Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 319 views
  • 241 votes
  • 241 voters
  • 15%
Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time

More about Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time:

Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time top list are added by the rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time has gotten 319 views and has gathered 241 votes from 241 voters. O O

Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time is a top list in the General category on rankly.com. Are you a fan of General or Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about General on rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Salem

    Salem

    Salem ( /ˈseɪləm/) is the capital of the U.S. state of Oregon, and the county seat of Marion County. It is located in the center of the Willamette Valley alongside the Willamette River, which runs north through the city. The river forms the boundary between Marion and Polk counties, and the city neighborhood of West Salem is in Polk County. Salem was founded in 1842, became the capital of the Oregon Territory in 1851, and was incorporated in 1857. Salem had a population of 154,637 at the 2010 census, making it the third largest city in the state after Portland and Eugene. Salem is less than an hour driving distance away from Portland. Salem is the principal city of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area, a metropolitan area that covers Marion and Polk counties and had a combined population of 347,214 at the 2000 census. A 2009 estimate placed the metropolitan population at 396,103, the state's second largest. The city is home to Willamette University and Corban University. The State of Oregon is the largest public employer in the city, and Salem Hospital is the largest private employer. Transportation includes public transit from Salem-Keizer Transit, Amtrak service, and
    7.57
    7 votes
    2
    Big Timber

    Big Timber

    Big Timber is a city in and the county seat of Sweet Grass County, Montana, United States. The population was 1,650 at the 2000 census. Big Timber is located at 45°50′0″N 109°57′1″W / 45.833333°N 109.95028°W / 45.833333; -109.95028 (45.833224, -109.950361). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km), of which, 0.9 square miles (2.3 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (3.09%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,650 people, 711 households, and 430 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,752.6 people per square mile (677.7/km²). There were 812 housing units at an average density of 862.5 per square mile (333.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.61% White, 0.79% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.73% from other races, and 1.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.70% of the population. There were 711 households out of which 27.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.2% were married couples living together, 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.5% were non-families. 34.7% of all
    8.00
    6 votes
    3
    Harrison

    Harrison

    Harrison is a city in Kootenai County, Idaho, United States. The population was 203 at the 2010 census. The community was named for President Benjamin Harrison, due to a large wood mill and stop for mining boats coming off the nearby Coeur d'Alene River. Harrison was incorporated in 1899 and was once the largest city on Lake Coeur d'Alene. In 1917 about half of the residential area of Harrison and a number of businesses were burned in a major fire. Most of the town was never rebuilt after the fire. Harrison is located at 47°26′59″N 116°46′50″W / 47.44972°N 116.78056°W / 47.44972; -116.78056 (47.449779, -116.780674). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.77 square miles (2.0 km), of which 0.69 square miles (1.8 km) is land and 0.077 square miles (0.2 km), or 8.55%, is water. Harrison is located 28 miles (45 km) south of Interstate 90 on the Lake Coeur d'Alene Scenic Byway, Highway 97. The Coeur d'Alene River flows into Lake Coeur d'Alene on Harrison's northern edge. The lower reaches of the river's valley are filled with smaller lakes, and as such water dominates much of the local geography. The Saint Joe Mountains of the Bitterroot Range
    7.17
    6 votes
    4
    Missoula

    Missoula

    Missoula /mɨˈzuːlə/ is a city in the U.S. state of Montana and is the county seat of Missoula County. It is located along the Clark Fork and Bitterroot rivers in Western Montana and at the convergence of five mountain ranges, thus is often described as being the "Hub of Five Valleys". The 2010 Census put the population of Missoula at 66,788 and the Missoula Metropolitan Area at 109,299. As of July 1, 2011 the city grew to 67,290, and put the Missoula metropolitan area at 110,138. Since 2000, Missoula has been the second largest city in Montana. Missoula was founded in 1860 and named Hellgate Trading Post while still part of Washington Territory. By 1866, the settlement had moved five miles upstream and renamed Missoula Mills before being shortened to Missoula. The mills provided supplies to western settlers traveling along the Mullan Road with Fort Missoula, set up in 1877 to protect the settlers, further stabilizing the economy. The arrival of the Northern Pacific Railway in 1883 was coupled with rapid growth and the maturation of the local lumber industry. An element of prestige could be claimed ten years later when what was already called the City of Missoula was chosen by the
    7.17
    6 votes
    5
    Post Falls

    Post Falls

    Post Falls is a city in Kootenai County, Idaho, United States, in the northern portion of the state, between Coeur d'Alene and Spokane, Washington. The population was 27,574 people at the 2010 census, making it Idaho's tenth largest city. Post Falls is named for Frederick Post, a German immigrant who constructed a lumber mill along the Spokane River in 1871 on land he purchased from Andrew Seltice, Chief of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The purchase of the land is preserved in a pictograph on a granite cliff in Treaty Rock park. 47°42′56″N 116°56′17″W / 47.71556°N 116.93806°W / 47.71556; -116.93806 (47.715552, -116.937926). Post Falls is located four miles (6 km) east of the Washington-Idaho border along Interstate 90 in Kootenai County. It is bounded by Coeur d’Alene to the east, the State of Washington to the west, the Spokane River to the south and the Rathdrum prairie to the north. Post Falls is 20 miles (32 km) east of Spokane and approximately 100 miles (160 km) south of the Canadian border. The elevation of the city is 2,182 feet (665 m) above sea level. Post Falls has four distinct seasons, with temperatures ranging in the 80's mid-summer and low teens during the winter. The
    8.40
    5 votes
    6
    Boulder

    Boulder

    Boulder is a town in and the county seat of Jefferson County, Montana, United States. It is on the north bank of the Boulder River between Butte and Helena, slightly east of the Continental Divide, at the intersection of Interstate 15 and Montana Highway 69. The population was 1,300 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Helena Micropolitan Statistical Area. Established as a 19th-century stagecoach station, Boulder grew into a regional trading center for farmers, ranchers, and miners and, by the end of that century, home to state schools for the deaf, blind and developmentally disabled. In the 21st century, it is the center of government in Jefferson County, and institutions based in the town offer services for disabled or troubled youths. Its library system serves about 10,000 people, and its high school district covers more than 1,000 square miles (2,600 km). Three buildings in Boulder are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Named for the many large boulders in the vicinity, the town of Boulder Valley was established in the early 1860s as a stagecoach station on the route between Fort Benton and Virginia City. It later became a trading center for nearby
    6.83
    6 votes
    7

    Jackson, Montana

    Jackson is an unincorporated community in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States. Although it is unincorporated, Jackson has a post office with a ZIP code of 59736. Jackson lies on Montana Secondary Highway 278 south of Wisdom and northwest of Dillon.
    6.67
    6 votes
    8

    Camp Disappointment

    Camp Disappointment is the northernmost campsite of the Lewis and Clark expedition, on its return trip from the Pacific Northwest. The site is on private land within the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Glacier County, Montana. It is located along the south bank of Cut Bank Creek and 12 miles (19 km) northeast of Browning, Montana. Glacier National Park can be seen in the distance. The modern Canada–United States border with Montana is the 49th parallel north. The campsite was used by a detachment of the expedition from July 22–26, 1806. Captain Meriwether Lewis, George Drouillard, the two Fields brothers—Joseph and Reubin—, possibly five more men, along with six horses, were exploring the Marias River in an attempt to show that the Missouri River watershed extended to the 50th parallel north in order to claim more land for the United States under the Louisiana Purchase. However, they discovered that the watershed does not extend to the 50th parallel and consequently named their campsite Camp Disappointment. Lewis called the site which is shaded by cottonwood trees a "beautiful and extensive bottom". Since it was overcast and damp throughout their stay the expedition could not make
    7.80
    5 votes
    9
    Butte

    Butte

    Butte /ˈbjuːt/ is a city in Montana and the county seat of Silver Bow County, United States. In 1977, the city and county governments consolidated to form the sole entity of Butte-Silver Bow. As of the 2010 census, Butte's population was 34,200. Butte is currently Montana's fifth largest city. In the 19th and 20th centuries, Butte experienced every stage of development of a mining town, from camp to boomtown to mature city to center for historic preservation and environmental cleanup. Unlike most such towns, Butte's urban landscape includes mining operations set within residential areas, making the environmental consequences of the extraction economy all the more apparent. Despite the dominance of the Anaconda Company, Butte was never a company town. It prided itself on architectural diversity and a civic ethos of rough-and-tumble individualism. In the 21st century, efforts at interpreting and preserving Butte's heritage are addressing both the town's historical significance and the continuing importance of mining to its economy and culture. Butte was one of the largest cities west of the Mississippi for generations. Silver Bow County (Butte and suburbs) had 24,000 people in 1890,
    7.60
    5 votes
    10
    Wallula

    Wallula

    Wallula is a census-designated place (CDP) in Walla Walla County, Washington, United States. The population was 179 at the 2010 census. Lewis and Clark reached the area April 27, 1806, on their return journey from the Pacific. The expedition spent three days at the village of Chief Yallept and his tribe of Walla Wallas (relatives of the Nez Perce), in the company of about a hundred Yakamas. Lewis put the total people at around 550. There the expedition learned of an overland route to the Nez Perce homelands which shortened their route by some eighty miles. During David Thompson's 1811 voyage down the Columbia River he camped at the junction with the Snake River on July 9, 1811, and erected a pole and a notice claiming the country for Great Britain and stating the intention of the North West Company to build a trading post at the site. Western Settlement of the area began in 1818, when the North West Company built Fort Nez Perce at the mouth of the Walla Walla River. The location was chosen to compete with the Hudson's Bay Company for the fur trade in the Pacific Northwest. That site was maintained until 1855. The first railroad to connect Walla Walla with the Columbia River at
    8.25
    4 votes
    11
    Emigrant

    Emigrant

    Emigrant is an unincorporated community in Park County, Montana, United States. As of the 2000 census, the ZIP Code Tabulation Area for Emigrant had a population of 372. Emigrant is located in southern Montana, on the Yellowstone River, about 30 miles (48 km) north of Yellowstone National Park, and 20 miles (32 km) south of Livingston. Emigrant is located at an elevation of 4,882 feet (1,488 m). Emigrant sits between the Absaroka Range and the Gallatin Range in Paradise Valley, Montana. The community is located just a few miles west of Emigrant Peak el. 10,915 feet (3,327 m). Due to its location near the Yellowstone River, Emigrant is a popular area for fly fishing, and also home to many species, such as American Badger, Black-billed Magpie, deer, elk, and occasionally American Bison and wolves. From Emigrant, it is only a few miles to the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness, and the Gallatin National Forest. Emigrant's proximity to the national forests, wilderness area, Yellowstone National Park and the Yellowstone River make it an ideal spot for outdoorsmen to visit and live in. Much of A River Runs Through It and The Horse Whisperer were filmed in Emigrant.
    8.00
    4 votes
    12
    Great Falls

    Great Falls

    Great Falls is a city in and the county seat of Cascade County, Montana, United States. The population was 58,505 at the 2010 census. It is the principal city of the Great Falls, Montana Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses all of Cascade County. Great Falls takes its name from the series of five waterfalls in close proximity along the upper Missouri River basin that the Lewis and Clark Expedition had to portage around over a ten mile stretch; the effort required 31 days of arduous labor during the westward leg of their 1805-06 exploration of the Louisiana Purchase and to the Pacific Northwest Coast of the Oregon Country. Each falls sports a hydroelectric dam today. Two undeveloped parts of their portage route are included within the Great Falls Portage, a National Historic Landmark. The city is home to the C. M. Russell Museum Complex, the University of Great Falls, Montana State University Great Falls - COT, Giant Springs, the Roe River (claimed to be the world's shortest river), the Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind, the Great Falls Voyagers minor league baseball (formerly known as the Great Falls White Sox and before that as the Dodgers and Giants
    9.67
    3 votes
    14
    Walla Walla

    Walla Walla

    Walla Walla is the largest city in and the county seat of Walla Walla County, Washington, United States. The population was 31,731 at the 2010 census. Walla Walla is in the southeastern region of Washington, approximately four hours by car from Seattle, Washington and thirteen miles from the Oregon border. Whitman College, Walla Walla Community College, and the Washington State Penitentiary are located in Walla Walla. Walla Walla University is located in nearby College Place, Washington. In addition, Baker Boyer Bank, the oldest bank in the state of Washington, was founded in Walla Walla in 1869. Walla Walla is famous for its sweet onions. Many wineries are located in the area and it is a popular vacation spot for wine enthusiasts. On September 1, 1836, Marcus Whitman arrived with his wife Narcissa Whitman. Here they established the Whitman Mission in an unsuccessful attempt to convert the local Walla Walla tribe to Christianity. Following a disease epidemic, both were killed by the Cayuse who believed that the missionaries were poisoning the native peoples. Whitman College was established in their honor. The original North West Company and later Hudson's Bay Company Fort Nez
    7.75
    4 votes
    15
    Hysham

    Hysham

    Hysham is a town in and the county seat of Treasure County, Montana, United States. The population was 312 at the 2010 census. Hysham is located at 46°17′26″N 107°13′48″W / 46.29056°N 107.23°W / 46.29056; -107.23 (46.290535, -107.229929). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.52 km), all of it land. It is bordered to the north by the Yellowstone River. The surrounding area is composed of rolling hills and farmland. When the Montana Territory became the state of Montana in 1889 the future site of Hysham was just a blank spot in the rolling prairie along the Yellowstone River. At that time, the area was within sprawling Custer County, which covered much of eastern Montana, and also included the eastern part of the Crow Reservation. The area was opened up to homesteading in 1906 after the federal government moved the Crow Reservation boundary further west to its present location. This made possible the development of farms and ranches throughout the area and at the same time allowed the settlement of small towns like Hysham (Cheney 1984). The location and founding of the town of Hysham is intertwined with its ranching and
    9.00
    3 votes
    16
    Virginia City

    Virginia City

    Virginia City is a town in and the county seat of Madison County, Montana, United States. In 1961, the town and the surrounding area was designated a National Historic Landmark District, the Virginia City Historic District. The population was 130 at the 2000 census. In 1863, the area was part of the Dakota Territory until March, when it became part of the newly formed Idaho Territory. On May 26, 1864, the Territory of Montana was formed, with Bannack briefly becoming the territorial capital, Virginia City would quickly take that title from Bannack. In May 1863, a group of prospectors were headed towards the Yellowstone River and instead came upon a party of the Crow tribe and were forced to return to Bannack. Gold was discovered on the retreat trip when Bill Fairweather stuck a pick near Alder Creek joking he might find something to fund some tobacco. The prospectors could not keep the site a secret. They were followed on their return to the gold bearing site and set up the town in order to formulate rules about individual gold claims. On June 16, 1863 under the name of "Verina" the township was formed a mile south of the gold fields. The name was meant to honor Varina Howell
    7.25
    4 votes
    17
    8.67
    3 votes
    18

    Condon, Montana

    Condon is an unincorporated community in Missoula County, Montana, United States. Condon is the site of a U.S. post office, using ZIP Code 59826. Mission Mountain School is located in the community and the U.S. Forest Service operates an airport in Condon.
    7.00
    4 votes
    19
    7.00
    4 votes
    20

    Travelers Rest

    Traveler's Rest was a stopping point of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, located about one mile south of Lolo, Montana. The expedition stopped from September 9–11, 1805 before crossing the Bitterroot Mountains, and again on the return trip from June 30–July 3, 1806. Traveler's Rest is at the eastern end of the Lolo Trail. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966. The boundaries were subsequently revised, and mostly lie within the 51 acres (21 ha) Travelers Rest State Park, which is operated by the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks. Significant archeological findings made in 2002, such as latrines with traces of mercury and fire hearths, make this the only site on the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail that has yielded physical proof of the explorers' presence. Records made by Lewis and Clark often spell "Traveler's" as "Traveller's". This spot is largely unchanged from the days of Lewis and Clark. From this location, Lewis and Clark split up to explore Montana during their return trip, not reuniting until they reached Sanish, North Dakota. At the time of designation in 1960, the exact location of the
    8.33
    3 votes
    21
    Conrad

    Conrad

    Conrad is a city in and the county seat of Pondera County, Montana, United States. The population was 2,570 at the 2010 census. Conrad is located at 48°10′22″N 111°56′50″W / 48.172807°N 111.947131°W / 48.172807; -111.947131 (48.172807, -111.947131). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.1 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,753 people, 1,154 households, and 755 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,338.5 people per square mile (900.8/km). There were 1,332 housing units at an average density of 1,131.5 per square mile (435.8/km). The racial makeup of the city was 95.75% White, 0.11% African American, 2.29% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 0.22% from other races, and 1.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.94% of the population. There were 1,154 households out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.5% were non-families. 31.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.2% had someone living
    6.75
    4 votes
    22
    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C.

    Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington, "the District", or simply D.C., is the capital of the United States. On July 16, 1790, the Residence Act approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. As permitted by the U.S. Constitution, the District is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States Congress and is therefore not a part of any U.S. state. The states of Maryland and Virginia each donated land to form the federal district, which included the preexisting settlements of Georgetown and Alexandria; however, Congress returned the Virginia portion in 1846. Named in honor of George Washington, the City of Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the new national capital. Congress created a single municipal government for the whole District of Columbia after the American Civil War. Washington, D.C., had an estimated population of 617,996 in 2011, the 25th most populous place in the United States. Commuters from the surrounding Maryland and Virginia suburbs raise the city's population to over one million during the workweek. The Washington Metropolitan Area, of which
    5.60
    5 votes
    24
    Cascade

    Cascade

    Cascade (Waterfall in French) is a town in Cascade County, Montana, United States. The population was 685 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Great Falls, Montana Metropolitan Statistical Area. Cascade is located at 47°16′19″N 111°42′10″W / 47.271954°N 111.702675°W / 47.271954; -111.702675 (47.271954, -111.702675). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 819 people, 323 households, and 221 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,561.9 people per square mile (608.1/km). There were 349 housing units at an average density of 665.6 per square mile (259.1/km). The racial makeup of the town was 97.56% White, 0.37% African American, 1.22% Native American, and 0.85% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.73% of the population. There were 323 households out of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.7% had someone living
    8.00
    3 votes
    25
    Bitterroot Mountains

    Bitterroot Mountains

    The Northern and Central Bitterroot Range, collectively the Bitterroot Mountains, is the largest portion of the Bitterroot Range, part of the Rocky Mountains, located in the panhandle of Idaho and westernmost Montana in the Western United States. The mountains encompass an area of 4,862 square miles (12,593 km²). The mountains are bordered on the north by Lolo Creek, to the northeast by the Clark Fork, on the south by the Salmon River, on the east by the Bitterroot River and Valley, and on the west by the Selway and Lochsa Rivers. Its highest summit is Trapper Peak, at 10,157 feet (3,096 m). The Northern Bitterroot Range is the northernmost and shortest subrange of the Bitterroot Mountains. The Northern Bitterroots encompass 1,869 square miles (4,841 km²) and its two tallest peaks are the 7,930 foot (2,417 m) Rhodes Peak and the 7,770 foot (2,368 m) Quartz Benchmark. The Northern Bitterroots also contain a smaller subrange, the Grave Creek Range. The Grave Creek Range is 262 square miles (679 km²) in area and its highest peak is the 7,270 foot (2,216 m) Petty Mountain. The Central Bitterroot Range is the southernmost and tallest subrange of the Bitterroot Mountains. The Central
    6.50
    4 votes
    26
    Seaside

    Seaside

    Seaside is a city in Clatsop County, Oregon, United States. The name Seaside is derived from Seaside House, a historic summer resort built in the 1870s by railroad magnate Ben Holladay. The city's population was 6,457 at the 2010 census. About January 1, 1806, a group of men from the Lewis and Clark Expedition built a salt-making cairn at the present site of Seaside. The Native American name for the Clatsop village near the cairn was Ne-co-tat. The city was incorporated on February 17, 1899. In 1912, Alexandre Gilbert (1843–1932) was elected Mayor of Seaside. Gilbert was a French immigrant, a veteran of the Franco Prussian War. After living in San Francisco, California and Astoria, Oregon, Gilbert moved to Seaside where he had a beach cottage (built in 1885). Gilbert was a real estate developer who donated land to the City of Seaside for its one and a half mile long Promenade, or "Prom," along the Pacific beach. In 1892 he added to his beach cottage. The Gilbert House, since the mid 1980s operated commercially as the Gilbert Inn, still stands at Beach Drive and A Avenue. Gilbert's "Gilbert Block" office building on Broadway also survives. Gilbert died at home in Seaside and is
    6.50
    4 votes
    27
    7.67
    3 votes
    28
    Salmon

    Salmon

    Salmon is a city in Lemhi County, Idaho, United States. The population was 3,112 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Lemhi County. Located in the Lemhi River valley, Salmon is home to the Sacajawea Interpretive Culture and Education Center, which focuses on Lemhi Shoshone culture, as well as the interaction between Sacagawea and black people. The Lewis and Clark Expedition crossed the continental divide at Lemhi Pass, 30 miles (48 km) to the southeast of Salmon. They followed the Salmon River through the present site of the city, then ascended the North Fork of the river to cross into present-day Montana near Lost Trail Pass. The sole female in the party, Sacajawea, was born in the Lemhi Valley near Salmon. The Sacajawea Interpretive, Cultural and Educational Center was opened in Salmon in August 2003. From 1910 to 1939, Salmon was the western terminus of the now-defunct Gilmore and Pittsburgh Railroad. Salmon is located at 45°10′41″N 113°54′10″W / 45.17806°N 113.90278°W / 45.17806; -113.90278 (45.178110, -113.902660). The elevation is 3944 feet (1202 m) above sea level. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.8 square miles
    7.67
    3 votes
    29
    7.67
    3 votes
    30
    Big Sky

    Big Sky

    Big Sky is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gallatin and Madison counties in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Montana. This unincorporated community straddles the two counties, is not considered a town, and has no town government. The primary industry of the area is tourism. Big Sky is located approximately midway between West Yellowstone and Bozeman on U.S. Route 191 and just 15 miles (24 km) from the northwestern border of the Yellowstone National Park. The population was 1,221 at the 2000 census. "The Meadow" sector of the area lies in an alpine valley formed during the cretaceous period. Initially called the Gallatin Canyon Basin, the Meadow is braided with small rivers that channel mountain snow run-off. Fishing is permitted on all of these Gallatin feeders. Two "ponds" are found on the Middle Fork that bisects the Meadow. Fishing there is permitted only for those 16 and younger. Since 1993, an innovative sewer system has protected the water in the area from sewage discharge. Several agencies, such as the Blue Water Task Force, monitor the health of the rivers. The community is home to two large ski resorts that are sited in the "Mountain" sector: Big Sky Ski and
    7.33
    3 votes
    31
    7.33
    3 votes
    32
    Ovando

    Ovando

    Ovando is a census-designated place (CDP) in Powell County, Montana, United States. The population was 71 at the 2000 census. Ovando is located at 47°0′55″N 113°8′29″W / 47.01528°N 113.14139°W / 47.01528; -113.14139 (47.015159, -113.141253). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 9.1 square miles (24 km), of which, 9.0 square miles (23 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km) of it (1.20%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 71 people, 33 households, and 22 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 7.9 people per square mile (3.0/km²). There were 44 housing units at an average density of 4.9 per square mile (1.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 97.18% White, and 2.82% from two or more races. There were 33 households out of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.3% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.15 and the average family size was 2.68. In
    7.33
    3 votes
    33
    Whitehall

    Whitehall

    Whitehall is a town in Jefferson County, Montana, United States. The population was 1,044 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Helena Micropolitan Statistical Area. Newscaster Chet Huntley graduated from Whitehall High School in 1929. Whitehall is located at 45°52′13″N 112°5′54″W / 45.87028°N 112.09833°W / 45.87028; -112.09833 (45.870238, -112.098464). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.7 square miles (1.8 km), all of it land. Whitehall is part of school district 4,47,2. It has one high school, and one grade school. Whitehall's mascot is the Trojans. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,044 people, 450 households, and 297 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,527.3 people per square mile (592.8/km²). There were 507 housing units at an average density of 741.7 per square mile (287.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 94.54% White, 2.49% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 2.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.72% of the population. There were 450 households out of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2%
    7.33
    3 votes
    35
    8.50
    2 votes
    36
    Clinton

    Clinton

    Clinton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Missoula County, Montana, United States. It is part of the 'Missoula, Montana Metropolitan Statistical Area'. The CDP was named for General Sir Henry Clinton. The population was 1,052 at the 2010 census, an increase from its population of 549 in 2000. Clinton is located at 46°46′33″N 113°42′54″W / 46.77583°N 113.715°W / 46.77583; -113.715 (46.775792, -113.715031). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.0 square miles (5.2 km), of which, 2.0 square miles (5.2 km) of it is land and 0.51% is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,052 people, 204 households, and 153 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 278.6 people per square mile (107.6/km²). There were 216 housing units at an average density of 109.6 per square mile (42.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.81% White, 0.36% African American, 1.64% Native American, 0.18% Asian, and 2.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.36% of the population. There were 204 households out of which 39.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 12.3% had
    8.50
    2 votes
    38
    Mount St. Helens

    Mount St. Helens

    Mount St. Helens is an active stratovolcano located in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is 96 miles (154 km) south of Seattle, Washington and 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Portland, Oregon. Mount St. Helens takes its English name from the British diplomat Lord St Helens, a friend of explorer George Vancouver who made a survey of the area in the late 18th century. The volcano is located in the Cascade Range and is part of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, a segment of the Pacific Ring of Fire that includes over 160 active volcanoes. This volcano is well known for its ash explosions and pyroclastic flows. Mount St. Helens is most notorious for its catastrophic eruption on May 18, 1980, at 8:32 am PDT, the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States. Fifty-seven people were killed; 250 homes, 47 bridges, 15 miles (24 km) of railways, and 185 miles (298 km) of highway were destroyed. A massive debris avalanche triggered by an earthquake measuring 5.1 on the Richter scale, caused an eruption, reducing the elevation of the mountain's summit from 9,677 ft (2,950 m) to 8,365 ft (2,550 m) and
    8.50
    2 votes
    39
    Victor

    Victor

    Victor is a census-designated place (CDP) in Ravalli County, Montana, United States. The population was 859 at the 2000 census. Victor is located at 46°25′2″N 114°8′58″W / 46.41722°N 114.14944°W / 46.41722; -114.14944 (46.417213, -114.149547). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.1 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 859 people, 351 households, and 230 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 537.6 people per square mile (207.3/km²). There were 375 housing units at an average density of 234.7 per square mile (90.5/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.16% White, 0.12% African American, 1.51% Native American, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 0.70% from other races, and 1.40% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.56% of the population. There were 351 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.1% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.2% were non-families. 27.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or
    8.50
    2 votes
    40
    Augusta

    Augusta

    Augusta is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lewis and Clark County, Montana, United States. The population was 284 at the 2000 census. It is named after the daughter of D. J. Hogan, an early rancher. Augusta is part of the Helena Micropolitan Statistical Area. Augusta is located at 47°29′27″N 112°23′39″W / 47.49083°N 112.39417°W / 47.49083; -112.39417 (47.490892, -112.394181). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.6 square miles (1.6 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 284 people, 142 households, and 83 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 509.1 people per square mile (195.8/km²). There were 193 housing units at an average density of 346.0 per square mile (133.1/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 92.61% White, 2.46% Native American, 1.41% from other races, and 3.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.76% of the population. There were 142 households out of which 19.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.5% were non-families. 38.7% of all households
    10.00
    1 votes
    41
    Laurel

    Laurel

    Laurel is a city in Yellowstone County, Montana, United States. It is the third largest community in the Billings Metropolitan Statistical Area, and is located in the Yellowstone Valley, as an east-west terminal division point of the Burlington-Northern Railroad.. The population was 6,781 at the 2010 census. Both Interstate 90 and a number of local railroads run through Laurel. It is most known for its industry and agriculture, but also has a historic shopping district. Laurel is home to a Cenex Harvest States oil refinery and Montana Rail Link's Laurel Yard, the largest rail yard between St. Paul, Minnesota and Pasco, Washington. Before Laurel became a city or a community, people passed through the site during the gold rush period, when gold was discovered at the Clarks Fork headwaters. They came by team and wagon, and by small steamer vessels up the Yellowstone River. The government was in the process of planning a railroad to the west coast, and had surveying crews out to map the country on the most direct route. Many of the prospectors that went west in search of gold, felt that gold might be found in other parts of the state, so some returned to the Yellowstone Valley, and
    6.67
    3 votes
    42

    Seeley Lake

    Seeley Lake is a census-designated place (CDP) in Missoula County, Montana, United States. It is part of the 'Missoula, Montana Metropolitan Statistical Area'. The population was 1,659 at the 2010 census, an increase from its population of 1,436 in 2000. Seeley Lake is located at 47°10′1″N 113°28′1″W / 47.16694°N 113.46694°W / 47.16694; -113.46694 (47.166892, -113.466817). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 11.0 square miles (28 km), of which, 10.9 square miles (28 km) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km) of it (1.36%) is water. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,659 people, 589 households, and 411 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 131.9 people per square mile (50.9/km²). There were 938 housing units at an average density of 86.2 per square mile (33.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.94% White, 0.07% African American, 1.46% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.49% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.46% of the population. There were 589 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.4% were married couples living
    6.67
    3 votes
    43
    8.00
    2 votes
    44
    The Dalles Dam

    The Dalles Dam

    The Dalles Dam is a concrete-gravity run-of-the-river dam spanning the Columbia River, two-miles (3 km) east of the city of The Dalles, Oregon, United States. It joins Wasco County, Oregon with Klickitat County, Washington, 192 miles (309 km) upriver from the mouth of the Columbia near Astoria, Oregon. The closest towns on the Washington side are Dallesport and Wishram. The Army Corps of Engineers commenced work on the dam in 1952 and completed it five years later. Slackwater created by the dam submerged Celilo Falls, the economic and cultural hub of Native Americans in the region and the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in North America. On March 10, 1957, hundreds of observers looked on as the rising waters rapidly silenced the falls, submerged fishing platforms, and consumed the village of Celilo. The reservoir behind the dam is named Lake Celilo and runs 24 miles (39 km) up the river channel, to the foot of John Day Dam. The dam is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the power is marketed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). It is part of an extensive system of dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The Dalles Dam Visitor Center is located
    8.00
    2 votes
    45
    Livingston

    Livingston

    Livingston is a city in and the county seat of Park County, Montana, United States. Livingston is located in southwestern Montana, on the Yellowstone River, north of Yellowstone National Park. The population was 7,044 at the 2010 census. Livingston evolved from a trading post on the Yellowstone River called Benson’s Landing which was approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) downstream from present day Livingston. In July 1882 when Northern Pacific Railway contractors arrived the trading post was renamed ‘’Clark City’’ for contractor Heman Clark. The railroad officially reached Clark City on November 22, 1882. At that time, the community moved to its present location upstream from the trading post and was renamed Livingston in honor of a Northern Pacific Railway stockholder and director, Johnston Livingston (1875–81 and 1884–87). Livingston became the original gateway to Yellowstone National Park, which the NPR began promoting heavily to visitors from the East, by way of a branch running some sixty miles south to first the Cinnabar station and later Gardiner. Livingston was also headquarters for the NPR's Central Division and a good location for railroad shops to service NPR steam trains
    6.33
    3 votes
    46
    7.50
    2 votes
    47
    Stevensville

    Stevensville

    Stevensville is a town in Ravalli County, Montana, United States. The population was 1,553 at the 2000 census. Stevensville is officially recognized as the first permanent settlement in the state of Montana. Forty-eight years before Montana became the nation’s 41st state, Stevensville was settled by Jesuit Missionaries at the request of the Bitter Root Salish Indians. Through interactions with Iroquois Indians between 1812 and 1820, the Bitter Root Salish Indians leaned about Christianity and Jesuit Missionaries (blackrobes) that worked with Indian tribes teaching about agriculture, medicine, and religion. Interest in these “blackrobes” grew among the Salish and, in 1831, four young Salish men were dispatched to St. Louis, Missouri to request a “blackrobe” to return with them to their homeland of present day Stevensville. The four Salish men were directed to the home and office of William Clark (of Lewis and Clark fame) to make their request. At that time Clark was in charge of administering the territory they called home. Through the perils of their trip two of the Indians died at the home of General Clark. The remaining two Salish men secured a visit with St. Louis Bishop Joseph
    7.50
    2 votes
    48
    Montana City

    Montana City

    Montana City is a census-designated place (CDP) in Jefferson County, Montana, United States. The population was 2,094 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Helena Micropolitan Statistical Area. Montana City is located at 46°32′14″N 111°55′54″W / 46.53722°N 111.93167°W / 46.53722; -111.93167 (46.537357, -111.931705). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 28.3 square miles (73 km), of which, 28.2 square miles (73 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.11%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,094 people, 697 households, and 627 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 74.2 people per square mile (28.6/km²). There were 709 housing units at an average density of 25.1/sq mi (9.7/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 98.19% White, 0.05% African American, 0.48% Native American, 0.10% Asian, 0.14% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.10% of the population. There were 697 households out of which 46.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 84.4% were married couples living together, 2.9% had a female householder with
    9.00
    1 votes
    49
    Polson

    Polson

    Polson (Ktunaxa: kwat̕aq̓nuk ) is a city in Lake County, Montana, United States, on the southern shore of Flathead Lake. It is also on the Flathead Indian Reservation. The population was 4,488 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Lake County. The city was named after pioneer rancher David Polson. Polson is located at 47°41′17″N 114°9′24″W / 47.68806°N 114.15667°W / 47.68806; -114.15667 (47.688089, -114.156766). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,041 people, 1,739 households, and 1,052 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,490.9 people per square mile (575.7/km²). There were 1,977 housing units at an average density of 729.4 per square mile (281.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 78.25% White, 0.15% African American, 16.11% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.45% from other races, and 4.50% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.25% of the population. There were 1,739 households out of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.7% were married couples living
    9.00
    1 votes
    50
    Idaho Falls

    Idaho Falls

    Idaho Falls is a city in and the county seat of Bonneville County, Idaho, United States, and the largest city in Eastern Idaho. As of the 2010 census, the population of Idaho Falls was 56,813, with a metro population of 130,374. Idaho Falls is the principal city of the Idaho Falls, Idaho Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Idaho Falls-Blackfoot, Idaho Combined Statistical Area. It is the state's largest city outside the Boise metropolitan area and the third-largest metro area behind Boise City-Nampa and Coeur d'Alene, which is connected to the larger Spokane, Washington. The city serves as a hub to all of eastern Idaho and much of western Wyoming. Due to its relative economic vitality, high quality of life, and proximity to world-class outdoor recreation, it is often featured in various publications' lists of "best places to live." The area is served by the Idaho Falls Regional Airport and is home to the Idaho Falls Chukars minor league baseball team. What became Idaho Falls was the site of Taylor’s Crossing on the Montana Trail, a timber frame bridge built across the Snake River. The 1865 bridge was built by Matt Taylor, a Montana Trail freighter, who built a toll bridge across
    6.00
    3 votes
    51
    Astoria

    Astoria

    Astoria is the seat of Clatsop County, Oregon, United States. Situated near the mouth of the Columbia River, the city was named after the American investor John Jacob Astor. His American Fur Company founded Fort Astoria at the site in 1811. Astoria was incorporated by the Oregon Legislative Assembly on October 20, 1876. Located on the south shore of the Columbia, the city is served by the Port of Astoria with a deep-water port. Transportation includes the Astoria Regional Airport with U.S. Route 30 and U.S. Route 101 as the main highways, and the 4.2-mile (6.8 km) Astoria – Megler Bridge connecting to neighboring Washington across the river. The population was 9,477 at the 2010 census. The Lewis and Clark Expedition spent the winter of 1805–1806 at Fort Clatsop, a small log structure south and west of modern day Astoria. The expedition had hoped a ship would come by to take them back east, but instead endured a torturous winter of rain and cold, then returned east the way they came. Today the fort has been recreated and is now a national monument. In 1810, John Jacob Astor's Pacific Fur Company sent the Astor Expedition that founded Fort Astoria as its primary fur-trading post in
    7.00
    2 votes
    52
    7.00
    2 votes
    53
    Billings

    Billings

    Billings is the largest city in the U.S. state of Montana, and is the principal city of the Billings Metropolitan Area, the largest metropolitan area in over 500 miles (800 km). With a trade area of over half a million people it is the largest metropolitan area between Denver and Calgary and between Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and Spokane, Washington. Billings is located in the south-central portion of the state and is the county seat of Yellowstone County, 2011 population of 150,069. The 2011 Census estimates put the Billings population at 105,636, the only city in Montana to surpass 100,000 people. The city is experiencing rapid growth and a strong economy; it has had and is continuing to have the largest growth of any city in Montana. Parts of the metro area are seeing hyper growth. From 2000 to 2010 Lockwood, a southeastern suburb of the city saw growth of 57.8% the largest growth rate of any community in Montana. Billings has avoided the economic downturn that affected most of the nation 2008–2012 as well as avoiding the housing bust. With the Bakken oil play in eastern Montana and western North Dakota, the largest oil discovery in U.S. history, as well as the Heath shale oil
    7.00
    2 votes
    54
    Cut Bank

    Cut Bank

    Cut Bank is a city in and the county seat of Glacier County, Montana, United States located just east-south-east of the "cut bank" (gorge) geographical feature which formed canyon-like along the eponymously named Cut Bank Creek river. The population was 2,919 at the 2010 census. Cut Bank is located at 48°38′5″N 112°19′52″W / 48.63472°N 112.33111°W / 48.63472; -112.33111 (48.634801, −112.331090). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km), all of it land. The city is located 30 miles south of the Canadian border. The name of the city comes from the Cut Bank (gorge)— a scenic hazard to navigation and geologic feature of the same name. The Cut Bank Creek river is spanned cliffs to cliffs by a scenic elevated railway bridge high above the canyon floor less than a mile from the edge of the town. As of the census of 2010, there were 2,919 people, and 1,249 households, residing in the city. The population density was 2,908 people per square mile (1,223.3/km). There were 1,492 housing units at an average density of 1,516.8 per square mile (587.8/km). The racial makeup of the city was 74.7% White, 0.02% African American, 19.0%
    5.67
    3 votes
    55
    Darby

    Darby

    Darby is a town in Ravalli County, Montana, United States. The population was 710 at the 2000 census. Darby is located near the southwestern border of Montana and Idaho, along the Continental Divide. It is best known for beautiful scenery, opportunities to enjoy outdoor activities, small town friendliness and independent thinking, such as a 2004 debate over teaching evolution in schools. Darby is located at 46°1′19″N 114°10′47″W / 46.02194°N 114.17972°W / 46.02194; -114.17972 (46.022030, -114.179603). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 710 people, 279 households, and 176 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,336.5 people per square mile (517.2/km²). There were 316 housing units at an average density of 230.2/km² or 594.8/sq mi. The racial makeup of the town was 90.56% White, 0.14% African American, 3.24% Native American, 2.39% from other races, and 3.66% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.52% of the population. There were 279 households out of which 36.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.9%
    5.67
    3 votes
    56
    The Dalles

    The Dalles

    The Dalles ( /ˈdælz/) is the largest city and county seat of Wasco County, Oregon, United States. The name of the city comes from the French word dalle (meaning either "sluice" or "flagstone" and referring to the columnar basalt rocks carved by the river, what the French-Canadian employees of the North West Company called the rapids of the Columbia River between the present-day city and Celilo Falls. The population was 12,156 at the 2000 census and was estimated at 12,314 in 2009. Also in the same area was the Petite Dalles or Little Dalles, or Short Narrows. The site of what is now the city of The Dalles was a major Native American trading center for at least 10,000 years. The general area is one of the continent's most significant archaeological regions. Lewis and Clark camped near Mill Creek on October 25–27, 1805, and recorded the Native American name for the creek as Quenett. The first use of the name Dalles, according to Oregon Geographic Names, appears in fur trader Gabriel Franchère's Narrative, on April 12, 1814, referring to the long series of major rapids in the river. By 1814 several overland groups of the land components of the Astor Expedition of 1810–1812 would have
    8.00
    1 votes
    58
    Havre

    Havre

    Havre ( /ˈhævər/ HAV-ər) (Assiniboine: Bahásaba ) is a city in, and the county seat of, Hill County, Montana, United States. It is said to be named after the city of Le Havre in France. The population was 9,310 at the 2010 census. Located in north central Montana, Havre was incorporated in 1893. It was founded primarily to serve as a major railroad service center for the Great Northern Railway (built by James J. Hill) with its location midway between Seattle and Minneapolis-St. Paul. A statue of Hill stands near the Havre Amtrak station to commemorate the key contributions his railroad has made to Havre's and Montana's history. Originally named Bullhook Bottoms, the town met in a series of meetings to determine a new name. The original settlers were given the final decision, and due to a strong French influence, the town was renamed Havre. Simon Pepin (1840–1914), the "Father of Havre," was a typical Montana entrepreneur. Born in Quebec, Canada, he emigrated to Montana in 1863, and became a contractor furnishing supplies for the construction of forts Custer, Assiniboine, and Maginnis. Pepin purchased ranch lands near Fort Assiniboine. When James J. Hill built the Great Northern
    5.33
    3 votes
    59
    Bonneville Dam

    Bonneville Dam

    Bonneville Lock and Dam ( /ˈbɒnɨvɨl/) consists of several run-of-the-river dam structures that together complete a span of the Columbia River between the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington at River Mile 146.1. The dam is located 40 miles (64 km) east of Portland, Oregon, in the Columbia River Gorge. The primary functions of Bonneville Lock and Dam are electrical power generation and river navigation. The dam was built and is managed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Electrical power generated at Bonneville is distributed by the Bonneville Power Administration. Bonneville Lock and Dam is named for Army Capt. Benjamin Bonneville, an early explorer credited with charting much of the Oregon Trail. The Bonneville Dam Historic District was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1987. In 1896, prior to this damming of the river, the Cascade Locks and Canal were constructed, allowing ships to pass the Cascades Rapids, located several miles upstream of Bonneville. Prior to the New Deal, development of the Columbia River with flood control, hydroelectricity, navigation and irrigation was deemed as important. In 1929, the US Army Corps of Engineers published the 308
    6.50
    2 votes
    60
    Bozeman

    Bozeman

    Bozeman is a city in and the county seat of Gallatin County, Montana, United States, in the southwestern part of the state. The 2010 census put Bozeman's population at 37,280 making it the fourth largest city in the state. It is the principal city of the Bozeman Micropolitan Statistical Area, consisting of all of Gallatin County with a population of 89,513. It is the second largest Micropolitan Statistical Area in Montana and is the fourth largest of all of Montana’s statistical areas. The city is named after John M. Bozeman who established the Bozeman Trail and was a key founder of the town in August 1864. The town became incorporated in April 1883 with a city council form of government and later in January 1922 transitioned to its current city manager/city commission form of government. Bozeman was elected an All-America City in 2001 by the National Civic League. Bozeman is a college town, home to Montana State University - Bozeman. The local newspaper is the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, and the city is served by Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport. For thousands of years, Native Americans tribes including the Shoshone, Nez Perce, Blackfeet, Flathead, Crow Nation and Sioux
    6.50
    2 votes
    61
    Dayton

    Dayton

    Dayton is a city in and the county seat of Columbia County, Washington, United States. The population was 2,526 at the 2010 census. Dayton was founded in the 1860s. A town site plat was filed by Jesse N. and Elizabeth Day on November 23, 1871. Dayton was officially incorporated on November 10, 1881 and was named for Jesse Day. Dayton has the oldest train depot (1881) in Washington State and the oldest continuously used courthouse (1887). Dayton is located at 46°19′11″N 117°58′40″W / 46.31972°N 117.97778°W / 46.31972; -117.97778 (46.319608, -117.977699). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.5 square miles (3.8 km²), all of it land. The Touchet River runs through Dayton. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,655 people, 1,081 households, and 695 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,803.0 people per square mile (697.3/km²). There were 1,181 housing units at an average density of 802.0 per square mile (310.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.58% White, 0.30% African American, 1.05% Native American, 0.49% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 3.54% from other races, and 2.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino
    6.50
    2 votes
    62
    Gardiner

    Gardiner

    Gardiner is a census-designated place (CDP) in Park County, Montana, United States, along the 45th parallel. The population was 851 at the 2000 census. Gardiner was officially founded in 1880, but the area has served as a main entrance to Yellowstone National Park since its creation in 1872. Parks' Fly Shop, one of the oldest fly shops and guiding operations in the Yellowstone area, was started by Merton Parks in 1953. Yellowstone National Park Heritage and Research Center, which opened May 18, 2005 is located in Gardiner, MT and houses National Park Service archives, Yellowstone museum collections and reference libraries. The name Gardiner derives from Johnson Gardner, a fur trapper who operated in the area in 1830-31. He named the lush headwaters valley of today's Gardner River Gardner's Hole. Originally, named Gardner's Fork, the river took on Gardner's name although prospectors and explorers who visited the area later in the century were unaware of the trapper Johnson Gardner. In 1870, when the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition passed through the area they began calling the river Gardiner--a phonetic error. Hiram M. Chittenden (1895) and Nathaniel P. Langford (1905) confirmed
    6.50
    2 votes
    63
    Harpers Ferry

    Harpers Ferry

    Harpers Ferry is an historic town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, United States. It was formerly Harper’s Ferry with an apostrophe and that form continues to appear in some references. It is situated at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers where the U.S. states of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia meet. The town is located on a low-lying flood plain created by the two rivers and surrounded by higher ground. Historically, Harpers Ferry is best known for John Brown's raid on the Armory in 1859 and its role in the American Civil War. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town had a population of 286. The lower part of Harpers Ferry is located within Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Most of the remainder, which includes the more highly populated area, is included in the separate Harpers Ferry Historic District. Two other National Register of Historic Places properties adjoin the town: the B & O Railroad Potomac River Crossing and St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) headquarters is located in Harpers Ferry and the town is one of only a few through which the Appalachian Trail passes directly. Harpers Ferry is also an
    6.50
    2 votes
    64
    Pierce

    Pierce

    Pierce is a city in Clearwater County, Idaho. The population was 508 at the 2010 census, down from 617 in 2000. The first discovery of gold in Idaho (then Washington Territory) was made by Elias D. Pierce and Wilbur F. Bassett on Orofino Creek (Canal Gulch) in October 1860, a mile (1.6 km) north of Pierce. Pierce was the first county seat for Shoshone County, which was established in January 1861 in Washington Territory and for a most of its first year included most of present-day Idaho and Wyoming. The Pierce Courthouse, constructed in 1862, is Idaho's oldest public building. Idaho Territory was established in 1863, and the county seat moved north to the Silver Valley in Murray in 1884 (and to Wallace in 1898). Present-day Clearwater County, formed in 1911, was part of Shoshone County until 1904, when it was annexed by Nez Perce County. The Bald Mountain Ski Area is located 11 miles (18 km) northwest of Pierce. Pierce is located at 46°29′33″N 115°47′58″W / 46.4925°N 115.79944°W / 46.4925; -115.79944 (46.492566, -115.799466), at an elevation of 3,094 feet (943 m) above sea level. It is located on the Weippe Prairie, north of the Clearwater River canyon. According to the U.S.
    6.50
    2 votes
    65
    Riggins

    Riggins

    Riggins is a city in Idaho County, Idaho, United States. It is nestled deep in a canyon at the confluence of the Salmon River and the Little Salmon River in west central Idaho, approximately 150 highway miles (241 km) north of Boise, and 120 highway miles (193 km) south-southeast of Lewiston. The elevation of Riggins is 1,821 feet (555 m) above sea level, and the population was 419 at the 2010 census. US-95, the only highway for the state connecting the Panhandle to the south, runs through Riggins as Main Street. Along this route, Riggins is the northwesternmost town in the Mountain time zone. The Pacific time zone begins just north of Riggins, upon crossing the Salmon River. Riggins is midway in the 300-mile (480 km) drive from Boise to Moscow, home of the University of Idaho, making it a popular refueling stop for students from the Treasure Valley. Riggins was named for Richard L. Riggins, local businessman and postmaster. Riggins is located at 45°25′20″N 116°18′57″W / 45.42222°N 116.31583°W / 45.42222; -116.31583 (45.422125, -116.315848). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.3 square miles (0.78 km), all of it land. As of the census of
    6.50
    2 votes
    66
    Weippe

    Weippe

    Weippe (pronounced wē′·īp) is a city in Clearwater County, Idaho, United States. The population was 441 at the 2010 census, up from 411 in 2000. Near present-day Weippe, the Lewis and Clark expedition first met with the Nez Percé in September 1805 on the Weippe Prairie. Weippe is located at 46°22′42″N 115°56′23″W / 46.37833°N 115.93972°W / 46.37833; -115.93972 (46.378219, -115.939825), at an elevation of 3,015 feet (919 m) above sea level. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.4 square miles (1.0 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 416 people, 161 households, and 119 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,009.8 people per square mile (391.8/km²). There were 198 housing units at an average density of 480.6 per square mile (186.5/km²). The; racial makeup of the city was 97.12% White, 0.24% African American, 1.20% Native American, 0.72% from other races, and 0.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.96% of the population. There were 161 households out of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.5% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a
    6.50
    2 votes
    67
    Kamiah

    Kamiah

    Kamiah (/ˈkæmi.aɪ/ KAM-ee-eye) is a city in Idaho and Lewis counties in the U.S. state of Idaho. The largest city in Lewis County, it extends only a small distance into Idaho County, south of Lawyer Creek. The population was 1,295 at the 2010 census. The city lies in the narrow valley of the Clearwater River; downstream are Orofino and Lewiston, at the confluence with the Snake River. The Kamiah area has been inhabited by the Nez Perce tribe for centuries. The name "Kamiah" is Nez Perce for "many rope litters," as Nez Perce manufactured "Kamia" ropes in the area to fish steelhead. Also according to Nez Perce tradition, the Appaloosa horse was first bred in the area. On their return trip east, the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped in the Kamiah area for several weeks during the spring of 1806, waiting for snows to melt. Kamiah is located at 46°13′37″N 116°1′40″W / 46.22694°N 116.02778°W / 46.22694; -116.02778 (46.226811, -116.027728), at an elevation of 1,240 feet (378 m) above sea level According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.1 km), of which, 1.1 square miles (2.8 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km) of it
    6.00
    2 votes
    68
    Twin Bridges

    Twin Bridges

    Twin Bridges is a town in Madison County, Montana, United States. It lies at the confluence of the Ruby, Beaverhead and Big Hole Rivers which form the Jefferson River. Twin Bridges is a well known fly fishing mecca for trout fisherman. The population was 400 at the 2000 census. Twin Bridges is located at 45°32′41″N 112°19′54″W / 45.54472°N 112.33167°W / 45.54472; -112.33167 (45.544683, -112.331579). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.9 square miles (2.3 km), all of it land. Four Indian trails came together at a bend of the Beaverhead River north of the present school building in Twin Bridges. These trails were used by early settlers and freight companies, and helped to establish where the community of Twin Bridges would develop. Judge M.H. Lott came to Montana in 1862, and with his brother John T. Lott, settled in the Ruby Valley in 1864. In 1865 they built a bridge across the Beaverhead River, and later built another bridge across the Beaverhead at the Point of Rocks. The Lott brothers continued development of roads and promoted settlement of the town, which was incorporated in 1902, with M.H. Lott as the first mayor. As of the census
    6.00
    2 votes
    69
    Coeur d'Alene

    Coeur d'Alene

    Coeur d'Alene (/ˌkɒr dəˈleɪn/ KORR də-LAYN) is the largest city and county seat of Kootenai (/ˈkuːtniː/ KOOT-nee) County, Idaho, United States. It is the principal city of the Coeur d'Alene Metropolitan Statistical Area. Coeur d'Alene has the second largest metropolitan area in the state of Idaho. As of the 2010 census the population of Coeur d'Alene was 44,137. The city is located about 30 mi (48 km) east of the larger Spokane, Washington, which combined with Coeur d'Alene and northern Idaho has population of 590,617. Coeur d'Alene is the largest city in the northern Idaho Panhandle. The city is located on the north shore of Lake Coeur d'Alene, 25-mile (40 km) in length. Locally, Coeur d'Alene is known as the "Lake City," or simply called by its initials: "CDA". The city of Coeur d'Alene has grown significantly in recent years, in part because of a substantial increase in tourism, encouraged by several resorts in the area. Barbara Walters called the city "a little slice of Heaven" and included it in her list of most fascinating places to visit. On November 28, 2007, Good Morning America broadcast the city's Christmas lighting ceremony because its display is among the largest in
    7.00
    1 votes
    70
    Grangeville

    Grangeville

    Grangeville is the largest city in and the county seat of Idaho County, Idaho, United States, in the west central part of the state. It had a population of 3,141 at the 2010 census, down from 3,228 in 2000. The people of Grangeville enjoy close access to scenic and wildlife areas. Whitewater rafting is a popular pursuit. The Clearwater River, Snake River, and Salmon River lie close by. Salmon and steelhead fishing is often a choice of recreation. Many residents of Grangeville hunt deer, elk, and turkeys in the nearby forests. Hiking is also popular in the Nez Perce National Forest, the Gospel Hump Wilderness, and Hells Canyon to the south of the city. The city operates the nearby Snowhaven ski area for winter recreation. Many residents of Grangeville depend on the nearby forests for their livelihoods. In addition to timber harvesting, the U.S. Forest Service is a major source of employment in the region. Grangeville's "Border Days" is a large public celebration on the weekend of July 4 (Independence Day), which features the state's oldest rodeo as well as parades, art shows, and the world's largest egg toss. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,228 people, 1,333 households, and
    7.00
    1 votes
    71
    Welches

    Welches

    Welches is an unincorporated community in Clackamas County, Oregon, United States. It is located within the Mount Hood Corridor between Zigzag and Wemme along U.S. Route 26. It is one of the communities that make up the Villages at Mount Hood. The community was named after Samuel Welch, a homesteader who settled near Welches Creek in 1882. A post office was established there in 1905. The first golf course in the state was built there in 1928, and today the largest hotel and golf resort in the corridor is located there, complete with croquet courts. Welches is home to the Hoodland library, operated by the city of Sandy.
    7.00
    1 votes
    72
    Miles City

    Miles City

    Miles City is a city in and the county seat of Custer County, Montana, United States. The population was 8,410 at the 2010 census. After the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876, the U.S. Army created forts in eastern Montana, including one where the north-flowing Tongue River flowed into the east-flowing Yellowstone River. The first fort was known as the Tongue River Cantonment or the Tongue River Barracks and was founded on August 27, 1876. A second, permanent fort was constructed on higher ground two miles to the west of the mouth of the Tongue and this became Fort Keogh. Fort Keogh (named after Captain Myles Keogh, one of the battle dead, whose horse, Comanche, was the lone survivor of Custer's command) started as a few rough winter cabins, but grew into a moderate sized western fort, from which its commander, General Nelson A. Miles, effectively brought the remaining "uncontrolled" Native Americans into subjugation during the last decade of the 1800s. Nelson Miles said that "whiskey caused him more trouble than the Indians" and, after tiring of drunken soldiers causing problems during the winter campaign, evicted the sutlers who provided "liquid stock" in the spring of 1877.
    4.67
    3 votes
    73
    Cannon Beach

    Cannon Beach

    Cannon Beach is a city in Clatsop County, Oregon, United States. The population was 1,588 as of the 2000 census. The 2007 estimate is 1,680 residents. The first recorded journey by a European to what is now Cannon Beach was made by William Clark, one of the leaders of the Lewis and Clark Expedition in early 1806. The expedition was wintering at Fort Clatsop, roughly 20 miles to the north near the mouth of the Columbia River. In December 1805, two members of the expedition returned to camp with blubber from a whale that had beached several miles south, near the mouth of Ecola Creek. Clark later explored the region himself. From a spot near the western cliffs of the headland he saw "...the grandest and most pleasing prospects which my eyes ever surveyed, in front of a boundless Ocean..." That viewpoint, later dubbed "Clark's Point of View," can be accessed by a hiking trail from Indian Beach in Ecola State Park. Clark and several of his companions, including Sacagawea, completed a three day journey on January 10, 1806 to the site of the beached whale. They encountered a group of Native Americans from the Tillamook tribe who were boiling blubber for storage. Clark and his party met
    6.00
    1 votes
    74
    Hardin

    Hardin

    Hardin is a city in and the county seat of Big Horn County, Montana, United States. The population was 3,505 at the 2010 census. The city was named for Samuel Hardin, a friend of developer Charles Henry Morrill. Hardin is located at 45°43′55″N 107°36′45″W / 45.73194°N 107.6125°W / 45.73194; -107.6125 (45.731824, -107.612542). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.4 square miles (3.6 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,384 people, 1,295 households, and 868 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,415.5 people per square mile (933.3/km²). There were 1,411 housing units at an average density of 1,007.2 per square mile (389.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 62.26% White, 0.12% African American, 31.59% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 1.03% from other races, and 4.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.53% of the population. There were 1,295 households out of which 36.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 16.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.9% were non-families. 29.2% of all households
    6.00
    1 votes
    75
    Kooskia

    Kooskia

    Kooskia (pronounced kōō′·skē) is a city in Idaho County, Idaho, United States. The population was 675 at the 2000 census. Kooskia is located at 46°8′30″N 115°58′47″W / 46.14167°N 115.97972°W / 46.14167; -115.97972 (46.141802, -115.979708). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.7 square miles (1.8 km), of which, 0.6 square miles (1.6 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (4.41%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 675 people, 278 households, and 179 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,039.3 people per square mile (401.0/km²). There were 332 housing units at an average density of 511.2 per square mile (197.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.19% White, 2.22% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 1.63% from other races, and 2.67% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.37% of the population. There were 278 households out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.5% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals and
    6.00
    1 votes
    77
    6.00
    1 votes
    78
    West Yellowstone

    West Yellowstone

    West Yellowstone is a town in Gallatin County, Montana, adjacent to Yellowstone National Park. The population was 1,177 at the 2000 census. The town is served by Yellowstone Airport. It is part of the 'Bozeman Micropolitan Statistical Area'. It was founded in June 1908 when the Oregon Short Line Railroad was completed. The town's name changed several times until West Yellowstone was settled upon in 1920. For many the town of West Yellowstone is a place to stay while traveling through Yellowstone National Park. The town is separated into two parts, residential and commercial. It is separated roughly at the road D Parkway. South of D Parkway (Alley) is mainly businesses, north of it is homes and apartments. The area north of D Parkway is known to locals as the "Madison Addition", it is where most of the homes are. The town has one school serving kindergarten through 12th grade. West Yellowstone is located at 44°39′45″N 111°6′21″W / 44.6625°N 111.10583°W / 44.6625; -111.10583 (44.662500, -111.105933). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.8 square miles (2.1 km), all of it land. At almost 7,000 feet above sea level and almost exactly halfway
    6.00
    1 votes
    79
    Glendive

    Glendive

    Glendive is a city in and the county seat of Dawson County, Montana, United States. The population was 4,935 at the 2010 census. The town of Glendive is located in Eastern Montana and is considered by many as an agricultural hub of Eastern Montana. The town itself is tucked between the Yellowstone River and the Badlands, named for the rugged terrain and jagged rock formations that are known to exist in the area. Makoshika State Park is located just east of Glendive. Glendive is located at 47°6′31″N 104°42′38″W / 47.10861°N 104.71056°W / 47.10861; -104.71056 (47.108491, -104.710419), at an altitude of 2,064 feet (629 m). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.4 square miles (8.8 km), of which, 3.3 square miles (8.5 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (0.89%) is water. Sir George Gore, a wealthy Irish sportsman, named his favorite hunting area "Glendive" in 1855, from the Irish gleann 'valley' and dubh 'black'. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,729 people, 1,983 households, and 1,229 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,419.0 people per square mile (548.3/km²). There were 2,204 housing units at
    4.50
    2 votes
    80
    Kuna

    Kuna

    Kuna is a city in Ada County, Idaho, United States. It is part of the Boise City–Nampa, Idaho Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 15,210 at the 2010 census. Kuna is one of the fastest-growing areas in Idaho, having nearly tripled in population between 2000 and 2010. Kuna is located at 43°29′35″N 116°25′8″W / 43.49306°N 116.41889°W / 43.49306; -116.41889 (43.493092, -116.418936) at an elevation of 2,694 feet (821 m) above sea level. Kuna's business center is approximately 18 miles (29 km) southwest of downtown Boise, the state capital. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 18.07 square miles (46.8 km) in 2010, all of it land. At the 2000 census, the city had a total area of only 2.4 square miles (6.2 km) South of Kuna is located the Kuna Caves, an underground lava flow cave. A small seasonal creek, Indian Creek, runs through the city. It is now used as an irrigation canal, filled by the New York Canal from the Boise River Diversion Dam. One of the few small floatable waterways in the region, Indian Creek is a favorite swimming spot for local residents. Kuna originated as a railroad stop with coach transport to Boise. It is
    4.50
    2 votes
    81
    Vermillion

    Vermillion

    Vermillion is a city in and the county seat of Clay County, in the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of South Dakota, and the tenth largest city in the state. According to the 2010 Census, the population was 10,571. Vermillion lies atop a bluff near the Missouri River. The area has been home to various Native American tribes for centuries. French fur traders first visited in the late 18th century. Vermillion was founded in 1859 and incorporated in 1873. The name refers to the Lakota name: wa sa wak pa'la (red stream). Home to the University of South Dakota, Vermillion has a mixed academic and rural character: The university is a major academic institution for the state, boasting the state's only law and medical school, and the state's only AACSB accredited business school. Major farm products include corn, soybeans, and alfalfa. The population was 10,571 at the 2010 census. Vermillion is located approximately 10 miles (16 km) from the proposed site of a Hyperion oil refinery (formerly known as the Gorilla Project), which will be one Lewis and Clark camped at the mouth of the Vermillion River near the present-day town on Friday, August 24, 1804. (The previous day they killed
    4.50
    2 votes
    82
    Waitsburg

    Waitsburg

    Waitsburg is a city in Walla Walla County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,217 at the 2010 census. Waitsburg has a unique city classification in the State of Washington. It is the only city which still operates under its territorial charter. Waitsburg was first settled in 1859 by Robert Kennedy. The town name commemorates Sylvester M. Wait, who established a mill there in 1864. Waitsburg was officially incorporated November 25, 1881. Waitsburg is located at 46°16′5″N 118°9′15″W / 46.26806°N 118.15417°W / 46.26806; -118.15417 (46.268060, -118.154278). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.9 square miles (2.5 km²), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,212 people, 490 households, and 314 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,279.5 people per square mile (492.6/km²). There were 522 housing units at an average density of 551.1 per square mile (212.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.80% White, 0.58% African American, 0.41% Native American, 0.66% Asian, 1.16% from other races, and 2.39% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.81% of the population. There were
    4.50
    2 votes
    83
    Celilo Falls

    Celilo Falls

    Celilo Falls (Wyam, meaning "echo of falling water" or "sound of water upon the rocks," in several native languages) was a tribal fishing area on the Columbia River, just east of the Cascade Mountains, on what is today the border between the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington. The name refers to a series of cascades and waterfalls on the river, as well as to the native settlements and trading villages that existed there in various configurations for 15,000 years. Celilo was the oldest continuously inhabited community on the North American continent until 1957, when the falls and nearby settlements were submerged by the construction of The Dalles Dam. The main waterfall, known variously as Celilo Falls, The Chutes, Great Falls, or Columbia Falls, consisted of three sections: a cataract, called Horseshoe Falls or Tumwater Falls; a deep eddy, the Cul-de-Sac; and the main channel. These features were formed by the Columbia River's relentless push through basalt narrows on the final leg of its journey to the Pacific Ocean. Frequently more than a mile (1.6 km) in width, the river was squeezed here into a width of only 140 feet (43 m). The seasonal flow of the Columbia changed the
    5.00
    1 votes
    84
    5.00
    1 votes
    85

    Gibbons Pass

    Gibbons Pass (el. 2117 m./6945 ft.) is a high mountain pass in the Rocky Mountains in Montana. It is situated on the North American Continental Divide.
    5.00
    1 votes
    86
    Park City

    Park City

    Park City is a census-designated place (CDP) in Stillwater County, Montana, United States. The population was 870 at the 2000 census. Park City is located at 45°37′46″N 108°55′3″W / 45.62944°N 108.9175°W / 45.62944; -108.9175 (45.629523, -108.917418). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 870 people, 330 households, and 256 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 838.9 people per square mile (323.0/km²). There were 343 housing units at an average density of 330.7 per square mile (127.3/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.78% White, 0.23% African American, 0.57% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 1.03% from other races, and 1.26% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.15% of the population. There were 330 households out of which 38.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.3% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.4% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or
    5.00
    1 votes
    87
    4.00
    1 votes
    88
    4.00
    1 votes
    89
    4.00
    1 votes
    90
    Portland

    Portland

    Portland is a city located in the US state of Oregon, near the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers. As of the 2010 Census, it had a population of 583,776, making it the 29th most populous city in the United States. Portland is Oregon's most populous city, and the third most populous city in the Pacific Northwest region, after Seattle, Washington and Vancouver, British Columbia. Approximately 2,260,000 people live in the Portland metropolitan area (MSA), the 23rd most populous in the United States. Portland was incorporated in 1851 and is the county seat of Multnomah County. The city extends west into the Cedar Mill neighborhood in Washington County and south towards Lake Oswego in Clackamas County. The city has a commission-based government headed by a mayor and four other commissioners; the city and region are noted for strong land-use planning and investment in light rail. This is supported by Metro, a distinctive regional government. Because of its public transportation networks and efficient land-use planning, Portland has been referred to as one of the most environmentally friendly, or "green", cities in the world. Located in the Marine west coast climate region,
    4.00
    1 votes
    91
    Sidney

    Sidney

    Sidney is a city in and the county seat of Richland County, Montana, United States, less than 10 mi (16 km) away from the North Dakota border. The population was 5,191 at the 2010 census. The city lies along the Yellowstone River and is in proximity to the badlands of the Dakotas. Sidney is approximately midway between Glendive, Montana and Williston, North Dakota. Settlers began arriving in the area in the 1870s, and a post office was established in 1888. Six year old Sidney Walters and his parents were staying with Hiram Otis, the local justice of the peace, and Otis decided that Sidney was a good name for the town. The following year, Montana became a state and Sidney was incorporated in 1911. Sidney was originally part of Dawson County, but became the county seat of Richland County at its inception in 1914. Agriculture became an important part of the region after the Lower Yellowstone Irrigation Project was completed in 1909. A dam was built on the river south of Glendive, which diverted water from the river into a 115.2 km (71.6 mi) main canal, which runs north-south, parallel to the Yellowstone, irrigating land from Glendive north up to Fairview, where it dumps into the
    4.00
    1 votes
    92
    Wisdom

    Wisdom

    Wisdom is a census-designated place (CDP) in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States. The population was 114 at the 2000 census. The ZIP Code of the area is 59761. Wisdom was named for the Wisdom River, which is now named the Big Hole River, that passes through the town. Wisdom is located at 45°36′58″N 113°26′59″W / 45.61611°N 113.44972°W / 45.61611; -113.44972 (45.616120, -113.449742). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km), of which, 0.9 square miles (2.3 km) of it is land and 1.04% is water. Wisdom's average elevation is 6245 feet, about 1.2 miles above sea level. As of the 2000 census, there were 114 people, 61 households, and 32 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 120.0 people per square mile (46.3/km²). There were 88 housing units at an average density of 92.7 per square mile (35.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.49% White, 1.75% Native American, 1.75% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.75% of the population. There were 61 households out of which 11.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.5% were married couples living together, 1.6% had a
    4.00
    1 votes
    93
    Belgrade

    Belgrade

    Belgrade is a city in Gallatin County, Montana, United States. The population was 7,389 at the 2010 census. It is the largest city in Montana that is not a county seat. The original townsite of Belgrade was established and filed in the Gallatin County Clerk and Recorder's Office by Thomas B. Quaw, a businessman from the midwest, in July 1881. According to Quaw, the townsite was a blind railroad siding nine and seven tenths miles west of Bozeman, and was named Belgrade after the capital of Serbia as an expression of appreciation to Serbian investors who helped finance a portion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Belgrade is part of the 'Bozeman Micropolitan Statistical Area'. Belgrade was incorporated in 1906. Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport is located adjacent to the city boundaries. Belgrade is located at 45°47′N 111°11′W / 45.783°N 111.183°W / 45.783; -111.183 (45.7785, -111.1790). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.7 square miles (4.4 km), all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,728 people, 2,132 households, and 1,507 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,429.8 people per square mile
    0.00
    0 votes
    94
    Bitterroot Valley

    Bitterroot Valley

    The Bitterroot Valley is located in southwestern Montana in the northwestern United States. It extends over 100 miles (160 km) from remote Horse Creek Pass north to a point near the city of Missoula. To the west is the Bitterroot Range and the large Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area, and to the east is the smaller Sapphire Mountains and the Anaconda-Pintler Wilderness Area. The southern end of the valley is split into the East and West Forks, and the northern end drains into the Clark Fork River. Connecting with the west side of the valley are numerous deeply-carved granite canyons, including scenic Blodgett Canyon and the valley formed by Lolo Creek. Highway 93 runs through the center of the valley, exiting to the south over 7014 foot (2140 m) Lost Trail Pass. Communities within the valley include Lolo (in Missoula County), Florence, Stevensville, Victor, Corvallis, Hamilton, Darby, Conner, and Sula, the latter being within present-day Ravalli County. Hamilton, the largest town and the county seat of Ravalli County, is located at 46°14.8'N and 114°09.6'W at an elevation of 3570 ft (1090 m). Historically, the valley was the long-term home of the Salish tribe of the Flathead nation.
    0.00
    0 votes
    96
    Charlottesville

    Charlottesville

    Charlottesville is an independent city geographically surrounded by, but separate from, Albemarle County in Virginia, United States, and named after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. The official population estimate for the city, calculated in 2010, was 43,475. It is the county seat of Albemarle County though the two are separate legal entities. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Charlottesville with Albemarle County for statistical purposes, bringing the total population to 118,398. The city is the heart of the Charlottesville metropolitan area which includes Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene and Nelson counties. Charlottesville is best known as the home to two U.S. Presidents (Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe), and nearby is that of James Madison in Orange, as well as the home of the University of Virginia, which, along with Monticello is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Monticello, Jefferson's mountain-top home, attracts approximately half a million tourists every year. While both served as Governor of Virginia, they lived in Charlottesville and traveled to and from the capitol (Richmond, Virginia) along the
    0.00
    0 votes
    97
    Columbus

    Columbus

    Columbus is a town in and the county seat of Stillwater County, Montana, United States. The population was 1,893 at the 2010 census. The community originated as a stagecoach station on the Yellowstone River. The original name was Sheep Dip, then changed to Stillwater, but because of a Stillwater, Minnesota on the Northern Pacific RR, the mail presented a problem. Then came the name Columbus, Montana. Columbus is located at 45°38′18″N 109°15′08″W / 45.638445°N 109.252332°W / 45.638445; -109.252332 (45.638445, -109.252332). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.1 km), of which, 1.2 square miles (3.1 km) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km) of it (3.20%) is water. Columbus is located between the Yellowstone River, the old Yellowstone Trail, Highway 10, and now Interstate 90. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,748 people, 709 households, and 455 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,449.6 people per square mile (557.8/km). There were 762 housing units at an average density of 631.9 per square mile (243.1/km). The racial makeup of the town was 96.62% White, 0.23% African American, 1.26% Native
    0.00
    0 votes
    98
    Fort Clatsop

    Fort Clatsop

    Fort Clatsop was the encampment of the Lewis and Clark Expedition in the Oregon Country near the mouth of the Columbia River during the winter of 1805-1806. Located along the Lewis and Clark River at the north end of the Clatsop Plains approximately 5 mi (8 km) southwest of Astoria, the fort was the last encampment of the Corps of Discovery before embarking on their return trip east to St. Louis. The site is now protected as part of the Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks, and is also known as Fort Clatsop National Memorial. A replica of the fort was constructed for the sesquicentennial in 1955 and lasted for fifty years; it was severely damaged by fire in early October 2005, weeks before Fort Clatsop's bicentennial. A new replica, more rustic and rough-hewn, was built by about 700 volunteers in 2006; it opened with a dedication ceremony that took place on December 9. Fort Clatsop was named after the local Clatsop tribe of Native Americans. Construction of the fort began on December 9 and the captains moved into their quarters (still unroofed) two days before Christmas 1805. The original stockade was a small cramped wooden structure, more of a barracks than a
    0.00
    0 votes
    99
    Moscow

    Moscow

    Moscow ( /ˈmɒskoʊ/ MOSS-koh) is a city in northern Idaho, situated along the Washington/Idaho border, with a population of 23,800 at the 2010 census. The county seat and largest city of Latah County, Moscow is the home of the University of Idaho, the land grant institution and primary research university for the state, as well as the home of New Saint Andrews College. Eight miles (13 km) west is Pullman, Washington, home of Washington's land-grant university, Washington State University. Moscow is the principal city in the Moscow, Idaho Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Latah County. The city contains over 60% of the county's population and while the university is the dominant employer in Moscow, the city also serves as an agricultural and commercial hub for the Palouse region. Moscow is the birthplace of coach Hec Edmundson, writer Carol Ryrie Brink, and singer Josh Ritter. Along with the rest of northern Idaho, Moscow resides in the Pacific Time Zone, and the elevation of its city center is 2,579 feet (786 m) above sea level. Major highways serving the city are US-95 (north-south) and Highway 8 (east-west), both of which are routed through central Moscow. Limited
    0.00
    0 votes
    100
    Wolf Point

    Wolf Point

    Wolf Point is a city in and the county seat of Roosevelt County, Montana, United States. The population was 2,621 at the 2010 census. It is the largest community on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Wolf Point is the home of the annual Wild Horse Stampede, held every year during the second weekend of July. Wolf Point's Wild Horse Stampede is the oldest rodeo in Montana, and has been called the "Grandaddy of Montana Rodeos". Wolf Point is located in north-eastern Montana at 48°5′29″N 105°38′33″W / 48.09139°N 105.6425°W / 48.09139; -105.6425 (48.091303, −105.642538), in the wide, shallow valley of the Missouri River, just below its confluence with Wolf Creek. Wolf Point is situated on the High Plains of eastern Montana. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.9 square miles (2.3 km), all of it land. The city is located on the north bank of the Missouri River, the southern part occupying the ancestral floodplain of that river. The northern part occupies south facing, low-lying hills overlooking a terrace. The central business district is located in the described southern portion. Wolf Point experiences a semi-arid steppe climate (BSkw), with
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

    Discuss Best Places Visited Eastward by Lewis & Clark of All Time

    Top List Voters