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Best Places Visited Westward by Lewis & Clark of All Time

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    1
    Three Forks

    Three Forks

    Three Forks is a city in Gallatin County, Montana, United States and is located within the watershed valley system of both the Missouri and Mississippi rivers drainage basins — and is historically considered the birthplace or start of the Missouri River. The population was 1,728 at the 2000 census. The city of Three Forks is named so because it lies geographically near the point, in nearby Missouri Headwaters State Park, where the Jefferson, Madison, and Gallatin Rivers converge to form the Missouri River — at once barely, and still traditionally called the longest River in North America. Three Forks is part of the 'Bozeman Micropolitan Statistical Area'. The three rivers, west to east, were named by Meriwether Lewis in late July 1805 for President Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State James Madison, and Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin which was in the times the genesis of a mild controversy and eventually spawned a modern day geographical controversy — in both cases regarding length comparisons between the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. Today the two confluences are incorporated inside Missouri Headwaters State Park, which is also a U.S. National Historic Landmark. The Drew
    7.75
    8 votes
    2
    Cincinnati

    Cincinnati

    Cincinnati (pronounced /sɪnsɨˈnæti/) is a city in and the county seat of Hamilton County, Ohio, United States. Settled in 1788, the city is located on the north bank of the Ohio River at the Ohio-Kentucky border, near Indiana. The population within city limits was 296,943 according to the 2010 census, making it Ohio's third-largest city. According to the 2011 Census Bureau estimate, the Cincinnati metropolitan area had a population of 2,138,038, the 27th most populous Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States and largest in Ohio. Residents of Cincinnati are called Cincinnatians. In the early 19th century, Cincinnati was the first American boomtown in the heart of the country to rival the larger coastal cities in size and wealth. As the first major inland city in the country, it is sometimes thought of as the first purely American city. It developed initially without as much recent European immigration or influence as took place in eastern cities. However, by the end of the 19th century, with the shift from steamboats to railroads, Cincinnati's growth had slowed considerably and the city became surpassed in population and prominence by another inland city,
    8.20
    5 votes
    3
    Kimball

    Kimball

    Kimball is a town in Brule County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 703 at the 2010 census. Kimball was first known as Stake 48 on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad line going west out of Mitchell, South Dakota. In 1880, the first homestead claims were made in the vicinity of Stake 48. Kimball was organized as a village in the spring of 1883. It was named for J.W. Kimball, a surveyor. Kimball is located at 43°44′50″N 98°57′27″W / 43.74722°N 98.9575°W / 43.74722; -98.9575 (43.747136, -98.957491). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.09 square miles (8 km²), all of it land. Kimball has been assigned the ZIP code 57355 and the FIPS place code 33980. As of the census of 2010, there were 703 people, 310 households, and 189 families residing in the city. The population density was 227.7 people per square mile (87.9/km²). There were 369 housing units at an average density of 119.5 per square mile (46.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.0% White, 0.3% African American, 3.3% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the
    8.20
    5 votes
    4
    Steubenville

    Steubenville

    Steubenville is a city located along the Ohio River in Jefferson County, Ohio on the Ohio-West Virginia border in the United States. It is the political county seat of Jefferson County. It is also a principal city of the Weirton–Steubenville, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 18,659. Steubenville is called the City of Murals because more than 25 murals can be found in the downtown area and Ohio's Cookie Capital. It is the home of Franciscan University of Steubenville, Eastern Gateway Community College (formerly Jefferson Community College), and Old Fort Steuben. It is the birthplace of singer and actor Dean Martin, actress Traci Lords, television commentator and oddsmaker Jimmy "The Greek" Snyder, Museum Director and Curator Mason Paul and Hall of Fame baseball pitcher Rollie Fingers. Steubenville was platted as a town in 1797, immediately after the creation of Jefferson County. It was built on the site of Fort Steuben which was erected in 1786–1787 and named in honor of Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben. Steubenville received a city charter in 1851. The city was also a stop along the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis
    8.20
    5 votes
    5
    Flandreau

    Flandreau

    Flandreau /ˈflændruː/ FLAN-droo is a city in Moody County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 2,341 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Moody County. It was named in honor of Charles Eugene Flandrau, a judge in the territory and state of Minnesota, who is credited with saving the community of New Ulm, Minnesota from destruction during conflict with the Sioux in 1862. Flandreau is located at 44°2′52″N 96°35′47″W / 44.04778°N 96.59639°W / 44.04778; -96.59639 (44.047855, -96.596417), along the Big Sioux River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.93 square miles (4.99 km²), of which, 1.86 square miles (4.81 km²) of it is land and 0.07 square miles (0.17 km²) is water. Flandreau has been assigned the ZIP code 57028 and the FIPS place code 21540. As of the census of 2010, there were 2,341 people, 973 households, and 583 families residing in the town. The population density was 1259.3 people per square mile (486.2/km²). There were 1,091 housing units at an average density of 586.9 per square mile (226.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 64.2% White, 0.5% African American, 27.7% Native American, 2.3% Asian, 1.5% from
    6.14
    7 votes
    6
    Lewiston

    Lewiston

    Lewiston is a city in and also the county seat of Nez Perce County in the state of Idaho. It is the second-largest city in the northern Idaho region, behind Coeur d'Alene and ninth-largest in the state. Lewiston is the principal city of the Lewiston, ID - Clarkston, WA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Nez Perce County and Asotin County, Washington. As of the 2010 census, the population of Lewiston was 31,894. Lewiston is located at the confluence of the Snake River and Clearwater River, thirty miles (48 km) northwest of the Lower Granite Dam. Because of dams (and their locks) on the Snake and Columbia River, Lewiston is reachable by some ocean-going vessels. The Port of Lewiston (Idaho's only seaport) has the distinction of being the farthest inland port east of the West Coast of the United States. The Lewiston-Nez Perce County Airport serves the city by air. Lewiston was founded in 1861 in the wake of a gold rush which began the previous year near Pierce, northeast of Lewiston. In 1863 Lewiston became the capital of the newly created Idaho Territory. Lewiston's stint as seat of the new territory's government was short-lived as a resolution, to have the capital
    7.80
    5 votes
    7
    Little Sioux

    Little Sioux

    Little Sioux is a city in Harrison County, Iowa, United States. The population was 217 at the 2000 census. The city is most known for Little Sioux Scout Ranch of the Boy Scouts of America. Little Sioux is located at 41°48′33″N 96°1′21″W / 41.80917°N 96.0225°W / 41.80917; -96.0225 (41.809169, -96.022556). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.9 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 217 people, 96 households, and 62 families residing in the city. The population density was 620.2 people per square mile (239.4/km²). There were 111 housing units at an average density of 317.2 per square mile (122.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 99.54% White, 0.46% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.46% of the population. There were 96 households out of which 22.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.4% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was
    7.80
    5 votes
    8
    Louisville

    Louisville

    Louisville (/ˈluːiːvɪl/, local /ˈluːəvəl/ or /ˈlʌvəl/) is a major city and the largest city in the U.S. state of Kentucky and the county seat of Jefferson County. Since 2003, the city's borders have been coterminous with those of the county because of a city-county merger. The city's total consolidated population at the 2010 census was 741,096 (Louisville's balance total, 602,011, excludes semi-autonomous towns and is the population listed in most sources and national rankings). As of 2010, the Louisville metropolitan area (MSA) had a population of 1,307,647 ranking 42nd nationally. The metro area includes Louisville-Jefferson County and 12 surrounding counties, eight in Kentucky and four in Southern Indiana (see Geography below). The Louisville Combined Statistical Area, having a population of 1,451,564, includes the MSA, Hardin County and Larue County in Kentucky, and Scott County, Indiana. An important internal shipping port in the 19th century, Louisville today is best known as the location of the Kentucky Derby, the first of three annual thoroughbred horse races making up the Triple Crown. Louisville is southeasterly situated along the border between Kentucky and Indiana, the
    6.33
    6 votes
    9
    Rufus

    Rufus

    Rufus is a city in Sherman County, Oregon, United States. The population was 268 at the 2000 census. The city was named for an early settler, Rufus Carrol Wallis. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.1 km), of which 1.2 square miles (3.1 km) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) is water. The total area is 1.65% water. As of the census of 2000, there were 268 people, 133 households, and 82 families residing in the city. The population density was 224.3 people per square mile (86.2/km²). There were 162 housing units at an average density of 135.6 per square mile (52.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.04% White, 3.36% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 3.73% from other races, and 1.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.72% of the population. There were 133 households out of which 15.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 4.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.3% were non-families. 35.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average
    8.50
    4 votes
    10
    Independence

    Independence

    Independence is the fourth largest city in the U.S. state of Missouri. Most of Independence lies within Jackson, of which it is the county seat. However a small portion lies in Clay County. It is a satellite city of Kansas City, Missouri and is part of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. In 2010, The city had a total population of 116,830 and is the county seat of Jackson County, and is known as the "Queen City of the Trails" because it was a point of departure of the California, Oregon and Santa Fe Trails. Independence is also well known as the hometown of US President Harry S Truman. His Presidential Library and home are in the city, as are the graves of Truman and First Lady Bess Truman. The city also played a pivotal role in the early history of the Latter Day Saint movement, and is home to the international headquarters of several Latter Day Saint denominations, most notably the Community of Christ (formerly the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints), whose Temple is located there. Other Latter Day Saint denominations headquartered in the city include the Church of Christ (Temple Lot) and the Church of Jesus Christ (Cutlerite), among others. A number of
    6.17
    6 votes
    11
    Culbertson

    Culbertson

    Culbertson is a town in Roosevelt County, Montana, United States. The population was 714 at the 2010 census. Culbertson was created in June 1887 following the arrival of the Great Northern Railway, then known as the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway. The town was named after Major Alexander Culbertson, former head of the American Fur Company's Fort Union 23 miles (37 km) to the east. The settlement of Culbertson followed hard on the heels of the 1886-87 watershed years for the early cattle industry. As a result, the first settlers in the area raised horses for the US Cavalry’s various Montana and Dakota posts. As cattle prices slowly rebounded, the range was once again stocked with cattle, though the second wave of cattlemen utilized hardy English breeds instead of the Texas longhorns of the earlier outfits. With the passage of new homestead laws in 1909 enabling homesteaders to take out larger acreages, the area saw an influx of dryland farmers. With its railroad connection, Culbertson became the center of the area’s agricultural trade. When the agricultural boom went bust after World War II and never resumed its former glory, Culbertson saw a gradual decline in businesses
    8.25
    4 votes
    12
    Fort Mandan

    Fort Mandan

    Fort Mandan was the name of the encampment at which the Lewis and Clark Expedition wintered in 1804-1805. The encampment was located on the Missouri River approximately twelve miles from Washburn, North Dakota, though the precise location is not known for certain and may be under the nearby river. The fort was built of cottonwood lumber cut from the riverbanks. It was triangular in shape, with high walls on all sides and a gate facing the riverbank. The Corps of Discovery started the fort on November 2, 1804, and remained in the area until April 7, 1805. They built the fort slightly down river from the nearby Mandan tribe's village. The Mandan were a tribe that Lewis was specifically told to trade with by then President Thomas Jefferson. During the Corps' stay at the Fort, the Sioux threatened to attack the Mandan village along with the explorers. Although several small parties of Sioux did attack, no major conflict arose. Also, the winter was very cold with temperatures sometimes dipping to minus 45 degrees Fahrenheit and quite a few men of the expedition were frostbitten. When the Corps passed back through the area in August 1806 on their return journey home, the fort had burnt
    7.00
    5 votes
    13
    Wellsburg

    Wellsburg

    Wellsburg is a city in and the county seat of Brooke County, West Virginia, United States. It is part of the Weirton–Steubenville, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. The 2010 census recorded a population of 2,805. The diverse economy includes one paper mill, a glass gift outlet, several telemarketing facilities, and a factory that does metal fabrication plus plastics molding. The town was laid out in 1790, and its post office was opened on September 1, 1870. In 1772, the Cox brothers, Friend, Israel, and Jonathan, made tomahawk rights claims totaling 1,200 acres (4.9 km) in the area now including Wellsburg. In March 1788, Charles Prather purchased 481 acres (1.95 km) from the Cox heirs for $3,000. In 1791, Prather petitioned Ohio County to incorporate the town of Charlestown, Virginia, naming it after himself. The original name continued until 1816, when it was changed to Wellsburg, to avoid confusion with Charles Town, Jefferson County. The new name was in honor of Charles Wells (1745-1815), Charles Prather’s son-in-law, builder of the first large flour warehouse in the east. Late in 1890, nearby Midway and Lazearville were annexed to Wellsburg. Wellsburg was the home of Patrick
    7.00
    5 votes
    14
    8.00
    4 votes
    15
    Bismarck

    Bismarck

    Bismarck is the capital of the U.S. state of North Dakota and the county seat of Burleigh County. It is the second most populous city in North Dakota after Fargo. The city's population was 61,272 at the 2010 census, while its metropolitan population was 108,779. Bismarck was founded in 1872 and has been North Dakota's capital since it gained statehood in 1889. Bismarck is situated on the east bank of the Missouri River, directly across the river from Mandan. The two cities make up the core of the Bismarck-Mandan Metropolitan Statistical Area. The North Dakota State Capitol, the tallest building in the state, towers over the central part of Bismarck. The state government employs more than 4,000 in the city. As a hub of retail and health care, Bismarck is the economic center of a large portion of south-central North Dakota and north-central South Dakota. Before the arrival of white settlers, present-day central North Dakota was inhabited by the Mandan Native American tribe. The Hidatsa name of Bismarck is mirahacii arumaaguash ("Place of the tall willows"); the Arikara name is ituhtaáwe [itUhtaáwe]. In 1872 the future capital city was founded at what was then called Missouri
    8.00
    4 votes
    16
    Pendleton

    Pendleton

    Pendleton ( /ˈpɛnəltən/) is a city in Umatilla County, Oregon, United States. Pendleton was named in 1868 by the county commissioners for George H. Pendleton, Democratic candidate for Vice-President in the 1864 presidential campaign. The population was 16,612 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Umatilla County. Pendleton is the smaller of the two principal cities of the Pendleton-Hermiston Micropolitan Statistical Area, a micropolitan area that covers Morrow and Umatilla counties and had a combined population of 87,062 at the 2010 census. A commercial center in the locality of Pendleton began as early as 1851, when Dr. William C. McKay established a trading post at the mouth of McKay Creek. A Post Office with the name of Marshall (named for the owner of another local store, and sometime gambler) was established April 21, 1865, and later renamed Pendleton. The city was incorporated by the Oregon Legislative Assembly on October 25, 1880. By 1900, Pendleton had a population of 4,406 and was the fourth-largest city in Oregon. Like many cities in Eastern Oregon, it had a flourishing Chinatown. The sector is supposed to have been underlain by a network of tunnels which are now a
    8.00
    4 votes
    17
    Kennewick

    Kennewick

    Kennewick is a city in Benton County in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Washington, near the Hanford nuclear site. It is the most populous of the three cities collectively referred to as the Tri-Cities (the others being Pasco and Richland). Kennewick is located along the southwest bank of the Columbia River, opposite Pasco and just south of the confluence of the Columbia and Yakima rivers. The population was 73,917 at the 2010 census. April 1, 2012 estimates from the Washington State Office of Financial Management put the city's population at 75,160. The nearest commercial airport is the Tri-Cities Airport in Pasco, a regional commercial and private airport. Forbes magazine named Kennewick the #2 area in the United States for job growth, while nearby Yakima was named #1. The article cites the number of scientists employed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and area farmland for this outlook. Kennewick Man is the name for the remains of a prehistoric man found on a bank of the Columbia River in 1996. The remains are notable for their age (some 9,300 years), and also for having Caucasoid features, despite being indigenous. Ownership of the bones has been a matter
    9.33
    3 votes
    18
    Pierre

    Pierre

    Pierre ( /ˈpɪər/ PEER) is the capital of the U.S. state of South Dakota and the county seat of Hughes County. The population was 13,646 at the 2010 census, making it the second least populous state capital after Montpelier, Vermont. Founded in 1880 on the Missouri River opposite Fort Pierre, Pierre has been the capital since South Dakota gained statehood on November 11, 1889, having been chosen for its location in the geographic center of the state. Fort Pierre itself was named after Pierre Chouteau, Jr., an American fur trader of French origin. Pierre is the principal city of the Pierre Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Hughes and Stanley counties. Pierre is located at 44°22′5″N 100°20′11″W / 44.36806°N 100.33639°W / 44.36806; -100.33639 (44.367966, −100.336378). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.07 square miles (33.85 km²), of which, 13.06 square miles (33.82 km²) of it is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km²) is water. Pierre lies on rough river bluffs overlooking the Missouri River. It is a few miles away from Lake Oahe, one of the largest man made lakes in the world and a very popular fishing destination. Pierre
    9.33
    3 votes
    20
    Williston

    Williston

    Williston is the county seat of Williams County, North Dakota, in the United States. With a population of 14,716 at the 2010 census, The U.S. Census Bureau estimated 2011 population is 16,006, making it the ninth largest city in North Dakota. Founded in 1887, Williston was named for Daniel Willis James, a board member of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, by his friend, railroad owner, James J. Hill. Williston's newspapers both in print and online are the daily, Williston Herald and the weekly, The Williston Trader . Sloulin Field International Airport is a public airport two miles north of the business district. Williston is the home of Williston State College and the Miss North Dakota Scholarship Pageant. Williston is located at 48°9′23″N 103°37′41″W / 48.15639°N 103.62806°W / 48.15639; -103.62806 (48.156477, -103.628064). It is located at the crossroads of U.S. Highways 2 and 85. It is near the confluence of the Yellowstone River and the Missouri River, at the upper end of the Lake Sakakawea reservoir. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.56 square miles (19.59 km²), of which, 7.5 square miles (19.44 km²) of it is land and 0.06
    6.80
    5 votes
    21
    Cape Girardeau

    Cape Girardeau

    Cape Girardeau ( /ˈkeɪp dʒɨˈrɑrdoʊ/, French: Cap-Girardeau [kap ʒiʁaʁdo] ( listen); colloquially referred to as "Cape") is a city located in Cape Girardeau and Scott counties in Southeast Missouri in the United States. It is located approximately 115 miles (185 km) southeast of St. Louis and 175 miles (282 km) north of Memphis. As of the 2010 census, the city's population was 37,941. A college town, it is the home of Southeast Missouri State University. It is the largest city in southeast Missouri, and the county seat is Jackson. The Cape Girardeau-Jackson, MO-IL Metropolitan Statistical Area encompasses Alexander County, Illinois, Bollinger County, Missouri and Cape Girardeau County, Missouri. The city is known to some as "The City of Roses" because of a 9-mile (14 km) stretch of highway that was once lined with dozens of rose bushes. Although there used to be many prominent rose gardens around the community, few of these gardens exist today. The city is also known as Cape Girardeau: Where the River Turns a Thousand Tales, due to the history of the town and the Mississippi River as well as the annual Storytelling Festival. The city is named after Jean Baptiste de Girardot, who
    7.75
    4 votes
    22
    Fort Buford

    Fort Buford

    Fort Buford was a United States Army base at the confluence of the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers in North Dakota, and the site of Sitting Bull's surrender in 1881. Its Arikara name was waahukaahaánuʾ . Company C, 2nd Battalion, 13th Infantry, 70 enlisted men commanded by Capt. (Brevet Lt. Col.) William G. Rankin, first established a camp on the site on June 15, 1866, with orders to build a post; the only tools they had to do it with were the company axes. The fort was named after John Buford, a Union Army cavalry general during the American Civil War. On July 28, Fort Buford's garrison was redesignated as Company C, 22nd Infantry. The second night after arrival the camp was attacked by Indians, who were driven off with one soldier wounded. The next day the Indians attacked and attempted to drive off the company's herd of beef cattle, but were repulsed and two Indians killed. Indian attacks upon the camp were of almost daily occurrence during the summer and fall. Parties of men cutting and rafting logs from the mouth of the Yellowstone were often attacked and driven to camp, where the fighting often lasted from two to six hours with losses on both sides. Three civilian wood
    7.75
    4 votes
    23

    Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

    The Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Complex is a wildlife preserve, one of the National Wildlife Refuges operated by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Headquartered in Ridgefield, Washington, it oversees the management of five refuges in the southwestern part of the state including: Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Conboy Lake NWR, and three refuges in the Columbia River Gorge - Franz Lake, Pierce and Steigerwald Lake NWR. Ridgefield NWR, located in the westernmost part of Clark County, has a total of 5,150 acres (20.8 km) of marshes, grasslands and woodlands. Preservation of the natural Columbia River floodplain is the management objective of the Carty, 2 mile (3 km) self guided hiking trail, Roth and Ridgeport Dairy units. The River 'S', 4.2 mile (7 km) auto tour route and 1.2 mile (2 km) seasonal hiking trail, and Bachelor Island units are managed to maximize habitat for waterfowl and other wetland wildlife. The refuge was established (along with 3 other refuges in the Willamette Valley of Oregon) in 1965, in response to a need to establish vital winter habitat for wintering waterfowl with an emphasis on the dusky Canada goose whose nesting areas in
    7.75
    4 votes
    24
    Fort Peck

    Fort Peck

    Fort Peck is a town in Valley County, Montana, United States. The population was 240 at the 2000 census. The name Fort Peck is associated with Col. Campbell K. Peck, the partner of Elias H. Durfee in the Leavenworth, Kansas, trading firm of Durfee and Peck. In 1867, company employee Abe Farwell constructed the Fort Peck trading post along the Missouri River, which enjoyed a virtual monopoly in trade with the Sioux and Assiniboine people. After its short life as a trading post, Fort Peck served as an Indian agency from 1873 until 1878. At that time, the agency was moved to its current location at Poplar. Fort Peck had a post office from 1879 to 1881. A new town of Fort Peck, located about 2 miles north of the original, was built in 1934 to house Army Corps of Engineers employees involved in the construction of the Fort Peck Dam. Designed to be temporary, the government-owned town nevertheless included many features of a permanent town, including an administrative headquarters, a hospital, stores, a theater, a recreation hall, and other facilities. Totally inadequate to house the 10,000-plus employees, Fort Peck was soon joined by numerous shanty towns, including Wheeler, New Deal,
    9.00
    3 votes
    25
    Loma

    Loma

    Loma is a census-designated place (CDP) in Chouteau County, Montana, United States. The population was 92 at the 2000 census. Loma is located at 47°56′14″N 110°29′59″W / 47.93722°N 110.49972°W / 47.93722; -110.49972 (47.937358, -110.499854). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.5 square miles (9.1 km), all of it land. Loma is the location of the most extreme recorded temperature change in a 24-hour period in the United States. On January 15, 1972, the temperature rose from −54 °F (−48 °C) to 49 °F (9 °C); a dramatic example of the regional Chinook wind in action. As of the census of 2000, there were 92 people, 40 households, and 25 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 26.6 people per square mile (10.3/km²). There were 47 housing units at an average density of 13.6 per square mile (5.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.83% White and 2.17% Native American. There were 40 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.5% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.5% were non-families. 37.5% of all households were made up of
    9.00
    3 votes
    26
    Pasco

    Pasco

    Pasco ( /ˈpæskoʊ/ US dict: păs′·kō) is a city in and the county seat of Franklin County, Washington, United States. Pasco is one of three cities that make up the Tri-Cities region of the state of Washington. The Tri-Cities is a mid-sized metropolitan area of approximately 264,133 people that also includes the cities of Kennewick and Richland in 2011 estimate. The population was 59,781 at the 2010 census. On October 16, 1805, the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped in the Pasco area, at a site now commemorated by Sacagawea State Park. The area was frequented by fur trappers and gold traders. In the 1880s, the Northern Pacific Railway was built near the Columbia River, bringing many settlers to the area. Pasco was officially incorporated on September 3, 1891. It was named by Virgil Bogue, a construction engineer for the Northern Pacific Railway after Cerro de Pasco, a city in the Peruvian Andes, where he had helped build a railroad. In its early years, it was a small railroad town, but the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1941 brought irrigation and agriculture to the area. Due in large part to the presence of the Hanford Site, the entire Tri-Cities area grew rapidly from the
    9.00
    3 votes
    27
    Cascade Locks

    Cascade Locks

    Cascade Locks is a city in Hood River County, Oregon, United States. The city took its name from a set of locks built to improve navigation past the Cascades Rapids of the Columbia River. The U.S. federal government approved the plan for the locks in 1875, construction began in 1878, and the locks were completed on November 5, 1896. The locks were subsequently submerged in 1938, replaced by Bonneville Lock and Dam, although the city lost no land from the expansion of Lake Bonneville behind the dam located some four miles (6 km) downstream of the city. Cascade Locks is located just upstream from the Bridge of the Gods, a toll bridge that spans the Columbia River. It is the only bridge across the Columbia between Portland and Hood River. Cascade Locks is also a few miles upstream of Eagle Creek Gorge, a popular scenic area that doubles as an alternate route for the Pacific Crest Trail. Cascade Locks is used frequently by hikers along the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) to cross the Columbia River. Cascade Locks is the lowest point along the trail, which runs from the Mexican border in California to the Canadian border in Washington. Since 1999, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs have
    6.60
    5 votes
    28
    6.60
    5 votes
    29
    Harpers Ferry

    Harpers Ferry

    Harpers Ferry is an historic town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, United States. It was formerly Harper’s Ferry with an apostrophe and that form continues to appear in some references. It is situated at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers where the U.S. states of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia meet. The town is located on a low-lying flood plain created by the two rivers and surrounded by higher ground. Historically, Harpers Ferry is best known for John Brown's raid on the Armory in 1859 and its role in the American Civil War. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town had a population of 286. The lower part of Harpers Ferry is located within Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Most of the remainder, which includes the more highly populated area, is included in the separate Harpers Ferry Historic District. Two other National Register of Historic Places properties adjoin the town: the B & O Railroad Potomac River Crossing and St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) headquarters is located in Harpers Ferry and the town is one of only a few through which the Appalachian Trail passes directly. Harpers Ferry is also an
    7.50
    4 votes
    30
    Atchison

    Atchison

    Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the Central United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 11,021. It is the county seat and most populous city of Atchison County. The city is named in honor of David Rice Atchison, United States senator from Missouri, and was the original eastern terminus of the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad. Atchison was the birthplace of aviatrix Amelia Earhart, and the Amelia Earhart Festival is held annually in July. Atchison is also home of Benedictine College, a Catholic liberal-arts college. Atchison is often called one of the most haunted places in America, due to the city's ghost-story heritage. Atchison was founded in 1854 and named in honor of Senator David Rice Atchison, who, when Kansas was opened for settlement, interested some of his friends in the scheme of forming a city in the new territory. Senator Atchison was interested in ensuring that the population of the new Kansas Territory would be majority pro-slavery, as he had been a prominent promoter of both slavery and the idea of popular sovereignty over the issue in the new lands.
    8.67
    3 votes
    31
    Boardman

    Boardman

    Boardman is a city in Morrow County, Oregon, United States on the Columbia River and Interstate 84. As of the 2010 census the population was 3,220. It is part of the Pendleton–Hermiston Micropolitan Statistical Area. Boardman was homesteaded in 1903, by Samuel Herbert Boardman, the first Superintendent of the Oregon State Parks System. The town was incorporated in 1927. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10 km), of which, 3.6 square miles (9.3 km) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km) of it (9.14%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,855 people, 853 households, and 686 families residing in the town. The population density was 798.2 people per square mile (307.9/km²). There were 947 housing units at an average density of 264.8 per square mile (102.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 55.24% White,1.93% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.39% African American, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 38.74% from other races, and 2.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 50.12% of the population. There were 853 households out of which 53.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were
    8.67
    3 votes
    32
    Missouri Valley

    Missouri Valley

    Missouri Valley is a city in Harrison County, Iowa, United States. The population was 2,992 at the 2000 census. Missouri Valley's longitude and latitude coordinates in decimal form are 41.558912, -95.893926. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.0 square miles (7.9 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,992 people, 1,222 households, and 779 families residing in the city. The population density was 982.9 people per square mile (380.0/km²). There were 1,300 housing units at an average density of 427.1 per square mile (165.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 99.03% White, 0.03% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.20% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.70% of the population. There were 1,222 households out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.5% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were non-families. 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average
    8.67
    3 votes
    33
    Richland

    Richland

    Richland is a city in Benton County in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Washington, at the confluence of the Yakima and the Columbia Rivers. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 48,058. April 1, 2012 estimates from the Washington State Office of Financial Management put the city's population at 49,890. Along with the nearby cities of Pasco and Kennewick, Richland is one of the Tri-Cities of Washington, home to the Hanford nuclear site. For centuries, the village of Chemna stood at the mouth of the current Yakima River. Today that village site is called Columbia Point. From this village the Wanapum, Yakama and Walla Walla Indians harvested the salmon runs entering the Yakima River. Captain William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition visited the mouth of the Yakima River on October 17, 1805. In 1904-1905, W.R. Amon and his son Howard purchased 2,300 acres (9 km) and proposed a town site on the north bank of the Yakima River. Postal authorities approved the designation of this town site as Richland in 1905, naming it for Nelson Rich, a state legislator and land developer. In 1906, the town was registered at the Benton County Courthouse. It was incorporated on
    10.00
    2 votes
    34
    Columbia River Gorge

    Columbia River Gorge

    The Columbia River Gorge is a canyon of the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Up to 4,000 feet (1,200 m) deep, the canyon stretches for over 80 miles (130 km) as the river winds westward through the Cascade Range forming the boundary between the State of Washington to the north and Oregon to the south. Extending roughly from the confluence of the Columbia with the Deschutes River down to eastern reaches of the Portland metropolitan area, the gorge furnishes the only navigable route through the Cascades and the only water connection between the Columbia River Plateau and the Pacific Ocean. The gorge holds federally protected status as a National Scenic Area called the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area and is managed by the United States Forest Service. The gorge is a popular recreational destination. The Columbia River cuts the only sea-level passageway through the Cascade Mountain Range here between the Deschutes River and the Sandy River, also marking the state lines between Oregon and Washington. The wide range of elevation and precipitation makes the Columbia River Gorge an extremely diverse and dynamic place. Ranging from 4,000 feet to sea level,
    7.25
    4 votes
    35
    Homer

    Homer

    Homer is a village in Dakota County, Nebraska, United States. It is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 549 at the 2010 census. Homer is located at 42°19′15″N 96°29′24″W / 42.32083°N 96.49°W / 42.32083; -96.49 (42.320915, -96.489960). According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.36 square miles (0.95 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 549 people, 213 households, and 154 families residing in the village. The population density was 1504.1 people per square mile (580.7/km²). There were 228 housing units at an average density of 624.7 per square mile (241.2/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 92.5% White, 5.3% Native American, 0.2% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.9% of the population. There were 213 households out of which 37.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.1% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 27.7% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6%
    7.25
    4 votes
    36
    Leavenworth

    Leavenworth

    Leavenworth is the largest city in and the county seat of Leavenworth County, Kansas, United States. Located on the west bank of the Missouri River 25 miles (41 km) northwest of Kansas City, Missouri, it is part of the Kansas City metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 35,251. Leavenworth, founded in 1854, was the first incorporated city in Kansas. The city is located south of Fort Leavenworth, the oldest active Army post west of the Mississippi, which was established in 1827 by Colonel Henry Leavenworth. The fort was located outside the city limits of Leavenworth until it was annexed by the city on April 12, 1977. Leavenworth is the home of many detention centers and prisons, including the Leavenworth federal prison for which the city is most famous, and several smaller jails and prisons, including the city and county jails, a Federal Detention Center, and the military's maximum security prison, the United States Disciplinary Barracks. The very large Kansas State Penitentiary and a state medium security prison are also located nearby. Mexican anarchist Ricardo Flores Magon was incarcerated and died in a Leavenworth prison in 1922. He was an important
    7.25
    4 votes
    37
    Pollock

    Pollock

    Pollock is a town in Campbell County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 241 at the 2010 census. Pollock is located at 45°54′59″N 100°17′18″W / 45.91639°N 100.28833°W / 45.91639; -100.28833 (45.899975, -100.288405). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.78 km), all of it land. Pollock has been assigned the ZIP code 57648 and the FIPS place code 51260. As of the census of 2000, there were 339 people, 164 households, and 83 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,061.4 people per square mile (409.0/km²). There were 204 housing units at an average density of 638.7 per square mile (246.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 99.41% White, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.29% of the population. There were 164 households out of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.0% were married couples living together, 3.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.8% were non-families. 47.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 30.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household
    6.20
    5 votes
    38
    8.33
    3 votes
    39
    The Dalles

    The Dalles

    The Dalles ( /ˈdælz/) is the largest city and county seat of Wasco County, Oregon, United States. The name of the city comes from the French word dalle (meaning either "sluice" or "flagstone" and referring to the columnar basalt rocks carved by the river, what the French-Canadian employees of the North West Company called the rapids of the Columbia River between the present-day city and Celilo Falls. The population was 12,156 at the 2000 census and was estimated at 12,314 in 2009. Also in the same area was the Petite Dalles or Little Dalles, or Short Narrows. The site of what is now the city of The Dalles was a major Native American trading center for at least 10,000 years. The general area is one of the continent's most significant archaeological regions. Lewis and Clark camped near Mill Creek on October 25–27, 1805, and recorded the Native American name for the creek as Quenett. The first use of the name Dalles, according to Oregon Geographic Names, appears in fur trader Gabriel Franchère's Narrative, on April 12, 1814, referring to the long series of major rapids in the river. By 1814 several overland groups of the land components of the Astor Expedition of 1810–1812 would have
    8.33
    3 votes
    40
    7.00
    4 votes
    41
    Fort Yates

    Fort Yates

    Fort Yates (Arikara: iinakanítwi [iinakanítWI]) is a city in Sioux County, North Dakota in the United States. It is the tribal headquarters of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and county seat of Sioux County. The population was 184 at the 2010 census. The first US Army post at this site was established in 1863 as the Standing Rock Cantonment with the purpose of overseeing the Hunkpapa and Blackfeet bands, and the Inhunktonwan and Cutheads of the Upper Yanktonais, of the Lakota Oyate. Its name was changed by the US Army in 1878 to honor Captain George Yates who was killed by the Lakota Oyate at the Battle of Little Big Horn in 1876. The Army post and fort were decommissioned in 1903, leaving the agency town its name. Fort Yates also served as the headquarters of the US Standing Rock Indian Agency, headed by US Indian Service Agent James McLaughlin who ordered the arrest of Sitting Bull on 14 December 1890. The 19th-century American Indian leader Sitting Bull was once buried at Fort Yates, but reports indicate that his body was possibly removed and transferred to a gravesite overlooking the Missouri River near Mobridge, South Dakota. An historical marker (pictured) notes the location
    7.00
    4 votes
    42
    Ste. Genevieve

    Ste. Genevieve

    Ste. Genevieve (Ste-Geneviève with French spelling) is a city in and the county seat of Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri, United States. The population was 4,410 at the 2010 census. Founded by French Canadian colonists, it was the first organized European settlement west of the Mississippi River in present-day Missouri. Founded around 1735 by Canadien habitants and migrants from settlements in the Illinois Country just east of the Mississippi River, Ste. Geneviève is the oldest permanent European settlement in Missouri. It was named for Saint Genevieve (who lived in the fifth century AD), the patron saint of Paris. While most residents were of French-Canadian descent, many of the founding families had been in the Illinois Country for two or three generations. It is one of the oldest colonial settlements west of the Mississippi River. It was located in an area encompassed by the pre-Louisiana Purchase territory known as New France, Illinois Country, or the Upper Louisiana territory. Traditional accounts suggested a founding of 1735 or so, but the historian Carl Ekberg has documented a more likely founding about 1750. The population to the east of the river needed more land, the soils
    7.00
    4 votes
    43
    Vermillion

    Vermillion

    Vermillion is a city in and the county seat of Clay County, in the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of South Dakota, and the tenth largest city in the state. According to the 2010 Census, the population was 10,571. Vermillion lies atop a bluff near the Missouri River. The area has been home to various Native American tribes for centuries. French fur traders first visited in the late 18th century. Vermillion was founded in 1859 and incorporated in 1873. The name refers to the Lakota name: wa sa wak pa'la (red stream). Home to the University of South Dakota, Vermillion has a mixed academic and rural character: The university is a major academic institution for the state, boasting the state's only law and medical school, and the state's only AACSB accredited business school. Major farm products include corn, soybeans, and alfalfa. The population was 10,571 at the 2010 census. Vermillion is located approximately 10 miles (16 km) from the proposed site of a Hyperion oil refinery (formerly known as the Gorilla Project), which will be one Lewis and Clark camped at the mouth of the Vermillion River near the present-day town on Friday, August 24, 1804. (The previous day they killed
    7.00
    4 votes
    44
    Oregon City

    Oregon City

    Oregon City is the county seat of Clackamas County, Oregon, located on the Willamette River near the southern limits of the Portland metropolitan area. Established in 1829 by the Hudson's Bay Company, in 1845 it became the first U.S. city west of the Rocky Mountains to be incorporated. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 31,859. Known in recent decades as the site of several large paper mills on the Willamette River, the city played a significant role in the early history of the Oregon Country. It was established by Hudson's Bay Company's Dr. John McLoughlin in 1829 near the confluence of the Clackamas River with the Willamette to take advantage of the power of Willamette Falls to run a lumber mill. During the 1840s and 1850s it was the destination for those wanting to file land claims after traveling the Oregon Trail as the last stop on the trail. It was the capital of the Oregon Territory from its establishment in 1848 until 1851, and rivaled Portland for early supremacy in the area. In 1846, the city's newspaper, the Oregon Spectator, was the first American newspaper to be published west of the Rocky Mountains. The center of the city retains part of its historic
    6.00
    5 votes
    45
    Boise

    Boise

    Boise ( /ˈbɔɪsiː/) is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Idaho, as well as the county seat of Ada County. Located on the Boise River, it anchors the Boise City-Nampa metropolitan area and is the largest city between Salt Lake City, Utah and Portland, Oregon. As of the 2010 Census, Boise's city population was 205,671. The Boise metropolitan area is home to about 616,500 people and is the most populous metropolitan area in Idaho, and the third most populous metropolitan area in the U.S. Pacific Northwest region (behind only the Seattle and Portland metropolitan areas). It is also the 104th largest U.S. city by population. The area was called Boise long before the establishment of Fort Boise. The original Fort Boise was 40 miles (64 km) west, near Parma, down the Boise River near its confluence with the Snake River at the Oregon border. This defense was erected by the Hudson's Bay Company in the 1830s. It was abandoned in the 1850s, however massacres along the Oregon Trail prompted the U.S. Army to re-establish a fort in the area in 1863 during the U.S. Civil War. The new location was selected because it was near the intersection of the Oregon Trail with a major
    9.50
    2 votes
    46
    Des Moines

    Des Moines

    Des Moines /dɨˈmɔɪn/ is the capital and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Iowa. It is also the county seat of Polk County. A small portion of the city extends into Warren County. It was incorporated on September 22, 1851, as Fort Des Moines which was shortened to "Des Moines" in 1857. It is named after the Des Moines River, which may have been adapted from the French Rivière des Moines, literally meaning "River of the Monks." The five-county metropolitan area is ranked 88th in terms of population in the United States with 580,255 residents according to the 2011 estimate by the United States Census Bureau. The city proper population was 203,433 at the 2010 census. Des Moines is a major center for the insurance industry and also has a sizable financial services and publishing business base. In fact, Des Moines was credited with the "number one spot for U.S. insurance companies" in a Business Wire article. The city is the headquarters for the Principal Financial Group, Aviva insurance, the Meredith Corporation, Ruan Transportation, EMC Insurance Companies, and Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield. Other major corporations such as Wells Fargo, ING Group, Nationwide Mutual
    9.50
    2 votes
    47

    North Fork

    North Fork is an unincorporated community in Lemhi County, Idaho. Its name is derived from confluence of the south-flowing North Fork of the Salmon River with the north-flowing main Salmon River, which makes a near-right angle turn here to flow westward across the state to Riggins. US 93 serves the community, connecting it with Salmon to the south and Lost Trail Pass to the north. Long time families in the community include Cummings, Prestwich, Randolph, Hughes, Smith, and Maxwell. The community of North Fork is built around the “North Fork Store” which also houses a post office and small liquor store. There are two hotels and a U.S. Forest Service Station. The community area includes a non-domination Christian Church .5 miles South East of North Fork and a small private Catholic Chapel some 5 miles North just off U.S. Highway 93 North. Notable creeks with trails and stunning vistas include: Trail Gulch, Fourth of July, Hull Creek, Hughes Creek, Lick Creek, Ditch Creek, Burns Gulch, Indian Creek, and Ulysses Lookout. Lewis and Clark traveled through this area and met with a local Indian man, Toby, who got the expedition lost crossing into Montana. Historians believe that they found
    9.50
    2 votes
    49
    Long Beach

    Long Beach

    Long Beach is a city in Pacific County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,392 at the 2010 census. It is the home of Northwestern pop cultural phenomenon Jake the Alligator Man. Long Beach began when Henry Harrison Tinker bought a land claim from Charles E. Reed in 1880. He platted the town and called it "Tinkerville." Long Beach was officially incorporated on January 18, 1922. From 1889 to 1930, a narrow gauge railroad called the Ilwaco Railway and Navigation Company ran up the whole peninsula. The Long Beach depot was built between First and Second Streets on the east side of the track, which ran north along "B" Street. A major destination in Long Beach was Tinker's Hotel, later renamed the Long Beach Hotel, and built very close to the station. This was the second hotel built at the site by Henry Harrison Tinker, the founder of Long Beach. Tinker's first hotel burned down in 1894. He built another one just a few feet to the east and south of the rail depot. The image in the gallery shows a crowd waiting for the train sometime between 1901 and 1907. Just across the tracks (which doubled in this area) from Tinker's Hotel in Long Beach was the Portland Hotel. The
    6.75
    4 votes
    50
    Sioux Falls

    Sioux Falls

    Sioux Falls /ˌsuː ˈfɔːlz/ is the largest city in the U.S. state of South Dakota. Sioux Falls is the county seat of Minnehaha County, and also extends into Lincoln County to the south. It is the 47th fastest growing city in the United States and the fastest growing metro area in the state of South Dakota, with a total increase of 22% since 2000. As of the 2010 census, Sioux Falls had a population of 153,888. The metropolitan population of 228,261 accounts for 28% of South Dakota's population. Sioux Falls is the largest city in the Sioux Falls-Sioux City, SD-IA-MN-NE Designated Market Area (DMA),with a population of 1,043,450. Chartered in 1856 on the banks of the Big Sioux River, the city is situated on the prairie of the Great Plains at the junction of Interstate 90 and Interstate 29. The history of Sioux Falls revolves around the cascades of the Big Sioux River. The falls were created about 14,000 years ago during the last ice age. The lure of the falls has been a powerful influence. Ho-Chunk, Ioway, Otoe, Missouri, Omaha (and Ponca at the time), Quapaw, Kansa, Osage, Arikira, Dakota, Nakota and Cheyenne people inhabited the region previous to European descendants. Numerous burial
    6.75
    4 votes
    51
    Sioux City

    Sioux City

    Sioux City ( /ˌsuːˈsɪti/) is a city in Woodbury and Plymouth counties in the western part of the U.S. state of Iowa. The population was 82,684 in the 2010 census, a decline from 85,013 in the 2000 census, which makes it currently the fourth largest city in the state. The bulk of the city is in Woodbury County, of which it is the county seat, though a small portion is in Plymouth County. Sioux City is the primary city of the four-county Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), with a population of 143,005 in 2000 and a slight increase to an estimated 144,360 in 2009. The Sioux City-Vermillion, IA-NE-SD Combined Statistical Area had a population of 156,503 as of 2000 and has grown to an estimated population of 157,850 as of 2009. Sioux City is at the navigational head of the Missouri River, about 95 miles north of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area. Sioux City and the surrounding areas of northwestern Iowa, northeastern Nebraska and southeastern South Dakota are sometimes referred to as Siouxland, especially by the local media. Money recognized Sioux City in its August 2010 issue of "Best Places To Live". In 2008 and 2009, the Sioux City Tri-State
    9.00
    2 votes
    52
    Brownville

    Brownville

    Brownville is a village in Nemaha County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 132 at the 2010 census. Established in 1854 and incorporated in 1856, Brownville was the largest town in the Nebraska Territory, with a population of 1,309 by 1880. Bordering slave-holding Missouri, the town became an important port on the Missouri River. Daniel Freeman, the first homesteader to file a claim under the Homestead Act of 1862, staked his claim at a New Year's Eve party in Brownville. The rise of the railroad was ultimately Brownville's undoing. The railroads siphoned traffic away from the Missouri River's steamboats. Brownville's attempt to secure a railroad of its own was severely botched and led to immense tax increases to pay the bonds for the failed venture. This drove most of the population away and led to the county seat being transferred to Auburn in 1885. In 1856 Thomas Weston Tipton moved to the town to serve as a minister. He later became a longtime U.S. Senator, and ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Nebraska. Omaha land magnates Herman and Augustus Kountze held large holdings in the early town. After the Civil War David Mercer established a law practice in the
    7.67
    3 votes
    53
    Falls of the Ohio State Park

    Falls of the Ohio State Park

    Falls of the Ohio State Park is a state park in Indiana. It is located on the banks of the Ohio River at Clarksville, Indiana, across from Louisville, Kentucky. The park is part of the Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area. The main feature of the park is the exposed fossil beds of the Jeffersonville Limestone dated from the Devonian period. The park includes an interpretive center open to the public, built on the grounds where Camp Joe Holt once existed. In 1990 the Indiana state government hired Terry Chase, a well-established exhibit developer, to design the center's displays. Building started in September 1992, costing $4.9 million with a total area of 16,000 sq ft (1,500 m). The center functions as a museum with exhibits that concentrate on the natural history related to findings in the nearby fossil beds as well as the human history of the Louisville area, covering pre-settlement, early settlement, and Louisville and southern Indiana history all the way up through the 20th century. Unlike at other Indiana state parks, annual entrance permits do not allow unlimited free access (rather, only five people per pass per visit) to the interpretive center, as fees are
    5.60
    5 votes
    55
    Garrison Dam

    Garrison Dam

    Garrison Dam is an earth-fill embankment dam on the Missouri River in central North Dakota. At over two miles (3 km) in length, it is the fifth-largest earthen dam in the world, constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1947-53. The reservoir impounded by the dam is Lake Sakakawea, which extends to Williston and the confluence with the Yellowstone River, near the Montana border. Garrison Dam is located between Riverdale and Pick City, named after the town of Garrison, directly north of the dam, across the reservoir. The dam is approximately midway between Bismarck and Minot, about 10 miles (16 km) west of U.S. highway 83. Hydropower turbines at Garrison Dam have an electric power generating nameplate capacity of 583.3 megawatts. Average production of 240 megawatts serves several hundred thousand customers. The construction on the dam necessitated the purchase of 152,360 acres (616.6 km) in the Fort Berthold Reservation that would be flooded by the creation of Lake Sakakawea. These lands were owned by the Three Affiliated Tribes and were sold in 1947 for $5,105,625 and ~1700 residents relocated. Construction on the $300 million dam project began in 1947, and its
    6.50
    4 votes
    56
    Mount St. Helens

    Mount St. Helens

    Mount St. Helens is an active stratovolcano located in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is 96 miles (154 km) south of Seattle, Washington and 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Portland, Oregon. Mount St. Helens takes its English name from the British diplomat Lord St Helens, a friend of explorer George Vancouver who made a survey of the area in the late 18th century. The volcano is located in the Cascade Range and is part of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, a segment of the Pacific Ring of Fire that includes over 160 active volcanoes. This volcano is well known for its ash explosions and pyroclastic flows. Mount St. Helens is most notorious for its catastrophic eruption on May 18, 1980, at 8:32 am PDT, the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States. Fifty-seven people were killed; 250 homes, 47 bridges, 15 miles (24 km) of railways, and 185 miles (298 km) of highway were destroyed. A massive debris avalanche triggered by an earthquake measuring 5.1 on the Richter scale, caused an eruption, reducing the elevation of the mountain's summit from 9,677 ft (2,950 m) to 8,365 ft (2,550 m) and
    6.50
    4 votes
    57
    Nebraska City

    Nebraska City

    Nebraska City is a city and county seat of Otoe County, Nebraska, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 7,289. The Nebraska State Legislature has credited Nebraska City as being the oldest incorporated city in the state, as it was the first approved by a special act of the Nebraska Territorial Legislature in 1855. Nebraska City is home of Arbor Day, the Missouri River Basin Lewis and Clark Center (which focuses on the natural history achievements of the expedition), and the Mayhew Cabin, the only site in the state recognized by the National Park Service as a station on the Underground Railroad. Early European-American official exploration was reported in 1804 by Lewis and Clark as they journeyed west along the Missouri River. They encountered many of the historic Native American tribes whose ancestors had inhabited the territory for thousands of years. During the years of early pioneer settlement, in 1846 the US Army built Old Fort Kearny at Nebraska City. Several years later, the army abandoned it to relocate the fort to central Nebraska, now south of present-day Kearney. Shortly after the post was vacated, John Boulware developed an important
    6.50
    4 votes
    58
    Omaha

    Omaha

    Omaha /ˈoʊməhɑː/ is the largest city in the state of Nebraska, United States, and is the county seat of Douglas County. It is located in the Midwestern United States on the Missouri River, about 20 miles (30 km) north of the mouth of the Platte River. Omaha is the anchor of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area, which includes Council Bluffs, Iowa, across the Missouri River from Omaha. According to the 2010 Census, Omaha's population was 408,958, making it the nation's 42nd-largest city. According to the 2011 Population Estimates, Omaha's population was 415,068. Including its suburbs, Omaha formed the 60th-largest metropolitan area in the United States in 2010, with an estimated population of 877,110 residing in eight counties. There are more than 1.2 million residents within a 50-mile (80-km) radius of the city's center, forming the Greater Omaha area. Omaha's pioneer period began in 1854 when the city was founded by speculators from neighboring Council Bluffs, Iowa. The city was founded along the Missouri River, and a crossing called Lone Tree Ferry earned the city its nickname, the "Gateway to the West." It introduced this new West to the world when in 1898 it played host
    6.50
    4 votes
    59
    Rocky Mountains

    Rocky Mountains

    The Rocky Mountains (or the Rockies) are a major mountain range in western North America. The Rocky Mountains stretch more than 3,000 miles (4,830 km) from the northernmost part of British Columbia, in western Canada, to New Mexico, in the southwestern United States. Within the North American Cordillera, the Rockies are somewhat distinct from the Pacific Coast Ranges and the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada which all lie farther to the west. The Rocky Mountains were formed from 80 million to 55 million years ago by the Laramide orogeny. Since then, erosion by water and glaciers have sculpted the mountain range into dramatic valleys and peaks. At the end of the last ice age, humans started to inhabit the mountain range. After Europeans, such as Sir Alexander MacKenzie and the Lewis and Clark expedition, started to explore the range, minerals and furs drove the initial economic exploitation of the mountains, although the range itself never became densely populated. Currently, much of the mountain range is protected by public parks and forest lands, and is a popular tourist destination, especially for hiking, camping, mountaineering, fishing, hunting, mountain biking, skiing, and
    6.50
    4 votes
    60
    Seattle

    Seattle

    Seattle (pronounced [siːˈætɫ̩] ( listen) see-AT-əl or [siːˈæɾɫ̩]) is a major coastal seaport and the seat of King County, in the U.S. state of Washington. With 608,660 residents as of the 2010 Census, Seattle is the largest city in the Pacific Northwest region of North America and the largest city on the West Coast north of San Francisco. The Seattle metropolitan area of about 3.4 million inhabitants is the 15th largest metropolitan area in the United States. The city is situated on a narrow isthmus between Puget Sound (an arm of the Pacific Ocean) and Lake Washington, about 114 miles (183 km) south of the Canada–United States border, yet further north than Toronto. In 2010, the container ports in the Seattle metropolitan area (Seattle-Tacoma) were the third busiest in the United States, after Los Angeles–Long Beach and New York–New Jersey, serving as a major gateway for trade with Asia. The Seattle area had been inhabited by Native Americans for at least 4,000 years before the first permanent white settlers. Arthur A. Denny and his group of travelers, subsequently known as the Denny Party, arrived at Alki Point on November 13, 1851. The settlement was moved to its current site and
    6.50
    4 votes
    61
    Arrow Rock

    Arrow Rock

    Arrow Rock is a village in Saline County, Missouri, United States, located along the Missouri River. This area of the state was called "Little Dixie" because so many early migrants came from the Upper South, bringing their slaves and culture with them. Although the busiest river port in the county before the American Civil War, the population was 79 as of the 2000 Census (56 as of the 2010 Census). The musical films Tom Sawyer (1973) and Huckleberry Finn (1974), both based on novels by Mark Twain, were partially shot here. Arrow Rock Historic District has significant properties. The George Caleb Bingham House, home of the nationally known painter for several years, has been designated a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Arrow Rock is located at 39°4′12″N 92°56′51″W / 39.07°N 92.9475°W / 39.07; -92.9475 (39.070117, -92.947364). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.1 square miles (0.26 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 79 people, 39 households, and 24 families residing in the town. The population density was 592.5 people per square mile (234.6/km²). There were 62 housing units at an average density of 465.0 per square mile
    10.00
    1 votes
    62

    Beulah

    Beulah is a city in Mercer County, North Dakota, in the United States. The population was 3,121 at the 2010 census, fourteenth largest city in North Dakota. Beulah is home to the Dakota Gasification Company. Beulah was founded in 1913. It was named after Beulah Stinchcombe, the niece of a local land developer. Beulah is located at 47°16′5″N 101°46′38″W / 47.26806°N 101.77722°W / 47.26806; -101.77722 (47.268088, -101.777229). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.52 square miles (6.52 km²), of which, 2.49 square miles (6.45 km²) of it is land and 0.02 square miles (0.06 km²) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 3,121 people, 1,353 households, and 862 families residing in the town. The population density was 1252.4 people per square mile (483.6/km²). There were 1,508 housing units at an average density of 605.1 per square mile (233.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 94.8% White, 0.2% African American, 2.3% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.3Pacific Islander, 0.7% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.3% of the population. There were 1,353 households out of which 25.6% had
    10.00
    1 votes
    63
    Lemhi Pass

    Lemhi Pass

    Lemhi Pass is a high mountain pass in the Beaverhead Mountains, part of the Bitterroot Range in the Rocky Mountains and within Salmon-Challis National Forest. The pass lies on the Montana-Idaho border on the continental divide, at an elevation of 7373 feet (2247 m) above sea level. The pass gained importance in the 18th century, when the Lemhi Shoshone acquired horses and used the route to travel between the two main parts of their homeland. From the time of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 until the Oregon Treaty in 1846 the pass marked the western border of the United States. On August 12, 1805 Meriwether Lewis and three other members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition crossed the Continental Divide at Lemhi Pass. Lewis found a "large and plain Indian road" over the pass. This was the first time that white men had seen present-day Idaho: We proceeded to the top of the dividing ridge from which I discovered immense ranges of high mountains still to the West of us wth their tops partially covered in snow The next day Lewis met Cameahwait and his band of Shoshone, and returned with them across the pass to meet Clark. On August 26, 1805 the entire expedition crossed the pass. In the
    10.00
    1 votes
    64
    10.00
    1 votes
    65
    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington, "the District", or simply D.C., is the capital of the United States. On July 16, 1790, the Residence Act approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. As permitted by the U.S. Constitution, the District is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States Congress and is therefore not a part of any U.S. state. The states of Maryland and Virginia each donated land to form the federal district, which included the preexisting settlements of Georgetown and Alexandria; however, Congress returned the Virginia portion in 1846. Named in honor of George Washington, the City of Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the new national capital. Congress created a single municipal government for the whole District of Columbia after the American Civil War. Washington, D.C., had an estimated population of 617,996 in 2011, the 25th most populous place in the United States. Commuters from the surrounding Maryland and Virginia suburbs raise the city's population to over one million during the workweek. The Washington Metropolitan Area, of which
    10.00
    1 votes
    66
    Orofino

    Orofino

    Orofino ("fine gold" [ore] in Spanish) is a city in Clearwater County, Idaho, along Orofino Creek and the north bank of the Clearwater River. The population was 3,142 at the 2010 census, and the city is the county seat of Clearwater County. Nearby is the historical "Canoe Camp," where the Lewis and Clark expedition built five new dugout canoes and embarked on October 7, 1805, downstream to the Pacific Ocean. Just 4 miles (6.4 km) north of town is the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery and the Dworshak Dam, third highest dam in the United States, completed in the early 1970s. Originally the name was two words, Oro Fino, applied to a gold mining camp established in 1861 two miles (3 km) south of Pierce, that is now a ghost town. When the Nez Perce reservation opened to settlers in 1895, Clifford Fuller set up a trading post on his new homestead and the town (Orofino-on-the-Clearwater) was established the next year. The railroad, later part of the Camas Prairie Railroad, arrived from Lewiston in 1899. Orofino is home to both the Idaho Correctional Institution - Orofino and Idaho State Hospital North. These two facilities are located adjacent to another Orofino institution: Orofino High
    7.33
    3 votes
    67
    Sergeant Bluff

    Sergeant Bluff

    Sergeant Bluff is a city in Woodbury County, Iowa, United States. It is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 4,227 at the 2010 census. The city was named after Sergeant Charles Floyd, the only member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition to die on the journey. Sergeant Bluff was incorporated on May 2, 1904. Sergeant Bluff is located at 42°24′7″N 96°21′30″W / 42.40194°N 96.35833°W / 42.40194; -96.35833 (42.402055, -96.358316). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.11 square miles (5.46 km), all of it land. The city is located just south of Sioux City at the edge of the Loess Hills. The Sioux City Municipal Airport (SUX) is adjacent to Sergeant Bluff, on the floodplain of the Missouri River. The city is home to a large brickmaking industry, and is near the Port Neal industrial complex. Interstate 29 cuts through the city, dividing residential and industrial areas. As of the census of 2010, there were 4,227 people, 1,464 households, and 1,142 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,003.3 inhabitants per square mile (773.5 /km). There were 1,499 housing units at an average density of
    7.33
    3 votes
    68
    The Dalles Dam

    The Dalles Dam

    The Dalles Dam is a concrete-gravity run-of-the-river dam spanning the Columbia River, two-miles (3 km) east of the city of The Dalles, Oregon, United States. It joins Wasco County, Oregon with Klickitat County, Washington, 192 miles (309 km) upriver from the mouth of the Columbia near Astoria, Oregon. The closest towns on the Washington side are Dallesport and Wishram. The Army Corps of Engineers commenced work on the dam in 1952 and completed it five years later. Slackwater created by the dam submerged Celilo Falls, the economic and cultural hub of Native Americans in the region and the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in North America. On March 10, 1957, hundreds of observers looked on as the rising waters rapidly silenced the falls, submerged fishing platforms, and consumed the village of Celilo. The reservoir behind the dam is named Lake Celilo and runs 24 miles (39 km) up the river channel, to the foot of John Day Dam. The dam is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the power is marketed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). It is part of an extensive system of dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The Dalles Dam Visitor Center is located
    7.33
    3 votes
    69
    Topeka

    Topeka

    Topeka (/tɵˈpiːkə/; Kansa: Tó Pee Kuh) is the capital city of the U.S. state of Kansas and the county seat of Shawnee County. It is situated along the Kansas River in the central part of Shawnee County, located in northeast Kansas, in the Central United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 127,473. The Topeka Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Shawnee, Jackson, Jefferson, Osage, and Wabaunsee counties, had an population of 233,870 in 2010 census. The city is well known for the landmark United States Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, which overturned Plessy vs. Ferguson and declared segregation in public schools on account of race to be unconstitutional. Three ships of the US Navy have been named USS Topeka in honor of the city. Topeka means "to dig good potatoes" in the languages of the Kansa and the Ioway. The potato referred to is the prairie potato (Psoralea esculenta), a perennial herb which is an important food for many Native Americans. As a placename, Topeka was first recorded in 1826 as the Kansa name for what is now called the Kansas River. Topeka's founders chose the name in 1855 because it "was novel, of Indian origin
    7.33
    3 votes
    70
    Troutdale

    Troutdale

    Troutdale is a city in Multnomah County, Oregon, north of Gresham and east of Wood Village. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 15,962. Troutdale was incorporated on October 2, 1907. It was named after the country home of Captain John Harlow, a former sea captain from Maine, and a successful Portland businessman. According to an article in the Oregonian in 1959, he named his home Troutdale because it had a "small dale near his house where it had a fish pond which he stocked with trout." The city serves as the western gateway to the Historic Columbia River Highway, the Mount Hood Scenic Byway, and the Columbia River Gorge. The area was first discovered by Lt. Broughton under the command of Captain George Vancouver in 1792. They had named Broughton's Bluff which is an outcropping directly across the Sandy River from what is now downtown Troutdale. The earliest settlers came to Troutdale in 1850. David F. Buxton is considered to be Troutdale's true founder. He had made land claims and donated his land in 1853 in what is now the center of Troutdale. Captain John Harlow purchased part of Buxton's land in 1872 and built a home and some trout farms, he named this farm
    7.33
    3 votes
    71
    Ellensburg

    Ellensburg

    Ellensburg is a city in, and the county seat of, Kittitas County, Washington, United States. The population was 18,174 at the 2010 census. The population was 18,320 at 2012 Estimate from Office of Financial Management. Ellensburg is located just east of the Cascade Range on Interstate 90 and is known as the most centrally located city in the state. Ellensburg is the home of Central Washington University (CWU). The surrounding Kittitas Valley is internationally known for the timothy-hay that it produces. There are several local hay brokering and processing operations that ship to Pacific Rim countries. Downtown Ellensburg has many historic buildings, many of which were constructed in the late 19th century. This is a legacy of its bid to be the state capital, which it lost to Olympia. CWU being placed there is another product of that legacy. The state legislature selected Ellensburg as the location for the then Normal School as a consolation prize. Eastern Washington has a much drier climate than Western Washington, and some Seattle-area residents have moved to the city and commute over Snoqualmie Pass on Interstate 90 to jobs located in the Puget Sound region. Ellensburg was
    6.25
    4 votes
    72
    New Town

    New Town

    New Town (Arikara: neetuhčipiriínu [neetUhčipiriíNU]) (Hidatsa: Awadihiraash) is a city in Mountrail County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 1,925 at the 2010 census. New Town was founded in 1953 to replace the cities of Sanish and Van Hook which were planned to be inundated by Lake Sakakawea. It is the largest city and administrative center of the Fort Berthold Reservation. New Town is home to Fort Berthold Community College. New Town is located at 47°58′54″N 102°29′5″W / 47.98167°N 102.48472°W / 47.98167; -102.48472 (47.981748, -102.484842). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.28 square miles (3.32 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,925 people, 647 households, and 437 families residing in the town. The population density was 1502.7 people per square mile (580.2/km²). There were 701 housing units at an average density of 547.2 per square mile (211.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 17.8% White, 0.2% African American, 76.4% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1Pacific Islander, 1.2% from other races, and 4.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.3% of the
    6.25
    4 votes
    73
    6.25
    4 votes
    74
    8.50
    2 votes
    75
    Dillon

    Dillon

    Dillon is a city in and the county seat of Beaverhead County, Montana, United States. The population was 4,134 at the 2010 census. Dillon is located at 45°12′57″N 112°38′3″W / 45.21583°N 112.63417°W / 45.21583; -112.63417 (45.215735, -112.634055), at an elevation of 5102 feet (1555 m). It lies approximately 40 miles (64 km) east of the Continental Divide. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.1 km), all of it land. Dillon is home to the Beaverhead River, a "blue ribbon" fly fishing river. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,752 people, 1,669 households, and 934 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,300.7 people per square mile (888.7/km²). There were 1,831 housing units at an average density of 1,122.7 per square mile (433.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.43% White, 0.35% African American, 1.31% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.61% from other races, and 1.17% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.95% of the population. There were 1,669 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.3% were married couples living together, 8.3%
    8.50
    2 votes
    76
    Minot

    Minot

    Minot (/ˈmaɪnɒt/ MY-not) is a city located in north central North Dakota in the United States. It is most widely known for the Air Force base located approximately 15 miles north of the city. With a population of 40,888 at the 2010 census, Minot is the fourth largest city in the state. A housing study completed by the Minot Area Development Corporation in 2011 estimated that 45,508 people live within the city limits. The city is the county seat of Ward County and is a trading center for a large portion of northern North Dakota, southwestern Manitoba, and southeastern Saskatchewan. Founded in 1886 during the construction of the Great Northern Railway, Minot is also known as "Magic City", commemorating its remarkable growth in size over a short time. Minot is the principal city of the Minot Micropolitan Statistical Area, a micropolitan area that covers McHenry, Renville, and Ward counties and had a combined population of 69,540 at the 2010 census. Minot came into existence in 1886, when James J. Hill's Great Northern Railway ended its push through the state for the winter, after having difficulty constructing a trestle across Gassman Coulee. It was the end of the railway's line, so
    8.50
    2 votes
    77

    Oacoma

    Oacoma is a town in Lyman County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 451 at the 2010 census. Oacoma is located on the west bank of the Missouri River, across from Chamberlain. Oacoma is located at 43°48′15″N 99°22′49″W / 43.804117°N 99.380157°W / 43.804117; -99.380157. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 4.4 square miles (11 km). 2.0 square miles (5.2 km) of it is land and 2.4 square miles (6.2 km) of it (54.38%) is water. Oacoma has been assigned the ZIP code 57365 and the FIPS place code 46180. As of the census of 2000, there were 390 people, 169 households, and 111 families residing in the town. The population density was 192.8 people per square mile (74.5/km). There were 188 housing units at an average density of 92.9 per square mile (35.9/km). The racial makeup of the town was 94.36% White, 3.33% Native American, and 2.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.26% of the population. There were 169 households out of which 33.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.9% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.3% were
    8.50
    2 votes
    78
    Skamokawa

    Skamokawa

    Skamokawa is an unincorporated rural village in Wahkiakum County, Washington, United States. Skamokawa rests on the banks of the Columbia River, and on WA 4. The town includes a post office, restaurant, and general store, along with a nearby historical museum and covered bridge. It is a local center for kayaking and fishing.
    8.50
    2 votes
    79
    Fargo

    Fargo

    Fargo is the largest city in the U.S. state of North Dakota, accounting for nearly 16% of the state population. Fargo is also the county seat of Cass County. According to the 2010 census, its population was 105,549. Fargo, along with its twin city of Moorhead, Minnesota, as well as adjacent West Fargo, North Dakota and Dilworth, Minnesota, form the core of the Fargo-Moorhead, ND-MN Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in 2010 contained a population of 208,777. Founded in 1871, Fargo is the economic center of southeastern North Dakota. Fargo is a cultural, retail, health care, educational, and industrial hub for the region. Fargo is also the home to North Dakota State University. The area that is present-day Fargo was an early stopping point for steamboats floating down the Red River during the 1870s and 1880s. The city was originally named "Centralia," but was later renamed "Fargo" after Northern Pacific Railway director and Wells Fargo Express Company founder William Fargo (1818 - 1881). The area started to flourish after the arrival of the Northern Pacific Railroad and the city became known as the "Gateway to the West". During the 1880s, Fargo became the "divorce capital" of the
    6.00
    4 votes
    80
    Platte City

    Platte City

    Platte City is a city in Platte County, Missouri, along the Little Platte River. The population was 3,866 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Platte County. Platte City was founded by Zadock "Zed" Martin and was incorporated as a city in September 1843. On December 16, 1861, Colonel W. James Morgan's Union Squad razed Platte City, including the courthouse. The Platte County Fair held annually just outside of Platte City began in 1863 and is the oldest continuously operating fair west of the Mississippi River. On April 3, 1882, Jesse James planned a robbery of the Platte City bank, but it was never carried out due to his assassination by Robert Ford on the morning of the raid. On July 19, 1933 Bonnie & Clyde were ambushed by, and engaged in, a shootout with local authorities just south of Platte City at the Red Crown Tourist Court. Platte City is located at 39°21′42″N 94°46′29″W / 39.36167°N 94.77472°W / 39.36167; -94.77472 (39.361775, -94.774672). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.4 square miles (8.8 km²), of which, 3.4 square miles (8.7 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it (1.17%) is water. As of the
    6.00
    4 votes
    82
    Dakota City

    Dakota City

    Dakota City is a city in Dakota County, Nebraska, United States. It is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,919 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Dakota County. Tyson Foods' largest beef production plant is located in Dakota City. Dakota City is located at 42°24′55″N 96°25′4″W / 42.41528°N 96.41778°W / 42.41528; -96.41778 (42.415294, -96.417808). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.12 km²), of which, 1.08 square miles (2.81 km²) of it is land and 0.12 square miles (0.31 km²) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,919 people, 637 households, and 464 families residing in the city. The population density was 1770.3 people per square mile (683.5/km²). There were 657 housing units at an average density of 606.1 per square mile (234/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 82.4% White, 0.8% African American, 1.9% Native American, 4.5% Asian, 8.3% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 29.3% of the population. There were 637 households out of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9%
    7.00
    3 votes
    83
    7.00
    3 votes
    84
    Great Falls of the Missouri River

    Great Falls of the Missouri River

    The Great Falls of the Missouri River are a series of waterfalls on the Missouri River in north-central Montana in the United States. The five falls, which are located in a 10-mile (16 km) area of the river, are: The Missouri River drops a total of 612 feet (187 m) from the first of the falls to the last, which includes 187 feet (57 m) of waterfalls and 425 feet (130 m) of riverbed descent. The Great Falls have been described as "spectacular", one of the "scenic wonders of America", and "a major geographic discovery". Meriwether Lewis said they were the grandest sight he'd beheld thus far in the journey of the Corps of Discovery. The Great Falls of the Missouri River were depicted on the Montana Territory territorial seal, and became part of the State of Montana's state seal in 1893. The Mandan Indians knew of the cataracts, and called them by a descriptive (but not formal) name "Minni-Sose-Tanka-Kun-Ya" or "the great falls." The South Piegan Blackfeet, however, had a formal name for Rainbow Falls, and called it "Napa's Snarling." No record exists of a Native American name for any of the other four waterfalls. Four of the five waterfalls were given names in 1805 by American
    7.00
    3 votes
    85
    Multnomah Falls

    Multnomah Falls

    Multnomah Falls is a waterfall on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge, located east of Troutdale, between Corbett and Dodson, along the Historic Columbia River Highway. The falls drops in two major steps, split into an upper falls of 542 feet (165 m) and a lower falls of 69 feet (21 m), with a gradual 9 foot (3 m) drop in elevation between the two, so the total height of the waterfall is conventionally given as 620 feet (189 m). Multnomah Falls is the tallest waterfall in the State of Oregon. It is credited by a sign at the site of the falls, and by the United States Forest Service, as the second tallest year-round waterfall in the United States. However, there is some skepticism surrounding this distinction, as Multnomah Falls is listed as the 137th tallest waterfall in the United States by the World Waterfall Database (this site does not distinguish between seasonal and year-round waterfalls). Underground springs from Larch Mountain are the year-round source of water for the waterfall, augmented by spring runoff from the mountain's snowpack and rainwater during the other seasons. A foot trail leads to Benson Footbridge, a 45-foot (14 m)-long footbridge that allows
    7.00
    3 votes
    86
    New Orleans

    New Orleans

    New Orleans ( /nuː ˈɔrliənz/ or /ˈnuː ɔrˈliːnz/, locally /nuː ˈɔrlənz/ or /ˈnɔrlənz/; French: La Nouvelle-Orléans [la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census. The New Orleans metropolitan area (New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States. The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,214,932. The city is named after Orléans, a city located on the Loire River in Centre, France, and is well known for its distinct French Creole architecture, as well as its cross-cultural and multilingual heritage. New Orleans is also famous for its cuisine, music (particularly as the birthplace of jazz), and its annual celebrations and festivals, most notably Mardi Gras. The city is often referred to as the "most unique" in America. New Orleans is located in southeastern Louisiana, straddling the Mississippi River. The boundaries of the city and Orleans Parish (French: paroisse d'Orléans) are
    7.00
    3 votes
    87
    Olympia

    Olympia

    Olympia is the capital city of the state of Washington and the county seat of Thurston County. It was incorporated on January 28, 1859. The population was 46,478 at the 2010 census. Olympia is a major cultural center of the Puget Sound region. The site of Olympia was home to Lushootseed-speaking peoples for thousands of years, including Squaxin, Nisqually, Puyallup, Chehalis, Suquamish, and Duwamish. The first recorded visit by Europeans was in 1792 when Peter Puget and a crew from the British Vancouver Expedition charted the site. In 1846, Edmund Sylvester and Levi Smith jointly claimed the land that now comprises downtown Olympia. In 1851, the U.S. Congress established the Customs District of Puget Sound for Washington Territory and Olympia became the home of the customs house. Its population being steadily expanded from Oregon Trail immigrants, in 1853 the town settled on the name Olympia, at the suggestion of local resident Colonel Isaac N. Ebey, due to its view of the Olympic Mountains to the northwest. The area began to be served by a small fleet of steamboats known as the Puget Sound Mosquito Fleet. In 1896, Olympia became the home of the Olympia Brewing Company, which
    7.00
    3 votes
    88
    Townsend

    Townsend

    Townsend is a city in and the county seat of Broadwater County, Montana, United States. The population was 1,867 at the 2000 census. Lewis and Clark passed through on the voyage of discovery in 1805, although the first white settlers, homesteaders and Civil War veterans in search of gold, did not arrive until the late 1860s. In 1883, a railstop was established as businesses became established supporting gold mining in the region. Townsend was named by railroad officials, in honor of the wife of Charles Barstow Wright, president of the Northern Pacific (1875–1879). Townsend is located at 46°19′13″N 111°31′4″W / 46.32028°N 111.51778°W / 46.32028; -111.51778 (46.320218, -111.517642). Situated at approximately 3800 feet above sea level. Located approximately 35 miles from Helena, the state capitol and 35 miles from the convergence of the Jefferson, Madison, and Gallatin rivers which form the headwaters of the Missouri River. Nicknamed "the first city on the Missouri River" Townsend sits nearby the southern tip of Canyon Ferry Lake (a part of, and fed by, the Missouri River) a popular recreation destination and Montana's third largest body of water. According to the United States
    7.00
    3 votes
    89

    Ellis Grove

    Ellis Grove is a village in Randolph County, Illinois, United States. The population was 363 at the 2010 census. Ellis Grove is located at 38°0′37″N 89°54′29″W / 38.01028°N 89.90806°W / 38.01028; -89.90806 (38.010394, -89.908123). According to the 2010 census, the village has a total area of 0.49 square miles (1.3 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 381 people, 145 households, and 102 families residing in the village. The population density was 819.4 people per square mile (319.8/km²). There were 149 housing units at an average density of 320.4 per square mile (125.1/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 99.21% White, 0.26% Native American, and 0.52% from two or more races. There were 145 households out of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.1% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.0% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.22. In the village the population was spread out with 29.4% under the age of
    8.00
    2 votes
    90
    8.00
    2 votes
    91
    Philadelphia

    Philadelphia

    Philadelphia ( /ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the fifth-most-populous city in the United States. It is located in the Northeastern United States along the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, and it is the only consolidated city-county in Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 Census, the city had a population of 1,526,006. Philadelphia is the economic and cultural center of the Delaware Valley, home to 6 million people and the country's fifth-largest metropolitan area. Popular nicknames for Philadelphia are Philly and The City of Brotherly Love, the latter of which comes from the literal meaning of the city's name in Greek (Greek: Φιλαδέλφεια ([pʰilaˈdelpʰeːa], Modern Greek: [filaˈðelfia]) "brotherly love", compounded from philos (φίλος) "loving", and adelphos (ἀδελφός) "brother"). In 1682, William Penn founded the city to serve as capital of Pennsylvania Colony. By the 1750s it was the largest city and busiest port in British America. During the American Revolution, Philadelphia played an instrumental role as a meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the Constitution in 1787.
    8.00
    2 votes
    92
    Hermiston

    Hermiston

    Hermiston is a city in Umatilla County, Oregon, United States, near the junction of I-82 and I-84. U.S. Route 395 also goes through the center of the city. Hermiston is seven miles south of the Columbia River, Lake Wallula, and the McNary Dam. The Umatilla Chemical Depot and the Umatilla Chemical Agent Disposal Facility are five miles west of the city, northeast of the intersection of I-84 and I-82. As of 2010, the estimated population is 16,745 residents. Hermiston is the larger of the two principal cities of the Pendleton-Hermiston Micropolitan Statistical Area, a micropolitan area that covers Morrow and Umatilla counties and had a combined population of 87,062 at the 2010 census. According to Hermiston's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are: According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.8 square miles (20 km), all land. Distance to major cities: Hermiston's recent population growth is due to its proximity to large cities in the Pacific Northwest and its location along two major freeways. As of the census of 2010, there were 16,745 people, 4,964 households, and 3,360 families residing in the city. The
    5.75
    4 votes
    93

    Lolo Hot Springs

    Lolo Hot Springs is an unincorporated community in Missoula County, Montana, United States. It is centered around a commercial hot springs. It also contains a hotel and restaurant. It is the westernmost settlement along U.S. Highway 12 in Montana. The first luge run in North America was built here in 1965.
    5.75
    4 votes
    94
    Celilo Falls

    Celilo Falls

    Celilo Falls (Wyam, meaning "echo of falling water" or "sound of water upon the rocks," in several native languages) was a tribal fishing area on the Columbia River, just east of the Cascade Mountains, on what is today the border between the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington. The name refers to a series of cascades and waterfalls on the river, as well as to the native settlements and trading villages that existed there in various configurations for 15,000 years. Celilo was the oldest continuously inhabited community on the North American continent until 1957, when the falls and nearby settlements were submerged by the construction of The Dalles Dam. The main waterfall, known variously as Celilo Falls, The Chutes, Great Falls, or Columbia Falls, consisted of three sections: a cataract, called Horseshoe Falls or Tumwater Falls; a deep eddy, the Cul-de-Sac; and the main channel. These features were formed by the Columbia River's relentless push through basalt narrows on the final leg of its journey to the Pacific Ocean. Frequently more than a mile (1.6 km) in width, the river was squeezed here into a width of only 140 feet (43 m). The seasonal flow of the Columbia changed the
    9.00
    1 votes
    95
    Fort Kaskaskia State Historic Site

    Fort Kaskaskia State Historic Site

    Fort Kaskaskia State Historic Site is a 200-acre (0.8 km²) park near Chester, Illinois, on a blufftop overlooking the Mississippi River. It commemorates the vanished frontier town of Old Kaskaskia and the support it gave to George Rogers Clark in the American Revolution. The village of Kaskaskia, Illinois was founded at the mouth of the Kaskaskia River as a missionary post by the Jesuits in 1703. Soon afterwards, settlers from the Quebec and Louisiana regions began to trickle towards the rich, alluvial farmland of the central Mississippi Valley. They built a village and agricultural settlement around the location of the Jesuit mission, a half-circle of bottomland cradled by the Kaskaskia River and by an oxbow of the Mississippi. French-speaking pioneers were noted throughout North America for their comparative fairness towards Native Americans. However, as the Kaskaskia settlement grew throughout the 18th century, the local Indians, members of the Illini Confederacy, may have realized that there might not be enough space for everybody. The French settlers raised Fort Kaskaskia around 1759; the fort stood atop the bluff that looked down upon the frontier village. "Fort Kaskaskia" is
    9.00
    1 votes
    96
    Fort Pierre

    Fort Pierre

    Fort Pierre is a city in Stanley County, South Dakota, United States. It is part of the Pierre, South Dakota Micropolitan Statistical Area and the county seat of Stanley County. The population was 2,078 at the 2010 census. Lily Park in Fort Pierre is situated at the confluence of the Bad and Missouri rivers. The city was named for Pierre Chouteau, Jr., a fur trader from St. Louis who established the trading post and fort. The site where the Lewis and Clark Expedition earlier met with the Teton Sioux is located nearby. Fort Pierre is located at 44°21′32″N 100°22′33″W / 44.35889°N 100.37583°W / 44.35889; -100.37583 (44.358941, -100.375742). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.15 square miles (8.16 km²), of which, 3.1 square miles (8.04 km²) of it is land and 0.05 square miles (0.12 km²) is water. Fort Pierre has been assigned the ZIP code 57532 and the FIPS place code 22260. As of the census of 2010, there were 2,078 people, 893 households, and 586 families residing in the town. The population density was 669.2 people per square mile (258.4/km²). There were 959 housing units at an average density of 308.9 per square mile (119.3/km²). The
    9.00
    1 votes
    97
    Gretna

    Gretna

    Gretna is a city in Sarpy County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 4,441 at the 2010 census. Gretna has the fastest rate of growth of any Nebraska city since 2000. Gretna started shortly after the Burlington Railroad built a short line between Omaha and Ashland in the summer of 1886. Advent of the village of Gretna on this new laid rail line was the cue for the exit of the nearby trading post of Forest City, which had existed since 1856. In its day, Forest City, located 2.5 miles southwest of where Gretna now stands, was a flourishing and busy place, but it was doomed by the rail road which passed it by. The only marker that exists today to show the site of old Forest City is the cemetery (Holy Sepulcher) which is located a little the east of what was the center of activity in the settlement. Names that were prominent in the beginnings of Forest City were the families of William Langdon, John Thomas and John Conner. The Lincoln Land Company, recognizing the potential of the site, surveyed and plotted the town site of Gretna in 1887. The village was incorporated by July 10, 1889. The name suggests Scotland's Gretna Green, the ancestral county of some of the earliest
    9.00
    1 votes
    98
    Maysville

    Maysville

    Maysville is a city in and the county seat of Mason County, Kentucky, United States. The population was 9,011 at the 2010 census, making it the fortieth largest city in Kentucky by population. Maysville is on the Ohio River, 66 miles (106 km) northeast of Lexington. It is the principal city of the Maysville Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Mason and Lewis counties. Two bridges cross the Ohio River from Maysville to Aberdeen, Ohio: the Simon Kenton Memorial Bridge built in 1931, and the William H. Harsha Bridge built in 2001. On the edge of the outer Bluegrass Region, Maysville was historically important in its settlement. Frontiersmen Simon Kenton and Daniel Boone were among the city's founders. Later Maysville was an important port on the Ohio River for the northeastern section of the state. It exported the commodity crops of hemp and tobacco, both produced chiefly by enslaved labor before the American Civil War. It was once a center of wrought-iron manufacture, sending fancy ironwork down the Ohio to decorate the buildings of New Orleans, Louisiana. Other small manufacturers located early in Maysville. Manufacturing remains an important part of the modern
    9.00
    1 votes
    99
    9.00
    1 votes
    100
    South Sioux City

    South Sioux City

    South Sioux City is a city in Dakota County, Nebraska, in the United States. It is located immediately across the Missouri River from Sioux City, Iowa, and is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 13,353, making it the 14th-largest city in Nebraska. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark passed through the South Sioux City area in 1804. European settlement on the Nebraska side of the river began as early as 1854. Several town sites were platted and incorporated in the 1850s. Pacific City, incorporated in 1858, was a short-lived settlement. Covington and South Covington, both incorporated in 1857, merged in 1870. Another town, Stanton, was founded in 1856. South Sioux City was incorporated in 1887. A special election in 1893 approved the merger of Covington and Stanton into the city of South Sioux City. South Sioux City is located at 42°28′16″N 96°24′53″W / 42.47111°N 96.41472°W / 42.47111; -96.41472 (42.471095, -96.414732). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.2 square miles (13.5 km²), of which, 4.9 square miles (12.7 km²) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.8 km²) of
    9.00
    1 votes
    101
    Ak-Sar-Ben Bridge

    Ak-Sar-Ben Bridge

    The Ak-Sar-Ben Bridge was a truss bridge that was the first road bridge to cross the Missouri River connecting Omaha, Nebraska and Council Bluffs, Iowa. It was replaced in 1966 by the Interstate 480 girder bridge. Originally called the Douglas Street Bridge, the bridge was built by the Omaha and Council Bluffs Street Railway Company in 1888 and was designed to handle street cars. It was a toll bridge. As automobiles became more popular, there were resentments about the tolls. A group of businessmen formed the "Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben" ("Nebraska" spelled backwards) to buy the bridge with the intentions of making it a free bridge. They continued to charge tolls until 1947 when it along with the South Omaha Bridge became free bridges. The hated toll booths were paraded through Omaha to celebrate Free Bridge Day on September 25, 1947. It was replaced in November 1966 with an unnamed I-480 girder bridge (I-480 was to go on and be named the "Gerald R. Ford Freeway" after the native son President). Attempts were made to salvage the bridge as a pedestrian walkway but it was demolished in 1968 although the east pier remains in the river just south of the interstate on the Council Bluffs
    6.67
    3 votes
    102

    Bainville

    Bainville is a town in Roosevelt County, Montana, United States. The population was 208 at the 2010 census. It is named for C. M. Bainville, an early resident. Bainville celebrated its centennial on July 4, 2006. Bainville is located at 48°8′26″N 104°13′15″W / 48.14056°N 104.22083°W / 48.14056; -104.22083 (48.140470, -104.220900). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 153 people, 72 households, and 43 families residing in the town. The population density was 147.9 people per square mile (57.4/km²). There were 83 housing units at an average density of 80.2 per square mile (31.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 89.54% White, 5.23% Native American, and 5.23% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.65% of the population. There were 72 households out of which 23.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 4.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.9% were non-families. 37.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 22.2% had someone living alone who was 65
    6.67
    3 votes
    103
    Beacon Rock State Park

    Beacon Rock State Park

    Beacon Rock State Park is a state park of Washington, USA, in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, on State Route 14 about 35 miles (56 km) east of Vancouver, Washington. The park takes its name from Beacon Rock, an 848-foot (258 m) monolith next to the Columbia River. The 5,100 acres (2,100 ha) park includes 4,482 acres (1,814 ha) of forested uplands across the highway from Beacon Rock, over 9.5 miles (15.3 km) of hiking trails, and 9,500 feet (2,900 m) of freshwater shoreline. There is a group campground and an individual site campground. Hardy Falls and Rodney Falls are scenic highlights along the trail to the summit of 2,445-foot (745 m) Hamilton Mountain, which has a view of Bonneville Dam and points east. Other trails go to the top of Beacon Rock and little Beacon Rock. On October 31, 1805, the Lewis and Clark Expedition arrived here and first measured tides on the river, indicating that they were nearing the ocean. Beacon Rock, from which the park takes the name, is on the north bank of the Columbia River. It was named by Lewis and Clark in 1805; they originally referred to it as Beaten Rock, later as Beacon Rock. They noted that the rock marked the eastern extent
    6.67
    3 votes
    104
    Bellevue

    Bellevue

    Bellevue (French for "beautiful view") is a city in Sarpy County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 50,137 at the 2010 census. Eight miles south of Omaha, Bellevue is part of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area. Originally settled in the 1830s, Bellevue was incorporated in 1855 and is the oldest continuous town in Nebraska. The Nebraska State Legislature has credited the town as being the second oldest settlement in Nebraska. It was once the seat of government in Nebraska. Bellevue is located at an elevation of 1159  ft (353 m). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 16.02 square miles (41.5 km²), of which, 15.85 square miles (41.06 km²) of it is land and 0.17 square miles (0.44 km²) is water. It is bounded on the east by the Missouri River. The Sarpy County Courthouse is located in nearby Papillion, Nebraska. As of the census of 2010, there were 50,137 people, 19,142 households, and 13,371 families residing in the city. The population density was 3162.8 people per square mile (1221.2/km²). There were 20,591 housing units at an average density of 1299 per square mile (501.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 81.5% White,
    6.67
    3 votes
    105
    Hamilton

    Hamilton

    Hamilton is a city in and the county seat of Ravalli County, Montana, United States. The population was 4,348 at the 2010 census. Significant outlying population growth is shown in the area; the ZIP Code Tabulation Area for Hamilton's ZIP Code, 59840, had a population of 15,393 at the United States Census Bureau 2009 estimate. Hamilton was founded by copper king Marcus Daly in the late 19th century. It was named for J.W. Hamilton, who provided the right-of-way to the railroad. Daly is said to have wanted to begin business in the then county seat of Grantsdale, but was denied the opportunity. He supposedly founded Hamilton out of his own pocket as a reaction to being rebuffed at Grantsdale. In the summer of 2000, Hamilton made international headlines when forest fires throughout the Bitterroot Valley filled the area with smoke and prompted the evacuation of many residents. President Clinton declared a state of emergency in the area and dispatched National Guardsmen to assist with fighting the fires. Hamilton is, as of 2004, home to two microbiological research and production facilities: the government-run Rocky Mountain Laboratories, and a branch of the Corixa Corporation (bought in
    6.67
    3 votes
    106
    Kelso

    Kelso

    Kelso is a city in southwest Washington State, United States, and is the county seat of Cowlitz County. At the 2010 census, the population was 11,925. Kelso is part of the Longview, Washington Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 102,410. Kelso shares its long western border with Longview, Washington. It is located near Mount St. Helens. The earliest known inhabitants of Kelso were Native Americans from the Cowlitz tribe. The Cowlitz people were separated into the Upper (or Taidnapam) and Lower (or Mountain) Cowlitz tribes, who were members of the Sahaptin and Salish language families, respectively. In 1855, European explorers noted that there numbered over 6000 individuals of the Cowlitz Tribe. Kelso was founded by Peter W. Crawford, a Scottish surveyor, who, in 1847, took up the first donation land claim on the Lower Cowlitz River. Crawford platted a townsite which he named after his home town of Kelso, Scotland. The original plat was dated and filed in October 1884. It became incorporated in 1889. In its early days, Kelso obtained the nickname "Little Chicago" as it became famous for its large number of taverns and brothels that catered to local loggers. On
    6.67
    3 votes
    107
    Metropolis

    Metropolis

    Metropolis is a city located along the Ohio River in Massac County, Illinois, United States. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 6,482. It is the county seat of Massac County. Metropolis is part of the Paducah, KY-IL Micropolitan Statistical Area and is located in Southern Illinois. Located on the Ohio River, the Metropolis area has been settled by many different peoples throughout history. For thousands of years, varying cultures of Native Americans populated the area. The most complex society was the Mississippian culture, which reached its peak around 1100 AD and built a large city at Cahokia, near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. Its people built large earthworks and related structures, many of which remain at the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Mississippian culture regional centers arose throughout the Ohio and lower Mississippian valleys, where the rivers were part of widespread trading routes. In 1757, Massac County was settled by a French expedition, which built Fort De L'Ascension for use during the French and Indian War (also known as the Seven Years War. The forces at the fort were able to resist a Cherokee attack during the war. Afterward the defeated French
    6.67
    3 votes
    108
    St. Louis

    St. Louis

    St. Louis /seɪnt ˈluːɪs/ (French: Saint-Louis or St-Louis, [sɛ̃ lwi] ( listen)) is an independent city on the eastern border of Missouri, United States, and is the second-largest city in the state. With a population of 318,069 in July 2011, it was the 58th-largest U.S. city at the 2010 U.S. Census. The Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) population of 2,812,896 is the 18th-largest in the country. The Greater St. Louis combined statistical area's (CSA) population of 2,882,932 is the 15th-largest CSA in the country, the fourth-largest in the Midwest. The Greater St. Louis area is the largest metropolitan area in Missouri. The city of St. Louis was founded in 1764 by Pierre Laclède and Auguste Chouteau, and after the Louisiana Purchase, it became a major port on the Mississippi River. Its population expanded after the American Civil War, and it became the fourth-largest city in the United States in the late 19th century. It seceded from St. Louis County in March 1877, allowing it to become an independent city and limiting its political boundaries. In 1904, it hosted the 1904 World's Fair and the 1904 Olympic Games. The city's population peaked in 1950, then began a long decline that
    6.67
    3 votes
    109
    Stevenson

    Stevenson

    Stevenson is a town in Skamania County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,465 at the 2010 census, a 22% increase over 2000. It is the county seat of Skamania County and home to the Skamania County Court House and Sheriff's Office. Stevenson is home to the Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center, which focuses on several tribes that were once located near the Columbia River. Stevenson is named for early settler George H. Stevenson. The Stevenson family, who settled in the Gorge in the 1800s from Missouri, founded the town of Stevenson on the old Shepard donation land claim. Under the auspices of the Stevenson Land Company, George Stevenson purchased the original town site for $24,000 in 1893, building the town along the lower flat near the river. Settlers expanded the original dock to serve the daily arrivals of sternwheelers unloading passengers, cargo and loading logs. In 1893, in a dispute over rental fees, an unknown crew transported the county records from the town of Cascades to Stevenson. Stevenson became the county seat of Skamania overnight. Stevenson was officially incorporated on December 16, 1907. In 1908 the SP&S Railroad arrived, pushing the town up the hill
    6.67
    3 votes
    110
    Yankton

    Yankton

    Yankton is a city in, and the county seat of, Yankton County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 14,454 at the 2010 census. Yankton was the original capital of Dakota Territory. It is named for the Yankton tribe of Nakota (Sioux) Native Americans. Yankton is located on the Missouri River just downstream of the Gavins Point Dam and Lewis and Clark Lake and just upstream of the confluence with the James River. The Human Services Center was established as a psychiatric hospital in 1882 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Yankton is commonly referred to as the "River City", due to its proximity to the Missouri River and the importance that the river played in the city's settlement and development. Yankton is located at 42°52′54″N 97°23′33″W / 42.88167°N 97.3925°W / 42.88167; -97.3925 (42.881647, -97.392485). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.45 square miles (21.9 km), of which, 8.21 sq mi (21.3 km) of it is land and 0.24 sq mi (0.6 km) is water. Yankton has been assigned the ZIP codes 57078-57079 and the FIPS place code 73060. As of the census of 2010, there were 14,454 people, 5,909 households, and 3,348
    6.67
    3 votes
    111
    Alton

    Alton

    Alton is a city on the Mississippi River in Madison County, Illinois, United States, about 15 miles (24 km) north of St. Louis, Missouri. The population was 27,865 at the 2010 census. It is a part of the Metro-East region of the Greater St. Louis metropolitan area in Southern Illinois. It is famous for its limestone bluffs along the river north of the city, for its role preceding and during the American Civil War, and as the hometown of Robert Wadlow, the tallest man known. It was the site of the last Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas debate in October 1858. The former state penitentiary here was used during the war to hold up to 12,000 Confederate prisoners of war. The city has been labeled "The most haunted city in America" by paranormal enthusiasts, due to its claimed haunted hot spots, such as McPike Mansion and other structures. Most were built on foundations of stone taken from the former Civil War prison after it was abandoned. Confederate prisoners had suffered severe overcrowding, and many died during a smallpox epidemic. The city holds regular "ghost tours" and has been visited by television crews hoping to film proof of the paranormal. The Alton area was home to Native
    7.50
    2 votes
    112
    7.50
    2 votes
    113
    Cardwell

    Cardwell

    Cardwell is a census-designated place (CDP) in Jefferson County, Montana, United States. The population was 40 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Helena Micropolitan Statistical Area. Cardwell is located at 45°51′54″N 111°57′32″W / 45.865°N 111.95889°W / 45.865; -111.95889 (45.864890, -111.959007). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km), of which, 2.3 square miles (6.0 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (1.72%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 40 people, 19 households, and 9 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 17.5 people per square mile (6.8/km²). There were 19 housing units at an average density of 8.3 per square mile (3.2/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.50% White, 2.50% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.50% of the population. There were 19 households out of which 10.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.1% were married couples living together, 5.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 52.6% were non-families. 42.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.8% had someone living
    7.50
    2 votes
    114
    Celilo Village

    Celilo Village

    Celilo Village, Oregon is an unincorporated Native American community on the Columbia River in northeastern Wasco County in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is near Lake Celilo, the former site of Celilo Falls; it is just south of the community of Wishram, Washington, across the Columbia River. In 2003 about 100 permanent residents lived in 14 dwellings. The site was once a major cultural and trading center, until Celilo Falls was inundated by The Dalles Dam in 1957. The 2000 census reported a total resident population of 44 persons living on a land area of 102.11 acres (0.4132 km²). The United States Army Corps of Engineers provided funding for construction of a new tribal long house in 2006. Most residents of Celilo are members of either the Yakama Nation or Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. Some may be members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, or the Nez Perce tribe. Many residents are fishers engaging in ceremonial, subsistence, and commercial fisheries for salmon, steelhead, and sturgeon in the Columbia River. While the historic fishing site at Celilo Falls is gone, there is an "in lieu" fishing site provided by the Army Corps of Engineers that
    7.50
    2 votes
    115
    Elk Point

    Elk Point

    Elk Point is a city in Union County, South Dakota, United States. It is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,963 as of the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Union County. Elk Point was named for a nearby point in the Misssouri River. The town was incorporated in 1873. Elk Point is located at 42°41′8″N 96°40′54″W / 42.68556°N 96.68167°W / 42.68556; -96.68167 (42.685512, -96.681789). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.36 square miles (3.52 km²), all of it land. Elk Point has been assigned the ZIP code 57025 and the FIPS place code 18620. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,963 people, 770 households, and 505 families residing in the town. The population density was 1443.4 people per square mile (557.3/km²). There were 830 housing units at an average density of 610.3 per square mile (235.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.0% White, 0.3% African American, 0.6% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.8% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.5% of the population. There were 770 households out of which 36.6% had children under the age of
    7.50
    2 votes
    116
    Pittsburgh

    Pittsburgh

    Pittsburgh ( /ˈpɪtsbərɡ/, PITS-burg) is the second-largest city in the U.S. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, after only Philadelphia, and the county seat of Allegheny County. Regionally, it anchors the largest urban area of both Appalachia and the Ohio River Valley. Nationally, it is the 22nd-largest urban area in the United States. The population of the city in 2010 was 305,704, while that of the seven-county metropolitan area stood at 2,356,285. Downtown Pittsburgh retains substantial economic influence, ranking at 25th in the nation for jobs within the urban core and 6th in job density. The characteristic shape of Pittsburgh's central business district is a triangular tract carved by the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers, which form the Ohio River. The city features 151 high-rise buildings, 446 bridges, two inclined railways, and a pre-revolutionary fortification. Pittsburgh is known colloquially as "the City of Bridges" and "the Steel City" for its many bridges and former steel manufacturing base. While the city is historically known for its steel industry, today its economy is largely based on healthcare, education, technology, robotics, and financial services.
    7.50
    2 votes
    117
    Saint Charles

    Saint Charles

    St. Charles (French: Saint-Charles; Spanish: "San Carlos") is a city in and the county seat of St. Charles County, Missouri, United States. The population was 65,794 at the 2010 census, making St. Charles the 2nd largest city in St. Charles County. It lies just to the northwest of St. Louis, Missouri on the Missouri River, and, for a time, played a significant role in the United States' westward expansion. It is the third oldest city west of the Mississippi, founded in 1765 as Les Petites Côtes, "The Little Hills", by Louis Blanchette, a French Canadian fur trader, and was the last "civilized" stop for the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1804. The city served as the first Missouri capital from 1821 to 1826. It is the site for the Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne shrine. It is also the home base for the St. Louis National Weather Service Forecast Office, serving central, east-central and northeastern Missouri, as well as west-central and southwest Illinois. Louis Blanchette was a French Canadian who traveled to the Americas, it is said, for adventure. According to Hopewell's Legends of the Missouri and Mississippi: According to Hopewell's rather romantic account, Blanchette met another
    7.50
    2 votes
    118
    Wheeling

    Wheeling

    Wheeling is a city in Ohio and Marshall counties in the U.S. state of West Virginia. It is the county seat of Ohio County. Wheeling is the principal city of the Wheeling Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 28,486. Wheeling was originally a settlement in the British Colony of Virginia and later an important city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It was part of the land which the United States allowed to be annexed to Virginia when the Northwest Territory was being organized in 1787. In 1853 the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) reached Wheeling, connecting it to markets back to the port city of Baltimore, Maryland and stimulating development. In 1861, with differences over slavery and loyalty to the Union upon the outbreak of the American Civil War, the western counties of Virginia seceded from the state. Wheeling was the location of the Wheeling Convention, which established the state of West Virginia, and was the first capital of West Virginia. The capital moved so often in its early years that it was nicknamed the "floating capital". In 1870, the State Legislature designated Charleston as the capital city. In 1875, the Legislature reversed
    7.50
    2 votes
    119
    Camp Dubois

    Camp Dubois

    Camp Dubois, near present day Hartford, Illinois, served as the winter camp for the Lewis and Clark Expedition from December 12, 1803, to May 14, 1804. It was located on the east side of the Mississippi River so that it was still in United States territory. This was important because the transfer of the Louisiana Purchase to France from Spain did not occur until March 9, 1804, and then from France to the United States on March 10, 1804. They returned again to the camp on their return journey on September 23, 1806. William Clark arrived at Camp Dubois first with a group of men that he recruited from Kaskaskia and Fort Massac on December 12, 1803. Captain Meriwether Lewis joined the camp several weeks later after gathering as much information about Upper Louisiana and the west from Cahokia, Kaskaskia, St. Louis and other locations. Also during this time, Lewis took the opportunity to smooth relations with the Spanish authorities to make the transfer of the Louisiana Purchase easier. Camp Dubois was a fully operating military camp. Soldiers stationed at the camp were required to participate in training, maintain personal cleanliness, police the camp and other duties spelled out by the
    6.33
    3 votes
    120
    6.33
    3 votes
    121
    Shubert

    Shubert

    Shubert is a village in Richardson County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 150 at the 2010 census. Shubert is located at 40°14′13″N 95°41′1″W / 40.23694°N 95.68361°W / 40.23694; -95.68361 (40.236860, -95.683546). According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.21 square miles (0.54 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 150 people, 73 households, and 48 families residing in the village. The population density was 714.3 people per square mile (275.8/km²). There were 103 housing units at an average density of 490.5 per square mile (189.4/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 96.7% White, 0.7% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.7% of the population. There were 73 households out of which 17.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.1% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.2% were non-families. 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household
    6.33
    3 votes
    122

    Ullin

    Ullin is a village in Pulaski County, Illinois, United States. The population was 779 at the 2000 census. Ullin is located at 37°16′40″N 89°10′54″W / 37.27778°N 89.18167°W / 37.27778; -89.18167 (37.277861, -89.181533). According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 2.9 square miles (7.5 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 779 people, 247 households, and 145 families residing in the village. The population density was 272.1 people per square mile (105.2/km²). There were 273 housing units at an average density of 95.3 per square mile (36.9/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 57.25% White, 31.84% African American, 7.57% Asian, 0.51% from other races, and 2.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.91% of the population. There were 247 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.2% were married couples living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.9% were non-families. 38.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 27.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the
    6.33
    3 votes
    123
    Bonneville Dam

    Bonneville Dam

    Bonneville Lock and Dam ( /ˈbɒnɨvɨl/) consists of several run-of-the-river dam structures that together complete a span of the Columbia River between the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington at River Mile 146.1. The dam is located 40 miles (64 km) east of Portland, Oregon, in the Columbia River Gorge. The primary functions of Bonneville Lock and Dam are electrical power generation and river navigation. The dam was built and is managed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Electrical power generated at Bonneville is distributed by the Bonneville Power Administration. Bonneville Lock and Dam is named for Army Capt. Benjamin Bonneville, an early explorer credited with charting much of the Oregon Trail. The Bonneville Dam Historic District was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1987. In 1896, prior to this damming of the river, the Cascade Locks and Canal were constructed, allowing ships to pass the Cascades Rapids, located several miles upstream of Bonneville. Prior to the New Deal, development of the Columbia River with flood control, hydroelectricity, navigation and irrigation was deemed as important. In 1929, the US Army Corps of Engineers published the 308
    7.00
    2 votes
    124
    Charlottesville

    Charlottesville

    Charlottesville is an independent city geographically surrounded by, but separate from, Albemarle County in Virginia, United States, and named after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. The official population estimate for the city, calculated in 2010, was 43,475. It is the county seat of Albemarle County though the two are separate legal entities. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Charlottesville with Albemarle County for statistical purposes, bringing the total population to 118,398. The city is the heart of the Charlottesville metropolitan area which includes Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene and Nelson counties. Charlottesville is best known as the home to two U.S. Presidents (Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe), and nearby is that of James Madison in Orange, as well as the home of the University of Virginia, which, along with Monticello is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Monticello, Jefferson's mountain-top home, attracts approximately half a million tourists every year. While both served as Governor of Virginia, they lived in Charlottesville and traveled to and from the capitol (Richmond, Virginia) along the
    7.00
    2 votes
    125
    Continental Divide of the Americas

    Continental Divide of the Americas

    The Continental Divide of the Americas, or merely the Continental Gulf of Division or Great Divide, is the name given to the principal, and largely mountainous, hydrological divide of the Americas, that is, the continental divide that separates the watersheds that drain into the Pacific Ocean from (1) those river systems that drain into the Atlantic Ocean (including those that drain into the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea), and (2) along the northernmost reaches of the Divide, those river systems that drain into the Arctic Ocean. There are many other hydrological divides in the Americas, however the Great Divide is by far the most prominent of these because it tends to follow a line of high peaks along the main ranges of the Rocky Mountains and Andes, at a generally much higher elevation than the other divides. The Continental Divide of the Americas begins at Cape Prince of Wales, Alaska, the westernmost point on the mainland of the Americas. The Divide crosses northern Alaska into the Yukon, then zig-zags south into British Columbia via the Cassiar Mountains and Omineca Mountains and northern Nechako Plateau to Summit Lake, north of the city of Prince George and just south
    7.00
    2 votes
    126
    Decatur

    Decatur

    Decatur is a village in Burt County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 481 at the 2010 census. This town is named after one of its incorporators, Stephen Decatur, who claimed to be the nephew of war hero Stephen Decatur, Jr.. Important Nebraska settler Peter Sarpy helped lay out the town. Decatur is located at 42°0′22″N 96°15′4″W / 42.00611°N 96.25111°W / 42.00611; -96.25111 (42.006018, -96.250982). According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.9 square miles (2.33 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 481 people, 240 households, and 136 families residing in the village. The population density was 536.2 people per square mile (207/km²). There were 275 housing units at an average density of 306.6 per square mile (118.4/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 89.0% White, 0.6% African American, 7.1% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 1.0% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.7% of the population. There were 240 households out of which 17.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.5% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with
    7.00
    2 votes
    128
    Hartford

    Hartford

    Hartford is a village in Madison County, Illinois, United States, near the mouth of the Missouri River. The population was 1,429 at the 2010 census. Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1803-1804 here, near what has been designated the Lewis and Clark State Historic Site. Hartford is the birthplace of actor Clint Walker, known for the television series Cheyenne and for the movies The Ten Commandments and The Dirty Dozen. Hartford is located at 38°49′28″N 90°5′33″W / 38.82444°N 90.0925°W / 38.82444; -90.0925 (38.824498, -90.092509). The village is located approximately 15 miles (24 km) north of downtown St. Louis, Missouri, on the Mississippi River. The confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers is just south of the village limits, while the confluence of the Illinois and Mississippi rivers is approximately 22 miles (35 km) upstream. According to the 2010 census, the village has a total area of 4.88 square miles (12.6 km), of which 4.66 square miles (12.1 km) (or 95.49%) is land and 0.22 square miles (0.57 km) (or 4.51%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,545 people, 650 households, and 434 families residing in the village. The population density was 396.4
    7.00
    2 votes
    129
    Kaw Point

    Kaw Point

    Kaw Point is the name given to the point where the Kansas River terminates at the Missouri River in the West Bottoms area of Kansas City, Kansas. Kaw Point is also where the Missouri ceases its southerly course and turns to flow generally east through the State of Missouri to the Mississippi River at St. Louis. Kaw Point was part of the land originally claimed by Spain, then by France, until ultimately the United States bought it as part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Following the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 the Lewis and Clark Expedition left St. Louis on a mission to reach the Pacific Ocean. Lewis and Clark camped near the point on June 26–28, 1804. Captain William Clark wrote on June 27, 1804, that "the Countrey about the mouth of this river is verry fine." The expedition's journals also noted that the location would be appropriate for a fort, and that the area teemed with deer, elk, buffalo, bear, and many "Parrot queets," the now extinct Carolina parakeet. It is the original reason for the location of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. Sitting at a longitude of 94 degrees 36 minutes West, Kaw Point was the basis for the state of Missouri's western boundary from Iowa to
    7.00
    2 votes
    130
    Lolo

    Lolo

    Lolo is a census-designated place (CDP) in Missoula County, Montana, United States. It is part of the 'Missoula, Montana Metropolitan Statistical Area'. The population was 3,892 at the 2010 census, an increase from its population of 3,388 in 2000. It is home to Travelers' Rest State Park, a site where Lewis and Clark camped in 1805 and again in 1806. It is one of the few sites in the nation with physical confirmation of their visit. Lolo is located at 46°45′55″N 114°5′9″W / 46.76528°N 114.08583°W / 46.76528; -114.08583 (46.765210, -114.085892). The town lies at the confluence of U.S. 12 and U.S. 93, and at the eastern end of the Lolo Trail. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.7 square miles (25 km), of which, 9.5 square miles (25 km) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km) of it (2.16%) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 3,892 people, 1,218 households, and 936 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 356.2 people per square mile (137.6/km²). There were 1,263 housing units at an average density of 132.8 per square mile (51.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.69% White, 0.24% African American, 0.89%
    7.00
    2 votes
    131
    Washburn

    Washburn

    Washburn (Arikara: iinetuhkatákux [iineetUkatákUx] ) is a city in McLean County, North Dakota in the United States. It is the county seat of McLean County. The population was 1,246 at the 2010 census. Washburn was founded in 1882 and became the county seat in 1883. Washburn is home to the North Dakota Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center which focuses on the Expedition's winter with the Mandans and houses a full-scale replication of Fort Mandan and one of the expedition's canoes. Washburn is located at 47°17′29″N 101°1′40″W / 47.29139°N 101.02778°W / 47.29139; -101.02778 (47.291313, -101.027647). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.89 square miles (4.89 km²), of which, 1.8 square miles (4.65 km²) of it is land and 0.09 square miles (0.24 km²) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,246 people, 551 households, and 369 families residing in the town. The population density was 694.2 people per square mile (268/km²). There were 661 housing units at an average density of 368.2 per square mile (142.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.0% White, 0.1% African American, 0.6% Native American, 0.5% from other races, and 0.9% from two
    7.00
    2 votes
    132
    Mount Adams

    Mount Adams

    Mount Adams is a potentially active stratovolcano in the Cascade Range and the second-highest mountain in the U.S. state of Washington. Adams is a member of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, and is one of the arc's largest volcanoes, located in a remote wilderness approximately 31 miles (50 km) east of Mount St. Helens. The Mount Adams Wilderness comprises the upper and western part of the volcano's cone. The eastern side of the mountain is part of the Yakama Nation. Adams' asymmetrical and broad body rises 1.5 miles (2.4 km) above the Cascade crest. Its nearly flat summit was formed as a result of cone-building eruptions from separated vents. Air travelers flying the busy routes above the area sometimes confuse Mount Adams with nearby Mount Rainier, which has a similar flat-topped shape. The Pacific Crest Trail traverses the western flank of the mountain. Although Adams has not erupted in over 1,400 years, it is not considered extinct. Contrary to legend, the flatness of Adams' current summit area is not due to the loss of the volcano's peak. Instead it was formed as a result of cone-building eruptions from separated vents. A false summit rises 11,500 feet (3,510 m) on the south side of
    6.00
    3 votes
    133
    Rushville

    Rushville

    Rushville is a village in Buchanan County, Missouri, United States. The population was 280 at the 2000 census, at which time it was a town. It is part of the St. Joseph, MO–KS Metropolitan Statistical Area. Rushville is located at 39°35′14″N 95°1′30″W / 39.58722°N 95.025°W / 39.58722; -95.025 (39.587324, -95.025131). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.52 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 280 people, 113 households, and 78 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,236.4 people per square mile (470.0/km²). There were 121 housing units at an average density of 534.3 per square mile (203.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 99.29% White, 0.36% Pacific Islander, and 0.36% from two or more races. There were 113 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.0% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the
    6.00
    3 votes
    134
    Fort Union National Monument

    Fort Union National Monument

    Fort Union National Monument is a unit of the National Park Service located north of Watrous, Mora County, New Mexico, USA. The national monument was founded on June 28, 1954. The site preserves the second of three forts constructed on the site beginning in 1851, as well as the ruins of the third. Also visible is a network of ruts from the Mountain and Cimarron Branches of the old Santa Fe Trail. There is a visitor center with exhibits about the fort and a film about the Santa Fe Trail. The altitude of the Visitor Center is 6760 feet (2060 m). A 1.2-mile (1.9-kilometre) trail winds through the fort's adobe ruins. Santa Fe trader and author William Davis gave his first impression of the fort in the year 1857: Fort Union, a hundred and ten miles from Santa Fé, is situated in the pleasant valley of the Moro. It is an open post, without either stockades or breastworks of any kind, and, barring the officers and soldiers who are seen about, it has much more the appearance of a quiet frontier village than that of a military station. It is laid out with broad and straight streets crossing each other at right angles. The huts are built of pine logs, obtained from the neighboring mountains,
    8.00
    1 votes
    135
    Gavins Point Dam

    Gavins Point Dam

    Gavins Point Dam is a hydroelectric dam on the Missouri River in the U.S. states of Nebraska and South Dakota. Built from 1952 to 1957, it impounds Lewis and Clark Lake. The dam is on the Nebraska-South Dakota border, west of Yankton, South Dakota. Gavins Point Dam is the lowermost dam on the Missouri, and was built as part of the Pick-Sloan Plan. The dam area (with Lewis and Clark Lake) is a very popular regional tourist destination. The stretch of the Missouri immediately downstream of Gavins Point Dam is the only significant section of non-channelized meandering stream on the lower portion of the river. This federally designated Wild and Scenic River is among the last free-flowing stretches of the Missouri; it exhibits the islands, bars, chutes, and snags that once characterized the "Mighty Mo". The dam has a hydroelectric plant with three generators, each having a nameplate capacity of 44,099 kW, for a total of 132.297 MW.
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    Marietta

    Marietta

    Marietta is a city in and the county seat of Washington County, Ohio, United States. During 1788, pioneers to the Ohio Country established Marietta as the first permanent American settlement of the new United States in the Northwest Territory. Marietta is located in southeastern Ohio at the mouth of the Muskingum River at its confluence with the Ohio River. The population was 14,085 at the 2010 census. It is the second-largest by population of the three principal cities included in the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna, West Virginia-Ohio (part) Metropolitan Statistical Area. The private, nonsectarian liberal arts Marietta College is located here. It was a station on the Underground Railroad before the Civil War. This is the site of the prehistoric Marietta Earthworks, a Hopewell complex more than 1500 years old, whose Great Mound and other major monuments were preserved by the earliest United States settlers in parks such as the Mound Cemetery. Succeeding cultures of indigenous peoples have lived along the Ohio River and its tributaries for thousands of years. Among them were more than one culture who built earthwork mounds, monuments which generally expressed their cosmology, often
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    North Bonneville

    North Bonneville

    North Bonneville is a city in Skamania County, Washington, United States. The population was 593 at the 2000 census and 956 at the 2010 census. The community of North Bonneville developed as a construction town next to the massive Bonneville Lock, Dam, and powerhouse project begun in late 1933. Federal legislation in 1937 also authorized a second Powerhouse, although the need was not then immediate. North Bonneville was officially incorporated on June 25, 1935. The Columbia’s north shore where North Bonneville had grown was selected by federal agencies in 1971 as the site for the second Powerhouse. Faced with the prospect of being displaced and disbanded the townspeople determined to relocate as a community. Intense efforts by citizens’ groups and planning assistance from state sources finally led to agreements with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to hire professionals for the design and construction of a new town. Contractors then prepared the chosen town site for the initial community of 600 people as the old town was devoured by the enormous excavation for the new powerhouse. Federal responsibility for the North Bonneville relocation was expanded in 1974 with enactment of
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Ocean Park

    Ocean Park

    Ocean Park is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pacific County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,573 at the 2010 census. Ocean Park is located at 46°29′38″N 124°2′53″W / 46.49389°N 124.04806°W / 46.49389; -124.04806 (46.493908, -124.047921). It is on the [North Beach Peninsula] and adjacent to Pacific Pines State Park. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10.0 km²), of which, 3.0 square miles (7.9 km²) of it is land and 0.8 square miles (2.1 km²) of it (21.45%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,459 people, 710 households, and 416 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 480.2 people per square mile (185.3/km²). There were 1,505 housing units at an average density of 495.3/sq mi (191.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.52% White, 0.27% African American, 1.85% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.64% from other races, and 1.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.18% of the population. 25.0% were of German, 13.4% English, 12.9% Irish and 5.2% Swedish ancestry according to Census 2000. There were 710 households out of which 17.0%
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    St. Matthews

    St. Matthews

    St. Matthews is the 20th largest city in Kentucky, United States, and is a prominent suburb of Louisville. It is located 8 miles east of downtown Louisville in Jefferson County. It is one of the state's major shopping areas, being home to second and fifth largest malls in Kentucky (Mall St. Matthews and Oxmoor Center), respectively, along with many smaller shopping centers along Shelbyville Road. In 2003 St. Matthews became part of the new "Louisville Metro" government. The population was 17,472 at the 2010 census. Indigenous peoples of varying cultures lived along the waterways of Kentucky for thousands of years before European contact. The Mississippian culture was a complex, sophisticated prehistoric culture whose people built massive earthwork mounds in the Ohio River valley, areas they settled between 1000 AD and 1400 AD. They preceded the historic tribes of the Ohio River area. The area eventually known as St. Matthews was first settled by European Americans in 1779 by Colonial James John Floyd. Floyd, who had conducted an important survey of Jefferson County in 1774, bought 2,000 acres (8 km) of land from soldiers who had been awarded the parcels for their service in the
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Wishram

    Wishram

    Wishram is a census-designated place (CDP) in Klickitat County, Washington, United States. The population was 213 at the 2000 census. The site of the historic Celilo Falls is nearby. The community was originally named Fallbridge; it was changed to Wishram to honor the Wishram tribe of Native Americans. The nearby Dalles Dam was completed in 1957, and began filling Lake Celilo. The original fishing village near this location was inundated. Wishram is located at 45°39′40″N 120°57′32″W / 45.66111°N 120.95889°W / 45.66111; -120.95889 (45.661198, -120.958788). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.3 km²), all of it land. Wishram's location results from two major geological features: the location of the Celilo Falls on the Columbia River, and the access to the Central Oregon Plateau via the Deschutes River just across the falls from Wishram. The falls not only provided early peoples a reliable source of food, but it later provided a convenient location for an easily constructed railroad bridge crossing the Columbia. The Deschutes valley just to the south of the falls provided a route for rail access to the south, and ultimately
    8.00
    1 votes
    142

    Wood River

    Wood River is a city in Madison County, Illinois, United States. The population was 10,657 at the 2010 census. Wood River is located at 38°51′47″N 90°5′19″W / 38.86306°N 90.08861°W / 38.86306; -90.08861 (38.863047, -90.088527). According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 7.15 square miles (18.5 km), of which 6.98 square miles (18.1 km) (or 97.62%) is land and 0.17 square miles (0.44 km) (or 2.38%) is water. Wood River is located on the Mississippi River approximately 15 miles (24 km) upstream of downtown St. Louis, Missouri, among several contiguous cities and villages that have come to be known as the "Riverbend" area. The current confluence of the Mississippi and the Missouri rivers is just south of one of these neighboring villages, Hartford. Other cities making up the "Riverbend" include Alton, East Alton, Godfrey, Roxana and Bethalto. Wood River is most famous for its role as being near the starting point of the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803–04. Meriwether Lewis declared the mouth of the Dubois River to be the expedition's official point of departure. The Dubois River is today known as the Wood River—or to locals as "Wood River Creek". Their winter camp
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Lancaster

    Lancaster

    Lancaster (Pennsylvania Dutch: Lengeschder) is a city located in South Central Pennsylvania and serves as the seat of Pennsylvania's Lancaster County and one of the older non-coastal towns in the United States, (along with Springfield, Massachusetts; Petersburg, Virginia; Schenectady, New York and several other settlements.). With a population of 59,322, it ranks eighth in population among Pennsylvania's cities. The Lancaster metropolitan area population is 507,766, making it the 101st largest metropolitan area in the US and 2nd largest in the South Central Pennsylvania area. Lancaster was home to James Buchanan, the nation's 15th president, and to congressman and abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens. The city's primary industries include healthcare, tourism, public administration, manufacturing, both professional and semi-professional services, and home of the Park City Center shopping mall, the largest indoor retail facility in the entire south-central Pennsylvania region. Lancaster is known for its innovative adoption of advanced technology and hosts more electronic public CCTV outdoor cameras per capita than any US city, despite its controversy among residents. Locally, Lancaster is
    5.67
    3 votes
    144
    Cahokia

    Cahokia

    Cahokia is a village in St. Clair County, Illinois, United States. As of the 2000 census, the village had a population of 16,391. The name is a reference to one of the clans of the historic Illini confederacy, who were encountered by early French explorers to the region. Early European settlers also named Cahokia Mounds after the Illini. This is an extensive prehistoric Mississippian culture urban complex located to the north in present-day Collinsville in Madison County. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a State Historic Park. The village of Cahokia is the home of significant colonial and Federal-period buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the Cahokia Courthouse (c 1740), in the French Colonial style, Church of the Holy Family (Cahokia) (c. 1697), and the Jarrot Mansion (c 1810). While the Europeans also named the Cahokia Mounds site to the north after the Illini group, archeologists have determined that the earthwork mounds complex was built by the Mississippian culture, an earlier, potentially unrelated indigenous people. The city site reached its peak in the 13th century and was abandoned centuries before European contact. The Cahokia Native
    6.50
    2 votes
    145
    Cathlamet

    Cathlamet

    Cathlamet is a town located along the Ocean Beach Highway in Wahkiakum County, Washington, United States where it is the county seat. The population was 532 at the 2010 census, though it has an additional rural population outside of the town limits. From time immemorial, Cathlamet was the largest, or one of the largest, villages of Columbia River Indians west of the Cascade Mountains. This village of cedar houses included 300-400 inhabitants when visited by Lewis and Clark. In 1846, James Birnie became the first permanent white settler at Cathlamet, moving there after a career with the Hudson's Bay Company. He set up a trading post, remnants of which were reported still standing in 1906. Cathlamet was officially incorporated on February 18, 1907. In 1938, the Julia Butler Hansen Bridge was built to carry what is now State Route 409 across the Columbia River's Cathlamet Channel to Puget Island. Cathlamet is located at 46°12′14″N 123°23′2″W / 46.20389°N 123.38389°W / 46.20389; -123.38389 (46.203767, -123.383838). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.4 square miles (1.0 km²), all land. Cathlamet is connected across the Columbia River to
    6.50
    2 votes
    146

    Giant Springs

    Giant Springs is a large first magnitude spring located near Great Falls, Montana. Its water has a temperature of 54 °F and originates from snowmelt in the Little Belt Mountains, 60 miles (97 km) away. According to radiometric dating, the water takes almost 2,900 years to travel underground before returning to the surface at the springs. Giant Springs is formed by an opening in a part of the Madison aquifer, a vast aquifer underlying 5 U.S. States and 3 Canadian Provinces. The conduit between the mountains and the spring is the geological stratum found in parts of the northwest United States called Madison Limestone. Although some of the underground water from the Little Belt Mountains escapes to form Giant Springs, some stays underground and continues flowing, joining sources from losing streams in the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains and other areas. The aquifer eventually surfaces in Canada. The spring outlet is located in Giant Springs State Park, just downstream and northeast of Great Falls, Montana on the east banks of the Missouri River. Giant Springs was discovered by Lewis and Clark during their exploration of the Louisiana Purchase in 1805. Giant Springs has an average
    6.50
    2 votes
    147
    6.50
    2 votes
    148
    Libby

    Libby

    Libby (Ktunaxa: ʔaqswaq) is a city in and the county seat of Lincoln County, Montana, United States. The population was 2,628 at the 2010 census. Libby is located at 48°23′17″N 115°33′13″W / 48.38806°N 115.55361°W / 48.38806; -115.55361 (48.388128, -115.553707), along U.S. Route 2. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.4 km), all of it land. Located in the Kootenai National Forest, between the Cabinet Mountains to the south and the Purcell Mountains to the north. The town lies in the heart of the Kootenai Valley along the Kootenai River, and downstream from the Libby Dam. Libby is at an elevation of 2096 feet (639 m). Libby experiences a continental climate (Köppen Dfb). As of the census of 2000, there were 2,626 people, 1,132 households, and 669 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,061.9 people per square mile (798.3/km²). There were 1,264 housing units at an average density of 992.5 per square mile (384.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.51% White, 0.15% African American, 1.26% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.53% from other races, and 1.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of
    6.50
    2 votes
    149
    Lincoln

    Lincoln

    The City of Lincoln is the capital and the second-most populous city of the US state of Nebraska, after Omaha. Lincoln is also the county seat of Lancaster County and the home of the University of Nebraska. Lincoln's 2010 Census population was 258,379. Lincoln was founded in 1856 as the village of Lancaster, and became the county seat of the newly created Lancaster County in 1859. The capital of Nebraska Territory had been Omaha since the creation of the territory in 1854; however, most of the territory's population lived south of the Platte River. After much of the territory south of the Platte considered annexation to Kansas, the legislature voted to move the capital south of the river and as far west as possible. The village of Lancaster was chosen, in part due to the salt flats and marshes. Omaha interests attempted to derail the move by having Lancaster renamed after the recently assassinated President Abraham Lincoln. Many of the people south of the river had been sympathetic to the Confederate cause in the recently concluded Civil War, and it was assumed that the legislature would not pass the measure if the future capital were named after Lincoln. The ploy did not work, as
    6.50
    2 votes
    151
    Pickstown

    Pickstown

    Pickstown is a town in Charles Mix County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 201 at the 2010 census. It was named after Lewis A. Pick, director of the Missouri River office of the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Pickstown is located at 43°3′59″N 98°31′55″W / 43.06639°N 98.53194°W / 43.06639; -98.53194 (43.066418, -98.531991). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.6 square miles (1.6 km), all of it land. Pickstown has been assigned the ZIP code 57367 and the FIPS place code 49460. As of the census of 2000, there were 168 people, 76 households, and 49 families residing in the town. The population density was 260.7 people per square mile (101.4/km²). There were 88 housing units at an average density of 136.5/sq mi (53.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 85.12% White, 11.31% Native American, 0.60% Asian, and 2.98% from two or more races. There were 76 households out of which 22.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.9% were married couples living together, 2.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.5% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.6%
    5.33
    3 votes
    152
    Carrollton

    Carrollton

    Carrollton is a city in Carroll County, Kentucky, United States, at the confluence of the Ohio and Kentucky Rivers. The population was 3,846 at the 2000 census. Carrollton was founded in 1794, and it was known as Port William initially. It served as the county seat of Gallatin County until 1838 when the county was split, creating Carroll County, and Port William was renamed Carrollton and became the seat of the new county. The Louisville & Nashville Railroad was built near town in 1868 and eventually became more important to the town's economy than river traffic. It has one of the state's largest tobacco markets, and the population has remained steady since being recorded at 3,884 in the 1970 census. See Carrollton bus disaster for an important, and tragic, event in Carroll County's history. Carrollton is located at 38°40′38″N 85°10′17″W / 38.67722°N 85.17139°W / 38.67722; -85.17139 (38.677329, -85.171504). The city is situated on the Ohio River at the mouth of the Kentucky River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.3 square miles (6.0 km), of which, 2.2 square miles (5.7 km) of it is land and 0.44% is water. As of the census of 2000,
    7.00
    1 votes
    153
    Hamburg

    Hamburg

    Hamburg is a city in Fremont County, Iowa, United States, along the Nishnabotna River. The population was 1,187 at the 2010 census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.10 square miles (2.85 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,187 people, 514 households, and 312 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,079.1 inhabitants per square mile (416.6 /km). There were 594 housing units at an average density of 540.0 per square mile (208.5 /km). The racial makeup of the city was 94.2% White, 0.8% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.7% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.2% of the population. There were 514 households out of which 25.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.8% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.3% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31
    7.00
    1 votes
    154
    Fort Benton

    Fort Benton

    Fort Benton is a city in and the county seat of Chouteau County, Montana, United States. A portion of the city was designated as a National Historic Landmark District in 1961. Established a full generation before the U.S. Civil War, Fort Benton is one of the oldest settlements in the American West; in contrast many other places—including large cities today—were settled in the late 1860s, 1870s, or 1880s. The population was 1,594 at the 2000 census. Established by European-Americans Auguste Chouteau and Pierre Chouteau, Jr. of St. Louis in 1847 as the last fur trading post on the Upper Missouri River, the fort became an important economic center. For 30 years, the port attracted steamboats carrying goods, merchants, gold miners and settlers, coming from New Orleans, Memphis, St. Louis, Hannibal, Bismarck, Kansas City, etc. As the terminus for the 642-mile-long Mullan Road, completed by the US Army in 1860, Fort Benton was part of the overland link between trade on the Missouri River and the Columbia River, at Fort Walla Walla, Washington. Twenty thousand migrants used the road in the first year to travel to the Northwest. It became an important route for miners from both directions
    6.00
    2 votes
    155
    6.00
    2 votes
    156
    Winifred

    Winifred

    Winifred is a town in north-central Fergus County, Montana, United States. The population was 156 at the 2000 census. Winifred was founded in 1913 as the terminus of a newly-built branch line of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad ("the Milwaukee Road"). It is popularly believed to have been named after one of the railroad owner's two daughters (the other being Christina, another small town about 15 miles away). Winifred is located at 47°33′35″N 109°22′38″W / 47.55972°N 109.37722°W / 47.55972; -109.37722 (47.559818, -109.377108). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 156 people, 69 households, and 38 families residing in the town. The population density was 305.0 people per square mile (118.1/km²). There were 85 housing units at an average density of 166.2 per square mile (64.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.79% White, 1.28% Native American, 0.64% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.92% of the population. There were 69 households out of which 24.6% had children under the age of 18
    6.00
    2 votes
    157
    Lolo Pass

    Lolo Pass

    Lolo Pass, elevation 5,233 feet (1,595 m), is a mountain pass in the United States, in the Bitterroot Range of the northern Rocky Mountains. It is on the border between the states of Montana and Idaho, approximately 40 miles (64 km) west-southwest of Missoula, Montana. The pass is the highest point of the historic Lolo Trail, between the Bitterroot Valley in Montana and the Weippe Prairie in Idaho. The trail was used by Nez Perce Indians in the 18th century, and by the Lewis and Clark Expedition, guided by Old Toby of the Shoshone, on their westward snowbound journey in September 1805. After a winter at Fort Clatsop in present-day Oregon, the Corps of Discovery returned the following June. The pass was also used in 1877 during the Nez Perce War as some of the Nez Perce under Chief Joseph tried to escape the U.S. Army. Shortly after crossing the pass the two sides clashed at the Battle of the Big Hole. US Highway 12, belatedly completed in the early 1960s, crosses the pass. Lolo Hot Springs is 7 miles (11 km) east of the pass in Montana. The first limited services in Idaho are in Powell, 13 miles (21 km) to the west of the pass, then another 65 miles (105 km) to Lowell, at the
    5.00
    3 votes
    158
    Niobrara

    Niobrara

    Niobrara ( /ˌnaɪ.əˈbrærə/; Omaha: Ní Ubthátha Tʰáⁿwaⁿgthaⁿ [nĩꜜ ubɫᶞaꜜɫᶞa tʰãꜜwãŋɡɫᶞã], meaning "water spread-out village") is a village in Knox County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 370 at the 2010 census. Niobrara is located at 42°45′0″N 98°1′55″W / 42.75°N 98.03194°W / 42.75; -98.03194 (42.750000, -98.031989). According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.73 square miles (1.89 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 370 people, 193 households, and 93 families residing in the village. The population density was 508.2 people per square mile (196.2/km²). There were 251 housing units at an average density of 344.8 per square mile (133.1/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 84.3% White, 0.3% African American, 11.6% Native American, and 3.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.4% of the population. There were 193 households out of which 14.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.3% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 51.8% were non-families. 45.6% of all
    5.00
    3 votes
    159

    Doniphan

    Doniphan is a small unincorporated community in Doniphan County, Kansas, United States. The company that founded the town was organized on November 11, 1854. The post office opened March 3, 1855, and closed August 15, 1943. Doniphan is part of the St. Joseph, MO–KS Metropolitan Statistical Area.
    5.50
    2 votes
    160

    Helena

    Helena ( /ˈhɛlɨnə/) is the capital city of the U.S. state of Montana and the county seat of Lewis and Clark County. The 2010 census put the population at 28,180. and the Lewis and Clark County population at 63,395. Helena is the principal city of the Helena Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Lewis and Clark and Jefferson counties; its population is 74,801 according to the 2010 U.S. Census. The local daily newspaper is the Independent Record. The Helena Brewers minor league baseball and Helena Bighorns Tier III Junior A hockey team call the city home. The city is served by Helena Regional Airport (HLN). Helena was founded with the July 14, 1864 discovery of gold in a gulch off the Prickly Pear valley by the "Four Georgians". The city's main street is named Last Chance Gulch and lies close to the winding path of the original gulch through the historic downtown district. The original camp was named "Last Chance" by the Four Georgians. By fall, the population had grown to over 200 and the name "Last Chance" was viewed as too crass. On October 30, 1864, a group of at least seven men met to name the town, authorize the layout of the streets, and elect commissioners. The
    5.50
    2 votes
    161
    Jefferson City

    Jefferson City

    Jefferson City is the capital of the U.S. state of Missouri and the county seat of Cole County. Located in Callaway and Cole counties, it is the principal city of the Jefferson City metropolitan area, which encompasses the entirety of both counties. As of the 2010 census, the population was 43,079. Jefferson City was named after Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States. Jefferson City is on the northern edge of the Ozark Plateau on the southern side of the Missouri River near the geographic center of the state, in a region known as Mid-Missouri. It is at the western edge of the Missouri Rhineland, one of the major wine-producing regions of the Midwest. The city is dominated by the domed Capitol, rising from a bluff overlooking the Missouri River to the north. Lewis and Clark passed beneath that bluff on their historic expedition upriver before Europeans established any settlement there. In pre-Columbian times, this region was home of an ancient people known only as the Mound Builders. By the time European settlers began arriving, the Mound Builders had vanished into history. The contemporary indigenous peoples were called the Osage Indians. When the Missouri
    5.50
    2 votes
    162
    Mandan

    Mandan

    Mandan is a city in Morton County, North Dakota in the United States. It is the county seat of Morton County and a core city of the Bismarck-Mandan Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 18,331 at the 2010 census. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated 2011 population is 18,507. Mandan was founded in 1879 and became the county seat in 1881. Mandan is located across the Missouri River from Bismarck. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 10.3 square miles (27 km). 10.2 square miles (26 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km) of it (1.07%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,718 people, 6,647 households, and 4,553 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,642.8 per square mile (634.1/km²). There were 6,958 housing units at an average density of 683.7 per square mile (263.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.98% White, 0.20% African American, 3.02% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.78% of the population. The top 6 ancestry groups in the city are German (61.3%), Norwegian (15.4%),
    5.50
    2 votes
    163
    Mount Hood

    Mount Hood

    Mount Hood, called Wy'east by the Multnomah tribe, is a stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc of northern Oregon. It was formed by a subduction zone and rests in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is located about 50 miles (80 km) east-southeast of Portland, on the border between Clackamas and Hood River counties. In addition to being Oregon's highest mountain, it is one of the loftiest mountains in the nation based on its prominence. The height assigned to Mount Hood's snow-covered peak has varied over its history. Modern sources point to three different heights: 11,249 feet (3,429 m) based on the 1991 U.S. National Geodetic Survey, 11,240 feet (3,426 m) based on a 1993 scientific expedition, and 11,239 feet (3,426 m) of slightly older origin. The peak is home to twelve glaciers. It is the highest point in Oregon and the fourth-highest in the Cascade Range. Mount Hood is considered the Oregon volcano most likely to erupt, though based on its history, an explosive eruption is unlikely. Still, the odds of an eruption in the next 30 years are estimated at between 3 and 7 percent, so the USGS characterizes it as "potentially active", but the mountain is
    5.50
    2 votes
    164
    Riverdale

    Riverdale

    Riverdale is a town in McLean County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 205 at the 2010 census. Riverdale was the largest of the construction camps that sprang up in 1946 to house workers building the Garrison Dam just to the west. After the dam was completed in 1953, residents of the other camps (including Dakota City and Big Bend) who decided to stay on relocated to Riverdale. It was operated directly by the federal government from its founding until 1986 when it was finally turned over to the state of North Dakota and incorporation followed shortly afterwards. Riverdale is located at 47°29′59″N 101°22′12″W / 47.49972°N 101.37°W / 47.49972; -101.37 (47.499853, -101.370074). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.4 square miles (3.6 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 273 people, 108 households, and 84 families residing in the city. The population density was 195.1 people per square mile (75.3/km²). There were 157 housing units at an average density of 112.2 per square mile (43.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.34% White, 2.20% Native American, 0.73% Asian, and 0.73% from two or more
    5.50
    2 votes
    165
    Spalding

    Spalding

    Spalding is an unincorporated village in Nez Percé County, Idaho, United States, ten miles east of Lewiston, on the Clearwater River close to the intersection of U.S. Routes 95 and 12. The village was named after Reverend Henry Harmon Spalding, a missionary who taught the neighboring Nez Percé irrigation. The Headquarters and Visitor's Center for the Nez Percé National Historical Park are located at Spalding. It is part of the Lewiston, ID-WA Metropolitan Statistical Area.
    5.50
    2 votes
    166
    Irrigon

    Irrigon

    Irrigon is a city in Morrow County, Oregon, United States, on the Columbia River and U.S. Route 730. Irrigon was incorporated on February 28, 1957. The Umatilla Chemical Depot and the Umatilla Chemical Agent Disposal Facility are located four miles south of the city, northeast of the intersection of I-84 and I-82. Three miles west of Irrigon is the Irrigon Hatchery. The population was 1,702 at the 2000 census. Irrigon is part of the Pendleton–Hermiston Micropolitan Statistical Area. Irrigon is an agriculture and food processing based community. The largest employer is Western Alfalfa, Inc., a company that makes prepared livestock feeds. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.4 square miles (3.6 km), of which, 1.2 square miles (3.1 km) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km) of it (10.79%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,702 people, 565 households, and 441 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,376.5 people per square mile (530.0/km²). There were 609 housing units at an average density of 492.5 per square mile (189.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 72.91% White, 0.18% African American, 1.12%
    4.67
    3 votes
    167

    Beaverhead Rock State Park

    Beaverhead Rock, also known as Point of Rocks, is a rock formation in Montana. It is located on Montana State Highway 41, 14 miles (23 km) south of Twin Bridges of Madison County. The rock formation is protected within Beaverhead Rock State Park, and is located above the Beaverhead River. Beaverhead Rock is a rock feature identified in 1805 by Sacagawea, during the Lewis and Clark Expedition, as a landmark not distant from the summer retreat of her nation. According to the Journal of Lewis:
    6.00
    1 votes
    168

    Chouteau Island

    Chouteau Island ( /ʃuːˈtoʊ/ shoo-TOH), situated approximately 8 miles (13 km) due north of the St. Louis, Missouri Gateway Arch and approximately 1-mile (2 km) south of the confluence of the Missouri River and Mississippi River, is one of a cluster of three islands: Chouteau, Gabaret, and Mosenthein. The three, with a combined area of approximately 5,500 acres (20 km), are located in Madison County, Illinois. The Island is manmade, having been created during the US construction of the Chain of Rocks Canal between 1946 and 1953. Chouteau Island is bounded by the Mississippi River to the west and the Chain of Rocks Canal to the east. The 10 miles (20 km) of Mississippi River that border the Island on the west is the only natural stretch of the Mississippi without barge traffic between St. Paul, Minnesota and New Orleans, Louisiana. Chouteau Island is accessed by car only from Illinois via the Canal Bridge, a 2-lane vehicular bridge that crosses the Chain of Rocks Canal. From Missouri, visitors may reach the Island by foot/bicycle traffic via U.S. Route 66's Old Chain of Rocks Bridge, but it is no longer open to motor vehicle traffic. Chouteau Island is a key part of the Confluence
    6.00
    1 votes
    169
    Nodaway

    Nodaway

    Nodaway, Missouri is a former town in Andrew County, Missouri near the confluence of the Nodaway River and Missouri River The Lewis and Clark Expedition camped by the town on Nodaway Island on July 8, 1804 and took note of the river, on their trip to explore what would become the Oregon Country. The explorers recommended the same spot for the winter headquarters for the next expedition, called the Astor Expedition, from St. Louis to mouth of the Columbia River. Fur trader John Jacob Astor financed that venture, and Wilson Price Hunt led the overland portion. Members of the party included British naturalist Thomas Nuttall. When Missouri entered the Union, one proposal would have defined the state's western border in relation to the mouth of the river. It was decided instead to use Kaw Point, at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri rivers, to define the border; Kaw Point lies about 20 miles east of Nodaway, and a fair distance south. Later, the Missouri would expand in its northwestern corner, past this initial border.
    6.00
    1 votes
    170
    Rock Port

    Rock Port

    Rock Port is a city in Clay Township, Atchison County, Missouri, United States and the county seat of Atchison County. The population was 1,318 at the 2010 census. The city, which is 8 miles east of the Missouri River in the Loess Hills bluffs above the river, derives its name from Rock Creek which flows through it. The original city is off of the interstate but an additional area is built that is a travel hub. Truck stops, motels, fast food and firework stands are located along the interstate hosting a large amount of day time visitors, despite the city's small size and otherwise slow population growth. The city of Rock Port has become completely energy self-sufficient. In April 2008 Rock Port claimed to be the first community in the United States to have its electricity 100 percent generated by wind power. Rock Port, which uses about 13 million kWh a year, has its power generated by the Loess Hills Wind Farm. The farm has four Suzlon 1.25-megawatt wind turbines. Excess power is sold to the Missouri Public Utility Alliance in Columbia, Missouri. The idea for the wind turbines came from the town's former mortuary worker, Eric Chamberlain. The farm was built by Wind Capital Group
    6.00
    1 votes
    171
    Clackamas

    Clackamas

    Clackamas was a census-designated place (CDP) in Clackamas County, Oregon, United States. The population was 5,177 at the 2000 census. It is a suburb of Portland, Oregon. It is the location of Camp Withycombe, a military base. Clackamas also has a branch of the Kaiser Permanente Hospital. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.1 square miles (5.4 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,177 people, 2,000 households, and 1,336 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 2,425.3 people per square mile (938.4/km²). There were 2,133 housing units at an average density of 999.3 per square mile (386.6/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 85.28% White, 1.08% African American, 0.66% Native American, 6.32% Asian, 0.33% Pacific Islander, 2.70% from other races, and 3.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.95% of the population. 22.1% were of German, 10.8% English, 9.4% Irish and 6.3% American ancestry according to Census 2000. There were 2,000 households out of which 36.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female
    5.00
    2 votes
    172
    Dickinson

    Dickinson

    Dickinson is a city in Stark County, North Dakota, in the United States. It is the county seat of Stark County. The population was 17,787 at the 2010 census. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated 2011 population is 18,499. Dickinson was founded in 1881. The local paper is The Dickinson Press. Theodore Roosevelt Regional Airport serves the city. Dickinson is home to Dickinson State University, bakery manufacturer and distributor Baker Boy, and cabinet manufacturer TMI. Dickinson is the principal city of the Dickinson Micropolitan Statistical Area, a micropolitan area that covers Billings and Stark counties and had a combined population of 24,982 at the 2010 census. The site where Dickinson is located began as "Pleasant Valley Siding" along the transcontinental rail line built through the area by the Northern Pacific Railway in 1880. One year later, the site was renamed Dickinson to honor Wells S. Dickinson, a land agent and New York state senator from Malone, New York who had visited in 1880. Its Hidatsa name is xareeʔadish, ("Rainy Butte") Dickinson is located at 46°53′01″N 102°47′20″W / 46.883575°N 102.788811°W / 46.883575; -102.788811 (46.883575, -102.788811). According to the
    5.00
    2 votes
    173
    Gates of the Mountains Wilderness

    Gates of the Mountains Wilderness

    The Gates of the Mountains Wilderness is located in the U.S. state of Montana. Created by an act of Congress in 1964, the wilderness is managed by Helena National Forest. A day use campground near the Gates of the Mountains, Meriwether Picnic site, is named in honor of Meriwether Lewis. Gates of the Mountains Wilderness (then known as the Gates of the Mountains Wild Area) was the site of the 1949 Mann Gulch fire, which claimed the lives of 13 firefighters and which was the subject of Norman Maclean's book Young Men and Fire. U.S. Wilderness Areas do not allow motorized or mechanized vehicles, including bicycles. Although camping and fishing are allowed with proper permit, no roads or buildings are constructed and there is also no logging or mining, in compliance with the 1964 Wilderness Act. Wilderness areas within National Forests and Bureau of Land Management areas also allow hunting in season. The Gates of the Rocky Mountains were named by Lewis and Clark. Captain Lewis wrote on July 19, 1805, The prominent gray cliffs along the Missouri River in the Gates of the Mountains are formed by Madison Limestone. At the southern entrance to the canyon the trace of the Eldorado thrust
    5.00
    2 votes
    174
    Gettysburg

    Gettysburg

    Gettysburg is a city in Potter County, South Dakota, United States, along the 45th parallel. The population was 1,162 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Potter County. Gettysburg area historical tornado activity is 42 percent less than the overall U.S. average. Steve Asmussen of Laredo, Texas, a successful American horse trainer, was born in Gettysburg in 1965. Gettysburg is located at 45°00′43″N 99°57′19″W / 45.011819°N 99.955386°W / 45.011819; -99.955386. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.89 square miles (4.89 km²), all of it land. Gettysburg has been assigned the ZIP code 57442 and the FIPS place code 24260. As of 2010 Gettysburg had a population of 1,162. The racial and ethnic composition of the population was 97.3% white, 0.3% black or African American, 1.2% Native America, 0.2% Asian and 1.0% from two or more races. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,162 people, 534 households, and 310 families residing in the town. The population density was 615.5 people per square mile (237.6/km²). There were 617 housing units at an average density of 326.8 per square mile (126.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.3% White,
    5.00
    2 votes
    175
    Hood River

    Hood River

    The city of Hood River is the seat of Hood River County, Oregon, United States. It is a port on the Columbia River, and is named for the nearby Hood River. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 7,167. Hood River post office was established at the site of the present city on September 30, 1858, and the city itself was incorporated in 1895. Hood River is located on the Columbia River directly opposite White Salmon, Washington. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.9 square miles (7.5 km), of which 2.0 square miles (5.2 km) is land and 0.8 square miles (2.1 km) (28.97%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,831 people, 2,429 households, and 1,442 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,839.4 people per square mile (1,098.2 per km²). There were 2,645 housing units at an average density of 1,288.0 per square mile (498.2 per km²). The racial makeup of the city was: Hispanic or Latino of any origin were 23.17% of the population. There were 2,429 households out of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no
    5.00
    2 votes
    176
    Orange

    Orange

    Orange is a town in Orange County, Virginia, United States. The population was 4,721 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Orange County. Orange is northeast of Charlottesville, and near Montpelier. Orange is located at 38°14′45″N 78°6′35″W / 38.24583°N 78.10972°W / 38.24583; -78.10972 (38.245894, -78.109786). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 3.32 square miles (8.60 km), of which 3.31 square miles (8.56 km) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.04 km), or 0.49%, is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,123 people, 1,607 households, and 1,010 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,274.1 people per square mile (491.3/km²). There were 1,712 housing units at an average density of 529.0 per square mile (204.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 76.84% White, 20.96% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.34% Asian, 0.68% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.70% of the population. There were 1,607 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.1% were married couples living together, 18.7% had a female householder
    5.00
    2 votes
    177
    Tekamah

    Tekamah

    Tekamah is a city in Burt County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 1,736 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Burt County. A claim was staked to establish Tekamah as a town in October 1854. On March 14, 1855, Tekamah became an incorporated city by an act of the first territorial legislature of Nebraska. A peculiar method produced the town's name. According to the diary of Colonel B.R. Folsom, who worked with the original townsite company, Tekamah was literally chosen by the luck of the draw. When the decision had been reached to make the location a settlement, a problem arose in naming it. It was agreed that each of the exploration parties should write their favorite name on a slip of paper and drop it into a hat. The first name drawn out would then become the official name of the community. The first name drawn was "Tekamah." A surveyor, William Byers, contributed the name. An Indian translation defines Tekamah as meaning "big cottonwoods," and this is appropriate due to the large cottonwood trees that grew along the banks of Tekamah creek and were scattered over the territory. Another translation found through research says the name "Teka-mah" comes from the
    5.00
    2 votes
    178

    Tendoy

    Tendoy is an unincorporated community in Lemhi County, Idaho, United States. It is located at 44°57′34″N 113°38′41″W / 44.95944°N 113.64472°W / 44.95944; -113.64472 (44.9593700, -113.6447780) on State Highway 28, at an altitude of 4,842 feet (1,476 m). the city is named for Tendoy, who was a chief of the Lemhi Shoshone. It is the nearest location to Lemhi Pass over the Bitterroot Range, where the Lewis and Clark Expedition first crossed the Continental Divide in 1805. Lemhi Pass is a National Historic Landmark. Sacagawea, the Shoshoni woman who guided the Lewis and Clark Expedition was born near Tendoy. The site of Fort Lemhi is 2 miles north of Tendoy. The place was named for Tendoy, a prominent Lemhi Shoshone chief in the mid-19th century. He was half-Shoshone and half-Bannock.
    5.00
    2 votes
    179
    Spokane

    Spokane

    Spokane ( /spoʊˈkæn/, spoh-KAN) is a city located in the Northwestern United States in the state of Washington. It is the largest city of Spokane County, of which it is also the county seat, and the metropolitan center of the Inland Northwest region. The city is located on the Spokane River in Eastern Washington, 92 miles (148 km) south of the Canadian border, approximately 15 miles (24 km) from the Washington–Idaho border, and 230 miles (370 km) east of Seattle. David Thompson explored the Spokane area and began European settlement with the westward expansion and establishment of the North West Company's Spokane House in 1810. This trading post was the first long-term European settlement in Washington and the center of the fur trade between the Rockies and the Cascades for 16 years. In the late 19th century, gold and silver were discovered in the Inland Northwest. The Spokane area is considered to be one of the most productive mining districts in North America. Spokane's economy has traditionally been based on natural resources, being a center for mining, timber, and agriculture; however, the city's economy has diversified to include other industries, including the high-tech and
    4.50
    2 votes
    180
    Clarkston

    Clarkston

    Clarkston is a city in Asotin County in the southeastern part of the state of Washington. It is part of the Lewiston ID-WA Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 7,229 in 2010 census. In 1993, Walla Walla Community College opened a Branch Campus in Clarkston that serves the surrounding area, Lewiston, Idaho. It is still a major draw for the surrounding area. With a ZIP code of 99403, Clarkston has the highest zip code of any area in the contiguous United States. Clarkston was first settled in 1862 by Robert Bracken. It was officially incorporated on August 14, 1902. Before becoming an official town, the area was called Jawbone Flats. The name Clarkston is a reference to William Clark, of Lewis and Clark fame. Lewiston, across the Idaho state line from Clarkston, is named for Meriwether Lewis, and is the larger and older of the two cities (ironically Lewis and Clark never even set foot on the Clarkston side of the river). Clarkston is in the Lewis-Clark Valley, at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Clarkston is located at 46°24′49″N 117°2′55″W / 46.41361°N 117.04861°W / 46.41361; -117.04861 (46.413545, -117.048742). Immediately across the Snake River
    5.00
    1 votes
    181

    Collinsville

    Collinsville is a city located mainly in Madison County, and partially in St. Clair County, both in Illinois. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 26,016. Collinsville is approximately 12 miles from St. Louis, Missouri and is considered part of that city's Metro-East area. Famously, it is the home of the Brooks Catsup Bottle Water Tower—the world's largest ketchup bottle—and is the world's horseradish capital. Collinsville is located at 38°40′28″N 89°59′43″W / 38.67444°N 89.99528°W / 38.67444; -89.99528 (38.674398, -89.995402), approximately 12 miles due east of St Louis. According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 14.87 square miles (38.5 km), of which 14.68 square miles (38.0 km) (or 98.72%) is land and 0.19 square miles (0.49 km) (or 1.28%) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 25,579 people, 10,458 households, and 6,672 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,817.4 people per square mile (701.9/km²). There were 11,025 housing units at an average density of 811.0 per square mile (313.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 87.4% White, 11.2% African American, 0.8% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander,
    5.00
    1 votes
    182
    Kansas City

    Kansas City

    Kansas City, Missouri (informally abbreviated KC)(IATA: MKC) is the largest city in the US state of Missouri and is the anchor city of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, the second largest metropolitan area in Missouri. It encompasses 316 square miles (820 km) in parts of Jackson, Clay, Cass, and Platte counties. It is one of two county seats of Jackson County, the other being Independence, which is to the city's east. As of 2011, the population estimate was 463,202 with a metro area of 2.1 million. Kansas City was founded in 1838 as the Town of Kansas at the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas rivers and was incorporated in its present form in 1850. Situated opposite Kansas City, Kansas, the city was the location of several battles during the Civil War, including the Battle of Westport. The city is well known for its contributions to the musical styles of jazz and blues as well as to cuisine, notably Kansas City-style barbecue. In March 2012, downtown Kansas City was selected as one of America's best downtowns by Forbes magazine for its rich culture in arts, numerous fountains, upscale shopping and various local cuisine – most notably barbecue. Kansas City, Missouri, is often
    5.00
    1 votes
    183
    5.00
    1 votes
    184
    Pick City

    Pick City

    Pick City is a town in Mercer County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 123 at the 2010 census. Pick City was founded in 1946 and named after Lewis A. Pick, director of the Missouri River office of the United States Army Corps of Engineers. It overlooks the Garrison Dam. Pick City is located at 47°30′43″N 101°27′24″W / 47.51194°N 101.45667°W / 47.51194; -101.45667 (47.511901, -101.456533). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.52 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 166 people, 72 households, and 51 families residing in the town. The population density was 951.5 people per square mile (377.0/km²). There were 117 housing units at an average density of 670.6 per square mile (265.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 87.35% White, 3.61% Native American, and 9.04% from two or more races. There were 72 households out of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.5% were married couples living together, 4.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone
    5.00
    1 votes
    185
    Ponca

    Ponca

    Ponca is a city in Dixon County, Nebraska, United States. It is part of the Sioux City, IA–NE–SD Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 961 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Dixon County. Ponca is located at 42°33′50″N 96°42′38″W / 42.56389°N 96.71056°W / 42.56389; -96.71056 (42.563964, -96.710563). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.73 square miles (1.88 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 961 people, 403 households, and 256 families residing in the city. The population density was 1321.9 people per square mile (510.4/km²). There were 428 housing units at an average density of 588.7 per square mile (227.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.8% White, 0.4% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.1% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.8% of the population. There were 403 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.9% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.5% were non-families. 32.8% of
    5.00
    1 votes
    186
    Vancouver

    Vancouver

    Vancouver is a city on the north bank of the Columbia River in the U.S. state of Washington. Incorporated in 1857, it is the fourth largest city in the state with a 2010 census population of 161,791 as of April 1, 2010 census. Vancouver is the county seat of Clark County and forms part of the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area, the 23rd-largest metropolitan area in the United States. Vancouver shares its name with the larger city of Vancouver located 305 miles (491 km) north in the Canadian province of British Columbia. Both cities were named in honor of sea captain George Vancouver, although the Canadian city was incorporated 29 years after the incorporation of Vancouver, Washington, and more than 60 years after the name Vancouver was first used in reference to the historic Fort Vancouver trading post on the Columbia River. City officials have periodically suggested changing the U.S. city's name to Fort Vancouver, Vancouver USA, or even Old Vancouver to reduce confusion with its northern neighbor. Many Pacific Northwest residents distinguish between the two cities by referring to the Canadian city as "Vancouver, B.C." and the United States one as "Vancouver, Washington," or
    5.00
    1 votes
    187
    Sibley

    Sibley

    Sibley is a village in Jackson County, Missouri, United States. The population was 347 at the 2000 census. It is known as the home of Fort Osage National Historic Landmark. Sibley is located at 39°10′49″N 94°11′45″W / 39.18028°N 94.19583°W / 39.18028; -94.19583 (39.180338, -94.195940). According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 347 people, 128 households, and 94 families residing in the village. The population density was 332.9 people per square mile (128.8/km²). There were 133 housing units at an average density of 127.6 per square mile (49.4/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 95.97% White, 1.44% African American, 1.15% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.86% from other races, and 0.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.17% of the population. There were 128 households out of which 37.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.3% were married couples living together, 2.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone
    4.00
    2 votes
    188
    Boone's Lick State Historic Site

    Boone's Lick State Historic Site

    The Boone's Lick State Historic Site is located in Missouri, United States near Arrow Rock. The park was established in 1960 around one of the saltwater springs that was used in the early 19th century. It was named after Nathan and Daniel Morgan Boone, sons of Daniel Boone, who produced salt from the springs. On October 11, 2009, The Plain Dealer reported that Tom Hanks would be involved in the production of a movie adaptation of Larry McMurtry's novel Boone's Lick, for release in 2010.
    4.00
    1 votes
    189
    Council Bluffs

    Council Bluffs

    Council Bluffs, known until 1852 as Kanesville, Iowa—the historic starting point of the Mormon Trail and eventual northernmost anchor town of the other emigrant trails—is a city in and the county seat of Pottawattamie County, Iowa, United States and is on the east bank of the Missouri River across from what is now the much larger city of Omaha, Nebraska. Settlers departing west into the sparsely settled unorganized parts of the Territory of Missouri to the Oregon Country and the newly conquered California Territory through the (eventual) Nebraska Territory from Kanesville traveled by wagon trains along the much storied Oregon, Mormon, or California Trails into the newly expanded United States western lands—after the first large organized wagon trains left Missouri in 1841, the annual migration waves began in earnest by spring of 1843 and built up thereafter with the opening of the Mormon Trail (1846) until peaking in the later 1860s when news of railroad progress had a braking effect. By the 1860s virtually all migration wagon trains were passing near the renamed town. The wagon train trails became less important with the advent of the first complete transcontinental railway in
    4.00
    1 votes
    190
    Onawa

    Onawa

    Onawa is a city in Monona County, Iowa, United States. The population was 2,998 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Monona County. It is the largest town on the Iowa side of the Missouri River between Council Bluffs and Sioux City. The city's main claim to fame is that it has the widest main street in the United States - about 75 feet (23 m) wide. Onawa's longitude and latitude coordinates in decimal form are 42.027490, -96.096513. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.19 square miles (13.44 km), all of it land. Onawa is located in the Loess Hills region of western Iowa, a unique geological and environmental area. Nearby are such natural areas as Lewis & Clark State Park, Preparation Canyon State Park and the Loess Hills State Forest. As of the census of 2010, there were 2,998 people, 1,345 households, and 756 families residing in the city. The population density was 577.6 inhabitants per square mile (223.0 /km). There were 1,519 housing units at an average density of 292.7 per square mile (113.0 /km). The racial makeup of the city was 96.4% White, 0.4% African American, 1.7% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and
    4.00
    1 votes
    191
    Plattsmouth

    Plattsmouth

    Plattsmouth is a city in and the county seat of Cass County, Nebraska, United States, which was founded in 1855. The population was 6,502 at the 2010 census. The Lewis and Clark Expedition passed the mouth of the Platte River, just north of what is now Main Street Plattsmouth, on July 21, 1804. Plattsmouth first appeared in 1854 as "the Barracks", a trading post established by Sam Martin, owner of the Platteville ferry in neighboring Mills County, Iowa, ferryman Wheatley Mickelwait, and Glenwood, Iowa attorney and politician Colonel Joseph Longworthy Sharp. The organization of the city under the charter of March, 1855, was effected December 29, 1856, by the election of Wheatley Mickelwait to the Mayoralty, and Enos Williams, W. M. Slaughter and Jacob Vallery, Aldermen. This Council met and proceeded to business January 29, 1857, their first ordinance, approved by the Mayor March 2, 1857, levying a tax of one-half of 1 per cent on all taxable property within the corporate limits of the city of Plattsmouth, the amount collected to be expended in the improvement of the streets and alleys and steamboat landings at and in the city. On December 7, 1857, the Council voted each member an
    4.00
    1 votes
    192
    Big Bend Dam

    Big Bend Dam

    Big Bend Dam is a major rolled earth dam along the Missouri River in central South Dakota. The dam, 95 feet (29 m) high and 10,570 feet (3.22 km) in length, was constructed as part of the Pick-Sloan Plan for Missouri watershed development authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1944. Construction began in 1959 and the embankment was completed in July 1963. Power generation began at the facility in 1964 and the entire complex was completed in 1966 at a total cost of $107 million. The hydroelectric plant generates 493,300 kilowatts of electricity and meets peak-hour demand for power within the Missouri River Basin. Located near Fort Thompson, South Dakota, just south of a major bend in the Missouri River (from which the dam takes its name), Big Bend Dam creates Lake Sharpe, named after South Dakota Governor Merrill Q. Sharpe. The lake extends for 80 miles (130 km) up the course of the Missouri River past Pierre to Oahe Dam, another major power-generating and flood control embankment. Lake Sharpe covers a total of 56,884 acres (230.20 km) and drains an area just under 250,000 mi (650,000 km). The construction of the dam in the 1960s resulted in the dislocation of people on the Crow
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    0 votes
    193
    Blair

    Blair

    Blair is a city in and the county seat of Washington County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 7,990 at the 2010 census. Blair is a part of the Omaha-Council Bluffs Metropolitan Statistical Area. Blair, county seat and largest city in Washington County, was not one of its earliest towns. It was established after the American Civil War, when the Sioux City and Pacific Rail Road chose to cross the river at that location, going from Missouri Valley, Iowa, and up along "Carter Hollow" on the Nebraska side. Whether by chance or design, the route missed the existing river towns of DeSoto and Cuming City. An entirely new town was needed. A 1,075-acre (4.35 km) tract of land was purchased and platted, with lots to be sold at auction on May 10, 1869. The entire tract was purchased by John I. Blair, an official of the railroad, who announced his plans for the city and named it for himself. This gave him and the railroad more opportunity for profit from development than by connecting existing towns, where rights of way may have been more expensive to purchase. Front Street quickly took shape. Many businesses and several churches were hauled overland from the former town sites to
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    0 votes
    194
    Chamberlain

    Chamberlain

    Chamberlain is a city in Brule County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 2,387 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Brule County. Chamberlain is home to the Akta Lakota Museum and Cultural Center, which profiles the lives of nomadic Plains Indians. Chamberlain is also the home of the South Dakota Hall of Fame. Chamberlain was named after Selah Chamberlain, a railroad director. Chamberlain is located at 43°49′20″N 99°19′42″W / 43.82222°N 99.32833°W / 43.82222; -99.32833 (43.805548, -99.328444). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.84 square miles (20.31 km²), of which, 6.64 square miles (17.21 km²) of it is land and 1.2 square miles (3.1 km²) is water. Chamberlain has been assigned the ZIP code range 57325-57326 and the FIPS place code 11220. As of the census of 2010, there were 2,387 people, 1,040 households, and 589 families residing in the town. The population density was 359.3 people per square mile (138.7/km²). There were 1,142 housing units at an average density of 171.9 per square mile (66.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 81.9% White, 0.3% African American, 14.8% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% from
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    0 votes
    195
    Choteau

    Choteau

    Choteau is a city in and the county seat of Teton County, Montana, United States. It lies along U.S. Routes 89 and 287 (the latter terminating at the former in this city) about 20 miles (32 km) east of the Rocky Mountains, near Flathead National Forest, the Rocky Mountain Division of Lewis and Clark National Forest, and Glacier National Park. The population was 1,781 at the 2000 census. The Montana town is named for French fur-trapper and explorer Pierre Chouteau, Jr., who is also the namesake of Chouteau County, Montana (county seat: Fort Benton). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km), all land. The Teton River runs nearby, although for some distance upstream of Choteau it is dry during much of the year. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,781 people, 807 households, and 464 families residing in the city. The population density was 994.3 people per square mile (383.9/km). There were 897 housing units at an average density of 500.8 per square mile (193.4/km). The racial makeup of the city was 93.94% White, 0.06% African American, 2.92% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 2.75% from two or more
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    196
    Clarksville

    Clarksville

    Clarksville is a town in Clark County, Indiana, United States, along the Ohio River as a part of the Louisville Metropolitan area. The population was 21,724 at the 2010 census. The town, once a home site to George Rogers Clark, was founded in 1783 and is the oldest American town in the Northwest Territory. The town is home to the Colgate clock, one of the largest clocks in the world and the Falls of the Ohio State Park, a large fossil bed. Clarksville is named for American Revolutionary War General George Rogers Clark, who lived for a time on a point of land on the Ohio River. Founded in 1783, the town is believed to be the first American settlement in the Northwest Territory of the new United States. The site was first used as a base of operations by Clark during the American Revolution. In 1778 he established a post on an island at the head of the Falls of the Ohio. From there he trained his 175-man regiment for the defense to the west. After the war, Clark was granted a tract of 150,000 acres (610 km) for his services in the war. In 1783 1,000 acres (4 km) were set aside for the development of a town, Clarksville. The same year a stockade was built and settlement began. The
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    197
    Covington

    Covington

    Covington is a city in Kenton County, Kentucky, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 40,640; it is the fifth-most-populous city in Kentucky. It is one of two county seats of Kenton County. Covington is located at the confluence of the Ohio and Licking Rivers. Covington is part of the Cincinnati – Northern Kentucky metropolitan area and is separated from Cincinnati by the Ohio River and from Newport by the Licking River. Covington is located within the Upland South region of the United States of America. Covington was established in 1814 when John Gano, Richard Gano, and Thomas Carneal purchased 150 acres (0.6 km) on the west side of the Licking River at its confluence with the Ohio River, referred to as "the Point," from Thomas Kennedy for $50,000. The city was incorporated by the Kentucky General Assembly a year later. Covington experienced growth during most of the 19th century, only to decline during the Great Depression and the middle 20th century. The city has seen some redevelopment during the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Stewart Iron Works was established in 1862 and became the largest iron fence maker in the world. In 1912, city leaders
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    198
    Fort Calhoun

    Fort Calhoun

    Fort Calhoun is a city in Washington County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 908 at the 2010 census. Fort Calhoun Nuclear Generating Station is built on 660 acres (2.7 km). This historic town includes Fort Atkinson, the first fort built west of the Missouri River. Fort Calhoun is located at 41°27′24″N 96°1′29″W / 41.45667°N 96.02472°W / 41.45667; -96.02472 (41.456691, -96.024589). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.65 square miles (1.68 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 908 people, 391 households, and 253 families residing in the city. The population density was 1399.1 people per square mile (540.2/km²). There were 413 housing units at an average density of 636.4 per square mile (245.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.2% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1Pacific Islander, 0.7% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.2% of the population. There were 391 households out of which 27.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with
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    199
    Higginsville

    Higginsville

    Higginsville is a city in Lafayette County, Missouri. The population was 4,682 at the 2000 census. Higginsville is located at 39°4′8″N 93°43′20″W / 39.06889°N 93.72222°W / 39.06889; -93.72222 (39.068829, -93.722126). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.7 square miles (9.6 km), of which, 3.7 square miles (9.6 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.54%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,682 people, 1,778 households, and 1,175 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,270.6 people per square mile (491.2/km²). There were 1,946 housing units at an average density of 528.1 per square mile (204.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.56% White, 5.28% African American, 0.43% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.68% from other races, and 1.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.50% of the population. There were 1,778 households out of which 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.0% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.9% were non-families. 29.6% of all households were made up of
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    200
    Kansas City

    Kansas City

    Kansas City, Kansas is the third-largest city in the state of Kansas, the county seat of Wyandotte County, and the third-largest city of the Kansas City, Missouri metropolitan area. It is part of a consolidated city-county government known as the "Unified Government" which also includes the cities of Bonner Springs and Edwardsville. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 145,786. It is situated at Kaw Point, which is the junction of the Missouri and Kansas rivers. It is commonly referred to as "KCK" to differentiate it from Kansas City, Missouri (which is often referred to as "KCMO"). Kansas City, Kansas formed in 1868 and incorporated in October 1872. The first city election was held October 22, 1872, by order of Judge Hiram Stevens of the Tenth Judicial District, and resulted in the election of Mayor James Boyle. The mayors of the city after its organization have been James Boyle, C. A. Eidemiller, A. S. Orbison, Eli Teed and Samuel McConnell. John Sheehan was appointed Marshal in 1875, by Mayor Eli Teed. He was also Chief of Police, having a force of five men. In June 1880, the Governor of Kansas proclaimed the city of Kansas City a city of the second class with the
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    Killdeer

    Killdeer

    Killdeer (Hidatsa: baahish, "singing") is a city in Dunn County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 751 at the 2010 census. Killdeer was founded in 1914 at the end of a Northern Pacific Railway branch line that began in Mandan. The name was taken from the nearby Killdeer Mountains. Killdeer is located at 47°22′12″N 102°45′18″W / 47.37°N 102.755°W / 47.37; -102.755 (47.370081, -102.755046). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.9 square miles (2.3 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 713 people, 297 households, and 182 families residing in the city. The population density was 752.7 people per square mile (289.8/km²). There were 351 housing units at an average density of 370.6 per square mile (142.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.97% White, 4.91% Native American, 0.14% Asian, and 0.98% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.70% of the population. There were 297 households out of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.8% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.4% were non-families.
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    202
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    203
    Mitchell

    Mitchell

    Mitchell is a city in and the county seat of Davison County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 15,254 at the 2010 census. Mitchell was incorporated in 1881. It was named for Milwaukee banker Alexander Mitchell, President of the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railroad (Milwaukee Road). Mitchell is the principal city of the Mitchell Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Davison and Hanson counties. Mitchell is located at 43°42′50″N 98°1′35″W / 43.71389°N 98.02639°W / 43.71389; -98.02639 (43.713896, -98.026282), on the James River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 12.14 square miles (31.44 km²), of which, 11.14 square miles (28.84 km²) of it is land and 1 square miles (2.6 km²) is water. Mitchell has been assigned the ZIP code 57301 and the FIPS place code 43100. Mitchell has a Humid continental climate, like much of the Midwestern United States, with cold, harsh, sometimes snowy winters, and hot, sometimes humid summers. Average daytime summer temperatures range from 86°F (30°C) during the day, and 62°F (16°C) during the night, and winter daytime temperatures average 26°F (-3°C) during the day, and 4°F (
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    204
    Mobridge

    Mobridge

    Mobridge is a city in Walworth County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 3,465 at the 2010 census. Mobridge is located at 45°32′23″N 100°26′05″W / 45.539709°N 100.434716°W / 45.539709; -100.434716. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.89 square miles (4.89 km²), all of it land. Mobridge has been assigned the ZIP code 57601 and the FIPS place code 43180. As of the census of 2010, there were 3,465 people, 1,514 households, and 898 families residing in the town. The population density was 1836.2 people per square mile (709/km²). There were 1,727 housing units at an average density of 915.2 per square mile (353.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 75.7% White, 0.2% African American, 20.5% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.8% of the population. There were 1,514 households out of which 24.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.5% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.7% were non-families. 34.9% of all
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    205
    Shoshone

    Shoshone

    Shoshone is the county seat and largest city of Lincoln County, Idaho, United States. The population was 1,461 at the 2010 census. In contrast to the Shoshone Native American tribe for which it is named, the city's name is correctly pronounced "Show-shown," with a silent 'e'. Shoshone has long been considered the main railroad station in Idaho's Magic Valley region. The much larger community of Twin Falls 26 miles (42 km) to the south never developed a strong railroad presence due to the logistical issues presented by its location south of the Snake River Canyon. For many years Shoshone was the only Amtrak stop in south central Idaho. A few miles north of Shoshone are the Shoshone Ice Caves, hollow subterranean lava tubes that stay cool enough for the ice inside them to remain frozen throughout the summer. In the days before refrigeration, this feature, coupled with the railroad, made Shoshone popular with travelers as "the only place for hundreds of miles where one could get a cold beer." Today, Shoshone still has one bar, but also boasts a cafe, a movie theater, and a grocery store—unusual for such a small town. While limited retail jobs exist, Shoshone is primarily a farming and
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    206
    Stanton

    Stanton

    Stanton is a city in Mercer County, North Dakota in the United States. It is the county seat of Mercer County. The population was 366 at the 2010 census. Stanton was founded in 1883 and became the county seat when Mercer County organized in 1884. Stanton is home to the Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site, which houses a Hidatsa earth lodge and three abandoned villages. One of these, Awatixa, is believed to be the former home of Sakakawea. Stanton is located at 47°19′10″N 101°22′57″W / 47.31944°N 101.3825°W / 47.31944; -101.3825 (47.319506, -101.382434). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km). As of the census of 2000, there were 345 people, 159 households, and 107 families residing in the city. The population density was 739.9 people per square mile (283.4/km²). There were 198 housing units at an average density of 424.7 per square mile (162.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.65% White, 1.74% Native American, 0.58% Asian, 0.29% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 1.45% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.29% of the population. There were 159 households out
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    207
    Watford City

    Watford City

    Watford City (Hidatsa: abaʔaruʔush), founded in 1914, is the seat of McKenzie County, North Dakota in the United States. The population was 1,744 at the 2010 census. The main offices of Frontier Energy Group, First International Bank and the headquarters of McKenzie Electric Cooperative are in Watford City. The local newspaper is the McKenzie County Farmer. In 1913, a few prospective businessmen located on the townsite of the future Watford City in anticipation of the arrival of the first Great Northern Railroad train. The Northern Land and Townsite Company, a division of the Great Northern, platted the town and sold lots in June 1914. Building began immediately, and many businesses and homes were moved from Schafer, which eventually became a ghost town. Watford was incorporated in June 1915, and was named by Dr. Vaughan G. Morris (1879–1940) for his hometown of Watford, Ontario. A year later the town added "City" to its name to differentiate itself from Wolford in Pierce County. The Great Northern planned to extend its line to New Rockford and in 1914 began building the "Madson Grade," one of the longest dirt filled railroad grades in the country about a mile west of town. Two
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    208
    Winner

    Winner

    Winner is a city in Tripp County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 2,897 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Tripp County. Winner also serves as the administrative center of neighboring Todd County, which does not have its own county seat. The nearest airport is Winner Regional Airport. Winner is very well known for its pheasant season. Pheasant season runs from October to December and brings many individuals from throughout the United States. The Brulé Sioux tribesman, Paul Eagle Star (1864-1891) is buried here. He attended Carlisle Indian Industrial School, enrolling in November 1882. He left the school in 1888 and worked in the blacksmith shop at Rosebud Agency in July 1889. Two years later, Eagle Star was recruited and worked under contract to perform in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, which toured in Europe. He died a few days after breaking his ankle when he fell off a horse in Sheffield, Yorkshire. His original resting place was in England's Brompton Cemetery. His casket was repatriated to America in March 1999. On May 22 2010, An EF2 tornado was reported in the Winner area. While the tornado caused minor damage in the city, no fatalities were
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