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Best Place of worship of All Time

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    1
    Antai-ji

    Antai-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Antai-ji (安泰寺) is a Buddhist temple that belongs to the Sōtō school of Zen Buddhism. It is located in the town of Shin'onsen, Mikata District, in northern Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan, where it sits on about 50 hectares of land in the mountains, close to a national park on the Sea of Japan. It accepts visitors in the summer months, but is inaccessible during the winter. Antai-ji was founded in 1923 by Oka Sotan as a monastery for scholars to study the Shōbōgenzō. At that time, it was located in northern Kyoto and many leading scholars studied there. Vacated during World War II, Sawaki Kodo (1880-1965) and Kosho Uchiyama (1912-1998) moved into Antai-ji in 1949, and made it a place for Zazen. During the late sixties, the name of this small temple became known both in Japan and abroad for its practice of Zazen and formal begging. The increase of visitors and the many new houses being built around the temple created much noise, which made it difficult for the practice of Zazen to continue at the Kyoto location. Therefore the following abbot, Watanabe Koho (b. 1942), decided to move Antai-ji to its present location in northern Hyōgo. Together with the quietude of the mountains, he was
    7.38
    8 votes
    2
    Tōdai-ji

    Tōdai-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tōdai-ji (東大寺, Tōdai-ji, Eastern Great Temple), is a Buddhist temple complex located in the city of Nara, Japan. Its Great Buddha Hall (大仏殿 Daibutsuden), houses the world's largest bronze statue of the Buddha Vairocana, known in Japanese simply as Daibutsu (大仏). The temple also serves as the Japanese headquarters of the Kegon school of Buddhism. The temple is a listed UNESCO World Heritage Site as "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara", together with seven other sites including temples, shrines and places in the city of Nara. Sika deer, regarded as messengers of the gods in the Shinto religion, roam the grounds freely. The beginning of building a temple where the huge Tōdai-ji complex sits today can be dated to 728, when Emperor Shōmu established Kinshōsen-ji (金鐘山寺) as an appeasement for Prince Motoi, his first son with his Fujiwara clan consort Kōmyōshi. Prince Motoi died a year after his birth. During the Tenpyō era, Japan suffered from a series of disasters and epidemics. It was after experiencing these problems that Emperor Shōmu issued an edict in 741 to promote the construction of provincial temples throughout the nation. Tōdai-ji (still Kinshōsen-ji at the time) was appointed
    8.00
    7 votes
    3
    Jufuku-ji

    Jufuku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kikokuzan Kongō Jufuku Zenji (亀谷山金剛寿福禅寺), usually known as Jufuku-ji, is a temple of the Kenchō-ji branch of the Rinzai sect and the oldest Zen temple in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. Ranked third among Kamakura's prestigious Five Mountains, it is number 24 among the Thirty-Three Kamakura Kannon (鎌倉三十三観音, Kamakura Sanjūsan Kannon) pilgrimage temples and number 18 of the Kamakura Nijūyon Jizō (鎌倉二十四地蔵) temples. Its main object of worship is Shaka Nyorai. The temple was founded by Hōjō Masako (1157–1225), a great historical figure familiar enough to the Japanese to appear on television jidaigeki dramas, in order to enshrine her husband Minamoto no Yoritomo (1147–1199), founder of the Kamakura shogunate, who died falling from his horse in 1199. Having chosen Jufuku-ji's present site because it used to be Yoritomo's father's residence, she invited Buddhist priest Myōan Eisai to be its founding priest. Eisai is important in the history of Zen because it was he who, after being ordained in China, introduced it to Japan. He is also known for introducing green tea to the country. Ostracized by the Tendai school in Kyoto because of the new ideas he had introduced there after coming
    8.80
    5 votes
    4
    Baksei Chamkrong

    Baksei Chamkrong

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Baksei Chamkrong (Khmer: ប្រាសាទបក្សីចាំក្រុង) is a small Hindu temple located in the Angkor complex (Siem Reap, Cambodia). It is dedicated to Lord Shiva and used to hold a golden image of him. The temple can be seen on the left side when entering Angkor Thom at the southern gate. It was dedicated to Yasovarman by his son, King Harshavarman I. The temple was completed by Rajendravarman II (944-968). The name Baksei Chamkrong means "The Bird Who Shelters Under Its Wings" and comes from a legend. In it, the king tried to flee Angkor during a siege and then a huge bird landed and sheltered him under its wings. This temple is one of the first temples constructed of durable material such as bricks and laterite and with decoration in sandstone. Much of the stucco on the surface of the temple has vanished. The main sandstone lintel is decorated with a fine carving of Indra standing on his three-headed elephant Airavata. Garlands emanate from either side of Indra in the style current to the monument. There is an inscription on either side of the small doorway. The pyramid measures 27 metres across at the base and 15 at the summit for an overall height of 13 metres.
    6.71
    7 votes
    5
    Beopjusa

    Beopjusa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Beopjusa (Korean: 법주사 or Beopju temple) is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. It is situated on the slopes of Songnisan in Naesongni-myeon, Boeun County, in the province of Chungcheongbuk-do, South Korea. It was initially constructed in 653 by Silla monk Uisin. It has been historically associated with Beopsang thought and the worship of the Maitreya Buddha. The founder, Uisin, named the temple Beopju (‘Residence of Dharma’) because a number of Indian sutras (scriptures about Dharma) he brought back with him were housed there. The temple with more than 60 buildings and 70 hermitages, including the highest wooden pagoda in Korea, Palsangjeon. Like most of the other buildings, this was burned to the ground in the Japanese invasions of Korea. The pagoda was reconstructed in 1624. In the Goryeo dynasty, this temple is said to have been home to as many as 3,000 monks. A few facilities from this period still remain on the temple grounds, including a cistern and iron pot for serving food and water to thousands of monks. It continued to play an important role in subsequent centuries, but shrank as the state's support for Buddhism disappeared under the Joseon Dynasty.
    6.71
    7 votes
    6
    Saihō-ji

    Saihō-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Saihō-ji (西芳寺) is a Rinzai Zen Buddhist temple located in Matsuo, Nishikyō Ward, Kyoto, Japan. The temple, which is famed for its moss garden, is commonly referred to as "Koke-dera" (苔寺), meaning "moss temple", while the formal name is "Kōinzan Saihō-ji" (洪隠山西芳寺). The temple, primarily constructed to honor Amitabha, was first founded by Gyōki and was later restored by Musō Soseki. In 1994, Saihō-ji was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto". According to temple legend, Saihō-ji was constructed during the Nara Period by Gyōki, on the location of one of Prince Shōtoku's former retreats. The temple first operated as a Hossō temple dedicated to Amitabha, and was known as "Saihō-ji" (西方寺), a homophone of the current name. The name was selected because Amitabha is the primary buddha of Western Paradise, known in Japanese as "Saihō Jōdo" (西方浄土). Legend states that such famous Japanese monks as Kūkai and Hōnen later served as the chief priests of the temple. Although the veracity of these legends is questionable, it is believed that such a predecessor to the current temple did, in fact, exist. Over time, the temple fell into
    8.60
    5 votes
    7
    Ruwanwelisaya

    Ruwanwelisaya

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Ruwanmalisaya is a stupa in Sri Lanka, considered a marvel for its architectural qualities and sacred to many Buddhists all over the world. It was built by King Dutugemunu c. 140 B.C., who became lord of all Sri Lanka after a war in which the Chola King Elara, was defeated. It is also known as Mahathupa, Swarnamali Chaitya, Suvarnamali Mahaceti (in Pali) and Rathnamali Dagaba. This is one of the Solosmasthana (the 16 places of veneration) and the Atamasthana (the 8 places of veneration in the ancient sacred city of Anuradhapura). The stupa is one of the world's tallest monuments, standing at 300 feet (91 m) and with a circumference of 950 ft (290 m). The Kaunghmudaw Pagoda in Sagaing, Myanmar is modeled after this stupa. The ancient texts recount the following: King Dutugemunu began the work of building the stupa during Vesak, on the full-moon day of the month of Vesakha (April–May), under the constellation of Visakha. In Buddhism this is considered a sacred full-moon day on which numerous events occurred, such as: On such a full-moon day King Dutugemunu had the inscribed stone pillar that was erected by King Devanampiya Tissa, removed; When the king had thus built and
    6.43
    7 votes
    8
    Eihei-ji

    Eihei-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Eihei-ji (永平寺) is one of two main temples of the Sōtō school of Zen Buddhism, the largest single religious denomination in Japan (by number of temples in a single legal entity). Eihei-ji is located about 15 km (9 mi) east of Fukui in Fukui Prefecture, Japan. In English, its name means "temple of eternal peace" (in Japanese, 'ei' means "eternal", 'hei' means "peaceful", and 'ji' means "Buddhist temple"). Its founder was Eihei Dōgen who brought Sōtō Zen from China to Japan during the 13th century. The ashes of Dōgen and a memorial to him are in the Joyoden (the Founder's hall) at Eihei-ji. William Bodiford of UCLA writes that, "The rural monastery Eiheiji in particular aggrandized Dōgen to bolster its own authority vis-à-vis its institutional rivals within the Sōtō denomination." Eihei-ji is a training monastery with more than two hundred monks and nuns in residence. As of 2003, Eihei-ji had 800,000 visitors per year, less than half the number of tourists who came ten years before. Visitors with Zen experience may participate after making prior arrangements and all visitors are treated as religious trainees. In keeping with Zen's Mahayana tradition, the iconography in various
    8.20
    5 votes
    9
    Senanayake Aramaya

    Senanayake Aramaya

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Senanayake Aramaya is a temple situated on the Main Chilaw Road, at Madampe, Sri Lanka which houses The Sacred Hair Relics of Buddha. This temple at Madampe was built by two philanthropists Gate Mudliyar L. M. W. Senanayake and D. M. W. Senanayake. They built the Sambuddha Jayanthi stupa to commemorate the 2500th Buddha Jayanti. The relics of the Buddha and Arahant theras and from many parts of the world were brought to Senanayake Aramaya. The Buddha Jayanti stupa is manmade out of solid granite and took 10 years for completion. A sapling of the Jaya Sri Maha Bodhi was planted in the premises of the Senanayake Aramaya. The Senanayake Aramaya is managed and maintained by the Senanayake Aramaya Trust. In addition to the Hair Relics offered by the living Buddha, to the two brothers Tapassu and Bhalluka, these are the other items enshrined in the stupa:
    7.00
    6 votes
    10
    Yokoji Zen Mountain Center

    Yokoji Zen Mountain Center

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Yokoji Zen Mountain Center is a year-round Zen Buddhist training and retreat center located in the San Jacinto Mountains of Southern California. It is a 160 acres (65 hectares) of sacred Native American land and wilderness. Founded 1981 by Taizan Maezumi, Roshi as a summer retreat center for the Zen Center of Los Angeles. Charles Tenshin Fletcher, Roshi who received Dharma transmission from Taizan Maezumi in the White Plum Zen Lineage is the teacher and abbott. When Yokoji Zen Mountain Center was founded, the formal name of the temple was Dounzan Yokoji. Doun refers to the honorary founder, Shiomi Doun, Roshi; Zan means mountain; and Yokoji means sunlight temple. Commonly the Center was known by the name of Zen Mountain Center and in 2006 it returned to the lineage root name, Yokoji Zen Mountain Center to prevent confusion with other Zen centers. Yokoji Zen Mountain Center is open to people in all spiritual traditions and walks of life. The Center has full-time residential training programs, as well as regularly scheduled silent meditation retreats (sesshin). Home practice is also supported by coming to the Center for periods of intensive practice as well and local practice with
    8.00
    5 votes
    11
    Bulguksa

    Bulguksa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Bulguksa is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism in the North Gyeongsang province in South Korea. It is home to seven National treasures of South Korea, including Dabotap and Seokgatap stone pagodas, Cheongun-gyo (Blue Cloud Bridge), and two gilt-bronze statues of Buddha. The temple is classified as Historic and Scenic Site No. 1 by the South Korean government. In 1995, Bulguksa was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List together with the Seokguram Grotto, which lies four kilometers to the east. The temple is considered as a masterpiece of the golden age of Buddhist art in the Silla kingdom. It is currently the head temple of the 11th district of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. Among the earliest woodblock prints in world, a version of the Dharani sutra dated between 704 and 751 was found there in 1966. Its Buddhist text was printed on a 8-×-630 cm (3.1-×-250 in) mulberry paper scroll. The temple's records state that a small temple was built on this site under King Beopheung in 528. The Samguk Yusa records that the current temple was constructed under King Gyeongdeok in 751, begun by Prime Minister Kim Daeseong to pacify the spirits of his parents. The building
    6.00
    7 votes
    12
    Sera Monastery

    Sera Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sera Monastery (Tibetan: སེ་ར་, Wylie: Se-ra; Chinese: 色拉寺; pinyin: Sèlā Sì) is one of the 'great three' Gelukpa university monasteries of Tibet, located 1.25 miles (2.01 km) north of Lhasa. The other two are Ganden Monastery and Drepung Monastery. The origin of the name 'Sera' is attributed to a fact that the site where the monastery was built was surrounded by wild roses (se ra in Tibetan language) in bloom. The original Sera monastery is located in Lhasa, Tibet, about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north of the Jokang and is responsible for some 19 hermitages, including four nunneries, which are all located in the foot hills north of Lhasa. The Sera Monastery, as a complex of structures with the Great Assembly Hall and three colleges, was founded in 1419 by Jamchen Chojey of Sakya Yeshe of Zel Gungtang (1355–1435), a disciple of Tsongkhapa. During the 1959 revolt in Lhasa, Sera monastery suffered severe damage, with its colleges destroyed and hundreds of monks killed. After the Dalai Lama took asylum in India, many of the monks of the Sera Monastery who survived the attack moved to Bylakuppe in Mysore, India. After initial tribulations, they established a parallel Sera Monastery with
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Thean Hou Temple

    Thean Hou Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Thean Hou Temple (Chinese: 天后宫; pinyin: Tiān​hòu​ gōng​; Cantonese Yale: tin1hau6 gung1; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Thian-hiō-kiong) is a landmark six-tiered Chinese temple in Kuala Lumpur. It is located on a 1.67 acres (6,760 m²) of land atop Robson Heights along Lorong Bellamy, overlooking Jalan Syed Putra (Federal Highway). It was completed in 1987 and officially opened in 1989. The property belongs to and is run by the Selangor & Federal Territory Hainan Association (Persatuan Hainan Selangor & Wilayah Persekutuan). The temple, built by the Hainanese community living in Kuala Lumpur, is dedicated to Goddess Tian Hou (The Heavenly Mother). Thean Hou temple was constructed between 1981 and 1987 at a cost of approximately 7 million Ringgit. The installation dates of the Goddesses are as follows: The temple was officially opened on 3 September 1989. This syncretic temple with elements of Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism is a grandiose structure and represents a successful combination of modern architectural techniques and authentic traditional design featuring imposing pillars, spectacular roofs, ornate carvings and intricate embellishments. Its grand architecture has made it a popular
    7.80
    5 votes
    14
    Chionin Temple

    Chionin Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Chion-in (知恩院, Chion-in) in Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto, Japan is the headquarters of the Jōdo-shū (Pure Land Sect) founded by Hōnen (1133–1212), who proclaimed that sentient beings are reborn in Amida Buddha's Western Paradise (Pure Land) by reciting the nembutsu, Amida Buddha's name. The vast compounds of Chion-in include the site where Hōnen settled to disseminate his teachings and the site where he died. The original temple was built in 1234 by Hōnen's disciple, Genchi (1183–1238) in memory of his master and was named Chion-in. While the temple was affiliated more closely in the early years with the Seizan branch of Jodo Shu, its 8th head priest, Nyoichi (1262–1321) was deeply influenced by the priest Ryōkū, a disciple of Ryōchū who was the 3rd head of the Chinzei branch of Jōdo-shū Buddhism, and disciple of Bencho. Later Nyoichi's successor Shunjō (1255–1355) advanced this further by citing a biography where Genchi's disciple Renjaku-bo and Ryōchū agree that there existed no doctrinal differences between them: By 1450, Chion-in had become fully under control of the Chinzei branch, but had little direct control, due to the outbreak of the Onin War. Numerous buildings in the complex
    6.67
    6 votes
    15
    Jing'an Temple

    Jing'an Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Jing'an Temple (Chinese: 静安寺; pinyin: Jìng'ānsì; literally "Temple of Peace and Tranquility") is a Buddhist temple on West Nanjing Road, in Jing'an District, Shanghai, China. The first temple was built in 247 AD, at the time of the Kingdom of Wu, during the Three Kingdoms period. Originally located beside Suzhou Creek, it was relocated to its current site in 1216 during the Song Dynasty. The current temple was rebuilt once in the Qing Dynasty. It is currently undergoing renovation. Three Southern-style main halls, each with its own courtyard, dating from the most recent reconstruction (1880): Jing'an Temple can be reached by taking Shanghai Metro Line 2 or 7 to Jing'an Temple station. Entrance Fee is 30 RMB (April 2012) Open Time:8:00-17:00, except during Buddhist holidays
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    Dhamek Stupa

    Dhamek Stupa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Dhamek Stupa (also spelled Dhamekh and Dhamekha) is a massive stupa located at Sarnath, 13 km away from Varanasi in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India. The Dhamek Stupa was built in 500 CE to replace an earlier structure commissioned by the great Mauryan king Ashoka in 249 BCE, along with several other monuments, to commemorate the Buddha's activities in this location. Stupas originated as circular mounds encircled by large stones. King Ashoka built stupas to enshrine small pieces of calcinated bone and other relics of the Buddha and his disciples. An Ashoka pillar with an edict engraved on it stands near the site. The Dhamek Stupa is said to mark the spot of a deer park (Rishipattana) where the Buddha gave the first sermon to his five disciples after attaining enlightenment, "revealing his Eightfold Path leading to nirvana". The stupa was enlarged on six occasions but the upper part is still unfinished. While visiting Sarnath in 640 CE, Xuanzang recorded that the colony had over 1,500 priests and the main stupa was nearly 300 feet (91 m) high. In its current shape, the stupa is a solid cylinder of bricks and stone reaching a height of 43.6 meters and having a diameter of 28 meters.
    7.40
    5 votes
    17
    Wat Chedi Luang

    Wat Chedi Luang

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Chedi Luang (Thai: วัดเจดีย์หลวง, lit. temple of the big stupa) is a Buddhist temple in the historic centre of Chiang Mai, Thailand. The current temple grounds were originally made up of three temples — Wat Chedi Luang, Wat Ho Tham and Wat Sukmin. The construction of the temple started in the 14th century, when King Saen Muang Ma planned to bury the ashes of his father there. After 10 years of building time it was left unfinished, later to be continued after the death of the king by his widow. Probably due to stability problems it took until mid-15th century to be finished during the reign of king Tilokaraj. It was then 82 m high and had a base diameter of 54 m, at that time the largest building of all Lanna. In 1468, the Emerald Buddha was installed in the eastern niche. In 1545, the upper 30 m of the structure collapsed after an earthquake, and shortly thereafter, in 1551, the Emerald Buddha was moved to Luang Prabang. In the early 1990s the chedi was reconstructed, financed by UNESCO and the Japanese government. However the result is somewhat controversial, as some claim the new elements are in Central Thai style, not Lanna style. For the 600th anniversary of the chedi in
    7.40
    5 votes
    18
    Nalanda

    Nalanda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Nālandā was an ancient center of higher learning in Bihar, India. The site of Nalanda is located in the Indian state of Bihar, about 88 kilometers south east of Patna, and was a Buddhist center of learning from the fifth or sixth century CE to 1197 CE. Nalanda flourished between the reign of the Śakrāditya (whose identity is uncertain and who might have been either Kumara Gupta I or Kumara Gupta II) and 1197 CE, supported by patronage from the Hindu Gupta rulers as well as Buddhist emperors like Harsha and later emperors from the Pala Empire. The complex was built with red bricks and its ruins occupy an area of 14 hectares. At its peak, the university attracted scholars and students from as far away as Tibet, China, Greece, and Persia. Nalanda was ransacked and destroyed by Turkic Muslim invaders under Bakhtiyar Khilji in 1193. The great library of Nalanda University was so vast that it is reported to have burned for three months after the invaders set fire to it, ransacked and destroyed the monasteries, and drove the monks from the site. In 2006, Singapore, China, India, Japan, and other nations, announced a proposed plan to restore and revive the ancient site as Nalanda
    8.50
    4 votes
    19
    Famen Temple

    Famen Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Famen Temple (Chinese: 法门寺; pinyin: Fǎmén Sì) is located in Famen town, Fufeng County, 120 kilometers west of Xi'an City, Shaanxi province. It was widely regarded as the "ancestor of pagoda temples in Guanzhong area". One theory, supported by unearthed eaves-tiles and carved bricks of Han Dynasty, is that the temple was built during the Northern Zhou Dynasty, by Emperor Huan and also by Emperor Ling of the Eastern Han Dynasty. The literature record indicates that during Northern Wei Dynasty, Famen Temple already existed on a quite large scale. However, Buddhism was greatly suppressed in Emperor Wu's years of Northern Zhou Dynasty, and Famen Temple was almost completely destroyed. After establishment of Sui Dynasty, Buddhism was venerated, and Famen Temple was rebuilt, although it couldn't be recovered to its heyday in Northern Wei Dynasty. Its name was changed to Cheng Shi Dao Chang (成实道场), and soon it merged with nearby Baochang Temple (宝昌寺), and became a temple-owned farm. Famen Temple entered its halcyon days after formation of the Tang Dynasty. Wude 1st year (武德元年, 618), Tang Dynasty, it was named Famen Temple, and monks were recruited next year. Later the temple took in
    6.33
    6 votes
    20
    Htilominlo Temple

    Htilominlo Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Htilominlo Temple (Burmese: ထီးလိုမင်းလိုဘုရား, pronounced [tʰílòmɪ́ɴlò pʰəjá]) is a Buddhist temple located in Bagan (formerly Pagan), in Burma/Myanmar, built during the reign of King Htilominlo (also known as Nandaungmya) in 1211. The temple is three stories tall, with a height of 46 metres (150 feet), and built with red brick. It is also known for its elaborate plaster moldings. On the first floor of the temple, there are four Buddhas that face each direction. The temple was damaged in the 1975 earthquake and subsequently repaired.
    6.33
    6 votes
    21
    Mahamuni Buddha

    Mahamuni Buddha

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Mahamuni Buddha Temple (Burmese: မဟာမုနိဘုရားကြီး, Burmese pronunciation: [məhà mṵnḭ pʰəjádʑí]; also called the Mahamuni Pagoda) is a Buddhist temple and major pilgrimage site, located southwest of Mandalay, Burma (Myanmar). The Mahamuni Buddha image (literal meaning: The Great Sage) is deified in this temple, and originally came from Arakan. It is highly venerated in Burma and central to many people's lives, as it is seen as an expression of representing the Buddha's life. Ancient tradition refers to only five likenesses of the Buddha, made during his lifetime; two were in India, two in paradise, and the fifth is the Mahamuni Buddha image in Myanmar. According to the legend, the Buddha visited the Dhanyawadi city of Arakan in 554 BC. King Sanda Thuriya requested that an image was cast of him. After casting the Great Image, the Buddha breathed upon it, and thereafter the image became the exact likeness of the Mahamuni. According to legend, the Gautama Buddha visited Dhanyawadi, the capital city of Arakan during his travels on a Proselytization mission to spread Buddhism. During the 26th anniversary of the King at the time, a devout Buddhist, the Buddha accompanied by Shin
    9.67
    3 votes
    22
    Kumanotaisha Shrine

    Kumanotaisha Shrine

    • Currently used by religion(s): Shinto
    • Type of place of worship: Shrine
    The Kumano Shrine (熊野大社, Kumano-taisha) is a historic shinto shrine in Miyauchi, Nan'yō, Yamagata, Japan. It dates from the 9th century, and is one of only three large Kumano shrines in Japan.
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    Sensō-ji

    Sensō-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sensō-ji (金龍山浅草寺, Kinryū-zan Sensō-ji) is an ancient Buddhist temple located in Asakusa, Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. It is Tokyo's oldest temple, and one of its most significant. Formerly associated with the Tendai sect, it became independent after World War II. Adjacent to the temple is a Shinto shrine, the Asakusa Shrine. The temple is dedicated to the bodhisattva Kannon, also known as Guan Yin or the Goddess of Mercy. According to legend, a statue of the Kannon was found in the Sumida River in 628 by two fishermen, the brothers Hinokuma Hamanari and Hinokuma Takenari. The chief of their village, Hajino Nakamoto, recognized the sanctity of the statue and enshrined it by remodeling his own house into a small temple in Asakusa, so that the villagers could worship the Kannon. The first temple was built on the site in 645, which makes it the oldest temple in Tokyo. In the early years of the Tokugawa shogunate, Tokugawa Ieyasu designated Sensō-ji as tutelary temple of the Tokugawa clan. The Nishinomiya Inari Shrine is located within the precincts of Sensō-ji; and a torii identifies the entry into the hallowed ground of a Shinto shrine. A bronze plaque on the gateway structure lists those who
    7.20
    5 votes
    24
    City of Ten Thousand Buddhas

    City of Ten Thousand Buddhas

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The City Of Ten Thousand Buddhas (Chinese: 萬佛聖城; pinyin: Wànfó Shèngchéng, Vietnamese: Chùa Vạn Phật Thánh Thành) is an international Buddhist community and monastery founded by the Venerable Master Hsuan Hua, an important figure in Western Buddhism. It is one of the first Chinese Zen Buddhist temples in the United States, and one of the largest Buddhist communities in the Western Hemisphere. The city is situated in Talmage, Mendocino County, California about 2 miles (3.2 km) east of Ukiah, and 110 miles (180 km) north of San Francisco. It was one of the first Buddhist monasteries built in the United States. The temple follows the Guiyang Ch'an School, one of the five houses of classical Chinese Ch'an. The city is noted for their close adherence to the vinaya, the austere traditional Buddhist monastic code. The Dharma Realm Buddhist Association purchased the City of Ten Thousand Buddhas site in 1974 and established an international center there by 1976. Originally the site housed the Mendocino State Hospital founded in 1889. There were over seventy large buildings, over two thousand rooms of various sizes, three gymnasiums, a fire station, a swimming pool, a refuse incinerator,
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Haeinsa

    Haeinsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Haeinsa (해인사, 海印寺: Temple of the Ocean Mudra) is a head temple of the Jogye Order (대한불교조계종, 大韓佛敎 曹溪宗) of Korean Buddhism in the Gaya Mountains (가야산, 伽倻山), South Gyeongsang Province South Korea. Haeinsa is most notable for being the home of the Tripitaka Koreana, the whole of the Buddhist Scriptures carved onto 81,350 wooden printing blocks, which it has housed since 1398. Haeinsa is one of the Three Jewel Temples of Korea, and represents Dharma or the Buddha’s teachings. It is still an active Seon (선, 禪) practice center in modern times, and was the home temple of the influential Rev. Seongcheol (성철, 性徹), who died in 1993. The temple was first built in 802. Legend says that two Korean monks returned from China, Suneung and Ijeong, and healed King Aejang's (애장왕, 哀莊王) wife of her illness. In gratitude of the Buddha's mercy, the king ordered the construction of the temple. Another account, by Choe Chi-Won in 900 states that Suneung and his disciple Ijeong, gained the support of a queen dowager who converted to Buddhism and then helped to finance the construction of the temple. The temple complex was renovated in the 10th century, 1488, 1622, and 1644. Hirang, the temple abbot enjoyed
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Muktinath

    Muktinath

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Muktinath is a sacred place both for Hindus and Buddhists located in Muktinath Valley at an altitude of 3,710 meters at the foot of the Thorong La mountain pass (part of the Himalayas), Mustang district, Nepal. The site is close to the village of Ranipauwa, which sometimes mistakenly is called Muktinath as well. The Hindus call the sacred place Mukti Kshetra, which literally means the "place of salvation". Mainly the temple is with a predominant Sri Vaishnava origin and worshipped by Buddhists. This temple is considered to be the 105th among the available 108 Divya Desam. The ancient name of this place, before Buddhist origin is known as Thiru Saligramam. This houses the Saligrama sila considered to be the naturally available form of Sriman Narayana - the Hindu God HEAD. It is also one of the 51 Sakthi peetams. The Buddhists call it Chumig Gyatsa, which in Tibetan means 'Hundred Waters'. For Tibetan Buddhists, Muktinath-Chumig Gyatsa is a very important place of Dakinis, goddesses known as Sky Dancers and one of the 24 Tantric places. They understand the murti to be a manifestation of Avalokitesvara. The central shrine of Sri Muktinath, predominant among all 108 Hindu SriVaishnava
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    Atamasthana

    Atamasthana

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Atamasthana (අටමස්ථානය) or Eight sacred places are a series of locations in Sri Lanka where the Buddha had visited during his three visits to the country. The sacred places are known as Jaya Sri Maha Bodhiya, Ruwanwelisaya, Thuparamaya, Lovamahapaya, Abhayagiri Dagaba, Jetavanarama, Mirisaveti Stupa and Lankarama. They are situated in Anuradhapura, the capital of the ancient Anuradhapura Kingdom. The sacred city of Anuradhapura exerted a considerable influence on the development of architecture in the country during several centuries. The city is nominated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1982, it lies 205 km north of the current capital Colombo in island's North Central Province, on the banks of the historic Malvathu Oya. According to the Mahavansa the sacred city was found around 350 BC by Pandukabhaya, the 1st king of the Anuradhapura kingdom and sixth since the arrival of Vijaya. It eventually become the principal shrines of Buddhism including the branch planted of the sacred fig tree, Bodhi tree from Bodhgaya, under which Siddharta attained spiritual enlightenment and supreme wisdom. The sacred tree brought there in the 3rd century BC during the second mission, led by
    9.33
    3 votes
    28
    Namdroling Monastery

    Namdroling Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Namdroling Nyingmapa Monastery (or Thekchog Namdrol Shedrub Dargye Ling) is the largest teaching center of Nyingmapa – a lineage of Tibetan Buddhism – in the world. Located in Bylakuppe — part of the Mysore district of the state of Karnataka — the monastery is home to a sangha community of over five thousand lamas (both monks and nuns), a religious college (or shedra) and hospital. The monastery was established by throne-holder Kyabje Penor Rinpoche in 1963, following his 1959 exit from Tibet as the second seat of the Palyul Monastery, one of the six great Nyingmapa Mother monasteries of Tibet prior to annexation. The monastery's full name is Thegchog Namdrol Shedrub Dargyeling, called "Namdroling" for short. Its initial structure was a temple constructed from bamboo, covering an area of approximately eighty square feet. Carved from the jungle that the India government generously granted Tibetan exiles, initial challenges included rampaging elephants and other tropical dangers. As of 2008, the lodging facilities alone for the school include three buildings with over 150 rooms. The population fluctuates as monks attend or complete studies at Namdroling. A recent census had the
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Dai Bai Zan Cho Bo Zen Ji

    Dai Bai Zan Cho Bo Zen Ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Dai Bai Zan Cho Bo Zen Ji is a Rinzai-style Zen temple, located on North Beacon Hill in Seattle, Washington. Its name translates from Japanese as "Listening to the Dharma Zen Temple on Great Plum Mountain." Dai Bai Zan Cho Bo Zen Ji was founded by Zen Master Genki Takabayashi, in 1983. Genjo Marinello Oshō succeeded Genki Rōshi in 1999 as the second abbot of Chobo-ji. Genki Takabayashi Rōshi was invited by the Seattle Zen Center (founded by Dr. Glenn Webb, at the time a University of Washington Art History professor) to become the resident teacher in the fall of 1978. He accepted, and by 1983 founded Cho Bo Zen Ji. In Japan, he trained for nearly twenty years at Daitoku-ji, one of two parent Rinzai school temples. Takabayashi also directed a Rinzai temple in Kamakura. He became a monk at age 11. In 1997, Takabayashi retired and moved to Montana. Genjo Marinello Oshō began his Zen training in 1975 and was ordained as an unsui, or novice monk, in 1980. From 1981-1982 he trained at Ryutaku-ji in Japan with Sochu Rōshi and Soen Nakagawa Rōshi. Marinello later continued his training with Eido Shimano Rōshi, abbot of Dai Bosatsu Monastery. On May 21, 2008, Marinello received dharma
    6.00
    6 votes
    30
    Kumano Shrine

    Kumano Shrine

    • Currently used by religion(s): Shinto
    • Type of place of worship: Shrine
    A Kumano shrine (熊野神社, Kumano Jinja) is a type of Shinto shrine which enshrines the three Kumano mountains: Hongū, Shingū, and Nachi (Kumano Gongen (熊野権現)). There are more than 3000 Kumano shrines in Japan, and each has received its kami from another Kumano shrine through a process of propagation called bunrei (分霊) or kanjō (勧請). The point of origin of the Kumano cult is the Kumano Sanzan shrine complex, which includes Kumano Hayatama Taisha (熊野速玉大社) (Wakayama Prefecture, Shingu), Kumano Hongu Taisha (Wakayama Prefecture, Tanabe), and Kumano Nachi Taisha (Wakayama Prefecture, Nachikatsuura). The three Kumano Sanzan shrines are the Sōhonsha ("head shrines") of all Kumano shrines and lie between 20 to 40 km from each other. They are connected to each other by the pilgrimage route known as "Kumano Sankeimichi" (熊野参詣道). The great Kumano Sanzan complex also includes two Buddhist temples, Seiganto-ji and Fudarakusan-ji. The religious significance of the Kumano region goes back to prehistoric times and therefore predates all modern religions in Japan. The area was, and still is, considered a place of physical healing. Each shrine initially had its own separate form of nature worship, but
    6.00
    6 votes
    31
    Three Pagodas

    Three Pagodas

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Three Pagodas (崇圣寺三塔) are an ensemble of three independent pagodas arranged on the corners of a equilateral triangle, near the town of Dali, Yunnan province, China, dating from the time of the Nanzhao kingdom and Kingdom of Dali. The Three Pagodas are located about 1.5 km (0.93 mi) north of scenic Dali, Yunnan province. They are at the east foot of the tenth peak of the massive Cangshan Mountains and face the west shore of the Erhai Lake of the ancient Dali town. The Three Pagodas are made of brick and covered with white mud. As its name implies, the Three Pagodas comprise three independent pagodas forming a symmetric triangle. The elegant, balanced and stately style is unique in China’s ancient Buddhist architectures, which makes it a must-see in the tour of Dali. The Three Pagodas, visible from miles away, has been a landmark of Dali City and selected as a national treasure meriting preservation in China. The main pagoda, known as Qianxun Pagoda (pinyin Qian Xun Ta), reportedly built during 823-840 AD by king Quan Fengyou (劝丰佑) of the Nanzhao state, is 69.6 meters (227 feet) high and is one of the tallest pagodas in China’s history. The central pagoda is square shaped and
    6.00
    6 votes
    32
    Angkor Wat

    Angkor Wat

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Angkor Wat (Khmer: អង្គរវត្ត) is the largest Hindu temple complex in the world. The temple was built by King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century in Yasodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ, present-day Angkor), the capital of the Khmer Empire, as his state temple and eventual mausoleum. Breaking from the Shaivism tradition of previous kings, Angkor Wat was instead dedicated to Vishnu. As the best-preserved temple at the site, it is the only one to have remained a significant religious centre since its foundation – first Hindu, dedicated to the god Vishnu, then Buddhist. The temple is at the top of the high classical style of Khmer architecture. It has become a symbol of Cambodia, appearing on its national flag, and it is the country's prime attraction for visitors. Angkor Wat combines two basic plans of Khmer temple architecture: the temple mountain and the later galleried temple, based on early Dravidian Architecture, with key features such as the Jagati. It is designed to represent Mount Meru, home of the devas in Hindu mythology: within a moat and an outer wall 3.6 kilometres (2.2 mi) long are three rectangular galleries, each raised above the next. At the centre of the temple
    6.80
    5 votes
    33
    Saidai-ji

    Saidai-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Saidai-ji (西大寺) or the "Great Western Temple" is a Buddhist temple in the city of Nara, Nara Prefecture, Japan. The temple was established in AD 765 as a counterpart to Tōdai-ji and it is the main temple of the Shingon Risshu (真言律宗) sect of Buddhism after the sect's founder, Eison, took over administration in 1238. One building, the Aizen-dō, houses a statue of Aizen Myō-ō, while the main image is of Shakyamuni Buddha, erected by Eison in 1249. Saidai-ji stands close to Yamato-Saidaiji Station on the Kintetsu Nara Line.
    6.80
    5 votes
    34
    Phnom Krom

    Phnom Krom

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Phnom Krom (Khmer: ប្រាសាទភ្នំក្រោម) is a 140 m high hill close to Siem Reap, Cambodia. Phnom Krom is located to 12 kilometers southwest of Siem Reap town. Phnom Krom hill is very rocky; local legend has it that the rocks were exposed by the monkey general Hanuman during a hunt for medicine in the Ramayana epic. The area beyond the temple’s west gate affords a spectacular view of the Tonle Sap lake. There is an Angkorian temple on top of the hill. It is a Hindu shrine dedicated to Shiva, Vishnu and Brahma. The temple in was built at the end of the 9th century, during the reign of King Yasovarman (889 A.D.-910 A.D.). Oriented toward the east, the hilltop temple is enclosed by a wall built of laterite blocks. Along the walls' top runs a cornice. Gates bisect the walls at each of the four cardinal directions. Just inside the east gate are four small buildings arrayed in a north-south row, possibly formerly used as crematoria. Inside the walls on the north and south sides are three halls, now collapsed. The temple’s focus is three towers, also in a row running north to south. They sit atop a platform reached by staircases of seven steps. The southern tower is dedicated to Brahma, the
    9.00
    3 votes
    35
    Rochester Zen Center

    Rochester Zen Center

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Rochester Zen Center (RZC) is a Sōtō and Rinzai Zen Buddhist sangha in the Sanbo Kyodan lineage, located in Rochester, New York and established in 1966 by Philip Kapleau. It is one of the oldest Zen centers in the United States. The history of the Rochester Zen Center begins overseas with the Nuremberg and Tokyo War Crimes Trials at the close of World War II. Trying to come to grips with the appalling testimony he heard as a court reporter, thirty-three year old Philip Kapleau began a spiritual search that would lead him to a Japanese Zen Buddhist monastery in 1953. His experiences there became the basis of his classic book, The Three Pillars of Zen, still much in demand forty years after its initial publication. As of October 8, 2010, it was the ranked 7th in books on Zen Buddhism on Amazon.com. One of the earliest readers of the book was a Batavia resident named Ralph Chapin, who saw the galley proofs while visiting Japan and, intrigued, asked that ten copies be sent him when the book was published. When they arrived, he passed one on to his Rochester friends Chester Carlson (the inventor of xerography) and his wife Dorris. . The Center's first sesshin took place in October,
    9.00
    3 votes
    36
    Donglin Temple

    Donglin Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Donglin Temple (simplified Chinese: 东林寺; traditional Chinese: 東林寺; pinyin: Dōnglínsì; literally "East Wood Temple") is a Buddhist monastery approximately 20 kilometres (12 mi) from Jiujiang, Jiangxi Province, People's Republic of China. Built in 386 CE at the foot of Lushan by Hui-yuan, founder of the Pure Land Sect of Buddhism, it is well known for how long it has stood without collapsing. The monastery reached its peak of influence during the Tang Dynasty (618–907 CE), but was severely damaged during the Taiping Rebellion and was almost destroyed during the Republican period (1912–1949) of Chinese history. It currently houses a small community of monks supported by a small farming village in the immediate vicinity. Various other places are named for the temple, including Donglin Academy 東林書院 and Tōrin-in 東林院.
    7.75
    4 votes
    37
    Geumsansa

    Geumsansa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Geumsansa (literally "Golden Mountain Temple") is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. It stands on the slopes of Moaksan in Gimje City, Jeollabuk-do, South Korea. There is a minor disagreement over in which year Geumsansa was founded, according to sources. The 1635 compilation, Geumsansa sajeok (hanja:金山寺事蹟, Chronicle of Geumsan Temple) records that the temple was established in 600 AD by Baekje (18 BC–660 AD), one of the three kingdoms that ruled the Korean peninsula during this period. The year indicates both the second year of King Beop's short-lived reign (r. 599–600) and the first year of the next ruler and his son, King Mu's reign (r. 600–641). In the document, King Beop who was a faithful Buddhist ordered a royal edict to prohibit killing of any living creatures in 599 and ordained 38 Buddhist monks. On the other hand, according to Cultural Heritage Administration of South Korea, Buddhapia, a South Korean Buddhist portal site and others, Geumsasa was built in 599, the first year of King Beop. Regardless of the founding date, it was assumed not to have been a significant temple in the scope of its scale and character. Since the Master Jinpyo had led the
    7.75
    4 votes
    38
    Guiyuan Temple

    Guiyuan Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Guiyuan Temple (simplified Chinese: 归元寺; traditional Chinese: 歸元寺; pinyin: Guīyuán Sì) is a Buddhist temple located on Cuiwei Rd., Wuhan City, Hubei Province of China. This part of Wuhan is the former Hanyang city. It was built in Shunzhi 15th year (1658), Qing Dynasty. It has a land area of 4.67 acres (1.89 ha). The New Pavilion built in 1922 is the treasury of the temple.
    7.75
    4 votes
    39
    Hōryū-ji

    Hōryū-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Hōryū-ji (法隆寺, lit. Temple of the Flourishing Law) is a Buddhist temple in Ikaruga, Nara Prefecture, Japan. Its full name is Hōryū Gakumonji (法隆学問寺), or Learning Temple of the Flourishing Law, the complex serving as both a seminary and monastery. The temple's pagoda is widely acknowledged to be one of the oldest wooden buildings existing in the world, underscoring Hōryū-ji's place as one of the most celebrated temples in Japan. In 1993, Hōryū-ji was inscribed together with Hokki-ji as a UNESCO World Heritage Site under the name Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area. The Japanese government lists several of its structures, sculptures and artifacts as National Treasures. The temple was originally commissioned by Prince Shōtoku; at the time it was called Ikaruga-dera (斑鳩寺), a name that is still sometimes used. This first temple is believed to have been completed by 607. Hōryū-ji was dedicated to Yakushi Nyorai, the Buddha of healing and in honor of the prince's father. Excavations done in 1939 confirmed that Prince Shotoku's palace, the Ikaruga-no-miya (斑鳩宮), occupied the eastern part of the current temple complex, where the Tō-in (東院) sits today. Also discovered were the ruins of a
    7.75
    4 votes
    40
    Guoqing Temple

    Guoqing Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Guoqing Temple (simplified Chinese: 国清寺; traditional Chinese: 國清寺; pinyin: Guóqīng sì; Wade–Giles: Kuoch'ing Szu) is a Buddhist temple on Mount Tiantai, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of China. Originally built in 598 AD during the Sui Dynasty, and renovated during the reign of the Qing Yongzheng Emperor (r. 1722–1735 AD), the temple is located roughly 220 kilometres (140 mi) from the city of Hangzhou. It was the initial site for the creation of the Tiantai Mahayana Buddhist school, founded by Zhiyi (538–597 AD). The temple covers an area of some 23,000 square metres (250,000 sq ft) and features 600 rooms in a total of 14 different halls, including the Grand Hall of Sakyamuni, the Hall of Five Hundred Arhats and the Hall of Monk Jigong. The exterior of the building features Chinese pagodas such as the Sui Pagoda, the Seven Buddha Pagoda, and the Memorial Pagoda of Monk Yi Xing (683–727 AD). This mountain temple is the site where indigenous Chinese Buddhism branched away from Buddhist teachings and doctrine commonly found in India. From there, the Tiantai sect of Buddhism spread to both Korea and Japan during the Tang Dynasty (618–907 AD). The tall brick Guoqing Pagoda
    7.50
    4 votes
    41
    Kiyomizu-dera

    Kiyomizu-dera

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kiyomizu-dera (清水寺), officially Otowa-san Kiyomizu-dera (音羽山清水寺) is an independent Buddhist temple in eastern Kyoto. The temple is part of the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities) UNESCO World Heritage site. (It should not be confused with Kiyomizu-dera in Yasugi, Shimane, which is part of the 33-temple route of the Chūgoku 33 Kannon Pilgrimage through western Japan.) Kiyomizu-dera was founded in the early Heian period. The temple was founded in 798, and its present buildings were constructed in 1633, during a ordered by the Tokugawa Iemitsu. There is not a single nail used in the entire structure. It takes its name from the waterfall within the complex, which runs off the nearby hills. Kiyomizu means clear water, or pure water. It was originally affiliated with the old and influential Hossō sect dating from Nara times. However, in 1965 it severed that affiliation, and its present custodians call themselves members of the "Kitahossō" sect. The main hall has a large veranda, supported by tall pillars, that juts out over the hillside and offers impressive views of the city. Large verandas and main halls were constructed at many popular sites during the Edo
    8.67
    3 votes
    42
    Guinsa

    Guinsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Guinsa, (Temple of Salvation and Kindness) in the Yeonhwa area of the Sobaek Mountains located near Danyang in Chungcheongbuk-do, South Korea, is the headquarters of the Cheontae school of Korean Buddhism. Guinsa is the administrative center of over 140 sub-temples and hermitages of the Cheontae sect. Although the architecture of Guinsa follows that of many other Buddhist temples in Korea, it is also markedly different in that the structures are several stories tall, instead of the typical one or two stories that structures in many other Korean temples have. This may be due to the restraints of the valley in which it is located and to modern construction techniques, but it creates a visual experience that is both beautiful and unique from what one sees at other temples. Up to 10,000 monks can live here at any one point while the kitchen can serve food for twice that number when needed. The ubiquitous black slate roof tiles found commonly on Korean temples is occasionally replaced by orange glazed tiles reminding one of those seen on the roofs of Beijing's Forbidden City. Some buildings resemble the Potala Palace in Lhasa with their use of height and vertical lines. The temple
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    Wat Pho

    Wat Pho

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Pho (Thai: วัดโพธิ์, IPA: [wát pʰoː]), is a Buddhist temple in Phra Nakhon district, Bangkok, Thailand. It is located in the Rattanakosin district directly adjacent to the Grand Palace. Known also as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, its official name is Wat Phra Chettuphon Wimon Mangkhlaram Ratchaworamahawihan (Thai: วัดพระเชตุพนวิมลมังคลารามราชวรมหาวิหาร IPA: [wát pʰráʔ tɕʰêttupʰon wíʔmon maŋkʰlaːraːm râːttɕʰawɔːráʔmahǎːwíʔhǎːn]). The temple is also known as the birthplace of traditional Thai massage. Wat Pho is named after a monastery in India where Buddha is believed to have lived. Prior to the temple's founding, the site was a centre of education for traditional Thai medicine, and statues were created showing yoga positions. An enormous Buddha image from Ayuthaya's Wat Si Sanaphet was destroyed by Burmeses in 1767, King Rama I (1782-1809 A.D.) incorporated its fragments to build a temple to enlarge and renovate the complex. The complex underwent many changes in the next 260 years. Under King Rama III (1824-1851 A.D.), plaques inscribed with medical texts were placed around the temple. These received recognition in the Memory of the World Programme launched by UNESCO on
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Candi Plaosan

    Candi Plaosan

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Candi Plaosan, also known as the 'Plaosan Complex', is one of the Buddhist temples located in Bugisan village, Prambanan district, Central Java, Indonesia, about a kilometer to the northwest of the renowned Hindu Prambanan Temple. Candi Plaosan covers an area of 2,000 square meters with an elevation of 148 meters above sea level. The Dengok River is located nearby, about 200 meters away. Candi Plaosan is surrounded by paddy fields along with vegetation such as banana and corn. Plaosan temple was built in the mid 9th century by Sri Kahulunnan or Pramodhawardhani, the daughter of Samaratungga, descendent of Sailendra Dynasty, and who was married to Rakai Pikatan in the Hindu tradition. The Plaosan complex is an ensemble of two Buddhist temples, Plaosan Lor and Plaosan Kidul. The temples are separated by a road; Plaosan Lor is located in the North and Plaosan Kidul in the South. Plaosan Lor consists of two main temples and an open area known as a mandapa. Both temples have an entrance, a gate, and the guardian statue known as Dwarapala. Plaosan Lor and Plaosan Kidul are considered to originally be one complex. The Ploasan temple complex is made up of 174 small buildings, 116 are
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Phra Pathom Chedi

    Phra Pathom Chedi

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Phra Pathom Chedi (Thai: พระปฐมเจดีย์) is the tallest stupa in the world with the height of 127 metres (417 ft). It is located in the town of Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. The name Phra Pathom Chedi means Holy chedi (stupa) of the beginning. The stupa at the location is first mentioned in Buddhist scriptures of the year 675, however archaeological findings date back to the 4th century. In the 11th century it was overbuilt with a Khmer (Ancient Cambodia) style prang, which was later overgrown by the jungle. The ruin was visited several times by the later King Mongkut during his time as a monk, and after his coronation he ordered the building of a new and more magnificent chedi at the site. After 17 years of construction it was finished in 1870, and the population of nearby Nakhon Chai Si was ordered to move to the newly created town around the chedi.
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Sulamani Temple

    Sulamani Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Sulamani Temple (Burmese: စူဠာမဏိ, pronounced [sùlàmənḭ pʰəjá]) is a Buddhist temple located in the village of Minnanthu (southwest of Bagan) in Burma. The temple is one of the most-frequently visited in Bagan. It was built in 1183 by King Narapatisithu, and is similar to the Thatbyinnyu Temple in design. The Sulamani Temple also shows influence from the Dhammayangyi Temple, and was the model for the Htilominlo Temple. Sulamani Temple was restored after the 1975 earthquake, and utilises brick and stone, with frescoes in the interior of the temple.It was rebuilt in 1994.
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Kinkaku-ji

    Kinkaku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Zen
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kinkaku-ji (金閣寺, Temple of the Golden Pavilion), also known as Rokuon-ji (鹿苑寺, Deer Garden Temple), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. The garden complex is an excellent example of Muromachi period garden design. The Muromachi period is considered to be a classical age of Japanese garden design. The correlation between buildings and its settings were greatly emphasized during this period. It was a way to integrate the structure within the landscape in an artistic way. The garden designs were characterized by a reduction in scale, a more central purpose, and a distinct setting. A minimalistic approach was brought to the garden design, by recreating larger landscapes in a smaller scale around a structure. It is designated as a National Special Historic Site and a National Special Landscape, and it is one of 17 locations comprising the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto World Heritage Site. It is also one of the most popular buildings in Japan, attracting a large number of visitors annually. It has also been made widely familiar as being featured in a photograph in the desktop picture art of Apple's OS X computer operating system, labeled simply as "Golden Palace". The site of
    8.33
    3 votes
    48
    Palpung Monastery

    Palpung Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Palpung (Tibetan: དཔལ་སྤུངས།, Wylie: Dpal-spungs) is the name of the congregation of monasteries and centers of the Tai Situpas as well as the name of the monastic seat in Tibet in Dege. Palpung means "glorious union of study and practice". Palpung Monastery, also known as Babang, is a Tibetan Buddhist temple in Sichuan in the vicinity of Dergé, near the border with Tibet, which originated in the 12th century and wielded considerable religious and political influence over the centuries. The current monastery is said to have been founded in 1727 by King Denba Tsering. It is the seat of four lines of incarnate lamas, the best known being the Situ Rinpoche or Tai Situpa, as well as the Jamgon Kongtrul and Beru Khyentse. The temple has historically been associated with the Karmapas: for instance, the 16th Karmapa was enthroned first at Palpung before travelling to his main seat at Tsurphu Monastery in Central Tibet. There are an estimated 40 monks residing in the monastery itself and a larger number resident in the surrounding region. Palpung monastery is the monastic seat of the successive incarnations of the Tai Situ Rinpoches in Eastern Tibet by the full name of Palpung Thubten
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Wat Pathum Wanaram

    Wat Pathum Wanaram

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Pathum Wanaram (Thai: วัดปทุมวนาราม) is a Buddhist temple in Bangkok, Thailand. It is located in the district Pathum Wan, between the two shopping malls Siam Paragon and CentralWorld, and across the street of Siam Square. The temple was founded in 1857 by King Mongkut (Rama IV) as a place of worship near his Sa Pathum Palace. At the time of its founding the area was still only rice fields, only accessible via the Khlong Saen Saeb. The temple is a third class royal temple of the Thammayut Nikaya order. The full name of the temple is Wat Pathum Wanaram Ratcha Wora Viharn (วัดปทุมวนารามราชวรวิหาร). The ashes of Thai Royal Family members in the line of Prince Mahidol Adulyadej are interred at the temple. Among the various buildings of the temple is a sala partially reconstructed from the crematorium of the late Princess Mother of Thailand. The crematorium was a rare example of ancient craftsmanship featuring ornate stencils and lacquered sculptures. Known in Thai as phra men, it represents Mount Meru, the heavenly abode of the gods.
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Quoc An Temple

    Quoc An Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Quoc An Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Quốc Ân) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Huế, central Vietnam. In the main hall is a banner, containing a verse of praise of the temple and its founder, written by Nguyễn Phúc Chu, one of the Nguyễn Lords who once ruled central and southern Vietnam and the city of Huế. The temple is situated on a small hill in the ward of Trường An in the city of Huế. It is located about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) from the Phú Cam bridge that spans the Perfume River, which passes through Huế. The temple was founded by Zen Master Thích Nguyên Thiều (1648–1728), between 1682 and 1685, and was known as the Vĩnh Ân Temple. Thích Nguyên Thiều was originally from China, and was a disciple of Thích Khoáng Viên, from Guangdong in southern China. In 1677, he immigrated to southern Vietnam by boat, to settle in territory ruled by the Nguyễn Lords. He had initially arrived in Bình Định further south, founding the Chùa Thập Tháp Di-đà (Vietnamese for Temple of the Ten Towers of Amitabha). After building his first temple, he travelled the region expounding the dharma, before travelling to Huế to found the Hà Trung Temple in Vinh Hà district before moving to the Ngự Bình mountain
    6.20
    5 votes
    51
    Shwegugyi Temple

    Shwegugyi Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Shwegugyi Temple (Burmese: ရွှေဂူကြီး, pronounced [ʃwèɡùdʑí pʰəjá]; literally "Great Golden Cave") is a Buddhist temple built during the reign of King Alaungsithu in 1131. The temple itself is built on an expansive brick foundation 3 metres (13 ft) tall. The temple is known for its arched windows, and its history, which is inscribed in two stone slabs in Pali. According to its inscription, the temple was completed in seven months.
    6.20
    5 votes
    52
    Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep

    Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep (Thai: วัดพระธาตุดอยสุเทพ) is a Theravada Buddhist temple in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. The temple is often referred to as "Doi Suthep" although this is actually the name of the mountain it is located on. The temple is located 15 km from the city of Chiang Mai and is a sacred site to many Thai people. From the temple, impressive views of Chiang Mai can be seen and it remains a popular destination of foreign visitors. The original founding of the temple remains a legend and there are a few varied versions. The temple is said to have been founded in 1383 when the first chedi was built. Over time, the temple has expanded, and been made to look more extravagant with many more holy shrines added. A road to the temple was first built in 1935. According to legend, a monk named Sumanathera from Sukhothai had a dream; in this vision he was told to go to Pang Cha and look for a relic. Sumanathera ventured to Pang Cha and is said to have found a bone, which many claim was Buddha's shoulder bone. The relic displayed magical powers; it glowed, it was able to vanish, it could move itself and replicate itself. Sumanathera took the relic to King Dharmmaraja who ruled
    6.20
    5 votes
    53
    Berkeley Zen Center

    Berkeley Zen Center

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Berkeley Zen Center (BZC), temple name Shogakuji (正覚寺, Shōgaku-ji), is a Sōtō Zen Buddhist practice center located in Berkeley, California led by Sojun Mel Weitsman. An informal affiliate to the San Francisco Zen Center (SFZC), BZC was originally founded in 1967 by Weitsman and Shunryu Suzuki as a satellite group for the SFZC. Despite founding the center, Weitsman was not installed as abbot there until 1985, one year after receiving Dharma transmission from Hoitsu Suzuki. Weitsman's Dharma heir, Alan Senauke, lives on site with his wife Laurie Senauke (as of 1999) and also works for the Buddhist Peace Fellowship. Another former teacher at BZC was Maylie Scott, who died in 2001. In 1969 Zenkei Blanche Hartman began sitting zazen at BZC, receiving Dharma transmission from Weitsman in 1988. In 1979 the center relocated to its current location on Russell Street—and today houses a small group of residents who live on site.
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Namgyal Monastery

    Namgyal Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Namgyal Monastery (Tibetan: རྣམ་གྱལ་, Wylie: rnam rgyal, ༸སྐུ་བཅར་རྣམ་པར་རྒྱལ་བ་ཕན་བདེ་ལེགས་བཤད་གླིང། named for a long-life deity) is a Tibetan Buddhist monastery associated with the Dalai Lamas. Founded in 1575 by the Third Dalai Lama, Sonam Gyatso, Namgyal Monastery was historically housed within the Potala Palace (the red section on top). Namgyal Monastery is personal monastery of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Its primary role was to assist with rituals involving the Dalai Lama of Tibet. After 1959, Namgyal Monastery relocated to Dharamshala, India, where it continues activity today. (Whether the People's Republic of China has maintained an institution with this name is unclear.) According to its website, Namgyal (Dharamshala) has "nearly 200" monks (up from 55 in 1959), representing all four Tibetan monastic lineages. Its main tantric practices are Kalachakra, Yamantaka, Chakrasamvara, Guhyasamaja, and Vajrakilaya. In 1992, on the advice of the present Dalai Lama, Namgyal established an American branch in Ithaca, New York. For information on this see Namgyal Monastery Institute of Buddhist Studies. In 1998, Namgyal incorporated a Tibetan monastery in Bodhgaya, India, called
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Preah Khan

    Preah Khan

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Preah Khan (Khmer: ប្រាសាទព្រះខ័ន), sometimes transliterated as Prah Khan, is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built in the 12th century for King Jayavarman VII. It is located northeast of Angkor Thom and just west of the Jayatataka baray, with which it was associated. It was the centre of a substantial organisation, with almost 100,000 officials and servants. The temple is flat in design, with a basic plan of successive rectangular galleries around a Buddhist sanctuary complicated by Hindu satellite temples and numerous later additions. Like the nearby Ta Prohm, Preah Khan has been left largely unrestored, with numerous trees and other vegetation growing among the ruins. Preah Khan was built on the site of Jayavarman VII's victory over the invading Chams in 1191. Unusually the modern name, meaning "holy sword", is derived from the meaning of the original—Nagara Jayasri (holy city of victory). The site may previously have been occupied by the royal palaces of Yasovarman II and Tribhuvanadityavarman. The temple's foundation stela has provided considerable information about the history and administration of the site: the main image, of the bodhisattva Avalokiteśvara in the form of the
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    Sakya Monastery

    Sakya Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sakya Monastery, also known as dPal Sa skya or Pel Sakya ("White Earth" or "Pale Earth") is a Buddhist monastery situated 25 km southeast of a bridge which is about 127 km west of Shigatse on the road to Tingri in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China. The seat of the Sakya or Sakyapa school of Tibetan Buddhism, it was founded in 1073, by Konchok Gyelpo (1034-1102), originally a Nyingmapa monk of the powerful noble family of the Tsang and became the first Sakya Trizin. Its powerful abbots governed Tibet during the whole of the 13th century after the downfall of the kings until they were eclipsed by the rise of the new Gelukpa school of Tibetan Buddhism. Its Mongolian architecture is quite different from that of temples in Lhasa and Yarlung. The only surviving ancient building is the Lhakang Chempo or Sibgon Trulpa. Originally a cave in the mountainside, it was built in 1268 by Ponchen Sakya Sangpo in 1268 and restored in the 16th century. It contains some of the most magnificent surviving artwork in all of Tibet, which appears not to have been damaged in recent times.The Gompa grounds cover more than 18,000 square metres, while the huge main hall covers some 6,000 square
    9.50
    2 votes
    57
    Shwenandaw Monastery

    Shwenandaw Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Shwenandaw Monastery (Burmese: ရွှေနန်းတော်ကျောင်း; MLCTS: hrwe. nan: taw kyaung:, IPA: [ʃwènándɔ̀ tʃáun]; lit. "Golden Palace Monastery") is a historical monastery located near Mandalay Hill, Mandalay Division, Myanmar (formerly Burma). It was built by King Mindon in the 19th century. It is known for its teak carvings of Buddhist myths, which adorn its walls and roofs. The monastery is built in the traditional Burmese architectural style. King Mindon Min died on this building. King Thibaw Min, son of King Mindon moved this building from the palace to its current location. Shwenandaw Monastery is the single remaining major structure of the original wooden Royal Palace today.
    9.50
    2 votes
    58
    Zen Mountain Monastery

    Zen Mountain Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Monastery
    Zen Mountain Monastery (or, Doshinji, meaning Temple of the Way of Reality) is a Zen Buddhist monastery and training center on a 230-acre (0.93 km) forested property in the Catskill Mountains in Mount Tremper, New York. It was founded in 1980 by John Daido Loori, originally as the Zen Arts Center. It combines the Rinzai and Sōtō Zen traditions, in both of which Loori received dharma transmission. Since Loori's death in October 2009, Zen Mountain Monastery has two teachers: Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, who received Dharma transmission from Loori in 1997, and Konrad Ryushin Marchaj, the abbot of the monastery. The monastery was originally built as Camp Wapanachki in the 1930s. The massive Arts and Crafts style stone and wood frame former retreat house and chapel was built in two phases between about 1935 and 1938. The four story "main house" is the earliest section. It contains living spaces, libraries, a small cellar and a large kitchen. The later section is built of bluestone and contains a dining hall and chapel. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994. Students and residents of the monastery practice according to Abbot Loori's Eight Gates of Zen training
    9.50
    2 votes
    59
    Magoksa

    Magoksa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Magoksa is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism in Gongju, South Korea. It is located on the eastern slope of Taehwasan, on taegeuk-shaped bend in the Taegeukcheon Stream. Magoksa is believed to have been established in 640 or 642 by the monk Jajang of Silla, however, this account is in dispute by some since Gongju would have lain within Baekje territory at that time. Whenever it was actually built, it was certainly operational during the Baekje Dynasty and the temple has lasted since that time to the present day, as evidenced by it containing manuscripts made with liquid gold and silver - relics from the late Goryeo period. The temple, used as a place of refuge during the early Joseon Dynasty, was left largely untouched by the Seven Year War of the 1590s. It continued to play this role in the 20th century, when used as a hideout by Korean independence leader Kim Ku, who is also known to have planted the Chinese junipers seen here. Legend tells us that when Jajang came to the eastern slope of Taehwasan where Magoksa is found he decided to establish a temple and call it magok, which means Flax Vally. Jajang felt that many good priests could come from the area "to
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    Tanzhe Temple

    Tanzhe Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Tanzhe Temple (Chinese: 潭柘寺; pinyin: Tán Zhè Sì; literally "Temple of Pool and Zhe Tree") is a Buddhist temple situated in the Western Hills, a mountainous area in western Beijing. It is one of the most well-known temples in Beijing. At one time, it was one of the most important temples in the nation. The temple is located near China National Highway 108 in the Mentougou District of Beijing. Built in the Jin Dynasty (265–420), it has an age of around 1,700 years. The area of the entire temple is 100 mu (6.8 hectares), and its arrangement of halls is akin to that found in the Ming and Qing dynasties. Tanzhe Temple is one of the oldest temples in Beijing. Most of the existing buildings in the temple are from the Ming and Qing dynasties, and there are pagodas from various historical periods such as the Jin, Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties. The two "Emperor trees" by the Hall of Three Sages were planted during the Liao Dynasty about 1,000 years ago. The spacious and imposing buildings are arranged in three main northsouth axes. Along the central axis are the Archway, the Front Gate, Deveraja Hall, Mahavira Hall and Vairochana Pavilion. The temple's central hall is its Mahavira Hall.
    7.00
    4 votes
    61
    Wat Phra Sri Rattana Mahatat Woramahawihan

    Wat Phra Sri Rattana Mahatat Woramahawihan

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Phra Sri Rattana Mahatat Woramahawihan (Thai: วัดพระศรีรัตนมหาธาตุ, also commonly referred to as Wat Yai) is a Buddhist temple (Wat) in Phitsanulok, Thailand, where it is located on the bank of the Nan River near the Naresuan Bridge. The cloister of the temple was established in 1357 during the reign of King Maha Thammaradscha I of Sukhothai. Wat Yai is famous throughout Thailand for its golden sculpture of the Buddha called the Phra Buddha Chinnarat (Thai: พระพุทธชินราช). Many Thai people consider the Phra Buddha Chinnarat to be the most beautiful Buddha portrait in Thailand. It depicts Buddha in the posture of overcoming Mara (Thai: ปางมารวิชัย), also called Mara submission. A stone inscription indicated that he was molded over 700 years ago by a King Mahathamaracha Lithai of Sukhothai dynasty. Several faithful copies of the Phra Buddha Chinnarat are displayed in other temples, including Wat Benchamabophit in Bangkok and Wat Saranat Thammaram in Rayong. Also, the Phra Buddha Chinnarat is depicted on the official seal of the Phitsanulok Province. The temple's large vihara has an immense main entrance with mother-of-pearl inserts donated by King Boromakot in 1756. Beyond the
    6.00
    5 votes
    62
    Samye

    Samye

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Samye Monastery or Samye Gompa (Tibetan: བསམ་ཡས་, Wylie: bsam yas, ZYPY: Samyä; Chinese:桑耶寺) is the first Buddhist monastery built in Tibet, was most probably first constructed between 775 and 779 CE under the patronage of King Trisong Detsen of Tibet who sought to revitalize Buddhism, which had declined since its introduction by King Songtsen Gampo in the 7th century. The monastery is located in Dranang, Shannan Prefecture. It was supposedly modeled on the design of Odantapuri monastery in what is now Bihar, India. The 18th century Puning Temple of Chengde, Hebei, China was modeled after the Samye Compa. According to tradition, the Indian monk Shantarakshita made the first attempt to construct the monastery while promoting his sutra-centric version of Buddhism. Finding the Samye site auspicious he set about to build a structure there. However, the building would always collapse after reaching a certain stage. Terrified, the construction workers believed that there was a demon or obstructive thoughtform in a nearby river making trouble. However, when Shantarakshita's contemporary Padmasambhava arrived from northern India, he was able to subdue the energetic problems obstructing
    8.00
    3 votes
    63
    Shaolin Monastery

    Shaolin Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Shaolin Monastery or Shaolin Temple (Chinese: 少林寺; pinyin: Shàolín Sì; Wade–Giles: Shao-lin Szu, pronounced [ʂɑ̂ʊ̯lǐn sî]; Cantonese Yale: Siulàhm Jí) is a Chán Buddhist temple on Mount Song, near Dengfeng, Zhengzhou, Henan province, China. It is led by Abbot Shi Yongxin. Founded in the fifth century, the monastery is long famous for its association with Chinese martial arts and particularly with Shaolin Kung Fu, and it is the best known Mahayana Buddhist monastery to the Western world. Shaolin Monastery and its famed Pagoda Forest were inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2010 as part of the "Historic Monuments of Dengfeng." The shào (少) in "Shaolin" refers to Mount Shaoshi (少室山), one of the seven mountains forming the Songshan mountain range; it is on this mountain the Temple is situated. The word lín (林) means "forest". The word sì (寺) means "monastery/temple". The taijiquan master Zhang Zuyao incorrectly translated "Shaolin" as "young (new) forest" or sometimes "little forest". This newer translation is commonly accepted today. The first Shaolin Monastery abbot was Batuo (also called Fotuo or Buddhabhadra, not to be confused with Bodhidharma) a dhyana master who came to
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Small Wild Goose Pagoda

    Small Wild Goose Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Small Wild Goose Pagoda, sometimes Little Wild Goose Pagoda (Chinese: 小雁塔; pinyin: Xiǎoyàn Tǎ), is one of two significant pagodas in the city of Xi'an, China, the site of the old Han and Tang capital Chang'an. The other notable pagoda is the Giant Wild Goose Pagoda, originally built in 652 and restored in 704. The Small Wild Goose Pagoda was built between 707–709, during the Tang Dynasty under Emperor Zhongzong of Tang (r 705–710). The pagoda stood 45 m (147 ft) until the 1556 Shaanxi earthquake. The earthquake shook the pagoda and damaged it so that it now stands at a height of 43 m (141 ft) with fifteen levels of tiers. The pagoda has a brick frame built around a hollow interior, and its square base and shape reflect the building style of other pagodas from the era. During the Tang Dynasty, the Small Wild Goose Pagoda stood across a street from its mother temple, the Dajianfu Temple. Pilgrims brought sacred Buddhist writings to the temple and pagoda from India, as the temple was one of the main centers in Chang'an for translating Buddhist texts. The temple was older than the pagoda, since it was founded in 684, exactly 100 days after the death of Emperor Gaozong of Tang (r.
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Tam Kung

    Tam Kung

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tam Kung (譚公, literally "Lord Tam") or Tam Tai Sin (譚大仙) is a sea deity worshiped in Hong Kong and Macau. In Chinese folk legends, Tam Kung was one of gods who could forecast the weather. He was born in Huizhou Prefecture. It was said that he could cure patients in his childhood. Tam Kung became an immortal in heaven at the age of twenty in the Nine-dragon Mountain in Huizhou. He was granted an honor in the Qing Dynasty. People whose ancestral home are in Huizhou or Chaoshan of Guangdong province worship Tam Kung most sincerely. The oldest temple dedicated to Tam Kung in Hong Kong is located at the end of Shau Kei Wan Man Street East, in A Kung Ngam, Shau Kei Wan. It was originally a small shrine. Local people raised money to construct it in 1905 and reconstructed it many times afterwards. The temple is a Grade I historic building. The statue of Tam Kung, which was first worshipped among the other gods in the temple, was formerly positioned in the Tam Kung Temple in Tam Kung Road in Kowloon City. There is a big rock in front of the temple and is believed to be Tam Kung's magic stamp. Local residents and fishermen are the sincere worshippers. On the birthday of Tam Kung (8th day of
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Abhayagiri Dagaba

    Abhayagiri Dagaba

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Abhayagiri vihāra is situated in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. It is one of the most extensive ruins in the world and one of the most sacred Buddhist pilgrimage cities in the nation. Historically it was a great monastic centre as well as a royal capital, with magnificent monasteries rising to many stories, roofed with gilt bronze or tiles of burnt clay glazed in brilliant colors. To the north of the city, encircled by great walls and containing elaborate bathing ponds, carved balustrades and moonstones, stood "Abhayagiri", one of seventeen such religious units in Anuradhapura and the largest of its five major viharas. One of the focal points of the complex is an ancient stupa, the Abhayagiri Dagaba. Surrounding the humped dagaba, Abhayagiri Vihara was a seat of the Northern Monastery, or Uttara Vihara. The term "Abhayagiri Vihara" means not only a complex of monastic buildings, but also a fraternity of Buddhist monks, or Sangha, which maintains its own historical records, traditions and way of life. Founded in the 2nd century BC, it had grown into an international institution by the 1st century AD, attracting scholars from all over the world and encompassing all shades of Buddhist
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Candi Kalasan

    Candi Kalasan

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kalasan (Indonesian: Candi Kalasan), also known as Candi Kalibening, is an 8th century Buddhist temple in Indonesia. It is located 13 km east of Yogyakarta on the way to Prambanan temple, on the south side of the main road 'Jalan Solo' between Yogyakarta and Surakarta. According to a Kalasan inscription dated 778 AD, written in Sanskrit using Pranagari script, the temple was erected by the will of Guru Sang Raja Sailendravamçatilaka (the Jewel of Sailendra family) that succeed to persuade Maharaja Tejapurnapana Panangkaran (in other part of the inscription also called as Kariyana Panangkaran) to construct a holy building for the goddess (boddhisattvadevi) Tara and also build a vihara (monastery) for buddhist monks from Sailendra family's realm. Panangkaran awarded the Kalaça village to sangha (buddhist monastic community).. According to the date of this inscription, Kalasan temple is the oldest among temples built in the Prambanan Plain. Despite being renovated and partially rebuilt during the Dutch colonial era, the temple currently is in poor condition. Compared to other temples nearby such as Prambanan, Sewu, and Sambisari the temple is not well maintained. The temple stands on
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    Amaravati Buddhist Monastery

    Amaravati Buddhist Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Amaravati is a Theravada Buddhist monastery at the eastern end of the Chiltern Hills in south east England. Established in 1984 by Ajahn Sumedho as an extension of Chithurst Buddhist Monastery, the monastery has its roots in the Thai forest tradition and takes inspiration from the teachings of the community's founder, the late Ajahn Chah. Its chief priorities are the training and support of a resident monastic community, and the facilitation for monastic and lay people alike of the practice of the Buddha's teachings. The resident community consists of monks (bhikkhus), nuns (siladhara), and male and female postulants who live in accordance with strict traditional codes of celibacy, together with a volunteer support staff and visitors. According to the monastery website, regarding the male monastic community, "Usually, there are between 15 and 25 bhikkhus and samaneras in residence, living a contemplative, celibate, mendicant life according to the Vinaya and Dhamma. [...] The community also consists of anagārikas, or white robed postulants on the eight precepts, who after a year or two may be given samanera ordination." The monastery's order of siladhara, or ten-precept nuns, dates
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Green Gulch Farm

    Green Gulch Farm

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Green Gulch Farm Zen Center, or Soryu-ji (meaning Green Dragon Temple) is a Soto Zen practice center located near Muir Beach, California that practices in the lineage of Shunryu Suzuki. In addition to its Zen training program, the center also manages an organic farm and gardens. Founded in 1972 by the San Francisco Zen Center and Zentatsu Richard Baker, the site is located on 115 acres (0.47 km) in a valley seventeen miles (27 km) north of San Francisco and offers a variety of workshops and classes throughout the year. The land is an inholding of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and has much wildlife within its borders. In addition to meditation retreats, offerings include classes and workshops on the Japanese tea ceremony and gardening. While Green Gulch Farm has a residential monastery and retreat center, guest house, and conference center, it has also become recognized as a place where organic farmers can come to learn the tools of their trade. One of the original architects of the gardens at Green Gulch was the renowned late horticulturist Alan Chadwick—who had introduced the biodynamic farming techniques influenced by Rudolf Steiner on the farm. Chadwick's grave is
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Wat Chaiwatthanaram

    Wat Chaiwatthanaram

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Chaiwatthanaram (Thai: วัดไชยวัฒนาราม) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Ayutthaya, Thailand, on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River, outside Ayutthaya island. It is one of Ayutthaya's best known temples and a major tourist attraction. Wat Chaiwatthanaram lies on the west bank of Chao Phraya River, south west of the old city of Ayyuthaya. It is a large compound and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It can be reached by road or by boat. The temple was constructed in 1630 by the king Prasat Thong as the first temple of his reign, as a memorial of his mother's residence in that area. The temple's name literally means the Temple of long reign and glorious era. It was designed in Khmer style which was popular in that time. It has a central 35 meter high prang in Khmer style (Thai: พระปรางด์ประธาน) with four smaller prangs. The whole construction stands on a rectangular platform. About halfway up there are hidden entrances, to which steep stairs lead. The central platform is surrounded by eight chedi-shaped chapels (Thai: เมรุทิศ เมรุราย - Meru Thit Meru Rai), which are connected by a rectangular cross-shaped passage (Phra Rabieng). The passage had numerous side entries and was
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Cold Mountain Temple

    Cold Mountain Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Hanshan Temple (Chinese: 寒山寺; pinyin: Hánshān Sì); literally "Cold Mountain Temple", is a Buddhist temple and monastery in Suzhou, China. It is located at the town of Fengqiao (lit. Maple Bridge), about 5 kilometres west of the old city of Suzhou. Traditionally, Hanshan Temple is believed to have been founded during the Tianjian era (502–519) of the reign of Emperor Wu of Liang, in the Southern and Northern Dynasties period. The current name of the monastery derives from Hanshan, the legendary monk and poet. Hanshan and his disciple Shide are said to have come to the monastery during the reign of Emperor Taizong of Tang (627–649), where Hanshan became the abbot. Hanshan Temple is famed in East Asia because of the poem "A Night Mooring by Maple Bridge" (楓橋夜泊), by Tang Dynasty poet, Zhang Ji. The poem describes the melancholy scene of a dejected traveller, moored at night at Fengqiao, hearing the bells of Hanshan Temple: The poem is still popularly read in China, Japan and Korea. It is part of the primary school curriculum in both China and Japan. The ringing of the bell at Hanshan Temple on Chinese New Year eve is a major pilgrimage and tourism event for visitors from these
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Ninna-ji

    Ninna-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Ninna-ji (仁和寺, Ninna-ji) is the head temple of the Omuro school of the Shingon Sect of Buddhism. Located in western Kyoto, Japan, it was founded in AD 888 by the retired Emperor Uda. It is part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto", a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Ninna-ji was founded in the early Heian period. In 886, Emperor Kōkō ordered the construction of the Nishiyama Goganji Temple to bless the nation and propagate Buddhist teachings, but he did not live to see its completion. Emperor Uda saw the construction to its completion in 888 and named it "Ninna" after the regnal year of the late Emperor Kōkō's reign. From 888 to 1869 it was traditional for reigning Emperors to send a son to the temple to take over as head priest when a vacancy arose. After retiring from his throne, Emperor Uda became the first Monzeki, or aristocratic priest, of Ninna-ji. From then on until the end of the Edo period, the temple saw a succession of head priests of imperial lineage. In 1467, the temple was destroyed by fire and fighting in the Ōnin War. It was rebuilt roughly 150 year later, thanks to the eldest son of Emperor Go-Yōzei, Kakushin Hosshinnō, who enlisted the help of Tokugawa
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Three Mountains of Dewa

    Three Mountains of Dewa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Shinto
    • Type of place of worship: Shrine
    The Three Mountains of Dewa (出羽三山, Dewa Sanzan) refer to the three sacred mountains of Mount Haguro, Mount Gassan and Mount Yudono, which are clustered together in the ancient province of Dewa (modern-day Yamagata Prefecture). Holy to the Japanese Shinto religion and especially the mountain ascetic cult of Shugendo, Dewa Sanzan are a popular pilgrimage site visited by many, including famed haiku poet Matsuo Bashō. The Haguro Five-story Pagoda is a recognized national treasure of Japan. The Dewa Sanzan mountains are particularly noteworthy as having the oldest history of mountain worship in Japan. The mountains were first opened as a religious center over 1400 years ago in 593 by prince Hachiko, who was the first-born son of Emperor Sushun, the 32nd emperor of Japan and reigning emperor at the time. Prince Hachiko arrived in Dewa province in 593 after fleeing the Soga clan upon the assassination of his father. He then devoted the rest of his life to religious pursuits, eventually enduring difficult ascetic exercises and a period of penance, which led to his worship of Haguro Gongen, the deity of the mountain. Following this, the prince began worship at the Gassan and Yudono
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Deer Park Monastery

    Deer Park Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Monastery
    Deer Park Monastery (Vietnamese: Tu Viện Lộc Uyển) is a 400-acre (1.6 km) Buddhist sanctuary in Escondido, California. It was founded in July 2000 by monastic and lay practitioners from Plum Village, France. The monastery is under the direction of Thich Nhat Hanh's Order of Interbeing in the Vietnamese Zen tradition. Deer Park follows the same practices and schedule as Plum Village and its sister monastery Blue Cliff Monastery in New York. Since its founding the monastery has grown to be very active. Deer Park hosts an annual retreat when Thich Nhat Hanh travels to North America. Over the years several people have taken voice vows and members of the other monasteries have moved to Deer Park in which the ordained Sangha has been growing. Lay practitioners also live at the monastery. The monastery is now composed of two hamlets; Solidity Hamlet for monks and laymen and Clarity Hamlet for nuns and laywomen. All retreats at Deer Park Monastery include the basic practices of sitting meditation and chanting, walking meditation, mindful eating, group discussions, touching the Earth, total relaxation, and working meditation. Depending on the retreat, extra activities may include private
    10.00
    1 votes
    75
    Gandantegchinlen Khiid Monastery

    Gandantegchinlen Khiid Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Gandantegchinlen Monastery (Mongolian: Гандантэгчинлэн хийд, Gandantegchinlen khiid short name: Gandan Mongolian: Гандан, Chinese: 慶寧寺, Qìngníng Temple), is a Tibetan-style monastery in the Mongolian capital of Ulaanbaatar that has been restored and revitalized since 1990. The Tibetan name translates to the "Great Place of Complete Joy." It currently has over 150 monks in residence. It features a 26.5-meter-high statue of Migjid Janraisig, a Buddhist bodhisattva also known as Avalokitesvara. It came under state protection in 1994. The monastery was constructed by the order of Yongzheng Emperor in 1727. Nine years later, it was established and named Qingning Si by Qianlong Emperor, as residence of the Second Jebtsundamba, Outer Mongolia's highest reincarnated lama. It became the principal center of Buddhist learning in Mongolia. In the 1930s, the Communist government of Mongolia, under the leadership of Khorloogiin Choibalsan and under the influence of Joseph Stalin, destroyed all but a few monasteries and killed more than 15,000 lamas. Gandantegchinlen Khiid monastery, having escaped this mass destruction, was closed in 1938, but then reopened in 1944 and allowed to continue as
    10.00
    1 votes
    76
    Hachiman Shrine

    Hachiman Shrine

    • Currently used by religion(s): Shinto
    • Type of place of worship: Shrine
    A Hachiman shrine (八幡神社, Hachiman Jinja, also Hachiman-gū (八幡宮)) is a Shinto shrine dedicated to kami Hachiman. It is the second most numerous type of Shinto shrine after those dedicated to Inari (see Inari Shrine). Originally the name was read Yawata or Yahata, a reading still used in some occasions.
    10.00
    1 votes
    77
    Htukkanthein Temple

    Htukkanthein Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    HtukKanThein (Burmese: မ္ရောက္‌ဦးမ္ရုိ့; MLCTS: {{{MLCTS}}}), (pronounced 'Htoke-kan-thein' in Arakanese) is one of the most famous temples in the ancient Arakanese city of Mrauk U, in Rakhine State, Western Myanmar. The name means "Cross-Beam Ordination Hall". Like most of Mrauk U's Buddhist temples, it is designed as a dual purpose 'fortress-temple'. Although it is a 'thein' (Ordination Hall), it is one of the most militaristic buildings in Mrauk U, built on raised ground, with a single entrance and small windows. According to Dr. Emil Forchhammer, an archaeologist employed by the British Raj to study Mrauk U in the late 19th century, the temples might have been employed as a refuge for the Buddhist religious order in times of war. The temple enshrining the statues of Buddha was built in 1571 by King Min Phalaung. It is located on a small hill a stone's throw away from the Shite-thaung Temple. At the centre of the temple is a dome topped with a mushroom shaped crown or hti, surrounded by four smaller stupas at the corners. At the facade base of the central dome is a square window designed in such a manner that, at dawn, the sun's rays shine directly onto the main Buddha image
    10.00
    1 votes
    78
    Kunzang Palyul Choling

    Kunzang Palyul Choling

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kunzang Palyul Choling (KPC) is a center for Buddhist study and practice in the Nyingma tradition (Palyul lineage). Founded as the Center for Discovery and New Life in 1985, and then given to His Holiness Penor Rinpoche and renamed by him in 1987, KPC was Penor Rinpoche's first Dharma Center in the US. The resident Lama at KPC is Jetsunma Ahkon Lhamo who was enthroned as a lineage holder by H. H. Penor Rinpoche in 1988. Other teachers include HH Penor Rinpoche; Ven. Gyatrul Rinpoche; HH Khenpo Jigme Phuntsok & Ani Mumtso; HH Karma Kuchen Rinpoche; Mugsang Tulku; Khentrul Gyangkhang Rinpoche; Khenchen Tsewang Gyatso; Khenchen Pema Sherab; Khenpo Namdrol; HH Ngawang Tenzin Rinpoche (Bhutan); Ven. Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoche & Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche; Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche; Ven. Yangthang Tulku; HE Taklung Tsetrul Rinpoche; HH Chetsang Rinpoche; Tulku Sangngag, Choji Rinpoche; Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche; Ven. Ngagpa Yeshe Dorje; HH Orgyen Kusum Lingpa; Tulku Rigdzin Pema; Bhaka Tulku; Khenpo Tenzin Norgey; and Lama Kuntuzangpo, Baasan Lama, and Lama Baasansuren (Mongolia). In April 1984, the Center began a 24-hour prayer vigil in the basement of Jetsunma Ahkon Lhamo's
    10.00
    1 votes
    79
    Sanjūsangen-dō

    Sanjūsangen-dō

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sanjūsangen-dō (三十三間堂, lit. thirty-three ken (length) hall) is a Buddhist temple in Higashiyama District of Kyoto, Japan. Officially known as "Rengeō-in" (蓮華王院), or Hall of the Lotus King, Sanjūsangen-dō belongs to and is run by the Myoho-in temple, a part of the Tendai school of Buddhism. The temple name literally means Hall with thirty three spaces between columns, describing the architecture of the long main hall of the temple. From the Edo period, archery exhibition contests called Tōshiya are held on the west veranda of this temple. Taira no Kiyomori completed the temple under order of Emperor Go-Shirakawa in 1164. The temple complex suffered a fire in 1249 and only the main hall was rebuilt in 1266. In January, the temple has an event known as the Rite of the Willow (柳枝のお加持), where worshippers are touched on the head with a sacred willow branch to cure and prevent headaches. A popular archery tournament known as the Tōshiya (通し矢) is also held here on the same grounds since the Edo period. The duel between the famous warrior Miyamoto Musashi and Yoshioka Denshichirō, leader of the Yoshioka-ryū, is popularly believed to have been fought just outside Sanjūsangen-dō in 1604. The
    10.00
    1 votes
    80
    Wat Phra Kaew

    Wat Phra Kaew

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Wat Phra Kaew (Thai: วัดพระแก้ว, RTGS: Wat Phra Kaeo, IPA: [wát pʰráʔ kɛ̂ːw], Pronunciation, English: Temple of the Emerald Buddha; full official name Wat Phra Si Rattana Satsadaram, Thai: วัดพระศรีรัตนศาสดาราม, IPA: [wát pʰráʔ sǐː rát.ta.náʔ sàːt.sa.daː.raːm]) is regarded as the most sacred Buddhist temple (wat) in Thailand. It is a "potent religio-political symbol and the palladium [safeguard] of Thai society". It is located in the historic centre of Bangkok (district Phra Nakhon), within the precincts of the Grand Palace. The main building is the central ubosoth, which houses the statue of Emerald Buddha. The legendary history of this Buddha image is traced to India, five centuries after the Lord Buddha attained Nirvana, till it was finally enshrined in Bangkok at the Wat Phra Kaew temple in 1782 during Rama I's reign (1782–1809). This marked the beginning and raise of the Chakri Dynasty of the present Kingdom of Thailand (the present head of the dynasty is King Rama IX.) The Emerald Buddha, a dark green statue, is in a standing form, about 66 centimetres (26 in) tall, carved from a single jade stone (Emerald in Thai means deep green colour and not the specific stone). It is
    10.00
    1 votes
    81
    Mendut

    Mendut

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Mendut is a ninth century Buddhist temple, located in Mendut village, Mungkid sub-district, Magelang Regency, Central Java, Indonesia. The temple is located about three kilometres east from Borobudur. Mendut, Borobudur and Pawon, all of which are Buddhist temples, are located in one straight line. There is a mutual religious relationship between the three temples, although the exact ritual process is unknown. Built around early ninth century AD, Mendut is the oldest of the three temples including Pawon and Borobudur. The Karangtengah inscription, the temple was built and finished during the reign of King Indra of Sailendra dynasty. The inscription dated 824 AD mentioned that King Indra of Sailendra has built a sacred building named Venuvana which means "bamboo forest". Dutch archaeologist JG de Casparis has connected the temple mentioned in Karangtengah inscription with Mendut temple. In 1836 it was discovered as a ruins covered with bushes. The restoration of this temple was started at 1897 and it was finished at 1925. Some archaeologists who had conducted research on this temple were JG de Casparis, Theodoor van Erp, and Arisatya Yogaswara. The 26.4 metres tall temple is facing
    6.50
    4 votes
    82
    Yongjusa

    Yongjusa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Yongjusa is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. It is located in on the slopes of Hwasan in Taean-eup, Hwaseong, in the province of Gyeonggi, South Korea. The temple's name means "dragon jewel temple." Two large bells in the temple are believed to date to the Unified Silla period. One of them is designated national treasure 120. The temple was initially established in 854 AD, under the name Garyangsa. It was expanded in the 10th century. It was rebuilt in the late 18th century under the orders of Jeongjo in honor of his deceased father, Prince Sado. This is one of few cases where the Joseon royal house supported Buddhism directly. At this time the temple changed to its current name. The temple is located near Seoul Subway Line 1, and is also connected to Suwon by intercity bus. Yongjusa is a Buddhist temple in Taean-eup, Hwaseong City, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. It was first founded in 854 A.D. during the reign of Silla king Munseong under the name of "Kalyangsa". It was a famous seminary. But the temple was destroyed by fire during the Manchu war of 1636. Jeongjo, the 22nd king of Joseon Dynasty, moved his father Prince Sado's grave from Mt. Baebong in Yangju
    6.50
    4 votes
    83
    Bupaya Pagoda

    Bupaya Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Bupaya Pagoda (Burmese: ဗူးဘုရား,pronounced: [bú pʰəjá]) is a notable pagoda located in Bagan (formerly Pagan), in Myanmar, at a bend on the right bank of the Ayeyarwady River. The small pagoda, which has a bulbous shaped dome, is widely believed to have been built by the third King of Pagan Pyusawdi who ruled from 168 to 243 AD. It is one of the most notable shrines among the thousands of new or ruined Pagodas in Pagan, which is located about 90 miles (140 km) south of Mandalay. The original pagoda was completely destroyed in the 1975 earthquake. As result of this earthquake, the bulbous pagoda broke into pieces and fell into the river. It was, however, fully reconstructed using modern materials, with lesser adherence to the original design. Subsequently it was built as a gilded superstructure. The name 'Bupaya' is made up of two words 'bu' and 'paya' in the Burmese language. As the pagoda is bulbous and in the shape of gourd or pumpkin, the word 'Bu' in Burmese, which means "pumpkin" or "gourd" is the affixed to 'paya'. The word 'paya' means "pagoda". It is also said that King Pyusawhti, builder of the Pagoda, got the river bank deweeded as it was infested with gourd-like plant,
    8.50
    2 votes
    84
    Daitoku-ji

    Daitoku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Daitoku-ji (大徳寺) is a Buddhist temple, one of fourteen autonomous branches of the Rinzai school of Japanese Zen. It is located in Kita-ku, Kyoto, Japan. The "mountain name" (sangō (山号) by which it is known is Ryūhōzan (龍宝山). Daitoku-ji originated as a small monastery founded in 1315 or 1319 by the monk Shūhō Myōchō (宗峰妙超) (also pronounced Sōhō Myōchō) (1282–1337), who is known by the title Daitō Kokushi, or "National Teacher of the Great Lamp," that he was given by Emperor Go-Daigo. In 1325, the monastery was converted into a supplication hall for the imperial court at the request of the retired Emperor Hanazono. The dedication ceremony for the imperial supplication hall, with its newly added dharma hall and abbot's living quarters, was held in 1326, and this is generally recognized as the true founding of the temple. Like many other temples in Kyoto during that time, the temple's buildings were destroyed by fire. In 1474, which was when Kyoto was the scene of the Onin War, Emperor Go-Tsuchimikado designated Ikkyū Sōjun as the head priest. With the help of merchants of the city of Sakai, Ikkyū contributed significantly to the temple's rehabilitation. From its earliest days, the
    8.50
    2 votes
    85
    Ginkaku-ji

    Ginkaku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Ginkaku-ji (銀閣寺, Ginkaku-ji), the "Temple of the Silver Pavilion," is a Zen temple in the Sakyo ward of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the constructions that represent the Higashiyama Culture of Muromachi period. Ashikaga Yoshimasa initiated plans for creating a retirement villa and gardens as early as 1460; and after his death, Yoshimasa would arrange for this property to become a Zen temple. The official name is Jishō-ji (慈照寺, Jishō-ji) or the "Temple of Shining Mercy." The temple is today associated with the Shokoku-ji branch of Rinzai Zen. The two-storied Kannon-den (観音殿, Kannon hall), is the main temple structure. Its construction began February 21, 1482 (Bummei 14 , 4th day of the 2nd month). The structure's design sought to emulate the golden Kinkaku-ji which had been commissioned by his grandfather Ashikaga Yoshimitsu. It is popularly known as Ginkaku, the "Silver Pavilion" because of the initial plans to cover its exterior in silver foil; but this familiar nickname dates back only as far as the Edo period (1600–1868). During the Ōnin War, construction was halted. Despite Yoshimasa's intention to cover the structure with a distinctive silver-foil overlay, this work was delayed
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Hpaung Daw U Pagoda

    Hpaung Daw U Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Hpaung Daw U Pagoda Burmese: ဖောင်တော်ဦးဘုရား [pʰàʊɴ dɔ̀ ʔú pʰəjá]; also spelt Hpaung Daw Oo or Phaung Daw Oo) is a notable Buddhist site in Burma (formerly Burma), located on Inle Lake in Shan State. The pagoda houses five small gilded images of Buddha, which have been covered in gold leaf to the point that their original forms cannot be seen. The gold-leaf application to such excess is relatively recent. Old photographs hanging on the monastery walls show some of the images in a more pristine form. It is reported that some gold has been removed on occasion to reduce its mass. Although the monastery is open to all for veneration, only men are permitted to place gold leaf on the images. Another part of the ritual for pilgrims is to place a small robe or thingan around the images, and to take the robe back to their houses and place it on their own altar as a token of respect for the Buddha and his teachings. The images are of differing sizes, range from about nine to eighteen inches tall. Being essentially solid gold, the images are extremely heavy. It is believed that the Buddha images were brought to Inlay Lake by King Alaungsithu. Surrounding the Pagoda, and in the basement are
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Pawon

    Pawon

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Pawon (known locally as Candi Pawon) is a Buddhist temple in Central Java, Indonesia. Located between two other Buddhist temples, Borobudur (1.75 km (1.09 mi) to the northeast) and Mendut (1.15 km (0.71 mi) to the southwest), Pawon is connected with the other two temples, all of which were built during the Sailendra dynasty (8th–9th centuries). Examines the detail and style of its carving this temple is slightly older than Borobudur. The three temples were located on a straight line, suggesting there was a symbolic meaning that binds these temples. "Between Mendut and Borobudur stands Pawon temple, a jewel of Javanese temple architecture. Most probably, this temple served to purify the mind prior to ascending Borobudur." The original name of this Buddhist shrine is uncertain. Pawon literally means "kitchen" in Javanese language, which is derived from the root word awu or dust. The connection to the word "dust" also suggests that this temple was probably built as a tomb or mortuary temple for a king.. Pawon from the word Per-awu-an (place that contains dust), a temple that houses the dust of cremated king. However who was the personage that entombed here is still unknown. Local
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    Prasat Preah Vihear

    Prasat Preah Vihear

    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Preah Vihear Temple (Khmer: ប្រាសាទព្រះវិហារ) is a Hindu temple built during the reign of Khmer Empire, that is situated atop a 525-metre (1,722 ft) cliff in the Dângrêk Mountains, in the Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. In 1962, following a lengthy dispute between Thailand and Cambodia over ownership, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague awarded the temple to Cambodia. Affording a view for many kilometers across a plain, Prasat Preah Vihear has the most spectacular setting of all the temples built during the six-centuries-long Khmer Empire. As a key edifice of the empire's spiritual life, it was supported and modified by successive kings and so bears elements of several architectural styles. Preah Vihear is unusual among Khmer temples in being constructed along a long north-south axis, rather than having the conventional rectangular plan with orientation toward the east. The temple gives its name to Cambodia's Preah Vihear province, in which it is now located, as well as the Khao Phra Wihan National Park which borders it in Thailand's Sisaket province and through which the temple is most easily accessible. On July 7, 2008, Preah Vihear was listed as a UNESCO World
    8.50
    2 votes
    89
    Tongdosa

    Tongdosa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tongdosa ('Salvation of the world through mastery of truth') is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and in the southern part of Mt. Chiseosan near Yangsan City, Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea. Tongdosa is one of the Three Jewel Temples of Korea and represents the Buddha; (Haeinsa, also located in Gyeongsangnam-do, represents the dharma or Buddhist teachings; and Songgwangsa in Jeollanam-do represents the sangha or Buddhist community.) Tongdosa is famous because there are no statues outside of the main (Sakyamuni) Buddha at the temple because the "real shrines of the Sakyamuni Buddha" (relics) are preserved at Tongdosa. Courtyards at the temple are arrayed around several stupas (pagodas) that house the Buddha's relics. Tongdosa was established by the monk Jajang after returning from China in 646 CE, during the reign of Queen Seondeok of Silla. It thrived throughout the Unified Silla and Goryeo periods, when Buddhism was the state religion, and remained strong even in the Joseon Dynasty. Tongdosa is reputeded to house several relics of the Sakyamuni Buddha himself, including a robe, a begging bowl, and a bone from his skull, all relics that Jajang brought back from
    8.50
    2 votes
    90
    Tōshōdai-ji

    Tōshōdai-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tōshōdai-ji (唐招提寺) is a Buddhist temple of the Ritsu sect in the city of Nara, in Nara Prefecture, Japan. The Classic Golden Hall, also known as the kondō, has a single story, hipped tiled roof with a seven bay wide facade. It is considered the archetype of "classical style." It was founded by a Chinese Buddhist monk named Jianzhen during the Nara period in the year 759. Jianzhen was hired by the newly empowered clans to travel in search of funding from private aristocrats as well. Tōshōdai-ji is one of the places in Nara that UNESCO has designated as World Heritage Site "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara".
    8.50
    2 votes
    91
    Wat Mahathat, Bangkok

    Wat Mahathat, Bangkok

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Mahathat Yuwarajarangsarit Rajaworamahavihara (Thai: วัดมหาธาตุยุวราชรังสฤษฎิ์ราชวรมหาวิหาร (Pronunciation)) is a Buddhist temple in Bangkok, Thailand. It is one of the 10 royal temples of the highest class (Thai: พระอารามหลวง ชั้นเอก ชนิดราชวรมหาวิหาร) in Bangkok. Built during Ayutthaya period, the temple was then known as Wat Salak. Soon after Bangkok was established as the capital of Siam, the temple became strategically situated in between the newly-built Grand Palace and Front Palace (residence of the vice-king). As a result, the temple was used for royal ceremonies and funerals. Throughout the past two centuries, the temple has been renovated and elevated in status by many Thai kings and royalties. It became the Wat Mahathat of Bangkok in 1803 and was given its current name in 1996. The temple is also home to Vipassana Medidation centre. Mahachulalongkornrajavidyalaya University, Thailand's oldest higher education institute for Buddhist monks, is located within the temple. This is one of the most important universities in Thailand split into faculty of Human Sciences, Social sciences, International programme and graduate college. The first class was admitted in 1889 and
    8.50
    2 votes
    92
    Bongeunsa

    Bongeunsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Bongeunsa is a Buddhist temple in Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea. It was founded in 794 during the reign of King Wonseong by the monk Yeon-hoe, then the highest ranking monk of Silla, and originally named Kyongseoungsa. It is located on the slope of Sudo Mountain in Samseong-dong, across the street from the COEX Mall. During the Joseon Dynasty, Buddhism in Korea was severely repressed. However, Bongeunsa was reconstructed in 1498 under the patronage of a Joseon Queen. With the support of Queen Munjeong, who revived Buddhism in Korea for a short time in the mid-16th century, it became the main temple of the Korean Seon (Zen) sect of Buddhism from 1551 through 1936. Monk Bo-wu was appointed head of the temple in 1548 by Queen Munjeong but was killed soon afterwards as the anti-Buddhist factions regained dominance in Korea towards the end of Queen Munjeong's rule. From 1552-1564 it was the center of the Buddhist National Exam. A fire in 1939 destroyed most of the buildings, and other parts of the temple were destroyed during the Korean War. Fortunately, one of the very few halls which escaped destruction during the Korean War continues to hold the woodblock carvings of the Flower
    7.33
    3 votes
    93
    Chua Buu Mon

    Chua Buu Mon

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Chua Buu Mon is a Buddhist Temple located on Proctor Street in Port Arthur, Texas. Leader/Title: Most Venerable Huyen Viet Ethnic Composition: Mostly Vietnamese, with a growing non-Vietnamese population. Resident Monks: Rev. Huyen Viet, Abbot, Rev. Bui Thanh Nhan (Thich Tri Quang), and Bhante Kassapa Bhikkhu, Assistant Abbot. Tradition: Theravada The temple holds regular services in Vietnamese at 11 a.m. on Sundays and English on Sundays at 2 p.m. with a Pali chanting class that follows the service at 3 p.m. Also, there is a weekly meditation class every Wednesday at 7 p.m. There are many festivals held throughout the year including the very popular and well visited Lotus Blossom Festival, which also is part of the Vesak celebration. During this celebration, the temple's well-known water gardens are visited by upwards of several thousand people over one weekend in early June. The congregation consists of Vietnamese immigrants and their children. Since the meditation classes have started in February 2007, a medium-sized group of non-Vietnamese Americans have started attending regularly. This temple has the largest amount of non-Vietnamese speaking people in a Theravada Vietnamese
    7.33
    3 votes
    94
    Drepung Monastery

    Drepung Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Drepung Monastery (Wylie: 'bras spungs dgon ),(literally “Rice Heap” monastery), located at the foot of Mount Gephel, is one of the "great three" Gelukpa university monasteries of Tibet. The other two are Ganden and Sera. Drepung is the largest of all Tibetan monasteries and is located on the Gambo Utse mountain, five kilometers from the western suburb of Lhasa. Freddie Spencer Chapman reported, after his 1936-37 trip to Tibet, that Drepung was at that time the largest monastery in the world, and housed 7,700 monks, "but sometimes as many as 10,000 monks." Since the 1950s, Drepung Monastery, along with its peers Ganden and Sera, have lost much of their independence and spiritual credibility in the eyes of Tibetans since they operate under the close watch of the Chinese security services. All three were reestablished in exile in the 1950s in Karnataka state in south India. Drepung and Ganden are in Mundgod and Sera is in Bylakuppe. It was founded in 1416 by Jamyang Choge Tashi Palden (1397–1449), one of Tsongkhapa's main disciples, and it was named after the sacred abode in South India of Shridhanyakataka. Drepung was the principal seat of the Gelugpa school and it retained the
    7.33
    3 votes
    95
    Ganden Monastery

    Ganden Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Ganden Monastery (also Gaden or Gandain) or Ganden Namgyeling is one of the 'great three' Gelukpa university monasteries of Tibet, located at the top of Wangbur Mountain, Tagtse County, 36 kilometers ENE from the Potala Palace in Lhasa, at an altitude of 4,300m. (The other two 'great monasteries' are Sera Monastery and Drepung Monastery.) Its full name is Ganden Namgyal Ling (dga' ldan rmam rgyal gling). Ganden means "joyful" and is the Tibetan name for Tuṣita, the heaven where the bodhisattva Maitreya is said to reside. Namgyal Ling means "victorious temple". It was the original monastery of the Geluk order, founded by Je Tsongkhapa himself in 1409, and traditionally considered to be the seat of Geluk administrative and political power. The Ganden Tripa or 'throne-holder of Ganden' is the head of the Gelukpa school. Tsongkhapa's preserved body was entombed there in a silver and gold encrusted tomb by his disciples in 1419. Being the farthest from Lhasa of the three university monasteries, Ganden traditionally had a smaller population with some 6,000 monks in the early 20th century (although Waddell reports an estimate of about 3,300 in the 1890s and there were, apparently only
    7.33
    3 votes
    96
    Hwangnyongsa

    Hwangnyongsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Hwangnyongsa, or Hwangnyong Temple, is the name of a former Buddhist temple in the city of Gyeongju, South Korea. Built in the 6th century, it was the center of state-sponsored Buddhism during the Silla and Unified Silla eras. Its name means "Golden/Yellow Dragon Temple" or "Emperor/Imperial Dragon Temple." Archaeological excavations and other scientific studies of the temple began in April 1976 (OCPRI 1984) and continue today. Hwangnyongsa was built during the Silla period, under the patronage of the Silla royal family, on a plain encircled by mountains near the royal palace compound of Banwolseong (Half-Moon Palace). Construction began in 553 under the reign of King Jinheung, and was not fully completed until 644. King Jinheung originally intended for the temple to be the site of a new palace but when a dragon was seen on the proposed site, a temple was commissioned instead. Hwangnyongsa was designed to be a place where monks prayed for the welfare of the nation by asking for the divine protection of the Buddha and a means to impress foreign dignitaries. Following the defeat of Baekje in the 660s, the Baekje architect, Abiji, was commissioned to build a nine-story wooden pagoda
    7.33
    3 votes
    97
    Mahabodhi Temple

    Mahabodhi Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Mahabodhi Temple (महाबोधि मंदिर) (Literally: "Great Awakening Temple") is a Buddhist temple in Bodh Gaya, the location where Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, is said to have attained enlightenment. Bodh Gaya (located in Gaya district) is located about 96 km (60 mi) from Patna, Bihar state, India. Next to the temple, to its western side, is the holy Bodhi tree. In the Pali Canon, the site is called Bodhimanda, and the monastery there the Bodhimanda Vihara. The tallest tower is 55 metres (180 ft) tall. The construction uses the styles of Dravidian Architecture, as opposed to Nagara Temple styles. The site of the Bodhi tree at Bodhigaya is, according to the Buddhist commentarial scriptures, the same for all Buddhas. According to the Jatakas, it forms the navel of the earth, and no other place can support the weight of the Buddha's attainment According to Buddhist mythology, if no Bodhi tree grows at the site, the ground around the Bodhi tree is devoid of all plants for a distance of one royal karīsa and nothing can travel in the air immediately above it, not even Sakka. Buddhist mythology also states that when the world is destroyed at the end of a kalpa, the Bodhimanda is the last
    7.33
    3 votes
    98
    Mindroling

    Mindroling

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Mindrolling Monastery (pronounced MINH-droh-lyng) is one of the six major monasteries of the Nyingma school in Tibet. It was founded by Rigzin Terdak Lingpa in 1676. Tendrak Lingpa's lineage is known as the Nyo lineage. Mindrolling, in Tibetan means "Place of Perfect Emancipation". It is located in Zhanang County, Shannan Prefecture, Tibet Autonomous Region, China, approximately 43 kilometers east of the Lhasa airport, on the south side of the Tsangpo river. Mindrolling was heavily damaged in 1718 by the Dzungar Mongols from East Turkistan. It was rebuilt during the reign of the Seventh Dalai Lama (1708-1757). Dungsay Rinchen-namgyel and Jetsunma Mingyur Paldron, the son and daughter of Terdak Lingpa, supervised its reconstruction. For nearly 300 years its monastic university trained Nyingma scholars and yogis from all over Tibet. At Mindrolling, special emphasis was placed on the learning of Buddhist scriptures, astronomy, Tibetan lunar calendar, calligraphy, rhetoric, and Traditional Tibetan medicine. Monks traditionally studied thirteen major sutra and tantra texts of the Nyingma, and learned the practices stemming from various terma, especially from the lineage of Terdak
    7.33
    3 votes
    99
    Nan Hua Temple

    Nan Hua Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Nan Hua Temple (南華寺, Nanhua Si) is the largest Buddhist temple and seminary in Africa, and is situated in the Cultura Park suburb of Bronkhorstspruit, South Africa. It is the African headquarters of the Fo Guang Shan (Buddha's Light Mountain) Order, covering over 600 acres (2.4 km). Fo Guang Shan was established in 1967 by Venerable Master Hsing Yun, and is a Mahayana Chinese Buddhism monastic order. The Temple, like its mother order in Taiwan, follows the Linji Chan school of Buddhism as well as the Pure Land School. The Temple can trace its roots back to 8 March 1992, when the Bronkhorstspruit City Council, under its chief executive and former church minister, Dr Hennie Senekal, who had previously visited Taiwan to promote investment opportunities in his town, donated six hectares of land to the Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Order for a Chinese Buddhist cultural and educational complex. The Fo Guang Shan Religious Affairs Committee subsequently sent Venerable Hui Li to be the founding abbot of the temple, whose main aim is to promote Buddhism on the African continent. Construction began in October 1992; the eventual cost of the temple complex was sixty million South African rand. Since
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Longxing Monastery

    Longxing Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Longxing Monastery or Longxing Temple (Chinese: 隆興寺; pinyin: Lóngxīng Sì) is an ancient Buddhist monastery located near the town of Zhengding in Hebei Province, China, approximately 15 kilometers north of the provincial capital of Shijiazhuang. It has been referred to as the "First Temple south of Beijing". The monastery was first built in 586 AD, during the Sui Dynasty. Its original name was Longcang monastery (Chinese: 龙藏寺; pinyin: Lóngcáng Sì). One of the oldest stelae on the grounds of the monastery, the "Longcangsi Stele" (Chinese: 龙藏寺碑; pinyin: Lóng Cáng Sì Bēi), dates from the year the monastery's foundation. Much of it was reconstructed during the Song Dynasty (960-1279 AD). Following a common pattern, the monastery complex features a central axis along which a sequence of buildings and focal points is arranged. The first building is the Hall of the Heavenly Kings. At the opposite end of the axis is the Main Hall (Chinese: 大悲阁; pinyin: Dàbēi Gé), a 33-meter-high wooden structure, which houses a bronze statue of Guan Yin. This bronze was built during the early years of the Song Dynasty; its height exceeds 20 meters. Inside the hall, a staircase leads around the statue
    6.25
    4 votes
    101
    Songyue Pagoda

    Songyue Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Songyue Pagoda (Chinese: 嵩岳寺塔 sōng-yuè sì-tǎ), constructed in 523 AD, is located at the Songyue Monastery on Mount Song, in Henan province, China. Built during the Northern Wei Dynasty, this pagoda is one of the few intact sixth-century pagodas in China and is also the earliest known Chinese brick pagoda. Most structures from that period were made of wood and have not survived. The spread of Buddhism dramatically influenced Chinese architecture. By the sixth century, Buddhism had spread with tremendous momentum throughout China: Chinese culture was adjusting and adapting its traditions to include Buddhism worship. The Chinese transformed the rounded earthen mound of the South Asian stupa into the towering pagoda to house the sacred buried relics of Buddha at its core. The pagoda has had a changing shape over time from its Indian Buddhist origins to its form in China. The unique many-sided shape of the Songyue Pagoda suggests that it represents an early attempt to merge the Chinese architecture of straight edges with the circular style of Buddhism from the Indian subcontinent. The perimeter of the pagoda decreases as it rises, as this is seen in Indian and Central Asian Buddhist
    6.25
    4 votes
    102
    Bongwon Temple

    Bongwon Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Bongwon Temple (or Bongwonsa) is a South Korean Buddhist temple in Bongwon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul near Yonsei University. Situated to the northeast of the university on the hillside of Ahn Mountain, this is the head temple of the Taego Order of Korean Buddhism. Originally founded in 889 by Master Doseon and located on the current site of Yonsei University, it moved to its present location in 1748. Part of the temple was destroyed in 1950 during the Korean War. In 1966 a new hall was built but this was later moved to another part of the city. In 1991 while a new Hall of 3000 Buddhas was being built, a fire destroyed the Main Buddha Hall, which was rebuilt in 1994. In the summer of 2004, it was discovered that serial killer Yoo Young-Cheol had buried over one dozen bodies of his victims on the temple grounds. Currently more than 50 monks live at the temple and are engaged in education and social welfare work.
    7.00
    3 votes
    103
    Daian-ji

    Daian-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Daian-ji (大安寺) was founded during the Asuka period and is one of the Seven Great Temples of Nara, Japan. The Nihon Shoki records the founding of the Kudara Dai-ji (百済大寺), predecessor of the Daian-ji, in 639 during the reign of Emperor Jomei. A nine story pagoda was added shortly afterwards. Moved during the reign of Emperor Temmu, excavations have uncovered the foundations of the site of the Daikandai-ji (大官大寺), as it was then known, seven hundred metres to the south of Mount Kagu. Like the Yakushi-ji, and Gangō-ji, the temple relocated to the new capital of Heijō-kyō in 716/7, and it was rebuilt as the Daian-ji in 729. Its importance declined when the capital moved again to Kyoto at the end of the Nara period. A succession of fires, a typhoon in 1459 and earthquakes in 1585 and 1596 destroyed most of the temple. The stone bases of the former twin pagodas were removed for reuse at Kashihara Jingū in 1889, while the ruins of the other buildings lie in adjacent properties. The temple houses nine statues in a style known as Daianji-yoshiki, but the acclaimed statue of Sakyamuni, said by the twelfth-century Oe no Chikamichi in Shichidaiji Junrei Shiki to have been the finest work in
    7.00
    3 votes
    104
    Mount Omine

    Mount Omine

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Mount Ōmine (大峰山, Ōmine-san), is a sacred mountain in Nara, Japan, famous for its three tests of courage. Officially known as Mount Sanjō (山上ヶ岳, Sanjō-ga-take), it is more popularly known as Mount Ōmine due to its prominence in the Ōmine mountain range. It is located in Yoshino-Kumano National Park in the Kansai region, Honshū, Japan. The temple Ōminesanji, located at the top of the mountain, is the headquarters of the Shugendō sect of Japanese Buddhism and the entire mountain is part of a pilgrimage and training ground for the yamabushi. The monastery at Mount Ōmine was founded in the 8th century by En no Gyōja, as a home for his new religion of Shugendō. Shugendo literally means "the path of training and testing," and is based on the self-actualization of spiritual power in experiential form through challenging and rigorous ritualistic tests of courage and devotion known as shugyo. During the Meiji period, in 1872 the imperial government forbade all "superstitious practices" including belief in folkloric creatures such as Yōkai and Yūrei, as well as gender bans on sacred mountains such as Mount Fuji and all of the rituals of Mount Ōmine. During this time the mountain was closed,
    7.00
    3 votes
    105
    Shwethalyaung Buddha

    Shwethalyaung Buddha

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Shwethalyaung Buddha (Burmese: ရွှေသာလျှောင်းဘုရား [ʃwèθàljáʊɴ pʰəjá]; officially ရွှေသာလျောင်းရုပ်ပွားတော်ကြီး) is a reclining Buddha in the west side of Bago (Pegu), Burma (Myanmar). The Buddha, which has a length of 55 m (180 ft) and a height of 16 m (52 ft), is the second largest Buddha in the world, after the 74 m reclining Buddha in Dawei (Tavoy). The Buddha is believed to have been built in 994, during the reign of Mon King Migadepa. It was lost in 1757 when Pegu was pillaged. During British colonial rule, in 1880, the Shwethalyaung Buddha was rediscovered under a cover of jungle growth. Restoration began in 1881, and Buddha's mosaic pillows (on its left side) were added in 1930.
    7.00
    3 votes
    106
    Silleuksa

    Silleuksa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Shilleuksa (also written as Silleuksa and Shilleuk-sa) is a Korean Buddhist temple situated against a low hill on the north side of the river Namhan, two miles east of Yeoju in Gyeonggi Province, approximately one-hour southeast of Seoul. The only riverside temple in Korea, Shilleuksa is a sacred pilgrimage site and a repository of seven Treasures. A 500-year-old aromatic juniper tree and a 600-year-old ginkgo tree stand on the temple grounds. Founded in circa 580 by Silla Dynasty monk Wonhyo, Shilleuksa was enlarged, burned, and rededicated several times. Shilleuksa was made a prayer sanctuary to the royal mausoleum of King Sejong the Great in 1469 (himself moved from Seoul that year), during the reign of King Seongjong. Often referred to as the "wall temple" because of an impressive brick pagoda towering high above, Shilleuksa is small by standard measure. A six-tier brick pagoda overlooks the river, one of a handful of brick pagodas in the country (T. #226). Nearby is a Silla Dynasty memorial stone stela (T. #230) whose inscription concerns a library that once stood on the premises of the preservation of wood printing blocks of the sutras. In the center courtyard is a seven-tier
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Sri Dalada Maligawa

    Sri Dalada Maligawa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sri Dalada Maligawa (Sinhala: ශ්‍රී දළදා මාළිගාව) or the Temple of the Sacred Tooth Relic is a Buddhist temple in the city of Kandy, Sri Lanka. It is located in the royal palace complex which houses the relic of the tooth of Buddha. Since ancient times, the relic has played an important role in local politics because it is believed that whoever holds the relic holds the governance of the country. Kandy was the last capital of the Sri Lankan kings and is a UNESCO world heritage site partly due to the temple. Monks of the two chapters of Malwatte and Asgiriya conduct daily worship in the inner chamber of the temple. Rituals are performed three times daily: at dawn, at noon and in the evenings. On Wednesdays there is a symbolic bathing of the Sacred Relic with an herbal preparation made from scented water and fragrant flowers, called Nanumura Mangallaya. This holy water is believed to contain healing powers and is distributed among those present. The temple sustained damage from bombings at various times but was fully restored each time. After the parinirvana of Gautama Buddha, the tooth relic was preserved in Kalinga and smuggled to the island by Princess Hemamali and her husband,
    7.00
    3 votes
    108
    Thommanon

    Thommanon

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Thommanon is one of a pair of Hindu temples built during the reign of Suryavarman II (from 1113–1150) at Angkor, Cambodia. This small and elegant temple is located east of the Gate of Victory of Angkor Thom and north of Chau Say Tevoda. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, inscribed by UNESCO in 1992 titled Angkor. The temple is dedicated to Shiva and Vishnu. Scholars studying the carvings of the devatas in Thommanon have concluded that Thommanon was built around the time when work on Angkor Wat was begun. However, there is some disagreement as to the precise date it was built. Some believe that the distinctive carvings of females, known as devatas indicate that they were built during the reign of Jayavarman VI (1080–1113 AD), some time at the end of the 11th century. However, there is greater agreement, especially given the scholarly studies that it was built by Suryavarman II around the time of Angkor Wat and Beng Mealea from 1,113–1,150 AD The Vaishnavite cult was adopted in Cambodia by Jayavarman II and his son Jayavarman III. Under these two rulers, the shaivite cult was subsumed with the Vaishnavite cult in the temples such as the Thommaman, Beng, Melea, Chausey,
    7.00
    3 votes
    109
    Jokhang

    Jokhang

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Jokhang, (Tibetan: ཇོ་ཁང།, Wylie: Jo-khang, ZYPY: Qokang; Chinese: 大昭寺; pinyin: Dàzhāosì), also called the Qokang Monastery, Jokang, Jokhang Temple, Jokhang Monastery or Zuglagkang (Tibetan: གཙུག་ལག་ཁང༌།, Wylie: gtsug-lag-khang, ZYPY: Zuglagkang; also Tsuklakang), is located on Barkhor Square in Lhasa. For most Tibetans it is the most sacred and important temple in Tibet. It is in some regards pan-sectarian, but is presently controlled by the Gelug school. The temple's architectural style is a mixture of Indian vihara design, Chinese Tang Dynasty design, and Nepalese design. It was founded during the reign of king Songsten Gampo. According to tradition, the temple was built for the two brides of the king, Princess Wencheng of the Chinese Tang Dynasty and Princess Bhrikuti of Nepal. Both wives are said to have brought important Buddhist statues and images from China and Nepal to Tibet as part of their dowries, and they were housed here. Many Nepalese artists worked to construct this temple. During the Bon period of Tibet the temple was (and sometimes still is), called the Zuglagkang (House of Religious Science or House of Wisdom). The term zuglag refers to the 'sciences' such as
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Mampuku-ji

    Mampuku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Ōbaku-san Manpuku-ji (黄檗山萬福寺, Manpuku Temple on Mt. Ōbaku) is a temple located in Uji, Kyoto. It is the head temple of the Japanese Ōbaku Zen sect, named after Wanfu Temple in Fujian, China. The mountain is likewise named after Mount Huangbo, where the Chinese temple is situated. The temple was founded in 1661 by the Chinese monk Yinyuan Longqi (Ingen) and his disciple Muyan. In 1664 control of the temple passed to Muyan, after many Chinese monks followed as head priests. Only the fourteenth priest and his successors are Japanese. The temple structures were constructed in Chinese Ming style. The arrangement of buildings also follows Ming Dynasty architectural style, representing an image of a dragon. The temple features an exemplary gyoban (fish board, used to toll the hours). The temple treasure house contains a complete collection of Buddhist scriptures completed in 1678 and comprising approximately 60,000 printing blocks, which are still in use. The production of the printing blocks was funded by donations collected throughout the country for many years. The temple's main statue is a seated Gautama Buddha. Sculptures by the Chinese sculptor known as Han Do-sei and latticed
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Yonghe Temple

    Yonghe Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Yonghe Temple 雍和宮, also known as the "Palace of Peace and Harmony Lama Temple", the "Yonghe Lamasery", or - popularly - the "Lama Temple" is a temple and monastery of the Geluk School of Tibetan Buddhism located in the northeastern part of Beijing, China. It is one of the largest and most important Tibetan Buddhist monasteries in the world. The building and the artworks of the temple is a combination of Han Chinese and Tibetan styles. Building work on the Yonghegong Temple started in 1694 during the Qing Dynasty. It originally served as an official residence for court eunuchs. It was then converted into the court of the Prince Yong (Yin Zhen), a son of the Kangxi Emperor and himself the future Yongzheng Emperor. After Yongzheng's ascension to the throne in 1722, half of the building was converted into a lamasery, a monastery for monks of Tibetan Buddhism. The other half remained an imperial palace. After Yongzheng's death in 1735, his coffin was placed in the temple. The Qianlong Emperor, Yongzheng's successor, gave the temple imperial status signified by having its turquoise tiles replaced with yellow tiles which were reserved for the emperor. Subsequently, the monastery
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    International Buddhist Temple

    International Buddhist Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The International Buddhist Temple (also 觀音寺 in Chinese; Guan Yin Sì in pinyin; Guan Yin Temple) is located in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada. It is a Chinese Buddhist temple run by the International Buddhist Society. While the Society officially practices Mahayana Buddhism, the temple is open to Theravada Buddhist affiliates and visitors, as well as visitors of all religious and cultural backgrounds. In 1979, two Buddhists from Hong Kong donated land and funds to the cause of building an authentic Chinese Buddhist temple in North America. The International Buddhist Society was established in 1981 for this cause by the Venerable Guan Cheng and five other individuals. The International Buddhist Temple officially opened to the public after two years, when its Main Hall was completed. Thousands of people, including Richmond's mayor and Member of Parliament, attended the inauguration ceremony in 1986. The International Buddhist Society is a non-profit organization and a registered Canadian charity. It sponsors charitable programs both in Canada and abroad. Some of the Society's efforts include: The Society also hosts free events for the community, such as Senior's Day celebrations
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Khoo Kongsi

    Khoo Kongsi

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Khoo Kongsi (Chinese: 邱公司; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Khu-kong-si) is a large Chinese clanhouse with elaborate and highly ornamented architecture, a mark of the dominant presence of the Chinese in Penang, Malaysia. The famous Khoo Kongsi is the grandest clan temple in the country. It is also one of the city's major historic attraction. The clan temple has retained its authentic historic setting, which includes an association building, a traditional theatre and the late 19th century rowhouses for clan members, all clustered around a granite-paved square. It is located in Cannon Square in the heart of the oldest part of the city of George Town, in the midst of narrow, winding lanes and quaint-looking pre-War houses exuding a palpable old world charm. The Khoo Kongsi is a clan association of the Leong San Tong (Dragon Mountain Hall) clan, whose forefathers came from Sin Kang clan village (now known as Xiangcheng) in Hokkien province. The Khoos were among the wealthy Straits Chinese traders of 17th century Malacca and early Penang. In the 19th century, the clan complex resembled a miniature clan village, with its own self-government as well as educational, financial, welfare and social
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Longhua temple

    Longhua temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Longhua Temple (Chinese: 龙华寺; pinyin: Lónghúa Sì, literally "Lustre of the Dragon Temple") is a Buddhist Temple dedicated to the Maitreya Buddha located in Shanghai, China. Although most of the present-day buildings date from later reconstructions, the temple preserves the architectural design of a Song Dynasty monastery of the Buddhist Chan sect. It is the largest, most authentic and complete ancient temple complex in the city of Shanghai. The temple was first built in 242 AD, during the Three Kingdoms Period. According to a legend, Sun Quan (孙权), King of the Kingdom of Wu, had obtained Sharira relics, which are cremated remains of the Buddha. To house these precious relics, the king ordered the construction of 13 pagodas. Longhua Pagoda (Longhua Ta), part of the Longhua temple complex, is said to have been one of them. Like the function of the pagoda, the name of the temple also has its origin in a local legend according to which a dragon once appeared on the site. The temple was destroyed by war towards the end of the Tang Dynasty and rebuilt in 977 AD, during the Northern Song Dynasty. (According to another version of the story, as contained in Song and Yuan Dynasty local
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    1 votes
    115
    Wat Phra Dhammakaya

    Wat Phra Dhammakaya

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Phra Dhammakaya (Thai: วัดพระธรรมกาย) is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Khlong Luang District, Pathum Thani Province north of Bangkok, Thailand. It was established on Magha Puja Day, 20 February 1970, on an eighty-acre (320,000 m²) plot of land donated by Lady Prayat Phaetayapongsa-visudhathibodi by a group led by the monk Phrarajbhavanavisudh and his teacher Chandra Khonnokyoong. The site, sixteen kilometres north of Don Mueang International Airport, was originally called 'Soon Buddacakk-patipatthamm' (Thai: ศูนย์พุทธจักรปฏิบัติธรรม). From acidic paddy fields, a woodland was created: a parkland for meditators. The foundation stone for the main chapel laid by H.R.H. Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn on behalf of H.M. the King in December 1977 becoming officially recognized as a temple by the Thai government in 1978 originally under the name 'Wat Voranee Dhammakayaram'. The Main Chapel was completed in 1982 and the ceremony for the allocation of the chapel boundary (sima) was held three years later. While the temple was under construction, the Dhammadayada ordination scheme gave training to hundreds of university students, a steadily increasing number of whom swelled the number of
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Jikjisa

    Jikjisa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Jikjisa is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. It is located on the slopes of Hwangaksan in Daehang-myeon, Gimcheon, in the province of Gyeongsangbuk-do. It may be one of the oldest temples in South Korea. Jikjisa is relatively well-connected to train and bus service. Jikjisa Station is located at the foot of the mountain, along the Gyeongbu Line railroad. It is served only by the local commuter trains, which run twice daily in each direction. Jikjisa is believed to have been first constructed by the Goguryeo monk Ado in the year 418, long before Buddhism gained general acceptance in Silla. Jikjisa was largely destroyed during the Seven Year War in the 1590s. The rebuilding lasted from 1610 to about 1670.
    6.67
    3 votes
    117
    Linggu Temple

    Linggu Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Linggu Temple (Chinese: 灵谷寺; pinyin: línggǔ sì) is a Buddhist temple in Nanjing, Jiangsu, China. The temple was described as 'the best Buddhist temple in the world'. It was now surrounded by a large park. The temple was first built in 515 under the reign of the Liang Dynasty (502-557). It used to lie at the northeast foot of Mount Zhongshan, i.e. where Ming Xiaoling Mausoleum now locates, since Emperor Zhu Yuanzhang chose the place to be his mausoleum and then the temple was moved to the present place. The temple was named by Emperor Zhu Yuanzhang himself. It used to be large and covered an area of over 300,000 square metres. Later it was destroyed in warfare under the reign of Emperor Xianfeng and rebuilt under the reign of Emperor Tongzhi in the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911). In the temple, except for Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, Monk Xuanzang and his relic were enshrined and worshiped. Wuliang Hall, or Beamless Hall, was constructed in 1381, and is 22 metres high and 53.8 metres wide. The hall enjoys high reputation for its special architectural techniques. It has three archways on the front and rear sides respectively. The structure was built with bricks from the bottom to the top
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Phap Hoa Temple

    Phap Hoa Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Phap Hoa Temple (Vietnamese: Chuà Pháp Hoa,  listen), meaning Dharma Lotus Temple, is a Buddhist temple located at 20 Butler Avenue, Pennington, South Australia, 5013. Established in 1978, it moved to its current location in December 1989. It is a member of the United Vietnamese Buddhist Congregation and the head is the Most Venerable Thich Nhu Hue, and the abbot is the Reverend Thich Vien Tri. Phap Hoa Temple was established in 1978 at a small house located at 83 Addison Road, Rosewater, South Australia by a group of Vietnamese immigrants, led by Nguyen Van Tuoi for the purpose of attending to the spiritual needs of immigrant Vietnamese Buddhists. The Most Venerable Thich Nhu Hue was invited to come from Japan to direct the temple. Due to the small size, a search for a plot of larger land to construct a temple was undertaken, and building of the temple in its current location began on a 5000 m² plot on 19 March 1984. The main hall of the temple was opened on 23 December 1989. On 26 June 2003 the main hall suffered extensive damage, when an intruder irreparably vandalized the majority of the statues and decorations. This required the replacement of a large number of statues. Along
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Putuo Zongcheng Temple

    Putuo Zongcheng Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Putuo Zongcheng Temple (Manchu: ᠪᡠᡩᠠᠯᠠ ᡳ ᡨᠣᠪ ᡧᠠᠴᡳᠨ ᡳ ᠮᡠᡴ᠋ᡨᡝᡥᡝᠨ; Chinese: 普陀宗 乘之廟; pinyin: Pǔtuó Zōngchéng zhī miào; Mongolian: ᠪᠤᠳᠠᠯᠠ ᠶᠢᠨ ᠲᠥᡋ ᠱᠠᠰᠢᠨ ᠤ ᠰᠦᠮ᠎ᠡ᠃; Tibetan: གྲུ་འཛིན་་་ བསྟན་པའི་རྩ་ བའི་ལྷ་ཁང༌།, ZYPY: Chunzin Dainbaiza Pailhakang) of Chengde, Hebei province, China is a Qing Dynasty era Buddhist temple complex built between 1767 and 1771, during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor (1735–1796). It is located near the Chengde Mountain Resort, which is south of the Putuo Zongcheng. Along with the equally famed Puning Temple, it is one of the Eight Outer Temples of Chengde. The temple was modeled after the Potala Palace of Tibet, the old sanctuary of the Dalai Lama built a century earlier. Since it was modeled after the Potala palace, the temple represents a fusion of Chinese and Tibetan architectural styles. The temple complex covers a surface area of some 220,000 square metres (2,400,000 sq ft), making it one of the largest in China. Many of its halls and pavilions are adorned with copper and gold tiled roofs, adding to the splendor of the site. The Putuo Zongcheng Temple is part of the "Eight Outer Temples" located in Chengde, which are part of the World Heritage List
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Gangō-ji

    Gangō-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Gangō-ji (元興寺) is an ancient Buddhist temple, that was once one of the powerful Nanto Shichi Daiji, in Nara, Japan. The original foundation of the temple was by Soga no Umako in Asuka, as Asuka-dera. The temple was moved to Nara in 718, following the capital relocation to Heijō-kyō. Gangō-ji initially held as many as seven halls and pagodas in its precincts, which occupied a wide area within what is now Naramachi, the preserved district of modern Nara city. The original architecture was however, lost over time and notably in fires during the 15th through 19th centuries (Muromachi and Edo periods respectively). The best preserved part of the temple is known as Gangō-ji Gokurakubō (元興寺極楽坊) and belongs to the Shingon-risshū school. This site is a part of a group of temples, shrines and other places in Nara that UNESCO has designated as World Heritage Site "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara", and holds three national treasures: Most of the destroyed complex ground has been altered and melded with parts of Naramachi over the course of time. Another small part of the temple remains today as the other Gangō-ji, of a Kegon school but with few remainders in terms of architecture. The
    7.50
    2 votes
    121
    Jogyesa

    Jogyesa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Jogyesa is the chief temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism, becoming so in 1936. It thus plays a leading role in the current state of Seon Buddhism in South Korea. The temple was first established in 1395, at the dawn of the Joseon Dynasty; the modern temple was founded in 1910 and initially called "Hwanggaksa." The name was changed to "Taegosa" during the period of Japanese rule, and then to the present name in 1954. Jogyesa is located in Gyeonji-dong, Jongno-gu, in central Seoul. Natural monument 9, an ancient white pine tree, is located within the temple grounds. Jogyesa came to the attention of the international news media in December 1998 due to several monks occupying the temple in a power struggle between factions of the Jogye Order. In the end, riot police were called in to take control of the temple and oust the protestors after they had occupied the building for more than 40 days.
    7.50
    2 votes
    122
    Kan'ei-ji

    Kan'ei-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tōeizan Kan'ei-ji Endon-in (東叡山寛永寺円頓院) (also spelled Kan'eiji or Kaneiji) is a Tendai Buddhist temple in Tokyo, Japan, founded in 1625 by Tenkai. The main object of worship is Yakushirurikō Nyorai (薬師瑠璃光如来). Because it was one of the two Tokugawa bodaiji (funeral temple; the other was Zōjō-ji) and because it was destroyed in the closing days of the war that put an end to the Tokugawa shogunate, its name is inextricably linked to that of the Tokugawa shoguns. Named after the Kan'ei era during which it was erected, this great complex used to occupy the entire heights north and east of Shinobazu Pond and the plains where Ueno Station now stands. It used to have immense wealth, power and prestige, and it consisted of over 30 buildings. Of the 15 Tokugawa shōguns, six are buried here. The Shinobazu Pond itself and the Bentendō temple which stands on its island used to be an integral part of Kan'eiji. Tenkai, liking Lake Biwa, had Benten Island built in imitation of Chikubushima, and then the Bentendō on it. At the time the island was accessible only by boat, but later a stone bridge was added on the east, making it possible to walk to it. The temple was destroyed during World War II,
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    2 votes
    123
    Kek Lok Si

    Kek Lok Si

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Kek Lok Si Temple (simplified Chinese: 极乐寺; traditional Chinese: 極樂寺; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Ki̍k-lo̍k-sī; Penang Hokkien for "Temple of Supreme Bliss" or "Temple of Sukhavati") is a Buddhist temple situated in Air Itam in Penang and is one of the best known temples on the island. It is the largest Buddhist temple in Southeast Asia. The temple is heavily commercialised with shops at every level and inside the main temple complexes. Mahayana Buddhism and traditional Chinese rituals blend into a harmonious whole, both in the temple architecture and artwork as well as in the daily activities of worshippers. The construction of the temple began in 1890 and was inspired by the chief monk of the Goddess of Mercy Temple at Pitt Street. With the support of the consular representative of China in Penang, the project received the sanction of the Emperor Guangxu, who bestowed a tablet and gift of 70,000 volumes of the Imperial Edition of the Buddhist Sutras. The primary benefactor of the Kek Lok Si Temple in 1906 was none other than Kapitan Chung Keng Quee. In 1930, the seven storey main pagoda of the temple or the Pagoda of 10,000 Buddhas, was completed. This pagoda combines a Chinese octagonal
    7.50
    2 votes
    124
    Nanzen-ji

    Nanzen-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Nanzen-ji (南禅寺, Nanzen-ji), or Zuiryusan Nanzen-ji, formerly Zenrin-ji (禅林寺, Zenrin-ji), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. Emperor Kameyama established it in 1291 on the site of his previous detached palace. It is also the headquarters of the Nanzen-ji branch of Rinzai Zen. Zenkei Shibayama, who provided a popular commentary on the Mumonkan, was an abbot of the monastery. The precincts of Nanzen-ji are a nationally-designated Historic Site and the Hōjō gardens a Place of Scenic Beauty. Nanzen-ji was founded in the middle Heian period. Nanzen-ji is not itself considered one of the "five great Zen temples of Kyoto"; however, it does play an important role in the "Five Mountain System" which was modified from Chinese roots. Tenryū-ji (天龍寺, Tenryū-ji) is considered to be one of the so-called Kyoto Gozan (京都五山, Kyōto gozan) or "five great Zen temples of Kyoto", along with Shōkoku-ji (相国寺, Shōkoku-ji), Kennin-ji (建仁寺, Kennin-ji), Tōfuku-ji (東福寺, Tōfuku-ji), and Manju-ji (満寿寺, Manju-ji). The head temple presiding over the Gozan in Kyoto is Nanzen-ji. After the completion of Shōkoku-ji by Ashikaga Yoshimitsu in 1386, a new ranking system was created with Nanzen-ji at the top and in
    7.50
    2 votes
    125
    Pha That Luang

    Pha That Luang

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Pha That Luang (Lao: ພຣະທາດຫຼວງ, IPA: [pʰā tʰâːt lwǎːŋ] 'Great Stupa') is a gold-covered large Buddhist stupa in the centre of Vientiane, Laos. Since its initial establishment suggested to be in the 3rd century, the stupa has undergone several reconstructions until the 1930s due to foreign invasions to the area. It is generally regarded as the most important national monument in Laos and a national symbol. Pha That Luang according to the Lao people was originally built as an Indic temple in the 3rd century. Buddhist missionaries from the Mauryan Empire are believed to have been sent by the Emperor Ashoka, including Bury Chan or Praya Chanthabury Pasithisak and five Arahata monks who brought a holy relic (believed to be the breast bone) of Lord Buddha to the stupa. It was rebuilt in the 13th century as a Khmer temple which fell into ruin. In the mid-16th century, King Setthathirat relocated his capital from Luang Prabang to Vientiane and ordered construction of Pha That Luang in 1566. It was rebuilt about 4 km from the centre of Vientiane at the end of That Luang Road and named Pha That Luang. The bases had a length of 69 metres each and was 45 metres high, and was surrounded by 30
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    2 votes
    126
    Sudeoksa

    Sudeoksa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sudeoksa is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. It is located on the southern slopes of Deoksungsan in Deoksan-myeon, Yesan County, in the province of Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea. Sudeoksa was one of very few temples not destroyed during the Imjin Invasion in the 1590s. Its main hall is South Korea's oldest wooden building, having been constructed during the Goryeo dynasty in 1308. This hall, or daeungjeon (H:大雄殿), is South Korean National Treasure 49. Media related to Sudeoksa at Wikimedia Commons
    7.50
    2 votes
    127
    Tiger Temple

    Tiger Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tiger Temple, or Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua, is a Theravada Buddhist temple in western Thailand that was founded in 1994 as a forest temple and sanctuary for wild animals, among them several tigers, mostly Indo-chinese Tigers. The temple is located in the Saiyok district of Thailand's Kanchanaburi province, not far from the border with Myanmar, some 38 km (24 mi) north-west of Kanchanaburi along the 323 highway. In 1999, the temple received the first tiger cub, one that had been found by villagers; it died soon after. Later, several tiger cubs were given to the temple, typically when the mothers had been killed by poachers, people whose "pet" tigers were getting too big, or those who had to when the laws about the keeping protected species became more strict. As of 2007, over 21 cubs had been born at the temple, and the total number of tigers was about 12 adult tigers and 4 cubs. As of May 2012, the total number of tigers living at the temple has risen to over 100. The temple charges a 600 Baht admission fee (March 2011 about US$19) and 1000 Baht for an opportunity to photograph with a tiger to raise funds to care for the animals. There are doubts, however, that tigers do receive
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Wat Benchamabophit

    Wat Benchamabophit

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Benchamabophit Dusitvanaram (Thai: วัดเบญจมบพิตรดุสิตวนารามราชวรวิหาร) is a Buddhist temple (wat) in the Dusit district of Bangkok, Thailand. Also known as the marble temple, it is one of Bangkok's most beautiful temples and a major tourist attraction. It typies Bangkok's ornate style of high gables, stepped-out roofs and elaborate finials. Construction of the temple began in 1899 at the request of King Chulalongkorn after building his palace nearby. The temple's name literally means the Temple of the fifth King located nearby Dusit Palace. It was designed by Prince Naris, a half-brother of the king, and is built of Italian marble. It has display of carrarra marble pillars, a marble courtyard and two large singhas guarding the entrace to the bot. The interiors are decorated with crossbeams of lacquer and gold, and in shallow niches in the walls of paintings of important stupas all over the country. The cloister around the assembly hall houses 52 images of Buddha. Inside the ordination hall (ubosot) is a Sukhothai-style Buddha statue named Phra Buddhajinaraja, cast in 1920 after the original located in Wat Mahathat in Phitsanulok. The main Buddha image is a copy of Phra Buddha
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    2 votes
    129
    Wat Bowonniwet

    Wat Bowonniwet

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Bowonniwet Vihara Rajavaravihara (Thai: วัดบวรนิเวศวิหารราชวรวิหาร; RTGS: Wat Bowon Niwet Wihan Ratchaworawihan, IPA: [wát bɔwɔːn níʔwêːt wíʔhǎːn râːttɕʰawɔːráʔwíʔhǎːn]) is a major Buddhist temple (wat) in Phra Nakhon district, Bangkok, Thailand. The temple is a center of the Thammayut Nikaya school of Thai Theravada Buddhism and has been a major temple of patronage for the Chakri dynasty. It is the shrine-hall of Phra Phutthachinasi (พระพุทธชินสีห์) which was moulded in about 1357. It is where many royal princes studied and served their monkhood, including king Bhumibol. Prince Bhikkhu Mongkut arrived at the temple in 1836 (ordination name: Vajirañāṇo) and became the first abbot. He later acceeded to the throne of Siam as King Rama IV. His great grandson, King Bhumibol Adulyadej ordained at the Grand Palace (Wat Phra Kaew) and resided here for a short period after he became King. Bhumibol's mentor, Somdet Phra Yanasangworn, eventually became abbot of the temple, and later, the Supreme Patriarch of Thai Buddhism. Exiled dictator Thanom Kittikachorn returned to Thailand as a novice monk to join Wat Bowonniwet leading to large public demonstrations and a bloody crackdown in
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    2 votes
    130
    Wat Phra Kaew, Chiang Rai

    Wat Phra Kaew, Chiang Rai

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Location and Status Wat Phra Kaew (Thai: วัดพระแก้ว) is a third-common-class royal temple situated in the area of 10,640 square metres on Trairat road, Wiang sub-district, Muang Chiang Rai in Chiang Rai City. His Majesty the King graciously upgraded the temple to the royal temple on May 31, 1978. The temple gains historical importance as the place where the Emerald Buddha was found. It is also one of the main centres of Buddhist education and the Sangha’s administration in northern Thailand. Derivation of the Name The Phra Kaew Marakot remained at Wat Phra Kaew, Chiang Rai for 43 years before its discovery 1391-1434 (B.E. 1934-1977) and remained for two years thereafter, at which time it was moved to Lampang in 1436 (B.E. 1979) One of the largest and most beautiful Buddha images in Thailand is presently housed in the ubosoth at Wat Phra Kaew, Phra Jao Lan Thong. The image is made of brass and copper and is believed to be 700 years old. The image was originally housed at Wat Phra Chao Lan Thong in Chiang Rai, then moved to Wat Ngam Muang, and then to Wat Phra Kaew in 1961 (B.E 2504). Thus it is now called Phra Jao Lan Thong. Uposatha Hall Phra Uposatha (a consecrated chapel used for
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    2 votes
    131
    Zenyōmitsu-ji

    Zenyōmitsu-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Zenyōmitsu-ji (善養密寺) is a Buddhist Temple located in the Setagaya ward of Tokyo, Japan. The temple follows the Shingon creed of Vajrayana Buddhism, which attaches particular importance to the origins of Buddhism and its manifestation throughout history. Zenyōmitsu-ji has a rich collection of authentic historical artifacts from India, Central Asia and China. Most notable is an exceptional collection of art from Gandhara, which was gathered over the course of twenty years by the head of the Temple. 35°36′06″N 139°38′31″E / 35.601642°N 139.642°E / 35.601642; 139.642
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Enryaku-ji

    Enryaku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Enryaku-ji (延暦寺, Enryaku-ji) is a Tendai monastery located on Mount Hiei in Ōtsu, overlooking Kyoto. It was founded during the early Heian period. The temple complex was established by Saichō (767–822), also known as Dengyō Daishi, who introduced the Tendai sect of Mahayana Buddhism to Japan from China. Enryaku-ji is the headquarters of the Tendai sect and one of the most significant monasteries in Japanese history. As such, it is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)". The founders of Jōdo-shū, Sōtō Zen, and Nichiren Buddhism all spent time at the monastery. Enryaku-ji is also the home of the "marathon monks." With the support of Emperor Kammu, the Buddhist monk Saichō ordained a hundred disciples in 807. Maintaining a strict discipline on Mt. Hiei, his monks lived in seclusion for twelve years of study and meditation. After this period, the best students were retained in positions in the monastery and others graduated into positions in the government. At the peak of its power, Enryaku-ji was a huge complex of as many as 3,000 sub-temples and a powerful army of warrior monks (僧兵, sōhei). In the tenth century,
    6.33
    3 votes
    133
    Guang Ming temple

    Guang Ming temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Guang Ming temple (Chinese: 光明寺; pinyin: Guāngmíng Sì; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Kong-bîng-sī; literally "Bright Light Temple") in Orlando, Florida, United States is the largest Buddhist temple in Central Florida. The three story, 30,000 square feet (2,800 m), traditional Chinese-monastic style temple was completed in 2007 and cost approximately $5 million dollars to construct. The temple is associated with Fo Guang Shan, a monastic organization from Taiwan led by Venerable Hsing Yun that claims over 1 million members worldwide, and with Hsi Lai Temple in Los Angeles. Guang Ming is home to several resident monastics, and boasts a vast main shrine room, auxiliary meditation room, vegetarian cafeteria, tea room, gift shop, and guest dormitories. The temple is open daily from 10:30 am to 5:00 pm, and weekly events are held in Chinese as well as English.
    6.33
    3 votes
    134
    Temple of the Six Banyan Trees

    Temple of the Six Banyan Trees

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Temple of the Six Banyan Trees (Chinese: 六榕寺; pinyin: Liùróng Sì) is an ancient Buddhist temple originally built in 537 in the Liang Dynasty in Guangzhou, southern China. The temple's proximity to foreign consulates in Guangzhou has made it a regular destination for families participating in the international adoption of children from China. Typically families receive blessings for their newly adopted children at this temple in front of the statue of Kuan Yin. The Temple of the Six Banyan Trees was originally called the Baozhuangyan Temple, but during the Northern Song Dynasty, a writer called Su Shi wrote the inscription Liu Rong (Six Banyan Trees) because of the six banyan trees he saw there and it has since been called the Temple of the Six Banyan Trees. The temple was burned down and rebuilt in the Northern Song Dynasty. Flower Pagoda, the main structure of the temple, was built in 1097, and was named for its colorful exterior. The Flower Pagoda once had a square base in its architecture, but was given an octagonal shaped base after it was rebuilt in 1097. It was rebuilt again in 1373 AD after another fire in the early Ming Dynasty period, and restored in 1900.
    6.33
    3 votes
    135
    Byodo-In Temple

    Byodo-In Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Byodo-In (平等院) Temple is a non-denominational Buddhist temple located on the island of O'ahu in Hawai'i at the Valley of the Temples. At 47-200 Kahekili Highway, the Byodo-In Temple is a replica of a 900-year-old Buddhist place of worship at Uji in Kyoto prefecture of Japan. Inside the Byodo-In Temple is a nine-foot (3 m) Lotus Buddha, a wooden Buddha. It is covered in gold and lacquer. Outside is a three-ton, brass peace bell. Surrounding the temple are large koi ponds that cover a total of two acres (8,000 m²). Around those ponds are lush Japanese gardens set against a backdrop of towering cliffs of the Ko'olau mountains. Sparrows are often seen fluttering about and playing in the garden trees while peacocks strut about displaying their beautiful feathers. The Byodo-In Temple is visited and used by thousands of worshippers from around the world. It welcomes people of all faiths to participate in its traditions. Apart from worship, the temple grounds are also used for weddings and office meetings. Byodo-In Temple is a half-size-scale replica of the Byodo-in Temple, a United Nations World Heritage Site near the ancient city of Kyoto, originally a monastery founded by Fujiwara
    8.00
    1 votes
    136
    Gawdawpalin Temple

    Gawdawpalin Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Gawdawpalin Temple (Burmese: ကောတော့ပလ္လင်ဘုရား, IPA: [ɡɔ́dɔ̰pəlɪ̀ɴ pʰəjá]) is a Buddhist temple located in Bagan, Burma. Construction of the pagoda began during the reign of Narapatisithu (1174–1211) and completed on 26 March 1227 during the reign of Htilominlo (1211–1235). Gawdawpalin Temple is the second tallest temple in Bagan. The temple is similar in layout to Thatbyinnyu Temple. Gawdawpalin Temple is two storeys tall, and contains three lower terraces and four upper terraces. The temple was heavily damaged during the 1975 earthquake and was reconstructed in following years. The Gawdawpalin Temple belongs to the style of the hollow gu-style temple. In contrast to the stupas, the hollow gu-style temple is a structure used for meditation, devotional worship of the Buddha and other Buddhist rituals. The gu temples come in two basic styles: "one-face" design and "four-face" design—essentially one main entrance and four main entrances. Other styles such as five-face and hybrids also exist. The one-face style grew out of 2nd century Beikthano, and the four-face out of 7th century Sri Ksetra. The temples, whose main features were the pointed arches and the vaulted chamber, became
    8.00
    1 votes
    137
    Huqiu Tower

    Huqiu Tower

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Tiger Hill Pagoda, more officially the Yunyan Pagoda, (Chinese: 云岩寺塔; pinyin: Yún yán sì tǎ or Chinese: 虎丘塔; pinyin: Hŭ qiū tǎ), is a Chinese pagoda situated on Tiger Hill in Suzhou City, Jiangsu Province. It is nicknamed the 'Leaning Tower of China'. It was the pagoda of the former Yunyan Temple. Construction began in 907 CE, during the later period of the Five Dynasties period, at a time when Suzhou was ruled by the Wuyue Kingdom. Construction was completed in 961 CE. The pagoda rises to a height of 47 m (154 ft). The pagoda has seven storeys and is octagonal in cross-section, and was built with a masonry structure designed to imitate wooden-structured pagodas prevalenat at the time. In more than a thousand years the pagoda has gradually slanted due to forces of nature. Now the top and bottom of the tower vary by 2.32 meters. The entire structure weighs some 7,000,000 kilograms (15,000,000 lb), supported by internal brick columns. However, the pagoda leans roughly 3 degrees due to the cracking of two supporting columns. The pagoda leans because the foundation is originally half rock and the other half is on soil. In 1957, efforts were made to stabilize the pagoda and prevent
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Mihwangsa

    Mihwangsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Mihwangsa is a Buddhist temple in located at the southern-most point on the Korean peninsula, Haenam County, South Jeolla Province, South Korea.Mihwangsa is a branch temple of Daeheungsa, the head temple of the 22nd district of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism.
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Nanhua Temple

    Nanhua Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Nanhua Temple (Chinese: 南華寺; pinyin: Nánhuá Sì) is a Buddhist monastery of the Chan School, one of Five Great Schools of Buddhism where Hui Neng, the Sixth Patriarch of the Chan School of Buddhism, once lived and taught. It is located 25 km southeast of Shaoguan, China in the town of Caoxi (漕溪), within Qujiang District. The location is in the northern part of Guangdong province, within a few kilometers from Bei River, formerly an important trade route from Central China to Guangzhou. The temple was founded during the time of the North-South Dynasties in 502 AD by an Indian monk named Zhiyao Sanzang (智樂三藏) who originally named the site Baolin Temple (寶林寺). It received its present name in 968 during the reign of the Song Dynasty Emperor Taizong. The site was later renovated in 1934 under the leadership of Hsu Yun. The temple covers an area of more than 42.5 hectares (105 acres). It consists of a set of magnificent Buddhist buildings, including the Hall of Heavenly Kings, the Grand Hall, Sutra Depository, Sixth Ancestor Hall, Lingzhao Pagoda and 690 Buddhist statues. There are 9 Chinese swamp cypresses (Glyptostrobus pensilis) believed to be 400 to 500 years old in the temple. The
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Shwezigon Pagoda

    Shwezigon Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Shwezigon Pagoda or Shwezigon Paya (Burmese: ရွှေစည်းခုံဘုရား) is a Buddhist temple located in Nyaung-U, a town near Bagan, in Burma (Myanmar). It is a prototype of Burmese stupas, and consists of a circular gold leaf-gilded stupa surrounded by smaller temples and shrines. Construction of the Shwezigon Pagoda began during the reign of King Anawrahta and was completed in 1102 AD, during the reign of King Kyansittha of the Pagan Dynasty. The pagoda is believed to enshrine a bone and tooth of Gautama Buddha. Within the compound of the Shwezigon Pagoda is a stone pillar containing Mon language inscriptions dedicated by King Kyansittha.
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Wat Arun

    Wat Arun

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Arun (Thai: วัดอรุณ, Thai pronunciation: [wát ʔarun], "Temple of the Dawn") is a Buddhist temple (wat) in the Bangkok Yai district of Bangkok, Thailand, on the Thonburi west bank of the Chao Phraya River. The full name of the temple is Wat Arun Ratchawararam Ratchawaramahawihan (วัดอรุณราชวรารามราชวรมหาวิหาร). Wat Arun is among the best known of Thailand's landmarks. The temple is so named because the first light of the morning reflects off the surface of the temple with pearly iridescence. Although the temple had existed since at least the seventeenth century, its distinctive prang (spires) were built in the early nineteenth century during the reign of King Rama II. A Buddhist temple had existed at the site of Wat Arun since the time of the Ayutthaya Kingdom. It was then known as Wat Makok, after the village of Bang Makok in which it was situated. (Makok is the Thai name for the Spondias pinnata plant.) According to the historian Prince Damrong Rajanubhab, the temple was shown in French maps during the reign of King Narai (1656–1688). The temple was renamed Wat Chaeng by King Taksin when he established his new capital of Thonburi near the temple, following the fall of
    8.00
    1 votes
    142
    Kagyu Samyé Ling Monastery and Tibetan Centre

    Kagyu Samyé Ling Monastery and Tibetan Centre

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Monastery
    Kagyu Samyé Ling Monastery and Tibetan Centre is a Tibetan Buddhist complex associated with the Karma Kagyu school located at Eskdalemuir, near Langholm, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. The building that now houses Samyé Ling was originally a hunting lodge called Johnstone House. In 1965 the Johnstone House Trust was formed with the objectives Initially the community there was led there by a Canadian Theravada monk named Anandabodhi. When the community declined, Anandabodhi returned to Canada; he was subsequently ordained in the Tibetan Vajrayana tradition and enthroned as Namgyal Rinpoche by the 16th Gyalwa Karmapa. In 1967 the Johnstone House trustees invited the Tibetan lamas and refugees Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche and Akong Rinpoche to take over. They were then in their late twenties. They named the new community "Samyé Ling", and were shortly joined by the thangka master-artist Sherab Palden Beru and the monk Samten. Samyé refers to the first Buddhist monastic university in Tibet, while Ling means 'Place'. Trungpa Rinpoche quickly came into conflict with both Akong Rinpoche and the trustees. He drank heavily and slept with his students. He married one of these, a fifteen year
    5.25
    4 votes
    143
    Adashino Nembutsu-ji

    Adashino Nembutsu-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Adashino Nenbutsu-ji (化野念仏寺, Adashino Nenbutsuji) is a Buddhist temple in Ukyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan. In 811 Kūkai is said to have founded a temple, then Honen altered it to the present Nenbutsuji. Situated high on a hill overlooking the city from the northwest, it sits in an area where since the Heian period people have abandoned the bodies of the dead, exposing them to the wind and rain. Now, some eight thousand Buddhist statuettes, which had been scattered around Adashino then collected about 1903, memorialize the souls of the dead. During its well-known 'sento kuyo', a ceremony dedicated to the spirits of the dead, about ten thousand stone statues are lit up with candles. Media related to Adashino-nenbutsuji at Wikimedia Commons 35°01′37″N 135°39′52″E / 35.026806°N 135.664522°E / 35.026806; 135.664522
    7.00
    2 votes
    144
    Ananda Temple

    Ananda Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Ananda Temple (Burmese: အာနန္ဒာဘုရား, pronounced: [ànàɴdà pʰəjá]), located in Bagan, Myanmar is a Buddhist temple built in 1105 AD during the reign (1084–1113) of King Kyanzittha of the Pagan Dynasty. It is one of four surviving temples in Bagan. The temple layout is in a cruciform with several terraces leading to a small pagoda at the top covered by an umbrella known as hti, which is the name of the umbrella or top ornament found in almost all pagodas in Myanmar. The Buddhist temple houses four standing Buddhas, each one facing the cardinal direction of East, North, West and South. The temple is said to be an architectural wonder in a fusion of Mon and adopted Indian style of architecture. The impressive temple has also been titled the "Westminster Abbey of Burma". The temple has close similarity to the Pathothamya temple of the 10th–11th century, and is also known as “veritable museum of stones”. The temple was damaged in the earthquake of 1975. However, it has been fully restored and is well maintained by frequent painting and whitewashing of the walls. On the occasion of 900th anniversary of its construction celebrated in 1990 the temple spires were gilded. It is a highly
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Gokoku-ji

    Gokoku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Gokoku-ji (護国寺) is a Shingon Buddhist temple in Tokyo's Bunkyō. This Buddhist temple was established by the fifth shogun Tokugawa Tsunayoshi, who dedicated it to his mother. It is notable for surviving the American air raids during World War II, whereas most other historical sites in Tokyo were turned into rubble. Like many Buddhist temples in Japan, Gokoku-ji has a cemetery on its premises. Among those interred are the remains of the following people.
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Jōchi-ji

    Jōchi-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kinpōzan Jōchi-ji (金宝山浄智寺) is a Buddhist Zen temple in Kita-Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. It belongs to the Engaku-ji school of the Rinzai sect and is ranked fourth among Kamakura's Five Mountains. The main objects of worship are the three statues of Shaka, Miroku and Amida Nyorai visible inside the main hall. Officially, the temple was founded in 1283 by Hōjō Munemasa (1253–1281) (son of the fifth Shikken Hōjō Tokiyori) and his son Hōjō Morotoki (1275–1311). However, because the temple opened the year Munemasa died at just 29 and because of Morotoki's age at the time, it's likely that his wife and Munemasa's younger brother Hōjō Tokimune (1251–1284) had a hand in directing its building and its opening. Priest Nanshu Kōkai (a.k.a. Shin’o Zenji) was invited to open the temple but, feeling too young and not up to the task, he asked the Hōjōs to nominate also Gottan Funei and Daikyu Shonen, both Chinese Zen masters that had come to Japan invited by Hōjō Tokiyori. The temple has therefore the distinction of having three official founding priests. In her 1918 guide to Kamakura "Kamakura: Fact and Legend", Iso Mutsu had little to say about Jōchi-ji, other than it was in complete
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Kanno-ji

    Kanno-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kannō-ji (Japanese: 神呪寺) is a Buddhist temple in the middle of Mount Kabutoyama in Nishinomiya, Hyōgo, Japan. The other name of the temple is Kabutoyama-daishi (甲山大師). The original object of worship at this temple was Mount Kabutoyama. In this region, Mount Kabutoyama was believed to be "a mountain of god". Until the Edo period, the temple was a mixture of Shintoism and Buddhism, as many Japanese temples or shrines. Today, the main object of worship at this temple is a statue of Nyoirin (如意輪半跏像). The statue is known as one of the three most famous Nyoirin statues in Japan, with those of Kawachi-Kannon-ji temple in Osaka Prefecture and Murō-ji temple in Nara Prefecture. According to Genko-Shakusho (元亨釈書), a famous history of Japanese Buddhism written in the fourteenth century, Kannō-ji was established by the fourth queen of Emperor Junna. However, another history, Teio-Hennnenki, writes that Ujikimi Tachibana (橘氏公) and Shunjo Mihara (三原春上) established the temple at the command of Empress Masako, the first queen of Emperor Junna in 827. Genko-Shakusho wrote that the fourth queen of Emperor Junna secretly escaped from the Royal Palace in Kyoto and moved to Mount Kabutoyama in 828 with
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Wat Suthat

    Wat Suthat

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Suthat Thepphawararam (Thai: วัดสุทัศนเทพวราราม, Thai pronunciation: [wát su.tʰát tʰêːp.pʰa.wáʔraːraːm]) is a royal temple of the first grade, one of ten such temples in Bangkok (23 in Thailand). Construction was begun by His Majesty King Rama I in 1807 (B.E. 2350). Further construction and decorations were carried out by King Rama II who helped carve the wooden doors, but the temple was not completed until the reign of King Rama III in 1847 (B.E.2390). This temple contains the Buddha image Phra Sri Sakyamuni or "Sisakayamunee" which moved from Sukhothai province. At the lower terrace of the base, there are 28 Chinese pagodas which mean the 28 Buddhas born on this earth. Wat Suthat also contains Phra Buddha Trilokachet in the Ubosot (Ordinary Hall) and Phra Buddha Setthamuni in Sala Kan Parien (Meeting Hall) In 2005, the temple was submitted to UNESCO for consideration as a future World Heritage Site. List of Buddhist temples in Thailand A brief introduction of this temple is available at:-
    7.00
    2 votes
    149
    Tō-ji

    Tō-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tō-ji (東寺, Tō-ji) (East Temple) is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect in Kyoto, Japan. It once had a partner, Sai-ji (West Temple) and, together, they stood alongside the Rashomon, gate to the Heian capital. It was formally known as Kyō-ō-gokoku-ji (教王護国寺, The Temple for the Defense of the Nation by Means of the King of Doctrines) which indicates that it previously functioned as a temple providing protection for the nation. Tō-ji is located in Minami-ku near the intersection of Ōmiya Street and Kujō Street, southwest of Kyoto Station. Tō-ji was founded in the early Heian period. The temple dates from 796, two years after the capital moved to Heian-kyō. Together with its partner Sai-in, and the temple Shingon-in (located in the Heian Palace), it was one of only three Buddhist temples allowed in the capital at the time, and is the only of the three to survive to the present. Tō-ji is often associated with Kōbō Daishi (Kūkai). The well-known Buddhist priest was put in charge of Tō-ji in 823 by order of Emperor Saga. The temple's principal image is of Yakushi Nyorai, the Medicine Buddha. The pagoda of Tō-ji stands 54.8 m high, and is the tallest wooden tower in Japan. It dates from
    6.00
    3 votes
    150
    Wat Khung Taphao

    Wat Khung Taphao

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Khung Taphao ( listen (help·info)) (Thai: วัดคุ้งตะเภา, literally Temple of the bend of sailing ship watercourse) is a Buddhist temple (wat) located in Ban Khung Taphao, Mueang Uttaradit District of Uttaradit Province in Northern Thailand. Wat Khung Taphao was established in the era of the Thonburi Kingdom (1768–1782), and is still an important active temple in the Ban Khung Taphao region. Wat Khung Taphao is an ancient temple, but there is no archaeological evidence as to when it was built. There have been monasteries here since the time of the Ayutthaya Kingdom (1351–1767), and Buddhists arrived sometime in the late 18th century. Wat Khung Taphao has a hall for religious observances. Local villagers were taught by the monks at the monastery until the government began supplying teachers. When the river floods, it rises over the river banks and scours under the monastery foundations. Khung Taphao villagers decided to establish a new monastery farther away from the river. After the new monastery was built, the river changed its course and moved away from the monastery; this new land became monastery property. When government representatives came to record the names of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    151
    Kadampa Buddhist Temple

    Kadampa Buddhist Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Kadampa World Peace Temple is located at Conishead Priory on the outskirts of Ulverston, Cumbria, England. It was consecrated in July 1997 and functions as the main meditation hall at Manjushri Kadampa Meditation Centre. It is also the location of the annual Spring and Summer Festivals attended by Kadampa Buddhists from all over the world. More Kadampa Buddhist Temples are currently under construction in various countries.
    5.00
    4 votes
    152
    Ban Sam Ruen

    Ban Sam Ruen

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Ban Sam Ruen (Thai: บ้านสามเรือน) is a village in the Nakhon Pa Mak subdistrict of Amphoe Bang Krathum District of Phitsanulok Province, Thailand. The first element ban (Thai: บ้าน) means village. The second element sam (Thai: สาม) means three. The third element ruen (Thai: เรือน) can either mean dwelling place, or it can be a classifier used to count oblique faces such as the faces of a gem or faces of clocks. The meaning of the name as a whole loosely means Village of Three Faces. Ban Sam Ruen is located in the southwest portion of Nakhon Pa Mak on the Wang Thong River. The Wang Thong flows into Sam Ruen from the northwest and out of the village to the south. A canal which leads to Ban Grong Greng runs out of Ban Sam Ruen from the northeast. The resulting pattern divides the land into three plots. At Ban Grong Greng, the Sam Ruen Canal makes its first split, one extension turning west toward Ban Dongphayom, and the other extending north. The canal has many branches, and forms a complex canal system which provides irrigation for much of Nakhon Pa Mak. Ban Sam Ruen is within the Nan River watershed. Ban Sam Ruen was home to the largest market in Phitsanulok until 1898 when the
    5.67
    3 votes
    153
    Jōzai-ji

    Jōzai-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Jōzai-ji (常在寺) is a Buddhist temple of the Nichiren sect in Gifu, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Its formal name is Shūrinzan Jōzai-ji (鷲林山常在寺). Starting with Saitō Dōsan, Jōzai-ji served as the family temple for the Saitō family for three generations, which included his son, Saitō Yoshitatsu, and his grandson, Saitō Tokugen. Also, it has been designated as a nationally Important Cultural Property, as it contains pictures of both Dōsan and Yoshitatsu. In 1450, Saitō Myōchin served as the guardian of upper Mino Province on behalf of the Toki clan. (Myōchin was the son of Saitō Sōen, who had earlier served as the guardian of Mino Province.) Using his power in the area, he built this temple. Afterwards, as Japan entered into the Sengoku period, Nagai Shinzaemon used the area around his temple as his base for uniting the region. Dōsan, his son, continued his father's base of operations for a second generation, designating Jōzai-ji the family temple. 35°25′56″N 136°46′15″E / 35.43219°N 136.770819°E / 35.43219; 136.770819
    5.67
    3 votes
    154
    Kamo Shrine

    Kamo Shrine

    • Currently used by religion(s): Shinto
    • Type of place of worship: Shrine
    Kamo Shrine (賀茂神社, Kamo-jinja) is a general term for an important Shinto sanctuary complex on both banks of the Kamo River in northeast Kyoto. It is centered on two shrines. The two shrines, an upper and a lower, lie in a corner of the old capital which was known as the "devil's gate" (鬼門, kimon) due to traditional geomancy beliefs that the north-east corner brought misfortune. Because the Kamo River runs from the north-east direction into the city, the two shrines along the river were intended to prevent demons from entering the city. The Kamo Shrine encompasses what are now independent but traditionally associated jinja or shrines: the Kamo-wakeikazuchi Shrine (賀茂別雷神社, Kamo-wakeikazuchi jinja) in Kyoto's Kita Ward, and the "Kamo-mioya Shrine'" (賀茂御祖神社, Kamo-mioya jinja) in Sakyo Ward. They are amongst the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto" which have been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. The jinja name identifies the clustered kami or deities who are venerated at the Kamo Shrine; and the name refers to the ambit of shrine's encircling woods. The shrine name also references the area's early inhabitants, the Kamo clan, many of whom continue to live near the shrine
    5.67
    3 votes
    155
    Lankarama

    Lankarama

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Lankarama is a stupa built by King Valagamba, in an ancient place at Galhebakada in the ancient kingdom of Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. Nothing is known about the ancient form of the stupa, and later this was renovated. The ruins show that there are rows of stone pillars and it is no doubt that there has been a house built encircling the stupa (vatadage) to cover it. The round courtyard of the stupa seems to be 10 feet (3 m) above the ground. The diameter of the stupa is 45 feet (14 m). The courtyard is circular in shape and the diameter is 1332 feet (406 m). Eth pokuna (Elephant pond) is an ancient man made pond situated close to Lankaramaya. It is 159 meters in length 52.7 meters across and 9.5 meters in depth with the holding capacity of 75,000 cubic meters of water. The water to this pond has been supplied from the Periyamkulama Tank through a network of underground canals. These underground canals still work after so many hundreds years. This tank probably has been used by the monks in the Abhayagiri Buddhist Monastery who amounted over five thousand priests.
    5.67
    3 votes
    156
    Longshan Temple

    Longshan Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Mengjia Longshan Temple (Chinese: 艋舺龍山寺; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Báng-kah Liông-san-sī) was built in Taipei in 1738 by settlers from Fujian, China. It served as a place of worship and a gathering place for the Chinese settlers. The temple has been destroyed either in full or in part on numerous earthquakes and fires. During World War II, on 31 May 1945 it was hit by American bombers during the Raid on Taipei, who claimed the Japanese were hiding armaments inside. The main building and the left corridor were damaged and many precious artifacts and artworks were lost in the ensuing fire. Taipei residents have nevertheless consistently rebuilt and renovated it, and did so again after the end of the Second World War a few months later. Longshan is seen as an emblematic example of Taiwanese classical architecture, with southern Chinese influences commonly seen in older buildings. Like most temples in Taiwan, the Temple worships a mixture of Buddhist, Taoist, and folk deities such as Matsu.
    5.67
    3 votes
    157
    Puning Temple

    Puning Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Puning Temple (Chinese: 普宁寺; pinyin: Pǔníng Sì; literally "Temple of Universal Peace") of Chengde, Hebei province, China (commonly called the Big Buddha Temple) is a Qing Dynasty era Buddhist temple complex built in 1755, during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor (1735-1796 AD) to show the Qing's respect to the ethnic minorities. It is located near the Chengde Mountain Resort, and alongside the equally famed Putuo Zongcheng Temple, it is one of the "Eight Outer Temples" of Chengde. Much how the Putuo Zongcheng Temple was modeled after the Tibetan Potala Palace, the Puning Temple was modeled after the Samye Monastery, the sacred Lamaist site in Tibet. The front temple was constructed in the Chinese style, although the temple complex follows both Chinese and Tibetan architectural styles. The Puning Temple also houses the world's tallest wooden sculpture of the Bodhisattva Avalokiteśvara (22.28-meter-high and 110-ton), hence the Puning Temple is often nicknamed the "Big Buddha Temple". The complex features temple halls, pavilions, drum towers and bell towers. Since the 17th century, during the late Chinese Ming Dynasty, the Dzungar people of northwestern China (modern Xinjiang)
    5.67
    3 votes
    158
    Ryōan-ji

    Ryōan-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Ryōan-ji (Shinjitai: 竜安寺, Kyūjitai: 龍安寺, The Temple of the Dragon at Peace) is a Zen temple located in northwest Kyoto, Japan. It belongs to the Myōshin-ji school of the Rinzai branch of Zen Buddhism. The temple garden is considered to be one of the finest examples of a kare-sansui, a Japanese rock garden, or zen garden, in Japan. The temple and gardens are listed as one of the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto, and as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The site of the temple was an estate of the Fujiwara family in the 11th century. The first temple, the Daiju-in, and garden were built in that century by Fujiwara Saneyoshi. In 1450, Hosokawa Katsumoto, another powerful warlord, acquired the land where the temple stood. He built his residence there founded a zen temple, Ryōan-ji, on the upper part of the territory of the old temple. During the Ōnin War between the clans, the temple was destroyed. Hosokawa Katsumoto died in 1473. In 1488, his son, Hosokawa Matsumoto, rebuilt the temple, and probably built the rock garden at the same time.. The temple served as a mausoleum for the late Hosokawa emperors. Their tombs are grouped together in what are today known as the "Seven Imperial
    5.67
    3 votes
    159
    Shwemawdaw Paya

    Shwemawdaw Paya

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Shwemawdaw Paya (Burmese: ရွှေမောဓော ဘုရား [ʃwè mɔ̀dɔ́ pʰəjá]; Mon: ကျာ်မုဟ်တ [tɕaɪʔmṵtú]) is a stupa located in Bago, Myanmar. It is often referred to as the Golden God Temple. At 375 feet in height, the Shwemadaw holds the record for the tallest pagoda in the country although the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon is usually credited as the tallest pagoda in Myanmar (at 98 meters - approximately 321.5 ft). Shwemadaw, along with the Shwedagon and Kyaiktiyo, are famous Mon pagodas. The pagoda's annual festival is a 10 day affair that takes place during the Burmese month of Tagu. The Shwemawdaw Paya was originally built around the tenth century, C.E. It was destroyed several times due to earthquakes, including one in 1917 and another in 1930. Portions of the fallen pre-1917 version of the Paya remain at the site. The original version of the pagoda was approximately 70 feet tall, built by the Mon supposedly to hold two hairs of the Buddha. Allegedly, the hairs were given personally to two Mon merchants named Mahasala and Kullasala by the Buddha on a trip to India. Tooth relics were also added to the pagoda in 982 and 1385. Further additions to the temple include a bell from King
    5.67
    3 votes
    160
    Banteay Samré

    Banteay Samré

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Banteay Samré (Khmer: ប្រាសាទបន្ទាយសំរែ) is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia located east of the East Baray. Built under Suryavarman II and Yasovarman II in the early 12th century, it is a Hindu temple in the Angkor Wat style. Named after the Samré, an ancient people of Indochina, the temple uses the same materials as the Banteay Srei.
    6.50
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    161
    Banteay Srei

    Banteay Srei

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Banteay Srei or Banteay Srey (Khmer: ប្រាសាទបន្ទាយស្រី) is a 10th century Cambodian temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Located in the area of Angkor in Cambodia. It lies near the hill of Phnom Dei, 25 km (16 mi) north-east of the main group of temples that once belonged to the medieval capitals of Yasodharapura and Angkor Thom. Banteay Srei is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today. The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a "precious gem", or the "jewel of Khmer art." Consecrated on the 22nd of April, 967 A.D., Bantãy Srĕi was the only major temple at Angkor not built by a monarch; its construction is credited to a courtier named Yajnavaraha / Yajñavarāha (modern Khmer: យជ្ញវរាហៈ), who served as a counsellor to king Rājendravarman II (modern Khmer: ព្រះបាទរាជេន្រ្ទវរ្ម័ន).The foundational stela says that Yajñavarāha, grandson of king Harṣavarman I was a scholar and philanthropist who helped
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    2 votes
    162
    Bodhivana Monastery

    Bodhivana Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Bodhivana Monastery is a Theravada Buddhist monastery in the Thai Forest Tradition. It is located in Warburton East, Victoria, Australia. The current abbot of Bodhivana Monastery is Ajahn Kalyano. He was born in London in 1962. Venerable Ajahn Kalyano received his ordination in North East Thailand in 1985 at Venerable Ajahn Chah's monastery. Bodhivana monastery is a branch monastery in the tradition of Venerable Ajahn Chah. It was established to provide a place where candidates can train for ordination as Buddhist monks. Address: 780 Woods Point Road, East Warburton, Victoria Australia
    6.50
    2 votes
    163
    Kōfuku-ji

    Kōfuku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kōfuku-ji (興福寺, Kōfuku-ji) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Nara, Japan. The temple is the national headquarters of the Hossō school and is one of the eight Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. Kōfuku-ji has its origin as a temple that was established in 669 by Kagami-no-Ōkimi (鏡大君), the wife of Fujiwara no Kamatari, wishing for her husbands’s recovery from illness. Its original site was in Yamashina, Yamashiro Province (present-day Kyoto). In 672, the temple was moved to Fujiwara-kyō, the first planned Japanese capital to copy the orthogonal grid pattern of Chang'an. In 710 the temple was dismantled for the second time and moved to its present location, on the east side of the newly constructed capital, Heijō-kyō, today's Nara. Kōfuku-ji was the Fujiwara's tutelary temple, and enjoyed as much prosperty, and as long as the family did. The temple was not only an important center for the Buddhist religion, but also retained influence over the imperial government, and even by "aggressive means" in some cases. When many of the Nanto Shichi Daiji such as Tōdai-ji -declined after the move of capital to Heian-kyō (Kyoto), Kōfuku-ji kept its
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Wat Phra Sing, Chiang Rai

    Wat Phra Sing, Chiang Rai

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Pra Singh (Thai: วัดพระสิงห์) is a Buddhist temple located on Thanon Singkhlai in Tambon Wiang, Mueang district, Chiang Rai Province, northern Thailand. Wat Pra Singh was built by Pra Chao Maha Proma (P.E. 1345 – 1400), circa 1385 (B.E. 1928). The Ubosoth contains several replicas of the Pra Singh or Pra Buddhasihing image, a cultural landmark in the history of the Lanka wong Theravada Sect of Buddhism in Thailand. The Pra Buddhasihing image, called the Pra Singh image in Northern Thailand, is said to have come from Sri Lanka to Nakorn Sri Thammalat to Sukhothai to Ayutthaya, Kamphaengphet, Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai before ending up in Bangkok. According to the Chiang Mai Chronicles Pra Chao Maha Proma attempted to usurp the throne at Chiang Mai upon the death of his brother Pra Nue Na but failed and withdrew to the protection of the king of Ayutthaya. When he later returned to Chiang Rai he brought the Pra Buddhasihing image with him. There are several other interesting Buddha images at Wat Pra Singh, like these gathered beneath a Bodhi tree sent from India. There has long been a Pali language school at Wat Pra Singh and a new building was dedicated on the occasion of the
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    2 votes
    165
    White Horse Temple

    White Horse Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Do not confuse this pagoda with the White Horse Pagoda, Dunhuang. White Horse Temple (simplified Chinese: 白马寺; traditional Chinese: 白馬寺; pinyin: Báimǎ Sì, Wade-Giles: Paima szu) is, according to tradition, the first Buddhist temple in China, established in 68 AD under the patronage of Emperor Ming in the Eastern Han capital Luoyang. The site is located just outside the walls of the ancient Eastern Han capital, some 12–13 kilometres (7.5–8.1 mi) east of Luoyang in Henan Province. It is located approximately 40 minutes by bus No. 56 from the Luoyang train station. The temple, although small in size in comparison to many other temples in China, is considered by most believers as "the cradle of Chinese Buddhism". The geographical landmarks to the south of the temple are Manghan mountain and Lucoche River. The main temple buildings, a large complex, were reconstructed during the Ming (1368 to 1644) and Qing (1644 to 1912) dynasties. They were refurbished in 1950s, and again in March 1973 after the Cultural Revolution. It has numerous halls divided by several courtyards and manicured gardens, covering an area extending to about 13 hectares (32 acres). The display plaques in Chinese and
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    2 votes
    166
    Beomeosa

    Beomeosa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Beomeosa (Temple of the Nirvana Fish) is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism in Cheongnyong-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan, South Korea. Built on the slopes of Geumjeongsan, it is one of the country's leading urban temples. Beomeosa was constructed in 678 during the reign of Silla king Munmu, by the monk Uisang. It became known as one of the ten great temples of the Hwaeom sect, although like most Korean temples it was later assimilated into the Jogye Order. At its largest, during the Goryeo dynasty, it was much larger than it is today - with over 360 rooms and more than a thousand monks in residence. The temple was burned to the ground in 1592 during the Japanese invasion. It was reconstructed in 1602, but was burned again by an accidental fire. In 1613 it was rebuilt again. The main hall (Daeungjeon) and the front gate (Iljumun) date to this reconstruction. The mountain where Beomeosa is found is said to have huge rock at the summit where there is a golden well which never, ever dries up. The water of this well is believed to have very special magical properties as one day a golden fish came from heaven and has lived there ever since. Beom(범;梵) = nirvana - eo(어;魚) =
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    167
    Four-gates pagoda

    Four-gates pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Four Gates Pagoda (Chinese: 四门塔; pinyin: Sì Mén Tǎ) is a Sui Dynasty (581-618 AD) stone Chinese pagoda located in central Shandong Province, China. It is thought to be the oldest remaining pavilion-style stone pagoda in China. The oldest extant brick-built pagoda in China is the 40-metre-tall (130 ft) Songyue Pagoda of 523 AD. The Four Gates Pagoda is located at the foot of Qinglong Mountain, near Liubu Village, in Licheng District, under the administration of Jinan City, about 33 kilometers southeast of the city of Jinan proper. The pagoda is located to the east of the site of the Shentong Temple (Chinese: 神通寺; pinyin: Shéntōng Sì; literally "Supernatural Power Temple"), which was one of the most important temples in northern China at the time the pagoda was built but is now in ruins. According to an inscription on a stone tablet which was discovered inside the pagodas ceiling in 1972, the pagoda was "built in the seventh year of the Daye period of the Sui Dynasty". This corresponds to the year 611 AD, near the end of the dynasty. During the Sui Dynasty, stone and brick were introduced as material for building pagodas. The Four-Gates Pagoda was built from blocks quarried from
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    1 votes
    168
    Isurumuniya

    Isurumuniya

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Isurumuniya is a Buddhist temple situated near to the Tisawewa (Tisa tank). The temple was built by King Devanampiya Tissa who ruled in the ancient Sri Lankan capital of Anuradhapura. After 500 children of high-caste were ordained, Isurumuniya was built for them to reside. King Kasyapa I (473-491 AD) renovated this viharaya and named it as "Boupulvan, Kasubgiri Radmaha Vehera". This name is derived from names of his 2 daughters and his name. There is a viharaya connected to a cave and above is a cliff. A small stupa is built on it. It can be seen that the constructional work of this stupa belong to the present period. Lower down on both sides of a cleft, in a rock that appears to rise out of a pool, have been carved the figures of elephants. On the rock is carved the figure of a horse. The carving of Isurumuniya lovers on the slab has been brought from another place and placed it there. A few yards away from this vihara is the Ranmasu Uyana. 6th Century Gupta style carving. The woman, seated on the man's lap, lifts a warning finger, probably as a manifestation of her coyness; but the man carries on regardless. The figures may represent Dutugemunu's son Saliya and the law caste
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    169
    Jade Buddha Temple

    Jade Buddha Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Jade Buddha Temple (Chinese: 玉佛禅寺; pinyin: Yùfó Chán Sì, literally Jade Buddha Chan Temple) is a Buddhist temple in Shanghai, China. As with many modern Chinese Buddhist temples, the current temple draws from both the Pure Land and Chan traditions of Mahayana Buddhism. It was founded in 1882 with two jade Buddha statues imported to Shanghai from Burma by sea. These were a sitting Buddha (1.95 metres tall, 3 tonnes), and a smaller reclining Buddha representing Buddha's death. The temple now also contains a much larger reclining Buddha made of marble, donated from Singapore, and visitors may mistake this larger sculpture for the original, smaller piece. During the rule of emperor Guang Xu in the Qing Dynasty (1875–1908), Hui Gen, an abbot from Mount Putuo went on a pilgrimage to Tibet via the two famous Chinese mountains Mount Wutai and Mount Emei. After Tibet, he arrived in Burma. Whilst there, Mr. Chen Jun-Pu, an overseas Chinese resident in Burma, donated five Jade statues of Buddha to Hui Gen, who transported two of them back to Jiang-wan, Shanghai. Here Hui Gen had a temple built with donated funds, and died shortly thereafter. This temple was occupied during the 1911
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    1 votes
    170
    Manuha Temple

    Manuha Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Manuha Temple is a Buddhist temple built in Myinkaba (located near Bagan), by captive Mon King Manuha in 1067, according to King Manuha's inscriptions. It is a rectangular building of two storeys. The building contains three images of seated Buddhas and an image of Buddha entering Nirvana. Manuha Temple is one of the oldest temples in Bagan. About the same time Makuta, ex-king of Mon from Thatön (his name is now corrupted into 'Manuha'), must have built his colossal images at Myinpagan, where he was living in captivity, a mile S. of Pagan. "Stricken with remorse", says the Glass Palace Chronicle, "he built a colossal Buddha with legs crossed, and a dying Buddha as it were making pariniruâna; and he prayed saying 'Whithersoever I migrate in samsâra, may I never be conquered by another!' The temple is called Manuha to this day.
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    1 votes
    171
    Tenryū-ji

    Tenryū-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tenryū-ji (天龍寺)—more formally known as Tenryū Shiseizen-ji (天龍資聖禅寺)—is the head temple of the Tenryū branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism, located in Susukinobaba-chō, Ukyō Ward, Kyoto, Japan. The temple was founded by Ashikaga Takauji in 1339, primarily to venerate Gautama Buddha, and its first chief priest was Musō Soseki. Construction was completed in 1345. As a temple related to both the Ashikaga family and Emperor Go-Daigo, the temple is held in high esteem, and is ranked number one among Kyoto's so-called Five Mountains. In 1994, it was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto". In the early Heian period, Empress Tachibana no Kachiko, wife of Emperor Saga, founded a temple called Danrin-ji on the site of present-day Tenryū-ji. The temple fell into disrepair over the next four hundred years. In the mid-thirteenth century, Emperor Go-Saga and his son Emperor Kameyama turned the area into an imperial villa which they called "Kameyama Detached Palace" (亀山殿, Kameyama-dono). The name "Kameyama", which literally means "turtle mountain", was selected due to the shape of Mt. Ogura, which lies to the west of Tenryū-ji—it is said to be
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    1 votes
    172
    Wat Bang Nom Kho

    Wat Bang Nom Kho

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Bang Nom Kho (Thai: วัดบางนมโค) is a Buddhist temple (Wat) in Sena district, Ayutthaya Province, Thailand. The temple was made famous by one of Thailand's Gaeji Ajarn high monks, Luang Pho Phan, who was renowned for his blowing of the sacred Diamond Armour Yantra, (or Yant, onto the forehead of his disciples. According to legend, many of these disciples, after death, were found to have an impression of the Yant mysteriously embedded into their skull. The Yant was allegedly revealed to Luang Pho Phan in a dream, which led him to its discovery on a metal template hidden within a Chedi. Luang Pho Phan was also reputed to have received the ability to make powder based amulets of Buddha images sitting on animals from a Chee Ba Khaw, (a spirit that appeared as a firefly). These amulets are extremely sought after and expensive due to their reputed powers.
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    173
    Dambulla cave temple

    Dambulla cave temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Dambulla cave temple (Sinhala: දඹුලු ලෙන් විහාරය dam̆būlū len vihāraya, Tamil: தம்புள்ளை பொற்கோவில் tampuḷḷai poṟkōvil) also known as the Golden Temple of Dambulla is a World Heritage Site (1991) in Sri Lanka, situated in the central part of the country. This site is situated 148 km east of Colombo and 72 km north of Kandy. It is the largest and best-preserved cave temple complex in Sri Lanka. The rock towers 160 m over the surrounding plains.There are more than 80 documented caves in the surrounding area. Major attractions are spread over 5 caves, which contain statues and paintings. These paintings and statues are related to Lord Buddha and his life. There total of 153 Buddha statues, 3 statues of Sri Lankan kings and 4 statues of gods and goddesses. The latter include two statues of Hindu gods, the god Vishnu and the god Ganesh. The murals cover an area of 2,100 square meters. Depictions on the walls of the caves include the temptation by the demon Mara, and Buddha's first sermon. Prehistoric Sri Lankans would have lived in these cave complexes before the arrival of Buddhism in Sri Lanka as there are burial sites with human skeletons about 2700 years old in this area, at
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    3 votes
    174
    Hsi Lai Temple

    Hsi Lai Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Fo Guang Shan Hsi Lai Temple (Chinese: 佛光山西來寺; pinyin: Fóguāngshān Xīlái Sì) is a traditional Chinese Buddhist mountain monastery in the United States, one of the largest of its kind in the North American continent. It is located on the foothill region of Hacienda Heights, California, a suburb of Los Angeles County. The name "Hsi Lai" means Coming West in the sense of the "Great Buddhadharma Coming West." The temple is affiliated Fo Guang Shan, one of Taiwan's largest Buddhist organizations. It is the order's first overseas branch temple, and serves as the North America regional headquarters for Fo Guang Shan. Hsi Lai was the site of the founding of Buddha's Light International Association, established in 1991. The temple, like its mother temple in Taiwan, practices Humanistic Buddhism, which incorporates all of the eight traditional schools of Chinese Buddhism - especially the Linji Chan and Pure Land schools - to provide guidance deemed most useful to modern life. In 1976, Master Hsing Yun, the founder of the order, represented a Buddhist group from Taiwan to participate in America's bicentennial celebration. Master Hsing Yun was asked by American friends to build a monastery in
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    3 votes
    175
    Sinheungsa

    Sinheungsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sinheungsa, sometimes spelled Shinheungsa, is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. It is situated on the slopes of Seoraksan in Sokcho, Gangwon Province, South Korea. Sinheungsa is located in Seoraksan National Park, and many tourists hiking Seoraksan up to Ulsanbawi (peak) pass by the temple on the way. Other temples with the name Sinheungsa are located in Seoul, Samcheok and Icheon. Historical accounts vary as to whether this ancient Zen (Seon) temple was first constructed by Jajang in 653, first called Hyangseongsa (Temple of Zen Buddhism), or in 637 following his return from Tang China. It burned to the ground in 699, was rebuilt in 710, burned again in 1645 and was rebuilt in 1648 at its present location by Uisang. This temple is believed to be the oldest Zen (Seon) temple in the world. The Great Unification Buddha, a 14.6-meter/48-foot, 108 ton gilt-bronze Buddha statue, called "Tongil Daebul", sits atop a 4.3-meter/15-foot high pedestal, of the same material, making the total height 18.9-meter/62-foot, excluding the lightning rod and nimbus. The lotus pedestal is flanked with 16 delicately engraved panels and the forehead of Tongil Daebul is adorned with
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    3 votes
    176
    Wat Saket

    Wat Saket

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Saket Ratcha Wora Maha Wihan (Thai: วัดสระเกศราชวรมหาวิหาร, usually shortened to Wat Saket) is a Buddhist temple (Wat) in Pom Prap Sattru Phai district, Bangkok, Thailand. The temple dates back to the Ayutthaya era, when it was known as Wat Sakae. When Bangkok became the capital, King Rama I renovated the temple and gave it its present name. Phu Khao Thong (Golden mountain, ภูเขาทอง) is a steep artificial hill inside the Wat Saket compound. Rama I's grandson, King Rama III (1787–1851), decided to build a chedi of huge dimensions inside Wat Saket. Unfortunately, the chedi collapsed during construction because the soft soil of Bangkok could not support the weight. Over the next few decades, the abandoned mud-and-brick structure acquired the shape of a natural hill and was overgrown with weeds. The locals called it the "phu khao" (ภูเขา), as if it were a natural feature. During the reign of King Rama IV, construction began of a small chedi on the hill. It was completed early in the reign of his son, King Rama V (1853–1910). A relic of the Buddha was brought from India and placed in the chedi. The surrounding concrete walls were added in the 1940s to stop the hill from eroding. The
    5.33
    3 votes
    177
    West Mebon

    West Mebon

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The West Mebon (Khmer: ប្រាសាទមេបុណ្យខាងលិច) is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, located in the center of the West Baray, the largest reservoir of the Angkor area. The temple's date of construction is not known, but evidence suggests the 11th Century during the reign of King Suryavarman I or Udayadityavarman II. In the dry season today, it is reachable by land. In rainy season, the waters of the 7,800-meter-long baray rise and the temple, located on a site higher than the baray's floor, becomes an island. Khmer architects typically surrounded temples with moats that represent the Hindu sea of creation. The West Mebon, located amid waters so vast that they can seem like a real sea, takes this religious symbolism to the ultimate level. The temple was built to a square design, with sides measuring about 100 meters. Each side had three tower-passages crowned with stone lotus flowers and arrayed about 28 meters apart. In the center of the square was a stone platform linked to the eastern wall by a laterite and sandstone causeway. Today the platform, causeway and much of the east wall and towers remain; the other sides are largely gone, though their outlines in stone are visible when the
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    3 votes
    178
    Zhanshan Temple

    Zhanshan Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Zhanshan Temple (Chinese: 湛山寺; pinyin: Zhànshān Sì) is a Buddhist temple in Qingdao, Shandong, China. It is located on the southern side of Zhanshan (literally 'clear' or 'deep mountain'), facing the sea. The monastery was built in 1945 and is an active, functional Buddhist sanctuary. Apart from the Stupa and the Olympic Mascot Bell Tower, located on the right-hand side of the grounds, the remaining buildings are situated in a rectangular format. To the right of the entry portal is one of the several Buddhist scripture shops. Here, incense sticks and other Buddhist supplies are available for purchase. Adjacent the scripture shop is a Bell Tower (zhonglou; 钟楼) with the first of many statues of Buddha. At the right of the entry is the Drum Tower (gulou; 鼓楼) with another Buddha. Returning to the central path, directly ahead is the Heavenly King Hall (tianwang dian; 天王殿). The large Buddha, which is the focal point of this shrine, is flanked by four large statues, one depicting a pipa player. Directly behind Heavenly King Hall is the larger Hall of Sakyamuni (大雄宝殿),which honors the founder of Buddhism, the son of a king of the Sakya clan of the Kshatriya (i.e., warriors). His given name
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    3 votes
    179
    Bayon

    Bayon

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Bayon (Khmer: ប្រាសាទបាយ័ន, Prasat Bayon) is a well-known and richly decorated Khmer temple at Angkor in Cambodia. Built in the late 12th century or early 13th century as the official state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII, the Bayon stands at the centre of Jayavarman's capital, Angkor Thom. Following Jayavarman's death, it was modified and augmented by later Hindu and Theravada Buddhist kings in accordance with their own religious preferences. The Bayon's most distinctive feature is the multitude of serene and massive stone faces on the many towers which jut out from the upper terrace and cluster around its central peak. The temple is known also for two impressive sets of bas-reliefs, which present an unusual combination of mythological, historical, and mundane scenes. The current main conservatory body, the Japanese Government team for the Safeguarding of Angkor (the JSA) has described the temple as "the most striking expression of the baroque style" of Khmer architecture, as contrasted with the classical style of Angkor Wat. The Bayon was the last state temple to be built at Angkor, and the only Angkorian state temple to be built primarily as a Mahayana
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    2 votes
    180
    Byōdō-in

    Byōdō-in

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Byōdō-in (平等院) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan. It is jointly a temple of the Jōdo-shū (Pure Land) and Tendai-shū sects. This temple was originally built in 998 in the Heian period as a rural villa of Fujiwara no Michinaga, one of the most powerful members of the Fujiwara clan. This villa was changed to a Buddhist temple by Fujiwara no Yorimichi in 1052. The most famous building in the temple is the Phoenix Hall (鳳凰堂 Hōō-dō) or the Amida Hall, constructed in 1053. It is the only remaining original building, surrounded by a scenic pond; additional buildings making up the compound were burnt down during a civil war in 1336. The main building in Byōdō-in, the Phoenix Hall consists of a central hall, flanked by twin wing corridors on both sides of the central hall, and a tail corridor. The central hall houses an image of Amida Buddha. The roof of the hall displays statues of the Chinese phoenix, called hōō in Japanese. The Phoenix Hall, completed in 1053, is the exemplar of Fujiwara Amida halls. It consists of a main rectangular structure flanked by two L-shaped wing corridors and a tail corridor, set at the edge of a large artificial pond. Though its
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    2 votes
    181
    Kōtoku-in

    Kōtoku-in

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kōtoku-in (高徳院) is a Buddhist temple of the Jōdo-shū sect in the city of Kamakura in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The temple is renowned for its "Great Buddha" (大仏, Daibutsu), a monumental outdoor bronze statue of Amida Buddha which is one of the most famous icons of Japan. The Great Buddha of Kamakura is a monumental outdoor bronze statue of Amitābha Buddha located at the Kōtoku-in Temple in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The bronze statue probably dates from 1252, in the Kamakura period, according to temple records. It was preceded by a giant wooden Buddha, which was completed in 1243 after ten years of continuous labor, the funds having been raised by Lady Inada (Inada-no-Tsubone) and the Buddhist priest Jōkō of Tōtōmi. That wooden statue was damaged by a storm in 1248, and the hall containing it was destroyed, so Jōkō suggested making another statue of bronze, and the huge amount of money necessary for this and for a new hall was raised for the project. The bronze image was probably cast by Ōno Gorōemon or Tanji Hisatomo, both leading casters of the time. At one time, the statue was gilded. There are still traces of gold leaf near the statue's ears. It is unclear,
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    2 votes
    182
    Kuopio Cathedral

    Kuopio Cathedral

    • Currently used by religion(s): Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland
    • Type of place of worship: Cathedral
    The Kuopio Cathedral (Finnish: Kuopion tuomiokirkko, Swedish: Kuopio domkyrka) is a stone Neoclassical style church in Kuopio, Finland and the seat of the Diocese of Kuopio. The cathedral was built between 1806 and 1815. Media related to Kuopio Cathedral at Wikimedia Commons
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    2 votes
    183
    Phnom Bakheng

    Phnom Bakheng

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Phnom Bakheng (Khmer: ប្រាសាទភ្នំបាខែង) at Angkor, Cambodia, is a Hindu temple in the form of a temple mountain. Dedicated to Shiva, it was built at the end of the 9th century, during the reign of King Yasovarman (889-910). Located atop a hill, it is nowadays a popular tourist spot for sunset views of the much bigger temple Angkor Wat, which lies amid the jungle about 1.5 km to the southeast. The large number of visitors makes Phnom Bakheng one of the most threatened monuments of Angkor. Constructed more than two centuries before Angkor Wat, Phnom Bakheng was in its day the principal temple of the Angkor region, historians believe. It was the architectural centerpiece of a new capital, Yasodharapura, that Yasovarman built when he moved the court from the capital Hariharalaya in the Roluos area located to the southeast. An inscription dated 1052 AD. and found at the Sdok Kak Thom temple in present-day Thailand states in Sanskrit: "When Sri Yasovardhana became king under the name of Yasovarman, the able Vamasiva continued as his guru. By the king's order, he set up a linga on Sri Yasodharagiri, a mountain equal in beauty to the king of mountains." Scholars believe that this passage
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    2 votes
    184
    Songgwangsa

    Songgwangsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Songgwangsa (Korean:송광사 / 松廣寺; translation: Spreading Pine Temple; alternates: Songgwang-sa, or Songgwang Sa, or Songkwangsa; also known as: Piney Expanse Monastery; originally: Gilsangsa), one of the three jewels of Korean Buddhism, is located in Jeollanam-do on the Korean Peninsula. Situated approximately 18 miles (29 km) away from the sea, it is within the Jogyesan Provincial Park. This monastery, though under the jurisdiction of the Chogye Order in Seoul, functions as an autonomous body. It controls a network of 49 small branch temples whose abbots are chosen from among the monks of the main monastery and who also enjoy a fair degree on independence as long as they function as independent economic units without depending on the main monastery. It serves as the head temple for the 21st district of the Jogye Order among the 25 head monasteries of the order. Songgwangsa, one of the oldest Zen temples in Korea, is still very active today as a practice center. While originally founded in 867, it was established in 1190 by Zen Master Jinul (Chinul). Chinul's meditation teachings evolved from this monastery and contributed significantly to the Zen practice that prevails to this day in
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Tsurphu Monastery

    Tsurphu Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tsurphu Monastery (also Tolung Tsurpu / sTod lung mTshur phu) is a Tibetan Buddhist monastery which served as the traditional seat of the Karmapa. It is located in Gurum town (rgu rum / Gǔróng Xiàng 古荣乡) of Doilungdêqên County in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China, 70 km from Lhasa. The monastery is about 14,000 feet (4,300 m) above sea level. It was built in the middle of the valley facing south with high mountains surrounding the monastery complex. Tsurphu is a 300-square-meter (3,200 sq ft) complex with walls up to 4 meters (13 ft) thick. The monastery or "gompa", the traditional seat of the Karmapa lamas, is about 28 km up the Dowo Lung Valley, on the north side of the river. The original walls of the main building were up to 4 meters thick and 300 meters square (area 90,000 square meters or 970,000 square feet). The monks' residences were on the eastern side. Tsurphu was founded by the first Karmapa, Düsum Khyenpa (1110-1193) in 1159, after he visited the site and laid the foundation for an establishment of a seat there by making offerings to the local protectors, dharmapala and genius loci. In 1189 he revisited the site and founded his main seat there. The monastery grew to
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Woljeongsa

    Woljeongsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Woljeongsa is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism, located on the eastern slopes of Odaesan in Pyeongchang County, Gangwon Province, South Korea. Woljeongsa was founded in 643 by the Silla monk Jajang. Burned down and rebuilt a number of times, the last disaster was during the Korean War (1950–1953), when about ten buildings were burnt down by the Korean Army because it had become a refuge for the rebel forces. It is said that, on this mountain, Master Jajang chanted before a stone statue of a Bodhisattva beside a pond, hoping to fulfill his wish to see a Manjusri Bodhisattva. On the seventh night after chanting he had a vision in which the Buddha gave him a poem with four lines in Sanskrit. Next day, a monk came and remarked that the master looked pale and troubled. Master Jajang explained that he had received a poem he could not understand. The mysterious monk explained the verses and then told Jajang to go to Odaesan in Shilla where he would find 10,000 Manjusris. After seven more days of chanting, a dragon appeared who told Jajang that the old monk had been a Manjusri and that now he must go and build a temple to the Bodhisattva. In 643 CE, Chajang reached
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Youguo Temple

    Youguo Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Youguo Temple (Chinese: 佑國寺) is a Buddhist monastery complex located northeast of Kaifeng, in Henan province, China. It was built during the Song Dynasty (960–1279 CE). The design features the Iron Pagoda towering in the center of the complex, in a style that flourished in Chinese Buddhist temple architecture through the 11th century. The original temple was magnificent in scale with 280 halls and 24 monasteries. Kaifeng was the capital city of the Northern Song Dynasty, and the temple was an important place that the emperors of the dynasty visited often. The imperial examinations were held at the temple, and applicants from throughout the Chinese empire came to take civil service exams. The temple's original pagoda was a mammoth octagonal wooden tower of thirteen stories. The eminent architect Yu Hao had designed and engineered it. In 1044, it was hit by lightning and burned to the ground. Emperor Renzong of the Northern Song Dynasty ordered its replacement. It was designed to resemble the original wooden pagoda but built of glazed bricks so the tower would be fire-resistant and enduring. The 55 metre high Iron Pagoda, built in 1049, is a solid core, octagonal brick tower with an
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    An'yō-in

    An'yō-in

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Gionzan An’yō-in Chōraku-ji (祇園山安養院長楽寺) is a Jōdo shū Buddhist temple in Kamakura, Kanagawa, Japan. Famous for its azaleas, it was named after its founder's (great historical figure Hōjō Masako) posthumous name. The main object of worship is Amida Nyorai, but it also enshrines Senju Kannon, Goddess of Mercy. An’yō-in is Number three of the 33 temples of the Bandō Sanjūsankasho pilgrimage circuit. This temple has a complex history and is the result of the fusion of three separate temples called Chōraku-ji, Zendō-ji and Tashiro-ji. It was first opened in 1225 as Chōraku-ji in Hase Sasamegayatsu by Hōjō Masako for her defunct husband Minamoto no Yoritomo, founder of the Kamakura shogunate. At the time it was a Ritsu sect temple. After being burned to the ground by Nitta Yoshisada's soldiery in 1333 at the fall of the Kamakura shogunate, it was fused with Zendō-ji, moved to this spot and renamed, but it burned again in 1680. It was then once more rebuilt and a Senju Kannon (Thousand-armed Goddess of Mercy) was transferred to it from Tashiro-ji in Hikigayatsu. The great Chinese black pine in the garden is over 700 years old. Behind the temple there are two hōkyōintō. The smallest is one
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    Engaku-ji

    Engaku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Not to be confused with Enryaku-ji in Kyoto. Zuirokuzan Engaku Kōshō Zenji (瑞鹿山円覚興聖禅寺), or Engaku-ji (円覚寺), is one of the most important Zen Buddhist temple complexes in Japan and is ranked second among Kamakura's Five Mountains. It is situated in the city of Kamakura, in Kanagawa prefecture to the south of Tokyo. It is very close to the Kita-Kamakura railway station on the Tokyo to Yokosuka line, and indeed the railway tracks cut across the formal entrance to the temple compound, which (showing Chinese influence) is by a path beside a pond which is crossed by a small bridge. The temple was founded in 1282 by a Chinese Zen monk at the request of the then ruler of Japan, the regent Hōjō Tokimune after he had repelled a Mongolian invasion in the period 1274 to 1281. Tokimune had a long-standing commitment to Zen and the temple was intended to honour those of both sides who died in the war, as well as serving as a centre from which the influence of Zen could be spread. According to the records of the time, when building work started a copy of the Sutra of Perfect Enlightenment (in Japanese, engaku-kyō 円覚経) was dug out of the hillside in a stone chest during the initial building works,
    5.50
    2 votes
    190
    Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Temple

    Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery (also the Bright Hill Pujue Ch'an Monastery) (simplified Chinese: 光明山普觉禅寺; traditional Chinese: 光明山普覺禪寺; pinyin: Guāngmíng Shān Pǔjué Chán Sì; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Kong-bîng-san-phóo-kak-sī), is located at 88 Bright Hill Road at Bishan. It is the largest Buddhist temple in Singapore. In 1920, Venerable Zhuan Dao built the temple as a place of practice to propagate the Dharma and to provide lodging for monks, as there were many Buddhist monks who came to Singapore without lodging. In 1921, the building of Phor Kark See Monastery was the first traditional Chinese forest monastery in Singapore. Since Phor Kark See Monastery is situated at Kong Meng San ("Bright Hill", formerly "Hai Nan Mountain"), it has come to be known as Kong Meng San Phor Kark See Monastery. The Monastery grew steadily and Dharma propagation began in Singapore. In 1943, Venerable Zhuan Dao died at Putuo Monastery at the age of 72. In 1947, Venerable Hong Choon became the monastery's abbot. With great perseverance, he progressively developed and expanded the monastery with his followers into the largest and most majestic place of practice in Singapore. Venerable Hong Choon also
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Nipponzan-Myōhōji

    Nipponzan-Myōhōji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Nipponzan-Myōhōji-Daisanga (日本山妙法寺大僧伽), founded in 1917 by Nichidatsu Fujii, is a new religious movement that emerged from the Nichiren sect of Japanese Buddhism. The community reveres the Lotus-Sūtra (jp: 法華経 Hokke-kyō) as the highest expression of the Buddhist message. In addition, it is actively engaged worldwide in the peace movement. It is the most pacifist group in Japan of seven religious movements surveyed by Robert Kisala. The main practice of Nichiren Buddhism is to chant the Daimoku Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō. Nipponzan-Myōhōji monks, nuns and followers beat hand drums while chanting the Daimoku, and walk throughout the world promoting peace and non-violence. Nipponzan-Myōhōji has Peace Pagodas (Stupas) in locations around the world. It has had peace pilgrimages undertaken by its followers. One of the most prominent of these was the 1994-1995 pilgrimage from Auschwitz to Hiroshima by way of Bosnia, Iraq, Cambodia and other countries then experiencing the effects of war. That pilgrimage was known as The Interfaith Pilgrimage for Peace and Life. Address: 8-7 Shinsen-cho, Shibuya, Tokyo 150-0045, Japan (In Japanese: 〒1500045 東京都渋谷区神泉町8番7号) Tel: (03) 3461-9363 Address: Nipponzan
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Pindaya Caves

    Pindaya Caves

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Pindaya Caves (Burmese: ပင်းတယရွှေဥမင်, pronounced [pɪ́ɴdəja̰ ʃwè ṵmɪ̀ɴ]; officially ပင်းတယရွှေဥမင်သဘောဝလိုဏ်ဂူဘုရား), located next to the town of Pindaya, Shan State, Burma (Myanmar) are a Buddhist pilgrimage site and a tourist attraction located on a limestone ridge in the Myelat region. There are three "caves" on the ridge which runs north-south, but only the southern cave can be entered and explored. It is not known whether the other two penetrate for any extended distance into the hillside. The southernmost Pindaya cave can be entered and extends for about 490 feet along a well-worn path. It is known for its interior which contains over 8,000 images of Buddha. Some of the older statues and images in the cave have inscriptions dating to the late 18th century, or early Konbaung period, and the earliest one dates from 1773. There may be some images without inscriptions that are older, but based on the style elements, Than Tun believes that none of them is older than the early 18th century and even suggests 1750 as the earliest possible date. Although most statues are of late 18th and early 19th century, many other statues and images have been placed there on an on-going basis
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Sōfuku-ji

    Sōfuku-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sōfuku-ji (崇福寺) is a Buddhist temple located in Gifu, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. The temple has strong ties to both Saitō Dōsan and Oda Nobunaga. Gifu's Sōfuku-ji is famed throughout Japan for both the number of monks it produces and for its "Blood Ceiling". Shortly after its founding, it was also known as Kōsai-ji (弘済寺), but that name is no longer used. It is also one of the Mino Thirty-three Kannon. Sōfuku-ji was originally built during the Kamakura period. However, because it suffered from much deterioration, Saitō Toshimasa moved and rebuilt the temple in 1511. In 1517, he gave it its current name. According to other stories, though, it was originally built in 1469, by Toki Shigeyori and Saitō Nagahiro, and it was officially opened in 1493. When Oda Nobunaga moved into Gifu in 1567, he claimed Sōfuku-ji as his family temple. After Nobunaga and his son, Nobutada, died during the Incident at Honnō-ji in 1582, many of their personal treasures were moved to the temple. In 1600, when Oda Hidenobu was responding to Ishida Mitsunari's call for assistance, Fukushima Masanori and Ikeda Terumasa sieged the castle and destroyed it during the Battle of Gifu Castle. Hidenobu's vassals died
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Tashilhunpo

    Tashilhunpo

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Tashilhunpo Monastery (Tibetan: བཀྲ་ཤིས་ལྷུན་པོ་), founded in 1447 by Gendun Drup, the First Dalai Lama, is a historic and culturally important monastery next to Shigatse, the second-largest city in Tibet. It was sacked when the Gurkhas invaded Tibet and captured Shigatse in 1791 before a combined Tibetan and Chinese army drove them back as far as the outskirts of Kathmandu, when they were forced to agree to keep the peace in future, pay tribute every five years, and return what they had looted from Tashilhunpo. The monastery is the traditional seat of successive Panchen Lamas, the second highest ranking tulku lineage in the Gelukpa tradition. The "Tashi" or Panchen Lama had temporal power over three small districts, though not over the town of Shigatse itself, which was administered by a dzongpön (prefect) appointed from Lhasa. Located on a hill in the center of the city, the full name in Tibetan of the monastery means: "all fortune and happiness gathered here" or "heap of glory". Pilgrims circumambulate the monastery on the Lingkor (sacred path) outside the walls. Fortunately, although two-thirds of the buildings were destroyed during the Cultural Revolution, they were mainly the
    5.50
    2 votes
    195
    Wat Chedi Liem

    Wat Chedi Liem

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Chedi Liam (originally Wat Ku Kham; also written as Wat Chedi Liem) is one of the wats in the ancient Thai city of Wiang Kum Kam, now part of present day Chiang Mai. The original name Wat Ku Kham means 'The temple of the Gold Chedi' and the later name means 'Temple with Angular Chedi'. Monks still reside here. The temple was built c.1287 and remained in use during the early Lan Na period after the new city of Chiang Mai had been established by King Mangrai the Great. The current buildings are from a renovation in 1908 CE by a Burmese trader. Because of this many of the decorations of the wat are Burmese in style. For example, all but one of the Buddha images on the chedi are wearing the yellow Burmese colourings rather than the white Thai colours. The chedi was also renovated in 1992 CE when a number of other improvements were made to the site. Not all of these improvements were popular, nor were some needed repairs carried out. Despite its great age the wat is used in much the same way as later wats (for example, there is a weekend market there). The Chedi is a five-tiered design common in the early Lanna period and shows clear influence of the Mon Haripunchai design. Each
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Great Vow Zen Monastery

    Great Vow Zen Monastery

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Great Vow Zen Monastery was founded in 2002 and is operated by Zen Community of Oregon (ZCO) under the leadership of abbots Chozen Bays, Roshi, and Hogen Bays. The monastery offers weekend workshops, weeklong meditation retreats, and special events throughout the year. Great Vow Zen Monastery is a training monastery in the White Plum lineage of the Japanese Soto Zen tradition. Abbot Hogen Bays was an early disciple of Roshi Philip Kapleau; both he and Chozen Roshi studied for many years with Taizan Maezumi Roshi at Zen Center of Los Angeles. More recently they have continued to deepen their spiritual practice with the contemporary Rinzai Zen teacher Shodo Harada Roshi. Visiting teachers often lead or co-lead meditation retreats or weekend workshops at the monastery, sometimes on a recurring annual basis. Among them are Buddhist teachers Kyogen Carlson and Gyokuko Carlson; Ejo Patrick McMullen; Lama Michael Conklin; Alan Wallace; and Ajahn Amaro. The monastery is housed in a former elementary school on 20 acres (81,000 m) of land overlooking the Columbia River floodplain near Clatskanie, Oregon. Two former classroom "pods" serve as dormitory wings for residents and visitors.
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Hase-dera

    Hase-dera

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Hase-dera (長谷寺) is the main temple of the Buzan sect of Shingon Buddhism. The temple is located in Sakurai, Nara Prefecture, Japan. According to the description on the bronze plaque of the Hokke Sessō-zu (銅板法華説相図, dōban hokke sessō zu), the temple was first built in 686 and dedicated to Emperor Temmu, who was suffering from a disease. Later in the year 727, the temple was further expanded by order of Emperor Shōmu and the statue of the eleven-faced Kannon was placed near the original temple that enshrined the bronze plaque. The temple was favored by aristocrats such as the author of the Kagerō Nikki and the author of the Sarashina Nikki during the Heian period. The temple has been burnt down as many as ten times since the 10th century. Hase-dera was consistently popular with visitors,helped by the fact it was situated on the route to Ise Shrine. Hase-dera has flourished as one of the centers of the reformed Shingon Buddhism, particularly after the arrival of priest Sen'yo from Negoro-ji in 1588. The best times of year to visit this temple are in spring, because at this time of year the peonies that line the 200m walkway from the gate to the hall are in bloom. There is approximately
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Kurjey Lhakhang

    Kurjey Lhakhang

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kurjey Lhakang, also known as Kurjey Monastery, is located in the Bumthang valley in the Bumthang district of Bhutan. This is the final resting place of the remains of the first three kings of Bhutan. Also, a large tree behind one of the temple buildings is believed to be a terma that was left there by Padmasambhava. Template:Barbie office-stub
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Kuthodaw Pagoda

    Kuthodaw Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kuthodaw Pagoda (Burmese: ကုသိုလ်တော်‌ဘုရား, pronounced: [kṵðòdɔ̀ pʰəjá]; literally Royal Merit, and formally titled Mahalawka Marazein မဟာလောကမာရဇိန်စေတီ) is a Buddhist stupa, located in Mandalay, Burma (Myanmar), that contains the world's largest book. It lies at the foot of Mandalay Hill and was built during the reign of King Mindon. The stupa itself, which is gilded above its terraces, is 188 feet (57 m) high, and is modelled after the Shwezigon Pagoda at Nyaung-U near Bagan. In the grounds of the pagoda are 729 kyauksa gu or stone-inscription caves, each containing a marble slab inscribed on both sides with a page of text from the Tipitaka, the entire Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism. Mindon Min had the pagoda built as part of the traditional foundations of the new royal city of Mandalay in 1857. He was later to convene the Fifth Buddhist Synod in 1871, but wanted to leave a great work of merit by having the Tipitaka set in stone for posterity, meant to last five millennia after the Buddha. Construction began in 1860, its hti (umbrella or crown) mounted on 19 July 1862, and the inscriptions were laid open to the public on 4 May 1868. They were arranged in neat rows within
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Meigetsu-in

    Meigetsu-in

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Fugenzan Meigetsu-in (福源山明月院) is a Rinzai Zen temple of the Kenchō-ji school in Kita-Kamakura, Kanagawa, Japan. Famous for its hydrangeas, it's also known as The Temple of Hydrangeas (ajisai-dera). The main object of worship is goddess Shō Kannon (聖観音). Meigetsu-in was built by Uesugi Norikata of the powerful Uesugi clan, and the name itself derives from Norikata's own posthumous name (Meigetsu). According to 350-year-old records it was originally just the guest rooms of a much bigger temple called Zenkō-ji (禅興寺) which was closed by the government during the Meiji period. Zenkō-ji was a temple of considerable prestige, being one of the Rinzai Zen temples classified as (Kantō Jissetsu (関東十刹), which were second in importance only to Kamakura's so-called Five Mountains (Kamakura Gozan (鎌倉五山). Zenkō-ji however didn't survive the anti-Buddhist clampdown (Haibutsu kishaku) that followed the Meiji Restoration. Meigetsu-in is the owner of a famous 13th century statue of Uesugi Shigefusa, founder of the Uesugi clan. He is dressed in the picturesque clothes of the dignitaries of the Kamakura period. The statue is a National Treasure.
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Plum Village

    Plum Village

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Plum Village (Làng Mai) is a Buddhist meditation center in the Dordogne, in southern France. It was founded by Vietnamese monk Thích Nhất Hạnh, and his colleague Bhikkhuni Chân Không, in 1982. After being refused the right to return to Vietnam, Thích Nhất Hạnh formed a small mindfulness community 100 miles south-west of Paris called the Sweet Potato, the food that poor Vietnamese eat. Following Thích Nhất Hạnh's expulsion from Singapore following illegal attempts to rescue Vietnamese boat people, he settled in France and began to lead mindfulness retreats. In 1981, Sweet Potato community held its first summer retreat, which attracted more people than it could accommodate. Thích Nhất Hạnh then traveled south with his colleague Chân Không to find a larger site. They found a piece of land in Thenac which seemed ideal. The landowner, Mr. Dezon, didn't want to sell, so they continued looking. A few days later, on September 28, 1982, Thích Nhất Hạnh purchased a tract of land about 6 kilometers away, which is now known as the Lower Hamlet (Xóm Hạ). Later that year, a hailstorm destroyed the vineyards on Mr. Dezon's property and he was forced to put his land on the market. Nhất Hạnh bought
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    Sanko Shrine

    Sanko Shrine

    • Currently used by religion(s): Shinto
    • Type of place of worship: Shrine
    Sankō Shrine (三光神社, Sankō-jinja) is a Shinto shrine on a hill named Mt. Sanada (真田山, Sanada-yama) in Tennōji-ku, Osaka, Japan. There is a statue of Sanada Yukimura on the grounds and the opening of a tunnel that is said to have once connected to Osaka Castle. Official website (Japanese)
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Sōji-ji

    Sōji-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sōji-ji (總持寺) is one of two head temples or honzan (本山?) of the Sōtō school of Zen Buddhism. Fodor's calls it "one of the largest and busiest Buddhist institutions in Japan". The temple was founded in 740 as a Shingon Buddhist temple. Keizan, later known as Sōtō's great patriarch Taiso Jōsai Daishi, founded the present temple in 1321, when he renamed it Sōji-ji with the help and patronage of Emperor Go-Daigo. The temple has about twelve buildings in the port city of Yokohama, one designed by the architect Itō Chūta. Giving it the name Morookadera circa 740, Gyōki (668-749) founded the temple as a Shingon Buddhist temple in Noto, a peninsula on Honshu, Japan's largest island. Dōgen who brought Sōtō Zen from China to Japan, became Sōtō's chief priest, and was eventually succeeded by Keizan. Together they founded Sōtō Zen during the 13th and 14th centuries. In 1321, Keizan changed the temple from Shingon to a Sōtō temple named Shogakuzan Sōji-ji (ji means Buddhist temple in Japanese). The temple was totally destroyed by fire in 1898. It was rebuilt over a period of several years and, in order to bring more Sōtō Zen to eastern Japan, reopened in 1911 in its present location at Tsurumi,
    6.00
    1 votes
    204
    Nan Tien temple

    Nan Tien temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Nan Tien Temple (Chinese: 南天寺; pinyin: Nántiān Sì; literally "Southern Heaven Temple") is a Buddhist temple complex located in the industrial suburb of Berkeley, on the southern outskirts of the Australian city of Wollongong, approximately 80 km south of Sydney. Nan Tien is a Chinese term which means "southern paradise". Nan Tien is one of the branch temples of the Taiwanese Fo Guang Shan Buddhist order, founded in 1967 by Hsing Yun, which has over 120 branches worldwide. The temple is one of the largest Buddhist temples in the southern hemisphere. Fo Guang Shan Buddhism is rooted in the Mahayana tradition which emphasises that Buddhahood is within everyone's potential reach. Fo Guang Shan followers strive to bring Buddhism into daily life and describe their philosophy as "Humanistic Buddhism." It was funded by and constructed under the auspices of the Mahayana Buddhist sect known as Fo Guang Shan, and completed in 1995. The sect itself was founded in Taiwan in 1967 by Venerable Master Hsing Yun, and has 120 branches throughout the world. The site of the Australian branch's temple was reputedly chosen by Hsing Yun due to its proximity to Mount Kembla, which is said to have an
    4.33
    3 votes
    205
    Sonoma Mountain Zen Center

    Sonoma Mountain Zen Center

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Sonoma Mountain Zen Center (or, Genjoji) is a Soto Zen practice center located on 80 acres (30 ha) in the mountainous region of Sonoma County in California—near Santa Rosa—carrying on the tradition and lineage of Shunryu Suzuki. Founded by Jakusho Kwong and his wife Laura Kwong in 1973, Kwong-roshi is the current guiding teacher of the Zen center. Offering residential training, Sonoma Mountain Zen Center also offers a practice regimen for members of the surrounding area and elsewhere who are not residents. Sonoma Mountain Zen Center was established by Jakusho Kwong and his wife Laura Kwong in 1973. According to the book Opening the Mountain, "Bill and Laura Kwong had moved to Mill Valley and began a little 'put away zendo.' It took place in a neighborhood hall. Every morning, mats, cushions, and altar were put away so other uses of the room could happen. In 1973 the Kwongs and their four sons moved one county north. Classes Bill taught at Sonoma State University gave birth to Sonoma Mountain Zen Center." A self-sustaining institution, the Zen center supports itself through members donations, proceeds from its Zen Dust bookstore, and by offering rooms for rental.Author Sarah Ban
    4.33
    3 votes
    206
    Hagia Sophia

    Hagia Sophia

    • Type of place of worship: Basilica
    Hagia Sophia (/ˈhɑːɪə soʊˈfiːə/; from the Greek: Ἁγία Σοφία [aˈʝia soˈfia], "Holy Wisdom"; Latin: Sancta Sophia or Sancta Sapientia; Turkish: Ayasofya) is a former Orthodox patriarchal basilica, later a mosque, and now a museum in Istanbul, Turkey. From the date of its dedication in 360 until 1453, it served as the Greek Patriarchal cathedral of Constantinople, except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire. The building was a mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931, when it was secularized. It was opened as a museum on 1 February 1935. The Church was dedicated to the Logos, the second person of the Holy Trinity, its dedication feast taking place on 25 December, the anniversary of the Birth of the incarnation of the Logos in Christ. Although it is sometimes referred to as Sancta Sophia (as though it were named after Saint Sophia), sophia is the phonetic spelling in Latin of the Greek word for wisdom – the full name in Greek being Ναός τῆς Ἁγίας τοῦ Θεοῦ Σοφίας, "Shrine of the Holy Wisdom of God". Famous in particular for its massive dome, it is considered the epitome of Byzantine architecture and is said to have "changed the
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    Jetavanaramaya

    Jetavanaramaya

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Jetavanaramaya is a stupa, located in the ruins of Jetavana Monastery in the sacred world heritage city of Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. King Mahasena (273-301 AD) initiated the construction of the stupa following the destruction of Mahavihara, his son Maghavanna I completed the construction of the stupa. A part of a sash or belt tied by the Buddha is believed to be the relic that is enshrined here. The structure is significant in the island's history for it represents the tensions within the Theravada and Mahayana sects of Buddhist monks, it is also significant in world history as one of the tallest structures in the ancient world. The height of the stupa is 400 feet (122 m) and was the tallest ancient stupa in the world, the structure is no longer the tallest however it is the largest with a volume of 233,000 m (2,508,000 sq ft). At the time of its completion the structure was the third tallest structure in the world behind the Great Pyramids of Giza. Approximately 93.3 million baked bricks were used in its construction; the engineering ingenuity behind the construction of the structure is a significant development in the history of the island. The sectarian differences between
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    Kanzeon Zen Center

    Kanzeon Zen Center

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kanzeon Zen Center is a Zen Buddhist center located in Salt Lake City, Utah. It is an affiliate of the White Plum Asanga, an association of Zen centers stemming from the tradition of Taizan Maezumi. Currently, the Abbot of Kanzeon Zen Center is Dennis Genpo Merzel Roshi, and the Vice-Abbot is Rich Taido Christofferson Sensei. Kanzeon Zen Center is the home temple and the hub of Kanzeon Sangha International, founded by Genpo Roshi in 1984, with affiliate teachers, centers and groups in the USA and seven European countries. The center is housed at 1274 E. South Temple, a historic building listed as a contributing property in the South Temple Historic District.
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    Kuttam Pokuna

    Kuttam Pokuna

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    One of the best specimen of bathing tanks or pools in ancient Sri Lanka is the pair of pools known as Kuttam Pokuna (Twin Ponds/Pools). The said pair of pools were built by the Sinhalese in the ancient kingdom of Anuradhapura. These are considered one of the significant achievements in the field of hydrological engineering and outstanding architectural and artistic creations of the ancient Sinhalese. A garden was landscaped which separates the two ponds which long is 18½ ft. The larger pool of the two is 132 ft by 51 ft, while the smaller pool is 91 ft by 51 ft. The depths of the two pools is 14 ft and 18 ft for the smaller pool and the larger pool respectively. The faces of the pools were cut granite slabs which includes the bottom and the sides of the pool. A wall was also built around the pool which encloses the compound. Flights of steps are seen on both ends of the pool decorated with punkalas, or pots of abundance and scroll design. Embankments were constructed to enable monks to bathe using pots or other utensils. Water to the pools were transferred through underground ducts and filtered before flowing to the pool and in a similar fashion the water was emptied. Dr. Senerath
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    Lumbini

    Lumbini

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Lumbinī (Sanskrit: लुम्बिनी, "the lovely") is a Buddhist pilgrimage site in the Rupandehi district of Nepal. It is the place where Queen Mayadevi gave birth to Siddhartha Gautama, who as the Buddha Gautama founded the Buddhist tradition. The Buddha lived between roughly 563 and 483 BCE. Lumbini is one of four magnets for pilgrimage that sprang up in places pivotal to the life of the Buddha, the others being at Kushinagar, Bodh Gaya and Sarnath. Lumbini was where the Buddha lived until the age of 29. Lumbini has a number of temples, including the Mayadevi temple, and others under construction. Also located here is the Puskarini or Holy Pond where the Buddha's mother took the ritual dip prior to his birth and where he, too, had his first bath, as well as the remains of Kapilvastu palace. At other sites near Lumbini, earlier Buddhas were, according to tradition, born, achieved ultimate awakening and finally relinquished earthly form. In the Buddha's time, Lumbini was situated between Kapilavastu and Devadaha Nepal. It was there that the Buddha was born. A pillar now marks the spot of Asoka's visit to Lumbiní. According to an inscription on the pillar, it was placed there by the people
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    Providence Zen Center

    Providence Zen Center

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Providence Zen Center (PZC) is the international headquarters for the Kwan Um School of Zen (KUSZ) and the first Zen center established by Seung Sahn in the United States in October 1972. The PZC offers residential training where students and teachers live together under one roof, which was one of the hallmarks of Seung Sahn's philosophy concerning Zen practice in his organization. While the PZC is primarily a residential training site, the center also offers retreats to the non-ordained—such as their Yong Maeng Jon Jin. Practice at the center, and at Diamond Hill Zen Monastery, which shares the PZC property, includes sitting meditation, prostrations, and chanting. The Providence Zen Center was originally located in Providence, Rhode Island, but in 1979 the center relocated to its current 50 acre site in Cumberland. One of the center's centerpiece landmarks is the Peace Pagoda, a towering 65-foot (20 m) high pagoda located at the front of the center grounds. PZC also serves as the U.S. headquarters for the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. The Providence Zen Center was established by Seung Sahn in October 1972 on Doyle Avenue in Providence, Rhode Island as the first practice center
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    Iron Pagoda

    Iron Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Iron Pagoda (Chinese: 鐵塔) of Youguo Temple (佑國寺), Kaifeng City, Henan province, is a Buddhist Chinese pagoda built in 1049 during the Song Dynasty (960–1279) of China. The pagoda is so-named not because it is made of iron, but because its colour resembles that of iron. It is a brick pagoda tower built on the location of a previous wooden pagoda that had been burnt down by lightning fire in 1044. Along with the Liuhe, Lingxiao, Liaodi, Pizhi, and Beisi pagodas, it is seen as a masterpiece of the Song Dynasty architecture. This octagonal-base structure stands at a current height of 56.88 meters (186.56 feet), with a total of 13 stories. It is a solid-core brick tower with an inner spiral stone staircase and outside openings to allow light and air flow. The architectural style features densely positioned, articulated dougong in the eaves (miyan) and multiple stories (louge). The exterior features more than fifty different varieties of glazed brick and 1,600 intricate and richly detailed carvings, including those of standing and sitting Buddha, standing monks, singers and flying dancers, flowers, lions, dragons and other legendary beasts as well as many fine engravings. Under the
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    Kenchō-ji

    Kenchō-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Kenchō-ji (建長寺) is a Rinzai Zen temple in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, which ranks first among Kamakura's so-called Five Great Zen Temples (the Kamakura Gozan) and is the oldest Zen training monastery in Japan. These temples were at the top of the Five Mountain System, a network of Zen temples started by the Hōjō Regents. Still very large, it originally had a full shichidō garan and 49 subtemples. The temple was constructed on the orders of Emperor Go-Fukakusa and completed in 1253, fifth year of the Kenchō era, from which it takes its name. It was founded by Rankei Doryū, a Chinese Zen master who moved to Japan in 1246, spending some years in Kyushu and Kyoto before coming to Kamakura. Kamakura Regent Hōjō Tokiyori was the temple's main patron during its early years. The sponsorship was spiritual (he was close to a Zen master himself) as well as political: the Kamakura Gozan, organization of which this temple was head, had an important role in the shogunate's organization. The system, to which the Ashikaga added a series of five temples in Kyoto called the Kyoto Gozan, was adopted to promote Zen in Japan however, there as it had already happened in China, it was soon
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    Lingyin Si

    Lingyin Si

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Lingyin Temple (simplified Chinese: 灵隐寺; traditional Chinese: 靈隐寺; pinyin: Língyǐn Sì) is a Buddhist temple of the Chan sect located north-west of Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of China. The temple's name is commonly literally translated as Temple of the Soul's Retreat. It is one of the largest and wealthiest Buddhist temples in China, and contains numerous pagodas and Budddhist grottoes. The monastery is the largest of several temples in the Wulin Mountains (武林山), which also features a large number of grottos and religious rock carvings, the most famous of which is the Feilai Feng (飞来峰; literally "the peak that flew hither"). The monastery was founded in 328 AD during the Eastern Jin Dynasty by monk Hui Li, who came from India. From its inception, Lingyin was a famous monastery in the Jiangnan region. At its peak under the Kingdom of Wuyue (907-978), the temple boasted nine multi-storey buildings, 18 pavilions, 72 halls, more than 1300 dormitory rooms, inhabited by more than 3000 monks. Many of the rich Buddhist carvings in the Feilai Feng grottos and surrounding mountains also date from this era. During the later Southern Song Dynasty, the monastery was regarded
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    Pagoda of Fogong Temple

    Pagoda of Fogong Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Sakyamuni Pagoda of Fogong Temple (simplified Chinese: 佛宫寺释迦塔; traditional Chinese: 佛宮寺釋迦塔; pinyin: Fógōng Sì Shìjiā Tǎ) of Ying County, Shanxi province, China, is a wooden Chinese pagoda built in 1056, during the Khitan-led Liao Dynasty. The pagoda was built by Emperor Daozong of Liao (Hongji) at the site of his grandmother's family home. The pagoda, which has survived several large earthquakes throughout the centuries, reached a level of such fame within China that it was given the generic nickname of the "Muta" (Chinese: 木塔; pinyin: mùtǎ; literally "Timber Pagoda"). The pagoda stands on a 4 m (13 ft) tall stone platform, has a 10 m (33 ft) tall steeple, and reaches a total height of 67.31 m (220.83 ft) tall; it is the oldest existent fully wooden pagoda still standing in China. Although it is the oldest fully wooden pagoda in China, the oldest existent pagoda is the 6th century Songyue Pagoda made of brick and the oldest existent wooden buildings in China date back to the mid Tang Dynasty (618–907), which are Buddhist temple halls found at Mount Wutai. The Pagoda of Fogong Temple was built 85 km (53 mi) south of the Liao Dynasty capital at Datong. The Gujin Tushu Jicheng
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    Phimeanakas

    Phimeanakas

    • Currently used by religion(s): Hinduism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Phimeanakas (Khmer: ប្រាសាទភិមានអាកាស, Prasat Phimean Akas, 'celestial temple') or Vimeanakas (Khmer: ប្រាសាទវិមានអាកាស, Prasat Vimean Akas) at Angkor, Cambodia, is a Hindu temple in the Khleang style, built at the end of the 10th century, during the reign of Rajendravarman (from 941-968), then rebuilt by Suryavarman II in the shape of a three tier pyramid as a Hindu temple. On top of the pyramid there was a tower. According to legend, the king spent the first watch of every night with a woman thought to represent a Nāga in the tower, during that time, not even the queen was permitted to intrude. Only in the second watch the king returned to his palace with the queen. If the naga who was the supreme land owner of Khmer land did not show up for a night, the king's day would be numbered, if the king did not show up, calamity would strike his land.
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    Sule Pagoda

    Sule Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Sule Pagoda (Burmese: ဆူးေလဘုရား, pronounced: [sʰúlè pʰəjá]) is a Burmese stupa located in the heart of downtown Yangon, occupying the centre of the city and an important space in contemporary Burmese politics, ideology and geography. According to legend, it was built before the Shwe Dagon pagoda during the time of the Buddha, making it more than 2,500 years old. Burmese legend states that the site for the Shwe Dagon pagoda was asked to be revealed from an old nat who resided at the place where the Sule Pagoda now stands. The Sule Pagoda has been the focal point of both Yangon and Burmese politics. It has served as a rallying point in both the 1988 uprisings and 2007 Saffron Revolution. The pagoda is listed on the Yangon City Heritage List. The Sule Pagoda incorporated the original Indian structure of the stupa, which initially was used to replicate the form and function of a relic mound. However, as Burmese culture became more independent of its South Indian influences, local architectural forms began to change the shape of the pagoda. It is believed to enshrine a strand of hair of the Buddha that the Buddha himself is said to have given to the two Burmese merchant brothers,
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    Taktshang

    Taktshang

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Monastery
    Paro Taktsang (spa phro stag tshang / spa gro stag tshang), is the popular name of Taktsang Palphug Monastery (also known as The Tiger's Nest), a prominent Himalayan Buddhist sacred site and temple complex, located in the cliffside of the upper Paro valley, Bhutan. A temple complex was first built in 1692, around the Taktsang Senge Samdup (stag tshang seng ge bsam grub) cave where Guru Padmasambhava is said to have meditated for three years, three months, three weeks, three days and three hours in the 8th century. Padmasambhava is credited with introducing Buddhism to Bhutan and is the tutelary deity of the country. Today, Paro Taktsang is the best known of the thirteen taktsang or "tiger lair" caves in which he meditated. The Guru mTshan-brgyad Lhakhang, the temple devoted to Padmasambhava (also known as Gu-ru mTshan-brgyad Lhakhang, "The Temple of the Guru with Eight Names") is an elegant structure built around the cave in 1692 by Gyalse Tenzin Rabgye; and has become the cultural icon of Bhutan. A popular festival, known as the Tsechu, held in honour of Padmasambhava, is celebrated in the Paro valley sometime during March or April. According to the legend related to this Taktsang
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    Wat Phra That Doi Chom Thong

    Wat Phra That Doi Chom Thong

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Phra That Doi Chom Thong (Thai: วัดพระธาตุดอยจอมทอง) (also known as Wat Phra That Doi Jom Thong) is located in Nakhon Chiang Rai, Amphoe Mueang, Chiang Rai Province, Thailand. Doi Chom Thong has undoubtedly been a sacred site for a very long time. The site was surely revered as the home of local spirits before Buddhism arrived in the area. As in many Thai wats, Spirit Houses coexist happily with the newer Buddhist shrines. Elephants are part of the lore of Doi Chom Thong. Paw Kuhn Meng Rai was said to have been following an elephant that had wandered off when he first came upon Doi Chom Thong, a solitary hill on the banks of the River Kok. There is a “Chedi” or “Golden Pagoda of Stupa” located in the center of the temple. The Chedi is the focal point of the temple. The Chedi was constructed with a mixture of Bhu-kam (ancient Burma) and Lanna style. It is around 14 meters high, the lotus-petal base, the body, the bell, the top part of the Chedi were decorated with a gold foil. According to the Yonok Chronicle, the That or Chedi was originally built in 940 during the reign of Phraya Ruen Kaew, Prince of Chiang Rai, to house the Lord Buddha's relics. Those relics were originally
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    Yakushi-ji

    Yakushi-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Yakushi-ji (薬師寺) is one of the most famous imperial and ancient Buddhist temples in Japan, located in Nara. The temple is the headquarters of the Hossō school of Japanese Buddhism. Yakushi-ji is one of the sites that are collectively inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, under the name of "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara." The main object of veneration, Yakushi Nyorai, also named "The Medicine Buddha", was one of first Buddhist Deities to arrive in Japan from China in 680, and gives the temple its name. The original Yakushi-ji was built in Fujiwara-kyō, Japan's capital in the Asuka period, commissioned by Emperor Temmu in 680 to pray for recovery from illness for his consort, who succeeded him as Empress Jitō. This act of building temples in devotion to Buddhist figures was a common practice among Japanese nobility when Buddhism was first imported from China and Korea. Emperor Temmu had died by the time Empress Jitō completed the complex around 698; and it was disassembled and moved to Nara eight years after the Imperial Court settled in what was then the new capital. It has been long believed that the temple was moved to its present location in 718, following the move of
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    Mireuksa

    Mireuksa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Mireuksa was the largest Buddhist temple in the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje. The temple was established in 602, by King Mu and is located 36.012083 N, 127.031028 E. This place depends nowadays from Iksan City (Iksan-si, Chollabuk-do, South Korea). The site was excavated in 1980, disclosing many hitherto unknown facts about Baekje architecture. The stone pagoda at Mireuksa is one of two extant Baekje pagodas. It is also the largest as well as being among the oldest of all Korean pagodas. The legend of the creation of Miruke-sa is told in the Samguk Yusa. King Mu and his queen were said to have seen a vision of the Maitreya Buddha at a pond on Mount Yonghwasan. The King promptly had the pond drained to establish the Mireuksa temple complex. The nine-storey wooden pagoda that once stood in the center of the complex is said to have been the work of Baekje master craftsman Abiji. Designated South Korean Historic Site No. 150, Mireuksa has been partially restored and now includes a museum. The complex included a central wooden pagoda flanked by two stone pagodas. A causeway seems to have led to the outer entrance of the walled complex. Miruksa temple had a unique arrangement of
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    Chaukhandi Stupa

    Chaukhandi Stupa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Chaukhandi Stupa is an important Buddhist stupa in Sarnath, located 13 kilometres from Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India. Stupas are descendents of burial mounds and serve as a shrine for a relic of the Buddha. The Chaukhandi Stupa is thought originally to have been built as a terraced temple during the Gupta period between the 4th to 6th Century to mark the site where Lord Buddha and his first disciples met traveling from Bodh Gaya to Sarnath. Later Govardhan, the son of a Raja, modified the stupa to its present shape by building the octagonal tower to commemorate the visit of Humayun, the powerful Mughal ruler. Today the stupa is a high earthen mound covered with a brickwork edifice topped by an octagonal tower. It is maintained by the Archaeological Survey of India.
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    Hongan-ji

    Hongan-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Hongan-ji (本願寺, Temple of the Primal Vow), also archaically romanized as Hongwanji, is the collective name of the largest school of Jōdo Shinshū Buddhism (which further sub-divides into the Nishi and Higashi branches). 'Hongan-ji' may also refer to any one of several actual temple buildings associated with the sect. The Hongan-ji was established as a temple in 1321, on the site of the Otani Mausoleum, where Shinran, the founder of the Jōdo Shinshū (True Pure Land) sect was buried. The mausoleum was attended by Shinran's grandson (through daughter Kakushinni), Kakue. Kakue's own son, Kakunyo, became the first chief priest of the Hongan-ji and 3rd Monshu, and dedicated it to the worship of Amida Buddha. The Hongan-ji first gained power and importance in the 15th century, when Rennyo became its eighth chief priest, or Monshu. However, the Tendai sect, based on Mount Hiei, saw this expansion as a threat and attacked the Hongan-ji three times with their army of warrior monks. Rennyo fled to Yoshizaki, where he established a new temple compound. During the Sengoku period, fearing the power of the monks of the Hongan-ji, Oda Nobunaga tried to destroy it. For ten years, he laid siege to
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    Shwedagon Paya

    Shwedagon Paya

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Shwedagon Pagoda (Burmese: ေရႊတီဂံု ဘုရား; MLCTS: hrwe ti. gum. bhu. ra:, IPA: [ʃwèdəɡòʊɴ pʰəjá]); Mon: ကျာ် လ္ဂုၚ်, [tɕaɪʔ təkɜ̀ŋ]; officially titled Shwedagon Zedi Daw ([ʃwèdəɡòʊɴ zèdìdɔ̀]), also known in English as the Great Dagon Pagoda and the Golden Pagoda, is a 99 metres (325 ft) gilded pagoda and stupa located in Yangon, Burma. The pagoda lies to the west of Kandawgyi Lake, on Singuttara Hill, thus dominating the skyline of the city. It is the most sacred Buddhist pagoda for the Burmese with relics of the past four Buddhas enshrined within: the staff of Kakusandha, the water filter of Koṇāgamana, a piece of the robe of Kassapa and eight strands of hair from Gautama, the historical Buddha. Uppatasanti Pagoda is an exact replica of Shwedagon Pagoda in Naypyidaw, the new capital of Burma. According to historical records, the Shwedagon Pagoda has existed for more than 2,600 years, making it the oldest historical pagoda in Burma and the world. According to tradition, two merchant brothers, Taphussa and Bhallika, from the land of Ramanya, met the Lord Gautama Buddha during his lifetime and received eight of the Buddha's hairs in BC 588. The brothers traveled back to their
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    Shwesandaw Pagoda, Pyay

    Shwesandaw Pagoda, Pyay

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Shwesandaw Pagoda, or Shwesandaw Paya, (Burmese: ရွှေဆံတော်စေတီ, pronounced [ʃwè sʰàɴdɔ̀ pʰəjá]) is a Buddhist pagoda in the center of Pyay, Burma. It is one of the more important Buddhist pilgrimage locations in Burma. It is said to contain a couple of the Buddha's hairs, as its name means Golden Hair Relic. It is one meter taller in height than Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon.
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    Tassajara Zen Mountain Center

    Tassajara Zen Mountain Center

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Monastery
    The Tassajara Zen Mountain Center in the Ventana Wilderness area of the Los Padres National Forest, southeast of Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, is the oldest Japanese Buddhist Sōtō Zen monastery in the United States. The Center is very isolated, more than 16 miles (26 km) from the nearest paved road, and only accessible via a narrow, steep, one-lane dirt road. During the winter months, practitioners live on site. During the summer months, the Center is opened to day and overnight guests. The hot springs have been developed into Japanese-style baths. It was the first Zen monastery outside of Asia. The name is a corruption of Tasajera, a Spanish-American word derived from an indigenous Esselen word, which means ‘place where meat is hung to dry.’" The 126-acre mountain property surrounding the Tassajara Hot Springs was purchased by the San Francisco Zen Center in 1967 for the below-market price of $300,000 from Robert and Anna Beck. They improved the property and renamed it The Tassajara Zen Mountain Center, or Zenshinji (Zen Mind Temple), during Shunryu Suzuki's tenure as its first abbot. When it was purchased in 1967, it was the first Zen monastery outside of Asia. A practice period
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    Westminster Abbey

    Westminster Abbey

    • Currently used by religion(s): Anglicanism
    • Type of place of worship: Christian Church
    The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, popularly known as Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in the City of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English, later British and later still (and currently) monarchs of the Commonwealth realms. The abbey is a Royal Peculiar and briefly held the status of a cathedral from 1540 to 1550. Westminster Abbey is a collegiate church governed by the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, as established by Royal charter of Queen Elizabeth I in 1560, which created it as the Collegiate Church of St Peter Westminster and a Royal Peculiar under the personal jurisdiction of the Sovereign. The members of the Chapter are the Dean and four residentiary canons, assisted by the Receiver General and Chapter Clerk. One of the canons is also Rector of St Margaret's Church, Westminster, and often holds also the post of Chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons. In addition to the Dean and canons, there are at present two full-time minor canons, one is precentor, and the other is sacrist. The office of Priest Vicar was
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    Amarbayasgalant Khiid

    Amarbayasgalant Khiid

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Monastery of Tranquil Felicity (Mongolian: Амарбаясгалант хийд, Mongolian script: Amurbayasqulangtu keyid) once one of the three largest Buddhist centres in Mongolia is located near the Selenge River in the Iven Valley, at the foot of Mount Büren-Khaan in Baruunbüren sum (district) of Selenge Province in northern Mongolia. The nearest town is Erdenet which is about 60 km to the southwest. The architectural design belongs to G. Zanabazar and the monastery itself was built to honour the memory of him. Looking for a site for building, the exploratory group met two boys, Amur and Bayasqulangtu, playing in a steppe, and decided to build the future monastery at that site and name the monastery after those children. Built between 1727 and 1736, it is one of the very few monasteries to have partly escaped the destruction of 1937, after which only the buildings of the central section remained. The entire contents: the tankas, statues and manuscripts were looted by the Communists or hidden until more fortunate times. Restoration work began in 1988 and some of the new deities were commissioned in Delhi, India. The monastery was originally built to house the remains of Zanabazar, the first
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    Bodnath

    Bodnath

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Boudhanath (Devnagari: बौद्धनाथ) (also called Boudha, Bouddhanath or Baudhanath or the Khāsa Caitya) is one of the holiest Buddhist sites in Kathmandu (Yambu), Nepal. It is known as Khāsti in Nepal Bhasa Jyarung Khasyor in Tamang language or as Bauddha by modern speakers of Nepali. Located about 11 km (6.8 mi) from the center and northeastern outskirts of Kathmandu, the stupa's massive mandala makes it one of the largest spherical stupas in Nepal. The Buddhist stupa of Boudhanath dominates the skyline. The ancient Stupa is one of the largest in the world. The influx of large populations of refugees from Tibet has seen the construction of over 50 Tibetan Gompas (Monasteries) around Boudhanath. As of 1979, Boudhanath is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Along with Swayambhunath, it is one of the most popular tourist sites in the Kathmandu area. The Stupa is on the ancient trade route from Tibet which enters the Kathmandu Valley by the village of Sankhu in the northeast corner, passes by Boudnath Stupa to the ancient and smaller stupa of Cā-bahī (often called 'Little Boudnath'). It then turns directly south, heading over the Bagmati river to Patan - thus bypassing the main city of
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    Cheng Hoon Teng

    Cheng Hoon Teng

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Cheng Hoon Teng temple (Chinese: 青云亭; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Tshinn-hûn-tîng; lit. "Temple of Green Cloud") is a Chinese temple practicing the Three Doctrinal Systems of Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism located at No. 25 Jalan Tokong, Malacca Town, Malaysia. It is the oldest functioning temple in Malaysia. The Cheng Hoon Teng is situated close to Jalan Tukang Emas, also known as "Harmony Street" because of its proximity to the Kampung Kling Mosque and Sri Poyatha Moorthi Temple. The richly decorated Cheng Hoon Teng temple covers an area of 4,600 m. Featuring a magnificent main gate along Jalan Tokong, the Cheng Hoon Teng temple consists of a complex of several prayer halls, with a large main prayer hall dedicated to the goddess of mercy, Kuan Yin. Additional smaller prayer quarters were added later. One of these is dedicated to the Buddhist gods of wealth, longevity and propagation, while another houses ancestral tablets. One of the most dramatic features of Cheng Hoon Teng temple is the seven-metre red flag-pole facing the left wing of the main prayer hall, which houses the remains of two of the three Kapitans who contributed to the construction of the temple. Across the road is a
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    231
    Dhammayangyi Temple

    Dhammayangyi Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Dhammayangyi Temple (Burmese: ဓမ္မရံကြီးပုထိုး, IPA: [dəma̰jàɴdʑí pətʰó]) is a Buddhist temple located in Bagan, Myanmar. Largest of all the temples in Bagan, the Dhammayan as it is popularly known was built during the reign of King Narathu (1167-1170). Narathu, who came to the throne by assassinating his father Alaungsithu and his elder brother, presumably built this largest temple to atone for his sins. The Dhammayangyi is the widest temple in Bagan, and is built in a plan similar to that of Ananda Temple.. Burmese Chronicles state that while the construction of the temple was in the process, the king was assassinated by some Indians and thus the temple was not completed. Sinhalese sources however indicate that the king was killed by Sinhalese invaders. The temple's interior is bricked up for unknown reasons, thus only the four porches and the outer corridors are accessible.
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    232
    Donghwasa

    Donghwasa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Donghwasa, also Donghwa Temple, is a Buddhist temple of the Jogye Order in northern Daegu, South Korea. The temple is located on the slopes of Palgongsan, within the boundaries of Dohak-dong, Dong-gu, near Daegu's northern border. It is the seat of the 9th region of the Jogye Order. The name means "temple of paulownia blossoms." The first temple on the site was built in 493. The name Donghwasa was applied during the Unified Silla period in 832. From this time to the present, it has remained one of the country's most powerful temples. During the Goryeo Dynasty, it was one of only four temples which administered the civil service examinations for monks. Buddhists were out of power during the Joseon Dynasty, but the temple retained a great deal of influence, and continued building new structures. Several National treasures of South Korea are housed at Donghwasa.
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    233
    Eihō-ji

    Eihō-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Eihō-ji (永保寺) is a Rinzai Zen Buddhist temple located in northern Tajimi, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. Eihō-ji was established in 1313 by the Nanzen-ji branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism. The temple grounds are home to a number of zazen trainees, and the temple holds regular zazen sessions open to the general public. In addition to two buildings listed as National Treasures, the grounds include a pond, bridge and waterfall, and a traditional Zen garden. On September 10, 2003, one of the main living quarters was destroyed by a fire. After a fundraising campaign run by the residents of Tajimi, the restoration was completed on August 29, 2007. 35°20′48″N 137°07′49″E / 35.34676944°N 137.1302389°E / 35.34676944; 137.1302389
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    234
    Fo Guang Shan Temple, Auckland

    Fo Guang Shan Temple, Auckland

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Fo Guang Shan temple is a large temple and community centre of the Fo Guang Shan Buddhist movement in the East Tamaki/Flatbush suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. It is the largest Buddhist temple in the country. The temple and complex were built over seven years at a cost NZ$ 20 million. It was designed in the architectural style of the Tang Dynasty. The temple also includes a large Buddha statue and a two-tonne bell. Opened in late 2007, the mission of the new temple is to promote Humanistic Buddhism. But it is also intended to benefit (and is open to) non-Buddhists, "through education and teaching people how to lead good lives." Even before its official opening, the temple had provided community courses such as Chinese calligraphy, Chinese language, yoga and martial arts, as well as providing a venue for crime prevention talks and meetings.
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    235
    Furnace Mountain

    Furnace Mountain

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Furnace Mountain (temple name Kwan Se Um San Ji Sah) is an American Zen Buddhist retreat center in Clay City, Kentucky, co-founded in 1986 by Seung Sahn Soen Sa Nim and Dae Gak Soen Sa Nim as part of the international Kwan Um School of Zen; it is now unaffiliated with the school in an official capacity. In 1990 the main Meditation Hall was completed, and in 1994 the temple was constructed and opened. Kwan Se Um San Ji Sah is modeled after a traditional Korean Buddhist Temple—located on 850 acres (263 ha) of woods in part of The Daniel Boone National Forest (in The Red River Gorge area). It is made of timber from the surrounding area (particularly Douglas fir siding and wood flooring). The exact site of Kwan Se Um San Ji Sah was determined by the use of geomantic divination, which was intended to help foster harmony. The Abbott and guiding teacher is Dae Gak Zen Master., 106 Media related to Furnace Mountain at Wikimedia Commons
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    236
    Giant Wild Goose Pagoda

    Giant Wild Goose Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Giant Wild Goose Pagoda or Big Wild Goose Pagoda (Chinese: 大雁塔; pinyin: Dàyàn Tǎ), is a Buddhist pagoda located in southern Xi'an, Shaanxi province, China. It was built in 652 during the Tang Dynasty and originally had five stories, although the structure was rebuilt in 704 during the reign of Empress Wu Zetian and its exterior brick facade was renovated during the Ming Dynasty. One of the pagoda's many functions was to hold sutras and figurines of the Buddha that were brought to China from India by the Buddhist translator and traveler Xuanzang. The original pagoda was built during the reign of Emperor Gaozong of Tang (r. 649-683), then standing at a height of 54 m (177 ft). However, this construction of rammed earth with a stone exterior facade eventually collapsed five decades later. The ruling Empress Wu Zetian had the pagoda rebuilt and added five new stories by the year 704; however, a massive earthquake in 1556 heavily damaged the pagoda and reduced it by three stories, to its current height of seven stories. The entire structure leans very perceptibly (several degrees) to the west. Its related structure, the 8th century Small Wild Goose Pagoda in Xi'an, only suffered minor
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    237
    Hwaeomsa

    Hwaeomsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Hwaeomsa (syllables: hwa-eom-sa) is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism. It is located on the slopes of Jiri-san, in Masan-myeon, Gurye County, in the province of Jeollanam-do, South Korea. It was constructed under the Silla dynasty in 544, burned down during the Seven Year War in the 1590s, and rebuilt thereafter. Four national treasures of South Korea are located within the temple. These include Gakhwangjeon Hall, an ancient stone lantern, and a three-storied stone pagoda supported by four stone lions.
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    238
    IBPS Manila

    IBPS Manila

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The International Buddhist Progress Society of Manila, Philippines (also known as Fo Guang Shan Manila) (Chinese: 菲律賓馬尼拉佛光山) is the main branch way-place of the Taiwan affiliated Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Order in the Philippines. As do all branch temples, way-places, and organizations of Fo Guang Shan, the branch follows Humanistic Buddhism, a modernized style of Buddhist teaching as propagated by Venerable Master Hsing Yun, spiritual founder and teacher of the order. In 1989, while monks from the Fo Guang Shan order were preaching Buddhist teachings on the southern islands of Cebu and Bacolod, they received requests from lay followers in Manila. In November 1992, Venerable Yung Guang brought with her statues of the Three Treasure Buddhas (namely Sakyamuni, Amitabha, and Bhaisajyaguru) to the famous Ongpin Street, in Manila’s Chinatown. In the beginning, Venerable Yung Guang founded the small Manila Buddhist Center in a premises offered by lay devotees. After half a year of preaching, the number of lay followers increased, and the space was no longer sufficient to accommodate all of them. Having realized the great potential in the capital of the Philippines, Venerable Yung Guang
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    239
    Liuhe Pagoda

    Liuhe Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Liuhe Pagoda (Chinese: 六和塔; pinyin: Liùhé Tǎ), literally Six Harmonies Pagoda, is a multi-story Chinese pagoda in southern Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China. It is located at the foot of Yuelun Hill, facing the Qiantang River. It was originally constructed in 970 AD during the Northern Song Dynasty (960–1127), destroyed in 1121, and reconstructed fully by 1165, during the Southern Song Dynasty (1127–1279). The pagoda was originally constructed by the ruler of the Wuyue kingdom, some of which would later makeup Zhejiang province. The name Liuhe comes from the six Buddhist ordinances and it is said that the reason for building the pagoda was to calm the tidal bore of the Qiantang River and as a navigational aid. However, the pagoda was completely destroyed during warfare in the year 1121. After the current pagoda was constructed of wood and brick during the Southern Song Dynasty, additional exterior eaves were added during the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing Dynasties (1644–1911). The pagoda is octagonal in shape and some 59.89 metres (196.5 ft) in height, it also has the appearance of being a thirteen-storey structure, though it only has seven interior stories. There is a spiral
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    240
    Mingalazedi Pagoda

    Mingalazedi Pagoda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Mingalazedi Pagoda (Burmese: မင်္ဂလာစေတီ, pronounced [mɪ̀ɴɡəlà zèdì]; also spelt Mingalar Zedi Pagoda) is a Buddhist stupa located in Bagan, Burma. It was built in 1284 during the reign of King Narathihapate. The pagoda is one of few temples in Bagan with a full set of glazed terra cotta tiles depicting the Jataka. The pagoda was built in brick and contains several terraces leading to large pot-shaped stupa at its centre, topped by a bejewelled umbrella (hti). Mingalazedi Pagoda was built a few years before the First Burmese Empire (Pagan Kingdom) was pillaged by the Mongols.
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    241
    Myoshin-ji

    Myoshin-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Myōshin-ji (妙心寺, Myōshin-ji) is a temple complex in Kyoto, Japan, and head temple of the associated branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism. The Myōshin-ji school is by far the largest school in Rinzai Zen, approximately as big as the other thirteen branches combined: it contains within it about three thousand five hundred temples throughout Japan, together with a handful overseas, of the approximately six thousand total Rinzai temples, and also has nineteen associated monasteries, of the total of forty monasteries and one nunnery. The grounds of the temple were formally a palace for the Emperor Hanazono. Hanazono abdicated in 1318 and took the tonsure (became a monk) in 1335, and in 1342 donated the palace to found the temple; the district and many places in the area are named "Hanazono" in his honor. The head temple was founded in 1342 by the Zen master Kanzan Egen (関山慧玄, 1277–1360), third patriarch in the influential Ōtōkan lineage. Nearly all of the buildings were destroyed in the Ōnin War in 1467. However, many of them have been rebuilt, initially under the leadership of Sekko-Soshin Zenji (1408–1486), the sixth patriarch. The present buildings were primarily build during the following
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    242
    Pohyonsa

    Pohyonsa

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Pohyon-sa is a Korean Buddhist temple located in Hyangsan county in North Pyong'an Province, North Korea. It is located within the Myohyang Mountains. Founded under the Koryo dynasty at the start of the 11th century, the temple flourished as one of the greatest centers of Buddhism in the north of Korea, and became a renowned place of pilgrimage. Like most other temples in North Korea, the complex suffered extensive damage from US bombing during the Korean War. The temple is designated as National Treasure #40 in North Korea, with many of its component buildings and structures further declared as individual national treasures. Pohyon Temple was founded under the Koryo dynasty in 1024 and named for the buddhist deity Samantabhadra (known as Pohyon Posal in Korean). During the Imjin Wars, when Japanese warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi ordered several attempted invasions of Korea, the temple became a stronghold for bands of warrior monks led by the great saint Sosan. At age 73, he led bands against the Japanese armies, even assisting recapture Pyongyang from the Japanese. He died at the temple in 1604. During the war, the temple was charged with protection the Chonju copy of the four Annals
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    243
    Qixia Temple

    Qixia Temple

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Qixia Temple (Chinese: 栖霞寺; pinyin: Qīxiá Sì) is a Buddhist temple located on Qixia Hill in the suburban Qixia District in Nanjing, Jiangsu province, People's Republic of China, 22 kilometres (14 mi) northeast of downtown Nanjing. It is one of Nanjing's most important Buddhist temples. Built in AD 489, the 7th year of the Yongming (永明) era during the South Qi Dynasty, the temple is known for its large collection of Chinese Buddhist visual art and sculptural art in the grounds. These consist of pagodas, murals and artwork that date back to the 10th century. Near the temple site and situated on the slopes of Qixia Hill, is the "Thousand Buddha Caves", a grotto containing many Buddhist sculptural works of art. The Buddha's Relics Pagoda is located in the southeast of Qixia Temple. It was built in 601 and destroyed in the Tang Dynasty. Then in 945, it was rebuilt by Southern Tang Dynasty emperor Li Jing. The pagoda has a 5-story, octagon-shaped structure. It is 18m high and perched on a 2-story stylobate carved with waves and a dash of fish and Chinese flowering crabapples.
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    244
    Seattle Buddhist Church

    Seattle Buddhist Church

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The Seattle Buddhist Church (built 1940–41) is a Japanese Jodo Shinshu Buddhist temple in Seattle, Washington, USA. Although it was designed by Japanese American K.A. Arai, the architect of record was Pierce A. Horrocks, because Arai lacked an architectural license. It replaced an earlier Seattle Buddhist Church (1906–1908, Charles W. Saunders & George Willis Lawton) that was torn down as part of the Yesler Terrace project. The building is a designated Seattle landmark.
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    Shōhō-ji

    Shōhō-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Shōhō-ji (正法寺) is a Buddhist temple of the Ōbaku school of Buddhism in Gifu, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. It is a branch temple of Mampuku-ji in Uji, Kyoto Prefecture. The temple has many aspects of the Ōbaku school, but its building style and sacraments are in the Chinese style. Additionally, it is much larger than the average Japanese temple. The temple's official name is Kinpōzan Shōhō-ji (金鳳山正法寺). The temple was first established in 1638, but did not join the Ōbaku school until 1692. In 1790, Ichū (推中), the 11th head priest, began planning the construction of the Gifu Great Buddha out of respect for Tōdai-ji's Great Buddha in Nara. Ichū never saw the completed Buddha, as he died in 1825. The Great Buddha was finally completed in 1832. From JR Gifu Station (Bus Platform 11) or Meitetsu Gifu Station (Bus Platform 4), board any bus towards Nagara. Get off the bus at "Gifu Koen, Rekishi Hakubutsukan-mae," approximately 15 minutes from the train stations. 35°25′57″N 136°46′19″E / 35.432416°N 136.771903°E / 35.432416; 136.771903
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    246
    Taiseki-ji

    Taiseki-ji

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Taiseki-ji (大石寺 (多宝富士大日蓮華山大石寺), Tahō Fuji Dainichirenge-zan Taiseki-ji) is the head temple (総本山, sōhonzan) of the Nichiren Shōshū school of the Nichiren branch of Japanese Buddhism. It is located on the lower slopes of Mount Fuji in Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. Taiseki-ji was founded in 1290 ce by Nikkō, one of Nichiren’s immediate disciples. Nichiren Shōshū’s head temple is the sect’s administrative center, and its chief abbot (貫主, kanzu) is simultaneously the high priest (法主, Hossu) of Nichiren Shōshū. The current High Priest is Nichinyo Hayase (1935–). High Priest Nichinyo assumed the position on December 16, 2005, and is the 68th in a lineage Nichiren Shōshū traces back to Nichiren (1222–1282). He is commonly styled 68th High Priest Nichinyo Shōnin in English. Because it is the head temple of Nichiren Shōshū and therefore home of the Gohonzon, Nichiren Shōshū’s ultimate object of veneration, Taiseki-ji is visited by believers from all around the world who come on personal pilgrimages, to participate in regular ceremonies, or to take part in large events such as temple-group pilgrimages, workshop-like study programs, and large rally-like meetings. The temple is
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    247
    Thuparamaya

    Thuparamaya

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Thuparamaya is a dagoba in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. It is a Buddhist sacred place of veneration. Mahinda Thera, an envoy sent by King Ashoka himself introduced Theravada Buddhism and also chetiya worship to Sri Lanka. At his request King Devanampiyatissa built Thuparamaya in which was enshrined the collarbone of the Buddha. It is considered to be the first dagaba built in Sri Lanka following the introduction of Buddhism. This is considered the earliest monument, the construction of which was chronicled Sri Lanka. The name Thuparamaya comes from "stupa" and "aramaya" which is a residential complex for monks. Thuparamaya dagoba has been built in the shape of a heap of paddy. This dagoba was destroyed from time to time. During the reign of King Agbo II it was completely destroyed and the King restored it. What is seen presently is the construction of the dagoba, done in 1862 AD. As of today, after several renovations, in the course of the centuries, the monument has a diameter of 59 ft (18 m), at the base. The dome is 11 feet 4 inches (3.45 m) in height from the ground, 164½ ft (50.1 m) in diameter. The compound is paved with granite and there are 2 rows of stone pillars round the
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    Wat Bang Phra

    Wat Bang Phra

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Bang Phra (Thai: วัดบางพระ) is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Nakhon Chai Si district, Nakhon Pathom Province, Thailand, about 50 km west of Bangkok. Wat Bang Phra translates into English as the "Temple of some Monks", or alternatively "Temple of some Buddha Images" (the word Bang means "some" and Phra means "Monk" or "Buddha image"). There is no existing record of when this temple was founded, however the architecture of its assembly hall indicates the late Ayutthaya period, while the murals inside the sermon hall demonstrate the craftsmanship during the reigns of Kings Rama III and Rama IV. Former abbot Phra Udom Prachanart, more commonly known as Luang Por Phern, was a famous meditation monk well known for his potent incantations and was also well rounded in the knowledge of the body of canons binding the Buddhist priesthood (Tripitaka). He built many of the structures on the premises from public donations during his time. The well renovated assembly and sermon halls, as well as the local museum where many abandoned artefacts have been put on display, are of interest. The temple is also known for the daily tattoos or Sak Yants given by the monks that live there, and especially
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    Wat Chalong

    Wat Chalong

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    The most important of the 29 buddhist temples of Phuket is Wat Chalong (Thai: วัดฉลอง or วัดไชยธาราราม), located in the tambon Chalong, Mueang Phuket district. It is dedicated to two highly venerable monks, Luang Pho Chaem (หลวงพ่อแช่ม) and Luang Pho Chuang (หลวงพ่อช่วง), who with their knowledge of herbal medicine helped the injured of a tin miners rebellion in 1876.
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    Wat Ratchanadda

    Wat Ratchanadda

    • Currently used by religion(s): Buddhism
    • Type of place of worship: Temple
    Wat Ratchanaddaram (Thai: วัดราชนัดดาราม, RTGS: Wat Ratchanatdaram, IPA: [wát râːt.tɕʰa.nát.daːraːm]) is a buddhist temple (wat) located at the intersection between Ratchadamnoen Klang and Maha Chai Road, in Phra Nakhon district, Bangkok. Meaning Royal Niece, the temple was built to the order of King Nangklao (Rama III) for Mom Chao Ying Sommanus Wattanavadi (หม่อมเจ้าหญิงโสมนัสวัฒนาวดี) in 1846. The temple is best known for the Loha Prasat (โลหะปราสาท), a multi-tiered structure 36 m high and having 37 metal spires, signifying the 37 virtues toward enlightenment. It is the third Loha Prasada (brazen palace) in existence, modelled after the earlier ones in India and Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. In the past, Loha Prasat was hidden behind an old movie theatre named Chalerm Thai. The theatre were demolished in 1989 as a project to improve scenery along Ratchadamnoen Road. In 2005, the temple was submitted to UNESCO for consideration as a future World Heritage Site.
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