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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Project of All Time

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    1
    Design of the Mobile Robot RHINO

    Design of the Mobile Robot RHINO

    • Project focus: Mobile Robot RHINO
    RHINO was the University of Bonn's entry in the 1994 AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition. RHINO is a mobile robot designed for indoor navigation and manipulation tasks. The RHINO Project was generally concerned with the design of autonomous and complex learning systems. RHINO was controlled by a dozen software modules which worked and communicated asynchronously. Special emphasis was put on real-time operation, learning, and the integration of reactivity and global map knowledge. RHINO did not require prior knowledge on the locations of walls/obstacles, nor on the topology of its environment.
    6.50
    8 votes
    2
    Stanford GCEP CO2 Capture Projects

    Stanford GCEP CO2 Capture Projects

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project
    GCEP has a number of research activities within several technical areas which are currently being investigated. All research efforts are geared towards developing technology that could lead to a future of significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
    6.86
    7 votes
    3
    Renovation of the Royal Festival Hall, 2005 to 2007

    Renovation of the Royal Festival Hall, 2005 to 2007

    • Project focus: Royal Festival Hall
    • Part of larger project: The Redevelopment of Southbank Centre site 1999 - 2007
    The Royal Festival Hall, located in London's South Bank centre, underwent a £91 million restoration project between June 2005 and June 2007.
    8.80
    5 votes
    4
    Stanford MNet Architecture

    Stanford MNet Architecture

    The MNet architecture explores how to architecturally improve sensor networking. The core principle of the architecture is to minimize the energy cost of diagnosing network behavior, transforming the typical "black box" embedded sensornet to a well-understood and transparent system that is easy to optimize, manage, and deploy.
    7.50
    6 votes
    5
    Cape to Cairo Railway

    Cape to Cairo Railway

    • Includes smaller projects: Initial design and construction of Victoria Falls Bridge
    The Cape to Cairo Railway is an uncompleted project to cross Africa from south to north by rail. This plan was initiated at the end of the 19th century, during the time of colonial rule, largely under the vision of Cecil Rhodes, in the attempt to connect adjacent African possessions of the British Empire through a continuous line from Cape Town, South Africa to Cairo, Egypt. While most sections of the Cape to Cairo railway are in operation, a major part is missing between northern Sudan and Uganda. British colonialism in Africa is closely linked to the concept of the Cape to Cairo Railway. Cecil Rhodes was instrumental in securing the southern states of the continent for the British Empire and envisioned a continuous "red line" of British dominions from north to south. A railway would be a critical element in this scheme to unify the possessions, facilitate governance, enable the military to move quickly to hot spots or conduct war, help settlement and foster trade. The construction of this project presented a major technological challenge. France had a rival strategy in the late 1890s to link its colonies from west to east across the continent, Senegal to Djibouti. Southern Sudan
    6.43
    7 votes
    6
    Manhattan Project

    Manhattan Project

    • Project focus: Nuclear weapon
    • Includes smaller projects: Hanford Project
    The Manhattan Project was a research and development program by the United States with the United Kingdom and Canada that produced the first atomic bomb during World War II. From 1942 to 1946, the project was under the direction of Major General Leslie Groves of the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Army component of the project was designated the Manhattan District; "Manhattan" gradually superseded the official codename, "Development of Substitute Materials", for the entire project. Along the way, the Manhattan Project absorbed its earlier British counterpart, Tube Alloys. The Manhattan Project began modestly in 1939, but grew to employ more than 130,000 people and cost nearly US$2 billion (roughly equivalent to $25.8 billion as of 2012). Over 90% of the cost was for building factories and producing the fissionable materials, with less than 10% for development and production of the weapons. Research and production took place at more than 30 sites, some secret, across the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada. Two types of atomic bomb were developed during the war. A relatively simple gun-type fission weapon was made using uranium-235, an isotope that makes up only 0.7 percent
    7.33
    6 votes
    7
    Design and Construction of the New Stanford Hospital

    Design and Construction of the New Stanford Hospital

    • Project focus: The New Stanford Hospital
    The New Stanford Hospital is being designed by the internationally recognized firm of Rafael Viñoly Architects, working in association with Lee, Burkhart, Liu, Inc. The innovative design utilizes the latest in sustainable technology and anticipates an ever-accelerating pace of medical and technological progress, with flexibility to adapt to future innovations that are unimaginable today. These technical requirements are carefully balanced with a healing environment responsive to the emotional, social and psychological needs of patients, families, visitors, medical professionals and staff. The project will increase the Hospital’s capacity to 600 beds, including new and expanded intensive care and emergency services. The design features a multidisciplinary, interventional platform, in which radiology and surgical services and the Emergency Department will be co-located with state-of-the-art imaging services to enhance care; upper-level residential pavilions with light-filled, single-patient rooms; and a unique, mid-level garden floor. The garden floor will offer dining, conference, and educational facilities, as well as social and spiritual support spaces, in a seamless indoor/outdoor environment highlighting Stanford’s natural setting and offering expansive views to the foothills and the bay.
    8.20
    5 votes
    8
    Design and Construction of the Stanford Bing Concert Hall

    Design and Construction of the Stanford Bing Concert Hall

    • Project focus: Stanford Bing Concert Hall
    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford Bing Concert Hall Opening Night Performance
    • Part of larger project: Stanford Arts Initiative
    A cutting-edge concert hall launches an "arts district" at Stanford. Top architects and acousticians have designed the 844-seat Bing Concert Hall to accommodate everything from soloists to full orchestras, classical masterpieces to the latest computer-generated sounds. The 844-seat Bing Concert Hall has been designed for a wide range of music performances, from small chamber ensembles to full-sized orchestras, jazz, multi-media, newly commissioned works and world music, and has an architectural and acoustic plan from some of the foremost designers in the world. The hall has been designed by the internationally recognized Ennead Architects (whose clients include Carnegie Hall) and Fisher Dachs Associates (theater planning consultants to Lincoln Center and others). Nagata Acoustics' Yasuhisa Toyota, one of the world's foremost acousticians, has provided the acoustic design for the hall. Toyota's previous projects have included the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and Russia's Mariinsky Concert Hall in St. Petersburg. Cheryl Barton, whose firm is a pioneer in sustainable landscape design, is the landscape architect.
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Stanford GCEP Advanced Transportation Projects

    Stanford GCEP Advanced Transportation Projects

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project
    GCEP has a number of research activities within several technical areas which are currently being investigated. All research efforts are geared towards developing technology that could lead to a future of significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
    7.00
    6 votes
    10
    The Sword Project

    The Sword Project

    The SWORD Project is the CrossWire Bible Society's free Bible software project. Its purpose is to create cross-platform open source tools—covered by the GNU General Public License—that allow programmers and Bible societies to write new Bible software more quickly and easily. The core of the Sword Project is a cross-platform library written in C++, providing access, search functions and other utilities to a growing collection of over 200 texts in over 50 languages. Any software based on their API can use this collection. The project is one of the primary implementers of and contributors to the Open Scripture Information Standard (OSIS), a standardized XML language for the encoding of scripture. The software is also capable of utilizing certain resources encoded in using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) format and maintains deprecated support for Theological Markup Language (ThML) and General Bible Format (GBF). Front-ends are available currently for Windows (The SWORD Project for Windows), various Unixes (Xiphos and BibleTime), including all mainline Linux distributions and FreeBSD, Mac OS X (Eloquent), WinCE (SwordReader), Internet Tablet OS (Rapier), as CGI utility (diatheke)
    7.00
    6 votes
    11
    9.25
    4 votes
    12
    Performance

    Performance

    • Project focus: South London Theatre
    A performance, in performing arts, generally comprises an event in which a performer or group of performers behave in a particular way for another group of people, the audience. Choral music and ballet are examples. Usually the performers participate in rehearsals beforehand. Afterwards audience members often applaud. The means of expressing appreciation can vary by culture. Chinese performers will clap with audience at the end of a performance; the return applause signals "thank you" to the audience. In Japan, folk performing arts performances commonly attract individuals who take photographs, sometimes getting up to the stage and within inches of performer's faces. Sometimes the dividing line between performer and the audience may become blurred, as in the example of "participatory theatre" where audience members get involved in the production. Theatrical performances can take place daily or at some other regular interval. Performances can take place at designated performance spaces (such as a theatre or concert hall), or in a non-conventional space, such as a subway station, on the street, or in someone's home. Examples of performance genres include: Music performance (a concert
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Stanford Mimir Project

    Stanford Mimir Project

    • Project focus: TopicFlow
    Governments, companies, and academic organizations regularly try to speed scientific progress in key areas by forming interdisciplinary centers. Do these innovations or recombinations accelerate research or decelerate it by moving scientists away from their disciplinary contexts? Are interdisciplinary confluences already underway when these centers are created, or do they induce new synergies among researchers? What kinds of organizational models most effectively promote interdisciplinary research? The research team has embarked on a longitudinal study of how scientific ideas, scholarly networks, and their institutional contexts influence one another. This project will take advantage of special access to data on Stanford University and its $4.3 billion dollar funding drive (commenced in 1998), which attempts to bolster interdisciplinary centers and alter university research so it addresses real world problems. This data will be set against the backdrop of large scale public data sources. The project aims to develop evidence-based tools and visualizations that reveal whether and how the form and content of intellectual work is changing in response to these major initiatives. Our interdisciplinary team will apply new computational techniques to study the spread of ideas and methods across disciplines, to contrast the success of virtual and ephemeral versus formal and physical organizations, and to understand the complex behavior of a large-scale intellectual enterprise, and what attributes are important for successful innovation.
    6.67
    6 votes
    14
    Design and Development of Dialog

    Design and Development of Dialog

    • Project focus: Dialog
    • Includes smaller projects: Dialog development of NASA RECON
    The project group worked on designing the file structure and programming the system that was to become Dialog. The original system design priorities we developed were as follows: - It should be command driven so that searchers could use it directly without needing computer programmers to act as intermediaries. - It needed to be interactive to allow searchers to display hits and modify queries based on intermediate results. - It had to be recursive, meaning that there needed to be a means to limit or extend the scope of a search without having to re-enter the query itself. - It should provide an alphabetical display of all retrievable terms from which one could choose. Two unique features of the design were search recursion and index word display. In 1972, Dialog was established as a commercial information retrieval business within the Lockheed Information Systems Laboratory.
    7.60
    5 votes
    15
    Yi Cui Lab : Printable Energy and Electronic Devices Projects

    Yi Cui Lab : Printable Energy and Electronic Devices Projects

    This project conducts research in Nanoscale paper and textile technologies. The team has exploited the novel microstructure of paper and developed nanostructured paper and textile as a platform for a wide range of energy and environmental device applications, including ultracapacitors, batteries, water filtration, microbial fuel cells and printed electronics. The excellent union of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires with paper and textile lead to the success for emerging devices with outstanding performances. The team is also interested in the understanding of the fundamental interactions between nanoscale materials such as carbon nanotube and bionanowires with paper and textile fibers. including: Graphene-textile and paper for supercapacitors; High-performance microbial fuel cells; 3D Li-ion textile batteries; Printing metal nanowires on paper.
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    Cochran Lab : Engineering Proteins that Bind to and Inhibit Multiple Receptors

    Cochran Lab : Engineering Proteins that Bind to and Inhibit Multiple Receptors

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Bifunctional antagonists of VEGFR2 and αvβ3 integrin with antiangiogenic properties
    Significant cross-talk exists between receptors that mediate angiogenesis, such as vasculature endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and alphav beta3 integrin. Thus, agents that inhibit both receptors would have important therapeutic potential. Here, we used an antagonistic VEGF ligand as a molecular scaffold to engineer dual-specific proteins that bound to VEGFR2 and alphav beta3 integrin with antibody-like affinities and inhibited angiogenic processes in vitro and in vivo. Mutations were introduced into a single-chain VEGF (scVEGF) ligand that retained VEGFR2 binding, but prevented receptor dimerization and activation. Yeast-displayed scVEGF mutant libraries were created and screened by high-throughput flow cytometric sorting to identify several variants that bound with high affinity to both VEGFR2 and alphav beta3 integrin. Engineered scVEGF mutants were specific for alphav beta3 integrin, and did not bind to the related integrins alphav beta5, alphaiib beta3, or alpha5 beta1. In addition, surface plasmon resonance and cell binding assays showed that the dual-specific proteins can simultaneously engage both receptors. Compared to mono-specific scVEGF mutants that bind VEGFR2 or alphav beta3 integrin, dual-specific proteins more strongly inhibited VEGF-mediated receptor phosphorylation, capillary tube formation, and proliferation of endothelial cells cultured on Matrigel or vitronectin-coated surfaces. Moreover, dual-specificity conferred complete inhibition of VEGF-mediated blood vessel formation in Matrigel plugs in vivo, while mono-specific scVEGF mutants that bind VEGFR2 or alphav beta3 were only marginally effective. Instead of relying on antibody associating domains or physical linkage, this work highlights an approach to creating dual-specific proteins where additional functionality is introduced into a protein ligand to complement its existing biological properties.
    6.50
    6 votes
    17
    Haussmann's renovation of Paris

    Haussmann's renovation of Paris

    Haussmann's Renovation of Paris, or the Haussmann Plan, was a modernization program of Paris commissioned by Napoléon III and led by the Seine prefect, Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann, between 1853 and 1870. Though work continued until the end of the 19th century, well after the Second Empire's demise in 1870, it is often referred to as the "Second Empire reforms". The project encompassed all aspects of urban planning, both in the centre of Paris and in the surrounding districts: streets and boulevards, regulations imposed on facades of buildings, public parks, sewers and water works, city facilities, and public monuments. The planning was influenced by many factors, not the least of which was the city's history of street revolutions. Haussmann's approach to urban planning was strongly criticised by some of his contemporaries, ignored for a good part of the twentieth century, but later re-evaluated when modernist approaches to urban planning became discredited. His restructuring of Paris gave the city its present form; its long, straight, wide boulevards with their cafés and shops determined a new type of urban scenario and have had a profound influence on the everyday lives of
    8.50
    4 votes
    18
    Stanford Trust Studies at the IRiSS

    Stanford Trust Studies at the IRiSS

    The Stanford Trust Studies at the Stanford Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (IRiSS) conducts research in the field of social human behavior revolves around several questions: * How do organizations react to institutional uncertainty? * How do institutions shape the behavior of political actors, parties and social movements? * What explains the patterning in time and space of social behavior?
    8.25
    4 votes
    19
    Stanford GCEP CO2 Storage Projects

    Stanford GCEP CO2 Storage Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford GCEP Geological Sequestration of CO2 Project
    • Part of larger project: Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project
    GCEP has a number of research activities within several technical areas which are currently being investigated. All research efforts are geared towards developing technology that could lead to a future of significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
    6.17
    6 votes
    20
    Wren's original design for St Paul's Cathedral

    Wren's original design for St Paul's Cathedral

    • Project focus: St Paul's Cathedral
    Nine years passed between the great fire and the first moves to demolish Old St Paul's and build a new Cathedral. Wren however pre-empted official orders and by 1673 had already prepared several projects. One of these projects has stronger similarities to St Peter's, Rome than the Cathedral which was finally built.
    7.00
    5 votes
    21
    Dialog development of NASA RECON

    Dialog development of NASA RECON

    • Part of larger project: Design and Development of Dialog
    In 1967 NASA issued a competitive RFP (request for proposal) for development of the NASA RECON system (Remote Console Information Retrieval System). The contract was awarded to Lockheed Information Systems Laboratory which successfully installed the NASA/RECON software on the NASA facility computer as part of the Design and Development of Dialog project. In 1969, Lockheed installed systems at European Space Research Organization (ESRO) for NASA RECON, and at the Atomic Energy Commission, for Nuclear Science Abstracts; contracts with U.S. Office of Education (USOE) to provide leased-line service to ERIC at Stanford.
    9.33
    3 votes
    22
    Dialog spin-out as separate corporation

    Dialog spin-out as separate corporation

    In 1982, Dialog was spun-off as a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Information Systems Laboratory, with Dr. Summit as president. The company relocated to a facility in the Stanford Industrial Part at Arastradero and Hillview in Palo Alto.
    9.33
    3 votes
    23
    Stanford Music and the Brain Symposium

    Stanford Music and the Brain Symposium

    Begun in 2006, the SiCa Center for Arts, Science and Technology’s Symposium on Music and the Brain has become an internationally renowned and respected interdisciplinary meeting of the world’s finest scholars, researchers and practitioners exploring the neuroscience of music.
    9.33
    3 votes
    24
    Virtual Assistant Denise

    Virtual Assistant Denise

    Denise is a photo-realistic Virtual Assistant, created by Guile 3D Studio ( www.guile3d.com ) from computer graphic software and a real-time proprietary graphics engine. Denise is the interface to our artificial intelligence software. Her main function is to assist users in human-computer interaction, like searching the web, exploring multimedia files, checking e-mail, scheduling new appointments, all these using natural language, as the user was "talking to a real person" Denise mimics a real human being, using facial recognition, text-to-speech and speech recognition technology to identify users, understand speech questions, search for the best answers and speak aloud important information and search results.
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    8.00
    4 votes
    26
    Stanford Solar Center

    Stanford Solar Center

    The Stanford Solar Center is an educational web site providing on-line activities to encourage and share the wonder of solar science exploration.
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    Taipei Organic Acupuncture

    Taipei Organic Acupuncture

    • Project focus: Ruin Academy
    Taipei Organic Acupuncture Marco Casagrande / Ruin Academy / 2010 Acupuncture is the procedure of inserting and manipulating needles into various points on the body to relieve pain or for therapeutic purposes. Urban planning integrates land use planning and transportation planning to improve the built, economic and social environments of communities. Urban design concerns the arrangement, appearance and functionality of towns and cities, and in particular the shaping and uses of urban public space. Environmental art is art dealing with ecological issues and possibly in political, historical or social context. Sociology is a science of human social activity. Anarchy is acting without waiting for instructions or official permission. The root of anarchism is the single impulse to do it yourself: everything else follows from this. The community gardens and urban farms of Taipei are astonishing. They pop up like mushrooms on the degenerated, neglected or sleeping areas of the city, which could be referred to as urban composts. These areas are operating outside the official urban control or the economic standard mechanisms. They are voids in the urban structure that suck in ad-hoc community actions and present a platform for anarchy through gardening. The punctual community gardens and urban farms of Taipei. C-LAB For the vitality of Taipei, the networks of the anarchist gardens seem to provide a positive social disorder; positive terrorism. They are tuning the industrial city towards the organic, towards accident and in this sense they are ruining the modern urbanism. They are punctual organic revolutions and the seeds of the Third Generation City, the organic ruin of the industrial city. Corners are windy Claude Lévi-Strauss believes in the beauty of the human nature as part of nature. Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno lost all the hope for the industrial development and said it has failed the promise of the Enlightment - it had corrupted humanity. Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalke (Mosfilm, 1979) is taking sophisticated people into the Zone, where their deepest wishes may come true. The Zone which is the organic ruin mirroring the surrounding mechanical reality. For the Strugatsky brothers (Arkady & Boris) the Zone was a Roadside Picnic. Missis Lee in the Gongguan community garden. The community gardens of Taipei are Roadside Picnic. Grandmothers can take us there, like Stalker. The honorable Lévi-Strauss could be happy to start new ethnographical research between the parallel realities of the cultures of the urban compost gardens and the surrounding city – the reversed modernization and focusing in Local Knowledge. Horkheimers & Adorno’s graves should be moved in one of these urban acupuncture spots of Taipei. Here even they would find hope, surrounded by the valueless modernity and hard industrialism. Prof. Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila has said: “The valueless void of the society of today will be filled with ethics: the corners are windy.” With the recognition of the urban farms and community gardens Taipei has found its corners. 101 Community Garden in-between Taipei 101 and World Trade Center. Photo: Isis Kang. What is the ethics then pushing through these corners into the city? It could be called Local Knowledge, site-specific reactions building a bridge between the modern man and nature. The gardens of Taipei, these acupuncture points, are penetrating through the industrial surface of the city and reaching the original ground. The self organized community gardens are the urban acupuncture needles of Taipei. Local Knowledge is in connection with the first generation city, when the built human environment was dependent on nature and regulated by nature. Now the anarchist gardeners are regulating the industrial city. Dominate the no-man’s land The community gardens are taking over abandoned construction sites and ruined housing areas, empty city-blocks waiting for development, flood banks of the rivers and even grave-yards out of fashion. In many cases the gardens are flourishing on spots of land where the land-owner issues are unsettle or complicated. Sometimes the garden will stay in the spot for only a couple of years, as in the cases of soon to be developed areas and sometimes the urban farming has decades long traditions as with the river flood plains or on the island in-between Zhongxiao and Zhongshing bridges. The smaller urban farms are flexible and eager to overtake the empty spots of the city, eager to dominate the no-man’s land. Treasure Hill in 2003. Photo: Stephen Wilde. One of the more famous urban farming communities of Taipei was the Treasure Hill settlement, originally an illegal community of KMT veterans. During its legitimating process Treasure Hill became so famous that eventually the original community was kicked away by the city government and the houses were taken over by artists and art related organizations. All the farms were destroyed on the process. Sounds like urban warfare against urban acupuncture. Treasure Hill was powerful and self-sustained when it was illegal. The community built its own houses and its own farms and it made its own rules. The official city wanted to eliminate this unofficial organic rival. NGOs found the issue sexy and stepped in to protect and legitimize the settlement. In the end the NGOs and artists took over the now-famous community and hooked up with the city government. The original urban farmers didn’t fit the picture anymore and had to leave. Now you can listen gansta-rap in a yellow plastic tent where the gardens used to be. Local knowledge died. Missis Chen, the leader of the Treasure Hill urban farming community. But Treasure Hill is not alone. Urban farming happens through different social classes and through out the city. The socially disordered citizens are ready to occupy land and start the community farms over and over again. Some acupuncture spots get hot and benefit the surrounding urban tissue while others fade away. The industrial surface of the city keeps constantly being broken up and herbs and vegetables are planted into the cracks. People are ruining the industrial city. Ruin is when man-made has become part of nature. Urban Editors Compared to Western cities Taipei plays in quite different rules. The aesthetics of the city is dominated by the functionality of a big collective machine and the urban mechanism is constantly being edited and rendered as with changing the micro-chips or other parts of a super-computer into more powerful ones. The urban data is people and this is what the machine needs to process. Mostly it goes smoothly, but also people get viruses – they get together to spontaneous demonstrations, they do tai-chi in improvised city-corners, they launch ad-hoc night markets or under-bridge sales on temporarily occupied streets or city corners. And they do farms – they are squeezing organic material into the machine like a creeper crawling into an air-conditioning box. Why they do this? Why does the nature want to break the machine? Hyena Man. Photo: Pieter Hugo Developers are the true urban editors. They are linked with the city authorities and necessary political powers and they make the urban editing. Architects are in a secondary role – something like the hyenas after the lions have made the kill. Money is a good consultant and the generating force of the developer run urban editing process. This is not urban acupuncture though; it is more like a western style medical practice – operations on the body removing, changing or maintaining parts – or even plastic surgery. (Oh, Shanghai has bigger tits than Taipei.) The body is not necessarily seen as one big organism. In this rough editing process the anarchist gardeners seem to act as micro-editors, parasites benefiting of the slow circles of the big-scale development. They occupy the not so sexy areas of the city and they jump in the more sleepy parts of the development cycle. For example – the developer buys a whole city block with originally many land-owners. The process is slow because he has to negotiate with all of them. While the process is dragging behind the urban farmers step in and start farming the area. The developer doesn’t want to cause any more fuss and let it happen. It takes 3-5 years before the developer has got all the area to his possession and those same years the site acts as the community garden. When the actual construction starts the gardeners have already occupied a next vacant spot in the city. Third Generation City First generation city was the human settlement in straight connection with nature and dependent on nature. The fertile and rich Taipei basing provided a fruitful environment for such a settlement. The rivers were full of fish and good for transportation and the mountains protected the farmed plains from the straightest hits of the frequent typhoons. Taipei Basin - a river valley surrounded by mountains on three sides and opening up to the Pacific Ocean. The second generation city is the industrial city. Industrialism claimed the citizens independence from nature – a mechanical environment could provide human everything needed. Nature was seen as something un-necessary or as something hostile – it was walled away from the mechanical reality. Third Generation City is the organic ruin of the industrial city. The community gardens of Taipei are fragments of the third generation urbanism when they exist together with the industrial surroundings. Local Knowledge is present in the city and this is where Ruin Academy focuses its research. Among the urban gardeners are the local knowledge professors of Taipei. Third Generation City is true when the city recognizes its local knowledge and allows itself to be part of nature. --- The paper is based on independent Ruin Academy research (2010) in co-operation with the National Taiwan University Department of Sociology. Special thanks to Professors Yen-Fen Tseng and Chia-Ling Wu, to RA researchers Frank Chen and Yu-Chen Chiu, to Project Manager Nikita Wu and for Roan Ching-Yueh and Hsieh Ying-Chun to keep the talk up. The Ruin Academy research is kindly supported by the JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture. --- Marco Casagrande is a Finnish architect and the Principal of the Ruin Academy in Taipei Taiwan. He currently teaches at the Aalto University’s Sustainable Global Technologies –centre and is leading the cross-disciplinary Ruin Academy research towards the Third Generation City.
    9.00
    3 votes
    28
    ActiveFedora

    ActiveFedora

    • Project focus: Fedora Repository
    ActiveFedora is a Ruby gem for creating and managing objects in the Fedora Repository Architecture.  The purpose of ActiveFedora is to make it possible to build Fedora client applications rapidly and efficiently while taking advantage of the best contemporary application development practices.  Within that, our emphasis is on * refining & popularizing a simple, intuitive and effective content modeling language
    * develop tools for leveraging mature parts of Fedora's Content Model Architecture (CMA)
    * leverage existing search/index techniques in a flexible and modular way
    * encourage creaion & exchange of sane and well encapsulated solutions for metadata management
    * facilitate community innovation & collaboration around user-oriented content-driven application development
    7.75
    4 votes
    29
    Cathar castles

    Cathar castles

    • Project focus: Château d'Aguilar
    Cathar castles (in French Châteaux cathares) is a modern term used by the tourism industry (following the example of Pays Cathare – Cathar Country) to designate a series of fortresses built by the French king on the southern border of his lands at the end of the Albigensian Crusade. Some of these sites, before the royal period, were fortified villages capable of sheltering Cathars and which were destroyed during the building of citadels. In Languedoc, the only real "Cathar castles" were fortified homesteads (castrum), such as Laurac, Fanjeaux, Mas-Saintes-Puelles. Certain sites like Lastours-Cabaret, Montségur, Termes or Puilaurens were castra before being razed to the ground and becoming royal citadels. The legend of Cathar architects and builders is no more than a myth. The only monuments which witnessed the events of the first half of the 13th century, and therefore the only ones which can claim the description "Cathar", given that the Cathar Church never built anything, are the small castles, often totally unknown to the public, whose meagre ruins are away from the tourist routes. Following the failure of the attempt to recapture Carcassonne by Raimond II, Viscount Trencaval in
    7.75
    4 votes
    30
    Design and Construction of Stanford University's Stanley Robot Car

    Design and Construction of Stanford University's Stanley Robot Car

    • Project focus: DARPA Grand Challenge
    Stanley is an autonomous vehicle created by Stanford University's Stanford Racing Team in cooperation with the Volkswagen Electronics Research Laboratory (ERL). It competed in, and won, the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge, earning the Stanford Racing Team the 2 million dollar prize, the largest prize money in robotic history. Led by Associate Professor Sebastian Thrun, director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab, the Stanford Racing Team was developed solely for the purpose of competing in the 2005 DARPA Grand Challenge. Stanford did not participate in the 2004 DARPA Grand Challenge and was considered to have 20:1 chances of winning the 2005 competition. Stanford did not participate in the 2004 DARPA Grand Challenge and was considered to have 20:1 chances of winning the 2005 competition. Stanley is currently located at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, although it was displayed at the 2006 New York International Auto Show, and spent 2 years at the Volkswagen Autostadt Museum (Germany).
    7.75
    4 votes
    31
    Dialog development for U.S. Office of Education

    Dialog development for U.S. Office of Education

    • Project focus: ERIC Online Retrieval System
    • Part of larger project: Design and Development of Dialog
    In 1969 Dialog negotiated a contract with the U.S. Office of Education, to provide a retrieval service on the ERIC database. The U.S. Office of Education asked Dialog to mount their database on Dialog's computer and provide them access for searching, leading to Dialog to migrate from a systems development/installation organization into a services organization.
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Microphotonics Lab : In vivo Dual-Axes Confocal Microscopy

    Microphotonics Lab : In vivo Dual-Axes Confocal Microscopy

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Multispectral 3-D Scanning System for DAC Microscopy
    Confocal microscopy is a promising technique for subsurface in vivo imaging and early detection of anomalies associated with cancer and other diseases. In collaboration with the research groups of Professors Christopher Contag and Gordon Kino, we are developing MEMS scanners and micro-optics for endoscopic implementations of dual-axes confocal microscopes, specifically designed for detection of neoplasia in the esophagus.
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Chu Group : Laser Cooling and Trapping Project

    Chu Group : Laser Cooling and Trapping Project

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Laser Cooling by Coherent Scattering
    This research group performed experiments with laser-cooled cesium atoms in atomic fountains to perform precision measurements. The group also worked on Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) of 87Rb.
    6.60
    5 votes
    34
    Design and Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge

    Design and Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge

    • Project focus: Golden Gate Bridge
    The Golden Gate Bridge was the longest suspension bridge span in the world when it was completed in 1937, and has become one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and of the United States. Despite its span length being surpassed by eight other bridges since its completion, it still has the second longest suspension bridge main span in the United States, after the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York City. It has been declared one of the modern Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.
    6.60
    5 votes
    35
    Matin Lab : Stress sensing; protein localization

    Matin Lab : Stress sensing; protein localization

    Bacteria respond to a variety of individual stresses by switching on a common set of genes that makes them resistant to stresses in general. Little is known about how the different stresses are sensed. We isolated a mutant in Pseudomonas putida that lost the capacity to develop general resistance. The mutated was identified to be flhF, which encodes a G-protein. This location of this protein was traced to the flagella-bearing pole of the cell. The nature of the cascade activated by this protein in response to stresses is under investigation.
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Project Jennifer

    Project Jennifer

    "Azorian" (erroneously called "Jennifer" after its Top Secret Security Compartment by the press) was the code name for a U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) project to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129 from the Pacific Ocean floor in the summer of 1974, using the purpose-built ship Hughes Glomar Explorer. The 1968 sinking of the K-129 occurred approximately 1,560 nautical miles (2,890 km) northwest of Hawaii. Project Azorian was one of the most complex, expensive, and secretive intelligence operations of the Cold War at a cost of about $800 million ($3.8 billion in 2012 dollars). In addition to designing the high tech recovery ship and its unique lifting cradle, the U.S. used concepts developed with Global Marine (see Project Mohole) that utilized their precision stability equipment to keep the ship nearly stationary above the target (and do this while lowering nearly three miles of pipe). They worked with scientists to develop methods for preserving paper that had been underwater for years in hopes of being able to recover and read the submarine's codebooks. The exact reasons why this project was undertaken are unknown, but likely reasons included the recovery of an
    8.67
    3 votes
    37
    Stanford Biodesign Innovation : Oculeve

    Stanford Biodesign Innovation : Oculeve

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Treatment of Ocular Diseases Using Device Which Modulates Pathological Neural Pathways
    Oculeve, whose product REVIVE, treats moderate to severe dry eye disease.
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Stanford Biodesign Innovation : Pediatric Medical Device Project

    Stanford Biodesign Innovation : Pediatric Medical Device Project

    • Project focus: Miret Surgical device
    The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation partnered with the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health in awarding a grant to create the Pediatric Medical Device Innovation fellowship team at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The Stanford Biodesign Innovation Pediatric Device Innovation Project team consists of engineer John Avi Roop and surgical resident Kevin Chao, MD. The two will begin the yearlong fellowship by conducting an assessment of pediatric clinical needs at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford under the mentorship of Thomas Krummel, MD, the Susan B. Ford Surgeon in Chief at the Hospital and co-director of the Stanford Biodesign Program at the School of Medicine.
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Stanford Entity Resolution Framework

    Stanford Entity Resolution Framework

    The goal of the SERF project is to develop a generic infrastructure for Entity Resolution (ER). ER (also known as deduplication, or record linkage) is an important information integration problem: The same "real-world entities" (e.g., customers, or products) are referred to in different ways in multiple data records. For instance, two records on the same person may provide different name spellings, and addresses may differ. The goal of ER is to "resolve" entities, by identifying the records that represent the same entity and reconciling them to obtain one record per entity.
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    Piccadilly Line Cockfosters extension

    Piccadilly Line Cockfosters extension

    • Project focus: Piccadilly Line
    The Piccadilly line extension to Cockfosters added eight new stations to the northern end of London Underground's Piccadilly Line. The extension through north London from Finsbury Park to Cockfosters was opened in three stages between 19 September 1932 and 31 July 1933. When the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR, precursor of the Piccadilly Line) opened in December 1906, its northern terminus was at Finsbury Park where it had an interchange with the Great Northern Railway (GNR) and the Great Northern & City Railway (GN&CR). To obtain approval for the railway's construction, the GNP&BR had, like the GN&CR before it, had to accept a GNR veto over further extensions north in competition of latter's suburban passenger services from King's Cross. Very soon after the GNP&BR opened it was clear that the termination of the line in urban Finsbury Park rather than further out of central London in more suburban Wood Green, Southgate or Tottenham had been a mistake. Passengers leaving the GNP&BR and the GN&CR at Finsbury Park preferred to transfer on to trams and buses for the continuation of their journeys, rather than use the GNR as it had hoped. This caused much
    6.40
    5 votes
    41
    Stanford Network for Translational Research in Optical Imaging

    Stanford Network for Translational Research in Optical Imaging

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Dual-Axis Confocal Microscope Having Improved Performance For Thick Samples
    In this project, an interdisciplinary team of investigators at Stanford University, and partner institutions, is involved in a translational research program that combines imaging-technology development with biomarker discovery for the early detection of cancer in the esophagus. Research projects include: Confocal Microscopy, Fluorescent Biomarker Discovery, and In Vivo Single-Axis Confocal Studies.
    6.40
    5 votes
    42
    Stanford Web Security Group

    Stanford Web Security Group

    • Project focus: Web Application Security
    The Web Security Group is a part of the Stanford Security Laboratory. Research projects focus on various aspects of browser and web application security.
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Design and construction of LODESTAR

    Design and construction of LODESTAR

    • Project focus: LODESTAR
    • Part of larger project: Roger Berry Major Works
    Lodestar is a sculpture by Roger Berry done in silicon bronze with patina. The work is 10' diameter and designed to be seen as a different form as the viewer drives around it. A word from the artist: "A lodestar is a star used to navigate, a beacon. Lodestar' will be visible at great distance down 15th Street and Bear Creek Road. The sculpture has been created for the roundabout and will appear to twist and turn as you travel around the intersection, a circle approaching on 15th Street, a figure-8 from Bear Creek."
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Microphotonics Lab : Photonic Crystal Sensors

    Microphotonics Lab : Photonic Crystal Sensors

    Photonic crystal devices can be engineered to have modes with very high sensitivity to structural changes, without requiring the large size, sensitive coupling, and critical stabilization that characterize traditional high quality-factor optical interferometers. We utilize these attributes of Photonic Crystals to create fiber-coupled sensors for mechanical measurands like pressure, acceleration, and displacement.
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Stanford Initiative on Improving K-12 Education

    Stanford Initiative on Improving K-12 Education

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Multidisciplinary Teaching and Research
    Among the greatest challenges in the United States today is the need to improve our public education system. The failure to provide effective education to all of our children not only squanders a national resource— our children’s potential—but also widens the gap between those who thrive and those who fail in society. At Stanford, we are working to address this challenge. Through Stanford’s initiative on Improving K–12 Education, scholars from across the university—from the schools of business, law, medicine, engineering, earth sciences, and humanities and sciences; the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; and the Hoover Institution—are joining with experts in the School of Education to approach the problem from multiple perspectives. And they are partnering with practitioners and policymakers to forge innovative and practical solutions.
    8.33
    3 votes
    46
    Stanford GCEP Advanced Materials and Catalysts Projects

    Stanford GCEP Advanced Materials and Catalysts Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford Corrosion Resistant (Photo)Anode Project
    • Part of larger project: Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project
    GCEP has a number of research activities within several technical areas which are currently being investigated. All research efforts are geared towards developing technology that could lead to a future of significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Materials used in advanced energy conversion and storage systems must have the required strength, stability, and functionality in order to demonstrate high performance as well as economic feasibility. New materials could benefit an array of energy applications including fuel cell membranes and catalysts, hydrogen storage tanks, wind turbine blades, radioactive product handling, and electricity distribution. New materials for energy systems may be highly specialized and molecularly complex. Recent advances in molecular-scale engineering and imaging will assist in the design and characterization of materials with the desired properties and function.
    9.50
    2 votes
    47
    Stanford University point25 project

    Stanford University point25 project

    "Point 25" was a concert developed within the Wallenberg Global Learning Network (WGLN) funded "Connected Performance Spaces" project at Stanford University. The project examines how a global performance event can be organised to achieve high levels of presence and interaction between both performers and audiences by exploring the possibilites of the performance spaces in Wallenberg Hall (Stanford) and KTH Learning Lab. The concert "Point 25" is a live field study. People in the audience will also be asked to take part in follow-up studies about their impressions.
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Deisseroth Lab : Basic Optogenetics Research Projects

    Deisseroth Lab : Basic Optogenetics Research Projects

    • Project focus: Optogenetics
    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Cell-specific gene expressing using floxed reverse-ORF AAV and Cre recombinase
    This project seeks to find ways to troubleshoot neural circuits associated with depression, Parkinson’s disease and other conditions. The team is developing optogenetics technology that precisely turns select brain cells on or off with flashes of light.
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    E-mu Multimedia Project Devleopment

    E-mu Multimedia Project Devleopment

    • Project focus: Sound Blaster AWE32
    After E-mu Systems was acquired by Creative Technology Ltd. in 1993, the E-mu Business Development group collaborated on the design of the Sound Blaster AWE32, which included E-mu's EMU8000 semiconductor component. The group also designed and delivered several multimedia products.
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Siebel Stem Cell Institute

    Siebel Stem Cell Institute

    The Siebel Stem Cell Institute, established by the Thomas and Stacey Siebel Foundation, is a joint initiative between the Berkeley Stem Cell Center and the Stanford Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Institute, which are two of the world's leading institutions at the forefront of biomedical science.
    6.00
    5 votes
    52
    Stanford SoundWIRE Project

    Stanford SoundWIRE Project

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Distributed Internet Reverberation for Acoustic Collaboration (DIRAC)
    The Stanford SoundWIRE Project (Sound Waves on the Internet for Real-time Echoes) research group is concerned with the use of Internet networks as an extension to computer music performance, composition and research.
    6.00
    5 votes
    53
    Stanford Brunet Lab

    Stanford Brunet Lab

    The Stanford Brunet laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms of aging and longevity. We are particularly interested in the aging of the nervous system. An emerging concept is that organismal aging, long thought to be a byproduct of wear and tear, is actually a highly controlled process, regulated by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The search for genes that play a central role in controlling lifespan in several species has converged on components of the signaling pathway that connects insulin/insulin like growth factors to FOXO transcription factors and on the family of Sirtuin deacetylases.
    8.00
    3 votes
    54
    Bianxiao Cui Lab :  Single molecule biophysics for neurobiology

    Bianxiao Cui Lab : Single molecule biophysics for neurobiology

    Single molecule measurements show great potential for characterizing complex dynamic behavior: such measurements allow one to look beyond the ensemble average and measure real-time trajectories of individual molecules to determine the exact distributions of molecular properties. In the light of new technique advances, single molecule fluorescence imaging studies have been carried out in live cells and provide a direct way to quantify biological events inside cells with a high spatial and temporal resolution.
    6.75
    4 votes
    55
    Development of: Tissue Regeneration from Differentiated Cells Project

    Development of: Tissue Regeneration from Differentiated Cells Project

    • Project focus: Tissue Regeneration from Differentiated Cells
    • Part of larger project: Blau Lab : Nuclear Reprogramming and Cell Fate Determination Research
    This project is developing techniques for tissue regeneration from differentiated cells, and to test the applicability of this approach in vivo, in different tissues, and in different injury settings.
    6.75
    4 votes
    56
    Folio Thinking: Personal Learning Portfolios

    Folio Thinking: Personal Learning Portfolios

    The Folio Thinking Project is a collaboration of six research groups at three universities—the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Uppsala University, and Stanford University. These research sites represent different cultures, educational contexts, and student populations; however, we are all implementing portfolio activities. We believe that the reflective practice of creating portfolios enables students to document and track their learning; develop an integrated, coherent picture of their learning experiences; and enhance their self-understanding. Through our collaboration, we will develop tools and techniques to teach and support Folio Thinking in any learning context.
    9.00
    2 votes
    57
    HMS Minotaur

    HMS Minotaur

    HMS Minotaur was the lead ship of the Minotaur class armoured frigates built for the Royal Navy during the 1860s. They were the longest single-screw warships ever built. Minotaur took nearly four years between her launching and commissioning because she was used for evaluations of her armament and different sailing rigs. The ship spent the bulk of her active career as flagship of the Channel Fleet, including during Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee Fleet Review in 1887. She became a training ship in 1893 and was then hulked in 1905 when she became part of the training school at Harwich. Minotaur was renamed several times before being sold for scrap in 1922 and broken up the following year. The Minotaur-class armoured frigates were essentially enlarged versions of the ironclad HMS Achilles with heavier armament, armour, and more powerful engines. They retained the broadside ironclad layout of their predecessor, but their sides were fully armoured to protect the 50 guns they were designed to carry. Their plough-shaped ram was also more prominent than that of Achilles. The Minotaur-class ships were 400 feet (121.9 m) long between perpendiculars and 411 feet (125.3 m) long overall. They
    9.00
    2 votes
    58
    Project HARP

    Project HARP

    Project HARP, short for High Altitude Research Project, was a joint project of the United States Department of Defense and Canada's Department of National Defence created with the goal of studying ballistics of re-entry vehicles at low cost; whereas most such projects used expensive (and failure-prone) rockets, HARP used a non-rocket spacelaunch method based on a very large gun to fire the models to high altitudes and speeds. Started in 1961, HARP was created largely due to lobbying from Gerald Bull, a controversial but highly successful ballistics engineer who went on to head the project. Bull had developed the high-speed gun technique while working on anti-ballistic missile (ABM) and intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) research at CARDE in the 1950s, shooting models of high-speed interceptor missiles from guns as opposed to building supersonic wind tunnels, which would be much more expensive. The ABM project eventually ended without delivering a working system, but Bull was convinced the rocket systems he had developed had potential and started looking for other ways to use the technology. HARP was such a development. The U.S. was in the process of testing newer ICBM
    9.00
    2 votes
    59
    Restoration of the Acropolis from 1894 to 1970

    Restoration of the Acropolis from 1894 to 1970

    • Project focus: Acropolis of Athens
    Following an earthquake in 1894, which damaged the Acropolis and to a lesser extent, the other monuments, attention was paid to restoring all the monuments on the Acropolis, as well as continuing archaeological excavations. The Committee set up to decide how these repairs were to be made consisted of the architects L Magne, J Durm, and Francis C Penrose. When work began in 1898, it was supervised by the engineer N Balanos, who continued to be involved in the project until 1940.
    9.00
    2 votes
    60
    Google Refine

    Google Refine

    • Includes smaller projects: SIMILE
    Originally conceived and developed as "Freebase Gridworks" by Metaweb Technologies, Inc. and later after Metaweb Technologies was acquired by Google in July 2010, the software went through various releases and a re-branding beginning with Version 2.0 in late 2010. Google Refine is a power tool for working with messy data and allows exploration of data through analysis, visualization, conversion, and mining. It also can be used to reconcile data with data registries like Freebase, augment data from other sources, and perform transforms into different formats for other tools to consume. It allows processing sensitive data with privacy, since it is not a web service but a desktop app that runs on a computer.
    5.80
    5 votes
    61
    Intel Science and Technology Centers

    Intel Science and Technology Centers

    • Includes smaller projects: Visual Computing
    Intel Labs will invest $100 million in U.S. university research over the years 2011 - 2016. Intel is opening Intel Science and Technology Centers (ISTC) across multiple universities, focusing on projects in areas "that align with the company's research agenda including visual computing, mobility, security and embedded solutions".
    5.80
    5 votes
    62
    Bejerano Lab : Human Genome Evolution and Evolutionary Developmental Biology

    Bejerano Lab : Human Genome Evolution and Evolutionary Developmental Biology

    Dobzhansky's famous quote, that "Nothing in biology makes sense, except in the light of evolution," is especially pragmatic in the genomic era. With over forty primate, mammalian and vertebrate genomes fully sequenced, and technological advances ushering in a flood of additional genomes, we are able to further interpret biological phenomena through the fascinating lens of time. We ask questions of genome evolution, such as what are all the conserved regions in the human genome (Siepel et al., 2005) and what are their functions (Bejerano et al., 2005), which conserved regions display remote homologies due to shared origins (Bejerano et al., 2004a), how mobile elements can be co-opted to become conserved regulatory elements (Bejerano et al., 2006; Lowe et al., 2007; Lowe et al., 2010), and how conserved element loss affects organism fitness (McLean & Bejerano, 2008). We are also fascinated with Evolutionary Developmental Biology, and together with David Kingsley's lab at Stanford we investigate regulatory aspects of vertebrate, mammalian and human specific evolution, looking to correlate sequence changes with trait evolution.
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Matin Lab : Biomolecular engineering

    Matin Lab : Biomolecular engineering

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Improved Enzymes for Bioremediation and Reductive Prodrug Cancer Chemotherapy
    Protein and cellular engineering are powerful approaches to enhance the efficiency of biological processes. Our current focus is on chromate bioremediation. Hexavalent chromate is a carcinogen which is a wide-spread environmental pollutant. Bacteria can remediate chromate, but several improvements are needed to make them efficient agents in this respect. We have cloned several genes that encode chromate reductase activity, and using pure enzyme preparations, have identified suitable candidates (the "safe enzymes" as opposed to many others that the cell contains) for improvement through enzyme evolution. The improvements we seek concern greater affinity for chromate, decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during chromate reduction (which is the main reason for chromate toxicity to the remediating bacteria), and a broader range, so that the same enzyme can detoxify also other contaminants. We have recently shown that several "safe" chromate reductases can also reduce uranyl [U(VI)] to its insoluble U(IV) valence state. We have improved both the chromate and uranyl reducing activity of one of the "safe" enzymes for both chromate and uranyl up to several hundred fold. Furthermore, collaborations are in place to: combine rational approaches with DNA shuffling to improve the enzymes; screen the shuffled libraries for improvement in remediating capability for various actinides; and for structural studies on the wild type and improved enzymes.
    7.67
    3 votes
    64
    Yi Cui Lab : Nanoscale Tools Projects

    Yi Cui Lab : Nanoscale Tools Projects

    This project conducts research in Nanoscale tools, including: In-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) electrical measurement; In-situ nanoindentation; Ultrahigh resolution scanning probe via atomic filament formation
    7.67
    3 votes
    65
    Field of the Cloth of Gold

    Field of the Cloth of Gold

    The Field of the Cloth of Gold or Camp du Drap d'Or (in French)http://fr.wikipedia.org//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_du_Drap_d%27Or is the name given to a place in Balinghem, between Guînes and Ardres, in France, near Calais. It was the site of a meeting that took place from 7 June to 24 June 1520, between King Henry VIII of England and King Francis I of France. The site is indicated by a commemorative plaque on the D231 road (Route de Marquise) at 50°51′08″N 1°55′22″E / 50.8523°N 1.9229°E / 50.8523; 1.9229. The meeting was arranged to increase the bond of friendship between the two kings following the Anglo-French treaty of 1514. The form "Field of Cloth of Gold" has been in general use in the English language since at least the 18th century. It would be the last meeting between an English or British monarch and a French one until Queen Victoria met with King Louis Philippe I, the last king to rule France, in 1843, excepting the meeting of James V of Scotland and Francis I of France merely sixteen years later. Under the guidance of England's Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, the chief nations of Europe sought to outlaw war forever among Christian nations. Mattingly (1938) studied the
    10.00
    1 votes
    66
    Matin Lab : Virulence in Space

    Matin Lab : Virulence in Space

    Space travel, and potential colonization are an important part of NASA's agenda. Yet, how bacteria might behave under conditions of diminished gravity has been little studied. We are studying bacteria grown in microgravity, using specially designed reactors. Bacteria acquire increased virulence and resistance during such growth. These characteristics resemble the general stress response of bacteria under normal gravity conditions. However, the molecular mechanisms of the two phenomena are radically different. Since human immune system becomes weakened in low gravity, the increased bacterial virulence and resistance are of concern for space travel and habitation. Our attempts to determine the molecular basis of this response should identify targets to address this problem. Our recent findings show that microgravity drastically alters regulatory processes that are influenced by folding patterns of macromolecules. Whether microgravity influences folding patterns is now being directly investigated.
    10.00
    1 votes
    67
    Meru Virtual World Architecture

    Meru Virtual World Architecture

    The Meru Project is designing and implementing an architecture for the virtual worlds of the future. Virtual worlds today exhibit properties that prevent success similar to applications such as the Web: they scale poorly, have centralized control, or cannot be easily extended. Our work focuses on solving the scalability challenges of virtual worlds by making geometric and physically based constraints an integral part of our architecture. Moreover, we address the issues of federation and extensibility by carefully separating the components of a virtual world, allowing each component to develop independently.
    10.00
    1 votes
    68
    Microphotonics Lab : Time-Resolved Tapping Force Near-field Microscopy

    Microphotonics Lab : Time-Resolved Tapping Force Near-field Microscopy

    The interaction forces between the tip and sample in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) operated in tapping mode contain information about the topography as well as the chemical and mechanical properties of the sample. Up to now, it has proven difficult to measure these forces with sufficient accuracy to obtain information other than the topography of the sample. We have designed, fabricated, and demonstrated AFM cantilevers with superior high-frequency response to overcome this measurement problem, and we have shown that high-resolution images based on chemical and mechanical contrast mechanisms can be generated. We are now developing this tool, which we call Time-Resolved Tapping Force Near-field Microscopy (TTFN) for the study of biomolecular interactions.
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Mutual Credit for Drupal

    Mutual Credit for Drupal

    Module to enable communities to record their exchanges and clear their mutual credit without using scarce national currencies. Features Multiple currencies 1stparty, 3rdparty & mass payments Pending transactions (parties must 'sign') email notification customisable transaction forms pluggable global/personal min/max balance limits Complete views integration visualisation & stats API for other modules to create exchanges
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    SMS König Wilhelm

    SMS König Wilhelm

    SMS König Wilhelm  (King William) was an armored frigate of the Prussian and later the German Imperial Navy. The ship was laid down in 1865 at the Thames Ironworks shipyard at in London, originally under the name Fatikh for the Ottoman Empire. She was purchased by Prussia in February 1867, launched in April 1868, and commissioned into the Prussian Navy in February 1869. The ship was the fifth ironclad ordered by the Prussian Navy, after Arminius, Prinz Adalbert, Friedrich Carl, and Kronprinz. She was built as an armored frigate, armed with a main battery of sixteen 24 cm (9.4 in) and five 21 cm (8.3 in) guns; several smaller guns and torpedo tubes were added later in her career. The ship was for a time the largest and most powerful warship in the German navy; she served as its flagship during the Franco-Prussian War in 1870–1871, though engine troubles prevented the ship from seeing action. In 1878, the ship accidentally rammed and sank the ironclad Grosser Kurfürst, with great loss of life. König Wilhelm was converted into an armored cruiser in 1895–1896; by early 1904, however, she had been superseded by newer vessels. In May of that year, she was placed out of active service and
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Stanford PEEC : Novel Materials and Packaging for Thermoelectric Waste-Heat Recovery in Buildings and Transportation Systems Project

    Stanford PEEC : Novel Materials and Packaging for Thermoelectric Waste-Heat Recovery in Buildings and Transportation Systems Project

    • Part of larger project: Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Transportation Research Projects
    Thermoelectric power conversion is promising for waste heat recovery in a broad variety of transportation and building systems. While this promise has increased over the past 15 years due to research on thermoelectric materials, several problems prevent commercial implementation. The proposed work addresses these problems including i) the lack of interface and packaging materials that yield acceptable system efficiency and system reliability, ii) the need for thermoelectric materials combining optimal thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties at high combustion temperatures, and iii) the absence of detailed impact assessments for consumer systems such as water heaters. Professor Goodson and his students are well-poised to make these developments given a long track record of thermal characterization and modeling research. PEEC funding will supplement and create a critical mass around a lower level of seed funding from Bosch Corporation on thermoelectric waste heat recovery for a commercial water heater system.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Stanford Sonia Project

    Stanford Sonia Project

    SoNIA is a Java-based package for visualizing dynamic or longitudinal "network" data. By dynamic, we mean that in addition to information about the relations (ties) between various entities (actors, nodes) there is also information about when these relations occur, or at least the relative order in which they occur.
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    The Complete Works of Charles Darwin Online

    The Complete Works of Charles Darwin Online

    The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online (or Darwin Online) is a freely-accessible website containing the complete print and manuscript works of Charles Darwin, as well as related supplementary material. Darwin Online is a research project and website based at the National University of Singapore. It aims to provide all available print and manuscript material except unpublished letters, which are being made available separately by the Darwin Correspondence Project. In addition Darwin Online includes the largest bibliographical list of Darwin's publications and the largest union catalogue of Darwin papers and manuscripts worldwide. The site also provides an extensive collection of related materials such as reviews of Darwin's books, descriptions of his Beagle specimens, obituaries and recollections and works cited or read by Darwin. There is also general history and commentary—some from published sources and some prepared for the project. The project began in 2002 and first produced a pilot website, The writings of Charles Darwin on the web, replaced in October 2006 by the new website. The launch was widely reported, and the project has been widely reviewed by professional
    10.00
    1 votes
    74
    The Redevelopment of Southbank Centre site 1999 - 2007

    The Redevelopment of Southbank Centre site 1999 - 2007

    • Project focus: Southbank Centre
    • Includes smaller projects: Renovation of the Royal Festival Hall, 2005 to 2007
    The entire Southbank Centre, London, was renovated between the years 1999 and 2007.  It was carried out to the masterplan drawn up by Rick Mather architects, and started with changes to the Belvedere Road Walkway in 1999, and finishing with the opening of the renovated Royal Festival Hall in June of 2007.
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Carnivore

    Carnivore

    Carnivore was a system implemented by the Federal Bureau of Investigation that was designed to monitor email and electronic communications. It used a customizable packet sniffer that can monitor all of a target user's Internet traffic. Carnivore was implemented in October 1997. By 2005 it had been replaced with improved commercial software such as NarusInsight. The Carnivore system was a Microsoft Windows-based workstation with packet-sniffing software and a removable disk drive. This computer must be physically installed at an Internet service provider (ISP) or other location where it can "sniff" traffic on a LAN segment to look for email messages in transit. The technology itself was not highly advanced — it used a standard packet sniffer and straightforward filtering. The critical components of the operation were the filtering criteria. To accurately match the appropriate subject, an elaborate content model was developed. The Carnivore system could be installed on a system either through the cooperation of the system owner, or by use of a court order. Once in place, the system was restricted by U.S. Federal law to only monitor specific persons. Under the current regulations,
    6.50
    4 votes
    76
    Stanford GCEP Electricity Distribution and Infrastructure Projects

    Stanford GCEP Electricity Distribution and Infrastructure Projects

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project
    GCEP has a number of research activities within several technical areas which are currently being investigated. All research efforts are geared towards developing technology that could lead to a future of significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
    6.50
    4 votes
    77
    8.50
    2 votes
    78
    Blau Lab : Technology Development for Elucidation of Regulatory Pathways Research

    Blau Lab : Technology Development for Elucidation of Regulatory Pathways Research

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Detection of Protein Modification
    Using technologies developed in the Technology Development for Elucidation of Regulatory Pathways Project laboratory (restriction enzyme generated siRNAs (REGS) for loss of function analyses and beta-galactosidase assays of protein complementation for monitoring intracellular protein translocation, membrane receptor protein interactions, and non-invasive in vivo imaging, we are determining the molecular bases (chromatin remodeling and signaling pathways) for changing the nuclear function of embryonic and adult stem cells.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Building the Virginian Railway

    Building the Virginian Railway

    Building the Virginian Railway began as a project to create an 80-mile (130 km)-long short line railroad to provide access for shipping of untapped bituminous coal reserves in southern West Virginia early in the 20th century. After facing a refusal of the big railroads (who had their own coal lands) to negotiate equitable rates to interchange and forward the coal for shipping, the owners and their investors expanded their scheme and built a U.S. Class I railroad which extended from some of the most rugged terrain of West Virginia over 400 miles (640 km) to reach port at Hampton Roads near Norfolk, Virginia. In the expansion westward of the United States in the 18th and 19th centuries, transportation was largely via rivers, canals, and other waterways. European moving westward often bypassed settling in the mountainous and wooded regions of western Virginia (much of which became the newly-formed State of West Virginia in 1863) to reach the valley of the Ohio River, and the fertile plains beyond. The Native Americans and early European settlers were aware of coal deposits throughout the area, and some had small personal mines. However, timber was the only natural resource which was
    8.50
    2 votes
    80
    Cochran Lab : Engineered Knottins as Molecular Imaging Agents

    Cochran Lab : Engineered Knottins as Molecular Imaging Agents

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Integrin Binding Peptides Based On Knottin Scaffolds
    Engineered Knottins as Molecular Imaging Agents The small size of knottins and their high stability have translated into desirable pharmacokinetic and biodistribution properties for molecular imaging applications, namely high tumor uptake and rapid clearance from non-target tissues (1). Knottins, engineered to bind to integrin receptors expressed on tumors and the tumor vasculature, have shown promise as diagnostic agents for imaging integrin expression in living subjects. Using combinatorial methods, EETI-II and AgRP knottin scaffolds were engineered to bind with low nanomolar to sub-nanomolar affinity and unique specificities to alpha5 beta1, alphav beta5 and/or alphav beta3 integrins (2,3). Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 64Cu- or 18F-radiolabeled versions of these knottins showed high tumor uptake and fast circulation clearance in murine tumor xenograft or spontaneous models (4-8). Interestingly, EETI-II based knottins exhibited extremely low liver and renal uptake (4-6) which appears to be unique among protein and peptide-based PET imaging agents. Moreover, an engineered EETI-II knottin detected small ( ~3 mm) lung tumors with enhanced contrast com-pared to the current clinical standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which is taken up non-specifically in highly metabolic tissues such as the heart (8) Engineered EETI-II knottins were conjugated to both optical and PET probes for dual-modality imaging (9), and were also used to target echogenic microbubbles to the tumor vasculature for contrast-enhanced ultrasound-based imaging (10). In addition, preliminary evaluation of an engineered EETI-II knottin labeled with 177Lu showed potential for radiotherapy applications (11).
    8.50
    2 votes
    81
    Stanford GCEP Biomass Energy Projects

    Stanford GCEP Biomass Energy Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford GCEP Biofuel Production Directly from Electricity Project
    • Part of larger project: Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project
    GCEP has a number of research activities within several technical areas which are currently being investigated. All research efforts are geared towards developing technology that could lead to a future of significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    Yi Cui Lab :  Energy Storage Projects

    Yi Cui Lab : Energy Storage Projects

    Energy storage devices such as lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors are important for portable electronics, vehicle electrification and smart grid. We develop novel nanostructured materials to address critical performance parameters related to energy storage including energy density, power density, safety, cycle and calendar life and cost. Nanostructures have the advantages of facile strain relaxation, enhance power rate but also present a challenge of forming stable electrode-electrolyte interface. Recently we invented silicon nanowire anodes for lithium ion batteries, which offer 10 times higher specific charge capacity of the existing carbon anodes (Nature Nanotechnology 3, 31-35, 2008). The following projects are currently being carried out: Lithium ion battery nanostructured alloy anodes: Si, Ge, Sn; Lithium ion battery nanostructured cathodes: metal oxides, sulfur, fluoride and air; Aqueous lithium ion batteries: electrode materials and electrolyte; Nanostructured supercapacitors and pseudocapacitors: carbon nanotubes and porous nanowires.
    8.50
    2 votes
    83
    American Airlines Flight 383 Memorial

    American Airlines Flight 383 Memorial

    • Project focus: Place Remembrance Memorial in Northern Kentucky for Flights 383/128
    • Includes smaller projects: Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport

    NOTICE TO OUR READERS: THIS GALLERY IS NO LONGER BEING SUPPORTED - PLEASE VISIT OUR HOME PAGE AT:  
    http://www.flightmemorial.vpweb.com/default.html .


    The hills of Hebron,Ky. were not kind to fliers in the 1960's. During this period,three aircraft on final approach failed to reach the safety of runway 18 at the Greater Cincinnati Airport, becoming victims of the area's treacherous terrain. Two crewmen survived the first crash on November 14, 1961 of a  cargo Zantop DC-4 enroute from Detroit to Atlanta, Ga. with an intermediate stop in Cincinnati. Then on November 8,1965, American Airlines flight 383 went down while arriving from New York's LaGuardia Airport, the result, 58 dead and 4 injured, one very critically. This was followed by Cincinnati's worst aviation disaster on November 20,1967 when TWA flight 128 crashed and burned on arrival from Los Angeles, California. This time, 70 lives were lost and 12 were injured in an apple orchard.

    On March 27, 2009, we gathered for the first time at the Marriott Cincinnati Airport to discuss the feasibility of placing  a memorial in Northern Kentucky to remember the crashes of American Airlines flight 383 and TWA flight 128, and the resultant loss of life , injuries, and the effect upon the lives of hundreds who were touched in countless ways by these tragedies. We all agreed that the baby boom generation is the last generation that will have a concern for these events and so the time is now to begin what appears to be a struggle to find an appropriate location and funding for the project. We prefer private vs government funding to accomplish this endeavor and welcome anyone with property along Kentucky State Route 20 or environs interested in placing a small memorial on site to contact us at: rollie13@woh.rr.com . In addition, anyone interested in assisting with financing or want to be involved in the planning, please contact us at the above email address.

    It is our wish that future generations will remember the people of these events, we hope you will join us in this endeavor...
    7.33
    3 votes
    84
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Greater Gabbard Windfarm

    Greater Gabbard Windfarm

    • Part of larger project: Construction of Greater Gabbard
    The Greater Gabbard Windfarm will be an offshore windfarm built off the coast of Suffolk by Scottish and Southern Energy. It will provide energy for 530,000 homes, or about 500,000 MW. 69 of 140 turbines in Greater Gabbard are already standing (June 2010).
    7.33
    3 votes
    86
    Matin Lab : Biofilm Studies

    Matin Lab : Biofilm Studies

    Bacterial biofilms are responsible for several chronic diseases that are difficult to treat. Examples are: cystic fibrosis, endocarditis, cystitis, and infections caused by indwelling medical devices. Biofilm bacteria show much greater resistance to antibiotics than their free-living counterparts and our interest is to investigate the mechanistic basis of this phenomenon. One potential reason for this increased resistance is the penetration barrier that biofilms may present to antimicrobials. We invented a real-time method to visualize biofilm cells coming in contact with tetracycline, and showed that all the cells in the biofilm were almost instantaneously exposed to the antibiotic, and yet they were more resistant than their planktonic (free-living) counterparts.
    7.33
    3 votes
    87
    Palanker Lab : Optoelectronic Retinal Prosthesis Project

    Palanker Lab : Optoelectronic Retinal Prosthesis Project

    • Project focus: Connecting Retinal and Other Neural Cells to Arrayed Electrodes
    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Connecting Retinal and Other Neural Cells to Arrayed Electrodes
    Blindness is one of the most devastating consequences of disease. We develop electronic retinal prosthesis for restoration of sight to patients suffering from degenerative retinal diseases such as Retinitis Pigmentosa and Age-Related Macular Degeneration. In these conditions the photoreceptor cells slowly degenerate, leading to blindness. However, many of the inner retinal neurons that transmit signals from the photoreceptors to the brain are preserved to a large extent for a prolonged period of time.
    7.33
    3 votes
    88
    Project Nike

    Project Nike

    Project Nike was a U.S. Army project, proposed in May 1945 by Bell Laboratories, to develop a line-of-sight anti-aircraft missile system. The project delivered the United States' first operational anti-aircraft missile system, the Nike Ajax, in 1953. A great number of the technologies and rocket systems used for developing the Nike Ajax were re-used for a number of functions, many of which were given the "Nike" name (after Nike, the goddess of victory from Greek mythology). The missile's first-stage solid rocket booster became the basis for many types of rocket including the Nike Hercules missile and NASA's Nike Smoke rocket, used for upper-atmosphere research. Project Nike began during 1944 when the War Department demanded a new air defense system to combat the new jet aircraft, as existing gun-based systems proved largely incapable of dealing with the speeds and altitudes at which jet aircraft operated. Two proposals were accepted. Bell Laboratories offered Project Nike. A much longer-ranged collision-course system was developed by General Electric, named Project Thumper, eventually delivering the BOMARC missile. Bell Lab's proposal would have to deal with bombers flying at
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Project Pluto

    Project Pluto

    Project Pluto was a United States government program to develop nuclear powered ramjet engines for use in cruise missiles. Two experimental engines were tested at the United States Department of Energy Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1961 and 1964. On January 1, 1957, the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission selected the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) predecessor, the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, to study the feasibility of applying heat from nuclear reactors to ramjet engines. This research became known as "Project Pluto". The work was directed by Dr. Ted Merkle, leader of the laboratory's R-Division. Originally carried out at Livermore, California, the work was moved to new facilities constructed for $1.2 million on 8 square miles (21 km) of Jackass Flats at the NTS, known as Site 401. The complex consisted of 6 miles (10 km) of roads, critical assembly building, control building, assembly and shop buildings, and utilities. Also required for the construction was 25 miles (40 km) of oil well casing which was necessary to store the approximately 1,000,000 pounds (450,000 kg) of pressurized air used to simulate ramjet flight conditions for Pluto. The
    7.33
    3 votes
    90
    Stanford Building-Scale Power Analysis (PowerNet)

    Stanford Building-Scale Power Analysis (PowerNet)

    Current power conservation research and development is hampered by a lack of comprehensive power usage data. We are designing and deploying a building-scale sensor network for power measurement and analysis. The network will consist of custom high fidelity wireless sensors, virtual power monitors based on power modeling techniques. This network will monitor the power consumption of a full spectrum of electronics, including end-user systems, back-end systems, and the networking infrastructure. Additionally, it will monitor the utilization of the measured systems to enable correlation between system use and power consumption. Our broader goal is to generate the comprehensive insights that can guide power research across system types and scales (individual system, data center, networking infrastructure, hardware and software).
    7.33
    3 votes
    91
    Stanford PEEC Energy Modeling Research Projects

    Stanford PEEC Energy Modeling Research Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford PEEC Projecting LED Competitiveness Project
    The Stanford PEEC Energy Modeling Research Projects include several research areas in energy demand modeling. These include conducting in-depth surveys of the energy demand literature, particularly on energy demand responses associated with characteristics of energy-using equipment vs. energy demand responses associated with changes in the use of energy services.
    7.33
    3 votes
    92
    Yamamoto Lab : Quantum Cryptography Project

    Yamamoto Lab : Quantum Cryptography Project

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Differential Phase Shift Keying Quantum Key Distribution
    Research toward a highly secure fiber optic encryption and decryption protocol using encryption keys distributed with quantum key distribution.
    6.25
    4 votes
    93
    2012 Summer Olympics

    2012 Summer Olympics

    • Includes smaller projects: Construction of Aquatics Centre
    The 2012 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXX Olympiad, and also more generally known as London 2012, was a major international multi-sport event, celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games, as governed by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), that took place in London, United Kingdom, from 27 July to 12 August 2012. The first event, the group stages in women's football, began two days earlier, on 25 July. More than 10,000 athletes from 204 National Olympic Committees (NOCs) participated. Following a bid headed by former Olympic champion Sebastian Coe and then-Mayor of London Ken Livingstone, London was selected as the host city on 6 July 2005 during the 117th IOC Session in Singapore, defeating bids from Moscow, New York City, Madrid and Paris. London was the first city to officially host the modern Olympic Games three times, having previously done so in 1908 and in 1948. Construction in preparation for the Games involved considerable redevelopment, particularly themed towards sustainability. The main focus was a new 200-hectare (490-acre) Olympic Park, constructed on a former industrial site at Stratford, East London. The Games also made use of venues which
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    Andaman Discoveries

    Andaman Discoveries

    Andaman Discoveries (AD) is a tourism social enterprise in Kuraburi, Phang Nga Province, Thailand. It is the continuation of North Andaman Tsunami Relief (NATR), a non-profit organization based in Thailand that provides assistance to tsunami-affected villages in the north Andaman Sea region. Andaman Discoveries has assumed the work of NATR, fostering long-term social, economic, and environmental sustainability and generating viable economic opportunities via training and marketing. The Boxing Day Tsunami devastated many coastal villages along the Andaman coast of Thailand on December 26, 2004. The North Andaman Tsunami Relief (NATR), the parent organization of Andaman Discoveries, was formed by Bodhi Garrett in early 2005 to help villagers to rebuild their villages and livelihood. A committed network of volunteers and donors emerged to support the reconstruction process. NATR implemented about 120 projects in 22 communities, with the emphasis on direct cooperation with the villagers, rather than imposing what outsiders think is good for them. Eighteen months later, Andaman Discoveries came into existence as a continuation of NATR's community development work. It started from the
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Design and construction of EMERGENCE

    Design and construction of EMERGENCE

    • Project focus: EMERGENCE
    • Part of larger project: Roger Berry Major Works
    Berry was inspired by his friend Mark Zern, a professor of internal medicine and highly-regarded stem cell expert at UC Davis. “Mark explained how stem cells have this remarkable ability to change and become new and different types of cells,” said Berry. “It’s called differentiation. In my sculpture, I wanted to reflect that amazing capacity to become something new and different with each day." Berry used dichroic glass, a special type of material often used in laser technology to both transmit and reflect light. Each round wafer of the sculpture can appear to be different colors, depending on the viewer's vantage point and how the sun is reflected upon it. “The mix of high-tech glass and everyday steel brings together the modern with the ancient,” he said. “Medicine and science are like that, too. Healing relies on both the technologies of today and the human touch that dates back even before Hippocrates or Archimedes.” The installation process took about one week, as Berry’s three-person team first had to attach nearly 700 pieces of colored glass to rings on the swirling-shaped steel framework. Weighing nearly 2,000 pounds, the piece was hoisted into place by a massive crane, where it now suspended outside the four-story building.
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Design of 5 Broadgate

    Design of 5 Broadgate

    • Project focus: 5 Broadgate
    5 Broadgate is a building being designed for the headquarters of UBS in the City of London, England. It is planned to be 12 stories tall and able to hold 6000 staff. British Land and Blackstone are developing the property and applied for planning permission in December 2010.
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Microphotonics Lab : External Cavity Tunable Lasers

    Microphotonics Lab : External Cavity Tunable Lasers

    Optical MEMS technology supports direct device fabrication, integration, and packaging. We are demonstrating this concept by creating integrated, external-cavity, tunable, semiconductor lasers that can be integrated on a single chip with most of the packaging performed on the wafer scale to reduce overall system cost. The tunable wavelength filters used in these lasers are microgratings in which each grating element can be actuated to perform the required amplitude and phase tuning of the filter. The tuning of the microgratings require only sub-wavelength motion, so wav3lenght switching times as short as 10 us can be achieved.
    7.00
    3 votes
    98
    Staccato Design and Development with Sondius-XG

    Staccato Design and Development with Sondius-XG

    • Project focus: SoundMax
    Staccato Systems designed a variety of products based on a suite of patents licensed from Stanford University called Sondius-XG. The products included music and sound effects audio synthesis based on physical modeling synthesis and were used in products ranging from game consoles to multimedia computers.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Stanford Corrosion Resistant (Photo)Anode Project

    Stanford Corrosion Resistant (Photo)Anode Project

    • Part of larger project: Stanford GCEP Advanced Materials and Catalysts Projects
    Electrochemical water splitting is a promising technique to produce hydrogen for storage of renewable energy. The water splitting efficiency, however, is limited by the water oxidation rate. One method to improve the water oxidation efficiency is to utilize solar energy with a semiconducting photo-anode that is stable under oxidative conditions.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Stanford Solid Oxide Fuel Cell research

    Stanford Solid Oxide Fuel Cell research

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: A novel catalyst with high activity and poisoning tolerance
    • Part of larger project: Stanford Nanoscale Prototyping Project
    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) remain a strong candidate for economically viable, high efficiency energy conversion devices. We focus on engineering the electrode and the electrolyte of SOFCs with our expertise in atomic layer deposition (ALD).
    7.00
    3 votes
    102
    Stanford PEEC Identifying and Mitigating Structural Barriers to Diffusion of Energy-Saving Technologies in the Building Industry Project

    Stanford PEEC Identifying and Mitigating Structural Barriers to Diffusion of Energy-Saving Technologies in the Building Industry Project

    • Part of larger project: Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Buildings Research Projects
    Energy-saving building technologies offer the best available opportunity to reduce GHG emissions with positive net present value and rapid payback. Civil engineer Raymond Levitt and Erica Plambeck, an expert in operations, information and technology in the Graduate School of Business, are investigating ways to help the construction industry easily adopt energy-efficient innovations.
    6.00
    4 votes
    103
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Degree Confluence Project

    Degree Confluence Project

    The Degree Confluence Project is a World Wide Web-based all-volunteer project which aims to have people visit each of the integer degree intersections of latitude and longitude on Earth, posting photographs and a narrative of each visit online. Intersections are defined on the horizontal datum WGS 84. The project describes itself as "an organized sampling of the world". Visitors to degree confluences almost always make use of GPS receivers, but visits can be achieved using only a map on the appropriate datum, or a map on another datum but with the appropriate correction applied. For a successful visit, the visitor must get within 100 metres of the confluence point, and post a narrative and several photographs to the project website. A visit, or attempted visit, which does not conform to these rules may still be recorded on the website as an incomplete visit. The project encourages visits to degree confluences which have been visited previously, and many confluence points in North America and Europe have been visited several times. The total number of degree confluences is 64,442, of which 21,543 are on land, 38,409 on water, and 4,490 on the Antarctic and Arctic ice caps. The
    8.00
    2 votes
    105
    Design and Construction of Stanford University's Junior Robot Car

    Design and Construction of Stanford University's Junior Robot Car

    • Project focus: Stanford University's Junior Robot Car
    Junior was an autonomous vehicle created by Stanford University's Stanford Racing Team in cooperation with the Volkswagen Electronics Research Laboratory (ERL). The computer-controlled car was Stanford University's official entry in the DARPA Urban Challenge, a race in which an autonomous car must navigate city streets, obey traffic laws, avoid obstructions, and, crucially, drive well among other cars in traffic. It drove nearly flawlessly during the DARPA Urban Challenge in 2007, and was awarded second place, and a $1 million prize. The motivation for the Urban Challenge was to build a better car. "As we all know, cars are unsafe," said Sebastian Thrun, the team leader and a professor of computer science at Stanford. Car accidents kill roughly 42,000 people a year in America and about a million people worldwide, he said. In addition, cars are inefficient, causing traffic jams and requiring people to consistently focus on the road during long commutes. The Stanford researchers' goal was to design a car that could drive itself, conceivably making roads safer and giving people back their time. "The idea of a self-driving car, in my opinion, will change society," said Thrun.
    8.00
    2 votes
    106
    Dialog sale to Knight-Ridder

    Dialog sale to Knight-Ridder

    Dialog was offered for acquisition using a process of a using a Goldman Sachs action Dialog was ultimately acquired by Knight-Ridder in 1988 for $353M. Tiger Sykes, Managing Director with Goldman Sachs, facilitated the sale.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Liverpool Overhead Railway

    Liverpool Overhead Railway

    The Liverpool Overhead Railway opened in 1893 with lightweight electric multiple units in the Liverpool Docks, England. An elevated railway, it was also known as the Docker's Railway. In the early 1900s electric trains ran on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway routes to Southport and Aintree; special trains to Aintree ran twice a year after these regular services were withdrawn. A local railway, it was not nationalised in 1948. However in 1955 a report into the structure of the viaduct showed major repairs were needed that the company could not afford. The railway closed at the end of 1956 and the structure dismantled the following year. Rails had appeared in the Liverpool Docks in 1852, linking the warehouses and docks, however for many years horses were used and locomotives banned because of the risk of fire. From 1859 adapted horse omnibuses ran for passengers on these rails; these had wheel flanges that could be retracted to allow the vehicle to leave the rails and overtake a goods train. By the 1880s there was an omnibus service every five minutes. An elevated railway was suggested in 1852, and in 1878 the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board obtained powers for a single line
    8.00
    2 votes
    108
    Stanford Cell and Molecular Engineering Research

    Stanford Cell and Molecular Engineering Research

    Molecular and Cellular Engineering uses engineering principles to understand and construct cellular and molecular circuits with useful properties. At the molecular level, proteins can be engineered to elicit specific ligand-receptor interactions, which can then be used for the rational design of targeted drug therapies. At the cellular level, metabolic engineering can create cellular biosensors that can monitor the environment for toxins or other specific molecules. Molecular and Cellular engineering can also be used to enhance the cellular production of pharmaceuticals, the delivery of beneficial genes to a particular cell type, and the production of tissues or tissue matrices for therapeutic purposes. This area of research also promises to help the scientific community unlock the mysteries of cellular metabolism, and how alterations in metabolism can lead to a myriad of human disease processes. Research at Stanford in this area includes: Cell-free reproduction of subcellular processes such as protein synthesis, protein folding and the generation and utilization of ATP; Development of industrially relevant methods of synthesizing biocatalysts, biopolymers, and other bioactive proteins; Application of genetic modification and combinatorial biosynthesis techniques to the production of novel polyketides, from which many pharmaceutical products are derived; Mechanobiology of cartilage and bone cells; Directed evolution and molecular design techniques to develop proteins with specific biological functions.
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Cochran Lab : Engineering Cystine Knot Peptides (Knottins) with Novel Molecular Recognition Properties

    Cochran Lab : Engineering Cystine Knot Peptides (Knottins) with Novel Molecular Recognition Properties

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Engineered knottin-protein platform for therapeutics, diagnostics, and research
    In one area of research, we recently achieved our goal to develop peptide-based alternatives to monoclonal antibodies for tumor-targeting applications. To this end, we engineered cystine knot (knottin) peptides for high affinity molecular recognition against tumor-associated receptors, and established them as a new class of molecular imaging agents in living animals. Knottin peptides consist of a disulfide-bonded core that confers outstanding proteolytic resistance and thermal stability. Using rational and combinatorial methods, we engineered one or more surface-exposed loops to bind to tumor targets. Due to their small size, knottins (~3-5 kDa) can be produced by recombinant methods or chemical synthesis, the latter of which allows for site-specific conjugation of imaging probes or radioisotopes for direct delivery to cancer cells.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Design and development of the Ellis Island Immigration Station

    Design and development of the Ellis Island Immigration Station

    • Project focus: Ellis Island Immigrant Station
    An architectural competition was held in September 1897, among the first under the Tarnsey Act, and a contract was awarded to the New York firm of Boring & Tilton in December 1897 for the design of the new Ellis Island Immigration Station. The government's design program called for a fireproof structure to accommodate the processing of 5,000 immigrants a day (up to 8,000 in an emergency). The main problem the architects had to address was circulation- -people needed to be processed with a minimum of confusion and delay as to avoid overnight stays...
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    EZService

    EZService

    • Project focus: Fedora Repository
    A utility to simplify the creation of Fedora Service Definition and Deployment objects.
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Founding the Stanford Sloan Master's Program

    Founding the Stanford Sloan Master's Program

    • Project focus: Stanford Sloan Master's Program
    The Stanford Sloan Master's Program was founded in 1957 under a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The Foundation provided the funds for six businessmen and six doctoral students to begin studies in the 1957-58 academic year under the leadership of Paul E. Holden, who served as the first Stanford Sloan director. In the mid-’60's the program was again enlarged to include foreign executives and participants from government and private organizations. A collaboration of Business School Acting Dean Carlton “Bud” Pederson and Stanford President J.E. Wallace Sterling proposed a plan to Alfred P. Sloan, the longtime chairman and CEO of General Motors turned philanthropist. Sloan accepted their proposal, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation provided crucial funds for the program’s first years.
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Kneller Hall

    Kneller Hall

    Kneller Hall is a stately home in Whitton, in west London, and takes its name from Sir Godfrey Kneller, court painter to British monarchs from Charles II to George I. Today it houses the Royal Military School of Music, training musicians for the British Army’s 23 military bands, having been acquired by the Army in the mid-19th century. The current building is the third house constructed on this site. The first was built by Edmund Cooke between 1635 and 1646 and in 1664 was the fourth largest house in Twickenham. After being purchased by Sir Godfrey Kneller in 1709, the first house was demolished and replaced by a new building (reputedly designed by Sir Christopher Wren). Originally known as Whitton Hall, it was renamed Kneller Hall by Kneller’s widow after his death. In 1757, Kneller Hall was sold to Sir Samuel Prime, a prominent London lawyer, who, with his son of the same name, extended the house significantly and landscaped the surrounding grounds. After Samuel Prime junior died in 1813, the hall was sold to Charles Calvert, Whig Member of Parliament for Southwark from 1812–1832. He further expanded the house (to designs by architect Philip Hardwick), adding drawing rooms at the
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Microphotonics Lab : Interfacial Engineering for MEMS

    Microphotonics Lab : Interfacial Engineering for MEMS

    The chemical, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of surfaces and interfaces must be understood to design and fabricated functional, reliable, and robust optical micro- and nano-devices. We are developing fabrication processes, including surface passivation and modification techniques, to create Photonic Crystals with tailored optical characteristics to fit our needs for optical device performance, and we are applying this technology to a range miniaturized, robust devices for optical communication specifically aimed at operation in challenging environments and aeronautic applications.
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Project ROSE

    Project ROSE

    Project ROSE (Retrofit Of Strike Element) was a programme initiated by the Pakistan Air Force (PAF) in 1992 to modernise a number of its Dassault Mirage III and Mirage 5 fighter aircraft with new avionics, some of which were supplied by European companies including SAGEM of France and FIAR (now SELEX Galileo) of Italy. Most of the aircraft were retrofitted at the Pakistan Aeronautical Complex (PAC) in Kamra, Pakistan, others being upgraded in France. Further upgrades were under consideration but Project ROSE was cancelled due to a combination of high costs and ageing Mirage III/5 airframes. 33 Mirage III fighters, designated ROSE I, were upgraded to perform multiple mission types including air superiority and strike missions. 34 Mirage 5 fighters were configured to specialise in the night-time surface attack role, the first 20 designated ROSE II and the last 14 aircraft ROSE III. All ROSE-modified aircraft are expected to remain in service with the Pakistan Air Force beyond 2010, being replaced by the JF-17 multirole fighter by 2015. Newer Mirage airframes in good condition and with low flight hours were sought from various sources to supplement the PAF's own fleet of 34 Mirage
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Stanford Bioelectricity research

    Stanford Bioelectricity research

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Nanoscale Prototyping Project
    The Stanford Bioelectricity research project focuses on exploring the possibility of drawing electricity directly from biological cells. For this purpose the team uses the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In the organism, solar energy splits water into oxygen, protons and electrons driven by the excitation of the two photosystems of the photosynthetic electron transport system, located in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts. The team employs nano-probe systems to locally capture the generated high energy electrons in order to harvest electrical energy.
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Stanford Biomedical Imaging

    Stanford Biomedical Imaging

    New developments in biomedical imaging provide a window into complex biological phenomena. Imaging enables researchers to track the movements of molecules, cells, fluids, gases, or sometimes even whole organisms. Imaging techniques such as x-ray crystallography and magnetic resonance imaging can also yield information about important biological structures from single proteins to the human brain. The frontiers of biomedical imaging promise to make diagnosis of disease more accurate and less invasive, and to improve our understanding of disease. At Stanford, Imaging research encompasses: Imaging of protein complexes involved in synaptic communication in the brain; Fluorescence tagging of molecules involved in intracellular signaling networks; Non-invasive imaging of cancer; Imaging of human movement using dynamic MR, motion capture systems, and ultrasonic imaging; Molecular and biochemical imaging with PET, SPECT, and optical imaging; Three-dimensional medical imaging of blood flow, blood vessels, and cardiovascular lesions; Functional human brain mapping; Strategies for fusing images across modalities (e.g., CT and MR); Ultrasonic diagnostic technology in medicine; Computational analysis and reconstruction of complex imaging data.
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Stanford GCEP Advanced Combustion Projects

    Stanford GCEP Advanced Combustion Projects

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project
    GCEP has a number of research activities within several technical areas which are currently being investigated. All research efforts are geared towards developing technology that could lead to a future of significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Buildings Research Projects

    Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Buildings Research Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford PEEC Identifying and Mitigating Structural Barriers to Diffusion of Energy-Saving Technologies in the Building Industry Project
    Residential and commercial buildings account for nearly half of all energy used in the United States, and commercial buildings account for the largest portion of peak demand in most regions. PEEC researchers are working to address these problems by developing and testing guidelines and methods for building owners and design teams to incorporate energy efficiency and end-user input into the design process.
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Stanford Project on Emerging Nonprofits

    Stanford Project on Emerging Nonprofits

    The Stanford Project on the Evolution of Nonprofits (SPEN) is a major research initiative of the Center for Social Innovation. The project developed a benchmark profile of the sector and documented how nonprofits are beset by capacity challenges and struggling to find new sources of funding.
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Wind farm

    Wind farm

    A wind farm is a group of wind turbines in the same location used to produce electric power. A large wind farm may consist of several hundred individual wind turbines, and cover an extended area of hundreds of square miles, but the land between the turbines may be used for agricultural or other purposes. A wind farm may also be located offshore. Many of the largest operational onshore wind farms are located in the USA and China. The Gansu Wind Farm in China has over 5,000 MW installed with a goal of 20,000 MW by 2020. China has several other "wind power bases" of similar size. The Alta Wind Energy Center in California is the largest onshore wind farm outside of China, with a capacity of 1020 MW of power. As of February 2012, the Walney Wind Farm in United Kingdom is the largest offshore wind farm in the world at 367 MW, followed by Thanet Offshore Wind Project (300 MW), also in the UK. There are many large wind farms under construction and these include Anholt Offshore Wind Farm (400 MW), BARD Offshore 1 (400 MW), Clyde Wind Farm (350 MW), Greater Gabbard wind farm (500 MW), Lincs Wind Farm (270 MW), London Array (1000 MW), Lower Snake River Wind Project (343 MW), Macarthur Wind
    9.00
    1 votes
    122
    Yi Cui Lab : Nano-environmental Technologies Projects

    Yi Cui Lab : Nano-environmental Technologies Projects

    This project conducts research in Nanowire filters and Nanowire biofuel cells. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technologies are very promising to alleviate both energy and environmental problems, due to their ability to harvest clean energy from waste by the activity of microorganisms. Nevertheless, low power output is a key factor hindering the scaling-up of MFCs to real applications. Improving the MFC electrodes is very important to enhance the MFC performance. Therefore, the team's research focuses on designing ideal MFC electrodes in both macroscale and microscale, and fabricating high-performance MFC electrodes using nano-materials...
    9.00
    1 votes
    123
    Earthquake Seismology at Stanford

    Earthquake Seismology at Stanford

    Research in this department includes: High precision earthquake location, New methods for earthquake location, Earthquake nucleation and foreshocks, Inferring earthquake mechanics from seismicity, Earthquake scaling properties, Pore-fluid effects in earthquake triggering, Improved estimates of radiated seismic energy, The energy balance during earthquake faulting, Random field models for heterogeneous earthquake rupture, Seismic hazard analysis using rupture dynamics, and Evidence for nonlinearity during strong ground motion.
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Hellfire Pass

    Hellfire Pass

    • Part of larger project: Construction of Death Railway
    Hellfire Pass (Thai: ช่องเขาขาด, known by the Japanese as Konyu Cutting) is the name of a railway cutting on the former "Death Railway" in Thailand which was built with forced labour during the Second World War, in part by Allied prisoners of war. The pass is noted for the harsh conditions and heavy loss of life suffered by its labourers during construction. Hellfire Pass is so called because the sight of emaciated prisoners labouring at night by torchlight was said to resemble a scene from Hell. Hellfire Pass in the Tenasserim Hills was a particularly difficult section of the line to build. It was the largest rock cutting on the railway, coupled with its general remoteness and the lack of proper construction tools during building. A tunnel would have been possible to build instead of a cutting, but this could only be constructed at the two ends at any one time, whereas the cutting could be constructed at all points simultaneously despite the excess effort required by the POWs. The Australian, British, Dutch and other allied Prisoners of War were required by the Japanese to work 18 hours a day to complete the cutting. Sixty nine men were beaten to death by Japanese guards in the
    6.67
    3 votes
    125
    ICARUS

    ICARUS

    • Project focus: Simulations
    The renown beyond 3G scenario depicts a diverse wireless networking world of "network-of-wireless-networks" accommodating a variety of radio technologies and mobile service requirements in a seamless manner. The achievement of this vision raises significant research challenges in view of system coexistence, system scale, interoperability, and evaluation tool design to provide a framework for cost-effective assessment of optimisation algorithms within a heterogeneous system environment. The ICARUS (Distributed Wireless Networking Experimental Infrastructure for Optimization and Convergence) platform aims to address the aforementioned research challenges by implementing an efficient, accurate and scalable virtual distributed testbed (VDT) to support cross-system and cross-layer optimization of heterogeneous systems in a unified manner. Through the use of the virtual testbed, cross-layer and cross-system interactions between next generation wireless systems and protocols can be investigated within an integrated telecommunications system, without neglecting important real-system details.
    6.67
    3 votes
    126
    Initial Design and Construction of the Royal Festival Hall

    Initial Design and Construction of the Royal Festival Hall

    • Project focus: Royal Festival Hall
    • Part of larger project: Preparation for the Festival of Britain
    The Royal Festival Hall, in London's South Bank, was initially designed to be part of the 1951 Festival of Britain.  The commisioning architect was Hugh Casson, the Director of Architecture for the Festival of Britain, who appointed the design of the Royal Festival Hall to architects Leslie Martin, Peter Moro and Robert Matthew, all employees of the London County Council's Architects' Department.  
    The hall's design is unashamedly Modernist, the Festival's commissioning architect (Hugh Casson) having taken the decision to appoint only young architects.  Leslie Martin was just 39 when he was appointed to lead the design team in late 1948.  Martin designed the structure as an 'egg in a box', a term he used to describe the separation of the curved auditorium space from the surrounding building and the noise and vibration of the adjacent railway viaduct.  Later Sir Thomas Beecham used similar imagery, calling the building a 'giant chicken coop'
    The foundation stone was laid by Clement Attlee, then Prime Minister, in 1949 on the site of the former Lion Brewery, built in 1837.
    6.67
    3 votes
    127
    Research in Slow Light

    Research in Slow Light

    • Project focus: Slow light
    The speed of light slows down slightly when it travels through various transparent media. But scientists reported in the journal Nature that they had slowed light down to a speed of only 38 miles per hour. The atomic physicist who achieved this dramatic result was Lene Vestergaard Hau of the Rowland Institute for Science at Harvard University.
    6.67
    3 votes
    128
    Stanford All-Electron Battery research

    Stanford All-Electron Battery research

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Nanoscale Prototyping Project
    The Stanford All-Electron Battery research project will seek to develop an "All-Electron Battery", a completely new class of electrical energy storage devices for electric vehicles that has the potential to provide ultra-high energy and power densities, while enabling extremely high cycle life. The All-Electron Battery stores energy by moving electrons, rather than ions, and uses electron/hole redox instead of capacitive polarization of a double-layer. This technology uses a novel architecture that has potential for very high energy density because it decouples the two functions of capacitors: charge separation and breakdown strength. If successful, this project will develop a completely new paradigm in energy storage for electrified vehicles that could revolutionize the electric vehicle industry and establish U.S. leadership in advanced energy storage technology for electric vehicles.
    6.67
    3 votes
    129
    6.67
    3 votes
    130
    6.67
    3 votes
    131
    Stanford Radar Remote Sensing Project

    Stanford Radar Remote Sensing Project

    The Stanford Radar Remote Sensing Project investigates the Earth and solar system using radar remote sensing techniques. The project's interests include InSAR imaging, Earth exploration from space, satellite remote sensing, planetary science, digital signal processing for geoscience applications, and EM scattering and propagation. The project is multidisciplinary and housed jointly in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Geophysics.
    6.67
    3 votes
    132
    Yi Cui Lab : Photovoltaics Projects

    Yi Cui Lab : Photovoltaics Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Nanocone Substrate Structure for Photovoltaics
    A photovoltaic device consists typically of multiple materials layer including antireflection, transparent electrodes, pn junction absorber, bottom contact and substrate. $/W is the most critical solar cell parameter, which requires both high power efficiency and low cost. Effective sun light management and charge carrier collection are necessary for high power efficiency. Low-cost materials, processing and possibility for large manufacturing are also desirable. We design nanostructured materials, photovoltaic cells and processing to address these challenges. The following projects are carried out: Nanocone solar cells for light management; CIGS nanostructured solar cells; Metal nanowire mesh as transparent electrodes; Solution-processed chalcogenide solar cells.
    6.67
    3 votes
    133
    Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Behavior Research Projects

    Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Behavior Research Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford PEEC Summer Energy Feedback Infrastructure Project
    This interdisciplinary, solutions-oriented set of projects centralizes key behavioral science resources relevant to accelerating the adoption and sustained use of energy-efficient technologies and climate-positive actions by individuals, groups, and organizations.
    5.75
    4 votes
    134
    5.75
    4 votes
    135
    Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey

    Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey

    • Part of larger project: Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education
    APPLES is the , a 10-minute online survey for undergraduate engineering students. APPLES was developed and administered as part of one of CAEE's research branches, the Academic Pathways Study (APS). The APPLE Survey is based on the Persistence in Engineering (PIE) Survey that was part of APS longitudinal research involving 160 students at four universities from 2003 to 2007. The first administration of APPLES ("APPLES1") took place at the four APS institutions in 2007. A streamlined version of the survey ("APPLES2") was administered to over 4,200 undergraduates at 21 U.S. universities in Spring 2008.
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Microphotonics Lab : Spatial Light Modulator for Maskless Lithography

    Microphotonics Lab : Spatial Light Modulator for Maskless Lithography

    The cost and technical challenges of mask making are becoming increasingly difficult issues as the lithographic feature size is reduced. This provides strong motivation for developing maskless techniques for future lithography systems. We are developing spatial light modulators, based on phase shifting MEMS mirrors, for Deep-Ultra-Violet wavelengths. The modulator is designed specifically for easy integration of electronics and MEMS, and the simplicity of the structure simplifies scaling to the small pixel sizes required for maskless lithography.
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    New Islington

    New Islington

    • Includes smaller projects: Construction of Chips
    New Islington is an inner city regeneration area of Manchester, in North West England. Historically a part of Ancoats, it has now taken a separate identity to reflect its changed status as a regeneration area. New Islington is the original name for the area; however, from the area's last attempted regeneration in the 1970s to its current redevelopment it was known as the Cardroom Estate. It was one of several millennium village projects around the UK seeking to regenerate inner-city areas. The name New Islington appeared on the 1840 Ordnance Survey map and there also a street with that name; this was also the local residents' choice of name for the area. The funding for the area was secured in 2002 and property developers Urban Splash have been at the forefront of developments including the Chips building. The New Islington area is bounded by Great Ancoats Street (west), New Union Street and New Islington (north-east), Weybridge Road (east) and Pollard Street (south). The area is also due to receive a metrolink stop as part of the general expansion of the tram system. It will be the first stop on the Piccadilly–Droylsden (subsequently after Phase 3B Ashton) line and will be
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Shivering Sands Army Fort

    Shivering Sands Army Fort

    • Project focus: Maunsell Forts
    Shivering Sands Army Fort [U7] was a Maunsell army fort built near the Thames estuary for anti-aircraft defence. It is made up of several once interconnected towers north of Herne Bay and is 9.2 miles from the nearest land. They can be viewed from Shoeburyness East Beach on clear, cloudless summer days. The towers were built on land and floated out in 1943. Later in the war the equipment was replaced and removed soon after. The forts were abandoned in 1958. In the 1960s some weather equipment was installed in the searchlight tower. On the 7th of June 1963 a boat called the Ribersborg collided with one of the towers, which fell into the sea without harming anyone or sinking the boat. In 1964 Screaming Lord Sutch set up Radio Sutch (a Pirate radio station) on one of the old towers. However, he soon became bored and handed the project to his manager Reginald Calvert, who then expanded into all five towers that were still connected and called it Radio City. After Reg Calvert was killed by Oliver Smedley, his wife took over for a short time before the project was stopped and the towers again abandoned. In 1990 the top of the searchlight tower was cut away so that helicopters could be
    7.50
    2 votes
    139
    5.50
    4 votes
    140
    Historypin

    Historypin

    Historypin is an online, user-generated archive of historical photos and personal recollections. Users are able to use the location and date of an image to "pin" it to Google Maps. Where Google Street View is available, users can overlay the historical photograph and compare it with the contemporary location. (Street Viewed Photo) The website was created by the non-profit company We Are What We Do as part of their inter-generational work, with funding and support from Google as part of a series of commitments to digital inclusion. The website has over 30,000 images and recollections "pinned" to the Historypin map, mainly in the UK but also covering North America and continental Europe, with a small number in other areas. The beta version of the website was launched in June 2010 at the Royal Institute in London by Nick Stanhope, CEO of We Are What We Do. The website features a range of themed collections, some of which commemorate historical events. Previous collections include: As well as user-generated content, material has been added to the site from museums, local history societies, historical photo archives, newspaper archives and businesses. Contributors include Biggleswade
    6.33
    3 votes
    141
    Project Tiger

    Project Tiger

    Project Tiger was launched in 1973 in India. The project aims at ensuring a viable population of Bengal tiger in their natural habitats and preserving areas of biological importance as a natural heritage for the people. The selection of areas for the reserves represented as close as possible the diversity of ecosystems across the tiger's distribution in the country. The project's task force visualized these tiger reserves as breeding nuclei, from which surplus animals would emigrate to adjacent forests. Funds and commitment were mustered to support the intensive program of habitat protection and rehabilitation under the project. The government has set-up a Tiger Protection Force to combat poachers, and funded the relocation of up to 200,000 villagers to minimize human-tiger conflicts. During the tiger census of 2008, a new methodology was used extrapolating site-specific densities of tigers, their co-predators and prey derived from camera trap and sign surveys using GIS. Based on the result of these surveys, the total tiger population has been estimated at 1,411 individuals ranging from 1,165 to 1,657 adult and sub-adult tigers of more than 1.5 years of age. The potential tiger
    6.33
    3 votes
    142
    Stanford PEEC Energy Policy Research Projects

    Stanford PEEC Energy Policy Research Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford PEEC Analysis of US Policies to Improve Automobile Fuel-Economy and Reduce Gasoline Consumption and Analysis of US Policies to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Project
    Energy policy modeling has expanded over the last thirty years, with increases in the number, variety, and sophistication of the existing energy policy models. And that field continues to grow in importance. At Stanford, the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) provides a locus for examining many of these models and using them to analyze energy policy and planning issues.
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Design and construction of ECLIPSE

    Design and construction of ECLIPSE

    • Project focus: ECLIPSE
    • Part of larger project: Roger Berry Major Works
    The design and construction of ECLIPSE, a sculpture by Roger Berry, is an important work in his career. Tis the first of his sculptures made in his Clarksburg studio, and represents a major departure from the previous forms of his earlier solar work. The 11' 6" diameter sculpture is implemented in Corten steel and is 11'6" diameter. It was carefully designed so that at two times during the year, the shadows of the upper bands eclipse the lower bands. The work is located at the Crocker Art Museum, Third and O Streets, Sacramento, CA.
    8.00
    1 votes
    145
    Förbifart Stockholm

    Förbifart Stockholm

    Förbifart Stockholm (Stockholm Bypass) is a controversial planned express highway between the E 4/E 20 at Kungens Kurva in the south of Stockholm and the E 4 at Häggvik north of Stockholm. Most of this bypass, more than 17 out of 21 kilometers, is planned to pass through underground tunnels. The Swedish government decided on September 3, 2009 to permit the construction of Förbifart Stockholm according to the proposal by the Swedish Road Administration (Swedish: Vägverket). The bypass will become the world's longest tunnel in the proximity of a city. 140,000 vehicles per day are expected to use the bypass, up to 65 meters below the land surface and the lake Mälaren. The projected cost for the project is estimated to 27.6 billion (short scale) SEK (2009 value). Construction will begin at the earliest in 2012 and is expected to take eight years to complete. The highway in the planning stage since 1966, when a regional planning sketch titled Greater Stockholm Physical Structure 2000 (Swedish: Storstockholm fysisk struktur år 2000) proposed three concentric circular arcs surround Stockholm to the west. The innermost arc was Brommagrenen, whose on-ramps were put in place already when
    8.00
    1 votes
    146
    Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project

    Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford GCEP Advanced Transportation Projects
    The Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) at Stanford University "seeks new solutions to one of the grand challenges of this century: supplying energy to meet the changing needs of a growing world population in a way that protects the environment." Beginning in December 2002, GCEP is a 10-year, $225m research project aimed at developing new energy technologies. It has the support of four major companies - ExxonMobil, General Electric, Schlumberger, and Toyota. Under the heading "Grand Challenge" it identifies a global warming-related need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through future energy development.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147
    Stanford Red Barn Renovation

    Stanford Red Barn Renovation

    • Project focus: Palo Alto Stock Farm Horse Barn
    The Red Barn predates the University and was built to board Leland Stanford Sr.’s many trotting horses. A $4 million renovation — the third restoration since the barn’s construction in 1880 — transformed it into a premier equestrian facility complex accessible to the entire Stanford community, including a new show arena, clubhouse, paddocks, and better training facilities
    8.00
    1 votes
    148
    TWA Flight 128 Memorial

    TWA Flight 128 Memorial

    • Project focus: Place Remembrance Memorial in Northern Kentucky for Flights 383/128
    • Includes smaller projects: Memorial Website


    NOTICE TO OUR READERS: THIS GALLERY IS NO LONGER BEING SUPPORTED. PLEASE VISIT OUR HOMEPAGE AT:
    http://www.flightmemorial.vpweb.com/default.html

    The hills of Hebron,Ky. were not kind to fliers in the 1960's. During this period,three aircraft on final approach failed to reach the safety of runway 18 at the Greater Cincinnati Airport, becoming victims of the area's treacherous terrain. Two crewmen survived the first crash on November 14, 1961 of a  cargo Zantop DC-4 enroute from Detroit to Atlanta, Ga. with an intermediate stop in Cincinnati. Then on November 8,1965, American Airlines flight 383 went down while arriving from New York's LaGuardia Airport, the result, 58 dead and 4 injured, one very critically. This was followed by Cincinnati's worst aviation disaster on November 20,1967 when TWA flight 128 crashed and burned on arrival from Los Angeles, California. This time, 70 lives were lost and 12 were injured in an apple orchard.

    On March 27, 2009, we gathered for the first time at the Marriott Cincinnati Airport to discuss the feasibility of placing  a memorial to remember the crashes of American Airlines flight 383 and TWA flight 128, and the resultant loss of life , injuries, and the effect upon the lives of hundreds who were touched in countless ways by these tragedies. We all agreed that the baby boom generation is the last generation that will have a concern for these events and so the time is now to begin what appears to be a struggle to find an appropriate location and funding for the project. We prefer private vs government funding to accomplish this endeavor and welcome anyone with property along Kentucky State Route 20 or environs interested in placing a small memorial on site to contact us at: rollie13@woh.rr.com . In addition, anyone interested in assisting with financing or want to be involved in the planning, please contact us at the above email address.

    It is our wish that future generations will remember the people of these events, we hope you will join us in this endeavor...
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    Bejerano Lab : Ultraconserved Elements

    Bejerano Lab : Ultraconserved Elements

    Our early exploration of the human genome's non-coding landscape led to the surprising discovery of ultraconserved elements in the human genome (Bejerano et al., 2004b). Ultraconservation is the genomic phenomenon whereby certain genomic regions, most of them non-coding, are perfectly conserved across many mammals (and often beyond) for no clear reason. Adding to the mystery, knock-out mice have been produced for four different ultraconserved elements, with no clear phenotypic effect. However, we have shown that these sequences evolve under extreme negative selection in human (Katzman et al., 2007) and are practically never lost in naturally evolving mammals (McLean & Bejerano, 2008), strongly suggesting a fitness toll that has yet to be discovered. Many of the ultraconserved elements have been shown to work as developmental enhancers, and as such form the tip of the iceberg for our focus in understanding genomic cis-regulation.
    5.25
    4 votes
    150
    Japan on Foot

    Japan on Foot

    "Japan on Foot" is the name of a walking project that was undertaken by Etsuko Shimabukuro of Okinawa and Mary King, a British citizen. The two women spent 16 months walking a zigzag route through Japan. The 7,494-kilometre walk started from Cape Soya, Japan's northernmost point on the island of Hokkaidō and ended on Yonaguni Island, Japan's westernmost point. The women's walk took in Honshū, Shikoku, Kyūshū, Okinawa (including Japan's southernmost inhabited island). It was a "roving reporter" walk. Shimabukuro and King wrote various newspaper, magazine, and website articles from the road. A book of the walk is due to be published.
    5.25
    4 votes
    151
    Bell tower

    Bell tower

    A bell tower (also belfry) is a tower which contains one or more bells, or which is designed to hold bells, even if it has none. In the European tradition, such a tower most commonly serves as part of a church and contains church bells. Modern bell towers often contain carillons. The term Campanile (/ˌkæmpəˈniːliː/; Italian pronunciation: [kampaˈniːle]) is synonymous with 'bell tower'; in American English it tends to be used to refer to free standing bell towers; the term is Italian, deriving from the word 'campana' meaning bell. When attached to a city hall or other civic building, especially in continental Europe, it is often named "belfry". Elsewhere, the term "belfry" refers strictly to the part of the tower which contains the bells. Thus some bell towers have no belfry. Old bell towers may be kept for their historic or iconic value, though in countries with a strong campanological tradition they often continue to serve their original purposes as well. Bell towers are common in China and countries of the related cultures, where they may appear both as part of a temple complex and as an independent civic building. The tallest free-standing bell tower in the world is the Joseph
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    COINTELPRO

    COINTELPRO

    COINTELPRO (an acronym for Counterintelligence Program) was a series of covert, and often illegal, projects conducted by the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) aimed at surveying, infiltrating, discrediting, and disrupting domestic political organizations. The FBI has used covert operations against domestic political groups since its inception; however, covert operations under the official COINTELPRO label took place between 1956 and 1971. COINTELPRO tactics have been alleged to include discrediting targets through psychological warfare; smearing individuals and groups using forged documents and by planting false reports in the media; harassment; wrongful imprisonment; and illegal violence, including assassination. The FBI's stated motivation was "protecting national security, preventing violence, and maintaining the existing social and political order." FBI records show that 85% of COINTELPRO resources targeted groups and individuals that the FBI deemed "subversive," including communist and socialist organizations; organizations and individuals associated with the civil rights movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr. and others associated with the Southern
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Deisseroth Lab :  Optogenetics Interventions for Treatment Projects

    Deisseroth Lab : Optogenetics Interventions for Treatment Projects

    • Project focus: A Device to Control Peripheral Nervous Tissue Containing Light-Gated Channels
    The team is developing optogenetics technology and devices that precisely turns select brain cells on or off with flashes of light in order to improve the condition of neural circuits associated with depression, Parkinson’s disease and other conditions.
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Design and construction of BOUND TETRAHEDRON

    Design and construction of BOUND TETRAHEDRON

    • Project focus: BOUND TETRAHEDRON
    • Part of larger project: Roger Berry Major Works
    Bound Tetrahedron is a sculpture by Roger Berry done in silicon bronze with patina. The work is 8' high and designed using AutoCAD and ultimately constructed out of 48 pieces of silicon bronze conic sections welded together. “At first, I could not see how a specific representation of work done at Oberlin could reflect the breadth of the sciences that make up the Science Center. So I began to look for ideas that might more generally connect to the sciences,” says Berry. “The tetrahedron is a basic structure in science—a basic building block—and I wanted to use it to relate to the field of science in a very literal way.” The Advisory Committee helped Berry both choose the location for the sculpture as well as finalize its form, a three-dimensional geometric figure common to the sciences. Though Bound Tetrahedron was built at the artist’s studio in California, it was structurally designed to withstand bleak Ohio winters. The sculpture’s surface will evolve, however, and that is just what Berry wants. “Bronze is a very live material,” he says, “and its patina changes over time. I want this piece to wear its environment. As a public sculpture, that’s very important.”
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Development of Google Street View

    Development of Google Street View

    • Project focus: Google Street View
    • Part of larger project: Development of Google Maps
    Early on, most locations had a more limited number of views, usually contained to the city limits, and only including major streets, and they only showed the buildings up to a certain height. But most of the initial views have been greatly expanded, and have been updated to show scenery all the way to the sky. Collections of photos taken of cities added later are generally more extensive from the beginning, and often include a more detailed area with every side street within the main city, more suburbs, and often more cities that within a close drive of the main city. These areas continue to be expanded with each set of introductions. Originally, while views could be seen in parts of all five of New York City's boroughs, there were minimal views provided of any New York suburbs. But on June 10, 2008, service was expanded in this area. Now, almost all streets in all five boroughs are included, as well many cities and suburbs in Long Island, Westchester County and North Jersey (such as Newark and Edison). While some of these extended locations include every street, others still feature just the main roads (see complete map). Much of eastern Upstate New York is featured near the
    7.00
    2 votes
    156
    Indian March of Paul

    Indian March of Paul

    • Project focus: The Great Game
    The Indian March of Paul was a secret project of a planned allied Russo-French expedition against the British dominions in India. It was scuttled following the assassination of Emperor Paul I of Russia in March 1801. Russia and Britain were allied during the Revolutionary Wars of the 1790s. The failure of their joint invasion of the Netherlands in 1799 precipitated a change in attitudes. Britain's occupation of Malta in October 1800 incensed Emperor Paul in his capacity of Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller. He hastily broke with Britain and allied himself with Napoleon who came up with an extravagant plan of a Russo-French expedition to attack the British possessions in India. The secret plan of the expedition, as preserved in the Russian archives, envisaged the joint operations of two infantry corps, one French (with artillery support) and one Russian. Each infantry corps had 35,000 men, the total force thus containing 70,000 men, plus artillery and a large contingent of Cossack cavalry. Napoleon insisted that the command of the French corps be entrusted to General André Masséna. The route of advance schedule for the French corps started in May 1801 via the Danube and the
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Operation Snow White

    Operation Snow White

    Operation Snow White was the Church of Scientology's name for a conspiracy during the 1970s to purge unfavorable records about Scientology and its founder L. Ron Hubbard. This project included a series of infiltrations and thefts from 136 government agencies, foreign embassies and consulates, as well as private organizations critical of Scientology, carried out by Church members, in more than 30 countries; the single largest infiltration of the United States government in history with up to 5,000 covert agents. This was also the operation that exposed 'Operation Freakout', because this was the case that initiated the US government investigation of the Church. Under this program, Scientology operatives committed infiltration, wiretapping, and theft of documents in government offices, most notably those of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. Eleven highly-placed Church executives, including Mary Sue Hubbard (wife of founder L. Ron Hubbard and second-in-command of the organization), pleaded guilty or were convicted in federal court of obstructing justice, burglary of government offices, and theft of documents and government property. The case was United States v. Mary Sue Hubbard et
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Visible Human Project

    Visible Human Project

    The Visible Human Project is an effort to create a detailed data set of cross-sectional photographs of the human body, in order to facilitate anatomy visualization applications. A male and a female cadaver were cut into thin slices which were then photographed and digitized. The project is run by the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) under the direction of Michael J. Ackerman. Planning began in 1989; the data set of the male was completed in November 1994 and the one of the female in November 1995. The project can be viewed today at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Washington, DC. There are currently efforts to repeat this project with higher resolution images but only with parts of the body instead of a cadaver. The male cadaver was encased and frozen in a gelatin and water mixture in order to stabilize the specimen for cutting. The specimen was then “cut” in the axial plane at 1 millimeter intervals. Each of the resulting 1,871 “slices” were photographed in both analog and digital, yielding 15 gigabytes of data. In 2000, the photos were rescanned at a higher resolution, yielding more than 65 gigabytes. The female cadaver was cut into slices at .33 millimeter
    7.00
    2 votes
    161
    7.00
    2 votes
    162
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Establishing the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford

    Establishing the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford

    • Project focus: Hasso Plattner Institute of Design
    In 2005 Hasso Plattner made an extraordinarily generous personal donation of 35 million dollars to fund the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford. He launched the d.school off the ground in earnest. In addition to his financial contribution, Hasso brings his expertise to the d.school as a Professor. He is on the teaching team for Software Design Experiences in the Spring Quarter of 2007, working with students and municipalities to design new and better civic experiences with enterprise software.
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Moscow Metro

    Moscow Metro

    • Project focus: Novoslobodskaya
    The Moscow Metro (Russian: Моско́вский метрополите́н, tr. Moskovsky metropoliten; IPA: [mɐˈskofskʲɪj mʲɪtrəpəlʲɪˈtɛn]) is a rapid transit system serving Moscow and the neighbouring Moscow Oblast towns of Krasnogorsk and Reutov. Opened in 1935 with one 11-kilometre (6.8 mi) line and 13 stations, it was the first underground railway system in the Soviet Union. As of 2012, the Moscow Metro has 186 stations and its route length is 308.7 kilometres (191.8 mi). The system is mostly underground, with the deepest section 84 metres (276 ft) at the Park Pobedy station. The Moscow Metro is the world's third most heavily used rapid transit system after Tokyo subway and Seoul Metropolitan Subway. The Moscow Metro is a state-owned enterprise. Its total length is 308.7 km (191.8 mi) and consists of 12 lines and 186 stations. The average daily passenger traffic is 6.6 million. Ridership is highest on weekdays (when the Metro carries over 7 million passengers per day) and lower on weekends. Each line is identified according to an alphanumeric index (usually consisting of a number), a name and a colour. Voice announcements refer to the lines by name. A male voice announces the next station when
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    PRT Meymaneh

    PRT Meymaneh

    • Part of larger project: Provincial reconstruction team
    The Provincial Reconstruction Team in Meymaneh is an International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) command. It is classified by NATO, as a "Provincial Reconstruction Team". It consists of soldiers and civilians from Norway, Latvia, Macedonia, Iceland and the USA. It conducts joint operations with Afghan Security Forces in Faryab province. It is led by ISAF and began its work in 2004, when they took over from the British. The camp was moved out of the city due to several attacks and a lack of space, in 2006. It is co-located with the airstrip, north of Meymaneh. Several "FOBs" are located in Ghormach and Qeysar districts, which the PRT share with Afghan soldiers. The PRT Meymaneh focuses on security operations with Afghan security forces who they 'partner'. Their joint mission is to establish a secure and safe environment for Afghan society. Since the Taliban were defeated by the Northern Alliance in 2001 and withdrew from the region, ISAF took control. Towards 2010, the Afghan Army and security forces have increased numerically and the provincial government given more influence. In Faryab Coalition forces are out to show their presence, talk to the locals to gather information and
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Queen Alexandra Dock

    Queen Alexandra Dock

    • Part of larger project: Construction of Cardiff Docks
    Queen Alexandra Dock is a dock in Cardiff Bay on the coast of Cardiff in south Wales. It was one of the principal ports during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century during the age of coal exportation and along with Barry grew to be the largest coal exporter in the world by 1913. However following World War I when the coal trade declined rapidly the dock became deserted and left to mudflats. However by the 1980s the great potential of Cardiff Bay and the dock became realised and the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation began extensive development of the dock and the rest of the bay. A number of shopping complexes were built at the site but during the 1990s in became the location of one of the points of the Cardiff Bay Barrage which was built across to Penarth Head. The site was the centre of a great deal of environmental controversy during this period with powerful oppositions from environmental NGOs such as Friends of the Earth and RSPB who argued that the mudflats in the dock were vital to the spawning of birds in what was previously a RAMSAR and SSSI site protected by European law of the EU. However in the end the protection site was relocated down the coast and the dock
    6.00
    3 votes
    167
    Stanford MMIL : Tumor Imaging Project

    Stanford MMIL : Tumor Imaging Project

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: A tumor visualization/detection method using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetotactic bacteria as a MRI contrast agent that can enhance positive and negative contrast.
    Stanford researchers have developed the use of magnetotactic bacterial agents that can target tumors and improve visualization for enhanced-positive contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
    6.00
    3 votes
    168
    Stanford Tuning Thermodynamics/Kinetics by Nanoscaling

    Stanford Tuning Thermodynamics/Kinetics by Nanoscaling

    Conversion efficiency is highest near thermodynamic equilibrium. Virtually any deviation from equilibrium results in irreversible energy losses. Energy conversion at high rates requires large overvoltages, which in turn reduce efficiency. We aim to improve energy efficiency by manipulating the surface-to-volume ratio of characteristic device features, thereby influencing the free energy of surface-bound chemical reactions.
    6.00
    3 votes
    169
    Philosophy Talk

    Philosophy Talk

    Philosophy Talk is a talk radio program co-hosted by John Perry and Ken Taylor, who are professors at Stanford University. The show is also available as a podcast, available for purchase. The program deals both with fundamental problems of philosophy and with the works of famous philosophers, especially as these relate to our contemporary, day-to-day lives. Some of the wide range of topics of past programs include terrorism, Bush's doctrine of pre-emptive self-defense, Descartes, genetic engineering, and virtue. The program airs from the studios of KALW, 91.7 FM, Information Radio, San Francisco, California, and is produced by Ben Manilla Productions. The show focuses on one topic or famous philosopher for an hour at a time, with an invited guest who is an expert on the philosopher or area of philosophy in question. As with most philosophical discussions, each show usually provides some factual information about the topic, as well as methods and points of view that are helpful in thinking about the topic. The Philosophy Talk motto is, “the program that questions everything, except your intelligence.”
    5.00
    4 votes
    170
    Provincial reconstruction team

    Provincial reconstruction team

    • Includes smaller projects: PRT Meymaneh
    A Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) is a unit introduced by the United States government, consisting of military officers, diplomats, and reconstruction subject matter experts, working to support reconstruction efforts in unstable states. PRTs were first established in Afghanistan in early 2002, and as of 2008 operate there as well as in Iraq. While the concepts are similar, PRTs in Afghanistan and Iraq have separate compositions and missions. Their common purpose, however, is to empower local governments to govern their constituents more effectively. A PRT includes a military component (Civil Affairs/Force Protection, etc.), civilian police advisors, and civilian representatives of US (or other national) government foreign affairs agencies. In a US-led PRT, this generally includes a representative from USAID, the Department of State, the Department of Agriculture, and the Department of Justice. They are assisted by public diplomacy and reporting staff. The PRTs are the primary civil-military relations tool in Afghanistan and Iraq and are described as “'a means to extend the reach and enhance the legitimacy of the central government'” into the provinces of Afghanistan. A PRT in
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    Stanford Initiative on Human Health

    Stanford Initiative on Human Health

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Multidisciplinary Teaching and Research
    Progress in improving human health in the last 100 years has been astonishing—the invention of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer, the mapping of the human genome, the first human heart transplant, among others. But, the issues we face today have increased in complexity and magnitude—the emergence of avian flu and new bacterial viruses, the limitations of known antibiotic therapies, the ongoing challenges of chronic disease, and autoimmune disease, for example. Progress in the next 100 years will require marshalling the expertise of researchers from a variety of disciplines and expediting the translation of discoveries from the laboratory to the patient's bedside. These are the goals behind Stanford's Initiative on Human Health.
    5.67
    3 votes
    172
    Ares V-1

    Ares V-1

    Ares V-Y was the proposed designation for the maiden flight of the cancelled heavy-lift Ares V Shuttle-Derived Launch Vehicle. The rocket launch was supposed to conducted first stage testing, which uses six RS-68 rocket engines currently in use on the Delta IV EELV rocket with two 5.5 segment Solid Rocket Boosters. The Ares V would have had an active Earth Departure Stage, which would have had a single J-2X rocket engine, but it would have not carry the Altair spacecraft. A Constellation derivative of the Apollo Lander Mass Simulator (used on Apollos 4, 6, and 8) would have been be used instead. Ares V-Y was supposed to see the first use of Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39A, while the Launch Pad 39B was being reconfigured for use as the Ares I launch facility. Before the cancellation of the Constellation Program, Ares V-Y was scheduled to take place in June 2018. A little over 50 years since the unmanned Apollos 4 and 6 flights. It would have flown a so-called "Shuttle Standard Insertion" flight profile from launch into Low Earth Orbit, allowing NASA to test the SRBs, the five RS-68 engines, and the single, restartable J-2X engine, the last engine being very important in that
    6.50
    2 votes
    173
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    Design and Construction of The Dome of Discovery

    Design and Construction of The Dome of Discovery

    • Project focus: Dome of Discovery
    • Part of larger project: Preparation for the Festival of Britain
    The Dome of Discovery was designed and constructed for the 1951 Festival of Britain.  It was designed by architect Ralph Tubbs in the Modernist Style and the consulting structural engineers were Freeman, Fox and Partners, of which employees Oleg Kerensky (later Dr. Oleg) and Gilbert Roberts (later Sir Gilbert) played a predominant role.
    6.50
    2 votes
    175
    Stanford Artificial Cornea Project

    Stanford Artificial Cornea Project

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Artificial Cornea
    This project is a multidisciplinary collaboration at Stanford University to develop a hybrid biomolecular and synthetic-polymer artificial cornea which is biocompatible, easily implantable and cost-effective.
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    Stanford Arts Initiative

    Stanford Arts Initiative

    • Includes smaller projects: Design and Construction of the Stanford Bing Concert Hall
    • Part of larger project: Stanford Multidisciplinary Teaching and Research
    Education in the arts and humanities is the foundation of a liberal arts education and serves three important roles. First, it prepares graduates to deal with the complexity, diversity, and ambiguity of human societies. Second, it draws out and develops personal creativity. Third, the arts bridge all cultures, providing access to the experience of people in other times and places. In the contemporary world in which Stanford graduates will lead and inspire, understanding complexity, finding creative solutions to problems, and navigating the richness of human culture are essential capabilities. To ensure our students develop these skills, we have launched the Arts Initiative. The Bing Concert Hall represents a next step for the initiative as an arts district takes shape on the north part of campus. The district will centralize widely scattered resources for music, drama, dance, visual arts, film and creative writing. Besides the concert hall, the new district will include the Frost Amphitheater, the Thomas Welton Stanford Art Gallery, the Iris & Gerald Cantor Arts Center, Memorial Auditorium and the new Burton and Deedee McMurtry Building, which will house the Department of Art and Art History.
    6.50
    2 votes
    177
    Stanford International Initiative

    Stanford International Initiative

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Multidisciplinary Teaching and Research
    In 2005, the university launched the Stanford International Initiative to promote collaboration throughout the campus on three themes: Pursuing international security Improving governance locally, nationally, and internationally Advancing human well-being at the individual level
    6.50
    2 votes
    178
    Trauttmansdorff Castle

    Trauttmansdorff Castle

    • Project focus: Castles of South Tyrol
    Trauttmansdorff Castle is a castle located south of the city of Meran, South Tyrol, northern Italy. It is home to a museum of tourism and since 2001 the surrounding grounds have been open as the Trauttmansdorff Castle Gardens, a botanical garden. During the years of fascist Italy the castle was called di Nova Castle (Torrente Nova is the name of a little brook near Trauttmansdorff).
    6.50
    2 votes
    179
    Design and construction of DUPLEX CONE

    Design and construction of DUPLEX CONE

    • Project focus: DUPLEX CONE
    • Part of larger project: Roger Berry Major Works
    DUPLEX CONE, designed and constructed by Roger Berry, represents Berry's first monumental solar sculpture. Implemented in Corton steel, the work is designed so that on the winter solstice, the sun follows along the edge of the smaller cone. On the summer solstice, the sun follows along the edge of the larger cone. The sculpture is in the Martin Luther King Jr. Shoreline (East Bay Regional Parks), Doolittle Drive and Swan Way, Oakland.
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    Design and Construction of Stanford University's Shelley Robot Car

    Design and Construction of Stanford University's Shelley Robot Car

    • Project focus: Stanford University's Shelly Robot Car
    A team of researchers at the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford (CARS) has filled the trunk of an Audi TTS with computers and GPS receivers, transforming it into a vehicle that drives itself. The car will attempt Pikes Peak without a driver at race speeds, something that's never been done. The Stanford Racing Team won its first autonomous race in 2005 with Stanley, a car developed for the Grand Challenge held in the Mojave Desert by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Their second car, Junior, took second place in DARPA'S 2007 Urban Challenge.
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Dialog expansion into International Markets

    Dialog expansion into International Markets

    • Part of larger project: Design and Development of Dialog
    Dialog methodically expanded into international markets, including Canada, Great Britain, Europe, Japan, South America, Australia. Established distributor relationships in each country. Since Dialog was the first Information Retrieval service in each country, the company tended to dominated each market. Dialog software was installed at at ESRO (European Space Research Agency) in 1969, making Dialog the first online network system to be used in Europe. Dialog contracted with two organizations, Maruzen and Kinokunia, in the early 1970s, becoming the first overseas service to provide information retrieval access in Japan.
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    Stanford Quantum Confinement Solar Cell research

    Stanford Quantum Confinement Solar Cell research

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Nanoscale Prototyping Project
    Quantum confined structures (wells, wires, dots) provide several advantages for next-generation solar cells. We are exploring the use of atomic layer deposition for fabrication of various photovoltaic components, including quantum dots, thin barrier layers, and transparent electrodes.
    5.33
    3 votes
    183
    ME SURI : Engineering Education Project

    ME SURI : Engineering Education Project

    • Includes smaller projects: Pathways of Engineering Alumni Research Survey
    • Part of larger project: Engineering Pathways Study
    Within the Stanford Mechanical Engineering department, the project team is doing research in the field of engineering education, continuing work started with the Academic Pathways Study (APS) and the Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES). The team is working on the Engineering Pathways Study (EPS), which focuses on engineering alumni who graduated four years ago, and the Pathways of Engineering Alumni Research Survey (PEARS) survey.
    7.00
    1 votes
    184
    Stanford GCEP Solar Energy Projects

    Stanford GCEP Solar Energy Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford GCEP Advanced Materials and Devices for Low-Cost and High-Performance Organic Photovoltaic Cells Project
    • Part of larger project: Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project
    GCEP has a number of research activities within several technical areas which are currently being investigated. All research efforts are geared towards developing technology that could lead to a future of significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions. An enormous flow of useful energy, thousands of times the current usage of humans, reaches the Earth's surface in the form of solar radiation. While a portion of this flow is used to power most processes in the natural world, a substantial amount could be collected for human utilization. Because conversion of solar energy does not directly involve exchanging matter with the environment, it is possible to use large amounts of solar energy without emitting greenhouse gases. Though its potential is large, solar radiation has a relatively low energy density and is intermittent. The low energy density requires solar energy to be harvested over large areas, affecting the size and material intensity of collection systems. Modern solar energy collection devices are inefficient and expensive compared to other energy conversion technologies. These drawbacks cause direct solar energy to continue to be a minor component of the global energy system. Research enabling higher efficiency and the use of cheaper materials could allow the solar energy resource to contribute significantly to a lower greenhouse gas emissions energy system. Advances in molecular-scale material engineering and direct biological conversion of solar energy to energy carriers may aid pursuit of this goal.
    7.00
    1 votes
    185
    Stanford Network Analysis Platform

    Stanford Network Analysis Platform

    Stanford Network Analysis Platform (SNAP) is a general purpose network analysis and graph mining library. It is written in C++ and easily scales to massive networks with hundreds of millions of nodes, and billions of edges. It efficiently manipulates large graphs, calculates structural properties, generates regular and random graphs, and supports attributes on nodes and edges. SNAP is also available through the NodeXL which is a graphical front-end that integrates network analysis into Microsoft Office and Excel.
    7.00
    1 votes
    186
    Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Systems Research Projects

    Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Systems Research Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford PEEC Supply Chain Design under Uncertain Production and Transportation Costs Project
    These interdisciplinary, solutions-oriented projects centralizes key behavioral science resources relevant to accelerating the adoption and sustained use of energy-efficient technologies and climate-positive actions by individuals, groups, and organizations.
    7.00
    1 votes
    187
    Stanford Regenerative Medicine Research

    Stanford Regenerative Medicine Research

    Regenerative medicine seeks to understand how and why stem cells differentiate into specialized tissues and to harness this potential for a wide variety of medical applications. Advances in regenerative medicine have the potential to prevent birth defects, retard damage to diseased tissues, repair injured tissues, enhance the metabolic or biomechanical function of tissues, and manipulate normal and abnormal tissue growth processes. Research in regenerative medicine occurs from the molecular level to clinical applications. Ongoing research at Stanford includes: Genetic regulation of signaling systems involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and patterning of tissues; Tissue engineering for the treatment of osteoarthritis; Understanding how mechanical loading affects the growth, development, regeneration, and aging of skeletal tissues; Enhancing neurogenesis through electrical and chemical stimulation; Development of biologically-based therapies to prevent or reduce pathological scar formation; Application of stem cell technologies to in vitro tissue production and the generation of specific cell types for therapeutic use.
    7.00
    1 votes
    188
    Bejerano Lab : Genomics of Morphogenesis and Differentiation in Development and Disease

    Bejerano Lab : Genomics of Morphogenesis and Differentiation in Development and Disease

    One of the key mysteries of the cis-regulatory architecture of the human genome lies in its ability to encode the use and reuse of the same gene repertoire to build and maintain very different tissues and organs. The cis regulatory regions underlying development also play significant roles in human disease onset and progression. For example, more and more cases are being discovered where an important developmental gene is intact, but a key regulatory region controlling it is mutated, triggering tissue specific disease pathology. Our lab is focusing on studying the cis regulatory underpinnings of three processes in human development.
    6.00
    2 votes
    189
    6.00
    2 votes
    190
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    JewLib. Digital Archive-Library

    JewLib. Digital Archive-Library

    • Project focus: Primary source
    JewLib. Digital Archive-Library is a shared, online source of facts and information on primary research sources for the study of Jewish history and cultures. JewLib has just started. Jewish Studies collections of Libraries, Archives, Museums and private owners as well as single items which document Jewish history and cultures across the world should be recorded in the framework of the project. Additionally research in the field of Jewish Studies should be focused.
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    La Ruche

    La Ruche

    La Ruche (literally the beehive) is an artist's residence at the Paris South-Western outskirts. Located in the "Passage Dantzig," in the 15th arrondissement of Paris, La Ruche was an old three-storey circular structure that got its name because it looked more like a large beehive than any dwelling for humans. Originally a temporary building designed by Gustave Eiffel for use as a wine rotunda at the Great Exposition of 1900, the structure was dismantled and re-erected as low-cost studios for artists by Alfred Boucher (1850–1934), a fireman and sculptor, who wanted to help young artists by providing them with shared models and with an exhibition space open to all residents. As well as to artists, La Ruche became a home to the usual array of drunks, misfits, and almost every penniless soul needing a roof over their head. At La Ruche the rent was dirt cheap; and no one was evicted for non-payment. When hungry, many would wander over to artist Marie Vassilieff's soup kitchen (more genteely called her "Cantine") for a meal and conversation with fellow starving artists. The Russian painter Pinchus Kremegne got off the train at the Gare de l'Est with three rubles in his pocket. The only
    6.00
    2 votes
    193
    Project Mogul

    Project Mogul

    Project Mogul (sometimes referred to as Operation Mogul) was a top secret project by the US Army Air Forces involving microphones flown on high altitude balloons, whose primary purpose was long-distance detection of sound waves generated by Soviet atomic bomb tests. The project was carried out from 1947 until early 1949. The project was moderately successful, but was very expensive and was superseded by a network of seismic detectors and air sampling for fallout which were cheaper, more reliable, and easier to deploy and operate. Project Mogul was conceived by Dr. Maurice Ewing who had earlier researched the deep sound channel in the oceans and theorized that a similar sound channel existed in the upper atmosphere: a certain height where the air pressure and temperature result in minimal speed of sound, so that sound waves would propagate and stay in that channel due to refraction. The project involved arrays of balloons carrying disc microphones and radio transmitters to relay the signals to the ground. It was supervised by Dr. James Peoples, who was assisted by Dr. Albert P. Crary. One of the requirements of the balloons was that they maintain a relatively constant altitude over
    6.00
    2 votes
    194
    Stanford University SALT Project

    Stanford University SALT Project

    • Project focus: SALT Prototype
    The Self Archiving Legacy Toolkit (SALT) Project within the Stanford University Libraries and Academic Information Resources (SULAIR), funded by Stanford University President's Fund, completed it’s 3-year startup phase in the Fall of 2009. The SALT Project developed a prototype software system enabling digital online archives of distinguished faculty. The prototype delivered a largely automated, engaging, hosted software toolkit that presented the faculty member with a visual representation of their legacy for enhancement and, in the process, captured "content and context" to enrich the online material and make it findable. The team solved the problem of getting this material online rapidly while the faculty member is still active and interested in participating, and found that the visual representation of the legacy is the key to elicit valuable new knowledge and meaning: the annotations of connections, the back-story, undocumented facts.
    6.00
    2 votes
    195
    “What is a Reader” Project

    “What is a Reader” Project

    The "What is a Reader?" Project is a joint research effort by Stanford, Mills College, UC Berkeley, and UC Santa Cruz, sponsored by the Teagle Foundation with the objective of improving student learning by engaging Big Questions of meaning and value within the context of the disciplines.
    6.00
    2 votes
    196
    Iraq Body Count project

    Iraq Body Count project

    Iraq Body Count project (IBC) is a web-based effort to record civilian deaths resulting from the US-led 2003 invasion of Iraq. Included are deaths attributable to coalition and insurgent military action, sectarian violence and criminal violence, which refers to excess civilian deaths caused by criminal action resulting from the breakdown in law and order which followed the coalition invasion. As of October 2010, the IBC has recorded approximately 100,000 civilian deaths. The IBC has a media-centered approach to counting and documenting the deaths. Other sources have provided differing estimates of deaths, some much higher. See Casualties of the Iraq War. The project uses reports from English-language news media (including Arabic media translated into English), NGO-based reports, and official records that have been released into the public sphere to compile a running total. On its database page the IBC states: "Gaps in recording and reporting suggest that even our highest totals to date may be missing many civilian deaths from violence." The group is staffed by volunteers consisting mainly of academics and activists based in the UK and the US. The project was founded by John Sloboda
    5.00
    3 votes
    197
    Sistine Chapel - restoration of frescoes

    Sistine Chapel - restoration of frescoes

    • Project focus: Sistine Chapel
    The restoration of the frescoes of the Sistine Chapel was one of the most significant art restorations of the 20th century. The Sistine Chapel was built by Pope Sixtus IV within the Vatican immediately to the north of St. Peter's Basilica and completed in about 1481. Its walls were decorated by a number of Renaissance painters who were among the most highly regarded artists of late 15th century Italy, including Ghirlandaio, Perugino, and Botticelli. The Chapel was further enhanced under Pope Julius II by the painting of the ceiling by Michelangelo between 1508 and 1512 and by the painting of the Last Judgment, commissioned by Pope Clement VII and completed in 1541, again by Michelangelo. The tapestries on the lowest tier, today best known from the Raphael Cartoons (painted designs) of 1515–16, completed the ensemble. Together the paintings make up the greatest pictorial scheme of the Renaissance. Individually, some of Michelangelo's paintings on the ceiling are among the most notable works of western art ever created. The frescoes of the Sistine Chapel and in particular the ceiling and accompanying lunettes by Michelangelo have been subject to a number of restorations, the most
    5.00
    3 votes
    198
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    Education Resources Information Center

    Education Resources Information Center

    • Project focus: ERIC Database
    The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) - is an online digital library of education research and information. ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences of the United States Department of Education. The mission of ERIC is to provide a comprehensive, easy-to-use, searchable, Internet-based bibliographic and full-text database of education research and information for educators, researchers, and the general public. Education research and information are essential to improving teaching, learning, and educational decision-making. ERIC provides access to more than 1.3 million bibliographic records (citations, abstracts, and other pertinent data) of journal articles and other education-related materials, with hundreds of new records added every week. A key component of ERIC is its collection of grey literature in education, which is largely available in full text in Adobe PDF format. Approximately one quarter of the complete ERIC Collection is available in full text. Materials with no full text available (primarily journal articles) can often be accessed using links to publishers and/or library holdings. The ERIC Collection, begun in 1966, contains records for a
    5.50
    2 votes
    200
    Genome project

    Genome project

    Genome projects are scientific endeavours that ultimately aim to determine the complete genome sequence of an organism (be it an animal, a plant, a fungus, a bacterium, an archaean, a protist or a virus) and to annotate protein-coding genes and other important genome-encoded features. The genome sequence of an organism includes the collective DNA sequences of each chromosome in the organism. For a bacterium containing a single chromosome, a genome project will aim to map the sequence of that chromosome. For the human species, whose genome includes 22 pairs of autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes, a complete genome sequence will involve 46 separate chromosome sequences. The Human Genome Project was a landmark genome project that is already having a major impact on research across the life sciences, with potential for spurring numerous medical and commercial developments. Genome assembly refers to the process of taking a large number of short DNA sequences and putting them back together to create a representation of the original chromosomes from which the DNA originated. In a shotgun sequencing project, all the DNA from a source (usually a single organism, anything from a bacterium to a
    5.50
    2 votes
    201
    PROPOSALS FOR A PRIMARY SUBSTATION

    PROPOSALS FOR A PRIMARY SUBSTATION

    • Project focus: St. Wilfrid's Church, Harrogate
    HAVE YOUR SAY Yes - to boosted power in the town NO - to spoiling our Heritage! CE ELECTRIC and NEDL - subsidiaries of MidAmerican Holdings’ - have submitted plans g for a Primary Electricity Substation in the grounds of St Wilfrid’s - Harrogate’s ONLY Grade I Listed Building. Support Harrogate Civic Society and The Victorian Society in voicing objections at: http://publicaccess.harrogate.gov.uk/publicaccess/tdc/DcApplication/application_detailview.aspx?caseno=KI8VR7HY03000 Further information can be found on the Save St Wilfrid’s website at: http://www.save-stwilfrids-harrogate.com/
    5.50
    2 votes
    202
    Research using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Research using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    • Project focus: Electromagnetically induced transparency
    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a technique for eliminating the effect of a medium on a propagating beam of electromagnetic radiation. EIT may also be used to eliminate optical self-focusing and to improve the transmission of laser beams through inhomogeneous refracting gases and metal vapors. Of particular interest to this project, EIT may also be used to create large populations of coherently-driven, uniformly-phased atoms, thereby making possible new types of optical frequency converters and oscillators. Present projects are: (1) the use of EIT for the generation of biphotons with a length approaching a microsecond. (2) Modulation of single photons and biphotons. (3) The experimental demonstration of a quantum-optical effect that we term as nonlocal modulation. (4) Early work, with the ultimate objective of making entangled photons with a temporal length of a single cycle.
    5.50
    2 votes
    203
    Yi Cui Lab : Advanced Materials Synthesis and Fabrication Projects

    Yi Cui Lab : Advanced Materials Synthesis and Fabrication Projects

    We developed a set of synthetic and fabrication techniques to obtain designed nanostructure materials with composition, size and shape control. Our most recently study demonstrated chiral branched nanowires induced by both screw-dislocation and vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mediated growth, showing the existence of well-known “Eshelby Twist”). These techniques include: Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of nanowires; Colloidal solution nanocrystal synthesis; Electrospinning synthesis of nanofibers; Nanoporous material synthesis; Nanosphere lithography.
    5.50
    2 votes
    204
    Bomarc Missile Program

    Bomarc Missile Program

    • Project focus: CIM-10 Bomarc
    The CIM-10 Bomarc was the only surface-to-air missile (SAM) ever deployed by the United States Air Force. All other U.S. land-based SAMs were and are under the control of the United States Army. The supersonic Bomarc missiles were the first long-range anti-aircraft missiles. Rocket boosted and then ramjet powered, they were capable of carrying conventional or nuclear warheads. Their intended role in defense was in an intrusion prevention perimeter controlled by the SAGE computer air defense system. Bomarcs sited on the eastern and western coasts of North America theoretically would launch and would destroy enemy bombers before the bombers could drop their payloads on industrial regions. It involved the deployment of tactical stations armed with Bomarc missiles along the east and west coasts of North America and the central areas of the continent. At the height of the program, there were 14 Bomarc sites in the United States and two in Canada. BOMARC and the SAGE guidance system were phased out in the early 1970s since they seemed to be ineffective and costly. Neither of these systems was ever used in combat, so while their combat effectiveness remains untested, they are still
    4.67
    3 votes
    205
    Design and construction of DARWIN

    Design and construction of DARWIN

    • Project focus: DARWIN
    • Part of larger project: Roger Berry Major Works
    DARWIN, designed and constructed by Roger Berry, represents Berry's largest monumental solar sculpture and is a philosophical summary of his solar work. Implemented in Corton steel, the front cone describes the summer sun; the back cone describes the winter sun. A band of sunlight bisects the interior on the equinox. The sculpture is in the Oliver Ranch Collection, Geyserville, Sonoma County, CA.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    EG LNG

    EG LNG

    EG LNG (also known as Punta Europa LNG) is a LNG company that operates a liquid natural gas terminal and plant in Malabo, Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. The LNG plant began operation in 2007 and the first cargo of LNG was delivered on 24 May 2007. The plant's Train 1 has a capacity of 3.4 million metric tonnes per annum. Several systems are in places such as feed gas metering, liquefaction, refrigeration, ethylene storage, boil off gas compression, product transfer to storage and LNG product metering. The EG LNG plant utilizes the ConocoPhillips Optimized Cascade(SM) Process. A planned second train will produce 4.4 million metric tonnes of LNG per annum. In addition to the construction of the second train, the US$3 billion project includes construction of three gas pipelines to connect Nigeria, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea gas fields with the LNG plant. In addition to the shareholders of the Train 1, Unión Fenosa Gas, a joint venture of Unión Fenosa and Eni, and E.ON will participate in this project. The shareholders in EG LNG Co are:
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Open Library

    Open Library

    Open Library is an online project intended to create “one web page for every book ever published”. Open Library is a project of the non-profit Internet Archive and has been funded in part by a grant from the California State Library and the Kahle/Austin Foundation. The website was relaunched adding ADA compliance and offering over 1 million modern and older books to the print disabled in May 2010. Tens of thousands of modern books were made available from 4 and then 150 libraries and publishers for digital lending. Its book information is collected from the Library of Congress, other libraries, and Amazon.com, as well as from user contributions through a Wiki-like interface. If books are available in digital form, a button labelled "Read" appears next to its catalog listing. Links to where books can be purchased or borrowed are also provided. There are different entities in the database: Open Library claims to have 6 million authors and 20 million books (not works), and about one million Public Domain books are available as digitized books. Open Library began in 2006 with Aaron Swartz as the original engineer and leader of Open Library's technical team. The project is now led by
    6.00
    1 votes
    208
    Stanford Full-Duplex Wireless Radio Design

    Stanford Full-Duplex Wireless Radio Design

    • Project focus: Adaptive techniques for full-duplex wireless
    This project explores the design of a single channel full-duplex wireless transceiver. The design uses a combination of RF and baseband techniques to achieve full-duplexing with minimal effect on link reliability. Experiments on real nodes show the full-duplex scheme achieves a median gain of 84% in aggregate throughput as compared to traditional half-duplexing wireless for a single hop network. This project introduces Antenna Cancellation, a novel technique for self-interference cancellation. In conjunction with existing RF interference cancellation and digital base- band intereference cancellation, antenna cancellation achieves the amount of self-interference cancellation required for full- duplex operation. Their are significant potential MAC and network gains with full-duplexing A full-duplex system can solve some important problems with existing wire- less systems including hidden terminals, loss of throughput due to congestion, and large end-to-end delays.
    6.00
    1 votes
    209
    Stockholm City Line

    Stockholm City Line

    The Stockholm City Line (Swedish: Citybanan) is a railway tunnel under construction beneath central Stockholm in Sweden which will be used by the Stockholm Commuter Rail. The line will be 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) long, double track and electrified. It will have two stations: Stockholm City Station will be located directly below T-Centralen, the central station of the Stockholm Metro. Stockholm Odenplan Station will be the other station, and will be located next to the Odenplan metro station. The line is scheduled to enter service in 2017. The tunnel will significantly improve the traffic throughput to and from south of Stockholm as there are only two tracks in that direction from Stockholm Central Station, the same number that were in place in 1871 when the railway was originally built. It has 24 scheduled trains per hour in each direction. The commuter trains pass Stockholm with up to 16 trains per hour per direction. The other eight are regional and long-distance trains. The tunnel will take all commuter trains, allowing more regional and intercity trains to operate along the old line. Placing the commuter rail traffic into a tunnel of its own will thus allow increased capacity for
    6.00
    1 votes
    210
    Suppes : Computer Aided Learning Projects

    Suppes : Computer Aided Learning Projects

    In the 1960s, Suppes and Richard C. Atkinson (the future president of the University of California) conducted experiments in using computers to teach math and reading to schoolchildren in the Palo Alto area. Stanford's Education Program for Gifted Youth and Computer Curriculum Corporation (CCC, now named Pearson Education Technologies) is an indirect descendant of those early experiments.[2] At Stanford, Suppes was instrumental in encouraging the development of high-technology companies that were springing up in the field of educational software up into the 1990s, (such as Bien Logic). One computer used in Suppes and Atkinson's Computer-assisted Instruction (CAI) experiments was the specialized IBM 1500 Instructional System. Seeded by a research grant in 1964 from the U.S. Department of Education to the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences at Stanford University, the IBM 1500 CAI system was initially prototyped at the Brentwood Elementary School (Ravenswood City School District) in East Palo Alto, California by Suppes. The students first used the system in 1966. [source: Wikipedia]
    6.00
    1 votes
    211
    Top of the Tower

    Top of the Tower

    • Project focus: BT Tower
    Famous rotating restaurant on the top of the BT Tower, London, open from 1966 to 1980, when it closed due to possible terrorist action. Due to reopen in late 2009 or 2010 following almost 30 years of inactivity.
    6.00
    1 votes
    212
    Cochran Lab : Artificial cornea collaboration

    Cochran Lab : Artificial cornea collaboration

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Artificial Cornea Project
    Over 10 million people worldwide are blind due to corneal disease. Corneal transplantation is highly effective, but is limited in worldwide distribution due to supply issues, and economic and cultural factors. Artificial corneas offer an alternative treatment with potential for widespread, cost-effective distribution to patients. Our interdisciplinary research team has developed a novel biomaterial that mimics the biomechanical properties and nutrient diffusivity of the natural cornea, and promotes corneal cell growth and attachment. This biomaterial consists of a poly(ethylene glycol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PEG/PAA) interpenetrating network, which forms a hydrogel with extremely high mechanical strength and permeability, despite a high (>70%) water content. PEG and PAA are both hydrophilic and biocompatible; however, these properties also render them inert to cell attachment, which is an important component for tissue integration and epithelialization of an artificial cornea. Therefore, we tethered collagen type I, the predominant extracellular matrix protein in the cornea, to the PEG/PAA hydrogels to create a biosynthetic polymer that will support cell attachment and growth. Surface modification of the PEG/PAA hydrogel with collagen type I was achieved with a photoreactive, heterobifunctional crosslinker. Quantitative amino acid analysis and FITC-labeled collagen were used to determine the amount and distribution of collagen on the surface of the hydrogels. The bioactivity of the coupled collagen was confirmed by a conformation-specific antibody. Implantation of the hydrogel into the corneas of live rabbits demonstrated that epithelial cell migration is supported by the material, although the rate of migration and morphology of the epithelium were suboptimal. These results are being used to guide further optimization of bioactive hydrogels for corneal implant applications.
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Design and construction of Fembots Robots

    Design and construction of Fembots Robots

    • Project focus: 2009 FIRST Robotics Competition
    The Fembots team competes in the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition. The Fembots are one of the few all-girls robotics teams in the nation, representing St. Francis High School from Sacramento, CA.
    5.00
    2 votes
    214
    Matin Lab : Multidrug resistance

    Matin Lab : Multidrug resistance

    The management of infectious diseases as well as cancer treatment is greatly complicated by the multidrug resistance mechanisms that enable cells to extrude a large number of drugs. We have been studying the EmrAB pump of E. coli, which can extrude a variety of chemically unrelated drugs and antibiotics. We showed that the pump is negatively regulated by the product of one of its own genes, namely emrR. We purified the EmrR protein and showed that it binds to the promoter of the operon, shutting it off. Furthermore, a large number of chemically unrelated compounds (that are both inducers and substrates for the pump) react with EmrR, rendering it unable to bind to the operator. Current work in this area is focused mainly on bacterial biofilms.
    5.00
    2 votes
    215
    Stanford Atomic Layer Deposition and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy research

    Stanford Atomic Layer Deposition and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy research

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Nanoscale Prototyping Project
    The Stanford Atomic Layer Deposition and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy research project is explore the large parameter space of nanostructures (size, shape, material, organization) using the combined tools of Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). The team plans to do this by observing and tailoring the natural ALD growth process and by fabricating nanostructures on the scale of 10 nanometers directly using the STM tip and ALD chemistry. Information gained from this project about the optical and electronic properties of nanostructures will be used to inform their use in solar energy conversion and charge storage.
    5.00
    2 votes
    216
    Varasgaon

    Varasgaon

    • Part of larger project: Construction of Khadakwasla Dam
    Varasgaon is a dam on the Mose river which supplies water to city of Pune, Maharashtra, India. It is situated on Mose river. It is also called Veer Pasalkar dam. It is one of the three major dams which provide water to Pune city. It is located around 40 km from Pune city. The Panshet dam is adjacent to Varasgaon dam, and together both have become a popular picnic spots. During the monsoon or just after monsoon the hills around are lush green with plenty of waterfall. Water sports are also played in this dam. About 30 minutes from Varasgaon is Lavasa whose construction was halted by the Bombay High Court on 7th December, 2010, partially due to the proximity as it is feared that it could lead to contamination of water supply to Pune. Apart from this, around 18 indigenous tribal villages were displaced with meager or no compensation due to the Lavasa project. Villagers have reported misappropriation of land (in the name of agricultural irrigation) through compensation cheques that bounced on depositing and agents that threaten the locals with death if the land wasn't sold to them. Some were relocated to hill tops where Varasgaon water was then supplied to them by tankers.
    5.00
    2 votes
    217
    Stanford Multidisciplinary Teaching and Research

    Stanford Multidisciplinary Teaching and Research

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford Arts Initiative
    Since its founding, Stanford University has been a pioneer in cross-disciplinary collaboration among faculty, students and researchers, producing innovative basic and applied research in all fields. The university is unusual among its peer institutions in having seven schools on one campus, and all of them possess exceptional breadth and depth of excellence. This naturally facilitates multidisciplinary collaboration.
    4.50
    2 votes
    218
    Angola LNG

    Angola LNG

    Angola LNG is a liquefied natural gas (LNG) project to be located in Soyo, Angola. The Angola LNG plant will be a single train facility with production capacity of 5.2 million tonnes per year. The plant will use ConocoPhillips' proprietary natural gas liquefaction technology (Optimized CascadeSM Process). In addition to LNG, it will also produce propane, butane and condensate. The plant will be supplied from offshore gas fields on blocks 14, 15, 17 and 18, and from non-associated gas fields Quiluma, Atum, Polvo and Enguia. The LNG project is presented as environmentally friendly by its designers, because most of its feedstock will consist of associated gas produced in association with crude oil in offshore field, that is currently flared. The LNG plant is expected to cost US$9 billion, and it would be commissioned in 2012. The plant will be constructed by Bechtel. The project was initially proposed to Sonangol by Texaco in June, 1997. The project, jointly managed by Sonangol and Texaco, continued evaluation processes and brought in outside partners (originally ExxonMobil, Elf Aquitaine, and BP.) Subsequently Texaco merged with Chevron Corporation, ExxonMobil was replaced in the
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Bianxiao Cui Lab : Microfluidic culture platform for neuronal network

    Bianxiao Cui Lab : Microfluidic culture platform for neuronal network

    • Project focus: A microfluidic chamber for long-term live-cell imaging
    The human brain is a complex network composed of ~ 1011 neurons, each making up to ~ 104 connections to other neurons. The structure and connection of neural network is at the root of the enormous sophistication and computational power of the brain. Thus, it is of great interest to understand the relation between the neuronal network spatial-organization and its functional activity.
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Blau Lab : Nuclear Reprogramming and Cell Fate Determination Research

    Blau Lab : Nuclear Reprogramming and Cell Fate Determination Research

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Tissue Regeneration from Differentiated Cells Project
    The Nuclear Reprogramming and Cell Fate Determination Project is elucidating the cell intrinsic molecular mechanisms that govern nuclear reprogramming critical to directing adult stem cell differentiation for use in cell based therapies. To study chromatin remodeling mechanisms necessary for reprogramming, the team is using cell fusion and nuclear transfer approaches.
    5.00
    1 votes
    221
    Course on Land Rights and Land Value Capture

    Course on Land Rights and Land Value Capture

    • Project focus: Land Rights Education
    1. LAND RIGHTS AND POVERTY 1.1 The roots of poverty, slums and most social and economic injustice lie in the original dispossession of people from their land. No matter how advanced or complex an economic system might be, there is no escaping the fact that all tangible wealth originates in the raw material of land and natural resources. 1.2 Underpinning the massive wealth divide between the very rich and the rest of the people worldwide is the monopolization of land and the subsequent treatment of land as a market commodity for sale and speculation. When nature’s gifts are treated in this manner they yield an unearned income (land rent) for a few while land prices rise to the detriment of the many who must work longer and harder simply for a place to be. Lacking secure land tenure, millions live precarious lives with chronic fear of eviction and displacement.
    5.00
    1 votes
    222
    Design and construction of the World Trade Center

    Design and construction of the World Trade Center

    • Project focus: World Trade Center
    • Part of larger project: Downtown-Lower Manhattan Association's regeneration project for Lower Manhattan
    The project was developed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which hired architect Minoru Yamasaki who came up with the specific idea for twin towers. After extensive negotiations, the New Jersey and New York State governments, which oversee the Port Authority, agreed to support the World Trade Center project at the Radio Row site on the lower-west side of Manhattan. To make the agreement acceptable to New Jersey, the Port Authority agreed to take over the bankrupt Hudson & Manhattan Railroad (renamed as PATH), which brought commuters from New Jersey to the Lower Manhattan site. The towers were designed as framed tube structures, which provided tenants with open floor plans, uninterrupted by columns or walls. This was accomplished using numerous closely spaced perimeter columns to provide much of the strength to the structure, along with gravity load shared with the core columns. The elevator system, which made use of sky lobbies and a system of express and local elevators, allowed substantial floor space to be freed up for use as office space by making the structural core smaller. The design and construction of the World Trade Center twin towers involved many other
    5.00
    1 votes
    223
    Heinrich Eljaqim Loewe : Netzwerke und Räume

    Heinrich Eljaqim Loewe : Netzwerke und Räume

    • Project focus: Heinrich Loewe
    The PhD project’s aim is to comprehend the life and work of Heinrich Loewe (1869-1951) in a transcultural context with its whole complexity. Loewe, librarian, scholar and Zionist activist belongs to the most important protagonists of German Jewry in the beginning 20th century.Loewe's life was special in many respects. But it also has paradigmatic traits of a whole German-Jewish generation: His life was connected to different places and persons and twisted in different societies, communities and institutions: Loewe worked, thought, developed ideas, loved and hated in translocal and transcultural networks. My biographical study should meet this point. I try to connect „classical“ approaches, like discourse-analysis, with the concepts of histoire croisée and network analysis. These approaches shall be integrated into a transdisciplinary biographical method. While discourse-analysis focuses on Loewe's intellectual life, the methods, implied by network analysis and histoire croisée, concentrate on the sociocultural context of his life history. Connections in and between different networks, like family, friends, profession and political involvements will be set into relation. In this context, the study asks for the importance of space referring to the formation of cultural (multi-)identity.
    5.00
    1 votes
    224
    Library of Congress Digital Library project

    Library of Congress Digital Library project

    The Library of Congress National Digital Library Program (NDLP) is assembling a digital library of reproductions of primary source materials to support the study of the history and culture of the United States. Begun in 1995 after a five-year pilot project, the program began digitizing selected collections of Library of Congress archival materials that chronicle the nation's rich cultural heritage. In order to reproduce collections of books, pamphlets, motion pictures, manuscripts and sound recordings, the Library has created a wide array of digital entities: bitonal document images, grayscale and color pictorial images, digital video and audio, and searchable e-texts. To provide access to the reproductions, the project developed a range of descriptive elements: bibliographic records, finding aids, and introductory texts and programs, as well as indexing the full texts for certain types of content. The reproductions were produced with a variety of tools: image scanners, digital cameras, devices that digitize audio and video, and human labor for rekeying and encoding texts. American Memory employs national-standard and well established industry-standard formats for many digital
    5.00
    1 votes
    225
    Matin Lab : Improved Enzymes for Prodrug Reduction

    Matin Lab : Improved Enzymes for Prodrug Reduction

    We have discovered that many of the enzymes we initially characterized as 'chromate reductases' (now termed ChrR) and subsequently showed to have the biological role of two-electron quinone reduction (see Molecular Bioremediation) can also reduce prodrugs. These are compounds such as mitocycin C and CB1954 that are innocuous but upon reduction become highly toxic alkylating agents. By DNA shuffling combined with rational approaches, and using a novel screening method, we have enhanced the prodrug reducing activity of these enzymes (e.g., ChrR6). Work in collaboration with Dr. Chris Contag's group (BioX) shows that these enzymes are effective in vivo in enhancing prodrug effectiveness. In fact, one of the improved versions of these enzymes is the most effective agent currently available for this purpose. We have recently crystallized ChrR.
    5.00
    1 votes
    226
    Parker Library on the Web

    Parker Library on the Web

    • Project focus: Parkerweb
    Parker Library on the Web was a multi-year undertaking of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, the Stanford University Libraries and the Cambridge University Library, to produce a high-resolution digital copy of every imageable page in the 538 manuscripts described in M. R. James Descriptive Catalogue of the Manuscripts in the Parker Library, Corpus Christi College (Cambridge University Press, 1912). The results were placed on a subscription-only interactive web application in which the manuscript page images can be used by scholars and students in the context of editions, translations and secondary sources. The 538 items numbered and catalogued by James exist as 546 physical volumes. A very small number of these are printed books, mistakenly catalogued as manuscripts in the 18th century, and so were excluded. Additionally, there are a few manuscripts with paper pages which are badly damaged by moisture, or those with very fragile bindings, which at present cannot be successfully imaged in their totality. Exterior images were made of the present bindings of each manuscript. The project is of major importance for creating and preserving quality images of unique materials. The project
    5.00
    1 votes
    227
    Stanford Initiative on Environment and Sustainability

    Stanford Initiative on Environment and Sustainability

    • Part of larger project: Stanford Multidisciplinary Teaching and Research
    The 21st century is a critical time in our earth's history. The quality and quantity of natural resources—oceans, forests, freshwater, air—are stressed by the increasing demands of human activity. At the same time, nearly a billion people do not have enough food to eat and more than a billion do not have access to clean water. The challenges of providing the resources we need without irrevocably compromising our precious life-support systems are formidable. Through Stanford's Initiative on the Environment and Sustainability, environmental researchers and scholars are taking up these challenges, helping to ensure that current and future generations can live well on our planet.
    4.00
    2 votes
    228
    Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas

    Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas

    • Project focus: Sustainable agriculture
    ATTRA - National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service is managed by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) and is funded under a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture's Rural Business-Cooperative Service. It provides information and other technical assistance to farmers, ranchers, Extension agents, educators, and others involved in sustainable agriculture in the United States. (ATTRA was formerly known as the "Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas" project.)
    4.00
    1 votes
    229
    Chavín de Huántar Archaeological Acoustics Project

    Chavín de Huántar Archaeological Acoustics Project

    • Part of larger project: Proyecto de Investigaciones y Conservación Chavín de Huántar
    The Chavín de Huántar Archaeological Acoustics Project, part of the Chavín de Huántar Investigation and Conservation Project (Proyecto de Investigaciones y Conservación Chavín de Huántar, under the auspices of the Instituto Nacional de Cultura, Perú) seeks to explore the architectural and instrumental acoustics of Chavín de Huántar, a 3000-year old pre-Inca ceremonial center in the north-central sierra of Perú. The site complex includes an extensive network of labyrinthine corridors, shafts, and drains built of stone block, intact and primarily without post-period modification since the end of monumental construction around 600 B.C. The project has several aims: to measure, analyze, archive, and model the architectural and instrumental acoustics of Chavín, culminating in simulations for public interface and new archaeological research tools.
    4.00
    1 votes
    230
    Cochran Lab : Engineering Growth Factor Ligand and Receptor Interactions

    Cochran Lab : Engineering Growth Factor Ligand and Receptor Interactions

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: Epidermal Growth Factor Mutants for Improved Epidermal and Epithelial Wound Healing
    Our research group has much interest in engineering natural growth factor ligands and receptors as molecular tools for studying the relationship of protein sequence/structure to biological read-outs. These engineered proteins also have important clinical applications as therapeutics for the treatment of a variety of human malignancies. Project 1: Development of Met Receptor Antagonists through Combinatorial and Rational Engineering of the NK1 Fragment of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Project 2: A Toolkit of Engineered EGF ligands for Probing the Relationship Between Biochemical Properties and Biological Efficacy
    4.00
    1 votes
    231
    Design and construction of PERSPECTIVES

    Design and construction of PERSPECTIVES

    • Project focus: PERSPECTIVES
    • Part of larger project: Roger Berry Major Works
    The sculputre PERSPECTIVES was designed and constructed by Roger Berry. It is implemented in stainless steel which is half-inch thick at the bottom and graduates to three-eighth inches thick, so it's lighter at the top. Berry says the $150,000 sculpture was built in two pieces, which were ground and welded together on-site. It was installed over a two-day period in March. Berry says the 7,500-pound monolith is so big "it had to be dropped in place by a crane." Berry describes his creation as being "akin to the stitching on a tennis ball." He chose the name Perspectives because the look of the piece changes depending on the angle you see it from. "It's like a figure eight unwinding and re-winding," he says.
    4.00
    1 votes
    232
    Dialog Database Negotiations

    Dialog Database Negotiations

    Beginning the database aquisition phase of Dialog, Roger Summit and Dick Kollin negotiate online pricing for Pandex database at the ASIS national meeting in New York in 1971.
    4.00
    1 votes
    233
    Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Transportation Research Projects

    Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Transportation Research Projects

    • Includes smaller projects: Stanford PEEC : An Incentive Mechanism for Reducing Congestion-related Costs in Transportation Systems: A pilot program in India Project
    Energy efficient automobiles depend on the right automotive systems, energy efficient engines and power trains, appropriate fuels, and policies that encourage energy efficiency. Public policy to promote diversity in transportation modes can also reduce fuel consumption.
    4.00
    1 votes
    234
    Stanford University Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability

    Stanford University Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability

    • Project focus: Ignite Innovations
    Professor James Patell is one of the seven founding core faculty of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the d-School). Within the d-School, Professor Patell co-teaches Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability with Professor David Beach. In this course, student teams collaboratively design product prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures that address poverty in developing countries.
    4.00
    1 votes
    235
    Yamamoto Lab : Semiconductor Spin Qubits Project

    Yamamoto Lab : Semiconductor Spin Qubits Project

    • Project focus: Quantum information
    Spin qubits in semiconductors have promising characteristics for quantum information applications, such as operation speed and device integration. Projects include Ultrafast Optical Control of Spin Qubits, Optical Spin Echo, Nuclear Bath Interaction with a Spin Qubit, Nuclear Spin Detection in Silicon, Donor-bound Electron Spin Qubit in ZnSe, and Semiconductor Indistinguishable Single Photon Source
    4.00
    1 votes
    236
    Algiers Metro

    Algiers Metro

    The Algiers Metro (in Arabic: مترو الجزائر العاصمة‎) in Algiers, Algeria, is a transport project dating from the 1970s that was designed to address the need for mass transport caused by the city's growth. Formally launched in the 1980s, the project slowed down due to financial difficulties and security issues in the 1990s. The project recommenced in 2003. The first phase of Line 1 - "Haï el Badr" - "Tafourah-Central Post Office", spanning 9.2 kilometres (5.7 mi) and 10 stations, has been completed and was brought into service in October 2011. Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika attended the ribbon cutting opening ceremony on October 31, 2011. The Algiers Metro opened to passengers on November 1, 2011. During the 1970s, the promoters of the Algiers rapid transit subway project envisioned a 64 km (40 mi) network. The project was officially inaugurated in 1982, with technical studies completed in 1985. Authorities retained a German company and a Japanese specialist for building the network. The collapse of oil prices in the 1980s considerably affected the Algerian state's ability to continue funding the project. Authorities discussed the possibility of folding the subway
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Bejerano Lab : Understanding How the Human Genome Encodes Cis-Regulatory Function

    Bejerano Lab : Understanding How the Human Genome Encodes Cis-Regulatory Function

    Our lab aims to understand the cis-regulatory architecture of the human genome. To this end, we are building a unique suite of computational tools. We compile our own transcription factor binding site motif library, discover motifs de novo from sequence, perform genome wide binding site predictions, filter these using multiple species conservation, and more. By massively running our tools on our large computer cluster, we start to decipher the transcription factor combinations that dictate promoter and enhancer specificity. We then employ functional genomics in the mouse and zebrafish model organisms to validate and improve our predictions. We have also recently published and released GREAT (the Genomic Regions Enrichment of Annotations Tool), the first tool dedicated to the analysis of genome-wide cis-regulatory data. We have shown that GREAT can associate a set of genomic regions, such as ChIP-Seq peaks, with the nearby genes they likely regulate and perform enrichment analysis over many ontologies to find subsets of the genomic regions likely working in concert in well defined contexts (McLean et al., 2010).
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    Bergstrom Lab : The structure and economics of scientific publishing

    Bergstrom Lab : The structure and economics of scientific publishing

    A healthy academic community requires a vibrant system of scholarly communication - but the growing influence of large commercial publishers has made it increasingly difficult for universities to maintain their journal collections. The academic community as a whole suffers, and the authors, reviewers, and editorial board members who give their labor freely to the commercial publishers become unwitting accessories.
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Center for  the Advancement of  Engineering Education

    Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education

    • Includes smaller projects: Academic Pathways Study
    The Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education conducted research in engineering learning and teaching to support the education of a diverse community of engineers better able to meet the challenges of tomorrow in a world that continues to move faster and face more significant decisions than ever before. CAEE conducted research from 2003 into 2010. The CAEE website is hosted by the Center for Engineering Learning and Teaching (CELT) at the University of Washington.
    0.00
    0 votes
    240
    Design and construction of Portrait of a DNA Sequence

    Design and construction of Portrait of a DNA Sequence

    • Project focus: Portrait of a DNA Sequence
    • Part of larger project: Roger Berry Major Works
    Designed by Roger Berry, the design team developed a suspended helix of coiled steel and colored glass, the structure is 50 feet long and 18 inches wide, depicting 201 base pairs, or chemical letters. The sculpture is modeled after a segment of sea urchin DNA that was first deciphered by UC Davis researchers in the early 1990s. Berry used dichroic glass for the base pairs, a special type of glass that both transmits and reflects light. A round wafer of the glass can appear to be either of two colors, depending on the viewer's vantage point. The work was commissioned by the UC Davis Division of Biological Sciences and underwritten by a $50,000 gift.
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    Design and Development of Visible Legacy

    Design and Development of Visible Legacy

    • Project focus: Visible Legacy
    Visible Legacy is an online service offering an interactive knowledge map of projects and people in an academic ecosystem, beginning with Stanford University. People and projects are presented visually and in context.
    0.00
    0 votes
    242
    Docklands Light Railway

    Docklands Light Railway

    The Docklands Light Railway (the DLR) is an automated light metro or light rail system opened in 1987 to serve the redeveloped Docklands area of London. It reaches north to Stratford, south to Lewisham, west to Tower Gateway and Bank in the City of London financial district, and east to Beckton, London City Airport and Woolwich Arsenal. The system is not entirely unmanned: it uses minimal staffing on board trains and at major interchange stations. Similar proposals have been made for the adjacent system, the Tube. The DLR is operated under a concession awarded by Transport for London to Serco Limited, part of the Serco Group. The system is owned by Docklands Light Rail Limited, part of the London Rail division of Transport for London. In 2006 the DLR carried over 60 million passengers. It has been extended several times and further extensions are being planned. The docks immediately east of London began to decline in the early 1960s as cargo became containerised. The opening of the Tilbury container docks, further east in Essex, rendered them redundant and in 1980 the British government gained control. The Jubilee line of the London Underground opened in 1979 from Stanmore to
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    E-mu OEM Product Development

    E-mu OEM Product Development

    • Project focus: Waveblaster
    E-mu Systems was a leading supplier of electronic music products for professional and "pro-sumer" musicians. The founders and CEO of E-mu Systems were seeking an OEM strategy based on their extensive, high-quality internally developed technology to propel the company toward growth and liquidity.
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    NorduGrid

    NorduGrid

    • Part of larger project: European Grid Initiative - EGI
    NorduGrid is a collaboration aiming at development, maintenance and support of the free Grid middleware, known as the Advanced Resource Connector (ARC). The name NorduGrid first became known in 2001 as short for the project called "Nordic Testbed for Wide Area Computing and Data Handling" funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers via the Nordunet2 programme. That project's main goal was to set up a prototype of a distributed computing infrastructure (a testbed), aiming primarily at the needs of the High Energy Physics researchers in the ATLAS experiment. Following evaluation of the then existing Grid technology solutions, NorduGrid developers came up with an alternative software architecture. It was implemented and demonstrated in May 2002, and soon became known as the NorduGrid Middleware. In 2004 this middleware solution was given a proper name, the Advanced Resource Connector (ARC). Until May 2003, NorduGrid headquarters were in the Niels Bohr Institute; at the 5th NorduGrid Workshop it was decided to move them to the Oslo University. The present-day formal collaboration was established in 2005 by five Nordic academic institutes (Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark,
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    246
    Origami

    Origami

    Origami is a mobile service that lets you bookmark and share your world from any mobile phone.
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    247
    Pont de Neuilly

    Pont de Neuilly

    • Project focus: Pont de Neuilly
    Le pont de Neuilly is a road and rail bridge carrying Route nationale 13 and Paris Métro Line 1 which crosses the River Seine between the right bank of Neuilly-sur-Seine and Courbevoie and Puteaux on the left bank in the French department of Hauts-de-Seine. It faces the headquarters of La Défense and is aligned on the Axe historique of Paris. The first bridge on the site was in wood, built after the fall of Henry IV and Marie de Médicis's carriage in June 1606. The second was a 219m-long five-arched structure built in 1774 by Jean-Rodolphe Perronet, founder of the École des ponts et chaussées (a stone statue of him is now at the foot of the bridge, at the west point of île de Puteaux). The second bridge was demolished between 1936 and 1942 and replaced in 1942 with a metal bridge by L. A. Lévy and the Daydé company. In 1992, its pedestrian sidewalks were narrowed to allow Line 1 to be added to the bridge and the bridge gave its name to the nearby Metro station. The present bridge effectively consisted of two bridges - a 67m span between Neuilly and 'île de Puteaux, and an 87m span between île de Puteaux and Courbevoie. A pedestrian staircase in the middle of the bridge allows
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    248
    Stanford GCEP Advanced Materials and Devices for Low-Cost and High-Performance Organic Photovoltaic Cells Project

    Stanford GCEP Advanced Materials and Devices for Low-Cost and High-Performance Organic Photovoltaic Cells Project

    • Part of larger project: Stanford GCEP Solar Energy Projects
    This project was dedicated to the development of novel organic materials to be used in bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices. Their properties were customized to increase the overall energy conversion efficiency of organic PV cells. In particular, photon absorption was enhanced by synthesizing low-bandgap organic semiconductors with sufficient charge carrier mobility for charge extraction. [completed]
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    249
    Stanford NQP Electrically injected active III-V lasers and modulators Project

    Stanford NQP Electrically injected active III-V lasers and modulators Project

    • Includes smaller projects: Development of: A practical electrically pumped photonic crystal nanocavity
    The Stanford NQP Electrically injected active III-V lasers and modulators Project is conducting research to develop practical, low-threshold photonic crystal lasers and laser arrays for optical telecom, optical interconnects, and sensing applications.
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    250
    Stanford PEEC Towards Improved Energy Simulation Tools for Buildings - Improving airflow parameterizations within energy simulation using CFD and building measurements Project

    Stanford PEEC Towards Improved Energy Simulation Tools for Buildings - Improving airflow parameterizations within energy simulation using CFD and building measurements Project

    • Project focus: Formalization of factors and mechanisms to define and generate construction zones for detailed construction planning and visualization
    • Part of larger project: Stanford PEEC Energy Efficient Buildings Research Projects
    Improving the energy efficiency of buildings in California and beyond has great potential for reducing carbon emissions at low cost. Mechanical engineer Gianluca Iaccarino and civil engineer Martin Fischer set out to create a computer model to predict energy use in buildings. They plan to validate their model in part with information from one of the greenest structures on campus, the Yang and Yamazaki Environment and Energy building (Y2E2), completed in 2008.
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