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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Publication of All Time

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    1
    Harper's Magazine

    Harper's Magazine

    Harper's Magazine (also called Harper's) is a monthly magazine of literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts. Launched in June 1850, it is the second-oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the U.S. (Scientific American is the oldest). The current editor is Ellen Rosenbush, who replaced Roger Hodge in January 2010. Harper's Magazine has won many National Magazine Awards. Harper's Magazine was launched as Harper's New Monthly Magazine in June 1850, by the New York City publisher Harper & Brothers; who also founded Harper's Bazaar magazine, later growing to become HarperCollins Publishing. The first press run, of 7,500 copies, sold out almost immediately; circulation was some 50,000 issues six months later. The early issues reprinted material already published in England, but the magazine soon was publishing the work of American artists and writers, and in time commentary by the likes of Winston Churchill and Woodrow Wilson. The first appearance in print of portions of Moby Dick occurred in Harper's Magazine in Oct. 1851 under the title, "The Town-Ho's Story". In 1962, Harper & Brothers merged with Row, Peterson & Company, becoming Harper & Row (now
    7.13
    8 votes
    2
    Southern Literary Messenger

    Southern Literary Messenger

    The Southern Literary Messenger was a periodical published in Richmond, Virginia, from 1834 until June 1864. Each issue carried a subtitle of "Devoted to Every Department of Literature and the Fine Arts" or some variation and included poetry, fiction, non-fiction, reviews, and historical notes. It was founded by Thomas Willis White who served as publisher and occasional editor until his death in 1843. White hired Edgar Allan Poe in 1835 as a staff writer and critic. Others involved with the periodical included Matthew Fontaine Maury and Maury's kinsman Benjamin Blake Minor. It ended in June 1864 in part due to Richmond's involvement in the American Civil War. The Southern Literary Messenger first appeared in August 1834 with Thomas Willis White as publisher. In the inaugural issue Willis stated that his aim was "to stimulate the pride and genius of the south, and awaken from its long slumber the literary exertion of this portion of our country." This was in reference to the fact that at the time most magazines were published in Boston, New York and Philadelphia. Edgar Allan Poe served as an editor for a time (see below). After his departure, White resumed editorial duties before
    7.00
    8 votes
    3
    7.14
    7 votes
    4
    The Awakening

    The Awakening

    The Awakening is a novel by Kate Chopin, first published in 1899 (see 1899 in literature). Set in New Orleans and the Southern Louisiana coast at the end of the nineteenth century, the plot centers around Edna Pontellier and her struggle to reconcile her increasingly unorthodox views on femininity and motherhood with the prevailing social attitudes of the turn-of-the-century South. It is one of the earliest American novels that focuses on women's issues without condescension. It is also widely seen as a landmark work of early feminism. The novel's blend of realistic narrative, incisive social commentary, and psychological complexity makes The Awakening a precursor of American modernism; it prefigures the works of American novelists such as William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway and echoes the works of contemporaries such as Edith Wharton and Henry James. It can also be considered among the first Southern works in a tradition that would culminate with the modern masterpieces of Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Katherine Anne Porter, and Tennessee Williams. The novel's protagonist. The wife of Léonce and the mother of two boys, she is presented as a complex and emotionally
    7.00
    7 votes
    5
    Aberjhani's Blog at Red Room

    Aberjhani's Blog at Red Room

    Aberjhani's Red Room blog was established in February 2009 with a focus on contemporary literary culture, the publishing industry, African-American history and culture, and 21st century historical and technological trends. Various posts have been featured on the Red Room web site's front page and in other special categories. The author was inducted into the Red Room Hall of Fame in October 2009.
    9.00
    5 votes
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    6.86
    7 votes
    7
    7.50
    6 votes
    8

    The Art of Computer Programming

    The Art of Computer Programming (acronym: TAOCP) is a comprehensive monograph written by Donald Knuth that covers many kinds of programming algorithms and their analysis. Knuth began the project, originally conceived as a single book with twelve chapters, in 1962. The first three of what were then expected to be a seven-volume set were published in 1968, 1969, and 1973. The first installment of Volume 4 (a paperback fascicle) was published in 2005. The hardback volume 4A was published in 2011. Additional fascicle installments are planned for release approximately biannually. After winning a Westinghouse Talent Search scholarship, Knuth enrolled at the Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where his performance was so outstanding that the faculty voted to award him a master of science upon his completion of the baccalaureate degree. During his summer vacations, Knuth was hired to write compilers, earning more in his summer months than did full professors all year. Such exploits made Knuth a topic of discussion among the mathematics department, which included Richard S. Varga. Knuth started to write a book about compiler design in 1962, and soon realized
    8.60
    5 votes
    9
    5.75
    8 votes
    10
    Outline of the Post-War New World Map

    Outline of the Post-War New World Map

    The Outline of the Post-War New World Map was a map created and self-published by Maurice Gomberg of Philadelphia PA, on February 25, 1942 after the attack on Pearl Harbor and the entry of the US into World War II. It shows a proposed political division of the world after World War II in the event of an Allied victory in which the United States of America, the United Kingdom, and the Soviet Union would rule. The map includes a manifesto describing a "New World Moral Order", along with quotes from Roosevelt's Four Freedoms speech. Gomberg created the map as a personal project, and little else is known of him. The map has been highlighted by New World Order conspiracy theorists who believe it represents some broader view of the US government, and has also been widely circulated online. The map proposes a total of 14 independent sovereign states, 13 of them democracies and 10 of them demilitarized. The United States has 80 states, not including Security Outposts in the Pacific and the Atlantic, gaining all of Canada, Mexico, and Central America, among other places: States: Protectorates: Port "Peace-security bases": Dakar and Freetown on the Atlantic coast of Africa Everything below
    8.40
    5 votes
    11
    7.17
    6 votes
    12
    Stanford News

    Stanford News

    The Stanford News Service provides assistance to reporters and disseminates much of the university's news. We also help to publicize and handle media relations for major events, provide media training for key faculty and administrators and serve as a liaison between scholars and media outlets.
    8.20
    5 votes
    13

    Architectural Review

    The Architectural Review is a monthly international architectural magazine published in London since 1896. Articles cover the built environment which includes landscape, building design, interior design and urbanism as well as theory of these subjects. The publishers, Emap Construct also produce a sister publication called Architects' Journal. The Architectural Review was founded in 1896, on the cusp of the 20th century. The cover of the first issue bore the legend 'a magazine for the artist and craftsman', though this subsequently became 'artist, archaeologist, designer and craftsman', thus firmly setting its sights on Victorian polymaths everywhere. The earliest issues were large in format and plainly intended to make the discussion of architecture visual as well as verbal. In those early years, the AR was very much an Arts and Crafts organ inspired by John Ruskin and AWN Pugin, the movement’s great patriarchs. It slowly changed with the zeitgeist to become more devoted to classical architecture and conscious of stirring international developments. By 1900 the magazine could boast that it was ‘the only magazine in the British Empire dealing with the artistic, as distinguished
    7.00
    6 votes
    14
    Edelstein Thron

    Edelstein Thron

    Edelstein Thron is the 1987 Bastei Lubbe published paperback edition of the German language translation of Janet Morris' book, The Carnelian Throne.
    7.00
    6 votes
    15
    7.00
    6 votes
    16
    Burton's Magazine

    Burton's Magazine

    Burton's Gentleman's Magazine or, more simply, Burton's Magazine, was a literary publication published in Philadelphia in 1837-1841. Its founder was William Evans Burton, an English-born immigrant to the United States who also managed a theatre and was a minor actor. The magazine included poems, fiction, and essays, with an emphasis on sporting life. Articles featured sailing, cricket, hunting, and more. To compete with other magazines of the time, Burton's included extra illustrations and thicker paper than standard. The magazine's most famous contributor and one-time editor was Edgar Allan Poe in 1839. The June 1839 issue of Burton's included the notice that its owner had "made arrangements with Edgar A. Poe, Esq., late Editor of the Southern Literary Messenger, to devote his abilities and experience to a portion of the Editorial duties of the Gentlemen's Magazine." Poe agreed to provide about 11 pages of original material per month and was paid $10 a week and his name was added next to Burton's. In Burton's, Poe published now well-known tales including "The Man That Was Used Up", "The Fall of the House of Usher", "William Wilson", "Morella", and others. In 1841, Burton sold the
    6.00
    7 votes
    17
    Frontier Times 1957 Winter

    Frontier Times 1957 Winter

    1st issue of the new series.

    Canyon of the Skeletons, Gentleman Killer, The Blizzard, "The Fightin'est Ranger", The Fight That Finished Tombstone, The Donner Tragedy, They Could Laugh At Death
    7.80
    5 votes
    18
    7.80
    5 votes
    19
    7.80
    5 votes
    20
    9.00
    4 votes
    21

    The State of the Art

    The State of the Art is a short story collection by Scottish writer Iain M. Banks, first published in 1991. The collection includes some stories originally published under his other byline, Iain Banks as well as the title novella and others set in Banks' Culture fictional universe. At 100 pages long, the title novella makes up the bulk of the book. The novella chronicles a Culture mission to Earth in the late Seventies, and also serves as a prequel of sorts to Use of Weapons by featuring one of that novel's characters, Diziet Sma. Here, Sma argues for contact with Earth, to try to fix the mess the human species has made of it; another Culture citizen, Linter, goes native, choosing to renounce his Culture body enhancements so as to be more like the locals; and Li, who is a Star Trek fan, argues that the whole "incontestably neurotic and clinically insane species" should be eradicated with a micro black hole. The ship Arbitrary has ideas, and a sense of humour, of its own. 'Also while I'd been away, the ship had sent a request on a postcard to the BBC's World Service, asking for 'Mr David Bowie's "Space Oddity" for the good ship Arbitrary and all who sail in her.' (This from a
    8.50
    4 votes
    22

    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

    The Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences is an academic journal published by the New York Academy of Sciences. It is one of the oldest science journals still being published, having been founded in 1823.
    6.33
    6 votes
    23
    London Magazine

    London Magazine

    The London Magazine is a historied publication of arts, literature and miscellaneous interests. Its history ranges nearly three centuries and several reincarnations, publishing the likes of William Wordsworth, William S. Burroughs and John Keats. The London Magazine was founded in 1732 in political opposition to the Tory-based Gentleman's Magazine and ran for 53 years until its closure in 1785. In 1820, the London Magazine was resurrected by the publishers Baldwin, Craddock & Joy under the editorship of John Scott who formatted the magazine along the lines of the Edinburgh publication Blackwood's Magazine. It was during this time the magazine enjoyed its greatest literary prosperity publishing poetic luminaries such as William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Clare and John Keats. In September 1821, the first of two installments of Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium-Eater appeared in the journal; these were later published in book form. Scott quickly began a literary row with members of the Blackwood's, in particular with Dr. John Gibson Lockhart in regards to many subjects including the Blackwood's virule criticism of the Cockney School under which Leigh
    9.67
    3 votes
    24
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    The Bible—What Is Its Message?

    The Bible—What Is Its Message?

    This brochure presents a brief, fast-moving summary of the message found in the Bible. However, this summary is not intended to explain in detail what the Bible teaches on every subject.
    7.00
    5 votes
    26
    7.00
    5 votes
    27
    Agence France-Presse

    Agence France-Presse

    Agence France-Presse (AFP) is a French news agency, the oldest one in the world, and one of the three largest with Associated Press and Reuters. It is also the largest French news agency. Currently, its CEO is Emmanuel Hoog and its news director Philippe Massonnet. AFP is headquartered in Paris, with regional offices in Nicosia, Montevideo, Hong Kong, and Washington, D.C., and bureaus in 150 countries. It transmits news in French, English, Arabic, Spanish, German, and Portuguese. The agency was founded in 1835 by a Parisian translator and advertising agent, Charles-Louis Havas as Agence Havas. Two of his employees, Paul Reuter and Bernhard Wolff, later set up rival news agencies in London and Berlin respectively, starting 1848. In order to reduce overheads and develop the lucrative advertising side of the business, Havas's sons, who had succeeded him in 1852, signed agreements with Reuter and Wolff, giving each news agency an exclusive reporting zone in different parts of Europe. This arrangement lasted until the 1930s, when the invention of short-wave wireless improved and cut communications costs. To help Havas extend the scope of its reporting at a time of great international
    8.00
    4 votes
    28
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    The Annotated Alice

    The Annotated Alice

    The Annotated Alice is a work by Martin Gardner incorporating the text of Lewis Carroll's major tales: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass as well as the original illustrations by John Tenniel. It has extensive annotations explaining the contemporary references (including the Victorian poems that Carroll parodies), mathematical concepts, word play, and Victorian traditions (such as the snap-dragons) featured in the two books. The original book was first published in 1960. It has been reprinted several times and translated into Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, German and Hebrew. In 1990, a sequel, More Annotated Alice, was published. This sequel doesn't contain the original side notes and Tenniel's illustrations were replaced by those of Peter Newell. It also contains the "suppressed" chapter "The Wasp in a Wig", which Carroll omitted from the text of Through the Looking-Glass on Tenniel's recommendation. In 1999 The Definitive Edition was published. It combines the notes from both works and features Tenniel's illustrations in improved quality. Gardner also compiled a companion volume, The Annotated Snark, dedicated to Carroll's classic
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    6.80
    5 votes
    31

    Journal of Finance

    The Journal of Finance publishes leading research across all the major fields of financial research. It is the most widely cited academic journal on finance. Each issue of the journal reaches over 8,000 academics, finance professionals, libraries, government and financial institutions around the world. Published six times a year, the journal is the official publication of The American Finance Association, the premier academic organization devoted to the study and promotion of knowledge about financial economics.
    9.00
    3 votes
    32
    9.00
    3 votes
    33
    Frontier Times 1958 Winter

    Frontier Times 1958 Winter

    Day of Massacre, They're Dead - Let's Go!, I Smuggled Guns Across the Border, Lost: A Fortune in Silver, Durned Right There's Ghosts!, Bitter Blizzard, Lady Moon, What The Kid Said - Went!
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Ein Sturm Aus Dem Abgrund

    Ein Sturm Aus Dem Abgrund

    Ein Sturm Aus Dem Abgrund is the 1987 Bastei Lubbe published German language edition of Janet E. Morris' book "Wind from the Abyss." Volume 3 in Janet E. Morris' four volume Silistra series
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    7.50
    4 votes
    37

    Meet Mr Mulliner

    Meet Mr Mulliner is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. First published in the United Kingdom on September 27, 1927 by Herbert Jenkins, and in the United States on March 2, 1928 by Doubleday, Doran, it introduces the irrepressible pub raconteur Mr Mulliner, who narrates all nine of the book's stories. The last story, "Honeysuckle Cottage", was not originally a Mr Mulliner story; it was given a Mulliner frame for the book, and is the only one of the stories which is not explicitly narrated from the bar-parlour of the Anglers' Rest public house. The original story titles and publication dates were as follows:
    7.50
    4 votes
    38
    Beyond Lies the Wub

    Beyond Lies the Wub

    Beyond Lies the Wub is a collection of science fiction stories by Philip K. Dick. It was first published by Gollancz in 1988 and reprints Volume I of The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick. Many of the stories had originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction, Planet Stories, If, Galaxy Science Fiction, Imagination, Space Science Fiction, Fantastic Story Magazine, Amazing Stories, Future, Cosmos, Fantasy Fiction, Beyond Fantasy Fiction, Thrilling Wonder Stories and Startling Stories. The collection was reprinted by Citadel Press in 2003 under the title Paycheck and Other Classic Stories.
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Tamerlane and Other Poems

    Tamerlane and Other Poems

    Tamerlane and Other Poems is the first published work by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. The short collection of poems was first published in 1827. Today, it is believed only 12 copies of the collection still exist. Poe abandoned his foster family, the Allans, and moved to Boston to find work in 1827. Having only minor success, he enlisted in the United States Army. He brought with him several manuscripts, which he paid a printer named Calvin F. S. Thomas to publish. The 40-page collection was called Tamerlane and Other Poems and did not include Poe's name. Distribution was limited to 50 copies and it received no critical attention. The poems were largely inspired by Lord Byron, including the long title poem "Tamerlane", which depicts an historical conqueror who laments the loss of his first romance. Like much of Poe's future work, the poems in Tamerlane and Other Poems include themes of love, death, and pride. Poe's first published collection is so rare that after Poe's death Rufus Wilmot Griswold believed it had never existed until one was found in 1859. It has since been recognized as one of the rarest first editions in American literature. Edgar Poe was unable to complete
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    8.67
    3 votes
    41
    Visions of a Skylark Dressed in Black

    Visions of a Skylark Dressed in Black

    VISIONS OF A SKYLARK DRESSED IN BLACK is composed of 2 works of short fiction and 52 poems. It was first written and published as the global community came to grips with the reality of 9/11 and a number of catastrophes that shook humanity to its collective core throughout the first decade of the 21st century.
    7.25
    4 votes
    42
    The Boston Globe

    The Boston Globe

    The Boston Globe (and the Boston Sunday Globe) is an American daily newspaper based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Boston Globe has been owned by The New York Times Company since 1993. Its chief print rival is the Boston Herald. The Boston Globe has won 21 Pulitzer Prizes. The Boston Globe was founded in 1872 by six Boston businessmen, led by Eben Jordan, who jointly invested $150,000. The first issue was published on March 4, 1872 and cost four cents. Originally a morning daily, it began Sunday publication in 1877. In 1878, The Boston Globe started an afternoon edition called The Boston Evening Globe, which ceased publication in 1979. The Boston Globe was a private company until 1973 when it went public under the name Affiliated Publications. It continued to be managed by the descendants of Charles H. Taylor. In 1993, The New York Times Company purchased Affiliated Publications for US$1.1 billion, making The Boston Globe a wholly owned subsidiary of The New York Times' parent. The Jordan and Taylor families received substantial New York Times Company stock, but the last Taylor family members left management in 2000–2001. Boston.com, the online edition of Boston Globe was launched
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    8.33
    3 votes
    44

    A Man of Means

    A Man of Means is a collection of six short stories written in collaboration by P. G. Wodehouse and C. H. Bovill. The stories first appeared in the United Kingdom in the Strand in 1914, and in the United States in Pictorial Review in 1916. They were later published in book form in the UK by Porpoise Books in 1991; the collection was released on Project Gutenberg in 2003. The stories all star Roland Bleke, a young man for whom financial success is always a mixed blessing. The plots follow on from each other, sometimes directly, and occasionally refer back to past events in Bleke's meteoric career.
    9.50
    2 votes
    45
    Book of Mormon

    Book of Mormon

    The Book of Mormon is a sacred text of the Latter Day Saint movement, which adherents believe contains writings of ancient prophets who lived on the American continent from approximately 2200 BC to AD 421. It was first published in March 1830 by Joseph Smith as The Book of Mormon: An Account Written by the Hand of Mormon upon Plates Taken from the Plates of Nephi. According to Smith's account, and also according to the book's narrative, the Book of Mormon was originally written in otherwise unknown characters referred to as "reformed Egyptian" engraved on golden plates. Smith claimed that the last prophet to contribute to the book, a man named Moroni, buried it in a hill in present-day New York and then returned to earth in 1827 as an angel, revealing the location of the book to Smith and instructing him to translate and disseminate it as evidence of the restoration of Christ's true church in the latter days. The Book of Mormon has a number of original and distinctive doctrinal discussions on subjects such as the fall of Adam and Eve, the nature of the Atonement, eschatology, redemption from physical and spiritual death, and the organization of the latter-day church. The pivotal
    9.50
    2 votes
    46
    9.50
    2 votes
    47
    Frontier Times 1960 Fall

    Frontier Times 1960 Fall

    The Red Buffalo, That's what the Indians called the dreaded prairie fire!, Cover Contest Results, The Echo Canyon War, Fort Lincoln's Phantom Forger, The Lost Van Duzen Mine
    7.00
    4 votes
    48
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    St. Petersburg Times

    St. Petersburg Times

    The Tampa Bay Times, previously named the St. Petersburg Times, is an American newspaper published in St. Petersburg, Florida. It is one of two major publications serving the Tampa Bay Area, the other being The Tampa Tribune, which the Times tops in both circulation and readership. The Times has won eight Pulitzer Prizes since 1964, and in 2009, won two in a single year for the first time in the paper's history. It is published by the Times Publishing Company, which is owned by The Poynter Institute for Media Studies, a nonprofit journalism school directly adjacent to the University of South Florida St. Petersburg campus. Many issues are available through Google News Archive. A daily electronic version is also available for the Amazon Kindle and iPad. The paper traces its origins to the West Hillsborough Times, a weekly newspaper established in Dunedin, Florida on the Pinellas peninsula in 1884. At the time, neither St. Petersburg nor Pinellas County existed; the peninsula was part of Hillsborough County. The paper was published weekly in the back of a pharmacy and had a circulation of 480. It subsequently changed ownership six times in seventeen years. In December 1884 it was
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    The Smart Set

    The Smart Set

    The Smart Set was a literary magazine founded in America in March 1900 by Colonel William d'Alton Mann. During its heyday under the editorship of H.L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan, The Smart Set offered many up-and-coming authors their start and gave them access to a relatively large audience. In creating The Smart Set, Mann initially sought to offer a cultural counterpart to his Town Topics, a preceding gossip rag which he used for political and social gain among New York City's elite, which would include works “by, for and about ‘The Four Hundred’” (Dolmetsch 4). With The Smart Set, Mann wanted to provide sophisticated content that would reinforce the social values of New York’s social elite and gave it the subtitle: “The Magazine of Cleverness.” He published the first issue of The Smart Set on March 10, 1900, under the editorship of Arthur Grissom, who also worked at Town Topics. As editor, Grissom created the formula of the magazine that would remain intact throughout the greater part of its existence: 160 pages containing a novelette, a short play, several poems, and several witticisms to fill blank space. Grissom died of typhoid fever a year later, and Marvin Dana took over
    7.00
    4 votes
    51

    Zodiac #10

    Zodiac #10 is the 10th issue of the Zodiac magazine, published in Milan.  This issue was published in 1962.
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    The Fish the Fighters and the Song-girl

    The Fish the Fighters and the Song-girl

    In the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe, after the Battle of Meridian, Tempus and his Unified Sacred Band leave Sanctuary to draw the stragglers from the war away from the town. On the foray north by cloud conveyance, the storm god Enlil redirects the Band to unknown lands. During the evenings on this trip, veteran Stepsons tell the new recruits stories of earlier days in Sanctuary. During the journey, the Band confronts Thrax, patron god of Thrace, and is set upon by naiads. This anthology contains all the stories of the Sacred Band of Stepsons from Thieves World (R) #6-#11, as well as a new novelette and interstitial stories that appear nowhere else, chronicling the adventures of Tempus's personal guard as he takes them upcountry to rendezvous with his larger force before returning to Lemuria. "The Fish the Fighters and the Song-girl" is both the name of the new novelette in the book and of the book itself. Its companion volume and first of the two "Sacred Band Tales" volumes is "Tempus with his right-side companion Niko." "The Fish the Fighters and the Song-girl is the second in the two-volume sub-series, "Sacred Band Tales. This two-volume set collects all the short fiction of the Sacred Band of Stepsons series and contain every Stepsons story from Thieves World, revised, expanded and framed in a new context.
    8.00
    3 votes
    53
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Le vent du chaos

    Le vent du chaos

    Le vent du chaos is the 1983 Editions J'ai Lu published paperback edition of Janet E. Morris' book Wind from the Abyss.
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    6.75
    4 votes
    56
    Penny Magazine

    Penny Magazine

    The Penny Magazine, published every Saturday from 31 March 1832 to 31 October 1845, was an illustrated British magazine aimed at the working class. Charles Knight created it for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge in response to Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, which started two months earlier. Sold for only a penny and illustrated with woodcuts, it was an expensive enterprise that could only be supported by very large circulation. Though initially very successful—with a circulation of 200,000 in the first year—it proved too dry and too Whiggish to appeal to the working class audience it needed to be financially viable. Its competitor—which included a weekly short story—grew more slowly, but lasted much longer.
    6.75
    4 votes
    57

    The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

    The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (later Fantasy & Science Fiction and usually referred to as just F&SF) is a digest-size American fantasy and science fiction magazine first published in 1949 by Mystery House and then by Fantasy House. Both were subsidiaries of Lawrence Spivak's Mercury Publications, which took over as publisher in 1958. Spilogale, Inc. has published the magazine since 2001. Since the April/May 2009 issue, it is published bimonthly with 256 pages per issue. It began as The Magazine of Fantasy (Fall 1949), with Anthony Boucher and J. Francis McComas as editors. To encompass the full spectrum of speculative fiction, the title expanded into The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction with the second issue. The quarterly became a bimonthly with the fifth issue (December 1950). Switching to an ampersand, it became The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction with the sixth issue (February 1951), returning to The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction when it went monthly with issue 17 (October 1952). The ampersand reappeared in May 1979, and the title was finally shortened to just Fantasy & Science Fiction with the October 1987 issue. With the April/May 2009
    6.75
    4 votes
    58

    Cotton A.x.

    The manuscript containing "Pearl" and "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight". So named because it was part of Robert Bruce Cotton's manuscript library.
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    Good Housekeeping

    Good Housekeeping

    Good Housekeeping is a women's magazine owned by the Hearst Corporation, featuring articles about women's interests, product testing by The Good Housekeeping Institute, recipes, diet, health as well as literary articles. It is well known for the "Good Housekeeping Seal," popularly known as the "Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval." The magazine was founded May 2, 1885 by Clark W. Bryan in Holyoke, Massachusetts. The magazine achieved a circulation of 300,000 by 1911, at which time it was bought by the Hearst Corporation. In 1966 it reached 5,500,000 readers. Good Housekeeping is one of the "Seven Sisters", a group of women's service magazines. The Hearst Corporation created a British edition along the same lines in 1922. Famous writers who have contributed to the magazine include Somerset Maugham, Edwin Markham, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Frances Parkinson Keyes, A. J. Cronin, Virginia Woolf, and Evelyn Waugh. In 1900, the "Experiment Station", the predecessor to the Good Housekeeping Research Institute (GHRI), was founded. The formal opening of the headquarters of GHRI - the Model Kitchen, Testing Station for Household Devices, and Domestic Science Laboratory - occurred in January
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    9.00
    2 votes
    61
    Redbook

    Redbook

    Redbook is an American women's magazine published by the Hearst Corporation. It is one of the "Seven Sisters", a group of women's service magazines. The magazine was first published in May 1903 as The Red Book Illustrated by Stumer, Rosenthal and Eckstein, a firm of Chicago retail merchants. The name was changed to The Red Book Magazine shortly thereafter. Its first editor, from 1903 to 1906, was Trumbull White, who wrote that the name was appropriate because, "Red is the color of cheerfulness, of brightness, of gayety." In its early years, the magazine published short fiction by well-known authors, including many women writers, along with photographs of popular actresses and other women of note. Within two years the magazine was a success, climbing to a circulation of 300,000. When White left to edit Appleton's Magazine, he was replaced by Karl Edwin Harriman, who edited The Red Book Magazine and its sister publications The Blue Book and The Green Book until 1912. Under Harriman the magazine was promoted as "the largest illustrated fiction magazine in the world" and increased its price from 10 cents to 15 cents. According to Endres and Lueck (p. 299), "Red Book was trying to
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    Cornhill Magazine

    Cornhill Magazine

    The Cornhill Magazine was a Victorian magazine and literary journal named after Cornhill Street in London. Cornhill was founded by George Murray Smith in 1859 and was published until 1975. It was a literary journal with a selection of articles on diverse subjects and serialisations of new novels. Smith hoped to gain some of the same readership enjoyed by All the Year Round, a similar magazine owned by Charles Dickens, and he employed as editor William Thackeray, Dickens' great literary rival at the time. The magazine was phenomenally successful, selling many more issues than anyone had thought likely, but within a few years circulation dropped rapidly. It also gained a reputation for rather safe, inoffensive content in the late Victorian era. A mark of the high regard in which it was held was its publication of Leaves from the Journal of our Life in the Highlands by Queen Victoria. The stories were often illustrated and it contained works from some of the foremost artists of the time including: George du Maurier, Edwin Landseer, Frederic Leighton, and John Everett Millais. Some of its subsequent editors included G. H. Lewes, Leslie Stephen, Ronald Gorell Barnes, James Payn, Peter
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    The Man Upstairs

    The Man Upstairs is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom on 23 January 1914 by Methuen & Co., London. Most of the stories had previously appeared in magazines, generally Strand Magazine in the UK and Cosmopolitan or Collier's Weekly in the United States. Although the book was not published in the U.S., many of the stories were eventually made available to U.S. readers in The Uncollected Wodehouse (1976) and The Swoop! and Other Stories (1979) It is a miscellaneous collection, not featuring any of Wodehouse's regular characters; most of the stories concern love and romance. Annette Brougham, a quick-tempered female composer and music-teacher, is disturbed by a knocking on her ceiling. She visits the flat above to complain, but despite her initial feelings of anger towards him, she soon finds herself drawn to "Alan Beverley", the modest and charming struggling artist she finds there. Reginald Sellers, another resident of the building, a pompous and self-important painter, criticizes Alan's work harshly, and Annette defends him, but regrets her cruelty towards Reginald. The boorish Sellers finds some success with his art, selling
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    Frontier Times 1970 May

    Frontier Times 1970 May

    Death Valley's Fast Fading Ghost Towns, Motion Pictures Vignettes, Sacred Arrows of the Cheyennes, Saga of the Camp Bird, The Tow Boys of Falls Creek, Man on the Dodge
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    Star Trek Magazine

    Star Trek Magazine

    Star Trek Magazine is an authorized periodical published bi-monthly by Titan UK in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, devoted to the Star Trek franchise. The magazine has limited distribution in Europe. In August 2006 the magazine began to be published in North America with issue 128 being issue 1 in the US version. Star Trek Magazine was the first regular magazine to be published by Titan Magazines and is its longest-running title. It was launched in March 1995 as Star Trek Monthly, soon after the first broadcast of Star Trek: Voyager. It dropped to bi-monthly release (but larger format) in 2004. With issue 143 (Mar/Apr 2009), the magazine will increase its output to eight issues a year. The contents listed below are intended as a general reference and are not exhaustive. Recent issues include columns by Star Trek insiders Dave Rossi and Larry Nemecek.
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    North of Boston

    North of Boston is a 1914 poetry collection by Robert Frost. It includes two of his most famous poems, "Mending Wall" and "After Apple-Picking". Most of the poems resemble short dramas or dialogues.
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    Sandman

    The Sandman is a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics. Beginning with issue #47, it was placed under the imprint Vertigo. It chronicles the adventures of Dream (of the Endless), who rules over the world of dreams. It ran for 75 issues from January 1989 until March 1996. Gaiman's contract stipulated that the series would end when he left it. The Sandman was one of Vertigo's flagship titles, and is available as a series of ten trade paperbacks. It has also been reprinted in a recolored five-volume Absolute hardcover edition with slipcase. Critically acclaimed, The Sandman is one of the few graphic novels ever to be on the New York Times Best Seller list, along with Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns. It was one of five graphic novels to make Entertainment Weekly's "100 best reads from 1983 to 2008", ranking at 46. Norman Mailer described the series as "a comic strip for intellectuals." The Sandman grew out of a proposal by Neil Gaiman to revive DC's 1974–1976 series The Sandman, illustrated by Jack Kirby and Ernie Chua and written by Joe Simon and Michael Fleisher. Gaiman had considered including characters from the "Dream Stream" (including the Kirby
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    Sartor Resartus

    Sartor Resartus

    Sartor Resartus (meaning 'The tailor re-tailored') is an 1836 novel by Thomas Carlyle, first published as a serial in 1833-34 in Fraser's Magazine. The novel purports to be a commentary on the thought and early life of a German philosopher called Diogenes Teufelsdröckh (which translates as 'god-born devil-dung'), author of a tome entitled "Clothes: their Origin and Influence", but was actually a poioumenon. Teufelsdröckh's Transcendentalist musings are mulled over by a skeptical English editor who also provides fragmentary biographical material on the philosopher. The work is, in part, a parody of Hegel, and of German Idealism more generally. However, Teufelsdröckh is also a literary device with which Carlyle can express difficult truths. Archibald MacMechan surmised that the novel's invention had three sources. The first being The Tale of a Tub by Jonathan Swift, whom Carlyle intensely admired in his college years, even going by the nicknames "Jonathan" and "The Dean". In that work, the three main traditions of Christianity are represented by a father bestowing his three children with clothes they may never alter, but proceed to do so according to fashion. The second being
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    The Ohio Cardinal

    The Ohio Cardinal

    The Ohio Cardinal is the journal of record for observers of Ohio's bird life. For over twenty-five years this quarterly has presented extensive organized reports of bird observations season by season. These records now number over fifty thousand and form a substantial source of data for the study of the abundance and distribution of our avifauna.

    The Cardinal began as, and remains, a collaboration among Ohio birders, with hundreds sharing in each issue sightings reports, photographs of unusual birds, artwork, articles, or field notes. Each issue features a comprehensive summary of the season's observations across the state, highlighting not only the unusual but also interesting patterns discernible in the usual. Reports from the Ohio Bird Records Committee appear regularly. Rob Harlan writes a regular column "Further Afield," an informative and often wry look at field work and birding for fun, bird records, and the history of Ohio ornithology. A timely compilation of all the state's Christmas Bird Count results appears yearly. Articles are featured in every issue, and treat topics such as birding locales and techniques, field identification issues, the history and status of selected Ohio species, first state records, counts and surveys, trends in the abundance and distribution of our birds, and many others. Short notes from observers around the state describe noteworthy events, behaviors, numbers, and observations. New books and other sources of information to students of Ohio bird life are announced and reviewed. We take pride in regular and timely publication, with each issue mailed about two to three months after the end of the season treated. Source
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    8

    8

    8 (eight /ˈeɪt/) is the natural number following 7 and preceding 9. The SI prefix for 1000 is yotta (Y), and for its reciprocal, yocto (y). It is the root word of two other numbers: eighteen (eight and ten) and eighty (eight tens). Linguistically, it is derived from Middle English eighte. 8 is a composite number, its proper divisors being 1, 2, and 4. It is twice 4 or four times 2. Eight is a power of two, being (two cubed), and is the first number of the form , p being an integer greater than 1. It has an aliquot sum of 7 in the 4 member aliquot sequence (8,7,1,0) being the first member of 7-aliquot tree. It is symbolized by the Arabic numeral (figure) All powers of 2 ;(), have an aliquot sum of one less than themselves. A number is divisible by 8 if its last 3 digits are also divisible by 8. Eight is the first number to be the aliquot sum of two numbers other than itself; the discrete biprime 10, and the square number 49. 8 is the base of the octal number system, which is mostly used with computers. In octal, one digit represents 3 bits. In modern computers, a byte is a grouping of eight bits, also called an octet. The number 8 is a Fibonacci number, being 3 plus 5. The next
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    81
    Das Schwert Der Hoffnung

    Das Schwert Der Hoffnung

    Das Schwert Der Hoffnung is the 1987 German language paperback edition of Janet Morris' novel, The Golden Sword. It was published by Bastei Lubbe in Berlin.
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    Paradigm Dancing

    Paradigm Dancing

    PARADIGM DANCING is the the American author Aberjhani's official PEN International and PEN American Center blog. In the tradition of PEN itself, the blog features articles and essays addressing both literary and human rights issues. It is distinguished, however, by a strong focus as well on the life and philosophy of PEN Club founder and Nobel Laureate John Galsworthy.
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    Asimov's Science Fiction

    Asimov's Science Fiction (ISSN 1065-2698) is an American science fiction magazine which publishes science fiction and fantasy and perpetuates the name of author and biochemist Isaac Asimov. It is currently published by Penny Publications 10 times a year, with double issues in April/May and October/November. Circulation in 2012 was 22,593, as reported in the annual Locus magazine survey. Asimov's Science Fiction began life as the digest-sized Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine (or IASFM for short) in 1977. Joel Davis of Davis Publications approached Asimov to lend his name to a new science fiction magazine, after the fashion of Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine or Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine. Asimov refused to act as editor, but served instead as editorial director, writing editorials and replying to reader mail until his death in 1992. Initially a quarterly, its first issue was dated Spring 1977. It changed to a bimonthly in 1978 and began publishing monthly in 1979. In the mid-1980s it was published once every four weeks, with an extra "mid-December" issue. Double issues were added in the early 1990s before the schedule was scaled back to the present 10 issues per
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    Die Goldene Kurtisane

    Die Goldene Kurtisane

    Die Goldene Kurtisane is the 1987 paperback edition of Janet Morris' The Golden Courtesan. Bastei Lubbe published this German language edition.
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    The Inimitable Jeeves

    The Inimitable Jeeves

    The Inimitable Jeeves is a semi-novel collecting Jeeves stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, on May 17, 1923, and in the United States by George H. Doran, New York on September 28, 1923, under the title Jeeves. The novel combined 11 previously-published stories, of which the first six and the last were split in two, to make a book of 18 chapters. It is now often printed in 11 chapters, mirroring the original stories. All the stories had previously appeared in the Strand Magazine in the UK, between December 1921 and November 1922, except for one, "Jeeves and the Chump Cyril", which had appeared in the Strand in August 1918. That story had appeared in the Saturday Evening Post (US) in June 1918. All the other stories appeared in Cosmopolitan magazine in the US between December 1921 and December 1922. This was the second collection of Jeeves stories, after My Man Jeeves (1919); the next collection would be Carry on, Jeeves, in 1925. All of the short stories are connected and most of them involve Bertie's friend Bingo Little, who is always falling in love. The original story titles and publication dates were as follows (with
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    92
    The Saturday Evening Post

    The Saturday Evening Post

    The Saturday Evening Post is a bimonthly American magazine. It was published weekly under this title from 1897 until 1969, and quarterly and then bimonthly from 1971. While the publication traces its historical roots to Benjamin Franklin, The Pennsylvania Gazette was first published in 1728 by Samuel Keimer. The following year (1729), Franklin acquired the Gazette from Keimer for a small sum and turned it into the largest circulation newspaper in all the colonies. It continued publication until 1800. The Saturday Evening Post was founded in 1821 and grew to become the most widely circulated weekly magazine in America. The magazine gained prominent status under the leadership of its longtime editor George Horace Lorimer (1899–1937). The Saturday Evening Post published current event articles, editorials, human interest pieces, humor, illustrations, a letter column, poetry (with contributions submitted by readers), single-panel gag cartoons (including Hazel by Ted Key) and stories by the leading writers of the time. It was known for commissioning lavish illustrations and original works of fiction. Illustrations were featured on the cover and embedded in stories and advertising. Some
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    Cell

    Cell

    Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing research papers across a broad range of disciplines within the life sciences. Areas covered include molecular biology, cell biology, systems biology, stem cells, developmental biology, genetics and genomics, proteomics, cancer research, immunology, neuroscience, structural biology, microbiology, virology, physiology, biophysics, and computational biology. The journal was established in 1974 by Benjamin Lewin and is published twice monthly by Cell Press, an imprint of Elsevier. Benjamin Lewin founded Cell in January 1974, under the aegis of MIT Press. He then bought the title and established an independent Cell Press in 1986. In April 1999, Lewin sold Cell Press to Elsevier. The "Article of the Future" feature was the recipient of a 2011 PROSE Award for Excellence in Biological & Life Sciences presented by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers. According to ScienceWatch, the journal was ranked first overall in the category of highest-impact journals (all fields) over 1995–2005 with an average of 161.2 citations per paper. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal
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    The Age

    The Age

    The Age is a daily broadsheet newspaper which has been published in Melbourne, Australia, since 1854. Owned and published by Fairfax Media, The Age primarily serves Victoria but is also available for purchase in Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory and border regions of South Australia and southern New South Wales. It is delivered in both hardcopy and online formats. The newspaper shares many articles with other Fairfax Media metropolitan daily newspapers, such as The Sydney Morning Herald. The Age was founded by three Melbourne businessmen, the brothers John Cooke and Henry Cooke, who had arrived from New Zealand in the 1840s, and Walter Powell. The first edition appeared on 17 October 1854. As of June 2011, The Age had an average weekday circulation of 190,600, increasing to 275,000 on Saturdays (in a city of 4 million). The Sunday Age had a circulation of 225,400. The paper advertised that its Monday-to-Friday readership averaged 668,000, increasing to 857,000 on Saturdays and 695,000 for the The Sunday Age. The management board announced on 18 June 2012 that during the following three years 1,900 positions were expected to be terminated from Fairfax Media, including many
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    Through the Looking-Glass

    Through the Looking-Glass

    Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There (1871) is a work of literature by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). It is the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865). The themes and settings of Through the Looking-Glass make it a kind of mirror image of Wonderland: the first book begins outdoors, in the warm month of May (4 May), uses frequent changes in size as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of playing cards; the second opens indoors on a snowy, wintry night exactly six months later, on 4 November (the day before Guy Fawkes Night), uses frequent changes in time and spatial directions as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of chess. In it, there are many mirror themes, including opposites, time running backwards, and so on. Alice is playing with a white kitten (whom she calls "Snowdrop") and a black kitten (whom she calls "Kitty")—the offspring of Dinah, Alice's cat in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland—when she ponders what the world is like on the other side of a mirror's reflection. Climbing up on the fireplace mantel, she pokes at the wall-hung mirror behind the fireplace and discovers, to her surprise, that she is able to step through it to
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    99
    El Aleph

    El Aleph

    The Aleph and Other Stories (Spanish:El Aleph, 1949) is a book of short stories by Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges. The title work, "The Aleph", describes a point in space that contains all other spaces at once. The work also presents the idea of infinite time. Borges writes in the original afterword, dated May 3, 1949 (Buenos Aires) that most of the stories belong to the genre of fantasy, mentioning themes such as identity and immortality. Borges added four new stories to the collection in the 1952 edition, for which he provided a brief postscript to the afterword.
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    Lo studio dell'orchestrazione

    Lo studio dell'orchestrazione

    This is a manual which describes general orchestration principles through almost a thousand musical examples, tenths of drawings, photographs and tables, and hundreds of references. It is addressed primarily to students of Composition and Orchestral Conducting, as well as to music arrangers and recording technicians. It is rich in translations into various languages of instruments names and orchestration techniques, and therefore it can be used as a reference dictionary by all musicians and music lovers.

    "No music book has ever succeeded in miraculously replacing the listening experience."
    Lorenzo Ferrero
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    Make #13

    This is the 13th issue of Make magazine. The main articles are around magic and how to make your own magic tricks.
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    Marginalia

    Marginalia is a collection of Fantasy, Horror and Science fiction short stories, essays, biography and poetry by and about the American author H. P. Lovecraft. It was released in 1944 and was the third collection of Lovecraft's work published by Arkham House. 2,035 copies were printed. The contents of this volume were selected by August Derleth and Donald Wandrei. The dust-jacket art is a reproduction of Virgil Finlay's illustration for Lovecraft's story "The Shunned House." Marginalia contains the following:
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    Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell

    Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell

    Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell was a volume of poetry published jointly by the three Brontë sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Anne in 1846 (see 1846 in poetry), and their first work to ever go in print. To evade contemporary prejudice against female writers, the Brontë sisters adopted androgynous first names. All three retained the first letter of their first names: Charlotte became Currer Bell, Anne became Acton Bell, and Emily became Ellis Bell. The book was printed by Aylott and Jones, from London. The first edition failed to attract interest, with only two copies being sold. However, the sisters decided to continue writing for publication and began work on their first novels, which became commercial successes. Following the success of Charlotte's Jane Eyre in 1848, and after the deaths of Emily and Anne, the second edition of this book (printed in 1850 by Smith & Elder) fared much better, with Charlotte's additions of previously unpublished poetry by her two late sisters. It is believed that there are fewer than ten copies in existence with the Aylott and Jones title-page.
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    Howl and Other Poems

    Howl and Other Poems

    Howl and Other Poems is a collection of poetry by Allen Ginsberg published November 1, 1956. It contains Ginsberg's most famous poem, "Howl", which is considered to be one of the principal works of the Beat Generation as well as "A Supermarket in California", "Transcription of Organ Music", "Sunflower Sutra", "America", "In the Baggage Room at Greyhound", and some of his earlier works. For printing the collection, the publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti, another well-known poet, was arrested and charged with obscenity. On October 3, 1957, Judge Clayton W. Horn found Ferlinghetti not guilty of the obscenity charge, and 5,000 more copies of the text were printed to meet the public demand, which had risen in response to the publicity surrounding the trial. "Howl and Other Poems" contains two of the most well-known poems from the Beat Generation, "Howl" and "A Supermarket in California", which have been reprinted in other collections, including the Norton Anthology of American Literature. Lawrence Ferlinghetti offered to publish "Howl" through City Lights soon after hearing Ginsberg perform it at the Six Gallery Reading. Ferlinghetti was so impressed, he sent a note to Ginsberg,
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    Tales of St. Austin's

    Tales of St. Austin's

    Tales of St. Austin's is a collection of short stories and essays, all with a school theme, by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published on 10 November 1903 by Adam & Charles Black, London, all except one item having previously appeared in the schoolboy magazines, The Captain and Public School Magazine. The stories are set in the fictional public school of St. Austin's, which was also the setting for The Pothunters (1902); they revolve around cricket, rugby, petty gambling and other boyish escapades. Stories Essays Several of the stories were eventually published in the U.S. in the collections The Swoop! and Other Stories (1979) and The Eighteen-Carat Kid and Other Stories (1980); others, along with many school stories never published in book form in Wodehouse's lifetime, were collected in Tales of Wrykyn and Elsewhere (1997).
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    Collier's Weekly

    Collier's Weekly

    Collier's is an American magazine, founded in 1888 by Peter Fenelon Collier, which went by the title Collier's Weekly during its early years. With the passage of decades, the title was shortened to Collier's. The magazine ceased publication with the January 4, 1957 issue and was revived in February 2012. As a result of Peter Collier's pioneering investigative journalism, Collier's Weekly established a reputation as a proponent of social reform. When attempts by various companies to sue Collier ended in failure, other magazines became involved in what Theodore Roosevelt described as "muckraking journalism." In 2010, the Collier's trademark was purchased by JTE Multimedia, which announced plans to resurrect the brand and did so in 2012 with "The Special Relaunch Issue". Irish immigrant Peter F. Collier (1849–1909) left Ireland at age 17. Although he went to a seminary to become a priest, he instead started work as a salesman for P. J. Kennedy, publisher of books for the Roman Catholic market and the paternal grandfather of U.S. President John F. Kennedy. When Collier wanted to boost sales by offering books on a subscription plan, it led to a disagreement with Kennedy, so Collier left
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    Essays

    Essays

    Essays is the title given to a collection of 107 essays written by Michel de Montaigne that was first published in 1580. Montaigne essentially invented the literary form of essay, a short subjective treatment of a given topic, of which the book contains a large number. Essai is French for "trial" or "attempt". Montaigne wrote in a kind of crafted rhetoric designed to intrigue and involve the reader, sometimes appearing to move in a stream-of-thought from topic to topic and at other times employing a structured style which gives more emphasis to the didactic nature of his work. His arguments are often supported with quotations from Ancient Greek, Latin and Italian texts. Montaigne's stated goal in his book is to describe man, and especially himself, with utter frankness. He finds the great variety and volatility of human nature to be its most basic features. A representative quote is "I have never seen a greater monster or miracle than myself." He opposed the conquest of the New World, deploring the suffering it brought upon the natives. Citing the case of Martin Guerre as an example, he believes that humans cannot attain certainty. His skepticism is best expressed in the long essay
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    Frontier Times 1967 July

    Frontier Times 1967 July

    Walt Coburn's Tally Book, Will Rogers and Charlie Russell, Mount Franklin's Lost Treasure, "God and the Apaches", The Mason-Henry Gang, I Helped Capture Cherokee Bill!, Swift "Justice" on Chilkoot Pass, Doctor Grandma French
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    La Guerre des Mondes

    An illustrated edition of a the Davray translation of H. G. Wells' "The War of the Worlds", this edition was limited to 500 copies.
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    Punch

    Punch

    Punch, or the London Charivari was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire established in 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells. Historically, it was most influential in the 1840s and 50s, when it helped to coin the term "cartoon" in its modern sense as a humorous illustration. It became a British institution, but after the 1940s, when its circulation peaked, it went into a long decline, finally closing in 1992. It was revived in 1996, but closed again in 2002. Punch was founded on 17 July 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells, on an initial investment of £25. It was jointly edited by Mayhew and Mark Lemon. Initially it was subtitled The London Charivari, this being a reference to a satirical humour magazine published in France as Le Charivari. Reflecting their satiric and humorous intent, the two editors took for their name and masthead the anarchic glove puppet, Mr. Punch, of Punch and Judy; the name also referred to a joke made early on about one of the magazine's first editors, Lemon, that "punch is nothing without lemon". Mayhew ceased to be joint editor in 1842 and became "suggestor in chief" until he severed his connection in 1845. The
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    Soul of the City

    Soul of the City

    Soul of the City, written by Lynn Abbey, C.J.Cherryh, and Janet Morris, is Book 8 in the Thieves World shared fictional universe and the Sacred Band of Stepsons fictional universe. In this volume, after Abarsis, the patron shade of the Sacred Band of Stepsons, brings them a message from the gods, Tempus returns to Sanctuary with the Sacred Band and Theron, the new Rankan emperor, follows. The Nisibisi witch Roxane and the necromant, Ischade, confront each other in a conflagration that shakes the town from Downwind to the mansions on the Hill, involving gods and mortals in a sorcerous bedlam that reaches from the Sanctuary Mageguild to Shambles Cross and even into Niko's rest-place and results in the destruction of much of Sanctuary's magical fabric and a decree from the Rankan emperor that puts the town dangerously close to martial law.
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    AuthorsDen.com

    AuthorsDen.com

    An online literary community of authors and readers that includes postings by professional and novice authors. The site in 2010 began to branch out into self-publishing and other literary services as well. Maintains a marketing system that allows readers to buy autographed books by member authors.
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    ELEMENTAL: The Power of Illuminated Love

    ELEMENTAL: The Power of Illuminated Love

    ELEMENTAL: The Power of Illuminated Love is the product of two individuals’ combined creative and spiritual visions. It features some 64 paintings by celebrated artist Luther E. Vann with more than approximately 50 accompanying poems and two essays by award-winning author Aberjhani. The art, spanning the early 1970s to 2007, expresses Vann’s perception of spiritual principles active in the personal and pubic modern lives of people living in New York and Savannah, though the artist’s penetrating interpretations are universal and the subjects could in fact be residents of any given city or country. Books that combine art and poetry are not especially unique in and of themselves but this one stands out for many reasons. One primary reason is because both Vann and Aberjhani are twenty-first century creative artists who have strong links to the twentieth century Jazz Age Harlem Renaissance. Vann was actually taught by artists of the period and Aberjhani co-authored the original Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance (Facts On File).
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    Mosses from an Old Manse

    Mosses from an Old Manse

    Mosses from an Old Manse was a short story collection by Nathaniel Hawthorne, first published in 1846. The collection included several previously-published short stories and was named in honor of The Old Manse where Hawthorne and his wife lived for the first three years of their marriage. The first edition was published in 1846. Hawthorne seems to have been paid $75 for the publication. Many of the tales collected in Mosses from an Old Manse are allegories and, typical of Hawthorne, focus on the negative side of human nature. Hawthorne's friend Herman Melville noted this aspect in his review "Hawthorne and His Mosses": This black conceit pervades him through and through. You may be witched by his sunlight,—transported by the bright gildings in the skies he builds over you; but there is the blackness of darkness beyond; and even his bright gildings but fringe and play upon the edges of thunder-clouds. William Henry Channing reviewed the collection in The Harbinger and noted that its author "had been baptized in the deep waters of Tragedy" and his work was dark with only brief moments of "serene brightness" which was never brighter than "dusky twilight". After its first publication,
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    Parents

    Parents

    Parents, published by Meredith Corporation, is an American mass circulation monthly magazine that features scientific information on child development geared to help parents in raising their children. It was first published in October 1926 and soon was selling 100,000 copies a month. Its editorial focus is on the daily needs and concerns of mothers with young children. The glossy monthly features information about child health, safety, behavior, discipline and education. There are also stories on women's health, nutrition, pregnancy, marriage, and beauty. It is aimed primarily at women ages 18–35 with young children. Columns include As They Grow, which cover age-specific child development issues, as well as the reader-generated Baby Bloopers, It Worked for Me and Goody Bag. The magazine also produces a website, an iPhone app for kids, Parents Flash Cards, and a blog called GoodyBlog.com. WCBS-TV aired segments about this magazine during its afternoon newscasts throughout the 1990s. The magazine was started by George J. Hecht in 1926, and he hired Clara Savage Littledale to be its first editor. She was followed by Mary Buchanan. The magazine was sold to Gruner + Jahr in 1978, at
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    The American Conservative

    The American Conservative (TAC) is a monthly journal of opinion published by the American Ideas Institute. It reflects traditional American conservatism that has argued vigorously against American interventionism, against a debt-based fiscal policy used to finance adventurism abroad and government growth at home, and against the intrusions on Americans’ private lives by an exploding state security apparatus. In general, TAC represents an anti-war and Old Right voice against the dominance of what it sees as a neoconservative strain on the Right. In 2009 Reihan Salam wrote that the publication had "gained a devoted following as a sharp critic of the conservative mainstream." The magazine's stated editorial position is 'that true conservatism has a predisposition for the institutions and mores that exist and the wisdom that underlies them. So much of what passes for contemporary conservatism is wedded to a kind of radicalism — fantasies of global hegemony, the hubristic notion of America as a universal nation for all the world's peoples, economic theories that are utopian and ruinous, and an eagerness to substitute diatribe for debate. We believe in the conservatism of our
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    131

    The Infinite Matrix

    The Infinite Matrix was an online science fiction magazine. It was published from August 2001 through January 2006. II
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    The New York Review of Books

    The New York Review of Books (or NYREV or NYRB) is a fortnightly magazine with articles on literature, culture and current affairs. Published in New York City, it takes as its point of departure that the discussion of important books is itself an indispensable literary activity. Esquire called it "the premier literary-intellectual magazine in the English language." In 1970 Tom Wolfe described it as "the chief theoretical organ of Radical Chic". Robert B. Silvers has edited the paper since its founding in 1963, together with Barbara Epstein until her death in 2006. The Review has a book publishing division, established in 1999, called New York Review Books. The New York Review was founded by Robert B. Silvers and Barbara Epstein, together with publisher A. Whitney Ellsworth and writer Elizabeth Hardwick, who were backed and encouraged by Epstein's husband, Jason Epstein, a vice president at Random House and editor of Vintage Books, and Hardwick's husband, poet Robert Lowell. Hardwick had published an essay in Harpers in 1959, edited by Robert Silvers, called "The Decline of Book Reviewing", a scornful look at the failure of criticism in book reviews of the time, that inspired this
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    135

    Conservation Biology volume 19 issue 3

    Conservation Biology is a peer-reviewed academic journal of the Society for Conservation Biology, published by Wiley-Blackwell. Conservation Biology publishes articles covering the science and practice of conserving Earth's biological diversity. Coverage includes issues concerning any of the Earth's ecosystems or regions, and that apply different approaches to solving problems in this area. Conservation Biology categorises items as:
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    Examiner.com

    Examiner.com

    Examiner.com is a media company based in Denver, Colorado, that operates a network of local news websites, allowing "pro–am contributors" to share their city-based knowledge on a blog-like platform, in 238 markets throughout the United States and parts of Canada with two national editions, one for each country. Examiner.com is a division of Clarity Media Group, with the primary investor being billionaire businessman Philip Anschutz, owner of Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG), Regal Cinemas, and other media and entertainment companies. Examiner.com has over 55,000 contributors, commonly referred to on the site as "Examiners." The company derives its name from Anschultz/Clarity's 2004 purchase of the San Francisco Examiner, which had previously owned the examiner.com domain. The domain was registered by The San Francisco Examiner on September 13, 1994, and was used by the San Francisco newspaper. Anschutz/Clarity acquired the examiner.com domain in 2004 when it acquired the San Francisco newspaper. In 2006, David Schafer, Clarity Digital Media's CEO (former MapQuest general manager) transformed the domain from being San Francisco specific to being a hyperlocal news aggregator for
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    137
    6.33
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    138
    Lawyers in Hell

    Lawyers in Hell

    In Lawyers in Hell, the thirteenth volume of the Heroes in Hell series created by Janet Morris and edited by Janet Morris, heaven sends auditors to hell to make sure that injustice is being properly administered. Damned souls from every epoch of human history cower before retribution from on high as Erra and the Seven, personified weapons of destruction, disrupt the lives of Caesar, Cleopatra, Lord Wellington, Alexander the Great, and damned from all the ages. Characters as diverse as Machiavelli and Che Guevara struggle to protect what little joy they have in hell's varied afterlives, from the Akkadian hells of antiquity to the hells of post-modern times. Lawyers in Hell introduces hell's landlords, the Kigali, who are native sons of the dimension in which all the gods of humanity posited their hells. Some characters return from the 20th century volumes, some are new to this first Heroes in hell volume of the 21st century.
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    The Canterbury Tales

    The Canterbury Tales

    The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century. The tales (mostly written in verse although some are in prose) are presented as part of a story-telling contest by a group of pilgrims as they travel together on a journey from Southwark to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral. The prize for this contest is a free meal at the Tabard Inn at Southwark on their return. After a long list of works written earlier in his career, including Troilus and Criseyde, House of Fame, and Parliament of Fowls, the Canterbury Tales was Chaucer's magnum opus. He uses the tales and the descriptions of its characters to paint an ironic and critical portrait of English society at the time, and particularly of the Church. Structurally, the collection resembles The Decameron, which Chaucer may have read during his first diplomatic mission to Italy in 1372. The question of whether The Canterbury Tales is finished has not yet been answered. There are 83 known manuscripts of the work from the late medieval and early Renaissance period, more than any other vernacular literary text with the exception of The Prick of
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    141

    Transmission of the Lamp

    Transmission of the Lamp (Jingde Chuandeng Lu, 景德傳燈錄) is a collection of Chan (Zen) koans from Zen masters such as: Yunmen Wenyan and Sengcan. One of the most famous verses collected in this book is the Xinxin Ming..
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    3 votes
    142

    13 Shocking Secrets You'll Wish You Never Knew About Lemony Snicket

    This is a complete list of books by Lemony Snicket, the pen name of American author Daniel Handler, who has written other books too. As of winter 2012 there are 24 published books of fiction by Snicket, fourteen in the Unfortunate Events franchise, which also includes at least three companion books. His works have been translated into more than 40 languages and have sold more than 60 million copies. A Series of Unfortunate Events is a series of children's novels which follows the turbulent lives of Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire after their parents' death in an arsonous house fire. The children are placed in the custody of their distant cousin Count Olaf, who begins to abuse them and openly plots to embezzle their inheritance. After the Baudelaires are removed from his care by their parents' estate executor, Arthur Poe, Olaf begins to doggedly hunt the children down, bringing about the serial slaughter and holocaust of a multitude of characters. The entire series is actively narrated by Snicket, who makes numerous references to his mysterious, deceased love interest, Beatrice. Both Snicket and Beatrice play roles in the story along with Snicket's family members, all of whom
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    143
    A Shropshire Lad

    A Shropshire Lad

    A Shropshire Lad is a cycle of sixty-three poems by the English poet Alfred Edward Housman (26 March 1859 – 30 April 1936). Some of the better-known poems in the book are "To an Athlete Dying Young", "Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now" and "When I Was One-and-Twenty". The collection was published in 1896 (see 1896 in poetry). Housman originally titled the book The Poems of Terence Hearsay, referring to a character in the volume, but changed the title at the suggestion of his publisher. A Shropshire Lad was first published in 1896 at Housman's own expense after several publishers had turned it down, much to the surprise of his colleagues and students. At first the book sold slowly, but during the Second Boer War (1899–1902), Housman's nostalgic depiction of rural life and young men's early deaths struck a chord with English readers and the book became a bestseller. Later, World War I further increased its popularity. Arthur Somervell and other composers were inspired by the folksong-like simplicity of the poems, and the most famous musical settings are by George Butterworth and Ralph Vaughan Williams, with others by Ivor Gurney, John Ireland and Ernest John Moeran. Housman was
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    144

    Birds of Prey

    Birds of Prey is a comic book series published by DC Comics that features the adventures of the heroine Oracle and her group of superheroines. The group is initially based in Gotham City and later operates in Metropolis and then relocates once more to "Platinum Flats", California, a new locale introduced in Birds of Prey in 2008. The series was conceived by Jordan B. Gorfinkel and originally written by Chuck Dixon. Gail Simone scripted the comic from issue #56 to #108. Sean McKeever was originally to replace Simone, but McKeever has since decided to leave the project, and will only write issues #113-117; Tony Bedard, who wrote issues #109-112, brifely took over the title at issue #118. Artists have included Butch Guice, Greg Land, Ed Benes, and Joe Bennett; Nicola Scott began a stint as artist with issue #100. In 2011, the title was relaunched under writer Duane Swierczynski and artist Jesus Saiz. Despite the title of the series being Birds of Prey, the phrase was not mentioned in the book until issue #86, when one of the group's members, Zinda Blake, suggests that it might be a fitting name for the team. However, the other characters get sidetracked and do not respond to her
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    147

    Colossus and Other Poems

    This is a 1968 edition of "The Colossus and Other Poems", the first volume of poetry by American poet Sylvia Plath. The ISBN is 9780394704661.
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    148
    Ladies' Home Journal

    Ladies' Home Journal

    Ladies' Home Journal is an American magazine published by the Meredith Corporation. It first appeared on February 16, 1883, and eventually became one of the leading women's magazines of the 20th century in the United States. It was the first American magazine to reach 1 million subscribers in 1907. Ladies' Home Journal is one of the Seven Sisters, a group of women's service magazines. The Ladies' Home Journal arose from a popular single-page supplement in the American magazine Tribune and Farmer titled Women at Home. Women at Home was written by Louisa Knapp Curtis, wife of the magazine's publisher Cyrus H. K. Curtis. After a year it became an independent publication with Knapp as editor for the first six years. Its original name was The Ladies Home Journal and Practical Housekeeper, but she dropped the last three words in 1886. It rapidly became the leading American magazine of its type, reaching a circulation of more than one million copies in ten years. At the turn of the 20th century, the magazine published the work of muckrakers and social reformers such as Jane Addams. In 1901 it published two articles highlighting the early architectural designs of Frank Lloyd Wright. During
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    149

    Nickelodeon

    Nickelodeon Magazine was a children's magazine based on the Nickelodeon cable channel. Its first incarnation appeared in 1990, and was distributed at participating Pizza Hut restaurants; this version of the magazine only saw two issues. The magazine returned in Summer 1993 with different type of content, primarily humor and comics. Originally published on a quarterly basis, it switched to bi-monthly with the February/March 1994 issue. It then went to 10 times per year starting March 1995, with a bi-annual December/January and June/July issue. In spite of being related to the network it was named after, Nickelodeon Magazine covered all sorts of topics for kids, not just what was on the network. The magazine contained informative non-fiction pieces, humor, interviews, comics, pranks, and recipes (such as green slime cake). The magazine's mascot was Zelda Van Gutters, a Lakeland Terrier dog who appeared throughout the magazine with sarcastic asides on the articles. She was also the star of the magazine's regular photo comic strip "Ruffing It". Other contributors included Dan Abdo, John Accurso, Bill Alger, Graham Annable, Ian Baker, Martin Cendreda, Greg Cook, Dave Cooper, Jordan
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    Swordspoint

    US 2003 Bantam Spectra paperback edition of Ellen Kushner's fantasy novel, with three other stories.
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    155
    The Yellow Book

    The Yellow Book

    The Yellow Book, published in London from 1894 to 1897 by Elkin Mathews and John Lane, later by John Lane alone, and edited by the American Henry Harland, was a quarterly literary periodical (priced at 5s.) that lent its name to the "Yellow" 1890s. The Yellow Book's brilliant color immediately associated the periodical with illicit French novels- an anticipation, many thought, of the scurrilous content inside. Yet The Yellow Book's first list of contributors bespoke a non-radical, typically conservative collection of authors: Edmund Gosse, Walter Crane, Sir Frederick Leighton, and Henry James among others. Upon its publication, Oscar Wilde dismissed The Yellow Book as "not yellow at all". In The Romantic '90s, Richard Le Gallienne, a poet identified with the New Literature of the Decadence, described The Yellow Book as the following: "The Yellow Book was certainly novel, even striking, but except for the drawings and decorations by Beardsley, which, seen thus for the first time, not unnaturally affected most people as at once startling, repellent, and fascinating, it is hard to realize why it should have seemed so shocking. But the public is an instinctive creature, not half so
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    Grimm's Fairy Tales

    Grimm's Fairy Tales

    Children's and Household Tales (German: Kinder- und Hausmärchen) is a collection of German folk tales first published in 1812 by the Grimm brothers, Jacob and Wilhelm. The collection is commonly known today as Grimms' Fairy Tales (German: Grimms Märchen). On December 20, 1812, the first volume of the first edition was published, containing 86 stories; the second volume of 70 stories followed in 1814. For the second edition, two volumes were issued in 1819 and a third in 1822, totalling 170 tales. The third edition appeared in 1837; fourth edition, 1840; fifth edition, 1843; sixth edition, 1850; seventh edition, 1857. Stories were added, and also subtracted, from one edition to the next, until the seventh held 211 tales. All editions were extensively illustrated, first by Philipp Grot Johann and, after his death in 1892, by Robert Leinweber. The first volumes were much criticized because, although they were called "Children's Tales", they were not regarded as suitable for children, both for the scholarly information included and the subject matter. Many changes through the editions – such as turning the wicked mother of the first edition in Snow White and Hansel and Gretel to a
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    160

    Newsweek

    Newsweek is an American weekly news magazine published in New York City. It is distributed throughout the United States and internationally. It is the second-largest news weekly magazine in the U.S., having trailed Time in circulation and advertising revenue for most of its existence. Newsweek is published in four English language editions and 12 global editions written in the language of the circulation region. Since 2008, Newsweek has undergone internal and external contractions designed to shift the magazine's focus and audience while improving its finances. Instead, losses at the newsweekly accelerated: revenue dropped 38 percent from 2007 to 2009. The revenue declines prompted an August 2010 sale by owner The Washington Post Company to 92-year-old audio pioneer Sidney Harman—reportedly for a purchase price of $1.00 and an assumption of the magazine's liabilities. Editor Jon Meacham left the magazine after the sale. In November 2010 Newsweek merged with the news and opinion website The Daily Beast, forming the Newsweek Daily Beast Company, after negotiations between the owners of both publications. Tina Brown, The Daily Beast's editor-in-chief has since served as the editor of
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    161

    Scientific American Special Issue on Communications, Computers, and Networks

    The Scientific American special Issue on Communications, Computers, and Network, is a special issue of Scientific American dedicated to articles concerning impending changes to the internet in the period prior to the expansion and mainstreaming of the world wide web via Mosaic and Netscape. This issue contained essays by a number of important computer science and internet pioneers. It bore the promotional cover title: Scientific American presents the September 1991 Single Copy Issue: Communications, Computers, and Networks University of California, Berkeley's September 1991 online journal, "Current Cites" commented: "Scientific American Special Issue on Communications, Computers and Networks 265(3) (September 1991): If you purchase a single issue of a magazine this year, this should be it. Filled with eleven articles by some of the biggest names in computer networking, this issue covers all bases and includes suggestions for further readings on the issues." In addition, a 4 September 1991 post to the University of Houston's "Computer System's Forum" also recommends the issue stating: "These articles cover enough ground that I would recommend the issue to people getting ready to
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    Tales of the Jazz Age

    Tales of the Jazz Age

    Tales of the Jazz Age (1922) is a collection of eleven short stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Divided into three separate parts, according to subject matter, it includes one of his better-known short stories, "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button". Several of the stories had also been published earlier, independently, in either The Metropolitan, Saturday Evening Post, Smart Set, Collier's, Chicago Tribune, or Vanity Fair. This is a Southern story, with the setting laid in the small Lily of Tarleton, Georgia. Fitzgerald wrote that he had "a profound affection for Tarleton, but somehow whenever I write a story about it I receive letters from all over the South denouncing me in no uncertain terms." Written shortly after his first novel was published, the author also collaborated with his wife on certain scenes. The story momentarily follows the life of a "jelly-bean", or an idler, of Jim Powell. An invitation to a dance with the old crowd revives his dreams of social advancement and love, until the consequences of drink and power of money come through and ruin them. In the short introduction to this short story, Fitzgerald wrote, "I suppose that of all the stories I have ever written
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    164
    Tatler

    Tatler

    Tatler has been the name of several British journals and magazines, each of which has viewed itself as the successor of the original literary and society journal founded by Richard Steele in 1709. The current incarnation, founded in 1901, is a glossy magazine published by Condé Nast Publications focusing on the glamorous lives and lifestyles of the upper class. A 300th anniversary party for the magazine was held in October 2009. The original Tatler was founded in 1709 by Richard Steele, who used the nom de plume "Isaac Bickerstaff, Esquire", the first such consistently adopted journalistic persona, which adapted to the first person, as it were, the 17th-century genre of "characters", as first established in English by Sir Thomas Overbury and soon to be expanded by Lord Shaftesbury's Characteristics (1711). Steele's idea was to publish the news and gossip heard in London coffeehouses, hence the title, and seemingly, from the opening paragraph, to leave the subject of politics to the newspapers, while presenting Whiggish views and correcting middle-class manners, while instructing "these Gentlemen, for the most part being Persons of strong Zeal, and weak Intellects...what to think."
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    165
    The Black Skylark ZPed Music Player

    The Black Skylark ZPed Music Player

    The Black Skylark ZPed Music is a multi-platform blog by Aberjhani devoted to an extended work exploring both healthy and negative relationships between creative artists of a certain type and those who follow them for either general entertainment or something more. This particular blog was established in late 2003 and first featured excerpts from works of fiction and poetry that dramatized its major themes and eventually gave birth to the novel Christmas When Music Almost Killed the World. It remains a showcase for ongoing Black Skylark ZPed projects but has since evolved to incorporate a variety of works, including fiction, poetry, articles, and books.
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    The River of Winged Dreams

    The River of Winged Dreams

    The River of Winged Dreams is the official blog for the Bright Skylark Productions website. It was named after one of the titles, which became a top 10 bestseller, produced by the publishing arm of the organization. The graphic seen here was first posted on the Squidoo site before its presentation on the home site. The text is taken from the title work, which reportedly is otherwise available only in the book itself.
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    168
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    170

    Jack of Fables

    Jack of Fables was a spin-off of the comic book Fables, both of which were published by DC Comics as part of that company's Vertigo imprint. It shows the adventures of Jack Horner that take place after his exile from Fabletown in the Fables story-arc Jack Be Nimble (Fables #34 and #35). A preview of the series was shown in Fables #50, and the series itself debuted in July 2006. It was written by Fables writer Bill Willingham and Matthew Sturges. The series follows Jack's adventures following his time in Hollywood where he successfully completed a hugely popular series of movies based on himself and his life. However, he had his power and money stripped from him by Fabletown authorities. In the first issue Jack was abducted whilst hitch-hiking across America and taken to the Golden Boughs Retirement Village, where he is essentially held prisoner. Following his first encounter with "Revise", who wants to purge the world of superstition by locking up Fables until the world forgets them, he then plans and executes the first successful breakout from the Golden Boughs. While some of the escapees were captured or killed, many are now free and on the run from Revise's team. Following his
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    171
    Luciano Berio: Composer

    Luciano Berio: Composer

    This is an interview taken by composer Lorenzo Ferrero in August 2000 at Luciano Berio's birth place in Oneglia, on the occasion of his 75th anniversary celebration. 
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    172
    North American Review

    North American Review

    The North American Review (NAR) was the first literary magazine in the United States. Founded in Boston in 1815 by journalist Nathan Hale and others, it was published continuously until 1940, when publication was suspended due to J. H. Smyth, who had purchased the magazine, being unmasked as a Japanese spy. Publication subsequently resumed in 1964 at Cornell College (Iowa) under Robert Dana. Since 1968 the University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls) has been home to the publication. Nineteenth-century archives are freely available via Cornell University's Making of America. Until the founding of the Atlantic Monthly in 1857, the NAR was the foremost publication in New England and probably the entire United States. For all its lasting impact on American literature and institutions, however, the Review had no more than 3000 subscribers in its heyday. The NAR's first editor, William Tudor (1779-1830), and other founders had been members of Boston's Anthology Club, and launched The North American Review to foster a genuine American culture. In its first few years the NAR published poetry, fiction, and miscellaneous essays on a bi-monthly schedule, but in 1818 it became a quarterly with
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    173
    Strand Magazine

    Strand Magazine

    The Strand Magazine was a monthly magazine composed of fictional stories and factual articles founded by George Newnes. It was first published in the United Kingdom from January 1891 to March 1950 running to 711 issues, though the first issue was on sale well before Christmas 1890. Its immediate popularity is evidenced by an initial sale of nearly 300,000. Sales increased in the early months, before settling down to a circulation of almost 500,000 copies a month which lasted well into the 1930s. It was edited by Herbert Greenhough Smith from 1891 to 1930. The Sherlock Holmes short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle were first published in The Strand with illustrations by Sidney Paget. With the serialization of Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, sales reached their peak. Readers lined up outside the magazine's offices, waiting to get the next installment. The A. J. Raffles, a "gentleman thief", stories of Ernest William Hornung first appeared in The Strand in the 1890s. Other contributors included Grant Allen, Margery Allingham, J. E. Preston Muddock, H.G. Wells, E.C. Bentley, Agatha Christie, C.B. Fry, Walter Goodman, E. Nesbit, W.W. Jacobs, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Morrison, Dorothy
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    174
    35

    35

    35 (thirty-five) is the natural number following 34 and preceding 36. 35 is the sum of the first five triangular numbers, making it a tetrahedral number. 35 is the number of ways that three things can be selected from a set of seven unique things also known as the "combination of seven things taken three at a time". 35 is a centered cube number, a pentagonal number and a pentatope number. 35 is a highly cototient number, since there are more solutions to the equation x - φ(x) = 35 than there are for any other integers below it except 1. There are 35 free hexominoes, the polyominoes made from six squares. Since the greatest prime factor of 35 + 1 = 1226 is 613, which is obviously more than 35 twice, 35 is a Størmer number. 35 is a discrete semiprime (or biprime) (5 × 7); the tenth, and the first with 5 as the lowest non-unitary factor. The aliquot sum of 35 is 13 this being the second composite number with such an aliquot sum; the first being the cube 27. 35 is the last member of the first triple cluster of semiprimes 33,34,35. 85,86,87 is the second such triple discrete semiprime cluster. 35 is the highest number one can count to on one's fingers using base 6. 35 is also: 35 A.D.,
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    175

    BioScience

    BioScience is a peer-reviewed monthly sometimes daily scientific journal that is published by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). The content is written and edited for accessibility to researchers, educators, and students alike. Since 1964, BioScience has published overviews of current research in biology, accompanied by essays and discussion sections on education, public policy, history, and the conceptual underpinnings of the biological sciences. Coverage focuses on organisms from molecules to the environment. Each issue also includes professionally written feature articles about the latest frontiers in biology, book reviews, news about AIBS, and a policy column (Washington Watch). Other articles offer the perspectives of opinion leaders and invite further commentary. Occasional special sections provide an in-depth look at important topics.
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    Viriconium

    US 2005 Bantam Spectra trade paperback, anthology of three novels (The Pastel City, A Storm of Wings, and In Viriconium) and a collection of short stories (Viriconium Nights).
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    Lonely Planet

    Lonely Planet

    Lonely Planet is the largest travel guide book and digital media publisher in the world. The company is owned by BBC Worldwide, which bought a 75% share from the founders Maureen and Tony Wheeler in 2007 and the final 25% in February 2011. Originally called Lonely Planet Publications, the company changed its name to Lonely Planet in July 2009 to reflect its broad travel industry offering and the emphasis on digital products. After Let's Go Travel Guides, it was one of the first series of travel books aimed at backpackers and other low-cost travellers. As of 2010, it publishes about 500 titles in 8 languages, as well as TV programmes, a magazine, mobile phone applications and websites. Lonely Planet also has its own television production company, which has produced numerous series: Lonely Planet Six Degrees, The Sport Traveller, Going Bush, Vintage New Zealand, Bluelist Australia and Lonely Planet: Roads Less Travelled. Lonely Planet is headquartered in Footscray, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia, with affiliate offices in London and Oakland, California. As of 2009, it was increasing its digital, online presence greatly. In 2009 Lonely Planet began publishing a monthly travel
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    182

    Star Trek: The Magazine

    Star Trek: The Magazine was an authorized monthly tabloid-size periodical published in the United States and Canada by Fabbri Publishing (US) devoted to the Star Trek franchise. It ran for 48 issues, from May 1999 through April 2003, covering nearly 5,000 pages. There were three volumes, the first with 24 issues, and the latter two with 12 issues each. The magazine was notable for its exclusive interviews with actors and production crew. Each issue also featured detailed technical briefings, many of which were lifted from the European Star Trek Fact Files. Advertisements in ST:TM were scarce. A significant feature of later issues was the "Starfleet Technical Database", written by Rick Sternbach. The lengthy articles provided exclusive backstory and carry the same semi-canon weight as the technical manuals, which he also contributed to. Some of his material was reclaimed from an abandoned Star Trek: Voyager Technical Manual. The issues listed below are intended as a general reference and are not inexhaustive.
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    The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick

    The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick

    The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick is a collection of science fiction stories by Philip K. Dick. It was first published by Underwood-Miller in 1987 as a five volume set. See Philip K. Dick bibliography for information about the mass market reprints. Many of the stories had originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction, Planet Stories, If, Galaxy Science Fiction, Imagination, Space Science Fiction, Fantastic Story Magazine, Amazing Stories, Future Science Fiction, Cosmos, Fantasy Fiction, Beyond Fantasy Fiction, Thrilling Wonder Stories, Startling Stories, Fantastic Universe, Science Fiction Quarterly, Astounding, Science Fiction Adventures, Science Fiction Stories, Orbit, Satellite Science Fiction, Imaginative Tales, Fantastic, Worlds of Tomorrow, Escapade, Famous Science Fiction, Niekas, Rolling Stone College Papers, Interzone, Playboy, Omni and The Yuba City High Times. The set was published in four states: The volumes were not sold individually. All sets except the trade edition (800 copies) also included a chapbook, "Brief Synopsis for An Alternate World Novel: The Acts of Paul, an outline for a novel that was never written.
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    Journal of Experimental Medicine

    The Journal of Experimental Medicine is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal published by the Rockefeller University Press that publishes research papers and commentaries on the physiological, pathological, and molecular mechanisms that encompass the host response to disease. The journal prioritizes studies on intact organisms and has made a commitment to publishing studies on human subjects. Topics covered include immunology, inflammation, infectious disease, hematopoiesis, cancer, stem cells and vascular biology. The journal has no single editor-in-chief, but thirteen academic editors. The journal was established in 1896 at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine by William H. Welch, the school's founder and also the first president of the Board of Scientific Directors of the Rockefeller Institute (since renamed Rockefeller University). From its inception, Welch edited the journal by himself—even editing manuscripts while attending baseball games. By March 1902, the editorial burden became too great for Welch, who stopped publishing papers and began stockpiling manuscripts and unanswered correspondence in his office, explaining the conspicuous absence of published papers from
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    Lyrical Ballads

    Lyrical Ballads

    Lyrical Ballads, with a Few Other Poems is a collection of poems by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, first published in 1798 and generally considered to have marked the beginning of the English Romantic movement in literature. The immediate effect on critics was modest, but it became and remains a landmark, changing the course of English literature and poetry. Most of the poems in the 1798 edition were written by Wordsworth, with Coleridge contributing only four poems to the collection, including one of his most famous works, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner". A second edition was published in 1800, in which Wordsworth included additional poems and a preface detailing the pair's avowed poetical principles. Another edition was published in 1802, Wordsworth added an appendix titled Poetic Diction in which he expanded the ideas set forth in the preface. Wordsworth and Coleridge set out to overturn what they considered the priggish, learned and highly sculpted forms of 18th century English poetry and bring poetry within the reach of the average person by writing the verses using normal, everyday language. They place an emphasis on the vitality of the living voice that
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    The Village Voice

    The Village Voice

    The Village Voice is a free weekly newspaper and news and features website in New York City that features investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts and music coverage, and events listings for New York City. It is also distributed throughout the United States on a pay basis. It was the first of the big-city tabloids that came to be known as alternative weeklies. The Voice was launched by Ed Fancher, Dan Wolf, John Wilcock, and Norman Mailer on October 26, 1955 from a two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village, which was its initial coverage area, expanding to other parts of the city by the 1960s. The offices in the 1960s were located at Sheridan Square; they are now at Cooper Square in the East Village. The Voice has published groundbreaking investigations of New York City politics, as well as reporting on local and national politics, with arts, culture, music, dance, film, and theater reviews. The Voice has received three Pulitzer Prizes, in 1981 (Teresa Carpenter), 1986 (Jules Feiffer) and 2000 (Mark Schoofs). Almost since its inception the paper has recognized alternative theater in New York through its Obie Awards. The paper's "Pazz & Jop" music poll,
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    193

    Analysis

    Analysis is a peer-reviewed academic journal of philosophy established in 1933 that is published quarterly by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Analysis Trust. Prior to January 2009, the journal was published by Blackwell Publishing. Electronic access to this journal is available via JSTOR (1933–1998), Wiley InterScience (1996–2008), and Oxford Journals (2009-present). The journal publishes short, concise articles in virtually any field of the analytic tradition (except for primarily historical ones). A number of seminal works have been published in the journal. Some of the most recognizable are: List of philosophy journals
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    Illustrated London News

    Illustrated London News

    The Illustrated London News was the world's first illustrated weekly newspaper; the first issue appeared on Saturday 14 May 1842. It was published weekly until 1971 and then increasingly less frequently until publication ceased in 2003. Printer and newsagent Herbert Ingram moved from Nottingham to London in early 1842. Inspired by how the Weekly Chronicle always sold more copies when it featured an illustration, he had the idea of publishing a weekly newspaper that would contain pictures in every edition. Ingram's initial idea was that it would concentrate on crime reporting, as per the later Illustrated Police News, but his collaborator, engraver Henry Vizetelly, convinced him that a newspaper covering more general news would enjoy greater success. Ingram rented an office, recruited artists and reporters, and employed as his editor Frederick William Naylor Bayley (1808–1853), formerly editor of the National Omnibus. The first issue of the The Illustrated London News appeared on Saturday 14 May 1842. Its 16 pages and 32 wood-engravings covered topics such as the war in Afghanistan, a train crash in France, a survey of the candidates for the US presidential election, extensive crime
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    Physics Today

    Physics Today, created in 1948, is the membership journal of the American Institute of Physics. It is provided to 130,000 members of twelve physics societies, including the American Physical Society. Over the last 60 years many famous physicists have written for the magazine, including Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, and Richard Feynman. Although its content is scientifically rigorous and up to date, it is not a true scholarly journal in the sense of being a primary vehicle for communicating new results. Rather, it is more of a hybrid magazine that informs readers about important developments in the form of overview articles written by experts, shorter review articles written internally by staff, and also discusses the latest issues and events of importance to the science community such as science politics. The physics community's main vessel for new results is the Physical Review suite of scientific journals published by the American Physical Society and Applied Physics Letters published by the American Institute of Physics. The magazine provides a historical resource of events associated to physics, including debunking the physics behind the so-called Star Wars program of the 1980s,
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    Realms of Fantasy

    Realms of Fantasy was a professional bimonthly fantasy speculative fiction magazine published by Damnation Books, which specializes in fantasy, nonfiction, and art. The magazine publishes short stories by some of the genre's most popular and most prominent authors. Its original publisher was Sovereign Media, and it first launched with the October 1994 issue. On January 27, 2009, the magazine's managing editor under Sovereign Media announced that Realms of Fantasy would cease publication after the April 2009 issue. The closure was blamed on "plummeting newsstand sales, the problem currently faced by all of the fiction magazines." In March 2009, SFScope reported that the magazine had been bought by Warren Lapine's Tir Na Nog Press and will not close. Publication restarted with a release date in July 2009, missing at least one issue (May 2009). The fiction editorial staff did not change. Douglas Cohen was promoted to Editor in November 2009, and was previously Assistant (Fiction) Editor [May 2005], and had assumed roles of Nonfiction Editor and Art Director in March 2009. Shawna McCarthy has been the Fiction Editor since the magazine's inception in 1994. In October 2010, Lapine
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    Someone Like You

    Someone Like You is a collection of short stories by Roald Dahl. It was published in 1953 by Alfred Knopf. Boucher and McComas praised the collection's "subtly devastating murder stories [as well as] two biting science-fantasties, plus a few unclassifiable gems" and concluded the volume "belong[ed] on your shelves somewhere in the Beerbohm/Collier/Saki section."
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    Literary Savannah (Magazine)

    Literary Savannah (Magazine)

    The first of the new LITERARY SAVANNAH magazines made its debut December 5, 2010 in Savannah, Georgia. Plans were announced for the publication of future editions on a bi-monthly basis featuring fiction, non-fiction, poetry and art by established and emerging creative artists who are native to or reside in the Savannah-tidewater area. Featured in the first edition is the following: short stories by Susan B. Johnson, Henry Precht, Manly Heidt; non-fiction by Kevin McCarey, Thomas A. Williams; poetry by Aberjhani, Lisbeth Thom, Maryanne Stahl, Phil Linz, Marie Vacquer; novel excerpt by Daisy Mae Byrd; art by Daisy Mae Byrd.
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    The Nation

    The Nation is the oldest continuously-published weekly magazine in the United States. The periodical, devoted to politics and culture, is self-described as "the flagship of the left." Founded on July 6, 1865, it is published by The Nation Company, L.P., at 33 Irving Place, New York City. The Nation has bureaus in Washington, D.C., London and South Africa, with departments covering architecture, art, corporations, defense, environment, films, legal affairs, music, peace and disarmament, poetry and the United Nations. Circulation peaked at 187,000 in 2006 but by 2010 had dropped back to 145,000 in print, though digital subscriptions had risen to over 15,000. Print ad pages declined by 5% from 2009 to 2010, while digital advertising rose 32.8% from 2009–10. Advertising accounts for 10% of total revenue for the magazine, while circulation totals 60%. The Nation has lost money in all but three or four years of operation and is sustained in part by a group of more than 30,000 donors called The Nation Associates, who donate funds to the periodical above and beyond their annual subscription fees. This program accounts for 30% of the total revenue for the magazine. An annual cruise also
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    A Fortress in Shadow

    US 2008 Night Shade trade paperback edition collecting Glen Cook's novels The Fire in his Hands and With Mercy Towards None.
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    Histoires ou contes du temps passé

    Histoires ou contes du temps passé

    Histoires ou contes du temps passé or Les Contes de ma Mère l'Oye (Stories or Fairy Tales from Past Times with Morals or Mother Goose Tales) is a collection of literary fairy tales written by Charles Perrault, published in Paris in 1697. The volume became well-established because is was written at a time when reading literary fairy tales was a popular literary trend in literary salons. Perrault's career was spent as secretary to influential minister Jean-Baptiste Colbert, at the court of Louis XIV of France. After Colbert's death, Perrault was forced into retirement and turned to writing. His stories were either original literary fairy tales, modified from commonly known stories or based on stories written by earlier writers such as Boccaccio. At a time when the French court valued embellishments and elaboration, Perrault modified simple plots, embellished the language, and wrote for an audience of the nobility and aristocracy. Thematically the stories support Perrault's belief that nobility is superior to the peasant class; moreover many of his stories show an adherence to Catholic beliefs, such as those in which a woman must undergo purification from sin and repentance before
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    Strange Horizons

    Strange Horizons is an online speculative fiction magazine. (This a term that its editors use as a blanket term covering science fiction, fantasy, slipstream and related genres.) It also features speculative poetry in every issue. It was launched in September 2000, and publishes new material (usually some combination of fiction, articles, reviews, columns, poetry, and/or art) 51 weeks of the year. The magazine was founded by writer and editor Mary Anne Mohanraj. It has a staff of approximately thirty volunteers, and is unusual among professional speculative fiction magazines in being funded entirely by donations, holding twice-annual fund drives. The Fiction Editors are Susan Marie Groppi, Jed Hartman and Karen Meisner. Susan Marie Groppi won the World Fantasy Special Award: Non-Professional in 2010 for her work as Editor-in-Chief on Strange Horizons, and the magazine itself was nominated for a Best Website Hugo Award in 2002 and 2005 . The short story "The House Beyond Your Sky" by Benjamin Rosenbaum, published in 2006 in the magazine, was nominated for a 2007 Hugo Award for Best Short Story. Other stories in Strange Horizons have also been nominated for the Nebula and other
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    Accelerando

    Accelerando is a 2005 science fiction novel consisting of a series of interconnected short stories by British author Charles Stross. As well as normal hardback and paperback editions, it was released as a free e-book under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license. Accelerando won the Locus Award in 2006, and was nominated for several other awards in 2005 and 2006, including the Hugo, Campbell, Clarke, and British Science Fiction Association Awards. In Italian, accelerando means "speeding up" and is used as a tempo marking in musical notation. In Stross' novel, it refers to the accelerating rate at which humanity in general, and/or the novel's characters, head towards the technological singularity. The term was earlier used in this way by Kim Stanley Robinson in his 1992-96 Mars trilogy. The book is a collection of nine short stories telling the tale of three generations of a family before, during, and after a technological singularity. It was originally written as a series of novelettes and novellas, all published in Asimov's Science Fiction magazine in the period 2001 to 2004. According to Stross, the initial inspiration for the stories was his
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    Cosmopolitan

    Cosmopolitan

    Cosmopolitan is an international magazine for women. It was first published in 1886 in the United States as a family magazine, was later transformed into a literary magazine and eventually became a women's magazine in the late 1960s. Also known as Cosmo, its content as of 2011 included articles on relationships, sex, health, careers, self-improvement, celebrities, as well as fashion and beauty. Published by Hearst Magazines, Cosmopolitan has 63 international editions, is printed in 32 languages and is distributed in more than 100 countries. Cosmopolitan began as a family magazine, launched in 1886 by Schlicht & Field of New York as The Cosmopolitan. Paul Schlicht told his first-issue readers that his publication was a "first-class family magazine", adding, "There will be a department devoted exclusively to the interests of women, with articles on fashions, on household decoration, on cooking, and the care and management of children, etc.There was also a department for the younger members of the family." Cosmopolitan's circulation reached 25,000 that year, but by March 1888, Schlicht & Field were no longer in business. John Brisben Walker acquired the magazine in 1889. That same
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    New England Journal of Medicine

    New England Journal of Medicine

    The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) is an English-language peer-reviewed medical journal published by the Massachusetts Medical Society and it is among the most prestigous in the world. It describes itself as the oldest continuously published medical journal in the world. The journal publishes editorials, papers on original research, review articles, correspondence, and case reports, and has a special section called "Images in Clinical Medicine". In September 1811, John Collins Warren, a Boston physician, along with James Jackson, submitted a formal prospectus to establish the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and Collateral Branches of Science as a medical and philosophical journal. Subsequently, the first issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and the Collateral Branches of Medical Science was published in January 1812. The journal was published quarterly. On April 29, 1823, another publication, the Boston Medical Intelligencer, appeared under the stewardship of Jerome V.C. Smith. The Intelligencer ran into financial troubles in the spring of 1827, and the editors of the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and the Collateral Branches of
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    212

    Open Sources: Voices from the Open Source Revolution

    Open Sources: Voices from the Open Source Revolution is a book published by O'Reilly Media. It is an anthology of essays written by luminaries of the open source and free software movements. The essays variously chronicle aspects of free software history, describe various philosophical positions, or sketch groups important to the movements. The book is edited by Chris DiBona, Sam Ockman and Mark Stone. The essays contained were written by Chris DiBona, Sam Ockman, Mark Stone, Brian Behlendorf, Scott Bradner, Jim Hamerly, Marshall Kirk McKusick, Tim O'Reilly, Tom Paquin, Bruce Perens, Eric Raymond, Richard Stallman, Michael Tiemann, Linus Torvalds, Paul Vixie, Larry Wall, and Bob Young. First Edition published in January 1999, ISBN 1-56592-582-3. The book is open source itself, published under a free license. Printed copies can be purchased, but the book is also available in its entirety for free online reading at the publisher's web site. Its sequel is similarly licensed, and has been made available through archive.org.
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    Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque

    Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque

    Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque is a collection of previously published short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1840. It was published by the Philadelphia firm Lea & Blanchard and released in two volumes. The publisher was willing to print the anthology based on the recent success of Poe's story "The Fall of the House of Usher." Even so, Lea & Blanchard would not pay Poe any royalties; his only payment was 20 free copies. Poe had sought Washington Irving to endorse the book, writing to him, "If I could be permitted to add even a word or two from yourself... my fortune would be made." In his preface, Poe wrote the now-famous quote defending himself from the criticism that his tales were part of "Germanism". He wrote, "If in many of my productions terror has been the thesis, I maintain that terror is not of Germany but of the soul". The collection was dedicated to Colonel William Drayton, whom Poe likely met while stationed in Charleston, South Carolina; when Drayton moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Poe continued to correspond with him. Drayton was a former member of Congress turned judge and may have subsidized the book's publication. Contemporary reviews were
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    The Sandman: Dream Country

    The Sandman: Dream Country

    Dream Country is the third trade paperback collection of the comic book series The Sandman, published by DC Comics. It collects issues #17-20. It is written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Kelley Jones, Charles Vess, Colleen Doran and Malcolm Jones III, coloured by Robbie Busch and Steve Oliff, and lettered by Todd Klein. It was first issued in paperback in 1991, and later in hardback in 1995. This volume contains four independent stories. The first story, "Calliope," contains the first reference to Dream's son Orpheus, who will play an important role later in the series. The second story, "A Dream of a Thousand Cats," is one of the most enduringly popular issues of the entire series. Sandman #19, "A Midsummer Night's Dream," introduces Morpheus' creative partnership with William Shakespeare, and was the first and only comic book to win a World Fantasy Award. Lastly, this volume has the first story in which Dream does not appear, "Façade." The collected edition also includes Gaiman's script for "Calliope." It is preceded by The Doll's House and followed by Season of Mists. Like the sixth collection, Fables and Reflections, and the eighth, Worlds' End, Dream Country consists of short
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    Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

    The Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms is an audio/visual glossary of 256 terms prepared and hosted by the National Human Genome Research Institute in the United States. The first version was published in English online in September 1998 by the NHGRI Office of Science Education under the title of "Talking Glossary of Genetics". The Spanish language version was released 18 months later. The Talking Glossary of Genetics A new multimedia, and significantly updated, version of the English Talking Glossary of Genetics was released by the National Human Genome Research Institute in October, 2009. An identical update of the Spanish language version was released in October, 2011. In September, 2011, an iPhone App of the English Talking Glossary was released by NHGRI and made available as a free download in the Apple App store. The App version contains all 3-D animations, high quality illustrations, the "Test Your Gene IQ" quiz, and similar user functions such as "Suggest a Term" and "Mail This Term to a Friend." The original version had been based on simple HTML entries and was developed in the mid-1990s at a time when dial-up modems were commonly used to access the internet at speeds as
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    Nature

    Nature

    Nature, first published on 4 November 1869, is ranked the world's most cited interdisciplinary scientific journal by the Science Edition of the 2010 Journal Citation Reports. Most scientific journals are now highly specialized, and Nature is among the few journals (the other weekly journals Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are also prominent examples) that still publish original research articles across a wide range of scientific fields. There are many fields of scientific research in which important new advances and original research are published as either articles or letters in Nature. Research scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles are intended to make many of the most important papers understandable to scientists in other fields and the educated general public. Towards the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts. The remainder of the journal consists mostly of research articles, which are
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    Topix

    Topix

    Tokyo Stock Price Index (東証株価指数), commonly known as TOPIX, along with the Nikkei 225, is an important stock market index for the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) in Japan, tracking all domestic companies of the exchange's First Section. It is calculated and published by the TSE. As of 1 February 2011 (2011 -02-01), there are 1,669 companies listed on the First Section of the TSE, and the market value for the index was ¥197.4 trillions. The index transitioned from a system where a company's weighting is based on the total number of shares outstanding (commonly called the float) to a weighting based on the number of shares available for trading (called the free float). This transition took place in three phases starting in October 2005 and was completed in June 2006. Although the change is a technicality, it had a significant effect on the weighting of many companies in the index, because many companies in Japan have significant holdings of shares of their business partners as a part of intricate business alliances, and such shares are no longer included in calculating the weight of companies in the index. TSE currently calculates and distributes TOPIX every second and further plans to
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    African American Review

    African American Review

    The African American Review is a quarterly academic journal and the official publication of the Division on Black American Literature and Culture of the Modern Language Association. The journal covers African-American literature and culture, including theatre, film, the visual arts, interviews, poetry, and fiction. Between 1967 and 1976, the journal appeared under the title Negro American Literature Forum and until 1992 as Black American Literature Forum before obtaining its current title.
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    Reader's Digest

    Reader's Digest

    Reader's Digest is a general interest family magazine, published ten times annually. Formerly based in Chappaqua, New York, its headquarters is now in New York City. It was founded in 1922, by DeWitt Wallace and Lila Bell Wallace. For many years, Reader's Digest was the best-selling consumer magazine in the United States, losing the distinction in 2009 to Better Homes and Gardens. According to Mediamark Research, it reaches more readers with household incomes of $100,000+ than Fortune, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week and Inc. combined. Global editions of Reader's Digest reach an additional 40 million people in more than 70 countries, with 49 editions in 21 languages. It has a global circulation of 10.5 million, making it the largest paid circulation magazine in the world. It is also published in Braille, digital, audio, and a version in large type called Reader's Digest Large Print. The magazine is compact, with its pages roughly half the size of most American magazines'. Hence, in the summer of 2005, the U.S. edition adopted the slogan, "America in your pocket." In January 2008, it was changed to "Life well shared." The magazine was started by DeWitt Wallace, while
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    Remaining Sunlight

    Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Remaining Sunlight is a trade paperback collecting comic stories based on the Buffy the Vampire Slayer television series. Buffy Summers and her friends come face to face with some kung fu vampires on their way from the Bronze and are threatened by a figure in a straw hat. They soon discover that the black belts of Sunnydale are being eaten. As Halloween approaches Sunnydale is suffering an increasing number of vampire-caused murders. Buffy's search for the perpetrators is halted by All Hallow's Eve, and Buffy hopes she can have an uneventful night of trick or treating with her friends. However the killers are still on free and they soon come across a house that does not answer the door. Buffy Summers' holidays continue with Thanksgiving approaching. The day soon gathers pace whilst there are some bizarre things happening around Buffy's house. Buffy wants answers: What happened a vampire-opponent who survived the fateful Halloween massacre? Why is someone searching through her garbage? Why do so many people go grocery shopping at the last minute? Buffy Summers gets a present from Giles – a test in the shape of two troublemaking green critters. How to
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    Tales of the Dying Earth

    US 2000 Orb paperback collection of Jack Vance's four Dying Earth novels: The Dying Earth, The Eyes of the Overworld, Cugel's Saga, and Rhialto the Marvellous.
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    The Jungle Book

    The Jungle Book

    The Jungle Book (1894) is a collection of stories by English Nobel laureate Rudyard Kipling. The stories were first published in magazines in 1893–94. The original publications contain illustrations, some by Rudyard's father, John Lockwood Kipling. Kipling was born in India and spent the first six years of his childhood there. After about ten years in England, he went back to India and worked there for about six-and-half years. These stories were written when Kipling lived in Vermont. The tales in the book (and also those in The Second Jungle Book which followed in 1895, and which includes five further stories about Mowgli) are fables, using animals in an anthropomorphic manner to give moral lessons. The verses of The Law of the Jungle, for example, lay down rules for the safety of individuals, families and communities. Kipling put in them nearly everything he knew or "heard or dreamed about the Indian jungle." Other readers have interpreted the work as allegories of the politics and society of the time. The best-known of them are the three stories revolving around the adventures of an abandoned "man cub" Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle. The most famous of the
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    Nature Medicine

    Nature Medicine is an academic journal publishing research articles, reviews, news and commentaries in the biomedical area, including both basic research and early-phase clinical research. Topics covered include cancer, cardiovascular disease, gene therapy, immunology, vaccines, and neuroscience. The journal seeks to publish research papers that 'demonstrate novel insight into disease processes, with direct evidence of the physiological relevance of the results.' Founded in 1995, Nature Medicine is published by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd, and is one of the rapidly expanding stable of Nature journals. As with other Nature journals, there is no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team, although peer review by external expert referees forms a part of the review process. Nature Medicine is published monthly. Articles are archived online in text and PDF formats; access is by subscription only. Its 2010 impact factor was 25.430, making it the highest-cited research journal in preclinical medicine. It is also among the highest impact of primary (non-review) scientific journals.
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    ... The poems of Edgar Allan Poe

    "Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe" is an anthology containing all stories and poems of American author, poet, literary critic, and editor Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849).
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    United States Government Policy and Supporting Positions

    United States Government Policy and Supporting Positions

    United States Government Policy and Supporting Positions (more commonly referred to as the Plum Book) is a publication of the United States Senate's Committee on Governmental Affairs and the House of Representatives' Committee on Government Reform. Published after each Presidential election, the register lists over 7,000 Federal civil service leadership and support positions in the legislative and executive branches of the Federal Government that may be subject to noncompetitive appointment, nationwide. Data covers positions such as agency heads and their immediate subordinates, policy executives and advisors, and aides who report to these officials. The duties of many such positions may involve advocacy of Administration policies and programs and the incumbents usually have a close and confidential working relationship with the agency or other key officials. The Plum Book is used to identify presidentially appointed positions within the federal government. The list originated in 1952 during the Eisenhower administration. For twenty years prior, the Democratic Party controlled the Federal Government. When President Dwight D. Eisenhower took office, the Republican Party requested a
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    Frontier Times 1965 January

    Book Bonus! Cow By The Tail! Part Two by the irrepressible Jessie James Benton  Can an ole Kentucky boy turn Injun? The Fiddling Trapper Oasis in the Mojave It's Fun to Own a Ghost Town! Little Things, Dark Forest, and Gold The Bonney Brothers A Black Day for Mr. Brown Powder Face Hated the Whites The Man Who Was Afraid Lone Prairie Graves
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    Khaleej Times

    Khaleej Times

    The Khaleej Times is a daily English language newspaper published in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Traditionally perceived as one of the most popular newspaper in the UAE, popular with expats that have been in the region for a long period of time, it is still the 3rd largest national newspaper in English. It is published by Galadari Brothers, and was the first English daily in the UAE when it was founded on April 16, 1978. The newspaper is also part-owned by the government of the UAE, and its main competitors are 7DAYS, The National and Gulf News. The broadsheet comprises the general news section, the business pages and a lively sports section. Khaleej Times is not audited and it is believed to print around 40,000 copies, making it one of the smallest English Language newspapers in the Gulf. It reaches out to all parts of the UAE. Additionally, it covers Bahrain, Oman, Kuwait, Qatar and Saudi Arabia through a dedicated distribution network. With a multinational readership of unknown volume, Khaleej Times Special Reports and Supplements are regarded as part of a valuable service to the community. They offer advertisers an opportunity to promote their products and services over an
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    L'ere des Fornicatrices

    L'ere des Fornicatrices

    L'ere des Fornicatrices is the 1982 French language edition of Janet E. Morris' book The Golden Sword. It was published by Editions J'ai Lu in Paris.
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    Shadow

    Shadow is a translation of the poem La Féticheuse by French writer Blaise Cendrars. The book was released by Scribner and illustrated by Marcia Brown. It was the recipient of the Caldecott Medal for illustration in 1983, Brown's third honor.
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    Tempus

    Tempus

    Tempus is the 1987 english language edition of the book Tempus written by Janet Morris.
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    Testament

    Testament was an American comic book series written by Douglas Rushkoff with art and covers by Liam Sharp. It was published from February 2006 to March 2008 under DC Comics' Vertigo imprint. There are several key themes to Testament. The story takes place simultaneously in the near future and the biblical past to illustrate the most prominent theme: that history repeats itself. This is done by juxtaposing the two timelines, the purpose of which seems to be to illustrate that religion is a continually evolving, living story that is being written by how people, and specifically the protagonists, live their daily lives. Other themes include increasing numbers of fascist governments, human rights, technology, and information economics in the form of a global currency, manna. In the near future grad student Jake Stern and his conscientious objector friends fight against the new RFID-based universal draft by attempting to access the collective unconscious through an experimental combination of the hallucinogenic preparation ayahuasca and shared sensory deprivation tank experiences. The near future story is mirrored through the history-repeats-itself idea as biblical narrative based on
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    The River of Winged Dreams (Gift Edition)

    The River of Winged Dreams (Gift Edition)

    The hardback edition of The River of Winged Dreams has been described as being 14 pages longer than the paperback and including the classic short story, “Angels and Shakespeare,” first published in the Savannah Literary Journal and later in I Made My Boy Out of Poetry. In addition, the inside flap cover provides some indication that The River of Winged Dreams is likely the last in the Songs of the Angelic Gaze Series. Oddly enough, the inside flap also contains an excerpt from the as-yet-unpublished book entitled Collected Visions of a Skylark Dressed in Black.
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    The True Game

    US 1996 Berkley Books of The True Game, an omnibus collecting the Sherry S. Tepper novels King's Blood Four, Necromancer Nine, and Wizard's Eleven.
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    Typewriter in the Sky & Fear

    Typewriter in the Sky & Fear

    Typewriter in the Sky & Fear is a 1951 collection of two science fiction novels by L. Ron Hubbard. It was first published by Gnome Press in 1951 in an edition of 4,000 copies. Both the novels originally appeared in the magazine Unknown.
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    250

    Yésica Toscanini

    Yésica Toscanini (born 26 March 1986 in Junín, Argentina) is a professional Argentinian fashion model. She appeared in the 2006 and 2007 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issues. She was photographed for the cover of the Argentinian edition of Cosmopolitan and twice for Para Ti magazine. She also appeared in the Abercrombie & Fitch catalog of 2006. She played the high school sweetheart of Enrique Iglesias in the music video for "Do You Know? (The Ping Pong Song)". In 2008 she was selected as the girl for the Intimissimi spring–summer ad campaign. Through legal counsel she requested, and was granted the right, to have all her images and data to be removed from internet search results in Argentina.
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