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    1

    The End of Eternity

    • Year Released: 1955
    The End of Eternity by Isaac Asimov is a science fiction novel, with mystery and thriller elements, on the subjects of time travel and social engineering. The themes are very different from most of his robot and 'space opera' stories, and take a clever approach to time paradoxes. Some people consider it his best work, or at least one of his best. As of April 2009, a film adaptation—to be directed by Kevin Macdonald—is planned. In December 1953, Asimov was thumbing through a copy of the March 28, 1932 issue of Time when he noticed what looked at first glance like a drawing of the mushroom cloud of a nuclear explosion. A longer look showed him that the drawing was actually the Old Faithful geyser. However, he began pondering the question of what the implications would be if there had been a drawing of a mushroom cloud in a magazine from 1932, and he eventually came up with the plot of a time travel story. He began the story, called The End of Eternity on December 7, 1953, and finished it on February 6, 1954, by which time it was 25,000 words long. Asimov submitted the story to Galaxy Science Fiction, and within days received a call from Galaxy editor Horace L. Gold, rejecting the
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    2

    Foundation

    • Year Released: 1951
    Foundation is the first novel in Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy (later expanded into The Foundation Series). Foundation is a collection of five short stories, which were first published together as a book by Gnome Press in 1951 which, together, form a single plot. Foundation saw multiple publications—it also appeared in 1955 as part of Ace Double D-110 under the title "The 1,000-Year Plan." Four of the stories were originally published in Astounding Magazine (with different titles) between 1942 and 1944, and the fifth was added when they first appeared in book form. A further two books of short stories were published shortly after, and decades later, Asimov wrote two further sequel novels and two prequels. Later writers have added authorized tales to the series. The Foundation Series is often regarded as one of Isaac Asimov's best works, along with his Robot series. Foundation tells the story of a group of scientists who seek to preserve knowledge as the civilizations around them begin to regress. (0 F.E.) (First published as the book edition in 1951) Set in the year 0 F.E., The Psychohistorians opens on Trantor, the capital of the 12,000-year-old Galactic Empire. Though the
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    3

    Second Foundation

    • Year Released: 1953
    Second Foundation is the third novel published of the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov, and the fifth in the in-universe chronology. It was first published in 1953 by Gnome Press. Second Foundation saw multiple publications. The stories comprising this volume were originally published in Astounding Magazine (with different titles) between 1948 and 1950. Two other books of short stories were published shortly before, and decades later, Asimov wrote two further sequel novels and two prequels. Later writers have added authorized tales to the series. The Foundation series is often regarded as one of Isaac Asimov's best works, along with his Robot series. The term also describes the organization by that name which is the focus of the book. The organization's existence (and nothing more) had been revealed in Foundation, searched for in Foundation and Empire, and makes brief appearances in this novel. It would not be described in detail until Foundation's Edge. Part I: Search By the Mule is about The Mule's search for the elusive Second Foundation, with the intent of destroying it. The executive council of the Second Foundation is aware of the Mule's intent and, in the words of the First
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    4

    3000 Years of Fantasy and Science Fiction

    • Year Released: 1972
    3000 Years of Fantasy and Science Fiction is an anthology of fantasy and science fiction short stories, edited by L. Sprague de Camp and Catherine Crook de Camp. It was first published in both hardcover and paperback by Lothrop Lee & Shepard in 1972. It was the first such anthology assembled by the de Camps, preceding their later Tales Beyond Time (1973). The book collects eleven tales by various authors, with a foreword by Isaac Asimov and an overall introduction by the de Camps.
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    5

    A Gun for Dinosaur and Other Imaginative Tales

    • Year Released: 1963
    A Gun for Dinosaur and Other Imaginative Tales is a short story collection by science fiction and fantasy author L. Sprague de Camp, first published in hardback by Doubleday in 1963, and in paperback by Curtis Books in 1969. It has also been translated into German. Avram Davidson found the collection "a great disappointment," saying he could no longer enjoy de Camp's shorter work because the author typically "gets hold of a great idea -- and throws it away in playing for laughs of the feeblest conceivable sort."
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    6

    A Second Chance at Eden

    • Year Released: 1998
    A Second Chance at Eden (1998) is a collection of short stories by Peter F. Hamilton set in the Night's Dawn universe. The stories in this collection form a series of snapshot glimpses into the history of the Confederation leading up to the time of Joshua Calvert and Quinn Dexter, two of the main characters in The Night's Dawn Trilogy. During the early 1990s Hamilton wrote several short stories centered around the affinity technology - and they became the inspiration to write Night's Dawn. Sonnie's Edge was first published in New Moon magazine September 1991. It's set on Earth in the year 2070, and is a story about the then popular sport of beastie-baiting - involving contests to the death between artificial monsters controlled via human affinity bonds. Sonnie's team is particularly successful, and her monster, Khanivore, has one special advantage... A Second Chance at Eden is the main story in this collection, a detective story set in the year 2090. It tells about the events leading to the formation of the society that was to become the Edenists. Eden is a bitek habitat which orbits Jupiter, mining the fusion fuel on which Earth is dependent - a mini-nation of radical politics and
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    7

    Aces High

    Aces High is the second volume in the Wild Cards shared universe fiction series edited by George R. R. Martin. It was published in 1987 and dealt with two main plots that linked the stories in the volume: the arrival of the alien Swarm and a Masonic conspiracy led by a bookish villain named the Astronomer. In the end, these two storylines connect. The title "Aces High" comes from the name of a popular and ritzy restaurant of the same name that caters to a clientele consisting solely of Aces — those victims of the Wild Card virus who gain "superpowers" as a result of their exposure — and features in several of the stories, along with its proprietor Hiram Worchester (aka Fatman). Aces High contains the following short stories: The stories "Jube" and "Unto the Sixth Generation" occur as interludes between the other stories; the former throughout the entire book, the latter ending just after "If Looks Could Kill".
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    8

    Again, Dangerous Visions

    • Year Released: 1972
    Again, Dangerous Visions is the sequel to the science fiction short story anthology Dangerous Visions, first published in 1972. It was edited by Harlan Ellison and illustrated by Ed Emshwiller. Like its predecessor, Again, Dangerous Visions and the stories within it received many awards. The Word for World is Forest, by Ursula K. Le Guin, won a Hugo for Best Novella. "When It Changed" by Joanna Russ won a Nebula Award for Best Short Story. For a second time, Harlan Ellison received a special Hugo for editing the anthology. Again, Dangerous Visions was to be followed by a third anthology, The Last Dangerous Visions, but this was never published.
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    9

    Agent of Vega

    • Year Released: 1960
    Agent of Vega is a science fiction novel by James H. Schmitz, 1960. Like the Foundation series, it is a collection of stories that originally appeared separately in magazines. It was republished in 2001 as Agent of Vega & Other Stories. The tale began in 1949 as a longish short story published in the SF magazine Astounding. In 1960 it appeared as a book, along with three loosely related stories set in the same time and context: The Illusionists; The Truth About Cushgar; The Second Night of Summer. In the far future, humans are building a 'Confederacy of Vega' to replace the original fallen Empire of Earth. The new empire includes some mutated humans and also some non-humans. Enemies are also a mix of humans and aliens and it is very much space opera, featuring Vega's 'zone agents'. Combat involves both physical weapons and telepathic attacks. It clearly owes a lot to E. E. Smith's Lensman series. Unlike the six Lensman books, the four stories are only loosely connected. Each features a completely different set of enemies. The non-human telepath Pagadan is the main connecting link, appearing a secondary character in the first story, the main character in The Illusionists and makes a
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    10

    Alia

    Alia is small print anthology of international fantasy literature published in 2003 by CoopStudi, Turin. An offshoot of the LN LibriNuovi experience, the anthology (first in a series) was designed to fill a gap in the field of genre fiction as published by major publishers in Italy, presenting new translations of short stories, ranging from horror fiction to cyberpunk, split among four thematic sections: Introductions and essays were included by Silvia Treves, Vittorio Catani, Massimo Soumaré, Davide Mana and Danilo Arona.
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    11

    Alternate Realities

    • Year Released: 2000
    Alternate Realities is an omnibus collection from 2000 of three short science fiction novels by science fiction and fantasy author C. J. Cherryh. The three books included in this anthology are: Wave Without a Shore (1981), Port Eternity (1982), and Voyager in Night (1984). All three novels are set in Cherryh's Alliance-Union universe and share a common theme of people encountering and coping with a reality different from their own. The original books as well as the omnibus edition were all published by DAW Books. The novels are what Cherryh and her publisher at DAW, Donald A. Wollheim, referred to as "magic cookie" books. Such works explore unusual themes and ideas in science fiction, and can in some sense be seen as thought experiments. Wollheim encouraged Cherryh to experiment in this way during the late 1970s and early 1980s because he felt that the science fiction market would support such unusual offerings at the time. One consequence of this approach is that the original novels were therefore short by contemporary standards, each having only approximately 90,000 words. The relative brevity of the books facilitated DAW's release of the omnibus edition in 2000. Port Eternity is
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    12

    Aristotle and the Gun and Other Stories

    • Year Released: 2002
    Aristotle and the Gun and Other Stories is a 2002 collection of short stories by science fiction and fantasy author L. Sprague de Camp, published in hardcover by the Gale Group as part of its Five Star Speculative Fiction Series. The book contains short works of fiction by the author spanning much of his writing career, having originally been published from 1939 to 1993. It also contains an introduction by Harry Turtledove.
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    13

    Arkham's Masters of Horror

    Arkham's Masters of Horror is an anthology of fantasy and horror stories edited by Peter Ruber. It was released by Arkham House in an edition of approximately 4,000 copies in 2000. The book includes an introductory essay by Ruber before each story and about its author. Ruber has drawn criticism from the horror/fantasy community for the hostility with which he introduces some authors within the volume - for instance, his accusation that H.P. Lovecraft "had a schizoid personality" and could be labelled "a genuine crackpot." Arkham's Masters of Horror contains the following stories:
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    14

    Before the Golden Age

    • Year Released: 1974
    Before the Golden Age: A Science Fiction Anthology of the 1930s is an anthology of 25 science fiction stories from 1930s pulp magazines edited by Isaac Asimov. It was first published in April 1974. The anthology was inspired by a dream Asimov had on the morning of 3 April 1973. In his dream, Asimov had prepared an anthology of his favorite science fiction stories from the 1930s and was getting a chance to read them again. After waking, he told his fianceé Janet Jeppson about the dream, and she suggested that he actually do such an anthology. Doubleday agreed to publish the anthology, and Asimov's friend Sam Moskowitz provided him with copies of the relevant science fiction magazines. Asimov completed work on the anthology on 10 May. The stories were selected by Asimov, and the main selection criterion was the degree to which they influenced him when he was growing up in the 1930s. The prefatory material and individual introductions to the stories fill in the details about the early life of the child prodigy, which effectively makes the volume an autobiographical prequel to his earlier collection The Early Asimov. The anthology also includes "Big Game", a story written by Asimov in
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    15

    Burning Chrome

    • Year Released: 1986
    "Burning Chrome" is a short story, written by William Gibson and first published in Omni in July 1982. Gibson first read the story at a science fiction convention in Denver, Colorado in the autumn of 1981, to an audience of four people, among them Bruce Sterling (who Gibson later said "completely got it"). It was nominated for a Nebula Award in 1983 and collected with the rest of Gibson's early short fiction in a 1986 volume of the same name. "Burning Chrome" tells the story of two hackers who hack systems for profit. The two main characters are Bobby Quine who specializes in software and Automatic Jack whose field is hardware. A third character in the story is Rikki, a girl with whom Bobby becomes infatuated and for whom he wants to hit it big. Automatic Jack acquires a piece of Russian hacking software that is very sophisticated and hard to trace. The rest of the story unfolds with Bobby deciding to break into the system of a notorious and vicious criminal called Chrome, who handles money transfers for organized crime, and Automatic Jack reluctantly agreeing to help. The break-in is ultimately successful, but Rikki decides to leave the group and go to Hollywood, to the grief of
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    16

    Can You Feel Anything When I Do This?

    • Year Released: 1971
    Can You Feel Anything When I Do This? is a collection of science fiction short stories by American writer Robert Sheckley, published in December 1971 by Doubleday. It was also published by Pan Books under title The Same To You Doubled. It contains the following stories (magazines in which the stories originally appeared given in parentheses): Theodore Sturgeon, reviewing the collection for The New York Times, said "[Sheckley] is a reliable writer who enjoys what he says, and so will you."
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    17

    Crystal Express

    • Year Released: 1989
    Crystal Express is a collection of Science fiction and fantasy stories by cyberpunk author Bruce Sterling. It was released in 1989 by Arkham House. It was initially published in an edition of 4,231 copies and was the author's first book published by Arkham House. Many of the stories appeared in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and the first five stories are set in Sterling's Shaper/Mechanist universe. Crystal Express contains the following stories:
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    18

    Dangerous Visions

    • Year Released: 1967
    Dangerous Visions (ISBN 0-425-06176-0) is a science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison, published in 1967. A path-breaking collection, Dangerous Visions helped define the New Wave science fiction movement, particularly in its depiction of sex in science fiction. Writer/editor Al Sarrantonio writes how Dangerous Visions "almost single-handedly [...] changed the way readers thought about science fiction." The list of the authors' names reads like a Who's Who of 1960s science fiction. Ellison introduced the anthology both collectively and individually while authors provided afterwords to their own stories. The stories and the anthology itself were nominated for and the recipients of many awards. "Gonna Roll the Bones" by Fritz Leiber received both a Hugo Award and a Nebula Award for Best Novelette, whilst Philip K. Dick's submission "Faith of our Fathers" was a nominee for the Hugo in the same category. Philip José Farmer tied for the Hugo Award for Best Novella for "Riders of the Purple Wage". Samuel R. Delany won the Nebula for Best Short Story for "Aye, and Gomorrah..." Harlan Ellison received a special citation at the 26th World SF Convention for editing "the
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    19

    Divide and Rule

    • Year Released: 1948
    Divide and Rule is a 1948 collection of two science fiction novellas by L. Sprague de Camp, first published in hardcover by Fantasy Press, and later reissued in paperback by Lancer Books in 1964. The collected pieces were previously published in 1939 and 1941 in the magazines Unknown and Astounding. The first stand-alone edition of the title story was published as a large-print hardcover by Thorndike Press in September 2003. An E-book edition of the title story was issued by Gollancz's SF Gateway imprint on September 29, 2011 as part of a general release of de Camp's works in electronic form. The stories in the collection both postulate futures in which Earth has reverted to feudalism, in one instance by the dictate of alien invaders and in the other as a result of the accumulation of excessive power by corporations. John K. Aiken, writing in Fantasy Review, rates de Camp "very nearly at his best" in the two stories making up the collection, and his best as "very good indeed." He considers them "[a]ltogether, as sprightly and enjoyable a pair of tales as one might meet in a couple of years' reading." He appreciates the basis of de Camp's science fiction "in the behaviour of real
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    20

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

    • Year Released: 1968
    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a science fiction novel by American writer Philip K. Dick and first published in 1968. The main plot follows Rick Deckard, a bounty hunter of androids, while a secondary plot follows John Isidore, a man of sub-normal intelligence who aids some fugitive androids. The novel is set in a post-apocalyptic near future, where Earth and its populations have been damaged greatly by Nuclear War during World War Terminus. Most types of animals are endangered or extinct due to extreme radiation poisoning from the war. To own an animal is a sign of status, but what is emphasized more is the empathic emotions humans experience towards an animal. Deckard is faced with "retiring" six escaped Nexus-6 brain model androids, the latest and most advanced model. Because of this task, the novel explores the issue of what it is to be human. Unlike humans, the androids possess no empathic sense. In essence, Deckard probes the existence of defining qualities that separate humans from androids. The book's plot served as the primary basis for the 1982 film Blade Runner. The story centers on the lower peninsula below San Francisco, which is still relatively free from
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    21

    Dream's Edge

    Dream's Edge is an anthology of short science fiction stories about the "future of Planet Earth". It is edited by collector Terry Carr. It was published in 1980 by Sierra Club Books (San Francisco) with ISBN 0-87156-238-3. The short stories included are:
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    22

    Dreams of Dark and Light: The Great Short Fiction of Tanith Lee

    • Year Released: 1986
    Dreams of Dark and Light: The Great Short Fiction of Tanith Lee is a collection of fantasy, horror and science fiction stories by author Tanith Lee. It was released in 1986 and was the author's first book published by Arkham House . It was published in an edition of 3,957 copies. Dreams of Dark and Light contains the following tales:
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    23

    E Pluribus Unicorn

    E Pluribus Unicorn is a collection of fantasy and science fiction stories by Theodore Sturgeon, published in 1953 by Abelard. New York Times reviewer Basil Davenport noted that while "Sturgeon's poetic sensitivity sometimes leads him to overwriting, . . . at his best it gives his work an emotional depth which is all too rare in this field." Boucher and McComas gave the collection a lukewarm review, describing it as "a hodgepodge" mixing "Grade A Sturgeon stories" with "a good many one can see no particular reason for collecting"; still, they concluded that Unicorn was "a book belonging in any fantasy library." P. Schuyler Miller praised the collection as "one of the finest short story collections by any writer in the field."
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    24

    Fire Watch

    • Year Released: 1984
    Fire Watch is a book of short stories by Connie Willis, first published in 1984, that touches on time travel, nuclear war, the end of the world, and cornball humour. The title story, "Fire Watch", is about a time-travelling "historian" who goes back to The Blitz in London. He's miffed because he spent years preparing to travel with St. Paul and gets sent to St. Paul's Cathedral in London, instead. This model of time travel also features in Willis's subsequent novels Doomsday Book, To Say Nothing of the Dog and Blackout/All Clear, set in the same continuity. The stories are: This was Connie Willis's first collection. Several of the stories won or were nominated for awards:
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    25

    Footprints on Sand

    • Year Released: 1981
    Footprints on Sand: a Literary Sampler is a 1981 collection of writings by science fiction authors L. Sprague de Camp and Catherine Crook de Camp, illustrated by C. H. Burnett, published by Advent. The collection was compiled to celebrate the de Camps' appearance as joint Guests of Honor at the June 12-14, 1981 X-Con science fiction convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The book opens with a series of tributes to the de Camps by Robert A. Heinlein, Lin Carter, Isaac Asimov, Poul Anderson, Andrew J. Offutt, Patricia Jackson, and George H. Scithers. The bulk of the work consists of various short works by the de Camps themselves representing the range of their work in fantasy, science fiction, juvenile fiction, poetry, and non-fiction.
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    26

    Foundation and Empire

    • Year Released: 1952
    Foundation and Empire is a novel written by Isaac Asimov that was published by Gnome Press in 1952. It is the second book published in the Foundation Series, and the fourth in the in-universe chronology. It takes place in two halves, originally published as separate novellas. Foundation and Empire saw multiple publications—it also appeared in 1955 as Ace Double (but not actually paired with another book) D-125 under the title "The Man Who Upset the Universe." The stories comprising this volume were originally published in Astounding Magazine (with different titles) in 1945. The publication of Foundation and Empire was preceded and followed by one each of two books of short stories were published shortly before and after, and decades later, Asimov wrote two further sequel novels and two prequels. Later writers have added authorized tales to the series. The Foundation Series is often regarded as one of Isaac Asimov's best works, along with his Robot series. The first half of the book, titled "The General," tells how the Galactic Empire, now well into its collapse but led by skilled General Bel Riose, launches an attack against the Foundation. The Empire still retains far more
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    27

    Foundation's Edge

    • Year Released: 1982
    Foundation's Edge (1982) is a science fiction novel by Isaac Asimov, the fourth book in the Foundation Series. It was written more than thirty years after the stories of the original Foundation trilogy, due to years of pressure by fans and editors on Asimov to write another, and, according to Asimov himself, the amount of the payment offered by the publisher. It was his first novel to ever land on The New York Times best-seller list, after 262 books and 44 years of writing. Foundation's Edge won the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1983, and was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1982. Five hundred years after the establishment of the Foundation, the Mayor of Terminus, Harla Branno, is basking in a political glow, her policies having been vindicated by the recent successful resolution of a Seldon Crisis. Golan Trevize, a former officer of the Navy and now a member of Council, believes the Second Foundation (which is almost universally thought to be extinct) still exists and is controlling events. He attempts to question the continued existence of the Seldon Plan during a Council session and Branno has him arrested on a charge of treason. She orders him to leave Terminus
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    28

    From Weird and Distant Shores

    From Weird and Distant Shores is fantasist Caitlin R. Kiernan's second solo short-story collection, released by Subterranean Press in 2002. As with her first collection, Tales of Pain and Wonder, interior illustrations were supplied by Canadian artist Richard A. Kirk. The book includes thirteen stories (horror, science fiction, and fantasy), including a collaboration with Poppy Z. Brite and another with Christa Faust. As Kiernan explains in the collection's introduction, most of these stories were originally written for "'shared world' and 'theme' anthologies," books wherein the authors have been asked to write stories set in the worlds of other authors or stories pertaining to some particular subject, respectively. The collection is notable in that includes Kiernan's earliest published short story, "Persephone." Kiernan provides an afterword for each story.
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    29

    Future Primitive: The New Ecotopias

    Future Primitive - The New Ecotopias, edited by Kim Stanley Robinson, republishes notable short works of utopian fiction and dystopian fiction, incorporating elements of primitivism and of eco-anarchism.
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    30

    Gene Wolfe's Book of Days

    • Year Released: 1981
    Gene Wolfe's Book of Days is a short story collection by American science fiction author Gene Wolfe published in 1981 by Doubleday. The stories within the collection are each paired with a holiday within the calendar year that is thematically linked to the content of the story. Thus, a story about the resurgence of slavery ("How the Whip Came Back") is dedicated to Lincoln's Birthday. The material here was combined with The Castle of the Otter to make the volume Castle of Days.
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    31

    Grantville Gazette II

    • Year Released: 2006
    Grantville Gazette II is the third collaborative anthology published in print set in the 1632-verse shared universe in what is best regarded as a canonical sub-series of the popular alternate history that began with the February 2000 publication of the hardcover novel 1632 by author-historian Eric Flint. Baen Books and Flint decline the distinction, counting this book as the sixth published work. Overall it is also the third anthology in printed publication in the atypical series which consists of a mish-mash of main novels and anthologies produced under popular demand after publication of the initial novel which was written as a stand-alone work. Anne Jefferson and Harry Lefferts pose for Rembrandt as part of a complex political situation. Hans Richter's flying instructor is still heartsore over his loss. He volunteers to fly a special mission to Paris targeting the unsuspecting Cardinal Richelieu. Composer Giacomo Carissimi is directed by Cardinal Mazarini (Mazarin) to visit Grantville, and finally obtains adequate funds. The ambassador from the powerful Mughal Empire of northern India is held captive in Austria, but Grantville does not have enough troops to rescue him. Instead,
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    32

    Grantville Gazette III

    The Grantville Gazette III is the third collaborative and the fourth anthology in the 1632 series edited by the series creator, Eric Flint. It was published as an e-book by Baen Books in October 2004. It was released as a hardcover in January 2007, and trade paperback in June 2008 with both editions containing Flint's story "Postage Due". The illustration on the e-book cover is Judith Slaying Holofernes (Naples Version) by Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–1653), painted circa 1612–1613. Gentileschi was the most prominent female artist of the period, and is referred to in the novel 1634: The Galileo Affair, and appears earlier in the overall series timeline when she sends her daughter to Grantville in "Breaking News" in the anthology Grantville Gazette V. The Biblical episode involving Judith and her maidservant killing the Assyrian tyrant Holofernes was an immensely popular theme for painters and sculptors of the Renaissance and the early modern era. This story might well be considered a continuing serial by Eric Flint, as it follows the trend set from the outset in Grantville Gazette I's "Portraits" wherein Anne Jefferson is cast as the common model for five seventeenth century master
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    33
    Grantville Gazette V

    Grantville Gazette V

    • Year Released: 2005
    Grantville Gazette II is the third collaborative anthology published in print set in the' '1632-verse' shared universe in what is best regarded as a canonical sub-series of the popular alternate history  that began with the February  2000 publication of the hardcover novel 1632 (novel) by author-historian Eric Flint. Baen Books and Flint decline the distinction, counting this book as the sixth published work. Overall it is also the third anthology in printed publication* in the atypical series which consists of a mish-mash of main novels and anthologies produced under popular demand after publication of the initial novel which was written as a stand-alone work. The internet forum Baen's Bar figures large in the history of the series overall where 1632 Tech Manual discussions not only convinced Flint to do a sequel, but helped formulate potential story lines in the period early-2000–mid-2001. In the Eric Flint oriented sub-forums 1632 Tech Manual and both 1632 Slush and 1632 Slush Comments all determine the "acceptable" content of these Gazettes, as is covered in depth the The Grantville Gazettes and 1632 Editorial Board articles. Both the shared universe main series and this
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    34

    Grantville Gazette VI

    The Grantville Gazette VI (Main article: The Grantville Gazettes)  is the sixth collaborative mixed-work set in the '1632verse' in what is best regarded as a canonical sub-series of the popular Alternate history  that began with the February  2000 publication of the hardcover novel 1632 (novel) by author-historian Eric Flint. Overall it is the seventh anthology in the atypical series which consists of a mish-mash of main novels and anthologies produced under popular demand after publication of the initial novel which was written as a stand-alone work. This particular sub-series, the various Grantville Gazettes include encyclopedia grade fact articles by members of the 1632 research committee which cover the technological issues faced in fitting 21st century knowledge and base technology to the 17th century setting of the Milieu. The internet forum Baen's Bar hosts the 1632verse oriented sub-forums 1632 Tech Manual and 1632 Slush and both forums figure prominently in the background of these works as is covered in the The Grantville Gazettes main article. The series as a whole, and this sub-series in particular are an example of internet-age collaborative writing in the literary
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    35

    Grantville Gazette VII

    The Grantville Gazette VII (Main article: The Grantville Gazettes)  is the seventh collaborative work set in the '1632verse' in what is best regarded as a canonical sub-series of the popular alternate history  that began with the February  2000 publication of the hardcover novel 1632 (novel) by author-historian Eric Flint. Overall it is the eighth anthology in the atypical series which consists of a mish-mash of main novels and anthologies produced under popular demand after publication of the initial novel which was written as a stand-alone work. The internet forum Baen's Bar in the Eric Flint oriented sub-forums 1632 Tech Manual and 1632 Slush figure prominently in the background of these works as is covered in the The Grantville Gazettes main article and are an example of the internet-age collaborative writing in the literary field. The cover illustration is the painting "Forge of Vulcan", 1630 by Diego Rodriguez da Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660), and continues a tradition of e-covers using classical painters works from within the era around 1632 and the Thirty Years' War. The Grantville Gazettes are all edited by Eric Flint, creator of the fictional universe in which they are
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    36

    Hackers

    • Year Released: 1996
    Hackers (ISBN 0-441-00375-3) is an anthology of short stories edited by Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois. It contains stories by noted science fiction and cyberpunk writers of the late 1980s and early 1990s about hackers. This story, written by William Gibson, was first published in Omni in July, 1982. It tells the story of two hackers who hack systems for profit. The two main characters are Bobby Quine who specializes in software and Automatic Jack whose field is hardware. A third character in the story is Rikki, a girl with whom Bobby becomes infatuated and for whom he wants to hit it big. Automatic Jack acquires a piece of Russian hacking software that is very sophisticated and hard to trace. The rest of the story unfolds with Bobby deciding to break into the system of a notorious and vicious criminal called Chrome, who handles money transfers for organized crime, and Automatic Jack reluctantly agreeing to help. The break-in is ultimately successful, but Rikki decides to leave the group and go to Hollywood, to the grief of Quine and Jack who have grown to love her. One line from this story — "...the street finds its own uses for things" — has become a widely-quoted aphorism for
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    37

    High Justice

    • Year Released: 1977
    High Justice is a 1974 collection of science fiction short stories by Jerry Pournelle. It was republished in a omnibus edition with Exiles to Glory in 2009 as Exile -- and Glory. A major part of the background of these stories is the final fall of the Welfare States; Russia is never mentioned, and the US is downsliding due to inflation and political corruption. In short, Earth's civilization is about to collapse under the weight of its bureaucracies, but a new civilization is being built by determined multinational corporations. The stories were published between 1972 and 1975, and reflect Pournelle's concerns with the effects of environmentalism, welfare states, and high taxes on the ability of people to make advances in technology. At that time the Great Society, America's version of the Welfare State, was not even 10 years old. Each short story concerns itself with the problems facing large technological tasks in the near future. These include plutonium fuel breeding, deep sea thermal power, large scale food cultivation and access to fresh water. The protagonists are the agents of multinational corporations - engineers engaged in large scale projects and troubleshooters engaged
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    38

    Hothouse

    • Year Released: 1962
    Hothouse is a 1962 award-winning fantasy/science fiction novel by British author Brian Aldiss, composed of 5 novelettes that were originally serialized in a magazine. In the US, an abridged version was published as The Long Afternoon of Earth; the full version was not published there until 1976. Five of the stories which make up the novel, which were published separately in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in 1961, were collectively awarded the 1962 Hugo Award for Best Short Fiction. In the novel, Earth now has one side constantly facing the sun (which is larger and hotter than it is at present) so it has become a veritable hothouse, where plants have filled almost all ecological niches. According to Aldiss' account, the US publisher insisted on the name-change so the book wouldn't be put amongst the horticulture books in bookshops. Set in a far future, the earth has locked rotation with the Sun, and is attached to the now-more-distant Moon, which resides at a Trojan point, with cobwebs spun by enormous spider-like plants. The Sun has swollen to fill half the sky and, with the increased light and heat, the plants are engaged in a constant frenzy of growth and decay, like a
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    39

    Howard Who?

    Released July 1, 1986, Howard Who? is the first short story collection by science fiction writer Howard Waldrop. Howard Who? Doubleday (1986) ISBN 0-385-19708-X
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    40

    In the Stone House

    • Year Released: 2000
    In the Stone House is a collection of science fiction, fantasy and horror stories by author Barry N. Malzberg. It was released in 2000 and was the author's first book published by Arkham House. It was published in an edition of approximately 2,500 copies. The stories originally appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Omni and Science Fiction Age and other magazines. In the Stone House contains the following tales:
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    41

    Lacey and His Friends

    Lacey and His Friends (Baen Books, ISBN 99927-45-73-8) is a 1986 compilation of three stories by David Drake, about Jed Lacey, a ruthless individual, convicted for raping a former contemporary as an act of revenge for betraying him, turned detective by a computer that allocates people to work in areas where their "psych profile" indicates they will be effective. It includes other, less grim stories at the end. Lacey lives in a world of constant sousveillance and surveillance. Readers of 1984 will find this world eerily familiar, but with a democratic and capitalistic background that sets it up in contrast to the totalitarian world of George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. People have chosen to live in this world rather than it being enforced from above by an unelected and unaccountable government. Ironically the government, in choosing to ignore its own laws, sets Lacey free from his former punishment in exchange for his silence about its own apparently illegal activities, in an inversion of the power relationships present in Nineteen Eighty-Four. Drake mentions on his website that the three stories concerning Lacey were the harshest he has ever written.
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    42

    Looking for Jake

    • Year Released: 2005
    Looking for Jake is a collection of science fiction, horror and fantasy stories by British author China Miéville. It was first published by Del Rey Books, part of Random House, in 2005, and later by Pan MacMillan. The book contains fourteen short stories written between 1998 and 2005. One of them, "On The Way To The Front", is an illustrated, comic book-esque tale, while the other thirteen are standard written stories. All of the stories are set in London, with the exceptions of "Jack", set in Miéville's created world Bas-Lag, and "Foundation", the setting of which is not specified. The stories are as follows: In 2006 it was announced that the story Details was turned into a script by Dan Kay, and subsequently picked up by studio Paramount Vantage. The script was said to expand upon the original story's exploration of pareidolia and rework the plot to feature a father and daughter. As of November 2008, Martyrs director Pascal Laugier is attached to direct.
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    43

    Medea: Harlan's World

    Medea: Harlan's World (1985; ISBN 0-932096-36-0) is a collection of science fiction short stories by different authors, all taking place on the same fictional moon. It was an experiment in collaborative science-fictional world-building, featuring contributions by Hal Clement, Frank Herbert, and others. It was based on a 1975 UCLA seminar called "10 Tuesdays Down a Rabbit Hole", held by Ellison and other science fiction authors.
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    44

    Meeting in Infinity

    • Year Released: 1992
    Meeting in Infinity is a collection of Science fiction stories by author John Kessel. It was released in 1992 and was the author's first book published by Arkham House . It was published in an edition of 3,547 copies. Most of the stories originally appeared in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. "Another Orphan" won a Nebula Award in 1982. Meeting in Infinity contains the following stories:
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    45

    Nameless Places

    • Year Released: 1975
    Dark Things is an anthology of science fiction, fantasy and horror stories edited by Gerald W. Page. It was released in 1975 by Arkham House in an edition of 4,160 copies. The stories in this volume had not been previously published. Nameless Places contains the following tales:
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    46

    Nanotech

    • Year Released: 1998
    Nanotech is a 1998 anthology of science fiction short-stories revolving around nanotechnology and its effects. It is edited by Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois.
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    47

    New Horizons

    New Horizons is an anthology of science fiction stories edited by August Derleth (d. 1971). It was released posthumously by the specialty house publisher Arkham House in an hardcover edition of 2,917 copies. While the title page gives the date of publication as 1998, the book was not actually printed and released until 1999. The is an anthology that Derleth had planned in the early 1960s, but never published. New Horizons contains the following stories:
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    48

    No Place Like Earth

    • Year Released: 2003
    No Place Like Earth (ISBN 978-0-9740589-0-0) is a collection of science fiction short stories by John Wyndham, published in July 2003 by Darkside Press. The collection contains the following short stories: There is a compilation of short science-fiction stories published under the same title: John Carnell's No Place like Earth: A Science Fiction Anthology' (1954). It contains one story by John Wyndham.
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    49

    Noon: 22nd Century

    • Year Released: 1962
    Noon: 22nd Century (Russian: Полдень. XXII век, Polden'. Dvadcat' vtoroy vek) is a 1961 science fiction book by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky, expanded in 1962 and further in 1967, translated into English in 1978. It is sometimes considered an episodic novel, collection of linked short stories or a fix-up as some parts had been published previously as independent short stories. It relates several stories of the XXII century, while providing the background "feel" for the style of life which gave birth to the Noon Universe. The title was chosen by the authors as a polemic of the postapocalyptic Daybreak: 2250 AD by Andre Norton. The book is a collection of short stories describing various aspects of human life on Earth in the 22nd century. The plots of the stories are not closely connected, but they feature a shared set of characters. The most commonly recurring characters are Evgeny Slavin and Sergei Kondratev, who, as a result of a lengthy journey through interstellar space at near the speed of light, are thrown over a century into the future and must re-integrate into the society of their great-grandchildren. The book includes the following stories: Noon: 22nd Century has been
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    50

    Polyphemus

    • Year Released: 1987
    Polyphemus is a collection of Science fiction, fantasy and horror stories by author Michael Shea. It was released in 1987 by Arkham House . It was published in an edition of 3,528 copies and was the author's first hardcover book. Most of the stories originally appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Polyphemus contains the following stories:
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    51

    Prayers to Broken Stones

    • Year Released: 1990
    Prayers to Broken Stones is a short story anthology by the American author Dan Simmons. It includes 13 of his earlier works, along with an introduction by Harlan Ellison in which the latter relates how he "discovered" Dan Simmons at the Colorado Mountain College's "Writers' Conference in the Rockies" in 1981. The title is a borrowed line from T. S. Eliot's "The Hollow Men". "The River Styx Runs Upstream" was Dan Simmons's first published work, and the short story that brought him to Ellison's attention in August 1979. Simmons relates the tale in his introduction, noting that Ellison's initial reaction was this (possibly a little tongue in cheek): Simmons survived Ellison's critique, and Ellison pushed Simmons into submitting it to Twilight Zone Magazine "for their first annual contest for unpublished writers" (pg 16, introduction to "The River Styx Runs Upstream"). Out of ~7000 submissions, it tied for first place and was published 15 February 1982 (according to PtBS's copyright page, in April, not February). The actual story is classic Simmons in its literary allusions, with epigraphs from Ezra Pound's Cantos; the protagonist's father is a Pound scholar with an especial interest
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    52
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    53

    Ring of Fire

    • Year Released: 2004
    Ring of Fire is the third published book by editor-author-historian Eric Flint of the 1632 series, an alternate history series begun in the novel 1632 (February 2000). The Ring of Fire is both descriptive of the cosmic event as experienced by the series' characters, but also is at times used as the name for the series itself. The series is set in war-torn Europe during the middle of the Thirty Years' War. Ring of Fire is a collection of short stories —half by a variety of established science fiction authors invited into the setting, half fan-fiction by enthusiasts who helped take the stand alone novel into a series numbering works in the tens of books; all set in the universe initially created by Flint's science fiction novel 1632 written as a stand-alone novel and turned into a series by popular demand. Unlike most short works in a novel created series, the stories within are important milieu shaping creations—story threads which are formalized into the series canon for they helped establish it, and act as a spring board for further developments in the books. Many characters debut in these short stories who play an important role in subsequent longer works. The series heralds a
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    54

    Rivers of Time

    • Year Released: 1993
    Rivers of Time is a 1993 collection of short stories by science fiction and fantasy author L. Sprague de Camp, first published in paperback by Baen Books. All but two of the pieces were originally published between 1956 and 1993 in the magazines Galaxy, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Analog, and Asimov's Science Fiction, and the Robert Silverberg-edited anthology The Ultimate Dinosaur. The remaining pieces were first published in the present work. The book collects the author's nine tales of time-traveling hunter Reginald Rivers, the hero of his 1956 classic, "A Gun for Dinosaur". He wrote another Rivers story in 1990 to fulfil a request by Robert Silverberg for a dinosaur story for his 1991 anthology The Ultimate Dinosaur; afterwards, de Camp added to the sequence until he had enough stories for a book. The Rivers stories take the form of first-person narratives by the protagonist told to companions whose identities vary, but who have in common the fact that their contributions to the conversation are omitted, and must be inferred from those of Rivers. Every story is an anecdote from Rivers' career as a conductor of time safaris to previous eras, both to hunt
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    55

    Scribblings

    • Year Released: 1972
    Scribblings is a 1972 collection of writings by science fiction and fantasy author L. Sprague de Camp to celebrate his appearance as Guest of Honor at Boskone IX, a convention sponsored by the New England Science Fiction Association. The Association served as publisher. The book contains poetry, short works of fiction and non-fiction, and aphorisms. Among the stories are the complete set of de Camp's four short "Drinkwhiskey Institute" series of tall tales.
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    56

    Sirius: The Dog Star

    Sirius: The Dog Star is a 2004 anthology of science fiction/fantasy short-stories revolving around dogs. Its editors are Martin H. Greenberg and Alexander Potter.
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    57

    Space, Inc.

    • Year Released: 2003
    Space, Inc. is a 2003 anthology of science fiction short-stories revolving around careers in space. It is the first anthology edited by Julie E. Czerneda, for which she won a 2004 Prix Aurora Award.
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    58

    Sprague de Camp's New Anthology of Science Fiction

    • Year Released: 1953
    Sprague de Camp's New Anthology of Science Fiction is a 1953 collection of science fiction stories by L. Sprague de Camp and edited by H. J. Campbell, first published in both hardcover and paperback by Panther Books. The book contains six short works of fiction by the author, the first two of them stories in his Viagens Interplanetarias series uncollected elsewhere. Anthony Boucher, writing in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, called the book "most misleadingly titled; it is not an anthology edited by de Camp, but a group of six de Camp stories selected by H. J. Campbell." While noting they were "[a]ll new to book form," he considered them "a drab assemblage of unfunny humor and (what is even less forgivable) unsexy sex."
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    59

    Standard Candles

    Standard Candles (1996, ISBN 0-9648320-4-6) is a compilation of short stories by American science fiction author Jack McDevitt. The sixteen stories in the anthology were originally published in various magazines from 1982 to 1996. The introduction is provided by Charles Sheffield. Like many of the author's works, the title story is set at an astronomical observatory and refers to a star's absolute brightness, connecting that phenomenon with the relationship between two individuals in the story. No matter where one stands, the light radiates at the same level of intensity. ("Standard Candles", "Ellie", and "Cryptic") Other stories in the collection deal with chess ("Black to Move" and "The Jersey Rifle"), time travel with unintended consequences ("Cruising Through Deuteronomy" and "Time Travelers Never Die"), and the beginnings of interplanetary exploration ("Translations from the Colosian", "Promises to Keep", and "To Hell with the Stars", the last an exposition of what may happen if humanity chooses to not enter space). The stories are arranged:
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    60

    Star Science Fiction Stories No.2

    Star Science Fiction Stories No.2 is the second book in the anthology series, Star Science Fiction Stories, edited by Frederik Pohl. It was first published in 1953 by Ballantine Books. P. Schuyler Miller reviewed the anthology favorably, reported than many of the stories were "as good as you'll find anywhere."
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    61

    Star Science Fiction Stories No.3

    Star Science Fiction Stories No.3 is the third book in the anthology series, Star Science Fiction Stories, edited by Frederik Pohl. It was first published in 1954 by Ballantine Books.
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    62

    Star Wars: Visionaries

    Star Wars: Visionaries is a 2005 collection of 11 stories written and drawn by concept artists who worked on the film Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. The book is published by Dark Horse Comics and edited by Jeremy Barlow. The opening story, "Old Wounds" by Aaron McBride, is set in "the third year Imperial Occupation" and begins with Owen Lars trying to teach new words to a toddler-age Luke Skywalker. They see a strange figure on the horizon running towards the Lars homestead, and Owen instructs his wife Beru to bring him his rifle and take the boy inside. The figure dodges warning shots with ease and uses the Force to disarm Owen before smashing the weapon over his head. Standing on triple-jointed droid legs and concealed by a dark hood, the figure calls out through the Force to an unseen enemy. The voice claims to have been tracking this adversary for years, just missing him by two days on Kamino one day on Geonosis and only a few minutes on Mustafar. He had then killed witnesses on Polis Massa before finally gaining crucial information on Mos Espa from an aged Watto, whom he beheads for his greed. The creature declares that he knows threatening Luke would bring his
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    63

    Starwater Strains

    • Year Released: 2005
    Starwater Strains is a collection of short stories by Gene Wolfe. As his previous collection, Innocents Aboard, contained fantasy and horror stories, this one largely consists of science fiction.
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    64

    Study War No More

    • Year Released: 1977
    Study War No More is a science fiction anthology edited by science fiction author and Vietnam War veteran Joe Haldeman. All of the short stories concern war, and were previously published in other publications. The title is derived from a line in the traditional gospel song "Down by the Riverside", "I ain't go study war no more". It was published by St. Martin's Press in 1977, and reprinted by Avon Books in 1978. It has been published in the U.K, and translated into German and French.
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    65

    Synthesis & Other Virtual Realities

    • Year Released: 1996
    Synthesis & Other Virtual Realities is a collection of science fiction stories by author Mary Rosenblum. It was released in 1996 and was the author's first collection of stories. It was published by Arkham House in an edition of 3,515 copies. The stories originally appeared in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine. Synthesis & Other Virtual Realities contains the following stories:
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    66
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    67

    Tales from the New Republic

    Tales from the New Republic (1999) is an anthology of short stories set in the fictional Star Wars universe. The book is edited by Peter Schweighofer and Craig Carey.
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    68

    Tales of the Bounty Hunters

    Tales of the Bounty Hunters (1996) is an anthology of short stories set in the fictional Star Wars universe. It presents the background stories about each bounty hunter that was seen aboard the Executor in the film The Empire Strikes Back. The stories all intersect at that particular movie scene. The book was edited by Kevin J. Anderson, who wrote one of the stories as well.
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    69

    The Aliens of Earth

    • Year Released: 1993
    The Aliens of Earth is a collection of science fiction stories by author Nancy Kress. It was released in 1993 and was the author's first book published by Arkham House . It was published in an edition of 3,520 copies. Most of the stories originally appeared in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine. The Aliens of Earth contains the following stories:
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    70

    The Bachelor Machine

    • Year Released: 2003
    The Bachelor Machine is a collection of erotic science fiction short stories by M. Christian. It was first published in 2003 (ISBN 1-931160-16-3) by Green Candy Press; the book is introduced by Cecilia Tan. It was republished in 2010 by Circlet Press (ISBN 978-1-885865-58-8) with a new foreword by Kit O'Connell. The stories take place in a wide variety of settings, with an assortment of themes and widely differing tone, from grim to humorous. There is also a wide variety of sexual acts depicted in the work, including many which are not possible with modern technology, involving a wide variety of partners in heterosexual, bisexual, homosexual and sometimes non-human couplings. Although there are depictions of sadomasochistic acts, edge play, and even simulated snuff, the author has commented that "I always try and put in either redemption or depth." His stated goal in publishing the collection is that he would "like the reader to be sort of abstractly aroused, more titillated than directly stimulated, changed in the way they think about sex." The book has been analyzed in a Brown University honors thesis. Some of the short stories in this collection include,
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    71

    The Best of L. Sprague de Camp

    • Year Released: 1978
    The Best of L. Sprague de Camp is a 1978 collection of writings by science fiction and fantasy author L. Sprague de Camp, first published in hardback by Nelson Doubleday and in paperback by Ballantine Books the same year. It has also been translated into German. The book contains short works of fiction and poetry by the author, together with an introduction by fellow science fiction writer Poul Anderson.
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    72

    The Breath of Suspension

    • Year Released: 1994
    The Breath of Suspension is a collection of science fiction stories by author Alexander Jablokov. It was released in 1994 and was the author's first book published by Arkham House . It was published in an edition of 3,496 copies. the stories originally appeared in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine. The Breath of Suspension contains the following stories:
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    73

    The Collected Stories of Vernor Vinge

    • Year Released: 2001
    The Collected Stories of Vernor Vinge is a collection of science fiction short stories by Vernor Vinge. The stories were first published from 1966 to 2001, and the book contains all of Vinge's published short stories from that period except "True Names" and "Grimm's Story". Also appears in: The United States government has experimented with intelligence amplification by connecting a chimpanzee named Norman Simmons to an electronic memory bank. However, they have accidentally cross-connected the experimental computer with the government's main databank. Norman has accessed all classified federal data and knowing this carries severe punishment, he uses this information to escape captivity. Norman remains remotely connected to the government computers, and due to their own security systems, he cannot be disconnected. Norman uses his information access advantageously to evade government forces. Eventually, he contacts the last remaining Soviet agents in the United States to help him escape to Canada. At this point, the American forces close in, and Norman and his Soviet accomplices are captured. Norman is returned to the research compound and the Russians have their memories read and
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    74

    The Continent Makers and Other Tales of the Viagens

    • Year Released: 1953
    The Continent Makers and Other Tales of the Viagens is a 1953 collection of stories by science fiction and fantasy author L. Sprague de Camp, the fifth book in his Viagens Interplanetarias series. It was first published in hardcover by Twayne Publishers, and in paperback by Signet Books in 1971 with a cover by illustrator Bob Pepper. An E-book edition was published by Gollancz's SF Gateway imprint on September 29, 2011 as part of a general release of de Camp's works in electronic form. It has also been translated into Portuguese, Dutch, and Italian. The pieces were originally published between 1949 and 1951 in the magazines Astounding Science-Fiction, Startling Stories, Future Combined with Science Fiction, and Thrilling Wonder Stories. The book is a collection of most of de Camp's early "Viagens Interplanetarias" tales, all of which are set in a future in which interstellar travel between the Solar System and nearby stellar systems inhabited by alien races is common, and an Interplanetary Council regulates relations between the various civilizations. Terrans and the reptilian natives of the planet Osiris are the main spacefaring peoples. The tales take place in the period from the
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    75

    The Counterfeit Man

    • Year Released: 1963
    The Counterfeit Man is a collection of science fiction short stories by Alan E. Nourse, published in 1963 by Scholastic. Several of the stories have a medical or psychological theme:
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    76

    The Doll-House

    • Year Released: 1967
    "The Doll-House" is a short story by James Cross from Harlan Ellison's science fiction anthology Dangerous Visions.
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    77

    The Enemy Papers

    • Year Released: 2005
    The Enemy Papers is a short story collection by Barry B. Longyear containing the novella "Enemy Mine," later made into a feature-length film of the same name, along with two sequels: "The Last Enemy" and "The Tomorrow Testament." The volume also contains excerpts from the Drac holy book, a discussion of the writing of the three stories (including the production of the Enemy Mine film), the author's perspective on formulating the Drac language, and a Drac vocabulary list. Willis Davidge, a human fighter pilot, is stranded along with Jeriba Shigan, a Drac, on a hostile planet. The Drac are a race of aliens which are reptilian in appearance, and are hermaphrodites who reproduce parthenogenetically. Chronicles the capture of Joanne Nicole, a human female, at the hands of the Dracs. Soon after she is blinded by a USEF bombing raid. She is taken in by high ranking Drac military officer, where like Davidge, she learns the Talman. While she recovers, she discovers that the war between Dracs and Humans was the result of a conspiracy by another race called the Timans. She writes the tale of her life, capture, and personal growth, and submits it as the first book of the Talman not authored by
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    78

    The Jennifer Morgue

    • Year Released: 2006
    The Jennifer Morgue (2006, ISBN 1-930846-45-2) is the second collection of stories by Charles Stross featuring Bob Howard, containing the title novel The Jennifer Morgue, the short story "Pimpf", and an essay titled "The Golden Age of Spying". The collection is a sequel to the stories published in The Atrocity Archives (2004); a third book, The Fuller Memorandum, was released in July 2010. The stories are Lovecraftian spy thrillers involving a secret British intelligence agency known as "The Laundry", which deals with occult events and technology. Where 2004's The Atrocity Archives is written in the idiom of Len Deighton, The Jennifer Morgue is a pastiche of Ian Fleming's James Bond novels and refers to the real-life Project Azorian (incorrectly named by the press as Project Jennifer); Stross also uses footnotes and narrative causality, two literary devices common in the novels of Terry Pratchett. The included short story, "Pimpf", draws heavily on the mythos of online role-playing games as well as the "Bastard Operator from Hell" stories of Simon Travaglia. Just as a side note, Bob Howard's middle names are Oliver Francis. The Jennifer Morgue was nominated for the Locus Award for
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    79

    The John Varley Reader

    • Year Released: 2004
    The John Varley Reader is a representative collection of 18 of the science fiction short stories by John Varley, first published in paperback in September 2004. It features 5 new stories. Each story is preceded by an autobiographical introduction; until this book Varley had avoided discussing himself, or his works, in print.
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    80

    The Last Dangerous Visions

    The Last Dangerous Visions was a planned sequel to the science fiction short story anthologies Dangerous Visions and Again, Dangerous Visions, originally published in 1967 and 1972 respectively. It is edited by Harlan Ellison. The projected third collection was started but controversially never finished. It has become something of a legend in science fiction as the genre's most famous unpublished book. It was originally announced for publication in 1973, but other work demanded Ellison's attention and the anthology has not seen print to date. He has come under criticism for his treatment of some writers who submitted their stories to him, whom some estimate to number nearly 150. Many of these editors have since died. Various difficulties delayed publication many times. As recently as May 2007, Ellison said he still wants to get the book out. British author Christopher Priest, whose story "An Infinite Summer" had been accepted for the collection, wrote a lengthy critique of Ellison's failure to complete the LDV project. It was first published by Priest as a one-shot fanzine called The Last Deadloss Visions, a pun on the title of Priest's own fanzine, Deadloss. It proved so popular
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    81

    The Rediscovery of Man

    • Year Released: 1993
    The Rediscovery of Man: The Complete Short Science Fiction of Cordwainer Smith (ISBN 0-915368-56-0) is a 1993 book containing the complete collected short fiction of science fiction author Cordwainer Smith. It was edited by James A. Mann and published by NESFA Press. Most of the stories take place in Smith's future history set in the universe of the Instrumentality of Mankind; the collection is arranged in the chronological order in which the stories take place in the fictional timeline. The collection also contains short stories which do not take place in this universe. Within the context of the future history, the Rediscovery of Mankind refers to the Instrumentality's re-introduction of chance and unhappiness into the sterile utopia that they had created for humanity. Other than Smith's novel, Norstrilia, which takes place in the same future history, the book collects all of Smith's known science fiction writing. E-texts available as part of Baen books' "Webscription" service:
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    82

    The River of Time

    • Year Released: 1986
    The River of Time (1986) is an anthology of science fiction short stories by David Brin. Several of the short stories and novellas from The River of time are available for free on David Brin's official web site.
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    83

    The Science Fictional Solar System

    • Year Released: 1979
    The Science Fictional Solar System is a 1979 anthology of science fiction short-stories revolving around the solar system. Its editors are Isaac Asimov, Charles G. Waugh, and Martin H. Greenberg.
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    84

    The Skylark of Space

    • Year Released: 1928
    The Skylark of Space by Edward E. "Doc" Smith was written between 1915 and 1921 while Smith was working on his doctorate. Though the original idea for the novel was Smith's, he co-wrote the first part of the novel with Lee Hawkins Garby, the wife of his college classmate and later neighbor Carl Garby. The Skylark of Space is considered to be one of the earliest novels of interstellar travel and the first example of space opera, complete with protagonists perfect in mind, body, and spirit who fight against villains of absolute evil. Originally serialized in 1928 in the magazine Amazing Stories, it was first published in book form in 1946 by The Buffalo Book Co. Note: This synopsis is consistent with the published novel in its final form (c. 1951) but differs in detail from the original 1928 text as transcribed at Project Gutenberg. The Skylark of Space is the first book in the Skylark series and pits the hero, Dick Seaton, against Marc "Blackie" DuQuesne ( pronounced "Du Kane"). The story not only has whiz-bang technology, but also has conflict by the characters of Seaton and DuQuesne. Seaton is intelligent, good-looking, young, and capable. So is DuQuesne, but he is totally
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    85

    The State of the Art

    • Year Released: 1989
    The State of the Art is a short story collection by Scottish writer Iain M. Banks, first published in 1991. The collection includes some stories originally published under his other byline, Iain Banks as well as the title novella and others set in Banks' Culture fictional universe. At 100 pages long, the title novella makes up the bulk of the book. The novella chronicles a Culture mission to Earth in the late Seventies, and also serves as a prequel of sorts to Use of Weapons by featuring one of that novel's characters, Diziet Sma. Here, Sma argues for contact with Earth, to try to fix the mess the human species has made of it; another Culture citizen, Linter, goes native, choosing to renounce his Culture body enhancements so as to be more like the locals; and Li, who is a Star Trek fan, argues that the whole "incontestably neurotic and clinically insane species" should be eradicated with a micro black hole. The ship Arbitrary has ideas, and a sense of humour, of its own. 'Also while I'd been away, the ship had sent a request on a postcard to the BBC's World Service, asking for 'Mr David Bowie's "Space Oddity" for the good ship Arbitrary and all who sail in her.' (This from a
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    86

    The Throne of Saturn

    • Year Released: 1949
    The Throne of Saturn is a collection of science fiction short stories by author S. Fowler Wright. It was released in 1949 and was the author's first American book and his only collection published by Arkham House. It was released in an edition of 3,062 copies. The book is an expansion of The New Gods Lead published by Jarrolds in 1932 by the addition of two stories. The Throne of Saturn contains these twelve stories, as well as a foreword: Boucher and McComas described the 1949 edition as "twelve superb short stories of a future in which the new gods have led man into strange scientific and sociological bypaths -- a book it would be difficult to overpraise." P. Schuyler Miller praised the collection as "imaginative fiction entirely different from anything else you are likely to find in print."
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    87

    The Virgin & the Wheels

    • Year Released: 1976
    The Virgin & the Wheels is a 1976 collection of two short science fiction novels by L. Sprague de Camp, published in paperback by Popular Library. An E-book edition was published by Gollancz's SF Gateway imprint on September 29, 2011 as part of a general release of de Camp's works in electronic form. The Virgin of Zesh. Earth missionary Althea Merrick, stranded on the planet Krishna and fleeing from an unwanted marriage to a Viagens Interplanetarias official, joins a scientist and poet en route to a utopian Terran colony on the island of Zesh. There she becomes embroiled in the affairs of some peculiarly intelligent aborigines. The story is notable for its satirization of contemporary pseudoscientific movements and for some remarkable parallels to Daniel Keyes's novel Flowers for Algernon, which it predates. The Wheels of If. Lawyer Alister Park is inexplicably torn from his normal existence and thrust into a series of alternate worlds. Each morning he discovers he has become someone else, in a world changed from his own. Ultimately he finds himself a bishop in Vinland, an America that might have been had the early Anglo-Saxons converted to Celtic Christianity and the Franks lost
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    88

    The Virgin of Zesh & The Tower of Zanid

    • Year Released: 1982
    The Virgin of Zesh & The Tower of Zanid is a 1982 collection of two science fiction novels by L. Sprague de Camp. Both works are part of his Viagens Interplanetarias series and of its subseries of stories set on the fictional planet Krishna. The collection was first published in paperback by Ace Books in February 1983, and reprinted in April of the same year. It was issued as the fourth volume of the standard edition of the Krishna novels, and its component parts were at the time of publication the fifth and sixth Krishna novels, chronologically. Afterwards, publication of The Bones of Zora (1983) put The Tower of Zanid seventh in order of chronology. As with all of de Camp's "Krishna" novels, the component parts of this collection have a "Z" in them, a practice he claimed to have devised to keep track of them. Short stories in the series do not follow the practice, nor do Viagens Interplanetarias works not set on Krishna. The Virgin of Zesh. Missionary Althea Merrick, fleeing from an unwanted marriage to a Viagens official, joins a scientist and poet enroute to a utopian Terran colony on the island of Zesh, where she becomes embroiled in the affairs of some peculiarly intelligent
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    89

    The Wheels of If and Other Science Fiction

    • Year Released: 1949
    The Wheels of If and Other Science Fiction is a 1948 collection of science fiction stories by L. Sprague de Camp, first published in hardback by Shasta and in paperback by Berkley Books in 1970. It has also been translated into German. All the stories were originally published in Unknown Worlds. Astounding reviewer P. Schuyler Miller praised the stories as "representative examples of de Campian whimsy and reverse plot-twists."
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    90

    The Wind from a Burning Woman

    • Year Released: 1983
    The Wind from a Burning Woman is a collection of science fiction stories by author Greg Bear. It was released in 1983 and was the author's first hardcover book. It was published by Arkham House in an edition of 3,046 copies. Two of the included stories were nominated for a Nebula Award. "Petra" was nominated in 1983, but lost. "Hardfought" was nominated in 1984, and won. The Wind from a Burning Woman contains the following tales:
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    91

    Time and Stars

    • Year Released: 1964
    Time and Stars (no ISBN for original hardcover version) is a collection of science fiction short stories by Poul Anderson, published in 1964. "Dangerous universe: Faced with machines that think by and for themselves, super-intelligent space beings bent on a suicidal course and a galaxy teeming with dangerous alien life, man had to invent new weapons, new defenses - or perish from the universe." Source The collection was reviewed by Algis Budrys in the February 1965 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction.
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    92

    Time in Advance

    • Year Released: 1958
    Time in Advance (no ISBN) is a collection of four short stories by science fiction writer William Tenn (a pseudonym for the sci-fi work of Philip Klass). The stories all originally appeared in a number of different publications between 1952 and 1957. Time in Advance was first published by Bantam Books as a paperback in 1958 and also published as a hardcover in the UK by Victor Gollancz in 1963, followed a hardcover edition in 1964 published in the United Kingdom by the Science Fiction Book Club and by a Panther paperback edition in April 1966. Dedication: "To Fruma: For being there during Winthrop at his worst and life at its best" Fruma Klass was Philip Klass's (William Tenn's) wife, Winthrop being the name of the title character of the final story in the collection. (Astounding Science Fiction, February 1952) The Earth is visited by large, enigmatic alien spheres, who take up residence in colonies on several prairies and deserts across the world. They make visits to cities, factories and other areas of human activity, seemingly to merely float and observe. All attempts at communication are unsuccessful and despite the best efforts of mankind, no one is able to decipher their
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    93

    To Ride Pegasus

    • Year Released: 1973
    To Ride Pegasus is a collection of four science fiction stories by Anne McCaffrey, published by Ballantine Books in 1973 and later under its Del Rey imprint. Alternatively, "To Ride Pegasus" is a novella, the first chapter of the book, and the one of four stories that was original to the collection. To Ride Pegasus originates the fictional premise of the Talents universe, the setting for seven novels published 1990 to 2000: two more "Pegasus" books and five "Tower and Hive" books. All eight books feature so-called Talents, people with psionic powers such as empathy, telepathy, teleportation, telekinesis, clairvoyance, precognition, and the ability to find what is lost ('finders'). Pegasus is a symbol for Talent, early adopted by Henry Darrow: "You'd see a lot from the back of a winged horse ..." (p. 11). "When you ride the winged horse, you can't dismount. ... We'll find our bridle, I think, with time and training and more practice at riding". The novella "To Ride Pegasus" is a prequel to the three previously published stories. It explains the fortunate scientific discovery of psionic powers and the earliest establishment of the Talents in human society, in Greater New York late
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    94

    Tomorrow, the Stars

    • Year Released: 1952
    Tomorrow, the Stars is an anthology of speculative fiction short stories, presented as edited by Robert A. Heinlein and published in 1952. Heinlein wrote a six-page introduction in which he discussed the nature of science fiction, speculative fiction, escapist stories, and literature. None of the stories had previously been anthologized. According to science-fiction historian Bud Webster, however, Heinlein's introduction and name on the book were his sole contributions; the actual selection of the stories, and the work involved in arranging for their publication, was done by Frederik Pohl and Judith Merril. This is confirmed by Virginia Heinlein in Grumbles from the Grave (without mentioning Pohl or Merril) and by Pohl in chapter 6 of his autobiography, The Way the Future Was (Del Rey 1978). However, the correspondence between Heinlein and Merril, now housed in Library and Archives Canada, shows that while Heinlein claimed to be uninvolved in the editing, he certainly had some input into the structure and contents of the book: I am the lowest form of literary prostitute, swindling the public into thinking that I have done a piece of editing which I aint done and aint going to do
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    95

    TV: 2000

    • Year Released: 1982
    TV: 2000 is a 1982 anthology of science fiction short-stories revolving around television and its implications. Its editors are Isaac Asimov, Charles G. Waugh, and Martin H. Greenberg.
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    96

    Unorthodox Engineers

    • Year Released: 1979
    The Unorthodox Engineers were the subject of a series of science fiction short stories by Colin Kapp. They were a misfit bunch of engineers who solved problems of alien technology/weird planets in the future. The stories had a very large grain-of-salt-type humor. They were commanded by maverick engineer Fritz van Noon and included, amongst others, a convicted bank robber as quartermaster (on the entirely-sound grounds that he was likely to be the most capable person for the job). The Unorthodox Engineers originally appeared in various British SF magazines: Dobson Books published a collection of the stories as The Unorthodox Engineers {ISBN 0-234-72072-7} in November 1979. The short story "The Pen and the Dark" was adapted into a text-based computer adventure game by Keith Campbell, with text by Colin Kapp. It was published in 1984 by Mosaic Software.
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    97

    Untouched by Human Hands

    • Year Released: 1954
    Untouched by Human Hands is a collection of science fiction short stories by Robert Sheckley. It was first published in 1954 by Ballantine Books (catalogue number 73). It includes the following stories (magazines in which the stories originally appeared given in parentheses): Critic Groff Conklin reviewed the collection for Galaxy Science Fiction in 1954; although generally favorable, the review claimed that Sheckley was "still trying to discover his own particular bent" and that he "hasn't quite found his footing." Sheckley himself, according to a 1980 interview, was aware of the extreme stylistic diversity of the collection and the fact that some stories were not science fiction in the usual sense of the word: I felt I wasn't really writing science fiction. I was in some way writing a commentary on science fiction, and this sometimes made me feel, a little sadly, that I was not really into it. The collection received positive reviews. Writing in The New York Times, Villiers Gerson wrote that Sheckley was "a writer not quire like any other [whose] forte is his own brand of strange and wonderful humor."Boucher and McComas found it "as brightly individual and entrancing a group of
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    98

    Voyages by Starlight

    • Year Released: 1996
    Voyages by Starlight is a collection of science fiction and horror stories by author Ian R. MacLeod. It was released in 1996 and was the author's first book. It was published by Arkham House in an edition of 2,542 copies. The stories originally appeared in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and Weird Tales. Voyages by Starlight contains the following stories:
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    99

    Wild Cards

    The first volume in the Wild Cards shared universe fiction series edited by George R. R. Martin. It was first published in 1987 and contained a dozen short stories establishing the Wild Cards universe, introducing the main characters and setting up plot threads that still continue to play out over the rest of the on-going series. In 2010 this volume was reissued with three new stories by three new writers added to the volume's original contents. These expanded the original Wild Cards history to reflect new story and character developments introduced in later volumes of the on-going series. The original Wild Cards novel was published in 1987, but various additions have been made to the manuscript over various republications. In addition, there are several interludes (written by Martin) between stories that expand upon the background of the Wild Cards world and an appendix on "The Science of the Wild Card Virus" (written by Milán) that explains how Xenovirus Takis-A works. Both the interludes and the appendix take the form of excerpts from literature within the universe. In 2010 Tor Books reissued the anthology along with the addition of three new chapters, "Captain Cathode and the
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    100

    Years in the Making: the Time-Travel Stories of L. Sprague de Camp

    • Year Released: 2005
    Years in the Making: the Time-Travel Stories of L. Sprague de Camp is a 2005 collection of short stories by science fiction and fantasy author L. Sprague de Camp edited by Mark L. Olson and illustrated by Bob Eggleton, published in hardcover by NESFA Press. The book contains what the editor regards as de Camp's best science fiction stories and essays concerning time travel. It is the first in a projected series of the author's works. It also contains an introduction by Harry Turtledove, often regarded as de Camp's literary heir.
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