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Best Publisher of All Time

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    1
    University of Toronto Press

    University of Toronto Press

    • Book editions published: Bodies of Tomorrow: Technology, Subjectivity, Science Fiction
    University of Toronto Press (UTP) is Canada's leading scholarly publisher and one of the largest university presses in North America. Founded in 1901, UTP has published over 6,500 books, with well over 3,500 of these still in print. The Scholarly Publishing division produces approximately 175 titles per year, and the Higher Education division publishes around 25 titles per year. The Press has published dozens of notable authors, including Northrop Frye, Robertson Davies, Harold Innis, Marshall McLuhan, Mark Kingwell, Lester Pearson, George Elliott Clarke, Julia Kristeva, Yousuf Karsh, Bernard Lonergan, and Umberto Eco, and has produced some of the most important books ever published in Canada, such as The Gutenberg Galaxy, The Bias of Communication, The Vertical Mosaic, the Historical Atlas of Canada, the Dictionary of Canadian Biography and History of the Book in Canada. In 2008, UTP and the Rotman School of Management launched a new imprint called Rotman-UTP Publishing that focuses on actionable business books for professionals and students. In addition, UTP has significantly expanded its course and textbook offerings through the acquisition of selected lists from Broadview
    6.89
    9 votes
    2
    William Blackwood

    William Blackwood

    • Book editions published: The Book of Ballads
    William Blackwood (20 November 1776 – 16 September 1834) was a Scottish publisher who founded the firm of William Blackwood & Sons. Blackwood was born of humble parents in Edinburgh. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed to a firm of booksellers in Edinburgh, and he followed his calling also in Glasgow and London for several years. Returning to Edinburgh in 1804, he opened a shop in South Bridge Street for the sale of old, rare and curious books. He undertook the Scottish agency for John Murray and other London publishers, and gradually drifted into publishing on his own account, moving in 1816 to Princes Street. On 1 April 1817 the first number of the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine was published, which on its seventh number became Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. "Maga," as this magazine soon came to be called, was the organ of the Scottish Tory party, and round it gathered a host of able writers. William Blackwood was succeeded by his two sons, Alexander and Robert, who added a London branch to the firm. In 1845 Alexander Blackwood died, and shortly afterwards Robert. A younger brother, John Blackwood succeeded to the business; four years later he was joined by Major William
    8.50
    6 votes
    3
    Mercure de France

    Mercure de France

    • Book editions published: L' Éden cinéma
    The Mercure de France was originally a French gazette and literary magazine first published in the 17th century, but after several incarnations has evolved as a publisher, and is now part of the Éditions Gallimard publishing group. The gazette was published from 1672 to 1724 (with an interruption in 1674-1677) under the title Mercure galant (sometimes spelled Mercure gallant) (1672–1674) and Nouveau Mercure galant (1677–1724). The title was changed to Mercure de France in 1724. The gazette was briefly suppressed (under Napoleon) from 1811 to 1815 and ceased publication in 1825. The name was revived in 1890 for both a literary review and (in 1894) a publishing house initially linked with the symbolist movement. Since 1995 Mercure de France has been part of the Éditions Gallimard publishing group. Mercure de France should not be confused with another literary magazine, the Mercure du XIXe siècle (1823–1830). The Mercure galant was founded by the writer Jean Donneau de Visé in 1672. The name refers to the god Mercury, the messenger of the gods; the title also echos the Mercure françoys which was France's first literary gazette, founded in 1611 by the Paris bookseller J. Richer. The
    8.00
    6 votes
    4
    Universitas

    Universitas

    • Book editions published: Inside Scientology. My experiences in the power apparatus of the “Church”
    Universitas is a student newspaper in Oslo, Norway, published since 1946. With a weekly circulation of 17,000, Universitas is one of Europe's largest student newspapers. It is distributed on campuses of institutions of higher learning, that are affiliated with the Student Welfare Organisation in Oslo. The newspaper is considered as student welfare, and is partly paid for by the students' semester fee. Universitas is published both in Norwegian and English (the Internet edition). The newspaper's principles state that Universitas is a newspaper made by students, for students. The publication's first editor was the to-be professor in literature and Henrik Ibsen expert, Daniel Haakonsen. In the early years, Universitas had an editorial council, where professor names like Arne Næss and Ragnar Frisch figured. In more recent years, many profiles from Norwegian media has started their careers in the newspaper, including Øystein Sørensen, Kjetil Rolness, Ivar Hippe and Tor Edvin Dahl. Many illustrators also began drawing for Universitas: Ellen Auensen, Christopher Nielsen, Mikael Holmberg, Ola A. Hegdal and Karine Haaland. Today, Universitas is produced by a staff led by the full time
    6.86
    7 votes
    5
    Harper & Brothers

    Harper & Brothers

    • Book editions published: Sound and Fury: An Informal History of Broadcasting
    Harper is an American publishing house, currently the flagship imprint of global publisher HarperCollins. James Harper and his brother John, printers by training, started their book publishing business J. & J. Harper in 1817. Their two brothers, Joseph Wesley Harper and Fletcher Harper, joined them in the mid 1820s. The company changed its name to "Harper & Brothers" in 1833. The headquarters of the publishing house were located at 331 Pearl Street, facing Franklin Square in Lower Manhattan (about where the Manhattan approach to the Brooklyn Bridge lies today). Harper & Brothers began publishing Harper's New Monthly Magazine in 1850. The brothers also published Harper's Weekly (starting in 1857), Harper's Bazar (starting in 1867), and Harper's Young People (starting in 1879). George B. M. Harvey became president of Harper's on Nov. 16, 1899. Harper's New Monthly Magazine ultimately became Harper's Magazine, which is now published by the Harper's Magazine Foundation. Harper's Weekly was absorbed by The Independent (New York; later Boston) in 1916, which in turn merged with The Outlook in 1928. Harper's Bazar was sold to William Randolph Hearst in 1913 and is now Bazaar, published by
    8.60
    5 votes
    6
    University Press of New England

    University Press of New England

    • Book editions published: Birdwatching in Vermont
    The University Press of New England (or UPNE), located in Lebanon, New Hampshire and founded in 1970, is a university press consortium including Brandeis University, Dartmouth College (its host member), the University of New Hampshire, and Northeastern University. Titles published by the press have been reviewed by The New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, USA Today, Library Journal, Washington Post, All Things Considered and many other venues. Notable fiction authors published by UPNE include Howard Frank Mosher, Roxana Robinson, Ernest Hebert, Cathie Pelletier, Chris Bohjalian, Percival Everett, Laurie Alberts and Walter D. Wetherell. Notable poets distributed by the press include Rae Armantrout, Claudia Rankine, James Tate, Mary Ruefle, Donald Revell, Ellen Bryant Voigt, James Wright, Jean Valentine, Stanley Kunitz, Heather McHugh, and Yusef Komunyakaa. Notable nature and environment authors published include William Sargent, Cynthia Huntington, David Gessner, John Hay, and Tom Wessels. Notable scholarly authors published by UPNE and its members include Kathleen J. Ferraro, Jehuda Reinharz, Joyce Antler, Peter Gizzi, Mary Caroline Richards, Leslie
    6.43
    7 votes
    7
    Platts

    Platts

    • Imprint of: McGraw-Hill Information & Media
    Platts is a provider of energy and metals information and a source of benchmark price assessments in the physical energy markets. Platts was founded in Cleveland, Ohio in 1909 by Warren C. Platt (1883-1963) to provide "reliable market-based price information" on the oil industry. From an original focus on the oil industry, Platts gradually expanded its purview to include metals, shipping, and all energy-related markets - oil, coal, natural gas, electricity, nuclear power, petrochemicals, renewables, and emissions. Platts is a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., (NYSE: MHP), an information provider, and sister to such brands as Standard & Poor's, J.D. Power & Associates, Aviation Week, and McGraw-Hill Construction. It was acquired by McGraw-Hill in 1953. In 2000 McGraw-Hill merged Platts with other like assets to turn the company into a provider of energy information. It is part of the Information and Media Services group of McGraw-Hill.
    9.50
    4 votes
    8
    American Book Company

    American Book Company

    • Book editions published: A School History of The United States
    The American Book Company (ABC) was an educational book publisher in the United States that specialized in elementary school, secondary school and collegiate-level textbooks. It is best known for publishing the McGuffey Readers, which sold 120 million copies between 1836 and 1960. American Book Company was formed in 1890 by the consolidation of Van Antwerp, Bragg and Co., A.S. Barnes & Co., D. Appleton and Co., and Ivison, Blakeman and Co. It was acquired by Litton Industries in 1967 and existed as a division of Litton Educational Publishing, Inc. until being sold to the International Thomson Organization in the late seventies. Thomson then sold its American Book Company K-12 assets to D. C. Heath and Company in 1981. The company was absorbed into D. C. Heath and ceased to exist as an imprint. Any remaining K-12 assets of the American Book Company are now owned by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, which acquired D. C. Heath and Company in 1995. Many of the college level textbook rights of ABC/Litton were sold by International Thomson as well, to Van Nostrand Reinhold, though some remained under the Wadsworth imprint at Thomson, which is now Cengage Learning.
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Graphic Arts Center Publishing

    Graphic Arts Center Publishing

    • Book editions published: New Mexico, Rio Grande and Other Essays
    Graphic Arts Center Publishing Company is a book publishing company based in Portland, Oregon, United States. Graphic Arts Center is one of the Northwest's largest book publishers, publishing about 40 books annually and selling over 500 titles to the U.S., Canada, United Kingdom and Europe. Using three imprints—Graphic Arts Books, Alaska Northwest Books, and WestWinds Press—Graphic Arts publishes and distributes books that focus on lifestyle and place. Graphic Arts Center Publishing started in 1967 as a division of Graphic Arts Center, Inc., Oregon's largest printer. The publishing house was one of the pioneers in publishing large-format, full-color print books. These became known as "coffee table books." Their first book in this format was the popular Oregon, a book of photographs by Ray Atkeson, which became a series that includes Oregon 2 and Oregon III. In the mid 1980s, Graphic Arts began to diversify from photographic books into subjects like children’s fiction and non-fiction. In 1993, Graphic Arts acquired Alaska Northwest Books, the largest trade book publisher in the Alaskan market. In 1998, Graphic Arts started its third imprint, WestWinds Press, to launch a series of
    7.00
    6 votes
    10
    Gilbert & Dean

    Gilbert & Dean

    • Book editions published: An oration, pronounced July 4th, 1803, at the request of the inhabitants of the town of Boston in commemoration of the anniversary of American independence
    Gilbert & Dean (1802–1823) was a banking and publishing firm in Boston, Massachusetts, run by Samuel Gilbert and Thomas Dean in the early 19th-century. As publishers, they produced works by Joseph Croswell, David Humphreys, Susanna Rowson, John Sylvester John Gardiner, Benjamin Dearborn and others, as well as the Boston Weekly Magazine. They kept an office on State Street. Samuel Gilbert (1777-ca.1867) and Thomas Dean (1779–1826) established their partnership in 1802. Both Dean and Gilbert had trained with Boston newspaperman Benjamin Russell, of the Columbian Centinel. In 1802 they began publishing the Boston Weekly Magazine. Susanna Rowson served as editor, and also contributed serialised fiction and other pieces. "As an early attempt to describe the manners, reprehend the follies, cultivate the taste and soften the customs of the people, the Boston Weekly Magazine is not discreditable to American literature." The magazine ceased in 1805. Besides the weekly, the firm published numerous other titles. They kept an office at "no. 56, State-street, Boston, where printing in all its branches, is executed with neatness, accuracy and dispatch;" by 1804 they'd moved to "no.78,
    9.25
    4 votes
    11
    Hoover Institution

    Hoover Institution

    • Book editions published: The aging of communism
    The Hoover Institution is an American public policy think tank located at Stanford University in California. It is part of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace, a library founded in 1919 by Herbert Hoover, Stanford's first student and first alumnus, before he became President of the United States. The library, known as the Hoover Institution Library and Archives, houses multiple archives related to Hoover, World War I, World War II, and other world history. The Hoover Institution is a unit of Stanford University but has its own board of overseers. It is located on the campus. Its mission statement outlines its basic tenets: representative government, private enterprise, peace, personal freedom, and the safeguards of the American system. The Hoover Institution is influential in the American conservative and libertarian movements. The Institution has long been a place of scholarship for high-profile conservatives with government experience. High-profile conservatives Edwin Meese, Condoleezza Rice, George Shultz, Thomas Sowell, Shelby Steele, and Amy Zegart are all Hoover Institution fellows. In 2007 retired U.S. Army General John P. Abizaid, former commander of the
    8.00
    5 votes
    12
    Hutchinson House

    Hutchinson House

    • Book editions published: The Patience of Metal
    The Hutchinson House is a historic home completed in 1908 in Tampa, Florida, United States. It is a three-story brick building in the Second Empire architecture. The building includes a high mansard roof and large porch with tall Corinthian columns. It was built by Currie J. Hutchinson, a local merchant, and is one of the few structures of its style in Florida. It was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places on November 1, 1977 and is located at 304 Plant Avenue. The Hutchinson House was built by Mr. Currie Hutchinson. Construction began in 1906 and the building was finished in 1908. Most of the building materials were shipped from Hutchinson’s home state of Ohio. The masonry technique was rather unusual and allowed for a very tight mortar line in between the red bricks. The exterior walls are approximately 18 inches thick of solid brick. The building even has a basement, which has remained dry for over 100 years, despite being situated less than 1/8 of a mile from the Tampa Bay. There are 5 working fireplaces, 3 on the first floor, two on the second floor and a stove in the basement. The total construction cost was reported to be approximately six thousand five
    9.00
    4 votes
    13
    Benjamin Franklin

    Benjamin Franklin

    • Book editions published: Poor Richard's Almanac of 1758
    Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 [O.S. January 6, 1705] – April 17, 1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A noted polymath, Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer, and the glass 'armonica'. He facilitated many civic organizations, including a fire department and a university. Franklin earned the title of "The First American" for his early and indefatigable campaigning for colonial unity; as an author and spokesman in London for several colonies, then as the first United States Ambassador to France, he exemplified the emerging American nation. Franklin was foundational in defining the American ethos as a marriage of the practical values of thrift, hard work, education, community spirit, self-governing institutions, and opposition to authoritarianism both political and religious, with the scientific and
    7.60
    5 votes
    14
    National Institute on Drug Abuse

    National Institute on Drug Abuse

    • Book editions published: Drug Themes in Science Fiction
    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is a United States federal-government research institute whose mission is to "lead the Nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction." NIDA's roots can be traced back to 1935, when a research facility (named the Addiction Research Center in 1948) was established in Lexington, Kentucky as part of a USPHS hospital. The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) and National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA) were created in 1972. In 1974 NIDA was established as part of the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration and given authority over the DAWN and NHSDA programs. The Monitoring the Future Survey, which surveys high school seniors, was initiated in 1975; in 1991, it was expanded to include 8th and 10th graders. In October 1992, NIDA became part of the National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services. At that time, responsibility for the DAWN and NHSDA programs were transferred to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). NIDA is organized into divisions and offices, each of which is involved with programs of drug abuse research. Nora
    7.60
    5 votes
    15
    VIZ Media

    VIZ Media

    • Book editions published: Steamboy
    VIZ Media, LLC, headquartered in San Francisco, is a manga, anime, and Japanese entertainment company. It was founded in 1986 as VIZ LLC. In 2005, VIZ LLC and ShoPro Entertainment merged to form the current VIZ Media LLC, which is jointly owned by Japanese publishers Shogakukan and Shueisha, and Shogakukan's licensing division Shogakukan Productions (ShoPro Japan). Seiji Horibuchi, originally from Tokushima Prefecture in Shikoku, moved to California in 1975. After living in the mountains for almost two years, he moved to San Francisco, where he started a business exporting American cultural items to Japan, and became a writer of cultural information. He also became interested in publishing Japanese manga in the United States, though he himself was not a fan of Japanese comics until a visit to Japan in 1985 exposed him to Katsuhiro Otomo's single-volume title Domu: A Child's Dream. His idea came to fruition after he met Masahiro Ohga, then managing director of Shogakukan, in 1985 and shared his vision. Shogakukan provided Horibuchi with $200,000 in startup capital, which Horibuichi used in 1986 to found VIZ Communications. VIZ Communications released its first titles in 1987, which
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    Armenian Encyclopedia

    Armenian Encyclopedia

    The Armenian Encyclopedia (Armenian: Հայկական Հանրագիտարան; AE) publishing house was established in 1967 as a department of the Institute of History of the National Academy of Sciences under the presidency of Viktor Hambardzumyan (1908–1996), co-edited by Abel Simonyan (1922–1994) and Makich Arzumanyan (1919–1988). In 1988-1999 the editor-in-chief was Konstantin Khudaverdyan (1929–1999) and since 1999 Hovhannes Aivazyan. It produced the Soviet Armenian Encyclopedia (also rendered Armenian Soviet Encyclopedia; Armenian: Հայկական Սովետական Հանրագիտարան, Haykakan sovetakan hanragitaran, Russian: Армя́нская сове́тская энциклопе́дия, Armyanskaya sovetskaya entsiklopediya АСЭ) from 1974-1986. The AE publishing house also edited a children's encyclopedia, Who is it? What is it? (Armenian: Ո՞վ է, Ին՞չ է), in 4 volumes (1984–87), the Russian-Armenian Polytechnical Dictionary (1988) and a "Traveler's Encyclopedia" (1990). Since Armenian independence (1991) publications include titles on topics of such current-day issues such as the Nagorno-Karabakh War, the Armenian Question and the Armenian diaspora. The first volume of the Soviet Armenian Encyclopedia (SAE) appeared in 1974, and the first
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    Gruner + Jahr

    Gruner + Jahr

    • Book editions published: Preussen ohne Legende
    Gruner + Jahr GmbH & Co. KG is the largest European printing and publishing firm. Its headquarters is in Hamburg, Germany. Originally founded on August 1, 1948 as the Henri Nannen publishing house, Gruner + Jahr was created in 1965 from a merger by acquisition, by publishers John Jahr Sr. and Gerd Bucerius joining the printing firm of Richard Gruner. In 1969, Richard Gruner retired, and thanks to the entrepreneurship of Reinhard Mohn, Bertelsmann acquired 25% of the ownership. Over the next fifteen years, the firm grew by expansion, acquisition (publishers Kindler & Schiermeier) and merger (Spiegel Verlag and Motor-Presse Verlag). By 1976, Bertelsmann owned a 74.9% stake, and the Hamburg publishing family Jahr owned 25.1%, a balance which has been maintained through 2007. In 1978, Gruner + Jahr became the first German publishing house to expand into other European and International markets. Over the next twenty years, publishing houses in France, the USA, and Spain were purchased, and a number of new magazines were started in Germany including Impulse, Schöner Essen, and Gala. In 2005, Gruner + Jahr exited the U.S. magazine business, selling its women's magazine portfolio to the
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    Soho Press

    Soho Press

    Soho Press is a New York City-based publisher. Founded by Laura Hruska in 1986, the company's primary focus is literary fiction and international crime series, with the occasional memoir. It is currently headed by Bronwen Hruska. Soho Press releases an average of 60 titles per year, and its fiction backlist holds titles from authors such as National Book Award finalist Edwidge Danticat (Krik? Krak!), Sue Townsend (Adrian Mole: The Lost Years), Maria Thomas (Antonia Saw the Oryx First), Jake Arnott (Long Firm-C), John L'Heureux (The Handmaid of Desire), Delores Phillips, and Jacqueline Winspear, recipient of the Agatha Award. Soho Crime is a department of Soho Press that focuses on exotic crime series. It has produced works from widely-read authors like Cara Black, Stuart Neville, Colin Cotterill and Peter Lovesey. Each crime novel or series explores a foreign country or exotic culture. Settings have included Paris, Bath, Northern Ireland, Laos, South Korea, Japan, Australia, Brazil, Bristol, Madrid, and Berlin. Soho Constable is a co-publishing venture with UK publisher Constable & Robinson, through which Soho Press releases British procedural mysteries in the United States.
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    Albert Einstein Institution

    Albert Einstein Institution

    • Book editions published: From dictatorship to democracy: A conceptual framework for liberation
    The Albert Einstein Institution is a non-profit organization that specializes in the study of the methods of non-violent resistance in conflicts and to explore its policy potential and communicate these findings through print and other media, translations, conferences, consultations, and workshops. The institution's founder and senior scholar, Gene Sharp, is known for his writings on strategic nonviolent struggle. The institute is named after the physicist Albert Einstein, who was, at least at some points in his life, a pacificist. The institution "is committed to the defense of freedom, democracy, and the reduction of political violence through the use of nonviolent action". To further this mission, the Institution has supported research projects; actively consulted with resistance and pro-democracy groups from Burma, Thailand, Egypt, Tibet, Serbia, Equatorial Guinea, the Occupied Palestinian Territories, and elsewhere; and worked to publicize the power and potential of nonviolent struggle around the world through educational materials, scholarly writings, workshops, and the media. The Albert Einstein Institution was founded in 1983 and operates out of a small office in East
    5.57
    7 votes
    20
    Royal Institute of British Architects

    Royal Institute of British Architects

    • Book editions published: In the Line of Development, by Alan Powers, RIBA Heinz Gallery, 1992
    The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a professional body for architects primarily in the United Kingdom, but also internationally. Originally named the Institute of British Architects in London, it was formed in 1834 by several prominent architects, including Philip Hardwick, Thomas Allom, William Donthorne, Thomas Leverton Donaldson, John Buonarotti Papworth, and Thomas de Grey, 2nd Earl de Grey. After the grant of the royal charter it had become known as the Royal Institute of British Architects in London, eventually dropping the reference to London in 1892. In 1934, it moved to its current headquarters on Portland Place, with the building being opened by King George V and Queen Mary. It was granted its Royal Charter in 1837 under King William IV. Supplemental Charters of 1887, 1909 and 1925 were replaced by a single Charter in 1971, and there have been minor amendments since then. The original Charter of 1837 set out the purpose of the Royal Institute to be: '… the general advancement of Civil Architecture, and for promoting and facilitating the acquirement of the knowledge of the various arts and sciences connected therewith…' The operational framework is
    6.33
    6 votes
    21
    Hogarth Press

    Hogarth Press

    • Book editions published: The Spanish temper
    The Hogarth Press was founded in 1917 by Leonard Woolf and Virginia Woolf. It was named after their house in Richmond, in which they began hand-printing books. During the inter-war years, the Hogarth Press grew from a hobby of the Woolfs to a business when they began using commercial printers. In 1938 Virginia Woolf relinquished her interest in the business and it was then run as a partnership by Leonard Woolf and John Lehmann until 1946, when it became an associate company of Chatto & Windus. "Hogarth" is now an imprint of The Crown Publishing Group, part of Random House Inc. As well as publishing the works of the members of the Bloomsbury group, the Hogarth Press was at the forefront of publishing works on psychoanalysis and translations of foreign, especially Russian, works.
    8.25
    4 votes
    22
    Aschehoug

    Aschehoug

    H. Aschehoug & Co (W Nygaard), commonly known as Aschehoug, is one of the largest independent publishing companies in Norway, founded in 1872. Headquartered in Oslo, the publishing house has 480 employees. The Aschehoug group also comprises other publishing houses owned partially or wholly by Aschehoug. Aschehoug literally means "ash hill." Aschehoug was founded as a bookstore in 1872 on Egertorvet in Oslo by cousins, Hieronymus and Halvard Aschehoug. From the start the firm was involved in publishing in a modest way, its output consisting mainly of school books. In 1888, the company was taken over by William Martin Nygaard and Thorstein Lambrechts (1856-1933), who kept the name while expanding its operations. In 1900 William Nygaard withdrew from the bookselling side of the business and established a publishing company, which was given the name H. Aschehoug & Co. (W. Nygaard). In 1935, following the death of William Nygaard, the publishing house turned into a corporation in connection with the inheritance settlement and Williams Nygaard's son, Mads Wiel Nygaard became the Executive Officer. Aschehoug published an increasing number of important books through the years. Important
    6.17
    6 votes
    23
    Bad Press

    Bad Press

    Bad Press is a London and Cambridge-based publisher of poetry, writings and essays - founded in 2003 by Marianne Morris. Its current editorial board comprises Marianne Morris, Jow Lindsay and Jonathan Stevenson. Bad Press writers use new performance practices, digital technology and networking with a playfulness in adopting conservative, pre-British Poetry Revival registers to expand the writer's modernist toolkit.
    7.00
    5 votes
    24
    George Newnes

    George Newnes

    • Book editions published: Dialstone Lane
    Sir George Newnes, 1st Baronet (13 March 1851 Matlock Bath, Derbyshire – 9 June 1910 Lynton, north Devon) was a publisher and editor in England. His father, Thomas Mold Newnes, was a Congregational church minister at the Glenorchy Chapel, Matlock. He was educated at Silcoates School and then at Shireland Hall, Warwickshire, and the City of London School. In 1875 he married Priscilla Hillyard. In 1867 he entered commerce in the "fancy goods" trade, working in London and Manchester. He began his career in publishing in 1881 when he founded Tit-Bits. The magazine was initially published in Manchester, containing extracts from books and other publications. He funded the magazine by opening a vegetarian restaurant in Manchester. The addition of competitions increased the readership of the periodical, and in 1884 Newnes moved publication to London. He began to work with W T Stead, with whom he founded the Review of Reviews in 1890. Tit-Bits reached a circulation of 700,000 by the end of the 19th century. It paved the way for popular journalism — the Daily Mail was founded by Alfred Harmsworth, a contributor to Tit-Bits, and the Daily Express was launched by Arthur Pearson, who worked at
    7.00
    5 votes
    25
    McLoughlin Brothers

    McLoughlin Brothers

    • Book editions published: Farm animals: pictures
    McLoughlin Bros., Inc. was a New York publishing firm active between 1828 and 1920. The company was a pioneer in color printing technologies in children's books. The company specialized in retellings or bowdlerizations of classic stories for children. The artistic and commercial roots of the McLoughlin firm were first developed by John McLoughlin, Jr. (1827–1905) who made his younger brother Edmund McLoughlin (1833 or 4-1889) a partner in 1855. By 1886, the firm published a wide range of items, including cheap chapbooks, large folio picture books, linen books, puzzles, games and paper dolls. Many of the earliest and most valuable board games in America were produced by McLoughlin Brothers of New York. In 1920 the corporation was sold to Milton Bradley & Company. McLoughlin ceased game production at this time, but continued publishing their picture books.
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    Morgan Library

    Morgan Library

    • Book editions published: Drawing Babar: Early Drafts and Watercolors
    The Morgan Library & Museum (formerly The Pierpont Morgan Library) is a museum and research library in New York City, USA. It was founded to house the private library of J. P. Morgan in 1906, which included, besides the manuscripts and printed books, some of them in rare bindings, his collection of prints and drawings. The library was designed by Charles McKim from the firm of McKim, Mead and White and cost $1.2 million. It was made a public institution in 1924 by his son, John Pierpont Morgan, Jr. The building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1966. Today the library is a complex of buildings which serve as a museum and scholarly research center. The scope of the collection was shaped in its early years as a private collection by Belle da Costa Greene, J.P. Morgan's personal librarian, who would become the library's first director and served from the time it became public until her retirement in 1948. Her successor, Frederick Baldwin Adams, Jr., managed the Library until 1969 and was also world-renowned for his own personal collections. The most internationally significant part of the collection is its relatively small but very select collection of illuminated
    9.33
    3 votes
    27
    Teach Yourself

    Teach Yourself

    • Book editions published: Spanish: A Complete Course for Beginners (Teach Yourself Books)
    • Imprint of: Hodder Education Group
    Teach Yourself is an imprint of Hodder Education that specializes in self-instruction books. The series is most famous for its language education books, but its titles in mathematics (including algebra and calculus) are also best sellers, and the series covers a great many other subjects as well. Like many similar series, the Teach Yourself series has always used a common design for all of its books. Most older titles are covered with a distinctive yellow and blue dust jacket, but over the years the publisher has changed the cover design several times, using an all-blue paperback format during the 1980s, a larger photographic or painted front cover with a black stripe containing the title in the 1990s, and recently adopting a yellow rounded rectangle with a black border as their primary logo in the 21st century. For 2010, the books have had a total redesign, and for the first time will be printed in colour. The website has been revamped to coincide with the "relaunch". The Teach Yourself books were published from 1938 until 1973 by the English Universities Press. Most titles published during the Second World War were aimed at helping the British nation survive as well as improving
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    Bach Gesellschaft

    Bach Gesellschaft

    • Book editions published: Kirchencantaten Band 1 No.1-10
    The Bach-Gesellschaft was a society formed in 1850 for the express purpose of publishing the complete works of Johann Sebastian Bach without editorial additions. The collected works are known as the Bach-Gesellschaft-Ausgabe. The nineteenth-century society needs to be distinguished from its successor, the New Bach Society (Neue Bachgesellschaft), founded in 1900. The New Bach Society promotes an annual festival of Bach's music at different venues. The founders of the society were Moritz Hauptmann, cantor of the St. Thomas Church, Leipzig, (and thus a successor of Bach); Otto Jahn, author of a noted biography of Mozart; Carl Ferdinand Becker, teacher at the Leipzig Conservatory; and the composer Robert Schumann. The Bach-Gesellschaft began publishing Bach's works in 1851 with a volume that started with BWV 1, the cantata Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, BWV 1. It completed publication in 1900 with its forty-sixth volume. However, the edition of The Art of Fugue by Wolfgang Graeser, published in 1926, is sometimes counted as "Volume 47" and was issued as a supplement to the Bach-Gesellschaft publication by Breitkopf & Härtel, publishers of the original series. Additionally, Vol.
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Edition Peters

    Edition Peters

    Edition Peters, also known as C.F.Peters Musikverlag, is a German music publishing house, founded in Leipzig in 1800. From the 1860s it was largely run by members the Hinrichsen family, who were Jewish. The company was confiscated by the Nazis and administered by the "Trustee of Jewish Property". Henri Hinrichsen and Hans-Joachim Hinrichsen did not survive the Holocaust. After the end of the war the company received a license from the Soviet military authority to continue publishing but in 1948 the firm was formally confiscated by the East German authorities and turned into a state owned and managed enterprise. Walter Hinrichsen, a surviving member of the family, founded C.F. Peters Corporation in New York in 1948, initially reprinting the main works in Edition Peters, then contemporary American composers. Simultaneously Max Hinrichsen was republishing Edition Peters in London. A famous case in the English High Court confirmed the inheritance of Edition Peters by the surviving Hinrichsen heirs and C.F. Peters Corporation, New York, remains one of the most notable publishing houses in the US. Following reunification the East German company was merged with C.F. Peters of Frankfurt,
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Library of Congress

    Library of Congress

    • Book editions published: Papers, 1775-1860
    The Library of Congress is the research library of the United States Congress, de facto national library of the United States of America, and the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. Located in four buildings in Washington, D.C., as well as the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, it is the largest library in the world by shelf space and number of books. The head of the Library is the Librarian of Congress, currently James H. Billington. The Library of Congress was instituted for Congress in 1800, and was housed in the United States Capitol for most of the 19th century. After much of the original collection had been destroyed during the War of 1812, Thomas Jefferson sold 6,487 books, his entire personal collection, to the library in 1815. After a period of decline during the mid-19th century the Library of Congress began to grow rapidly in both size and importance after the American Civil War, culminating in the construction of a separate library building and the transference of all copyright deposit holdings to the Library. During the rapid expansion of the 20th century the Library of Congress assumed a preeminent public role, becoming a "library of last
    8.00
    4 votes
    31
    Scholastic Press

    Scholastic Press

    • Imprints: Arthur A. Levine Books
    • Book editions published: The Forgotten Heroes: The Story Of The Buffalo Soldiers
    Scholastic (or Scholastic Inc.) is a global book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. It also has the exclusive United States publishing rights to both the Harry Potter and The Hunger Games book series. Scholastic Inc. is the world's largest publisher and distributor of children's books. In the 1970s, Scholastic Press was well-known mainly through their Scholastic Book Clubs , a mail-order service dealing in children's books, and their magazine publications aimed at youths: Wow (preschoolers and elementary schoolers), Dynamite (pre-teens) and Bananas (teens). The company's official mascot is Clifford the Big Red Dog. Scholastic has grown its business most recently by acquiring other media companies, including Klutz, the animated television production company Soup2Nuts, the K–12 educational software publisher Tom Snyder Productions, and most significantly the reference publisher Grolier, which publishes the Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia and The New Book of Knowledge. In 1920, Maurice R. "Robbie" Robinson founded the business he named
    6.80
    5 votes
    32
    Shinchosha

    Shinchosha

    • Book editions published: Shi ni isogu kujiratachi
    Shinchosha Publishing Co, Ltd. (株式会社新潮社, Kabushiki Kaisha Shinchōsha) is a publisher founded in 1896 in Japan and headquartered in Yaraichō, Shinjuku, Tokyo. Shinchosha is one of the sponsors of the Japan Fantasy Novel Award.
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Bungeishunjū

    Bungeishunjū

    Bungeishunjū Ltd. (株式会社文藝春秋, Kabushiki-gaisha Bungeishunjū), established in 1923, is a Japanese publishing company known for its leading monthly magazine Bungeishunjū. It also grants the annual Akutagawa Prize, one of the most prestigious literary awards in Japan, as well as the annual Naoki Prize for popular novelists. It also grants the annual Bungeishunjū Manga Award for achievement in the manga and illustration fields. It is headquartered in Chiyoda, Tokyo. The company publishes Bungakukai (文學界), the weekly Bunshun (週刊文春), and the sports magazine Number, which represent public opinion of literary, political, and sport-journalistic culture, respectively. The Bunshun, in particular, has come to be known for litigation involving freedom of speech issues, particularly alleged privacy violations and defamation; for example Mitsuo Kagawa. The magazines published by Bungeishunjū include: Bungeishunjū was founded in 1923 by writer Kan Kikuchi. The company was disbanded in March 1946 but was reestablished in June of the same year.
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    National Maritime Museum

    National Maritime Museum

    • Book editions published: Seaside Piers
    The National Maritime Museum (NMM) in Greenwich, England is the leading maritime museum of the United Kingdom and may be the largest museum of its kind in the world. The historic buildings forming part of the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, it also incorporates the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and 17th-century Queen's House. The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Like other publicly funded national museums in the United Kingdom, the National Maritime Museum does not levy an admission charge although most temporary exhibitions do incur admission charges. The Museum was created by the National Maritime Act of 1934 Chapter 43, under a Board of Trustees, appointed by H.M. Treasury. It is based on the generous donations of Sir James Caird (1864–1954). King George VI formally opened the Museum on 27 April 1937 when his daughter Princess Elizabeth, later Queen Elizabeth II accompanied him for the journey along the Thames from London. The first Director was Sir Geoffrey Callender. Since earliest times Greenwich has had associations with the sea and navigation. It was a landing place for the Romans; Henry VIII lived
    7.75
    4 votes
    35
    University press

    University press

    • Book editions published: The poems of Leopardi
    A university press (U.P.) is an academic, nonprofit publishing house. Most but not all are affiliated with a large research university. They publish work that has been reviewed by scholars in the field. They produce mainly scholarly works, but also often have "popular" titles designed to reach their target audience, such as books on religion or on regional topics. Because scholarly books are mostly unprofitable, university presses may also publish textbooks and reference works, which tend to have larger audiences and sell more copies. Most university presses operate at a loss and are subsidized by their owners; others are required to break even. In China, university presses are profit-making institutions for their academic owners. Demand has fallen as library budgets are cut and the online sales of used books undercut the new book market. Many presses are experimenting with electronic publishing. Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press are the two oldest and largest university presses in the world. They have numerous branches around the world. University presses emerged in the United States in the late 19th century. Cornell University started one in 1869 but had to
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Urban Land Institute

    Urban Land Institute

    • Book editions published: Better Places, Better Lives: A Biography of James Rouse
    The Urban Land Institute, or ULI, is a non-profit research and education organization with offices in Washington, D.C., Hong Kong, and London. Its stated mission is "to provide leadership in the responsible use of land and in creating and sustaining thriving communities worldwide." ULI advocates progressive development, conducting research and education in topics such as sustainability, smart growth, compact development, place making, and workforce housing. The ULI was founded in 1936 and currently has nearly 30,000 members. More than 20% of the members work in government, academia, or public-private partnerships. Most of the rest are involved in the real estate and urban development industries. ULI states that it produces regular research and publications "that anticipates emerging land use trends and issues, proposing creative solutions based on that research" and "imparts knowledge to help the development community continuously improve its performance." ULI also maintains a number of initiatives and programs, including a respected Advisory Services program that provides government, businesses and non-profits with strategic advice on real estate development and urban policy
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania

    Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania

    • Book editions published: New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures
    The Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania is a non-stock, not-for-profit organization headquartered in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, United States. It is the main legal entity used worldwide by Jehovah's Witnesses to direct, administer and develop doctrines for the religion and is often referred to by members of the religion simply as "the Society". It is the parent organization of a number of Watch Tower subsidiaries, including the Watchtower Society of New York and International Bible Students Association. Membership of the society is limited to between 300 and 500 "mature, active and faithful" male Jehovah's Witnesses. About 5800 Jehovah's Witnesses provide voluntary unpaid labour, as members of a religious order, in three large Watch Tower Society facilities in New York; nearly 15,000 other members of the order work at the Watch Tower Society's other facilities worldwide. The organization was formed in 1881, as Zion's Watch Tower Tract Society, for the purpose of distributing religious tracts. The society was incorporated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on December 15, 1884. In 1896, the society was renamed Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society. Following a
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Bridge Publications

    Bridge Publications

    Bridge Publications, Inc. (BPI) is a Californian 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation. It is based in Los Angeles, California, and is the Church of Scientology's North American publishing corporation. It publishes the Scientology and nonfiction works of L. Ron Hubbard. Outside of North America, this is done under the New Era Publications name, based in Copenhagen. It also published Hubbard's fiction and the annual Writers of the Future science fiction anthologies until 2002, when Galaxy Press was established for this purpose. Bridge was originally established in 1971 as Publications Organization, United States. Its location in Los Angeles is amongst other buildings owned and used by the Church of Scientology around L. Ron Hubbard Way, a one block long, no parking, embricked public section of North Berendo St. In 1990 it was reported that Bridge employees bought and returned their own books to get them on bestseller lists.
    6.60
    5 votes
    39
    University of North Carolina Press

    University of North Carolina Press

    • Book editions published: American Heretic: Theodore Parker and Transcendentalism
    The University of North Carolina Press (or UNC Press), founded in 1922, is a university press that is part of the University of North Carolina. It is a member of the American Association of University Presses (AAUP) and the Green Press Initiative. In 1922, on the campus of the nation's oldest state university, thirteen faculty members and trustees met to charter a publishing house. Their creation, the University of North Carolina Press, was the first university press in the South and one of the first in the nation. UNC Press was the first scholarly publisher to develop an ongoing program of books by and about African Americans, beginning in the late 1920s. By 1950, nearly 100 such volumes had appeared under its imprint. In the 1970s, UNC Press took an early lead in publishing feminist literary and historical works of distinction. In 2009, the Press announced plans to bring back into print all of its out of print titles as print-on-demand titles through a series called “Enduring Editions.” These editions are published unaltered from the original and are presented in paperback formats, bringing both historical and cultural value to a new generation of scholars, students, and general
    6.60
    5 votes
    40
    CBS Corporation

    CBS Corporation

    CBS Corporation (NYSE: CBS, CBSA) is an American mass media corporation focused on commercial broadcasting, publishing, billboards and television production, with most of its operations in the United States. The president and chief executive of the company is Leslie Moonves. Sumner Redstone, owner of National Amusements, is CBS's majority shareholder and serves as executive chairman. The company began trading on the NYSE on January 3, 2006. Until then, the corporation was known as Viacom, and is the legal successor to said company. A new company, keeping the Viacom name was spun off from CBS. CBS, not Viacom, retains control of over-the-air television (CBS, CW) and radio broadcasting, TV production and distribution, publishing, pay-cable, recording, and outdoor advertising assets formerly owned by the larger company. CBS has its headquarters in CBS Building, Midtown, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States. Viacom was created in 1970 as the television syndication division of CBS, and was spun off in 1971. However, in 1999, Viacom acquired its former parent, by this time also named CBS Corporation, formerly Westinghouse Electric. The prior CBS Corporation also owned CMT
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Gyldendal

    Gyldendal

    • Book editions published: Drage-prinsessen
    Gyldendalske Boghandel, Nordisk Forlag A/S, usually referred to simply as Gyldendal (Danish pronunciation: [ˈɡylˀəndæˀl]; OMX: GYLD A, GYLD B) is a Danish publishing house. Founded in 1770 by Søren Gyldendal, it is the oldest and largest publishing house in Denmark, offering a wide selection of books including fiction, non-fiction and dictionaries. Prior to 1925, it was also the leading publishing house in Norway, and it published all of Henrik Ibsen's works. In 1925, a Norwegian publishing house named Gyldendal Norsk Forlag ("Gyldendal Norwegian Publishing House") was founded, having bought rights to Norwegian authors from Gyldendal. Gyldendal is a public company and its shares are traded on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange. Gyldendal stopped the print version of their encyclopedia in 2006, focusing instead on selling paid subscriptions for its online encyclopedia. By 2008 it had decided that it needed another approach to support that online site. Subsidiaries includes;
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Metropolitan Museum of Art

    • Book editions published: Impressed by Light: British Photographs from Paper Negatives, 1840-1860
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art (colloquially The Met), located in New York City, is the largest art museum in the United States with among the most significant art collections. Its permanent collection contains more than two million works, divided among nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, located on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan's Museum Mile, is by area one of the world's largest art galleries. There is also a much smaller second location at "The Cloisters" in Upper Manhattan that features medieval art. Represented in the permanent collection are works of art from classical antiquity and Ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met also maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanic, Byzantine, and Islamic art. The museum is also home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, and antique weapons and armor from around the world. Several notable interiors, ranging from 1st-century Rome through modern American design, are permanently installed in the Met's galleries. The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded
    8.67
    3 votes
    43
    Sheba Prokashoni

    Sheba Prokashoni

    Sheba Prokashoni (Bengali: সেবা প্রকাশনী) is a well-known publishing house in Dhaka, Bangladesh. It was founded by Qazi Anwar Hussain. Sheba's books have enjoyed great popularity among young Bangladeshi readers, and it is particularly notable for its accessible translations of Western literary classics into the Bengali language. Sheba Prokashoni was founded in May, 1963. Its name may have derived from the first syllables of Shegun Bagan, now renamed as Shegun Bagicha, the neighbourhood of Dhaka city where its offices are located. The literal meaning of "Sheba" is "service." Sheba's focus, from its inception, has been to produce mass-market popular Bengali paperbacks that are both attractively-written and affordably priced. Its first successful product was Kuasha (Kuasha-1, first edition June 1964 ), a short-lived modern-Robin Hood style adventure series. This was closely followed by the Masud Rana, a spy-thriller series, one of Sheba's most enduring and popular imprints. These books described the adventures of its eponymous hero Masud Rana, an international spy of Bangladeshi origin, closely resembling James Bond in his expertise with weapons and women. Although the author of the
    8.67
    3 votes
    44
    The Economist Group

    The Economist Group

    The Economist Group is a source of analysis on international business and world affairs, delivering information through a range of formats, from newspaper and magazines to conferences and electronic services. The publications and services delivered under The Economist brand are The Economist magazine, The Economist online, Economist Intelligence Unit, Economist Conferences, Economist Corporate Network, The World In series and a bi-monthly lifestyle magazine, Intelligent Life. Digital editions of The Economist can be read on devices including the iPad, iPhone and Kindle, and on Android smartphones, and an iPad application of Intelligent Life is available. The Group’s other brands include CQ Roll Call and European Voice (aimed at decision-makers on Capitol Hill and Brussels respectively), EuroFinance, a cash and treasury management event business, and a digital media agency, TVC. The Economist Group is an international company, with offices throughout the world, including London, Brussels, Frankfurt, Geneva, Paris, Dubai, Johannesburg, New York, Washington, DC, Hong Kong, mainland China, Singapore, Tokyo and India. The Economist Group is an associate and not a subsidiary of Pearson
    8.67
    3 votes
    45
    Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    • Book editions published: Pakistan: Between Mosque And Military
    The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a foreign-policy think tank with centers in Washington, D.C., Moscow, Beirut, Beijing, and Brussels. The organization describes itself as being dedicated to advancing cooperation between nations and promoting active international engagement by the United States. Founded in 1910 by Andrew Carnegie, its work is not formally associated with any political party. Andrew Carnegie, like other leading internationalists of his day, believed that war could be eliminated by stronger international laws and organizations. "I am drawn more to this cause than to any," he wrote in 1907. Carnegie's single largest commitment in this field was his creation of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. On his seventy-fifth birthday, November 25, 1910, Andrew Carnegie announced the establishment of the Endowment with a gift of $10 million. In his deed of gift, presented in Washington on December 14, 1910, Carnegie charged trustees to use the fund to "hasten the abolition of international war, the foulest blot upon our civilization," and he gave his trustees "the widest discretion as to the measures and policy they shall from time to time adopt" in
    10.00
    2 votes
    46
    University College London

    University College London

    • Book editions published: Thinking and meaning: inaugural lecture.
    University College London (UCL) is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, and the oldest and largest constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1826, UCL was the first university institution to be founded in London and the first in England to be established on an entirely secular basis, to admit students regardless of their religion and to admit women on equal terms with men. UCL became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836. UCL's main campus is located in the Bloomsbury area of central London, with a number of institutes and teaching hospitals located elsewhere in central London. UCL is organised into 10 constituent faculties, within which there are over 100 departments, institutes and research centres. UCL had a total income of £802 million in 2010/11, of which £283 million was from research grants and contracts. For the period 1999 to 2009 it was the 13th most-cited university in the world (and the most-cited in Europe). UCL has around 4,000 academic and research staff and 650 professors, the highest number of any British university. There are 26 Nobel Prize winners and three Fields Medalists
    10.00
    2 votes
    47
    Charles Ranhofer

    Charles Ranhofer

    • Book editions published: The Epicurean: A complete treatise of analytical and practical studies on the culinary art, including table and wine service, how to prepare and cook dishes... etc., and a selection of interesting bills of fare of Delmonico's from 1862 to 1894. Making a
    Charles Ranhofer (November 7, 1836, Saint-Denis, France — October 9, 1899, New York) was the chef at the famous Delmonico's Restaurant in New York from 1862 to 1876 and 1879 to 1896. Ranhofer was the author of The Epicurean, (1894), an encyclopedic cookbook of over 1,000 pages, similar in scope to Escoffier's Le Guide Culinaire. Ranhofer was sent to Paris at the age of 12 to begin his training by studying pastry-making, and at 16 became the private chef for the prince d'Hénin, comte d'Alsace. In 1856 he moved to New York to become the chef for the Russian consul, and later worked in Washington, D.C. and New Orleans. He returned to France in 1860 for a short time, where he arranged balls for the court of Napoleon III at the Tuileries Palace, but then came back to New York to work at what was then a fashionable location, Maison Dorée. In 1862, Lorenzo Delmonico hired him for Delmonico's, and it was there that Ranhofer made his real fame, though others say that he made the fame of the restaurant as well. At that time, Delmonico's was considered the finest restaurant in the United States. He was the chef at Delmonico's until his retirement in 1896, except for a short hiatus from 1876
    6.40
    5 votes
    48
    Curtis Publishing Company

    Curtis Publishing Company

    The Curtis Publishing Company, founded in 1891 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, became one of the largest and most influential publishers in the United States during the early 20th century. The company's publications included the Ladies' Home Journal and The Saturday Evening Post, The American Home, Holiday, Jack & Jill, and Country Gentleman. In the 1940s, Curtis also had a comic book imprint, Novelty Press. The company was formed in 1891 by publisher Cyrus Curtis, who published the People's Ledger, a news magazine he had begun in Boston in 1872 and moved to Philadelphia in 1876. He had also established the Tribune and Farmer in 1879, from the women's section of which he fashioned the Ladies' Home Journal under the editorship of his wife, Louisa Knapp in 1883. These publications were taken under the imprimatur of the new company. In 1897, Curtis spent $1,000 to buy The Saturday Evening Post, which would become one of the nation's most popular periodicals, known for its timely articles and stories and frequent cover illustrations by Norman Rockwell. In 1946 Curtis Circulation Company is created as an official subsidiary of Curtis Publishing Company. The advent of television in the
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Frederick Warne & Co

    Frederick Warne & Co

    • Book editions published: Judo: The Art of Defence and Attack
    • Imprint of: Penguin Group USA
    Frederick Warne & Co was a British publishing firm famous for children's books, particularly those of Beatrix Potter. It was founded in 1865 by a bookseller, who gave his own name to the firm. Frederick Warne was founded in 1865 by a bookseller turned publisher who gave his own name to the firm. The new venture replaced an earlier association between Warne and George Routledge, who also went on to found his own publishing company. During the second half of the nineteenth century, Warne's firm built a reputation based upon its children's list, publishing illustrated books by such well-known authors and artists as Edward Lear, Kate Greenaway and Walter Crane. Toward the end of the century, Frederick Warne retired and handed the management of the business over to his three sons, Harold, Fruing, and Norman. Warne was among the six publishers to whom Beatrix Potter submitted her first book, the story of a rabbit called Peter. As did the other five, Warne turned the proposal down. People at the company changed their minds, however, when they saw the privately printed edition of the book in 1901. They offered to publish it if Potter redid the illustrations in color. The next year, Warne
    7.25
    4 votes
    50
    National Museums Liverpool

    National Museums Liverpool

    • Book editions published: British Ships in China Seas: 1700 to the Present Day
    National Museums Liverpool, previously known as National Museums and Galleries on Merseyside, comprises several museums and art galleries in and around Liverpool, England. All museums and galleries in this group have free admission. The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and an exempt charity under English law. National Museums Liverpool's origins go back to 1851 and the founding of what is now World Museum. It was established as a national museums group in 1986 and changed its name to National Museums Liverpool in 2003. currently comprises eight different venues, one of which is outside Liverpool itself — the Lady Lever Art Gallery, based on the Wirral. It holds in trust multi-disciplinary collections of world wide origin made up of more than one million objects and works of art. The organisation holds courses, lectures, activities and events and provides educational workshops and activities for school children, young people and adults. Its venues are open to the public seven days a week 361 days a year and all exhibitions are free. National Museums Liverpool has charitable status and is England’s only national museums
    7.25
    4 votes
    51
    Cambridge University Press

    Cambridge University Press

    • Book editions published: Numerical Recipes in C: The Art of Scientific Computing (1st Edition)
    Cambridge University Press is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house, and the second largest university press in the world. It also publishes bibles and academic journals. The Press’s mission is to “To further through publication the University’s objective of advancing learning, knowledge and research worldwide.” This mission is laid out in ‘Statute J’ in the University of Cambridge’s Statutes and Ordinances. The Press's objective is "To operate sustainably for the public benefit a publishing programme that upholds the integrity of the Cambridge name." Cambridge University Press is both an academic and educational publisher. It has more than 50 offices all around the globe, employs 2,000 people, and publishes over 45,000 titles by authors from 100 countries. Its publishing includes professional books, textbooks, monographs, reference works, over 300 academic journals, Bibles and prayer books, English language teaching publications, educational software, and electronic publishing. As a department of a charity, Cambridge University Press is exempt from income tax and corporate tax
    8.33
    3 votes
    52
    Everyman's Library

    Everyman's Library

    • Book editions published: If This Is a Man: The Truce
    • Imprint of: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
    Everyman's Library is a series of reprinted classic literature currently published in hardback by Random House. It was originally an imprint of J. M. Dent (latterly a division of Weidenfeld & Nicolson), who continue to publish Everyman Classics in paperback. J. M. Dent and Company began to publish the series in 1906. It was conceived in 1905 by London publisher Joseph Malaby Dent, whose goal was to create a 1,000 volume library of world literature that was affordable for, and that appealed to, every kind of person, from students to the working classes to the cultural elite. Dent followed the design principles and to a certain extent the style established by William Morris in his Kelmscott Press. This was later replaced in 1935 by Eric Ravilious's designs. Everyman's Library books were pocket-sized hardcovers that sold initially for what was then the remarkably low price of a shilling apiece. The original U.S. distribution rights were granted to New York City publishers, E. P. Dutton. The first title published was Boswell's Life of Johnson, published with a quotation on the title page from the works of John Milton: "A good book is the precious life-blood of a master-spirit, embalmed
    8.33
    3 votes
    53
    Hakusensha

    Hakusensha

    Hakusensha, Inc. (株式会社白泉社, Kabushiki-gaisha Hakusensha) is a Japanese publishing company. It is headquartered in Chiyoda, Tokyo. The company mainly publishes manga magazines of various genres and is involved in certain series' productions in their games, original video animation, musical and their animated TV series. Hakusensha was founded on December 1, 1973 by Shueisha, but is now a separate company although still a part of the Hitotsubashi Group together with Shueisha and Shogakukan as one of the major members of the keiretsu. After setting up the company for 5 months, the firm published their first magazine, a shōjo manga magazine titled as Hana to Yume (花とゆめ) and in November that year, they moved from Tōkyō-to, Chiyoda-ku, Kanda-Jinbōchō Ichi-chōme (東京都千代田区神田神保町1丁目) to Kanda-Jinbōchō San-chōme (神田神保町3丁目). Then in year 1975, the firm changed the frequency of their magazine from monthly to semi-monthly and in March, they created their first imprint, Hana to Yume Comics (花とゆめコミックス). In July 1976, they published their second manga magazine, a shōjo manga magazine named Hana to Yume LaLa (花とゆめ LaLa) as a sister magazine to Hana to Yume that is published bi-monthly. In April 1977,
    8.33
    3 votes
    54
    G. Schirmer

    G. Schirmer

    • Book editions published: The Louis Armstrong Companion: Eight Decades of Commentary
    G. Schirmer Inc. is an American classical music publishing company based in New York City, founded in 1861. It publishes sheet music for sale and rental, and represents some well-known European music publishers in North America, such as the Music Sales Affiliates ChesterNovello, Breitkopf & Härtel, Sikorski and many Russian and former Soviet composers' catalogs. The company was founded in 1861 in the United States by German-born Gustav Schirmer, Sr. (1829-1893), the son of a German immigrant. In 1891, the company established its own engraving and printing plant. The next year it inaugurated the Schirmer's Library of Musical Classics. The Musical Quarterly, the oldest academic journal on music in the U.S., was founded by Schirmer in 1915 together with musicologist Oscar Sonneck, who edited the journal until his death in 1928. In 1964, Schirmer acquired Associated Music Publishers (BMI) which had built up an important catalog of American composers including Elliott Carter, Henry Cowell, Roy Harris, Charles Ives, Walter Piston, and William Schuman, adding to a Schirmer's ASCAP roster which had already included Samuel Barber, Leonard Bernstein, Morton Gould, Gian Carlo Menotti, and
    6.20
    5 votes
    55
    Les éditions Arthaud

    Les éditions Arthaud

    • Book editions published: La long route
    Arthaud is a French publishing house founded in 1882 by Jules Rey. Originally based in Grenoble, this family business moves to Paris in 1930 on the initiative of Benjamin Arthaud, son-in-law and successor of Jules Rey. From its early days to the present, Arthaud has been a leader in the publishing of fiction and non-fiction works in the domain of the Great Outdoors and Adventure: Mountaineering at first and soon Sailing and discovery at large. The publishing house remained in the hands of Claude and Jacques Arthaud until 1977 when it was acquired by the Flammarion group, France's 4th publishing and editing house. The Editions Arthaud continue publishing under this and successive ownership and remains a synonym of quality production for Adventure and travel books and guides. Trivia: Florence Arthaud, daughter of Jacques may have read too many of her family's publications in her childhood and became a renowned sailor and indeed author of several books well worthy of Arthaud's collections.
    6.20
    5 votes
    56
    Macmillan Publishers

    Macmillan Publishers

    • Imprints: Nature Publishing Group
    • Book editions published: Faraday
    • Imprint of: Holtzbrinck Publishers LLC
    Macmillan Publishers Ltd, also known as The Macmillan Group, is a privately held international publishing company owned by Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. It has offices in 41 countries worldwide and operates in more than thirty others. Macmillan was founded in 1843 by Daniel and Alexander Macmillan, two brothers from the Isle of Arran, Scotland. Daniel was the business brain, while Alexander laid the literary foundations, publishing such great authors as Charles Kingsley (1855), Thomas Hughes (1859), Francis Turner Palgrave (1861), Christina Rossetti (1862), Matthew Arnold (1865) and Lewis Carroll (1865). Alfred Tennyson joined the list in 1884, Thomas Hardy in 1886 and Rudyard Kipling in 1890. As the company evolved, the brothers' vision continued to inspire the publishing of major writers including W.B. Yeats, Rabindranath Tagore, Sean O'Casey, John Maynard Keynes, Charles Morgan, Hugh Walpole, Margaret Mitchell, C. P. Snow, Rumer Godden and Ram Sharan Sharma. Beyond literature, their vision led to the creation of such enduring titles as Nature (1869), the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1877) and Sir Robert Palgrave's Dictionary of Political Economy (1894–99).
    6.20
    5 votes
    57
    Dover Publications

    Dover Publications

    • Book editions published: First-Order Logic
    Dover Publications, also known as Dover Books is an American book publisher founded in 1941 by Hayward Cirker and his wife, Blanche. It publishes primarily reissues, books no longer published by their original publishers. These are often, but not always, books in the public domain. The original published editions may be scarce or historically significant. Dover republishes these books making them available at a significantly reduced cost. Dover is well known for its reprints of classic works of literature, classical sheet music and of public-domain images from the 18th and 19th centuries. Dover also publishes an extensive collection of mathematical, scientific and engineering texts. It often targets its reprints at a niche market such as wood working. Most Dover reprints are facsimiles by photo process of the originals, retaining the original pagination and typeset, sometimes with a new introduction. Dover will usually add new and more colorful cover art to its paper-bound editions. They retitle some books to make them more in line with modern usage and categorization. For example, the book Woodward's National Architect was retitled A Victorian Housebuilder's Guide. The Cirkers
    9.50
    2 votes
    58
    Emerald Publishing Group

    Emerald Publishing Group

    Emerald Group Publishing Limited is a scholarly publisher of academic journals and books in the fields of management, business, education, library studies, health care, and engineering. It was founded in the United Kingdom in 1967 and has its headquarters in Bingley. It operates worldwide with offices and associates in Australia, Brazil, China, the Czech Republic, Dubai, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey, and the United States. Emerald was formed in 1967 as Management Consultants Bradford (MCB) by a group of academics dissatisfied by the publishing outlets of the time. It acquired its first journal, Management Decision (originally the British Journal of Management), the following year for £1. Fifty academics from the University of Bradford Management Centre each paid £100 for a share in the company in 1969 to allow the company to buy a building on Keighley Road, Bradford, West Yorkshire. The first employee was hired in 1970. Individual journals were managed as separate companies and MCB became a "service company" for the journal companies. In 1977 it was decided that the individual journal companies would be merged
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Kodansha

    Kodansha

    • Book editions published: Fukuzawa Yukichi no jitsugaku ni miru gendai Nichi-Bei bencha seishin
    Kodansha Limited (株式会社講談社, Kabushiki-gaisha Kōdansha), the largest Japanese publisher, produces the manga magazines Nakayoshi, Afternoon, Evening, and Weekly Shonen Magazine, as well as more literary magazines such as Gunzō, Shūkan Gendai, and the Japanese dictionary Nihongo Daijiten. The company has its headquarters in Bunkyō, Tokyo. As of 2010 the Noma family—relatives of the founder—continues to own Kodansha. Seiji Noma founded Kodansha in 1909 as a spinoff of the Dai-Nippon Yūbenkai (Greater Japan Oratorical Society) and produced the literary magazine Yūben as its first publication. The name Kodansha (taken from "Kōdan Club", a now defunct magazine published by the company) originated in 1911 when the publisher formally merged with the Dai-Nippon Yūbenkai. The company has used its current legal name since 1958. It uses the motto Omoshirokute tame ni naru ("To be interesting and beneficial"). Kodansha Limited owns the Otowa Group, which manages subsidiary companies such as King Records and Kobunsha, and publishes Nikkan Gendai, a daily tabloid. It also has close ties with The Walt Disney Company, and officially sponsors Tokyo Disneyland. The largest publisher in Japan, Kodansha
    9.50
    2 votes
    60
    Montague Institute

    Montague Institute

    • Book editions published: Customizing & Governing the SharePoint 2010 Search System
    Since its founding in 1992, the Montague Institute has been educating executives and information professionals on cutting-edge topics relating to corporate information services. The Institute's research is unique because it spans all information disciplines and is based on the staff's own experience. We conduct research, develop and present workshops, publishing briefings, books, and a monthly Web journal, develop custom knowledge bases for selected clients, and sponsor a membership organization, the Society of Knowledge Base Publishers.
    9.50
    2 votes
    61
    National Geographic Society

    National Geographic Society

    • Book editions published: Geography of Religion: Where God Lives, Where Pilgrims Walk
    The National Geographic Society (NGS), headquartered in Washington, D.C. in the United States, is one of the largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, the promotion of environmental and historical conservation, and the study of world culture and history. The National Geographic Society’s logo is a yellow portraitframe – rectangular in shape – which appears on the margins surrounding the front covers of its magazines and as its television channel logo. The National Geographic Society's historical mission is "to increase and diffuse geographic knowledge while promoting the conservation of the world's cultural, historical, and natural resources." Its purpose is to inspire people to care about their planet, according to John M. Fahey, Jr., President and CEO since March 1998 and Chairman since January 2010. The Society is governed by a Board of Trustees whose 22 members include distinguished educators, business executives, former government officials, and conservationists. The organization sponsors and funds scientific research and exploration. The Society publishes an official journal,
    9.50
    2 votes
    62
    Sanseido

    Sanseido

    • Book editions published: Basho taisei
    Sanseidō Co., Ltd. (株式会社三省堂, Kabushiki-gaisha Sanseidō) is a Japanese publishing company known for publishing dictionaries (such as Shin Meikai Kokugo Jiten) and textbooks.
    9.50
    2 votes
    63
    Sinclair Research Ltd

    Sinclair Research Ltd

    • Book editions published: Sinclair ZX Spectrum: BASIC programming
    Sinclair Research Ltd is a British consumer electronics company founded by Sir Clive Sinclair in Cambridge. Originally incorporated in 1973 as Ablesdeal Ltd., it remained dormant until 1976, and did not adopt the name Sinclair Research until 1981. In 1980, Clive Sinclair entered the home computer market with the ZX80 at £99.95, at the time the cheapest personal computer for sale in the UK. In 1982 the ZX Spectrum was released, later becoming Britain's best selling computer, competing aggressively against Commodore and Amstrad. At the height of its success, and largely inspired by the Japanese Fifth Generation Computer programme, the company established the "MetaLab" research centre at Milton Hall (near Cambridge), in order to pursue artificial intelligence, wafer-scale integration, formal verification and other advanced projects. The combination of the failures of the Sinclair QL computer and the TV80 led to financial difficulties in 1985, and a year later Sinclair sold the rights to their computer products and brand name to Amstrad. Sinclair Research Ltd still exists today as a one man company, continuing to market Sir Clive Sinclair's newest inventions. On 25 July 1961, Clive
    9.50
    2 votes
    64
    A & C Black

    A & C Black

    • Imprints: Thomas Reed Publications
    • Book editions published: Black's veterinary dictionary
    • Imprint of: Bloomsbury Publishing Plc
    A & C Black is a British book publishing company. The firm was founded in 1807 by Adam and Charles Black in Edinburgh, and moved to the Soho district of London in 1889. In 1851, the firm bought the copyright of Walter Scott's Waverley Novels for £27,000. In 1902 it published P. G. Wodehouse's first book, The Pothunters, and went on to produce many of his early works. The company is best known as the publisher of the annual Who's Who (since 1897) and also, since 2002, the Whitaker's Almanack. Other notable works include Black's Medical Dictionary and the Know The Game series of sports rules and laws reference books . A & C Black purchased both Christopher Helm Publishers and later the Pica Press, publishers of the Helm Identification Guides, from Christopher Helm. In June 2002, T & A D Poyser and their back-list of around 70 ornithology titles were acquired from Elsevier Science. A & C Black purchased Methuen Drama from Methuen Publishing in 2006, and acquired Arden Shakespeare from Cengage Learning in 2008. The company is now part of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, who purchased it in 2000, and produces that company's range of reference works.
    7.00
    4 votes
    65
    EBSCO Publishing

    EBSCO Publishing

    EBSCO Publishing, headquartered in Ipswich, Massachusetts, is an aggregator of full-text content. EBSCO Publishing's core business is providing online databases via EBSCOhost to libraries. EBSCOhost is used by libraries, schools, academic institutions, medical institutions, and corporations. The company is a subsidiary of Birmingham, Alabama-based EBSCO Industries. The company’s core business is providing online databases to libraries. EBSCO provides over 350 full-text and secondary databases. Content for these databases include full-text journals, magazines, books, monographs, reports, ebooks, business book summaries and various other publication types. EBSCO Publishing was established in 1984 as an independent company with two employees called Data Base Communications Corp. In 1987 the company was purchased by EBSCO Industries and its name was changed to EBSCO Publishing. By 2007 it had grown to employ approximately 750 people.
    7.00
    4 votes
    66
    Joint Publishing

    Joint Publishing

    Joint Publishing (Chinese: 三聯書店) is a book store chain and publisher founded at Queen's Road Central in Hong Kong in 18 October 1948. It is one of major book store chains in Hong Kong. Currently a subsidiary company of Sino United Publishing (Holdings) Limited. The book store was merged from three leading publishers and book stores, (生活書店), (讀書出版社) and (新知書店) , at Shanghai in 1948. The newly merged book store was closely related to the communist government at that time. Many intellects stayed in Hong Kong and publishing in Hong Kong was its main business. It moved its headquarters to Peking with many key staff in March 1949. Joint Publishing (HK) was its subsidiary. After the establishment of People's Republic of China in 1 October 1949, the book store located in Hong Kong was mainly responsible for publishing materials from mainland China. While the main branch in mainland China was nationalized. After the coming of Cultural Revolution in mainland China in 1966, the publishing business in mainland China was seriously damaged and the book store in Hong Kong earned its survival by republishing old books. With several re-locations, it finally settled in current premises in Queen
    7.00
    4 votes
    67
    Aldine Press

    Aldine Press

    Aldine Press was the printing office started by Aldus Manutius in 1494 in Venice, from which were issued the celebrated Aldine editions of the classics (Latin and Greek masterpieces plus a few more modern works). The Aldine Press is famous in the history of typography, among other things, for the introduction of italics. The press was the first to issue printed books in the small octavo size, similar to that of a modern paperback, and like that intended for portability and ease of reading. The press issued 127 editions during the lifetime of Aldus. The press was continued after Aldus’s death in 1515 by his wife and her father until his son Paolo (1512–1574) took over. His grandson Aldo then ran the firm until his death in 1597. Due to the firm's commercial success many pirated editions were also produced in Lyons and elsewhere. Today, antique books printed by the Aldine Press in Venice are referred to as Aldines. The press was started by Aldus based on his love of classics, and at first printed new copies of Plato, Aristotle, and other Greek and Latin classics. He also printed dictionaries and grammars to help people interpret the books. While scholars wanting to learn Greek used
    6.00
    5 votes
    68
    Akita Shoten

    Akita Shoten

    • Book editions published: All of Blackjack
    Akita Shoten (秋田書店) is a Japanese publishing company established on August 10, 1948 in Chiyoda, Tokyo. Its main editorial target has always been teenagers (shōnen and shōjo), and it currently publishes mostly manga. The current president is Sadami Akita.
    8.00
    3 votes
    69
    Franklin Library

    Franklin Library

    • Book editions published: Pride and Prejudice
    The Franklin Library, the distributing arm of the publishing division The Franklin Press (a division of The Franklin Mint), was the United States's largest distributor of great 'classic title' books produced in fine bindings for collectors until the company permanently closed, ceasing all of its publishing activity, in 2000. Its books were designed and bound by The Sloves Organization, Ltd., an affiliate of the Franklin Mint, whose bindery was one of the few in the world devoted exclusively to the crafting of fine leather book bindings. The Franklin Mint purchased the Sloves Book Bindery in New York City to help jumpstart its book division in the early 1970s. More recent book offerings were produced for The Franklin Library by R.R. Donnelly. From its founding in 1973 until its permanent closure in 2000, the Franklin Library, headquartered at Franklin Center PA, near Philadelphia, was one of the two largest publishers of fine leather-bound books in the United States. The unsurpassed quality of Franklin's 'first generation' creations are avidly sought by collectors worldwide. For more than a decade, many classic titles were marshaled into the ranks of several series, each consisting
    8.00
    3 votes
    70
    White Crane Institute

    White Crane Institute

    • Book editions published: Charmed Lives: Gay Spirit in Storytelling
    White Crane Institute (commonly known as "White Crane") is a United States non-profit organization headquartered in New York State. White Crane Institute is an educational non-profit dedicated to publishing the Gay wisdom and culture quarterly magazine White Crane (magazine). The institute has published classics in modern gay literature through the White Crane Books imprint in collaboration with Lethe Press. Titles in the series have included work by Andrew Ramer, James Broughton, Toby Johnson, Malcolm Boyd, and Mark Thompson. On the urging of the late gay health advocate Eric Rofes, the White Crane Institute began and continues to sponsor the Gay Men's Health Academies for the training of gay health advocates towards a positive understanding of sexuality. In collaboration with the estate of James L. White, the institute sponsors a biennial poetry book manuscript prize, the White Crane/James White Poetry Prize for excellence in Gay Men's Poetry. The inaugural judge is the poet Mark Doty. White Crane Institute achieved 501(c)(3) status in 2004. Bo Young is the executive director. White Crane, (formerly White Crane Newsletter & White Crane Journal) was created by Robert Barzan in
    8.00
    3 votes
    71
    Marshall Cavendish

    Marshall Cavendish

    • Book editions published: The Virgin and the Gipsy and Other Stories
    • Imprint of: Penguin Group Australia
    Marshall Cavendish is a subsidiary company of Times Publishing Group, the printing and publishing subsidiary of Singapore-based conglomerate Fraser and Neave and at present is a publisher of books, directories and magazines. Marshall Cavendish was established in the United Kingdom in 1968 by Norman Marshall and Patrick Cavendish. Times Publishing Group acquired it in 1980. In 2011, Amazon Publishing acquired over 450 titles of Marshall Cavendish's US Children’s trade books business, Marshall Cavendish Children’s Books (MCCB).
    6.75
    4 votes
    72
    WonderDads

    WonderDads

    WonderDads is the leading publisher of dad/child books and products that make it a little easier for dads to be heroes. Founded in 2007 by Jonathan Aspatore, former CEO and founder of Aspatore Books, one of the five largest business/legal book-publishing houses. After selling Aspatore Books to Thomson Reuters, Aspatore developed a series of dad/child classes to help fathers bond with their kids. After the success of the classes, WonderDads launched a line of dad/child city guides for San Francisco, California and Marin County, CA. There are also guides for Albuquerque, Ann Arbor, Atlanta, Austin, Baltimore, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Dallas, Denver, Greensboro, Indianapolis, Inland Empire (California), Jacksonville, Kansas City, Long Island, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Mobile, New Orleans, Orange County, Phoenix, Portland, Oregon, Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, Sacramento, San Jose, Seattle, St. Louis, Washington, D.C.. WonderDads is based in San Rafael, California.
    6.75
    4 votes
    73
    Dallas Museum of Art

    Dallas Museum of Art

    • Book editions published: The Voyage of the Icebergs: Frederic Church's Arctic Masterpiece
    The Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) is a major art museum located in the Arts District of downtown Dallas, Texas, USA, along Woodall Rodgers Freeway between St. Paul and Harwood. In 1984, the museum moved from its previous location in Fair Park to the Arts District, Dallas, Texas. The new building was designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes, the 2007 winner of the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal. The Dallas Museum of Art collection is made up of more than 24000 objects, dating from the third millennium BC to the present day. The museum is also defined by its dynamic exhibition policy and award-winning educational programs. The Mildred R. and Frederick M. Mayer Library (the museum’s non-circulating research library) contains over 50,000 volumes available to curators and the general public. The Dallas Museum of Art's history began with the establishment in 1903 of the Dallas Art Association, which initially exhibited paintings in the Dallas Public Library. Frank Reaugh, a Texas artist, saw in the new library the opportunity to display works of art. This idea was championed by May Dickson Exall, who was the first president of the Dallas Public Library. Her intention was the
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    NASA

    NASA

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is the agency of the United States government that is responsible for the nation's civilian space program and for aeronautics and aerospace research. Since February 2006, NASA's mission statement has been to "pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery and aeronautics research." On September 14, 2011, NASA announced that it had selected the design of a new Space Launch System that it said would take the agency's astronauts farther into space than ever before and provide the cornerstone for future human space exploration efforts by the U.S. NASA was established by the National Aeronautics and Space Act on July 29, 1958, replacing its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The agency became operational on October 1, 1958. U.S. space exploration efforts have since been led by NASA, including the Apollo moon-landing missions, the Skylab space station, and later the Space Shuttle. Currently, NASA is supporting the International Space Station and is overseeing the development of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Commercial Crew vehicles. The agency is also responsible for the
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    Planet Of The Dogs

    Planet Of The Dogs

    • Imprint of: Barking Planet Productions
    Far out in space, on the other side of the sun, is the Planet Of The Dogs. Dogs have always lived there in peace and happiness. Long, long ago, there were no dogs on Planet Earth. There came a time when the abundance and happiness found on Planet Earth were threatened by by the cruelty of the warrior tribes. This is the story of how the dogs came down to planet Earth to teach people about loyalty and love and to save the farmers of Green Valley from invasion by the Stone City warriors. 8 illustrations, map
    9.00
    2 votes
    76
    Planeta Pub Corp

    Planeta Pub Corp

    • Book editions published: Génesis: Narración Épica Sobre El Secreto Más Terrible Del Mundo
    Planeta Corporación, S.R.L., doing business as Grupo Planeta, is a Spanish media group based in Barcelona. The company operates in Spain, Portugal, France and Latin America. Editorial Planeta, its flagship, was founded in 1949. Planeta owns over 70 publishing houses worldwide. It publishes the newspapers La Razón and ADN. Besides publishing, the group operates in the areas of collectibles, training, direct marketing, distance learning, and audiovisual media. With its purchase of Editis in 2008, it became one of the largest publishers in the world, with over 1 billion dollars of revenue that year.
    9.00
    2 votes
    77
    Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press

    Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press

    Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press (SFLEP) is a large university press in China. With an affiliate to Shanghai International Studies University, it was founded in December,1979. The press has published 6000-plus titles with a diversity of 30 languages, including course-books, academic works, reference books, dictionaries, journals and electronic publications. The 'Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press has established and maintained business relationship with over 60 publishing companies in the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Russia, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Denmark, Korea and Japan. Listed below are some of the publishers among the 60-odd:
    9.00
    2 votes
    78
    John Murray

    John Murray

    • Book editions published: Lives of the Engineers, Volume I
    • Imprint of: Hachette UK
    John Murray is an English publisher, renowned for the authors it has published in its history, including Jane Austen, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Lord Byron, Charles Lyell, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Herman Melville, Edward Whymper, and Charles Darwin. Since 2004, it has been owned by conglomerate Lagardère under the Hachette UK brand. The business was founded in London in 1768 by John Murray I (1745–1793), an Edinburgh-born Royal Marines officer, who built up a list of authors including Isaac D'Israeli and published the English Review. John Murray the elder was one of the founding sponsors of the London evening newspaper The Star in 1788. He was succeeded by his son, John Murray II, who made the publishing house one of the most important and influential in Britain. He was a friend of many leading writers of the day and launched the Quarterly Review in 1809. He was the publisher of Jane Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Washington Irving, George Crabbe and many others. His home and office at 50 Albemarle Street in Mayfair was the centre of a literary circle, fostered by Murray's tradition of "Four o'clock friends", afternoon tea with his writers. Murray's most notable author was Lord Byron,
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Otava

    Otava

    • Book editions published: Miehiä naisten kanssa
    Otava Publishing Company Ltd. (Kustannusosakeyhtiö Otava in Finnish) is a major Finnish publisher of books. It was founded in 1890 and now is the second largest in Finland. It publishes fiction, non-fiction, books for teenagers and children, multimedia and teaching materials. The number of new titles a year exceeds 400. Otava has also been at the forefront of encyclopedia-publishing in Finland, with many well-known series, such as the Otavan Suuri Ensyklopedia (Otava's Big Encyclopedia). Some of the prominent writers whose work Otava has published over the years include; Frans Emil Sillanpää, Eino Leino, Paavo Haavikko, Pentti Saarikoski and Laila Hirvisaari. Otava was founded in 1890 by Hannes Gebhard and Eliel Aspelin-Haapkylä to publish Finnish national literature. A couple of years later Alvar Renqvist stepped in and gradually took over. He was the main figure during the company's early years. His descendants (surname fennicized to Reenpää) have continued his work so that Otava remains, in spite of its size, to a large extent a family company. 1906 saw the completion of the new headquarters right in the centre of Helsinki. In 1908 printing press operations began and in 1916 the
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    Turtleback Books

    Turtleback Books

    • Book editions published: House of Spirits
    • Imprint of: San Val
    Turtleback Books is a division of San Val, Inc. It is a publishing company based in St Louis, Missouri, and specializing in pre-bound books, generally serving the library and school markets. Turtleback has a catalog of more than 5,000 titles which covers the most popular works. Turtleback Books are pre-bound hardcover editions of books previously available only in paperback format.
    7.67
    3 votes
    81
    Dey's Publishing

    Dey's Publishing

    Dey's Publishing, based in Kolkata, India, ranks among the top Bengali publishing houses of India. Dey's Publishing has popular titles from such top-of-the-line Bengali authors Dey's Publishing is led by Sudhangshu Shekhar Dey, who also happens to be the ground convenor of the Kolkata Book Fair. They have a long history of being the 'launchpad' of many authors who are established today. They have hundreds of bestseller titles to their credit, and publish over 150 new titles each year. Dey's Publishing has their main office and wholesale outlet at 13 Bankim Chatterjee Street, Kolkata 700073 and its web address is http://deyspublishing.com/ http://deyspublishing.com/
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Image Comics

    Image Comics

    • Book editions published: Invincible: Eight is Enough (Invincible)
    Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. It was founded in 1992 by high-profile illustrators as a venue where creators could publish their material without giving up the copyrights to the characters they created, as creator-owned properties. It was immediately successful, and remains one of the largest comic book publishers in North America. Its output was originally dominated by work from the studios of the Image partners, but later included work by numerous independent creators. Its best-known series include Spawn, Savage Dragon, Witchblade, The Darkness, Invincible, and The Walking Dead. In the early 1990s, several freelance illustrators doing popular work for Marvel Comics grew frustrated with the company's policies and practices. Their primary complaint was that the artwork and new characters they created were being merchandised heavily, with the artists receiving only standard page rates for their work and modest royalties on sales of the comics. In December 1991, a group of these illustrators approached Marvel president Terry Stewart and demanded that the company give them ownership and creative control over their work. Accounts vary as to whom this group included,
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Review and Herald Publishing Association

    Review and Herald Publishing Association

    The Review and Herald Publishing Association is one of two major Seventh-day Adventist publishing houses in North America and is the oldest institution of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. The organization publishes books, magazines, study guides, CDs, videos and games for Adventist churches, schools and individual subscribers. It also prints and distributes the Adventist Review magazine. The current (2011) president is Mark B. Thomas. The roots of the Review and Herald Publishing Association go back to 1849 when James White produced The Present Truth and, in 1850, The Advent Review. From there the publication house grew and moved to Battle Creek, Michigan. A major fire on December 12, 1902 destroyed the offices. The headquarters was then moved to Takoma Park, Maryland. In the 1950s, the association developed The Bible Story by Arthur Maxwell. The set was notable for its size—including 411 stories from the Bible—and for having color illustrations on each page opening—an extravagant expense for a book publisher at that time. In 1983 the organization moved to Hagerstown, Maryland onto a 127-acre (0.51 km) campus and employs approximately 175 people. Edson White established the Gospel
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    ScienceDirect

    ScienceDirect

    • Imprint of: Elsevier Science & Technology
    ScienceDirect is one of the largest online collections of published scientific research in the world. It is operated by the publisher Elsevier and contains nearly 10 million articles from over 2,500 journals and over 6,000 e-books, reference works, book series and handbooks issued by Elsevier. The articles are grouped in four main sections: Physical Sciences and Engineering, Life Sciences, Health Sciences, and Social Sciences and Humanities. For most articles on the website, abstracts are freely available; access to the full text of the article (in PDF, and also HTML for newer publications) requires a subscription or pay-per-view purchase.
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    SPCK

    SPCK

    • Book editions published: Six books on the priesthood
    The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK) is the oldest Anglican mission organisation. It was founded in 1698 by Thomas Bray (an Anglican priest), and a small group of friends. The most important early leaders were Anton Wilhelm Boehm and court preacher Friedrich Michael Ziegenhagen. Today, the SPCK is most widely known for its publishing of Christian books. The Society was founded to encourage Christian education and the production and distribution of Christian literature. SPCK has always sought to find ways to communicate the basic principles of the Christian faith to a wider audience, both in Britain and overseas. Thomas Bray believed passionately in the power of the printed word and from its earliest days SPCK commissioned tracts and pamphlets, making it the third oldest publishing house in England. (Only the Oxford and Cambridge University Press have existed longer.) Throughout the eighteenth century SPCK was by far the largest producer of Christian literature in Britain. The range of its output was considerable—from pamphlets aimed at specific groups such as farmers, prisoners, soldiers, seamen, servants and slave-owners, to more general works on subjects such as
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    The McGraw-Hill Companies

    The McGraw-Hill Companies

    • Imprints: McGraw-Hill Education
    • Book editions published: The Four Pillars of Investing: Lessons for Building a Winning Portfolio
    The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., (NYSE: MHP) is an American publicly traded corporation headquartered in Rockefeller Center in New York City. Its primary areas of business are financial, education, publishing, and business services. It publishes numerous textbooks and magazines, including Architectural Record and Aviation Week, and is the parent company of Standard & Poor's, Platts, and J.D. Power and Associates. It is the majority owner of the Canadian publisher McGraw-Hill Ryerson (TSX). The company has its corporate headquarters in 1221 Avenue of the Americas, Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The McGraw-Hill Companies traces its history back to 1888 when James H. McGraw, co-founder of the company, purchased the American Journal of Railway Appliances. He continued to add further publications, eventually establishing The McGraw Publishing Company in 1899. His co-founder, John A. Hill, had also produced several technical and trade publications and in 1902 formed his own business, The Hill Publishing Company. In 1909 both men, having known each other's interests, agreed upon an alliance and combined the book departments of their publishing companies into The McGraw-Hill Book
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    Vrzhu Press

    Vrzhu Press

    Vrzhu Press is a contemporary poetry publishing company based in the Brookland neighborhood of Washington, DC. It was founded in 2006 by Michael Gushue and Dan Vera. In March 2006 the press released its first two titles The Kimnama, by D.C. poet Kim Roberts and More Than Anything by Maryland poet Hiram Larew.
    10.00
    1 votes
    88
    William Hilliard

    William Hilliard

    William Hilliard (1778–1836) was a publisher and bookseller in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the early 19th-century. He worked with several business partners through the years, including Jacob Abbot Cummings, James Brown, and Charles C. Little. President Thomas Jefferson selected his firm to supply approximately 7,000 volumes on numerous topics in 1825-1826, to create the University of Virginia Library. Hilliard married, and he and his wife had the following children: Foster (1814-1817), James Winthrop (1816-1817), and Francis Hilliard (ca.1808-1878) Hilliard's several bookselling and publishing firms in Boston and Cambridge included: In 1825-1826, Cummings, Hilliard & Co. supplied Thomas Jefferson with books for his new library at the University of Virginia. "Jefferson felt the need for an American agent, one who would not only supply books for the Library but who would also set up near the University a bookstore for handling texts to be used by the students. The Boston firm of Cummings, Hilliard and Company was selected, the sum of $18,000 was placed to its credit, and Jefferson undertook to supply a complete list of desirable volumes covering all fields of learning. By
    10.00
    1 votes
    89
    Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

    Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

    • Book editions published: Information Warfare. Die Rolle der Medien (Literatur, Kunst, Photographie, Film, Fernsehen, Theater, Presse, Korrespondenz) bei der Kriegsdarstellung und -deutung
    Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht (V&R) is a scholarly publishing house based in Göttingen, Germany. It was founded in 1735 by Abraham Vandenhoeck (1700-1750) in connection with the establishment of the Georg-August-Universität in the same city. After Abraham Vandenhoeck's death in 1750, his English-born widow, Anna Vandenhoeck, née Parry (d. 1787) successfully continued the business together with Carl Friedrich Günther Ruprecht (born 1730), who had entered the business as an eighteen-year-old apprentice in 1748. At the death of Anna Vandenhoeck in 1787, Ruprecht took over the business which he led until his death in 1816, when he was succeeded by his then 25-year-old son Carl August Adolf Ruprecht (1791-1861). The management of the company remained in the hands of the Ruprecht family for seven generations. The traditional core areas of the publications of V&R are Theology and Religion, History, Ancient History, Philosophy and Philology. Current production also includes schoolbooks and non-academic publications. In 1935, the Göttingen Academy of Sciences gave Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht responsibility for its publications. These include the Abhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften zu
    5.60
    5 votes
    90
    American Meteorological Society

    American Meteorological Society

    • Book editions published: Northeast Snowstorms
    The American Meteorological Society (AMS) promotes the development and dissemination of information and education on the atmospheric and related oceanic and hydrologic sciences and the advancement of their professional applications. Founded in 1919, the American Meteorological Society has a membership of more than 14,000 professionals, professors, students, and weather enthusiasts. Some members have attained the designation "Certified Consulting Meteorologist (CCM)", many of whom have expertise in the applied meteorology discipline of atmospheric dispersion modeling. To the general public, however, the AMS is best known for its "Seal of Approval" to television and radio meteorologists. The AMS publishes nine atmospheric and related oceanic and hydrologic journals (in print and online), issues position statements on scientific topics that fall within the scope of their expertise, sponsors more than 12 conferences annually, and offers numerous programs and services. There is also an extensive network of local chapters. The AMS headquarters are located at Boston, Massachusetts. It was built by the famous Boston architect Charles Bulfinch, as the third Harrison Gray Otis House in 1806
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Bright Skylark Literary Productions

    Bright Skylark Literary Productions

    • Imprints: Black Skylark Singing
    • Book editions published: The River of Winged Dreams
    Bright Skylark Literary Productions is an independent publishing and editorial consultation organization. It has been the primary engine behind the publication of a number of works by fiction writers and poets emerging out of the American Southeast during the first decade of the twenty-first century. It has also served as the Internet umbrella for two important websites, Creative Thinkers International on the Ning network and the Black Skylark ZPed Music Player on AuthorsDen. The primary declared purpose of the satellite sites is the unfettered creation and sharing of work with the possibility of publication in book form as a secondary objective. The Bright Skylark Literary Productions web component itself is hosted by the Authors Guild of America net service. In addition, the web component also serves as a news distribution site for individuals affiliated with the outfit.
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Imperial War Museum

    Imperial War Museum

    • Book editions published: Tracing Your Family History
    Imperial War Museums (IWM) is a British national museum organisation with branches at five locations in England, three of which are in London. Founded as the Imperial War Museum in 1917, the museum was intended to record the civil and military war effort and sacrifice of Britain and its Empire during the First World War. The museum's remit has since expanded to include all conflicts in which British or Commonwealth forces have been involved since 1914. As of 2012, the museum aims 'to provide for, and to encourage, the study and understanding of the history of modern war and "wartime experience"'. Originally housed in the Crystal Palace at Sydenham Hill, the museum opened to the public in 1920. In 1924 the museum moved to space in the Imperial Institute in South Kensington, and finally in 1936 the museum acquired a permanent home which was previously the Bethlem Royal Hospital in Southwark. The outbreak of the Second World War saw the museum expand both its collections and its terms of reference, but in the post-war period the museum entered a period of decline. The 1960s saw the museum redevelop its Southwark building, now referred to as Imperial War Museum London, which serves as
    8.50
    2 votes
    93
    Lancelot Press

    Lancelot Press

    Lancelot Press was a Canadian publishing company which operated between 1966 and 1997. It specialized in non-fiction titles, many of which were of a regional nature centered on Maritime Canada, in the fields of local history, spirituality and personal memoirs. For many years, Lancelot was one of the very few Maritime publishing companies. The business was founded by Reverend William Pope, a United Church minister, near Hantsport, Nova Scotia. Responsibilities for its operation were shared with his wife Isabel. Between its founding and wrapping up, it published more than 200 titles. Many well-known writers in the region published with Lancelot, including Douglas How, Bridglal Pachai and Alden Nowlan and Dorothy Perkyns. The poet Margaret Avison published several titles with Lancelot including No Time (1989) which won the Governor General's Award for Poetry. Many Lancelot Press titles remain in print through a publishing arrangement with Nimbus. The Popes wrapped up Lancelot Press in 1997 to focus on an new enterprise, the Robert Pope Foundation. Named for their late son and artist Robert Pope, who died of Hodgkins Lymphoma, the foundation shares his legacy of art which conveyed the
    8.50
    2 votes
    94
    Rice University Press

    Rice University Press

    • Book editions published: Twice told tales: stories
    The Rice University Press was a publishing house, a division of Rice University. Relaunched in 2006 after a ten-year hiatus, the press was noted for its unique all-digital platform. Rice's digital press operated just as a traditional press, up to a point. Manuscripts were solicited, reviewed, edited and resubmitted for final approval by an editorial board of prominent scholars. But rather than waiting for months for a printer to make a bound book, Rice University Press's digital files were instead run through Connexions, an open-source e-publishing platform. The technology offered authors a way to use multimedia — audio files, live hyperlinks or moving images — to craft dynamic scholarly arguments, and to publish on-demand original works in fields of study that were increasingly constrained by print publishing. Users of Rice University Press titles were able to view the content online for free, or order printed books in every style from softbound black-and-white on inexpensive paper to leather-bound, full-color hardbacks on high-gloss paper. In August 2010, Rice University confirmed that the press, despite being digital-only, had become too expensive to maintain. Rice University
    8.50
    2 votes
    95
    Zimmermann

    Zimmermann

    Musikverlag Zimmermann is a German music publisher that claims to be the first specialized publisher for instrumental methods. Until 1933, it was also a manufacturer of brass, string, wind musical instruments as well as mechanical musical instruments. Formed in 1876 in Saint Petersburg it also published Russian composers, including works by Nicolai Medtner, Mily Balakirev, Sergei Lyapunov, Alexander Taneyev and Alexander Gretchaninov. With subsidiaries in Moscow, Riga, Leipzig and London, the company was one of the largest music dealers in Europe. The Zimmermann family was of German origin. Musikverlag Zimmermann traces its roots back to a shop for German musical instruments near the Nevsky Prospekt established by Julius Heinrich Zimmermann (1851-1923) in 1876. In 1880 he set up a factory for brass instruments. Soon he began publishing methods for all instruments, the first official publication was a Method for Flute by Ernesto Köhler in 1885. Julius Heinrich Zimmermann also developed new designs for flutes and was one of the first German saxophone manufacturers. The company also commenced production of string instruments. After settlement of a branch in Moscow in 1882, Zimmermann
    8.50
    2 votes
    96
    Encounter Books

    Encounter Books

    • Book editions published: A Bee in the Mouth: Anger in America Now
    Encounter Books is an American conservative book publisher. It is an activity of Encounter for Culture and Education, Inc. Encounter Books draws its name from Encounter (magazine), the now defunct literary magazine founded by Irving Kristol and Stephen Spender. Encounter Books publishes serious non-fiction books, with a scholarly leaning, in the areas of history, religion, biography, education, public policy, current affairs, social sciences, and politics. Encounter Books was founded in 1997 in San Francisco, by Peter Collier. Collier retired in late-2005, and Encounter Books was taken over by the commentator Roger Kimball, who is also co-editor and publisher of The New Criterion. Kimball relocated Encounter Books to New York City in early 2006. Encounter Books has published many well-known writers, including Brian C. Anderson, Ward Connerly, Theodore Dalrymple, John Fund, Victor Davis Hanson, Peter Hitchens, David Horowitz, Leon Kass, William Kristol, Yuval Levin, Andrew C. McCarthy, Melanie Phillips, David Pryce-Jones, Jean-François Revel, Thomas Sowell, David Stove, and Keith Windschuttle. Encounter Books is distributed by the Perseus Books Group. Encounter Books has seen
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Gita Press

    Gita Press

    The Gita Press is one of the world's largest publishers of Hindu religious texts. It is located in Gorakhpur city of India's Uttar Pradesh state. It was founded in 1923 by Jaya Dayal Goyandka for promoting the principles of Sanatana Dharma. Hanuman Prasad Poddar was the founding and the lifetime editor of its noted magazine, Kalyan. It started publishing in 1927, with a circulation of 1,600 copies and by 2007 its print order had reached 230.000 (2.3 lakh). The Gita Press archives contain over 3,500 manuscripts including over 100 interpretations of the Gita. Seth Jai Dayal Goyandka, a Gita preacher set up the Gita Press on April 29, 1923, as a unit of Gobind Bhawan Karyalaya registered under the Societies Registration Act, 1860 (presently governed by the West Bengal Societies Act, 1960). Five months later it acquired its first printing machine for Rs 600. Since its establishment, the Gita Press has published 71.9 million copies of the Gita (in different editions) and 70.0 million copies of the Ramcharitamanas, at subsidized prices. Neither of these magazines runs any advertisements. It has a small Bhagavath Gita which costs Rs.4/- which is very popular These texts are published in
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Manchester University Press

    Manchester University Press

    • Book editions published: Experimental British Television
    Manchester University Press is the university press of the University of Manchester, England and a publisher of academic books and journals. Manchester University Press has developed into an international publisher. It maintains its links with the University and is the third largest university press in the United Kingdom after Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press. Manchester University Press publishes textbooks for academic teaching in higher education. It produces around 140 new books and sells around 150,000 books annually. It also publishes 11 journals: about half the output is exported. The historical legacy is still apparent: around one third of the books published today are on History. Other areas of expertise are Politics and International Law, Literature and Theatre Studies, and Visual Culture. In the United States of America MUP books are marketed and distributed by Palgrave, in Canada by the University of British Columbia Press, and in Australia by Footprint Books: all other global territories are covered from Manchester itself. From the ending of the agreement with Longmans (in the 1930s) all publishing functions had taken place in house; Editorial,
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    Mojo Press

    Mojo Press

    • Book editions published: Red Range
    Mojo Press is a now-defunct small press which primarily published science fiction, horror, and western books and graphic novels between 1994 and 1999. Mojo Press was founded in 1994 by publisher Ben Ostrander and managing editor Richard Klaw ostensibly to publish the Joe R. Lansdale and Klaw co-edited anthology Weird Business (1995), although the first Mojo Press title was actually the Klaw-edited comic book anthology Creature Features (1994) featuring the original Lansdale story "Grease Trap", illustrated by Ted Naifeh. In 1994, during the 90s comic-boom, friends Lansdale and Klaw had ruminated over the non-existence of a "a comic book anthology with some of the biggest names in fantasy and horror fiction". Klaw suggested they produced one themselves, utilising Lansdale's connections, and the two began searching for a publisher. Concurrently, Klaw (then working in a Bookstop) had struck up a friendship with regular customer Ben Ostrander, even renewing his interest in comics after a considerable hiatus, having discovered the two shared many interests. Ostrander was looking to change careers, even approaching Klaw with the idea of opening a specialty science fiction shop, although
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Time Inc.

    Time Inc.

    • Book editions published: Sports Illustrated: Athlete
    Time Inc. is a subsidiary of the media conglomerate Time Warner, the company formed by the 1990 merger of the original Time Inc. and Warner Communications. It publishes 130 magazines, most notably its namesake, Time. Other magazines include Sports Illustrated, Fortune, People, InStyle, Life, GOLF Magazine, Southern Living, Essence, This Old House, All You and Entertainment Weekly. It also owns the UK magazine house IPC Media, whose major titles include What's On TV, NME, Country Life, Marie Claire and Nuts. Time Inc. also owns the rights to LIFE, a well known magazine that has been published in many different formats. Time Inc. currently owns and runs LIFE.com, a website dedicated to news and photography. In 2008, Time Inc. launched Maghound, an internet-based magazine membership service that features approximately 300 magazine titles from both Time Inc. brands and external publishing companies. On January 19, 2010, Time Inc acquired StyleFeeder, a personal shopping engine. In August 2010 Time Inc. announced that Ann S. Moore, its chairman and chief executive, would step down as CEO and be replaced by Jack Griffin, an executive with Meredith Corporation, the nation's second-largest
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    University of North Texas College of Music

    University of North Texas College of Music

    • Book editions published: The Personal Correspondence of Sam Houston, Volume I: 1839-1845
    The University of North Texas College of Music, based in Denton, is a comprehensive music school with the largest enrollment of any music institution accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. It is the oldest and first in the world to offer a degree in jazz studies. As one of thirteen colleges and schools at the University of North Texas, it has been among the largest music institutions of higher learning in North America since the 1940s. North Texas has been a member of the National Association of Schools of Music for 73 years. Since the 1970s, approximately one-third of all North Texas music students have been enrolled at the graduate level. Music at North Texas dates back to the founding of the university in 1890 when Eliza Jane McKissack, its founding director, structured it as a conservatory. The College of Music offers 19 programs leading to degrees and 1 leading to an artist certificate: Bachelors degrees Masters degrees Doctor of Musical Arts degrees Doctor of Philosophy degrees
    7.33
    3 votes
    102
    Brown & Bigelow

    Brown & Bigelow

    Brown & Bigelow is a publishing company based in Saint Paul, Minnesota that produces advertising specialties, or promotional products, such as clocks, pens, cocktail spoons with corkscrew and cap-lifter, and advertising calendars. The company was founded in 1896 by Herbert Huse Bigelow and Hirm Brown. In 1925, Brown & Bigelow began a tradition by publishing calendars for the Boy Scouts of America, many of which were illustrated by Norman Rockwell. In 1969, as a tribute to Rockwell's 75th year birthday that year, officials of Brown & Bigelow and the Boy Scouts of America asked Rockwell to pose in this calendar illustration (pictured). In 1936, then president Charlie Ward paid the large amount of $10,000 to Maxfield Parrish for exclusive rights to his work "Peaceful Valley." Brown and Bigelow also published art, including works by Cassius Marcellus Coolidge, Rolf Armstrong, Gil Elvgren, Earl Moran, Vaughn Alden Bass, Mabel Rollins Harris, and Norman Rockwell. In the late 1940s, it was one of the biggest calendar printers in the world, employing some of the United States' best pin-up artists and putting calendars into an estimated 50 million homes. Ward served time in prison for tax
    6.25
    4 votes
    103
    Arnoldo Mondadori Editore

    Arnoldo Mondadori Editore

    • Book editions published: Fuori di testa
    Arnoldo Mondadori Editore (Italian pronunciation: [aɾˈnɔldo mondaˈdoːɾi ediˈtoːɾe]) is the biggest publishing company in Italy. Founded by the 18-year-old Arnoldo Mondadori in 1907 to publish the magazine titled Luce!, it soon became an important publisher. Its headquarters are in Milan. It is controlled by Fininvest, Silvio Berlusconi's family holding company. Marina Berlusconi is the chairman. Between 1989 and 1991, there has been a financial conflict between Silvio Berlusconi and Carlo De Benedetti, two of the largest employers of those years. In 1988 Berlusconi bought Leonardo Mondadori's (nephew of Arnoldo Mondadori) shares. Mondadori was then owned by three: Berlusconi's Fininvest, Carlo De Benedetti's CIR and the Formenton family (Arnoldo Mondadori's heir). Carlo De Benedetti convinced the Formentons to conclude an agreement that would bring him to obtain the Formenton's shares by 30 January 1991, but in November 1989 the Formenton family sided on Berlusconi's side, allowing him to become the new Mondadori president on 25 January 1990; De Benedetti then protested, claiming its agreement. The three sides took the unanimous decision of an arbitrary award to solve the
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Bantam Books

    Bantam Books

    • Book editions published: Sudden Death
    • Imprint of: Random House
    Bantam Books is an American publishing house owned entirely by Random House, the German media corporation subsidiary of Bertelsmann; it is an imprint of the Random House Publishing Group. It was formed in 1945 by Walter B. Pitkin, Jr., Sidney B. Kramer, and Ian and Betty Ballantine. It has since been purchased several times by companies including National General, Carl Lindner's American Financial and, most recently, Random House. It began as a mass market publisher, mostly of reprints of hardcover books, with some original paperbacks as well. It expanded into both trade paperback and hardcover books, including original works, often reprinted in house as mass market editions. Bantam has published the entire original run of the "Choose Your Own Adventure" series of children's books, as well as the first original novels based upon the Star Trek franchise, publishing about a dozen such books between 1970 and 1982, when the license was taken over by Pocket Books. Bantam also published a dozen volumes of short story adaptations of scripts from Star Trek: The Original Series. Bantam is the American paperback publisher of The Guinness Book of Records. Other series include Bantam Classics
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Copper Canyon Press

    Copper Canyon Press

    • Book editions published: Not Far from the River: Poems from the Gatha-Saptasati
    Copper Canyon Press is an independent, non-profit small press, specializing in the publication of poetry and located in the picturesque town of Port Townsend, Washington. Since 1972, the Press has published poetry exclusively and has established an international reputation for its commitment to authors, editorial acumen, and dedication to the poetry audience. Copper Canyon Press has been called the best independent publisher of poetry in America by the noted writer Jim Harrison. Copper Canyon Press publishes new collections of poetry by both revered and emerging American poets, translations of classical and contemporary work from many of the world's cultures, re-issues of out-of-print poetry classics, anthologies, and prose books about poetry. The press achieved national stature when Copper Canyon poet, W.S. Merwin, won the 2005 National Book Award for Poetry in the same year another Copper Canyon poet, Ted Kooser, won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Merwin later won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and in 2010 was named United States Poet Laureate. Copper Canyon has published more than 400 titles, including works by Nobel Prize Laureates Pablo Neruda, Odysseas Elytis,
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Fantasy Flight Games

    Fantasy Flight Games

    • Book editions published: The Art of H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos
    Fantasy Flight Games (FFG) is a Roseville, Minnesota-based game company that creates and publishes role-playing, board, and card games. Fantasy Flight Publishing was founded in 1995 by its CEO, Christian T. Petersen. Since the release of its first game product (Twilight Imperium) in 1997, the company has been doing business as Fantasy Flight Games ("FFG"). Since that time, FFG has grown to become one of the biggest names in the hobby games industry, being a marketplace leader in board games and maintaining strong businesses in the card game, roleplaying game, and miniature game categories. In 2008, FFG formed an exclusive partnership with industry-leading, UK-Based Games Workshop, to represent its acclaimed IPs (Warhammer and Warhammer 40K) in the hobby games market, publishing new versions of classic titles such as Talisman and Horus Heresy as well as brand new games such as Warhammer: Invasion LCG and Chaos In the Old World. In August 2011 Fantasy Flight Games bought the license which allows it to commercialize any card, miniature or role-playing game set in the Star Wars universe. Living Card Games (LCGs) are a variant of collectible card games (CCG) developed by Fantasy
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    G. Henle Verlag

    G. Henle Verlag

    G. Henle Publishers is a German publishing house that specializes in Urtext editions of sheet music. The programme includes works by composers from all different periods, in particular composers from the baroque to the early twentieth century whose works are no longer under copyright. In addition to its sheet music, G. Henle Publishers also produces scholarly complete editions, books, reference works and periodicals. The publishing house was founded on 20 October 1948 by Günter Henle with the permission of the US military government. It had offices in Duisburg and Munich. Under the founder’s direction, from the very beginning an integral part of the business was to “ensure the publication of Urtext editions of music on a scholarly basis, in particular from the 18th and 19th centuries”. It was at this time that Joseph Lehnacker (1895–1965) came up with the “Henle blue” for the cover (the same colour that is used today) as well as the design of the title font. For several decades, the engraving was done by the Universitätsdruckerei H. Stürtz (Würzburg), later they were also joined by engravers in Leipzig and Darmstadt. The first works to be published were Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Lorenz Publishing

    Lorenz Publishing

    The Lorenz Publishing Company is a music publisher best known for its publication of church music for smaller congregations served by amateur musicians. It is located in Dayton, Ohio. The company was founded by E.S. Lorenz in 1890 and has been under the management of E.S. Lorenz and his descendants since that time. In the 1970s and 1980s the company changed its name to Lorenz Industries, and then The Lorenz Corporation. Reiff Lorenz, a great great grandson of the founder, operates the company today. The Lorenz Corporation still runs Lorenz Publishing Company as a publishing imprint. Lorenz Publishing Company is best known for its bi-monthly publications for church musicians, including:
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    Reclam

    Reclam

    • Book editions published: A Clockwork Orange:Hrsg. V. Claus Melchior. (Fremdsprachentexte)
    Reclam Verlag or just Reclam is a German publishing house, established in Leipzig in 1828 by Anton Philipp Reclam. It is known for its "little yellow books", in particular those of its "universal library" (Universal-Bibliothek). In 1912 it became the first company to introduce book vending machines to Germany. During Nazi rule in Germany, Reclam was forbidden to publish books by some authors, and particularly by Jewish authors. In an allied bombing raid on Leipzig in World War II on December 4, 1943, 450 tons of books were destroyed. After the partition of Germany in the aftermath of the war, the house was divided after the owner was partly dispossessed in the Soviet occupation zone and in September 1947 the main office was moved to Stuttgart, (then American occupation zone, later West Germany). Since 1980, the house's head office has been in nearby Ditzingen. The original parent house in Leipzig remained there, but was nationalized by the Communist regime of East Germany until German reunification. Eventually, Leipzig was given up in 2006. The house has always been family property. The colour code of their Universal-Bibliothek edition is as follows: the (most popular) yellow books
    7.00
    3 votes
    110
    Riverside Publishing

    Riverside Publishing

    • Book editions published: Creating successful readers: A practical guide to testing and teaching at all levels
    • Imprint of: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
    Riverside Publishing Company is a leading publisher of clinical and educational standardized tests in the United States, headquartered in Rolling Meadows, Illinois. It is also a charter member of the Association of Test Publishers. Riverside Publishing was established as a wholly owned subsidiary of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, a leading educational publisher in the United States, in 1979, and continues to serve as the corporation’s research and testing division today. Riverside originated in 1852 as The Riverside Press, a book printing plant in Boston, Massachusetts. Henry Houghton originally started The Riverside Press in an old Cambridge building along the banks of the Charles River. In 1880, George Mifflin entered into a partnership with Henry Houghton and together founded and led Houghton Mifflin Company. They soon established an educational department and quickly expanded the company's educational offerings. Beginning with the publication of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale during World War I, Houghton Mifflin became increasingly involved in publishing standardized tests. The Riverside Publishing Company was officially established as a wholly owned subsidiary of Houghton
    7.00
    3 votes
    111
    The History Press

    The History Press

    • Book editions published: Titanic - The Ship Magnificent Vol I: Design and Construction
    The History Press is a British publishing company specialising in the publication of titles devoted to local and specialist history. It claims to be the United Kingdom's largest publisher in this field, publishing approximately 500 books per year. Created in December 2007, The History Press has integrated core elements of the NPI Media Group within it, including all existing published titles, plus all the future contracts and publishing rights contained in them. Its imprints include Phillimore, Pitkin, Spellmount, Stadia, Sutton Publishing and Tempus Publishing. The History Press can be traced back to the 1970s with the first title published in 1978. The company evolved from the amalgamation of a number of smaller publishing houses that formed part of the NPI Media Group. The largest component of the NPI Media Group was Tempus Publishing, founded by Alan Sutton in 1993. Tempus Publishing's early years were spent producing local history titles, principally books of old photographs on towns and villages throughout the UK. Tempus Publishing opened offices in both the USA and Europe which are in use today by The History Press. During the 1990s, the list diversified in a number of
    7.00
    3 votes
    112
    British Film Institute

    British Film Institute

    • Book editions published: Citizen Kane
    The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to: The BFI runs the BFI Southbank (formerly the National Film Theatre (NFT)) and IMAX theatre, both located on the south bank of the River Thames in London. The IMAX has the largest cinema screen in the UK, and shows popular recent releases and short films showcasing its technology, which includes 3D screenings and 11,600 watts of digital surround sound. BFI Southbank (the National Film Theatre screens and the Studio) shows films from all over the world particularly critically acclaimed historical & specialised films that may not otherwise get a cinema showing. The BFI also distributes archival and cultural cinema to other venues - each year to more than 800 venues all across the UK, as well as to a substantial number of overseas venues. The BFI runs the annual London Film Festival along with the London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival and the youth-orientated Future Film Festival. The BFI offers a range of education initiatives, in particular to support the teaching of film and media studies in schools. The BFI maintains the world's largest film archive, the BFI National Archive, previously
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Fantagraphics Books

    Fantagraphics Books

    • Book editions published: Love and Rockets: New Stories no.1
    Fantagraphics Books is an American publisher of alternative comics, classic comic strip anthologies, magazines, graphic novels, and the adult-oriented Eros Comix imprint. Many notable cartoonists publish their work through Fantagraphics, including Jessica Abel, Peter Bagge, Ivan Brunetti, Charles Burns, Daniel Clowes, Roberta Gregory, Joe Sacco, and Chris Ware. Fantagraphics was founded in 1976 by Gary Groth and Mike Catron at College Park, Maryland. Kim Thompson joined the company in 1977, and soon became a co-owner with Groth. Catron acted as Fantagraphics' co-publisher until 1985, also handling advertising and circulation for The Comics Journal from 1982–1985, when he left the company. Fantagraphics moved from Maryland to Stamford, Connecticut, then Los Angeles, and finally in 1989 to the Maple Leaf neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. Fantagraphics publishes The Comics Journal (TCJ), a magazine that covers comics as an art form from a critical perspective. From 1981 to 1992, Fantagraphics also published Amazing Heroes, which examined comics from a hobbyist's point of view. Since 1982, Fantagraphics has also published critically acclaimed and award-winning series and graphic
    8.00
    2 votes
    114
    Graphic novels in ancient Greek

    Graphic novels in ancient Greek

    • Book editions published: About Circè
    A series of graphic novels in the original ancient Greek texts. Edited and illustrated by MAGDA VAN TILBURG, Amsterdam, Holland. Published by PANHOLZER UITGEVERIJ, Amsterdam, Holland.
    8.00
    2 votes
    115
    Nikita Wu

    Nikita Wu

    • Book editions published: Cicada
    Nikita Wu (born Wu Chi-Ling 巫祈麟, 1975 in Taipei Taiwan) is a Taiwanese actress, writer and arts manager. She has curated the Future Pavilion of the Taiwan Design Expo 2005, and the Venice Architecture Biennale 2006 Taiwan Pavilion in co-operation with Roan Chin-Yueh and C-Laboratory.
    Nikita Wu's cross-over artistic career covers various fields of art and architecture as a former independent record producer, senior staff reporter in alternative Taiwanese weekly magazine POTS and art manager for C-Laboratory. She is the editor of the Taiwan Design Expo´s free experimental newspaper PePo. 
    Besides artistic activities Nikita Wu is also known as a professional salmon drift net hanger in the Bering Sea based Watzituya net-hanging shop in Naknek, Alaska.
    8.00
    2 votes
    116
    Regent's Park College, Oxford

    Regent's Park College, Oxford

    Regent's Park College is a Permanent Private Hall in the University of Oxford, situated in central Oxford, just off St Giles. The College admits both undergraduate and graduate students to take Oxford degrees in a variety of Arts, Humanities and Social Science subjects. The College also trains men and women for ordained ministry among Baptist churches in Great Britain and overseas. Regent’s Park College traces its roots to the formation of the London Baptist Education Society in 1752. This venture led to the development of the Stepney Academy in East London in 1810. The impetus for the creation of the Academy arose from the fact that only members of the Church of England were given places at ancient universities. It was not until the Oxford University Act of 1854 that Baptists and other dissenters were admitted to the University of Oxford. In 1810 there were only three students, but by 1850 the number had risen to 26. The premises at Stepney consisted of two large houses near Whitechapel Road. Between them was King John’s Tower. This structure, which can still be seen in the present Regent’s Park College crest, is believed to be all that remained of a royal suburban lodge. In 1849
    8.00
    2 votes
    117
    Samuel Green

    Samuel Green

    • Book editions published: A Thankfulle Remembrence of Gods Mercy. To several Persons at Quabaug or BROOKFIELD
    Samuel Green (c.1614-January 1, 1702) was an American printer and progenitor of the Green family of printers, which included Bartholomew Green, Bartholomew Green, Jr. and Joseph Dennie. Born in England, he came to Cambridge, Massachusetts with John Winthrop in 1630. He was one of the first American printers; while he arrived in America eight years before Stephen Daye, there is no record of him being a printer until ten years after Daye's business began. Green was also Cambridge's town clerk, and captain of the town militia. Green had nineteen children by two wives, and his descendants were printers in Connecticut, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Nova Scotia, among other places.
    8.00
    2 votes
    118
    Shodensha

    Shodensha

    Shodensha (株式会社祥伝社, Kabushiki kaisha Shōdensha) is a Japanese publisher of mostly non-fiction magazines and books, though it has recently begun publishing light novels and manga, including magazines which contain both. Shodensha publishes magazines such as Feel Young (an all-manga magazine), Zipper (a fashion magazine aimed at junior high and high school girls), and Nina's (a fashion and lifestyle magazine aimed at younger housewives). Shodensha is a member of the keiretsu Hitotsubashi Group of publishing companies. Shodensha was founded on 1970-11-05 by five people: Shōzō Sasabe (from Shogakukan), Isamu Kurosaki (from Kobunsha), Kōzaburō Iga, Hidenori Sakurai, and Toshio Fujioka. The company was able to release a number of best selling titles which helped the company get off to a running start. They began their "Non-Novel" imprint in 1973, and their "Non-Pochette" imprint in 1975. In 2000, Shodensha created their Shodensha Gold imprint, and their most recent imprint, Shodensha Shinsho, was released in 2005. Shodensha has also published a variety of magazines throughout the years, including Bishō (微笑) (a magazine which covers a wide range of women's issues, first published in
    8.00
    2 votes
    119
    University of Pittsburgh Press

    University of Pittsburgh Press

    • Book editions published: Bethlehem Steel: Builder and Arsenal of America
    The University of Pittsburgh Press is a scholarly publishing house and a major American university press, part of the University of Pittsburgh. The university and the press are located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States. The Press publishes several series in the humanities and social sciences, including Illuminations—Cultural Formations of the Americas; Pitt Latin American Series; Pitt Series in Russian and East European Studies, Pittsburgh Series in Composition, Literary, and Culture; Pittsburgh/Konstanz Series in Philosophy and History of Science; Culture, Politics, and the Built Environment; and Central Eurasia in Context. The Press is especially known for literary publishing, particularly its Pitt Poetry Series, the Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize, and the Drue Heinz Literature Prize. The press also publishes the winner of the annual Donald Hall Prize, awarded by the Association of Writers & Writing Programs and the winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. One of its perennial bestselling titles is Thomas Bell's historical novel Out of This Furnace, reissued by the press in 1976. The Press was established in September 1936 by University of Pittsburgh Chancellor
    8.00
    2 votes
    120
    Unpopular Books

    Unpopular Books

    • Book editions published: The assault on culture: utopian currents from Lettrisme to class war
    Unpopular Books is a publisher in London's East End, producing leaflets, pamphlets and books.
    8.00
    2 votes
    121
    Fawcett Publications

    Fawcett Publications

    • Book editions published: Harry's Game
    Fawcett Publications was an American publishing company founded in 1919 in Robbinsdale, Minnesota by Wilford Hamilton "Captain Billy" Fawcett (1885–1940). At the age of 16, Fawcett ran away from home to join the Army, and the Spanish-American War took him to the Philippines. Back in Minnesota, he became a police reporter for the Minneapolis Journal. While a World War I Army captain, Fawcett's experience with the Army publication Stars and Stripes gave him the notion to get into publishing, and his bawdy cartoon and joke magazine, Captain Billy's Whiz Bang, became the launch pad for a vast publishing empire embracing magazines, comic books and paperback books. The title Captain Billy's Whiz Bang combined Fawcett's military moniker with the nickname of a destructive World War I artillery shell. According to one account, the earliest issues were mimeographed pamphlets, typed on a borrowed typewriter and peddled around Minneapolis by Captain Billy and his four sons. However, in Captain Billy's version, he stated that when he began publishing in October, 1919, he ordered a print run of 5,000 copies because of the discount on a large order compared with rates for only several hundred
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    National Gallery, London

    National Gallery, London

    • Book editions published: On Reflection
    The National Gallery is an art museum on Trafalgar Square, London, United Kingdom. Founded in 1824, it houses a collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900. The gallery is an exempt charity, and a non-departmental public body of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Its collection belongs to the public of the United Kingdom and entry to the main collection (though not some special exhibitions) is free of charge. The Gallery is the fourth most visited art museum in the world, after Musée du Louvre, Metropolitan Museum of Art and the British Museum. Unlike comparable art museums in continental Europe, the National Gallery was not formed by nationalising an existing royal or princely art collection. It came into being when the British government bought 38 paintings from the heirs of John Julius Angerstein, an insurance broker and patron of the arts, in 1824. After that initial purchase the Gallery was shaped mainly by its early directors, notably Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, and by private donations, which comprise two thirds of the collection. The resulting collection is small in size, compared with many European national galleries, but
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Popular Holdings

    Popular Holdings

    Popular Holdings (Chinese: 大众书局) (SGX: P29), commonly called Popular, is a Singapore-based company that publishes, distributes, and retails books for the local education market. It has subsidiaries in countries such as Canada, the People's Republic of China, Malaysia, Hong Kong and Taiwan. In the financial year 2011, it had a turnover of S$522.4 million. The first Popular Bookstore was set up in 1936 by Chou Sing Chu in North Bridge Road, focusing on retailing Chinese books and stationery. In March 2006, Popular Holdings was the main organiser of BookFest@Singapore, the first Chinese-language book fair ever held outside of China. In May 2006, Popular Holdings staged the inaugural BookFest@Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur. It is a platform for established publishers to showcase their latest publications and renowned authors to meet and interact with the readers. The inaugural BookFest@Hong Kong was organized in 2008. By 2009, the annual BookFest has become a major event of the book industries in Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong. Popular was founded in 1924 as the Cheng Hing Company, established by Chou Sing Chu in 1924, in the port of Tanjong Pagar in Singapore. In 1934, Mr Chou Sing Chu
    9.00
    1 votes
    124
    Rough Guides

    Rough Guides

    • Book editions published: The Rough Guide To Superheroes (Rough Guide Sports/Pop Culture)
    • Imprint of: Penguin Group UK
    Rough Guides Ltd is a travel guidebook and reference publisher, owned by Pearson PLC. Their travel titles cover more than 200 destinations, and are distributed worldwide through the Penguin Group. The series began with the 1982 Rough Guide to Greece, a book conceived by Mark Ellingham, who was dissatisfied with the polarisation of existing guidebooks between cost-obsessed student guides and "heavyweight cultural tomes." Initially, the series was aimed at low-budget backpackers. The Rough Guides books have incorporated more expensive recommendations since the early 1990s, and books have had colour printing since the late 1990s, which are now marketed to travelers on all budgets. Much of the books' travel content is also available online. Ellingham left Rough Guides in November 2007, after the company had celebrated "25 Rough Years" with a celebratory series of books, to set up a new green and ethical imprint, GreenProfile, at Profile Books. Rough Guides is now run by co-founder Martin Dunford (travel) and Andrew Lockett (reference), under the aegis of Penguin. It is based at the Penguin offices at 80 Strand, London, with a satellite office in Delhi. The slogan of Rough Guides is
    9.00
    1 votes
    125
    Taschen

    Taschen

    • Book editions published: China, Portrait of a Country
    Taschen is an art book publisher founded in 1980 by Benedikt Taschen in Cologne, Germany. It began as Taschen Comics publishing Benedikt's extensive comic collection. Taschen has been a noteworthy force in making lesser-seen art available to mainstream bookstores, including some fetishistic imagery, queer art, historical erotica, pornography and adult magazines (including multiple books with Playboy magazine). Taschen has helped bring this art into broader public view, by publishing these potentially controversial volumes alongside its more mainstream books of comics reprints, art photography, painting, design, fashion, advertising history, film, and architecture. Taschen's publications are available in a variety of sizes, from large tomes detailing the complete works of Leonardo Da Vinci, to surprisingly uncommon middle-sized books, to their "Icons" series of small, flexicover volumes which encapsulate themes of everything from old ads of Las Vegas, Nevada to male nudes. The company has also produced calendars, address books, and postcards of popular subjects. The company's stated mission has been to publish innovative, beautifully designed art books at popular prices. The Icons
    9.00
    1 votes
    126
    ArtScroll

    ArtScroll

    • Book editions published: Courage: formulas, stories and insights
    ArtScroll is an imprint of translations, books and commentaries from an Orthodox Jewish perspective published by Mesorah Publications, Ltd., a publishing company based in Brooklyn, New York. Its general editors are Rabbis Nosson Scherman and Meir Zlotowitz. In 1975, Zlotowitz, a graduate of Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem, was director of a high-end graphics studio in New York. The firm, named ArtScroll Studios, produced brochures, invitations, awards and ketubahs. Rabbi Nosson Scherman, then principal of Yeshiva Karlin Stolin Boro Park, was recommended to Zlotowitz as someone who could write copy, and they collaborated on a few projects. In late 1975, a close friend of Zlotowitz, Rabbi Meir Fogel, died in his sleep, prompting Zlotowitz to want to do something to honor his memory. As Purim was a few months away, he decided to write an English translation and commentary on the Book of Esther, and asked Scherman to write the introduction. The book was completed in honor of the shloshim (the 30-day commemoration of a death) and sold out its first edition of 20,000 copies within two months. With the encouragement of Rabbi Moses Feinstein, Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky, and other Gedolei Yisrael,
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Kingdom Builders Publishing

    Kingdom Builders Publishing

    • Book editions published: The World, The Flesh, and The Devil: Practical Insights to Living Victoriously in Christ
    Kingdom Builders Publishing is an extension of Kingdom Builders International Ministries. Kingdom Builders Publishing catalogues numerous books focusing on all aspects of the Christian ministry and life. Kingdom Builders Publishing offers a variety of books and teaching resources for the Christian community. Books published are great tools for seminars, workshops, bible studies, or personal enrichment.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Omaha World-Herald

    Omaha World-Herald

    The Omaha World-Herald, based in Omaha, Nebraska, is the primary daily newspaper of Nebraska, as well as portions of southwest Iowa. For decades it circulated daily throughout Nebraska, and in parts of Kansas, South Dakota, Missouri, Colorado and Wyoming. In 2008, distribution was reduced to the eastern third of Nebraska and western Iowa. The World-Herald was the largest employee-owned newspaper in the United States. On November 30, 2011, Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway announced plans to buy the newspaper. It is the only remaining major metropolitan newspaper in the United States to publish both morning and afternoon editions. The newspaper publishes four daily editions, with three morning editions (regional; Lincoln, Neb.; and metropolitan) and one afternoon edition (metropolitan). Its market area spans two time zones and is more than 500 miles across. The World-Herald had for many years been the newspaper with the highest penetration rate – the percentage of people who subscribe to the publication within the paper's home circulation area – in the United States. The Omaha World-Herald Company also operates the website Omaha.com, the region's most popular website by all
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    Toyo Keizai

    Toyo Keizai

    • Book editions published: Kinyu jiyuka to kinyu seisaku
    Toyo Keizai Inc. (株式会社東洋経済新報社, Kabushiki-gaisha Tōyō Keizai Shinpōsha) is a book and magazine publisher specializing in politics, economics and business, based in Tokyo, Japan. The company is famous for Weekly Toyo Keizai (週刊東洋経済, Shūkan Tōyō Keizai) established in 1895, one of three Japanese leading business magazines ranked with Nikkei Business (日経ビジネス) published by Nikkei Business Publications and Weekly DIAMOND (週刊ダイヤモンド) published by DIAMOND.
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    Picador

    Picador

    • Imprints: Young Picador
    • Book editions published: The Road
    • Imprint of: Macmillan USA
    Picador is an imprint of Pan Macmillan in the United Kingdom and Australia and of Macmillan Publishing in the United States. Both companies are owned by Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. Picador was launched in the UK in 1972 with the aim of publishing outstanding international writing in paperback. In 1990, Picador started publishing its own hardcovers; however in 2007, it announced that in future it expects most new titles to launch as paperback originals, a trend its expects the rest of the other UK publishing industry to follow. Picador authors have included Jonathan Franzen, Michael Chabon, Angela Carter, Thomas Pynchon, Pankaj Mishra, Bret Easton Ellis and Salman Rushdie.
    5.75
    4 votes
    131
    Alfred A. Knopf

    Alfred A. Knopf

    • Book editions published: Lunar Park
    • Imprint of: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
    Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. is a New York publishing house, founded by Alfred A. Knopf, Sr. in 1915. It was acquired by Random House in 1960 and is now part of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group at Random House, which has been owned since 1998 by the German private media corporation Bertelsmann. The publishing house is known for its borzoi trademark (shown at right), which was designed by co-founder Blanche Knopf. Many of its hardcover books later appear as Vintage paperbacks. Vintage is a sister imprint under the Knopf Publishing Group. In late 2008 and early 2009, the Knopf Publishing Group merged with the Doubleday Publishing Group to form the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Knopf was founded in 1915 and officially incorporated in 1918, with Alfred Knopf as president, Blanche Knopf as vice-president, and Samuel Knopf as treasurer. Blanche and Alfred traveled abroad regularly and were known for publishing European, Asian, and Latin American writers in addition to leading American literary trends. Samuel Knopf died in 1932. William A. Koshland joined the company in 1934, and worked with the firm for more than fifty years, rising to take the positions of President and Chairman of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Apple Inc.

    Apple Inc.

    • Book editions published: So Far: The First Ten Years of a Vision
    Apple Inc., (NASDAQ: AAPL) formerly Apple Computer Inc., is an American multinational corporation which designs and manufactures consumer electronics and software products. The company's best-known hardware products include Macintosh computers, the iPod and the iPhone. Apple software includes the Mac OS X operating system, the iTunes media browser, the iLife suite of multimedia and creativity software, the iWork suite of productivity software, and Final Cut Studio, a suite of professional audio and film-industry software products. The company operates more than 250 retail stores in nine countries and an online store where hardware and software products are sold.
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Arkham House

    Arkham House

    • Book editions published: Gravity's Angels
    Arkham House is a publishing house specializing in weird fiction founded in Sauk City, Wisconsin in 1939 by August Derleth and Donald Wandrei to preserve in hardcover the best fiction of H. P. Lovecraft. The company's name is derived from Lovecraft's fictional New England city, Arkham. Arkham House editions are noted for the quality of their printing and binding. The colophon for Arkham House was designed by Frank Utpatel. In addition to volumes of H. P. Lovecraft's fiction, Arkham House has published a five volume edition of Lovecraft's Selected Letters which gives an overview of Lovecraft's correspondence to peers, friends and family. Among his correspondents were Arkham House founders, Derleth and Wandrei. (Arkham House's volumes of Lovecraft's letters are highly abridged; unabridged volumes of Lovecraft's letters to individual correspondents are progressively being issued by Hippocampus Press). Arkham House also published fiction by many of Lovecraft's contemporaries, including Ray Bradbury, Robert E. Howard, Frank Belknap Long, Clark Ashton Smith, Robert Bloch, and Derleth himself; classic genre fiction by authors such as William Hope Hodgson, Algernon Blackwood, H. Russell
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

    • Imprints: Riverside Publishing
    • Book editions published: Running the Table: The Legend of Kid Delicious, the Last Great American Pool Hustler
    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (/ˈhoʊtn ˈmɪflɪn/) is an educational and trade publisher in the United States. Headquartered in Boston's Back Bay, it publishes textbooks, instructional technology materials, assessments, reference works, and fiction and non-fiction for both young readers and adults. The company was formerly known as Houghton Mifflin Company but changed its name following the 2007 acquisition of Harcourt Publishing. Prior to March 2010, it was a subsidiary of Education Media and Publishing Group Limited, an Irish-owned holding company registered in the Cayman Islands and formerly known as Riverdeep. In 1832, William Ticknor and James Thomas Fields had gathered an impressive list of writers, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau. The duo formed a close relationship with Riverside Press, a Boston printing company owned by Henry Oscar Houghton. Shortly after, Houghton also founded a publishing company with partner George Mifflin. In 1880, Ticknor and Fields and Houghton and Mifflin merged their operations, combining the literary works of writers with the expertise of a publisher and creating a new partnership named Houghton, Mifflin and
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    Keystone Bridge Company

    Keystone Bridge Company

    • Book editions published: Carnegie Pocket Companion
    The Keystone Bridge Company, founded in 1865 by Andrew Carnegie, was an important American bridge building company. It was one of the 28 companies absorbed into the American Bridge Company in 1900. The company advertised its services for building steel, wrought iron, wooden railway and road bridges. It held a patent for wrought iron bridges and also supplied wrought iron columns for buildings. Thomas Carnegie worked for Keystone Bridge as treasurer for roughly 20 years, from the founding of the company until his death in 1886. Keystone is perhaps best remembered for the Eads Bridge in St. Louis, completed in 1874, which survives to this day. A number of its works are listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. Carnegie sold his company, Carnegie Steel Company to J.P. Morgan in 1901. Works include (attribution):
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    O'Reilly Media

    O'Reilly Media

    • Imprints: Editions O'Reilly
    • Book editions published: JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, Fifth Edition
    O'Reilly Media (formerly O'Reilly & Associates) is an American media company established by Tim O'Reilly that publishes books and Web sites and produces conferences on computer technology topics. Their distinctive brand features a woodcut of an animal on many of their book covers. The company began in 1978 as a private consulting firm doing technical writing, based in the Cambridge, Massachusetts area. In 1984, it began to retain publishing rights on manuals created for Unix vendors. A few 70-page "Nutshell Handbooks" were well-received, but the focus remained on the consulting business until 1988. After a conference displaying O'Reilly's preliminary Xlib manuals attracted significant attention, the company began increasing production of manuals and books In 1992, O'Reilly Media published one of the first popular books about the Internet, Ed Krol's Whole Internet User's Guide and Catalog. O'Reilly Media also created the first web portal, the Global Network Navigator ("GNN") in 1993; it was sold to AOL in 1995, one of the first large transactions of the dot-com bubble. O'Reilly launched a Perl Conference to raise the profile of the Perl programming language. Many of the company's
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Shuter & Shooter Publishers

    Shuter & Shooter Publishers

    Shuter & Shooter is a publishing house based in South Africa. One of the earliest business houses in Pietermaritzburg was Vause, Slatter and Co. This company was taken over in 1921 by Mr. L.G. Shuter. In 1925 Mr. R.A. Shooter joined the company and the name was changed to Shuter & Shooter. Mr. L.G. Shuter was the stationer and Mr. R.A. Shooter the bookseller and publisher. Vause, Slatter and Co. was originally a printing, stationery and music business. According to a letter which we received from the Standard Bank in 1981, when they presented the company with a plaque commemorating 102 years of association, the company Vause, Slatter and Co. was established in 1850. The original trading site was 185 Church Street, the site now occupied by Volkskas Bank. As the business grew, they moved to 192 Church Street (part of the site now occupied by the Sanlam Building) and then to 166 Church Street, next to the Cathedral. (Part of the OK Building.) These premises were specially built to their requirements. A further move was made to Grays Inn, 230 Church Street in 1950. The adjoining buildings at 232 Church Street were acquired in 1976 and 1979 and both shop frontages were restored to their
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    • Book editions published: Substance abuse treatment for persons with child abuse and neglect issues
    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is a branch of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is charged with improving the quality and availability of prevention, treatment, and rehabilitative services in order to reduce illness, death, disability, and cost to society resulting from substance abuse and mental illnesses. The Administrator of SAMHSA reports directly to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. SAMHSA's headquarters building is located in Rockville, Maryland. SAMHSA was established in 1992 by Congress as part of a reorganization of the Federal administration of mental health services; the new law renamed the former Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA). ADAMHA had passed through a series of name changes and organizational arrangements throughout its history: Congress directed SAMHSA to target effectively substance abuse and mental health services to the people most in need and to translate research in these areas more effectively and rapidly into the general health care system. Charles Curie was SAMHSA's Director until his resignation in May 2006. In December 2006 Terry
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    Ziff Davis

    Ziff Davis

    • Book editions published: The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
    Ziff Davis Inc. (ZD) is an American publisher and Internet company. It was founded in 1927 in Chicago by William B. Ziff, Sr. and Bernard G. Davis. Throughout most of its history, it was a publisher of hobbyist magazines, often ones devoted to expensive, advertiser-rich hobbies such as cars, photography, and electronics. However, since 1980, Ziff Davis has primarily published computer and technology related magazines, and its growing number of websites, spun off from its magazines, have established Ziff Davis as an Internet Information company. Ziff Davis had several broadcasting properties, first in the mid-1970s, and later with its own technology network ZDTV, later renamed to TechTV, that was sold to Vulcan Ventures in 2001. Ziff Davis' magazine publishing and Internet operations offices are based in New York City, San Francisco and Woburn (Massachusetts). The company (Ziff Davis Media) announced that it had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on March 5, 2008 and emerged, following a court supervised corporate restructuring in July 2009. On January 6, 2009, the company sold 1up.com to UGO Entertainment, a division of Hearst Corporation and announced the January 2009
    7.50
    2 votes
    140
    Eyre & Spottiswoode

    Eyre & Spottiswoode

    • Book editions published: Difficulties: being a correspondence about the Catholic religion
    Eyre & Spottiswoode, Ltd. was the London based printing firm that was the King's Printer, and subsequently, after April 1929, a publisher of the same name. It became part of Associated Book Publishers and merged with Methuen Publishing in the 1970s. William Strahan established his printing house in London in 1739 and by 1769 had a share in both the King's Printing House and the Law Printing House. George Edward Eyre and Andrew Spottiswoode were printers to the Queen's most excellent majesty for Her Majesty's Stationery Office in 1845. Their sons subsequently ran the business. In 1920 the firm experienced the dubious distinction of being the first to publish, if not in the "King's English", at least in printed book form, the notorious antisemitic text, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, with the additional title The Jewish Peril. However, as Norman Cohn points out, a distinction is to be made between the printer and the publisher of the same name. The book, or rather pamphlet, shows it was printed by "EYRE & SPOTTISWOODE, LTD."
    5.50
    4 votes
    141
    Checker Book Publishing Group

    Checker Book Publishing Group

    • Book editions published: Alex Raymond's Flash Gordon, Vol. 3
    Checker Book Publishing Group was an independent publisher of comics reprints, from newspaper strips to modern out-of-print titles and collections from defunct publishers. However, as of 2012, Checker BPG itself seems to be defunct. Based in Miamisburg near Dayton, Ohio, CheckerBPG was established in 2000 by Mark Thompson, Paul Dubuc and Ben Rangel in order to bring back into print "dormant, unpublished, and under-published serial comics and cartooning." CheckerBPG's publisher, Mark Thompson, (b. 1967/68) graduated from Miami University with a business degree, and worked for a newspaper before starting his first comics company - Checker Comics - in 1997. Based in the Oregon District, Checker Comics published original works including Danger Ranger and Mutator before becoming one of many victim of the collapse of the comics speculator bubble in the late-1990s. Checker Book Publishing was incorporated in 2001, and set to work collecting individual comics' content into single collections, which are printed at an outside press, but shipped in-house after difficulties with outside distribution. Over the next five years, Checker published 43 titles. Sales between 2003 and 2004 doubled as
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Howard Fast

    Howard Fast

    • Book editions published: Spartacus
    Howard Melvin Fast (November 11, 1914 – March 12, 2003) was an American novelist and television writer. Fast also wrote under the pen names E. V. Cunningham and Walter Ericson. Fast was born in New York City. His mother, Ida (née Miller), was a British Jewish immigrant and his father, Barney Fast, was a Ukrainian Jewish immigrant whose name was shortened from Fastovsky upon arrival in the USA. When his mother died in 1923 and his father became unemployed, Howard's youngest brother, Julius, went to live with relatives, while he and his older brother Jerome worked by selling newspapers. He credited his early voracious reading to his part-time job in the New York Public Library. Young Howard began writing at an early age. While hitchhiking and riding railroads around the country to find odd jobs, he wrote his first novel, Two Valleys, published in 1933 when he was 18. His first popular work was Citizen Tom Paine, a fictional account of the life of Thomas Paine. Always interested in American history, he also wrote The Last Frontier, about an attempt by Cheyennes to return to their native land; and Freedom Road, about the lives of former slaves during Reconstruction. The novel 'Freedom
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Barnes & Noble

    Barnes & Noble

    • Book editions published: Common Sense
    Barnes & Noble, Inc. (NYSE: BKS) is the largest book retailer in the United States, operating mainly through its Barnes & Noble Booksellers chain of bookstores headquartered at 122 Fifth Avenue in the Flatiron District in Manhattan in New York City. Barnes & Noble also operated the chain of small B. Dalton Booksellers stores in malls until they announced the liquidation of the chain. The company is known for large, upscale retail outlets, many of which contain a café serving Starbucks Coffee, and for competitive discounting of bestsellers. Most stores also sell magazines, newspapers, DVDs, graphic novels, gifts, games, and music. Video games and related items were sold in the company's GameStop retail outlets until October 2004, when the division was spun off into an independent company. Barnes & Noble is also known for selling the Barnes & Noble Nook, as well as various incarnations of its mascot, a teddy bear named "Barnsie". The company operates 705 stores (as of April 30, 2011) in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia in addition to 636 college bookstores that serve more than 4.6 million students and faculty members across the country. Barnes & Noble originated in
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Ian Allan Publishing

    Ian Allan Publishing

    • Book editions published: Hohenstaufen: 9th SS Panzer Division (Spearhead)
    Ian Allan Publishing is a UK publisher, established in 1942, which specialises in transport magazines and books. In 1942 Ian Allan, then working in the public relations department for Southern Railway at Waterloo Station, decided he could deal with many of the requests he received about rolling stock by collecting the information into a book . The result was his first book, "ABC of Southern Locomotives". This proved to be a success, leading to the emerging of trainspotting as a national hobby, and from this the company was formed. The company has grown from a small producer of books for train enthusiasts and spotters to a large transport publisher. Each year it publishes books covering subjects such as military and civil aviation, naval and maritime topics, buses, trams, trolleybuses and steam railways, including history, preservation and modern operations. The headquarters is at the western end of Shepperton railway station in Surrey. Ian Allan Publishing has acquired several companies and imprints. Ian Allan Publishing's trade representation is provided by Amalgamated Book Services for its own imprints and a growing list of associated publishers. Midland Counties Publications,
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Ins & Outs Press

    Ins & Outs Press

    Ins & Outs Press is a small English-language publisher with international connections based in Amsterdam and registered in the Netherlands as a cultural foundation, or stichting. It was started in 1980 by Eddie Woods, Jane Harvey, and Henk van der Does as a natural extension of Ins & Outs magazine, the first three issues of which were produced by Woods and Harvey in 1978. For two years the Press also operated a bookstore, located on the 'quiet fringe of the red-light district,' until Van der Does left the organization to start his own bookshop and Woods converted the ground floor of the six-story building into a gallery and performance space. The Press remained periodically active throughout the 1980s and into the early 1990s. In 1993, with the premises lost the previous year following a series of acrimonious lawsuits with the landlord (and Woods having gone personally bankrupt), Ins & Outs went into a long spell of 'suspended animation' from which it only began emerging (and on a much smaller scale) in 2004. Among the poets and authors published by Ins & Outs are Allen Ginsberg, Paul Bowles, Harold Norse, Jack Micheline, William Levy, Ira Cohen, Gerard Malanga, Lawrence
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Johns Hopkins University

    Johns Hopkins University

    • Imprints: Johns Hopkins University Press
    • Book editions published: A family venture: men and women on the southern frontier
    The Johns Hopkins University (informally Johns Hopkins, JHU, or simply Hopkins) is a private research university based in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. The university was founded on January 22, 1876 and named for its benefactor, the philanthropist Johns Hopkins. Daniel Coit Gilman was inaugurated as the first president on February 22, 1876. Johns Hopkins maintains campuses in Maryland; Washington, D.C.; Italy; China and Singapore. The university is organized into two undergraduate divisions and five graduate divisions on two main campuses—the Homewood campus and the Medical Institutions campus—both located in Baltimore. The university also consists of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the Peabody Institute, the Carey Business School, and various other facilities. Johns Hopkins pioneered the concept of the modern research university in the United States and has ranked among the world's top such universities throughout its history. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has ranked Johns Hopkins #1 among U.S. academic institutions in total science, medical and engineering research and development spending for 31 consecutive years. As of 2011,
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    1 votes
    148
    Kadokawa Shoten

    Kadokawa Shoten

    Kadokawa Shoten Publishing Co., Ltd. (株式会社角川書店, Kabushiki-gaisha Kadokawa Shoten), a division of Kadokawa Group Holdings, Inc. (株式会社角川グループホールディングス), is a well-known Japanese publishing company based in Tokyo, Japan. Kadokawa has published both manga novels and magazines, such as Newtype magazine. In recent years it has expanded into the multimedia sector, namely in video games and movies (as Kadokawa Pictures). Kadokawa Shoten was established on November 10, 1945 by Genyoshi Kadokawa. The company's first publication imprint, Kadokawa Bunko, was published in 1949. The company went public on April 2, 1954. In 1975, Haruki Kadokawa became the president of Kadokawa Shoten, following Genyoshi Kadokawa's death. On April 1, 2003, Kadokawa Shoten was renamed to Kadokawa Holdings, transferring the existing publishing businesses to Kadokawa Shoten. On July 1, 2006, the parent company was renamed to Kadokawa Group Holdings, and inherited the management and integration businesses within Kadokawa Shoten. In January 2007, Kadokawa Group Holdings inherited the management and integration businesses within Kadokawa Shoten. The magazine businesses was transferred to the Kadokawa Magazine Group. The
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Lonely Planet

    Lonely Planet

    • Book editions published: Slowly Down the Ganges
    Lonely Planet is the largest travel guide book and digital media publisher in the world. The company is owned by BBC Worldwide, which bought a 75% share from the founders Maureen and Tony Wheeler in 2007 and the final 25% in February 2011. Originally called Lonely Planet Publications, the company changed its name to Lonely Planet in July 2009 to reflect its broad travel industry offering and the emphasis on digital products. After Let's Go Travel Guides, it was one of the first series of travel books aimed at backpackers and other low-cost travellers. As of 2010, it publishes about 500 titles in 8 languages, as well as TV programmes, a magazine, mobile phone applications and websites. Lonely Planet also has its own television production company, which has produced numerous series: Lonely Planet Six Degrees, The Sport Traveller, Going Bush, Vintage New Zealand, Bluelist Australia and Lonely Planet: Roads Less Travelled. Lonely Planet is headquartered in Footscray, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia, with affiliate offices in London and Oakland, California. As of 2009, it was increasing its digital, online presence greatly. In 2009 Lonely Planet began publishing a monthly travel
    8.00
    1 votes
    150
    Marvel Entertainment

    Marvel Entertainment

    • Book editions published: Fantastic Four: Season One
    Marvel Entertainment, LLC, formerly Marvel Enterprises and Toy Biz, Inc., is an American entertainment company formed from the merger of Marvel Entertainment Group, Inc. and Toy Biz, Inc. In 2009, The Walt Disney Company acquired Marvel Entertainment, Inc. for $4 billion. It has been a limited liability company (LLC) since then. As of August 2012, Marvel is the highest-grossing movie franchise, with a total of over $5 billion. Marvel Entertainment Group, Inc. (Marvel or MEG), the parent company of Marvel Comics and Marvel Productions, was put up for sale as part of the liquidation of its then parent corporation, Cadence Industries, and sold in 1986 to New World Pictures. In 1989, Ronald Perelman's MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings group of companies bought Marvel Entertainment Group from New World for $82.5 million, not including Marvel Productions, which was folded into New World's TV and movie business. "It is a mini-Disney in terms of intellectual property," said Perelman. "Disney's got much more highly recognized characters and softer characters, whereas our characters are termed action heroes. But at Marvel we are now in the business of the creation and marketing of
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    1 votes
    151
    Medici Oriental Press

    Medici Oriental Press

    The Medici Oriental Press (also Typographia Medicea) was a press established by Ferdinand de Medici in the 16th century. This press produced some of the earliest books printed in Arabic. The press was active from 1584 to 1614. The press initially benefited from the oriental manuscripts contributed by Ignatius Nemet Allah I, Patriarch of the Syriac Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch, then in exile in Italy. The Medici Oriental Press published Christian religious works in oriental languages, such as the Gospels which were printed in Arabic in 1591, with the objective of converting Muslims. The Press also produced scientific books in the original Arabic language, possibly for European scientist to gain direct access to Arabic works. The Press received from the Pope a monopoly to print books in "foreign languages". Robert Granjon of Paris (who also worked for the Typographia Vaticana) was employed to cut Oriental typefaces, and Giovan Battista Raimondo from Cremona was designated as the manager of the Press.
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Plantin Press

    Plantin Press

    • Book editions published: Whatever love declares
    The Plantin Press at Antwerp was one of the focal centers of the fine printed book in the 16th century. Christophe Plantin (ca 1520 - 1589) of Touraine, trained as a bookbinder, fled from Paris, where at least one printer had recently been burned at the stake for heresy, for Antwerp, where he bound books, became a citizen, and by 1555 began to print books, at first for distribution by other publishers. The city was already an established center of printing woodcuts, engravings and books. Plantin took on an assistant, Jan Moretus (Moerentorf), who read Latin and Greek, could write correspondence in several modern languages, became Plantin's business manager, son-in-law and eventually his successor in the Plantin printing press. For over two hundred years the Plantin press had a monopoly, granted by the papacy, for the printing of liturgical formularies, yet in 1562, suspected of heresy, Plantin fled to France for two years. At an auction of his press, friends bought up his equipment on his behalf. After 1564, when Plantin set up again in a new shop at the sign of De Gulden Passer ("The Golden Compasses") the printers mark of the House of Plantin, which often appeared in a vignette
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    University of Pennsylvania Press

    University of Pennsylvania Press

    • Book editions published: Vizcaya: An American Villa and Its Makers
    The University of Pennsylvania Press (or Penn Press) is a university press affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Press was originally incorporated with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on March 26, 1890, and the imprint of the University of Pennsylvania Press first appeared on publications in the closing decade of the nineteenth century, among the earliest such imprints in America. One of the Press's first book publications, in 1899, was a landmark: The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study, by renowned black reformer, scholar, and social critic W.E.B. Du Bois, a book that still remains in print on the Press's lists. Today the Press has an active backlist of roughly 1,500 titles and an annual output of upwards of 120 new books in a focused editorial program. Areas of special interest include American history and culture; ancient, medieval, and Renaissance studies; anthropology; landscape architecture; studio arts; human rights; Jewish studies; and political science. The Press also publishes ten peer-reviewed academic journals, mostly in the humanities, and the magazine Dissent. The University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc. is a
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    A. C. McClurg

    A. C. McClurg

    • Book editions published: Musical memories: my recollections of celebrities of the half century, 1850-1900
    A. C. McClurg was a Chicago based publisher made famous by their original publishing of the Tarzan of the Apes novels and other stories of Edgar Rice Burroughs. McClurg was originally Jansen, McClurg & Company, and successed Griggs in bookselling within Chicago, and is still a leading wholesaler and retailer. In 1889, McClurg was a founding member of the American Publishers Association.
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    2 votes
    155
    Absolute Entertainment

    Absolute Entertainment

    Absolute Entertainment was an American video game publishing company. Through its development house, Imagineering, Absolute Entertainment produced titles for the Amiga, Atari 2600, Atari 7800, Sega Game Gear, Sega Mega Drive, Mega-CD, Game Boy, Nintendo Entertainment System, and Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game consoles, as well as for the PC. It also released games for the Sega Master System in Europe. After leaving his position as a video game developer and designer at Activision, Garry Kitchen founded the company in 1986 with his brother Dan Kitchen, along with David Crane, Alex Demeo, John Van Ryzin. The company's headquarters was in Glen Rock, New Jersey, but later moved to another New Jersey borough, Upper Saddle River. While the company was based in New Jersey, David Crane worked out of his home on the West Coast. The company's name was chosen because it was alphabetically above Activision, implying that Absolute Entertainment was superior to Activision . It was the same strategy that Activision chose when the programmers left Atari. At Absolute Entertainment, Kitchen continued developing games for the Atari 2600 and Atari 7800, as he had done at Activision.
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    American Museum of Natural History

    American Museum of Natural History

    • Book editions published: The Snouters: Form and Life of the Rhinogrades
    The American Museum of Natural History (abbreviated as AMNH), located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City is one of the largest and most celebrated museums in the world. Located in park-like grounds across the street from Central Park, the Museum comprises 25 interconnected buildings that house 46 permanent exhibition halls, research laboratories, and its renowned library. The collections contain over 32 million specimens, of which only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time. The Museum has a scientific staff of more than 200, sponsors over 100 special field expeditions each year, and averages about five million visits annually. The Museum was founded in 1869. Prior to construction of the present complex, the Museum was housed in the Arsenal building in Central Park. Theodore Roosevelt, Sr., the father of the 26th U.S. President, was one of the founders along with John David Wolfe, William T. Blodgett, Robert L. Stuart, Andrew H. Green, Robert Colgate, Morris K. Jesup, Benjamin H. Field, D. Jackson Steward, Richard M. Blatchford, J. Pierpont Morgan, Adrian Iselin, Moses H. Grinnell, Benjamin B. Sherman, A. G. Phelps Dodge, William A. Haines, Charles A.
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Central European University

    Central European University

    For other uses, see European University (disambiguation) Central European University (CEU) is a graduate-level, English-language university promoting a distinctively Central European perspective. The university offers degrees in the social sciences, humanities, law, public policy, business management, environmental science, and mathematics. The university is located in Budapest, and is accredited in the United States and in Hungary. CEU has more than 1500 students from 100 countries and 300 faculty members from more than 30 countries. CEU cultivates close ties with philanthropist George Soros, who has provided an endowment of US$880 million, making the university one of the wealthiest in Europe. CEU evolved from a series of lectures held at the IUC in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, (now Croatia). In the Spring of 1989, as historical change was gathering momentum in the region the need for a new, independent, international university was being considered. The minutes of the gathering held in April 1989 records an inspirational discussion among scholars such as Rudolf Andorka, Péter Hanák, Márton Tardos, István Teplán, Tibor Vámos and Miklós Vásárhelyi from Budapest, William Newton-Smith and
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    2 votes
    158
    D. C. Heath and Company

    D. C. Heath and Company

    • Book editions published: Moving On Teacher's Edition Workbook Grade 1 (American Readers)
    D.C. Heath and Company was an American publishing company located at 125 Spring Street in Lexington, Massachusetts, specializing in textbooks. The company was founded in Boston by Daniel Collamore Heath in 1885. D.C. Heath and Company was owned by Raytheon from 1966 to 1995. When Raytheon exited the textbook market, it sold the company to Houghton Mifflin.
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    2 votes
    159
    Delius Klasing Verlag

    Delius Klasing Verlag

    • Book editions published: Der verschekte Sieg (3rd ed.)
    Delius Klasing Verlag GmbH is a publisher based in Bielefeld, Germany and generally specializing in the areas of Sports, Travel, Adventure, Automobile, Sailing and the Great Outdoors.
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    2 votes
    160
    English Heritage

    English Heritage

    • Book editions published: The English Heritage Members' & Visitors' Handbooks
    English Heritage (officially the Historic Building and Monuments Commission for England) is an executive non-departmental public body of the British Government sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). By advising on the care of the historic environment in England, English Heritage complements the work of Natural England which aims to protect the natural environment. It has a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England and advises the relevant Secretary of State on policy and in individual cases such as registering listed buildings and scheduled ancient monuments. Simon Thurley has been chief executive since 2002. It was set up under the terms of the National Heritage Act 1983. Its functions for maintaining ancient monuments had previously been undertaken by part of the Department of the Environment which was the successor to the Ministry of Works. The 1983 Act also dissolved the bodies that had hitherto provided independent advice — the Ancient Monuments Board for England and the Historic Buildings Council for England and incorporated these functions in the new body. Another advisory body, the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of
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    2 votes
    161
    Ridan Publishing

    Ridan Publishing

    Ridan Publishing is a small, independent publisher working out of Fairfax, Virginia, in the United States. It was founded in 2007 by Robin Sullivan, initially as a vehicle for her husband, Michael Sullivan's science fiction novels. It has since expanded from a self-publishing venture to publish works from other writers. Primarily an electronic publisher specialising in Fantasy and Science Fiction. Publications have included: Awards received by Ridan Author's include:
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    Safari Books Online

    Safari Books Online

    In July 2001, two of the world's most prominent technology publishers, O'Reilly Media and The Pearson Technology Group, joined forces to create a joint venture, Safari Books Online. The premise was simple. Take the best IT books from the best authors and publishers. Put them into an online database that programming and IT professionals can search to quickly pinpoint reliable code examples and technical information. The result was extraordinary. Safari's flagship service, Safari Tech Books Online, exceeded all expectations selling site licenses to Fortune 50 companies, major universities and leading training organizations worldwide. Faced with increasing client demand for more content in more functional areas, Safari tapped into the deep content pools of its venture partners, O'Reilly and Pearson (whose imprints include such well-known names as Addison-Wesley, Financial Times Prentice Hall, Cisco Press, and Prentice Hall) to expand its product line. Safari offers a series of e-reference libraries and other e-reference tools for enterprises, academic institutions and individuals. For additional information, please visit www.safaribooksonline.com.
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    2 votes
    163
    Salariya Book Company

    Salariya Book Company

    The Salariya Book Company is an independent publishing company based in Brighton, United Kingdom, which publishes children’s non-fiction, fiction and baby books both domestically and internationally. Salariya books are published in the UK through its Book House, Scribblers and Scribo imprints. The Salariya Book Company was founded by David Salariya as a book-packaging company in 1989 in Brighton, England. In 2002, it started publishing under its imprint Book House, going on to launch the imprint Scribblers (designed to develop key learning skills for babies and pre-school children) in 2007 and the children’s fiction imprint Scribo in 2009. David Salariya was born in Dundee, Scotland in 1954. He attended Ancrum Road Primary School then Harris Academy, before studying illustration and printmaking at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee, specialising in book design in his postgraduate year. He worked as a freelance illustrator and designer before founding The Salariya Book Company in 1989. He lives in Brighton with his wife Shirley and their son Jonathan. Book series publishing by The Salariya Book Company include You Wouldn’t Want To Be (published as The Danger
    7.00
    2 votes
    164
    Thomson Corporation

    Thomson Corporation

    The Thomson Corporation was one of the world's largest information companies. It merged with Reuters Group to form Thomson Reuters in 2008. The Thomson Corporation was active in financial services, healthcare sectors, law, science & technology research, and tax & accounting sectors. The company operated through five segments (2007 onwards): Thomson Financial, Thomson Healthcare, Thomson Legal, Thomson Scientific, and Thomson Tax & Accounting. Until 2007, Thomson was also a major worldwide provider of higher education textbooks, academic information solutions and reference materials. On October 26, 2006, Thomson announced the proposed sale of its Thomson Learning assets. In May 2007, Thomson Learning was acquired by Apax Partners and subsequently renamed Cengage Learning in July. The Thomson Learning brand was used through the end of August, 2007. Subsequently, on October 15, 2007, Educational Testing Service (ETS) finalized acquisition of Thomson's Prometric. Thomson sold its global network of testing centers in 135 countries, for a reported $435 million. Prometric now operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of ETS. On May 15, 2007, The Thomson Corporation reached an agreement with
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    2 votes
    165
    WorldNetDaily

    WorldNetDaily

    • Book editions published: Target: Caught in the Crosshairs of Bill and Hillary Clinton
    WorldNetDaily (WND) is an American web site that publishes news and associated content from the perspective of U.S. conservatives and the political right. It was founded in May 1997 by Joseph Farah with the stated intent of "exposing wrongdoing, corruption and abuse of power" and is headquartered in Washington, D.C. In 1997, Joseph Farah created the news website WorldNetDaily as a division of the Western Journalism Center. It was subsequently spun off in 1999 as a for-profit organization with the backing of $4.5 million from investors, Farah owning a majority of the stock. The site describes itself as "an independent news company dedicated to uncompromising journalism". In 1999, WorldNetDaily.com, Inc. was incorporated in Delaware with offices in Cave Junction, Oregon. According to its website, World Net Daily has a staff of approximately 25 people. In 2007 it was headquartered in Medford, Oregon. Seeking credentials to cover the U.S. Congress in 2002, WND was opposed by the Standing Committee of Correspondents. This panel of journalists was charged by Congress with administering press credentials. Until 1996, internet-only publications had been deemed unacceptable. It was argued
    7.00
    2 votes
    166
    Calender

    Calender

    The calender is a series of hard pressure rollers used to form or smooth a sheet of material. In a principal application, the calender is located at the end of a papermaking process (on-line). Those that are used separate from the process (off-line) are also called supercalenders. The purpose of a calender is to make the paper smooth and glossy for printing and writing. The calender section of a paper machine consist of a calender and other equipment. The paper web is run between in order to further smooth it out, which also gives it a more uniform thickness. The pressure applied to the web by the rollers determines the finish of the paper, and there are three types of finish that the paper can have. The first is machine finish, and can range from a rough antique look to a smooth high quality finish. The second is called a supercalendered finish and is a higher degree for fine-screened halftone printing. The third type of finish is called a plater finish, and whereas the first two types of finish are accomplished by the calender stack itself, a plater finish is obtained by placing cut sheets of paper between zinc or copper plates that are stacked together, then put under pressure
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Éditions du Seuil

    Éditions du Seuil

    • Book editions published: Écrits
    Éditions du Seuil (French pronunciation: [edisjɔ̃ dy sœj]) is a French publishing house created in 1935, currently owned by La Martinière Groupe. It owes its name to this goal "The seuil (threshold) is the whole excitement of parting and arriving. It is also the brand new threshold that we refashion at the door of the Church to allow entry to many whose foot gropes around it" (letter of father Plaquevent, 28 December 1934). Éditions du Seuil was the publisher of the Don Camillo series, and of Chairman Mao's Little Red Book. The large sales which these generated have allowed the house to publish more specialized titles, particularly in the social sciences. Éditions du Seuil is widely respected in the publishing world maintaining good relations with its authors. Seuil has published works by Jacques Lacan, Roland Barthes and Philippe Sollers (in his first period), and later by Edgar Morin, Maurice Genevoix and Pierre Bourdieu. Notably, they published Frantz Fanon's doctoral thesis, Black Skin, White Masks, in 1952. Similarly, Seuil's good relations with book retailers have allowed it to establish significant distribution activity, ensuring the circulation of the works of such
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    Elsevier BV

    Elsevier BV

    • Book editions published: Handbook of Constraint Programming
    Elsevier B.V. (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɛlzəvir]) is a publishing company which publishes medical and scientific literature. It is a part of the Reed Elsevier group. Based in Amsterdam, the company has operations in the United Kingdom, USA, and elsewhere. Elsevier took its name from the Dutch publishing house Elzevir, which, however, had no connection with the present company. The Elzevir family operated as booksellers and publishers in the Netherlands. Its founder, Lodewijk Elzevir (1542–1617), lived in Leiden and established the business in 1580. The modern company was founded in 1880. Leading products include journals such as The Lancet and Cell, books such as Gray's Anatomy, the ScienceDirect collection of electronic journals, the Trends and Current Opinion series of journals, and the online citation database Scopus. Its free researcher collaboration tool, 2collab, launched in 2007, was discontinued in 2011. Elsevier publishes 250,000 articles a year in 2,000 journals. Its archives contain seven million publications. Total yearly downloads amount to 240 million. The company is currently being boycotted by academics who object to its business model, which includes "paywalls" and
    6.00
    3 votes
    169
    Zebra

    Zebra

    • Book editions published: Universe 11
    • Imprint of: Kensington Books
    An imprint of Kensington primarily of historical romance titles, but also publishes contemporary romances, westerns, horror and humor.
    5.00
    4 votes
    170
    Aphrodisia

    Aphrodisia

    • Book editions published: Wolf Tales IV
    • Imprint of: Kensington Books
    An imprint of Kensington Books launched in 2006 that primarily publishes erotica and erotic stories.
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Design Museum

    Design Museum

    • Book editions published: Isambard Kingdom Brunel: Recent Works
    Design Museum is a museum by the River Thames near Tower Bridge in central London, England. The museum covers product, industrial, graphic, fashion and architectural design. It was founded in 1989 and claims to be the first museum of modern design. In 2007, the museum was listed by The Times newspaper as number two in their top five museums of the year. Deyan Sudjic is the current Director of the museum. He succeeded Alice Rawsthorn in 2006. Unlike most large London museums, the entrance is not free, as it is not subsidized by the UK Arts Council. For this reason it operates as a charity, and all funds generated by ticket sales aid the museum in putting new exhibitions together. The museum attracts 200,000 visitors annually. The museum is currently housed in a former 1940s banana warehouse on the south bank of the River Thames in the Shad Thames area in SE1 London. The conversion of this warehouse altered it beyond recognition to resemble a building in the International Modernist style of the 1930s. This was funded by many companies, designers and benefactors. The museum was principally designed by the Conran group, with exhibitions over two floors, and a "Design Museum Tank"
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Lontar Foundation

    Lontar Foundation

    • Imprints: Godown
    • Book editions published: Illuminations: The Writing Traditions of Indonesia
    The Lontar Foundation, a not-for-profit organization based in Jakarta, Indonesia, was founded in 1987 by four Indonesian writers: Goenawan Mohamad, Sapardi Djoko Damono, Umar Kayam, and Subagio Sastrowardoyo and the American translator, John H. McGlynn. The foundation is an independent organization, neither affiliated with nor intended to promote the interests of any particular political cause or group. The Foundation's core activity is the translation and publication of Indonesian literary works whose long term goals are: One of the more significant ventures of the publishing venture was the book published in 2005 - Indonesia in the Soeharto Years - Issues, Incidents and images - written by John H. McGlynn and a large number of other writers. According to Tempo (Indonesian magazine), "[Lontar] has inarguably become Indonesia's foremost literary foundation, and now has under its belt an impressive collection of translated literary works, from prose to poetry to drama."
    5.67
    3 votes
    173
    Oxford University Press

    Oxford University Press

    • Book editions published: Brave New Words: The Oxford Dictionary of Science Fiction
    Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world. It is a department of the University of Oxford and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the Vice-Chancellor known as the Delegates of the Press. They are headed by the Secretary to the Delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies. Oxford University has used a similar system to oversee the Press since the 17th century. The university became involved in the print trade around 1480, and grew into a major printer of Bibles, prayer books, and scholarly works. Its Press took on the project that became the Oxford English Dictionary in the late 19th century, and expanded to meet the ever-rising costs of the work. As a result, the last hundred years has seen Oxford publish children's books, school text books, music, journals, the World's Classics series, and a best-selling range of English Language Teaching texts to match its academic and religious titles. Moves into international markets led to the Press opening its own offices outside the United Kingdom, beginning with New York in 1896. With the advent of computer technology and
    5.67
    3 votes
    174
    Brimstone Press

    Brimstone Press

    • Book editions published: First Cut
    Brimstone Press was an Australian independent publisher of dark fiction (horror and dark fantasy). Brimstone Press was established in 2004 by Angela Challis and Shane Jiraiya Cummings and was based in Western Australia. The first publication from Brimstone Press was Shadowed Realms, an online flash fiction horror magazine that was active from 2004 to 2007. Authors published in Shadowed Realms include Terry Dowling, Richard Harland, Robert Hood, Poppy Z Brite, Stephen Dedman, Kurt Newton, Martin Livings, Lee Battersby, Paul Haines, Steven Cavanagh and Kaaron Warren. Shadowed Realms gained professional status from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) in 2005 and was nominated for the Best Collected Work Ditmar Award in 2006. Brimstone Press also published HorrorScope: The Australian Dark Fiction Web Log, a news and review webzine. In December 2006, Brimstone Press moved into book publication. Among their published anthologies are Shadow Box and the Australian Dark Fantasy & Horror series. Brimstone Press produced a newsstand-quality horror magazine, Black: Australia's Dark Culture magazine which ran for three issues in 2008. Many of Australia's best-known horror
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Export Publishing Enterprises Ltd.

    Export Publishing Enterprises Ltd.

    • Imprints: News Stand Library
    • Book editions published: Destroy the U.S.A.
    Export Publishing Enterprises Ltd. was a Canadian publisher that operated from 1946 to 1951. It published two paperback imprints, News Stand Library and Torch, as well as comics,pulps and magazines. The shareholders and officers of the company were Stanley Schrag, President, Martin Kastner, Secretary and Frank Steele, Vice-president. Harry M. Steele was the Managing Editor. Export was incorporated in November 1946. The first News Stand Library was published in mid 1948, the last (#157) in early 1951. The only issues of the Torch imprint (#1-#4) were published in November 1950. Export's printing plant was destroyed by fire on December 11, 1950 and the company did not survive. A second series of the NSL imprint (with an "A" after the number) was published by Export for distribution in the US. Most were reprints of books that Export published in the first series but the title and/or author were sometimes changed.Twenty of the 28 books of this series had dust covers. While not unique this was very uncommon for paperbacks. Export published a few crime, westerns, science fiction and non-fiction but nearly all its books were contemporary stories with the male or female protaganist in
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    FC2

    FC2

    Fiction Collective Two (FC2) is an author-run, not-for-profit publisher of avant-garde, experimental fiction supported in part by the University of Utah, the University of Alabama, Central Michigan University, private contributors, arts organizations and foundations, and contest fees. FC2 is "devoted to publishing fiction considered by America's largest publishers too challenging, innovative, or heterodox for the commercial milieu… FC2's mission has been and remains to publish books of high quality and exceptional ambition whose styles, subject matter, or forms push the limits of American publishing and reshape our literary culture." The precursor to FC2, the Fiction Collective, was founded in 1974 by Jonathan Baumbach, Peter Spielberg, B. H. Friedman, Mark Jay Mirsky, Steve Katz, and Ronald Sukenick, among others. It formed the first US not-for-profit publishing collective run by innovative authors and for innovative authors. According to Sukenick, the Fiction Collective was intended to "make serious novels and story collections available in simultaneous hard and quality paper editions" and to "keep them in print permanently." Although geographically disparate (including members
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Focal Press

    Focal Press

    • Book editions published: The technique of radio production: a manual for broadcasters
    Focal Press is a publisher of media technology books and it is an imprint of Elsevier. It was founded in 1938 by Andor Kraszna-Krausz, a Hungarian photographer who immigrated to England in 1937 and eventually published over 1,200 books on photography.
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Guilford Press

    Guilford Press

    • Book editions published: Love in the Time of HIV: The Gay Man's Guide to Sex, Dating, and Relationships
    Guilford Publications, Inc. is a New York City-based independent publisher founded in 1973 that specializes in publishing books, journals, software, and DVDs in psychology, psychiatry, the behavioral sciences, education, and geography. The firm is owned by its two founding partners, president Bob Matloff and editor-in-chief Seymour Weingarten. When reviewing a Guilford Press title on parenting, Kirkus Reviews said of the company: Guilford Press makes the following claim on its web site: "From psychology, psychiatry, and the behavioral sciences, to education, geography, and communication, the company is dedicated to bringing well-written, solidly researched work to professionals, academics, and interested general readers." We've taken a very close look at many of their books, and the claim so far holds up. Library Journal also described Guilford Press as a leading publisher of mental health resources: No single publisher dominates this field, although Guilford Publications is an excellent source of professional and consumer books and videos dealing with mental health. The publishing house currently has over 1,350 titles in print and typically publishes more than 90 new books each
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Jaypee Brothers

    Jaypee Brothers

    Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers, is a leading publishing house based in India. The company works in closed conjunction with health care professionals as well as health care information providers. As a publisher, Jaypee has been publishing works of educationalists, medical professionals, academicians not only from India, but also world wide. Jaypee’s publications are distributed both in developed and developing countries. Besides publication, the company distributes and promotes the publications of some of the biggest publishers in the world. As a distributor they are involved in promoting and distributing books of publishers world wide. The company is also involved in the translations of their titles in languages like Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic, Chinese, etc. Jaypee Brothers, which started out as a small publication house (300 sq. feet) with just a few titles in 1969, now has ten branches all over India and in the United States. The foundation of Jaypee Medical Publishing Company was laid by Late Sohan Lal Vij in 1969, the period during which the medical book publishing was still in its infancy in India. After his death in 1972, the company’s responsibility fell in the hands of
    6.50
    2 votes
    180
    Stanford Center for the Study of Language and Information

    Stanford Center for the Study of Language and Information

    • Book editions published: Language, Proof and Logic
    The Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI) is an independent research center at Stanford University. Founded in 1983 by philosophers, computer scientists, linguists, and psychologists from Stanford, SRI International, and Xerox PARC, it strives to study all forms of information and improve how humans and computers acquire and process it. CSLI was initially funded by a US$15 million grant from the System Development Foundation (SDF) for the Situated Language Project, the name of which reflects the strong influence of the work on situation semantics by philosophers John Perry and Jon Barwise, two of the initial leaders of CSLI. This funding supported operations for the first few years as well as the construction of Cordura Hall. Subsequent funding has come from research grants and from an industrial affiliates program. CSLI's publications branch, founded and still headed by Dikran Karagueuzian, has grown into an important publisher of work in linguistics and related fields. Researchers associated with CSLI include Ronald Kaplan, the mathematicians Keith Devlin (current Executive Director) and Solomon Feferman, the linguists Ivan Sag and Joan Bresnan, psychologist
    6.50
    2 votes
    181
    The New York Times Company

    The New York Times Company

    The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr. has served as Chairman of the Board since 1997. It is headquartered in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The company was founded by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones in New York City. The first edition of the newspaper The New York Times, published on September 18, 1851, stated: "We publish today the first issue of the New-York Daily Times, and we intend to issue it every morning (Sundays excepted) for an indefinite number of years to come." The company also owns the International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, and several related media properties, including NYTimes.com, Boston.com, and About.com. Since 1967, the company has been publicly traded and listed on the New York Stock Exchange by the symbol NYT. While it offers two kinds of shares of its stock, Class A and Class B, Class B shares are not publicly traded. The Class B shares provide a mechanism by which the descendants of Adolph Ochs, who purchased The New York Times newspaper in 1896, maintain control of the company by holding nearly 90 percent of this
    6.50
    2 votes
    182
    Aperture Foundation

    Aperture Foundation

    • Book editions published: New York Rises: Photographs by Eugene de Salignac
    The Aperture Foundation was founded in 1952 by Ansel Adams, Minor White, Barbara Morgan, Dorothea Lange, Nancy Newhall, Beaumont Newhall, Ernest Louie, Melton Ferris, and Dody Warren. Their vision was to create a forum for fine art photography, a new concept at the time. The first issue of Aperture (magazine) was published in spring 1952 in San Francisco. Aperture's efforts increased respect for photography and its popularity among contemporary artists soared. In January 2011, Englishman Chris Boot joined the organization as its director. Mr. Boot has been previously employed by both Magnum Photos and Phaidon Press. Aperture is a not-for-profit. The foundation is committed to shining a spotlight on work that is new and challenging while providing a forum for reevaluations of the history of the medium. Intellectual rigor and calculated risk-taking have always defined Aperture Foundation, as expressed by the mission statement: The purpose of Aperture Foundation, a non-profit organization, is to advance photography in all its forms and to foster the exchange of ideas among audiences worldwide. Aperture is known as publisher of photography books, with more than 500 titles in print.
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    Abel Bowen

    Abel Bowen

    Abel Bowen (1790-1850) was an engraver, publisher, and author in early 19th-century Boston, Massachusetts. Bowen was born in New York in 1790. Arriving in Boston in 1812, he worked as a printer for the Columbian Museum, at the time under the proprietorship of his uncle, Daniel Bowen. In 1814 Abel married Eliza Healey of Hudson, New York. Their children included Abel Bowen (d.1818). With W.S. Pendleton he formed the firm of Pendleton & Bowen, which ended in 1826. He joined the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association in 1828. In the 1830s Bowen and others formed the Boston Bewick Company, which published the American Magazine of Useful and Entertaining Knowledge. He lived and worked in Congress Square, ca.1823-1826;in 1832 he kept his shop on Water Street, and lived on Union Street; in 1849 he worked on School Street, and lived in Chelsea. Bowen taught Joseph Andrews, Hammatt Billings, George Loring Brown, B.F. Childs, William Croome, Nathaniel Dearborn, G. Thomas Devereaux, Alonzo Hartwell, Samuel Smith Kilburn, and Richard P. Mallory. Contemporaries included William Hoogland. His siblings included publisher Henry Bowen.
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Asian American Writers' Workshop

    Asian American Writers' Workshop

    • Book editions published: Take Out: Queer Writing From Asian Pacific America
    The Asian American Writers' Workshop is a nonprofit literary arts organization founded in 1991 to support of writers, literature and community. The Workshop also offers the annual Asian American Literary Awards and sponsors Page Turner: The Asian American Literary Festival. In 2007, The Asian American Writers' Workshop partnered with Hyphen Magazine to start a short story contest called the Hyphen Asian American Short Story Contest, the only national, pan-Asian American writing competition of its kind Previous winners include Preeta Samarasan, Sunil Yapa, Shivani Manghnani, and Timothy Tau. Previous judges include Porochista Khakpour, Yiyun Li, Alexander Chee, Jaed Coffin, Brian Leung, Monique Truong and Monica Ferrell.
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Chick Publications

    Chick Publications

    • Book editions published: Conozcamos el Catolicismo Romano
    Chick Publications is an American publishing company founded and run by Jack T. Chick which produces and markets Protestant fundamentalist pamphlets, DVDs, VCDs, videos, books, and posters. Chick Publications' best-known products are Chick tracts, which are comic tracts that are available in nearly 100 languages. Arguably all of its products promote and seek to win converts to Christian fundamentalism. While some tracts express views that are generally accepted within Christian theology, e.g. the Incarnation of Christ, other tracts have controversial views and criticisms against cultures, religions and theological concepts. The Southern Poverty Law Center labels the organization as a hate group. Chick Publications has its headquarters in Rancho Cucamonga, while it has an Ontario, California mailing address. All of Chick Publications' tracts, and several excerpts from his full-length comics, may be read without charge at the Chick website. Many older tracts are out of print; however, Chick Publications will print a minimum 10,000 tract special order of any out-of-print series. On the company's website they also note that "Our ministry is primarily publishing the gospel tracts of
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Peabody Essex Museum

    Peabody Essex Museum

    • Book editions published: Yankee India: American Commercial and Cultural Encounters with India in the Age of Sail, 1784-1860
    The Peabody Essex Museum (est. 1992) in Salem, Massachusetts, may be considered one of the oldest continuously operating museums in the United States. It combines the collections of the former Peabody Museum of Salem and the Essex Institute, located in the Downtown Salem District. The museum holds one of the major collections of Asian art in the US. Its total holdings include about 1.3 million pieces, as well as twenty-four historic buildings. In 1992, the Peabody Museum of Salem merged with the Essex Institute to form the Peabody Essex Museum. Included in the merger was the legacy of the East India Marine Society, established in 1799 by a group of Salem-based captains and supercargoes. Members of the Society were required by the society's charter to collect "natural and artificial curiosities" from beyond the Cape of Good Hope or Cape Horn. Due to the institution's age, the items they donated to the collections are significant for their rare combination of age and provenance. In 2003, the Peabody Essex Museum opened a new wing designed by Moshe Safdie, more than doubling the gallery space to 250,000 square feet (23,000 m²); this allowed the display of many items from its extensive
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Poisoned Pen Press

    Poisoned Pen Press

    • Book editions published: Hornswoggled
    Poisoned Pen Press is a publisher of hardcover mystery fiction in the United States. It is based in Scottsdale, Arizona. Poisoned Pen Press typically publishes thirty-six new hardcover mysteries per year, thirty-six new large type editions of those hardcovers, and between thirty and forty new trade paperback editions of previously published hardcovers. Audio books of new titles are produced by Blackstone Audio. All titles are distributed through Ingram Publisher Services. Poisoned Pen Press was founded in 1997 by Barbara G. Peters, Robert Rosenwald, and their daughter, Susan Malling. Peters, who had founded Scottsdale Arizona's 'The Poisoned Pen, A Mystery Bookstore' a decade ago, sees consolidations in the publishing industry as a threat to cultural diversity and to the survival of the independent bookstore. Poisoned Pen Press began by selling out-of-print books, but soon expanded to publish original titles. They earned two Edgar Award nominations (1998 and 2000) and many of their books receive positive reviews in trade publications and general press. In recognition of Barbara Peters' and Robert Rosenwald's contribution to the publishing industry, they received the Lifetime
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Quebecor

    Quebecor

    Québecor Inc. (TSX: QBR.A, QBR.B) is a communications company based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Before 2012 it was spelled Quebecor (without acute accent) in both English and French. It was founded by Pierre Péladeau, and remains run by his family. Quebecor Inc. owns 55% of Quebecor Media Inc. - the broadcasting, communications and publishing company which operates various subsidiaries: Quebecor Inc. also formerly owned the printing company Quebecor World. Quebecor Media's wide range of media properties enables it to execute "convergence" strategies that are sometimes criticized. When the TVA television network was running the program Star Académie (sort of a French-language "American Idol"-type program), it was heavily cross-promoted: TVA would mention it in the "entertainment" segment of news broadcasts, the newspaper Le Journal de Montréal would run several pages on it, magazines would run articles on it, and so forth. The show was even hosted and produced by company CEO Pierre-Karl Péladeau's girlfriend, TV personality Julie Snyder. Current members of the board of directors of Quebecor Inc. are: Françoise Bertrand, Jean La Couture, Sylvie Lalande, Pierre Laurin, Brian
    7.00
    1 votes
    189
    Recruit

    Recruit

    Recruit Co., Ltd. (株式会社リクルート) is a classified advertisement, publication and human resources company in Japan, founded in 1963 originally as an advertisement company specialized in university newspapers. The company based its core business around job matchmaking particularly between ready-to-graduate students and corporates in the 60s, further expanding into matchmaking of job change seekers, as well as real estate and rental information in the 1970s. By the end of the 1980s, the company was also engaged in the publication of classified ad magazines covering fields such as part-time job listings, automobile and overseas travel. In 1988, the company was reported to be engaged in the so-called Recruit scandal, which led to the retirement of founder Hiromasa Ezoe from the company and his share being sold to Daiei, from which it became independent in 2000. While expanding its channel for distribution information from paper publication to the net and mobile, the company has been pushing for a shift of their revenue from advertisement to "real" human resource provisioning. As a result, its share of consolidated revenue from human resource related business in fiscal ending 2008 has grown
    7.00
    1 votes
    190
    Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

    Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

    The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is a nonprofit organization founded in 1937 by philanthropist Solomon R. Guggenheim and his long-time art advisor, artist Hilla von Rebay. The foundation is a leading institution for the collection, preservation, and research of modern and contemporary art and operates several museums around the world. The first museum established by the foundation was The Museum of Non-Objective Painting, in New York City. This became The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1952, and the foundation moved the collection into its first permanent museum building, in New York City, in 1959. The foundation next opened the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy, in 1980. Its international network of museums expanded in 1997 to include the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in Bilbao, Spain and the Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, and it expects to open a new museum, Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, in 2017. The mission of the foundation is "to promote the understanding and appreciation of art, architecture, and other manifestations of visual culture, primarily of the modern and contemporary periods, and to collect, conserve, and study" modern and contemporary art. The Foundation seeks, in
    7.00
    1 votes
    191
    Chatto and Windus

    Chatto and Windus

    • Book editions published: Brave New World
    • Imprint of: Random House UK
    Chatto & Windus has been, since 1987, an imprint of Random House, publishers. It was originally an important publisher of books in London, founded in the Victorian era. The firm developed out of the legitimate publishing business of John Camden Hotten, founded in 1855. After his death in 1873, it was sold to Hotten's junior partner Andrew Chatto (1841–1913) who took on the minor poet W. E. Windus as partner. Chatto & Windus published Mark Twain, W. S. Gilbert, Wilkie Collins, H.G. Wells, Richard Aldington, Frederick Rolfe (as Fr. Rolfe), Aldous Huxley, Samuel Beckett, the famous 'unfinished' novel Weir of Hermiston (1896) by Robert Louis Stevenson, and the first translation into English of Marcel Proust's novel À la recherche du temps perdu (Remembrance of Things Past, C. K. Scott-Moncrieff, 1922), amongst others. In 1946, the company took over the running of the Hogarth Press, founded in 1917 by Leonard and Virginia Woolf. Active as an independent publishing house until 1969, when it merged with Jonathan Cape, it published broadly in the field of literature, including novels and poetry. It is not connected, except in the loosest historical fashion, with Pickering & Chatto
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    Hyperion

    Hyperion

    • Imprints: Hyperion AudioBooks
    • Book editions published: The Man Who Loved Only Numbers: The Story of Paul Erdos and the Search for Mathematical Truth
    • Imprint of: Buena Vista Books
    Hyperion Books is a general-interest book publishing part of the Disney-ABC Television Group, a division of the Walt Disney Company, established in 1991. Hyperion publishes general-interest fiction and non-fiction books for adults under the following imprints: ABC Daytime Press, ESPN Books, Hyperion Audio, Hyperion eBooks, Hyperion East, Miramax Books, and Voice. The company is named after Hyperion Avenue, the location of Walt Disney Studios prior to 1939. The Disney Book Group publishes children's books under the Disney-Hyperion publishing arm. Hyperion is the home of numerous bestselling novels, including Mitch Albom’s The Five People You Meet in Heaven and For One More Day; Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl, Candace Bushnell’s Trading Up and Lipstick Jungle; Laura Moriarty’s The Rest of Her Life; Percy Jackson & The Olympians and Ridley Pearson's The Kingdom Keepers. The company's bestselling memoirs include J. R. Moehringer’s The Tender Bar; Duane “Dog” Chapman’s You Can Run But You Can't Hide, and Bob Newhart’s I Shouldn’t Even Be Doing This. They are also home to influential business books like Chris Anderson’s The Long Tail; self-help books like Dr. Phil McGraw’s Relationship
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Rodale Press

    Rodale Press

    • Book editions published: The Intellectual Devotional: Revive Your Mind, Complete Your Education, and Roam Confidently with the Cultured Class
    Rodale Inc. is an American publisher of health and wellness magazines, books, and digital properties. Rodale is headquartered in Emmaus, Pennsylvania and also maintains a satellite office in New York City, on Third Avenue. Rodale Inc. publishes some of the most well-known health and wellness lifestyle magazines, including Men's Health and Prevention. It is also one of the largest independent book publishers in the United States. The company has published a collection of bestsellers, including An Inconvenient Truth and Eat This, Not That. J. I. Rodale founded Rodale Inc., in 1930. He was a partner with his brother Joseph in Rodale Manufacturing, manufacturer of electrical switches. Joseph moved Rodale Manufacturing to Emmaus, Pennsylvania to take advantage of favorable local taxes, while J. I. dabbled in publishing. In 1942, Rodale started Organic Farming and Gardening magazine. It taught people how to grow better food without using chemicals in the soil. Today, Organic Gardening is the most highly read gardening magazine in the world. In 1950, Rodale introduced Prevention, a health magazine. In 1971, J. I. Rodale died during a taping of The Dick Cavett Show, and his son, Robert D.
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Clear Cut Press

    Clear Cut Press

    • Book editions published: Shoot the Buffalo
    Clear Cut Press is small press located in Portland, Oregon. Clear Cut Press was founded by novelist Matthew Stadler and Up Records co-founder Rich Jensen in 2002. Jensen began talking to Stadler while taking a poetry class in 1997. Their mutual interest in cultural movements and the role of books lead to a discussion resulting in the press. Stadler realized that he knew about "a dozen writers who weren't reaching the audience the could--or weren't being published at all." Stadler noted that, "as a business and artistic venture, Clear Cut is inspired by early 20th century subscription presses, such as Hours Press and Contact Editions, and by the mid-century paperbacks of New Directions and City Lights." A series was available by subscription. Individual volumes were distributed to the trade. As part of what Stadler referred to as the cultivation of "a long-term conversation that makes a community of readers (and therefore a market) that isn't reached through the national book review organs or most bookstores," Clear Cut actively participates in events in bookstores, warehouses, summer festivals, art museums, and non-traditional settings. Events included reading The Horse Hospital,
    5.00
    3 votes
    195
    Merck & Co.

    Merck & Co.

    • Book editions published: The Merck Manual of Medical Information: Home Edition
    Merck & Co., Inc. (NYSE: MRK), dba Merck Sharp & Dohme, MSD outside the United States and Canada, is one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world. Merck headquarters is located in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey. The company was established in 1891 as the United States subsidiary of the German company now known as Merck KGaA. Merck & Co. was confiscated by the US government during World War I and subsequently established as an independent American company. It is currently one of the world's seven largest pharmaceutical companies by market capitalization and revenue. The company describes itself as "a global research-driven pharmaceutical company" that "discovers, develops, manufactures and markets a broad range of innovative products to improve human and animal health, directly and through its joint ventures". Merck also publishes The Merck Manuals, a series of medical reference books for physicians, nurses, and technicians. These include the Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, the world's best-selling medical textbook, and the Merck Index, a compendium of chemical compounds. In 2011 the company received the "Facility of the Year"-Award for the integration of its
    5.00
    3 votes
    196
    Beacon Press

    Beacon Press

    • Book editions published: A dialogue on love
    Beacon Press is an American non-profit book publisher. Founded in 1854 by the American Unitarian Association, it is currently a department of the Unitarian Universalist Association. Under director Gobin Stair (1962-1975), new authors included James Baldwin, Kenneth Clark, Herbert Marcuse, Jürgen Habermas, Howard Zinn, Ben Bagdikian, Mary Daly, and Jean Baker Miller. Wendy Strothman became Beacon's director in 1983; she set up the organization's first advisory board, a group of scholars and publishing professionals who advised on book choices and direction. She turned a budget deficit into a surplus. In 1995, her last year at Beacon, Strothman summarized the Press's mission: "We at Beacon publish the books we choose because they share a moral vision and a sense that greater understanding can influence the course of events. They are books we believe in." Stair was replaced by Helene Atwan in 1995. In 1971, it published the "Senator Gravel edition" of The Pentagon Papers for the first time in book form, when no other publisher was willing to risk publishing such controversial material. Robert West, then-president of the Unitarian Universalist Association, approved the decision to
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Grand Forks Herald

    Grand Forks Herald

    • Book editions published: Echoes; a Selection of Stories and Columns
    The Grand Forks Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper, begun in 1879, published in Grand Forks, North Dakota. It is the primary daily paper for northeast North Dakota and northwest Minnesota. Its average daily circulation is 34,763 on Sundays and 31,524 on weekdays. It has the second largest circulation in the state of North Dakota. The paper won a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for its coverage of the 1997 flood but the prize was bittersweet, as the Herald building had not only been inundated but, ironically, burned to the ground in the midst of the floodwaters. Despite losing its offices during the flood, the Herald never missed a day of publication. Temporary offices were set up at the University of North Dakota and at a nearby elementary school. Papers were distributed free of charge to flood "refugees" in neighboring towns. Following the flood, the newspaper rebuilt its office building in downtown Grand Forks. Its distinctive features are a tall clock tower and the symbolism built into the structure, as well as parts of the old building that survived the fire. A new printing facility was also built in an industrial park in the western part of Grand Forks. Knight Ridder
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Sean Wallace

    Sean Wallace

    Sean A. Wallace (born January 1, 1976) is an American science fiction and fantasy editor and publisher. Wallace began publishing fiction in 1997, when he launched Cosmos Books, with Philip Harbottle. Their début title, Fantasy Annual, was an anthology of British authors including E.C. Tubb, John Russell Fearn, and Sydney Bounds. In 1999, the "Cosmos Books" name was licensed to Wildside Press; output greatly increased, expanding with American and Australian authors. Wallace also became a freelance editor for Wildside Press, working from Ohio. In mid 2001, Wallace stepped in to assist an ailing publishing company, Imaginary Worlds, though commercial conditions ultimately meant the company went into bankruptcy. Wallace then launched Prime Books to publish a few of the orphaned books, including the award-winning City of Saints and Madmen, by Jeff VanderMeer. Later, in 2003, he licensed the company to Wildside Press, and moved from Ohio to Pennsylvania, subsequently becoming a senior editor. In early 2009, Wallace reacquired Prime Books, and relaunched as an independent publishing house in May that year. Wallace was twice-nominated for a World Fantasy Award in 2003 and 2004 for editing
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Smithsonian Institution

    Smithsonian Institution

    • Book editions published: The papers of Joseph Henry
    The Smithsonian Institution ( /smɪθˈsoʊniən/ smith-SOH-nee-ən), established 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge", is a group of museums and research centers administered by the United States government. Termed "the nation's attic" for its eclectic holdings of 137 million items, the Institution's Washington, D.C. nucleus of nineteen museums, nine research centers, and zoo—many of them historical or architectural landmarks—is the largest such complex in the world. Additional facilities are located in Arizona, Maryland, New York City, Virginia, Panama and elsewhere, and 168 other museums are Smithsonian affiliates. The Institutions's thirty million annual visitors are admitted without charge; funding comes from the Institution's own endowment, private and corporate contributions, membership dues, government support, and retail, concession and licensing revenues. Institution publications include Smithsonian and Air & Space magazines. British scientist James Smithson (d. 1829) left most of his wealth to a nephew, but when the nephew died childless in 1835, under Smithson's will the estate passed "to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    United States Government Printing Office

    United States Government Printing Office

    • Book editions published: Psychology of Intelligence Analysis
    The United States Government Printing Office (GPO) is an agency of the legislative branch of the United States federal government. The office prints documents produced by and for the federal government, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, the Executive Office of the President, executive departments, and independent agencies. GPO was created on June 23, 1860 by Congressional Joint Resolution 25. It began operations March 4, 1861, with 350 employees and reached a peak employment of 8,500 in 1972. The agency began transformation to computer technology in 1980s; along with the gradual replacement of paper with electronic document distribution, this has led to a steady decline in the number of staff at the agency. For its entire history, GPO has occupied the corner of North Capitol Street NW and H Street NW in the District of Columbia. The activities of GPO are defined in the public printing and documents chapters of Title 44 of the United States Code. The Public Printer, who serves as the head of GPO, is appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Public Printer selects a Superintendent of Documents. The Superintendent of Documents (SuDocs) is in
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    University of Chicago

    University of Chicago

    • Imprints: University of Chicago Press
    • Book editions published: Investigations representing the departments: Greek; Latin; Comparative philology; Classical archaeology.
    The University of Chicago (U of C, UC, UChicago, or simply Chicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois, United States. The University consists of the College of the University of Chicago, various graduate programs and interdisciplinary committees organized into four divisions, six professional schools, and a school of continuing education. The University enrolls approximately 5,000 students in the College and about 15,000 students overall. In 2008, the University spent $423.7 million on scientific research. University of Chicago scholars have played a role in the development of the Chicago school of economics, the Chicago school of sociology, the law and economics movement in legal analysis, the Chicago school of literary criticism, the Chicago school of religion, the school of political science known as behavioralism, and in the physics leading to the world's first man-made, self-sustaining nuclear reaction. The University is also home to the University of Chicago Press, the largest university press in the United States. The University of Chicago is affiliated with 87 Nobel Laureates, 49 Rhodes Scholars and 9 Fields Medalists. It was founded by the American
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    W H Smith

    W H Smith

    • Book editions published: The Silver Chair & The Last Battle
    WHSmith plc (known colloquially as Smith's) is a British retailer, headquartered in Swindon, Wiltshire, England. It is best known for its chain of high street, railway station, airport, hospital and motorway service station shops selling books, stationery, magazines, newspapers, and entertainment products. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 250 Index. It has been innovative over the course of its history, being the first chain store company in the world and was responsible for the creation of the ISBN book catalogue system. In 1792, Henry Walton Smith and his wife Anna established the business as a news vendor in Little Grosvenor Street, London. After their deaths, the business — valued in 1812 at £1,280 —(about ~63764 in 2012, adjusted by inflation) was taken over by their youngest son William Henry Smith, and in 1846 the firm became W H Smith & Son when his only son, also William Henry, became a partner. The firm took advantage of the railway boom by opening newsstands on railway stations, starting with Euston in 1848. In 1850 the firm opened depots in Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool. The younger W H Smith used the success of the firm
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    Council for British Archaeology

    Council for British Archaeology

    • Book editions published: Survey of Piled Maritime Pleasure Piers in England & Wales
    Established in 1944, the Council for British Archaeology (CBA) is an educational charity working throughout the UK to involve people in archaeology and to promote the appreciation and care of the historic environment for the benefit of present and future generations. It achieves this by promoting research, conservation and education, and by widening access to archaeology through effective communication and participation. The origins of the CBA lie in the Congress of Archaeological Societies, founded in 1898, but it was in 1943, with the tide of war turning, that archaeologists in Britain began to contemplate the magnitude of tasks and opportunities that would confront them at the end of hostilities. In London alone more than 50 acres (20 ha) of the City lay in ruins awaiting redevelopment, while the historic centres of Bristol, Canterbury, Exeter, Southampton, and many other towns had suffered devastation. In response to a resolution from the Oxford Meeting of the Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies, Sir Alfred Clapham, then President of the Society of Antiquaries of London, called a meeting of the Congress of Archaeological Societies "to discuss the requirements of
    4.67
    3 votes
    204
    Bucknell University Press

    Bucknell University Press

    Bucknell University Press (BUP) was founded in 1968 as part of a consortium operated by Associated University Presses and currently partnered with Rowman & Littlefield. Since then it has published more than 1000 titles in the humanities and social and biological sciences. The first title was published in 1969. Run by its director and editorial board, the Bucknell Press is an editorially independent organization. The editorial operations of the Press are supported and funded by the office of the Provost at Bucknell University. The current Press Director is Greg Clingham, professor of English at Bucknell University. The Press receives about 400 proposals and inquiries a year and considers for publication about 70 manuscripts from authors all over the world. Each year it publishes an average of 35 books. Traditionally the Press’s strengths have been in English and American literature, French literature, German literature, Hispanic Studies, philosophy, and religion, though it also publishes serious criticism and scholarship in Classics, theory, cultural studies, historiography, psychology and psychoanalysis, political science, and cultural and political geography. The Press maintains
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    205
    Casa Ricordi

    Casa Ricordi

    Casa Ricordi is a classical music publishing company founded in 1808 as G. Ricordi & Co. by violinist Giovanni Ricordi (1785–1853) in Milan, Italy. Its classical repertoire represents one of the important sources in the world through its publishing of Rossini, Donizetti, Bellini, Verdi, and Puccini. In 1825, Giovanni Ricordi purchased the complete musical archives of La Scala and in 1839 he bought the copyright to Giuseppe Verdi's music that marked the beginnings of a long working relationship. During the 1840s, Casa Ricordi grew to be the largest music publisher in southern Europe and in 1842 the company created the musical journal the Gazzetta Musicale di Milano. In 1864 it expanded to Naples and then to Florence (1865), Rome (1871), London (1878), Palermo and in 1888 to Paris. Until 1919, when outside management was appointed, four generations of Ricordis were at the helm of the company. Its most notable personality was Giulio Ricordi (1840–1912) who was closely involved in the operatic career of Giacomo Puccini but whose interests also extended to composing music, art, design and painting. Under him, the company went into the business of printing advertising posters that were
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Cengage Learning

    Cengage Learning

    • Imprints: Delmar
    • Book editions published: The Force of Finance: Triumph of the Capital Markets
    Cengage Learning delivers highly-customized learning solutions for colleges, universities, professors, students, reference centers, government agencies, corporations, and professionals around the world. These solutions are delivered through specialized content, applications, and services that foster academic excellence and professional development, as well as provide measurable learning outcomes to its customers. Cengage Learning's mission is to shape the future of global learning by delivering consistently better learning solutions for learners, instructors, and institutions.Businesses and brands: 
    • Gale is a world leader in e-research and educational publishing for libraries, schools, and businesses. Gale creates and maintains more than 600 databases that are published online, in print, and in microform.
    • Delmar is a leading provider of tailored learning solutions in health care, technology, and trades, and career education for various types of learning institutions. Delmar also serves the training markets in business, industry, and government.
    • Course Technology is the worldwide leader in computing education. Offering more than 1,600 print- and technology-based products for business and technology training, Course Technology's teaching and learning solutions are available for almost every popular software application.
    • Nelson - Offering more than 22,000 products, Nelson is the largest Canadian-owned academic publisher. Nelson's markets include K-12, post-secondary, and adult corporate training. Nelson represents all Cengage Learning brands in Canada.
    • Brooks/Cole draws on a 40-year tradition of innovative, customer-centric publishing, and offers a spectrum of print and digital choices for instructors and students in mathematics, statistics, and the sciences.
    • Heinle is currently the only specialized, multi-level, full-service, integrated language publisher in the higher education market, and enjoys a reputation for service and publishing excellence.
    • Wadsworth - For more than 50 years, Wadsworth has been a leading provider of books, online, and multimedia solutions for the humanities and the behavioral and social sciences.
    • Schirmer - The Schirmer name has been synonymous with quality music publishing since 1861, when Gustav Schirmer established his sheet music publishing house. Schirmer Books was established in 1970 and, today, offers a distinguished list of textbooks for students of music.
    • South-Western recently celebrated its 100th anniversary as an innovator in meeting the needs of all students of business. South-Western meets the lifelong needs of students and teachers of business and economics with innovative, customer-centric solutions.
    • Paraninfo is a leading provider of learning solutions in vocational/technical, corporate training, higher education, and career education in Spain and Portugal. Paraninfo publishes college, vocational/technical, and lifelong learning products, including textbooks and CD-ROM materials.
    Cengage Learning was formerly known as Thomson Learning, a division of Thomson Corporation. It was purchased by private equity groups in 2007.
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    207
    Condé Nast Publications

    Condé Nast Publications

    • Book editions published: Son of Brideshead
    Condé Nast, a division of Advance Publications, is a magazine publisher. In the U.S., it produces 18 consumer magazines, including Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, GQ, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, and Vogue, as well as four business-to-business publications, 27 websites, and more than 50 apps for mobile and tablet devices. The company, headquartered in New York City, was founded in 1909 by Condé Montrose Nast and has been owned by the Newhouse family since 1959. S.I. “Si” Newhouse Jr. is the chairman and CEO of Advance Publications, Charles H. Townsend is Condé Nast’s chief executive officer and Robert A. Sauerberg is Condé Nast’s president. Condé Nast is largely considered to be the originator of the “lifestyle magazines”, a type of magazines focused on a particular class or interest instead of targeting the largest possible readership. Its magazines focus on a wide range of subjects, including travel, food, home, culture, and other interests, with fashion the larger portion of the company's focus. More recently, Condé Nast has expanded its offerings to include marketing services and consumer-focused products such as apps and licensed merchandise. In 2010, GQ became the first
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    1 votes
    208
    MonkeyBrain Books

    MonkeyBrain Books

    • Book editions published: British Summertime (Gollancz SF)
    MonkeyBrain Books (MonkeyBrain, Inc.) is an independent American publishing house based in Austin, Texas, specialising in books comprising both new content and reprinting online, international or out-of-print content, which show "an academic interest," but which "reach a popular audience as well." Founded by science-fiction author Chris Roberson with his business partner and spouse Allison Baker, MonkeyBrain Books specializes in "genre fiction and nonfiction genre studies" after two years focusing solely on non-fiction. After dabbling in self-publication and Print On Demand, Roberson said he wanted to ensure that his books were distributed widely. The first project MonkeyBrain Books published was a collection of companion notes to Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's 1999 comic book series The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume I compiled by Texas-native Jess Nevins. Heroes & Monsters: The Unofficial Companion to the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen sold well, and continues to be one of MonkeyBrains best-selling titles several years after its first publication. It was nominated for an International Horror Guild award and favorably reviewed in both Locus and The Magazine of
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    1 votes
    209
    Paulist Fathers

    Paulist Fathers

    The Missionary Society of Saint Paul the Apostle, better known as the Paulist Fathers, is a Roman Catholic society of apostolic life for men founded in New York City in 1858 by Servant of God Fr. Isaac Thomas Hecker in collaboration with Fr. George Deshon, Fr. Augustine Hewit, and Fr. Francis A. Baker. Members of the society identify themselves as such by the use of the initials C.S.P. after their names, for the Congregation of St. Paul. The Paulist Fathers were the first religious community of priests created in North America and as such the Society took on a very American character, particularly in organization and administration. The President, Vice-President, and Council of the Paulist Fathers are elected to 4-year terms; in addition, a First Consultor is appointed by the President. The current President of the Paulist Fathers is the Very Reverend Michael B. McGarry, C.S.P., who succeeded Fr. John Duffy, C.S.P. in May 2010 The Paulist mission is to evangelize the people of North America in a manner particularly suited to the continent's culture. In addition to evangelization, the Paulists have taken on ministries of ecumenism, interfaith relations, and reconciliation as part of
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    1 votes
    210
    University Press of Florida

    University Press of Florida

    • Book editions published: Tupperware Unsealed: Brownie Wise, Earl Tupper, and the Home Party Pioneers
    The University Press of Florida (UPF) is the scholarly publishing arm of the State University System of Florida, representing Florida's eleven state universities. It is located in Gainesville near the University of Florida, one of the state's major research institutions. It is overseen by the Florida Board of Governors and publishes works from and about the state. Its predecessor was University of Florida Press. Founded in 1945 and located in Gainesville, Florida near the campus of one of the state's major research universities, University Press of Florida is the oldest book publisher in the state and one of the largest university presses in the Southeast. It was founded as the University of Florida Press with a commitment to books about the region, as exemplified by its first title, Florida Under Five Flags, a centennial history of the state by Rembert Patrick. UPF has published almost 2,500 volumes with a staff of 41. It has undergone a total conversion to electronic editing and production and boasts efficient schedules and procedures in place to release about 100 new titles each year in the areas of international studies, archaeology, dance, history, literature, political
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    Benesse

    Benesse

    Benesse Corporation (ベネッセコーポレーション, Benesse Kōporēshon, TYO: 9783) is a Japanese company which focuses on correspondence education and publishing. Based in Okayama-City, it is the parent company of Berlitz Language Schools, which in turn is the parent company of ELS Language Centers. Benesse is listed on the Tokyo and Osaka Stock Exchanges (listing code 9783). The company name is derived from the Latin words "bene" (well) and "esse" (being). The company was founded in 1955 as Fukutake Publishing Co. Ltd. (株式会社福武書店, Kabushiki-gaisha Fukutake Shoten). In 1994, it completed the construction of the Fukutake Shoten Tokyo Building (now Benesse Corporation Tokyo Building) in Tama-City, Tokyo. In April 1995, the company was renamed Benesse Corporation. A major breakthrough in the company's history was the acquisition of a majority stake in Berlitz Language Schools, which had gone public in 1989. In 2001, Benesse completed the take-over by acquiring 100% ownership of Berlitz and making it a private company once again.
    5.00
    2 votes
    212
    Big Brother Mouse

    Big Brother Mouse

    Big Brother Mouse is a not-for-profit publishing project in Laos. Big Brother Mouse focuses on publishing books that improve literacy and quality of life; and on making those books accessible, particularly in rural Lao villages. Books are scarce in Laos. Many people have never read anything except old textbooks and government pamphlets. The project uses the slogan, “Books that make literacy fun!” Its first books, published in 2006, were easy picture books designed to have a strong appeal for children. Since then, it has expanded to publish books for all ages, “designed not only to make reading fun, but also to share information about the wider world.” A growing number of titles focus on health, nutrition, history, and science. The founder, retired book publisher Sasha Alyson, first visited Laos in May, 2003, and discovered that many children in Lao villages had never seen a book. In fact, he himself “never saw a book in Lao. That gave me the idea for a publishing project here, that would both teach publishing skills and create books.” He began exploring the feasibility of such an idea. For three years, Alyson regularly visited Laos from a temporary base in Thailand, exploring the
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    2 votes
    213
    Munshiram Manoharlal

    Munshiram Manoharlal

    • Book editions published: Mīrā Bāī and her padas
    Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd. (MRML) is a publishing house located in New Delhi, India. Established in 1952 by Manohar Lal Jain, it is one of the oldest publishing houses in India. It publishes books on Social Sciences and Humanities and has published over 3000 academic and scholarly publications in subjects such as Indian Art, Art History, Architecture, Archaeology, History, Culture, Politics, Numismatics, Geography, Travels, Voyages, Indian Law, Indian Medicine, Language, Literature, Linguistics, Dictionaries, Glossaries, Handbooks, Indices, Music, Dance, Theatre, Religion, Philosophy, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Sufism, Sikhism, Tantra, Mysticism, Yoga, Sanskrit Literature, Sociology, Anthropology, and related subjects. MRML also co-publishes scholarly titles with governmental institutions and bodies such as Indian Council of Philosophical Research (ICPR); Centre for Studies in Civilizations which is known for the series of scholarly publications namely Project of History of Science, Philosophy and Culture (PHISPC); Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA); and Indian Council of Historical Research (ICHR). In addition to this, MRML publishes and
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    2 votes
    214
    Alaska Native Language Center

    Alaska Native Language Center

    • Book editions published: Dena'ina Legacy: K'tl'egh'i Sukdu: The Collected Writings of Peter Kalifornsky
    The Alaska Native Language Center, established in 1972 in Fairbanks, Alaska, is a research center focusing on the research and documentation of the Alaska's Native languages. It publishes grammars, dictionaries, folklore collections and research materials, as well as hosting an extensive archive of written materials relating to Eskimo, North Athabaskan and related languages. The Center provides training, materials and consultation for educators, researchers and others working with Alaska Native languages. The closely affiliated Alaska Native Language Program offers degrees in Central Yup'ik and Inupiaq at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and works toward the documentation and preservation of these languages. In 1974, Michael Krauss published a language map of Alaska, which he later updated in 1982. It has remained the standard since then. In the summer of 2011, the Alaska Native Language Center made an update to Krauss's map. One of the biggest reasons for this update was that some of the names of these languages had changed over the years. While there was not a dramatic change in the updated map, the new edition is entirely digital.
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Congressional Quarterly

    Congressional Quarterly

    • Book editions published: Up In Smoke: From Legislation To Litigation In Tobacco Politics
    Congressional Quarterly, Inc., or CQ, is part of a privately owned publishing company called CQ Roll Call that produces a number of publications reporting primarily on the United States Congress. CQ was acquired by the Economist Group and combined with Roll Call to form CQ Roll Call in 2009. As of 2009, CQ ceased to exist as a separate entity. CQ was founded in 1945 by Nelson Poynter and his wife, Henrietta Poynter, with the aim of providing a link between local newspapers and the complex politics within Washington D.C. CQ has the largest news team covering Capitol Hill, with more than 100 reporters, editors and researchers. CQ's readership includes 95 percent of the members of Congress, academic and media outlets, as well as members of business and nonprofit organizations, government affairs and the executive branch. Thomas N. Schroth, who had been managing editor of The Brooklyn Eagle, was elected in October 1955 as executive editor and vice president. Schroth built the publication's impartial coverage, with annual revenue growing during his tenure from $150,000 when he started to $1.8 million. In addition to adding a book division, Schroth added many staff members who achieved
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    2 votes
    216
    Fedogan & Bremer

    Fedogan & Bremer

    • Book editions published: A Coven of Vampires
    Fedogan & Bremer is a weird fiction specialty publishing house founded in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1985 by Philip Rahman and Dennis Weiler. The name comes from the nicknames of the two founders when they were in college. The first Fedogan and Bremer project was a commercial cassette recording of a reading of H.P. Lovecraft's "Fungi From Yuggoth", released in 1987. A remastered CD version was released in the 1990s, and the work has been extensively pirated. Currently, it is available at the Lovecraft ezine. Arkham House had announced the forthcoming publication of Colossus by Donald Wandrei as early as 1965. However, it remained unpublished into the 1980s. Philip Rahman approached the Wandrei estate with the hopes of publishing the collection. While no manuscript nor proposed contents could be found, Rahman and Weiler went forward and published a collection using the same title as the unpublished Arkham House collection. Fedogan and Bremer continued to publish the sorts of works that were published by Arkham House in the sixties under August Derleth's direction. Fedogan & Bremer books were distributed by DreamHaven Books in Minneapolis for many years. They distributed via Arkham
    4.50
    2 votes
    217
    John Joseph Stockdale

    John Joseph Stockdale

    • Book editions published: The Beauty, Marriage Ceremonies and Intercourse of the Sexes in All Nations; to which is added The New Art of Love (Grounded on Kalogynomia)
    John Joseph Stockdale (1770, 1776 or 1777 – 16 February 1847) was an English publisher and editor with something of a reputation as a pornographer. He sought to blackmail a number of public figures over the memoirs of society courtesan Harriette Wilson, drawing the notorious retort from the Duke of Wellington, Publish and be damned! He also famously sued the parliamentary reporter Hansard over an allegation that he had published an indecent book and became involved in an important constitutional clash between parliament and the courts that ultimately brought about a change in the law. The son of John Stockdale and Mary neé Ridgway, John Joseph was brother to Mary Stockdale. He was educated privately at a boarding school in Bedfordshire and in 1793 started to work for his father, being admitted to the freedom of the Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers on 3 August 1802, and afterwards taking up the livery. In 1805 he married Sophia, a niece of Philip Box a successful banker, and he established his own business in Pall Mall in 1806, possibly with financial help from Box. He compiled and edited many books, including: Stockdale also sold copies of Original Poetry by
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    2 votes
    218
    Carnegie Institution for Science

    Carnegie Institution for Science

    • Book editions published: A General Catalogue of Double Stars Within 121 ̊ of the North pole, Volume 1
    The Carnegie Institution for Science (also called the Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW)) is an organization in the United States established to support scientific research. Today the CIW directs its efforts in six main areas: plant molecular biology at the Department of Plant Biology (Stanford, California), developmental biology at the Department of Embryology (Baltimore, Maryland), global ecology at the Department of Global Ecology (Stanford, CA), Earth science, materials science, and astrobiology at the Geophysical Laboratory (Washington, DC); Earth and planetary sciences as well as astronomy at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (Washington, DC), and (at the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (OCIW; Pasadena, CA and Las Campanas, Chile)). As of June 30, 2011, the Carnegie Institution of Science had assets of $851 million and net external revenue of 53$ million. Expenses for scientific programs and administration was $91.4 million "It is proposed to found in the city of Washington, an institution which...shall in the broadest and most liberal manner encourage investigation, research, and discovery [and] show the application of knowledge to the
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    1 votes
    219
    Charles Scribner's Sons

    Charles Scribner's Sons

    • Book editions published: The Green Mile: The Complete Serial Novel
    • Imprint of: Simon & Schuster
    Charles Scribner's Sons, or simply Scribner, is an American publisher based in New York City, known for publishing a number of American authors including Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kurt Vonnegut, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Stephen King, Robert A. Heinlein, Thomas Wolfe, George Santayana, John Clellon Holmes, and Edith Wharton. The firm published Scribner's Magazine for many years. More recently, several Scribner titles and authors have garnered Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards and other merits. In 1978 the company merged with Atheneum and became The Scribner Book Companies. In turn it merged into Macmillan in 1984. Simon & Schuster bought Macmillan in 1994. By this point only the trade book and reference book operations still bore the original family name. The former imprint, now simply "Scribner," was retained by Simon & Schuster, while the reference division has been owned by Gale since 1999. The firm was founded in 1846 by Charles Scribner I and Isaac D. Baker as "Baker & Scribner". After Baker's death, Scribner bought the remainder of the company and renamed it the "Charles Scribner Company." In 1865 the company made its first venture into magazine publishing
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    1 votes
    220
    City Lights Bookstore

    City Lights Bookstore

    • Book editions published: The new world border: prophecies, poems, & loqueras for the end of the century
    City Lights is an independent bookstore-publisher combination in San Francisco, California that specializes in world literature, the arts, and progressive politics. It also houses the nonprofit City Lights Foundation, which publishes selected titles related to San Francisco culture. It was founded in 1953 by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Peter D. Martin (who left two years later). Both the store and the publishers became widely known following the obscenity trial of Ferlinghetti for publishing Allen Ginsberg's influential poem Howl and Other Poems (City Lights, 1956). Nancy Peters started working there in 1971 and retired as executive director in 2007. In 2001, City Lights was made an official historic landmark. City Lights is located at 261 Columbus Avenue, on the nexus of North Beach and Chinatown in San Francisco. City Lights was the inspiration of Peter D. Martin, who relocated from New York City to San Francisco in the 1940s to teach sociology. He first used City Lights—in homage to the Chaplin film—in 1952 as the title of a magazine, publishing early work by such key Bay Area writers as Philip Lamantia, Pauline Kael, Jack Spicer, Robert Duncan, and Ferlinghetti himself, as
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    1 votes
    221
    Dream Vision Publishing

    Dream Vision Publishing

    Dream Vision Publishing is an independent and small Publishing Company. DVP, disturbs books and instructional DVD's about martial arts, and sport related subjects.
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell

    LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell

    • Book editions published: Martindale-Hubbell Law Digest: Venezuela
    • Imprint of: LexisNexis
    LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell is an information services company to the legal profession that was founded in 1868. The company publishes the Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory, which provides background information on United States lawyers and law firms. Martindale-Hubbell is owned by LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier. The Martindale Directory was first published in 1868 by James B. Martindale, a lawyer and businessman. Its purpose was "to furnish to lawyers, bankers, wholesale merchants, manufacturers, real estate agents, and all others…the address of one reliable law firm, one reliable bank, and one reliable real estate office in every city in the United States..." By 1896, the directory included basic information that still appears in the modern "Practice Profile" listings, as well as ratings and a section on foreign lawyers and firms. In 1930, the Martindale Company purchased the publishing rights to Hubbell's Legal Directory which consisted of: a digest of the collected laws of each state; court calendars; and a selective list of lawyers and firms. Through the combination of the Martindale Directory and Hubbell's Legal Directory, the first edition of the Martindale-Hubbell
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    1 votes
    223
    Little, Brown and Company

    Little, Brown and Company

    • Imprints: Back Bay Books
    • Book editions published: What's Wrong with Timmy?
    • Imprint of: Hachette Book Group USA
    Little, Brown and Company is a publishing house established by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown. Since 2006 it has been a constituent unit of Hachette Book Group USA. The firm initially specialized in legal treatises and imported titles. For many years, it was the most extensive law publisher in the United States, and also the largest importer of standard English law and miscellaneous works, introducing American buyers to the Encyclopædia Britannica, the dictionaries of William Smith, and many other standard works. Even so, in the early years Little and Brown published the Works of Daniel Webster, George Bancroft's History of the United States, William H. Prescott's Ferdinand and Isabella, Jones Very's first book of poetry (edited by Ralph Waldo Emerson), Letters of John Adams and works by James Russell Lowell and Francis Parkman. The firm was the original publisher of United States Statutes at Large beginning in 1845, under authority granted by a joint resolution of Congress. In 1874, Congress transferred the authority to publish the Statutes at Large to the Government Printing Office, which has been responsible for producing the set since that time. 1
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    1 votes
    224
    National Geographic

    National Geographic

    • Book editions published: Abraham Lincoln's Extraordinary Era: The Man and His Times
    National Geographic, formerly the National Geographic Magazine, is the official journal of the National Geographic Society. It published its first issue in 1888, just nine months after the Society itself was founded.There are 12 monthly issues of the National Geographic per year, plus additional map supplements. The Magazine is available in its traditional printed edition on paper, or through an interactive digital edition, available online. On occasion, special editions of the Magazine are issued. It contains articles about geography, popular science, history, culture, current events, and photography. In a National Geographic Press Release, it was announced that in late-2011 that the magazine was circulated worldwide in thirty-four language editions and had a global circulation of 8.2 million. In the United States, the circulation is around 5 million every month. In May 2007, 2008, and 2010 National Geographic magazine won the American Society of Magazine Editors' General Excellence Award in the over two million circulation category. In 2010, National Geographic Magazine received the top ASME awards for photojournalism and essay. In 2011, National Geographic Magazine received the
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    1 votes
    225
    Charles Carrington

    Charles Carrington

    • Imprints: Cosmopolitan Society of Bibliophiles
    Charles Carrington (1857–1922) was a leading British publisher of erotica in late-19th and early 20th century Europe. Born Paul Harry Ferdinando in Bethnal Green, England on 11 November 1867, he moved in 1895 from London to Paris where he published and sold books in the rue Faubourg Montmartre and rue de Chateaudun; for a short period he moved his activities to Brussels. Carrington also published works of classical literature, including the first English translation of Aristophanes' "Comedies," and books by famous authors such as Oscar Wilde and Anatole France, in order to hide his "undercover" erotica publications under a veil of legitimacy. His books featured the erotic art of Martin van Maële. He published a French series La Flagellation a Travers le Monde mainly on English flagellation, identifying it as an English predilection. Carrington went blind as a result of syphilis and the last few years of his life were spent in poverty as his mistress stole his valuable collection of rare books. He was placed in a lunatic asylum and died in 1922 at Ivry-sur-Seine, France.
    4.00
    2 votes
    226
    G. P. Putnam's Sons

    G. P. Putnam's Sons

    • Book editions published: Wit's End: What Happens When Your Readers Steal Your Characters?
    • Imprint of: Penguin Group USA
    G. P. Putnam's Sons was a major United States book publisher based in New York City, New York. Since 1996, it has been an imprint of the Penguin Group. The company began as Wiley & Putnam with the 1838 partnership between George Palmer Putnam and John Wiley, who had founded his own company in 1807. In 1841, Putnam went to London, UK where he set up a branch office, the first American company ever to do so. In 1848, he returned to New York, where he dissolved the partnership with John Wiley and established G. Putnam Broadway, publishing a variety of works including quality illustrated books. Wiley began John Wiley and Sons, which is still an independent publisher to the present day. In 1853, G. P. Putnam & Co. started Putnam’s Magazine with Charles Frederick Briggs as its editor. On George Palmer Putnam’s death in 1872 his sons George H., John and Irving inherited the business and the firm's name was changed to G. P. Putnam's Sons. Son George H. Putnam became president of the firm, a position he held for the next fifty-two years. In 1874, the company established its own book printing and manufacturing office, set up by John Putnam and operating initially out of newly leased premises
    4.00
    2 votes
    227
    Amazon.com

    Amazon.com

    • Book editions published: The Hope of Elantris
    Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN) is an American multinational electronic commerce company with headquarters in Seattle, Washington, United States. It is the world's largest online retailer. The company also produces consumer electronics—notably the Amazon Kindle e-book reader and the Kindle Fire tablet computer—and is a major provider of cloud computing services. Amazon has separate retail websites for the following countries: United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan, and China, with international shipping to certain other countries for some of its products. It is also expected to launch its websites in Poland, Brazil, Netherlands and Sweden. Jeff Bezos incorporated the company (as Cadabra) in July 1994, and the site went online as amazon.com in 1995. The company was renamed after the Amazon River, one of the largest rivers in the world, which in turn was named after the Amazons, the legendary nation of female warriors in Greek mythology. Amazon.com started as an online bookstore, but soon diversified, selling DVDs, CDs, MP3 downloads, software, video games, electronics, apparel, furniture, food, toys, and jewelry. The company was founded in 1995,
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    1 votes
    228
    Asiatic Society of Bangladesh

    Asiatic Society of Bangladesh

    • Book editions published: Banglapedia
    The Asiatic Society of Bangladesh was established as the Asiatic Society of Pakistan in Dhaka in 1952. It was renamed as the Asiatic Society of Bangladesh in 1972. Ahmed Hasan Dani, a noted historian and archaeologist of Pakistan played an important role in founding this society. He was assisted by Muhammad Shahidullah, a noted Bengali linguist. The society is housed in a building in Nimtali locality of Dhaka. Current projects of the society include:
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    1 votes
    229
    Calendar

    Calendar

    A calendar is a system of organizing days for social, religious, commercial, or administrative purposes. This is done by giving names to periods of time, typically days, weeks, months, and years. A date is the designation of a single, specific day within such a system. Periods in a calendar (such as years and months) are usually, though not necessarily, synchronized with the cycle of the sun or the moon. Many civilizations and societies have devised a calendar, usually derived from other calendars on which they model their systems, suited to their particular needs. A calendar is also a physical device (often paper). This is the most common usage of the word. Other similar types of calendars can include computerized systems, which can be set to remind the user of upcoming events and appointments. A calendar can also mean a list of planned events, such as a court calendar. The English word calendar is derived from the Latin word kalendae, which was the Latin name of the first day of every month. A full calendar system has a different calendar date for every day. Thus the week cycle is by itself not a full calendar system; neither is a system to name the days within a year without a
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    1 votes
    230
    MacAdam/Cage

    MacAdam/Cage

    • Book editions published: A Mouthful of Air
    MacAdam/Cage is a small publishing firm located in San Francisco, California. It was founded by publisher David Poindexter in 1998. As of 2003, it published around 30 to 45 titles per year, primarily fiction, short story collections, history, biography, and essays, and had twelve employees. Most notably, it published The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger and The Contortionist's Handbook by Craig Clevenger. Publishers Weekly describes MacAdam/Cage as "one of the West Coast's most literary" independent publishing firms. Two years after founding MacAdam/Cage, Poindexter bought MacMurray & Beck, which added "an impressive backlist" to the firm, including Susan Vreeland's Girl in Hyacinth Blue and William Gay's The Long Home. The company's most successful publication has been Audrey Niffenegger's The Time Traveler's Wife, which has sold 2.5 million copies as of March 2009. Until then, its most successful publication had been Mark Dunn's Ella Minnow Pea, which sold 30,000 copies. In 2004, the company launched a children's book division, headed by Chandler Crawford. The bulk of the children's books published by MacAdam/Cage are translations into English and out-of-print works. In
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    231
    Roberts Brothers

    Roberts Brothers

    • Book editions published: Little women; or, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy
    Messrs. Roberts Brothers (1857–1898) were bookbinders and publishers in 19th-century Boston, Massachusetts. Established in 1857 by Austin J. Roberts, John F. Roberts, and Lewis A. Roberts, the firm began publishing around the early 1860s. Authors included Louisa May Alcott, George Sand, Julia Ward Howe and many others. The Roberts Brothers were "bookbinders" from 1857 until 1862 (offices successively at: 120 Washington St.; Temple Place; 149 Washington St.) Beginning in 1862 they were also makers of "photograph albums." In 1863 Thomas Niles, Jr. began working at the firm. He became partner some years thereafter and remained with the Roberts Brothers until his death in 1894. By 1873 the firm was listed under the names of just Lewis Roberts and Thomas Niles. After several decades on Washington Street across from Old South, the business moved to Somerset Street in the 1880s. As publishers, the Roberts Brothers made their name in 1868 with the publication of Louisa May Alcott's Little Women, a best-seller. It featured illustrations by Alcott's sister, May Alcott, who also appeared as a character (Amy) in the book. The Famous Women Series of the 1880s and 1890s consisted of biographies
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    232
    University of Arkansas Press

    University of Arkansas Press

    • Book editions published: The Long Shadow of Little Rock: A Memoir
    The University of Arkansas Press is a university press that is part of the University of Arkansas. It was established in 1980, and as of 2009 the press issues an average of twenty titles per year. The press is a member of the Association of American University Presses.
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    233
    Washington State University

    Washington State University

    • Book editions published: American education: innovations of the first kind
    Washington State University is a public research university based in Pullman, Washington, in the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest. Founded in 1890, WSU (colloquially referred to as Wazzu) is the state's original and largest land-grant university. The university is well known for its programs in veterinary medicine, agriculture, animal science, food science, plant science, architecture, neuroscience, criminal justice, and communications. It is ranked in the top-ten universities in the US in terms of clean technology and it is one of 96 public and private universities in America with "very high research activity," as determined by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. WSU is ranked among the top half of national universities at 115th according to U.S. News and World Report. The university also operates campuses across Washington known as WSU Spokane, WSU Tri-Cities, and WSU Vancouver, all founded in 1989. In 2012, WSU launched an Internet-based Global Campus, which includes its online degree program, WSU Online. These campuses award primarily bachelor's and master's degrees. Freshmen and sophomores were first admitted to the Vancouver campus in 2006 and to
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    234
    Cato Institute

    Cato Institute

    • Book editions published: Republican Revolution 10 Years Later: Smaller Government or Business as Usual?
    The Cato Institute is an American libertarian think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C. Founded as the Charles Koch Foundation in 1974 by Murray Rothbard, Ed Crane and Charles Koch. In July 1976, the name was changed to the Cato Institute. According to the 2011 Global Go To Think Tank Index, Cato is the 6th most influential US based think tank, ranking 3rd in Economic Policy and 2nd in Social Policy. The Institute's stated mission is "to increase the understanding of public policies based on the principles of limited government, free markets, individual liberty, and peace. The Institute will use the most effective means to originate, advocate, promote, and disseminate applicable policy proposals that create free, open, and civil societies in the United States and throughout the world." Cato scholars were critical of George W. Bush's Republican administration (2001–2009) on several issues, including the Iraq War, civil liberties, education, agriculture, energy policy, and excessive government spending. On other issues, most notably health care, Social Security, global warming, tax policy, and immigration, they supported Bush administration initiatives. During the 2008 U.S.
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    235
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Press

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Press

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press was founded in 1933 to aid in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's purpose of furthering the advance and spread of scientific knowledge. CSHL Press publishes monographs, technical manuals, handbooks, review volumes, conference proceedings, scholarly journals and videotapes. These examine important topics in molecular biology, genetics, development, virology, neurobiology, immunology and cancer biology. Manuscripts for books and for journal publication are invited from scientists worldwide. Revenue from sales of CSHL Press publications is used solely in support of research at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Scientific journals published by CSHL Press: CSHL Press has two operation centers. The main office is located in Woodbury, New York, near Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where Editorial, Marketing & Advertising, Composition, and Fulfillment & Distribution functions are performed. An additional Book Fulfillment & Distribution operation is handled by NBN International in Plymouth, United Kingdom. Its current Executive Director is John R. Inglis, Ph.D., University of Edinburgh Medical School, 1976.
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    236
    D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd

    D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd

    • Book editions published: The People's Friend 2005 Annual: 30 Wonderful New Stories, Plus Lots More! (Annuals)
    D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd, is a publishing company based in Dundee, Scotland, best known for producing The Dundee Courier, The Evening Telegraph, The Sunday Post, Oor Wullie, The Broons, The Beano, The Dandy and Commando comics. It also owns Friends Reunited, Parragon, and the Aberdeen Journals Group which publishes the Press and Journal, the Evening Express, the Aberdeen Citizen and the North Scotland edition of ScotAds. Historically it was a significant shareholder in the former ITV company Southern Television. The company began as a branch of the Thomson family business when William Thomson became the sole proprietor of Charles Alexander & Co., publishers of Dundee Courier and Daily Argus. In 1884, David Coupar Thomson took over the publishing business, and established it as DC Thomson in 1905. The firm flourished, and took its place as the third J in the "Three Js", the traditional summary of Dundee industry ('jam, jute and journalism'). Thomson was notable for his conservatism, vigorously opposing the introduction of trade unions into his workforce, and for refusing to employ Catholics. The company produces more than 200 million comics, magazines, and newspapers every year from
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    237
    Éditions Grasset

    Éditions Grasset

    • Book editions published: Sylva
    'Les édititions Grasset', formally 'Éditions Grasset & Fasquelle' is a French publishing house headquartered in Paris. It is part of the 'Hachette' group. Founded in 1907 by Bernard Grasset, the company focused on quality literature and has been successful in publishing the works of renown French authors throughout the 20th Century and to this day. In 1954 'Édition Grasset' becomes part of the the Hachette group and is placed under the leadership of Bernard Grasset's nephew, Bernard Privat. A few years later, 'Éditions Grasset and 'Éditions Fasquelle' are joined, and in 1959 Jean-Claude Fasquelle who had been at the head of 'Éd. Fasquelle' since 1954 becomes CEO of 'Éditions Grasset & Fasquelle' (always within the 'Hachette' group). Since 2000 this position is held by Olivier Nora. Grasset's catalog has in excess of 3,500 titles, in French and foreign literature, essays and humanities. Grasset also publishes works aimed at young readers as well as mass produced paperback editions. The company publishes approximately 160 books each year, novel and essays, of which literary pieces cover the better half and the remainder is divided among various collections including these of the Youth sector.
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    238
    Evans Brothers Limited

    Evans Brothers Limited

    • Book editions published: Keith and Sally at the seaside
    Evans Brothers (Nigeria Publishers) Limited is Nigeria's leading educational publisher. The company was incorporated in December 1966, and it publishes titles for all levels of education. In 1903, brothers Robert and Edward Evans founded a company called Evans Brothers, London focused on the publication of teacher training journals and periodicals. Initially headquartered at the brothers' residence at 118 Newgate Street, London, England, early Evans Brothers publications included some of the foremost teacher training materials of the time, such as The Education News of Scotland, Irish School Weekly, Woman Teacher's World (1911-13), The Word Master, The Music Teacher, Child Education, and The School Mistress. In the first year of operations, the company grossed 150 pounds. In the 1930s, Evans Brothers London moved into book publishing, with emphasis on children's books. Notable titles from the Evans stable included the Evans War Classics, Dam Busters, and a number of titles from the prolific British children's writer Enid Blyton. In 1945 the company, under Noel Evans (a second generation Evans) decided to venture outside the United Kingdom. They hired a consultant to come out to
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    239
    HarperCollins

    HarperCollins

    • Imprints: Harper Perennial
    • Book editions published: Poker Nation: A High-Stakes, Low-Life Adventure into the Heart of a Gambling Country
    HarperCollins is one of the world's largest publishing companies. Headquartered in New York City, the company is a subsidiary of News Corporation. The company name is a combination of Harper & Row - an American publishing company acquired in 1987, itself the result of an earlier merger of Harper & Brothers (founded 1817) and Row, Peterson & Company - and UK publishing company William Collins, Sons (founded 1819), acquired in 1990. The worldwide CEO of HarperCollins is Brian Murray. HarperCollins has publishing groups in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and India. The company publishes many different imprints, both former independent publishing houses and new imprints. In 1989, Collins was bought by Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation, and the publisher was combined with Harper & Row, which NewsCorp had acquired two years earlier. In addition to the simplified and merged name, the logo for HarperCollins was derived from the torch logo for Harper and Row, and the fountain logo for Collins, which were combined into a stylized set of flames atop waves. In 1999, News Corporation purchased the Hearst Book Group, consisting of William Morrow & Company
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    240
    John Wiley & Sons

    John Wiley & Sons

    • Imprints: Wrox Press
    • Book editions published: Applied Cryptography
    John Wiley & Sons, Inc., also referred to as Wiley, (NYSE: JWA) is a global publishing company that specializes in academic publishing and markets its products to professionals and consumers, students and instructors in higher education, and researchers and practitioners in scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly fields. The company produces books, journals, and encyclopedias, in print and electronically, as well as online products and services, training materials, and educational materials for undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education students. Founded in 1807, Wiley is known for publishing For Dummies and the Frommer's travel series, as well as the Webster's New World Dictionary and CliffsNotes. As of 2011, the company had 5,100 employees and a revenue of US$1.7 billion. Wiley was established in 1807 when Charles Wiley opened a print shop in Manhattan. The company was the publisher of such 19th century American literary figures as James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, Herman Melville, and Edgar Allan Poe, as well as of legal, religious, and other non-fiction titles. Wiley later shifted its focus to scientific, technical, and engineering subject areas, abandoning
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    241
    Merrymount Press

    Merrymount Press

    The Merrymount Press was a printing company, both scholarly and craftsmanlike, founded and run by Daniel Berkeley Updike in Boston, Massachusetts, and extant during the years 1893–1941. It was perhaps the finest representative of the Arts and Crafts movement in American book arts, influenced by William Morris and founded "to do common work uncommonly well." Updike established his own studio in 1893, first with the idea of designing type fonts, but soon after as a printing company. He called it the Merrymount Press in honor of Mount Wollaston just south of Boston. In 1896, Updike commissioned font designer Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue to design the Merrymount font for an Altar Book for the Episcopal Church. In 1904 Herbert Horne designed Montallegro for him, and noted graphic artist and print designer Rudolph Ruzicka (1883–1978) also produced designs for the Press. In 1896 Updike also purchased the Caslon face; other types employed included Scotch Roman, Janson, Mountjoye and Oxford. Merrymount Press was the first American firm to use the Times New Roman font. In 1899 the Merrymount Press printed Edith Wharton’s novels for Charles Scribner's Sons, which firmly established the press as
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    242
    Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

    Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

    • Book editions published: Art Czar: The Rise and Fall of Clement Greenberg
    The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts, is one of the largest museums in the United States, attracting over one million visitors a year. It contains over 450,000 works of art, making it one of the most comprehensive collections in the Americas. It is also the 31st most visited art museum in the world, and the fifth most-visited in the United States, as of 2012. The museum was founded in 1870 and its current location dates to 1909. In addition to its curatorial undertakings, the museum is affiliated with an art academy, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, and a sister museum, the Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, in Nagoya, Japan. The current director of the museum is Malcolm Rogers. The Museum was founded in 1870 and opened in 1876, with a large portion of its collection taken from the Boston Athenaeum Art Gallery. Francis Davis Millet was instrumental in starting the Art School attached to the Museum and getting Emil Otto Grundmann (1844–1890) appointed as its first director. The Museum was originally located in a highly ornamented brick Gothic Revival building designed by John Hubbard Sturgis and Charles Brigham, located on Copley Square in the Back Bay neighborhood
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    243
    National Gallery of Victoria

    National Gallery of Victoria

    • Book editions published: Charles Blackman: Schoolgirls and Angels : a Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings and Drawings by Charles Blackman
    The National Gallery of Victoria, popularly known as the NGV, is an art museum in Melbourne, Australia. Founded in 1861, it is the oldest and largest public art museum in Australia. The NGV operates across two sites: NGV International, located on St Kilda Road in the heart of the Melbourne Arts Precinct of Southbank, and The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia, located nearby at Federation Square. The St Kilda Road building, designed by Sir Roy Grounds, opened in 1968, and was renovated by Mario Bellini and reopened in 2003. The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia was designed by LAB Architecture Studio and opened in 2002. The NGV was founded in 1861. Victoria had been an independent colony for only ten years, but in the wake of the Victorian gold rush, it was the richest colony in Australia, and Melbourne was the largest city in Australia. In addition to donations of works of art, donated funds from wealthy citizens have been used by the NGV to purchase Australian and international works by both old and modern masters. The NGV currently holds over 70,000 works of art. The Felton Bequest, established by the will of Alfred Felton in 1904, has purchased over 15,000 works of art for the
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    244
    Odhams Press

    Odhams Press

    • Book editions published: Pendulum / Nick the Click / Believed Violent
    Odhams Press was a British publishing firm. Originally a newspaper group, founded in 1890, it took the name Odham's Press Ltd in 1920 when it merged with John Bull magazine. By 1937 it had founded the first colour weekly, Woman, for which it set up and operated a dedicated high-speed print works. The company also owned Ideal Home (founded 1920) and the well-known equestrian magazine Horse and Hound (acquired). Later Odhams expanded into book publishing (for example, publishing Winston Churchill's Painting as a Pastime, The Gunnis Dictionary of British Sculpture 1660-1851, and an edition of the complete works of William Shakespeare). According to Susan M Penn's history of Long Street at Sherborne in Dorset, as verified by Harrop's historical house survey and by local census information, the house known from 1920 as Ramadia House, but with no name until that date, was occupied in 1834 by one John Odhams. He had married his wife, Fanny, on 16th May 1813, and they had three sons and a daughter. The eldest son, William, grew up to be a compositor, possibly serving his apprenticeship with Langdon and Harker at the Sherborne Mercury Printing Office in Long Street, according to his great
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    245
    ProQuest

    ProQuest

    ProQuest LLC is an Ann Arbor, Michigan-based electronic publisher and microfilm publisher. It provides archives of sources such as newspapers, periodicals, dissertations, and aggregated databases of many types. Its content is estimated at 125 billion digital pages. Content is accessed most commonly through library internet gateways, with navigation through such search platforms as ProQuest, CSA Illumina, Dialog, Datastar, Chadwyck-Healey, eLibrary and SIRS. Microfilm publishing is under the UMI brand. The current Chief Executive Officer is Kurt Sanford. ProQuest is part of Cambridge Information Group. Eugene Power, a 1930 M.B.A. graduate of the University of Michigan, founded the company as University Microfilms in 1938, preserving works from the British Museum on microfilm. In his autobiography Edition of One, Power details the development of the company, including how University Microfilms assisted the OSS during World War II. This work mainly involved filming maps and European newspapers so they could be shipped back and forth overseas more cheaply and discreetly. Power also noticed a niche market in dissertations publishing. Students were often forced to publish their own works
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    246
    Rand McNally

    Rand McNally

    • Book editions published: Great Keinplatz Experiment and Other Stories
    Rand McNally is an American publisher of maps, atlases, textbooks, and globes for travel, reference, commercial, and educational uses. It also provides online consumer street maps and directions, as well as commercial transportation routing software and mileage data. The company is headquartered in the Chicago suburb of Skokie, Illinois with a distribution center in Richmond, Kentucky. In 1856, William Rand opened a printing shop in Chicago and two years later hired a newly arrived Irish immigrant, Andrew McNally, to work in his shop. The shop did big business with the forerunner of the Chicago Tribune, and in 1859 Rand and McNally were hired to run the Tribune's entire printing operation. In 1868, the two men formally established Rand McNally & Co. and bought out the Tribune's printing business. The company initially focused on printing tickets and timetables for Chicago's booming railroad industry, and the following year supplemented that business by publishing complete railroad guides. In 1870, the company expanded into printing business directories and an illustrated newspaper, the People's Weekly. According to company lore, during the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Rand McNally
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    247
    Street & Smith

    Street & Smith

    • Book editions published: Analog Science Fiction & Fact, October 1960 (Volume LXVI, No. 2)
    Street & Smith or Street & Smith Publications, Inc. was a New York City publisher specializing in inexpensive paperbacks and magazines referred to as pulp fiction and dime novels. They also published comic books and sporting yearbooks. Among their many titles was the science fiction pulp magazine Astounding Stories, acquired from Clayton Magazines in 1933, and retained until 1961. Street & Smith was founded in 1855, and was bought out in 1959. The Street & Smith headquarters was at 79 Seventh Avenue in Manhattan; it was designed by Henry F. Kilburn. Francis Scott Street and Francis Shubael Smith began their publishing partnership in 1855 when they took over a broken-down fiction magazine. They then bought the existing New York Weekly Dispatch in 1858. Francis Smith was the company president from 1855 until his 1887 retirement; his son Ormond Gerald Smith taking over his role. Francis Street died in 1883. Francis Smith died on February 1, 1887. The company became a publisher of inexpensive novels and weekly magazines starting in the 1880s and continuing into 1959. In the early decades of the 20th century, Ormond V. Gould was the company secretary. Ormond Smith remained company
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    248
    The Times of India

    The Times of India

    • Book editions published: The Indian Year Book
    The Times of India (TOI) is an Indian English-language daily newspaper. According to Audit Bureau of Circulations, it has the largest circulation among all English-language newspapers in the world, across all formats (broadsheet, tabloid, compact, Berliner and online). In 2008, the newspaper reported that (with a circulation of over 3.14 million) it was certified by the Audit Bureau of Circulations (India) as the world's largest selling English-language daily, ranking it as the 8th largest selling newspaper in any language in the world. According to the Indian Readership Survey (IRS) 2012, the Times of India is the most widely read English newspaper in India with a readership of 76.43 lakhs (7.643 million). This ranks the Times of India as the top English daily in India by readership. It is owned and published by Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. which is owned by the Sahu Jain family. The Times Of India was founded on 3 November 1838 as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce In Bombay, during the British Raj. Published every Saturday and Wednesday, The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce was launched as a semi-weekly edition by Raobahadur Narayan Dinanath Velkar, a Maharashtrian
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    249
    Tyndale House

    Tyndale House

    • Book editions published: The Inspired Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln: How Faith Shaped an American President -- and Changed the Course of a Nation
    Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth N. Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. The book appeared under the title Living Letters, and received a television endorsement from Billy Graham. This ensured the book's great success, and in 1971 Tyndale published Taylor's complete Living Bible. Taylor named the company after William Tyndale, whose English translation of the New Testament was first printed in 1526. The current president of Tyndale House is Mark D. Taylor. During the first nine years of Tyndale's history, Kenneth N. Taylor continued paraphrasing the text of the Bible. Living Letters was followed by Living Prophecies (1965) and The Living New Testament (1967). Finally, The Living Bible was launched in 1971. According to Publishers Weekly, it was the bestselling book in the United States in the years 1972-74. The Living Bible was published in many different editions and binding styles, including a popular youth editiion called The Way and a study edition called The Life Application Study Bible. Today, Tyndale publishes a wide range of books by Christian authors such
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    250
    Zuda Comics

    Zuda Comics

    • Imprint of: DC Comics
    Zuda Comics was DC Comics' webcomics imprint from 2007 until 2010. It featured comics for Flash player instead of in a web page. Announced in a press release on July 9, 2007 and the first ongoing series and competing comic entries went live October 30, 2007. Zuda removed the competition aspect in April 2010 and in July 2010, soon after the launch of DC's digital comics service, it was announced that Zuda would close and be folded into the new digital publishing arm. Zuda comics series have won awards and nominations from comic industry's Glyph Comics Awards and Harvey Awards. Bayou, Volume 1 was also named one of the 2010 Great Graphic Novels for Teens by the American Library Association. Zuda had competitions that were open for comic creators to submit their own eight-page comics. Each month ten were selected to compete by editorial. Users could vote for their favorite and the winner received a contract to continue their comic on Zuda with 52 more screens. When the contract was filled, if the comic was liked enough it could be renewed for an additional "season". Occasionally an "instant winner" was chosen to receive a contract without having to compete. In July 2008 an
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