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Best School mascot of All Time

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    1
    8.71
    7 votes
    2

    Butler Blue II

    • School: Butler University
    Butler Blue II (Nickname: Blue) is the second in a young lineage of English Bulldogs bred by Frank and Jeane King of Kong King Kennels in Lizton, Indiana, which have served as the mascot of Butler University, Indianapolis, Indiana since 2000. Butler Blue II is owned and tended to by Michael Kaltenmark, an 2002 Butler graduate and the university's director of annual giving, and his wife, Tiffany. Butler Blue II (male) was born March 27, 2004 with his first day of service to Butler coming on May 20, that same year. He currently weighs 60 lb (27 kg) and features a fawn and white fur coat. Butler Blue II's sire is CH Sandy Ridge Too Right Mate, while his dam is Kongs Margie M. He is also the nephew of Butler Blue I (female), who served as the first official Butler University live mascot in 2000 before retiring and moving away with her owner and 1991 Butler graduate, Kelli Walker, in 2004. Butler Blue I was named through a contest that allowed university students, alumni and faculty/staff to submit entries to name the new mascot. Butler Blue I's sire is CH Loch Lomond Jean Luc, while her dam is Kongs Bonnie B B. Butler had a history of "unofficial" bulldog mascots that were kept by
    8.17
    6 votes
    3
    7.14
    7 votes
    4
    Nor'easter

    Nor'easter

    • School: University of New England
    A nor'easter (also northeaster; see below) is a type of macro-scale storm along the East Coast of the United States and Atlantic Canada, so named because the storm travels to the northeast from the south and the winds come from the northeast, especially in the coastal areas of New England and Atlantic Canada. This type of storm has characteristics similar to a hurricane. More specifically it describes a low-pressure area whose center of rotation is just off the East Coast and whose leading winds in the left forward quadrant rotate onto land from the northeast. The precipitation pattern is similar to that of other extratropical storms. Nor'easters also can cause coastal severe flooding, coastal erosion, hurricane force winds, blizzard conditions, these conditions are usually accompanied with heavy snow or rain depending on when the storm occurs. Nor'easters can occur at any time of the year but are known mostly for their presence in the winter season. Nor'easters can be devastating and damaging, especially in the winter months, when most damage and deaths are cold-related, as nor'easters are known for bringing extremely cold air down from the Arctic air mass. Nor'easters thrive on
    6.57
    7 votes
    5
    Lumberjack

    Lumberjack

    • School: R. A. Long High School
    A lumberjack is a worker in the logging industry who performs the initial harvesting and transport of trees for ultimate processing into forest products. The term usually refers to a bygone era (before 1945 in the United States) when hand tools were used in harvesting trees. Because of its historical ties, the term lumberjack has become ingrained in popular culture through folklore, mass media and spectator sports. The actual work was difficult, dangerous, intermittent, low—paying, and primitive in living conditions, but the men built a traditional culture that celebrated strength, masculinity, confrontation with danger, and resistance to modernization. The term lumberjack is primarily historical; logger is used for workers in the 21st century. When lumberjack is used, it usually refers to a logger from an earlier time before the advent of chainsaws, feller-bunchers and other modern logging equipment. Other terms for the occupation include woodcutter, and the colloquial term woodhick (Pennsylvania, US). A logger employed in driving logs down a river was known locally in northern North America as a river pig, catty-man, river hog, or river rat. The term "lumberjill" has been known
    8.40
    5 votes
    6
    Dragon

    Dragon

    • School: Cragmont Elementary School
    A dragon is a legendary creature, typically with serpentine or reptilian traits, that features in the myths of many cultures. There are two distinct cultural traditions of dragons: the European dragon, derived from European folk traditions and which is ultimately related to Greek and Middle Eastern mythologies, and the Chinese dragon, with counterparts in Japan, Korea and other East Asian countries. The two traditions may have evolved separately, but have influenced each other to a certain extent, particularly with the cross-cultural contact of recent centuries. The English word "dragon" derives from Greek δράκων (drákōn), "dragon, serpent of huge size, water-snake", which probably comes from the verb δρακεῖν (drakeîn) "to see clearly". The word dragon entered the English language in the early 13th century from Old French dragon, which in turn comes from Latin draconem (nominative draco) meaning "huge serpent, dragon," from the Greek word δράκων, drakon (genitive drakontos, δράκοντος) "serpent, giant seafish", which is believed to have come from an earlier stem drak-, a stem of derkesthai, "to see clearly," from Proto-Indo-European derk- "to see" or "the one with the (deadly)
    9.50
    4 votes
    7

    GSD Tiger

    • School: Georgia School for the Deaf
    Tiger is Georgia School for the Deaf's mascot.
    9.50
    4 votes
    8
    9.25
    4 votes
    9

    Bucky Badger

    • School: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Buckingham U. "Bucky" Badger is the official mascot of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He attends all major sporting events for the Wisconsin Badgers as well as hundreds of other events around Wisconsin every year. The as-yet unnamed Wisconsin mascot appeared as a human-like cartoon figure in University of Wisconsin publications in the 1930s. The most familiar portrayal of Bucky Badger, wearing a "W" sweater and strutting forward with a fierce expression, was drawn by California-based commercial artist Art Evans in 1940, and first sold from Brown's Book Store in Madison. An actual badger from Eau Claire was used at the first few football games that year, but proved to be too fierce to be controlled properly and was retired to the nearby Henry Vilas Zoo. After that, the school replaced the live badger with a live raccoon named Regdab ('badger' backwards). In 1949, a UW-Madison art student, Connie Conrad was asked to create a paper-mache Bucky head-piece. A UW-Madison Gymnast and cheerleader, Bill Sagal, wore the outfit at the homecoming game and a contest was started to properly name the mascot. The winning entry was Buckingham U. Badger. Bucky has been maintained over the
    8.00
    5 votes
    10

    Catamount

    Catamount is a term used to describe a wild cat, usually of the cougar or mountain lion variety, also called a puma.
    6.83
    6 votes
    11
    Triton

    Triton

    • School: Edmonds Community College
    Triton (Greek: Τρίτων, gen: Τρίτωνος) is a mythological Greek god, the messenger of the big sea. He is the son of Poseidon and Amphitrite, god and goddess of the sea respectively, and is herald for his father. He is usually represented as a merman, having the upper body of a human and the tail of a fish, "sea-hued", according to Ovid "his shoulders barnacled with sea-shells". Like his father, Poseidon, he carried a trident. However, Triton's special attribute was a twisted conch shell, on which he blew like a trumpet to calm or raise the waves. Its sound was such a cacophony, that when loudly blown, it put the giants to flight, who imagined it to be the roar of a dark wild beast. According to Hesiod's Theogony, Triton dwelt with his parents in a golden palace in the depths of the sea; Homer places his seat in the waters off Aegae. The story of the Argonauts places his home on the coast of Libya. When the Argo was driven ashore in the Gulf of Syrtes Minor, the crew carried the vessel to the "Tritonian Lake", Lake Tritonis, whence Triton, the local deity euhemeristically rationalized by Diodorus Siculus as "then ruler over Libya", welcomed them with a guest-gift of a clod of earth
    6.83
    6 votes
    12
    Wolfie the Seawolf

    Wolfie the Seawolf

    • School: State University of New York at Stony Brook
    Wolfie the Seawolf is the mascot of Stony Brook University. Wolfie is based on a mythical creature call the Seawolf. The school's athletic teams are nicknamed the Seawolves. The Seawolves name was chosen in the mid-1990s with the rise of Stony Brook to Division I. Wolfie has been the mascot ever since and is commonly seen at all the athletic games of the University. He also appears at other school events and make appearances at events across Long Island.
    6.83
    6 votes
    13
    6.67
    6 votes
    14
    Thoroughbred

    Thoroughbred

    • School: Skidmore College
    The Thoroughbred is a horse breed best known for its use in horse racing. Although the word thoroughbred is sometimes used to refer to any breed of purebred horse, it technically refers only to the Thoroughbred breed. Thoroughbreds are considered "hot-blooded" horses, known for their agility, speed and spirit. The Thoroughbred as it is known today was developed in 17th- and 18th-century England, when native mares were crossbred with imported Oriental stallions of Arabian, Barb, and Turkoman breeding. All modern Thoroughbreds can trace their pedigrees to three stallions originally imported into England in the 17th century and 18th century, and to a larger number of foundation mares of mostly English breeding. During the 18th and 19th centuries, the Thoroughbred breed spread throughout the world; they were imported into North America starting in 1730 and into Australia, Europe, Japan and South America during the 19th century. Millions of Thoroughbreds exist today, and more than 118,000 foals are registered each year worldwide. Thoroughbreds are used mainly for racing, but are also bred for other riding disciplines such as show jumping, combined training, dressage, polo, and fox
    6.67
    6 votes
    15
    Cobra

    Cobra

    • School: Keystone School
    Cobra ( pronunciation (help·info)) is any of various species of venomous snakes usually belonging to the family Elapidae, most of which can expand their neck ribs to form a widened hood. Not all snakes commonly referred to as cobras are of the same genus, or even of the same family. The name is short for cobra capo or capa Snake, which is Portuguese for "snake with hood", or "hood-snake". When disturbed, most of these snakes can rear up and spread their necks (or hoods) in a characteristic threat display. A favorite of snake charmers, cobras are found from southern Africa, through southern Asia, to some of the islands of Southeast Asia. Cobra may refer to: Naja, also known as typical cobras (with the characteristic ability to raise the front quarters of their bodies off the ground and flatten their necks in a threatening gesture), a group of venomous elapids found in Africa and Asia The king cobra is the world’s largest venomous snake, with an average length of 12 feet but known to grow up to 18.5 feet. While it preys chiefly on other snakes, the king cobra is highly aggressive, extremely fast and agile, and injects a larger amount of venom per bite (as much as 600 mg) than most
    8.75
    4 votes
    16
    Ohio State University Brutus Buckeye

    Ohio State University Brutus Buckeye

    • School: Ohio State University
    Brutus Buckeye is the athletics mascot of The Ohio State University. Brutus is a student dressed in Buckeye colors with a headpiece resembling an Ohio Buckeye nut. Brutus has appeared since 1965, with periodic updates to design and wardrobe. As a member of the cheerleading team, Brutus Buckeye travels to many events around The Ohio State University and often makes appearances around Columbus. Ohio State students Ray Bourhis and Sally Huber decided Ohio State needed a mascot in 1965 and convinced the athletic council to study the matter. At the time, mascots were generally animals brought into the stadium or arena. A buck deer was contemplated but rejected as impossible. Instead, the buckeye was selected, as the buckeye is the official state tree of Ohio. A simple papier-mâché chocolate was constructed by students, worn over the head and torso, with legs sticking out. It made its appearance at the Minnesota vs. Ohio State homecoming football game on October 30, 1965. The heavy papier-mâché chocolate did not last and it was soon replaced by a fiberglass shell. On November 21, 1965, The Columbus Dispatch reported that judges picked Brutus Buckeye to be the new mascot's name after a
    7.40
    5 votes
    17

    York Lions

    • School: York University
    The York Lions is the official name for the athletic varsity teams that represent York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The university's varsity teams compete in the Ontario University Athletics conference of the Canadian Interuniversity Sport and, where applicable, in the east division. The Lion's logo features a red lion from the school's logo with the university's colours, red and white. York's former teams were known as the York Yeomen and York Yeowomen, but changed their name to the gender-neutral Lions in 2003. In 2008, the York Lion's men's soccer team won the Canadian men's soccer championship, York's first national championship in any sport in 18 years, and their first soccer championship since 1977. The York Lions women's ice hockey team competes in the 10-team Ontario University Athletics conference and finished their 2010-11 season with an 11-16 record. The team's head coach is Dan Church, who is entering his eighth year with the team in the 2011-12 season. The York Lions football team has been in continuous operation since 1969 and are one of three teams currently playing in CIS football to have never won a conference championship. The other two teams, the
    7.40
    5 votes
    18
    Bald Eagle

    Bald Eagle

    • School: Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania
    The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus Greek hali = salt, aeetus = eagle, leuco = white, cephalis = head) is a bird of prey found in North America. It is the national bird of the United States of America and appears on its Seal. This sea eagle has two known sub-species and forms a species pair with the White-tailed Eagle. Its range includes most of Canada and Alaska, all of the contiguous United States, and northern Mexico. It is found near large bodies of open water with an abundant food supply and old-growth trees for nesting. Its diet consists mainly of fish, but it is an opportunistic feeder. It hunts fish by swooping down and snatching them out of the water with its talons. It is sexually mature at four years or five years of age. The Bald Eagle builds the largest nest of any North American bird, up to 4 meters (13 ft) deep, 2.5 meters (8.2 ft) wide, and one metric ton (1.1 tons) in weight. The adult Bald Eagle is mainly brown with a white head and tail. The sexes are identical in plumage, but females are larger than males. The beak is large and hooked. The plumage of the immature is brown. Bald Eagles are not actually bald, the name derives from the older meaning of the
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    Buster Bronco

    Buster Bronco

    • School: Western Michigan University
    Buster Bronco is the official mascot of Western Michigan University athletic teams. "Born" in 1988, Buster is an official member of the WMU Cheer Team. Along with cheering at Bronco athletic events, Buster also makes appearances at community school, hospitals, libraries and parades. Initially Buster was a student dressed in a horse's head. After a few changes, the current Buster Bronco took the form seen today in 1991.
    7.20
    5 votes
    20
    Grizzly Bear

    Grizzly Bear

    • School: Franklin College
    The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis), also known as the silvertip bear, the grizzly, or the North American brown bear, is a subspecies of brown bear (Ursus arctos) that generally lives in the uplands of western North America. This subspecies is thought to descend from Ussuri brown bears which crossed to Alaska from eastern Russia 100,000 years ago, though they did not move south until 13,000 years ago. Except for cubs and females, grizzlies are normally solitary, active animals, but in coastal areas, the grizzly congregates alongside streams, lakes, rivers, and ponds during the salmon spawn. Every other year, females (sows) produce one to four young (commonly two) which are small and weigh only about 500 grams (1 lb). A sow is protective of her offspring and will attack if she thinks she or her cubs are threatened. The word "grizzly" in its name refers to "grizzled" or gray hairs in its fur, but when naturalist George Ord formally named the bear in 1815, he misunderstood the word as "grisly", to produce its biological Latin specific or subspecific name "horribilis". Most adult female grizzlies weigh 130–200 kg (290–440 lb), while adult males weigh on average 180–360 kg
    7.20
    5 votes
    21

    Sam the Minuteman

    • School: University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Sam the Minuteman is the mascot of the University of Massachusetts Amherst athletics teams. Sam can be found at any event in which the Minutemen or Minutewomen are participants. He has also been seen around the University of Massachusetts Amherst without the athletics teams, and pitching in at charity events. Sam placed second in the 2005 Capital One Mascot Of The Year competition, behind to Nebraska's Herbie the Husker. Sam has also finished in the top ten at the National Cheerleading Association's Mascot Nationals for the last four years. He was also named the Mascot of the Month by Playboy.com in October 2005. Sam was featured in a This is SportsCenter commercial, knocking a tennis ball away from Andy Roddick, presumably from frustration over the sound of the ball hitting the racket. Sam was also featured in a SportsCenter commercial in August 2009 involving the team status of NFL quarterback Brett Favre where Sam is shown holding either one or two lamps, to indicate his status as retired or not. (A play on the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem, The Ride of Paul Revere)
    7.20
    5 votes
    22
    Patriot

    Patriot

    • School: Archbishop Carroll High School
    Patriots (also known as Rebels, Revolutionaries, Congress-Men or American Whigs) were the colonists of the British Thirteen United Colonies who violently rebelled against British control during the American Revolution and in July 1776 declared the United States of America an independent nation. Their rebellion was based on the political philosophy of republicanism, as expressed by pamphleteers, such as Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Paine. As a group, Patriots represented a wide array of social, economic, ethnic and racial backgrounds. They included lawyers like John Adams and Alexander Hamilton; planters like Thomas Jefferson and George Mason; merchants like Alexander McDougall and ordinary farmers like Daniel Shays and Joseph Plumb Martin. The critics of British rule called themselves Whigs after 1768, identifying with members of the British Whig party (including the Radical Whigs and Patriot Whigs), who favored similar colonial policies. The Oxford English Dictionary third definition of "Patriot" is "A person actively opposing enemy forces occupying his or her country; a member of a resistance movement, a freedom fighter. Originally used of those who opposed
    8.25
    4 votes
    23

    Jayhawk

    • School: University of Kansas
    For the origin of the term, see Jayhawker Jayhawk may also refer to:
    7.00
    5 votes
    24

    Rogers State Hillcats

    The Rogers State University Hillcats are the athletic teams that represent Rogers State University. Their mascot, a fictional animal based on a bobcat and named for the hill that the school sits upon, was chosen in 2005 by a group of students. The school participates in the NAIA's region six and is a member of the Sooner Athletic Conference. The university fields men's teams in baseball, basketball, cross country, golf and soccer and women's teams in basketball, cross country, golf, soccer and softball. The school's women's softball team became the first RSU athletic team to be nationally ranked on March 28, 2007, entering the NAIA softball ratings at number 22. The men's basketball team became the school's first number one on January 26, 2009, topping the NAIA DI men's basketball poll. The Hillcats' current athletic director is Ryan Bradley, named the second athletic director in school history replacing Wren Baker. Justin Barkley is the men's basketball coach, Amy Williams is the women's basketball coach, Ron Bradley is the baseball coach, Mark Dicus is the softball coach, Derek Larkin is the men's and women's soccer coach, Lynn Blevins is the men's and women's golf coach, and
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    7.00
    5 votes
    26

    Tim the Beaver

    • School: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Tim the Beaver is the mascot at MIT http://web.mit.edu/campus-activities/www/html/timframeset.html. His name is Tim because it is MIT backwards. A beaver was selected as the mascot because beavers are nature's engineers. This decision was made at the Technology Club of New York's annual dinner on January 17, 1914. President Maclaurin proposed the beaver. The sports teams at MIT either choose to have Tim as their mascot, or to be the Engineers.
    7.00
    5 votes
    27

    Rebel Black Bear

    • School: University of Mississippi
    Rebel, The Black Bear is the official sporting mascot of the Ole Miss Rebels, the collegiate athletic teams of the University of Mississippi. The anthropomorphic black bear replaced Colonel Reb as the official mascot in 2010. In 2003, Colonel Reb was removed from the sidelines at Ole Miss athletic events as the on-the-field mascot due to its racial connotations as a Confederate soldier. A contest was held in which fans were invited to design a replacement. The athletic department chose two finalists, Rebel Bruiser and Rowdy Rebel, and invited fans to vote on their favorite. The limited fan response prompted the administration to cancel the poll. Many still supported Colonel Reb as the school mascot. In 2010 Ole Miss students voted to choose a new mascot for the school. An internet campaign to replace Colonel Reb with fictional 'Star Wars' character Admiral Ackbar gained popular, but not universal, support. Admiral Ackbar was a high-ranking commander of the Rebel Alliance in the fictional Star Wars universe. However the students that began the campaign insist that Admiral Ackbar is not their ideal choice for the school's mascot. Instead they intended the character as "the face of a
    8.00
    4 votes
    28

    The Oregon Duck

    • School: University of Oregon
    The Oregon Duck (also known as the Fighting Duck, Donald Duck, Puddles, or simply The Duck) is the mascot of the University of Oregon Ducks athletic program, based on Disney's Donald Duck character through a special license agreement. The mascot wears a green and yellow costume, and a green and yellow beanie cap with the word "Oregon" on it. Oregon teams were originally known as Webfoots, possibly as early as the 1890s. The Webfoots name originally applied to a group of fishermen from the coast of Massachusetts who had been heroes during the American Revolutionary War. When their descendants settled in Oregon's Willamette Valley in the 19th century, the name stayed with them. A naming contest in 1926 won by Oregonian sports editor L. H. Gregory made the Webfoots name official, and a subsequent student vote in 1932 affirmed the nickname, chosen over other suggested nicknames such as Pioneers, Trappers, Lumberjacks, Wolves, and Yellow Jackets. Ducks, with their webbed feet, began to be associated with the team in the 1920s, and a live white duck named "Puddles" began to appear at sports events. Journalists, especially headline writers, also adopted the shorter Duck nickname. In 1978,
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Borregos Salvajes

    Borregos Salvajes

    • School: Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education
    The Borregos Salvajes (in English: Rams) is the name of all the sports teams that represent the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM) in various sports, such as: basketball, volleyball, football and soccer for both men's and women's teams. The Tec de Monterrey teams are best known for college football across Mexico. The two most successful Borregos football teams are those from the Monterrey and State of Mexico campuses. Whenever these two teams meet, the game is considered a derby. These two teams have won the majority of the college league championships since the early 1990s. In 1945, a group of young students from an emerging educational institution came together to create a team of a little-known sport called American football, to accept an invitation from the newly-created team of the Autonomous University of Nuevo León. They did not realize at the time that this match would give birth to an icon of the regional culture. The first "Clásico" was played on November 20, 1945, and the Borregos won 12-7. From 1945 to 1947, they competed in a league that included the local teams Tigres and Gatos Negros. However, the rapid growth of this sport in Monterrey
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Halo

    Halo

    • School: Carroll College
    A halo (from Greek ἅλως; also known as a nimbus, icebow or gloriole) is an optical phenomenon produced by ice crystals creating colored or white arcs and spots in the sky. Many are near the sun or moon but others are elsewhere and even in the opposite part of the sky. They can also form around artificial lights in very cold weather when ice crystals called diamond dust are floating in the nearby air. There are many types of ice halos. They are produced by the ice crystals in cirrus clouds high (5–10 km, or 3–6 miles) in the upper troposphere. The particular shape and orientation of the crystals is responsible for the type of halo observed. Light is reflected and refracted by the ice crystals and may split up into colors because of dispersion. The crystals behave like prisms and mirrors, refracting and reflecting sunlight between their faces, sending shafts of light in particular directions. Atmospheric phenomena such as halos were used as part of weather lore as an empirical means of weather forecasting before meteorology was developed. Other common optical phenomena involving water droplets rather than ice crystals include the glory and the rainbow. A light pillar, or sun pillar,
    6.80
    5 votes
    31

    Raider

    • School: Seminole State College of Florida
    A raider is a person who commits robbery at sea. With use of raid tactics, the raiders uses the naval strategy of attacking an opponent's commercial shipping rather than contending for command of the sea with its naval forces. The raiders destroy supplies of the enemy instead of engaging the combatant themselves. When the raiders are at war, they break into towns and plunder. The raider image is used in several sports organizations such as the NFL team, the Oakland Raiders. It is also a popular topic in books.
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Reveille

    Reveille

    • School: Texas A&M University
    Reveille is the official mascot of Texas A&M University. Students adopted the first Reveille, a mixed-breed dog, in 1931. To thank Texas A&M for its assistance during World War II, the US Army designated Reveille a Cadet General (5 diamonds), the highest-ranking member of the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets. Eight years after the death of the first Reveille, a graduate of the university donated a Shetland Sheepdog to be the second official Aggie mascot, Reveille II. The third Reveille was the first to be a purebred Rough Collie; all subsequent mascots have belonged to this breed. Reveille IV, V, and VI, died in 1989, 1999, and 2003 respectively. Reveille VII has retired and is living in Wellborn, Texas. The current mascot, Reveille VIII, has served since August 2008. All Reveilles to date have been female. Upon her death, Reveille is buried in a special cemetery located outside the north end of Kyle Field. She is placed facing the south end zone and the scoreboard. After the addition to Kyle Field was built at the north end blocking the view of the scoreboard, a small scoreboard was placed outside the stadium, named the Reveille Scoreboard, so the tradition could live on. Reveille I
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Chimera

    Chimera

    • School: California College of the Arts
    (not to be confused with Hemera, the Greek goddess of daytime) The Chimera (also Chimaera or Chimæra) ( /kɨˈmɪərə/ or /kaɪˈmɪərə/; Greek: Χίμαιρα, Khimaira, from χίμαρος, khimaros, "she-goat") was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing female creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of three animals: a lion, a serpent and a goat. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ended in a snakes's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimera has also come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals. Homer's brief description in the Iliad is the earliest surviving literary reference: "a thing of immortal make, not human, lion-fronted and snake behind, a goat in the middle, and snorting out the breath of the terrible flame of bright fire". Elsewhere in the Iliad, Homer attributes the rearing of Chimera to Amisodorus. Hesiod's Theogony follows the Homeric description: he makes the Chimera the issue of Echidna: "She was the mother of Chimaera who breathed raging fire, a
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    6.60
    5 votes
    36
    Florida Panther

    Florida Panther

    • School: Florida Institute of Technology
    The Florida panther is an endangered subspecies of cougar (Puma concolor) that lives in forests and swamps of southern Florida in the United States. Its current taxonomic status (Puma concolor coryi or Puma concolor couguar) is unresolved, but recent genetic research alone does not alter the legal conservation status. This species is also known as the cougar, mountain lion, puma, and catamount; but in the southeastern United States and particularly Florida, it is exclusively known as the panther. Males can weigh up to 160 pounds (73 kg) and live within a range that includes the Big Cypress National Preserve, Everglades National Park, and the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. This population, the only unequivocal cougar representative in the eastern United States, currently occupies 5% of its historic range. In the 1970s, there were an estimated 20 Florida panthers in the wild, and their numbers have increased to an estimated 100 to 160 as of 2011. In 1982, the Florida panther was chosen as the Florida state animal. Florida Panthers are spotted at birth and typically have blue eyes. As the panther grows the spots fade and the coat becomes completely tan while the eyes
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Benny Beaver

    Benny Beaver

    • School: Oregon State University
    Benny Beaver is the official mascot of Oregon State University and current winner of the 2011 Capital One Mascot of the Year write-in campaign. The exact date of when the name was first used as the university's mascot is not known, but photographs in the school's yearbook document its use as early as the 1940s. The university's school newspaper is the first known organization on campus to adopt the beaver as its namesake, with its use occurring as early as 1908. The school yearbook's long use of the name (it was known as "The Beaver starting in 1916) eventually helped solidify the beaver as the university's official mascot. The popularity of the beaver was also shared by students at University of Oregon. For several early publishings, students at this school also used "The Beaver" as their yearbook's title. Oregon State University's first documented use of "Benny Beaver" was found in a photograph showing students posing next to a statue of a beaver inscribed with the name "Benny Beaver." This photograph appears in the 1942 edition of the yearbook. Prior to the beaver, Oregon State's mascot was an individual known as John Richard Newton Bell (1893–1928). A longtime member of the
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Freddie Falcon

    Freddie Falcon

    • School: Bowling Green State University
    Freddie and Frieda Falcon are the mascots of Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio. The pair are anthropomorphized Peregrine Falcons. They are somewhat of a rarity among collegiate mascots, being one of the few male-female mascot pairs in existence. In 2006 they were both named “Best Collegiate Mascot” at the 2006 NCA Cheer Camp in Nashville, Tennessee at Vanderbilt University. Bowling Green State University was originally known as Bowling Green Normal University, designated a normal school because its purpose was to train teachers. Because of this, their athletic teams were referred to by a variety of nicknames, such as the “B.G. Normals” and the “Teachers”. As the necessity of a mascot and nickname became more apparent over the years, Ivan “Doc” Lake, the sports editor of the local newspaper, decided to come up with a fitting name. In 1927, after reading about falconry, he decided on “Falcons” because the birds were powerful and highly trained, much like the University's athletes. A creation of the Alpha Phi Omega fraternity, Freddie Falcon made his first appearance at a BGSU men's basketball game on January 16, 1950 against the Bobcats of Ohio University. Under
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Super Frog

    Super Frog

    • School: Texas Christian University
    Superfrog is the mascot of the Texas Christian University Horned Frogs.
    10.00
    2 votes
    41
    6.40
    5 votes
    42
    Boo Hoo the Bear

    Boo Hoo the Bear

    • School: Queen's University
    Boo Hoo the Bear is the mascot of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. Boo Hoo wears a vest and tam in the Royal Stewart tartan. Originally, Boo Hoo was a real bear which was paraded around at football games and kept in the basement of Grant Hall. The first bear was a pet of Bill Hughes who brought him to Queen's when he was hired as a boxing trainer. The bear was popular enough to have [music] : Boo-Hoo's march for piano, Boo Hoo's Queen's Dominion Victory March (1922) and The Mascot: Boo Hoo's March to Queen's Rugby Team composed for it by Oscar Telgmann in Toronto in the 1920s. This was the first of a succession of 5 bears who lived at the stadium until the 1950s. The mascot was revived in its present form in the 1980s by the Queen's Bands Cheerleaders and is currently in his eighth incarnation, giving him the full title of "King Boo Hoo the eighth". He is seen often around the Queen's campus, at the Queen's Gaels football games, frosh week and homecoming, and has been on the cover of several Golden Words issues.
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Cosmo the Cougar

    Cosmo the Cougar

    • School: Brigham Young University
    Cosmo the Cougar is the official mascot of Brigham Young University's (BYU) athletic teams. He can be seen at many sporting events, wearing the uniform of the team that is playing. In the past, Cosmo's job was a volunteer position, and no scholarship or academic assistance was given. However scholarships and other benefits are offered today. The mascot is expected to be involved in civic events and university functions. On October 15, 1953, Cosmo made his first appearance in front of BYU fans. Dwayne Stevenson, the pep chairman of BYU, bought the costume for $73 and persuaded his roommate Daniel T. Gallego to wear it and thus become the first Cosmo. The name Cosmo derives from the word "cosmopolitan" and was chosen because BYU had recently been selected as a Cosmopolitan school. Cosmo became immediately popular, and since Gallego many people have been Cosmo, including BYU president Ernest L. Wilkinson, who once put on the costume at a pep rally. Lavell Edwards, the legendary football coach for the Cougars, wore the Cosmo costume during the final season basketball game against Utah in 1981 for the unveiling of that year's Cosmo, Brian L.(In Dec. the Cougars had beat SMU in the
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Penguin

    Penguin

    • School: Maine School of Science and Mathematics
    Penguins (order Sphenisciformes, family Spheniscidae) are a group of aquatic, flightless birds living almost exclusively in the southern hemisphere, especially in Antarctica. Highly adapted for life in the water, penguins have countershaded dark and white plumage, and their wings have evolved into flippers. Most penguins feed on krill, fish, squid, and other forms of sealife caught while swimming underwater. They spend about half of their lives on land and half in the oceans. Although all penguin species are native to the southern hemisphere, they are not found only in cold climates, such as Antarctica. In fact, only a few species of penguin live so far south. Several species are found in the temperate zone, and one species, the Galápagos Penguin, lives near the equator. The largest living species is the Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri): on average adults are about 1.1 m (3 ft 7 in) tall and weigh 35 kg (75 lb) or more. The smallest penguin species is the Little Blue Penguin (Eudyptula minor), also known as the Fairy Penguin, which stands around 40 cm tall (16 in) and weighs 1 kg (2.2 lb). Among extant penguins, larger penguins inhabit colder regions, while smaller penguins
    7.25
    4 votes
    45

    Purdue Pete

    • School: Purdue University College of Engineering
    Purdue Pete is a mascot of Purdue University. Despite his visible and constant on-field presence at Purdue sporting events, Pete is not the official mascot of the university. The official mascot of Purdue is the Boilermaker Special. Purdue Pete was first designed as a logo by the University Bookstore in 1940. They would put it on their products and portray him dressed up in different clothes for the different majors. He got the Purdue part of his name from Purdue University. The owners of the bookstores gave him the name “Pete”, yet no one officially knows why this was chosen to be his name. He was given a physical identity in 1956 as he came out and helped the students cheer at a pep rally. Over the years, the appearance of Purdue Pete has gone under several drastic changes as well as several minor changes. His original head was made of paper-mâché, pasted onto a chicken wire frame. This was very inconvenient for the person who would be underneath because it would limit his movements, yet he was still expected to move around and do stunts. This head was changed to a giant fiberglass head where the person inside would use a harness to support it. This was unpractical due to the
    7.25
    4 votes
    46

    Roary Rage

    Roary Rage is the team mascot used for all of the intercollegiate athletic teams that play for Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida. He is an anthropomorphic representation of a Florida Panther (a Puma subspecies), from which the university's athletic teams take their nickname of Golden Panthers. Roary is usually seen cheering FIU against traditional rivals such as cross-town rivals the University of Miami, as well as conference rivals FAU and Western Kentucky University.
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Condor

    Condor

    • School: Conestoga College
    Condor is the name for two species of New World vultures, each in a monotypic genus. They are the largest flying land birds in the Western Hemisphere. They are: Condors are part of the family Cathartidae, whereas the 15 species of Old World vultures are in the family Accipitridae, that also includes falcons, hawks, and eagles. The New World and Old World vultures evolved from different ancestors. However, they both are carrion-eaters and have distinctive bare heads. See Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy for an alternative classification. Both condors are very large broad-winged soaring birds, the Andean Condor being 5 cm shorter (beak to tail) on average than the northern species, but larger in wingspan. California Condors are the largest flying land birds in North America. The Andean Condor is second only to the Wandering Albatross (up to 3.5 m) in terms of wingspan among all living flying birds. The adult plumage is uniformly black, with the exception of a frill of white feathers nearly surrounding the base of the neck which are meticulously kept clean by the bird. As an adaptation for hygiene, the condor's head and neck have few feathers, which exposes the skin to the sterilizing effects
    8.33
    3 votes
    49

    Raider Red

    • School: Texas Tech University
    Raider Red is one of the mascots of Texas Tech University. The main mascot is The Masked Rider who rides a live horse. Raider Red is used at events where The Masked Rider is not allowed or would not be appropriate. Around the 1971 football season, the Southwest Conference created a rule forbidding the bringing of live animal mascots to away games unless the host school permitted it. Since the Masked Rider's horse might have been prohibited from attending some games under this rule, Raider Red was created as an alternate mascot. Texas Tech now plays in the Big 12 Conference, but the tradition of having both mascots continues. Jim Gaspard, a member of the Texas Tech Saddle Tramps student spirit organization, created the original design for the Raider Red costume based on a character created by Lubbock, Texas, cartoonist and former mayor Dirk West. Raider Red is a Wild West character with an over-sized cowboy hat. He carries two guns which he fires into the air after Texas Tech scores. The student serving as Raider Red is a member of the Saddle Tramps or High Riders. Although The Masked Rider's identity is public knowledge, Raider Red's identity is normally kept secret until the end
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    General

    General

    • School: Rufus King High School
    A general officer is an officer of high military rank, usually in the army, and in some nations, the air force. The term is widely used by many nations of the world, and when a country uses a different term, there is an equivalent title given. The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer; and as a specific rank. Since the late twentieth century, the rank of general is usually the highest active rank of a military not at war. The various grades of general officer are at the top of the rank structure. Lower-ranking officers are known as field officers or field-grade officers, and below them are company-grade officers. All officers who commanded more than a single regiment came to be known as "general officers". The word "general" is used in its ordinary sense in English (and other languages) as relating to larger, general, military units, rather than smaller units in particular. There are two common systems of general ranks. Variations of one form, the old European system, were once used throughout Europe. It is used in the United Kingdom (although it did not originate there), from which it eventually spread to the Commonwealth and
    6.20
    5 votes
    51
    Hokie Bird

    Hokie Bird

    • School: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
    The HokieBird is the official mascot of Virginia Tech. It has been named as one of the top college football mascots in the United States, and spawned a series of children's books featuring college and pro sports mascots, including Hello, HokieBird, published by Mascot Books. Fans of Virginia Tech athletics have referred to the teams by the nickname Fighting Gobblers since the early 20th century. According the Virginia Tech university relations, the name originated in 1909, when football Coach Branch Bocock initiated his players into the "Gobbler Club", a name which appeared in print that same year. Another popular legend regarding the origin of the "Gobblers" moniker refers to when the university was a military college known as the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College (VAMC). As future military officers and gentlemen, cadets were not allowed to look at their plates as they ate. To do so was termed "gobbling" your food and was a cause for punishment. Athletes were given increased portions of food and in consideration of the limited meal time, were allowed to "gobble" their meals. Because of this, the sports teams for VAMC became known as "The Gobblers". Regardless of the
    9.50
    2 votes
    52

    Swoop

    • School: Eastern Michigan University
    Swoop is the mascot of Eastern Michigan University.
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Cardinal Bird

    Cardinal Bird

    • School: University of Louisville
    The Cardinal Bird is the mascot of the University of Louisville. The Cardinal was chosen as the mascot after 1913. It was selected the cardinal bird because it is the state bird of Kentucky. The school colors of black and red were adopted later. The Cardinal Bird appears at university sporting events, notably skydiving into Papa John's Cardinal Stadium for each home football game. He also attends other community events during the year. He is considered a part of the "Spirit Groups" and is a member of the Cheerleading team. In 2004, the Cardinal Bird was presented with the National Cheerleaders Association's Most Collegiate Mascot award. On occasion, the Cardinal Bird will travel over to the school marching band's section to conduct the players from the band's podium. The Cardinal Bird is nicknamed "Louie" in some circles. This is in homage its school name and city name, both, as they are sometimes pronounced as "Louie-ville." Others choose abbreviate his name, nicknaming him "C.B." His costume weighs over 50 pounds.
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Mustang

    Mustang

    • School: State University of New York at Morrisville
    A Mustang is a free-roaming horse of the North American west that first descended from horses brought to the Americas by the Spanish. Mustangs are often referred to as wild horses, but there is intense debate over terminology. Because they are descended from once-domesticated horses, they can be classified as feral horses. In 1971, the United States Congress recognized Mustangs as “living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West, which continue to contribute to the diversity of life forms within the Nation and enrich the lives of the American people.” Today, Mustang herds vary in the degree to which they can be traced to original Iberian horses. Some contain a greater genetic mixture of ranch stock and more recent breed releases, while others are relatively unchanged from the original Iberian stock, most strongly represented in the most isolated populations. Today, the Mustang population is managed and protected by the Bureau of Land Management. Controversy surrounds the sharing of land and resources by the free ranging Mustangs with the livestock of the ranching industry, and also with the methods with which the federal government manages the wild population numbers.
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Oski

    Oski

    • School: Haas School of Business
    Oski or Oski the Bear (named after the "Oski Wow-Wow" yell) is the official mascot of the University of California and has been a tradition at the school since making his debut on September 26, 1941 during the football season-opener against St. Mary's. Up until 1941, live bears were used as mascots. Nowadays, the bear's activities are overseen by the Oski Committee, which also appoints a new Oski whenever a replacement is required. Oski chugs beer through a hole in his right eye,, stands at 5-foot-7-inches, and wears a size 15 shoe. Oski's identity is protected by the Committee and wearers of the suit generally do not disclose their having worn the suit. There may be multiple members of the Committee who wear the suit depending on their schedules. Oski is mentioned by name in several California fight songs. In the songs, the name "Oski" is used interchangeably with the title "Golden Bear". Several of the songs give an impression of Oski being a powerful guardian-being dwelling in the heavens, as well as sallying forth from a lair on Earth. Oski is identified as the astronomical constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). Although Oski has his benign side ("patient" and "silent"), he
    7.00
    4 votes
    57

    Seymour d'Campus

    • School: The University of Southern Mississippi
    Seymour d'Campus is the mascot for The University of Southern Mississippi. He attends Golden Eagle sporting events all year round including Southern Miss Football, Lady Eagle Volleyball, Lady Eagle Soccer, Golden and Lady Eagle Basketball games, as well as many other community and University functions and personal appearances. He is also active in various radio and television promotions. Seymour competes in the UCA Mascot National competition when the opportunity presents itself. In 2000, he ranked 21st in the nation; in 2001, he ranked 11th; and in 2002, he ranked 7th. In 2003 he ranked 15th, in 2008 he ranked 10th and was also chosen to be a member of the Capital One's All American Mascot Team along with schools such as Miami (FL), Penn State, Alabama, Tennessee and Syracuse. This is a very prestigious award, as only 12 of over 250 schools were selected. Over the years, Southern Miss has experienced an evolution of mascots. The earliest nickname for the University’s athletic teams was Tigers, but early teams were also referred to as Normalites. In 1924, the mascot was changed to the Yellow Jackets. When the school was renamed Mississippi Southern College in 1940 a name change for
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    8.00
    3 votes
    60

    Charlie Cardinal

    • School: Ball State University
    Charlie Cardinal is the mascot of Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, USA. He is an anthropomorphized cardinal. Ball State's athletics teams have been known as the Cardinals since 1927. Originally nicknamed the "Hooserions," discontent led to a school newspaper-sponsored contest to find a new nickname. When no acceptable choices came, a committee was formed, and it was a member of this committee, Professor Paul Billy Williams, who came up with the new nickname of Cardinals. He came up with it while talking to Coach Norman G. Wann, another committee member, about how the logo of his favorite team, the Saint Louis Cardinals, looked distinctive on the jersey of Rogers Hornsby. The mascot, named Charlie, is seen at various athletics events, usually wearing team apparel. (The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Cardinals (now the Panthers) had a "Charlie Cardinal" mascot in the 1956-1964 period. Two characters in the Milwaukee-based sitcom Happy Days appeared in one episode in their Charlie Cardinal outfits.) 2005 Ball State Football Media Guide
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Goldy Gopher

    Goldy Gopher

    • School: University of Minnesota
    Goldy Gopher is the mascot for the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus and the associated sports teams, known as the Golden Gophers, as well as the defending UCA Mascot National Champion. During the year, Goldy makes over 1000 appearances and is at virtually all home games for University teams, usually wearing the appropriate sporting attire. The University's Marching Band was in charge of Goldy until 1992. Up until that time when it was taken from the band and given to the athletic department, Goldy would be in every pregame and halftime show of the band. Each week a new band member would be Goldy, and the mouth could open wide enough so the person could play his or her instrument while marching the drill that Goldy was doing for that show. The mascot's appearance morphed over the years, and around the late 70s and early 80s, became more aggressive looking, but was revamped in 1986 when the athletics department was trying to change its image. The students that portray Goldy maintain anonymity throughout their tenure. They are also recognized as student athletes due to their vigorous schedule and amount of work that goes into it. Goldy also competes in the UCA Mascot
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Griffin

    Griffin

    • School: Grant MacEwan College
    The griffin, griffon, or gryphon (Greek: γρύφων, grýphōn, or γρύπων, grýpōn, early form γρύψ, grýps; Latin: gryphus) is a legendary creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. As the lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle was the king of the birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature. The griffin was also thought of as king of the creatures. Griffins are known for guarding treasure and priceless possessions. Adrienne Mayor, a classical folklorist, proposes that the griffin was an ancient misconception derived from the fossilized remains of the Protoceratops found in gold mines in the Altai mountains of Scythia, in present day southeastern Kazakhstan, or in Mongolia. In antiquity it was a symbol of divine power and a guardian of the divine. Some have suggested that the word griffin is cognate with Cherub. While griffins are most common in the art and lore of Ancient Greece, there is evidence of representations of griffins in Ancient Egyptian art as far back as 3,300 BC. Most statues have bird-like talons, although in some older illustrations griffins have a lion's forelimbs; they
    8.00
    3 votes
    63

    Hatter

    • School: Stetson University
    A hatter is a person engaged in hatmaking. Hatter(s) also may refer to:
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Miner

    Miner

    • School: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
    A miner is a person whose work or business is to extract ore or minerals from the earth. Mining is one of the most dangerous trades in the world. In some countries miners lack social guarantees and in case of injury may be left to cope without assistance. This text has been ratified by 70 countries, 28 of which have denounced.
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    8.00
    3 votes
    66

    Peruna

    • School: Southern Methodist University
    Peruna is the official mascot of the Southern Methodist University Mustangs. The name "Peruna" is given to each successive live mascot. A black shetland pony, Peruna has been present at every SMU home football game for over 70 years. "Peruna" also refers to the costumed mascot and SMU's fight song. Peruna was selected the #10 Best College Mascot by America's Best and Top Ten in 2009. On November 4, 1932, Peruna I made his first mascot appearance, appearing at the SMU football game against Texas A&M University. Peruna I was a four-year old, 150-pound pony that was donated by T.E. Jones, the owner of Arlington Downs racetrack. Cy Barcus, a 1929 graduate of Perkins School of Theology and director of the Mustang Band, introduced the black Shetland pony as the mascot. In the March 22, 1985 edition of The Daily Campus, Barcus related his story to Linda Beheler: “I was out on a picnic and saw a little black horse running through the high weeds and I said, ‘that would make a good mascot for SMU.’ So I went to coach Ray Morrison and said, ‘Ray, I’ve found a horse that I think would make a good mascot,’ and he told me to bring it to the pep meeting. So I got a popular [student] to bring the
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    Vaquero

    Vaquero

    • School: Glendale Community College
    The vaquero (Spanish pronunciation: [baˈkeɾo], Portuguese: vaqueiro [vaˈkejɾu]) is a horse-mounted livestock herder of a tradition that originated on the Iberian Peninsula. Today the vaquero is still a part of the doma vaquera, the Spanish tradition of working riding. The vaquero traditions developed in Mexico from methodology brought to Mesoamerica from Spain also became the foundation for the North American cowboy. The vaqueros of the Americas were the horsemen and cattle herders of Spanish Mexico, who first came to California with the Jesuit priest Eusebio Kino in 1687, and later with expeditions in 1769 and the Juan Bautista de Anza expedition in 1774. They were the first cowboys in the region. In the modern United States and Canada, remnants of two major and distinct vaquero traditions remain, known today as the "Texas" tradition and the "Spanish", "Vaquero", or "California" tradition. The popular "horse whisperer" style of natural horsemanship was originally developed by practitioners who were predominantly from California and the Northwestern states, clearly combining the attitudes and philosophy of the California vaquero with the equipment and outward look of the Texas
    8.00
    3 votes
    68
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    Tupper the Bulldog

    Tupper the Bulldog

    • School: Bryant University
    Tupper the bulldog is the Bryant University mascot. The mascot can be seen at Bryant University sporting events. The Bulldog mascot has been the staple of Bryant athletics since the 1994 season. In 2004, when the university changed its name from Bryant College to Bryant University, they underwent some logo redesigns and came across the current mascot. The new logos and mascot have been used since 2004. Tupper the Bulldog can be seen at every Bryant Sporting event, and most other campus-wide events. He has been spotted at places such as orientations, pep-rallies, graduations, extracurricular activities for clubs, and intramurals. He has also been seen at many charitable events that the school hosts, such as the Relay for Life walks. The name Tupper comes from Earl Tupper, the inventor of Tupperware, who in October 1967 donated his 220-acre Smithfield estate to Bryant, which was then located in Providence. Bryant broke ground on the new Smithfield campus in 1970 and relocated in 1971. Ironclad Tupper I , an English bulldog, was purchased in May 2010 by Bryant University President Ron Machtley and his wife, Kati, and was given to the University in celebration of the success of the
    6.75
    4 votes
    70
    Baldwin the Eagle

    Baldwin the Eagle

    • School: Boston College
    Baldwin the Eagle, an anthropomorphized bald eagle, is the mascot of the Boston College Eagles. The nickname "Eagles" goes back to 1920 when Rev. Edward McLaughlin, unhappy at seeing a newspaper cartoon which represented Boston College as a cat after a track victory, wrote to the college newspaper The Heights: The "Eagles" nickname stuck. Soon a pair of golden eagles from Texas and New Mexico were given to the college as gifts. Sadly, one escaped and the other broke its beak trying. For the next four years, the official "mascot" was a stuffed golden eagle located in the athletic offices. In 1961, another attempt was made at a live mascot when the college adopted a 10-month old golden eagle named "Margo" (so named because the team colors are maroon and gold). Margo lived at the Franklin Park Zoo and was brought to all home games for several years until dying of a virus early in the 1966 season. Another notable incarnation of the Boston College Eagle is a gilded bronze osprey sculpture that diplomat Larz Anderson and Isabel Weld Perkins, his socialite heiress wife, brought back from Japan in the early 20th century. The eagle remained in Larz Anderson Park until 1954 when it was
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Nittany Lion

    Nittany Lion

    • School: Pennsylvania State University
    This article is about the Penn State mascot. For the Penn State fight song see "The Nittany Lion (song)". The Nittany Lion is the mascot of the Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pennsylvania, USA and its athletic teams. It refers to the mountain lions that once roamed near the school, and to Mount Nittany, a local landmark. There is a song played during sporting events on campus entitled "The Nittany Lion." Fans know this song as Hail to the Lion, even though that is not technically the name of the song. The mascot was the creation of Penn State senior H. D. "Joe" Mason in 1907. While on a 1904 trip to Princeton University, Mason had been embarrassed that Penn State did not have a mascot. Mason did not let that deter him: he fabricated the Nittany Lion on the spot and proclaimed that it would easily defeat the Princeton Bengal tiger. The Lion's primary means of attack against the Tiger would be its strong right arm, capable of slaying any foes (this is now traditionally exemplified through one-armed push-ups after the team scores a touchdown). Upon returning to campus, he set about making his invention a reality. In 1907, he wrote in the student publication The
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Terrier

    Terrier

    • School: Hiram College
    A terrier is a dog of any one of many breeds or landraces of terrier type, which are typically small, wiry, very active and fearless dogs. Terrier breeds vary greatly in size from just a couple of pounds to over 70 pounds and are usually categorized by size or function. There are five different groups with each group having several different breeds. Most terrier breeds were developed in Great Britain and Ireland. They were used to control rats, rabbits, and foxes both over and under the ground. Some larger terriers were also used to hunt badgers. In fact, the word terrier comes from the Middle French terre, derived from the Latin terra, meaning earth. Terrier is also the modern French for "burrow". The Kerry Blue Terrier and Airedale, however, are particularly noted for tackling river rats and otters in deep water. Different localities raised terriers suited to their hunting or vermin control needs. Terriers were crossed with hunting dogs, fighting dogs, and other terriers. In the mid-19th century, with the advent of dog shows, various breeds were refined from the older purpose-bred dogs. All of today's terrier breeds are bred primarily as pets. The gameness of the early hunting
    9.00
    2 votes
    73

    Tritons

    • School: Eckerd College
    Tritons (Τρίτωνες) are a race of sea gods and goddesses born from Poseidon's and Amphitrite's son Triton. Triton lived with his parents, Poseidon and Amphitrite, who was also known as Celaeno, in a golden palace on the bottom of the sea. According to Homer it was called Aegae. Unlike their ancestor Poseidon who is always fully anthropomorphic in ancient art (this has only changed in modern popular culture), Tritons' lower half is that of a fish, while the top half is presented in a human figure. This is debated often because their appearance is described differently throughout history. It is said by Pausanias that the "Tritons have green hair on their head, very fine and hard scales, breathing organs below their ears, a human nose, a broad mouth, with the teeth of animals, sea-green eyes, hands rough like the surface of a shell, and instead of feet, a tail like that of dolphins. They are often compared to other Merman/Mermaid like beings, such as Merrows, Selkies, and Sirens. They are also thought of as the aquatic versions of Satyrs. Another description of Tritons is that of the Centaur-Tritons, also known as Ichthyocentaurs who are depicted with two horse's feet in place of where
    9.00
    2 votes
    74

    Gorlok

    • School: Webster University
    The Gorlok is Webster University's school mascot. It is a mythical creature that was designed by Webster staff and students through a school contest. It has the paws of a cheetah, the horns of a buffalo, and the face of a Saint Bernard dog. The name was derived from the combination of the two streets that intersect in the heart of Old Webster, Gore and Lockwood Avenues. The name was chosen in June 1984 by a campus committee that considered many suggestions before settling on the nickname. Once a name was chosen, a contest was run in the October 4, 1984 issue of The Journal, the Webster University student newspaper. At the time the contest was run, only the name Gorlok had been decided. The contest required the applicants to submit a sketch as well as a description of how they thought a Gorlok would look. The winning entry included a picture of a blue and yellow creature holding a hand-held pump sprayer. The first life-size reproduction of the Gorlok was not complete until 1988, and made its debut at the February 9, 1988 men's basketball game between Webster and St. Louis Christian College. That first Gorlok stood 6'3" and was covered in blue fur. It was designed and created by Jana
    7.67
    3 votes
    75

    Sammy the Slug

    • School: University of California, Santa Cruz
    Sammy the Slug is University of California, Santa Cruz's mascot.
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Tornado

    Tornado

    • School: King College
    A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud. They are often referred to as twisters or cyclones, although the word cyclone is used in meteorology, in a wider sense, to name any closed low pressure circulation. Tornadoes come in many shapes and sizes, but they are typically in the form of a visible condensation funnel, whose narrow end touches the earth and is often encircled by a cloud of debris and dust. Most tornadoes have wind speeds less than 110 miles per hour (177 km/h), are about 250 feet (76 m) across, and travel a few miles (several kilometers) before dissipating. The most extreme tornadoes can attain wind speeds of more than 300 miles per hour (483 km/h), stretch more than two miles (3.2 km) across, and stay on the ground for dozens of miles (more than 100 km). Various types of tornadoes include the landspout, multiple vortex tornado, and waterspout. Waterspouts are characterized by a spiraling funnel-shaped wind current, connecting to a large cumulus or cumulonimbus cloud. They are generally classified as non-supercellular tornadoes that
    7.67
    3 votes
    77

    Astro Boy

    • School: Doshisha University
    Astro Boy (アトム, Atomu, lit. "Atom") is a title character and the protagonist of the Astro Boy franchise. Created by Osamu Tezuka, the character was introduced in the 1951 Captain Atom manga. Astro Boy has appeared in animated television shows (notably the 1963, 1980, 2003 series) and feature film adaptations of its eponymous manga, as well as a live-action TV series, other works by Tezuka, and video games. On 7 April 2003, the City of Niiza registered the character as an actual resident. He was also inducted into the Robot Hall of Fame in 2004. Astro Boy (sometimes nicknamed Astro) originally appeared as a supporting character in the comic Atom Taishi (Ambassador Atom, sometimes referred to as Captain Atom), which appeared in Shonen, a monthly magazine for boys, in April 1951. Tezuka then created a comic series in which Astro Boy was the main character. Osamu Tezuka created Astro Boy to be, in the words of Frederik L. Schodt (creator of the English-language version of the Astro Boy manga), a "21st-century reverse-Pinnochio, a nearly perfect robot who strove to become more human and emotive and to serve as an interface between man and machine." As Tezuka's art style advanced, Astro
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Blizzard T. Husky

    Blizzard T. Husky

    • School: Michigan Technological University
    Blizzard T. Husky is the costumed mascot of the Michigan Tech Huskies. Michigan Technological University is a top-rated science and technology university located in Upper Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. Blizzard was christened via a campus-wide competition on January 31, 1997. The "T" in his name stands for "The." Blizzard appears at Michigan Tech's home sporting events as well as other university and community functions. He is often seen skating in the hockey arena before and during home games and participating in various other activities. Blizzard appeared at the 41st Annual GLI (Great Lakes Invitational) hockey tournament held at the Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, Michigan, along with fellow mascots Sparty (Michigan State University) and Joe College (the GLI Tournament). Blizzard returned this year for the 42nd Annual GLI as well. Blizzard also travels the United States. In November 2010, Blizzard was the first mascot to visit the Kennedy Space Center. While he was there he experienced a gravity-force simulator, walked on the beach, and shopped in Ron Jon’s famous Surf Shop in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Additionally, Blizzard enjoys spending time with other mascots. In August 2010,
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Lil' Red

    Lil' Red

    • School: University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    Lil' Red is one of two mascots at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln's athletics teams. Lil' Red is the newest mascot, having been created for the 1993 season after a state wide contest run for that purpose. Associate athletic director Dr. Barbara Hibner was the driving force in the creation of Lil' Red. He can be seen on the sidelines of a Nebraska football game at Memorial Stadium, at the Bob Devaney Sports Center during basketball games and at volleyball games. The mascot is currently produced by Signs and Shapes International, Inc. based in Omaha, Nebraska. The wearer of the costume wears a "PowerBelt," a belt with an air circulation system, which brings in over 100 cubic feet (2.8 m) of fresh outside air per minute. This is enough fresh air to accommodate roughly 1,000 people. Due to the mascot's incredibly light weight, the larger-than-life mascot can run, dance, crowd surf and shake hands. Since its installment, Lil' Red has won two major awards. The first was the national championship at the NCAA National Mascot Competition in 1999. The second one was an induction into the 2007 Mascot Hall of Fame, which selected its winners by an online vote.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    Lobo

    • School: University of New Mexico
    The Lobo is the official mascot of the University of New Mexico. Lobo, the Spanish word for "wolf," was suggested by George S. Bryan, a sophomore at UNM, in 1920. "The Lobo is respected for his cunning, feared for his prowess, and is the leader of the pack," read Bryan's editorial in the Oct. 1, 1920 issue of the UNM student newspaper. "... All together now; 15 rahs for the LOBOS." The Lobo became the official mascot of the school. For a brief period in the 1920's, a live wolf pup appeared at every football game, but UNM administrators were forced to cease the practice when a child teased the wolf and was subsequently bitten. A live wolf was present on the sidelines of UNM's October 28, 1989 home loss to Wyoming, and reportedly nipped a player who rolled out of bounds. In 2004, the school again considered using a live wolf as a mascot and brought a two-year old wolf to a spring scrimmage. The Daily Lobo is the name of UNM's daily campus newspaper. Human mascots, dubbed "Lobo Louie" and "Lobo Lucy," currently rouse crowds at New Mexico athletic events. During Fran Fraschilla's short coaching tenure at UNM there was a small "Baby Lobo" mascot who appeared at men's basketball games
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Zippy

    Zippy

    • School: University of Akron
    Zippy is the mascot of the University of Akron athletics team. Zippy is a kangaroo, and was chosen by a committee in 1953. The school's nickname, "Zips," is a shortening of "Zippers," a pair of rubber overshoes and a brand name of the BF Goodrich Company of Akron. It was originally adopted by the school in 1925 after a contest to give the school a nickname. "Kangaroos" was one of the choices at the time. In 1950, the current nickname was adopted because of the rising popularity of zippers in use on pants. Three years later, a committee suggested the kangaroo as a mascot, and it was accepted by the student council on May 1, 1953. Originally, it was met with derision, as it was not put to a campuswide vote. However, over time, Zippy has become a fan favorite at the school. "Zippy" has always been a costumed mascot, and currently wears a blue letter-sweater and a gold-and-blue rat cap. In 2007 Zippy was chosen as one of twelve collegiate mascots to compete for Capital One Bowl mascot of the year. With an unprecedented 13–0 record, Zippy was named the winner on January 1, 2008
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Aubie

    Aubie

    • School: Auburn University
    Aubie is Auburn University's tiger mascot. Aubie has won a record seven mascot national championships (his latest coming in 2012), more than any other mascot in the United States. Aubie was among the first three college mascots inducted to the Mascot Hall of Fame, inducted on August 15, 2006. A popular character among Auburn fans and one of the more animated mascots in the country, Aubie has been on the job since 1979. Aubie's existence began as a cartoon character that first appeared on the Auburn/Hardin-Simmons football program cover on October 3, 1959. Birmingham Post-Herald artist Phil Neel created the cartoon Tiger who continued to adorn Auburn program covers for 18 years. Aubie's look changed through the years. In 1962, he began to stand upright and the next year, 1963, wore clothes for the first time—a blue tie and straw hat. Aubie's appearances on game programs proved to be somewhat of a good luck charm for head football coach Ralph "Shug" Jordan's teams. The Tigers were victorious in the first nine games Aubie graced the cover and in his first six years, Auburn posted a 23-2-1 home record. Auburn's home record during the eighteen years Aubie served as Cover Tiger was
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    Empty set

    Empty set

    In mathematics, and more specifically set theory, the empty set is the unique set having no elements; its size or cardinality (count of elements in a set) is zero. Some axiomatic set theories assure that the empty set exists by including an axiom of empty set; in other theories, its existence can be deduced. Many possible properties of sets are trivially true for the empty set. Null set was once a common synonym for "empty set", but is now a technical term in measure theory. Common notations for the empty set include "{}", "", and "". The latter two symbols were introduced by the Bourbaki group (specifically André Weil) in 1939, inspired by the letter Ø in the Danish and Norwegian alphabet (and not related in any way to the Greek letter Φ). Other notations for the empty set include "Λ" and "0". The empty-set symbol ∅ is found at Unicode point U+2205. In TeX, it is coded as \emptyset or \varnothing. In standard axiomatic set theory, by the principle of extensionality, two sets are equal if they have the same elements; therefore there can be only one set with no elements. Hence there is but one empty set, and we speak of "the empty set" rather than "an empty set". The mathematical
    6.50
    4 votes
    86
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Boomer and Sooner

    Boomer and Sooner

    • School: University of Oklahoma
    Boomer and Sooner are two mascots of the University of Oklahoma and its sports teams, the Oklahoma Sooners. The main mascot present at football games is the Sooner Schooner, a Conestoga wagon, pulled by two crème white ponies, Boomer and Sooner. At certain events, there is not sufficient room for the wagon with the live ponies, or live animal mascots may be prohibited by the rules of the venue. Boomer and Sooner are the two Costumed Mascots of the University of Oklahoma. They represent the two crème white ponies that pull the Sooner Schooner, a Conestoga wagon across Owen Field in a victory ride after every OU score. Boomer is the Blue eyed horse and Sooner is the Brown eyed Horse. Traditionally, Boomer wears Crimson jerseys and Sooner wears White Jerseys that match the team that they are supporting. The Sooner Schooner and ponies were introduced in 1964 and became the official mascot in 1980. The Sooner Schooner is cared for, maintained and driven by The Ruf/Neks, OU's all-male spirit squad. Mick Cottom, a freshman Ruf/Nek member from Liberty Mounds, Okla., has the distinction of being the first person to pilot the Schooner across Owen Field in 1964. The Sooner Schooner and ponies
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Herky the Hawk

    Herky the Hawk

    • School: University of Iowa
    Herky the Hawk is the athletics mascot of the University of Iowa Hawkeyes. Herky is a student dressed in black and gold, including wings made out of fabric, with a headpiece shaped like a hawk's head. Herky was first drawn as a cartoon in 1948, and was first portrayed at a football game in 1959. Periodically, Herky's wardrobe and overall design have been updated. There are currently two different styles of Herky costumes. The version used at football games and related events features Herky wearing a Hawkeye football helmet. The version used at basketball games and other events features Herky with different facial features and no helmet. Other important figures to the University of Iowa are the tiger hawk symbol, a logo designed during Hayden Fry's tenure as coach of the Iowa football team, and the Golden Girl and Drum Major which perform with the University of Iowa marching band and during football games. The University borrowed its athletic nickname from the state of Iowa (also known as the Hawkeye State) many years ago. The state of Iowa acquired the nickname, chiefly through the efforts of Judge David Rorer of Burlington and James G. Edwards of Fort Madison. Burlington had been
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Rocket

    Rocket

    • School: Richard Montgomery High School
    A rocket is a self-propelled, unguided weapon system powered by a rocket motor. In military parlance, powered munitions are broadly categorised as follows: However, the distinction can become somewhat blurred, especially where a weapon begins as an unguided rocket and is then fitted with a guidance system - e.g. the GMLRS system is still referred to as rocket artillery, despite employing guided munitions. The use of rockets as some form of artillery dates back to medieval China where devices such as fire arrows were used (albeit mostly as a psychological weapon), and gradually spread to Europe and the Middle East. Rockets became a significant weapon during the 20th Century, when precise manufacturing processes made relatively accurate rockets possible. Rockets are widely used as an artillery weapon, due to their simplicity and the ability of a launch platform to fire multiple rockets in a very short space of time – unlike gun-based artillery, which typically carries a single, heavy barrel and must be reloaded for each shot, multiple rocket launchers can typically fire their entire ammunition supply in a matter of seconds. This rate of fire is very useful as it allows little time
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Rocky

    Rocky

    • School: A. Crawford Mosley High School
    Rocky is a 1976 American sports drama film directed by John G. Avildsen and both written by and starring Sylvester Stallone. It tells the rags to riches American Dream story of Rocky Balboa, an uneducated but kind-hearted debt collector for a loan shark in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Rocky starts out as a club fighter who later gets a shot at the world heavyweight championship. It also stars Talia Shire as Adrian, Burt Young as Adrian's brother Paulie, Burgess Meredith as Rocky's trainer Mickey Goldmill, and Carl Weathers as the champion, Apollo Creed. The film, made on a budget of less than $1 million and shot in 28 days, was a sleeper hit; it made over $225 million the highest grossing film of 1976, and won three Oscars, including Best Picture. The film received many positive reviews and turned Stallone into a major star. It spawned five sequels: Rocky II, III, IV, V and Rocky Balboa. On November 25, 1975, Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) is introduced as a small-time boxer and collector for Anthony Gazzo (Joe Spinell), a loan shark, living in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. The World Heavyweight Championship bout is scheduled for New Year's Day 1976,
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Rocky the Bull

    Rocky the Bull

    • School: University of South Florida St. Petersburg
    Rocky the Bull (sometimes written like a full name, complete with middle initial, Rocky D. Bull) is the mascot of University of South Florida's USF Bulls athletics. He is an anthropomorphized bull who can typically be seen dressed in USF athletic gear--usually a football or basketball jersey, but occasionally other attire like a USF T-shirt. Shortly after the University's inception in 1956, a contest was held that would determine the University's mascot. Among the finalists were the Golden Brahman, the Olympian, the Cougar, the Buccaneer, and the Golden Eagle, and the Golden Brahman was ultimately selected and unveiled as the mascot on November 17, 1962. The USF athletics teams were known as the Golden Brahmans until the earlier 1980s, when the name was simplified to the Bulls. At the start of the 2004 football season, the current iteration of the Rocky mascot costume was unveiled.
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Sarimanok

    Sarimanok

    • School: Mindanao State University
    The Sarimanok is a legendary bird of the Maranao people who originate from Mindanao, a major island in the Philippines. It comes from the words "sari" and "manok." "Sari" means cloth or garment, which is generally of assorted colors. Manòk, which makes up part of its name, is a Philippine word for chicken. It is the legendary bird that has become a ubiquitous symbol of Maranao art. It is depicted as a fowl with colorful wings and feathered tail, holding a fish on its beak or talons. The head is profusely decorated with scroll, leaf, and spiral motifs. It is said to be a symbol of good fortune. The Sarimanok is derived from a totem bird of the Maranao people, called Itotoro. According to the Maranao people, the Itotoro is a medium to the spirit world via its unseen twin spirit bird called Inikadowa. According to the tradition, the sarimanok is never displayed by itself. It must be displayed with the set of flags, standards and vexilloids. At present, this is not totally true; sarimanok may be placed on the top of the umbrella of a Sultan or dignitary, and also, the Mindanao State University has adopted it for the graduation exercises following a non-traditional use. The Far Eastern
    8.50
    2 votes
    93

    The Notre Dame Leprechaun

    • School: University of Notre Dame
    The Notre Dame leprechaun is the mascot of the Fighting Irish sports club at the University of Notre Dame, USA. He appears at athletic events, most notably at football games. It was designed by noted sports artist Theodore W. Drake in 1964 for US$50. In keeping with the nickname "Fighting Irish" and Irish folklore, the Leprechaun serves as the mascot for the University of Notre Dame. The Fighting Irish logo features a side view of The Leprechaun with his fists up, ready to battle anyone that comes his way. The live version is a student, chosen annually at tryouts, dressed in a cutaway green suit and Irish country hat. The Leprechaun brandishes a shillelagh and aggressively leads cheers and interacts with the crowd, supposedly bringing magical powers and good luck to the Notre Dame team. The Leprechaun was not always the official mascot of Notre Dame. For years, the team was represented by a series of Irish terrier dogs. The first, named Brick Top Shuan-Rhu, was donated by Charles Otis of Cleveland and presented to football head coach Knute Rockne the weekend of the Notre Dame-Pennsylvania game November 8, 1930. A number of terriers later took the role of the school mascot, which
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Buzz

    Buzz

    • School: Georgia Institute of Technology
    Buzz is one of the two official mascots of the Georgia Institute of Technology. Buzz is usually represented as a stylized yellowjacket with yellow-and-black fur, white wings, a yellow head, and antennae. He is almost never drawn with six legs, but rather with arms, legs, hands (in white gloves) and feet (in black Converse high tops), like a human. Invented in 1972 and reinvented in 1979, Buzz reflects the tradition of referring to Georgia Tech students as "Yellow Jackets." Buzz is also one of Georgia Tech's emblems and trademarks, one that they defended in a 1998 legal conflict with the Salt Lake Buzz. Like many mascots, Buzz communicates via hand gestures and sign language, rather than speech. At some school events, there are a few people who dress up as Buzz. The identities of these individuals must be kept secret until their graduation. They must be in excellent physical condition, about 5'4" tall, and must be able to do a front "suicide" flip called a Buzz Flip, Buzz's trademark move. Those interested in donning the Buzz suit must take part in a two day tryout, judged by the former Buzz. Buzz is officially part of Georgia Tech's cheerleading team, so the Buzz tryout happens at
    7.33
    3 votes
    95

    Gnome

    • School: Davenport College
    In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, gnomes are one of the core races available for play as player characters. Some speculate that they are closely related to dwarves; however, gnomes are more tolerant of other races and of magic, and are skilled with illusions. Gnomes are Small sized humanoids, standing 3-3½ feet (90-105 centimeters) tall. The gnome first appeared in the original 1974 edition of Dungeons & Dragons, and in its second supplement, Blackmoor (1975). The gnome appeared as a player character race in the original Player's Handbook (1978). The gnome also appeared in the original Monster Manual (1977). A number of gnomish subraces were presented as character races in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985). Gnomes were originally introduced to Dungeons & Dragons as a new alternative to dwarves, elves, and halflings. They were developed from mythology from a number of different sources, originally being a bearded, short race similar to halflings and dwarves. The gnome's niche in play was made magical, to separate it from the more warrior-like dwarf and the more rogue-like halfling. The gnome appeared in the Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set (1977, 1981, 1983) as a
    6.25
    4 votes
    96
    Swoop

    Swoop

    • School: University of Texas at Tyler
    The mascot Swoop is used to represent various sports organizations in the United States. One of the most notable mascots named Swoop is used by the NFL Football team the Philadelphia Eagles. Various American universities use the name Swoop as their athletic program mascots. The "Swoop" character is sometimes depicted as an American Bald Eagle or some type of bird wearing a sports jersey of the team that "Swoop" represents. During the NFL regular season, Swoop regularly appears as an animated character in the weekly Eagles Kids Club television show. Since the show's debut in 2005, the animated version of Swoop has been serving as a host of this show. Swoop made a cameo appearance in an NFL Shop commercial where a thief disguised as a kangaroo mascot tried to steal Philadelphia Eagles jerseys from the locker room after a game. Swoop walks into the locker room and the kangaroo tries to escape but the security guards catch it. Swoop is the name of the mascot that represents Eastern Michigan University. The athletics teams are nicknamed the "Eagles". The Eagles name was officially adopted on May 22, 1991, when the EMU Board of Regents voted to replace the existing Huron (Native
    6.25
    4 votes
    97

    Bucky

    • School: Charleston Southern University
    Bucky is the mascot for Charleston Southern University.
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Handsome Dan

    Handsome Dan

    • School: Yale University
    Handsome Dan is a bulldog who serves as the mascot of Yale University's sports teams. In addition to a person wearing a costume, the position is filled by an actual bulldog, the honor (and the title "Handsome Dan") being transferred to another upon death or retirement. Handsome Dan is selected based on his ability to tolerate bands and children, negative reaction to the color crimson and to tigers (the symbols of rival schools Harvard and Princeton respectively), and cleanliness. Handsome Dan is the first live college mascot in America. In addition, it is believed to be the first live mascot in all of America. Since the inception of the tradition in 1889, 16 dogs have held the position. In the late 1880s, Princeton and Harvard already had their football mascots – Princeton had a tiger and Harvard had the "Orange Man" as a stand-in for Puritan John Harvard. In 1889, Andrew B. Graves saw a bulldog sitting in front of a New Haven blacksmith shop. Graves was an Englishman in the Yale class of 1892 and a member of the crew team as well as a football tackle. He offered fifty dollars for the dog, and the blacksmith countered with seventy-five. Graves purchased the dog for sixty-five
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Seminole

    Seminole

    • School: Florida State University
    The Seminole are a Native American people originally of Florida, who now reside primarily there and in Oklahoma. The Seminole nation emerged in a process of ethnogenesis out of groups of Native Americans, most significantly Creek from what is now Georgia and Alabama, who settled in Florida in the early 18th century. The word Seminole is a corruption of cimarrón, a Spanish term for "runaway" or "wild one", historically used for certain Native American groups in Florida. The Seminole are closely related to the Miccosukee, who were recognized as a separate tribe in 1962. After an initial period of colonization in Florida, during which they distanced themselves increasingly from other Creek groups, the Seminole established a thriving trade network during the British and second Spanish periods (roughly 1767–1821). The tribe expanded considerably during this time, and was further supplemented from the late 18th century with the appearance of the Black Seminoles – free blacks and escaped slaves who settled in communities near Seminole towns, where they paid tribute to the Native Americans in exchange for protection. However, tensions grew between the Seminole and the United States to the
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Anchor

    Anchor

    • School: Bahria University
    An anchor is a device, normally made of metal, that is used to connect a vessel to the bed of a body of water to prevent the vessel from drifting due to wind or current. The word derives from Latin ancora, which itself comes from the Greek ἄγκυρα (ankura ). Anchors can either be temporary or permanent. A permanent anchor is used in the creation of a mooring, and is rarely moved; a specialist service is normally needed to move or maintain it. Vessels carry one or more temporary anchors, which may be of different designs and weights. A sea anchor is a drogue, not in contact with the seabed, used to control a drifting vessel. Anchors achieve holding power either by "hooking" into the seabed, or via sheer mass, or a combination of the two. Permanent moorings use large masses (commonly a block or slab of concrete) resting on this seabed. Semi-permanent mooring anchors (such as mushroom anchors) and large ship's anchors derive a significant portion of their holding power from their mass, while also hooking or embedding in the bottom. Modern anchors for smaller vessels have metal flukes which hook on to rocks on the bottom or bury themselves in soft bottoms. The vessel is attached to the
    6.00
    4 votes
    101
    George Tirebiter

    George Tirebiter

    George Tirebiter was the unofficial mascot of the University of Southern California in the 1940s. When a stray dog was discovered by a group of USC students at Curry's Ice Cream parlor, one student remarked that the dog looked like a Navy V-12 student named George Kuhns. Thus, the dog was dubbed "George." He received the surname "Tirebiter" because he would bite at the tires of cars he chased down Trousdale Parkway, which bisects the campus. (Today Trousdale is only open to foot traffic.) His pastime ultimately led to his demise, as he was eventually run over and killed by a car in 1950. A public funeral was held on campus. The original George Tirebiter was succeeded by a handful of subsequent Tirebiters until 1957. George became endeared to the student body when he bit the University of California Los Angeles mascot Joe Bruin on the nose at a home football game and chased after Oski the Golden Bear mascot of the University of California Berkeley at another home game. The legacy of the Tirebiter mascots was replaced with Traveler, the white Andalusian horse ridden by a Trojan rider at USC home football games. In 2006, USC unveiled a statue celebrating the unofficial mascot's
    6.00
    4 votes
    102
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    Hoosier

    Hoosier

    Hoosier ( /ˈhuːʒər/) is the official demonym for a resident of the U.S. state of Indiana. Although residents of most U.S. states typically adopt a derivative of the state name, e.g., "Indianan" or "Indianian", natives of Indiana do not tend to use these derivatives. Indiana adopted the nickname "Hoosier State" more than 150 years ago. "Hoosiers" is also the nickname for the Indiana University athletic teams. Hoosier is sometimes used in the names of Indiana-based businesses and organizations. In the Indiana High School Athletic Association, seven active athletic conferences and one disbanded conference have the word Hoosier in their name. In other parts of the country, the word has been adapted to other uses. In St. Louis, Missouri, the word is used in a derogatory fashion similar to "hick" or "white trash". "Hoosier" also refers to the cotton-stowers, both black and white, who move cotton bales from docks to the holds of ships, forcing the bales in tightly by means of jackscrews. A low-status job, it nevertheless is referred to in various sea shanty lyrics. Shanties from the Seven Seas includes lyrics that mention hoosiers. Hoosier at times can also be used as a verb describing
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Reggie Redbird

    Reggie Redbird

    • School: Illinois State University
    Reggie Redbird is the mascot for Illinois State University located in Normal, Illinois. Reggie is present at all home football games, women's' volleyball matches, men's basketball games, women's' basketball games, and appears at various other athletic events. Reggie also does numerous of appearances at schools and events within the Twin Cities,the state of Illinois, and the country. Reggie Redbird is a student bedecked in costume. Reggie was named in 1980 after a contest among Junior Redbird Club Members. The suit is donated by Rick Percy, general manager of Clemens and Associates Insurance and a longtime member of The Redbird Club.[1] The nickname "Redbirds" for the sports teams (replacing "Teachers") was adopted by the then Illinois State Normal University in 1923 by the athletic director Clifford E. "Pop" Horton, with an assist from The Daily Pantagraph sports editor Fred Young. Horton liked "Cardinals" because the school colors, established in 1895-96, were cardinal and white, and the University teams were known by that nickname for a short period of time. Young recommended the change to "Redbirds" to avoid confusion in the headlines with the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team.
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    Tusk

    Tusk

    • School: University of Arkansas
    Tusk is the name of the official live mascot for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. It is one of three offspring of Tusk I (all male; female swine do not have tusks) which were born on either August 2, 2002 or August 12, 2002, to two separate female sows. All three are Russian boars, resemble wild razorback hogs, and weigh in at approximately 475 pounds each. All three Russian boars live on a rural farm, just outside of Dardanelle, Arkansas, and travel to every home football game at Fayetteville, or Little Rock, Arkansas, as well as other select events (such as pep rallies). Tusk III is put into a spacious cardinal red holding pen which travels through the crowds, with the cheerleaders on the upper level, making him a crowd favorite. During the actual game, Tusk is moved into Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium where he can be seen by the entire crowd. Tusk II died on January 5, 2010 and his brother, Tusk III took over as the Razorback mascot. Tusk III, along with UGA, the Georgia Bulldog mascot, and Smokey, the bluetick coonhound of the Tennessee Volunteers, are the only lineage live mascots in the SEC. There are only a few lineage mascots in the entire country. Tusk III
    6.00
    4 votes
    106
    Bighorn Sheep

    Bighorn Sheep

    • School: Universidad Autónoma de Baja California
    The bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) is a species of sheep in North America named for its large horns. These horns can weigh up to 30 pounds (14 kg), while the sheep themselves weigh up to 300 pounds (140 kg). Recent genetic testing indicates that there are three distinct subspecies of Ovis canadensis, one of which is endangered: Ovis canadensis sierrae. Sheep originally crossed to North America over the Bering land bridge from Siberia: the population in North America peaked in the millions, and the bighorn sheep entered into the mythology of Native Americans. However, by 1900 the population had crashed to several thousand. Conservation efforts (in part by the Boy Scouts) have restored the population. Ovis canadensis is one of three species of mountain sheep in North America and Siberia; the other two species being Ovis dalli, which includes Dall Sheep and Stone's Sheep, and the Siberian snow sheep Ovis nivicola. Wild sheep crossed the Bering land bridge from Siberia during the Pleistocene (~750,000 years ago) and subsequently spread through western North America as far south as Baja California and northwestern mainland Mexico. Divergence from their closest Asian ancestor (snow
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Bull

    Bull

    • School: University of Botswana
    A bull is an intact (i.e., not castrated) adult male of the species Bos taurus (cattle). More muscular and aggressive than the female of the species, the cow, the bull has long been an important symbol in many cultures, and plays a significant role in both beef and dairy farming, and in a variety of other cultural activities. The female counterpart to a bull is a cow, while a male of the species which has been castrated is a steer, ox or bullock, although in North America this last term refers to a young bull, and in Australia to a draught animal. Usage of these terms varies considerably with area and dialect. Colloquially, people unfamiliar with cattle may refer to both castrated and intact animals as "bulls". A wild, young, unmarked bull is known as a micky in Australia. Improper or late castration on a bull results in it becoming a coarse steer, also known as a stag in Australia, Canada and New Zealand. In some countries an incompletely castrated male is known also as a rig or ridgling. The word "bull" also denotes the males of other bovines, including bison and water buffalo as well as many other species of large animals including elephants, camels, elk, moose, and
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    8.00
    2 votes
    109

    Colonel Reb

    • School: Nathan Bedford Forrest High School
    Colonel Reb is the former sporting mascot of Ole Miss Rebels, the collegiate athletic teams of the University of Mississippi ("Ole Miss"). Designed in the 1930s, the figure served as the teams' official or near-official mascot from 1979 until 2003. He was replaced in 2010 with a new on-field mascot, the Rebel Black Bear. Noted Ole Miss historian David Sansing has stated that "Blind Jim [Ivy] may have been the model for Colonel Rebel." Sansing cites "the late Frank Everett" as the sole basis for this conclusion. "Blind Jim" Ivy was a campus fixture until his death in 1955, seven years before the school was integrated in 1962. He was affectionately known as "the dean of freshmen" for his many pep talks to incoming Ole Miss freshmen classes. Jim Ivy became an integral part of the University of Mississippi in 1896. Born in 1870 as the son of former slave Matilda Ivy, he moved from Alabama to Mississippi in 1890. Ivy was blinded in his early teens when coal tar paint got into his eyes while painting the Tallahatchie River Bridge. Ivy became a peanut vendor in Oxford and was considered the university's mascot for many years. Ivy attended most Ole Miss athletic events and was fond of
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Mike the Tiger

    Mike the Tiger

    • School: Louisiana State University
    Mike the Tiger is the official mascot of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge and serves as the graphic image of LSU sports. By tradition the tiger is a live Bengal tiger, although, the last two tigers were of mixed breeds. Mike V was a Bengali-Indochinese mix, while Mike VI is a Bengali-Siberian hybrid. LSU's men's and women's sports teams are called the Fighting Tigers and Lady Tigers, respectively, and the university's football team plays its home games in Tiger Stadium. LSU first adopted its "Tigers" nickname in the fall of 1869. The moniker is a reference to the state's Confederate heritage; the Louisiana troops of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia became known as the Tigers during the Civil War in recognition of the bravery of two New Orleans brigades, the Tiger Rifles and the Washington Artillery (whose logo featured a snarling tiger's head). Born on October 10, 1935, the first Mike was purchased from the Little Rock Zoo with money raised by collecting 25 cents from each LSU student for a total of $750. Originally named Sheik, the new mascot was renamed in honor of Mike Chambers, LSU's athletic trainer at the time, who was the person most responsible for
    8.00
    2 votes
    113

    Rhett the Boston Terrier

    • School: Boston University
    Rhett is the official costumed mascot of the Boston University (BU) and the Boston University Academy (BUA) Terriers and has been the BU mascot since 1922. The often snarling, bi-pedal black and white Boston Terrier was named after the male lead in Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind, because "No one loves Scarlett more than Rhett" referencing Rhett Butler's affection for Scarlett O'Hara (scarlet is BU's primary color). In recent years Rhett has frequented Boston University games, events, and dining halls wearing his scarlet and white double-zero hockey jersey. Other outfits include a basketball jersey and a referee uniform (typically worn during the short youth hockey games that take place during ice hockey intermissions). However, he is also known to enjoy wearing his scarlet superhero cape when the occasion presents itself. Like all mascots, Rhett and the Terrier logo are ubiquitous at athletic events. The Terriers play varsity Division I intercollegiate sports in ten men's and twelve women's programs. Rhett's arch nemesis is Baldwin, the Boston College eagle. Rhett has participated in several ESPN "This is SportsCenter" commercials and competed three times in the Universal
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Viking

    Viking

    • School: Lawrence University
    The Vikings (from Old Norse víkingr) were the Norse explorers, warriors, merchants, and pirates who raided, traded, explored and settled in wide areas of Europe, Asia and the North Atlantic islands from the late 8th to the mid-11th century. These Norsemen used their famed longships to travel as far east as Constantinople and the Volga River in Russia, and as far west as Iceland, Greenland, and Newfoundland, and as far south as Al-Andalus. This period of Viking expansion – known as the Viking Age – forms a major part of the medieval history of Scandinavia, Great Britain, Ireland and the rest of Medieval Europe. Popular conceptions of the Vikings often differ from the complex picture that emerges from archaeology and written sources. A romanticised picture of Vikings as Germanic noble savages began to take root in the 18th century, and this developed and became widely propagated during the 19th-century Viking revival. The received views of the Vikings as violent brutes or intrepid adventurers owe much to the modern Viking myth which had taken shape by the early 20th century. Current popular representations are typically highly clichéd, presenting the Vikings as familiar caricatures.
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    8.00
    2 votes
    116

    YoUDee

    • School: University of Delaware
    YoUDee (pronounced yoo-dee) is the mascot of the University of Delaware. She is a "fighting Blue Hen" and is named after the state bird of Delaware. According to the University of Delaware, YoUDee's colors are Gold and Blue because her great-great-great-grandfather was awarded the Gold Medal for Valor during the Battle of Trenton in the American Revolutionary War. The men in the company commanded by Captain Jonathan Caldwell actually carried Blue Hens with them into combat in order to hold cockfights in their spare time. It is said that the men under Capt. Caldwell fought so bravely that they were compared to their fighting blue hens. On August 16, 2006 YoUDee was inducted into the Mascot Hall of Fame, in a ceremony at Philadelphia's Love Park.
    8.00
    2 votes
    117

    Big Al

    • School: University of Alabama
    Big Al is the costumed mascot of the University of Alabama Crimson Tide in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The origin of the mascot dates back to 1930. On October 8, a sportswriter wrote about the previous weekend's Alabama-Ole Miss football game. The writer, using the flair for the dramatic common in sportswriting at the time, wrote that an anonymous fan yelled out "Hold your horses, the elephants are coming!" upon hearing the rumble of the first team coming on the field. The name stuck throughout what became a national championship season and beyond. Melford Espey, Jr., then a student, was the first to wear an elephant head costume to portray the Crimson Tide's mascot in the early 1960s. Espey later became a university administrator and Coach Paul "Bear" Bryant asked him to take responsibility when student groups asked to resurrect the costumed mascot in the late 1970s. The costumed "Big Al" mascot officially debuted at the 1979 Sugar Bowl, when the Tide beat Penn State University for the national championship. Since then, the mascot has been a fan favorite for the Tide fans. As the Crimson Tide do not have a logo on their helmets or uniforms, Big Al's likeness appears on much team
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Knight

    Knight

    • School: Jamestown College
    A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood has been conferred upon mounted warriors. During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Since the Early Modern period, the title of knight is purely honorific, usually bestowed by a monarch, as in the British honours system, often for non-military service to the country. Historically, the ideals of chivalry were popularized in medieval literature, especially the Matter of Britain and Matter of France, the former based on Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae ("History of the Kings of Britain"), written in the 1130s. Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur ("The Death of Arthur"), written in 1485, was important in defining the ideal of chivalry which is essential to the modern concept of the knight as an elite warrior sworn to uphold the values of faith, loyalty, courage, and honour.
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Louie the Laker

    Louie the Laker

    • School: Grand Valley State University
    Louie the Laker is the mascot of Grand Valley State University, located in Allendale, Michigan. The costume of Louie consists of a large cartoonish face with an oversized jaw, a scowl, a blue and white striped shirt, blue pants, a blue captain's hat, and large black boots. He is seen at all football games as well as randomly around campus during events. According to short videos shown at Laker football games, Louie the Laker sleeps on the 50 yard line and dreams of Laker football. With the first three men's teams (Golf, Basketball, Tennis) entering intercollegiate athletics, Grand Valley State College asked the general public for help in 1965 while looking for an official mascot to represent the school. Before entering official sports competition, Grand Valley's teams were unofficially known as the Bruisers because of the blue, black, and white color scheme. GVSC's United College Organization (UCO) selected six finalists submitted by the public for the official mascot to be selected by an overall student vote. The names chosen were the Bruisers, Warriors, Bluejays, Ottawas, Archers, and Voyagers. After a seven hour vote, Grand Valley students selected a late write-in vote submitted
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Minutemen

    Minutemen

    • School: Lexington High School
    Minutemen were members of teams from Massachusetts that were well-prepared militia companies of select men from the American colonial partisan militia during the American Revolutionary War. They provided a highly mobile, rapidly deployed force that allowed the colonies to respond immediately to war threats, hence the name. The minutemen were among the first people to fight in the American Revolution. Their teams constituted about a quarter of the entire militia. Generally younger and more mobile, they served as part of a network for early response. Minuteman and Sons of Liberty member Paul Revere was among those who spread the news that the British Regulars (soldiers) were coming out from Boston. Revere was captured before completing his mission when the British marched toward the arsenal in Concord to confiscate the weapons and ammunition that were stored there. The term has also been applied to various later United States civilian-based military forces to recall the success and patriotism of the originals. In the British colony of Massachusetts Bay, all able-bodied men between the ages of 16 and 60 were required to participate in their local militia. As early as 1645 in the
    9.00
    1 votes
    121

    Truman the Tiger

    • School: University of Missouri–Columbia
    Truman the Tiger is the official mascot of the athletic teams of the University of Missouri Tigers. Truman is named after U.S. President Harry S. Truman, who was from the U.S. state of Missouri. The mascot was named on September 12, 1986, though the use of a Bengal Tiger as Missouri's mascot is traced to the 1890s. Truman has been awarded "best mascot in the nation" several times, most recently in 2004. Truman is best known to Mizzou fans for his "tail-spin" during the Missouri Waltz, doing push-ups with the ROTC after Tiger scores, and for riding into home football games on a 1950s-vintage Boone County fire truck ("Truman's Taxi"), painted gold and black and outfitted with several Missouri flags. The mascot makes hundreds of appearances state-wide at university functions, sporting events and at private parties, where he can be hired for a small donation. Actors playing Truman, in contrast to at other schools, are semi-public: they are usually introduced as "Truman" during Senior Night festivities at the last home football and basketball games of the year. The day of the 2011 Independence Bowl featuring Missouri and North Carolina, Truman accidentally broke the crystal bowl that
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Yorktown High School

    Yorktown High School

    Yorktown High School is one of three public high schools located in Arlington, Virginia. There are 123 teachers and 1786 students as of 2012. It is a fully accredited high school based on Virginia's SOL examinations, and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The school is ranked among the top 100 schools in the nation according to Newsweek. The school opened for the first time for the 1960-1961 school year, with only Sophomore and Junior classes. The first graduating class was in 1962. The building was originally an elementary school, which was converted into a high school to relieve crowding at Washington-Lee High School. The school was threatened with closure in 1982 due to declining enrollment, but because of strong community support, the idea was nixed. To boost the school's population, the attendance boundary between W-L and Yorktown in the northeastern portion of the county was redrawn in 1983. Portions of the Donaldson Run, Cherrydale, Woodmont, Dover Crystal, and Old Dominion neighborhoods were transferred into a larger Yorktown district. In the 90 s its boundaries expanded once again to serve the communities of Rosslyn, Courthouse, Clarendon,
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Devil

    Devil

    • School: Germantown High School
    The Devil (from Greek: διάβολος or diábolos = 'slanderer' or 'accuser') is believed in many religions, myths and cultures to be a supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The nature of the role varies greatly. It ranges from being an effective opposite force to the creator god at one extreme, where both are locked in an eons long holy war for human souls on what may seem even terms (to the point of dualistic ditheism/bitheism), to being just a comical figure of fun or even an abstract aspect of the individual human condition at the other. Whilst mainstream Judaism contains no overt concept of a devil, Christianity and Islam have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel or demon that tempts humans to sin, if not commit evil deeds himself. In these religions – particularly during periods of division or external threat – the Devil has assumed more of a dualistic status commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. As such, the Devil is seen as an allegory that represents a crisis of faith, individualism, free will, wisdom and enlightenment. In mainstream Christianity, God and the Devil are
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    Pistol Pete

    Pistol Pete

    • School: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater
    Pistol Pete is the athletics mascot of Oklahoma State University, New Mexico State University and the University of Wyoming. The Pistol Pete mascot costume features traditional cowboy attire and a headpiece resembling Frank Eaton. Pistol Pete has been the mascot for the Oklahoma State Cowboys since 1923 and the mascot for the New Mexico State Aggies since the 1950s. From the 1890s on, Oklahoma A&M sports teams had been referred to as the Agriculturists or Aggies, the Farmers, and officially but unpopularly, the Tigers. By 1924 Charles Saulsberry, sports editor of the Oklahoma City Times, and other writers who regularly covered college events had begun to refer to Stillwater's teams as the A&M Cowboys. The Athletic Council authorized Athletic Director Edward C. Gallagher to have 2,000 balloons printed, "Oklahoma Aggies - Ride 'Em Cowboy" for sale at football games in 1926. Around 1923, when Oklahoma A&M College was searching for a new mascot to replace their tiger (which had been copied from Princeton and accounts for the orange and black school colors), a group of students saw Frank Eaton leading the Armistice Day Parade. He was approached to see if he would be interested in being
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Matador

    Matador

    • School: Valencia Community College
    A torero (Spanish: [toˈɾeɾo]) or toureiro (Portuguese: [toˈɾɐjɾu]) is a bullfighter and the main performer in bullfighting, practised in Spain, Portugal, Mexico, Peru, France and various other countries influenced by Spanish culture. In Spanish, the word torero describes any of the performers who actively participate in the bullfight. The main one who is the leader of the entourage and who kills the bull is addressed as maestro (master) and his formal title is matador de toros (killer of bulls) but the word "matador" by itself is not used in Spanish. The term torero encompasses all who fight the bull in the ring (picadores and rejoneadores). The other bullfighters in the entourage are called subalternos and their suits are embroidered in silver as opposed to the matador's gold. An alternative word for torero is toreador in English (and in Bizet's opera Carmen), but this term (older than torero) is not used in Spain and seldom in Latin America. A very small number of women have been bullfighters on foot or on horseback, a recent example being Cristina Sánchez. Female matadors have experienced considerable resistance and hostility from aficionados and other matadors. Usually, toreros
    5.75
    4 votes
    128

    A&M Tiger

    • School: A&M Consolidated High School
    Tiger is A&M Consolidated High School's mascot.
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Privateer

    Privateer

    • School: State University of New York Maritime College
    A privateer is a private person or ship authorized by a government by letters of marque to attack foreign shipping during wartime. Privateering was a way of mobilizing armed ships and sailors without having to spend public money or commit naval officers. They were of great benefit to a smaller naval power or one facing an enemy dependent on trade: they disrupted commerce and pressured the enemy to deploy warships to protect merchant trade against commerce raiders. The cost was borne by investors hoping to profit from prize money earned from captured cargo and vessels. The proceeds would be distributed among the privateer's investors, officers, and crew. It has been argued that privateering was a less destructive and wasteful form of warfare, because the goal was to capture ships rather than to sink them. Privateers were part of naval warfare from the 16th to the 19th centuries. Some privateers have been particularly influential in the annals of history. Sometimes the vessels would be commissioned into regular service as warships. The crew of a privateer might be treated as prisoners of war by the enemy country if captured. Historically, the distinction between a privateer and a
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Stallion

    Stallion

    • School: Myongji University
    A stallion is a male horse that has not been gelded (castrated). Stallions will follow the conformation and phenotype of their breed, but within that standard, the presence of hormones such as testosterone may give stallions a thicker, "cresty" neck, as well as a somewhat more muscular physique as compared to female horses, known as mares, and castrated males, called geldings. Temperament varies widely based on genetics, and training, but because of their instincts as herd animals, they may be prone to aggressive behavior, particularly toward other stallions, and thus require careful management by knowledgeable handlers. However, with proper training and management, stallions are effective equine athletes at the highest levels of many disciplines, including horse racing, horse shows, and international Olympic competition. The term "stallion" dates from the era of Henry VII, who passed a number of laws relating to the breeding and export of horses in an attempt to improve the British stock, under which it was forbidden to allow uncastrated male horses to be turned out in fields or on the commons; they had to be "kept within bounds and tied in stalls." (The term "stallion" for an
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    5.50
    4 votes
    135

    Teeger

    • School: Idaho Falls High School
    Teeger is Idaho Falls High School's mascot.
    5.50
    4 votes
    136
    6.33
    3 votes
    137

    Temoc

    • School: University of Texas at Dallas
    Temoc is the name of the official mascot of the sports teams of the University of Texas at Dallas, known as the Comets. The name was chosen by the UTD Student Government Association in 2002. "Temoc" was crafted by spelling the word "comet" backwards. The mascot was originally named "Blaze" but the university was forced to change its name due to possible trademark infringement against another organization. Temoc attends many of the UTD home sporting events, supporting the soccer, basketball, baseball, volleyball, and other teams. Temoc often appears with the UTD cheerleaders and the Power Dancers dance team. Student auditions to wear the Temoc costume are held annually, and the identity of the mascot is kept secret. After a poll among students, faculty, staff and alumni in 2007, there was discussion of eliminating the Temoc character, while keeping the Comets as the school's mascot. Temoc has since remained the UTD mascot, through Spring 2010. The character of Temoc (then known as Blaze) was created in 1998 and first drawn by student Aaron Aryanpur. Temoc is depicted as a blue-skinned, fiery red-headed smiling anthropomorphic comet.
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Aztec

    Aztec

    • School: Universidad de las Américas Puebla
    The Aztec /ˈæztɛk/ people were certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who dominated large parts of Mesoamerica from the 14th to 16th centuries. The Nahuatl words aztecatl [as'tekat͡ɬ] (singular) and aztecah [as'tekaʔ] (plural) mean "people from Aztlan", a mythological place for the Nahuatl-speaking culture of the time, and later adopted as the word to define the Mexica people. Often the term "Aztec" refers exclusively to the Mexica people of Tenochtitlan (now the location of Mexico City), situated on an island in Lake Texcoco, who referred to themselves as Mexica Tenochca [me'ʃika te'not͡ʃka] or Cōlhuah Mexica [koːlwaʔ me'ʃika]. Sometimes the term also includes the inhabitants of Tenochtitlan's two principal allied city-states, the Acolhuas of Texcoco and the Tepanecs of Tlacopan, who together with the Mexica formed the Aztec Triple Alliance which controlled what is often known as "the Aztec Empire". In other contexts, Aztec may refer to all the various city states and their peoples, who shared large parts of their ethnic history and cultural traits with the Mexica, Acolhua and Tepanecs, and who often also used the
    8.00
    1 votes
    139

    Chief Illiniwek

    Chief Illiniwek was the mascot and the official symbol of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign associated with the University's intercollegiate athletic programs from 1926 to February 21, 2007. The mascot was portrayed by a student dressed in Sioux regalia to represent the Illiniwek, the state's namesake. The student portraying Chief Illiniwek performed during halftime of Illinois football and basketball games, as well as during women's volleyball matches. For more than two decades, Chief Illiniwek was the center of a controversy. At the root of the controversy is the view of several American Indian groups, as well as other people, both of color and white, that the symbol/mascot was a misappropriation of indigenous cultural figures and rituals and that it perpetuated stereotypes about American Indian peoples. As a result of this controversy, the NCAA termed Chief Illiniwek a "hostile or abusive" mascot and image in August 2005 and banned the university from hosting postseason activities as long as it continued to use the mascot and symbol. Chief Illiniwek and the Chief Illiniwek logo—a stylized front view of an American Indian face and headdress—are trademarks of the
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Grenadier

    Grenadier

    • School: Elk Grove High School
    A grenadier (from French, derived from the word grenade) was originally a specialized soldier, first established as a distinct role in the mid-to-late 17th century, for the throwing of grenades and sometimes assault operations. At this time grenadiers were chosen from the strongest and largest soldiers. By the 19th century, the throwing of grenades was no longer relevant, but grenadiers were still chosen for being the most physically powerful soldiers and would lead assaults in the field of battle. Grenadiers would also often lead the storming of breaches in siege warfare, although this role was more usually fulfilled by all-arm units of volunteers called forlorn hopes, and might also be fulfilled by sappers or pioneers. In the 19th century, certain countries such as France and Argentina established units of "Horse Grenadiers". Like their infantry grenadier counterparts, these horse-mounted soldiers were chosen for their size and strength (i.e. heavy cavalry). The concept of throwing grenades may go back to the Ming Dynasty, when Chinese soldiers on the Great Wall were reported using this weapon. The earliest references to these grenade-throwing soldiers in Western armies come from
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Joe Bruin

    Joe Bruin

    • School: University of California, Los Angeles
    Joe Bruin is the official mascot of UCLA and is often found with Josephine Bruin, a female brown bear. He is a visible and constant on-field presence at UCLA sporting events. The original mascot was represented by bear cubs. In 1924, students chose a more threatening grizzly bear. In 1926 the name was changed to the "Bruins" and UC Berkeley called its mascot the Bears. UCLA used live bears as mascots, which entertained the home crowd at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The bears were given various names, but "Joe Bruin" endured over time. Costumed student mascots have represented Joe Bruin since the mid-1960s. The design for the costume bear changed again in 1996 from a smiling bruin to the current one. Joe Bruin has been on the final team for the Capital One Bowl National Mascot of the Year team four times: 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2010. The contest began in 2002.
    8.00
    1 votes
    142

    Lou Wolf

    Lou Wolf is the mascot for Loyola University Chicago. He was inspired by the coat-of-arms of St Ignatius of Loyola, from whom Loyola derives its name, which depicts two wolves standing over a kettle. He is ever-present at Loyola's basketball games, encouraging fans to show their support for the Ramblers.
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Sparty

    Sparty

    • School: Michigan State University
    Sparty is the mascot of Michigan State University. Sparty is usually depicted as a muscular male Spartan warrior/athlete dressed in stylized Greek costume. After changing the team name from "Aggies" to "Spartans" in 1925, various incarnations of a Spartan warrior with a prominent chin appeared at university events and in university literature. In 1943, MSU art professor Leonard D. Jungwirth designed a statue for the university, which had to be cast in terra cotta because of World War II rationing. In 2005, the university replaced Jungwirth's original statue with a bronze replica, moving the original indoors to protect it from the elements. Sparty appears in several other incarnations. In printed literature, the university uses a copyrighted cartoon Spartan, usually drawn with a grimace and several days worth of whiskers, lending the nickname of "Gruff" Sparty. Finally, Sparty appears as a foam rubber mascot with an oversized head. The mascot costume, worn by an anonymous student, appears at most university sporting, alumni, and fundraising events; he is often portrayed in MSU notices and materials. Though MSU is now a large university, in the 19th century it was a small
    8.00
    1 votes
    144

    Victor E. Bull

    • School: University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
    Victor E. Bull is the costumed mascot of the University at Buffalo Bulls. Victor can be seen at many of UB's athletics events and events throughout the University.
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Black panther

    Black panther

    • School: West High School
    A black panther is typically a melanistic color variant of any of several species of larger cat. In Latin America, wild 'black panthers' may be black jaguars (Panthera onca); in Asia and Africa, black leopards (Panthera pardus); in Asia, possibly the very rare black tigers (Panthera tigris); and in North America they may be black jaguars or possibly black cougars (Puma concolor – although this has not been proven to have a black variant), or smaller cats. Captive black panthers may be black jaguars, or more commonly black leopards. Melanism in the jaguar (Panthera onca) is conferred by a dominant allele, and in the leopard (Panthera pardus) by a recessive allele. Close examination of the color of these black cats will show that the typical markings are still present, but are hidden by the excess black pigment melanin, giving an effect similar to that of printed silk. This is called "ghost striping". Melanistic and non-melanistic animals can be littermates. It is thought that melanism may confer a selective advantage under certain conditions since it is more common in regions of dense forest, where light levels are lower. Recent, preliminary studies also suggest that melanism might
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Boilermaker Special

    Boilermaker Special

    • School: Purdue University
    The Boilermaker Special is the official mascot of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. It resembles a Victorian-era railroad locomotive and is built on a truck chassis. It is operated and maintained by the student members of the Purdue Reamer Club. Purdue University is a land-grant university (or Agricultural and Mechanical (A&M) university) created through the Morrill Act of 1862. In the 1890s, Purdue became a leader in the research of railway technology. For many years Purdue operated the "Schenectady No. 1", and later the "Schenectady No. 2", on a dynamometer in an engineering laboratory on the West Lafayette campus. These were 4-4-0 type steam locomotives manufactured by the Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Schenectady was a classic Victorian-era design similar in construction to the Western and Atlantic Railroad No. 3 (see The General (locomotive) on display at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History). Purdue even operated its own railroad to connect the campus powerplant to a main rail line. In the 1930s the dynamometer was decommissioned and the Schenectady No. 2 was retired as the railroad industry in the United States
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Cavalier

    Cavalier

    • School: East Stroudsburg Senior High School
    Cavalier was the name used by Parliamentarians for a Royalist supporter of King Charles I and son Charles II during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). Prince Rupert, commander of much of Charles I's cavalry, is often considered an archetypical Cavalier. Cavalier derives from the same Latin root as the French word chevalier (as well as the Spanish word caballero), the Vulgar Latin word caballarius, meaning “horseman”. Shakespeare used the word cavaleros to describe an overbearing swashbuckler or swaggering gallant in Henry IV, Part 2, in which Shallow says "I'll drink to Master Bardolph, and to all the cavaleros about London." "Cavalier" is chiefly associated with the Royalist supporters of King Charles I in his struggle with Parliament in the English Civil War. It first appears as a term of reproach and contempt, applied to the followers of King Charles I during the summer of 1642: Charles, in the Answer to the Petition June 13, 1642 speaks of Cavaliers as a "word by what mistake soever it seemes much in disfavour". It was soon reappropriated (as a title of honour) by the king's party, who in return applied Roundhead to their opponents,
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Demon Deacon

    Demon Deacon

    • School: Wake Forest University
    The Demon Deacon is the mascot of Wake Forest University, a school located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Probably best known for its slightly unorthodox name and appearance, the Demon Deacon has become a mainstay in the world of U.S. college mascots. Like most old U.S. universities, the origins of Wake Forest's mascot are distinctive, yet somewhat debated. As early as 1895, Wake Forest College (as it was called at the time) was using its colors in athletic competition. The school's literary magazine, "The Wake Forest Student," described them in this manner: During the early part of the 20th century, these colors became more and more associated with the college. Since Wake Forest was founded as a Baptist college, some historians have proposed an association with the Bible, but most people believe their adoption comes from the connection with the original tiger mascot. The tiger mascot stayed with the school for a little more than two decades, but reports indicate that by the early 1920s, the college's nicknames were most commonly noted as the "Baptists," or "The Old Gold & Black." The first few decades of the 20th century were particularly rough for the Wake Forest athletic
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Duke Dog

    Duke Dog

    • School: James Madison University
    The Duke Dog is the official mascot for the James Madison University Dukes. 'Dukes' was made the official nickname in 1947, and was named after the University's president from 1919-1949, Samuel Page Duke. However, the bulldog was not chosen to represent the Dukes until the 1972-1973 school year. After a decade of the original costume, Dr. Ray V. Sonner revamped the appearance of the Duke Dog in 1982-83 school year. On November 28, 1982, Duke Dog appeared in JMU's first home game of the men's basketball season, against The Virginia Military Institute. In 2004, Duke Dog was named a finalist for the Capital One Mascot Bowl. After eleven weeks of voting, Duke Dog won its matchup each week to finish a perfect 11-0. The next closest mascot finish with a record of 6-5. Although Duke Dog overwhelmingly won in polling, the contest was based also on scores from a panel of judges, and Monte from the University of Montana ended up winning the contest overall (ironically, JMU had just defeated Montana in the I-AA football championship less than a month prior). Since this incident, Capital One has changed the contest so that the popular vote is the sole determinant of the winner of the Mascot
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Friar

    Friar

    • School: Servite High School
    A friar, or occasionally fray, is a man who is a member of a mendicant religious order in Catholic Christianity. "Fray" is sometimes used in former Spanish colonies such as the Philippines or the American Southwest as a title, such as in Fray Juan de Torquemada. Friars differ from monks in that they are called to live the evangelical counsels (vows of poverty, chastity and obedience) in service to a community, rather than through cloistered asceticism and devotion. Whereas monks live in a self-sufficient community, friars work among laypeople and are supported by donations or other charitable support. A monk or nun makes their vows and commits to a particular community in a particular place. Friars commit to a community spread across a wider geographical area known as a province, and so they will typically move around, spending time in different houses of the community within his province. The English term Friar is derived from the Norman French word frere ("brother"), from the Latin frater ("brother"), which was widely used in the Latin New Testament to refer to members of the Christian community. St. Francis of Assisi called his followers fratres minores, which G. K. Chesterton
    7.00
    2 votes
    151

    Friar Boy

    • School: Providence College
    Friar Boy is the name of the dog that is mascot of the Providence Friars.
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Hairy Dawg

    Hairy Dawg

    • School: University of Georgia
    Hairy Dawg is the costumed mascot of the University of Georgia Bulldogs. Hairy Dawg made his first appearance at the 1981 Sugar Bowl and has been an official mascot of UGA since. Hairy Dawg attends all Georgia Bulldogs football games and most home athletic events (including Georgia Bulldogs basketball, Georgia Lady Bulldogs basketball, Georgia Bulldogs baseball, Georgia Gym Dogs, tennis, volleyball, equestrian, and soccer). Forbes ranks Hairy Dawg No. 3 in their list of "America's Top 10 Sports Mascots". The inspiration for Hairy Dawg came in the 1980 football season at the Florida vs. Georgia Football Classic, when Florida unveiled its new mascot. Compared to the rival's mascot, Georgia’s previous mascot was a "dark, dingy gray mutt with zero personality." Tom Sapp, a 1969 Georgia graduate and designer of the mascot explains, “I created Hairy Dawg to intimidate." Former University head football coach Vince Dooley was the first to be presented with the sketches for Hairy Dawg and wanted the mascot at the 1981 Sugar Bowl. After many long and stressful hours of sweating and stitching by Sapp, Hairy Dawg was ready in three weeks for the national championship game between the Georgia
    7.00
    2 votes
    153

    Judge and Bruiser

    Joy "'Lady'" and Bruiser are the mascots of Baylor University in Waco, Texas. Lady and Joy are the names of the live mascots (both of which are North American black bears), while Bruiser is the anthropomorphized bear mascot. The tradition of bears being the mascots of Baylor goes back to 1914, when Baylor president Samuel Palmer Brooks sponsored a competition to find a mascot for the athletics teams, which had been playing since the 1890s. There were over two dozen options given, including antelope, frogs, buffalo and ferrets, but Bears was selected. The first live bear, named Ted, was donated by local businessman Herbert E. Mayr who won him in a poker game from the 107th Engineers at nearby Camp MacArthur in 1917. He premiered at the football game against Texas A&M. There has been a bear on campus ever since. In 1974, the student body voted to give all future bears the first name of "Judge" (in honor of Judge Robert Emmett Bledsoe Baylor, the school's founder) followed by a surname to differentiate between them. The current bears are Judge Joy Reynolds, named for the wife of former president Herbert H. Reynolds, and Judge Sue "Lady" Sloan, named for the wife of former president
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    7.00
    2 votes
    155

    TC Panther

    • School: University of Northern Iowa
    TC Panther is the Mascot for the University of Northern Iowa and the Northern Iowa Panthers athletic teams. TC (The Cat) is the award winning mascot for the University of Northern Iowa, located in Cedar Falls, Iowa. Who TC is the official mascot of the University of Northern Iowa Panthers. TC dates back to the mid 1980s when he became known as “The Cat”, but the Panther dates back to the 1930s. The Panther was chosen as the mascot because of his grace and ferocity and is one of the most respected of the animals. The panther first sizes up the situation, then leaps upon his prey. Once he strikes he rarely misses. Measurements Height: 6 ft., 2 in. Chest: 24 in. Tail: 22 in. long Paw Size: 16.5 in. Design & Production Street Characters Inc. In 1931,The University of Northern Iowa, then called the Iowa State Teachers College held a contest to decide on a new mascot for the school. At the conclusion of the contest it was decided that the Iowa State Teachers College athletics teams would be known as the Purple Panthers. The College Eye sports editor noted the characteristics of the panther that made it an appropriate nickname. "The sinuous grace and bestial ferocity of the panther make
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Unicorn

    Unicorn

    • School: Keio University
    The unicorn is a legendary animal from European folklore that resembles a white horse with a large, pointed, spiraling horn projecting from its forehead, and sometimes a goat's beard and cloven hooves. First mentioned by the ancient Greeks, it became the most important imaginary animal of the Middle Ages and Renaissance when it was commonly described as an extremely wild woodland creature, a symbol of purity and grace, which could only be captured by a virgin. In the encyclopedias its horn was said to have the power to render poisoned water potable and to heal sickness. Until the 19th century, belief in unicorns was widespread among historians, alchemists, writers, poets, naturalists, physicians, and theologians. Unicorns are not found in Greek mythology, but rather in accounts of natural history, for Greek writers of natural history were convinced of the reality of the unicorn, which they located in India, a distant and fabulous realm for them. The earliest description is from Ctesias who described them as wild asses, fleet of foot, having a horn a cubit and a half in length and colored white, red and black. Aristotle must be following Ctesias when he mentions two one-horned
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawks

    Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawks

    • School: Wilfrid Laurier University
    The Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawks is the name used by the varsity sports teams of Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. The university's varsity teams compete in the Ontario University Athletics conference of the Canadian Interuniversity Sport and, where applicable, in the west division. The football program has become one of the best in the conference, recently winning a Vanier Cup national championship in 2005 to go along with their previous title in 1991. Since 2003, the team has not finished lower than fourth in the ten-team OUA conference under the guidance of head coach Gary Jeffries. The women's varsity hockey team have become very successful, winning their first OUA championship in their 1998–1999 season, winning in 2002 and having won five consecutive years in a row (2003–2008). They also won Nationals in 2004–2005. The Golden Hawk Cheerleading team has also risen to prominence in the last few years having won 3 national championship titles at the prestigious University National Cheerleading Championships conducted by Power Cheerleading Athletics. The Golden Hawk Cheerleaders have been ranked in the top five squads in the nation at least 8 times in the
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Bill the Goat

    Bill the Goat

    • School: United States Naval Academy
    Bill the Goat is the mascot of the United States Naval Academy. The mascot is a live goat and is also represented by a costumed midshipman. There is also a bronze statue of the goat just inside Gate 1, the main gate to the Academy grounds. This statue also plays a role in "Army Week" traditions. The Navy Monkey (which was really a gorilla) was the first mascot, which was George Bancroft's favorite animal, and stayed the primary mascot - along with a cat - from 1847 to 1851. The first Bill the Goat appeared in 1893. Currently, Bill XXXIII reigns as the 36th mascot and is the 33rd goat to be named Bill. His backup is Bill XXXIV. For centuries, ships sailed with livestock in order to provide sailors with fresh food, and ships in the British and early American navies often carried goats, to eat the garbage and other undesirable food, and return milk and butter. The first usage of "billy goat" for a male goat occurs in the nineteenth century replacing the older term "he-goat." There is a legend that a Navy ship sailed with a pet goat. The goat died during the cruise. The officers preserved the skin to have it mounted when they returned to port. Two young ensigns were entrusted with the
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Herbie Husker

    Herbie Husker

    • School: University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    Herbie Husker is the oldest current mascot of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's sports teams. Herbie was created by Lubbock, Texas, artist Dirk West and first appeared on the cover of the Husker's media guide in 1974. Soon after, he became the university's official mascot. Herbie has gone through a few makeovers, the most recent coming before the 2003 college football season. Until 2003 he was dressed in denim overalls, a red cowboy hat emblazoned with a large N, and has an ear of corn in his pocket. After the 2003 makeover, he now dons a red cowboy hat, red workshirt, blue jeans and workboots. This was done to update the overall appearance of the state's agricultural workers and general public. During halftime of the 2006 Capital One Bowl, Herbie was named National Mascot of the year for 2005. In January 2005, Herbie starred in his own children's book, Hello, Herbie Husker!, published by Mascot Books. There are currently two students who put on the Herbie costume.
    6.00
    3 votes
    162

    Wild E. Cat

    • School: University of New Hampshire
    Wild E. Cat is the recognized name of the human Wildcat mascot for the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire. "Wild E. Cat" is the fifth live mascot and first human mascot since the UNH declared the Wildcat as the official mascot in 1926.
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Lynx

    Lynx

    • School: Rhodes College
    A lynx ( /ˈlɪŋks/; plural lynx or lynxes) is any of the four species within the Lynx genus of medium-sized wildcats. The name "lynx" originated in Middle English via Latin from Greek word "λύγξ", derived from the Indo-European root "*leuk-", meaning "light, brightness", in reference to the luminescence of its reflective eyes. There is considerable confusion about the best way to classify felids at present, and some authorities classify them as part of the genus Felis. Neither the caracal, sometimes called the Persian lynx or African lynx, nor the jungle cat, called the swamp lynx, is a member of the Lynx genus. Lynx have short tails and the characteristic tufts of black hair on the tips of their ears. They have a ruff under the neck, which has black bars, is not very visible, and resembles a bow tie. They have large, padded paws for walking on snow, and long whiskers on the face. Their body colour varies from medium brown, to goldish, to beige-white, and is occasionally marked with dark brown spots, especially on the limbs. All species of lynx also have white fur on their chests, bellies and on the insides of their legs, which are extensions of the chest and belly fur. Also, the
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    McFogg the Dog

    McFogg the Dog

    • School: Simon Fraser University
    McFogg the Dog was the Scottish Terrier mascot of the Simon Fraser University Clan. Simon Fraser University is a major University located in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. McFogg first appeared in the fall semester of 1996, replacing the former gorilla mascot frequently present at Clan athletic events, who was officially retired on October 18, 1996. It was believed that McFogg better represented the Scottish theme of the university, derived from its namesake, Simon Fraser (explorer). From 1996-2003, McFogg appeared frequently on campus, attending sporting and campus events, including the haggis festival, pipe-band concerts, and annual Shrum Bowl football game. McFogg is named after Simon Fraser University's first president Patrick McTaggart-Cowan. During World War II, McTaggart-Cowan was serving as a meteorologist in charge of determining whether or not the weather would allow Allied aircraft to fly missions. During an extended period of poor weather, McTaggart-Cowan was reportedly given the nickname "McFog" by many of the Allied aviators. This was seen as an appropriate for Simon Fraser's mascot because it is frequently foggy on the school's campus, due to its location atop
    5.67
    3 votes
    165

    Rufus the Bobcat

    • School: Ohio University
    Rufus the Bobcat is the mascot for Ohio University. Ohio University revealed the new mascot during a ceremony before the Bobcats' victory over Tennessee-Martin on Saturday, September 2, 2006. The ceremony began with a video of the mascot interacting with the football team and Head Coach Frank Solich culminating with Rufus roaring into Peden Stadium on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. In early 2006, Ohio University alumus Michael A Massa formally suggested to the university that the university provide a proper name and identity to the generic bobcat mascot. The university held a campus-wide competition to select a formal name. There were more than 500 submissions nominated for the name of the new Bobcat in May. Fans then participated in a naming contest on www.ohiobobcats.com from June through August, the chosen name of the Bobcats' new mascot was Rufus. Rufus was the popular choice for many fans because Lynx rufus is the species name for the bobcat. Other fans made the connection with Rufus Putnam, who presided over the meeting to form the Ohio Company of Associates that resulted in the founding of Ohio University. Rufus Putnam was also on the first board of trustees at the University
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Thunderbird

    Thunderbird

    • School: University of British Columbia
    The thunderbird is a legendary creature in certain North American indigenous peoples' history and culture. It is considered a "supernatural" bird of power and strength. It is especially important, and frequently depicted, in the art, songs and oral histories of many Pacific Northwest Coast cultures, and is found in various forms among the peoples of the American Southwest, Great Lakes, and Great Plains. Thunderbirds were components of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex of American prehistory. The thunderbird's name comes from the common belief that the beating of its enormous wings causes thunder and stirs the wind. The Lakota name for the thunderbird is Wakį́yą, from wakhą, meaning "sacred", and kįyą, meaning "winged". The Kwakwaka'wakw have many names for the thunderbird, and the Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) called it Kw-Uhnx-Wa. The Ojibwa word for a thunderbird that is closely associated with thunder is animikii, while large thunderous birds are known as binesi. Across many North American indigenous cultures, the thunderbird carries many of the same characteristics. It is described as a large bird, capable of creating storms and thundering while it flies. Clouds are pulled together
    5.67
    3 votes
    167
    Bevo

    Bevo

    • School: University of Texas at Austin
    Bevo is the name of the mascot of the sports teams at the University of Texas at Austin, a Texas longhorn steer with burnt orange coloring. The shape of the Longhorn's head and horns gives rise to the school's hand symbol and saying, Hook 'em Horns. The current Bevo is fourteenth in the line of longhorns that have been the university's mascot. A Longhorn steer was not the original mascot of the University of Texas. The original mascot was actually a pit bulldog named "Pig". The idea to use a live strong longhorn as the university's mascot is attributed to UT alumnus Stephen Pinckney in 1916. Pinckney gathered $124 from other alumni to purchase a steer in the Texas Panhandle, which they originally named "Bo" and shipped to Austin. Counting the currently serving mascot, there have been fourteen Bevos to date. Bevo I was originally named "Bo" but came to be called Bevo during his service. Bevo II once charged a SMU cheerleader, who had to defend himself with his megaphone. Bevo III escaped from his enclosure and ran amok across campus for 2 days. Bevo IV once attacked a parked car, while Bevo V broke loose and scattered the Baylor band. More recent Bevos have had a more peaceful
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Demon

    Demon

    • School: Westlake High School
    A demon is a supernatural, often malevolent being prevalent in religion, occultism, literature, and folklore. The original Greek word daimon does not carry the negative connotation initially understood by implementation of the Koine δαιμόνιον (daimonion), and later ascribed to any cognate words sharing the root. In Ancient Near Eastern religions as well as in the Abrahamic traditions, including ancient and medieval Christian demonology, a demon is considered an unclean spirit, more specifically an evil angel, which may cause demonic possession, calling for an exorcism. In Western occultism and Renaissance magic, which grew out of an amalgamation of Greco-Roman magic, Jewish demonology, and Christian tradition, a demon is a spiritual entity that may be conjured and controlled. The Ancient Greek word δαίμων daimōn denotes a spirit or divine power, much like the Latin genius or numen. Daimōn most likely came from the Greek verb daiesthai (to divide, distribute). The Greek conception of a daimōns notably appears in the works of Plato, where it describes the divine inspiration of Socrates. To distinguish the classical Greek concept from its later Christian interpretation, the former is
    6.50
    2 votes
    169

    Indians

    • School: Chipola College
    "Indians" is a single by thrash metal band Anthrax, from the album, Among the Living. It is one of Anthrax's most famous songs, appearing on their best-of albums: Return of the Killer A's, Madhouse: The Very Best of Anthrax and Anthrology: No Hit Wonders (1985–1991). It appears in Guitar Hero game Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock and as downloadable content for the Rock Band series. The music video features Anthrax playing the song live. It was directed by Jean Pellerin. A single was released, it was also the first single for the album, displaying a Native American on a coin with a purple background. Track Listing
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Kansas State's Willie the Wildcat

    Kansas State's Willie the Wildcat

    • School: Kansas State University
    Willie the Wildcat is the mascot for the Kansas State University Wildcats. He is not to be confused with the mascot for Northwestern University or Abilene Christian University, who both have mascots also named Willie the Wildcat. At the start of the 20th century, Kansas State's athletic teams first acquired the nickname "Aggies." This name lives on in the entertainment district that abuts the University, Aggieville. The first costumed Willie mascot appeared in 1947. Since this time Willie has changed many times, and currently has an appearance that is heavily influenced by the team's Powercat logo. While the student inside the mascot costume (whose identity is kept secret) changes every few years, the persona of Willie has remained the same throughout. Willie likes crowd surfing and does one push-up for each point on the board for K-State when the Wildcats score a touchdown or make a field goal.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Osprey

    Osprey

    • School: University of North Florida
    The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus), sometimes known as the sea hawk, fish eagle or fish hawk, is a diurnal, fish-eating bird of prey. It is a large raptor, reaching more than 60 cm (24 in) in length and 180 cm (71 in) across the wings. It is brown on the upperparts and predominantly greyish on the head and underparts, with a black eye patch and wings. The Osprey tolerates a wide variety of habitats, nesting in any location near a body of water providing an adequate food supply. It is found on all continents except Antarctica although in South America it occurs only as a non-breeding migrant. As its other common name suggests, the Osprey's diet consists almost exclusively of fish. It possesses specialised physical characteristics and exhibits unique behaviour to assist in hunting and catching prey. As a result of these unique characteristics, it has been given its own taxonomic genus, Pandion and family, Pandionidae. Four subspecies are usually recognized, one of which has recently been given full species status (see below). Despite its propensity to nest near water, the Osprey is not a sea-eagle. The Osprey was one of the many species described by Carolus Linnaeus in his 18th-century
    6.50
    2 votes
    172

    Paws

    • School: Northeastern University
    Paws is the mascot of the Northeastern University Huskies.
    6.50
    2 votes
    173

    Sparky

    • School: Arizona State University
    Sparky the Sun Devil is the official mascot of Arizona State University. Originally the ASU athletic teams' mascot was an owl, then became a "Normal" (named for the Tempe Normal School), then was later changed to a bulldog. The State Press, the student newspaper, ran frequent appeals during the fall of 1946, urging the Bulldog to be replaced by the new Sun Devil. On November 8, 1946, the student body voted 819 to 196 to make the change. On November 20, as reported by the Arizona Republic, the student council made it official. The following day, the first Arizona State team played as the Sun Devils. Two years later an alumnus and Disney illustrator by the name of Bert Anthony designed Sparky, an imp with a trident (also described as a pitchfork). In the 1970s and early 1980s, Orange Julius beverage stands used the image of a devil with a pitchfork around an orange. The company later dropped the logo after threats of a lawsuit from the alumni association. The hand gesture "The Pitchfork", which is widely used by those associated with Arizona State, is an extension of the trident that Sparky carries.
    6.50
    2 votes
    174

    The Jet Plane

    • School: South Georgia Technical College
    The Jet Plane is South Georgia Technical College's mascot.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Thundar

    • School: North Dakota State University
    "Thundar" is the nickname of the mascot for North Dakota State University's Bison athletic program. The name is derived from an additional nickname that the teams use, the "Thundering Herd". Thundar is a caricature of a bison. He is known for his exaggerated features, including a large head and tail. He is part of the 2008 Capital One Mascot team. Entering the competition, he was seeded at #1, but was defeated by Cy from Iowa State University in the final round. Thundar
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Big Red

    Big Red

    Big Red is the costumed male mascot of the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The mascot is modeled after the wild razorback hog. In the early twentieth century, wild razorback hogs were a common sight in rural Arkansas. After the team's fifth straight victory, over LSU in Memphis, to open the 1909 football season, coach Hugo Bezdek told a group of fans at the train station upon their return that the team played “like a wild band of razorback hogs.” The name stuck, and "Razorbacks" replaced "Cardinals" (still the school color) as the school's nickname. Since the 1960s, live mascots have been kept, the current one being Tusk, a Russian boar which resembles the old razorback hogs; previously, the live mascots were also called "Big Red". There are currently four costumed mascots serving the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. "Big Red" is the original mascot, also nicknamed "the Fighting Razorback." A female mascot, "Sue E.," serves at all women's events, and is known for her dancing skills and costume changes. There is a child-sized mascot named "Pork Chop," popular with younger fans. And, since 1999, "Boss Hog" (named for the character from "The Dukes of Hazard") has
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Hook 'em

    Hook 'em

    • School: University of Texas at Austin
    Hook 'em is the costumed mascot of The University of Texas at Austin's athletics teams. Hook 'em can be seen on the sidelines of Darrell K Royal – Texas Memorial Stadium during football games and also at the Frank Erwin Center during basketball games.
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Sebastian the Ibis

    Sebastian the Ibis

    • School: University of Miami
    Sebastian the Ibis is the official mascot for the University of Miami. He is an anthropomorphized American White Ibis with a Miami Hurricanes football jersey, number 0. The ibis was chosen as Miami's unofficial mascot in 1926 when the school's yearbook chose its name to be "The Ibis." The first official mascot for the Miami Hurricanes was a 65-pound brown and white bulldog named Hurricane I. Chosen in 1950, the canine wore a ceremonial orange and green blanket with his name lettered in white. Sebastian was created in August 1957 and was used as a homecoming competition entry. The next year, student John Stormont performed at Hurricanes football games dressed up in a makeshift ibis costume. The current costume dates from the 1980s. The mascot was named after the San Sebastian building, which became a University dormitory in 1939. The building, now an apartment building, still stands at the intersection of LeJeune Road and University Drive in Coral Gables. From 1984 through 1992, Sebastian was portrayed by John Routh, who also portrayed The Miami Maniac at baseball games, and later Billy the Marlin for the Florida Marlins. Routh created what is now Sebastian's signature: the
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    The Masked Rider

    The Masked Rider

    • School: Texas Tech University
    The Masked Rider is the primary mascot of Texas Tech University. It is the oldest of the university's mascots still in existence today. Originally called "Ghost Rider", it was an unofficial mascot appearing in a few games in 1936 and then became the official mascot with the 1954 Gator Bowl. The Masked Rider has led the team onto the field at nearly every football game since. It is the nation's first school mascot to feature a live horse at a football game, ahead of Florida State's Chief Osceola and Renegade and 25 years before USC's Traveler and all other such mascots in existence today. In fact, after learning of the Masked Rider, other schools emulated the idea of a mounted mascot. Florida State began their tradition in 1978, immediately after seeing Texas Tech's live mascot at the 1977 Tangerine Bowl that pitted the two. The Oklahoma State Cowboys copied the Masked Rider in 1984 when Eddy Finley, a Texas Tech alumnus became an Oklahoma State University agricultural education professor, and started the Spirit Rider Program when both schools were still in separate conferences. The Masked Rider is adorned from head to toe in black, including a black gaucho hat and a black mask.
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Billiken

    Billiken

    • School: Saint Louis University School of Law
    The Billiken was a charm doll created by an American art teacher and illustrator, Florence Pretz of St. Louis, Missouri, who is said to have seen the mysterious figure in a dream. In 1908, she obtained a design patent on the ornamental design of the Billiken, who was elf-like with pointed ears, a mischievous smile and a tuft of hair on his pointed head. His arms were short and he was generally sitting with his legs stretched out in front of him. To buy a Billiken was said to give the purchaser luck, but to have one given would be better luck. The image was copyrighted and a trademark was put on the name. After a few years of popularity, like other fad toys, the Billiken faded into obscurity. The Billiken should not be confused with baby-like Kewpie figures that debuted in the December 1909 Ladies' Home Journal. Today, the Billiken is the official mascot of Saint Louis University and St. Louis University High School, both Jesuit institutions, and both located in St. Louis. The Billiken is also the official mascot of the Royal Order of Jesters, an invitation only Shriner group, affiliated with Freemasonry. Many current on-line articles about the Billikens are based on an article by
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Lancer

    Lancer

    • School: Pasadena City College
    A lancer was a type of cavalryman who fought with a lance. Lances were used in mounted warfare by the Assyrians as early as 700 BC and subsequently by Greek, Persian, Gallic, Han-Chinese, nomadic and Roman horsemen. The weapon was widely used in Asia and Europe during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance by armoured cavalry before being adopted by light cavalry, particularly in Eastern Europe. The lancer (called ułan in Polish and Uhlan in German) had become a common sight in almost every European, Ottoman and Indian army during this time, but with the exception of the Ottoman troops, they increasingly discarded the heavy armour to give greater freedom of movement in combat. The Polish "winged" lancers were amongst the last to abandon the armour in Europe. There was a widespread debate over the value of the lance in mounted combat during the 18th and 19th centuries and most armies had few lancer units by the beginning of the 19th century; however during the Napoleonic Wars lancers were to be seen in many of the combatant nations as their qualities became clear. During the wars the Poles became a ready territory for recruitment by several armies, willingly or unwillingly, and served
    5.33
    3 votes
    184

    Muleriders

    • School: Southern Arkansas University
    The Southern Arkansas University Muleriders, also known as The 'Riders, is the name of college sports teams at the Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia, Arkansas. The Muleriders take their name from the legend that the football team in the early 1900s had to ride mules from the college's agricultural department to catch the nearest train 6 miles north of the college in order to reach out-of-town football games. The teams are the only sports team in the US with the nickname and are often listed in top 10 lists of the most unusual or unique mascot names.
    5.33
    3 votes
    185
    Warrior

    Warrior

    • School: Merrimack College
    A warrior is a person skilled in combat or warfare, especially within the context of a tribal or clan-based society that recognizes a separate warrior class. In tribal societies engaging in endemic warfare, warriors often form a caste or class of their own. In feudalism, the vassals essentially form a military or warrior class, even if in actual warfare, peasants may be called to fight as well. In some societies, warfare may be so central that the entire people (or, more often, large parts of the male population) may be considered warriors, for example in the Iron Age Germanic tribes and Indian clans like the Rajputs and Sikhs. While the warrior class in tribal societies is typically all-male, there are some exceptions on record where women (typically unmarried, young women) formed part of the warrior class. A purported group of fighting women is the legendary Amazons, recorded in Classical Greek mythology. The military caste in a feudal society is evolved from—but not identical with—the warrior class in a tribal society. Many pre-modern states had castes, estates or social groups dedicated to warfare. This includes the Khalsa and Kshatriya castes in ancient and modern India, the
    5.33
    3 votes
    186
    Antelope

    Antelope

    • School: Avonworth High School
    Antelope is a term referring to many even-toed ungulate species indigenous to various regions in Africa and Eurasia. Antelopes comprise a miscellaneous group within the family Bovidae, encompassing those old-world species that are neither cattle, sheep, buffalo, bison, nor goats. A group of antelope is called a herd. The English word "antelope" first appears in 1417 and is derived from the Old French antelop, itself derived from Medieval Latin ant(h)alopus, which in turn comes from the Byzantine Greek word anthólops, first attested in Eustathius of Antioch (circa 336), according to whom it was a fabulous animal "haunting the banks of the Euphrates, very savage, hard to catch and having long, saw-like horns capable of cutting down trees". It perhaps derives from Greek anthos (flower) and ops (eye), perhaps meaning "beautiful eye" or alluding to the animals' long eyelashes; however, this may be a later folk etymology. The word talopus and calopus, from Latin, came to be used in heraldry. In 1607, it was first used for living, cervine animals. There are 91 species, most of which are native to Africa, in about 30 genera. The classification of tribes or subfamilies within Bovidae is
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    6.00
    2 votes
    188

    Kohawk

    • School: Coe College
    Kohawk is the mascot of Coe College, located in Cedar Rapids, IA. Its name, often assumed to be an imaginary bird, actually means "like" a hawk. "Like" comes from "Ko" which originated from a nearby Native American language. The athletic teams associated with Coe College often call themselves Kohawks.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Northwestern's Willie the Wildcat

    Northwestern's Willie the Wildcat

    • School: Northwestern University
    Willie the Wildcat is the mascot for the Northwestern University Wildcats. He is not to be confused with the mascot for Kansas State University, also named Willie The Wildcat. The first mascot was a live, caged bear cub from the Lincoln Park Zoo named Furpaw. In fall 1923, Furpaw was driven to the playing field to greet the fans before each game. After a losing season, the team decided that Furpaw was the harbinger of bad luck and banished him from campus. The name "Wildcats" was bestowed upon the university in 1924 by a writer for the Chicago Tribune who wrote that even in a loss to the University of Chicago Maroons, the Northwestern football players looked like "Wildcats [that] had come down from Evanston." The name was so popular that university board members made "Wildcats" the official nickname just months later. In 1933, the Northwestern athletic department and an advertising firm created the first image of Willie. He did not actually come to life until 1947, when members of the Alpha Delta fraternity dressed up as him during the Homecoming parade. In 2007, the first football game revealed a new-look Willie after a "makeover".
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Ralphie

    Ralphie

    • School: University of Colorado at Boulder
    Ralphie the Buffalo is the name of the live mascot of the University of Colorado Buffaloes. Ralphie has been called one of the best live mascots in sports, and she is often erroneously labeled male. The team of "Ralphie Handlers," who are varsity student-athletes, run Ralphie around Folsom Field, the University of Colorado's football field, in a horse shoe pattern before each half of each home game. It takes five Ralphie Handlers to run her around the field: two up front on each side to steer her around the field, two in the back on each side to help guide her, and one in far back to control her speed, called the "loop" position. Ralphie can reach speeds of 25 miles per hour (40 km/h). Female bison are used because they are smaller and less aggressive, as well as for insurance reasons, although Ralphie has knocked over her handlers on more than one occasion. Because of this, whether or not Ralphie runs is at the sole discretion of her handlers, and her run may be canceled if she is unusually nervous or upset. The tradition began in 1934, three weeks after the selection of Buffaloes as a nickname for the University in a contest by the school newspaper, the Silver & Gold. A group of
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    6.00
    2 votes
    192

    Trinity Tiger

    • School: Trinity Christian School - Cedar Hill
    Tiger is Trinity Christian School - Cedar Hill's mascot.
    5.00
    3 votes
    193
    5.00
    3 votes
    194
    Gopher

    Gopher

    • School: Goucher College
    Gopher is the common term for any of several distinct species of small burrowing rodents endemic to North America, including: the pocket gopher (family Geomyidae), also called true gophers; the ground squirrel (family Sciuridae); Richardson's ground squirrel; and species of prairie dog. Gophers weigh around 0.5 pounds (230 g), and are about 15 inches (38 cm) long in body length, with a tail 7 inches (18 cm) long. Their lifespan is normally 2–3 years (assuming no diseases or predation). Gophers dig tunnels and subterranean chambers, and are associated with the rodent order, Rodentia. There are over 100 kinds of gophers in America. Gophers, because of their burrowing, can disrupt human plans like commercial agriculture, garden plots, some landscaping, and some underground cables. This has led to their frequent treatment as pests. Gophers create a large community of tunnels with large mounds of dirt (not always mounds of dirt at the top) at their entrances, frequently referred to as gopher towns or gopher holes. They are also found in parks. Adult gophers will frequently stand watch at the entrance to a tunnel and whistle when predators are spotted, causing all the other gophers to
    5.50
    2 votes
    195

    Rams

    • School: J Russell Elementary School
    Rams, most commonly, refers to the plural of the word ram. In zoology, a ram is an uncastrated adult male sheep. Other uses of Rams include:
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Raven

    Raven

    • School: San Jacinto College
    Raven is the common name given to several larger-bodied members of the genus Corvus—but in Europe and North America the Common Raven is normally implied. They have black plumage and large beaks. Species include: Extinct: Smaller-bodied species in the genus Corvus include the crows, jackdaws, and the rook. Most ravens eat some sort of fruit, such as dates, or berries. Most are omnivorous. The ravens look similar to another common bird, the crow, being related.
    5.50
    2 votes
    197

    Rodney the Raven

    • School: Carleton University
    Rodney the Raven is the official mascot of the Anderson University. Rodney, normally portrayed by a costumed character, is usually represented as a stylized raven with black feathers, yellow legs, and an orange beak. Rodney reflects the tradition of referring to Anderson students as "Ravens." Rodney the Raven is the face of AU athletics and has been increasingly used to raise school spirit on AU's campus. Formerly the Tigers, AU's mascot was changed to a Raven in 1937.
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Titan

    Titan

    • School: T. C. Williams High School
    In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek: Τιτάν—Ti-tan; plural: Τιτᾶνες—Ti-tânes) were a primeval race of powerful deities, descendants of Gaia (Earth) and Uranus (Heaven), that ruled during the legendary Golden Age. They were immortal giants of incredible strength and stamina and were also the first pantheon of Greco-Roman gods and goddesses. In the first generation of twelve Titans, the males were Oceanus, Hyperion, Coeus, Cronus, Crius and Iapetus and the females - the Titanesses - were Mnemosyne, Tethys, Theia, Phoebe, Rhea and Themis. The second generation of Titans consisted of Hyperion's children Eos, Helios, and Selene; Coeus's daughters Leto and Asteria; Iapetus's sons Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius; Oceanus' daughter Metis; and Crius's sons Astraeus, Pallas, and Perses. The Titans were overthrown by a race of younger gods, the Olympians, in the Titanomachy ("War of the Titans"). This represented a mythological paradigm shift that the Greeks may have borrowed from the Ancient Near East. Greeks of the classical age knew of several poems about the war between the Olympians and Titans. The dominant one, and the only one that has survived, was in the Theogony
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Bison

    Bison

    • School: Gallaudet University
    Members of the genus Bison are large, even-toed ungulates within the subfamily Bovinae. Two extant and four extinct species are recognized. The surviving species are the American bison, also known as the American buffalo (although it is only distantly related to the true buffalo), Bison bison, found in North America, and the European bison, or wisent (Bison bonasus), found in Europe and the Caucasus. The North American species is composed of two subspecies, the plains bison, Bison bison bison, and the wood bison, Bison bison athabascae. While all bison species are usually grouped into their own genus, they are sometimes included in the closely related genus Bos, together with cattle, gaur, kouprey and yaks, with which bison have a limited ability to interbreed. The American bison and the European wisent are the largest terrestrial animals in North America and Europe. Bison are good swimmers and can cross rivers over half a mile (1 km) wide. Bison are nomadic grazers and travel in herds. The bulls leave the herds of females at 2 or 3 years of age, and join a male herd which is generally smaller than the female herds. Mature bulls rarely travel alone. Both sexes get together for the
    4.67
    3 votes
    200
    Fire

    Fire

    • School: Southeastern University of the Assemblies of God
    Fire is the rapid oxidation of a material in the exothermic chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products. Slower oxidative processes like rusting or digestion are not included by this definition. In ancient Greece, fire was considered one of four elements. The flame is the visible portion of the fire. If hot enough, the gases may become ionized to produce plasma. Depending on the substances alight, and any impurities outside, the color of the flame and the fire's intensity will be different. Fire in its most common form can result in conflagration, which has the potential to cause physical damage through burning. Fire is an important process that affects ecological systems across the globe. The positive effects of fire include stimulating growth and maintaining various ecological systems. Fire has been used by humans for cooking, generating heat, signaling, and propulsion purposes. The negative effects of fire include water contamination, soil erosion, atmospheric pollution and hazard to human and animal life. Fires start when a flammable and/or a combustible material, in combination with a sufficient quantity of an oxidizer such as oxygen
    4.67
    3 votes
    201
    Blue Streak

    Blue Streak

    • School: Woodstock High School
    The Blue Streaks is the mascot of Woodstock High School, Woodstock, Illinois
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Bobcat

    Bobcat

    • School: West Virginia Wesleyan College
    The bobcat (Lynx rufus) is a North American mammal of the cat family Felidae, appearing during the Irvingtonian stage of around 1.8 million years ago (AEO). With twelve recognized subspecies, it ranges from southern Canada to northern Mexico, including most of the continental United States. The bobcat is an adaptable predator that inhabits wooded areas, as well as semi-desert, urban edge, forest edges, and swampland environments. It persists in much of its original range and populations are healthy. With a gray to brown coat, whiskered face, and black-tufted ears, the bobcat resembles the other species of the mid-sized Lynx genus. It is smaller on average than the Canada lynx, with which it shares parts of its range, but is about twice as large as the domestic cat. It has distinctive black bars on its forelegs and a black-tipped, stubby tail, from which it derives its name. Though the bobcat prefers rabbits and hares, it will hunt anything from insects, chickens, and small rodents to deer. Prey selection depends on location and habitat, season, and abundance. Like most cats, the bobcat is territorial and largely solitary, although there is some overlap in home ranges. It uses
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Butch T. Cougar

    Butch T. Cougar

    • School: Washington State University
    Butch T. Cougar is the mascot of Washington State University. As his name indicates, Butch is a cougar. Though the cougar was adopted as Washington State University's mascot in 1919 it was not until 1927 when a cougar cub was presented to the student body of Washington State that Butch T. Cougar was born. The cougar was named Butch after Herbert "Butch" Meeker of Spokane, a football star of the day. Butch was represented by a live cougar until 1978 when Butch VI died at age 15. Today Butch is represented by a costumed student. Butch T. Cougar was the 2006 Capital One Mascot of the Year The primary duty of Butch is to be an ambassador of WSU. He can be seen roaming the sidelines at home American football and basketball games leading spirit chants and tossing shirts into the stands. Butch also makes appearances at official University events and other events to promote the image of WSU. The student playing Butch is anonymous throughout the school year. At the last home sporting event of each year, usually the last home basketball game, the student beneath the Butch mask is revealed.
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Cougar

    Cougar

    • School: National Autonomous University of Mexico
    The cougar (Puma concolor), also known as the puma, mountain lion, or catamount, is a mammal of the family Felidae, native to the Americas. This large, solitary cat has the greatest range of any large wild terrestrial mammal in the Western Hemisphere, extending from Yukon in Canada to the southern Andes of South America. An adaptable, generalist species, the cougar is found in every major American habitat type. It is the second heaviest cat in the Western Hemisphere, after the jaguar. Although large, the cougar is most closely related to smaller felines and is closer genetically to the domestic cat than to true lions. Like the smaller felines, the cougar is nocturnal. A capable stalk-and-ambush predator, the cougar pursues a wide variety of prey. Primary food sources include ungulates such as deer, elk, moose, and bighorn sheep, as well as domestic cattle, horses and sheep, particularly in the northern part of its range. It will also hunt species as small as insects and rodents. This cat prefers habitats with dense underbrush and rocky areas for stalking, but it can also live in open areas. The cougar is territorial and survives at low population densities. Individual territory
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    6.00
    1 votes
    206

    Pegleg

    A pegleg is a prosthesis, more specifically an artificial limb of carved wood fitted to the remaining stump of a human leg, and is often portrayed in pirate movies. Wooden peg legs have been replaced by more modern materials, though some sports prostheses do have the same form.
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Turtle

    Turtle

    • School: College for Advanced Studies in Social Theory
    The Turtle (also called the American Turtle) was the world's first submersible with a documented record of use in combat. It was built in Old Saybrook, Connecticut in 1775 by American Patriot David Bushnell as a means of attaching explosive charges to ships in a harbor. Bushnell designed it for use against British Royal Navy vessels occupying North American harbors during the American Revolutionary War. Connecticut Governor Jonathan Trumbull recommended the invention to George Washington; although the commander-in-chief had doubts, he provided funds and support for the development and testing of the machine. Several attempts were made using the Turtle to affix explosives to the undersides of British warships in New York Harbor in 1776. All failed, and her transport ship was sunk later that year by the British with the submarine aboard. Bushnell claimed eventually to have recovered the machine, but its final fate is unknown. Modern functional replicas of the Turtle have been constructed; the Connecticut River Museum, the Submarine Force Library and Museum, and the Royal Navy Submarine Museum have them on display. In the early 1770s, Yale College freshman David Bushnell began
    6.00
    1 votes
    208

    Angels

    • School: Academy of the Holy Angels
    "Angels" is the third single of Dutch symphonic metal/rock band Within Temptation from their album The Silent Force. It peaked at #1 in Finland and #1 in the Netherlands. It is also one of their most successful singles in the U.S. along with "Ice Queen", "Stand My Ground", "Mother Earth", "The Howling" and Memories. The song was shipped to American rock radio on July 29, 2007. The video is shot in a desert in Spain. It tells the story of a group of vigilante angels who make it their mission to wipe out evil. Sharon den Adel is a woman who has been seemingly abandoned on the side of the road in the middle of nowhere. She accepts a lift from a priest, who takes her back to his home. The priest is in fact a demonic serial killer, who adopts different disguises to get to his victims. All of these disguises are trustworthy people, like a doctor, a police officer, a clown, judge, or a priest. As Sharon stumbles upon a board full of newspaper clippings in the killers home, which are about his previous victims, he seemingly overpowers her with chloroform. He takes a tied up Sharon to the middle of the desert to bury her alive. However, Sharon immediately awakens as the other angels
    4.33
    3 votes
    209
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Phoenix

    Phoenix

    • School: Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering
    The phoenix (Greek: Φοίνιξ Greek pronunciation: [ˈfiniks], Persian: ققنوس, Arabic: العنقاء أو طائر الفينيق, Chinese: 鳳凰 or 不死鳥, Turkish: Tuğrul), Hebrew: פניקס), is a mythical sacred fire bird that can be found in the mythologies of the Arabian, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Chinese, Turks, Indians and (according to Sanchuniathon) Phoenicians/Canaanites. It is described as a bird with a colorful plumage and a tail of gold and scarlet (or purple, blue, and green according to some legends). It has a 500 to 1000 year life-cycle, near the end of which it builds itself a nest of twigs that then ignites; both nest and bird burn fiercely and are reduced to ashes, from which a new, young phoenix or phoenix egg arises, reborn anew to live again. The new phoenix is destined to live as long as its old self. In some stories, the new phoenix embalms the ashes of its old self in an egg made of myrrh and deposits it in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis (literally "sun-city" in Greek). It is said that the bird's cry is that of a beautiful song. The Phoenix's ability to be reborn from its own ashes implies that it is immortal, though in some stories the new Phoenix is merely the offspring of
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Oblation

    Oblation

    • School: University of the Philippines
    The Oblation (Filipino: Pahinungod, Oblasyon) is a concrete statue by Filipino artist Guillermo E. Tolentino which serves as the iconic symbol of the University of the Philippines. It depicts a man facing upward with arms outstretched, symbolizing selfless offering of oneself to his country. The idea for the Oblation was first conceived during the presidency of Rafael Palma, who was the one to commission Tolentino to make the sculpture. Palma requested that the statue would be based on the second verse of Rizal's Mi Ultimo Adios; The concrete sculpture painted to look like bronze, measures 3.5 meters in height, symbolizing the 350 years of Spanish rule in the Philippines. The sculpture is replete with references of selfless dedication and service to the nation, and as Tolentino himself describes it; Originally, the statue was completely naked, but, as morality was prevailing at that time, it was modified by former U.P. President Jorge Bocobo with the addition of a fig leaf to cover the genitals. The sculpture was funded by the U.P. students of 1935-1936, and was presided by Potenciano Illusorio and Jose B. Laurel, Jr., presidents of the student council during the first and second
    4.50
    2 votes
    212

    Rhody the Ram

    • School: University of Rhode Island
    Rhody the Ram is the official mascot of the University of Rhode Island. His mascot status was given on March 8, 1923, and he made his first appearance on November 21, 1929. At one time a real ram was housed at a dairy barn across from the campus, but that stopped in the 1960s, and was picked up for one year in 1974. Unlike other popular universities, the Rhody the Ram mascot program is run by the URI Student Alumni Association, a student run organization which serves the university by organizing many popular events on campus. February 3, 1998 - Rhody the Ram tried to prevent the St. Joe's Hawk from his eternal flapping by putting an inner tube over its head, temporarily immobilizing his arms. While trying to remove the tube, the Hawk's head (costume) fell off. The incident was televised and repeated on ESPN. December 2, 2006 - Rhody the Ram was assaulted by a fan at the Dunkin Donuts center during halftime of the annual URI-Providence College game, a fierce in-state rivalry. The assailant was never found, but Comedy Central talk show host Stephen Colbert has claimed responsibility for the attack. The Ram was taken to the hospital for minor injuries, making this another incident in
    4.50
    2 votes
    213

    RMIT Redbacks

    • School: RMIT University
    The RMIT Redbacks are the semi-professional university sports team collective of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) It is managed by the campus union RMIT Link. The teams compete at a regional level in the Southern University Games and at a national level in the Australian University Games. It was crowned overall champion at the Southern University Games in 2008 and 2012. Members of the Redbacks have also competed at an international level at Universiade, and various other international competitions.
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Stanford Tree

    Stanford Tree

    • School: Stanford University School of Earth Sciences
    The Stanford Tree is the Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band's mascot and the unofficial mascot of Stanford University. Stanford's team name is "The Cardinal," referring to the vivid red color (not the common song bird as at several other schools), and the University has never been able to come up with an official mascot. The Tree, in various vesions, has been called one of America's most bizarre and controversial college mascots. The tree regularly appears at the top of internet "worst mascot" lists, and has also appeared on several Best Mascots lists. The Tree is a member of the Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band (LSJUMB) and appears at football games, basketball games, and other events where the Band performs. The "Tree" is representative of El Palo Alto, the tree that appears on both the official seal of the University and the municipal seal of Palo Alto, Stanford's nearby city. From 1930 until 1972, Stanford's sports teams had been known as "the Indians," and, during the period from 1951 to 1972, Prince Lightfoot (portrayed by Timm Williams, a member of the Yurok tribe) was the official mascot. But in 1972, Native American students and staff members
    4.50
    2 votes
    215

    Tiger

    • School: Princeton University
    A tiger is the mascot for many professional sports teams, universities, secondary schools, and other organizations, including: (In the United States, unless otherwise noted)
    4.50
    2 votes
    216

    UC Merced Golden Bobcats

    • School: University of California, Merced
    The mascot of University of California, Merced is the Golden Bobcat and the school colors are royal blue and gold. A majority of UCM's sports teams compete as club sports and intramurals. On April 19th, the NAIA made UC Merced one of four new members to join the organization. On May 6th, the Golden Bobcats were made official members of the California Pacific Conference. The announced sports that will compete intercollegiately will be men's and women's cross country, women's volleyball and men's basketball. Club sports at UC Merced include aquatics, baseball, women's basketball, lacrosse, men's and women's soccer, softball and men's volleyball as of now. The university plans on adding more as the school progresses. The teams compete against sister UC's and other California universities. Intramurals include a wide array of sports such as ultimate frisbee, flag football, coed volleyball, etc.
    4.50
    2 votes
    217
    Wilbur

    Wilbur

    • School: University of Arizona
    Wilbur and Wilma Wildcat are the official mascots at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. In 1915, the school's first mascot, "Rufus Arizona" was brought to campus. He was a live desert bobcat, named for U of A president Rufus von KleinSmid. For the next fifty years, the school used live mascots, a practice which was discontinued in the 1960s. However, in 1959, Wilbur, the costumed version of the live bobcat mascots, began appearing at football games. He was extremely popular, and has stayed ever since. In 1986, Wilma Wildcat was created, and was even married to Wilbur. Originally, in honor of Arizona's Old West heritage, Wilbur wore a blue flat-topped cowboy hat, a blue vest, a cardinal bandana scarf around his neck and a holster with two pistols. Recently, Wilbur and Wilma have taken to wearing the teams' athletics jerseys instead of their traditional outfits, both as a sign of team spirit and to avoid references to gun violence. However, the hat remains on Wilbur, and Wilma wears a cardinal-colored bow. The identities of the students portraying Wilbur and Wilma are kept confidential until the final home basketball game of the season.
    4.50
    2 votes
    218
    Gamecock

    Gamecock

    • School: Jacksonville State University
    A gamecock or game fowl is a type of rooster with physical and behavioral traits suitable for cockfighting and may be further identified as a secular term denoting use of a fighting cock as identified in the Douay–Rheims Bible translation from the late 4th-century Latin Vulgate into English of Proverbs 30:31 of "a cock girded about the loins". The first use of the word gamecock, denoting use of the cock as to a “game”, a sport, pastime or entertainment, being in 1646. after the term “cock of the game” used by George Wilson, in the earliest known book on the secular sport of cockfighting in The Commendation of Cocks and Cock Fighting in 1607. Game fowl are more closely related to their wild cousins "jungle fowl"; a shy wild chicken from forests in South Central and Southeastern Asia. Game fowl are physically more similar to jungle fowl than domestic chickens and are bred to retain these physical attributes as well as the jungle fowl's natural territorial instinct. This instinct among sexually mature males is the driving force behind their desire to dominate (and eliminate) other males that would compete for breeding rights in their territory. Hens also will often have an above
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Paydirt Pete

    Paydirt Pete

    • School: University of Texas at El Paso
    Paydirt Pete is the current mascot of the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP). He is a student dressed as a prospector, reflecting UTEP's nickname of "Miners". The Miners have had nearly as many mascots for its athletic teams as the school has had names. Probably the first so-called mascot was a student dressed as a prospector leading a burro named Clyde. Some years after Clyde began making appearances at football games, then-president Dr. Joseph Ray became disenchanted with the animal's appearance. In a letter to the dean of students, Dr. Ray demanded that something be done about that "sorry-looking, pot-bellied creature, not fit to represent the Miners." Clyde was surveyed out in 1966 and replaced by Henry, another burro. The name Paydirt Pete originated from a 1974 contest to give a name to the mascot. The name Paydirt Pete was selected from over 500 entries. The first animated Paydirt Pete was given a face in 1974. It was recreated in 1980. This was a lovable little ol' Miner which probably led to his being dubbed "Sweet Pito." At any rate, ol' Sweet Pito was not a very popular mascot and, like Clyde, he made a quick exit in order for the present Paydirt Pete to arrive on the
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    The Bird

    The Bird

    The Bird is the mascot of the United States Air Force Academy. The Bird is also the name of the bronze falcon statuette presented to distinguished visitors or speakers at the Academy. After the distinguished visitor is finished, they are presented with the statuette under the traditional line, "...on behalf of the Academy and the Cadet Wing we would like to give you ..." All cadets in the audience finish this sentence by calling out "The Bird!" The falcon was chosen as the official mascot by the inaugural class of 1959 for its symbolization of the aerial combat of the US Air Force. The Air Force Academy falcon is the only performing mascot in the National Collegiate Athletic Association, performing at football games, other athletic events, and cadet parades. The birds are housed on the Academy grounds and trained by cadets.
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    USC Traveler

    USC Traveler

    • School: University of Southern California
    Traveler is a horse who is the mascot of the University of Southern California. He appears at all USC home football games in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum as well as many other outdoor events, including numerous Rose Parades. The current horse is Traveler VII. Although the Traveler web site describes Traveler as "pure white," most of the horses who have served as Traveler are actually gray horses whose hair coats have become completely white. (Truly white horses are quite uncommon.) The rider, dressed as an idealized Trojan warrior, is often mistaken for Tommy Trojan, the Trojan portrayed in USC's famous Trojan Shrine statue; however, the rider is unnamed and simply designated as a Trojan warrior with the horse as the official mascot. Until it was renovated in the 1990s, the Coliseum included an Olympic running track going around the football field. This proved to be useful for Traveler, who would gallop around the track after every USC score and pump up the crowd. Once the track was removed, Traveler still made its way around the field but had to move cautiously to avoid people on the sidelines. The horse had a minor collision with a person in 2000, and afterwards had human
    5.00
    1 votes
    222

    Griffin

    • School: College of William and Mary
    The Griffin, a mythical creature with the head of an eagle and the body of a lion, is the mascot of The College of William & Mary. William & Mary President Taylor Reveley announced the adoption of the new mascot on April 6, 2010. The Griffin mascot beat out the other four finalists: a King and Queen (dual mascot), a Phoenix, a Pug, and a Wren. The Griffin replaced the College's unofficial mascot a green and gold frog called "Colonel Ebirt". Originally, the mascot for William and Mary were students that dressed as Native Americans because William & Mary's athletic teams used to be known as the "Indians", which was later changed to the "Tribe." In May 2006, the NCAA ruled that the old athletic logo for William & Mary, which includes two green and gold feathers, could create an environment that is offensive to the Native American community. The College's appeal regarding the use of the institution’s athletic logo to the NCAA Executive Committee was rejected. The "Tribe" nickname, by itself, was found to be neither hostile nor abusive, but rather communicates ennobling sentiments of commitment, shared idealism, community and common cause. The College stated it would phase out the use
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    4.00
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    224
    Keggy the Keg

    Keggy the Keg

    • School: Dartmouth College
    Keggy the Keg is the unofficial mascot of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League university in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. Keggy is an anthropomorphic beer keg, invented in 2003 by members of the college humor magazine the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern, to fill the mascot void that followed the abolition of the Indian mascot in 1971. Due to its nature, the mascot was controversial on Dartmouth's campus, and it was reported on in a variety of national media. With time, however, it has become an "ingrained part of Dartmouth culture". After dropping the mascot of the Indian Dartmouth had no official mascot. Dartmouth continued to be known by its nickname of "The Big Green," but, citing the ambiguity, lack of dynamism, and intangibility of having no mascot, the Dartmouth Student Assembly proposed a student poll in spring 2003 to decide upon a new mascot. While the Moose came in first in this poll, many students remained dissatisfied with the choice, and the moose lost a final poll to "no mascot." Chris Plehal and Nic Duquette, students at the Jack-O-Lantern humor magazine, expressed interest in creating a mascot that "wasn't racist, biased or sexist, yet [was] entirely unacceptable."
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    225
    Knightro

    Knightro

    • School: University of Central Florida
    Knightro is the official mascot of the University of Central Florida, and its sports teams, the Knights. Knightro appears at UCF sporting events and also appears at UCF-related functions. Knightro is sometimes seen riding a horse around the campus, and occasionally uses a custom car designed and built by UCF Engineering students dubbed "Chariot II." In 1994 a committee was formed to explore and develop a character mascot that would attend athletics events. A number of drawings were submitted by Trey Gordon. With Linda Gooch, Gordon and SGA commissioned Metropolis Graphics to sketch a knight. UCF's first mascot had been the Citronaut in 1969. The first costume was made by Costume World, of Pompano Beach. Gordon filled the mascot position during that first season of 1994-95. At the start of the 1995-96 season, Trey recruited a freshman engineering student named Jay Lovelace to join him. Lovelace would fill the position of Knightro for four more years. In 1996, a new Knightro was created by a Disney character developer, and the female "Glycerin" was added. But after two years, the costumes had fallen apart. In 1998, Dave Minichello, of Wizzards Production, created the molds for the
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    226

    Lyceum Pirates

    The Lyceum Pirates is the name of the collegiate men's varsity basketball team of the Lyceum of the Philippines University that plays in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (Philippines), the premiere athletic league in the country. The collegiate women's varsity basketball team is called the Lady Pirates which plays in the Women's National Collegiate Athletic Association (Philippines) (WNCAA) while the high school varsity basketball team is called the Junior Pirates from the Cavite Branch. Lyceum is a founding member of the Inter-Scholastic Athletic Association (ISAA), where they are a two time defending champions. But they left the league to be a Guest team in NCAA Season 87. Lyceum together with FEATI University, Ma­nila Doctors College, Southville International School and Colleges, Manila Adventist Medical Center and Colleges and La Consolacion College formed the Inter-Scholastic Athletic Association (ISAA) back in 2009. They eventually became the basketball champions both men's and women's up until the 2010 season. After the 2010 season they left the league to pursue their dreams in the NCAA. In the WNCAA they are back-to-back champions in 2010 and 2011 respectively.
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    227
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    228

    Otto the Orange

    • School: Syracuse University
    Otto the Orange is the mascot for the Syracuse Orange, the athletic teams of Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York, USA. Otto is an anthropomorphic orange, wearing a large blue hat and blue pants. Though "Otto" is typically a male name, the mascot is traditionally regarded as gender-neutral. Otto can usually be seen at Syracuse sporting events in the Carrier Dome and other university sporting events. A team of 4-6 students serve as Otto, each one passing tryouts and a training program. The Syracuse mascot was originally a Native American character named "The Saltine Warrior" (Syracuse's unofficial nickname is the Salt City) and "Big Chief Bill Orange". The character was born out of a hoax in which it was claimed that a 16th century Onondogan Indian chief was unearthed while digging the foundation for the women's gymnasium in 1928. In the mid-1950s, the father of a Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity brother owned a cheerleading camp. He made a Saltine Warrior costume for his son to wear at SU football games. Thus began a nearly forty-year tradition of Lambda Chi brothers serving as SU's mascot. In 1990 however the University opened up the mascot traditions to the entire student body
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    229

    Swoop

    • School: Eastern Washington University
    Swoop is the mascot of the Eastern Washington Eagles.
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    230

    Vic the Demon

    • School: Northwestern State University
    Vic The Demon is the mascot at Northwestern State University. His name is short for "VICtory." He is most noted as the mascot involved in a fight with Northeast Louisiana University mascot Chief Brave Spirit, in which playful sparring on the sidelines turned into an ugly fight. The two mascots were separated by police, by which time, the headpiece of Vic's costume had been knocked off. As the game was televised, the footage of the brawling mascots was widely broadcast on sports newscasts around the country and still appears on bloopers shows to this day.
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    231
    Albert and Alberta

    Albert and Alberta

    • School: University of Florida
    Albert E. Gator and Alberta Gator are the official mascots of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. Costumed in plush, Albert and Alberta are anthropomorphic representations of American alligators. The modern University of Florida was created when the Florida Legislature passed the Buckman Act in 1905, which dissolved the state's existing public institutions of higher education, and consolidated the faculty and academic programs of four predecessor institutions in the new "University of the State of Florida." After operating on the Lake City campus of one of its predecessor's during the 1905–1906 academic year, the modern university occupied its current campus in Gainesville, Florida in September 1906, and fielded its first official intercollegiate sports team (football) that autumn. Early in its existence, the football team adopted orange and blue as its official colors, representing a combination of the orange and black colors of the former Florida Agricultural College in Lake City and the blue and white colors of the former East Florida Seminary in Gainesville, the modern university's two oldest predecessors. The football team did not initially have an official
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    232
    Bantam

    Bantam

    • School: Petaluma Junior High School
    A bantam is a small variety of poultry, especially chickens. Etymologically, the name bantam is derived from the city of Bantam - currently known as "Banten Province" or previously "Banten Residency" - once a major seaport, in Indonesia. European sailors restocking on live fowl for sea journeys found the small native breeds of chicken in Southeast Asia to be useful, and any such small poultry came to be known as a bantam. Most large chicken breeds have a bantam counterpart, sometimes referred to as a miniature. Miniatures are usually one-fifth to one-quarter the size of the standard breed, but they are expected to exhibit all of the standard breed's characteristics. Bantams are suitable for smaller backyards as they do not need as much space as other breeds. Bantam hens are also used as laying hens. With some Bantam breeds laying up to 150 eggs per year[2]. However, Bantam eggs are only about one-half to one-third the size of a regular hen egg. The Bantam chicken eats the same foods as a normal chicken. In commercial situations they are fed grain based foods because this is convenient and efficient for the producer. Chickens in the wild eat more insects and vegetation than
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    233
    Book

    Book

    • School: Machakos Institute of Technology
    A book is a set of written, printed, illustrated, or blank sheets, made of ink, paper, parchment, or other materials, usually fastened together to hinge at one side. A single sheet within a book is called a leaf, and each side of a leaf is called a page. A book produced in electronic format is known as an electronic book (e-book). Books may also refer to works of literature, or a main division of such a work. In library and information science, a book is called a monograph, to distinguish it from serial periodicals such as magazines, journals or newspapers. The body of all written works including books is literature. In novels and sometimes other types of books (for example, biographies), a book may be divided into several large sections, also called books (Book 1, Book 2, Book 3, and so on). A lover of books is usually referred to as a bibliophile or, more informally, a bookworm — an avid reader of books. A shop where books are bought and sold is a bookshop or bookstore. Books can also be borrowed from libraries. In 2010, Google estimated that since the invention of printing, approximately 130,000,000 unique titles had been published. The word comes from Old English "bōc" which
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    234
    Cy the Cardinal

    Cy the Cardinal

    • School: Iowa State University
    Cy the Cardinal is the mascot of Iowa State University's sports teams. Since a cyclone was difficult to depict in costume, a cardinal was selected from the cardinal and gold of the official school colors. A cardinal-like bird was introduced at the 1954 homecoming pep rally. A contest was conducted to select a name for the mascot, and the winning entry of Cy was submitted by 17 people. The first to submit the name, Mrs. Ed Ohlsen, won a cardinal and gold stadium blanket. Cy has won two national mascot challenges since 2007; the CBS Sportsline Most Dominant College Mascot on Earth in 2007, and the CapitalOne Bowl National Mascot of the Year in 2008. List of U.S. college mascots
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    235

    Don

    • School: De Anza College
    Don (Spanish: [ˈdon], Italian: [ˈdɔn], Portuguese: Dom [ˈdõ]) from Latin dominus, is an honorific title used in Iberia and Italy. The female equivalent is doña (Spanish: [ˈdoɲa]), Donna (Italian: [ˈdɔnna]), and Dona (Portuguese: [ˈdonɐ]), abbreviated "Dª" or simply "D." Although originally a title reserved for royalty, select nobles, and church hierarchs, it is now often used as a mark of esteem for a person of personal, social or official distinction, such as a community leader of long standing, a person of significant wealth, or a noble, but may also be used ironically. As a style, rather than a title or rank, it is used with, and not instead of, a person's name. Syntactically, it is used in much the same way (although for a broader group of persons) as "Sir" and "Dame" are used in English when speaking of or to a person who has been knighted, e.g. "Don Firstname" or "Doña Firstname Lastname". Unlike "The Honourable" in English, Don may be used when speaking directly to a person, and unlike "Mister" it must be used with a given name. For example, "Don Diego de la Vega," or (abbreviating "señor") "Sr. Don Diego de la Vega," or simply "Don Diego" (the secret identity of Zorro) are
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    236
    Gunrock

    Gunrock

    • School: University of California, Davis
    Gunrock is the official mascot of the UC Davis Aggies. He is named after Gun Rock, who was born in 1914 and was the offspring of English Triple Crown winner Rock Sand and race mare Gunfire. His bloodlines are similar to those of racehorse Man O' War. In 1921, he was brought by the U.S. Army Cavalry to the campus of University of California, Davis, which was breeding horses for the Cavalry at the time. In 1924, he was adopted as the official mascot of the men's basketball team and accompanied the team to games and rallies. Later, a traditional mascot was created and named Gunrock by the students. That mascot persisted into the 1970s, when he was replaced by Ollie the Mustang. Ollie did not last long, as a period of confusion about the school's mascot and nickname set in, lasting into the first decade of the 21st century. In 2003, after the school's official mascot was officially identified as the mustang, the name Gunrock returned.
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    237
    Hawk

    Hawk

    • School: University of Maryland Eastern Shore
    Hawks are birds of prey, widely distributed and varying greatly in size. They have sharp beaks and strong claws for catching and eating prey. Owls are members of the order Strigiformes and are not hawks. The common names of certain non-hawks include the term "hawk", reflecting traditional usage rather than taxonomy, such as referring to an Osprey as a "fish hawk" or the Buteo species B. jamaicensis as a Red-tailed Hawk. In February 2005, the Canadian ornithologist Louis Lefebvre announced a method of measuring avian "IQ" in terms of their innovation in feeding habits. Hawks were named among the most intelligent birds based on his scale. Hawks are widely reputed to have visual acuity several times that of a normal human being. This is due to the many photoreceptors in the retina (up to 1,000,000 per square mm for Buteo, against 200,000 for humans), an exceptional number of nerves connecting these receptors to the brain, and an indented fovea, which magnifies the central portion of the visual field.
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    238
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    239
    Jonathan the Husky

    Jonathan the Husky

    • School: University of Connecticut
    Jonathan the Husky is the mascot of the University of Connecticut. All UConn huskies are named Jonathan in honor of Jonathan Trumbull, the last colonial and first state Governor of Connecticut. There are two versions of Jonathan: the costumed version and the canine version. All but the first real husky mascot, a brown and white dog, have been solid white with one brown eye and one blue eye. The current Jonathan is Jonathan XIII; he is often seen greeting fans and eating dog biscuits at sporting events. Jonathan is one of the few university mascots in the nation to have been selected by students via a popular poll (in 1933). The co-ed service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega has helped to care for the canine Jonathan since the 1970s. Jonathan I (July 23, 1934 - February 1935) In 1934 Rhode Island's ram mascot was kidnapped and the story gained interest in bringing a live animal mascot to Connecticut State College. A student poll selected the husky, and January 1935 Connecticut State College's first husky mascot had arrived at the campus in Storrs. The Alumnus had announced a "Name the Mascot Contest" and "Jonathan" was the winning entry. Sadly, the day before the name was announced
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    240
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    241
    Musketeer

    Musketeer

    • School: Eastern High School
    A musketeer (French: mousquetaire) was an early modern type of infantry soldier equipped with a musket. Musketeers were an important part of early modern armies, particularly in Europe. They sometimes could fight on horseback, like a dragoon or a cavalryman. The musketeer was a precursor to the rifleman. Muskets were replaced by rifles in most western armies during the mid 1850s. The traditional designation of "musketeer" for an infantry private survived in the Imperial German Army until World War I. Muskets were used in China at least from the 14th Century. Musketeers were utilized in the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) and Qing Dynasty (1644–1911). 14th century military book Huolongjing already describe Chinese matchlock. In Zhao Shizhen's book of 1598 AD, the Shenqipu, there were illustrations of Ottoman Turkish riflemen with detailed illustrations of their muskets, alongside European musketeers with detailed illustrations of their muskets. There was also illustration and description of how the Chinese had adopted the Ottoman kneeling position in firing while favoring European-made rifles. The Chinese also built the first repeating fire-arm, several barrels behind a small wooden
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    242
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    243
    Rameses

    Rameses

    • School: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Rameses is the Bighorn Ram mascot of the North Carolina Tar Heels. Two versions of Rameses appear at UNC sporting events. One is a member of the UNC cheerleading team in an anthropomorphic ram costume; the second is a live Horned Dorset Sheep named Rameses who attends Carolina football games with his horns painted Carolina Blue. The origin of a ram as Carolina's mascot dates back to 1924. In 1922, the star fullback, Jack Merritt, was given the nickname "the battering ram" for his performance on the field. Vic Huggins, Carolina's head cheerleader at the time, suggested the idea of a ram mascot to the athletic business manager, Charles T. Woollen, and had the idea approved. Charles gave Vic $25 to purchase a ram. Rameses the First was shipped from Texas, just in time for the pep rally. The first appearance of Rameses was at a pep rally before the football game against Virginia Military Institute on November 8, 1924. After the pep rally the ram was taken to Emerson Field. Through three quarters the game was scoreless. Late in the fourth quarter Bunn Hackney was called out to attempt a field goal. Before stepping out on the field he rubbed Rameses' head. Just a few seconds later
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    244
    Red Fox

    Red Fox

    • School: University of Leicester
    The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is the largest of the true foxes and the most geographically spread member of the Carnivora, being distributed across the entire Northern Hemisphere from the Arctic Circle to North Africa, Central America and Asia. Its range has increased alongside human expansion, having been introduced to Australia, where it is considered harmful to native mammal and bird populations. Because of these factors, it is listed as Least Concern for extinction by the IUCN. It is included among the IUCN's list of the "world's 100 worst invasive species". The red fox originated from smaller-sized ancestors from Eurasia during the Middle Villafranchian period, and colonised North America shortly after the Wisconsian glaciation. Among the true foxes, the red fox represents a more progressive form in the direction of carnivory. Apart from its large size, the red fox is distinguished from other fox species by its ability to adapt quickly to new environments and, unlike most of its related species, is not listed as endangered anywhere. Despite its name, the species often produces individuals with abnormal colourings, including albinos and melanists. Forty-five subspecies are
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    245
    Sammy the Owl

    Sammy the Owl

    • School: Rice University
    Sammy the Owl is the official mascot for the Rice Owls of Rice University. An early symbol of Rice's athletic teams was large canvas owl, a tempting target for Rice Institute's rivals. In 1917, when students from Southwest Conference football rival Texas A&M kidnapped the owl, Rice students pooled their resources and hired a private detective to go to College Station to find the missing mascot. Upon recovering the owl, the detective sent a coded telegram to Houston that read "Sammy is fairly well and would like to see his parents at eleven o'clock," giving the mascot a name for the first time. Eventually, the canvas representation of Sammy was replaced with a live owl. During this period, handlers kept Sammy in a roost in front of Lovett College. Prior to football games, Sammy was known to fly into the stadium. Rice University later discontinued its tradition of a live owl, replacing it with a student dressed in an owl suit. As such, Sammy the Owl is an elected position of the Rice University Student Body. Sammy the Owl has also served as the image of Rice athletics for many years. Past images have depicted Sammy as wearing a sailor hat. In 1995, the image of the owl swooping in
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    246
    Smokey IX

    Smokey IX

    • School: University of Tennessee
    The official mascot is Smokey, a rather pleasant blue tick coonhound that has been on the job since 1953. After a student poll revealed a desire to select a live mascot for the University of Tennessee, the UT Pep Club held a contest in 1953 to select a coon hound, a native breed of the state.

    Announcements of the contest in local newspapers read, "This can't be an ordinary hound. He must be a 'Houn' Dawg' in the best sense of the word." The late Rev. W.C. Brooks entered his prize-winning blue tick coon hound, Smokey, in the contest. At halftime of the Mississippi State game, the dogs were lined up on the old cheerleaders' ramp at Neyland Stadium. Each dog was introduced and the student body cheered for their favorite. Smokey was the last hound introduced. When his name was called out, he barked. The students cheered and Smokey threw his head back and howled again. This kept going and soon the whole stadium was in a roar and UT had found its mascot. The dog is a native breed of Tennessee and a line of dog used for hunting raccoons. The present Smokey is the nineth in a line of such canines and is appropriately called Smokey IX. Rev. Brooks of Knoxville supplied UT with the canines until his death in 1986 when his wife Mildred Brooks and family friends took over the caretakingrole.
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    247
    Sooner Schooner

    Sooner Schooner

    • School: University of Oklahoma
    The Sooner Schooner is the official mascot of the sports teams of the University of Oklahoma Sooners. Pulled by two white ponies named Boomer and Sooner, it is a scaled-down replica of the Conestoga wagon used by settlers of the Oklahoma Territory around the time of the Land Run of 1889. Its name comes from the common term for such wagons ("prairie schooners") and the name for settlers who sneaked into the Territory before it was officially opened for settlement ("Sooners"). The Schooner is maintained and driven by members of the RUF/NEKS, the university's all-male spirit organization. At home football games and bowl games, the Sooner Schooner is driven onto the field in an arc that almost reaches the 50-yard line after every score. The RUF/NEK Queen sits next to the driver, and a young member of the RUF/NEKS usually hangs by his legs off the back, waving the university's flag. Until the late 1980s, it was customary for the schooner's driver to stand up while driving the ponies onto the field after scores, and duck down only an instant before reaching the stadium tunnel parking spot, barely clearing the tunnel ceiling—a practice eventually ended for safety reasons. The Schooner
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    248

    University of Belize Black Jaguars

    • School: University of Belize
    The Black Jaguars athletic teams are the athletic representatives of the University of Belize, in Belmopan, Belize, Central America. The Black Jaguar was selected at the University's inception in August, 2000 as the mascot of the university.
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    249
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    250

    Wil D Cat

    • School: Bethune-Cookman University
    Dr. Wil D Cat is the official mascot of Bethune-Cookman University.
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