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Best Place of interment of All Time

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    1
    Madikeri

    Madikeri

    • People interred here: Field Marshal K M Cariappa
    Madikeri is a hill station town in Karnataka state, India. Also known as Mercara, it is the headquarters of Kodagu (Also called Coorg) district. It is a popular tourist destination. Madikeri was formerly known as Muddu raja keri. Muddurajakeri which means Mudduraja's town, was named after the prominent Haleri king, Mudduraja who ruled Kodagu from 1633-1687. The form of the name often used in English, Mercara, is derived from Madikeri by a standard transformation of the retroflex 'd' to an 'r' consonant. The history of Madikeri is related to the history of Kodagu. From the 2nd to 6th century AD, the northern part of Kodagu was ruled by Kadambas. The southern part of Kodagu was ruled by Gangas from 4th to 11th century. After defeating the Gangas in the 11th century, Cholas became the rulers of Kodagu. In the 12th century, Cholas lost Kodagu to the Hoysalas. Kodagu fell to the Vijayanagar kings in the 14th century. After their fall, the local chieftains (Palegars) started ruling their areas directly. These were defeated by the Haleri kings who ruled Kodagu from 1600-1834 A.D. Haleri kings made the place Haleri, near Madikeri as their capital. Mudduraja, the third king among the Haleri
    6.20
    10 votes
    2
    Mount Olivet Cemetery

    Mount Olivet Cemetery

    • People interred here: Alvan Cullem Gillem
    Mount Olivet Cemetery is a 250-acre (100 ha) cemetery located in Nashville, Tennessee. Mount Olivet has been continuously operated since its establishment in 1856. It serves as the final resting place for many of Middle Tennessee's political and business leaders, including several former governors of Tennessee, U.S. Senators, and U.S. Congressional Representatives. After the American Civil War, women of Nashville formed an association to raise funds to purchase a separate plot of land at the cemetery for the interment of Confederate dead. It became known as "Confederate Circle". It was used for the interment of Confederate soldiers who had died on nearby battlegrounds and as a memorial to their sacrifice. Women organized such memorial associations and raised money for interment of Confederate soldiers in major cities across the South and areas where there were concentrations of bodies. The memorial association arranged for burials of about 1,500 soldiers at Confederate Circle. Confederate veterans were also eligible for interment there. For many years, interments at Mount Olivet were limited to white Protestants. Although this policy was officially eliminated decades ago, tradition
    6.63
    8 votes
    3
    Bisley

    Bisley

    • People interred here: Denis Parsons Burkitt
    Bisley is a village in Gloucestershire, England, approximately 4 miles (6 km) east of Stroud. The parish is today united administratively with the adjoining parish of Lypiatt and the two are usually referred to as Bisley-with-Lypiatt. The manor was formerly extensive, including the villages of Stroud and Chalford, as well as Thrupp, Oakridge, Bussage, Througham and Eastcombe. The area is noted for the wealth of its Cotswold stone houses of architectural and historic interest. They include Lypiatt Park, formerly the home of Judge H.B.D. Woodcock and then of the late Modernist sculptor Lynn Chadwick; Nether Lypiatt Manor, formerly the home of Violet Gordon-Woodhouse and Prince and Princess Michael of Kent; Daneway (near Sapperton, but within the parish of Bisley); Over Court; Througham Court (repaired in 1929 for the novelist Sir Michael Sadleir by Norman Jewson); and Jaynes Court, formerly the home of Simon Charles Henry Rufus Isaacs, 4th Marquess of Reading (b. 1942). Througham Slad Manor is believed to date from the mid 16th century with 18th century additions, the manor was altered in the 1930’s by Norman Jewson for W. A. Cadbury. In the 1970s, the house was owned by Mike
    7.43
    7 votes
    4
    Batalha Monastery

    Batalha Monastery

    • People interred here: Afonso V of Portugal
    Mosteiro Santa Maria da Vitória, more commonly known as the Batalha Monastery, is a Dominican convent in Batalha, in the District of Leiria, Portugal. It is one of the best and original examples of Late Gothic architecture in Portugal, intermingled with the Manueline style. The convent was built to thank the Virgin Mary for the Portuguese victory over the Castilians in the battle of Aljubarrota in 1385, fulfilling a promise of King John I of Portugal. The battle put an end to the 1383-1385 crisis. It took over a century to build, starting in 1386 and ending circa 1517, spanning the reign of seven kings. It took the efforts of fifteen architects (Mestre das Obras da Batalha), but for seven of them the title was no more than an honorary title bestowed on them. The construction required an enormous effort, using extraordinary resources of men and material. New techniques and artistic styles, hitherto unknown in Portugal, were deployed. Work began in 1386 by the Portuguese architect Afonso Domingues who continued till 1402. He drew up the plan and many of the structures in the church and the cloister are his doing. His style was essentially Rayonnant Gothic, however there are
    7.00
    7 votes
    5
    Cologne Cathedral

    Cologne Cathedral

    • People interred here: Marie de' Medici
    Cologne Cathedral (German: Kölner Dom, officially Hohe Domkirche St. Petrus, English: High Cathedral of St. Peter) is a Roman Catholic church in Cologne, Germany. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Cologne and the administration of the Archdiocese of Cologne. It is a renowned monument of German Catholicism and Gothic architecture and is a World Heritage Site. It is Germany's most visited landmark, attracting an average of 20,000 people a day. Construction of Cologne Cathedral commenced in 1248 and was halted in 1473, leaving it unfinished. Work restarted in the 19th century and was completed, to the original plan, in 1880. It is 144.5 metres (474 ft) long, 86.5 m (284 ft) wide and its towers are approximately 157 m (515 ft) tall. The cathedral is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spires and largest facade of any church in the world. The choir has the largest height to width ratio, 3.6:1, of any medieval church. Cologne's medieval builders had planned a grand structure to house the reliquary of the Three Kings and fit its role as a place of worship for the Holy Roman Emperor. Despite having been left incomplete during the medieval period,
    7.83
    6 votes
    6
    Forest Lawn Memorial Park

    Forest Lawn Memorial Park

    • People interred here: King C. Gillette
    Forest Lawn – Hollywood Hills Cemetery is part of the Forest Lawn chain of Southern California cemeteries. It is at 6300 Forest Lawn Drive in the Hollywood Hills neighborhood in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles, California, on the lower north slope at the far east end of the Santa Monica Mountains range that overlooks North Hollywood and Burbank in the San Fernando Valley from its southeast. The Los Angeles River courses from west to east immediately to the north. Forest Lawn – Hollywood Hills is a park dedicated to the preservation of American history, and hosts high-profile events such as an annual Veterans Day ceremony attended by dignitaries and other VIPs. Los Angeles Magazine described it as a "theme-park necropolis", paraphrasing Jessica Mitford, indicating "Forest Lawn’s kitsch was just a sophisticated strategy for lubricating the checkbooks of the grieved." The park features such sights as: The first Forest Lawn, in Glendale, was founded in 1906 by businessmen who hired Dr. Hubert Eaton, a firm believer in a joyous life after death, who was convinced that most cemeteries were "unsightly, depressing stone yards," and pledged to create one that would reflect his
    7.83
    6 votes
    7
    Fairhaven

    Fairhaven

    • People interred here: Warren Delano Robbins
    Fairhaven is a town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, in the United States. It is located on the south coast of Massachusetts where the Acushnet River flows into Buzzards Bay, an arm of the Atlantic Ocean. The town shares a harbor with the city of New Bedford, a place well known for its whaling and fishing heritage; consequently, Fairhaven's history, economy, and culture are closely aligned with those of its larger neighbor. The population of Fairhaven was 15,873 at the time of the 2010 census. Fairhaven was first settled in 1659 as "Cushnea", the easternmost part of the town of Dartmouth. It was founded on land purchased by English settlers at the Plymouth Colony from the Wampanoag sachem Massasoit, and his son, Wamsutta. In 1787, the eastern portion of Dartmouth seceded and formed a new settlement called New Bedford. This new town included areas that are the present-day towns of Fairhaven, Acushnet, and New Bedford itself. Fairhaven eventually separated from New Bedford, and it was officially incorporated in 1812. At that time, Fairhaven included all of the land on the east bank of the Acushnet River. The northern portion of Fairhaven, upriver from Buzzards Bay, formed another
    6.86
    7 votes
    8
    Svetitskhoveli Cathedral

    Svetitskhoveli Cathedral

    • People interred here: George XII of Georgia
    Svetitskhoveli Cathedral (Georgian: სვეტიცხოვლის საკათედრო ტაძარი, svet'icxovlis sak'atedro t'adzari; literally, "the Living Pillar Cathedral") is a Georgian Orthodox cathedral located in the historical town of Mtskheta, Georgia, 20 km (12 mi) northwest of the nation's capital of Tbilisi. Svetitskhoveli, known as the burial site of Christ's mantle, has long been the principal Georgian church and remains one of the most venerated places of worship to this day. It presently functions as the seat of the archbishop of Mtskheta and Tbilisi, who is at the same time Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia. The current cathedral was built in the 11th century by the Georgian architect Arsukisdze, though the site itself is even older dating back to the early 4th century and is surrounded by a number of legends associated primarily with the early Christian traditions. It is the second largest church building in the country, after the recently consecrated Tbilisi Holy Trinity Cathedral, and is listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site along with other historical monuments of Mtskheta. The original church was built in 4th century A.D. during the reign of Mirian III of Kartli (Iberia). St. Nino is
    8.80
    5 votes
    9
    Iona

    Iona

    • People interred here: Áed of Scotland
    Iona (Scottish Gaelic: Ì Chaluim Chille) is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the western coast of Scotland. It was a centre of Irish monasticism for four centuries and is today renowned for its tranquility and natural beauty. It is a popular tourist destination and a place for retreats. Its modern Gaelic name means "Iona of (Saint) Columba" (formerly anglicised "Icolmkill"). The Hebrides have been occupied by the speakers of several languages since the Iron Age, and as a result many of the names of these islands have more than one possible meaning. Nonetheless few, if any, can have accumulated so many different names over the centuries as the island now known in English as "Iona". The earliest forms of the name enabled place-name scholar William J. Watson to show that the name originally meant something like "yew-place". The element Ivo-, denoting "yew", occurs in Ogham inscriptions (Iva-cattos [genitive], Iva-geni [genitive]) and in Gaulish names (Ivo-rix, Ivo-magus) and may form the basis of early Gaelic names like Eogan (ogham: Ivo-genos). It is possible that the name is related to the mythological figure, Fer hÍ mac Eogabail, foster-son of Manannan, the forename meaning
    7.50
    6 votes
    10
    Peter and Paul Cathedral

    Peter and Paul Cathedral

    • People interred here: Catherine II of Russia
    The Peter and Paul Cathedral is a Russian Orthodox cathedral located inside the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg, Russia. It is the first and oldest landmark in St. Petersburg, built between 1712 and 1733 on Zayachy Island along the Neva River. Both the cathedral and the fortress were originally built under Peter the Great and designed by Domenico Trezzini. The cathedral's bell tower is the world's tallest Orthodox bell tower. Since the belfry is not standalone, but an integral part of the main building, the cathedral is sometimes considered the highest Orthodox Church in the world. The cathedral is dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, the patron saints of the fortress (Saint Peter being the patron saint of the city). The current cathedral is the second one on the site. The first, built soon after Peter's founding of the city, was consecrated by Archbishop Iov of Novgorod the Great in April 1704. The current building, the first stone church in St. Petersburg, was designed by Trezzini and built between 1712 and 1733. Its golden spire reaches a height of 404 feet and features at its top an angel holding a cross. This angel is one of the most important symbols of St.
    6.57
    7 votes
    11
    St Andrews

    St Andrews

    • People interred here: Constantine II of Scotland
    St Andrews (Scots: Saunt Aundraes; Scottish Gaelic: Cill Rìmhinn) is a former royal burgh on the east coast of Fife in Scotland, named after Saint Andrew the Apostle. The town is home to the University of St Andrews, the third oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Britain's most prestigious. The University is an integral part of the burgh, and during term time students make up approximately one third of the town's population. St Andrews has a population of 16,680, making this the fifth largest settlement in Fife. There has been an important church in St Andrews since at least the 8th century, and a bishopric since at least the 11th century. The settlement grew to the west of St Andrews cathedral with the southern side of the Scores to the north and the Kinness burn to the south. The burgh soon became the ecclesiastical capital of Scotland, a position which was held until the Scottish Reformation. The famous cathedral, the largest in Scotland, now lies in ruins. St Andrews is also known worldwide as the "home of golf". This is in part because the Royal and Ancient Golf Club, founded in 1754, exercises legislative authority over the game worldwide (except in the
    6.57
    7 votes
    12
    Baltimore

    Baltimore

    • People interred here: John H. B. Latrobe
    Baltimore ( /ˈbɒltɨmɔr/, colloquially /ˈbɔl.mɔr/) is the largest city in the U.S. state of Maryland and the 24th largest city in the country. It is located in the central area of the state along the tidal portion of the Patapsco River, an arm of the Chesapeake Bay. The independent city is often referred to as Baltimore City to distinguish it from surrounding Baltimore County. Founded in 1729, Baltimore is the largest seaport in the Mid-Atlantic United States and is situated closer to Midwestern markets than any other major seaport on the East Coast. Baltimore's Inner Harbor was once the second leading port of entry for immigrants to the United States and a major manufacturing center. After a decline in manufacturing, Baltimore shifted to a service-oriented economy. At 620,961 residents in 2010, Baltimore's population has decreased by one-third since its peak in 1950. The Baltimore Metropolitan Area has grown steadily to approximately 2.7 million residents in 2010; the 20th largest in the country. Baltimore is also a principal city in the larger Baltimore–Washington combined statistical area of approximately 8.4 million residents. The city is named after Cecilius Calvert, Lord
    8.60
    5 votes
    13
    Amsterdam

    Amsterdam

    • People interred here: Bruce Anderson
    Amsterdam is a city located in Montgomery County, New York, USA. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 18,620. The name is derived from the city of Amsterdam in the Netherlands. The city of Amsterdam is surrounded on the north, east, and west sides by the town of Amsterdam. The Mohawk River runs through the city. The majority of the city lies on the north bank, but the Port Jackson area on the south side is also part of the city. The city is within the original, now defunct town of Caughnawaga (meaning "at the rapids"), formed in northern Montgomery County in 1788. The first Europeans to settle here were Dutch immigrants about 1710. They called the community Veeders Mills and Veedersburgh after Albert Veeder, an early mill owner, but residents changed the name to Amsterdam in 1803. In 1773, Guy Johnson built Guy Park, a stone Georgian mansion, but as a Loyalist, he fled to Canada during the Revolution. It was incorporated as a village on April 20, 1830 from a section of the town of Amsterdam. New charters in 1854, 1865, and 1875 increased the size of the village. In 1885, Amsterdam became a city, which subsequently increased in size by annexation of the former
    8.40
    5 votes
    14
    Tønsberg

    Tønsberg

    • People interred here: Bjørn Farmann
    Tønsberg (help·info) is a municipality in Vestfold county, southern Norway, located around 25 km (15.53 mi) north-east of Sandefjord. The administrative centre of the municipality is the town of Tønsberg. The municipality has a population of 38,914 and covers and area of 107 km (41 sq mi). Tønsberg is generally regarded as the oldest town in Norway. Tønsberg was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). The rural municipality of Sem was merged into the municipality of Tønsberg on 1 January 1988. The Old Norse form of the name was Túnsberg. The first element is the genitive case of tún (n), meaning fenced area or garden. The last element is berg (n), meaning mountain. The name originally referred to the fortifications on Slottsfjellet. The old spelling has been retained in the name of the diocese, Tunsberg bispedømme. The coat-of-arms is an old city seal from as far back as 1349. The seal shows Tønsberg Fortress surrounded by a ring wall on a mountain with the sea in front. There is also a longship in the water in front of the fortress. Around the seal are the words (in Latin): This is the seal of Tunsberg. The first time the town was mentioned by
    8.40
    5 votes
    15
    Manchester

    Manchester

    • People interred here: Benjamin S. Roberts
    Manchester is a town in, and one of two shire towns (county seats) of, Bennington County, Vermont, United States. The population was 4,180 at the 2000 census. Manchester Village, an incorporated village, and Manchester Center are settlement centers within the town. Manchester has become a tourist destination, especially for those from New York and Connecticut, offering visitors factory outlet stores of national chain retailers such as Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren, as well as many locally owned businesses, including the Northshire Bookstore, one of America's leading independent bookstores. The town was one of several chartered in 1761 by Benning Wentworth, colonial governor of New Hampshire. It was his custom to name new towns after prominent English aristocrats of the day, hoping they might adopt a patronly interest in their namesakes. Wentworth named Manchester for Robert Montagu, 3rd Duke of Manchester. First settled in 1764, the town was laid out in 1784. The land was better suited for grazing than tillage, so by 1839 about 6000 sheep roamed the pasturage and hillsides. Other industries came to include iron mines, marble quarries and mills, and lumber companies. The arrival
    9.50
    4 votes
    16
    Mystras

    Mystras

    • People interred here: John VI Kantakouzenos
    Mystras (Greek: Μυστράς, Μυζηθράς, Myzithras in the Chronicle of the Morea) is a fortified town and a former municipality in Laconia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Sparti, of which it is a municipal unit. Situated on Mt. Taygetos, near ancient Sparta, it served as the capital of the Byzantine Despotate of the Morea in the 14th and 15th centuries, experiencing a period of prosperity and cultural flowering. The site remained inhabited throughout the Ottoman period, when it was mistaken by Western travellers for ancient Sparta. In the 1830s, it was abandoned and the new town of Sparti was built, approximately eight kilometres to the east. In 1249, Mystras became the seat of the Latin Principality of Achaea, established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade, and Prince William II Villehardouin, a grand-nephew of the Fourth Crusade historian Geoffrey of Villehardouin, built a palace there. In 1261, the Latins ceded Mystras and other forts in the southeastern Peloponnese as ransom for William II, who had been captured in Pelagonia, and Michael VIII Palaeologus made the city the seat of the new
    8.20
    5 votes
    17
    Bellu

    Bellu

    • People interred here: Dan Spătaru
    Bellu is the most famous and largest cemetery in Bucharest, Romania. It is located on a plot of land donated to the local administration by Baron Barbu Bellu. It has been in use since 1858.
    7.00
    6 votes
    18
    St Pancras Old Church

    St Pancras Old Church

    • People interred here: Mary Wollstonecraft
    St Pancras Old Church is a Church of England parish church in Somers Town, central London. It is believed to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in England, and is dedicated to the Roman martyr Saint Pancras, although the building itself is largely Victorian. It is situated on Pancras Road in the London Borough of Camden. The surrounding area and its international railway station are named after the church and parish. It is not to be confused with St Pancras New Church about a kilometre away, on the Euston Road. Documentary evidence for the early history of the church is scanty, but it is believed to have existed since A.D. 314. Remnants of medieval features and references in the Domesday Book suggest it pre-dates the Norman Conquest. It was known simply as St Pancras Church until - as a result of 18th and 19th century urban expansion - St Pancras New Church was built a little over half a mile away on the main Euston Road. Originally, the parish of St Pancras stretched from close to Oxford Street almost to Highgate. However, in the 14th century the population abandoned the site and moved to what is now Kentish Town. The reasons for this were probably the vulnerability
    6.83
    6 votes
    19
    Glasnevin Cemetery

    Glasnevin Cemetery

    • People interred here: Constance Georgine, Countess Markiewicz
    Glasnevin Cemetery (Irish: Reilig Ghlas Naíon), officially known as Prospect Cemetery, is the largest non-denominational cemetery in Ireland with an estimated 1.5 million burials. It first opened in 1832, and is located in Glasnevin, Dublin. Prior to the establishment of Glasnevin Cemetery, Irish Catholics had no cemeteries of their own in which to bury their dead and, as the repressive Penal Laws of the eighteenth century placed heavy restrictions on the public performance of Catholic services, it had become normal practice for Catholics to conduct a limited version of their own funeral services in Protestant cemeteries. This situation continued until an incident at a funeral held at St. Kevin's Cemetery in 1823 provoked public outcry when a Protestant sexton reprimanded a Catholic priest for proceeding to perform a limited version of a funeral mass. The outcry prompted Daniel O'Connell, champion of Catholic rights, to launch a campaign and prepare a legal opinion proving that there was actually no law passed forbidding praying for a dead Catholic in a graveyard. O'Connell pushed for the opening of a burial ground in which both Irish Catholics and Protestants could give their dead
    7.80
    5 votes
    20
    Westminster Abbey

    Westminster Abbey

    • People interred here: Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of York and Albany
    The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, popularly known as Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in the City of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English, later British and later still (and currently) monarchs of the Commonwealth realms. The abbey is a Royal Peculiar and briefly held the status of a cathedral from 1540 to 1550. Westminster Abbey is a collegiate church governed by the Dean and Chapter of Westminster, as established by Royal charter of Queen Elizabeth I in 1560, which created it as the Collegiate Church of St Peter Westminster and a Royal Peculiar under the personal jurisdiction of the Sovereign. The members of the Chapter are the Dean and four residentiary canons, assisted by the Receiver General and Chapter Clerk. One of the canons is also Rector of St Margaret's Church, Westminster, and often holds also the post of Chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons. In addition to the Dean and canons, there are at present two full-time minor canons, one is precentor, and the other is sacrist. The office of Priest Vicar was
    6.67
    6 votes
    21
    Old San Juan

    Old San Juan

    • People interred here: Ángel Rivero Méndez
    Old San Juan (Spanish: Viejo San Juan) is the oldest settlement within Puerto Rico and it is the historic colonial section of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Old San Juan is located on a small and narrow island which lies in the north coast, about 35 miles (56 km) from the east end of Puerto Rico, and is united to the mainland of Puerto Rico by the three bridges. It is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and to the south by San Juan Bay or "Bahia de San Juan" which lies between the city and the mainland. On a bluff about 100 feet (30 m) high at the west end of the island and commanding the entrance to the harbor rise the battlements of Fort San Felipe del Morro, in which there is a lighthouse. The "Caño de San Antonio" lies also in South Coast and extends to the Southeast where the island of Old San Juan connects to the mainland through Santurce by three bridges, "Puente Dos Hermanos" (Ave. Ashford), "Puente G. Esteves" (Ave. Ponce de León) and "Puente San Antonio" (Ave. Fernández Juncos). The city is characterized by its narrow, blue cobblestone streets and flat-roofed brick and stone buildings dating back to the 16th and 17th century when Puerto Rico was a Spanish possession. Near
    8.75
    4 votes
    22
    Père Lachaise Cemetery

    Père Lachaise Cemetery

    • People interred here: Pierre Jules César Janssen
    Père Lachaise Cemetery (French: Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, [simtjɛːʁ dy pɛːʁ laʃɛːz]; officially, cimetière de l'Est, "East Cemetery") is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris, France (44 hectares (110 acres)), though there are larger cemeteries in the city's suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement, and is reputed to be the world's most visited cemetery, attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors annually to the graves of those who have enhanced French life over the past 200 years. It is also the site of three World War I memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Ménilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station called Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance. Many tourists prefer the Gambetta station on line 3, as it allows them to enter near the tomb of Oscar Wilde and then walk downhill to visit the rest of the cemetery. The cemetery takes its name from the confessor to Louis XIV, Père François de la Chaise (1624–1709), who lived in the Jesuit house rebuilt in 1682 on the site of the chapel. The property, situated on the hillside from which the king during the
    7.40
    5 votes
    23
    Lowell

    Lowell

    • People interred here: Jack Kerouac
    Lowell is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA. According to the 2010 census, the city's population was 106,519. It is the fourth largest city in the state. Lowell and Cambridge are the county seats of Middlesex County. Lowell is known as the cradle of the industrial revolution in the United States and many of the city's historic sites have been preserved by the National Park Service. Founded in the 1820s as a planned manufacturing center for textiles, Lowell is located along the rapids of the Merrimack River, 25 miles northwest of Boston in what was once the farming community of East Chelmsford, Massachusetts. The so-called Boston Associates, including Nathan Appleton and Patrick Tracy Jackson of the Boston Manufacturing Company, named the new mill town after their visionary leader, Francis Cabot Lowell, who had died five years before its 1823 incorporation. As Lowell's population grew, it acquired more land from neighboring towns, and diversified into a full-fledged urban center. Many of the men who comprised the labor force for constructing the canals and factories had immigrated from Ireland, escaping the poverty and Potato Famines of the 1830s and 1840s. The mill
    8.50
    4 votes
    24
    Castel Sant'Angelo

    Castel Sant'Angelo

    • People interred here: Antoninus Pius
    The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as the Castel Sant'Angelo (English: Castle of the Holy Angel), is a towering cylindrical building in Parco Adriano, Rome, Italy. It was initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used by the popes as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum. The tomb of the Roman emperor Hadrian, also called Hadrian's mole, was erected on the right bank of the Tiber, between 130 AD and 139 AD. Originally the mausoleum was a decorated cylinder, with a garden top and golden quadriga. Hadrian's ashes were placed here a year after his death in Baiae in 138 AD, together with those of his wife Sabina, and his first adopted son, Lucius Aelius, who also died in 138 AD. Following this, the remains of succeeding emperors were also placed here, the last recorded deposition being Caracalla in 217 AD. The urns containing these ashes were probably placed in what is now known as the Treasury room deep within the building. Hadrian also built the Pons Aelius facing straight onto the mausoleum – it still provides a scenic approach from the center of Rome and the right bank of the Tiber, and is
    8.25
    4 votes
    25
    Odense

    Odense

    • People interred here: Christian II of Denmark
    Odense (Danish pronunciation: [ˈoðˀn̩sə] ( listen)) is the third largest city in Denmark. It has a population of 168,798 (as of 1 January 2012 (2012 -01-01)) and is the main city of the island of Funen. The city is the seat of Odense Municipality, with a population of 191,610 (as of 1 January 2012 (2012 -01-01)), and was the seat of Odense County until 1970, and Funen County from 1970 until 1 January 2007, when Funen County became part of the Region of Southern Denmark. Odense (from Odins Vé, meaning "Odin's shrine", referring to the god Odin of Denmark's indigenous Norse mythology), is one of the oldest cities of Denmark and had its 1000th anniversary in 1988. To celebrate this, a forest named "the Thousand Year Forest" (Danish: Tusindårsskoven) was cultivated. The shrine of Saint Canute (Danish: Sankt Knud / Knud den Hellige) in Saint Canute's Cathedral held great attraction for pilgrims throughout the Middle Ages. In the 16th century, the town was the meeting-place of several parliaments, and down to 1805 it was the seat of the provincial assembly of Funen. Odense's most famous landmark was Odinstårnet (The Odin Tower) constructed in 1935, as the second-tallest tower in Europe,
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Pantheon

    Pantheon

    • People interred here: Margherita of Savoy
    The Pantheon ( /ˈpænθiːən/ or US /ˈpænθiːɒn/; Latin: Pantheon, from Greek: Πάνθειον (ἱερόν), an adjective meaning "(temple consecrated) to all gods") is a building in Rome, Italy, commissioned by Marcus Agrippa as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome, and rebuilt by Emperor Hadrian in about 126 AD. The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered, concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 metres (142 ft). It is one of the best-preserved of all Roman buildings. It has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a Roman Catholic church dedicated to "St. Mary and the Martyrs" but informally known as "Santa Maria della Rotonda." The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda. The ancient Roman writer
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    Annaba

    Annaba

    • People interred here: Arthur Louis Aaron
    Annaba (Arabic: عنابة‎, ‘Annābah, formerly Bône, historically Hippo or Hippo Regius) is a city in the northeastern corner of Algeria near the river Seybouse. It is located in Annaba Province. With a population of 257,359 (2008), it is the fourth largest city in Algeria. It is a leading industrial centre in eastern Algeria. Most of the people call this city Balad Al Unnâb, i.e. the Jujubes city, because of the abundance of this fruit in this place. Annaba is a coastal city and a pole of spontaneous growth. The area of growth of Annaba is accompanied by a metropolitan area under pressure even at high compression to the image of the other metropolises of the Algerian coastline such as Oran and the capital Algiers. With more than 200,000 inhabitants, it's in direct and indirect relationship with the region of "Bône", a territory of nearly 4 million people. It's character of a "port town" gives it a regional international radiation. Much of eastern and southern Algerian seeks the services, equipment, and infrastructure of the city. Economically, it is located in the centre of dynamic and varied activities: industry, transport, finance and tourism. The vicinity of Annaba has yielded
    7.00
    5 votes
    28
    Notre-Dame Cathedral, Luxembourg

    Notre-Dame Cathedral, Luxembourg

    • People interred here: Adolphe, Grand Duke of Luxembourg
    Notre-Dame Cathedral (Luxembourgish: Kathedral Notre-Dame, French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame, German: Kathedrale unserer lieben Frau) is the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Luxembourg City, in southern Luxembourg. It was originally a Jesuit church, and its cornerstone was laid in 1613. The church is a noteworthy example of late gothic architecture; however, it also has many Renaissance elements and adornments. At the end of the 18th century, the church received the miraculous image of the Maria Consolatrix Afflictorum, the patron saint of both the city and the nation. Around 50 years later, the church was consecrated as the Church of Our Lady and in 1870, it was elevated by Pope Pius IX to the Cathedral of Notre-Dame. At the cemetery of the cathedral is the National Monument to the Resistance and to the Deportation. The centerpiece of the monument is the famous bronze monument by the 20th century Luxembourgish sculptor Lucien Wercollier called The Political Prisoner. The cathedral was expanded and enlarged from 1935 to 1938.
    8.00
    4 votes
    29
    Riddarholmskyrkan

    Riddarholmskyrkan

    • People interred here: Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden
    The Riddarholmen Church (Swedish: Riddarholmskyrkan) is the burial church of the Swedish monarchs. It is located on the island of Riddarholmen, close to the Royal Palace in Stockholm, Sweden. The congregation was dissolved in 1807 and today the church is used only for burial and commemorative purposes. Swedish monarchs from Gustavus Adolphus (d. 1632 AD) to Gustaf V (d. 1950) are entombed here (with exceptions such as Queen Christina who is buried within St. Peter's Basilica in Rome), as well as the earlier monarchs Magnus III (d. 1290) and Charles VIII (d. 1470). It is one of the oldest buildings in Stockholm, parts of it dating to the late 13th century, when it was built as a greyfriars monastery. After the Protestant Reformation, the monastery was closed and the building transformed into a Protestant church. A spire designed by Willem Boy was added during the reign of John III, but it was destroyed by a strike of lightning on July 28, 1835 after which it was replaced with the present cast iron spire. Coats of arms of knights of the Order of the Seraphim are in the walls of the church. When a knight of the Order dies, his coat of arms is hung in the church and when the funeral
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Repton

    Repton

    • People interred here: Ethelbald of Mercia
    Repton is a village and civil parish on the edge of the River Trent floodplain in South Derbyshire, about 4.5 miles (7 km) north of Swadlincote. Repton is close to the county boundary with neighbouring Staffordshire and about 4.5 miles (7 km) northeast of Burton upon Trent. Christianity was reintroduced to the Midlands at Repton, where the Mercian royal family under Peada were baptised in AD 653. Soon a double abbey under an Abbess was built. In 669 the Bishop of Mercia translated his see from Repton to Lichfield. Offa, King of Mercia, seemed to resent his own bishops paying allegiance to the Archbishop of Canterbury in Kent who, while under Offa's control, was not of his own kingdom of Mercia. Offa therefore created his own Archdiocese of Lichfield, which presided over all the bishops from the Humber to the Thames. Repton was thus the forebear of the archdiocese of Lichfield, a third archdiocese of the English church: Lichfield, the other two being Canterbury and York. This lasted for only 16 years, however, before Mercia returned to being under the Archbishopric of Canterbury. At the centre of the village is the Church of England parish church of Saint Wystan. The church is
    9.00
    3 votes
    31
    Colorado Springs

    Colorado Springs

    • People interred here: Floyd K. Lindstrom
    Colorado Springs is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and most populous city of El Paso County, Colorado, United States. Colorado Springs is located in the southern portion of the state. It is situated on Fountain Creek and is located 65 miles (105 km) south of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. At 6,035 feet (1839 m) the city stands over one mile (1.6 km) above sea level, though some areas of the city are significantly higher and lower. Colorado Springs is situated near the base of one of the most famous American mountains, Pikes Peak, in the eastern edge of the Southern Rocky Mountains. With a population of 416,427 as of the 2010 Census, it is the second most populous city in the state of Colorado, behind Denver, and the 41st most populous city in the United States, while the Colorado Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated population of 645,613 in 2010. The city covers 194.7 square miles (504 km), making it Colorado's largest city in area. Colorado Springs was selected as the No. 1 Best Big City in "Best Places to Live" by Money magazine in 2006, and placed number one in Outside's 2009 list of America's Best Cities. William Jackson Palmer, a
    7.75
    4 votes
    32
    Goshen

    Goshen

    • People interred here: Harry J. Michael
    Goshen ( /ˈɡoʊʃən/) is a city in and the county seat of Elkhart County, Indiana, United States. It is the smaller of the two principal cities of the Elkhart-Goshen Metropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn is part of the South Bend-Elkhart-Mishawaka Combined Statistical Area. It is located in the northern part of Indiana near the Michigan border, in a region known as Michiana. Goshen is located 10 miles south of Elkhart, 25 miles southeast of South Bend, 120 miles east of Chicago, and 150 miles north of Indianapolis. The population was 31,719 at the 2010 census. The city is known as a center of manufacturing for recreational vehicles and accessories, the home of Goshen College, a small Mennonite liberal arts college, and home to the Elkhart County 4-H Fair, the second largest county fair in the United States. Goshen is located at 41°34′55″N 85°50′12″W / 41.58194°N 85.83667°W / 41.58194; -85.83667. The Elkhart River winds its way through the city and through a dam on the south side making the Goshen Dam Pond. Rock Run Creek also runs through town. The city is divided east/west by Main Street and north/south by Lincoln Avenue. According to the 2010 census, the city has a total
    7.75
    4 votes
    33
    Paisley

    Paisley

    • People interred here: John McDermond
    Paisley (Scottish Gaelic: Pàislig) is the largest town in the historic county of Renfrewshire in the west central Lowlands of Scotland and serves as the administrative centre for the Renfrewshire council area. The town is situated on the northern edge of the Gleniffer Braes, straddling the banks of the White Cart Water, a tributary of the River Clyde. The town, a former burgh, forms part of a contiguous urban area with Glasgow, Glasgow City Centre being 6.9 miles (11.1 km) to the east. The town came to prominence with the establishment of Paisley Abbey in the 12th century, an important religious hub in mediaeval Scotland which formerly had control over the other churches in the local area. By the 19th century, Paisley had established itself as a centre of the weaving industry, giving its name to the Paisley Shawl and the Paisley Pattern. The town's associations with political Radicalism were highlighted by its involvement in the Radical War of 1820, with striking weavers being instrumental in the protests. Formerly and variously known as Paislay, Passelet, Passeleth, and Passelay the burgh's name is of uncertain origin; some sources suggest a derivation either from the Brythonic
    7.75
    4 votes
    34
    Clonmacnoise

    Clonmacnoise

    • People interred here: Rory O'Connor
    The monastery of Clonmacnoise (Cluain Mhic Nóis in Irish, meaning "Meadow of the Sons of Nós", or perhaps, albeit less likely, Cluain Muccu Nóis "Meadow of the Pigs of Nós") is situated in County Offaly, Ireland on the River Shannon south of Athlone. Clonmacnoise was founded sometime between 545 and 548 by Ciarán Mac a tSaor, a young man from Rathcroghan, Co. Roscommon. Until the 9th century it had close associations with the kings of Connacht. The strategic location of the monastery helped it become a major centre of religion, learning, craftsmanship and trade by the 9th century and together with Clonard it was the most famous in Ireland, visited by scholars from all over Europe. From the ninth until the eleventh century it was allied with the kings of Meath. Many of the high kings of Tara and Connacht were buried here. Shortly after his arrival with seven companions - at the point where the major east-west land route through the bogs of central Ireland along the Eiscir Riada, an esker left by the receding glaciers of the last ice age crossed the River Shannon - Saint Ciarán met Diarmait Uí Cerbaill who helped him build the first church at the site. This was a small wooden
    7.50
    4 votes
    35
    Isola di San Michele

    Isola di San Michele

    • People interred here: Luigi Nono
    San Michele is an island in the Venetian Lagoon, northern Italy. It is associated with the sestiere of Cannaregio, from which it lies a short distance northeast. Along with neighbouring San Cristoforo della Pace, the island was a popular place for local travellers and fishermen to land. Mauro Codussi's Chiesa di San Michele in Isola of 1469, the first Renaissance church in Venice, and a monastery lie on the island, which also served for a time as a prison. San Cristoforo was selected to become a cemetery in 1807, designed by Gian Antonio Selva, when under French occupation it was decreed that burial on the mainland (or on the main Venetian islands) was unsanitary. The canal that separated the two islands was filled in during 1836, and subsequently the larger island became known as San Michele. Bodies were carried to the island on special funeral gondolas, including Igor Stravinsky, Joseph Brodsky, Jean Schlumberger, Frederick Rolfe, Horatio Brown, Sergei Diaghilev, Ezra Pound, Luigi Nono, Franco Basaglia, Zoran Mušič, and Salvador de Iturbide y Marzán. The cemetery is still in use today. Aspasia Manos was initially interred at the cemetery of Isola di San Michele. Her remains were
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    Schleswig Cathedral

    Schleswig Cathedral

    • People interred here: Frederick I of Denmark
    Schleswig Cathedral (German: Schleswiger Dom), (Danish: Slesvig Domkirke) officially the Cathedral of St. Peter at Schleswig (German: St. Petri-Dom zu Schleswig), is the main church of Schleswig and was the cathedral of the Bishop of Schleswig until the diocese was dissolved in 1624. It is now a church of the North Elbian Evangelical Lutheran Church, seating of one of its bishops, and ranks among the most important architectural monuments of Schleswig-Holstein. In 850 a missionary church was founded in Haithabu (Hedeby). From 947 to 949 Otto I installed 3 dioceses on the cimbrian peninsula: Ribe diocese, Schleswig diocese and in 948 Århus diocese. After the founding of Schleswig diocese in 947, the first cathedral in Schleswig was built. Today, neither the size nor the location of this cathedral is known. In 1134, construction of a new romanesque basilica began. The work was only completed around 1200, because an additional nave was constructed that can still be seen today. Construction materials included granite, tuff from the Rhine, and brick. In 1134, the Danish King Niels' headless was body was laid out in St. Peter's Cathedral after it was pulled from the Schlien in the nets
    7.50
    4 votes
    37
    Norwalk

    Norwalk

    • People interred here: John D. Magrath
    Norwalk is a city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the population of the city is 85,603, making Norwalk sixth in population in Connecticut, and third in Fairfield County. The city is part of the New York metropolitan area. The name "Norwalk" comes from the Algonquian word "noyank" meaning "point of land", or its Native American name, “Naramauke” (also spelled "Norwauke", "Norowake", or "Norwaake"), a Native American chief. The farming of oysters has long been important to Norwalk, which was once nicknamed "Oyster Town." Each September, Norwalk holds its Oyster Festival. Norwalk was purchased in 1640 by Roger Ludlow. The original purchase included the land between the Norwalk and Saugatuck rivers, at a distance of a "day’s walk" from the sea. Norwalk was chartered as a town on September 11, 1651. The traditional American song "Yankee Doodle" has Norwalk-related origins. During the French and Indian War, a regiment of Norwalkers arrived at Fort Crailo, NY. The British regiment began to mock and ridicule the rag-tag Connecticut troops, who had only chicken feathers for a uniform. Richard Shuckburgh, a British army surgeon, added words
    8.67
    3 votes
    38
    Prairie City

    Prairie City

    • People interred here: Herschel F. Briles
    Prairie City is a city in Jasper County, Iowa, United States. The population was 1,680 at the 2010 census. It is twenty-two miles east of Des Moines. Prairie City was founded by James Elliot in 1856, for whom it was originally named; it was later changed because there was already another Elliot in the state. The first resident was William Means, who built a tavern 2 miles (3.2 km) west of Elliot's cabin. The railroad first came through Prairie City in 1866. The first school in Prairie City was built on 1868(The Plainsmen) ; the city's district remained independent until a merger with that of Monroe in 1990, brought about by the destruction by fire of Monroe's high school. The new school is called the PCM Mustangs. Prairie City's Historical Society was established in 1995. The Prairie City Historical Museum is located at 109 S. Main Street and open by appointment. Many artifacts from Prairie City's history are housed in the museum including the Dowden Potato Digger, which was originally manufactured in Prairie City. The city was the subject of Douglas Bauer's popular reminiscence of change in small town Iowa from the 1950s through the 1970s, Prairie City, Iowa: Three Seasons at
    8.67
    3 votes
    39
    Stuttgart

    Stuttgart

    • People interred here: Oskar Schlemmer
    Stuttgart ( /ˈʃtʊtɡɑrt/; German pronunciation: [ˈʃtʊtɡaɐ̯t] ( listen)) is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg in southern Germany. The sixth-largest city in Germany, Stuttgart has a population of 600,038 (December 2008) while the metropolitan area has a population of 5.3 million (2008). The city lies at the centre of a densely populated area, surrounded by a ring of smaller towns. This area called Stuttgart Region has a population of 2.7 million. Stuttgart's urban area has a population of roughly 1.8 million, making it Germany's seventh largest. With over 5 million inhabitants, the greater Stuttgart Metropolitan Region is the fourth-biggest in Germany after the Rhine-Ruhr area, Berlin/Brandenburg and Frankfurt/Rhine-Main. Stuttgart is spread across a variety of hills (some of them vineyards), valleys and parks – unusual for a German city and often a source of surprise to visitors who primarily associate the city with its industrial reputation as the 'cradle of the automobile'. Stuttgart has the status of Stadtkreis, a type of self-administrating urban county. It is also the seat of the state legislature, the regional parliament, local council and the Protestant State
    8.67
    3 votes
    40
    Carnegie

    Carnegie

    • People interred here: James H. Bronson
    Carnegie is a borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, United States and is part of the Pittsburgh Metro Area. The population was 7,972 at the 2010 census. Carnegie is located at 40°24′25″N 80°5′12″W / 40.40694°N 80.08667°W / 40.40694; -80.08667. It is approximately 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Pittsburgh. Chartiers Creek runs through the center of the borough. According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.1 km), all of it land. Its average elevation is 833 ft (254 m) above sea level. Carnegie is named after Andrew Carnegie, who donated one of his libraries for the gesture. It was incorporated on March 1, 1894. from the boroughs of Chartiers and Mansfield (separated by Chartiers Creek). Later, the borough annexed part of Robinson Township (now Rosslyn Heights). Neighborhoods include Rosslyn Heights, Cubbage Hill, Irishtown, Forsythe Hill, Library Hill, and Old Mansfield. Many neighborhoods were at one time or another mined for coal. The main employers were steel mills such as Superior Steel & Union Electric Steel. Carnegie had a rail yard that had connections to several railroads early in the twentieth century, including the
    10.00
    2 votes
    41
    Moscow

    Moscow

    • People interred here: Grigory Landsberg
    Moscow ( /ˈmɒskaʊ/ or /ˈmɒskoʊ/; Russian: Москва, tr. Moskva; IPA: [mɐˈskva] ( listen)) is the capital city and the most populous federal subject of Russia. The city is a major political, economic, cultural and scientific center in Russia and in Europe. According to Forbes 2011, Moscow has the largest community of billionaires in the world. Moscow is the northernmost megacity on Earth, the most populous city in Europe, and the 5th largest city proper in the world. It's also the largest city in Russia with a population, according to the 2010 Census, of 11,503,501. By its territorial expansion on July 1, 2012 southwest into the Moscow Oblast, the capital increased its area 2.5 times; from about 1,000 square kilometers (390 sq mi) up to 2,500 square kilometers (970 sq mi), and gained additional population of 230,000 people. Moscow is situated on the Moskva River in the Central Federal District of European Russia. In the course of its history the city has served as the capital of a progression of states, from the medieval Grand Duchy of Moscow and the subsequent Tsardom of Russia to the Soviet Union. Moscow is the site of the Moscow Kremlin, an ancient fortress that is today the
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    West Point Cemetery

    West Point Cemetery

    • People interred here: John T. Thompson
    West Point Cemetery is a historic cemetery on the grounds of the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York. It overlooks the Hudson River, and served as a burial ground for American Revolutionary War soldiers and early West Point inhabitants long before 1817 when it was officially designated as a military cemetery. Prior to 1817, the area was known as "German Flats" before it was formally designated as the official cemetery. Until that time several small burial plots scattered in mid-post also served as places of interment. The graves from these plots and the remains subsequently found during building excavations were removed to the new site. An improved road to the cemetery was constructed in 1840, and the caretaker's cottage was erected in 1872. Besides offices for the cemetery management, the caretaker's cottage now also houses West Point's Inspector General office. The cemetery is home to several monuments, to include Dade Monument, the Cadet Monument, Wood's Monument, and Margaret Corbin Monument.
    6.40
    5 votes
    43
    Góra Kalwaria

    Góra Kalwaria

    • People interred here: Yehudah Aryeh Leib Alter
    Góra Kalwaria [ˈgura kalˈvarʲa] is a town on the Vistula River in the Mazovian Voivodship, Poland, about 25 km southeast of Warsaw. It has a population of about 11,000 (1992). The town has significance for both Catholic Christians and Hasidic Jews. Originally, its name was simply Góra (literally: "Mountain"), changed in 1670 to Nowa Jerozolima ("New Jerusalem"), and in the 18th century to Góra Kalwaria ("Calvary Mountain"). The Yiddish name of the town is גער (Ger). Major industries include: food processing (Hortex), sports equipment (Polsport), and chemical industry. But in 2005 it is all closed down. The village of Góra already existed in the 13th century. Completely destroyed during a Swedish occupation known as the Deluge, in 1666, it became the property of Stefan Wierzbowski, Bishop of Poznań, who decided to found a new town on the ruins. His plan was to build a so-called calvary—a religious center dedicated to passion plays and services which was quite popular in the early modern Poland. He was encouraged by the fact that the local landscape closely resembled that of the Holy Land. In 1670, the town was renamed Nowa Jerozolima, granted city rights and construction work kicked
    7.25
    4 votes
    44
    Jennings

    Jennings

    • People interred here: John H. Quick
    Jennings is a city in St. Louis County, Missouri, United States. The population was 14,712 at the 2010 census. Jennings is located at 38°43′16″N 90°15′41″W / 38.72111°N 90.26139°W / 38.72111; -90.26139 (38.721100, -90.261428). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.7 square miles (9.6 km), all of it land. As of the census in 2010, there are 14,712 people. As of the 2000 census, there were 15,469 people, 6,174 households, and 4,081 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,193.3 people per square mile (1,618.6/km²). There were 6,798 housing units at an average density of 1,842.8 per square mile (711.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 19.32% White, 78.58% African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.38% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 1.40% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.73% of the population. There were 6,174 households out of which 35.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29.2% were married couples living together, 31.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.9% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of
    7.25
    4 votes
    45
    Montparnasse Cemetery

    Montparnasse Cemetery

    • People interred here: Urbain Le Verrier
    Montparnasse Cemetery (French: Cimetière du Montparnasse) is a cemetery in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, part of the city's 14th arrondissement. Created from three farms in 1824, the cemetery at Montparnasse was originally known as Le Cimetière du Sud. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery. Montparnasse Cemetery is the eternal home of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris. Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction. Among those interred here are:
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Mount Vernon

    Mount Vernon

    • People interred here: George Washington
    Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architectural style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River. Mount Vernon was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is owned and maintained in trust by The Mount Vernon Ladies' Association and is open every day of the year. When Augustine Washington owned the estate, it was known as Little Hunting Creek Plantation after the nearby Little Hunting Creek. Lawrence Washington, George's older half-brother, inherited the estate and changed its name to Mount Vernon in honor of Vice Admiral Edward Vernon famed for the War of Jenkin's Ear and capture of Portobelo, Colón. Vernon had been Lawrence's commanding officer in the British Royal Navy, and Lawrence greatly admired him. When George Washington inherited the property he retained the name. The early history of the estate at Little Hunting Creek is separate from that of the home, which wasn't occupied until 1743. In 1674, John Washington and Nicholas Spencer
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    St Paul's Cathedral

    St Paul's Cathedral

    • People interred here: Ethelred the Unready
    St Paul's Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral and seat of the Bishop of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. St Paul's sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London, and is the mother church of the Diocese of London. The present church dating from the late 17th century was built to an English Baroque design of Sir Christopher Wren, as part of a major rebuilding program which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London, and was completed within his lifetime. The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London, with its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, dominating the skyline for 300 years. At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962, and its dome is also among the highest in the world. In terms of area, St Paul's is the second largest church building in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral. St Paul's Cathedral occupies a significant place in the national identity of the English population. It is the central subject of much promotional material, as well as postcard
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Lake View Cemetery

    Lake View Cemetery

    • People interred here: John D. Rockefeller
    Lake View Cemetery is located on the east side of the City of Cleveland, Ohio, along the East Cleveland and Cleveland Heights borders. There are over 104,000 people buried at Lake View, with more than 700 burials each year. There are 70 acres (0.28 km) remaining for future development. Known locally as "Cleveland's Outdoor Museum," Lake View Cemetery is home to the James A. Garfield Memorial, Wade Memorial Chapel, which features an interior designed by Louis Tiffany, as well as an 80,000,000-US-gallon (300,000,000 l) capacity concrete-filled dam. Lake View Cemetery was founded in 1869 and sits on 285 acres (1.15 km) of land. The cemetery is so named because it is partially located in the "heights" area of Greater Cleveland, with a view of Lake Erie to the north. It was modeled after the great garden cemeteries of Victorian era England and France. The Italian stonemasons brought in to create the Cemetery founded the Cleveland neighborhood of Little Italy just to its southwest. The James A. Garfield Memorial is the most prominent point of interest at Lake View Cemetery. The ornate interior features a large marble statue, stained glass, bas relief, and various historical relics from
    8.33
    3 votes
    49
    Rustburg

    Rustburg

    • People interred here: Forrester L. Taylor
    Rustburg is a census-designated place (CDP) in Campbell County, Virginia, United States. The population was 1,431 in the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Campbell County. Rustburg is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. The public high school in Rustburg is Rustburg High School. The public primary and elementary schools are Rustburg Middle School, Rustburg Elementary School, Yellow Branch Elementary School, Fray Educational Center, and Campbell County Technical Center. Rustburg was named for Jeremiah Rust, who donated 50 acres (200,000 m) of his land for the village in 1784. Rustburg is located at 37°16′25″N 79°05′56″W / 37.273731°N 79.098914°W / 37.273731; -79.098914 (37.273731, -79.098914). According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 10.8 square miles (28 km), of which 0.09% is water. The town of Rustburg has three neighborhoods: As of the census of 2000, there were 1,271 people, 474 households, and 321 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 117.3 people per square mile (45.3/km). There were 518 housing units at an average density of 47.8/sq mi (18.5/km). The racial makeup of the CDP was 74.82% White, 23.60%
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Winchester

    Winchester

    • People interred here: Alfred the Great
    Winchester (archaically known as Winton and Wintonceastre) is a historic cathedral city and former capital city of England. It is the county town of Hampshire, in South East England. The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs, along the course of the River Itchen. At the time of the 2001 Census, Winchester had a population of 41,420. Winchester developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which developed from an Iron Age oppidum. Winchester's major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe. The town is also home to the University of Winchester and the famous public school, Winchester College. The city's architectural and historic interest, and its fast links to other towns and cities have led Winchester to become one of the most expensive and desirable areas of the country. A person who is from or resides in Winchester is sometimes locally known as a Wintonian. Settlement in the area dates back to prehistoric times, with three Iron Age hillforts,
    8.33
    3 votes
    51
    Jerónimos Monastery

    Jerónimos Monastery

    • People interred here: Manuel I of Portugal
    The Hieronymites Monastery (Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, Portuguese pronunciation: [muʃˈtɐjɾu duʃ ʒɨˈɾɔnimuʃ]) is located near the shore of the parish of Belém, in the municipality of Lisbon, Portugal. The monastery is one of the most prominent monuments of the Manueline-style architecture (Portuguese late-Gothic) in Lisbon, classified in 1983 as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with the nearby Tower of Belém. Originally, the home for the Hieronymite religious order, was built by the Infante Henry the Navigator around 1459. The chapel that existed there, to the invocation of Santa Maria de Belém, was serviced by monks of the military-religious Order of Christ who provided assistance to pilgrims who transited the area. The small beach of Praia do Restelo was an advantage spot, with safe anchorage and protection from the winds,sought after by the ships that entered the Tagus. The Hermitage of Restelo (Portuguese: Ermida do Restelo), as it was known, was already a hermitage in disrepair, when Vasco da Gama and his men spent the night in prayer before departing on their expedition to the Orient in 1497. The existing structure was started on the orders of Manuel I (1469–1521) at the
    9.50
    2 votes
    52
    Mukacheve

    Mukacheve

    • People interred here: Chaim Elazar Spira
    Mukachevo or Mukacheve (Ukrainian: Мукачево, Мукачеве; see name section) is a city located in the valley of the Latorica river in the Zakarpattia Oblast (province), in southwestern Ukraine. Serving as the administrative center of the Mukachivskyi Raion (district), the city itself is also designated as a separate raion within the oblast. The population in 1989 was 91,000, in 2004 77,300 and is now 93,738 (As of 2008). The city is now a rail terminus and highway junction, and has beer, wine, tobacco, food, textile, timber and furniture industries. During the Cold War it was home to Mukachevo air base. Mukachevo has a Ukrainian majority (77.1%) with a significant minority of Russians (9.0%), Hungarians (8.5%), Germans (1.9%) and Roma (1.4%). There are many different ways to name Mukacheve. In Ukrainian it is usually spelled as Mukacheve while Мукачів (Mukachiv) is sometimes also used in Ukrainian. Its name in Rusyn is either spelled Мукачево (Mukachevo) or Мукачово (Mukachovo). Other names are Hungarian: Munkács; Romanian: Muncaci, Munceag; Russian: Мукачево, (Mukachevo); Polish Mukaczewo; Slovak and Czech: Mukačevo; German: Munkatsch; Yiddish: מונקאטש, Munkatsh, Minkatsh. From the
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Rock Island National Cemetery

    Rock Island National Cemetery

    • People interred here: Edward J. Moskala
    Rock Island National Cemetery is a United States National Cemetery located within Rock Island Arsenal near the city of Rock Island, Illinois. It encompasses 66 acres (27 ha), and as of the end of 2006, had 24,525 interments. The cemetery is also nearing compliance with the National Shrine guidelines, due to its use of college students during the summer to reset and realign stones. When looking from any one stone there should be seven lines visible and all should be straight. The cemetery was established in 1863 as a place to inter the remains of American Civil War Union army soldiers. Its initial placement interfered with expansion of the Arsenal's facilities, so it was moved to a location on the northern end of the island. Civil War veterans who were interred in Oakdale Cemetery in Davenport, Iowa, were later disinterred and moved to the National Cemetery. Property transfers from the Arsenal in 1926, 1936, and 1950 increased the cemetery's area. There are plans for further expansion of this cemetery including an addition pavilion, more land, and a wall for cremations near the tank track. A second, 2-acre (0.81 ha) cemetery was established near Rock Island National Cemetery to bury
    9.50
    2 votes
    54
    Sandringham

    Sandringham

    • People interred here: Prince Alexander John of Wales
    Sandringham is a village and civil parish in the north of the English county of Norfolk. The village is situated some 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) south of the village of Dersingham, 12 km (7.5 mi) north of the town of King's Lynn and 60 km (37 mi) north-west of the city of Norwich. The civil parish extends westwards from Sandringham itself to the shore of The Wash some 6 km (3.7 mi) distant, and also includes the villages of West Newton and Wolferton. It has an area of 41.91 km (16.18 sq mi) and in 2001 had a population of 402 in 176 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of King's Lynn and West Norfolk. Sandringham is best known as the location of Sandringham House and its associated estate. This is a favoured holiday home of Queen Elizabeth II and several of her predecessors. Near to Sandringham house is the Royal Stud, a stud farm that houses many of the royal horses. The village is also the birthplace of Lady Diana Spencer.
    9.50
    2 votes
    55
    Vergina

    Vergina

    • People interred here: Philip II of Macedon
    Vergina (Greek: Βεργίνα) is a small town in northern Greece, located in the regional unit of Imathia, Central Macedonia. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Veroia, of which it is a municipal unit. The town became internationally famous in 1977, when the Greek archaeologist Manolis Andronikos unearthed what he claimed was the burial site of the kings of Macedon, including the tomb of Philip II, father of Alexander the Great. The finds established the site as the ancient Aigai (Greek: Αἰγαί). The modern town of Vergina is about 13 km south-east of the district centre of Veroia and about 80 km south-west of Thessaloniki, the capital of Greek Macedonia. The town has a population of about two thousand people and stands on the foothills of Mount Pieria, at an elevation of 120 m (360 ft) above sea level. During the 8th and 7th century BC the area was ruled by Illyrian tribes, which established a strategic base at the location of Aegae. When in the early 7th century BC local Thracian and Paeonian tribes revolted, the Illyrians pulled out. In approximately 650 BC, the Argeads, an ancient Greek royal house led by Perdiccas I, fled from Argos and established
    9.50
    2 votes
    56
    Althorp

    Althorp

    • People interred here: Diana, Princess of Wales
    Althorp ( /ˈɔːlθɔrp/ or /ˈɔːltrəp/) is a country estate of about 14,000 acres (60 km) and a stately home in Northamptonshire, England. It is about 5 miles (8.0 km) north-west of the county town of Northampton. Althorp was built by the Earl of Sunderland in 1688. The estate has been the ancestral home of the Spencer family since the 16th century. Their fortune derived from its earliest known ancestor, Sir John Spencer of Wormleighton, Warwickshire, who bought Althorp in 1522 from the Catesby family with the huge profits from his sheep-rearing business. The house was originally a red brick Tudor building but its appearance was radically altered in the 18th century when the architect Henry Holland was commissioned to make extensive changes starting in 1788. The interior of the house is generally considered its strongest asset as the Spencer family has assembled an impressive collection of portrait art including several pieces painted by the Flemish master Anthony van Dyck. The estate stable block has been converted into an exhibition devoted to the memory of Diana, Princess of Wales, who is buried on the estate, and provides an attractive sandstone setting that effectively offsets the
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Highgate Cemetery

    Highgate Cemetery

    • People interred here: Shura Cherkassky
    Highgate Cemetery is a place of burial in north London, England. It is designated Grade I on the English Heritage Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England. It is divided into two parts, named the East and West cemetery. There are approximately 170,000 people buried in around 53,000 graves at Highgate Cemetery. Highgate Cemetery is notable both for some of the people buried there as well as for its de facto status as a nature reserve. The cemetery is located on both sides of Swain's Lane in Highgate, N6, next to Waterlow Park. The Main Gate is located just north of Oakshott Avenue. There is another entrance on Chester Road. The cemetery is in the London Boroughs of Camden, Haringey and Islington. The nearest transport link is Archway tube station. The cemetery in its original form – the northwestern wooded area – opened in 1839, as part of a plan to provide seven large, modern cemeteries, known as the "Magnificent Seven", around the outside of London. The inner-city cemeteries, mostly the graveyards attached to individual churches, had long been unable to cope with the number of burials and were seen as a hazard to health and an undignified way to treat
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Lasswade

    Lasswade

    • People interred here: Robert Dundas, 2nd Viscount Melville
    Lasswade is a civil parish and village in Midlothian, Scotland, on the River North Esk, nine miles (14.5 kilometres) south of Edinburgh city centre, between Dalkeith and Loanhead. Melville Castle lies to the north east. The name Lasswade probably dervives from the Old English for læs - meaning meadow and (ge)wæd - meaning ford. The current Lasswade Parish Church building was originally built for the former United Presbyterian Church (later United Free Church), which became part of the Church of Scotland in 1929. The old parish church was built in the 13th century, though little of it today survives. It was abandoned in 1793 and much of its ruins collapsed in 1866. The 17th century Scottish poet, William Drummond of Hawthornden was buried within its grounds. Sir John Lauder, 1st Baronet of Fountainhall was born at Melville Mill, Lasswade, in 1595, and the present 18th-century Barony House was known as Lasswade Cottage when Sir Walter Scott rented it (1798-1804). He was visited here by the writer James Hogg (the 'Ettrick Shepherd') and the Wordsworths. Thomas de Quincey, author of Confessions of an English Opium Eater, also lived in nearby Polton for some years from 1843, in the
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    Rancho Palos Verdes

    Rancho Palos Verdes

    • People interred here: Edward A. DeVore, Jr.
    Rancho Palos Verdes (sometimes abbreviated RPV) is a city in Los Angeles County, California that was incorporated on September 7, 1973. The population was 41,643 at the 2010 census. Rancho Palos Verdes translates from Spanish as Green Mast Farm or Green Pole Farm, referring to the North American tree species Parkinsonia florida (blue palo verde). Rancho Palos Verdes is an affluent suburb of Los Angeles. Sitting atop the Palos Verdes Hills and bluffs of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, it is known for expansive views of the Pacific Ocean. The history of Rancho Palos Verdes dates back to the Spanish explorers and the establishment of the first Spanish rancho land grant in California. Its most notable geographic features are the Palos Verdes Hills and cliffs with grand vistas of the Pacific Ocean, and views of Santa Catalina Island. Wayfarers Chapel designed by Lloyd Wright and built between 1949 - 1951 is on the National Register of Historic Places. Point Vicente Lighthouse was built in 1926 and is also on the National Register of Historic Places. Point Vicente Interpretive Center opened in 1984 with a mission to present and interpret the unique features and history of the Palos Verdes
    7.00
    4 votes
    60
    Darmstadt

    Darmstadt

    • People interred here: Alice of the United Kingdom
    Darmstadt is a city in the Bundesland (federal state) of Hesse in Germany, located in the southern part of the Rhine Main Area. Darmstadt has a population of 147.150 (2011). The Darmstadt Larger Urban Zone has 430.993 inhabitants. The sandy soils in the Darmstadt area, ill-suited for agriculture in times before industrial fertilisation, prevented any larger settlement from developing, until the city became the seat of the Landgraves of Hessen-Darmstadt in the 16th century. As the administrative centre of an increasingly prosperous duchy, the city gained in prominence during the following centuries. In the 20th century, industry (especially chemicals) as well as large science and electronics (later information technology) sectors became increasingly important, and are still a major part of the city's economy. Darmstadt also has a large tertiary education sector, with three major universities and numerous associated institutions. Darmstadt is one of few cities (as opposed to smaller towns) in Germany which does not lie close to a river, lake or coast. It is the sunniest city in the state of Hesse. The chemical element darmstadtium (atomic number 110) is named after it, having been
    6.00
    5 votes
    61
    Lapeer County

    Lapeer County

    • People interred here: Frederick Alber
    Lapeer County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the population was 88,319. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, it is part of Metro Detroit, but is also considered part of the Metro Flint area. The county seat is Lapeer. The county was created on September 18, 1822, and was fully organized on February 2, 1835. The name is an anglicization of the French la pierre, which means "flint" or "flint stone." List of Michigan county name etymologies. On October 26, 2010, Lapeer became a founding member of the Karegnondi Water Authority. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 663.08 square miles (1,717.4 km), of which 654.20 square miles (1,694.4 km) (or 98.66%) is land and 8.88 square miles (23.0 km) (or 1.34%) is water. Lapeer County's geography is very similar to Oakland County, except Lapeer County is more rural. Lapeer is one of the five counties that form the peninsula projecting into Lake Huron known as the Thumb, which in turn is a sub-region of the Flint/Tri-Cities. As of the census of 2000, there were 87,904 people, 30,729 households, and 23,876 families residing in the county. The population density was 134 people per square
    6.00
    5 votes
    62
    Vilnius

    Vilnius

    • People interred here: Vytautas the Great
    Vilnius ([ˈvʲɪlʲnʲʊs] ( listen); see also other names) is the capital of Lithuania, and its largest city, with a population of 554,060 (838,852 together with Vilnius County) as of 2011. It is located in the southeast of the country. It is the second biggest city of the Baltic states, after Riga. Vilnius is the seat of the Vilnius city municipality and of the Vilnius district municipality. It is also the capital of Vilnius County. The first known written record of Vilnius as the Lithuanian capital is known from Gediminas' letters in 1323. Vilnius is classified as a Gamma global city according to GaWC studies, and is known for its Old Town of beautiful architecture, declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994. Its Jewish influence until the 20th century has led to it being described as the “Jerusalem of Lita" and Napoleon named it "the Jerusalem of the North" as he was passing through in 1812. In the year 2009, Vilnius was the European Capital of Culture, together with the Austrian city of Linz. The name of the city originated from the Vilnia River. The city has also been known by many derivate spellings in various languages throughout its history. The most notable non-Lithuanian
    6.00
    5 votes
    63
    Bath Abbey

    Bath Abbey

    • People interred here: Thomas Malthus
    The Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Bath, commonly known as Bath Abbey, is an Anglican parish church and a former Benedictine monastery in Bath, Somerset, England. Founded in the 7th century, Bath Abbey was reorganised in the 10th century and rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries; major restoration work was carried out by Sir George Gilbert Scott in the 1860s. It is one of the largest examples of Perpendicular Gothic architecture in the West Country. The church is cruciform in plan, and is able to seat 1200. An active place of worship, with hundreds of congregation members and hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, it is used for religious services, secular civic ceremonies, concerts and lectures. The choir performs in the abbey and elsewhere. There is a heritage museum in the vaults. The abbey is a Grade I listed building, particularly noted for its fan vaulting. It contains war memorials for the local population and monuments to several notable people, in the form of wall and floor plaques and commemorative stained glass. The church has two organs and a peal of ten bells. The west front includes sculptures of angels climbing to heaven on two stone ladders. In
    8.00
    3 votes
    64
    Church of Peace

    Church of Peace

    • People interred here: Victoria, Princess Royal
    The Protestant Church of Peace (German: Friedenskirche) is situated in the Marly Gardens on the Green Fence in the palace grounds of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam, Germany. The church was built according to the wishes and with the close involvement of the artistically gifted King Frederick William IV and designed by the court architect, Ludwig Persius. After Persius' death in 1845, the architect Friedrich August Stüler was charged with continuing his work. Building included work by Ferdinand von Arnim and Ludwig Ferdinand Hesse also. The cornerstone of the churchhouse was laid on April 14, 1845. The building was dedicated on September 24, 1848, though construction continued until 1854. The structure resembles a High Italian monastery. The church is a columned basilica with three naves and no transept, with a free-standing belltower. The 13.5 m high central nave overlaps the side aisles, which are half as wide. An arcade of central arches mark the crossing point. An etching of the Basilica di San Clemente in Rome made by early Christians resembles a draft design of the Potsdam church. The religious Frederick William IV desired a flat coffered ceiling on the inside, with gold stars on a
    8.00
    3 votes
    65
    Hollywood Cemetery

    Hollywood Cemetery

    • People interred here: James Monroe
    Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery located at 412 South Cherry Street in Richmond, Virginia. Characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River, it is the resting place of two United States Presidents, James Monroe and John Tyler, as well as the only Confederate States President, Jefferson Davis. It is also the resting place of 25 Confederate generals, more than any other cemetery in the country. Included are George Pickett and J.E.B. Stuart. Hollywood Cemetery was opened in 1849, constructed on land known as "Harvie's Woods" that was once owned by William Byrd II. It was designed in the rural garden style, with its name, "Hollywood," coming from the holly trees dotting the hills of the property. In 1869, a 90-foot (27 m) high granite pyramid was built as a memorial to the more than 18,000 enlisted men of the Confederate Army buried in the cemetery. Hollywood Cemetery is one of Richmond's major tourist attractions. There are many local legends surrounding certain tombs and grave sites in the cemetery, including one about a little girl and the black iron statue of a dog standing watch over her grave. Other notable legends rely on ghosts
    8.00
    3 votes
    66
    Braunschweig

    Braunschweig

    • People interred here: Henry the Lion
    Braunschweig (German pronunciation: [ˈbʁaʊnʃvaɪç]; Low German: Brunswiek [ˈbrɔˑnsviːk]; English: Brunswick), is a city of 250,556 people, located in the state of Lower Saxony, Germany. It is located north of the Harz mountains at the farthest navigable point of the Oker river, which connects to the North Sea via the rivers Aller and Weser. The date and circumstances of the town's foundation are unknown. Tradition maintains that Braunschweig was created through the merger of two settlements, one founded by Brun(o), a Saxon count who died in 880, on one side of the river Oker – the legend gives the year 861 for the foundation – and the other the settlement of a legendary Count Dankward, after whom Dankwarderode Castle (Dankward's clearing), which was reconstructed in the 19th century, is named. The town's original name of Brunswik is a combination of the name Bruno and Low German wik, a place where merchants rested and stored their goods. The town's name therefore indicates an ideal resting-place, as it lay by a ford across the Oker River. Another explanation of the city's name is that it comes from Brand, or burning, indicating a place which developed after the landscape was cleared
    6.75
    4 votes
    67
    Dresden

    Dresden

    • People interred here: Augustus III of Poland
    Dresden (German pronunciation: [ˈdʁeːsdᵊn]; Upper Sorbian: Drježdźany) is the capital city of the Free State of Saxony in Germany. It is situated in a valley on the River Elbe, near the Czech border. The Dresden conurbation is part of the Saxon Triangle metropolitan area. Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendour. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city centre. A controversial Allied aerial bombing towards the end of World War II killed thousands of civilians and destroyed the entire city centre. The impact of the bombing and 40 years of urban development during the East German communist era have considerably changed the face of the city. Some restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Oper and the Dresdner Frauenkirche. Since the German reunification in 1990, Dresden has regained importance as one of the cultural, educational, political and economic centres of Germany. Although Dresden is a relatively recent city of Slavic origin, the
    6.75
    4 votes
    68
    El-Lisht

    El-Lisht

    • People interred here: Senusret I
    Lisht or el-Lisht is an Egyptian village located south of Cairo. It is the site of Middle Kingdom royal and elite burials, including two pyramids built by Amenemhat I and Senusret I. The two main pyramids were surrounded by smaller pyramids of members of the royal family, and many mastaba tombs of high officials and their family members. They were constructed throughout the Twelfth and Thirteenth Dynasties. The site is also known for the tomb of Senebtisi, found undisturbed and from which a set of jewelry has been recovered. The pyramid complex of Senusret I is the best preserved from this period. The coffins in the tomb of Sesenebnef present the earliest versions of the Book of the Dead.
    6.75
    4 votes
    69
    Rouen

    Rouen

    • People interred here: Empress Matilda
    Rouen (French pronunciation: [ʁwɑ̃]), in northern France on the River Seine, is the capital of the Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) region and the historic capital city of Normandy. Once one of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, it was the seat of the Exchequer of Normandy in the Middle Ages. It was one of the capitals of the Anglo-Norman dynasties, which ruled both England and large parts of modern France from the 11th to the 15th centuries. It was here that Joan of Arc was executed in 1431. People from Rouen are called Rouennais. The population of the metropolitan area (in French: agglomération) at the 1999 census was 518,316, and 532,559 at the 2007 estimate. The city proper had an estimated population of 110,276 in 2007. Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) région, as well as a commune and the préfecture (capital) of the Seine-Maritime département. Rouen and 70 suburban communes of the metropolitan area form the Agglomeration community of Rouen-Elbeuf-Austreberthe (CREA), with 494,382 inhabitants at the 2010 census. In descending order of population, the largest of these suburbs are Sotteville-lès-Rouen, Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray, Le Grand-Quevilly, Le
    6.75
    4 votes
    70
    Davenport

    Davenport

    • People interred here: George Henry Cram
    Davenport is a city located along the Mississippi River in Scott County, Iowa, United States. Davenport is the county seat of and largest city in Scott County. Davenport was founded on May 14, 1836 by Antoine LeClaire and was named for his friend, George Davenport, a colonel during the Black Hawk War stationed at nearby Fort Armstrong. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 99,685, making it Iowa's third-largest city. A 2011 estimate shows an increase to 100,802. As of 2012, the mayor of Davenport is Bill Gluba. Davenport is the largest of the Quad Cities. The Quad Cities also consists of neighboring Bettendorf and the Illinois cities of Moline, East Moline, and Rock Island and has an population estimate of 381,342. Located approximately half way between Chicago and Des Moines, Davenport is on the border of Iowa and Illinois. The city is prone to frequent flooding due to its location on the Mississippi River. There are two main universities: Saint Ambrose University and Palmer College of Chiropractic, which is where the first chiropractic adjustment took place. Several annual music festivals take place in Davenport, including the Mississippi Valley Blues Festival, The
    9.00
    2 votes
    71
    Napa

    Napa

    • People interred here: Carlton W. Barrett
    Napa is the county seat of Napa County, California. It is the principal city of the Napa county Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses Napa county. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 76,915. It is also the 100th largest city in California. The area was settled in the 1830s. It was incorporated as a city in 1872. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 18.1 square miles (47 km). 17.8 square miles (46 km) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km) of it (1.69%) is water. The Napa River traverses the city on its journey to the San Pablo Bay. The city has conducted a variety of waterfront development along the banks of the river including certain fill operations governed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers regulations. The Napa River Flood Project has been in progress since the late 1990s with the goal of mitigating the risk of flooding along a 6-mile (9.7 km) stretch of the River and 1-mile (1.6 km) of Napa Creek. Napa has a Mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification Csa), with cool, wet winters and very warm, dry summers. In January, average temperatures range from 58.5 °F (14.7 °C) to 38.9 °F
    9.00
    2 votes
    72
    Neenah

    Neenah

    • People interred here: Elmer J. Burr
    Neenah is a city on Lake Winnebago in Winnebago County, Wisconsin, United States. Its population was 25,470 at the 2010 census. The city is bordered by, but is politically independent of, the Town of Neenah. Neenah is the southwestern-most of the Fox Cities of Northeast Wisconsin. It is the smaller in population of the two principal cities of the Oshkosh-Neenah, Wisconsin Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah Combined Statistical Area. The city is on the banks of Lake Winnebago, Little Lake Butte des Morts, and the Fox River. Neenah is sometimes called a twin city with the City of Menasha. Neenah shares Doty Island with Menasha. Neenah was named for the Winnebago word for "water" or "running water" by Governor James Duane Doty. The area was first designated an industrial and agricultural mission to the Menominee Indians in 1835, and early settlement by Americans of European descent began a few years later, stimulated in large part by the proximity of the area to the Fox River. Neenah is located at 44°10′26″N 88°28′6″W / 44.17389°N 88.46833°W / 44.17389; -88.46833 (44.174035, -88.468508). According to the United States Census Bureau, the
    9.00
    2 votes
    73
    Tanis

    Tanis

    • People interred here: Osorkon II
    Tanis ( /ˈtænɨs/; Ancient Greek: Τάνις; Egyptian: Djanet; Arabic: صان الحجر‎ Ṣān al-Ḥagar) is a city in the north-eastern Nile delta of Egypt. It is located on the Tanitic branch of the Nile which has long since silted up. Tanis was founded in the late Twentieth Dynasty, and became the northern capital of Egypt during the following Twenty-first Dynasty. It was the home city of Smendes, founder of the 21st dynasty. During the Twenty-second Dynasty Tanis remained as Egypt's political capital (though there were sometimes rival dynasties located elsewhere in Upper Egypt). It was an important commercial and strategic city until it was threatened with inundation by Lake Manzala in the 6th century AD, when it was finally abandoned. The refugees founded the nearby city of Tennis. The Hebrew story adopted by Christianity of Moses’ being found in the marshes of the Nile River as told in Exodus 2:3-5 is commonly located at Tanis. However, the intent of those stories may be as spiritual as much as historical allegories, as no supporting archeological evidence has been unearthed. The demise of the city may well have been siltation of Nile distributaries. There are ruins of a number of temples,
    9.00
    2 votes
    74
    The Woodlands Cemetery

    The Woodlands Cemetery

    • People interred here: John Joseph Abercrombie
    The Woodlands is a National Historic Landmark District on the western banks of the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It includes a magnificent federal style mansion, a matching carriage house and stable, and a garden landscape that in 1840 was transformed into a Victorian rural cemetery with an arboretum of over 1,000 trees. The site was once part of Blockley Township. The Woodlands was originally purchased in 1735 as a 250-acre (1.0 km) tract on the west bank of the Schuylkill River by the famous Philadelphia lawyer Andrew Hamilton. When he died in 1741, he willed his lands to his son, also named Andrew, who survived his father by only six years. He devised what became a 300 acres (1.2 km) estate to his son, William (1745–1813), who acquired it at the age of twenty-one. He built a Georgian-style mansion with a grand, two-storied portico overlooking the river above Gray's Ferry Bridge. Following a trip to England after the American Revolution, Hamilton doubled the size of the dwelling into a 16-room manor with kitchens and service rooms in a windowed ground floor. The rebuilt Woodlands mansion became one of the greatest domestic American architectural achievements of
    9.00
    2 votes
    75
    World War II Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial

    World War II Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial

    • People interred here: Frank D. Peregory
    The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War II cemetery and memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, that honors American soldiers who died in Europe during World War II. On June 8, 1944, the U.S. First Army established the temporary cemetery, the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. After the war, the present-day cemetery was established a short distance to the east of the original site. Like all other overseas American cemeteries in France for World War I and II, France has granted the United States a special, perpetual concession to the land occupied by the cemetery, free of any charge or any tax. This cemetery is managed by the American government, under Congressional acts that provide yearly financial support for maintaining them, with most military and civil personnel employed abroad. The U.S. flag flies over these granted soils. The cemetery is located on a bluff overlooking Omaha Beach (one of the landing beaches of the Normandy Invasion) and the English Channel. It covers 70 ha (172 acres), and contains the remains of 9,387 American military dead, most of whom were killed during the invasion of Normandy and ensuing military
    9.00
    2 votes
    76
    Braemar

    Braemar

    • People interred here: Prince Alastair, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn
    Braemar (/breɪˈmɑr/) is a village in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, around 58 miles (93 km) west of Aberdeen in the Highlands. It is the closest significantly-sized settlement to the upper course of the River Dee sitting at an altitude of 339 metres (1,112 ft). The Gaelic Bràigh Mhàrr properly refers to the area of upper Marr (as it literally means), i.e. the area of Marr to the west of Aboyne, the village itself being Castleton of Braemar (Baile a' Chaisteil). The village used to be known as Cinn Drochaid (bridge end), while Baile a' Chaisteil only referred to the part of the village on the east bank of the river, the part on the west bank being known as Ach an Droighinn (thorn field). Braemar is approached from the South on the A93 from Glen Clunie and the Cairnwell Pass - and from the East also on the A93 from Deeside. Braemar can be approached on foot from the West through Glen Tilt, Glen Feshie, Glen Dee (by the Lairig Ghru), and Glen Derry (by the Lairig an Laoigh). Braemar is within a one-and-a-half hour drive of Aberdeen, Dundee, and Perth. The village is overlooked (from roughly northwest) by Carn na Drochaide (818 m), (from roughly northeast) by Creag Choinneach (538 m), (from
    5.80
    5 votes
    77
    Dunfermline Abbey

    Dunfermline Abbey

    • People interred here: Robert Stuart, Duke of Kintyre
    Dunfermline Abbey is a Church of Scotland Parish Church located in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. In 2002 the congregation had 806 members. The minister (since 1991) is the Reverend Alastair Jessamine. The church occupies the site of the ancient chancel and transepts of a large medieval Benedictine abbey, which was sacked in 1560 during the Scottish Reformation and permitted to fall into disrepair. Part of the old abbey church continued in use at that time and some parts of the abbey infrastructure still remain to this day. Dunfermline Abbey is one of Scotland's most important cultural sites. The Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Trinity and St Margaret, was founded in 1128 by King David I of Scotland, but the monastic establishment was based on an earlier foundation dating back to the reign of King Máel Coluim mac Donnchada (i.e. "Malcolm III" or "Malcolm Canmore", r. 1058-93) and his queen. At its head was an abbot, the first incumbent being Geoffrey of Canterbury, former prior of Christ Church, Canterbury, the Kent monastery that probably supplied Dunfermline's first monks. At the peak of its power it controlled four burghs, three courts of regality and a large portfolio of lands from
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Forest Home Cemetery

    Forest Home Cemetery

    • People interred here: Christopher Latham Sholes
    Forest Home Cemetery located in the Lincoln Village neighborhood of Milwaukee, Wisconsin is the final resting place of many of the city's famed beer barons, politicians and social elite. Both the cemetery and its Landmark Chapel are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and were declared a Milwaukee Landmark in 1973. The cemetery is run by a non-profit organization held in public trust. Profits from each sale are reinvested to insure continual care of the buildings and land. Its Victorian landscape contains over 300 species of trees, along with many ornate statues, crypts and monuments. A committee appointed by members of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in 1847 established Forest Home Cemetery on what would later become Milwaukee's south side. When the land was selected it was located nearly two miles outside of the city limits along the newly built Janesville Plank Road (now Forest Home Avenue), in an area believed to be far enough from urban development to remain rural. The 72 acres (290,000 m) that were purchased in 1850 quickly grew to nearly 200 acres (0.81 km) by the turn of the century. Orville Cadwell was the first burial on August 5, 1850 but was soon joined by
    7.67
    3 votes
    79
    Leicestershire

    Leicestershire

    • People interred here: Richard III of England
    Leicestershire (/ˈlɛstəʃɪər/ or /ˈlɛstərʃər/; abbreviation Leics.) is a landlocked county in the English Midlands. It takes its name from the City of Leicester, traditionally its administrative centre, although the City of Leicester unitary authority is today administered separately from the rest of Leicestershire. The county borders Derbyshire to the north-west, Nottinghamshire to the north, Rutland to the east, Warwickshire to the south-west, Staffordshire to the west, Lincolnshire to the north-east, and Northamptonshire to the south-east. The border with Warwickshire is Watling Street (the A5). County Hall, situated in Glenfield, about 3 miles (5 km) north-west of Leicester city centre, is the seat of Leicestershire County Council and the headquarters of the county authority. The City of Leicester is administered from offices in Leicester itself and the City Council meets at Leicester Town Hall. The River Soar rises to the east of Hinckley, in the far south of the county, and flows northward through Leicester before emptying into the River Trent at the point where Derbyshire, Leicestershire, and Nottinghamshire meet. A large part of the north-west of the county, around
    7.67
    3 votes
    80
    Nidaros Cathedral

    Nidaros Cathedral

    • People interred here: Inge II of Norway
    Nidaros Cathedral (Norwegian: Nidarosdomen / Nidaros Domkirke) is a Church of Norway cathedral located in the city of Trondheim in Sør-Trøndelag county, Norway. It is the traditional location for the consecration of the King of Norway. King Harald was consecrated at Nidaros Cathedral on June 23, 1991. It was the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Nidaros from its establishment in 1152 until its abolition in 1537. Since the Reformation, it has been the cathedral of the Lutheran bishops of Trondheim (or Nidaros) in the Diocese of Nidaros. The architectural style of the cathedral is Romanesque and Gothic. Historically it was an important destination for pilgrims coming from all of Northern Europe. It is the northernmost medieval cathedral in the world. Along with Vår Frue Church, the cathedral is part of the Nidaros og Vår Frue parish in the Nidaros deanery in the Diocese of Nidaros. Work on the cathedral started in 1070 and was finished sometime around 1300. The cathedral was badly damaged by fires in 1327 and again in 1531. The nave west of the transept was destroyed and was not rebuilt until the restoration in early 1900s. In 1708 it burned down completely except for
    7.67
    3 votes
    81
    Pacific Ocean

    Pacific Ocean

    • People interred here: Don S. Davis
    The Pacific Ocean is the largest of the Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic in the north to the Southern Ocean (or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south, bounded by Asia and Australia in the west, and the Americas in the east. At 165.25 million square kilometres (63.8 million square miles) in area, this largest division of the World Ocean – and, in turn, the hydrosphere – covers about 46% of the Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of the Earth's land area combined. The equator subdivides it into the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean, with two exceptions: the Galápagos and Gilbert Islands, while straddling the equator, are deemed wholly within the South Pacific. The Mariana Trench in the western North Pacific is the deepest point in the world, reaching a depth of 10,911 metres (35,797 ft). The eastern Pacific Ocean was first sighted by Europeans early in the 16th century. Spanish explorer Vasco Núñez de Balboa crossed the Isthmus of Panama in 1513 and named it Mar del Sur (South Sea). The ocean's current name was given by Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan during the Spanish
    7.67
    3 votes
    82
    Zürich

    Zürich

    • People interred here: James Joyce
    Zurich (German: Zürich, German pronunciation: [ˈtsyːrɪç]; Swiss German: Züri ) is the largest city in Switzerland and the capital of the canton of Zurich. It is located in north-central Switzerland at the northwestern tip of Lake Zurich. The municipality has approximately 390 000 inhabitants, and the Zurich metropolitan area 1.83 million. Zurich is a hub for railways, roads, and air traffic. Both Zurich Airport and railway station are the largest and busiest in the country. Permanently settled for around 7000 years, the history of Zurich goes back to its founding by the Romans, who, in 15 BC, called it Turicum. During the Middle Ages Zurich gained the independent and privileged status of imperial immediacy and, in 1519, was the place of origin and centre of the Protestant Reformation in German-speaking Switzerland, led by Ulrich Zwingli. Zurich is a leading global city and among the world's largest financial centres. The city is home to a large number of financial institutions and banking giants. Also, most of the research and development centres are concentrated in Zurich and the low rate of tax attracts overseas companies to set up their headquarters there. Monocle's 2012
    7.67
    3 votes
    83
    Agra

    Agra

    • People interred here: Akbar
    Agra (/ˈɑːɡrə/; Hindi: आगरा, Urdu: آگرہ), the former capital of Hindustan, is a city on the banks of the river Yamuna in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, India, 363 kilometres (226 mi) west of state capital, Lucknow and 200 kilometres (124 mi) south of the national capital New Delhi. With a population of 1,686,976 (2010 est.), it is one of the most populous cities in Uttar Pradesh and the 19th most populous in India. Agra can also refer to the administrative district that has its headquarters in Agra city. The city finds mention in the epic Mahābhārata where it was called Agrevaṇa, or 'the border of the forest'. Legend ascribes the founding of the city to Raja Badal Singh, a Sikarwar Rajput king (circa 1475), whose fort, Badalgarh, stood on or near the site of the present Fort. However, the 11th century Persian poet Mas'ūd Sa'd Salmān writes of a desperate assault on the fortress of Agra, then held by the Shāhī King Jayapala, by Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni. Sultan Sikandar Lodī was the first to move his capital from Delhi to Agra in the year 1506; he died in 1517 and his son Ibrāhīm Lodī remained in power there for nine more years, finally being defeated at the Battle of Panipat in
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Armagh

    Armagh

    • People interred here: Áed Findliath mac Neíll
    Armagh ( /ɑrˈmɑː/ ar-MAH; from Irish: Ard Mhacha meaning "Macha's height" [aɾˠd̪ˠ ˈwaxə]) is the county town of County Armagh in Northern Ireland. It is of historical importance for both Celtic paganism and Christianity and is the seat—for both the Roman Catholic Church and the Church of Ireland—of the Archbishop of Armagh (the Primate of All Ireland). In 1995, Armagh was twinned with Razgrad, Bulgaria. Although classed as a medium-sized town, Armagh was given city status in 1994 and Lord Mayoralty status in 2012, both by Queen Elizabeth II. Its population of 14,590 (2001 Census) makes it the least-populated city in both Northern Ireland and on the island of Ireland and the fourth smallest in the United Kingdom. Eamhain Mhacha (or Navan Fort), at the western edge of Armagh, is believed to have been used as an ancient pagan ritual or ceremonial site. According to Irish mythology it was once the capital of Ulster, until it was abandoned during the 1st century. The site was named after the goddess Macha, and as the settlement grew on the hills nearby, it was also named after the goddess — Ard Mhacha means "Macha's height". This name was later anglicised as Ardmagh, which eventually
    10.00
    1 votes
    85
    Cambridge City

    Cambridge City

    • People interred here: Solomon Meredith
    Cambridge City is a town in Jackson Township, Wayne County, Indiana, United States. The population was 1,870 at the 2010 census. Cambridge City is located at 39°48′47″N 85°10′15″W / 39.81306°N 85.17083°W / 39.81306; -85.17083 (39.812996, -85.170812). According to the 2010 census, the town has a total area of 1.02 square miles (2.6 km), of which 1.01 square miles (2.6 km) (or 99.02%) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.026 km) (or 0.98%) is water. Cambridge City was platted on October 23, 1836 and celebrated its Sesquicentennial in 1986. The town celebrates its history and heritage during the second weekend in each September during the annual Canal Days festival, which commemorates the importance of the Whitewater Canal to the formation and growth of Cambridge City in the 19th century. Situated along the historic National Road (U.S. 40), Cambridge City is currently a prominent destination for antique seekers and is the home of many notable American figures including: During the 1990s, members of Cambridge City's historic preservation group Western Wayne Heritage, Inc. purchased the famous Vinton House hotel. Built in the 1840s to accommodate travelers on the newly opened Whitewater
    10.00
    1 votes
    86
    Cuba

    Cuba

    • People interred here: Egbert B. Brown
    Cuba is a city in Crawford County, Missouri, United States. The population was 3,230 at the 2000 census. Cuba was founded in 1857 by George Jamison and Wesley Smith. It was named after the island of Cuba. Harry Truman visited Cuba during a tour of U.S. Route 66. He surveyed the property that would eventually become Indian Hills Lake. Indian Hills Lake was originally known as "Indian Head Lake" because the skull of a Native American was found during excavation. Bette Davis and Amelia Earhart also visited the town. Their visits are commemorated in the Viva Cuba Mural Project . Cuba was designated as the Route 66 Mural City by the Missouri legislature in recognition of Viva Cuba's Outdoor Mural Project. The beautification group commissioned twelve outdoor murals along the Route 66 corridor . Cuba was the site of the first Adopt a Highway program in the Missouri. The Wagon Wheel Motel is a historic landmark and has been a presence on Route 66 since the 1930s. The guest cottages and old Wagon Wheel Cafe building underwent renovations beginning in 2009. Cuba is home to the Crawford County History Museum. The Veterans Memorial, with almost 1000 names of veterans, sits in front of the
    10.00
    1 votes
    87
    Fulda

    Fulda

    • People interred here: Conrad I of Germany
    Fulda (German pronunciation: [ˈfʊlda]) is a city in Hesse, Germany; it is located on the river Fulda and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). In 1990, the town hosted the 30th Hessentag state festival. The Benedictine monastery of Fulda was founded in 744 by Saint Sturm, a disciple of Saint Boniface, as one of Boniface's outposts in the reorganization of the church in Germany. It later served as a base from which missionaries could accompany Charlemagne's armies in their political and military campaign to fully conquer and convert pagan Saxony. The initial grant for the abbey was signed by Carloman, the son of Charles Martel. The support of the Mayors of the Palace and later, the early Pippinid and Carolingian rulers, was important to Boniface's success. Fulda also received support from many of the leading families of the Carolingian world. Sturm, whose tenure as abbot lasted from 747 until 779, was most likely related to the Agilolfing dukes of Bavaria. Fulda also received large and constant donations from the Etichonids, a leading family in Alsatia, and the Conradines, predecessors of the Salian Holy Roman Emperors. Under Sturm, the donations Fulda received
    10.00
    1 votes
    88
    Garrison

    Garrison

    • People interred here: Abraham Arnold
    Garrison is a hamlet in Putnam County, New York, United States. It is part of the town of Philipstown and is on the east side of the Hudson River, across from the United States Military Academy at West Point. The Garrison Metro-North Railroad station serves the town. The Garrison train wreck occurred near Garrison on the Great Hudson River Railway on October 24, 1897, killing 20 people. For the 1969 film Hello, Dolly! starring Barbra Streisand, Garrison was the filming location for the Yonkers scenes. Saint Basil's Academy in the town served as the finish line of The Amazing Race 10 in 2006. Garrison is home to many non-profit and cultural organizations. 'Manitoga' is the extensive woodland gardens estate of modernist designer Russel Wright, and the location of his National Register of Historic Places listed modern style house 'Dragon Rock.' It is operated by the non-profit Russel Wright Design Center, with tours and hiking trails. The Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival, founded in 1987 with its first performances at Manitoga, is now located at Boscobel, a Federal-style mansion (built 1804–1808) for the Morris States Dyckman family. Constitution Marsh is an Audubon sanctuary with
    10.00
    1 votes
    89
    Isle of Wight

    Isle of Wight

    • People interred here: Alexander Mountbatten, 1st Marquess of Carisbrooke
    The Isle of Wight is a county and the largest island in England, located in the English Channel, on average about 2–5 miles (3–7 km) off the coast of the county of Hampshire, separated from the mainland by a strait called the Solent. The island has many resorts which have been holiday destinations since Victorian times. The island has a rich history, including a brief status as an independent kingdom in the 15th century. Until 1995, like Jersey and Guernsey, the island had its own Governor—most notably Lord Mountbatten from 1969 to 1974, after which he became Lord Lieutenant until his assassination in 1979. It was home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson, and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House at East Cowes. The island's maritime and industrial history encompasses boat building, sail making, the manufacture of flying boats, the world's first hovercraft and the testing and development of Britain's space rockets. It is home to the Isle of Wight International Jazz Festival, Bestival and the recently revived Isle of Wight Festival, which, in 1970, was the largest rock music event ever held. The island has some exceptional wildlife
    10.00
    1 votes
    90
    Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire

    Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire

    • People interred here: Philip I of France
    Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire is a commune in the Loiret department in north-central France. This town hosts the Abbaye de Fleury, also known as the Abbaye de Saint Benoît (Saint Benedict Abbey). Founded around 630, it is one of the oldest abbeys of the Benedictine rule. In 660, the remains of Saint Benedict of Nursia were transferred to Saint Benoît from Monte Cassino. The monastery, known for the Fleury Playbook, was pillaged and damaged multiple times over the course of history, including during the Norman conquests and the French Revolution. The current abbey church is in the Romanesque style and dates from the eleventh century. A community of approximately 40 monks currently resides in the monastery.
    10.00
    1 votes
    91
    St Peter ad Vincula

    St Peter ad Vincula

    • People interred here: Anne Boleyn
    The Chapel Royal of St. Peter ad Vincula ("St. Peter in chains") is the parish church of the Tower of London. It is situated within the Tower's Inner Ward and dates from 1520. It is a Royal Peculiar. The name refers to St. Peter's imprisonment under Herod Agrippa in Jerusalem. The Chapel is probably best known as the burial place of some of the most famous prisoners executed at the Tower. The existing building was rebuilt for Henry VIII by Sir Richard Cholmondeley in 1519–20, but a chapel stood in its position since before the Norman conquest. At the west end is a short tower, surmounted by a lantern bell-cote, and inside the church is a nave and shorter north aisle, lit by windows with cusped lights but no tracery, a typical Tudor design. The Chapel contains many splendid monuments. In the north-west corner is a memorial to John Holland, Duke of Exeter, a Constable of the Tower who died in 1447. Under the central arcade lies the effigy of Sir Richard Cholmondeley, a Lieutenant of the Tower who died in 1521. In the sanctuary, there is an impressive monument to Sir Richard Blount, who died in 1564, and his son Sir Michael, died in 1610, both Tudor Lieutenants of the Tower, who would
    10.00
    1 votes
    92
    The Red Fort

    The Red Fort

    • People interred here: Akbar Shah II
    The Red Fort (usually transcribed into English as Lal Qil'ah or Lal Qila) is a 17th century fort complex constructed by the Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan in the walled city of Old Delhi (in present day Delhi, India) that served as the residence of the Mughal Emperors. The fort was the palace for Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan's new capital, Shahjahanabad, the seventh city in the Delhi site. He moved his capital here from Agra in a move designed to bring prestige to his reign, and to provide ample opportunity to apply his ambitious building schemes and interests. It served as the capital of the Mughals until 1857, when Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah Zafar was exiled by the British Indian government. The fort lies along the Yamuna River, which fed the moats that surround most of the walls. The wall at its north-eastern corner is adjacent to an older fort, the Salimgarh Fort, a defence built by Islam Shah Suri in 1546. The construction of the Red Fort began in 1638 and was completed by 1648. The Red Fort has had many developments added on after its construction by Emperor Shah Jahan. The significant phases of development were under Aurangzeb and later under later Mughal rulers. It was designated
    10.00
    1 votes
    93
    Topeka

    Topeka

    • People interred here: Cyrus K. Holliday
    Topeka (/tɵˈpiːkə/; Kansa: Tó Pee Kuh) is the capital city of the U.S. state of Kansas and the county seat of Shawnee County. It is situated along the Kansas River in the central part of Shawnee County, located in northeast Kansas, in the Central United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 127,473. The Topeka Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Shawnee, Jackson, Jefferson, Osage, and Wabaunsee counties, had an population of 233,870 in 2010 census. The city is well known for the landmark United States Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, which overturned Plessy vs. Ferguson and declared segregation in public schools on account of race to be unconstitutional. Three ships of the US Navy have been named USS Topeka in honor of the city. Topeka means "to dig good potatoes" in the languages of the Kansa and the Ioway. The potato referred to is the prairie potato (Psoralea esculenta), a perennial herb which is an important food for many Native Americans. As a placename, Topeka was first recorded in 1826 as the Kansa name for what is now called the Kansas River. Topeka's founders chose the name in 1855 because it "was novel, of Indian origin
    10.00
    1 votes
    94
    Balmaghie

    Balmaghie

    • People interred here: Samuel Rutherford Crockett
    Balmaghie ( /bælməˈɡiː/ bal-mə-GEE), from the Scottish Gaelic Baile Mac Aoidh, is a civil parish in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland and was the seat of the McGhee family. It is bordered by the River Dee to the north and east. The River Dee is commonly known as the Black Water of Dee on the northern border, the name changes with the meeting of the Water of Ken to the north west and is then known as Loch Ken along the eastern border. Balmaghie parish borders Girthon to the west and Tongland and Twynholm to the south. The closest market town is Castle Douglas about 6 miles from Balmaghie Kirk. Balmaghie parish is very rural and contains only a handful of small settlements: Laurieston, Bridge of Dee, Balmaghie and Glenlochar as well as number of farms and houses scattered throughout the parish. Farming is the major industry of the area, although there is large area of commercial forestation operated by the Forestry Commission to the west of Laurieston. A small number of tourists visit the area to watch wild birds at the RSPB Nature Reserve at Duchrae, the Ken-Dee Marshes. A number of Red Kite have been re-introduced to the area and can been seen near Laurieston at the Bellymack feeding
    6.50
    4 votes
    95
    Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio

    Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio

    • People interred here: Louis II, Holy Roman Emperor
    The Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio (St. Ambrose) is a church in Milan, northern Italy. One of the most ancient churches in Milan, it was built by St. Ambrose in 379-386, in an area where numerous martyrs of the Roman persecutions had been buried. The first name of the church was in fact Basilica Martyrum. When St. Ambrose arrived in Milan, the local churches were in conflict with each other over the conflict between Arianism and the Nicene Creed as well as numerous local issues. He was firmly in support of the Nicene side of the conflict, and wanted to make northern Italy into a pro-Rome stronghold. He did this through both preaching and construction. He built three or four churches surrounding the city; Basilica Apostolorum (now San Nazaro in Brolo), Basilica Virginum (now San Simpliciano, and Basilica Martyrum (which was later renamed in his honor). A fourth church, Basilica Salvatoris (now San Dionigi) is attributed to him as well, but may not actually be from the 4th Century. These churches were dedicated with anti-Arian language and as symbols of the wealth and power of the pro-Nicene faction in Milan. In the centuries after its construction, the edifice underwent several
    6.50
    4 votes
    96
    Hyde Park

    Hyde Park

    • People interred here: Eleanor Roosevelt
    Hyde Park is a town located in the northwest part of Dutchess County, New York, United States, just north of the city of Poughkeepsie. The town is most famous for being the hometown of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The population was 21,571 at the 2010 census. US 9 passes through the town near the Hudson River. Hyde Park is the location of the Culinary Institute of America, a residential college devoted to culinary and pastry arts. Settlement of the region officially began around 1742, but may have begun as early as 1710. The name of the area was changed to "Hyde Park" around 1810. Previously, it was part of the Fauconnier Patent and was named "Stoutenburgh", after an early settler. Part of the town was from the Great Nine Partners Patent of 1697. Dr. John Bard had called his estate "Hyde Park" in honor of Edward Hyde, who was Lord Cornbury and Governor of New York. In 1804 a tavern keeper whose business was slow named the tavern "Hyde Park Inn", much to the annoyance of Dr. Bard. Miller, the tavern keeper, applied for a post office to be located at his Inn, which was nothing unusual. The request was granted as the "Hyde Park Post office". Because the Post Office's name was
    6.50
    4 votes
    97
    Imam Ali Mosque

    Imam Ali Mosque

    • People interred here: Ali
    The Imām ‘Alī Holy Shrine (Arabic: حرم الإمام علي‎), also known as Masjid Ali or the Mosque of ‘Alī, located in Najaf, Iraq, is the third holiest site for some of the estimated 200 million followers of the Shia branch of Islam. ‘Alī ibn Abī Tālib, the cousin of Muhammad, the fourth caliph (Sunni belief), the first Imam (Shia belief) is buried here. According to Shi'a belief buried next to Ali within this mosque are the remains of Adam and Noah. The shrine was first built by the Iranian ruler the Daylamite Fannakhosraw Azod ad Dowleh in 977 over the tomb of Ali. After being destroyed by fire, it was rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I in 1086, and rebuilt yet again by the Safavid Shah Ismail I shortly after 1500. During the uprising of March 1991, following the Persian Gulf War, Saddam Hussein's Republican Guards damaged the shrine, where members of the Shia opposition were cornered, in storming the shrine and massacring virtually all its occupants. Afterwards the shrine was closed for two years, officially for repairs. Hussein also deported to Iran a large number of the residents of the area who were of Iranian descent. It is newly renovated by Dawoodi Bohras spiritual leader the
    8.50
    2 votes
    98
    Reims

    Reims

    • People interred here: Mary of Guise
    Reims ( /ˈriːmz/; also spelt Rheims; French: [ʁɛ̃s]), a city in the Champagne-Ardenne region of France, lies 129 km (80 mi) east-northeast of Paris. Founded by the Gauls, it became a major city during the period of the Roman Empire. Reims played a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the crowning of the kings of France. The Cathedral of Reims (damaged by the Germans during the First World War but restored since) played the same role in France as Westminster Abbey has in the United Kingdom. It housed the Holy Ampulla (Sainte Ampoule) containing the Saint Chrême (chrism), allegedly brought by a white dove (the Holy Spirit) at the baptism of Clovis in 496. It was used for the anointing, the most important part of the coronation of French kings. Some sources regard Reims as the effective capital of the province of Champagne, given its size as by far the largest city in the region. The 2008 census recorded 188,078 inhabitants (Rémoises (feminine) and Rémois (masculine)) in the city of Reims proper (the commune), and 291,735 inhabitants in the metropolitan area (aire urbaine). Reims functions as a subprefecture of the department of Marne, in
    8.50
    2 votes
    99
    Flushing Cemetery

    Flushing Cemetery

    • People interred here: Lemuel E. Quigg
    Flushing Cemetery is a cemetery in Flushing in the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. The cemetery is the final resting place for:
    7.33
    3 votes
    100
    Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon

    Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon

    • People interred here: William Shakespeare
    The Collegiate Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon is a Grade I listed parish church of the Church of England in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England. It is often known simply as Holy Trinity Church or as Shakespeare's Church, due to its fame as the place of baptism and burial of William Shakespeare. More than 200,000 tourists visit the church each year. The past building dates from 1210 and is built on the site of a Saxon monastery. It is Stratford's oldest building, in a striking position on the banks of the River Avon, and has long been England's most visited parish church. Holy Trinity contains many interesting features, including: The carved scenes of the life of Jesus around Balsall's tomb were mutilated during the Reformation, as were most images of Christ. Notable 'survivors' include a remarkable face of Christ or possibly God the Father within a sedilia canopy, and some beautiful medieval stained glass depicting the Resurrection and Ascension of Christ and the Day of Pentecost. The pre-reformation stone altar slab or mensa was found hidden beneath the floor in Victorian times and has now been re-instated as the High Altar. The church has a
    7.33
    3 votes
    101
    Narbonne

    Narbonne

    • People interred here: Philip III of France
    Narbonne (French pronunciation: [naʁ.bɔn]; Occitan: Narbona; Latin: Narbo) is a commune in southern France in the Languedoc-Roussillon region. It lies 849 km (528 mi) from Paris in the Aude department, of which it is a sub-prefecture. Once a prosperous port, it is now located about 15 km (9.3 mi) from the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. It is marginally the largest commune in Aude, although the capital is the slightly smaller commune of Carcassonne. Narbonne is linked to the nearby Canal du Midi and the Aude River by the Canal de la Robine, which runs through the centre of town. The town's name is very ancient. The earliest known record of the name of what is now Narbonne is by the Greek Hecataeus of Miletus in the Fifth Century C.E. In ancient inscriptions it is sometimes rendered in Latin and sometimes translated into Iberian as Nedhena. The Greek, Latin, and Iberian names roughly mean "those who profit from [fishing via] nets." The modern name is derived from the Latin rendering. Narbonne was established in Gaul in 118 BC, as Colonia Narbo Martius. It was located on the Via Domitia, the first Roman road in Gaul, built at the time of the foundation of the colony, and connecting
    7.33
    3 votes
    102
    Persepolis

    Persepolis

    • People interred here: Artaxerxes III of Persia
    Persepolis was the ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Empire (ca. 550–330 BCE). Persepolis is situated 70 km northeast of the modern city of Shiraz in the Fars Province of modern Iran. The earliest remains of Persepolis date from around 515 BCE. UNESCO declared the citadel of Persepolis a World Heritage Site in 1979. To the ancient Persians, the city was known as
    7.33
    3 votes
    103
    Cairo

    Cairo

    • People interred here: Farouk of Egypt
    Cairo ( /ˈkaɪroʊ/ KYE-roh; Arabic: القاهرة‎ al-Qāhira, literally "the Vanquisher" or "the Conqueror") is the capital of Egypt and the largest city in the Arab world and Africa. The its metropolitan area is the 16th largest in the world. Located near the Nile Delta, it was founded in 969 AD. Nicknamed "the city of a thousand minarets" for its preponderance of Islamic architecture, Cairo has long been a centre of the region's political and cultural life. Cairo was founded by the Fatimid dynasty in the 10th century AD, but the land composing the present-day city was the site of national capitals whose remnants remain visible in parts of Old Cairo. Cairo is also associated with Ancient Egypt due to its proximity to the ancient cities of Memphis, Giza and Fustat which are near the Great Sphinx and the pyramids of Giza. Egyptians today often refer to Cairo as Maṣr (Arabic: مصر‎), the Arabic pronunciation of the name for Egypt itself, emphasizing the city's continued role in Egyptian influence. Cairo has the oldest and largest film and music industries in the Arab world, as well as the world's second-oldest institution of higher learning, al-Azhar University. Many international media,
    6.25
    4 votes
    104
    Glendora

    Glendora

    • People interred here: Donald W. Evans, Jr.
    Glendora is a municipality in Los Angeles County, California, United States, 23 miles (37 km) east of downtown Los Angeles. As of the 2010 census, the population of Glendora was 50,073. Glendora is an upscale city with a diverse housing stock and a consistently high-ranking school district. Glendora lies within the San Gabriel Valley, area code 626. A small portion of southeast Glendora is in the area code 909, which is the area code for areas in eastern Los Angeles County, such as Claremont, and for western San Bernardino County. The city to Glendora's west is Azusa while San Dimas lies to Glendora's east. Glendora has its own police force, and the town's crime rate is very low. Residences in Glendora range from early 20th century bungalows, to modest ranch style homes, to multi-story configurations, to grand mansions. Glendora's most expensive neighborhoods contain many large, secluded, estate homes with sweeping views across the San Gabriel Valley to Downtown Los Angeles. These neighborhoods include Morgan Ranch, Gordon Highlands, Bluebird Hill, Silent Ranch, Oakhart Estates, Easley Canyon Estates, and North Glendora Private, where homes have been listed and sold upwards of $10
    6.25
    4 votes
    105
    Woodlawn Cemetery

    Woodlawn Cemetery

    • People interred here: Marilyn Miller
    Woodlawn Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in New York City and is a designated National Historic Landmark. A rural cemetery located in the Bronx, it opened in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was annexed to New York City in 1874. The cemetery covers more than 400 acres (160 ha) and is the resting place for more than 300,000 people. There is a memorial to the victims of the 1912 RMS Titanic disaster, called The Annie Bliss Titanic Victims Memorial. Built on rolling hills, its tree-lined roads lead to some unique memorials, some designed by McKim Mead & White, John Russell Pope, James Gamble Rogers, Cass Gilbert, Carrère and Hastings, Sir Edwin Lutyens, Beatrix Jones Farrand, and John LaFarge. As of 2007, plot prices at Woodlawn were reported as $200 per square foot, $4,800 for a gravesite for two, and up to $1.5 million for land to build a family mausoleum. In 2011, Woodlawn Cemetery was designated a National Historic Landmark, since it shows the transition from the rural cemetery popular at the time of its establishment to the more orderly 20th-century cemetery style. Woodlawn was the destination for many human remains disinterred from
    6.25
    4 votes
    106
    Katarina kyrka

    Katarina kyrka

    • People interred here: Sten Sture the Elder
    Katarina kyrka (Church of Catherine) is one of the major churches in central Stockholm, Sweden. The original building was constructed 1656–1695. It has been rebuilt twice after being destroyed by fires, the second time during the 1990s. The Katarina-Sofia borough is named after the parish and the neighbouring parish of Sofia. Construction of the church started during the reign of Charles X of Sweden, and the church is named after Princess Catherine, mother of the king, wife of John Casimir, Palsgrave of Pfalz-Zweibrücken and half-sister of Gustavus Adolphus. The original architect was Jean de la Vallée. The construction was severely delayed due to shortage of funds. In 1723 the church, together with half of the buildings in the parish, was completely destroyed in a major fire. Rebuilding started almost immediately, under supervision of Göran Josua Adelcrantz, the city architect, who designed a larger, octagonal tower. May 17, 1990, the church burned down again. Almost nothing but the external walls remained. Architect Ove Hidemark was responsible for rebuilding the church, which was reopened in 1995. The new organ was built by J. L. van den Heuvel Orgelbouw in the
    7.00
    3 votes
    107
    Ross Bay Cemetery

    Ross Bay Cemetery

    • People interred here: John F. Gosnell
    Ross Bay Cemetery is located at 1516 Fairfield Road in Victoria, British Columbia, on Vancouver Island, Canada. The cemetery was opened in 1873. The 27.5 acre (111,000 m²) cemetery is part of a public park and its south side faces Ross Bay on the Pacific Ocean. In 1911, a sea wall had to be constructed because of the severe erosion that occurred as a result of the relentless pounding of the ocean's waves. During the 1930s, the City began planting a large number of trees and today the cemetery is quite different from the original that was mainly barren ground. The Victorian-style Ross Bay Cemetery, contains numerous elaborate mausoleums and tall pillars from the early elite. Because the city of Victoria is the capital of the province of British Columbia, until the second quarter of the 20th century when improved ferry service and air travel made mobility to and from the island much easier, most senior politicians made Victoria their permanent home. As such, Ross Bay Cemetery is the burial site for many of the province's premiers. Although the Ross Bay Cemetery had long been considered full, the City of Victoria discovered approximately 270 unused plots in the cemetery in the late
    6.00
    4 votes
    108
    Katholische Hofkirche

    Katholische Hofkirche

    • People interred here: Albert I of Saxony
    The Katholische Hofkirche (English: The Catholic Church of the Royal Court of Saxony), and since 1980 also known as Kathedrale Sanctissimae Trinitatis (English: Cathedral of the Holy Trinity) is a Roman Catholic Cathedral in Dresden. Previously the most important Catholic parish church of the city, it was elevated to cathedral of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dresden-Meissen in 1964. It is located near the Elbe River in the historic center of Dresden, Germany. The Hofkirche stands as one of Dresden's foremost landmarks. It was designed by architect Gaetano Chiaveri from 1738 to 1751. The church was commissioned by Frederick Augustus II, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland while the Protestant city of Dresden built the Frauenkirche (Church of Our Lady) between 1726 and 1743. The Elector decided that a catholic church was needed in order to counterbalance the Protestant Frauenkirche. In the crypt the heart of King August the Strong is buried along with the last King of Saxony and the remains of 49 other members of the Wettin family as well as people who married into the family, such as Princess Maria Carolina of Savoy, wife of Anthony of Saxony. The church was badly damaged during
    8.00
    2 votes
    109
    Laurel Hill Cemetery

    Laurel Hill Cemetery

    • People interred here: Frank Furness
    Laurel Hill Cemetery, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the second major garden or rural cemetery in the United States. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1998, one of only a few cemeteries to receive the distinction. The cemetery has spectacular vistas and thousands of 19th- and 20th-century marble and granite funerary monuments on 74 acres (300,000 m) terraced above the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia's East Falls section. Obelisks dot the rolling terrain, which is highlighted by elaborately sculpted hillside tombs and mausoleums. Overall, Laurel Hill contains more than 33,000 monuments and more than 11,000 family lots. The cemetery was founded in 1836 by John Jay Smith, a librarian and editor with interests in horticulture and real estate who was distressed at the way his deceased daughter was interred in a Philadelphia churchyard. He and other prominent citizens decided to create a rural garden cemetery five miles north of Philadelphia, a location that was viewed as a haven from urban expansion and a respite from the increasingly industrialized city center. The city later grew past Laurel Hill, but the cemetery retained its rural character. Famous Revolutionary
    8.00
    2 votes
    110
    Ludwigsburg Palace

    Ludwigsburg Palace

    • People interred here: Charlotte, Princess Royal
    Ludwigsburg Palace (German: Schloss Ludwigsburg) is a historical building in the city of Ludwigsburg (12 km north of Stuttgart's city centre), Germany. It is one of the country's largest Baroque palaces and features an enormous garden in that style. From the 18th century to 1918 it was the principal royal palace of the dukedom that became in 1806 the Kingdom of Württemberg. The foundation stone was laid on May 17, 1704 under Duke Eberhard Ludwig of Württemberg (reigning monarch from 1693 to 1733). One year later, the site was named "Ludwigsburg" (in English: "Ludwig's castle"). Begun as a hunting lodge, the project became much more complex and gained momentum over the years. On August 17, 1709, the duke established the city of Ludwigsburg directly next to his palace, copying the proximity of Versailles to Paris. Previously, the royal palace was the cramped and outdated Old Castle (Altes Schloss) in the heart of Stuttgart. In 1718, Ludwigsburg temporarily became capital and sole residence of the dukes of Württemberg. In 1733, when construction was complete, the baroque style prevailed in Germany. Eventually, successors of Eberhard Ludwig modified the original design of the palace,
    8.00
    2 votes
    111
    Pleasant Lake

    Pleasant Lake

    • People interred here: Mary Theresa Mehegan
    Pleasant Lake is a neighborhood of the city of Rockville in Stearns County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 504 at the 2000 census. Pleasant Lake was settled about 1890 and incorporated on July 11, 1938. On 1 June 2002, the city of Pleasant Lake and Rockville Township were merged into the city of Rockville. At the center of the community, lies the 400 Supper Club which lines the lakefront of Pleasant Lake. Most notable for its venue in weddings, conferences, and banquets, the 400 Supper Club also hosts the annual Polar bear plunge to raise money for the Special Olympics. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 0.8 square miles (2.1 km), all land. As of the census of 2000, there were 504 people, 174 households, and 137 families residing in the city. The population density was 641.2 people per square mile (246.3/km²). There were 179 housing units at an average density of 227.7 per square mile (87.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.42% White, 0.79% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.20% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.40% of the population. There
    8.00
    2 votes
    112
    Pontiac

    Pontiac

    • People interred here: Israel B. Richardson
    Pontiac /ˈpɒnᵗiæk/ is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, located within the Metro Detroit. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 59,515. It is the county seat of Oakland County. Named after Chief Pontiac, the city was best known throughout its history for its General Motors automobile manufacturing plants including Fisher Body, Pontiac East Assembly (aka. Truck & Coach/Bus) and Pontiac Motor Division, which in the city's heyday was the primary automobile assembly plant where the famed Pontiac cars were produced and named after the city. The city of Pontiac also was home to Oakland (automobile) Motor Car Company which was acquired by General Motors in 1909. Also of note is the Pontiac Silverdome, the stadium that hosted the Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL) from 1975 until 2002, when the team moved back to Downtown Detroit. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 20.2 square miles (52 km), of which, 20.0 square miles (52 km) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km) of it (1.09%) is water. The city is bounded by the City of Auburn Hills to the east and north, the City of Lake Angelus to the north,
    8.00
    2 votes
    113
    Arlington National Cemetery

    Arlington National Cemetery

    • People interred here: Albert Scott Crossfield
    Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia, is a military cemetery in the United States of America, established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Confederate general Robert E. Lee's wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a great grand-daughter of Martha Washington. The cemetery is situated directly across the Potomac River from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. It is served by the Arlington Cemetery station on the Blue Line of the Washington Metro system. In an area of 624 acres (253 ha), veterans and military casualties from each of the nation's wars are interred in the cemetery, ranging from the American Civil War through to the military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Pre-Civil War dead were reinterred after 1900. Arlington National Cemetery and United States Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery are administered by the Department of the Army. The other national cemeteries are administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs or by the National Park Service. Arlington House (Custis-Lee Mansion) and its grounds are administered by the National Park Service as a memorial to Lee. George
    9.00
    1 votes
    114
    Carmo Convent

    Carmo Convent

    • People interred here: Ferdinand I of Portugal
    The Carmo Convent (Portuguese: Convento da Ordem do Carmo) is a historical building in Lisbon, Portugal. The mediaeval convent was ruined in the 1755 Lisbon Earthquake, and the ruins of its Gothic church (the Carmo Church or Igreja do Carmo) are the main trace of the great earthquake still visible in the city. The Carmo Convent is located in the Chiado neighbourhood, on a hill overlooking the Rossio square and facing the Lisbon Castle hill. It is located in front of a quiet square (Carmo Square), very close to the Santa Justa Lift. Nowadays the ruined Carmo Church is used as an archaeological museum (the Museu Arqueológico do Carmo or Carmo Archaeological Museum). The Carmo Convent was founded as a convent for the Carmelite Order in 1389 by the Portuguese knight Nuno Álvares Pereira. Álvares Pereira was Constable of Portugal, meaning that he was the supreme military commander after the King. At the service of King John I, Álvares Pereira commanded the Portuguese army in the decisive Battle of Aljubarrota (1385), in which the Portuguese guaranteed their independence by defeating the Castilian army. The Carmo Convent was initially inhabited by Carmelites from Moura (southern
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Colombo

    Colombo

    • People interred here: Arthur C. Clarke
    Colombo (Sinhala: කොළඹ, pronounced [ˈkoləmbə]; Tamil: கொழும்பு) is the largest city of Sri Lanka. It is located on the west coast of the island and adjacent to Sri Jayawardenapura Kotte, the capital of Sri Lanka. Colombo is often referred to as the capital of the country, since Sri Jayawardenapura Kotte is a satellite city of Colombo. Colombo is a busy and vibrant city with a mixture of modern life and colonial buildings and ruins and the population of about 752,993 in the city limits. It was formerly the political capital of Sri Lanka, before Sri Jayawardenapura Kotte. Due to its large harbour and its strategic position along the East-West sea trade routes, Colombo was known to ancient traders 2,000 years ago. It was made the capital of the island when Sri Lanka was ceded to the British Empire in 1815, and its status as capital was retained when the nation became independent in 1948. In 1978, when administrative functions were moved to Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte, Colombo was designated as the commercial capital of Sri Lanka. Like many cities, Colombo's urban area extends well beyond the boundaries of a single local authority, encompassing other Municipal and Urban Councils. The
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Graz

    Graz

    • People interred here: Jochen Rindt
    Graz ( /ˈɡræts/ or /ˈɡrɑːts/; German pronunciation: [ˈɡʁaːt͡s]; Slovene: Gradec, Hungarian: Grác) is the second-largest city in Austria after Vienna and the capital of the federal state of Styria (Steiermark). On 1 April 2010 it had a population of 291,890 (of which 258,605 had principal residence status). Graz has a long tradition as a student city: its six universities have more than 44,000 students. Its "Old Town" is one of the best-preserved city centres in Central Europe. Politically and culturally, Graz was for centuries more important for Slovenes than Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia, and still remains influential. In 1999, Graz was added to the UNESCO list of World Cultural Heritage Sites, and the site was extended in 2010 by Schloss Eggenberg. Graz was sole Cultural Capital of Europe for 2003 and got the title of a City of Culinary Delights in 2008. The name of the city, Graz (see the Slavic settlement Grad), and some archaeological finds point to the erection of a small castle by Alpine Slavic people, which in time became a heavily defended fortification. In literary Slovene, gradec literally means "small castle", which is etymologically a hypocoristic derivative of
    9.00
    1 votes
    117
    Mecca Masjid

    Mecca Masjid

    • People interred here: Mahbub Ali Khan, Asif Jah VI
    Makkah Masjid (Arabic: ‎and Urdu: مکہ مسجد, Telugu: మక్కా మసీదు) is one of the oldest mosques in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India, And it is one of the largest Mosques in India. Makkah Masjid is a listed heritage building in the old city of Hyderabad, close to the historic landmarks of Chowmahalla Palace, Laad Bazaar, and Charminar. Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah, the fifth ruler of the Qutb Shahi dynasty, commissioned bricks to be made from the soil brought from Mecca, the holiest site of Islam, and used them in the construction of the central arch of the mosque, thus giving the mosque its name. It formed the centerpiece around which the city was planned by Muhammad Quli Qutub Shah. Makkah Masjid was built during the reign of Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah, the 6th Qutb Shahi Sultan of Golconda (now Hyderabad). The three arched facades have been carved from a single piece of granite, which took five years to quarry. More than 8,000 workers were employed to build the mosque. Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah personally laid the foundation stone. The construction was later completed by Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb after conquering Hyderabad. Jean-Baptiste Tavernier, the French explorer, in his travelogue
    9.00
    1 votes
    118
    Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz, California

    Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz, California

    • People interred here: Jay Moriarty
    Two more spots surfed in the early '70's are "Little Wind & Sea" and "26th avenue". Both are just north of "Sewers" and "First Peak" at 26th Avenue. Pleasure Point is on the northern Monterey Bay in Santa Cruz County, California, is a world renowned surf location. Traditionally defined as the area along the coast from 41st Ave to Moran Lagoon, up 30th Ave to Portola and over to 41st Ave down to the sea at the "Hook". It is a prime example of surf culture. From the time of the Costanoan through the Spanish missions in California, into the time of the Californios and the breakup of the Ranchos to the development of the Coastal cottages and businesses, the “Point” has had a rich and interesting past. In the more modern times of Prohibition, with the speakeasies that gave the area the name Pleasure Point and through the development of the surf culture, this area has been a place of distinction along the California coast. The new Century has ushered in a new phase of development in which the beach cottages are being replaced by large houses, and the surfers being replaced by new residents and vacation rentals. The Ohlone were the early settlers of the Central Coast, prior to the
    9.00
    1 votes
    119
    St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle

    St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle

    • People interred here: Princess Augusta Charlotte of Wales
    St George's Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England, United Kingdom. It is both a royal peculiar and the chapel of the Order of the Garter. The chapel is governed by the Dean and Canons of Windsor. The chapel is located in the Lower Ward of the castle, which is one of the principal residences of Queen Elizabeth II. The day to day running of the chapel is the responsibility of the religious College of St George, which is directed by a chapter of the dean and four canons, assisted by a clerk, virger (traditional spelling of verger) and other staffers. The Society of the Friends of St George's and Descendants of the Knights of the Garter, a registered charity, was established in 1931 to assist the College in maintaining the chapel. In 1348, King Edward III founded two new religious colleges: St Stephen's at Westminster and St George's at Windsor. The new college at Windsor was attached to the Chapel of St Edward the Confessor which had been constructed by Henry III in the early thirteenth century. The chapel was then rededicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, St Edward the Confessor and St George the Martyr. Edward III also built the Aerary Porch in 1353-1354. It was
    9.00
    1 votes
    120
    Zentralfriedhof

    Zentralfriedhof

    • People interred here: Walter Nowotny
    The Zentralfriedhof (German for "Central Cemetery") is one of the largest cemeteries in the world, largest by number of interred in Europe and most famous cemetery among Vienna's nearly 50 cemeteries. The cemetery's name is descriptive of its significance as Vienna's biggest cemetery, not of its geographic location, as it is not situated in the city center of the Austrian capital, but on the very outskirts, in the outer city district of Simmering, and its address is Simmeringer Hauptstraße 230–244, Vienna 1110, Austria. The musician Wolfgang Ambros honoured the Zentralfriedhof in his 1975 song "Es lebe der Zentralfriedhof" ("Long live the Zentralfriedhof"), marking with it the 100th anniversary of the cemetery's opening. The Vienna Central Cemetery is not one that has evolved slowly with the passing of time unlike many others. The decision to establish a new, big cemetery for Vienna came in 1863. Around that time, it became clear that – due to industrialisation – the city's population would eventually increase to such an extent that the existing communal cemeteries would prove insufficient. It was expected that Vienna, then capital of the large Austro-Hungarian Empire, would grow
    9.00
    1 votes
    121
    Basilica of San Francesco d'Assisi

    Basilica of San Francesco d'Assisi

    • People interred here: Giovanna of Italy
    The Papal Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi (Italian: Basilica Papale di San Francesco, Latin: Basilica Sancti Francisci Assisiensis) is the mother church of the Roman Catholic Order of Friars Minor—commonly known as the Franciscan Order—in Assisi, Italy, the city where St. Francis was born and died. The basilica is one of the most important places of Christian pilgrimage in Italy. With its accompanying friary, the basilica is a distinctive landmark to those approaching Assisi. It has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2000. The basilica, which was begun in 1228, is built into the side of a hill and comprises two churches known as the Upper Church and the Lower Church, and a crypt where the remains of the saint are interred. The interior of the Upper Church is an important early example of the Gothic style in Italy. The Upper and Lower Churches are decorated with frescoes by numerous late medieval painters from the Roman and Tuscan schools, and include works by Cimabue, Giotto, Simone Martini, Pietro Lorenzetti and possibly Pietro Cavallini. The range and quality of the works gives the basilica a unique importance in demonstrating the development of Italian art of this
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Faversham

    Faversham

    • People interred here: Stephen of England
    Faversham ( /ˈfævərʃəm/) is a market town and civil parish in the Swale district of Kent, England. The parish of Faversham (Feversham) grew up around an ancient sea port on Faversham Creek and was the birthplace of the explosives industry in England. Faversham, established as a settlement before the Roman conquest was held in royal demesne in 811, and is further cited in a charter granted by Kenulf, the King of Mercia. It was recorded in the Domesday Book as Favreshant. The town has regularly throughout its history obtained curious royal privileges and charters In 1148 Faversham Abbey was established in Faversham by King Stephen who with his consort Matilda of Boulogne, and his son, Eustace, the Earl of Boulogne was buried there. During Stephen's reign, Faversham was a very important settlement and even became the capital of England for a short period King John tried to give the church to Simon of Wells in 1201, but the church was owned by the monks of St Augustine's Abbey at Canterbury, who appealed to Rome and kept Simon from receiving the church. Sir Thomas Culpeper was granted Faversham Abbey by Henry VIII of England during the Dissolution of the Monasteries about 1536. The
    6.67
    3 votes
    123
    Hillsdale

    Hillsdale

    • People interred here: Dorothy Kneen
    Hillsdale is a city in the state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 8,305. It is the county seat of Hillsdale County, and is run as a council-manager government. The city is the home of Hillsdale College, a private liberal arts college noted for its academics and its influence in politics and education. In 2005, the town made history when Michael Sessions was elected mayor at age 18. He was still in high school at the time of his election. The city is situated mostly within Hillsdale Township, but is a municipality governed independently of the township. Nearby communities include: Allen, Bankers, Cambria, Camden, Frontier, Jerome, Jonesville, Litchfield, Montgomery, Moscow, Mosherville, North Adams, Osseo, Pittsford, Prattville, Ransom, Reading, and Waldron. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.6 square miles (15 km), of which 5.3 square miles (14 km) is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km) (4.32%) is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 8,233 people, 3,067 households, and 1,781 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,548.2 per square mile (597.5/km²). There were 3,274 housing units at an
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Glenwood Springs

    Glenwood Springs

    • People interred here: Edward T. Taylor
    The City of Glenwood Springs is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and the most populous city of Garfield County, Colorado, United States. The U.S. Census Bureau stated that the city population was 9,614 in 2010 census. Glenwood Springs is home to one of the campuses in the Colorado Mountain College system. Glenwood Springs was originally known as "Defiance". Defiance was established in 1883, a camp of tents, saloons, and brothels with an increasing amount of cabins and lodging establishments. It was populated with the expected crowd of gamblers, gunslingers, and prostitutes. Town Founder Isaac Cooper's wife Sarah was having a hard time adjusting to the frontier life and in an attempt to make her environment somewhat more comfortable, persuaded the founders to change the name to Glenwood Springs, Colorado, after her beloved hometown of Glenwood, Iowa. Its location at the confluence of the Colorado River and the Roaring Fork River as well as gaining a stop on the railroad historically made it a center of commerce in the area. The city has seen famous visitors including President Teddy Roosevelt who spent an entire summer vacation living out of the historic Hotel
    5.75
    4 votes
    125
    Przysucha

    Przysucha

    • People interred here: Simcha Bunim of Peshischa
    Przysucha [pʂɨˈsuxa] is a town in Poland. Located in historic Lesser Poland, it is part of the Masovian Voivodeship, about 100 km southwest of Warsaw and 40 km west of Radom. It is the capital of Przysucha County, and the town 6,762 inhabitants (2004). Its name in Yiddish is פשיסחא or פשיסכא (pronounced: Pshiskhe). In the past, it was home to a number of Hasidic Rabbis, such as The Holy Jew and Simcha Bunim of Peshischa. Przysucha is located on the Radomka river, along national road nr. 12 (which in the future will make Expressway S12). Rail station Przysucha is located in the village of Skrzyńsko, on the line from Radom to Łódź. First mention of Przesucha, as it was known then, comes from 1415. In the early 16th century, the village belonged to the Morsztyn family. Przysucha had a public house, a watermill, and a forge, and it belonged to the parish of Skrzyńsko. On December 11, 1710, upon a royal privillege, issued by King Augustus II the Strong, artisans were allowed to settle in the town, and a weekly market was established. Later on, two markets a week were permitted, and a manufactory was opened in town, along the Radomka river. German artisans from Silesia and Saxony founded
    5.75
    4 votes
    126
    Tyre

    Tyre

    • People interred here: Margaret of France, Queen of England and Hungary
    Tyre (Arabic: صور, Ṣūr; Phoenician: , Ṣur; Hebrew: צוֹר‎‎, Tzor; Tiberian Hebrew צר, Ṣōr; Akkadian:
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    Bellefontaine and Calvary Cemeteries

    Bellefontaine and Calvary Cemeteries

    • People interred here: Sara Teasdale
    Bellefontaine Cemetery (established in 1849) and the Roman Catholic Calvary Cemetery (established in 1857) in St. Louis, Missouri are adjacent burial grounds, which have numerous historic and extravagant tombstones and mausoleums. They are the necropolis for a number of prominent local and state politicians, as well as soldiers of the American Civil War. Founders planned Bellefontaine Cemetery to make room for development in the business area before the cholera epidemic of 1849. That event made it more critical for the city to have room for burials. It was not until later that doctors understood the relation between the epidemics and water supplies, but the residents benefited by moving burials away from the river, which might have become infected by water leaching past the remains of infected people. The original St. Louis cemetery was by the Old Cathedral in Downtown St. Louis near the Mississippi River. Bodies from that cemetery (including that of city co-founder Auguste Chouteau) were moved to Bellefontaine. Burials from an historic African-American cemetery, discovered in the 1990s during construction at Lambert-Saint Louis International Airport, were reinterred
    7.50
    2 votes
    128
    Belz

    Belz

    • People interred here: Yehoshua Rokeach
    Belz (Ukrainian: Белз, Polish: Bełz, Yiddish/Hebrew: בעלז translit. Belz), a small city in the Lviv Oblast (province) of Western Ukraine, near the border with Poland, is located between the Solokiya river (a tributary of the Bug River) and the Rzeczyca stream. The current estimated population is 2408 (as of 2004), making it the smallest city in Ukraine. There are a few versions of the origin of the name: The name occurs only in two other places, both Celtic areas in antiquity: Belz is situated in a fertile plain which tribes of Indo-European origin settled in ancient times: Celtic Lugii, next (2nd-5th century) German Goths, slavized Sarmatians (White Croats), and at last Slavic Lendians. The town has existed since at least the 10th century, as one of the Burgs of Czerwień (Red Ruthenia) strongholds under Bohemian and Polish rule. In 981, Belz was incorporated into the Kievan Rus', except 1018–1030 when it belonged to Poland. In 1170 the town became a seat of the Duchy of Belz. In 1234 it was incorporated into the Duchy of Galicia–Volhynia, which would control Belz till 1340, when it came under Lithuanian rule. In 1366 it became a fief of Poland, since 1462 a permanent part of the
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Holyrood Abbey

    Holyrood Abbey

    • People interred here: James V of Scotland
    Holyrood Abbey is a ruined abbey of the Canons Regular in Edinburgh, Scotland. The abbey was founded in 1128 by King David I of Scotland. During the 15th century, the abbey guesthouse was developed into a royal residence, and after the Scottish Reformation the Palace of Holyroodhouse was expanded further. The abbey church was used as a parish church until the 17th century, and has been ruined since the 18th century. The remaining walls of the abbey lie adjacent to the palace, at the eastern end of Edinburgh's Royal Mile. The site of the abbey is protected as a scheduled monument. Rood is an old word for a type of Christian cross, bearing a lower cross-bar as well as the main upper cross-bar. It therefore means the cross which Jesus Christ was crucified upon; thus the name Holyrood is equivalent to "Holy Cross." Legend relates that in 1127, while King David I was hunting in the forests to the east of Edinburgh during the Feast of the Cross, he was thrown from his horse after it had been startled by a hart. According to variations of the story, the king was saved from being gored by the charging animal when it was startled either by the miraculous appearance of a holy cross
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Lakeland

    Lakeland

    • People interred here: James Henry Mills
    Lakeland is a city in Polk County, Florida, United States, is located between Tampa and Orlando along Interstate 4. According to the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau estimate, the city had a population of 97,422. Lakeland is a principal city of the Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area, which had an estimated population of 584,383 in July, 2009 based on data from the University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research. It is twinned with Richmond Hill, Ontario; Imabari, Japan; Balti, Moldova; Portmore, Jamaica; and Chongming County, Shanghai, China as part of the Sister Cities program. The first Paleo-indians reached the central Florida area near the end of the last ice age, as they followed big game south. As the ice melted and sea levels rose, these Native Americans ended up staying and thrived on the peninsula for thousands of years. By the time the first Spanish conquistadors arrived, there were over 250,000 Native Americans living on the peninsula. Some of these first early tribes were the Tocobago, Timucua, and the Calusa. In 1527, a Spanish map showed a settlement near the Rio de la Paz. The arrival of the Spanish turned out to be disastrous to these
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Mount Taupiri

    Mount Taupiri

    • People interred here: Te Atairangikaahu
    Mount Taupiri is a hill at the southern end of the Taupiri Range in the Waikato. The highest peak in the range, it rises to 288 metres above sea level and overlooks Taupiri township immediately to its south. It is separated from the Hākarimata Range to the south by the Taupiri Gorge, through which the Waikato River flows from the Waikato Basin to the Lower Waikato. The Mangawara Stream joins the Waikato River at the base of the hill. Mount Taupiri is a sacred mountain and burial ground for the Waikato tribe of the Māori people. Until sometime in the 19th century a large Māori village or town, Kaitotehe, stood on the flat land on the other side of the river, below the Hākarimata Range. In early years it was the home of Paoa, brother of Mahuta, before Paoa moved to Hauraki. It became the headquarters of the Ngāti Mahuta people. Brothers Whare and Tapuae, grandsons of Mahuta and the leaders of Ngāti Mahuta, lived there. After the two brothers were killed, Tapuae's son Te Putu built Taupiri pā on the summit of a spur of Taupiri mountain, in the 1600s. When Te Putu was an old man in the 1700s, he was treacherously killed by Ngātokowaru of Ngāti Raukawa at Te Mata-o-tutonga, his home
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Pasargadae

    Pasargadae

    • People interred here: Cyrus the Great
    Pasargadae (Persian: پاسارگاد‎ Pāsārgād), the capital of Cyrus the Great (559–530 BC) and also his last resting place, was a city in ancient Persia, and is today an archaeological site and one of Iran's UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Cyrus the Great began building his capital in 546 BCE or later; it was unfinished when he died in battle, in 530 or 529 BCE. The remains of the tomb of Cyrus' son and successor, Cambyses II, has been found in Pasargadae, near the fortress of Toll-e Takht, and identified in 2006. Pasargadae remained the Persian capital until Cambyses II moved it to Susa; later, Darius founded another in Persepolis. The archaeological site covers 1.6 square kilometres and includes a structure commonly believed to be the mausoleum of Cyrus, the fortress of Toll-e Takht sitting on top of a nearby hill, and the remains of two royal palaces and gardens. Pasargad Persian Garden provide the earliest known example of the Persian chahar bagh, or fourfold garden design (see Persian Gardens). Recent research on Pasargadae’s structural engineering has shown that Achaemenid engineers built the city to withstand a severe earthquake, what would today be classified as 7.0 on the Richter
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Rachel's Tomb

    Rachel's Tomb

    • People interred here: Rachel
    Rachel's Tomb (Hebrew: קבר רחל‎ translit. Kever Rakhel), also known as the Bilal bin Rabah mosque (Arabic: مسجد بلال بن رباح‎) to Muslims is the name given to a small religious building revered by Jews, Christians and Muslims. The tomb is located within a Muslim cemetery in a walled enclave biting into the outskirts of Bethlehem, 460 meters south of Jerusalem’s municipal boundary, in the West Bank. The burial place of the matriarch Rachel as mentioned in the Jewish and Christian Old Testament, and in Muslim literature is contested between this site and several others to the north. The earliest extra-biblical records describing this tomb as Rachel's burial place date to the first decades of the 4th century CE. The present structure consists of two chambers; one, a domed chamber, is of Muslim Ottoman construction. The antechamber was built by Sir Moses Montefiore in 1841. According to the UN Partition Plan, the tomb was to be part of the internationally administered zone of Jerusalem, but the area was occupied by Jordan, which prohibited Israelis from entering the area. Though not falling within Area C, the site has come under the control of the Israeli Ministry of Religious Affairs.
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Rouen Cathedral

    Rouen Cathedral

    • People interred here: William, Count of Poitou
    Rouen Cathedral (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen) is a Roman Catholic Gothic cathedral in Rouen, in northwestern France. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Rouen and Normandy. A church was already present at the location in late 4th century, and eventually a cathedral was established in Rouen as in Poitiers. It was enlarged by St. Ouen in 650, visited by Charlemagne in 769. All the buildings perished during a Viking raid in the 9th century, Rollo was baptized here in 915 and buried in 931, Richard I further enlarged it in 950, St. Romain's tower was built in 1035. The buildings of Archbishop Robert II were consecrated in 1065. The cathedral was struck by lightning in 1110. Construction on the current building began in the 12th century in the Early gothic style for Saint Romain's tower, front side porches and part of the nave. The cathedral was burnt in 1200. Others were built in the High gothic style for the mainworks: nave, transept, choir and first floor of the lantern tower in the 13th century; side chapels, lady's chapel and side doorways in the 14th century. Some windows are still decorated with stained glass of the 13th century, famous because of a special cobalt blue
    7.50
    2 votes
    135
    St. Mary's Church, Nottingham

    St. Mary's Church, Nottingham

    • People interred here: John Holles, 1st Earl of Clare
    The Church of St Mary the Virgin is the oldest religious foundation in the City of Nottingham, England, the largest church after the Roman Catholic Cathedral and the largest mediæval building in Nottingham. The church is Grade I listed by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport as a building of outstanding architectural or historic interest. It is one of only five Grade I listed buildings in the City of Nottingham. It is situated on High Pavement at the heart of the historic Lace Market district and is also known as St Mary's in the Lace Market. It is a member of the Greater Churches Group, and part of the parish of All Saints', St Mary's and St Peter's, Nottingham. The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book and is believed to go back deep into Saxon times. The main body of the present building (at least the third on the site) dates from the end of the reign of Edward III (1377) to that of Henry VII (1485–1509). The nave was finished before 1475 and it is notable for its uniformity of gothic perpendicular style. It is likely that the south aisle wall was the first part of the building to be constructed in the early 1380s, with the remainder of the nave and transepts being from
    7.50
    2 votes
    136
    Taj Mahal

    Taj Mahal

    • People interred here: Shah Jahan
    The Taj Mahal ( /ˈtɑːdʒ/ or /ˈtɑːʒ məˈhɑːl/; Hindi: ताज महल, from Persian/Urdu: تاج محل "crown of palaces", pronounced [ˈt̪aːdʒ mɛˈɦɛl]; also "the Taj") is a white marble mausoleum located in Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India. It was built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in memory of his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal. The Taj Mahal is widely recognized as "the jewel of Muslim art in India and one of the universally admired masterpieces of the world's heritage". Taj Mahal is regarded by many as the finest example of Mughal architecture, a style that combines elements from Persian, Ottoman Turkish and Indian architectural styles. In 1983, the Taj Mahal became a UNESCO World Heritage Site. While the white domed marble mausoleum is the most familiar component of the Taj Mahal, it is actually an integrated complex of structures. The construction began around 1632 and was completed around 1653, employing thousands of artisans and craftsmen. The construction of the Taj Mahal was entrusted to a board of architects under imperial supervision, including Abd ul-Karim Ma'mur Khan, Makramat Khan, and Ustad Ahmad Lahauri. Lahauri is generally considered to be the principal designer. In 1631, Shah Jahan,
    7.50
    2 votes
    137
    Woodside

    Woodside

    • People interred here: Robert Augustus Sweeney
    Woodside is a neighborhood in the western portion of the New York City borough of Queens. It is bordered on the south by Maspeth, on the north by Astoria, on the west by Sunnyside and on the east by Elmhurst and Jackson Heights. Some areas are widely residential and very quiet, while others (especially closer to Roosevelt Avenue) are more urban. The neighborhood is located in Queens Community Board 1 and Queens Community Board 2. In the 19th century the area was part of the Town of Newtown (now Elmhurst). The adjacent area of Winfield was largely incorporated into the post office serving Woodside and as a consequence Winfield lost much of its identity distinct from Woodside. With large scale residential development in the 1860s, Woodside became the largest Irish American community in Queens. In the early 1930s, the area was approximately 80% Irish. Even as the neighborhood has seen growth in ethnic diversity today, the area still retains a strong Irish American presence. There are a number of Irish pubs and restaurants scattered across Woodside. In the early 1990s, many Asian American families moved into the area, particularly east of the 61st Street – Woodside. In 2000, Woodside's
    7.50
    2 votes
    138
    Trajan's Column

    Trajan's Column

    • People interred here: Pompeia Plotina
    Trajan's Column (Italian: Colonna Traiana) is a Roman triumphal column in Rome, Italy, that commemorates Roman emperor Trajan's victory in the Dacian Wars. It was probably constructed under the supervision of the architect Apollodorus of Damascus at the order of the Roman Senate. It is located in Trajan's Forum, built near the Quirinal Hill, north of the Roman Forum. Completed in AD 113, the freestanding column is most famous for its spiral bas relief, which artistically describes the epic wars between the Romans and Dacians (101–102 and 105–106). Its design has inspired numerous victory columns, both ancient and modern. The structure is about 30 metres (98 ft) in height, 35 metres (125 ft) including its large pedestal. The shaft is made from a series of 20 colossal Carrara marble drums, each weighing about 32 tons, with a diameter of 3.7 metres (11 ft). The 190-metre (625 ft) frieze winds around the shaft 23 times. Inside the shaft, a spiral staircase of 185 stairs provides access to a viewing platform at the top. The capital block of Trajan's Column weighs 53.3 tons, which had to be lifted to a height of c. 34 m. Ancient coins indicate preliminary plans to top the column with a
    4.80
    5 votes
    139
    Protestant Cemetery, Rome

    Protestant Cemetery, Rome

    • People interred here: John Keats
    The Protestant Cemetery (Italian: Cimitero protestante) now officially called the Cimitero acattolico ("Non-Catholic Cemetery") and often referred to as the Cimitero degli Inglesi ("Englishmen's Cemetery") is a cemetery in Rome, located near Porta San Paolo alongside the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built in 30 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. The presence of Mediterranean cypress, pomegranite, and other trees, and a grassy meadow suggests the more naturalistic landscape style of northern Europe, where cemeteries sometimes incorporate grass and other greenery. As the official name indicates, it is the final resting place of non-Catholics (not only Protestants or English people). The earliest known burial is that of an Oxford student named Langton in 1738. The most famous graves are those of English poets John Keats (1795–1821) and Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822). Keats died in Rome of tuberculosis at the age of 25. His epitaph, which does not mention him by name, is by his friends Joseph Severn and Charles Armitage Brown: "This grave contains all that was mortal, of a YOUNG ENGLISH
    5.50
    4 votes
    140
    Thanjavur

    Thanjavur

    • People interred here: Serfoji II
    Thanjavur, formerly Tanjore, is a municipality and the headquarters of the Thanjavur District in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Scholars believe the name Thanjavur to have been derived from "Tanjan", a legendary asura in Hindu mythology. While the early history of Thanjavur remains unclear, the city first rose to prominence during the reign of the Medieval Cholas when it served as the capital of the Chola empire. After the fall of the Cholas, the city was ruled by various dynasties like Pandyas, Vijayanagar Empire, Madurai Nayaks, Thanjavur Nayaks, Thanjavur Marathas and the British. It has been a part of independent India since 1947. Thanjavur is an important center of South Indian art and architecture. Most of the Great Living Chola Temples which are UNESCO World Heritage Monuments are located in and around Thanjavur. The foremost among the Great Living Chola temples, the Brihadeeswara Temple, is located in the center of the city. Thanjavur is also the home of the Tanjore painting, a painting style unique to the region. The city is an important agricultural center located at the heart of the region, known as the "Rice bowl of Tamil Nadu". South Zone Culture Centre in Thanjavur
    5.50
    4 votes
    141
    Westminster Hall and Burying Ground

    Westminster Hall and Burying Ground

    • People interred here: Edgar Allan Poe
    The Westminster Hall and Burying Ground is a graveyard and former church located at 519 West Fayette Street in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. Occupying the southeast corner of Fayette and Greene Street on the west side of downtown Baltimore, the site is probably most famous as the burial site of Edgar Allan Poe. The complex was declared a national historic district in 1974. The graveyard was established in 1786 by the First Presbyterian Church, a congregation of socially and economically elite local Presbyterians. Over the next 60 years, the burying grounds became the final resting place for important and influential merchants, politicians, statesmen, and dozens of veterans of the American Revolutionary War and War of 1812. Today, this "who's who" of early Baltimore is overshadowed by the presence of writer Edgar Allan Poe, who was buried here in October 1849 following his sudden and mysterious death. In 1852, a church was erected overtop the graveyard, its brick piers straddling gravestones and burial vaults to create what later Baltimoreans referred to as "catacombs." For years, it was thought that the Gothic Revival-style Westminster Presbyterian Church was built in
    5.50
    4 votes
    142
    Bayamón

    Bayamón

    • People interred here: Agustin Ramos Calero
    Bayamón (Spanish pronunciation: [baʝaˈmon]) is a municipality of Puerto Rico located on the northern coastal valley, north of Aguas Buenas and Comerío; south of Toa Baja and Cataño; west of Guaynabo; and east of Toa Alta and Naranjito. Bayamón is spread over 11 wards and Bayamón Pueblo (The downtown area and the administrative center of the city). It is part of the San Juan-Caguas-Guaynabo Metropolitan Statistical Area. Bayamón is sometimes called "El Pueblo del Chicharrón" (Pork Rind Town) and "Ciudad del Tapón" (City of the Traffic Jams) because of the constant traffic jams that plague the city. Juan Ramírez de Arrellano established Bayamón as a town on May 22, 1772. It derives its name from the local Indian chief Bahamon or from the Taíno word Bayamongo, which is the name of the main river that crosses the city. In 1821, Marcos Xiorro a slave owned by Vicente Andino, a Militia Captain who owned a sugar plantation in Bayamón, planned and conspired to lead a slave revolt against the sugar plantation owners and the Spanish Colonial government in Puerto Rico. Even though the conspiracy was unsuccessful, he achieved legendary status among the slaves and is part of Puerto Rico's
    6.33
    3 votes
    143
    Bury St. Edmunds

    Bury St. Edmunds

    • People interred here: Edmund the Martyr
    Bury St Edmunds is a market town in the county of Suffolk, England, and formerly the county town of West Suffolk. It is the main town in the borough of St Edmundsbury and known for the ruined abbey near the town centre. Bury is the seat of the Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich, with the episcopal see at St Edmundsbury Cathedral. The town, originally called Beodericsworth, is known for brewing and malting (with the large Greene King brewery) and for a British Sugar processing factory. Many large and small businesses are located in Bury, which traditionally has given Bury an affluent economy with low unemployment, with the town being the main cultural and retail centre for West Suffolk. Tourism is also a major part of the economy, plus local government. It is in the Bury St Edmunds parliamentary constituency and is represented in Parliament by David Ruffley. Bury St Edmunds (Beodericsworth, St Edmund's Bury), supposed by some to have been the Villa Faustina of the Romans, was one of the royal towns of the Saxons. Sigebert, king of the East Angles, founded a monastery here about 633, which in 903 became the burial place of King Edmund, who was slain by the Danes in 869, and owed
    6.33
    3 votes
    144
    Cathedral of Magdeburg

    Cathedral of Magdeburg

    • People interred here: Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor
    The Protestant Cathedral of Magdeburg (German: Magdeburger Dom), officially called the Cathedral of Saints Catherine and Maurice (German: Dom zu Magdeburg St. Mauritius und Katharina), is the oldest Gothic cathedral in Germany. It is the proto-cathedral of the former Prince-Archbishopric of Magdeburg. Today it's the principal church of the Evangelical Church in Central Germany. One of its steeples is 99.25 m (325 ft 7 in) tall, and the other is 100.98 m (331 ft 4 in), making it one of the tallest cathedrals in eastern Germany. The cathedral is likewise the landmark of Magdeburg, the capital city of the Bundesland of Saxony-Anhalt, and is also home to the grave of Emperor Otto I the Great. The first church built in 937 at the location of the current cathedral was an abbey called St. Maurice, dedicated to Saint Maurice. The current cathedral was constructed over the period of 300 years starting from 1209, and the completion of the steeples took place only in 1520. Despite being repeatedly looted, the Cathedral of Magdeburg is rich in art, ranging from antiques to modern art. The first church was founded September 21, 937 at the location of the current cathedral was an abbey called
    6.33
    3 votes
    145
    Childwickbury Manor

    Childwickbury Manor

    • People interred here: Stanley Kubrick
    Childwickbury Manor is a manor in Hertfordshire, England, between St Albans and Harpenden. Previous owners were the Lomax family who bought the house in 1666 and who lived there until 1854 when Joshua Lomax sold it to Henry Hayman Toulmin, a wealthy ship owner and High Sheriff of Hertfordshire and mayor of St Albans. Toulmin left the property to Sir John Blundell Maple around 20 years later. Toulmin's granddaughter, the author Mary Carbery, was born at the house. Sir John Blundell Maple bred and raced Thoroughbreds and built Childwickbury Stud into a very successful horse breeding operation. Another prominent racehorse owner, Jack Barnato Joel, bought the estate including the stud farm farm in 1906. On his death in 1940, his son Jim Joel took over the operation. He too became a successful racehorse owner and breeder and maintained the property until 1978 when the stud and the manor were sold separately. It was advertised thus: “The Manor House, mainly 18th century has 12 Reception Rooms, 18 Bed and Dressing Rooms, 11 Staff Bedrooms, and 10 Bathrooms. Immaculate Timbered Grounds. Walled Garden. Courtyard with Garaging and Flat. Estate Office. Victorian Dairy House with about 19
    6.33
    3 votes
    146
    Gloucester Cathedral

    Gloucester Cathedral

    • People interred here: Edward II of England
    Gloucester Cathedral, or the Cathedral Church of St Peter and the Holy and Indivisible Trinity, in Gloucester, England, stands in the north of the city near the river. It originated in 678 or 679 with the foundation of an abbey dedicated to Saint Peter (dissolved by King Henry VIII). The foundations of the present church were laid by Abbot Serlo (1072–1104). Walter Gloucester (d. 1412) the abbey's historian, became its first mitred abbot in 1381. Until 1541, Gloucester lay in the see of Worcester, but the separate see was then constituted, with John Wakeman, last abbot of Tewkesbury, as its first bishop. The diocese covers the greater part of Gloucestershire, with small parts of Herefordshire and Wiltshire. The cathedral has a stained glass window containing the earliest images of golf. This dates from 1350, over 300 years earlier than the earliest image of golf from Scotland. There is also a carved image of people playing a ball game, believed by some to be one of the earliest images of medieval football. The cathedral, built as the abbey church, consists of a Norman nucleus (Walter de Lacy is buried there), with additions in every style of Gothic architecture. It is 420 feet
    6.33
    3 votes
    147
    Medzhybizh

    Medzhybizh

    • People interred here: Yisroel ben Eliezer
    Medzhybizh, previously known as Mezhybozhe, population 1731, (Census 2001) (Ukrainian: Меджибіж, Russian: Меджибож, Translit: Medzhibozh, Polish: Międzybóż or Międzybuż, German: Medschybisch, Yiddish: מעזשביזש, translit. Mezhbizh, Turkish: Mejibuji) is a town in the Khmelnytskyi Oblast (province) of western Ukraine. It is located in the Letychivsky Raion (district), 25 kilometres from the Khmelnytskyi on the main highway between Khmelnytskyi and Vinnytsia at the confluence of the Southern Buh and Buzhok rivers. Medzhybizh was once a prominent town in the former Podolia Province. Its name is derived from "mezhbuzhye", which means "between the Buzhenka (and the Buh) Rivers". It is known as the birthplace of the Jewish Hasidic mystical religious movement. Medzhybizh is first mentioned in chronicles as an estate in Kievan Rus. It was given to Prince Svyatoslav by the prince of Kiev in the year 1146. In 1148, ownership transferred to Rostyslav, the son of Yuri Dolgoruky. The wooden fortress that stood there was destroyed in 1255. After the Mongol incursion, by 1360, the town and surrounding territory passed into the hands of the Lithuanians. The town suffered from numerous attacks by
    6.33
    3 votes
    148
    St. John's Cathedral, Warsaw

    St. John's Cathedral, Warsaw

    • People interred here: Stanisław August Poniatowski
    St. John's Archcathedral in Warsaw (Polish: Archikatedra św. Jana w Warszawie) is a Catholic church in Warsaw's Old Town, is the only one archcathedral in Warszawa, the other 3 are cathedrals in the Polish capital. St. John's stands immediately adjacent to Warsaw's Jesuit church, and is one of the oldest churches in the city and the main church of the Warsaw archdiocese. St. John's Archcathedral is one of Poland's national pantheons. Along with the city, the church has been listed by UNESCO as of cultural significance. Originally built in the 14th century in Masovian Gothic style, the Cathedral served as a coronation and burial site for numerous Dukes of Masovia. The Archcathedral was connected with the Royal Castle (Zamek Królewski w Warszawie) by an elevated 80-meter-long corridor that had been built by Queen Anna Jagiellonka in the late 16th century and extended in the 1620s after Michał Piekarski's failed 1620 attempt to assassinate King of Poland Sigismund III in front of the Cathedral. After the resolution of the Constitution of May 3, 1791, at the end of the session at the Royal Castle, King Stanisław August Poniatowski went to the Cathedral of St. John to repeat the Oath of
    6.33
    3 votes
    149
    Whitby Abbey

    Whitby Abbey

    • People interred here: Oswiu of Northumbria
    Whitby Abbey is a ruined Benedictine abbey overlooking the North Sea on the East Cliff above Whitby in North Yorkshire, England. It was disestablished during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under the auspices of Henry VIII. It is a Grade I Listed building in the care of English Heritage and its site museum is housed in Cholmley House. The first monastery was founded in 657 AD by the Anglo-Saxon era King of Northumbria, Oswy (Oswiu) as Streoneshalh (the older name for Whitby). He appointed Lady Hilda, abbess of Hartlepool Abbey and niece of Edwin the first Christian king of Northumbria, as founding abbess. The name Streoneshalh is thought to signify Fort Bay or Tower Bay in reference to a supposed Roman settlement that previously existed on the site. This contention has never been proven though and alternate theories have been proposed, such as the name meaning Streona's settlement. Some believe that the name referred to Eadric Streona, but this is highly unlikely due to chronological considerations: Streona died in 1017 so the naming of Streoneshalh would have preceded his birth by several hundred years. The double monastery of Celtic monks and nuns was home to the great
    6.33
    3 votes
    150
    Church of the Holy Sepulchre

    Church of the Holy Sepulchre

    • People interred here: Baldwin I of Jerusalem
    The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, also called the Basilica of the Holy Sepulchre, or the Church of the Resurrection by Eastern Christians, is a church within the Christian Quarter of the walled Old City of Jerusalem. It is a few steps away from the Muristan. The site is venerated as Golgotha (the Hill of Calvary), where Jesus was crucified, and is said also to contain the place where Jesus was buried (the Sepulchre). The church has been a paramount – and for many Christians the most important – pilgrimage destination since at least the 4th century, as the purported site of the resurrection of Jesus. Today it also serves as the headquarters of the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, while control of the building is shared between several Christian churches and secular entities in complicated arrangements essentially unchanged for centuries. Today, the church is home to Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism. Anglican, Nontrinitarian and Protestant Christians have no permanent presence in the church – and some regard the alternative Garden Tomb, elsewhere in Jerusalem, as the true place of Jesus's crucifixion and resurrection. In the early 2nd century, the
    4.60
    5 votes
    151
    Kew

    Kew

    • People interred here: Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge
    Kew is a village in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in South West London. It is situated 7.1 miles (11.4 km) west south-west of Charing Cross. Kew is best known for being the location of the Royal Botanic Gardens, now a World Heritage Site, which includes Kew Palace. Kew is also the home of Domesday Book which is on public display at The National Archives (previously known as the Public Record Office). Since 1965 Kew has incorporated the former area of North Sheen which includes St Philip and All Saints, the first barn church to be consecrated in England. It is now in a combined Church of England parish with St Luke's Church, Kew. "Kew Village" refers to the parades of shops adjoining Kew Gardens station. It contains the Kew Bookshop, a whole foods store, several independent retailers, restaurants and cafes. A village community market is held on the first Sunday of every month. There are also major high street retailers at the nearby Kew Retail Park (originally known as Richmond Retail Park). Today, Kew is a popular residential area because of its open spaces, schools, transport links and proximity to Kew Gardens. Most of Kew developed in the late 19th century,
    8.00
    1 votes
    152
    Odivelas

    Odivelas

    • People interred here: Denis of Portugal
    Odivelas (Portuguese pronunciation: [oðiˈvɛlɐʃ] or [ɔðiˈvɛlɐʃ]) is a civil parish in Odivelas Municipality in Lisbon Metropolitan Area, Portugal.. The city has a population of 50,846. The municipality is composed of 7 parishes, and is located in the District of Lisbon. The present Mayor is Susana de Fátima Carvalho Amador, elected by the Socialist Party. The city of Odivelas is located northwest of Lisbon in its metropolitan area, in conurbation with Lisbon. The municipality has a total area of 26.1 km². The population of the city of Odivelas is of 53,448. The municipality of Odivelas has 133,894 inhabitants in 7 parishes. The most famous monument in Odivelas is the feminine Convent of Saint Denis of Odivelas, founded by King Dinis I around 1295. Many famous religious women lived in the convent, which was frequently visited by Kings and Queens (indeed, several Kings had illegitimate sons with the nuns). The Gothic convent was very much damaged in the 1755 Lisbon Earthquake, but the apse has survived, as well as the tomb of King Dinis and his daughter, Princess Maria Afonso. The Convent also has interesting architecture in Manueline and Baroque styles. The Convent, which is open for
    8.00
    1 votes
    153
    South Carolina

    South Carolina

    • People interred here: Harold E. Wilson
    South Carolina (/ˌsaʊθ kærəˈlaɪnə/) is a state in the Southeastern United States. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina; to the south and west by Georgia, located across the Savannah River; and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. Originally part of the Province of Carolina, the Province of South Carolina was the first of the 13 colonies that declared independence from the British Crown during the American Revolution. The colony was originally named by King Charles II of England in honor of his father Charles I (Carolus being Latin for Charles). South Carolina was the first state to ratify the Articles of Confederation, the 8th state to ratify the US Constitution on May 23, 1788. South Carolina later became the first state to vote to secede from the Union which it did on December 20, 1860. It was readmitted to the United States on June 25, 1868. South Carolina is the 40th most extensive and the 24th most populous of the 50 United States. South Carolina comprises 46 counties. The capital and largest city of the state is Columbia. South Carolina is composed of five geographic areas, or physiographic provinces, whose boundaries roughly parallel the Atlantic coastline. In the
    8.00
    1 votes
    154
    Tatoi

    Tatoi

    • People interred here: Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark
    Tatoi, located 5 km north of Athens's suburbs, and 27 km from the Athenian Acropolis was the summer palace and 10,000 acre estate of the former Greek Royal Family, and the site of George II of the Hellenes's birth. The area is a densely wooded southeast-facing slope of Mount Parnitha, and its ancient and current official name is Decelea. The Greek Royal Family obtained the estate during the 1870s. After 1916 many of the buildings burnt down. In the 1920s most of the estate became public property, but in 1936 it was returned to the Royal Family. They were forced to relinquish it after the referendum of 1973. The confiscation of the estate and of other property of the deposed and exiled King, Constantine II, without any compensation, led to a court case in the European Court of Human Rights. The king's argument centered on the claim that the property in question was acquired by his predecessors by legal means and was therefore subject to regular personal inheritance. The Greek state argued that the property was either used by the royal family by virtue of its sovereign status or obtained by taking advantage of that status, and therefore, once the monarchy was abolished, the property
    8.00
    1 votes
    155
    Green-Wood Cemetery

    Green-Wood Cemetery

    • People interred here: Robert Roosevelt
    Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Brooklyn, Kings County , New York. It was granted National Historic Landmark status in 2006 by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Located in Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn, it lies several blocks southwest of Prospect Park, between Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Kensington, and Sunset Park. Paul Goldberger in The New York Times, wrote that it was said "it is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood". Inspired by Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where a cemetery in a naturalistic park-like landscape in the English manner was first established, Green-Wood was able to take advantage of the varied topography provided by glacial moraines. Battle Hill, the highest point in Brooklyn, is on cemetery grounds, rising approximately 200 feet above sea level. As such, there on that spot in 1920, was erected a Revolutionary War monument by Frederick Ruckstull, Altar to Liberty: Minerva. From this height, the bronze Minerva statue gazes The Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. The cemetery was the idea of Henry Evelyn
    5.25
    4 votes
    156
    Brompton Cemetery

    Brompton Cemetery

    • People interred here: Roderick Murchison
    Brompton Cemetery is located near Earl's Court in South West London, England (postal districts SW 5 and 10), in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is managed by The Royal Parks and is one of the Magnificent Seven. Established by Act of Parliament, it opened in 1840 and was originally known as the West of London and Westminster Cemetery. Brompton Cemetery, consecrated by the Bishop of London in June 1840, is one of the Britain's oldest and most distinguished garden cemeteries. Some 35,000 monuments, from simple headstones to substantial mausolea, now mark the resting place of more than 205,000 burials. The site includes large plots for family mausolea, and common graves where coffins are piled deep into the earth, as well as a small columbarium. Brompton was closed to burials between 1952 and 1996, but is once again a working cemetery, with plots for interments and a 'Garden of Remembrance' for the deposit of cremated remains. The official address of Brompton Cemetery is Old Brompton Road in West Brompton, SW10, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. The Main Gate (or North Gate) is near the junction with Kempsford Gardens. There is another gate (the South
    7.00
    2 votes
    157
    Mausoleum of Augustus

    Mausoleum of Augustus

    • People interred here: Augustus
    The Mausoleum of Augustus (Italian: Mausoleo di Augusto) is a large tomb built by the Roman Emperor Augustus in 28 BC on the Campus Martius in Rome, Italy. The Mausoleum, now located on the Piazza Augusto Imperatore, is no longer open to tourists, and the ravages of time and carelessness have stripped the ruins bare. However, the ruins remain a dominating landmark on the northern side of the Campus Martius. The Mausoleum was one of the first projects initiated by Augustus in the city of Rome following his victory at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC. The mausoleum was circular in plan, consisting of several concentric rings of earth and brick, planted with cypresses on top of the building and capped (possibly, as reconstructions are unsure at best) by a conical roof and a statue of Augustus. Vaults held up the roof and opened up the burial spaces below. Twin pink granite obelisks flanked the arched entryway; these now stand, one at the Piazza dell'Esquilino (on the northwest side of the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore) and other at the Quirinal fountain. The completed Mausoleum measured 90 m (295 ft) in diameter by 42 m (137 ft) in height. A corridor ran from the entryway into the
    7.00
    2 votes
    158
    Medellín

    Medellín

    • People interred here: Omar Londoño Tamayo
    Medellín (Spanish pronunciation: [meðeˈʝin]), officially the Municipio de Medellín (Spanish for Municipality of Medellín), is the second-largest city in Colombia. It is in the Aburrá Valley, one of the most northerly of the Andes in South America. To 2012, it has a population of 2.7 million. With its surrounding area, the metropolitan area of Medellín (área metropolitana de Medellín), composed by another nine cities, it is the second largest urban agglomeration in Colombia in terms of population and economy, with more than 3.5 million people. Medellín was founded in 1616 by the Spaniard Francisco Herrera Campuzano as Poblado de San Lorenzo (Saint Lawrence Town) in present-day El Poblado. In 1675 the queen consort Mariana of Austria created the Villa de Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria de Medellín (Town of Our Lady of Medellín). In 1826 the city was named the capital of the Department of Antioquia by the National Congress of the young Republic of Greater Colombia (Gran Colombia), comprised by present day Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Panama. After Colombia won its independence from Spain, Medellín became the capital of the Federal State of Antioquia until 1888, with the
    7.00
    2 votes
    159
    Wiener Neustadt

    Wiener Neustadt

    • People interred here: Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor
    Wiener Neustadt (German pronunciation: [ˈviːnɐ ˈnɔʏʃtat], Vienna New Town) is a town located south of Vienna, in the state of Lower Austria, in north-east Austria. It is a self-governed city and the seat of the district administration of Wiener Neustadt-Land. The area once belonged to the County of Pitten, which had been inherited by Margrave Ottokar III of Styria in 1158. After the dynasty of the Otakars became extinct with the death of his son Ottokar IV, the Duchy of Styria passed to the Austrian House of Babenberg according to the Georgenberg Pact. Duke Leopold V of Austria established the town in 1194 and financed the construction of a fortress close to the Hungarian border with the ransom paid for the English king Richard the Lionheart, whom he had previously captured and held as a hostage at Dürnstein Castle. In 1241, a small Mongol squadron raided Neustadt during the Mongol invasion of Europe. Wiener Neustadt, meaning more or less New Vienna ("Viennese Newtown"), gained important privileges given to the city in order to enable it to prosper. It remained a part of Styria, which after the 1278 Battle on the Marchfeld fell to the House of Habsburg and in 1379 became a
    7.00
    2 votes
    160
    Church of Maria Magdalene

    Church of Maria Magdalene

    • People interred here: Princess Alice of Battenberg
    The Church of Mary Magdalene (Russian: Храм Марии Магдалины, Khram Marii Magdaliny) is a Russian Orthodox church located on the Mount of Olives, near the Garden of Gethsemane in East Jerusalem. The church is dedicated to Mary Magdalene (Miryam of Migdal), a follower of Jesus. According to the sixteenth chapter of the gospel of Mark, Mary Magdalene was the first to see Christ after his resurrection. (Mark 16:9) She is considered a crucial and important disciple of Jesus, and seemingly his primary female associate, along with Mary of Bethany, whom some believe to have been the same woman. The church was built in 1886 by Tsar Alexander III to honor his mother, Empress Maria Alexandrovna of Russia. It was constructed to David Grimm's design in the traditional tented roof style popular in 16th and 17th century Russia, and includes seven distinctive, gilded onion domes. The convent is located directly across the Kidron Valley from the Temple Mount. Two martyred saints, who are the Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna of Russia and her fellow nun Varvara Yakovleva are buried in the church. In the 1930s, Princess Alice of Battenberg, mother of the Duke of Edinburgh, visited the church and
    5.00
    4 votes
    161
    Graceland Cemetery

    Graceland Cemetery

    • People interred here: Louis Sullivan
    Graceland Cemetery is a large Victorian era cemetery located in the north side community area of Uptown, in the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. Established in 1860, its main entrance is at the intersection of Clark Street and Irving Park Road. The Sheridan stop on the Red Line is the nearest CTA "L" station. In the 19th century, a train to the north suburbs occupied the eastern edge of the cemetery where the "L" now rides. The line was also used to carry mourners to funerals, in specially rented funeral cars, requiring an entry on the east wall, now closed. At that point, the cemetery would have been well outside the city limits of Chicago. After the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Lincoln Park which had been the city's cemetery, was deconsecrated and some of the bodies moved here. The edge of the pond around Daniel Burnham's burial island was once lined with broken headstones and coping transported from Lincoln Park. Lincoln Park then became a recreational area, with a single mausoleum remaining, the "Couch tomb", containing the remains of Ira Couch. The cemetery is typical of those that reflect Queen Victoria's reconception of the early 19th century "graveyard". Instead of
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    Ootacamund

    Ootacamund

    • People interred here: Sam Manekshaw
    Ootacamund ( listen (help·info)) (officially, Udhagamandalam sometimes abbreviated to Udhagai or Ooty  listen (help·info)), is a town, a municipality and the district capital of the Nilgiris district in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Ootacamund is a popular hill station located in the Nilgiri Hills. Originally occupied by the Todas, the area came under the rule of the East India Company at the end of the 18th century. Today the town's economy is based on tourism and agriculture, with manufacturing of medicines and photographic film also present. The town is connected to the rest of India by road and rail, and its historic sites and natural beauty attract tourists. The origin of the name Udhagamandalam is obscure. The first mention of the place occurs in a letter of March 1821 to the Madras Gazette by an unknown correspondent as Wotokymund. In early times it was called OttaikalMandu "mund" is the Tamil word for a Toda village, and the first part is probably a corruption of the local name for the central region of the Nilgiri Plateau. Another likely origin of the stem of the name (Ootaca) comes from the local language where Otha-Cal literally means Single Stone. This is perhaps a
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    White Pyramid

    White Pyramid

    • People interred here: Amenemhat II
    The White Pyramid of Amenemhat II is located in the pyramid field at Dahshur, Egypt, and is now nothing more than a pile of rubble, having been heavily quarried for stone. The remaining limestone rubble has given rise to its modern name. The pyramid is surrounded by a large rectangular enclosure wall. A number of intact tombs were found inside this enclosure wall belogning to the relatives of Amenemhat II including the tombs of prince Amenemhetankh and princesses Ita, Khnumet, Itiueret and Sithathormeret. A wide variety of funerary furniture was recovered from these tombs including wooden coffins, alabaster perfume jars, and canopic chests. There was also a large quantity of beautiful jewellery in the tombs of Ita and Khnumet. In 1894 and 1895 Jaques de Morgan dug in the pyramid complex, concentrating on the surrounding royal graves, with other areas not being explored, a full scale investigation of the whole complex has yet to be undertaken.
    5.67
    3 votes
    164
    Cumberland

    Cumberland

    • People interred here: Robert Bruce, jure uxoris Earl of Carrick
    Cumberland ( /ˈkʌmbərlənd/) is a historic county of North West England that had an administrative function from the 12th century until 1974. It bordered Northumberland to the east, County Durham to the southeast, Westmorland and Lancashire to the south, and Dumfriesshire in Scotland to the north. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 (excluding Carlisle from 1914) and now forms, along with Westmorland and parts of historic northern Lancashire, Cumbria. The first record of the term "Cumberland" appears in 945, when the Anglo Saxon Chronicle recorded that the area was ceded to Malcolm I of Scotland by King Edmund of England. At the time of the Domesday Book in 1086 most of the future county remained part of Scotland although some villages in the far south west, which were the possessions of the Earl of Northumbria, were included in the Yorkshire section with the Furness region. In 1092 King William Rufus of England invaded the Carlisle district, settling it with colonists. He created an Earldom of Carlisle, and granted the territory to Ranulf Meschyn. In 1133 Carlisle was made the see of a new diocese, identical with the area of the earldom. However, on the death of
    6.50
    2 votes
    165
    Frogmore

    Frogmore

    • People interred here: Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein
    The Frogmore Estate or Gardens comprise 33 acres (130,000 m) of private gardens within the grounds of the Home Park, adjoining Windsor Castle, in the English county of Berkshire. The name derives from the preponderance of frogs which have always lived in this low-lying and marshy area. It is the location of Frogmore House, a Royal retreat. It is also the site of three burial places of the British Royal Family: the Royal Mausoleum containing the tombs of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; the Duchess of Kent's Mausoleum, burial place of the Queen Victoria's mother; and the Royal Burial Ground. Frogmore House was built in the 1680s and purchased by King George III as a country retreat for Queen Charlotte in 1792. In 1900 Earl Mountbatten of Burma was born there. This mausoleum within the Frogmore Gardens is the burial place of Queen Victoria's mother, Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, the Duchess of Kent. The Mausoleum was designed by the architect A J Humbert, to a concept design by Prince Albert's favourite artist, Professor Ludwig Gruner. In the latter years of her life, the Duchess lived in Frogmore House and in the 1850s, construction began on a beautiful domed 'temple' in the
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Ohio

    Ohio

    • People interred here: Douglas E. Dickey
    Ohio (/oʊˈhaɪ.oʊ/) is a state in the Midwestern United States. Ohio is the 34th most extensive, the 7th most populous, and the 10th most densely populated of the 50 United States. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus. The name "Ohio" originated from Iroquois word ohi-yo’, meaning "great river". The state, originally partitioned from the Northwest Territory, was admitted to the Union as the 17th state (and the first under the Northwest Ordinance) on March 1, 1803. Although there are conflicting narratives regarding the origin of the nickname, Ohio is historically known as the "Buckeye State" (relating to the Ohio buckeye tree) and Ohioans are also known as "Buckeyes". The government of Ohio is composed of the executive branch, led by the Governor; the legislative branch, which comprises the Ohio General Assembly; and the judicial branch, which is led by the Supreme Court. Currently, Ohio occupies 18 seats in the United States House of Representatives. Ohio is known for its status as both a swing state and a bellwether in national elections. Ohio's geographic location has proven to be an asset for economic growth and expansion. Because Ohio links the Northeast to the
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Salem

    Salem

    • People interred here: George Peabody
    Salem is a city in Essex County, Massachusetts, in the United States. The population was 41,340 at the 2010 census. Salem and Lawrence are the county seats of Essex County. Home to Salem State University, the Salem Willows Park and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem is a residential and tourist area which includes the neighborhoods of Salem Neck, The Point, South Salem and North Salem, Witchcraft Heights, Pickering Wharf, and the McIntire Historic District (named after Salem's famous architect and carver, Samuel McIntire). Salem was one of the most significant seaports in early America. It has the first National Historic Site designated by Congress, Salem Maritime National Historic Site, which protects Salem's historic waterfront. Featured notably in Arthur Miller's The Crucible, much of the city's cultural identity is reflective of its role as the location of the Salem witch trials of 1692: Police cars are adorned with witch logos, a local public school is known as the Witchcraft Heights Elementary School, the Salem High School athletic teams are named the Witches; and Gallows Hill, a site of numerous public hangings, is currently used as a playing field for various sports. Tourists
    6.50
    2 votes
    168
    Savoy Chapel

    Savoy Chapel

    • People interred here: John Theophilus Desaguliers
    The Savoy Chapel or the Queen's Chapel of the Savoy is a chapel off the Strand, London, dedicated to St John the Baptist. It was originally built in the Middle Ages off the main church of the Savoy Palace (later the Savoy Hospital). The Hospital was in ruins by the 19th century, and the Chapel was the only part to survive demolition. The original chapel was within Peter of Savoy's palace, and was destroyed with it in the Peasants' Revolt in 1381. The present Chapel building was constructed in the 1490s (and finished in 1512) by Henry VII as a side chapel off his Hospital's 200-foot (61 m) long nave (this nave was secular rather than sacred, held 100 beds, and was demolished in the 19th century). The chapel has been the host to various other congregations, most especially that of St Mary-le-Strand whilst it had no church building of its own 1549–1714. Also the German Lutheran congregation of Westminster (now at Sandwich Street and Thanet Street, near St Pancras) was granted royal permission to worship here, when it split from Holy Trinity (the City of London Lutheran congregation, now at St Anne and St Agnes). The new congregation's first pastor, Irenaeus Crusius (previously an
    6.50
    2 votes
    169
    Uppsala Cathedral

    Uppsala Cathedral

    • People interred here: Gustav I of Sweden
    Uppsala Cathedral (Swedish: Uppsala domkyrka) is a cathedral located centrally in the city of Uppsala, Sweden. It dates back to the late 13th century and at a height of 118.7 m is the tallest church building in Scandinavia. Originally built under Roman Catholicism and used for coronations of the Swedish monarch, since the Protestant Reformation, it has been controlled by the Lutheran Church of Sweden. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Uppsala, the primate of Sweden. The construction of the cathedral be the archbishopric was moved from Old Uppsala (Swedish: Gamla Uppsala). It took more than a century to complete. When inaugurated in 1435 under archbishop Olaus Laurentii, the cathedral was not completely finished. It was dedicated to Saint Lawrence, highly cherished in all of Sweden at that time; Saint Eric, the patron of Sweden (though never canonised by the Roman Catholic Church); and Saint Olaf, the patron of Norway. It was completed within the following decades. Between 1885-1893, the architect Helgo Zettervall (1831-1907) oversaw a second restoration, intending for the cathedral a French Gothic revival appearance, which was popular in the late 19th century. The original,
    6.50
    2 votes
    170
    Ypres

    Ypres

    • People interred here: Prince Maurice of Battenberg
    Ypres (/ˈiːprə/; French pronunciation: [ipʁ]; Dutch: Ieper, pronounced [ˈipər]) is a Belgian municipality located in the Flemish province of West Flanders. Though Ieper is the Dutch and local name, Ypres is most commonly used in English. The municipality comprises the city of Ypres and the villages of Boezinge, Brielen, Dikkebus, Elverdinge, Hollebeke, Sint-Jan, Vlamertinge, Voormezele, Zillebeke, and Zuidschote. Together, they count some 34,900 inhabitants. During World War I, Ypres was the centre of intense and sustained battles between the German and the Allied forces. During the war, due to it being hard to pronounce in English, British troops nicknamed the city "Wipers". Ypres is an ancient town, known to have been raided by the Romans in the first century BC. During the Middle Ages, Ypres was a prosperous Flemish city with a population of 40,000, renowned for its linen trade with England, which was mentioned in the Canterbury Tales. As the third largest city in the County of Flanders (after Ghent and Bruges) Ypres played an important role in the history of the textile industry. Textiles from Ypres could be found on the markets of Novgorod in Russia in the early 12th century.
    6.50
    2 votes
    171
    Zhaoling

    Zhaoling

    • People interred here: Hong Taiji
    Zhaoling (Chinese: 昭陵; pinyin: Zhàolíng; Lit: Luminous Tomb), also known as Beiling (Northern Tomb) is the mausoleum of the second Qing emperor, Huang Taji, and his empress Xiaoduanwen Borjite. The tomb is located within Beiling Park, in the northern part of Shenyang, in Liaoning province, and is a popular area attraction. The tomb complex took eight years to build (between 1643 and 1651) and has a row of animal statues leading to it. The tomb and surrounding park cover an area of 3,300,000 square metres making it the largest of the three imperial tombs north of the great wall. The area around the tomb was originally set aside for imperial use and ordinary people were forbidden entry. This forbidden area was opened to the public in 1928 and now forms Shenyang's Beiling park. The site is aligned on a north-south axis set west of Shenyang city's old north axis. This access forms the sacred way of about 1.2km that leads from the park gate to the tomb buildings. The way itself is made in three paths. The centre path was for the deities only or bearers of offerings. The path of the lefthand (west) of the sacred way was for the ruling emperor and the righthand (east) path was for
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Haifa

    Haifa

    • People interred here: Mike Brant
    Haifa (Hebrew: חֵיפָה‎‎, Hebrew pronunciation: [χeiˈfä], Ḥefa; Arabic: حيفا‎ Ḥayfā) is the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country, with a population of over 268,000. Another 300,000 people live in towns directly adjacent to the city including the cities of the Krayot, as well as, Tirat Carmel, Daliyat al-Karmel, some Kibuzim and Nesher. Together these areas form a contiguous urban area home to nearly 600,000 residents which makes up the inner core of the Haifa metropolitan area. Haifa is a mixed city: 90% are Jews, more than a quarter of whom are immigrants from the former Soviet Union, while 10% are Arabs, predominantly of the Christian religion. It is also home to the Bahá'í World Centre, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Built on the slopes of Mount Carmel, the history of settlement at the site spans more than 3,000 years. The earliest known settlement in the vicinity was Tell Abu Hawam, a small port city established in the Late Bronze Age (14th century BCE). In the 3rd century CE, Haifa was known as a dye-making center. Over the centuries, the city has changed hands: It has been conquered and ruled by the Phoenicians, Persians, Hasmoneans,
    4.75
    4 votes
    173
    Acapulco

    Acapulco

    • People interred here: Johnny Weissmuller
    Acapulco (officially known as Acapulco de Juárez) is a city, municipality and major sea port in the state of Guerrero on the Pacific coast of Mexico, 300 kilometres (190 mi) southwest from Mexico City. Acapulco is located on a deep, semi-circular bay and has been a port since the early colonial period of Mexico’s history. It is a port of call for shipping and cruising lines running between Panama and San Francisco, California, United States. The city of Acapulco is the largest in the state, far larger than the state capital Chilpancingo. Acapulco is also Mexico's largest beach and balneario resorted city. The city is best known as one of Mexico’s oldest and most well-known beach resorts, which came into prominence by the 1950s as a getaway for Hollywood stars and millionaires. Acapulco is still famous for its nightlife and still attracts many vacationers, although most are now from Mexico itself. The resort area is divided into two: The north end of the bay is the "traditional" area, where the famous in the mid 20th century vacationed and the south end is dominated by newer luxury high rise hotels. The name "Acapulco" comes from Nahuatl language Aca-pōl-co, and means "where were
    7.00
    1 votes
    174
    Atlanta

    Atlanta

    • People interred here: Alfred Iverson, Jr.
    Atlanta ( /ətˈlæntə/, stressed /ætˈlæntə/, locally  /ætˈlænə/) is the capital of and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia, with a 2010 population of 420,003. Atlanta is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, home to 5,268,860 people and the ninth largest metropolitan area in the country. Atlanta is the county seat of Fulton County, and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County. Atlanta was established in 1847 at the intersection of two railroad lines, and the city rose from the ashes of the Civil War to become a national center of commerce. In the decades following the Civil Rights Movement, during which the city earned a reputation as "too busy to hate" for the progressive views of its citizens and leaders, Atlanta attained international prominence. Atlanta is the primary transportation hub of the Southeastern United States via highway, railroad, and air, with Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport being the world's busiest airport since 1998. Atlanta is considered an "alpha(-) world city," and, with a gross domestic product of US$270 billion, Atlanta’s economy ranks 15th among world cities and sixth in the
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Christ Church Burial Ground

    Christ Church Burial Ground

    • People interred here: Benjamin Franklin
    Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is an important early-American cemetery. It is the final resting place of Benjamin Franklin and his wife, Deborah. Four other signers of the Declaration of Independence are buried here, Dr. Benjamin Rush, Francis Hopkinson, Joseph Hewes and George Ross. Two more signers are buried at Christ Church just a few blocks away. The cemetery belongs to Christ Church, the Anglican church founded in 1695 and place of worship for many of the famous Revolutionary War participants, including George Washington. The burial ground is located at 5th and Arch Streets, across from the Visitors Center and National Constitution Center. The Burial Ground was started in 1719, and it is still an active graveyard. 100,000 tourists visit each year, many leaving pennies on Franklin's grave. The cemetery is open to the public for a small fee, weather permitting. Once closed, one can still view Benjamin Franklin's gravesite through iron rails. The iron rails in the brick wall were added for public viewing at the request of Franklin's descendants in 1858. Other famous people buried at Christ Church Burial Ground are:
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    1 votes
    176
    El Escorial

    El Escorial

    • People interred here: Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
    El Escorial is a municipality in the Autonomous Community of Madrid, located 45 km (28 mi) northwest of the Spanish capital Madrid. It belongs to the comarca of Cuenca del Guadarrama. Its population in 2009 was 14,979. The territory of El Escorial is home to the park of La Granjilla de la Fresneda. The famous Royal Seat of San Lorenzo de El Escorial also known as Monasterio de El Escorial or El Escorial, is located in the adjacent municipality of San Lorenzo de El Escorial. On the outskirts of San Lorenzo de El Escorial is the national memorial Valle de los Caídos (Valley of the Fallen). The name of the town derives from slag (escoria) deposits from an old local foundry. The municipality of El Escorial contains a RENFE commuter train station connecting the area to Madrid. Media related to El Escorial at Wikimedia Commons
    7.00
    1 votes
    177
    Mirow

    Mirow

    • People interred here: Augusta of Cambridge
    Mirow (German pronunciation: [ˈmiːʁoː]) is a city in the district of Mecklenburgische Seenplatte in southern Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. Mirow lies in the middle of the Mecklenburg Lake District (Mecklenburgische Seenplatte) on the southern shore of Lake Mirow, which is connected to the Müritz and the Havel by a system of lakes, rivers, and canals. There are several more lakes on the territory of this municipality. The neighboring towns of Diemitz, Fleeth, Granzow, Peetsch, and Starsow were incorporated into the city in 2004 and are now part of the municipality. In 1227, the Order of St. John founded a commandry on the shore of Lake Mirow after Duke Borwin II had given them land there. In 1701, the town became part of the duchy of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. In 1919, it gained town privileges. Mirow is the birthplace of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Oradea

    Oradea

    • People interred here: Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor
    Oradea (Romanian pronunciation: [oˈrade̯a]; German: Großwardein, Hungarian: Nagyvárad, Hungarian pronunciation: [nɒɟvaːrɒd], colloquially also Várad, former Turkish: Varat, Yiddish: גרויסווארדיין Groysvardeyn) the capital city of Bihor County and Crișana region, is one of the important centers of economic, social and cultural development of the western part of Romania, retaining these characteristics throughout history. The city is nestled between the hills that separate and unify in a harmonious way and ends with plain Crisana hilly aspect of the Apuseni Mountains. Located on the banks Crisul Repede river, the river that divides the city into almost equal halves, it is the gateway to Central and Western European world. Depending on the main points of the compass, the city is located in the north-west of Romania, at the intersection of parallel 47 ° 03 'north latitude with meridian 21 ° 55' east longitude. Located about 10 km from Bors, the biggest point of the border on the west border, Oradea ranks tenth in size among the cities. More specifically, it covers an area of 11,556 ha. The city is at an altitude of 126 m above sea level, in the opening of the Cris valley and the plain
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Sorø Klosterkirke

    Sorø Klosterkirke

    • People interred here: Valdemar IV Atterdag of Denmark
    Sorø Klosterkirke (i.e. Sorø Abbey Church) is located in the Danish town of Sorø. It was founded by Danish archbishop Absalon and built by Cistercians in the period from 1161-1201. It is made of red brick, which was a new material for the time. It is built similar style to the Abbey of Fontenay. The church contains royal graves.
    7.00
    1 votes
    180
    La Brique Military Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemeteries

    La Brique Military Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemeteries

    • People interred here: Alfred George Drake
    La Brique Military Cemeteries No 1 and No 2 are Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) burial grounds for the dead of the First World War located in the Ypres Salient on the Western Front. The cemetery grounds were assigned to the United Kingdom in perpetuity by King Albert I of Belgium in recognition of the sacrifices made by the British Empire in the defence and liberation of Belgium during the war. The cemetery, named after a now-lost brickworks near to the site, is divided in two by the main road. Cemetery No 1 was founded in May 1915 and used until December 1915. It is the smaller of the two. Cemetery No 2 was founded in February 1915 and was used until March 1918. Originally containing 383 graves, the cemetery was expanded by concentration of graves from the battlefield after the Armistice. It now contains 840 graves. One of the graves concentrated in Cemetery No 2 was originally in the now-gone Kemmel No 2 French Cemetery. See also Kemmel No 1 French Cemetery. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield. Cemetery No 2 holds the last resting place of 22-year-old Corporal Alfred George Drake, who was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery.
    5.33
    3 votes
    181
    Wareham

    Wareham

    • People interred here: Edward the Martyr
    Wareham (/ˈwɛərəm/ WAIR-əm) is an historic market town and, under the name Wareham Town, a civil parish, in the English county of Dorset. The town is situated on the River Frome eight miles (13 km) southwest of Poole. The town is built on a strategic dry point between the River Frome and the River Piddle at the head of the Wareham Channel of Poole Harbour. The Frome Valley runs through an area of unresistant sand, clay and gravel rocks, and much of its valley has wide flood plains and marsh land. At its estuary the river has formed the wide shallow ria of Poole Harbour. Wareham is built on a low dry island between the marshy river plains. The town is situated on the A351 Lytchett Minster-Swanage road and at the eastern terminus of the A352 road to Dorchester and Sherborne, both roads now bypassing the town centre. The town has a station on the South Western Main Line railway, and was formerly the junction station for services along the branch line to Swanage, now preserved as the Swanage Railway. The steam railway has ambitions to extend its service, currently from Swanage to Norden, near Corfe Castle back to Worgret Junction (where the mainline and branch divided) and into Wareham
    5.33
    3 votes
    182
    Bergen

    Bergen

    • People interred here: Margaret, Maid of Norway
    Bergen (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈbærɡən]  ( listen)) is a city and municipality in Hordaland on the west coast of Norway. As of 18 October 2012, the municipality had a population of 267,000 and Greater Bergen had a population of 392,600, making Bergen the second-largest city in Norway. The municipality covers an area of 465 square kilometers (180 sq mi) and is located on the peninsula of Bergenshalvøyen. The city center and northern neighborhoods are located on Byfjorden and the city is built around the Seven Mountains. Many of the extra-municipal suburbs are located on islands. Bergen is the administrative center of Hordaland and consists of eight boroughs—Arna, Årstad, Åsane, Bergenhus, Fana, Fyllingsdalen, Laksevåg and Ytrebygda. Trading in Bergen may have started as early as the 1020s, but the city was not incorporated until 1070. It served as Norway's capital from 1217 to 1299, and from the end of the 13th century became a bureau city of the Hanseatic League. Until 1789, Bergen enjoyed exclusive rights to mediate trade between Northern Norway and abroad. The remains of the quays, Bryggen, is a World Heritage Site. The city was hit by numerous fires. The Norwegian School of
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    2 votes
    183
    Inveresk

    Inveresk

    • People interred here: Laura Lee
    Inveresk (Gaelic: Inbhir Easg) is a village in East Lothian, Scotland situated immediately to the south of Musselburgh. It forms one of the finest conservation areas in Scotland having been designated a conservation area since 1969. It is situated on slightly elevated ground on the north bank of a loop of the River Esk. This ridge of ground, 20 to 25 metres above sea level, was used by the Romans as the location for a fort in the second century AD. The element "Inver", from the Gaelic inbhir, refers to the confluence of the river Esk with the Firth of Forth. The village was formerly in the Midlothian district of the same name and developed distinctly from the separate burgh of Musselburgh. Inveresk is notable for its fine street of 17th and 18th century houses. Inveresk Lodge is now privately leased, but the adjacent Inveresk Lodge Garden belongs to the National Trust for Scotland, and its west facing gardens overlooking the river Esk are open to the public. This was formerly the mansion of James Wedderburn who had made his fortune as a slave-owning sugar plantation owner in Jamaica. When his son by one of his slaves, Robert Wedderburn, travelled to Inveresk to claim his kinship he
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Mount Royal Cemetery

    Mount Royal Cemetery

    • People interred here: David Thompson
    Opened in 1852, Mount Royal Cemetery is a 165-acre (668 000 m²) terraced cemetery on the north slope of Mount Royal in the borough of Outremont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The burial ground shares the mountain with the much larger adjacent Roman Catholic cemetery -- Cimetière Notre-Dame-des-Neiges. Mount Royal Cemetery is now bordered on the southeast by Mount Royal Park, on the west by Notre-Dame-des-Neiges Cemetery and on the north by two Jewish cemeteries. Mount Royal Cemetery is in operation and even the old portion of the cemetery still has some burial sites available. In the middle of the 1800s, the cemeteries located downtown needed space desperately. Concerned with epidemics and public health issues, these cemeteries had to be developed elsewhere.The Protestant community of Montreal purchased, in 1851, a section of Mount Royal that belonged to Dr. Michael McCulloch. The Mount Royal Cemetery, one of the first rural cemeteries in North America, was incorporated in 1847 under an Act of the Provincial Parliament of Canada. Following the trend of the American rural cemetery movement, the purpose of choosing land on the mountain was to use the natural surroundings to combine
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Roskilde Cathedral

    Roskilde Cathedral

    • People interred here: Louise of Great Britain
    Roskilde Cathedral (Danish: Roskilde Domkirke), in the city of Roskilde on the island of Zealand (Sjælland) in eastern Denmark, is a cathedral of the Lutheran Church of Denmark. The first Gothic cathedral to be built of brick, it encouraged the spread of the Brick Gothic style throughout Northern Europe. Constructed during the 12th and 13th centuries, the cathedral incorporates both Gothic and Romanesque architectural features in its design. Until the 20th century, it was Zealand's only cathedral. Its twin spires dominate the skyline of the town. The cathedral has been the main burial site for Danish monarchs since the 15th century. As such, it has been significantly extended and altered over the centuries to accommodate a considerable number of burial chapels. Following the Danish Reformation in 1536, the bishop's residence was moved to Copenhagen while the title was changed to Bishop of Zealand. Coronations normally took place in Copenhagen's Church of Our Lady or in the chapel of Frederiksborg Palace. The cathedral is a major tourist attraction, bringing in over 125,000 visitors annually. Since 1995, it has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. A working church, it also
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Shlisselburg

    Shlisselburg

    • People interred here: Ivan VI of Russia
    Shlisselburg (Russian: Шлиссельбург; IPA: [ʂlʲɪsʲɪlʲˈburk]; German: Schlüsselburg; Swedish: Nöteborg) is a town in Leningrad Oblast, Russia, located at the head of the Neva River on Lake Ladoga, 35 kilometers (22 mi) east of St. Petersburg. From 1944 to 1992, it was known as Petrokrepost. Population: 13,170 (2010 Census); 12,401 (2002 Census); 12,589 (1989 Census). The fortress and the city center are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The first fortification was built in 1299 by Lord High Constable of Sweden Torgils Knutsson but was lost to the Novgorodians in 1301. A wooden fortress named Oreshek (also Orekhov) ("Nutlet") was built by Grand Prince Yury of Moscow (in his capacity as Prince of Novgorod) on behalf of the Novgorod Republic in 1323. It guarded the northern approaches to Novgorod and access to the Baltic Sea. The fortress is situated on Orekhovets Island, whose name, refers to nuts in Swedish and (Pähkinäsaari, "Nut Island") in Finnish and Russian. After a series of conflicts, a peace treaty, was signed at Oreshek on August 12, 1323, between Sweden and Grand Prince Yury and the Novgorod Republic which was the first agreement on the border between Eastern and Western
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Sorø

    Sorø

    • People interred here: Olav IV of Norway
    Sorø is a town in Sorø municipality in Region Sjælland on the island of Zealand (Sjælland) in east Denmark. The population is 7,764 (1 January 2012). The municipal council and the regional council are located in Sorø. Sorø was founded in 1161 by Bishop Absalon, later the founder of Copenhagen, and is the site of Sorø Academy (Danish Sorø Akademi). The Academy is an educational institution built in 1140. Also built that year was Sorø Klosterkirke, the church where Bishop Absalon and Margaret I of Denmark were buried (she was later moved to Roskilde Domkirke, Roskilde). Many people live in Sorø, but work either in the greater Copenhagen metropolitan area or in the town of Roskilde.
    6.00
    2 votes
    188
    Gorizia

    Gorizia

    • People interred here: Henri, Comte de Chambord
    Gorizia  listen (help·info) (Friulian: Gurize, German: Görz, Slovene: Gorica) is a town and comune in northeastern Italy, in the autonomous region of Friuli Venezia Giulia. It is located at the foot of the Julian Alps, bordering Slovenia. It is the capital of the Province of Gorizia, and it is a local center of tourism, industry, and commerce. Since 1947, a twin town of Nova Gorica has developed on the other side of the modern-day Italian-Slovenian border: the entire region was subject to territorial dispute between Italy and Yugoslavia during the period of early development, by the time the boundaries were marked and agreed by both parties, Nova Gorica came to stand on the Yugoslav side as this area marked one section of the new threshold. Both towns constitute a conurbation, which also includes the Slovenian municipality of Šempeter-Vrtojba. Since May 2011, these three towns are joined in a common trans-border metropolitan zone, administered by a joint administration board. Gorizia is located at the confluence of the Isonzo and Vipava Valleys. It lies in a plain overlooked by the Collio hills, which are renowned for the production of outstanding wines. Sheltered from the north by
    5.00
    3 votes
    189
    Springfield

    Springfield

    • People interred here: Abraham Lincoln
    Springfield is the third and current capital of the US state of Illinois and the county seat of Sangamon County with a population of 116,250 (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2010), making it the sixth most populated city in the state and the second most populated Illinois city outside of the Chicago Metropolitan Area. It is the largest city in central Illinois. Just over 208,000 residents live in the Springfield Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Sangamon County and adjacent Menard County. Present day Springfield was first settled in the late 1810s, around the time Illinois became a state. The most famous past resident is Abraham Lincoln, who lived in Springfield itself from 1837 until he went to the White House in 1861. Major tourist attractions include a multitude of historic sites connected with Lincoln. In 1908 a large race riot erupted in the city which culminated in the lynching of two African American residents and led to the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The city lies on a mostly flat plain which encompasses much of the surrounding countryside. There is more hilly terrain near the Sangamon River. Lake Springfield,
    5.00
    3 votes
    190
    Abney Park Cemetery

    Abney Park Cemetery

    • People interred here: Thomas Wilson
    Abney Park in Stoke Newington, in the London Borough of Hackney, is a historic parkland originally laid out in the early 18th century by Lady Mary Abney and Dr. Isaac Watts, and the neighbouring Hartopp family. In 1840 it became a non-denominational garden cemetery, a semi-public park arboretum, and an educational institute, which was widely celebrated as an example of its time. Abney Park is one of the Magnificent Seven London cemeteries. A total number of 196,843 burials took place here as of the year 2000. It is a Local Nature Reserve. The official address of Abney Park is Stoke Newington High Street, N16. The main gate is at the junction of this street and Rectory Road, with a smaller gate on Stoke Newington Church Street. The park lies within the London Borough of Hackney. In 1840, Abney Park opened as a model garden cemetery, a pioneering non-denominational place of rest. Its approach was based on the Congregational church's role in the London Missionary Society (LMS), whose fundamental principle was to develop a wholly non-denominational exemplar. It also drew on American burial ideas, specifically Mount Auburn in Massachusetts. At first there were many links between Abney
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Cajamarca

    Cajamarca

    • People interred here: Atahualpa
    Cajamarca (Spanish pronunciation: [kaxaˈmaɾka]) is located in the northern highlands of Peru and is the capital of the Cajamarca region. It is approximately 2,700 m (8,900 ft) above sea level and has a population of about 240,000 people. Cajamarca has an equatorial climate so it is mild, dry and sunny, which creates very fertile soil. The city is well known for its cheeses and dairy products. Cajamarca is also known for its churches, and hot springs, or Inca Baths. There are also several active mining sites in surrounding areas. Most of all, Peruvians remember Cajamarca as the place where the Inca Empire came to an end; the Battle of Cajamarca and the capture, abuse, and murder of the Incan emperor Atahualpa took place here. The origin of the city goes back over 2000 years. Traces of pre-Chavín cultures can be seen in surrounding archaeological sites such as Cumbe Mayo and Kuntur Wasi. During the period between 1463 and 1471, Tupac Inca conquered the area and brought Cajamarca into the Tawantinsuyu, or Inca Empire, which at the time was still being ruled by Tupac's father Pachacuti. Cajamarca's place in history is secured by the events of 1532. Atahualpa had beaten his brother
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    2 votes
    192
    Luther Burbank Home and Gardens

    Luther Burbank Home and Gardens

    • People interred here: Luther Burbank
    Luther Burbank Home and Gardens (1 acre) is a city park containing the former home, greenhouse, gardens, and grave of noted American horticulturist Luther Burbank (1849-1926). It is located at the intersection of Santa Rosa Avenue and Sonoma Avenue in Santa Rosa, California, in the United States. The park is open daily without charge; a fee is charged for guided tours. It is designated as a National Historic Landmark as well as a California Historical Landmark (#234). Burbank lived in Santa Rosa for more than 50 years, and performed the bulk of his life's work at this location. From 1884 to 1906 he lived in this park's Greek Revival house; he then moved across Tupper street to a house that no longer exists. After Burbank's death in 1926, his widow Elizabeth moved back to the house, where she remained until her death in 1977. The gardens include many of Burbank's horticultural introductions, with collections of cactus, fruit trees, ornamental grasses, medicinal herbs, roses, and walnuts. Most plants are labeled with botanic and common names. The garden's greenhouse was designed and built by Burbank in 1889; Burbank's grave is nearby. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Umayyad Mosque

    Umayyad Mosque

    • People interred here: Saladin
    The Umayyad Mosque, also known as the Great Mosque of Damascus (Arabic: جامع بني أمية الكبير‎, transliteration Ğām' Banī 'Umayya al-Kabīr) or formerly the Basilica of Saint John the Baptist (Greek: Βασιλική του Αγίου Ιωάννη του Βαπτιστή, transliteration Vasilikí tou Agíou Ioánni tou Vaptistí), located in the old city of Damascus, is one of the largest and oldest mosques in the world. It is considered the fourth-holiest place in Islam. After the Arab conquest of Damascus in 634, the mosque was built on the site of a Christian basilica dedicated to John the Baptist (Yahya). The mosque holds a shrine which today may still contain the head of John the Baptist, honored as a prophet by both Christians and Muslims alike, and is believed to be the place where Isa (Jesus) will return at the End of Days. The tomb of Saladin stands in a small garden adjoining the north wall of the mosque. Damascus was the capital of the Aramaean state Aram-Damascus during the Iron Age. The Arameans of western Syria followed the cult of Hadad-Ramman, the god of thunderstorms and rain, and erected a temple dedicated to him at the site of the present-day Umayyad Mosque. It is not known exactly how the temple
    5.50
    2 votes
    194
    Adhamiyah

    Adhamiyah

    • People interred here: Faisal II of Iraq
    Al-Adhamiyah (Arabic: ألأعظمية, al-aʿẓamiyyah; BGN: Al A‘z̧amīyah), also Azamiya, is a neighborhood and east-central district of the city of Baghdad, Iraq. Adhamiyah is located to the north-west of the city center and is a relatively upscale area with a predominately Sunni Muslim population. It has 300,000 inhabitants. The base of the population of Adhamiya consists of people with a high intellectual background, whether it be politicians, artists, scholars and even sport's figures. The name is a reference to Abū Hanīfah an-Nuʿmān, a renowned scholar and founder of the prominent Sunni Hanafī School of Islamic Religious Jurisprudence. Abu Hanifa Mosque is also a prominent landmark of the area, where Abu Hanifa an-Nu‘man is buried. Adhamiyah is one of nine administrative districts in Baghdad. The Al Nuaman Hospital is located in Adhamiyah, as is a royal cemetery for Sunnis. Adhamiyah neighborhood is one of the oldest areas of Baghdad; it dates back to the Abbasid period. Although Adhamiyah has been the site of many clashes between Iraqi insurgents and US forces as well as tensions between Shi'a security forces and Sunni residents, in September 2005, the residents of Adhamiyah were
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    Cathedral of the Archangel

    Cathedral of the Archangel

    • People interred here: Ivan V of Russia
    The Cathedral of the Archangel (Russian: Архангельский собор, or Arkhangelsky sobor) is a Russian Orthodox church dedicated to the Archangel Michael. It is located in Cathedral Square of the Moscow Kremlin in Russia between the Great Kremlin Palace and the Ivan the Great Bell Tower. It was the main necropolis for members of the Tsars of Russia until the relocation of the capital to St. Petersburg. It was constructed between 1505 and 1508 under the supervision of an Italian architect Aleviz Fryazin Noviy on the spot of an older cathedral, built in 1333. A precursor to the present cathedral was built in 1250, and was replaced with a stone church in 1333 by Grand Duke Ivan Kalita, who would later become the first Russian monarch to be buried in the church. In 1505, Grand Duke Ivan III, already in the midst of major renovation project for the Kremlin, turned his attention to the church, as in the case of the rebuilding of the Assumption Cathedral two decades earlier, turned to architects from Italy for assistance. A Milanese, Lamberti Aloisio da Mantagnana was invited to Moscow, and ground was broke for a new cathedral on 21 May 1505. Ivan died in the autumn of the same year, and was
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Covington City

    Covington City

    • People interred here: Gary L. Miller
    Covington is an independent city in the U.S. state of Virginia, located at the confluence of Jackson River and Dunlap Creek. It is surrounded by Alleghany County, of which it is also the county seat. The population was 5,961 in 2010. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Covington with Alleghany county for statistical purposes. Covington is one of three cities (with Roanoke and Salem) in the Roanoke Regional Partnership. The current mayor of Covington is Robert Bennett. The city's media and news needs are served by The Virginian Review newspaper, which has been continuously published since August 10, 1914, and by AM radio station WKEY. Fire protection is provided by the Covington Fire Department, which was chartered on March 4, 1902. The Covington Rescue Squad provides emergency medical services to the city of Covington. Both the fire department and rescue squad are volunteer organizations. The rescue squad was organized in 1933 and is the third oldest volunteer rescue squad in Virginia. Covington is named in honor of General Leonard Covington, hero of the War of 1812 and friend of James Madison and Thomas Jefferson. The city has a rich history and heritage and today
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Gotha

    Gotha

    • People interred here: Prince Alfred of Edinburgh and Saxe-Coburg-Gotha
    Gotha is a town in Thuringia, within the central core of Germany. It is the capital of the district of Gotha. The town has existed at least since the 8th century, when it was mentioned in a document signed by Charlemagne as Villa Gotaha ("Good Waters"). Its importance derives from having been chosen in 1640 as the capital of the Duchy of Saxe-Gotha. In the 18th century, the extended séjour of the French philosopher Voltaire turned the court into one of the centres of the Enlightenment in Germany. From 1826 to 1918, Gotha was one of the two capitals of the Duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. Gotha has played an important role in the German workers' movement. The German socialist party (SPD) was founded in Gotha in 1875, through the merger of two organizations: the Social Democratic Workers' Party, led by August Bebel and Wilhelm Liebknecht, and the General German Workers' Association, founded by Ferdinand Lassalle. A compromise known as the Gotha Program was forged, although it had been strongly criticized by Karl Marx for its reformist bias in his Critique of the Gotha Program. This is the city where the famous psychologist and anthropologist Theodor Waitz was born in 1821. Gotha also has
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Iran

    Iran

    • People interred here: Naser al-Din Shah Qajar
    Iran (/ɪˈrɑːn/ or /aɪˈræn/; Persian: ایران‎ [ʔiˈɾɒn] ( listen)), officially the Islamic Republic of Iran (Persian: جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎, Jomhuri-ye Eslāmi-ye Irān), is a country in Western Asia. The name "Iran", which in Persian means "Land of the Aryans", has been in native use since the Sassanian era. It came into use internationally in 1935, before which the country was known to the Western world as Persia ( /ˈpɜrʒə/ or /ˈpɜrʃə/). Both "Persia" and "Iran" are used interchangeably in cultural contexts; however, "Iran" is the name used officially in political contexts. The 18th-largest country in the world in terms of area at 1,648,195 km (636,372 sq mi), Iran has a population of around 75 million. It is a country of particular geopolitical significance owing to its location in three spheres of Asia (West, Central, and South). Iran is bordered on the north by Armenia, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan. As Iran is a littoral state of the Caspian Sea, which is an inland sea, Kazakhstan and Russia are also Iran's direct neighbors to the north. Iran is bordered on the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan, on the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, on the west by Iraq and on the
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Massachusetts

    Massachusetts

    • People interred here: Edwin Leonard
    Massachusetts (/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɨts/), officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is a U.S. state in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America. It is bordered by Rhode Island and Connecticut to the south, New York to the west, and Vermont and New Hampshire to the north; at its east lies the Atlantic Ocean. Massachusetts is the 7th least extensive, but the 14th most populous and the 3rd most densely populated of the 50 United States. The commonwealth features two separate metropolitan areas: Greater Boston in the east and the Springfield metropolitan area in the west. Approximately two thirds of the commonwealth's population lives in Greater Boston, most of which is either urban or suburban. Western Massachusetts features one urban area – the Knowledge Corridor along the Connecticut River – and a mix of college towns and rural areas. Many of Massachusetts' towns, cities, and counties have names identical to ones in England. Massachusetts is the most populous of the six New England states and has the US's sixth highest GDP per capita. Massachusetts has played a significant historical, cultural, and commercial role in American history. Plymouth was the site of
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Newport, Isle of Wight

    Newport, Isle of Wight

    • People interred here: Princess Elizabeth of England
    Newport is a civil parish and a county town of the Isle of Wight, an island off the south coast of England. Newport has a population of 23,957 according to the 2001 census. The town is situated slightly to the north of the centre of the Island, at the head of the navigable section of the River Medina, which flows northward to the Solent, and on which the town has a quay. There are signs of Roman settlement in the area, which was probably known as Medina, including two known Roman villas one of which, Newport Roman Villa, is excavated and open to the public. There was little later use until after the Norman conquest with the first charter being granted late in the twelfth century. In 1377 an invading French force burnt down much of the town while attempting to take Carisbrooke Castle, then under the command of Sir Hugh Tyrill. A group of French were captured and killed, then buried in a tumulus later nicknamed Noddies Hill, a "noddy" being medieval slang for a body. This was later corrupted to Nodehill, the present-day name for a part of central Newport – a name confusing to many as the area is flat. In 1648 Charles I and a group of Parliamentary Commissioners concluded the Treaty
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    1 votes
    201
    Avery Island

    Avery Island

    • People interred here: Walter Stauffer McIlhenny
    Avery Island (historically French: Île Petite Anse) is a salt dome best known as the source of Tabasco sauce. Located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana, United States, it is about three miles (5 km) inland from Vermilion Bay, which in turn opens onto the Gulf of Mexico. A small human population lives on the island. The island was named after the Avery family, who settled there in the 1830s, but long before that, American Indians had found that Avery Island’s verdant flora covered a precious natural resource—a massive salt dome. There the Indians boiled the Island’s briny spring water to extract salt, which they traded to other tribes as far away as central Texas, Arkansas, and Ohio. According to records maintained prior to 1999 in the Southern Historical Collection at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Petite Anse Island, renamed Avery Island in the late 19th century, was purchased by John Craig Marsh of New Jersey in 1818. Marsh operated a sugar plantation on the island's fertile soil. A daughter, Sarah Craig Marsh, married Daniel Dudley Avery in 1837, thus uniting the Marsh and Avery families. Daniel Dudley Avery hailed from Baton Rouge, and was a jurist. In 1849, Daniel
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    202
    Brookwood Cemetery

    Brookwood Cemetery

    • People interred here: Hamid Mirza
    Brookwood Cemetery, also known as the London Necropolis, is a burial ground in Brookwood, Surrey, England. It is the largest cemetery in the United Kingdom and one of the largest in western Europe. Brookwood Cemetery was established by the London Necropolis Company in 1849 to house London's deceased, since the capital was finding it difficult to accommodate its increasing population, both of living and dead. The cemetery is said to have been landscaped by architect William Tite, but this is disputed. By 1854, Brookwood was the largest cemetery in the world (it is no longer). Incorporation by Royal Act of Parliament in 1852, Brookwood Cemetery was consecrated by the Bishop of Winchester on 7 November 1854 and opened to the public on 13 November 1854. Over 235,000 people have been buried there. Brookwood originally was accessible by rail from a special station – the London Necropolis railway station – next to Waterloo station in London. Trains ran right into the cemetery on a branch from the South Western Main Line – the junction was situated just to the west of Brookwood station. The original London Necropolis station (near Waterloo) was relocated in 1902, but its successor was
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    203
    Kremlin Wall Necropolis

    Kremlin Wall Necropolis

    • People interred here: Kliment Voroshilov
    Burials in the Kremlin Wall Necropolis in Moscow began in November 1917, when 240 pro-Bolshevik victims of the October Revolution were buried in mass graves on Red Square. It is centered on both sides of Lenin's Mausoleum, initially built in wood in 1924 and rebuilt in granite in 1929–1930. After the last mass burial made in 1921, funerals on Red Square were usually conducted as state ceremonies and reserved as the last honor for the notable politicians, military leaders, cosmonauts and scientists. In 1925–1927 burials in the ground were stopped; funerals were now conducted as burials of cremated ash in the Kremlin wall itself. Burials in the ground only resumed with Mikhail Kalinin's funeral in 1946. The practice of burying dignitaries on Red Square ended with the funeral of Konstantin Chernenko in March 1985. The Kremlin Wall Necropolis was designated a protected landmark in 1974. The eastern segment of the Kremlin wall, and Red Square behind it, emerged on its present site in the 15th century, during the reign of Ivan III; the wall and the square were separated with a wide defensive moat filled with water diverted from the Neglinnaya River. The moat was lined with a secondary
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    204
    Elmira

    Elmira

    • People interred here: Susy Clemens
    Elmira [El-MY-ra] is a city in Chemung County, New York, USA. It is the principal city of the 'Elmira, New York Metropolitan Statistical Area' which encompasses Chemung County, New York. The population was 29,200 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Chemung County. The City of Elmira is located in the south-central part of the county, surrounded on three sides by the Town of Elmira. It is in the Southern Tier of New York a short distance north of the Pennsylvania state line. This was long an area inhabited by indigenous people. In historic times, it was occupied by the Cayuga nation of the Iroquois Confederacy, also called the Kanawaholla. They had some relations with Europeans and English over fur trading, but were relatively isolated from the encroaching settlements. During the American Revolutionary War, the Sullivan Expedition of 1779 was mounted against the four Iroquois nations who had allied with the British and Loyalist forces. It fought a combined British-Iroquois force at the Battle of Newtown, south of the current city, in which Sullivan and his forces were victorious. After the conclusion of the war, the Iroquois and the new United States made a treaty at Elmira
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    205
    Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park

    Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park

    • People interred here: Edward Hill
    Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park is a unit of the National Park Service in Fredericksburg, Virginia, and elsewhere in Spotsylvania County, commemorating four major battles in the American Civil War. The military park encompasses four major Civil War battlefields: Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of the Wilderness, and Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. It also preserves four historic buildings associated with them: Chatham Manor, Salem Church, Ellwood, and the house where Stonewall Jackson died. The ruins of the Chancellor family mansion are included. There are two visitor centers staffed by Park Service rangers, one in Fredericksburg near the foot of Marye's Heights, and another at the Chancellorsville site. Exhibit shelters are staffed on a seasonal basis at Wilderness and Spotsylvania Court House. Chatham Manor in Stafford County is open daily. All sites are free. The park was established as Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields Memorial National Military Park on February 14, 1927, and transferred from the War Department August 10, 1933. The lengthy name remains its official designation—75 letters, the longest name
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    206
    Sais

    Sais

    • People interred here: Psammetichus I
    Sais (Ancient Greek: Σάϊς) or Sa el-Hagar was an ancient Egyptian town in the Western Nile Delta on the Canopic branch of the Nile. It was the provincial capital of Sap-Meh, the fifth nome of Lower Egypt and became the seat of power during the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt (c. 732–720 BC) and the Saite Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (664–525 BC) during the Late Period. Its Ancient Egyptian name was Zau. Herodotus wrote that Sais is where the grave of Osiris was located and that the sufferings of the god were displayed as a mystery by night on an adjacent lake. The city's patron goddess was Neith, whose cult is attested as early as the 1st Dynasty, ca. 3100- 3050 BCE. The Greeks, such as Herodotus, Plato and Diodorus Siculus, identified her with Athena and hence postulated a primordial link to Athens. Diodorus recounts that Athena built Sais before the deluge that supposedly destroyed Athens and Atlantis. While all Greek cities were destroyed during that cataclysm, the Egyptian cities including Sais survived. In Plato's Timaeus and Critias (around 395 B.C., 200 years after the visit by the Greek Legislator Solon), Sais is the city in which Solon (Solon visited Egypt in 590 B.C.)
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    207
    Faversham Abbey

    Faversham Abbey

    • People interred here: Eustace IV of Boulogne
    Faversham Abbey was a Cluny style monastery immediately to the north-east of the town of Faversham in the county of Kent in England. It was founded by King Stephen and his queen, Matilda I of Boulogne, in 1148. A party of monks from Bermondsey Abbey provided the nucleus and the first abbot. The Abbey was dissolved in 1538 and subsequently most of it was demolished. Much of the building material was removed by military engineers and transported by sea to France, where it was used to strengthen the fortifications of the towns in the Pale of Calais, which at the time was England's continental bridgehead. Some of the domestic buildings remained in 1671, and about this time the refectory was dismantled and its timber re-used to create a long warehouse which still stands on Standard Quay nearby. Not long afterwards the final traces were removed and the exact site of the church was lost. Among the few surviving buildings of Faversham Abbey are the two Barns at Abbey Farm. The smaller (Minor) Barn dates from 1425 and the larger (Major) Barn dates from 1476. In the farmyard of which they form part there are other listed buildings, including Abbey Farmhouse, part of which dates from the 14th
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    208
    Glastonbury Abbey

    Glastonbury Abbey

    • People interred here: Edmund I of England
    Glastonbury Abbey was a monastery in Glastonbury, Somerset, England. The ruins are now a grade I listed building, and a Scheduled Ancient Monument and are open as a visitor attraction. The abbey was founded in the 7th century and enlarged in the 10th, before a major fire in 1184 destroyed the buildings. It was rebuilt and by the 14th century was one of the richest and most powerful monasteries in England. The abbey also controlled large tracts of surrounding land and was instrumental in major drainage projects on the Somerset Levels. The abbey was suppressed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII of England and the last Abbot Richard Whiting (Whyting) was hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor on Glastonbury Tor in 1539. From at least the 12th century the Glastonbury area was frequently associated with the legend of King Arthur, a connection promoted by medieval monks who asserted that Glastonbury was Avalon. Christian legends have also claimed that the abbey was founded by Joseph of Arimathea in the 1st century. Suggestions that Glastonbury may have been a site of religious importance in Celtic or pre-Celtic times are referred to as dubious by the
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    209
    Mendes

    Mendes

    • People interred here: Nefaarud I
    Mendes (Μένδης), the Greek name of the Ancient Egyptian city of Djedet, also known in Ancient Egypt as Per-Banebdjedet ("The Domain of the Ram Lord of Djedet") and Anpet, is known today as Tell El-Ruba (Arabic: تل الربع‎). The city is located in the eastern Nile delta (30°57′30″N 31°30′57″E / 30.95833°N 31.51583°E / 30.95833; 31.51583) and was the capital of the 16th Lower Egyptian nome of Kha, until it was replaced by Thmuis in Greco-Roman Egypt. The two cities are only several hundred meters apart. During the 29th dynasty, Mendes was also the capital of Ancient Egypt, which lies on the Mendesian branch of the Nile (now silted up), about 35 km east of al-Mansurah. In ancient times, Mendes was a famous city that attracted the notice of most ancient geographers and historians, including Herodotus (ii. 42, 46. 166), Diodorus (i. 84), Strabo (xvii. p. 802), Mela (i. 9 § 9), Pliny the Elder (v. 10. s. 12), Ptolemy (iv. 5. § 51), and Stephanus of Byzantium (s. v.). The city was the capital of the Mendesian nome, situated at the point where the Mendesian arm of the Nile (Μενδήσιον στόμα, Scylax, p. 43; Ptol. iv, 5. § 10; Mendesium ostium, Pliny, Mela, ll. cc.) flows into the lake of
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    210
    Montreal

    Montreal

    • People interred here: Karl Stern
    Montreal (/ˌmʌntriːˈɒl/; French: Montréal; pronounced [mɔ̃ʁeal] ( listen)) is a city in the Canadian province of Quebec. It is the largest city in the province, the second-largest in the country (after Toronto) and the fifteenth-largest in North America. Originally called Ville-Marie, or "City of Mary", named after Mount Royal, the triple-peaked hill located in the heart of the city, or Mont Réal as it was spelled in Middle French (Mont Royal in present French). The city is located on the Island of Montreal, which took its name from the same source as the city, and a few much smaller peripheral islands, the largest of which is Île Bizard. As of 2011, the city of Montreal had a population of 1,649,519. Montreal's metropolitan area (CMA) (land area 4,259 square kilometres (1,644 sq mi)) had an estimated metropolitan population of 3,824,221 and a population of 1,886,481 in the urban agglomeration of Montreal, all of the municipalities on the Island of Montreal included. French is the city's official language and is also the language spoken at home by 56.9% of the population in the city of Montreal proper, followed by English at 18.6% and 19.8% other languages (as of 2006 census). In
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    211
    Prüm

    Prüm

    • People interred here: Lothair I
    Prüm (German pronunciation: [ˈpʁʏm]) is a town in the Westeifel (Rhineland-Palatinate), Germany. Formerly a district capital, today it is the administrative seat of the Verbandsgemeinde ("collective municipality") Prüm. Prüm lies on the river Prüm (a tributary of the Sauer) at the southeastern end of the Schneifel, which is 697 m high. See main article on the town's former monastery, Prüm Abbey. Since 1980 it has not been possible to take the train to Prüm, with the exception of freight trains that operated up to the end of the 1990s. In December 2000 the last train went through Prüm, and this was a special event. Since that time, the rail tracks have been dismantled. The federal highway B265 and B410 cross in Prüm, the autobahn A60 and B51 also run near the city. Prüm Air Station is located just outside of Prüm, and this station is operated by the United States Air Force. In July and August Prüm Summer takes place. It begins with a market and a music competition on the streets on the last Sunday in June. During the next eight Thursdays, various guests meet at the town hall, where there are various competitions, such as a beer jug lift and trunk sawing. There is also a bicycle
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    212
    Rijnsburg

    Rijnsburg

    • People interred here: William I, Count of Holland
    Rijnsburg (population: 14,941 in 2004) is a community in the eastern part of the town of Katwijk, in the western Netherlands, in the province of South Holland. The name means Rhines Burg in Dutch. The history starts way before the 6th century when a town called ‘Rothulfuashem’ (Rudolfsheim). Later about 900 there was a stronghold, which could explain the current name of the village Rijnsburg, which means 'Rhine fortress' Rijnsburg used to be a separated municipality until 1 January 2006, when, together with Valkenburg, it was added to the municipality and city of Katwijk. Before that, the municipality covered an area of 6.07 km² (2.34 mile²) of which 0.21 km² (0.08 mile²) is water, and had a population of 14851 inhabitants on 1 June 2005. Rijnsburg's main claim to fame is that the philosopher Spinoza lived there from 1661 to 1663. The modest house in which he lived is still preserved, and can be visited. Rijnsburg is located in an area called the "Dune and Bulb Trek" (Duin- en Bollenstreek). An Abbey (a convent) was established by Petronilla, consort of Floris II, Count of Holland, in 1133. It flourished for many years. Two of her granddaughters, Sophie and Hedwig, would later join
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    213
    West Norwood Cemetery

    West Norwood Cemetery

    • People interred here: Michel Emmanuel Rodocanachi
    West Norwood Cemetery is a 40-acre (16 ha) cemetery in West Norwood in London, England. It was also known as the South Metropolitan Cemetery. One of the first private landscaped cemeteries in London, it is one of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries of London, and is a site of major historical, architectural and ecological interest. Its grounds are a mixture of historic monumental cemetery and modern lawn cemetery, but it also has catacombs, cremation plots and a columbarium for cinery ashes. The cemetery's crematorium still operates, and cremation plots are still available, but all the conventional burial plots have been allocated and hence it is closed to new burials pending further agreement under current burial legislation. The Main gate is located on Norwood Road near the junction with Robson Road, where Norwood Road forks into Norwood High Street and Knights' Hill. It is in the London Borough of Lambeth, (SE27). The local authority are the current owners. The site, with some of its neighbouring streets, forms part of a conservation area. Reckoned to hold the finest collection of sepulchral monuments in London, it features 69 Grade II and Grade II* listed buildings and structures,
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    214
    Albany

    Albany

    • People interred here: Charles Fort
    Albany (/ˈɔːlbəniː/ AWL-bə-nee) is the capital city of the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Albany County, and the central city of New York's Capital District. Roughly 150 miles (240 km) north of New York City, Albany sits on the west bank of the Hudson River, about 10 miles (16 km) south of its confluence with the Mohawk River. The population of the city was 97,856 at the time of the 2010 census. Albany has close ties with the nearby cities of Troy, Schenectady, and Saratoga Springs, forming a region called the Capital District. The bulk of this area is made up of the Albany-Schenectady-Troy Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Its 2010 population was 870,716, the fourth-largest urban area in New York State and the 58th-largest MSA in the country. Albany saw its first European settlement in 1614 and was officially chartered as a city in 1686. It became the capital of New York in 1797. It is one of the oldest surviving settlements from the original thirteen colonies, and the longest continuously chartered city in the United States. Modern Albany was founded as the Dutch trading posts of Fort Nassau in 1614 and Fort Orange in 1624; the fur trade brought in a population that
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    215
    Dijon

    Dijon

    • People interred here: Philip III, Duke of Burgundy
    Dijon (French pronunciation: [diʒɔ̃] ( listen)) is a city in eastern France, and is the capital of the Côte-d'Or département and of the Burgundy region. Dijon is the historical capital of the region of Burgundy. Population (2008): 151,576 within the city limits; 250,516 (2007) for the greater Dijon area. Dijon began as a Roman settlement called Divio, located on the road from Lyon to Paris. Saint Benignus, the city's patron saint, is said to have introduced Christianity to the area before being martyred. This province was home to the Dukes of Burgundy from the early 11th until the late 15th centuries and Dijon was a place of tremendous wealth and power and one of the great European centres of art, learning and science. The Duchy of Burgundy was a key in the transformation of medieval times toward early modern Europe. The Palais des ducs de Bourgogne (Palace of the Dukes of Burgundy) now houses city hall and a museum of medieval art. It was occupied by Nazi Germany between June 1940 and 12 September 1944, when it was liberated by joint French/UK/US forces. The average low of winter is -1°C (with average high of 4.2°C). The average high of summer is 25.3°C (average low 14.7°C).
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    Harbor Beach

    Harbor Beach

    • People interred here: Frank Murphy
    Harbor Beach is a city in Huron County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 1,837 at the 2000 census, with an estimated population of 1,587 in 2009. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,837 people, 774 households, and 503 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,036.3 per square mile (400.7/km²). There were 928 housing units at an average density of 523.5 per square mile (202.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.35% White, 0.11% African American, 0.49% Native American, 1.36% Asian, 0.38% from other races, and 1.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.93% of the population. There were 774 households out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.9% were non-families. 32.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.92. In the city the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 23.8% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to
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    217
    Lublin

    Lublin

    • People interred here: Meir Shapiro
    Lublin [ˈlublʲin] ( listen) (Ukrainian: Люблін, Liublin, Yiddish: לובלין Lublin) is the ninth largest city in Poland, and the second largest city of Lesser Poland. It is the capital of Lublin Voivodeship (province) with a population of 350,392 (June 2009). Lublin is also the largest Polish city east of the Vistula River. Lublin was a candidate for the title of European Capital of Culture in 2016. Lublin is situated around 170 km (105 miles) away from the capital, Warsaw. The first permanent settlements on the Lublin site were established in the early Middle Ages, though archeological finds indicate a long, earlier presence of various cultures in the general area. The earliest, most significant settlement began in the 6th century, on a hill located in the suburb of Czwartek (in Polish Thursday, most likely in reference to the market day of the settlement). It is likely that the surrounding hills, notably the site of the present day Old Town, were also settled at around this time. In the 10th and 11th centuries the Czwartek settlement developed into an important trade centre. The location of Lublin at the eastern borders of the Polish lands gave it a military significance. The first
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    218
    Palermo

    Palermo

    • People interred here: Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor
    Palermo (Italian: [paˈlɛrmo] ( listen), Sicilian: Palermu, Latin: Panormus, from Greek: Πάνορμος, Panormos, Arabic: بَلَرْم‎, Balarm; Phoenician: זִיז, Ziz) is a city in Insular Italy, the capital of both the autonomous region of Sicily and the Province of Palermo. The city is noted for its history, culture, architecture and gastronomy, playing an important role throughout much of its existence; it is over 2,700 years old. Palermo is located in the northwest of the island of Sicily, right by the Gulf of Palermo in the Tyrrhenian Sea. The city was founded by the Phoenicians, but named by the Ancient Greeks as Panoremus meaning 'always fit for landing in.' Palermo became part of the Roman Republic, the Roman Empire and eventually part of the Byzantine Empire, for over a thousand years. From 827 to 1071 it was under Arab rule during the Emirate of Sicily when it first became a capital. Following the Norman reconquest, Palermo became capital of a new kingdom (from 1130 to 1816), the Kingdom of Sicily. Eventually it would be united with the Kingdom of Naples to form the Two Sicilies until the Italian unification of 1860. The population of Palermo urban area is estimated by Eurostat to
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    219
    Tynemouth

    Tynemouth

    • People interred here: Malcolm III of Scotland
    Tynemouth ( /ˈtaɪnˌmaʊθ/ is a town and a historic borough in Tyne and Wear, England, at the mouth of the River Tyne, between North Shields (on the Tyne) and Cullercoats (on the coast to the North). It is administered as part of the borough of North Tyneside, but until 1974 was an independent county borough (including North Shields) in its own right. It has a population of 17,056. The headland towering over the mouth of the Tyne has been settled since the Iron Age. The Romans occupied it. In the 7th century a monastery was built there and later fortified. The headland was known as PEN BAL CRAG The monastery was sacked by the Danes in 800, rebuilt, destroyed again in 875 but by 1083 was again operational. Three kings are reputed to have been buried within the monastery - Oswin - King of Deira (651); Osred II - King of Northumbria (792) and Malcolm III- King of Scotland (1093). Three crowns still adorn the North Tyneside coat of arms. (North Tyneside Council 1990). The queens of Edward I and Edward II stayed in the Priory and Castle while their husbands were campaigning in Scotland. King Edward III considered it to be one of the strongest castles in the Northern Marches. After
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    William Henry Harrison Tomb State Memorial

    William Henry Harrison Tomb State Memorial

    • People interred here: Anna Harrison
    The William Henry Harrison Tomb State Memorial is the final resting place of William Henry Harrison, the ninth President of the United States, his wife Anna Harrison, and his son John Scott Harrison, the father of the twenty-third President, Benjamin Harrison. It is located on Mount Nebo along State Route 128 in North Bend, Ohio. On his death on April 4, 1841, after only a month in office, President Harrison was originally buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C.; later that year, his remains were moved to their final resting place in North Bend. The tomb and grounds fell into a state of disrepair over the course of several decades. In 1919, the Ohio General Assembly took notice and appropriated funds for its care. The tomb was listed in the National Register on November 10, 1970. In 2007, kiosks were placed at the base of the hill to educate visitors about the life of President Harrison.
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    Akershus Fortress

    Akershus Fortress

    • People interred here: Maud of Wales
    Akershus Fortress (Norwegian: Akershus Festning) or Akershus Castle (Norwegian: Akershus slott) is a medieval castle that was built to protect Oslo, the capital of Norway. It has also been used as a prison. The first construction on the castle started around the late 1290s, by King Haakon V, replacing Tønsberg as one of the two most important Norwegian castles of the period (the other being Båhus). It was constructed in response to the Norwegian nobleman, Earl Alv Erlingsson of Sarpsborg’s earlier attack on Oslo. The fortress has successfully survived all sieges, primarily by Swedish forces, also by Charles XII in 1716. In the early 17th century, the fortress was modernized and remodelled under the reign of the active King Christian IV, and got the appearance of a renaissance castle. The fortress was first used in battle in 1308, when it was besieged by the Swedish duke Eric of Södermanland, whose brother won the Swedish throne in 1309. The immediate proximity of the sea was a key feature, for naval power was a vital military force as the majority of Norwegian commerce in that period was by sea. The fortress was strategically important for the capital, and therefore, Norway as
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    222
    Ambohimanga

    Ambohimanga

    • People interred here: Andrianampoinimerina
    Ambohimanga, a hill topped by a royal city of the same name, is located approximately 24 kilometers to the east of the capital city of Antananarivo and is considered the most significant symbol of the cultural identity of the people of Madagascar. The site consists of a walled historic village including residences and burial sites of several key members of the royalty of the Merina people, the ethnic community that rose to power in the 19th century and ruled much of the island as the Kingdom of Madagascar, a modern state under its administrative authority. The site, one of the twelve sacred hills of Imerina, is associated with strong feelings of national identity and has maintained its spiritual and sacred character both in ritual practice and the popular imagination for the past 500 years. It remains a place of worship to which pilgrims come from Madagascar and elsewhere. The compound was added to the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2001. Madagascar's central highlands were first inhabited between 200 BCE–300 CE by the island's earliest settlers, the Vazimba, who appear to have arrived by pirogue from southeastern Borneo and established simple villages in the island's dense
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    Arkansas

    Arkansas

    • People interred here: Edgar H. Lloyd
    Arkansas (/ˈɑrkənsɔː/ AR-kən-saw) is a state located in the Southern region of the United States. Its name is an Algonquian name of the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozarks and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta. Arkansas is the 29th most extensive and the 32nd most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and most populous city is Little Rock, located in the central portion of the state. The Territory of Arkansas was admitted to the union as the 25th state on June 15, 1836. The name “Arkansas” derives from the same root as the name for the state of Kansas. The Kansa tribe of Native Americans are closely associated with the Sioux tribes of the Great Plains. The word “Arkansas” itself is a French pronunciation (“Arcansas”) of a Quapaw (a related “Kaw” tribe) word, akakaze, meaning “land of downriver people” or the Sioux word akakaze meaning “people of the south wind”. The pronunciation of Arkansas was made official by an act of the state legislature in 1881, after a dispute between two U.S. Senators from Arkansas.
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    Canterbury Cathedral

    Canterbury Cathedral

    • People interred here: Thomas Becket
    Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. It is the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Church of England and symbolic leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion. Its formal title is the Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ at Canterbury. Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt 1070-77. The east end was greatly enlarged at the beginning of the twelfth century, and largely rebuilt in the Gothic style following a fire in 1174. The Norman nave and transepts survived until the late fourteenth century, when they were demolished to make way for the present structures. The cathedral's first archbishop was Augustine of Canterbury, previously abbot of St. Andrew's Benedictine Abbey in Rome. He was sent by Pope Gregory the Great in 596 as a missionary to the Anglo-Saxons. Augustine founded the cathedral in 597 and dedicated it to Jesus Christ, the Holy Saviour. Augustine also founded the Abbey of St. Peter and Paul outside the city walls. This was later rededicated to St. Augustine himself and was for many centuries the burial place of the
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    Cave of the Patriarchs

    Cave of the Patriarchs

    • People interred here: Sarah
    The Cave of the Patriarchs or the Cave of Machpelah (Hebrew: מערת המכפלה,  Me'arat ha-Machpela (help·info), trans. "cave of the double tombs"), is known by Muslims as the Sanctuary of Abraham or Ibrahimi Mosque (Arabic: الحرم الإبراهيمي‎,  Al-Haram Al-Ibrahimi (help·info)). Situated beneath a large rectangular Herodian era structure, the series of subterranean chambers is located in the heart of Hebron(Al-Khalil)'s old city in the Hebron Hills. According to tradition that has been associated with both the Book of Genesis and the Quran, the cave and adjoining field were purchased by Abraham and Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, and Leah, considered the Patriarchs and Matriarchs of the Jewish and Arab people, are all believed to be buried there. The only matriarch missing is Rachel, who is believed to be buried near Bethlehem where she died in childbirth. The Hebrew name possibly refers to the physical layout of the original two chambers while according to the Book of Genesis, Jacob "digged" further in to make a third chamber for Leah and himself. The Arabic name of the complex reflects the prominence given to Abraham, revered by Muslims as a Quranic prophet and patriarch
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    Chillicothe

    Chillicothe

    • People interred here: Joshua W. Sill
    Chillicothe ( /ˌtʃɪlɨˈkɒθiː/ CHIL-ə-KOTH-ee) is a city in and the county seat of Ross County, Ohio, United States. The population was 21,797 at the 2000 census. It is the only city in Ross County and the center of the Chillicothe Micropolitan Statistical Area (as defined by the United States Census Bureau in 2003). Chillicothe is a designated Tree City USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Chillicothe was the first and third capital of Ohio and is located in southern Ohio along the Scioto River. The town's name comes from the Shawnee Chala·ka·tha, named after one of the five major divisions of the Shawnee people, as it was the chief settlement of that tribal division. The Shawnee and their ancestors inhabited the territory for thousands of years prior to European contact. At the time of European-American settlement, the community was plotted by General Nathaniel Massie on his land grant. Modern Chillicothe was the center of the ancient Hopewell tradition, which flourished from 200 BCE until 500 CE. This Amerindian culture had trade routes extending to the Rocky Mountains. They built earthen mounds for ceremonial and burial purposes throughout the Scioto and Ohio River valleys.
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    227
    Derby Cathedral

    Derby Cathedral

    • People interred here: Henry Cavendish
    The Cathedral of All Saints (known as Derby Cathedral), is a cathedral church in the City of Derby, England. It is the seat of the Bishop of Derby, and with an area of around 10,950 sq ft (1,017 m) is the smallest Anglican cathedral in England. The original church was founded by King Edmund I in about 943 as a royal collegiate church; however, no traces of its structure survive. According to the Domesday assessors, it belonged to the King, and was served by a college of seven priests. The current cathedral dates from the fourteenth century, although it appears to be based on an earlier medieval building, which drawings show was about the same size as the present church. It may be that it became structurally unstable and was pulled down. The 212 feet (65 m) tower dates from 1510 to 1530 and was built in the popular perpendicular Gothic style of the time. Under the Protestant persecutions of Queen Mary, Joan Waste was tried for heresy at the cathedral in 1556. The execution took place on the Burton Road in Derby. Apart from the tower, the building was rebuilt in a classical style to the designs of James Gibbs of 1725, and it was further enlarged in 1972. At the same time, the
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    Faisalabad

    Faisalabad

    • People interred here: Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
    Faisalabad, (Urdu: فیصل آباد) formerly known as Lyallpur, is the third largest metropolis in Pakistan, the second largest in the province of Punjab after Lahore, and a major industrial center in the heart of Pakistan. Nicknamed the Manchester of Asia, Faisalabad remains an important industrial city west of Lahore. The city-district of Faisalabad is bound on the north by the districts of Hafizabad and Chiniot, on the east by Nankana Sahib, on the south by Sahiwal, and Toba Tek Singh and on the west by Jhang. The city is at a road and railway junction, which has played an influential role in the development of Faisalabad's trade and economy. The surrounding countryside, irrigated by the Lower Chenab River, has seen expanded production of cotton, wheat, sugarcane, vegetables, and fruits, which form 55% of Pakistan's exports. The city is an industrial centre with major railway repair yards, engineering works, and mills that process sugar, flour, and oil seed. Produce includes superphosphates, cotton and silk textiles, hosiery, dyes, industrial chemicals, beverages, apparels, pulp and paper, printing, agricultural equipment, and ghee (clarified butter). Faisalabad is the site of the
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    229
    Fontevraud Abbey

    Fontevraud Abbey

    • People interred here: Eleanor of Aquitaine
    Fontevraud Abbey or Fontevrault Abbey (in French: abbaye de Fontevraud) is a religious building hosting a cultural centre since 1975, the Centre Culturel de l'Ouest, in the village of Fontevraud-l'Abbaye, near Chinon, in Anjou, France. It was founded by the itinerant reforming preacher Robert of Arbrissel, who had just created a new order, the Order of Fontevrault. The first permanent structures were built between 1110 and 1119. It is situated in the Loire Valley, an UNESCO World Heritage Site between Chalonnes-sur-Loire and Sully-sur-Loire, and is within the Loire-Anjou-Touraine French regional natural park (Parc naturel régional Loire-Anjou-Touraine). Philippa of Toulouse persuaded her husband William IX, Duke of Aquitaine to grant Robert of Abrissel land in Northern Poitou to establish a religious community dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The abbey was founded in 1100 and became a double monastery, with both monks and nuns on the same site. An international success, the order established several "Fontevrist" abbeys set up in England. Robert of Arbrissel declared that the leader of the order should always be a woman and appointed Petronille de Chemillé as the first abbess. She was
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    230
    Ganges River

    Ganges River

    • People interred here: Ashoka
    The Ganges ( /ˈɡændʒiːz/ GAN-jeez) or Ganga ( Bengali: গঙ্গা Gônga, Sanskrit: गङ्गा, Hindi: गंगा, Gujarati: ગંગા, Kannada: ಗಂಗಾ, Tamil: கங்கை Gangai, Malayalam: ഗംഗ, Telugu: గంగ Ganga, Urdu: گنگا Ganga IPA: [ˈɡəŋɡaː] ( listen) ), is a trans-boundary river of India and Bangladesh. The 2,525 km (1,569 mi) river rises in the western Himalayas in the Indian state of Uttarakhand, and flows south and east through the Gangetic Plain of North India into Bangladesh, where it empties into the Bay of Bengal. It is the longest river of India and is the second greatest river in the world by water discharge. The Ganges basin is the most heavily populated river basin in the world, with over 400 million people and a population density of about 1,000 inhabitants per square mile (390 /km). The Ganges is the most sacred river to Hindus and is also a lifeline to millions of Indians who live along its course and depend on it for their daily needs. It is worshiped as the goddess Ganga in Hinduism. It has also been important historically: many former provincial or imperial capitals (such as Patliputra, Kannauj, Kara, Kashi, Allahabad, Murshidabad, Munger, Baharampur and Kolkata) have been located on its
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    Imperial Crypt, Vienna

    Imperial Crypt, Vienna

    • People interred here: Maria Theresa of Austria
    The Imperial Crypt (German: Kaisergruft, but usually called Kapuzinergruft, "Capuchins' Crypt") in Vienna, Austria lies below the Capuchin Church and monastery founded in 1618 and dedicated in 1632. It is on the Neuer Markt square of the Innere Stadt, near the imperial Hofburg Palace. Since 1633 it has been the principal place of entombment for members of the Habsburg dynasty. The bodies of 145 Habsburg royalty, plus urns containing the hearts or cremated remains of four others, are deposited here, including 12 emperors and 18 empresses. The most recent entombment was in 2011.150 The visible 107 metal sarcophagi and 5 heart urns range in style from puritan plain to exuberant rococo. The Imperial Crypt is one of the top tourist attractions in Vienna. To this day, some of the dozen resident Capuchin friars continue their customary role as the guardians and caretakers of the crypt along with their other pastoral work in Vienna. Anna of Tyrol1, wife of Emperor Matthias2 conceived the idea of a Capuchin cloister and burial crypt for her and her husband, to be built in the neighborhood of the Hofburg castle in Vienna. She provided funds for it in the will she made on 10 November 1617,
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    Kensal Green Cemetery

    Kensal Green Cemetery

    • People interred here: Princess Sophia of the United Kingdom
    Kensal Green Cemetery is a cemetery in Kensal Green, in the west of London, England, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Inspired by the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris and founded in 1833 by the barrister George Frederick Carden, Kensal Green Cemetery comprises 72 acres of beautiful grounds including two conservation areas and an adjoining canal. Kensal Green Cemetery is home to 33 species of bird and other wildlife. This distinctive cemetery has a host of different of memorials ranging from large mausoleums housing the rich and famous to many distinctive smaller graves and even includes special areas dedicated to the very young. With three chapels catering for people of all faiths and social standing, the General Cemetery Company has provided a haven in the heart London for more than 170 years for its inhabitants to remember their loved one in a tranquil and dignified environment. It was immortalised in the lines of G. K. Chesterton's poem The Rolling English Road from his book The Flying Inn: "For there is good news yet to hear and fine things to be seen; Before we go to Paradise by way of Kensal Green." The cemetery is located in the London Borough of Kensington &
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    233
    Lyubavichi

    Lyubavichi

    • People interred here: Menachem Mendel Schneersohn
    Lyubavichi (Russian: Люба́вичи; Yiddish: לובאוויטש, Lyubavitsh; Polish: Lubawicze) is a rural locality (a village) in Rudnyansky District of Smolensk Oblast, Russia. The village is known to have existed in the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth since at least 1654. In 1784 mentioned as a small town , then a possession of the magnate Lubomirski family . During the French invasion of Russia in 1812, the village was occupied by Napoleonic troops for two weeks. In the days of the Russian Empire, the village was a shtetl in Orshansky Uyezd of Mogilev Governorate. In 1857, it had a population of 2,500. However, according to another source from ca.1880, only 1516 inhabitants (978 Jews) were reported there, as well as 313 houses, 2 orthodox churches and 2 houses of prayer (shuls) . In the late 19th–early 20th centuries, the largest market in Mogilev Governorate, with a turn-over of over 1.5 million roubles, was held in Lyubavichi. After the October Revolution, the Hasidic leadership left Lyubavichi, and the Jewish population of the village gradually declined and secularized. During World War II, on November 4, 1941, 483 local Jews were massacred by the Nazis and their collaborators. The
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    Mars Hill

    Mars Hill

    • People interred here: Edward C. Dahlgren
    Mars Hill is a town in Aroostook County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,480 at the 2000 census. The town is named for Hezekiah Mars, who camped for three years at the base of Mars Hill Mountain. In 1834, the first industry was cutting timber, particularly trees for masts. Following the Aroostook War, farming became important. The Bangor and Aroostook Railroad arrived in 1892, allowing shipment to distant markets of local produce -- especially potatoes. In the 1960s, Big Rock Ski Area was founded on Mars Hill Mountain. In 2006, Maine's first wind farm was installed along the top and northern side. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 35.2 square miles (91 km), of which, 35.1 square miles (91 km) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km) of it (0.20%) is water. Mars Hill is split partly in half by the Prestile Stream, which runs directly between Fort Street and Silver Street, and then crosses beneath the Fort Street Bridge. After passing the bridge, it flows between Pleasant Street and U.S. 1. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,480 people, 614 households, and 413 families residing in the town. The population density was 42.1
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    Missouri

    Missouri

    • People interred here: Darrell S. Cole
    Missouri (/məˈzʊəri/, /məˈzʊərə/, /məˈzɜri/, or /məˈzɜrə/, among others) (nickname The Show Me State) is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern United States. Missouri is the 21st most extensive and the 18th most populous of the 50 United States. Missouri comprises 114 counties and the independent city of St. Louis. The four largest urban areas are St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, and Columbia. Missouri's capital is Jefferson City. The land that is now Missouri was acquired from France as part of the Louisiana Purchase and became known as the Missouri Territory. Part of the Territory was admitted into the union as the 24th state on August 10, 1821. Missouri generally mirrors the demographic, economic and political makeup of the United States and has long been considered a political bellwether state. With the exceptions of the Presidential elections of 1956 and 2008, Missouri voters have elected the next President of the United States in every election since 1904. It has both Midwestern and Southern cultural influences, reflecting its history as a border state and early settlement by migrants from the Upper South. It is also a transition between the Eastern and Western United
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    Monastery of Alcobaça

    Monastery of Alcobaça

    • People interred here: Afonso III of Portugal
    The Alcobaça Monastery (Portuguese: Mosteiro de Santa Maria de Alcobaça) is a Mediaeval Roman Catholic Monastery located in the town of Alcobaça, in central Portugal. It was founded by the first Portuguese King, Afonso Henriques, in 1153, and maintained a close association with the Kings of Portugal throughout its history. The church and monastery were the first Gothic buildings in Portugal, and, together with the Monastery of Santa Cruz in Coimbra, it was one of the most important of the mediaeval monasteries in Portugal. Due to its artistic and historical importance, it was listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1989. The Alcobaça Monastery is one of the first foundations of the Cistercian Order in Portugal. It was founded in 1153 as a gift to Bernard of Clairvaux, shortly before his death, from the first Portuguese King, Afonso Henriques, to commemorate his victory over the Moors at Santarém in March 1147. The foundation of the monastery was part of the strategy by Afonso Henriques to consolidate his authority in the new kingdom and promote the colonisation of areas recently taken from Moorish hands during the Reconquista. The building of the monastery began in 1178, some
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    Mount of Olives

    Mount of Olives

    • People interred here: Simchah Bunim Alter
    The Mount of Olives (also Mount Olivet, Hebrew: הר הזיתים‎, Har HaZeitim; Arabic: جبل الزيتون, الطور‎, Jebel az-Zeitun) is a mountain ridge east of Jerusalem's Old City in East Jerusalem. It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes. Jesus gave an end-time prophecy at this location. The Mount of Olives is associated predominantly with Jewish and Christian traditions but also contains several sites important in Islam. The mount has been used as a Jewish cemetery for over 3,000 years and holds approximately 150,000 graves. The Mount of Olives is one of three peaks of a mountain ridge which runs for 3.5 km just east of Old Jerusalem across the Kidron Valley, in this area called the Valley of Josaphat. The peak to its north is Mount Scopus, at 826 m, while the peak to its south is the Mount of Corruption, at 747. The highest point on the Mount of Olives is at-Tur, at 818 meters (2,683 ft). The ridge acts as a watershed, and its eastern side is the beginning of the Judean Desert. The ridge is formed of oceanic sedimentary rock from the Late Cretaceous, and contains a soft chalk and a hard flint. While the chalk is easily quarried, it is not a suitable strength for
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    Norristown

    Norristown

    • People interred here: Winfield Scott Hancock
    Norristown is a municipality in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States, 6 miles (9.7 km) northwest of the city limits of Philadelphia, on the Schuylkill River. The population was 34,324 as of the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Montgomery County. Norristown is in a rich agricultural region; in the past, it had extensive manufactures of cigars, tacks, wire, screws, boilers, bolts, silos, tanks, iron, hosiery, knitting machines, underwear, shirts, lumber and milling machinery, paper boxes, rugs and carpets. Its official name is Municipality of Norristown, though it was formerly a borough operating under Pennsylvania's Borough Code and is frequently referred to as "the borough" even in statements by its officials. However, since 1986, Norristown has been governed under home rule charters, not under Pennsylvania's Borough Code. The 1986 charter was properly forwarded to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for inclusion in the Pennsylvania Code. The succeeding 2004 home rule charter has not been so published, but may be read at the municipal website. Some areas outside the municipality, in the surrounding townships, also have "Norristown, PA" mailing addresses. The entire
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    239
    Oslo

    Oslo

    • People interred here: Haakon VI of Norway
    Oslo (English pronunciation: /ˈɒzloʊ/, OZ-loh, Norwegian pronunciation: [²uʃlu] ( listen) or, rarer [²uslu] or [uʃlu]) is the capital of and most populous city in Norway. Founded around 1048 by King Harald III, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 and with Sweden from 1814 to 1905 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, the city was moved closer to Akershus Castle during the reign of King Christian IV and renamed Christiania in his honour. It was established as a municipality (formannskapsdistrikt) on 1 January 1838. Following a spelling reform, it was known as Kristiania from 1877 to 1925, when its original Norwegian name was restored. Oslo is the economic and governmental centre of Norway. The city is also a hub of Norwegian trade, banking, industry and shipping. It is an important centre for maritime industries and maritime trade in Europe. The city is home to many companies within the maritime sector, some of which are amongst the world's largest shipping companies, shipbrokers and maritime insurance brokers. Oslo is a pilot city
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    Portsmouth

    Portsmouth

    • People interred here: Alfred Gibbs
    Portsmouth is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 17,389 at the 2010 U.S. Census. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 59.3 square miles (154 km), of which, only 23.2 square miles (60 km) (39.14%) of it is land and 36.1 square miles (93 km) (60.86%) of it is water. Most of its land area lies on Aquidneck Island, which it shares with Middletown and Newport. In addition, Portsmouth encompasses some smaller islands, including Prudence Island, Patience Island, Hope Island, and Hog Island. Portsmouth was settled in 1638 by a group of religious dissenters from Boston Colony, including Dr. John Clarke, William Coddington, and Anne Hutchinson. It is named after Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. Roger Williams convinced the settlers that they should go there, instead of settling in New Jersey, where they had first planned on going. It was founded by the signers of the Portsmouth Compact. Its original Indian name was Pocasset. It was officially named Portsmouth on May 12, 1639. It became part of the colony of Rhode Island (see Aquidneck Island) and eventually of the colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations and
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    Saint Denis Basilica

    Saint Denis Basilica

    • People interred here: Louis XV of France
    The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Cathédrale royale de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis, previously the Abbaye de Saint-Denis) is a large medieval abbey church in the commune of Saint-Denis, now a northern suburb of Paris. The abbey church was created a cathedral in 1966 and is the seat of the Bishop of Saint-Denis, Pascal Michel Ghislain Delannoy. The building is of unique importance historically and architecturally. The site originated as a Gallo-Roman cemetery, in late Roman times - the archeological remains still lie beneath the cathedral; the people buried there seem to have had a faith that was a mix of Christian and pre-Christian beliefs and practices. Around 475 St. Genevieve purchased some of the land and built a church. In the 7th century, the church was replaced by a much grander construction, on the orders of Dagobert I; it is claimed that Dagobert also moved the body of Saint Denis, a patron saint of France, to the building. The church became a place of pilgrimage and the burial place of the French Kings, with nearly every king from the 10th to the 18th centuries being buried there, as well as many from previous centuries. (It was not used for
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    242
    Spring Grove Cemetery

    Spring Grove Cemetery

    • People interred here: Manning Force
    Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum (733 acres) is a nonprofit garden cemetery and arboretum located at 4521 Spring Grove Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. It is the second largest cemetery in the United States and is recognized as a U.S. National Historic Landmark. The cemetery dates from 1844, when members of the Cincinnati Horticultural Society formed a cemetery association. They took their inspiration from contemporary rural cemeteries such as Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, and Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts. On December 1, 1844 Salmon P. Chase and others prepared the Articles of Incorporation. The cemetery was formally chartered on January 21, 1845, and the first burial took place on September 1, 1845. In 1855 Adolph Strauch, a renowned landscape architect, was hired to renovate the grounds. His sense and layout of the "garden cemetery", made of lakes, trees and shrubs, is what visitors today still see. In 1987, the association officially changed its name to "Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum" to better represent its remarkable collection of both native and exotic trees, as well as its State and National Champion Trees. On March 29, 2007, the cemetery was
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    243
    St Clement Danes

    St Clement Danes

    • People interred here: Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester
    St Clement Danes is a church in the City of Westminster, London. It is situated outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand. The current building was completed in 1682 by Sir Christopher Wren and it now functions as the central church of the Royal Air Force. The church is sometimes claimed to be the one featured in the nursery rhyme Oranges and Lemons and the bells do indeed play that tune. However, St Clement Eastcheap, in the City of London, also claims to be the church from the rhyme. St Clement Danes is known as one of the two 'Island Churches', the other being St Mary-le-Strand. The first church on the site was reputedly founded by Danes living nearby in the 9th century. The location, on the river between the City of London and the future site of Westminster, was home to many Danes at a time when half of England was Danish; being a seafaring race, the Danes named the church they built after St Clement, patron saint of mariners. King Harold I "Harefoot" was buried here in March 1040 after his body was disinterred by his briefly usurped brother Harthacnut, and thrown into the marshes bordering the Thames. The church was first rebuilt by William the Conqueror, and then
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    St. Peter's Basilica

    St. Peter's Basilica

    • People interred here: Saint Peter
    The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican (Latin: Basilica Sancti Petri), officially known in Italian as Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano and commonly known as Saint Peter's Basilica, is a Late Renaissance church located within Vatican City. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture and remains one of the largest churches in the world. While it is neither the mother church of the Roman Catholic Church nor the cathedral of the Bishop of Rome, Saint Peter's is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic sites. It has been described as "holding a unique position in the Christian world" and as "the greatest of all churches of Christendom". In Roman Catholic tradition, the basilica is the burial site of its namesake Saint Peter, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus and, also according to tradition, the first Bishop of Rome and therefore first in the line of the papal succession. Tradition and some historical evidence hold that Saint Peter's tomb is directly below the altar of the basilica. For this reason, many Popes have been interred at St Peter's since the
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    245
    Theatinerkirche

    Theatinerkirche

    • People interred here: Otto of Greece
    The Theatine Church of St. Cajetan (German: Theatinerkirche St. Kajetan) is a Catholic church in Munich, southern Germany. Built from 1663 to 1690, it was founded by Elector Ferdinand Maria and his wife, Henriette Adelaide of Savoy, as a gesture of thanks for the birth of the long-awaited heir to the Bavarian crown, Prince Max Emanuel, in 1662. The church was built in Italian high-Baroque style, inspired by Sant'Andrea della Valle in Rome, designed by the Italian architect Agostino Barelli. His successor, Enrico Zuccalli, added two towers, originally not planned, and then finished the 71 meter high dome in 1690. The facade in Rococo style was completed only in 1768 by François de Cuvilliés. Its Mediterranean appearance and yellow coloring became a well known symbol for the city and had much influence on Southern German Baroque architecture. After the crown prince and later elector Max Emanuel had been born on the 11th of July, 1662, Agostino Barelli from Bologna received the draught order. As a construction site for church and cloister the north-east corner of the cross quarter was selected directly by the town wall and Schwabinger Gate which lies opposite to the Residence. Already
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    246
    Urbana

    Urbana

    • People interred here: Paul Lauterbur
    Urbana ( /ɜrˈbænə/) is a city in and the county seat of Champaign County, Illinois, United States. The population was 41,250 at the 2010 census. Urbana is the tenth-most populous city in Illinois outside of the Chicago metropolitan area. Most of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus is located here. Urbana is located at 40°6′35″N 88°12′15″W / 40.10972°N 88.20417°W / 40.10972; -88.20417 (40.109665, -88.204247). According to the 2000 United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 10.5 square miles (27 km), of which 0.10% is water body. City planning maps from January 2010 indicate that the total area is now 11.7 square miles (30 km). Urbana borders the city of Champaign. The main campus of the University of Illinois is situated on this border. Together, these two cities are often referred to as Urbana-Champaign (the designation used by the University), Champaign-Urbana (the more common usage, due to the larger size of Champaign), and the nearby village of Savoy form the Champaign-Urbana Metropolitan Area. As of the census of 2000, there were 36,395 people, 14,327 households, and 6,217 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,468.3
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    Vagankovo Cemetery

    Vagankovo Cemetery

    • People interred here: Vasily Surikov
    Vagan'kovskoye Cemetery (Ваганьковское кладбище), established in 1771, is located in the Krasnaya Presnya (Красная Пресня) district of Moscow. It is the burial site for a number of people from the artistic and sports community of Russia and the old Soviet Union.
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    248
    Winchester Cathedral

    Winchester Cathedral

    • People interred here: William II of England
    Winchester Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Winchester, Hampshire, England. It is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the longest nave and greatest overall length of any Gothic cathedral in Europe. Dedicated to the Holy Trinity, Saint Peter, Saint Paul, and Saint Swithun, it is the seat of the Bishop of Winchester and centre of the Diocese of Winchester. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building. The cathedral was founded in 642 on a site immediately to the north of the present one. This building became known as the Old Minster. It became part of a monastic settlement in 971. Saint Swithun was buried near the Old Minster and then in it, before being moved to the new Norman cathedral. So-called mortuary chests said to contain the remains of Saxon kings such as King Eadwig of England, first buried in the Old Minster, and his wife Ælfgifu, are also housed in the present cathedral. The Old Minster was demolished in 1093, immediately after the consecration of its successor. In 1079, Bishop Walkelin began work on a completely new cathedral. Much of the limestone used to build the structure was brought across from the Isle of Wight from quarries around Binstead.
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    249
    Windsor Castle

    Windsor Castle

    • People interred here: Henry VI of England
    Windsor Castle is a medieval castle and royal residence in Windsor in the English county of Berkshire, notable for its long association with the British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I it has been used by a succession of monarchs and is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. The castle's lavish, early 19th-century State Apartments are architecturally significant, described by art historian Hugh Roberts as "a superb and unrivalled sequence of rooms widely regarded as the finest and most complete expression of later Georgian taste". The castle includes the 15th-century St George's Chapel, considered by historian John Robinson to be "one of the supreme achievements of English Perpendicular Gothic" design. More than five hundred people live and work in Windsor, making it the largest inhabited castle in the world. Originally designed to protect Norman dominance around the outskirts of London, and to oversee a strategically important part of the River Thames, Windsor Castle was built as a motte and bailey, with three wards surrounding a central mound. Gradually replaced with
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    250
    Worcester Cathedral

    Worcester Cathedral

    • People interred here: John of England
    Worcester Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Worcester. Its official name is The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester. Built between 1084 and 1504, Worcester Cathedral represents every style of English architecture from Norman to Perpendicular Gothic. It is famous for its Norman crypt and unique chapter house, its unusual Transitional Gothic bays, its fine woodwork and its "exquisite" central tower which is of particularly fine proportion. The cathedral's west facade appeared, with a portrait of Sir Edward Elgar, on the reverse of £20 note issued by the Bank of England between 1999 and 2007. The Cathedral was founded in 680 with Bishop Bosel as its head. The first cathedral was built in this period but nothing now remains of it. The existing crypt of the cathedral dates from the 10th century and the time of St. Oswald, Bishop of Worcester. The current cathedral dates from the 12th and 13th centuries. Monks and nuns had been present at the Cathedral since the seventh century (see Bede). The monastery became Benedictine in the second half
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