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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Primary election of All Time

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    New Hampshire primary

    New Hampshire primary

    The New Hampshire primary is the first in a series of nationwide party primary elections held in the United States every four years as part of the process of choosing the delegates to the Democratic and Republican national conventions which choose the party nominees for the presidential elections to be held the subsequent November. Although only a few delegates are chosen in the New Hampshire primary, its real importance comes from the massive media coverage it receives (along with the first caucus in Iowa); in recent decades the two states received about as much media attention as all other state contests combined. An example of this massive media coverage has been seen on the campus of Saint Anselm College, as the campus has held multiple national debates and have attracted media outlets like Fox News, CNN, NBC, and ABC. The publicity and momentum can be enormous from a decisive win by a frontrunner, or better-than-expected result in the New Hampshire primary. The upset or weak showing by a front-runner changes the calculus of national politics in a matter of hours, as happened in 1952 (D), 1968 (D), 1980 (R), and 2008 (D). Since 1952, the primary has been a major testing ground
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    Missouri Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    The 2012 United States presidential election in Missouri will take place on November 6, 2012 throughout all 50 states and D.C., which is part of the 2012 United States presidential election. Voters will chose electors to the Electoral College, who will vote for President and Vice President. Absentee voting began September 27, 2012. The Missouri Republican 2012 primary took place on February 7 and the caucuses ran from March 15 to March 24, 2012, except for one rescheduled for April 10. The primary election did not determine which delegates will be sent to the national convention; this is instead determined indirectly by the caucuses and directly by the Missouri Republican congressional-district conventions April 21 and the state convention June 2. The unusual situation of having both the primary election and the caucus for the same party in the same election year in Missouri arose as a result of a change in the nominating rules of the Republican Party. State primaries in Missouri were previously held in early February. In September 2008, the Republican National Committee adopted a set of rules which included a provision that no states except Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and
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    22

    Vermont Democratic primary, 2008

    The 2008 Vermont Democratic primary was an open primary that took place on March 4, 2008. Barack Obama won the primary, his only decisive win among the four March 4 contests. The primary determined the 15 pledged delegates that represented Vermont at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. The delegates were awarded to the candidates, Obama and Hillary Clinton, on a proportional basis. Vermont also sent 8 unpledged "superdelegates", to the convention not bound by the results of the primary. The Vermont Democratic Party sent 23 total delegates to the 2008 Democratic National Convention. Of those delegates, 15 were pledged and 8 were unpledged. The 15 pledged delegates were allocated (pledged) to vote for a particular candidate at the National Convention according to the results of Vermont's Democratic primary on March 4. The 8 unpledged delegates (popularly called "superdelegates" because their votes represented their personal decisions rather than the collective decision of many voters) were free to vote for any candidate at the National Convention and were selected by the Vermont Democratic Party's officials. The 15 pledged delegates were further divided into 10 district
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    6.80
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    9.00
    3 votes
    27

    Colorado Republican caucuses, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The Republican caucuses were held on "Republican Party Precinct Caucus Day" (February 7, 2012). Caucus locations opened on 9 PM, February 7, 2012, with 36 delegates at stake; 33 of which are tied to the caucuses while 3 are unpledged RNC delegates. The event occurred alongside the Minnesota Republican caucuses as well the Missouri Republican primary. The race was widely expected to be won by Mitt Romney even on the day of the caucus, but a strong surge by Rick Santorum across all three races that day carried him to a close victory. Results with 100% (2,917 of 2,917 precincts) reporting: There is no formal system of allocating delegates to candidates in any step of the election process. At each meeting the participants decides what the best course of action is. None of the 36 delegates are legally bound to vote for a candidate.
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    Washington Republican caucuses, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The Republican caucuses were held on March 3, 2012. Since 1992, the Washington Republicans have used a presidential preferential primary in addition to the caucuses. The primary was, however, canceled this year for budgetary reasons, as was the one in 2004. The initial caucuses were held on March 3, 2012, with voters reporting to caucus locations by precinct. However, the caucuses did not allocated delegates to the different candidates, they did only elected delegates to the county conventions and took part in a nonbinding strawpoll. County conventions convened all through March and April, each picking delegates to the state conventions who was not bound to any particular candidate either. The state convention was held on May 31-June 2, 2012. At that time, state delegates to the national convention was legally bound to specific candidates. With 3,677,919 registered voters as of February 29, the turnout was 1.4%. The 37th Legislative District covers parts of King County, and the Republican caucus for the district was held Saturday, April 21 at Dimmitt Middle School. The caucus was broken up by King County Republican Party Chairman Lori Sotelo
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    South Carolina Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    The 2012 United States presidential election in South Carolina will take place on November 6, 2012. It will also take place throughout all 50 states and D.C. South Carolina voters will be electing nine electors to vote for President and Vice President of the United States. [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The Republican primary was held on January 21, 2012. During the primary election campaign, the candidates ran on a platform of government reform in Washington. Domestic, foreign and economic policy emerged as the main themes in the election campaign following the onset of the 2008 economic crisis, as well as policies implemented by the Obama administration. This included the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, termed "Obamacare" by its opponents, as well as government spending as a whole. The primary has become one of several key early state nominating contests in the process of choosing the nominee of the Republican Party for the election for President of the United States. It has historically been more important for the Republican Party than for the Democratic Party; from its inception in 1980, until the nomination of Mitt Romney in 2012, the winner of the
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    Arizona Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    Nationwide elections for the United States President will be held November 6, 2012. Arizona held its primaries on February 28, 2012. Arizona will elect 11 electors, who will then vote for President in the Electoral College. Incumbent president Barack Obama won all the delegates and was renominated during the Democratic National Convention on September 5th, 2012. The Republican primary was a closed primary that took place on February 28, 2012. More than 1,130,000 registered Republican voters participated in the event, the purpose of which was to select delegates from the state to attend the Republican National Convention on behalf of candidates for the Republican presidential nomination. The Republican National Committee removed half of Arizona's delegate allocation because the state committee moved its Republican primary before March 6. Arizona therefore held a ballot to select 29 proportionally-allocated delegates. This election occurred the same day as the Michigan Republican primary. The Arizona primary was set as a winner-take-all contest, another violation of RNC delegate allocation rules, which require proportional allocation for all primaries held before April 1. The small
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    Minnesota Republican caucuses, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The Republican caucuses were held on February 7, 2012. The events coincided with the Colorado Republican caucuses as well as the Missouri Republican primary. Minnesota has a total of 40 delegates, 37 of which are tied to the caucuses while 3 are unpledged RNC delegates. The non-binding straw poll was won by Rick Santorum, but Ron Paul won 32 of the 40 delegates to the Republican National Convention. Results with 100.0% (4,137 of 4,137 precincts) reporting: There is no formal system of allocating delegates to candidates in any step of the election process. At each meeting the participants decides what the best course of action is. The state convention can vote to bind the 13 at-large delegates to a candidate. The 24 delegates elected at the CD conventions and the 3 automatic (RNC) delegates are not legally bound to vote for a candidate.
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    Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2012

    • Party: Democratic Party
    The 2012 Democratic presidential primaries and caucuses were the process by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 2012 U.S. presidential election. Incumbent President Barack Obama won the Democratic Party nomination by securing more than the required 2778 delegates on April 3, 2012 after a series of primary elections and caucuses. He was formally nominated by the 2012 Democratic National Convention on September 5, 2012, in Charlotte, North Carolina. The general expectation was that, with President Barack Obama having the advantage of incumbency and being the only viable candidate running, the race would be merely pro forma. Several of the lesser-known candidates made efforts to raise visibility. Some Occupy movement activists made an attempt to take over the Iowa caucuses, and managed to get about 2% of the vote for Uncommitted. With eight minor candidates on the ballot in New Hampshire, there was a debate at Saint Anselm College in Goffstown, New Hampshire on December 19, 2011, in which seven candidates participated. Pro-life activist Randall Terry bought time on television in order to show graphic commercials denouncing
    10.00
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    75

    Massachusetts Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    Nationwide elections for the United States President will be held November 6, 2012. Massachusetts held its primaries on March 6, 2012. Massachusetts will elect 12 electors who will vote for President in the Electoral college. Incumbent president Barack Obama won all the delegates and was renominated. The 2012 Massachusetts Republican primary was held on March 6, 2012. Among the 41 delegates to the Republican National Convention, 38 are awarded proportionately among candidates getting at least 15% of the vote statewide, and another three super delegates are unbound. Expectedly, Romney won Massachusetts by a landslide. Romney won the plurality in every town with the exception of 10 towns (Santorum winning 7, Paul winning 2, and a tie in 1), earning the majority in all but 53 towns. Gary Johnson leads in the third party candidates.
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    Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012

    Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    The 2012 Republican presidential primaries were the selection processes in which voters of the Republican Party elected state delegations to the Republican National Convention. The national convention then selected their nominee to run for President of the United States in the 2012 presidential election. There were 2,286 delegates chosen, and a candidate needed to accumulate 1,144 delegate votes at the convention to win the nomination. The caucuses allocated delegates to the respective state delegations to the national convention, but the actual election of the delegates were many times at a later date. Delegates were elected in different ways that vary from state to state. They could be elected at local conventions, selected from slates submitted by the candidates, selected at committee meetings, or elected directly at the caucuses and primaries. The primary contest began in 2011 with a fairly wide field. Mitt Romney, former Governor of Massachusetts, had been preparing to run for president ever since the 2008 election, and the media narrative became: "Who will be the anti-Romney candidate?" Several candidates rose in the polls throughout the year. However, the field was down to
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    New Hampshire Democratic primary, 2008

    New Hampshire Democratic primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The 2008 New Hampshire Democratic primary on January 8, 2008 was the first primary in the United States in 2008. Its purpose was to determine the number of delegates from New Hampshire that would represent a certain candidate at the National Convention. In a primary, members of a political party—in this case, the Democratic Party—will select the candidates to a subsequent election. Since 1920, New Hampshire has always hosted the first primaries in the entire nation. The Democratic Party's primary occurred on the same day as the Republican primary. Hillary Clinton was the winner of the popular vote in the primary, with Barack Obama trailing in second. Clinton and Obama received an equal number of delegates to the National Convention since the percentages of their votes were close. New Hampshire became the first state since Shirley Chisholm won New Jersey in 1972 to give a primary win to a female candidate. After Obama became the Democratic Party's presumptive nominee on June 3, the New Hampshire Delegation to the 2008 Democratic National Convention unanimously cast its 30 formal votes for him, one of only three states to do so. New Hampshire hosts the first primary in the entire
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    South Carolina Republican primary, 2008

    South Carolina Republican primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The South Carolina Republican primary, 2008 was held on January 19, with 24 delegates at stake. The Republican National Committee took half of South Carolina's 47 delegates away from them because the state committee moved its Republican primary before February 5. It was held on the same day as the Nevada Republican caucuses, 2008. The primary has become one of several key early state nominating contests in the process of choosing the nominee of the Republican party for the November 2008 election for President of the United States. It has historically been more important for the Republican Party than for the Democratic Party; from its inception in 1980 through the election of 2000, the winner of the Republican presidential primary has gone on to win the nomination. As of 2008, the primary has cemented its place as the "First in the South" primary for both parties. This states 24 delegates would be awarded on a "Winner-Takes-All" basis. 12 Delegates for the State-wide winner and 12 delegates awarded on a District-winner basis awarding 2 delegates for each of the states then 6 Congressional districts. As of January 19, RealClearPolitics reported that the average support from polls
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    Vermont Republican primary, 2008

    The 2008 Vermont Republican primary took place on March 4, 2008. Arizona Senator John McCain was the winner of the primary. * Candidate dropped out of the race before the primary
    5.40
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    Nevada Republican caucuses, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The Republican caucuses were held on February 4. They are closed caucuses. Mitt Romney was declared the winner. There are 400,310 registered Republicans voting for 28 delegates. The 2012 Nevada Republican caucuses were originally scheduled to begin on February 18, 2012, much later than the date in 2008, which almost immediately followed the beginning of the year in January 2008. On September 29, 2011, the entire schedule of caucuses and primaries was disrupted, however, when it was announced that the Republican Party of Florida had decided to move up its primary to January 31, in an attempt to bring attention to its own primary contest, and attract the presidential candidates to visit the state. Because of the move, the Republican National Committee decided to strip Florida of half of its delegates. Also as a result, the Nevada Republican Party, along with Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina, then sought to move their caucuses back into early January. All but Nevada, who agreed to follow Florida, confirmed their caucus and primary dates to take place throughout January, with Nevada deciding to hold their contest on February 4, 2012. The
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    Michigan Democratic primary, 2008

    Michigan Democratic primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Michigan Democratic Presidential Primary took place January 15, 2008. Originally, the state had 156 delegates up for grabs that were to be awarded in the following way: 83 delegates were to be awarded based on the winner in each of Michigan's 15 congressional districts while an additional 45 delegates were to be awarded to the statewide winner. Twenty-eight unpledged delegates, known as superdelegates, were initially able to cast their votes at the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. However, the Democratic National Committee determined that the date of the Michigan Democratic Primary violated the party rules and ultimately decided to sanction the state, stripping all 156 delegates and refusing to seat them at the convention. Despite this, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled that the primary could go ahead as scheduled. The DNC Rules and Bylaws Committee later met on May 31, 2008, and agreed to seat all of Michigan's delegates with each delegate having only receive half a vote. As a result of this compromise, Michigan had 78 votes at the convention. On August 24, the delegates had full voting rights restored. The Michigan Legislature passed a bill to move the date
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    Michigan Republican primary, 2008

    Michigan Republican primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The 2008 Michigan Republican primary took place on January 15, 2008. Mitt Romney came in first with 39 percent of the vote, followed by John McCain with 30 percent and Mike Huckabee in third-place with 16 percent. The victory was widely-viewed as critical for the Romney campaign, as a loss in Michigan, where his father was governor, would have resulted in a loss of momentum after two losses already in New Hampshire and Iowa. National delegates determined: 30 out of 60 In accordance with Republican National Committee rules, Michigan was stripped of half its delegates for holding primary contests before February 5, 2008.
    8.00
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    116

    New Hampshire Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    Nationwide elections for the United States President will be held November 6, 2012. New Hampshire will elect 4 electors who will vote for President in the Electoral college. New Hampshire held its primaries on January 10, 2012. The state is historically the first in the nation to hold presidential primaries, and moved its date up from February after Florida moved its primary date to January 31. Because New Hampshire has a proportional-delegate primary, the state's 12 national delegates will be allocated in proportion to candidates' percent of the popular vote. Incumbent president Barack Obama won all the delegates and is likely to be renominated. A Democratic presidential candidates debate, held at Saint Anselm College in December 2011, was attended by seven candidates; Obama did not participate. 60,659 votes were cast in the primary. Obama won with 49,080 votes. The total votes cast were more than 30 percent fewer than in 1996, the last time that a Democratic president ran for re-election without significant opposition. The Republican primary took place on Tuesday, January 10, 2012. Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney won the primary. Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt
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    9.00
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    Florida Democratic primary, 2008

    Florida Democratic primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Florida Democratic Presidential primary took place on January 29, 2008. Originally, the state had 185 delegates up for grabs that were to be awarded in the following way: 121 delegates were to be awarded based on the winner in each of Florida's 25 congressional districts while an additional 64 delegates were to be awarded to the statewide winner. Twenty-five unpledged delegates, known as superdelegates, were initially able to cast their votes at the Democratic National Convention. However, the Democratic National Committee determined that the date of the Florida Democratic Primary violated the party rules and ultimately decided to sanction the state, stripping all 210 delegates and refusing to seat them at the convention. The DNC Rules and Bylaws Committed later met on May 31, 2008, and agreed to seat all of Florida's delegates with each delegate having only receive half a vote. As a result of this compromise, Florida's had 105 votes at the convention. In August 2006, the Democratic National Committee adopted a proposal by its Rules and Bylaws Committee that only four states - Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina - would be permitted to hold primaries or caucuses
    9.00
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    119
    Florida Republican primary, 2008

    Florida Republican primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The 2008 Florida Republican primary was held on January 29, 2008, with 57 delegates at stake on a winner-take-all basis. The Republican National Committee removed half of Florida's delegates because the state committee moved its Republican primary before February 5. Arizona Senator John McCain was the winner of the primary. Rudy Giuliani dropped out of the race the next day, due to poor results. Rudy Giuliani campaigned quite heavily in Florida, which he expected to use as his "launch pad" for a "strong showing" on Super Tuesday. He campaigned almost entirely in Florida, and largely ignored South Carolina and other states voting before February 5. Polls taken before the primary showed that John McCain was the slight front runner over Mitt Romney. Giuliani had been campaigning with virtually no opposition; however, following the South Carolina Republican primary, 2008, several candidates flew down to Florida to begin campaigning up to January 29 when the primary occurred. As of January 29, RealClearPolitics reported that the average support from polls taken in the days immediately prior to primary day placed McCain slightly in the lead with 30.7%, followed by Romney with 30.1%,
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Hawaii Republican caucuses, 2008

    Hawaii Republican caucuses, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Hawaii Republican caucuses, 2008 were held between January 25 and February 5, 2008. The caucuses chose delegates to Hawaii's Republican State Convention in May 2008, which overwhelmingly lent its support to Presidential candidate John McCain. The Hawaii Republican Party held its caucuses in all 51 Hawaii House of Representatives districts from January 25 to February 5. Caucus-goers selected 1,093 delegates to the Hawaii State Convention, held between May 16 and 18. These 1,093 delegates selected 19 delegates to the 2008 Republican National Convention. Republican caucuses in Hawaii tend to be informal, taking place in parks, businesses, and homes over the course of several days. The Republican caucuses in Hawaii were closed to non-party members. None of the local delegates chosen at the caucus were committed to any candidate at the state convention. They were, however, bound to the preferences stated in the state convention in the first ballot. For this reason, Hawaiian Republican caucusgoers normally vote for convention delegates based on the delegates' personal records rather than their pledged support for a presidential candidate. However, most contenders provided slates of
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    6.67
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    126

    Wyoming Republican county conventions, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The 2008 Wyoming Republican caucuses took place on January 5, 2008, with 12 national delegates chosen by county convention delegates. A majority of the national delegates were won by former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. In addition, two national delegates were elected at the Republican State Convention on May 30-31. Eligible voters included precinct committee chairs (one man and one woman for each of the 487 precincts, which were elected in 2006) and 250 county convention delegates, elected in precinct caucuses held throughout Wyoming in December 2007 and apportioned according to Republican voters in the last congressional election. Although originally the size of the delegation was 28, RNC rules stated that any states holding primary contests before February 5 would lose half of their delegates. Each of the 23 counties elected either a delegate or an alternate delegate, except for Laramie County, which elected both a delegate and an alternate delegate. The Wyoming Republican Party did not release the vote totals.
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    South Carolina Democratic primary, 2008

    South Carolina Democratic primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The 2008 United States presidential election in South Carolina took place on November 4, 2008 throughout all 50 states and D.C., which was part of the 2008 United States presidential election. Voters chose 8 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President. South Carolina was won by Republican nominee John McCain by a 9.0% margin of victory. Prior to the election, all 17 news organizations considered this a state McCain would win, or otherwise considered as a safe red state. Despite the significant proportion of African Americans in the state, South Carolina still remains like all other states throughout the South, a GOP stronghold at the state and federal levels. Republican John McCain kept South Carolina in the GOP column in 2008, clinching 53.87% of the vote. There were 17 news organizations who made state by state predictions of the election. Here are there last predictions before election day: McCain won every single pre-election poll. The final 3 polls averaged McCain leading with 53% to 43%. John McCain raised a total of $2,574,332 in the state. Barack Obama raised $2,227,877. Obama spent $967,640. McCain and his interest
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    148
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    2 votes
    155
    7.00
    2 votes
    156

    Alaska Democratic caucuses, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Alaska Democratic Caucuses took place Super Tuesday, February 5, 2008. This was the first time that Democrats in Alaska participated in Super Tuesday, and the large turnout forced at least one caucusing site to delay closing its doors far beyond the 6 p.m. deadline. The state had a total of 13 delegates at stake. Barack Obama won the Alaska Democratic Caucuses and secured 9 delegates to the Democratic National Convention while Hillary Rodham Clinton took 4 delegates. However, the caucus was non-binding, and Alaska's Democratic State Convention in May awarded Obama 10 pledged delegates. The Alaska Democratic Caucuses were open to all Alaska voters. Non-Democrats and unregistered voters could register or switch party affiliation at the meeting. At the caucus, voters "fanned out" to groups of supporters of their candidate. Then delegates to the state convention on May 24, 2008, were selected from these preference groups. At the district caucuses, candidates required a minimum support threshold of 15 percent to win delegates to the state convention. The same threshold applied at the state convention; candidates needed a support threshold of 15 percent to receive delegates at the
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    6.00
    3 votes
    160
    6.00
    3 votes
    161
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    6.00
    3 votes
    164
    Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008

    Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008

    • Party: Democratic Party
    • Follow-on election: United States presidential election, 2008
    The 2008 Democratic presidential primaries were the process by which the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Senator Barack Obama of Illinois won and became the party's nominee. However, due to a close race between Obama and Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, the contest remained competitive for longer than expected, and neither candidate received enough delegates from state primary races and caucuses to achieve a majority without so-called "superdelegate" votes. The presidential primaries actually consisted of both primary elections and caucuses, depending upon what the individual state chose. The goal of the process was to elect the majority of the 4,233 delegates to the 2008 Democratic National Convention, which was held from Monday, August 25, through Thursday, August 28, 2008, in Denver, Colorado. To secure the nomination, a candidate needed to receive at least 2,117 votes at the convention—or a simple majority of the 4,233 delegate votes. This total included half-votes from American Samoa, Guam, the United States Virgin Islands, and Democrats Abroad, as well as "superdelegates", party leaders and elected
    6.00
    3 votes
    165
    Maine Republican caucuses, 2008

    Maine Republican caucuses, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Maine Republican caucuses, 2008 were held on February 1, February 2, and February 3 at various locations throughout the state of Maine. The results were used to apportion 21 delegates for the state. The Maine Republican caucuses were the first caucuses in the 2008 election season in which Rudy Giuliani was out of the race. The Maine Republican caucus is a modified closed caucus. New voters and voters who have not declared a party may register as Republicans 30 minutes before the caucus begins. Otherwise, a voter must have been registered Republican 15 days before the caucus. In addition, those who turn 18 by the general election are eligible to register at the caucus site. The delegates chosen at the caucuses are actually non-binding; this means that they will not be bound to any specific candidate. Like most Republican Party caucuses, there are two components to the Maine caucuses. First, delegates are elected from the attendees. These delegates later represent the caucusgoers at the state convention in May. Candidates generally provide slates of delegates to voters who are interested in supporting them, and voters can ask prospective delegates whom they support for
    6.00
    3 votes
    166
    Nevada Democratic caucuses, 2008

    Nevada Democratic caucuses, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Nevada Democratic Presidential Caucuses took place on January 19, 2008 after having been moved from a later date by the Nevada Democratic Party. The Nevada Democratic Caucus was considered important in determining the eventual party nominee, as many described it as the "Bellwether of the West" seeing as how it is the first Western state to vote in the Democratic Presidential Primary season. Nevada's 25 "pledged" delegates to the Democratic National Convention were chosen on May 17, 2008, when the Nevada Democratic Party held its State Convention. Barack Obama ended up receiving 14 national delegates compared to Hillary Rodham Clinton who received 11 national delegates. However, Clinton did ultimately prevail in terms of the number of votes received during the Nevada Democratic Caucus. It was the only state that held a caucus that she won during the course of the Democratic Presidential Primary. The Nevada Democratic Caucus was open to all voters who would be 18 by November 4, 2008, regardless of party affiliation. Republicans, unaffiliated voters, and members of other parties could change their registration at the door, and new voters could register as well. As with all
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    3 votes
    167
    5.00
    4 votes
    168
    5.67
    3 votes
    169
    5.67
    3 votes
    170
    5.67
    3 votes
    171
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    6.50
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    173
    6.50
    2 votes
    174
    6.50
    2 votes
    175

    Iowa Republican caucuses, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    Nationwide elections for the United States President will be held November 6, 2012. Iowa will elect electors who will vote for President in the Electoral college. Incumbent president Barack Obama won all the delegates was renominated. The 2012 Iowa Republican caucuses took place on January 3, 2012. It was the closest race in Iowa caucus history with only a thirty-four vote margin (about ⁄100th of a percent) separating former Senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, who received 29,839 votes (24.56 percent), and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, who received 29,805 votes (24.53 percent). Representative Ron Paul of Texas ran a close third, receiving 26,219 votes (21.43 percent). Trailing was former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich (16,251 votes, 13.3 percent), Texas governor Rick Perry (12,604 votes, 10.3 percent), and Representative Michele Bachmann (6,073 votes, 5 percent). Former Utah governor and ambassador to China Jon Huntsman, Jr., who skipped campaigning in Iowa to focus on the New Hampshire primary, received 745 votes (0.6 percent). Total turnout was 122,255 votes, setting a record for Iowa Republican caucuses, but still far less than the all-time Iowa caucus record
    6.50
    2 votes
    176
    4.75
    4 votes
    177
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    7.00
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    180
    7.00
    1 votes
    181
    7.00
    1 votes
    182
    7.00
    1 votes
    183
    7.00
    1 votes
    184

    Kansas Republican caucuses, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The Republican caucuses were held on Saturday, March 10, 2012. Kansas has 40 delegates to the 2012 Republican National Convention. 25 of these delegates are allocated proportionally to candidates who exceed a 20% threshold in the statewide vote tally. The 15 remaining delegates are 'winner-take-all' delegates. 12 delegates are given (3 each) to the candidates with most votes in each of Kansas's 4 congressional districts. 3 delegates are awarded to the candidate with most votes statewide. Rick Santorum won the caucus and will receive 33 delegates. He won the state with 51% of the statewide vote and received most votes in all of the congressional districts, thus winning 15 delegates. As only Santorum and Mitt Romney exceeded the 20% threshold, 18 of the 25 proportionally allocated delegates were allocated to Santorum and 7 to Romney.
    7.00
    1 votes
    185

    Michigan Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The Republican primary took place on February 28, 2012, the same day as the Arizona Republican primary. Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney won both of these elections. This Michigan election used a semi-open primary system (which the state referred to as "closed") in which each voter made a public declaration at their election site and received the ballot for the approriate party, rather than the fully open system used in the past. The state had 7,286,556 registered voters as of February 15, and delegates were awarded proportionately. Michigan was given 59 delegates to the Republican (GOP) national convention, but that number was reduced to 30 as a penalty for bringing the election date forward before March 6 as the GOP rules set. The candidate with the greatest number of votes in each of the 14 congressional districts will receive that district's two delegates. Two additional delegates for Michigan were announced by the media to be given proportionally before the election but after the election the Michigan GOP announced there had been an error in the memo published and that the two delegates will be given to the winner, which sparked
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    186
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    187
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    188
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    189
    6.00
    2 votes
    190

    Florida Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    The 2012 Florida Republican primary was held on January 31, 2012. Fifty delegates were at stake, none of them RNC (or super) delegates; it is unclear whether these delegates will be allocated proportionally or winner-take-all. Originally awarded 99 delegates, the Republican National Committee removed half of Florida's delegates because the state committee moved its Republican primary before March 6; the Republican National Committee rules also set the delegate allocation to be proportional because the contest was held before April 1. It is a closed primary. There were 4,063,853 registered Republican voters as of January 3, 2012. Florida is spread over two time zones, so voting wasn't completed until 7 pm CST/8pm EST. Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina, the first three contests in the primary election cycle to eventually determine a parties' nominee, are often the most politically significant states due to the bandwagon effect. The candidates themselves, their infrastructure and the national media are entrenched in these states and therefore these early states (particularly Iowa and New Hampshire) receive more media and political attention than any other state. Often the
    6.00
    2 votes
    191
    Louisiana Republican caucuses, 2008

    Louisiana Republican caucuses, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Louisiana Republican caucuses, 2008 were held on January 22 and the primary on February 9, 2008. On December 19, 2007, the Republican Party of Louisiana announced the procedures for selection of its delegates to the 2008 Republican National Convention. The Louisiana caucuses selected 105 delegates to the state convention on February 16 in Baton Rouge. Fifteen delegates (and 15 alternates) from each of the seven (7) congressional districts were elected at the caucus sites. Eligibility to participate was originally restricted to those who had been registered Louisiana Republicans since November 30, 2007 and presented a photo identification, however the restriction date was changed to November 1, 2007 at the last minute. Voters were to select up to 15 candidates on a secret ballot. Twenty-one delegates to the 2008 RNC will be selected through the caucus process, since each district's 15 delegates to the state convention will separately select three RNC delegates and three alternates for their respective district. In addition, the state convention delegates, as a whole, will select 20 delegates and 20 alternates to the national convention as at-large delegates. Under state party
    6.00
    2 votes
    192
    5.00
    3 votes
    193
    5.00
    3 votes
    194
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    5.50
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    196
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    2 votes
    197
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Nevada Republican caucuses, 2008

    Nevada Republican caucuses, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Nevada Republican caucuses, 2008 was held on January 19, the same day as the 2008 South Carolina Republican primary, with 31 delegates at stake. Mitt Romney was the winner in Nevada with 51% of the votes, with Ron Paul in second place. Half of Romney's votes came from Mormons, while two-thirds of the independent voters favored Paul. According to the Las Vegas Sun, Republicans crossed over in large numbers to vote Democratic; CNN exit polls indicated that Republican voters made up 4% of the Democratic caucus turnout. The Nevada Republican Party caucus is a closed caucus open to those who were registered 30 days before the caucus date, and 17-year-olds who are eligible to vote in the general election in November. As in most Republican caucuses, there are two components. First, delegates are elected from the attendees. These delegates represent the caucusgoers at the county conventions in March, and generally announce who they support for President, and why they should go to the county convention. Election of delegates is by show of hands. Then, a supporter of each campaign speaks on behalf of their candidate. Finally, a straw poll, called a presidential preference poll, is taken
    5.50
    2 votes
    199
    4.67
    3 votes
    200
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
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    1 votes
    202
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    6.00
    1 votes
    205

    Georgia Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The 2012 Georgia Republican primary took place on March 6, 2012. Georgia has 76 delegates to the Republic National Convention. The three super delegates are awarded winner-take-all to the statewide winner. Thirty-one delegates are awarded proportionately among candidates winning at least 20% of the vote statewide. Another 42 delegates are allocated by Congressional district, 3 delegates for each district. If a candidate gets a majority in a district, he wins all 3 delegates. If no one get majority, the delegates are split 2 and 1 between the top two candidates respectively.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    5.00
    2 votes
    207
    4.50
    2 votes
    208
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    1 votes
    209
    5.00
    1 votes
    210
    5.00
    1 votes
    211
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    1 votes
    212
    5.00
    1 votes
    213
    5.00
    1 votes
    214

    Puerto Rico Republican primary, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    The 2012 Puerto Rico Republican primary took place on March 18, 2012. On January 18, 2012, Secretary of State Kenneth McClintock announced that seven candidates, including Newt Gingrich, Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Ron Paul and Rick Perry (who has since withdrawn and endorsed Gingrich) would be eligible to appear on the March 18 ballot unless they notified McClintock by February 17 of their desire not to compete in Puerto Rico. If a candidate received a majority of the votes, then the primary was to be winner-take-all, but if no candidate met the 50% threshold, its 20 delegates were to be divided proportionally. On February 20, 2012, the Republican Party of Puerto Rico announced the six candidate names and their order on the ballot for the island's March 18 presidential primary. Prior to certification: In 2012 U.S. presidential candidate Rick Santorum was criticized during the runup to the Puerto Rican Republican primary for stating that if Puerto Rico opted to become a state, it would have to make English its primary language. As The New York Times reported: His remarks drew immediate criticism, and prompted one delegate who had been pledged to him to quit, saying he was offended.
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    2008 Iowa Democratic caucuses

    2008 Iowa Democratic caucuses

    • Party: Democratic Party
    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Iowa Democratic Presidential Caucus occurred on January 3, 2008, and was the state caucuses of the Iowa Democratic Party. It was the first election for the Democrats of the 2008 presidential election. Also referred to as "the First in the Nation Caucus," it was the first election of the primary season on both the Democratic and Republican sides. Of the eight major Democratic presidential candidates, then-U.S. Senator Barack Obama of Illinois received the most votes and was ultimately declared the winner of the Iowa Democratic Caucus of 2008, making him the first African American to win the caucus. Former U.S. Senator John Edwards of North Carolina came in second place and then-U.S. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York finished third, though Clinton received more delegates than Edwards. Campaigning had begun as early as two years before the event. The Iowa Caucuses have historically been the first held in the United States. The caucus marked the traditional and formal start of the delegate selection process for the 2008 United States presidential election, and the process in which members of the Democratic Party gathered to make policy decisions. Iowa state law mandates
    4.00
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    216
    4.00
    1 votes
    217
    4.00
    1 votes
    218
    4.00
    1 votes
    219
    4.00
    1 votes
    220
    Alabama Democratic primary, 2008

    Alabama Democratic primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The Alabama Democratic Presidential Primary was held on Super Tuesday, February 5, 2008, and had a total of 52 delegates at stake. The winner in each of Alabama's seven congressional districts was awarded all of that district's delegates, totaling 34. Another 18 delegates were awarded to the statewide winner, Barack Obama. The 52 delegates represented Alabama at the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Eight other delegates were chosen on March 1, 2008 during an Alabama Democratic Party Executive Committee meeting. Those eight delegates attended the National Convention as officially unpledged. With its heavily African American population, Barack Obama solidly defeated Hillary Rodham Clinton in Alabama. According to exit polls, 51 percent of voters in the Alabama Democratic Primary were African Americans and they opted for Obama by a margin of 84-15 compared to the 44 percent of Caucasian voters who backed Clinton by a margin of 72-25. Obama won all age groups and educational attainment levels in Alabama except senior citizens aged 65 and over and those who did not complete high school. Obama won voters who identified as Democrats but Clinton won those who identified
    4.00
    1 votes
    221
    Democratic Party presidential primaries, 1992

    Democratic Party presidential primaries, 1992

    • Follow-on election: United States presidential election, 1992
    The 1992 Democratic presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1992 U.S. presidential election. Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton was selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections and caucuses culminating in the 1992 Democratic National Convention held from July 13 to July 16, 1992 in New York City. During the aftermath of the Gulf War, President Bush's approval ratings were extremely high. During one point after the successful performance by U.S forces in Kuwait, President Bush's approval ratings were 89%. As a result, several high profile candidates such as Mario Cuomo refused to seek the Democratic Nomination for President. Senator (and later vice-president) Al Gore refused to seek the nomination due to the fact his son was struck by a car and was undergoing extensive surgery as well as physical therapy. The Democrats lacked a high-profile viable candidate to face an incumbent Republican president. Still, several candidates such as Bill Clinton, Paul Tsongas and Jerry Brown chose to run. Candidates: Clinton, a Southerner with experience governing a more
    4.00
    1 votes
    222

    1992 Republican presidential primary

    The 1992 Republican presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Republican Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1992 U.S. presidential election. Incumbent President George H.W. Bush was again selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections and caucuses culminating in the 1992 Republican National Convention held from August 17 to August 20, 1992 in Houston, Texas. For only the third time in the 20th century, after the elections of 1912 and 1976, a sitting Republican president was seriously challenged for his party's nomination. President George H. W. Bush was challenged by conservative commentator Pat Buchanan, and during the early counting of the votes at the New Hampshire primary, it appeared that the president might actually lose. However, Buchanan faded by the end of the evening, and Bush won all the rest of the primaries. Bush's margins in many of the primaries weren't as large as expected, and led to the rise of Ross Perot as an independent candidate. Former Democrat and Louisiana State Representative David Duke also ran in a number of primaries, but he didn't receive any delegates. Former Governor Harold
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    223
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    224
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    225
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    0 votes
    226
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    227
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    0 votes
    228
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    0 votes
    229
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    0 votes
    230
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    0 votes
    231
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    232
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    0 votes
    233
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    0 votes
    234
    2008 Iowa Republican caucuses

    2008 Iowa Republican caucuses

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The 2008 United States presidential election in Iowa took place on November 4, 2008 throughout all 50 states and D.C., which was part of the 2008 United States presidential election. Voters chose 7 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for President and Vice President. Iowa was won by Democratic nominee Barack Obama by a 9.5% margin of victory. Prior to the election, all 17 news organizations considered this a state Obama would win, or otherwise considered as a safe blue state. In 2004 Republican George W. Bush very narrowly won the state in his reelection bid. A Midwestern state where agriculture plays a critical role in the daily lives of its citizens, Iowa is nevertheless an independent state. However, due to Obama's victory in the Iowa caucuses, Bush's unpopularity, and the troubling economy, the state easily fell into Obama's column later in the election season. The 2008 Iowa caucuses took place on January 3, 2008. They are an unofficial primary, with the delegates to the state convention selected proportionally via a straw poll. The Iowa caucuses mark the traditional formal start of the delegate selection process for the 2008 United States
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    0 votes
    235
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    236
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    237
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    238
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    239
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    240
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    241
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    242
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    243
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    244
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    0 votes
    245
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    American Samoa Democratic caucuses, 2008

    American Samoa Democratic caucuses, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The American Samoa Democratic caucuses, 2008 took place on February 5, 2008, also known as Super Tuesday. Caucusing began at 11:00 am local time. The early time ensured that results would be reported that evening in the mainland United States. Hillary Clinton won the caucus, the smallest of Super Tuesday's nominating contests. The caucus drew a record turnout for the territory. A record setting 285 caucus goers, who voted for their candidates at a hotel in the capital, Pago Pago, turned out for the caucus. The caucus selected six pledged delegates to the 2008 Democratic National Convention; however, each delegate received only half a vote, so the caucus essentially determined the allocation of three delegate votes. Since the pledged delegates were awarded proportionally, Clinton secured 2 delegates, with the third going to her opponent Barack Obama. American Samoa also sent 6 unpledged superdelegates to the national convention; 4 endorsed Senator Clinton while 2 endorsed Senator Obama.
    0.00
    0 votes
    247

    Florida Democratic primary, 2012

    As the Florida legislature broke the rules of both parties and scheduled its primary for the last day in January, the Democratic National Committee declared the primary to be merely a non-binding preference poll. With no delegates at stake, the minor candidates didn't try to get on the ballot, and with President Obama's the only name submitted, the State declared the ballot blank, and the exercise meaningless. The State Democratic committee proposed an alternate delegate selection system, which consisted of county caucuses which are to take place on May 5, followed by a state convention in June. As a result of this change, Florida’s Democratic delegation was awarded an additional 20% bonus in the number of delegates and alternates sent to Charlotte. As there was only one candidate, ballots were not printed and the primary effectively cancelled. There were no published results.
    0.00
    0 votes
    248

    Maine Republican caucuses, 2012

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2012
    [Data unknown/missing. You can help!] The Republican caucuses were held between Sunday, January 29, and Saturday, March 3, at various locations throughout the state of Maine. Presidential preference polls (straw polls) were held at the caucuses, but those polls were not binding on the choices of delegates to the Maine Republican Party convention. The caucuses chose delegates in processes separate from the straw polling. The state party encouraged all municipal committees to hold their caucuses between February 4 and February 11, although each committee was free to choose a different date. The first caucus was in Waldo County on January 29 and the last one in Castine (Hancock County) on March 3. On Saturday, February 11, after 84% of precincts had completed voting, state-party officials announced results of straw polls. The results were revised in a second declaration on February 17 to include previously-missing results from several caucuses. Those statewide totals still did not include the caucuses in Washington County, which had been scheduled for February 11 but postponed to February 18 by predictions of bad weather, nor did they include caucuses originally scheduled to occur
    0.00
    0 votes
    249
    New Hampshire Republican primary, 2008

    New Hampshire Republican primary, 2008

    • Follow-on election: Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008
    The 2008 New Hampshire Republican primary took place on January 8, 2008, with 12 national delegates being allocated proportionally to the popular vote. Arizona Senator John McCain won 7 of the delegates. Independent voters made up 44 percent of the New Hampshire electorate and could choose to vote in either this primary or the Democratic Party's contest held on the same day, but voters could not vote in both. In the days leading up to the primary, John McCain appeared to gain a slight lead over Mitt Romney. Average support from polls were McCain, 31.8%; Romney, 28.2%; Huckabee, 12.2%; Giuliani, 9.3%; Paul, 8.2%; Thompson, 2.2%. The official return was certified by the New Hampshire Secretary of State on 9 January. According to New Hampshire law, delegates are allocated proportionally with a minimum 10% threshold required to receive delegates. The balance of delegates that are not assigned are then allocated to the winner. * Candidate had already dropped out of the race prior to primary. Most New Hampshire voters cast their votes on vulnerable Diebold optical-scan systems, leading election-reform activists to immediately begin examining the results from New Hampshire, claiming later
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    0 votes
    250
    Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008

    Republican Party presidential primaries, 2008

    • Party: Republican Party
    • Follow-on election: United States presidential election, 2008
    The 2008 Republican presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Republican Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Senator John McCain of Arizona was selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections and caucuses culminating in the 2008 Republican National Convention held from Monday, September 1, through Thursday, September 4, 2008, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In a crowded primary of several prominent Republicans eying the nomination, moderate former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani was the early front runner. However, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee won the Iowa Caucuses as he gained momentum just two months prior to the primary. Moderate U.S. Senator and former presidential candidate John McCain won the New Hampshire primary, eventually leading to Giuliani's fall, as the former mayor did not win a single primary. McCain ultimately won the nomination after winning most of the primaries against Mike Huckabee and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney on Super Tuesday. Notes for the following table: Delegate counts is the final estimated delegate count. Republican
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