    Tony Castro

    • Ship classes designed: SB3
    Antonio Maria de Lancastre de Mello e Castro, Conde das Antas, Visconde de Pernes, born in Lisbon, Portugal. Has been designing sailing and motor yachts for 35 years, with about 8,000 boats launched to date that include custom boats and One-design production models. His firm is based on the South Coast of England in Hamble, Southampton After leaving Ron Holland’s design team in 1980, Castro's first significant racing yacht design was Justine III, for Frank Woods of the National Yacht Club, Ireland the first and only yacht to win the One Ton Cup with five straight firsts. The same owner then built JUSTINE IV crowned best Offshore Admiral's Cupper in 1983 Then followed IZTANOTHER PURLA, a 43 footer, which missed being chosen for the British Admirald's Cup Team but then went on to win all 7 races in Cowes Week beating all the Admiral's Cuppers helmed by the late Sir Peter Blake and his NZ crew from Steinlager ! A boat full of innovative ideas. He followed that up with 2 x Quarter-Ton World Championships, MCDONALDS AND SCANDINAVIAN SEAWAYS a Half-Ton cup ( Production) with BALTHAZAR and a 6m JI World Championshop and Coupe de France " THISBE" He was appointed by a member of Royal Cork
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    Sparkman & Stephens

    • Ship classes designed: Dolphin 24 Sailboat
    Sparkman & Stephens is a naval architecture and yacht brokerage firm with main offices on 5th Avenue in New York City, USA and offices in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida and Newport, Rhode Island, USA. The firm performs design and engineering of new vessels for pleasure, commercial, and military use. Sparkman & Stephens also acts as a yacht and ship brokerage. The firm offers similar design and engineering services for the performance optimization of existing yachts. Their designs have won most of the major international yacht races such as the America's Cup, for several decades, including a string of victories in the Fastnet and Sydney to Hobart races. S&S has a number of custom yacht design projects as well as being designers for boat builders such as Nautor's Swan, Grand Banks Yachts, and Morris Yachts. During World War II the company was employed to design the hulls for the invaluable DUKW 'army duck' and the Ford GPA amphibious jeep. For this Roderick Stephens was awarded the Medal of Freedom, the United States army's highest civilian award. Sparkman & Stephens Inc was formally created on November 11, 1929, with five partners: Drake Sparkman and his younger brother James Sparkman,
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    David Sadler

    • Ship classes designed: Sadler 29
    David Sadler is a British yacht designer who was responsible for a number of classic production yachts during the period from 1960 to 1980. His designs include the Contessa 26, the Contessa 32, the Sadler 25, the Sadler 29 and the Sadler 32.
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    Hapag-Lloyd

    Hapag-Lloyd

    • Boats Designed: Berlin Express
    Hapag-Lloyd is a German transportation company comprising a cargo container shipping line, Hapag-Lloyd AG, which in turn owns other subsidiaries such as Hapag-Lloyd Ships and a cruise line, Hapag-Lloyd Cruises which is now integrated into TUI AG, Hanover. It was formed in 1970 as a merger of two 19th century companies, Hapag, which dated from 1847, and Norddeutscher Lloyd (NDL) or North German Lloyd (NGL), which was formed in 1856. Hapag-Lloyd was acquired in 1998 by TUI AG (Hanover) and became its fully owned subsidiary in 2002. In 2009, TUI sold a majority stake to a group of private investors. The main founders of Hapag and Lloyd in the 19th century were Berenberg Bank and H. J. Merck & Co. Hapag-Lloyd was formed in 1970 through a merger of Hamburg America Line (HAPAG) and the North German Lloyd. The Hamburg-Amerikanische Paketfahrt-Aktien-Gesellschaft for shipping across the Atlantic Ocean was founded in Hamburg. In 1912, Hapag built the first of their "Big Three" ocean liners; the Imperator, followed by her sister Vaterland. The third sister, Bismarck, was under construction at the outbreak of World War I and was completed after the war for White Star Line as the Majestic.
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    John Henslow

    • Boats Designed: HMS Amethyst
    • Ship classes designed: Mars class ship of the line
    Sir John Henslow (9 October 1730 – 22 September 1815) was Surveyor to the Navy (Royal Navy) a post he held jointly or solely from 1784 to 1806. He was 7th child of John Henslow a master carpenter in the dockyard at Woolwich Cape Henslow on Guadalcanal is named after him Among the vessels he designed were the Acute class gun-brigs and four frigates to the same design, the first of which was Phoebe. The Laurel class post ship sixth rates were a series of six ships built to his 1805 design. Perhaps his smallest vessels were the two Placentia-class sloops of 42 tons burthen, which he designed for coastal patrol duties off Newfoundland. His son John Prentis Henslow, solicitor, was father of John Stevens Henslow. He was also the grandfather of Francis Hartwell Henslowe, who was the son of Edward Prentis Henslow.
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    Jan Herman Linge

    • Ship classes designed: Yngling
    Jan Herman Linge (January 28, 1922 in Oslo, Norway – June 25, 2007) was a Norwegian engineer and boat designer. He was the son of Martin Linge, known for his war effort in Kompani Linge. Linge was born in Oslo in 1922. He was a member of the merchant navy for two years before undertaking a naval architecture course while financing his studies by working in a shipyard. During World War II, he joined the Norwegian resistance and was trained as a saboteur in the United Kingdom. He was captured on a mission and spent some time in a German prison camp. Linge completed his studies in 1949. Linge was an engineer from 1949 to 1956 in Westermoen Båtbyggeri og Mek Verksted, and was responsible for the design of the Tjeld class patrol boat. He later started his own boat design house, Jan H. Linge A/S, and has designed many recreational vessel for companies like Draco, Fjord and Windy. He was also a very active designer of sail boats. The Soling was selected as Olympic class in 1968, and participated in 8 Olympic games. The Yngling became an international class in 1979, and an Olympic class in the Athens Olympics in 2004. The designs by Linge are known by the "ling" suffix, such as Brisling,
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    Olin Stephens

    • Boats Designed: Ranger
    Olin James Stephens II (April 13, 1908 – September 13, 2008) was an American yacht designer of the 20th century. Stephens was born in New York, but spent his summers with his brother Rod, learning to sail on the New England coast. He also attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for a term. Stephens' name had a long history in connection with America's Cup. He assisted W. Starling Burgess with the design of the J-Class Ranger, which won the America's Cup in 1937, defeating the Royal Yacht Squadron's Endeavour II in four races. He was the original designer of six out of seven successful 12 Metre defenders of the America's Cup between 1958 and 1980, with the exception of Weatherly in 1962. Other than Ranger, the most remarkable of his defenders was the Intrepid. She had a rudder separate from her keel to reduce wetted surface and improve steering. Stephens had previously designed separate rudders on a number of increasingly large ocean racers of the 1960s, most notably Thomas Watson's state of the art Palawan III, before using it successfully on the Intrepid in 1967. After alterations by Britton Chance, Jr., she won the America's Cup again in 1970. Stephens also designed
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