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  • Nov 27th 2012
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Best Playing card game of All Time

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    1
    Shithead

    Shithead

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Shithead (as known also Palace or Palase) is a card game originating from South London similar to Paskahousu. In the game the object is to lose all of one's cards, with the last player to do so being the "shithead", who must deal the next game and may be subject to some minor forfeit of the group's choice, such as fetching the next round of drinks. The game, and variations of it, is popular in many countries amongst teenage and twenty-something travelers. Although the basic structure of the game generally remains constant there are often regional variations of the game's original "Terry Rules". Shithead has no documented origin. The game is generally believed however to have emerged in the early 1960s under the name of "Terry" in the South London town of Sutton. "Terry" fast became a popular game among members of the military and has since been exported worldwide by both the armed forces as well as backpackers. It is believed that the ease with which the game may be learned, the emphasis on not-losing rather than winning and the versatility in the rules have made the game the worldwide phenomenon it is today. The word "Shithead" has been attributed to the game since 1983 when a
    6.70
    10 votes
    2
    Bashi Fen

    Bashi Fen

    Shēng Jí (升級; Advance in Level) is a family of point trick-taking card games played in China and in Chinese immigrant communities. They have a dynamic trump, i.e., which cards are trump changes every round. As these games are played over a wide area with no standardization, rules vary widely from region to region. The game can be played with multiple decks of cards. With one deck, it may be called Dǎ Bǎi Fēn (打百分; Competing for a Hundred Points) or Sìshí Fēn (四十分; Forty Points); with two decks, as is most commonly played, it may be called Bāshí Fēn (八十分; Eighty Points), Tuō Lā Jī (拖拉機; Tractor), Zhǎo Péngyǒu (找朋友; Looking for Friends), and Shuāi Èr (摔二; Throw Two). The article below mainly describes the Bashi Fen variant, with players playing with two decks and in fixed partnerships. The game is played with four players in fixed partnerships, with players sitting across each other forming a team. Each team has a rank that they are currently playing, henceforth referred to as their score. At the beginning of a match, everyone starts at a score of 2. The teams are divided into the Declarers (also known as Defenders) and the Opponents (also known as Attackers), which are determined in
    8.33
    6 votes
    3
    Auf Achse

    Auf Achse

    Auf Achse (literally on the axle; figuratively on the road) is a logistics-themed board game designed by Wolfgang Kramer and published in 1987 by FX Schmid. The game won the Spiel des Jahres award. In 1992, a junior edition was released; and in 1994 a rummy-like card game spinoff was released. In 2007 a revised edition was published by Schmidt Spiele.
    8.80
    5 votes
    4
    Minchiate

    Minchiate

    Minchiate is a late-medieval card game, probably originating in 15th-century Florence, Italy. It is no longer widely played. Minchiate can also refer to the special deck of playing cards used in the game. The deck is closely related to the tarot cards, but contains an expanded suit of trumps. The game was similar to tarocchi and the game of tarot. In the view of some, the larger number of trump cards may shed light on what the original intentions of the creators of the Tarot deck meant by the images they included. Scholars generally believe that the Tarot cards were invented in Lombardy and the Piedmont regions of northern Italy; they spread elsewhere in Italy early on. The Minchiate represents a Florentine variant on the original game. The name first appears in Italian sources dated to 1466 in a "lost letter", 1471 in a case of prohibition and 1477, in which it is listed in a list of games permitted by law; literary references may date to around 1440. The game was later also known as Gallerini or Germini. The word minchiate comes from a dialect word meaning "nonsense" or "trifle." The word minchione is attested in Italian as meaning "fool," and minchionare means "to laugh at"
    8.40
    5 votes
    5
    Captive Queens

    Captive Queens

    Captive Queens is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. The game is so named because the queens become "enclosed" as the foundations are built. There are two ways that the queens are played in this game: either they are laid in the center of the table immediately or shuffled into the deck and laid out later. Either way, their role is purely decorative and play no functional role in the game. The game starts by laying cards from the stock one at a time into a wastepile in search for fives or sixes. Once any of these cards are found, it becomes a foundation and can be placed on a circle surrounding the area where queens are placed; it can be built upon immediately. The foundations' places in this circle are irrelevant. The fives then receive cards lower than five while the sixes receive higher cards, all by suit. Here's the chart of which cards are placed on these cards: After the foundation cards are found, the rest of the stock is dealt to look for cards that can be built on the foundations. In case the queens are shuffled into the deck, when a queen is found, it is placed on the center. Once the stock runs out, the cards are gathered from the wastepile and become
    6.29
    7 votes
    6
    Pilotta

    Pilotta

    Pilotta (in Greek Πιλόττα) is a trick-taking 32-card game whose origin probably goes back to the Frankish occupation of the Greek lands after 1204. The game is broadly similar to Contract Bridge and closely related to the French game Belote. It is played primarily in Cyprus, being very popular among the Cypriot population, especially the youngsters, who usually arrange “pilotta meetings” in places such as cafés and cafeterias. Its counterpart played in Greece is named Vida (in Greek βίδα) One variation from the French Belote is based on biddings. In Pilotta seeds which are allowed to bid on are: "No trumps" and "All trumps" are excluded in Cyprus Pilotta, since Pilotta is a variation of Contract Belote and not Modern Belote, which does not have these special options or rules. There is a more recent variation to the game known as Pilotta Palaristi, which reintroduces a point-based bidding system. Bids correspond to the total expected value of the bidders tricks. The winning bidder must gain at least the number of points that have bid, or they forfeit all points in the hand to the opposing team. Bidding is typically performed in increments of 10, with the lowest opening bid being
    7.00
    6 votes
    7
    Three-card Monte

    Three-card Monte

    Three-card Monte, also known as the Three-card marney, Three-card trick, Three-Way, Three-card shuffle, Menage-a-card, Triplets, Follow the lady, Les Trois Perdants (French for Three Losers), le Bonneteau, Find the lady, Bola bola or Follow the Bee is a confidence game in which the victim, or mark, is tricked into betting a sum of money, on the assumption that they can find the money card among three face-down playing cards. It is the same as the shell game except that cards are used instead of "shells". In its full form, Three-card Monte is an example of a classic "short con" in which a shill pretends to conspire with the mark to cheat the dealer, while in fact conspiring with the dealer to cheat the mark. This confidence trick was already in use by the turn of the 15th century. The Three-card Monte game itself is very simple. To play, a dealer places three cards face down on a table, usually on a cardboard box which provides the ability to set up and disappear quickly. The dealer shows that one of the cards is the target card, e.g., the queen of hearts, and then rearranges the cards quickly to confuse the player about which card is which. The player is then given an opportunity
    8.00
    5 votes
    8
    Yukon

    Yukon

    Yukon is a version of solitaire similar to standard Klondike solitaire, but with the following additions:
    8.00
    5 votes
    9
    Auction Pitch

    Auction Pitch

    Auction Pitch, is a trick-taking variation of the 17th century card game All Fours which derived from Seven-up. The name is derived from the rule that the first card played, or pitched, is the trump suit, and that the eldest hand has the privilege of pitching or selling it out to the highest bidder. The game is also known as Pitch or Setback. A full pack is used, and the cards rank as in All Fours, namely from ace down to 2, ace being highest in cutting also. From four to seven may play, each player being provided with seven white counters, and also with red counters in case stakes are played for. Each player receives six cards in every deal, three at a time, no trump being turned. The object is to get rid of the white counters, one of which may be put into the pool either: In case of a tie of pips no game is scored. If the eldest hand decides to pitch and not to sell out, he may do so, but is obliged to make four points or be set back that number. If he decides to sell, he says "I pass," and the player at his left bids for the privilege of pitching the trump or passes. When a bid has been made the rest must pass or bid higher, and the eldest hand must either accept a bid or
    6.00
    7 votes
    10

    Paskahousu

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Paskahousu (shitty pants) is a Finnish card game similar to Shithead. The object of the game is to play higher cards than the previously played cards, first to get replacement cards from the stock pile, and, after the stock pile has exhausted, to get rid of one's cards. Although the basic play is the same across rule variants, the details of the rules vary tremendously. It is practically impossible to find two identical descriptions of the game in the literature. See the Miscellaneous rule variations section for how the rules can vary. One of the most widespread variants is Valepaska, in which the cards are played face down, and players need not announce their plays truthfully. One deck of 52 cards is used, ace is the highest. The game is played by 3-6 players. Everyone is dealt five cards. The rest of the cards form a face-down stock. In each turn the player in turn places (one or more) cards of the same rank from his hand into a pile next to the stock according to the following rules. If the player cannot or does not want to play cards according to the previous rules, he must take the entire pile in his hand. After the player has either played cards or taken the pile, turn passes
    7.80
    5 votes
    11
    Écarté

    Écarté

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Écarté is a two-player card game originating from France, the word literally meaning "discarded". It is a trick-taking game, similar to whist, but with a special and eponymous discarding phase. It is closely related to Euchre, a card game played mainly in the United States. Écarté was popular in the 19th century, but is now rarely played. All cards from two to six are removed from a 52-card pack, to produce the Piquet pack of thirty-two cards, which rank from the lowest 7, 8, 9, 10, ace, knave, queen, to king high. Note that the ace ranks between ten and knave, making the king the highest card. The players cut to determine the dealer, who deals five cards each in packets of two and three, or three and two, either to whim or some agreement. The eleventh card is dealt face up to determine the trump suit. If this card is a king, the dealer can immediately mark an extra point for himself. The elder hand (the player opposite the dealer) is then entitled, if desired, to begin the exchange -- a crucial part of the game. This involves discarding cards in order to improve their hand with fresh cards from the remaining pack. To make an exchange, the elder hand must make a proposal to the
    7.60
    5 votes
    12
    Pinochle

    Pinochle

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Pinochle or Binocle (sometimes pinocle, or penuchle) is a trick-taking card game typically for two to four players and played with a 48 card deck. Derived from the card game bezique, players score points by trick-taking and also by forming combinations of cards into melds. It is thus considered part of a "trick-and-meld" category which also includes a cousin, belote. Each hand is played in three phases: bidding, melds, and tricks. The standard game today is called "partnership auction pinochle." Pinochle derives from the game bezique. The French word "binocle" also meant "eyeglasses". The word is also possibly derived from the French word, "binage", for the combination of cards called "binocle". This latter pronunciation of the game would be adopted by German speakers. German immigrants brought the game to America, where it was later mispronounced and misspelled "Pinochle." Auction pinochle for three players has some similarities with the German game skat, although the bidding is more similar to that of bid whist. During World War I, the city of Syracuse, New York outlawed the playing of pinochle in a fit of anti-German sentiment. Pinochle was the favorite card game of American
    6.50
    6 votes
    13
    Khanhoo

    Khanhoo

    Khanhoo is a non-partnership Chinese card game of draw-and-discard structure which may be as old as the card game T'ienkeu ("Heavens and Nines"). Meaning "watch the pot", it was revised in its rules and published in an authorized edition by Emperor Kao Tsung in 1130 AD for the information of his subjects. The game is very possibly the ancestor of all rummy games, and certainly divides the honour of being one of the two national card games of China. Adapted to the western taste by Sir William Henry Wilkinson, British Sinologist and Consul-General in China and Korea in the mid 1890's, it belongs to a same family as Mahjong and the mid-nineteenth century Mexican card game Conquian, whose name probably derives from the Chinese card game Kon Khin. Khanhoo, "Kanhǔ" (Pinyin: 看虎) or "Kanhú" (Pinyin: 看湖), seems to have its roots derived from a term in Mahjong, being Hu (和) a state where a player has a certain combined set of Mahjong tiles that turns out to be victorious. Winning is called hú (胡) in Chinese. Kanhu, which is phonetically related to Khanhoo, is one of the games with the terminological component Hu, there being many other games with the name Hu. The card games Mohu poker (默和牌)
    10.00
    3 votes
    14
    Poker Square

    Poker Square

    Poker Square (sometimes known either by its plural or Poker Solitaire) is a Patience game with a very unusual objective: to build the best poker hand using just 25 cards from the deck. The game starts with placing a card onto a space in a 5x5 grid. Placing cards are done one at a time and once a card is placed on the grid, it can no longer be moved. Once all 25 cards are dealt, points are scored on hands formed horizontally or vertically. The number of points depend on the hierarchy of poker hands. There are two systems of scoring: The English and the American point systems. The English system reflects the difficulty of getting the hands in the game; the American system reflects the difficulty of getting the hands in actual poker. The two systems rate the hands' scores as follows: The points scored from each hand are added to the total score. Sloane Lee and Gabriel Packard suggest (in their book 100 Best Solitaire Games, ISBN 1-58042-115-6) that to win one must score at least 200 points in the American system or 70 in the English system. Because of the application of the point system, this solitaire is more prevalent as a computer game. Take the image above for instance.
    8.50
    4 votes
    15

    500 Rum

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    500 rum, also called pinochle rummy, Michigan rummy, rummy 500 or 500 rummy, is a popular variant of rummy. The game of canasta and several other games are believed to have developed from this popular form of rummy. The distinctive feature of 500 Rum is that each player scores the value of the sets he melds. It may be played by 2 to 8 players, but it is best for 3 to 5. The term "Michigan Rummy" may also refer to an unrelated game involving a playing board, chips, and accumulated pots that are awarded to players who play certain cards. 500 rum is played using a standard French deck and can use 52-54 cards including jokers. When playing with 5 or more players, a double pack should be substituted for 104-108 cards. An ace counts as 15 points whenever it is played. Face cards count as 10 points each. Other cards count their pip value. Some people play where A-9 are 5 points, unless the Ace is used high, when it is 15. Jokers are used as wild cards and can represent any card the player chooses even if that card is already used in another meld. Jokers count as 15 points. The players draw for deal, low dealing first. Ace is the lowest card in the draw. The dealer shuffles, and the player
    6.33
    6 votes
    16
    Panguingue

    Panguingue

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Panguingue (pronounced pan-geen-eee), Tagalog Pangginggí, also known as Pan, is a 19th century gambling card game probably of Philippine origin similar to rummy, first described in America in 1905. It used to be particularly popular in Las Vegas and other casinos in the American southwest. Its popularity has been waning, and now is only found in a handful of casinos in California, in house games and at online poker sites. The game traditionally is played using a 320-card deck, constructed from eight decks of playing cards, removing all eights, nines, tens, and Jokers. In some localities, 5 or 6 decks are used, and often one set of spades is removed. Each player pays an ante one chip, called the top. The value of the top sets the value of all pays in the game. Some high stakes games are played with a two chip ante, which is called double tops. The rotation of dealing and playing is to the right, not to the left as in most card games. Each player receives 10 cards. Beginning with the eldest hand, each player either folds their hand (going out on top) or agrees to play. The player who folds loses their top. If all but one fold, the final player receives the tops, and the hand is
    9.67
    3 votes
    17
    Baraja

    Baraja

    The Baraja (literally deck/pack of cards) is a deck of playing cards associated with Spain. It is usually called Baraja Española (literally Spanish Deck). It has four suits and is usually made up of 40 cards. It has a quite high resemblance to the Latin deck, and somewhat less to the Anglo-American-French deck. The traditional 40-card Spanish baraja is an ancient deck that existed in Spain since between the 14th-16th century. The suits closely resemble those of Italian cards and Latin suited Tarot decks. In fact, the Baraja, like the tarot, are used for both game playing and cartomancy. The Baraja have been widely considered to be part of the occult in many Latin-American countries, yet they continue to be used widely for card games and gambling, especially in Spain. Among other places, the Baraja have appeared in One Hundred Years of Solitude and other Spanish and Latin American literature (e.g., Viaje a la Alcarria by Camilo José Cela). The Baraja is widely used in Spain, Portugal, and Latin America and almost every Spanish family has at least one Baraja. Baraja in the Spanish language can refer to any type of card deck. A traditional Spanish deck consists of four suits of ten
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Post and Pair

    Post and Pair

    Post and Pair, is a 16th century English gambling card game based on the same three-card combinations, namely Prial, found in related game of this family. It is much depended on vying, or betting, requiring repeated staking as well as daring on the part of the players. It is considered a derivative on the game of Primero and closely resembles Put, having been as popular as Gleek and Noddy during the Tudor Dynasty. It is generally agreed by every expert and researcher in the field of playing cards that the game of Post and Pair clearly derives from the game of Primero. Due to its gaming mechanics and resemblance with Primero and its variants, it is easily implied that Post and Pair evolved into a faster-paced card game with the addition of rules borrowed from neighboring games, like the Tudor game of "Post", attested by the Oxford English Dictionary from the early 16th to the 17th centuries, which may have survived longer in local versions. Charles Cotton in his 1674 The Complete Gamester, mentions that Post ad Pair was particularly popular in the west of England, as well as All-Fours was popular in Kent and Fives in Ireland. And if Francis Willughby gives no rules for the game,
    7.20
    5 votes
    19
    Sueca

    Sueca

    Sueca (meaning Swedish (female) in Portuguese) is a 4 player-partnership point trick-taking card game. The game is most popular in Portugal, Brazil and Angola. Its closest known relative is the very similar German game Einwerfen. The game is normally played by 4 players, where a 2 person-team sits across from each other, and compete against the other team by capturing as many points as possible, ala the bridge card game. Sueca is played with 40 cards by removing 7s, 8s, 9s, and 10s, from a standard 52 card deck. The rank of the cards in each suit, from highest rank to lowest one, is: Ace, 7, King, Jack, Queen, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2. The entire deck is distributed equally to the 4 players by sequencially rotating the dealer, who will turn one of his/her cards face-up to establish the trump suit. Rules of the game requires every player to follow suit, and can trump in only when void in the lead-suit. Player winning a hand then has honors to lead the next card. The 10 cards per suit are valued at 30 points; where Ace=11 points, 7=10 points, K=9, J=8, and Q=7. With 120 points at stake in every round (hand) of play, first team of 2 to reach 61 points wins the game/hand. If a team recahes more
    7.20
    5 votes
    20

    Give Me the Brain

    Give Me the Brain is a discard-style card game designed by James Ernest and released in 1996 by Cheapass Games. The name derives from the theme; players assume the role of zombies attempting to complete their tasks for the day at Friedey's, a "fast food restaurant for the damned", yet they only have one brain to share between them. The game inspired several sequels, all set at Friedey's. The original edition was the recipient of an Origins Award for Best Traditional Card Game of 1997. A Czech language version of the original game was released in 1997 with the name Dej sem mozek. An expanded Special Edition was released in 2002, and was nominated in the same category for the 2003 Origins Awards. Just as Steve Jackson Games re-released Lord of the Fries in 2008, it was revealed at PAX 2010 that a third edition of Give Me the Brain would be released in the same manner. Each player receives a hand of cards at the start of the game; the objective of Give Me the Brain is to play all cards in your hand, which corresponds to your zombie completing all the work assigned for the day. Each card is labeled with zero, one, or two hand icons; when it's your turn, you can play any number of
    7.00
    5 votes
    21
    Cego

    Cego

    Cego (Badishes Tarock), also called Ceco, from the Latin "Caecus" or "blind", is a trick-taking card game played mainly in Baden, Schwarzwald, and Lake Constance, in Switzerland. The game is similar to French tarot and Austrian Tarock. It is distinguished by a large Skat, or Talon, called "the Blind". The 54 cards in Cego consist of 22 trumps, 16 face/court cards (images) and 16 (number cards) empty cards. 21 of the trumps cards are numbered from one to twenty-one. The highest trump is not numbered. It shows a gleeman and is called the Stieß or G'stieß (Fool). All other cards (face and number cards) are of the regular suits: clubs, spades, hearts, and diamonds. In addition to the King, Queen, and Jack there is also the Knight. Face cards cannot win over the trumps, but are important because of their card value with respect to the total of points. Number cards have neither high card value nor are they very useful in winning tricks. The red number cards are numbered from one to four (one being the highest card) and the black number cards are numbered from seven to ten. Cego can be played by three or four players. Play proceeds counter-clockwise. Normally, one player plays against the
    8.00
    4 votes
    22
    Karnöffel

    Karnöffel

    Karnöffel is a card game which probably came from the upper-German language area in Europe in the first quarter of the 15th century. It first appeared "listed in a municipal ordinance of Nördlingen, Bavaria, in 1426 among the games that could be lawfully played at the annual city fête. This makes the game the oldest identifiable European card game in the history of playing cards. The name Karnöffel, is probably derived from another card game, Kanjafah or Kanjifah (called in contemporary manuscripts, Karniffel, Karnueffel and Karnoeffelins ), of Persian origin, which bears also a similarity with the name Ganjifa, Ganjifeh, of Indian origin. Karnöffel is unique in that it had a trump suit of cards with a higher priority than any other suit in the deck, which indicates that it might be a possible precursor to the trump cards of Tarot, as well as the Joker card found in modern card decks. In contrast to modern card games such as poker and gin rummy, Karnöffel utilizes a deck of 48 cards. The earliest substantial reference to Karnöffel is a poem by Meissner, discovered by Dr. von Leyden, written in or before 1450. A derivative of the game is still played around Stans and in the
    8.00
    4 votes
    23
    Tarabish

    Tarabish

    Tarabish, also known by its slang term Bish, is a Lebanese trick-taking card game of complex rules derived from Belote, a game of the Jass family. The actual pronunciation of the name is "tar-bish", even though it can be spelled "tarabish".. It is played primarily by the people of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, in Canada, where it was brought in 1901 by a Lebanese immigrant called George Shebib.. The game is over when one or both teams accumulate 500 points or more. Points are counted at the end of each hand and both teams always count their points. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins. A Tarbish deck consists of a normal deck of playing cards with the 2 through 5 of each suit removed. In preparation for the hand the dealer shuffles the cards in the usual manner. When finished the person to the right of the dealer cuts the cards. The cut must leave at least four cards in each portion of the deck. Once the cards have been cut, no further shuffling is allowed. The 36 Tarbish cards are dealt in groups of three beginning to the left of the dealer and proceeding clockwise until all the cards are passed out. Players look at their first six cards and the last three, called
    8.00
    4 votes
    24
    Virginia Reel

    Virginia Reel

    Virginia Reel is a solitaire card game which uses two decks of 52 playing cards mixed together. The object of the game is to place all the cards in the 24 foundations. First three cards, a 2, a 3, and a 4, are placed vertically. Then, beside each of the three cards is a row of seven cards. The first card in each row shows that it is the row for all other cards with the same rank. The first row is known as the "2s' row," the second row the "3s' row," and the third row the "4s' row." A fourth row of eight cards is dealt. This serves as the reserve with each card forming a pile. The foundations are built up by suit in intervals of three. The table below shows how. To play, a card can be moved to a foundation or to a rightful row from the other rows or from the reserve. But the player has to bear in mind that when a card is moved from anywhere in the tableau, the gap it leaves behind must be filled with a card appropriate for the row where the gap is located. For instance, when a card has left the 2s' row, the gap it left behind must be filled with a 2, either from the other rows or from the reserve. This is especially true at the beginning of the game, where some cards are on each
    8.00
    4 votes
    25
    Tien len

    Tien len

    Tiến lên (Vietnamese: tiến lên, tiến: advance; lên: to go up, up; literally: "go forward"), also known as Vietnamese cards, Thirteen, American Killer, or Jamal Patel in India, is a Vietnamese shedding-type card game devised in Southern China and Vietnam. It is similar to Zheng Shangyou, which uses a specially printed deck of cards, Big Two, and other "climbing" card games popular in many parts of Asia. Tien len, considered the national card game of Vietnam, is a game intended and best for 4 players. A standard deck of fifty-two playing cards is used. The ranking of the cards from highest to lowest is as follow: 2 A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3. The 2 is the highest card in the game, and the 3 is the lowest card. The cards are also ranked based on their suits. The ranking from highest to lowest are as follow: The objective of the game is to be the first to get rid of all of your cards by playing various combinations. A standard deck of fifty-two playing cards is used. The dealer can be anyone, and is normally designated by the players themselves. Each player is dealt thirteen cards, with a card being dealt one at a time to each player counter-clockwise, although some players allow
    9.00
    3 votes
    26
    Tute

    Tute

    Tute (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtute] ( listen)) is an Italian trick-taking card game for two to four players. During the 19th century, the game spread in Spain, becoming one of the most popular card games in the country. The name of the game was later modified by Spanish speakers, who started calling the game Tute. The game is played with a deck of traditional Spanish playing cards, or naipes, that is very similar to the Italian 40-card deck. The classic version of the game is Two-player Tute, while the most played is Tute in Pairs, where four players form two teams. The object of the game is to score the most points in the baza (a pile next to a player that contains the cards that the player gets after winning a trick) and by declarations (holding certain combinations of cards). Due to its wide popularity, several variations of the game exist. Tute originated in Italy. The game belongs to the same family as Brisca and has similar rules in gameplay and final count of points. The name of the game originated from the Italian word Tutti (all), the declaration that a player announces when holding the four kings. The game spread to Spain during the 19th century, brought back by Spanish
    7.75
    4 votes
    27
    Belote

    Belote

    Belote is a 32-card trick-taking game played in France, and is currently one of the most popular card games in that country. It was invented around 1920, probably from Klaverjas, Klaverjassen, a game played since at least the 17th century in the Netherlands. Closely related games are played throughout the world, and its rules first published in 1921. In Bulgarian the official name is Bridge-Belote (Бридж-белот), in Greece it is called Vida (Βίδα), in Cyprus it is called Pilotta (Πιλόττα), in Quebec the word was shortened to the first syllable and spelled bœuf, and in Croatian a similar game with different rules exists, called Bela. In Saudi Arabia it is Baloot. In Bulgaria it is usually called Belot (Белот). In Macedonia it is Belyot (Бељот) and it is especially played in Bitola region. Belot in Armenia, more commonly known as Bazaar Belote, is also a very popular game, and it is played in a slightly different way. It is also the number one card game in Saudi Arabia; although, the rules in the Saudi version are very different from the rules generally played by in Europe. Within the game's terminology, belote is used to designate a pair of a King and a Queen of a trump suit,
    6.60
    5 votes
    28
    Stonewall

    Stonewall

    Stonewall is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. It is probably named because the player seems to break down walls in exposing more of the face-down cards. Its tableau is similar to that of Flower Garden with its beds as columns. Thirty-six cards are dealt onto the tableau into six columns of six cards each. The exposed (top) card and the third and fifth cards from it are faced up while the second, fourth, and sixth cards from the top are faced down. The 16 leftover cards act as the reserve. The object of the game is to move the Aces to the foundations and build each of them up by suit. The top cards of each column, as well as all the cards in the reserve, are available for play to the foundations or the tableau. Building on the tableau is down by alternating colors and a sequence (or a part of a sequence) can be moved as unit. Any gap on the tableau can be filled by any exposed card or any sequence. The game is won when all cards are built onto the foundations. But chances of winning are low, especially, for instance, that the needed cards are those faced down.
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    Tarocchini

    Tarocchini

    Tarocchini is a point trick-taking Tarot card game from the 17th century. The diminutive form of Tarocco (referring to the reduction of the Bolognese pack from 78 to 62 cards, which probably occurred in the early 16th century), the game is also known as Partita. Tarocchini is played by 4 players in two partnerships sitting opposite each other. The middle part of the game is very similar to the basic Tarot game. It adds a round of point-counting before and after the game based on sets and runs of the cards. An unusual feature is that the partners are allowed to make certain limited signals to each other during play. The game is popular in the Bologna region of Italy and has been confined mostly to this area. Tarocchini is a very complex game of cards, yet the rules have changed little over the years. Partita can be played with a standard Tarot deck (where the 2–5 number cards in each suit have been removed), though normally, a special Tarot deck, the Tarocco Bolognese is used. The trump cards are in a non-standard order (probably because of this, the Bologna tarot decks were amongst the last to add numbers to the trump cards). The biggest difference in ordering is amongst what is
    6.60
    5 votes
    30
    Forty-fives

    Forty-fives

    Forty-Fives (also known as Forty-Five, Forte Fives, Auction Forty-Fives, Auction 120s, 120, Growl, Spoil Five, Maw and Strong Fives) is a trick-taking card game that is played in Ireland and on the island portion of Newfoundland and Labrador, as well as in some parts of New England, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia where it is known as Forte Fives. It is closely related to the game One-hundred and ten (110) also described below. The game may have got its name from "forte" which is Latin for strong which describes the 5's in the deck. The origin of this game is thought to be Ireland. In the 1920s, the game became Forte Fives when it moved south into the Merrimack Valley of Massachusetts and New Hampshire with French Canadian immigrants. Today, Forty-fives continues to be very popular in the Merrimack Valley. It is played with a standard deck of 52 cards (sometimes with jokers). Forty-Fives is a descendant of the Irish game Spoil Five, which in turn is a descendant of a game that King James VI of Scotland popularized in the 17th century called Maw. Maw was first seen being played in 1511 and the earliest written rules of 1576, the incomplete "Groom Porter's lawes
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    Kings

    Kings

    Kings (also known as Circle of Death, King's Cup, Donut, Oval of Fire or Ring of Fire) is a drinking game that uses playing cards. It is common among university students in Portugal, Canada, Mexico, South Africa, Chile, New Zealand, Australia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, the Netherlands, Lebanon, Denmark, Italy, Belgium and Spain. Players must drink and dispense drinks based on cards drawn, and Kings can also be mixed with other drinking games. Each card has a rule that is predetermined before the game starts. Many houses have their own variation of rules. In this game, players do certain actions that are associated with each card. Like many other drinking games, Kings is played with different "house rules" throughout the United States, Australia, Egypt, and Canada. Sometimes, rules on the cards "reveal interesting things about the participants." Usually, cards are shuffled and dealt into a circle around either an empty cup or a full can of beer (or a shot/cup of spirits or wine). Each player takes turn drawing cards, and the players must participate in the instructions corresponding to the drawn card. This game is highly open ended and all of the cards
    7.50
    4 votes
    32
    Precedence

    Precedence

    Precedence (also known as Order of Precedence) is a solitaire card game which uses two decks of playing cards. It is a building game where the playing does not have to worry about a tableau or playing area. In the book 100 Solitaire Games by Sloane Lee and Gabriel Packard, it is known under the name Downing Street. At the start of the game, a king is removed from the rest of the deck and placed on the first of eight foundations. (Some rule sets state that as the cards are deal, the first King that becomes available is placed on the first foundation.) After that, the following cards must be placed on the next seven foundations: a queen, a jack, a 10, a 9, an 8, a 7, and a 6. These cards should be placed on their respective foundations in this order and a foundation should not start until the foundation to its immediate left does. So the fourth foundation (which starts with a 10) for instance should not start unless the third one (which starts with a jack) is already in place. Also, when one foundation is already been started, it can immediately be built down regardless of suit until it has thirteen cards. (It is suggested that it should overlap to keep track on which card should end
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    Spider

    Spider

    Spider is a type of Patience game. It is one of the more popular two-deck solitaire games. The main purpose of the game is to remove all cards from the table, assembling them in the tableau before removing them. Initially, 54 cards are dealt to the tableau in ten piles, face down except for the top cards. The tableau piles build down by rank, and in-suit sequences can be moved together. The 50 remaining cards can be dealt to the tableau ten at a time when none of the piles are empty. The most common software version of Spider is the one included in the Vista, ME and XP versions of Microsoft Windows, Spider Solitaire. Spider Solitaire was introduced in the Microsoft Plus! 98 addition pack for Windows 98. On Unix operating systems, an early version was developed around 1989 at Sun Microsystems. A version of Spider Solitaire typically comes bundled with both the KDE and GNOME desktop environments on other Unix-like operating systems such as Linux and BSD, under the names KPatience and Aisleriot Solitaire, respectively. Versions for Macintosh and most other operating systems are also available. The Windows version offers three levels of difficulty, with one, two, or four suits. These
    7.50
    4 votes
    34

    Sultan

    Sultan (or Sultan of Turkey) is a solitaire card game, meaning it is played only by one person. However, this game uses two packs of playing cards. Nine cards are laid out like this at the beginning of the game: These cards make up the foundations and will be built up by suit in order. On the single foundation with an Ace, the A♥ foundation, the next cards will be 2♥, 3♥, and so on. On the seven kings, the order is Ace, 2, 3, etc., of the appropriate suits. Throughout the game, the only card which you cannot place other cards on is the K♥ (the Sultan) in the center location. Six cards (or eight in some versions) from the deck are placed, face up, around the foundations; these make up the reserve. The player then makes one of three moves: The goal is to end the game with the Sultan (King of Hearts) surrounded by his "Queens". When there are no more cards in the face-down deck, the player may re-deal (shuffle the waste and place them face-down, creating a new deck), but may only do this twice per game. After the player has run through the deck three times, or when all the cards are on the foundations, then the game is over.
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    Conquian

    Conquian

    Conquian is a card game which probably dates back to seventeenth-century Central America, but which was popularized and extended to the United States, especially Texas, from Mexico, although this allegation is still much controversial. It was first described in detail in R. F. Foster's Hoyle in 1897. And according to David Parlett, it is an ancestor to all modern rummy games, a kind of proto-Gin Rummy. The name is thought to either derive from "con quién" – Spanish "with whom", or from the Chinese game Kon Khin, a variation of the earlier game Khanhoo. It is sometimes corrupted to Coon Can (first described in The Standard Hoyle in 1887 and today known in the United States as Double Rum for being played with two packs), Councan, Conca and Cunca, a South American variation of the game. However, no Chinese card game by the name of ‘Kon Khin’ has ever been found, and these words do not even match any of the many card games that have prevailed in Ming-Qing China. In 19th-century Mexican literature (e.g. Luis Gonzaga Inclán’s Astucia, 1865; Juan Antonio Mateos’s Sacerdote y caudillo, 1869) the word is spelled cunquián, in italics, showing thus it has nothing to do with the phrase "¿Con
    8.67
    3 votes
    36
    Five-Handed Euchre

    Five-Handed Euchre

    This article deals with variations in game playing. For a description on variations in game rules and terminology, see Euchre variations. Euchre has many variations in game playing. Some of them are designed for two, three, five or even six hands. Described below are some of these regional variations. A common variation played in southwestern England competitive pub leagues uses the standard Euchre deck with an extra card, usually a Joker or 2 of spades, called the "Benny" (often called the "Bird" in Australia). This card is the highest trump no matter what suit is called. When the Benny is turned over by the dealer, the dealer must choose a suit to call as trumps before looking at his or her hand. Bidding then proceeds normally. The Duchy of Cornwall lays claim to the origin of the Benny in Euchre, its usage being exported from Cornwall to the USA, Australia and Canada by emigrant Cornish miners in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Four Bennies In southwestern Ontario (Canada), there is an extension of this style wherein the 9s are removed from the deck and up to four "Bennys" are added. These usually take the form of either one or two Jokers and/or one or two Deuces (of
    8.67
    3 votes
    37

    Wizard card game

    Wizard is a trick-taking card game for 3 to 6 players invented by Ken Fisher of Toronto, Ontario in 1984. Wizard cards were first printed in June 1986. A Wizard deck consists of 60 cards: a regular set of 52 playing cards, 4 Wizards and 4 Jesters. The Jesters have the lowest value, then the one up to thirteen, with Wizards highest in value. The game is licensed in Canada, the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy and Japan. It is derived from Oh Hell and bears some resemblance to it. The object of the game is to bid correctly on the number of tricks that a player will take in the subsequent round of play. Points are awarded for a correct bid and subtracted for an incorrect bid. The player with most points after all rounds have been played is the winner. The game is played in a number of rounds from 10 to 20, depending on the number of players and each round consists of three stages: Dealing, Bidding, and Playing. In the first round every player gets one card. In the subsequent rounds the number of cards is increased by one until all cards are distributed. That means that three players play 20 rounds, four players 15 rounds, five players 12 rounds and six players 10
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Shanghai rum

    Shanghai rum

    Shanghai rum is a Rummy card game, based on gin rummy and a variation of Contract rummy played by 3 to 8 players. It is also known as California rummy. Shanghai rum is played with multiple decks of 54 standard playing cards, including the Jokers. Aces are high (above a King), and Jokers are wild cards. The number of decks varies from 2 to 4 and is based on the number of players (see chart). Each game is based on 7 hands, and the rules for each hand are unique. One person begins as dealer for the first hand, and then the person to the dealer's left becomes dealer for the next hand, and so on. Each player is dealt eleven cards. The rest of the deck is then placed face down in the middle of the players; this is referred to as the stock. One card is taken from the top of the stock and placed face up next to it. This card is called the upcard and becomes the beginning of the discard pile, other wise known as "dead", or no longer in the game. The first player to play is the player to the dealer's left. Play always progresses in this clockwise direction. Each player has a choice at the beginning of their turn. They may either pick up one new card from the top of the stock or take the
    10.00
    2 votes
    39
    Tableau

    Tableau

    Tableau is a solitaire that founds its own style, which means all cards are open and arranged to the left and right of the foundations. This is a similar setup like Little Napoleon Patience (solitaire), Beleaguered Castle, Fortress (solitaire), Kings Solitaire (solitaire), or Fürst Bismark (solitaire). This is a thinking and planning game that starts hard and gets easier the farther you advance. Cascades are built down in suit. The foundations are built up from the aces in suit. You can move multiple cards that are descending in suit between cascades. Rudolf Heinrich, 1976, “Die schönsten Patiencen”. Perlen-Reihe 641, 18th and 27th Edition, probably out of print, ISBN 3-85223-095-0, Perlen-Reihe Verlag, Wien
    10.00
    2 votes
    40
    Tarot

    Tarot

    The French game of tarot, also jeu de tarot, is a trick-taking card game for four players using the traditional 78-card tarot deck. The game is enjoyed throughout France and also known in French-speaking Canada. French tarot is one of the older forms of tarot and has remained popular for centuries. Tarot is a member of the tarock family of games. Tarot, the second-most popular card game in France after Belote, has been gaining popularity since the latter part of the 20th century, helped largely by the fact that the rules are very consistent wherever the game is played. The Fédération Française de Tarot publishes official rules for tarot. In English, the game is sometimes referred to as French tarot. This is done to differentiate the card game from other uses of the tarot deck which are more familiar in the Americas and English-speaking countries, namely cartomancy and other divinatory uses, and also to distinguish it from other card games played with a tarot deck. The game of tarot is played using a 78-card tarot deck, which is composed of a numbered series of 21 trump cards (atouts), one Fool (l'excuse), and 4 suits (spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs), divided into 10 numbers from 1
    10.00
    2 votes
    41

    Wyatt Earp

    Wyatt Earp is a rummy-like card game first released in 2001. The game is named after Wyatt Earp, a famous lawman, and is set in the American Old West. It is manufactured by Rio Grande Games and was created by Mike Fitzgerald and Richard Borg for Alea. The following is a partial summary of the rules of play. Each player tries to earn reward money by participating in the capture of seven outlaws during multiple rounds of play. Outlaws are captured through the accumulation of capture points, awarded to players who play sets or melds of cards representing the outlaws, or who play cards which build on the melds of others. Cards almost always have reward amounts associated with them; playing a card adds to the reward for the outlaw associated with the play. As in rummy or gin rummy, a meld is three or more matching cards. In Wyatt Earp, card matches are not determined by suits; instead, cards are matched based on a color marking associated with each of the seven outlaws. A round starts with each player being dealt ten cards, with one of the remaining cards used to establish the discard pile (face up) and the rest of the deck serving as the card supply, face down. Each player's turn
    6.40
    5 votes
    42
    Decade

    Decade

    Decade also known by the name of Ten-Twenty-Thirty is a Patience game played with a traditional 52 card deck that is akin to another solitaire game called Accordion. Like Accordion, it is traditionally played with the cards in a line. Because of its minimal use of space, it can also be played in one hand by placing the deck face down in the hand, and placing the line in a stack on top of the deck, with the discard pile face up on the bottom (as seen in picture to right). Taking a standard 52-card deck of playing cards (without Jokers), three cards are drawn from the bottom of the deck and placed face up in a line on the table laid out in the order they were drawn so the faces can be read. Spot cards (cards from ace, deuce, etc. to ten) have their face value while face cards (jack, queen, and king) are valued at ten points. If the total of at least two consecutive cards in the line equals 10, 20, or 30, they are discarded. The cards are treated as if in a straight line, so cards coming from both the front and back of the line that value to ten, twenty, or thirty are not considered consecutive unless they occupy a physically adjacent position to the card. After this has been repeated
    7.25
    4 votes
    43
    Big Two

    Big Two

    Big Two (also known as Deuces and other names, see below; Chinese: 大老二;; pinyin: dà lǎo èr; Cantonese: 鋤大D; jyutping: co4 daai6 di2) is a card game similar to the game of Asshole, Crazy Eights, Bullshit, Winner, and other shedding games. It is sometimes called "Chinese poker" because of its Chinese origin and its use of poker hands, though there is actually a different game by that name of an entirely different nature. In Malta it is often referred to as Giappuniza or Ciniza due to its Asian origin. This card game has many names, including Big Deuce, Big Two, Top Dog, "The Hannah Game" (used in Canada), Da Lao Er (Mandarin Chinese), Sho Tai Ti, Choh Dai Di, Dai Di (Cantonese), Cap Sa (Hokkien, used in Indonesia), and Pusoy Dos (a Philippine variant of the game). A common mistake is to confuse this game with Tien Len or Thirteen or 13 because these two games are actually different in the sense that Big Two involves poker hands but Tien Len does not. The game is very popular in East Asia and South East Asia, especially throughout China (including Hong Kong and Macau), Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. It is played both casually and as a gambling game. It is usually played
    8.33
    3 votes
    44
    Grandfather's Clock

    Grandfather's Clock

    Grandfather's Clock is a solitaire game using a deck of 52 playing cards. Its foundation is akin to Clock Solitaire; but while winning the latter depends on the luck of the draw, this game has a strategic side. Before the game begins, the following cards are taken out of the deck: 2♥, 3♠, 4♦, 5♣, 6♥, 7♠, 8♦, 9♣, 10♥, J♠, Q♦, and K♣. They are then arranged in a circular fashion like a clock face with the 2♥ on the "five o' clock" position, 3♠ on the "six o' clock" position, and so on. These cards will be the foundations. The remaining cards are then shuffled and dealt into eight columns of five cards each on the tableau. The object of the game is to distribute the cards to the foundations to point that the top cards of the foundations show the correct numbers on the clock face. (A queen is equal to twelve, a jack eleven.) Each foundation should be built up by suit until the card with the correct corresponding number on the clock face is placed. The cards on the tableau on the other hand are built down regardless of suit. The top cards of each column are the only ones available for play. Only one card can be played at a time and any space that occurs is filled with any available
    8.33
    3 votes
    45
    Winner Card Game

    Winner Card Game

    Winner (Chinese: 争上游; Pinyin: Zheng Shangyou) is a card game popular in China, similar to the game President, the game Big Two, and other shedding games. It is the game from which Tien Len and other similar games are derived. The game uses a standard 52-card deck, with thirteen cards in four suits. Diamond is the lowest suit, followed by clubs, then hearts, then spade. Like Big Two, twos rank high, and the rest of the deck ranks as usual: aces above kings, kings above queens, and so on, with threes being the lowest. The Jokers are the highest singles, and the red joker ranks higher than the black joker. Two decks may be used for four or more players. Cards may be played as singles, pairs, three of a kind, full house, four of a kind, straights (3 or more in a row), straight flushes (3 or more in a row of the same suit), pair straights, and three of a kind straights. The leading card to a trick sets down the type of play. The combinations and their rankings are as follows. The dealer (who may be chosen by cutting the cards, as usual) shuffles the deck to begin with and begins dealing out the cards singly, starting with himself, in a clockwise manner around the table. The cards are
    8.33
    3 votes
    46

    FreeCell

    FreeCell is a solitaire-based card game played with a 52-card standard deck. It is fundamentally different from most solitaire games in that nearly all deals can be solved. Although software implementations vary, most versions label the hands with a number (derived from the random number seed used to generate the hand). A version of FreeCell was created by Microsoft for release with the Windows operating system. Construction and layout: Building during play: Moves: Victory: For games with the standard layout (four open cells and eight cascades) most games are easily solved. One of the oldest ancestors of FreeCell is Eight Off. In the June 1968 edition of Scientific American, Martin Gardner described in his "Mathematical Games" column a game by C. L. Baker that is similar to FreeCell, except that cards on the tableau are built by suit rather than by alternate colors. Gardner wrote, "The game was taught to Baker by his father, who in turn learned it from an Englishman during the 1920's." This variant is now called Baker's Game. FreeCell's origins may date back even further to 1945 and a Scandinavian game called Napoleon in St. Helena (not the game Napoleon at St. Helena, also known
    9.50
    2 votes
    47

    Oh Hell

    Oh Hell (also known as Oh Pshaw, Up the River, Up and down the River, Bumble, Vanishing Whist, Diminishing Whist, Hell Yeah!, Peanuts, Stinky Fingers, Get Fred, Gary's Game, Diminishing Bridge, Shit On Your Neighbor, "Screw Your Neighbor", O'Shay, Juego de Daniel, Nah Pearse, Old Hell, German Bridge in Hong Kong, and many variations of "Oh Hell" with euphemisms and other swearwords) is a trick-taking card game in which the object is to take exactly the number of tricks bid, unlike contract bridge and spades: taking more tricks than bid is a loss. Its first appearance dates to the early 1930s and it is sometimes credited to Geoffrey Mott-Smith. The game of Oh Hell explores the idea of taking an exact number of tricks specified by a bid before the hand, and differs from other trick-taking games in that players play a fixed number of hands. The game uses trump, often decided by a cut of the deck after the hand's cards have been distributed. Like many popular social card games, Oh Hell has many local variants, in both rules and names. There are many variations to this game; a common set of regulations is given here. Oh Hell can be played with almost any number of players (3+) although
    9.50
    2 votes
    48
    Sechsundsechzig

    Sechsundsechzig

    Sixty-six or Schnapsen is a fast 5- or 6-card point-trick game of the marriage type for 2–4 players, played with 20 or 24 cards. First recorded in 1718 under the name Mariagen-Spiel, it is the national card game of Austria and also popular in Germany and Hungary. Closely related games for various numbers of players are popular all over Europe and include Czech/Slovak Mariáš, Hungarian Ulti, Finnish Marjapussi, French Bezique and American Pinochle. Together with the Jack–Nine family they form the large King–Queen family of games. German Sixty-six is a 6-card game played with a deck of 24 cards consisting of the Ace, Ten, King, Queen, Jack and Nine, worth 11, 10, 4, 3, 2 and 0 card-points, respectively. The other major variant is Austrian Schnapsen, which does not make use of the Nines and has a hand size of 5 cards. The trump suit is determined randomly. Players each begin with a full hand and draw from the stock after each trick. The object in each deal is to be the first player to score 66 points. The cards have a total worth of 120 points, and the last trick is worth 10 points. A player who holds King and Queen of the same suit scores 20 points, or 40 points in trumps, when
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Txintxon

    Txintxon

    Chinchón is a matching card game played in Spain, Uruguay, Argentina, Cape Verde and other places. It is a close variant of Gin Rummy (possibly drawing the first part of its name from "gin"), with which it shares the same objective: making sets — groups or runs — of matching cards. The name is spelled Txintxon in Basque and in Cape Verdean creole (the latter also features the alternate spellings txin-txon, txintxom, tchimtchom, tchintchom or tchintchon). In Uruguay, the game is called Conga or La Conga. The game of Chinchón is played with a Spanish 40 or 48-card pack. The rules of the game are very similar to those of Gin Rummy, that is, seven cards are given to each player, and the remaining of the deck is laid in the table face down to form the stock. The top card of this pile is then turned face up and laid beside it to start the discard pile. The players look at and sort their cards, and then play by turns. Each turn consists of a draw and a discard: Once a player has enough sets, they may decide to meld their cards, laying off their hand on the table, and the round ends. That can be done when the player thinks that the value of their unmatched cards, called "deadwood" in
    9.50
    2 votes
    50
    Nertz

    Nertz

    Nertz is a fast-paced, real-time, multiplayer card game involving multiple decks of playing cards. It is often described as a combination of the card games Speed and Solitaire. Nertz is known by a number of different names, although the name "Nertz" appears to be the most recognized. Pounce, Nerts, and Peanuts are alternate names that are often common substitutes when referring to the game of Nertz. According to the National Nertz Association (U.S.), there is not a known inventor or a specific date of creation for the game of Nertz. The NNA also claims that this game has been around since the 1940s. Canfield, a card game similar in set-up to Nertz, was created in the 1890s and seems to be the closest relative in the family tree of cards games. In fact, if one were to attempt to play Nertz alone, one would essentially be playing Canfield, a variant of Klondike Solitaire or Patience. What makes Nertz different from Solitaire (aside from the fact that it is not played alone) or any other card game for that matter is the fact that players have the option to play cards communally, in real-time, using multiple decks of playing cards. The object in a hand of Nertz is to be the first
    7.00
    4 votes
    51
    Pyramid

    Pyramid

    Pyramid or beeramid is a card game that is most commonly used as a drinking game. One begins by creating a pyramid of cards by placing them face down on the table in rows (6 cards on the bottom row, 5 on the next, then 4, 3, 2, and 1 card peak on the top row). Next, the dealer passes out four cards to each player, face down. Players can look at their cards only once and should not let other players see them. The object of the game is to make other players drink based on what cards that they think you have.
    7.00
    4 votes
    52
    Big Harp

    Big Harp

    Big Harp is a medium easy game of solitaire played with 104 playing cards. It has one more stack than double Klondike, which makes the game easier. This game is called "Die Pyramide" in Germany (Rudolf Heinrich, 1976), however this name is already taken in English for Pyramid (solitaire). Use two decks of cards. Shuffle them and deal 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 and 0 hidden cards on the 10 cascades. Now add one row of open cards and you are ready to go. Try to build ascending from the aces on the 8 foundations and use the Klondike red on black alternating color rule to build cascades. If stuck, draw card by card from the stock to the waste. The game allows you to recycle the waste stack exactly one time. Empty cascades can accept any card (easy variation) or only kings (harder variation). Rudolf Heinrich, 1976, “Die schönsten Patiencen”. Perlen-Reihe 641, 18th and 27th Edition, probably out of print, ISBN 3-85223-095-0, Perlen-Reihe Verlag, Wien List of Solitaire Card Games
    6.00
    5 votes
    53
    Gin rummy

    Gin rummy

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Gin rummy, or simply gin, is a two-player card game created in 1909 by Elwood T. Baker and his son C. Graham Baker. According to John Scarne, Gin evolved from 19th-century Whiskey Poker and was created with the intention of being faster than standard rummy, but less spontaneous than knock rummy. Gin is played with a standard 52-card pack of playing cards. The ranking from high to low is K-Q-J-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-A. The objective in gin rummy is to score points and reach an agreed number of points or more, usually 100, before your opponent does. The basic game strategy is to improve one's hand by forming melds and eliminating deadwood. Gin has two types of meld: Sets of 3 or 4 cards sharing the same rank, e.g. 8♥ 8♦ 8♠; and runs of 3 or more cards in sequence, of the same suit. e.g. 3♥ 4♥ 5♥ or more. Deadwood cards are those not in any meld. In gin rummy aces are considered low and can form any set of aces but only the low end of runs (e.g. A♠ 2♠ 3♠ etc.). Q♠ K♠ A♠ is not a legal run in gin rummy. A player can form any combination of melds within their hand, whether it contains all sets, all runs, or both. A hand can contain three or fewer melds to knock or form legal gin. The
    6.00
    5 votes
    54
    Konter a Matt

    Konter a Matt

    Konter a Matt, “Kontra a Matt” or “Konter a Midd” is a Luxembourgish card game to be played by four players. Players form two teams of two partners. Partners sit at opposite seats. A 24-card deck is used: the four suits with ace (A), king (K), queen (Q), jack (J), ten (10) and nine (9). The value in points of the cards are: ace 4, king 3, queen 2, jack 1, 10 and 9 nothing. In order to win a match, a team has to get more than 20 points. If each team gets 20 points, the game ends as a draw. At the beginning of one game, the trump suit is fixed. Additionally, three cards are always trumps: the queens of spades ♠Q, hearts ♥Q and diamonds ♦Q are always trumps. This is what gave the name to the game: the two queens of hearts ♥Q and diamonds ♦Q are the two Kontra trumps, the queen of spades Q is the “Matt”. As a consequence, in a match, depending on which suit is the trump, there are nine or eight trumps, four possibilities, the value of the cards is as follows (from highest to lowest, the point value is not affected): The next rule is the obligation to respond to the suit that has been played or to play a trump. If you have a card belonging to the suit that is played, you may not play
    8.00
    3 votes
    55
    Mus

    Mus

    Mus is a Basque card game, widely played in Spain and to a lesser extent in France. It is a vying game. The word Mus is believed to come from the French word mouche ("fly"), from Latin mussula. In Spain it is the most played card game, spawning several Mus clubs or peñas and becoming a staple game among college students. It is not uncommon to hear the Basque terms, such as órdago (from Basque hor dago "there it is") used by Spanish speakers, often without them being aware of the literal meanings of the terms and phrases. Basque emigrants carried the game to other countries such as the USA and Australia, where it is played in Basque clubs. Nowadays there is an international Mus tournament, in addition to many national and regional competitions. The game is played between two opposing pairs of players with the Spanish deck which is a deck of 40 cards, without eights, nines, or tens and no jokers, and it has a variety of different rules in the different regions of Spain. The game has four rounds: In each of these four rounds players take by order a call each, verbalizing (usually after discussing it with his partner) whether if he/them will bid "enbido" or pass "paso" which only
    8.00
    3 votes
    56
    Setback

    Setback

    Setback, also known as Pitch, is a trick-taking card game somewhat similar to Spades. It is generally played by four individual players, however there are variations in which 8 may play, sometimes in teams of 2 or 4 players. The object of Setback is to accumulate a predefined number of points, typically 11, 15 or 21, over the course of several hands. The trump suit, determined by the highest bidder, is the highest suit. All other suits are equal. It is played with a single standard deck of playing cards. The rank order is A-K-Q-J-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2. The starting dealer is selected by whatever means seems appropriate at the time, and continues clockwise from that point on. Six cards are dealt to each player, typically in groups of 2 or 3, face down and starting to the dealer's left. A variation from rural West Virginia has an extra hand dealt face down, which is called "the widows." The player who wins the auction gets to add the widow to his or her hand and then discards six cards to bring the hand back to six cards. The player who has the widow does not get to draw any more cards than are contained in the original hand plus the widow, minus the six discards. The Player then
    8.00
    3 votes
    57

    Seven Spades

    Seven Spades is a card game, apparently created by Johan Wästlund in 2002. It's similar to Bullshit in that bluffing plays a key role; however the game is more fast-paced and, arguably, more intense. While originally intended for two players (which is still the best way to play it), any number of people can play. The gameplay is simple. A deck of 52 cards is used. The dealer shuffles the deck and places it on the table face down. The player to the left of the dealer is the first to go - he picks up a card from the deck, taking care not to show it to anyone. Now he can either discard it on the table, face up, or declare it a spade and put it in front of him, face down. If the latter happened, any other player can, but is not obliged to, challenge the first player by opening the card. If it's not a spade (i.e. the player attempted bluff), the first player is out of the game; if it is a spade, the second player is out. When only one player is left, he is declared the winner; with two people playing, the winner will always be determined on the first challenge. The only other way to win is to collect a pre-determined number of spades - seven spades in the two-player version. The last
    8.00
    3 votes
    58
    Dou Di Zhu

    Dou Di Zhu

    Dou Di Zhu, (simplified Chinese: 斗地主; traditional Chinese: 鬥地主; pinyin: Dòu Dìzhǔ; literally "Fight the Landlord") is a card game in the genre of shedding and gambling. It is one of the most popular card games played in China. Dou Di Zhu is described as easy to learn but hard to master requiring mathematical and strategic thinking as well as intended execution. Suits are unnecessary in playing Dou Di Zhu. Players can easily play the game with a set of Dou Di Zhu playing cards, without the suits printed on the cards. Less popular variations of the game do exist in China, such as four-player and five-player Dou Di Zhu played with two packs of cards. The class struggle during the Cultural Revolution in China reportedly authorized the peasants to violate the human rights of the landlords who were among the Five Black Categories and Stinking Old Ninth, whence the name Dou Di Zhu, (simplified Chinese: 斗地主; traditional Chinese: 鬥地主; pinyin: Doù Dìzhǔ; literally "Fight the Landlord"). China's Generation Y, who are among one of the most enthusiastic player groups, has no personal experience of the class struggle. Nowadays, the name of the game carries no negative connotation. Dou Di Zhu is
    6.75
    4 votes
    59
    Flower Garden

    Flower Garden

    Flower Garden is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. It is not known why the game is called such, but the terms used in this game do have a relation to those in gardening and it takes merit that some skill is needed. It is also known under the names The Bouquet and The Garden. Thirty-six cards are dealt in to six columns, each containing six cards. The columns are called the "flower beds" and the entire tableau is sometimes called "the garden." The sixteen leftover cards become the reserve, or "the bouquet." The top cards of each flower-bed and all of the cards in the bouquet are available for play. Cards can only be moved one at a time and can be built either on the foundations or on the other flower beds. The foundations are built up by suit, from Ace to King (a general idea of the game is to release the aces first). The cards in the garden, on the other hand, can be built down regardless of suit and any empty flower bed can be filled with any card. The cards in the bouquet can be used to aid in building, be put into the foundations, or fill an empty flower bed. The game is won when all cards end up in the foundations.
    6.75
    4 votes
    60
    Fuck the dealer

    Fuck the dealer

    Fuck the Dealer (also known as Over Under) is a card game that is often used as a drinking game and can be played by as few as two people. The name refers to the end of the game, when most of the cards have been used and the players can easily "fuck the dealer" by guessing correctly.
    6.75
    4 votes
    61
    Solitaire

    Solitaire

    Solitaire is any tabletop game which one can play by oneself or with other people. In the USA, it may refer to any card game played by oneself; the British use the term Patience to refer to solitaire with cards. The term "solitaire" is also used for single-player games of concentration and skill using a set layout of tiles, pegs or stones rather than cards. These games include Peg solitaire and Mahjong solitaire. Most solitaire games function as a puzzle which, due to a different starting position, may (or may not) be solved in a different fashion each time. There are a number of different types of solitaire game. These include:
    6.75
    4 votes
    62

    Bourré

    Bourré (also commonly known as Bouré and Boo-Ray) is a trick-taking gambling card game primarily played in the Acadiana region of Louisiana in the United States of America. It is also played in the Greek island of Psara, with the name Boureki (Μπουρέκι in Greek). The game's closest relatives are probably Spades and Euchre; like many regional games, Bourré sports a large number of variant rules for both gameplay and betting considerations. The object of Bourré is to take a majority of the tricks in each hand and thereby claim the money in the pot. If a player cannot take a majority of tricks, his/her secondary goal is to keep from bourréing, or taking no tricks at all. A bourré usually comes at a high penalty, such as matching the amount of money in the pot. The game is played with a standard 52-card deck; aces are high. There can be anywhere from 2 to 7 players. When there are 7 players, the players may only diss 3 cards (as to not use the dead cards). After every player antes, the dealer passes out five cards to each player, one at a time. The dealer flips their own fifth card—the last dealt—and the suit of that card is considered trumps. In Boureki it is called kozia or atoy. As
    9.00
    2 votes
    63
    Calabresella

    Calabresella

    Calabresella, Calabragh, sometimes spelt Calabrasella, "the little Calabrian game", also known as Terziglio, is an Italian trick-taking card game variation of Tressette for three players, but it can be played by four with the dealer receiving no cards for the hand. One of the earliest references of the game dates from 1822. The overall aim is to be the first to make a score of 21 points. In each deal, one person plays against the other two with the aim of capturing in tricks cards totalling at least 6 of the 11 points available for counters and the last trick. The soloist is determined by auction and each successive bid must be higher than the last. A player who has once passed may not come in again. The game moves to the right of the dealer and the bids from low to high are: Calabresella is played with an Italian pack, consisting of a King (Re), Knight/Cavalier (Cavallo, literally meaning Horse), and a Knave (Fante, literally meaning Footsoldier) and the pip cards 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, ace in 4 suits of Batons (Bastoni), Swords (Spade), Cups (Coppe) and Coins (Danari). The rather unusual rank of the cards goes as follows: One player plays against the other two, paying to each or
    9.00
    2 votes
    64
    President (card game)

    President (card game)

    Scum (also known as President, Kings, and many other names), an Americanized version of Dai Hin Min, is a card game for three or more in which players race to get rid of all of the cards in their hands in order to become President in the following round. It can also be played as a drinking game. Gameplay is similar to Dai Hin Min, in which players attempt to get rid of their cards first. When played as a drinking game, the following rules may be used: There may be many titles used by players during the game. Often, players move seats to sit in the order of their place, so as not to forget the order. There is generally at least a President, Vice President and Scum. More or fewer titles may be used, depending on how many players are in the game. Common extra titles include the Secretary one level below VP, Citizens, Normals, Neutrals or Average Joes in between the high and low named ranks, and Clerk one level above Vice-Asshole. Other ranking systems use the presidential line of succession. The Secretary and Clerk are generally only used with six or more players, and rules regarding card passing or drinks can be changed to accommodate these two positions as desired. A large and/or
    9.00
    2 votes
    65
    Bid whist

    Bid whist

    Bid whist is a partnership trick-taking variant of the classic card game whist. As indicated by the name, bid whist adds a bidding element to the game that is not present in classic whist. It is generally accepted that the game of bridge came from the game of whist. Bid whist, along with spades, remains popular particularly in US military culture and a tradition in African-American culture with probable roots in the period of slavery in the United States. The general play of bid whist is similar to that of whist, with four notable exceptions. In whist, the trump suit for a given hand is determined at random by the last card dealt, whereas in bid whist, the trump suit (or whether there will even be a trump suit) for a given hand is determined by the outcome of the bidding process. Secondly, whether a trick is won by the higher-ranking card of the winning suit, or by the lower-ranking card of that suit is also determined by the outcome of the bidding process. Thirdly, whether the ace is the highest-ranking card of the suit or the lowest-ranking card can change from hand to hand, depending on whether higher-ranking cards or lower-ranking cards win in that hand. And lastly, the scoring
    7.67
    3 votes
    66
    Rummoli

    Rummoli

    Rummoli is a family card game for 2 to 8 people. This Canadian board game, first marketed in 1940 by the Copp Clark Publishing Company of Toronto requires a Rummoli board, a deck of playing cards (52 cards, no jokers), and chips or coins to play. The game is usually played for fun, or for small stakes (e.g. Canadian cent). Rummoli is similar to Michigan Rummy. A Rummoli board, used during play, has the shape of an octagon. It is generally simply printed on a large sheet of paper. In the centre of the board is a pot called Rummoli, surrounded by eight pots: Each of these pots on the board is used to store chips. The ordering of the pots around the board is not important. Ace is high. For brevity, in the following description the "lowest card" means the lowest card in a player's hand or, if two or more cards are equally low, either or any of them. A game is played in one or more rounds. The game ends at the end of a round, at the discretion of the players. For example it may be agreed to finish at a certain time, or when all but one player have exhausted their chips. For each round, there are four stages: the Deal, the Poker phase, the Rummoli phase, and the End of round, which are
    7.67
    3 votes
    67
    Tonk

    Tonk

    Tonk, or tunk is a matching card game, which combines features of knock rummy and conquian. Tonk is a relatively fast game that can be played during brief periods of time by varying numbers of players. In some places it is a popular pastime for workers on their lunch break. Tonk is usually played for money, with a stake agreed on before the game starts. Each player pays the stake to the winner of the hand. Games typically involve three to five players. Stakes may be any amount, on the order of a nickel or dime, a dollar, which is a standard amount, or even up to twenty dollars in some cases. A game consists of several hands. The players take turns dealing. A standard fifty-two card deck is used. Each card has a point value: Ace through ten have their face value, aces having a value of one point, deuces a value of two points, and so on. The Jack, Queen, and King are each worth ten points. Players are dealt three, five, seven, or twelve cards, depending on the number of players, in turn. The dealer turns up the first of the un-dealt cards as the start of the discard pile (Some people play that the dealer does not turn up the first card. The discard pile is started after the first
    7.67
    3 votes
    68
    Canasta

    Canasta

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Canasta ( /kəˈnæstə/; Spanish for "basket") is a card game of the rummy family of games believed to be a variant of 500 Rum. Although many variations exist for 2, 3, 5 or 6 players, it is most commonly played by four in two partnerships with two standard decks of cards. Players attempt to make melds of 7 cards of the same rank and "go out" by playing all cards in their hand. It is the only partnership member of the family of Rummy games to achieve the status of a classic. The game of Canasta was devised by Segundo Santos and Alberto Serrato in Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1939. In the 1940s the game quickly spread in myriad variations to Chile, Peru, Brazil and Argentina, where its rules were further refined before being introduced to the United States in 1948, where it was then referred to as the Argentine Rummy game by Ottilie H. Reilly in 1949 and Michael Scully of Coronet magazine in 1953. The game quickly became a card-craze boom in the 1950s providing a sales avalanche of card sets, card trays and books about the subject. The classic game is for four players in two partnerships. Variations exist for two and three player games wherein each plays alone, and also for a six player
    10.00
    1 votes
    69
    Cắt Tê

    Cắt Tê

    Cắt Tê, (Vietnamese for six cards), or catte, is a trick taking card game popular in Vietnam and expatriate Vietnamese communities. Unlike other trick games, in which the objective is either to collect tricks, avoid tricks, or fulfill a contract; the object of Cắt Tê is to win the last trick in a given round. The game is similar to Tien Gow, but played with cards instead of dominoes. It can be played by 3-6 players. Gambling is an essential part of Cắt Tê. Like mahjongg, there is only one betting round per game; and all players make the same bet. Also like Mahjongg, there are additional rewards and penalties for certain outcomes. It is possible for a player to be required to forfeit more than his additional bet at the conclusion of a game. The object of Cắt Tê is to either: After the fourth trick, players who have won no tricks are eliminated, so it is not possible to win the sixth trick without winning one of the first four tricks. There are never more than six tricks played per game. Cắt Tê is played with a standard deck of 52 cards, with jokers removed. As in Bridge, the rank-order is A-K-Q-J-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2, from high to low. There is no trump suit. Cắt Tê is played in
    10.00
    1 votes
    70
    Cribbage

    Cribbage

    Cribbage, or crib, is a card game where points are scored for holding certain combinations of cards and for playing the cards in a certain order. There are certain cards and card combinations that are likely to be beneficial to a hand. They include Players will try to keep these cards, non-dealers discarding to the crib cards deemed least likely to improve their hand after the cut (and simultaneously unlikely to strengthen their opponent's crib), while the dealer retains the best cards while throwing combinations that will likely maximize points in the crib. Particularly useful cards, whether for the hand or crib, include: Often players are confronted with a conundrum. They have good cards to hold, but must throw cards to their opponent that are likely to score significantly in their crib. You are dealt a hand composed of 10-10-8-7-6-2. Your best opportunity to score points is to hold the 8-7-6-2. Fifteen four and a run of three make seven; more importantly, this hand can be cut to ten, eleven, twelve, fourteen or sixteen. But to what extent does throwing a pair of 10s mitigate the usefulness of holding the deuce? By throwing a 10-deuce the likelihood that your opponent will score
    10.00
    1 votes
    71
    Troccas

    Troccas

    Troccas is a member of the Tarot family of card games. It is played in the Romansh speaking part of the canton Grisons of Switzerland. It is not known exactly how this game entered Switzerland but it is generally thought to have arrived from Italy during the 17th century. Troccas decks are sometimes called "JJ" or "Juno and Jupiter" decks because they substitute Juno for The High Priestess and Jupiter for The Hierophant. The Tower is called Le Maison Dieu. The deck's captions are usually in French, but A version with English captions has been published.
    10.00
    1 votes
    72
    Briscola

    Briscola

    Briscola (bixkla in Maltese, brìscula in Sicilian, brìšcula or brišc in Neapolitan, briškula in Croatian, Skembeel in Libya, la brisca in Spanish, bisca in Portuguese, briškola in Slovene, бришкуле in Serbian), one of Italy's most popular games together with Scopa and Tressette, and a little-changed descendant of Brusquembille, the ancestor of Briscan and Bezique, is a Mediterranean trick-taking card game for two to six players played with a standard Italian 40-card deck. Apart from the Northern Mediterranean, the game is also popular in Puerto Rico. It is believed to have originated in the early 18th century in the Northern Eastern region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Currently Modiano S.p.a. is a large manufacturing firm of Briscola cards and is currently located in Trieste, the capital of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. It is also common to find the Triestino coat of arms on Modiano playing cards, which is placed in order to recall the historics of the Briscola game. Alternatively, it can be played with a modern Anglo-French deck, without the eight, nine and ten cards (see Portuguese variations below). With three or six players, twos are removed from the deck to ensure the number of cards in
    6.50
    4 votes
    73

    ROOK

    Rook is a trick-taking game, usually played with a specialized deck of cards. Sometimes referred to as "Christian cards" or "missionary poker", Rook playing cards were introduced by Parker Brothers in 1906 to provide an alternative to standard playing cards for those in the Puritan tradition or Mennonite culture who considered the face cards in a regular deck inappropriate because of their association with gambling and cartomancy. Parker Brothers created Rook in the early 1900s and released the game in 1906. The Rook deck consists of 57 cards: a blue Rook Bird card, similar to a joker, and 56 cards divided into four suits, or colors. Each suit—black, red, yellow, and green—is made up of cards numbered 1 through 14. This 14-card, 4-suit system is derived from the French tarot deck; removing the 21 atouts, or trumps, from that deck while keeping the Fool card yields the 57-card French-suited deck that was re-faced to create the Rook deck. Though the culture-neutral deck was developed for the game Rook, many other games have evolved or existed previously that use the 56-card deck with or without the Rook, or — by removing the 14s and the Rook — one can use the deck like a deck of
    6.50
    4 votes
    74
    Spoons

    Spoons

    Spoons, also known as Pig or Tongue, is a fast-paced game of matching and bluffing family of card games of the Crazy Eights group, closely related to Craits played with an ordinary pack of playing cards and several ordinary kitchen spoons or various other objects. It is played in multiple rounds and each player's objective is to be the first in the round to have four of a kind, or to not be the last to grab a spoon. Once one spoon is taken, everybody attempts to get the remaining spoons. A popular variant of the game is to replace the spoons with the players shoes, in situations where cutlery is not available. The game Spoons can be played with 3 or more players, using two decks of 52 ordinary playing cards and a number of spoons totalling one fewer than the number of players. The spoons are placed in the center of the table in a circle with handles pointing outward so that they may be easily grabbed by any of the players. One person is designated first dealer and deals four cards to each player. The dealer will use the remaining cards to draw from. Players are not allowed to pick up their cards until the dealer has. If they do, they get a letter which will begin to spell out the
    6.50
    4 votes
    75
    Königrufen

    Königrufen

    Königrufen or Königsrufen ("The Calling of a King" Tarock) is a trick-taking card game four-player variant played in Austria and nearby areas in Central Europe, especially in Slovenia. Also five players may play the game with the dealer sitting out. Austrian Königrufen has a common core set of rules with considerable variation in the types of announcements and bonuses permitted, along with scoring, with most groups of players creating their own house rules. Although widely accepted tournament rules have been developed, such rules vary depending on the region where the game is played. Königrufen evolved from the older 18th century tarock games which borrowed their concepts of bidding from the card game Quadrille, an Hombre variant, to determine who played with whom. The earliest reference of the game appears in Wien, in a book written in 1840. Its closest cousin is Tapp Tarock, extensively played in Austria. The 54-card Tarock deck with combined value of 70 points is used. Each player receives 12 cards and 6 cards called the Talon are placed in the center. Players take turn in a counter-clockwise direction. After the exchange with the Talon, the player to the right of the dealer
    8.50
    2 votes
    76
    Piquet

    Piquet

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    Piquet (/ˈpɪkɨt/; French pronunciation: [pike]) is an early 16th-century trick-taking card game for two players. Piquet has long been regarded as one of the all-time great card games still being played. It was first mentioned on a written reference dating to 1535, in Gargantua and Pantagruel by Rabelais. Although legend attributes the game's creation to Stephen de Vignolles, also known as La Hire, a knight in the reign of Charles VII during the Hundred Years' War, it may possibly have come into France from Spain because the words "pique" and "repique", the main features of the game, are of Spanish origin. The game was introduced in Germany during the Thirty Years War, and texts of that period provide substantial evidence of its vogue, like the metaphorical use of the word "Repique" in the 1634-8 political poem Allamodisch Picket Spiel ("Piquet Game à la mode"), which reflects the growing popularity of the game at that time. As with other games like Bête, the substantive form of the word "Piquet" was turned into a verb and this is used substantially by Rist's 1640 Spiele: die man Picquetten who gives the word his grudging assent. Until the early 20th century, Piquet was perhaps the
    8.50
    2 votes
    77
    Pitch

    Pitch

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Pitch is an American trick-taking card game derived from the English game of All Fours (Seven Up). Historically, Pitch started as "Blind All Fours", a very simple All Fours variant that is still played in England as a pub game. The modern game involving a bidding phase and setting back a party's score if the bid is not reached came up in the middle of the 19th century and is more precisely known as Auction Pitch or Setback. Pitch was allegedly invented by eight men during a deer hunting trip in Mayfield, Kentucky. One of the eight men, Ernest Ray Cole, reported that the men were snowed in during the hunting trip in a log cabin and had nothing better to do with themselves. Ernest, though a boy at the time, was likely in attendance with his father, Pleasant Grant Cole and possibly on the property of Robert or Thomas Cole, brothers who at one time had adjacent properties in the latter half of the 19th century (Reference = Mayfield County Property Records and Deeds, Clerk of Courts, Mayfield, KY). Unlike most Kentucky winters, the hunters could not hunt at dusk or dawn because the weather was so bad that it was "pitch black" (as black as tar pitch from a tree) outside most of the time,
    8.50
    2 votes
    78
    500

    500

    500, Five Hundred, is a game devised in America shortly before 1900 and promoted by the United States Playing Card Company, who copyrighted and marketed the rules in 1904. The game can be played by two to six players but the most common form is for four players in partnerships although some sources say that the game is primarily for three players. The game is an extension of Euchre which also incorporates the basic principles of Bridge. 500 has always been considered as a social card game and was highly popular in the United States until about 1920 when Auction bridge surpassed it. Subsequently, Contract Bridge drove it out of favour in America, but it continues to enjoy popularity in Australia. It is popular in New Zealand as well, and widely played in Quebec. The game is played with a regular deck of cards with certain cards removed. Specialised "500" packs contain 63 cards, extended from 52 by the addition of a Joker, Elevens and Twelves in each suit, and two Thirteens in the red suits. The full pack is only required for six players, however, and is stripped of various cards for varying number of players, the basic principle that there should be just enough for ten cards per
    7.33
    3 votes
    79
    Bastra

    Bastra

    Bastra, the Greek deformation of the Arabic word Basra, which is also a similar game played in Egypt, Lebanon and other Middle-Eastern countries, is a popular fishing card game similar to Cassino very popular in Cyprus. In Turkey, the game is known as Pişti or Paşta. The game was probably introduced to the Cypriots through the Turks during the Ottoman occupation. There are also variations of the game played in Greece, such as Diloti and Kseri. The game has been exported by both the Cypriot and Turkish diasporas and is played in Cypriot communities in Australia, Canada, England and the United States, usually passed on by the first generation of immigrants to their children and grandchildren. Despite this, the game is virtually unknown in these countries outside of the Cypriot and Greek communities. In Turkey the game is still very popular. The game is played with a 52 card deck and can involve two, three or four players, although the game is most interesting in the two or four player versions. In the four player version, the players can play for themselves or in two player teams. The first team or player to score 100 points is the winner. The dealer starts by dealing 1 card to each
    7.33
    3 votes
    80
    Kaiser

    Kaiser

    Kaiser, or three-spot, is a trick-taking card game popular in the prairie provinces in Canada, especially Saskatchewan and parts of its neighbouring provinces. It is played with four players in two partnerships with a 32-card deck. The origins of this game are a mystery and there seems to be no historical record (spoken or written) that justifies it being a solely Saskatchewan-area game. It is especially popular among Ukrainian communities, and was possibly brought to Canada by Ukrainian immigrants, although it is not now played in Ukraine. Kaiser is played by four people: two teams of two players each. Unlike many card games, only 32 cards are used out of a normal 52-card deck. The deck contains the cards from 8 to ace inclusively (8, 9, 10, jack, queen, king, ace) for each suit. The other four cards are the 7 of clubs, 7 of diamonds, 5 of hearts and 3 of spades. All 32 cards are dealt out: 8 to each player. Unique to Kaiser, the cards may be dealt in any order to any player at so long as each player ends up with 8 cards. In a clockwise manner, starting with the player to the dealer's left, each player may bid on the number of points that he believes he can make. The minimum bid
    7.33
    3 votes
    81
    Old Maid

    Old Maid

    Old maid is a Victorian card game for two to eight players probably deriving from an ancient gambling game in which the loser pays for the drinks. It is known in Germany as Schwarzer Peter, in Sweden as Svarte Petter and in Finland as Musta Pekka (all meaning "black Peter") and in France as le pouilleux ("the lousy/louse-ridden one") or vieux garçon ("old boy"). The game spawns an element of bluffing, commonly used in poker. There are retail card decks specifically for playing old maid, but it is just as easy to play with a regular deck of 52 cards. When using a regular deck, a card is either added or removed, resulting in one unmatchable card. The most popular choices are to remove the ace of clubs or queen of clubs or to add a single joker. The ace of spades, queen of spades or joker, respectively, becomes the "old maid"; it cannot be matched, and whoever holds it at the end of the game is the loser. It is possible to discard a single card from the deck face-down; if this is done, players cannot know which card is the old maid. The dealer deals all of the cards to the players. Some players may have more cards than others; this is acceptable. Players look at their cards and
    7.33
    3 votes
    82
    Scopa

    Scopa

    • Deck type: Italian
    • Play direction: Counter-clockwise
    Scopa is an Italian card game, and one of the two major national card games in Italy. It is also popular in Brazil, brought in by Italian immigrants, mostly in the Scopa di Quindici variation. It is played with a standard Italian 40-card deck, mostly between two players or four in two partnerships, but it can also be played by 3, 5, or 6 players. The name is an Italian noun meaning "broom", since taking a scopa means "to sweep" all the cards from the table. Watching a game of scopa can be a highly entertaining activity, since games traditionally involve lively, colorful, and somewhat strong-worded banter in between hands. However, skill and chance are more important to the outcome of the game. A deck of Italian cards consist of 40 cards, divided into four suits. Neapolitan, Piacentine, Triestine, and Sicilian cards are divided into Coppe (Cups), Ori or Denari (Golds or Coins), Spade (Swords) and Bastoni (Clubs), while Piemontesi, Milanesi and Toscane cards use the 'French' suits, that is Cuori (Hearts), Quadri (Diamonds, literally "Squares"), Fiori (Flowers) and Picche (Spades, literally "Pikes"). The values on the cards range numerically from one through seven, plus three face
    7.33
    3 votes
    83

    Solo whist

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Solo Whist, sometimes known as simply Solo, is a trick-taking card game whose direct ancestor is the 17th century Spanish game Hombre, based on the English Whist. Its major distinctive feature is that one player often plays against the other three. However, players form temporary alliances with two players playing against the other two if "Prop and Cop" is the current bid. It requires four players using a standard 52 card deck with no jokers. Aces are high and the deal, bidding and play are clockwise. Solo Whist was first played in the Low Countries in the first half of the 19th century and in England somewhere about the year 1852 by a family of Dutch Jews. It was practically unknown outside Jewish circles until the end of 1860s. From 1870 and 1872 it began to be played in the London sporting clubs in an attempt to supplant the card games formerly in vogue. Solo Whist derives from an early variety of Boston Whist through a Flemish form of the game called "Ghent Whist" and became popular in Britain as a relaxation from the rigors of partnership Whist in the 1890s, just as Bridge was appearing on the scene. In the event, it remains an essentially informal game of home and pub, and
    7.33
    3 votes
    84
    Trick-taking game

    Trick-taking game

    A trick-taking game is a card game or tile-based game in which play of a "hand" centers on a series of finite rounds or units of play, called tricks, which are each evaluated to determine a winner or "taker" of that trick. The object of such games then may be closely tied to the number of tricks taken, as in plain-trick games such as Whist, Contract Bridge, Spades, Napoleon, Rowboat, and Spoil Five, or on the value of the cards contained in taken tricks, as in point-trick games such as Pinochle, the Tarot family, Rook, All Fours, Manille, Briscola, and most "evasion" games like Hearts. The domino game Texas 42 is an example of a trick-taking game that is not a card game. Trick-and-draw games are trick-taking games in which the players can fill up their hands after each trick. Typically players are free to play any card into a trick in the first phase of the game, but must follow suit as soon as the score is depleted. Certain actions in trick-taking games with three or more players always proceed in the same direction. In games originating in North and West Europe, Russia, and the United States and Canada, the rotation is typically clockwise, i.e. play proceeds to the left; in South
    7.33
    3 votes
    85
    Crash

    Crash

    Crash is a British card game extension of Nine-card Brag. In Crash, there is no betting, as in Brag, but rather players aim to reach a total of 11 points, gained over successive deals, or else to 'crash', meaning to win the game outright by means of winning all four tricks in one deal. Players are dealt 13 cards each and must sort their hand into 4 Brag hands of three cards, or in 3 sets of 4 of a kind, discarding the last remaining card. The hands rank as in Brag. Once the players have sorted their hands, each plays their highest ranked hand, and the player playing the highest gains one point. If hands are tied, no-one scores. Players then play their second-best hands, then their third best, then final hands. Note that not all players accept 'high card' hands, and many do not accept 'pairs', which means that it is quite common for a player not to have four hands. The game is very popular in pubs and bars in the UK, and sometimes gambling is involved. All these rules depend on the rules of the house: The highest hand is a 3 of a kind, Starting with 3's, followed by Aces, Kings and so on. After this, a Run of the same suit, also called Bouncer (all the way through is worth more than
    6.25
    4 votes
    86

    Go Fish

    Go Fish (also Goldfish or simply Fish) is a simple card game. It is usually played by two to five players, although it can be played with up to ten. Using a standard 52-card deck, five cards are dealt to each player, or seven if there are four or fewer. The remaining card pack is shared between the players, usually sprawled out in a non-orderly pile referenced as the "ocean" or "pool". The player whose turn it is to play asks another player for his or her cards of a particular rank. For example, "Bim, do you have any threes?" The player who is asking must have at least one card of the rank he asked for in his hand. The recipient of the request must then hand over a card of that rank, if he has any. If the recipient of the request has none, he tells the player to "go fish," and the player draws a card from the pool and ends his turn. If the player receives the card he wanted (through either means), he may take another turn. If the player is now holding a pair of one rank, he may place the cards face up in front of himself. Play proceeds to the left. Winning: When one player runs out of cards, or the pool is empty, the game ends. The player with the most piles in front of him or her
    6.25
    4 votes
    87
    Stalactites

    Stalactites

    Stalactites is a solitaire card game which uses a deck of 52 playing cards. The game is similar to Freecell, but it is different because of the way building onto the foundations and the tableau. The player deals four cards from the deck. These four cards form the foundations. They are turned sideways (although it is not necessary to do so). The rest of the cards are dealt into eight columns of six cards each on the tableau. These cards can only be built up on the foundations regardless of suit and they cannot be built on each other. Before the game starts, the player can decide on how the foundations should be built. Building can be either in ones (A-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-J-Q-K) or in twos (A-3-5-7-9-J-K-2-4-6-8-10-Q). Once the player makes up his mind, he begins building on the foundations from the cards on the tableau. The foundations are built, as already mentioned, up regardless of suit, and it goes round the corner, building from King to Ace (if building by ones) or from Queen to Ace (if building by twos) if necessary. The foundation cards turned sideways, though not necessarily be done, is a reminder of the last card's rank on each foundation. The cards in the tableau should be
    6.25
    4 votes
    88
    All-Fours

    All-Fours

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    All Fours, also known as High-Low-Jack or Seven Up, is an English tavern trick-taking card game that was popular as a gambling game until the end of the 19th century. It is the eponymous and earliest recorded game in a family that flourished most in 19th century North America, notable other members being Auction Pitch, Pedro and Cinch, which competed against Poker and Euchre. Nowadays the original game is especially popular in the Caribbean, but a simpler variant has also survived in parts of England. Each player is dealt six cards. In trick play, players are allowed to trump instead of following suit. The title refers to the possibility of winning four game points by being dealt both the highest and the lowest trump in play, capturing the Jack of trumps and winning the greatest number of card-points. Two or more players play individually or in equal-sized teams, seated alternatingly. Default play rotation is clockwise in most areas. Players cut for first deal. Cards rank as in Whist and have certain numerical card-point values as shown in the table. In each deal up to 4 scoring points are distributed among the parties. The game is won by the party that first reaches the previously
    7.00
    3 votes
    89

    Auction bridge

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    The card game auction bridge, the third step in the evolution of the general game of bridge, was developed from straight bridge (i.e. bridge whist) in 1904. The precursor to contract bridge, its predecessors were whist and bridge whist. The main difference between auction bridge and contract bridge is that in auction bridge a game is scored whenever the required number of tricks (9 in No Trump, 10 in Hearts or Spades, 11 in Clubs or Diamonds) is scored, and in contract bridge the number of points from tricks taken past the bid do not count towards making a game. Because of this, accurate bidding becomes much more important in contract bridge: partners have to use the bidding to tell each other what their suits and strengths are, so a judgement can be made as to what the chances are of making a game. It is not certain to whom auction bridge should be credited. A letter in The Times (London), January 16, 1905, signed by Oswald Crawford, describes auction bridge as first played in 1904, while a book by "John Doe" (F. Roe), published in Alláhábád, India, in 1889, puts forward auction bridge as an invention of three members of the Indian Civil Service stationed at an isolated community,
    7.00
    3 votes
    90
    Botifarra

    Botifarra

    Botifarra (Catalan pronunciation: [butiˈfarə]) is a point trick-taking card game for four players in fixed partnerships played in Catalonia, the Northeast country of Spain, and parts of Aragon and Castelló province. It is a historical game also played in many parts of Spain, not only in bars and coffee shops. The game is closely related to Manille from which it takes the mechanics, but its rules enforces deduction and minimises the effects of luck. Botifarra is a point trick card game and only the points in the tricks are important, not the number of tricks, although a trick also has a value by itself. The game is usually played for 101 points or more, and this requires several hands. The point value of each card is as follows: One additional point is added for every trick won Botifarra is played with a Spanish 48-card deck of Coins, Cups, Swords and Batons running from 1 to 12. The card order is 9 (high), Ace, King, Horse, Jack, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 (low). The dealer deals the whole deck counterclockwise in batches of four cards. After each hand the turn to deal and play always passes to the right. Usually, dealer's right hand opponent shuffles the deck and the left hand opponent
    7.00
    3 votes
    91
    Clabber

    Clabber

    Clabber is a four player trick-taking card game that is played in and near Evansville, IN. Clabber is a member of the Jack-Nine family of card games that are popular in Europe. The game is a four player variation of Klaberjass, which was brought to Evansville by 19th century German immigrants. The game differs from Euchre in that you are not awarded the number of tricks you take, but the actual point value of cards in those tricks. Additional points can also be scored for a combination of cards in your hand. Clabber is played by four players in fixed partnerships with partners sitting opposite. The deck consist of 24 of the standard 52 playing card deck: Ace, King, Queen, Jack, Ten, Nine of each of the suits Clubs (♣), Diamonds (♦), Hearts (♥) and Spades (♠). The card ranks from hight to low and their values are as follows: The team that takes the last trick scores an extra 10 points, so that without melds there are a total of 162 possible points. Notice that in the trump suit the Jack and Nine move from the lowest rank to the highest rank and are the only cards to change in point value. A meld is a scoring combination of cards in the hand of a player. The rank and point values of
    7.00
    3 votes
    92
    Contract bridge

    Contract bridge

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Contract bridge, or simply bridge, is a trick-taking game using a standard 52-card deck. It is played by four players in two competing partnerships, with partners sitting opposite each other around a table. Millions of people play bridge worldwide in clubs, tournaments, online and with friends at home, making it one of the world's most popular card games, particularly among seniors. The World Bridge Federation is the governing body for international competitive bridge. The game consists of several deals each progressing through four phases: dealing the cards, the auction (also referred to as bidding), playing the hand, and scoring the results. Dealing the cards and scoring the results are procedural activities while the auction and playing the hand are the two actively competitive phases of the game. In its most basic form, bridge is a game played by two competing partnerships, i.e. four people. For purposes of scoring and reference, each player is identified by one of the points of the compass and thus North and South play against East and West. More can participate, either as individuals or pairs or as teams of up to six, in formal tournaments or social gatherings where the
    7.00
    3 votes
    93

    Haihowak

    Haihowak (Polish name: hejhołek) is a card game played with ordinary playing cards. Haihowak was designed in Poland in 1998. The name comes from the name of fruit juice, that was being drunk during designing its rules. Official rules of the game are nowadays managed by the Haihowak International Federation. last changes: July 24, 2001 Haihowak (Polish name: hejhołek) is a playing card game designed on April 4, 1998 by Paweł Goleniowski and Małgorzata Dulka. Two full packs of cards with 2 jokers each are used (108 cards). Number of players - from two to four. Each player gets 11 cards. Then five cards are placed on board with their front up (these unhidden cards are called "open cards"). The rest of cards lay on the table with their back up (they are called "hidden cards"). The main and the only arrangement in Haihowak is called "key". In Haihowak there are only two suits called "colours": red suit (hearts ♥ and diamonds ♦) and black suit (spades ♠ and clubs ♣). Key is an arrangement of two or more cards of the same colour with a space of one card between every two neighbour cards. Therefore all cards in key are only even numbers or all cards are only odd numbers. Examples of keys:
    7.00
    3 votes
    94

    Poke

    Poke is a two-player multi-genre card game invented by Sid Sackson and discussed in his book A Gamut of Games. It combines strong elements of Poker with trick-taking games like Bourré or Spades, and adds scoring reminiscent of Bridge. Like bridge, score is kept on a pad split down the centre both across and down; points "above the line" count for the final total, whereas points "below the line" are intermediate. The game is also played until a rubber, or best of three games, is completed. A hand of Poke is played in two phases; in the first phase, players draw cards to better their Poker hand, and in the second phase the players proceed to take "tricks" with their hand. Points from the first phase go above the line; points from the second go below the line, with some exceptions. Once a player has twenty points below the line (which may take more than one deal), the game is over, bonus points are added, and the points above the line are tallied to determine the winner of that particular game. Play is as follows: This ends the first phase. Next comes the trick-taking phase. After all five cards have been played in tricks, points below the line are determined. Each player gets one
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    Teen patti

    Teen patti

    Teen Patti ("three cards" in English) is a gambling card game that originated in India and became popular in South Asia. This game is also called Flush. The game starts with one of the players dealing the cards. The cards are usually dealt counter-clockwise. Before starting the game, usually an agreed number of card(s) is/are picked or dealt to decide the dealer for the opening hand. Each player may be required to put up an ante into the pot before picking/dealing the card(s). The winning player gets the pot. The relative rankings of the card(s) may also decide the seating arrangement for each player. This entire process is called cut-for-seat. After the first/opening hand, the winner of any hand will be the dealer for the next hand. There is usually an ante or boot amount put on the table (the pot). The betting then starts by the player next to the dealer. Loose and tight in teen patti refer to a player's general tendency to play hands beyond the first round or to fold them quickly. There is no commonly accepted threshold in terms of a ratio or percentage of hands played, but a "tight" player will often choose to fold weaker hands, while a "loose" player will bet on more of these
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Twenty-eight

    Twenty-eight

    This is one of a group of Indian trick-taking card games in which the Jack and the Nine are the highest cards in every suit. 28 is usually played by four players in fixed partnerships, partners facing each other. 32 cards from a standard 52-card pack are used for play. There are eight cards in each of the usual "French" suits: hearts, diamonds, clubs and spades. The cards in every suit rank from high to low: J-9-A-10-K-Q-8-7. The aim of the game is to win tricks containing valuable cards. The total number of points in the deck is 28, hence the name of the game. The values of the cards are: Deal and play are counter-clockwise; the cards are shuffled by the dealer and cut by the player to dealer's left. Four cards are then dealt to each player. Based on these four cards, players bid for the right to choose trumps. Each bid is a number, and the highest bidder undertakes that his or her side will win in tricks at least the number of points bid. The player to dealer's right speaks first, and must bid at least 17 or it can be more. Subsequent players, in counter-clockwise order, may either bid higher or pass. The auction continues for as many rounds as necessary until three players pass
    7.00
    3 votes
    97

    Robbers' rummy

    Robbers' rummy is a card game for two or more players which became popular in Germany in the early 20th century. Being derived from normal rummy, it emphasises arrangement of cards based on card matching rules (generally simplified, but thereby no less challenging), while abandoning the notions of card discards or scoring entirely. The rules of robbers' rummy are very close to those adopted for the popular table game Rummikub, which uses sets of tiles numbered 1-13 instead of suits from a deck of cards. Rummikub has one glaring omission from its rules; that is, the rule that the cards on the table at the beginning of a turn must remain there at the end. Hence, if you play Rummikub, simply take all the tiles that anyone plays and you have the distinct advantage of being able to use those tiles, while everyone else does not. Robbers' rummy is played using two standard 52 card decks, and 2 to 6 wildcards (Jokers). Initially, each player is dealt 11 to 13 cards from the shuffled deck, whose remainder, called the stock is placed face-down on the table. The goal of each player is to reduce the number of cards held in hand by placing them on the table, face-up, forming melds. A meld
    6.00
    4 votes
    98

    9-5-2

    The card game 9-5-2 (952) is basically simplified bridge for three players, with a forced card-switching twist thrown in. It is a social game and not suitable for gambling since a degree of trust is required for some elements of the game. Cut for deal; high card deals first. For each hand, the dealer has an automatic contract to make 9 tricks. The player to the dealer's left must make 5 tricks and the player to the dealer's right must make 2 tricks. Deal rotates in a clockwise fashion. Any player may shuffle, with dealer shuffling last. Dealer deals 16 cards to each player, one by one. In addition, a kitty of four cards are dealt aside. Except on the first hand and in subsequent hands in which every player exactly made their contract, cards must be traded between players depending on the results of the previous hand. If a player made x more tricks than their contract, then they give x cards to the player or players who made x less tricks than their contract. The player receiving a card must give the player who passed him the card the highest card of that suit in his hand. If the given card is the highest, then the card is returned. Should two players be "up", that is to say they
    8.00
    2 votes
    99
    La Belle Lucie

    La Belle Lucie

    La Belle Lucie is a Patience game where the object is to build the cards into the foundations. All cards are visible from the start, but this does not imply that this game is solvable with strategy. The default rule is very hard to win. The majority of games cannot be solved. For example, moving a single card onto another blocks that stack until both cards can be removed to the foundations. Any setup that has a lower card of a specific suit below a higher of the same suit, or all kings not on the bottom of each cascade cannot be solved without cheating. The shuffle and redeal is of little help. For each king left in the second redeal, there is a 66% chance that the cascade cannot be solved (if the king is not lowest). Moving aces out (Trefoil rule) has cosmetic character. It is also known as The Fan, Clover Leaves, Three Shuffles and a Draw, Alexander the Great, Trefoil and Midnight Oil to name a few and has some variations. Variations are listed in the order they will occur in the game play: The "no redeal rule" and the "king rule" are often used together since redeals are needed to get to cards under a king unless it’s allowed to move kings to empty fans. Since all cards are
    8.00
    2 votes
    100

    Piedro/Pedro

    Pedro (also known as Piedro) ["peedro"] is a trick-taking game played with a standard deck of cards plus a joker. The game is played with four players, divided into two partnerships. The game is played to or through 62 points. Each hand consists of four phases: In Pedro, the following point values are assigned to the following cards of the trump suit: The Pedro ("Off Suit Five") refers to the same-color-as-trump Five Card of a different suit. For example, if Spades are being played, the Five of Clubs is the "Pedro." There are seventeen possible points for each hand. The rank of cards is as follows: [In trump suit:] A,K,Q,J,"BIG" Joker,"SMALL" Joker,10,9,8,7,6,5,Pedro,4,3,2 NOTE: The Pedro is trump! Rank in nontrump: No rank. Always below trump. The four players are divided into two teams, with partners sitting opposite each other at the table. The dealer deals out nine cards three at a time beginning with the player to the immediate left. Beginning with the first player to the left of the dealer, the players bid in turn as to how many of the fourteen possible points they believe their team can take in play. The minimum bid is 9. The maximum bid is 17, this is also called "shooting
    8.00
    2 votes
    101
    Primero

    Primero

    Primero, Prime, Primus, Primiera, Primavista, often referred to as “Poker’s mother”, as it is the first confirmed version of a game directly related to modern day poker, is a 16th century gambling card game of which the earliest reference dates back to 1526. The game of Primero is closely related to the game of Primo visto, if not the same. It still seems uncertain whether the game of Primero is of Spanish or Italian origin. Although Daines Barrington is of opinion that it is of Spanish origin, the poem of Francesco Berni, the earliest writer to mention the game, affords proof that it was at least commonly played in Italy at the beginning of the 16th century. His work entitled Capitolo del Gioco della Primiera, published in Rome in 1526, and believed to be the earliest work extant describing a card game, contains some particulars on the game of Primero. According to David Parlett, the game is still very much played in central Europe and Spain with Italian-suited cards under the name of Goffo or Bambara, remaining the major native vying game of Italy. This old game of cards was called Prime in France, Primera in Spain, and Primiera in Italy. All names derived from the Latin
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Ruff and Honours

    Ruff and Honours

    Ruff and Honours, a successor of the French game Triomphe (M.Eng. Triumph, Trump) with many different spellings, is a 17th century card game derivative of Ruff, the ancestor of Whist, which in turn was the forerunner of bridge and many other trick-taking card games like Whisk and Swabbers. This game was first mentioned in 1522 by Bernadine of Sienna in his sermon "Ye Tryumphe." There seemed to be two slightly different games at that time. In the game of Ruff, a pack of 52 cards was used and 12 cards dealt to each player, with the first of the remaining four cards turned over to determine the trump suit. In Honours, 48 cards were used with the last of the cards dealt to the player on the dealers left turned over to determine trumps. Some versions of this game seem to have been among the principal forms of card games in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, but by the end of the eighteenth they had already been replaced by Whist. Other forms seem to have been around since the mid-fifteenth century, judging by a reference to the game of Roufle (M.Fr. Roffle, earlier Romfle (1414), from It. Ronfa) in a letter of Jean de Lannoy in 1875. Many scholars on card games have speculated
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Atom

    Atom

    Atom is a popular card game played in China. Atom is usually played with four people with three packs of cards, including the jokers. The objective of the game is to run out of cards as soon as possible AND get as many points as possible. Atom is described as easy-to-learn but hard-to-master requiring mathematic and strategic thinking as well as intended execution. Suits are partially necessary in playing Atom. Three shuffled packs of 162 cards are dealt to four players. Two players are dealt 41 cards each, and the other two 40 cards each. Just like in Upgrade, two opposing players form a team, as well as the fives, tens and kings are point cards, worthing 5, 10, 10 points each. Moreover, before dealing, one of the cards is turned face-up, and all cards of the same rank become the trump, or "Blade" card of this game. If a Joker is turned, then another card is turned. The "Blade" changes from game to game. The player who got the turned-up card leads. The players play in a counter-clockwise turn, when it's your turn, you can play a card or cards that beat the previous combination, or simply pass. If all the other players pass consecutively, you get the points in the trick (if any),
    9.00
    1 votes
    104
    Blackjack

    Blackjack

    Blackjack, also known as twenty-one, is the most widely played casino banking game in the world. Blackjack is a comparing card game between a player and dealer and played with one or more decks of 52 cards. The player or players are dealt an initial two card hand and add the total of their cards. Face cards (Kings, Queens, and Jacks) are counted as ten points. The player and dealer can count their own Ace as 1-point or 11 points. All other cards are counted as the numeric value shown on the card. After receiving their initial two cards, players have the option of getting a "hit" (taking additional cards) to bring their total value of cards to 21 points, or as close as possible without exceeding 21 (called "busting"). The dealer has to take hits until his cards total less 17 or more points. If his initial two cards equal 17, the dealer does not take a hit. However, if his first two cards are a six and an ace (equaling 17) his hand is called a soft 17 and the dealer will then have to take a hit. Players who do not bust and have a total higher than the dealer, win. The dealer will lose if he or she busts, or has a lesser hand than the player who has not busted. If the player and
    9.00
    1 votes
    105

    Calculation

    Calculation (also known as Broken Intervals) is a solitaire card game played with a standard pack of 52 cards. It offers more scope for skill than many similar games; a skilled player can win Calculation at least nine times out of ten, although normal play can allow winning 1 in 5 times. At the start of play, an ace, two, three, and four of any suit are removed from a standard deck of cards and laid out as the foundations. The ace foundation is to be built up in sequence until the king is reached, regardless of suit. The other foundations are similarly built up, but by twos, threes, and fours, respectively, until they each reach a king, as in the following table: The tableau, initially empty, consists of four piles of cards, usually arranged immediately below the four foundations. Play in Calculation is simple. A single card is turned up from the stock and played either to the top of any of the four tableau piles, or onto one of the foundations if desired. The top card of any tableau pile may also be played onto one of the foundation piles if it is the next number in the appropriate sequence for that foundation. The game is won when all cards have been played onto the foundations,
    9.00
    1 votes
    106
    Horserace

    Horserace

    Horserace is a qualitydrinking game for all the family. Using playing cards that is inspired by horse racing. Participants bet amounts of alcohol on one of four aces, much like bettors would bet money on horses at a racing track. The horseracing game requires active participation by only one person: the announcer. The announcer should preferably be an exciting narrator. The announcer prepares the field by searching through the deck, taking out the ace (horse) of each suit, and laying them face-up and side-by-side at one end of the table (this is "the gates"). He then shuffles the deck and lays out a variable number of cards face-down (these form the "links" of the race) in a straight line perpendicular to the row of aces. A typical race has from six to eight links. The cards thus appear to form an "L" or the two legs of a right triangle. The field is now set. Before the game begins, each player makes bets based on their favorite horse. Bets are generally as simple as "five on diamonds" but can get as complex as any true horse race. Announcers may choose to allow such exotic bets as Trifectas, Exactas, Daily Doubles, etc. In another variation, players may simply pick their favorite
    9.00
    1 votes
    107
    Krutzjass

    Krutzjass

    Krutzjass is a Swiss German trick-taking card game in some ways similar to Contract bridge. The name, literally translated into English, is Cross-Game, a name derived from the fact that it is played between two teams or partnerships of two, where team members sit opposite each other, with an opponent on either side. There are many variants of the game, however, this article deals primarily with the double-deck variant. Unlike most card games, the variant of Krutzjass is not played with a 52 card deck. It is played with a 48 card deck, consisting of only 6 denominations: 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King and Ace. In the deck there are two cards of every denomination, so that, for example, it is possible to have 2 nines of spades in one's hand. Like Euchre and bridge, trump does appear in Krutzjass, and trump affects the relative power of certain cards. In a non-trump suit, Aces are high, with cards descending in power in the normal fashion. However, in trump, the hierarchy is as follows, from high to low: Jack, 9, Ace, King, Queen, 10. Also, in trump a 9 is referred to as a knell, and a Jack as a Bauer. Unlike in Euchre, there is no such thing as a left bauer. Furthermore, one should note
    9.00
    1 votes
    108

    Linger longer

    Linger longer is a card game related to Go boom. The aim of the game is to keep your cards for as long as possible. When you run out of cards you are eliminated from the game. "Linger longer" is also a phrase used by radio personality Doug Tracht. The phrase has been co-opted by multiple radio shows, including Don and Mike and Opie and Anthony. Opie (Gregg Hughes) has, in particular, used the phrase quite often on his show, making it unique to their show references.
    9.00
    1 votes
    109
    Ombre

    Ombre

    Ombre, English corruption of the Spanish word Hombre, arising from the muting of the H in Spanish, is a fast-moving seventeenth-century trick-taking card game for three players. Its illustrious history began in Spain around the end of the 16th Century as a four person game. It is one of the earliest card games known in Europe and by far the most classic game of its type, directly ancestral to Euchre, Boston and Solo Whist. Despite its difficult rules, complicated point score and strange foreign terms, it swept Europe in the last quarter of the 17th century, becoming Lomber in Germany, Lumbur in Austria and Ombre in England, occupying a position of prestige similar to contract bridge today. The historical importance of Ombre in the field of playing cards is the fact that it was the first card game in which a trump suit was established by bidding rather than by the random process of turning the first card of the stock. This notion of bidding was adopted from Triomfi, though it was from L'Hombre that the idea of bidding was adopted into other card games such as Skat, and Tarot, which owes Hombre a good portion of its betting system as well. The game continued to be in vogue almost in
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Sheepshead

    Sheepshead

    Sheepshead or Sheephead is a trick-taking card game related to the Skat family of games. It is the Americanized version of a card game that originated in Central Europe in the late 18th century under the German name Schafkopf. Although Schafkopf literally means "sheepshead", it has nothing to do with sheep. The term probably was derived and translated incorrectly from Middle High German and referred to playing cards on a barrel head (from kopf, meaning head, and Schaff, meaning a barrel). In the United States, sheepshead is most commonly played in Wisconsin, which has a large German-American population. Numerous tournaments are held throughout Wisconsin during the year, with the largest tournament being the "Nationals", held annually during the first or second weekend in November, and mini-tournaments held hourly throughout Germanfest in Milwaukee during the last weekend of each July. Sheepshead is most commonly played by five players, but variants exist to allow for two to eight players. The six-player version consists of one player dealing to five others. The dealer sits out for that round, but the position rotates among the players. Sheepshead is played with 7-8-9-10-J-Q-K-A in
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    War

    War

    War is a card game typically involving two players. It uses a standard French playing card deck. Due to its simplicity, it is played most often by children. The deck is divided evenly among the two players, giving each a down stack. In unison, each player reveals the top card on his deck (a "battle"), and the player with the higher card takes both the cards played and moves them to the bottom of his stack. If the two cards played are of equal value, each player lays down three face-down cards and picks one of the cards out of the three (a "war"), and the higher-valued card wins all of the cards on the table, which are then added to the bottom of the player's stack. If one of the players has no more cards in a battle that player wins that battle. In the case of another tie, the war process is repeated until there is no tie. The face value of each cards is as follows: Ace=14 King=13 Queen=12 Jack=11 2 through 10=Same as number on card (10=10, etc.) A player wins by collecting all the cards. If a player runs out of cards while dealing the face-down cards of a war, he may play the last card in his deck as his face-up card and still have a chance to stay in the game. When the cards are
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Lansquenet

    Lansquenet

    Lansquenet (derived from the German Landsknecht ('servant of the land or country'), applied to a mercenary soldier) is a card game. Lansquenet also refers to 15th and 16th century German foot soldiers; the lansquenet drum is a type of field drum used by these soldiers. The dealer or banker stakes a certain sum, and this must be met by the nearest to the dealer first, and so on. When the stake is met, the dealer turns up two cards, one to the right, - the latter for himself, the former for the table or the players. He then keeps on turning up the cards until either of the cards is matched, which constitutes the winning, - as, for instance, suppose the five of diamonds is his card, then should the five of any other suit turn up, he wins. If he loses, then the next player on the left becomes banker and proceeds in the same way. When the dealer's card turns up, he may take the stake and pass the bank; or he may allow the stake to remain, whereat of course it becomes doubled if met. He can continue thus as long as the cards turn up in his favour - having the option at any moment of giving up the bank and retiring for that time. If he does that, the player to whom he passes the bank has
    5.00
    5 votes
    113

    Bingo

    Bingo is a card game named by analogy to the game bingo. The game is played with a bridge deck of 52 cards. The dealer gives each player X cards, which are held in the hand or placed face-down in front of the player. The dealer places Y cards face down in the center of the table. Typically X=Y=5. A round of play consists of betting, followed by the dealer turning over one of the center cards, so that it is facing-up. Any card in a player's hand that has the same rank value as the rank of the center card just turned are now revealed and discarded. The discards can be placed face-up in front of the player. Betting rounds continue until a player has all of the cards knocked from their hand. In analogy to regular bingo, the first player to realize their hand is empty says "bingo" and claims the pot. If no player is knocked out after all the center cards have been revealed, then all of the players reveal their remaining cards. A winner can be determined by adding the rank values of cards remaining in the hand. In determining value, jacks are valued at 11, queens, at 12, kings at 13, and aces at either 1 or 15, depending on whether the players have agreed that high rank wins or low rank
    6.67
    3 votes
    114

    Dirty clubs

    Dirty clubs, also called buck euchre, is the name given to a number of variations of euchre popular in the midwestern United States. It is also like the 500 card game, which is another variation of euchre. Like euchre, these games are trick-taking card games; unlike euchre, the players must bid on how many tricks they will take. In this respect, dirty clubs bears a superficial resemblance to contract bridge. The set of rules here are just an example; there is considerable regional variation. Dirty clubs can be played with between 3 and 6 players, depending on the variation. The game uses the same cards as euchre: the 10, J, Q, K, and A of each suit (three players), with lower cards (9, 8, 7, etc.) added if necessary for more players. The first hand, the dealer is chosen at random, then the deal proceeds clockwise. Each hand, one suit is trump (but see variations below); trump cards are higher than non-trump. The order of cards for the trump suit is the same as euchre: J of the trump suit (right bauer)-J of the other suit of the same color (left bauer)-A-K-Q-10-etc. The order of cards for non-trump suits is A-K-Q-(J)-10-etc. Each hand, five cards are dealt to each player; the
    6.67
    3 votes
    115
    Intelligence

    Intelligence

    Intelligence is a Patience game which uses two decks of playing cards mixed together. It is basically a two-deck version of another solitaire game La Belle Lucie and its game play is somewhat closer to the parent game than its cousins House in the Wood and House on the Hill. First, 18 piles (or fans) of three cards are dealt. During this deal any ace encountered regardless of where it would end up in the pile will be moved to a foundation and be replaced with another card. As they become available, the other aces are placed on the foundations, which are all built up by suit. The top cards of the piles are available to be built on the foundations or on each other's piles on the tableau. When building on the tableau, the cards are built either up or down by suit. Aces cannot be placed over kings, however, and vice versa. When a gap occurs, it is immediately filled by three new cards from the stock. This is the only way cards from the stock are introduced from the game and the only way spaces are refilled. As in the original deal, any ace that comes up is immediately placed on the foundations. When all moves have been made and become stuck, even if there are still cards in the stock,
    6.67
    3 votes
    116

    Bartok

    The game of Bartok, also known by a number of other names, such as Wartoke, Warthog, Bartog, Bentok, Last One Standing or Bong 98, is a card game where the winner of each round invents a new rule which must be obeyed for the remainder of the game. It belongs to the "shedding" or Crazy Eights family of card games, whereby each player tries to rid himself of all of his cards. The game progresses through a series of rounds with a new rule being added in each round, thus making the game increasingly complex as it progresses. These newly introduced rules may modify any existing rules. The game of Bartok consists of several rounds of play. The winner of each round creates a new rule which remains in play for future rounds of the game. The players sit in a circle and the cards are placed face down in the centre and mixed. Each player then picks up either five or seven cards, by agreement. A single card is then flipped to face up to start the discard pile. The rest of the face down cards form the draw pile. Any player may then play on that card, providing such a play is legal. One of the players to the left or right of that person then plays, to determine the direction of play. It is also
    7.50
    2 votes
    117
    Complex hearts

    Complex hearts

    Complex Hearts is a variant of Hearts reported to be invented by Richard Garfield. It uses the complex number system for scoring. The rules of play are similar to those of conventional Hearts. The loser of a game is the first player whose score, in absolute value, exceeds 100. The winner is the player whose absolute value is smallest. (The absolute value of a complex number a + bi is .) Rules are similar to those of conventional Hearts, but there are differences. In conventional hearts, every point card is undesirable unless the player is attempting to shoot (or prevent shooting of) the moon. Complex hearts adds a new dimension to this. For instance, depending on a player's score, it might be valuable for them to acquire the Q♠. It can be stimulating and fun to try to predict opponents' strategies and thwart them. A player might ask himself: "Hmm. The Q♠ is good for me, because it decreases my negative imaginary score, but it's very bad for Alfred since he took the 10♣. Should I take the Q♠ myself, or drop it on him?" Typically, trick taking goals break down like this: It is worth noting that Q♠ with 10♣ can be a particularly malevolent combination to take, as it yields − 26 + 0i
    7.50
    2 votes
    118

    Eleusis

    Eleusis is a multi-genre card game where one player chooses a secret rule to determine which cards can be played on top of others, and the other players attempt to determine the rule using inductive logic. The game was invented by Robert Abbott in 1956, and was first published in Martin Gardner's Scientific American column in June 1959. A revised version appeared in Gardner's July 1977 Scientific American column. Eleusis is sometimes considered an analogy to the problems of scientific method. It can be compared with the card game Mao, which also has secret rules that can be learned inductively. The games of Penultima and Zendo also feature players attempting to discover inductively a secret rule or rules thought of by a "Master" or "Spectators" who declare plays legal or illegal on the basis of the rules. The formalisation of Eleusis+Nobel inspired new modes of communication by exchange of logical notes. In 2006, John Golden developed a streamlined version of the game, intended to assist elementary school teachers in explaining the scientific method to students. Abbott himself considers the variant a "great game", and refers to it as "Eleusis Express". To play Eleusis Express, each
    7.50
    2 votes
    119
    Spiderette

    Spiderette

    Spiderette is a solitaire card game which uses a deck of 52 playing cards. It is basically a one-deck version of Spider, a popular two-deck solitaire card game. This game should not be confused with Little Spider, which is played differently. The first 28 cards are dealt the same way as in another popular solitaire game Klondike, i.e. the first column should have one face-up card, the second column should have one face-up card and one face down card at the bottom, and so on. Cards in the tableau are built down regardless of suit. Only the top cards of each column can be moved; however, a sequence of cards that are in suit (such as 9-8-7-6♥) can be moved as one unit. Face-down cards that become exposed are turned face-up and empty column spaces on the tableau are filled by any card. If all possible plays have been made, a new set of seven cards (one for each column) are dealt, provided that each column must contain at least one card. After three such deals, and the game becomes stuck, the three left over cards are dealt on the first three columns. Once a suit sequence of 13 cards from king down to ace is successfully built, it is discarded from the game. The game is won when four
    7.50
    2 votes
    120

    Spite and Malice

    Spite and Malice, also known as Cat and Mouse, is a card game for two or more players. It is a form of competitive solitaire and has a number of variations that can be played with two or three regular decks of cards. A variation sold by Hasbro is called Spite and Malice, and another variation sold by Mattel is called Skip-Bo. Another is the card game Flinch. The deck consists of three regular playing card decks with the jokers removed or jokers may be retained and used as wild, although the United States Playing Card Company's version of the game uses two 52 card decks. The rank of the cards is Ace low and then proceeding normally up to Queen which is the highest card in the deck. Kings are wild and may substitute for any other card rank. Suits have no bearing to the game. Two or more (if too many people play it is possible you will need to add additional standard playing card decks to your Spite and Malice deck). Usually the game is played with 2 to 4 players. Be the first person to move all the cards in your goal pile into the playing piles, thus winning the game. Players cut for the deal with the highest card winning the deal, aces being high. Once a dealer is chosen he/she
    7.50
    2 votes
    121

    Trex

    Trex, pronounced Tricks or Trix, and also known as Ticks, is a four-player [middle eastern (Levant area: Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan) [Culture of Palestine|Palestinian]] trick-taking card game. Similar to the European game of Barbu, Trex takes on a cycle style in which there are four cycles with each cycle consisting of five games. Each cycle is called a "kingdom" in reference to the fact that in each cycle one player (the King) determines which contract to play in each of the five games. Trex is also popular in Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Syria, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. Trex is played by four people using a standard international 52-card pack without jokers. The cards in each suit rank from high to low: A-K-Q-J-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2. Deal and play are counter-clockwise. To begin the session, the cards are shuffled, cut (by player to left of dealer) and dealt out to the four players, one at a time, so that each player has 13 cards. It does not matter who deals first, but the player who is dealt the 7 of hearts in this first deal is said to "own the kingdom." This player chooses which contract to be played each hand, and is also the dealer
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Beleaguered Castle

    Beleaguered Castle

    Beleaguered Castle is a solitaire card game played with a deck of 52 playing cards. It is one of the card games touted as "Freecell without cells" because its game play is somewhat akin to the popular solitaire computer game but without extra empty spaces to maneuver. This game is also called Laying Siege and Sham Battle. First, the player removes the aces from the deck and aligns them vertically without overlapping them. They form the foundations. Then cards are dealt to the left and right of the aces, forming eight rows of six overlapping cards each. The top card of each row (the cards that are exposed) is available for play either on the foundations or on any other row. The foundations are built up to kings by suit. Cards in the rows are built down in sequence regardless of suit. Once a row becomes empty, it can be filled by any card. The game is won when all of the cards are built onto the foundations. However, this is easier said than done because most games are doomed to fail in just a few moves. In the 2011 film Source Code, "Beleaguered Castle" is the call sign for the Source Code program.
    5.50
    4 votes
    123
    Ligretto

    Ligretto

    Ligretto is a card game for two to twelve players. The aim of the game is to get rid of all your cards faster than all the other players by discarding them in the middle of the table. Instead of taking turns, all players play simultaneously. Play is fast and lively, and demands attention to the cards being played by others as well as one's own cards. It can be played and enjoyed equally by children from 8 years old to adult with youth being at no disadvantage. The game, in its present form, was published in 1988 by Germany's Rosengarten Spiele (Rose Garden games) designed by Michael Michaels. An earlier form of the game was published at the start of the 1960s. Since the year 2000 the game has been published by Schmidt-Spiele of Berlin, Germany. In 2009, Playroom Entertainment began publishing the game for North America and other English-speaking countries. The game is similar to Dutch Blitz, which is based upon the original 1960s Ligretto. The game uses a special deck of cards: each face is red, green, yellow, or blue, and is numbered from 1 to 10. Each player gets 40 cards (ten of each color) which have a distinctive design on the reverse unique to that player. Before starting a
    5.50
    4 votes
    124

    Shichi Narabe

    Shichi Narabe (in Japanese : 7並べ) is the name for a fairly simple card game for 3 or more players. It is played with the international 52-card deck. There appear to be several versions of this game, so these rules are rather generic. Aces are low. How to play: Shuffle the deck and deal 13 cards to each player. (There is a version of this game using jokers, but it is uncommon and will not be explained here.) Next the order of play is determined, although there is no specified method for doing so. Next, the players set up the layout. They remove the sevens from their hands and arrange them into a column on the table, leaving plenty of room on each side of the column. This will eventually grow into a tableau of 13 columns and 4 rows. On his turn, a player may either place a card from his hand onto the table or take no action. He may choose to take no action a maximum of three times per game. A card can be played only if there is already a card on the table matching it in suit and adjacent to it in rank. For instance, at the start of play, since all the 7s are on the table, the first card played must be a 6 or 8, of any suit. If one starts off by playing 6♥, the second card may be 5♥,
    5.50
    4 votes
    125
    Skat

    Skat

    • Deck type: German
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Skat is an early 19th century 3 player trick-taking card game devised in Germany. Along with Doppelkopf it is the most popular card game in Germany and Silesia. Skat features prominently in Günter Grass's novel The Tin Drum and leads a trail connecting the plot. It is also played by many soldiers in Remarque's novel All Quiet on the Western Front, and was a favorite game of Richard Strauss, who included a hand in his opera Intermezzo. Skat was developed by the members of the Brommesche Tarok-Gesellschaft between 1810 and 1817 in Altenburg, in what is now the Federated State of Thuringia, Germany, based on the three-player game of Tarock, also known as Tarot, and the four-player game of Schafkopf (the American equivalent being Sheepshead). In the earliest known form of the game, the player in prior position was dealt twelve cards to the other players' ten each, made two discards, constituting the skat, and then announced a contract. But the main innovation of this new game was then that of the Bidding process. The first text book on the rules of Skat was published in 1848 by a secondary school Professor called J. F. L. Hempel. Nevertheless, the rules continued to differ by region
    5.50
    4 votes
    126
    Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game

    Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game

    The Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game (遊☆戯☆王オフィシャルカードゲーム, Yū☆Gi☆Ō Ofisharu Kādo Gēmu, Yu-Gi-Oh! Official Card Game) is a Japanese collectible card game developed and published by Konami. It is based on the fictional game of Duel Monsters created by manga artist Kazuki Takahashi, which is the main plot device during the majority of his popular manga franchise, Yu-Gi-Oh!, and its various anime adaptations and spinoff series. The Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game was first launched by Konami in 1999. It was named the top selling trading card game in the world by Guinness World Records on July 7, 2009, having sold over 22 billion cards worldwide. The trading card game continues to gain popularity as it is played around the world, mostly in Japan, North America, Europe and Australia. Prior to December 2008, Konami's trading cards were distributed in territories outside of Asia by The upper Deck Company. In December 2008, Konami filed a lawsuit against Upper Deck alleging that it had distributed unauthentic Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG cards made without Konami's authorization. Upper Deck also sued Konami alleging breach of contract and slander. A few months later, a federal court in Los Angeles issued an
    5.50
    4 votes
    127
    Bing Rummy

    Bing Rummy

    Bing rummy is a variant of kalooki (a rummy-based gambling card game) invented in the mining towns of Alaska. The game can be played with 2 to 8 players but works best with 3 to 6 players. It is unknown how the game came to be called “bing” although it may be because of the mining terms: unit of weight equal to 800 pounds, or a pile of rich lead ore. It is probably the second definition that gives the game its name referring to the pile of coins that accumulate throughout the game; especially as it is the Galena lead mines that popularized the term “bing ore”. These mines opened in 1919 about the time the game was developed. The deck consists of two standard 52-card decks (no jokers) with deuces wild. The game starts with each person buying in for the agreed amount (traditionally 25 cents). Once the cards are shuffled, the player on the dealer’s right “cuts for a deuce” viz. starts to cut the deck and if the bottom card of the top section is a deuce, the player can keep the card. This is not a true cut as the two sections do not exchange positions. Each player is dealt 14 cards. If the player on the dealer’s right cut a deuce, he is only dealt 13 additional cards, skipping the
    6.33
    3 votes
    128
    Che Deng

    Che Deng

    Che Deng (斜釘, Cantonese: che4 deng1) literally means diagonal nails in Cantonese. It is the name of a Chinese game that plays with the Chinese dominoes set. Che refers to the diagonal pattern of the "three" pip on the tile. Deng refers to the "one" pip on the tile.
    6.33
    3 votes
    129
    Napoleon

    Napoleon

    Napoleon or Nap is a straightforward trick taking game in which players receive five cards each; whoever bids the highest number of tricks chooses trumps and tries to win at least that many. It is a simplified relative of Euchre, and with many variations throughout Northern Europe. It's been popular in England for 200 years and has given the language a slang expression, "to go nap", meaning to take five of anything. It may be less popular now than it was, but it is still played in some parts of southern England and in Strathclyde. Despite its title and allusions, it is not recorded before the last third of the nineteenth century, and may have been first named after Napoleon III. The old game of Napoleon consists simply of five cards dealt out singly with the various players bidding in their turn how many tricks they think they can make. The player to the dealer’s left has the privilege of bidding first, and then every player after him may bid up to the limit, Napoleon, which is a declaration to take 5 tricks. Whoever bids highest leads first, the card led determining the trump for that round, and the winner of the trick then leads to the next. The cards are not gathered or packed
    6.33
    3 votes
    130

    Ninety-nine

    Ninety-nine is a card game for 2, 3, or 4 players. It is a trick-taking game that can use ordinary Anglo-American playing cards. Ninety-nine was created in 1967 by David Parlett; his goal was to have a good 3-player trick-taking game with simple rules yet great room for strategy. In ninety-nine, players bid for the number of tricks that they will take; players who gain exactly that number of tricks (no more or less) gain a significant bonus. One unusual feature of ninety-nine is that players bid by discarding three cards. A round of ninety-nine begins with the deal of a shuffled deck. The two- and three-player versions of the game use only the 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, J, Q, K, A (ranked from lowest to highest) - note that 6 is the lowest rank, and that the 2 through 5 are not included in the deck. The four-player version of the game uses the entire 52-card deck (in which case the 2 is the lowest rank). Players are dealt the entire deck, one card at a time, with all cards face down. In the two-player version, the cards are dealt to the two players and also to a third pseudo-player called the "dummy". As a result, in the two- and three-player versions players are initially dealt 12 cards,
    6.33
    3 votes
    131

    Spit

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    Spit, also referred to as Slam or Speed, is a game of the shedding family of card games for two players. The game is played until all of someone's cards are gone; at which time, the game has finished. http://www.bicyclecards.com/card-games/rule/spit Spit game rules.
    6.33
    3 votes
    132
    Around the World

    Around the World

    Around the World is a card based drinking game, similar to, but more complex (and at the same time quicker) than, Fuck the Dealer. It is notorious for the large quantity of drinks consumed, especially if multiple rounds are played, and the largely chance based nature of the gameplay. This game is also known as Irish Poker, Chico High Low, Monkey Balls, North Carolina, Up the River Down the River, John Theis, Charleston Special and Unlucky 'Sevens' Seven. The game is divided into two rounds. The first is a guessing or probabilistic round where players must make predictions about the card to be drawn, while the second is completely chance based. Very little setup is required. In the first phase of the game, each player must make a prediction about the card to be drawn on their turn. The dealer deals each player one card, face up, proceeding clockwise from themselves and dealing themselves last (as is customary in most card games). Before each card is dealt, the dealer asks the player a simple question about the nature of the card to be drawn. If the player guesses correctly, they may "give" a drink (i.e. select a rival player who must drink). If their guess is incorrect, instead they
    8.00
    1 votes
    133
    Barbu

    Barbu

    Barbu or Le Barbu, also known as Tafferan, is a trick-taking card game similar to hearts where four players take turns leading seven different sub-games (known as contracts) over the course of 28 deals. Barbu originated in France in the early 20th century where it was especially popular with university students, and became a prominent game among French Bridge-players in the 1960s. "Le Barbu" literally means "The Bearded" (man), and phonetically "The Barb" – a reference to the King of Hearts' common depiction as a bearded monarch nonchalantly stabbing himself in the head. This card is of special significance in one of the seven contracts featured in the game. Four players (no partnerships) use a deck of 52 French suited cards (♠ ♥ ♣ ♦) ranking A (high) K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 (low). Players draw for high card to determine who will be the first declarer. For the next seven deals cards are shuffled and dealt by the player on the declarer's right, and cut by the player on the dealer's right. 13 cards are dealt to each player, and the declarer names which contract all will play for that deal. The declarer names each one of the contracts once. After this declarer has played all seven
    8.00
    1 votes
    134
    Continental

    Continental

    Continental, Continental Rummy, May I?, often called Double-deck rummy, is a progressive partnership Rummy card game related to Rumino. It is considered the forerunner of the whole family of rummy games using two packs of cards as one. Its name derive from the fact that it is played throughout the United States, Mexico, Canada, and also in South America. According to Albert Morehead, it was "at one time the most popular form of Rummy in women's afternoon games, until in 1950 it lost out to Canasta." The object of Continental is to be the player with the fewest amount of penalty points after playing all seven hands. Everyone draws 1 card, the high card deals, and the subsequent deals are passed to the left. Two 52-card decks are used plus 2 Jokers per deck. The number of decks used is determined by dividing the number of players by 2 and rounding up, if needed. For example: Each player is dealt 11 cards, the remaining stock pile is set on the table, and the player to the left of the dealer draws the top card from the stock pile to make melds. Jokers and red Aces are wild. After a card is drawn, one must be discarded, and the next player to the left has the option of drawing either
    8.00
    1 votes
    135
    Cuarenta

    Cuarenta

    Cuarenta is the national card game of Ecuador. It is a fishing game played with the standard 52 card pack of Anglo-American playing cards, but all 10s, 9s and 8s are omitted (ace is low). This card game is almost exclusively played in Ecuador. The name of the game, cuarenta is Spanish for the number 40 (forty). This refers to the number of points that are required to win a chica (small division of the game) and also to the number of cards used to play it. Two chicas or the first chica with zapatería (loss of the chica by scoring less than ten points) win the game (a completed game is called a "mesa", which means "match"). The game can be played by 2 players, or 4 players split into two teams. The score is kept with two kinds of chips, the two-point tantos (points) and the ten-point perros (dogs). When a standard 52 card pack is used, the 8s, 9s and 10s can be used to keep the score. Five cards are dealt to each player, given out as a batch of five cards at a time. The opponent of the dealer or the opponents of the dealer's team are given ten points if there are any irregularities during the deal itself, and the dealer's turn is handed over to the opponent ("pasa la mano con diez",
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    Euchre

    Euchre

    Euchre ( /ˈjuːkər/) or eucre, is a trick-taking card game most commonly played with four people in two partnerships with a deck of 24 standard playing cards. It is the game responsible for introducing the joker into modern packs; this was invented around 1860 to act as a top trump or best bower (from the German word Bauer, "farmer", denoting also the jack). It is believed to be closely related to the French game Écarté that was popularized in the United States by the Cornish and Pennsylvania Dutch, and to the seventeenth-century game of bad repute Loo. It may be sometimes referred to as Knock Euchre to distinguish it from Bid Euchre. Euchre appears to have been introduced into the United States by the early German settlers of the state of Michigan, and from that state gradually to have been disseminated throughout the nation. It has been more recently theorized that the game and its name derives from an eighteenth-century Alsatian card game named Juckerspiel, a derivative of Triomphe. Also, it may have been introduced by immigrants from Cornwall, England, where it still remains a popular game. It is also played in the neighboring county of Devon, where one theory is that it was
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Hearts

    Hearts

    Hearts is an "evasion-type" trick-taking playing card game for four players, although variations can accommodate 3–6 players. The game is also known as Black Lady, The Dirty, Dark Lady, Slippery Anne, Chase the Lady, Crubs, and Black Maria, though any of these may refer to the similar but differently-scored game Black Lady. The game is a member of the Whist family of trick-taking games (which also includes Bridge and Spades), but the game is unique among Whist variants in that it is an evasion-type game; players avoid winning certain penalty cards in tricks, usually by avoiding winning tricks altogether. The game of Hearts as currently known originated with a family of related games called Reversis, which became popular around 1750 in Spain. In this game, a penalty point was awarded for each trick won, plus additional points for capturing the Jack of Hearts or the Queen of Hearts. A similar game called "Four Jacks" centered around avoiding any trick containing a Jack, which were worth one penalty point, and the Jack of Spades worth two. Over time, additional penalty cards were added to Reverse, and around 1850, the game gave way to a simple variant of Hearts, where each Heart was
    8.00
    1 votes
    138

    Jabberwocky

    Jabberwocky is a card game of the trick-taking variety, played by 3 to 5 players with a standard deck of cards and pencil and paper for scoring. Its object is to bet the number of tricks one is estimating to make and to fulfill this bet (which scores a point). The player who fulfills the most bets after 13 turns wins the game, and more than one player may tie it. It may have originated on the Island of Hawaiʻi in the early 1980s. (This game was also played in Austria at about the same time). At the start of the first round, the dealer gives three cards to each player. The number of cards increases by one each round until nine cards are dealt. After that, the number of cards dealt decreases by one each round. After the end of the 13th round, when three cards are dealt again, the game ends. Once the cards have been dealt to the players, the dealer turns over the top card of the remainder of the deck. The suit of that card is the trump suit, and that card remains face-up during the round. Deal passes to the left after each round! Bidding proceeds to the left, and the player to the dealer's left bids first. A player may bid any number from 0 up to the total number of cards that were
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Tarocchi

    Tarocchi

    Tarocchi (Italian, plural form of Tarocco), also known as Tarock (German-Austrian name), '''Tarot''' (French name) and similar names in other languages, is a specific form of playing card deck, which in its history was used for different trick-taking game and later for cartomantic interests and divination (concrete forms appear at least since the article of Court de Gebelin in the year 1781), also as a field for artists to display specific iconographical forms often connected to an ideological system in the background. It is recorded as one of the oldest types of playing card decks known. The playing material (a deck with usually 4ᅢラ14 normal Italian suits and court cards, which include in contrast to other forms a cavallo or knight, with additional 21 trumps; the suits may differ from other national patterns) is older than the name of the game, which, according to the current state of research, became known in the year 1505 parallel in France (Taraux) and Ferrara (Italy, as Tarocchi) (Tarot press note) (Details). An earlier form of the game had the name Trionfi or triumphs, this name developed later as general term for trick-taking (trumpfen in German, to trump in English) and
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Three card brag

    Three card brag

    Three card brag is a 16th century British card game, and the British national representative of the vying or "bluffing" family of gambling games. Brag is a direct descendant of the Elizabethan game of Primero and one of the several ancestors to poker, just varying in betting style and hand rankings. The game is very popular in India and Nepal, where it is known both as "Flush" and "Teen Patti" (literally translated from Hindi as "three cards"), played with some minor variations. At large gatherings and especially during festival times, it is the game of choice since many people of different skills can play together and have fun. It is also a very popular game among British fairground showmen, who usually get together at the bigger fairs and play for quite high stakes. Three card brag was played in the film Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels directed by Guy Ritchie, where it was played without table stakes. Everyone antes, and players are each dealt three cards face down. There is a single round of betting, with action starting to the left of the dealer. Each player has the option of betting or folding. If there was a previous bet, the player must contribute at least that much more
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Tri

    Tri

    Tri is a two- or three-player matching card game in which players attempt to achieve at least 65 net points in one suit. The suit is not verbally declared; players select a suit by using plays, discards, and pick-ups as signals. The game was developed in March 2001 by Will M. Baker and Pete Richert, in an attempt to create a card game that was entirely cooperative. The game went through many revisions and much playtesting, seeing crucial rules added and ineffective rules dropped. The game reached its final form sometime in April 2001. Tri was created using the 5-suited "Instinct" deck produced by Wizards of the Coast. The suit names (Stars, Fire, Skulls, Drips, and Brocs) were derived directly from the images on the "Instinct" cards. ('Brocs' is, perhaps, the only obscure suit title; the true suit image is that of a tree, but it has an uncanny resemblance to broccoli.) The title comes simply from the game's process of "trying" to select a suit. Tri was developed by Will M. Baker and Pete Richert in March 2001. A computerized version is in planning stages. Played in a format similar to Gin, players each take turns drawing from either the discard pile or the deck, then discarding,
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Belot

    Belot

    Belot also Bridge belot is the name of a French trick-taking card game very popular in Bulgaria, in some parts of Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Macedonia (Especially Bitola), and in Saudi Arabia. It is also very popular in Armenia and extensively played by the Armenian Diaspora, in former USSR area (Russia, Ukraine, Republic of Moldova) and by Jewish communities worldwide. The rules of Belot are very close to those of the French card game Belote, and Jewish card game Clobyosh, but with a few significant differences in each. The game is played by 2, 3 or 4 players. The 4-player version is considered to be the standard game, and other two are just crippled versions played only if there aren't enough players available. The 4 players are 2 teams of two. The other variations each player is alone. 2 player and 3 players use the 24-card deck (9 to Ace). Note that these rules are slightly different among countries. Each round of Belot (no matter how many players) consists of these steps: dealing, bidding, declaration, playing and scoring: The best world player ever is the Bulgarian Nikola Trifonski, many times national champion, the yongest world champion with special
    5.25
    4 votes
    143
    Bid Euchre

    Bid Euchre

    Bid Euchre, is the name given to a group of card games played in North America based on the popular game Euchre. It introduces an element of bidding in which the trump suit is decided by which player can bid to take the most tricks. Bid Euchre is very similar to Euchre, the primary differences being the number of cards dealt, absence of any undealt cards, the bidding and scoring process, and the addition of a no trump declaration. Local rules may allow a low no trump declaration. It is typically a partnership game for four players, played with a 24, 32 or 36-card pack, or even two decks of 24 cards each. The game is also known as Hoss or Pepper, a delineation which comes from "Hasenpfeffer", a German dish of marinated and stewed trimmings of hare. A pack of 24 cards containing 9, 10, J, Q, K, and A in each suit. The rank of the cards in the trump suit is: J (of trump suit, also known as the right bower; high), J (of the other suit of the same color as the trump suit, also known as the left bower), A, K, Q, 10, 9 (low). In the plain suits the rank is: A (high), K, Q, J, 10, 9 (low). When playing with no trumps, all four suits follow the 'plain suit' ranking. Cards are dealt one at a
    5.25
    4 votes
    144
    3B/RTR Spades

    3B/RTR Spades

    Spades was invented in the United States of America in the 1930s and is played quite widely in North America. 3B/RTR Spades was invented at Bell Laboratories in Lisle Illinois in the 1980s. Number of Players: Three to five; each game is slightly different and referred to as "the 3 handed game", "the 4 handed game" , and "the 5 handed game". The Deck: Standard 52 card deck for three handed. Add a JOKER to make it 53 when playing 4 handed or 5 handed. Rank of Suit: Spade always trump. Other suits have no intrinsic value. Rank of cards:A (high), K, Q, J, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, A (low). Note: The Aces can be called high or low ONLY in the 4 and 5 handed game. With 17 cards the 3 handed game does not need the added complexity of the high/low Aces. When using the JOKER (4 and 5 handed version) it is alway the highest spade. The Extra Card Object of the game:Not to lose and become the TRAY-PERSON. To accumulate the most points; points are accrued by winning at least the number of tricks bid in each hand. There is a variation where the object is not to lose - the loser having an amusing penalty. Player to the left of the dealer plays the first card of the first trick and play goes
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Canfield

    Canfield

    Canfield is a solitaire card game with a very low probability to win. According to legend, it is originally a casino game, named after the casino owner who is said to have invented it. In England, it is known as Demon. Richard A. Canfield, noted gambler, owned the Canfield Casino in Saratoga Springs, New York during the 1890s. Gamblers at his casino would play the game by "buying" a deck of cards for $50. The gambler would then play the game and earn $5 for every card he managed to place into the foundations. Although players make a loss (about an average of five to six cards), the game proved to be popular, and Canfield became rich. The disadvantage of this new game was to hire a croupier for every gambler playing the game. Though the above story appears very widely, some critics of the story say that it cannot be correct because Canfield would have been bankrupt if this story were true, if simple mathematics is applied. Nonetheless, the story stuck to explain the game's origins, although it has not yet been researched thoroughly. Canfield himself called the game Klondike, but the name Canfield stuck and became synonymous with solitaire itself. Sometimes, Canfield and Klondike are
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Duchess

    Duchess

    Duchess (also Dutchess) is a solitaire card game which uses a deck of 52 playing cards. It has all four typical features, a tableau, a reserve, a stock and a waste pile, and is quite easy to win. First, four fans of three cards are set up; they form the reserve. Then a space is left for the four foundations, then four cards are placed in a row; they form the bases for the tableau columns. To start the game, the player will choose among the top cards of the reserve fans which will start the first foundation pile. Once he/she makes that decision and picks a card, the three other cards with the same rank, whenever they become available, will start the other three foundations. The top cards of the reserve fans and the top cards of the columns in the tableau are available for play onto the foundations or on the tableau. The foundations are built up by suit and ranking is continuous as Aces are placed over Kings. The cards on the tableau are built down in alternating colors. Ranking is also continuous in the tableau as Kings can be placed over Aces. One card can be moved at a time, but sequences can also be moved as one unit. No cards can be built on the reserve. Spaces that occur on
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Five-card draw

    Five-card draw

    Five-card draw is a poker variant that is considered the simplest variant of poker. As a result, it is often the first variant learned by most new players. It is commonly played in home games but are rarely played in casino and tournament play. The variant is also offered by some online venues, although it is not as popular as other variants such as Texas hold 'em. In casino play the first betting round begins with the player to the left of the big blind, and subsequent rounds begin with the player to the dealer's left. Home games typically use an ante; the first betting round begins with the player to the dealer's left, and the second round begins with the player who opened the first round. Play begins with each player being dealt five cards, one at a time, all face down. The remaining deck is placed aside, often protected by placing a chip or other marker on it. Players pick up the cards and hold them in their hands, being careful to keep them concealed from the other players, then a round of betting occurs. If more than one player remains after the first round, the "draw" phase begins. Each player specifies how many of their cards they wish to replace and discards them. The deck
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Jass

    Jass

    Jass (pronounced /jas/) is a trick taking card game and a distinctive branch of the Marriage family, popularly supposed to be the progenitor of the American game of Pinochle. It is popular throughout the Alemannic German speaking area of Europe (German-speaking Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Alsace part of France, Vorarlberg province of Austria, South-Western Germany (Baden-Wuerttemberg land) and beyond in Romansh-speaking Graubünden and in French-speaking Suisse romande of Switzerland as well as German-speaking South Tyrol in Italy. The most common variant of Jass is the Schieber (in Vorarlberg also known as Krüzjass), played by two teams of two players each. It is often considered Switzerland's national card game, and is so popular there that the Swiss have come to apply the name Jass to trick-taking card games in general. Jass, first mentioned in Switzerland in 1796, was originally the name of the highest trump, the Jack, in a family of related games originally spread from the Netherlands during the Late Middle Ages. Today, Jass is the name of the game. The traditional 36-card, Swiss-German-suited pack with which it is played is called Jasskarten. By extension, Jass is often used
    7.00
    2 votes
    149

    Minor suit

    In contract bridge the minor suits are diamonds (♦) and clubs (♣). They are given that name because contracts made in those suits score less (20 per contracted trick) than contracts made in the major suits (30 per contracted trick), and they rank lower in bidding. In particular, one can make game with a bid of 4 in a major suit, while a bid of 5 is required in a minor. Of the two minor suits, diamonds (♦) rank higher than clubs (♣) Fundamentally, there are three ways to divide four suits into pairs: by color, by rank and by shape resulting in six possible suit combinations. In the event of widespread introduction of four-color decks, it has been suggested that the red/black distinction could be replaced by pointed bottoms (hearts and diamonds visually have a sharp point downwards, whereas spades and clubs have a blunt stem).
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Penguin

    Penguin

    Penguin is a solitaire card game, invented by David Parlett, which uses a deck of 52 playing cards. The game play is similar to other solitaire card games as Freecell and Eight Off. After shuffling the cards, the cards are dealt from left to right into seven columns, each with seven rows. The first card dealt is called the "beak" (in the example below, the five of spades). When the three other cards with the same rank appear, they are immediately placed on the foundations, and the next card dealt takes its place in the tableau so that no empty spaces appear. The object of the game is to build the foundations up in suit up to the card that is a rank lower than the beak. For example, if the beak is a five, the last card of each foundation should be a four; if it is an ace, the last card of each foundation should be a king. The cards on the tableau are built down by suit. Cards are moved one at a time, unless a suit sequence of cards is formed, which can be moved as a unit. Unlike Freecell, such a sequence is treated as one card and does not require enough free cells for all the cards in the sequence. When an empty column occurs in the tableau, only a card of the rank directly
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    Put

    Put

    Put is an English tavern trick-taking card game first recorded in the 16th century and later castigated by 17th century moralists as one of ill repute. It belongs to a very ancient family of card games and clearly relates to a group known as Trut, Truque, also Tru, and the South American game Truco. Its more elaborate version is the Spanish game of Truc, which is still much played in many parts of Southern France and Spain. The name Put, pronounced "u", like the name of the English village of Putney, derives from "putting up your cards in cafe", if you do not like them, or from "putting each other to the shift". It is so easy to learn and fun to play that it would be a pity to omit it from the core curriculum of card game learners. It is essentially a game of bluff rather than calculation. Like the game of Brag, it depends in a great measure upon the boldest player, and by assuming a superiority in hand, either by your look, or by any other means your antagonist is apt to be intimidated. The game of Put appears in a "riddle", or acrostic, probably written by a Royalist in the thrilling interval between the resignation of Richard Cromwell on May 25, 1659 and the restoration of
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Rumino

    Rumino

    Rumino, rumina, is a powerful and intense knock rummy card game of Italian origin played up to 6 players in which players try to form sets or sequences of cards. It may possibly have been devised in American during the 40's by Italian immigrants by adapting the game Scala Quaranta to Gin rummy. It is usually played for small stakes Two 52-card decks are used plus four Jokers comprising 108 cards. The aim of the game is to push the players over 100 points and keep a score low. All players draws a card from the deck, and the high card determines the dealer. Subsequent deals are passed to the left. Each player is dealt 7 cards, and the remaining stock pile is spread on the table. The top card of the deck is then turned face up to start the discard pile, and the player to the left of the dealer draws the top card from the stock pile or discard pile to make combinations of three or four-card "lays", e.g. Three of a kind, Four of a kind, a three straight flush or a four card straight flush. Aces can only be played Low and Jokers are wild. After a card is drawn, one must be discarded, and the next player to the left has the option of drawing either the top discard or top stock card, then
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Rummikub

    Rummikub

    Rummikub (also known as Rummy-O, Rummycube, Rummyking Tile rummy and Rummy Tile) is a tile-based game for two to four players. Rummikub was invented by Ephraim Hertzano, a Romanian-born Jew, who immigrated to Mandate Palestine in the early 1930s. He hand-made the first sets with his family in the backyard of his home. The game combines elements of rummy, dominoes, mah-jongg and chess. Hertzano sold the first sets door-to-door and on a consignment basis at small shops. Over the years, the family licensed it to other countries and it became Israel’s #1 export game. In 1977, it became a bestselling game in the United States. Hertzano's 'Official Rummikub Book', published in 1978, describes three different versions of the game: American, Sabra and International. Modern Rummikub sets include only the Sabra version rules, with no mention of the others, and there are variations in the rules between publishers. The game was first made by Lemada Light Industries Ltd, founded by Hertzano. "Six handed" (a game with 6 colors) is available in Germany. It tends to be more fun for larger parties, but less challenging, as it is much easier to make a set of 3 different colors when there are 6
    7.00
    2 votes
    154
    Slapjack

    Slapjack

    Slapjack, also known as Slaps, is a simple standard-deck card game, generally played among children. It can often be a child's first introduction to playing cards. The game is related to Egyptian Ratscrew and is also sometimes known as Heart Attack. It is also related to the simpler 'slap' card games often called snap. A 52-card deck is divided into face-down stacks as equally as possible between all players. One player removes the top card of his stack and places it face-up on the playing surface within reach of all players. The players take turns doing this in a clockwise manner until a Jack is placed on the pile. At this point, any and all players may attempt to slap the pile with the hand they used to place the card; whoever covers the stack with his hand first takes the pile, shuffles it, and adds it to the bottom of his stack. If a card covers the jack it does not count. When a player has run out of cards, he has one more chance to slap a jack and get back in the game, but if he fails, he is out. Gameplay continues with hands of this sort until one player has acquired all of the cards. Snap is a popular card game in which the object is to win all the cards. Gameplay is
    7.00
    2 votes
    155
    Snip Snap Snorem

    Snip Snap Snorem

    Snip Snap Snorem, or Snip Snap Snorum, is a matching-type card game heading a range of children's games which certainly go back to the 18th century and probably derive from a more ancient and bibulous gambling game. Almost identical is the German game of Schipp-Schnapp-Schnurr-Burr-Basilorum, except that Kings are not stops but are followed by Ace, two, et cetera. There are several methods of playing the game, but in the most common a full whist pack is used and any number of players may take part. The pack is dealt, one card at a time, and the eldest hand places upon the table any card he likes. Each player in his turn then tries to match the card played just before his, making use of a prescribed formula if successful. Thus, if a King is played, the second player lays down another king (if he can) calling out "Snip!" The next player lays down the third King, saying "Snap!" and the next the fourth King with the word "Snorem." A player not being able to pair the card played may not discard, and the holder of Snorem has the privilege of beginning the next round. The player who gets rid of all his cards first wins a counter from his companions for each card still held by them. Earl
    7.00
    2 votes
    156

    Thirty-one

    'Thirty-one (French Trente et un) is a gambling card game played by two to seven people. The game is also known as Joanna rides the short bus and is also known as Jo Jo potato head, Nickel Nock, Blitz, "Clinker", "Klinker", "Skat", Cadillac in south Louisiana, Whammy! in central Indiana, and as Skedaddle, Joanna rides the short boat across the river, Schnautz, Stop the Bus or Ride the Bus in other countries. Drawing cards to a total of 31, has formed the whole or part of various games like Commerce, [[Cribbage], Trentuno, and Wit and Reason, since the 15th century. The object is to obtain a hand with a point value as close as possible to 31, from which the name of the game is taken. The game is usually best played with at least four players. Thirty-one uses a standard deck of 52 playing cards. Aces are high, counting 11; face cards count 10; and all other cards count face value. Each player gets a hand of three cards. The rest of the deck sits in the middle of the table as stock for the game, and the top card of the stock is turned over to begin the discard. Each player uses a five dollar bill. After the hands in the first round are dealt, play proceeds as in Gin rummy, with each
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Desmoche

    Desmoche

    Desmoche is a popular rummy card game usually played for small stakes which closely resembles other games in the rummy family, like Conquian and gin rummy, more than poker. It was probably devised in Nicaragua in the first half of the 20th century. The object of Desmoche is to play, in either runs or sets, exactly ten cards on the table. The game is played by 2, 3 or 4 players with a standard deck of 52 playing cards and aces can be either played as a high or low card. Any player may start out as the dealer, which then rotates from round to round in a counter-clockwise fashion. The player on the dealer's right cuts, then the dealer deals the cards face-down starting with the player on the right and continuing until each player receives 9 cards. If the dealer deals an incorrect amount of cards to any player, he forfeits the hand, and his cards are removed from the game. Cards that are not dealt remain in the deck, which is placed in the middle of the table and used throughout the game. The winner of the prior hand will become the dealer of the following hand. After the deal and before play begins, each player chooses one card from their hand and passes it face down to the player on
    6.00
    3 votes
    158

    Happy Families

    Happy Families is a traditional card game played in the UK, usually with a specially made set of picture cards, featuring illustrations of fictional families of four, most often based on occupation types. The object of the game is to collect complete families. The player whose turn it is asks another player for a specific card from the same family as a card that the player already has. If the asked player has the card, he gives it to the requester and the requester can then ask for any player for another card. If the asked player does not have the card, it becomes his turn and he asks another player for a specific card. Play continues in this way until no families are separated among different players. The player with the most cards wins. The game can be adapted for use with an ordinary set of playing cards. The game was devised by John Jaques II, who is also credited with inventing tiddlywinks, ludo and snakes and ladders, and first published before the Great Exhibition of 1851. Cards following Jaques's original designs, with grotesque illustrations possibly by Sir John Tenniel (there was no official credit), are still being made. A series of children's books based on the
    6.00
    3 votes
    159
    Make-A-Million

    Make-A-Million

    Make-a-Million is a card game created by Parker Brothers. It was copyrighted in 1934 and released to the public in 1935. The game was first released in Salem, Massachusetts, and then to New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, and Atlanta. The original game was designed for four players, with a three-player option with a dummy hand. Later, Parker Brothers adapted the game to accommodate six or eight players. The game enjoyed popularity through the 1930s into the 1950s. Major printings occurred in 1934, 1935, and 1945, with the last printing from Parker Brothers in 1957. With each printing, the card style changed slightly. In 2004, Carlos Packard, President of Packard Technologies purchased the trademark for the Make-A-Million card game. The company printed over 17 thousand decks of the original 1934 design and called it the '70 Year Anniversary Edition'. Packard Technologies now sells the game as a two-deck game for four to eight players. The object of each side is to capture tricks in which Money cards have been played. The side to first score a million dollars wins. The privilege of naming trump color and getting the "widow" goes to the highest bidder. If the highest bidder and
    6.00
    3 votes
    160

    Skitgubbe

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Skitgubbe is a multi-genre card game that originated in Sweden. The game occurs in two phases. The first phase is a multi-player version of War, in which players accumulate a hand. The second phase is a rummy game, where players attempt to discard the accumulated hand. The last player to go out is the skitgubbe (crapman, in Swedish). Sometimes, the skitgubbe must make a goat noise. There is no other scoring system. The first phase is unusual for a trick-taking game, in that there is asynchronous sloughing of cards that match played cards, while play goes around the table. In a variation common in the United States, the second phase is unusual because sequences of cards are played, connected, and picked up during the rummy phase.
    6.00
    3 votes
    161

    Snap

    Snap is a popular card game in which the object is to lose all the cards. In the game the entire pack of cards is dealt out among the players in face-down stacks as equally as possible. Play proceeds with the players taking it in turns to remove a card from the top of their stack and place it face-up on a central pile. If two cards placed consecutively on the pile are identical (or, if a conventional pack of cards is used, are of the same number) then the first player to shout "Snap!" and places his/her hand on the top of the central pile does not need to take the cards. But the person that "snaps" the card last takes in all the cards. The player with the most cards loses. Alternate versions of the game include the person with most cards as the winner, and instead claiming cards by shouting snap. The game is often one of the first card games to be taught to children and is often played with special packs of cards featuring popular children's characters from television programmes or recent films. For older children more complex packs exist, where the differences between cards are more subtle and penalties exist for falsely calling Snap. Gameplay is related to Egyptian Ratscrew. In
    6.00
    3 votes
    162
    Spank Pankis

    Spank Pankis

    Spank Pankis is a card game of the shedding family, reminiscent of Spoons and Speed, but more complex. The game is played with two or more standard 52-card decks, though only 2 are usually used. As a variation, one or more jokers may be added. The entire deck is first dealt equally among the four players. After that, each player must deal their own playing pile and saving deck. It consists of (respectively) one face down card and a pair of face down cards. The remainder of cards are then the player's draw deck. The player must then draw their hand of up to five cards. The single play card acts as the play card in speed, and the two carded save deck has the same purpose as the five save cards of speed. The two cards of the save deck may be flipped at absolutely any time, unlike speed in which both players must not be able to play cards. Gameplay starts mostly resembling speed. All players grab their play card and flip it over, yelling "Spank Pankis!". They then proceed in playing cards of either one value higher or one value lower. Players may play on their deck, and the deck of the player to their right. The player must draw to five cards in their hand from their draw deck. The
    6.00
    3 votes
    163
    Concentration

    Concentration

    Concentration, also known as Memory, Pelmanism, Shinkei-suijaku, Pexeso or simply Pairs, is a card game in which all of the cards are laid face down on a surface and two cards are flipped face up over each turn. The object of the game is to turn over pairs of matching cards. Concentration can be played with any number of players or as solitaire and is an especially good game for young children, though adults may find it challenging and stimulating as well. The scheme is often used in quiz shows and can be employed as an educational game. Any deck of playing cards may be used, although there are special cards available, as shown in the picture above. The rules given here are for a standard deck of 52 cards, which are normally laid face down in 4 rows of 13 cards each. The two jokers may be included for a tableau of 6 rows of 9 cards each. In turn each player chooses two cards and turns them face up. If they are of the same rank and color (e.g. 6 of hearts and 6 of diamonds, queen of clubs and queen of spades, or both jokers, if used) then that player wins the pair and plays again. If they are not of the same rank and color, they are turned face down again and play passes to the
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Dutch Blitz

    Dutch Blitz

    Dutch Blitz is a fast-paced, family oriented, action card game played with a specially printed deck. The game was created by Werner Ernst George Muller, a German immigrant from Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The game is very popular among the Pennsylvania Amish and Dutch community, and among Christian groups in the United States and Canada (primarily in Dutch and German communities). The game is essentially the same as Nertz, with the essential difference being that Nertz is played with four standard playing decks, but Dutch Blitz must be played with specialized decks. It is similar to and possibly derived from the European game of Ligretto manufactured in Germany. Blitz Pile: This pile of 10 cards is the most important pile of cards to each player since it is the key towards "Blitzing" the other players when all cards from this pile have been cleared. Dutch Piles: Stacks of cards in each of the four colors - 1 through 10 an ascending sequence - placed in the center of the table and played upon by all players. Each player accumulates scoring points here. Post Piles: Groups of cards placed to the left of both the Blitz and Wood piles in descending sequence For each player, the Post
    5.67
    3 votes
    165
    Beggar-My-Neighbour

    Beggar-My-Neighbour

    Beggar-My-Neighbour (alternatively Beggar-Thy-Neighbour or Beggar-Your-Neighbour, each a bowdlerization reflecting the substitution of "beggar" for "bugger"), also known by the etymologically unrelated names Jack Daniels, Beat Jack Out of Doors, Beat Your Neighbour Out of Doors, Beat your Neighbour Out of Town, Strip Jack Naked, Picture and Draw the Well Dry, is a simple card game somewhat similar in nature to War, and has spawned a more complicated variant, Egyptian Ratscrew. The game was probably invented in Britain and has been known there since at least the 1860s. It appears in Charles Dickens's 1861 novel Great Expectations, as the only card game Pip, the book's protagonist, as a child seems to know how to play. A standard 52-card deck is divided equally between two players, and the two stacks of cards are placed on the table face down. The first player lays down his top card face up, and the opponent plays his top card on it, and this goes on alternately as long as no ace or face card (King, Queen, or Jack) appears. If either player turns up such a card, his opponent has to pay a penalty: four cards for an ace, three for a King, two for a Queen, or one for a Jack. When he has
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Clock patience

    Clock patience

    Clock patience, also known as clock solitaire is a solitaire card game with the cards laid out to represent the face of a clock. One deck of cards (minus jokers) is used. The deck is shuffled and twelve piles of four cards each are laid out, face down, in a circle. The remaining four cards are placed, also face down, in a pile in the center of the circle. The twelve positions around the circle represent the 12 hour clock and the pile in the middle represents the hands. Play starts by turning over the top card of the central pile. When a card is revealed, it is placed face up under the pile at the corresponding hour (i.e. Ace = 1 o'clock, 2 = 2 o'clock, etc. The Jack is 11 o'clock and the Queen is 12 o'clock) and the top card of the pile of that hour is turned over. If a King is revealed, it is placed face up under the central pile. Play continues in this fashion and the game is won if all the cards are revealed. The game is lost if all four Kings are revealed and face-down cards are still present. This is a game of zero skill and is a purely mechanical process. The chances of winning are 1 in 13. There is no possible way to win the game if none of the bottommost cards in the twelve
    6.50
    2 votes
    167

    Patience sorting

    Patience sorting is a sorting algorithm, based on a solitaire card game, that has the property of being able to efficiently compute the length of a longest increasing subsequence in a given array. The game begins with a shuffled deck of cards, labeled . The cards are dealt one by one into a sequence of piles on the table, according to the following rules. The object of the game is to finish with as few piles as possible. D. Aldous and P. Diaconis suggest defining 9 or fewer piles as a winning outcome for n = 52, which has approximately 5% chance to happen. Given an n-element array with an ordering relation as an input for the sorting, consider it as a collection of cards, with the (unknown in the beginning) statistical ordering of each element serving as its index. Note that the game never uses the actual value of the card, except for comparison between two cards, and the relative ordering of any two array elements is known. Now simulate the patience sorting game, played with the greedy strategy, i.e., placing each new card on the leftmost pile that is legally possible to use. At each stage of the game, under this strategy, the labels on the top cards of the piles are increasing
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Poker

    Poker

    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Poker is a family of card games involving betting and individualistic play whereby the winner is determined by the ranks and combinations of their cards, some of which remain hidden until the end of the game. Poker games vary in the number of cards dealt, the number of shared or "community" cards and the number of cards that remain hidden. The betting procedures vary among different poker games in such ways as betting limits and splitting the pot between a high hand and a low hand. In most modern poker games, the first round of betting begins with one of the players making some form of forced bet (the ante). In standard poker, each player is betting that the hand he has will be the highest ranked. The action then proceeds clockwise around the table and each player in turn must either match the maximum previous bet or fold, losing the amount bet so far and all further interest in the hand. A player who matches a bet may also "raise," or increase the bet. The betting round ends when all players have either matched the last bet or folded. If all but one player fold on any round, then the remaining player collects the pot and may choose to show or conceal their hand. If more than one
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Rummy

    Rummy

    Rummy is a group of matching card games notable for similar gameplay based on the matching cards of the same rank or sequence and same suit. The basic goal any form of rummy is to build melds which consists of sets, three or four of a kind of the same rank, or runs, three or more cards in sequence, of the same suit. The original form of rummy is called Sai rummy or Basic rummy. The Mexican game of Conquian is considered by David Parlett to be ancestral to all rummy games, which itself is derived from a Chinese game called Khanhoo and, going even further back, Mahjong. A book consists of at least three cards of the same rank or consecutive cards of the same suit. This is an almost universal pattern, although there exist minor variations, such as allowing only melds of the first type or requiring in melds of the second type that the cards are all of a different suit. In some games it is required that the melds of the second type contain at least four cards. Some games also feature wild cards, which can be used to represent any card in a meld. The number of wild cards in a meld may be restricted. A fairly large number of cards is used. This varies from one standard deck upwards. There
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Tressette

    Tressette

    Tressette or Tresette is one of Italy's major national trick-taking card games, together with Scopa and Briscola. It is recorded only from the early 18th century, though greater antiquity is suggested by its trumplessness. The name of the game, literally "three Sevens" may refer to a scoring combination no longer recognized, or to the fact that it is played up to twenty-one. There are many variants depending on the region of Italy the game is played in. Tressette is played with a standard Italian 40-card deck and the cards are ranked as follows from highest to lowest: 3-2-Ace-King-Knight-Knave and then all the remaining cards in numerical order from 7 down to 4. The game may be played with four players playing in two partnerships, or in heads-up play. In either case, ten cards are dealt to each player. In one on one play, the remaining twenty cards are placed face down in front of both players. The object of the game is to score as many points as possible until a score of 21 is achieved. Players must follow suit unless that suit does not remain in their hand, and players must show the card they pick up off the card pile to their opponent. Points are scored by collecting the face
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Windmill

    Windmill

    Windmill is a solitaire card game played with two decks of playing cards. It is so called because the initial layout resembles a windmill's sails. First, an ace is placed at the center. Then eight cards are placed around in such a way that the layout looks like a cross. The ace forms the primary foundation and the eight cards form the reserve. The gaps at the corner of the "sails" are reserved for kings and form the secondary foundations. The suits of the kings to be placed on the secondary foundations are disregarded. The object of the game is to build the primary foundation up to king with 52 cards in it and the secondary foundations down to ace with 13 cards each in them. All foundations are built regardless of suit. The illustration below shows how the tableau is initially laid out. (A) is for the primary foundation, R for the reserve (8 free cells) and (K) for the secondary foundations, empty at first. Game starts by moving cards from the reserve to either the primary foundation or if available, either one of the secondary foundations. Gaps at the reserve can be filled by cards from the wastepile, or if the empty, from the stock. If no more moves are possible from the reserve,
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Baccarat

    Baccarat

    Baccarat is a card game, played at casinos and by gamblers. It is believed to have been introduced into France from Italy during the reign of King Charles VIII (ruled 1483–98), and it is similar to Faro and Basset. There are three popular variants of the game: punto banco (or "North American baccarat"), baccarat chemin de fer, and baccarat banque (or "à deux tableaux"). Punto banco is strictly a game of chance, with no skill or strategy involved; each player's moves are forced by the cards the player is dealt. In baccarat chemin de fer and baccarat banque, by contrast, both players can make choices, which allows skill to play a part. Despite this, the winning odds are in favour of the bank, with a house edge no lower than around 1 per cent. Baccarat is a comparing card game played between two hands, the "player" and the "banker." Each baccarat coup has three possible outcomes: "player" (player has the higher score), "banker," and "tie." In Baccarat, cards 2–9 are worth face value, 10s and J, Q K are worth zero, and Aces are worth 1 point. Hands are valued according to the rightmost digit of the sum of their constituent cards: for example, a hand consisting of 2 and 3 is worth 5,
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    Kemps

    Kemps

    Kemps (also well known by other names) is a matching card game for two to six teams of two players each. It is played with a standard 52-card deck. The origin of the game is not known. The object of Kemps is for one member of a team to accumulate all four cards of a single rank in his hand and to have his partner recognize that fact aloud by yelling "Kemps!" before another team realizes that his team has four of a kind. The winning team, after each hand, receives a letter (beginning with K, then E, M and so on). The first team to spell K-E-M-P-S or P-I-C-K-L-E wins. However, with other variations of the game, a target number of wins may be predetermined. Prior to the game, partners confer to create a signal to indicate when four cards of a rank have been accumulated. When one partner accumulates four of a kind during game play, he or she makes the signal and his partner says Kemps or Quems. Partners sit diagonal each other, with the playing surface in the middle. The game is ended in one of two ways. If a team calls Kemps or Quems, the opposing team checks to see if the partner who did not make the call has four of a kind. If the call was valid and the partner does in fact have
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Scorpion

    Scorpion

    Scorpion is a Patience game using a deck of 52 playing cards. Although somewhat related to Spider, the method of game play is akin to Yukon. The object of this game is to form four columns of suit sequence cards from king down to ace. The game starts with 49 cards dealt into seven columns of seven cards each on the tableau. The first four columns each have three face-down cards with four face-up cards placed over them. The cards in the remaining three columns are all faced up. The three leftover cards are set aside for later. Cards in the tableau are built down by suit and every face up card is available for play, no matter where in the column it is. That means that any card can be placed on top of a card that is a rank higher. However, once a card from the bottom or middle of a column is moved, all cards on top of it are moved as well as one unit. Also, nothing can be placed on an ace and gaps on the tableau can only be taken by kings or sequences with Kings as their top cards. Furthermore, once a face-down card is exposed, it is turned face up. When no more moves are possible, the three leftover cards are dealt onto the first three columns and put into play. As earlier mentioned,
    7.00
    1 votes
    175

    Bullshit

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Cheat (also known as Bullshit and I Doubt It) is a card game where the players aim to get rid of all of their cards. Normally played with 3 or more players it is often classed as a party game. It is a game of deception and lying. A challenge is made by players calling-out (normally the name of the game), but whoever is wrong has to pick up all the cards in the middle. As with many card games, cheat has an oral tradition and so people are taught the game under different names, called I doubt it by Hoyle and sometimes known as Bullshit in the USA, with other names including: Bluff, Bluffaroo, BS, Bologna, Bible Study, Challenge, No Way, Liar, Bus Stop, I don't think so, Bull, Boy Scout, Cooner, Sheep, and Shredder often used in situations where yelling 'bullshit!' may not be desirable. Normally, a standard pack of 52 playing cards is used, but the game can be played with multiple packs of cards and often includes the jokers as wild cards. A dealer is chosen and the cards are shuffled and dealt (normally using a Western deal) until all the cards are dealt. The first player is either the first player dealt to or sometimes in variants the first person with a specified card and play
    5.33
    3 votes
    176
    Carpet

    Carpet

    Carpet is a solitaire game where the object is to discard all cards to the foundations where the aces are already dealt. The game starts with the aces separated from the deck to form the foundations. After the remaining 48 cards are shuffled, 20 cards are laid out on the tableau in a 5x4 grid fashion to form "the carpet." The remaining 28 cards make up the stock. All cards from "the carpet" must be moved to the foundations up by suit (i.e. 2♠ over A♠). Any "holes on the carpet," i. e. gaps left behind by the cards that are moved to the foundations, are filled by cards from the waste pile or, if the waste pile is empty, the stock. The stock cards are dealt one at the time on the waste pile and can be moved to the foundations or to the carpet if necessary. Once the stock is used up, all cards on the waste pile cannot be used as a new stock. Only the top card of the waste pile can be played. The game is won when all of the cards are moved into the foundations.
    5.33
    3 votes
    177

    Crazy Eights

    Crazy Eights is a shedding-type card game for two to seven players. The object of the game is to be the first to get rid of all the player's cards to a discard pile. The game is considered a pre-extension of Switch and Mau Mau, much favoured in schools during the 1970s. A standard 52-card deck is used when there are fewer than six players. When there are more than five players, two decks are shuffled together and all 104 cards are used. There are many variations of the basic game, and a number of different names including Crates, UNO, Last One, Mau-Mau, Pesten, Rockaway, Spoons, Swedish Rummy, Switch, Last Card, Screw Your Neighbour, and Tschausepp. In Britain, it is often referred to as Black Jack (not to be confused with the casino card game Blackjack). The name Crazy Eights dates to the 1940s, derived from the military designation for discharge of mentally unstable soldiers, Section 8. Bartok, Mao, Quango, Zar, Taki and UNO are more extreme variations, containing elements not covered in this entry. Eight cards are dealt to each player. The remaining cards of the deck are placed face down at the center of the table. The top card is then turned face up to start the game. Players
    5.33
    3 votes
    178
    Crazy Quilt

    Crazy Quilt

    Crazy Quilt (also known as Indian Carpet and Japanese Rug) is a solitaire card game using two decks of 52 playing cards each. The game is so-called because the reserve resembles the weaves of a carpet or an arrangement of a quilt. The arrangement of the cards on the reserve is also the reason it is rarely seen on computer solitaire packages, most of which have their cards placed vertically. First, one Ace and one King of each suit are taken out to form the foundations. The rest of the cards are shuffled, and 64 cards are dealt into eight rows of eight cards each. The first row should have its first card placed vertically, the second placed horizontally, the third vertically, the fourth horizontally, and so on. The second row should have its first card placed horizontally, its second one vertically and so on. To make this description short, the resulting layout should resemble a chessboard; the cards placed on one direction (vertically or horizontally) represent the darker squares and the cards placed on the other direction symbolize the lighter squares. This reserve is called the "quilt." The cards on the quilt with their shorter sides exposed, i.e. cards each with one of its
    5.33
    3 votes
    179
    Liverpool Rummy

    Liverpool Rummy

    Liverpool Rummy is a multi-player, multi-round card game similar to other variants of rummy that adds features like buying and going out. It's the same as Contract Rummy, except that if a player manages to cut the exact number of cards required to deal the hand and leave a face-up card, then the cutting player's score is reduced by 50 points. The game is played with multiple (typically 2, for four to five players, 3 decks for more) standard 52-card packs of playing cards. The ranking from low-to-high is A-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-J-Q-K-A. Aces can be low or high. Dealership rotates to each player from round to round. The dealer to the first round is usually determined by cutting the deck. Low card deals. The dealer deals a ten-card hand to each player. (In some circles, a 12-card hand is dealt, this variant is sometimes called Peruvian rummy) After all the players' hands have been dealt, another card (the upcard), is placed face-up in a central location known as the discard pile. The remainder of the pack is called the deck. The player to the immediate left of the dealer plays first. On each turn, a player: Play continues, in alternating turns, until one player goes out, or has no cards
    5.33
    3 votes
    180
    UNO

    UNO

    Uno ( /ˈuːnoʊ/; from Italian and Spanish for 'one') is an American card game which is played with a specially printed deck (see Mau Mau for an almost identical game played with normal playing cards). The game was originally developed in 1971 by Merle Robbins in Reading, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati. It has been a Mattel product since 1992. The game's general principles put it into the Crazy Eights family of card games. The deck consists of 108 cards, of which there are 19 of each color (red, green, blue, and yellow), each color having two of each rank except zero. The ranks in each color are 0 through 9, "Skip", "Draw Two" and "Reverse". In the New UNO, there are Skip cards, Reverse cards, Draw Two cards and more. The remaining eight cards are "Wild" and "Wild Draw Four", the deck having four of each. Before playing, a dealer must be selected by drawing lots or by some other method. The Dealer shall deal seven cards to each player in rounds. The top card of the deck is flipped and laid to the side to start the discard pile. If the exposed card has a special ability (the "word cards"), it is treated as a regular card. If the exposed card is a "Wild Draw Four", however, it is
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Bisley

    Bisley

    Bisley is a solitaire card game which uses a deck of 52 playing cards. It is one of the few one-deck games in which the player has options on which foundation a card can be placed. First the four aces are taken out and laid on the tableau to start the foundations. Then four columns of three cards are placed overlapping each other separately under the aces. After that, nine columns of four cards, also overlapping each other, are dealt to the right of the aces and first four columns. If the player decides to lay out all of the cards, he must make sure that there are four rows of thirteen cards and the first four cards on the first row should be the four aces. Here is the method of game play: The game is won when all cards end up in the foundations. It actually does not matter where the ace and king foundations of each suit would meet and how many cards the ace and king foundations of each suit will have. At the end of one game for example, the K♠ is the only one on its foundation while the rest of spade cards are built on the A♠; the A♣ remains unbuilt because all club cards are built on the K♣; the A♥ is built up to 4♥ while the K♥ is built down to 5♥; and the A♦ is built up to 8♦
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Phase 10

    Phase 10

    Phase 10 is a card game created in 1982 by Kenneth Johnson and originally sold by Fundex Games, now a subsidiary of Mattel. Phase 10 is based on a variant of rummy known as Liverpool Rummy, and is a member (along with Liverpool) of the contract rummy family. It requires a special deck or two regular decks of cards; it can be played by two to six people. The game is named after the ten phases (or melds) that a player must advance through in order to win. Phase 10 is Fundex's best selling product, selling 32,658,846 units to date, making it the 2nd best-selling commercial card game behind Mattel's Uno. In December 2010, Fundex sold the rights to Phase 10 to Mattel, and now develops and markets a line of games based on brands and other IP formerly exclusive to Mattel as well as Fundex's own brands. The object of the game is to be the first person to complete all 10 phases. In the case of two players completing the last phase in the same hand, the player with the lowest score out of the tied players is the winner. If those scores also happen to be tied, a tiebreaker round is played where the tying players attempt to complete phase 10 (or in variants, the last phase each player had
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Speed

    Speed

    Speed is a game for two or more players of the shedding family of card games, in which each player tries to get rid of all of his/her cards. Speed is a game associated with the game Nertz. Each player is dealt five cards to form a hand, and each player is dealt 15 cards face down to form a draw pile. If you are playing with jokers, you use them as wild cards and give each draw pile 16 cards. Two stacks of five cards, placed face down on each side between the players, serves as a replacement pile. Finally, two cards are placed face down in the center between the replacement piles. The round begins when the players each flip one of the face-down cards simultaneously from their own pile. By using cards from their hand, the players must place cards one above or one below or the same on the top card of either pile (suit of the cards does not matter). For example, a pile with a six on top may have a five, six,or a seven placed on it (You may not lay down more than one card at once, but you can lay down two cards with the same number when playing). King and Ace are considered adjacent so that there is a continuous loop of options. A common variant, good for younger children, is to allow
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Tournament

    Tournament

    Tournament is a solitaire card game which uses two decks of playing cards shuffled together. Despite the name, the game play doesn't seem to be related to the word tournament. First, the cards are shuffled and dealt as two columns of four cards laid out. The player must make sure that these eight cards include either a king, an ace, or both. If neither a king nor an ace is found among these eight cards, all cards are collected and shuffled and two new columns of four cards are dealt. As long there is no king or ace among the eight cards, the shuffling and dealing continues. When at least a king or an ace are present, six columns of four cards are then dealt. At least a king or an ace must be present among the first eight cards for the game to work. The first eight cards compose the reserve (or "the kibitzers") and the six columns of four cards form the tableau (or "the dormitzers"). The object of the game is to free one king and one ace of each suit and built them by suit. The kings should be built down while the aces should be built up. The top cards of each column on the tableau and all eight cards on the reserve are available. The cards on the reserve are available to be built
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Whist

    Whist

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Whist is a classic English trick-taking card game which was played widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. It derives from the 16th century game of trump or ruff, via Ruff and Honours. Although the rules are extremely simple, there is enormous scope for scientific play. Originating in the early 17th century, the now obsolete adjective whist and variant spelling wist (in which the word wistful has its roots), meant quiet, silent, and/or attentive. The adverb wistly is also defined as meaning intently. In its heyday a large amount of literature about how to play whist was written. Edmond Hoyle, of "According to Hoyle" fame, wrote an early popular and definitive textbook, A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist. It is important to note that this game, called "French ruff" by Charles Cotton, is similar to écarté. English ruff-and-honours, also described by Cotton, is similar to whist. If we admit that ruff and trump are convertible terms, of which there is scarcely a doubt, the game of trump was the precursor of whist. A purely English origin may, therefore, be claimed for trump (not la triomphe). No record is known to exist of the invention of this game, nor of the mode of its growth
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Baloot

    Baloot

    Baloot (Arabic: بلوت‎), is a popular trick card game played in Saudi Arabia, which is similar to the French game Belote. The game is similar to the French Belote. The similarity between the games rules is unknown. Baloot is believed that it was brought Hijaz by the Indian immigrants during the Ottoman Empire, then it spread to all over the country when it was unified under the Saudi rule. Some suggest that it was brought to the area of Hijaz by the Ottomans themselves when they ruled that area. There are four players in partnerships of two teams. A standard 32-card set is used. 8 for each player. There are two ways of playing "Judges suit, Arabic: أوراق الحكم / حكم(Hokom)‎" and the other way call "Sǔn صـن (Sǔn)". the suits ranking are : Assume the Hokom suit is the Sherya (Clubs) ♣ (for example) The two members of each team are seated across each other at a table in such a way that no player can see the cards of other players . The first dealer is chosen at random and after each hand the turn to deal passes to the right. The cards are shuffled by the dealer, and cut by the player on the left. The player on the left of the dealer can either say "go" without cutting the deck,
    5.00
    3 votes
    187

    Spades

    Spades is a trick-taking card game devised in the United States in the 1930s. It can be played as either a partnership or solo/"cutthroat" game. The object is to take at least the number of tricks that were bid before play of the hand began. In partnership Spades, the bids and tricks taken are combined for a partnership. Spades is a descendant of the Whist family of card games, which also includes Bridge, Hearts, and Oh, Hell. Its major difference as compared to other Whist variants is that, instead of trump being decided by the highest bidder or at random, the Spade suit is always trump, hence the name. Spades was devised in the United States in the late 1930s and became popular in the 1940s. It is unclear which game it is most directly descended from, but it is known that Spades is a member of the Whist family and is a simplification of Contract Bridge such that a skilled Spades player can learn Bridge relatively quickly (the major additional rules being dynamic trump, the auction, dummy play, and rubber scoring). The game's rise to popularity in the U.S. came during World War II, when it was introduced by soldiers from its birthplace in Cincinnati, Ohio to various military
    5.00
    3 votes
    188
    Biriba

    Biriba

    Biriba (Greek: Μπιρίμπα) is the Greek partnership version of a rummy card game of Italian origin called it:Pinnacola. The Greek name comes probably from the Italian game Biribara, or Biribisso, or Biribi, even if this game is totally different (more similar to the roulette). It is played by two to six players, with two decks and 4 Jokers comprising 108 cards. If 6 players play, one more deck and two 2 jokers more are added. Biriba can also be played by three players with or without partnership rules. While there are many variations of Biriba, the basic rules and objective are the same. The player to the right of the dealer shuffles the cards and his partner cuts the deck (the starting dealer is selected by a random draw, the lowest card winning the privilege to receive cards and play first.) Eleven cards are dealt to each player while two other sets of 11 cards are also dealt by one of the opponents and put face down to the side. These cards (two secondary 11-card hands) are called Paketa ("packages" or "parcels") or Biribakia (Greek for "small Biribas".) The objective of the game is to be the first player or team to surpass a pre-determined point total (commonly 2500 or 3000,
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Escoba

    Escoba

    Escoba is a variant of the Italian fishing card game Scopa, which means "broom", a name that refers to the situation in the game where you "sweep" all of the cards from the board in one turn. The game is usually played with a deck of traditional Spanish playing cards, called naipes. The object of the game is to be the first player to score 15 points through capturing cards. Points are scored in a variety of ways as detailed below. It does not necessarily follow that the player with the most captured cards in any particular round will get the greatest score. A traditional Spanish deck of 40 cards is used to play. For traditional decks which have 1 through 12 of each suit, you must remove the 8 and 9 of each suit, leaving 40 cards. A standard deck of playing cards (having Ace,2-10,Jack,Queen,King) can be modified by removing the 8, 9, and 10 of every suit, leaving 40 cards. At the start of each round the dealer will deal three cards to each player, face down. After all the players have been dealt cards, four board cards are dealt, face up, in the center of the table, and play commences. On rare occasions where the four initial cards dealt to the board add up to 15, they are taken by
    5.50
    2 votes
    190

    Four-handed All Fours

    Four-handed All Fours is a four player card game. The players cut to decide who shall be partners; the two highest playing against the two lowest, and facing each other, as at Whist. The right to the first deal is decided, by the cut, the highest dealing. Afterwards each player deals in rotation. The dealer and the elder hand alone look at their cards in the first instance, the option of begging resting with the latter. The other two players must not take up their cards till the dealer has decided whether he will "give one" or "run the cards" for a new trump. The players play in succession as at Whist, four cards constituting a trick. In other respects, the play is the same as in the two-handed All Fours.
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Klondike

    Klondike

    Klondike is a patience game (solitaire card game). Many people refer to Klondike as patience or solitaire (North America). Taking a shuffled standard 52-card deck of playing cards (without Jokers), one upturned card is dealt on the left of the playing area, then six downturned cards (from left to right). On top of the downturned cards, an upturned card is dealt on the left-most downturned pile, and downturned cards on the rest until all piles have an upturned card. The piles should look like the figure to the right. The four foundations (light rectangles in the upper right of the figure) are built up by suit from Ace (low in this game) to King, and the tableau piles can be built down by alternate colors, and partial or complete piles can be moved if they are built down by alternate colors also. Any empty piles can be filled with a King or a pile of cards with a King. The aim of the game is to build up a stack of cards starting with 2 and ending with King, all of the same suit. Once this is accomplished, the goal is to move this to a foundation, where the player has previously placed the Ace of that suit. Once the player has done this, they will have "finished" that suit- the goal
    5.50
    2 votes
    192

    Lost Cities

    Lost Cities is a 60-card card game, designed in 1999 by game designer Reiner Knizia and published by several publishers. The objective of the game is to mount profitable expeditions to one or more of the five lost cities (the Himalayas, the Brazilian Rain Forest, the Desert Sands, the Ancient Volcanos and Neptune's Realm). The game was originally intended as a 2-player game, but rule variants have been contributed by fans to allow 1 or 2 further players, causing Reiner Knizia himself to later provide semi-official 4-player rules. Lost Cities is a fast-moving game, with players playing or discarding, and then replacing, a single card each turn. Cards represent progress on one of the five color-coded expeditions. Players must decide, during the course of the game, how many of these expeditions to actually embark upon. Card play rules are quite straightforward, but because players can only move forward on an expedition (by playing cards which are higher-numbered than those already played), making the right choice in a given game situation can be quite difficult. An expedition that has been started will earn points according to how much progress has been made when the game ends, and
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Manille

    Manille

    Manille (derived from the Spanish and Catalan Malilla) is a French trick-taking card game which uses a 32 card deck. It spread to the rest of France in the early 20th century, but was subsequently checked and reversed by the expansion of Belote. It is still popular in Northern France, the western part of Flanders and the south-west part of the country. The game is played with a 32-card piquet deck. It is usually played by four players in two partnerships, but variants with just two players also exist. The 32 cards are distributed equally between the four players, starting with the player to the left of the dealer, moving clockwise. There are various ways to do this, often players receive two cards at a time rather than just one, until all players have eight cards each. The dealer now announce the trump suit. There are five possibilities as in bridge, clubs, diamonds, hearts spades and no-trump. No trump (known as en voiture in French) also means that the points are doubled at the end of the deal. The dealer can also announce "opposite" (en face) and let his partner choose the trump suit. If the opposing team believes they can beat the chosen trump (get more than 30 points) then
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Preferans

    Preferans

    Preferans (Russian: преферанс) is an Eastern European 10-card plain-trick game with bidding, played by three players with a 32-card Piquet deck. It is a sophisticated variant of the Austrian game Préférence, which in turn descends from Spanish Ombre and French Boston. Popular in Russia since approximately the 1830s, Preferans quickly became the country's national card game. Although superseded in this role by Durak, it is still one of the most popular games in Russia. Similar games are played in Eastern Europe from Lithuania to Greece, where an earlier form of Russian Preferans is known as Prefa (Greek: Πρέφα). Compared to Austrian Préférence, Russian Preferans and Greek Prefa are distinguished by the greater number of possible contracts, which allows for almost any combination of trumps and numbers of tricks. Another distinguishing feature is the relatively independent roles played by the opponents of the soloist. Preferans is played by three active players with a French-suited 32-card piquet deck. Aces rank high and tens rank in their natural position between jacks and nines. As happens with many three-player trick-taking games, the game is frequently played by four players using
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Primo visto

    Primo visto

    Primo visto, Primavista, Prima-vista, Primi-vist, Primiuiste, Primofistula, or even Primefisto, is a 16th-century gambling card game fashionable c. 1530-1640. Very little is known about this game, but judging by the etymology of the words used to describe the many local variants of the game, it appears to be one of Italian origin. Based upon references in period literature it appears to be closely related to the game of Primero, with some later authorities claiming that the two games were in fact the very same. Opposing claims to this theory include the fact that the earliest known reference to the name Primo visto appears in Greene's "Notable Discovery of Coosnage" published in 1591, more than half a century after the name Primero was in common use. John Minsheu, an English linguist and lexicographer, claims that Primero and Prima vista (hence Primo visto) were two distinct card games - "That is, first and first seen, because he that can shew such an order of cardes first winnes the game", although he gives but one set of names and just one reason for their names Robert Nares in his book "A Glossary" states that the circumstance of the cards being counted in the same way, with the
    5.50
    2 votes
    196

    Tabby Cat

    Tabby Cat is a long version of solitaire similar to Aces Up. The play consists of four stacks in the tableau, with an additional "tail", where partial builds can be placed. Four foundations are available, and the goal of the game is to build up kings to aces (low), regardless of color, whereupon the build can then be cleared from the tableau and moved to a foundation. The play proceeds by sequentially dealing four cards to each stack of the tableau. These stacks are to be managed, building cards of lower rank on top of cards of higher rank. Partial builds can be moved onto the tail if need be, but if the partial build has, for example, 9 as its highest rank, to move off the tail it must be moved onto a card of rank 10.
    5.50
    2 votes
    197
    Ulti

    Ulti

    Ulti or Ultimó, is Hungary's national trick-taking card game for three players. It is virtually unknown outside its home borders. Its name derives from the winning of the last trick with the lowest trump, a feature derived from several games like Trappola and Tapp Tarock played in Central Europe and in the former Austro-Hungarian empire, though the game as a whole must have grown naturally out of the Czech Mariaš, first mentioned in Hungary in 1787 and first described in 1883, as suggested by its alternative title Talonmariaš, described as "ultimáriás" by G. J. Potter in 1930. All games ultimately deriving from the old French game Marriage. It is important to note that the rules of the game are not universal, and typically every group of players will have their own set of rules that they agree upon. When people play together for the first time, it often takes considerable amount of time until they can agree on rule set they play. Some rules can significantly alter the strategy (See reference for a different set of rules from what is described below). Three players use a 32-card pack, with cards normally ranking A 10 K O U 9 8 7. The first dealer is chosen by any agreed means and
    5.50
    2 votes
    198
    Hand

    Hand

    Hand Solitaire is a solitaire game using one deck of playing cards, but it can be played in the hand, making it ideal when space is limited. The deck is held, face down, in the hand. One card at a time is flipped face up from the back of the deck. Once four cards are in play, the first and last card are of interest. If they are the same suit, the middle cards can be removed. If they are the same number, all four cards can be removed. Remove cards by placing them face up on the bottom of the deck. Continue playing by flipping over the last card from the back of the deck. Only the last four cards played can be used. The object of the game is to have 4 or less cards remaining in play. You should always end with an even number left, since you only remove an even number at a time. Note: When dealing the cards, flip them face up from the back of the deck, laying them on top of the previously dealt card. (The images show inserting the dealt card between the dealing deck and the up cards). It is much faster dealing this way and produces the same outcome, always looking at the top 4 cards of the face up cards.
    4.67
    3 votes
    199
    Golf

    Golf

    Golf is a card game where players try to earn the lowest number of points (as in golf, the sport) over the course of nine deals (or "holes" to further use golfing teminology). It is a game for four or more players using a double-deck of 108 cards. The multi-player game of golf has little in common with its solitaire cousin. Four or more players use two standard 52-card decks plus 2 or 4 Jokers . Each player is dealt 6 cards face down from the deck, the remainder is placed face down and the top card is turned up to start the discard pile beside it. Players arrange their 6 cards in 2 rows of 3 in front of them and turn 2 of these cards face up. This arrangement is maintained throughout the game and players always have 6 cards in front of them. The object is for players to reduce the value of the cards in front of them by either swapping them for lesser value cards or by pairing them up with cards of equal rank. Beginning at dealer's left, players take turns drawing single cards from either the stock or discard piles. The drawn card may either be swapped for one of that player's 6 cards, or discarded. If the card is swapped for one of the face down cards, the card swapped in remains
    6.00
    1 votes
    200

    Jerky

    Jerky is a card game for between two and four players. Each player's hand consists of one suit of an ordinary deck of cards. Additionally, one suit (traditionally, clubs) is shared among the players. It is acceptable to repeat suits among the players. The clubs are shuffled and placed face down (or, in some variants, face-up and spread out so that all cards are visible). On a turn: The top club is revealed. Players secretly select one card from their hand as a bid. When everyone has selected one, the cards are revealed. The player with the highest card takes the top club. Any cards bid are discarded and cannot be used for the remainder of the game. Card order is A,2-9,J,Q,K, and for scoring, A=1, J=11, Q=12, K=13. If two players tie for highest, they secretly select another card each, and repeat the bidding process until there is no longer a tie. Only the last cards played count: the rest are returned to the players' hands as if they had never been played. Further bids among tying players need not be higher than bids among players who bid lower on the first round. Those players can no longer bid. Scoring: A player's score is the sum of clubs he or she has collected. The player with
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Klaverjas

    Klaverjas

    Klaverjas, or Klaverjassen, is the Dutch name for a four player trick-taking card game using the piquet deck of playing cards. It is closely related to the Hungarian/Romanian card game klaberjass, also known as Kalabriasz, Klobiash, Clobiosh, and other similar spellings. It is one of the most popular card games in the Netherlands, traditionally played in cafes and social clubs. The game offers a considerable level of complexity and depth. It has numerous variants, but the core rules are basically the same. The name dates to 1890–95 from the Dutch word klaverjas, combining klaver (the suit of clubs, literally "clover") plus jas, the original name for the highest trump card. According to Scarne, its origin has been variously claimed by the Dutch, Swiss, French, and Hungarians. The game is played clockwise by four players in two teams, partners sitting opposite as in whist. It uses a piquet deck, i.e. a set of 32 cards in the four French suits: Ace, King, Queen, Jack and 7–10. All cards are dealt to the players, in batches of 3–2–3 or 4–4. Starting with the elder hand, the first player prepared to do so chooses a trump suit and thereby becomes obliged to win the deal. Various versions
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Ninety-nine

    Ninety-nine

    Ninety-nine is a simple card game based around addition and reportedly popular among gypsies. It uses one or more standard decks of Anglo-American playing cards in which certain ranks have special properties, and can be played by any number of players. During the game, the value of each card played is added to a running total which is not allowed to exceed 99. A player who cannot play without causing this total to surpass 99 loses that hand and must forfeit one token. Due the simple strategy and focus on basic addition, the game is ideal for culturing math skills in children. This is also true because the new total must be called out with each play, lending enjoyment to more expressive children and assertiveness practice to others. At the beginning of the game, three tokens are distributed to each player. Each hand, three cards are dealt to each player, and the player to the left of the dealer takes the first turn. He chooses one of the cards in his hand, places as a discard pile, calls out its value, and then draws a new card. The player to his left then chooses one of her cards and places it on the discard pile, adds its value to the previous card and calls out the new total. If
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Shamrocks

    Shamrocks

    Shamrocks is a solitaire game akin to La Belle Lucie. The object is the same as the latter: move the cards into the foundations. The game is layout out as in La Belle Lucie: seventeen piles of three cards are placed on the table with one card counting as an eighteenth. Any card that can be moved to the foundations should be moved and built up by suit (starting from the ace). The top card of each pile can be used for play and once a pile is empty, it cannot be refilled. But its similarity to La Belle Lucie ends there. Before the game begins, each King which is on top or middle of its respective pile is placed underneath. (Morehead and Mott-Smith's rules to the game specifically states that a King that is on top of a lower-ranked card of the same suit should be placed under that lower-ranked card, no matter what else in its pile.) To play on the tableau, a card can be placed over a card that is one rank higher or lower, regardless of suit (a 6♠ can be placed on a 7♣ or a 5♦). However, each pile can hold no more than three cards at a time; thus no card can be placed on a pile with three cards. The game is won when all of the cards have been moved to the foundations.
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Spoil-Five

    Spoil-Five

    Spoil-Five, Spoilt Five, Five and Ten, is the traditional book version of the Irish national card game called Twenty-Five, which underlies the Canadian game of Forty-Five. Charles Cotton describes it in 1674 as "Five Fingers", a nickname applied to the Five of Trumps extracted from the fact that the Irish word cuig means both 'five' and 'trick'. It is supposed to be of great antiquity, and widely believed to have originated in Ireland. It may be identified with the game of Maw, of which James I of England was very fond. Edmund Hoyle in his The Complete Gamester describes it as Five-cards. In the game of Five Cards, for example, when played by only two persons, Five and Ten, the card second in value is stated to be the ace of hearts, instead of the knave of trumps. Spoil Five is a respected member of one of the most prolific families of card games based on this pattern: each player receives five cards, or six or nine, and another is turned up to fix the trump suit. The object of the play is to win one trick, or at least three or five. The game is played by 2–8 persons, five being the best number. When three play at this game, it is still necessary that one of them should win the
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    The Clock

    The Clock

    The Clock is a very easy game of solitaire played with 52 cards. You have 13 foundations to drop cards. Each foundation has a specific card value (the clock value). You build 4 layers of cards on each foundation that must alternate in color (you can either start with black or red). Use one deck of cards. Shuffle it and you are ready to go. Imagine a clock on your game table. All ones will be placed at the 1 o'clock position, all Queens on 12 o'clock, and the kings in the center. This game has no cascades. In the figure the stock and waste are inside the clock. If playing the game with a real deck you would hold the stock in you hand and put the waste at a convenient location outside the clock. Draw card by card from the stock. If one fits to any of the 13 foundations play it, otherwise put it on the waste. Foundations are built by alternating color and layer wise. This means that you can choose your starting suit, but the second card on the foundation must be opposite color. Layer wise by suit means that you must have the same suit on each layer of the foundations. So on all foundations you must have - for example - Spades, Diamonds, Clubs, Hearts in the same order, though you can
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Tichu

    Tichu

    Tichu is a multi-genre card game; primarily a shedding game that includes elements of Bridge, Daihinmin, and Poker played between two teams of two players each. Teams work to accumulate points; the first team to reach a predetermined score (usually 1,000 points) is the winner. Tichu is the trade name for what appears to be a variant of Choi Dai Di (Hong Kong slang: "Step on the little guy") or Da Lao Er (Mandarin slang: "Big penis") combined with Zheng Fen ("Competing for Points"). It is also marketed asTai-Pan in Dutch. The following covers the basic rules of gameplay. However, for more comprehensive rulesets, consult the links below. Each player sits across from their teammate so that play alternates between the two teams. The game is traditionally run counter-clockwise, but is frequently played clockwise. The game is played with a deck of 56 cards, consisting of a 52-card deck of four suits (Jade, Sword, Pagoda, Star) plus four special cards (Mah Jong, Dog, Phoenix, Dragon). A standard 52-card deck with 4 jokers (marked to indicate the special cards) can also be used. Each player is dealt (or alternately draws, in Chinese play) eight cards, and may call "Grand Tichu," a
    6.00
    1 votes
    207
    Cassino

    Cassino

    Cassino, also known as Casino, is an Italian fishing card game for two, three, four players in two partnerships, or even theoretically five players. It is the only one to have penetrated the English-speaking world, via Italian immigrants to America. First recorded just before 1800 (1797), it seems to have been heavily elaborated in 19th century American practice. It is mostly played by two with a standard deck of playing cards, being the object of the game to score 21 points by fishing up cards displayed on the table. It is very similar to and probably descended from the Italian game Scopa. The dealer deals four cards to each player, two at a time, and, in the first deal, four cards face up to the table. The dealer has the option to deal any number of cards at one time to each person so long as each person is dealt in sequence. This can include a deal of one, two, three, or four cards to each. In subsequent deals, the dealer replenishes the players' hands, but not the table. The deal rotates only at the end of a complete round, when the deck has been exhausted. Beginning with the player to the dealer's left, each player plays one card at a time, performing one (or more) of the
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    Knock-out Whist

    Knock-out Whist

    Knock-out Whist is a member of the Whist family known by a variety of names including Trumps in Britain, Reduction Whist, Diminishing Whist (from the way one less card is dealt each hand) and Rat. It is often simply called Whist by players who are unfamiliar with the game properly called Whist. It is a basic trick-taking game and is a good way to teach the concept of "tricks" to children. The ultimate object of Knockout Whist is to be the last player still "standing" at the end of the game, with the object in each round being to win a majority of tricks.. A standard 52 card pack is used. The cards in each suit rank from highest to lowest: A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. The game may be played by two to seven players. For the first deal the dealer deals seven cards to each player and one card is turned up to indicate that its suit is the trump suit for the first round. (In subsequent rounds, the winner of the previous round selects the trump suit). The player to the dealer's left leads to the first trick; any card may be led. The other players, in clockwise order, each play a card to the trick and must follow suit by playing a card of the suit led if they have one. A player with no
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    Musta Maija

    Musta Maija

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Musta Maija is a Finnish card game. It is primarily a children's game, but due to tactical possibilities, it can be enjoyed by adults as well. The game suits to 3-5 players, and it uses the standard deck of 52 cards. Ace is the highest. Everyone is dealt five cards, and the rest of the cards forms a face-down stock. The top card of the stock is placed face up under the stock, and it determines the trump suit. If it is spades, the card is returned into the middle of the stock, and a new card is turned to determine the trumps. The queen of spades is a special card, and it is called Maija (Black Maria). Whenever, during the play, a player has less than five cards in his hand and there are cards left in the stock, the player must take cards from the stock so that he has five cards. In each turn the player in turn plays one or more cards from his hand onto the table with the following restrictions: The cards must all be of a same suit (in this purpose, Maija counts as a spade). Their number must not exceed the number of cards that the player left to the one in turn has in his hand. Playing cards onto the table is one action, and the player is not allowed to take cards from the stock in
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Pharaoh′s Grave

    Pharaoh′s Grave

    Pharaoh's Grave is a gallery style free cell based game played with 104 playing cards. It arranges the foundations as pyramid and when successfully finished, the Pharaoh, symbolized by the King of Hearts, is on the center bottom and the aces build the pyramid. After starting the game any Kings and the Ace of Hearts need to be swapped swapped to the correct location. This game can deal (rarely) unsolvable right away if no kings appear. Also, if two foundations of the same suit hold a card of their own suit (not the King) the game cannot be solved. Just start a new game, or fetch some kings from the stock and replace them to the right location, or swap cards on the foundations to avoid this. The whole tableau consists of free cells that each hold one card. It is not possible to move a card from the foundation to a free cell. Only from a foundation to the other. The game is played by fetching card by card from the stock to the waste. Marry matching cards from the waste to the foundations or place them on empty free cells. The foundations, arranged as pyramid, have fixed suits. The starting cards are: K of Hearts (top), Kings of Spades (row 2), Kings of Diamonds (row 3), Kings of Clubs
    5.00
    2 votes
    212

    Pope Julius

    Pope Julius, or Pope July, is a gambling card game of the 16th century for four or more players. Players included King Henry VIII. Very little is known about the game, and its existence is known to be attested only by three written sources, those being:
    5.00
    2 votes
    213
    Sedma

    Sedma

    Sedma, Zsírozás or Şeptică is a Central European 4-card trick-and-draw game played by 4 four players in fixed partnerships with a 32-card piquet deck. Card suits do not play a role in this game, and there is no ranking order. A trick is won by the last player to play a card of the same rank as the card led. Hola is a similar, slightly earlier game. The games have been described as highly unusual members of the Ace–Ten family, immediately related only to the Finnish card game known as Ristikontra or Ristiklappi. The game is played by four players in fixed partnerships, sitting crosswise. Normally a German-suited piquet deck is used, but as in Skat and other games played with this pack it can be replaced by a French-suited piquet deck consisting of the 32 cards of the ranks ace, king, queen, jack, ten and 7–9. The suits are irrelevant for this game, and the ranks are not ordered in a hierarchy. Aces and tens have card-point values of 10 points each, while all other cards have no card-point value. This schedule appears to be a simplification of the usual schedule in Ace–Ten card games used by Ristikontra. Together with the 10 points awarded for winning the last trick, there are 90
    5.00
    2 votes
    214

    Benny

    Benny is a card used in trick-taking games that automatically counts as the highest trump. If no-trump rounds are allowed, the Benny is often considered to be a solitary trump, in a suit of its own. Normally, the Benny is represented with a Joker or the two of spades. The most common use of Benny is in a 25-card euchre variant. It is for this specific game that the Joker was introduced in the 19th century United States.
    4.50
    2 votes
    215
    Little Spider

    Little Spider

    Little Spider is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. Because of its form of game play and dealing, it should not be confused with two other solitaire games: Spider and its one-deck cousin Spiderette. Game play is composed of two parts. At first, eight cards are dealt into two rows of four cards each, with a space in the middle for the four foundations. At the first part of game play, two aces of one color and two kings of the other should be found and transferred to the foundations. When at least one of them is available, it is built immediately; the kings are built down to ace while the aces are built up to kings, in both cases by suit. Game play in this part is composed strictly of moving cards from the two rows to the foundations. Cards from the upper row can be placed on any of the foundations, while cards from the lower row can only be placed on the foundations directly on top of it. Once possible plays are made, eight new cards are dealt from the stock, one on each pile, empty or otherwise. Once the entire stock is dealt, the second part of game play begins. At the second part of game play, cards from both rows can be placed on the foundations as well as
    4.50
    2 votes
    216
    400

    400

    400 is a Lebanese trick-taking card game played in two partnerships with a standard deck of 52 playing cards. The object of the game is to be the first team to reach forty-one points. The game somewhat resembles Spades, but with subtle differences. To accumulate the most points at or beyond 41; points are accrued by winning at least the number of tricks bid in each hand, where each trick that is bid is worth one point. Hearts are always trump and other suits have no innate value. Cards rank: A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 The first dealer is chosen by a draw for high card, and thereafter the turn to deal proceeds counter clockwise. The entire deck is dealt two cards at a time, face down, beginning on the dealer's right (The first deal being either one card or three cards per player, in order to arrive at thirteen cards each). The players then pick up their cards and arrange them by suits. If one player prematurely runs out of cards, that is, either extra cards were dealt elsewhere or one or more cards are missing, the hand is considered void and the deal passes to the player's right. Each player decides how many tricks he will be able to take. The player to the dealer's right starts
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    Bristol

    Bristol

    Bristol is a Patience game using a deck of 52 playing cards. It has an unusual feature of building regardless of suit on both the foundations and on the tableau; it is also one of the easiest to win. Eight piles (or fans) of three cards each are dealt onto the tableau. Any king that is not on the bottom of its pile is placed underneath. Then three cards are placed under these piles. These form the bases for the three reserve piles. Whenever an ace becomes available, it becomes a foundation, on which it can be built up regardless of suit up to a King. The same is done on the three other aces. The top card of each pile on the tableau and the top card of each reserve pile is available to be built on the foundations and around the tableau. Like the foundations, the piles on the tableau are built down regardless of suit. Only one card can be moved at a time and when a pile becomes empty, it is never filled. Cards in the stock are dealt onto the reserve three at a time, one for each pile. In effect, gaps on the reserve are filled during the deal; therefore, when a reserve pile becomes empty, it is not filled until the next batch of three cards is dealt. The game is successfully won when
    5.00
    1 votes
    218

    Mau Mau

    Mau Mau is a card game for 2 or more players that is popular in Germany, Brazil, the Netherlands and some other areas. For more than 5 players, 2 packs of cards may be used. Whoever gets rid of his/her cards first wins the game. Mau Mau is very similar to the game Uno and Flaps, both belonging to the larger Crazy Eights or Shedding family of card games. However Mau Mau is played with a regular deck of playing cards. The game is played with a regular deck of playing cards. In Germany, most decks contain neither card values below 7 nor Jokers (as they are made for the national game of Skat), however Mau Mau is playable with any deck. The players are dealt each a hand of cards (usually 5). The rest are placed face down as the drawing stack. At the beginning of the game the topmost card is revealed, then the players each get a turn to play cards. One can play a card if it corresponds to the suit or value of the open card. E.g. on a 10 of spades, only other spades can be played or other 10s. If a player is not able to, they draws one card from the stack. If he can play this card, he may do so, otherwise he keeps the drawn card and passes his turn. If the drawing stack is empty, the
    5.00
    1 votes
    219
    Monte Carlo

    Monte Carlo

    Monte Carlo (also known as Weddings and Double and Quits, which is not to be confused with Double or Quits) is a Patience pair-matching card game (using a deck of 52 playing cards) where the object is to remove pairs from the tableau. Contrary to its name, it has no relation to the city with the same name nor to any casino-related game. Game starts when 25 cards are laid out in such a way that they form a 5x5 grid (one version states that 20 cards are dealt to form a 5x4 grid). The rest of the deck are set aside for later as the reserve. Cards that make up a pair (such as two Kings or two Sixes) are removed when they are immediately next to each other horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. Once all pairs have been removed, the cards are consolidated, i.e. moving cards to the left as if towards the upper left corner to fill any gaps left behind by the discarded pairs. New cards are then laid out from the reserve to form a fresh layout of 25 cards. This removal of pairs, consolidation of cards, and addition of new cards continue until the reserve cards have run out. After this, removal of pairs and consolidation continues. The game finishes when all cards have been discarded. The
    5.00
    1 votes
    220
    Schafkopf

    Schafkopf

    Schafkopf, also called Schaffkopf, is a late 18th century German trick-taking card game most popular in Bavaria, but also played in other parts of Germany as well as other German-speaking countries like Austria. Its modern descendants are Doppelkopf, Skat and the North American game of Sheepshead. Its earliest written reference dates to 1803, although it only came to notice by the polite society of Altenburg in 1811. Today Schafkopf is an important part of the Bavarian culture and way of life. Explanations of the origin of the name Schafkopf vary. One suggestion is that Schafkopf acquired its name at a time when it was played up to nine points, which were marked with a piece of chalk as nine lines on a board, gradually building up to the stylized representation of a sheep's head (German: Schaf = sheep, Kopf = head). Another is that it comes from "Schaffen" and "Kopf", "to work one's brain." A third theory, from the author Wolfgang Peschel, states that in earlier times the game was generally played on the top (head, Kopf) of wooden beer casks (middle high German: Schaff = cask) . To this day, such casks are used as tables at beer stands and beer halls. Schafkopf is played by four
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    Tien Gow

    Tien Gow

    Tien Gow (Sometimes spelled Tin Kau, transliteration of the Chinese characters: (天九, Cantonese: tin1 gau2) in Cantonese Heaven and Nine) is the name of a Chinese trick-taking gambling game for 4 players played with a set of Chinese dominoes. In the game, Heaven is the top rank tile of the civilian suit, while Nine is the top rank tile of the military suit of the domino set. The game of Tien Gow is quite different from Pai Gow. The only similarities are the tiles set and the names of the tiles. It is analogous to comparing the games of poker and bridge. Pai gow is more like poker where the players compare which hand has a higher rank. Tien gow is more like playing bridge with no trump suit and no partner, except that the number of tricks taken does not determine the winner. The player who takes the last trick is the winner of tien gow. There are complex rules to the game play and scoring. There is an accumulating multiplier to the winning and loss as the game proceeds. Since the last trick determines who collects the winning, the players need to rely on luck and strategies to save the strong hand to the last trick. It is a very challenging game to learn and master. Only a small
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    222
    Quadrille

    Quadrille

    Quadrille is a Spanish trick-taking card game directly ancestral to Boston and chief progenitor of Solo whist. It was perfected in early 18th century France as a four-handed version of the Spanish card game Ombre, which was superseded as a fashionable game in about 1726, although it still remained as one of the great European games over a hundred years in France and England until it was ousted by partnership Whist. Its chief problem was that of extreme complexity, its upside-down ranking system in two suits, non-standard bids and a hard-score pay-off system of extreme complexity. Four play, each for himself in the long run, though temporary alliances may be formed from deal to deal. Each should start with an equal number of counters, but never fewer than forty. A 40-card pack is used and cards rank K Q J 7 6 5 4 3 2 in ♠ and ♣ and A K Q J 2 3 4 5 6 7 in ♥ and ♦. The current trump suit, however, has certain peculiarities. The highest trumps ranks downwards and bear names as follows: They are called "matadors" and have special powers in play. When a black suit is trump, the fourth highest trump is the King, and so downwards to the 3 (2 being Manille). When a red suit is trump, the
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    223
    Bezique

    Bezique

    Bezique, or Bésigue, is a 19th-century French melding and trick-taking card game for two players. The game is derived from Piquet, possibly via Marriage (Sixty-six) and Briscan, with additional scoring features, notably the peculiar liaison of the Q♠ and J♦ that is also a feature of Pinochle, Binokel, and similarly named games that vary by country. Bezique was developed in France from the game Piquet, although the word Bezique, formerly Bésique or Bésigue, was known in France in the 17th century, coming probably from the Italian card game Bazzica. The word bezique once meant "correspondence" or "association". In English-speaking nations, Binocles, meaning eyeglasses with this pronunciation, became the name for Bezique with minor rule variations, ultimately evolving into Pinochle. Two-handed Pinochle and two-handed Bezique are almost identical. The former, together with Six-Pack Bezique and Rubicon Bezique, is still played in the United States of America. The game achieved its greatest popularity in Paris by 1860 and in England a few years later. Perhaps the most famous proponent of the game was Winston Churchill, an avid player and early expert of Six-Pack, or "Chinese" Bezique.
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    224

    Chicago

    The poker-related card game called Chicago is one of the most popular card games in Sweden today. Relying on the keeping of score instead of the placing of bets, it is suitable even for environments such as schools, where gambling is often prohibited. The game exists in countless versions, so here a (somewhat arbitrarily chosen) basic game will be followed by a number of possible variations. The backbone of the game is that each poker hand has its own point value, as given in this table: Chicago is played with a standard 52-card deck. Each player is dealt five cards. The objective is to reach 52 points. The players are allowed to exchange any number of their cards. If a player chooses to exchange one card only, he may choose "one up", meaning that he is dealt one card faced up, which he can either accept, or instead take the next card unseen. After the exchanges, the player with the best hand (and only one player) gets points for his hand. Then follows another round of exchanges, but no hand scoring. Now, the first player begins by playing one card. Ordinary whist rules apply, but the players keep their cards collected by themselves. The player who wins the last trick gets 5
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    Gate

    Gate

    Gate is a solitaire card game which is played using a deck of 52 playing cards. It gets its name because the cards are laid out in such a way that they form a gate. First, two columns of five cards are dealt face up. These act as the reserve or "gate posts." Then, between these columns, two rows of four cards are dealt, again face-up. These compose the "rails" or the tableau. The spaces for the foundations are allotted over the first row of cards. The object of the game, like many solitaire games, is to find the aces, place then onto the foundations, and build each of them up by suit to kings. The cards in the rails are available for play, to be placed on the foundations or onto other cards in the rail. The cards in the rails are built down by alternating color (a card with a red suit over a one with a black suit, and vice versa). Spaces in the rails are filled using cards from the gate posts. If the cards in the gate posts are used up, the top card of the wastepile, or the next card in the stock if there is no wastepile, can be used to fill spaces. The gate posts are never replenished. Generally, one card can be moved at a time. The most prevalent rule regarding moves of sequences
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    226
    Kalooki

    Kalooki

    Kalooki (Jamaican Rummy) or Kaluki, is a version of Contract Rummy which is very popular in Jamaica. A version called "Super Kalooki" is played in tournaments while a version called "Baby Kalooki" is often played with children or for purposes of teaching the game. There are a few variations of the game described in books and on the internet. This article gives the basic accepted tournament rules and some popular home variations. There are usually three to eight players; tournaments are played with four players at each table. Two or more packs of cards are used, depending on the number of players. The object of the game is to go out by laying down all of your cards. The point values of the cards left in a player's hand when someone goes out are: A "3" is a set of three or more cards of the same rank, such as 5-5-5 or K-K-K-K-K. The suits of the cards do not matter and duplicates are allowed. A "4" is a run of four or more consecutive cards in the same suit, such as spade7-spade8-spade9-spade10-spadeJ. Aces can be high or low, regardless of their point value, but they cannot be in the middle of a run, so A-2-3-4 and J-Q-K-A are valid, but Q-K-A-2-3 is not. When more than one "4" is
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    227
    Mao

    Mao

    Mao (or Mau) is a card game of the shedding family, in which the aim is to get rid of all of the cards in hand without breaking certain unspoken rules. The game is from a subset of the Stops family, and is similar in structure to the card game Uno or Crazy Eights. The game forbids its players from explaining the rules, and new players are often told only "the only rule you may be told is this one." The ultimate goal of the game is to be the first player to get rid of all the cards in their hand. Specifics are discovered through trial and error. A player who breaks a rule is penalized by being given an additional card from the deck. The person giving the penalty must state what the incorrect action was, without explaining the rule that was broken. There are many variants of Mao in existence. While beginners sometimes assume that the dealer (sometimes called the "Chairman", the "Mao" or the "Grand Master") and other experienced players are simply making up possibly inconsistent rules (as in the game Mornington Crescent), the rules of Mao are consistent within each game and can be followed correctly. Mao is most likely descended from the German game Mau Mau, or from Eleusis, which was
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    228

    Misère game

    Misere or misère (French for "destitution"; equivalent terms in other languages include bettel, contrabola, devole, null, pobre) is a bid in various card games, and the player who bids misere undertakes to win no tricks or as few as possible, usually at no trump, in the round to be played. This does not allow sufficient variety to constitute a game in its own right, but it is the basis of such trick-avoidance games as Hearts, and provides an optional contract for most games involving an auction. A misere bid usually indicates an extremely poor hand, hence the name. An open or lay down misere is a 500 bid where the player is so sure of losing every trick that they undertake to do so with their cards placed face-up on the table. Consequently, 'lay down misere' is Australian gambling slang for a predicted easy victory. The word is first recorded in this sense in the rules for the game "Boston" in the late 18th century. A misère game is a game that is played according to its conventional rules, except that it is "played to lose"; that is, the winner is the one who loses according to the normal game rules. Such games generally have rulesets that normally encourage players to win; for
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    229
    Soureh

    Soureh

    Soureh is a matching card game originated in the Middle East. The aim of the game is to transform eight given cards into four valid coops while preventing opponents from doing the same. It is a very strategic game, and involves much thinking and memory. Pariah, an Americanized variation on the game, uses a different scoring system and adds the elements of face cards. Soureh is played with two standard 52-card decks of playing cards with the jokers and face cards removed. The object of Soureh is to obtain the lowest score by creating valid coops of cards. A coop consists of two cards, one face up and one face down. The validity of a coop is determined by the following rules: At the beginning of a round, each player is dealt four face down cards side by side and four face up cards facing the center of the playing table, one in front of each face down card. The four parallel pairs of face up and face down cards form the player's four coops. A player may look at his own face down cards whenever he chooses, while his opponents may not look at them. The remainder of the deck is placed face down in the center of the playing table as the stock pile. On each turn, a player draws a card from
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    230
    Tarneeb

    Tarneeb

    Tarneeb (Arabic: طرنيب‎, literally meaning trump, translit: ṭarnīb, also spelled Tarnibe and Tarnib and called hakam Arabic: حكم‎ in the Persian gulf region, the Arabic word for "trump"), is a popular plain trick-taking card game played in various middle eastern countries, most notably in the countries of the Fertile Crescent and Tanzania. The game may be considered a variation of Whist. Tarneeb was probably inspired by many other Arabic card games, though many different nations throughout the Middle East claim that Tarneeb was created in their respective countries. Historically Tarneeb can be traced back to Bla'd Al Sham, more specifically Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine, however the game seems to have truly flourished only from the early 18th century on. The aim of tarneeb is to win a set of continuous hands. There are four players in partnerships of two teams. A standard 52 card deck is used, each suit ranking in the usual way from Ace (high) down to two (low). The game is played in a counterclockwise fashion. The teams stay together for all the games of a set. In tarneeb tournament, at the end of a set, the losing team is replaced for the next set. The two members of each
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    Agnes

    Agnes

    Agnes is a solitaire card game which is a variant of the very popular game Klondike. It is similar to the latter except on how the stock is dealt. Dealing the first 28 cards onto the tableau is a lot like in Klondike. Then a card is placed in the first of the four foundations. This card will be the first card of that foundation and all other cards with the same rank should be placed at the other three foundations. Seven cards are then dealt in a row either above or below the tableau. This will act as the reserve. The cards in the reserve are available for play. Playing the game is a lot like Klondike except that any gaps are filled in by a card a rank lower than the first card of the foundation. For instance, if the first card of each foundation is a 10, gaps are only filled by 9s. Foundations are built up by suit, while the columns on the tableau are built down in alternating colors, wrapping from Ace to King if necessary. When play is no longer possible on the tableau, any card on the reserve can be used to continue the game. Gaps in the reserve are not filled until a new set is dealt. If the game cannot continue even from the reserve, a new set of seven cards is dealt from the
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    Black Lady

    Black Lady

    Black Lady is an extremely combative variant of the card game Whist that is popular in the United Kingdom and is similar to the North American game Hearts. It is commonly played among large groups of players, typically 8 to 10, using two decks of cards, or it can be played by as few as three players using a single deck. The penalty cards are : There are therefore 205 points to be taken per deck, per hand. One variant makes the 10♠ worth 15 points, so the total is exactly 200. The cards are dealt out evenly among all the players, using standard Whist conventions for rotating dealership and lead. This requires that the number of cards in play is divisible by the number of players, so before any hands are dealt, the pack(s) is inspected and the appropriate number of innocuous cards of trivial denomination (low Diamonds/Clubs) are extracted and discarded. When multiple packs are in use, there are multiple cards of each face. When the winning card face in a trick is played multiple times to that trick, the first such card played is the one which takes the trick. After the deal and before the first lead, each player must select three of his dealt cards and pass them covertly to his
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    Buraco

    Buraco

    Buraco is a Rummy-type card game for four players in fixed partnerships in which the aim is to lay down combinations in groups of cards of equal rank and suit sequences, there being a bonus for combinations of seven cards or more. Buraco is a variation of Canasta, originated in Uruguay and Argentina in the mid-1940s, with apparent characteristics of simplicity and implications that are often unforeseeable and absolutely involving. Its name derives from the Portuguese word "buraco" which means “hole”, applied to the minus score of any of the two partnerships. The game is also popular in the Arab world, specifically in the Persian Gulf; where it is known as 'Baraziliya' (Brazilian). Buraco is played with two 52-card decks of standard playing cards for a total of 104 cards. Team members sit opposite each other, so that no team member is sitting next to their own teammate. Before beginning the game, the players cut the deck to establish who deals first. The player from the team who has the lowest card must deal to the player of the other team who has cut the highest card. In the case of two identical cards being chosen, two new cards must be cut. The dealer shuffles and the player to
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    Carioca

    Carioca

    Carioca is a Latinoamerican card game similar to Rummy style card games with many variations. The variation described below is Perla's Cariocas. See Carioca for a description in Spanish of a related variation. The objective of the game is to finish with the smallest number of points, like Golf. The following may be played after round 7 above:
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    Cinch

    Cinch

    Cinch, also known as Double Pedro or High Five, is an American trick-taking card game derived from Pitch via Pedro. Developed in Denver, Colorado in the 1880s, it was soon regarded as the most important member of the All Fours family but went out of fashion with the rise of Auction Bridge. The game is primarily played by 4 players in fixed partnerships, but can also be played by 2–6 individual players. The game uses a regular pack of 52 cards. As in Pedro, all points are awarded to the winners of the tricks containing certain cards rather than to the players who originally held them. This includes the Game point, which goes to the winner of the trump Ten. Five points each go the winner of the Right Pedro (Five of trumps) and Left Pedro (Off-Five), respectively. The game is played for, for example, 42 or 51 points, of which up to 14 can be won in a single deal. The name Cinch comes from a Mexican word that is applied to the practice of securing the tricks that contain a Left or Right Pedro, but it was once also common to refer to the Left Pedro as the Cinch. The following rules are based on Foster's Complete Hoyle of 1897 and are very similar to the modern Bicycle rules. The game is
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    Doppelkopf

    Doppelkopf

    Doppelkopf (German, lit. double-head), also abbreviated to "Doko," is a trick-taking card game for four players. The origins of this game are not well known; it is assumed that it originated from the game Schafkopf. In Germany, Doppelkopf is nearly as popular as Skat, especially in Northern Germany and the Rhein-Main Region. Schafkopf however is still the preferred trick-taking variant in Bavaria. Unlike in Skat, there are numerous variants. Although the Deutscher Doppelkopf-Verband developed standard rules for tournaments, informal games often play many variants and players adopt their own house rules. Before playing with a new group of players, it is therefore advisable to agree on a specific set of rules before their first game. Note: In the following section, the most common rules are described. Doppelkopf is a team game where each team normally consists of two players. The most distinguishing feature of the game is that the actual pairing is not known from the start, which is what makes the game interesting for most players. The deck of cards consists of either 48 or 40 cards: Each group of 8 cards consists of 2 cards from each suit: Diamonds, Hearts, Spades and Clubs. Each
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    Durak

    Durak is a card game that is popular throughout most of the post-Soviet states. The object of the game is to get rid of all one's cards. At the end of the game, the last player with cards in their hand is referred to as the fool (durak). The game is typically played with a deck of 36 cards (numerical cards 2 through 5 are removed from a standard 52 card deck prior to play) and is played with two to six people. The deck is shuffled, and each player receives six cards. The top card on the remaining deck is made visible and placed at the bottom of the deck at a 90 degree angle (so that its denomination and suit are visible). This determines the trump suit, however the revealed card is actually a part of the deck, the last card to be drawn. The player with the lowest trump is the first attacker. A deck of 36 cards limits the number of players to six, although some variants allow more than one deck to be used. A six-player game with one deck is not optimal, however, because it gives a considerable advantage to the player who attacks first, and a considerable disadvantage to the player who defends first. If multiple games have been played, often the loser of the previous game shuffles
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    Egyptian Ratscrew

    Egyptian Ratscrew

    Egyptian Ratscrew (commonly known by Egyptian Rat's Crew, Egyptian Rattlesnake, Egyptian War, Egyptian Rat War, ERS, Egyptian Rat Slap, Egyptian Ratskee, Slaps, Acid, Egyptian Canasta, Egyptian Costanza, and Egyptian Rascal, Purple Monkey Dishwasher, as well as many other names) is a card game of the matching family of games, reminiscent of Slapjack and Beggar-My-Neighbour, but more complex. The game appears to be a combination of Beggar-My-Neighbour, mentioned by Charles Dickens in his Great Expectations (published originally as a weekly serial from 1860 to 1861 in Britain), and the concept of slapping for cards, possibly derived and expanded from the gameplay of Slapjack. The game is played with a standard 52-card deck, or with multiple standard decks shuffled together for large numbers of players. As a variation, one or more Jokers may be added. Players are dealt an equal number of cards from the deck, using as many as possible. If two people are playing, each player will receive 26 cards from a 52-card deck; if there is a large number of players, multiple decks may be used. (As many players can play as can reach at arm's length into the middle of a general circle that they will
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    Escova

    Escova

    Escova [is'kovɐ], too known as escopa or scopa is an Italian card game. Very popular in the Brazilian Province Rio Grande do Sul. Escova is played with one spanish deck. But, it can too be played with the Anglo-American one. If you decide to play with the Spanish one, you should remove the 8 and the 9. If you decide to play with the Anglo-American one, you should remove the 8, the 9 and the 10. Remember that escova don't have any coringas (jokers). Each player receives 3 cards. And other 4 cards go to the middle of the table, where all players can catch up. The player at the right of the one that shuffled the cards start the game. The game is played until someone reach 31 points. These points are done by completing some objects. When the deck cards finish, each player count their own points. The "sub-object" of escova is to do escovas and montinhos. To do an escova, you must have a card that match with all of the middle of the table to make 15. Sample: the cards on the table are 3♠ 2♣ 1♥ and 4♦ and you have a 5♠, if you sum 5+3+2+1+4, you will have 15. To do an montinho, you must have a card that match with any card on the middle of the table to do 15. The diamond (♦)is the
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    Flinch

    Flinch is a card game, played with a custom deck, invented in 1901 by A.J. Patterson. This deck has 150 cards, consisting of ten sets numbered from one to fifteen. Some variations use a 144-card deck. It is based on "Spite and Malice".
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    King Albert

    King Albert

    King Albert is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. It is said to be named after King Albert of Belgium the first. It is the best known of the three games that are each called Idiot's Delight because of the low chance of winning the game (the other two are Aces Up and Perpetual Motion). The aim of the game, like many solitaire games, is to release the aces to the foundations and build each of them up by suit to Kings. First, the cards are dealt into nine columns in such a way that the first column contains nine cards, the second having eight cards, the third seven, and so on until the ninth column has a single card. The seven left over cards form the reserve, sometimes known as "the Belgian Reserve." Building on the tableau is down by alternating colors and only one card can be moved at a time. Only the top card of each column and all cards in the reserve are available for play. Furthermore, an empty column can be filled with any available card. Once an ace is released, it can be built upon immediately. The game is won when all cards end up in the foundations. Achieving this is difficult as only one in ten games can be won, hence the alternate name of Idiot's
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    Marjapussi

    • Deck type: Anglo-American
    • Play direction: Clockwise
    Marjapussi (Bag of Berries) is a traditional Finnish partnerships trick taking game. The speciality of Marjapussi is that the trump suit is determined in the middle of the play by declaring a marriage (a king and a queen of a same suit). To win a game, a partnership must get exactly twelve points. A very similar game evidently related to Sixty-six, but with a curious resonance of All-Fours is played in Sweden under the name Bondtolva, Farmer's Dozen. Later, Marjapussi evolved into Huutopussi (Auction Bag), which involves bidding. The exact winning condition was dropped, but the trump determining process remained. Actually, in Huutopussi the trump suit may even change in the middle of the play if players declare further marriages. Marjapussi is a trick taking game for four players in fixed partnerships. The partners sit opposite to each other. Marjapussi is played with a deck of 36 cards, remove the cards 2-5 from the standard deck. The order of cards is Ace (highest), ten, king, queen, jack, nine, eight, seven, six (lowest). That is, the order is otherwise normal except that a ten beats a king, a queen and a jack. All cards are dealt so that everyone gets 9 cards. A hand always
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    Osmosis

    Osmosis

    Osmosis (also known as Treasure Trove) is a solitaire game played with a deck of 52 playing cards where the object, like many solitaire games, is to put the cards into foundations, although not in numerical order. Game play consists of four, vertically arranged reserve piles of four cards each (one face-up card on top of three face-down cards). A seventeenth card is put in the first (top) of four foundations, which are also arranged vertically to the right of the reserve piles. Cards with the same suit as this card must be moved to this foundation. The other three foundations are also built by suit, but must begin with cards of the same rank as the first card of the top foundation (the 17th card previously mentioned). Foundation piles are fanned from left to right. All undealt cards make up the stock. To begin, the top cards in each reserve pile are the only cards in play and must be moved to the foundations if possible. A card can be moved to a foundation if a card of the same value has already been placed in the foundation above it. Once all possible cards have been placed in the foundations, the next face-down cards remaining in the reserve piles are turned face-up. When placing
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    Pedro

    Pedro

    Pedro (pronounced "peedro") is an American trick-taking card game of the All Fours family based on Auction Pitch. Its most popular variant is known as Cinch, Double Pedro or High Five. Developed in Denver, Colorado in the 1880s, it was soon regarded as the most important member of the All Fours family. Although it went out of fashion with the rise of Auction Bridge, it is still widely played at the western coast of the United States and in its southern states, being the dominant game in some locations in Louisiana. Forms of the game have been reported from Nicaragua, the Azores, Italy and Finland. The game is primarily played by 4 players in fixed partnerships, but can also be played by 2–6 individual players. Pedro uses a regular pack of 52 cards, but some variants add a Joker. The game is considerably simplified when compared to Pitch, in that all points are awarded to the winners of the tricks containing certain specific cards. This includes the Game point, which goes to the winner of the trump Ten. The winner of the Pedro (Five of trumps) receives 5 points. In Cinch or Double Pedro the same holds for the Left Pedro (Off-Five), which counts as a trump. The practice of making
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    Pontoon

    Pontoon

    Pontoon is an unlicensed variant of the American game Spanish 21 that is played in Australian, Malaysian and Singaporean casinos, in Treasury Casino, Brisbane, it is known as Treasury 21. In Jupiters Casino, Gold Coast, it is known as Jupiters 21, in The Reef Casino, Cairns, it is known as Paradise Pontoon, and in Tasmania, it is known as Federal Pontoon. It should not be confused with the British blackjack variant, which is also called Pontoon, found in the UK and Commonwealth, and played with regular 52-card decks. British pontoon uses special terms ("twist" - for hit, "stick" - stand and "buy" - double the bet (not to be confused with doubling down) and a special set of rules. The special rules for Buy-ing in Pontoon include allowing the player to buy on any hand of 2 - 4 cards, allowing the player to twist after he buys. Pontoon has proven to be far more popular in Australia than Spanish 21 has been in the United States. Pontoon is the British or domestic version of Blackjack, which in turn is the American version of Vingt-et-un (French for Twenty-one), a French gambling game popular at the court of Louis XV and later, much favored by Napoleon, especially at St. Helena. In the
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    Ponytail Canasta

    Ponytail Canasta

    Ponytail Canasta is a variation of the card game Canasta. The rules for Canasta were standardized in North America around the 1950s, it was this version of the game that gained worldwide popularity. In many countries, Classic Canasta is still played in more or less its original form, sometimes alongside a number of variations. In North America, however, some players have continued to develop the game. There are several variations of Ponytail Canasta, but no official version has ever been sanctioned. This is not Hand and Foot Canasta (that's another variation) but there are similarities. Canasta is generally agreed to be best for four players playing in partnerships. However, there are playable versions for two, three, or four partnerships. These additional player partnerships call for additional decks of cards Canasta is normally played with standard 52 card decks plus two jokers. The cards A, K, Q, J, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4 are called natural cards. All of the deuces (twos) and jokers are wild cards. With some restrictions, wild cards can be used during the game as substitutes for a natural card of any rank. The threes have special functions and values: Black threes are used as
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    Pyramid

    Pyramid

    Pyramid is a solitaire game where the object is to get all the cards from the pyramid to the foundation. The object of the game is to remove pairs of cards that add up to the total of the highest card in the deck from an arrangement of cards - a pyramid of 28 cards. When using the common French deck, Jacks value at 11, Queens 12, and Kings 13. So the highest value is 13. In the numbered Spanish deck the highest numbers are also the Kings at 12, so the pairs must add up to 12. To set up the pyramid, deal one card face up at the top of the playing area, then two cards beneath and partially covering it, then three beneath them, and so on till you have dealt out a row of seven cards for a total of 28 cards dealt. Refer to image. The remaining cards are placed to the side face down. This is the Stock. To play, pairs of exposed cards can be removed to the Foundation if their values total 13 (12 if using the Spanish deck). Thus, kings can be removed immediately to the Foundation. Cards must not be covered. Thus when an Ace rests on a Queen, that Queen can not be removed. You may draw cards from the Stock one at a time and match it with any exposed card. if no match is made the drawn Stock
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    Three thirteen

    Three thirteen

    Three thirteen is a variation of the card game Rummy. It is an eleven-round game played with two or more players. It requires two decks of cards with the jokers removed. Like other Rummy games, once the hands are dealt, the remainder of the cards are placed face down on the table. The top card from the deck is flipped face up and put beside the deck to start the discard pile. The object of Three thirteen is to meld all the cards in your hand into sets. A set is defined by two parameters. The first type of set consists of three or more cards of the same rank, such as 4-4-4. The second type of set consists of a sequence of three or more cards of the same suit, such as 4-5-6 of Hearts. Sets can contain more than three cards, however, you cannot include the same card in multiple sets. Once a player melds all of his cards into sets, he "goes out". He must still discard when "going out" and the remaining players are given one more draw to better their hands. The winner of a game of "Three thirteen" is the player who, at the end of the final round, has accumulated the fewest points. The first dealer, chosen at random, deals three cards to each player. In each successive round, the deal
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    Truco

    Truco

    Truco is a variant of Truc and a popular trick-taking card game originary from Valencia and Balearic Islands (Spain) and played in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Italy (in Piemonte, in Lomellina, and a particular variant in the towns Porto San Giorgio, Sirolo, Numana, Porto Recanati, Potenza Picena (Marche) and Paulilatino (Sardegna) ), Uruguay, southern Chile and Venezuela. It is played using a Spanish deck, by two, four or six players, divided into two teams. Except for the variant played in Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina, in the Brazilian states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo and many others, Truco is played with a 32-card French deck - See below. Each player is dealt three cards from a subset of the deck consisting of the numbers 1 to 7 and figures sota in Spanish or valete in Portuguese (jack, worth 10), caballo in Spanish or dama in Portuguese (equivalent to a queen, worth 11) and rey in Spanish or rei in Portuguese (king, worth 12). The most common form of the game is the four-player version, in which there are two teams of two players, who sit opposite each other. For six players, there are two teams of three players, with every second player on the same team. The game is
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    250
    Xactika

    Xactika

    Xactika is a proprietary card game for two to ten players created by Set Enterprises in 2002. The trick-taking game is played with a dedicated deck of 81 cards, in which the object is to obtain the highest number of points after eight rounds of play. Points are awarded by taking the exact number of tricks that one bids before each round. The card deck consists of cards with face values ranging from 4 to 12, each with different combinations of four different suits -- balls, cubes, cones and stars. A card can have anywhere from one to three of each of the suits, the sum of all of the shapes equaling the face value of the card. For example, a card with a face value of 9 could have 1 ball, 3 cubes, 3 cones, and 2 stars, as 1+3+3+2=9. Alternatively, a card with a face value of 9 could also have 2 balls, 2 cubes, 2 cones, and 3 stars (or any other combination of suits that sums 9). The deck is not composed of an even distribution of face-values. For example, there is only one card in the deck with face-value of four, and likewise for face-value of 12. The most common face-value in the deck is eight (19 of the 81 cards have a face-value of eight). The following table outlines how many
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