Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 3.782 views
  • 622 votes
  • 622 voters
  • 3%
Best Railway of All Time

More about Best Railway of All Time:

Best Railway of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Railway of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Railway of All Time has gotten 3.782 views and has gathered 622 votes from 622 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

Best Railway of All Time is a top list in the Cars & Auto category on Rankly.com. Are you a fan of Cars & Auto or Best Railway of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Cars & Auto on Rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Railway of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of Rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At Rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Railway of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Dartmouth Steam Railway

    Dartmouth Steam Railway

    The Dartmouth Steam Railway, formerly known as the Paignton & Dartmouth Steam Railway or the Dart Valley Railway, is a 6.7-mile (10.8 km) heritage railway on the former Kingswear branch line between Paignton and Kingswear in Torbay, Devon, England. Due to the location of this line – at the heart of the English Riviera – much of the railway's business is summer tourists from the resorts of Torbay who are transported to Kingswear railway station from where a ferry takes them across the River Dart to the historic town of Dartmouth. The line is owned and operated by Dart Valley Railway plc, who also own Dart Pleasure Craft Limited. Dart Pleasure Craft, who also trade as River Link, operates the Dartmouth Passenger Ferry between Kingswear and Dartmouth, together with river and coastal cruises from Dartmouth, many of which connect with the railway. As such, it is unusual amongst preserved railways in that it is a for-profit operation, and does not rely on volunteer labour or charitable donations. The line was built by the Dartmouth and Torbay Railway, opening to Brixham Road station on 14 March 1861 and on to Kingswear on 10 August 1864. The Dartmouth and Torbay Railway was always
    7.22
    9 votes
    2
    Noarlunga Centre railway line, Adelaide

    Noarlunga Centre railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    The Noarlunga Centre railway line is a suburban commuter line in the city of Adelaide, South Australia. Before the extension of the line to Noarlunga Centre line in 1978, the Willunga line ran from Hallett Cove station on a different route through Reynella, Morphett Vale and Hackham to Willunga (southeast of Noarlunga). It closed in 1969 and in September 1972 a track-removal train removed the tracks. For six years Noarlunga had no train service. The South Australian Railways and its successor, the State Transport Authority (STA), extended the railway southwards in stages from Hallett Cove to cater for increasing residential development in the southern area. Opening dates for passenger services were: The line runs from the Adelaide Railway Station south west via the suburbs of Edwardstown, Oaklands Park and Marion to the coast at Brighton, where it turns south towards Noarlunga Centre in the southern suburbs. The line was known as the Marino and Hallett Cove line when it finished at Hallett Cove. Most trains terminated at Marino, with only about a quarter going to Hallett Cove. Like the rest of the Adelaide network, the line is broad gauge (1600mm). It is approximately 30.2
    8.00
    7 votes
    3
    Buenos Aires–Rosario–Córdoba high-speed railway

    Buenos Aires–Rosario–Córdoba high-speed railway

    The Buenos Aires–Rosario–Córdoba high-speed railway (Tren de Alta Velocidad –TAVe) is a project designed to link the Argentine cities of Buenos Aires, Rosario and Córdoba through a 710 km (440 mi) high-speed rail network. The plan, announced by President Néstor Kirchner during a press conference at the Casa Rosada on 26 April 2006, would be the first in Argentina operating at up to 320 km/h (200 mph). The entire project is currently on hold due to the financial crisis. Buenos Aires and its metropolitan area has a population of more than 13 million, almost one third of the national total. It is the economic and political center of Argentina, and its main international entry point. Rosario, located about 286 km (178 mi) north-northwest of the capital, is the third-largest city and a major port, with a metropolitan population of 1.3 million. It is part of the agricultural and industrial core of the littoral region. Córdoba, with a population around 1.4 million, is located about 710 km (440 mi) from Buenos Aires, near the geographical center of Argentina. It is the second most populated metropolitan area, and a cultural, touristic, and industrial center. Altogether, the three cities
    5.78
    9 votes
    4
    Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway

    Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway

    The Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway (Eastern Mass) was a streetcar and later bus company in eastern Massachusetts, serving most suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts. Many of its former routes are now run by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. The Eastern Mass connected to the Boston Elevated Railway (BERy) system at many points; through service continued along BERy trackage at some. Former Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway car 4387, built in 1918 by the Laconia Car Company, is preserved in operating condition at the Seashore Trolley Museum, in Kennebunkport, Maine.
    8.00
    6 votes
    5
    Wehra Valley Railway

    Wehra Valley Railway

    The Wehra Valley Railway (German: Wehratalbahn) was a 19.7 km long branch line from Schopfheim to Bad Säckingen in southwestern Germany, that was electrified in 1913 at the same time as the Wiesen Valley Railway. For part of its length it followed the river of the same name. The line runs through the Fahrnau Tunnel (Fahrnauer Tunnel) which, at that time, was one of the longest railway tunnels (3.169 km) in Germany. The Wehra Valley Railway was intended as a strategic railway circumnavigating Switzerland near Basle and was laid ready to take a second track. Passenger services were withdrawn from the line on 23 May 1971. Goods traffic between Bad Säckingen and Wehr continued to run until 1 September 1990. On 31 December 1994 the line was closed. In a local council meeting on 19 April 2005, the town of Wehr (Baden) called for an expert opinion to determine whether the line could be reactivated. The report from Tübingen-based local transport advisor Ulrich Grosse was positive, although its restoration would be relatively expensive and only possible for a short time. Initially the route will be protected from being built on. Currently checks are being carried out to see whether the
    8.00
    6 votes
    6
    Mary Valley Railway

    Mary Valley Railway

    The Mary Valley Heritage Railway conduct steam train trips and tours from Gympie through the Mary Valley in the Cooloola Region of Queensland, Australia. "Ride The Rattler" scenic tours are operated by The Mary Valley Heritage Railway (MVHR) every Saturday, Sunday and Wednesday from the historic Gympie Railway Station. This historic 40 km journey commences at Gympie, and after crossing the Mary River, negotiates an abundance of curves, gradients and bridges to pass through the small country villages of Dagun, Amamoor and Kandanga to Imbil. The steam train, a fully restored C17 class locomotive from the early 1920s, departs Gympie station at 10 am. The Gympie Station itself dates back to pre-1880. As the train travels south, it passes through the southern end of the city of Gympie. After crossing the Mary River, the railway line enters the Mary Valley. The line wanders away from the river to negotiate the valleys of some of its main tributaries, including the Yabba, Kandanga and Amamoor Creeks. In this area there are a number of curves, gradients and bridges as you head towards the station of Kandanga. The country village of Kandanga was established in 1910 to service patrons
    7.50
    6 votes
    7
    Didcot, Newbury and Southampton Railway

    Didcot, Newbury and Southampton Railway

    The Didcot, Newbury and Southampton Railway (DN&SR) was a cross-country railway running north-south between Didcot, Newbury and Southampton although it actually reached the latter by running over the London and South Western Railway tracks from Shawford Junction, south of Winchester. At Newbury, it had junctions with the Berks and Hants branch of the Great Western Railway (GWR) east and west of the town, running over Great Western tracks for the short distance in between and sharing the Great Western station. The line was finally completed in January 1891 and was formally absorbed into the GWR under the Railways Act in 1923. The DN&SR was authorised in 1873 and became part of a series of 'railway wars' in the south of England between the Great Western Railway and the London and South Western Railway (LSWR). The idea for a railway running the length of Hampshire stemmed from a proposal for the Manchester & Southampton Railway during the 'Railway Mania' of the 1850s. The plan never progressed, but the idea of a railway linking the industrial areas of the Midlands was revived in the 1870s, when the growth of the railway network meant that main lines reached Southampton via Oxford,
    8.60
    5 votes
    8
    West Lancashire Light Railway

    West Lancashire Light Railway

    The West Lancashire Light Railway operates at Hesketh Bank, situated between Preston and Southport in North West England. The Railway is narrow gauge 2 ft (610 mm) and has a running length of 430 yards (393 m). The full line is longer than this however it follows a ledge above the old clay pit which is narrow enough to prohibit the building of a run round loop. An extension is planned. The line now boasts eight steam locomotives, four of which are in operating condition, one is currently being restored and another is on static display. There are also two electric locomotives and many IC locomotives. See Locomotives section for details. The line was first envisaged by six like-minded school boys who wanted to save the light railway equipment which was disappearing from local industries. The first problem was finding a suitable site, this was solved when a strip of land above the clay pits at Alty's Brickworks. In 1967 the group of six started laying track using rails from the former clay tramways and rough timbers as sleepers. Two locos were soon acquired both of Ruston and Hornsby design, one a 13 hp diesel, the other a 20 hp diesel. Respectively named Clwyd and Tawd, these two
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    Waterford and Tramore Railway

    Waterford and Tramore Railway

    The Waterford and Tramore Railway was an independent line which opened on September 5, 1853, connecting Manor St. in the city of Waterford, Ireland, to the seaside resort of Tramore, 7.25 miles (11.67 km) away. It closed on 31 December 1960. Construction began on February 10, 1853. The Waterford business community financed the 77,000 pounds cost. The William Dargan Construction Company completed the line in 7 months - a considerable achievement as a section of line just outside Waterford ran over deep bogland covered in bulrushes. In 1925, the line was amalgamated into the Great Southern Railways (GS&WR), which subsequently became part of CIE. The Waterford and Tramore Railway was the only line in Ireland that did not connect to any others. It was one of Waterford's five railways, the others being: On September 27, 1960, CIE announced closure of the line and, on December 31, it was permanently closed, to be replaced by a bus service. To avoid demonstrations, the last scheduled train did not run. The final trains thus were the 1.25 p.m. from Waterford and the 2.10 p.m. from Tramore. During the first half of 1961, all the tracks were lifted - locally it is believed for shipment to
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    New York and Manhattan Beach Railway

    New York and Manhattan Beach Railway

    The New York and Manhattan Beach Railway was a narrow gauge excursion railroad constructed in the stages in Kings County, New York (now the borough of Brooklyn) in the mid-1870s and completed to Manhattan Beach on the shore of the Atlantic Ocean on Coney Island in the town of Gravesend, in 1878. The line originated at the shore in Bay Ridge, in the town of New Utrecht at its western end, where it connected with ferries from New York City and the City of Brooklyn and at East New York in the Town of New Lots, where connections were made to other railroad lines. Most of this line is currently the freight-only Bay Ridge branch of the Long Island Rail Road, with service provided by lease by the New York and Atlantic Railway. The route to Manhattan Beach connected to the central Kings County line at a junction at the current location of East 17th Street between Avenues H and I at the southern border of Fiske Terrace at the border of the Towns of Gravesend and Flatbush, just east of the current BMT Brighton Line. From that point the route proceeding more or less directly to Manhattan Beach with an extension east to Orient Beach on Coney Island, and a branch to the Sheepshead Bay
    9.25
    4 votes
    11
    Royal Arsenal 18 inch Railway

    Royal Arsenal 18 inch Railway

    The Royal Arsenal Railway was a private military railway. It ran inside the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, south east London. The earliest parts of this railway system proper were constructed to standard gauge from 1859 onwards as a to replace an ad hoc arrangement of individual plateways. Laying of plateways had started in 1824 and was completed by 1854-5; they then came under the control of the Corps of Royal Engineers. From 1871 onwards some of the track was constructed as 18 in (457 mm) narrow gauge and it comprised some 50 to 60 miles (80 to 97 km) of track. It ran in some form from 1871 until much of it was abandoned between 1919 and 1933 and various locomotives were advertised for sale during 1919-22 and in 1933. Some of the dual gauge track was removed at the same time. However five new narrow gauge locomotives were bought in World War II, between 1934 and 1941; and a final one from Hunslet Engine Company in 1954. The remaining narrow gauge lines finally closed in 1966. Parts of the narrow gauge track were built as dual gauge track, with the outer rails gauged to standard gauge; other parts of the site were only served by standard gauge track. Some 120 miles (190 km) of mixed or
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    South Gippsland Railway

    South Gippsland Railway

    The South Gippsland Railway is a tourist railway located in south Gippsland, Victoria, Australia. It controls a section of the former South Gippsland line between Nyora and Leongatha, operating services from Leongatha to Nyora via Korumburra taking around 65 minutes, trains operate on Sundays, public holidays (except Good Friday and Christmas Day) and Wednesdays during Victorian school holidays. The line passes through the rolling Strzelecki Ranges and lush dairy farmland. The South Gippsland line was opened from Dandenong to Cranbourne in 1888 and extended to Koo Wee Rup, Nyora and Loch in 1890, Korumburra and Leongatha in 1891. The section from Lang Lang to Leongatha was transferred to the South Gippsland Railway in 1994. Freight trains continued to use the line from Dandenong as far as Koala Siding near Nyora until 1998. Station works are in progress at both Nyora and Korumburra stations. Korumburra works include the establishment of works sheds and locomotive and rollingstock stabling sheds. The work commenced in February 2009, and is scheduled to be completed by 30 June. Nyora works include the repairs to the station building, including repair of internal and external wall
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Derwent Valley Light Railway

    Derwent Valley Light Railway

    The Derwent Valley Light Railway (DVLR) (also known as The Blackberry Line) was a privately owned standard-gauge railway running from Layerthorpe on the outskirts of York to Cliffe Common near Selby in North Yorkshire, England. It opened in 1913, and closed in sections between 1965 and 1981. Between 1977 and 1979, passenger steam trains operated between Layerthorpe and Dunnington — the entire length of track at that time. In 1993 a small section was re-opened as part of the Yorkshire Museum of Farming at Murton. The line gained its nickname of The Blackberry Line in the days when it used to transport blackberries to markets in Yorkshire and London. The south end of the railway, from Wheldrake to Cliffe Common, was opened on 29 October 1912, with the remainder of the line opening on 19 July 1913. Although it was constructed primarily as a freight line, passenger trains were introduced from 1913, and during World War I it was used as a diversionary route by the North Eastern Railway between York and Selby. Passenger services ended in 1926, though freight traffic prospered through World War II. In 1923, most British railway companies were grouped into 4 large companies, with the
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    Duffield Bank Railway

    Duffield Bank Railway

    The Duffield Bank Railway was built by Sir Arthur Percival Heywood in the grounds of his house on the hillside overlooking Duffield, Derbyshire in 1874. Although the Ordnance Survey map circa 1880 does not show the railway itself, it does show two tunnels and two signal posts. It was more than just a garden railway. In a century of technological innovation in the railways, Sir Arthur wished to explore the possibilities of such railways for mining, quarrying, agriculture etc. He believed that they would be relatively easy to build, and to move. He saw possibilities for military railways behind the lines carrying ammunition and supplies. Some other small railways had been built to two foot gauge, but he wished to use the minimum that he felt was practical. Having previously built a small railway of 9 inch gauge, he settled on 15 in (381 mm). Duffield Bank is a fairly steep hillside to the east of the village. Over a period of about seven years, the track reached about a mile long with tunnels and some very sharp curves and steep gradients. He included some stations, and to demonstrate the versatility of such a line, to the freight trucks, he added passenger coaches, as well as a
    7.60
    5 votes
    15
    Foxfield Light Railway

    Foxfield Light Railway

    The Foxfield Light Railway is a preserved standard gauge line located south east of Stoke-on-Trent. The line was built in 1893 to serve the colliery at Dilhorne on the Cheadle Coalfield. It joined the North Staffordshire Railway line near Blythe Bridge. The Foxfield Railway was built in 1892-1893 to provide a link to the North Staffordshire Railway for the Foxfield Colliery. The railway was built by local labour provided by North Staffordshire Railway employees at weekends and supervised by the North Staffordshire Railway foreman plate layer Noah Stanier, using second hand material, again obtained from the North Staffordshire Railway. When the colliery closed in 1965, local volunteers formed the Foxfield Light Railway Society to preserve the line. At first, passengers were taken in converted trucks up the formidable 1:19 to 1:26 gradient out of the colliery site at Dilhorne, accompanied by a tank engine. Eventually, new coaches were purchased and a station was built at Caverswall Road, Blythe Bridge, half a mile from Blythe Bridge station. The service runs for 2.5 miles from there to the top of Foxfield Bank. The last half mile into the colliery is currently being relaid to
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    Weardale Railway

    Weardale Railway

    The Weardale Railway is a British single-track branch line railway providing regular daily passenger service between Bishop Auckland (West), Wolsingham, Frosterley and Stanhope. Services began on 23 May 2010 after a lapse of almost sixty years. The railway originally ran from Bishop Auckland to Wearhead in County Durham, a distance of about 25 miles (40 km). It was built in the nineteenth century to carry passenger and freight traffic. As late as 1993 the line remained in use as part of the national network, serving a large cement works at Eastgate (latterly owned by the Lafarge group) and providing a summer Sundays-only passenger service between Bishop Auckland and Stanhope. The rails were lifted in the 1960s from the extreme western section of the line between Eastgate and Wearhead (passing through Westgate and St John's Chapel, County Durham). The trackbed itself has been removed in at least one place on this last section. The line currently runs 18 miles (29 km) between Bishop Auckland and the site of Eastgate-In-Weardale, Making the line the fourth longest preserved standard gauge railway in Great Britain. In 1993 British Rail announced its intention to close the line
    7.60
    5 votes
    17
    Jersey Railway

    Jersey Railway

    The Jersey Railway was opened in 1870 and was originally a standard gauge railway, 3.75 miles (6.0 km) long, in Jersey in the Channel Islands. Converted to narrow gauge in 1884 and extended, the line closed in 1936. It is not to be confused with the Jersey Eastern Railway. In 1864 the States of Jersey passed a law authorising the construction of the island's first railway. This standard gauge line was constructed, connecting St. Helier to St. Aubin, and the first train ran 25 October 1870. This railway was not a success and the company declared bankruptcy in 1874. The railway continued to operate but passed through a succession of proprietors until 1883. Meanwhile the owner of a granite quarry near La Moye had petitioned to build a railway linking his quarry to St. Aubin. This law passed in June 1871 and the St Aubin & La Moye Railway commenced construction to the narrow gauge of 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm). This line too, ran into financial problems and although construction trains ran on the section from La Moye to Pont Marquet, the company declared bankruptcy in 1878 before completion or opening to the public. In 1883 the Jersey Railway and the partially completed St Aubin & La Moye
    6.50
    6 votes
    18
    Almond Valley Light Railway

    Almond Valley Light Railway

    The Almond Valley Light Railway is a narrow gauge heritage railway running at the Almond Valley Heritage Trust site at Livingston, Scotland. The railway operates at weekends between Easter and the end of September and daily during some school holiday periods. There are two stations, both with waiting shelters and run round loops. A small two-road loco shed is provided at the Heritage centre end of the line. There is a storage siding here also. The line uses only internal combustion locomotives. It has never intended to use steam locomotives and therefore has no facilities for them. The railway is home to a number of electric locomotives (five battery, one overhead); however, these are not used. All of the battery locomotives are likely to require new batteries before being used again. The railway's passenger stock consists of three air braked coaches constructed on-site using ex-RNAD wagon underframes. An ex-RNAD all steel bogie brake van also forms part of the passenger train. In addition to this, the railway has a small selection of ex-RNAD wagons (two tank wagons, a covered van and an open wagon). The railway's trackwork consists of flat-bottomed rail mounted using pandrol clips
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Palmerston and Pine Creek Railway

    Palmerston and Pine Creek Railway

    The North Australia Railway (NAR), also known as the Palmerston to Pine Creek railway, was a 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) narrow gauge railway which ran from Darwin, once known as Palmerston, to Birdum, just south of Larrimah. In the nineteenth century the Northern Territory was administered by South Australia. The John Cox Bray Government in South Australia introduced the Palmerston and Pine Creek Railway Bill in 1883. The £959,300 contract went to C & E Millar of Melbourne on the proviso that they could use coolie labour. The line reached Pine Creek in 1888 and was officially opened on 30 September 1889. Singhalese and Indian gangs did the grubbing and earthwork and 3,000 Chinese labourers laid over 1 km of track per day. A total of 310 bridges and flood openings were built. The Commonwealth Government took control in 1911, having promised to complete the railway from Adelaide to Darwin but without setting a time frame for so doing. The line was extended to near Katherine in 1917. A further extension saw the line reach Birdum in 1929. In 1930 a mixed train, called Leaping Lena ran to an established timetable. During the Second World War Larrimah, nine kilometres north of Birdum, became
    7.40
    5 votes
    20
    Joondalup railway line, Perth

    Joondalup railway line, Perth

    The Joondalup Line is a suburban railway line in Perth, Australia. It mostly traverses the median strip of the Mitchell Freeway, connecting the northern coastal suburbs between Perth and Clarkson. The regional city of Joondalup is also serviced via the Joondalup station. The line to Joondalup was completed on 20 December 1992 as a major capital works project started by the Dowding Labor government. A realignment of the entire bus system was undertaken whereby the new train stations became bus interchanges. The extension to Currambine was completed in March 1993. Initially, service frequencies were similar to those for the Fremantle line as lower passenger numbers were anticipated, however overcrowding saw the doubling of services between Whitfords and Perth on weekdays. Services were reverted to Fremantle Line frequencies between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on 28 June 2009 due to low passenger numbers on those services. On 5 October 2004, the Clarkson extension, part of the Gallop government's New MetroRail project, was opened to the public, connecting the outer northern suburbs to the city for the first time. Previously, catching a bus to Joondalup which took approximately 30–40 minutes was
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    Matheran Hill Railway

    Matheran Hill Railway

    Matheran Hill Railway is a heritage railway in Maharashtra, India. The railways comes under the administration of the Central Railways. The railway covers a distance of 21 km (13.05 mi), over large swathes of forest territory connecting Neral to Matheran in the Western Ghats. UNESCO is considering granting heritage status to the railway. The Neral-Matheran Light Railway was built between 1901 and 1907 by Abdul Hussein Adamjee Peerbhoy, financed by his father, Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy of the Adamjee Group at the cost of 16 lakh (US$30,200). Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy visited Matheran often and wanted to build a railway to make it easier to get there. Hussain's plans for the Matheran Hill Railway were formulated in 1900 and construction started in 1904. Consulting engineer was Everard Calthrop of Barsi Light Railway fame. The line was open to traffic by 1907. Originally, the tracks were laid with 30 lb/yd (14.9 kg/m) rails but now has 42 lb/yd (20.8 kg/m) rails. Ruling gradient is 1:20 (5%) with tight curves and speeds are limited to 12 km/h (7.5 mph). The railway was closed by flood damage during 2005 and was not expected to re-open before April 2007. Contrary to those expectations, the first
    8.50
    4 votes
    22
    Killesberg Railway

    Killesberg Railway

    The Killesberg Railway (German: Killesbergbahn) is a miniature railway in the Killesberg Park in Stuttgart, Germany. Opened with the park in 1939, the 15 in (381 mm) gauge track travels in a 2294.35 metre loop around the park. Diesel locomotives pull trains around the park daily during the summer months whilst steam locomotives are used for special occasions. The park now maintains four locomotives, of which two are powered by diesel and two by steam. Blitzschwoab is the oldest of the two diesel engines, manufactured in 1950. Schwoabapfeil was manufactured in 1992. The steam engines Tazzelwurm and Springerle were delivered to the park in 1950 to replace the two that originally operated on the line until they were removed to Leipzig during World War II. The Killesbergbahn was formerly operated by the Stuttgart Fair company and today by a promotion association.
    6.33
    6 votes
    23
    Rudyard Lake Steam Railway

    Rudyard Lake Steam Railway

    The Rudyard Lake Steam Railway is a minimum gauge railway and the third railway of any gauge to run along the side of Rudyard Lake in Staffordshire. The railway runs for 1.5 miles (2.4 km) on the track bed of an old standard gauge North Staffordshire Railway line. After the NSR line closed down, a small narrow gauge train ran on the site for two years before moving via Suffolk to Trago Mills in Devon. The current line started in 1985 and is 10 ⁄4 in (260 mm) gauge, and operates to a timetable. It was built by the late Peter Hanton of Congleton working on his own over a period of 10 years. He sold the railway to the Rudyard Lake Steam Railway Ltd in October 2000 who have developed it since that date. Trains are about half the size a normal narrow gauge railway and are steam hauled. The railway runs from Rudyard railway station to the Dam then along the side of the lake to terminate by the lakeside at Hunthouse Wood. This is about a mile South of the site of the old Cliffe Park railway station. Trains run on Sundays and Bank Holidays from January to the end of November, with more regular services from Easter to October and daily during school holidays. The railway is a member of
    6.33
    6 votes
    24
    Tonsley railway line, Adelaide

    Tonsley railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    Tonsley Railway Line is a rail route in Adelaide, South Australia, that stems off the Noarlunga Centre railway line to end in Mitchell Park opposite Science Park and close to the Flinders University and the Flinders Medical Centre. There have been many proposals to extend the line so that it ends closer to the Flinders Campus, but nothing has eventuated. The line was constructed in 1965/66 to serve the former Chrysler/Mitsubishi plant at Clovelly Park, which closed in March 2008. Currently, the Tonsley railway line is closed between Woodlands Park and Tonsley from 27 February 2012 to early 2013. The line is single track for its entire length from the junction near Ascot Park to the terminus at Tonsley, with two intermediate stations. Services operate hourly on weekdays with trains operating slightly more frequently in peak periods. No services operate between 7pm-7am or on weekends, and services were only extended to operate during weekday off-peak periods in 2004. Stations between Woodlands Park and Adelaide are also serviced by the Noarlunga Centre railway line, and stations between Goodwood and Adelaide are also serviced by the Belair line. Bus route W90 services the areas
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Norfolk, Franklin and Danville Railway

    Norfolk, Franklin and Danville Railway

    The Norfolk, Franklin and Danville Railway (reporting mark NFD), which operated as the Atlantic & Danville Railway prior to 1962, at one time operated 250 miles of track between Portsmouth (on the harbor of Hampton Roads adjacent to Norfolk) and Danville, Virginia. Part of the line passed through North Carolina. Between 1899 and 1949 the A&D was leased to the Southern Railway. After Southern discontinued the lease, the A&D operated as an independent railroad for 10 years before becoming bankrupt. It was acquired by the Norfolk and Western Railway in 1962 and renamed the NF&D. In March 1982 upon the merger of the N&W and the Southern into the new Norfolk Southern, the NF&D became largely redundant. All that remains of the NF&D is the eastern segment between Lawrenceville and Suffolk and terminal trackage in Portsmouth and Danville. The A&D was built in the 1880s between Danville and Claremont, Virginia on the James River. The railroad expected Claremont to become a major river port. When the expected volume of shipping at Claremont did not materialize, the A&D added a branch from near Emporia, Virginia to Portsmouth. The Danville-Emporia-Portsmouth route quickly became more
    6.17
    6 votes
    26
    Sutter Street Railway

    Sutter Street Railway

    The Sutter Street Railway was originally a horsecar line in San Francisco. In 1877 the line was converted to cable car operation. The line introduced the side grip, and lever operation, both designed by Asa Hovey. Sutter Street Railway's grip car 46 and trailer 54 have been preserved and are displayed in the San Francisco Cable Car Museum.
    6.17
    6 votes
    27
    Beer Heights Light Railway

    Beer Heights Light Railway

    The Beer Heights Light Railway operates 1-mile (1.6 km) of minimum gauge  7 ⁄4 in (184 mm) track at Beer, Devon, England. It is part of Pecorama, an exhibition owned by Peco. The official opening was by Rev. W.V. Awdry on 14 July 1975, at which time it offered a return ride from "Much Natter" station via a balloon loop. Subsequently, it was almost doubled in length by construction of the "Devil's Gorge" extension which involved a very considerable cutting, and the complex track layout also includes a more recent steeply-graded branch line to "Wildway Down". The line is notable for its high standard of presentation to the public and for the fine views obtainable from it. It is home to seven steam locomotives designed on narrow gauge principles. The railway currently has 9 steam locomotives, one diesel and one electric.
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    Mandurah railway line, Perth

    Mandurah railway line, Perth

    • Terminuses: Mandurah
    The Mandurah Railway Line is a suburban railway line, running through the south western suburbs of Perth, Western Australia. Partly located in the median of the Kwinana Freeway, the line connects Perth with Western Australia's second largest city, Mandurah. The line opened on 23 December 2007. The Mandurah Railway, now operating with over 50,000 boardings per day and a Perth to Mandurah journey time of approximately 50 minutes, replaced an existing busway on the Kwinana Freeway, with about 14,000 boardings per day and a Perth to Mandurah journey time of approximately 68 minutes. In this comparison, the Kwinana Freeway busway had been implemented at a significantly lower incremental (i.e adding bus lanes to an existing freeway/road) cost than the railway. Legislation for the construction of the Mandurah Line was passed in December 1999. The original proposed route branched from the Armadale Line at Kenwick, and then ran alongside the freight lines until Jandakot where it would run in the middle of the Kwinana Freeway. However, a bill passed in November 2002 after a change of state government saw that the route would start at Perth, traverse the Kwinana Freeway, and then continue
    9.33
    3 votes
    29
    Otis Elevating Railway

    Otis Elevating Railway

    The Otis Elevating Railway was a cable funicular railroad to the Catskill Mountain House in Palenville, New York. For the first 64 years of its existence, the Catskill Mountain House was accessible only by a long stage coach from Catskill Landing on the Hudson. Faced with increased competition from the Hotel Kaaterskill, served by the Kaaterskill Railroad, Charles Beach hired the Otis Elevator Company to build a cable funicular railroad straight up the Wall Of The Manitou. Opening on August 7, 1892, the line was 7,000' long with a rise of 1,630', a maximum grade of 34%, and an average grade of 12%. In 1904, the line was shortened and the lower trestle eliminated. A cable pulled the specially-designed passenger cars up the mountain, with the car having a mechanism that hooked onto the cable. To balance the system there were two cars. The cars were built by Jackson & Sharp Co. in 1892, and each car could seat 75 passengers. The cars were named Rickerson and Van Santvoord. A small open-air baggage car was coupled to the downhill end of each passenger car. The cable was pulled by two Hamilton Corliss steam engines that spun a set of cogwheels that drove the cable. Each engine was 12
    9.33
    3 votes
    30
    Fort Collins Municipal Railway

    Fort Collins Municipal Railway

    The Fort Collins Municipal Railway operated streetcars in Fort Collins, Colorado, from 1919 until 1951. Since 1984, a section of one of the former routes has been in operation as a seasonal heritage streetcar service, under the same name, running mainly on spring and summer weekends. The heritage service is operated by volunteers from the Fort Collins Municipal Railway Society (FCMRS). Electric streetcar service in Fort Collins began operating on December 29, 1907. The first local street railway service had actually begun on August 8, 1907, temporarily using a steam locomotive borrowed from the Colorado and Southern Railway, hauling four elderly passenger coaches, on a newly constructed single-track line along Mountain Avenue. True electric trolley/streetcar service was inaugurated with the formal dedication of the new street railway system, on December 29 of the same year. Its owner and operator was the Denver and Interurban Railroad (D&I), a subsidiary of Colorado & Southern Railway. Fort Collins was reportedly one of the smallest cities in the United States to operate streetcars. The system struggled financially, its light ridership making it no longer economically viable as a
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    Lewis and Clark Railway

    Lewis and Clark Railway

    The Lewis and Clark Railway (reporting mark LINC) is a county-owned railroad located in Clark County, Washington. The line is 33 miles long, beginning at the BNSF interchange at Rye Junction in Vancouver, Washington and stretching northeast, passing through Brush Prairie and Battle Ground to the line's northern end past Yacolt. 1888: Built to Brush Prairie as the Vancouver, Klickitat & Yakima. Original line extended from a ferry dock near the current Vancouver depot up Lincoln Street. 1898: Reorganized by new owners as the Portland, Vancouver and Yakima Railroad 1902: Line extended to Yacolt. 1903: Northern Pacific Railway acquires the line. 1948: Harbor Plywood Company builds an independent line from Yacolt to Chelatchie Prairie. 1950: Longview, Portland and Northern Railway acquires the Harbor Plywood line. 1960: Longview, Portland and Northern Railway acquires the NP line from Rye to Yacolt. NP continues to service branch to Rye. 1979: International Paper in Chelatchie Prairie closes. Traffic drops precipitously. 1981: Chelatchie Prairie Railroad acquires the line. 1984: Service discontinued. 1985: Abandonment authorized on August 29 1987: Line purchased by Clark County and
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    Kamloops Heritage Railway

    Kamloops Heritage Railway

    The Kamloops Heritage Railway is a heritage railway in Kamloops, British Columbia. The railway operates throughout the year running trains within Kamloops. The train is pulled by restored steam locomotive Canadian National Railway 2141, the "Spirit of Kamloops". 2141 was built in 1912 by the Canadian Locomotive Company, in Kingston, ON - built for the Canadian Northern Railway, prior to it being absorbed into the Canadian National Railway. She is a 2-8-0, 'Consolidation' class of steam locomotive built for branch line railways. Originally a coal burner, she was converted to burn oil in 1954, and retired from active duty in 1958. 2141 was sold to the City of Kamloops in 1961, and placed on display in Riverside Park until restoration work began in 1995. The restoration was completed in 2001, and 2141 has been working for KHR from May until December each year since. The Kamloops railway station, is used by the railway with tickets sold from their ticket office at 5-510 Lorne St near the station.
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Köping-Uttersberg-Riddarhyttan Railway

    Köping-Uttersberg-Riddarhyttan Railway

    The Köping–Uttersberg–Riddarhyttan Railway (Swedish: Köping-Uttersberg-Riddarhyttans Järnväg or KURJ) was a narrow gauge railway in central Sweden, 46 kilometers long. The railway went between the port city of Köping and small industry cities e.g. Uttersberg and Riddarhyttan in the northwestern direction. It existed 1864–1968. This railway had a unique rail gauge of 1,093 mm (3 ft 7 in), which is said not to have existed anywhere else in the world. This happened by mistake. The railway was planned to have 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in), a relatively common gauge in Sweden at this time, around 1860. Something went wrong when ordering locomotives and rail cars. Probably someone measured in the wrong way on the track, which was built from Köping and on. Possibly there was a mistake with the Swedish and English foot, which differ by about 2.7%. When the trains arrived they did not match the railway, and it was considered that moving one rail on the half-built railway would be cheaper than rebuilding the vehicles. In 1864 cargo traffic was started on a part of the railway. In 1866 the 35-kilometer-long Köping-Uttersberg railway was opened officially. In the year 1880 a new railway, the
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Swansea Vale Railway

    Swansea Vale Railway

    The Swansea Vale Railway (SVR) was a railway line connecting the port of Swansea in South Wales to industries and coalfields in the Swansea Valley and the Brynamman district on the borders of Glamorgan and Carmarthenshire. Later additions to the route included a loop line through Morriston and a branch – the Swansea Vale and Neath and Brecon Joint Railway – which connected the SVR to the system of the Midland Railway Company by means of running powers over the Neath and Brecon Railway. The Midland and its successor company the London, Midland and Scottish Railway were the owners of the SVR from 1876 until 1947. First opened in 1816 as a tramroad for conveying coal from Scott's Pit, near Birchgrove, to wharves on the River Tawe nearly four miles (6 km) to the south, the Swansea Vale route grew to become a feeder railway for several mines and metal-working industries in the valley, and by 1874 it was carrying passengers between Swansea St Thomas station, Llansamlet, Glais, Pontardawe, Ystradgynlais (on the Swansea Vale and Neath and Brecon Junction Railway), Ystalyfera, and Brynamman. The railway was leased in 1874 by the Midland Railway and purchased outright by that company two
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    Acadiana Railway

    Acadiana Railway

    The Acadiana Railway Company (reporting mark AKDN) is a short line railroad based in Opelousas, Louisiana. It operates on the following trackage: Founded in 1990, the company started business on October 15 in the same year, after it acquired trackage from Union Pacific and Missouri Pacific. The company is controlled by Trac-Work Inc.. Media related to Acadiana Railway at Wikimedia Commons
    5.83
    6 votes
    36
    Don Valley Railway

    Don Valley Railway

    Don Valley Railway first formed as a heritage rail project in September 2003 to operate on the freight rail line between Stocksbridge Steel Works and Sheffield following the route of the former Woodhead Line between Deepcar and Sheffield, The project is developed by Don Valley Railway Ltd., a not-for-profit company and registered charity based in Stocksbridge, South Yorkshire. Original plans to operate heritage rail services for the purposes of tourism at weekends along side regular commuter services have now shifted towards concentrating on the development of a viable commuter service - though with help of outside assistance heritage plans could be revised. The proposed route runs along trackbed owned by Network Rail that was constructed in the 1840s by the Sheffield, Ashton-Under-Lyne and Manchester Railway (later the Great Central Railway) as part of their line between Manchester and Sheffield. This line, which became known as the Woodhead Line, closed to passengers in 1970. The portion of the Woodhead Line that the Don Valley Railway propose to use is currently used as a freight-only line linking the national rail network with tracks owned by the steelworks at
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Drachenfels Railway

    Drachenfels Railway

    The Drachenfels Railway or Drachenfelsbahn is a rack railway line in the North Rhine-Westphalia region of Germany. The line runs from Königswinter to the summit of the Drachenfels mountain at an altitude of 289 m (948 ft). Besides the two terminal stations, an intermediate station serves the Schloss Drachenburg. The Drachenfels Railway is one of only four rack railways still operational in Germany, along with the Bavarian Zugspitze Railway, the Stuttgart Rack Railway and the Wendelstein Railway. The line is 1.5 km (0.93 mi) long and is single track. There are two terminal stations, Köningswinter Drachenfelsbahn and Drachenfels, and a single intermediate station, Drachenburg, which also has a passing loop. The line has a rail gauge of 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 ⁄8 in) and uses the Riggenbach rack design to overcome a height difference of 220 m (722 ft) and a maximum gradient of 20%. The line is electrified, with overhead supply at 750 V DC. The service is operated with a fleet of four four-wheel electric railcars, built in Rastatt between 1955 and 1960, plus a fifth identical railcar built by the railway itself in 1979. Although double-ended, the railcars are unusual in that they have doors
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Nevada Northern Railway

    Nevada Northern Railway

    The Nevada Northern Railway (reporting mark NN) was a railroad in the U.S. state of Nevada, built primarily to reach a major copper producing area in White Pine County, Nevada. The railway, constructed in 1905-06, extended northward about 140 miles from Ely to a connection with the Southern Pacific Railroad at Cobre. In 1967 NN reported 40 million net ton-miles of revenue freight on 162 miles of line. The Nevada Northern owes its beginnings to the discovery and development of large porphyry copper deposits near Ely in the first years of the twentieth century. Two of the region's largest mines were purchased in 1902 by Mark Requa, president of the Eureka and Palisade Railroad in central Nevada. Requa then organized the White Pine Copper Company to develop his new properties, and it soon became evident that rail access to the isolated region would be essential to fully exploit the potential of the mines. Subsequent surveys indicated that the most practical route for such a railroad was northward from Ely, connecting with the Southern Pacific somewhere in the vicinity of Wells. The Ely-area copper properties were further merged in 1904, forming the Nevada Consolidated Copper Company,
    7.50
    4 votes
    39
    Prairie Dog Central Railway

    Prairie Dog Central Railway

    The Prairie Dog Central Railway is a heritage railway just outside of Winnipeg. Regular trips are every Saturday, Sunday and Holiday Monday from May through September, and last almost four hours with one stop in the rural community of Grosse Isle. Special dinner excursions occur during the season, as well as the Howlin' Halloween Express Trains in October. Details of the operations can be found by reviewing the schedules. Private Charters, School Programs and Engineer for a Day are also available. Initiated in 1970 by The Vintage Locomotive Society Inc., the first operations were in July, 1970. From 1970–1974, the train operated out of Charleswood on the now-abandoned Canadian National Cabot Subdivision. From 1975 to 1996 the train operated out of St. James, immediately west of Polo Park on a now abandoned Canadian National Railways line. In 1999 the station, now a Federal Heritage Site, was moved to its present location at Inkster Junction in Rosser. The Vintage Locomotive Society Inc. purchased the former Oak Point Subdivision from Canadian National Railways in 1999. Originally constructed between 1905 and 1910 by Mackenzie & Mann for the Canadian Northern Railway, it became part
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Alishan Forest Railway

    Alishan Forest Railway

    The Alishan Forest Railway (阿里山森林鐵路) is an 86 km network of 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) narrow-gauge railways running up to and throughout the popular mountain resort of Alishan in Chiayi County, Taiwan. The railway, originally constructed for logging, is itself a tourist attraction with unique Z-shaped switchbacks, 50 tunnels, and over 77 wooden bridges. The narrow-gauge lines were originally constructed by the Japanese Colonial Government in 1912 to facilitate the logging of cypress and Taiwania wood, however today the line caters mostly to tourists. Passenger carriages were first added to the trains in 1918. The first motive power was a Shay locomotive purchased second hand from the Kiso Forest Railway in Japan. Eventually the railway acquired 20 Shay locomotives. The completion of the Alishan Highway in 1982 led to the loss of many rail passengers to faster and cheaper buses and the rail became primarily a tourist attraction. Accidents on the line have resulted in a number of fatalities over the years. On 24 April 1981, a collapsed tunnel resulted in nine deaths and 13 injuries. On 1 March 2003, 17 people were killed and 156 injured when a train derailed near Alishan Railway Station. On
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Oregon, Pacific and Eastern Railway

    Oregon, Pacific and Eastern Railway

    The Oregon, Pacific and Eastern Railway (reporting mark OPE) is a short line railroad that began in 1904 as the Oregon and Southeastern Railroad (O&SE). The line ran 18 miles (29 km) between the towns of Cottage Grove and Wildwood. The Oregon, Pacific & Eastern Railway Company incorporated in 1912, and purchased the physical assets of the O&SE two years later. The OP&E's operations ran some 16.6 miles (26.7 km) from an interchange with the Southern Pacific Railroad at Cottage Grove, then east to Culp Creek. The last of the track was closed and scrapped in 1994. A successor corporation now operates a narrow-gauge line at Wildlife Safari. The company reorganized in 1940 under the same name, and was purchased by the Booth-Kelly Lumber Company in 1947. Georgia-Pacific subsequently purchased Booth-Kelly (including the OP&E) in 1959, and in turn sold it in 1970 to Willis Kyle, who formed the Row River Investment Company (jointly owned by Kyle Railways and Bohemia, Inc.). The line operated passenger excursions from 1972 until 1987. At that time the train used a self-propelled Budd Rail Diesel Car originally built for Southern Pacific, which had spent most of its life on the Southern
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Tokyu Meguro Line

    Tokyu Meguro Line

    The Tōkyū Meguro Line (東急目黒線, Tōkyū Meguro-sen) is a railway line operated by Japanese private railway company Tokyu Corporation. As a railway line, the name is for the section between Meguro and Den-en-chōfu in southwest Tokyo, but nearly all trains run to Hiyoshi on a quad-tracked section of the Tōyoko Line in Yokohama, Kanagawa. The Meguro line currently interoperates with the Tokyo Metro Namboku Line and Toei Mita Line beyond Meguro. Until this connection was established in 2000, the line was a part of the Mekama Line, and ran between Meguro and Kamata. The rest of the Mekama Line was named the Tōkyū Tamagawa Line. On June 22, 2008, new tracks for the Meguro Line trains from Motosumiyoshi to Hiyoshi stations were added. Express services between Musashi-Kosugi and Meguro started on September 25, 2006, and was extended to Hiyoshi on June 22, 2008. The Express saves 5 minutes over the route and overtakes local trains at Musashi-Koyama. Express trains operate during the daytime one in every 4 to 5 trains, with higher frequencies during peak periods.
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Feather River Route

    Feather River Route

    The Feather River Route is a rail line that was built and operated by the Western Pacific Railroad. It was constructed between 1906 and 1909, and connects the cities of Oakland, California, and Salt Lake City, Utah. The line was built to compete with the Central Pacific Railroad (and later Southern Pacific Railroad), which at the time held a nearly complete monopoly on Northern California rail service. The route derives its name from its crossing of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, where it follows both the North and Middle Forks of the Feather River. The route is famous for its impressive engineering qualities and its considerable scenic value. All of the route is now owned and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad; however, the Union Pacific has transferred significant portions of the route to other lines. The portion still called the Feather River Route by the Union Pacific runs from the California Central Valley to Winnemucca, Nevada. Interest in building a transportation artery through the Feather River Canyon and across the deserts of Nevada and Utah began with the discovery of Beckwourth Pass, in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, in 1850. The pass, at 5,221 feet (1,591 m) in
    10.00
    2 votes
    44
    Laupheim–Schwendi railway

    Laupheim–Schwendi railway

    The Railway line Laupheim West - Schwendi in Germany connected the city of Laupheim with the then village of Schwendi. The railway line was opened by the Royal Württemberg State Railways on 17 May 1904. It branched off from the main artery of the Royal Württemberg State Railways in the south, connecting Ulm with Friedrichshafen. The length of the railway line was 16 km (approximately 10 miles). The railway line had the classification number of 4510. The steam locomotive used on the line, received the nickname Rottalmolle by the local population, referring to the course of the railway line through the valley of the river Rot. The transport of passengers between the city station of Laupheim and Schwendi was discontinued on 23 May 1971, the transportation of goods on 28 September 1984. Afterwards the railway tracks were dismantled. Passenger trains on the part leading from Laupheim to Laupheim-West were discontinued on 27 May 1983. However, unlike the tracks leading to Schwendi, the tracks to Laupheim-West were left intact and re-opened on 30 May 1999 for public transport. Direct trains now operate from Laupheim to Langenau via Ulm Central Station, without passengers having to change
    10.00
    2 votes
    45
    Stafford and Uttoxeter Railway

    Stafford and Uttoxeter Railway

    The Stafford and Uttoxeter Railway was created by Act of Parliament in 1862, to run between Stafford and Uttoxeter in Staffordshire, England.It opened for traffic in 1867. It was nicknamed the Clog and Knocker. It was purchased for £100,000 by the Great Northern Railway in July 1881 as a means of reaching Wales. The latter thus gained a through route from Grantham via the Ambergate, Nottingham, Boston and Eastern Junction Railway and the GNR Derbyshire and Staffordshire Extension. From Stafford it would reach Shrewsbury by the Shropshire Union Railways and Canal Company line which had opened in 1849 and continue over the Potteries, Shrewsbury and North Wales Railway. Passenger services ended on 4 December 1939. The through line closed on 5 March 1951 a stub survived at Stafford to serve the RAF Stafford 16 Maintenance Unit, that closed on 1 December 1975. in the early 1840s a number of schemes were put forward to link Stafford and Uttoxeter by rail. Two in particular were planned to extend as far as Derby. Notice of the first of these was placed in 1845. Called the Derby, Uttoxeter and Stafford Railway it was part of plans for a cross-country line from the Eastern Counties to
    10.00
    2 votes
    46
    Ouse Valley Railway

    Ouse Valley Railway

    The Ouse Valley Railway was to have been part of the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway (LBSCR). It was authorised by an Act of Parliament and construction of the 20 miles (32 km) long line was begun, but not completed. It never opened to traffic. In the 1860s, the South Eastern Railway and the London, Chatham and Dover Railway were proposing to build railways to Brighton and Eastbourne. To counter this threat, the LBSCR proposed to build a 20 miles (32 km) long railway linking Haywards Heath, Uckfield, and Hailsham. It accepted that the line would not be profitable but it wanted to keep other companies out of its territory. Authorisation was given to extend the line to St Leonards. One tactic to be employed by the LBSCR was to build the line as slowly as possible, delaying its opening to force other companies to look elsewhere to build their lines. An Act of Parliament was needed to construct the line. This was sought in 1863 and granted - 26&27 Vict c.xxxv s.13, L.B. & S.C.R.(Ouse Valley Line) 1864. In 1864, authorisation was received to extend the line to St Leonards. The line was to leave the Brighton Main Line just south of Balcombe Viaduct and pass through Lindfield. From
    6.40
    5 votes
    47
    Jinghu railway

    Jinghu railway

    The Beijing–Shanghai Railway or Jinghu railway (simplified Chinese: 京沪铁路; traditional Chinese: 京滬鐵路; pinyin: Jīnghù tiĕlù) is a railway line in China between Beijing and Shanghai. The line has a total length of 1,462 kilometres and connects the municipalities of Beijing, Tianjin, and Shanghai, as well as the provinces of Hebei, Shandong, Anhui and Jiangsu. It is commonly referred to as the Jinghu Railway, taking on the abbreviated names of the two terminal cities. In Chinese, "Jing" means "capital" and refers to Beijing, and "Hu" is the abbreviatied name for Shanghai. The Beijing–Shanghai railway is composed of three sections. These three sections are some of the earliest railways in China, built before 1910 during the Qing dynasty. The first section is from Beijing to Tianjin, constructed as part of the Imperial Railways of Northern China between 1897 and 1900. The second section is from Tianjin to Pukou – a suburb of Nanjing – and used to be called the Tianjin–Pukou Railway. Between Pukou and Xiaguan, the railway crosses the Yangtze River. Before the completion of the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge in 1968, the trains were ferried across car-by-car. The third section is from
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Volk's Electric Railway

    Volk's Electric Railway

    Volk's Electric Railway (VER) is the oldest operating electric railway in the world. It is a narrow gauge railway that runs along a length of the seafront of the English seaside resort of Brighton. It was built by Magnus Volk, the first section being completed in August 1883. Today the line runs between terminal stations at Aquarium (a short distance from the Palace Pier) and Black Rock (at Black Rock, not far from Brighton Marina), with an intermediate station and depot at Paston Place (now known as Halfway). The line has a gauge of 2 ft 8 ⁄2 in (825 mm), It is electrified at 110 V DC using a third rail, and is just under 1+⁄4 miles (2 km) long. Operated as a historical seafront tourist attraction, the railway does not usually run during the winter months, and its service is also occasionally liable to suspension due to severe weather or maintenance issues. Information on any current service changes is available from the railway office. A highly detailed model of Volks carriage no.6 is on show in the foyer of the Brighton Toy and Model Museum, donated by Siemens who provided much of the electrical equipment used on the railway. In 1883 Magnus Volk opened a short 2 ft gauge
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Pressnitz Valley Railway

    Pressnitz Valley Railway

    The Pressnitz Valley Railway (German: Preßnitztalbahn) was a narrow gauge railway line in Saxony, Germany. It used to climb from Wolkenstein on the standard gauge Flöha - Vejprty line (the Zschopau Valley Railway or Zschopautalbahn) through the valley of river Pressnitz (Czech: Přísečnice) to Jöhstadt on the border with Bohemia. It was dismantled in the 1990s, however the Steinbach - Jöhstadt section was rebuilt as a museum railway after the fall of communism in East Germany. Construction started in 1891 and the railway was opened on 1 June 1892. In May 1893 the line was extended to the border with Bohemia. There were several projects to connect the line to Bohemian standard gauge lines, with the aim of enabling the importation of lignite from the Most Basin. However, the proposed link with border station at Reitzenhain on the Chomutov - Flöha line was rejected, as well as a plans to build an extension to the Chomutov–Vejprty/Reitzenhain railway. From 1911 freight was carried using transporter trailers. The Pressnitz Valley Railway was the last Saxon narrow gauge railway to be closed by the East German government. Passenger services were terminated in 1984; the transportation of
    6.20
    5 votes
    50
    Burlington Northern Railroad

    Burlington Northern Railroad

    The Burlington Northern Railroad (reporting mark BN) was a United States-based railroad company formed from a merger of four major U.S. railroads. Burlington Northern operated between 1970 and 1996. Its historical lineage begins in the earliest days of railroading with the chartering in 1848 of the Chicago and Aurora Railroad, a direct ancestor line of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, which lends Burlington to the names of various merger-produced successors. Burlington Northern merged with the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway at the end of 1996 to form the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway (later renamed BNSF Railway), which was owned by the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corporation. That corporation was purchased by Berkshire Hathaway in 2009 which is controlled by investor Warren Buffett. The Burlington Northern Railroad was the product of a March 2, 1970 merger that involved four major railroads: the Great Northern Railway, Northern Pacific Railway, Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad as well as a few small jointly-owned subsidiaries owned by the four. Although the four railroads shared common ownership
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Butte, Anaconda and Pacific Railway

    Butte, Anaconda and Pacific Railway

    The Butte, Anaconda and Pacific Railway (reporting mark BAP) is a short line railroad in the U.S. state of Montana which was founded in 1892. It was financed by the interests behind the Anaconda Copper Mining Company and operated primarily to carry copper ore from the mines at Butte, Montana to the smelters at Anaconda, Montana, although the company was chartered as a common carrier and also carried passengers and general freight. The BA&P was an electrification pioneer, converting in 1913 and being the first primarily freight railroad to electrify. Electrification was at 2,400 volts DC; the work was performed by General Electric and the railroad's own staff. The electrification was abandoned in 1967 as it had become cheaper to operate diesel-electric locomotives. The railroad as a whole lost much of its business following the closure of the Anaconda smelters, and in 1985 was sold to a consortium of local investors and reconstituted as the Rarus Railway (reporting mark RARW). On July 19, 2007, Patriot Rail Corporation, the parent company which acquired Rarus Railway in May 2007, announced that the railway's name was officially changed back to Butte, Anaconda and Pacific Railway.
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Franklin and Megantic Railway

    Franklin and Megantic Railway

    The Franklin and Megantic Railway (F&M) (original name "Franklin and Megantic Railroad") was a narrow gauge railroad in northern Maine that branches off from the Sandy River Railroad (SRR) at Strong and served sawmills in Salem township and in the town of Kingfield. The F&M was constructed in 1884 to reach aboriginal spruce forests on the south slope of Mount Abraham. The 1.8-mile (2.9 km) Mount Abram branch was constructed to Soule's sawmill in 1886. In 1894, the F&M formed the Kingfield and Dead River Railroad (K&DR) to extend rails up the Carrabassett River from Kingfield to Carrabassett. At that time, the F&M owned 2 locomotives, 7 box cars, 21 flat cars, 40-foot (12 m) combination car #1 built by the Laconia Car Company in 1885, and 20-foot (6.1 m) baggage car #2 (renumbered #4 in 1903) built by the Portland Company in 1887. The company was renamed to "Franklin and Megantic Railway" in 1897 due to financial problems. The owners of the Sandy River Railroad purchased controlling interest in the F&M in 1898. In 1899 the line was extended to a large sawmill in Crockertown (later called Bigelow), as close to the Canadian town of Megantic as it would reach. Twenty new flat cars were
    7.00
    4 votes
    53
    Mauritania Railway

    Mauritania Railway

    The Mauritania Railway is the national railway of Mauritania. Opened in 1963, it consists of a single, 704-kilometre (437 mi) railway line linking the iron mining centre of Zouerate with the port of Nouadhibou, via Fderik and Choum. The state agency Société Nationale Industrielle et Minière (National Mining and Industrial Company, SNIM) controls the railway line. Since the closure of the Choum Tunnel, a 5 km section of the railway cuts through the POLISARIO controlled part of the Western Sahara (21°21′18″N 13°00′46″W / 21.354867°N 13.012644°W / 21.354867; -13.012644)). Trains on the railway are up to 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) in length, making them among the longest and heaviest in the world. They consist of 3 or 4 diesel-electric EMD locomotives, 200 to 210 cars each carrying up to 84 tons of iron ore, and a variable number of service cars. The total traffic averages 16.6 million tons per year. Travelers' carts are also occasionally transported by train; these services are managed by an SNIM subsidiary, the ATTM Society (Société d'assainissement, de travaux, de transport et de maintenance). Passenger carts are sometimes attached, but more often passengers simply ride atop the ore
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Jezreel Valley railway

    Jezreel Valley railway

    The Jezreel Valley railway, or simply the Valley railway (Hebrew: רכבת העמק‎, Rakevet HaEmek) refers to a historical railroad in Ottoman and British Palestine, which was part of the larger Hejaz railway and ran along the Jezreel Valley. It was built in the beginning of the 20th century and connected Haifa with the rest of the 1,050 mm (3 ft 5 ⁄3 in) narrow gauge Hejaz railway, its last stop within the Palestine Mandate borders being al-Hamma. After many failed attempts, the final planning and construction lasted 4 years. The railway was inaugurated on October 15, 1905, and operated until 1948. In the decades since there have been several failed attempts to revive the railway. Finally, a large-scale project to build a new standard gauge railway from Haifa to Beit She'an along roughly the same route as the historical valley railway began in 2011 and is expected to be completed in 2016. In the 1860s the deputy British consul in Haifa, Thomas B. Sandwit, proposed the construction of a railway from the city to Baghdad, through the Jezreel Valley, with a possible extension to Damascus. Sandwit hoped to create a continuous railway link between British India and the Palestine, and increase
    6.00
    5 votes
    55
    Corringham Light Railway

    Corringham Light Railway

    The Corringham Light Railway (CLR) served the town of Corringham, Essex, England. It was incorporated on 10 July 1899 and opened to freight on 1 January 1901 and to passengers on 22 June 1901. It closed to passengers on 1 March 1952 and was absorbed into the Mobil Oil Company on 20 September 1971. The London, Tilbury and Southend Railway had a branch from Thames Haven Junction, near Stanford-le-Hope, to Thames Haven on the Thames Estuary. There was a passenger station at Thames Haven but it closed before the CLR opened. The CLR ran from a junction with the LTSR near Thames Haven to the Kynoch explosives works at Shell Haven with branches east to Kynochtown (later renamed Coryton) and west to Corringham. In its later years the CLR was owned by the Mobil Oil Company serving its Coryton Refinery. It was some 2+⁄4 miles (4.4 km) in length. The site of the Corringham Station on Fobbing Road is still apparent from the satellite view of postcode SS17 9DB. The trees that lined the track as it ran north and curved westward into the station are still present. If you enter a small development of houses called The Hawthorns, the rear of the brick built platform is still visible behind "Station
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Dakar–Niger Railway

    Dakar–Niger Railway

    The Dakar–Niger Railway connects Dakar, (Senegal) to Koulikoro, (Mali). The name refers to the Niger River, not the Republic of Niger. It serves many cities in Senegal (including Thiès) and Mali (including Kayes, Kita, Kati, Bamako). The line covers a course of 1,287 km of which 641 km lies in Mali. The line is managed and operated by the Transrail consortium. Construction work on the Dakar–Niger Railway began at the end of the 19th century under the French general Gallieni, commander of French Sudan. The railroad connected the Niger River with the port of Dakar, allowing the transport of raw materials across the globe. The line was completed at the beginning of the 20th century, the Kayes-Koulikoro section being inaugurated in 1904, but the final section of line did not open until 1924. In 1947, the railroad workers went on a several-month strike to obtain the same rights as the French railwaymen. The successful strike was celebrated as a turning point in the anti-colonial struggle by Senegalese writer Ousmane Sembène in his 1960 novel Les bouts de bois de Dieu. With the independence of Mali and Senegal, after the break-up of the Mali Federation, control of the railroad was
    8.00
    3 votes
    57
    Festiniog and Blaenau Railway

    Festiniog and Blaenau Railway

    The Festiniog & Blaenau Railway was a narrow gauge railway built in 1868 to connect the town of Blaenau Ffestiniog with the slate quarries around Tanymanod and the smaller town of Llan Ffestiniog. At Blaenau Ffestiniog it made a direct connection with the Ffestiniog Railway with which it was closely associated during its brief existence. The railway was purchased by the Great Western Railway in 1883 and converted to standard gauge to extend the Bala Ffestiniog line, a branch of the GWR's line from Ruabon to Barmouth. By the early 1860s Llan Ffestiniog had largely become a dormitory town supplying workers to the slate industry centred about three miles north-east at Blaenau Ffestiniog. The quarries at Blaenau were connected to the harbor at Porthmadog by the recently built Ffestiniog Railway and as a result were able to significantly increase their output and profitability. However the Ffestiniog was struggling to cope with the volume of traffic from the quarries and some owners were looking for other outlets for their product. At the same time, several standard gauge railway companies were looking to extend their lines into the region to tap the demand for slate transport. In
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Fils Valley Railway

    Fils Valley Railway

    The Fils Valley Railway (German: Filstalbahn, historically Filsbahn or Württembergische Ostbahn—Württemberg Eastern Railway) designates the Württemberg line from Stuttgart via Göppingen to Ulm. It runs from Plochingen to Geislingen an der Steige through the Fils Valley. The Fils Valley Railway was built as part of the first railway line in Württemberg connecting the navigable Neckar in Heilbronn via Stuttgart with the navigable Danube at Ulm, with a further connection from Ulm to Lake Constance. The Stuttgart-Esslingen section of the line was built as part of the Central Railway (Zentralbahn) between 1844 and 1846. The line was completed between Cannstatt and Esslingen on 22 October 1845 and the Rosenstein Tunnel was completed on 4 July 1846, allowing the first train to run into Stuttgart station on 26 September 1846. It was extended to Plochingen in December 1846 and on 28 June 1850, the first train rolled over the new single-track line of the Royal Württemberg State Railways (Königlich Württembergische Staats-Eisenbahnen). The line is also considered as the first railway to cross a low mountain range in Europe because of the Geislinger Steige (Geislingen Ramp). The upward
    8.00
    3 votes
    59
    Gawler railway line, Adelaide

    Gawler railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    The Gawler Central line is a suburban commuter railway line in the city of Adelaide, South Australia. It is the only rail route in Adelaide to have no interchange with another line at any station except Adelaide. The line was constructed in 1857-58 to connect the Adelaide with copper resources at Kapunda and Burra, as well as to provide passenger and freight services to the new town of Gawler. The construction of the standard gauge line to the west now carries the majority of freight, but there is still a regular "stone train" running to the quarries north of Angaston. Originally running through rural land, the line is now surrounded by suburbs and has developed into a suburban commuter line. The line is three tracks between Adelaide and Salisbury (two broad gauge and one standard gauge), two tracks between Salisbury and Gawler (both broad gauge), and a single broad gauge track between Gawler and Gawler Central. The line to Angaston continues on from Gawler Central; this is the only broad gauge freight line remaining in operation in South Australia. When delivering the 2008 South Australian State Budget, Treasurer Kevin Foley announced a $116 million dollar plan to re-bed,
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Ikawa Line, Oigawa Railway

    Ikawa Line, Oigawa Railway

    The Ikawa Line (井川線, Ikawa-sen) of the Ōigawa Railway is the only rack-and-pinion railway in Japan. The line originates at Senzu Station in Kawanehon, Shizuoka Prefecture, the end station of the Ōigawa Main Line, and terminates at Ikawa Station in Aoi-ku, Shizuoka, Shizuoka Prefecture. The line has 61 tunnels and 51 bridges along its 25.5 kilometer length. The Ikawa line began operations on March 20, 1935, as a private line for the Ōigawa Electric Company, to carry workers and materials upstream to facilitate dam construction. The single track line was originally constructed with 762 mm (2 ft 6 in) gauge However, in order to have dual usage with carriages on the Senzu-Shinrin Line (now extinct) a third rail was added the following year for the 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in) Japanese standard gauge. In 1954, the line was extended under the aegis of the Chubu Electric Power Company to facilitate the construction of the Ōigawa Dam. Railway operations were spun out of Chubu Electric into a separate company in 1959, with the foundation of the Ōigawa Railway Company. With the completion of the Nagashima Dam, a portion of the line had to be re-routed along a 1.5 km section with a maximum gradient
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Isle of Mull Railway

    Isle of Mull Railway

    The Isle of Mull Railway is a  10 ⁄4 in (260 mm) gauge line, 1+⁄4 miles (2.0 km) long, which ran from the ferry terminal at Craignure to Torosay Castle, on the Isle of Mull in the Scottish Inner Hebrides. Originally it was known as the Mull and West Highland Railway. The line opened in 1983 and closed in October 2010. A limited service operated over the 2011 Easter holiday until 2 May 2011. It is now shown as operating from Friday 27 May 2011 until Thursday 1 September 2011. The Company's lease ended in October 2011.. Its website now says trains will run in August then it will close. The line was marketed as Scotland's original island passenger railway. In 1975, the then-owner of Torosay Castle, David James decided to open the house and gardens to the public. Local businessman Graham Ellis, a railway enthusiast, suggested that a narrow-gauge railway might be the ideal way to transport visitors from the ferry terminal 1+⁄2 mi (2.4 km) away, whilst also becoming a tourist attraction in its own right. Although Planning permission was granted in 1975, it was not until April 1982 that construction got under way. The line was completed in May 1983, with the first test run taking place on
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Willunga railway line, Adelaide

    Willunga railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    The Willunga railway line ran through the southern Adelaide suburbs from Hallett Cove to Willunga, over 45-kilometre (28 mi) long (longer than the current Gawler line, 42.2 kilometres (26.2 mi)). The line reached Willunga in 1918, and had 16 stations. It closed in 1969 and was dismantled in 1972, but the corridor remains as the 34-kilometre (21 mi) long Coast to Vines Rail Trail. There is some evidence of railway track remaining on this trail, notably near the South Road crossing at Hackham, the top of the Seaford Hill and a small section of track in a paddock adjacent to Victor Harbor Road, McLaren Vale. Occasionally, rails surface through the bitumen at Field Street, McLaren Vale.
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Belair railway line, Adelaide

    Belair railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    The Belair railway line is a suburban rail commuter route within the City of Adelaide, South Australia, that runs from the Adelaide Railway Station to Belair in the Adelaide Hills. The Bridgewater railway line from Adelaide to Belair / Bridgewater opened in 1883. In 1987, passenger services to Bridgewater ceased, mainly due to low patronage, the terminus becoming Belair. In 1995, one track of the double track main line from Adelaide to Belair was converted from broad gauge (1600mm) to standard gauge (1435mm) as part of the Adelaide to Melbourne standardisation project. The broad gauge passenger services were thus restricted to a single track with crossing loops located at Mitcham Station, Blackwood Station, Eden Hills and Sleeps Hill. At the same time, the stations at Millswood, Hawthorn and Clapham were closed despite criticism from local residents. The motive power used for suburban passenger trains is now exclusively 3000 and 3100 class railcars. Until June 2007, on weekends some services were run with a 2000 class railcar modified to incorporate increased bike capacity. In 2005, trains ran the route every 30 minutes on weekdays (hourly after 7pm) and every 60 minutes on
    6.75
    4 votes
    64
    Frýdlant-Heřmanice Railway

    Frýdlant-Heřmanice Railway

    In 1864, a committee for construction of normal gauge railway line Zittau - Reichenau (Bogatynia) - Frýdlant - Liegnitz (Legnica) was established. Negotiations with governments and investors failed. In 1884, a narrow gauge railway connecting Zittau with Markersdorf via Reichenau was built. As a result, new plans for construction of narrow gauge line with a gauge of 750 mm connecting Frýdlant and Zittau were drawn. In 1899, a concession for construction of line Frýdlant - Dětřichov - Heřmanice was granted. Public transport, operated by Friedländer Bezirksbahn, started in August 1900. The line was closed down in January 1976. The track and some bridges were dismantled in 1996. Total length of the track amounted to 10.781 km, maximum slope 35‰, minimum radius 50 meters, maximum speed 40 km/h.
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    Jingguang Railway

    Jingguang Railway

    The Beijing–Guangzhou Railway or Jingguang Railway (simplified Chinese: 京广铁路; traditional Chinese: 京廣鐵路; pinyin: Jīngguǎng tiělù) is a major arterial railway in the China that connects Beijing in the north with Guangzhou in the south. This dual-track electrified line has a total length of 2,324 kilometres and spans five provinces through north, central and south China. The line passes through the provincial capitals of each of those provinces, namely: Shijiazhuang of Hebei Province, Zhengzhou of Henan Province, Wuhan of Hubei Province, Changsha of Hunan and Guangzhou of Guangdong Province. The line's two terminal stations are the Beijing West Railway Station and the Guangzhou Railway Station. The Jingguang Railway was originally two railways: the Beijing–Hankou Railway in the north from Beijing to Hankou, and the Guangdong–Hankou Railway in the south from Wuchang to Guangzhou. Hankou and Wuchang are both parts of the city of Wuhan, separated by the Yangtze River. The Jinghan Railway, 1,215 km in length, was built from 1897 to 1906. Work on the Yuehan Railway began in 1900 and progressed more slowly. The Guangzhou-Sanshui section was built in 1903. The Changsha-Zhuzhou section was
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    Huron Central Railway

    Huron Central Railway

    Huron Central Railway (reporting mark HCRY) is a Canadian railway operating in northern Ontario, operated by Genesee & Wyoming Canada Inc., the Canadian subsidiary of Genesee & Wyoming Inc. The Huron Central Railway was established in July 1997 to operate a 305-kilometre (190 mi) route leased from the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. The railway operates one train in each direction six days per week between its two endpoints (westbound from Sudbury in the evening; eastbound from Sault Ste. Marie in the afternoon) plus a daily train, leaving Sudbury in the morning, to Espanola and return. Coil steel manufactured by Algoma Steel in Sault Ste. Marie and freight from the Domtar paper mill at Espanola account for 80% of freight traffic, although pulpwood, chemicals used by the steel industry, slab steel, paper, and miscellaneous goods are also carried. The railway handled 23,000 carloads a year. The route has variable topography and typically two or three locomotives are used to haul trains varying between 25 and 50 cars in length. The line parallels Ontario Highway 17 for much of its length. The railroad had been asking the provincial
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Moretonhampstead and South Devon Railway

    Moretonhampstead and South Devon Railway

    The Moretonhampstead and South Devon Railway was a 7 ft 0 ⁄4 in (2,140 mm) broad gauge railway which linked the South Devon Railway at Newton Abbot railway station with Bovey (in the town of Bovey Tracey, Lustleigh and Moretonhampstead, Devon, England. In 1861 the Moretonhampstead and South Devon Railway company was formed at the Globe Hotel in Exeter, and in 1862 the bill for making the railway was given Royal Assent. Work on the line commenced in 1863 and the major earthworks (with cuttings and embankments, many still visible today) were complete. All the granite used for construction of the bridges was cut from Lustleigh Cleave. The line was 12 miles, 28 chains (20 km) long. Following a Board of Trade inspection, the branch line opened to the public on 26 June 1866. A public holiday was observed, with people turning out to witness the first journey from Newton Abbot to Moretonhampstead. In 1892, the 7 ft 0 ⁄4 in (2,140 mm) broad gauge line was replaced by a 4 ft 8 ⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge format, taking only 32 hours and 60 men to complete - part of the wider conversion of the whole network. The railway brought tourists to the area. Other users of the service were local
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    Southsea Railway

    Southsea Railway

    The Southsea Railway was a branch of the Portsmouth Direct Line. It was opened in 1885 from Fratton Station, terminating at East Southsea Station (near to a road junction called The Strand). It was 1.25 miles long and almost completely level. Two unstaffed halts were added in 1904 at Albert Road and Jessie Road/Devonshire Avenue. The line was not able to compete with the Portsmouth Corporation tram services, despite the introduction of cheaper autocars. It was closed in August 1914 and never re-opened. The line itself and the stations have since been demolished and replaced with houses and roads; however, it is possible to walk the approximate route, which is clearly visible on street maps of the area. Southsea is now served by stations at Fratton, Portsmouth & Southsea, and Portsmouth Harbour (also called The Hard), with regular trains to London Waterloo and coastway services.
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    North Western Railway

    North Western Railway

    The North Western Railway is the main railway company featured in The Railway Series of children's books by the Rev. W. Awdry. Although the company's name has never been specifically stated in the books, it was mentioned as such in tie-in books such as The Island of Sodor: Its People, History and Railways by the Rev. Awdry, and also on some maps that were drawn to accompany the Railway Series. The railway is situated on the fictional Island of Sodor and is usually referred to as the Fat Controller's Railway after the nickname of its chief executive or chairman Sir Topham Hatt. The railway's motto is "Nil Unquam Simile", which is Latin for "There's nothing quite like it"! In the television series Thomas & Friends, which is based on characters from the Railway Series books, the NWR is the main standard gauge railway on Sodor but the railway is known as the "Sodor Railway" and "The Fat Controller's Railway. The main line runs from Barrow to Tidmouth. It is run by the Fat Controller's biggest engines. The most important train is the Express (called the Wild Nor' Wester), usually pulled by Gordon the Big Engine. Other services are run by Henry the Green Engine, James the Red Engine and
    5.80
    5 votes
    70
    Trans-Aral Railway

    Trans-Aral Railway

    The 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 ⁄6 in) broad gauge Trans-Aral Railway (also known as the Tashkent Railway) was built in 1906 connecting Orenburg and Tashkent, then both in the Russian Empire. For the first part of the 20th century it was the only railway-connection between European Russia and Central Asia. There were plans to construct the Orenburg-Tashkent line as early as 1874. Construction work did not start, however, until the autumn of 1900. The railway was simultaneously built from both ends toward a common junction. It opened in January 1906, linking the existing network of Russian and European railways to the Trans-Caspian Railway. After the revolution the line was blocked by Cossacks under the command of Ataman Dutov. Cut off from food supplies, and unable to sustain itself due to forced cotton cultivation, Russian Turkestan experienced an intense famine. The temporary loss of the Trans-Aral also allowed the Tashkent Soviet a degree of autonomy from Moscow during the period immediately following the Bolshevik takeover, which resulted in great atrocities like the Kokand Massacre, in which between 5,000 and 14,000 people were killed. The line passes through several notable cities in
    5.80
    5 votes
    71
    Austrian Northwestern Railway

    Austrian Northwestern Railway

    The Austrian Northwestern Railway (German: Österreichische Nordwestbahn, ÖNWB, Czech: Rakouská severozápadní dráha) was the name of a former railway company during the time of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. Today, the term is still used (although only rarely) to refer to the railway line which was formerly operated by that company. The privately owned Nordwestbahn took over the branch of the Nordbahn from Floridsdorf to Stockerau in 1841 and extended it in 1871 via Hollabrunn and Retz to Znojmo (Moravia). Nordwestbahn owned and operated many important lines in Bohemia and Moravia. It was nationalized in 1908 and subsequently lost its significance. Vienna Northwest Station was closed down in 1924 and has only been used for freight transports since World War II. The bridge used by the company was transformed into an Autobahn bridge during the 60s. Passenger service between Retz and Znojmo was reopened in 1990.
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Great Southern and Western Railway

    Great Southern and Western Railway

    The Great Southern and Western Railway (GS&WR) was the largest Irish gauge (1,600 mm/5 ft 3 in) railway company in Ireland in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It grew to have the largest of Ireland's "Big Four" railway networks, taking over smaller companies and increasing its route mileage for much of its history. The core of the GS&WR was the Dublin Kingsbridge – Cork main line, the "Premier Line", still one of Ireland's most important main line railways. William Dargan was the driving force behind this and other GS&WR routes (and also for other railways in Ireland not part of the GS&WR). The company's headquarters were Kingsbridge station. At its greatest extent the GS&WR included, in addition to the Dublin – Cork main line, the Dublin – Waterford and Mallow – Waterford lines and numerous branch lines. The GS&WR competed with the Midland Great Western Railway for many years. Both ran services westwards from Dublin: the GS&WR running southwest to Limerick, Cork and Waterford, and the MGWR running west to Galway, Westport, Ballina, and Sligo. The GS&WR also had designs on rail traffic to the west of Ireland. A branch was built from the Dublin – Cork main line to connect
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Los Angeles and Mount Washington Railway

    Los Angeles and Mount Washington Railway

    The Los Angeles and Mount Washington Railway Company was an early 20th Century incline railway which once operated in the Mount Washington district north of Downtown Los Angeles. Inspired by nearby Angels Flight, the railway entered service in May, 1909 as a means to promote the area as a hillside suburb. Built by developer Robert Marsh, the "L.A. & Mt. Washington Ry. Co." consisted of a pair of electrically powered, counterbalanced trolley-style cars connected to an underground steel cable loop running the length of Avenue 43 - then a dirt road - to Marsh's Mount Washington Hotel at the 940'/287m summit. Speed was 4 mph (6.4 km/h). Visitors then enjoyed a yet-unspoiled vista stretching from the nearby San Gabriel Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. The ride proved to be a popular one, with the railway operating until midnight on weekends. Unfortunately, this proved to be the railway's downfall. Worn equipment and concerns over safety led to its final closure in 1919. By 1930, Avenue 43 was paved and the tracks and equipment long since removed. The Mount Washington Hotel remains, having been purchased by the Self-Realization Fellowship in 1925. It was declared Historic Monument #845 by
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Memphis Suspension Railway

    Memphis Suspension Railway

    The Memphis Suspension Railway or Mud Island Monorail is a suspended monorail that connects the city center of Memphis with the entertainment park on Mud Island. Celebrating its grand opening on July 3, 1982, it is located beneath a footbridge over the Wolf River Lagoon connecting to the southern tip of Mud Island. The system consists of two suspended cars constructed in Switzerland, delivered in summer 1981. The 1,700 ft (518 m) long bridge opened to pedestrians on June 29, 1981; however, the suspended monorail would not be operational until July 1982. The cars are driven by a 3,500 ft (1,067 m) long, external cable instead of by internal motors. The two cars simultaneously shuttle back and forth on parallel tracks between the Front Street Terminal on the downtown side and the Mud Island Terminal. Each car has a maximum capacity of 180 passengers and travels at a speed of 7 mph (11.3 km/h). At the time of its construction, the U.S. Coast Guard stated that the proposed bridge would have to have the same clearance as the Hernando de Soto Bridge, as it was deemed it was spanning a commercially used public waterway. This resulted in the bridge being constructed at its current
    7.67
    3 votes
    75
    Monte Generoso Railway

    Monte Generoso Railway

    The Monte Generoso railway or Ferrovia Monte Generoso (MG) is a mountain railway line in the Italian speaking canton of Ticino, in south-east Switzerland. The line runs from Capolago, on Lake Lugano, to a terminus near the summit of Monte Generoso. The summit (1,701 m/5,581 ft) offers extensive views over the Lombardy Plain and towards the Alps. Whilst the railway lies entirely within Switzerland, the summit station is only a few metres from the international border with the Italian region of Lombardy. The line is owned by the Migros group, better known for operating supermarkets throughout Switzerland. In 1867, Doctor Carlo Posta built a hotel on Monte Generoso, near to the current location of the Bellavista stop on the Monte Generoso railway. In 1886, a concession was granted to the Monte Generoso SA for the construction of a narrow gauge and cog railway to the summit. The line opened on the June 5, 1890. The line was originally operated with steam locomotives. However the owning company encountered financial difficulties at various times during the first half of the 20th century. In the 1939, the then owners approached Gottlieb Duttweiler, the founder of the Migros group, for
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Tralee and Dingle Light Railway

    Tralee and Dingle Light Railway

    The Tralee and Dingle Light Railway and Tramway was a 51 km (32 mi), 914 mm (3 ft) gauge narrow gauge railway running between Tralee and Dingle, with a 10 km (6.2 mi) branch from Castlegregory Junction to Castlegregory, in County Kerry on the west coast of Ireland. It operated between 1891 and 1953, the Castlegregory branch closed shortly prior the outbreak of the Second World War. It was the most westerly railway line in Europe. The railway was built as cheaply as possible, largely following adjacent roads, resulting in some very tight curves and severe gradients. The railway opened on 31 March 1891, but from the start income failed to cover operating expenses. In March 1893 the Board of Trade held an inquiry into poor management and operating practices on the railway; nevertheless a fatal accident (involving a runaway train) took place at Curraduff in May of the same year. The railway continued to require public subsidies from local ratepayers, which were able to be reduced in 1898 after a grant from the Treasury (although the line continued to require subsidies throughout its existence). In 1907 a further grant of £23,000 (just over €2 Million in 2007/8 values) was made to allow
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Alderney Railway

    Alderney Railway

    The Alderney Railway on Alderney is the only railway in the Bailiwick of Guernsey (a British Crown dependency), and the only working railway in the Channel Islands. (There is a standard gauge railway at the Pallot Heritage Steam Museum in Jersey, but this provides no actual transport link, but only pleasure rides.) The Alderney Railway opened in 1847 and runs for about two miles (3 km), mostly following a coastal route, from Braye Road to Mannez Quarry and Lighthouse. The railway is run by volunteers and usually operates during summer weekends and bank holidays. The current stock is former London Underground 1959 Tube Stock cars nos. 1044 and 1045, a Vulcan Drewry 0-4-0 diesel locomotive no. D100 'Elizabeth', a Ruston & Hornsby 0-4-0 diesel 'Molly II' and six Wickham rail cars. 'Molly II' is currently awaiting modification to her coupler system, so she can haul the London Underground stock. However, this cannot happen at the moment due to the fact she is not yet owned by the Alderney Railway company. This company took over the railway in 1923, together with locomotives No.1 and No.2. No.1 was returned to England and replaced by Manning Wardle 0-6-0ST "Nitro". No.2 and "Nitro" were
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Copper Basin Railway

    Copper Basin Railway

    The Copper Basin Railway (reporting mark CBRY) is an Arizona shortline railroad that operates from a connection with the Union Pacific Railroad (UP) at Magma to Winkelman, Arizona, 54 miles (87 km). The CBRY also has a 7-mile (11 km) branch line that runs from Ray Junction to Ray, Arizona. There was formerly an interchange with the San Manuel Arizona Railroad (SMA) at Hayden, Arizona. The CBRY exists primarily to serve a copper mine. L. S. “Jake” Jacobson is the President and Chief Operating Officer. In summer 2006, ASARCO Copper Corporation purchased the entire railroad. 107,000 cars per year (1996 estimate) The Magma-Winkelman line was constructed by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (ATSF) subsidiary Phoenix and Eastern Railroad between 1902-1904. The Phoenix and Eastern Railroad built the railroad from Phoenix - Winkelman via Florence. It originally proposed to build to a connection with the Southern Pacific Railroad (SP) at Benson, Arizona but the line was never built past Winkelman. The railroad was leased to the Santa Fe Railway upon completion of construction on December 10, 1904, and was operated by the ATSF subsidiary Santa Fe, Prescott and Phoenix Railway. On
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Cornwallis Valley Railway

    Cornwallis Valley Railway

    The Cornwallis Valley Railway (CVR) was a historic Canadian railway in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley. It was built in 1889 and ran 13.6 miles (21.9 km) from Kentville to Kingsport serving the Cornwallis Township area of Kings County. For most of its history, it operated as a branch line of the Dominion Atlantic Railway and was sometimes known as the "Kingsport Line". The CVR crossed its namesake, the Cornwallis River, at Kentville and ran north to stations at the Camp Aldershot military base, Mill Village (Steam Mill), and Centreville and then ran east to Ford's Crossing (Gibson Woods), Sheffield Mills, Hillaton, Canning, Pereau, and ended on the large government wharf at Kingsport. An additional branch, the North Mountain Line was added in 1914 running 12 miles (19 km) from Centreville to Weston. The Cornwallis Valley Railway was formed in 1887 by merchants and farmers in Canning, Nova Scotia. Built with local labour but professional supervised, the line opened on December 22, 1890, leasing rolling stock and terminal facilities from the Windsor and Annapolis Railway (W&A) in Kentville. Tapping the richest apple growing areas of Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley, the railway
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad

    Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad

    • Part of network: Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad
    • Terminuses: Antonito
    The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad (C&TS) is a narrow gauge heritage railroad running between Chama, New Mexico and Antonito, Colorado. It runs over the 10,015 ft (3,053 m) Cumbres Pass. The track was originally laid in 1880 by the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad. In 1970 the C&TS began to take tourists on six-hour trips between the two towns, using steam locomotives. As Denver & Rio Grande Railroad San Juan Extension, the railway was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The boundaries of the NRHP listed area were increased in 2007. Chama today is a small village, but considered hallowed ground by many railfans. Chama houses one of the most physically complete railroad yards from the steam era in the US. Although portions of the roundhouse, warehouses, and parking lots have been changed, the railroad yard has the ambience of 1960 and earlier. The yard tracks contain authentic rolling stock of the Denver and Rio Grande indigenous to the railroad line. All the locomotives of the railroad were built for the C&TS's precursor, all 2-8-2 Mikados. These range from the K-27 "Mudhen", #463, once owned by Gene Autry, to the K-37s, originally built as standard gauge
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Porthgain Railway

    Porthgain Railway

    The Porthgain Railway was a narrow gauge industrial railway connecting the Pen Clegyr and St. Bride's quarries with Porthgain harbour. It operated from the late 1880s until 1931.
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Ridable miniature railway

    Ridable miniature railway

    A ridable miniature railway (USA: 'riding railroad' or 'grand scale railroad') is a ground-level, large scale model railway that hauls passengers using locomotives that are models of full-sized railway locomotives (powered by diesel or petrol engines, live steam engines or electric motors). Typically they have a rail track gauge between  5 in (127 mm) and  18 in (457 mm), though both larger and smaller gauges are used. These large model railroads are most often seen in urban parks or in commercial settings, such as amusement park rides. The major distinction between a miniature railway and a narrow gauge railway is that miniature lines use models of full-sized prototypes. There are miniature railways that run on gauges as wide as 2 ft (610 mm), for example the Wicksteed Park Railway. There are also narrow gauge railways running on extremely narrow track as small as  15 in (381 mm) gauge or less, for example the Rudyard Lake Steam Railway, Perrygrove Railway and the Eaton Hall Railway: these are known as minimum gauge railways. Typically in the UK miniature lines are operated as public heritage railways, though many private lines also exist, especially in the USA. At gauges of
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Scarborough and Whitby Railway

    Scarborough and Whitby Railway

    The Scarborough & Whitby Railway was a railway line from Scarborough to Whitby in North Yorkshire, England, the line followed a scenic route along the Yorkshire coast. It fell victim to the Beeching Axe closing in 1965. The trackbed has been developed into a rail trail and now forms part of National Cycle Network Route 1. The owners of the North Yorkshire Moors Railway intended to purchase the line in the 1960s as the Yorkshire Coast Railway, however the cost proved too great so they transferred their attention to the line through the North York Moors. In 1988, a planning application - number 40270093 - was submitted to the North York Moors National Park Authority to reconstruct Ravenscar station and turn it into a railway museum, but the application was refused. However there remains local hope that the Whitby-Scarborough line could possibly someday re-open as a heritage railway with the Coastal Rail-Trail alongside it, which could be very valuable for the economy of this part of coastal North Yorkshire.
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Schnaittach Valley Railway

    Schnaittach Valley Railway

    The Schnaittach Valley Railway (German: Schnaittachtalbahn) is a single-tracked, branch line in the Bavarian province of Middle Franconia in southern Germany. It branches off at Neunkirchen am Sand from the Nuremberg–Cheb railway and runs from there in a northerly direction through the valley of the Schnaittach to its terminal station at Simmelsdorf-Hüttenbach. The stub line was opened on 5 December 1895, after connexion of Schnaittach to the railway line from Nuremberg to Bayreuth was dropped in favour a route through the Pegnitz Valley. An extension to the village of Betzenstein 12 km away was never established due to disagreements over the course of the line and the outbreak of the First World War. Train crossings took place in the former station of Schnaittach Markt. Since 27 September 1987 the line has been integrated into the Greater Nuremberg Transport Network (VGN) and has been given a line number of R31. Since 15 September 2008 the line has been worked exclusively by Class 648 diesel multiple units these having gradually replaced earlier stock in anticipation of the introduction of DB Regio Mittelfranken's Middle Franconian Railway after the 2008/2009 timetable change.
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    South Devon Railway

    South Devon Railway

    The South Devon Railway is a 6.64 miles (10.69 km) heritage railway from Totnes to Buckfastleigh in Devon, alongside the River Dart. Its was previously known as the Dart Valley Railway is sometimes still heard. The Railway is operated by the South Devon Railway Trust, a registered charity. The Railway's headquarters and museum are located in Buckfastleigh railway station. The line is 6 miles and 51 chains long (10.7 km) It stretches from Totnes (Littlehempston) station to Buckfastleigh station. Staverton station is the only intermediate station on the line. Just north of Staverton is a signal box known as "Bishops Bridge" where there is the only passing loop on the line. For most of its route, the line runs along the left bank of the River Dart. This means that the river, and the best views, can be seen to the left of the train when facing Buckfastleigh, and the right of the train when facing Totnes. Trains on the South Devon Railway operate daily from late March to the end of October. On most days a single train set operates, providing four journeys a day in each direction. On busy days (most of the school holidays) two train sets operate, providing more journeys. Other services
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Western railway line, Sydney

    Western railway line, Sydney

    The Western Line is part of the CityRail metropolitan rail network in Sydney, and is the suburban section of the Main West line which connects Sydney with the west of New South Wales. It connects the Sydney CBD to the employment centre of Parramatta and the outer western suburbs, terminating at Emu Plains at the foot of the Blue Mountains. The line physically continues over the mountains but this is known as the Blue Mountains Line. Passengers are able to travel beyond this into western New South Wales via CountryLink as well as interstate to Adelaide, South Australia and Perth, Western Australia with the Indian Pacific. A north-westerly branch also operates to Richmond. Western Line trains are usually fed by the North Shore Line. The Western Line opened to Penrith in 1863 as a double track branch from the junction with the Main South line at Granville. Electrification reached Parramatta in 1928 and Penrith in 1955. In 1980, quadruplication of the track between Blacktown and St Marys was completed. The branch line from Blacktown to Windsor, Richmond and the Hawkesbury River opened in 1864 (known locally as the Richmond Line). In 1926, an extension was opened to Kurrajong, closing
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    Aberystwyth and Welsh Coast Railway

    Aberystwyth and Welsh Coast Railway

    The Aberystwith and Welsh Coast Railway was a standard gauge railway built in 1863 connecting major towns on the Welsh coast. Authorised in 1861, the railway was intended to run between the Cardigan Bay towns of Aberystwyth and Porthdinllaen near Nefyn on the Lleyn Peninsula. The plan also included a link with the Newtown and Machynlleth Railway by means of a line from Machynlleth to Ynyslas on the southern shore of the Dyfi estuary opposite Aberdyfi, the Dyfi itself to be bridged at this point. Work began at Machynlleth, and the line was opened through to Aberystwyth in 1864. However, the planned Dyfi bridge at Ynyslas proved impracticable, requiring the divergence between the Aberystwyth and Coast lines to be moved 6 miles east to Dyfi Junction. This added 12 miles to the journey north from Aberystwyth, but the twisting line – just a few feet above high tide level - between Dyfi Junction and Aberdyfi remains one of the most scenic sections of railway in Britain. Also abandoned at an early date was the idea of crossing the Lleyn Peninsula in the north, and the last 5 miles beyond Pwllheli were never built. For a time before completion, southbound passengers detrained at Aberdyfi
    6.50
    4 votes
    88
    Melbourne Military Railway

    Melbourne Military Railway

    The Melbourne Line was a railway line which ran from Derby to Ashby de la Zouch. It was used by the British Army and Allied engineers during the Second World War from 1939 until late 1944 to prepare them for the invasion of mainland Europe. Engineers practised the demolition and rebuilding of railways and the running and maintenance of a railway line and its rolling stock. There was also a bridge building school at Kings Newton. The section used by the military was between junctions near Ashby-de-la-Zouch in Leicestershire and Chellaston and Swarkestone in Derbyshire. Its principal station was Melbourne, which was actually at the hamlet of Kings Newton. Troops camped mainly at Weston-on-Trent from 1940. A suspension bridge linked the camp with Kings Newton over the Trent. In the early stages of the War it was soon realised that the military railway at Longmoor would have to be expanded if the capacity to train the necessary railway personnel was to be met. A second training establishment was sought. Derby Midland was a major railway centre. The London, Midland and Scottish Railway staff college there was about to close and its Principal, Colonel Lionel Manton recommended the nearby
    6.50
    4 votes
    89
    Los Angeles Terminal Railway

    Los Angeles Terminal Railway

    The Los Angeles Terminal Railway, earlier known as the Pasadena Railway, and unofficially as the Altadena Railway, was a small terminal railroad line that was constructed between Altadena and Pasadena, California in the late 1880s. It was a byproduct of a land boom period and a victim of the land bust that occurred soon thereafter. It opened officially on January 31, 1888. Though the reason for establishing the small railroad is argued by historians, it is apparent to some that there was a need to provide some sort of public passenger service between the two communities. Others say that it was the whimsy of two particular, wealthy Altadenans to provide themselves with the refined means of a daily train ride to get themselves from home to office and back home in a style grander than that of a horse and buggy. The service was originally organized as the Pasadena Railway Company in 1887 by investors John Woodbury, James Swartout, and the two prominent and wealthy Altadenans, Andrew McNally and Col. G. G. Green (aka) George Gill Green, mutual friends from with McNally from Chicago and Green from Woodbury, New Jersey. Swartout had a large estate between New York Dr. and Boston St. near
    5.60
    5 votes
    90
    Hawaiian Railway

    Hawaiian Railway

    The 'Hawaiian Railway' Society is a heritage railroad located in Ewa, Hawaii, USA. In 1970 two important events took place. First, Waialua Agricultural Co. announced that they planned to scrap their 0-6-2T locomotive No. 6 because rust and deterioration had reduced the engine to an unsightly liability and posed a danger to the local kids who played on her. John Knaus then contacted Bill Paty who was the manager of Waialua Agricultural Co. about saving and restoring the locomotive. John then contacted his boss, Captain Henry Davies, of the Naval Ammunition Depot, Lualualei about having the locomotive moved there since it had the only locomotive facility left on Oahu. This was followed by a letter to Ed Bernsten of the National Railway Historical Society seeking information on organizing a local chapter. John received approval to have No. 6 restored at Lualualei. He then talked to Nick Carter, another rail fan who had expressed interest in saving the Navy mainline on the leeward coast for an operating railroad. On August 22, 1970, John Knaus, Nick Carter, Luman Wilcox and Ken Peale met at Coco's Restaurant to discuss forming a local chapter of the NRHS. Wilcox was appointed to draw
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Lanxin railway

    Lanxin railway

    The Lanzhou−Xinjiang Railway or Lanxin Railway (simplified Chinese: 兰新铁路; traditional Chinese: 蘭新鐵路; pinyin: Lánxīn Tiělù) is the longest railway in northwestern China. It runs 1,904 kilometers (1,183 mi) from Lanzhou, Gansu, through the Hexi Corridor, to Ürümqi, in the Xinjiang. It is Xinjiang's only rail link with the rest of China. The railway follows the path of the ancient Silk Road and now forms part of the Second Eurasian Continental Bridge which extends from eastern China to Rotterdam in the Netherlands. The Lanzhou–Xinjiang Railway, often abbreviated as the Lanxin Line, is the longest railway built by the People's Republic of China. It was built by the China Railway Engineering Corporation. Construction of the initial stage (to Urumqi) started in 1952, completed in 1962, and opened in 1966. The extension to the Kazakhstan border was built in the late 1980s, linkup with the Kazakhstan Railroads achieved on September 12, 1990. After the completion of the 20 km Wushaoling Tunnel in 2006, the railway from Lanzhou to Urumqi is all double-tracked. The Lanxin Railway's eastern terminus is Lanzhou's West railway station. Lanzhou is a railway junction city in eastern Gansu
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Tokyu Toyoko Line

    Tokyu Toyoko Line

    • Terminuses: Shibuya Station
    The Tōkyū Tōyoko Line (東急東横線, Tōkyū Tōyoko-sen) is a major railway line connecting Tokyo (Shibuya) to Yokohama. The line is privately owned and operated by the Tokyu Corporation. The name of the line, Tōyoko (東横), is a combination of the first characters of Tōkyō (東京) and Yokohama (横浜). The first section of the line from Tamagawa to Kanagawa (separate from the present Kanagawa of Keikyū) opened on February 14, 1926. The line was extended incrementally until the entire length from Shibuya to Sakuragichō in Yokohama was opened on March 31, 1932. On August 29, 1964, through service to the Tokyo Metro Hibiya subway line via Naka-Meguro Station was started. On January 30, 2004, the section of Yokohama to Sakuragichō was abandoned. Two days later, on February 1, Tōkyū Tōyoko Line trains started through service from Yokohama to the Minatomirai Line. A massive project to connect the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line to the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line, allowing through service to Shinjuku, Ikebukuro and beyond, is currently in progress. Expected to open before April 2013, the project entails constructing a new 1.4-km underground link from Daikan-yama to the present Shibuya terminus of the Fukutoshin Line
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway

    Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway

    The Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR), also known as the Hampstead tube, was a railway company established in 1891 that constructed a deep-level underground "tube" railway in London. Construction of the CCE&HR was delayed for more than a decade whilst funding was sought. In 1900, it became a subsidiary of the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL) controlled by American financier Charles Yerkes. The UERL quickly raised the funds, mainly from foreign investors. Various routes were planned but a number of these were rejected by Parliament. Plans for tunnels under Hampstead Heath were authorised, despite opposition by many local residents who believed they would damage the ecology of the Heath. When opened in 1907, the CCE&HR's line served 16 stations and ran for 7.67 miles (12.34 km) in a pair of tunnels between its southern terminus at Charing Cross and its two northern termini at Archway and Golders Green. Extensions in 1914 and the mid-1920s took the railway to Edgware and under the River Thames to Kennington, serving 23 stations over a distance of 14.19 miles (22.84 km). In the 1920s, the route was connected to another of London's deep-level
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Longmoor Military Railway

    Longmoor Military Railway

    The Longmoor Military Railway (LMR) was a British military railway in Hampshire, built by the Royal Engineers from 1903 in order to train soldiers on railway construction and operations. Authorised for construction from 1902, activities date from 1903 when a  18 in (457 mm) gauge tramway was laid to assist in removing seventy corrugated iron huts from Longmoor Military Camp Camp to Bordon. The railway was relaid to 4 ft 8 ⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge in 1905–1907 and was initially known as the Woolmer Instructional Military Railway. It was renamed the Longmoor Military Railway in 1935. The Liss extension was opened in 1933. The stations and junctions included: An additional loop ran eastwards from Longmoor camp via a station at Hopkins Bridge to Whitehill Junction, completed in 1942. This provided circular running to the line, allowing for improved training without the need to turn trains at the terminals. As a training railway, it was often being constructed/deconstructed. The layout would often change, and at one time housed a machine which could lay 1,500 yards (1,400 m) of track a day. At its peak, the railway ran to over 70 miles (110 km) of operational laid track and
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Tatra Electric Railway

    Tatra Electric Railway

    The Tatra Electric Railway (Slovak: Tatranská elektrická železnica), colloquially Tatra Railway, is an electrified (1500 V DC) single track narrow gauge railway (1000 mm) in the Slovak part of the Tatra mountains. It consists of two parts: After the completion of the Košice-Bohumín Railway in 1871 and of Poprad - Kežmarok in 1892, the High Tatras were easier to access, and tourism expanded, which required accessibility. In 1896, a rack railway from Štrbské Pleso to Štrba was built. Finally, it was decided to build an electrified, narrow gauge railway from Poprad to Starý Smokovec. Construction started in 1906 and the track was opened in 1908. The leg from Starý Smokovec to Tatranská Lomnica was opened in 1911 and a final part from Starý Smokovec to Štrbské Pleso was opened in 1912. At that time, the railway was used for passenger, as well for cargo transport. In 1948, the railway was nationalised, from 1950 to 1992 it was managed by the Czechoslovak State Railways and since 1993 by the Railways of the Slovak Republic. In the second half of 1960s, the railway underwent major reconstruction during preparations for the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in 1970 and since 1970 only a
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Tokyu Tamagawa Line

    Tokyu Tamagawa Line

    • Terminuses: Tamagawa Station
    The Tōkyū Tamagawa Line (東急多摩川線, Tōkyū Tamagawa-sen) is a commuter railway line in Japan owned by private railway operator Tokyu Corporation. It runs between Tamagawa and Kamata in southwest Tokyo, entirely within Ōta ward. The operator's name, Tokyu, is included in the formal name of this line. It was formed in 2000 from the western portion of the Tokyu Mekama Line, which was then rerouted west of Tamagawa (former Tamagawa-en) station and renamed the Meguro Line. The Tokyu Tamagawa Line was formed on 6 August 2000 with the splitting of the former Tokyu Mekama Line. Wanman driver-only operation also commenced on the line from this date.
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Trans-Australian Railway

    Trans-Australian Railway

    The Trans-Australian Railway crosses the Nullarbor Plain of Australia from Port Augusta in South Australia to Kalgoorlie in Western Australia. It includes the world's longest stretch of dead-straight railway track, a 478 kilometre (297 mi) length between the 797 km post west of Ooldea and the 1275 km post west of Loongana. The line forms an important freight route between Western Australia and the eastern states. Currently two passenger services also use the line, the Indian Pacific for its entire length and The Ghan between Port Augusta and Tarcoola. Earlier passenger services on the route were known as the Trans-Australian or, commonly, just 'The Trans'. In 1901, the six Australian colonies federated to form the Commonwealth of Australia. At that time, Perth the capital of Western Australia, was isolated from the remaining Australian States by thousands of kilometres of desert terrain and the only practicable method of transport was by sea, a time-consuming, inconvenient and often uncomfortable voyage across the Great Australian Bight, a stretch of water known for rough seas. One of the inducements held out to Western Australians to join the new federation was the promise of a
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Walhalla Goldfields Railway

    Walhalla Goldfields Railway

    The Walhalla Goldfields Railway is a 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) gauge (narrow gauge) tourist railway located in the Thomson River and Stringers Creek valleys in Gippsland, Victoria, Australia, near the former gold-mining town and tourist destination of Walhalla. The Walhalla line was the last of four experimental narrow gauge lines of the Victorian Railways, the Moe-Walhalla railway commenced in 1904, but was not completed until 1910. The railway was expected to be a boon for Walhalla, which was in a state of decline with gold mining operations becoming uneconomical. The largest gold mining company closed in 1914. After the closure of the Walhalla mines, substantial timber traffic was carried from sawmills around Erica until the late 1940s. Freight and passenger traffic declined, with the railway closed in sections from 1944 with the final section from Moe to Erica closed on June 25, 1954. The tracks and buildings were removed by 1960, leaving only the roadbed and a number of bridges. The former station building at Walhalla was re-located to the Melbourne suburban station of Hartwell. The centre span of the National Estate listed Thomson River Railway Bridge was formerly part of a road
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    Wensleydale Railway

    Wensleydale Railway

    The Wensleydale Railway is a railway line in Wensleydale and Lower Swaledale in North Yorkshire, England and the name of the company (Wensleydale Railway plc) that operates services on the line. The line currently runs 22 miles (35 km) between Northallerton on the East Coast Main Line and Redmire. This makes the line the third longest preserved standard gauge railway in Great Britain. Occasional freight services and excursions travel the full length of the line, however regular passenger services currently only operate between Leeming Bar and Redmire, a distance of 17.5 miles (28 km). The line formerly ran from Northallerton to Garsdale on the Settle-Carlisle Railway. However, the track between Redmire and Garsdale has been lifted and several bridges and viaducts demolished. There are plans to provide regular services between Leeming Bar and Northallerton and to re-open the section between Redmire and Garsdale (though the latter would require much restoration and is likely to be done in stages). This would recreate 40 miles (64 km) of track between Northallerton and Garsdale and make it the largest private railway in Europe. The original line between Northallerton and Garsdale was
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    West End and Crystal Palace Railway

    West End and Crystal Palace Railway

    The Crystal Palace and South London Junction Railway was built by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway from Nunhead to Crystal Palace High Level to serve the Crystal Palace after the building was moved to the area that became known as Crystal Palace from its original site in Hyde Park. The branch line had a chequered history, linked to the Crystal Palace's own precarious financial position, with two periods of closure. Wartime economies led to the line closing from 1917 to 1919. After this first closure, trains from the Holborn Viaduct railway station) in the City were not reinstated. However, the branch was electrified, as part of a Southern Railway scheme, on 12 July 1925. After electrification all trains operated to Blackfriars and Holborn Viaduct. Following the destruction of the Crystal Palace by fire in 1936, the line lost most of its original function of carrying visitors to events in the Palace. Manpower shortages led to a second closure from 1944 to 1946. When services were reintroduced they were very lightly used, and the line finally closed on 20 September 1954. The track was lifted in 1956. Lordship Lane station has found ongoing fame as the subject of one of Camille
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    Ghost Town and Calico Railway

    Ghost Town and Calico Railway

    The Ghost Town & Calico Railroad is a heritage railroad within Knott's Berry Farm, a theme park in Buena Park, California. Walter Knott began acquiring the authentic vintage equipment in 1951 and work began to grade and lay 3 ft  (914 mm) narrow gauge track for a grand circle rail route for recently acquired rolling stock with service starting that November. The railroad's opening ceremony commenced on January 12, 1952. Unlike many other theme park railroads, the locomotives and most of the other equipment of the Ghost Town & Calico - Knott's Scenic Route have been restored to original paint schemes and appearance on Colorado's Rio Grande Southern Railroad and Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad. Also unlike most theme park railroads used as transportation, it travels in a circle and riders disembark at the same place they alight - Calico Depot. The roster includes two Class C-19 Consolidation (2-8-0) locomotives, both originally constructed for the Denver & Rio Grande in 1881. When retired from service in Colorado, they were D&RGW C-19 engines No. 340 Green River (renamed Gold Nugget No. 40 for many years on the GT&C) from the Denver & Rio Grande Western and RGS No. 41 Red
    5.40
    5 votes
    102
    South Devon and Tavistock Railway

    South Devon and Tavistock Railway

    The South Devon and Tavistock Railway was a broad-gauge railway linking Plymouth with Tavistock in Devon, England. It opened in 1859, was extended by the Launceston and South Devon Railway to Launceston, Cornwall, in 1865, and was closed in 1962. The Plymouth and Dartmoor Railway, a horse-worked line, had brought rail transport to Plymouth on 26 September 1823. When the South Devon Railway (SDR) brought a main line from Exeter St Davids in 1848, where it linked with a route from London Paddington, schemes to expand into the hinterland were put forward. However, rival schemes from London Waterloo were also put forward. The South Devon and Tavistock Railway eventually gained an Act of Parliament on 24 July 1854 which enabled them to construct a 7 ft 0 ⁄4 in (2,140 mm) broad gauge railway from Tavistock Junction on the SDR main line to Tavistock. This was opened on 21 June 1859, with trains sharing the South Devon's terminus at Millbay. On 30 June 1862 the independent Launceston and South Devon Railway gained its own Act of Parliament to extend the broad gauge line from Tavistock on to Launceston. Construction was completed in time for opening on 1 June 1865. One month later, on 1
    5.40
    5 votes
    103
    Canterbury and Whitstable Railway

    Canterbury and Whitstable Railway

    The Canterbury and Whitstable Railway, sometimes referred to colloquially as the Crab and Winkle Line, was an early British railway that opened in 1830 between Canterbury and Whitstable in the county of Kent, England. There are a number of claimants to the title "first railway in Britain", including the Middleton Railway, the Swansea and Mumbles Railway and the Surrey Iron Railway amongst others. From the beginning it was a public railway, intended for passengers as well as freight. Indeed, the world's first season ticket was issued for use on the line in 1834, to take Canterbury passengers to the Whitstable beaches for the summer season. Unlike the public Liverpool and Manchester Railway which opened four months later, it used cable haulage by stationary steam engines over much of its length, with steam locomotives restricted to the level stretch. Until the early nineteenth century Canterbury's line of supply for goods had been along the River Stour which flows to Pegwell Bay, near Ramsgate on the eastern cost of Kent. Although this is only seventeen miles as the crow flies, the meandering river journey is around seventy miles. The river was continually silting up, and the cost of
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Fillmore and Western Railway

    Fillmore and Western Railway

    The Fillmore and Western Railway (reporting mark FWRY),is a privately owned company owned by the Filmore & Western Railway Company. The company operates on track owned by the Ventura County Transportation Commission. The F&W is known as the "Home of the Hollywood Movie Trains" because the majority of its rolling stock was acquired from three major studios: 20th Century Fox, Paramount, and MGM. The railroad is frequently used for the filming of television series, motion pictures and commercials and as a locale for private and commercial still photography, Visitors to Fillmore can often see filming activity as well as sets and support equipment at the company's rail yard and along the tracks between Santa Paula and Piru. The F&W has been used in more than 300 movie, TV and commercial shots. Movies shot on the railroad include Seabiscuit, Get Smart and Race to Witch Mountain. Television series CSI and Criminal Minds have used the railroad for location shooting. The railroad also operates a year-round tourist train and offers numerous special events including the Railroad Days Festival, the Pumpkinliner, Christmas Tree Trains, the North Pole Express, the Day Out with Thomas, and the
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Innerste Valley Railway

    Innerste Valley Railway

    The Innerste Valley Railway (German: Innerstetalbahn) was a railway line, that ran through the Upper Harz in Central Germany. It was also called the Upper Harz Railway or Harz Railway. It was built in order to enable the Magdeburg-Halberstadt Railway Company (Magdeburg-Halberstädter Eisenbahngesellschaft or MHE) to access the mines in the Harz mountains. The Innerste Valley Railway was built between 1874 and 1914 and linked several formerly isolated mountain villages in the Upper Harz to the existing railway network in the northern Harz Foreland. The railway was built in 1875 by the MHE from its marshalling yard at Vienenburg through Grauhof and Langelsheim to Lautenthal. Its original passenger services to Langelsheim on the Vienenburg–Langelsheim railway via Grauhof ended as early as 1884 and all traffic ceased in 1954; a direct line to Goslar being employed instead. Until the cessation of regular services in 1976 the line branched off at Langelsheim station from the existing Neuekrug-Hahausen–Goslar railway and ran past the halt of Innerstetalsperre (before the construction of the dam there was a halt at Lindthal, now under water) to Lautenthal, from there through the Innerste
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Kerr's Miniature Railway

    Kerr's Miniature Railway

    Kerr's Miniature Railway is a 10 ⁄4 in (260 mm) gauge railway, a 1/2 mile return ride, adjacent to the east coast mainline railway to Aberdeen, in West Links Park Arbroath. It is the oldest miniature railway in Scotland, having first opened for business in 1935. Under its original owner, Matthew Kerr (senior), it was a commercial business but since 1979 when it passed to his son, Matthew Kerr Jnr, it has been run as a non-profit concern. With the death of Matthew Kerr Jnr, owner of Kerr's Miniature Railway, on 17 April 2006 after a prolonged illness, the future of the railway has been uncertain. However Matthew Kerr's widow and son have continued to run the railway with the help of the volunteers The railway has 6 locomotives, two of which are steam and built by Herbert Bullock in the 1930s. Also on site are 3 miniature vehicles which give rides to children along the Arbroath seafront. Fares are currently £1.50 Adults and £1 Children, with trains running weekends from April to end of September and both Easter and Summer local school holidays from 11am to 4pm. An extension is planned for the 2013 season, to the entrance of West Links Park.
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Lynbarn Railway

    Lynbarn Railway

    The Lynbarn Railway opened in 1995 as a park ride at The Milky Way, a family-based theme park attraction near Clovelly in north Devon, England. It was built and operated by enthusiast volunteers working to revive the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway (L&B) – a nearby historical line running through Exmoor. Built to the same rail gauge – 1 ft 11⁄2 in (597 mm) – as the L&B, but with a considerably smaller loading gauge, the ride made significant contributions to the finances, skills and expertise of the L&B and was substantially extended and improved during 2003/2004. So they could concentrate on operating at Woody Bay the L&B sold their share in the Lynbarn operation to the owners of the Milky Way, who now operate the ride along with the other attractions. The "Lynbarn" uses three coaches that were part of a lot bought by the L&B and formerly based at Thorpe Park in Surrey. Four other coaches have been fully rebuilt, and are now carrying passengers at Woody Bay. There are also a number of service wagons, used for maintaining the track. Motive power was provided by two steam outline diesel locomotives. One of these, Parracombe, was built by Baguley in 1947 for the line at Butlins,
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Semaphore railway line, Adelaide

    Semaphore railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    Semaphore railway line was a railway in the north-west of Adelaide servicing the suburb of Semaphore and Exeter. It serviced two stations: Semaphore and Exeter. The line opened in 1882 and closed in 1978. The line branched off at Glanville station and ran along the centre of Semaphore Road, until it terminated right next to the Esplanade. Semaphore station was located east of Esplanade Road. Exeter station was located to the east side of where Swan Terrace and Woolnough Road intersect. The stations have been demolished and no evidence of the stations remain; also, the track has since been dismantled. The large median strip along Semaphore road remains as a result of the line. In 2006, the City of Port Adelaide Enfield council made a proposal for a light rail network to be constructed in the North West suburbs, which included a branch along the route of the former Semaphore Line. The state government in the 2008 state budget announced that a light rail network would be constructed, and that a light rail branch was expected to be constructed to Semaphore in 2018. The line was extended from the port on 7 January 1882 by South Australian Railways to serve the new overseas shipping
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    Vale of Glamorgan Railway

    Vale of Glamorgan Railway

    The Barry Tourist Railway (formerly the Barry Island Railway) is a railway developed to attract visitors to Barry in the Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales. It is a key element of the Barry Rail Centre which also includes engineering and training facilities. An unusual aspect of the railway is that for several hundred yards across from Barry to Barry Island the trackbed used is directly alongside the Network Rail track which uses the original down line, with the Barry Tourist Railway using the up. This continues across the Causeway bridge where the lines diverge into separate platforms at Barry Island. The Railway does not consider itself a line but more of a network as it has two different routes. This is reflected in the map below, with Network Rail shown in red. In November 2008, the land owner the Vale of Glamorgan Council, undertook a commercial tender exercise, which terminated the lease of previous operator the Vale of Glamorgan Railway in favour of a private operator, Cambrian Transport under a 20 year long lease. Operations commenced in December 2009 and a full years programme of services operated during 2010. Details are shown on the council website. Services have been
    7.00
    3 votes
    110
    Kashmir Railway

    Kashmir Railway

    The Kashmir Railway (Hindi: कश्मीर रेलवे, Urdu: کشمیر ریلوے Kaśmīr rēlavē) in India is being built to connect the state of Jammu and Kashmir with the rest of the country. Officially termed the Jammu Udhampur Srinagar Baramulla Railway Link (JUSBRL), the railway starts from Jammu and will travel for 345 km (214 mi) to Baramulla on the northwestern edge of the Kashmir Valley. The route crosses major earthquake zones, and is subjected to extreme temperatures of cold and heat and inhospitable terrain, making it an extremely challenging engineering project. Forming a part of Firozpur division of the Northern Railway zone, the line has been under construction since 1983 by various railway companies. It will link the state's winter capital of Jammu with the summer capital of Srinagar and beyond. The project has had a long and chequered history but serious progress was made only after it was declared a National Project in 2002. The scheduled date of completion was 15 August 2007. However, unforeseen complications have pushed back the deadline to 2017 at the earliest. 1898: Maharaja Pratap Singh first explored the possibility of a railway line connecting Jammu with Srinagar. For various
    6.00
    4 votes
    111
    Dublin and Kingstown Railway

    Dublin and Kingstown Railway

    The Dublin and Kingstown Railway (D&KR), which opened in 1834, was Ireland’s first railway. It linked Westland Row in Dublin with Kingstown Harbour’s West Pier in County Dublin. The Dublin and Kingstown Railway Company was founded in 1831 by businessmen in the city to look into building a railway. Within two years, they had a contractor and a parliamentary act. The construction contract was awarded to William Dargan. Building of the 10 km (6 mi) line was delayed by opposition from two different landowners who insisted on large cash compensations and in the case of Lord Cloncurry the building of a private foot bridge over the line to a bathing area complete with a Romanesque temple, a short tunnel and a cutting to maintain his privacy. Part of the line ran on an embankment built across the strand between Merrion and Blackrock which later led to the formation of Booterstown marsh. The first train ran on 9 October 1834, consisting of eight carriages hauled by Hibernia. From Bradshaw's 1843 timetable DUBLIN AND KINGSTOWN From both ends on week days, every half-hour from 6 a.m. until 11½ p.m., stopping at all stations, Viz: Booterstown, Black Rock and Salt Hill. An extra train from
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Grange railway line, Adelaide

    Grange railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    The Grange railway line is a suburban branch line in the city of Adelaide, South Australia. The railway line between Woodville and Grange opened in September 1882. This was a private railway, constructed by the Grange Railway and Investment Company. The early railway was not a financial success and was bought out by the government-owned South Australian Railways in 1893. Modifications to the track layout at Woodville station in 1909 enabled trains from the Grange branch to travel beyond Woodville. into Adelaide In November 1940 the Hendon branch line was opened diverging from the Grange line at Albert Park and running 1.1 km (¾ mile) to the Hendon munitions works. After the end of World War II, the Hendon trains operated only at industrial shift-change times. In spite of low passenger numbers, the Hendon branch continued operation until 1 February 1980, after which the line was closed and removed. The terminus at Grange was rebuilt in the late 1980s on the eastern side of Military Rd to eliminate a level crossing. The old station was formerly a stop on the Henley Beach line, an extension of the Grange line which closed in 1957. A station named Holdens, located between Woodville and
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Lakeside Miniature Railway

    Lakeside Miniature Railway

    The Lakeside Miniature Railway, runs alongside the Marine Lake on the sea front at Southport England, it is of 15 in (381 mm) gauge and is representative of many miniature pleasure railways which sprung up in the early 1900s. The line originally consisted of a straight-running line on the seaward shore of the Southport Marine lake with a run-round loop at each end. In 1918 the original straight up and back track was extended round a sharp reverse curve under Southport pier through 90 degrees into the present terminus at Marine Parade Station. This layout remains today with the round trip covering about 1.5 km. At the Pleasureland end of the line there is a loco shed / Workshop and a second, larger locomotive shed. The station at this end of the line has a single island platform serving two running lines with run round loops which converge to form the single line route which runs alongside the lake, there is also a third siding for stock storage. At the pier end of the line there are two platforms again serving two running lines with run round loops, the station building at this end of the line has recently been rebuilt. The railway was built in 1911 along the seaward side of the
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Northfield railway line, Adelaide

    Northfield railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    The Northfield railway line is a defunct railway in northern Adelaide which was used mainly for industrial purposes and cattle trains. The line branched off the Gawler line just north of Dry Creek station. The line went east from the Gawler line and served three stations: Cavan, Pooraka, and Northfield. The Northfield line was opened in 1857. The State Transport Authority decided that passenger services on the line was uneconomic and patron numbers were low, and the last passenger train was on 24 July 1987. However cattle trains still used some of the line up to Cavan station until 1995. The stations were mostly demolished and the track ripped up. The triangle junction where the track joined to the Gawler line remained in place until late 2009 and was used as a storage area for rails, sleepers and Maintenance of Way equipment by TransAdelaide. With the decision to replace the Adelaide Railcar depot (located on the southern side of Adelaide station yard), the triangle was removed and the site prepared for the new Dry Creek railcar depot. This project also took over the site of the former ARHS (Australian Railway Historical Society) depot which was vacated in 1995. The dual gauge
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Amerton Railway

    Amerton Railway

    The Amerton Railway is a 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge heritage railway in the English county of Staffordshire. It is owned by the Staffordshire Narrow Gauge Railway Society. Construction of the railway was begun in 1990 in a field at the side of Amerton Working Farm. The first trains ran in 1992, but it was around 10 years later when the railway was completed as a full circle with two passing loops. In May 2012 the 17 acres of land on which the railway is run was purchased by the railway, securing the future of operations at Amerton.
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Central Kansas Railway

    Central Kansas Railway

    The Central Kansas Railway (CKR) (reporting mark CKRY) was a short-line railroad operating 900 miles (1,400 km) of trackage in the U.S. state of Kansas and west to Towner, Colorado, most all of which were former Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway lines. Owned by Omnitrax, CKR's main business was from the Kansas wheat harvests, as well as other traffic. The Watco Companies of Pittsburg, Kansas purchased all of the CKR's lines on May 31, 2001 and formed the Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad.
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Cliffe Hill Mineral Railway

    Cliffe Hill Mineral Railway

    The Cliffe Hill Mineral Railway was an industrial narrow gauge railway that connected the Cliffe Hill granite quarry to the nearby London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) between Leicester and Coalville. The line opened in 1896 and operated until 1948. Granite is reputed to have been quarried from the outcrop near Markfield in Leicestershire since Roman times. However it was not until the 1860s that quarrying began on a commercial scale. In the late 1870s two Birmingham businessmen opened a quarry at Cliffe Hill to provide street setts and kerb stones. This quarry closed in 1887 but was revived in 1889 by Mr. J. Rupert Fitzmaurice the son of one of the original owners. Fitzmaurice equipped the quarry with then modern machinery and it quickly became a commercial success. In the first year of the new operation 630 tons of finished kerbs and 10,200 tons of broken stone were produced. Most of this was taken by horse and cart to Bagworth station 2½ miles away for transit by rail. In 1892 a traction engine was purchased to help transport stone to the railway. Over the next few years demand for the company's products continued to increase and road transportation became a bottleneck to
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Newcastle and Carlisle Railway

    Newcastle and Carlisle Railway

    The Newcastle and Carlisle Railway, occasionally referred to as the Tyne Valley Line, is a railway line in northern England. The 60-mile (97 km) line was built in the 1830s, and links the city of Newcastle upon Tyne in Tyne and Wear with Carlisle in Cumbria. Formal opening took place on 18 June 1838. The line follows the course of the River Tyne through Northumberland. Five stations and two viaducts on the route are listed structures. Passenger services on the Tyne Valley Line are operated by Northern Rail and First ScotRail. The line is also heavily used for freight, and is an important diversionary route during East Coast Main Line closures. The line is not an electrified route. Passenger services are operated by diesel multiple units, typically Class 142 "Pacers", Class 156 "Super Sprinters" which were introduced in the late 1980s and on rare occasions Class 158s used to be used, which were introduced in the early 1990s, before being transferred to other depots . Prior to this, Metro-Cammell Class 101 units were used. The railway was built by the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway Company, the requisite Act of Parliament gaining Royal Assent on 22 May 1829. The line was built in
    5.75
    4 votes
    119
    Baghdad Railway

    Baghdad Railway

    The Baghdad Railway (Turkish: Bağdat Demiryolu, German: Bagdadbahn, French: Chemin de Fer Impérial Ottoman de Baghdad), was built from 1903 to 1940 to connect Berlin with the (then) Ottoman Empire city of Baghdad, where the Germans wanted to establish a port in the Persian Gulf, with a 1,600 kilometres (990 mi) line through modern-day Turkey, Syria, and Iraq. Funding and engineering was mainly provided by German Empire banks and companies, which in the 1890s had built the Anatolian Railway (Anatolische Eisenbahn) connecting Constantinople, Ankara and Konya. The Ottoman Empire desired to maintain its control of Arabia and to expand its influence across the Red Sea into the nominally Ottoman (until 1914) Khedivate of Egypt, which had been militarily controlled by the United Kingdom since the Urabi Revolt in 1882. The Germans gained access to and ownership of oil fields in Iraq, and with a line to the port of Basra would have gained better access to the eastern parts of the German colonial empire, bypassing the Suez Canal. The railway became a source of international disputes during the years immediately preceding World War I. Although it has been argued that they were resolved in
    7.50
    2 votes
    120
    Capitol Limited

    Capitol Limited

    Amtrak's Capitol Limited is one of the railroad's two routes connecting Washington, D.C., to Chicago, running 764 miles (1,230 km) via Cleveland, Ohio (the other is the Cardinal via Cincinnati). Service began in 1981 and was named after the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's Capitol Limited which ended in 1971 upon the formation of Amtrak. It carries the Amtrak train numbers 29 and 30, which were previously assigned to the discontinued National Limited. During fiscal year 2011, the Capitol Limited carried over 225,000 passengers, a 3.5% increase over FY2010. The train had a total revenue of $20,312,544 in FY2011, a 9.3% increase from FY2010. On October 1, 1981, Amtrak inaugurated its Capitol Limited. It ran over the same route as the B&O's train east of Pittsburgh, but west of Pittsburgh it ran combined with the Chicago-New York Broadway Limited over the former Pennsylvania Railroad's Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway. Its numbers, 440 (eastbound) and 441 (westbound), were derived from the Broadway Limited's 40 and 41 and the new train also used Heritage Fleet equipment. The new train replaced the Broadway Limited's former Washington section which had diverged at Philadelphia,
    7.50
    2 votes
    121
    Congo-Ocean Railway

    Congo-Ocean Railway

    The Congo–Ocean Railway (COR; French: Chemin de fer Congo-Océan, CFCO) links the Atlantic port of Pointe-Noire (now in the Republic of Congo) with Brazzaville, a distance of 502 kilometres. It bypasses the rapids on the lower Congo River; from Brazzaville river boats are able to ascend the Congo River and its major tributaries, including the Oubangui River to Bangui. The railway was constructed, starting in 1921, using forced labour, by the French colonial administration between 1924 and 1934, at a heavy cost in human lives. It has been estimated that 17,000 of the construction workers, mainly recruited from what is now southern Chad and the Central African Republic, died during the construction of the railway. Other estimates were higher. In 1962, a branch was constructed to Mbinda near the border with Gabon, to connect with the COMILOG Cableway and thus carry manganese ore to Pointe-Noire. The Cableway closed in 1986 when neighbouring Gabon built its own railway to haul this traffic. The branch line remains active nonetheless. The Congo–Ocean Railway was a user of the Golwé locomotive. Motive power is now provided by diesel locomotives. From the start of the civil war in 1997,
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Kolkata Circular Railway

    Kolkata Circular Railway

    Kolkata Circular Railway is a railway line that encircles the entire city of Kolkata. It starts from Dum Dum Junction in the north and passes through Chitpur, Burrabazar, B.B.D.Bagh, Prinsep Ghat, Hastings, Kidderpore, Remount Road, Majherhat, Ballygunge, Sir Gurudas Banerjee Halt and finally back to Dum Dum Junction. With the increasing population of Calcutta metropolis, and road transport being unable to cope with the demand due to bottlenecks in roads, it was felt necessary to introduce some other source of transport which will ease off the problem particularly at peak hours. Out of various modes including Tramcars and trolleybus, the railway was found to be most suitable. Unlike other metropolitan cities Calcutta does not have any rail route running through the heart of the city or piercing through the central district area, where more commuters will be seeking their transport. Previously a railway line existed between Dum Dum to Ultadanga for transport of wagons to Chitpur goods yard and some part between BBD bag to Majherhat existed for a long time for transport of goods from port area to the godowns of Calcutta port along the Ganges. These were built during the early EIR
    7.50
    2 votes
    123
    Llanberis Lake Railway

    Llanberis Lake Railway

    The Llanberis Lake Railway (Welsh: Rheilffordd Llyn Padarn) is a narrow gauge heritage railway that runs for 2.5 miles (4 km) along the northern shore of Llyn Padarn in north Wales in the Snowdonia National Park. The starting point is the town of Llanberis at the eastern end of the lake (53°07′03″N 4°07′09″W / 53.1175°N 4.1193°W / 53.1175; -4.1193 (Llanberis station)), with the western terminus at Pen Llyn in the Padarn Country Park (53°08′13″N 4°08′58″W / 53.1370°N 4.1495°W / 53.1370; -4.1495 (Penllyn station)). The return journey takes around 45 minutes. The Llanberis Lake Railway runs along part of the trackbed of the defunct Padarn Railway, a 4 ft  (1,219 mm) gauge line which connected the quarry with Y Felinheli (Port Dinorwic) on the Menai Strait. The Padarn Railway closed in October 1961 and was lifted between 16 May 1962 and February 1963. Following the closure of the Padarn Railway, various plans were made to open a 2 ft  (610 mm) gauge tourist railway on the trackbed. The first serious attempt was made by G. Ward a local resident, who proposed a railway that would circle Llyn Padarn using the trackbeds of the British Rail Llanberis branch and the Padarn Railway.
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Moors valley railway

    Moors valley railway

    The Moors Valley Railway is a 7¼ inch narrow gauge passenger railway, in the Moors Valley Country Park at Ashley Heath, Dorset, England near Ringwood in Hampshire. There are 17 steam engines and 2 diesel engines. The railway is fully signalled, with two signal boxes, one in a Great Western Railway style and one in a British Rail Southern Region style. The latter box also contains a mini lever frame and push button panel, for the control of the Lakeside area. The railway was constructed at its present location in 1985/86 and opened to the public in July 1986, after the closure in 1985 of its predecessor at Tucktonia in nearby Christchurch, which had run since 1980. Moors Valley uses a narrow gauge prototype to produce tank engines in which one may sit, allowing running during the harshest of conditions, so much so that it runs throughout the year. A further benefit of the style of locomotives built to this prototype is that, unlike models, and standard gauge 7¼ inch locomotives, the locomotives used on the Moors Valley Railway are considerably more powerful due to the increased boiler size that can be achieved through almost freelance prototypes. Roger Marsh was a pioneer of this
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Waterloo – St. Jacobs Railway

    Waterloo – St. Jacobs Railway

    The Waterloo-St. Jacobs Railway (WSJR) was a heritage railway west of Toronto that ran between Waterloo and St. Jacobs, Ontario from 1997 to 1999. The railway used two diesel locomotives built in the 1950s, originally owned by Canadian National Railways, and repainted them in their original paint scheme. The locomotives were named Spirit of St. Jacobs and Pride of Waterloo. It also had several passenger cars painted in the same paint scheme. Excursions had three stops, and visitors could board on a later train. The Railway allowed visitors to see farms of the Old Order Mennonites and visit the village of St. Jacobs. The railway ceased operation in 2000 due to maintenance costs. In late 2006, the two diesels and three passenger cars were purchased by the West Coast Railway Association. However, as of spring 2008 the diesels and one passenger car remain in Via Rail's Mimico maintenance yard. In May 2007, the Southern Ontario Locomotive Restoration Society received approval from the City of Waterloo to launch a new Waterloo-St. Jacobs tourist train service. The new railway became the Waterloo Central Railway. Waterloo Central Railway began operations in June 2007. It operates a
    7.50
    2 votes
    126
    Mornington Railway

    Mornington Railway

    The Mornington Railway is a heritage railway near Mornington, a town on the Mornington Peninsula, near Melbourne, Victoria. The line is managed by the Mornington Railway Preservation Society and operates on part of the former Victorian Railways branch line which ran from Baxter to Mornington. The Mornington railway line was a rural railway branching off from the Stony Point railway line at Baxter. The line operated for 92 years before closing. Ten years later the line was reopened as a heritage railway. The Mornington Railway Preservation Society (MRPS) was formed out of a public meeting in 1984 with the objective of securing access to the then-closed Mornington railway line. The vision was to reopen it as a heritage railway, focusing on the operation of steam-hauled passenger trains. In 1991 the MRPS was granted a State Government Order in Council, giving access and operating rights to the line, so it could be operated as a heritage railway. Prior to the granting of the Order in Council to the MRPS, the final section of the line between Rail Motor Stopping Place (RMSP) 16 and the former Mornington terminus (which was considered to have significant commercial value) was sold by the
    4.80
    5 votes
    127
    Crewe Works Railway

    Crewe Works Railway

    The Crewe Works Railway was a narrow gauge internal tramway system serving Crewe Works, the main locomotive construction works of the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) and later the London Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS). The system was first introduced by John Ramsbottom the LNWR Locomotive Superintendent from 1857 and it was a pioneering use of locomotive propelled vehicles within a manufacturing plant. The Crewe system was soon adopted elsewhere. There were four sections to this system built at different times and each in turn significantly altered several times before final abandonment. The four sections were: Of the above, the first section dating from 1862 was within the original locomotive works first built in 1843 and expanded many times as the railway system grew. Prior to the introduction of the tramway most internal transport was by hand-cart and barrow. The original lines totalled 550 yards (500 m) and to this was soon added a further 300 yards (270 m). The "Old Works" section ceased operation c1929. The second, the steel works section, and largest of all, was always self-contained and from its authorisation on October 20, 1864 lasted under locomotive haulage
    5.50
    4 votes
    128
    Kinzig Valley Railway

    Kinzig Valley Railway

    The Fulda–Hanau railway is a double track and electrified main line in the German state of Hesse. It runs south from Fulda along a ridge and then through the valley of the Kinzig to Hanau. As a result is also known the Kinzigtalbahn (Kinzig Valley Railway). The line was completed in 1868, as part of the Frankfurt-Bebra Railway. It has been upgraded for high-speed traffic as part of an important line between Frankfurt and northern and eastern Germany. The construction of the Kinzig Valley Railway commenced as part of the Bebra–Hanau Railway or Kurhessen State Railway (German: Kurhessischen Staatsbahn). After the Prussian annexation of the Electorate of Hesse-Kassel (Kurhessen) as a result of the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, it was completed to Frankfurt as the Frankfurt-Bebra Railway in 1868. As a result of the division of Germany after World War II, the traditional traffic flows from Frankfurt to Leipzig and Berlin on the Kinzig Valley Railway were largely lost. Increasingly, however, traffic to and from Hamburg shifted from the Main-Weser Railway to the Kinzig Valley Railway. The route of the current connection of the new line south of Fulda to the Kinzig Valley Railway was
    5.50
    4 votes
    129
    Bala Lake Railway

    Bala Lake Railway

    The Bala Lake Railway (Welsh: Rheilffordd Llyn Tegid) is a preserved railway at Bala Lake, in Gwynedd, north Wales, which runs for a distance of 4+⁄2 miles (7.2 km) using 2 ft (610 mm) gauge rolling stock. It was built on a section of the former Ruabon - Barmouth GWR route which was closed in 1965. This section runs along the south-eastern shore of Bala Lake. Another section of the former trackbed is today used by the Llangollen Railway. The railway runs from Llanuwchllyn railway station, where the main railway buildings, workshops and offices are located, to Bala (Llyn Tegid) near Bala. The station at Bala is outside the town, and there have been various plans to extend the railway into Bala itself, but none have been realised. Most trains on the line as steam-hauled, using one of three locomotives currently in service. Steam locomotives currently in use or stored on the line are Maid Marian, works number 822 (in use), Holy War, works number 779 (in use), Alice, works number 780 (in use) and George B, works number 680. George B is currently undergoing a lengthy rebuild. In mid-2012, the slightly larger locomotive Winifred, works number 364, was repatriated to the UK from a
    6.33
    3 votes
    130
    Belgrade - Bar railway

    Belgrade - Bar railway

    The Belgrade–Bar railway (Serbian: Пруга Београд-Бар or Pruga Beograd-Bar) is a railway connecting the Serbian capital of Belgrade with the town of Bar, a major seaport in Montenegro. The Belgrade–Bar railway is a standard gauge railway, 476 km (296 mi) long. Of this length, 301 km (187 mi) of the railway goes through Serbia, and 175 km (109 mi) through Montenegro. It is electrified along the entire corridor (25 kV, 50 Hz AC). It passes through 254 tunnels of total length of 114,435 m (375,443 ft) and over 435 bridges (total length 14,593 m (47,877 ft)). The longest tunnels are "Sozina" 6.17 km (4 mi) and "Zlatibor" 6.17 km (4 mi). The biggest and the best known bridge is Mala Rijeka viaduct, 498 m (1,634 ft) long and 198 m (650 ft) above ground level. The highest point of the railway is at 1,032 m (3,386 ft) AMSL, at town of Kolašin. The railway descends to 40 m AMSL at Podgorica in a relatively short distance, thus the gradient of 25‰ on this section. A small 9 km (6 mi) section of the railway actually passes through Bosnia and Herzegovina, near the town of Štrpci, but the trains do not stop there. When built, it took a train approximately 7 hours to go from Belgrade and Bar,
    6.33
    3 votes
    131
    Hotham Valley Railway

    Hotham Valley Railway

    The Hotham Valley Tourist Railway (commonly Hotham Valley Railway) is a tourist and heritage railway in the Peel region of Western Australia. The railway operates over a 32 kilometre section of the original Pinjarra to Narrogin railway line, and has its origins in a small group of enthusiasts who met together in 1974 with the object of preserving both Western Australian steam locomotives and the railway line itself, from Pinjarra at least as far as Dwellingup. Dwellingup is now the primary centre of Hotham Valley's operations. Today the railway operates both steam and diesel locomotive hauled trains on a variety of services and is staffed almost exclusively by volunteers. It is one of only a handful of heritage railway organisations in Western Australia, and as of mid-2011 was the only such railway in the state regularly operating original 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) ‘Cape’ gauge Western Australian Government Railways steam locomotives. 2012 sees the railway in its 36th year of operation, and it is thus one of the older preserved railways in Australia. In 2010 and 2011 the Hotham Valley Railway hosted a number of appeals, some of which (as of early 2012 at least) are ongoing. The appeals
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    Minnesota Commercial Railway

    Minnesota Commercial Railway

    The Minnesota Commercial Railway (reporting mark MNNR) is a short line railroad in the United States. This railroad operates out of the St. Paul area with service to Minneapolis, Bayport, Hugo, Fridley and New Brighton. It is considered a terminal and switching line. It is based out of a roundhouse on Cleveland Ave. in St. Paul just blocks south of the Amtrak station and its main yard is just to the north of the station. Its lines consist of one to Fridley, with an interchange with Canadian National Railway and a small yard in New Brighton. The railroad also runs to Hugo and Bayport on trackage rights. It interchanges with BNSF Railway at Northtown yard. It also serves east Minneapolis' grain elevators by the University of Minnesota as well as the grain elevators on Minnesota State Highway 55 adjacent to the Hiawatha Light Rail Line. The Minnesota Commercial connects with all major railroads in the Twin Cities including: Canadian National Railway, BNSF Railway, Canadian Pacific Railway, Union Pacific Railway, Iowa, Chicago and Eastern Railroad, and Twin Cities and Western Railroad. The MNNR's roster consists of mainly Alco and GE locomotives. With over two dozen locomotives,
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Pontypool and Blaenavon Railway

    Pontypool and Blaenavon Railway

    The Pontypool and Blaenavon Railway (Welsh: Rheilffordd Pont-y-pŵl a Blaenafon) is a volunteer-run heritage railway in South Wales, running trains between a halt platform opposite the Whistle Stop public house (famed for its collection of miner's lamps) southwards to the town of Blaenavon via a two-platform station at the site of former colliery furnace. The line is the highest preserved standard-gauge line in the United Kingdom, and also uniquely having the only standard-gauge rail-over-rail bridge within preservation. The line from Brynmawr to Blaenavon was originally built in 1866 by the Brynmawr and Blaenavon Railway and immediately leased to the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) to transport coal to the Midlands via the Heads of the Valleys line. The line was completed in the late 1860s and the LNWR were operating passenger trains over the line by 1872. Eight years later it was extended to meet the Great Western Railway (GWR) at Abersychan & Talywain. Here the line carried on down the valley through Pontypool Crane Street Station to the coast at Newport. In 1922, the LNWR was grouped into the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. In later years the line saw a variety of
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Sittingbourne and Kemsley Light Railway

    Sittingbourne and Kemsley Light Railway

    The Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway in Kent is a 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) gauge heritage railway that operates from Sittingbourne to the banks of The Swale. The line was formerly owned by Bowater, the paper making firm, and was used to carry raw materials and finished products between Ridham Dock and the company's two mills, one at Sittingbourne and the other at Kemsley. In the late 1960s the railway faced closure by its owners but the Locomotive Club of Great Britain accepted an offer to operate the railway from 1970. The section of line from Kemsley Down to Ridham Dock was however abandoned for redevelopment of the paper mills. In 2008-09, the line survived a threat of closure due to the owners of Sittingbourne Paper Mill closing the mill and selling the land, the lease then held by the railway expired in January 2009. Negotiations resulted in the railway being saved, although no public trains ran in 2009. In September 2010, press reports announced the possibility that the railway would operate an anniversary service - over a short section between Kemsley Down Station and the Milton Regis Halt - to celebrate 40 years of operation. The service carried more than 700 passengers over
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    The Giant's Causeway and Bushmills Railway

    The Giant's Causeway and Bushmills Railway

    The Giant's Causeway and Bushmills Railway (GC&BR) is a 3 ft  (914 mm) gauge narrow gauge heritage railway operating between the Giant's Causeway and Bushmills on the coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The line is two miles (3.2 km) long. The Giant's Causeway Tramway, operated by the Giant's Causeway, Portrush and Bush Valley Railway & Tramway Company Ltd, was a pioneering 3 ft  (914 mm) gauge electric narrow gauge railway operating between Portrush and the Giant's Causeway. 9+⁄4 miles (15 km) long, it was hailed at its opening as “the first long electric tramway in the world”. Promoted by W.A. Traill it was powered by hydroelectricity from an elevated third rail, although steam tram engines were also used in its earlier years, and the power supply was converted to overhead wire in 1899. It opened to Bushmills in 1883, the extension from there to the Causeway following on 1 July 1887. The line did not reopen after the end of the 1949 season on 20 September, and was subsequently dismantled. The new railway utilises equipment originally assembled by Lord O’Neill for a tourist line at Shane's Castle, Country Antrim, which closed in 1994. The idea of using this to revive part of
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Tōkyū Den-en-toshi Line

    Tōkyū Den-en-toshi Line

    The Tōkyū Den-en-toshi Line (東急田園都市線, Tōkyū Den'entoshi-sen) is a major commuter line operated by Tokyu Corporation and connecting south-western suburbs of Tokyo and neighbouring Kanagawa Prefecture, with its western terminus of Chūō-Rinkan, to a major railway junction of western downtown Tokyo, Shibuya. At Shibuya, nearly all the trains continue on the Tokyo Metro Hanzōmon Line. The line's color on maps and station guides is green, and stations carry the letter DT followed by a number. Nearly all trains on the Den-en-toshi Line are operated through to/from the Tokyo Metro Hanzōmon Line using Tokyu, Tokyo Metro, and Tobu Railway 10-car EMUs. Around half of them continue beyond Oshiage, the terminus of the Hanzōmon Line, to the Tōbu Isesaki Line (Kuki Station) and Tōbu Nikkō Line (Minami-Kurihashi Station). Tokyu operates two types of rapid services as well as Locals. A few trains are operated through to/from the Tōkyū Ōimachi Line to utilize forwardings to/from Saginuma depot, up to Ōimachi in the mornings, and down to Saginuma in the late evenings. These formations are 5-car sets, unlike the 10-car trains normally used on the line. A few express trains in holidays also serve from
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    Trinidad Government Railway

    Trinidad Government Railway

    The Trinidad Government Railway existed between 1876 and 28 December 1968. Originally built to connect Port of Spain with Arima, the railway was extended to Couva in 1880, San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago in 1882, Cunapo (now Sangre Grande) in 1897, Tabaquite in 1898, Siparia in 1913 and Rio Claro in 1914. The first attempt to establish a railway was a private affair in 1846 by the Trinidad Railway Company. At this, its greatest extent, the railway covered 173 km (107 mi). After the end of World War I, the appearance of the automobile led to changes that culminated with the phased closure of the railway April 1953 and 28 December 1968 saw the complete closure of the Trinidad Government Railways. The TGR appeared to have 640 route-km and was standard gauge (1,435 mm (4 ft 8⁄2 in)). On 11 April 2008 the Trinitrain consortium was chosen to plan and build two new Trinidad Rapid Railway passenger lines.
    6.33
    3 votes
    138
    Bicton Woodland Railway

    Bicton Woodland Railway

    The Bicton Woodland Railway is a narrow gauge railway running in gardens in the grounds of Bicton House near Budleigh Salterton in Devon. The line was built in 1962 as a tourist attraction for visitors to the house. Most of the rolling stock was acquired from the Royal Arsenal Railway, Woolwich, with two locomotives, Woolwich and Carnegie coming from that source, as well as seven goods wagons which were reduced to their frames and converted to passenger carriages. It opened to passengers in 1963. Originally locomotives and carriages had royal blue livery. Additional rolling stock was acquired from the RAF Fauld railway and the internal railway of the LNWR Wolverton works. In 1998 the Bicton Gardens were put up for sale and the railway put into hiatus. The new owners sold the line's existing stock and in 2000 took delivery of a 5.5-tonne diesel-powered replica tank engine. The line's original equipment was purchased by the Waltham Abbey Royal Gunpowder Mills museum at Waltham Abbey.
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Connecting Railway

    Connecting Railway

    The Connecting Railway was a subsidiary of the Pennsylvania Railroad, incorporated to build a connection between the Philadelphia and Trenton Railroad and the PRR in the city of Philadelphia. The PRR controlled the Philadelphia & Trenton, and had originally intended to directly connect the two lines through the heart of Philadelphia. However, attempts to buy out and demolish buildings in the right-of-way led to riots, and the Philadelphia & Trenton was forced to end at Kensington. To resolve the problem, Connecting Railway Company was incorporated May 15, 1863, and between 1864 and June 1867, constructed a 6.75-mile (10.86 km) connecting line between Frankford Junction on the Philadelphia & Trenton and Mantua Junction (now Zoo Interlocking) on the PRR main line, passing through what is now North Philadelphia. On July 18, 1863, the Frankford and Holmesburg Railroad was incorporated to build a line from Frankford to Holmesburg. This would have paralleled the Philadelphia & Trenton between those points. The charter was amended on April 10, 1867, to allow it to build from the Philadelphia & Trenton at Holmesburg Junction to the nearby town of Bustleton instead. It built 4.16 miles
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Eastern Kentucky Railway

    Eastern Kentucky Railway

    The Eastern Kentucky Railway (reporting mark EK) was a railroad in northeastern Kentucky, USA. It served mainly mine traffic, running north from Webbville through Grayson to Riverton (now part of Greenup) on the Ohio River and Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. The Kentucky Improvement Company was chartered in December 1866 and renamed January 1, 1870 to the Eastern Kentucky Railway. The first section, from Riverton south to Argillite, opened in 1867. Further extensions took it to Hunnewell by 1870, Grayson in 1871, Willard by 1874 and Webbville in 1889. At Hitchins, between Grayson and Willard, the line junctioned with the Elizabethtown, Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad, an east-west branch of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. The Consolidated Southern Railway was a plan in the 1880s to extend the EK south as part of a through line to Hickory and Statesville, North Carolina, also using the never-built Norfolk and Cincinnati Railroad and part of the Chester and Lenoir Railroad. The EK went bankrupt in 1919, and the part south of Grayson was reorganized in 1928 as the Eastern Kentucky Southern Railway. That company stopped operations in January 1933, and the tracks were removed soon
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Great Laxey Mine Railway

    Great Laxey Mine Railway

    The Great Laxey Mine Railway was originally constructed to serve the Isle of Man's Great Laxey Mine, a lead mine located in Laxey. The 19 in (483 mm) gauge railway runs from the old mine entrance to the washing floors along a right of way that passes through the Isle of Man's only railway tunnel under the 3 ft  (914 mm) gauge Victorian Manx Electric Railway and the main A2 Douglas to Ramsey coast road. Although the railway began with pony haulage, a pair of steam locomotives were delivered from Stephen Lewin of Poole in 1877. Ant and Bee were 0-4-0 tank locomotives made unusually narrow, in order to fit within the adit shaft. They were 4 ft 9in high and only 3 ft wide. Their two 4×6in inside cylinders had Bagnall-Price valve gear and a geared drive to the rear axle, but coupling rods between the axles. The arrangement of the water tanks was particularly unusual, being a front tank ahead of the smokebox, in order to reduce width. The boilers were launch-type, as were commonly used for small locomotives with insufficient space between the frames for a conventional firebox. Around 1905, a replacement locomotive was considered and W G Bagnall were asked for a design. This was similar
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Leighton Buzzard Light Railway

    Leighton Buzzard Light Railway

    The Leighton Buzzard Light Railway (LBLR) is a narrow gauge light railway in Leighton Buzzard in Bedfordshire, England. It operates on a 2 ft (610 mm) gauge, and is just under 3 miles (4.8 km) long. The line was built after the First World War to serve sand quarries north of the town. In the late 1960s the quarries switched to road transport and the railway was taken over by volunteers, who now run the line as a heritage railway. A bed of Lower Cretaceous sand across Bedfordshire has been quarried on a small scale for centuries. The most significant occur around Leighton Buzzard. In the 19th century sand was carried by horse carts from quarries south of the town to be shipped on the Dunstable-Leighton Buzzard railway. The carts damaged roads and resulted in claims for compensation against the quarry owners from Bedfordshire County Council. At the end of the century steam wagons were introduced which increased the damage to roads. The outbreak of the First World War cut off supplies of foundry sand from Belgium. Sand was needed for ammunition factories and new sources were sought. Leighton Buzzard sands proved well suited and production increased. After 1919 the quarry companies
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Lochaber narrow gauge railway

    Lochaber narrow gauge railway

    The Lochaber Narrow Gauge Railway was a 3 ft  (914 mm) gauge narrow gauge industrial railway. It was a relatively long line, built for the construction and subsequent maintenance of a 15 miles (24 km) long tunnel from Loch Treig to a factory near Fort William in Scotland. The tunnel was excavated to carry water for the Lochaber hydro-electric power scheme in connection with aluminium production by the British Aluminium Company. The railway came to be known colloquially as the 'Old Puggy Line'. The railway was initially built for the contractors Balfour Beatty to move workers and materials during construction of the tunnel. It was originally intended as a temporary feature. Later, a decision was made to retain the railway for the delivery and despatch of materials and to assist with the maintenance of the tunnel. The principal location on the railway was the factory area (or 'Base Camp' prior to its opening), where there were various facilities such as a locomotive and speeder shed. Some of the sidings here were of mixed gauge (3 ft /914 mm gauge and standard gauge). The railway as a whole comprised a network of lines as follows: The Pier Railway ran from 'Base Camp' (near the
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Mackenzie Northern Railway

    Mackenzie Northern Railway

    The Mackenzie Northern Railway (reporting mark RLGN) was a 602-mile (969 km) Canadian railway operating in Alberta and the Northwest Territories. It is the northernmost trackage of the contiguous North American railway network. The majority of the tracks which the Mackenzie Northern Railway used were built by the federal government as the Great Slave Lake Railway, running from a point on the Northern Alberta Railways at Grimshaw, Alberta to the southern shores of Great Slave Lake at Hay River, Northwest Territories starting in 1961 with the proposal to Parliament and opening in 1964. The railroad was built as part of Lester B. Pearson's vision for the north, and would ease shipment of lead-zinc ore from the Pine Point Mines. The Great Slave Railway's operation was entrusted to Canadian National Railway in 1966, which had been operating the line on behalf of the federal government since it opened. The line also continued east from Hay River, along the south shore of Great Slave Lake, to a mine at Pine Point. This section was abandoned in 1988 once concentrate shipments from the closed mine ceased. The total mileage in the Northwest Territories from the border with Alberta to Hay
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Manx Northern Railway

    Manx Northern Railway

    The Manx Northern Railway (MNR) was the second common carrier railway built in the Isle of Man. It operated as an independent concern only from 1879 to 1905. When the people in the town of Ramsey realised their town was not going to be incorporated into the newly promoted Isle of Man Railway (IOMR) network in the 1870s it was left to them to promote their own railway as a link with the rest of the island. The rugged geography of the east coast forced the Manx Northern Railway into an indirect route - first westwards to Kirk Michael and then south to St John’s where a junction could be made with the Isle of Man Railway’s Peel to Douglas line which opened in 1873. Built to a common Manx gauge of 3 ft 0 in (914 mm), construction began in 1878 and the railway opened for business without formality on 23 September 1879. It was initially operated by the Isle of Man Railway until 6 November 1880 when the MNR took over the responsibility. In 1881, passenger services started operating through to Douglas using running rights over the tracks of the Isle of Man Railway. Some impressive engineering works were required on the west coast section of the line including the bridging of the deep Glens
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Meon Valley Railway

    Meon Valley Railway

    The Meon Valley Railway (MVR) was a cross-country railway in Hampshire, England that ran for 22.5 miles (36.2 km) between Alton and Fareham, closely following the course of the River Meon. At its northern (Alton) end, it joined with the Mid-Hants Railway to Winchester, the Alton Line to Brookwood and the Basingstoke and Alton Light Railway. At Fareham it linked with the Eastleigh to Fareham Line, the West Coastway Line and the line to Gosport. The railway was authorised in 1896 and opened in 1903, making it one of the last railways of any size to be built to main-line standards in the United Kingdom. The MVR was built by the London and South Western Railway (LSWR), which had a virtual monopoly on railway services in southern Hampshire. It already operated services between London (from its Waterloo terminus) and Southampton and Portsmouth. The former destination was served by the South Western Main Line and the latter by the Portsmouth Direct Line, as well as the line from Eastleigh via Fareham. Despite this, the LSWR felt that it would be advantageous to build a more direct line between London and the Portsmouth area (especially Gosport). Alton was becoming an important railway
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Padarn Railway

    Padarn Railway

    The Padarn Railway was a narrow gauge railway line in Wales, built to the unusual gauge of 4 ft  (1,219 mm) . It was built to carry slate from the Dinorwic Quarry (53°07′17″N 4°06′55″W / 53.1213°N 4.1152°W / 53.1213; -4.1152 (Padarn Railway, Gilfach Ddu terminus)) to Port Dinorwic (53°11′09″N 4°12′32″W / 53.1859°N 4.2090°W / 53.1859; -4.2090 (Padarn Railway, Port Dinorwic terminus)). It opened in 1842, replacing the previous Dinorwic Railway. The Padarn Railway closed in 1961 . An unusual feature of the railway were the transporter waggons. These 4 ft  (1,219 mm) gauge vehicles were flat wagons with two parallel 1 ft 10 ⁄4 in (578 mm) gauge tracks on them. Loaded slate wagons of 1 ft 10 ⁄4 in (578 mm) gauge - the gauge used on the extensive internal system at the quarry - were wheeled onto the transporter wagons and carried four at a time down to their destination at Port Dinorwic where they were unloaded via a 2 ft  (610 mm) gauge incline which led to the quayside. Since closure, part of its route has been reopened as the 1 ft 11 ⁄2 in (597 mm) gauge Llanberis Lake Railway.
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    Sabah State Railway

    Sabah State Railway

    Sabah State Railway (SSR) is a railway system and operator in the state of Sabah in Malaysia. It is the currently the only rail transport system operating on the island of Borneo. The railway consists of a single 134 km line from Tanjung Aru, near Kota Kinabalu, to the town of Tenom, in the Interior Division. It was formerly known as North Borneo Railway. Construction of the then North Borneo Railway began in 1896 under the command of engineer Arthur J. West with his assistant Gounon a Murutman from Keningau. The railway was built by workers who brought in from Japan led by Akira. It was originally intended primarily for the transport of tobacco from the interior to the coast for export. The first line built was a 32 km track from Bukau River, north to Beaufort, and south to the port of Weston. This was then extended with a further 48 km route in 1903 to Tenom, the works for which was completed in 1905. The line was extended again in 1906 with a further 16 km from Tenom to Melalap. Engineer Arthur J. West also plans to build another railway line heading to Keningau, but he was transferred to Australia caused the construction interrupted. At the same time as this work, was work on
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Toei Mita Line

    Toei Mita Line

    The Toei Mita Line (都営地下鉄三田線, Toei Chikatetsu Mita-sen) is a subway line of the Tokyo Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation (Toei) network in Tokyo, Japan. The line runs between Nishi-Takashimadaira in Itabashi and Meguro in Shinagawa. Trains continue with direct service into the Meguro Line of Tokyu Corporation for Hiyoshi. The portion between Shirokane-Takanawa and Meguro is shared with the Tokyo Metro Namboku Line. On maps and signboards, the line is shown in "blue" (O). Stations carry the letter I followed by a two-digit number. Platforms on the Mita Line are equipped with chest-height automatic platform gates that open in sync with the train doors. The line was the first in the Tokyo subway system to have low barriers. The Tokyo Metro Namboku Line has used full-height platform screen doors since its opening. The right-of-way and stations between Shirokane-Takanawa and Meguro are shared with the Tokyo Metro Namboku Line. Under an agreement of both parties, the fare for this section is calculated on the Toei system for passengers traveling to stations on the Mita Line past Shirokane-Takanawa, using the Tokyo Metro system for those travelling on the Namboku Line past
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Cadeby Light Railway

    Cadeby Light Railway

    The Cadeby Light Railway was a narrow gauge railway in the garden of the rectory in Cadeby, Leicestershire. In the early 1960s the Reverend Teddy Boston became rector of All Saints' Church, Cadeby. Boston was a lifelong railway enthusiast and wanted to build a miniature railway in his new garden, but the cost proved prohibitive. Instead he searched for a full-sized narrow-gauge locomotive. In 1962 he purchased Pixie a W.G. Bagnall 0-4-0ST from the Cranford quarry. The quarry owners donated a short length of track and two wagons and the Cadeby Light Railway was opened. Over the years, the Rev. Boston built an extensive collection of ex-industrial narrow-gauge rolling stock which ran on the extremely short line in his garden. Although the Rev. Boston died in 1986, his widow Audrey kept the railway open for nearly twenty years, holding regular open days. The railway finally closed in 2005, subsequently the majority of the collection has been amalgamated with the Moseley Railway Trust at the Apedale Community Country Park. Media related to Cadeby Light Railway at Wikimedia Commons
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Carrizo Gorge Railway

    Carrizo Gorge Railway

    The Carrizo Gorge Railway (reporting mark CZRY) is a freight operator on the San Diego and Arizona Eastern Railway from Tijuana, Mexico to Plaster City, California (Desert Line), San Diego, California to La Mesa, California (Orange Line) and San Diego, California to Santee, California (Green Line). The other freight operator on the SD&AE, the San Diego and Imperial Valley Railroad, did not want to invest the $5.5 million necessary to repair the collapsed tunnels and bridges in the Carrizo Gorge. The owners of CZRY, however, believed that the investment would be worthwhile and negotiated trackage rights on the line. The agreement required a fee of 6.9% of the gross revenues from any freight on the SD&AE's Desert Line to Plaster City and $200 per car on any car that would have been brought by the SD&IV to the Coast Line. Sand hauling is the primary business for the CZRY. The sand is used in making ready-mixed concrete for the construction markets in San Diego County. There is also minor traffic of other goods between the U.S. and Mexico. Rail car storage is another revenue source. Usually, you can see a Union Pacific engine pulling a freight. This is because CZRY closely switches
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Čierny Hron Railway

    Čierny Hron Railway

    The Čierny Hron Railway (in Slovak: Čiernohronská železnica or ČHŽ) is a narrow gauge railway in the Slovak Ore Mountains, built as an industrial railway for logging operations. The planning for the railway began in 1898 and building began in 1908. In 1909 regular wood transport on the railway started, between Čierny Balog and Hronec. The network was extended to transport wood from the forests and by the middle of the 20th century the railway had a total length of 131,97 km, the most extensive forestry railway network in Czechoslovakia. On 19 July 1927 passenger traffic was permitted on the railway between Čierny Balog and Hronec, which operated until 1962. The railway was closed in 1982, but it has been granted national heritage status since. During the following few years it was repaired by enthusiasts and re-opened in 1992 as a heritage railway for tourists. The line is now 17 km long: Chvatimech - Hronec - Čierny Balog - Vydrovo.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Henley Beach railway line, Adelaide

    Henley Beach railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    The Henley Beach railway line is a defunct railway in western Adelaide. The line opened on 5 February 1894 as an extension of the Grange line. The line serviced five stations: Grange (old), Kirkcaldy, Marlborough Street, Henley Beach Jetty Road, and Henley Beach. The line closed on 31 August 1957 due to the track being close to public roads with no fencing between. The line was cut back to the now defunct original Grange station, which was cut even further back to the current Grange station in the late 1980s by removal of tracks across Military Road and infrastructure from the original platform. The unused platform still remains on the side of the road.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Moscow-Saint Petersburg Railway

    Moscow-Saint Petersburg Railway

    The Moscow to Saint Petersburg Railway is a 649.7-kilometre (403.7 mi) railway running between the two largest Russian cities of Moscow and Saint Petersburg, and through four oblasts: Moscow, Tver, Novgorod and Leningrad. It is a major traffic artery in the north-west region of Russia, operated by the Oktyabrskaya Railway subdivision of Russian Railways. The current maximum speed on the Moscow-St. Petersburg line is 250 km/h (155 mph); the fastest train takes 3 hours and 30 minutes. The Siemens-built Velaro RUS train, aka Sapsan, operates on this line since 2009, but running below their speed capacity (300 km/h (186 mph)) because of difficulties upgrading all the tracks. For this Sapsan project, Russian Railways spent nearly $1 billion for its eight Siemens Velaro trains. Since 1931, a famous train, called the Krasnaya Strela ("Red Arrow"), has operated on this line, leaving Moscow (Leningradsky Rail Terminal) at 23:55 daily and arriving in Saint Petersburg (Moskovsky Rail Terminal) at 07:55 the next morning and vice-versa. The railway is relatively congested, which means that only a few high speed trains can be run each direction and day. Therefore there are plans of building a
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Perrygrove Railway

    Perrygrove Railway

    The Perrygrove Railway is a minimum gauge railway of 15 in (381 mm) gauge. It is a private heritage railway at Perrygrove Farm in the Royal Forest of Dean near Coleford, Gloucestershire, England. Trains travel at frequent intervals on a round trip of 1+⁄2 miles (2.4 km) between four stations. The railway was inspired by the minimum gauge estate railways or British narrow gauge railways developed by Sir Arthur Heywood at the end of the 19th century, including his pioneering Duffield Bank Railway and the later Eaton Hall Railway. Perrygrove is the home of the Heywood Collection, which consists of five original vehicles, including the original saloon carriage from Eaton Hall. Also based at Perrygrove are replica vehicles built by James Waterfield, including the locomotive "Ursula" and the Duffield Bank Dining Carriage. All these vehicles are available for viewing when Perrygrove is open, but visitors are asked to telephone if they wish to be certain of seeing a particular item. Perrygrove Farm was purchased by Michael and Frances Crofts in 1993. Construction of the railway commenced in 1995 and it opened in 1996. The railway's existence depends on visits from day trippers, tourists
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Sodor & Mainland Railway

    Sodor & Mainland Railway

    The Sodor & Mainland Railway (1853–1914) is a fictional railway that existed on the Island of Sodor in The Railway Series books written by the Rev. W. Awdry. In the books it is known as the S&M and was built when railway-mania was still in force, opening in 1853. The initial aim of the railway was to link Sodor with the British Mainland. The Sodor & Mainland Railway ran from the docks at Kirk Ronan to the town of Ballahoo via Rolf's Castle and Crovan's Gate, but never actually reached the mainland due to lack of money and misfortunes. The plan to extend to the Mainland via Vicarstown failed when the tunnel under construction through the Balahoo Ridge collapsed and plans to build a bridge across the Walney Channel was halted by the Admiralty (who ironically in World War I became the driving force behind the unification of Sodor's railways and completion of the same link to the mainland that they hindered the S&M in building). The S&M did, at one time plan to build a western extension into Sodor's mountain country to connect the expanding industrial town of Peel Godred to the railway network. This plan, like the others, came to nothing and Peel Godred's first railway was the narrow
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line

    Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line

    The Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line (東京地下鉄日比谷線, Tōkyō Chikatetsu Hibiya-sen) is a metro line in Tokyo, Japan, owned and operated by Tokyo Metro. The line was named after the district of Hibiya, under which it passes. The Hibiya Line runs between Naka-Meguro in Meguro and Kita-Senju in Adachi. The line's path is somewhat similar to that of the Ginza Line; however, the Hibiya Line was designed to serve a number of important districts, such as Ebisu, Roppongi, Tsukiji, Kayabachō and Senju, which were not on an existing line. There is through service onto the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line for Kikuna and the Tōbu Isesaki Line for Tōbu-Dōbutsu-Kōen. From 16 March 2013, when through-running starts between the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line and the Tōkyū Tōyoko Line, Hibiya Line trains will no longer through-run to Kikuna. According to the Tokyo Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation, as of June 2009 the Hibiya Line is the eighth most crowded subway line in Tokyo, running at 164% capacity between Minowa and Iriya stations. On maps, diagrams and signboards, the line is shown using the color "silver" (▉), and its stations are given numbers using the letter H. All stations are located in Tokyo. The Hibiya Line was
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Utah Railway

    Utah Railway

    The Utah Railway (reporting mark UTAH) is a class III railroad operating in Utah and Colorado, and owned by Genesee & Wyoming Inc. The Utah Railway Company was incorporated on January 24, 1912, with the name of Utah Coal Railway, shortened to Utah Railway in May of the same year. It was founded to haul coal from the company's mines to Provo, Utah, in reaction to company disappointment in the service and route of the existing Denver and Rio Grande Railroad nearby. It was known for owning the most modern equipment; when built, its large "Santa Fe" (2-10-2) and "Mallet" (2-6-6-2) steam locomotives had automatic stokers, a new invention at the time, and a convenience that drew many firemen from the D&RGW's Utah Division to the Utah Railway in 1917 when that line opened. In addition, the Utah Railway was the first to equip its air brakes with fourteen-pound tension springs instead of the standard seven-pound springs. The company was one of the earliest coal hauling railroads to employ diesel locomotives, and was early to adopt automation technologies, including the use of flashing rear end devices instead of cabooses. The Utah Railway's freight car roster consisted of fifteen flatcars
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Nebraska Northeastern Railway

    Nebraska Northeastern Railway

    The Nebraska Northeastern Railroad (reporting mark NENE) is a shortline railroad that began operations on July 23, 1996, in northeastern Nebraska. It operates on about 120 miles of former Burlington Northern Railroad track between Ferry Station, NE and O'Neill, Nebraska, as well as trackage rights over the BNSF Railway, Burlington Northern's successor, into Sioux City, Iowa.
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    Silver Stream Railway

    Silver Stream Railway

    Silver Stream Railway is a heritage railway at Silverstream in the Hutt Valley near Wellington, New Zealand. It regularly operates preserved New Zealand Railways Department locomotives along a restored section of the Hutt Valley Line (part of the Wairarapa Line) before a deviation was built in 1954. The beginnings of Silver Stream Railway were in 1967 when the Wellington branch of the New Zealand Railway and Locomotive Society began a collection of locomotives and rolling stock. Tracklaying on the old formation of the Hutt Valley Line did not begin until 1977. The collection of locomotives and rolling stock had previously been stored at a site by the Gracefield Branch in Seaview, and this was transferred to the present Silverstream site in 1984. The official opening of the full 1.5 kilometre track took place on 15 February 1986. The railway owns an assortment of rolling stock, some in operational condition while others are awaiting or under restoration. The railway has a wide selection of rolling stock and some of the items are rather rare. One of the most notable items of rolling stock is a 50' passenger carriage of the Wellington and Manawatu Railway (WMR), No. 48, later NZR A
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    Ballyhooley Steam Railway

    Ballyhooley Steam Railway

    The Bally Hooley Steam Railway is a heritage railway operating in Port Douglas, Queensland, Australia. It operates on approximately 4 km of 2 ft  (610 mm) gauge line from the Marina Mirage to Saint Crispin's Station. The railway is operated by a group of volunteers and runs services on Sundays.
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    North Island Main Trunk Railway

    North Island Main Trunk Railway

    The North Island Main Trunk (NIMT) is the main railway line in the North Island of New Zealand, linking Wellington, the capital, and Auckland, the largest city, via Paraparaumu, Palmerston North, Taihape, National Park, Taumarunui, Te Kuiti, Hamilton, and Pukekohe. It is 681 kilometres (423 mi) in length, built to the standard New Zealand rail gauge of 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in). Most is single track with frequent passing loops, with double track most of the distance between Wellington and Waikanae, and between Hamilton and Auckland. Around 460 kilometres (290 mi) of the line is electrified: 55 km at 1500 V DC between Wellington and Waikanae, and 412 km at 25 kV AC between Palmerston North and Te Rapa in Hamilton. The 34 km between Papakura and Britomart is currently being electrified. The first section of what became the NIMT opened in 1873 in Auckland. Construction of the Wellington end began in 1885, and the line was completed in 1908 and fully operational by 1909. The line is credited for having been an economic lifeline for the young nation, and for having opened up the centre of the North Island to European settlement and investment. In the early days, a passenger journey along the
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    Penfield railway line, Adelaide

    Penfield railway line, Adelaide

    • Part of network: TransAdelaide
    Penfield railway line is a defunct railway in northern Adelaide which was used mainly for industrial purposes in the World War II years. It started just north of the Salisbury station on the Gawler line. The line then went north west and then turned north through Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) in Edinburgh. It serviced four stations; Hilra, Penfield 1, Penfield 2, and Penfield 3. It was double track for the whole length. The line had a balloon loop for trains to go the other way. The line was closed and dismantled in 1991. The line opened in 1941 to service various World War II armaments factories at Penfield. As it was built for industrial purposes, sidings branched off both the Up and Down tracks at many locations. The largest siding went as far as the RAAF base at Edinburgh. During the war years this branch line was used by many passenger trains carrying workers to the munitions factories in the area. This was necessary because Salisbury was still a semi-rural community at the time and most of the workforce had to be brought in from other districts. A more limited peak hour service to Penfield continued after the war, serving staff at the government Weapons
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Culdee Fell Railway

    Culdee Fell Railway

    The Culdee Fell Railway (CFR) is a fictional narrow gauge rack and pinion railway appearing in the book Mountain Engines written by the Rev. W. Awdry. The stories are based on incidents in the history of the Snowdon Mountain Railway. Awdry visited the Snowdon Mountain Railway (SMR) with his friend, the Rev. Teddy Boston, in early 1963. That summer he wrote a two-part article about it in his series "Remarkable Railways", for the Church of England Newspaper. The Director of the SMR at the time, A.O.E. Davis, suggested that Awdry might like to include a similar railway on Sodor. Fortunately, a suitable mountain was already marked on the first published maps of Sodor, the 2046 ft-high Culdee Fell. In the book, the Culdee Fell Railway runs from Kirk Machan, where it meets the standard gauge line from Killdane to Peel Godred, to the summit of Culdee Fell. Devil's Back is a high exposed ridge which the railway runs along, corresponding to Clogwyn of the real Snowdon Mountain Railway. According to "research" by the Rev. W Awdry, the railway was the brainchild of the tourist-minded Mid Sodor Railway, who had hopes to extend their line beyond Peel Godred to Kirk Machan at the foot of Culdee
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Great Whipsnade Railway

    Great Whipsnade Railway

    The Great Whipsnade Railway, also known as The Jumbo Express, is an English 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) gauge narrow gauge heritage railway that operates within Whipsnade Zoo. Construction started in 1970 and the initial line opened on August 26, 1970. The line provided rides within the animal enclosures and an additional attraction in its own right. Originally called the Whipsnade and Umfolozi Railway, it began as a short line running from near the children's zoo. It was later extended to form a loop through several paddocks. The railway is now over a mile long in length. The line was primarily equipped from the Bowater's Railway (now Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway) in Sittingbourne, Kent, which was the last steam-operated narrow gauge industrial railway in Britain. The railway is now equipped with four steam locomotives and five diesels (although one has been sold to the Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway). Steam services run once every half-hour, usually during the summer holidays. The train normally travels clockwise around the loop. Leaving the station the train travels east under the foot bridge and passing the children's play area and children's farm on the left. At this
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    South Yorkshire Junction Railway

    South Yorkshire Junction Railway

    The South Yorkshire Junction Railway is a railway which ran from Wrangbrook Junction on the main line of the Hull and Barnsley Railway to near Denaby in South Yorkshire. It was nominally an independent company sponsored by the Denaby and Cadeby Colliery Company but was worked by the Hull and Barnsley Railway. The S.Y.J.R. received its Act of Parliament on 14 August 1890 opening for goods traffic on 1 September 1894 and for passengers on 1 December the same year. The passenger service lasted less than 9 years, the last trains running on 1 February 1903. Intermediate passenger stations were at Sprotborough and Pickburn and Brodsworth. The line was over 11miles in length, with many embankments and cuttings, it also had steep uphill grades in the northerly direction at parts, including a 1 in 100 rise after Denaby, and another steep rise near Wrangbrook, 3miles long being between built at a grade of 1 in 100 or 1 in 112. It crossed the Great Northern and Great Central Joint line 2.5 miles after Wrangbrook junction, a short tunnel "Cadeby Tunnel" was required around 1.5 miles from the Denaby end, being ~250yards long. A branch to Brodsworth colliery was added in 1908 from
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Trans-Caspian railway

    Trans-Caspian railway

    The Trans-Caspian Railway (also called the Central Asian Railway, Russian: Среднеазиатская железная дорога) is a railway that follows the path of the Silk Road through much of western Central Asia. It was built by the Russian Empire during its expansion into Central Asia in the 19th century. The railway was started in 1879, following the Russian defeat of Khokand. Originally it served a military purpose of facilitating the Imperial Russian Army in actions against the local resistance to their rule. However when Lord Curzon visited the railway, he remarked that he considered its significance went beyond local military control and threatened British interests in Asia. Construction was begun in 1879 as a narrow-gauge railway to Gyzylarbat in connection with the Russian conquest of Transcaspia under General Mikhail Skobelev. It was rapidly altered to the standard Russian gauge of five feet, and construction through to Ashkabad and Merv (modern Mary) was completed under General Michael Nicolaivitch Annenkoff in 1886. Originally the line began from Uzun-Ada on the Caspian Sea, but the terminus was later shifted north to the harbour at Krasnovodsk. The Railway reached Samarkand via
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Weisseritz Valley Railway

    Weisseritz Valley Railway

    The Weisseritz Valley Railway, or Weißeritztalbahn, is a steam operated narrow gauge railway in Saxony, Germany. The line connects Freital, near Dresden, with Kurort Kipsdorf, in the Erzgebirge mountains, and follows the valley of the Red Weißeritz. It was badly damaged by major flooding in 2002 and is only partially operational, with fully restoration expected in 2010. The line was the second Saxon narrow gauge railway to be built, and is also considered to be the oldest public narrow gauge railway in Germany still in operation. Since 14 September 2004, the line has been operated by Sächsische Dampfeisenbahngesellschaft mbH (Saxon Steam Railway Company, formerly BVO Bahn), a company that also operates the Fichtelberg Railway and Lößnitzgrund Railway. The construction started in 1881. The gauge selected for the line was 750 mm (2 ft 5 ⁄2 in), in common with other Saxon narrow gauge railways. The first section to Schmiedeberg was put into operation on 1 November 1882. On 3 September 1883, the regular trains reached the terminal station at Kurort Kipsdorf. In 1912 a part of the track was relocated to allow construction of the Malter Valley Dam. In 1920 construction began on the Pöbel
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    AN Railway

    AN Railway

    The AN Railway (reporting mark AN) is one of several shortline railroad companies owned by the Genesee & Wyoming parent company. It operates between Port Saint Joe, Florida and a connection with CSX's Pensacola & Atlantic and Tallahassee Subdivisions at Chattahoochee, Florida, with a short spur to Apalachicola, Florida. The railroad operates approximately 96 miles (154 km) of track. The Apalachicola Northern Railroad was chartered on April 7, 1903. Construction began on March 21, 1905, and trains began running north from Apalachicola in 1907. The extension to Port St. Joe was completed on May 10, 1910. The company operated in receivership on three separate occasions: July 1907 to October 1908, May 1914 to February 1916 and May 1932 to December 1936. The company came under ownership of Alfred I. du Pont in 1933, along with the entire town of Port St. Joe. The railroad's largest customer, the St. Joe Paper Company mill in Port St. Joe, was owned by the Alfred I. duPont Testamentary Trust from 1936 to 1996. On September 30, 1940, Edward Ball, who managed the du Pont trust properties, transferred control of the railroad to the St. Joe Paper Company. When the paper company was sold in
    7.00
    1 votes
    170
    Hell Valley Railway

    Hell Valley Railway

    There are other railway lines in German-speaking countries called Höllentalbahn The Höllentalbahn (literally, "Hell Valley Railway") is a railway line that partially runs through the Höllental valley in the Black Forest of Germany. The line connects Freiburg im Breisgau with Donaueschingen, a distance of 74.7 km (46.4 mi). Over its entire course the line rises from an altitude of 278 m (912 ft) in Freiburg to 885 m (2,904 ft) in Hinterzarten. Part of the route has a 5.5% gradient, making the line one of the steepest in Germany. The line passes through beautiful scenery along its entire length. The line, which opened as far as Neustadt in 1887, was constructed for the Grand Duchy of Baden State Railways and was the last project of railway architect Robert Gerwig. The 7.2 km (4.5 mi) section of the line between Hirschsprung and Hinterzarten has a maximum gradient of 5.5%, and was initially operated as a rack railway on the Riggenbach system. The line was extended from Neustadt to Donaueschingen in 1901. In 1932/33, ten powerful Class 85 steam locomotives were built, which enabled traffic to operate over the Hirschsprung and Hinterzarten section without rack assistance, and rack
    7.00
    1 votes
    171
    Manchester-Sheffield-Wath electric railway

    Manchester-Sheffield-Wath electric railway

    The Manchester–Sheffield–Wath electric railway was a electrification scheme on British railways. The route featured long ascents on both sides of the Pennines with the long Woodhead Tunnel at its central summit close to the Woodhead pass. This led to the route being called the Woodhead Line. The main route ran from Manchester London Road (later Manchester Piccadilly) over the Pennines, through the Woodhead Tunnel to Penistone, where the Wath line split. The main line then proceeded through Sheffield Victoria Station and on to Rotherwood sidings. The Wath line ran from Penistone to Wath marshalling yard in the heart of the South Yorkshire coalfields. Minor electrified branches off the main line ran to the locomotive depot at Reddish on the Fallowfield Loop line, to Glossop (for local passenger trains), Dewsnap sidings (all at the Manchester end) and Tinsley Marshalling Yard (at the Sheffield end). Following developments with electric traction in the USA, the Great Central Railway (GCR) first considered the electrification of the line prior to World War I. No detailed plans were drawn up, but by the 1920s the high levels of heavy freight traffic made steam operation increasingly
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    Matadi-Kinshasa Railway

    Matadi-Kinshasa Railway

    The Matadi-Kinshasa Railway is a railway line in Bas-Congo Province between the port of Matadi and Kinshasa, the capital of Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Matadi-Kinshasa Railway was built from 1890 to 1898. Its length is 366 kilometres and it is run by ONATRA. In the 1880s the exploration and exploitation of the Congo territory was carried out by the Congo Free State, which benefitted from hydrographic network of the Congo River. But between Matadi and Kinshasa (formerly known as Léopoldville), the river was not navigable, being barred by the Livingstone Falls, which follow one another for 300 kilometres. Transport was done by human bearers, which was not very efficient and often fatal. Therefore it was decided to build a railway line along this route. The Compagnie du Congo pour le Commerce et l'Industrie (CCCI) was founded on 31 July 1887. On the same day the Compagnie du Chemin de Fer du Congo (CCFC) was created. Work on the railway was directed by Albert Thys, who would give his name to one of the stations, Thysville (now Mbanza-Ngungu). The completion of the railway cost the lives of 1,932 people (1,800 blacks and 132 whites). The main difficulty was to make it
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Northern Railway

    Northern Railway

    The Emperor Ferdinand Northern Railway (German: Kaiser Ferdinands-Nordbahn, KFNB; Czech: Severní dráha císaře Ferdinanda, SDCF) was the name of a former railway company during the time of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. Its main line was supposed to connect Vienna with salt mines in Bochnia near Kraków. Today, the term is still used to describe certain railway lines which were formerly operated by that company. The Nordbahn, or Kaiser Ferdinands-Nordbahn, was Austria's first steam railway company and financed by Salomon Mayer von Rothschild (1774-1855). The first track was built between Floridsdorf and Deutsch Wagram in 1837. The extension to Vienna was built in 1838, and the track through Břeclav (Lundenburg) to Brünn in 1839. In 1841 it reached Přerov (Prerau) and Olomouc(Olmütz) and in 1842 Lipník nad Bečvou(Leipnik). Extension to Ostrava(Ostrau) and Bohumín(Oderberg) was finished in 1847. Nordbahn never directly reached Kraków(Krakau) or Bochnia. The first way to Kraków on rails via Bogumin (Oderberg), Kozle (Kosel), and Mysłowice (Myslowitz) was served by the Prussian lines of William's Railway (Wilhelmsbahn) and Upper Silesian Railway (Oberschlesische Bahn). The line from
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Trans-Iranian Railway

    Trans-Iranian Railway

    The Trans-Iranian Railway was a major railway building project started in 1927 and completed in 1938, under the direction of the Persian monarch, Reza Shah, and entirely with indigenous capital. It links the capital Tehran with the Persian Gulf and Caspian Sea. The railway connected Bandar Shah (now: Bandar Torkaman) in the north and Bandar Shahpur (now: Bandar-e Emam Khomeyni) in the south via Ahvaz, Ghom and Tehran. During the land reforms implemented by Mohammad Reza Shah in 1963 as part of the "White Revolution" the Trans-Iranian railway was extended to link Tehran to Mashhad, Tabriz, and Isfahan. The idea of a railway connecting Russia and India was proposed by several private Russian promoters in 1889, 1900, and 1905. However, the Russian government declined such proposals, fearing that it would jeopardize Russia’s geographically enabled commercial dominance in Iran as well as complicate relations with the British. In 1889 Russia and the Shah agreed that no railways could be built in Iran without the mutual consensus of the Russians. However, by 1910 the agreement was vetoed in the Iranian Constitutional Revolution. Fears that Russian interests were no longer primary,
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Branson Scenic Railway

    Branson Scenic Railway

    The Branson Scenic Railway is a heritage railroad in Branson, Missouri. The trains depart from a historic depot in downtown Branson and operate in the scenic Ozark Mountains for an approximate 40 mile round trip. As the underlying rail lines are owned by the Missouri and Northern Arkansas Railroad (MNA) and are still in use as an active railroad, MNA traffic determines whether a particular trip will operate northbound from Branson to Galena, Missouri, or southbound from Branson to the Barren Fork Trestle in Arkansas. The railroad operates a variety of vintage railroad equipment, including two dome cars, a dining car, and several coaches built by the Budd Company. Power is provided by an EMD F9 A unit on the northbound end of the train and an EMD GP30 on the southbound end of the train. This arrangement makes it possible to make the return trip without having to use a wye junction or a passing siding. The railroad was originally built as the White River Railway between 1902 and 1905. Because of the rugged terrain of the Ozarks, a number of trestles and tunnels were required in order to create a level railroad grade. The lines later became part of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, and
    5.33
    3 votes
    176
    Diakofto Kalavrita Railway

    Diakofto Kalavrita Railway

    The Diakofto–Kalavryta Railway is a historic 750 mm (2 ft 5 ⁄2 in) gauge rack railway in Greece. Located on the northern Peloponnese, it runs 22 km from Diakofto through the Vouraikos Gorge and the old Mega Spilaion Monastery and up to Kalavryta, stopping en route at Zachlorou. The line was built by the Piraeus, Athens and Peloponnese Railways (SPAP). Currently the infrastructure and rolling stock are owned and maintained by Hellenic Railways Organisation (OSE). Passenger trains are operated by TrainOSE. The railway is single line with 750 mm (2 ft 5 ⁄2 in) gauge. It climbs from sea level to 720 m in 22.3 km with a maximum gradient of 17.5%. There are three sections with Abt system rack for a total of 3.8 km. Maximum speed is 40 km/h for adhesion sections and 12 km/h for rack sections. There are bridges over Vouraikos River at many locations and numerous tunnels. Passing loops exist at Niamata, Triklia, Zachlorou and Kerpini. Rolling stock sheds and maintenance facilities are located at Diakofto. Additional facilities existed at Kalavrita station during the steam era but they are no longer in use. The line was to be electrified and EMUs were ordered at Billard, France. Before the
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    Eastern Railway

    Eastern Railway

    The Eastern Railway (ER) is one of the 17 zones of the Indian Railways. Its headquarters is at Fairlie Place, Kolkata, and comprises four divisions: Howrah, Malda, Sealdah, and Asansol. These are the financial departments and each has an assistant divisional financial manager (ADFM), divisional railway manager (DRM), and senior divisional railway manager (Sr.DFM). The name of the division denotes the name of the city where the divisional headquarters is located. It has three major workshops: Jamalpur, Liluah, and Kanchrapara. The Jamalpur Workshop is for wagon repair, periodic overhaul (POH) of diesel locomotives, manufacturing of cranes and tower-wagons; the Liluah workshop is for POH of coaching & freight vehicles and the Kanchrapara workshop is for POH of electric locomotives, EMU Locals and coaches. The East Indian Railway (EIR) Company was incorporated in 1845 to connect East India with Delhi. The first train ran here between Howrah and Hooghly on 15 August 1854. The train left Howrah Station at 08:30 a.m. and reached Hooghly in 91 minutes. The management of the East Indian Railway was taken over by the British Indian government on 1 January 1925. The Eastern Railway was
    5.33
    3 votes
    178
    Jingha railway

    Jingha railway

    The Beijing–Harbin or Jingha Railway (simplified Chinese: 京哈铁路; traditional Chinese: 京哈鐵路; pinyin: Jīnghā Tiělù) is the railway that connects Beijing with Harbin in Heilongjiang Province. It spans 1,249 km (776 mi). It is a very prominent route in the Manchurian Provinces of northeastern China. Construction of the section between Tangshan and Tianjin began in 1881 as the Kaiping Tramway. This section is the second-oldest railway in China and the oldest still in use. (The oldest railway in China was the Woosung Railway in Shanghai, built in 1876 but dismantled and removed to Taiwan the next year.) Later this section was extended west to Beijing and east to Shanhaiguan. It was further extended to the east and reached Mukden (modern Shenyang) in Fengtian province (modern Liaoning) by 1912. The railroad operated under or was known by several names, including: Under the late Qing and during the early Republic, it was administered by and provided much of the revenue for the Ministry of Posts and Communications. It is now administered by the Ministry of Railways for the People's Republic of China. The section from Shenyang to Harbin used to be a part of the South Manchuria branch of the
    5.33
    3 votes
    179
    Eaton Hall Railway

    Eaton Hall Railway

    The Eaton Hall Railway was an early 15 in (381 mm) gauge narrow gauge estate railway built in 1896 at Eaton Hall in Cheshire. It was built for the Duke of Westminster by Sir Arthur Percival Heywood, who had pioneered the fifteen inch (381 mm) gauge with his Duffield Bank Railway, and connected the hall to the GWR station sidings at Balderton on their Shrewsbury to Chester Line, some 3 miles (4.8 km) away. The total length of the line was four and a half miles (7.2 km), with the addition of several branches including one long one to the brick store and estate workshop at Cuckoo's Nest. The track was steel flat-bottomed rail of 16.5 pounds per yard (8.2 kg/m), attached by spring clips to cast iron sleepers, 3 feet (0.91 m) long and 6.5 inches (165 mm) wide, spaced at 2-foot-3-inch (0.69 m) centres. Pointwork was prepared at the workshop in Duffield (for which Heywood charged £7/15s/0d [£7.75] each), and carried to site. The maximum gradient was 1 in 70 (1.43%), Eaton Hall being 51 feet (16 m) above the sidings at Balderton. For much of its length it followed the main driveway and crossed the park, including the major driveways. Therefore the line had to be as unobtrusive as possible
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    Grimsby and Immingham Electric Railway

    Grimsby and Immingham Electric Railway

    The Grimsby & Immingham Electric Railway was an electric tramway linking Grimsby with the port of Immingham in Lincolnshire, England. It is probably best described by the American term "interurban" as it ran on reserved track rather that through the streets. With silting problems occurring at Grimsby, a problem with that site since it was first used by the monks of the local priory, the owners of the docks, the Great Central Railway company were forced to look elsewhere in order to maintain and strengthen their hold on seaborne traffic on the River Humber. The company were looking for a site which could be made accessible at all states of the tide to vessels of up to 6,000 gross registered tons (grt). Taking into account the fact that the deep water channel of the river comes nearest the south bank at Immingham this was chosen as the site for the new deep water dock and estate. Immingham village, and the land purchased for this new venture, were rather inaccessible by road, and the G.C.R. sent a delegation to Bristol and Cardiff, two cities where their docks were situated some distance from the centre, the homes of the workforce. It seemed essential that direct communications
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway

    Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway

    The Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway is a Canadian regional railway that stretches 414 kilometres (257 mi) through the wilderness of northeastern Quebec and western Labrador. It connects Labrador City, Labrador, with the port of Sept-Îles, Quebec, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River. QNSL is owned by the Iron Ore Company of Canada (IOC). Built between 1951 and 1954, the QNSL originally connected the port of Sept-Îles, Québec on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River with the northern terminus at IOC's mining community of Schefferville, Quebec, a distance of 359 miles (578 km). In 1958, the Wabush ore body near Labrador City was opened by both IOC and the Wabush Mining Company. QNSL built a 36-mile (58 km) line to serve these mines, running west from the Sept-Îles, Quebec-Schefferville, Quebec, main line at Emeril Junction, Labrador, to Carole Lake, Labrador, near Wabush, Labrador. Service on this branch began in 1960. At the same time, Wabush Mining Company built the relatively short Wabush Lake Railway from its mines at Labrador City to the QNSL connection at Wabush. QNSL hauls its own traffic from Carol Lake to IOC port facilities at Sept-Îles, Quebec. QNSL
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Sydney Coal Railway

    Sydney Coal Railway

    The Sydney Coal Railway (reporting mark SCR) is a Canadian short-line railway operating in the eastern part of Cape Breton County, Nova Scotia. SCR operates from the international coaling piers on Sydney Harbour in Sydney to the Lingan Generating Station, a coal-fired electrical generating station near New Waterford. The railway's trackage, the piers, and the generating station are owned by Nova Scotia Power, a subsidiary of Emera Inc. The railway line was completed in 1895 by the Dominion Coal Company (DOMCO) between Sydney and Louisbourg. The trackage was organized as the appropriately named Sydney and Louisburg Railway (S&L) in 1910. The S&L, along with other assets of the corporate successor to DOMCO, Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation (DOSCO), were expropriated by the Cape Breton Development Corporation (DEVCO) on March 30, 1968. DEVCO operated the railway as an unincorporated department of its Coal Division, however it was informally known as the Devco Railway. DEVCO built a coal preparation and coal wash plant and storage facility, along with new locomotive shops at Victoria Junction, a location midway between Sydney and the Lingan Generating Station near New Waterford. On
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Wiese Valley Railway

    Wiese Valley Railway

    The Wiese Valley Railway (German: Wiesentalbahn) is a 27.2 km long, electrified main line in Baden-Württemberg in the triangle where Germany, Switzerland and France meet near the Swiss city of Basel. It runs alongside the Wiese River from Basel Badischer Bahnhof in Basel – initially on Swiss territory – to Zell im Wiesental. The line was built as the first private railway in the Grand Duchy of Baden by the Wiese Valley Railway Company (Wiesenthalbahn-Gesellschaft) and opened on 7 June 1862 to Schopfheim with a length of 20 km. It was continued up the valley as the Hintere Wiesenthalbahn (“rear” Wiese Valley Railway) on 5 February 1876 by the Schopfheim-Zell Railway Company (Schopfheim-Zeller Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft). This was followed in 7 July 1889 by a narrow-gauge railway owned by the Baden railway consortium of Herrmann Bachstein, later called the South German Railway Company (Süddeutsche Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft AG), the Zell im Wiesental–Todtnau railway, known as the Upper Wiese Valley Railway (Obere Wiesentalbahn) and also as the Todtnauerli. Because the German Empire demanded that the Grand Duchy of Baden construct an efficient railway from Weil am Rhein to Säckingen for
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Ohio Valley Electric Railway

    Ohio Valley Electric Railway

    The Ohio Valley Electric Railway was a street railway and interurban system that ran between Huntington, West Virginia, and Ashland, Kentucky. The system was also connected by ferry to Ironton, Ohio. The Ohio Valley Electric Railway was organized Sept. 27, 1899, and, backed by Senator Johnson N. Camden, bought out the Consolidated Light and Railway Company of Huntington, the Ashland and Catlettsburg Street Railway, and the Ironton and Petersburg Street Railway. By the fall of 1900, new track connected the West Virginia and Kentucky segments of the line, and the combined properties became known as the Camden Interstate Railway Company. In 1908, the company changed its name back to the Ohio Valley Electric Railway. Street railway operations ceased in 1937.
    5.00
    3 votes
    185
    Alb Valley Railway

    Alb Valley Railway

    The Alb Valley Railway (German: Albtalbahn) is a railway line in southern Germany that runs from Karlsruhe via Ettlingen to Bad Herrenalb with a branch to Ittersbach. The line is owned and operated, as part of the Stadtbahn Karlsruhe, by the Albtal-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft (AVG). The town of Ettlingen had gained a rail connection in 1844 with the opening of the current Ettlingen West station on the Baden Mainline, but the station was far from the town and could not satisfy the needs of its population and industries. Therefore, the town pressed for a short branch line to the centre of the town. Since the Grand Duchy of Baden State Railways was not interested in the construction of the line, the town of Ettlingen requested a permit to build the line itself. On 25 August 1885, the first section of the standard gauge line was opened from Ettlingen West station to Erbprinz and this was followed on 15 July 1887 by the opening of the remaining section to the current Ettlingen Stadt station. The management of this line was transferred to the Grand Duchy of Baden State Railways, which began operating 17 daily passenger trains in each direction. The timetable included both shuttle trains
    5.50
    2 votes
    186
    Daylesford Spa Country Railway

    Daylesford Spa Country Railway

    The Daylesford Spa Country Railway (which is operated by the Central Highlands Tourist Railway) is a volunteer-operated 1,600 mm (5 ft 3 in) broad gauge tourist railway located in Victoria, Australia. It operates on a section of the formerly disused and dismantled Daylesford line. It presently operates between Daylesford and the hamlet of Bullarto, although the section between Musk and Bullarto is currently closed due to bushfire damage sustained in early 2009. The original line was opened in two stages—from the mainline junction at Carlsruhe to the town of Trentham, on 16 February 1880. The remainder of the line was opened a month later on 17 March. The line initially had significant goods and passenger traffic, with 50,000 passengers travelling the line in 1884 alone. However, over the next seventy years, both traffic and the quality of line gradually degraded, until the last passenger service was replaced with a road coach in 1978. The Central Highlands Tourist Railway was founded two years later, and set about restoring the railway to operating condition. After several years of restoration, trolley services commenced to a temporary terminus located in the Wombat State Forest in
    5.50
    2 votes
    187
    Epping Ongar Railway

    Epping Ongar Railway

    The Epping Ongar Railway is a heritage railway run by a team of volunteers in South-West Essex, England. It was the final section of the Great Eastern Railway and London Underground Central Line branch line between Loughton via Epping to Ongar, with intermediate stations at North Weald and Blake Hall. The line was closed by London Underground in 1994 but reopened between 2004 and 2007 as a preserved railway offering a volunteer-run Class 117 DMU service between Ongar and Coopersale. A change of ownership in 2007 led to the line being closed for restoration to a heritage steam railway which reopened on 25 May 2012. The connection to Ongar was made in 1865 by the Eastern Counties/Great Eastern Railway. The eastern section of the line, between Epping and Ongar, was always single track, with one passing loop at North Weald station, and approximately 14 trains each day went as far as the Ongar terminus, with the rest terminating at Epping or Loughton. This remained the case until 1949, when the London Transport Passenger Board's New Works scheme extended the Central Line to Epping using electric trains (taking over the railway from British Railways). The Epping-Ongar branch lost its
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Lynton and Barnstaple Railway

    Lynton and Barnstaple Railway

    The Lynton & Barnstaple Railway (L&B) opened as an independent railway in May 1898. It was a single track narrow gauge railway slightly over 19 miles (31 km) long running through the rugged and picturesque area bordering Exmoor in North Devon, England. Although opened after the 1896 Light Railways Act came into force, it was authorised and constructed prior to that act. Therefore, as with all other railways, it was authorised under its own Act of Parliament and built to higher (and more costly) standards than similar railways of the time. In the United Kingdom it was notable as being the only narrow gauge line required to use main-line standard signalling. For a short period the line earned a modest return for shareholders, but for most of its life the L&B made a loss. In 1922 the L&B was taken over by the Southern Railway, and eventually closed in September 1935. The Lynton & Barnstaple Railway Association was formed in 1979; and a short section was reopened to passengers in 2004. This was extended in 2006; and the following year plans were announced to open nine miles (14 km) of track, linking the station at Woody Bay to both Lynton (at a new terminus on an extension to the
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Orangeville Brampton Railway

    Orangeville Brampton Railway

    The Orangeville-Brampton Railway is a 55-kilometre (34-mile) long short line railway between Orangeville and Streetsville Junction in Mississauga Ontario. It passes through the City of Brampton and the Town of Caledon. At Streetsville, the OBRY connects with the Canadian Pacific Railway Galt Subdivision. At Brampton, it crosses the Canadian National Railway Halton Subdivision at grade, but no interchange traffic is handled. North of Brampton, the railway winds through the Niagara Escarpment, and is notable for a curved,349-metre (1,145-foot) long trestle over the Credit River and Forks of the Credit Road near Belfountain in Caledon. The railway's main purpose is to service several industries in Orangeville and Brampton, but since the fall of 2004, OBRY has operated a public excursion train, marketed as Credit Valley Explorer, between Orangeville and Snelgrove (the northern edge of Brampton). Freight trains, operated by Cando Contracting Limited for OBRY, make weekday round trips (on Tuesdays and Fridays) between Orangeville and Mississauga. Most of the current OBRY route was built in the 1870s by the Credit Valley Railway (CVR), with construction completed to Orangeville (with a
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Eastern Railway

    Eastern Railway

    Eastern Railway was the name given to the railway constructed east of Fremantle, Western Australia, through Perth to Guildford in the period 1879-1881. The first sod of the Fremantle-Guildford Railway was turned by Governor Ord at Guildford on 3 June 1879. The event coincided with the celebration of the 50th Jubilee of settlement of Western Australia.The alignment of the first section of the railway, from Fremantle to Guildford, has remained generally unchanged since it opened on 1 March 1881. The centenary of the railway was celebrated on 1 March 1981 Source: West Australian Government Gazette of 1885, 5 January The First Route was opened on 11 March 1884. The route ascended the escarpment around Greenmount Hill passing through Boya, Darlington, Glen Forrest, Mundaring and Sawyers Valley before turning north to White's Mill. A significant delay in construction was experienced at a site which became popularly known as 'Devil's Terror' - a location between Darlington and Glen Forrest. Clay was struck when a cutting was under construction followed by an underground stream. The resulting flooding turned the clay into a bottomless bog. The rail had to be moved 100 metres south, along
    4.67
    3 votes
    191
    Groudle Glen Railway

    Groudle Glen Railway

    The Groudle Glen Railway is a narrow gauge railway north of Douglas in the Isle of Man which is owned and operated by a small group of enthusiastic volunteers and operates on summer Sundays; May to September and Wednesday evenings in July and August along with a number of annual special events. The line was built in the late Victorian era in response to increasing demand for transportation down Groudle Glen brought on by the introduction of the Manx Electric Railway. The headland was developed, with a zoo being created and the railway being built. The 2 ft (610 mm) gauge line ran from the upper part of the glen, Lhen Coan, to the Zoo at Sea Lion Rocks. The line opened on May 23, 1896 and started with one engine, called Sea Lion, and three coaches. The engine was built by W.G. Bagnall Ltd. of Castle Engine Works, Stafford. The line became so popular that a further engine, Polar Bear, and additional coach stock was purchased. The railway operated very successfully until the outbreak of the First World War when all services ceased and the associated zoo was closed. When the line re-opened the locomotives were overhauled and returned to service but by 1921 they had been replaced with
    4.67
    3 votes
    192
    Swindon and Cricklade Railway

    Swindon and Cricklade Railway

    The Swindon & Cricklade Railway is a heritage railway in Wiltshire, England, that operates on a short section of the old Midland and South Western Junction Railway line between Swindon and Cricklade. The Swindon & Cricklade Railway Preservation Society was set up/formed by a group of Enthusiasts in 1978 to reconstruct and preserve a sole-surviving section of the Midland & South Western Junction Railway that once ran from Andover, Hampshire to Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. The volunteer-operated railway has since built a tale of two railway stations: Hayes Knoll and Blunsdon - the headquarters of the line. Hayes Knoll features a restored signalbox that is operational during special events. The line continues north to South Meadow Lane (a few hundred yards close to a proposed Farfield Lane halt) near Cricklade, and the charity are also extending the line south via Mouldon Hill towards Swindon. Currently, as of September 2012, the S&CR currently operates from South Meadow Lane (close to Farfield Lane nr Cricklade) via Hayes Knoll and Blunsdon to as far as the proposed Taw Valley Halt (close to a nearby Mouldon Hill), at a current total of over 3 miles in length.
    4.67
    3 votes
    193
    Beijing-Shanghai High-Speed Railway

    Beijing-Shanghai High-Speed Railway

    The Beijing–Shanghai High-Speed Railway (or Jinghu High-Speed Railway from its Chinese name) is a 1,318-kilometre (819 mi) long high-speed railway that connects two major economic zones in the People's Republic of China, the Bohai Economic Rim and the Yangtze River Delta. Construction began on April 18, 2008, and a ceremony to mark the completion of track laying was held on November 15, 2010. The line opened to the public for commercial service on June 30, 2011. This rail line is the world's longest high-speed line ever constructed in a single phase. Under former Minister of Railways Liu Zhijun, the railway line was the first one designed for a maximum speed of 380 km/h in commercial operations. The non-stop train from Beijing South to Shanghai Hongqiao was expected to finish the 1,305 kilometres (811 mi) journey in 3 hours and 58 minutes, averaging 329 kilometres per hour (204 mph), making it the fastest scheduled train in the world, compared to 9 hours and 49 minutes on the fastest trains running on the parallel conventional railway. However, following Liu Zhijun's dismissal in February 2011, several major changes were announced. First, trains would be slowed to a maximum speed
    6.00
    1 votes
    194
    Danube Valley Railway

    Danube Valley Railway

    The Danube Valley Railway (German: Donautalbahn; KBS 993) in Bavaria in southern Germany is the railway line that runs from Regensburg via Ingolstadt and Donauwörth to Ulm, just over the Bavarian border in Baden-Württemberg. The section between Regensburg and Ingolstadt was also listed as timetable route no. KBS 992. In 1967 this section of the line was route no. KBS 412 and the Ingolstadt–Neuoffingen section was no. 411e. Neuoffingen–Ulm was included in the timetable as no. 410 Augsburg–Ulm. The construction of the Regensburg–Ingolstadt railway was originally carried out primarily for military reasons. On 29 April 1869 the law for its construction was passed; the official opening took place on 1 June 1874. The precise route was initially contested. The towns of Kelheim and Abensberg both wanted a direct railway link. The Kelheim option would have involved the construction of an expensive tunnel; as a result of which Abensberg eventually won the day. As compensation a 5.5 km long stub line was built between Saal and Kelheim, that was ceremoniously opened on15 February 1875. Passenger services on this branch were withdrawn in 1986. The line between Regensburg and Ingolstadt is
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    Midland railway line, Perth

    Midland railway line, Perth

    Midland Line is a suburban railway line in Perth, Western Australia. It runs through Perth's eastern suburbs and connects Perth and Midland. The line was a part of the first suburban railway line in Perth, opening on 1 March 1881. It originally operated as the Eastern Railway and ran between Fremantle and Guildford passing through Perth. Throughout the 1880s, the Eastern Railway line was extended beyond Guildford and Midland Junction along its first route to Chidlow and Northam. The second route varied after Bellevue proceeding to Chidlow. The third route saw the removal of the Bellevue Railway station in its construction, with the new Midland railway terminus replacing the older Midland Junction railway station. An anomaly of the Midland line timetables in the 1950s and 1960s was that Bellevue was nominally the terminus of the line until 1962. Koongamia, which was a new station prior to Greenmount on the original first route, was the terminus from 1962 to 1966. In 1966, the stations on the first two Eastern Railway routes as well as the old Midland Junction railway station were closed and the new Midland was constructed 200 metres to the west and became the new
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Peninsular Railway

    Peninsular Railway

    The Peninsular Railway was an interurban electrified railway in the U.S. State of California in the United States of America. It served the area between San Jose, Los Gatos, and Palo Alto, comprising much of what is today known as "Silicon Valley". For much of its existence it was a subsidiary of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The Peninsular Railway was incorporated in January 1906 as a subsidiary of the Southern Pacific in response to calls for an interurban line from San Francisco to San Jose. In addition to the line to Los Gatos, branches were also planned to extend to Alviso, Oakland and Lick Observatory. However, due to the Colorado River flood of 1905 (which created the Salton Sea), many of the rails to be used for this construction had to be rushed to the Imperial Valley to rebuild the Southern Pacific line between Los Angeles and Yuma, Arizona. Therefore, only the lines connecting San Jose, Palo Alto and Los Gatos were constructed, and interurban service did not exist between Palo Alto and San Mateo. Another attempt to complete this line came in the next decade, but construction was again delayed by a scarcity of steel rails, this time due to World War I. By 1920, the
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Public Service Railway

    Public Service Railway

    The Public Service Railway, owned by the Public Service Corporation of New Jersey, operated most of the streetcar lines in New Jersey by the early 20th century. Public Service lines stretched from northeast New Jersey to Trenton, and then south to Camden and its suburbs. Major parts of the system were: For many years, the only streetcar route still in operation was the #7 line, in the form of the Newark City Subway. The #7 at the turn of the 21st century underwent a line rehabilitation including new modern light rail cars, and was extended northward into Bloomfield. Additionally, a portion of an old NCS spur tunnel to the abandoned Cedar Street Subway (#13-Broad St., #27-Mt. Prospect, and #43-Jersey City), another Public Service trolley conduit, has been rehabilitated and opened for service in 2006 as another portion of the subway, to serve as a connection between Newark's two train stations and provide access to the Performing Arts Center, Newark Bears Stadium, Washington Park and the Newark Public Library. The other two light rail systems in New Jersey Hudson Bergen Light Rail and River Line are built along freight railroad rights-of-way and public streets, and do not date back
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Rhyl Miniature Railway

    Rhyl Miniature Railway

    The Rhyl Miniature Railway (Welsh: Rheilffordd Fach y Rhyl) is a  15 in (381 mm) gauge miniature railway line located in Rhyl on the North Wales Coast. The line runs in a circle around a boating lake near the promenade, to the west of the town centre. The railway is operated by Rhyl Steam Preservation Trust a Registered charity. The railway has a long association with one type of locomotive, a class of six one-third scale 4-4-2 tender engines built by Albert Barnes & Co of Rhyl. The Rolling stock on the RMR (Rhyl Miniature Railway) Includes 8 "Cars De luxe", 2 small carriages, 2 Cagney carriages, and various other non passenger stock. This Room holds Billy, Display boards, a Hands on interactive signalling feature and an interactive touch screen computer. Work on the railway began in December 1910 when it was surveyed by Henry Greenly, to whom permission was given to start work in March 1911, and the railway opened to the public on 1 May 1911. The railway proved to be a great success in its first year. The railway was originally operated using a single Bassett-Lowke Class 10 Atlantic and 6 Bassett-Lowke carriages. In 1913 it was decided to buy a second Class 10 and the "cars de
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Royal Deeside Railway

    Royal Deeside Railway

    The Royal Deeside Railway was formed in 1996 with the intention of reclaiming part of the former branch line from Aberdeen to Ballater, constructed between 1853 and 1856 by the Deeside Railway company and closed by British Railways in 1966. Work is underway to reinstate the railway between Banchory and Milton of Crathes, with a new station under construction at Milton of Crathes and one mile of track laid towards Banchory. The railway offers a passenger train service over 1 mile of track from Milton of Crathes to Birkenbaud Crossing. The first steam-hauled passenger services were operated during 2010. The Royal Deeside Railway is one of the members of the Ferryhill Railway Trust who are aiming to restore the former Caledonian Railway engine shed at Aberdeen Ferryhill, next to the Duthie Park in Aberdeen. Aberdeen City Council, owners of the shed, have now leased the site to the trust allowing them to proceed with making plans for the restoration of the building. It is hoped to establish a railway heritage centre and workshop facility using the building and surrounding land once major restoration work on the building is carried out. Some of the vintage carriage collection owned by
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Salekhard–Igarka Railway

    Salekhard–Igarka Railway

    The 1,524 mm (5 ft)  broad gauge Salekhard–Igarka Railway, (Трансполярная магистраль, Transpolyarnaya Magistral - "Transpolar Mainline") also referred to variously as Railroad of Death, Road of Death, and Dead Road, is an incomplete railway in northern Siberia. The railway was a project of the Soviet Gulag system that took place from 1947 to 1953. Construction was coordinated via two separate Gulag projects, the 501 Railroad beginning on the River Ob and 503 Railroad beginning on the River Yenisey, part of a grand design of Joseph Stalin to span a railroad across northern Siberia to reach the Soviet Union's easternmost territories. The planned route from Igarka to Salekhard measured 806 miles (1,297 km) in length. The project was built mostly with prisoner labour, particularly that of political prisoners, and thousands perished. A rebuilt section of the railway between Novy Urengoy and Stary Nadym is still in operation, as is the extreme western section connecting Labytnangi and the railway to Vorkuta. The section from Salekhard and Nadym is planned to be rebuilt, including a new bridge over the Ob to connect Salekhard to the rest of the Russian railway system via Labytnangi. The
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Sheffield District Railway

    Sheffield District Railway

    The Sheffield District Railway was a railway line in South Yorkshire, England with its main line running between Brightside Junction, on the Midland Railway's Sheffield to Rotherham line, and Treeton Junction, on the same company's Rotherham to Chesterfield line (The Old Road). The Sheffield and District's main line was 4.5 miles (7 km) long and had two stations, Tinsley Road, which was later was renamed West Tinsley and Catcliffe. Building of the line started on 20 November 1896 when the Duke of Norfolk cut the first sod. The line was opened on 20 May 1900 by the Duke of Portland. The line was operated by the Great Central Railway (GCR) although it had no physical connection with any other part of its system, running powers over other companies' metals being used to reach the line and its facilities. It was integrated into the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) in 1923. The company had two short spurs; firstly from the Midland Railway's line at Grimesthorpe Junction to its own goods yard in East Coast Road and secondly to a large goods warehouse and yard adjacent to West Tinsley station. This warehouse was reached by a fairly steep incline as the warehouse was at road level.
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    South Durham & Lancashire Union Railway

    South Durham & Lancashire Union Railway

    The South Durham & Lancashire Union Railway (SD&LUR), also known as the Stainmore Railway, is a former railway line linking the Stockton & Darlington Railway near Bishop Auckland with the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway (the West Coast Main Line) at Tebay, via Barnard Castle, Stainmore Summit & Kirkby Stephen. A short section of the line at Kirkby Stephen East station has been restored by the Stainmore Railway Company. Stations along the route were: Junctions were made at Barnard Castle, with lines to Darlington and Middleton-in-Teesdale, and at Kirkby Stephen with the Eden Valley Railway to Penrith. The line was also noted for its viaducts. These were (from the east):
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Tokyo Subway

    Tokyo Subway

    The Tokyo subway (東京の地下鉄, Tōkyō no chikatetsu) is an integral part of the world's most extensive rapid transit system in a single metropolitan area, Greater Tokyo. While the subway system itself is largely within the city center, the lines extend far out via extensive through services onto suburban railway lines. As of June 2008, the entire network of Tokyo Metro and Toei has 274 stations and 13 lines. The Tokyo Metro and Toei networks together carry a combined average of over eight million passengers daily. Despite being ranked first in worldwide subway usage, subways make up a small fraction of heavy rail rapid transit in Tokyo alone—only 274 out of 882 railway stations, as of 2007. The Tokyo subway at 8.7 million daily passengers only represents 22% of Tokyo's 40 million daily rail passengers (see Transport in Greater Tokyo). There are two primary subway operators in Tokyo: In addition, but not formally designated as subways: The Yamanote Line and the Chūō-Sōbu Line are not subway lines, but above-ground busy commuter lines which operate with metro-like frequencies and trains owned by JR East. They act as key transportation arteries in central Tokyo, and are often marked on
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Tokyu Ikegami Line

    Tokyu Ikegami Line

    The Tōkyū Ikegami Line (東急池上線, Tōkyū Ikegami-sen) is a railway line operated by Tokyu Corporation. It runs through Tokyo, extending from Gotanda Station in Shinagawa to Kamata Station in Ōta. New 3-car 7000 series EMUs were introduced in December 2007, with a total of 19 sets due to be delivered by 2011. The line first opened on 6 October 1922 as a 1.8 km line between Kamata and Ikegami. On 4 May 1923, this was extended 3.7 km from Ikegami to Yukigaya. The line voltage was raised from 600 V to 1,500 V DC from 10 August 1957. The 3000 series trains were withdrawn on 18 March 1989. On 19 March 1989, Ebara-Nakanobu Station was moved underground. From 16 March 1998, wanman driver-only operation commenced on the line.
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Hull–Chelsea–Wakefield Railway

    Hull–Chelsea–Wakefield Railway

    The Hull–Chelsea–Wakefield Railway is a 33 km (20.5 mi) heritage railway in Quebec, Canada, running tourist trains through the scenic Gatineau Hills and beside the Gatineau River between Hull (part of the city of Gatineau) and the tourist town of Wakefield (part of La Pêche municipality) from May to October, using a 1907 Swedish steam locomotive and 1940s-built Swedish passenger cars. On average, the railway attracts about 50 000 tourists and generates revenues of about $8 million for the region. The railway line has been plagued in recent years with repeated damage to the track bed caused by severe storms. Some sections of the track run through steep terrain and along the bank of the Gatineau River, making it susceptible to such washouts. In 2007, a disagreement erupted between the owner of the steam train line and the municipality of Chelsea and city of Gatineau over the railway safety and maintenance. In July, a rain storm caused damage to some parts of the railway. The owner of the steam train mentioned that without funding from the cities, he would have to cease the operations of the line and sell the steam train. In November, an agreement was made when the province of Quebec
    5.00
    2 votes
    206
    Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway

    Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway

    The Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway is a water-powered funicular railway joining the twin towns of Lynton and Lynmouth on the rugged coast of North Devon. The high cliffs separating the two towns (then villages) were a major obstacle to economic development in the 19th century. Because of the remoteness of the area, and rugged geography, villagers had to rely on the sea for most deliveries of coal, lime, foodstuffs and other essentials, which had then to be carried by packhorses and carts up the steep hill to Lynton. The cliffs also posed problems for the burgeoning tourist industry. Holiday makers began to arrive at Lynmouth on paddle steamers from Bristol, Swansea and other Bristol Channel ports, from about 1820. Ponies, donkeys and carriages were available for hire, but the steep gradients led to the animals having only short working lives. The first proposals for a rail-based lift, able to carry passengers and goods, were made in 1881, although this first scheme was to have been steam powered. The water-powered railway was designed by George Croydon Marks (later Baron Marks of Woolwich), and paid for mainly by his business partner, the publisher Sir George Newnes. Newnes, who
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    Kolkata Suburban Railway

    Kolkata Suburban Railway

    The Kolkata Suburban Railway is a suburban rail system for the suburbs surrounding the city of Kolkata. Railways such as this are important and heavily-used infrastructure in India. The suburban railway services in Kolkata are operated by Eastern Railway (ER) and South Eastern Railway (SER). The Kolkata Metro Railway operates the underground Metro services in the city as well. There is a separate Circular Railway corridor in the city also operated by ER. Operated by the South Eastern Railway, this section of the line serves the south western suburbs of Greater Kolkata. The destination stations lie : Operated by the Howrah division of Eastern Railways, this line runs on the western bank of river Hooghly and serves the following areas: Howrah to Bardhaman is reached by two corridors popularly known as the Main Line and the Chord Line. The main Line runs through the towns of Serampore, Chandernagore, Chinsurah and Bandel. The Chord Line runs through the towns of Dankuni, Baruipara, Kamarkundu and Massagram. Howrah, Tikiapara, Dasnagar, Ramrajatala, Santragachi At Santragachi, the line splits up into three sections : Santragachi, Bankranayabaz, Baltikuri, Kona, Dansi, Jhalurberi,
    4.50
    2 votes
    208
    Vancouver Downtown Historic Railway

    Vancouver Downtown Historic Railway

    The Vancouver Downtown Historic Railway is a heritage streetcar line that operates between Granville Island and the Cambie Station (north of 6th Ave just east of Ash Street) in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It operates only on weekends and holidays, usually from May to mid-October, and is aimed primarily at tourists. Two restored interurban streetcars are used on the line, which used a former freight railway right-of-way. The line is owned by the City of Vancouver. The cars are operated by volunteers from the Transit Museum Society. The car shown (1207) is privately owned. Service was inaugurated on July 29, 1998, and was considered to be a demonstration project for a modern downtown streetcar system that the city plans to develop. It continued to operate almost every summer since then, as an excursion-oriented historic streetcar line. However, as of summer 2012, service has been suspended indefinitely due to financial constraints. When last fully operational, the line ran from Granville Island to a stop near Science World and Main Street-Science World SkyTrain station. Since then, however, Olympic related construction has razed sections of the line east of the Olympic
    4.50
    2 votes
    209
    Brighton and Rottingdean Seashore Electric Railway

    Brighton and Rottingdean Seashore Electric Railway

    The Brighton and Rottingdean Seashore Electric Railway was a unique coastline railway in Brighton, England that ran through the shallow waters of the English Channel between 1896 and 1901. Magnus Volk, its owner, designer and engineer, had already been successful with the more conventional Volk's Electric Railway, which had then not been extended east of Paston Place. Facing unfavourable geography, Volk decided to construct a line through the surf from a pier at Paston Place to one at Rottingdean. This was also home to Volk's Seaplane Station which was used by his son George Herbert Volk. The railway itself consisted of two parallel 2 ft 8 ⁄2 in (825 mm) gauge tracks, billed as 18 ft (5.5 m) gauge, the measurement between the outermost rails. The tracks were laid on concrete sleepers mortised into the bedrock. The single car used on the railway was a 45 by 22 ft (13.7 by 6.7 m) pier-like building which stood on four 23 ft (7.0 m)-long legs. The car weighed 45 long tons (50 ST; 46 t). Propulsion was by electric motor. It was officially named Pioneer, but many called it Daddy Long-Legs. Due to regulations then in place, a qualified sea captain was on board at all times, and the car
    5.00
    1 votes
    210
    Cairn Valley Light Railway

    Cairn Valley Light Railway

    The Cairn Valley Light Railway was built under the regulations of the Light Railways Act 1896 and was opened on 1 March 1905. It connected the market town of Dumfries in south-west Scotland to the village of Moniaive in Dumfriesshire at the end of the Cairn Valley. The line was 17.5 miles (28.2 km) long and had stations at Irongray, Newtonairds, Stepford, Dunscore, Crossford and Kirkland. It was built by the Glasgow and South Western Railway as a subsidiary company. The line was single throughout with passing loops and some goods sidings. Plans had involved developing Moniaive into a resort, the countryside being very scenic and peaceful, but apart from the construction of a few outlying hotels little progress was made. Trains travelled on the Glasgow, Dumfries and Carlisle Railway for the last mile into Dumfries. The line was operated by a series of elderly express locomotives, often pulling a single coach; and also steam railmotors,which were not very successful,being noisy and poorly sprung. Eventually the railcar steam engine and the coach were separated,but this was a failure as well in service on this line. Traffic was never heavy, with between two and four trains per day in
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
    Cork, Bandon and South Coast Railway

    Cork, Bandon and South Coast Railway

    Cork, Bandon and South Coast Railway (CB&SCR), was an Irish gauge (1,600 mm (5 ft 3 in)) railway in Ireland. It opened in 1849 as the Cork and Bandon Railway, changed its name to Cork Bandon and South Coast Railway in 1888 and became part of the Great Southern Railway in 1924. The CB&SCR served the south coast of County Cork between Cork and Bantry. It had a route length of 94 miles (151 km), all of it single track. Many road car routes connected with the line, including the route from Bantry to Killarney. The Chetwynd Viaduct carried the line over a valley and the main Bandon road (now the N71) about 2 miles (3 km) southwest of Cork city. It was designed by Charles Nixon (a former pupil of I.K. Brunel) and built between 1849 and 1851 by Fox, Henderson and Co, which also built the Crystal Palace in London. It was in regular use until the line was closed in 1961, though during the dismantling of the line occasional 'recovery' trains passed over the bridge, until at least 1965. The viaduct is 91 feet (28 m) high, has four 110 feet (34 m) spans, each span composed of four cast iron arched ribs, carried on masonry piers 20 feet (6 m) thick and 30 feet (9 m) wide. The overall span
    5.00
    1 votes
    212
    Dublin and South Eastern Railway

    Dublin and South Eastern Railway

    The Dublin and South Eastern Railway (DSE) was an Irish gauge (1,600 mm (5 ft 3 in)) railway in Ireland from 1846 to 1925. It was incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1846 as the "Waterford, Wexford, Wicklow and Dublin Railway Company". In 1860 it was renamed the "Dublin, Wicklow and Wexford Railway Company" and on 31 December 1906 it was renamed again as the DSE. Amongst the lines forming the DSE was the Dublin and Kingstown Railway, which was authorised in 1831 and opened in 1834 – the first public railway in Ireland. The Kingstown – Dalkey section was operated by atmospheric traction for a short while. The railway formed part of the Royal Mail route between London and Dublin via Dun Laoghaire railway station at Kingstown (now Dún Laoghaire). One DSE steam locomotive is preserved: a 2-6-0 goods locomotive No. 15 (later Great Southern Railways No. 461) owned by the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland at Whitehead, County Antrim. The DSE had two main stations in Dublin on separate lines: Westland Row (renamed after Padraig Pearse in 1966) and a terminus at Harcourt Street. Apart from the main line to Wexford there were also branches to Shillelagh and Waterford. Sections were
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    Franconian Saale Valley Railway

    Franconian Saale Valley Railway

    The Franconian Saale Valley Railway (Fränkische Saaletalbahn) is a 55 kilometre long, single-tracked, railway line in the northern part of the province of Lower Franconia in Bavaria, Germany. It runs from Gemünden (Main) via Bad Kissingen to Ebenhausen and follows, for most of the way, the Franconian Saale (Fränkische Saale) river. The Saale Valley Railway leaves Gemünden (Main) initially in a northerly direction on the line to Jossa, part of the old Flieden–Gemünden railway, before it branches off to the east after 1.3 km to follow the Saale Valley. It runs along the Franconian Saale from Gemünden until just short of Euerdorf, the river being almost always within view. As a result the line often describes long curves as it runs through the mixed and pine forests of the greenbelt recreation region and out over the open countryside with good views. Beyond Euerdorf it leaves the valley floor in order to reach the higher-lying station at Bad Kissingen and the old section of line from Ebenhausen to Bad Kissingen. The Saale Valley Railway begins in Gemünden am Main, where it branches away from the double-tracked, electrified main line from Würzburg to Aschaffenburg (the Main-Spessart
    5.00
    1 votes
    214
    North and South Railway

    North and South Railway

    The North and South Railway (N&S), now defunct, was an American railroad planned for construction between Casper, Wyoming and Miles City, Montana, via Sheridan, Wyoming. Though substantial portions of the railroad's grade were completed in 1923, only the far southern end of the line was ever completed, and that trackage was abandoned in 1935. During the first years of the twentieth century, residents of north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana advanced multiple proposals for the construction of a new railway line between Sheridan and Miles City. The proposed route, which generally followed the course of the Tongue River, would access the vast and remote ranching country between the two towns, and would provide Sheridan with a second railway outlet to the east. (The city was already served by a main line of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad.) The N&S line to Salt Creek operated only until 1935, when it was abandoned. Substantial evidence of the old railroad grade remains visible today, in both Wyoming and Montana. Interestingly, the never-completed alignment of the N&S in Montana continues to receive attention as a possible rail corridor today – this time by the
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Tokyu Oimachi Line

    Tokyu Oimachi Line

    The Tōkyū Ōimachi Line (東急大井町線, Tōkyū Ōimachi-sen) is a railway line in Japan operated by the private railway operator Tokyu Corporation. It extends from Ōimachi in Shinagawa, Tokyo to Mizonokuchi in Kawasaki, Kanagawa. Local trains are classified as blue and green. The latter runs on the express track between Futako-Tamagawa and Mizonokuchi and does not stop at Futako-Shinchi or Takatsu.
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Boston Elevated Railway

    Boston Elevated Railway

    The Boston Elevated Railway (BERy) was a precursor first to the Metropolitan Transit Authority in Massachusetts, now the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, operating rapid transit, streetcars and buses in the Boston, Massachusetts area. It was formerly known as the West End Street Railway. The rapid transit lines have evolved into the Red, Blue and Orange Lines. The only streetcars that remain are the various branches of the Green Line and the Ashmont-Mattapan High Speed Line; the rest have been converted to buses. The Boston Elevated Railway operated in the following cities and towns: Additionally, streetcars from adjoining towns, run by other companies, operated over Boston Elevated Railway trackage. Originally intended to build a short electric trolley line to Brookline, the West End Street Railway was organized in 1887. By the next year it had consolidated ownership of a number of horse-drawn streetcar lines, composing a fleet of 7816 horses and 1480 rail vehicles. As the system grew, a switch to underground pulled-cable propulsion (modeled after the San Francisco cable cars) was contemplated. After visiting Frank Sprague and witnessing the Richmond, Virginia system in
    4.00
    2 votes
    217
    Cincinnati Street Railway

    Cincinnati Street Railway

    Cincinnati Street Railway was the public transit operator in Cincinnati, Ohio, from 1859 to 1952. The company ceased streetcar operations and was renamed Cincinnati Transit Commission. The company was founded in 1859 and was one of several operators. The Cincinnati Consolidated Railway merged with CSR in 1880: Some of the city's streetcars were sold to the Toronto Transit Commission upon abandonment. The company began subway construction from 1920 to 1925, but the route was abandoned due to lack of money.
    4.00
    1 votes
    218
    Corris Railway

    Corris Railway

    The Corris Railway (Welsh: Rheilffordd Corris) is a narrow gauge preserved railway based in Corris on the border between Merionethshire (now Gwynedd) and Montgomeryshire (now Powys) in Mid-Wales. The line opened in 1859, and originally ran from Machynlleth north to Corris and on to Aberllefenni. Branches served the slate quarries at Corris Uchaf, Aberllefenni, the isolated quarries around Ratgoed and quarries along the length of the Dulas Valley. The railway closed in 1948, but a preservation society was formed in 1966, initially opening a museum; a short section of line between Corris and Maespoeth was re-opened to passengers in 2002. The railway now operates as a tourist attraction. A new steam locomotive was built for the railway, which was delivered in 2005. The two surviving locomotives, plus some of the original rolling stock, are preserved on the nearby Talyllyn Railway. The gauge of the railway is 2 ft 3 in (686 mm). Proposals to construct a line to connect the slate quarries in the district around Corris, Corris Uchaf and Aberllefenni with wharves on the estuary of the Afon Dyfi at Derwenlas and Morben, south-west of Machynlleth, first appeared around 1850 with Arthur
    4.00
    1 votes
    219
    Jingjiu Railway

    Jingjiu Railway

    The Beijing-Jiujiang-Kowloon Railway, also known as the Jingjiu Railway (simplified Chinese: 京九铁路 or 京九线; traditional Chinese: 京九鐵路 or 京九線; pinyin: Jīngjiŭ tiĕlù or Jīngjiŭ Xiàn) is a railway in the China connecting Beijing West Station in Beijing to Shenzhen Station in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province. It then follows the rail-link between Shenzhen to the special administrative region of Hong Kong to Hung Hom Station (Kowloon Station) in Kowloon. It is a dual-track railway. Construction began in February 1993. It was opened in 1996, connecting Beijing and Kowloon through Tianjin, Hebei, Shandong, Henan, Anhui, Hubei, Jiangxi and Guangdong, with a length of 2,397 kilometres. It has 790 bridges and 160 tunnels. The Jiujiang Yangtze River Bridge, at a length of 7,679 metres, is the longest across the Yangtze River. Located between Jinghu Railway (Beijing-Shanghai) and Jingguang Railway (Beijing-Guangzhou), it was built to alleviate the congested Jingguang Railway, and to foster development in the areas to the east of Jingguang Railway. The idea had been proposed for a long time, and some of the sections, such as the Jiujiang Yangtze River Bridge, were built before construction of the
    4.00
    1 votes
    220
    Leadhills and Wanlockhead Railway

    Leadhills and Wanlockhead Railway

    The Leadhills and Wanlockhead Railway, a 2 ft  (610 mm) gauge railway in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, is laid on the trackbed of the former Leadhills and Wanlockhead Branch of the Caledonian Railway which led off the main line between Carlisle and Glasgow at Elvanfoot. The "preserved" section runs from Leadhills for about 1 kilometre (0.6 mi) towards Wanlockhead and is the highest adhesion railway in the UK. The rack and pinion Snowdon Mountain Railway is higher. Trains are currently diesel worked with the locomotive propelling the train up hill away from Leadhills. The original railway closed in the late 1930s shortly after the mines in Wanlockhead had closed. The railway currently stops at the border of South Lanarkshire and Dumfries and Galloway. Trains operate on the push-pull principle as there is no run round loop facilities at the end of the run. Movements within the main station site at Leadhills are controlled from the reconstructed signal box which contains the original lever frame from Arrochar and Tarbet signal box. Most locomotives are fitted with air brakes to allow them to operate passenger trains. The railway maintains four, air braked, coaches for use on its
    4.00
    1 votes
    221
    Narita Rapid Railway

    Narita Rapid Railway

    The Keisei Narita Airport Line (京成成田空港線, Keisei-Narita-Kūkō-sen) is a Japanese railway line running between Keisei-Takasago Station and Narita Airport Station. The entire route from Keisei Ueno Station, including the Keisei Main Line as far as Keisei-Takasago, is branded Narita Sky Access (成田スカイアクセス, Narita-sukai-akusesu). The whole line is operated by Keisei Electric Railway, while some parts of the line are operated by other companies as well, such as Hokuso Railway. The new line is used by Skyliner services operating at up to 160 km/h using new Keisei AE series EMUs. The project involved the refurbishment of 32.3 km of existing track on the Hokusō Line, as well as the construction of 19.1 km of new track to Narita Airport, partly using disused rights-of-way originally planned for the cancelled Narita Shinkansen project. The total cost, according to the Narita Rapid Rail Access website, was estimated to be ¥126 billion, or about US$1.3 billion. Trains also utilize the Keisei Electric Railway's Main Line between Keisei Ueno and Keisei-Takasago. Trains run at a maximum speed of 160 km/h, thus completing the run from Nippori to Airport Terminal 2 in a minimum of 36 minutes, 15
    4.00
    1 votes
    222
    Phoenix Street Railway

    Phoenix Street Railway

    The Phoenix Street Railway provided streetcar service in Phoenix, Arizona, from 1887 to 1948. The motto was, "Ride a Mile and Smile the While." The line was originally founded in 1887 by Moses Hazeltine Sherman and used horse-drawn carts. Beginning in 1893, however, the railway was completely electrified. The line was popular with the locals and was partly responsible for the growth patterns observed in the early history of Phoenix. In 1911, the first of several planned interurban lines opened to Glendale; additional lines were planned but never built to Tempe, Mesa, and Scottsdale. The system reached its height in the 1920s with several line extensions. In 1925 there were 33.6 miles of track on six lines. A potential competitor, the Salt River Valley Electric Railway, in 1912 hired engineers to build lines east from downtown Phoenix to Mesa via Tempe and Scottsdale, and a Southside line, to run from Phoenix to Tempe on the south side of the Salt River. The Salt River company later announced its lines would "connect Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa, Chandler, Alhambra, Glendale and Peoria." However, other than some digging on Van Buren and Monroe Streets, the line never managed to
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Rur Valley railway

    Rur Valley railway

    Rurtalbahn (German for "Rur Valley Railway") is a railway company servicing the Rur valley from Linnich to Heimbach. Its major hub is Düren, from where two train lines run to the two destinations. Rurtalbahn GmbH is owned by R.A.T.H GmbH (74.9%) and Dürener Kreisbahn (25.1%). It was outsourced from Dürener Kreisbahn in 2003, who had formerly promoted their railway network as Rurtalbahn. Dürener Kreisbahn had operated the two train lines since 1993 (however with the line to Linnich being shorter - trains only went to Jülich). On weekends, Rurtalbahn runs several tourist trains in the Eifel area such as the BördeExpress. Rurtalbahn has a stake of 50% in the recently founded VIAS GmbH, a railway company servicing the Frankfurt area. In the Düren area, Rurtalbahn runs its trainlines on behalf of Aachener Verkehrsverbund (AVV), the Bördeexpress is run on behalf of IG Rurtalbahn. Rurtalbahn is also expanding its freight branch.
    4.00
    1 votes
    224
    Scarborough North Bay Railway

    Scarborough North Bay Railway

    North Bay Railway (NBR) is a miniature railway in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England. It was built in 1931, to the gauge of  20 in (508 mm), and runs for approximately ⁄8 miles (1.4 km) between Peasholm Park and Scalby Mills in the North Bay area of the town. The opening ceremony took place at 2 p.m. on Saturday 23 May 1931. The locomotive, Neptune, was officially handed over by the Chairman of the North Side Development Committee, Alderman Whitehead, to the Mayor of Scarborough, Alderman J.W. Butler, for the Entertainments Department. Alderman Whitehead made a short presentation speech: "On behalf of the National Union of Drivers, Engineers and others, I have to present you, the first driver of the North Bay Railway Engine, with your insignia of office, your oil can and your 'sweat rag'." The mayor was presented with a peaked cap, an oil can (adorned with a blue ribbon), and a rag, before driving the train from Peasholm Station non-stop to Scalby Mills, at which point the engine was transferred to the other end of the train for the return journey. The four locomotives are of common vintage and were constructed in the same works. The first two belong to Scarborough Borough
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Willans Hill Miniature Railway

    Willans Hill Miniature Railway

    Willans Hill Model Railway is located in Wagga Wagga Botanic Gardens in the suburb of Turvey Park in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia. The railway was established in 1982. It is operated by the Wagga Wagga Society of Model Engineers. It includes 2 kilometres of track, two stations, several buildings, bridges, tunnels and a number of locomotives owned by the club or individual members. The railway is open to the public on the 1st and 3rd Sundays of each month. Each ride is A$2.00. Covered footwear is essential for rides. Opening times 10.30am to 4.30pm with a lunch break between 12.30pm and 1.30pm. An annual Invitational Run happens on the 1st weekend of November. Miniature trains from all over Australia converge here for two days of train running. Traditionally, the Saturday is for club members only and the Sunday event is open to the public. The first 24 hour run, called Railway for Life, was held 15-16 September 2007 in aid of the Cancer Council. There are currently two routes in use. The main line which is a shorter route that runs within the boundaries of the botanical gardens itself and the museum line which takes the trains under Lord Baden Powell Drive over to the
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Alberni Pacific Railway

    Alberni Pacific Railway

    The Alberni Pacific Railway is a heritage railway originating in Port Alberni, British Columbia. The railway is powered by a 1929 Baldwin steam locomotive departing from the 1912 CPR Station. It uses rebuilt cabooses as passenger cars. The 35 minute excursions go to the McLean Mill National Historic Site.
    0.00
    0 votes
    227
    Bentley and Bordon Light Railway

    Bentley and Bordon Light Railway

    The Bordon Light Railway was a short-lived light railway line in Hampshire that connected the Army Camp at Bordon, as well as the villages of Bordon and Kingsley, with the national rail network at Bentley on the main Farnham-Alton line, a distance of 4.5 miles (7.2 km). Following the end of the Boer War, a number of military camps were established to accommodate the returning soldiers. Amongst these featured "Bordon Camp" which was built on agricultural land near the village of Bordon 4½ miles to the south of Bentley station, and "Longmoor Camp" 4½ miles further south near the village of Whitehill. Two battalions were assigned to Longmoor where they were housed in corrugated huts constructed on soft ground. This led to complaints from the soldiers and in 1903 it was decided to move them and the huts to Bordon Camp. To save costs, a temporary primitive railway line with a 18 in (457 mm) gauge was laid to Bordon to facilitate the move. The increased military presence at Bordon coupled with its proximity to the national rail network at Bentley led to an application being made on 6 October 1902 for a light railway order under the Light Railways Act 1896 authorising a standard gauge
    0.00
    0 votes
    228
    Cavan and Leitrim Railway

    Cavan and Leitrim Railway

    The Cavan & Leitrim Railway was a narrow-gauge railway in the counties of Leitrim and Cavan in the north-west of Ireland, which ran from 1887 until 1959. Unusually for Ireland, this 914mm (3ft)-gauge line survived on coal traffic, from the mine at Arigna. It outlived most of the other Irish narrow-gauge lines, giving a further lease of life to some of their redundant engines. In September 1883, a public meeting in Ballinamore declared that a light railway and tramway would open up the coal and iron districts of Arigna and Lough Allen. The Cavan and Leitrim Railway opened for goods traffic on 17 October 1887 and for passengers on 24 October 1887. The section from Belturbet in County Cavan to Dromod in County Leitrim was light railway, and a tramway ran from Ballinamore to Arigna. At the start both lines were operated by eight Robert Stephenson and Company 4-4-0T locomotives. In later years locomotives from other closing narrow gauge lines were used. Ballinamore was the hub of the line, with the locomotive depot and works. At Belturbet the line connected with the Great Northern Railway (Ireland) broad-gauge branch to Ballyhaise on the Clones to Cavan line, and at Dromod connected to
    0.00
    0 votes
    229
    Chattenden and Upnor Railway

    Chattenden and Upnor Railway

    The Chattenden and Upnor Railway (later known as the Lodge Hill and Upnor Railway) was a narrow gauge railway serving the military barracks and depot at Upnor and associated munitions and training depots. It was built in 1873 as a 18 in (457 mm) gauge railway, converted to 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) gauge around 1885 and continued in use until 1961. The Chattenden and Upnor Railway was originally laid in 1873 to 18 in (457 mm) gauge, as a training exercise for the Royal School of Military Engineering which was then based at Chattenden. The line ran from Pontoon Hard by the River Medway and climbed steeply towards Chattenden. A spur lead from Church Crossing to the Upnor Depot of the Royal Engineers and until 1895 a branch ran from Chattenden to Hoo. In 1885 the railway was relaid and converted to 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) gauge by the 8th. Railway Company of the Royal Engineers who managed the line. In 1891 the Admiralty took over Upnor Depot to use as a gun and ammunition store. Another armaments depot was constructed at Lodge Hill, north of Chattenden which was also served by the railway. In 1905 the entire Chattenden enclosure was taken over by the Navy, and in 1906 the railway was also taken
    0.00
    0 votes
    230
    Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad

    Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad

    • Part of network: Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad
    • Terminuses: Silverton
    The Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad (D&SNG) is a narrow gauge heritage railroad that operates 45 miles (72 km) of 3 ft (914 mm) track between Durango and Silverton, in the US state of Colorado. The railway is a federally designated National Historic Landmark and is also designated by the American Society of Civil Engineers as a Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The route was originally built between 1881 and 1882, by the Denver and Rio Grande Railway, in order to carry supplies and people to and silver and gold ore from mines in the San Juan Mountains. The line was an extension of the D&RG narrow gauge from Antonito, Colorado to Durango. The last train to operate into Durango from the east was on December 6, 1968. The States of New Mexico and Colorado purchased 64 miles of the line between Antonito and Chama, New Mexico in 1970 and operates today as the Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad. The trackage between Chama and Durango was abandoned and rails were removed by 1971. The line from Durango to Silverton has run continuously since 1881, although it is now a tourist and heritage line hauling passengers, and is one of the few places in the United States which has
    0.00
    0 votes
    231
    East Coast Main Trunk Railway

    East Coast Main Trunk Railway

    The East Coast Main Trunk Railway is a railway line in the North Island of New Zealand, originally running between Hamilton and Taneatua via Tauranga, connecting the Waikato with the Bay of Plenty. The ECMT now runs between Hamilton and Kawerau, with a branch line to Taneatua from the junction at Hawkens. The line is built to narrow gauge of 1067 mm (3 ft 6 in), the uniform gauge in New Zealand. In 1880, the North Island Main Trunk Railway had reached Frankton, Hamilton, from Auckland. From there, the line made its way to Morrinsville in October 1884, Te Aroha in March 1886 and Paeroa in 1898. The route to Waihi through the Karangahake Gorge was surveyed in the next few years with construction starting in 1900, with three bridges, including a road-rail bridge and a kilometre-long tunnel, which has a 1:50 grade and took three years to build, being completed in 1904. The line between Paeroa and Waihi opened in November 1905. Surveys were undertaken for the route beyond Waihi in 1907 and construction started in March 1912, but was suspended in November of the same year. The work started again in 1914, but was suspended again in March 1917 because of a shortage of staff due to World
    0.00
    0 votes
    232
    Exmoor Steam Railway

    Exmoor Steam Railway

    The Exmoor Steam Railway is a narrow gauge steam railway and locomotive manufacturer, located at Bratton Fleming in North Devon. The railway was built by the Stirland family and first opened as a tourist attraction in August 1990. At this time the railway ran in a circuit from the main station at Exmoor Central, trains descending on a large embankment before climbing back up through a spiral and tunnel. In 1996 a new station was opened at Cape of Good Hope, which changed the line to an "end-to-end" layout. At the end of the 2001 season, the decision was taken to close the railway to the public and concentrate on building new steam locomotives and associated equipment. The railway remains in full working order, and work started in the winter 2008/9 on extending the railway. By mid 2010 an additional half a mile of track had been brought into use, with a very steep ascending and descending ruling gradients of 1 in 28. A number of other locomotives have run at Exmoor including Nos.293, 296 & 297 all now based at the Rudyard Lake Steam Railway During the 1990s, a number of 1 ft 11 ⁄2 in (597 mm) gauge Beyer Garratt articulated locomotives from South Africa arrived on site and were
    0.00
    0 votes
    233
    Georgia Central Railway

    Georgia Central Railway

    The Georgia Central Railway (reporting mark GC) operates about 174 miles (280 km) of track from Macon, Georgia through Dublin, Georgia and Vidalia, Georgia to Savannah, Georgia. It also operates about 20 miles (32 km) of trackage between Savannah and Riceboro, Georgia, switching Interstate Paper LLC. It connects with CSX Transportation and the Norfolk Southern Railway. The Georgia Central Railway is owned by Rail Link, a subsidiary of Genesee & Wyoming Inc. The Georgia Central operates a roster of GE U23B, GE U30B, EMD GP9, EMD GP18, and EMD SW9 locomotives.
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    Hesper Valley Railway

    Hesper Valley Railway

    The Hesper Valley Railway (German: Hespertalbahn) is a German heritage line running steam locomotive services between Kupferdreh Old Station and Haus Scheppen on the Baldeneysee lake in Essen. As a narrow gauge wagonway it linked opened up Erzgruben in 1867, and the Pörtingsiepen mine in 1877. The upgrading of part of the line to standard gauge followed in 1918. In 1973 the line was closed. In June 1975 the Hesper Valley Railway Preservation Society (Verein zur Erhaltung der Hespertalbahn) saved the route and has since operated it as a heritage railway. The top speed on the line is 15 km/h. The Hesper Valley Railway is part of the Route der Industriekultur, route 12 (The Ruhr — past and present) and route 15 (Railways in the area).
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Kirklees Light Railway

    Kirklees Light Railway

    The Kirklees Light Railway is a 3.5-mile (5.6 km) long  15 in (381 mm) gauge minimum gauge railway in Kirklees metropolitan borough, West Yorkshire first opened in October 1991. It runs along the trackbed of the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway's branch line from the village of Clayton West to Clayton West Junction near Shepley on the Penistone Line from Huddersfield to Penistone. The Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway opened their branch line from Clayton West Junction to Clayton West on 1 September 1879. The branch was built with bridges, tunnels and earthworks suitable for a double line, but only one line was laid. The line survived the Beeching cuts (in large part thanks to the mineral traffic generated by the collieries at the terminus and Skelmanthorpe) but was not adopted by the West Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive unlike nearly all other passenger lines in West Yorkshire and so closed on 24 January 1983. Construction of the narrow gauge railway started in midsummer 1990, following a joint application for a Light Railway Order between Kirklees Council and the Kirklees Light Railway Company on 22 February 1989. Construction was aided significantly by the amount of
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Market Street Railway

    Market Street Railway

    The Market Street Railway Company was a commercial streetcar and bus operator in San Francisco. The company was named after the famous Market Street of that city, which formed the core of its transportation network. Over the years, the company was also known as the Market Street Railroad Company, the Market Street Cable Railway Company and the United Railroads of San Francisco. The company should not be mistaken for the current Market Street Railway, which is named after its predecessor but is actually a legally unconnected non-profit support group for San Francisco's heritage streetcar lines. The franchise for what would become the Market Street Railway was granted in 1857 to Thomas Hayes. The line was the first horsecar line to open in San Francisco, opened on July 4, 1860, as the Market Street Railroad Company. A few years later, the line was converted to steam power utilizing a steam engine that was part locomotive and part passenger car, and a trailer car. Following the opening of the cable hauled Clay Street Hill Railroad in 1873, pressure grew to convert the city's horsecar lines to the new form of traction. In 1882, Leland Stanford and associates bought the Market Street
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Meigs Elevated Railway

    Meigs Elevated Railway

    The Meigs Elevated Railway was an experimental steam-powered monorail invented by Josiah V. Meigs (also known as Joe Vincent Meigs) of Lowell, Massachusetts. A 227-foot demonstration line was built in 1886 in East Cambridge, Massachusetts on land abutting Bridge Street, now Monsignor O'Brien Highway. Never expanded, it ran until 1894.
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    Mercer and Somerset Railway

    Mercer and Somerset Railway

    The Mercer and Somerset Railway was a short-lived line of the Pennsylvania Railroad in western New Jersey, built to delay completion of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad, part of the National Railway line (later owned by the Philadelphia and Reading Railway) from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to New York City. The railroad ran from Somerset Junction on the Belvidere Delaware Rail Road via Pennington and Hopewell to Millstone, with a connection to the Millstone and New Brunswick Railroad for a through route to New Brunswick. Hopewell was the site of a frog war with the National Railway. A plan existed at one time to extend the Philadelphia, Newtown and New York Railroad, another railroad being built to block the National Railway, to cross the Delaware River and connect with the M&S. The railroad was chartered on March 17, 1870 by the United New Jersey Railroad and Canal Companies for the sole purpose of tying up the construction of the National Railway. In 1873, the M&S had plans to straighten out the line as part of a new through railroad operated by the PRR. No straightening was done, but it did become PRR-operated. The railroad was formally opened on February 6, 1874, with an
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Mid-Norfolk Railway

    Mid-Norfolk Railway

    The Mid-Norfolk Railway or MNR is a heritage railway in the English county of Norfolk. Re-opening as a tourist line in the mid-1990s, it is often referred to as a "New Generation" heritage railway, especially since the start of preservation in 1974. The 11.5-mile (18.5 km) line runs through the centre of Norfolk between the market towns of Wymondham and Dereham via Yaxham, Thuxton and Kimberley Park, operating steam and diesel services. The line is periodically used for commercial freight operations and staff instruction for mainline railway companies. It is the southern section of the former Wymondham, Dereham, Fakenham and Wells-next-the-Sea line, opened by the Norfolk Railway in 1847 and closed to passengers in stages from 1964 to 1969 as part of the Beeching cuts. The final section of the line closed to goods traffic in 1989. The northern section of this line has been operated by the Wells and Walsingham Light Railway since 1982. The MNR is owned and operated by the Mid-Norfolk Railway Preservation Trust (a charitable trust), and is mostly operated and staffed by volunteers. The company owns a further 6 miles (9.7 km) of line, as far as County School railway station, which will
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    Müglitz Valley Railway

    Müglitz Valley Railway

    The Müglitz Valley Railway (Müglitztalbahn) is a German railway in Saxony. Branching off the Elbe Valley Railway, it connects the town of Heidenau near Dresden with the spa town of Altenberg in Erzgebirge (Ore Mountains). The total length is 38 km, with a total incline of 634 meters. The scenic track follows primarily the Müglitz river, passing the towns of Dohna, Glashütte and Geising. The railway was initially a narrow gauge railway, which was opened on November 17, 1890. Between 1935 and 1938, the tracks were graded and converted to standard gauge.
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    North Devon and Cornwall Junction Light Railway

    North Devon and Cornwall Junction Light Railway

    The North Devon and Cornwall Junction Light Railway was a railway built to serve numerous ball clay pits that lay in the space between the London and South Western Railway's Torrington branch, an extension of the North Devon Railway group, and Halwill, an important rural junction on the North Cornwall Railway and its Okehampton to Bude Line. Ball clay was an important mineral but its weight and bulk required efficient transportation; the material had been brought to main line railways by a 3 ft  (914 mm) gauge tramway. Expanding volumes prompted conversion to a light railway -- requiring less complex engineering and operational procedures than a full railway -- and it was opened on 27 July 1925. Passengers were carried in addition to the mineral traffic, but the business largely consisted of workers at the ball clay pits themselves. (Thomas says, "The largest place on the railway is Hatherleigh ... a market town in the centre of a barren countryside, it is badly decayed".) The conversion from a tramway was overseen by Colonel Stephens, the famous owner and operator of marginal English and Welsh railways. Although in construction details typically Stephens this was visually a
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    North Gloucestershire Railway

    North Gloucestershire Railway

    The North Gloucestershire Railway (NGR) is a narrow gauge railway running alongside the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Railway at Toddington. It was built in 1985 when the Dowty Railway Preservation Society needed a new home for its collection of narrow gauge rolling stock. The rail used on the railway was purchased from the Southend Pier Railway.
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Ruislip Lido Railway

    Ruislip Lido Railway

    The Ruislip Lido Railway is a 12 in (305 mm) gauge miniature railway around Ruislip Lido in Ruislip, 14 miles (22.5 km) west of central London. Running from the main station at Woody Bay by the lido's beach, on a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) track around the reservoir, the railway passes through Ruislip Woods to Ruislip Lido station near the Water's Edge restaurant and the lido's car park and is the longest exact 12-inch gauge railway in the United Kingdom. There are two disused stations (formerly termini) on the line: Eleanor's Loop and Haste Hill. The Woody Bay to Wellington Junction section of the railway features a double track, with passing loops at Eleanor's Loop and Haste Hill thereby allowing two-train operation. There is a level crossing between Haste Hill and Ruislip Lido stations. Originally built by the Grand Union Canal Company over a much shorter route, the line has been extended in recent years and now covers over two thirds of the perimeter of the reservoir. Following several years of decline under the ownership of the local council, the railway has been operated by a voluntary society since 1979. The railway was built in 1945 by the Grand Union Canal Company as part of
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    Skarloey Railway

    Skarloey Railway

    On the fictional Island of Sodor in The Railway Series by Rev. W. Awdry, the Skarloey Railway is a narrow gauge railway which runs from the main line at Crovan's Gate to the passenger terminus at Skarloey. Beyond Skarloey the line continues to a slate quarry. In the stories, the railway is run by the Thin Controller. Its chief engineer is Mr Ivo Hugh. The line was inspired and based on the Talyllyn Railway in Wales, where Rev. W. Awdry worked as a volunteer guard in the 1950s. The railway was originally owned by Sir Haydn Jones MP who became Sir Handel Brown in the books. The railway was central to the books Four Little Engines, The Little Old Engine, Gallant Old Engine, Very Old Engines, Great Little Engines and New Little Engine. It played a significant supporting role in Mountain Engines and Duke the Lost Engine. The Rev. W Awdry based all his stories on real incidents on the real railways. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy, Awdry developed a 'history' for the Island of Sodor and its railways, which was published to accompany the series. The history was set in context, and dates were determined to be consistent with the real world. In the case of the Skarloey Railway,
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    South Brooklyn Railway

    South Brooklyn Railway

    The South Brooklyn Railway (reporting mark SBK) is a railroad in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It continues to operate today as a subsidiary of MTA New York City Transit. Its original main line ran parallel to 38th Street from the Upper New York Bay to McDonald Avenue, and south on McDonald Avenue to the Coney Island Yards, mostly underneath the ex-Culver Shuttle and IND Culver Line of the New York City Subway. The line still exists in parts. The section between the BMT West End Line's Ninth Avenue station and its interchange yard at Second Avenue and 39th Street is still open. The section under the Culver El has been paved over. The South Brooklyn Railroad and Terminal Company was incorporated September 30, 1887 to build from the end of the Brooklyn, Bath and West End Railroad (West End Line) at 38th Street and 9th Avenue northwest to the foot of 38th Street, and was leased to the BB&WE, allowing BB&WE trains to run to the 39th Street Ferry. The Prospect Park and South Brooklyn Railroad connected the Prospect Park and Coney Island Railroad (Culver Line) to the South Brooklyn Railroad in 1890. The company was reorganized as the South Brooklyn Railroad on January 13, 1900.
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    Southern Fuegian Railway

    Southern Fuegian Railway

    The Southern Fuegian Railway or the Train of the End of the World (Spanish: Ferrocarril Austral Fueguino (FCAF) or El Tren del Fin del Mundo) is a 500 mm (19 ⁄4 in) (narrow-gauge) steam railway in Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina. It was originally built as a freight line to serve the prison of Ushuaia, specifically to transport timber. It now operates as a heritage railway into the Tierra del Fuego National Park and is considered the southernmost functioning railway in the world. In the late 19th century, Ushuaia on Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego developed as a penal colony, with the first prisoners arriving in 1884. In 1902 work began on a proper set of buildings for the prison by inmates, and a railway on wooden rails was constructed to assist the transport of materials, mainly local rock, sand and timber. Oxen pulled wagons along the narrow gauge of less than 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 ⁄8 in) (metre gauge). In 1909, the prison governor informed the government of the need to upgrade the line and Decauville tracks at a 500 mm gauge were laid in 1909 and 1910 for use with a steam locomotive. They connected the prison camp with the forestry camp and passed along the shoreline in front
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    Southwold Railway

    Southwold Railway

    The Southwold Railway was a narrow gauge railway line between Halesworth and Southwold in the English county of Suffolk. 8+⁄4 miles (14.1 km) long, it was built to 3 ft  (914 mm) gauge. It opened in 1879 and closed in 1929. Intermediate stations were at Wenhaston, Blythburgh and Walberswick. The route closely followed the River Blyth, with Halesworth and Southwold both on the north side, but the longest section including the intermediate stations on the south side. Although the line closed in 1929, its track was still marked and identified on a 1933 Ordnance Survey map, a navigable version of which is accessible in the external links section. The line was lifted & the equipment was scrapped in 1941 to help with war efforts. Some track can still be found on the harbour branch and a surviving van is at the East Anglian transport museum (Carlton Colville). There is also a surviving (but derelict) coal shed at Blythburgh. Parts of the route from Southwold to Blythburgh are walkable in particularly through woodland known as the Heronry on the south shore of the Blyth estuary. The original footbridge at Southwold was blown up during the war but its pillars now support a footbridge. The
    0.00
    0 votes
    248
    Teifi Valley Railway

    Teifi Valley Railway

    The Teifi Valley Railway (Welsh: Rheilffordd Dyffryn Teifi) is a 2 ft (610 mm) gauge railway operating between Llandysul and Newcastle Emlyn along the River Teifi, West Wales. It is a narrow-gauge tourist railway built on the GWR part of the Carmarthen and Cardigan Railway and currently operating on about two miles of track. A new platform has been constructed at Henllan, on the original GWR location, from where the service is planned to continue to Newcastle Emlyn and, eventually, to Pentrecwrt. Trains currently run from Henllan station to Llandyfriog Riverside. The Teifi Valley Railway was originally conceived as a 7 ft 0 ⁄4 in (2,140 mm) broad-gauge line between Carmarthen and Cardigan. The line was opened temporarily in 1860, under the South Wales Railway and was fully opened the following year. It was operated by the Carmarthen and Cardigan Railway between Carmarthen and Cynwyl Elfed. In 1864, the line was extended to Pencader and Llandysul and, by 1872, had been converted to standard gauge (4 ft 8 ⁄2 in (1,435 mm)). By this time though, the line was bankrupt. Eventually the line was bought by the Great Western Railway which extended the terminus to Newcastle Emlyn. Passenger
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    The Hull & South Yorkshire Extension Railway

    The Hull & South Yorkshire Extension Railway

    The Hull and South Yorkshire Extension Railway was incorporated on 6 August 1897 and on 25 July 1898 was transferred to the Hull and Barnsley Railway. The bill was deposited by a group of local coal owners representing the Manvers Main Colliery Company, Hickleton Main Colliery, Wath Main Colliery, Warncliffe Silkstone Colliery together with representatives of the Hull and Barnsley Railway. The main line left that of the Hull and Barnsley at Wrangbrook Junction, which then became a three-way affair with the South Yorkshire Junction Railway as well as the H&B. It ran via Hickleton and Thurnscoe to Wath where it made an east facing junction with the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway and a spur to reach Manvers Main Colliery. The line was over 8 miles in length, with steep gradients - being between 1 in 120 to 150 uphill for the first six miles after Wrangbrook junction, then around 1 in 110 to 1 in 115 dowhill to Wath. The line had problems with subsidence, as well as flooding at the point it passed under the Midland railway. The line was transferred to the H&B on 25 July 1898 and the in June following year they put in hand work to double the line between Wrangbrook
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    Wells & Walsingham Light Railway

    Wells & Walsingham Light Railway

    The Wells and Walsingham Light Railway is a  10 ⁄4 in (260 mm) gauge heritage railway in Norfolk, England running between the coastal town of Wells and Walsingham which is further inland. The railway occupies a part of the trackbed of the Wymondham to Wells branch also used by the Mid-Norfolk Railway. The line, which is 4 miles (6.44 km) long, once formed part of the Great Eastern Railway and is now the longest  10 ⁄4 in (260 mm) gauge railway in the world. It runs from the coastal town of Wells-next-the-Sea to the pilgrimage centre at Walsingham. It is the northern section of the former Wymondham, Dereham, Fakenham and Wells-next-the-Sea line which was closed to passengers in stages from 1964 to 1969 as part of the Beeching cuts. The railway operates from a new-build station located on the A149 approximately half a mile south of the original terminus at Wells. The terminus at Walsingham is situated a short distance north of the original GER station. Trains run daily between March and November. Trains are mostly steam-operated; however in some cases diesel is used. The Lynn and Dereham Railway and the Norfolk Railway both obtained Parliament's permission to build lines to Dereham
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:
    Tags: best, all, time, railway

    Discuss Best Railway of All Time

    Top List Voters