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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best San Francisco of All Time

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    1
    Alec Mapa

    Alec Mapa

    Alejandro "Alec" Mapa ( /ˈmɑːpə/; born July 10, 1965) is a Filipino American actor, comedian and writer. Mapa was born in San Francisco and attended George Washington High School. While in high school, he played Randolph McAfee in a a production of Bye Bye Birdie. Mapa's senior year productions were Cabaret and Harvey, both in which he had the lead roles. Mapa was also a champion orator in the Humorous and Dramatic Interpretation categories of Speech. Mapa got his first professional break when he was cast to replace B.D. Wong in the Broadway production of M. Butterfly. On television, he has made guest appearances on a wide variety of programs, including The Jamie Foxx Show, Roseanne, Seinfeld, NYPD Blue, Friends, Murder One and Dharma & Greg. He had a supporting role in the short-lived 2001 comedy Some of My Best Friends. He played Adam Benet in the UPN comedy Half & Half. He wrote and performed in a one-man play titled "I Remember Mapa", about his experiences growing up gay in San Francisco. Mapa was a featured performer on the Logo original stand-up comedy series Wisecrack. In 2006 appeared as Vern, Gabrielle's personal shopper, on the TV series Desperate Housewives. He had a
    7.40
    10 votes
    2
    19th Street/Oakland

    19th Street/Oakland

    19th Street/Oakland is an underground Bay Area Rapid Transit station located at 19th Street and Broadway in Downtown Oakland. It is an official northbound transfer station along the BART system, since September 13, 2010. Like the Oakland City Center/12th Street station, the concourse mezzanine is on the first level down, an island platform and two main tracks for trains bound for Richmond and Pittsburg/Bay Point are on the second level down, and a side platform and one main track for trains bound for San Francisco/Daly City/Millbrae/SFO and Fremont are on the third level down. This station is identifiable by the blue brickwork on the interior. At all times during the day, there are timed cross-platform transfers between the northbound lines, San Francisco - Pittsburg/Bay Point and Fremont - Richmond. There are no timed transfers between southbound lines, since there is only one southbound track. The station was originally planned to have four main tracks and an island platform on each of the two levels, but budget constraints limited that idea. A portion of Will Smith's film The Pursuit of Happyness was filmed in this station. Passengers from Millbrae bound for Fremont transfer
    8.00
    8 votes
    3
    San Francisco cable car system

    San Francisco cable car system

    The San Francisco cable car system is the world's last manually operated cable car system. An icon of San Francisco, California, the cable car system forms part of the intermodal urban transport network operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway, or "Muni" as it is better known. Of the twenty-three lines established between 1873 and 1890, three remain (one of which combines parts of two earlier lines): two routes from downtown near Union Square to Fisherman's Wharf, and a third route along California Street. While the cable cars are used to a certain extent by commuters, their small service area and premium fares for single rides make them more of a tourist attraction. They are among the most significant tourist sites in the city, along with Alcatraz Island and Fisherman's Wharf. The cable cars are the only mobile National Monument in the world, and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The cable cars are not to be confused with San Francisco's heritage streetcars, which operate on Market Street and the Embarcadero. The first successful cable-operated street railway was the Clay Street Hill Railroad, which opened on August 2, 1873. The promoter of the line
    8.00
    6 votes
    4
    Justin Whalin

    Justin Whalin

    Justin Garrett Whalin (born September 6, 1974) is an American actor best known for his role as Jimmy Olsen in the American television series Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman. Whalin, an only child, was born in the Sunset District of San Francisco, California. His mother, Terry Villanueva, is a teacher and school administrator who owns and operates two L.A. area schools: The Learning Castle and La Cañada Preparatory. His father, Craig Whalin, is a real estate appraiser. His parents divorced when he was seven years old, both would remarry. He has a younger half brother, Danny Quiros. He has an older stepbrother, Michael Galo-Rothman, and an older stepsister, Michele Dahlberg. Whalin studied acting at the esteemed American Conservatory Theatre (A.C.T.) in San Francisco, and attended Lowell High School. After years of commuting between Los Angeles and San Francisco, he and his mother eventually relocated to L.A. permanently when he was fifteen years old. He completed his high school education through U.C. Berkeley's home schooling program. Whalin is known for his appearances in such films as John Waters' cult classic Serial Mom with Kathleen Turner, Child's Play 3, The
    7.00
    7 votes
    5
    Leslie Mann

    Leslie Mann

    Leslie J. Mann (born March 26, 1972) is an American actress best known for her roles in comedic films, many of which are collaborations with her husband, Judd Apatow. Mann was born in San Francisco, California and was raised by her mother, a real estate agent. Mann graduated from Corona del Mar High School. She began her career at the age of 17, with appearances in television commercials. In 1995, Mann was chosen from an open audition of 500 candidates for her first big movie role in The Cable Guy (1996). She also guest-starred in Freaks & Geeks, which was produced by her husband. Since then, she has appeared in films such as She's the One, George of the Jungle, Big Daddy, Stealing Harvard, The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up, Drillbit Taylor and 17 Again. In 2009, Mann reunited with her Big Daddy co-star Adam Sandler and Knocked Up co-star Seth Rogen in Funny People. Mann is set to star alongside Elizabeth Banks in What Was I Thinking?, based upon the book by Barbara Davilman and Liz Dubelman. She also lent her voice to the animated series Allen Gregory, as the title character's second-grade teacher. Mann is married to producer Judd Apatow, with whom she has two daughters, Iris and
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    Henry Perrin Coon

    Henry Perrin Coon

    Henry Perrin Coon (September 30, 1822 – December 4, 1884) was the 11th Mayor of San Francisco who served from July 1, 1863 to December 1, 1867. He was one of the most versatile men ever to hold the office, having previously worked as a teacher, doctor, lawyer, druggist and businessman. Coon was born on September 30, 1822 in Columbia County, New York, the youngest of 13 children, and was raised in the Presbyterian church. His parents sent him to Claverack Academy, near Hudson, New York, where he spent two or three years. He then attended Williams College where he graduated with the class of 1844. After college, he was the superintendent of Claverack Academy for a short time before beginning studies for the ministry. After about a year, his biography records that a severe cold settled into his throat that spoiled his voice for public speaking, which he ultimately regained in California's milder climate. At that point, he selected medicine as his profession. After receiving his medical degree from the Philadelphia College of Medicine in 1848, he returned to Hudson, New York where he married Ruthetta Folger on September 18, 1849. He then established a medical practice in Syracuse, New
    8.40
    5 votes
    7
    Mission District

    Mission District

    The Mission District, also commonly called "The Mission", is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, USA, originally known as "the Mission lands" meaning the lands belonging to the sixth Alta California mission, Mission San Francisco de Asis. This mission, San Francisco's oldest standing building, is located in the neighborhood. The principal thoroughfare of the Mission District of San Francisco is Mission Street. Its borders are U.S. Route 101 to the east which forms the boundary between the eastern portion of the district, known as "Inner Mission" and its eastern neighbor, Potrero Hill, while Sanchez Street separates the neighborhoods from Eureka Valley (also known as "The Castro") and Noe Valley to the west. The part of the neighborhood from Valencia Street to Sanchez Street, north of 20th, is known as Mission Dolores. South of 20th towards 22nd, and between Valencia and Dolores Streets is a distinct sub-neighborhood known as Liberty Hill. Cesar Chavez Street (formerly Army Street) is the southern border which lies next to Bernal Heights, while to the north the neighborhood is separated from South of Market roughly by Duboce Avenue and the elevated highway of the Central
    6.29
    7 votes
    8
    International High School

    International High School

    The International High School of San Francisco (familiarly known as International or IHS) is a private high school attached to the French American International School (San Francisco) located in the Hayes Valley neighborhood of San Francisco, California, United States. Graduates may earn either the International Baccalaureate Diploma or the French Baccalaureate Diploma. Both IB and French Bac are recognized by universities and colleges globally, and graduates may be able to receive college credit. Many of its graduates attend well-known international universities and Ivy League schools, with a high percentage of students attending small liberal arts schools. In 2011, 94 graduates received 127 acceptances from the University of California school system. "Guided by the principles of academic rigor and diversity, the French American International School offers programs of study in French and English to prepare its graduates for a world in which the ability to think critically and to communicate across cultures is of paramount importance." International High School is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), the French Ministry of Education (MEN), the
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Millennium Tower

    Millennium Tower

    Millennium Tower is a 58-story highrise condominium completed in 2009 in the San Francisco Financial District, South of Market. A mixed-use building, primarily residential, it is the tallest building in San Francisco to include residences. The blue-gray glass, late-modernist tower is bounded by Mission, Fremont, and Beale Streets, and the north end of the Transbay Terminal. The building was opened to residents on April 23, 2009. Its highest level, 58 floors above the ground, is listed as the 60th. The US$350 million project was developed by Millennium Partners of New York City, designed by Handel Architects, engineered by DeSimone Consulting Engineers and constructed by Webcor Builders. At 645 ft (197 m), it is the tallest concrete structure in San Francisco, the fourth tallest building in San Francisco overall, and the tallest since 345 California Street in 1986. It is also the tallest residential building west of the Mississippi. The tower is slender, with each floor containing 14,000 sq ft (1,300 m) of floor space. In addition to the 58-story tower, there is an 125 ft (38 m), 11-story tower on the northeast end of the complex. Between the two towers is a 43 ft (13 m), two-story
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Bank of America Center

    Bank of America Center

    555 California Street, formerly Bank of America Center, is a 52-story, 779 ft (237.4 m) skyscraper in San Francisco, California, and is also known locally as Triple Nickel. It is the second tallest building in the city and a focal point of the Financial District. Completed in 1969, the tower served as the world headquarters of Bank of America until the 1998 merger with NationsBank, when the company moved its headquarters to the Bank of America Corporate Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. A 70 percent interest was acquired by Vornado Realty Trust from foreign investors in March 2007 with a 30 percent limited partnership interest still owned by Donald Trump, while continuing to be managed by the Shorenstein Company. 555 California Street was meant to be a deliberate and unambiguous display of the wealth, power, and importance of Bank of America. To that end, the center was handled by the architecture firms Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons and Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, with architect Pietro Belluschi consulting. The structural engineering was performed by the San Francisco firm H. J. Brunnier Associates. The skyscraper incorporates thousands of bay windows thanks to its unique
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    San Francisco Ferry Building

    San Francisco Ferry Building

    The San Francisco Ferry Building is a terminal for ferries that travel across the San Francisco Bay, a marketplace, and also has offices, located on The Embarcadero in San Francisco, California. On top of the building is a 245-foot tall clock tower, with four clock dials, each 22 feet in diameter, which can be seen from Market Street, a main thoroughfare of the city. Designed by the New York architect A. Page Brown in the Beaux Arts style in 1892, the ferry building was completed in 1898. At its opening, it was the largest project undertaken in the city up to that time. Brown designed the clock tower after the 12th-century Giralda bell tower in Seville, Spain, and the entire length of the building on both frontages is based on an arched arcade. With decreased use after bridges were constructed across the bay to carry railroad traffic, in the 1950s, the building was adapted for office use and its public spaces were broken up in an unsympathetic manner. In 2002, a restoration and renovation were undertaken to redevelop the entire complex. The 660-foot long Great Nave was restored, together with its height and materials. A marketplace was created for the ground floor, the former
    9.00
    4 votes
    12
    Hallidie Building

    Hallidie Building

    The Hallidie Building is an office building in the Financial District of San Francisco, California, at 130 Sutter Street, between Montgomery Street and Kearny Street. It was built around 1917-1918 and, though credited as the first American building to feature glass curtain walls, it was in fact predated by Louis Curtiss' Boley Clothing Company building in Kansas City, Missouri, completed in 1909. The building was designed by architect Willis Polk and is named in honor of San Francisco cable car pioneer Andrew Smith Hallidie. Currently it houses the San Francisco chapters of the American Institute of Architects, AIGA, Center for Architecture + Design, the U.S. Green Building Council - Northern California Chapter, Charles M Salter Associates, Inc, and Coordinated Resources, Inc (CRI). The Hallidie Building was deemed unsafe by the City of San Francisco's Department of Building Inspection in August 2010. The building's balconies and fire escapes are considered unsafe.
    5.86
    7 votes
    13
    50 California Street

    50 California Street

    50 California Street is a 148 m (486 ft), 37-storey office tower completed in 1972 at the foot of California Street in the financial district of San Francisco, California. There is a plaza located at the foot of the building. The building is owned and managed by the Shorenstein Company.
    6.67
    6 votes
    14
    Powell Street Station

    Powell Street Station

    Powell Street Station is a Muni Metro and Bay Area Rapid Transit station near the intersection of Market Street and Powell Street in downtown San Francisco, California. The station is located along the Market Street Subway and extends underground from Fourth Street to Fifth Street. Hallidie Plaza connects to the station on the north side of Market Street. Like all of the shared BART and Muni stations on the Market Street Subway, the concourse mezzanine is on the first level down, an island platform for the Muni Metro is on the second level down, and the island platform for BART is on the third level down. The Powell-Mason and Powell-Hyde cable car lines turn around at Powell and Market, above the station. Union Square is three blocks north of the station, and the Westfield San Francisco Centre is on Market at Powell. The Westfield has its own entrance from the Powell Station itself. The old United States Mint building is located one block away at Fifth Street and Mission Street. Also nearby are Yerba Buena Gardens, the Moscone Convention Center, and the Metreon movie theater and entertainment complex. Tourist information is available at the San Francisco Visitor's Bureau located in
    7.60
    5 votes
    15
    Union City

    Union City

    Union City is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located in downtown Union City near the Decoto district . Service at this station began on September 11, 1972. The station sits near Decoto Road east of Alvarado-Niles Road, directly behind James Logan High School's campus. The temporary parking spaces were constructed between 2006, and opened in the Summer of 2007. Local bus service is provided by Union City Transit and AC Transit. Currently, no connection to other regional trains exists at Union City BART station. In February 2008, Union City's Economic Development Department and BART have proposed that this station become a regional rail intermodal station. The intermodal station would serve BART trains, Capitol Corridor intercity trains, and Caltrain commuter rail service to the Peninsula via a new rail bridge located near the Dumbarton Bridge. For now, the Dumbarton Express bus service provides such service to the Peninsula, operating between Union City and Palo Alto. In May 2011, developers, Union City and BART officials broke ground on the first residential housing project inside the city/transit agency-specified redevelopment district. By October, the Avalon Apartment building
    8.75
    4 votes
    16
    Charles Haid

    Charles Haid

    Charles Maurice Haid III (born June 2, 1943) is an American actor and director, with notable work in both movies and television. He is known for his portrayal of Officer Andy Renko in Hill Street Blues. Haid was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Grace Marian (née Folger) and Charles Maurice Haid, Jr. He attended Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University), where he met Steven Bochco. He was associate producer of the original stage production of Godspell in 1971, which was developed at CMU. Haid's acting credits include the 1976/1977 police drama series Delvecchio as Sgt. Paul Schonski, the 1980s police drama series Hill Street Blues as Officer Andy Renko, and the 1980 movie Altered States as Dr. Mason Parrish. In 2004-2005 Haid played C. T. Finney, a corrupt New York police captain, on the sixth season of the NBC show Third Watch. Haid provided the voice of the one-legged rabbit "Lucky Jack" in the 2004 Disney animated film Home On The Range. Twenty years earlier, Haid voiced main character "Montgomery Moose" in the pilot episode of The Get Along Gang, produced by Nelvana. He was replaced by Sparky Marcus for the subsequent series. His directing
    5.71
    7 votes
    17
    Ghirardelli Square

    Ghirardelli Square

    Ghirardelli Square is a landmark with shops and restaurants in the Fisherman's Wharf area of San Francisco, California, USA. A portion of the area is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Pioneer Woolen Mills and D. Ghirardelli Company. Ghirardelli Square once featured over 40 specialty shops and restaurants. Some of the original shops and restaurants still occupy the square. Ghirardelli Square is undergoing an extensive renovation. Many of the specialty shops have closed or moved to other locations (inside or outside the square). In the main plaza there are new shops and restaurants. The square also recently opened a new children's day care center, Peekadoodle Kids' Club. Notably, Gary Danko will soon open a second restaurant within walking distance of his original San Francisco eatery. This new restaurant will be in the Mustard Building along with the Fairmont Heritage Place which occupies the original factory space (the Chocolate, Cocoa and Mustard Buildings) as well as the top floors of the Clock Tower and Woolen Mill buildings. In 1893, Domingo Ghirardelli purchased the entire city block in order to make it into the headquarters of the Ghirardelli Chocolate
    7.40
    5 votes
    18
    Hayward

    Hayward

    The Hayward station is a Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station that serves the Downtown Hayward area of Hayward, California. It is directly across the street from the rear of Hayward City Hall. The station consists of two train platforms (north and southbound) and a free five-level parking garage. Service at the station began on September 11, 1972. In May 2008, an electrical fire caused service to this station to be temporarily disrupted as well as service to the Union City BART and Fremont stations. The fire started at the train maintenance yard near the Hayward station. On October 30, 2010, a man in a wheelchair fell onto the tracks and was hit by a train, dying 2 weeks later from his injuries. Hayward BART is served by several local AC Transit routes, including the Transbay Route M, which provides service to San Mateo County via the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge. Shuttles from California State University, East Bay also provide service to the station. The Hayward Amtrak station, which provides Capitol Corridor services, is located near the station. A Greyhound Lines bus stop is located nearby. SamTrans also served the station until 1999. This station is in BART District 3 and is
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Joshua A. Norton

    Joshua A. Norton

    Joshua Abraham Norton (c. 1819 – January 8, 1880), the self-proclaimed Imperial Majesty Emperor Norton I, was a celebrated citizen of San Francisco, California, who in 1859 proclaimed himself "Emperor of these United States" and subsequently "Protector of Mexico". Born in England, Norton spent most of his early life in South Africa. He immigrated to San Francisco in 1849 after receiving a bequest of $40,000 from his father's estate. Norton initially made a living as a businessman, but he lost his fortune investing in Peruvian rice. After losing a lawsuit in which he tried to void his rice contract, Norton left San Francisco. He returned a few years later, apparently mentally unbalanced, claiming to be the Emperor of the United States. Although he had no political power, and his influence extended only so far as he was humored by those around him, he was treated deferentially in San Francisco, and currency issued in his name was honored in the establishments he frequented. Though he was considered insane, or at least highly eccentric, the citizens of San Francisco celebrated his regal presence and his proclamations, most famously, his "order" that the United States Congress be
    8.50
    4 votes
    20
    Lower Haight

    Lower Haight

    The Lower Haight is a neighborhood, sometimes referred to as Haight-Fillmore, in San Francisco, California. Referred to as "Pine Valley" in the 70s because of all the pine trees, the Lower Haight lies generally along Haight Street east of Divisadero Street, and between Oak Street (or Fell Street) on the north, and Duboce Avenue on south. The eastern boundary is variously placed at Webster Street, Laguna Street, or even Market Street. It is east of the more famous Haight-Ashbury, which is also known as the Upper Haight. The name derives from the significant elevation change as Haight Street climbs steeply from Scott Street to Buena Vista Park. The area straddles a shallow valley between Mint Hill and Upper Haight, sloping down from Oak Street (north) toward Duboce (south). Duboce Park, toward the corner of Duboce and Scott, is a grassy park containing a children's playground and the Harvey Milk Recreational Arts Building. Adjacent neighborhoods include the Western Addition/Alamo Square to the north; Duboce Triangle to the south; Hayes Valley to the east; and the Upper Haight to the west. The San Francisco Association of Realtors defines the area more narrowly as the
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    Kongregate

    Kongregate

    Kongregate is an online games hosting website owned by Gamestop Corporation, which allows users to upload user-created Adobe Flash, HTML 5/JavaScript, Shockwave, Java or Unity3D games. Users can rate the games and search games by its user rating. It features an API that Flash and Unity developers can integrate into their games which allows users to submit high scores and in some games, earn achievement badges. Badges and local score submissions are available only on games whose developers choose to use the Kongregate API. Kongregate was released on October 10, 2006 by sister and brother team Emily and Jim Greer into an alpha testing phase, which lasted until December 2006. During this time, game developers and players tested the site's interface and functionality. In December of the same year, the site was formally opened to the public. The site formally entered the beta testing phase on March 22, 2007. The original design for the Kongregate website itself was created by Happy Cog Studios. As of July 2008, Kongregate has raised around $9 million in capital from investments by Reid Hoffman, Jeff Clavier, Jeff Bezos, and Greylock Partners. In July 2010, GameStop announced an
    8.25
    4 votes
    22
    Visitacion Valley

    Visitacion Valley

    Visitacion Valley is a neighborhood located in the south eastern quadrant of San Francisco, California. Visitacion Valley is roughly defined by McLaren Park and Gleneagles Golf Course to the West, Mansell Blvd to the North, Bayview Hill and Candlestick Cove to the East, and the San Francisco / San Mateo County line to the South. The streets of this neighborhood straddle the border between San Francisco and Daly City, hence Visitacion Valley partially blends in with the adjacent Daly City neighborhood of Bayshore. The grounds of the Cow Palace, straddling the San Francisco/Daly City border, are partially within Visitacion Valley. Visitacion Valley takes its name from Rancho Cañada de Guadalupe la Visitación y Rodeo Viejo, a large tract of land that also included the Bayshore district of Daly City, the city of Brisbane, and San Bruno Mountain. The area is a largely family-oriented working-class neighborhood. Average Adjusted Gross Incomes for the area are at $38,802, much lower than the citywide average of $73,798. Median rents in 2007 for the neighborhood at $896 a month are also far below the citywide average at $1,141. The area was originally settled by Irish and Italian
    8.25
    4 votes
    23
    Fisherman's Wharf

    Fisherman's Wharf

    Fisherman's Wharf is a neighborhood and popular tourist attraction in San Francisco, California. It roughly encompasses the northern waterfront area of San Francisco from Ghirardelli Square or Van Ness Avenue east to Pier 35 or Kearny Street. The F Market streetcar runs through the area, the Powell-Hyde cable car lines runs to Aquatic Park, at the edge of Fisherman's Wharf, and the Powell-Mason cable car line runs a few blocks away. Fisherman's Wharf gets its name and neighborhood characteristics from the city's early days during the Gold Rush when Italian immigrant fishermen settled in the area and fished for the Dungeness crab. From then until the present day it remained the home base of San Francisco's fishing fleet. Despite its redevelopment into a tourist attraction during the 1970s and 1980s, the area is still home to many active fishermen and their fleets. In 2010, a $15,000,000 development plan was proposed by city officials hoping to revitalize its appearance for tourists, and to reverse the area's downward trend in popularity among San Francisco residents, who have shunned the locale over the years. One of the busiest and well known tourist attractions in the western
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    Kurt Fuller

    Kurt Fuller

    Kurt Fuller (born September 16, 1953) is an American character actor. He has appeared in a number of television, film, and stage projects. He graduated from Lincoln High School in Stockton, California in 1971. Standing 6-feet-5-inches-tall, Fuller is frequently cast as a weaselly executive, a smarmy authority figure, or a law enforcement officer. He may be recognized as nerdy television director Russell in Wayne's World, a spiteful mayoral aide in Ghostbusters II, the sleazy television executive and mastermind of the "Battle of the Tough Guys", Mr. Brell in No Holds Barred, a seedy real estate agent in Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, and power-abusing, egotistical NSC Director Robert Lindsey in the third season of Alias. Usually cast in comedic roles, Fuller played Werner Klemperer, whom he resembles, in Paul Schrader's Auto Focus and Karl Rove on the TV satire That's My Bush!. He also portrayed Pacific Bell Retirement Fund Executive Walter Ribbon in The Pursuit of Happyness. Fuller has also appeared in many television shows, including Knight Rider, Timecop, Quantum Leap, L.A. Law, Murder, She Wrote, Ally McBeal, Felicity, Malcolm in the Middle, The West Wing, Boston Legal, Boston
    9.33
    3 votes
    25
    VIZ Media

    VIZ Media

    VIZ Media, LLC, headquartered in San Francisco, is a manga, anime, and Japanese entertainment company. It was founded in 1986 as VIZ LLC. In 2005, VIZ LLC and ShoPro Entertainment merged to form the current VIZ Media LLC, which is jointly owned by Japanese publishers Shogakukan and Shueisha, and Shogakukan's licensing division Shogakukan Productions (ShoPro Japan). Seiji Horibuchi, originally from Tokushima Prefecture in Shikoku, moved to California in 1975. After living in the mountains for almost two years, he moved to San Francisco, where he started a business exporting American cultural items to Japan, and became a writer of cultural information. He also became interested in publishing Japanese manga in the United States, though he himself was not a fan of Japanese comics until a visit to Japan in 1985 exposed him to Katsuhiro Otomo's single-volume title Domu: A Child's Dream. His idea came to fruition after he met Masahiro Ohga, then managing director of Shogakukan, in 1985 and shared his vision. Shogakukan provided Horibuchi with $200,000 in startup capital, which Horibuichi used in 1986 to found VIZ Communications. VIZ Communications released its first titles in 1987, which
    9.33
    3 votes
    26
    Hayes Valley

    Hayes Valley

    Hayes Valley is a fashionable neighborhood in San Francisco, California, between the historical districts of Alamo Square and Civic Center. Victorian, Queen Anne, and Edwardian townhouses rub shoulders with boutiques, restaurants, and public housing complexes. Although its boundaries are ill defined, Hayes Valley is generally considered to be the area north and south of Hayes Street between Webster (near Alamo Square) and Franklin (near Civic Center) streets. Hayes Valley's commercial center is made up of the section of Hayes Street running from approximately Laguna Street in the west to Franklin Street in the east, with extensions on perpendicular Gough and Laguna Streets. As of April 2012, after changes to the district boundaries used by the Board of Supervisors, the Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association considers the neighborhood as a whole to be bound by Webster Street in the west, Van Ness Avenue in the east, Fulton Street in the north, and Hermann Street and Market Street in the south, with extensions as far west as Fillmore, between Haight Street and Hermann Street, as far north as McAllister Street, between Franklin Street and Van Ness Avenue, and as far south as Market
    8.00
    4 votes
    27
    Palace of Fine Arts Theatre

    Palace of Fine Arts Theatre

    The Palace of Fine Arts in the Marina District of San Francisco, California, is a monumental structure originally constructed for the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition in order to exhibit works of art presented there. One of only a few surviving structures from the Exposition, it is the only one still situated on its original site. It was rebuilt in 1965, and renovation of the lagoon, walkways, and a seismic retrofit were completed in early 2009. It remains a popular attraction for tourists and locals, and is a favorite location for weddings and wedding party photographs for couples throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, and such an icon that a miniature replica of it was built in Disney's California Adventure in Anaheim. The Palace of Fine Arts was one of ten palaces at the heart of the Panama-Pacific Exhibition, which also included the exhibit palaces of Education, Liberal Arts, Manufactures, Varied Industries, Agriculture, Food Products, Transportation, Mines and Metallurgy and the Palace of Machinery. The Palace of Fine Arts was designed by Bernard Maybeck, who took his inspiration from Roman and Greek architecture in designing what was essentially a fictional ruin from another
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    University of California, San Francisco

    University of California, San Francisco

    The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) is a center of health sciences research, patient care, and education; located in San Francisco, California. Though one of the ten campuses of the University of California, it is unique for being the only University of California campus dedicated solely to graduate education, and in health and biomedical sciences. Some of UCSF's treatment centers include kidney transplants and liver transplantation, radiology, neurosurgery, neurology, oncology, ophthalmology, gene therapy, women's health, fetal surgery, pediatrics, and internal medicine. Founded in 1873, the mission of UCSF is to serve as a "public university dedicated to saving lives and improving health." The UCSF Medical Center is consistently ranked among the top 10 hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, who also ranked UCSF’s medical school specialty program in AIDS medical care first in the country. UCSF is administered separately from Hastings College of Law, another UC institution located in San Francisco. In recent years, UCSF and UC Hastings have increased their collaboration, including the formation of the UCSF/Hastings Consortium on Law, Science, and
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Tenderloin

    Tenderloin

    The Tenderloin is a neighborhood in downtown San Francisco, California, in the flatlands on the southern slope of Nob Hill, situated between the Union Square shopping district to the northeast and the Civic Center office district to the southwest. It encompasses about 50 square blocks and a conservative description has it bounded on the north by Geary Street, on the east by Mason Street, on the south by Market Street and on the west by Van Ness Avenue. The northern boundary with Lower Nob Hill historically has been set at Geary Street. The terms Tenderloin Heights or The Tendernob refer to the area around the indefinite boundary between the Upper Tenderloin and Lower Nob Hill. The eastern extent, near Union Square, overlaps with the Theater District. Part of the western extent of the Tenderloin, Larkin and Hyde Streets between Turk and O'Farrell, was officially named "Little Saigon" by the City of San Francisco. There are a number of stories about how the Tenderloin got its name. One says it is a reference to an older neighborhood in New York with the same name and similar characteristics. Another is a reference to the neighborhood as the "soft underbelly" (analogous to the cut of
    6.80
    5 votes
    30
    Academy of Art University

    Academy of Art University

    The Academy of Art University (formerly Academy of Art College), a for-profit university owned by the Stephens Institute, was founded in San Francisco, California in 1929 by Richard S. Stephens. With an enrollment of over 18,000 students, the academy is reportedly the largest art and design school in the United States. In 1929, the Academy of Art University was established in San Francisco as the Academy of Art Advertising by Richard S. Stephens, a fine arts painter and the creative director for Sunset. Assisted by his wife, Clara Stephens, Stephens opened the new school in a rented loft at 215 Kearny Street to teach advertising art. Over the next few years, he hired a faculty of practicing art and design professionals and formulated the school's philosophy to hire established professionals to teach future professionals. In 1933, the curriculum was expanded to include Fashion Illustration, and a Fine Art Department was added in 1936. Stephens' son, Richard A. Stephens, took over direction of the school after graduating from Stanford University in 1951. During the son's tenure, the academy expanded its enrollment from 50 to 5,200 students. Richard A. Stephens oversaw continued
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    Hunters Point

    Hunters Point

    Bayview-Hunters Point or The Bayview, is a neighborhood in the southeastern corner of San Francisco, California, United States. The decommissioned Hunters Point Naval Shipyard is located within its boundaries and Candlestick Park is on the southern edge. Originally dominated by grassland and tidal marshland, Bayview-Hunters Point has a unique history for its transformation into an urban industrial neighborhood while segregated from the metropolitan area. Slaughterhouses and their associated industries in the 1800s and shipbuilding in the 1900s drove its urbanization. Subsequent extensive toxic pollution, loss of industry jobs and racial segregation in the 1960s and 1970s resulted in urban decay. Bayview-Hunters Point has been described as a marginalized community. Modern problems include high rates of unemployment, poverty, crime and disease. Redevelopment projects for the neighborhood became the dominant issue of the 1990s and 2000s. Efforts include the Bayview Redevelopment Plan for Area B, which includes approximately 1300 acres of existing residential, commercial and industrial lands. This plan identifies seven Economic Activity nodes within the area. The former Navy Shipyard
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Mercy High School

    Mercy High School

    Mercy High School, San Francisco is a Catholic all-girls college-preparatory high school located in San Francisco, California. It is a part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco, and is sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy in Dublin, Ireland. The campus is located on 19th Ave., near San Francisco State University, and includes a multipurpose Pavilion, which was built and dedicated to Catherine McAuley in 2001. In 1855, Mother Baptist Russell and the Sisters of Mercy opened a night school for adults on Vallejo Street, San Francisco. The late auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of San Francisco James T. O'Dowd, who was then the Archdiocesan Superintendent of Schools, requested that the Sisters of Mercy provide a secondary school for the Catholic girls in the Sunset, Lakeside, and Park Merced districts. As a result, Mercy High School was opened on September 3, 1952 with a class of 199 freshmen in a partially completed building. Nearly two years later, the original building was completed in 1954. On June 11, 1956, a class of 173 seniors received diplomas and became the first graduating class of Mercy High School. The achievement of Mercy's first graduating class placed the
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    San Francisco Twins

    San Francisco Twins

    Marian and Vivian Brown (born 25 January 1927) are American identical twins and icons of San Francisco, known for the appearance in media with their signature identical bright snappy outfits with hats atop their meticulously coiffed hair. They were voted second as San Francisco's "Best Local Character" in 2000. They often eat dinner at one of the front tables at Uncle Vito's restaurant, just below the crest of Nob Hill. In 2012 the sisters faced financial problems after Vivian required costly care after a fall. San Franciscans and charities united to help keep the sisters together. Vivian and Marian were born in Kalamazoo, Michigan, just eight minutes apart. Vivian is the elder. They grew up in Mattawan, Michigan, where they attended Mattawan High School and in 1945 graduated as co-valedictorians, giving the valedictory speech together. They went on to earn matching degrees in business education from Western Michigan University at Kalamazoo. With the intent of escaping hot summers and the long cold winter months, the Browns left Michigan for San Francisco in 1970, and found work as secretaries at separate downtown businesses. While in Kalamazoo the twins were frequently seen on the
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Dublin/Pleasanton

    Dublin/Pleasanton

    Dublin/Pleasanton (also and originally known as East Dublin/Pleasanton) is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station on the border of Dublin and Pleasanton. The station is fed by twenty local and regional bus lines from five different providers. The station consists of an island platform located in the center median of Interstate 580. Parking lots for the station are located on both sides of the freeway. It is somewhat unique in that trains travel down a long, somewhat rural stretch of Interstate 580 between Castro Valley and Dublin to get to the station. It is also notable in having transit service to the city of Modesto, over 55 miles (89 km) away. Local bus service is provided by WHEELS. Connection to ACE's Pleasanton station is available through WHEELS route 54. Service at the station began on May 10, 1997. It was originally intended to be called the East Dublin/Pleasanton station, and was at one time shown as so on maps, to differentiate it from the planned West Dublin/Pleasanton station. However, the West Dublin/Pleasanton station did not actually open until 2011, and the "East" designator is not commonly used; station signage and route maps use the shorter name. The station features
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Gracie Allen

    Gracie Allen

    Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie "Gracie" Allen (July 26, 1895 – August 27, 1964), was an American comedienne who became internationally famous as the zany partner and comic foil of husband George Burns. For contributions to the television industry, Gracie Allen was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6672 Hollywood Boulevard. Gracie Allen was born in San Francisco, California, to George Allen and Molly Darragh, who were of Irish Catholic extraction. She made her first appearance on stage at age three and was given her first chance On Air by Eddie Cantor. She was educated at the Star of the Sea Convent School and during that time became a talented dancer. She soon began performing Irish folk dances with her three sisters, who were billed as "The Four Colleens." In 1909 Allen joined her sister, Bessie, as a vaudeville performer. At a performance in 1922 Allen met George Burns and the two formed a comedy act. The two were married on January 7, 1926, in Cleveland, Ohio. Gracie Allen was born with two different color eyes; one blue and one green. Depending on the source, Gracie Allen is alleged to have been born on July 26 in 1895, 1896, 1902, or 1906. All public records
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Mala Powers

    Mala Powers

    Mary Ellen "Mala" Powers (December 20, 1931 – June 11, 2007) was an American film actress. She was born in San Francisco, California. In 1940, her family moved to Los Angeles. Her father was an executive with United Press. In the summer of her relocation, Powers attended the Max Reinhardt Junior Workshop where she enjoyed her first role in a play before a live audience. She continued with her drama lessons, and a year later she auditioned and won a part in the 1942 Dead End Kids film Tough as They Come. At the age of 16 she began working in radio drama, before becoming a film actress in 1950. Her first roles were in Outrage and Edge of Doom in 1950. That same year, Stanley Kramer signed Powers to star opposite Jose Ferrer in what may be her most remembered role as Roxane in Cyrano de Bergerac. She was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for her part in this movie. While on a USO entertainment tour in Korea in 1951, she acquired a blood disease and almost died. She was treated with chloromycetin, but a severe allergic reaction resulted in the loss of much of her bone marrow. Powers barely survived, and her recovery took nearly nine months. She began working again in 1952, including a
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Margaret Cho

    Margaret Cho

    Margaret Moran Cho (born December 5, 1968) is an American comedian, fashion designer, actress, author, and singer-songwriter. Cho, of Korean descent, is best known for her stand-up routines, through which she critiques social and political problems, especially those pertaining to race and sexuality. She has also directed and appeared in music videos and has her own clothing line. She has frequently supported LGBT rights and has won awards for her humanitarian efforts on behalf of women, Asians, and the LGBT community. As an actress she has played more serious parts, such as Charlene Lee in It's My Party and that of John Travolta's FBI colleague in the action movie Face/Off. She is part of the TV series Drop Dead Diva on Lifetime Television, playing the role of Teri Lee, a paralegal assistant. Cho was born into a Korean family in San Francisco, California. She grew up in a racially diverse neighborhood in the 1970s and 1980s, which she described as a community of "old hippies, ex-druggies, burn-outs from the '60s, drag queens, Chinese people, and Koreans. To say it was a melting pot — that's the least of it. It was a really confusing, enlightening, wonderful time." Cho's parents,
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Rockridge

    Rockridge

    Rockridge is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located in the Rockridge District of Oakland, California. The station has an island platform in the center median of State Route 24 at College Avenue west of the Caldecott Tunnel. Service at this station began on May 21, 1973. This station is in BART District 3 and is represented by Bob Franklin.
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

    San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

    The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) is a modern art museum located in San Francisco, California. A nonprofit organization, SFMOMA holds an internationally recognized collection of modern and contemporary art and was the first museum on the West Coast devoted solely to 20th century art. The museum’s current collection includes over 26,000 works of painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, design, and media arts. The building complex was designed by Swiss architect Mario Botta. SFMOMA's Research Library was established in 1935 and contains extensive resources pertaining to modern and contemporary art, including books, periodicals, artists’ files, and lecture recordings. The museum also houses a restaurant, Caffè Museo, and a coffee bar run by the Blue Bottle Coffee Company. SFMOMA was founded in 1935 under director Grace L. McCann Morley as the San Francisco Museum of Art. For its first sixty years, the museum occupied the fourth floor of the War Memorial Veterans Building on Van Ness Avenue in the Civic Center. A gift of 36 artworks from Albert M. Bender, including The Flower Carrier (1935) by Diego Rivera, established the basis of the permanent collection. Bender
    7.75
    4 votes
    40
    San Francisco Opera

    San Francisco Opera

    San Francisco Opera (SFO) is an American opera company, based in San Francisco, California. It was founded in 1923 by Gaetano Merola (1881–1953) and is the second largest opera company in North America. The Opening Night Gala of San Francisco Opera is considered to be one of the most prominent events in the musical and social life of San Francisco. The first performance given by San Francisco Opera was La bohème, with Queena Mario and Giovanni Martinelli, on September 26, 1923, in the city's Civic Auditorium and conducted by Merola, whose involvement in opera in the San Francisco Bay Area had been ongoing since his first visit in 1906. Merola launched the company in 1922, convinced that the city could support a full-time opera organization and not depend upon visiting companies, which had been coming to the San Francisco since Gold Rush days. In fact, Merola's initial visits to the city were as conductor of some of these troupes—the first in 1909 with the International Opera Company of Montreal. Continued visits for the next decade convinced him that a San Francisco company was viable, and in 1921 he returned to live in the city under the patronage of Mrs. Oliver Stine. By the fall
    5.83
    6 votes
    41
    Terry Bozzio

    Terry Bozzio

    Terry John Bozzio (December 27, 1950) is an American drummer best known for his work with Missing Persons and Frank Zappa. Terry Bozzio was born December 27, 1950 in San Francisco, California. He started at age 6 playing makeshift drum sets. At the age of 13 he saw The Beatles premier performance on The Ed Sullivan Show, and begged his father for drum lessons. During the 1960s, he played in the garage bands Blue Grass Radio, The Yarde, and Tamalpais Jungle Mountain Boys. In 1968 Bozzio attended Sir Francis Drake High School in San Anselmo, California, where he received a music scholarship award, and later went on to the College of Marin. During this time he studied concurrently with Chuck Brown on the drum set and Lloyd Davis and Roland Kohloff on a percussion and timpani scholarship. He also played Bartok-Dahl-Cowell & Baroque chamber ensembles with the Marin and Napa County Symphonies. In 1972 Bozzio played in the rock musicals Godspell and Walking in my Time. He also began playing in local jazz groups with Mark Isham, Peter Maunu, Patrick O'Hearn, Mike Knock, Art Lande, Azteca, Eddie Henderson, Woody Shaw, Julian Priester, Eric Gravatt, Billy Higgins, Andy Narell, Hadley
    6.60
    5 votes
    42
    345 California Street

    345 California Street

    345 California Center is a 48 story office tower located in the San Francisco financial district. Completed in 1986, the 211.8 m (695 ft) tower is the third-tallest in the city after the Transamerica Pyramid and 555 California Street, and was originally proposed at 30 m (98 ft) taller. 345 California is located in the middle of a block with four historic buildings on each of the four corners. Initially planned as condominiums, the top 11 floors of the twin towers tower are situated at 45-degree angles relative to the rest of the building and make up the Mandarin Oriental, San Francisco. Several glass skybridges offer views from the Financial District and the San Francisco Bay Area. The Mandarin Oriental is officially registered with the street address 222 Sansome, with a different entrance.
    7.50
    4 votes
    43
    Alcatraz Island

    Alcatraz Island

    Alcatraz Island is located in the San Francisco Bay, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) offshore from San Francisco, California, United States. Often referred to as "The Rock," the small island was developed with facilities for a lighthouse, a military fortification, a military prison (1868), and a federal prison from 1933 until 1963. Beginning in November 1969, the island was occupied for more than 19 months by a group of Aboriginal Peoples from San Francisco who were part of a wave of Native activism across the nation with public protests through the 1970s. In 1972 Alcatraz became a national recreation area and received designation as a National Historic Landmark in 1986. Today, the island's facilities are managed by the National Park Service as part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area; it is open to tours. Visitors can reach the island by ferry ride from Pier 33, near Fisherman's Wharf, San Francisco. Hornblower Cruises and Events, operating under the name Alcatraz Cruises, is the official ferry provider to and from the island. Hornblower launched the nation's first hybrid propulsion ferry in 2008, the Hornblower Hybrid, which now serves the island, docking at the Alcatraz Wharf. It is
    7.50
    4 votes
    44
    Haight-Ashbury

    Haight-Ashbury

    Haight-Ashbury is a district of San Francisco, California, named for the intersection of Haight and Ashbury streets. It is also called The Haight and The Upper Haight. The district generally encompasses the neighborhood surrounding Haight Street, bounded by Stanyan Street and Golden Gate Park on the west, Oak Street and the Golden Gate Park Panhandle on the north, Baker Street and Buena Vista Park to the east and Frederick Street and Ashbury Heights and Cole Valley neighborhoods to the south. The street names commemorate two early San Francisco leaders: Pioneer and exchange banker Henry Haight and Munroe Ashbury, a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors from 1864 to 1870. Both Haight and his nephew as well as Ashbury had a hand in the planning of the neighborhood, and, more importantly, nearby Golden Gate Park at its inception. The name "Upper Haight", used by locals, is in contrast to the Haight-Fillmore or Lower Haight district; the latter being lower in elevation and part of what was previously the principal African-American and Japanese neighborhoods in San Francisco's early years. The Haight-Ashbury district is noted for its role as a center of the 1960s hippie
    7.50
    4 votes
    45
    16th Street Mission

    16th Street Mission

    16th Street Mission Station is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station in the Mission District of San Francisco, California. It is used by the Richmond–Millbrae line, the Pittsburg/Bay Point – SFO line, the Fremont – Daly City line, and the Dublin/Pleasanton – Daly City line. It is an underground station with an island platform located below the intersection of Mission Street and 16th Street. Service at this station began, along with other stations between Montgomery Street Station and the Daly City station, on November 3, 1973.
    8.67
    3 votes
    46
    Eric Dane

    Eric Dane

    Eric Dane (born November 9, 1972) is an American actor. After appearing in television roles throughout the 1990s and 2000s, he became known for playing Dr. Mark "McSteamy" Sloan on the medical drama television series Grey's Anatomy, and has recently branched into film, co-starring in Marley & Me, Valentine's Day, and Burlesque. Dane was born in San Francisco, California to a homemaker mother, Leah, and an interior designer/architect father. He has a younger brother. Dane was raised in his mother's Jewish religion. He attended Sequoia High School in Redwood City, California, from 1987 to 1990, and San Mateo High School in San Mateo, California, from 1990 to 1991, where he graduated.Aragon High School Dane was an athlete in high school, playing on the Boys' Varsity water polo team, but decided to pursue a career in acting after appearing in a school production of Arthur Miller's All My Sons. In 1993, Dane moved to Los Angeles, where he played small roles in the television series Saved by the Bell, The Wonder Years, Roseanne, and Married With Children, among others. But in 2000, he was signed for a recurring role in Gideon's Crossing, and followed this with a two-season run in
    8.67
    3 votes
    47
    LucasArts

    LucasArts

    LucasArts Entertainment Company, LLC is an American video game developer and publisher. The company was once famous for its innovative line of graphic adventure games, the critical and commercial success of which peaked in the mid 1990s. Today, it publishes games primarily based on the Star Wars and Indiana Jones franchises. The company was founded in May 1982 as the video game development group of Lucasfilm Limited, the film production company of George Lucas. Lucas wanted his company to branch out into other areas of entertainment, so he cooperated with Atari to produce video games. The first results of this collaboration were unique action games like Ballblazer in 1984, and Rescue on Fractalus!. Beta versions of both games were leaked to pirate bulletin boards exactly one week after Atari had received unprotected copies for a marketing review, and were in wide circulation months before the original release date. In 1984, they were released for the Atari 5200 under the Lucasfilm Games label. Versions for home computers were not released until 1985, by publisher Epyx. Lucasfilm's next two games were Koronis Rift and The Eidolon. Their first games were only developed by Lucasfilm,
    8.67
    3 votes
    48
    Pittsburg/Bay Point

    Pittsburg/Bay Point

    Pittsburg/Bay Point is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station in the town of Bay Point, California. As the terminal station of the Pittsburg/Bay Point - SFO Line, it serves all of northern and eastern Contra Costa County, including the cities of Pittsburg, Antioch, Oakley and Brentwood, as well as the Sacramento River Delta. The station opened on December 7, 1996. The eBart extension was a under construction DMU train from Pittsburg/Bay Point to the cities of Pittsburg, Oakley, Antioch, Byron, Brentwood and Discovery Bay. As of 2010 the extension is under construction with the first phase to include stations in Pittsburg/Railroad Avenue and Antioch/Hillcrest Avenue. This station is in BART District 2 and is represented by Joel Keller. In May 2008 a Library-a-Go-Go machine was added at this station, it is a vending machine that offers library books from the Contra Costa County Library system. This was BART's first book vending machine and the first on a transit system in the nation. Several Tri Delta Transit bus lines stop at the station: Rio Vista Delta Breeze:
    8.67
    3 votes
    49
    Ghirardelli Chocolate Company

    Ghirardelli Chocolate Company

    The Ghirardelli Chocolate Company is a United States division of Swiss confectioner Lindt & Sprüngli. The company was founded by and is named after Italian chocolatier Domenico Ghirardelli, who, after working in South America, moved to California. The Ghirardelli Chocolate Company was incorporated in 1852, and is the second-oldest chocolate company in the United States, after Baker's Chocolate. In 1817, Domenico Ghirardelli was born in Rapallo, Italy, to an "exotic foods importer" and his wife. Domenico received his first education in the chocolate trade when he was apprenticed to a local candymaker as a child. By the time he was 20, Ghirardelli sailed to Uruguay with his wife to work in a chocolate and coffee business. A year later, Ghirardelli moved to Lima, Peru, and opened a confectionery store. In 1847, nine years later, James Lick (Ghirardelli's neighbor) moved to San Francisco with 600 pounds of Ghirardelli's chocolate. Ghirardelli remained and continued to operate his store in Peru. In 1849, Ghirardelli received news of the gold strike at Sutter’s Mill and sailed to California. After doing some prospecting, Ghirardelli opened a general store in Stockton, California,
    6.40
    5 votes
    50
    California Automobile Association Building

    California Automobile Association Building

    The California Automobile Association Building is an office tower located in San Francisco's Civic Center near the San Francisco City Hall on Van Ness Avenue. The building, completed in 1974, stands 400 feet (122 m) and has 29 floors of office space housing the California State Automobile Association. The building was sold by CSAA to VNO Patson, LLC in 2008 and was leased back to CSAA until 2010, at which time they relocated to a new corporate headquarters campus near Walnut Creek, CA. VNO Patson's interest in the building was foreclosed on by its lender and is now owned by Civic Center Commons Associates, which took title to the property in 2011. The new owner is planning a conversion of the building to rental apartments which will boast some of the best residential views in San Francisco. Construction on the new apartment tower is expected to be completed by 2015.
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    Embarcadero Station

    Embarcadero Station

    Embarcadero is a BART and Muni Metro station in the Financial District of San Francisco. The easternmost stop on the Market Street Subway, Embarcadero acts as a major hub for passenger movement throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. With 34,310 exits each weekday, Embarcadero is the busiest station in the BART system, a title for which it vies with its western neighbor, Montgomery Street. Embarcadero is located in the northeastern section of San Francisco's Financial District, specifically underneath Market Street between Front and Drumm Streets to the north and Fremont and Main Streets to the south. The Ferry Building, Embarcadero Center, Transbay Terminal and the eastern end of the California Street cable car line are all located near Embarcadero station. Service at this station began on May 27, 1976, three years after the other San Francisco stations. The station was not part of the original plans for the system. As a result of increasing development in the lower Market Street area, the basic structure of the station was added into the construction of the Market Street subway, anticipating a later opening. The later opening resulted in Embarcadero having a much different design
    7.25
    4 votes
    52
    Erinn Hayes

    Erinn Hayes

    Erinn Hayes (born Erinn Carter; May 25, 1976) is an American actress from San Francisco, California, known for her role as Melanie Clayton on the CBS comedy series Worst Week. She also played the roles of Alison McKellar in the 2007 Fox sitcom The Winner and Lola Spratt on comedy series Childrens Hospital. Hayes played Alison on the television show The Winner, created by Ricky Blitt. On May 16, 2007, the series was officially cancelled. She played the role of Melanie Clayton on the CBS comedy series Worst Week. The series was an Americanized version of the British comedy The Worst Week of My Life. In the 2008-2009 television season, the show aired Monday nights at 9:30 PM ET on CBS following Two and a Half Men. Hayes also appeared as chef Becky Sharp on FOX's short-lived Kitchen Confidential. She and her husband, construction supervisor Jack Hayes, have a daughter, Maggie. They welcomed their second daughter, Lilah Grace, on April 29, 2009.
    7.25
    4 votes
    53
    Exploratorium

    Exploratorium

    The Exploratorium is a museum in San Francisco with over 475 participatory exhibits, all of them made onsite, that mix science and art. It also aims to promote museums as informal education centers. Founded in 1969 by physicist and educator Frank Oppenheimer, the Exploratorium offers visitors a variety of ways—including exhibits, webcasts, websites and events—to explore and understand the world around them. In 2011, the Exploratorium received the National Science Board 2011 Public Service Science Award for its contributions to public understanding of science and engineering. The Exploratorium was founded in 1969 by Frank Oppenheimer, a noted experimental physicist and university professor. He served as the museum’s director until his death in 1985. In 1949, Oppenheimer was forced to resign from his position at the University of Minnesota as a result of inquiry by the House Un-American Activities Committee. He was drawn into the local high school in Pagosa Springs, Colorado, where he taught for several years. When Oppenheimer returned to university physics in 1959, he focused on improving laboratory teaching, developing a "Library of Experiments" in which students could explore
    7.25
    4 votes
    54
    Transamerica Pyramid

    Transamerica Pyramid

    The Transamerica Pyramid is the tallest skyscraper in the San Francisco skyline and one of its most iconic. Although the building no longer houses the headquarters of the Transamerica Corporation, it is still strongly associated with the company and is depicted in the company's logo. Designed by architect William Pereira and built by Hathaway Dinwiddie Construction Company, at 260 m (850 ft), upon completion in 1972 it was among the five tallest buildings in the world. The tower has no public access except for the first floor lobby, thus visitors cannot ascend to the top for a panoramic view. The Transamerica building was commissioned by Transamerica CEO John (Jack) R. Beckett, with the claim that he wished to allow natural light and fresh air to filter down to the street below. Built on the location of the historic Montgomery Block, it has a structural height of 260 m (850 ft) and contains 48 floors of retail and office space. Construction began in 1969 and finished in 1972, and was overseen by San Francisco-based contractor Dinwiddie Construction (now Hathaway Dinwiddie Construction Company). Transamerica moved its headquarters to the new building from across the street, where it
    7.25
    4 votes
    55
    Marla Sokoloff

    Marla Sokoloff

    Marla Lynne Sokoloff (born December 19, 1980) is an American actress and musician, known for playing the part of Lucy Hatcher on the TV show The Practice, and Gia Mahan on the ABC sitcom, Full House. Sokoloff was born in San Francisco, California, the daughter of Cindi (née Sussman), a former caterer, and Howard Sokoloff, a podiatrist. Her family is Jewish, and originates from Russia and Germany. Sokoloff graduated from the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts. In 2004, she began dating composer and Deadsy drummer, Alec Puro. Sokoloff and Puro were married November 7, 2009. On August 1, 2011, it was announced that the couple was expecting their first child. On September 19, 2011, Sokoloff confirmed that the child would be a girl. On February 8, 2012, she gave birth to her daughter, Elliotte Anne. Sokoloff began acting at age 12 (1993), when she was cast as Gia Mahan in the sitcom Full House. She played Stephanie Tanner's arch enemy, but later became her best friend. In 1998, Sokoloff landed her most notable role as she was cast as the sassy receptionist Lucy Hatcher in The Practice. Along with other popular appearances, she is well-remembered as Joey's pregnant sister, Dina,
    6.20
    5 votes
    56
    Linda Arvidson

    Linda Arvidson

    Linda Arvidson (12 July 1884 – 26 July 1949) was an American actress in silent films. Linda Arvidson was the first wife of film director D.W. Griffith (14 May 1906 - 2 March 1936). She played lead roles in many of his earliest films. While acting, she was sometimes credited as Linda Griffith. The pair separated around 1912 and finally divorced in 1936 when Griffith wished to remarry. In 1925, she authored her autobiography When the Movies Were Young (1925, 1968). She is mentioned in William J. Mann's The Biograph Girl, a novel based on Florence Lawrence.
    9.50
    2 votes
    57
    Six Apart

    Six Apart

    Six Apart Ltd., sometimes abbreviated 6A, is a software company known for creating the Movable Type blogware, TypePad blog hosting service, and Vox. The company also is the former owner of LiveJournal. Six Apart is headquartered in Tokyo and is planning to open a new, U.S.-based office in New York. The name is a reference to the six-day age difference between its married co-founders, Ben and Mena Trott. The company was founded in September 2001 after Ben, during a period of unemployment, wrote what became Movable Type to allow Mena to easily produce her weblog. When version 1.0 was put on the web, it was downloaded over 100 times in the first hour. In 2003, Six Apart received initial venture capital funding from a group led by Joi Ito and his Neoteny Co., something which allowed the company to hire additional employees, acquire a French weblog publishing company, and unveil plans for what was to become its hosted weblog publishing system, TypePad. In 2004, Six Apart completed a second round of funding with August Capital, a move which allowed it to make acquisitions of other companies. In January 2005, Six Apart purchased Danga Interactive, parent company of LiveJournal, from owner
    9.50
    2 votes
    58
    Twin Peaks

    Twin Peaks

    The Twin Peaks are two hills with an elevation of about 922 feet (281 m) near the geographic center of San Francisco, California. Except for Mount Davidson, they are the highest points in the city. The North and South Twin Peaks are about 660 ft (200 m) apart; Twin Peaks Boulevard runs a figure eight around them. The peaks form a divide for the summer coastal fog pushed in from the Pacific Ocean. Their west-facing slopes often get fog and strong winds, while the east-facing slopes receive more sun and warmth. Elevation at each summit is just over 900 feet (270 m). Thin, sandy soil is commonplace on Twin Peaks, making them susceptible to erosion. Before the arrival of the Europeans, the native Ohlone people may have used Twin Peaks as a lookout or hunting ground. The ecological diversity of Twin Peaks provided medicinal or ceremonial plants, grains and berries. When the Spanish conquistadors and settlers arrived at the beginning of the 18th century, they called the area "Los Pechos de la Chola" or "Breasts of the Indian Maiden" and devoted the area to ranching. When San Francisco passed under American control during the 19th century, it was renamed "Twin Peaks". The peaks each have
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Cole Valley

    Cole Valley

    Cole Valley is a small neighborhood in San Francisco. Its boundaries are usually considered to be Arguello Boulevard and Hillway Street to the west, Carmel Street to the south, Clayton Street to the east, and Golden Gate Park and Waller Street to the north. The main commercial strip is condensed into two blocks along Cole Street, between Parnassus Avenue to the south and Frederick Street to the north. It is very close to Haight-Ashbury, and is sometimes considered a sub-area of that district. It is also close to the Inner Sunset. Cole Valley grew up around the streetcar stop at the entrance to the Sunset Tunnel at the intersection of Carl and Cole Streets. That intersection is still the center of the neighborhood's small business district, and the N Judah light rail line still stops there. Cole Valley was popular with dot-commers during the late 1990s dot-com bubble. Craig Newmark, founder of Craigslist, is a recent former resident, and still an habitué of Cole Valley's cafes. Today the neighborhood is home to a mix of young professionals, some University of California, San Francisco residents and staff, and the African American and working-class families who have lived in the
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    Financial District

    Financial District

    The Financial District is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, that serves as its main central business district. The nickname "FiDi" is occasionally employed, analogous to nearby SoMa. The area is marked by the cluster of high-rise towers that lies between Grant Avenue east of the Union Square shopping district, Sacramento Street and Columbus Street, south of Chinatown and North Beach, and the Embarcadero that rings the waterfront. The city's tallest buildings, including 555 California Street and the Transamerica Pyramid, and some other tall buildings, such as 101 California Street and 345 California Street, are located there. Under Spanish and Mexican rule, the area was the site of a small civilian outpost named Yerba Buena that served to support the military population of the Presidio and the Mission Dolores. The sandy, marshy soils of the tip of the San Francisco Peninsula discouraged the Spanish, and later Mexican governments from establishing a preeminent town there, who focused their pueblo settlement efforts in the Pueblo of San José with its extremely fertile land. Yerba Buena's potential as a seaport made it the eventual center for European and American
    7.00
    4 votes
    61
    Isaac Smith Kalloch

    Isaac Smith Kalloch

    Isaac Smith Kalloch (July 10, 1832 – December 9, 1887) was the 18th Mayor of San Francisco serving from December 1, 1879 to December 4, 1881. He was born at Rockland, Maine and was a native of Maine. Kalloch was a Baptist minister and came to California looking to spread the Baptist religion. In 1879, he decided to run for mayor of San Francisco. It wasn't long before he came under attack from the San Francisco Chronicle's editor-in-chief, Charles DeYoung, who was backing another candidate. DeYoung, with the hopes of taking Kalloch out of the mayoral race, accused the minister of having an affair. Kalloch responded by accusing Charles' mother, Amelia, of running a brothel. In response, Charles DeYoung ambushed Kalloch in the streets of San Francisco and shot him twice. Kalloch survived the wounds and with the sympathy of voters was elected the 18th Mayor of San Francisco. He served from 1879 until 1881. On April 23, 1880, Kalloch's son, Isaac Milton Kalloch, entered the Chronicle building and shot and killed Charles DeYoung. After his time in office, Kalloch left San Francisco and moved to the Washington Territory. He died of diabetes in Bellingham, Washington, aged 55.
    7.00
    4 votes
    62
    Montgomery Street Station

    Montgomery Street Station

    Montgomery Street Station is a Muni Metro and Bay Area Rapid Transit station in the Financial District of San Francisco, California. It is located on the Market Street Subway beneath Market Street, between Montgomery Street and Sansome Street. Like all of the shared BART and Muni stations on the Market Street Subway, the concourse mezzanine is on the first level down, an island platform for the Muni Metro is on the second level down, and the island platform for BART is on the third level down. Both the Transbay Terminal and Golden Gate University are located on Mission Street, near Montgomery Station. Service at this station began on November 3, 1973.
    7.00
    4 votes
    63
    Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) is a multi-disciplinary contemporary arts center in San Francisco, California, United States. Located in Yerba Buena Gardens, YBCA features visual art, performance, and film/video that celebrates local, national, and international artists and the Bay Area's diverse communities. YBCA programs year-round in two landmark buildings—the Galleries and Forum by Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki and Theater by American architect James Stewart Polshek. The center has been used for the launch of new products by Apple Inc., including iPods and the iPad. The idea of building a conference center, under the name Yerba Buena Center, in downtown San Francisco was a further development of the idea stemming from the late 1950s to redevelop the city center, particularly the industrial areas that were gradually falling into disuse. At the heart of the proposal was the vision of the city transforming from an industrial to a tourist-conventioneering city. The idea of the Yerba Buena Center itself first emerged in the early 1960s. At that time there was a concern about how development could occur in the downtown area. The South of Market area offered hundreds of
    6.00
    5 votes
    64
    Bank of America

    Bank of America

    Bank of America Corporation (NYSE: BAC) is an American multinational banking and financial services corporation headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina. It is the second-largest bank holding company in the United States by assets. Bank of America serves clients through 5,600 branches and 16,200 ATMs in more than 150 countries and has a relationship with 99% of the U.S. Fortune 500 companies and 83% of the Fortune Global 500. The company is a member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and a component of both the S&P 500 Index and the Dow Jones Industrial Average. As of 2010, Bank of America is the fifth-largest company in the United States by total revenue, as well as the third-largest non-oil company in the U.S. (after Walmart and General Electric). In 2010, Forbes listed Bank of America as the 3rd biggest company in the world. The bank's 2008 acquisition of Merrill Lynch made Bank of America the world's largest wealth management corporation and a major player in the investment banking market. The company held 12.2% of all bank deposits in the United States as of August 2009, and is one of the Big Four banks in the United States, along with Citigroup, JPMorgan
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    George Field

    George Field

    George Field (18 March 1877, San Francisco – 9 March 1925, Los Angeles, California) was an American silent film actor. George's full name was George Blankman Field. He was the son of George Durgin Field, born 16 May 1849 in Beloit, Wisconsin and of Elizabeth Blankman, born in Monterey, CA in 1856. Elizabeth was the daughter of Dr. Henry Gerrit Blankman, born 3 May 1813 in Amsterdam, North Holland. He came to San Francisco from New York in June 1849 and was not only perhaps California's first dentist, but was an attorney as well. Elizabeth's mother was Magdelena del Valle, the niece and ward of the famous Mexican General Mariano de Vallejo and his brother Jose de Jesus de Vallejo. George began his career as a stage actor in the popular San Francisco theatre scene but was signed into film in 1912 and starred in 207 films until 1924. He also had a bit part in "Don Q Son of Zorro," where he was named as George Blankman. He was married to his co-star Winifred L. Greenwood who herself starred in at least 222 films. They married in 1913 and were perhaps divorced in 1918. George and Winifred worked at Flying A Studios in Santa Barbara. George later worked for Dustin Farnum, after whom
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Mount Sutro

    Mount Sutro

    Mount Sutro is a hill in San Francisco, California. Most of Mount Sutro remains private property owned by the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), but a 61 acres (25 ha) parcel, including the summit, has been set aside as the Mount Sutro Open Space Reserve and is open to the public. It is one of San Francisco's 47 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills". Sutro Tower, a large television and radio broadcasting tower for the San Francisco Bay Area, does not stand on Mount Sutro, but on a lower hill between it and Twin Peaks. Mount Sutro is covered by a dense forest, about 80% eucalyptus trees, planted in the late 19th century. The trees are now over 100 feet (30 m) tall. The mountain is within San Francisco's fog belt, receiving fog all through the summer. The tall trees precipitate the fog. This moisture is absorbed by the undergrowth and duff so the forest remains damp through the summer months. It receives some 30 to 40% of its moisture in this fashion. There is a dense understory of blackberry and other plants. The forest is habitat for a number of bird species including Great Horned Owls and various woodpeckers. Over thirty species were recorded in one morning of
    8.00
    3 votes
    67
    Public Library of Science

    Public Library of Science

    The Public Library of Science (PLOS, formerly PLoS) is a nonprofit open-access scientific publishing project aimed at creating a library of open access journals and other scientific literature under an open content license. It launched its first journal, PLoS Biology, in October 2003 and publishes seven journals, all peer reviewed, as of April 2012. The Public Library of Science began in early 2001 as an online petition initiative by Patrick O. Brown, a biochemist at Stanford University, and Michael Eisen, a computational biologist at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The petition called for all scientists to pledge that from September 2001 they would discontinue submission of papers to journals which did not make the full-text of their papers available to all, free and unfettered, either immediately or after a delay of several months. Some now do this immediately, as open access journals, such as the BioMed Central stable of journals, or after a six-month period from publication, as what are now known as delayed open access journals, and some after 6 months or less, such as the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
    8.00
    3 votes
    68
    Telegraph Hill

    Telegraph Hill

    Telegraph Hill (elev. 275 ft or 84 m) is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. It is one of San Francisco's 44 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills." The San Francisco Chronicle defines the Chinatown, North Beach, and Telegraph Hill areas as bounded by Sacramento Street, Taylor Street, Bay Street, and the water. The neighborhood is bounded by Vallejo Street to the south, Sansome Street to the east, Francisco Street to the north and Powell Street and Columbus Avenue to the west, where the southwestern corner of Telegraph Hill overlaps with the North Beach neighborhood. Originally named Loma Alta ("High Hill") by the Spaniards, the hill was then familiarly known as Goat Hill by the early San Franciscans, and became the neighborhood of choice for many Irish immigrants. From 1825 through 1847, the area between Sansome and Battery, Broadway and Vallejo streets was used as a burial ground for foreign non-Catholic seamen. The hill owes its name to a semaphore, a windmill-like structure erected in September 1849, for the purpose of signaling to the rest of the city the nature of the ships entering the Golden Gate. Atop the newly-built house, the marine telegraph consisted of
    8.00
    3 votes
    69
    Victoria Vetri

    Victoria Vetri

    Victoria Vetri (born September 26, 1944) is an American model and actress. Vetri was born in San Francisco, California to parents who were immigrants from Italy. She attended Hollywood High School in Hollywood, California between 1959 and 1963 and later studied art at Los Angeles City College. She began acting and modelling in her teens. Vetri is a singer and dancer who once turned down the voice dub for Natalie Wood in West Side Story (1961). Of this she remarked "I did not want to be known as a standby." She also auditioned for the title role in the Stanley Kubrick adaptation of Lolita but lost the role to Sue Lyon. She also writes poetry and plays guitar. Using the name Angela Dorian, she was chosen as Playboy's Playmate of the Month for the September 1967 issue and subsequently was the 1968 Playmate of the Year. Her centerfold was photographed by Carl Gunther. Vetri won $20,000 in prizes when she was selected Playmate of the Year. Among these were a new car (an all pink 1968 AMC AMX), gold watch, skis and a ski outfit, a complete wardrobe, a movie camera, a typewriter, a tape recorder, a stereo, and a guitar. A nude photo of her (along with fellow playmates Leslie Bianchini,
    8.00
    3 votes
    70
    West Dublin/Pleasanton

    West Dublin/Pleasanton

    West Dublin/Pleasanton is a BART station on the Dublin/Pleasanton - Daly City Line, located in the median of I-580, just west of I-680. It opened for revenue service on Saturday, February 19, 2011, with a ceremony taking place the day before. The station was originally planned to enter into service as part of the original extension to Dublin/Pleasanton, which entered service in 1997. As a result, the station's foundation, along with some communication and train control facilities, already existed on-site. Construction on the station began on October 29, 2006, and was slated to be complete in 2009, but possible faulty construction delayed its opening until 2011. Its cost was estimated at $106 million, with funding coming from a unique public-private partnership and the proceeds of planned transit-oriented development (TOD) on adjacent BART-owned property. This is BART's 44th station and is only the second infill station to be built in the system, the other being Embarcadero Station, which opened in 1976. Bus service is provided by WHEELS, including a line providing express service to the Pleasanton ACE station, and Tri-Valley Rapid , a BRT line, using techniques such as signal
    8.00
    3 votes
    71
    EdTV

    EdTV

    EDtv is a 1999 American comedy film directed by Ron Howard. An adaptation of the Quebec film Louis 19, le roi des ondes (1994), it stars Matthew McConaughey, Jenna Elfman, Woody Harrelson, Ellen DeGeneres, Martin Landau, Rob Reiner, Sally Kirkland, Elizabeth Hurley, Clint Howard, and Dennis Hopper. The film was screened out of competition at the 1999 Cannes Film Festival. EDtv starts off with the television channel True TV commencing interviews for a TV show that shows a normal person's life 24/7. This idea was thought up by a TV producer named Cynthia (Ellen DeGeneres). They interview Ed Pekurny (Matthew McConaughey) and his brother, Ray (Woody Harrelson). When the producers see the interview Cynthia decides to use Ed and interviews only Ed. So now they start airing the show, which they call Ed TV. The show is a total failure at first, as only boring things happen and the main producers want to pull the plug, except for Cynthia. However, Ed TV suddenly gets interesting on Day 3 when Ed visits Ray. Ed (along with the cameramen) discovers that Ray is cheating on his girlfriend Shari (Jenna Elfman). Ed then visits Shari to apologize to her for Ray's actions. Shari is very drunk and
    6.75
    4 votes
    72
    The Conversation

    The Conversation

    The Conversation is a 1974 American psychological thriller film written, produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman. Also starring are John Cazale, Allen Garfield, Cindy Williams, Frederic Forrest, Harrison Ford and Robert Duvall. The Conversation won the Palme d'Or at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival, and in 1995, it was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". Originally, Paramount Pictures distributed the film worldwide. Paramount retains American rights to this day but international rights are now held by Miramax Films and StudioCanal in conjunction with American Zoetrope. The Conversation was nominated for three Academy Awards in 1974. It lost Best Picture to The Godfather Part II, another Francis Ford Coppola film. Harry Caul (Gene Hackman) is a surveillance expert who runs his own company in San Francisco. He is highly respected by others in the profession. Caul is obsessed with his own privacy; his apartment is almost bare behind its triple-locked door and burglar alarm, he uses pay phones to make calls, claims to have no home
    6.75
    4 votes
    73
    Marina District

    Marina District

    The Marina District is a neighborhood located in San Francisco, California. The neighborhood sits on the site of the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition, staged after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake to celebrate the reemergence of the city. Aside from the Palace of Fine Arts (POFA), all other buildings were demolished to make the current neighborhood. The area is bounded to the east by Van Ness Avenue and Fort Mason; on the west by Cow Hollow, Lyon Street and the Presidio National Park; on the south by Lombard St, which bisects the southern edge of the Marina District. The northern half of the Marina is a shoreline of the San Francisco Bay, and features the Marina Green, a picturesque park adjacent to the municipal boat marina from which the neighborhood takes its name. Much of the Marina is built on former landfill, and is susceptible to soil liquefaction during strong earthquakes. This phenomenon caused extensive damage to the entire neighborhood during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The area in the 19th century prior to the 1906 Earthquake consisted of bay shallows, tidal pools, sand dunes, and marshland similar to nearby Crissy Field. Human habitation and
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    Roy D'Arcy

    Roy D'Arcy

    Roy D'Arcy (10 February 1894 – 15 November 1969) was an American film actor of the silent film and early sound period of the 1930s noted for his portrayal of flamboyant villains. He appeared in 50 different films between 1925 and 1939, such as The Temptress in 1926 with actresses such as Greta Garbo. Roy D'Arcy was born as Roy Francis Giusti in San Francisco but educated in Europe and studied painting in Paris. After several years of traveling and various business ventures in South America and Asia he returned to the United States and decided to become involved in the theater. He was hired as a singer in several touring theatrical companies. He spent some time in vaudeville as a monologist, and took his act to Europe and Asia. D'Arcy was performing his show on a Los Angeles stage when he was spotted by director Erich von Stroheim, who thought D'Arcy was just right for the part of the villainous, arrogant Prince Mirko in The Merry Widow. Von Stroheim had wanted to play the part himself, but was forbidden from doing so by MGM production head Irving Thalberg. It was a troubled production - from which von Stroheim was fired, brought back, then fired again - but the film was a great
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    Galileo Academy of Science and Technology

    Galileo Academy of Science and Technology

    Galileo Academy of Science and Technology (formerly Galileo High School) is a public secondary school located in San Francisco's Russian Hill and Marina District neighborhoods. The school is a part of the San Francisco Unified School District. Galileo has two regular hour schedules with 5-minute passing period (Monday, Tuesdays, and Fridays at 3:05PM), two early-leave days with 5-minute passing period (Wednesdays and Thursdays at 2:10PM, staff until 3:05PM), and two block period days with homeroom and 5-minute passing periods (Wednesdays with 1st, 3rd, and 5th periods; Thursday with 2nd, 4th, and 6th periods and dismiss at 2:10PM). On December 10, 1920, Major Joseph P. Nourse, who had been actively engaged in educational work in the city for many years, became the first principal of Galileo High School. Throughout the summer, carpenters were busy converting the Red Cross Building, located on Fulton Street near the Civic Center. On August 1, 1921, Galileo High School welcomed its student body into the remodeled facilities. The ceremony of "breaking ground" for the new building occurred on November 4, 1921 ' Dedication of the Van Ness Building took place on March 30, 1924. At the
    5.80
    5 votes
    76
    Presidio of San Francisco

    Presidio of San Francisco

    The Presidio of San Francisco (originally, El Presidio Real de San Francisco or Royal Presidio of San Francisco) is a park and former military base on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula in San Francisco, California, and is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. It had been a fortified location since September 17, 1776, when New Spain established it to gain a foothold on Alta California and the San Francisco Bay. It passed to Mexico, which in turn passed it to the United States in 1848. As part of a 1989 military reduction program, Congress voted to end the Presidio's status as an active military installation. On October 1, 1994, it was transferred to the National Park Service, ending 219 years of military use and beginning its next phase of mixed commercial and public use. In 1996, the United States Congress created the Presidio Trust to oversee and manage the interior 80% of the park's lands, with the National Park Service managing the coastal 20%. In a first-of-its-kind structure, Congress mandated that the Presidio Trust make the Presidio financially self-sufficient by 2013, which it achieved 8 years earlier. The park is characterized by many wooded
    5.80
    5 votes
    77
    Fruitvale

    Fruitvale

    Fruitvale is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located in the Fruitvale District of Oakland. The station consists of two elevated side platforms with the concourse mezzanine at ground level. The redevelopment of the immediate station area from a parking lot to a mixed-use "transit village" has served as a model for transit-oriented development planning elsewhere in the Bay Area. Service at this station began on September 11, 1972. Alameda Bicycle operates a bike station here. On January 1, 2009, BART police officer Johannes Mehserle shot and killed Oscar Grant III at the Fruitvale BART station. After 2:15 AM PST, BART Police were responding to reports of a fight on a BART train inbound from San Francisco. While on the train platform, when Grant was already restrained on his stomach on the platform floor, Mehserle drew his weapon, stood over Grant, and shot him in the back. Grant died seven hours later at Highland Hospital in Oakland, CA. Video recorded by other riders at the scene were later aired on local television. Media related to Fruitvale BART station at Wikimedia Commons
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Gavin Newsom

    Gavin Newsom

    Gavin Christopher Newsom (born October 10, 1967) is an American politician who is the 49th and current Lieutenant Governor of California. Previously, he was the 42nd Mayor of San Francisco and was elected in 2003 to succeed Willie Brown, becoming San Francisco's youngest mayor in 100 years. Newsom was re-elected in 2007 with 72 percent of the vote. In 2010, Samepoint released a study that measured the social media influence of mayors around the country and ranked the top 100 most social mayors. Newsom was named the Most Social Mayor in America according to the Samepoint study. Newsom graduated from Redwood High School in Larkspur, California, in 1985, and in 1989 from Santa Clara University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science. His PlumpJack Wine Shop, founded in 1992, grew into a multimillion-dollar enterprise, and now includes bars, restaurants, and a Lake Tahoe hotel called Squaw Valley Inn. He was first appointed by Willie Brown to serve on San Francisco's Parking and Traffic Commission in 1996 and was appointed the following year as Supervisor. Newsom drew voter attention with his Care Not Cash program, designed to move homeless people into city assisted care.
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Jerry Garcia

    Jerry Garcia

    Jerome John "Jerry" Garcia (August 1, 1942 – August 9, 1995) was an American musician who was best known for his lead guitar work, singing and songwriting with the band the Grateful Dead. Though he disavowed the role, Garcia was viewed by many as the leader or "spokesman" of the group. One of its founders, Garcia performed with the Grateful Dead for their entire thirty-year career (1965–1995). Garcia also founded and participated in a variety of side projects, including the Saunders-Garcia Band (with longtime friend Merl Saunders), Jerry Garcia Band, Old and in the Way, the Garcia/Grisman acoustic duo, Legion of Mary, and the New Riders of the Purple Sage (which Garcia co-founded with John Dawson and David Nelson). He also released several solo albums, and contributed to a number of albums by other artists over the years as a session musician. He was well known by many for his distinctive guitar playing and was ranked 13th in Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" cover story. Later in life, Garcia was sometimes ill because of his unstable weight, and in 1986 went into a diabetic coma that nearly cost him his life. Although his overall health improved somewhat after
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    Robert McNamara

    Robert McNamara

    Robert Strange McNamara (June 9, 1916 – July 6, 2009) was an American business executive and the eighth Secretary of Defense, serving under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson from 1961 to 1968, during which time he played a large role in escalating the United States involvement in the Vietnam War. Following that, he served as President of the World Bank from 1968 to 1981. McNamara was responsible for the institution of systems analysis in public policy, which developed into the discipline known today as policy analysis. Prior to public service, McNamara was one of the "Whiz Kids" who helped rebuild Ford Motor Company after World War II, and briefly served as Ford's President before becoming Secretary of Defense. McNamara is the longest serving Secretary of Defense, amassing 2,595 days between 1961 and 1968. Robert McNamara was born in San Francisco, California. His father was Robert James McNamara, sales manager of a wholesale shoe company. His mother was Clara Nell Strange McNamara. His father's family was Irish and in about 1850, following the Great Irish Famine, had emigrated to the US, first to Massachusetts and later to California. He graduated from Piedmont High
    7.67
    3 votes
    81
    Balboa Park

    Balboa Park

    Balboa Park Station is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located south of Balboa Park in southern San Francisco, California. It consists of two main tracks and a single island platform. Interstate 280 runs along the west side of the station, and City College of San Francisco is to the north. Balboa Park is currently the busiest BART station outside downtown San Francisco, with seven San Francisco Muni bus lines and three Muni Metro lines connecting in the vicinity. In addition, the station is popular with passengers who kiss and ride, due to its proximity to Interstate 280, a major commuter route into San Francisco. The station is the southernmost in the BART system that passengers can access using an SF Muni FastPass (which is valid for travel only within San Francisco); the next southbound stop, Daly City Station, is just outside San Francisco, across the San Mateo County border in suburban Daly City. Balboa Park serves as an official transfer station in the BART system. Although all four BART lines that pass through the station currently continue southward to Daly City, the Balboa Park Station design offers southbound passengers transfers between trains without having to change
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Bank of California

    Bank of California

    The Bank of California was opened in San Francisco, California, on July 4, 1864, by William Chapman Ralston. It was the first commercial bank in the Western United States, the second-richest bank in the nation, and considered instrumental in developing the American Old West. The ancestor of the bank was the banking firm of Garrison, Morgan, Fretz & Ralston, established in San Francisco in January 1856 by a group that included Ralston, Cornelius K. Garrison and R.S. Fretz. Ralston established the Bank of California in 1864 when he sold shares to 22 of the state's leading businessmen for $100 a share. The bank opened on July 4, 1864, with Darius Ogden Mills as president and Ralston as cashier; Louis McLane was on the board of directors. A branch was opened in Gold Hill, Nevada, near Virginia City, on September 4, 1864. William Sharon was long the bank's Nevada agent. Built of stone quarried on nearby Angel Island in San Francisco Bay, the Bank of California Building at the NW corner of California and Sansome streets in San Francisco was said to be "one of the handsomest structures on the coast …" The Bank of California financed a number of mining operations of the Comstock Lode, and
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Bill Bixby

    Bill Bixby

    Wilfred Bailey Everett “Bill” Bixby III (January 22, 1934 − November 21, 1993) was an American film and television actor, director, and frequent game show panelist. His career spanned over three decades; he appeared on stage, in motion pictures and TV series. He is known for his roles as Tim O'Hara on the CBS sitcom My Favorite Martian, Tom Corbett on the ABC comedy-drama series The Courtship of Eddie's Father, and Dr. David Banner on the CBS drama series The Incredible Hulk. Bixby, a fourth-generation Californian of English descent, was born in San Francisco, California. His father, Wilfred Bailey Everett Bixby Jr., was a store clerk and his mother, Jane (née McFarland) Bixby, was a senior manager at I. Magnin & Company. When Bixby was eight, his father enlisted in the U.S. Navy during World War II and traveled to the South Pacific. He attended Lowell High School where he developed his oratory and dramatic skills as a member of the Lowell Forensic Society. Though he received only average grades, he also competed in high school speech tournaments regionally. After graduation from high school in 1952, against his parents' wishes, he majored in drama at San Francisco City College,
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    City College of San Francisco

    City College of San Francisco

    City College of San Francisco, or CCSF, is a two-year community college in San Francisco, California. The Ocean Avenue campus, in the Ingleside neighborhood, is the college's primary location. With an enrollment in excess of 100,000 students, City College of San Francisco is the largest community and junior college in the United States, and the second-largest collegiate institution overall. The college is experiencing significant public difficulties, including dire warnings from its regional accreditor, and severe financial issues "exacerbated by 'operational dysfunction.' City College first opened in August 1935 as San Francisco Junior College. In February 1948, the name was changed to City College of San Francisco. It consists of eleven campuses; the Ocean campus is being the primary. CCSF is the largest junior and community college and the second largest collegiate institution overall in the US. In 2012, the college experienced significant public turmoil. In July of 2012, the college's regional accreditor gave the college eight months to prove it should remain accredited and ordered it to "make preparations for closure." Two months later and in the wake of a financial audit that
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    James D. Phelan

    James D. Phelan

    James Duval Phelan (April 20, 1861 – August 7, 1930) was an American politician, civic leader and banker. He represented California in the United States Senate from 1915 to 1921. Phelan was born in San Francisco, the son of an Irish immigrant who became wealthy during the California Gold Rush as a trader, merchant and banker. He graduated from St. Ignatius College in 1881. He studied law at the University of California, Berkeley and then became a banker. He was elected Mayor of San Francisco and served from 1897 until 1902. He pushed for the reform City Charter of 1898 in San Francisco. He served as the first president of the League of California Cities, which was created in 1898. In the 1900s, Phelan bought land and water acreage in various places around the San Francisco Bay Area, and he obtained the rights to the water flow of the Tuolumne River in Hetch Hetchy Valley. Ethan A. Hitchcock, Secretary of the Interior under President Theodore Roosevelt, tried to stop Phelan, but Roosevelt decided that the wild area could be used for "the permanent material development of the region." Phelan's plans for the region included publicly-funded water and electricity for a geographical
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    John W. Geary

    John W. Geary

    John White Geary (December 30, 1819 – February 8, 1873) was an American lawyer, politician, Freemason, and a Union general in the American Civil War. He was the final alcalde and first mayor of San Francisco, a governor of the Kansas Territory, and the 16th governor of Pennsylvania. Geary was born near Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania, in Westmoreland County—in what is today the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. He was the son of Richard Geary, an ironmaster and schoolmaster, and Margaret White, a native of Maryland. Starting at the age of 14, he attended nearby Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, studying civil engineering and law, but was forced to leave before graduation due to the death of his father, whose debts he assumed. He worked at a variety of jobs, including as a surveyor and land speculator in Kentucky, earning enough to return to college and graduate in 1841. He worked as a construction engineer for the Allegheny Portage Railroad. In 1843, he married Margaret Ann Logan, with whom he had several sons, but she died in 1853. Geary then married the widowed Mary Church Henderson in 1858 in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Geary was active in the state militia as a teenager and
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    Mount Davidson

    Mount Davidson

    Mount Davidson is the highest natural point in San Francisco, California, with an elevation of 928 feet (283 m) It is located near the geographical center of the city, south of Twin Peaks and Portola Drive and to the west of Diamond Heights and Glen Park. It dominates the southeastern view from most of Portola Drive. It is one of San Francisco's 44 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills". Mount Davidson's most notable feature, aside from its height, is the 103-foot (31.4 m) concrete cross situated on the crest of the hill. It is the site of a yearly prayer service, performed on Easter, when the cross is illuminated. Mount Davidson Park tops the hill - excluding the land at the summit, which is privately owned. The parkland portion is located between Myra Way (east), Dalewood Way (southwest) and Juanita Way (north). Public transportation is provided by the 36 Teresita Muni line, which stops at the Dalewood Way and Myra Way entrance to the park. The residential neighborhoods around Mount Davidson Park are Miraloma Park, to the east, Westwood Highlands to the southwest, and Sherwood Forest, to the southwest. Adolph Sutro purchased the land in 1881. Under his ownership, what was
    10.00
    1 votes
    88
    Natalie Wood

    Natalie Wood

    Natalie Wood (born Natalia Nikolaevna Zacharenko; Russian: Наталья Николаевна Захаренко; July 20, 1938 – November 29, 1981) was an American film and television actress best known for her screen roles in Miracle on 34th Street, Splendor in the Grass, Rebel Without a Cause, and West Side Story. After first working in films as a child, Wood became a successful Hollywood star as a young adult, receiving three Academy Award nominations before she was 25 years old. Wood began acting in movies at the age of four and at age eight was given a co-starring role in the classic Christmas film Miracle on 34th Street. As a teenager, her performance in Rebel Without a Cause (1955) earned her a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She starred in the musical films West Side Story (1961) and Gypsy (1962), and received Academy Award for Best Actress nominations for her performances in Splendor in the Grass (1961) and Love with the Proper Stranger (1963). Her career continued with films such as Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969). After this she took a break from acting and had two children, appearing in only two theatrical films during the 1970s. She was married to actor Robert
    10.00
    1 votes
    89
    Shaklee Terraces

    Shaklee Terraces

    Shaklee Terraces also known as One Front Street is an office skyscraper in the Financial District of San Francisco, California. The 164 m (538 ft) 38 floor, tower was completed in 1979. The composition of the façade closely resembles that of the Shell Building by Emil Fahrenkamp, which was built in Berlin in 1931. The Shaklee Corporation was once headquartered in the tower until the company moved to Pleasanton, California in 2000. In 1999-2001 Scient Corporation, a dot-com era consulting firm, had its head office on the upper floors of the building, prior to its move to Market Street.
    10.00
    1 votes
    90
    El Cerrito Plaza

    El Cerrito Plaza

    El Cerrito Plaza is one of two elevated BART stations located in El Cerrito, California. It primarily serves southern El Cerrito, northern Albany, and Kensington, along with nearby areas of Berkeley and Richmond. Outside of the station is the El Cerrito Plaza shopping center. The station hosts the first BART trial of bikelink on-demand electronic bicycle lockers (traditional BART lockers are leased by the year, and are almost always fully booked). These are the same lockers used by C-TRAN of Vancouver, Washington, as funded by the US EPA. Service at this station began on January 29, 1973. In 1998 the Pacific East Mall opened and is within walking distance of the station via the trail to Point Isabel Regional Shoreline. On February 3, 2008 UC Berkeley music professor Jorge Liderman committed suicide by jumping in front of an incoming Richmond bound train at this station. On June 8, 2009 Everret Carey a 4 month-old boy, died as a result of hyperthermia after having been left unattended inside his father's car earlier in the day. The infant was discovered later in the afternoon by the mother, who notified BART police.
    5.60
    5 votes
    91
    Angel Island

    Angel Island

    Angel Island is an island in San Francisco Bay that offers expansive views of the San Francisco skyline, the Marin County Headlands and Mount Tamalpais. The entire island is included within Angel Island State Park, and is administered by California State Parks. The island, a California Historical Landmark, has been used for a variety of purposes, including military forts, a U.S. Public Health Service Quarantine Station and a U.S. Bureau of Immigration inspection and detention facility. The Immigration Station on the northeast corner of the island, where officials detained, inspected and examined approximately one million immigrants, has been designated a National Historic Landmark. The highest point on the island, almost exactly at its center, is Mount Caroline Livermore at a height of 788 feet (240 m). The island is almost entirely in Marin County, California, although, there is a small sliver (0.7%) at the eastern end of it (Fort McDowell) which extends into the territory of San Francisco County. The island is separated from the mainland of Marin County by Raccoon Strait. The United States Census Bureau reported a land area of 3.107 km² (1.2 sq mi) and a population of 57 persons
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Britney Spears

    Britney Spears

    • Web Link(s): MusicMoz page for Britney Spears
    Britney Jean Spears (born December 2, 1981) is an American recording artist and entertainer. Born in McComb, Mississippi, and raised in Kentwood, Louisiana, she began performing as a child, landing acting roles in stage productions and television shows. She signed with Jive Records in 1997 and released her debut album ...Baby One More Time in 1999, which became the best-selling album by a teenage solo artist. During her first decade in the music industry, she became a prominent figure in mainstream popular music and popular culture, followed by a much-publicized personal life. Her first two albums established her as a pop icon and broke sales records, while title tracks "...Baby One More Time" and "Oops!... I Did It Again" became international number-one hits. Spears was credited with influencing the revival of teen pop during the late 1990s, and became the 'best-selling teenaged artist of all time' before she turned 20, garnering her honorific titles such as "Princess of Pop". In 2001, she released her third studio album Britney and expanded her brand, playing the starring role in the film Crossroads. She assumed creative control of her fourth studio album, In the Zone (2003),
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Cathedral Hill

    Cathedral Hill

    Cathedral Hill is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Its northern border is Post Street, the eastern border is Van Ness Avenue, the southern border is Eddy Street and the western border is Laguna Street. The neighborhood is centered around St. Mary's Cathedral on the corner of Geary Street and Gough Street. It is home to large condominium and apartment towers with numerous churches built atop the hill; St. Mary's Cathedral, St. Mark's Lutheran Church, The First Unitarian Church of San Francisco, and Hamilton Baptist Church. Sacred Heart Cathedral Prep is inside the neighborhood.
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    West Oakland

    West Oakland

    West Oakland is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located in the neighborhood of West Oakland in Oakland. It has two elevated side platforms, and is located near the eastern end of the Transbay Tube. This is the last stop before entering the Transbay Tube into San Francisco, and all trains except those of the Richmond - Fremont line pass through this station. In late 2005 a parking program was implemented in which parking commuters at this station would have to pay $5 per day. This was implemented to raise revenues for BART, to bring parking costs at the station in line with parking at other local garages, and to ensure that parking at the stations was going to be used for BART patrons only, parking spaces would have had to be 'validated' inside the BART paid area. The station was originally named Oakland West until 1982.
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Stuart Hall High School

    Stuart Hall High School

    Stuart Hall High School is a college-preparatory high school located in San Francisco's Pacific Heights district. Stuart Hall opened in the fall of 2000. The school, along with Convent of the Sacred Heart High School, Convent Elementary, and Stuart Hall for Boys, is part of the Schools of the Sacred Heart San Francisco, which in turn is part of the international Schools of the Sacred Heart organization. Stuart Hall High School operates by a block schedule; theology, ethics and social justice classes are mandatory for graduation. Heavy emphasis is placed on community involvement, service, critical thinking and self-development. Each Stuart Hall High School student completes four years of English, history, mathematics, theology, and philosophy/religion; three years of lab science and international language; two years of physical education; and one year of computer science and fine arts. Students have a choice of AP courses, including art history, biology, calculus, chemistry, comparative government/politics, computer science, English language/composition, environmental science, European history, French language, French literature, human geography, music theory, physics, psychology,
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    South San Francisco

    South San Francisco

    South San Francisco Station is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located in suburban South San Francisco, California in northern San Mateo County. It consists of two main tracks and a shared underground island platform. Service at the station began on June 22, 2003, as part of the BART San Mateo County Extension project that extended BART service southward from Colma to Millbrae and San Francisco International Airport. El Camino High School is located near the station along the opposite side of Mission Road, and Solaire Village, a 361-unit, mixed-use transit village that includes a Trader Joe's supermarket, is nearby. Several SamTrans bus lines serve the station, including:
    6.25
    4 votes
    97
    Alicia Silverstone

    Alicia Silverstone

    Alicia Silverstone ( /əˈliːsiə ˈsɪlvərstoʊn/; born October 4, 1976) is an American actress, film and television producer, author, and animal rights and environmental activist. Following The Crush, which gave Silverstone the MTV Movie Award for Best Breakthrough Performance, she starred in such films as Clueless and Batman & Robin, where she played Batgirl. A vegan, Silverstone endorsed PETA activities and published a book The Kind Diet. Silverstone was born in San Francisco, California, the daughter of parents from the United Kingdom - Deirdre "Didi" (née Radford), a Scottish-born former Pan Am flight attendant, and Monty Silverstone, a real estate agent born in England. She has two older siblings, a half-sister from her father's previous marriage named Kezi Silverstone and a brother named David Silverstone. She grew up in an upper-middle class home in the San Francisco suburb of Hillsborough, California. Her father is Jewish and her mother converted to Conservative Judaism before marriage. She began modeling when she was six years old, and was subsequently cast in television commercials, the first being for Domino's Pizza. She attended Crocker Middle School and then San Mateo High
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Caffe Trieste

    Caffe Trieste

    Caffé Trieste is a chain of six Italian-themed coffeehouse plus one retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. The Caffe Trieste was opened in 1956 by Giovanni Giotta (aka "Papa Gianni"), who in 1950 had emigrated to San Francisco, California, from the small fishing town of Rovigno, Italy (now part of Croatia). Missing the espresso houses of Trieste, Italy, Giotta opened his own cafe. Caffe Trieste is said to be the first espresso house on the West Coast. The original Caffé Trieste in San Francisco's North Beach quickly became popular among the neighborhood's primarily Italian residents. "It was all Italian people," Giotta said of the neighborhood, "But I got the American people to like cappuccino." Papa Gianni Giotta is known as "The Espresso Pioneer", both in Italy and America, earning the label by having brought Espresso and Cappuccino to the West Coast, thus starting the Espresso Movement seen today. The company's Licensing Program promises to open, on a one-by-one, "non cookie-cutter" basis, more Trieste locations in the SF Bay Area, Northern California, Southern California, the Southwest and East Coast areas. The Caffé Trieste also becomes a convenient meeting
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Colleen Camp

    Colleen Camp

    Colleen Celeste Camp (born June 7, 1953) is an American actress and film producer, known for her performances in two installments of the Police Academy series and as Yvette the Maid in the 1985 black comedy Clue. She was also the first actress to play Kristin Shepard in the primetime soap opera Dallas in 1979. Camp was born in San Francisco, California. She had small early roles in films like Funny Lady with Barbra Streisand in 1975. She also appeared in the Bruce Lee movie Game of Death as his girlfriend, Ann (her scenes were shot with a lookalike as Bruce had died long before she became involved). Camp portrayed a Playmate in Francis Coppola's 1979 film Apocalypse Now (followed by an actual pictorial in the October 1979 Playboy), though most of her footage was cut from the initial theatrical release. She would later feature more heavily in Coppola's Redux cut. She has worked steadily in film comedies like Peter Bogdanovich's They All Laughed, 1983's Valley Girl and the Michael J. Fox comedy Greedy. She often is cast as a police officer. Camp has been nominated twice for the Worst Supporting Actress Golden Raspberry Award – first, in 1982, for The Seduction, and then, in 1993, for
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Fremont

    Fremont

    Fremont is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station that serves Fremont, California. The elevated island platform serves as the southernmost terminal station of BART's Fremont line, which is served by trains on the Fremont - Daly City Line, which runs daytimes Monday-Saturday, and the Richmond - Fremont Line whose trains run during all BART service times. All trains terminate service and reverse direction at this station. In 2015 the station will no longer be the southern terminal of this line as the Warm Springs station will open, a precursor to the planned extension to San José at Berryessa. Service at this station began on September 11, 1972. On October 2, 1972 a car ran off the tracks at this station due to a component failure. Fremont station is an important regional transit transfer point, as it is a hub for AC Transit and Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) buses. AC Transit operates the following route from the station: VTA, on the other hand, provides several express and commuter buses that serve San Jose, Milpitas, and other attractions in the South Bay, and its services act as a connector along the only part of the ring around the Bay without rail connections (the
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Russ Building

    Russ Building

    The Russ Building is a Neo-Gothic office tower located in the Financial District of San Francisco, California. The 133 m (436 ft) building was completed in 1927 and had 32 floors as well as the city's first indoor parking garage. The building was the tallest building in San Francisco from 1927 to 1964 and one of the most prominent, along with its 133 m (436 ft) 'twin' the PacBell Building to the south. Upon completion, the building was iconic enough that that Architect and Engineer wrote, “In nearly every large city there is one building that because of its size, beauty of architectural design and character of its use and occupancy, has come to typify the city itself ... Today the Russ Building takes this place in San Francisco. by its size and location and by the character of its tenants the building becomes indeed—'The Center of Western Progress'.” However, Manhattanization from 1960 to 1990 has shrouded the tower in a shell of skyscrapers, removing the tower's prominence. The tower is a California Historical Landmark. Until the emergence of Sand Hill Road in the 1980s, many of the largest venture capital firms held offices in the Russ Building.
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Oakland Coliseum Amtrak/BART Station

    Oakland Coliseum Amtrak/BART Station

    The Oakland Coliseum Station is a complex of two stations of two public transit providers that are within 600 feet (180 m) of each other: Amtrak Capitol Corridor's Oakland Coliseum station and Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART)'s Coliseum/Oakland Airport (OAK) station. They are located in East Oakland, and are connected to each other, and to the O.co Coliseum and the Oracle Arena by a pedestrian bridge. BART and Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority (CCJPA), Capitol Corridor's administration agency, will sometimes refer to these separate stations as one station. AirBART shuttle bus and AC Transit bus routes 73 (73rd Avenue) and 805 (All-Nighter) all provide service between the BART station and Oakland International Airport. BART's Coliseum/Oakland Airport station consists of an elevated island platform with the concourse mezzanine at ground level. Capitol Corridor's Oakland Coliseum station, the newest Capitol Corridor station, consists of a side platform on a side track. It is unstaffed, but has an electronic ticketing system. BART's Coliseum/Oakland Airport station opened as part of BART's initial service on September 11, 1972, connecting the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum and the
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    Potrero Hill

    Potrero Hill

    Potrero Hill is a residential neighborhood in San Francisco, California. It is known for having views of the San Francisco bay/skyline, close proximity to many destination spots, sunny weather, and having two freeways and a Caltrain station nearby. It was initially a working-class neighborhood until gentrification arrived in the 1990s. It is now an upper-middle-class family oriented neighborhood. Potrero Hill is located on the eastern side of the city, east of the Mission District and south of SOMA (South of Market) and the newly designated district Showplace Square. It is roughly bordered by 16th Street to the north, Potrero Avenue (above 20th Street) and U.S. Route 101 (below 20th Street) to the west and Cesar Chavez Street to the south; although the city of San Francisco considers the area below 20th Street between Potrero Ave and Route 101 to be part of Potrero Hill as well, as outlined in the Eastern Neighborhood Plan. The area east of Highway 280 is Dogpatch. The Dogpatch was originally part of Potrero Neuvo and its history is closely tied to Potrero Hill, some considered Dogpatch to be its own neighborhood while others disagree. Dogpatch has its own neighborhood association
    6.00
    4 votes
    104
    Simon Rex

    Simon Rex

    Simon Rex (born July 20, 1974) is an American actor, comedian, television host and recording artist. He is known for starring as Jeff Campbell in What I Like About You, during the first season. Rex was born Simon Rex Cutright in San Francisco, California, and is the only child of Paul and Zoe Cutright, a relationship coach and an environmental consultant. He attended Alameda High School in Alameda, California. He is Jewish. In 1993, at age 19, he appeared solo in scenes for three masturbation porn films, Young, Hard & Solo II; Young, Hard & Solo III; and Hot Sessions III. In 1995, MTV hired Rex to work as a VJ and kept him on the air for over two years. Rex began to pursue mainstream acting and in 1999 was cast in the television show Jack & Jill, which ran for two seasons. He appeared as "Eli" in the TV show Felicity and television guest appearances followed including Baywatch, Everwood, and Summerland. In 2002, the pilot for the show What I Like About You was picked up by The WB, which now has become The CW. Rex starred in the first season. He later appeared on the Lifetime show, Monarch Cove which ran for 11 episodes in 2006. He also co-produced a pilot for a show called Rex,
    6.00
    4 votes
    105
    44 Montgomery Street

    44 Montgomery Street

    44 Montgomery is a 43-storey, 172 m (564 ft) office skyscraper in the heart of San Francisco's Financial District. When completed in 1967, it was the tallest building west of Dallas until 555 California Street was erected in 1969. The building was once the world headquarters for Wells Fargo Bank. It was sold by AT&T in 1997 for US$111 million. The building contains direct underground access to the Montgomery Street Station. Tenants include Business Wire.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Aisha Tyler

    Aisha Tyler

    Aisha N. Tyler (born September 18, 1970) is an American actress, stand-up comedian, and author, known for her regular role as Andrea Marino in the first season of Ghost Whisperer and voicing Lana Kane in Archer, as well as her recurring roles in CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Talk Soup, and on Friends as Charlie Wheeler. She is currently a co-host of The Talk. Tyler is also recognized for her supporting role as Mother Nature in the Santa Clause sequels. Tyler was born in San Francisco, California, the daughter of Robin Gregory, a teacher, and Jim Tyler, a photographer. Her parents divorced when she was 10 and she was raised by her father. She pursued an early interest in comedy during high school; she attended McAteer High School in San Francisco, which had a special program called McAteer School of the Arts, where she attended improv and theater classes. She attended Dartmouth College, where she earned a degree in environmental policy and was a member of The Tabard, a co-ed fraternity. At Dartmouth, she co-founded and sang in the Dartmouth Rockapellas, an all-female a cappella group devoted to spreading social awareness through song. After briefly working for a San Francisco
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Carmel Myers

    Carmel Myers

    Carmel Myers (April 4, 1899 – November 9, 1980) was an American actress who worked chiefly in silent movies. Myers was born in San Francisco, the daughter of an Australian rabbi and Austrian Jewish mother. Her father became well-connected with California's emerging film industry, and introduced her to film pioneer D. W. Griffith, who gave Carmel a small part in Intolerance (1916). Myers also got her brother Zion Myers into Hollywood as a writer/director. From this beginning, Myers left for New York, where she acted mainly on stage for the next two years. She was signed by Universal, where she emerged as a popular actress in vamp roles. Her most popular film from this period is probably the romantic comedy All Night, opposite Rudolph Valentino. By 1924 she was working for MGM, making such films as Broadway After Dark, which also starred Adolphe Menjou, Norma Shearer and Anna Q. Nilsson. In 1925, she appeared in arguably her most famous role, that of the Egyptian vamp Iras in Ben-Hur, who tries to seduce both Messala (Francis X. Bushman) and Ben-Hur himself (Ramón Novarro). This film was a boost to Myers' career, and she appeared in major roles throughout the 1920s, including Tell It
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Fillmore District

    Fillmore District

    The Fillmore District, also called The Fillmore, The Fill, The Moe, or Fillmoe, is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Though its boundaries are not well-defined, it is usually considered to be the subset of the Western Addition neighborhood and is roughly bordered by Van Ness Avenue on the east, Divisadero Street on the west, Geary Boulevard on the north, and Grove Street on the south. These delineations are approximate and there are certain irregularities in the geographic shape of the neighborhood; for instance, the Westside Housing Projects are generally considered to be part of the Fillmore District, even though they are located a block west of Divisadero and a block north of Geary. The community also extends south of Grove St. at several points. Fillmore Street, from which the district gets its name, is the main north-south thoroughfare running through the center of the district. The area east of Fillmore St. is locally referred to as Downtown Fillmore, while the area to the west of Fillmore is known by many locals as Uptown Fillmore. Some definitions, particularly older ones, include Hayes Valley, Japantown, and what is now known as North of Panhandle as part of the
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Golden Gate Park

    Golden Gate Park

    Golden Gate Park, located in San Francisco, California, is a large urban park consisting of 1,017 acres (412 ha) of public grounds. Configured as a rectangle, it is similar in shape but 20% larger than Central Park in New York, to which it is often compared. It is over three miles (5 km) long east to west, and about half a mile north to south. With 13 million visitors annually, Golden Gate is the third most visited city park in the United States after Central Park in New York City and Lincoln Park in Chicago. In the 1860s, San Franciscans began to feel the need for a spacious public park similar to Central Park that was taking shape in New York. Golden Gate Park was carved out of unpromising sand and shore dunes that were known as the “outside lands” in an unincorporated area west of then-San Francisco’s borders. Although the park was conceived under the guise of recreation, the underlying justification was to attract housing development and provide for the westward expansion of The City. The tireless field engineer William Hammond Hall prepared a survey and topographic map of the park site in 1870 and became commissioner in 1871. He was later named California's first State
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Joseph Alioto

    Joseph Alioto

    Joseph Lawrence Alioto (February 12, 1916 – January 29, 1998) was the 36th mayor of San Francisco, California, from 1968 to 1976. Alioto was born in San Francisco in 1916. His father was a Sicilian immigrant who owned and operated several fish processing companies. His mother, Domenica Mae Lazio, was born in San Francisco in 1893. His parents met on a fishing boat while escaping the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. He attended Saint Ignatius College Prep. Alioto graduated with honors from St. Mary's College in Moraga, California in 1937 and from law school at The Catholic University of America with honors, in Washington, D.C. in 1940. Alioto worked for the Antitrust Division of the Justice Department and then for the Board of Economic Warfare. He returned to San Francisco after World War II and started an antitrust practice, representing Walt Disney and Samuel Goldwyn, among others, eventually becoming a millionaire. He argued the Radovich v. National Football League case before the Supreme Court, convincing the justices that professional football, unlike baseball, was subject to antitrust laws. In 1993, he represented his father-in-law Billy Sullivan in his lawsuit against the NFL.
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Lillie Hitchcock Coit

    Lillie Hitchcock Coit

    Lillie Hitchcock Coit (August 23, 1843 in West Point – July 22, 1929 in San Francisco) was a well-known volunteer firefighter, wife of Howard Coit, and the benefactor for the construction of the Coit Tower in San Francisco. In 1851, she moved to California from West Point with her parents, Charles, an Army doctor, and Martha Hitchcock. 'Firebelle Lil' Coit was one of the more eccentric characters in the history of North Beach and Telegraph Hill, smoking cigars and wearing trousers long before it was socially acceptable for women to do so. She was an avid gambler and often dressed like a man in order to gamble in the males-only establishments that dotted North Beach. Coit was reputed to have shaved her head so her wigs would fit better. Lillie had a special relationship with the city's firefighters. She had from very early days of her life been fascinated and enamored of the red shirted and helmeted fire fighters. At the age of fifteen she witnessed the Knickerbocker Engine Co. No. 5 in response to a fire call up on Telegraph Hill when they were shorthanded; she threw her school books to the ground and pitched in to help, calling out to other bystanders to help get the engine up the
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    M. H. de Young Memorial Museum

    M. H. de Young Memorial Museum

    The M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, commonly called simply the de Young Museum, is a fine arts museum located in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. It is named for early San Francisco newspaperman M. H. de Young. The museum opened in 1895 as an outgrowth of the California Midwinter International Exposition of 1894 (a fair modeled on the Chicago World's Columbian Exposition of the previous year). It was housed in an Egyptian style structure which had been the Fine Arts Building at the fair. The building was badly damaged in the earthquake of 1906, closing the building for a year and a half for repairs. Before long, the museum's steady development called for a new space to better serve its growing audiences. Michael de Young responded by planning the building that would serve as the core of the de Young Museum facility through the 20th century. Louis Christian Mullgardt, the coordinator for architecture for the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition, designed the Spanish-Plateresque-style building. The new structure was completed in 1919 and formally transferred by de Young to the city's park commissioners. In 1921, de Young added a central section, together with a tower that
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Mission San Francisco de Asís

    Mission San Francisco de Asís

    Mission San Francisco de Asís, or Mission Dolores, is the oldest surviving structure in San Francisco and the sixth religious settlement established as part of the California chain of missions. The Mission was founded on June 29, 1776, by Lieutenant José Joaquin Moraga and Father Francisco Palóu (a companion of Father Junipero Serra), both members of the de Anza Expedition, which had been charged with bringing Spanish settlers to Alta (upper) California, and evangelizing the local Natives, the Ohlone. The settlement was named for St. Francis of Assisi, the founder of the Franciscan Order, but was also commonly known as "Mission Dolores" owing to the presence of a nearby creek named Arroyo de Nuestra Señora de los Dolores, meaning "Our Lady of Sorrows Creek." and which runs now under the 16th street of present San Francisco. A member of the Anza Expedition, Friar Font, wrote about the spot chosen for the Mission: We rode about one league to the east [from the Presidio], one to the east-southeast, and one to the southeast, going over hills covered with bushes, and over valleys of good land. We thus came upon two lagoons and several springs of good water, meanwhile encountering much
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    PacBell Building

    PacBell Building

    The PacBell Building or 140 New Montgomery Street in San Francisco's South of Market district is a Neo-Gothic, 132.6 m (435 ft) office tower located close to the St. Regis Museum Tower and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The 26-floor building was completed in 1925 and was San Francisco's first significant skyscraper development when construction began in 1924. The building was the tallest in San Francisco until the Russ Building matched its height two years later in 1927. The building is illuminated at night. The building was originally called the Pacific Telephone Building. At the time of its construction, the operating telephone company it housed was Pacific Telephone & Telegraph, a member of the Bell System. The building once had a bell motif in many places on its façade, most notably surrounding the arch over the main entrance doors on New Montgomery Street. After the breakup of the Bell System (AT&T) and the formation the regional so-called Baby Bell companies, Pacific Telephone changed its name to "Pacific Bell". The tower has an "L" shaped floor plan and the architecture decoratively incorporates spotlights to light the outside of the building. In 2007, the PacBell
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Richmond District

    Richmond District

    The Richmond District is a neighborhood in the northwest corner of San Francisco, California. It is a family-oriented residential neighborhood known for its quieter pace and the cold/fog that initiates from the Pacific Ocean. The entire Richmond District is sandwiched between Presidio of San Francisco (north) and Golden Gate Park (south), allowing its residents ample park accessibility. Some people confuse the Richmond District with Richmond - a city 20 miles north of San Francisco. Lying directly north of Golden Gate Park, "the Richmond" is bounded roughly by Fulton Street to the south, Arguello Boulevard and Laurel Heights to the east, The Presidio National Park and Lincoln Park to the north, and Ocean Beach and the Pacific Ocean to the west. Park Presidio Boulevard, a major thoroughfare, divides the Richmond into the western "Outer Richmond" and the eastern portion, called the "Inner Richmond." Geary Boulevard is a major east-west thoroughfare that runs through the Richmond and to downtown. The district was given its name by Australian immigrant and Japanese fine art dealer George Turner Marsh, one of the neighborhood's earliest residents, who called his home "the Richmond
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    50 Fremont Center

    50 Fremont Center

    50 Fremont Center is a office skyscraper rising 600 ft. (183 m) up from Fremont and Mission Street on the boundary of the San Francisco's Financial District and South of Market Area (SOMA). The tower has 43 stories and was completed in 1985. 50 Fremont street was developed and owned by Fremont Properties who sold the building in 2000, which was later purchased by Hines, who in turn sold the property to TIAA-CREF in early 2005. Hines Interests Limited Partnership provides property management for this building.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Anza Vista

    Anza Vista

    Anza Vista is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, United States. It is located between Geary Boulevard to the north, Turk Street to the south, Masonic Avenue to the west and Divisadero Street to the east, although some of the surrounding areas between The Presidio, Golden Gate Park, the Panhandle, and the Western Addition may sometimes be referred to as part of the Anza Vista neighborhood. It sits atop the former location of the San Francisco Calvary Cemetery. Graves in this cemetery, along with all graves in San Francisco, were moved in the 1930s and 1940s to Colma after burials in San Francisco were banned in 1902 at all but two cemeteries to increase available real estate. A small shopping center, called The City Center, is located on Geary Boulevard and Masonic Avenue in the north-western corner of the neighborhood. Anza Vista is also the location of a Kaiser Permanente hospital at Geary Boulevard and St. Joseph's Avenue and Raoul Wallenberg Traditional High School on Nido Avenue. 37°46′51″N 122°26′35″W / 37.78087°N 122.44319°W / 37.78087; -122.44319
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Blinkx

    Blinkx

    Blinkx (London AIM:; stylized as blinkx; USA NASDAQ), is an Internet search engine for video and audio content, headquartered in San Francisco, California and the UK that allows searching and classification of audio files, video clips and streaming media such as Internet television and video on demand. blinkx’s video search engine differs by using speech recognition to listen to the audio component of the video content, and then uses both the phonetic and text transcripts to match content with search queries. blinkx also indexes and searches podcasts and video blogs. It claims to be the largest deep indexed Video search engine with 35 million hours indexed (almost 4,000 years) and agreements with over 720 content companies. Blinkx has built a strong reputation for their company as one of the largest video web page, they now have an index of a total of 35million hours of searchable video and more than 800+ media partnerships, including national broadcasters, commercial media giants, and private video libraries, it has cemented its position as the premier destination for online TV. Blinkx started the largest pioneered video site, developing an engine based on technology that was
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Diamond Heights

    Diamond Heights

    Diamond Heights is a neighborhood in the middle part of San Francisco, California, roughly bordered by Diamond Heights Boulevard and Noe Valley on the east side and Glen Canyon Park on the west side. Diamond Heights was the first project of the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association, intended to use redevelopment powers to use land on the hills in the center of the city to be developed with, rather than against, the topography. Few existing residents needed to be relocated for the redevelopment program, which included housing for a range of incomes, churches, schools, parks, and a commercial center. This type of redevelopment came under the California Redevelopment Law, passed in 1951, a codified version of the California Redevelopment Act which had passed in 1941. More than half a million dollars was appropriated by the Water Department just for a water system for the redevelopment. The "Diamond Heights Redevelopment Project Area B-1" plan was debated between the Board of Supervisors and the Diamond Heights Property Owners' Association. In 1955 alternative proposals to the Supervisors' plan were presented in an effort to protect the property rights of existing
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Edward Robeson Taylor

    Edward Robeson Taylor

    Edward Robeson Taylor (September 24, 1838 – July 5, 1923) was the 28th Mayor of San Francisco serving from July 16, 1907 to January 7, 1910. Edward Robeson Taylor was born on September 24, 1838 in Springfield, Illinois, the only son of Henry West Taylor and the former Mary Thaw of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (he was descended on his mother's side from the early colonial merchant, Andrew Robeson, of Philadelphia.) He was a lawyer and a poet in California before he became mayor, publishing an 1898 book of sonnets based on the paintings of William Keith. Taylor was appointed mayor due to the resignation of Charles Boxton, after his eight-day term. When he was sworn in, he became the oldest mayor of San Francisco to be sworn in at 68 years old and still currently holds the record today. He died in San Francisco on July 5, 1923.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Golden Gate Bridge

    Golden Gate Bridge

    The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay into the Pacific Ocean. As part of both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1, the structure links the city of San Francisco, on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula, to Marin County. It is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States. It has been declared one of the modern Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The Frommers travel guide considers the Golden Gate Bridge "possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world". Before the bridge was built, the only practical short route between San Francisco and what is now Marin County was by boat across a section of San Francisco Bay. Ferry service began as early as 1820, with regularly scheduled service beginning in the 1840s for purposes of transporting water to San Francisco. The Sausalito Land and Ferry Company service, launched in 1867, eventually became the Golden Gate Ferry Company, a Southern Pacific Railroad subsidiary, the largest ferry operation in the world by the late 1920s. Once for
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Lotta's Fountain

    Lotta's Fountain

    Lotta's fountain is an historical fountain, located at the intersection of Market Street, where Geary and Kearny Streets connect in downtown San Francisco, California. It was dedicated on September 9, 1875. The cast iron fountain served as a meeting point, during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire aftermath, and a metal panel on the side of the fountain indicates this. Another panel also mentions legendary opera soprano Luisa Tetrazzini, who sang for people at the fountain on Christmas Eve, 1910. The plaque was installed in 1911. The cast pillar was donated to San Francisco by the entertainer Lotta Crabtree, in 1916. Commemorations of the earthquake, including a dwindling pool of survivors, are held every year at 5:12 a.m. on April 18 at the intersection. It was relocated in 1974. In 1999, the fountain, which had suffered neglect in the past decades, was totally refurbished to its 1875 appearance. It is painted with a metallic gold-brown paint. The lion's head-motif fountain stations located on the sides of the column flow during daytime hours.
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    North Concord/Martinez

    North Concord/Martinez

    North Concord/Martinez is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station that serves the cities of Concord and Martinez, California. The station itself is in the northern part of Concord. Despite its location on the most heavily used line (the Bay Point Line) of BART, it is the least utilized station in the system. The North Concord/Martinez station was opened on December 16, 1995 and briefly functioned as a terminal station until 1996, when the extension over Willow Pass was completed. The present terminal is Pittsburg/Bay Point. This station is in BART District 1 and is represented by Gail Murray who is also current BART President. Several County Connection bus lines stop at the station: No connecting bus service provided on Weekends Media related to North Concord/Martinez BART station at Wikimedia Commons
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Todd Bridges

    Todd Bridges

    Todd Anthony Bridges (born May 27, 1965) is an American actor. He is best known for his childhood role as Willis Jackson on the NBC/ABC sitcom Diff'rent Strokes, and for his recurring role as Monk on the UPN/CW sitcom Everybody Hates Chris. He is currently a comedic commentator on the television series TruTV Presents: World's Dumbest..., which airs on truTV. Bridges was born May 27, 1965, in San Francisco, California. He is the son of Betty Alice Pryor, an actress, director, and manager, and James Bridges, Sr., an agent. Bridges has one brother and one sister who are both actors, Jimmy Bridges and Verda Bridges. He has three nieces from his brother Jimmy, Penny Bridges, Brooke Bridges, and Rachel Bridges. Todd is married to Dori Bridges and has one son, Spencir Bridges (born July 15, 1998) who is also a child actor and appeared in the film Daddy Day Camp and one episode on iCarly. They also have a daughter, Bo. Todd is divorcing his wife, Dori Smith. In his 20s, Bridges battled a crack cocaine addiction for several years. In 1988, he was arrested and tried for the attempted murder of Kenneth "Tex" Clay, a Los Angeles area drug dealer who, prosecutors argued, had been shot by
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Laura Hope Crews

    Laura Hope Crews

    Laura Hope Crews (December 12, 1879 – November 12, 1942) was a leading actress of the American stage in the first decades of the 20th century who is best remembered today for her later work as a character actress in motion pictures of the 1930s. Her best-known film role was Aunt Pittypat in Gone with the Wind. She was the daughter of stage actress Angelena Lockwood and backstage carpenter John Thomas Crews. She had three older siblings. Crews started acting at age four. Her first stage appearance was at Woodward's Garden. She stopped acting to finish school and then returned to acting in 1898. She appeared in plays written by A.A. Milne, who was particularly impressed by her work in his Mr. Pim Passes By. The play was a big success and ran for 232 performances. Afterwards, she began to work in productions staged by the New York Theater Guild, which had just opened. Crews's final stage appearance came in 1942, in the original Broadway run of Arsenic and Old Lace in which she replaced one of the original cast members. She stayed with the production for more than a year and a half on Broadway and in a touring company before she was forced to leave because of illness. Crews also
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Mike Bordin

    Mike Bordin

    • Web Link(s): http://www.discogs.com/artist/Mike+Bordin
    Mike Bordin (born November 27, 1962 in San Francisco, California) is the co-founder and drummer of rock band Faith No More. He is also known for playing with Ozzy Osbourne. As a left-handed drummer, he notably plays with a right-handed kit with his ride cymbal on the left. He is noted for his distinctive long dreadlocks, and for playing in shorts while shirtless at concerts. In the late 1970s, while still in high school, Mike Bordin played in the band EZ-Street with future Metallica bassist Cliff Burton and future Faith No More guitarist Jim Martin. In 1981, Bordin formed Faith No Man with bassist Billy Gould, keyboardist Wade Worthington, and frontman Mike Morris. A year later the group replaced Wade Worthington with keyboardist Roddy Bottum, removed Mike Morris, and changed their name to Faith No More. Faith No More released their first album, We Care a Lot, in 1985. After releasing several more albums, including the Grammy-nominated The Real Thing, Faith No More disbanded in 1998. In 2009, Faith No More reformed and performed a series of festival shows in Europe, leading to several shows in select American cities. In 1997, Bordin began performing with Ozzy Osbourne's band. After
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Millbrae Station

    Millbrae Station

    Millbrae Station (also known as Millbrae Intermodal Terminal) is an at-grade Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) and Caltrain station located in suburban Millbrae, California, in northern San Mateo County. Millbrae Station is the largest intermodal terminal in the United States west of the Mississippi. It consists of three ground-level main tracks for BART and two for Caltrain. An island platform provides a cross-platform connection between the two systems (for traveling north to San Francisco). An elevated concourse mezzanine is above the platforms. Currently two BART tracks and one island platform usually are kept out of regular service, used instead to hold train sets that are also out of service. However, because one of the two Caltrain tracks has only a side platform, to remove Caltrain sets from service, passengers occasionally must disembark using this island platform. The station is also a regional bus transit hub with multiple bus bays served by several SamTrans lines. Millbrae Station has about 2,900 parking spaces, including a five-story parking garage and surrounding surface parking. Except for the marked Reserved Parking areas, most parking is currently $2/day from 4am-3pm
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    ON24

    ON24

    ON24, Inc., is a San Francisco-based company that markets products and services based upon webcasting and virtual event and environment technology. ON24 is a privately held company whose primary venture capital investors are Gold Hill Capital, U.S. Venture Partners, Canaan Partners and Rho Ventures . Founded in 1998 as a financial news company, ON24 has evolved to become the market share leader in webcasting and virtual events. The ON24 Webcast Center platform launched in 2002. In 2006 ON24 began its global expansion and now has local presence in the US, the UK, Australia, Singapore and Spain. With its current expansion in China and certified global partner network, ON24 provides local support in almost every country in the world. In 2008 ON24 launched its virtual event platform, ON24 Virtual Show. In 2009 ON24 was recognized with Frost & Sullivan’s virtual events market leadership award, and in 2010 ON24 received a second market share leadership award from Frost & Sullivan, for web events. 2010 saw the launch of ON24’s Virtual Briefing Center, a virtual environment platform used for a wide range of applications, such as training, marketing, product launches and corporate and HR
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    San Francisco 49ers

    San Francisco 49ers

    The San Francisco 49ers are a professional American football team based in San Francisco, California, playing in the West Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The team was founded in 1946 as a charter member of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) and joined the NFL in 1950 after the two leagues merged. The 49ers are known for having one of the NFL's greatest dynasties, winning five Super Bowl championships in only 14 years, between 1981 and 1994, with four of those championships coming in the 1980s. Those championship teams were led by hall of famers such as Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Ronnie Lott, Steve Young, and coach Bill Walsh. They are currently tied with the Dallas Cowboys for the second-most Super Bowl wins with 5 (the Pittsburgh Steelers have 6); the 49ers remain the only team in NFL history to appear in more than one Super Bowl without ever losing. The name "49ers" comes from the name given to the gold prospectors who arrived in Northern California around 1849 during the California Gold Rush. The name was suggested to reflect the voyagers who had rushed the West for gold. The team is legally and corporately
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Theodore Roberts

    Theodore Roberts

    Theodore Roberts the actor is not to be confused with author Theodore Goodridge Roberts, 1877–1953, who wrote "The Harbor Master". Please see discussion page. Theodore Roberts (October 8, 1861, San Francisco, California – December 14, 1928, Hollywood, California) was an American movie and stage actor. He was a stage actor decades before becoming lovable old man in silents. On stage in the 1890s he acted with Fanny Davenport in her play called Gismonda (1894) and later in The Bird of Paradise (1912) with actress Laurette Taylor. He started his film career in the 1910s in Hollywood, and was often associated in the productions of Cecil B. DeMille. He was buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery. He was a cousin of the stage actress Florence Roberts.
    5.75
    4 votes
    131
    333 Bush Street

    333 Bush Street

    333 Bush Street is a 43-floor, 151 m (495 ft) skyscraper completed in 1986 in the financial district of San Francisco, California. The building was designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill and contains commercial offices as well as seven stories of individually owned residential condominiums. The tower's owners, Hines and Sterling American Property, forfeited ownership to their lenders after the primary tenant, multinational law firm Heller Ehrman filed for bankruptcy and defaulted on rent payments leaving property 65 percent vacant in 2009.
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Bay Fair

    Bay Fair

    Bay Fair is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located near the Bayfair Center in San Leandro, California. The station is in BART District 3 and is represented by Bob Franklin. After the BART system was extended to Dublin/Pleasanton, the elevated island platform became a transfer station because the railroad junction was built immediately south of the station. Service at this station began on September 11, 1972.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    First Market Tower

    First Market Tower

    First Market Tower is an office skyscraper at First- and Market Streets in the financial district of San Francisco, California. The 161 m (528 ft), 39 floor tower was the second largest office building in the city when completed in 1973
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Herb Caen

    Herb Caen

    Herbert Eugene "Herb" Caen (1916–1997) was a San Francisco journalist whose daily column of local goings-on and insider gossip, social and political happenings, painful puns and offbeat anecdotes appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle for almost sixty years (excepting a brief defection to the San Francisco Examiner) and made his name a household word throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. A special Pulitzer Prize called him the "voice and conscience" of San Francisco. Caen was born April 3, 1916 in Sacramento, California though he liked to point out that his parents—pool hall operator Lucien Caen and Augusta (Gross) Caen—had spent the summer nine months previous in San Francisco. After graduating high school (where he wrote a column, "Corridor Gossip") he covered sports for The Sacramento Union. In 1936 Caen began writing a radio column for the San Francisco Chronicle. When that column was discontinued in 1938, Caen proposed a daily column on the city itself; "It's News to Me" first appeared July 5. Excepting Caen's three and one-half years in the Air Force during World War II and a 1950–1958 stint at the San Francisco Examiner, his column—eventually titled simply "Herb
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Kevin Pollak

    Kevin Pollak

    Kevin Elliot Pollak (born October 30, 1957) is an American actor, impressionist, game show host, and comedian. He started performing stand-up comedy at the age of 10 and touring professionally at the age of 20. In 1988, Pollak landed a role in George Lucas’s Willow, directed by Ron Howard, and began his acting career. Pollak is an avid poker player, hosting weekly home games with some of Hollywood's A-list celebrities. He finished 134th out of 6,598 entrants in the 2012 WSOP, earning himself $52,718. Pollak was born in San Francisco, the youngest son of Elaine Harlow and Robert "Bobby" Pollak. He has one older brother. He has since moved to and currently resides in San Francisco. His parents live in Chicago, and his brother resides with his family in Boston. He attended high school at Pioneer High School in San Jose. As an actor, Pollak's most notable roles are usually playing the best friend or confidant characters to the leading men, as he did in Ricochet (1991), A Few Good Men (1992), End of Days (1999) and The Wedding Planner (2001). However, Pollak has also played a wide variety of parts; he played a criminal in The Usual Suspects (1995) and a gangster in The Whole Nine Yards
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Koyaanisqatsi

    Koyaanisqatsi

    Koyaanisqatsi (English pronunciation: /koʊjɑːnɪsˈkɑːtsiː/) also known as Koyaanisqatsi: Life Out of Balance, is a 1982 film directed by Godfrey Reggio with music composed by Philip Glass and cinematography by Ron Fricke. The film consists primarily of slow motion and time-lapse footage of cities and many natural landscapes across the United States. The visual tone poem contains neither dialogue nor a vocalized narration: its tone is set by the juxtaposition of images and music. Reggio explains the lack of dialogue by stating "it's not for lack of love of the language that these films have no words. It's because, from my point of view, our language is in a state of vast humiliation. It no longer describes the world in which we live." In the Hopi language, the word Koyaanisqatsi means "unbalanced life". The film is the first in the Qatsi trilogy of films: it is followed by Powaqqatsi (1988) and Naqoyqatsi (2002). The trilogy depicts different aspects of the relationship between humans, nature, and technology. Koyaanisqatsi is the best known of the trilogy and is considered a cult film. However, because of copyright issues, the film was out of print for most of the 1990s. The first
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Nob Hill

    Nob Hill

    Nob Hill refers to a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, centered on the intersection of California and Powell streets. It is one of San Francisco's 44 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills." The actual peak of Nob Hill lies slightly to the northwest, approximately at the intersection of Jones and Sacramento Streets. South of Nob Hill is the shopping district of Union Square, the Tenderloin neighborhood, and Market Street. To the east is San Francisco's Chinatown and a little farther, the city's financial district. Northeast of Nob Hill is North Beach and Telegraph Hill. North of Nob Hill is Russian Hill, and eventually, the tourist-centered areas of the waterfront such as Pier 39 and Fisherman's Wharf. The area was settled in the rapid urbanization happening in the city in the late 19th century. Because of the views and its central position, it became an exclusive enclave of the rich and famous on the west coast who built large mansions in the neighborhood. This included prominent tycoons such as Leland Stanford, founder of Stanford University and other members of The Big Four. The neighborhood was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake and fire, except for the granite
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    So I Married an Axe Murderer

    So I Married an Axe Murderer

    So I Married an Axe Murderer is a 1993 American comedy-horror film starring Mike Myers and Nancy Travis. Myers plays Charlie McKenzie, a man afraid of commitment until he meets Harriet (Travis), who works at a butcher shop and may be a serial killer. In addition to playing the main character, Myers also plays Charlie's father, Stuart. This was Myers' first film after achieving success in the Wayne's World franchise and was not well received by most mainstream critics or at the box office, grossing a total of USD $11 million in North America, well below its $20 million budget. Charlie McKenzie is a beat poet living in San Francisco, after having broken up with yet another girl based on paranoid perception. His policeman friend Tony tries to point out the pattern; that Charlie simply is afraid of commitment and tries to think of, or invent, any reason to break up with someone. Things pick up again when Charlie meets a butcher named Harriet, and becomes infatuated instantly. After a while of driving near her workplace, he goes in and volunteers to help her out that day, and eventually a date ensues that evening, with him learning various factoids about her. He learns she used to live
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    The Castro

    The Castro

    The Castro District, commonly referenced as The Castro, is a neighborhood in Eureka Valley in San Francisco, California. The Castro is one of the United States' first and best-known gay neighborhoods, and it is currently the largest. Having transformed from a working-class neighborhood through the 1960s and 1970s, the Castro remains one of the most prominent symbols of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) activism and events. The local news media view the intersection of Market and Castro as ground zero location for interviews when prominent news impacting the gay community occurs. San Francisco's gay village is mostly concentrated in the business district that is located on Castro Street from Market Street to 19th Street. It extends down Market Street toward Church Street and on both sides of the Castro neighborhood from Church Street to Eureka Street. Although the greater gay community was, and is, concentrated in the Castro, many gay people live in the surrounding residential areas bordered by Corona Heights, the Mission District, Noe Valley, Twin Peaks, and Haight-Ashbury neighborhoods. Some consider it to include Duboce Triangle and Dolores Heights, which both have a
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    Kimpton Hotels & Restaurant Group

    Kimpton Hotels & Restaurant Group

    The Kimpton Hotel & Restaurant Group Inc. is an American hotel and restaurant company. Founded in 1981 by William (Bill) Kimpton and led by Chief Executive Officer Michael Depatie, it is the largest chain of boutique hotels in the United States. The company's headquarters are in San Francisco, California. All its properties are located in the U.S. Most Kimpton properties are marketed under their own independent names as boutique hotels; however, in 2005, the company launched two sub-brands within the company's brand: Hotel Palomar and Hotel Monaco. Each hotel has a restaurant or bar that is marketed as upscale or trendy. The company's loyalty program is called Kimpton InTouch.. CNNMoney.com listed it as the #16 best company to work for in 2012. Under contract, the company also manages and operates hotels owned by other entities. In addition to the Hotel Monaco and Palomar Hotel brand hotels, other company hotels include: The company's environmental program is called Earthcare. Every hotel adopts standard environmentally friendly products and practices, such as eco-friendly cleaning supplies and recycling. Every year, the company sponsors a red-ribbon campaign generating awareness
    4.80
    5 votes
    141
    McKesson Plaza

    McKesson Plaza

    McKesson Plaza is an office skyscraper located on Market Street in the financial district of San Francisco, California. The 161 m (528 ft) 38 story building serves as headquarters for the McKesson Corporation. Designed by noted architect Welton Becket, the building exemplified his penchance for repetitive geometric patterns and walls clad in natural stone. Landscape architect SWA Group's design for the busy triangular site created an octagonal, two-tiered opening leading to a Bay Area Rapid Transit station, and flanked by trees, shops and a series of granite steps used for seating.
    5.50
    4 votes
    142
    California Palace of the Legion of Honor

    California Palace of the Legion of Honor

    The California Palace of the Legion of Honor (often abbreviated Legion of Honor) is a part of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF). The name is used both for the museum collection and for the building in which it is housed. The Legion of Honor was the gift of Alma de Bretteville Spreckels, wife of the sugar magnate and thoroughbred racehorse owner/breeder Adolph B. Spreckels. The building is a three-quarter-scale version of the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur also known as the Hôtel de Salm in Paris by George Applegarth and H. Guillaume. It was completed in 1924. The museum building occupies an elevated site in Lincoln Park in the northwest of the city, with views over the Golden Gate Bridge. Most of the surrounding Lincoln Park Golf Course is on the site of a potter's field called the "Golden Gate Cemetery" that the City had bought in 1867. The cemetery was closed in 1908 and the bodies were relocated to Colma. During seismic retrofitting in the 1990s, however, coffins and skeletal remains were unearthed. The plaza and fountain in front of the Palace of the Legion of Honor is the western terminus of the Lincoln Highway, the first road across America. The terminus marker
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    49-Mile Scenic Drive

    49-Mile Scenic Drive

    The 49-Mile Scenic Drive (also known as 49-Mile Drive) in San Francisco highlights many of the city's major attractions and historic structures. Opened on September 14, 1938 as a promotion for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition, it features views of the then-newly-built Golden Gate Bridge (opened May 1937) and the Bay Bridge (opened November 1936). Then it terminated at the fairgrounds on Treasure Island. The Drive is marked by blue and white signs that lead one through the city. Currently the route begins at the intersection of Hayes Street and Van Ness Avenue, near City Hall: The blue and white seagull "49-Mile Scenic Drive" sign was designed by a local artist named Rex May. May's design won the 1955 competition held by San Francisco's Downtown Association to create a new sign for the route. Prior to 1955 the city used blue and gold triangular signs. Some sources erroneously cite the origin date of the newer sign as 1938, which is actually the origin of the 49-Mile-Scenic Drive itself, but not the sign. Some of the 49-Mile Scenic Drive signs have gone missing over the years, presumably due to theft. Because of this, sometimes the route is hard to follow due to missing
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

    Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

    The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco is a museum in San Francisco, California, United States. It has one of the most comprehensive collections of Asian art in the world. The museum owes its origin to a donation to the city of San Francisco by Chicago millionaire Avery Brundage, who was a major collector of Asian art. The Society for Asian Art, incorporated in 1958, was the group that formed specifically to gain Avery Brundage's collection. The museum opened in 1966 as a wing of the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park. Brundage continued to make donations to the museum, including the bequest of all his remaining personal collection of Asian art on his death in 1975. In total, Brundage donated more than 7,700 Asian art objects to San Francisco. Until 2003, the museum shared a space with the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park. As the museum’s collection grew, the facilities in Golden Gate Park were no longer sufficient to display or even house the collection. In 1987 Mayor Diane Feinstein proposed a plan to revitalize Civic Center which included relocating the museum to the Main Library. In 1995, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Chong-Moon Lee made a $15 million donation
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Baker Beach

    Baker Beach

    Baker Beach is a public beach on the peninsula of San Francisco, California, U.S.. The beach lies on the shore of the Pacific Ocean to the northwest of the city. It is roughly a half mile (800 m) long, beginning just south of Golden Gate Point (where the Golden Gate Bridge connects with the peninsula), extending southward toward the Seacliff peninsula, the Palace of the Legion of Honor and the Sutro Baths. The northern section of Baker Beach is "frequented by clothing-optional sunbathers". As such it is considered a nude beach. Baker Beach is part of the Presidio, which was a military base from the founding of San Francisco by the Spanish in 1812 until 1997. In 1904, it was fortified with disappearing gun installations known as Battery Chamberlin, which can still be viewed today. When the Presidio was decommissioned as a U.S. Army base, it became part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which is administered by the National Park Service. From 1986 to 1990, the north end of Baker Beach was the original site of the Burning Man art festival. In 1990, park police allowed participants to raise the traditional large statue but not to set it on fire, since the beach enforces a
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles

    Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles

    Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles is a 1994 American drama horror film directed by Neil Jordan, based on the 1976 novel Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice. The film focuses on Lestat and Louis, beginning with Louis' transformation into a vampire by Lestat in 1791. The film chronicles their time together, and their turning of a twelve year old girl, Claudia, into a vampire. The narrative is framed by a present day interview, in which Louis tells his story to a San Francisco reporter. The film stars Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, and Kirsten Dunst, with Antonio Banderas and Stephen Rea co-starring. The film was released in November 1994 to generally positive critical acclaim, and received Oscar nominations for Best Art Direction and Best Original Score. Kirsten Dunst was also nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film. In modern-day San Francisco, reporter Daniel Molloy (Christian Slater) interviews Louis de Pointe du Lac (Brad Pitt), who claims to be a vampire. Louis starts his story by describing the events which precipitated his transformation into a vampire. It begins in Spanish Louisiana in 1791, when the protagonist Louis was
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Jeffrey Tambor

    Jeffrey Tambor

    Jeffrey Michael Tambor (born July 8, 1944) is an American actor and voice actor, perhaps best known for his roles as Hank Kingsley on The Larry Sanders Show, and George Bluth Sr. and Oscar Bluth on Arrested Development. Tambor was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Eileen (née Salzberg), a housewife, and Michael Bernard "Mike" Tambor, a flooring contractor. He grew up in a Conservative Jewish family with roots in Hungary and Russia. Tambor is a graduate of San Francisco State University, where he studied acting and then went on to receive a master's degree from Wayne State University. Tambor first moved to repertory theater, later making his Broadway debut in the comedy Sly Fox (1976), appearing with George C. Scott and directed by Arthur Penn. He appeared in Measure For Measure in the same year. In 1979 he starred in Norman Jewison's ...And Justice For All, as a lawyer friend of the protagonist, Arthur Kirkland (Al Pacino). In an early TV job, an ad for Avis rent-a-car, he was seen running (huffing and puffing) through an airport, mocking O.J. Simpson's "Go, O.J., go!" ads for Hertz. He has had a significant career in episodic TV, where he made numerous guest
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Lone Mountain

    Lone Mountain

    Lone Mountain is a hill in west-central San Francisco, California and the site of the private University of San Francisco (USF) - Lone Mountain Campus, which in turn was previously the San Francisco Lone Mountain College for Women. Lone Mountain was once the location of Lone Mountain Cemetery, a complex encompassed Laurel Hill, Calvary, Masonic, and Odd Fellows Cemeteries. In the early 20th century, San Francisco voted most of its cemeteries out of existence, ostensibly for reasons of public health; after decades of further dispute workmen eventually began the transfer of Lone Mountain's forty-seven thousand inhabitants, primarily to Cypress Lawn Memorial Park in the city of Colma, just to the south. In what writer Harold Gilliam has described as "an act of civic vandalism," thousands of crypts and mausoleums were unearthed, the granite and marble dumped along the Pacific shoreline to reinforce seawalls.
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Mel Blanc

    Mel Blanc

    Melvin Jerome "Mel" Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989) was an American voice actor and comedian. Although he began his nearly six-decade-long career performing in radio commercials, Blanc is best remembered for his work with Warner Bros. as the voice of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, Yosemite Sam, Foghorn Leghorn, Marvin the Martian, Pepé Le Pew, Speedy Gonzales, the Tasmanian Devil, and many of the other characters from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies theatrical cartoons during the "Golden Age of American animation." He later worked for Hanna-Barbera's television cartoons, most notably as the voice of Barney Rubble in The Flintstones and Mr. Spacely in The Jetsons. Blanc was also a regular performer on The Jack Benny Program, in both its radio and television formats. Having earned the nickname “The Man of a Thousand Voices,” Blanc is regarded as one of the most influential people in the voice-acting industry. At the time of his death, it was estimated that 20 million people heard his voice every day. Blanc was born Melvin Jerome Blank in San Francisco, California, to Jewish parents Frederick and Eva Blank. The younger of two children, he
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Rincon Hill

    Rincon Hill

    Rincon Hill is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. It is one of San Francisco's 44 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills." Rincon Hill is one of many hills located in the greater South of Market area of San Francisco, located just south of the Financial District. The top of the hill serves as the anchorage and touch-down for the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge. Recently it is transitioning from a former industrial district into a high-density residential neighborhood. The hill is about 100 feet (30 m) tall. During and immediately following the Gold Rush, the most prestigious residential neighborhoods in San Francisco were located south of Market Street on Rincon Hill and in the nearby neighborhood known as Happy Valley (centered around First and Market Streets). With the advent of cable cars in the 1870s, the residential trend shifted towards new mansions built on the taller hills north of Market Street, especially Nob Hill. The Second Street Cut of 1869, which sliced through Rincon Hill to reach industrial areas to the south, also contributed to the decline of Rincon Hill as a fashionable residential area. The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and the resulting fire
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    San Francisco Railway Museum

    San Francisco Railway Museum

    The San Francisco Railway Museum is a local railway museum located in the South of Market area of San Francisco. This small museum features exhibits on the antique streetcars of the F Market & Wharves and national landmark cable cars that continue to run along the city's major arteries. The museum is located at the Steuart Street F line stop, across the street from the Ferry Building. Admission to the museum is free. In addition to the permanent collection of San Francisco railway artifacts from Market Street Railway Company and San Francisco Municipal Railway, the museum produces unique exhibits such as a retrospective on the 1906 Earthquake and a replicated end of the now extinct MSR '100-Class streetcar'. The museum is a project of the nonprofit Market Street Railway, Muni’s historic transportation advocacy group.
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Telesis Tower

    Telesis Tower

    Post Montgomery Center, formerly Pacific Telesis Tower is an office skyscraper located at Post- and Kearny Streets in the financial district of San Francisco, California. The 152 m (499 ft), 38 storey tower was completed in 1982, and is connected by the Crocker Galleria mall to McKesson Plaza.
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    Tommy Guerrero

    Tommy Guerrero

    • Web Link(s): http://www.discogs.com/artist/Tommy+Guerrero
    Tommy Guerrero (born September 9, 1966 in San Francisco) is an American skateboarder and musician. As a teen, he was one of the prominent members of the Bones Brigade, Powell Peralta's professional skateboarding team that was successful during the 1980s. He was well known for his relaxed style of street skating in his hometown of San Francisco, which was depicted in most of the Brigade's videos (Future Primitive, The Search for Animal Chin, Public Domain, and Ban This). After riding for Powell Peralta, Guerrero and Jim Thiebaud (a hometown friend and PP teammate) started the skateboarding company "Real". After his success in the world of skateboarding, he decided to pursue his musical interests. Guerrero was a member of the skate rock band Free Beer and the experimental group Jet Black Crayon, but has had more success as a solo artist. His critically acclaimed albums, EPs, and singles combine various types of music from rock, rap, funk, soul, and jazz. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine named Guerrero's third studio album, Soul Food Taqueria (2003), #2 on its 2003 "best of list". Guerrero also had numerous unreleased songs appear on the video game skate. by EA.
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Castro Valley

    Castro Valley

    Castro Valley is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station serving Castro Valley, California. The station consists of an island platform located in the center median of Interstate 580, with the concourse mezzanine located underneath the freeway's westbound lanes. The station was built as part of Bay Area Rapid Transit's Dublin/Pleasanton extension, and service began on May 10, 1997.
    5.25
    4 votes
    155
    Albert MacQuarrie

    Albert MacQuarrie

    Albert MacQuarrie (8 January 1882, San Francisco – 17 February 1950, California) was an American silent film actor. He was signed in 1912 and starred in about 70 films before his retirement. He starred with William Garwood in films such as Lord John in New York and The Grey Sisterhood and also starred regularly with Douglas Fairbanks.
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Clint Eastwood

    Clint Eastwood

    Clinton "Clint" Eastwood, Jr. (born May 31, 1930) is an American film actor, director, producer, composer, and politician. Eastwood first came to prominence as a supporting cast member in the TV series Rawhide (1959–1965). He rose to fame for playing the Man with No Name in Sergio Leone's Dollars trilogy of spaghetti westerns (A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More, and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly) during the late 1960s, and as Harry Callahan in the Dirty Harry films (Dirty Harry, Magnum Force, The Enforcer, Sudden Impact, and The Dead Pool) throughout the 1970s and 1980s. These roles, among others, have made him an enduring cultural icon of masculinity. For his work in the films Unforgiven (1992) and Million Dollar Baby (2004), Eastwood won Academy Awards for Best Director and Producer of the Best Picture, as well as receiving nominations for Best Actor. These films in particular, as well as others including Play Misty for Me (1971), Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974), The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976), Escape from Alcatraz (1979), Tightrope (1984), Pale Rider (1985), Heartbreak Ridge (1986), In the Line of Fire (1993), The Bridges of Madison County (1995), and Gran Torino
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Courtney Love

    Courtney Love

    • Web Link(s): http://www.vintagestars.com/river
    Courtney Michelle Love (born Courtney Michelle Harrison; July 9, 1964) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, actress and artist. Love initially gained notoriety in the Los Angeles indie rock scene with her band Hole, which she formed in 1989 with Eric Erlandson. Their debut album, Pretty on the Inside (1991) garnered them critical praise, and they went on to achieve international critical and commercial acclaim for their following albums, Live Through This (1994) and Celebrity Skin (1998). Love also had a career in acting, originally landing small roles in Alex Cox films in the 1980s. In 1996, Love starred in The People vs. Larry Flynt alongside Woody Harrelson, and was nominated for a Golden Globe for her performance. She later had a brief solo career in the early 2000s after the dissolution of Hole, releasing America's Sweetheart (2004), and went through several rehab sentences and run-ins with the the law until achieving sobriety. In 2009, Love reformed Hole with new members and released Nobody's Daughter (2010). In 2012, she debuted an art exhibit featuring a collection of her own paintings and drawings titled "And She's Not Even Pretty". Love was married to the late Kurt
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Lafayette

    Lafayette

    Lafayette is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station in Lafayette, California. The station has of an island platform in the center median of State Route 24. Service at this station began on May 21, 1973. In 2011 BART was reported to have spent $2 million dollars on a wheelchair ramp at this station that lacked actual access to passengers that use wheelchairs. This station is in BART District 1 and is represented by Gail Murray who is also current BART President. The Lafayette Hillside Memorial is across the street.
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Marjorie Rambeau

    Marjorie Rambeau

    Marjorie Rambeau (July 15, 1889 – July 6, 1970) was an American film and stage actress. Rambeau was born in San Francisco, California to Marcel and Lilian Garlinda (née Kindelberger) Rambeau. Her parents separated when she was a child. She and her mother went to Nome, Alaska where young Marjorie dressed as a boy, sang and played the banjo in saloons and music halls. Her mother insisted she dress as a boy to thwart amorous attention from drunken grown men in such a wild and woolly outpost as Nome. She began performing on the stage at the age of 12. She attained theatrical experience in a rambling early life as a strolling player. Finally she made her Broadway debut on March 10, 1913 in a tryout of Willard Mack's play, Kick In. In her youth she was a Broadway leading lady. In 1921, Dorothy Parker memorialized her in verse: If all the tears you shed so lavishly / Were gathered, as they left each brimming eye. / And were collected in a crystal sea, / The envious ocean would curl up and dry— / So awful in its mightiness, that lake, / So fathomless, that clear and salty deep. / For, oh, it seems your gentle heart must break, / To see you weep. ... Her silent films with the Mutual
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Mission Bay

    Mission Bay

    Mission Bay is a 303-acre (1.23 km) neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Mission Bay is roughly bounded by Townsend Street on the north, Third Street and San Francisco Bay on the east, Mariposa Street on the south, and 7th Street and Interstate 280 on the west. It was created in 1998 by the Board of Supervisors as a redevelopment project. Much of the land was long a railyard of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, and transferred to Catellus Development Corporation when it was spun off as part of the aborted merger of Southern Pacific and the Santa Fe Railway. Catellus subsequently sold or sub-contracted several parcels to other developers. It has rapidly evolved in to a wealthy neighborhood of luxury condominiums, high-end restaurants and retail, and biotechnology research and development. Mission Bay is currently the headquarters of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. It is also the headquarters, at 550 Terry Francois Blvd, of the Old Navy brand of The Gap clothing retailer. It is the location of a new research campus of the University of California, San Francisco, UCSF Mission Bay Mission Bay is served by the N Judah and T Third Street lines of San
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    Pier 39

    Pier 39

    Pier 39 is a shopping center and popular tourist attraction built on a pier in San Francisco, California. At Pier 39, there are shops, restaurants, a video arcade, street performances, an interpretive center for the Marine Mammal Center, the Aquarium of the Bay, virtual 3D rides, and views of California sea lions hauled out on docks on Pier 39's marina. The marina is also home to the floating Forbes Island restaurant. A two-story carousel is one of the pier's more dominant features, although it is not directly visible from the street and sits towards the end of the pier. The family-oriented entertainment and presence of marine mammals make this a popular tourist location for families with kids. The pier is located at the edge of the Fisherman's Wharf district and is close to North Beach, Chinatown, and the Embarcadero. The area is easily accessible via the historic F Market streetcars. From the pier one can see Angel Island, Alcatraz, the Golden Gate Bridge, and the Bay Bridge. Blue & Gold Fleet's bay cruises leave from Pier 39. Pier 39 was first developed by entrepreneur Warren Simmons and opened October 4, 1978. California Sea Lions have been always present in San Francisco Bay.
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Richmond Station

    Richmond Station

    Richmond Station is an at-grade Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) and Amtrak station located in Richmond, California. Each system is served by an island platform. The Capitol Corridor, San Joaquins, California Zephyr, and Coast Starlight stop here and connect to BART. The station is currently being rebuilt. The Metro Walk - Richmond Transit Village is adjacent; north of the station is a BART rail yard. Richmond is the north end of BART's Richmond Line; the Richmond - Millbrae Line operates Monday-Saturday during the daytime (although the line does not travel south of Daly City on Saturdays) and the Richmond - Fremont Line operates at all times during regular BART service. This station has been identified as an important hub in the transportation network for metropolitan and state wide planning. BART service at this station began January 29, 1973. The station is served by two bus agencies. AC Transit provides a variety of local and regional service. Buses connect the station to various locations such as Contra Costa College, Hilltop Mall, El Cerrito del Norte BART Station, which is a regional bus hub with connecting services to the North Bay, and Richmond Parkway Transit Center. Routes
    7.00
    2 votes
    163
    Wini Shaw

    Wini Shaw

    Wini Shaw (February 25, 1907 – May 2, 1982), sometimes credited as Winifred Shaw, was an American actress, dancer and singer. Although credited with a 1910 year of birth, she was actually born in 1907 as per the Social Security Death Index under her married name Wini O'Malley (SS# 132-10-9051). She was born as Winifred Lei Momi in San Francisco, California in 1907, the youngest of thirteen children of Hawaiian descent. Shaw began her entertainment career as a child in her parents' vaudeville act and later appeared in a number of Warner Brothers musical films in the 1930s. She is best remembered for introducing the song "Lullaby of Broadway" in the musical film Gold Diggers of 1935 (1935). Shaw's only recording, (Decca 408) with Dick Jurgens and his Orchestra, was "Lullaby of Broadway" and "I'm Goin' Shoppin' with You". Both songs were from the film, and the recording was made on February 28, 1935. She also sang "The Lady in Red" in the musical film In Caliente (1935), starring Dolores del Rio; the song was later made famous when Bugs Bunny sang it in drag. Shaw also appeared in a brief revival of the musical-theatre production of Simple Simon (1931) on Broadway in New York City,
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Boudin Bakery

    Boudin Bakery

    Boudin Bakery (Anglicized pronunciation: "boo-DEEN") is a bakery based in San Francisco, California, known for its sourdough bread (self-proclaimed as the "Original San Francisco Sourdough French Bread"). It was established in 1849 by Isidore Boudin, son of a family of master bakers from Burgundy, France, by blending the sourdough prevalent among miners in the Gold Rush with French techniques. Steven Giraudo, an artisan baker from Italy whose first job in America was at Boudin, bought the bakery in 1941 but later sold it. After a series of ownership changes the bakery was bought by two of Giraudo's sons through an investment bank. The bakery has locations on Fisherman's Wharf near San Francisco Bay, Disney California Adventure Park, and 30 other cafés scattered throughout California. The main bakery in San Francisco is in the Richmond District on the corner of 10th Avenue and Geary Boulevard. The Boudin Bakery hosts the attraction The Bakery Tour at Disney California Adventure Park, where tourists are given a tour about how sourdough bread is produced. The bakery still uses the same starter yeast-bacteria culture it developed during the California Gold Rush. The first outlet
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Bullitt

    Bullitt

    Bullitt is a 1968 American dramatic thriller film directed by Peter Yates and produced by Philip D'Antoni. It starred Steve McQueen, Robert Vaughn and Jacqueline Bisset. The screenplay by Alan R. Trustman and Harry Kleiner was based on the 1963 novel Mute Witness by Robert L. Fish, using the pseudonym Robert L. Pike. Lalo Schifrin wrote the original jazz-inspired score, arranged for brass and percussion. Robert Duvall has a small part as a cab driver who provides information to McQueen. The film was made by McQueen's Solar Productions company, with his then-partner Robert E. Relyea as executive producer. Released by Warner Bros.-Seven Arts on October 17, 1968, the film was a critical and box office smash, later winning the Academy Award for Best Film Editing (Frank P. Keller) and receiving a nomination for Best Sound. Writers Trustman and Kleiner won a 1969 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for Best Motion Picture Screenplay. Bullitt is notable for its car chase scene through the streets of San Francisco, regarded as one of the most influential car chase sequences in movie history. In 2007, Bullitt was selected for preservation in the United States National Film
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    JP MorganChase Building

    JP MorganChase Building

    The JPMorgan Chase Building is an office building in San Francisco, California, 560-584 Mission Street, on the border between South of Market and the Financial District. Designed by architect César Pelli, the building stands 128.02 m (420.0 ft) and has about 655,000 square feet (60,900 m) of office space. It also has two levels of underground parking and a large plaza. About 400,000 sq ft (37,000 m) of the building is leased to the major tenant JPMorgan Chase. This is one out of several new highrise projects completed or under construction on Mission Street since 2000.
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Paula Raymond

    Paula Raymond

    Paula Raymond (November 23, 1924 – December 31, 2003) was an American model and actress. In 1950, she was put under contract by MGM, where she played opposite such leading men as Cary Grant and Dick Powell. Earlier in her career, Raymond acted in film noir thrillers such as City That Never Sleeps (with Gig Young and Marie Windsor), but later in her career she developed a horror film reputation. In 1952, she played the heroine in The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms. In the late 1950s and 1960 Raymond appeared in many television shows and low-budget horror movies including Perry Mason, Hawaiian Eye, 77 Sunset Strip, and Blood of Dracula's Castle with Alexander D'Arcy and John Carradine. She turned down the role of saloon keeper Kitty in the long-running western classic series Gunsmoke (the role went to Amanda Blake). In 1962, Raymond was a passenger in a car that crashed into a tree on Sunset Boulevard. Her nose was severed by the rear view mirror. After only a little more than a year of extensive plastic surgery and recovery she returned to acting. In 1977, while working on the soap opera Days of our Lives, after only 3 appearances, she accidentally tripped on a telephone cord and broke
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee

    Bruce Lee (traditional :李小龍) (born Lee Jun-fan; 27 November 1940 – 20 July 1973) was an actor, martial arts instructor, philosopher, film director, film producer, screenwriter, founder of Jeet Kune Do, and the son of Cantonese opera star Lee Hoi-Chuen. He is widely considered by commentators, critics, media and other martial artists to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time, and a pop culture icon of the 20th century. He is often credited with changing the way Asians were presented in American films. Lee was born in Chinatown, San Francisco on 27 November 1940 to parents from Hong Kong and was raised in Kowloon with his family until his late teens. Lee returned to San Francisco at the age of 18 to claim his U.S. citizenship and receive his higher education. It was during this time that he began teaching martial arts, which soon led to film and television roles. His Hong Kong and Hollywood-produced films elevated the traditional Hong Kong martial arts film to a new level of popularity and acclaim, sparking a surge of interest in Chinese martial arts in the West in the 1970s. The direction and tone of his films changed and influenced martial arts and martial arts
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    Danny Glover

    Danny Glover

    Danny Lebern Glover (born July 22, 1946) is an American actor, film director and political activist. Glover is well known for his roles as Mr. Albert Johnson in The Color Purple, as Michael Harrigan in Predator 2, as corrupt cop James McFee in Witness, as Detective Roger Murtaugh in the Lethal Weapon film franchise (where he coined the catchphrase "I'm too old for this shit"), as Detective David Tapp in Saw, and as George Knox in Angels in the Outfield. He has also appeared in many other movies, television shows, and theatrical productions. He is an active supporter of various humanitarian and political causes. Glover was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Carrie (née Hunley) and James Glover. His parents, postal workers, were active in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), working to advance equal rights. Glover's mother, daughter of a midwife, was born in Louisville, Georgia and graduated from Paine College in Augusta, Georgia. Glover grew up with a love for sports, like his father. As a teenager and a young adult, Glover suffered from epilepsy, but he claims to have "developed a way of concentrating so that seizures wouldn't happen."
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    Dianne Feinstein

    Dianne Feinstein

    Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein ( /ˈfaɪnstaɪn/; born June 22, 1933) is the senior United States Senator from California. A member of the Democratic Party, she has served in the Senate since 1992. She also served as 38th Mayor of San Francisco from 1978 to 1988. Born in San Francisco, Feinstein graduated from Stanford University. In the 1960s she worked in city government, and in 1970 she was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. She served as the board's first female president in 1978, during which time the assassinations of Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk drew national attention to the city. Feinstein, who was the first to discover the shootings, succeeded Moscone as mayor. During her tenure as San Francisco's first female mayor she took a politically moderate stance, leading a revamp of the city's cable car system and overseeing the 1984 Democratic National Convention. After a failed gubernatorial campaign in 1990, she won a 1992 special election to the U.S. Senate. Feinstein was first elected on the same ballot as her peer Barbara Boxer, and the two became California's first female U.S. Senators. Feinstein formerly chaired the Senate Rules
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Glen Park Station

    Glen Park Station

    Glen Park Station is a Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station in the Glen Park neighborhood of San Francisco, California, at the intersection of Bosworth and Diamond Streets. It consists of an underground island platform. Interstate 280 is located on the south side of the station. This is the only station in San Francisco to have parking. The station was designed by Corlett & Spackman and Ernest Born in the brutalist style. Born also designed the station graphics. Service began on November 3, 1973. The November 1974 Architectural Record wrote of the station: Born designed a marble mural at the west end of the mezzanine. "100 pieces, few of which are cut at right angles, in warm brown and red-brown tones, make it up". The mural is prominently featured in a scene of the 2006 Will Smith film The Pursuit of Happyness.
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Gymboree Corporation

    Gymboree Corporation

    The Gymboree Corporation is a San Francisco-based corporation that operates a chain of around 900 specialty retail stores of children's apparel in the United States, Puerto Rico, Mexico and Canada. It has nearly 500 Play and Music centers worldwide. Bain Capital acquired the company in 2010. Play centers are located across the United States, Puerto Rico, Mexico, and Canada. It has expanded its franchises in 30 countries including Colombia; San Paulo, Brazil; Hangzhou, China; Hyderabad, India, Saudi Arabia. In addition, Gymboree franchises nearly 300 Gymboree Play & Music centers around the globe. In 1986, the company opened a chain of clothing stores named Gymboree. Gymboree stores offer coordinating children's clothing. The sizes range from birth to age twelve. Gymboree, in its current incarnation (it has reorganized several times) is incorporated under the Gym-Mark, Inc nameplate. It currently operates 630 Gymboree Retail, 150 Gymboree Outlet, 120 Janie & Jack, and 200 Crazy 8 stores in the United States. Crazy 8 was started in August, 2007. It features cheaper clothing and is Gymboree's direct competitor for The Children's Place and Old Navy. In November, 2005, Gymboree settled
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    The Game

    The Game

    The Game is a 1997 psychological thriller film directed by David Fincher, starring Michael Douglas and Sean Penn, and produced by PolyGram Filmed Entertainment. It tells the story of an investment banker who is given a mysterious gift: participation in a game that integrates in strange ways with his life. As the lines between the banker's real life and the game become more uncertain, hints of a large conspiracy become apparent. The Game was well received by critics like Roger Ebert and major periodicals like The New York Times, though Leonard Maltin found the film "unusually mean-spirited" and lacking a sense of humor. The Game had middling box-office returns compared to the success of Fincher's previous film, Seven. The scene in which protagonist Van Orton finds a life sized clown doll in his driveway was ranked #44 on Bravo's The 100 Scariest Movie Moments. Nicholas Van Orton (Douglas) is a successful and extremely wealthy investment banker, but his success has come at the cost of his personal life. He is estranged from both his ex-wife and his only brother. He remains haunted from having seen his father commit suicide on the latter's 48th birthday. On his own 48th birthday,
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    Golden Gate University School of Law

    Golden Gate University School of Law

    Golden Gate University School of Law (informally referred to as GGU School of Law, GGU Law and Golden Gate Law) is one of the professional graduate schools of Golden Gate University. Located in downtown San Francisco, California, GGU is a California non-profit corporation and is fully accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA). In December 2011, the National Jurist ranked the law school's public interest program as among the top 15 in the United States. GGU Law was founded in the autumn of 1901 as the YMCA Evening Law School, a component of the San Francisco Central YMCA Evening College. Classes were held in the YMCA's building at Mason and Ellis Streets in the Tenderloin, which was destroyed in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Like other YMCA Law Schools across the nation, it was established to provide people who worked full-time the opportunity to attend law school at night. The first graduating class in June 1905 had four students (all men). After the earthquake, the school was conducted out of tents, and later leased space at 1220 Geary St. (now Geary Boulevard) near Franklin Street in the Western Addition neighborhood. For the purpose of conferring the LL.B degree
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Lombard Street

    Lombard Street

    Lombard Street is an east–west street in San Francisco, California. It is famous for having a steep, one-block section that consists of eight tight hairpin turns. Lombard Street begins at Presidio Boulevard inside The Presidio and runs east through the Cow Hollow neighborhood. For twelve blocks, between Broderick Street and Van Ness Avenue, it is a principal arterial road that is co-signed as U.S. Route 101. Lombard Street then continues through the Russian Hill neighborhood and onto the Telegraph Hill neighborhood. At Telegraph Hill it breaks off to the south, becoming Telegraph Hill Boulevard, leading to Pioneer Park and Coit Tower. Lombard Street starts again at Winthrop Street and finally terminates at The Embarcadero as a collector road. Lombard Street is best known for the one-way section on Russian Hill between Hyde and Leavenworth Streets, in which the roadway has eight sharp turns (or switchbacks) that have earned the street the distinction of being the crookedest (most winding) street in the world (though this title is contested - see "See Also" links). The switchback's design, first suggested by property owner Carl Henry and instituted in 1922, was born out of necessity
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Matthew Barney

    Matthew Barney

    Matthew Barney (born March 25, 1967) is an American artist who works in sculpture, photography, drawing and film. His early works were sculptural installations combined with performance and video. Between 1994 and 2002 he created the Cremaster Cycle, a series of five films described by Jonathan Jones in The Guardian as "one of the most imaginative and brilliant achievements in the history of avant-garde cinema." Matthew Barney was born March 25, 1967, in San Francisco, California. He lived in Boise, Idaho from 1973 to 1985, where he attended elementary, middle, and high school. His parents divorced and his mother moved to New York City, where he would frequently visit, and where he was introduced to the art scene. In 1989, he graduated from Yale University. His earliest works, created at Yale, were staged at the university’s athletic complex. In the 90s, Barney moved to New York, where he worked as a male model—more notably for J.Crew catalogues—a career that helped him finance his early work as an artist. Barney lives with his partner, singer Björk, with whom he had a daughter in 2002. The ongoing Drawing Restraint series was begun in 1987 as a series of studio experiments,
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Sunset District

    Sunset District

    The Sunset District is a large neighborhood in the west-central part of San Francisco, California, United States. The Sunset District is the largest district within the city of San Francisco, and with a population of over 85,000 it is also the most populated. Golden Gate Park forms the neighborhood's northern border, and the Pacific Ocean (or, more specifically, the long, flat strand of beach known as Ocean Beach) forms its western border. The Sunset District's southern and eastern borders are not as clearly defined, but there is a general consensus that the neighborhood extends no further than Sigmund Stern Grove and Sloat Boulevard in the south and no further east than Stanyan Street (just east of the Parnassus campus of the University of California, San Francisco) and Laguna Honda Hospital. Prior to the residential and commercial development of the Sunset District, much of the area was covered by sand dunes and was originally referred to by 19th century San Franciscans as "the Outside Lands". The Sunset District and the neighboring Richmond District (on the north side of Golden Gate Park) are often collectively known as The Avenues, because the majority of both neighborhoods are
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    The Last Waltz

    The Last Waltz

    The Last Waltz was a concert by the rock group The Band, held on American Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. The Last Waltz was advertised as The Band's "farewell concert appearance", and the concert saw The Band joined by more than a dozen special guests, including Paul Butterfield, Eric Clapton, Neil Diamond, Bob Dylan, Emmylou Harris, Ronnie Hawkins, Dr. John, Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison, Ringo Starr, Muddy Waters, Ronnie Wood, Bobby Charles, Neil Young and The Staple Singers. The musical director for the concert was The Band's original record producer, John Simon. The event was filmed by director Martin Scorsese and made into a documentary of the same name, released in 1978. Jonathan Taplin, who was The Band's tour manager from 1969-1972 and later produced Scorsese's film Mean Streets, suggested that Scorsese would be the ideal director for the project and introduced Robbie Robertson and Scorsese. Taplin was the Executive Producer of The Last Waltz. The film features concert performances, scenes shot on a studio soundstage and interviews by Scorsese with members of The Band. A triple-LP soundtrack recording, produced by Simon and Rob
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Willie Brown

    Willie Brown

    Willie Lewis Brown, Jr. (born March 20, 1934) is an American politician of the Democratic Party. He served over 30 years in the California State Assembly, spending 15 years as its Speaker, and afterward served as the 41st mayor of San Francisco, the first African American to do so. Under the current California term limits law, no Speaker of the California State Assembly will ever have a longer tenure than Brown's. The San Francisco Chronicle called Brown “one of San Francisco’s most notable mayors” that had “celebrity beyond the city’s boundaries.” Brown was born in Mineola, Texas and attended a segregated high school. He moved to San Francisco in 1951, attending San Francisco State, graduating in 1955 with a degree in liberal studies. Brown earned a J.D. from University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 1958. He spent several years in private practice before gaining election in his second attempt to the California Assembly in 1964. Brown became the Democrats' whip in 1969 and Speaker in 1980. He was known for his ability to manage people and maintain party discipline. According to The New York Times, Brown became one of the country's most powerful state legislators.
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Bernal Heights

    Bernal Heights

    Bernal Heights is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Bernal Heights lies to the south of San Francisco's Mission District. Its most prominent feature is the open parkland and radio tower on its large rocky hill, Bernal Heights Summit. Bernal is bounded by Cesar Chavez Street to the north, Mission Street to the west, US 101 to the east, and I-280 to the south. Bernal had its origin with the 1839 Rancho Rincon de las Salinas y Potrero Viejo Mexican land grant to José Cornelio Bernal (1796–1842). By 1860, the land belonged to San Francisco financier, Frenchman François Louis Alfred Pioche (1818–1872), who subdivided it into smaller lots. Bernal remained undeveloped, though, until the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Built atop bedrock, the hill's structures survived the tremor, and the sparseness of the development saved much of Bernal from the ravages of the firestorm that followed. The commercial corridor of Cortland Avenue filled in with shops as the pastureland on the hilltop was developed for workers' homes during the rapid rebuilding of the city. Some of the tiny earthquake cottages—that the city built to house quake refugees—survive to this day, including three which
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    Candlestick Point State Recreation Area

    Candlestick Point State Recreation Area

    Candlestick Point State Recreation Area (or simply Candlestick Point) is a state park unit of California, USA, providing an urban protected area on San Francisco Bay. The park is located at the southeastern tip of San Francisco immediately south of Hunters Point and 2 miles (3.2 km) north of Sierra Point in Brisbane. This 170-acre (69 ha) landfilled area was intended to be used during World War II as a shipyard by the United States Navy. However it was abandoned as the war ended. Without government controls, the area was used by nearby residences as a garbage dump. In 1973 the California State Legislature purchased the land with $10 million and in 1977 voted to turn this area into a state recreation area. After the designation Candlestick became the first urban recreation area in the state. To this day Candlestick remains as a major recreation area in San Francisco, offering a wide view of the bay. The park features various picnic areas, two fishing piers, fitness courses as well as hiking trails. This park is also a popular area for windsurfing because of strong wind. Candlestick Park, the current stadium of the San Francisco 49ers, is also located next to Candlestick Point. There
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    Chinatown

    Chinatown

    Chinatown, in San Francisco, California, (Chinese: 唐人街; Mandarin Pinyin: tángrénjiē; Jyutping: tong4 jan4 gaai1) is the oldest Chinatown in North America and one of the largest Chinese communities outside Asia. Since its establishment in 1848, it has been highly important and influential in the history and culture of ethnic Chinese immigrants in North America. Chinatown is an enclave that continues to retain its own customs, languages, places of worship, social clubs, and identity. There are two hospitals, numerous parks and squares, a post office, and other infrastructure. Visitors can easily become immersed in a microcosmic Asian world, filled with herbal shops, temples, pagoda roofs and dragon parades. In addition to being a starting point and home for thousands of Chinese immigrants, it is also a major tourist attraction, drawing more visitors annually than the Golden Gate Bridge. Chinatown has been traditionally defined by the neighborhoods of North Beach, and Telegraph Hill areas as bound by Bush Street, Taylor Street, Bay Street, and the water. Officially, Chinatown is located in downtown San Francisco, covers 24 square blocks, and overlaps five Postal ZIP Codes. It is
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    1 votes
    183
    Coit Tower

    Coit Tower

    Coit Tower, also known as the Lillian Coit Memorial Tower, is a 210-foot (64 m) tower in the Telegraph Hill neighborhood of San Francisco, California. The tower, in the city's Pioneer Park, was built in 1933 using Lillie Hitchcock Coit's bequest to beautify the city of San Francisco; at her death in 1929 Coit left one-third of her estate to the city for civic beautification. The tower was proposed in 1931 as an appropriate use of Coit's gift. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 29, 2008. The art deco tower, built of unpainted reinforced concrete, was designed by architects Arthur Brown, Jr. and Henry Howard, with fresco murals by 27 different on-site artists and their numerous assistants, plus two additional paintings installed after creation off-site. Although an apocryphal story claims that the tower was designed to resemble a fire hose nozzle due to Coit's affinity with the San Francisco firefighters of the day, the resemblance is coincidental. Coit Tower was paid for with money left by Lillie Hitchcock Coit, a wealthy socialite who loved to chase fires in the early days of the city's history. The tower took five years to construct. Before
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    1 votes
    184
    Downtown Berkeley

    Downtown Berkeley

    Downtown Berkeley is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located in Berkeley, California. One of three stations in Berkeley along with Ashby and North Berkeley, it is the second-busiest BART station outside of San Francisco, with 11,749 exits each weekday. The busiest outside of San Francisco, 12th St. Oakland City Center, handles 12,181 weekday exits. It is the primary station for those travelling to and from the University of California, Berkeley. Downtown Berkeley opened on January 29, 1973, as part of an extension from MacArthur to Richmond, with service southward to Fremont until the opening of the Transbay Tube and subsequent service to San Francisco later that year. In the mid-1990s, BART changed the name of the station from simply "Berkeley" to "Downtown Berkeley" in an effort to minimize confusion between this station and North Berkeley. The station has been the site of many BART Alert protests in response to occurrences on the political scene. Like most underground BART stations, Downtown Berkeley has two levels: a mezzanine containing faregates and an island platform with two tracks. Access to the station is provided by five street-level entrances on Shattuck Avenue, with
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    1 votes
    185
    Tedy Bruschi

    Tedy Bruschi

    Tedy Lacap Bruschi (/ˈbruːski/; born June 9, 1973) is a former American college and professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. He played college football for the University of Arizona, and was a two-time consensus All-American. He was drafted by the New England Patriots in the third round of the 1996 NFL Draft, and played his entire professional career with the Patriots. Bruschi won three Super Bowl rings and was a two-time All-Pro selection. Bruschi was born in San Francisco, California. He attended Roseville High School in Roseville, California, where he lettered in high school football, wrestling and track and field (shot put). He was an all-conference selection as a defensive tackle for the Roseville Tigers. Bruschi attended the University of Arizona, where he played for the at Arizona Wildcats football team from 1991 to 1995. In his four-year college career, he compiled 185 total tackles (137 solos), with 74 tackles for losses, forced six fumbles and recovered five others, and tied the NCAA Division I-A sack record with 52 sacks. He was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American in 1994 and 1995, and won
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Yerba Buena Light

    Yerba Buena Light

    Yerba Buena Lighthouse is a lighthouse in California, United States, in the San Francisco Bay on Yerba Buena Island, California The island’s lighthouse connection began in 1873 when the Lighthouse Service moved the district's depot from Mare Island to the southeast side of Yerba Buena Island. In 1875 construction was completed on the 25 foot tower with a fifth order Fresnel lens. In 1886 another fifth order lens replaced the previous one. In 1933, a tunnel was bored through Yerba Buena Island to serve as a link between the east and west sections of the Oakland Bay Bridge. The light was automated by the United States Coast Guard in 1958. It is currently an active aid to navigation and not open to the public. Now that the lighthouse is automated, the former keeper’s quarters are now the home of the Coast Guard District Commander.
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    1 votes
    187
    Adolph Sutro

    Adolph Sutro

    Adolph Heinrich Joseph Sutro (April 29, 1830 – August 8, 1898) was the 24th mayor of San Francisco, and first Jewish mayor, serving in that office from 1894 until 1896. He is today perhaps best remembered for the various San Francisco lands and landmarks that still bear his name. Born in Aachen, Rhine Province, Prussia (today North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany), Sutro, educated as an engineer, at the age of twenty arrived in the United States and in 1850, he introduced himself to William Ralston of the Bank of California and introduced his plans for de-watering and de-gassing the mine shafts of the Comstock Lode by driving a tunnel through Mount Davidson to drain the water. Sutro incorporated the Sutro Tunnel company and raised US$3 million, a considerable fortune through this work in Nevada. He included the miners in his scheme, and planned to sail to Europe to negotiate with the Parisian Bank, but the Franco-Prussian War commenced in the middle of July 1870. Sutro was stymied, but out of the blue came an offer from a London bank led by a banker named McClamont, who offered $650,000 in gold per year for the Comstock. According to Dickson, "... Sutro set off blasts of dynamite, ...
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Levi Strauss & Co.

    Levi Strauss & Co.

    Levi Strauss & Co. ( /ˌliːvaɪ ˈstrɔːs/), also known as LS&CO or simply Levi's, is a privately held American clothing company known worldwide for its Levi's brand of denim jeans. It was founded in 1853 when Levi Strauss came from Buttenheim, Bavaria, to San Francisco, California to open a west coast branch of his brothers' New York dry goods business. In 1873 Levi Strauss and tailor Jacob Davis received a U.S. patent to make the first riveted men's work pants out of denim: the first blue jeans. The company briefly experimented (in the 1970s) with a public stock listing, but remains owned and controlled by descendants and relatives of Levi Strauss's four nephews. The company's corporate headquarters is located at Levi's Plaza in San Francisco. Levi Strauss & Co. is a worldwide corporation organized into three geographic divisions: Levi Strauss Americas (LSA), based in the San Francisco headquarters; Levi Strauss Europe, Middle East and Africa (LSEMA), based in Brussels; and Asia Pacific Division (APD), based in Singapore. The company employs a staff of approximately 10,500 people worldwide. The core Levi's was founded in 1873 in San Francisco, specializing in riveted denim jeans and
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    2 votes
    189
    Linden Lab

    Linden Lab

    Linden Research, Inc., d/b/a Linden Lab, is a privately held American Internet company that is best known as the creator of Second Life. The company's head office is in San Francisco, with additional offices in Boston, Seattle, Virginia and Davis, California. Its offices in Mountain View, Brighton, Singapore and Amsterdam were closed in 2010. In addition, the company employs remote workers that communicate and collaborate on projects using Second Life technology. The company, founded in 1999, employs numerous established high-tech veterans, including former executives from Electronic Arts, eBay, Disney, Adobe, and Apple. The company's founder and original CEO is Philip Rosedale, a former CTO of RealNetworks, one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in The World in 2007. In December 2010, the company announced a new CEO, Rod Humble, who controls day-to-day management and operations. Rosedale remains chairman of the board of Linden Lab, with a focus on product development and strategy. In 2008, the company was awarded an Emmy for Second Life in the user-generated content and game modification category. The award was given at the 59th annual Technology & Engineering Emmy
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    Patty Hearst

    Patty Hearst

    Patricia Campbell Hearst (born February 20, 1954), now known as Patricia Campbell Hearst Shaw, is an American newspaper heiress, socialite, actress, kidnap victim, and convicted bank robber. Her kidnapping case is held by many as an example of Stockholm syndrome. The granddaughter of publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst and great-granddaughter of millionaire George Hearst, she gained notoriety in 1974 when, following her kidnapping by the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA), she ultimately joined her captors in furthering their cause. Apprehended after having taken part in a bank robbery with other SLA members, Hearst was imprisoned for almost two years before her sentence was commuted by President Jimmy Carter. She was later granted a presidential pardon by President Bill Clinton in his last official act before leaving office. Hearst was born in San Francisco, California, the third of five daughters of Randolph Apperson Hearst and Catherine Wood Campbell. She grew up primarily in Hillsborough. She attended Crystal Springs School for Girls in Hillsborough and the Santa Catalina School in Monterey. Among her few close friends she counted Patricia Tobin, whose family founded the
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    2 votes
    191
    San Francisco City Hall

    San Francisco City Hall

    San Francisco City Hall, re-opened in 1915, in its open space area in the city's Civic Center, is a Beaux-Arts monument to the City Beautiful movement that epitomized the high-minded American Renaissance of the 1880s to 1917. The structure's dome is the fifth largest in the world. The present building replaced an earlier City Hall that was completely destroyed during the 1906 earthquake. The principal architect was Arthur Brown, Jr., of Bakewell & Brown, whose attention to the finishing details extended to the doorknobs and the typeface to be used in signage. Brown's blueprints of the building are preserved at the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley. Brown also designed the San Francisco War Memorial Opera House, Veterans Building, Temple Emanuel, Coit Tower and the Federal office building at 50 United Nations Plaza. The building's vast open space is more than 500,000 square feet (46,000 m) and occupying two full city blocks. It is 390 ft (120 m) between on Van Ness Avenue and Polk Street, and 273 ft (83 m) between Grove and McAllister Streets. Its dome, which owes much to Mansart's Baroque dome of Les Invalides, Paris, is the fifth largest dome in the world,
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    2 votes
    192
    St. Ignatius College Preparatory

    St. Ignatius College Preparatory

    St. Ignatius College Preparatory is a private Catholic preparatory school in the Jesuit tradition, serving the San Francisco Bay Area since 1855. Located in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco, in the Sunset District of San Francisco, St. Ignatius is one of the oldest secondary schools in the U.S. state of California. It is known also as S.I. St. Ignatius was founded as a one-room schoolhouse on Market Street by Fr. Anthony Maraschi, a Jesuit priest, just after the California Gold Rush in 1855. Maraschi paid $11,000 for the property which was to become the original church and schoolhouse. The church opened on July 15, 1855, and three months later, on October 15, the school opened its doors to its first students. SI was the high school division of what later became the University of San Francisco, but it has since split from the university and changed locations five times due to the growth of the student body and natural disaster. In the 1860s, the school built a new site, adjacent to the first, on Market Street in downtown San Francisco. In 1880, SI moved its campus to a location on Van Ness Avenue in the heart of San Francisco, and by 1883, SI had become the largest
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Time After Time

    Time After Time

    Time After Time is a 1979 American science fiction film starring Malcolm McDowell, David Warner and Mary Steenburgen. It was the directing debut of screenwriter Nicholas Meyer, whose screenplay is based largely on the uncredited novel of the same name by Karl Alexander (which was unfinished during the time the film was made) and a story by the latter and Steve Hayes. The film concerns British author H. G. Wells and his fictional use of a time machine to pursue Jack the Ripper into the 20th century. In 1893 London, popular writer Herbert George "H.G." Wells (Malcolm McDowell) displays a time machine to his skeptical dinner guests. After explaining how it works (including a "non-return key" that keeps the machine at the traveler's destination and a "vaporizing equalizer" that keeps the traveler and machine on equal terms), police constables arrive at the house searching for Jack the Ripper. One finds a bag, with blood-stained gloves, belonging to one of Herbert's friends, a surgeon named John Leslie Stevenson (David Warner), whom they are unable to locate in the house, concluding that Stevenson might be the infamous killer. Wells races to his laboratory, but the time machine is
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Western Addition

    Western Addition

    The Western Addition is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, United States. The Western Addition is sandwiched between Van Ness Avenue, Golden Gate Park, the Upper and Lower Haight neighborhoods, and Pacific Heights. Historically, it was an addition to the city west of Van Ness Avenue (hence, "Western Addition"). The area was first developed around the turn of the 20th century as a middle-class suburb served by cable cars. It survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake with its Victorian-style buildings largely intact. Today, the term Western Addition is generally used in two ways: to denote the development's original geographic area, or to denote the eastern portion of the neighborhood (also called the Fillmore District) that was redeveloped in the 1950s. Those who use the term in the former sense generally consider its boundaries to be Van Ness Avenue on the east, Masonic on the west, California Street on the north, and Fell or Oak Street on the south. From there, it is usually divided into smaller neighborhoods such as Lower Pacific Heights, Cathedral Hill, Japantown, the Fillmore, Hayes Valley, Alamo Square, Anza Vista, and North Panhandle. The San Francisco Association
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    2 votes
    195
    425 Market Street

    425 Market Street

    425 Market Street is an office skyscraper located on the corner of Market- and Fremont Streets in the financial district of San Francisco, California. The 160 m (520 ft), 38 floor office tower was completed in 1973. It was built by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company as their "Pacific Coast Headquarters" and was called "1 Metropolitan Plaza". It was built as a modern replacement for their older headquarters on Nob Hill at 600 Stockton Street (now remodeled as the Ritz-Carlton Hotel). It was among the first buildings in San Francisco to have a high-speed transport system (a glorified dumb waiter) for computer data cards, files and inner-office mail, at the time a state-of-the-art system. Its largest tenant today is law firm Morrison & Foerster LLP, one of the original tenants when the building first opened.
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Acropolis of Athens

    Acropolis of Athens

    The Acropolis of Athens (Greek: Ακρόπολη Αθηνών) is an ancient citadel located on a high rocky outcrop above the city of Athens and containing the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historic significance, the most famous being the Parthenon. The word acropolis comes from the Greek words ἄκρον (akron, "edge, extremity") and πόλις (polis, "city"). Although there are many other acropoleis in Greece, the significance of the Acropolis of Athens is such that it is commonly known as "The Acropolis" without qualification. The Acropolis was formally proclaimed as the preeminent monument on the European Cultural Heritage list of monuments on 26 March 2007. The Acropolis is located on a flat-topped rock that rises 150 m (490 ft) above sea level in the city of Athens, with a surface area of about 3 hectares. It was also known as Cecropia, after the legendary serpent-man, Cecrops, the first Athenian king. While the earliest artifacts date to the Middle Neolithic era, there have been documented habitations in Attica from the Early Neolithic (6th millennium BC). There is little doubt that a Mycenaean megaron stood upon the hill during the late Bronze Age. Nothing of
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    2 votes
    197
    Noe Valley

    Noe Valley

    Noe Valley (/ˈnoʊ.iː/NOH-ee) is a neighborhood in the central part of San Francisco, California. Its borders are generally considered to be 22nd Street to the north, Randall Street to the south, Dolores Street to the east, and Grand View Avenue to the west. These borders are informal, nothing more, and continue to expand, thanks to real estate agents. The Castro (Eureka Valley) is directly to Noe Valley's north, although the border is not well defined and can stretch into Noe Valley, and The Mission is to its east. The neighborhood is named after José de Jesús Noé, the last Mexican alcalde (mayor) of Yerba Buena (present day San Francisco), who owned this land as part of his Rancho San Miguel. Noé sold the land, later to be known as Noe Valley, to John Meirs Horner in 1854, and at this time the land was called Horner's Addition. The original Noé adobe house was located in the vicinity of the present day intersection of 23rd Street and Douglass Street. Noe Valley was primarily developed at the end of the 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century, especially in the years just after the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. As a result, the neighborhood contains many examples of
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    2 votes
    198
    South of Market

    South of Market

    South of Market (or SoMa) is a relatively large neighborhood in San Francisco, California, United States located just south of Market Street and contains several sub-neighborhoods including South Beach, Mission Bay and Rincon Hill. Its boundaries are Market Street to the northwest, San Francisco Bay to the northeast, Mission Creek to the southeast, and Division Street, 13th Street and U.S. Route 101 (Central Freeway) to the southwest. It is the part of the city in which the street grid runs parallel and perpendicular to Market Street. The neighborhood contains many smaller neighborhoods such as South Park, Yerba Buena, South Beach, and Financial District South (part of the Financial District), and overlaps with several others, notably Mission Bay, and the Mission District. As with many neighborhoods, the precise boundaries of the South of Market area are fuzzy and can vary widely depending on the authority cited. From 1848 until the construction of the Central Freeway in the 1950s, 9th Street (formerly known as Johnston Street) was the official (and generally recognized) boundary between SoMa and the Mission District. Since the 1950s, the boundary has been either 10th Street, 11th
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    2 votes
    199
    The Birds

    The Birds

    The Birds is a 1963 suspense/horror film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the 1952 story "The Birds" by Daphne du Maurier. It depicts Bodega Bay, California which is, suddenly and for unexplained reasons, the subject of a series of widespread and violent bird attacks over the course of a few days. The film was billed as 'introducing' Tippi Hedren. It also starred Rod Taylor, Jessica Tandy, Suzanne Pleshette and a young Veronica Cartwright. The screenplay was written by Evan Hunter. Hitchcock told him to develop new characters and a more elaborate plot, keeping Du Maurier's title and concept of unexplained bird attacks. Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren), a young socialite, meets Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor) in a San Francisco bird shop. Brenner wants to purchase a pair of lovebirds for his sister's eleventh birthday, but the shop has none. He pretends to mistake Daniels for a salesperson, which infuriates her; she requests an explanation. He says they met previously, but she doesn't remember him. Intrigued, she tracks down his address in Bodega Bay, California and purchases a pair of lovebirds herself. After driving several hours, she sneaks across a bay in a motor boat and
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    2 votes
    200
    Washington Bartlett

    Washington Bartlett

    Washington Montgomery Bartlett (February 29, 1824 – September 12, 1887) was the 20th mayor of San Francisco, California from 1883 to 1887, the 16th governor of California, and–to date–the only one that was Jewish. Bartlett was born in Savannah, Georgia in 1824, the son of Sarah E. Melhado and Cosam Emir Bartlett. His mother was Sephardic. He was a lifelong bachelor and a printer by trade, and was not particularly religious. During his lifetime Bartlett was a San Francisco newspaper publisher, San Francisco County Clerk, lawyer, state senator, mayor, and finally a governor. Bartlett's term as governor started and ended in 1887 when he died in office of Bright's disease nine months into his term. His inaugural address after being elected as governor was presented on 8 January 1887. Bartlett is buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland, California.
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    2 votes
    201
    650 California Street

    650 California Street

    650 California Street, also known as the Hartford Building, is a 34 story, 142 m, (466 feet) office tower on the northwestern edge of San Francisco's Financial District. The tower is located on California Street on the edge of Chinatown, and not far from 555 California Street. 650 California is visible from every direction except from the southeast, where the Financial District skyscrapers block the view. The building was designed by Edward Charles Bassett of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill for Hartford Insurance, its initial tenant. It is architecturally significant, featuring a tall modernist lobby, high ceilings, and an exterior skeleton of floor-to-ceiling windows recessed into a square gridwork of precast white reinforced concrete. When this tower was completed in 1964, it was the second in San Francisco larger than 400,000 sq ft (37,000 m). It also became California's tallest building, replacing both the Russ Building in San Francisco and the Los Angeles City Hall in Los Angeles, California. Later skyscrapers in both San Francisco and Los Angeles took the title of California's tallest from this building. 650 California was acquired for US$160 million by the Pivotal Group in 2000,
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    1 votes
    202
    Edna Maison

    Edna Maison

    Edna Maison (17 August 1892 San Francisco - 11 January 1946 Hollywood, California), was an American silent film actress. She starred in a total of 85 films between 1912 and 1926 in films such as The Idol of Bonanza Camp (1913) with actors such as Harry von Meter.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Rider Strong

    Rider Strong

    Rider King Strong (born December 11, 1979) is an American actor, director, producer and screenwriter. He is best known for his role as Shawn Hunter on the 1990s sitcom Boy Meets World. Rider King Strong was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Lin (née Warner), a teacher and nutritionist, and King Strong, a firefighter. He graduated from high school in Sebastopol, California in 1997. His brother is Shiloh Strong, an actor and still photographer. Strong began his acting career at the young age of nine, when he starred as Gavroche in the San Francisco production of Les Misérables. After the stage production, he appeared in small screen roles on television. In 1992, he received his first regular television series role as Julie Andrews's son on Julie. When the series was canceled, Strong made his debut on film as Amy Irving's son in Benefit of the Doubt. It was not until he was chosen for the role of Shawn Hunter in the ABC series Boy Meets World that he received widespread recognition. During the seven year run he was nominated twice for the Young Artist Award and nominated for a Hollywood Reporter YoungStar Award. When the series ended, Strong returned to the big screen to
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    San Francisco

    San Francisco

    San Francisco (/ˌsæn frənˈsɪskoʊ/), officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the leading financial and cultural center of Northern California and the San Francisco Bay Area. The only consolidated city-county in California, it encompasses a land area of about 46.9 square miles (121 km) on the northern end of the San Francisco Peninsula, giving it a density of about 17,179 people per square mile (6,632 people per km). It is the most densely settled large city (population greater than 200,000) in the state of California and the second-most densely populated major city in the United States after New York City. San Francisco is the fourth most populous city in California and the 14th most populous city in the United States, with a population of 805,235 as of the 2010 Census. The city is also the financial and cultural hub of the larger San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland metropolitan area, with a population of 7.6 million. San Francisco (Spanish for "Saint Francis") was founded on June 29, 1776, when colonists from Spain established a fort at the Golden Gate and a mission named for St. Francis of Assisi a few miles away. The California Gold Rush of 1849 propelled the city into a
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    1 votes
    205
    The Maltese Falcon

    The Maltese Falcon

    The Maltese Falcon (1941) is a Warner Bros. film noir based on the novel of the same name by Dashiell Hammett. Directed by John Huston, the film stars Humphrey Bogart as private investigator Sam Spade and Mary Astor as his "femme fatale" client. Gladys George, Peter Lorre, and Sydney Greenstreet co-star, with Greenstreet appearing in his film debut. The Maltese Falcon was Huston's directorial debut and was nominated for three Academy Awards. The story follows a San Francisco private detective and his dealings with three unscrupulous adventurers, all of whom are competing to obtain a jewel-encrusted falcon statuette. The Maltese Falcon has been named as one of the greatest films of all time by Roger Ebert and Entertainment Weekly, and was cited by Panorama du Film Noir Américain as the first major film noir. The film premiered on October 3, 1941 in New York City, and was selected for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry in 1989. In 1539 the Knight Templars of Malta, paid tribute to Charles V of Spain, by sending him a Golden Falcon encrusted from beak to claw with rarest jewels——but pirates seized the galley carrying this priceless token and the fate of the
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    1 votes
    206
    The Pursuit of Happyness

    The Pursuit of Happyness

    The Pursuit of Happyness is a 2006 American biographical drama film based on Chris Gardner's nearly one-year struggle with homelessness. Directed by Gabriele Muccino, the film features Will Smith as Gardner, an on-and-off-homeless salesman-turned stockbroker. Smith's son Jaden Smith co-stars, making his film debut as Gardner's son Christopher Jr. The screenplay by Steven Conrad is based on the best-selling memoir written by Gardner with Quincy Troupe. The film was released on December 15, 2006, by Columbia Pictures. For his performance, Smith, was nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe for Best Actor. The unusual spelling of the film's title comes from a sign Gardner saw when he was homeless. In the film, "happiness" is misspelled as "happyness" outside the daycare facility Gardner's son attends. In 1981 San Francisco, Chris Gardner (Will Smith) invests his family's savings in portable bone-density scanners which he tries to demonstrate and sell to doctors. The investment proves to be a white elephant, which financially breaks the family and as a result, his wife Linda (Thandie Newton) leaves him and moves to New York. Their son Christopher (Jaden Smith) remains with his
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    1 votes
    207
    Benjamin Bratt

    Benjamin Bratt

    Benjamin Bratt (born December 16, 1963) is an American actor. He is most famous for his role as Rey Curtis on the TV series Law & Order; and his appearances in the movies Miss Congeniality, Demolition Man, Blood in Blood Out, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Traffic, and Piñero. Bratt was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Eldy (née Banda), a nurse, and Peter Bratt, Sr., a sheet metal worker. Bratt's mother is a Peruvian Indigenous activist of the Quechua ethnic group; born in Peru, she moved to the U.S. at age nine. His father was an American of German and English descent. They married December 30, 1960, in San Francisco, but divorced in September 1967. Bratt's paternal grandfather, George Cleveland Bratt (March 5, 1893 – March 29, 1984), was a Broadway actor who married Benjamin's grandmother, Wiltrude Hildner, on August 6, 1920, in Detroit, Michigan. As a child, Bratt went with his mother and siblings to participate in the 1969 Native American occupation of Alcatraz. Today Bratt is an active supporter of such Native American causes as the American Indian College Fund and We Shall Remain, a mini-series and multi-media project, narrated by Bratt, that establishes
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    2 votes
    208
    Four Seasons Hotel, San Francisco

    Four Seasons Hotel, San Francisco

    The Four Seasons Hotel & Residences is a 121 m (397 ft) mixed-used, development at 757 Market Street in San Francisco, California near Moscone Center. The five-star hotel operated by Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts hosts 277 guest rooms and retail stores, and has 142 luxury condominiums on the upper floors. Non-linear viscous dampers located at the top of the hotel tower help dampen some of the wind sway due to powerful winds off the Pacific Ocean. Completed in January 2001, the tower is the first skyscraper in the 21st century to be completed in the city.
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    James Van Ness

    James Van Ness

    James Van Ness (1808 Burlington, Vermont – December 28, 1872) was the seventh mayor of San Francisco, USA from 1855 to 1856. He was the son of Dutch-American Vermont Governor Cornelius Van Ness and father-in-law of future San Francisco mayor Frank McCoppin. Prior to being mayor, he had been a lawyer in the U.S. South and then a San Francisco city alderman. As alderman, he sponsored the "Van Ness Ordinance", which ordered all land within the city limits that was undeveloped at that time (that is, west of Larkin Street and southwest of Ninth Street) to be surveyed and then to be transferred to their original deedholders. Because there were many fraudulent deed holders at that time, this law led to many lawsuits for many years. Van Ness was elected mayor as a Democrat in 1855. However, his administration proved ineffectual in the face of three major crises that arose. First, his election was called into question following allegations of irregularities in the outcome. Then, On November 18, 1855, Charles Cora fatally shot U.S. Marshal William H. Richardson. Cora sought the safety of the sheriff at the city jail and Van Ness pleaded with the mob that had surrounded the jail to disperse.
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Justin.tv

    Justin.tv

    Justin.tv is a website created by Justin Kan, Emmett Shear, Michael Seibel and Kyle Vogt in 2007 that allows anyone to broadcast video online. Justin.tv user accounts are called "channels", and users are encouraged to broadcast a wide variety of user-generated live video content, called "broadcasts". The company is an Internet startup based in San Francisco, California, with seed funding from Paul Graham of seed capital firm Y Combinator and Series A funding with Alsop Louie Partners and Draper Associates The original Justin.tv was a single channel featuring founder Justin Kan, who broadcast his life 24/7 and popularized the term lifecasting. In 2007, Justin Kan stopped broadcasting and Justin.tv relaunched into its current form as a network of thousands of various channels. Users are permitted to broadcast to an unlimited number of people for free, and watching broadcasts does not require user registration. Broadcasts that are considered to contain potentially offensive content are available only to registered users over the age of 18. Broadcasts containing defamation, pornography, copyright violations, or encouraging criminal conduct are prohibited by Justin.tv's terms of
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    North Beach

    North Beach

    North Beach is a neighborhood in the northeast of San Francisco adjacent to Chinatown, Fisherman's Wharf and Russian Hill. The neighborhood is San Francisco's Little Italy, and has historically been home to a large Italian American population. It still holds many Italian restaurants today, though many other ethnic groups currently live in the neighborhood. It was also the historic center of the beatnik subculture. Today, North Beach is one of San Francisco's main red light and nightlife districts as well as a residential neighborhood populated by a mix of young urban professionals, families and Chinese immigrants connected to the adjacent Chinatown. The American Planning Association (APA) has named North Beach as one of ten 'Great Neighborhoods in America'. North Beach is bounded by the former Barbary Coast, now Jackson Square, the Financial District south of Broadway, Chinatown to the southwest of Columbus below Green Street, Russian Hill to the west, Telegraph Hill to the east and Fisherman's Wharf at Bay Street to the north. Main intersections are Union and Columbus, the southwest corner of Washington Square, Grant Avenue and Vallejo Street. The somewhat compact layout of the
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Rick Levin

    Rick Levin

    Richard Charles Levin (born April 7, 1947) is a professor and American economist who has served as president of Yale University since 1993. He is currently the longest-tenured Ivy League president. Levin had been rumored as a possible replacement for Larry Summers as Director of the White House National Economic Council until Gene Sperling was selected instead. Born in San Francisco, California, to Jewish-American parents, Levin graduated from Lowell High School in San Francisco in 1964. At Lowell, he was a member of the Lowell Forensic Society and debated in high school debate tournaments regionally. He graduated from Stanford University in 1968 with a B.A. in history. He received a Bachelor of Letters in politics and philosophy from Merton College, Oxford. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from Yale in 1974. His academic specialties include industrial research and development, intellectual property, and productivity in manufacturing. Levin became an Assistant Professor of Economics at Yale in 1974 and was elevated to Associate Professor in 1979. In 1982, he was promoted to Professor of Economics and Management at the Yale School of Management. In 1992, he was appointed Frederick
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    St. Regis Museum Tower

    St. Regis Museum Tower

    St. Regis Museum Tower is a highrise in the South of Market district of San Francisco, California, adjacent to Yerba Buena Gardens, Moscone Center, PacBell Building and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The 42-storey, 484 ft (148 m) tower is bounded by Mission Street, 3rd Streets and is operated by Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide. The hotel recently attained five-star status. The tower was designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill and constructed by Webcor Builders. Construction began on the highrise sometime around 2001. The project was completed in 2005 along with the retrofit of historic nine-story The Williams Building, which was incorporated and annexed to the tower. The tower houses 102 luxury Condominiums, 269 hotel rooms, a 4-story subterranean parking garage, and Yerba Buena's newest museum, the Museum of the African Diaspora. The St. Regis Museum Tower is one of several new 21st century highrise projects completed or under construction on Mission Street joining 555 Mission Street, The Paramount, 101 Second Street, JP MorganChase Building, and 301 Mission Street.
    5.00
    2 votes
    214
    Tailrank, Inc

    Tailrank, Inc

    Tailrank.com was a site that provided a feed of content on the World Wide Web that's being discussed across the blogosphere. The site continuously scanned blogs that had been registered with it, and composed an index of "top stories" that had been cited by the various blogs it had scanned. The focus of the site was the news items themselves, but users were also able to see snippets of the various blog citations that made the story popular. The list of top stories changed over time; newer items were given a higher score than older items, and more popular items were given a higher score than less popular items. Items high on the list tended to be articles or posts that had triggered a lot of blog activity over the last day or so. Because the site's index allowed one to follow the spread of ideas from blog to blog, it could have been considered a memetracker. It was the closest thing to a modern equivalent of blogdex, which has been shut down. Tailrank closed down some time before June 2009, with the company concentrating on its search and index technology, spinn3r.
    5.00
    2 votes
    215
    Bob Weir

    Bob Weir

    Robert Hall "Bob" Weir (born October 16, 1947) is an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist, most recognized as a founding member of the Grateful Dead. After the Grateful Dead disbanded in 1995, Weir performed with The Other Ones, later known as The Dead, together with other former members of the Grateful Dead. Weir also founded and played in several other bands during and after his career with the Grateful Dead, including Kingfish, the Bob Weir Band, Bobby and the Midnites, Scaring the Children, RatDog, and his newest band Furthur, co-led by former Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh. During his career with the Grateful Dead, Weir played mostly rhythm guitar and sang most of the band's rock-n-roll tunes (Jerry Garcia sang The Dead's more melodic tunes). He is known for his unique style of complex voiceleading, bringing unusual depth and a new approach to the role of rhythm guitar expression. Weir was born in San Francisco, California and raised by his adoptive parents in the suburb of Atherton. He began playing guitar at age thirteen after less successful experimentation with the piano and the trumpet. He had trouble in school because of undiagnosed dyslexia and he was expelled
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    Charlotte Burton

    Charlotte Burton

    Charlotte Burton (May 30, 1881 – March 28, 1942) was an American silent film actress. Born in San Francisco, Burton was signed by the American Company in 1912 where she worked for several years. She joined Essanay Studio which she sued in 1919 for $25,000 for breach of contract. She originally signed with the company believing she would be acting in mostly drama film but she was cast in mostly comedy films. Her salary had been $200 a week with an option for her services at the rate of $300 a week for a second year. Charlotte claimed that she was signed by Essanay business manager, Vernon R. Day, to a contract extending from November 1916 until November 1918. She was discharged without reason. When Burton came to the Chicago, studio she refused a role offered her in a Black Cat comedy, presented to her by Essanay president George K. Spoor. She declined because she was not a comedienne. Instead, she accepted a role as leading lady in a film featuring Henry B. Wallace. She admitted that she was paid for ten weeks, at $200 per week, prior to being dumped by Essanay. Essanay executives claimed Burton automatically voided her contract when she refused the comedic part. Upon arriving in
    4.50
    2 votes
    217
    B.D. Wong

    B.D. Wong

    Bradley Darryl "BD" Wong (born October 24, 1960) is an American actor, best known for his roles as Dr. George Huang on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, as Father Ray Mukada on Oz, as Dr. John Lee on Awake, Henry Wu in the movie Jurassic Park, his portrayal of Ngawang Jigme in the movie Seven Years in Tibet, the voice of Li Shang in the movie Mulan and for his Tony Award winning role as Song Liling in the Broadway production of M. Butterfly. Wong was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Roberta Christine (née Leong), a telephone company supervisor, and William D. Wong. He is of Chinese descent. Wong attended Lincoln High School before attending San Francisco State University. Wong gained attention for his Broadway debut in M. Butterfly opposite John Lithgow. The play won multiple awards, including several for Wong. He is notable as the only actor to be honored with the Tony Award, Drama Desk Award, Outer Critics Circle Award, Clarence Derwent Award, and Theatre World Award for the same role. In addition to his long-running stint on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit as FBI psychiatrist Dr. George Huang, he has had recurring roles in All American Girl and as a prison priest
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Civic Center Station

    Civic Center Station

    Civic Center/UN Plaza is a BART and Muni Metro station in the Civic Center of San Francisco. The westernmost of the dual BART/Muni stops on the Market Street Subway, Civic Center/UN Plaza acts as a major hub for passenger movement throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. With 18,432 exits each weekday, Civic Center/UN Plaza is fourth-busiest station in the BART system. Outside, in the United Nations Plaza itself, facing Market Street, there is a fountain and a north-south cross marking its center to be at latitude/longitude coordinates 37°46′48″N 122° 24′49″W. There is a flea market at the plaza or farmer's market every day, year round. There are several notable buildings in the Civic Center area, including City Hall, the War Memorial Opera House, Asian Art Museum, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall. The San Francisco Public Library's main branch is located across the street and San Francisco City Clinic is 2 blocks east on 7th street. Service at this station began on November 3, 1973. On July 3, 2011, a knife-wielding transient named Charles Blair Hill was shot to death by two BART Police officers at the station. This incident led to a non-violent protest at the station on July 11,
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Frank Chu

    Frank Chu

    Frank Chu (born 24 March 1960) is one of San Francisco's best-known eccentrics. His street protests against US Presidents, corporations, and a distinctive concept he calls the “12 Galaxies” have been held in San Francisco and nearby locales since at least 1995. Chu lives in Oakland, California, and commutes daily to San Francisco where he can find the largest audience of passers-by and television news crews with whom to share his thoughts. He supports himself through a combination of state aid, sign sponsorships, and small donations from his supporters. Little is known about Chu's life before he started protesting. In early 1985, Chu, then 24 years old, took 11 members of his family hostage in his home in Oakland and was reported to have beaten one or more with his fists. Chu fired a .38 pistol at a police officer who came to investigate, but missed. Police cordoned off a ten-block area for three hours. Chu eventually released his hostages and surrendered to the police. Frank Chu protests daily, or nearly daily, typically walking throughout the daytime hours in downtown San Francisco (particularly along Market Street and Montgomery Street) holding one of his signs, and occasionally
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Haas-Lilienthal House

    Haas-Lilienthal House

    The Haas-Lilienthal House at 2007 Franklin Street, San Francisco, California, USA is the city's only intact Victorian era home that is open regularly as a museum, complete with authentic furniture and artifacts. William Haas entrusted Bavarian architect Peter R. Schmidt and contractors McCann & Biddell to build his home in 1886. The house withstood the 1906 Earthquake with only slight damage. However, the home was threatened by the devastating fire, which followed the earthquake and destroyed about 40% of San Francisco. The Haas family watched the fire from the roof of their house, but was soon forced to evacuate by city authorities. So the family, along with most other San Francisco residents, went to the nearest public park, Lafayette Park, to camp out during the emergency. Later, they temporarily moved to a large house in Oakland while the City was reconstructed. The 1928 addition — living quarters over a garage — were built to provide needed space for the additions to the family when Billy and Madeline were brought to the Haas home. The architect of the addition, Gardner Dailey, later in life received recognition for his work on Ranch-style houses in the Bay
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Jacki R. Chan

    Jacki R. Chan

    Jaclyn Roxane Chan (born December 2, 1980), also known simply as Jacki R. Chan or Jacki Chan, is an American actress, musician, and Model. She has appeared in various magazines, calendars and print ads, as well as several motion pictures, television shows, and commercials. She is niece to Hollywood stuntman Darryl Chan. Formerly under the Universal Music Group label, she is also an experienced drummer who has been featured in several films, commercials, television spots, and music videos. Jaclyn Roxanne Chan was born in San Francisco, California and raised as the oldest of three siblings in Daly City, California. From an early age she was drawn to the performing arts and participated in several after-school programs and functions. She graduated from Westmoor High School in Daly City, where she took an active role in drama and music. These included taking major roles in numerous plays, membership in the International Thespian Society, being the only female drummer and percussionist in the school's Jazz and Symphonic Bands, and being one of the leads in the school's Drill/Streetdancing Team. Chan was a Salutatorian of her 1998 Graduating class and voted "Most Dramatic" in the
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Keith Hernandez

    Keith Hernandez

    Keith Barlow Hernandez (born October 20, 1953) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) player who was the starting first baseman on World Series championship teams with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1982 and the New York Mets in 1986. He began his career in the majors with the Cardinals in 1974, winning the National League (NL) batting title and sharing the circuit's Most Valuable Player (MVP) honors with Willie Stargell in 1979. After a midseason trade sent him to the Mets in 1983, he became the undisputed leader amongst the players of the brash ballclub that also fell a victory short of capturing the 1988 NL Championship Series. Hernandez appeared in five MLB All-Star Games and hit better than .300 six times between 1979 and 1987. Generally considered one of the best defensive players at his position, he was awarded the Gold Glove in eleven consecutive seasons from 1978 to 1988, the most by any first baseman in baseball history. He retired as an active player after spending one year with the Cleveland Indians in 1990. Currently a baseball analyst working on Mets telecasts for SportsNet New York and WPIX since 2006, he has gained a cult following from his broadcasting
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Oakland City Center/12th Street

    Oakland City Center/12th Street

    12th Street Oakland City Center is an underground Bay Area Rapid Transit station located at 12th Street and Broadway next to the Oakland City Center in Downtown Oakland. It used to be a northbound transfer station along the BART system, until that role was moved to 19th Street/Oakland on September 13, 2010. Like the 19th Street Oakland station, the concourse mezzanine is on the first level down, an island platform and two main tracks for northbound trains (bound for Richmond and Pittsburg/Bay Point) are on the second level down, and a side platform and one main track for southbound trains (bound for San Francisco and Fremont) are on the third level down. The station was originally planned to have four main tracks and an island platform on each of the two levels, but budget constraints limited that idea. This station is still the transfer point for Fremont passengers bounding to and from SFO/Millbrae at nights and on weekends.
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    William Gaxton

    William Gaxton

    William Gaxton (December 2, 1893 - February 2, 1963) was a star of vaudeville, film, and theatre. Born as Arturo Antonio Gaxiola in San Francisco, he appeared on film and onstage. He debuted on Broadway in the Music Box Revue on October 23, 1922. He went on to star in such hits as Rogers and Hart's A Connecticut Yankee (1927), singing "Thou Swell", Cole Porter's Fifty Million Frenchmen (1929), singing "You Do Something to Me", Of Thee I Sing (1933) with Victor Moore, Cole Porter's Anything Goes (1934), with Ethel Merman and Victor Moore, White Horse Inn (1936), Leave It to Me! (1938) with Victor Moore, and Louisiana Purchase (1940). He and Victor Moore became a popular theatre team in the 1930s and 1940s and also appeared in several films and shorts together. Although a fine vocalist, Gaxton's strength was his comic timing and he often requested songs of his be removed from shows in favor of giving him more time for comedic scenes.An example of this was the removal of Easy to Love from Cole Porter's Anything Goes . The song reappeared in the show 53 years later sung by Howard McGillin in the 1987 Broadway revival. He starred in the film version of Fifty Million Frenchmen (1931), as
    5.00
    1 votes
    225
    William Randolph Hearst

    William Randolph Hearst

    William Randolph Hearst ( /ˈhərst/; April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper publisher who built the nation’s largest newspaper chain and whose methods profoundly influenced American journalism. Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887, after taking control of The San Francisco Examiner from his father. Moving to New York City, he acquired The New York Journal and engaged in a bitter circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer's New York World which led to the creation of yellow journalism—sensationalized stories of dubious veracity. Acquiring more newspapers, Hearst created a chain that numbered nearly 30 papers in major American cities at its peak. He later expanded to magazines, creating the largest newspaper and magazine business in the world. He was twice elected as a Democrat to the U.S. House of Representatives, and ran unsuccessfully for Mayor of New York City in 1905 and 1909, for Governor of New York in 1906, and for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1910. Nonetheless, through his newspapers and magazines, he exercised enormous political influence, and is sometimes blamed for pushing public opinion in the United States into a war with Spain in 1898. His
    5.00
    1 votes
    226
    World Famous Bushman

    World Famous Bushman

    David Johnson, also known as the World Famous Bushman, is a homeless man who has been scaring passers-by along Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco since 1980. His current act began after he tried dressing as a robot but found there were too many others doing the same thing. Johnson hides motionless behind some eucalyptus branches and waits for unsuspecting people to wander by. When they approach, he shakes the bush towards the unsuspecting tourists and startles them. Crowds gather to watch him work, often including those he has previously scared. Crowds usually watch Johnson in front of Joe's Crab Shack, located across the street from where he usually sits, to see him entertain people. In a "good year", Johnson claims to earn $60,000. At one point, he employed a bodyguard to protect himself against attacks by the unamused, distract his targets, and to alert him to the approach of elderly people so he could avoid scaring them. The police have received a number of complaints about the Bushman, and Fisherman's Wharf merchants have tried to shut him down. In 2004, he was charged with four misdemeanors, but a jury cleared him. The District Attorney subsequently dropped several remaining
    5.00
    1 votes
    227
    George Moscone

    George Moscone

    George Richard Moscone ( /mɒsˈkoʊni/; November 24, 1929 – November 27, 1978) was an American attorney and Democratic politician. He was the 37th mayor of San Francisco, California, US from January 1976 until his assassination in November 1978. Moscone served in the California State Senate from 1967 until becoming Mayor. In the Senate, he served as Majority Leader. Moscone was born in San Francisco, California. His father was George Joseph Moscone, a prison guard, and his mother, Lena, was a homemaker. Moscone attended St. Brigid's, and then St. Ignatius College Preparatory, where he was an all-city basketball star. He then attended University of the Pacific. While in college, Moscone befriended John L. Burton, who would later become a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Moscone then studied at University of California, Hastings College of the Law, where he received his law degree. He met and married Gina Bondanza, in 1954. The Moscones would go on to have four children. After serving in the United States Navy, Moscone started private practice in 1956. John Burton's brother, Phillip, a member of the California State Assembly, recruited Moscone to run for an Assembly seat in
    4.00
    1 votes
    228
    Liev Schreiber

    Liev Schreiber

    Isaac Liev Schreiber ( /ˈliːɨv/ not /ˈliːv/; born October 4, 1967), commonly known as Liev Schreiber, is an American actor, producer, director, and screenwriter. He became known during the late 1990s and early 2000s, having initially appeared in several independent films, and later mainstream Hollywood films, including the Scream trilogy of horror films, Phantoms, The Sum of All Fears, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Salt and Goon. Schreiber is also a respected stage actor, having performed in several Broadway productions. In 2005, Schreiber won a Tony Award as Best Featured Actor for his performance in the play Glengarry Glen Ross. That year, Schreiber also made his debut as a film director and writer with Everything Is Illuminated, based on the novel of the same name. Schreiber is in a relationship with Naomi Watts, with whom he has two children. Schreiber was born Isaac Liev Schreiber in San Francisco, California, the son of Heather (née Milgram) and Tell Schreiber, a stage actor and director. Schreiber's father, who is of Austrian, Swiss, Irish, and Scottish descent, was from a wealthy "WASP" society family from Bucks County, Pennsylvania; he graduated from Hampshire College and was
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    MacArthur

    MacArthur

    MacArthur is a rapid transit station on three lines of the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system in Oakland, California. It is the largest station in the BART system, being the only one with four platform tracks in regular use. MacArthur station is in north Oakland, in the median of Route 24 just north of its interchange with Interstate 580 and perpendicular to 40th Street. The surrounding area is mostly low-density residential, making MacArthur station a commuting hub. Because of MacArthur's importance as an interchange and its location in the center of the East Bay, BART has conducted a number of feasibility studies about the prospects of creating transit-oriented development around the station. These studies have resulted in a plan for the "MacArthur Transit Village," a mixed-use development on the eastern side of Route 24 bounded by 40th Street, Telegraph Avenue, and West MacArthur Boulevard. The current plan calls for 624 residential units as well as 42,500 square feet of retail space. The groundbreaking for the project was held in May 2011 with the start of construction for a new 450-space parking garage for BART, signalling the beginning of construction for the long waited
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Museum of the African Diaspora

    Museum of the African Diaspora

    The Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) is a museum in San Francisco, California, documenting the African diaspora. The museum focuses on North America, the Caribbean, and South America, and traces the history of the African slave trade, African people's liberation movements in Africa and the New World, African music and its legacy in other musical forms, among other subjects. It is located inside St. Regis's new 42-story St. Regis Museum Tower, next to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The museum, and the building, opened in 2005. MoAD introduces visitors to the original African diaspora—the original movement of Homo Sapiens (from the earliest human remains found in Africa)—to eventually all inhabited regions. The museum asks visitors "when did you first realize you were African?" The museum espouses the scientifically accepted idea of panethnicity, wherein all humans have a common African origin.
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    Pleasant Hill

    Pleasant Hill

    Pleasant Hill/Contra Costa Centre is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station serving the Contra Costa Centre Transit Village in Contra Costa Centre, California, just north of Walnut Creek and just east of Pleasant Hill. The station consists of two elevated side platforms. Service at this station began on May 21, 1973. This station is in BART District 1 and is represented by Gail Murray who is also current BART President. A new parking garage opened at the station with 1,547 space on June 30, 2008. The purpose is to move parking to a vertical platform from the ground level areas where a transit village will be built. An improved access path to the station better connecting it with the Iron Horse Regional Trail was proposed before the Walnut Creek City Council on July 15, 2008. The proposal has gained support from BART and the local cycling organization. Despite opposition from the Pleasant Hill City Council, the BART Board of Directors recently approved the station name change from "Pleasant Hill" to "Pleasant Hill/Contra Costa Centre" because of the station's proximity to the transit village. The Contra Costa County Redevelopment Agency and AvalonBay Communities will cover the cost of
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    San Francisco Mint

    San Francisco Mint

    The San Francisco Mint is a branch of the United States Mint, and was opened in 1854 to serve the gold mines of the California Gold Rush. It quickly outgrew its first building and moved into a new one in 1874. This building, the Old United States Mint, also known affectionately as The Granite Lady, is one of the few that survived the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake. It served until 1937, when the present facility was opened. Within the first year of its operation, the San Francisco mint turned $4 million in gold bullion into coins. The second building, completed in 1874, was designed by Alfred B. Mullett in a conservative Greek Revival style with a sober Doric order. The building had a central pedimented portico flanked by projecting wings in an E-shape; it was built round a completely enclosed central courtyard that contained a well—the features that saved it during the fire of 1906, when the heat melted the plate glass windows and exploded sandstone and granite blocks with which it was faced. The building sat on a concrete and granite foundation, designed to thwart tunneling into its vaults, which at the time of the 1906 fire held $300 million, fully a third of the United
    4.00
    1 votes
    233
    Union Square

    Union Square

    Union Square is a plaza of 2.6 acres (11,000 m) bordered by Geary, Powell, Post and Stockton Streets in San Francisco, California. "Union Square" also refers to the central shopping, hotel, and theater district that surrounds the plaza for several blocks. The area got its name because it was once used for rallies and support for the Union Army during the American Civil War, earning its designation as a California Historical Landmark. Today, this one-block plaza and surrounding area is one of the largest collections of department stores, upscale boutiques, gift shops, art galleries, and beauty salons in the United States, making Union Square a major tourist destination, a vital, cosmopolitan gathering place in downtown San Francisco, and one of the world's premier shopping districts. Grand hotels and small inns, as well as repertory, off-Broadway, and single-act theaters also contribute to the area's dynamic, 24-hour character. Union Square was originally a tall sand dune, and the square was later set aside to be made into a public park in 1850. Union Square got its name from the pro-Union rallies held there on the eve of the Civil War. The monument itself is also a tribute to the
    4.00
    1 votes
    234
    101 California Street

    101 California Street

    101 California Street is a 48-story office skyscraper completed in 1982 in the Financial District of San Francisco, California. The 183 m (600 ft) tower providing 1,200,000 sq ft (110,000 m) of office space is bounded by California, Davis, Front, and Pine Streets near Market Street. The faceted cylindrical tower features a seven story, glass enclosed lobby and a granite plaza with flower beds and a fountain. The building's entrance is very similar to that of 101 Park Avenue in New York City, and was also designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee in 1982. 101 California is equipped with a total of thirty-two elevators, with twenty-two serving the tower; two serving floors 45 through 48; four serving the triangular annex building; two serving the garage; and two for freight. The eight stairwells throughout the building are intended for emergency use only. The building is the site of what has become known as the 101 California Street shootings, a mass murder which occurred there in 1993. On July 1, Gian Luigi Ferri, a disgruntled client of the law firm Pettit & Martin, entered their offices on the 34th floor and killed eight people and wounded six before killing himself. The event
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    0 votes
    235
    California Academy of Sciences

    California Academy of Sciences

    The California Academy of Sciences is among the largest museums of natural history in the world. The academy began in 1853 as a learned society and still carries out a large amount of original research, with exhibits and education becoming significant endeavors of the museum during the 20th century. Completely rebuilt in 2008, the building totals 400,000 square feet (37,000 square metres) and is among the newest natural history museums in the United States. The primary building in Golden Gate Park reopened on September 27, 2008. Prior to being replaced, the old academy building attracted approximately half a million visitors each year. As has been the case from the start, the main thrust of the exhibits is natural history. As such, the public areas of the academy are divided into three general areas. The academy conducts research in numerous fields, largely, but not exclusively, in anthropology, marine biology, botany, entomology, herpetology, ichthyology, invertebrate zoology, mammalogy, and ornithology, all branches of biology. Geological research also has a long history at the academy, with a concentration on paleontology. There also is a strong emphasis on environmental
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    0 votes
    236
    Cisco Systems, Inc.

    Cisco Systems, Inc.

    Cisco Systems, Inc. is an American multinational corporation headquartered in San Jose, California, United States, that designs, manufactures, and sells networking equipment. The stock was added to the Dow Jones Industrial Average on June 8, 2009, and is also included in the S&P 500 Index, the Russell 1000 Index, NASDAQ 100 Index and the Russell 1000 Growth Stock Index. Leonard Bosack and Sandy Lerner, a married couple who worked as computer operations staff members at Stanford University, later joined by Richard Troiano, founded Cisco Systems in 1984. Lerner briefly moved on to direct computer services at Schlumberger, but returned full-time to Cisco in 1987. The name "Cisco" was derived from the city name, San Francisco, which is why the company's engineers insisted on using the lower case "cisco" in the early days. For Cisco's first product, Bosack adapted multiple-protocol router software originally written some years before by William Yeager, another Stanford employee who later joined Sun Microsystems. The company's first CEO was Bill Graves, who held the position from 1987 to 1988. In 1988, John Morgridge was appointed CEO. On February 16, 1990, Cisco Systems went public
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    0 votes
    237
    Crissy Field

    Crissy Field

    Crissy Field is a former airfield, now a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, United States. Historically a part of the Presidio of San Francisco, Crissy Field was closed as an airfield and eventually the National Park Service took control over it. While maintained by the United States Army, Crissy Field was heavily affected by the military's dumping of hazardous materials. In 1997, the park service began to clean up the area and in 2001 the Crissy Field Center opened to the public. The land Crissy Field resides on is an ancient 130-acre salt marsh and estuary. Prior to European settlement, the Ohlone people used the area for harvesting shellfish and fish. They also lived in seasonal camps in the area, leaving behind shell middens in the archaeological record. The Spanish arrived in 1776 and called the area El Presidio. They began to use the area for livestock grazing and agriculture. The 127-acre marsh site was filled in during the 1870s. This alteration was finished in time for the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition. The U.S. Army took control of the Presidio in 1846, using the tidal wetland as a wasteland for dumping and
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    Eugene Schmitz

    Eugene Schmitz

    Eugene Edward Schmitz (August 22, 1864, San Francisco – November 20, 1928, San Francisco) was an American politician and the 26th mayor of San Francisco, who became notorious for his conviction by a jury on charges of corruption. "Handsome Gene" was the son of an Irish mother and a German father. He had played the violin and conducted the orchestra at the Columbia Theatre on Powell Street in San Francisco. Schmitz was president of the Musicians' Union, when Abe Ruef chose him to run for mayor on the ticket of the Union Labor Party. Schmitz was elected in 1902 and was the mayor of his hometown when the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and subsequent fire destroyed a prodigious amount of the city. On the day of the earthquake, Wednesday, April 18, he invited a cross section of the city's most prominent businessmen, politicians and civic leaders, but none of the members of the Board of Supervisors, to form the Committee of Fifty to help him manage the crisis. On June 13, 1907, Schmitz was found guilty of extortion, and the office of Mayor was declared vacant. He was sent to jail to await sentence. Shortly thereafter he was sentenced to five years at San Quentin State Prison, the maximum
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    James J. Corbett

    James J. Corbett

    James John "Gentleman Jim" Corbett (September 1, 1866 – February 18, 1933) was an American professional boxer and a former World Heavyweight Champion, best known as the man who defeated the great John L. Sullivan. He also coached boxing at the Olympic Club in San Francisco. He stood at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), with a reach of 73 inches (185 cm). Dubbed by the media as "Gentleman Jim Corbett," he graduated from Sacred Heart High School in San Francisco and was rumored to have a college education. He also pursued a career in acting, performing at a variety of theatres. He has been called the "Father of Modern Boxing" because of his scientific approach and innovations in technique. Some think that he changed prizefighting from a brawl to an art form. On May 21, 1891, Corbett fought Peter "Black Prince" Jackson, a much-heralded bout between cross-town rivals, since Corbett and Jackson were boxing instructors at San Francisco's two most prestigious athletic clubs. They fought to a no contest after 61 rounds. The fight's outcome did much more for Corbett's career than Jackson's, since reigning Heavyweight Champion, John L. Sullivan, drew the color line and refused to defend his title against
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    Josh Hartnett

    Josh Hartnett

    Joshua Daniel "Josh" Hartnett (born July 21, 1978) is an American actor and producer. He first came to audiences' attention in 1997 as "Michael Fitzgerald" in the television series Cracker. He made his feature film debut in 1998 in Halloween H20: 20 Years Later, followed by teen roles in films such as The Faculty and The Virgin Suicides. Hartnett has since gone on to further fame for his roles in films such as Pearl Harbor, Black Hawk Down, 40 Days and 40 Nights and 30 Days of Night, and has starred for a variety of well-known directors such as Ridley Scott, Brian De Palma, Robert Rodriguez, Tran Anh Hung, Roland Joffé and Michael Bay. Hartnett was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and was raised by his father, Daniel Hartnett, a building manager, and his stepmother, Molly, an artist. He has three younger half-siblings. He is of mainly Irish ancestry and was raised Roman Catholic, attending Nativity of Our Lord Catholic Grade School, where he played Adam Apple in an eighth grade production of "Krazy Kamp". He later attended Cretin-Derham Hall High School before switching to South High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota, from which he graduated in June 1996. Hartnett was active in sports
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    241
    Marjorie Lord

    Marjorie Lord

    Marjorie Lord (born Marjorie F. Wollenberg; July 26, 1918) is an American television and film actress. She played Kathy "Clancy" Williams opposite Danny Thomas on Make Room for Daddy and later Make Room for Granddaddy. Lord was born in San Francisco, California, the daughter of Lillian Rosalie (née Edgar) and George Charles Wollenberg. Her paternal grandparents were German, as were two of her maternal great-grandparents. In 1934, at the age of sixteen, Lord made her Broadway debut in The Old Maid with Judith Anderson. The following year, she was signed with RKO Radio Pictures. While appearing in Springtime for Henry with Edward Everett Horton, director Henry Koster approached her and signed her to a contract with Universal Studios. She appeared in six feature films for Universal. Her film work includes a number of wartime pictures, including the 1943 mystery Sherlock Holmes in Washington, starring Basil Rathbone in the title role. She appeared on the 1951 episode "The Return of Trigger Dawson" of Bill Williams's syndicated western television series The Adventures of Kit Carson. In 1956, while she was appearing in Anniversary Waltz, Lord caught the attention of Danny Thomas, who
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    Metaweb Technologies, Inc.

    Metaweb Technologies, Inc.

    • Web Link(s): metaweb.com
    Metaweb Technologies, Inc. was a United States company based in San Francisco that developed Freebase, described as an "open, shared database of the world's knowledge". The company was founded by Danny Hillis in July, 2005, and operated in stealth mode until 2007. Metaweb was acquired by Google in July, 2010. Although Metaweb no longer exists as a separate corporate entity, Freebase and its associated website freebase.com continue to be provided as an open database under Metaweb's original CC-BY licensing terms. On March 14, 2006, Metaweb received $15 million in funding. Investors included: Benchmark Capital, Millennium Technology Ventures, and Omidyar Network. Kevin Harvey of Benchmark Capital is a member of Metaweb's board of directors. On January 15, 2008, Metaweb announced a $42.5 million Series B round led by Goldman Sachs and Benchmark Capital. On July 16, 2010, Google acquired Metaweb for an undisclosed sum.
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    243
    Musée Mécanique

    Musée Mécanique

    The Musée Mécanique (English: Mechanical Museum) is a for-profit interactive museum consisting of 20th-century penny arcade games and artifacts located at Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco, California. The museum owns over 300 mechanical machines, and is one of the largest privately owned collection of such games in the world. Owner Ed Zelinsky began collecting at age 11 and his games were exhibited in the 1920s at Playland. In the 1960s Playland closed and Musée Mécanique became a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The museum moved into the basement of the famed Cliff House, which is where Playland historically stood. Zelinsky's son, Dan Zelinsky, took a temporary job in the 1970s maintaining the collection. The museum was featured in the 2001 film The Princess Diaries. In 2002 the National Park Service announced plans to relocate the Musée Mécanique temporarily to Fisherman's Wharf upon beginning renovations to the Cliff House. A portion of the $14 million renovation was devoted to the moving the museum, with support from the National Park Service, the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and museum owner Ed Zelinsky. The museum move instigated protests against
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    244
    O. J. Simpson

    O. J. Simpson

    Orenthal James "O. J." Simpson (born July 9, 1947), nicknamed "The Juice", is a retired American college track athlete, college and professional football player. Simpson was the first professional football player to rush for more than 2,000 yards in a season, a mark he set in 1973. While five other players have passed the 2,000 rush yard mark, he stands alone as the only player to rush for more than 2,000 yards in a fourteen-game season (professional football changed to a sixteen-game season in 1978). He holds the record for the single season yards-per-game average, which stands at 143.1 ypg. Simpson was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1985. After retiring from professional football, Simpson had a successful career as a football broadcaster and actor. In 1995, he was acquitted of the 1994 murder of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman after a lengthy, internationally publicized criminal trial – the People v. Simpson. In 1997, a civil court awarded a judgment against Simpson for their wrongful deaths; to date he has paid little of the $33.5 million penalty. In September 2007, Simpson was arrested in Las Vegas, Nevada, and charged with numerous felonies, including
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    Pacific Heights

    Pacific Heights

    Pacific Heights is a neighborhood of San Francisco, California. It is located in one of the most scenic and park-like settings in Northern California, offering panoramic views of the Golden Gate Bridge, the San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz and the Presidio. Its idyllic location provides a temperate micro-climate that is clearer, but not always warmer, than many other areas in San Francisco. The Pacific Heights Residents Association defines the neighborhood as inside Bush Street, Presidio Avenue, Union Street, and Van Ness Avenue. Pacific Heights is situated on a primarily east-west oriented ridge that rises sharply from the Marina District and Cow Hollow neighborhoods, to the north, to a maximum height of 370 feet above sea level. The streets of Jackson, Pacific, and Broadway extend along some of the most scenic areas along the hill's crest. The section of Broadway Street extending from Divisadero to Lyon Street is known as the "Gold Coast." Pacific Heights features two parks, Lafayette and Alta Plaza, each with spectacular views of the city and the bay. Easily visible to the north, for example, are the Golden Gate Bridge, the Marin Headlands, and Alcatraz Island. Lower Pacific Heights
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    Russian Hill

    Russian Hill

    Russian Hill is a neighborhood of San Francisco, California, in the United States. It is one of San Francisco's 44 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills." Russian Hill is directly to the north (and slightly downhill) from Nob Hill, to the south (uphill) from Fisherman's Wharf, and to the west of the North Beach neighborhood. The Hill is bordered on its west side by parts of the neighborhoods of Pacific Heights, Cow Hollow, and the Marina District. Downhill to the north is Ghirardelli Square, which sits on the waterfront of the San Francisco Bay, Aquatic Park, and Fisherman's Wharf, an extremely popular tourist area. Down the turns of Lombard Street and across Columbus Avenue to the east is the neighborhood of North Beach. Down the hill to the west, past Van Ness Avenue, are Cow Hollow and the Marina districts. The neighborhood's name goes back to the Gold Rush era, when settlers discovered a small Russian cemetery at the top of the hill. Russian naval and merchant ships frequently visited San Francisco throughout the 19th century beginning in 1806, and there are several mentions of burials of crew members in the Russian Hill cemetery in the first half of the century. The
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    San Francisco Art Institute

    San Francisco Art Institute

    San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) is a school of higher education in contemporary art with the main campus in the Russian Hill district of San Francisco, California. Its graduate center is in the Dogpatch neighborhood. The private, non-profit institution is accredited by WASC and is a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design. SFAI was founded in 1871, and is one of the oldest art schools in the United States and the oldest west of the Mississippi River SFAI offers Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, and Master of Fine Arts degrees and Post-Baccalaureate certificates. Like many institutions of higher-education, it also awards honorary PhDs. SFAI's current Dean of Academic Affairs is Jeannene Przyblyski. Hou Hanru is Director of Exhibitions and Public Program and Chair of Exhibition and Museum Studies. The School of Studio Practice consists of the traditional departments of Painting, Sculpture, Film, Photography, Design+Technology, Printmaking, and New Genres. Founded in 2006, SFAI's School of Interdisciplinary Studies offers BA and MA degrees in History and Theory of Contemporary Art, Urban Studies, and Exhibition and Museum Studies
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    San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

    San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

    The San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge (known locally as the Bay Bridge) is a pair of bridges spanning San Francisco Bay of California, in the United States. As part of Interstate 80 and the direct road route between San Francisco and Oakland, it carries approximately 270,000 vehicles per day on its two decks. It has one of the longest spans in the world. The toll bridge was conceived as early as the gold rush days, but construction did not begin until 1933. Designed by Charles H. Purcell, and built by American Bridge Company, it opened for traffic on November 12, 1936, six months before the Golden Gate Bridge. It originally carried automobile traffic on its upper deck, and trucks and trains on the lower, but after the closure of the Key System, the lower deck was converted to road traffic as well. In 1986, the bridge was unofficially dedicated to James B. Rolph. The bridge consists of two main spans of roughly equal length, a western span connecting downtown San Francisco to Yerba Buena Island and an eastern span connecting the island to Oakland. The main part of the western span is a suspension bridge while the main part of the eastern span is a cantilever bridge. During the 1989
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    San Leandro

    San Leandro

    San Leandro is a Bay Area Rapid Transit station located near the downtown area of San Leandro, California. It is the busiest station in the city and is also one of the busiest in the East Bay. The station consists of two elevated side platforms with the concourse mezzanine at ground level. Service at this station began on September 11, 1972.. This station is in BART District 3 and is represented by Bob Franklin. Bus services is provided 24 hours a day by AC Transit with local, rapid, school, and all nighter services. There is also the free LINKS shuttle that loops around San Leandro from the station during commute hours.
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    West Portal

    West Portal

    West Portal is a small neighborhood in San Francisco, California. Similar to adjacent Forest Hill and St. Francis Wood, West Portal is an affluent, primarily residential area of the City. The neighborhood's main corridor, West Portal Avenue, serves as a principal shopping district of southwestern San Francisco. West Portal is located at the southern edge of the hills in central San Francisco. The neighborhood is named for the western terminus of the Muni tunnel beneath Twin Peaks that opened in 1918. The ride in the subway from West Portal to Union Square is about fifteen minutes. Because of its small size and mom and pop stores, restaurants, and saloons, the neighborhood is often described as having a village atmosphere. The neighborhood is served by a branch of the San Francisco Public Library. Like Glen Park, the neighborhood is one of San Francisco's metro-centered communities. The frequent fog helps keep the area green in the usually rainless summer months, and on a clear day, the park above the tunnel provides a view of the Marin Headlands and the Farallon Islands in the Pacific.
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