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Best Religious Organization of All Time

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    1
    Episcopal Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast

    Episcopal Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast

    • Is Member Of: Episcopal Church in the United States of America
    The Episcopal Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast is a diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, part of Province 4. The diocese was created in 1970 from portions of the adjoining dioceses of Alabama and Florida. Its territory encompasses the southern third of Alabama and the Florida Panhandle region, west of the Appalachicola River. Most of its churches are located in the Mobile, Alabama area and in a population strip along the Gulf of Mexico extending from Pensacola to Panama City, Florida; most of the remaining churches are located in Alabama, typically in towns with greater than 10,000 population. Historically, the Diocese's congregations have favored low, or evangelical, churchmanship, with a generally more conservative theological and cultural tone than the Episcopal Church nationally. Diocesan offices are located in Pensacola, while the cathedral is Christ Church Cathedral in Mobile, making it one of only a few dioceses in the Episcopal Church where the diocesan offices and cathedral are located in different cities and the only diocese in which they are located in different states. The Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast was organized in 1970 by carving
    7.14
    7 votes
    2
    Britain Yearly Meeting

    Britain Yearly Meeting

    The Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Britain, also known as Britain Yearly Meeting (and until 1995, known as London Yearly Meeting), is a Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in England, Scotland, Wales, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. It is the national organisation of Quakers living in Britain. Whilst Britain Yearly Meeting remains a part of the international Religious Society of Friends, it is independent from other yearly meetings, and has some beliefs and practices distinct from other branches of the Religious Society of Friends. Notably, some Quakers in Britain since the end of the twentieth century have not seen themselves as Christians, which is very different from Quakers in most other countries. Britain Yearly Meeting, which until 1995 was known as London Yearly Meeting, grew out of various national and regional meetings of Friends in the 1650s and 1660s and has met annually in some form since 1668. The first meeting of Friends from different parts of Britain to be organised was at Balby in Yorkshire in 1656. This consisted of representatives from each Church in Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Derbyshire and
    7.67
    6 votes
    3
    Sheng Kung Hui

    Sheng Kung Hui

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui (abbreviated SKH), also known as the Hong Kong Anglican Church (Episcopal), is the Anglican Church in Hong Kong and Macau. It is the 38th Province of the Anglican Communion. It is also one of the major denominations in Hong Kong. The Most Rev. Dr. Paul Kwong is the current Archbishop and Primate of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui and Bishop of the Diocese of Hong Kong Island with his seat at St. John's Cathedral. The Rt. Rev. Dr. Thomas Soo is Bishop of the Diocese of Western Kowloon, and also the chairman of Hong Kong Christian Council and the Board of the Hong Kong Bible Society. The Anglican Church is a global family and a fellowship of churches which trace their roots to the Church of England, with a province being a basic autonomous unit. There are presently 38 independent and self-governing provinces spanning over 160 countries. With well over 100 million members, The Holy Anglican Communion is the third largest church in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches. In the Anglican Communion, there is no central governing authority. Churches uphold and proclaim the Catholic and Apostolic faith. The front-line unit of
    7.67
    6 votes
    4
    Siddhartha's Intent

    Siddhartha's Intent

    Founded in 1989 by Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche, Siddhartha's Intent is an international Buddhist association of non-profit centers, most of which are nationally registered societies and charities, with the principal intention of preserving the Buddhist teachings, as well as increasing an awareness and understanding of the many aspects of the Buddhist teaching, beyond the limits of cultures and traditions.
    7.67
    6 votes
    5
    Zhihua Si Temple

    Zhihua Si Temple

    • Associated With: Buddhism
    The Zhihua Temple (智化寺; pinyin: Zhìhuà Sì; lit. "Temple of Wisdom Attained") is a Ming Dynasty-era Buddhist temple in Beijing, China. It is located in the Lumicang (禄米仓) hutong, in the Chaoyangmen area of the Dongcheng District, within the Second Ring Road to the north of Jinbaojie Street, west of the Yabaolu area. The temple was built in 1443 at the order of Wang Zhen, a powerful eunuch in the Rites Supervising Office of the court of the Zhengtong Emperor (also known as Yingzong; reigned 1436-1449 and 1457-1464). The temple, surrounding buildings, and grounds comprise approximately 20 thousand square meters. It is one of the most important original building complexes from the Ming Dynasty period in the Old City area, and one of the only wooden structures and groups of buildings from the Ming Dynasty to remain intact in Beijing. It is also striking for its extensive use of black roof tiles. The Beijing Cultural Exchange Museum, established in November 1992, is located in the temple compound; its principal aim is "as a centre for developing cultural exchange and for developing the study of cultural relics and museums." At the temple, a group of musicians regularly performs
    7.67
    6 votes
    6
    Union for Reform Judaism

    Union for Reform Judaism

    • Associated With: Reform Judaism
    The Union for Reform Judaism (URJ), formerly known as the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC), is an organization which supports Reform Jewish congregations in North America. The current President is Rabbi Richard Jacobs, and the Chairman of the Board is Stephen Sacks. The origins of the URJ began with the founding of the UAHC by Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise in 1873, based at Cincinnati, Ohio. At the time it consisted of 34 congregations. In 1951, the UAHC relocated its headquarters to New York City. In 2003, the UAHC was officially renamed the Union for Reform Judaism by the General Assembly at the organization's Biennial Convention. The former name was dropped because it reflected Wise's unrealized expectation that the whole of American Jewry would eventually affiliate with the Reform movement, and also because it failed to acknowledge the Reform-affiliated congregations outside the United States. Today, the organization is often referred to simply as "the Union." As of 2012, over 900 synagogues were affiliated with it. In 1875, the Union created Hebrew Union College (HUC) in Cincinnati, the Reform movement seminary to train rabbis and later cantors and other Jewish
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    Hatzolah

    Hatzolah

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Hatzolah/Hatzalah ("rescue" or "relief" in Hebrew: הצלה‎) is a volunteer Emergency Medical Service (EMS) organization serving mostly Jewish communities around the world. Most local branches operate independently of each other, but use the common name. The Hebrew spelling of the name is always the same, but there are many variations in transliteration, such as Hatzolah, Hatzoloh, Hatzalah, and Hatzola. It is also often called Chevra Hatzolah, which loosely translates as "Company of Rescuers" or "Group of Rescuers." The original Hatzolah EMS was founded in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York, USA by Rabbi Hershel Weber in the late 1960s, to improve rapid emergency medical response in the community, and to mitigate cultural concerns of a Yiddish-speaking, religious Hasidic community. The idea spread to other Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods in the New York City area, and eventually to other regions, countries, and continents. Hatzolah, as an organization, is the largest volunteer ambulance service in the world. Chevra Hatzalah in New York has more than a thousand volunteer EMTs and Paramedics who answer more than 250,000 calls each year with private vehicles and a fleet of more than 70
    8.60
    5 votes
    8
    Carthusian

    Carthusian

    The Carthusian Order, also called the Order of Saint Bruno, is a Roman Catholic religious order of enclosed monastics. The order was founded by Saint Bruno of Cologne in 1084 and includes both monks and nuns. The order has its own Rule, called the Statutes, rather than the Rule of Saint Benedict, and combines eremitical and cenobitic life. The name Carthusian is derived from the Chartreuse Mountains; Saint Bruno built his first hermitage in the valley of these mountains in the French Alps. The word charterhouse, which is the English name for a Carthusian monastery, is derived from the same source. The same mountain range lends its name to the alcoholic cordial Chartreuse produced by the monks since the 1740s which itself gives rise to the name of the colour. The motto of the Carthusians is Stat crux dum volvitur orbis, Latin for "The Cross is steady while the world is turning." There are no Carthusian abbeys as they have no abbots, and each charterhouse is headed by a prior and is populated by choir monks, referred to as hermits, and lay brothers. Each hermit —  that is, a monk who is or who will be a priest  — has his own living space, called a cell, usually consisting of a small
    8.40
    5 votes
    9
    Norwood

    Norwood

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Norwood is a UK charity established in 1785 in the East End of London. In 1996, it merged with Ravenswood, a Berkshire-based charity for people with learning disabilities, to create one of the largest welfare organisations within the United Kingdom Jewish community. Norwood currently provides more than 120 services for people with learning disabilities, and children and families in need, within the Jewish and wider communities in London and the South East. These specialist services benefit more than 7,000 people each year and are delivered by 1,200 staff and supported by around 800 volunteers. Norwood’s Patron is HM The Queen and its Patron of Children’s Services is Cherie Blair. The charity’s celebrity supporters include Simon Cowell, Elton John, David Furnish, Sir Philip Green, Bernie Ecclestone, Roger Daltrey, Theo Paphitis, Tom Conti and Piers Morgan. In 1795, brothers Abraham and Benjamin Goldsmid began campaigning for funds for a major Jewish poor relief scheme. Twelve years later they were able to use the funds to establish the Jews’ Hospital in Mile End. Following the death of the Goldsmid brothers, Queen Victoria’s uncle, Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, became
    6.29
    7 votes
    10
    Albanian Orthodox Church

    Albanian Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Autocephalous Orthodox Church of Albania (Albanian: Kisha Ortodokse Autoqefale e Shqipërisë) is one of the newest autocephalous Eastern Orthodox churches. It declared its autocephaly in 1922, and gained recognition from the Patriarch of Constantinople in 1937. The church suffered during the Second World War, and in the communist period that followed, especially after 1967 when Albania was declared an atheist state, and no public or private expression of religion was allowed. The church has, however, seen a revival since religious freedom was restored in 1991, with more than 250 churches rebuilt or restored, and more than 100 clergy being ordained. It has 909 parishes spread all around Albania, and around 500,000 faithful. The Holy Synod of Bishops was established in 1998, and is currently consisted of: Christianity first arrived in Albania with Saint Paul during the 1st century. Saint Paul wrote that he preached in the Roman province of Illyricum, and legend holds that he visited Durrës. However it was with Constantine the Great, who issued the Edict of Milan and legalized Christianity, that the Christian religion became official in the lands of modern Albania. When Albania
    7.17
    6 votes
    11
    Archdiocese of Yucatán

    Archdiocese of Yucatán

    The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Yucatán (Latin: Archidioecesis Yucatanensis) is located in Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico; Campeche and Tabasco are its suffragans. Its area is that of the state of the same name, 17,204 sq. miles. There is a legend that long before the arrival of the Spanish in Mexico the Christian religion had been preached in Yucatán by Quetzacoatl. Yucatán was the first region of the Mexican territory to encounter Christianity in the sixteenth century; it was there that the first Roman Catholic Mass was celebrated. It is said that in 1517 Francisco Hernández de Córdoba, the discoverer and explorer of the region, founded the first parish. Leo X, believing the newly-discovered land to be an island, by the Bull "Sacri apostolatus ministerio", dated 27 January 1518, created the Bishopric of Yucatán, under the name "Carolense" and placed it under the protection of "Santa Maria de los Remedios". When it was known that Yucatán was part of the continent which Hernán Cortés was conquering, Clement VII made certain modifications, and Father Julián Garcés, appointed first Bishop of Yucatán, to make his residence at Tlaxcala when he arrived in Mexico, as the Spanish had abandoned
    9.50
    4 votes
    12
    Eastern Orthodox Church

    Eastern Orthodox Church

    The Eastern Orthodox Church, officially called the Orthodox Catholic Church and commonly referred to as the Orthodox Church, is the second largest Christian church in the world, with an estimated 300 million adherents, primarily in Eastern and Southeastern Europe. It is the religious denomination of the majority of the populations of Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia, Romania, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Cyprus. It teaches that it is the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church established by Jesus Christ and his Apostles almost 2,000 years ago. The Orthodox Church is composed of several self-governing ecclesial bodies, each geographically and nationally distinct but theologically unified. Each self-governing (or autocephalous) body, often but not always encompassing a nation, is shepherded by a Holy Synod whose duty, among other things, is to preserve and teach the apostolic and patristic traditions and related church practices. Like the Roman Catholic Church, Anglican Communion, Assyrian Church of the East, Oriental Orthodoxy and some other churches, Orthodox bishops trace their lineage back to the apostles through the process of apostolic
    8.20
    5 votes
    13
    Hazon Yeshaya Institutions

    Hazon Yeshaya Institutions

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Hazon Yeshaya Humanitarian Network is an Israeli charity organization, based in Jerusalem, that provides a number of services for impoverished Israelis, regardless of religious affiliation. The organization was founded by Abraham Israel in 1997. In April 2012, the Israel Police arrested 10 employees of Hazon, including the head, "on suspicion of pocketing millions of dollars from donors abroad for poor people, including Holocaust victims." In 1956, after the Suez War, Abraham Israel's family fled Egypt to escape growing anti-Semitism. They spent three years in Paris, France before immigrating to the United States of America. Abraham Israel received a bachelor's degree in business administration from Baruch College in New York and worked as a shoe importer. In 1997, Abraham Israel moved to Israel with his family and founded Hazon Yeshaya. Hazon Yeshaya soup kitchens serve more than 400,000 meals each month at more than 60 distribution points around Israel and is the only organization that provides soup kitchens facilities 365 days of the year in Israel. Beneficiaries included over 10,000 school children whose teachers have identified them to be in need of better nutrition. In 2008,
    8.20
    5 votes
    14
    Ravenna Kibbutz

    Ravenna Kibbutz

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Ravenna Kibbutz is a nondenominational Jewish intentional community located in the Ravenna neighborhood of Seattle. Its three rented houses and one apartment are home to 15 resident-organizers, who plan public programs such as Shabbat dinners and Jewish movie nights. In-house events are always free, though occasionally a donation jar is made available for those who wish to contribute. The Kibbutz's ideology isn't communistic; it's not a true commune but simply an example of cohousing. The Pacific Northwest contains many cohousing communities and a wide variety of Jewish organizations, but thus far the region has no other Jewish cohousing community. House Aleph, the original Kibbutz house, is supported in part by the Moishe House program, which offers financial and other resources to young Jews interested in hosting a certain number of public events per month. Houses Bet and Gimel are unaffiliated with Moishe House and play host to events like a monthly open-mic nights, film screenings, yoga classes, storytelling events, meditation sessions, and more. Resident-organizers range from secular to Modern Orthodox in their religious views and vary also in their Jewish practices.
    8.20
    5 votes
    15
    Pittsburgh Jewish Community

    Pittsburgh Jewish Community

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Jewish history of Pittsburgh, the second largest city in the state of Pennsylvania, USA and the chief city of Western Pennsylvania. According to the 2002 Pittsburgh Jewish Community Study, "Jewish households represent 3.8% of the total number of households living in Allegheny County." In 2012, Pittsburgh's Jewish community will celebrate its 100th year of federated giving through the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. The city's Jewish federation is one of the oldest in the country, marking the deep historical roots of Jews in Pittsburgh. There are no reliable records of the beginnings of the Jewish community; but it has been ascertained that between 1838 and 1844 a small number of Jews, mostly from Baden, Bavaria, and Württemberg, settled in and around Pittsburgh. These were joined by others in 1847 and by still others in 1852, who included in their numbers the founders of Jewish communal life. The first Jewish service was held in the autumn of 1844, while the first attempt at organization was made in 1847, when a mere handful of men combined with the hope of forming a congregation. They worshiped in a room on Penn street near Walnut (now 13th) street, having engaged the
    7.00
    6 votes
    16
    Osho-Rajneesh movement

    Osho-Rajneesh movement

    The Rajneesh movement is a term used by Hugh B. Urban and other commentators to refer collectively to persons inspired by the Indian mystic Osho (formerly known as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, 1931–1990), particularly initiated disciples who are referred to as "neo-sannyasins" or simply "sannyasins." They were also formerly known as Rajneeshees or "Orange People," because of the orange and later red, maroon and pink clothes they used from 1970 until 1985. Members of the movement are also sometimes called Oshoites in the Indian press. The movement was controversial in the 1970s and 1980s, due to the founder's hostility to traditional values, first in India and later in the United States of America. In the USSR the movement was banned as being contrary to "positive aspects of Indian culture and to the aims of the youth protest movement in Western countries". These "positive aspects" were seen as being subverted by Osho, who was portrayed as a reactionary religious ideologist of the monopolistic bourgeoisie of India, promoting the ideas of the consumer society in a traditional Hindu guise. In Oregon the movement's large intentional community of the early 1980s, called Rajneeshpuram, caused
    8.00
    5 votes
    17

    Order of the Solar Temple

    The Order of the Solar Temple also known as Ordre du Temple Solaire (OTS) in French, and the International Chivalric Organization of the Solar Tradition or simply as The Solar Temple was a secret society based upon the modern myth of the continuing existence of the Knights Templar (see Origins of the Solar Temple below). OTS was started by Joseph Di Mambro and Luc Jouret in 1984 in Geneva as l'Ordre International Chevaleresque de Tradition Solaire (OICTS) and renamed Ordre du Temple Solaire. Some historians allege that the Solar Temple originates with French author Jacques Breyer who established a Sovereign Order of the Solar Temple in 1952. In 1968, a schismatic order was renamed the Renewed Order of the Solar Temple (ROTS) under the leadership of French right-wing political activist Julien Origas. Some reports have claimed that Origas was a Nazi SS member during World War II. According to "Peronnik" (a pseudonym of temple member Robert Chabrier) in his book, "Pourquoi la Résurgence de l'Ordre du Temple? Tome Premier: Le Corps" ("Why a Revival of the Order of the Solar Temple? Vol. One: The Body") 1975, pp. 147–149 , the aims of the Order of the Solar Temple included: establishing
    7.80
    5 votes
    18
    Concordia Club

    Concordia Club

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The O'Hara Student Center, formerly the Concordia Club, is a three-story, 18,000-square-foot (1,700 m) building on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh on O'Hara Street in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is a contributing property to the Schenley Farms National Historic District and the City of Pittsburgh Oakland Civic Center Historic District. The building to the university in mid-December, 2009. and has since been renovated to house academic and student activity programs. On January 21, 1874, a group of prominent German Jews, mostly members of the Rodef Shalom Congregation, met for the purpose of organizing a private club in Pittsburgh, "to promote social and literary entertainment among its members." The small group establishing the Jewish social club voted to host it at a private residence on Pittsburgh's North Side and voted Judge Josiah Cohen to be its first president. The popularity of the Club called for a move to larger quarters on Stockton Street on the North Side. It was at this location that a conference of eighteen rabbis met at the Club in November 1885 to sign the defining document of American Reform Judaism termed the Pittsburgh
    8.75
    4 votes
    19
    Order of Saint Benedict

    Order of Saint Benedict

    • Associated With: Catholicism
    The Order of Saint Benedict (Latin name: Ordo Sancti Benedicti) is a Roman Catholic religious order of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Within the order, each individual community (which may be a monastery, a priory or abbey) maintains its own autonomy, while the organization as a whole exists to represent their mutual interests. Today the terms "Order of Saint Benedict" and "Benedictine Order" are also used frequently to refer to the total of the independent Benedictine abbeys, thereby giving the wrong impression of a "generalate" or "motherhouse" with jurisdiction over dependent communities. The Benedictine Confederation, which was established in 1883 by Pope Leo XIII in his brief Summum semper, is the international governing body of the order, headed by the Abbot Primate. Members of the order generally use the initials O.S.B. after their name. The monastery at Subiaco established in Italy by Saint Benedict of Nursia circa 529 was the first of a dozen monasteries founded by him. Even so, there is no evidence to suggest that he intended to found an order. To the contrary, the Rule of St Benedict presupposes the autonomy of each community.
    8.75
    4 votes
    20
    Canadian Jewish Political Affairs Committee

    Canadian Jewish Political Affairs Committee

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Canadian Jewish Political Affairs Committee (also known as CJPAC), is a Canadian political organization. The Executive Director of CJPAC is Mark Waldman, who has been active with the organization since its establishment. Josh Cooper served as the founding Executive Director from 2005-2009. CJPAC is a unique national, grassroots, independent organization whose mandate is to engage the community in the political process. CJPAC mobilizes the grassroots across the country, builds relationships with elected officials – of all political parties – and works for Jewish community interests, on a multi-partisan basis, during and between elections. It’s mission is to advance the interests of the Canadian Jewish community and strengthen the Canada-Israel relationship by participating directly in the political process. In addition, its mandate also involves engaging students in the political process, and it runs programs geared towards youth during the summer months. Some of their programs include the CJPAC Fellowship for politically involved university students, high school councils, mock elections and seminars. CJPAC is the only political, national, membership based advocacy organization
    6.50
    6 votes
    21
    Coptic Catholic Church

    Coptic Catholic Church

    The Coptic Catholic Church, also known as the Western Orthodox Church of Alexandria, is an Alexandrian Rite particular Church in full communion with the Pope of Rome. Historically, it represents a schism from the Coptic Orthodox Church, its adherents having left the Orthodox church to enter into communion with the Bishop of Rome. The current Patriarch of Alexandria of the Catholic Copts is Antonios I Naguib, who replaced Stephanos II Ghattas in 2005. The offices of the Patriarchate are located in Cairo. The patriarchal Cathedral (Our Lady of Egypt) is in Nasr City, a suburb of Cairo. At the Council of Florence on February 4, 1442, a Coptic Orthodox Church delegation signed the Cantate Domino document for the formal union with the Catholic Church. With little support in Egypt, the document had no effect. In the 1600s, missionaries, primarily the Franciscans, started to come to the Copts. In 1630, a Cairo mission of the Capuchin Order was founded. The Jesuits came in 1675. Again in 1713, the Coptic Patriarch of Alexandria had submitted to Rome, but like in 1442 was the union of long duration. In 1741, Coptic Bishop Anba Athanasius of Jerusalem became a Catholic. In 1781, he was
    6.50
    6 votes
    22
    9.67
    3 votes
    23
    Chaldean Catholic Church

    Chaldean Catholic Church

    The Chaldean Catholic Church (Syriac: ܥܕܬܐ ܟܠܕܝܬܐ ܩܬܘܠܝܩܝܬܐ; ʿītha kaldetha qāthuliqetha), is an Eastern Syriac particular church of the Catholic Church, maintaining full communion with the Bishop of Rome and the rest of the Catholic Church. The Chaldean Catholic Church presently comprises an estimated 500,000 Chaldean Christians who are ethnic Babylonians. The ancient history of the Chaldean Church is the history of the Church of the East. It was originally named The Church of the East. Before the 1553 consecration of Shimun VIII Yohannan Sulaqa, the term Chaldeans had only been officially used previously by the Council of Florence in 1445 as a new name for a group of Greek Nestorians of Cyprus who entered in Full Communion with the Catholic Church. After the massacres of Tamerlane around 1400 had devastated several bishoprics, the Church of the East, which had previously extended as far as China, was reduced to a handful of Mesopotamian Aramaic Language speaking ethnic Chaldean-Assyrian survivors who lived largely in the triangular area of Northern Mesopotamia between Amid (Diyarbakır), Salmas and Mosul. The See was moved to Alqosh, in the Mosul region and Patriarch Mar Shimun IV
    8.25
    4 votes
    24
    Roman Catholic Diocese of Belleville

    Roman Catholic Diocese of Belleville

    The Roman Catholic Diocese of Belleville is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the southern Illinois region of the United States. It comprises the southern counties of the state of Illinois and is administered from the City of Belleville. The prelate is a bishop serving as pastor of the mother church, the Cathedral of Saint Peter. Its current bishop is Bishop Edward Braxton. The Diocese of Belleville was created on January 7, 1887. There are 111,000 Catholics in the Diocese today. In October 2009, the diocese agreed to settle a lawsuit from a former altar boy over allegations that he had been sexually abused by priest Raymond Kownacki of Dupo, Illinois.
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Church of Nigeria

    Church of Nigeria

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Church of Nigeria is the Anglican church in Nigeria. It is the second-largest province in the Anglican Communion, as measured by baptized membership, after the Church of England. It gives its current membership as "over 18 million", out of a total Nigerian population of 140 million. Since 2002 the Church of Nigeria is organised in ecclesiastical provinces, currently in the number of 14. It has rapidly increased the number of its dioceses and bishops from 91 in 2002 to 161, as at May 2012. The administrative headquarters are located in Abuja. Its current primate is Archbishop Nicholas Okoh. Christianity came to Nigeria in the 15th century through Augustine and Capuchine monks from Portugal. The first mission of the Church of England was, though, only established in 1842 in Badagry by Henry Townsend. In 1864 Samuel Ajayi Crowther, a Yoruba and former Slave, was elected Bishop of the Niger. Lagos became a diocese of its own in 1919. Leslie Gordon Vining became Bishop of Lagos in 1940 and in 1951 the first archbishop of the newly inaugurated Province of West Africa. Vining was the last Bishop of Lagos of European descent. On 24 February 1979, the sixteen dioceses of Nigeria were
    6.17
    6 votes
    26
    Church of the Province of Southern Africa

    Church of the Province of Southern Africa

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Anglican Church of Southern Africa, known until 2006 as the Church of the Province of Southern Africa, is the Anglican province in the southern part of Africa, including dioceses in Angola, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Saint Helena, South Africa and Swaziland. In South Africa, there are at least 4 million Anglicans out of an estimated population of 45 million. The Anglican Church of Southern Africa is one of the oldest and largest Christian communities in South Africa today. The primate is the Archbishop of Cape Town. The current archbishop is Thabo Makgoba who succeeded Njongonkulu Ndungane. During the years 1986 to 1996 the primate was Nobel Peace Prize laureate Desmond Tutu. The first Anglican clergy to minister regularly at the Cape were military chaplains who accompanied the troops when the British occupied the Cape Colony in 1795 and then again in 1806. The second British occupation resulted in a growing influx of civil servants and settlers who were members of the Church of England, and so civil or colonial chaplains were appointed to minister to their needs. These were under the authority of the governor. The first missionary of the Society for the Propagation of the
    7.00
    5 votes
    27
    Tibetan Buddhism

    Tibetan Buddhism

    Tibetan Buddhism is the body of Buddhist religious doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet and certain regions of the Himalayas, including northern Nepal, Bhutan, and India (particularly in Arunachal Pradesh, Ladakh, Dharamsala, Lahaul and Spiti in Himachal Pradesh, and Sikkim). It is the state religion of Bhutan. It is also practiced in Mongolia and parts of Russia (Kalmykia, Buryatia, and Tuva) and Northeast China. Texts recognized as scripture and commentary are contained in the Tibetan Buddhist canon, such that Tibetan is a spiritual language of these areas. A Tibetan diaspora has spread Tibetan Buddhism to many Western countries, where the tradition has gained popularity. Among its prominent exponents is the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet. The number of its adherents is estimated to be between ten and twenty million. Tibetan Buddhism comprises the teachings of the three vehicles of Buddhism: the Foundational Vehicle, Mahāyāna, and Vajrayāna. The Mahāyāna goal of spiritual development is to achieve the enlightenment of Buddhahood in order to most efficiently help all other sentient beings attain this state. The motivation in it is the bodhicitta mind of enlightenment — an
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    Church of Uganda

    Church of Uganda

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Church of the Province of Uganda (or Church of Uganda) is a member church of the Anglican Communion. Currently there are 34 dioceses which make up the Church of Uganda, each headed by a bishop. Each diocese is divided into archdeaconries, each headed by a senior priest known as an archdeacon. The archdeaconries are further subdivided into parishes, headed by a parish priest. Parishes are subdivided into sub-parishes, headed by lay readers. As of the 2002 Census, 8,782,821 Ugandans (35.9% of the population) consider themselves affiliated with the church. The current Primate and Metropolitan Archbishop is the Most Reverend Henry Luke Orombi, who was enthroned in 2004 and retires in December 2012. The Diocese of Kampala is the fixed episcopal see of the Archbishop, but unlike many other fixed metropolitical sees, the incumbent is not officially known as 'Archbishop of Kampala', but bears the longer title 'Archbishop of Uganda and Bishop of Kampala'. The primary source for this section is listed in the References section below Shergold Smith and C. T. Wilson of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) were the first European Anglican missionaries to Uganda when they arrived in June
    8.00
    4 votes
    29

    Ekoji Buddhist Temple

    • Associated With: Buddhism
    • Is Member Of: Buddhist Churches of America
    Ekoji (恵光寺, Ekō-ji) is a Jodo Shinshu Buddhist Temple of the Nishi-Hongwanji Tradition in Fairfax Station, Virginia, near Washington, D.C. It is a member of the Buddhist Churches of America, the oldest Buddhist organization in the mainland United States. Ekoji (literally in Japanese, "Temple of the Gift of Light") was founded in 1981; its initial location was an office condominium building located in Springfield, Virginia, and a larger temple was constructed in Fairfax Station, Virginia, in 1998. The temple was established through the beneficial efforts of the late Rev. Kenryu Tsuji (1919-2004), the former Bishop of the Buddhist Churches of America, and the late Rev. Dr. Yehan Numata, a Japanese businessman and devout Jodo Shinshu Buddhist. He also established the Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai ("Society for the Promotion of Buddhism") to help spread Buddhism throughout the world. In July 2009, Reverend Kazuaki Nakata became the full-time resident minister. There are several Ekoji Temples in Japan, as well as in Düsseldorf, Germany and Mexico City.
    6.00
    6 votes
    30
    Chevra Kadisha

    Chevra Kadisha

    • Associated With: Judaism
    A chevra kadisha (Hevra kadishah) (Aramaic: חברא קדישא, Ḥebh'ra Qaddisha "holy society") is an organization of Jewish men and women who see to it that the bodies of Jews are prepared for burial according to Jewish tradition and are protected from desecration, willful or not, until burial. Two of the main requirements are the showing of proper respect for a corpse, and the ritual cleansing of the body and subsequent dressing for burial. It is usually referred to as a burial society in English. The task of the chevra kadisha is considered a laudable one, as tending to the dead is a favour that the recipient cannot return, making it devoid of ulterior motives. Its work is therefore referred to as a chesed shel emet (a good deed of truth), paraphrased from Genesis  47:29 (where Jacob asks his son Joseph, "do me a 'true' favor" and Joseph promises his father to bury him in the Land of Israel). At the heart of the society's function is the ritual of tahara, or purification. The body is first thoroughly cleansed of dirt, body fluids and solids, and anything else that may be on the skin, and then it is ritually purified by immersion in, or a continuous flow of, water from the head over the
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    Christian City Church, Oxford Falls

    Christian City Church, Oxford Falls

    • Building: Christian City Church, Oxford Falls
    C3 Church Sydney (formerly Christian City Church Oxford Falls) is a Pentacostal megachurch based in Sydney, Australia and is the largest congregation in the Christian City Church movement. The church's headquarters are located at its Oxford Falls campus. C3 Church Sydney is considered one church, but is separated into three campuses, with other sites located in Silverwater and Potts Point. The church as a whole has a weekly attendance in excess of 4,000, and a membership in excess of 6,000 people, making it one of the largest congregations in Australia. C3 Church runs events and services targeted at specific demographics such as youth and young adult conferences as well as operating a ministry leadership and creative arts college from its Oxford Falls campus. C3 Church Sydney was founded in 1980 by Phil and Chris Pringle who came to Sydney from New Zealand for that purpose as 'Christian Centre Northside'. The church began with 12 attendees and met on the Northern beaches of Sydney. The current Oxford Falls campus was opened by John Howard the then Prime Minister of Australia. In 2009 the Christian City Church, Oxford Falls become C3 Church Sydney and adopted Christian City Church,
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric

    Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric

    The Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric (Serbian, Macedonian: Православна Охридска Архиепископија, Pravoslavna Ohridska Arhiepiskopija) is an autonomous Eastern Orthodox archdiocese in the Republic of Macedonia. It is the only canonical Orthodox Church in the Republic of Macedonia and is in full communion with all other Orthodox Churches. The Orthodox Ohrid Archbishopric has been refused registration by the Macedonian State Religion Commission on the grounds that one group may be registered for each confession and that the name was not sufficiently distinct from that of the Macedonian Orthodox Church (MOC). MOC is recognized by the State Religion Commission but not by any other Orthodox churches, which consider its unilateral 1967 declaration of autocephaly a breach of canon law. The Archbishopric claims inheritance from the Ohrid Archbishopric of Justiniana prima and all Bulgaria (Bulgarian: Охридска Архиепископиия на Юстинияна първа и цяла България, Greek: Αρχιεπίσκοπος της πρωτης 'Ιουστινιανης και πάσης Βουλγαριας), founded in 1019, by Basil II. In attempt to restore its canonical status and gain recognition from the Orthodox churches, the Macedonian Orthodox Church negotiated with
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in South Carolina

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in South Carolina

    • Building: Columbia South Carolina Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of year-end 2007, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 36,141 members in 6 stakes, 46 wards, 14 branches, 1 mission, and 1 temple in South Carolina. The first LDS member in South Carolina is believed to be Emmanual Masters Murphy, who was baptized in Tennessee in 1836. When Elder Lysander M. Davis arrived in South Carolina in 1839 (nine years after the Church was organized in New York), he found the Murphys had people prepared for baptism. Seven of these were baptized. Opposition arose and Davis was briefly jailed. Murphy had reportedly spoken with Church President Joseph Smith in the late 1830s, and was told to warn South Carolinians of the destruction soon to hit their state, "the wars that will shortly come to pass, beginning at the rebellion of South Carolina, which will eventually terminate in the death and misery of many souls ... the Southern states will call on other nations, even the nation of Great Britain..." This warning saw reality in 1861, when the Confederates attacked Fort Sumter, and the Civil War commenced. The South Carolina Conference was organized on March 31, 1882. Some of the earliest branches were established at King’s Mountains
    7.75
    4 votes
    34

    United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism (USCJ) is the primary organization of synagogues practicing Conservative Judaism in North America. It closely works with the Rabbinical Assembly, the international body of Conservative rabbis, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. The United Synagogue was founded in 1913 by Rabbi Dr. Solomon Schechter on the principle that through cooperation they could both develop and perpetuate Conservative Judaism. The USCJ has over 675 congregations as of 2009 (down from 850 in 1985). The USCJ works in the fields of Jewish education, youth activities, congregational standards and action and Israel affairs, and published the magazine United Synagogue Review. Historically, the Jewish Theological Seminary has taken the leadership role in the Conservative movement (unlike the Reform movement, whose congregational organization has dominated its rabbinical school). The diminished number of affiliated congregations noted above raised serious concern in the first decade of the century as new congregational forms, often populated by people who were educated in the Conservative movement, have become popular.
    7.75
    4 votes
    35

    Greek Orthodox Church of Alexandria

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Greek Orthodox Church of Alexandria, also known as the Patriarchate of Alexandria and All Africa (Greek: Πατριαρχεῖον Ἀλεξανδρείας καὶ πάσης Ἀφρικῆς, Patriarcheîon Alexandreías kaì pásēs Aphrikês) is an autocephalous Greek Orthodox Church within the wider communion of Orthodox Christianity. Officially, it is called the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria to distinguish it from the non-Chalcedonian Coptic Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria. Members of the church were once known as Melkites, because they remained in communion with the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople after the schism that followed the Council of Chalcedon in 451. The Greek Orthodox Church of Alexandria head bishop is the Pope and Patriarch of Alexandria and All Africa. His full title is "His Most Divine Beatitude the Pope and Patriarch of the Great City of Alexandria, Libya, Pentapolis, Ethiopia, all the land of Egypt, and all Africa, Father of Fathers, Shepherd of Shepherds, Prelate of Prelates, thirteenth of the Apostles, and Judge of the Œcumene". Like the Coptic Orthodox Pope of Alexandria and the Coptic Catholic Patriarch of Alexandria, he claims to have succeeded the Apostle Mark the
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Valliscaulian Order

    Valliscaulian Order

    The Valliscaulian Order was a religious order of the Roman Catholic Church, so named after "Vallis Caulium", or "Val-des-Choux", its first monastery, in Burgundy. It was founded at the end of the twelfth century and lasted until its absorption by the Cistercians in the eighteenth century. The order was founded towards the end of the twelfth century by Viard (also styled Gui), a lay brother of the Carthusian priory of Lugny, in the Diocese of Langres in Burgundy. Viard was permitted by his superior to lead the life of a hermit in a cavern in a wood, where he gained by his life of prayer and austerity the reputation of a saint. Odo (Eudes) III, Duke of Burgundy, in fulfilment of a vow made while on the Fourth Crusade, immediately upon inheriting his estates built a church and monastery on the site of the hermitage. Viard became prior in 1193, and framed rules for the new foundation drawn partly from the Carthusian and partly from the Cistercian observance. In 1203, for the benefit of his soul, of his father's and his predecessors' the Duke Eudes gave all the surrounding forest to the brothers. He made a further gift in 1209. The gifts were confirmed by a bull of Pope Innocent III, 10
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Burmese Buddhist Temple

    Burmese Buddhist Temple

    • Associated With: Buddhism
    The Burmese Buddhist Temple (also known as Maha Sasana Ramsi; Burmese: သာသနာ့ရံသီ မြန်မာဘုရားကျောင်း; Chinese: 缅甸玉佛寺; pinyin: Miǎndiàn yùfósì) is located on Tai Gin Road in Novena, Singapore. Founded in 1875, the temple is the oldest Theravada institution and the only Burmese Buddhist temple of its kind in Singapore. The temple houses the largest pure white marble statue of the Buddha outside of Myanmar, and has become a religious landmark for Burmese and Singaporean devotees to make merits and take part in merit sharing activities alike. The Burmese Buddhist Temple (BBT) was founded by a Burmese, named U Thar Hnin, also known as Tang Sooay Chin, at 17 Kinta Road (off Serangoon Road) in 1875. In 1878, U Thar Hnin donated the temple to U Kyaw Gaung (also known as Khoo Teogou), a traditional Burmese physician. The temple houses the largest pure white marble statue of the Buddha outside of Myanmar. It is also the only Burmese Buddhist temple built outside of Myanmar in the traditional Burmese architectural style. U Kyaw Gaung, also known as Khoo Teogou, was born in Mandalay, Myanmar in 1866. He arrived in Singapore at an early age and was later joined by his wife, Daw Khin Mae and
    8.67
    3 votes
    38

    Latter Rain Movement

    • Associated With: Pentecostalism
    The Latter Rain, also known as the New Order or New Order of the Latter Rain, was a post–World War II movement within Pentecostal Christianity which remains controversial to this day. For clarification in discussion of the Latter Rain, a distinction should be made between: The Latter Rain Movement had its beginnings in the years following World War II and was contemporary with the evangelical awakening led by Billy Graham, as well as the Healing Revival of Oral Roberts, Jack Coe, and William Branham. Branham is often erroneously considered the founder of the Latter Rain because those who started it were inspired by attending one of his meetings. Rather, several leaders of the small Pentecostal, 'Sharon Orphanage' in North Battleford, Saskatchewan, were inspired to look for a deeper dimension of Christianity after visiting Branham's meeting. They began to fast and pray in search of it. Later that year, groups organized large revival events, and news quickly swept across Canada and the United States, influencing many Pentecostal believers. As the revival died down after a few years, those who had been changed by the doctrine formed various groups which became known as "The Latter
    8.67
    3 votes
    39

    Melkite Greek Catholic Church

    The Melkite Greek Catholic Church (Arabic: كنيسة الروم الملكيين الكاثوليك‎, Kanīsat ar-Rūm al-Malakiyyīn al-Kāṯūlīk) is an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Holy See as part of the worldwide Catholic Church. The Melkites, Byzantine Rite Catholics of mixed Eastern Mediterranean and Greek origin, trace their history to the early Christians of Antioch, Syria, of the 1st century AD, where Christianity was introduced by St. Peter. The Melkite Church has a high degree of ethnic homogeneity and the church's origins lie in the Near East, but Melkite Greek Catholics are present throughout the world due to migration. Outside of the Near East, the Melkite Church has also grown through inter-marriage with, and the conversion of, people of various ethnic heritages. At present there is a worldwide membership of approximately 1.6 million. The Melkite Catholic Church's Byzantine roots and liturgical practices are rooted in those of Eastern Orthodoxy, while the Church has maintained communion with the Catholic Church in Rome since a split from the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch in 1729. Melkite, from the Syriac word malkā for "King", was originally a pejorative term for
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Anglicanism

    Anglicanism

    Anglicanism is a tradition within Christianity comprising churches with historical connections to the Church of England or similar beliefs, worship and church structures. The word Anglican originates in ecclesia anglicana, a medieval Latin phrase dating to at least 1246 that means the English Church. Adherents of Anglicanism are called Anglicans. The great majority of Anglicans are members of churches which are part of the international Anglican Communion. There are, however, a number of churches outside of the Anglican Communion which also consider themselves to be Anglican, most notably those referred to as Continuing Anglican churches. The faith of Anglicans is founded in the scriptures, the traditions of the apostolic church, the apostolic succession ("historic episcopate") and the early Church Fathers. Anglicanism forms one of the branches of Western Christianity; having definitively declared its independence from the Roman pontiff at the time of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement, in what has been otherwise termed the British monachism. Many of the new Anglican formularies of the mid 16th century corresponded closely to those of contemporary Reformed Protestantism and these
    10.00
    2 votes
    41
    Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism

    Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Religious Action Center (RAC) is the political and legislative outreach arm of Reform Judaism in the United States. The RAC is operated under the auspices of the Commission on Social Action of Reform Judaism, a joint body of the Central Conference of American Rabbis and the Union for Reform Judaism. It was founded in 1961. Consistent with the political and social concerns of Reform Judaism, the RAC played a key role in important political events of the American civil rights movement, the struggles of Soviet Jewry, as well as the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Darfur. It hosted several meetings at which the groundwork for the various pieces of legislation, including the Civil Rights Acts and Voting Rights Acts, were laid. It also shielded civil rights marchers who were attacked by District of Columbia police. Aside from its community organizing and direct advocacy work, the RAC has also been a hub of social justice programming for the Reform Jewish community. The L'Taken seminar series has given thousands of young Jews the opportunity to visit Washington, DC, and learn about public policy and Jewish values. The RAC also hosted a Passover Seder for the Dalai Lama in the late
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    Worldwide Communion of Catholic Apostolic National Churches

    Worldwide Communion of Catholic Apostolic National Churches

    The Worldwide Communion of Catholic Apostolic Churches (WCCAC) is a communion of several Independent Catholic bodies. The communion was born at the VI Worldwide Council held in Guatemala. WCCAC is the result of a long path, started by Dom Carlos Duarte Costa who in 1945 organized the Brazilian Catholic Apostolic Church. The communion has as symbols of its unity Dom Luis Fernando Castillo Méndez, who served until his death in October 2009 as Patriarch of ICAB and WCCAC. At the present time Archbishop Jerry King is the president and Archbishop John Parnell is the chancellor and vice president. (WCCAC Const. Art.2) WCCAC professes steadfastly and wholly the Catholic faith as it is witnessed in the Holy Scriptures, in the Apostles and Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creeds, in the first seven Ecumenical Councils and in the Tradition of the Undivided Church. For that reason, with Vincent of Lérins, we affirm and embrace "that which has been believed everywhere, always, and by all people; it is truly and properly Catholic."[1] All other doctrinal postulates, beliefs and practices, so long as they are not contrary to Catholic faith can be accepted by local churches and by the faithful on the
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    Aum Shinrikyo

    Aum Shinrikyo

    Aum Shinrikyo (currently known as Aleph) is a Japanese cult, listed as a terrorist organization by several countries. The group was founded by Shoko Asahara in 1984. The group gained international notoriety in 1995, when it carried out the Sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway. The name "Aum Shinrikyo" (オウム真理教, Ōmu Shinrikyō) derives from the Sanskrit syllable Aum, which represents the universe, followed by Shinrikyo written in kanji, roughly meaning "religion of Truth". In English "Aum Shinrikyo" is usually translated as "Supreme Truth". In January 2000, the organization changed its name to Aleph in reference to the first letter of the Arabic alphabet, Hebrew alphabet and Phoenician alphabets. It changed its logo as well. In 1995, the group claimed they had over 9,000 members in Japan, and as many as 40,000 worldwide. Police consider the existing groups Aleph and Hikari no Wa to be branches of the "dangerous religion". Aum Shinrikyo/Aleph is a syncretic belief system that incorporates Asahara's facets of Christianity with idiosyncratic interpretations of Yoga, and the writings of Nostradamus. In 1992 Asahara published a landmark book, and declared himself "Christ", Japan's only
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the LDS Church or, colloquially, the Mormon Church) is a Christian primitivist church that considers itself to be a restoration of the church founded by Jesus Christ. The church is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, and has established congregations (called wards or branches) and built temples worldwide. With over 55,000 missionaries worldwide, the church currently has a membership of over 14.4 million and is ranked by the National Council of Churches as the fourth largest Christian denomination in the United States. It is the largest church originating on American soil, and it is the largest denomination in the Latter Day Saint movement started by Joseph Smith during the period of religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening. Adherents, referred to as Latter-day Saints or, more informally, Mormons, view faith in Jesus Christ and his atonement as the central tenet of their religion. LDS theology includes the Christian doctrine of salvation only through Jesus Christ, though LDS doctrines regarding the nature of God and the potential of mankind differ significantly from mainstream Christianity. The church has an open canon
    7.25
    4 votes
    45

    United Synagogue

    • Associated With: Orthodox Judaism
    United Synagogue is an organisation of London Jews that was founded with the sanction of an Act of Parliament, in 1870. As of 2007, it remains the largest religious grouping within the British Jewish community and indeed in Europe, covering 62 Orthodox Jewish communities. It takes its religious authority from the Chief Rabbi of Britain and has its own Beth Din and Dayanim. The United Synagogue's values stem from the principles of both Torah and Halacha. From 1866, Nathan Marcus Adler was instrumental in bringing together the United Synagogue, a union of the three City of London synagogues — the Great Synagogue, the New Synagogue, and the Hambro Synagogue — and their branch synagogues at Great Portland Street and Bayswater. Its direct work has always been confined to the metropolis, but it has exercised, indirectly, considerable influence over the Jews of the British Empire and British Commonwealth. It is governed by an elected council representing the constituent congregations. In religious and ritual matters it is under the jurisdiction of the Chief Rabbi. The president of the United Synagogue in 1910 was Lord Rothschild. The United Synagogue directs and supports educational and
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Church of Scientology

    Church of Scientology

    • Associated With: Scientology
    The Church of Scientology is an organization devoted to the practice and the promotion of the Scientology belief system. The Church of Scientology International is the Church of Scientology's parent organization, and is responsible for the overall management, dissemination and propagation of Scientology. Every Church of Scientology is separately incorporated and has its own local board of directors and executives responsible for its own activities and corporate well-being. The first Scientology church was incorporated in December 1953 in Camden, New Jersey, by American science fiction author L. Ron Hubbard. The church has been the subject of much controversy. Its world headquarters are located in the Gold Base, located in unincorporated Riverside County, California. The first Scientology church was incorporated in December, 1953 in Camden, New Jersey by L. Ron Hubbard, his wife Mary Sue Hubbard, and John Galusha, although the Hubbard Association of Scientologists International (HASI) had already been operating since 1952 and Hubbard had been selling Scientology books and other items. Soon after, he explained the religious nature of Scientology in a bulletin to all Scientologists,
    8.33
    3 votes
    47
    Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church

    Eritrean Orthodox Tewahdo Church

    • Associated With: Oriental Orthodoxy
    The Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church is an Oriental Orthodox church. Its autocephaly was recognised by Pope Shenouda III after Eritrea gained its independence in 1993. Tewahdo (Te-wa-hido) (Ge'ez ተዋሕዶ tawāhidō) is a Ge'ez word meaning "being made one". According to the Catholic Encyclopedia (1917 edition) article on the Henoticon: the Patriarchs of Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem, and many others, all refused to accept the "two natures" doctrine decreed by the Byzantine Emperor Marcian's Council of Chalcedon in 451, thus separating them from the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox. The Oriental Orthodox Churches, which today include the Coptic Orthodox Church, the Armenian Apostolic Church, the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Malankara Orthodox Church of India, the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church, and the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, are referred to as "Non-Chalcedonian", and, sometimes by outsiders as "monophysite" (meaning "One Nature", in reference to Christ; a rough translation of the name Tewahido). However, these Churches themselves describe their Christology as miaphysite. Tewahdo (Te-wa-hido) is a major ethnoreligious group in Eritrea and the largest Christian group
    8.33
    3 votes
    48

    Heaven's Gate

    Heaven's Gate was an American UFO religion based in San Diego, California, founded in the early 1970s and led by Marshall Applewhite (1931–1997) and Bonnie Nettles (1927–1985). On March 26, 1997, police discovered the bodies of 39 members of the group who had committed suicide in order to reach what they believed was an alien space craft following the Comet Hale–Bopp, which was at its brightest. According to Jacques Vallée in his 1979 book Messengers of Deception, the group began in the early 1970s when Marshall Applewhite was recovering from a heart attack during which he claimed to have had a near-death experience. He came to believe that he and his nurse, Bonnie Nettles, were "the Two", that is, the two witnesses spoken of in the Book of Revelation 11:3 in the Bible. After a brief and unsuccessful attempt to run an inspirational bookstore, they began traveling around the United States of America giving talks about their belief system. As with some other New Age faiths they combined Christian doctrine (particularly the ideas of salvation and apocalypse) with the concept of evolutionary advancement and elements of science fiction, particularly travel to other worlds and
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Serbian Orthodox Church

    Serbian Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Serbian Orthodox Church (Serbian: Српска православна црква / Srpska pravoslavna crkva) is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches. It is the second oldest Slavic Orthodox Church in the world (after the Bulgarian Orthodox Church). The Serbian Orthodox Church is the dominant church in Serbia, Montenegro and Republika Srpska entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina, with more than 84% of the population being adherents in all three. It is organized into metropolises and eparchies located primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and Croatia, but also in surrounding countries, and all over the world. Since many Serbs have emigrated to foreign countries, there are now Serbian Orthodox communities worldwide. The Serbian Orthodox Church is an autocephalous, or ecclesiastically independent, member of the Orthodox communion. The Patriarch of Serbia serves as first among equals in his church; The current patriarch is His Holiness Irinej. The Church achieved autocephalous status in 1219 under the leadership of St. Sava, becoming independent Archeparchy of Žiča. Its status was elevated to that of a patriarchate in 14th century, and was known afterwards as the
    8.33
    3 votes
    50

    West London Synagogue

    • Associated With: Reform Judaism
    The West London Synagogue of British Jews (commonly abbreviated WLS) is a Jewish Reform synagogue and congregation near Marble Arch in London. It was established on 15 April 1840. Its current building in Upper Berkeley street dates from 1870, making it the oldest standing Reform synagogue, and one of the oldest synagogues, in the United Kingdom. The West London Synagogue of British Jews was formed by a group of families after breaking away from the Bevis Marks congregation in 1841. Its first location was a building in Burton Street, and David Woolf Marks was its first minister. On 27 January 1842, the West London Synagogue of British Jews was consecrated, the name reflecting the unity now existing between Sephardi and Ashkenazi members and expressing the patriotism felt for Britain by its members. By 1848, the building in Burton Street had become too small for the congregation. A new location was found, in Margaret Street, Cavendish Square, at a cost of £5000, and it was consecrated on 25 January 1849. From 1849 to 1867 the numbers of the congregation continued to rise, and a new location was required. Eventually, its current location in Upper Berkeley Street was found and was
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Saint Louis

    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Saint Louis

    The Archdiocese of St. Louis is the Roman Catholic archdiocese that covers the City of St. Louis as well as the following Missouri counties: Franklin, Jefferson, Lincoln, Perry, Saint Charles, Saint Francois, Ste. Genevieve, St. Louis, Warren, and Washington. It was led by Archbishop Raymond Burke until his transfer to the position of Prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura on June 27, 2008. Robert James Carlson, the former Bishop of Saginaw, was named the Archbishop-elect on April 21, 2009 by Pope Benedict XVI, and was installed on June 10, 2009. Archbishop Carlson is assisted by Auxiliary Bishop Edward M. Rice and Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus Robert Joseph Hermann. The archdiocesan cathedral is the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis. The original cathedral and motherchurch is the Basilica of St. Louis, King of France. The area's first bishop was Louis William Valentine Dubourg, who on September 24, 1815 was appointed Bishop of Louisiana and the [East and West] Floridas by Pope Pius VII. DuBourg chose to set up his episcopal see in St. Louis. After his resignation and transfer to lead the diocese of Montauban, France, the Diocese of St. Louis was erected on July 18,
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    Diskin Orphanage

    Diskin Orphanage

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Diskin Orphanage was an orphanage in the Old City of Jerusalem, established in 1881 by Yehoshua Leib Diskin. From the Jewish Quarter, it moved to Street of the Prophets outside the walls of the Old City. In 1927, it moved to a new building in the Kiryat Moshe neighborhood, near the main entrance to the city from the west. In 1878, Rabbi Yehoshua Leib Diskin left his rabbinical position in Brest-Litovsk and moved to Palestine, where he found a large religious community living under near impossible conditions. The persecution and disease from which the Jews of the Holy Land suffered moved Diskin to open a home for orphans in the city, after bringing needy children into his own home. In time, as the number of children increased, Diskin established the “Great Institution for Orphans” that came to be known as the Diskin Orphanage of Jerusalem. Diskin's second wife, Sarah, known as the Brisker Rebbetzin, brought 40,000 rubles into the marriage which was used for this purpose. When Diskin died in 1898, his lifework was continued by his only son, Yitzhak Yerucham Diskin. Rabbi Yitzhak built the imposing Diskin Orphanage campus, cited by Israeli architect and historian David Kroyanker
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    The Rock Church

    The Rock Church

    The Rock Church is a Protestant, evangelical megachurch located in San Diego, California, with a satellite campus in San Marcos, California. Miles McPherson, a former NFL player, has served as senior pastor since he founded the church in 2000. With an average weekly attendance of more than 12,000 at five weekly services in San Diego, as well as weekly services in San Marcos where attendees watch McPherson's sermon on a large-screen television, the Rock is one of the largest and fastest growing church in the United States. The Rock offers more than 130 external ministries for members to serve in. These include ministries that work in Donovan Prison, homeless shelters, hospital oncology wings and with military families. The Rock was founded in 2000 by Miles McPherson; the Rock's very first service had 3,300 in attendance. Initially the church met for worship services on the campus of San Diego State University. McPherson's church growth methods led to rapid growth and in 2002, the church launched a Pre-K–12, Christian school, and Rock Academy. In 2003, McPherson's sermons began to be broadcast on KPRZ, a Christian radio station. That same year, the church began a fundraising campaign
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    United Synagogue Youth

    United Synagogue Youth

    • Associated With: Judaism
    • Is Member Of: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism
    United Synagogue Youth (USY) is the youth movement of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism. USY operates in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The goal of the movement is to bring Jewish teenagers closer to Judaism and Israel through learning and social interaction. The organization was founded in 1951, under the auspices of the Youth Commission of what was then the United Synagogue of America. USY runs a variety of summer tours. USY High is an eight-week program in which high schoolers (juniors and seniors) live at the Israel Goldstein Youth Village in Jerusalem, studying and exploring Israel. In the campus classroom, participants are introduced chronologically to each historical period. Campus class time is interspersed with time experiencing the "classroom without walls" - the Land of Israel. Participants learn in an ancient cave, a mountain fortress, an army bunker, riding on a camel, or at the beach. It is the sister program of Tichon Ramah Yerushalaim (TRY), which is done by Ramah. TRY is seventeen weeks long and is for sophomores and juniors. International Convention (IC) is a gathering of hundreds of North American USY members held every December in a different
    9.50
    2 votes
    55

    World Union for Progressive Judaism

    • Associated With: Liberal Judaism
    The World Union for Progressive Judaism (WUPJ) describes itself as the "international umbrella organization for the Reform, Liberal, Progressive and Reconstructionist movements." This overall Jewish religious movement is based in about 40 countries with more than 1,000 affiliated synagogues. The WUPJ states that it aims are to create common ground between its constituents and to promote Progressive Judaism in places where individuals and groups are seeking authentic, yet modern ways of expressing themselves as Jews. It seeks to preserve Jewish integrity wherever Jews live, to encourage integration without assimilation, to deal to modernity while preserve the Jewish experience and to strive for equal rights and social justice. The WUPJ was established in London in 1926, moved its headquarters to New York in 1959 and to Jerusalem in 1973. It has regional offices in London, Moscow and New York. Past presidents include Claude Montefiore, Leo Baeck, Lily Montagu (1955-1959) and Solomon Freehof. The WUPJ claims more than 1.7 million members throughout the world, encompassing more than 1,200 Reform, Progressive, Liberal and Reconstructionist congregations. Most congregations are located
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    Buddhism

    Buddhism

    Buddhism is a religion indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs, and practices largely based on teachings attributed to Siddhartha Gautama, who is commonly known as the Buddha (meaning "the awakened one" in Sanskrit and Pāli). The Buddha lived and taught in the eastern part of the Indian subcontinent some time between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE. He is recognized by Buddhists as an awakened or enlightened teacher who shared his insights to help sentient beings end suffering (dukkha) through eliminating ignorance (avidyā) by way of understanding and seeing dependent origination (pratītyasamutpāda) and eliminating craving (taṇhā), and thus attain the highest happiness, nirvāņa (nirvana). Two major branches of Buddhism are recognized: Theravada ("The School of the Elders") and Mahayana ("The Great Vehicle"). Theravada has a widespread following in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. Mahayana is found throughout East Asia and includes the traditions of Pure Land, Zen, Nichiren Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhism, Shingon, Tiantai (Tendai) and Shinnyo-en. In some classifications, Vajrayana—practiced mainly in Tibet and Mongolia, and adjacent parts of
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Czechoslovak Hussite Church

    Czechoslovak Hussite Church

    The Czechoslovak Hussite Church (Czech: Církev československá husitská, CČSH or CČH) is a Christian Church which separated from the Roman Catholic Church after World War I in former Czechoslovakia. It traces its tradition back to the Hussite reformers and acknowledges Jan Hus (John Huss) as its predecessor. It was well-supported by Czechoslovakia's first president, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk. The forerunner of the CČSH was the Jednota (Union of the Catholic Czechoslovak Clergy), which was founded in 1890 to promote modernist reforms in the Roman Catholic Church, such as use of the vernacular in the liturgy and the adoption of voluntary rather than compulsory clerical celibacy. The radical movement that resulted in the foundation of a new Church began in the Christmas season of 1919, when Christmas masses were celebrated in the Czech language in many Czechoslovak churches. The CCH was officially established on January 8, 1920 by Dr. Karel Farský, who became its first Patriarch and author of its liturgy. It was known until 1971 as the Czechoslovak Church. The head of the Church continues to bear the title of Patriarch. Membership is estimated at between 100,000 and 180,000 adherents,
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    4 votes
    58
    New England Yearly Meeting

    New England Yearly Meeting

    New England Yearly Meeting (officially the New England Yearly Meeting of Friends) is a body of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) headquartered in Worcester, Massachusetts that includes Friends from the New England region of the United States. New England Yearly Meeting (NEYM) is part of both Friends General Conference and Friends United Meeting –- two broader bodies of Friends. They are also part of Friends World Committee for Consultation and the Friends Peace Teams Project. Sixty-eight monthly meetings are associated with NEYM. Most of the constituent monthly meetings are in the unprogrammed tradition, which means that they meet for silent worship in which any participant may share whatever they believe the Spirit of God leads them to say. Others are in the programmed tradition, which means that they have a pastor who leads the meeting and plans ahead of time what will be said and done. Yearly meeting sessions are held once a year, usually in the first week of August. Most recently they have been held at Bryant University in Smithfield, Rhode Island. Past locations include Stonehill College in North Easton, Massachusetts; Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts; Bowdoin
    7.00
    4 votes
    59

    17th century denominations in England

    A large number of religious denominations emerged during the early-to-mid-17th century in England. Many of these were influenced by the radical changes brought on by the English Civil War, subsequent execution of Charles I and the advent of the Commonwealth of England. This event lead to a widespread discussion about how society should be structured.
    6.00
    5 votes
    60

    Buddhist Churches of America

    The Buddhist Churches of America (米国仏教団, Beikoku Bukkyōdan) is the United States branch of the Honpa Hongan-ji (also known as Nishi-Honganji) sub-sect of Jōdo Shinshū ("True Pure Land School") Buddhism. Jodo Shinshu is also popularly known as Shin Buddhism. The B.C.A. is one of several overseas kyodan ("districts") belonging to the Nishi ("Western") Hongwan-ji. The other kyodan are South America, Hawaiʻi, Jodo Shinshu Buddhist Temples of Canada, and Europe. Their headquarters is at 1710 Octavia Street, San Francisco, California, near San Francisco's Japantown. It is the oldest Buddhist organization in the United States. The origins of the Buddhist Churches of America (BCA) began with the arrival of Japanese immigrants to the American mainland during the late 1800s. Devout Shin Buddhists who had expressed concern over the lack of religious services, and the activities of Christian missionaries among the newly-arrived immigrant population, petitioned the monshu (head abbot) of the Nishi Hongwan-ji to send priests to the United States. The first Jodo Shinshu priests arrived in San Francisco in 1893, and the first American temple constructed in 1899. The priests' arrival in San
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Church of Satan

    Church of Satan

    The Church of Satan is an organization dedicated to the acceptance of the carnal self, as articulated in The Satanic Bible, written in 1969 by Anton Szandor LaVey. In the 1960s Anton LaVey formed a group called the Order of the Trapezoid, which later became the governing body of the Church of Satan. The group included: "The Baroness" Carin de Plessen, Dr. Cecil Nixon, Kenneth Anger, City Assessor Russell Wolden, Donald Werby, and Michael Harner. According to the Church of Satan historiography, other LaVey associates from this time include noted Science Fiction and Horror writers Anthony Boucher, August Derleth, Robert Barbour Johnson, Reginald Bretnor, Emil Petaja, Stuart Palmer, Clark Ashton Smith, Forrest J. Ackerman, and Fritz Leiber Jr. The Church of Satan was established at the Black House in San Francisco, California, on Walpurgisnacht, April 30, 1966, by Anton Szandor LaVey, who was the Church's High Priest until his death in 1997. In the first year of its foundation, Anton LaVey and the Church of Satan publicly performed a Satanic marriage of Judith Case and journalist John Raymond. The ceremony was attended by Joe Rosenthal. The church also performed a public funeral for
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    3 votes
    62
    Cypriot Orthodox Church

    Cypriot Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Church of Cyprus (Greek: Ἐκκλησία τῆς Κύπρου, Ekklisía tîs Kýprou) is an autocephalous Greek Church within the communion of Orthodox Christianity. It is one of the oldest Eastern Orthodox autocephalous churches, achieving independence from the Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East in 431. The bishop of the ancient capital, Salamis (renamed Constantia by Emperor Constantius II), was constituted metropolitan by Emperor Zeno, with the title archbishop. The Apostle Paul, accompanied by Barnabas and Mark the Evangelist (Barnabas' kinsman), came to Cyprus in 45 AD to spread Christianity. Arriving at Salamis, they travelled across the island to Paphos, where Sergius Paulus was the first Roman official to convert to Christianity. In 50 AD St. Barnabas returned to Cyprus accompanied by St. Mark and set up his base in Salamis. He is considered to be the first Archbishop of Cyprus. Some Christians say Barnabas was stoned to death by the Jews on the outskirts of Salamis, where he was also buried. A few of the bishops who helped spread Christianity on the island were Lazarus, the Bishop of Kition, Herakleidios the Bishop of Tamasos, Avxivios the Bishop of Soloi, and Theodotos the Bishop
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Lakewood Church

    Lakewood Church

    Lakewood Church is a non-denominational Christian megachurch located in Houston, Texas. It is the largest congregation in the United States, averaging more than 43,500 in attendance per week. The 16,800-seat Lakewood Church Central Campus, home to four English language services and two Spanish language services per week, is located at the former Compaq Center. Joel Osteen is the senior pastor of Lakewood Church with his wife, Victoria, who serves as co-pastor. Lakewood Church is evangelical in belief. Lakewood Church was founded by John Osteen and his second wife, Dodie in 1959 inside an abandoned feed store in northeast Houston. Previously, John Osteen had been a Southern Baptist minister; however, after experiencing a self-described baptism in the Holy Spirit, he withdrew from his Baptist fellowship and began Lakewood Church. From the beginning, Lakewood was non-denominational and racially inclusive. In 1979, attendance was over five thousand, and the church was becoming prominent among Pentecostals and charismatics. John and Dodie created and hosted Lakewood's weekly television program, which could be seen in 100 countries worldwide. Upon John Osteen's death in 1999 after
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Malankara Church

    Malankara Church

    The Malankara Church is the church of the Saint Thomas Christians of Kerala, India, with particular emphasis on the part of the community that joined Archdeacon Mar Thoma in swearing to resist the authority of the Portuguese Padroado in 1653. This faction soon entered into a relationship with the Syriac Orthodox Church of Antioch, and was thereafter often known as the Malankara Syrian Church (Malayam: Malankara Suriyani Sabha). As part of the Saint Thomas Christian community, the church traced its origins to the evangelical activity of Thomas the Apostle in the 1st century. As an independent faction, it originated in the first major split within the Saint Thomas Christian community. Historically, the Thomas Christians had been united in leadership and liturgy, and were part of the Church of the East, based in Persia. However, the collapse of the Church of the East's hierarchy in Asia left the province of India effectively isolated, and through the 16th century, the Portuguese, recently established in Goa, forcefully drew the Thomas Christians into Latin Rite Catholicism. Resentment of these measures led the majority of the community to join the archdeacon, Thoma, in swearing never
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church

    Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church

    • Associated With: Oriental Orthodoxy
    The Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church, also known as the Indian Orthodox Church, is an Autonomous Oriental Orthodox church centred in the Indian state of Kerala. It is one of the churches of India's Saint Thomas Christian community, which traces its origins to the evangelical activity of Thomas the Apostle in the 1st century. The church is locally headed by the autonomous Catholicos and its present primate is Baselios Mar Thoma Paulose II, Catholicos of the East and the Malankara Metropolitan. Historically, the Saint Thomas Christians were united in leadership and liturgy, and were part of the Church of the East centred in Persia. From the 16th century the Portuguese Jesuits attempted to forcefully bring the community fully into the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church. Resentment of these measures led the majority of the community to join the archdeacon, Thomas, in swearing never to submit to the Portuguese in the Coonan Cross Oath in 1653. The part of the church that followed Thomas is known as the Malankara Church. Following the arrival of the Bishop Gregorios Abdul Jaleel of Jerusalem, Archdeacon Thomas forged a relationship with the Syriac Orthodox Church and gradually adopted
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    3 votes
    66
    Polish Orthodox Church

    Polish Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church, commonly known as the Polish Orthodox Church, (Polish: Polski Autokefaliczny Kościół Prawosławny), is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Churches in full communion. The church was established in 1924, to accommodate Orthodox Christians of Polish, Ukrainian and Belarusian descent in the eastern part of the country, when Poland regained its independence after the First World War. The establishment of the church was undertaken after the Treaty of Riga left a large amount of territory previously under the control of the Russian Empire, as part of the Second Polish Republic. Eastern Orthodoxy was widespread in the Belarusian Western Belarus regions and the Ukrainian Volhynia. The loss of ecclesiastical link due to the persecution of the Russian Orthodox Church in the Soviet Union, left the regional clergy in a crisis moment, and in 1924, the Ecumenical Patriarchate took over establishing several autonomous churches on territories of the new states that were formerly wholly or partially part of the Russian Empire (Finland, the Baltic States, and Poland). During the interbellum, however, the Polish authorities imposed severe restrictions on
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    3 votes
    67
    Roman Catholic Diocese of Lake Charles

    Roman Catholic Diocese of Lake Charles

    The Roman Catholic Diocese of Lake Charles (Latin: Dioecesis Lacus Carolini), is a particular church located in southwest Louisiana (USA). It is a fairly new diocese of the Roman Catholic Church, being founded on January 29, 1980. It is suffragan to the Archdiocese of New Orleans. The diocese is administered from the city of Lake Charles. The patron saint of the diocese is St. Peter Claver and the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception serves as the Episcopal see. The Diocese comprises five civil parishes: Allen, Beauregard, Calcasieu, Cameron, and Jefferson Davis. The statue of the Millennium Christ is located in Bilbo Cemetery in Lake Charles. The actual name of the statue is "Jesus Christ Our Citizen of the Centuries" and it stands atop an eight-foot Labrador green granite base. The statue was sculpted by Janie Stine LaCroix, a native of nearby Sulphur and a descendant of John Jacob Ryan Jr., who is regarded as being the 'Father of Lake Charles'; Ryan is buried in the cemetery. The statue is regarded as being a symbol of peace and unity for all citizens and faiths of southwest Louisiana. On 6 March 2007 Pope Benedict XVI named Glen Provost as the new bishop. On 23 April 2007,
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    3 votes
    68
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the District of Columbia

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the District of Columbia

    • Building: Washington D.C. Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of January 1, 2011, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 2,382 members in the District of Columbia. Also located in the district are 3 Congregations (2 wards and 1 branch). A brief history can be found at LDS Newsroom (District of Columbia) or Deseret News 2010 Church Almanac Congregations that meet in the District Other congregations that serve the District of Columbia On November 19, 1974 the Washington D.C. Temple was dedicated by President Spencer W. Kimball. Despite its name, the temple is not located within the District of Columbia; it is located in Kensington, Maryland approximately 3 miles north of the city limits.
    8.00
    3 votes
    69
    Episcopal Church in the United States of America

    Episcopal Church in the United States of America

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Episcopal Church (also officially known as the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America) is a mainline Anglican Christian church found mainly in the United States, as well as in Honduras, Taiwan, Colombia, Ecuador, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, the British Virgin Islands and parts of Europe. The Episcopal Church is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and many other territories where it has a presence (excluding Europe). The Episcopal Church describes itself as being "Protestant, yet Catholic." In 2010, the Episcopal Church had a baptized membership of 2,125,012 both inside and outside the United States. In the U.S., it had a baptized membership of 1,951,907, making it the nation's 14th largest denomination. The Church was organized shortly after the American Revolution when it was forced to separate from the Church of England, as Church of England clergy were required to swear allegiance to the British monarch, who is the Supreme Governor of the Church of England. It became, in the words of the 1990 report of the Archbishop of Canterbury's Group on the Episcopate, "the first Anglican Province outside the British Isles." Now
    6.75
    4 votes
    70
    Old Apostolic Church

    Old Apostolic Church

    The Old Apostolic Church is a Christian religious community, with historical roots in the Catholic Apostolic Church and the New Apostolic Church. The Old Apostolic Church is part of a branch of Christianity called Irvingism, and is separate from Protestantism. The Old Apostolic Church's roots are found in the Catholic Apostolic Church, that was founded in 1832 by Henry Drummond, Edward Irving, and others. After the death of three Catholic Apostolic Apostles in 1855 the apostolate declared that there was no reason to call new apostles. Two callings of substitutes ("Jesus calleth thee Apostolic Messenger. He would use thee Coadjutor for him whom He hath gathered to Himself.") were explained by the apostolate in 1860 as Coadjutors to the remaining apostles. After this event another apostle was called in Germany in 1862 by the prophet Heinrich Geyer. The Apostles did not agree with this calling, and therefore the larger part of the Hamburg congregation who followed their Bishop F.W. Schwartz in this schism were excommunicated. Out of this sprang the Allgemeine Christliche Apostolische Mission (ACAM) in 1863 and the Dutch branch of the Restored Apostolic Mission Church (at first known
    6.75
    4 votes
    71
    Aleph Zadik Aleph

    Aleph Zadik Aleph

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Grand Order of the Aleph Zadik Aleph (AZA) is an international youth-led fraternal organization for Jewish teenagers, founded in 1924 and currently existing as the male wing of BBYO Inc., an independent non-profit organization. AZA's sister organization, for teenage girls, is the B'nai B'rith Girls. The greatest chapter is unofficially recognized as Ometz AZA #2553 AZA was founded in May, 1924 in Omaha, Nebraska by a group of 14 Jewish teenagers between the ages of 15 and 17. It arose as a response of the fact that the Jewish community was, for the most part, not allowed into the Greek fraternities. The letters bore no significance, other than the popularity of Greek-style fraternities at the time, and the teenagers' desire to parallel them with a Hebrew slant. The first chapter, formed in 1923, was Mother Chapter AZA #1, which continues to operate. Abe Babior, the new group's first president, said that it was started "as a social and Zionist youth group." The group's meetings would usually feature speakers on a number of both Judaic and non-Judaic topics. The group held social events, including parties and dances. The group's first advisor, Nathan Mnookin, an accomplished
    9.00
    2 votes
    72

    Chavurah

    • Associated With: Judaism
    A chavurah or havurah (חבורה Hebrew: "fellowship", plural chavurot) is a small group of like-minded Jews who assemble for the purposes of facilitating Shabbat and holiday prayer services, sharing communal experiences such as lifecycle events, and Jewish learning. Chavurot usually provide autonomous alternatives to established Jewish institutions and Jewish denominations. Most chavurot place an emphasis on egalitarianism in the broad sense (of which gender egalitarianism is one piece), depending on participation by the entire community rather than top-down direction by clergy. The first havurah in America was formed in September 1960 in Whittier, California. However, most chavurot in America had their origins in the North American Jewish counter-cultural trends of the late 1960s and early 1970s. During this period, groups of young rabbis, academics, and political activists founded experimental chavurot for prayer and study, in reaction to what they perceived as an over-institutionalized and unspiritual North American Jewish establishment. Initially the main inspiration was the pietistic fellowships of the Pharisees and other ancient Jewish sects. Also, initially some of these
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    2 votes
    73
    Friends of the Israel Defense Forces

    Friends of the Israel Defense Forces

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF) (in Hebrew ארגון ידידי צה״ל בארה״ב) is a government-independent American charity. Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF) was established in 1981 by a group of Holocaust survivors to provide for the wellbeing of the men and women who serve in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) as well as the families of fallen soldiers. Headquartered in New York City, FIDF is a 501c3 not-for-profit organization that operates 14 regional offices in the United States and one office in Panama. FIDF maintains and constructs sports, cultural, recreational, and other such facilities across Israel, from Qiryat Shemona in the Golan Heights down to the far reaches of the Negev near Eilat. Seventeen of these projects have been completed while others are in the planning or construction phase. In addition to these centers, FIDF supports mobile units that serve similar functions for troops unable to use a permanent one. In another program known as "Spirit", FIDF supports weekly R&R for IDF soldiers at AWIS recreation facilities. Beyond these centers, FIDF runs several financial support programs. "IMPACT!" is a program that provides 4-year college, university, or
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    2 votes
    74
    Guild of All Souls

    Guild of All Souls

    The Guild of All Souls is an Anglican devotional society dedicated to prayer for faithful departed Christians. As stated on its website, it is a "devotional society praying for the souls of the Faithful Departed, and teaching the Catholic doctrine of the Communion of Saints." The stated objectives of the Guild are as follows: The Guild of All Souls was founded in March 1873 at St. James’s Church, Hatcham. It was originally called the Guild Burial Society, with Father Arthur Tooth as the first president. The purpose of the Guild Burial Society was: "to provide furniture for Burial according to the use of the Catholic Church so as to set forth the two great doctrines of the Communion of Saints and the Resurrection of the Body; and Intercessory prayer for the Dying and for the repose of the souls of the deceased members and all the faithful departed." The work of the guild soon attracted the attention of other churches in England, and from a small parochial group it increased rapidly in membership throughout England. In Chicago, 1885, an English delegation had a meeting with priests and lay persons of the Episcopal Church to build an American Branch. This was accomplished in 1889. In
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    Russian Orthodox Church

    Russian Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Russian Orthodox Church (ROC; Russian: Русская Православная Церковь, Russkaya Pravoslavnaya Tserkov’) headed by the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: Московский Патриархат, Moskovskiy Patriarkhat), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who constitute an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church under the jurisdiction of the Patriarch of Moscow, in communion with other Eastern Orthodox Churches. The ROC is often said to be the largest of the Eastern Orthodox churches in the world. Including all the autocephalous churches under its supervision, its adherents number over 150 million worldwide — about half of the 300 million estimated adherents of the Eastern Orthodox Church. Among Christian churches, the Russian Orthodox Church is second only to the Roman Catholic Church in terms of numbers of followers. Within Russia the results of a 2007 VCIOM poll indicated that about 75% of the population considered themselves Orthodox Christians. Up to 65% of ethnic Russians and a similar percentage of Belarusians and Ukrainians identify themselves as "Orthodox". According to figures released on February 2, 2010, the Church has 160 dioceses including 30,142
    9.00
    2 votes
    76
    Sovereign Military Order of Malta

    Sovereign Military Order of Malta

    The Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of Saint John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta (Italian: Sovrano Militare Ordine Ospedaliero di San Giovanni di Gerusalemme di Rodi e di Malta), also known as the Sovereign Military Order of Malta (SMOM), Order of Malta or Knights of Malta, is a Roman Catholic lay religious order, traditionally of military, chivalrous, noble nature. It is the world's oldest surviving order of chivalry. The Sovereign Military Order of Malta is headquartered in Rome, and is widely considered a sovereign subject of international law. SMOM is the modern continuation of the original medieval order of Saint John of Jerusalem, known as the Knights Hospitaller, a group founded in Jerusalem about 1050 as an Amalfitan hospital to provide care for poor and sick pilgrims to the Holy Land. After the conquest of Jerusalem in 1099 during the First Crusade, it became a military order under its own charter. Following the loss of Christian held territories of the Holy Land to Muslims, the Order operated from Rhodes (1310–1523), and later from Malta (1530–1798), over which it was sovereign. Although this state came to an end with the ejection of the Order from Malta by
    9.00
    2 votes
    77
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Arizona

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Arizona

    • Building: Mesa Arizona Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of October 2010, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) reported 381,235 members in 794 Congregations in Arizona, with 4 missions and 3 temples. The first presence of Latter-day Saints in Arizona found is the Mormon Battalion. They marched through what is now southern Arizona in 1846 on the way to California as part of the Mexican-American War. They encountered wild cattle bulls and killed several of them in defense. They passed through Tucson (then a town of 400–500 inhabitants) causing an attachment Mexican Forces to flee. They camped at the mouth of the Gila River before entering into California. The next time Latter-day Saints entered the area was in 1858 and 1859, when Jacob Hamblin and his companions camped at Pipe Spring in the northwestern part of present-day Arizona. They did this while journeying to and from their missions among the Moqui (Hopi) Indians east of the Colorado River. During the 1860s and 1870s, LDS parties explored portions of the area searching for possible settlement sites. Also during this period, isolated ranches and small Mormon settlements were established at Short Creek (now Colorado City), Pipe Spring, Beaver Dams (now
    9.00
    2 votes
    78
    International Buddhist Temple

    International Buddhist Temple

    • Associated With: Buddhism
    The International Buddhist Temple (also 觀音寺 in Chinese; Guan Yin Sì in pinyin; Guan Yin Temple) is located in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada. It is a Chinese Buddhist temple run by the International Buddhist Society. While the Society officially practices Mahayana Buddhism, the temple is open to Theravada Buddhist affiliates and visitors, as well as visitors of all religious and cultural backgrounds. In 1979, two Buddhists from Hong Kong donated land and funds to the cause of building an authentic Chinese Buddhist temple in North America. The International Buddhist Society was established in 1981 for this cause by the Venerable Guan Cheng and five other individuals. The International Buddhist Temple officially opened to the public after two years, when its Main Hall was completed. Thousands of people, including Richmond's mayor and Member of Parliament, attended the inauguration ceremony in 1986. The International Buddhist Society is a non-profit organization and a registered Canadian charity. It sponsors charitable programs both in Canada and abroad. Some of the Society's efforts include: The Society also hosts free events for the community, such as Senior's Day celebrations
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Jews for Jesus

    Jews for Jesus

    • Associated With: Evangelicalism
    Jews for Jesus is a conservative, Christian evangelical organization that focuses on the conversion of Jews to Christianity. Its members consider themselves to be Jews – either as defined by Jewish law, or as according to the view of Jews for Jesus. Jews for Jesus defines "Jewish" in terms of parentage and as a birthright, regardless of religious belief. The identification of Jews for Jesus as a Jewish organization is rejected by Jewish religious denominations and secular Jewish groups due to the Christian beliefs of its members. The group's evangelical activities have garnered mixed reactions from other Christian individuals and organizations, largely divided between liberal and conservative lines. Founded in 1973, Jews for Jesus employs more than 200 people, estimates its adherents at 30,000 to 125,000 worldwide and takes in about $20 million a year in donations. The organization was founded by Moishe Rosen an ordained Baptist minister (who was born Jewish and converted to Christianity at the age of 17) and Jhan Moskowitz an ordained Christian and Missionary Alliance minister and son of a holocaust survivor. Rosen was the head of the San Francisco arm of the American Board of
    7.67
    3 votes
    80

    Synagogue Council of America

    The Synagogue Council of America was an organization of American Jewish synagogue associations, founded in 1926, including : The organization dissolved in 1994, facing financial difficulties and fractiousness among its members, the organization effectively collapsed after a proposal to relocate the council's offices from Manhattan to White Plains, New York, where it would have been housed in a Reform congregation, was rejected by Orthodox members of the organization. Rabbi Haskel Lookstein of the Orthodox Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun served as the organization's final president lamented the lack of "people who are really interested in maintaining the organization." The records of the organization are stored with the Center for Jewish History (CJH) in New York, which also maintains a history of the organization. The North American Boards of Rabbis was formed in 1999, as part of an effort at interdenominational cohesiveness in the Jewish community. The organization would be a parent body for boards of rabbis in individual communities, with its first president being Orthodox Rabbi Marc Schneier, who was then serving as president of the New York Board of Rabbis.
    7.67
    3 votes
    81

    Anglican Church of Canada

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Anglican Church of Canada (ACC or ACoC) is the Province of the Anglican Communion in Canada. The official French name is l'Église Anglicane du Canada. In 2001, the Anglican Church counted 641,845 members on parish rolls. The 2001 Canadian Census counted 2,035,500 self-identified Anglicans (6.9 percent of the total Canadian population), making the Anglican Church the third largest Canadian church after the Roman Catholic Church and the United Church of Canada. According to the census, 48 percent of self-identified Anglicans live in Ontario. Until 1955, the Anglican Church of Canada was known as the Church of England in the Dominion of Canada or simply the Church of England in Canada. In 1977, the church's General Synod adopted l'Église Episcopale du Canada as its French-language name. This name was replaced with the current one, l'Église Anglicane du Canada, in 1989; however, the former name is still used in some places along with the new one. A matter of some confusion for Anglicans elsewhere in the world is that while the Anglican Church of Canada is a province of the Anglican Communion, the Ecclesiastical Province of Canada is merely one of four such ecclesiastical provinces
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Jewish Theological Seminary of America

    Jewish Theological Seminary of America

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS or JTSA) is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism, and a major center for academic scholarship in Jewish studies. JTS operates five schools: Albert A. List College of Jewish Studies (which is affiliated with Columbia University and offers joint/double bachelors degree programs with both Columbia and Barnard College); The Graduate School; the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education; the H. L. Miller Cantorial School and College of Jewish Music; and The Rabbinical School. It also operates a number of research and training institutes. Rabbi Zecharias Frankel (1801–1875) at one time was in the traditional wing of the nascent Reform Judaism movement. After the second Reform rabbinic conference (1845, Frankfurt, Germany) he resigned after coming to believe that their positions were excessively radical. In 1854 he became the head of a new rabbinical school, the Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau. In his magnum opus Darkhei HaMishnah (Ways of the Mishnah), Frankel amassed scholarly support which showed that Jewish law was not static, but rather had always developed in response to changing
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    New Profile

    New Profile

    • Associated With: Judaism
    New Profile (פרופיל חדש) is a movement for transforming Israeli society into a "civilian" one ("חברה אזרחית" – a term recently coined by parts of the Israeli left wing to highlight their view of the present society as "recruited" or "militarized"). It is a voluntary organization that acts against the compulsory law of military enlistment and supports people who refuse to enlist in the Israel Defense Forces. New Profile is a feminist organization and most of its activists are women. In September 2008, Israeli Attorney General, Menachem Mazuz, ordered the police to open a criminal investigation against New Profile because of allegations of "incitement to draft dodging" and helping people secure exemptions fraudulently. On April 26, 2009, 8 New Profile activists were detained and the organization's computers were confiscated.
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Orthodox Judaism

    Orthodox Judaism

    Orthodox Judaism is the approach to religious Judaism which adheres to the interpretation and application of the laws and ethics of the Torah as legislated in the Talmudic texts by the Sanhedrin ("Oral Torah") and subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. Orthodox Jews are also called "observant Jews"; Orthodoxy is known also as "Torah Judaism" or "traditional Judaism". Orthodox Judaism generally refers to Modern Orthodox Judaism and Haredi Judaism but can actually include a wide range of beliefs. As of 2001, approximately 13 percent of American Jews and 25 percent of Israeli Jews were Orthodox. Among American synagogue members, 27 percent attended Orthodox synagogues. Orthodoxy is not a single movement or school of thought. There is no single rabbinic body to which all rabbis are expected to belong, or any one organization representing member congregations. In the United States, there are numerous Orthodox congregational organizations, such as Agudath Israel, the Orthodox Union, and the National Council of Young Israel; none of which can claim to represent a majority of all Orthodox congregations. The exact forms of
    10.00
    1 votes
    85

    Relief Society

    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    The Relief Society (RS) is a philanthropic and educational women's organization and an official auxiliary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). It was founded in 1842 in Nauvoo, Illinois, USA and has approximately 6 million members in over 170 countries and territories. The Relief Society is often referred to by the church and others as "one of the oldest and largest women's organizations in the world." The motto of the Relief Society, taken from 1 Corinthians 13:8, is "Charity never faileth". The official purpose of Relief Society is to "prepare women for the blessings of eternal life by helping them increase their faith and personal righteousness, strengthen families and homes, and help those in need. Relief Society accomplishes these purposes through Sunday gospel instruction, other Relief Society meetings, visiting teaching, and welfare and compassionate service." In the spring of 1842 Sarah Granger Kimball and her seamstress, Margaret A. Cook, discussed combining their efforts to sew clothing for workers constructing the Latter Day Saints' Nauvoo Temple. They determined to invite their neighbors to assist by creating a Ladies' Society. Kimball asked
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Roman Catholic Church

    Roman Catholic Church

    • Associated With: Catholicism
    The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the world's largest Christian church, with more than one billion members worldwide. It is among the oldest institutions in the world and has played a prominent role in the history of Western civilisation. The Catholic hierarchy is led by the Pope and includes cardinals, patriarchs and diocesan bishops. The Church teaches that it is the one true Church founded by Jesus Christ, that its bishops are the successors of Christ's apostles and that the Pope is the sole successor to Saint Peter who has apostolic primacy. Catholic doctrine maintains that the Church is infallible when it dogmatically teaches a doctrine of faith or morals. There are a variety of doctrinal and theological emphases within the Catholic Church, including the Eastern Catholic Churches and religious communities such as the Jesuits, the Franciscans and the Dominicans. The Catholic Church is Trinitarian and defines its mission as spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ, administering the sacraments and exercising charity. Catholic worship is highly liturgical, focusing on the Mass or Divine Liturgy during which the sacrament of the Eucharist is celebrated.
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Texas

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Texas

    • Building: Dallas Texas Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of year-end 2010, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) reported 296,141 members, 49 stakes, 3 districts, 557 Congregations (413 wards and 105 branches), 8 missions, and 4 temples in Texas. Due to increased persecution around Nauvoo, Joseph Smith realized that he would have to relocate the Church outside the borders of the United States. The Republic of Texas was considered by Smith a place where the Church members would be able to peacefully practice their religion. The prophet began to negotiate with Sam Houston, president of the Texas Republic, for the southern and western portions of Texas for the future Latter-day Saint nation. Joseph Smith sent Lucien Woodworth to Austin, Texas to meet with Houston. Woodworth returned to Nauvoo and reported the progress he had made in May. Reports indicated plans for purchasing large tracts of land. A commission composed of Woodworth, George Miller and Almon W. Babbitt was organized to lead the final negotiations. Joseph Smith asked that Lyman Wight and Miller to prepare to lead a group of settlers to Texas with assumption that negotiations would be successful. These negotiations ended with the death of Joseph Smith
    6.50
    4 votes
    88

    Apostolic Johannite Church

    • Associated With: Gnosticism
    • Is Member Of: North American College of Gnostic Bishops
    The Apostolic Johannite Church is a Gnostic Christian Church which claims valid Apostolic Succession from various lineages including Catholic, Old Catholic and Orthodox bishops. The AJC is one of the largest extant Gnostic jurisdictions, having Parishes, Narthexes or representatives in six countries (Canada, USA, Spain, Germany, Mexico and Australia.) It is among the most active Gnostic Churches in North America, and is a founding member of the North American College of Gnostic Bishops. It also maintains an active seminary program, the St. Raphael the Archangel Theological Seminary. The work of the AJC is a continuation of that of the 1804 Johannite Church of Bernard Raymond Fabré-Palaprat, but is more in keeping with Doinel's Gnostic Restoration of 1890, which became part of the tradition of Apostolic Succession in 1913. As an independent jurisdiction employing traditional sacraments, it can be considered part of the Independent Sacramental Movement. The AJC understands Apostolic Succession as being derived from the act of consecration by means of the laying on of hands from bishop to bishop going back to the Apostles themselves, to Jesus, and thereby to John the Baptist.
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Cistercians

    Cistercians

    The Order of Cistercians ( /sɪˈstɜrʃⁱən/; OCist. Latin: Ordo Cisterciensis or, alternatively, OCSO for the Trappists (Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance)) is a Roman Catholic religious order of enclosed monks and nuns. They are sometimes also called the Bernardines or the White Monks, in reference to the colour of the habit, over which a black scapular is worn. The emphasis of Cistercian life is on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales. The term Cistercian (French Cistercien), derives from Cistercium, the Latin name for the village of Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France. It was in this village that a group of Benedictine monks from the monastery of Molesme founded Cîteaux Abbey in 1098, with the goal of following more closely the Rule of Saint Benedict. The best known of them were Robert of Molesme, Alberic of Citeaux and the English monk Stephen Harding, who were the first three abbots. Bernard of Clairvaux entered the monastery in the early 1110s with 30 companions and helped the rapid proliferation of the order. By the end of the 12th century, the order had
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Alpha Epsilon Pi

    Alpha Epsilon Pi

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi), the global Jewish college fraternity, has 166 active chapters in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, and Israel with a membership of over 9,000 undergraduates. Alpha Epsilon Pi is a Jewish fraternity, though non-discriminatory and open to all who are willing to espouse its purpose and values. AEPi was founded in 1913 under the Washington Square Arch at New York University (NYU) by Charles C. Moskowitz and 10 other Jewish men: David K. Schafer, Isador M. Glazer, Herman L. Kraus, Arthur E. Leopold, Benjamin M. Meyer, Arthur M. Lipkint, Charles J. Pintel, Maurice Plager, Hyman Shulman, and Emil J. Lustgarten. These men are known as the "Immortal 11." Their first pledge was Samuel L. Epstein. Charles C. Moskowitz had just transferred to New York University's School of Commerce from the City College of New York. Several fraternities at the School of Commerce expressed interest in him and one gave him a bid. The name of that fraternity is unknown. When Charles asked if his close Jewish friends could join as well, he was told that the invitation was for him alone. At this point, the group of 11 men began meeting regularly in a German
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Bridgettines

    Bridgettines

    The Bridgettine or Birgittine Order (formally the Order of the Most Holy Savior, abbrevated as O.Ss.S.) is a monastic religious order of Augustinian nuns, Religious Sisters and monks founded by Saint Birgitta (Saint Bridget) of Sweden in approximately 1350, and approved by Pope Urban V in 1370. There are today several different branches of Bridgettines. The original Bridgettine Order was open to both men and women, and was dedicated to devotion to the Passion of Jesus Christ. It was a ”double order” each monastery having attached to it a small community of monks to act as chaplains, but under the government of the abbess. St Bridget's Rule stipulated: the number of choir nuns shall not exceed sixty, with four lay sisters; the priests shall be thirteen, according to the number of the thirteen apostles, of whom Paul the thirteenth was not the least in toil; then there must be four deacons, who also may be priests if they will, and they are the figure of the four principal Doctors, Ambrose, Augustine, Gregory and Jerome, then eight lay brothers, who with their labors shall minister necessaries to the clerics, therefore counting three-score sisters, thirteen priests, four deacons, and
    7.33
    3 votes
    92

    Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago

    • Is Member Of: Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago
    Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago is the largest in a nationwide network of faith-based social service providers that form Catholic Charities. Together they form the largest private network of social service providers in the United States. More than 1,400 agencies, institutions, and organizations make up the Catholic Charities network, which provides services to nearly 10 million people in need each year regardless of religious, social, or economic backgrounds. The network also seeks to advocate for issues of importance to those in need. Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago began in 1917, when a group of Catholic businessmen petitioned Cardinal Mundelein to create a Catholic charity to centralize resources in order to relieve the burden of Catholic parishes that were struggling to meet the needs of the poor in their communities. Their vision was a central fundraising mechanism for archdiocesan charities, which would solicit donations and distribute funds. The organization was chartered in January 1918, and Cardinal Mundelein addressed its 200 board members at its first annual meeting in April of the following year, reporting on the success of the agency
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Conservative Judaism

    Conservative Judaism

    • Associated With: Committee on Jewish Law and Standards
    Conservative Judaism (also known as Masorti Judaism outside of the United States and Canada) is a modern stream of Judaism that arose out of intellectual currents in Germany in the mid-19th century and took institutional form in the United States in the early 1900s. Conservative Judaism has its roots in the school of thought known as Positive-Historical Judaism, developed in 1850s Germany as a reaction to the more liberal religious positions taken by Reform Judaism. The term conservative was meant to signify that Jews should attempt to conserve Jewish tradition, rather than reform or abandon it, and does not imply the movement's adherents are politically conservative. Because of this potential for confusion, a number of Conservative Rabbis have proposed renaming the movement, and outside of the United States and Canada, in many countries including Israel and the UK, it is today known as Masorti Judaism (Hebrew for "Traditional"). In the United States and Canada, the term Conservative, as applied, does not always indicate that a congregation is affliliated with the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, the movement's central institution and the one to which the term, without
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Jewish political movements

    Jewish political movements

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Jewish political movements refer to the organized efforts of Jews to build their own political parties or otherwise represent their interest in politics outside of the Jewish community. From the time of the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans to the foundation of Israel the Jewish people had no territory, and, until the 19th century they by-and-large were also denied equal rights in the countries in which they lived. Thus, until the 19th century effort for the emancipation of the Jews, almost all Jewish political struggles were internal, and dealt primarily with either religious issues or issues of a particular Jewish community. (See Judaism and politics.) Since Jews were excluded as outsiders throughout Europe, they were mostly shut out of politics or any sort of participation in the wider political and social sphere of the nations in which they were involved until the Enlightenment, and its Jewish counterpart, Haskalah, made popular movements possible. As long as the Jews lived in segregated communities, and as long as all avenues of social intercourse with their gentile neighbors were closed to them, the rabbi was the most influential member of the Jewish community. In
    7.33
    3 votes
    95

    National Association of Evangelicals

    • Associated With: Christian and Missionary Alliance
    The National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) is a fellowship of member denominations, churches, organizations, and individuals. Its goal is to honor God by connecting and representing evangelicals in the United States. Today it works in four main areas: Church & Faith Partners, Government Relations, Chaplains Commission, and World Relief. The NAE is a member of the World Evangelical Alliance (WEA). The mission of the National Association of Evangelicals is to honor God by connecting and representing evangelical Christians. The National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) was formed by a group of 147 people who met in St. Louis, Missouri on April 7–9, 1942. The fundamentalist/modernist controversy and the related isolation of various evangelical denominations and leaders provided the impetus for developing such an organization. Early leaders in the movement were Ralph T. Davis, Will Houghton, Harold Ockenga, and J. Elwin Wright. Houghton called for a meeting in Chicago, Illinois in 1941. A committee was formed with Wright as chairman, and a national conference for United Action Among Evangelicals was called to meet in April 1942. Harold Ockenga was appointed the first president
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Syriac Orthodox Church

    Syriac Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Oriental Orthodoxy
    The Syriac Orthodox Church; (Syriac: ܥܕܬܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܬܐ ܬܪܝܨܬ ܫܘܒܚܐ, ʿīto suryoyto trīṣaṯ šubḥo) is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Eastern Mediterranean, with members spread throughout the world. The Syriac Orthodox Church claims to derive its origin from one of the first Christian communities, established in Antioch by the Apostle St. Peter. It employs the oldest surviving liturgy in Christianity, the Liturgy of St. James the Apostle, and uses Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic spoken by Jesus Christ and his Apostles, as its official and liturgical language. The church is led by the Syriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch. The Syriac Orthodox Church derives its origin from one of the first Christian communities, established in Antioch by the Apostle St. Peter. It is one of the two autocephalous which claim the title of the Patriarch of Antioch. The current head of the Syriac Orthodox Church is the Patriarch Moran Mor Ignatius Zakka I Iwas, who resides in Damascus, the capital of Syria. The Church has about 26 archdioceses and 11 patriarchal vicarates. Patriarch Zakka was enthroned head of the church on 14 September 1980, on the feast of the Cross. Syriac Orthodox faithful
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Church of Ireland

    Church of Ireland

    The Church of Ireland is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion. The church is organised on an all-Ireland basis and is the second largest religious denomination on the island after the Roman Catholic Church. Like other Anglican churches, it has retained elements of pre-Reformation practice, notably its Episcopal polity, while rejecting papal authority. Nevertheless, in theological and liturgical matters, it incorporates many reforms of the Reformation, in particular the English Reformation. In accommodating both influences, the church formally identifies as both Catholic and Reformed. Within the church, divisions exist between those members whose subculture is more Catholic-leaning and those members whose subculture is more Protestant-leaning. For particular historical and cultural reasons, the Church of Ireland is generally identified as a Protestant church. The Church of Ireland is the second largest and fastest growing Christian community in Ireland. When the church in England broke communion with the Roman Catholic Church, all but two of the bishops of the Church in Ireland followed the Church of England, although almost no other clergy or laity did so. The church
    5.40
    5 votes
    99
    Chavagnes International College

    Chavagnes International College

    • Associated With: Catholicism
    • Is Member Of: Roman Catholic Church
    Chavagnes International College is a Catholic school for boys in Chavagnes-en-Paillers, France. Founded in 1802 by Louis-Marie Baudouin the school was re-fashioned an "international college" by Ferdi McDermott in 2002. It teaches in English, and prepares pupils for British GCSEs and A-levels. Chavagnes en Paillers has a long history of association with England, and with a general attitude of welcoming outsiders. The motto on the official arms of the village comes from the 133rd Psalm (Ecce Quam Bonum): 'Habitare fratres in unum' (Behold how good it is brethren to dwell together in unity.) The land on which the College is built, formerly the site of a Roman villa, was given to a community of Benedictine monks in the thirteenth century by the Anglo-French family, Harpedan de Belleville, who then ruled the area. The monastery built at that time was dedicated to St Anthony of Egypt (also called St Anthony the Great), the founder of monasticism. In the years that followed, Chavagnes saw many changes and upheavals. In the nineteenth century, its walls housed the first junior seminary in France after the Revolution, founded by the Venerable Louis-Marie Baudouin in 1802. Placed under the
    7.00
    3 votes
    100

    Cistercian Order of the Holy Cross

    The Cistercian Order of the Holy Cross (abbreviated OCCO) is a Christian monastic organization that bases itself on the Rule of Saint Benedict. Headquartered in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA it has members in several U.S. states. The order considers itself to be part of the Catholic tradition but is independent of both the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101

    Cistercian Sisters

    Cistercian nuns are female members of the Cistercian Order, a religious order belonging to the Roman Catholic branch of the Catholic Church. The first Cistercian monastery for women, Le Tart Abbey, was established at Tart-l'Abbaye in the Diocese of Langres (now Dijon), in the year 1125, by nuns from the Benedictine monastery of Juilly, and with the co-operation of Saint Stephen Harding, abbot of Cîteaux. At Juilly, a dependence of Molesme Abbey, Humbeline, the sister of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, lived and died. The Cistercian nuns of Le Tart founded successively Ferraque (1140) in the Diocese of Noyon, Blandecques (1153) in the Diocese of St-Omer, and Montreuil-les-Dames (1164) near Laon. In Spain the first Cistercian monastery of women was that of Tulebras (1134) in the Kingdom of Navarre. Then came Santa María la Real de las Huelgas (Valladolid) (1140), Espírito Santo Olmedo (1142), Villabona, or San Miguel de las Dueñas (1155), Perales (1160), Gradefes (1168), Cañas (1169) and others. The most celebrated was Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas near Burgos, founded in 1187 by Alfonso VIII of Castile. The observance was established there by Cistercian nuns who came from Tulebras,
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Hinduism

    Hinduism

    Hinduism is the predominant religion of the Indian subcontinent, and one of its indigenous religions. Hinduism includes Shaivism, Vaishnavism and Śrauta among numerous other traditions. It also includes historical groups, for example the Kapalikas. Among other practices and philosophies, Hinduism includes a wide spectrum of laws and prescriptions of "daily morality" based on karma, dharma, and societal norms. Hinduism is a conglomeration of distinct intellectual or philosophical points of view, rather than a rigid common set of beliefs. Hinduism is formed of diverse traditions and has no single founder. Among its direct roots is the historical Vedic religion of Iron Age India and, as such, Hinduism is often called the "oldest living religion" or the "oldest living major religion" in the world. One orthodox classification of Hindu texts is to divide into Śruti ("revealed") and Smriti ("remembered") texts. These texts discuss theology, philosophy, mythology, rituals and temple building among other topics. Major scriptures include the Vedas, Upanishads, Purāṇas, Mahābhārata, Rāmāyaṇa, Bhagavad Gītā and Āgamas. Hinduism, with about one billion followers, is the world's third largest
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Soka Gakkai International

    Soka Gakkai International

    Sōka Gakkai (創価学会, lit., "Value-Creation Society") and/or Sōka Gakkai International (SGI) is a lay Buddhist movement linking more than 12 million people around the world. Sōka gakkai members integrate their Buddhist practice into their daily lives, following the Lotus Sutra based teachings of Nichiren, a 13th-century Japanese Buddhist priest. It is a lay Buddhist movement within the school of Nichiren Buddhism and is being regarded as one of the largest Japanese new religions. Founded by educator Tsunesaburō Makiguchi in 1930, the organization was suppressed during World War II for its opposition to government-supported State Shintō, which should not be equated to Shintō. Makiguchi, Jōsei Toda, and other top Sōka Gakkai leaders were arrested and jailed in 1943 and charged as "thought criminals". In November 1944, Makiguchi died in prison of malnutrition at the age of 73. His companion Jōsei Toda was released in July 1945, and took responsibility for the organisation. In the following years he rebuilt the Sōka Gakkai membership from less than 3,000 families in 1951 to more than 750,000 before his death in 1958. The Sōka Gakkai International (SGI) currently consists of 84 constituent
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Idaho

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Idaho

    • Building: Idaho Falls Idaho Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of January 1, 2011, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 414,182 members in 121 stakes, 1,077 Congregations (979 wards and 98 branches), 2 missions, and 4 temples in Idaho, with a fifth announced. It also is home to Brigham Young University–Idaho. Idaho has the third most Mormons of any U.S. state (after Utah and California), and the second-highest percentage of Mormons (after Utah). Mormonism is strongest in Eastern Idaho. A brief history can be found at LDS Newsroom (Idaho) or Deseret News 2010 Church Almanac (Idaho) Idaho currently has 4 temples in operation. On April 2, 2011, the Meridian Idaho Temple was announced Latter-day Saints have had a significant role in establishing and settling communities within the "Mormon Corridor", including the following in Idaho:
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Oklahoma

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Oklahoma

    • Building: Oklahoma City Oklahoma Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of year-end 2007, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 40,683 members, 7 stakes, 82 Congregations (57 wards and 25 branches), 2 missions, and 1 temple in Oklahoma. In the late 1840s, George Miller, a former bishop who delayed going to the West, traveled from Winter Quarters to visit his son in Texas. He and two other members with him, Joseph Kilting and Richard Hewitt, found construction work available in the Cherokee Nation. They arrived in Tahlequah on July 9, 1847, and began to build houses. They also began to teach others about the Mormon faith, but antagonism forced Miller to leave in December. Hewitt and Kilting remained to work. In 1855, Orson Spencer and James McGaw visited the Indian Territory from St. Louis, Mo., and on April 8, five more missionaries were sent from Salt Lake City, and four from St. Louis. The Indian Territory Mission was created and placed under the leadership of Miller on June 26, 1855. The missionaries met and reconverted followers of Lyman Wight. One of these was Jacob Croft who had met missionaries earlier and started for Utah. After hearing misconceptions about conditions there, his party settled in Indian Territory and built
    7.00
    3 votes
    106

    Central Conference of American Rabbis

    • Associated With: Reform Judaism
    The Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR), founded in 1889 by Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise, is the principal organization of Reform rabbis in the United States and Canada, the CCAR is the largest and oldest rabbinical organization in the world. It primarily consists of rabbis educated at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, located in Cincinnati, Ohio, New York City, Los Angeles, and Jerusalem. The CCAR also offers membership to those who have graduated in Europe from the Leo Baeck College in London (United Kingdom) and the Abraham Geiger College at the University of Potsdam (Germany), and others who joined the Reform movement after being ordained. Most of the last group graduated from either the Conservative Jewish Theological Seminary or the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College. The CCAR issues responsa, resolutions, and platforms, but in keeping with the principles of Reform Judaism, their positions are non-binding on individual rabbis or congregations. It is also the publisher of CCAR Journal, a journal of Reform Judaism published quarterly. The group also runs the CCAR Press, a large publishing house that produces Reform siddurim, machzorim, and haggadot with a
    6.00
    4 votes
    107
    Jews in the woods

    Jews in the woods

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Jews in the Woods (JITW or JitW) also referred to as Fruity Jews or Fruity Jews in the Woods is a privately organized Jewish youth group. It has hosted a number of Shabbaton meetings whereby young Jews gather to observe the Shabbat (the Jewish Sabbath) in a formalized manner. The group began in New England in 1997 and held its most recent event in Rhode Island in 2012. The group was founded by two friends, Dan Smokler and Dan Zimmerman who sought to create a Jewish community that evoked their Hassidic teacher Josh Lauffer's shabbat gatherings. Zimmerman has also cited the famous gatherings of the sainted Rebbe of Szebreszhin as an inspiration for the gathering. JITW has come to be known for its serene, wooded locations, intense praying and singing, and the musical, lyrical and terpsichorean geniuses who frequent its gatherings. It has been described as both neo-Hasidic and post-denominational. The original gathering in 1997 was relatively small, consisting of friends that the three founders had made at their universities, and on two Israel summer programs: Nesiya, and the Bronfman Youth Fellowship in Israel. The following year there were over 100 attendees from the North East and
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Unification Church

    Unification Church

    The Holy Spirit Association for the Unification of World Christianity is a new religious movement founded in South Korea in 1954 by the late Sun Myung Moon. It is more commonly known as the Unification Church. Since its inception, the church has expanded to most nations of the world, with an uncertain number of members. Unification Church beliefs are based on the Bible and are explained in the church's textbook, Divine Principle. The Blessing ceremony of the Unification Church, a wedding or marriage rededication ceremony, is a church practice which has attracted wide public attention. The Unification Church has engaged in interfaith activities with other religions, including mainstream Christianity and Islam, despite theological differences. The Unification Church has sponsored many organizations and projects over the years; including businesses, news media, projects in education and the arts, and political and social activism. It has a large 'megachurch' in Seoul, Korea and Peace Island in Liberia, which is the site of the New Hope Academy. The church was led by Moon until his death on September 3, 2012, at which time, it was reported that his wife Hak Ja Han and their sons Hyung
    6.00
    4 votes
    109
    AmrKhaled.net

    AmrKhaled.net

    Founder and chairman of the board of trustees of Right Start Foundation International, based in UK. Head of the Programs Development Dept., ART, Arab Radio & Television. Presenting and Preparing, Sunaa al-Hayah, Program (Life Makers). Owner of the website (www.AmrKhaled.net), which is classified as the most famous Arabic website, the first individual website worldwide and ranked as number 388 among all other websites all over the world. More than 2 millions visitors monthly.
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples

    Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples

    The Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples (Congregatio pro Gentium Evangelizatione) in Rome is the congregation of the Roman Curia responsible for missionary work and related activities. It is perhaps better known by its former title, the Sacred Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith (Sacra Congregatio de Propaganda Fide). It was founded by Pope Gregory XV in 1622 as the Congregation of Propaganda Fide, an organization to arrange missionary work on behalf of the various religious institutions and in 1627, Pope Urban VIII established a training college for missionaries. It was renamed by Pope John Paul II in 1982 and its mission continues unbroken. The early Congregation was established in the Palazzo Ferratini, donated by Juan Bautista Vives, to the south of the Piazza di Spagna. Two of the foremost artistic figures of Baroque Rome were involved in the development of the architectural complex; the sculptor and architect Gianlorenzo Bernini and the architect Francesco Borromini. The current Prefect of the Congregation is Cardinal Fernando Filoni. The current Secretary is Archbishop Savio Hon Tai-Fai from Hong Kong. The Under-Secretary is Father Tadeusz Wojda, S.A.C..
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Íslenska Ásatrúarfélagið

    Íslenska Ásatrúarfélagið

    • Associated With: Germanic neopaganism
    The Ásatrúarfélagið (English: Ásatrú Association) is an Icelandic Germanic Neopagan, Ásatrú, religious organization with the purpose of promoting and continuing a revived form of Norse paganism. It was founded on the First Day of Summer, 1972, and granted recognition as a registered religious organization in 1973, allowing it to conduct legally binding ceremonies and collect a share of the church tax. The organization was led by farmer and poet Sveinbjörn Beinteinsson from 1972 until his death in 1993. During most of this period membership did not exceed 100 people and after the initial enthusiasm faded, there was little activity. The time of the next high priest, Jörmundur Ingi Hansen (1994–2002), saw considerable growth and activity, including the design of a pagan burial ground. These trends have continued under the present high priest, musician Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson (2003-), and as of 2012 the organization has 1951 registered members, 31,5% of whom are women. Ásatrúarfélagið does not have a fixed religious dogma or theology but the high priests have tended towards a pantheistic worldview. The central ritual is the communal blót feast but the priests (goðar) also conduct
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    112
    Ukrainian Orthodox Church

    Ukrainian Orthodox Church

    The Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Ukrainian: Українська Православна Церква; Russian: Украинская Православная Церковь) is an autonomous Church of Eastern Orthodoxy in Ukraine, under the ecclesiastic jurisdiction of the Moscow Patriarchate. There are two other major Orthodox Churches in Ukraine, while it is the only one whose canonical status is recognised by the whole Eastern Orthodox communion, Moscow Patriarchate only. Before taking the formal title of Ukrainian Orthodox Church it was the Ukrainian exarchate of the Russian Orthodox Church and it received autonomy on October 27, 1990. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church considers itself the descendant of the Orthodox Church of Kiev and all Rus' in Ukraine, claiming a direct lineage to the original Baptism of Rus' by St. Vladimir (Volodymyr) in 988. The Metropolitan Volodymyr (Viktor Sabodan) was enthroned in 1992 as the head of the UOC under the title Metropolitan of Kiev and all Ukraine, with the official residency in the Kiev Pechersk Lavra, which also houses all of the Church's administration. The church is currently the only Ukrainian church to have full canonical standing in Eastern Orthodoxy, and operates in full communion with the
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Charles L. Cochran

    Charles L. Cochran

    • Associated With: Methodist
    • Is Member Of: Spring Hill United Methodist Church
    Captain Charles L. Cochran was part of the flight crew on TWA flight 128 was killed in the crash on November 20, 1967.
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople

    Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople (Greek: Οἰκουμενικὸν Πατριαρχεῖον Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, IPA: [ikumenikˈon patriarˈxion konstantinuˈpoleos]; Turkish: Rum Ortodoks Patrikhanesi, "Greek Orthodox Patriarchate"), part of the wider Orthodox Church, is one of the fourteen autocephalous churches within the communion of Orthodox Christianity. It is headed by the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, currently Bartholomew I. Because of its location at the former capital of the Byzantine Empire and its role as the Mother Church of most modern Orthodox churches, the Ecumenical Patriarchate has enjoyed the status of "Primus inter pares (first among equals)" among the world's Eastern Orthodox prelates. Unlike the Pope, he does not exercise control over the individual autocephalous churches, which are fully autonomous. He is, however, widely regarded as the representative and spiritual leader of the world's 300 million Orthodox Christians, although this role has been disputed by the Moscow Patriarchate, which represents the numerically largest Orthodox community (a disputable position, as the majority of its flock is made up of parishes in Ukraine). Christianity in Byzantium existed
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    1 votes
    115
    Edith and Carl Marks Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst

    Edith and Carl Marks Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Edith and Carl Marks Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst, known as "the J", was incorporated in 1927 and has helped over one million Jews in the Bensonhurst section of New York City's borough of Brooklyn. It initially served as a community center for Eastern European Jewish immigrants and their children. As the complexion of the Jewish community in Bensonhurst changed, its community center changed in accord. During the 1940s and 1950s, a large influx of Syrian Jews immigrated to the area. It was during this period that Sandy Koufax, the son of Syrian Jewish immigrants, played on the basketball courts of "the J". In the 1980s, a third wave of immigrants, this time from the former Soviet Union, once again shifted the focus of the community center to that of a settlement house. Former members include:
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    1 votes
    116
    HaEdah HaCharedis

    HaEdah HaCharedis

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Edah HaChareidis, (lit. "Haredi Community"), also known as the Edah for short and popularly as the Badatz, is a prominent Orthodox Jewish communal organization based in Jerusalem, Israel. It represents a large section of the Ashkenazi Haredi community and provides facilities such as kashrus supervision, mikvas, an eruv and a rabbinical court. The Edah HaChareidis is viewed as a continuation of the former leaders of the Yishuv haYashan, and is well known for being strongly opposed to Zionism, which it condemns as heretical and opposed to Judaism. There is also an "Edah HaChareidit HaSefaradit" representing part of Sephardi Haredi Jewry. While the Sephardi Edah holds similar viewpoints to the Ashkenazi Edah regarding Zionism and the State of Israel, they are not officially affiliated with each other.-- The Edah was founded by Rabbi Yosef Chaim Sonnenfeld (1848–1932) and Rabbi Yitzchok Yerucham Diskin (son of Rabbi Yehoshua Leib Diskin (1818–1898), Rabbi of Brisk, Lithuania) in 1919, prior to the establishment of the Chief Rabbinate by the Zionist movement under British auspices. Rabbi Sonnenfeld was named the first Av Beis Din of the Edah Chareidis, a position he held until his
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    117

    Kachin Church

    Kachin Church is a church centred in Kachin State of Myanmar. It is also present in China and India and is predominantly Baptist. The Kachin Church is growing.
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    118
    Sinai Hospital

    Sinai Hospital

    • Associated With: Judaism
    LifeBridge Health is a Baltimore area corporation operating several medical institutions. These most notably include Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Northwest Hospital (formerly Baltimore County General Hospital), and various nursing homes and medical office complexes. Sinai Hospital is a Baltimore, Maryland hospital originally founded in 1866 as the Hebrew Hospital and Asylum. It is now a Jewish-sponsored ANCC Magnet and teaching hospital that provides care for patients in the greater Baltimore City, Baltimore County and surrounding communities. It is notable as the birthplace of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or ICD, invented by the team of Dr. Michel Mirowski, Dr. Morton Mower, M. Stephen Heilman, and Alois Langer who are all in the National Inventors Hall of Fame for their achievement. Since 1998, Sinai Hospital has been a part of the LifeBridge Health system, which also runs Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Nursing Home (which is across the street from Sinai), Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, several medical office buildings in the Baltimore area, and a health and fitness club called LifeBridge Health & Fitness,
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    1 votes
    119
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Tennessee

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Tennessee

    • Building: Memphis Tennessee Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of January 1, 2009, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 43,179 members, 10 stakes (with stake center inside the state), 92 Congregations (68 wards and 24 branches), 2 missions, and 2 temples in Tennessee. David W. Patten and Warren Parish arrived in Tennessee shortly before 11 October 1834 and soon baptized 31 people: organizing a branch by the end of the year. These efforts were in Henry, Benton, and Humphreys counties. In 1835, Parrish worked alone after Patten returned to Kirtland, Ohio. On March 27, 1835, Wilford Woodruff, then a priest, came to assist Parrish. When Warren Parrish was called as a Seventy in July 1835, he ordained Woodruff as an elder and placed him in charge of the work in Tennessee. Woodruff was assisted by Abraham O. Smoot and Benjamin L. Clapp. In 1836, there were about 100 members in seven branches. By 1839, 12 branches existed in the state and by 1846, missionaries had preached in 26 counties. Following the exodus to the West, little work was done in Tennessee. Hyrum H. Blackwell and Emmanuel M. Murphy visited the state in 1857 to call the saints to gather in the west. In 1870, Hayden Church resumed work in Tennessee. The Southern
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    1 votes
    120
    Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania

    Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania

    • Building: United States - Bethel Home
    • Associated With: Jehovah's Witnesses
    • Is Member Of: Jehovah's Witnesses
    The Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania is a non-stock, not-for-profit organization headquartered in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, United States. It is the main legal entity used worldwide by Jehovah's Witnesses to direct, administer and develop doctrines for the religion and is often referred to by members of the religion simply as "the Society". It is the parent organization of a number of Watch Tower subsidiaries, including the Watchtower Society of New York and International Bible Students Association. Membership of the society is limited to between 300 and 500 "mature, active and faithful" male Jehovah's Witnesses. About 5800 Jehovah's Witnesses provide voluntary unpaid labour, as members of a religious order, in three large Watch Tower Society facilities in New York; nearly 15,000 other members of the order work at the Watch Tower Society's other facilities worldwide. The organization was formed in 1881, as Zion's Watch Tower Tract Society, for the purpose of distributing religious tracts. The society was incorporated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on December 15, 1884. In 1896, the society was renamed Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society. Following a
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    1 votes
    121
    Anglican Communion

    Anglican Communion

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Anglican Communion is an international association of national and regional Anglican churches (and a few other episcopal churches) in full communion with the Church of England (which is regarded as the mother church of the worldwide communion) and specifically with its principal primate, the Archbishop of Canterbury. There is no single "Anglican Church" with universal juridical authority as each national or regional church has full autonomy. The status of full communion means, ideally, that there is mutual agreement on essential doctrines and that full participation in the sacramental life of each church is available to all communicant Anglicans. With a membership currently estimated at over 85 million members worldwide, the Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches. Some of these churches are known as Anglican, such as the Anglican Church of Canada, due to their historical link to England (Ecclesia Anglicana means "English Church"). Some, for example the Church of Ireland, the Scottish and American Episcopal churches, and some other associated churches have a separate name. Each
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Jews Against the Occupation

    Jews Against the Occupation

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Jews Against the Occupation describes itself as "an organization of progressive, secular and religious Jews of all ages throughout the New York City area advocating what it calls "peace through justice for Palestine and Israel" and the removal of the Israeli West Bank barrier," which it refers to as the "Apartheid wall." The organization seeks unity with the Palestinian people by promoting human bonds that transcend religious, ethnic, and political divisions. There are six major planks in its platform, stating the organization's opposition to: According to member Rachel Newmann, on the JATO website
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    3 votes
    123
    Syriac Catholic Church

    Syriac Catholic Church

    The Syriac Catholic Church (Syriac: ܥܕܬܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܬܐ ܩܬܘܠܝܩܝܬܐ ʿīṯo suryaiṯo qaṯolīqaiṯo) is a Christian church in the Levant having practices and rites in common with the Syriac Orthodox Church. They are one of the Eastern Catholic Churches following the Antiochene rite, the Syriac tradition of Antioch, along with the Maronites and Syro-Malankara Christians. This is distinct from the Greek Byzantine rite of Antioch of the Melkites, both Orthodox and Catholic. Their head, the Syriac Catholic Patriarch of Antioch, lives in Beirut, Lebanon. They have a separate church organization from the Melkites, Maronites, and Chaldean Catholics, which are other communities of the Levant also in full communion with Rome. The Patriarch of Antioch of this church has the title of Patriarch of Antioch and all the East of the Syrians. and resides in Beirut. The incumbent Patriarch is Ignatius Joseph III Yonan (2009–). The Syriac Catholic Church belongs to the See of Antioch (which, prior to his departure to Rome, Saint Peter had established) and extends it roots back to the origins of Christianity in the Orient. And in the Acts of the Apostles we are told that it is in Antioch where the followers of Jesus
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in New Mexico

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in New Mexico

    • Building: Albuquerque New Mexico Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of year-end 2007, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) reported 63,987 members in 14 stakes, 128 Congregations (89 wards and 39 branches), 1 mission, and 1 temple in New Mexico. Mormons first came to New Mexico in 1846. The LDS Church has traditionally had a strong presence in the Four Corners Region of New Mexico, settling the town of Kirtland and other surrounding areas. Mormons found converts among the Zuni Indians. On March 7, 1943, the Navajo-Zuni Mission was organized, and specialized with teaching Native Americans in their language. This was renamed the Southwest Indian Mission on January 1, 1949. It was renamed the New Mexico-Arizona Mission on October 10, 1972. New Mexico became its own mission when the New Mexico Albuquerque Mission was organized on December 15, 1896. Stanley D. Robers was president at the time of organization. On March 5, 2000 the Albuquerque New Mexico Temple was dedicated by President Gordon B. Hinckley. Latter-day Saints had a significant role in establishing and settling communities within the "Mormon Corridor", including the following in New Mexico:
    5.75
    4 votes
    125
    Anglican Church of Australia

    Anglican Church of Australia

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Anglican Church of Australia is a member church of the Anglican Communion. It was previously officially known as the Church of England in Australia and Tasmania (renamed in 1981). It is the second largest church in Australia, behind the Roman Catholic Church in Australia. When the First Fleet was sent to New South Wales in 1787, the Reverend Richard Johnson of the Church of England was licensed as chaplain to the Fleet and the settlement. In 1825 the Revd Thomas Scott was appointed Archdeacon of Australia under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Calcutta. The Revd William Grant Broughton, who succeeded Scott in 1829, was consecrated the first (and only) "Bishop of Australia" in 1836. In early Colonial times, Church of England clergy worked closely with the governors. Richard Johnson, a chaplain, was charged by the governor, Arthur Phillip, with improving "public morality" in the colony, but he was also heavily involved in health and education. The Reverend Samuel Marsden (1765–1838) had magisterial duties, and so was equated with the authorities by the convicts. He became known as the "flogging parson" for the severity of his punishments. Some of the Irish convicts had been
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    2 votes
    126
    Christian Aid

    Christian Aid

    Christian Aid is the official relief and development agency of the 40 British and Irish churches and works to support sustainable development, alleviate poverty, support civil society and provide disaster relief in South America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, Africa and Asia. Christian Aid campaigns to change the rules and systems that keep people poor, speaking out on issues such as Tax Justice, trade justice, climate change, and Third World debt. Christian Aid has fought poverty for more than 65 years. Christian Aid's essential belief is summed up in the statement "We believe in life before death", often used alongside the Christian Aid logo. Christian Aid states it works where the need is greatest, regardless of religion, nationality or race. One of its other messages is Poverty Over, represented by the word Over highlighted within the word Poverty. It works with 570 local partner organisations in 45 countries around the world to help the world's poorest communities. It is a major member of the Stop Climate Chaos, Fairtrade Foundation and Trade Justice Movement campaigns. Its headquarters is in London and has regional teams across the UK and Ireland. Christian Aid also
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    2 votes
    127
    Episcopal Church of the Sudan

    Episcopal Church of the Sudan

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Episcopal Church of Sudan is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion in Sudan and South Sudan. The province consists of 28 dioceses, each one headed by a bishop. The current Primate is the Most Rev. Daniel Deng Bul. The episcopal see of the Archbishop of Sudan is at Juba. The incumbent serves the church as both its Primate and its Metropolitan archbishop, and is titled 'Archbishop of Sudan, and Bishop of Juba'. He represents the province to the rest of the Anglican Communion, and serves on the international Primates' Meeting. In February 2008, the Episcopal Church of Sudan elected Bishop Daniel Deng Bul of the Diocese of Renk to serve as its next archbishop, succeeding Archbishop Joseph Marona, who retired on 31 December 2007 after serving eight years in the office. The first major Anglican mission in Sudan was founded in Omdurman in 1899, under the auspices of the Church Mission Society. The mission led to widespread conversion to Christianity throughout southern Sudan. Missionary activity came first under the Diocese in Jerusalem, and then, in 1920, as part of the new Diocese of Egypt and the Sudan, with Llewellyn Henry Gwynne as its first bishop. As the pace of
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    2 votes
    128
    Hieronymites

    Hieronymites

    Hieronymites, or the Order of St. Jerome (Latin: Ordo Sancti Hieronymi, abbreviated O.S.H.), is a common name for several congregations of hermits living according to the Rule of St. Augustine, with supplementary regulations taken from the writings of the 5th-century monk and scholar, St Jerome. The principal group with this name was founded in Spain in the 14th century. Their traditional habit is a white tunic with a brown, hooded scapular and a brown mantle. Established near Toledo, the Order developed out of a spontaneous interest by a number of eremetical communities in both Spain and Italy in imitating the life of St. Jerome. This way of life soon became popular in both Spain and Portugal. Two of these hermits, Pedro Fernández y Pecha and Fernando Yáñez y de Figueroa, decided it would be more advantageous to live a more regular way of life in a community, under an authorized monastic Rule. Under their leadership, the Monastery of St. Bartholomew was then founded in Lupiana, with Fernández y Pecha acting as their first Prior. On 18 October 1373 Pope Gregory XI issued a Papal Bull recognizing them as a religious order, under the Rule of St. Augustine. The Constitutions included
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    2 votes
    129
    Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia

    Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia

    The Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (Russian: Ру́сская Правосла́вная Це́рковь Заграни́цей, Russkaya Pravoslavnaya Tserkov' Zagranitsey), also called the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad, ROCA, or ROCOR, is a semi-autonomous part of the Russian Orthodox Church. ROCOR was formed as a jurisdiction of Eastern Orthodoxy as a response against the policy of Bolsheviks with respect to religion in the Soviet Union soon after the Russian Revolution of 1917, and separated from the Russian Church of the Moscow Patriarchate in 1927 after an imprisoned metropolitan Sergius (Stragorodsky) pledged the Church’s qualified loyalty to the Bolshevik state. The Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia officially signed the Act of Canonical Communion with the Moscow Patriarchate on May 17, 2007 restoring the canonical link between the churches. Critics of the reunification argue that the issue of KGB infiltration of the Moscow Patriarchate church hierarchy has not been addressed by the Russian Orthodox Church. The Church has around 400 parishes worldwide, and an estimated membership of over 15,000 people. Of those, 138 parishes and 10 monasteries are in the United States, with 27,700 adherents and
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    2 votes
    130
    Sikh

    Sikh

    A Sikh (/siːk/ or /sɪk/; Punjabi: ਸਿੱਖ, sikkh [sɪkkʰ]) is a follower of Sikhism, a religion that originated in the 15th century in the Punjab region of South Asia or a member of the Sikh people. The Sikh religion was founded by Guru Nanak Dev. It is stated in the Sikh texts that Guru Nanak while in deep meditation by a river was called to the court of God where he received direct revelations from God for three days. It is stated that God asked Nanak to drink from the cup of Naam (Path/Essence of God) and then promoted Nanak to the highest of all status. From there on he was known as Guru Nanak so that he could teach the world that there is one God, that all humanity is one, and that religious divisions are man-made. The Guru spread his many taught revelations wherever he traveled and demonstrated many miracles when necessary. Near the end of his life the Guru had many followers from many walks of life and religions. The Guruship was consecutively passed down to nine other Gurus, who were stated to have the divine light of God with them. These Gurus strengthened and expanded the Sikh religion and the revelations of God. The final and last Guruship was given to the total combined
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    2 votes
    131
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Connecticut

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Connecticut

    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of January 1, 2011, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 14,990 members in 4 stakes, 32 Congregations (27 wards and 5 branches), and 1 mission in Connecticut. A brief history can be found at LDS Newsroom (Connecticut) The following table are missions that have served Connecticut, and the date they were organized. * Denotes Name Change Only - No new mission created. On October 2, 2010 the Hartford Connecticut Temple was announced by President Thomas S. Monson.
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    2 votes
    132
    Neturei Karta

    Neturei Karta

    Neturei Karta (Jewish Babylonian Aramaic: נטורי קרתא nāṭūri qarṯā, literally "Guardians of the City") is a Jewish group formally created in Jerusalem, British Mandate of Palestine, in 1938, splitting off from Agudas Yisrael. Neturei Karta opposes Zionism and calls for a peaceful dismantling of the State of Israel, in the belief that Jews are forbidden to have their own state until the coming of the Messiah. They live as a part of larger Chareidi communities around the globe. In Israel some members also pray at affiliated beis midrash, in Jerusalem's Meah Shearim neighborhood and in Ramat Beit Shemesh Bet. Neturei Karta states no official statistics exist about numbers. The Jewish Virtual Library puts their numbers at 5,000 in Jerusalem The Anti-Defamation League estimates that fewer than 100 members of the community take part in anti-Israel activism. According to Neturei Karta: "The name Neturei Karta is a name usually given to those people who regularly pray in the Neturei Karta synagogues (Torah Ve'Yirah Jerusalem, Torah U'Tefillah London, Torah U'Tefillah NY, Beis Yehudi Upstate NY, etc.), study in or send their children to educational institutions run by Neturei Karta, or
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    4 votes
    133
    Polish National Catholic Church

    Polish National Catholic Church

    The Polish National Catholic Church (PNCC) is a Christian church founded and based in the United States by Polish-Americans who were Roman Catholic. The PNCC is a breakaway Catholic Church in dialogue with the Catholic Church; it seeks full communion with the Holy See although it differs theologically in several important respects. The Polish National Catholic Church welcomes people of all ethnic, racial and social backgrounds. A sister church in Poland, likewise not in communion with the Catholic Church, is the Polish Catholic Church. In 2011 the Church had some 25,000 members in the United States. There are five dioceses: Buffalo-Pittsburgh, Central, Eastern, Western and Canada. The Mass of the Polish National Catholic Church uses one of three liturgies: the Contemporary Rite, the Traditional Rite, and the Rite of Prime Bishop Hodur. The Contemporary is the shortest of the Mass types and the most used in PNCC parishes. It is similar to the current Roman Rite Mass except some parts are from the other two Masses. The Traditional is longer and is still widely used. It is the older Mass used at the time when the PNCC formed. The Prime Bishop Hodur Mass is the longest and filled with
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    4 votes
    134
    Congregation Emanu-El

    Congregation Emanu-El

    Congregation Emanu-El of San Francisco, California, is one of the two oldest Jewish congregations in California. During the Gold Rush in 1849, a small group of Jews held the first High Holy Days services on the west coast of the United States in San Francisco. This group of traders and merchants founded Congregation Emanu-El sometime in 1850, and its charter was issued in April, 1851. The 16 signatories were mostly Jews from Bavaria.
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    3 votes
    135
    Shi'a Islam

    Shi'a Islam

    Shia Islam (Arabic: شيعة‎, Shīʿah) is the second largest denomination of Islam. Adherents of Shia Islam are called Shi'ites or Shias. "Shia" is the short form of the historic phrase Shīʻatu ʻAlī (شيعة علي), meaning "followers", "faction", or "party" of Muhammad's son-in-law Ali, whom the Shia believe to be Muhammad's successor. Like other branches of Islam, Shia Islam is based on the teachings of the Quran and the message of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In contrast to other types, the Shia believe that only God has the right to choose a representative to safeguard Islam, the Quran and sharia. Thus the Shias look to Ali, Muhammad's son-in-law, whom they consider divinely appointed, as the rightful successor to Muhammad, and the first imam. The Shia extend this belief to Muhammad's family, the Ahl al-Bayt ("the People of the House"), and certain individuals among his descendants, known as imams, who have special spiritual and political authority over the community. Although there were many Shia branches throughout history, modern Shia Islam is divided into three main branches. The largest Shia sect in the early 21st century is the Ithna ashariyya, commonly referred to in English as
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    United Evangelical Lutheran Church

    United Evangelical Lutheran Church

    The United Evangelical Lutheran Church (commonly known as the United Church) was one of the many denominations formed when Lutherans came to the United States from Europe. Originally known as the United Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church, the United Church merged with other Lutheran groups to form the American Lutheran Church in 1960. The Danish Evangelical Lutheran Association in America (or Blair Church) was formed in 1884 by a group of Danish members who left the Conference of the Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. Many of Blair Church pastors were supportive of the Inner Mission. The Blair Church was based in Blair, Nebraska. The Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in North America (or North Church) was formed in 1894 when seminary president Kristian Anker and professor Peter Sørensen Vig, along with a number of pastor and congregations, left the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in America over theological differences. These two churches merged in 1896 in Minneapolis, Minnesota to form the United Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church (in addition to being known as the United Church, this new church continued to be referred to as the "Blair Church"). The
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Antiochian Orthodox Church

    Antiochian Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch, also known as the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East and the Antiochian Orthodox Church (Greek: Πατριαρχεῖον Ἀντιοχείας, Patriarcheîon Antiocheías; Arabic: بطريركية أنطاكية وسائر المشرق للروم الأرثوذكس‎, Baṭrīarkīyyat Anṭākiya wa-sā'ir al-mašriq li'l-Rūm al-Ūrthūduks), is an autocephalous Greek Orthodox Church within the wider communion of Orthodox Christianity. Headed by the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch, it considers itself the successor to the Christian community founded in Antioch by the Apostles Peter and Paul. It is one of several churches that lays claim to be the canonical incumbent of the ancient see of St. Peter and St. Paul in Antioch. The Oriental Orthodox Syriac Orthodox Church of Antioch makes the same claim, as do the Syrian Catholic Church, the Maronite Church, and the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, all of them Eastern Catholic Churches in full communion with the Holy See. These three, however, mutually recognize each other as holding authentic patriarchates, being part of the same Catholic communion. The Roman Catholic Church also appointed titular Latin Rite patriarchs for many centuries, until the
    8.00
    1 votes
    138

    Brigham Young University

    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    Brigham Young University (often referred to as BYU, or sometimes just the Y) is a private university located in Provo, Utah. It is owned and operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), and is the United States' largest religious university and third-largest private university. Approximately 98% of the university's 34,000 students are members of the LDS Church, and one-third of its American students come from within the state of Utah. BYU students are required to follow an honor code, which mandates behavior in line with LDS teachings (e.g., academic honesty, adherence to dress and grooming standards, and abstinence from extramarital sex and from the consumption of drugs and alcohol). Many students (78% of men, 10% of women) take a two-year hiatus from their studies at some point to serve as Mormon missionaries. Many BYU students speak foreign languages during their Mormon missions, and approximately 31% of the student body enroll in foreign language courses, making it one of the most multilingual student bodies in the United States. A BYU education is also less expensive than at similar private universities, since "a significant portion" of the cost of
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    1 votes
    139
    Magshimey Herut

    Magshimey Herut

    • Associated With: Judaism
    World Magshimey Herut (Hebrew: מגשימי חרות עולמי‎, lit. "world achievers of liberty") is a Zionist young adult movement founded in 1999 by a group of Jewish activists who felt the need for a young adult movement dedicated to the ideals of aliyah, social justice and the territorial integrity of the Land of Israel. The world headquarters of the movement are located in Israel symbolizing the state of Israel's centrality to Jewish life. World MH is dedicated to a strong and independent Jewish nation in the Land of Israel, composed of Jews from around the world reuniting in their homeland. To this end the movement works in conjunction with the World Zionist Organization (WZO), the Jewish Agency for Israel, and the Jewish National Fund on projects that advance common goals. World MH was founded in 1999 by a number of Betar members looking to answer the need for a hagshama movement of young adult activists dedicated to the personal implementation of their commitment to social justice, the unity of the Hebrew nation and the integrity of the Land of Israel. When a Likud government led by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu relinquished parts of Hebron to Yasser Arafat in 1998, Betar (the
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    1 votes
    140
    Order of Saint Benedict (Anglican)

    Order of Saint Benedict (Anglican)

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    There are a number of Benedictine Anglican religious orders, some of them using the name Order of St. Benedict (OSB). Just like their Roman Catholic counterparts, each abbey / priory / convent is independent of each other. The vows are not made to an order, but to a local incarnation of the order, hence each individual order is free to develop its own character and charism, yet each under a common rule of life after the precepts of St. Benedict. Most of the communities include a confraternity of oblates. The order consists of a number of independent communities: England Australia Republic of Korea United States The following abbeys and communities follow the Benedictine Rule, but do not style themselves "OSB".
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Orthodox Union

    Orthodox Union

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America (UOJCA), more popularly known as the Orthodox Union (OU), is one of the oldest Orthodox Jewish organizations in the United States. It is best known for its kosher food preparation supervision service. Its circled-U symbol, Ⓤ, a hechsher, is found on the labels of many commercial and consumer food products. The OU supports a network of synagogues, youth programs, Jewish and Religious Zionist advocacy, programs for the disabled, localized religious study programs, and some international units with locations in Israel and formerly in Ukraine. It is one of the largest Orthodox Jewish organizations in the United States. Its synagogues and their rabbis typically identify themselves with Modern Orthodox Judaism. The OU was founded in 1898, and serves about 1,000 synagogues and congregations of varying sizes. The need for a national Jewish Orthodox rabbinical organization in the early twentieth century was recognized by a number of groups. The Union of Orthodox Rabbis was the most powerful rabbinical body at that time and many of its members saw great value in establishing the early Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of
    8.00
    1 votes
    142

    Prestonwood Baptist Church

    Prestonwood Baptist Church, in Plano, Texas, is one of the largest megachurches in North America and one of America's 50 Most Influential Churches according to a 2007 survey of church leaders. The Plano campus covers an area of 140 acres (0.219 sq mi; 0.567 km), and includes a 7,000-seat worship center, a school offering Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12, a fitness center, a sports stadium, sports fields, a large cafe, a library, and two bookstores. In 2006, the church expanded to include a second "North" campus of nearly 128 acres (0.200 sq mi; 0.518 km) in Prosper, Texas.. In 2011 the church again expanding adding a "Dallas" campus near LBJ Freeway and Hillcrest. With a staff of almost 40 ministers, Prestonwood provides biblical teachings and worship services in the Baptist tradition. It also has Bible Fellowship classes, a 498-member church choir, and specialized ministries for children, students and Spanish speakers, as well as mission outreach at local and global levels. The church operates a sports ministry, known as PSO (Prestonwood Sports Organization), which offers youth baseball and soccer leagues, each serving approximately 1,000 children annually with youth football and
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Roman Catholic Diocese of Las Cruces

    Roman Catholic Diocese of Las Cruces

    • Associated With: Catholicism
    • Is Member Of: Roman Catholic Church
    The Roman Catholic Diocese of Las Cruces is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the southwestern region of the United States, comprising the 10 southern counties in the state of New Mexico: Hidalgo, Grant, Luna, Sierra, Doña Ana, Otero, Lincoln, Chaves, Eddy, and Lea. It is led by a prelate bishop which serves as pastor of the motherchurch, Immaculate Heart of Mary Cathedral, in the City of Las Cruces. Its congregants are overwhelmingly Hispanic, mostly Mexican in descent. The See of Las Cruces was canonically erected on August 17, 1982. Its territory was taken from the Archdiocese of Santa Fe and the Diocese of El Paso.
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia

    Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia is a church of the Anglican Communion serving New Zealand, Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, and the Cook Islands. The primate of the church, known as the Archbishop of New Zealand, is William Brown Turei. Since 1992, the church (formerly known as the Church of the Province of New Zealand) has consisted of three tikanga or cultural streams: Aotearoa, New Zealand, and Polynesia. The church's constitution says that, among other things, it is required to "maintain the right of every person to choose any particular cultural expression of the faith". As a result the church's General Synod has agreed upon the development of the three-person primacy based on this three tikanga system. This sees Turei sharing the primacy with Bishops David Moxon and Winston Halapua. The church has decided that three bishops shall share the position and style of Archbishop, each representing one of the three tikanga. The three Archbishops sharing the title of Archbishop of New Zealand are: The Most Reverend William Brown Turei, Bishop of Aotearoa, the head of Te Pīhopatanga o Aotearoa, which oversees churches for the indigenous Māori people of New Zealand.); The
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Anglican Church of Tanzania

    Anglican Church of Tanzania

    The Anglican Church of Tanzania (ACT) is a member of the Anglican Communion based in Dodoma. It consists of 26 dioceses (25 on the Tanzanian mainland, and 1 on Zanzibar) headed by their respective bishops. It seceded from the Province of East Africa in 1970, which it shared with Kenya. The current Archbishop is the Most Reverend Dr. Valentino Mokiwa, the Bishop of the Diocese of Dar es Salaam. The Church became part of the Province of East Africa in 1960. From 1970 until 1997, then was known as the Church of the Province of Tanzania. Today it is known as the Anglican Church of Tanzania or ACT. The church was founded originally as the Diocese of Eastern Equatorial Africa (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania) in 1884, with James Hannington as the first bishop; however, Anglican missionary activity had been present in the area since the Universities' Mission to Central Africa and the Church Missionary Society began their work in 1864 and 1878 at Mpwapwa. In 1898, the diocese was split into two, with the new diocese of Mombasa governing Kenya and northern Tanzania (the other diocese later became the Church of Uganda); northern Tanzania was separated from the diocese in 1927. In 1955, the diocese's
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Bet Tzedek Legal Services - The House of Justice

    Bet Tzedek Legal Services - The House of Justice

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Bet Tzedek is an American non-profit human and poverty rights organization, internationally recognized for its work in providing unique advocacy and support for people living in poverty, and for communities victimized by discrimination and civil rights abuses. One of the United States' leading centers for social justice, Bet Tzedek is based in Los Angeles, California. It was founded in 1974 by a group of Jewish attorneys determined to address the human rights issues and humanitarian needs endemic to Los Angeles. Their social justice philosophy was rooted in a central tenet of Jewish law and teaching: "Tzedek, tzedek tirdof - Justice, justice you shall pursue." Bet Tzedek embraces the fundamental commitment of achieving full and equal access to justice for all people. The United States legal system was created to fairly serve all citizens, yet without equal access to the justice system, low-income citizens are disproportionately victimized by unjust and illegal practices such as coercive labor practices, abuse and neglect of developmentally disabled people, unlawful debt collection and racially targeted victimization. In a city with one of the highest poverty rates in the United
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Grace Community Church

    Grace Community Church

    Grace Community Church is a non-denominational, evangelical megachurch located in Sun Valley, California. John MacArthur is the pastor-teacher of the congregation, founded in 1956. As of 2008, the average weekly attendance was 8,258. Founded as Grace Community Church of the Valley, with an emphasis on the basics of Christianity, the congregation held its first public service on July 1, 1956, calling Don Householder to be its founding pastor. Within the first few years, the church had moved to the present location on Roscoe Boulevard and expanded to hold two Sunday morning services. Following Householder's death in 1965, Richard Elvee was called to be pastor and the church continued to grow under his leadership until he died in 1968. In February 1969, John F. MacArthur assumed the pastorate. During the early days of MacArthur's ministry, the church doubled in size every two years, building a new Family Life Center in 1971 and a new Worship Center in 1977. In 1972, Moody Monthly magazine published a feature article about the congregation titled, "The church with nine hundred ministers." Grace Community Church has tightly-held theological positions regarding elder rule, church
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Harmony Society

    Harmony Society

    The Harmony Society was a Christian theosophy and pietist society founded in Iptingen, Germany, in 1785. Due to religious persecution by the Lutheran Church and the government in Württemberg, the group moved to the United States, where representatives initially purchased land in Butler County, Pennsylvania. On February 15, 1805, the group of approximately 400 followers formally organized the Harmony Society, placing all their goods in common. Under its founder and spiritual leader, Johann Georg Rapp (1757–1847); Frederick (Reichert) Rapp (1775–1834), his adopted son who managed its business affairs; and their associates, the Society existed for one hundred years; roughly from 1805 until 1905. Members were known as Harmonists, Harmonites, or Rappites. The Society is best known for its worldly successes, most notably the establishment of three model communities, the first at Harmony, Pennsylvania; the second, also called Harmony, in the Indiana Territory, now New Harmony, Indiana; and the third and final town at Economy, now Ambridge, Pennsylvania. Johann Georg Rapp (November 1, 1757–August 7, 1847), also known as George Rapp, was the founder of the religious sect called Harmonists,
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee

    Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee (JAC, Russian: Еврейский антифашистский комитет Yevreysky antifashistsky komitet, ЕАК) was formed on Joseph Stalin's order in Kuibyshev in April 1942 with the official support of the Soviet authorities. It was designed to influence international public opinion and organize political and material support for the Soviet fight against Nazi Germany, particularly from the West. In 1952, as part of the persecution of Jews in the latter part of Stalin's rule (for example, the "Doctors' plot"), most prominent members of the JAC were arrested on trumped-up spying charges, tortured, and executed by firing squad after a secret mock trial. They were officially rehabilitated in 1988. Solomon Mikhoels, the popular actor and director of the Moscow State Jewish Theater, was appointed the JAC chairman. The JAC's newspaper in Yiddish language was called Einigkeit (אייניקייט "Unity", Cyrillic: Эйникейт). The JAC broadcast pro-Soviet propaganda to foreign audiences, assuring them of the absence of anti-Semitism in the USSR. In 1943, Mikhoels and Itzik Feffer, the first official representatives of the Soviet Jewry allowed to visit the West, embarked on a seven-month
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Laestadianism

    Laestadianism

    Laestadianism is a conservative Lutheran revival movement started in the middle of the 19th century. It is strongly marked by both pietistic and Moravian influences. It is the biggest revivalist movement in the Nordic countries. It has members mainly in Finland, North America, Norway, Russia and Sweden. There are also smaller congregations in Africa, South America and Central Europe. In addition Laestadians have missionaries in 23 countries. The number of Laestadians worldwide is estimated to be between 144,000 and 219,000. Laestadians in Finland are part of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland, but in America, where there is no official Lutheran church, they founded their own denomination, which split into several sub-groups in the mid-20th Century. Because of doctrinal opinion differences and personality conflicts, the movement split into 19 branches, of which about 15 are active today. The three large main branches are Conservative Laestadianism (corresponds to the Laestadian Lutheran Church, in North America known to other Laestadians as the "Heidemans" after 20th Century leader Paul A. Heideman); the Firstborn (in North America, "Old Apostolic Lutheran Church"
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Laupheim Jewish Community

    Laupheim Jewish Community

    The History of the Jews in Laupheim began in the first half of the 18th century. Until the second half of the 19th century, the Jewish community in Laupheim expanded continuously to become the largest of its kind in Württemberg. During this period, the Jewish community gradually assimilated to its Christian surroundings and its members prospered until the beginning of the Nazi-period in 1933. With the deportation of the last remaining Jews in 1942, more than 200 years of Jewish history in Laupheim forcibly came to an end. At the beginning of the 18th century, Laupheim was a small market town in Upper Swabia and politically part of Further Austria. Jews were allowed to enter the town as pedlars but permanent residence was refused. Since the 15th century, Jews were not allowed to settle within the territories of the surrounding free imperial cities, nor in the Duchy of Württemberg. The settlement of Jews in the territories of Imperial Knights, however, was often welcomed. These rulers were often highly in debt due to the fragmentation of their territories, as was the case with Laupheim being separated into two independent states, Großlaupheim and Kleinlaupheim, as well as frequent
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles

    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles

    The Archdiocese of Los Angeles (Latin: Archidioecesis Angelorum in California, Spanish: Arquidiócesis de Los Ángeles) is an archdiocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the U.S. state of California. Headquartered in Los Angeles, the archdiocese comprises the California counties of Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Ventura. The diocesan cathedral is the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, and its present archbishop is José Horacio Gómez. With approximately five million professing members, the archdiocese considers itself the largest diocese in the United States in terms of congregant population. The Archbishop of Los Angeles also serves as metropolitan bishop of the suffragan dioceses within the Ecclesiastical Province of Los Angeles, which includes the Dioceses of Fresno, Monterey, Orange, San Bernardino, and San Diego. Following the establishment of the Spanish missions in California, the Holy See established the Diocese of the Two Californias in 1840, when the Los Angeles region was still part of Mexico. In 1848, present-day California was ceded to the United States, and the U.S. portion of the diocese was renamed the Diocese of Monterey. The diocese was renamed the
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    2 votes
    153
    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco

    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco

    • Associated With: Catholicism
    • Is Member Of: Roman Catholic Church
    The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Catholic Church in the northern California region of the United States. It covers the City and County of San Francisco and the Counties of Marin and San Mateo. The Archdiocese of San Francisco was canonically erected on July 29, 1853, by Pope Pius IX and its cathedral is the Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Assumption. The first church in the Archdiocese of San Francisco is older than the Archdiocese itself; Mission San Francisco de Asís was founded on June 29, 1776 by Franciscan Friars. The mission church that stands today was completed in 1791 and attached next door is Mission Dolores Basilica. The Franciscans who founded the mission also are credited with naming the City and County of San Francisco, and the entire region, after their patron, Saint Francis of Assisi. From his installation on February 15, 2006 until the acceptance of his resignation on July 27, 2012, the archdiocese was led by Archbishop Emeritus George Hugh Niederauer, formerly the bishop of the Diocese of Salt Lake City. The current auxiliary bishops of the archdiocese are William J. Justice and Robert W. McElroy. On
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Siddha Yoga

    Siddha Yoga

    Siddha Yoga is a spiritual path based on the Indian spiritual traditions of Vedanta and Kashmir Shaivism. The Siddha Yoga path was founded by Swami Muktananda Paramahamsa (1908–1982). The leader of Siddha Yoga is Gurumayi Chidvilasananda. The two main ashrams are: Gurudev Siddha Peeth in Ganeshpuri, India, and Shree Muktananda Ashram in upstate New York. The Siddha Yoga organization has ashrams and meditation centers in a number of countries, including India, the United States, Australia, Great Britain, Canada, France, Italy, Brazil and Japan. The Siddha Yoga Vision: "For everyone, everywhere, to realize the presence of divinity in themselves and creation, the cessation of all miseries and suffering, and the attainment of supreme bliss." The Siddha Yoga Mission: "To constantly impart the knowledge of the Self." (Shiva Sutras III.28) Three aphorisms express three essential teachings of Siddha Yoga: "Honor your Self. Worship your Self. Meditate on your Self. God dwells within you as you." --Swami Muktananda "See God in each other." --Swami Muktananda "The heart is the hub of all sacred places. Go there and roam." --Bhagawan Nityananda Swami Muktananda's spiritual teacher, Bhagawan
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer

    Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer

    The Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer (Latin: Filii Sanctissimi Redemptoris, Latin siglum: F.SS.R.), formerly the Transalpine Redemptorists are a religious institute based on Papa Stronsay in the Orkney Islands, Scotland. Their rule is based on that of St. Alphonsus Liguori, although they have no formal connection to the Redemptorist religious institute. The congregation was erected as Transalpine Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (C.SS.R.) on 2 August 1988 by Father Michael Mary Sim C.SS.R. as a traditionalist Catholic Redemptorist religious community affiliated with Society of St. Pius X, and were called the Transalpine Redemptorists. On 3 December 1987 Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre had officially blessed the undertaking of the foundation. Originally based at the Monastery of the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary in the Isle of Sheppey, Kent, they moved to the Mother of Perpetual Succour Monastery in Joinville, Haute-Marne, France in 1994 until they bought the island of Papa Stronsay on 31 May 1999. There they established the Golgotha Monastery, and publish The Catholic, a monthly since 1982. In the past they promoted their own version of a Redemptorist Purgatorian
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Camp Interlaken JCC

    Camp Interlaken JCC

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Camp Interlaken JCC is a Jewish summer camp located in Eagle River, Wisconsin, USA. The JCC purchased it in 1966 for $250,000. It was named Camp Interlaken of the Pines for Boys before the JCC bought it. According to Jewish Living Magazine, Camp Interlaken is the third best Jewish summer camp in the country. Camp Interlaken has many specialty staff and a 5:1 camper to staff ratio. Campers sign up for their activities in two week blocks. There are 2, 4, 6 and 8 week sessions available. Individual Sports: Tennis, Gymnastics, Golf, Disc golf, Tushball, Ga-ga, Archery, Cycling, and Climbing. Team Sports: Softball, Soccer, Basketball, Volleyball, Floor (Court) Hockey, Ultimate Frisbee and Maccabiah. Waterfront Activities: Waterskiing, Windsurfing, Sailing, Small Boats, Swimming, Life Guard Training and Fishing. Cultural and Creative activities: Ceramics, Fine Arts, Aerobics, Modern Dance, Theater, Theater Tech, Israeli Dance, Bar/Bat Mitzvah Preparation, Woodworking, Crafts, Outdoor Cooking, Guitar, Photography, Video, Nature and Fishing. The main point of Tushball is simple: get the person behind you out. Similar to Knockout, you have to simply be better than the person behind you.
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Church of England

    Church of England

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The church considers itself within the tradition of Western Christianity and dates its formal establishment principally to the mission to England by St Augustine of Canterbury in AD 597. As a result of Augustine's mission, the church in England came under the authority of the Pope. Initially prompted by a dispute over the annulment of the marriage of Henry VIII to Catherine of Aragon, the Church of England separated from the Roman Catholic Church in 1534 and became the established church by an Act of Parliament in the Act of Supremacy, beginning a series of events known as the English Reformation. During the reign of Queen Mary I, the Church was fully restored under Rome in 1555. Papal authority was again explicitly rejected after the accession of Queen Elizabeth I when the Act of Supremacy of 1558 was passed. Catholic and Reformed factions vied for determining the doctrines and worship of the church. This ended with the 1558 Elizabethan settlement, which developed the understanding that the church was to be both Catholic and Reformed: During
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster

    Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster

    The Free Presbyterian Church is a Presbyterian denomination founded by the Rev. Ian Paisley in 1951. Most of its members live in Northern Ireland. The church has congregations in Republic of Ireland, Great Britain and Australia, with a sister denomination in North America that has congregations in Canada and the United States. The Free Presbyterian Church began on 17 March 1951 (St Patrick's Day) as the result of a conflict between some members of the local Lissara Presbyterian congregation in Crossgar, County Down, Northern Ireland, and the Down Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. At a meeting on 8 January 1951, the Down Presbytery banned the elders of the local congregation from using the church hall for a Gospel mission, but the date when the Lissara elders were informed of this is disputed. The Presbytery met with the Lissara Session ninety minutes before the mission was due to begin on 3 February with an "Opening Witness March." When two elders refused to accept the Presbytery decision, they were immediately suspended. As a result of this disagreement with the Presbytery, five of the seven session members, all the Sunday School teachers, and sixty members of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Harmonie Club

    Harmonie Club

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Harmonie Club is an exclusive private social club in New York City. Founded in 1852, the venerable club is the second oldest social club in New York. It is located at 4 East 60th Street, in a building designed by Stanford White. Originally named the Gesellschaft Harmonie, the club was founded on October 16, 1852 by N. Gutman, M. Werner, H. Beer, H. Cohn, Chs. Werner, and Sigmund Werner. Although prominent German Jews, the group was reportedly denied admission to the Union Club, which had a tacit policy of discrimination. The club's original charter provided that it was created to provide "mutually beneficial entertainment, occasional singing entertainments, lectures, etc" for recent German immigrants. The first meeting of the club was held November 8, 1852 in a rented room on Broome Street with thirty-nine members in attendance. Between 1852 and 1867, the burgeoning club was regularly moved as the membership outgrew each rented space. After this nomadic period the club purchased land at 45 West Forty-Second Street to erect a permanent location and raised enough funds to have architect Henry Fernbach design the building. Later, this building was refurbished and had an annex
    6.00
    3 votes
    160

    Rabbinical Council of America

    • Associated With: Orthodox Judaism
    The Rabbinical Council of America (RCA) is one of the world's largest organizations of Orthodox rabbis; it is affiliated with The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, more commonly known as the Orthodox Union, or OU. Most rabbis of the RCA belong to Centrist Modern Orthodox Judaism. The roots of the organization go back to 1923 when it was founded as the Rabbinical Council of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. Its purpose was to perpetuate and promote Orthodox Judaism in the United States of America. Its members attempted on a number of occasions to merge with other Jewish groups, for the purpose of developing a unified traditional rabbinate for the American Jewish community. A number of attempts were made to join with groups such as Agudat Israel, but all such attempts were rebuffed. A merger took place in 1935 between the Rabbinical Council of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations and another Orthodox rabbinical group, the Rabbinical Association of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, a part of Yeshiva University. With this merger the combined group took the name Rabbinical Council of America, known in the Jewish community as the
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Twelver

    Twelver

    Twelver or Imami Shīa Islam (Arabic: اثنا عشرية‎, Athnā‘ashariyyah or Ithnā‘ashariyyah; Persian: شیعه دوازده‌امامی‎, pronounced [ʃiːʔe-je dævɒːzdæh emɒːmiː]) is the largest branch of Shī‘ī (Shi'a) Islam. Adherents of Twelver Shī‘ism are commonly referred to as Twelvers, which is derived from their belief in twelve divinely ordained leaders, known as the Twelve Imāms and their belief that the Mahdi will be none other than the returned Twelfth Imam that disappeared and is believed by Twelvers to be in occultation. Approximately 85% of Shī‘a are Twelvers, and the term Shi'a Muslim as commonly used in English usually refers to Twelver Shī‘a Muslims only. Twelvers share many tenets of Shī‘ism with related sects, such as the belief in Imāms, but the Ismā‘īlī and Zaydī Shī‘ī sects each believe in a different number of Imāms and for the most part, a different path of succession regarding the Imāmate. They also differ in the role and overall definition of an Imām. The Twelver faith is a majority in countries like Iran, Iraq, Azerbaijan and Bahrain, and forms a plurality in Lebanon. Alevis in Turkey and Albania and Alawis of Syria also regard themselves as Twelvers, but hold significantly
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Jewish people

    Jewish people

    The Jews (Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‎‎ ISO 259-3 Yehudim Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]), also known as the Jewish people, are a nation and an ethnoreligious group, originating in the Israelites or Hebrews of the Ancient Near East. The Jewish ethnicity, nationality, and religion are strongly interrelated, as Judaism is the traditional faith of the Jewish nation. Converts to Judaism, whose status as Jews within the Jewish ethnos is equal to those born into it, have been absorbed into the Jewish people throughout the millennia. In Jewish tradition, Jewish ancestry is traced to the Biblical patriarchs Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the second millennium BCE. The modern State of Israel defines itself as a Jewish state in its Basic Laws, and Israel's Law of Return states: "Every Jew has the right to come to this country as an oleh." Israel is the only country where Jews are a majority of the population. Jews achieved political autonomy twice before in ancient history. The first of these periods lasted from 1350 to 586 BCE, and encompassed the periods of the Judges, the United Monarchy, and the Divided Monarchy of the Kingdoms of Israel and Judah, ending with the destruction of the First Temple.
    5.00
    4 votes
    163
    Apostolic Church of South Africa - Apostle Unity

    Apostolic Church of South Africa - Apostle Unity

    The Apostolic Church (Apostle Unity) is the South African branch of the United Apostolic Church. It has roots in the Catholic Apostolic Church of the early 19th century. It was founded in 1955 as a schism of the New Apostolic Church. It is part of a branch of Christianity called Irvingism and is separate from Protestantism. It is a member church of the United Apostolic Church, which was founded in Düsseldorf, Germany in 1956 after several apostles of the New Apostolic Church were excommunicated for refusing to accept the teachings of the Chief Apostle that Jesus Christ would return in his lifetime. Its logo is a four R-symbol, which is also used by the Australian sister church, The Apostolic Church of Queensland. The four "R"s stand for: Right, Royal, Righteous and Rich. Right according to the Bible, Royal as the Bride to have membership with Christ, Righteous in partaking of the body and blood of Christ and Rich in the promises Christ gave to his apostles. In 1889, Evangelist Carl George Klibbe arrived in South Africa to begin his mission work for the Apostolic Church. He was ordained as an Apostle in 1893 by Apostle H.F. Niemeyer of Australia. At that time, the office of Chief
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Passionist

    Passionist

    • Associated With: Catholicism
    The Passionists (The Congregation of the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ) are a Roman Catholic religious institute founded by Saint Paul of the Cross (Paul Francis Danei). Professed members use the initials C.P. after their names. St. Paul of the Cross wrote the rules of the Congregation in December 1720; and in 1725, Pope Benedict XIII granted Paul the permission to form his congregation. Paul and his brother, John Baptist, were ordained by the pope on the same occasion. In 1769 Clement XIV granted full rights to the Passionists as enjoyed by the other religious institutes, making them not an order but a congregation. The congregation historically has had two primary goals: missionary work and contemplative life, with an attempt to blend the two. Its founder had attempted to combine aspects of the contemplative orders, such as the Trappist monks, together with the dynamic orders, such as the Jesuits. There are 2,179 Passionists in 59 countries on the five continents, led by a superior general who is elected every six years. He is assisted by four consultors in governing the congregation. The present superior general is Father Ottaviano D'Egidio. The congregation is divided into
    5.67
    3 votes
    165

    Rabbinical Assembly

    • Associated With: Conservative Judaism
    The Rabbinical Assembly (RA) is the international association of Conservative rabbis. The RA was founded in 1901 to shape the ideology, programs, and practices of the Conservative movement. It publishes prayerbooks and books of Jewish interest, and oversees the work of the Committee on Jewish Law and Standards for the Conservative movement. It organizes conferences and coordinates the Joint Placement Commission of the Conservative movement. Members of the RA serve as rabbis, educators, community workers and military and hospital chaplains around the world. Rabbis ordained by Jewish Theological Seminary of America, the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies at the American Jewish University (California), The Seminario Rabínico Latinoamericano (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and The Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies (Jerusalem, Israel) automatically become members of the RA upon their ordination. Rabbis whose ordination is from other seminaries and Yeshivas may also admitted to the RA. As of 2010, there were 1,648 members of the RA. The majority of RA members serve in the United States and Canada, while more than ten percent of its rabbis serve in Israel and many of its rabbis serve in
    5.67
    3 votes
    166
    Council of Four Lands

    Council of Four Lands

    The Council of Four Lands (Va'ad Arba' Aratzot) in Lublin, Poland was the central body of Jewish authority in Poland from 1580 to 1764. Seventy delegates from local kehillot met to discuss taxation and other issues important to the Jewish community. The "four lands" were Greater Poland, Little Poland, Ruthenia and Volhynia. The terms "Council of Three Lands" and "Council of Five Lands" and more have also been used for the same body. In 1623 the Jewish communities from the Grand Duchy of Lithuania withdrew from the "Council of Four Lands" and established the "Council of the Land of Lithuania". The great number of the Jewish population of Poland, its importance in the industrial life of the country, and the peculiarities of the political and class organization of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth were the reasons why the Jews of Poland formed a separate class enjoying liberal autonomy within the sphere of their communal and spiritual interests, the outcome of which was their exemplary communal organization. A Jewish community, with its administrative, judicial, religious, and charitable institutions, constituted a unit of self-government. The term "Kahal" denoted both the community
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Georgian Orthodox and Apostolic Church

    Georgian Orthodox and Apostolic Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Georgian Apostolic Autocephalous Orthodox Church (Georgian: საქართველოს სამოციქულო ავტოკეფალური მართლმადიდებელი ეკლესია, sak’art’velos samots’ik’ulo avtokep’aluri mart’lmadidebeli eklesia) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church. It is Georgia's dominant religious institution, and a majority of Georgian people affirm their membership in the Church. It asserts apostolic foundation, and its historical roots can be traced to the conversion of the Kingdom of Iberia to Christianity in the 4th century AD. Christianity, as embodied by the Church, was the state religion of Georgia until 1921, when a constitutional change separated church and state. The Georgian Orthodox Church is in full communion with the other churches of Eastern Orthodoxy. Its autocephaly is recognized by other Orthodox bodies, including the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople since 1990. As in similar autocephalous Orthodox churches, the Church's highest governing body is the Holy Synod of bishops. It is headed by the Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia. The current Patriarch is Ilia II, who was elected in 1977. The Constitution of Georgia recognizes the special role of the Georgian Orthodox Church in the
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Nan Hua Temple

    Nan Hua Temple

    • Associated With: Buddhism
    • Is Member Of: Fo Guang Shan
    Nan Hua Temple (南華寺, Nanhua Si) is the largest Buddhist temple and seminary in Africa, and is situated in the Cultura Park suburb of Bronkhorstspruit, South Africa. It is the African headquarters of the Fo Guang Shan (Buddha's Light Mountain) Order, covering over 600 acres (2.4 km). Fo Guang Shan was established in 1967 by Venerable Master Hsing Yun, and is a Mahayana Chinese Buddhism monastic order. The Temple, like its mother order in Taiwan, follows the Linji Chan school of Buddhism as well as the Pure Land School. The Temple can trace its roots back to 8 March 1992, when the Bronkhorstspruit City Council, under its chief executive and former church minister, Dr Hennie Senekal, who had previously visited Taiwan to promote investment opportunities in his town, donated six hectares of land to the Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Order for a Chinese Buddhist cultural and educational complex. The Fo Guang Shan Religious Affairs Committee subsequently sent Venerable Hui Li to be the founding abbot of the temple, whose main aim is to promote Buddhism on the African continent. Construction began in October 1992; the eventual cost of the temple complex was sixty million South African rand. Since
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Oadby Evangelical Free Church

    Oadby Evangelical Free Church

    Oadby Evangelical Free Church is an independent evangelical church in Oadby, Leicestershire, UK. It was formed mainly by members of Knighton Evangelical Free Church, also in Leicester in 1973, and was officially inaugurated on Friday 24 January 1975. In September the following year the Rev. Michael Stringer was inducted as the first pastor, a position he held until his retirement at the end of August 2007. Glenn Shotton was appointed Assistant Minister in July 2005 until he left at the end of 2006 to take up a pastorate in Surrey. Rev. Adam Broughton was called to take up the position of Pastor of Oadby Evangelical Free Church from 1 August 2008. The church currently leases the North Memorial Hall in Oadby for its meetings. This is on Stoughton Road, just off the main A6. The hall is sited on the North Memorial Homes estate which was originally built to house wounded members of the armed forces from the Great War. The main service times are 10:30am and 6.30pm on Sunday. Other events, including youth groups, art classes and a mums and tots group are detailed on the church web site. The church is affiliated to the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches (FIEC).
    6.50
    2 votes
    170

    Sisters of Loreto

    The Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary whose members are commonly known as Sisters of Loreto (named so after the shrine at Loreto, Marche in Italy where Mary Ward used to pray) is a religious congregation of women, dedicated to apostolic work in the Church. It was founded in 1609 by Mary Ward. In North America, the original spelling of "Loretto" is used. Mary Ward was declared "Venerable" (the first of three steps towards being declared a saint) by the authority of Pope Benedict XVI on 19 December 2009. After being suppressed for a short period in 1639, the Institute was slowly revived, receiving complete canonical approval in 1877. Today it is engaged in a wide variety of ministries: Catholic schools, literacy programmes, spiritual direction, counselling, managing shelters for homeless women as well as several aspects of the movement for greater justice and peace in the world. They are active in every continent. Today, the Loreto Sisters have set up 150 schools worldwide, educating over 70,000 pupils. Mary Ward was inspired by the spiritual exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola (now often referred to as "Ignatian spirituality"). She had a vision for a different, new and modern
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Synod of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

    Synod of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

    The Synod of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, commonly called the Norwegian Synod, was founded in 1853. It included churches in Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin. In February 1853, several Lutheran ministers including Claus Lauritz Clausen, Hans Andreas Stub, A. C. Preus, Herman Amberg Preus, G. F. Dietrichson, Jacob Aall Ottesen, and R. D. Brandt organized the Synod of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, commonly known as the Norwegian Synod. It was organized at Koshkonong and Luther Valley near the Jefferson Prairie Settlement outside Madison, Wisconsin. Among the first denominational leaders was Ulrik Vilhelm Koren. The Synod adopted the ritual of the Church of Norway. In 1868 the name was changed to the Synod for the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. In the early years Norwegian Synod seminary students were sent to Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. Luther College was founded near La Crosse, Wisconsin in 1861, and relocated to Decorah, Iowa the next year. Peter Laurentius Larsen served as President of Luther College from 1861 until he resigned from the presidency in 1902. In 1876 the denomination established Luther
    6.50
    2 votes
    172

    Tironensian order

    The Tironensian Order or the Order of Tiron was a Roman Catholic monastic order named after the location of the mother abbey (Tiron Abbey, French: Abbaye de la Sainte-Trinité de Tiron, established in 1109) in the woods of Tiron (sometimes Thiron) in Perche, some 35 miles west of Chartres in France). They were nicknamed "Grey Monks" because of their grey robes, which their spiritual cousins, the monks of Savigny, also wore. The order, or congregation, of Tiron was founded in about 1106 by the Benedictine Bernard de Ponthieu, also known as Bernard d'Abbeville (1046-1117), born in a small village near Abbeville, Ponthieu. As a pre-Cistercian reformer, Bernard's intention was to restore the asceticism and strict observance of the Rule of St. Benedict in monastic life, insisting on manual labour. Tonsured at the Benedictine Abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers around the year 1070, Bernard left the order in 1101 when his nomination as new abbot was disapproved by Cluny and Pope Paschal II. From then on Bernard lived first as a hermit on the island of Chausey, between Jersey and Saint-Malo, then in the woods of Craon, near Chartres, with two other rigorist monks: Robert d'Arbrissel, future
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    Universal House of Justice

    Universal House of Justice

    • Associated With: Bahá'í Faith
    The Universal House of Justice is the supreme governing institution of the Bahá'í Faith. It is a legislative institution with the authority to supplement and apply the laws of Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the Bahá'í Faith, and exercises a judicial function as the highest appellate institution in the Bahá'í administration. The institution was defined in the writings of Bahá'u'lláh and `Abdu'l-Bahá, Bahá'u'lláh's successor, and was officially established in 1963 as the culmination of the Ten Year Crusade, an international Bahá'í teaching plan. Its nine members are elected every five years from the male membership in good standing of the world community by an electoral college consisting of all the members of each Bahá'í National Spiritual Assembly throughout the world. The Seat of the Universal House of Justice and its members reside in Haifa, Israel, on the slope of Mount Carmel. While being empowered to legislate on matters, the Universal House of Justice has, since its inception, limited its exercise of this function. Instead it has generally provided guidance to Bahá'ís around the world through letters and messages. The books and documents published by the Universal House of
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    2 votes
    174
    American Atheists

    American Atheists

    • Associated With: Atheism
    American Atheists is a non-profit organization in the United States dedicated to defending the civil liberties of atheists and advocating for the complete separation of church and state. It provides speakers for colleges, universities, clubs and the news media. It also publishes books and the quarterly American Atheist Magazine, currently edited by Pamela Whissel. The organization was founded by Madalyn Murray O'Hair. American Atheists was founded in 1963 by Madalyn Murray O'Hair as the Society of Separationists, after the legal cases Abington School District v. Schempp and Murray v. Curlett (1959) which were later consolidated. Both Schempp and Murray challenged mandatory prayer in public schools. Over the years American Atheists has filed numerous lawsuits against public institutions it considers to have breached the wall of separation between church and state. The organization, which has approximately 2,200 members, is headquartered in Cranford, New Jersey. In 1959, Murray filed a case on behalf of her son, William J. Murray, who was being forced to attend Bible readings in school and was being harassed by teachers and school administrators for refusing to participate. The
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Jewish United Fund

    Jewish United Fund

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Jewish United Fund / Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago (JUF) is the central philanthropic address of Chicago's Jewish community and one of the largest not-for-profit social welfare institutions in Illinois. JUF provides critical resources that bring food, refuge, health care, education and emergency assistance to 300,000 Chicagoans of all faiths and 2 million Jews in Israel and around the world, funding a network of nearly 70 agencies and programs. National and Overseas—The Jewish United Fund of Metropolitan Chicago (JUF) conducts fundraising activities by means of annual calendar year campaigns and makes allocations/grants to the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) and the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago (JF). Through its allocation to JFNA, JUF supports services to nearly 2 million individuals in Israel and 71 other countries. These range from basic social service programs addressing needs of all age groups to formal and informal Jewish education/identity development. The major beneficiary organizations which engage in overseas work through support from JFNA are the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee , The Jewish Agency for Israel and the
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Union for Traditional Judaism

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Union for Traditional Judaism is an ostensibly non-denominational Jewish educational, outreach and communal service organization. The UTJ, as it is known, sees itself as trans-denominational, and works to encourage traditional observance among all Jews. The UTJ maintains various educational and religious programs, and makes these available to the wider community. Though officially non-denominational, the UTJ is understood to have many components typically associated with a religious denomination, i.e. a seminary, an association of clergy, and a committee which has authority over religious issues. The UTJ is often viewed as representing a denomination or inhabiting an ideologic space nestled between Conservative Judaism and Orthodox Judaism. The UTJ is headquartered in Teaneck, New Jersey, USA. The Union for Traditional Judaism, originally known as the Union for Traditional Conservative Judaism, began as a rabbinic rather than a lay movement. It was founded by a group of traditionalist Conservative rabbis, led by former Jewish Theological Seminary of America Talmud professor David Weiss Halivni, who broke with the movement because of ideological differences, including the
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Church of the Province of Central Africa

    Church of the Province of Central Africa

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Church of the Province of Central Africa is part of the Anglican Communion, and includes 15 dioceses in Botswana, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The Primate of the Church is the Archbishop of Central Africa. Albert Chama is the current Archbishop, being installed on 20 March 2011, succeeding Bernard Amos Malango who retired in 2007. Archbishop Chama continues to serve as Bishop of Northern Zambia, and is the first Zambian to be Archbishop of Central Africa. In 1861, the first Anglican missionary to the area was Bishop Charles Frederick Mackenzie, who arrived with David Livingstone. In 1855, he went to Natal with Bishop John Colenso. They worked among the English settlers till 1859. In 1860, Mackenzie became head of the Universities' Mission to Central Africa and he was consecrated bishop in St George's Cathedral, Cape Town, on 1 January 1861. Following Dr David Livingstone's request to Cambridge, Bishop Mackenzie took on the position of being the first missionary bishop in Malawi (Nyasaland). Moving from Cape Town, he arrived at Chibisa’s village in June 1861 with the goal to establish a mission station at Magomero, near Zomba. Bishop Mackenzie worked among the people of the
    5.33
    3 votes
    178
    Iglesia Anglicana del Cono Sur de las Americas

    Iglesia Anglicana del Cono Sur de las Americas

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Anglican Church of the Southern Cone of America (Spanish: Iglesia Anglicana del Cono Sur de América) is the ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion that covers the countries of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. Formed in 1981, as of 30 November 2007, the province reported 22,000 members. Its members in South America are thinly spread, making it one of the smaller provinces in the Anglican Communion in terms of numbers, although one of the largest in geographical extent. During the 19th century, immigrants to South America brought Anglicanism with them(Milmine p.8). In Britain a voluntary Anglican society was formed in 1844 to evangelize the inhabitants of Tierra del Fuego. This later became The South American Mission Society (SAMS) and extended its activities the Araucanian regions of Chile and the Chaco. It still plays an important place in the life of the church. The first Diocese was established in 1869 as the Diocese of the Falkland Islands and the rest of South America excepting British Guyana with its Bishop resident in Buenos Aires.(Milmine p.11) Despite its title, the diocese's effective territory was restricted to the Southern Cone plus
    5.33
    3 votes
    179
    Japan Evangelistic Band

    Japan Evangelistic Band

    The Japan Evangelistic Band (JEB), or 'Kyodan Nihon Dendo Tai' (日本伝道隊) in Japanese, is an evangelical Christian group founded in England in 1903 with the original aim to "initiate and sustain evangelistic work among Japanese wherever they are found". Within thirty years the organisation grew to 180 workers from many countries, but most of them from Japan. The JEB's primary field was the Kansai region of South West Japan and the island of Shikoku but missionaries worked among Japanese living on the West Coast of Canada and the USA, and in the UK. In 1999 the organisation in the UK adopted the name Japan Christian Link for their operations in the UK, while work in Japan continue under the name of JEB. The JEB was founded by the Rev. Barclay Fowell Buxton and Paget Wilkes at the Keswick Convention in 1903 as an evangelising agency to assist existing missions and churches and to organise Christian Conventions for Bible Study and Prayer. Buxton had been an independent missionary in Japan with the British Church Missionary Society since 1890 and had invited Wilkes to join him as a lay helper there in 1897. They worked together at Matsue in Western Japan, before returning to England.
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    Sanhedrin

    Sanhedrin

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Sanhedrin (Hebrew: סַנְהֶדְרִין sanhedrîn, Greek: συνέδριον, synedrion, "sitting together," hence "assembly" or "council") was an assembly of twenty-three judges appointed in every city in the Biblical Land of Israel. The Great Sanhedrin was the supreme court of ancient Israel made of 71 members. The Great Sanhedrin was made up of a Chief/Prince/Leader called Nasi (at some times this position may have been held by the Kohen Gadol or the High Priest), a vice chief justice (Av Beit Din), and sixty-nine general members. In the Second Temple period, the Great Sanhedrin met in the Hall of Hewn Stones in the Temple in Jerusalem. The court convened every day except festivals and Shabbat. In the late 3rd century, to avoid persecution, its authoritative decisions were issued under the name of Beth HaMidrash. The penultimate binding decision of the Sanhedrin was in 358, when the Hebrew Calendar was adopted. The Sanhedrin was dissolved after continued persecution by the Roman Empire. Over the centuries, there have been attempts to revive the institution, such as the Grand Sanhedrin convened by Napoleon Bonaparte and modern attempts in Israel. The Sanhedrin is mentioned in the Gospels in
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Kadampa Buddhist Temple

    Kadampa Buddhist Temple

    • Associated With: Buddhism
    The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at Conishead Priory on the outskirts of Ulverston, Cumbria, England. It was consecrated in July 1997 and functions as the main meditation hall at Manjushri Kadampa Meditation Centre. It is also the location of the annual Spring and Summer Festivals attended by Kadampa Buddhists from all over the world. More Kadampa Buddhist Temples are currently under construction in various countries.
    4.50
    4 votes
    182
    Bellevue Baptist Church

    Bellevue Baptist Church

    Bellevue Baptist Church is a large Southern Baptist megachurch in the Cordova area of Memphis, Tennessee, United States. Bellevue Baptist was founded in 1903 by Central Baptist Church as a mission church on the outskirts of Memphis. With a small $1,000 gift from member Fannie Jobe, pastor Thomas Potts, led the congregation to build a one-room stone chapel at the corner of Bellevue and Erskine Avenues. The first service was held on July 12, 1903 with Bellevue's first pastor, Dr. Henry Hurt. Thirty-two founding members signed the official charter on August 9, 1903. The church completed a 3,000 seat building in 1952, which was one of the first air-conditioned churches in Memphis. Bellevue became one of the largest Southern Baptist churches in the United States in the 1950s with more than 9,000 members. The church relocated to its current building (2000 Appling Road), which seats 7,000, on a 377 acre (1.6 km²) campus in Cordova, a Memphis suburb, in 1989. Bellevue is ranked 80th in the largest and fasting growing churches in America by LifeWay Research for Outreach Magazine. The attendance has been up to 6,567. The church's location near Interstate 40 is marked by a display of three
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Brazilian Catholic Apostolic Church

    Brazilian Catholic Apostolic Church

    The Brazilian Catholic Apostolic Church (Portuguese: Igreja Católica Apostólica Brasileira; ICAB) is an independent Catholic church established in 1945 by Brazilian bishop Dom Carlos Duarte Costa, a former Roman Catholic Bishop of Botucatu. The ICAB has 58 dioceses and claims seven million members in 17 countries. Its past head was Patriarch Dom Luis Fernando Castillo Mendez, Worldwide Council of Catholic Apostolic Churches (WCCAC), a loose communion of churches in 14 countries. The present President of the Episcopal Council in Brazil is Dom Josivaldo Perriera. The ICAB accepts the Nicene, Athanasian, and Apostles' creeds and observes seven sacraments (baptism, Eucharist, confirmation, penance, unction, ordination, and matrimony). ICAB practices open communion for all Christians who acknowledge the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. The church acknowledges divorce as a reality of life and permitted in Holy Scripture, and will marry divorced persons after the Ecclesiastical Process of Investigation and baptize the children of divorced or single parents. ICAB teaches that birth control is acceptable in certain circumstances (such as for disease prevention). It opposes
    6.00
    2 votes
    184

    Bright

    • Associated With: Atheism
    If you are rational, scientific, generally skeptical of supernatural claims, and look to the natural world for your inspiration, you may not feel like claiming any traditional religion as your own. So what do you say when asked your religion? Maybe "atheist" or "nonreligious" is too strong, or too confrontational. One possible answer is "Bright". Is it an actual "religion"? There is not much to believe in, other than good mental hygiene. Brights can be agnostics, rationalists, skeptics, atheists, objectivists, igtheists, and so on. Will the term catch on?

    Here are four links that help explain the "Bright religion", but the contents are all copyrighted.

    http://www.the-brights.net/
    http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,12084,981412,00.html
    http://www.the-brights.net/vision/essays/dennett_nyt_article.html
    http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20040209-000016.html

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    2 votes
    185

    Committee on Jewish Law and Standards

    • Associated With: Conservative Judaism
    The Committee on Jewish Law and Standards is the central authority on halakha (Jewish law and tradition) within Conservative Judaism; it is one of the most active and widely known committees on the Conservative movement's Rabbinical Assembly. Within the movement it is known as the CJLS. The current Chairman of the CJLS is Rabbi Elliot Dorff. The Committee on Jewish Law was created by the Rabbinical Assembly (RA) in 1927. Max Drob was the first chair of the Committee. The Committee was tasked with including representatives from the "Various tendencies" of the Rabbinical Assembly. Of the ten members of the committee, four were to represent a "more conservative tendency," four were to represent "the liberal tendency," and two more were to be chosen by the eight. The more conservative rabbis on the initial committee were Louis Epstein, Louis Finkelstein, Julius Greenstone, and Chairman Drob. The liberals were Mordecai Kaplan, Jacob Kohn, Herman Rubenovitz, and Solomon Goldman. The two additional members were Harry S. Davidowitz and Morris Levine. Drob viewed the creation of the Committee as "the first step towards the organization of an American beit din hagadol [supreme court of
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Fellowship of the Pentecostal Churches in India

    Fellowship of the Pentecostal Churches in India

    The Fellowship of the Pentecostal Churches in India has around 1,100 churches in its network with its headquarters at Itarsi, Madhya Pradesh, India. The fellowship unanimously re-elected Dr. Matthew Thomas as chairman during the October Fellowship Conference in 2008. As Pentecostal churches continued to spring all over India, the graduates of Central India Theological Seminary who worked mainly in the north, began to feel the need to form a Fellowship for closer fellowship. So, at the 1966 Annual Convention of the Pentecostal Church at Itarsi, the Christian workers united to form the Fellowship of the Pentecostal Churches of God in India (FPCGI). The first elected chairman of the Fellowship was Dr. Kurien Thomas, a pioneer Pentecostal missionary in north India, who held that position till 1984, "when it was unanimously decided that the burden should be placed upon...Thomas Matthews." The Fellowship was registered with the Indian Government in 1969 and had the following objectives: To preach the Gospel in the whole of the land of India. To establish independent Churches.... To oppose all doctrines that are not true to the clear teachings of the Bible. The local Church should be free
    6.00
    2 votes
    187

    Jewish Federation

    • Associated With: Judaism
    A Jewish Federation is a confederation of various Jewish social agencies, volunteer programs, educational bodies, and related organizations, found within most cities in North America that host a viable Jewish community. Their broad purpose is to provide "human services", generally, but not exclusively, to the local Jewish community. The Jewish Federations of North America represents 157 Jewish Federations and over 300 Network communities, which raise and distribute more than $3 billion annually. The first Jewish federation was founded in Boston in 1895. Federations were soon formed in Cincinnati, then in many other cities. Each federation is autonomous from federations of other cities and they tend to focus on local concerns. The federations typically have elected boards or trustees that are accountable to the community, paid staff, and volunteer leadership. Federations raise money for central "community chests" that support the organizations of the entire local Jewish community. Between 30 and 50 percent of Jewish households in the United States typically contribute to their local federation. They engage in centralized planning for the needs of the local community, and may provide
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Premonstratensian

    Premonstratensian

    The Order of Canons Regular of Prémontré, also known as the Premonstratensians, the Norbertines, or in Britain and Ireland as the White Canons (from the colour of their habit), are a Roman Catholic religious order of canons regular founded at Prémontré near Laon in 1120 by Saint Norbert, who later became Archbishop of Magdeburg. Premonstratensians are designated by O.Praem (Ordo Praemonstratensis) following their name. Saint Norbert had made various efforts to introduce a strict form of canonical life in various communities of canons in Germany; in 1120 he was working in the now-extinct Diocese of Laon, in the Picardy province of northeastern France. There, in a rural place called Prémontré, he and thirteen companions established a monastery to be the cradle of a new order. As they were canons regular, they followed the Rule of St. Augustine, but with supplementary statutes that made their life one of great austerity. Norbert was a friend of Saint Bernard of Clairvaux and so was largely influenced by the Cistercian ideals as to both the manner of life and the government of his order. As the Premonstratensians are not monks but canons regular, their work often involves preaching and
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    Romanian Orthodox Church

    Romanian Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Romanian Orthodox Church (Biserica Ortodoxă Română in Romanian) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox church. It is in full communion with other Eastern Orthodox churches, and is ranked seventh in order of precedence. The Primate of the church has the title of Patriarch. Its jurisdiction covers the territory of Romania, with dioceses for Romanians living in nearby Moldova, Serbia and Hungary, as well as diaspora communities in Central and Western Europe, North America and Oceania. It is the only Eastern Orthodox church using a Romance language. The majority of people in Romania (18,817,975, or 86.8% of the population, according to the 2002 census data) belong to it, as well as some 720,000 Moldovans. The Romanian Orthodox Church is the second-largest in size behind the Russian Orthodox Church. Adherents of the Romanian Orthodox Church sometimes refer to it as Dreapta credinţă ("right/correct belief" or "true faith"; compare to Greek ὀρθὴ δόξα, "straight/correct belief"). In 1859, the Romanian principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia formed the modern state of Romania. The hierarchy of the Orthodox churches tends to follow the structure of the state. Therefore, shortly
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    2 votes
    190
    St. Anne of the Sunset Church in San Francisco

    St. Anne of the Sunset Church in San Francisco

    • Is Member Of: Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco
    St. Anne of the Sunset Catholic Church in San Francisco is a parish of the Archdiocese of San Francisco in San Francisco, California. St. Anne is one of four Sunset District Catholic churches and mainly caters to the Inner Sunset area near Golden Gate Park and the University of California, San Francisco hospital campus. The larger, rosy-red church can easily be seen from anywhere in the Inner Sunset and a MUNI streetcar has a line that travels along Judah Street in front of the Church. Every year, the parishioners of St. Anne's hold a novena honoring their patron saint, in which they have a procession around the neighborhood, commencing in the vestibule of the church. The parish has an illustrious history, dating back to its founding in 1904. The parish grew up with the Sunset neighborhood, originally known as the "Outside Lands," which were made up entirely of sand dunes extending out to present-day Ocean Beach. The first church, a small wood-frame structure, was built in 1905 on land donated by a Mrs. Jane Callahan. The church, which seated up to 450 people, was toppled in the 1906 earthquake. Though it was rebuilt and extended to accommodate the growing parish, it became
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Georgia

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Georgia

    • Building: Atlanta Georgia Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of January 1, 2011, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 77,948 members in 15 stakes, 151 Congregations (112 wards and 39 branches,), 3 missions, and 1 temple in Georgia. In 1843, missionary work was briefly opened in Georgia by Elder John U. Eldredge. Other missionaries followed to preach and to campaign for Joseph Smith in his presidential bid. The campaign ceased in 1844 with the death of Joseph Smith, and missionary work halted in 1846. Missionary work in Georgia resumed in 1878. The Southern States Mission headquarters was established in Rome (60 miles north of Atlanta). One early convert to the Church donated land and built a chapel at Mormon Springs in Haralson County. Missionaries were initially treated well upon their return to the South, but before long their success led to violent opposition. On July 21 1879, Elder Joseph Standing was killed by a mob near Varnell's Station. His companion escaped serious injury. Unable to secure protection for missionaries, the church pulled out all missionaries in Georgia for the next decade. in 1884, a small group of members left to go west by Train. Missionaries returned to Georgia in 1899, but slowly and
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    5.00
    3 votes
    193
    Universal Church of the Kingdom of God

    Universal Church of the Kingdom of God

    Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (UCKG, from Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus, pronounced: [iˈgɾeʒɐ wˌnʲiveʁˈsaw du ˈʁejnu dʒi ˈdews], also known as UCKG HelpCentre) is a Pentecostal Christian organisation established in Brazil on July 9, 1977, with a presence in many countries. According to church sources as reported in Brazilian magazine Veja, in 1999 the UCKG had 12 million members worldwide, of which 8 million in Brazil, with 5,000 churches and 20,000 pastors there. Church sources from 2003 indicate a worldwide membership of about 2 million, over 90% of which in Brazil. The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God was formed in 1977 in Brazil. It owes its origins to an evangelistic programme conducted by Bishop Robert McAlister, a Canadian missionary in the Pentecostal tradition. The church's spiritual leader, Edir Macedo is a former Brazilian national lottery employee and disillusioned Catholic who began his ministry in mid 1977 by preaching on a weekly radio show, according to Brazilian press reports. Macedo went on to found UCKG. He started to hold services under a small park shelter in Rio de Janeiro and later used cinemas and local halls to draw in congregants and
    5.00
    3 votes
    194
    Agudath Israel of America

    Agudath Israel of America

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Agudath Israel of America (Hebrew: אגודת ישראל באמריקה‎) (sometimes referred to as Agudah or abbreviated AIA), is a Haredi Jewish communal organization in the United States loosely affiliated with the international World Agudath Israel. Agudah serves as a leadership and policy umbrella organization for Haredi Jews in the United States, both those affiliating with the Hasidic and the non-Hasidic Mitnagdim/Lithuanian Jewish camps. Agudah in the United States has been very successful in the difficult task of retaining its major Hasidic factions, with members from the Ger Hasidim in America working together within the organization and its non-Hasidic Lithuanian rosh yeshivas as partners. Agudah represents the vast majority members of the yeshiva world, sometimes known by the old label of misnagdim, as well as sectors of Hasidic Judaism; all are commonly known as Haredim or "ultra-Orthodox" Jews representing Torah Judaism in North America. Not all Hasidic Jewish groups are affiliated with Agudath Israel. For example, the Hasidic group Satmar dislikes Agudah's relatively moderate stance towards the State of Israel. Agudah has ideological connections with both the Agudat Israel party and
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Church in Wales

    Church in Wales

    The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys yng Nghymru) is the Anglican church in Wales, composed of six dioceses. As with the primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, the Archbishop of Wales serves concurrently as one of the six diocesan bishops. The current archbishop is Barry Morgan, the Bishop of Llandaff. In contrast to the Church of England, the Church in Wales is not an established church. Disestablishment was effected in 1920, under the Welsh Church Act 1914. It was, however, on Disestablishment, allowed to keep all its church buildings including ancient pre-Reformation ones. As a member of the Anglican Communion the Church in Wales recognises the primacy of the Archbishop of Canterbury who does not, however, have any formal authority in the Church in Wales (except for residual roles — in ecclesiastical court to try the archbishop, as metropolitan, and the appointment of notaries). A handful of border parishes remained in the Church of England and so were exempt from disestablishment, It has proved possible for a cleric of the Church in Wales to come to occupy the See of Canterbury, and the current archbishop, the Most Reverend Rowan Williams, is Welsh and originally held posts
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    Orthodox Church in America

    Orthodox Church in America

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Orthodox Church in America (OCA) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox church in North America. The OCA consists of more than 700 parishes, missions, communities, monasteries and institutions in the United States and Canada. In 2011, it had 84,900 members in the United States. The OCA began when eight Russian Orthodox monks established a mission in Alaska, then part of Russian America, in 1794. This became a diocese of the Russian Orthodox Church after the United States purchased Alaska from Russia in 1867. By the late 19th century, the Russian Orthodox Church had grown in other areas of the United States due to the arrival of immigrants from areas of Europe and the Middle East. Many of these immigrants, regardless of nationality or ethnic background, were united under a single North American diocese of the Russian Orthodox Church. After the Bolshevik Revolution, Patriarch Tikhon of Moscow directed all Russian Orthodox churches outside of Russia to govern themselves autonomously. Orthodox churches in America became a self-governing Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church in America in 1924 under the leadership of Metropolitan Platon (Rozhdestvensky). The Russian Orthodox Greek
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    197
    Roman Catholic Church in New Zealand

    Roman Catholic Church in New Zealand

    • Associated With: Catholicism
    The Catholic Church in New Zealand is part of the worldwide Catholic Church, which, inspired by the life, death and teachings of Jesus Christ, and under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and Roman curia in Vatican City (within Rome) is the largest Christian church in the world. Catholic settlers first arrived in the 1820s, with British settlement of New Zealand. There are now an estimated 508,000 baptized Catholics in New Zealand, around 12 percent of the total population. In New Zealand there is one Archdiocese (Wellington) and five suffragan dioceses (Auckland, Christchurch, Dunedin, Hamilton and Palmerston North). There are 530 priests and 1200 men and women religious. In 2006, around 55% of New Zealanders identified as being Christian, with first Anglicanism then Catholicism and Presbyterianism being the largest denominations. The Census recorded 508,437 New Zealand Catholics, a 4.7% increase on the 2001 census. This represented about 12.3% of the overall population of New Zealand, which was measured at 4,143,279 people on census night. The number of Catholics increased by 12,900 between 1996 and 2001 and by 22,800 between 2001 and 2006 and the Catholic Church was the
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    198

    Temple Emanu-El of Dallas

    • Associated With: Reform Judaism
    Temple Emanu-El of Dallas, Texas (founded in 1875) was the first Reform Jewish congregation in North Texas, and is the largest synagogue in the South. Temple Emanu-El of Dallas was founded in 1873 and chartered in 1875. Originally called the Jewish Congregation Emanu-El, it was renamed Temple Emanu-El Congregation in 1974. The small but growing Jewish community felt the need for a permanent religious structure as well as for a rabbi to conduct services and to offer religious education for children, several families formed Congregation Emanu-El. They elected David Goslin president; Philip Sanger vice president; Emanuel Tillman treasurer; H. Regensburger secretary; and Alexander Sanger, August Israelsky, and Henry Loeb trustees. The next year they built a small red brick temple in the Byzantine style at Commerce and Church (now Field) streets in downtown Dallas. The congregation engaged its first rabbi, Aaron Suhler, in 1875 and joined the Union of American Hebrew Congregations in 1906. In 1957 the temple moved to its present location in north Dallas. Architects Howard R. Meyer and Max M. Sandfield, with noted California architect William Wurster as consultant, received an Award of
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    199
    Armenian Apostolic Church

    Armenian Apostolic Church

    • Associated With: Oriental Orthodoxy
    The Armenian Apostolic Church (Armenian: Հայաստանեայց Առաքելական Եկեղեցի, Hayastaneayc’ Aṙak’elakan Ekeġec’i) is the world's oldest National Church, is part of Oriental Orthodoxy, and is one of the most ancient Christian communities. Armenia was the first country to adopt Christianity as its official religion in 301 AD, in establishing this church. The Armenian Apostolic Orthodox Church traces its origins to the missions of Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus in the 1st century and is an early center of Christianity. It is sometimes referred to as the Gregorian Church, but the latter name is not preferred by the Church, as it views the Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus as the founders, and St. Gregory the Illuminator as merely the first official governor of the Church. Various legends tie the origin of the Armenian Church to the Apostles. Apostolic succession is an important concept for many churches, especially those in the east. The legend of the healing of Abgar V of Edessa by the facecloth of Jesus has been appropriated by the Armenian Church in claiming that Abgar was a prince of Armenia. The more common tradition claims that St. Thaddaeus, one of the Twelve Apostles, was sent
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    200
    Armenian Catholic Church

    Armenian Catholic Church

    The Armenian Catholic Church (Armenian: Հայ Կաթողիկէ Եկեղեցի Hay Kat’oġikē Ekeġec’i) is an Eastern Catholic Church sui juris in full union with the Roman Catholic Church. It is in full communion with and accepts the authority of the Pope in Rome as regulated by Eastern canon law. Since 1749, Armenian Catholic Church is headquartered at the Armenian Catholic Patriarchate complex in Bzoummar, Lebanon. After the Armenian Apostolic Church formally broke off communion from the Chalcedonian churches in the 5th century, some Armenian bishops and congregations made attempts to restore communion with the Catholic Church. During the Crusades, the church of the Armenian kingdom of Cilicia entered into a union with the Catholic Church, an attempt that did not last. The union was later re-established during the Council of Florence in 1439, but did not have any real effects for centuries. In 1740, Abraham-Pierre I Ardzivian, who had earlier become a Catholic, was elected as the patriarch of Sis. Two years later Pope Benedict XIV formally established the Armenian Catholic Church. In 1749, the Armenian Catholic Church built a convent in Bzoummar, Lebanon. During the horrific Armenian genocide in
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    201
    Atheist Alliance International

    Atheist Alliance International

    • Associated With: Atheism
    Atheist Alliance International (AAI) is a global network of atheist organisations around the world. AAI was founded in 1991. The organisation consists of group (affiliate) members and individual supporters. Affiliate members are the organisation stakeholders and have voting rights for the board and any bylaws changes. The organisation also includes a network of associate groups who do not hold any voting power. AAI's board consists of up to 13 people elected for two-year terms. No more than 3 board members can come from the same country, and any affiliate can have a maximum of 1 representative serving on the board. (Board members may also be unaffiliated with any affiliate group.) Elections are staggered so approximately half of the board is up for election each year. Elections are held at the Annual General Meeting (AGM), held in the spring of each year and usually in conjunction with a conference co-hosted by AAI and one of its affiliate groups. AAI officers are elected by and from its board for one-year terms each spring. The current President of AAI is Carlos A. Diaz from Buenos Aires, Argentina. He was elected for the 2012-2013 term on 27 May 2012. AAI's vision is "a secular
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    202
    Bialystoker Synagogue

    Bialystoker Synagogue

    The Bialystoker Synagogue at 7-11 Willett Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, New York State is an Orthodox Jewish synagogue. The physical building is registered as an historic landmark. The Bialystoker Synagogue was first organized in 1865 on Manhattan's Lower East Side as the Chevra Anshei Chesed of Bialystok, founded by a group of Jews who came from town of Białystok in Poland. The congregation was begun in a building on Hester Street, then it later moved to Orchard Street, and ultimately to its present location 7-11 Bialystoker Place on the Lower East Side. In order to accommodate the influx of new immigrants from that area of Poland, in 1905 the congregation merged with congregation Hadas Yeshuan, also from Bialystok, and formed the Bait Ha'Knesset Anshi Bialystok (The Bialystoker Synagogue). The newly formed congregation then purchased and moved into the Willett Street Methodist Episcopal Church at 7 Willet Street (now 7-11 Willet Street, later renamed Bialystoker Place). During the Great Depression a decision was made to beautify the main sanctuary, to provide a sense of hope and inspiration to the community. The fieldstone Methodist Episcopal Church
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    203
    Coalition for the Advancement of Jewish Education

    Coalition for the Advancement of Jewish Education

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The Coalition for the Advancement of Jewish Education (CAJE), founded as the Coalition for Alternatives in Jewish Education, is a non-profit organization based in New York City. Its activities include an annual conference that draws more Jewish educators than any other similar event, advocacy for Jewish educators, various education-related publications, and more. Its founding was the brainchild of Jerry Benjamin and Cherie Koller-Fox. In 2009 CAJE closed its doors. According to its bylaws, the purpose of CAJE is to "bring together Jews of all ideologies for work, study, and sharing in discussion of issues in the field of Jewish education." Also according to the bylaws, "[t]he conduct of educational conferences shall be a primary activity of [CAJE]." The yearly CAJE conference draws between 1,000 and 2,000 Jewish educators from around the world. Unlike other conferences of its size, the CAJE conference typically offers several hundred workshops over the course of only a few days. The daily workshops are supplemented by evening keynote addresses and musical and theatrical entertainment. In recent years, sub-conferences such as the "Consortium for the Future of the Jewish Family" have
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    204
    Orthodox Church of Jerusalem

    Orthodox Church of Jerusalem

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem (Greek: Πατριαρχεῖον Ἱεροσολύμων, Patriarcheîon Hierosolýmōn; Arabic: كنيسة الروم الأرثوذكس في القدس‎Kanisa Ar-rum Urtudoks fi al-Quds), also known as the Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem, is an autocephalous Orthodox Church within the wider communion of Orthodox Christianity. Headed by the Patriarch of Jerusalem, it is regarded by Orthodox Christians as the mother church of all of Christendom. Christians believe that it was in Jerusalem that the Church was established on the day of Pentecost with the descent of the Holy Spirit on the disciples of Jesus Christ (Acts 2:1-41) and that the Gospel of Christ spread from Jerusalem. The Church celebrates its liturgy in the Byzantine rite, whose original language is Greek, and follows its own calendar of feasts, preserving the Julian calendar (that is thirteen days behind the Western (Gregorian) calendar). It is also often called "Σιωνίτις Εκκλησία" (Greek: Sionitis Ecclesia, i.e. the "Church of Zion"). The number of Orthodox Christians in the Holy Land are estimated at about 500,000 people. A majority of Church members are Palestinians and Jordanians, and there are also many Russians, Romanians,
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    205

    Presbyterian Church

    The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), or PC(USA), is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. Part of the Reformed tradition, it is the largest Presbyterian denomination in the U.S., followed by the Presbyterian Church in America. The PC(USA) was established by the 1983 merger of the former Presbyterian Church in the United States, whose churches were located in the Southern and border states, with the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, whose congregations could be found in every state. With 1,952,287 members and 21,064 ordained ministers in 10,657 congregations at the end of 2011, the reunited denomination is the most visible and influential Presbyterian denomination in North America. The denomination reported a loss of 61,047 members (−2.9%) in 2010, a loss of 63,804 in 2011 and had a membership of 1,952,287 at the end of 2011. Denominational offices are located in Louisville, Kentucky. The PC(USA) is a member of the National Council of Churches, the World Communion of Reformed Churches, the World Council of Churches, and Christian Churches Together. Presbyterians trace their history to the 16th century and the Protestant
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    206
    Rabbis for Human Rights

    Rabbis for Human Rights

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Rabbis for Human Rights is an Israeli human rights organisation describing itself as "the rabbinic voice of conscience in Israel, giving voice to the Jewish tradition of human rights". Rabbis for Human Rights is a partner organization of Rabbis for Human Rights-North America. Their membership includes Reform, Orthodox, Conservative and Reconstructionist rabbis and students. According to their web site, the organization includes "over one hundred ordained rabbis and rabbinical students". The organization received the Niwano Peace Prize in 2006. The organization was founded in 1988. Its membership consists of Israeli Rabbis and rabbinical students. RHR has a nineteen member Board of Directors. Rabbi Arik Ascherman served as co-director of Rabbis For Human Rights, becoming executive director in 1998. Ayala Levi took over as Executive Director in 2010. In 2002, Rabbis for Human Rights-North America was created, inspired by the work of Rabbis for Human Rights-Israel. Rabbis for Human Rights-North America works on human rights issues in both North American and in Israel, and financially supports the work of RHR in Israel. RHR is best known for dispatching volunteers to act as human
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    207

    Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability

    • Associated With: Christian and Missionary Alliance
    The Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) is an accreditation agency to promote fiscal integrity and sound financial practices among member organizations. Founded in 1979, it comprises over 1,600 evangelical Christian organizations which qualify for tax-exempt, nonprofit status and receive tax-deductible contributions. As of 2006, the total income of ECFA member organizations is reported to be approximately $15 billion. The organization has, since its inception, been based in the Washington, DC area with offices presently in Winchester, Virginia. In 1977, Senator Mark Hatfield, who was since 1973 a member of the board of World Vision, told evangelicals that they needed to formalize some means for financial accountability or government legislation would be required. At the same time, Texas Congressman Charles Wilson had drafted a bill that would have required ministries to disclose "at the point of solicitation." A group of representatives from more than thirty evangelical groups met in December of that year to formulate a plan. At that meeting, Hatfield's chief legislative assistant told them that "a voluntary disclosure program" would "preclude the necessity of
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    208
    Evangelical Lutheran Synod

    Evangelical Lutheran Synod

    The Evangelical Lutheran Synod or ELS is a US-based Protestant Christian denomination based in Mankato, Minnesota. It describes itself as a conservative, Confessional Lutheran body. There are approximately 19,945 baptized members in 142 established congregations and 12 mission churches. The current president is the Rev. John Moldstad, M.Div., S.T.M., who has been serving since 2002. Note that the ELS uses the term synod differently from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and is a separate denomination. The Evangelical Lutheran Synod traces its history back to 1853 when the "Norwegian Synod" was organized in the Midwestern United States. They practiced "fellowship", a form of full communion, with the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod (LCMS) during the 1850s and 1860s. In 1872, they along with the LCMS and the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) formed the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America. In 1917, the Norwegian Synod merged with two other Norwegian Lutheran groups and formed the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, later named the Evangelical Lutheran Church. This led to disagreement among members of the Norwegian Synod. The people who
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    209
    Kollel Shomrei HaChomos

    Kollel Shomrei HaChomos

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Kollel Shomrei haChomos (Hebrew: כולל שומרי החומות‎) is a financial charity institute or kollel set up to support the community of Hungarian-Jews who emigrated to the Holy Land, hence it is called by many the Hungarian Kollel. The Hungarian Jews separated themselves in 1858 from its mother institute Kolel Chibas Yerushalayim which at one point in time included the Jewish communities of the entire Austrian Hungarian Kingdom. Kolel Chibas Yerushalayim was itself a breakaway from the original Kolel Perushim, established by the students of the Vilna Gaon. Two leading Hungarian rabbis were appointed as the "Nesyim" or "Presidents of the Kolel, Avroham Shmuel Binyamin Sofer, author of Ketav Sofer, and Meir Eisenstein. In honor of these two leaders the Hungarian Kolel was also called "House of Sofer and Meir" By the year 1881 the kollel had built up many apartment buildings to provide housing for its members. This was accomplished in great part thanks to donations by Rabbi Yitzchok Zvi Ratzersdorfer, a Hungarian Jew who later relocated to Antwerp, Belgium and helped build the Jewish community there. These houses are called Batei Ungarin, in Yiddish Ungarishe Hoiser - the Hungarian
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    210
    Monks of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel

    Monks of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel

    The Monks of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel (also known as Carmelite Monks) is an enclosed religious community of diocesan right, founded in 2003 by Fr. Daniel Mary of Jesus Crucified, M. Carm. under the authority of Bishop David Ricken, D.D., J.C.L. in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cheyenne in Wyoming. The Monks of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel do not belong to either the Ancient Observance or Discalced branches of the Carmelite Order, who originated as hermit monks and have been mendicant friars since the 13th century. The male Carmelites of the two main branches of the Order are not considered monastics, as the cloistered Carmelite nuns are. The Carmelite Monks of Wyoming are a new and separate community of men living an enclosed life, inspired by the ancient Carmelite monastic life, under the authority of the local diocesan Bishop, yet maintain their Carmelite identity through Fr. Daniel Mary, who was clothed as a Carmelite by members of the order. They use the suffix M.Carm. to designate membership in their order. These Carmelites are monks although Carmelite men today in general are not monks, but friars since they live a more active expression of
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    211
    Roman Catholic Diocese of Alcalá de Henares

    Roman Catholic Diocese of Alcalá de Henares

    The Roman Catholic Diocese of Alcalá de Henares (Latin: Compluten(sis)) is a diocese located in the city of Alcalá de Henares in the Ecclesiastical province of Madrid in Spain. On July 23, 1991, it was established as Diocese of Alcalá de Henares from the Archdiocese of Madrid.
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    212
    Augustinians

    Augustinians

    The term Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (354–430), applies to two separate and unrelated types of Catholic religious orders: (1) Several mendicant Orders of friars, who lived a mixed religious life of contemplation and apostolic ministry and follow the Rule of St. Augustine, a brief document providing guidelines for living in a religious community. The largest and most familiar, originally known as the Hermits of Saint Augustine (O.E.S.A. - Ordo Eremitarum sancti Augustini) and also as the Austin friars, is now simply referred to as the Order of Saint Augustine (O.S.A.). Two other Orders, the Augustinian Recollects and the Discalced Augustinians, were once part of the Augustinian Order under a single Prior General. The Recollect friars, founded in 1588 as a reform movement of the Augustinian friars in Spain, became autonomous in 1612 with their first Prior General, Enrique de la Sagrada. The Discalced friars became an independent religious congregation with their own Prior General in 1592, and were raised to the status of a separate mendicant Order in 1610. (2) Various congregations of clerics, known as canons regular, who also follow the Rule of St. Augustine,
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    213
    Church of Greece

    Church of Greece

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Church of Greece (Greek: Ἐκκλησία τῆς Ἑλλάδος Ekklisía tis Elládos, [ekliˈsia tis eˈlaðos]), part of the wider Greek Orthodox Church, is one of the autocephalous churches which make up the communion of Orthodox Christianity. Its canonical territory is confined to the borders of Greece prior to the Balkan Wars of 1912–1913, with the rest of Greece being subject to the jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople. However, most of its dioceses are de facto administered as part of the Church of Greece for practical reasons, under an agreement between the churches of Athens and Constantinople. The Eastern Orthodox Church of Christ is established by the Greek constitution as the "prevailing" religion of Greece. In return for having granted a portion of its estates to the newly independent Hellenic republic in 1821, the mainstream Orthodox clergy's salaries and pensions are being paid for by the State at rates comparable to those of teachers. The Church had compensated the State by a tax of 35% on ordinary revenues of the Church but Law 3220/2004 in 2004 abolished this tax. By virtue of its status as the prevailing religion, the canon law of the Church is recognized
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    2 votes
    214
    Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria

    Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria

    • Associated With: Oriental Orthodoxy
    The Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria is the official name for the largest Christian church in Egypt and the Middle East. The Church belongs to the Oriental Orthodox family of churches, which has been a distinct church body since the Council of Chalcedon in CE 451, when it took a different position over Christological theology from that of the Eastern Orthodox Church. The precise differences in theology that caused the split with the Coptic Christians are still disputed, highly technical and mainly concerned with the nature of Christ. The foundational roots of the Church are based in Egypt but it has a worldwide following. The church was established by Saint Mark, an apostle and evangelist, in the middle of the 1st century (approximately AD 42). The head of the church and the See of Alexandria is the Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of All Africa on the Holy See of Saint Mark. As of 2012, about 10% of Egyptians belong to the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria. Egypt is identified in the Bible as the place of refuge that the Holy Family sought in its flight from Judea: "When he [Joseph] arose, he took the young Child and His mother by night and departed for Egypt, and was there
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    215
    Galveston Jewish Community

    Galveston Jewish Community

    Jews have inhabited the city of Galveston, Texas, for almost two centuries. The first known Jewish immigrant to the Galveston area was Jao de la Porta, who, along with his brother Morin, financed the first settlement by Europeans on Galveston Island in 1816. de la Porta was born in Portugal of Jewish parentage and later became a Jewish Texan trader. In 1818, Jean Laffite appointed de la Porta supercargo for the Karankawa Indian trade. When Laffite left Galveston Island in 1820, de la Porta became a full-time trader. In 1852, residents of Galveston established the first Jewish cemetery in Texas, with the first organized Jewish services being held in 1856. During the American Civil War, although most residents had fled the city of Galveston, Rosanna Osterman remained. In 1862 she opened her home as a hospital, treating first Union soldiers and then extending her care to Confederate soldiers. Congregation B'nai Israel opened in 1868. The congregation was the first Jewish Reform congregation chartered in Texas, and only the second Jewish congregation founded in the state. On June 20, 1875, the congregation voted to become one of the charter members of the Union of American Hebrew
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    216
    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago

    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago

    • Is Member Of: Roman Catholic Church
    The Archdiocese of Chicago was established as a diocese in 1843 and as an Archdiocese in 1880. It serves more than 2.3 million Catholics in Cook and Lake counties in Northeastern Illinois, a geographic area of 1,411 square miles. The Archdiocese is divided into six vicariates and 31 deaneries. This local church is shepherded by Francis Cardinal George, OMI, assisted by six Episcopal Vicars, each responsible for a vicariate (region). Cardinal George is the first Chicago native to become Archbishop of Chicago. Installed in May 1997, he became the thirteenth Ordinary for Chicago since its establishment as a diocese. Cardinal George is a member of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate and is the sixth Cardinal to lead the Archdiocese of Chicago. French Jesuit missionary Rev. Jacques Marquette, SJ first explored the area that is now Chicago in the mid-17th century. On December 4, 1674, Father Marquette arrived at the mouth of the Chicago River where he built a cabin to recuperate from his travels. His cabin became the first European settlement in the area now known as Chicago. Marquette published his survey of the new territories, and soon, more French missionaries and settlers
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    217

    Norbertine Rite

    The Premonstratensian Rite or Norbertine Rite is the liturgical rite, distinct from the Roman Rite, specific to the Premonstratensian Order of the Roman Catholic Church The Norbertine rite ("Norbertine" is another name for the Premonstratensians) differs from the Roman in the celebration of Mass, the Liturgy of the Hours and the administration of the Sacrament of Penance. Its liturgical books were reprinted by order of the general chapter held at Prémontré in 1738. A new edition of the Missal and the Breviary was issued after the General Chapter of Prague, in 1890. In 1902 a committee was appointed to revise the Gradual, Antiphonary etc. and was encouraged by the motu proprio of Pope Pius X on church music. The General Chapter of Tepl, Austria, in 1908, decided to edit the musical books of the order as prepared, in accordance with ancient manuscripts by this committee. The Premonstratensian Missal was not arranged like the Roman Missal. While the canon was identical, with the exception of a slight variation as to the time of making the sign of the cross with the paten at the "Libera nos", the music for the Prefaces etcetera differed, though not considerably, from that of the Roman
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    218
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Florida

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Florida

    • Building: Orlando Florida Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of January 1, 2011, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 136,549 members in 26 stakes, 234 Congregations (184 wards, 50 branches, 5 missions, and 1 temple in Florida. In April 1843, Joseph Smith called William Brown and Daniel Cathcart to serve a mission to Pensacola, but no record exists of them fulfilling the calling. Between April and June 1854, Phineas Young visited the Indian chiefs in Florida and distributed copies of the Book of Mormon. Missionaries began preaching in Pensacola in January 1895 and started a number of Sunday Schools soon afterwards. The first was in Coe Mills in May 1895. The first branch, known as the Hassell Branch, was created in Jefferson County on May 9, 1897. In September 1897, the Sanderson branch was organized. George P. Canova, a well-to-do landowner a chairman of the Baker County Commission, became the Sanderson branch president in January 1898. Five months later, following threats of violence, Canova was killed as he returned home from a Church meeting. In 1906, Charles A. Callis became president of the Florida Conference. That same year, a meetinghouse was dedicated in Jacksonville. Another meetinghouse was completed in Oak
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    219
    Anglican Church of Kenya

    Anglican Church of Kenya

    • Associated With: Anglicanism
    The Anglican Church of Kenya is part of the Anglican Communion, and includes 30 dioceses. The Primate of the Church is the Archbishop of Kenya. The Church became part of the Province of East Africa in 1960, but by 1970 Kenya and Tanzania were divided into separate Provinces. The church was founded originally as the diocese of Eastern Equatorial Africa (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania) in 1884, with James Hannington as the first bishop; however, Anglican missionary activity had been present in the area since 1844, when Dr. Johann Ludwig Krapf landed in Mombasa. The first Africans were ordained to the priesthood in 1885. In 1898, the diocese was split into two, with the new diocese of Mombasa governing Kenya and northern Tanzania (the other diocese later became the Church of Uganda); northern Tanzania was separated from the diocese in 1927. Mass conversions of Africans began as early as 1910. In 1955, the diocese's first African bishops, Festo Olang’ and Obadiah Kariuki, were consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury in Uganda (Olang’ would be elected the first African archbishop in 1970); in 1960, the province of East Africa, comprising Kenya and Tanzania, was formed with Leonard James
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    2 votes
    220
    Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church

    Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church

    • Associated With: Oriental Orthodoxy
    The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ኦርቶዶክስ ተዋሕዶ ቤተ ክርስቲያን; Transliterated Amharic: Yäityop'ya ortodoks täwahedo bétäkrestyan) is the predominant Oriental Orthodox Christian church in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian Church was administratively part of the Coptic Orthodox Church until 1959, when it was granted its own Patriarch by Coptic Orthodox Pope of Alexandria and Patriarch of All Africa, Cyril VI. It should not be confused with the Ethiopian Catholic Church, which is a Chalcedonian church. One of the few pre-colonial Christian churches of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Ethiopian Church has a membership of between 40 and 45 million, the majority of whom live in Ethiopia, and is thus the largest of all Oriental Orthodox churches. The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church is a founding member of the World Council of Churches. Tewahedo (Te-wa-hido) (Ge'ez ተዋሕዶ tawāhidō, modern pronunciation tewāhidō) is a Ge'ez word meaning "being made one" or "unified". This word refers to the Oriental Orthodox belief in the one single unified Nature of Christ; i.e., a belief that a complete, natural union of the Divine and Human Natures into One is self-evident in order to accomplish the divine
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    221
    Dominican Order

    Dominican Order

    The Order of Preachers (Latin: Ordo Praedicatorum), more commonly known after the 15th century as the Dominican Order or Dominicans, is a Roman Catholic religious order founded by Saint Dominic de Guzman in France and approved by Pope Honorius III (1216–27) on 22 December 1216. Membership in the Order includes friars, nuns, active sisters, and lay or secular Dominicans (formerly known as tertiaries) affiliated with the Order. A number of other names have been used to refer to both the order and its members. Members of the order generally carry the letters O.P. standing for Ordinis Praedicatorum, meaning of the Order of Preachers, after their names. Founded to preach the Gospel and to combat heresy, the order is famed for its intellectual tradition, having produced many leading theologians and philosophers. The Dominican Order is headed by the Master of the Order, who is currently Father Bruno Cadoré. Like his contemporary, Francis of Assisi, Dominic saw the need for a new type of organization, and the quick growth of the Dominicans and Franciscans during their first century of existence confirms that the orders of mendicant friars met a need. He had accompanied as canon Diego de
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    Fo Guang Shan

    Fo Guang Shan (Chinese: 佛光山; pinyin: Fóguāngshān; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Hu̍t-kong-san; literally "Buddha's Light Mountain") is an international Chinese Mahayana Buddhist monastic order based in the Republic of China (Taiwan), and one of the largest Buddhist organizations. The headquarters of Fo Guang Shan, located in Kaohsiung, is the largest Buddhist monastery in Taiwan. The organization itself is also one of the largest charity organizations in Taiwan. The order also calls itself the International Buddhist Progress Society. Founded in 1967 by Venerable Master Hsing Yun, the order promotes Humanistic Buddhism, a modern Chinese Buddhist thought developed through the 20th Century and made popular by this and other modern Chinese Buddhist orders. Humanistic Buddhism aims to make Buddhism relevant in the world and in people's lives and hearts. While Hsing Yun is a Dharma heir in the Linji Chan (Chinese: 臨濟宗; pinyin: Línjìzōng) school, his stated position within Fo Guang Shan is that it is an "amalgam of all Eight Schools of Chinese Buddhism" (八宗兼弘), including but not limited to Chan. In this sense, it is a monastic order, and not a doctrinal school of thought per se. This is the case for much
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    Maronite Church

    Maronite Church

    The Syriac Maronite Church of Antioch (Classical Syriac: ܥܕܬܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܬܐ ܡܪܘܢܝܬܐ ܕܐܢܛܝܘܟܝܐ‎ ʿīṯo suryaiṯo māronaiṯo d'anṭiokia; Arabic: الكنيسة الأنطاكية السريانية المارونية‎ al-Kanīsa al-Intākīyya al-Seryānīyya al-Mārwnīyya; Latin: Ecclesia Maronitarum) is an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Holy See of Rome. It traces its heritage back to the community founded by Maroun, a 4th-century Syriac monk venerated as a saint. The first Maronite Patriarch, Saint John Maron, was elected in the late 7th century. Although reduced in numbers today, Maronites remain one of the principal ethno-religious groups in Lebanon. The Maronite Church asserts that since its inception, it has always remained faithful to the Church of Rome and the Pope. Before the conquest by Arabian Muslims reached Lebanon, the Lebanese people, including those who would become Muslim and the majority who would remain Christian, spoke a dialect of Aramaic. Syriac (Christian Aramaic) still remains the liturgical language of the Maronite Church. The members of the Maronite Church are a part of the Syriac people; though they have, over time, developed a distinctive Maronite character, this has not obscured
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    Roman Catholic Diocese of Balanga

    Roman Catholic Diocese of Balanga

    The Diocese of Balanga is one of the 72 ecclesiastical territories called dioceses of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines. It comprises the whole province of Bataan. It was established on March 17, 1975, appointing the Most Rev. Celso Guevarra as the first Bishop on June 4, 1975. On July 3, 2004, Bishop Socrates B. Villegas was appointed as the third Bishop of the Diocese of Balanga; he was named Archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lingayen-Dagupan The Diocese of Balanga was established on March 17, 1975. It comprises the entire civil province of Bataan, the smallest among the provinces of Central Luzon. The province is a peninsula jutting out to sea, with Manila Bay to the east, China Sea to the west, and the province of Zambales to the north. Before this, the region was divided into two parts: the Corregimiento of Mariveles and the Province of Pampanga. The towns of Mariveles, Bagac, Morong and Maragondon, Cavite comprised the Corregimiento of Mariveles that was under the jurisdiction of the Recollect Order of the Roman Catholic Church. The province of Pampanga included the towns of Orion, Pilar, Balanga, Abucay, Samal, Orani, Llana Hermosa and San Juan de
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    Scriptural Way of the Cross

    Scriptural Way of the Cross

    The Scriptural Way of the Cross or Scriptural Stations of the Cross is a version of the traditional Stations of the Cross inaugurated as a Roman Catholic devotion by Pope John Paul II on Good Friday 1991. Thereafter John Paul II performed the scriptural version many times at the Colosseum in Rome on Good Fridays during his reign. The scriptural version was not intended to invalidate the traditional version, rather it was meant to add nuance to an understanding of the Passion. Before each station: Minister: We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you'. All: Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world. Then Jesus came with them to a place called Gethsemane, and he said to his disciples, "Sit here while I go over there and pray." He took along Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to feel sorrow and distress. Then he said to them, "My soul is sorrowful even to death. Remain here and keep watch with me." He advanced a little and fell prostrate in prayer, saying, "My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from me; yet, not as I will, but as you will." When he returned to his disciples he found them asleep. He said to Peter, "So you could not keep watch with me for
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    Zentralrat der Juden in Deutschland

    Zentralrat der Juden in Deutschland

    The Zentralrat der Juden in Deutschland ("Central Council of Jews in Germany") is a federation of German Jews organizing many Jewish organisations in Germany. It was founded on July 19, 1950, as a response to the increasing isolation of German Jews by the international Jewish community and increasing interest in Jewish affairs by the (West) German government. Originally based in the Rhenish areas (Düsseldorf and Bonn), it currently has its seat in Berlin. The Jewish community in Germany has around 100,000 registered members (although far more Jews live in the country without belonging to a synagogue). From its early years, the organization has received strong financial and moral support from the government. The Zentralrat is the German affiliate of the World Jewish Congress (WJC). In its early years, its leadership was composed of native German Jews, while most of the Jewish community in Germany was made up of Polish-born Jewish Holocaust survivors who had come to Germany as displaced persons, fleeing from the sporadically anti-zionist communist regime of Poland. Thus, the organization called itself "Central Council of Jews in Germany" rather than "Central Council of German Jews."
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    Ahmadi

    Ahmadi

    Ahmadiyya (Arabic: أحمدية‎; Urdu: احمدِیہ) is an Islamic reformist movement founded in British India near the end of the 19th century, originating with the life and teachings of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (1835–1908), who claimed to have fulfilled the prophecies of the world’s reformer during the end times, who was to herald the Eschaton as predicted in the traditions of various world religions and bring about the final triumph of Islam as per Islamic prophecy. He claimed that he was the Mujaddid (divine reformer) of the 14th Islamic century, the promised Messiah and Mahdi awaited by Muslims. The adherents of the Ahmadiyya movement are referred to as Ahmadis or Ahmadi Muslims. Ahmadi thought emphasizes the belief that Islam is the final dispensation for humanity as revealed to Muhammad and the necessity of restoring to it its true essence and pristine form, which had been lost through the centuries. Thus, Ahmadis view themselves as leading the revival and peaceful propagation of Islam. The Ahmadis were among the earliest Muslim communities to arrive in Britain and other Western countries. The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community believes that God sent Ahmad, like Jesus, to end religious wars,
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    Branch Davidian

    Branch Davidian

    The Branch Davidians (also known as "The Branch") are a Protestant sect that originated in 1955 from a schism in the Davidian Seventh Day Adventists ("Davidians"), a reform movement that began within the Seventh-day Adventist Church ("Adventists") around 1930. The majority of those who accepted the reform message have been disfellowshipped due to the Adventist church rejecting it. The Branch Davidians have many theological beliefs in common with Messianic Judaism From its inception in 1930, the reform movement inherited Adventism's apocalypticism, in that they believed themselves to be living in a time when Bible prophecies of a final divine judgment were coming to pass as a prelude to Christ's second coming. The name "Branch Davidian" is most widely known for the Waco Siege of 1993 on their property (known as the Mount Carmel Center) near Waco, Texas, by the ATF, FBI, and Texas National Guard, which resulted in the deaths of their leader, David Koresh, as well as 82 other Branch Davidians and four ATF agents. In 1929 Victor Houteff, a Bulgarian immigrant and a Seventh-day Adventist Sabbath School teacher, claimed that he had a new message for the church. He presented this message
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    Bulgarian Orthodox Church

    Bulgarian Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Bulgarian Orthodox Church - Bulgarian Patriarchate (Bulgarian: Българска православна църква - Българска патриаршия, Balgarska pravoslavna tsarkva - Balgarska patriarshiya) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church with some 6.5 million members in the Republic of Bulgaria and between 1.5 and 2.0 million members in a number of European countries, the Americas and Australia. The recognition of the autocephalous Bulgarian Patriarchate by the Patriarchate of Constantinople in 927 AD makes the Bulgarian Orthodox Church the oldest autocephalous Slavic Orthodox Church in the world, which was added to the Pentarchy of the original Patriarchates - those of Rome (i.e., the Roman Catholic Papacy), Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem - and the autocephalous Georgian Orthodox Church. The Bulgarian Orthodox Church considers itself an inseparable member of the one, holy, synodal and apostolic church and is organized as a self-governing body under the name of Patriarchate. It is divided into thirteen dioceses within the boundaries of the Republic of Bulgaria and has jurisdiction over additional two dioceses for Bulgarians in Western and Central Europe, the Americas, Canada and
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    Cincinnati Jewish Community

    Cincinnati Jewish Community

    The history of the Jews in Cincinnati occupies a prominent place in the development of Jewish secular and religious life in the United States. Cincinnati is not only the oldest Jewish community west of the Allegheny Mountains but has also been an institutional center of American Reform Judaism for more than a century. The American Israelite, the longest-running Jewish weekly still published in the country, opened for business in the city in 1854. The first Jew who settled in Cincinnati was Joseph Jonas, who arrived in the city in March 1817. Jonas, a young man, decided to leave his home in Exeter, England, with the avowed intention of settling in Cincinnati. Friends in Philadelphia originally endeavored to dissuade him from going to a place so isolated from all association with his coreligionists. However, Jonas reassured them that he would succeed. For the first two years, he was the only Jew in the Midwestern town. In 1819, Jonas was joined by three others, Lewis Cohen of London, Barnet Levi of Liverpool, and Jonas Levy of Exeter. On the High Holidays in the autumn of 1819, these four men, together with David Israel Johnson of Brookville, Indiana, (a frontier trading-station)
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    Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

    Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

    The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei), previously known as the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Roman and Universal Inquisition (wherefrom arose the names Roman Inquisition or Holy Inquisition popularly used in reference to the 16th century tribunals against witchcraft and heresy), and after 1904 called the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Holy Office, is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. Among the most active of the congregations, it oversees Catholic Church doctrine. Its offices are housed at the Palace of the Holy Office at the Vatican. On July 21, 1542, Pope Paul III proclaimed the Apostolic Constitution Licet ab initio , establishing the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Roman and Universal Inquisition, staffed by cardinals and other officials whose task it was "to maintain and defend the integrity of the faith and to examine and proscribe errors and false doctrines". It served as the final court of appeal in trials of heresy and served as an important part of the Counter-Reformation. This body was renamed the Supreme Sacred Congregation of the Holy Office in 1904 by Pope Saint Pius X. The
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    Czech and Slovak Orthodox Church

    Czech and Slovak Orthodox Church

    • Associated With: Eastern Orthodox Church
    The Orthodox Church of the Czech Lands and Slovakia is a self-governing body of the Eastern Orthodox Church that territorially covers the countries of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The primate is Metropolitan Christopher of Prague and the Czech Lands and Slovakia, who was elected on May 2, 2006. The Church of the Czech Lands and Slovakia presents both an ancient history as well as a very modern history. The present day church occupies the land of Moravia, where the brothers Ss. Cyril and Methodius began their mission to the Slavs, introducing the liturgical and canonical order of the Orthodox Church, translated into the Church Slavonic language. In doing this they developed the first Slavic alphabet. This mission was destroyed after Methodius died in 885, as Pope Stephen V of Rome forced all disciples of the brothers to leave the countryside which is now the Czech Republic. The Orthodox order survived in present day Slovakia due to its nearness and influence to Kievan Rus' until the union with Rome was instituted by the Viennese Court. After the legal restraints to Orthodoxy were removed with the end of World War I, many people left the Roman Catholic Church. Many looked to the
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    Dor Yeshorim

    Dor Yeshorim

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Dor Yeshorim (Hebrew: דור ישרים‎ - "upright generation", cf. Psalms 112:2), also called Committee for Prevention of Genetic Diseases, is an organization that offers genetic screening to members of the worldwide Jewish community. Its objective is to minimize, and eventually eliminate, the incidence of genetic disorders common to Jewish people, such as Tay-Sachs disease. Dor Yeshorim is based in Brooklyn, New York, but has offices in Israel and various other countries. It announces testing sessions in community newspapers and Orthodox Jewish high schools. In both the Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jewish communities, there is an increased rate of a number of genetic disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease, an autosomal recessive disorder that goes unnoticed in carriers, but is fatal within the first few years of life in homozygotes. Orthodox Judaism generally opposes selective abortion. Although preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is often approved by Halakha, it is a difficult and costly process. By avoiding marriages between "carriers", the incidence of the disorders decreases without having to resort to such methods. Dor Yeshorim screens only for recessive traits that give rise to lethal
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    Ecclesia Gnostica

    Ecclesia Gnostica

    • Associated With: Gnosticism
    The Ecclesia Gnostica (Latin for The Church of Gnosis or The Gnostic Church) is an openly Gnostic liturgical Church that is practicing publicly. It is centered in Los Angeles, California with parishes in Seattle, Washington; Portland, Oregon; Salt Lake City, Utah; Sedona, Arizona; and Oslo, Norway. The church and its affiliate, the Gnostic Society, attempt to "make available the philosophy and practice of gnosticism to the contemporary world." The organization now called the Ecclesia Gnostica was originally organized in England under the name the Pre-Nicene Gnostic Catholic Church in 1953, by the Most Rev. Richard Jean Chretien Duc de Palatine with the object of “restoring the Gnosis - Divine Wisdom to the Christian Church, and to teach the Path of Holiness which leads to God and the Inner Illumination and Interior Communion with the Soul through the mortal body of man.” Born Ronald Powell, Richard Duc de Palatine had served in the Liberal Catholic Church in Australia, before moving to England. Bishop Duc de Palatine was consecrated by the Most Rev. Msg. Hugh George de Wilmott Newman (Mar Georgius I), patriarch of the Catholic Apostolic Church (Catholicate of the West) who
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    Edah

    • Associated With: Modern Orthodox Judaism
    Edah was a Modern Orthodox Jewish organization, generally associated with the liberal wing of Orthodox Judaism in the United States and with the Religious Zionism movement of Israel. Its headquarters are located in Manhattan, New York City. Edah states that it is "committed to ... modern Orthodoxy, which maintains a serious devotion to Torah and Halakhah while enjoying a mutually enriching relationship with the modern world ..." In July 2006, Edah announced plans to close down its operations as a stand-alone entity. Its founder and director, Rabbi Saul Berman, will be transitioning to an administrative position at Yeshivat Chovevei Torah, a Modern Orthodox yeshiva in New York City. The reason was that given limited financial resources available to the Orthodox community, a tactical decision was made so that its goals would be able to continue through other means. As such, Orthodox rabbis associated with Edah still will contribute to their goals through their membership in the Rabbinical Council of America, they still will attend conferences, such as the conferences on women, feminism and Orthodox, e.g. JOFA, and they would still publish articles in a continuing form of The Edah
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    Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition

    The Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT) is a network of Buddhist centers focusing on the Gelugpa tradition of Tibet. Founded in 1975 by Lama Thubten Yeshe and Lama Thubten Zopa Rinpoche, who began teaching Buddhism to Western students in Nepal, the FPMT has grown to encompass 150 teaching centers, projects, and social services in 33 countries. Since the death of Lama Yeshe in 1984, the FPMT's spiritual director has been Lama Zopa Rinpoche. We provide integrated education through which people's minds and hearts can be transformed into their highest potential for the benefit of others, inspired by an attitude of universal responsibility. We are committed to creating harmonious environments and helping all beings develop their full potential of infinite wisdom and compassion. Our organization is based on the Buddhist tradition of Lama Tsongkhapa of Tibet as taught to us by our founder Lama Thubten Yeshe and spiritual director Lama Zopa Rinpoche." The FPMT's international headquarters are in Portland, Oregon (USA). The central office has previously been located at: In addition, the FPMT has numerous local centers in various countries around the world.
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    Halukka

    Halukka

    • Associated With: Judaism
    The halukka (Hebrew: החלוקה‎) was an organized distribution and collection of funds for the residents of the Yishuv haYashan in the Holy Land; which were organized into Kolelim. Sympathizing Jews in the diaspora formed a standing committee, presided over by a gabbai, under whose supervision collections in his city or district were made, the money being remitted by him semiannually to the proper "minahalim" (leaders) in Jerusalem, who distribute it among the needy—with the learned, elderly, destitute, widows and orphans taking precedence. This article describes the halukka as it stood in 1910. The system was not abolished with the founding of the State of Israel in 1948, but continues by Orthodox Judaism, for example Kupath Rabbi Meir Baal Haness Kolel Polen to support Polish Jews, the general united charity of Rabbi Meir Baal Haneis Salant, Kolel Shomrei HaChomos for Hungarian Jews, Kolel Chibas Yerushalayim for Galician Jews, and Kollel Zibenbergen. After World war 1 many more splinter groups were establishes such as Tomchei Yotsei Anglia for the support of scholars originally from England. The history of the halukka may perhaps be said to date back to the earliest rabbinical
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    Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil

    Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil

    The Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil (Portuguese: Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil) is an ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion that covers Brazil. Originally under the metropolitcal supervision of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil became an independent province in 1965 and consists of a single metropolitical province, so that one bishop serves as both Metropolitan and Primate. In this role he uses the style of "The Most Reverend", but does not have the usual title of "Archbishop", being known by the alternative title of "Bishop Primate" (Bispo Primaz). The Bishops Primate have been: A substantial proportion of the priests of the province are women, but all the bishops are men. The president of the House of Clergy and Laity for the first time is a lay woman mrs Selma, who was elected at the General Synod for a three year term. The General Secretary of the Church is the Reverend Arthur Cavalcante, also appointed at the General Synod for a three year term. Anglican ministry in Brazil began as a number of chaplaincies catering for expatriate Anglicans in 1810. The first known parish was settled in Nova Lima, State of Minas Gerais
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    Keren Hayesod

    Keren Hayesod

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Keren Hayesod – United Israel Appeal (Hebrew: קרן היסוד‎, literally "The Foundation Fund") is the central fundraising organization for Israel, with operations in 45 countries. The work of Keren Hayesod is carried out in accordance with the Keren Hayesod Law, 5716-1956, passed by the Knesset in January 1956. It is a registered corporation of the State of Israel. Keren Hayesod was established at the World Zionist Conference in London on July 7–24, 1920, and officially declared on December 24, 1920. The resolution adopted called on "the whole Jewish people", Zionists and non-Zionists alike to contribute toward the building of the Land of Israel through Keren Hayesod. Jewish communities throughout the world established local campaigns under the Keren Hayesod umbrella, often using local names (UIA, UJIA, IUA, CJA, AUJF) According to the Reconstitution Agreement of the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI), Keren Hayesod is one of its three constituent bodies (along with the World Zionist Organization (WZO) and the United Israel Appeal in the United States, a subsidiary of the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA)) and provides 20% of the representatives on the Board of Governors and the
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    Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary

    Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary

    The Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary or the Visitation Order is a Roman Catholic religious order for women. Members of the order are also known as the Salesian Sisters or, more commonly, as the Visitandines. The Order was founded in 1610 by Saint Francis de Sales and Saint Jane Frances de Chantal in Annecy, Haute-Savoie, France. The special charism of the Visitation Order combines gentleness with a valiant spirit; initiative with communal support; dedication to prayer with presence in the world; a contemplative life with an apostolic dimension. The order's motto is "Vive Jésus" (French for "Live Jesus"). The Order spread from France throughout Europe and to North America. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1914, The convent of Georgetown was the first house of the Visitation founded in the United States.... The Visitation of Georgetown founded that of Mobile 1833 and in the same year that of Kaskaskia [Illinois], which was transferred to St. Louis in 1844. In 1837 it founded the Visitation of Baltimore, that of Frederick [Maryland] in 1846, and Philadelphia in 1848. These various convents founded others, and at present there are in the United States 21 houses of the
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    Peoples Temple

    Peoples Temple

    People's Temple was a religious organization founded in 1955 by Jim Jones that, by the mid-1970s, included over a dozen locations in California including its headquarters in San Francisco. It is best known for the events of November 18, 1978, in Guyana, in which 909 people died at the Peoples Temple Agricultural Project (informally, and now commonly, called "Jonestown") and nearby airstrip at Port Kaituma, and Georgetown in an organized mass suicide/killing. The mass suicide and killings at Jonestown resulted in the greatest single loss of American civilian life in a non-natural non-accidental disaster prior to the events of September 11, 2001. Casualties at the airstrip included, among others, Congressman Leo Ryan. Before forming a church, Jim Jones had become enamored by communism and frustrated by the harassment communists received in the U.S. This, among other things, provided a seminal inspiration for Jones; as he himself described in a biographical recording, Although he feared a backlash for being a communist, Jones was surprised when a Methodist superintendent (whom he had not met through the American Communist Party) helped him into the church, despite his knowledge that
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    Rajneeshpuram

    Rajneeshpuram

    • Is Member Of: Osho-Rajneesh movement
    Rajneeshpuram, Oregon was an intentional community in Wasco County, Oregon, briefly incorporated as a city in the 1980s, which was populated with followers of the spiritual teacher Osho, then known as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. The city was located on the site of a 64,229-acre (25,993 ha) Central Oregon property known as the Big Muddy Ranch, which was purchased in 1981 for $5.75 million ($13.8 million in 2011 dollars). Within three years, the neo-sannyasins (Rajneesh's followers, also termed Rajneeshees in contemporaneous press reports) developed a community, turning the ranch from an empty rural property into a city of up to 7,000 people, complete with typical urban infrastructure such as a fire department, police, restaurants, malls, townhouses, a 4,200-foot (1,300 m) airstrip, a public transport system using buses, a sewage reclamation plant and a reservoir. The Rajneeshpuram post office had ZIP code 97741. Within a year of arriving, the commune leaders had become embroiled in a series of legal battles with their neighbours, the principal conflict relating to land use. Initially, they had stated that they were planning to create a small agricultural community, their land being
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    Sigma Alpha Epsilon Pi

    Sigma Alpha Epsilon Pi

    • Associated With: Judaism
    Sigma Alpha Epsilon Pi is a United States sorority that was founded on October 1, 1998 at the University of California, Davis. In the early 1990s with the closing of a national Jewish sorority the University of California, Davis was left without a Jewish women's social organization. With the gap left open Alpha Epsilon Pi, a national Jewish fraternity, urged the women of Davis to start a Jewish women's social organization of their own. With positive response from the campus Sigma Alpha Epsilon Pi was formed. The "Sigma" is meant to represent "sisters of" in honor of Alpha Epsilon Pi's contributions towards the formation of the sorority. Additionally Sigma is also the 18th letter of the Greek alphabet in Jewish tradition, the number 18 means chai (life). The six women who founded the sorority; Alycia Seaman, Erin Glick, Leah Dansker, Rachel Rothfarb, Erin Barker, and Dana Miller are considered the eternal mothers of the sorority. Despite being a Jewish sorority there is no discrimination based on race, creed, ethnicity, or religious beliefs. "The purpose of this organization shall be to promote unity, support, and a Jewish awareness, as well as to provide a Jewish experience for
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    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Michigan

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Michigan

    • Building: Detroit Michigan Temple
    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints arrived in Michigan in the 1830s. It did not have an organized presence in the state from the late 1850s into the 1870s. However missionary work was reopened by Cyrus Wheelock and has progressed steadily since then. Today there are over 40,000 church members in the state, and a temple that was dedicated in 1999. As of year-end 2007, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 42,422 members, 8 stakes, 65 wards, 1 district, 43 branches, 42 Family History Centers, 2 missions, and 1 temple in Michigan. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Michigan began with the Mack family. Almira Mack Scobey had gone to Kirtland, Ohio to visit her cousin Joseph Smith and there they joined the church. On June 7, 1831 Doctrine and Covenants Section 52 was received which among other things commanded another one of Mack Scobey's cousins Hyrum Smith and also John Murdock to go to Detroit and preach the gospel on the way to Jackson County, Missouri. These two brethren went to Michigan in company with Mack Scobey and Hyrum's (and Joseph's) mother, Lucy Mack Smith. They were also accompanied by Lyman Wight and John
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    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in North Carolina

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in North Carolina

    • Associated With: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
    As of year-end 2007, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported reported 71,737 members in 15 stakes, 144 Congregations (102 wards and 42 branches), 2 missions, and 1 temple in North Carolina. North Carolina was originally part of the Southern States Mission when it was created on December 15, 1896. It then became part of the East Central States Mission on December 9, 1928. On October 26, 1947, it became part of the Central Atlantic States Mission. The mission was then renamed the North Carolina-Virginia Mission on June 10, 1970. The North Carolina Mission was organized on July 18, 1973. It was renamed the North Carolina Greensboro Mission on June 20, 1974. On July 1, 1980, the mission split moving the mission office to Charlotte. The North Carolina Charlotte and the North Carolina Raleigh Missions were the result of the split. On December 18, 1999 the Raleigh North Carolina Temple was dedicated by President Gordon B. Hinckley.
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    Trappists

    Trappists

    The Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (O.C.S.O.: Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae) is a Roman Catholic religious order of cloistered contemplative monastics who follow the Rule of St. Benedict. A branch of the Order of Cistercians, they have communities of both monks and nuns, commonly referred to as Trappists and Trappistines, respectively. The order takes its name from La Trappe Abbey or La Grande Trappe in Normandy in France. A reform movement began there in 1664, in reaction to the relaxation of practices in many Cistercian monasteries. Armand Jean le Bouthillier de Rancé, originally the commendatory abbot of La Trappe, led the reform. As commendatory abbot, de Rancé was a layman who obtained income from the monastery but had no religious obligations. After a conversion of life between 1660 and 1662, de Rancé formally joined the abbey and became its regular abbot in 1663. In 1892 the reformed "Trappists" broke away from the Cistercian order and formed an independent monastic order with the approval of the Pope. The life of the Trappists is guided by the Rule of St. Benedict, written in the sixth century. The Rule describes ideals and values of a monastic
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    Unitarian Universalist Association

    • Associated With: Unitarian Universalism
    Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA), in full the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations in North America, is a liberal religious association of Unitarian Universalist congregations formed by the consolidation in 1961 of the American Unitarian Association and the Universalist Church of America. Both of these predecessor organizations began as Christian Unitarian and Christian Universalist denominations. However, modern Unitarian Universalists do not limit themselves to Christian beliefs or affinities. Rather, they define themselves as non-creedal, and draw wisdom from various religions and philosophies in addition to Christianity, including Humanism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Earth-centered spirituality. Thus, the UUA qualifies as a form of post-Christian liberal religion with syncretistic leanings. Most of the member congregations of the UUA are in the United States and Canada, but the UUA has also admitted congregations from Australia, New Zealand, the Philippines and Pakistan (although UUA policy appears at present to be against admitting any new congregations from outside North America, rather having them form their own national bodies and having these
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    Ursulines

    Ursulines

    The Ursulines (in full: Ursulines of the Roman Union) are a Roman Catholic religious institute for women founded at Brescia, Italy, by Saint Angela de Merici in November 1535, primarily for the education of girls and the care of the sick and needy. Their patron saint is Saint Ursula. St Angela de Merici spent 17 years leading a group of women known as the "Company of St. Ursula," who regularly met for conferences and devotional practices but did not live together. They were recognized in 1544 by Pope Paul III. In 1572, Pope Gregory XIII, at the insistence of Saint Charles Borromeo, the Cardinal Archbishop of Milan, declared the Ursulines a religious order with enclosure under the rule of Augustine of Hippo. Ursulines were the main accusers in the Loudun and Aix-en-Provence demonic possession cases. In the following century, the Ursulines were powerfully encouraged and supported by Saint Francis de Sales. In most cases, especially in France, the sisters adopted enclosure and took solemn vows. They were called the "religious Ursulines" as distinct from the "congregated Ursulines," who preferred to follow the original plan. The Ursuline Sisters were the first Catholic nuns to land in
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    Vatican Secret Archives

    The Vatican Secret Archives (Latin: Archivum Secretum Vaticanum), located in Vatican City, is the central repository for all of the acts promulgated by the Holy See. The Pope, having primal incumbency until death, owns the archives until the next appointed Papal successor. The archives also contain the state papers, correspondence, papal account books, and many other documents which the church has accumulated over the centuries. In the 17th century, under the orders of Pope Paul V, the Secret Archives were separated from the Vatican Library, where scholars had some very limited access to them, and remained absolutely closed to outsiders until 1881, when Pope Leo XIII opened them to researchers, more than a thousand of whom now examine its documents each year. The use of the word "secret" in the title "Vatican Secret Archives" does not denote the modern meaning of confidentiality. Its meaning is closer to that of the word "private", indicating that the archives are the Pope's personal property, not belonging to those of any particular department of the Roman Curia or the Holy See. The word "secret" was generally used in this sense as also reflected in phrases such as "secret
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    Young Religious Unitarian Universalists

    Young Religious Unitarian Universalists

    • Associated With: Unitarian Universalism
    Young Religious Unitarian Universalists (YRUU) is a term used within the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) in the United States and the Canadian Unitarian Council. YRUU was an organization at the continental level primarily run by youth, ranging in age from 14 to 20, with mentoring adult partners. The continental organization of YRUU ended in 2008, but the term is still used by certain active youth groups and conferences at the congregational and regional/district levels. The continental YRUU goals included youth empowerment, social activism and building leadership qualities. YRUU members often made their presence known in public demonstrations; for instance, in the June 23, 2006 protest in St. Louis, Missouri against Victoria's Secret for allegedly printing its catalogues on paper from endangered North American forests. In February 2008, UUA President William G. Sinkford, in a letter to the YRUU Steering Committee, announced there would be no further funding for continental level YRUU at the end of the fiscal year. “There is broad consensus that the current structure for continental youth ministry is not serving our faith well,” wrote Sinkford. “It is true that continental
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