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Best School newspaper of All Time

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    1
    The Berry

    The Berry

    • School: University of Cambridge
    The Berry is the only political newspaper at Cambridge University, England. In its print form, like The Cambridge Student and Varsity it had a distribution of 10,000. In 2009-10 it was relaunched as an online newspaper, 'The Berry Online', providing Cambridge students with their only regular forum for political debate. Just as berries can be red, blue, yellow, black and almost any other colour, this paper was created to address the concerns of students of all political beliefs. Originally a joint project between CULC and CUCA, the paper has expanded to include contributors from all political persuasions. It aims to remain unbiased while removing the anti-political slant of so much modern media. In the past, the Cambridge Union was seen as being relatively right wing (see Cambridge Mafia) and the Cambridge University Students' Union seen as left wing. In this context, the Berry's pan-political project is one which self-consciously attempts to broaden political debate outside any one traditional constituency. The paper was launched in October, 2005, by Laurie Fitzjohn-Sykes, then chairman of CUCA, to challenge the political apathy then prevalent among the university's students. While
    7.00
    9 votes
    2
    The Stony Brook Press

    The Stony Brook Press

    • School: State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The Stony Brook Press is a student-run news and feature publication at the Stony Brook University published fortnightly. Founded in 1979, the Press was created as an alternative to the Stony Brook Statesman, the official newspaper of the university. In its early days, the Press featured exclusive interviews with political figures including Amiri Baraka, Abbie Hoffman, Ralph Nader, and Al D'Amato. The paper currently has a blend of journalism, alternative thinking, satire and features. In October 2011, the Press announced a merger with rival campus publication Think Magazine. Both publications merged under the Press name later that month, with the Think Magazine members becoming part of the Press web staff.
    8.43
    7 votes
    3
    The Daily Collegian

    The Daily Collegian

    • School: Pennsylvania State University
    The Daily Collegian is an award-winning, student-operated newspaper that is published independently at the Pennsylvania State University. The newspaper is printed on weekdays during the Fall, Spring, and second Summer semesters. It is distributed for free at the University Park campus. As of 2010, the off-campus cost for a copy of the newspaper is 30 cents. A compilation edition of the week's top stories, known as the Weekly Collegian is also distributed free of charge at the University's Commonwealth campuses. Subscriptions to the Weekly Collegian and The Daily Collegian, as well as back issues, can be purchased here. Collegian Inc., which publishes The Daily Collegian, the Weekly Collegian, Collegian Magazine, Venues, and The Daily Collegian Online, is an independent, non-profit corporation and has a board of directors that is composed of faculty, students, and professionals The mission statement of Collegian Inc. is "to publish a quality campus newspaper and to provide a rewarding educational experience for the student staff members." The student editing and reporting staff annually receives notable journalism awards. In 2010, the Collegian won the Best Newspaper Silver Crown
    6.56
    9 votes
    4

    The Daily Northwestern

    • School: Northwestern University
    The Daily Northwestern is a student newspaper at Northwestern University that is published on weekdays during the academic year. Established in 1881 and published in Evanston, Illinois, it is run entirely by undergraduates, many of whom are students at Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism. The Daily is widely considered one of the best college newspapers in the country. It is a frequent winner of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association and the coveted Associated Collegiate Press Pacemaker Award. Its former staffers are leaders in the world of journalism; many have won awards such as the Pulitzer Prize. Although it serves the Northwestern community, The Daily is unaffiliated with the university, being supported entirely by advertisers. It is owned by the Students Publishing Company, which also publishes the Northwestern Syllabus Yearbook. Current circulation is in excess of 7,500. The Daily Northwestern is the only daily publication for both Northwestern and the city of Evanston, Illinois. The paper's offices are located on the third floor of the Norris University Center on Northwestern's Evanston campus. The Daily is the descendant of two earlier publications, the Tripod
    7.67
    6 votes
    5

    State Press

    • School: Arizona State University
    The State Press is the independent, student-operated newspaper of Arizona State University. It publishes a free newspaper every weekday. The history of The State Press goes back to ASU's establishment as a "Normal School" during Arizona's territorial period. The university's first student newspaper, The Normal Echo, made its debut on October 18, 1890. Back then, it was a one-page supplement to the local newspaper now called the East Valley Tribune. The existence of The State Press as an independent entity began in 1906, when it became the Tempe Normal Student, a four-page tabloid distributed on campus each Friday for five cents per copy. The paper changed its name to Tempe Collegian in 1925 when the school's name changed to Tempe College in the same year. The name was eventually shortened to the Collegian in 1930 and fell under the control of the newly created Faculty of Journalism two years later. The newspaper was renamed the Arizona State Press in 1936, and the name was shortened to State Press the next year. (The word "The" was added to the masthead in the early 2000s.) In the 1970s, The State Press regained its independence from what is now the Walter Cronkite School of
    8.60
    5 votes
    6

    La Rotonde

    • School: University of Ottawa
    La Rotonde is the official French-language student newspaper at the University of Ottawa. The newspaper publishes weekly throughout the fall and winter sessions on regular topics including news, arts and culture, sports, and travel. Previously owned by the Student Federation of the University of Ottawa, La Rotonde achieved an independent status on May 1, 2008. A not-for-profit corporation, Les Publications La Rotonde Inc., has been created to manage the newspaper. Its directors are elected by University of Ottawa students during an annual general meeting. While The Fulcrum is the official English-language student newspaper, the two publications are not repetitions of each other and offer unique, and sometimes conflicting, opinions.
    6.43
    7 votes
    7

    Williams Record

    The Williams Record is the student newspaper of Williams College. It was founded in 1885. News broken by the Record is often reported in other newspapers like the Berkshire Eagle, the North Adams Transcript, and The New York Times. Former Record staffers have gone on to careers with major newspapers, and/or in book and magazine publishing. Dan Keating, a 1983 Record editor-in-chief, went on to win a Pulitzer Prize as part of a team at the Washington Post.
    8.40
    5 votes
    8

    The Irvine Progressive

    • School: University of California, Irvine
    The Irvine Progressive is a left leaning student newspaper at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). It was launched in April 2003 by a group of undergraduate activists at UCI. Today it is run by a dedicated staff of student volunteers wishing to promote progressive values and interest in political discourse at the University of California, Irvine campus. The paper is a Campus Progress publication, receiving funding from the group Campus Progress. Campus Progress is a project of the Center for American Progress. The paper covers subjects as varied as foreign policy, national security, economics, and campus issues. Published monthly, it has a circulation of about 3,000. The Progressive is distributed throughout the campus of the University of California, Irvine at various media kiosks.
    7.17
    6 votes
    9

    Daily Trojan

    • School: University of Southern California
    The Daily Trojan, or "DT," is the student newspaper of the University of Southern California. The newspaper is a forum for student expression and is written, edited, and managed by university students. The paper is intended to inform USC students, faculty, and staff on the latest news and provide opinion and entertainment. Student writers, editors, photographers and artists can develop their talents and air their opinions while providing a service to the campus community through the Daily Trojan. Readers can interact with the Daily Trojan by commenting on articles online or writing a letter to the editor. It is published Monday through Friday (during regularly scheduled class days) and distributed at various locations around campus. Articles are also available online at the official Daily Trojan web site. The Daily Trojan is produced weekly as the "Summer Trojan" during the summer session, typically on Wednesdays, from commencement until July. Although the length of the Daily Trojan varies depending on the volume of advertisements, larger issues throughout the semester include the Orientation version, Career Guide, Transportation Guide, and Restaurant Guide. Starting in 2006, at
    9.50
    4 votes
    10

    Daily Nexus

    • School: University of California, Santa Barbara
    The Daily Nexus is the university newspaper for the campus of the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). Student journalism has always been a part of college life in Santa Barbara, even before the existence of UCSB. Before joining the University of California system, for example, Santa Barbara State College had a newspaper called The Eagle. As the institution slowly transformed into the modern UCSB, it adopted various other named for various other news publications, including The Roadrunner, El Gaucho and The University Post. The paper reverted back to the name El Gaucho by 1964. In 1967, former El Gaucho editor John Maybury started a competing off-campus paper called "The Isla Vista Argo". Protesters burned down the Bank of America building in Isla Vista in 1970. In the wake of that incident, the paper's editors decided to change the publication's name to the Daily Nexus, in order to "keep with the changing nature of the university." The name was drawn by the paper's 1970-71 editorial board from a quote attributed to Robert Maynard Hutchins: "A free press is the nexus of any democracy." Since then, the Daily Nexus has provided the students of UCSB with both campus-related
    8.20
    5 votes
    11
    The Paisano

    The Paisano

    • School: University of Texas at San Antonio
    The Paisano is the independent student-run newspaper of the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). It was established in 1981 and publishes 7,000 copies weekly. "Paisano" is a Spanish and Italian word for "fellow countryman." The newspaper is published once a week except during exam and holiday periods. Because it is student-run and independent from University administration, The Paisano is written completely by unpaid volunteers, with advertisements helping to support the costs associated with printing and distributing. The Paisano won a gold medal in 2000 from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. The office for the newspaper is located at 14545 Roadrunner Way, across the street from the Main UTSA campus.
    6.83
    6 votes
    12

    The Holcad

    • School: Westminster College
    The Holcad is the official student newspaper of Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania. It is published every Friday during the academic year except the Fridays immediately before or after breaks and during finals. The Holcad was started in 1884, 32 years after the establishment of the college. It has been published every year since without interruption. It is printed by West Penn Printing in New Castle, Pennsylvania under the advisement of The Herald of Sharon, Pennsylvania. Formerly of the tabloid format, it has been printed in broadsheet format since 2004. The Holcad is split into a number of sections. More than 1,500 copies of the March 3, 2006 edition were stolen from newsstands. The edition contained a story and editorial about and pictures of a hit list that a student made and posted in his dorm room. The hit list was found by his roommate and reported to school authorities, who the students felt reacted unfavorably. The information was brought to The Holcad and published. On the morning of March 3, staff members discovered that more than half of the double run—the editors had been warned by an administrator that the edition might be stolen, so they ordered more
    7.80
    5 votes
    13

    The Oklahoma Daily

    • School: University of Oklahoma
    The Oklahoma Daily is the independent, student-produced newspaper at the University of Oklahoma, with a circulation of 8,000. Though it maintains a connection with OU's Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, the newspaper is not a part of required learning for journalism students at OU. Some classes, however, are offered at The Daily for academic credit. The Daily is operated by OU Student Media, a division of Student Affairs, which also houses Sooner yearbook, Sower magazine, the OU Visitor Guide and an advertising office. At the paper, students are hired year round on both a paid and volunteer basis. The editor in chief is the only person to serve an entire school year in the same position, and the editorial board changes every semester. The newspaper runs an average of 8 to 12 pages per edition depending on the amount of advertisements sold. Because The Daily no longer owns an on-campus printer, editions are printed at The Norman Transcript. In 1897, five years after the University of Oklahoma opened its doors, the first student-run newspaper, The Umpire, made its debut. In 1903, it became a semi-weekly news publication called the University Oklahoman. By 1916,
    8.75
    4 votes
    14
    UCSD Guardian

    UCSD Guardian

    • School: University of California, San Diego
    The UCSD Guardian is a student-operated newspaper at the University of California, San Diego. Originally named the Triton Times, it is published twice a week during the regular academic year, usually Mondays and Thursdays. Although the Guardian is officially a university department, it is funded solely by advertising. Unlike many college newspapers, the Guardian has no faculty advisor and is not formally tied to any academic program. The Guardian's editorial staff consists of UCSD undergraduates. The Editor in Chief is elected in the late spring by a vote of the current year's staff; the Editor in Chief-elect then selects new senior editors, who make up the paper's Executive Board, which is ratified by the outgoing editors. In contrast, the paper's business side is operated by several longtime university employees. A Business Oversight Board, which includes the paper's general manager, Editor in Chief, and managing editors is responsible for setting long-term policies for the business and overseeing their implementation. Though the Guardian is technically a self-supporting enterprise under the university's Student Affairs department, it operates with relative independence and
    10.00
    3 votes
    15
    Washington Square News

    Washington Square News

    • School: New York University
    The Washington Square News is the daily student newspaper of New York University and serves the NYU, Greenwich Village, and East Village communities. The paper, better known as WSN, has a circulation of 10,000 and an estimated 65,000 readers online. It is published Monday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters and online on Friday, with additional issues published in the summer. WSN is run solely by NYU students, with the paper's senior staff composed of undergraduates. Its offices are located at 838 Broadway. The paper is editorially independent from the university and is solely responsible in selling advertisements to fund its production. The term for the position of editor-in-chief is one calendar year, beginning in the spring semester and ending in the fall semester. The term for all other editorial positions is one semester. The editor-in-chief for the 2012 calendar year is Amanda Randone. The newspaper was born in 1973 as the result of NYU's merging of their two campuses: the University Heights campus in the Bronx had published the Heights Daily News, while the Washington Square campus in Lower Manhattan originally published the Washington Square Bulletin. In
    6.50
    6 votes
    16
    Northumbria Student

    Northumbria Student

    • School: Northumbria University
    Northumbria Student is a newspaper produced by and for members of Northumbria University; Newcastle upon Tyne, England. The monthly published paper was established in May 2004, and is editorially independent of both Northumbria Students' Union and Northumbria University. Although it has ceased to publish, from August 2011 attempts were made by former students to start a student-run online newspaper also called Northumbria Student. The newspaper, still in its infancy compared to more established University newspapers and the weekly The Courier at Newcastle University, began life as a 20-page first issue in May 2004 - the only issue of that academic year - under founding editor Katherine Graham. The team produced a magazine version of Northumbria Student over the Summer holidays which was sent out to all freshers starting at Northumbria University that September. Graham edited two further editions of an extended 28-page format before leaving to join NSR fm. In the academic year 2004-05 there were four issues, including a January issue which was the first under the joint editorship of Sarah Bailey and Steven Martin. In 2005-06 the role of unpaid and part-time editor was integrated
    7.40
    5 votes
    17

    Skamija

    • School: Gymnasioum Jovan Jovanović Zmaj
    Skamija is a student magazine for the Serbian Jovan Jovanovic Zmaj Grammar School. The first issue was published in 1972. Skamija changed its name and look many times. With the "Silence" issue, Art directors and high-school students Milan Jovanović and Tara Petrić have redesigned the entire magazine, changed its format, switched the font to Minion Pro, and succeeded in making a prominent visual experience in spite of the very limited budget - the issue was in its entirety black and white. It is also the first black and white issue after a long series of coloured ones. The idea was that the birds which used to live in Skamija, have left. Unfortunately they took all colour with them. They even took the sounds, thus encapsulating "Skamija" in silence - hence the name of the issue. The next issue was named "Memoirs." The main topic is the celebration of 200 years since the foundation of Gymnasium Jovan Jovanović Zmaj. The magazine's deadline was January 27, but graphic design had less than a couple of weeks to be designed. So as to meet the tight deadline, the editorial staff and art director had to make severe cuts. Despite of these cuts to meet the deadline, the issue was delayed for
    7.40
    5 votes
    18
    The GUIDON

    The GUIDON

    • School: Ateneo de Manila University
    The GUIDON is the official student newspaper of the Ateneo de Manila University. It is a part of the Ateneo's Confederation of Publications (COP), including Heights and Matanglawin. The GUIDON is published monthly from June to March. The GUIDON is one of the founding members of the College Editors Guild of the Philippines, along with The Varsitarian of the University of Santo Tomas, The Philippine Collegian of the University of the Philippines Diliman and The National of National University (Philippines). It has three sections, namely: the Main (which include News, Opinion, Beyond Loyola, and Sports) section, the Features section, and the Inquiry section. The Inquiry section deals with explanatory and investigative journalism while The Beyond Loyola section tackles with issues outside the Ateneo campus, such as the recent Human Security Act and the Sumilao March. Aside from the three sections which are in print, The GUIDON also has an official website and a lifestyle magazine online. The GUIDON is currently on its 83rd year. Before 1929, the students of the Ateneo de Manila persistently demanded for a newspaper that would provide them with information on school activities and
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Oregon Commentator

    Oregon Commentator

    The Oregon Commentator is a student publication at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon, United States. Founded on September 27, 1983, and first published on October 24, 1983, it is a self-described "conservative journal of opinion," modeled after such publications as Harvard Lampoon, The Onion and Reason Magazine. The magazine's official ideological stance is conservative, although many of the ideas and values it promotes might be better described as libertarian. The journal is an independent journal of opinion for the campus community. Founded by a group of student journalists on September 27, 1983, the Commentator provides students with an alternative to the views of other student publications, professors and student groups. The program was founded in fall 1983, primarily by Dane S. Claussen, later a journalism/mass communication professor and now Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Nevada, and Richard E. Burr, now with The Detroit News' editorial pages. Other co-founders included Robert Davis and Michael Rust, in addition to faculty adviser Paul S. Holbo. The Commentator is the second-oldest publication on campus, after the Oregon Daily Emerald. It
    8.50
    4 votes
    20

    The Daily Iowan

    • School: University of Iowa
    The Daily Iowan is an independent, 19,500-circulation daily student newspaper serving Iowa City and the University of Iowa community. It has consistently won a number of collegiate journalism awards, including multiple National Pacemaker Awards, and is generally regarded as one of the finest student newspapers in the country. George Gallup, creator of the Gallup poll, served as editor of The Daily Iowan in the early 1920s. The newspaper's publisher is William Casey, who has served in the post since 1976. He is credited with starting the newspaper's scholarship program for talented future journalists, who have since worked at news agencies such as The Associated Press, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The St. Petersburg Times, The Dallas Morning News, The Star Tribune, The Des Moines Register, ESPN, USA Today, SPIN Magazine and The Times-Picayune. On December 11, 2011, The Daily Iowan endorsed 2012 Republican Presidential candidate Ron Paul. Like many other newspapers, the Daily Iowan publishes detailed arrest records. The records then become easily accessible from search engines. Although police blotters are removed from the website a month after they are posted, cached
    8.50
    4 votes
    21

    The Tufts Daily

    The Tufts Daily, known on campus simply as The Daily, is the student newspaper at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. Its first issue was published on February 25, 1980. The paper covers news, arts and sports both on campus and in the Boston area and allows members of the Tufts community to submit op-ed pieces about any campus or global issue. Unlike other student organizations and publications at Tufts, the Daily is financially self-sustaining, and does not receive funding from the student activities fee. During the Daily's first two decades, it was engaged in competition with a weekly campus newspaper, the Tufts Observer. The two newspapers co-existed until 2001, when the Observer changed to a newsmagazine format. The Daily has four sections of original editorial content (news, features, sports, and arts), one section allowing signed submissions from community members (viewpoints), and an editorial page. The Daily opines on campus, national, and global issues through original editorials published four times a week. The Daily's news section reports on Tufts events, campus politics, and student life. It also offers regular stories on community issues in Medford and
    9.67
    3 votes
    22

    Technician

    • School: North Carolina State University
    Technician is the student newspaper of North Carolina State University. Its first edition was published in 1920, and it has been published continuously since that date, becoming a daily paper in fall 1988. The newspaper is published five times per week when school is in session and also has an online presence, . In the mid-1990s it was one of the first university newspapers to publish to the World Wide Web. Since North Carolina State University has no journalism school, Technician's editorial staff comprises paid, full-time students. The paper operates as a public forum for student opinion with students having the final say over content. The newspaper's funding is managed by the university's Student Media Board of Directors. Technician submits an annual budget request that is reviewed, modified as necessary and approved by the board each spring. Technician uses no student fee monies directly and is entirely funded by advertising monies. Like many student newspapers, Technician has seen its share of controversies, including: 1919-1920 • vol. 1 • Marion Francis Trice, editor 1920-1921 • vol. 2 • J.H. Lane, editor 1921-1922 • vol. 3 • E.C. Tatum, editor 1922-1923 • vol. 4 • Alvin M.
    7.20
    5 votes
    23

    The Orion

    • School: California State University, Chico
    The Orion is the student newspaper of California State University, Chico and produces 32 issues every year, 16 each semester. Its offices are in the basement of Plumas Hall on the Chico State campus. It has won numerous state and national awards, including several National Pacemakers. Its name is taken from the constellation Orion, as the newspaper is meant to be a "hunter of truth." The Orion's first issue was published March 12, 1975. The offices were in the basement of Meriam Library. The newspaper was eight pages long and in tabloid format. There was another student paper on campus, The Wildcat, which was funded by the Associated Students. Because of frequent conflicts, The Wildcat removed itself from the campus in 1977, leaving The Orion as Chico State's only student newspaper. Today, The Wildcat is known as the Chico News & Review. The Orion moved from the Meriam Library basement to the Plumas Hall basement in the mid-1980s. The Orion won its first National Newspaper Pacemaker Award in 1989. The Orion is published every Wednesday of the semester, except for fall semester finals week. During finals week of spring semester, a special summer issue is produced. Each issue is
    7.20
    5 votes
    24

    Le Délit français

    • School: McGill University
    Le Délit français, also known as Le Délit, is an independent francophone newspaper on the McGill University campus, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Serving McGill University's francophone-student minority, Le Délit is a sister publication to the English-language The McGill Daily. Evolving from the Le McGill Daily français French-language section in The McGill Daily, Le Délit became a standalone newspaper on September 1st, 1977. Initially retaining the name Le McGill Daily français, the publication changed its moniker to the edgier-sounding Le Délit, a play on words: While it sounds like "Le Daily" in English, in French, Le Délit actually means the offense or the misdemeanor. Le Délit is a member of Canadian University Press and le Carrefour international de la presse universitaire francophone (CIPUF). Le Délit is published by The Daily Publications Society (DPS) every Tuesday during the university's Fall and Winter terms. The paper has two main sections: Nouvelles (news) and Arts & Culture. Current-affairs features appear in the centerfold pages. In accordance with the Constitution of the DPS, the newspaper is run exclusively by McGill students. Below is Le Délit's 2009-2010 editorial
    8.25
    4 votes
    25

    Rutgers Centurion

    • School: Rutgers University
    The Centurion is a conservative magazine focused on Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Its motto is "veritas vos liberabit," which is Latin for "the truth shall set you free." The magazine attempts to counterbalance that which its staff perceive as a predominant orthodoxy of social liberalism and political progressivism of the professors and staff at the university. They believe this is confirmed by documented faculty donations to political candidates in the 2004 presidential election. The Centurion was founded in September 2004 by James O'Keefe, a junior philosophy major, after he was fired from the Daily Targum. It was co-founded by fellow Rutgers college students Matthew Klimek, Joseph P. Nedick and Mason-Gross art student Justine Mertz. The Centurion has featured cover stories on Rutgers alumnus Paul Robeson, academic freedom, eminent domain in New Brunswick, New Jersey, the secret society Cap and Skull, the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy and the Rutgers College Governing Association. Mostly, it focuses on campus fraud and due diligence issues, claiming in its mission statement to be a remedy to "excessive political correctness and corruption at
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    Trinity Tripod

    Trinity Tripod

    • School: Trinity College
    The Trinity Tripod is the primary student newspaper of Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Since 2006, the Tripod has been arranged with six sections, in order, News, Opinions, Features, Arts, Announcements, and Sports. Each of those sections has two co-editors save Announcements which has one editor. A typical issue of the Tripod has 24 pages, and is published weekly on Tuesdays, when classes are in session. The Trinity Tripod was first published by the students of Trinity College in 1904. The newspaper is an affiliate of UWIRE, which distributes and promotes its content to their network. Famous alumni include syndicated columnist George F. Will 1962, Jim Murray (sportswriter) 1943, and reporter William K. Marimow 1969 – all Pulitzer Prize winners.
    7.00
    5 votes
    27

    Phroth

    Phroth is a humor magazine published by students at the Pennsylvania State University. Phroth is one of over 600 recognized student organizations at the University Park campus of Penn State and publishes two to four issues each academic year. The staff consists of approximately 30 students, who plan, write, produce and distribute each issue. The magazine was founded in 1909 as Froth. Its mascot, a jester, would appear along with the Nittany Lion at Penn State football games. In its early years, the magazine was financially successful and editors pocketed any profits. Froth's first run lasted from 1909-1943; however, the magazine stopped production during World War II due to a lack of staff members. Froth resumed printing by 1946, but was again stopped in 1962 when deemed too vulgar and offensive by the University. The ban was short-lived and in 1965 Froth again began printing. The new incarnation of the magazine struggled to gain popularity with students and production was scarce during the late 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The sordid history of Froth is best described in a masthead reading: ¬タワFounded 1909, unfounded 1962, re-founded 1965, confounded 1969.¬タン Failed attempts
    8.00
    4 votes
    28

    Rabelais Student Media

    • School: La Trobe University
    Rabelais Student Media is a student newspaper at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, named for French Renaissance writer François Rabelais. From its founding in 1967, Rabelais Student Media has been run as a department of the La Trobe University Student Representative Council (now the La Trobe Student Union). The paper is funded by a combination of advertising revenue and a student levy. Editors are elected annually and serve for a single year. Rabelais has a notorious history in the Australian legal world. The July 1995 edition of the magazine published an article which allegedly incited readers to shoplift as a means of surviving student poverty. This edition was subsequently banned by the Office of Film and Literature Classification and the editors of the magazine charged with publishing, distributing and depositing an objectionable publication. In this instance an objectional publication was defined as one that allegedly incited criminal activity. The editors lodged an appeal, which led to a protracted four-year court case. The appeal was eventually defeated by the full bench of the Federal Court, who refused the editors application to appeal to the High Court of
    8.00
    4 votes
    29

    The Daily Toreador

    • School: Texas Tech University
    The Daily Toreador is the student newspaper of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The newspaper started in 1925 after the founding of Texas Technological College in 1923. It was originally called The Toreador to reflect the Spanish Renaissance architectural of the campus's buildings. In 1965, the name changed to The University Daily and then changed again to its current name The Daily Toreador in 2005. The publication is available in print, email, and web formats. Although two advisers watch over the operations of the newspaper, the day-to-day decisions for the newspaper rest on the student staff. The advisers choose not to restrict the content that is placed in the paper, but instead make suggestions and give advice to the editorial board. The newspaper prints Monday-Friday, and has around 2,000 to 5,000 unique visitors per day to its website, continually making it one of the top-25 read college newspapers in the nation. Source: Marshall Formby, a state senator, radio station owner, and attorney, was student editor of The Toreador in 1931-1932.
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    The Lantern

    The Lantern

    • School: Ohio State University
    The Lantern is the name of the official, daily student-published university newspaper at The Ohio State University. It is one of the largest campus newspapers in the United States, reaching a circulation of 15,000. Sections of The Lantern include Campus, Sports, Arts+Entertainment and a Student Voice page managed by the editor-in-chief. Copies of the paper are free and available on campus and throughout Columbus. Editions are published in print Monday through Friday with online-only editions published Fridays (with exceptions) and during Summer Quarter. The Lantern received national attention in 2011 when it broke news regarding members of the school's illustrious football team selling memorabilia for money and tattoos. The paper was chartered in 1881 and became an integral part of the School of Journalism in 1914. At one time in the past, with a circulation of 28,000 papers during the regular school year and readership of 75,000, it was the third largest college newspaper in the country. The Lantern is a laboratory paper that is put together daily by students in the newsroom of the Journalism Building. There are 14 paid student editors and assistant editors who change after
    8.00
    4 votes
    31

    The Ontarion

    • School: University of Guelph
    The Ontarion is an independent English-language student newspaper published at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario. As of 2004, it publishes each Thursday with over 10,000 copies distributed weekly on and off campus during the fall and winter semester and bi-weekly during the summer semester. The newspaper's first edition was published on March 29, 1951. The paper served the students of the Ontario Agricultural College before the University of Guelph's amalgamation in 1964. The newspaper was intended to serve students at all three founding colleges. One early editor reported that the paper's name came from the idea that the three schools might one day become the University of Ontario. Over the years the newspaper has changed reflecting the growth on campus and changes in society, as well as the individuality of each new editor and various staff. The social club atmosphere of the 1950s lead to Ontarion editors in the 1960s to 'stir up controversy' with articles about communism and boarding houses that advertised "whites preferred." One issue in fall 1970 was confiscated by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police at the printing plant because it contained a bulletin with the FLQ
    6.00
    6 votes
    32

    The Red and Black

    • School: University of Georgia
    The Red & Black is an independent daily newspaper serving the University of Georgia. Students published its first issue in tabloid format on November 24, 1893, from offices in the Academic Building on North Campus. In the spring of 1895, the UGA faculty ordered that publication of the paper be discontinued; however, students revived the paper that fall as an independent venture with no oversight by the University. The private venture's success that Fall upset the faculty, and they took back control in January 1896 with the Athletic Association in charge of overseeing the paper. Published weekly, The Red & Black was the official organ of the Athletic Council from 1896 to 1928. The paper advertised athletic competitions and reported on the culture of the University. In 1928, the paper's administration moved under the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication as a laboratory for its students. It was being published semiweekly in 1968 when it changed to a broadsheet format and moved its offices to the new journalism building on campus. In 1980, after numerous run-ins with the University's administrators, The Red & Black became independent of the University a second time, left
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Tulane Hullabaloo

    Tulane Hullabaloo

    The Tulane Hullabaloo is the weekly student-run newspaper of Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. It is published every Friday of the academic year, except holidays, and has received multiple Pacemaker Awards, the highest award in college journalism. The Tulane Weekly began in 1905 to rival The Olive and Blue, another Tulane newspaper that dates back to 1896. (There were more Tulane newsletters and newspapers before The Olive and Blue named College Spirit, Collegian, Topics and The Rat.) The first issue of The Tulane Weekly was published on November 8, 1905 and stated that “the organization of this paper is the result of a dispute between the student body and a few individuals at The Olive and Blue. If a few students have a right to publish a periodical under the name of the University, and represent it as a student publication when the students have no voice in its management; then this paper has no right to an existence.” There is no record of The Olive and Blue after 1906. The Tulane Weekly changed its name to The Hullabaloo on January 16, 1920. A staff editorial titled “Note: Please Send Your Dollars to The Hullabaloo” appeared in the first issue and stated “The staff
    6.80
    5 votes
    34

    The Metropolitan

    • School: Metropolitan State College of Denver
    The Metropolitan, or The Met as it is commonly called, is the school newspaper of Metropolitan State College of Denver. It has a weekly press run of 5,000 copies, which are distributed every Thursday to more than 60 locations across the Auraria Campus and select locations in downtown Denver. The paper is a tabloid style publication with sections for news, sports, opinions, features and music. It focuses on issues of interest and concern to students at Metro and the other colleges located on the Auraria Campus. The editorial direction and content of The Metropolitan are entirely student-run. The staff of The Metropolitan comprises MSCD students, most of whom work on a strictly volunteer basis. An editorial staff of about 18 students, including section editors, copy editors, photo editors and an editor-in-chief direct a larger staff of about 30-50 reporters, photographers, columnists and artists. Most editorial positions are paid. The Metropolitan is supported almost entirely through advertising revenue, although it does receive a small amount of funding through student fees. The Metropolitan is produced in the Office of Student Media, which also produces a literary magazine, a news
    7.75
    4 votes
    35

    GW Hatchet

    • School: George Washington University
    The GW Hatchet is an independent student newspaper at The George Washington University. Founded in 1904, it is the second-oldest newspaper in the District of Columbia, behind only The Washington Post. It also serves as the newspaper of record for the University's archives. The Hatchet, known as The University Hatchet in its early days, has been named the best non-daily student newspaper in the country by the Society of Professional Journalists many times over its long history. The paper derives its name from the implement apocryphally used by George Washington to chop down his family's cherry tree. In 1993, the GW Hatchet was incorporated as an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit, and the paper has been editorially and financially independent of the University since then. It is run by a board of directors composed of Hatchet editors, former staff members, a GW student, a GW professor and professionals in the media industry. Daily operations are overseen by the full-time general manager & treasurer with assistance from the advertising manager. All other business and editorial positions are filled by current GW students and the editor in chief serves as the corporation's president. For
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    The Badger Herald

    The Badger Herald

    • School: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    The Badger Herald is a newspaper serving the University of Wisconsin–Madison community. Founded in 1969, it is one of America's first independent daily student newspapers. The paper is published Monday through Friday during the academic year and once during the summer. Available at newsstands across campus and Downtown Madison, Wisconsin and published on the Web, it has a print circulation of 15,000. The Badger Herald, Inc. is a nonprofit corporation run entirely by University of Wisconsin–Madison students and funded solely by advertising revenue. The Board of Directors, which operates the company, is composed of nine UW students and three non-voting advisers, including noted First Amendment expert Donald Downs and former Republican congressional candidate John Sharpless. The staff consists of more than 100, about half of whom are salaried employees. The office is located off-campus at 326 W. Gorham St., less than one block from State Street. The paper is printed by Capital Newspapers, Inc., home of the Wisconsin State Journal and The Capital Times. The Badger Herald was founded in 1969 by a group of four students seeking a conservative alternative to the UW–Madison's primary
    7.50
    4 votes
    37

    The Daily Reveille

    • School: Louisiana State University
    The Daily Reveille has been the student newspaper at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana for 125 years. It prints Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and twice a week (Tuesdays and Thursdays) during the summer semester. The Daily Reveille has a daily circulation of about 14,000 copies. The earliest known issue of the Reveille was published at Louisiana State University in 1887, but did not become a permanent part of campus until Jan. 14, 1897, when it began weekly publication; in the 1920s it began publishing twice a week. By the 1930s it was publishing five days a week. Just after 1934 the Daily Reveille earned national journalistic recognition after then Sen. Huey Long had seven staff members expelled for reporting on something he believed should not belong in "his" newspaper. The students, now commonly referred to as the "Reveille Seven," include Carl McArn Corbin, Samuel A. Montague, Stanley D. Shlosman, Cal Joseph Abraham, Jesse H. Cutrer Jr., L. Rea Godbold and David R. McGuire Jr. The publication became the Daily Reveille in 1938, only to be forced back to twice-a-week status during the Second World War. It resumed daily publication
    7.50
    4 votes
    38

    The Daily Tar Heel

    • School: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    The Daily Tar Heel (DTH) is the independent student newspaper of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It was founded on February 23, 1893, and became a daily newspaper in 1929. The paper places a focus on university news and sports, but it also includes heavy coverage of Orange County and North Carolina. It is published five days a week during the school year and weekly during the university's two summer school sessions. All editorial content is overseen by student editors and a volunteer student staff of about 250 people. It is the largest news organization in Orange County. The Daily Tar Heel circulates 18,000 free copies to more than 200 distribution locations throughout campus and in the surrounding community -- Chapel Hill, Carrboro, and Durham. Its estimated print readership of 38,000 makes it the largest community newspaper in Orange County. Revenues from advertising are self-generated through a student-run advertising staff. The student journalists are solely responsible for all content under the direction of the student editor-in-chief. The 2012-13 editor is Andy Thomason. A new editor is selected each spring and serves for one year. The editor is the public
    7.50
    4 votes
    39

    The Kentucky Kernel

    The Kentucky Kernel is the daily student newspaper of the University of Kentucky. The Kernel is distributed free on and around the University of Kentucky campus. It claims a circulation of 15,000 and readership of more than 30,000. Its sole source of revenue is advertising. It is issued during the weekdays during the spring and fall semesters and weekly during the summer term, roughly 150 days in the calendar year. It is one of the largest-circulating newspapers in Kentucky. The Kentucky Kernel was preceded by several student newspapers, with the earliest dating to 1892. From 1908 to 1915, the University of Kentucky's student newspaper was called The Idea, but it became the Kentucky Kernel following a naming contest in 1915. The first issue produced under the Kernel name was published September 16, 1915. The paper had become an eight-page weekly by 1923, and it became a Monday-Friday daily newspaper in 1966. In 1972, the Kernel formally established its editorial and financial independence from the University of Kentucky administration. The Kernel operates out of the Grehan Journalism Building, which is located in central campus and also is the home of the School of Journalism and
    7.50
    4 votes
    40

    Ergo

    In the winter of 1968, SDS feuilletonistes started bombarding New England campuses with copies of Up Against The Wall a soixante huitard alternative newspaper embodying the socialist activism of the Sixties. The following spring, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology student, Russell Seitz, shot back with Ergo a campus weekly designed to provide a forum for conservative and libertarian views, drawing on writers from Harvard and Boston University as well as MIT. Founded as a broadly conservative publication, Ergo did not long remain so. It was published weekly on Wednesdays; support came from advertising, contributions, and subscriptions; MIT provided free office space but did not otherwise support the paper. In the next few years Ergo shifted in a more explicitly libertarian direction, and its editorial policy became more clearly aligned with Objectivism. Content included commentary on local and national political issues, occasional analysis of more abstract philosophical issues, and reviews of books and music. The paper conducted a long-running campaign criticizing the MIT philosophy department for presenting analytic philosophy to the exclusion of other philosophical systems,
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    The Beacon

    The Beacon

    • School: Florida International University
    The Beacon is the student-run newspaper of Florida International University in Miami, Florida and has a circulation of 7,500. The Beacon is published thrice weekly in a compact format during the Fall and Spring semesters (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) and once a week on Wednesday during the Summer. It is split into five sections, News, reporting mainly on campus and local events, At the Bay for news on the Biscayne Bay Campus, Sports, Opinion and Life! The Beacon is available free campus-wide mainly in the residence halls, Graham Center and campus buildings and usually contains a mix of campus and local news coverage. The Beacon staffers air radio programs on WRGP Radiate FM. Public Reason, Pantherwire, Panther Sports Talk Live and live coverage of NCAA FIU athletics. Its content is published online at FIUSM.com. FIUSM.com is run separately from The Beacon.
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Chicago Weekly

    Chicago Weekly

    • School: University of Chicago
    Chicago Weekly is an American alternative weekly based in Hyde Park on the of South Side of Chicago, established in 1995. Operated by students as the independent voice of the University of Chicago, it is published every Wednesday during the academic year and also publishes articles to its website. Known as Chicago Weekly News until closing operations in the winter of 2002, a newly branded Chicago Weekly resumed operations in 2003, as a result of a co-publishing partnership with university alumni-founded Newcity. Under this new partnership, a copy of Newcity would come inserted in the middle of each Chicago Weekly issue. The paper promotes arts and culture on the South Side of Chicago through coverage and criticism, and follows South Side news stories that are ignored by mainstream media. It includes feature-length narrative journalism, essays, and a weekly calendar of cultural events. Since 2004, Chicago Weekly has held an annual showcase of arts and culture called REorientation at the University of Chicago. The event is designed to raise awareness of arts organizations on campus while introducing students to arts opportunities throughout the Chicago area. In the past, acts have
    10.00
    2 votes
    43

    The Daily Universe

    • School: Brigham Young University
    The Universe (formerly The Daily Universe) is the official student newspaper for Brigham Young University (BYU) and was started in 1956. It was first titled Y News, which was then changed to The Blue and White and finally to The Daily Universe. The Daily Universe is part of a larger news organization called BYU NewsNet, which was the first integrated (Web, radio, newspaper, and television) news organization in the world. The paper was printed Monday through Friday, except during school breaks and some holidays. It was distributed free of charge on BYU campus and is sent around the world to alumni and friends of the university for a small fee. On January 12, 2012, the BYU Communications Department announced the newspaper's move to digital. Beginning in 2012, content remained being published online daily while the print newspaper began being published only once a week. Other articles will be the The Daily Universe Website. This decision was made as advertising funds are dropping and the newspaper is preparing students for the primarily digital world. The editors, writers, photographers and copy editors are all students, some paid, some reporting for a journalism class. The opinion
    10.00
    2 votes
    44

    The Queen's Journal

    • School: Queen's University
    The Queen's Journal, or simply The Journal, is the main student-run newspaper at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. The paper was founded in 1873 and has been continually publishing ever since. It is as old as the Harvard Crimson, the oldest continuously published student newspaper in the United States. The Journal is published twice a week, usually on Tuesdays and Fridays. The 2012-2013 editors-in-chief are Katherine Fernandez-Blance and Labiba Haque. The current business manager is Geroldine Zhao. The paper maintains a friendly rivalry with the humour paper on campus, Golden Words. This is best exemplified by the annual publication of a fake edition of The Journal, containing outlandish stories, by Golden Words. The publication is an editorially autonomous paper, guaranteed by the Alma Mater Society, its Constitution, and its Corporate By-laws. Journal alumni can often be found working for many of North America's major newspapers and media outlets. Notable names include Adam Shortt, Charlotte Whitton, ABC News correspondent Jeffrey Kofman, Robertson Davies, CNN's Ali Velshi, former Toronto Star editor-in-chief Giles Gherson, Ottawa Citizen editor-in-chief Scott Anderson and
    10.00
    2 votes
    45

    Virginia Law Weekly

    Virginia Law Weekly is a weekly newspaper published by students at the University of Virginia School of Law each Friday of the school year, excluding breaks and exam periods. In 2006, 2007, and 2008 the Law Weekly was recognized as Best Law School Newspaper by the Law Student Division of the American Bar Association. Virginia Law Weekly was first printed in 1948 and has been cited by several courts in published judicial opinions, including the U.S. Supreme Court (Patterson v. New York (1977)), the Fifth Circuit (Thermo King v. White's Trucking Service, 292 F.2d 668 (5th Cir. 1961)), and numerous state courts. Virginia Law Weekly was first published online in the late 1990s, providing a downloadable PDF version of each week's edition. Features Editor Joey Katzen '07 relaunched the website as a full-featured interactive newspaper site in the spring of 2005.
    10.00
    2 votes
    46

    The Link

    • School: Concordia University
    The Link is an independent student newspaper at Concordia University. It was founded in 1980 as a merger between The Georgian, representing Sir George Williams University, and The Loyola News, representing Loyola College, when they merged to form Concordia University. The Link was so called because it was meant to link both campuses. The Link's mandate is to be a voice for the voiceless and it has a reputation for being an activist newspaper. The Link is the longest-running independent, non-profit, student-run newspaper. Its revenue comes from a student fee levy and both print and online advertising. The publication prides itself on offering an alternative to other media outlets, and also centering itself on covering various aspects of student life (news, arts, sports, etc.), as well as local, national and international stories of interest to the studentry. The Link offers a voice to marginalized and oppressed groups, and it is dedicated to fairly reporting upon people and events that other media outlets often pass over, and offering a chance for all to have their sides heard. The Link does not tolerate any form of racism, homophobia, ageism or xenophobia. It is a workplace that
    6.40
    5 votes
    47
    Daily Illini

    Daily Illini

    • School: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    The Daily Illini, commonly known as the DI, is an independent, student-run newspaper that has been published for the community of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign since 1871. Weekday circulation during fall and spring semesters is 20,000; copies are distributed free at more than 250 locations throughout Champaign-Urbana. The paper is published by Illini Media Company, a not-for-profit corporation which also prints other U of I publications, and also and operates WPGU 107.1 FM, a student-run radio station. While the IMC has no official ties to the university, university professors and others in the academic community serve on its board of directors. The newspaper's staff has both full-time professionals and amateur students. The paper is printed as a broadsheet, but downsizes during the summer months as a tabloid. The Daily Illini's history is replete with staffers who have gone on to prominent careers in journalism. However, in recent years, the quality of some of the paper's work has caused it to become embroiled in controversy. The editorial, business and production departments are staffed by students who are enrolled in a wide variety of degree programs, not just
    7.25
    4 votes
    48

    The Dartmouth Review

    • School: Dartmouth College
    The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, Ben Hart, and Keeney Jones—from the college's daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. It spawned a movement of politically conservative independent U.S. college newspapers such as the Yale Free Press, Harvard Salient, California Review, Princeton Tory and Cornell Review, and has been at the center of several lawsuits. Past staffers include author Dinesh D'Souza, talk show host Laura Ingraham, the Far Eastern Economic Review's Hugo Restall, Pulitzer Prize-winner Joseph Rago of The Wall Street Journal, and The New Criterion's James Panero. Author, columnist and former Nixon and Reagan speechwriter Jeffrey Hart, now Professor of English Emeritus at Dartmouth College, was also instrumental in the founding of the newspaper and has been a long-time board member and adviser. As of 2006, it claims 10,000 off-campus subscribers and distributes a further 4,000 newspapers on campus. The Darthmouth Review has consistently favored a stronger voice on the part of alumni who share its
    7.25
    4 votes
    49

    The Hoot

    The Hoot is a weekly student publication written for and by the students of Brandeis University. The Hoot began in January 2005 after several prominent writers and editors for Brandeis' other major student newspaper, the Justice, became upset over what they saw as heavy-handed policies of its editors and leadership. The Hoot was founded to fill in perceived gaps in the Justice's coverage by focusing on Brandeis-specific issues, while the Justice remains more general in its coverage of a variety of areas, including non-school news and events. Since The Hoot is published on Fridays while the Justice comes out on Tuesdays, The Hoot tends to focus more on events since the previous Tuesday and previews of the weekend's events. The Hoot's funding is not guaranteed and must be approved each semester by a student run funding board that allocates money among all Brandeis student clubs, whereas The Justice has a larger budget guaranteed with Student Activity Fee allocations each year. Notable pieces published during The Hoot's first semester in print included an article breaking the story on attempts (later abandoned) to bring Ann Coulter to campus, an investigative article on a
    7.25
    4 votes
    50

    The Michigan Review

    • School: University of Michigan
    The Michigan Review is the Journal of Campus Affairs at the University of Michigan. Since its inception in 1982, the paper has served as a voice of students. The Review, published biweekly, is funded primarily by grants from the Collegiate Network, donations, and by advertising revenue. National media routinely turn to Michigan Review editors for their perspective on university issues. Review editors have been quoted in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and numerous other newspapers, and have discussed affirmative action on CBS's 60 Minutes, the BBC World Service, and on various local television and radio programs. Review alumni have achieved some measure of success in the national arena, working for such media outlets as National Review, The Weekly Standard, The American Spectator, The Hill, and Investor's Business Daily, and writing speeches for President George W. Bush. A large percentage of Review alumni become lawyers. Review alumni have also gone on to very successful careers in business and other fields. The Review was principally founded by Thomas Fous and Ronald J. Stefanski in response to an editorial in The Michigan Daily attacking Fous, who was then the chairman
    7.25
    4 votes
    51

    The Varsity

    • School: University of Toronto
    The Varsity is one of the main student newspapers of the University of Toronto. In publication since 1880, it is the second-oldest student newspaper in Canada. The paper publishes weekly during the university semesters and three times over the summer. Originally a broadsheet daily, it now issues in compact form. The scope of the paper includes international news, national news, as well as local and campus issues. The major sections are news, comment, science, arts, sports, and features. The Varsity usually assumes a left-of-centre stance on political affairs. The paper is published by Varsity Publications, a not-for-profit corporation, and is primarily financed by advertisement revenues with subsidies from student levy. At the height of debate on coeducation in 1880, The Varsity published an article in its inaugural issue voicing in favour of admitting women. In 1895, the suspension of The Varsity's editor, James Tucker, led Latin Professor Dale to publicly attack the administration in The Globe, which in turn led to his own dismissal. University College students then approved a motion by Varsity staff member William Lyon Mackenzie King and boycotted lectures for a week. This is
    7.25
    4 votes
    52
    Wunderground

    Wunderground

    • School: Washington University in St. Louis
    WUnderground is an undergraduate satirical newspaper founded in 2003 at Washington University in St. Louis. Published bi-weekly and distributed campus-wide and locally, WUnderground’s articles and short content comment on current events at WashU and across the nation. WUnderground parodies traditional university newspapers, such as WashU’s Student Life, through its AP-style voice and its inclusion of stock campus newspaper features including infographics, "what do you think?" interviews, open forum editorial letters, polls, and classified ads. In March 2008, WUnderground’s ever-changing slogan box described the paper as “the end result of WashU not having a journalism school.” In 2005, WUnderground began publishing issues online. In 2008, the paper launched a revamp of its site: http://wunderground.wustl.edu In 2008, WUnderground was granted an ISSN number (1938-0089) by the Library of Congress, recognizing the paper as a certified periodical publication. In the fall of 2008, WUnderground's masthead, fonts and layout were redesigned in honor of the 5th anniversary of the paper's founding. WUnderground hosted Chad Nackers and John Harris, staff writers at The Onion, on April 10,
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    The Maine Campus

    The Maine Campus

    • School: University of Maine
    The Maine Campus is a twice-weekly newspaper produced by the students of the University of Maine in the United States. It covers university and Town of Orono events, and has four section: News, Opinion, Style and Sports. It serves the 20,000 students, faculty and staff of the University. Founded in 1875, it is one of the oldest surviving papers in Maine. (Only The Bowdoin Orient, founded in 1871, The Bates Student, founded in 1873, and the Sun Journal, founded in 1847, are older). Approximately 4,500 copies of the Campus are printed every issue. In recent years, the Campus published a 20-page full color edition on Mondays and a 16-page spot color edition on Thursdays. Now, with the new broadsheet format, the paper's length varies. In addition to the new size, the paper is printed in color every issue now and, depending on the length, the paper may be divided into separate sections. The Campus has been online since the late 1990s (MaineCampus.com). On April Fool's Day The Campus runs a satirical edition named The Maine Crapus. The Maine Campus has been around since 1875, and has at time been a weekly, daily and semiweekly paper. The Crucible was the first student newspaper at the
    8.33
    3 votes
    54

    Arthur

    • School: Trent University
    Arthur is a Canadian student newspaper with a circulation of 3000 in Peterborough, Ontario. It is the official paper of the Trent University student body. Arthur is funded through a non-refundable levy from every full-time student at the university. Articles for Arthur are produced by a staff collective of paid staff and volunteer writers who meet weekly to plan the next issue in Sadleir House, the historic building which houses its office. The collective elects one or more chief editors who serve a term of one academic year in an administrative and editorial role. Matt Jarvis and Sara Ostrowska were elected as the 2012-2013 Co-Editors-in-Chief. Arthur deals mainly with news related to the Trent and Peterborough communities, but also features arts, sports, national and world news and regular columnists. Historically, Arthur has had a left-leaning political stance. In the past articles have focused on issues such corporate boycottism, socialism, LGBT rights, Canadian Aboriginal rights, feminism, corporate presence on campus, and accountability in university administration. The first editor in chief was Stephen Stohn, now executive producer of the television series Degrassi: The Next
    9.50
    2 votes
    55

    The Pitt News

    The Pitt News is an independent, student-written and student-managed newspaper for the main campus of the University of Pittsburgh in Oakland which has been active in some form since 1910. It is published Monday through Friday during the regular school year and Wednesdays during the summer. According to an independent survey, more than 90% of Pitt students read The Pitt News each day. According to the constitution of The Pitt News, the organization's purpose is "to prepare and publish a high-quality newspaper, to provide experience for its members in all facets of the journalism profession, to provide a voice for the students of the university, and to provide a public forum for the university community." The Pitt News is a million-dollar non-profit operation, employing more than 100 undergraduate editors, roughly 25 students in the business division, and five professional staff members. The paper includes five regular sections: News, Opinions, Arts & Entertainment, Sports, and Classifieds. It also produces about a dozen special issues a year, such as the Dining, Employment and Rental guides. Circulation includes 14,000 copies an issue, distributed at approximately 100 sites.
    9.50
    2 votes
    56

    Loyola Phoenix

    • School: Loyola University Chicago
    The Loyola Phoenix is the official newspaper of Loyola University Chicago in Chicago, Illinois. It is a student activity, and independent of the school's journalism program. Published on a weekly basis, it not only serves the students and faculty of the various colleges of the university in the United States and Italy, but it also serves the northside Chicago neighborhoods of Edgewater and Rogers Park and has a readership that extends through the twenty-eight member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. Past staff advisors have been affiliated with the Chicago Tribune. The current adviser to the newspaper is Bob Herguth, an editor at the Better Government Association and former editor at the Chicago Sun-Times. Following the newspaper's coverage of an alleged violent beating of a gay man on the CTA Red Line by a then-Loyola student in Jan. 2010, the Phoenix was subpoenaed for their notes regarding the case. Attorneys for the criminal defendant also subpoenaed the Chicago Sun-Times and the Chicago Tribune. In the summer of 2011, however, judge Diane Cannon, blocked the subpoena, which set a new standard for student journalists, entitling them to the
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    Pipe Dream

    • School: Binghamton University
    Pipe Dream is the twice-weekly student newspaper of Binghamton University in Vestal, N.Y. It is printed in tabloid size with full color front and back pages. Pipe Dream is one of the few student newspapers in the country that is and always has been entirely student-run, without the supervision or assistance of an advisor. Though there is no journalism school at Binghamton University, Pipe Dream was named in 2010 as one of the nation's top college newspapers by the Princeton Review. Pipe Dream was first published in the form of "The Colonial News" on November 22, 1946, the same year as the founding of Triple Cities Colleges, the forebear of Binghamton University. The Colonial News' first editors wrote: The paper's name was changed to Pipe Dream in 1970 in protest of the Vietnam War. The newspaper is distributed at Binghamton University's main campus in Vestal, N.Y., and at several spots in the downtown Binghamton area, including the newly built Downtown Center. All copies are distributed openly and are free to the public. Pipe Dream regularly prints the following sections: Pipe Dream also publishes special issues for finals week, summer orientation, the annual Spring Fling
    7.00
    4 votes
    58

    Gair rhydd

    • School: Cardiff University
    gair rhydd (Welsh: [ˈɡair ˈr̥ɨːð], meaning "free word" ) is the official student newspaper of Cardiff University. It is a weekly, free, tabloid-sized paper established in 1972 and edited by a full-time sabbatical officer of the Students' Union. Its sections cover local and international news, politics, opinion, science, events listings and sport. In addition, there is a Welsh-language section called "Taf-Od". In 2003, gair rhydd launched Quench, a fortnightly student lifestyle magazine. The first paid editor, Meirion Jones (now on the BBC's Newsnight), was elected in 1980. Since then, gair rhydd has won numerous student media awards, including several in the early 1990s and, more recently, the title of Best Paper at the NUS/Daily Mirror National Student Journalism Awards 2004, Best Newspaper at the Guardian Student Media Awards 2005, with deputy editor James Anthony also being named overall Student Journalist of the Year, and Quench winning Best Magazine, adding to its award for Student Publication of the Year 2005 at the EMAP Fanzine Awards. The paper's current editor is Chris Williams. The sub-editor of gair rhydd is Tom Parry-Jones, and the co-editors of Quench are Jo Southerd
    6.00
    5 votes
    59

    Broadside

    • School: George Mason University
    Broadside is the name of the student newspaper of George Mason University. Broadside, George Mason University's official student newspaper, began its life as The Gunston Ledger. The Gunston Ledger, whose first issue appeared on the then George Mason College campus located in Bailey's Crossroads, VA on October 15, 1963, was an eight-page monthly printed on 12 inch by 9 inch paper. Its staff of twelve students included a photograph editor, Richard Sparks, who contributed two to four photos to each issue. The content consisted of campus news, features on GMC faculty and students, engagement and wedding notices, and some commentary. The Ledger became Broadside on October 28, 1969. It was noted in that issue that the name change was part of an effort to remake the paper into more of a news instrument like the early publications of the nation's revolutionary fathers. Broadside was a weekly paper which contained sixteen or more pages in each issue. Photography in Broadside was mostly limited to campus events and personalities. Broadside began printing in a broadsheet format in 1982 (12-inch by 24-inch), but moved to a tabloid format in 1986 (printed on 12 inch by 12 inch paper). Broadside
    8.00
    3 votes
    60

    The Aquinian

    • School: St. Thomas University
    The Aquinian is a student-owned-and-operated campus newspaper, at St. Thomas University (STU) in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. The newspaper was established in 1935. It's published on a weekly basis during the regular academic year. The paper is a member paper of Canadian University Press. The Aquinian's mission is "...to foster a sense of community at STU by developing and promoting dialogue on issues of concern to the community." The Aquinian launched its website in the fall of 2007 with TheAq.net . Before the 2004/2005 academic year, the newspaper was printed biweekly in broadsheet format. In the fall of 2004, the editorial staff scaled the paper down to tabloid format which made it financially feasible to print on a weekly basis. St. Thomas University gained international headlines in autumn 2004 when the paper published a photo taken of four University of New Brunswick (UNB) rugby players streaking across the university's rugby pitch. The incident generated huge interest in the paper among students and regional, national and international media. It was also a controversy among UNB students and administration as the four players captured in the photo were suspended from
    8.00
    3 votes
    61

    Harvard International Review

    The Harvard International Review is a quarterly journal and website of international relations published by the Harvard International Relations Council at Harvard University. The HIR offers commentary on global developments in politics, economics, business, science, technology, and culture, as well as interviews with prominent global leaders and reviews of books and documentaries. Founded in 1979 to "cover that middle ground between academic scholarship and journalism," the HIR is a widely distributed journal across the United States and around the world in more than 60 countries, boasting a readership of over 30,000. According to its mission statement, "The HIR features underappreciated topics in the international affairs discourse and underappreciated perspectives on more widely discussed topics. The HIR aims to serve as a trend-setter among similar publications by directing rather than following the public’s attention." The magazine is composed of the following sections: Features, Perspectives, Spotlight, World in Review, Global Notebook, Interview, Endpaper, and Correspondence. The website features exclusive content and active blogs on current events. The HIR has featured
    9.00
    2 votes
    62

    Tharunka

    • School: University of New South Wales
    Tharunka is a student newspaper published at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. Established in 1953 at the then New South Wales University of Technology, Tharunka has been published in a variety of forms by various student organisations. At present, Tharunka is published 10 times a year by Arc @ UNSW Limited. The name Tharunka means "message stick" in a Central Australian Aboriginal language. Until 1980, Tharunka was a weekly newspaper, switching to a fortnightly magazine format from 1981. In 2004 and 2005, Tharunka returned to a tabloid newspaper format. In 2006, Tharunka returned to the fortnightly magazine format. Tharunka was published by the UNSW Students Union from 1953 until 1992, when that body was replaced by the University of New South Wales Student Guild. The Guild published Tharunka from 1993 until 2006. A new student organisation, Arc @ UNSW Limited, took over publication of Tharunka from 2007, with Tharunka now published by a student team under the steerage of its Marketing Department. Tharunka is managed by a small staff and a wider group of volunteers. Including staff wages, the publication's budget is under $40,000 per year. The content of
    9.00
    2 votes
    63

    The Daily Campus

    • School: University of Connecticut
    The Daily Campus, founded in 1896, is a student-run newspaper at the University of Connecticut that has a circulation run of 8,000 copies weekdays during the school year and twice during the summer. The Daily Campus has the largest circulation of any college paper in Connecticut and the third-largest in New England, behind The Daily Collegian (UMass) and The Harvard Crimson (Harvard University). Since its creation, the newspaper has undergone several name changes, starting as The Lookout, a monthly, when it published its first issue in May 1896. The name was changed to The Connecticut Campus in 1915, followed by The Connecticut Daily Campus, and then finally just The Daily Campus in 1984. It began publishing five days a week during the academic year in 1952 and became a morning paper in 1955. The newspaper's offices are located at The Daily Campus Building at 1266 Storrs Road in Storrs, Connecticut. The paper was previously located across campus at 121 North Eagleville Road, but moved to their current location in 1991/1992. Though originally addressed at 11 Dog Lane, the building was re-addressed as 1266 Storrs Road in Spring of 2012 to accommodate the new buildings being
    9.00
    2 votes
    64

    The Lance

    • School: University of Windsor
    The Lance is the student newspaper at the University of Windsor in Windsor, Ontario, Canada.
    9.00
    2 votes
    65

    The MIT Tech

    • School: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    The Tech, first published on November 16, 1881, is the oldest and largest campus newspaper at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Editions are published on Tuesday and Friday throughout the academic year, daily during freshman orientation period, Wednesdays during January, and about once a month over the summer. Printed copies are distributed throughout the MIT campus on the morning of publication. The Tech became the first newspaper published on the World Wide Web, as stated on its webpage: "The world's first newspaper on the Web, est. 1993." Earlier, StarText, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's videotex system which displayed newspaper content on computer screens, began in 1982 in Fort Worth, Texas (but did not go on the Internet until 1996). In 1987, the Middlesex News (Framingham, Massachusetts) launched Fred the Computer, a single-line BBS system used to preview the next day's edition and later to organize the newspaper's past film reviews. Nearly every published Tech is available online and most issues are accessible as PDF files. For example, the first issue ever printed: The Tech (November 16, 1881). Edited by Arthur W. Walker, it was printed
    9.00
    2 votes
    66

    Kenyon Collegian

    • School: Kenyon College
    The Kenyon Collegian is the official student newspaper of Kenyon College. The paper is published weekly from Peirce Hall. An alumni group of past Collegian staffers has formed. Notable Collegian alumni include Matt Winkler of Bloomberg, Renee Peck, Jay Cocks and P. F. Kluge, the paper's current adviser and author of Eddie and the Cruisers.
    5.80
    5 votes
    67

    Ke Kalahea

    • School: University of Hawaii at Hilo
    Ke Kalahea is the student newspaper of the University of Hawaii at Hilo and Hawaii Community College. The newspaper is printed biweekly during the academic year, and is about 8 to 16 pages long. According to Ke Kalahea's Mission Statement: Ke Kalahea is the student newspaper for the University of Hawaii at Hilo and Hawaii Community College. We are a free rights to press and speech publication, which express the voice of the student body using our rights to the freedom of speech and press. The Mission of Ke Kalahea is to provide coverage of news and events affecting the university and our community. We offer a forum for the communication and exchange of ideas and provide educational training and experience to students in all areas of newspaper operation. Ke Kalahea operates a fiscally responsible organization, which ensures our ability to continue to serve the university well. Through Ke Kalahea’s publication, we encourage students to take advantage of academic and personal opportunities, ones that will deepen their knowledge, enhance their experience, and broaden their perspectives. The name translates roughly as "The Herald" from the Hawaiian language and was coined around 1991 by
    7.67
    3 votes
    68

    Scotcampus

    Scotcampus is a free independent national student newspaper for Scotland. The paper is put together using a combination of freelance journalists and student writers from across Scotland. It is distributed throughout various locations in all of Scotland's major towns and cities. Scotcampus was founded by Graeme Barratt and Anna Purdie, who launched Scotcampus, Scotland’s National Student Newspaper in 2001. The newspaper operates as a lifestyle publication, using approachable and inspiring journalism to reach student readers across all campuses in Scotland. Since it was founded Scotcampus has interviewed a number of different high-profile musicians, politicians, actors, directors and people of interest. Some of the most notable have included The Prodigy, Dizzee Rascal, Alex Salmond, Michelle Mone, Alastair Campbell, Armando Iannucci, Howard Marks and Sir Tom Hunter. Alongside the paper, Scotcampus hosts an annual Student Freshers' Festival, taking place in Glasgow.. The Freshers' Festival attracts more than 10,000 students and young people from across Scotland by offering up a selection of bands, DJ's and free gifts. Previous exhibitors at the Festival have been wide ranging and have
    7.67
    3 votes
    69
    The Hoya

    The Hoya

    • School: Georgetown University
    The Hoya, the oldest and largest student newspaper of Georgetown University in Washington, DC, was founded in 1920. The Hoya prints an edition every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year and has a circulation of 6,500. The newspaper has four main editorial sections: news, opinion, sports, and The Guide, a weekly arts and lifestyle magazine. The first issue of The Hoya was published on January 14, 1920. In its earlier days, coverage focused primarily on Georgetown's athletic teams. However, beginning in the 1940s, the publication shifted its coverage to campus events. In 1987, The Hoya began publishing twice-weekly, and in 1998, it launched a website. Editors are elected at the end of the fall and spring semesters and the general manager and departmental directors are hired by the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors oversees the overall well-being of the newspaper, the Editorial Division is responsible for decisions regarding the publication's content, and the Publishing Division manages the business operations. The Editorial Board is chaired by the opinion editor and is responsible for producing the staff editorials. In 2004 the newspaper began its official bid to gain
    7.67
    3 votes
    70

    The New Hampshire

    • School: University of New Hampshire
    The New Hampshire, or TNH, is the "University of New Hampshire's student newspaper since 1911," published by the student organization of the same name. The newspaper is published weekly on Tuesdays and Fridays during the academic year, with a printed circulation 6,000. TNH is distributed for free in the Memorial Union Building, University housing, academic buildings, Durham businesses and other select locations in the area. The newspaper also publishes an online edition, which mimics the print edition. TNH is the second-oldest University publication still in publication; The Granite, the yearbook, was first published in 1908. The official publisher of the newspaper is The New Hampshire Board of Governors. The Board of Governors comprises the: editor in chief, managing editor, layout editor, assigning editor, news editors (3), photo editors (2), sports editor (3), arts editor (2), copy editors (3), business manager, graphics manager and advisor (who only votes to break tie in editor in chief's appointment). The newspaper is printed off-site by Foster's Daily Democrat, it was printed prior to the 2005-06 academic year by Seacoast Newspapers located in Stratham, New Hampshire. The
    7.67
    3 votes
    71

    The Student Life

    • School: Pomona College
    The Student Life is a student newspaper covering Pomona College and the other colleges of the Claremont Colleges, a consortium of liberal arts schools in Claremont, California. It is published weekly each Friday during the school year by the Associated Students of Pomona College. The paper is the oldest college newspaper in Southern California and has been published since 1889. The Student Life helps support other students groups, and in the past has worked with KSPC, the Women's Union, and the Pomona college organic farm.
    7.67
    3 votes
    72

    Daily Free Press

    • School: Boston University
    The Daily Free Press is the independent student newspaper at Boston University. It publishes a daily print edition Monday through Thursday during the academic year and online 24/7 at www.dailyfreepress.com. The Daily Free Press is staffed by about 50 editors, writers, reporters and photographers, many but not all of whom are BU journalism students, who work on a volunteer basis and change over each semester. The paper is governed by a board of former editors who make up the Board of Directors of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc., a Massachusetts non-profit. Commonly called The FreeP, The Daily Free Press began publishing May 5, 1970 in response to violent student protests on campus in the wake of the Kent State shootings. It is now the publication at BU with the longest continuing run The Daily Free Press had published an issue every instructional day since its formation until February 13, 2009. In light of increasingly tight finances for newspapers and declining advertising revenue, the paper announced it would discontinue its Friday issue. As of September 2011, circulation was 5,000 issues per day Monday through Thursday. The publication is currently the fourth largest daily English
    10.00
    1 votes
    73

    Dakota Student

    • School: University of North Dakota
    The Dakota Student is the student-run newspaper publication of the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, North Dakota. The newspaper was first published in 1888, but went through several short lived name changes. It grew out of a publication of the UND Adelphi Literary Society named The Oracle, which was likely a literary magazine. In 1928, it was again called The Dakota Student and has been published twice-weekly under the same name ever since. "The Dakota Student" is independent from the University of North Dakota, but it still receives some funding from the Board of Student Publications (BOSP). BOSP is in charge of hiring the editor-in-chief for the following academic year each spring. The Dakota Student has a circulation of 6,500. It is distributed free of charge to students who may pick it up at several campus locations. Subscriptions are also available for a fee. The newspaper employs approximately 50 students as editors, ad setters, ad representatives, writers, columnists, and photographers. The Dakota Student also maintains a website.
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    Epigram

    Epigram

    • School: University of Bristol
    Epigram is the independent student newspaper of the University of Bristol. It was established in 1988 by James Landale, now a senior BBC journalist, who studied politics at Bristol. The former editor of The Daily Telegraph, William Lewis, was a writer for Epigram in its early years. Epigram is produced fortnightly during term time, and as of May 2012 the newspaper has reached 250 editions. It is available as a paper edition distributed freely around the university, with articles and discussion also appearing online. The paper follows a traditional newspaper layout: the front of the newspaper is devoted to news issues, particularly those concerning students at the university. The paper has a 30-strong editorial team consisting of students from the second year and above (formal recruitment is carried out in the last term of an academic year). The current editor is Pippa Shawley, and the deputy editors are Patrick Baker and Imogen Rowley. All students at the University are encouraged to write for the paper and each section of the paper has a weekly publicised meeting to discuss and allocate stories for the next edition - there are opportunities to join each section team at the
    10.00
    1 votes
    75

    L'Orignal déchaîné

    • School: Laurentian University
    L'Orignal déchaîné (The Unchained Moose) is the French language student newspaper at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Its English counterpart is Lambda. The paper was launched in 1987. Its name is a takeoff on the French satirical publication Le Canard enchaîné.
    10.00
    1 votes
    76

    Nassau Weekly

    • School: Princeton University
    Nassau Weekly is a weekly student newspaper of Princeton University. Published every Friday, the paper contains a blend of campus, local, and national news, reviews of films and bands, original art, fiction and poetry, and other college-oriented material, notably including "Verbatim," a weekly overheard-on-campus column. The paper was co-founded in 1979 by Princeton University students Robert Faggen, later a professor of literature at Claremont-McKenna College, Marc Fisher, later a columnist for The Washington Post, and David Remnick, who became editor of The New Yorker in 1998. It is affectionately known as "The Nass." Alumni include The Nation editor-in-chief Katrina vanden Heuvel, Vanity Fair national editor Todd Purdum, architect Peter Bentel, Television Without Pity cofounder Sarah D. Bunting, Slate.com television critic Troy Patterson, New York Times reporter Nicholas Confessore, New York Times reporter David Kirkpatrick and Washington Post staff writer Theola Labbé. On September 26, 2008, The Daily Princetonian reported that, due to financial problems and "a fundamental staff schism," the Nassau Weekly is in the midst of discussions to merge operations with the campus radio
    10.00
    1 votes
    77

    The Bowdoin Orient

    The Bowdoin Orient is the student newspaper of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, USA. Established in 1871, the Orient is the oldest continuously-published college weekly in the United States. The Orient currently has an on-campus print distribution of approximately 2,000 and sends the paper to hundreds of alumni, parents and other friends of the College. The paper is published each Friday while classes are in session and is distributed to the dining halls, the library, the student union and various other College buildings, as well as in a number of businesses and restaurants in downtown Brunswick. Since some time in the late 1990s, the Orient's content has been available free of charge on the World Wide Web. The website underwent major redesigns in 2001, 2004, 2009, and 2012. "The Bowdoin Orient is a student-run weekly publication dedicated to providing news and information relevant to the College community. Editorially independent of the College and its administrators, the Orient pursues such content freely and thoroughly, following professional journalistic standards in writing and reporting. The Orient is committed to serving as an open forum for thoughtful and diverse
    10.00
    1 votes
    78

    The Mendota Beacon

    The Mendota Beacon was a free, privately funded biweekly (and later, weekly) published newspaper in Madison, Wisconsin between 2005 and 2007. Its first issue was on February 12, 2005, Republican president Abraham Lincoln's birthday. It was formed in 2004 as a conservative alternative to The Badger Herald, The Daily Cardinal, and The Madison Observer that are distributed throughout the UW–Madison campus and downtown area. The name came from the fact that the campus is on the shore of Lake Mendota. The newspaper's motto was "Shining the Light on What's Right." The paper received its start-up capital from the Leadership Institute, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization located in Arlington, Virginia that teaches "political technology". The Institute's mission is to "identify, train, recruit and place conservatives in politics, government, and media". Many of the op-eds run in the Beacon addressed the issue of being conservative in Madison, a city that has a history of being a liberal hotbed. The editorial writers also addressed issues of national and international concern. Founders of the Beacon included Tim Shea, Robert Thelen III, Bradley Vogel, Jordan Smith, Steven Schwerbel and
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    The Triangle

    The Triangle

    The Triangle is the independent student newspaper of Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Editions of the paper are printed early every Friday morning; they are distributed in buildings on Drexel's campus as well as in select locations in University City, Philadelphia. The Triangle was first published on February 1, 1926, under the direction of students with University advisors functioning only to offer advice. Publication has been on a weekly schedule during the academic school year with bi-weekly publication during summer. The Triangle began publishing in color in the summer of 2004. During the summer of 2007 publishing switched from tabloid to broadsheet format. Sections include News, Op-ed (also called Ed-op), Arts & Entertainment, Sports, Comics, and Classified ads. The Triangle has won several Mark of Excellence Awards which honor the best in Student Journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists. First place in Editorial Writing (2000), General Column Writing (2000), Second place in Editorial Writing (2001), and third place in Sports Column Writing (2001). In 2004 they won two National Pacemaker Awards for excellence in college newspapers. One of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    Centretown News

    • School: Carleton University
    Centretown News is a newspaper in Ottawa published by Carleton University's school of journalism, distributed to the neighbourhood north of the school, called Centretown. Its publisher is Klaus Pohle, an associate professor of journalism at the school and supervisor of undergraduate studies for the journalism program. The paper is run by journalism students. They write the stories, solicit advertising, lay out the pages and edit the newspaper before it hits the streets. Students in the third year of Carleton's journalism program are required to do a reporting stint at the paper. In fourth year, students can take an optional half-credit course for a semester at the paper, where they work at rotational job postings; for instance, a student who works as the arts reporter for one issue could be the editor-in-chief for the next. These postings usually last two issues, but some students choose to stay at the same job. Students in the Masters journalism program can also take a course at Centretown News. They manage the editorial sections and grade the undergraduates on their performance. Centretown News' website says the circulation of the newspaper is 17,000. It is distributed free of
    6.50
    4 votes
    81

    College Heights Herald

    • School: Western Kentucky University
    The College Heights Herald is the student newspaper of Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Kentucky. It is free and distributed throughout the campus and city. The school provides staff support and facilities for the newspaper but does not exercise editorial control. Called "The Herald" for short, the publication is supported through the sale of advertising and is entirely student-run. The Herald is an affiliate of UWIRE, which distributes and promotes its content to their network. During the fall and spring semesters, the Herald is published Tuesdays and Fridays and has a circulation of about 8,500. It is distributed to 40 locations on campus and 15 locations off campus. The newspaper switched its printing schedule from Tuesdays and Thursdays to Tuesdays and Fridays during the fall 2009 semester. The Herald's website, wkuherald.com, features all paper content in a digital format, as well as multimedia such as videos, photo galleries, and audio slideshows. The website serves as a way to release breaking news and allow readers to interact through online comments. The newspaper launched a new website on August 28, 2009, leaving behind the College Publisher platform for
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Matanglawin

    Matanglawin

    • School: Ateneo de Manila University
    Matanglawin, literally meaning "Hawk's Eye" and usually contracted as Mata, is the official student newspaper of the Ateneo de Manila University in the Filipino language. The student paper dedicates itself to discussing socio-political events in the Philippines, the plight and suffering of the working class, as well as pressing student rights issues. It is part of the Ateneo's Confederation of Publications (COP), including The GUIDON and Heights., which is published bi-monthly (formerly quarterly). From a circulation of a few mimeographed copies hidden in books at the Rizal Library in the 1970s, Matanglawin is now published in glossy form and has a circulation of more than 2,000, serving the Loyola Schools community. Copies of the publication are also sent to student publications across the Philippines, serving as an inspiration and guide to journalists and creative writers using the Filipino language as their medium. The word or name Matanglawin contained negative connotations based from Philippine literary canon. The character of Cabesang Tales from Jose Rizal's novel El filibusterismo took the word as his moniker when he descended into terrorism and banditry after having been
    6.50
    4 votes
    83

    New University

    • School: University of California, Irvine
    The UCI New University is a student-operated newspaper at the University of California, Irvine. Originally named the Spectrum, later Spectre, The Tongue, and The Anthill, it is published once a week during the regular academic year. Although the New University is officially a university department, it is funded solely by advertising. Unlike many college newspapers, the New University has no faculty advisor and is not formally tied to any academic program. The New University's editorial staff consists of UCI undergraduates. The Editor in Chief is elected in the late winter by a vote of the current year's staff; the Editor in Chief-elect then selects new senior and associate editors. Though the New University is technically a self-supporting enterprise under the university's Student Government department, it operates with relative independence and autonomy from the university. Throughout the years, the New University has won many local, regional, statewide, and national awards.
    6.50
    4 votes
    84
    Cornell Moderator

    Cornell Moderator

    The Cornell Moderator is a student publication founded in 2004 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Self-described as "unabashedly unbiased", the Moderator is meant to serve as a vehicle for intellectually-honest campus discussion. The publication uses a unique point-counterpoint-point-counterpoint format in which two writers who disagree are encouraged to address and respond to one another's arguments. The paper itself takes no editorial position, allowing the mutually-opposed arguments of its freelance writers to succeed or fail on their own merits. Founded in part to rebuke politicized campus dialogue, the Moderator intends to promote constuctive engagement of the major issues of the day. The topics of controveries and features covered in the Moderator are selected by its editorial staff, and are heavily influenced by current events around the world and at Cornell. The Moderator publishes 2 to 3 issues per semester, and has a circulation ranging from 3,000 to 5,000 issues per print run. The Moderator was founded in 2004. Its original name was You Turn, a play on the name of the liberal campus newspaper Turn Left, founded in 2000. In its early stages, the
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    On Dit

    On Dit

    • School: University of Adelaide
    On Dit is a student newspaper funded by the Adelaide University Union and advertising revenue which is published fortnightly during semester time. Founded in 1932, it is the third oldest student newspaper in Australia along with Semper Floreat (which was first published in the same year as On Dit. The paper replaced its precursor the Varsity Ragge which ran from 1928 to 1931 when it ended because of what On Dit described in its first edition as 'student apathy'. The Varsity Ragge returned in 1934 for a single edition as a rival to On Dit. On Dit's title is French and has a number of different translations. These include "so I hear", "what the people are saying", "rumour", "one says", "they say", "we say", "people say", and "hearsay". The last was a variation title of the newspaper in 1972 when due to French nuclear testing in the Pacific, the editors refused to use the paper's original French language title, opting for one of its English translations. Contrary to popular belief, the title is pronounced 'On Dee' rather than phonetically. The newspaper began as a two-page broadsheet but within a few years quickly grew to four pages. The first editors were C.R. Badger (Arts), K.L.
    8.50
    2 votes
    86

    The Crimson White

    • School: University of Alabama
    The Crimson White, known colloquially as "The CW," is the student-run newspaper of the University of Alabama. It is published four times a week -- every weekday except Friday -- throughout the fall and spring semesters and weekly during the summer semester. Its daily circulation in the fall and spring is about 14,000, and it is distributed across the UA campus and Tuscaloosa community. Since 2009, The Crimson White has built a social media presence of 13,616 Twitter followers and 5,917 Facebook fans as of March 10,2012, significantly increasing its numbers after covering the April 27, 2011 EF4 tornado that devastated Tuscaloosa. The CW is part of UA's Office of Student Media (OSM), an auxiliary department overseen by the university's vice president for student affairs. The department also includes the Alabama Scholastic Press Association, the Corolla yearbook, the Black Warrior Review and Marr's Field Journal literary magazines, The Southern Historian history journal, and 90.7 The Capstone, the student-run radio station. The OSM director advises the newspaper staff but has no control over or responsibility for The Crimson White's content. The newspaper is editorially independent.
    8.50
    2 votes
    87

    The Daily Beacon

    The Daily Beacon is the editorially independent student newspaper of The University of Tennessee. The paper publishes 15,000 copies a day, five days a week and has a staff of over 100 which includes an editorial team of 14, more than 60 staff writers, photographers, copyeditors, and other staff members during the Fall and Spring semesters. The paper publishes twice a week during the summer semester (May through August) and has significantly fewer staff writers during the summer. The publication of a student newspaper is one of the oldest traditions at the University, tracing its roots back to the semi-monthly publication of The University Times-Prospectus in 1871. The Orange and White followed in 1906 as a weekly publication and was later published semi-weekly. The Daily Beacon was established 61 years later under the management of alumnus David Hall ('65) and was published four times per week. Not long after, the paper began publishing issues five times a week and continues to do so now, publishing approximately 180 issues per academic year while classes are in session. Daily Beacon, TheDaily Beacon, The
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    The Water Tower

    The Water Tower

    • School: University of Vermont
    The Water Tower is a newspaper distributed at the University of Vermont, Vermont, United States, that is intended for students, faculty, and staff of the University as well as members of the surrounding community. Launched in early 2007, it is published weekly during the academic year with a current circulation of 2,500. The Water Tower is available at many locations throughout the UVM campus. In addition, all of the paper's articles can be read on The Water Tower's website. The paper's articles include reflections on current events and student life, humor pieces, cartoons, and "Top Five" lists. The Water Tower's staff and writers are all UVM students. The paper is an officially recognized club and receives funding from UVM's Student Government Association (SGA). Writing, editing, and managing The Water Tower is all on a completely volunteer basis—students do not receive course credit for working on the newspaper. New Paper On Campus: Seven Days-type publication to come to UVM as alternative to The Vermont Cynic By Laura Pedro (Vermont Cynic 6 Feb 2007) (free registration required to read second page of article) Drought ends for The Water Tower - Alternative student news mag moves
    8.50
    2 votes
    89

    Varsity

    • School: University of Cambridge
    Varsity is the oldest of Cambridge University's main student newspapers. It has been published continuously since 1947, and is one of only three fully independent student newspapers in the UK. It appears every Friday around Cambridge. In November 2009, the paper won six prizes at the Guardian Student Media Awards, was nominated for a further two, and former editor Patrick Kingsley was named Student Journalist of the Year. Varsity is one of Britain's oldest student newspapers. Its first edition was published in 1931 as Varsity: the Cambridge University Illustrated (later The Varsity Weekly, and then the Cambridge Varsity Post). However, the first few years saw Varsity get off to a shaky start. In 1932 controversy about some of the stories resulted in the editor being challenged to a duel, and the following year the paper went bankrupt with losses of £100. A variety of attempts to revive Varsity led to the paper resurfacing periodically over the following decade, but it was not until 1947 that the paper was re-established permanently in its current form. Harry Newman Jr (1921–2001), a graduate from Harvard and the Harvard Business School, then studying for a postgraduate degree at St
    8.50
    2 votes
    90

    Fairfield Mirror

    The Fairfield Mirror (or The Mirror) is the student newspaper of Fairfield University in Fairfield, Connecticut. It is financially and editorially independent of the University, and publishes weekly on Wednesday during the academic year with additional issues during commencement and orientation. The Mirror staff has won numerous Excellence in Journalism Awards from the Connecticut Society of Professional Journalists. The students of Fairfield University founded and published the first edition of The Mirror in 1977. The newspaper was founded after the merging of two prior publications: one produced under the supervision of the University (The Voice), and one published independently (The Free Press and Review). , The genesis of the change to The Mirror, was Ned Barnett. who as Editor-in-Chief of "The Voice", was one of the driving forces to create an independent newspaper. In addition, the University was seeking to limit its liability from the publication of a student-run media outlet. The Mirror's first Editor-in-Chief was Robert M. "Doc" Dougherty, who was responsible for the editorial content, and Frank Godfrey, the Business Manager, who was responsible for the paper's finances
    7.33
    3 votes
    91

    The Medium

    • School: Rutgers University
    The Medium is the student-run weekly entertainment and comedy newspaper at Rutgers University. The paper refers to itself as "The Entertainment Weekly of Rutgers University." During the 2000s, as a result of frequent attacks on their right to print offensive material, the editors and contributors of The Medium had turned the paper into a veritable exercise of their First Amendment Rights, often in ways that resulted in protests from the student body and pressure from the administration. Nearly all protests against The Medium have been largely ineffective because of the University's commitment to democracy. The current version of The Medium is purely satire and humor based on events on the Rutgers University campus, current events, and popular culture. The front pages of The Medium is the news section provides articles that are satire of news on the Rutgers University campus, current events, and popular culture. Usually these articles are twisted out of real occurrences, the normal exception being The Daily Medium issue where many of the articles may be completely false for the shock reaction of the readers. The features section includes normally recurring content every week.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    The Stag

    The Stag

    • School: University of Surrey
    The Stag is a fortnightly student newspaper published by the University of Surrey Students' Union. The newspaper was established under the name barefacts in 1967. In 1968, the University was to move from its home in Battersea Park, South-West London, to Stag Hill, in Guildford, Surrey. Concerns were raised at a lunchtime Students Union meeting over troubles in communication between the students on each site while the move was in progress. Outgoing Union President, Bob Matthews, suggested a one-page newsletter covering both campuses, which would carry messages by clubs and societies, as well as general notices from the students' union. The first few hundred issues were usually edited by the Union Executive, before an annual editor was appointed. The last edition published under the name barefacts was in September 2008. Then-editor Claire Worgan chose to rebrand the newspaper as The Stag. barefacts won several notable awards, including the National Student Journalism Awards in 2002 and 2003 for Best Student Campaign. The 2002 campaign related to increases in campus rent, whilst the 2003 "Lights, Camera, Action" campaign related to student safety on and near campus.
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    The Villanovan

    The Villanovan

    • School: Villanova University
    The Villanovan has been the officially recognized and accredited student newspaper of Villanova University since its founding in 1916. The tabloid-style, weekly paper publishes every Thursday during the semester and maintains a circulation of 5,000 copies which are distributed throughout the Villanova campus and at various locations in the surrounding community. It is staffed by over 150 undergraduate students. All content of The Villanovan is the responsibility of the editors and the editorial board and do not necessarily represent the views of the administration, faculty and students of Villanova University unless specifically stated. While The Villanovan is owned by Villanova University, Villanova University subscribes to the principle of responsible freedom of expression for the student editors. Subscriptions are available at a cost of $35 per semester or $55 per year.
    7.33
    3 votes
    94

    UWO Gazette

    • School: University of Western Ontario
    The Gazette is the student newspaper at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada. The Gazette is the only daily student newspaper in Canada, publishing Tuesday through Friday. It is owned and published by the University Students' Council. The Gazette began in 1906 as a hand-written literature newspaper called In Cap And Gown. The paper was not actually produced in newsprint until 1908. The Gazette adopted its current name in 1930. The Gazette moved from weekly to twice per week in 1948, and moved to its current four-times-a-week publication schedule in 1991. The paper's large staff (three full-time supervising editors, 20 section editors and dozens of volunteers, plus a full-time advertising and composing department) makes this publication schedule possible. The editorial board is made of volunteer students and full-time staff. The Editor-in-Chief, Deputy Editor and Managing Editor are full-time salaried employees, usually recent graduates. The remaining editors are full-time students who volunteer and receive an honorarium per issue published. There are typically 22 to 24 editors in total. Gazette alumni can be found working for several of Canada's major
    7.33
    3 votes
    95

    Crystal 99

    • School: Malden Catholic High School
    The Crystal 99 is the student-run school newspaper of Malden Catholic High School. The name derives from the address of the school at 99 Crystal St., Malden, Massachusetts. The paper has been running for decades, with five or six issues printed each school year. The Crystal 99 is run by a regularly rotating staff of editors, generally consisting of juniors and seniors. Articles and artwork are contributed from the entire school community. The paper will be celebrating 25 years of having the name "Crystal 99" in 2006-2007. (See history) The paper is currently moderated by History teacher Peter Rockwell Wright. As Malden Catholic moved from Highland Avenue to 99 Crystal Street during the 1968–1969 school year, the school newspaper entered a new stage. Calling itself The End in September 1968, its final month on Highland Avenue, the staff welcomed ideas for a new name. The winning entry was Crystal XCIX (the “XCIX” would change to “99” in 1982 with the help of Fred Eid, then known as Bro. Fred Eid, CFX), which was chosen over such names as Avatar, The Intellectual Receptacle, and The 1875 Buttermilk Edition. “Crystal XCIX was the name selected because it was the only one not
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Palatinate

    Palatinate

    • School: Durham University
    Palatinate is the award-winning official student newspaper of Durham University and is one of Britain's oldest and best-known student publications, having celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2008. The paper was named NUS/Independent Student Newspaper of the Year in 2001. Notable former editors include George Alagiah, Hunter Davies, Piers Merchant, Timothy Laurence, Jeremy Vine and Harold Evans. The name of the newspaper derives from the colour Palatinate, a shade of purple closely associated with the university and derived from County Durham's political history as a County Palatine. Palatinate is published on a fortnightly basis during term time, and its editors are elected on a termly basis; its constitution prevents an editorship lasting more than two terms. Although the Durham Students Union technically subsidies the paper, revenues from advertising outstrip the cost of production, ensuring that the publication actually makes money for the DSU. Despite the potential conflict of interest arising from the student union subsidising the paper, Palatinate often publishes articles critical of the union. However, the publication does not have complete editorial independence: since it is
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    The Advocate

    The Advocate is a student newspaper published at Contra Costa College, a community college in San Pablo, California. The paper is published weekly during the school year and has a circulation of approximately 2,500. An online edition, "AccentAdvocate," is also published. The current editor in chief is Sam Attal. The Advocate is one of the most honored two-year college newspapers in the United States, having won 14 Associated Collegiate Press National Pacemaker Awards since 1990. The newspaper was inducted into the ACP Hall of Fame in 1996, and has been cited by ACP officials as being one of the best examples of small-college journalism. Advocate reporters and photographers cover the campus, which rests halfway in San Pablo and halfway in Richmond in the East Bay Area. The students cover topics ranging from crime on campus, to student profiles, sports and local entertainment. The tradition of The Advocate has always been to chase news stories and focus on the hard news.
    6.25
    4 votes
    98

    The Louisville Cardinal

    • School: University of Louisville
    The Louisville Cardinal is the independent weekly student newspaper of the University of Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky. It is published every Tuesday during the academic year and once in June for distribution throughout the summer. The Cardinal was originally founded in 1926 and has maintained financial and editorial independence since 1980. Although the University of Louisville has no journalism program, The Cardinal serves as an outlet and learning experience for aspiring journalists. Recent advisers include Robert Schulman, Vince Staten, Kim Speirs and Mickey Meece (current).
    6.25
    4 votes
    99

    Heuristic Squelch

    The Heuristic Squelch, founded in 1991 as a successor to the Pelican, is a satirical magazine published three to four times a semester by students at UC Berkeley. The magazine distributes approximately 66,000 copies total each year in the Berkeley area as well as other parts of the state through a small subscription service. Though the paper was founded as an official ASUC-sponsored group in 1991, it lost that status in 1995 and was reformed in 1997. Only students of UC Berkeley are allowed to hold official positions in the Heuristic Squelch, but anyone is allowed to contribute material. The magazine won an award in 1999 from Rolling Stone for best college humor website. The Heuristic Squelch has also received disapproval for what critics see as tasteless humor. In 2000 a top ten list entry which referenced Filipinos drew condemnation from the ASUC and certain campus Filipino groups. The Heuristic Squelch is commonly associated with the SQUELCH! ASUC political party, most of whose candidates are drawn from the writers and editors of the Heuristic Squelch. During the 1995 ASUC election the SQUELCH! party name was registered by a student not connected with the magazine. In
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    The Cambridge Student

    The Cambridge Student

    • School: University of Cambridge
    The Cambridge Student, commonly known as TCS, is one of Cambridge University's student newspapers (The Tab and Varsity are the others). The newspaper is owned and published by the Cambridge University Students' Union (CUSU) but is editorially independent. The paper was founded in October 1999 and has since continued to produce a weekly print run of 10,000 copies during university term time. TCS is also downloaded around 10,000 times per issue. The paper boasts several Guardian Student Media Awards, and has interviewed public figures including United Nations Weapons Inspector Hans Blix, director Ridley Scott, politician Ian Paisley, the BBC's security correspondent Frank Gardner and journalist David Frost. TCS was the first newspaper to break the story of the threatened closure of Cambridge's architecture department, which later featured in the national press.. Since then, it made national headlines with news of Animal rights abuses at the University. The newspaper's photography of the tuition fee riots also won plaudits. The editors for Michaelmas term 2012 will be Nicholas Tufnell and Laurence Tidy. Previous editors have been: Lent 2012: Michaelmas 2011: Lent 2011: Michaelmas
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    The Michigan Times

    The Michigan Times

    • School: University of Michigan
    The Michigan Times, the student newspaper of the Flint campus of the University of Michigan, was founded in 1956. It is the only official campus newspaper issued on campus and run entirely by the university students. It is casually referred to on and around campus as "The M-Times." Starting in the fall of 2010, The Michigan Times went from being published biweekly, to weekly. The transition also included cutting the number of pages in the newspaper in half, with a four-page A section and a two-page B section (M2). The Michigan Times has seen notables such as filmmaker Michael Moore and American Idol finalist LaKisha Jones on its staff. The Michigan Times has a print run of 3,000 papers per issue and is printed weekly. The Michigan Times website was launched in 2003. It marked the first time the newspaper had been available in a digital format. The website was re-vamped in 2010, preceding the relaunch of the university's website. The website will once again undergo a makeover during the summer of 2011 and will re-launch in September 2011. In 2004, music writer John McKay received 2nd prize statewide from the Michigan Press Association for his album review of popular rock group The
    7.00
    3 votes
    102

    The Oxford Student

    • School: University of Oxford
    The Oxford Student is a newspaper produced by and for students of the University of Oxford; it is sometimes abbreviated to The OxStu. The paper was established in 1992 by the Oxford University Student Union The Oxford Student is owned by OUSU and run through the Student Union's commercial subsidiary, Oxford Student Services Ltd (OSSL). The newspaper's constitution grants the paper editorial independence. The Oxford Student was named "Student Newspaper of the Year" at the Guardian Student Media Awards in 2001, was shortlisted in 2004 and awarded the runner-up prize in 2007. Every term, the Oxford Student's sister magazine, Exposition, is released along with the penultimate issue of the paper. Exposition is primarily written by university post-graduates "covering politics, society and the arts and encompassing a diverse array of disciplines: from Art History to International Relations, Urban Anthropology to Legal Ethics." In 2004, the newspaper gained national publicity when two reporters broke University rules to expose security flaws in the University's computer network; the student journalists responsible, Patrick Foster and Roger Waite, were rusticated by the University's Court
    7.00
    3 votes
    103

    Varsity

    • School: University of Cape Town
    Varsity is the official student newspaper of the University of Cape Town (UCT). In 1942, the first edition of Varsity went to print. The paper was founded as a result of the burgeoning cultural tensions on campus between Afrikaans and English students. The student representative council (SRC) sought to control these tensions by uniting the English student newspaper UCTattle and the Afrikaans medium publication Die Spantou. The SRC aimed to lessen the widening gap in political opinion advocated by each of these mouthpieces by launching a bilingual student newspaper. A storm of controversy met the decision to abolish the original papers. The first Varsity constitution even had a clause forbidding comment on politics at UCT. The SRC was firm that "racial friction and political bitterness must be eliminated" (UCTattle, 1941-10-08). The SRC took Varsity Newspaper firmly under its wing, with much indignation from the student body. The first editor, NC Gracie, chose the name claiming UCT had the right to the name "being the oldest [university] with the most inspiring record and the greatest tradition of tolerance and unity" (Varsity, 1942-04-18). The newspaper grew in popularity as the
    7.00
    3 votes
    104

    Ka Leo O Hawaii

    • School: University of Hawaii at Manoa
    Ka Leo O Hawai‘i (The Voice of Hawai‘i) is the student newspaper at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, founded in 1922 (as the Mirror). Beginning in the fall of 2010, "Ka Leo" began printing every Monday, Wednesday and Friday (previously Ka Leo had printed Monday, Wednesday and Thursday) during the fall and spring semesters, and only Wednesday during the summer semester. Page length is normally 12 to 80 pages, in a tabloid format. Circulation is 10,000, distributed to over 100 locations on campus and in the community. "Ka Leo" is published by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Board of Publications, a Board of Regents Chartered Student Organization founded in 1966. Previous to the founding of the BOP, Ka Leo was published by a committee of the Associated Students of the University of Hawai‘i. Ka Leo O Hawai‘i seeks to foster informed involvement throughout the University of Hawai‘i community. As the official newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i, Ka Leo endeavors to become a cornerstone of intellectual exchange on campus. Ka Leo continually strives to be inclusive and balanced in our reporting, while sustaining the values of journalistic integrity and reliability. Taken from
    5.20
    5 votes
    105

    Daily Bruin

    • School: University of California, Los Angeles
    The Daily Bruin is the student newspaper at the University of California, Los Angeles. When classes are in session, the Bruin is published Monday through Friday during the school year, twice a week during finals week, and once a week on Mondays in the summer quarter. The Bruin's staff also publishes Prime, a quarterly lifestyle magazine. It is overseen by the ASUCLA Communications Board, which sets policies for the newspaper and other campus communications media. The current editor is James Barragan. The Daily Bruin was preceded by the weekly Normal Outlook on the campus of UCLA's predecessor, the Los Angeles State Normal School, from 1910 through 1918 or 1919 (the records are incomplete). Upon the establishment in fall 1919 of the Southern Branch of the University of California, as UCLA was first known, the twice-weekly Cub Californian was first issued on Sept. 29, 1919. Its name was changed to the California Grizzly with the issue of March 21, 1924, and on September 13, 1925 it began to publish five days a week. On October 22, 1926, the newspaper became known as the California Daily Bruin. During World War II it reduced its publication frequency to three times a week under the
    8.00
    2 votes
    106

    Iowa State Daily

    • School: Iowa State University
    The Iowa State Daily is an independent student newspaper serving Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa, that is published in print and online. It was founded in 1890, and is largely funded by advertising revenues. The Government of the Student Body helps pay for its free distribution on campus. The paper is published five days a week during the fall and winter semesters, and weekly during the summer. The Daily printed circulation is 12,500. Laura Widmer is the Daily's general manager. Mark Witherspoon has served as the editorial adviser since 1999. Beginning in the fall of 2006, he became a full-time adviser. In the spring of 1890, The I.A.C. Student was founded by a group of students led by F.E. Davidson at the Iowa Agricultural College. It was done without any support from the college or officials. The publication led the way for the Iowa Agricultural College Student, which formally launched on August 7, 1890. It was printed at Ames Intelligencer. The first issue stated: Seven issues later, the Student wrote: The Iowa Agricultural College Student was a bi-weekly newspaper until 1894, when it began publishing on a weekly basis at the cost of about 5 to 10 cents per issue. In March
    8.00
    2 votes
    107

    Lambda

    • School: Laurentian University
    Lambda is the official English student newspaper at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. It is directly funded from the student fees paid to the Student General Association (SGA), Laurentian University's full-time student union, although the newspaper's charter explicitly prevents the SGA from exerting editorial control of any kind over it. Lambda is distributed bi-weekly on Fridays and is available almost anywhere on the Laurentian University campus, as well as partner distributors throughout the city. The Lambda offices currently reside on the second floor of the Student Centre. Lambda began publication in 1961 at Laurentian University. The newspaper then consisted of 6 staff members which included the Editor-in-Chief, Financial Director, Assistant Editor, Arts and Entertainment Editor, Sports Editor, and Science and Technology Editor. For the 2010/11 school year, Lambda's masthead and layout were completely redesigned with a fresh, slightly grungy aesthetic. Although Lambda maintains an editorial staff on payroll, it continues to accept unsolicited submissions from students and faculty at Laurentian University, and members of the Sudbury community. Lambda also
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Nouse

    Nouse

    • School: University of York
    Nouse ( /ˈnuːz/ NOOZ; Ancient Greek: nous, meaning intellect, or common sense; also the local River Ouse) is a student newspaper and website at the University of York. It is the oldest registered society of, and funded by the University of York Students' Union. Founded in 1964 by student Nigel Fountain, some twenty years before its rival York Vision. Nouse is printed three times a term with frequent website updates in between print runs. It has changed dramatically in outlook and presentation over the years, being known at one point as the Nouse Co-operative or NouseCoop, and presenting itself as a samizdat publication throughout the 1980s. In its current incarnation, Nouse is a politically left-of-centre paper. The last edition of the 2006–07 academic year was printed in full-size broadsheet format. Rival paper York Vision often styles the name as "No-Use" when referring to the paper. In last few years Nouse has become one of the University's largest media societies, picking up multiple nominations and wins in the National Student Journalism Awards and Guardian Student Media Awards. The Borthwick Institute for Archives at the University of York Library has an archive of Nouse
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    The Phoenix Press

    The Phoenix Press

    • School: Bell Gardens High School
    The Phoenix Press is an independent newspaper in Bell Gardens, California. It is the brainchild of current and former reporters and editors of the Lancer Scroll in Bell Gardens High School. Currently, the paper runs bi-weekly in a 1 page (front and back) newsletter format. While the majority of the circulation and articles are directed towards students and teachers of Bell Gardens High School, the Phoenix Press claims no affiliation with the school, instead aligning itself with the city of Bell Gardens and its neighboring area. Because of this, the Phoenix Press does not receive any sanctioned school funds. Instead it is funded by those who work on it and by private donations and advertisement. The name Phoenix Press finds its roots in the mythology of the Phoenix. When Huerta and Rodriguez were still a part of the Lancer Scroll, upon working on the first 2006-2007 issue, they discovered that the new direction of the Lancer Scroll totally disregarded the teachings and the standards that Lancer Scroll had become known for in years past. This "new" Lancer Scroll that was being imposed by the new Editors-in-Chief did not sit well Huerta, Rodriguez and various staff members. In
    8.00
    2 votes
    110

    Columbia Daily Spectator

    • School: Columbia University
    Columbia Daily Spectator is the daily student newspaper of Columbia University. It is published at 112th and Broadway in New York, New York. Founded in 1877, it is the oldest continuously operating college news daily in the nation after The Harvard Crimson, and has been legally independent of the university since 1962. It is printed weekdays during the academic term. In addition to serving as a campus newspaper, the Spec, as it is commonly known, also reports the latest news of the surrounding Morningside Heights community. The paper is delivered each day to over 150 locations throughout the Morningside Heights neighborhood and has a circulation of 8,000. Spectator is published by the Spectator Publishing Company, an independent non-profit organization. The president of the Spectator Publishing Company also serves as the publisher of the Columbia Daily Spectator. Spectator's writing departments, each headed by one or two editors, include campus news, city news, sports, arts and entertainment, and opinion. The other non-writing departments, also headed by their own respective editors, include photography, design, online, production, copy, and business. The business departments,
    9.00
    1 votes
    111

    Grand Valley Lanthorn

    • School: Grand Valley State University
    The Grand Valley Lanthorn is the student-run newspaper for Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan. The Lanthorn is printed twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays during the academic year (Late August through April). It is not printed over academic breaks, and there are typically two issues over the summer months. The "Lanthorn" prints 8,000 copies per individual publication and also operates its own website. The word "lanthorn" is derived from an old English word meaning "look out" or "lantern." A lanthorn was constructed of leather and a lens made of ox or steer horn, it was used for lighting or as a beacon. The common pronunciation of the word on campus is lan-thorn, although the proper pronunciation is lant-horn. The Grand Valley Lanthorn first traces its history back to November 22, 1963, with the founding of at the time Grand Valley State College's first student run newspaper, "The Keystone". The Keystone did not last long however, and had its last edition published on January 22, 1966. It was then replaced by GVSC's second newspaper, "The Valley View", on October 28, 1966 until its last publication on June 6, 1968. In October 1968, the college changed the name
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Imprint

    Imprint

    • School: University of Waterloo
    Imprint is a publication created by Imprint Publications, Waterloo and is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. Imprint prints weekly during the fall and winter semesters, and bi-weekly during the spring semester. Imprint publishes 30 issues a year and is paid for mostly by advertising, but is also supplemented with a $3.30 refundable fee paid per semester by students enrolled at the university. A student-run newspaper at the campus of Waterloo began in the late 1950s when the campus was still called the Waterloo College Associate Faculties and was affiliated with Waterloo College, which is now known as Wilfrid Laurier University. The Engineering students of the Associated Faculties started their own newsletter in early 1959, shortly after the formation of the Engineering society. The newsletter was called Enginews and was published as a mimeographed sheet of foolscap. By late 1959, Enginews had joined The Cord Weekly and was its own special section with its own masthead in the newspaper. The federation of Waterloo College and the Associated Faculties (which had now been renamed the University of Waterloo) failed in the spring of 1960. The Cord Weekly and
    9.00
    1 votes
    113

    London Student

    • School: University of London
    London Student is the newspaper of the University of London Union. It began publishing in 1979. It is an editorially independent publication with ultimate control over content and editorial appointments vested in the elected full-time Editor, who is currently Jen Izaakson. It distributes 12,500 copies fortnightly during termtime throughout the university year, equating to approximately 12 issues annually. 20,000 copies of 2007's Freshers' Issue were distributed, up from 14,000 in 2006. The editor of London Student is chosen annually by an election in which all University of London students are entitled to vote. The current editor is Jen Izaakson. Previous editors include: In March 2006, the newspaper broke the story that the Mail on Sunday newspaper had offered student reporters money to infiltrate and record meetings of student Islamic societies in the wake of the London bombings of 7 July 2005. The report, headlined 'Nailed on Sunday', created some international media coverage, although the response in the UK was more muted. The Mail on Sunday responded by saying that they were investigating "a subject of great public interest" and had acted "responsibly", but did not deny the
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    The Peak

    • School: Simon Fraser University
    The Peak is the independent student newspaper of Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. It is split into six major sections: News, Opinions, Features, Arts, Sports and Humour. The Peak was founded on October 6, 1965 through the merger of SFU's two original student newspapers, The Tartan and The SF View. The Tartan had published six issues under the editorship of Lorne Mallin, while the SF View had published one, edited by Rick McGrath. Because no name had yet been decided, the first printed issue was unnamed; the October 20, 1965 issue was the first to carry the banner of The Peak. The Peak achieved full financial and editorial autonomy from the Student Society in a 1995 decision, bringing The Peak in line with the majority of Canadian student newspapers. Student newspapers seek autonomy mostly to avoid conflicts of interest, in which the Student Society or the University attempts to exert control over the content of the paper. Notable Peak alumni include journalist and author Allen Garr, Vancouver Province copy editor Lorne Mallin, author and interviewer John Sawatsky, award winning Calgary Herald journalist Michelle Lang, and Charles Demers, a comedian and
    9.00
    1 votes
    115

    The Renegade Rip

    • School: Bakersfield College
    The Renegade Rip is Bakersfield College's award-winning student newspaper. In publication since 1929, The Rip covers campus news as well as major events off campus. Official Website The Renegade Rip won Pacesetter awards in 2003 and 2008.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116

    The Technique

    • School: Georgia Institute of Technology
    The Technique, also known as the "'Nique," is the official student newspaper of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia and has referred to itself as "the South's liveliest college newspaper" since 1945. As of the Fall semester of 2011, the Technique has a weekly circulation of 10,000, distributed to numerous locations on the Georgia Tech campus and a handful of locations in the surrounding area. The first issue of the Technique was published on November 17, 1911, and the paper has printed continuously since its founding. The paper publishes weekly throughout the regular school year and primarily covers news, events and issues specific to the Georgia Tech community. In 2004 it was one of 25 collegiate newspapers to receive the Pacemaker award from the Associated Collegiate Press. A publication known as The Georgia Tech was Georgia Tech's first student newspaper. It was established in 1894 and was the second student publication to be established on campus. The Georgia Tech published a "Commencement Issue" that reviewed sporting events and gave information about each class. The "Commencement Issue" was likely similar to the Technique's Freshman Issue. The Technique
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    Campus Times

    The Campus Times (the CT) is the student newspaper at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York. Established in 1873, the current paper is the merger of The Campus (representing the all-male River Campus), and the Tower Times newspapers (representing the all-women Prince Street Campus) when the campuses were integrated in 1955. The paper is published weekly, typically on Thursdays, with special editions being published, including a Commencement issue. The paper features sections covering current news, features, opinions, comics, arts and entertainment, and sports. The paper is managed by a group of student editors. For Spring 2006, the CT staff includes:
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Felix

    Felix

    • School: Imperial College London
    Felix is the award-winning student newspaper of Imperial College London. It won the Guardian Student Newspaper of the Year award in 2008. The newspaper is published weekly during term time, approximately 30 issues per year, and is distributed around the various Imperial College campuses. The FELIX motto, "Keep The Cat Free" (first adopted in 1974), refers to the policy of distributing the newspaper free of charge but more importantly to the tradition of free speech: unlike many students' newspapers Felix is free to criticise union policy whenever the editor sees fit, although during Spring Term 2008 Imperial College Union constitution controversially prevented some news articles from being published. In addition to news, Felix also carries comic strips, features, opinions, puzzles and reviews, plus reports of trips and Imperial College sporting events. As a student newspaper, it is read by a large proportion of the student body, as well as other members of the Imperial College community. Consequently, it provides an opportunity for advertising to both students and staff. The editorial offices are located at the Imperial College Union Media Centre in Beit Quad. The editor is elected
    6.67
    3 votes
    119

    Tattler

    • School: Ithaca High School
    The Tattler is the student newspaper of Ithaca High School in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1892, it is one of the oldest student newspapers in the United States. It is published six to ten times a year, and has a circulation of about 3,000, with distribution in both the school and in the community. School The Tattler has traditionally been almost entirely student-run, with a student editorial board and student writers working with the assistance of a faculty advisor (usually a teacher in the IHS English department). The publication has expanded considerably in the past ten years, increasing its number of pages, introducing distribution outside of the high school, and developing an online presence. Famous alumni include Paul Wolfowitz (Features Editor, 1959–1960; Editorial Assistant, 1960–1961) and Stephen Carter (Editor-in-Chief, 1971–1972). The Tattler's slogan, a pun on the New York Times' slogan, is "All the news that's fit to tattle." The Tattler has twice (in 2005 and 2007) won the Ithaca High School Class/Ithaca Public Education Initiative "Support Our School Community Award," an award given to the extracurricular activity "which has had the most positive impact on IHS". The
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    The Emory Wheel

    The Emory Wheel

    • School: Emory University
    The Emory Wheel is the student-run newspaper of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. The Wheel is published twice a week, on Tuesday and Friday, during the regular school year, and is updated regularly at its website. The sections of the Wheel include News, Editorials, Sports, Entertainment, Arts & Living and, formerly, The Hub, an award-winning quarterly magazine founded in 2005. Serving the Emory community since 1919, the Wheel is editorially and financially independent from the University. The staff is composed entirely of students, with the exception of the general manager, who oversees advertising and whose salary is paid by the newspaper. The Wheel offices are currently located in the Dobbs University Center. The Wheel's editor-in-chief is Evan Mah. The Emory Wheel began in 1919 as a weekly newspaper with its offices located in the journalism department. The name is wordplay on an emery wheel, a sharpening device. An editorial published in the first issue of The Wheel explains that the newspaper will strive to sharpen the intellect of the University community. The newspaper, initially chartered by the Student Government Association, was originally meant to promote Emory's
    6.67
    3 votes
    121

    The Gateway

    The Gateway is the student newspaper at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The newspaper was founded in North Garneau at the home of Liddy Lloyd on October 26, 1910. A group of students had gathered to discuss the creation of a student newspaper. They came up with the name "The Gateway" and selected A.E. Ottewell as its first editor-in-chief. The first issue was published on November 21, 1910. According to the newspaper's first editorial, the name "Gateway" was chosen because "there is something unique about our position in this institution, the university farthest north in America and farthest West in Canada, standing at the portal of a great undeveloped and practically unknown region, rich in potentialities of future greatness." In 1938, The Gateway became a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP), a non-profit news wire service owned by post-secondary student newspapers across Canada. The Gateway hosted CUP national conferences in January 1979, January 2005, and January 2010. From its first published issue in 1910 until 2002, the Gateway was run as a department of the University of Alberta Students' Union. In 2002, the paper ran a successful
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    The LaSallian

    The LaSallian

    • School: De La Salle University-Manila
    The LaSallian (TLS) is the official student publication of De La Salle University, under the Student Publications Office. It is the university's English-language newspaper, composed of the University (News), Menagerie (Features), Sports, Art & Graphics, and Photo sections. It is released every 1st week of every month from June to April. Other publications of the university include Ang Pahayagang Plaridel, Malate Literary Folio, and Green & White. The La Sallian was first released as the official student publication of then De La Salle College on October 24, 1960, under its first Editor in Chief, Polo Santiago Pantaleon. Its name was given by Ernido Agustin in a contest. A series of major changes started in 1992, when the spelling of the publication was officially changed to The LaSallian. Under 1994-1995 Editor in Chief (EIC) Elegio Cabasug, the Features section was renamed Menagerie, which was later introduced as a separate magazine in 2000-2001 under EIC Faith Santiago. The Spoofs (comics) section was also renamed Poptown. Finally in 2002-2003 under EIC Sarah Espina, the nameplate's font was officially changed from Old English to Times New Roman. The LaSallian has five sections,
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    The Manitoban

    The Manitoban

    The Manitoban is the official student newspaper at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Published for the first time on November 5, 1914, the Toban, as it is called for short, is one of the oldest and largest (by circulation and budget) student newspapers in Canada. The tabloid-sized paper is published monthly during the summer and every Wednesday during the regular Fall-Winter university session. The Manitoban is non-profit and is completely owned and operated by students. During the fall and winter 10,000 copies of the Manitoban are printed on a weekly basis, and distributed extensively on both campuses of the University of Manitoba and throughout Winnipeg. Notable past contributors include Marshall McLuhan, Marcel Dzama, Andrew Coyne, Nahlah Ayed, Graham Spry and Izzy Asper. The Manitoban starts advertising for the position of Editor-in-Chief (EiC) each February, and normally hires for the position at the beginning of March. EiCs are hired for a term position of 54 weeks, from May 1 to May 14, with the overlap intended to be used for the outgoing EiC to train their replacement. EiCs are chosen by the Hiring Committee, made up of the paper's Editorial Board and two
    6.67
    3 votes
    124

    The Muse

    • School: Memorial University of Newfoundland
    For other uses of the title see The Muse (disambiguation). The Muse, successor to the Memorial Times, began publishing in 1950 in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, as an unnamed paper. That paper held a contest to choose a new name, the winner being a professor who named the paper after all of the following: Beginning with a small editorial staff controlled by the student union, The Muse grew into an autonomous student-run paper. In the early years of publication, it was a campus gossip tabloid; in the late 1960s it developed an activist flair which attracted the attention of the provincial government and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), with the latter including The Muse in their investigations of supposedly Marxist organizations. In the late eighties, the paper was enlivened by the women's movement, and followed a more activist agenda, including special coverage of gay, lesbian and bisexual issues not discussed in the mainstream media, and a boycotted list of advertisers. The Muse incorporated in 2002 as The Muse Publications Inc, and became fully autonomous from the Memorial University students' union in January 2003. The Muse focuses on campus life,
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Wilfrid Laurier University Student Publications

    Wilfrid Laurier University Student Publications

    • School: Wilfrid Laurier University
    The Cord is a student newspaper at Wilfrid Laurier University. Founded in 1926, it features stories about current events on campus and the community as well as student life, sports, arts and opinion. The paper's website compiles all the content from the print edition as well as web-exclusive content. The Cord publishes every Wednesday of the fall and winter semester and monthly over the summer. The Cord is a member of the Canadian University Press. It is one of several publications produced by Wilfrid Laurier University Student Publications. The Cord currently features the following sections in print: News (Campus, Local, and National), Sports, Arts, In Depth and Features (alternating), Opinion, classifieds, and letters to the editor. The paper's local content has expanded in recent years to cover regional news including elections and other events in the Waterloo community. The Cord also publishes an online Life section with student lifestyle-related stories as well as horoscopes, advice columns, and the popular venting platform, "Dear Life." In 2011, The Cord made the decision to remove its World section from print due to a lack of student reader interest. Instead, The Cord
    6.67
    3 votes
    126

    Daily Nebraskan

    • School: University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    The Daily Nebraskan, established in 1871 as the Monthly Hesperian Student, is the student newspaper of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Although many journalism students work there, the Daily Nebraskan is independent of the University's College of Journalism and Mass Communications. The newspaper is entirely student-produced and managed. It has a longtime professional business manager, Dan Shattil. The paper publishes every school day during the fall and spring semesters, with the exceptions of the Tuesday before Thanksgiving break and the last four days of finals week. It publishes weekly during summer sessions. The newspaper covers campus and Lincoln-area news, along with arts, entertainment and sports. There is also an opinion page featuring student columnists. The paper, once referred to as "The Rag", is now known as "The DN" to UNL students. In 2008, another student newspaper, the Dailyer Nebraskan was launched. This bi-weekly publication features satirical news. The Daily Nebraskan has had a number of different names throughout its existence: Willa Cather was the literary editor of the newspaper when she was a student at the University of Nebraska. In the 1890s, a number
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Daily Vanguard

    Daily Vanguard

    • School: Portland State University
    The Daily Vanguard is an independent student newspaper for Portland State University. The newspaper is now generally referred to as simply the Vanguard. The tabloid format newspaper has a circulation of 5,000, and is distributed for free in and around the Portland State campus area. Until fall 2010 it was published Tuesday through Friday during the academic year, and once a week during the summer. Tuesday, Friday and summer issues were 12 pages, while Wednesday and Thursday issues were eight. Beginning September 28 the Vanguard began publishing two 16-page issues twice per week on Tuesdays and Fridays due to budget cuts. Exclusively online stories are also released every Tuesday evening. The Vanguard is composed of four sections: News, Opinion, Arts & Culture and Sports. The news section provides coverage of significant events relating to the university, administration, student government and the city of Portland. The opinion section offers a variety of views on local and national news and politics and provides a forum of discussion and debate for students and faculty. Arts & Culture covers arts, entertainment and popular culture around campus and Portland. The sports section
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    2 votes
    128

    Michigan Daily

    • School: University of Michigan
    The Michigan Daily is the daily student newspaper of the University of Michigan. Its first edition was published on September 29, 1890. The newspaper is financially and editorially independent of the University's administration and other student groups, but shares a university building with other student publications on 420 Maynard Street, north of the Michigan Union and Huetwell Student Activities Center. In 2007, renovations to the historic building at 420 Maynard were completed, funded entirely by private donations from alumni. To dedicate the renovated building, a reunion of the staffs of The Michigan Daily, the Michiganensian yearbook, and the Gargoyle humor magazine was held on October 26–28, 2007. The Michigan Daily is published in broadsheet form five days a week, Monday through Friday, during the Fall and Winter semesters. It is published weekly in tabloid form from May to August. Mondays contain a lengthy SportsMonday Sports section. On Thursdays, the paper publishes an extended arts section called The B-side. Wednesdays include a magazine, originally titled Weekend Magazine. In the fall of 2005, the magazine was renamed The Statement, a reference to former Daily Editor
    7.50
    2 votes
    129

    Student Times newspaper

    Student Times is a free English national student newspaper which was launched in October 2004. Studenttimes.org was launched in March 2005. The newspaper is distributed to universities and colleges within the United Kingdom, and the publication contains a mixture of national and international student news alongside graduate courses, graduate jobs and careers advice, features, entertainment articles and interviews from external sources. The majority of articles, photographs and illustrations are written and produced by students. Interviews so far have included Tracey Emin, Don McCullin, Goldie Lookin' Chain and Zero 7. The paper carries frequent reports from the National Union of Students of the United Kingdom, the British Universities Sports Association and the Student Radio Association.
    7.50
    2 votes
    130

    The Auburn Plainsman

    • School: Auburn University
    The Auburn Plainsman is the student-run newspaper for Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama. It has notably received awards for excellence from the Associated Collegiate Press and is the second-most decorated student publication in the history of the National Pacemaker competition. It is published Thursdays throughout each academic term and freely distributed at more than 75 locations. The editor is selected by a group of faculty, students and professional journalists. In turn, the editor hires a paid staff to run the paper and recruits volunteers. Plainsman staff and volunteers create all of the paper's content without the use of a wire service. The business manager, also a student, is selected by a group similar to the one that selects the editor. The business manager hires advertisement salespeople and designers. The Plainsman is a self-supported publication and receives no student or state taxpayer money. Though located on campus, it pays rent to Auburn University. A typical page count for each modern issue is 20 pages and includes four sections: Campus, Community, Intrigue and Sports. Founded by the school's two literary societies, Wirts and Websterians, students began
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    The Daily Barometer

    The Daily Barometer

    • School: Oregon State University
    The Daily Barometer is an independent campus newspaper of Oregon State University, in Corvallis, Oregon. It is published five days a week during the fall, winter and spring quarters, and weekly during the summer. In 1896, the College Barometer was founded as a monthly magazine for literature. The format changed to a weekly paper in 1906, a semi-weekly in 1909 and in 1922 became a daily paper, publishing five times per week.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    The Dartmouth

    The Dartmouth

    • School: Dartmouth College
    The Dartmouth is the daily student newspaper at Dartmouth College. Founded in 1799, it is America's oldest college newspaper. It is published by The Dartmouth, Inc., an independent, nonprofit corporation chartered in the state of New Hampshire. Many alumni of The Dartmouth have gone on to careers in journalism, and several have won Pulitzer Prizes. The Dartmouth was first published in Hanover, New Hampshire on August 27, 1799, by Moses Davis “on College Plain” under the name the Dartmouth Gazette. “Here range the world – explore the dense and rare; And view all nature in your elbow chair,” Davis wrote in the first issue of the Dartmouth Gazette. In his first column, Davis stressed the necessity of avoiding “personal reflections” while maintaining “impartiality in view.” The first articles of the Dartmouth Gazette focused on local news, but also printed two pages of foreign and national news. The Gazette’s aim was to print news articles that were of practical use to readers, often covering information about local events, laws that would affect local residents, and imminently dangerous sicknesses. The first issue of the Dartmouth Gazette contains a poem and short story signed by
    7.50
    2 votes
    133

    The Flat Hat

    • School: College of William and Mary
    The Flat Hat is the official student newspaper at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA. It prints Tuesdays and Fridays during the College's academic year. It began printing twice-weekly in 2007; since its inception in 1911, The Flat Hat had printed weekly. The newspaper is printed as a broadsheet. Today, The Flat Hat's front page and back page are generally printed in color while the inside pages are printed in black and white. During the early 1990s, The Flat Hat was printed with a colored front page and a separate colored variety section. The newspaper currently supports four sections, news, sports, opinions and variety. The news section covers local and national news, focusing on events at the College. The sports section covers all William and Mary varsity athletics and profiles teams and individual players. The opinions section publishes regular op-eds and staff editorials, and prints student letters to the editor. The variety section features regular columns, including "Behind Closed Doors" (the sex column) and "Confusion Corner" (an opinion column), along with human interest stories. In October 2007, The Flat Hat won a Pacemaker award for excellence in the
    7.50
    2 votes
    134

    The Gargoyle

    • School: University College, University of Toronto
    The Gargoyle is the student newspaper of University College at the University of Toronto. It was named after the gargoyle statue in the college building. Students rub this for good luck before tests. The Gargoyle was established in 1954 as the first regularly appearing student newspaper at University College. Except for a hiatus between 1973 and 1977 it has published continuously since 1954. The Gargoyle is staffed by an editorial collective of undergraduate students, as well as a group of staff and regular contributors. The Gargoyle has taken many formats over the years. Formerly self-described as a "Knee Jerk, Left Wing, Reactionary Rag," it currently calls itself a "fortnightly rag" and contains University College news, political opinion, satire, music and show reviews, and original cartoons. The Gargoyle accepts contributions from all University of Toronto students, although the majority of contributors are from University College. The Gargoyle was notable for its somewhat archaic production style. As opposed to most contemporary publications (whose production is almost entirely digital), until 2008, The Gargoyle was laid out completely by hand, forsaking "desktop publishing"
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    The Setonian

    The Setonian

    • School: Seton Hall University
    The Setonian is the student newspaper for Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ. The paper is distributed weekly, with issues being distributed on Thursdays during the academic term. The Setonian is also available electronically through its website. List of college newspapers
    7.50
    2 votes
    136

    The Stanford Daily

    • School: Stanford University
    The Stanford Daily is the student-run, independent daily newspaper serving Stanford University. The Daily is distributed throughout campus and the surrounding community of Palo Alto, California, United States. It has published since the University was founded in 1892. The paper publishes weekdays during the academic year. Unlike many other campus publications, it enjoys a wide circulation of 8,000 and is distributed at 500 locations throughout the Stanford campus, including dormitory dining halls, and in the city of Palo Alto. In addition to the daily newspaper, the Daily publishes two weekly supplements: Intermission, a weekly pullout entertainment section, and Cardinal Today, a weekly sports "outsert" during football and basketball seasons. The Daily also published several special issues every year: The Orientation Issue, Big Game Issue, and The Commencement Issue. In the fall of 2008, the paper's offices relocated from the Storke Publications Building to the newly constructed Lorry I. Lokey Stanford Daily Building, near the recently renovated Old Student Union. The paper began as a small student publication called The Daily Palo Alto serving the Palo Alto area and the
    7.50
    2 votes
    137

    Turn Left

    • School: Cornell University
    The Cornell Progressive (previously called Turn Left') is an independent student-run publication at Cornell University. Calling itself "Cornell's Liberal Voice," The Cornell Progressive focuses on political and humanitarian issues that it believed were underreported by other media outlets. It also participates in campus dialogs through debates and other events in collaboration with other student organizations. In a controversial decision, Turn Left was renamed The Cornell Progressive in February 2007. Founded in 2000 by three engineering students to counter the domination of the independent campus press by the conservative Cornell Review, Turn Left became an influential source for political discussion and debate at Cornell. During the 2004 election, the Turn Left staff generally backed moderate Democrat John Kerry for the presidency over more liberal candidates such as independent Ralph Nader. The publication itself did not endorse a candidate. TL notably avoided a hard line on such hot-button issues as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Turn Left attracted much notice among Cornellians in the spring of 2005 for its scathing attack on the Cornell Daily Sun in response to what it
    7.50
    2 votes
    138

    Berkeley High Jacket

    • School: Berkeley High School
    The Jacket is the student newspaper serving the roughly three thousand students of Berkeley High School, California. The paper is published every other Friday and is usually sixteen pages long. There are five sections in the paper: news, opinion, features, entertainment, and sports. The staff of the Jacket includes more than one hundred student editors, reporters, photographers, and videographers as well as one faculty adviser. The Jacket's editorial board is composed of about twenty five students who are elected by the previous year's senior editors. The name is taken from the mascot of Berkeley High School, the Yellowjacket. From around the mid-1950s into the early 1960s, the paper was a daily, printed by students in the school's own print shop. Most issues at that time were one-sheets, that is, two-sided, 8½ x 11 inch pages. Friday issues were usually four pages long. You can find the Jacket's website at bhsjacket.com In 1994, Frontline (PBS), produced a four-hour documentary about racial politics at Berkeley High School entitled School Colors , including a segment about the Jacket. The paper's editorial board was extremely vocal throughout the broadcasting of the program and
    6.33
    3 votes
    139
    McGill Daily

    McGill Daily

    • School: McGill University
    The McGill Daily is a campus newspaper created and run by students of McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The paper was first published in 1911. The paper was originally published daily, but is now issued twice a week. It began as a broadsheet that covered mainly sports and it retained the broadsheet format for many years, but it now publishes in the tabloid format and covers a range of topics and genres in its pages. The paper's main sections are News, Culture, Commentary, Health & Education, Features, Compendium!, Science & Technology, and Sports. The paper is generally considered a farther left voice on the McGill campus, compared to the more centrist McGill Tribune, and the other faculty-produced papers such as the The Bull & Bear. The Daily generally endorses left-wing student candidates, and backs grassroots student activism and direct action. Much of its features coverage is devoted to issues of social justice, accessibility, and inequality. However, the paper's longstanding policy of publishing almost all letters means that dissenting points of view and lively debate occur within the newspaper's pages. The McGill Daily is one of Canada's oldest university
    6.33
    3 votes
    140
    6.33
    3 votes
    141

    The Chicago Maroon

    • School: University of Chicago
    The Chicago Maroon, the independent student newspaper of the University of Chicago, is a twice-weekly publication that traces its founding to 1892. During autumn, winter, and spring quarters of the academic year, the Maroon publishes every Tuesday and Friday. The paper consists of four sections: news, opinion ("Viewpoints"), arts, and sports. In the late summer, it publishes its annual orientation Issue (O-Issue) for entering first-year students, including sections on the university and the city of Chicago. Any student at the University of Chicago can contribute to the newspaper, and many go through training and complete a series of requirements to join the Maroon as a staff member. Although the requirements have changed over time, the process of joining staff has traditionally been called "hustling." The editorial board explained in 1903 that when the newspaper changed from a weekly to a daily, many more students were needed to produce the paper, so they "hustled" (meaning both "to sell or promote energetically and aggressively" and "to convey forcibly or hurriedly") new writers and editors from the student body. The executive board of the Maroon is effectively its Editor-in-Chief
    6.33
    3 votes
    142

    The Daily Collegian

    The Daily Collegian is the student-operated newspaper at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Daily Collegian (Massachusetts), TheDaily Collegian (Massachusetts), The
    6.33
    3 votes
    143

    The Daily Pennsylvanian

    • School: University of Pennsylvania
    The Daily Pennsylvanian (The DP) is the independent daily student newspaper of the University of Pennsylvania. It is published every weekday when the university is in session by a staff of more than 250 students. During the summer months, a smaller staff produces a weekly version called The Summer Pennsylvanian. The DP also publishes a weekly arts and entertainment magazine called 34th Street Magazine and a weekly newspaper mailed to parents and alumni called The Weekly Pennsylvanian. The DP operates three principal web sites — thedp.com, 34st.com, and underthebutton.com — as well as a variety of opinion, news, and sports blogs. Founded in 1885, the newspaper has been published daily since 1894, except for a hiatus from May 1943 to November 1945 on account of World War II. The DP broke away from the university in 1962 to become an independent publication, incorporating in 1984 to solidify its financial and editorial independence from the university. Today the newspaper's budget is funded primarily through the sale of advertising by a student business staff. The DP is sometimes called Penn's "unofficial journalism department," because the university has no journalism department
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Vision

    Vision

    • School: University of York
    York Vision (previously known as yorkVision and York Student Vision) is one of two student newspapers at the University of York. It is a registered society of, and funded by the University of York Students' Union. It is distinguished from its campus rival, Nouse, by its tabloid design, tone and anarchic sense of humour. Since 2002 the newspaper has held the title Guardian Student Newspaper of the Year on five occasions, making it the most awarded student newspaper in the UK. It was recently chosen as "Best Publication" at the 2011 awards. Unlike many other university newspapers, which have sabbatical editors, Vision's staff is made up entirely of current students. The newspaper currently has two editors, Oliver Todd and Helena Kaznowska. The newspaper itself contains several sections, with comment, features and lifestyle bookended by news and sport. It has recently won the Guardian award for Best Student Publication. Vision has a number of features that help mould its distinct character. These include: Vision was the first newspaper in the country to launch a Facebook application, featuring articles and scoops from York campus. Users could keep up-to-date with the latest gossip on
    6.33
    3 votes
    145

    McGill Tribune

    The McGill Tribune is an independent campus newspaper published by the Tribune Publication Society in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It has a circulation of 11,000 between McGill's downtown and Macdonald campuses. It publishes once a week on Tuesdays, and it has News, Opinion, Features, Arts & Entertainment and Sports sections. In March 2010, following a student referendum, the Tribune severed its ties with the Students' Society of McGill University, which had previously published the newspaper. The newspaper is now published by the Tribune Publication Society - a non-profit, independent students' society. The Tribune's editorial staff for 2012-2013 consists of: Gail Simmons, Top Chef judge, host Top Chef: Just Desserts and contributor to Food and Wine Magazine Christian Lander, founder of the Stuff White People Like blog Adam Sternbergh, The New York Times Magazine culture editor Byron Tau, Politico reporter Tim Mak, Politico reporter John Semley, editor of the A.V. Club Toronto, The Walrus and Torontoist contributor Elizabeth Perle, The Huffington Post Teen editor Carolyn Gregoire, The Huffington Post Teen associate editor Steven Hoffer, The Huffington Post Crime & Weird News editor
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    The Cavalier Daily

    • School: University of Virginia
    The Cavalier Daily is the fully independent student-run newspaper at the University of Virginia, founded in 1890. It is the oldest daily college newspaper in Virginia and the oldest newspaper in Charlottesville, Virginia. Cavalier Daily alumni include affiliates of prominent media organizations and winners of prestigious journalistic awards including the Pulitzer Prize. The Cavalier Daily printed its first issue under the name College Topics on January 15, 1890. In 1924, the newspaper increased its publication schedule from twice a week to six times a week, making the paper a daily. However, the following year paper's off-campus printer suffered a catastrophic fire, and the newspaper alternated between two and three publication days a week until 1940. During World War II College Topics struggled for survival as the University of Virginia student population was greatly reduced due to the war effort. By 1943, the paper had become a four-page weekly that featured only bulletins. After the war, the paper increased its circulation and content, and was renamed The Cavalier Daily on May 4, 1948. The admission of women and African-American students to the University of Virginia beginning
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    The Charlatan

    • School: Carleton University
    The Charlatan is a student newspaper at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario. It is published by a not-for-profit corporation, Charlatan Publications Inc., and is independent of student governments and university administration. Papers are free, and are available in news-stands both on and off campus. It is published weekly during the fall and winter semesters, and monthly during the summer. All Carleton students are eligible to contribute. The current editor-in-chief is Jessica Chin. Originally called the Carleton, the paper's first issue appeared on November 28, 1945, the same year that the young Carleton College's School of Journalism was formed. Only four issues appeared in the first year, but by 1948 it was a regular weekly. The paper's first office was in the Student Union Building on First Avenue, but when Carleton relocated to its new Rideau River campus, the Carleton moved to a basement-level office below Paterson Hall. When Carleton's student centre, or University Centre, was built in 1970, the Carleton moved to the fifth floor of that building, where it remains today. Citing a desire to have a more fun, pranksterish image in keeping with the political spirit of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    The Towerlight

    The Towerlight

    • School: Towson University
    The Towerlight is the twice-weekly independent student newspaper at Towson University. It is run by Towson students, and frequently updates the campus on events and news. In the summer of 2008, members of The Towerlight created Baltimore Student Media, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing support for aspiring student journalists, photographers, videographers and graphic designers. In July 2008, Towson University agreed to sign over the rights of The Towerlight to BSM. According to the first issue of The Oriole, the very first newspapers were published in 1921 with no names, in order to advertise the school and increase enrollment. There were only two issues published in 1921, and the first monthly publication was created in January 1922. Also in the first issue, then principal Lida Lee Tall, wrote that the purpose of the newspaper was: The original name (The Oriole) was a suggestion from one of the seniors at the time, Ellen Hutchinson. There were a pool of names suggested, and the students voted unanimously for the name. The Society of Professional Journalists named The Towerlight No. 1 in its region and No. 2 nationally in the category "Best All-Around Non-Daily
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Harvard Law Record

    Harvard Law Record

    • School: Harvard Law School
    The Harvard Law Record is an independent student-edited newspaper based at Harvard Law School. Founded in 1946, it is the oldest law school newspaper in the United States. The Record, an online publication, includes law school news, world and national news, and scholarly articles and op-eds written by Harvard Law School students and professors, as well as outside contributors. It should not be confused with the Harvard Law Review, which is limited to publishing scholarly academic articles exclusively. Although it is student-run, the Record is owned by the Harvard Law School Record Corporation, an independent non-profit organization funded primarily through donations. It does not receive funding or substantial support from the law school. The Record is home to fictional law student Fenno, who since the 1950s has satirically chronicled the adventures of an anonymous law student, and has lampooned prominent members of the Harvard Law School community in the process. It also publishes an annual April Fool's Day issue, renowned for its satire. The Record was founded in 1946 by a group of returning World War II veterans who were unhappy with conditions at the School, particularly a lack
    7.00
    2 votes
    150

    Harvard Salient

    • School: Harvard University
    The Harvard Salient is the conservative student newspaper at Harvard University. The Harvard Salient was founded in 1981, and is one of the oldest in a movement of conservative newspapers established in the Ivy League during the beginnings of the Reagan administration. It publishes biweekly. It has often started heated campus debates, often owing to the "Back Page" feature, which features parodies of Harvard's politically correct culture. Past editors include the Wall Street Journal's Naomi Schaefer Riley, the critic and New York Times columnist Ross Douthat, Commentary contributor Kevin Shapiro, University of Virginia law professor Caleb Nelson, Claremont McKenna College Professor Charles Kesler, and other up-and-coming conservative intellectuals. The current faculty advisers are William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Government Harvey C. Mansfield and Martin Peretz Professor of Yiddish Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature Ruth Wisse.
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    Purdue Exponent

    • School: Purdue University
    The Purdue Exponent is one of a handful of daily independent student newspapers, with most other college newspapers being owned by the university or operated by the journalism school. The college newspaper serves Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. It is published on weekdays during university semesters by the Purdue Student Publishing Foundation, and is Indiana's largest collegiate daily newspaper. The Exponent employs eight full-time professionals, relying for most operations on a staff of approximately 160 students, though the university has no journalism school. The Exponent's first edition was published on December 15, 1889. It has been a daily paper since 1906. Started Web edition (www.purdueexponent.org) in 1996. First college newspaper in the country to build its own building (1989). One of six college newspapers with its own press. The path to becoming an independent entity began in 1968, when the university removed William R. Smoot II as editor-in-chief. The moved followed critical and controversial columns in the newspaper, particularly one on October 23, 1968 that castigated university president Frederick L. Hovde. The university informed Smoot on Friday, Nov.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152

    The Cornell Review

    • School: Cornell University
    The Cornell Review is an independent, conservative newspaper published by students of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. It usually adheres to a fortnightly tabloid format, publishing six issues per semester. While the ideological makeup of its staff shifts over the years, the paper has consistently accused Cornell of adhering to left-wing politics and political correctness, delivered with a signature anti-establishment tone. The Review was incorporated in 1986 as The Ithaca Review, Inc. The editorial staff is headed by an undergraduate editor-in-chief, while the business staff is headed by an undergraduate president. Funding for the Review comes primarily from the Collegiate Network, a syndicate of conservative campus newspapers funded by the Intercollegiate Studies Institute. The unanticipated success of the Dartmouth Review at Dartmouth College inspired conservative students at other institutions to found similar newspapers. The Institute for Educational Affairs, founded in 1978 to assist conservative academics, created The Collegiate Network in 1984 to offer these groups technical and financial assistance. Jim Keller, a government major, founded The Cornell Review during
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    The Daily Cougar

    • School: University of Houston
    The Daily Cougar is a daily newspaper run entirely by students at the University of Houston. In publication since April 6, 1928, The Daily Cougar was originally named The Cougar. The Daily Cougar operates as a student-managed, school-funded forum for the university community. The Daily Cougar publishes Monday through Friday during the school year, and Wednesdays during the summer, though it has run Tuesdays and Thursdays, and Mondays and Wednesdays in previous summers. The Cougar also maintains a website in which content is distributed electronically online on a daily basis. The newspaper was founded in 1928 by University of Houston students as The Cougar. By the 1950s, circulation had increased to 6,800. In 1965, the paper began a press run of four days a week with a release schedule of Tuesday through Friday. On March 27, 1978, the newspaper added Mondays to its release schedule, and was renamed to The Daily Cougar. As of 2003, The Daily Cougar was Houston's second largest English-language daily newspaper, with a circulation of nearly 12,000 and a readership approaching 40,000.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154

    Student

    • School: University of Edinburgh
    The Student is a weekly British independent newspaper produced by students at the University of Edinburgh. It held the title of Best Student Newspaper in Scotland, awarded by the Herald Student Press Awards in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010. The newspaper has been independent of the university since 1992, but maintains a commercial agreement with the Edinburgh University Students' Association. All staff are volunteers, who fit work for the newspaper around their studies. The newspaper is distributed on a Tuesday and usually consists of 28 pages. It has a physical circulation of 4,000 copies per issue and is read by some 30,000 people in Edinburgh. The Student started as a small weekly magazine, published by the Students' Representative Council. A typical, turn-of-the-century edition of The Student would open with a short biography of a notable person and an editorial. The remaining content largely comprised notes from various societies, sports results, poetry and literary reviews, and profiles of newly appointed lecturers. The magazine was supported by advertising, but cost two pence. By the 1970s, The Student had become a weekly newspaper, roughly Berliner in format. The running of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    155

    The Daily Texan

    • School: University of Texas at Austin
    The Daily Texan is the student newspaper of the University of Texas at Austin. It is entirely student-run and independent from the university. It is one of the largest college newspapers in the United States, with a daily circulation of roughly 30,000 during the fall and spring semesters, and bills itself as the oldest student newspaper in the South. The Texan has won more national, regional and state awards than any other college newspaper in America and counts 10 Pulitzer Prize winners among its former staff. A number of comic strips that began in the Texan went on to have commercial success. The most notable of these is Berke Breathed's Academia Waltz, the predecessor to Bloom County. Hepcats by Martin Wagner and Eyebeam by Sam Hurt also found continued success after their creators had left the University of Texas. The Texan's origins date back to 1900, when two privately owned weekly newspapers were distributed on campus — the Calendar and the Ranger. In 1904 the two papers were taken over by the student council and merged. In 1913, the student body voted to publish the paper each weekday, and The Daily Texan was born on September 24, 1913. In 2008, The Daily Texan was one of
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    The Independent Florida Alligator

    The Independent Florida Alligator

    • School: University of Florida
    The Independent Florida Alligator is the daily student newspaper of the University of Florida. The Alligator is the largest student-run newspaper in the United States, with a daily circulation of 35,000 and readership of over 52,000. It is an affiliate of UWIRE, which distributes and promotes its content to their network. The paper prints every weekday during the spring and fall semesters (mid-August to early May) and on Tuesdays and Thursdays during the summer semesters. The Alligator has been financially and editorially independent from the university since 1973. The Alligator has been owned by non-profit, student-controlled 501(c)(3) Campus Communications Inc. since its independence. Students from both UF and Santa Fe College, also located in the city of Gainesville, Florida, are allowed to work at the paper. Only college students are allowed to work in the editorial department or be advertising representatives or interns. The Alligator is distributed free on campus and around the city of Gainesville, Florida, and contains a mix of campus and local news coverage, as well as national and international stories from wire services. It also contains a sports section that begins from
    6.00
    3 votes
    157

    The Martlet

    • School: University of Victoria
    The Martlet is a weekly student newspaper at the University of Victoria (UVic) in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. There are over a dozen employees on the payroll, but significant work is done by student volunteers (writing, taking photos, copy editing). The Martlet is funded partially by student fees, and partially by advertisements. As of 2007, each student pays $3.75 per semester to the Martlet. The newspaper is distributed freely around the UVic campus and various locations around greater Victoria each Thursday during the school year, and on a monthly basis in the summer. The paper also maintains a website . The Martlet is a member of the Canadian University Press. The Martlet was founded when UVic was Victoria College, and the original name was the Microscope. The paper takes its name from a heraldic bird with no feet. Three martlet birds appear on the crest of McGill University, and the University of Victoria grew out of the McGill University College of British Columbia. For a brief period in the early 1970s, the Martlet was renamed the 'Cougar City Gazette', a reflection of the defiance of the paper towards the administration. In 1971, the Martlet was partly responsible
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    The Sheaf

    The Sheaf

    • School: University of Saskatchewan
    The Sheaf is a student run newspaper serving the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan since 1912. A new issue comes out every Thursday with approximately 9,000 copies per issue. The Sheaf is a student-run non-profit organization. It receives part of its operating budget from U of S students in the form of a direct-levy; the remainder of the revenue is generated through advertising. The financial affairs are governed by a eight member Board of Directors, seven of whom are students. The mission of The Sheaf is to inform and entertain students by addressing those issues that are relevant to life on campus, in the city, or in the province. The newspaper is also meant to be a forum for discussion on a wide range of issues that concern students. The paper is written for students by students. Most of the staff (editors, photographers, artists) are student-journalists. With this composition, The Sheaf tries to stay in touch with students on this campus. It offers unique insight to university issues through a student perspective. The Sheaf is divided into four main sections: news, opinions, arts and culture, and sports — especially focusing on the University of Saskatchewan
    6.00
    3 votes
    159

    Redbrick

    • School: University of Birmingham
    Redbrick is the student newspaper of the University of Birmingham. Originally titled Guild News, the newspaper was renamed Redbrick in 1962. As with most student newspapers Redbrick is not fully independent due to funding arrangements, but is editorially independent as is set out in its charter. Redbrick is written, photographed, edited and published entirely by University students, and is run not for profit, funded by both advertising revenue and the Guild of Students. It consists of News, Comment&Features, Arts, Music, Life&Style, Television, Film, Food, Travel, Technology and Sport sections. A sport supplement titled The Lion is published biannually. The newspaper is produced weekly during term time, with the exception of the summer semester as publication halts during exam season. The newspaper celebrated its 75th birthday in February 2011. The paper is distributed free around campus and the local area every Friday. Redbrick's website - has grown significantly following a redesign in early 2011. Since then it has won the Guardian Student Media Award for 'Website of the Year' 2011 and it receives over 5,000 unique visitors every week, meaning it has now overtaken the print
    5.00
    4 votes
    160

    The Communicator

    • School: Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
    The Communicator, a 5,000 weekly circulation, is the student newspaper of IPFW (Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne). IPFW has over 14,000 full and part-time students and has grown considerably over the past ten years. The Communicator itself has changed by leaps and bounds in the past several years. In Spring 2005, editor Andrew Welfle instituted a major redesign involving the use of the font Frutiger for major headlines and borderless, clean designs, favoring a thin rule line instead of boxes. The paper, as previously mentioned, has undergone many changes since the turn of the millennium with many different editors. The paper has changed in size and become much smaller and compact. The sections have mostly stayed the same, with Student Life being added and subtracted many times over the years. Major changes include the implementation of "Arts & Entertainment" as a replacement to "Features" during the summer of 2003 and the addition of the "News & Politics" section (formerly known as "Politics & Money"). The paper, in coordination with CollegeHoopsNet, broke a national story in 2005 when the school hired Dane Fife as its head basketball coach, making him the youngest
    5.67
    3 votes
    161

    The Cornell Daily Sun

    • School: Cornell University
    The Cornell Daily Sun is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York by students at Cornell University. It is the oldest independent college daily in the United States. The Sun features original coverage of the university and its environs as well as stories from the Associated Press and UWIRE. It prints on weekdays when the university is open for academic instruction as a tabloid-sized daily. In addition to these regular issues, The Sun publishes a graduation issue and a freshman issue, which is mailed to incoming Cornell freshmen before their first semester. The paper is free on campus and online. The Sun is staffed entirely by Cornell students, aside from a few full-time production and business positions, and is fully independent of the university. It operates out of its own building in downtown Ithaca. The Sun is the 13th best college newspaper in the United States, according to The Princeton Review. The Cornell Sun was founded in 1880 by William Ballard Hoyt to challenge Cornell's original and leading publication, the weekly Cornell Era (founded 1868). The Era shortly became a literary journal, and was eventually consigned to oblivion. The Sun boasted in its
    5.67
    3 votes
    162

    The Daily Orange

    • School: Syracuse University
    The Daily Orange is an independent student newspaper published in Syracuse, New York. It is free, and published daily during the Syracuse University academic year. It was one of the first college papers to become fully independent from its parent college. Its alumni work at nearly every major newspaper in the nation -- The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Dallas Morning News, The Boston Globe -- in a variety of reporting, editing, design and photographic capacities. Publisher reported circulation for 2005 was 9,000 copies, with an online circulation of 20,000. The paper is published Monday through Thursday, with occasional sports extras on Fridays. Lengthy legal battles gained The Daily Orange its independence from Syracuse University in 1971. In the early 1980s, The Daily Orange was a plaintiff in a lawsuit against the CIA. The Daily Orange is also unique in featuring its own student art, comics and editorial cartoons. The Daily Orange has produced many famous cartoonists, such as Vaughn Bode, Robb Armstrong (creator of Jump Start), Brad Anderson (creator of Marmaduke) and Nicholas Gurewitch (creator
    5.67
    3 votes
    163

    Blue & Gold

    • School: Taipei American School
    The Blue & Gold is the school newspaper of the Taipei American School. Produced monthly, the newspaper is usually eight A3 full-color pages. The paper also publishes newsletters during IASAS events held at the school, an April Fool's Issue modeled after a respectable publication (TIME, People, etc.), and an issue commemorating the graduation of each class. Previously known as Paws, the Blue & Gold newspaper has won several awards from the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA). In 2005, select representatives from the Blue & Gold staff and editorial team attended a conference in Seattle, Washington representing the school, the only delegation from outside the Americas. In the last few years, the Blue & Gold has won numerous awards including Two Best Design Awards (2004 & 2005), Cartooning Award (2005), All-American Award (2003), Pacemaker Finalist (2004), all awarded by the NSPA. Currently, the Blue & Gold is a Pacemaker Finalist.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Leeds Student

    Leeds Student

    • School: University of Leeds
    Leeds Student is a British weekly student newspaper, published free every Friday during term-time and distributed around the University of Leeds, Leeds, England. The only paid position is that of the editor, who is elected yearly by members of Leeds University Union. The articles are written by students, and are largely about local and student based issues. It is one of the country's most active university newspapers and regularly wins national student media awards. Leeds Student was formed in 1970 by the merger of the Leeds University Union newspaper (Union News) and the then Leeds Polytechnic Students Union newspaper ("Pact"), but in November 2005 Leeds Metropolitan University students voted to disaffiliate from Leeds Student, citing under-representation. Once known as an LUU 'Incorporated Body' along with RAG, Action, Nightline and LSRfm.com it now falls in the 'media' section of the student activities department along with LSRfm.com, LS:TV, Photography Society, Lippy Magazine, Leeds Review and Film Making Society. The editorship became a full-time, paid sabbatical position in 1972 after a campaign led by the then editor, Paul Vallely CMG, who went on to become the first
    6.50
    2 votes
    165

    The Newspaper

    • School: University of Toronto
    The Newspaper, published by non-profit corporation Planet Publications Inc., is the largest independent student-run campus newspaper in Canada with circulation on the University of Toronto campus. It began publishing in 1978 and was briefly operated as The Independent Weekly. The Newspaper has been financially self-supporting for its entire history and has survived despite competing against many student-fee-supported campus newspapers. The Newspaper is officially recognized by the University of Toronto under the campus media policy of its Governing Council, a unique policy protecting the rights of independent publishers on the University of Toronto campus. Film director Atom Egoyan, novelists Rohinton Mistry and Ray Robertson, and television public affairs host Steve Paikin all worked for The Newspaper as students while attending the University of Toronto. In The Newspaper's first year of publication, prominent professors at the University of Toronto contributed articles, including Allan Bloom, Denis Duffy, and Robertson Davies. The founding editors of the newspaper were Steven Petranik, Thomas Simpson and Ken Whitehurst. The Newspaper's offices are Located at 1 Spadina Crescent in
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    The Virginia Informer

    The Virginia Informer

    • School: College of William and Mary
    The Virginia Informer is a weekly student-run publication at The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. The newspaper contains five sections: News, Features, Sports, Arts & Culture, and Opinion. The organization also maintains The Virginia Informer Online, a website that is updated daily, as well as The Virginia Informer Newswire. It is the largest member of the non-profit group Collegiate Network and a member of the Associated Collegiate Press. Unlike the two other primary campus publications, The DoG Street Journal and The Flat Hat, The Informer receives no funding from the college administration or student activity fee for any of its operations but rather from grants, subscriptions, advertising and other donations. The Informer is non-partisan but is known to publish conservative and libertarian editorials. In March 2010, The Virginia Informer celebrated its 5th Anniversary in Miller Hall at the Mason School of Business with guests including Congressman Rob Wittman, William and Mary President W. Taylor Reveley III, Miss Virginia USA 2010 Samantha Casey, Members of Williamsburg City Council, senior business executives, College alumni and faculty, and student
    6.50
    2 votes
    167

    Centre Daily Times

    The Centre Daily Times is a daily newspaper located in State College, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is the hometown newspaper for the Pennsylvania State University, one of the most well-known and largest universities in the country with more than 40,000 students attending the main campus. The Weekly Times was founded in 1898 and was later renamed The State College Times. In 1934, the paper became a daily, the Centre Daily Times. It was purchased by Knight Ridder in 1979. A Saturday morning edition was added in 1980, and a Sunday edition was launched in 1982. The Centre Daily Times became a morning paper in 1986. The McClatchy Company purchased Knight Ridder in June 2006, thereby acquiring the Centre Daily Times. Home delivery is available to all of Centre County and parts of Blair, Clearfield, Clinton, Huntingdon and Mifflin counties. In addition, single copy sales reach several more counties, especially during college football season.
    7.00
    1 votes
    168
    Livic

    Livic

    • School: Imperial College London
    livic ("civil" spelt backwards, hence a "reflection of Civil Engineering") is the newspaper of the Civil Engineering Society (CivSoc) at Imperial College London. It is a monthly, free, A4-sized paper established in 2004, edited by an elected committee member of the society. The newspaper has a typical circulation of 250. In 2006, livic launched 'livique', a one-off special printed for the International Trip to Paris. Similar spin-offs have included 'livek', prepared for the trip to Budapest in 2007 and 'livøc' for the 2008 trip to Copenhagen. While not a notable student publication, livic aims to highlight current Civil & Environmental Engineering concerns and complications to undergraduates who are likely to be contributing to the shaping of the built environment in the long-term, and is therefore an invaluable resource to them. Articles from Livic are now published online through the City and Guilds College Union's media website 'Live' in order to help expand its readership numbers and so it is accessible to all at any time. It can be found here: Livic at Live
    7.00
    1 votes
    169

    Minnesota Daily

    • School: University of Minnesota
    The Minnesota Daily is the campus newspaper of the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, published Monday-Thursday while school is in session, and published weekly on Wednesdays during summer sessions. Published since 1900, the paper is one of the largest student-run and student-written newspapers in the United States and the fifth-largest paper in the state of Minnesota. "The Daily" was named best daily college newspaper in the United States in 2009 and 2010 by the Society of Professional Journalists. The paper is independent from the University, but receives $550,000 worth of student service fees funding. The Daily has a distribution of 20,000 copies per day (Monday through Thursday during the school year) - available at over 200 locations on and near campus free of charge, as it is largely funded by advertising. A typical edition has about a dozen pages, with a special sports section every Monday and arts & entertainment section every Thursday. The Daily also provides readers with several special issues, including voters guides, employment guides, housing guides, survival guides (published the first day of school) and even parody issues - distributed during finals weeks. The
    7.00
    1 votes
    170

    San Francisco Foghorn

    • School: University of San Francisco
    The San Francisco Foghorn is the official student newspaper of the University of San Francisco. Originally founded in 1903 as The Saint Ignatius, the newspaper changed its name to the San Francisco Foghorn in August 1928, making it one of the oldest collegiate newspapers on the West Coast. Known colloquially as the Foghorn, the newspaper has continuously run weekly issues every semester. It has a readership of 5,000 and is distributed free on campus. As of 2004 it was ranked 14th in collegiate newspapers in the nation by The Princeton Review. The Foghorn Online Edition was started in 1995. Among the notable USF alumni who wrote for the Foghorn were Pierre Salinger, former press secretary for President John F. Kennedy; Warren Hinckle, publisher of Ramparts Magazine; cartoonist Dan O'Neill; and Kevin Starr, author, professor, and California state librarian emeritus.
    7.00
    1 votes
    171

    The Daily of the University of Washington

    • School: University of Washington
    The Daily of the University of Washington, usually referred to in Seattle simply as The Daily, is the student newspaper of the University of Washington in Seattle, USA. The Daily was founded in September 1891 as The Pacific Wave and ran under that title until June 5, 1908, having absorbed the short-lived The College Idea which ran during the 1895-1896 school year. The newspaper became a daily with its September 15, 1908 issue and changed its name to The Pacific Daily Wave. This name lasted until May 21, 1909, and the paper became The University of Washington Daily when the 1909-1910 school year began. The Daily ceased publishing a Monday issue in 1933 during the Great Depression. In 1976, it became The Daily of the University of Washington, and in 1985 it resumed publishing on Mondays. "The Daily Double Shot", a half-hour television show, premiered on UWTV, Channel 27 on February 5, 2010. "The Daily" also became a partner with Next Door Media by launching udistrictdaily.com, a blog site that reports on the U-District in Seattle, Washington. The Daily is one of the most awarded college newspapers in the nation. At the 2010 National College Media Conference The Daily earned the
    7.00
    1 votes
    172

    The Johns Hopkins News-Letter

    • School: Johns Hopkins University
    The Johns Hopkins News-Letter is the independent student newspaper of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. Published since 1896, it is one of the nation's oldest continuously published, weekly student-run college newspapers. The News-Letter is published every Thursday in a full-color front and back page broadsheet format, and has two sections: an A section and a B section. Its total circulation is approximately 5,200, including the local campuses of Johns Hopkins, area colleges and the greater Baltimore region. Several times a year, The News-Letter distributes a magazine edition with 20- to 30-page tabloid-sized inserts, such as Best of Baltimore, Cover-Letter (introducing new students to the University), Housing Guide, Lacrosse Guide, and the Dining Guide. The editorial and business boards consist entirely of undergraduates. Members of the editorial staff are democratically elected to one-year terms, while members of the business board are hired by the editors-in-chief. The News-Letter won an Associated Collegiate Press Newspaper Pacemaker award for four-year, non-daily college newspapers in 2007, and has won and been nominated for the Pacemaker in previous
    7.00
    1 votes
    173

    The Recorder

    The Recorder is a student-produced publication of Central Connecticut State University and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of CCSU's administrators, faculty, or students. The purpose of the Recorder is to approach and define issues of importance to the students of Central Connecticut State University. Recorder, TheRecorder, The
    7.00
    1 votes
    174

    The Student Voice

    • School: Pensacola Christian College
    The Student Voice was an unofficial newspaper of Pensacola Christian College (PCC) that ran from 1996 to 2003. It is said to have made significant challenges against the rules of PCC. A PCC alumnus, along with several students, anonymously started and ran this newspaper. The editors saw the rules as a form of legalism and asserted that the rules prevented the college from attaining its objectives. The president of PCC, Dr. Arlin Horton, responded to the newspaper's first issue with a speech in the campus chapel, calling the newspaper an attack from Satan, reminding students that they agreed to follow the rules when they came, that they were not forced to attend the school, and that anyone involved with the newspaper was subject to expulsion. PCC still lists "Participation in unauthorized petition, newsletter, demonstration, protest, or riot" as an offense resulting in expulsion. This rule extends to alumni; alumni who are participating in such protests are removed from the alumni records. Because of this, the editors of The Student Voice edited their earlier issues under pseudonym, such as Mr. X and Leibniz, though they did eventually reveal their identities. The Student
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Woroni

    Woroni

    • School: Australian National University
    Woroni is the student newspaper of the Australian National University, based in Canberra, ACT, Australia. The name ‘Woroni’ derives from an Indigenous Australian word meaning ‘mouthpiece’. Woroni is published fortnightly in full colour tabloid format, and features broad coverage of university & local news, opinion, features, arts & culture, sports, and leisure. Woroni was first published in 1948. Traditionally, the editorial tone has been lighthearted and satirical. However, in recent years Woroni has increased its coverage of serious issues such as VSU, "Wadgate", and changes to the ANU School of Humanities. From 1948 to 2010 Woroni was published by ANUSA; its editors were officers of the Association, and responsible to the ANUSA Board of Trustees. In 2010/2011, Woroni became ANU Student Media Inc, a financially and editorially independent student-run publishing house - the first of its kind in Australia. As of 2011, the Woroni Editorial Board is composed of 8 Editors, elected in alternating groups of 4, to terms of 12 months. Elections employ OPV, and are conducted online at the ANU website. Any ANU Student who has submitted 3 substantive articles to Woroni is eligible to run for
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Rice Thresher

    • School: Rice University
    The Rice Thresher is the weekly, student-run newspaper of Rice University in Houston, Texas, United States. It was founded in 1916, the year of Rice University's first matriculation . It has an estimated circulation of 6,000, given on-campus distribution, subscriptions and off-campus distribution at area businesses, including Kahn's Deli in the Rice Village and House of Pies. The Thresher has won several awards from the Associated College Press, including 2007 Best in Show for a tabloid weekly, 2005 First Place for a tabloid weekly, and 2003 ACP Newspaper Pacemaker Finalist. In 1992, the Thresher broke a cheating scandal, revealing athlete corruption while the university refused to confirm or deny the events. The Thresher's coverage garnered national recognition. The Thresher is separated into six sections: News, Sports, Arts and Entertainment, Calendar, Opinion and Backpage. The Backpage is satire and not published on the Website. Thresher News focuses almost entirely on campus events. In 2010 Seth Brown, Cindy Dinh, and Josh Rutenberg received 2010 Region 8 Marks of Excellence for In-Depth Reporting for coverage of the proposed Rice-Baylor College of Medicine merger. Thresher
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    Trinity News

    Trinity News

    • School: Trinity College, Dublin
    Trinity News is the student newspaper of Trinity College, and the oldest student newspaper in Ireland. It is an independent newspaper which reports on the news and views of the students and staff of Dublin University. The newspaper was first published in 1953; it is using this date as the first volume that the volume numbers are currently derived. Over the years, Trinity News has appeared in many formats including broadsheet and tabloid; as of 2008 it is a broadsheet which publishes on a fortnightly basis during term time. The newspaper is produced exclusively by students of the University under the direction of a student Editor; due to the increased number of issues and workload, it has become common practice for the editor to take a sabbatical from studies for the year. In addition to advertising revenue, Trinity News is funded in part by a grant from the Dublin University Publications Committee, but the newspaper claims full editorial independence. It is printed by NWN Media. The print run is 6,000 copies for each issue, which are distributed around Trinity College, various other city centre locations, Froebel College, Blackrock and Marino College. A small number of copies are
    5.33
    3 votes
    178
    The Collegian

    The Collegian

    The Collegian is the student newspaper of the University of Richmond. Founded in 1914, the publication is staffed by members of the Richmond journalism undergraduate program, and is available in print format as well as online. There is also a digital archive of the newspaper's content from 1914 to 2003 published online by the university, using the Greenstone open source content system. The Collegian offered a sample of historical student perspective on numerous student issues at this private southern university, including racial integration and coeducation. In later years, the newspaper also provided primary coverage of one of the 1992 presidential debates held in Richmond, as well as the disintegration of the Greek system at the university in the face of the emerging political correctness movement in academia.
    4.50
    4 votes
    179

    Kentucky Kernel

    • School: University of Kentucky
    The Kentucky Kernel is an independent daily student newspaper of the University of Kentucky. Preceded by several student newspapers ¬タヤ the earliest dating to 1892 ¬タヤ the first Kentucky Kernel was published Sept. 16, 1915. From 1908 to 1915, the University of Kentucky's student newspaper was called The Idea, but it became the Kentucky Kernel following a naming contest in 1915. The paper had become an eight-page weekly by 1923, and it became a Monday-Friday daily newspaper in 1966. In 1972, the Kernel formally established its editorial independence from the University of Kentucky administration. It publishes 17,000 copies on roughly 150 days in the calendar year and it technically is one of the largest-circulation newspapers in Kentucky. Several major American news media figures worked at the Kernel, including current Associated Press chief White House correspondent Terence Hunt, former National Geographic photographer Sam Abell, current Chicago Tribune Washington correspondent William Neikirk and current New York Times South African correspondent Michael Wines. Award-winning writer Bobbie Ann Mason also worked at the Kernel. Various issues were used as historical backdrops in
    6.00
    2 votes
    180

    North Texas Daily

    • School: University of North Texas College of Music
    The North Texas Daily, also known as the NT Daily, is the student newspaper of the University of North Texas in Denton, Texas, published Tuesday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters and weekly during the summer. The Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday papers are broadsheets. Starting in 2005, the Daily began publishing Scene, an arts and entertainment-focused tabloid, on Fridays during the fall and spring semesters. The decision to publish the Scene was in part financial after the newspaper underwent an audit. During the summer, the paper publishes once a week, on Thursdays. In 2009, the student journalists began publishing a magazine called "On the Record" during the summer. Three issues were published that year. The multimedia Web site for the newspaper is http://www.ntdaily.com. It includes audio, video and interactive projects. Readers also may post comments on stories, sometimes generating strong political debates on national and campus issues. The Web site receives approximately 7,000 hits per day. The newspaper's daily circulation is approximately 10,000. Paper copies are delivered Tuesday through Friday to campus buildings, dorms and businesses in Denton. The
    6.00
    2 votes
    181

    The Campus

    • School: Bishop's University
    The Campus is a student-run newspaper that covers Bishop's University (an English language, liberal arts university located in Lennoxville, Quebec, Canada), events in the Eastern Townships region as they pertain to students, and other items of interest to Canadian university students. This newspaper, established in 1944, is run entirely by the student body of the university and its staff of approximately 8 or 9 members is selected each year by the outgoing incumbents. It publishes on a bi-monthly schedule during the academic school year and also prints one summer issue with the intent of sending it to incoming students. It is an independent, not-for-profit newspaper financed by a student levy and advertising revenue. The Campus hosted the Spring 2005 regional Canadian University Press conference. Since 2003, The Campus has maintained a parallel online edition located on their website. Complete archives of The Campus are available in the Bishop's University Old Library, and issues from 2007 onward are archived electronically on the Campus' website The Mitre acted as an outlet for student opinion and record of student life before The Campus. The Mitre first appeared in June 1893 and
    6.00
    2 votes
    182

    The Daily Californian

    • School: University of California, Berkeley
    The Daily Californian (or Daily Cal) is an independent, student-run newspaper that serves the University of California, Berkeley campus and its surrounding community. It is published Monday through Friday (but not Wednesday, owing to dwindling ad revenues) during the academic year, and twice a week during the summer. Established in 1871, The Daily Californian is one of the oldest newspapers on the West Coast, and one of the oldest college newspapers in the United States. Current circulation is about 10,000 for a campus of roughly 30,000. The Daily Californian became independent from UC Berkeley in 1971 after the campus administration fired three senior editors over an editorial that encouraged readers to "take back" People's Park. Both sides came to an agreement, and The Daily Californian gained financial and editorial independence from the university and is now published by an independent corporation called the Independent Berkeley Students Publishing Company, Inc. The paper licenses its name from the Regents of the University of California. UC Davis, originally established as the University Farm, the agricultural extension of UC Berkeley, also published its own newspaper, The
    6.00
    2 votes
    183

    The Daily Cardinal

    • School: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    The Daily Cardinal is a student newspaper that serves the University of Wisconsin–Madison community. The sixth oldest daily student newspaper in the country, it began publishing on Monday, April 4, 1892. The newspaper is financially and editorially independent of the university. The Cardinal's motto, printed at the bottom of every front page and taken from an 1894 declaration by the university's board of regents, is "...the great state University of Wisconsin should ever encourage that continual and fearless sifting and winnowing by which alone the truth can be found." The Daily Cardinal is published Monday through Friday during the academic year in both a tabloid print format and in electronic form on the Web. The daily press run of 10,000 is distributed throughout the campus community. Nearly 200 undergraduate and graduate student volunteers and employees work at the paper. Its daily sections include News, Opinion, Arts and Sports, and its weekly sections are Features, Food and Science. In 2001, 2002, 2005 and 2006, the Cardinal was the recipient of the Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence award for best daily college newspaper of the year in Region 6
    6.00
    2 votes
    184

    The Daily Targum

    • School: Rutgers University
    The Daily Targum is the official student newspaper of Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey. Founded in 1869, it is the second-oldest collegiate newspaper in the United States. The Daily Targum is student written and managed, and boasts a circulation of 18,000. In its current form, it exists as a bi-fold tabloid-style paper featuring international, national, local, and university news, as well as editorials, columns, comics, classifieds, sports, and other amusements. In 1980, the paper achieved independence from the University, establishing a non-profit organization, the Targum Publishing Company, which now oversees all areas of the paper. The Daily Targum is published Monday through Friday while classes are in session, in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Its website is www.dailytargum.com, and can be found on Facebook (/thedailytargum), Twitter (/daily_targum), and Tumblr (targum-finds.tumblr.com). In 2006, publishing of The Newark Targum began, serving the Rutgers-Newark campus. CNBC personality Rebecca Quick served as the newspaper's editor-in-chief for a period, before joining The Wall Street Journal. AVN personality David Aaron Clark served as the newspaper's
    6.00
    2 votes
    185

    The Gamecock newspaper

    • School: University of South Carolina
    The Daily Gamecock (formerly The Gamecock) is the daily student newspaper of the University of South Carolina. It primarily serves the main campus of the university in Columbia and regional campuses of the University of South Carolina System in the state of South Carolina. The Daily Gamecock circulates 14,000 papers each weekday and claims a daily readership of 30,000. It was recently ranked as The Princeton Review's 17th best college newspaper. According to the South Carolina Press Association, The Daily Gamecock is South Carolina's 14th largest newspaper. The newspaper is editorially independent from the university. The newspaper is printed at the press of The State in Columbia The first issue of The Gamecock was published on January 30, 1908. Robert Gonzales, a student, was largely responsible for the paper's establishment. In its first semester only three issues were produced, but in the following term the paper began weekly production. The paper eventually moved to publication on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and in the fall semester of 2006 began publishing Monday through Friday in print and online. Renamed the Daily Gamecock, it became the first student paper in South
    6.00
    2 votes
    186

    The Harvard Crimson

    • School: Harvard University
    The Harvard Crimson, the daily student newspaper of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. It is the only daily newspaper in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is run entirely by Harvard College undergraduates. Many Crimson alumni have gone on to careers in journalism, and some have won Pulitzer Prizes. Any student who volunteers and completes a series of requirements known as the "comp" is elected an editor of the newspaper. Thus, all staff members of The Crimson—including writers, business staff, photographers, and graphic designers—are technically "editors". (If an editor makes news, he or she is referred to in the news article as a "Crimson editor", which, though important for transparency, also leads to odd attributions such as "former President John F. Kennedy '40, who was also a Crimson editor, ended the Cuban Missile Crisis.") Editorial and financial decisions rest in a board of executives, collectively called a "guard", who are chosen for one-year terms each November by the outgoing guard. This process is referred to as the "turkey shoot" or the "shoot". The unsigned opinions of "The Crimson Staff" are decided at tri-weekly meetings that are open to any Crimson editor (except
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    The Purchase Independent

    The Purchase Independent

    The Purchase Independent was established in 2001. Commonly referred to as "The Indy," it is a student newspaper at SUNY Purchase (The State University of New York at Purchase College), USA. It is funded by the Purchase Student Government Association through mandatory student activity fees. The paper is published weekly during the academic year and is distributed on Thursdays. The Indy was founded in 2001 by Purchase student Glen Parker. Parker wanted to open an on-campus thrift store, but could not fund it through the Purchase Student Government Association (PSGA) due to rules about operating a business within the business of the PSGA. He could, however, use the profits from the thrift store to fund a student-run publication. At the time, The Purchase College Dispatch, operated by the Journalism department and open only to Journalism majors, was the only news source on campus. Parker's joint venture combined the thrift store, The Independent Purchase, with the new newspaper, The Purchase Independent, forming I.P.P.I. In 2003-2004 the thrift store folded and the newspaper became separate, funded by the PSGA. 2012-2013 Executives
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    The Stillman Exchange

    The Stillman Exchange

    • School: Seton Hall University
    The Stillman Exchange is a student newspaper of Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey, United States. The paper, founded in 2006, focuses on business issues and is distributed bi-weekly, with issues being distributed on Tuesdays during the academic term. In 2008, the paper launched an online version of its biweekly print edition, which offers all the articles found in the print addition along with several continuations. (stillmanexchange.com) The Stillman Exchange is a 16 page, full color periodical published on a bi-weekly basis from the Center for Securities Trading and Analysis in the W. Paul Stillman School of Business at Seton Hall University. The mission of The Stillman Exchange is to educate Seton Hall students and its extended community on the impacts and interactions of current financial, domestic and international news events guided by the highest standards of integrity and professionalism. (Adopted Fall 2009) The Stillman Exchange was founded with students from the W. Paul Stillman School of Business felt a need that students at Seton Hall were not getting enough business news exposure. The paper printed its first edition on March 29, 2006 and has been
    6.00
    2 votes
    189

    The Brunswickan

    • School: University of New Brunswick
    The Brunswickan is the official student newspaper of the Fredericton campus of the University of New Brunswick, New Brunswick, Canada. It has a circulation of 6,000 and issues are published each Wednesday of the school year, traditionally running from 25-27 issues annually. A founding member of the Canadian University Press, The Brunswickan remains one of the largest community newspapers in Atlantic Canada, and among the largest in Canada, well out-of-proportion to the size of its home campus. In January 2009, the paper switched from broadsheet to tabloid format in response to financial pressures, and in an effort to reduce its impact on the environment. The Brunswickan subsequently dropped its circulation from 10,000 to 6,000 issues per week later that month. The tagline for the paper, "Canada's Oldest Official Student Publication", combines two facts: the paper is the official student publication for the Fredericton campus of the University of New Brunswick and the first issue was published in 1867, prior to any other official student publication at a Canadian university. Regional rival, The Dalhousie Gazette at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, claims the title of
    5.00
    3 votes
    190

    The Ubyssey

    • School: University of British Columbia
    The Ubyssey is the University of British Columbia's official, independent student-run paper and is published every Monday and Thursday. Founded in 1918, The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian University Press (CUP), and is the largest student-run paper in Western Canada, and the second largest in Canada. Notable writers throughout its history include Pierre Berton, John Turner, Allan Fotheringham, Michael Valpy, Joe Schlesinger, Danny Stoffman, Stephen Scobie, Vaughn Palmer, Bruce Arthur, and Earle Birney. Other notable alumni include cartoonist Arn Saba, journalist and author Katherine Monk, and photographers Jeff Wall and Richard Lam. The Ubyssey is an independent publication and funded by a $6 annual fee which students can opt-out from. The staff functions as a collective; current UBC students who have contributed to the paper and attend staff meetings are eligible to become staff members. The staff elects the full-time editors on an annual basis. The Ubyssey Publications Society board and president, who deal chiefly with financial matters and do not play any editorial role, are elected by the general student body annually. Regular issues of the print edition appear twice a week
    5.00
    3 votes
    191
    Cherwell

    Cherwell

    • School: University of Oxford
    Cherwell (/ˈtʃɑrwɛl/ CHAR-well) is an independent newspaper, largely published for students of Oxford University. First published in 1920, it has had an online edition since 1996. Named after the local river, Cherwell is published by OSPL (Oxford Student Publications Ltd.), who also publish the sister publication ISIS along with the Etcetera Supplement and Bang! Science magazine. One of the oldest student publications in the UK, it is editorially independent and has been the launching pad for many well known journalistic and business careers. The newspaper has a commercial business team, receives no university funding and is independent of the student union. The current editors are Grace Goddard and Barbara Speed. Cherwell was conceived by two Balliol College students, Cecil Binney and George Edinger, on a ferry from Dover to Ostend during the summer vacation of 1920 while the students were travelling to Vienna to do relief work for the Save the Children charity. Edinger recalls the early newspaper having a radical voice: "We were feeling for a new Oxford… We were anti-convention, anti-Pre War values, Pro-Feminist. We did not mind shocking and we often did." Nonetheless, early
    5.50
    2 votes
    192

    Eastern Echo

    The Eastern Echo is the independent student newspaper of Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan. The paper is funded through advertising revenue. The paper is published Monday and Thursday during the fall and winter semesters. It is published weekly during the spring semester. Although EMU funds a Student Media Director, that official has no editorial influence over the content of the Eastern Echo. The Eastern Echo celebrated its 125th anniversary in fall 2005. The newspaper started as the Normal News in 1881 when the school was known as Normal College. It later became the Normal College News and, then, the Eastern Echo in 1956, when the university was renamed to Eastern Michigan College. The newspaper is currently operating out of the second floor of King Hall, a former dormitory which has been converted into office space for a number of campus organizations and services. Many former Eastern Echo staffers have established themselves in the professional media business. Their work extends to major metropolitan newspapers, world-class trade publications and the top Internet sites in the U.S. The student paper has been nationally recognized for decades. Since the 1970s,
    5.50
    2 votes
    193

    Fulcrum

    • School: University of Ottawa
    The Fulcrum is the English language student newspaper at the University of Ottawa. The paper dates back to 1942 and co-exists on the bilingual campus with La Rotonde, the University of Ottawa's French newspaper. The two newspapers are not simply translated copies of the same material, rather, the two are completely separate—and sometimes rivalling—entities. The newspaper covers news, arts and culture, and sports information relevant to University of Ottawa students and nearby community, and contains a feature article each week. It is published weekly during the school year and less regularly during exam and break periods. By tradition, the last issue published contains a parody publication within; the parody at the end of the 2007 school year, for example, was FulPress; a parody of the Ottawa Xpress. The Fulcrum is a member of the Canadian University Press (CUP), and recently hosted CUP 70 (the 70th annual Canadian University Press National Conference) in January, 2008. At CUP 71, held in Saskatoon during January 2009, the Fulcrum officially became the sister paper of the Muse at Memorial University. The first student publication on record at the University of Ottawa was The Owl
    5.50
    2 votes
    194

    North Star News

    • School: North Harris College
    North Star News is a monthly newspaper run by students at North Harris College in Houston, Texas that usually runs stories relating to issues pertaining to the community, the nation and North Harris students. The articles are written by students and also includes editorials and a couple of comic strips. Although there was a news club active in the early decade, it was ceased due to lack of support. In 2001, it was spawned again and ran until 2008 when it went on hiatus. Recently however, there were North Star News pamphlets released by the school that contained mostly bulletins and side stories in place of a fully active newspaper.
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    The Bates Student

    The Bates Student

    • School: Bates College
    The Bates Student, established in 1873 is the student-run newspaper of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. The Student is run entirely by students with only administration interacting with management on budgetary issues. The Student is one of the oldest continuously-published college weeklies in the United States, and the oldest co-ed college weekly in the country. Approximately 1,900 copies of The Student printed every week and distributed to hundreds of alumni, parents, and other friends of the College. The paper is published each Tuesday while classes are in session and is distributed to New Commons (~1,000 copies), the Chase Hall Post Office (~400), the newsroom in Chase Hall (~100), the Lane Hall mail room (~300, to be sent to trustees, alumni, subscribers and students studying abroad), Ladd Library (~25), and Pettengill Hall (~75). The Student has been intermittently online since the late 1990s. Once a year The Student runs a spoof edition commonly known as the "Bates Spudent." The Bates Student was one of many college newspapers founded shortly after the Civil War and describes itself as "the nation's oldest continuously co-ed college weekly," although this fact is hotly
    5.50
    2 votes
    196

    The Brown Daily Herald

    • School: Brown University
    The Brown Daily Herald is the student newspaper of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. It is financially and editorially independent of the University, and publishes Monday through Friday during the academic year with additional issues during commencement, summer and orientation. Established in 1866 and published daily since 1891, The Herald is the second-oldest student newspaper among America's college dailies. The Herald is managed by a board of trustees of which two editorial staffers, two business staffers and five Herald alumni are members. The Herald first appeared on Wednesday, December 2, 1891. The first issue was printed during the night and copies were distributed to each door in the dormitories with no preliminary announcement. The secret planning for the paper was actually begun about a month earlier by Ted Baylies 1895 and George Hunter 1893, who, as readers of The Harvard Crimson and The Yale Daily News, were convinced that they could put out a daily newspaper at Brown. They enlisted the help of John 1893 and Edward Casey 1893, who were putting themselves through college in their printing shop at the foot of College Hill. Baylies and Steve Hopkins 1893
    5.50
    2 votes
    197

    The Chronicle

    • School: Duke University
    The Chronicle is a daily student newspaper at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. The Chronicle was first published as The Trinity Chronicle on December 19, 1905. The paper's name was changed to The Chronicle when Trinity College was renamed Duke University following a donation by James Buchanan Duke. One of the most highly honored college newspapers in the United States, The Chronicle commands a budget of more than $1 million and employs a staff of 120. Its coverage gained national significance in light of the 2006 lacrosse team scandal at Duke, and it has been widely lauded for having balanced coverage, even as most national publications jumped to conclusions. The current editor of The Chronicle is junior Yeshwanth Kandimalla. He is currently majoring in economics. The Chronicle has a print readership of roughly 30,000, and its website, The Chronicle Online, has an average of more than 70,000 hits each day. At the 2009 Associated Collegiate Press National College Media Convention in Austin, Texas, the paper won the Best in Show category for four-year daily tabloids. In 2007, The Chronicle took home four awards from the ACP, including online Story of the Year for its
    5.50
    2 votes
    198

    The Stanford Review

    The Stanford Review is a student-run newspaper that serves Stanford University in Stanford, California. It was founded in 1987 by Peter Thiel and Norman Book. It is published and distributed without charge to the Stanford community every two weeks during the academic year. Several of its former editors – including David O. Sacks and Ken Howery joined with Thiel to start PayPal, the online payments company. Books written by its former editors include:
    5.50
    2 votes
    199

    Glasgow University Guardian

    • School: University of Glasgow
    Glasgow University Guardian is the student newspaper of the University of Glasgow. Founded in 1956 as the Gilmorehill Guardian, it changed its name in 1960 to the Glasgow University Guardian under editor Neil MacCormick. The publication is produced by students of the university on a voluntary basis and funded by the Glasgow University Students' Representative Council and revenue from advertising. The paper is compact-sized and has a circulation of four thousand copies per issue. The paper has reported on sex tourism in Vietnam, racist door policies of Glasgow nightclubs and conducted the first ever independent staff satisfaction survey which revealed doubts about the University management strategy. In 2004 Guardian revealed a CIA officer was working as a lecturer in the Politics department and a year later that Glasgow University Union had been spending part of its grant on a pornography channel subscription, money which had been intended for front line student services. In the same year, it ran an undercover investigation into sub-standard and dangerous student housing, which was described by the editor of The Herald as "campaigning journalism at its best. In 2006, it also
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Sin Newspaper

    Sin Newspaper

    • School: National University of Ireland, Galway
    Sin Newspaper is a student newspaper in Galway, Ireland. Its offices are based at the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG). Sin is printed fortnightly and covers news about Galway events on and off campus, while its entertainment and features sections aim to entertain and provoke debate and shape opinion. Sin accepts articles from past and present students and lecturers and staff. Sin was founded in 2001 and is published every two weeks with a current print run of 6,000 copies. Sin is currently printed in tabloid size across 32 pages. The Sin website, Sin.ie hosts a gallery, the University message boards, newspaper archives and links to the Sin E-zine - Sin Byte In 2009, Sin and Sin.ie received nominations for Best Website, Best Features Education, Best Colour Writer and Editor of the Year in Smedia awards On 9 December 2008, Ministers Eamon O'Cuiv and Batt O'Keefe were the subject of a protest by a small group of students who were highlighting the issue of third level fees. During Minister O'Cuiv's attempt to enter the Quadrangle to meet with University authorities, the students attempted to block his entrance. The minister engaged in a scuffle and was seen to forcibly
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Sun Star

    Sun Star

    • School: University of Alaska Fairbanks
    The Sun Star is the student newspaper of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, formed in a merger of the Northern Sun and the Polar Star. The newspaper has been the recipient of journalism awards from the Alaska Press Club, the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, and other groups. In addition to news, advertisements for local companies and event listings, the Sun Star website gives the public the ability to access financial information regarding University of Alaska (including UAA, UAS and UAF) employees.
    6.00
    1 votes
    202

    The Dalhousie Gazette

    • School: Dalhousie University
    The Dalhousie Gazette (more commonly referred to as "The Gazette") is the main student publication at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. The paper first began publishing in 1868, making it the oldest continually operating student newspaper in North America followed by The Harvard Crimson (1873) and The Columbia Daily Spectator (1877). (The Brunswickan, printed out of the University of New Brunswick, actually predates The Gazette by a year, but began printing in magazine format). The founding editors were J.J. Cameron (who went on to found the Queen's Journal), A.P.Seeton, and W.E. Roscoe. The Gazette's weekly circulation is 10,000, making it Halifax's second-largest free publication (after the independent weekly The Coast). The Gazette is run, financed and published by the Dalhousie Gazette Publishing Society, a group of students made up from the Gazette's editors, contributors, and The Dalhousie Gazette Publishing Board. The society operates independently of the Dalhousie Student Union, though the paper does charge an annual student levy through the DSU (approx $5.00 per student each academic year) as a means of complementing its advertising income. The
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    The Michigan Every Three Weekly

    The Michigan Every Three Weekly

    • School: University of Michigan
    The Michigan Every Three Weekly is a student publication at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor modeled after the satirical news publication The Onion. The Every Three Weekly (colloquially referred to as the E3W) contains a collection of fictional news articles that satirize local, national, and international events and public figures. Since the Every Three Weekly reports stories both real and imagined, it is not intended to be taken literally. The Every Three Weekly derives most of its humor from presenting orthodox events in unexpected and often ludicrous ways. It begins by taking often overlooked events in daily life and then inserting situational humor. A large number of its headlines employ puns and other common double entendre. The Michigan Every Three Weekly is one of many student-run publications on the University of Michigan Ann Arbor campus. Among these are the Michigan Daily, a newspaper in the vein of the Associated Press, the Gargoyle Humor Magazine, another satirical publication on campus, and SHEI magazine, a campus fashion and culture publication. The Michigan Every Three Weekly was started by a group of engineering students at the University of Michigan. In what
    6.00
    1 votes
    204

    The Oarsman

    • School: Venice High School
    The Oarsman is Venice High School's official student newspaper. The paper gained some national publicity in 2003 when a story on teacher Jacqueline Domac's "quasi-spousal" relationship with then minor age actor Edward Furlong was censored by school principal Janice Davis. Ironcially, Davis's actions brought more attention to the incident than would otherwise have been likely, and all the information from the story was eventually published elsewhere, including in the Los Angeles Times. OarsmanOarsman
    6.00
    1 votes
    205

    The Virginia Quarterly Review

    The Virginia Quarterly Review is a literary magazine in the United States. It was founded in 1925 by James Southall Wilson, at the request of University of Virginia president E. A. Alderman. This "National Journal of Literature and Discussion" is a quarterly publication from the University of Virginia that includes poetry, fiction, book reviews, essays, photography, and comics from some of the nation's most notable writers, photographers and artists. In 1915, President Alderman announced his intentions to create a university publication that would be "an organ of liberal opinion": He appealed to financial backers of the university for financial contributions, and over the next nine years an endowment was raised to fund the publication while it became established. Alderman announced the establishment of The Virginia Quarterly Review in the fall of 1924, saying it would provide: The inaugural issue was released in spring of 1925, and the 160-page volume featured writing by Gamaliel Bradford, Archibald Henderson, Luigi Pirandello, Witter Bynner, William Cabell Bruce, among two dozen other notable, mostly southern, writers. Since 2005, the magazine has been nominated for twenty-eight
    6.00
    1 votes
    206

    The Yale Herald

    • School: Yale University
    The Yale Herald is a newspaper run by undergraduate students at Yale University since 1986. As a weekly, the paper aims to provide in-depth, investigative reporting, and includes comics, arts and entertainment coverage, sports and intramurals sections, and coverage of campus and local events. The paper has a circulation of about 3,000 and is distributed free of charge throughout the Yale campus.
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    The Merciad

    The Merciad

    • School: Mercyhurst University
    The Merciad is the student newspaper at Mercyhurst College in Erie, Pennsylvania. The paper was founded in 1929. Since 2007, the newspaper’s slogan is, “If you don’t want it printed…don’t let it happen," a slogan that, it turns out, it is the same as that of the Aspen (Col.) Daily News. It is a free tabloid-sized newspaper published every Wednesday while classes are in session, with the exception of the week before finals. The newspaper is the recipient of a "Best of Show" award presented February 2008, by the Associated Collegiate Press. The mission of the Merciad as the official student newspaper of Mercyhurst College since 1929, is to be a reliable source of information for the entire college community. It is to represent, and more importantly, encourage the free expression of ideas essential to an informed academic community. The Merciad is dedicated to gathering college news and distributing a wide array of college information and ideas that are diverse in content, varied in format and rich in viewpoint. It has as its objective to inform, enlighten and promote literacy, while reflecting the multicultural character of the student body. Essential to this mission is an active
    4.33
    3 votes
    208

    Gauntlet

    • School: University of Calgary
    The Gauntlet is a campus newspaper published by the Gauntlet Publications Society in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. It has a circulation of 8,000 and is the official student newspaper of the University of Calgary. It publishes most Thursdays throughout the year.
    5.00
    2 votes
    209

    Honi Soit

    • School: University of Sydney
    Honi Soit is the student newspaper of the University of Sydney, first published in 1929 and produced by an elected editorial team as part of the activities of the Students' Representative Council (SRC). The name is short for the Old French "Honi soit qui mal y pense" ("Shame upon him who thinks evil of it"), the motto of the British Order of the Garter. Honi Soit is a tabloid-style publication incorporating a mixture of humorous and serious opinion articles. A typical issue contains a topical feature article and interview, letters to the editor, campus news, pop culture articles and news satire. Periodically, special editions are published, including Election Honi, devoted towards covering the annual Students' Representative Council (SRC) student elections, Women's Honi, and Queer Honi, dedicated to covering LGBT issues. In 2010 and 2011, the last three pages of each issue were presented as part of fictional newspaper 'The Garter,' which parodied numerous sections of The Sydney Morning Herald, including Column 8, and contains satirical and irreverent articles. In 2012, 'The Garter' was discontinued in favour of more integrated satire and comedy. Issues are published weekly during
    5.00
    2 votes
    210

    The Harvard Independent

    • School: Harvard University
    The Harvard Independent is a weekly newspaper produced by undergraduate students at Harvard University. It is one of many hard-news media outlets on the Harvard undergraduate campus. The Independent was founded in 1969 by students and alumni who felt the campus needed an alternative to The Harvard Crimson. The Crimson at the time reflected the left-wing turn of student organizations throughout the nation in the 1960s, and the founders of the Independent felt politically alienated from Crimson editors. As the decades passed, the weekly newspaper, released every Thursday and distributed both on the Internet and to Harvard College student dormitories, the format morphed to that of an alternative weekly rather than a standard newspaper, with illustrated covers and four main sections: News, Sports, Arts, and the Forum (Op-Ed) section. In addition, the Independent also has several themed issues each year, including the annual The Game issue for the Harvard-Yale game, the literary issue, and the sex issue, featuring a Harvard-wide anonymous survey on sexual practices and opinions. The Independent no longer has any political affiliation. In 2006, the Independent was the first to report
    5.00
    2 votes
    211

    The Stony Brook Statesman

    • School: State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The Stony Brook Statesman is a student newspaper servicing Stony Brook University in New York's Long Island. It was founded in the fall of 1957 as the Sucolian , for the "State University Campus On Long Island" at Oyster Bay, the university's name and location until 1962. The name was changed to The Statesman in February 1958. The newspaper is now published weekly, but was previously published twice a week during the academic year and until recently was also published bimonthly during the summer months, though it did not publish at all in the summers of 2005 and 2006. It currently prints 6,000 issues per run, at two runs per week. It is distributed to many on-campus locations, the Hospital, and over 70 off-campus locations. As late as 1984, the Statesman was published three times per week during the academic year. The Statesman Association was formed as a non-profit organization approximately 1970 and was incorporated in 1975. The paper is funded by advertising and additional funds from the Stony Brook Undergraduate Student Government. The Statesman is often viewed as the campus publication of record. However, the Stony Brook Press(in 1979)and the Stony Brook Independent (in 2005)
    5.00
    2 votes
    212

    Mars' Hill

    • School: Trinity Western University
    Mars’ Hill is the official student newspaper of Trinity Western University. It is funded by the TWU Student Association and according to its website, "seeks to be a professional and relevant student publication, reflecting and challenging the TWU community, while also addressing local, national and international issues". It started as an underground newspaper in 1988, led by Bruce Beck, but was shut down by administration after only two issues. In 1995, it replaced the current official student newspaper, "The Today". Mars' Hill is published twelve times during the academic school year (September to May), coming out approximately every two weeks. Its current distribution is 1500, reaching over 4000 students, faculty, staff and alumni both on and off the Trinity Western University campus. Mars' Hill has won several awards since its inception in 1995, including the Associate Collegiate Press' National Pacemaker Award for a non-dailies in 2008 and 2010. Mars' Hill is a member both of the Associate Collegiate Press and of the Canadian University Press. It was named a finalist for the Pacemaker for non-dailies in 2006, 2008, 2009, and 2010.
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    Mustang Daily

    Mustang Daily

    • School: California Polytechnic State University
    The Mustang Daily is the student newspaper at California Polytechnic State University. It is issued daily Monday through Thursday . It is the only daily paper in the United States that is produced entirely by students (From the writing and ad design to the printing). The Mustang Daily is an affiliate of UWIRE, which distributes and promotes its content to their network
    4.50
    2 votes
    214

    Stony Brook Independent

    The Stony Brook Independent, also colloquially referred to as the "Indie," is a collegiate news publication serving Stony Brook University and the surrounding community. The Independent was founded in January 2005 by Stony Brook University undergraduate students Michael Nevradakis, Jeff Licitra and Karen Mascher, to serve as an alternative hard news publication to the well-established Stony Brook Statesman. Nevradakis had previously been an editor for the Statesman, before resigning in the fall of 2004, alleging that the Statesman was not following its constitution and other governing documents, a matter which reached the University's Undergraduate Student Government Judiciary. Several other writers also resigned from the Statesman that fall for similar reasons, many of whom also became founding members of the Independent as well. The name Independent was chosen to signify the new publication's identity as an unbiased, credible, objective source of news pertaining to the Stony Brook University campus, without any display of favoritism towards the University's administration, student government or any specific body of students, while striving to maintain and uphold the highest
    4.50
    2 votes
    215

    The Daily Princetonian

    The Daily Princetonian is the award-winning daily independent student newspaper of Princeton University. Founded in 1876 and daily since 1892, the Prince is among the oldest college newspapers in the country. Its alumni have pursued careers in journalism at The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and have won the Pulitzer Prize. In addition to the print and online editions, the Prince publishes The Prox, a news blog, Intersections, an arts and entertainment blog and hosts The Daily Princetonian Photo Store. The Daily Princetonian, nicknamed the "Prince," was the second college newspaper in America to publish daily. The paper, founded in 1876 as a biweekly publication named The Princetonian, became The Daily Princetonian in 1892 when it became a daily newspaper. Produced by a staff of nearly 200 undergraduate students, the organization has an annual budget of more than $600,000. The "Prince" has a daily print circulation of 2,000 and its website receives roughly 30,000 hits every day. The "Prince" is fully independent from Princeton University. It is directed by a graduate board of trustees, consisting of former editors and business staffers. The paper
    4.50
    2 votes
    216

    Bath Impact

    • School: University of Bath
    bathimpact is the student newspaper for the University of Bath Students' Union, England. Student Impact was created from the merger of two former publications at the University of Bath, Spike and Sponge. Sponge was the University of Bath Students' Union paper which had been running for the previous 30 years, while Spike was a student-run magazine concentrating mainly on film, music and book reviews. In December 1999, following controversy over an article in Sponge entitled "How to stuff your bird at Christmas", the Students' Union took the decision to stop the publication of Sponge. Spike had been struggling from a lack of contributors and funding for some time. The Students' Union Media and Communications Officer, Peter Secchi, together with founding Editor Arthur Lewis, put out the first issue of Student Impact on February 14, 2000. On February 22, 2010, just over a decade after the paper was created, it was relaunched and rebranded as "bathimpact". The paper runs on a fortnightly basis, with a print run of 2,000. The newspaper was originally split into seven sections, News, Opinion, Features, International, Science, Entertainments and Sport. It is produced on a voluntary basis
    5.00
    1 votes
    217

    Clareification

    • School: Clare College, Cambridge
    Clareification is the weekly student newsletter of Clare College, Cambridge, a college of Cambridge University. One of the things that distinguishes Clare as a particularly friendly and informal college is the fellows' tolerance of the publication, even after the 2007 Muhammad cartoons controversy. Every week in term, Cambridge traditions are mocked, events of the weeks are satirised and silly student antics are reported on. The newsletter also chronicles college gossip. Clareification evolved gradually in the mid-late 1990s as a newsletter of the Union of Clare Students. Named as a pun on the college's name, it was padded out with comedy articles, gradually turning into a weekly 8-page comedy paper with only the occasional piece of real news. Spoof formattings of real-life newspapers and magazines are common. It is widely read by Clare students, but academic opinion of it is sharply divided. In 2005, it won the 'Best College Paper' award in The Cambridge Student. The current editors-in-chief are Alex Walmsley and Joe Goddard.   In 2007, in a guest-edited edition devoted to religious satire, entitled Crucification, the magazine re-printed one of the Danish Muhammad cartoons which
    5.00
    1 votes
    218

    Empire Times

    • School: Flinders University
    Empire Times was the student newspaper of Flinders University. It was published by the Students' Association of Flinders University (SAFU) and was published from 1967 to 2006. The editorial team of the paper was elected by students. The editors were constitutionally required to produce at least ten printed editions of the paper during the academic year, and generally produced twelve editions, amounting to fortnightly publication while classes are were session. Empire Times had a history of controversial humour and anti-establishment discussion. Notable former editors include Steph Key and Kate Ellis. The Empire Times ceased publication with the withdrawal of funding after the introduction of voluntary student unionism, however a new newspaper called Libertine was published mid way through 2008, however it will only be a quarterly publication.
    5.00
    1 votes
    219

    Exeposé

    • School: University of Exeter
    Exeposé is the official student-run newspaper of the University of Exeter. With a circulation of up to 16,000, Exeposé is free and published fortnightly during term time. Its sections include news, features, lifestyle and sport, with review sections covering films, books, music, arts and video games. Exeposé is compiled by a team of around 20 section editors, headed by two editors with two deputies. It was the winner of the NUS Student Publication of the Year 2008 and is used as a forum for reportage and debate of both national and student-related issues. As of the 2006–2007 academic year it became a full colour fortnightly paper available to all students at the Streatham and St. Luke's campuses. From 2010 onwards it has increased online presence through Twitter and Facebook as well as online viewing platforms such as Issuu.com. In September 2012, Exeposé will launch its own website. Exeposé released its first issue to the students of Exeter University in 1987, although the existence of a student newspaper in some form can be traced back to 1938 when the latest news was presented in a broadsheet format newspaper called The South Westerner. During the early to mid 1990s, Exeposé was
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    The Eyeopener

    The Eyeopener

    • School: Ryerson University
    The Eyeopener is one of two weekly student newspapers at Ryerson University in Toronto. It has a circulation of 10,000 copies per week during the school year. The Eyeopener is published by Rye Eye Publishing Inc., owned by the students of Ryerson as a non-profit corporation. Most of the writing is done by contributors (as is the case with most campus newspapers) but the paper's masthead is elected towards the end of each academic year, by the previous year's masthead and volunteers who have made a certain number of contributions. As of 2008, the minimum number of contributions to be eligible to vote is six. While contributors and editors are often students of the Ryerson School of Journalism, students in other programs are more than welcome to write for the paper. The paper is composed of several main sections; news, arts & life, biz and tech, sports, features, community, video, and an editorial and 'fun' page. It was started on September 26, 1967, by Tom Thorne, a Radio and Television Arts student upset with the amount of editorial powers held by faculty members at The Ryersonian. He took the name from a muck-raking turn-of-the-century weekly published in Calgary. It has received
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    221
    The Spectrum

    The Spectrum

    The Spectrum is one of the oldest student publications in the Philippines; its history dates back to 1956. Its monthly newspaper, bimonthly magazine, and annual literary folio Scribe are published by the students of the University of St. La Salle in Bacolod City. In the school year 1956-1957 The Spectrum was born in an exclusive school for boys. That time, the then La Salle College was populated by less than 1,000 from prep to college. The Spectrum came out once every quarter in tabloid form, printed on white paper which was the standard during that time. Although the high school and college shared the same flag for their publications, they had separate issues prepared by their 30-member staff. Oscar L. Hilado (college) and Mario Guariňo (high school) were the first editors-in-chief of The Spectrum. When La Salle opened its doors to female students in 1966, Lourdes Carisma Barredo became the first female editor-in-chief of the publication three years later. The Spectrum joined the annual Western Visayas College Press Conference and Awards (COPRE) in 1976. COPRE was and is still being sponsored by the Philippine Information Agency under the Office of the President of
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    222
    UC Juice

    UC Juice

    UC Juice, Union County Juice, is the monthly newspaper for the Union County Vocational Technical Schools (UCVTS) campus. It is based in the Academy for Information Technology building. While it is called a newspaper, it more closely resembles a magazine in that it is made using duplex A4 paper stapled with three staples on the right binding. The staff use Adobe InDesign as its layout program. The original name for UC Juice was TechToday. It was changed due to the addition of the Academy for Performing Arts school on campus, rendering the name TechToday unfitting for the campus newspaper. TechToday was founded in 2006-2007 school year. During its first year it released 3 issues, typically around four pages long. Each edition consited of a news section and an arts section (called TechToday Arts). At the end of the 2006/2007 school year, management was failing and most of the work was being done by the advisor at the time. He appointed two new editors, Phyllis Lee and Taylor Kelly, to take over the next year. At the 2007-2008 club fair, TechToday had approximately 150 people sign up to join the club. Throughout the year, it had six issues released. It went through a layout program
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    223

    The Underground

    • School: University of Toronto Scarborough
    The Underground is the official student newspaper at the University of Toronto Scarborough. It began distributions in 1982 and is currently printed in a news magazine format. It is a member of the Canadian University Press.
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    224

    California Pelican

    • School: University of California, Berkeley
    The California Pelican was a college humor magazine founded in 1903 by Earle C. Anthony at the University of California, Berkeley. Lasting eighty years, it was the first successful student humor magazine in UC Berkeley, though it was preceded by Smiles in 1891 and Josh in 1895. It is succeeded by the Heuristic Squelch, which is still running. Gender was significant in the magazine’s name. Although early issues carried an illustration of the eponymous bird on its cover, at the turn of the twentieth century “pelican” was actually an uncomplimentary term for Berkeley coeds. The publication was even often referred to as “the Old Girl,” in contrast to its cross-bay counterpart, the Stanford Chaparral, known as “the Old Boy.” Often referred to simply as the Pelican, the magazine featured cartoons, poetry, original humor articles, and short jokes reprinted from other college humor magazines such as the Pennsylvania Punchbowl and Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern. Aside from its wealthy founder, the magazine's most well known contributor was Rube Goldberg, who drew cartoons for the magazine as a student. Goldberg recalled in later years that he “had great admiration for Earle Anthony, the editor of
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    225

    Canta

    Established in 1930, Canta is the official magazine of the University of Canterbury Students' Association (UCSA) of the University of Canterbury. It is freely available around campus every Wednesday during term time. It is usually 32 pages long and A4 in page size. Famous former editors include Denis Glover. There are a variety of sections which usually appear every week: Canta is a member of the Aotearoa Student Press Association (ASPA). In 1996 the Canta editors Steven Fleming and Creon Upton were removed after publishing a range of controversial articles including a Mel Brooks Nazi parody, a column purporting to have been written by Michael Jackson, a mock Tintin comic strip, and a list of student criminal offenders (a hoax). The editors claimed at the time that their sacking was more a result of their poor relationship with the university’s student executive council than anything else. An employment tribunal later found in favour of the sacked editors resulting in a substantial payout from the student executive. Canta was again involved in controversy following the publishing of an article entitled "The Completely Unofficial Top 13 Ways of Cheating" in the issue preceding
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    226

    Die Matie

    • School: Stellenbosch University
    Die Matie is a student newspaper at the University of Stellenbosch. Founded in 1941, Die Matie is published every second Wednesday during the academic term. The editorial content includes sections on news, student life, sport, arts and entertainment, current affairs and news from other campuses. The entire production of Die Matie – from photos, articles and advertisements to page layout and distribution – is managed by the editorial staff; all students. On August 1, 1941, the first issue of Die Matie student newspaper was published in Stellenbosch. 8,000 copies of the newspaper are distributed on the main campus of Stellenbosch, as well as on the three satellite campuses, the medical campus at Tygerberg, military campus at Saldanha and business school in Bellville. Die Matie has an estimated readership of 16 000 students, staff and Stellenbosch residents. In addition to print the paper is also published electronically though an online archive. With every edition of Die Matie a pre-elected editorial team member has the responsibility of compiling a supplement, either on: motoring, lifestyle, travel, science & technology and health. The editor of this supplement is expected to gather
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    227
    The Gateway

    The Gateway

    The Gateway newspaper is a fortnightly business and careers newspaper, distributed at fifteen universities in the United Kingdom. First published at Oxford University in October 2007, The Gateway is often dubbed "the student FT" due to being printed on the same light salmon paper as the Financial Times. Published by Career Gateways Limited, The Gateway specialises in making the world of business and finance accessible to students keen to pursue a career in the city. The Gateway website was most recently relaunched in October 2011. It is updated daily with articles aimed at improving readers commercial awareness and providing advice on graduate jobs in business and finance. The Gateway was conceived by three Oxford University students, Mawuli Ladzekpo (Exeter College), Max Lewis (Pembroke College) and Chris Wilkinson (Lincoln College) in the summer of 2007. The trio aimed to fill the apparent niche for a publication that combined business and financial news with independent careers advice, and sought to take advantage of the growing graduate recruitment marketing industry that centered around Oxbridge. The first issue of The Gateway was released on October 8th 2007 with a
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    228

    The Harrovian

    • School: Harrow School
    The Harrovian is a weekly newspaper published by Harrow School during term time "as an organ of record, and a forum for comment, debate and expression of individual opinion within the school". All articles are published anonymously, except for letters which are signed, though until recently with false names. The Harrovian is printed on cream paper and is usually 8 A4 sides long (including photos). Articles are written on any topic. There are comment articles on current affairs, reports on school trips, society meetings and concerts amongst other things as well as the results of school matches. The only regular columns are 'Here and There' which reports on achievements of Old Harrovians, staff weddings/babies and other notable events, and 'The Strutt' (after John William Strutt 3rd Baron Rayleigh OH) which is a scientific column set up in 2011. There have been and are other columns that persist for a term or so and then die out. For example satire columns such as the current 'Spyglass' column, recipe columns ('Two Fat Ladies') and university advice. The Harrovian has been published under various guises and titles since 1828. Previous titles include 'The Tyro' or 'The Record'. Almost
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    229

    The Maneater

    • School: University of Missouri–Columbia
    The Maneater student newspaper is the official, but independent, student-run newspaper of the University of Missouri. The Maneater editorial and advertising staffs are composed entirely of students with the exception of a professional business adviser and a receptionist. The newspaper is unaffiliated with the Missouri School of Journalism. The Maneater is published twice weekly, on Tuesdays and Fridays. The Maneater was founded in 1955 by Joel Gold, then a sociology student, and Jim Willard, as Business Manager. Gold took over the former newspaper, then named the Missouri Student. The Missouri Student was run by the Delta Upsilon fraternity, but Gold renamed it The Maneater to reflect a more aggressive news angle. Regarding the name change, Gold wrote in the first issue of The Maneater: “The name ‘Missouri Student’ reflected the editorial policy of the former paper quite well. It signified nothing.” Recent editors-in-chief and managing editors: 2012-13: Kelly Olejnik/Pat Iversen 2011-12: Travis Cornejo/Katherine Moritz/Abby Spudich 2010-11: Zachary Toombs/Lyndsie Manusos 2009-10: Josh Barone/Mary Daly 2008-09: Elliot Njus/Michael Sewall 2007-08: Steve Oslica/Rae Nudson 2006-07: Lee
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    230

    The Pacer

    • School: University of Tennessee at Martin
    Founded in 1928, The Pacer is the name of the student newspaper of the University of Tennessee at Martin. The Office of Student Publications at UT Martin publishes The Pacer every Tuesday morning throughout the semester except for holidays and exam periods. As of 2006, the newspaper has a circulation of 3,000 copies. Throughout its history, the newspaper has also been named The Checkerboard and The Volette. According to Bob Carroll’s book, The University of Tennessee at Martin: The First One Hundred Years, the forerunner of UTM was a Baptist school, Hall-Moody Institute, established in 1900. A student newspaper called The Crimson and Gold (the Institute’s colors) was printed for several years, and two annuals, or yearbooks, also were published. The Crimson and Gold run ended when the institute closed in 1927 because of financial troubles, and all students were given the opportunity to transfer to nearby Union University in Jackson, Tennessee. The University of Tennessee Junior College opened in the fall 1927, and a student newspaper, The Checkerboard, followed in 1928. A group of students decided in the fall of 1927 that UTJC needed a student newspaper. They called themselves the
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    231

    The South End

    The South End is the official student newspaper of Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, published in print and online. It was founded in 1967, and its publication is funded partly from university funds and partly from advertising revenues, and is distributed free of charge. The paper is published in print once a week during the fall and winter terms but produces new online content daily. During the summer, The South End publishes content exclusively online, with the exception of its special editions: the Freshman Survival Guide, an informative publication for new students, and the Back to School issue, which is printed the first week of the fall semester. On the website, users can access The South End's weekly PDF issues. The daily printed circulation is 8,000 and the online readership community is over 30,000. While the majority of contributing and staff writers for the paper are journalism majors, any Wayne State student may write articles for it. The South End primarily covers Wayne State's campus and Midtown Detroit. It has news, arts & entertainment, features, sports and multimedia sections. Other features of The South End include columns, editorials, occasional
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    232

    The Tartan

    • School: Carnegie Mellon University
    The Tartan, formerly known as The Carnegie Tartan, is the original student newspaper of Carnegie Mellon University. Publishing since 1906, it is one of Carnegie Mellon's largest and oldest student organizations. It currently has over 170 student members, who contribute on a weekly basis. It is funded by advertisements and the university's student activities fee. There are two sections in The Tartan. One is a standard broadsheet news section and the other is an entertainment, arts, and living tabloid section called Pillbox. The News section consists of the front page and two or three other pages of timely, campus-focused content covering events, accomplishments and disappointments of the student body. The section's semi-regular features include news analysis, personality profiles, investigative reporting, and trend reporting. Its regular features include news briefs, a preview of the university's lectures, featured photographs of campus events, and a weekly dose of topical statistics. The Forum section is where Carnegie Mellon's campus discusses current issues. It contains letters to the editor, op-ed pieces, a "Leadership Perspectives" column that features input from student
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    233

    Albany Student Press

    • School: University at Albany, The State University of New York
    The Albany Student Press or the ASP, the newspaper of the University at Albany, The State University of New York, is one of the oldest continuously published and independent college newspapers in the United States. First published monthly in 1892 as the Normal School Echo the paper would evolve into a weekly in 1916, known as the State College News. The newspaper has evolved into a comprehensive news agency with a circulation of 8,000. It is released on Tuesdays during the school year and is published by the Albany Student Press Corporation. The paper covers campus news, sports, and entertainment, and it includes opinion columns by students. It is delivered to newsstands located around the campus. The paper receives no funding or advisement of any kind from the school or the Student Association, giving it a fully independent voice on school matters. The State University News began publishing in the fall of 1916. From 1892 to 1916 a monthly periodical that featured student work was published under the title "The Normal School Echo". The newspaper officially changed its name to the Albany Student Press in 1963 to reflect the growing shift to a major research university. By the 1960s,
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    234
    Bully pulpit

    Bully pulpit

    • School: Cornell University
    Bully Pulpit is a bi-weekly leftist student-run publication at Cornell University that focuses on political issues, such as, but not limited to human rights, economic justice, and the protection of the Constitution. It is Cornell's premier political publication that adheres to the left of the political spectrum. The Bully Pulpit began in August 2007, in response to a lack of publications at Cornell that embraced the political left. The Bully Pulpit regularly publishes columns from the Token Conservative Viewpoint, Rant-in-a-Box, Professor's Corner, Libertastic (libertarian leaning), and guess columns. In addition, it publishes periodical interviews with Cornell individuals known as Five Questions. The publication is known for not only for its vocal opinions and commentaries, but also for its humor in the snark and caustic wit genre. 2007-2008
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    235
    California Review

    California Review

    The California Review is an Independent Conservative college paper distributed primarily on the campus of the University of California, San Diego. The publication is one of a handful of campus newspapers partially funded by the Associated Students of UCSD. The California Review was founded by Eric Clasen Young and Harry Crocker III on January 7, 1982. Eric Clasen Young, fresh from a semester at Dartmouth College where he had encountered The Dartmouth Review, was trying to put together a staff to create a conservative student paper at UCSD called California Review. Quick to join was Elizabeth "E.T." Sullivan, a Guardian staff writer (who transferred to the University of Washington after the first issue). Eric teamed up with Harry Crocker III to form the brain trust of the new organization. Shortly thereafter Harry's brother, Brandon (C. Brandon Crocker), also offered his services. By early Spring 1982, the California Review had received 501(c)(3) status from the IRS as a non-profit educational organization, and received a seed funding commitment from the Institute for Educational Affairs (now called the Madison Center for Educational Affairs). On May 24, 1982 (or a few days before)
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    236
    College Tribune

    College Tribune

    • School: University College Dublin - National University of Ireland, Dublin
    The College Tribune is a student newspaper based in University College Dublin. Established in 1989 by one of Ireland's best known print journalists, Vincent Browne, it is UCD's oldest surviving newspaper. It is currently co-edited by Cathal O' Gara and James Granell. The various sections throughout the paper include news, sport, features, opinion, music, books, film, health and fashion. Volume 20 saw the introduction of a full colour entertainment supplement, The Siren. In contrast to the majority of student newspapers, The College Tribune operates independently of college authorities and the students' union, supporting itself through advertising revenue. It is one of the four media outlets in UCD, the others being The University Observer, Belfield FM and the Campus Television Network. It has produced a number of high-profile journalists that can be seen in the national media today. Previous editors include Conor Lally, crime correspondent for The Irish Times, The Sunday Times journalist Richard Oakley, Irish Independent soccer correspondent Daniel McDonnell, Roddy O'Sullivan deputy news editor of The Irish Times, Paul Lynch, film critic of the Sunday Tribune, Emmet Oliver, Deputy
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    237

    Craccum

    Craccum is the weekly magazine produced by the Auckland University Students' Association of the University of Auckland, New Zealand. It was founded in 1927. The name originated from the scrambled acronym of "Auckland University College Men's Common Room Committee". Craccum is the largest student magazine in New Zealand, with a weekly distribution of 10,000 - 12,000 copies. It is anomalous as a publication due to the fact of it having annual student elections for the position of editor. The magazine is infamous for its controversial content, with previous editors choosing to publish stories on how to shoplift, the drawbacks of various methods of committing suicide, drug use guides, recipes for illegal drugs and drug rape guides. Craccum is also a popular proving ground for New Zealand mainstream media, with many of its alumni moving on to publications such as The Listener, The New Zealand Herald, The National Business Review and Metro magazine. In 1989 the publication was controversially re-branded "Torso" for the final issues of that year, an event duly noted in the mainstream media. However the original name was re-established by the incoming editors the following year. In 2005,
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    238

    Nux

    • School: University of KwaZulu-Natal
    Nux is the official student newspaper of the University of KwaZulu-Natal. Started in 1934 on the Pietermaritzburg campus, it is the oldest student newspaper in South Africa. The newspaper is primarily funded by the university, and 8000 copies are distributed to students across all campuses of the University of KwaZulu-Natal free of charge. Eight issues, of 16 pages each, are distributed per year. The content is created almost entirely by students, from journalism to design. The name had its origins in the acronym Natal University Campus Chronicles (NUCCs), which became transformed into NUX, by homophony and rotation of the C's. The Executive body sits in Pietermaritzburg, and is editorially independent of the university and its structures.
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    239
    Oregon Daily Emerald

    Oregon Daily Emerald

    The Oregon Daily Emerald is an independent daily newspaper and website produced at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon, United States. The publication, founded in 1899, has trained many now-prominent writers and journalists and has made important contributions to journalism case law. The Oregon Daily Emerald is published by the Emerald Media Group. The Emerald operates independently of the University with offices in Suite 300 of the Erb Memorial Union. On May 24, 1966 the Emerald ran a story, "Students Condone Marijuana Use," by author Annette Buchanan, which included seven unnamed sources discussing their drug use. The interviews were granted under the condition that the sources’ names would not be revealed. After reading Buchanan's story, local law enforcement officials convened a grand jury investigation into the illegal use of drugs. On June 1, 1966, the Lane County District Attorney subpoenas Buchanan, requesting names of sources. Buchanan refused and was fined $300 for contempt of court. The case went through the court system until the Oregon Supreme Court dismissed Buchanan's claim that the Oregon Constitution protected her. In 1968 the U.S. Supreme Court refused to
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    240
    Spark

    Spark

    • School: Victorian College of the Arts
    Spark is the official student newspaper of the Victorian College of the Arts Student Union. It is published four times per year and is free to all Victorian College of the Arts students.
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    241

    The Battalion

    • School: Texas A&M University
    The Battalion (often referred to simply as The Batt) is the student newspaper of Texas A&M University. Started in 1893 as a monthly publication, it continues to this day, now as a daily paper. The first paper at Texas A&M University was the Texas Collegian published in 1878. It was later named the College Journal from 1889 to 1893 and then The Battalion. Princeton Review named The Battalion as the twentieth best college newspaper in the nation in its 2008 edition of The Best 361 Colleges. Along with four other university newspapers, The Battalion received honorable mention in the 2004 National College Newspaper Convention held by the Associated Collegiate Press. The paper was named the winner of the 2008 National Pacemaker Award. It was also a Pacemaker finalist in the 1996-97 and 1995-96 scholastic years, and won the Southwest Regional Pacemaker for the 1991-92 school year. The Battalion is published on weekdays during the fall and spring semesters, and Monday through Thursday during the summer sessions. The paper version is distributed throughout the Texas A&M campus to interested students, faculty, and staff. Many College Station places, such as restaurants and apartments,
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    242

    The Beaver

    The Beaver is the weekly newspaper of the London School of Economics Students' Union at the LSE. Despite being published by the Students' Union, The Beaver is independent in its reporting. 2,000 copies are published and distributed free of charge every Tuesday during term time. The Beaver is governed by the Collective, a body of students who have contributed three or more written pieces or photographs to the paper and elects the editorial staff. The paper is made up of sections for News, Comment, Features, Social and Sport, as well as an arts and culture supplement, PartB. The Beaver's news section has consistently been among the strongest in UK student media, consisting of LSE, University of London and Higher Education stories from across Britain, frequently being quoted in the national press. A recent example concerned the story of the LSE Council having discussed the option of privatisation, which was subsequently reported by a number of national newspapers including The Guardian. Comment publishes opinion pieces discussing issues that are relevant to the LSE community, regardless of whether they have wider social or political implications. Letters to the editor are also
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    243

    The Carillon

    • School: University of Regina
    The Carillon is the student published newspaper at the University of Regina in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. It began publication in 1962 and has a reputation for producing notable journalists. Like many university newspapers, it has had a colourful, precarious existence. Among its many alumni are Canadian broadcaster Norm Bolen and novelist Ken Mitchell. The Carillon as a student organization has grown and evolved over the years. Before 1962 there existed a variety of campus news outlets in the form of single page letters or smaller broadsheet publications. The names of these papers include The Cricket, The Sparrow and The Forum. The name Carillon (French in origin) was selected in 1962 by a vote of the student body. It moved to change its status from a conventional "top-down" administrative structure in 1975, a shift that was formalized about 15 years later. During the period of the 1960s The Carillon enjoyed great infamy, labeled as a "red paper" for its strong left wing editorial content. Archives reveal a paper filled with political activism and left wing rhetoric. The Carillon reflected the anti-war sentiment of many American intellectuals who left the U.S. to teach in
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    244

    The Cornell American

    • School: Cornell University
    The Cornell American is an often-controversial independent student-run conservative monthly opinion newspaper at Cornell University, founded in 1992. It competes for attention with the more established Cornell Review, another conservative paper founded in 1984. Craig Hymowitz, a chairman of the Cornell College Republicans with a difficult history with the Review, is credited with the original vision for the American. After research, it was decided that an independent group would be a more viable project than a partisan publication. In January 1992, Hymowitz, Jonathan Bloedow, and Hartley Etheridge founded The American Society, an organization formed to "advance classical American values, and to publish a journal, The Cornell American." The first issue, entitled "The Endangered American," was published in March 1992. It contrasted with the Review in appearance and style, but most notably in tone¬タヤthe older paper was known for its "zany" humor and lampooning of campus excesses, inflammatory to its critics. The new publication was even and philosophical¬タヤpretentious, or boring, to fans of the Review. The situation paralleled that of Peninsula and the Salient at Harvard. The
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    The Cornell Centrist

    The Cornell Centrist

    The Cornell Centrist (also known as "The Centrist") was founded in September 2005, and published its first issue in April 2006. Its purpose is to publish multiple newspaper-style journals that contain centrist, center-right, and center-left political positions. It was originally conceived with the primary goal of "advancing an intellectual, sophisticated political dialogue on campus," according to a statement by its founders. The Centrist publishes one or two issues each semester and distributes approximately 2,500 copies for free throughout the Cornell campus. The publication is wholly funded from the Cornell University Student Activities Fund Commission (SAFC). While The Centrist is still in a nascent stage, it has grown since its start and elicited reactions from Cornell's other political publications. The liberal [Turn Left] and conservative [Cornell Review] have denounced the publication as an essentially publication masquerading as a moderate one. The Cornell Daily Sun profiled The Centrist in an article entitled, "Group Encourages Student Publishers." In this piece, Molly O'Toole outlined the publication: "For those more centrally- located on the political scale, there is
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    246

    The Other Press

    • School: Douglas College
    The Other Press is the independent student newspaper of Douglas College, a multi-campus community college in British Columbia. The Other Press was founded in 1976. Originally formed in reaction to the other school newspaper known as "The Pinion," it is a relatively prominent student newspaper in Canada, having a wide readership on the Canadian University Press (CUP) website. It is also one of British Columbia's oldest student publications. College newspapers are nearly always training vehicles for journalism majors under the supervision of faculty members; The Other Press, however, is highly unusual in the sense that Douglas College has no journalism department and its campus newspaper is produced entirely by students (plus whichever community members choose to become involved). Due to this autonomy, the quality of the writing and editing of the Other Press often varies a great deal. Since 1978 The Other Press has been formally published through the Other Publications Society, a registered non-profit society whose sole function is to publish the Other Press. The OP is different from many other student newspapers in that the Other Publications Society does not receive student union
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    247

    The Parthenon

    • School: Marshall University
    The Parthenon is the student newspaper of Marshall University based in Huntington, West Virginia. The paper began publication in 1898. It currently is published in color on Tuesday - Friday mornings during the Fall and Spring semesters and weekly during the Summer term (and not at all during breaks). It is distributed for "free" (it is funded by a fee added to tuition and by ad revenue) on the Huntington and South Charleston campuses. The newspaper generally covers campus news and news from the local area, only rarely mentioning national or world events. The Parthenon is also published online.
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    248

    The Spartana

    First published in 1969, The Spartana is a bi-weekly high school newspaper out of Fort Wayne, Indiana. The publication is nationally recognized for its innovative and creative excellence. Distributed biweekly, every Friday, the newspaper consists of eight pages including News, Opinion, Life and Sports sections. A biweekly fine arts supplement is published alongside The Spartana.
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    249

    The Warwick Boar

    • School: University of Warwick
    The Boar is the student newspaper of the University of Warwick. Since 1973 it has been published weekly in term time, but switched to fortnightly in 2009 after financial troubles. Whilst a society of the Union, the paper is editorially independent. It consists of news, opinion, arts, reviews and lifestyle. Contribution to the Boar is entirely voluntary and none of the approximately 40 editorial staff are paid. Furthermore, the paper does not receive any budget from the Students' Union and therefore relies entirely on self-generated advertising revenue to keep afloat. Upon its founding in 1973, the Boar incorporated Campus, the student newspaper of the late 1960s and early 1970s. For a brief period in 1988, the Boar changed its name to Mercury, though by the end of the academic year it reverted back to the Boar. With the exception of the occasional comedy issue of the Warwick Goat, the Boar has consistently remained as the Boar or the Warwick Boar. The Boar has been a free newspaper since 1990. In 2004, the online edition was relaunched with a feature to accept reader comments. This work was undertaken by Electronic Engineering student Chris Williams, with the help of online editor
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    250

    Yale Daily News

    • School: Yale College
    The Yale Daily News is an independent student newspaper published by Yale University students in New Haven, Connecticut since January 28, 1878. The newspaper's first editors wrote: Financially and editorially independent of Yale University since its founding, the paper is published by a student editorial and business staff five days a week, Monday through Friday, during Yale's academic year. Called the YDN (or sometimes the News or the Daily News), the paper is produced in the Briton Hadden Memorial Building at 202 York Street in New Haven and printed off-site at the Republican-American in Waterbury, Connecticut. Each day, reporters, mainly freshmen and sophomores, cover the university, the city of New Haven and sometimes the state of Connecticut. An expanded sports section is published on Monday, a two-page Opinion Forum on Friday, and "WEEKEND", an arts and living section, also on Friday. The News prints an Arts & Culture spread on Tuesdays, a Science and Technology spread on Wednesdays, and a Business & Enterprise page on Thursdays. Staff members are generally elected as editors on the managing board during their junior year. A single chairman led the News until 1970. Today, the
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