Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 806 views
  • 98 votes
  • 98 voters
  • 2%
Best Prayer of All Time

More about Best Prayer of All Time:

Best Prayer of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Prayer of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Prayer of All Time has gotten 806 views and has gathered 98 votes from 98 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

Best Prayer of All Time is a top list in the Religion category on Rankly.com. Are you a fan of Religion or Best Prayer of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Religion on Rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Prayer of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of Rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At Rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Prayer of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1

    Tefilat HaDerech

    Tefilat HaDerech or the Traveler's Prayer or Wayfarer's Prayer in English, is a prayer for a safe journey recited by Jews, when they travel, by air, sea, and even on long car trips. It is recited at the onset of every journey, and preferably done standing but this is not necessary. It is often inscribed onto hamsas which sometimes contain the Sh'ma or Birkat HaBayit prayer instead. Y'hi ratzon milfanekha A-donai E-loheinu ve-lohei avoteinu she-tolikhenu l'shalom v'tatz'idenu l'shalom v'tadrikhenu l'shalom, v'tagi'enu limhoz heftzenu l'hayim ul-simha ul-shalom. V'tatzilenu mi-kaf kol oyev v'orev v'listim v'hayot ra'ot ba-derekh, u-mi-kol minei pur'aniyot ha-mitrag'shot la-vo la-olam. V'tishlah b'rakha b'khol ma'a'se yadeinu v'tit'nenu l'hen ul-hesed ul-rahamim b'einekha uv-einei khol ro'einu. V'tishma kol tahanuneinu ki E-l sho'me'a t'fila v'tahanun ata. Barukh ata A-donai sho'me'a t'fila. May it be Your will, LORD, our God and the God of our ancestors, that You lead us toward peace, guide our footsteps toward peace, and make us reach our desired destination for life, gladness, and peace. May You rescue us from the hand of every foe, ambush along the way, and from all manner of
    7.80
    5 votes
    2
    Prayer to Saint Michael

    Prayer to Saint Michael

    The Prayer to Saint Michael is a prayer, used mainly by Catholics, which is addressed to Michael the archangel. Pope Leo XIII added it in 1886 to the Leonine Prayers, which he had directed to be said after Low Mass two years earlier. The practice of reciting these prayers after Mass was suppressed in 1964. However, Pope John Paul II referred to the St Michael prayer in his Regina Coeli address of 24 April 1994 as follows: "May prayer strengthen us for the spiritual battle that the Letter to the Ephesians speaks of: 'Be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might' (Ephesians 6:10). The Book of Revelation refers to this same battle, recalling before our eyes the image of St Michael the Archangel (cf. Revelation 12:7). Pope Leo XIII certainly had this picture in mind when, at the end of the last century, he brought in, throughout the Church, a special prayer to St Michael: 'Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle. Be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil...' Although this prayer is no longer recited at the end of Mass, I ask everyone not to forget it and to recite it to obtain help in the battle against the forces of darkness and against the
    7.20
    5 votes
    3
    Kaddish

    Kaddish

    Kaddish (קדיש, Qaddish Aramaic: "holy"; alternate spellings, qaddish, ḳaddish) is a prayer found in the Jewish prayer service. The central theme of the Kaddish is the magnification and sanctification of God's name. In the liturgy different versions of the Kaddish are used functionally as separators between sections of the service. The term "Kaddish" is often used to refer specifically to "The Mourners' Kaddish", said as part of the mourning rituals in Judaism in all prayer services as well as at funerals and memorials. When mention is made of "saying Kaddish", this unambiguously denotes the rituals of mourning. Mourners say Kaddish to show that despite the loss they still praise God. The opening words of this prayer are inspired by Ezekiel 38:23, a vision of God becoming great in the eyes of all the nations. The central line of the Kaddish in Jewish tradition is the congregation's response: יְהֵא שְׁמֵהּ רַבָּא מְבָרַךְ לְעָלַם וּלְעָלְמֵי עָלְמַיָּא (Yehei shmëh rabba mevarakh lealam ulalmey almaya, "May His great name be blessed for ever, and to all eternity"), a public declaration of God's greatness and eternality. This response is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew "ברוך שם
    8.25
    4 votes
    4

    Hallel

    Hallel (Hebrew: הלל‎, "Praise") is a Jewish prayer—a verbatim recitation from Psalms  113-118, which is used for praise and thanksgiving that is recited by observant Jews on Jewish holidays. Hallel consists of six Psalms (113–118), which are said as a unit, on joyous occasions. On those occasions, Hallel is usually chanted aloud as part of Shacharit (the morning prayer service) following the Shacharit's Shemoneh Esreh ("The Eighteen", the main prayer). It is also recited during the evening prayers the first night of Passover, except by Lithuanian and German Jews, and by all communities after the Grace After Meals in the Passover Seder service. The first 2 psalms 113 and 114 are sung before the meal and the remaining 4 are sung after the meal. Psalm 136 which in Jewish liturgy is called "the Great Hallel" recited at the Passover meal after the "Lesser Hallel". It is punctuated by the refrain that emphasizes God's lovingkindness is everlasting. There is mention in some references that this Psalm may also be used antiphonally in Temple worship. These occasions include the following: The three pilgrim festivals Passover, Shavuot, and Sukkot (the "bigger" Jewish holy days), mentioned in
    8.00
    4 votes
    5

    Birkat HaShachar

    Birkot hashachar or Birkot haShachar (Hebrew: ברכות השחר‎) ("morning blessings' or "blessings [of] the dawn") are a series of blessings that are recited at the beginning of Jewish morning services. The blessings represent thanks to God for a renewal of the day. The order of the blessings is not defined by halakha and may vary in each siddur, but is generally based on the order of activities customary upon arising. This blessing represents the cleanliness of one's hands following ritual defilement. This is a blessing regarding the works of one's body. It is also recited each time following one's urination or defecation. This paragraph represents thanks to God for the return of one's soul. When one sleeps, the soul departs the body. This state is referred to as a "semi-death." Upon awakening, the body is reunited with the soul. The Birkot hashachar includes some blessings pertaining to Torah study. It is forbidden for one to study any Torah prior to reciting these blessings. One of the blessings is identical to the one that is recited by a person called for an aliyah. Since one is required to fulfill a mitzvah immediately after reciting a blessing on that mitzvah without
    7.75
    4 votes
    6
    Apostles' Creed

    Apostles' Creed

    The Apostles' Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum or Symbolum Apostolicum), sometimes titled Symbol of the Apostles, is an early statement of Christian belief, a creed or "symbol". It is widely used by a number of Christian denominations for both liturgical and catechetical purposes, most visibly by liturgical Churches of Western tradition, including the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church, Lutheranism, Anglicanism, and Western Orthodoxy. It is also used by Presbyterians, Methodists, and Congregationalists. The Apostles' Creed was based on Christian theological understanding of the Canonical gospels, the letters of the New Testament and to a lesser extent the Old Testament. Its basis appears to be the old Roman Creed. Because of the early origin of its original form, it does not address some Christological issues defined in the later Nicene and other Christian Creeds. It thus says nothing explicitly about the divinity of either Jesus or of the Holy Spirit. This makes it acceptable to many Arians and Unitarians. Nor does it address many other theological questions that became objects of dispute centuries later. The name of the Creed may come from the probably 5th-century tradition
    7.50
    4 votes
    7

    Aleinu

    Aleinu (Hebrew: עָלֵינוּ, "it is our duty") or Aleinu leshabei'ach ("[it is] our duty to praise [ God ]"), meaning "it is upon us or it is our obligation or duty to praise God," is a Jewish prayer found in the siddur, the classical Jewish prayerbook. It is recited at the end of each of the three daily Jewish services. It is also recited following the New Moon blessing and after a circumcision is performed. It is second only to the Kaddish (counting all its forms) as the most frequently recited prayer in current synagogue liturgy. A folkloric tradition attributes this prayer to the biblical Joshua at the time of his conquest of Jericho. This might have been inspired by the fact that the first letters of the first four verses spell, in reverse, Hoshea, which was the childhood name of Joshua (Numbers 13:16). Another attribution is to the Men of the Great Assembly, during the period of the Second Temple. An early - that is, pre-Christian - origin of the prayer is evidenced by its explicit mention of bowing and kneeling - practices associated with the Temple, and its non-mention of exile or a desire to restore Israel or the Temple. On the other hand, it has been argued that the phrase:
    7.00
    4 votes
    8
    Saint John Vianney's prayer to Jesus

    Saint John Vianney's prayer to Jesus

    Saint John Vianney, the patron saint of parish priests, composed his prayer to Jesus in the 19th century. The prayer reflects Vianney's deep religious feelings, which were praised by Pope John XXIII in his encyclical Sacerdotii Nostri Primordia in 1959. The prayer is quoted in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.
    7.00
    4 votes
    9

    Amidah

    The Amidah (Hebrew: תפילת העמידה, Tefilat HaAmidah "The Standing Prayer"), also called the Shmoneh Esreh (שמנה עשרה, Shmoneh Esreh "The Eighteen," in reference to the original number of constituent blessings, there are now nineteen), is the central prayer of the Jewish liturgy. This prayer, among others, is found in the siddur, the traditional Jewish prayer book. As Judaism's central prayer, the Amidah is often designated simply as tefila (תפילה, "prayer") in Rabbinic literature. Observant Jews recite the Amidah at each of three prayer services in a typical weekday: morning, afternoon, and evening. A special abbreviated Amidah is also the core of the Mussaf ("Additional") service that is recited on Shabbat (the Jewish Sabbath), Rosh Chodesh (the day of the New Moon), and Jewish festivals, after the morning Torah reading, with various forms of the Amidah that depend on the occasion. The typical weekday Amidah actually consists of nineteen blessings, though it originally had eighteen; when the Amidah is modified for specific prayers or occasions, the first three blessings and the last three remain constant, framing the Amidah used in each service, while the middle thirteen blessings
    6.50
    4 votes
    10

    Ein Keloheinu

    Ein Keloheinu (in Hebrew: אֱין כֱּאלֹהֱינוּ, "there is none like our God") is a well known Jewish hymn. Orthodox Jews pronounce it as Ein Kelokeinu when referring to it outside of prayer, in order to avoid taking the name of God in vain or otherwise violating the sanctity of reverence to the Almighty. Ein Keloheinu is sometimes chanted at the end of the morning service (shacharit). In the Ashkenazi tradition outside of Israel, it is only said at the end of Shabbat and festival services, towards the end of the Mussaf service, immediately before a Talmudic lesson on the making of the Temple incense. However, in the Land of Israel, as well as in all Sephardi weekday morning prayer services it is said daily. In some other regional traditions it is used elsewhere in the liturgy, but it seems to be known worldwide. In many synagogues it is sung; in some Orthodox synagogues it is only said quietly by every person for themselves and is not regarded as a critical part of the prayer service. The background for the prayer is that its 20 sentences each count as a blessing. Jews are exhorted to make at least 100 blessings daily. On weekdays, the Shemoneh Esrei (or "Amidah") prayer contains 19
    7.67
    3 votes
    11
    Fatima Prayer

    Fatima Prayer

    The Fátima Prayer (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈfatimɐ]) or Invocation is a common version of the Jesus Prayer used by Catholics. It, along with four other "Fátima prayers", originated during the Marian apparitions at Fátima, Portugal in 1917. The Decade Prayer, as the most commonly said of these five prayers is known, is commonly added at the end of each decade of the Dominican Rosary, one of the most popular devotional practices in Roman Catholicism. Two other prayers are also associated with the visions and may be classed as Fátima Prayers, however they did not come to existence in Fátima but in Spain many years later. This brings the number of prayers to seven. While not part of the original tradition of the Rosary or in the original text of the vulgate, many Roman Catholics choose to add it after the Glory Be to the Father after the Blessed Virgin Mary was said to have requested its use during her apparition at Fátima, a miracle deemed "worthy of belief" by the Church. The following text of the prayer appears first in Latin and then in English. Here is a Portuguese version: According to the book Our Lady of Fátima by William Thomas Walsh (Macmillan, 1947), in an interview with
    5.75
    4 votes
    12

    Prayer to Saint Joseph

    The following Prayers to Saint Joseph are Roman Catholic prayers to Saint Joseph. Joseph, the silent man of the Gospels, is in the line of the great men of faith of the Old Testament. He is described as a "just man", a righteous man of integrity. He is in the tradition of Abraham who was called by God to "walk before my face and be upright (Gen: 17.1);and of Moses who was told to be "entirely sincere", "entirely faithful" (Deut: 18.13). For centuries his place in the story of Jesus was comparatively unnoticed. Gradually, in Catholic tradition, he was recognised as patron of fathers of families, of bursars and procurators, of manual workers, especially carpenters, and of all who desire a holy death. The litany of St. Joseph, one of the more recent Catholic prayers, was sanctioned by Pope Pius X in 1909. V/ Lord, have mercy. R/ Lord, have mercy. V/ Christ, have mercy. R/ Christ, have mercy. V/ Lord, have mercy. R/ Lord, have mercy. V/ Jesus, hear us. R/ Jesus, graciously hear us. V/ God, the Father of Heaven, R/ have mercy on us. V/ God, the Son, Redeemer of the world, R/ have mercy on us. V/ God, the Holy Spirit, R/ have mercy on us. V/ Holy Trinity, One God, R/ have mercy on us. R/
    7.00
    3 votes
    13
    Selichot

    Selichot

    Selichot or slichot (Hebrew: סליחות‎) are Jewish penitential poems and prayers, especially those said in the period leading up to the High Holidays, and on Fast Days. God's Thirteen Attributes of Mercy are a central theme throughout these prayers. In the Sephardic tradition, recital of Selichot in preparation for the High Holidays begins on the second day of the Hebrew month of Elul. In the Ashkenazic tradition, it begins on the Saturday night before Rosh Hashanah. If, however, the first day of Rosh Hashanah falls on Monday or Tuesday, Selichot are said beginning the Saturday night prior to ensure that Selichot are recited at least four times. This may be because originally the pious would fast for ten days during the season of repentance, and four days before Rosh Hashanah were added to compensate for the four of the Ten days of Repentance on which fasting is forbidden - the two days of Rosh Hashanah, Shabbat Shuvah, and the day preceding Yom Kippur - and, while the fasts have since been abandoned, the Selichot that accompanied them have been retained. Alternatively, the Rosh Hashanah liturgy includes the Biblical phrase, “you shall observe a burnt offering”, and like an offering
    7.00
    3 votes
    14
    Saint Louis de Montfort's Prayer to Jesus

    Saint Louis de Montfort's Prayer to Jesus

    Saint Louis de Montfort's Prayer to Jesus is a reflection of his philosophy of "total consecration to Jesus Christ through Mary" a theme that centuries later influenced the development of Roman Catholic Mariology. Although St Louis is perhaps best known for his Mariology and devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, his spirituality is founded on the mystery of the Incarnation of Jesus Christ, and is centered on Christ, as reflected in his collected works God Alone. As the prayer suggests, St. Louis introduced the key concepts that underlie Roman Catholic Mariology today: that Jesus and Mary are son and mother, redeemer and redeemed and that the path to Jesus is through Mary. Theologically, the prayer reflects the inherent inclusion of Mariology in Christology. This concept was echoed by Pope John Paul II about his reading of Montfort's works: O most loving Jesus, deign to let me pour forth my gratitude before Thee, for the grace Thou hast bestowed upon me in giving me to Thy holy Mother through the devotion of Holy Bondage, that she may be my advocate in the presence of Thy majesty and my support in my extreme misery. Alas, O Lord! I am so wretched that without this dear Mother I
    6.67
    3 votes
    15

    Tachanun

    Tachanun or Taḥanun (Hebrew: תחנון "Supplication"), also called nefillat apayim ("falling on the face") is part of Judaism's morning (Shacharit) and afternoon (Mincha) services, after the recitation of the Amidah, the central part of the daily Jewish prayer services. It is omitted on Shabbat, Jewish holidays and several other occasions (e.g., in the presence of a groom in the week after his marriage). Most traditions recite a longer prayer on Mondays and Thursdays. On all days except Monday and Thursday (days when the Torah is read in the synagogue), Tachanun consists of three (in some communities two) short paragraphs. In most Ashkenazic synagogues, Tachanun begins with introductory verses from II Samuel (24:14), and then continues with Psalm 6:2-11, which King David composed - according to traditional sources - while sick and in pain. In the presence of a Torah scroll, this first paragraph is recited with the head leaning on the back of the left hand or sleeve (right hand when wearing tefillin on the left) as per Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 131:1-2). The second paragraph, "שומר ישראל" ("Guardian of Israel") is recited seated, but erect (some communities only recite it on fast
    8.50
    2 votes
    16
    Birkat HaHammah

    Birkat HaHammah

    Birkat Hachama (ברכת החמה, "Blessing of the Sun") refers to an exceedingly rare Jewish blessing that is recited to the Creator, thanking Him for creating the sun. The blessing is recited when the sun completes its cycle every 28 years on a Tuesday at sundown. Jewish tradition says that when the Sun completes this cycle, it has returned to its position when the world was created. Because the blessing needs to be said when the sun is visible, the blessing is postponed to the following day, on Wednesday morning. According to Judaism, the Sun has a 28 year solar cycle known as machzor gadol (מחזור גדול, "the great cycle"). A solar year is estimated as 365.25 days and the "Blessing of the Sun", being said at the beginning of this cycle, is therefore recited every 10,227 (28 times 365.25) days. The last time that it was recited was on April 8, 2009 (14 Nisan 5769 on the Hebrew calendar). This coincided with the day before the Jewish Holiday of Passover (Hebrew: פסח). Other blessings are recited upon experiencing various natural phenomena, including lightning, comets, and meteor showers; as well as upon witnessing wondrous natural topography, such as great mountains, rivers and vast
    6.00
    3 votes
    17
    Hail Mary

    Hail Mary

    The Angelic Salutation, Hail Mary, or Ave Maria (Latin) is a traditional Catholic prayer asking for the intercession of the Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus. The Hail Mary is used within the Catholic Church, and it forms the basis of the Rosary. The prayer is also used by some Anglicans as well as by many other groups within the Western Catholic tradition of Christianity. A somewhat different form of the prayer is used in the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches and other groups of Eastern Christianity. Some Protestant denominations, such as Lutherans, also make use of some form of the prayer. Most of the text of the Hail Mary can be found within the Gospel of Luke. The prayer incorporates two passages from Saint Luke's Gospel: "Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee," and "Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb." In mid-13th-century Western Europe the prayer consisted only of these words with the single addition of the name "Mary" after the word "Hail," as is evident from the commentary of Saint Thomas Aquinas on the prayer. The first of the two passages from Saint Luke's Gospel is the greeting of the Angel Gabriel to Mary, originally
    6.00
    3 votes
    18
    Jesus Prayer

    Jesus Prayer

    The Jesus Prayer (Greek: Η Προσευχή του Ιησού, i prosefchí tou iisoú) or "The Prayer" (Greek: Η Ευχή, i efchí̱ – literally "The Wish") is a short, formulaic prayer esteemed and advocated within the Eastern Orthodox church: The prayer has been widely taught and discussed throughout the history of the Eastern Churches. It is often repeated continually as a part of personal ascetic practice, its use being an integral part of the eremitic tradition of prayer known as Hesychasm (Ancient Greek: ἡσυχάζω, hesychazo, "to keep stillness"). The prayer is particularly esteemed by the spiritual fathers of this tradition (see Philokalia) as a method of opening up the heart (kardia) and bringing about the Prayer of the Heart (Καρδιακή Προσευχή). The Prayer of The Heart is considered to be the Unceasing Prayer that the apostle Paul advocates in the New Testament. St. Theophan the Recluse regarded the Jesus Prayer stronger than all other prayers by virtue of the power of the Holy Name of Jesus. While its tradition, on historical grounds, also belongs to the Eastern Catholics, and there have been a number of Roman Catholic texts on the Jesus Prayer, its practice has never achieved the same
    10.00
    1 votes
    19
    Priestly Blessing

    Priestly Blessing

    The priestly blessing or priestly benediction, (Hebrew: ברכת כהנים‎; translit. birkat kohanim), also known as raising of the hands (Hebrew nesiat kapayim), or Dukhanen (from the Yiddish word dukhan - platform - because the blessing is given from a raised rostrum), is a Jewish prayer recited by Kohanim during certain Jewish services. It is based on a scriptural verse: "They shall place My name upon the children of Israel, and I Myself shall bless them." It consists of the following Biblical verses (Numbers 6:24–26): The source of the text is Numbers 6:23–27, where Aaron and his sons bless the Israelites with this blessing. This is the oldest known Biblical text that has been found; amulets with these verses written on them have been found in graves in dating from the First Temple Period, and are now in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Various interpretations of these verses connect them to the three Patriarchs; Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, or to three attributes of God: Mercy, Courage, and Glory. This ceremony is traditionally performed daily in Israel (except in Galilee), and among most Sephardi Jews worldwide, every day during the repetition of the Shacharit Amidah. On Sabbath and
    10.00
    1 votes
    20
    Salve Regina

    Salve Regina

    The "Salve Regina", also known as the Hail Holy Queen, is a Marian hymn and one of four Marian antiphons sung at different seasons within the Christian liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church. The Salve Regina is traditionally sung at Compline in the time from the Saturday before Trinity Sunday until the Friday before the first Sunday of Advent. The Hail Holy Queen is also the final prayer of the Rosary. The work was composed during the Middle Ages most probably by German monk Hermann of Reichenau and originally appeared in Latin, the prevalent language of Western Christianity until modern times. Traditionally it has been sung in Latin, though many translations exist. These are often used as spoken prayers. In some cases, the following versicle, response, and collect are added: Oremus. Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, qui gloriosæ Virginis Matris Mariæ corpus et animam, ut dignum Filii tui habitaculum effici mereretur, Spiritu Sancto cooperante præparasti: da, ut cuius commemoratione lætamur; eius pia intercessione, ab instantibus malis, et a morte perpetua liberemur. Per eumdem Christum Dominum nostrum. R/ Amen. Variations exist among most translations. (in the version used by
    10.00
    1 votes
    21
    Lord's Prayer

    Lord's Prayer

    The Lord's Prayer (also called the Pater Noster or Our Father) is a central prayer in Christianity. In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, it appears in two forms: in the Gospel of Matthew as part of the discourse on ostentation in the Sermon on the Mount, and in the Gospel of Luke, which records Jesus being approached by "one of his disciples" with a request to teach them "to pray as John taught his disciples." The prayer concludes with "deliver us from evil" in Matthew, and with "lead us not into temptation" in Luke. The liturgical form is Matthean. Some Christians, particularly Protestants, conclude the prayer with a doxology, an addendum appearing in some manuscripts of Matthew. The context of the prayer in Matthew is a discourse deploring people who pray ostentatiously: Jesus instructs his listeners to pray in the manner prescribed in the prayer. Taking into account its structure, flow of subject matter and emphases, one interpretation of the Lord's Prayer is as a guideline on how to pray rather than something to be learned and repeated by rote. The New Testament records Jesus and his disciples praying on several occasions, but never this specific prayer, so the
    7.50
    2 votes
    22
    Prayer of Repentance

    Prayer of Repentance

    The Prayer of Repentance is a prayer created by Meher Baba. Meher Baba dictated the prayer in Gujarati in Khuldabad, India in November, 1951. The prayer has become a part of a canon of prayers regularly repeated by Meher Baba's followers, along with the O Parvardigar and the Beloved God Prayer. The three prayers are repeated morning and evening at Meher Baba's samadhi in Ahmednagar, India. Meher Baba originally dictated the prayer in Gujarati in November 1951. It was then translated into English by two disciples Eruch Jessawala and William Donkin." However it was not introduced until one year later on November 8, 1952. Baba introduced the prayer saying, "Maybe some of you, or many of you, or all of you have no bindings, or desires and attachments. But as today I am in this state (of a devotee) I would like you to join me, to encourage me in asking God's forgiveness." The prayer was read aloud numerous times in Baba's presence, often with an added prelude written by Baba. For example in 1954 it was read aloud in Baba's presence by his disciple William Donkin with the following prelude: In an interview by Tim Owens at Meherazad in 1980, Eruch Jessawala described the process of
    4.50
    4 votes
    23
    Agnus Dei

    Agnus Dei

    Agnus Dei is a Latin term meaning Lamb of God, and was originally used to refer to Jesus Christ in his role of the perfect sacrificial offering that atones for the sins of humanity in Christian theology, harkening back to ancient Jewish Temple sacrifices. The phrase "Agnus Dei" refers to several uses of this title. The Biblical significance of the title is rendered in the context of earlier lamb symbolism. The blood of the paschal lamb of the Old Testament protects and saves the Israelites in Exodus 12. This link is made explicit in 1 Corinthians 5:7. For Paul, Christians are saved by Christ as their true paschal lamb. The Old Testament also testifies to the earlier practice of sin offerings as a possible means of atonement. Lambs could be used in these offerings (e.g. Leviticus 4:32-34 and Leviticus 5:6), and this link is strongly suggested by Gospel of John 1:29 and 1 Peter 1:19. Just as in Judaism sins could be forgiven through the offering and the pouring out of the blood of an "unblemished" lamb (cf. Leviticus 4:32), so Christians believe they can be cleansed of their sins by the blood of Jesus, the unblemished Lamb of God. See Sin for further discussion about the concept of
    7.00
    2 votes
    24

    Anaphora

    The Anaphora is the most solemn part of the Divine Liturgy (or Mass), in which the offerings of bread and wine are consecrated as the body and blood of Christ. This is the usual name for this part of the Liturgy in Greek-speaking Eastern Christianity, but in other Christian traditions that have a comparable rite it is more often called the Eucharistic Prayer. When the Roman Rite had a single Eucharistic Prayer, it was called the Canon of the Mass. "Anaphora" is a Greek word (ἀναφορά) meaning a "carrying back" (hence its meaning in rhetoric and linguistics) or a "carrying up", and so an "offering" (hence its use in reference to the offering of sacrifice to God). In the sacrificial language of the Greek version of the Old Testament known as the Septuagint, προσφέρειν (prosphora) is used of the offerer bringing the victim to the altar, and ἀναφέρειν is used of the priest offering up the selected portion upon the altar (see, for instance, Leviticus 2:14, 2:16, 3:1, 3:5). To describe the structure of the Anaphoras as it became standardized from the 4th century, we can look at the structure of the anaphoras in the Antiochene (or "West Syrian") family of liturgies, which display an order
    7.00
    2 votes
    25

    Adon Olam

    Adon Olam (Hebrew: אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם‎‎; "Eternal Lord" or "Lord of the Universe") is a strictly metrical hymn in the Jewish liturgy written in Iambic tetrameter. It has been a regular part of the daily and Shabbat (Sabbath) liturgy since the 15th century. According to the custom of the Sephardim and in British synagogues generally, it is congregationally sung at the close of Sabbath and festival morning services, and among the Ashkenazi Jews also it often takes the place of the hymn Yigdal at the close of the evening service on these occasions, while both hymns are almost universally chanted on the Eve of Atonement (Kol Nidre). Because of this solemn association, and on account of its opening and closing sentiments, the hymn has also been selected for (tuneless) reading in the chamber of the dying, and in some congregations it is recited (subdued and tuneless) in the synagogue as a means of reporting a death in the community. It is likewise recited or chanted at the commencement of the daily early morning prayer, that its utterance may help to attune the mind of the worshiper to reverential awe. When it is sung at the end of the service, the congregation sits while singing it, as a
    9.00
    1 votes
    26
    Prayer before a Crucifix

    Prayer before a Crucifix

    The Prayer before the Crucifix is a Roman Catholic prayer to Jesus which is said while kneeling before a crucifix. It is often said by Roman Catholics after Communion or after Mass. The faithful receive a partial indulgence if they recite the prayer after Communion before a crucifix. On the Fridays of Lent, the indulgence is a plenary indulgence.
    5.00
    3 votes
    27
    Beloved God Prayer

    Beloved God Prayer

    Beloved God is the common name of a prayer created by Meher Baba on August 25, 1959. Meher Baba was fond of the prayer, and encouraged his followers to repeat it. The prayer has become a part of a canon of prayers regularly repeated by Meher Baba's followers, along with the Prayer of Repentance and O Parvardigar. The three prayers are repeated morning and evening at Meher Baba's samadhi in Ahmednagar, India. The prayer refers to Meher Baba's daaman, which means "hem" in Urdu, as in the hem of a garment. Baba often gave the figure of a mother telling a child to hold her garment's hem while they walked through the market place, and said that his disciples should always hold fast to his daaman in the same way. Pete Townshend of The Who, a follower of Meher Baba, used this simile in his song Don't Let Go the Coat, the second track on The Who's 1981 Face Dances album.
    6.50
    2 votes
    28
    Birkat Hamazon

    Birkat Hamazon

    Birkat Hamazon or Birkath Hammazon, (Hebrew: ברכת המזון ; trans. Blessing on Nourishment), known in English as the Grace After Meals, (Yiddish: בענטשן; translit. bentshn or "to bless"; Yinglish: Benching), actually a corruption of the word "Benediction", is a set of Hebrew blessings that Jewish Law prescribes following a meal that includes bread or matzoh made from one or all of wheat, barley, rye, oats, spelt. It is a matter of rabbinic dispute whether birkat hamazon must be said after eating certain other bread-like foods such as pizza. Birkat hamazon is typically read to oneself after ordinary meals and often sung aloud on special occasions such as the Shabbat and festivals. The blessing can be found in almost all prayerbooks and is often printed in a variety of artistic styles in a small booklet called a birchon (or birkon, ברכון) in Hebrew or bencher (or bentcher) in Yiddish. The scriptural source for the requirement to say birkat hamazon is Deuteronomy 8:10 "When you have eaten and are satisfied, you shall bless the LORD your God for the good land which He gave you". Birkat hamazon is made up of four blessings. The first three blessings are regarded as required by scriptural
    6.50
    2 votes
    29
    Yigdal

    Yigdal

    Yigdal (Hebrew: יִגְדָּל‎; yighdāl, or Hebrew: יִגְדַּל‎; yighdal; means "Magnify [O Living God]") is a Jewish hymn which in various rituals shares with Adon 'Olam the place of honor at the opening of the morning and the close of the evening service. It is based on the 13 Articles of Faith (sometimes referred to as "the 13 Creeds") formulated by Moses ben Maimon, and was written by Daniel ben Judah Dayan, who spent eight years in improving it, completing it in 1404. This was not the only metrical presentment of the Creeds; but it has outlived all others, whether in Hebrew or in the vernacular. A translation can be found in any bilingual siddur. With the Ashkenazim only thirteen lines are sung, one for each creed; and the last, dealing with the resurrection of the dead, is repeated to complete the antiphony when the hymn is responsorially sung by Chazzan and congregation. The Sephardim, who sing the hymn in congregational unison throughout, use the following line as the 14th: "These are the 13 bases of the Rule of Moses and the tenets of his Law". "Yigdal" far surpasses "Adon 'Olam" in the number of its traditional tunes and the length of time during which they have been
    6.50
    2 votes
    30
    Kol Nidre

    Kol Nidre

    Kol Nidre (also known as Kol Nidrei and Kal Nidre and Col Nidre) (Aramaic: כָּל נִדְרֵי) is an Aramaic declaration recited in the synagogue before the beginning of the evening service on every Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. Though not a prayer, this dry legal formula and its ceremonial accompaniment have been charged with emotional undertones since the medieval period, creating a dramatic introduction to Yom Kippur on what is often dubbed "Kol Nidrei night". It is written in Aramaic, not Hebrew. Its name is taken from the opening words, meaning all vows. Kol Nidrei has had an eventful history, both in itself and in its influence on the legal status of the Jews. Introduced into the liturgy despite the opposition of some rabbinic authorities, attacked in the course of time by some rabbis, and in the nineteenth century expunged from the prayer book by many communities of western Europe. The term Kol Nidrei refers not only to the actual declaration, but is also popularly used as a name for the entire Yom Kippur evening service. Before sunset on the eve of Yom Kippur ("Day of Atonement"), the congregation gathers in the synagogue. The Ark is opened and two people take from it two
    6.00
    2 votes
    31

    Yishtabach

    Yishtabach (Hebrew: ישתבח‎) (Hebrew: "[ God ] be praised") is a prayer in the final portion of the Pesukei Dezimra morning prayers of Judaism known as shacharit, recited before the second kaddish leading to the Shema prayers. The theme of the number "fifteen" plays a pivotal role in the blessing; there are fifteen expressions conveying praise in the beginning half of the paragraph and fifteen words in the concluding blessing (after "Blessed are You, God..."). The number fifteen is an allusion both to the Divine Name יה (whose gematria is fifteen) and to the fifteen Songs of Ascents composed by King David (Psalms 120–34). There are two themes of Yishtabach: God's power and might are deserving of our praise and adoration, and that one must continually praise God. Since Baruch Sheamar and Yishtabach are both blessings, this gives the sense that Pesukei Dezimra is one single prayer. Yishtabach is not recited unless Baruch Sheamar is recited, because Baruch Sheamar is the opening blessing, and Yishtabach is the closing blessing. Yishtabach is normally recited while standing. This is because Baruch Sheamar is recited while standing, and since Baruch Sheamar is the opening of Pesukei
    6.00
    2 votes
    32

    Bus Driver's Prayer

    The Bus Driver's Prayer, also known as the Busman's Lord's Prayer, was a parody of the Lord's Prayer that takes the bus driver around Greater London (while avoiding further destinations). The words are apocryphal and have been around since 1960 at least. The word play, making extensive use of puns on English place names, is typical of English humour. It was recorded by Ian Dury, originally on the soundtrack album Apples (1989) and later on The Bus Driver's Prayer & Other Stories (1992), who used just those placenames which referred to London locations. Below is a version predating Dury's recording, with alternate versions given in Notes. An earlier version, undated and possibly apocryphal, is provided by Nancy Lyon. This undated version is linked with the development of stations on the London Underground
    5.50
    2 votes
    33
    Anima Christi

    Anima Christi

    The Anima Christi is a medieval prayer to Jesus in the tradition of the Catholic Church. The sequence of sentences in Anima Christi have rich associations with Catholic concepts that relate to the Holy Eucharist (Body and Blood of Christ), Baptism (water) and the Passion of Jesus (Holy Wounds). Jean-Baptiste Lully composed a Motet called Anima Christi, and musicians such as Giovanni Valentini performed it. As it was once mistakenly attributed to St. Ignatius Loyola, who included it in his "Spiritual Exercises," it is sometimes referred to as the "Aspirations of St. Ignatius Loyola." This well known Catholic prayer dates to the early fourteenth century and was possibly written by Pope John XXII, but its authorship remains uncertain. The prayer takes its name from its first two words in Latin. Anima Christi means "the soul of Christ." The Anima Christi was popularly believed to have been composed by St. Ignatius Loyola, as he puts it at the beginning of his "Spiritual Exercises" and often refers to it. This is a mistake, as has been pointed out by many writers, since the prayer has been found in a number of prayer books printed during Ignatius' youth and is in manuscripts which were
    5.00
    2 votes
    34
    Prayer to the shoulder wound of Jesus

    Prayer to the shoulder wound of Jesus

    This Roman Catholic prayer is variously attributed to Saint Bernard of Clairvaux or to St. Gertrude or St. Mechtilde. In English: According to St. Bernard, he asked Jesus which was His greatest unrecorded suffering and the wound that inflicted the most pain on Him in Calvary and Jesus answered: The modern version of the prayer bears the imprimatur of Bishop Thomas D. Bevan . Power of Christian prayer
    6.00
    1 votes
    35

    Shehecheyanu

    The Shehecheyanu blessing (Hebrew: שהחינו‎, "Who has given us life") is a common Jewish prayer said to celebrate special occasions. It is said to be thankful for new and unusual experiences. The blessing has been recited by Jews for nearly 2000 years. It comes from the Talmud (Berachot 54a, Pesakhim 7b, Sukkah 46a, etc.) The blessing of Shehecheyanu is recited in thanks or commemoration of: Some have the custom of saying it at the ceremony of the Birkat Hachama, which is recited once every 28 years in the month of Nissan/Adar II. It is not recited at a circumcision, since that involves pain, nor at the Counting of the Omer, since that is a task which does not give pleasure (and causes sadness at the thought that the actual omer ceremony cannot be performed because of the destruction of the Temple). Some traditions dictate saying "lizman" rather than "lazman" ("to [this] season"), this follows the ruling of the Mishnah Berurah and Aruch Hashulchan, following Magen Avraham, and is followed by Chabad, but this seems to be a minority usage and is contrary to usual Hebrew usage. The Declaration of Independence of the State of Israel was publicly read in Tel Aviv on May 14, 1948, before
    6.00
    1 votes
    36
    Birkat HaBayit

    Birkat HaBayit

    Birkat HaBayit (Hebrew: ברכת הבית, Birkat HaBayit or Birkath HabBayith in Classical Hebrew‎, meaning Blessing for the Home) is a Jewish prayer often inscribed on wall plaques or hamsas and featured at the entrance of some Jewish homes. There are various versions of the prayer. In the home, the Birkat Habayit blessing is traditionally hung on the wall next to the front door or next to a window. It is meant to drive any evil spirits out of the house and protect the occupants within. Besides bringing a blessing upon your house, variations from around the world are also seen as brilliant works of art.
    5.00
    1 votes
    37
    Dala'il al-Khayrat

    Dala'il al-Khayrat

    Dala'il al-Khayrat or Dalaail u'l Khayraat Wa Shawaariq u'l Anwaar Fee Zikri's Salaat Alan Nabiyyi'l Mukhtaar (meaning the Waymarks of Benefits and the Brilliant Burst of Sunshine in the Remembrance of Blessings on the Chosen Prophet) is a famous collection of prayers for Islamic prophet Muhammad, which was written by the Moroccan Sufi and Islamic Scholar Muhammad al-Jazuli (died 1465). It is popular in parts of the Islamic world amongst traditional Muslims - specifically North Africa, the Levant, Turkey, the Caucasus and the South Asia and is divided into sections for daily recitation. Moroccan hadith scholar ‘Abdullah al-Talidi wrote of the Dala’il al-Khayrat: “Millions of Muslims from East to West tried it and found its good, its blessing, and its benefit for centuries and over generations, and witnessed its unbelievable spiritual blessings and light. Muslims avidly recited it, alone and in groups, in homes and mosques, utterly spending themselves in the Blessings on the Most Beloved and praising him." The Dala’il al-Khayrat is the first major book in Islamic history which compiled litanies of peace and blessings upon Muhammad. It is also the most popular and most universally
    4.00
    1 votes
    38

    Prayer to One's Guardian Angel

    The Prayer to One's Guardian Angel is a Catholic prayer. Dear Angel, in his goodness God gave you to me to guide, protect, and enlighten me, and to bring me back to the right way when I go astray. Encourage me when I am disheartened, and instruct me when I err in my judgment. Help me to become more Christlike, and so some day to be accepted into the company of Angels and Saints in heaven. Amen.
    4.00
    1 votes
    39

    Ha-motzi

    Ha-motzi literally translated as the one that takes out. In the blessing over bread one recites Ha-MoTZi LeHeM Min HaOReTZ the one that brings forth bread out of the earth i.e. Creator.In rabbinical literature it is used as a euphemism about the one that takes others out of one status in to a different one i.e once a group had said Amen they are now absolved from saying that specific blessing
    0.00
    0 votes
    40
    Kiddush

    Kiddush

    Kiddush (Hebrew: קידוש‎), literally, "sanctification," is a blessing recited over wine or grape juice to sanctify the Shabbat and Jewish holidays. The Torah refers to two requirements concerning Shabbat - to "keep it" and to "remember it" (shamor and zakhor). Jewish law therefore requires that Shabbat be observed in two respects. One must "keep it" by refraining from thirty-nine forbidden activities, and one must "remember it" by making special arrangements for the day, and specifically through the kiddush ceremony. Reciting kiddush before the meal on the eve of Shabbat and Jewish holidays is thus a commandment from the Torah (as it is explained by the Oral Torah). Reciting kiddush before the morning meal on Shabbat and holidays is a requirement of rabbinic origin. Kiddush is not usually recited at the third meal on Shabbat, although Maimonides was of the opinion that wine should be drunk at this meal as well. To honor the mitzvah of reciting kiddush, a silver goblet is often used, although any cup can suffice. The cup must hold a revi'it of liquid. A revi'it is between 5.46 fluid ounces (161.5 ml) (Rabbi Avrohom Yeshaya Karelitz) and 3.07 fluid ounces (90.7 ml) (Rabbi Avraham
    0.00
    0 votes
    41
    Shema Yisrael

    Shema Yisrael

    Shema Yisrael (or Sh'ma Yisrael) (Hebrew: שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל‎; "Hear, [O] Israel") are the first two words of a section of the Torah, and are the title (sometimes shortened to simply "Shema") of a prayer that serves as a centerpiece of the morning and evening Jewish prayer services. The first verse encapsulates the monotheistic essence of Judaism: "Hear, O Israel: the Lord is our God, the Lord is one," found in Deuteronomy 6:4 . Observant Jews consider the Shema to be the most important part of the prayer service in Judaism, and its twice-daily recitation as a mitzvah (religious commandment). It is traditional for Jews to say the Shema as their last words, and for parents to teach their children to say it before they go to sleep at night. The term "Shema" is used by extension to refer to the whole part of the daily prayers that commence with Shema Yisrael and comprise Deuteronomy 6:4–9, 11:13-21, and Numbers 15:37–41. These sections of the Torah are read in the weekly Torah portions Va'etchanan, Eikev, and Shlach, respectively. Originally, the Shema consisted only of one verse: Deuteronomy 6:4 (see Talmud Sukkot 42a and Berachot 13b). The recitation of the Shema in the liturgy,
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:
    Tags: best, all, time, prayer

    Discuss Best Prayer of All Time

    Top List Voters