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Best Pirates of All Time

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    1

    John Halsey

    John Halsey (died 1708) was a colonial American privateer and a later pirate who was active in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans during the early 18th century. Although much of his life and career is unknown, he is recorded in A General History of the Pyrates which states "He was brave in his Person, courteous to all his Prisoners, lived beloved, and died regretted by his own People. His Grave was made in a garden of watermelons, and fenced in with Palisades to prevent his being rooted up by wild Hogs." Born in Boston, Halsey became a privateer in the service of Great Britain commanding the 10-gun brigantine Charles during the War of the Spanish Succession, or Queen Anne's War as it was known in the American colonies, and raided French fishing fleets in the Newfoundland and later sailed to Fayal in the Azores and the to the Canary Islands where he attacked Spanish ships en route to Barcelona during 1704. During the voyage, several of his men deserted as he put his lieutenant ashore at Cape Verde. However they were subsequently returned to Halsey by the Portuguese governor who recognized the validity of his privateer's commission. However, as his letter of marque expired the following
    6.78
    9 votes
    2
    Cornelis Jol

    Cornelis Jol

    Cornelis Corneliszoon Jol (1597 – October 31, 1641), nicknamed Houtebeen ("pegleg"), was a 17th-Century Dutch corsair and admiral in the Dutch West India Company during the Eighty Year's War between Spain and the fledgling Dutch Republic. He was one of several early buccaneers to attack Campeche, looting the settlement in 1633, and was active against the Spanish in the Spanish Main and throughout the Caribbean during the 1630s and 40s. Jol was really more of a pirate (or rather privateer) than an admiral, raiding Spanish and Portuguese fleets and gathering large amounts of loot. He was nicknamed Houtebeen (Pé de Pau in Portuguese and Pata de Palo in Spanish), because he lost a leg during battle and got a wooden leg, being one of the earliest documented pirates to use a wooden peg leg. The Spanish also nicknamed him El Pirata. His son, also called Cornelis Corneliszoon Jol (or Hola), pursued a career at sea as well and served as an officer in the Dutch navy. He was captain of the Leiden under admiral Maarten Tromp during the First Anglo-Dutch War (1652–1654). A street in Scheveningen is named for Jol. One of his descendants named a company after him (Corneliszoon.com). Erstwhile AFC
    7.25
    8 votes
    3

    Charlotte DeBerry

    Charlotte de Berry (born 1636, England – died unknown date and place) was a (possibly fictional) female pirate captain. In her mid to late teens she fell in love with a sailor and, against her parents' will, married him. Disguised as a man, she followed him on board his ship and fought alongside him. Her true identity was discovered by an officer who kept this knowledge to himself, wanting de Berry. He assigned her husband to the most dangerous jobs, which he survived thanks to his wife's help. The officer finally accused Charlotte's husband of mutiny, of which he was found guilty based on an officer's word against that of a common sailor. He was punished by being flogged through the fleet, which, as the officer had hoped, killed him. The officer then made advances towards Charlotte, which she refused. The next time they were in port she killed the officer and snuck away, dressing again as a woman and working on the docks. While de Berry worked on the docks, a captain of a merchant ship saw her and kidnapped her. He forced de Berry to marry him and took her away on his trip to Africa. To escape her new husband, who was a brutal rapist and tyrant, de Berry gained the respect of the
    7.71
    7 votes
    4
    Howell Davis

    Howell Davis

    Captain Howell Davis (or Hywel) (or Davies) (ca. 1690 – June 19, 1719) was a Welsh pirate. His piratical career lasted just 11 months, from July 11, 1718 to June 19, 1719, when he was ambushed and killed. His ships were the Cadogan, Buck, Saint James, and Rover. Davis captured 15 known English and French ships. Born in Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Davis started out in piracy on July 11, 1718 when the slave ship Cadogan, on which he was serving as a mate, was captured by the pirate Edward England. Deciding to join the pirates, Davis was given command of the Cadogan and set out for Brazil on July 18, 1718. However, his crew mutinied and sailed to Barbados instead. Here Davis was imprisoned on the charge of piracy, but was eventually released and sought shelter in the pirate den of New Providence in the Bahamas. With New Providence being cleaned out by Governor Woodes Rogers, Davis left on the sloop Buck and conspired with six other crew members, who included Thomas Anstis and Walter Kennedy, to take over the vessel off Martinique. Davis was elected captain and conducted raids from his base at Coxon's Hole. Subsequently, he crossed the Atlantic to terrorize shipping in the
    7.14
    7 votes
    5
    Alexandre Exquemelin

    Alexandre Exquemelin

    Alexandre Olivier Exquemelin (also spelled Esquemeling, Exquemeling, or Oexmelin) (c. 1645–1707) was a French writer best known as the author of one of the most important sourcebooks of 17th century piracy, first published in Dutch as De Americaensche Zee-Roovers, in Amsterdam, by Jan ten Hoorn, in 1678. Born about 1645, it is likely that Exquemelin was a native of Harfleur, France, who on his return from buccaneering settled in Holland, possibly because he was a Huguenot. In 1666 he was engaged by the French West India Company and went to Tortuga, where he stayed for three years. There he enlisted with the buccaneers, in particular with the band of Henry Morgan, whose confidante he was, probably as a barber-surgeon, and remained with them until 1674. Shortly afterwards he returned to Europe and settled in Amsterdam where he qualified professionally as a surgeon, his name appearing on the 1679 register of the Dutch Surgeons' Guild. However, he was later once again in the Caribbean as his name appears on the muster-roll as a surgeon in the attack on Cartagena in 1697. The bibliographic legacy of Exquemelin's "History of the Bouccaneers of America" is complex. It has rightly been
    6.25
    8 votes
    6
    Murat Rais

    Murat Rais

    Murat Reis the Elder (Turkish: Koca Murat Reis, c.1534-1638) was an Albanian privateer and admiral of the Ottoman Navy. He is regarded as one of the most important Barbary corsairs. Born into an Albanian family in Rhodes or Albania in 1534 he began his career when he joined the crew of Turgut Reis at a very young age. He also fought alongside Piri Reis in several expeditions. In 1534 Murat Reis accompanied Barbarossa Hayreddin Pasha to Constantinople where they were received by Suleiman I and appointed to take command of the Ottoman fleet. While in Constantinople, Murat Reis participated in the construction of new warships at the naval arsenal on the Golden Horn. Murat Reis took part in all of the early naval campaigns of Turgut Reis. On September 25 and 26, 1538, he was assigned with the task of preventing the ships of the Holy League under the command of Andrea Doria from landing at Preveza, and he successfully repulsed them from the shoreline. On September 28, he took part in the main combat and played an important role in the Ottoman victory at the Battle of Preveza, where he fought along with Turgut Reis in the center-rear wing of the Ottoman fleet which had a Y shaped battle
    7.83
    6 votes
    7
    Piet Pieterszoon Hein

    Piet Pieterszoon Hein

    Pieter Pietersen Heyn (25 November 1577 – 18 June 1629) was a Dutch naval officer and folk hero during the Eighty Years' War between the United Provinces and Spain. Hein was born in Delfshaven (now part of Rotterdam), the son of a sea captain, and he became a sailor while he was still a teenager. In his twenties, he was captured by the Spanish, and served as a galley slave for about four years, probably between 1598 and 1602, when he was traded for Spanish prisoners. Between 1603 and 1607 he was again held captive by the Spanish, when captured near Cuba. In 1607, he joined the Dutch East India Company and left for Asia, returning with the rank of captain (of the Hollandia) five years later. He married Anneke Claesdochter de Reus and settled in Rotterdam. In 1618, when he was captain of the Neptunus, both he and his ship were pressed into service by Venice. In 1621 he left his vessel behind and traveled overland to the Netherlands. For a year in 1622 he was a member of the local government of Rotterdam, although he didn't even have citizenship of this city: the cousin of his wife, one of the three burgomasters, made this possible. In 1623, he became vice-admiral of the new Dutch
    7.17
    6 votes
    8
    Cutthroat Island

    Cutthroat Island

    Cutthroat Island is a 1995 action adventure film directed by Renny Harlin. The film stars Geena Davis, Matthew Modine, and Frank Langella. The film received mixed reviews from critics and was a major box office bomb. It is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the biggest box office flop of all time. It was the last film Carolco Pictures produced before it went bankrupt. The film begins in Jamaica in 1668. After bedding and outsmarting a bounty hunter trying to arrest her, female pirate Morgan Adams (Geena Davis) hunts down her uncle and fellow pirate Dawg Brown (Frank Langella), who has captured her father, Black Harry (Harris Yulin), who has one of three pieces of a map to a huge stash of gold on a remote island called Cutthroat Island. Dawg has another piece, having stolen it from the corpse of a third brother, while a fourth brother, Mordachai (George Murcell), has the third. Dawg tries to force Harry to give him the map, but Harry refuses and escapes with Morgan's help, but not before being mortally wounded. Before dying, Harry reveals to his daughter the location of the map piece: on his scalp. After scalping her dead father for the piece, Morgan, now the captain of
    7.80
    5 votes
    9
    Piracy

    Piracy

    Piracy is typically an act of robbery or criminal violence at sea. The term can include acts committed on land, in the air, or in other major bodies of water or on a shore. It does not normally include crimes committed against persons traveling on the same vessel as the perpetrator (e.g. one passenger stealing from others on the same vessel). The term has been used throughout history to refer to raids across land borders by non-state agents. Piracy is the name of a specific crime under customary international law and also the name of a number of crimes under the municipal law of a number of States. It is distinguished from privateering, which is authorized by national authorities and therefore a legitimate form of war-like activity by non-state actors. Privateering is considered commerce raiding, and was outlawed by the Peace of Westphalia (1648) for signatories to those treaties. Those who engage in acts of piracy are called pirates. Historically, offenders have usually been apprehended by military personnel and tried by military tribunals. In the 21st century, the international community is facing many problems in bringing pirates to justice. The English "pirate" is derived from
    7.80
    5 votes
    10

    Claes Gerritszoon Compaen

    Claes Gerritszoon Compaen (1587, Oostzaan, North Holland - February 25, 1660, Oostzaan), also called Claas Compaan or Klaas Kompaan, was a 17th century Dutch corsair and merchant. Dissatisfied as a privateer for the Dutch Republic, he later turned to piracy capturing hundreds of ships operating in Europe, the Mediterranean and West Africa during the 1620s. Born in Oostzaan, his father was an alleged member of the Geuzen of Dirck Duyvel housed in Zaanstreek allied other nobleman in opposition of Spanish rule. Compaen went to sea at an early age and eventually became a successful merchant as a trader along the coast of Guinea. He later used the profits from these voyages to refit his ships for privateering activities against the Spanish. Based from Oostende and Duinkerken, he was initially successful capturing several Spanish prizes within a short period of time, however, several of the ships were later released by Dutch authorities. One of these captured ships was over 200 tons, fitted with 17 guns and manned by a crew of 80 men. Sometime around 1621, he left port with a letter of marque from the Dutch Admiralty leaving them to pay his debt of 8,000 gilders to the widow of Medemblik
    7.60
    5 votes
    11

    Jean Fleury

    Jean Fleury (or Florin) (died 1527) was a 16th century French naval officer and privateer. He is best known for the capture of two out of the three Spanish galleons carrying the Aztec treasure from Mexico to Spain in 1522. This was one the earliest recorded acts of piracy against the new Spanish Empire and encouraged the French Corsairs, Dutch Sea Beggars and English Sea Dogs to begin attacking shipping and settlements in the Spanish Main during the next several decades. A French corsair and naval officer from Dieppe in Normandy, Fleury served as a pilot under Jean Ango and commanded a small squadron during the Four Years' War. He was involved in long range naval warfare, operating as far as 2,000 kilometres from his base with only a few hundred men, and was an active privateer during the conflict. In early 1522, three Spanish ships were sighted off the southwest coast of Portugal, somewhere between the Azores and Cape St. Vincent, and Florin ordered his five-ship squadron to attack. The small Spanish fleet, under Captain Quiñones and Alonso de Ávila, was on the last leg of their journey from Havana, Cuba to Seville, Spain carrying a large gold shipment taken from Hernando Cortez's
    7.60
    5 votes
    12

    Thomas Anstis

    Thomas Anstis (died April 1723) was an early 18th century pirate, who served under Captain Howell Davis and Captain Bartholomew Roberts, before setting up on his own account, raiding shipping on the eastern coast of the American colonies and in the Caribbean during what is often referred to as the "Golden Age of Piracy". Anstis is first recorded as a member of the sloop Buck, which sailed from Providence, Rhode Island in 1718. During the course of the voyage, Anstis conspired with six other crew members to attempt a mutiny aboard the ship which, upon doing so, stated their intentions to sail southward as pirates. Howell Davis was elected captain. After Davis' death Bartholomew Roberts replaced him as captain, and eventually had several ships. Anstis commanded one of these, the brigantine Good Fortune. During the night of April 18, 1721, Roberts' ships headed for Africa, but Anstis and his crew in the Good Fortune slipped away in the night and continued to operate in the Caribbean. Between Hispaniola and Jamaica, the Good Fortune plundered two vessels. Aboard one, the Irwin, Anstis's crew committed gang rape and murder against a female passenger. Afterwards they stopped to careen
    7.60
    5 votes
    13

    Bartholomew Sharp

    Bartholomew Sharp (c. 1650 – 29 October 1702) was an English buccaneer whose pirate career lasted only three years (1679–82). His flagship was the Trinity. Sharp's career as a pirate captain began when the buccaneers with whom he was sailing round South America needed a new commander. He quickly proved himself a natural leader and a capable seaman; however, these qualities did not prevent him being deposed as captain in January 1681, after storms and setbacks provoked a mutiny. His successor was killed three weeks later, and Sharp resumed command. Under him the buccaneers continued around South America and up to the Caribbean, taking 25 Spanish ships and plundering numerous Spanish towns. Bartholomew Sharp is credited as being the first Englishman ever to travel eastwards around Cape Horn. Sharp had planned to return to England via the Strait of Magellan, but a storm pushed the Trinity too far south, forcing him to navigate the Cape. An eyewitness account of Sharp's adventures was published in The Dangerous Voyage And Bold Assaults of Captain Bartholomew Sharp and Others, London, 1684. Because England and Spain were not at war, the Spaniards demanded Sharp's prosecution for piracy.
    7.40
    5 votes
    14
    Michel de Grammont

    Michel de Grammont

    Michel de Grammont (c. 1645 - 1686?) was a French pirate. He was born in Paris, France and was lost at sea, north-east Caribbean, April 1686. His pirate career was from c.1670 - 1686. His flagship was the Hardi. Chevalier de Grammont was a nobleman who came into disfavour after killing his sister's suitor in a duel. Forced to leave France he went to Hispaniola where he was given a French ship and served as a privateer. His first success was the capture of a Dutch convoy, valued at about 400,000 livres (US$4 million). On his next voyage he ran on a reef and sank. Grammont moved to Tortuga where he bought and outfitted a new ship which he used to attack Spanish shipping. When war broke out between France and Holland in 1678, he joined a fleet under the command of Comte d'Estrées for an abortive raid on the Dutch island of Curaçao however, the entire fleet of 17 vessels was wrecked on the Las Aves Archipelago. In June 1678 he was made commander of the six ships and 700 men salvaged from the Las Aves Disaster. De Grammont landed his men in Spanish-held Venezuela and captured Maracaibo then followed the capture and plundering of several smaller towns, penetrating as far inland as
    7.40
    5 votes
    15

    William Condon

    Captain William (Billy One-Hand) Condon was an English pirate. His ship was called the Fiery Dragon and was found by Barry Clifford off the coast of Sainte-Marie, Madagascar, where it had caught fire and sunk in 1721. He retired and settled on Réunion in 1721. He later moved to Normandy in 1723 and worked as a merchant and shipowner.
    7.40
    5 votes
    16

    Anicetus

    Anicetus was the leader of an unsuccessful anti-Roman uprising in Polemonia in 69. Formerly a freedman of King Polemon II of Pontus, Anicetus commanded the royal fleet until Pontus was converted into a Roman province under Emperor Nero in 63. During the civil war following Nero’s death, Anicetus sided with Vitellius and led a general insurrection against Vespasian in Pontus and Colchis 69. The rebels destroyed the Roman fleet (Classis Pontica) in a sudden attack on Trapezus and then turned to piracy using a type of boat known as camarae. The revolt was however put down by the Roman reinforcements under Virdius Geminus, a lieutenant of Vespasian. Overtaken at the mouth of the river Cohibus (now the Khobi River located in Mingrelia of Lazica, Anicetus was surrendered to the Romans by the local tribesmen, and put to death.
    9.67
    3 votes
    17

    Dirk Chivers

    Dirk Chivers was a Dutch pirate active in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean during the 1690s. Dirk Chivers is first recorded as a crew member of the Portsmouth Adventure, a privateering ship bound for the Red Sea, under Captain Joseph Farrell in early 1694. Soon after leaving Rhode Island, Chivers saw action as Farrell and Henry Every successfully captured two ships sometime around June 1695. On its return voyage to Rhode Island, the ship ran aground on Mayotte in the Comoro Islands and chose to stay behind with several others while Farrell and the others continued on with Every. Chivers eventually signed aboard the 28-gun Resolution after being picked by Captain Robert Glover near the end of the year. After several months in the Red Sea however, Chivers took part in a mutiny against Glover and had him and his 24 supporters placed onto the recently captured Arab ship Rajapura. Elected captain by the crew after the mutiny, he had the ship renamed the Soldado which, during the next year, was successful in capturing a number of valuable prizes before joining up with privateer John Hoar. Together they captured, and subsequently ransomed, two East India Company ships. However, the ships were
    7.20
    5 votes
    18
    Samuel Bellamy

    Samuel Bellamy

    Samuel Bellamy (c. February 23, 1689 – April 26, 1717), better known as "Black Sam" Bellamy, was an English pirate who operated in the early 18th century. Though his known career as a pirate captain lasted little more than a year, Bellamy and his crew captured more than 50 ships – making him the wealthiest pirate in history – before his death at age 28. Called "Black Sam" in Cape Cod folklore because he eschewed the fashionable powdered wig in favor of tying back his long black hair with a simple band, Bellamy became known for his mercy and generosity toward those he captured on his raids. This reputation earned him another nickname, the "Prince of Pirates". He likened himself to Robin Hood, with his crew calling themselves "Robin Hood's Men." Bellamy was probably the youngest of six known children born to Stephen and Elizabeth Bellamy in the parish of Hittisleigh in Devonshire, England in 1689. Elizabeth died in childbirth and was buried on February 23, 1689, three weeks before her infant son Samuel's baptism on March 18. The future pirate became a sailor at a young age and traveled to Cape Cod, where, according to local lore, he took up an affair with a local girl named Maria
    5.43
    7 votes
    19

    Pierre le Picard

    Pierre le Picard (1624-1679?) was a 17th century French buccaneer. He was both an officer to l'Ollonais as well as Sir Henry Morgan, most notably taking part in his raids at Maracaibo and Panama, and may have been one of the first buccaneers to raid shipping on both the Caribbean and Pacific coasts. Pierre le Picard is first referred to as an officer with l'Ollonais in his buccaneering expedition from Tortuga. Leaving with the fleet, he commanded a brigantine with 40 men and was present at the later raids against Maracaibo and Gibraltar in 1666 and Puerto de Cavallo and San Pedro in 1667. The fleet then stopped to regroup sometime after this point, capturing a Spanish ship off the coast of the Yucatán, before l'Ollonais called a council of his officers. Although proposing to sail to Guatemala, he and Moise Vauquelin opposed l'Ollonais' plan and, it is alleged, they encouraged the rest of the officers to leave their commander. The fleet did disband after this meeting, with Picard and Vauquelin leaving together to raid the coast of Costa Rica. The two successfully occupied and looted Veraguas that same year, however they parted ways after failing to capture the nearby town of Nata.
    7.00
    5 votes
    20

    Diabolito

    Diabolito or Little Devil (died July 1823) was a 19th century Cuban pirate. One of the more violent of the era, he actively engaged the United States Navy and was one of the main fugitives pursued during later American naval expeditions in the Caribbean during the 1820s. The Cuban-born Diabolito became known as a particularly dangerous pirate operating from his home island during the early 19th century. He among others including Charles Gibbs, Pedro Gilbert and Roberto Cofresí were identified as key figures in piracy when President James Monroe authorized the formation of an anti-piracy squadron to combat attacks on American shipping and naval forces occurring off the Florida coast. Based in Key West under Commodore David Porter, a veteran of the Barbary expedition and the War of 1812, the Mosquito Fleet soon began patrolling the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. Diabolito and other Cuban-based pirates were easily able to escape from American vessels, either escaping into the back country of the Florida Keys or retreating to Cuba where Porter's forces were unable to pursue. As the years past however, Cuban ship owners and other businessmen petitioned for authorities to cooperate
    9.33
    3 votes
    21
    Piracy in the Caribbean

    Piracy in the Caribbean

    The era of piracy in the Caribbean began in the 16th century and died out in the 1830s after the navies of the nations of Western Europe and North America with colonies in the Caribbean began combating pirates. The period during which pirates were most successful was from the 1690s until the 1720s. Piracy flourished in the Caribbean because of the existence of relatively lawless British seaports such as Port Royal in Jamaica and the French settlement at Tortuga. Piracy in the Caribbean resulted from the groups of Europeans, mostly English, Dutch and French, who were marooned or shipwrecked. They were called buccaneers, from the French "boucanier" (to smoke meat) on a "boucan" (wooden frame set over a fire.) By setting up smokey fires and boucans with prepared meat of marooned cattle, these castaways could get a ship to draw near for trading, at which time the buccaneers could seize the ship. The buccaneers were later chased off the island by colonial powers and had to seek a life at sea. There they created lucrative but illegitimate opportunities for common seamen to attack European merchant ships (especially Spanish fleets sailing from the Caribbean to Europe) and seize their
    8.00
    4 votes
    22

    Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl

    Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl is a 2003 American adventure fantasy film based on the Pirates of the Caribbean ride at Disney theme parks. It was directed by Gore Verbinski and produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. The story follows blacksmith Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and pirate Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) as they rescue the kidnapped Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) from the cursed crew of the Black Pearl, captained by Hector Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush). Jay Wolpert developed a script based on the theme park ride in 2001, and Stuart Beattie rewrote it in early 2002. Around that time, producer Jerry Bruckheimer became involved in the project; he had Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio work on the script, adding the supernatural curse to the storyline. Filming took place from October 2002 to March 2003 in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and on sets constructed around Los Angeles, California. The world premiere was held at Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, on June 28, 2003. The Curse of the Black Pearl was an unexpected success, with positive reviews and grossing over $654 million worldwide. The film became the first in a series, with two back-to-back
    6.80
    5 votes
    23

    Jan de Bouff

    Jan de Bouff was a Dutch renegade privateer who, during the Dutch War of Independence, entered Habsburg service and raided shipping as a Dunkirker during 1602. While attacking three French fishing boats in December of that year, he was surprised by the arrival of six Dutch ships out of Ostend. Although initially outnumbered, three other Dunkirkers joined the battle on behalf of De Bouff and, after the capture of two Ostend vessels, the remaining four were forced to flee shortly after. It is unknown whether De Bouff survived this battle; there are no further recorded incidents following the battle.
    7.75
    4 votes
    24

    Michael Geare

    Sir Michael Geare (b. 1565-?) was a 16th century English sailor, privateer and merchant. One of the many Sea Dogs who plagued the Spanish Empire during the Elizabethan age, Geare was well-known to the Spaniards of the West Indies and the Spanish Main as commander of the Little John. He remained one of the most active in the region throughout the 1590s and up until his retirement in 1603. Michael Geare was born in Limehouse around 1565, reportedly from a poor cockney background. An apprentice mariner in his youth, Geare embarked on his earliest voyages with Sir George Carew (also known as George Carey) and later Captain John Watts with whom he would first rise to prominence between 1588 and 1591. That same year he became the captain of the Little John, one of five-ship flotilla under William Lane and financed by Sir Frances Drake among others. Lane gave glowing accounts of Geare's bravery in battle and with whom he began to earn a small fortune from privateering and smuggling activities. Lane eventually began personally financing the Little John which was later renamed the Michael & John when he became a partner with Geare in 1592. During the next three years, Geare would complete
    7.75
    4 votes
    25

    Peter and the Starcatchers

    Peter and the Starcatchers is a best-selling children's novel that was published by Hyperion Books, a subsidiary of Disney, in 2004. Written by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson, the book provides a backstory for the character Peter Pan, and serves as a prequel to J. M. Barrie's novel Peter and Wendy. It was illustrated by artist Greg Call. The book is followed by three sequels, also set before the famous adventure with Peter and Wendy: Peter and the Shadow Thieves (2006), Peter and the Secret of Rundoon (2007), and Peter and the Sword of Mercy (2009). A fifth book titled The Bridge to Neverland was released in September 2011. A series of Never Land chapter books for younger readers is based on the novels. In 2005, Disney hired Jay Wolpert to adapt the book to film, reportedly to use 3D animation. A play with music adaptation of the book debuted in winter 2009 at La Jolla Playhouse, as part of an arrangement with Disney Theatrical. It was re-staged Off-Broadway in 2011 and opened on Broadway April 15, 2012, at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre. On May 17, 2012 Walt Disney Pictures announced that a film version of the book would be written by Jesse Wigutow. On August 20, 2012, "The Hunger
    7.75
    4 votes
    26

    Jan Jacobsen

    Jan Jacobsen (1588/89 – 1622) was a Flemish naval commander and Dunkirker during the Eighty Years' War. He became a posthumous hero when, after battling an enemy fleet for over 13 hours, he destroyed his own ship rather than surrender. He was the son of Admiral Michiel Jacobsen and great-uncle of Jean Bart. On 3 October 1622 Jacobsen put out from Ostend on his first expedition as a captain of one of the king's frigates. His ship was part of a three-ship flotilla, with the intention of locating the Dutch Baltic convoy, accompanied by Spanish privateers Pedro de la Plesa and Juan Garcia. Jacobsen failed to elude the Dutch blockaders patrolling off the Flemish coast and was soon in a running battle with nine Dutch warships which was to last for thirteen hours. He disabled two of them before finally fought to a standstill with his mast, rudder and sweeps shot away. The Dutch called upon Jacobsen to surrender and offered quarter, but, rather than let one of the king's ships fall into the hands of the enemy he exploded his powder store. In doing so he crippled the two Dutch ships alongside and caused considerable loss of life on board them but at the cost of destroying himself, his ship
    5.83
    6 votes
    27
    Calico Jack

    Calico Jack

    John Rackham (21 December 1682 – 18 November 1720), commonly known as Calico Jack, was an English pirate captain operating in the Bahamas during the early 18th century (Rackham is often spelled as Rackam or Rackum in historical documentation). His nickname was derived from the calico clothing he wore. Active towards the end (1717–1720) of the "golden age of piracy" (1690–1730) Rackham is most remembered for two things: the design of his Jolly Roger flag, a skull with crossed swords, which contributed to the popularization of the design, and for having two female crew members (Mary Read and Rackham's lover Anne Bonny). After deposing Charles Vane from his captaincy, Rackham cruised the Leeward Islands, Jamaica Channel and Windward Passage. He accepted a pardon some time in 1719 and moved to New Providence where he met Anne Bonny, who was married to James Bonny. When Rackham returned to piracy in 1720, by stealing a British sloop, Bonny joined him. Their new crew included Mary Read. After a short run he was captured by pirate hunter Jonathan Barnet in 1720, before being hanged in November of the same year in Spanish Town, Jamaica. Little is known of Rackham's upbringing or early
    6.60
    5 votes
    28
    Dark Watch

    Dark Watch

    Dark Watch is a novel by Clive Cussler and Jack Du Brul. It was published in 2005 and is the third installment in The Oregon Files series. It takes place with the Corporation, with its leader Juan Cabrillo and his band of mercenaries aboard their high tech cargo ship the Oregon. The story evolves that a group of Russian scientists are sent in search of ore and they find it. However greed overcomes them, and one of them kills the others to disguise the find. The story also follows something similar to instances of piracy (that the world currently is concerned with) and how these two seemingly different events are related.
    6.60
    5 votes
    29

    Abraham Blauvelt

    Abraham Blauvelt (died 1663?) was a Dutch privateer and explorer mapping much of Central America in the 1630s, after whom both the Bluefield River and the neighboring town of Bluefields, Nicaragua were named. One of the last of the Dutch corsairs of the mid 17th century, Abraham Blauvelt was first recorded exploring the coasts of present day Honduras and Nicaragua in service of the Dutch West India Company. He later traveled to England in an effort to gain support to establish a colony in Nicaragua near the city where Bluefields, Nicaragua presently stands. Around 1640 Blauvelt became a privateer serving the Swedish East India Company and in 1644 he commanded his own ship successfully raiding Spanish shipping from a base in southwest Jamaica, today known as Bluefields Bay, and selling the cargo and prizes to the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam (New York). After peace between Spain and the Netherlands was reached with the signing of the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, Blauvelt, unable to stay in New Amsterdam, instead sailed to Newport, Rhode Island in early 1649 to sell his remaining cargo. However the colonial governor seized one of Blauvelt's prizes and with his crew arguing over
    7.50
    4 votes
    30

    Francois le Clerc

    François or Francis Le Clerc, known as Jambe de Bois ('Peg Leg'), (died 1563) was a 16th century French privateer, originally from Normandy. He is credited as the first pirate in the modern era to have a "peg leg". He was often the first to board an enemy vessel during an attack or raid. It was this brazen style that eventually caused him to suffer the loss of a leg and severe damage to one arm while fighting the English at Guernsey in 1549. Although many pirates would have had their careers ended by such an injury, le Clerc refused to retire and instead expanded the scope of his piracy by financing the voyages and attacks of other pirates as well. Despite his wounds, Le Clerc led major raids against the Spanish, who nicknamed him "Pie de Palo" ("Peg Leg"). In 1553, he assumed overall command of seven pirate craft and three royal vessels, the latter commanded by himself, Jacques Sores and Robert Blundel. This same year he attacked the port of Santa Cruz de La Palma, in the Canary Islands, which he looted and set on fire, destroying a large number of buildings. This strong fleet raided San Germán in Puerto Rico and methodically looted the ports of Hispaniola (Cuba) from south to
    7.50
    4 votes
    31
    Jean Lafitte

    Jean Lafitte

    Jean Lafitte (ca. 1776 – ca. 1823) was a French pirate and privateer in the Gulf of Mexico in the early 19th century. He and his elder brother, Pierre, spelled their last name Laffite, but English-language documents of the time used "Lafitte." The latter has become the commonly seen spelling in the United States, including for places named for him. Lafitte is believed to have been born either in France or the French colony of Saint-Domingue. By 1805, he operated a warehouse in New Orleans to help disperse the goods smuggled by his brother Pierre Lafitte. After the United States government passed the Embargo Act of 1807, the Lafittes moved their operations to an island in Barataria Bay. By 1810, their new port was very successful; the Lafittes pursued a successful smuggling operation and also started to engage in piracy. Though Lafitte tried to warn Barataria of a British attack, the American authorities successfully invaded in 1814 and captured most of Lafitte's fleet. In return for a pardon, Lafitte helped General Andrew Jackson defend New Orleans against the British in 1815. The Lafittes became spies for the Spanish during the Mexican War of Independence and moved to Galveston
    7.50
    4 votes
    32

    Nathaniel Butler

    Nathaniel Butler (born c. 1577, living 1639, date of death unknown) was an English privateer who later served as the colonial governor of Bermuda during the early 17th century. He had built many structures still seen in Bermuda today including many of the island's coastal fortresses and the State House, in St. George's, the oldest surviving English settlement in the New World (the State House, completed in 1620, was the first purpose-built building to house the Bermudian parliament). He also has the distinction of introducing the potato, the first seen in North America, to the early English colonists of Jamestown, Virginia. First serving in the service of the Earl of Warwick during his early sailing career, he was later appointed as governor of Bermuda, then administered by the Somers Isles Company (an offshoot of the Virginia Company), a post which he served from 1619 to 1622. During this time, he salvaged guns from a shipwrecked vessel and used them to arm the island forts then under construction including Southampton Fort and those of Smith's and Paget Island in 1620 (the incident would later be recorded by John Smith in 1624). While Governor of Bermuda, he played an indirect
    7.50
    4 votes
    33
    Stede Bonnet

    Stede Bonnet

    Stede Bonnet (c. 1688 – 10 December 1718) was an early 18th-century Barbadian pirate, sometimes called "The Gentleman Pirate" because he was a moderately wealthy landowner before turning to a life of crime. Bonnet was born into a wealthy English family on the island of Barbados, and inherited the family estate after his father's death in 1694. In 1709, he married Mary Allamby, and engaged in some level of militia service. Because of marital problems, and despite his lack of sailing experience, Bonnet decided to turn to piracy in the summer of 1717. He bought a sailing vessel, named it Revenge, and traveled with his paid crew along the Eastern Seaboard of what is now the United States, capturing other vessels and burning other Barbadian ships. Bonnet set sail for Nassau, Bahamas, but he was seriously wounded en route during an encounter with a Spanish warship. After arriving in Nassau, Bonnet met Edward Teach, the infamous pirate Blackbeard. Incapable of leading his crew, Bonnet temporarily ceded his ship's command to Blackbeard. Before separating in December 1717, Blackbeard and Bonnet plundered and captured merchant ships along the East Coast. After Bonnet failed to capture the
    7.50
    4 votes
    34
    Turgut Reis

    Turgut Reis

    Turgut Reis (1485 – 23 June 1565) was an Ottoman Admiral and privateer who also served as Bey of Algiers; Beylerbey of the Mediterranean; and first Bey, later Pasha, of Tripoli. Under his naval command the Ottoman Empire maritime was extended across North Africa. When Turgut was serving as pasha, he adorned and built up the city of Tripoli, making it one of the most impressive cities along the North African Coast. Known in different languages under such names as Dragut or Darghouth (Arabic: درغوث‎), the name in Turkey is Turgut Reis. Turgut was a Muslim seaman of Greek descent. He was born in a village near Bodrum, on the Aegean coast of Asia Minor. He was captured and taken prisoner by the corsairs in his youth and had converted to Islam. He was born in the sub-district called Saravalos in the western tip of Bodrum peninsula (which is called Turgutreis in his honour today) and most probably in the Karabağ village on the Aegean coast of Asia Minor. At the age of 12 he was noticed by an Ottoman army commander for his extraordinary talent in using spears and arrows and was recruited by him. Under his support the young Turgut became a skilled sailor, an outstanding gunner, and was
    7.50
    4 votes
    35

    Wimund

    Wimund was a bishop who became a seafaring warlord adventurer in the years after 1147. His story is passed down to us by 12th-century English historian William of Newburgh in his Historia rerum anglicarum, Book I, Chapter 24 entitled "Of bishop Wimund, his life unbecoming a bishop, and how he was deprived of his sight". William tells us that Wimund was "born in the most obscure spot in England." He was educated at Furness Abbey, founded 1123–1127 by the future Stephen I of England. Wimund may have been a member of the party sent from Furness to found a house at Rushen on the Isle of Man by request of Amlaíb son of Gofraid Cróbh bhan, the King of Mann and the Isles, in 1134. King Amlaíb granted the monks of Furness the right to elect the Bishop of the Isles, and it appears that Wimund was elected to the see during the time of Thurstan (II), Archbishop of York. Thurstan died in early 1140, so that Wimund became Bishop of the Isles in the period 1134–1140. This was a very rapid rise for a young man of apparently obscure origins. However, as William of Newburgh tells us later, Wimund in time claimed to be the son of the Mormaer of Moray. William, and some later writers, doubted
    7.50
    4 votes
    36
    James Lancaster

    James Lancaster

    Sir James Lancaster (died 6 June 1618) was a prominent Elizabethan trader and privateer. Lancaster came from Basingstoke in Hampshire. In his early life, he was a soldier and a trader in Portugal. On 10 April 1591 he started from Torbay in Devon, with Raymond and Foxcroft, on his first great voyage to the East Indies; this fleet of three ships is the earliest of the English oversea Indian expeditions. Reaching Table Bay (1 August 1591), and losing one ship off Cape Correntes on 12 September, the squadron rested and refitted at Zanzibar (February 1592), rounded Cape Comorin the following May, and reached the Malay Peninsula in June. During this voyage, Lancaster's ships attacked for plunder every ship they encountered. After a later crossing to Ceylon, the crews insisted on returning home. The return voyage was disastrous with only twenty-five officers and men surviving to reach England in May 1594. Lancaster himself reached Rye on 24 May 1594. His Indian voyage, like Ralph Fitch's overland explorations and trading, was an important factor in the foundation of the East India Company. In the same year he led a privateering expedition against Pernambuco. Unlike the East Indies voyage,
    8.67
    3 votes
    37

    The Dark Frigate

    The Dark Frigate is a children's historical novel written by Charles Hawes. It won the 1924 Newbery Medal. It was the second, and final, book written by Charles Hawes, as he died shortly after its publication. The book opens in (Stuart London 17th century London). Philip Marsham, a nineteen year old sailor, has just been orphaned when his father's ship was lost at sea. An accident with a gun causes him to flee London, leaving behind the small inheritance left by his father. He decides to journey across England on foot, heading towards Bideford. During his travels, he encounters Sir John Bristol, a local Lord who greatly impresses the young man. He also encounters two men, Tom Jordan and Martin Barwick, who claim to be fellow sailors. Tom, who is more commonly known as the Old One, soon parts company with them, however Martin becomes Phil's traveling companion. When they reach Bideford, Martin leads the way to the house of Mother Taylor, an old woman who works as the go-between for numerous illegal activities. She informs them that the Old One has already gone ahead on a ship without them, but arranges positions for Martin and Phil on a frigate, known as the Rose of Devon. Once
    8.67
    3 votes
    38

    The Crimson Permanent Assurance

    The Crimson Permanent Assurance is a short film that plays as the beginning of the feature-length motion picture Monty Python's The Meaning of Life. Although it is presented as a separate film, and is sometimes shown without the feature, it can also be considered a prologue to The Meaning of Life, which is almost never shown without The Crimson Permanent Assurance preceding it. Having originally conceived the story as a 6-minute animated sequence in Monty Python's The Meaning of Life, intended for placement at the end of Part V, Terry Gilliam convinced the other members of Monty Python to allow him to produce and direct it as a live-action piece instead. According to Gilliam, the film's rhythm, length, and style of cinematography made it a poor fit as a scene in the larger movie, so it became "Our Short Feature Presentation", to be shown ahead of the "Main Feature". It was a common practice in British cinemas to show an unrelated short feature before the main movie, a holdover from the older practice of showing a full-length "B" movie ahead of the main feature. By the mid-1970s the short features were of poorer quality, or simply banal travelogues. As a kind of protest, the Pythons
    5.50
    6 votes
    39
    Eustace the Monk

    Eustace the Monk

    Eustace the Monk (c. 1170 – 24 August 1217) was a mercenary and pirate, in the tradition of medieval outlaws. Eustace was born a younger son of Baudoin Busket, a lord of the county of Boulogne. According to his biography, he went to Toledo, Spain, studied black magic there, returned home to become a Benedictine monk at St Samer Abbey near Calais, and then left the monastery to avenge his murdered father. Other evidence, however, suggests that his father's death occurred soon after 1190. That evidence proves that by 1202 Eustace was the seneschal and bailiff of the count of Boulogne, Renaud de Dammartin and that in c. 1204, the two quarrelled and, accused of mishandling his stewardship, Eustace fled and was declared an outlaw. Renaud confiscated his lands and fields; Eustace burned two mills in retaliation. He then became a pirate in the English Channel and the Strait of Dover, both for his own purposes and as a mercenary of France and England. John of England employed him intermittently from 1205 to 1212, against Philip II of France. The biography asserts that John gave him command of thirty ships at the start of this assignment. This employment involved Eustace and his brothers
    7.25
    4 votes
    40

    Peter Easton

    Peter Easton (c. 1570 – 1620 or after) was a pirate in the early 17th century who operated along the Newfoundland coastline between Harbour Grace and Ferryland from 1611 to 1614. Perhaps one of the most successful of all pirates he controlled such seapower that no sovereign or state could afford to ignore him and he was never overtaken or captured by any fleet commissioned to hunt him down. However, he is not as well known as some of the pirates from the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Peter Easton had been a loyal servant of the English Crown whose ancestors had served in the Crusades. The Eastons also distinguished themselves against the Spanish Armada. In 1602, Easton was in command of a convoy as a privateer with a commission from Queen Elizabeth I, to protect the Newfoundland fishing fleet. During these times, fishing vessels would carry arms and small cannons to protect the valuable cargo of fish from pirates and foreign vessels. Under his commission he could legally press-gang local fishermen into service for him. He could also attack the ships and wharves of the enemy as much as he wished, especially the much hated Spanish. Peter Easton's flagship was the Happy
    7.25
    4 votes
    41

    John Quelch

    John Quelch (1666-June 30, 1704) was an English pirate who had a lucrative but very brief career of about one year. His chief claim to historical significance is that he was the first person to be tried for piracy outside of England under Admiralty Law and thus without a jury. These Admiralty courts had been instituted to tackle the rise of piracy in colonial ports where civil and criminal courts had proved ineffective. In July, 1703, Governor Joseph Dudley of Boston sent out Captain Daniel Plowman of the Charles with a privateering license to attack French and Spanish ships off the coast of Newfoundland and Arcadia. John Quelch was Plowman's lieutenant. Before leaving Marblehead, Massachusetts, the Charles's crew under Quartermaster Anthony Holding mutinied and locked the ailing Plowman in his cabin. The crew elected Quelch the captain, who turned the Charles south. Plowman was thrown overboard, although it was never established whether he was dead or alive at that moment. The crew plundered nine Portuguese ships off the coast of Brazil and gained a large sum of money, even though England and Portugal were at peace at the time. The Charles contained large amounts of Brazilian
    8.33
    3 votes
    42
    Pierre Le Grand

    Pierre Le Grand

    Pierre Le Grand (Fr. = Peter the Great) was a Caribbean buccaneer of the 17th century. He is known to history only from one source, Alexandre Exquemelin's Buccaneers of America, and may be imaginary. Pierre was born in Dieppe, France. Nothing is known of his life before his arrival in Tortuga at some time in the mid-17th century. Pierre le Grand is known only for his attack on a Spanish galleon near the coast of Hispaniola in the 17th century. The exact site of the attack is uncertain; Exquemelin at one point says the Caicos Islands were the scene of the crime, and at another point places the attack at Cape Tiburón, off the southwest coast of Hispaniola. Pierre had recruited a crew of 28 men on a single small boat and sailed in search of Spanish ships to rob. After a long, fruitless cruise, his buccaneer band spotted a ship, a straggler from the Spanish treasure fleet. They voted to pursue it, and shortly after sunset, they drew alongside their prey without being seen. The legend says that Pierre ordered the crew's surgeon to cut a hole in the side of their own boat and sink it, to inspire the men to fight their hardest for lack of a means of retreat. Then the pirates climbed up
    8.33
    3 votes
    43
    Ching Shih

    Ching Shih

    Ching Shih (1775–1844) (simplified Chinese: 郑氏; traditional Chinese: 鄭氏; pinyin: Zhèng Shì; Cantonese: Jihng Sih; "widow of Zheng"), also known as Zheng Yi Sao (simplified Chinese: 郑一嫂; traditional Chinese: 鄭一嫂; pinyin: Zhèng Yī Sǎo; Cantonese: Jihng Yāt Sóu; "wife of Zheng Yi"), was a prominent pirate in middle Qing China. Ching Shih also known as Cheng I Sao terrorized the China Sea in the early 19th century. A brilliant Cantonese pirate, she commanded 1800 ships and more than 80,000 pirates — men, women, and even children. She challenged the world superpower empires at the time such as the British, Portuguese and the Qing dynasty. Undefeated, she would become one of China and Asia's strongest pirates, and one of world history's most powerful pirates. She was also one of the few pirate captains to retire from piracy. She became subject to numerous books, novels, video games and films. Little is known about Ching Shih's early life, including her birth name and precise date of birth. She was a Cantonese prostitute who worked in small brothel of Canton, but was captured by pirates. In 1801, she married Zheng Yi, a notorious Cantonese-Chinese pirate. The name she is best remembered
    6.20
    5 votes
    44

    The Confusion

    The Confusion is a novel by Neal Stephenson. It is the second volume in The Baroque Cycle and consists of two sections or books, Bonanza and The Juncto. In 2005, The Confusion won the Locus Award, together with The System of the World, also by Stephenson. Like the other volumes in the series, Confusion was written as multiple novels. However, unlike in the other two volumes of the Series, the two novels are set in concurrent periods. In the publication of the two novels as a single volume, Stephenson chose to publish the volume as alternating sections between Bonanza and The Juncto, book 4 and 5 respectively. Though the first publication of the Series in 3 volumes combined the two novels Bonanza and The Juncto, here the plots will be dealt with as separate entities, true to the author's original intention. The beginning of Bonanza finds Jack Shaftoe awakened from a syphilitic blackout of nearly three years. During this time he was a pirate galley slave. The other members of his bench, a motley crew who call themselves "The Cabal" from Africa, the Far East and Europe, create a plot to capture silver illegally shipped from Central America by a Spanish Viceroy; they convince the Pasha
    6.20
    5 votes
    45
    The Goonies

    The Goonies

    The Goonies is a 1985 American adventure-comedy film directed by Richard Donner. The screenplay was written by Chris Columbus from a story by executive producer Steven Spielberg. The film's premise features a band of pre-teens who live in the "Goon Docks" neighborhood of Astoria, Oregon attempting to save their homes from demolition, and in doing so, discover an old Spanish map that leads them on an adventure to unearth the long-lost fortune of One-Eyed Willie, a legendary 17th-century pirate. The Goonies, a group of friends living in the "Goon Docks" neighborhood of Astoria, Oregon, face foreclosure on their families' homes from the expanding Astoria Country Club. On one of their last days their morale sinks particularly low due to Mikey's older brother having failed his driver's license exam, thwarting their plans to "cruise the coast in style" during their "last Goonies weekend." While rummaging through the Walshes' attic, they find an old newspaper clipping, a Spanish map, and an artifact relating to a rumor of a lost but not forgotten pirate treasure somewhere in the area. Hearing the call of adventure, Mikey tries to persuade his friends to join him in search for the treasure
    9.50
    2 votes
    46
    Gentius

    Gentius

    Gentius (Greek: Γένθιος; ruled 181–168 BC) was the last Illyrian king of the Ardiaean State. The name appears to derive from PIE *g'en- "to beget", cognate to Latin gens, gentis "kin, clan, race". He was the son of Pleuratus III, a king who kept relations with Rome very strong. Gentius's principal city was Shkodra, the capital of Ardiaean State at the time. In 180 BC, during his early reign the Dalmatians and Daorson declared themselves independent from Gentius's rule and the city of Rhizon abandoned him prior to his defeat, receiving immunity from the Romans. He married the daughter of the Dardanian King Monunius. In 171 BC, Gentius was allied with the Romans against the Macedonians, but in 169 BC he changed sides and allied himself with Perseus of Macedon. The southernmost city of the Ardiaean State of Gentius was Lissus, a situation established sine the First Illyrian War. He arrested two Roman legati, accusing them of not coming as emissaries but as spies. Gentius destroyed the cities of Apollonia and Dyrrhachium, which were allied with Rome. In 168 BC, he was defeated at Scodra by a Roman force under L. Anicius Gallus, in only twenty or thirty days, and in 167 brought to Rome
    7.00
    4 votes
    47

    The Boy and the Pirates

    The Boy and the Pirates is a 1960 film from Bert I. Gordon ("Mr. B.I.G."), the master of giant monster films. It stars a very popular child star of the day in 12-year-old Charles Herbert and Gordon's own daughter, Susan. The story line, that of a little boy and girl trapped on the pirate ship of Blackbeard, ranges from comical at times to downright gruesome. There is a good deal of killing during the course of the film. The cook forces Jimmy at one point to take a fish and "gut and clean it, and save his entrails". There is another moment when Morgan the pirate tries to get Jimmy to reveal his coveted information by threatening to scald his mouth with a red-hot poker. Nonetheless, it has been described as "an engaging and innovative fantasy so perfect in its service to and embellishment of genre formula, it comes across as both completely familiar, yet breathtakingly original." A boy, Jimmy Warren, living along the coast in Massachusetts is upset with the unfairness of "modern" life in 1960 when his father scolds him about his school grades. He plays on a wrecked ship along the shore with Kathy. He picks up an odd jar, and wishes he were back in the olden days, on a pirate ship.
    7.00
    4 votes
    48

    Thomas Pound

    Thomas Pound (died 1703) was an English pirate who was briefly active in the coastal waters of New England during 1689. Boarding a small ship out of Boston, Massachusetts with six other passengers on August 8, 1689, Pound seized control of the ship shortly after picking up an additional five men off Lovell's Island. They soon encountered a fishing vessel and Pound, supposedly either out of generosity or because he was losing his courage, bought mackerel for eight pennies. Sailing to Falmouth, Maine, his crew was joined by soldiers who had deserted from the local garrison during the night and later they attacked the sloop Good Speed off Cape Cod and the brigantine Merrimack among other ships in the New England area. An armed sloop, the Mary, was soon sent out by the colonial governor against Pound and his crew who were soon discovered in Tarpaulin Cove. After heavy fighting, in which Pound suffered gunshot wounds, they eventually surrendered and were taken back to Boston. Tried on January 13, 1690, Pound was initially found guilty for acts of piracy. However, later he was reprieved. He was sent to England, where he was eventually released and eventually gained command of his own
    7.00
    4 votes
    49
    Thomas Tew

    Thomas Tew

    Thomas Tew (died 1695), also known as the Rhode Island Pirate, was a 17th century English privateer-turned-pirate. Although he embarked on only two major piratical voyages, and met a bloody death on the latter journey, Tew pioneered the route which became known as the Pirate Round. Many other famous pirates, including Henry Every and William Kidd, would follow in Tew’s path. Much of what is known about Tew is derived from Captain Charles Johnson's A General History of the Pyrates, which is a mixture of fact and fiction. When reading about Thomas Tew it is important to be able to distinguish between truth and story. Captain Johnson said "Tew, in Point of Gallantry, was inferior to none." It is frequently written that Tew had family in Rhode Island dating back to 1640, but it is not known where he was actually born. He may have been born in New England. One theory is that he was born in Maidford, Northamptonshire, England before immigrating to the colonies as a child with his family, although there is only a little circumstantial evidence for this. He lived at one time in Newport, Rhode Island. Tew is reported as being married with two daughters. According to one source his wife and
    7.00
    4 votes
    50
    Eric of Pomerania

    Eric of Pomerania

    Eric of Pomerania KG (1381 or 1382 – 3 May 1459) was King Eric (Eirik) III of Norway (1389–1442), King Eric VII of Denmark (1396–1439), and King Eric (Ericus) of Sweden (1396–1439; known there in history mainly as Erik av Pommern). He was the first King of the Nordic Kalmar Union, succeeding his adoptive mother Margaret I of Denmark. Referring to Eric of Pomerania as King Eric XIII of Sweden is a later invention, counting backwards from Eric XIV (1560–1568), who adopted hs numeral according to a fictitious history of Sweden. Going back into prehistory, it is not known how many Swedish monarchs were named Eric before this one (at least six were), so it would be speculative to try to affix a mathematically accurate one here. Born Boguslaw, the son of Polish Duke of Pomerania Wartislaw VII and Mary of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Eric's paternal grandparents were Boguslaw V, Duke of Pomerania and his second wife Adelheid of Brunswick-Grubenhagen. His maternal grandparents were Henry III, Duke of Mecklenburg and Ingeborg of Denmark, Duchess of Mecklenburg. Henry was a rival of Olaf Haakonsson in regard to the Danish succession in 1375. Ingeborg was a daughter of Valdemar IV of Denmark and his
    8.00
    3 votes
    51
    Jean du Casse

    Jean du Casse

    Jean Baptiste du Casse (Saubusse, August 2, 1646 – Bourbon-l'Archambault, June 25, 1715) was a French buccaneer and admiral. In his youth, he was not allowed into the French Navy because his parents were Huguenots. He then went into the slave trade with the Compagnie de Sénégal, sailing between Africa and the Caribbean. With the money of the slave trade he bought a ship in Saint-Domingue and privateered a packed Dutch ship. He sailed to France and offered half of the loot to the Crown. For this he was appointed Lieutenant in the French Navy by Louis XIV. In 1687 he tried to conquer Elmina; in June 1689 he attacked Berbice and Fort Zeelandia in Surinam. In 1691, he was appointed governor of Saint-Domingue, and gained the respect of the buccaneers of the island. In the following months he plundered the English colonies in the vicinity, including Port Royal which had just been struck by a devastating earthquake. In 1697, under Baron de Pointis he successfully raided the South American city of Cartagena, but did not receive the promised 1/5 share of the loot. He then sailed to France, to claim his share from King Louis XIV in person. In fact he and his men received a compensation of
    8.00
    3 votes
    52

    I, Jedi

    I, Jedi is a novel, written by Michael A. Stackpole that is set in the Star Wars galaxy. It was the first Star Wars novel written in the first-person perspective of a character never seen in the movies. The novel takes place around the same time as Kevin J. Anderson's Jedi Academy Trilogy. Like the Jedi Academy Trilogy, I, Jedi is notable in that it provides a detailed, first-hand look at the training of a Jedi Knight. The novel revisits many of the situations first presented by Anderson. Stackpole, however, is often commended for retconning parts of the Jedi Academy Trilogy into a much more logical storyline. In I, Jedi, Corran Horn must develop his Jedi powers in order to save the life of his wife, Mirax Terrik. Corran Horn was a member of the elite X-wing force Rogue Squadron. After returning home from a long campaign to find his wife kidnapped, he turns to Luke Skywalker, the only remaining Jedi Master at the time, for help. This coincides nicely with the master's timing, as he is seeking students for his new Jedi Academy on Yavin 4. Corran knows that he is Force-sensitive, and that only with the Force as his ally can he track down his enemy. It turns out that Corran's wife,
    6.75
    4 votes
    53

    Henry Jennings

    Henry Jennings (died 1745) was an 18th century British privateer who served primarily during the War of Spanish Succession and later served as leader of the pirate haven of New Providence. Although little is known of Jennings' early life, he was first recorded as a privateer during the War of the Spanish Succession operating from Jamaica, then governed by Lord Archibald Hamilton. There is evidence that Jennings owned enough land in Jamaica to live comfortably, thus leaving his motivations for piracy to conjecture. His first recorded act of piracy took place in early 1716 when, with three vessels and 150-300 men, Jennings' fleet ambushed the Spanish salvage camp from the 1715 Treasure Fleet. After forcing the retreat of around 40 soldiers, Jennings set sail for Jamaica carrying back an estimated 350,000 pesos. While en route to Jamaica, Jennings encountered another Spanish ship and captured another 60,000 pesos. When Jennings encountered Sam Bellamy, he teamed with him to commit more piracies against the French. When Bellamy double-crossed him, Jennings' ruthlessness was evidenced in the brutal slaying of more than 20 Frenchmen and Englishmen, and the burning of an innocent
    9.00
    2 votes
    54

    Juan García

    Juan Garcia (fl. 1622) was a 17th century Spanish privateer. He was among a number of Spaniards who served the Spanish Crown as Dunkirkers during the Eighty Years' War. Both he and Pedro de la Plesa were caught by the Dutch Republic naval force as they attempted to break through a blockade of Dunkirk. He and de la Plesa were accused of leaving Captain Jan Jacobsen to face nine pursuing Dutch warships alone. In October 1622, he and Pedro de la Plesa left Duinkerken with Jan Jacobsen attempting to break through the blockade imposed on the city by the Dutch Republic. However, a Dutch yacht spotted Pedro de la Plesa as he sailed out of Oostende. The ship's captain, Jacob Volckertzoon Vinck, immediately sailed to a small fleet stationed nearby. Its commander, Admiral Harman Kleuter, set off after the blockade runners at once and was later joined by another squadron under Captain Lambert Hendrikszoon. Garcia and Pedro de la Plesa fled instantly upon encountering the fleet, however Jacobsen stayed behind to fight the nine pursuing warships. Both because of his heroic last stand, as well as for covering his comrades' escape, Jacobsen and his crew became national heroes.
    9.00
    2 votes
    55

    Nicholas Alvel

    Nicholas Alvel (fl. ca. 1603) was an English pirate active in the Ionian Sea during the early 17th century.
    5.80
    5 votes
    56

    The Ghost Pirates

    The Ghost Pirates is a novel by William Hope Hodgson, first published in 1909. The economic style of writing has led horror writer Robert Weinberg to describe the Ghost Pirates as "one of the finest examples of the tightly written novel ever published." In it, Hodgson never describes the ghosts - if this is indeed what they are, since their true nature is left ambiguous - in any remarkable detail, he merely reports of their gradual commandeering of the ship. "The Ghost Pirates . . . is a powerful account of a doomed and haunted ship on its last voyage, and of the terrible sea-devils (of quasi-human aspect, and perhaps the spirits of bygone buccaneers) that besiege it and finally drag it down to an unknown fate. With its command of maritime knowledge, and its clever selection of hints and incidents suggestive of latent horrors in nature, this book at times reaches enviable peaks of power." — H.P. Lovecraft The novel is presented as the transcribed testimony of Jessop, who we ultimately discover is the only survivor of the final voyage of the Mortzestus, having been rescued from drowning by the crew of the passing Sangier. It begins with Jessop recounting how he came to be aboard the
    5.80
    5 votes
    57

    Anne Dieu-Le-Veut

    Anne Dieu-Le-Veut also called Marie-Anne or Marianne (born ca 1650) was a French Pirate, a so-called Buccaneer, and together with Jaquotte Delahaye one of very few female ones. She is believed to have been a criminal deported from France in this manner, as were many of those women. Her deportation to Tortuga was said to have taken place during the reign of governor Betrand d'Ogeron de la Bouere, which means it must have been in 1665-1668 or 1669-1675. In Tortuga she was married to the buccaneer Pierre Length. In 1683, Anne's husband was killed in a bar fight by the famous buccaneer Laurens de Graaf. She challenged Laurens to a duel to avenge her husbands death (other sources claims she heard him insult her), and while Laurens drew his sword, Anne drew her gun. Laurens then succumbed saying he would not fight a woman; he then proposed to her on the spot in admiration of her courage, and she accepted. In reality, the two were actually not married, as Laurens already had a wife he had abandoned many years ago, but they were from this point seen as man and wife. Others claim this event happened in 1693. Anne is called a pirate because she accompanied Laurens on his ship and fought on
    7.67
    3 votes
    58

    Benjamin Hornigold

    Captain Benjamin Hornigold (died 1719) was an 18th-century English pirate. His career lasted from 1715 to 1718, after which he turned pirate hunter and pursued his former allies on behalf of the Governor of the Bahamas. He was killed when his ship was wrecked on a reef during the 1719 hurricane season. Hornigold's early life is unrecorded, though it is possible he was born in Norfolk, England, and, if so, he might have first served at sea aboard ships whose home port was either King's Lynn or Great Yarmouth. His first documented acts of piracy were in the winter of 1713-1714, when he employed periaguas (sailing canoes) and a sloop to menace merchant vessels off the coast of New Providence and its capital Nassau. By 1717 Hornigold had at his command a thirty-gun sloop he named the Ranger, which was likely the most heavily armed ship in the region and allowed him to seize other vessels with impunity. His second-in-command during this period was Edward Teach, who would later be better known as the pirate Blackbeard. When Hornigold took command of the Ranger he delegated the captaincy of his earlier sloop to Teach. In the spring of 1717 the two pirate captains seized three merchant
    7.67
    3 votes
    59

    Edward Mansvelt

    Edward Mansvelt or Mansfield (fl. 1659-1666) was a 17th century Dutch corsair and buccaneer who, at one time, was acknowledged as an informal chieftain of the "Brethren of the Coast". He was the first to organise large scale raids against Spanish settlements, tactics which would be utilised to attack Spanish strongholds by later buccaneers in future years, and held considerable influence in Tortuga and Port Royal. He was widely considered one of the finest buccaneers of his day and, following his death, his position was assumed by his protégé and vice-admiral, Henry Morgan. His background is largely obscure, with conflicting accounts as a Dutchman from Curaçao or an Englishman, and is usually referred to by the surnames Mansvelt or Mansfield. He is first recorded accepting a privateering commission from Governor Edward D'Oyley at Port Royal in 1659. Based from Jamaica during the early-1660s, he began raiding Spanish shipping and coastal settlements, travelling overland as far as the Pacific coast of South America. In late 1665, he attacked a Cuban village with 200 buccaneers. Soon after this raid, he was offered a commission by the newly-appointed governor, Thomas Modyford, at Port
    7.67
    3 votes
    60
    7.67
    3 votes
    61

    John Ward

    John Ward or Birdy (c. 1553 – 1622), also known as Jack Ward and under his Muslim name Yusuf Reis, was a notorious English pirate around the turn of the 17th century who later became a Barbary Corsair operating out of Tunis during the early 17th century. Little is known about Ward's early life. What little is known comes from a pamphlet purportedly written by someone who sailed with him during his pirate days. That said, Ward seems to have been born about 1553 probably in Faversham, Kent, in southeast England. Like many born in coastal areas, he spent his youth and early adult years working in the fisheries. Then, after the failed invasion of England by the Spanish Armada in 1588, he found work as a privateer, plundering Spanish ships with a license from Queen Elizabeth I of England. When James I of England assumed the throne in 1603, he ended the war with Spain and in effect put the privateers out of business. However, many of them refused to give up their livelihood and simply continued to plunder. Those who did were considered pirates because they no longer had valid licenses – called letters of marque – issued by the state. Ward appears not to have turned immediately to piracy
    7.67
    3 votes
    62
    Stenka Razin

    Stenka Razin

    Stepan (Sten'ka) Timofeyevich Razin (Russian: Степан (Стенька) Тимофеевич Разин, Russian pronunciation: [sʲtʲɪpˈɑn (sʲtʲˈenʲkə) tʲɪmɐˈfʲeɪvʲɪt͡ɕ ˈrɑzʲɪn]; 1630 – June 16 [O.S. June 6] 1671) was a Cossack leader who led a major uprising against the nobility and Tsar's bureaucracy in South Russia. He is first noted by history in 1661, as part of a diplomatic mission from the Don Cossacks to the Kalmyks. That same year Razin went on a long-distance pilgrimage to the great Solovetsky Monastery on the White Sea for the benefit of his soul. After that, all trace of him is lost for six years, when he reappears as the leader of a robber community established at Panshinskoye, among the marshes between the rivers Tishina and Ilovlya, from whence he levied tribute from all vessels passing up and down the Volga. A long war with Poland in 1654-1667 and Sweden in 1656-1658 put heavy demands upon the people of Russia. Taxes increased as did conscription. Many peasants hoping to escape these burdens fled south and joined bands of Razin's marauding Cossacks. They were also joined by many others who were disaffected with the Russian government, including people of the lower classes as well as
    7.67
    3 votes
    63
    Barbary pirates

    Barbary pirates

    The Barbary pirates, sometimes called Barbary corsairs or Ottoman corsairs, were pirates and privateers who operated from North Africa, based primarily in the ports of Tunis, Tripoli and Algiers. This area was known in Europe as the Barbary Coast, a term derived from the name of its Berber inhabitants. Their predation extended throughout the Mediterranean, south along West Africa's Atlantic seaboard and even South America, and into the North Atlantic as far north as Iceland, but they primarily operated in the western Mediterranean. In addition to seizing ships, they engaged in Razzias, raids on European coastal towns and villages, mainly in Italy, France, Spain, and Portugal, but also in the British Isles, the Netherlands and as far away as Iceland. The main purpose of their attacks was to capture Christian slaves for the Islamic market in North Africa and the Middle East. While such raids had occurred since soon after the Muslim conquest of the region, the terms Barbary pirates and Barbary corsairs are normally applied to the raiders active from the 16th century onwards, when the frequency and range of the slavers' attacks increased and Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli came under the
    10.00
    1 votes
    64

    Charles Harris

    Captain Charles Harris (16??-1723) joined the notorious pirate Edward Low. He captained the sloop Ranger in the Action of 10 June 1723. While Low escaped, Charles and his crew were captured and hung in Newport.
    10.00
    1 votes
    65
    Cord Widderich

    Cord Widderich

    Cord Widderich (alternative spelling: Kort Wiederich) (died 1447) was a pirate active during political conflicts between Dithmarschen and North Frisia in the early fifteenth century. He lived during the times of Klaus Störtebeker and the Victual Brothers, but was not part of their movement. North Frisia aided Holstein when it declared war on Dithmarschen in 1404. After Dithmarschen defeated Holstein, a peace treaty prohibited further military campaigns. Instead, Cord Widderich and other Dithmarsians took revenge on their Frisian neighbors via piracy. In 1407, Cord Widderich and his men from Lunden, Germany occupied Eiderstedt and made the Pellworm church tower their base for looting the surrounding villages and tricking ships into stranding. Only when the church tower swayed with the wind and a storm threatened to topple the building did Widderich and his men leave North Frisia for good. During his retreat from Pellworm, Widderich carried off a number of treasures from the church. The most famous part of his booty was a bronze baptismal font from the thirteenth century, which he gave as a consecration gift to the newly built Saint Clemens church of Büsum, Dithmarschen, where it
    10.00
    1 votes
    66

    Cornelius Essex

    Cornelius Essex (died 1680) was an English buccaneer who took part in Captain Bartholomew Sharp's privateering expedition, the "Pacific Adventure", during the late 1670s. Although much of his early life is unknown, he is first recorded being brought with his ship, the Great Dolphin, to Port Royal by HMS Hunter in November 1679 and tried with twenty of his crew for "riotously comporting themselves" as well as charges of looting the plantation of a Major Samuel Jenck's of St. James' parish for which two men were sentenced to death. Essex, as did the other Captains, held a commission by the Jamaican government that granted them permission to cut logwood in Honduras and left Port Morant in December 1679 with Captain John Coxon, Robert Allison, Thomas Mackett, Jean Rose and a Captain Bournano and rendezvoused at the Isles of Pines near eastern Panama shortly after. Following the election of Coxon as head of the party, the privateers traced the old route Sir Henry Morgan had taken in his raid on Portobello in 1668. After anchoring at a deserted cay, he was one of the privateers that participated in the overland assault on the Spanish stronghold and was among thirty others killed in a
    10.00
    1 votes
    67

    Edward England

    Edward England, born Edward Seegar in Ireland, was a famous African coast and Indian Ocean pirate captain from 1717 to 1720. The ships he sailed on included the Pearl (which he renamed The Royal James) and later the Fancy, for which England exchanged the Pearl in 1720. His flag was the classic Jolly Roger with a skull above two crossed thigh bones on a black background. Born in Ireland, England made his way to Jamaica and became a mate on a sloop. He was captured by the pirate captain Christopher Winter and forced to join the crew. Winter most likely took England to the pirate base on Nassau, Bahamas, for England is next reported as Charles Vane's quartermaster, in March, 1718. Vane's sloop, the Lark was captured by the Royal Navy, but England and the rest of the crew were released to induce the other pirates of Nassau to accept the King's pardon. Vane granted England command of a captured vessel in mid-1718. England made for the west coast of Africa, where he plundered large numbers of slave ships. He and his crew stayed for some time in an African town, but a conflict arose over the pirates' treatment of the local women. Fighting broke out, the pirates burned the town, and set
    10.00
    1 votes
    68

    Glauketas

    Glaucetas (Greek: Γλαυκέτας), sometimes transliterated Glauketas (fl. 315 – 300 BC), was a corsair chief active in the Aegean Sea during 4th Century BC. Although little is known about his life, he is recorded in ancient Greek inscriptions of the Athenian navy under Thymochares of Sphettos raiding his base on Kythnos and capturing he and his men "making the sea safe for those that sailed thereon." ( I.G., II, 331.)
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    1 votes
    69

    Jack Plank Tells Tales

    Jack Plank Tells Tales is a children's book by Newbery Honor recipient Natalie Babbitt. Her first novel in 25 years, it was released by Scholastic, Inc. in 2007. The book contains connected stories dealing with an inept and humane pirate, Jack Plank, who has trouble finding work that suits him and his inhibitions. The book received a starred review from BookList in April 2007, and the School Library Journal gave it a most favorable review.
    10.00
    1 votes
    70

    John Fenn

    John Fenn (died May 1723) was an early 18th century English pirate who sailed with Captain Bartholomew Roberts and later had a brief partnership with Thomas Anstis. Although much of his early career is unrecorded, he was a member of Captain Roberts's fleet in June 1719 to April 1720, until leaving with fellow member Thomas Anstis, who was awarded command of the 21-gun Morning Star shortly before leaving the West Indies for the West African coast during the night of April 21, 1721. Remaining with Anstis in the Caribbean, Fenn participated in the capture of three or four merchant ships near Hispanola, Jamaica and Martinique during the month of June before being given command of the 21-gun Morning Star. After quarrelling for some time, Anstis and Fenn decided to end their piratical careers and petitioned King George I for a royal pardon claiming they had been forced into piracy by Roberts. After nine months camped in an uninhabited island off the coast of Cuba, having received no response from the British government, they decided to resume their piracy in August 1722. However, running into a violent storm shortly after their departure, Fenn's ship was wrecked on Grand Cayman Island
    10.00
    1 votes
    71

    Richard Sawkins

    Richard Sawkins or Hawkins (died May 22, 1680) was a British buccaneer who participated in the Pacific Adventure, a privateering expedition headed by Captain John Coxon. Although little is known of his early life, Sawkins was captured by HMS Success and later imprisoned in Port Royal while awaiting trial for piracy as late as December 1, 1679. He was apparently released however as he is later recorded commanding a small 16-ton vessel with a crew of 35 men and one gun. Along with Peter Harris, he joined up with Captain John Coxon's privateering expedition near Bocca del Toro in late-March and was one of 330 buccaneers who landed on the coast of Darien with Coxon and Bartholomew Sharp. Marching overland through the jungle, Sawkins participated in a surprise attack and looting of Santa Marta, later crossing the isthmus in Indian canoes, and sailing down the Santa Maria River eventually making their way to the Pacific Ocean. Arriving with his own group soon after, flying a red flag with yellow stripes, Sawkins soon captured two small Spanish vessels before sailing with his group towards Panama City. As they neared the city, Sawkins encountered a Spanish fleet of eight ships and, after
    10.00
    1 votes
    72

    Skybreaker

    Skybreaker, sequel to Airborn, is a fantasy novel for young adults and adolescents written by Canadian author Kenneth Oppel. It continues the adventures of young airship student Matt Cruse, and Kate de Vries, a would-be scientist. Matt Cruse has been stationed on the Flotsam, an old cargo ship. The Flotsam is his training vessel. All Airship Academy students are assigned a training vessel for two weeks, he is assigned to partake in journeys made by the training vessel. During one trip, the ship flies through the Devil's Fist, a permanent storm in the Indian Ocean. After several dangerous maneuvers through wind drafts, the Flotsam levels. A vessel, drifting at 20,000 feet, is suddenly spotted from the crow's nest. Captain Tritus deduces that it is the Hyperion, a long-lost ship built for billionaire Theodore Grunel that was supposedly carrying great riches. Tritus foolishly attempts to go tow the ship; however, he and most the crew are stricken with altitude sickness. Despite Tritus's protests, Matt, the sole crew member unaffected by the altitude, pilots the ship down and steers for the nearest port, saving the crew in the process. Matt returns to the Airship Academy where he is
    10.00
    1 votes
    73
    The Black Swan

    The Black Swan

    The Black Swan is a 1942 swashbuckler Technicolor film by Henry King, based on a novel by Rafael Sabatini, and starring Tyrone Power and Maureen O'Hara. It was nominated for three Academy Awards, and won one for Best Cinematography, Color. After England and Spain make peace, notorious pirate Henry Morgan (Laird Cregar) decides to reform. As a reward, he is made Governor of Jamaica, with a mandate to rid the Caribbean of his former comrades, by persuasion or force if necessary. He replaces the former governor, Lord Denby (George Zucco), but is not trusted by either the lawful residents or the pirates. Captain Jamie Waring (Tyrone Power) and his lieutenant, Tom Blue (Thomas Mitchell), reluctantly give up their "trade" out of friendship for Morgan, but others of the Pirate Brotherhood, such as Captain Billy Leech (George Sanders) and Wogan (Anthony Quinn), refuse to change. Meanwhile, Waring takes a liking to Denby's daughter, Lady Margaret (Maureen O'Hara), who happens to be inconveniently engaged to an English gentleman, Roger Ingram (Edward Ashley). As it turns out, her fiancé is secretly providing information about ship sailings to the unrepentant pirates. When Morgan is unable to
    10.00
    1 votes
    74

    Airborn

    Airborn is a 2004 young adult novel by Kenneth Oppel. The book won the Canada's Governor General's Award. Airborn is set in a time where the primary form of air transportation are airships. The technological advancements in the story appear to depict a world similar to the very early twentieth century, with a few changes: the airplane has not been invented and the Earth contains hydrium, a fictional gas lighter than hydrogen, as well as fictional flying creatures live their entire lives in the sky. This suggests that the book takes place in an alternate reality. The book takes place aboard a transoceanic airship, the Aurora, and is told from the perspective of its cabin boy, Matt Cruse. This novel inspired the album "The Airship" of Adam Young's melody and instrumental driven project "Port Blue". The story begins with the Aurora, an airship for a luxury line akin to the Cunard line, on a journey to Sydney, Australia. Matt, a 14-year-old cabin boy, is the protagonist of the story. When we first enter the story, we see him while he is on duty in the crow's nest, scanning the skies for anything unusual. He soon spots a dark balloon drifting a few hundred feet away. The balloon is
    6.50
    4 votes
    75
    John Hawkins

    John Hawkins

    Admiral Sir John Hawkins (also spelled as Hawkyns) (Plymouth 1532 – 12 November 1595) was an English shipbuilder, naval administrator and commander, merchant, navigator, and slave trader. As treasurer (1577) and controller (1589) of the Royal Navy, he rebuilt older ships and helped design the faster ships that withstood the Spanish Armada in 1588. He later devised the naval blockade to intercept Spanish treasure ships. One of the foremost seamen of 16th-century England, he was the chief architect of the Elizabethan navy. In the battle in which the Spanish Armada was defeated in 1588, Hawkins served as a vice admiral. He was knighted for gallantry. William, John's father, was a confidant of Henry VIII of England and one of England's principal sea captains, having sailed to the New World ca. 1527. Sir Francis Drake, John's second cousin, helped him in his second voyage. The first Englishman recorded to have taken slaves from Africa was John Lok, a London trader who, in 1555, brought five slaves from Guinea. A second London trader taking slaves at that time was William Towerson whose fleet sailed into Plymouth following his 1556 voyage to Africa and from Plymouth on his 1557 voyage.
    6.50
    4 votes
    76

    Joseph Baker

    Joseph Baker [Joseph Boulanger] (died May 9, 1800) was a Canadian pirate, known primarily for the failed mutiny and hijacking of the merchant schooner Eliza in 1800. Although little is known of his early life, Baker signed aboard the West Indies bound merchant schooner Eliza in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Soon after leaving port, Baker seized control of the ship with two other crewmen, Peter LaCroix and Joseph Berrouse, attacking the first mate during night watch and throwing him overboard. Wounding the Captain, a William Wheland, the three held him hostage while they discussed how to sell the cargo. As none of the sailors were able to navigate the ship, they accepted an offer from Wheland to sail them to the "Spanish Main" so they could rendezvous with other pirates in order to sell the cargo at a port. Although promising to spare Wheland's life in exchange for sailing the ship to a safe haven, Baker reportedly bragged to LaCroix and Berrouse that he planned to kill him once in sight of land. After a time however, Wheland managed to surprise his captors, locking LaCroix and Berrouse in the ship's hold when they were below decks taking inventory of the ship's cargo. Sneaking up
    5.60
    5 votes
    77
    Aruj

    Aruj

    Aruj or Arouj (Turkish: Oruç Reis, Arabic: عروج بربروس, Spanish: Arrudye; c. 1474 – 1518) was the elder brother of Barbarossa Hayreddin Pasha and Ottoman Bey (Governor) of Algiers and Beylerbey (Chief Governor) of the West Mediterranean. He was born on the Ottoman island of Midilli (Lesbos in today's Greece) and was killed in a battle with the Spaniards at Tlemcen in the Ottoman Eyalet of Algeria. He became known as Baba Aruj or Baba Oruç (Father Aruj) when he transported large numbers of Moriscos refugees from Spain to North Africa; he was known through folk etymology in Europe as Barbarossa (which meant Redbeard in Italian). Sources refer to him as a Greek, as a Turk or as an Albanian by origin. Oruç was born in the 1470s on the Ottoman island of Midilli (Lesbos in present-day Greece; Greek: Λέσβος) to his father Yakup Ağa, a Greek renegade or Turk as well as a former Sipahi from the Ottoman city of Yenice-i Vardar (modern Yannitsa in Greece) and his wife, Katerina, from the Aegean island of Lesbos. Yakup Ağa took part in the Ottoman conquest of Lesbos (Midilli) from the Genoese in 1462, and as a reward, was granted the fief of the Bonova village in the island. He married a local
    8.50
    2 votes
    78

    Christopher Moody

    Christopher Moody (1694–1722) was an 18th-century pirate who held a policy of no quarter (no sparing of lives). After he was captured, he was hanged at Cape Coast Castle in Cabo Corso, Ghana (now Cape Coast, Ghana). Moody may have previously been a member of Bartholomew Roberts' crew. He is believed to have pirated off the coast of North and South Carolina sometime between 1713 and 1718. Moody is largely remembered for his distinct Jolly Roger flag. Instead of the traditional white on black, Moody's Jolly Roger is gold on red. It also has an hourglass with wings, to express to his victims that their time to live was flying away. In the middle is a white arm holding a dagger. In addition, blood-red pennants were often tied to the ship's mainmast to show deadly intent. While the red Jolly Roger is distinctive, it is not unique. It is believed that the origin of the red flag is likely that English privateers flew the red jack by order of the Admiralty in 1694. When the War of Spanish Succession ended in 1714, many privateers turned to piracy and some retained the red flag, as red symbolized blood. No matter how much seamen dreaded the black pirate standard, all prayed they never
    8.50
    2 votes
    79

    Edward Davis

    Edward Davis or Davies (fl. c. 1680–1688) was an English buccaneer active in the Caribbean during the 1680s and would lead successful raids against Leon and Panama in 1685, the latter considered one of the last major buccaneer raids against a Spanish stronghold. Much of his career was later recorded by writer William Dampier in A New Voyage Round the World (1697). Possibly of Flemish ancestry, he is first recorded as one of the members of the "Pacific Adventure" led by Bartholomew Sharp and John Coxon in 1680. Briefly serving as a navigator, he and several others including James Kelly left the expedition within a year and returned overland through Panama with John Cook or Cooke. In August 1683, while selling captured prizes in Virginia, he agreed to join a privateering expedition as a quartermaster under Cooke. Sailing eastward, they soon captured the 36-gun Delight (or Bachelor's Delight) shortly after arriving off West Africa. Sailing to the Pacific by way of Cape Horn, Davis and the others were joined by John Eaton before raiding Spanish cities along the coast of present day South and Central America. Following the death of Cook in July 1684, the crew of the Delight elected
    8.50
    2 votes
    80

    Richard Hawkins

    Admiral Sir Richard Hawkins (or Hawkyns) (c. 1562 – April 17, 1622) was a 17th-century English seaman, explorer and Elizabethan "Sea Dog", and the son of Admiral Sir John Hawkins. He was from his earlier days familiar with ships and the sea, and in 1582 he accompanied his uncle, William Hawkins, to the West Indies. In 1585 he was captain of a galliot in Drake's expedition to the Spanish main, in 1588 he commanded a queen's ship against the Armada, and in 1590 he served with his father's expedition at the coast of Portugal. In 1593 he purchased the discovery ship Dainty, a vessel originally built for his father and used by him in his expeditions, and sailed for the West Indies, the Spanish Main and the South Seas. It seems clear that his project was to prey on the oversea possessions of Spanish crown. Hawkins, however, in an account of the voyage written thirty years afterwards, maintained, and by that time perhaps had really persuaded himself, that his expedition was undertaken purely for the purpose of geographical discovery. After visiting the coast of Brazil, the Dainty passed through the Straits of Magellan, and in due course reached Valparaíso. Having plundered the town,
    8.50
    2 votes
    81

    Sister Ping

    Cheng Chui Ping (simplified Chinese: 郑翠萍; traditional Chinese: 鄭翠萍; pinyin: Zhèng Cuìpíng; Wade–Giles: Cheng Ts'ui-p'ing), also known as Sister Ping (萍姐 Píng Jiě), ran a notorious Chinese human smuggling operation primarily from her base in New York City from 1984 until 2000, when she was arrested in Hong Kong and subsequently extradited back to the United States. Individuals who conducted such Chinese alien smuggling operations are known as "snakeheads". Almost all of the immigrants whom Sister Ping harbored came from the Fujian province of China. Sister Ping was renowned as the most notorious snakehead operating the largest, most sophisticated operation of its kind, which became international in scale. Sister Ping's smuggling operation was fraught with numerous problems, many of which made headlines. One such story involved a cargo ship named the Golden Venture which ran aground off the beaches of Queens, New York in June 1993. The Golden Venture had 286 would-be immigrants from China in its hold, all of whom had been traveling for months, many near starvation. Ten people drowned in the incident. Sister Ping fled the United States in advance of an indictment in 1994. The FBI and
    8.50
    2 votes
    82
    The Pirate

    The Pirate

    The Pirate is a novel by Walter Scott, based roughly on the life of John Gow who features as Captain Cleveland. The setting is the southern tip of the main island of Shetland (which Scott visited in 1814), around 1700. It was published in 1821, the same year that the lighthouse at Sumburgh Head began to operate. The arrival of the shipwrecked captain, Cleveland, spoils young Mordaunt's relationship with the Troil girls, and soon a bitter rivalry grows between the two men. Minna falls in love with Cleveland, not knowing his true profession. Brenda however is in love with Mordaunt. The pirates capture the Troils, but after an encounter with the frigate HMS Halcyon, they are freed. Brenda and Mordaunt are reunited, and Minna and Clement parted. Mr Mertoun and his son had arrived as strangers, and resided for several years in the remaining rooms of the old mansion of the Earls of Orkney, the father leading a very secluded life, while the son Mordaunt became a general favourite with the inhabitants, and especially with the udaller, Magnus Troil, and his daughters. On his way home from a visit to them, he and the pedlar Snailsfoot sought shelter from a storm at the Yellowleys' farmhouse,
    8.50
    2 votes
    83

    Christopher Condent

    Christopher Condent (1690s – died 1770), born in Plymouth in Devon, was an English pirate who led the return to the Eastern Seas. He and his crew fled New Providence in 1718, when Woodes Rogers became governor of the island. On a trip across the Atlantic Ocean, an Indian member of the crew, who was severely beaten and mistreated, threatened to ignite the ship's powder magazine. Condent swiftly jumped into the hold, and shot the Indian in the face. Purportedly, the crew hacked the body to pieces, and the gunner slashed open his stomach, tore out his heart, boiled it, and ate it. Further into the voyage, the crew captured a merchant vessel. Roughly half of the crew sailed away, while the other half chose Condent as their captain. At the Cape Verde Islands, Condent and his men captured a Portuguese wine vessel, a squadron of small ships, and a Dutch war ship. Condent kept the warship, and named it The Flying Dragon. The Flying Dragon then cruised the Brazilian coast, and Condent took more ships, occasionally torturing Portuguese prisoners by cutting off their ears and noses. Condent took much more "booty" when he reached the African coast. In June or July 1719, he reached Madagascar.
    7.33
    3 votes
    84
    Edward Lowe

    Edward Lowe

    Captain Edward "Ned" Low (also spelled Lowe or Loe; ca. 1690 – ca. 1724) was a notorious English pirate during the latter days of the Golden Age of Piracy, in the early 18th century. He was born around 1690 into poverty in Westminster, London, and was a thief from a young age. Low moved to Boston, Massachusetts, as a young man. His wife died in childbirth in late 1719. Two years later, he became a pirate, operating off the coasts of New England and the Azores, and in the Caribbean. He captained a number of ships, usually maintaining a small fleet of three or four. Low and his pirate crews captured at least a hundred ships during his short career, burning most of them. Although he was active for only three years, Low remains notorious as one of the most vicious pirates of the age, with a reputation for violently torturing his victims before killing them. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle described Low as "savage and desperate," and a man of "amazing and grotesque brutality". The New York Times called him a torturer, whose methods would have "done credit to the ingenuity of the Spanish Inquisition in its darkest days". The circumstances of Low's death, which took place around 1724, have been
    7.33
    3 votes
    85

    Guillaume Le Testu

    Guillaume Le Testu, also called Têtu, (c. 1509 or 1512 - April 29, 1573) was a 16th century French corsair, explorer and navigator during the Elizabethan age. He was a successful privateer during the early years of the French Wars of Religion. In 1573 he and Sir Francis Drake attacked a Spanish mule train escorting gold and silver to Nombre de Dios on the Atlantic coast of Panama, and he was subsequently killed following his capture by the Spanish. He was one of the foremost cartographers of his time, being one of the last students to be taught at Dieppe, and is one of the authors of the Dieppe maps. Many of his maps are distinguished by a high degree of sophistication and extensive detail, his work influencing future generations of navigators and explorers over the course of the next century. His work was also used by Admiral Gaspard de Coligny and French Huguenots hoping to establish themselves in Brazil, Florida, the Caribbean and even Terra Australis; however these attempts were abandoned following Coligny's assassination in 1572 and Le Testu's own death the following year. Guillaume le Testu was born sometime around 1509, either in Le Havre, Normandy or Grasse, Provence. He
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    86
    Jacob Willekens

    Jacob Willekens

    Jacob Willekens or Wilckens (1564 – 1649) was a Dutch admiral on a fleet to the Dutch Indies, and a herring seller, who went to sea again at the age of fifty for the Dutch West Indies Company. His most well-known success was undoubtedly the conquest of São Salvador da Bahia, the then capital of Brazil. His fleet, which included Dutch corsair Piet Hein as vice admiral, departed from Texel on December 22, 1623 with between 26-36 ships and 3,300 sailors towards South America. At the beginning of June 1624, they began their attack from sea and soon captured the Portuguese stronghold with little resistance. They occupied Bahia for over a year before the local population took up arms under acting governor Matias de Albuquerque and Archbishop Dom Marcos Teixeira who eventually expelled them with the help of a combined Spanish-Portuguese fleet numbering 52 warships and 12,000 soldiers in May 1625. This was the first major WIC privateering expedition to the region. He would also participate in an attack on Rio de Janeiro with Hein in 1626, but after a dispute over who would be in command, the two separated with Willekens returning to Amsterdam. Willekens joined the vroedschap in 1639 and
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    87

    John Bowen

    John Bowen (? - 1704) was a pirate of Créole origin active during the Golden Age of Piracy. He sailed with other famous contemporaries, including Nathaniel North (who would succeed him as captain of Bowen's final ship, the Defiant) and George Booth, who was his captain when he served under him as a crewman aboard the Speaker. Over the course of a four year period, Bowen took around £170,000 in goods and coinage and retired to Bourbon for a brief period of time before his death in 1704. Born on Bermuda, Bowen moved to the proprietary colony of Carolina and joined an English ship, serving as Petty Officer. After an unknown period of time, Bowen's ship was attacked and he was captured by French pirates. The pirates then crossed the Atlantic Ocean, heading to Madagascar, but ran aground near Elesa to the south of the island. There Bowen, along with a number of English merchant captains and seamen who had also been imprisoned aboard the privateer's vessel, seized the ship's longboat and sailed the 15 leagues (45 miles) to St. Augustine. Bowen remained there for the next 18 months before entering piracy - he joined the crew of Captain Read, leaving the island and being elected sailing
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    88

    John King

    John King (c. 1706/9 – April 26, 1717) was an 18th century pirate. He joined the crew of Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy while still a juvenile, and is the youngest known pirate on record. On November 9, 1716, Bellamy and his crew, sailing the sloop Mary Anne (or Marianne), attacked and captured the Antiguan sloop Bonetta, which was then en route from Antigua to Jamaica. John King, then aged between eight and eleven, was a passenger on the Bonetta. According to Abijah Savage, the Bonetta's commander, the pirates looted the ship for 15 days, during which time King demanded to join Bellamy's crew. "(F)ar from being forced or compelled (to join)," Savage wrote in his report, "he declared he would kill himself if he was restrained, and even threatened his Mother, who was then on board as a passenger and his father who did not like him." While teenage pirates were common in the 18th century, and though the Royal Navy employed young boys as "powder monkeys" to carry gunpowder from ship's magazine to their cannons, boys of King's age were unknown as pirates. However, after an initial show of defiance, Bellamy allowed King to join him. In the subsequent months, Bellamy and his crew would
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    89

    John Taylor

    John Taylor was a pirate who lived in the early 18th century. At Reunion Island (off the coast of Madagascar) in April 1721, he together with Olivier Levasseur captured the most valuable prize in pirate history, variously described as "Nostra Senora della Cabo", "Nostra Senhora do Cabo", or "Nossa Senhora do Cabo" (Our Lady of the Cape).
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    90
    Olivier van Noort

    Olivier van Noort

    Olivier van Noort (1558 – 22 February 1627) was the first Dutchman to circumnavigate the world. Olivier van Noort was born in 1558 in Utrecht. He left Rotterdam on 2 July 1598 with four ships and a plan to attack Spanish possessions in the Pacific and to trade with China and the Spice Islands. His ships were poorly equipped, especially in the way of armament and the crews were unruly. Nonetheless, Van Noort sailed through the Magellan Strait, and captured a number of ships (Spanish and otherwise) in the Pacific. He lost two ships on the way due to a storm, one was lost in an engagement with the Spanish near the Manila Bay in the Philippines. The Spanish lost their flagship, the galleon San Diego, the wreck of which was found in 1992 and yielded a treasure in porcelain and gold pieces. Van Noort returned to Rotterdam via the Dutch East Indies and the Cape of Good Hope on 26 August 1601 with his last ship, the Mauritius, and 45 of originally 248 men. The venture barely broke even, but was the inspiration for more such expeditions. The united Dutch East India Company was formed a few months later.
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    91

    Swashbuckler

    Swashbuckler is a romantic adventure film produced in the U.S. by Universal Studios and released in 1976. The film is based on the story “The Scarlet Buccaneer”, written by Paul Wheeler and adapted for the screen by Jeffery Bloom. It was directed by James Goldstone and was rated PG. It is a story that takes place in Jamaica in 1718 about a band of buccaneer pirates, led by Captain “Red” Ned Lynch, pitted against a greedy overlord, evil Lord Durant. Durant has ruthlessly imprisoned his Lord High Justice and mercilessly evicted his wife and daughter Jane Barnet who eventually attempts a rescue with Lynch’s help. The film stars Robert Shaw as Lynch, Peter Boyle as Durant, Geneviève Bujold as Barnet as well as James Earl Jones, Beau Bridges, Geoffrey Holder, Anjelica Huston and Avery Schreiber. (in order of credits) The film was shot in Mexico and on the galleon Golden Hinde, a replica of the Golden Hinde captained by Francis Drake from 1577 to 1580. In the film it was called the Blarney Cock and actually received a movie credit. According to the Special Feature section of the DVD, it was the only pirate movie filmed aboard an actual ship of that era. Swashbuckler received a lukewarm
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    92

    Jan Willems

    Jan Willems (died 1688), also known as Janke or Yankey Willems, was a 17th century Dutch buccaneer. Based out of Petit-Goâve, Willems participated in a number of expeditions against the Spanish during the early to-mid 1680s with other well-known privateers including Michiel Andrieszoon, Thomas Paine, Laurens de Graaf, Nicholas van Hoorn and Michel de Grammont. Although a Dutchman, Willems worked with English privateers during the first years of his buccaneering career raiding Rio de la Hacha with Thomas Paine in 1680. In September 1681, he and English privateer William Wright sailed together from Bocas del Toro. Although Willems did not have a commission himself, he captured a Spanish merchantman with a cargo of sugar and tobacco while sailing with Wright south along the coast of Colombia. Taking the Spanish prize as his own, he gave his old barque to Wright who burned his own ship. They attempted to sell the Spanish cargo at Curaçao, however they were forced to leave by the governor. He and Wright then sailed to the Isla Aves and Islas Roques where they remained until February 1682 and presumably parted ways soon after. During next year, he was among those present at a conference
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    93

    Lawrence Prince

    Laurens Prins known in English as Lawrence Prince (1630s, Amsterdam - 27 April 1717, off Cape Cod) was a 17th century Dutch buccaneer and an officer under Captain Sir Henry Morgan. He and Major John Morris led one of the columns against Panama in 1671. According to Spanish accounts, Lawrence Prince was a Dutchman from Amsterdam who arrived in the Caribbean in the late 1650s. In 1659, he was one of four men, including John Morris and Robert Searle, who bought a captured Spanish prize from Commodore Christopher Myngs following his ten-week voyage. Prior to joining Morgan's forces at Port Royal in November 1670, he had previously sailed up to Rio Magdalena intending to raid the town of Mompos located 150 miles inland. Prince was forced to retreat, however, when they were surprised by cannon fire from a recently built island fort protecting the settlement. Prince and his men, determined to "make voyage", sailed north to Nicaragua in August. As in Colombia, Prince sailed up the San Juan River, captured a Spanish fort and paddled by canoe to Lake Nicaragua where they successfully raided Granada. This was almost identical to the Morgan's raid in 1664. Official Spanish reports of the
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    94

    The Life of the World to Come

    The Life of the World to Come (2004) is the fifth installment in the series of science fiction time travel novels by Kage Baker concerning the exploits of The Company. This novel is another chapter in the disastrous life of the cyborg botanist Mendoza, recruited by the Company in 16th century Spain, and exiled to the far past. Twice in her life the same man, in different identities, has visited her, become her lover, and been killed. Neither seemed to know her at first. Alec Checkerfield is a 24th century data pirate and smuggler who steals a time machine. He encounters Mendoza. She encounters him. It's deja vu all over again for her. He is mystified. This meeting catalyzes the most horrific event in human history. All involved are left wondering what they have done, and why. Meanwhile, Dr. Zeus seems to go from strength to strength. The first part is an extension of the first person accounts previously supplied by Mendoza, which accounts are apparently previous chapters in her journal, written on any material she can get. Somehow all of this manages to stay intact for the unknown amount of time, perhaps 3000 years, that Mendoza spends in exile on Santa Catalina. The period is
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    95
    Gan Ning

    Gan Ning

    Gan Ning (died around 220) was a military general serving under the warlord Sun Quan during the late Han Dynasty period of Chinese history. He was born in Linjiang, Ba Commandery (present-day Zhong County, Chongqing). As a youth, Gan served under the warlord Liu Yan but revolted when the latter died. After his rebellion failed, he led a band of bandits carrying bows and crossbows to wander the lands. They wore bells about their waists and bone ornaments in their hair as a mark, causing commoners to either run or hide when they heard the ring of bells. He kept looting, robbing and killing until he decided to pursue scholarly arts in his twenties. After reading some literary texts by different philosophers, Gan sought the warlord Liu Biao's patronage, but was rejected for his background. Instead, he went to join Liu Biao's general Huang Zu, who was a local gentry and warlord of Jiangxia. Huang did not trust him and gave him an unworthy position. In an attack against Huang by Sun Quan's general, Ling Cao, at the Battle of Xiakou, Huang was nearly killed, and amidst the chaos and disarray, Gan fired a stray arrow that killed Ling, resulting in the safe retreat of Huang. However, the
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    96
    Hendrik Brouwer

    Hendrik Brouwer

    Hendrik Brouwer (spring 1581 – August 7, 1643) was a Dutch explorer, admiral, and colonial administrator both in Japan and the Dutch East Indies. He is thought to first have sailed to the East Indies for the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in 1606. In 1610 he left again to the Indies, now as commander of three ships. On this trip he devised the Brouwer Route, a route from South Africa to Java that reduced voyage duration from a year to about 6 months by taking advantage of the strong westerly winds in the Roaring Forties (the latitudes between 40° and 50° south). Up to that point, the Dutch had followed a route copied from the Portuguese via the coast of Africa, Mauritius and Ceylon. By 1617, the VOC required all their ships to take the Brouwer route. After his arrival in 1611 in the East Indies, he was sent to Japan to replace Jacques Specx temporarily as opperhoofd at Dejima from August 28, 1612 to August 6, 1614. During that time he made a visit to the Japanese court at Edo. In 1613 he made a trip to Siam that laid the foundation for the Dutch trade with Siam. Early in 1632, he was part of a delegation sent to London to solve trade disagreements between the English and Dutch East
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    97
    Lionel Wafer

    Lionel Wafer

    Lionel Wafer (1640–1705) was a Welsh explorer, buccaneer and privateer. A ship's surgeon, Wafer made several voyages to the South Seas and visited the Malay archipelago in 1676. The following year he settled in Jamaica to practise his profession. In 1679, however, two noted buccaneers named Cook and Linen convinced him to become a surgeon for their fleet. In 1680, Wafer met William Dampier at Cartagena and joined in a privateering venture under the leadership of Bartholomew Sharp. After a quarrel during an arduous overland journey, Wafer was marooned with four others in the Isthmus of Darien, where he stayed with the Cuna Indians. He spent his time gathering information about their culture, including their shamanism and a short vocabulary of their language. He also studied the natural history of the isthmus. The following year later, Wafer left the Indians, promising to return and marry the chief's sister and bring back dogs from England. He fooled the buccaneers at first as he was dressed as an Indian, wearing body-paint and ornamented with a nose-ring. It took them some time to recognise him. Wafer reunited with Dampier, and after privateering with him on the Spanish Main until
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    98
    Missee Lee

    Missee Lee

    Missee Lee is the tenth book of Arthur Ransome's Swallows and Amazons series of children's books, set in 1930s China. The Swallows and Amazons are on a round the world trip with Captain Flint aboard the schooner Wild Cat. After the Wild Cat sinks, they escape in the Swallow and Amazon but are separated in a storm. Both dinghies eventually end up in the lair of the Three Island pirates where they are held prisoner by the unusual Missee Lee, the leader of the Three Island pirates. The book, published in 1941, is considered one of the metafictional books in the series, along with Peter Duck and perhaps Great Northern?. One aspect of this book which modern readers may find objectionable is that all the Chinese characters are depicted as speaking English with a very stereotypical accent and grammar. Ransome made a visit to China in 1926 and 1927 where he learned about Chinese life and culture. He also met, amongst others Soong Ching-ling, the wife of Sun Yat-sen. Ransome said that he based many of Missee Lee's characteristics on her, though there were others who contributed to the character. The book opens with the Swallows, Amazons and Captain Flint in an unnamed port in the South
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    99

    Philippe Bequel

    Philippe Bequel (fl. c. 1650 – 1669) was a 17th century French privateer. Possibly born in La Rochelle, France, Bequel may have served under privateers Mathurin Gabaret and François Beaulieu during the 1650s and, by the end of the decade, he had become captain of his own ship. Operating from the port of Cagway (later renamed Port Royal after its capture by the British several years later), Bequel was granted permission by Governor D' Oyley to attack Spanish shipping on 13 December 1659. At the request of Deschamps of Rausset, Bequel would use the small island colony of Tortoise as a base of operations until shortly after the British capture of Jamaica. Arriving at Port Royal in late 1663, he would later become one of the first foreign privateers to receive a letter of marque by the colonial governor of Jamaica. During his privateering career, he may have sailed with François l'Ollonais in his less than successful raids against Honduras and Nicaragua during 1667 and 1668. He was reportedly based at Tortoise or along the coast of Santo Domingo during the late-1660s and later served as a pilot for a royal marine squadron under the command Vice Admiral Count Jean II d'Estrées while in
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    100

    Matsuura Takanobu

    Matsura Takanobu (松浦 隆信, 1529 – April 1, 1599) or Taqua Nombo was a 16th century Japanese samurai and 25th hereditary lord of the Matsura clan of Hirado. He should not be confused with Matsura Takanobu (same spelling, same kanji), the 4th daimyo of Hirado Domain under the Tokugawa shogunate. Matsura Takanobu was one of the most powerful feudal lords of Kyūshū and one of the first to allow trading with Europeans, particularly the Portuguese, through whom he amassed great profits in the import of western firearms. He was also an early host and patron to the Jesuits who he hoped would influence an increase in trade with the Portuguese and other European traders. After becoming lord of Hirado in 1543{{}}, the 15-year-old Takanobu was advised by Yasumasa Toyohisa. Toyohisa was a well-known samurai and cousin of the previous lord of Hirado and, under his guidance, the domains of the Koteta family were increased to include much of Ikitsuki, together with the islands of Takushima, Ojika, Noshima as well as the areas of Kasuga, Shishi and Iira in Hirado. That same year he became an ally of a powerful wakō leader, inviting him to live in Hirado and allowing his band to dominate the outlying
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    101
    Pedro Gilbert

    Pedro Gilbert

    Pedro Gilbert or Don Pedro Gibert (c. 1800 – June 11, 1835) was an early 19th century pirate, who was one of the few remaining pirates continuing to raid shipping on the Atlantic coast. Gilbert held the distinction of taking part in the last recorded act of piracy in Atlantic waters, although the distinction of "last American pirate" belongs to Nathaniel Gordon who was executed in 1862 for attempting to smuggle African slaves in violation of the U.S. Piracy Law of 1820. A former privateer in the service of the Colombian government, Gilbert began raiding American merchant vessels off the eastern coast of Florida with his schooner the Panda in early 1832. On September 21, 1832, off the coast of what is now Stuart, Florida, Gilbert chased then boarded the Mexican, an American brig bound from Salem to Rio de Janeiro carrying $20,000 in silver. Following the crew's surrender, a crew member asked Gilbert what was to be done with their captives to which the pirate captain reportedly remarked "Dead cats don't mew. You know what to do." Locking the crew inside the focsle, Gilbert's crew ransacked the ship looting the Mexican's stores. Slashing the rigging and sails, the pirates filled the
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    102

    Charles Gibbs

    Charles Gibbs (November 5, 1798 – April 22, 1831) was an American pirate (real name James D. Jeffers) who was one of the last active in the Caribbean during the early-19th century and was among the last executed for piracy by the United States. His career, like many others during this time, was marked by violence and brutality. Shortly before his execution, Jeffers admitted to have been involved in the killing of as many as 400 victims. His confessions during his imprisonment and trial detailing his career were recorded and published following his death and remained popular reading throughout the mid 19th century. However, given the sensationalistic nature of these accounts, historians have questioned the accuracy of Jeffers's confessions. Born in Newport, Rhode Island on November 5, 1798, he was the son of a Newport sea captain who had served as an American privateer during the Revolutionary War. Jeffers would later claim to have enlisted in the United States Navy during the War of 1812 and to have served under James Lawrence on the USS Hornet and USS Chesapeake before being captured following a battle with the HMS Shannon in Boston Harbor in 1813. Later investigations into these
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    103

    Daniel Montbars

    Daniel Montbars (1645–1707?), better known as Montbars the Exterminator, was a 17th-century French buccaneer. For several years, he was known as one of the most violent buccaneers active against the Spanish during the mid-17th century. His reputation as a fierce enemy of the Spanish Empire was matched only by l'Ollonais and Roche Braziliano. Montbars was born to a wealthy family in Languedoc around 1645. He was well educated and raised as a gentleman. According to popular legend, Montbars' legendary hatred of the Spanish came from reading about the cruelties of the Conquistadors upon the New World, particularly a narrative describing atrocities carried out against the native Indians, written by Las Casas. Leaving his native France in 1667, he embarked at Le Havre to serve with his uncle in the Royal French Navy during the war against Spain. He accompanied his uncle to the West Indies, where their ship was sunk and the uncle killed near Santo Domingo in a battle with two Spanish warships. His uncle's death served to further his hatred of the Spaniards; making his way to the pirate haven of Tortuga, he became a buccaneer captain soon afterwards. Montbars distinguished himself during
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    104

    Emanuel Wynn

    Emanuel Wynn (or Emanuel Wynne) was a French pirate of the 18th century, and is often considered the first pirate to fly the Jolly Roger. His design incorporated an hourglass beneath the bones to represent that time was running out. British Admiralty Records, in the Public Records Office in the UK show, in a report dated 18 July 1700, that HMS Poole, commanded by Captain John Cranby, engaged Wynn's ship off the Cape Verde islands. Cranby chased Wynn into a cove at Brava Island but, assisted by Portuguese soldiers, Wynn escaped Poole. Most historians agree that Cranby's account is the first mention of a Jolly Roger, which Cranby described as "a sable ensign with cross bones, a death's head, and an hour glass." Wynne is believed to be the first (or some sources contend one of the first) pirate to fly the now familiar form of the jolly roger. His flag, showing the distinctive skull and crossbones motif, was augmented with another common pirate symbol: an hourglass (meant to signify to his prey that only by timely surrender could they evade death). Wynne began his piratical career raiding English merchantmen off the coast of the Province of Carolina near the end of the 17th century. He
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    105
    Jean Bart

    Jean Bart

    Jean Bart (21 October 1650 – 27 April 1702) was a French sailor who served the French crown as naval commander and privateer. Jean Bart was born in Dunkirk in 1650to a seafaring family, the son of a sailor who has been described variously as a fisherman or corsair commander. He almost certainly spoke Flemish, at that time the native language in the region, and his birth name was most probably Jan Baert. When he was young, Bart served in the Dutch navy under Admiral Michiel de Ruyter. When war broke out between France and the United Provinces in 1672, he entered the French service. Since persons not of noble birth in those days couldn't obtain the rank of officer in the navy, he became captain of one of the Dunkirk privateers. In this capacity he displayed astonishing bravery, so that Louis XIV sent him on a special mission to the Mediterranean, where he gained great distinction. Unable due to his low birth to receive a command in the navy, he held an irregular sort of commission, but he had such success, however, that he became a lieutenant in 1679. He became a terror to the Dutch navy and a serious menace to the commerce of Holland. On one occasion, with six vessels, he broke
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    106

    John Nutt

    John Nutt (fl. 1620–1623) was a 17th-century English pirate. He was one of the more notorious brigands of his time raiding the coast of southern Canada and western England for over three years before his capture by Sir John Eliot in 1623. His arrest and conviction caused a scandal in the English court, Nutt having paid Eliot £500 in exchange for a pardon, and was eventually released by the Secretary of State George Calvert. Born in Lympstone, near Exmouth in Devon, England, John Nutt arrived in Newfoundland as a gunner on a Dartmouth ship around 1620. He decided to settle in the area permanently and moved his family to live in Torbay, Newfoundland and Labrador. He soon organized a small crew with whom he seized a small French fishing boat as well as two other French ships (another account claims the ships were English and Flemish) during the summer of 1621 before returning to the western coast of England. He would continue using unemployed sailors, particularly those conscripted to press gangs, and actually lured away a significant number from the Royal Navy paying regular wages and commissions. He would also offer his services to protect French and English settlements including
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    107
    Lancelot Blackburne

    Lancelot Blackburne

    Lancelot Blackburne (sometimes Blackburn or Blackborne or Blackbourn[e]), (10 December 1658 – 23 March 1743) was an English clergyman, who became Archbishop of York, and – in popular belief – a pirate. He was described by Horace Walpole, in his Memories, as "…Blackbourn, the jolly old Archbishop of York, who had all the manners of a man of quality, though he had been a buccaneer, and was a clergyman; but he retained nothing of his first profession, except his seraglio." He was born in London, a younger brother of Richard Blackburne. He attended Westminster School, and in 1676 entered Christ Church, Oxford. He graduated in 1680, was ordained, and travelled to the West Indies. In January 1684 he was granted an MA by the university; at this time, he is known to have been in Nevis. A popular story recounts that he spent these years sailing with buccaneers, either as their chaplain or as a pirate himself; there is little evidence either way, although a record of 1681 notes that he was paid £20 by Charles II for "secret services". He returned to England during 1684, marrying Catherine Talbot (the elder sister of William Talbot) in September, and shortly thereafter took up the first of a
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    108

    Nicholas van Hoorn

    The pirate Nicholas van Hoorn (c. 1635 – buried 24 June 1683, Isla Mujeres) was born in Holland and died near Vera Cruz, Mexico. Nikolaas or Klaas was engaged in the Dutch merchant service from about 1655 until 1659, and then bought a vessel with his savings. With a band of reckless men whom he had enlisted, he became a terror to the commerce of the Netherlands. Later he had several ships in his employment and obtained such notoriety that some governments were willing to employ him against their enemies. In 1666 a French minister sent Van Hoorn a commission, empowering him to pursue and capture Spanish vessels. As he was uniformly successful, he amassed enormous sums. After the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1668), it was expected that he would cease ravaging the American coast - but the French government, while openly disowning their champion, secretly connived at his misdeeds. He made the mistake of pillaging a French ship, but after an unsuccessful attempt to take him was made in 1663, he no longer attacked the French flag. Learning that several Spanish galleons were waiting in the harbour of Puerto Rico for a convoy, he entered the harbour and offered his services to the governor.
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    109
    Anne Bonny

    Anne Bonny

    Anne Bonny (8 March 1702 – 22 April 1782) was an Irish woman who became a famous female pirate, operating in the Caribbean. What little is known of her life comes largely from A General History of the Pyrates. Little is known of Bonny's life, particularly prior to her arrival in the Bahamas, although it is estimated that she was born in Ireland on March 8, somewhere between 1697-1700. Official records and contemporary letters dealing with her life are scarce and most modern knowledge stems from Charles Johnson's A General History of the Pyrates (a contemporary collection of pirate biographies, thought to be well embellished). Bonny's family travelled to the new world very early on in her life; at first the family had a rough start in their new home. Her mother died shortly after they arrived in North America. Her father attempted to establish himself as an attorney, but did not do well. Eventually, Bonny's father joined the more profitable merchant business and accumulated a substantial fortune. It is recorded she had red hair and was considered a "good catch", but may have had a fiery temper; at aged 13 she supposedly stabbed a servant girl with a table knife. She married a poor
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    110

    Bernard Claesen Speirdyke

    Bernard Claesen Speirdyke, also called Barnard or Bart Speirdyke, (fl. 1663-1670) was a 17th century Dutch buccaneer. His Dutch name Bernard Claesen Spierdijk suggests he may have come from the village of Spierdijk, North Holland. Commander of the 18-gun Mary and Jane, he was a longtime privateer active in Cuba throughout the 1660s and, on his first voyage, successfully attacked and looted the town of San Tomas while sailing along the coast of Venezuela. In early-1670, he set out from Port Royal with letters from Governor Thomas Modyford to the Governor of Cuba "signifying peace between the two nations". As a further show of goodwill, several Spanish prisoners being held in Jamaica were also returned. However, the Governor of Bayamo was suspicious of his intentions and had an officer search his ship three times looking for evidence of privateering. Having brought a full cargo of European luxury goods, which were in short supply among the local townspeople, Speirdyke soon sold his entire stock. Despite this breech of Spanish law, the governor chose to turn a blind eye. Setting sail for his return to Jamaica, it was shortly after leaving the harbor that they were hailed by an English
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    111

    Black Caesar

    Black Caesar (died 1718) was an 18th century African pirate. For nearly a decade, he raided shipping from the Florida Keys and later served as one of Captain Blackbeard's chief lieutenants aboard the Queen Anne's Revenge. He was one of the surviving members of Blackbeard's crew following his death at the hands of Lieutenant Robert Maynard in 1718. Caesar's Rock, one of three islands located north of Key Largo, is the present-day site of his original headquarters and named in his honor. Black Caesar, according to traditional accounts, was a prominent African tribal war chieftain. Widely known for his "huge size, immense strength, and keen intelligence", he evaded capture from many different slave traders. Caesar was finally captured when he and twenty of his warriors were lured onto a ship by a slave trader. Showing him a watch, the trader promised to show him and his warriors more objects which were "too heavy and too numerous to bring on shore" if they came aboard his ship. He enticed them to stay with food, musical instruments, silk scarves and jewels, however he had his men raise anchor and slowly sail away. When Caesar discovered what was happening, he and his men attempted to
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    112
    Henri Caesar

    Henri Caesar

    Henri Caesar, also known as Black Caesar, (fl. 1791-1830) was allegedly a 19th century Haitian revolutionary and pirate. Efforts to find historical evidence of his existence have been unsuccessful. According to works of fiction, he was a participant in the Haitian Revolution under Dutty Boukman and Toussaint Louverture as well as active in piracy for nearly a 30-year period during the early 19th century. Henri Caesar was allegedly born to a slave family kept by a French plantation owner known as Arnaut. He worked as a houseboy on the estate and, as a young man, worked in the lumberyard. He was apparently mistreated by the supervisor and later killed the man during the slave insurrection, torturing him with a saw. Joining the rebel forces led by Dutty Boukman and Toussaint Louverture, he remained with the revolution until its independence from France in 1804, when he left to try his luck at sea. Based in Port-de-Paix, he captured a Spanish ship in 1805 and soon began attacking small villages and lone vessels near Cuba and the Bahamas. Adopting the name Black Caesar, he was very successful during his piratical career before his disappearance in 1830. Although his fate is unrecorded,
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    113

    Johannes van Walbeeck

    Jan, Johan or Johannes van Walbeeck (1602, Amsterdam – after 1649) was a Dutch navigator and cartographer during a 1620s circumnavigation of the earth, an admiral of the Dutch West India Company, and the first governor of the Netherlands Antilles. Van Walbeeck is thought to have been born in Amsterdam in 1601 or 1602 and he might be the Jan van Walbeeck, son of the merchant Jacob van Walbeeck and of Weijntgen van Foreest (apparently the only Walbeeck family in town), who was baptized on August 15, 1602, in Amsterdam). He studied at the University of Leiden before enlisting as navigator and cartographer on the ship De Amsterdam during the three-year circumnavigation of the world from 1623 to 1626 by the Nassau fleet led by Admiral Jacques l'Hermite and Vice Admiral Gheen Huygensz Schapenham. It is thought that the account of this voyage published by Hessel Gerritsz shortly after the expedition's return in 1626 was written and drawn by Van Walbeeck. In 1627, Van Walbeeck continued his mathematics and physics study in Leiden, but interrupted it again to join Laurens Reael's diplomatic mission to Denmark at the end of the year. Upon his return, he enlisted in a fleet that sailed to
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    114
    John Julian

    John Julian

    John Julian (died 1733) was the first recorded black pirate to operate in the New World, as the pilot of the ship Whydah. Julian was a half-blood Miskito Indian who joined Samuel Bellamy early in his brief career. He eventually piloted the Whydah, which was the leading ship of Bellamy's fleet, when he was only 16 years old. Julian was one of 30 to 50 people of African descent in the pirate crew — all were treated as equals. Julian's life became more difficult after he survived the Whydah wreck in 1717. He was jailed in Boston but apparently never indicted. He was likely sold into slavery, the "Julian the Indian" bought by John Quincy — whose grandson, President John Quincy Adams, became a staunch abolitionist. A purported "unruly slave," Julian the Indian was sold to another owner and tried often to escape. During one attempt, he killed a bounty hunter who was trying to catch him. He was executed in 1733.
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    115
    Salih Reis

    Salih Reis

    Salih Reis (1488 ca. – 1568) was a Turkish privateer and Ottoman admiral. He is alternatively referred to as Salah Rais, Sala Reis, Salih Rais, Salek Rais and Cale Arraez in several European resources, particularly in Spain, France and Italy. In 1529, together with Aydın Reis, he took part in the Turkish-Spanish battle near the Isle of Formentera, during which the Ottoman forces destroyed the Spanish fleet, whose commander, Rodrigo Portundo, died in combat. In 1538 he commanded the right wing of the Turkish fleet at the naval Battle of Preveza, where the Ottoman forces under Barbarossa Hayreddin Pasha defeated the Holy League of Charles V under the command of Andrea Doria. In 1551, due to his success in the conquest of Tripoli (Libya) together with Turgut Reis and Sinan Pasha, he was promoted to the rank of Pasha and became the Beylerbeyi (Ottoman equivalent of Grand Duke) of Algiers and the Bahriye Beylerbeyi (Admiral) of the Ottoman West Mediterranean Fleet. Salih Reis was born in Biga, a village between Çanakkale and Edremit, near Kaz Dağı (Mount Ida) to the south of ancient Troy, on the Aegean coast of Turkey, in around 1488. At a very young age he joined the fleet of Oruç Reis
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    116
    Hippolyte de Bouchard

    Hippolyte de Bouchard

    Hippolyte de Bouchard, or Hipólito de Bouchard (January 15, 1780, or 1783– January 4, 1837), was a French and Argentine sailor and corsair who fought for Argentina, Chile, and Peru. During his first campaign as an Argentine corsair he attacked the Spanish colonies of Chile and Peru, under the command of the Argentine-Irish Admiral William Brown. He was the first Argentine to circumnavigate the world. During his voyage around the world he blockaded the port of Manila. In Hawaii, he recovered an Argentine privateer which had been seized by mutineers. He also met the local ruler, King Kamehameha I. His forces occupied Monterey, California, then a Spanish colony, raising the Argentine flag there and briefly claiming a small portion of the future State of California for Argentina. After raiding Monterey, he plundered Mission San Juan Capistrano in Southern California. Toward the end of the voyage Bouchard raided the Spanish ports in Central America. His second homeland remembers him as a hero and patriot; several places are named in his honour. Bouchard was born in Saint-Tropez in 1780 or 1783. The son of André Louis Bouchard and Thérèse Brunet was baptized as André Paul but eventually
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    5 votes
    117
    Bartholomew Roberts

    Bartholomew Roberts

    Bartholomew Roberts (17 May 1682 – 10 February 1722), born John Roberts, was a Welsh pirate who raided ships off America and West Africa between 1719 and 1722. He was the most successful pirate of the Golden Age of Piracy, as measured by vessels captured, taking over 470 prizes in his career. He is also known as Black Bart (Welsh: Barti Ddu), but this name was never used in his lifetime, and also risks confusion with Black Bart of the American West. Bartholomew Roberts was born in 1682 in Casnewydd-Bach, or Little Newcastle, between Fishguard and Haverfordwest in Pembrokeshire, Wales. His name was originally John Roberts, and his father was most likely George Roberts. It's not clear why Roberts changed his name from John to Bartholomew, but pirates often adopted aliases, and he may have chosen that name after the well-known buccaneer Bartholomew Sharp. He is thought to have gone to sea when he was 13 in 1695 but there is no further record of him until 1718, when he was mate of a Barbados sloop. In 1719 he was third mate on the slave ship Princess, under Captain Abraham Plumb. In early June that year the Princess was anchored at Anomabu, then spelled Annamaboa, which is situated
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    118

    Drift House: The First Voyage

    Drift House: The First Voyage is a 2005 children's novel written by Dale Peck. This was Peck's first children's book; he is best known as a polemicist reviewer, and adult novelist. In 2007 and 2008, Chicago Public Schools placed the novel on their recommended reading list for School Grades 6–8. Dale Peck wrote the book after a friend living in Cape Cod described a dream he had had about his house floating out to sea. He cites The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis as a strong influence on the book. After the 9/11 attack on New York City, the three Oakenfeld children, Susan, Charles, and Murray, are sent to live with their Uncle Farley in Canada. Farley has recently bought a strange ship-like home named Drift House on The Bay of Eternity. The home resembles a bizarre old-time ship, washed ashore. The children immediately find the home very odd. When they question their uncle about the strange house, he becomes nervous and distracted. The children later explore the house, where they meet a talkative parrot named President Wilson. One morning, they wake to discover the house has been raised up by a flood, carried out of the bay, and has drifted into the Sea of Time – a
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    119
    Jean Ango

    Jean Ango

    Jean Ango (or Jehan Angot) (1480–1551) was a French ship-owner who provided ships to Francis I for exploration of the globe. A native of Dieppe, Ango took over his father's import-export business, and ventured into the spice trade with Africa and India. He was one of the first French to challenge the monopoly of Spain and Portugal, in addition to trading with the eastern Mediterranean, the British Isles, and the Low Countries. He also helped to finance the voyages of Giovanni da Verrazzano and Jacques Cartier. His father (also named Jean Ango) sent two ships to Newfoundland in an early colonization attempt, including Thomas Aubert as captain of the Pensée. Their arrival in 1508 is the second recorded voyage of a French ship to the Grand Banks after the expedition of John Cabot. After his father's death (probably in the final years of the reign of King Louis XII), the younger Jean Ango stopped any personal participation in trading voyages and settled in Dieppe with his inherited fortune. He eventually controlled a fleet, partially or alone, of 70 ships, including merchant ships and fishing vessels. Although he funded expeditions for trade and exploration, and used his ships
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    120

    Robert Searle

    Robert Searle (alias John Davis) was one of the earliest and most active of the English buccaneers on Jamaica. Nothing, to date, is known of his early life. The famous buccaneer chronicler, Esquemeling, states that Searle was “born at Jamaica,” but this seems unlikely, since that island did not become an English dominion until 1655. Searle’s career as a “gentleman of fortune” was marred by frequent quarrels with Sir Thomas Modyford, royal governor of Jamaica, who usually befriended buccaneers. Searle’s first known ship was the 60-ton, 8-gun Cagway, the largest of four Spanish merchantmen captured by Sir Christopher Myngs as he returned from his raid on Santa Marta and Tolú (Colombia) in 1659. Four years later, Searle captained the Cagway as part of Myng’s expedition against Santiago de Cuba. This force of 1,300 men and a dozen vessels sailed from Port Royal (Jamaica) on October 1, 1662 and two-and-a-half weeks later disembarked to the east of their intended target. Santiago was overrun the following day and a considerable amount of booty carried back to Jamaica. In 1664, the political situation in Europe and the Caribbean was volatile. Constant raiding by English buccaneers had
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    3 votes
    121

    Sextus Pompeius

    Sextus Pompeius Magnus Pius, in English Sextus Pompey (67 BC – 35 BC), was a Roman general from the late Republic (1st century BC). He was the last focus of opposition to the Second Triumvirate. His father was Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great) and Shakespeare had him as a major character in his play Antony and Cleopatra (1606–07). Sextus Pompeius was the youngest son of Pompey the Great (Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus) by his third wife, Mucia Tertia. His older brother was Gnaeus Pompeius, from the same mother. Both boys grew up in the shadow of their father, one of Rome's best generals and an originally non-conservative politician who drifted to the more traditional faction when Julius Caesar became a threat. When Caesar crossed the Rubicon in 49 BC, thus starting a civil war, Sextus' older brother Gnaeus followed their father in his escape to the East, as did most of the conservative senators. Sextus stayed in Rome in the care of his stepmother, Cornelia Metella. Pompey's army lost the Battle of Pharsalus in 48 BC and Pompey himself had to run for his life. Cornelia and Sextus met him in the island of Lesbos and together they fled to Egypt. On the arrival, Sextus watched his
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    122
    William Dampier

    William Dampier

    William Dampier (5 September 1651 - 8 March 1715) was the first Englishman to explore parts of New Holland (Australia) and the first person to circumnavigate the world three times. Dampier has been described as the first natural historian of Australia and the greatest explorer-adventurer between Sir Walter Raleigh and Captain Cook. After impressing the Admiralty with his book 'New Voyage Round the World', Dampier was given command of a 26-gunner and made valuable discoveries in Western New Holland, but was court-martialled for cruelty. On a later voyage, he was able to rescue Alexander Selkirk, who was Daniel Defoe's inspiration for Robinson Crusoe. Others influenced by Dampier include Captain Cook, Lord Nelson and Charles Darwin. Born in East Coker, Somerset and educated at King's School, Bruton, Dampier sailed on two merchant voyages to Newfoundland and Java, before joining the Royal Navy in 1673, taking part in the two battles of Schooneveld in June of that year. His service was cut short by a catastrophic illness, and he returned to England for several months of recuperation. For the next several years he tried his hand at various careers, including plantation managing (in
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    3 votes
    123
    Awilda

    Awilda

    Awilda, also known as Alwilda, was a female pirate, according to legend. Awilda was the daughter of a 5th century Scandinavian king; referred to in one source as Synardus and a "Gothic king". It is said that the King, her father, had arranged a marriage for her to Alf, the crown prince of Denmark, whose father was King Sygarus of Denmark. However, Awilda refused her father's choice. She and some of her female friends dressed like sailors and commandeered a ship. While sailing, they came across a pirate ship that had recently lost its captain, and the pirates elected Awilda as their captain. The King of Denmark sent his son and a navy ship to battle with the "irksome" pirates. Prince Alf and his men were able to board their ship and gain the upper hand in the battle. Apparently, Awilda was so impressed with the prince's courage that she revealed her true identity, and agreed to marry Alf. They married on board, and lived happily ever after as King and Queen of Denmark. The story of Awilda is doubted by some historical scholars and considered to be a legend. Awilda, Awilda (les dialogues) is a poem written by Stephen Wack depicting the story of Awilda and Prince Alf's eventual
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    4 votes
    124

    Pieter Ita

    Pieter Adriaanszoon Ita (fl. 1628–1630) was a 17th-century Dutch corsair and privateer. He was also an admiral in the Dutch West India Company and, in 1628, commanded a large expedition against Portuguese and Spanish interests in the Caribbean. The expedition was one of the largest of its time and included many of the great corsairs of the era. Pieter Adriaanszoon Ita had established himself as a formidable corsair during his years fighting against the Spanish during the Eighty Years' War. Accepting a privateering commission from the Dutch West India Company, he was appointed an admiral and was placed at the head of a large privateering fleet being assembled to strike against the Spanish and Portuguese in the Caribbean and along the coast of Brazil. The fleet would also be transporting Dutch colonists to the island of Tobago being carried aboard the Fortuin under Captain Geleyn van Stapels. Leaving port in January 1628, the twelve ships left from separate harbors from the Netherlands and planned to sail directly to the Caribbean where they would rendezvous near Cuba. The last ship to leave was the Fortuin, carrying sixty-three colonists, departing with its escort, the Zuidsterre,
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    125

    Captain Daniel Johnson

    Daniel Johnson (1629–1675) was an English buccaneer who, serving under buccaneers as Moyse Van Vin and Pierre le Picard, sailed against the Spanish during the late 17th century becoming known among the Spanish as "Johnson the Terror". There is little record of his career aside from a single body of work, Appleton's Cyclopædia of American Biography (1887), suggesting he may be a fictional character. Born in Bristol, England, Johnson served as a merchant sailor for several years until his ship was captured by a Spanish warship in 1654 and was taken to Santo Domingo where he would be held as a slave for more than three years until escaping to the French-held island of Tortuga. Reportedly embittered by his experience, he readily enlisted as a crew member under Dutch buccaneer Captain Moyse Van Vin that same year. Johnson soon rose through the ranks and was soon promoted to chief, within two years, had become a lieutenant by 1659. However, they soon began to quarrel over the distribution of spoils, and eventually fought a duel in which Van Vin was seriously wounded. Leaving Van Vin soon after, he signed with Pierre le Picard and later participated in Sir Henry Morgan's expedition
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    126

    James Riskinner

    James Riskinner or Reiskimmer was a 17th century English privateer who operated from Providence Island against Spanish shipping during the late 1630s. A lieutenant on the ship Warwick, then part of a fleet under the command of Nathaniel Butler, he later took part in a privateering expedition under Butler between May–September 1639. According to Nathanial Butler's journal, James's father, Captain Nicholas Reiskimmer, was appointed governor of Association Island (Tortuga), but died shortly after arriving there. During the four month voyage, Riskinner was elected to succeed its former captain Nicholas Roope who died after leaving Providence Island. However, due both to being unfamiliar with the Caribbean waters and little experienece in tracking down Spanish ships, Riskinner and the others were unsuccessful and the expedition returned to Providence Island in September 1639. However, Riskinner continued searching for Spanish merchant ships and captured four Spanish ships before his return to England the following year with a Spanish prize carrying a large cargo of silver, gold, diamonds, pearls and jewels.
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    127
    Magnus Heinason

    Magnus Heinason

    Magnus Heinason (or Mogens Heinesøn) (1545 – 18 January 1589) was a Faroese naval hero, trader and privateer. He was the son of Heine Havreki, a Norwegian priest from Bergen who emigrated to the Faroe Islands and who helped introduce the Lutheran Reformation to the Faroe Islands, and Gyri Arnbjørnsdatter, Havreki's second wife from a powerful and weathly Norwegian clan. Magnus Heinason was engaged three times and married twice. Magnus had a son with a Faroese lady Kollfina around 1560. Rasmus Magnussen (1560–1670) lived to the age of 110 years old, and at the age of 103 he became the father of a son. In 1580 Magnus met a Norwegian noble lady Margrethe Axeldatter Gyntersberg or von Güntersberg (1565–1589). They had a child Mogensbarn that died as child. They did not marry, because she accused him of rape. The noble family then demanded that he marry Margrethe's younger sister, Sophie Axeldatter Gynhterberg (1566–1607). They married in 1582 in Bergenhus, Bergen and had one daughter, Elsebeth Magnusdatter (1584–1645). She later married Anders Matsen Ǣnes and lived at Ǣnes in the Hardangerfjord in Norway. Magnus Heinason served William the Silent and his son Maurice of Nassau, Prince
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    128
    Olivier Levasseur

    Olivier Levasseur

    Olivier Levasseur (1688 or 1690 – 7 July 1730), was a pirate, nicknamed La Buse or La Bouche (The Buzzard) in his early days, called thus because of the speed and ruthlessness with which he always attacked his enemies. Born at Calais during the Nine Years' War (1688–97) to a wealthy bourgeois family, he became a naval officer after receiving an excellent education. During the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714), he procured a Letter of Marque from king Louis XIV and became a privateer for the French crown. When the war ended he was ordered to return home with his ship, but instead joined the Benjamin Hornigold pirate company in 1716. Levasseur proved himself a good leader and shipmate, although he already had a scar across one eye limiting his sight. After a year of successful looting, the Hornigold party split, with Levasseur deciding to try his luck on the West African coast. In 1719 he operated together with Howell Davis and Thomas Cocklyn for a time. In 1720, they attacked the slaver port of Ouidah, on the coast of Benin, reducing the local fortress to ruins. Later that year, he was shipwrecked in the Mozambique Channel and stranded on the island of Anjouan, one of the
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    129
    Pirates

    Pirates

    Pirates (also known as Pirates XXX) is an adult action-adventure film produced by Digital Playground and Adam & Eve. Released in 2005, it stars Jesse Jane, Carmen Luvana, Janine Lindemulder, Devon, Jenaveve Jolie, Teagan Presley, and Evan Stone. The film was directed by Joone and features many references to the mainstream Hollywood film Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. The producer stated in an interview that Pirates was the most expensive pornographic film made to date, with a reported budget of up to $1 million U.S. dollars and featuring unusually high production values for a pornographic film. In 1763, Captain Edward Reynolds is hunting pirates, or at least trying to do so. He does not consider himself a great commander, and neither does most of his crew. Only his first officer Jules believes in him. When they save a young woman named Isabella from drowning, she tells them that her husband's ship has been destroyed by the feared Captain Victor Stagnetti and his crew of cutthroat pirates. Reynolds and his crew go hunting for Stagnetti, who tries to find a map that leads to a powerful secret on an island somewhere in the Caribbean Sea. Stagnetti finds the
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    130

    Samuel Mason

    Samuel Mason or Meason (1739–1803) was a Revolutionary War militia captain on the frontier, who following the war, became the leader of a gang of river pirates and highwaymen on the lower Ohio River and the Mississippi River in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. He was associated with Cave-in-Rock, Stack Island, and the Natchez Trace. Mason was born in Norfolk, Virginia and raised in what is now Charles Town, Virginia, where he lived until moving to what is now Ohio County, West Virginia in 1773. During the American Revolution, Samuel Mason was a captain of the Ohio County Militia, Virginia State Forces. According to Ohio County court minutes dated 7 January 1777, Mason was recommended to the governor of Virginia to serve as captain of the militia. On 28 January, he was present and cited as a captain from Ohio county at a “council of war” held Catfish Camp. Catfish Camp was located at or near present Washington, Pennsylvania. On 8 June 1777, Mason wrote a letter from Fort Henry, now Wheeling, West Virginia, to brigadier general Edward Hand, at Fort Pitt. The letter was signed Samuel Meason. On 1 September 1777, he was wounded but survived an ambush by Native Americans near
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    131

    Scandal Takes a Holiday

    Scandal Takes a Holiday is a crime novel by Lindsey Davis. Set in Ostia Antica during AD 76, Scandal Takes a Holiday stars Marcus Didius Falco, Informer and Imperial Agent. It is the sixteenth in her Falco series. The title is reference to the 'holiday' taken by Infamia, gossip columnist of the Daily Gazette. Marcus Didius Falco and Helena Justina travel to Ostia Antica, ostensibly on holiday. However, Falco is forced to confess to Petronius - present there on secondment - that he is in fact investigating the disappearance of Infamia, the pen name of the scribe who writes the gossip column for the Daily Gazette. He is at first believed to be merely a drunken truant, however investigations uncover some murky secrets. Piracy and other criminal traditions, long believed stamped out, are apparently alive and well in the region. Author's Official Website
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    132

    The Devil-Ship Pirates

    The Devil-Ship Pirates is a 1964 pirate adventure film made in the UK by Hammer Films. It concerned pirates from a vessel from the defeated Spanish Armada terrorizing citizens on the English coast. All goes well until the villagers realize the Spaniards have been defeated and revolt. It had some spectacular swordplay but was a largely land-locked pirate movie. A pirate ship, fighting in 1588 on the side of the Spanish Armada, suffers extensive damage and must put into a village on the British coast for repairs. The village is small and isolated and the Spanish convince the villagers that the English fleet has been defeated and that they, the Spanish, are now their masters. This results in the villagers' sullen cooperation, but rumors and unrest begin to spread and soon the Spanish pirates find themselves facing a revolt. Christopher Lee as Captain Robeles Barry Warren as Don Manuel Rodriguez de Savilla John Cairney as Harry Andrew Keir as Tom, Harry's Father Duncan Lamont as The Bosum Michael Ripper as Pepe Suzan Farmer as Angela Smeeton The outdoor sets are recognizable from Hammer's The Scarlet Blade, made the previous year. According to Christopher Lee, Hammer Studios had built
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    133

    Timoji

    Timoji (also referred to as Timoja or Timmayya) was a Hindu privateer who served the Vijayanagara Empire and the Portuguese Empire during the first decade of the 16th century. He claimed to have been born in Goa and to have escaped the city after its conquest by the Adil Shahi of Bijapur in 1496. After his support in the 1510 Portuguese conquest of Goa, he was for a short time appointed aguazil of the city. Since the 14th century the Deccan had been divided in two antagonistic entities: on the one side stood the Bahmani Sultanate, and on the other stood the Hindu rajas rallied around the Vijayanagara Empire. Continuous wars demanded frequent resupplies of fresh horses, which were imported through sea routes from Persia and Arabia. This trade was subjected to frequent raids by thriving bands of pirates based in the coastal cities of Western India. Timoji acted both as a privateer (by seizing horse traders, that he rendered to the raja of Honavar) and as a pirate who attacked the Kerala merchant fleets that traded pepper with Gujarat. Timoji operated off Anjediva (modern Anjadip) Island, with two thousand mercenaries under his command and at least fourteen ships. He met Vasco da
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    134

    William Fly

    Captain William Fly (died July 12, 1726) was an English pirate who raided New England shipping until he was captured by the crew of a seized ship. He was hanged in Boston, Massachusetts. William Fly's career as a pirate began in April 1726 when he signed on to sail with Captain John Green to West Africa on the Elizabeth. Green and Fly began to clash until one night William led a mutiny that resulted in Capt. Green being tossed overboard; Fly then took command of the Elizabeth. Having captured the ship, the mutineers sewed a Jolly Roger flag, renamed the ship Fames' Revenge, elected William Fly as captain, and sailed to the coast of North Carolina and north toward New England. They captured five ships in about two months before being captured themselves. Following his capture, Cotton Mather tried, and failed, to get Fly to publicly repent. William Fly and his crew were hanged at Boston Harbor on July 12, 1726. Reportedly, Fly approached the hanging with complete disdain and even reproached the hangman for doing a poor job, re-tying the noose and placing it about his neck with his own two hands. His last words were, roughly, a warning to captains to treat their sailors well and pay
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    135

    Captain Blood

    Captain Blood is a 1935 swashbuckling film made by First National Pictures and Warner Brothers. It was directed by Michael Curtiz and produced by Harry Joe Brown and Gordon Hollingshead with Hal B. Wallis as executive producer. The screenplay, written by Casey Robinson, is based on the novel of the same name by Rafael Sabatini. It features a stirring musical score by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Some of the impressive sea-battle footage was taken from The Sea Hawk (1924) (not to be confused with Flynn's 1940 film of the same name, though some of the footage was also reused in the initial sea battle scene). The film stars Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland with Lionel Atwill and Basil Rathbone. It was the first of eight films co-starring De Havilland and Flynn, and in 1938, the two would be re-united with Rathbone in The Adventures of Robin Hood. In seventeenth century England, Irish Dr. Peter Blood (Errol Flynn) is summoned to aid Lord Gildoy, a wounded patron who had participated in the Monmouth Rebellion. Arrested while performing his duties as a physician, he is convicted of treason against the King and sentenced to death by the infamous Judge Jeffreys in the Bloody Assizes, but by
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    136

    Samuel Axe

    Samuel Axe was an English privateer in Dutch service during the early 17th century. Serving with English forces in the Netherlands during the Dutch War of Independence, Axe traveled to the British Providence Island colony, in the western Caribbean Sea, where he assisted in the construction of its central fortress in 1629. However, after a disagreement with Daniel Elfrith (possibly over the capture of Spanish and Portuguese slavers during the early 1630s ), he soon left the island with Abraham Blauvelt and Sussex Camock and sailed for Honduras in 1633. In 1635, he accepted Dutch letters of marque despite being in the employ of the Providence Island Company and, from 1636 to 1641, acted as a privateer for the English trading company. Although briefly returning to Providence to assist the island's defense against Spanish attacks in 1636, Axe had a successful privateering career delivering a captured prize, with a cargo including gold, silver, jewels, indigo and cochineal, as he returned to England in May 1640. Following the capture of Providence by Spain in 1641, the Providence Island Company was dissolved. Escaping to St. Kitts, Axe would later take part in a privateering expedition
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    137
    Thomas Cavendish

    Thomas Cavendish

    Sir Thomas Cavendish (19 September 1560 – May 1592) was an English explorer and a privateer known as "The Navigator" because he was the first who deliberately tried to emulate Sir Francis Drake and raid the Spanish towns and ships in the Pacific and return by circumnavigating the globe. While members of Magellan's, Loaisa's, Drake's, and Loyola's expeditions had preceded Cavendish in circumnavigating the globe, it had not been their intent at the outset. His first trip and successful circumnavigation, made him rich from captured Spanish gold, silk and treasure from the Pacific and the Philippines. His richest prize was the captured 600 ton sailing ship the Manila Galleon Santa Ana (also called Santa Anna). He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth I of England after his return. He later set out for a second raiding and circumnavigation trip, but was not as fortunate and died at sea at the age of 32. Cavendish was born in 1560 at Trimley St. Martin near Ipswich, Suffolk, England. His father was William Cavendish; he was a descendant of Roger Cavendish, brother to Sir John Cavendish from whom the Dukes of Devonshire and the Dukes of Newcastle derive their family name of Cavendish. When
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    138
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    139

    Lewis Scot

    Lewis Scot was an English buccaneer who, according to writer Alexander Esquemeling, was the first Englishman to raid Spanish coastal settlements in the Caribbean and West Indies during the mid-seventeenth century. Scot is especially known for his raid of the Spanish city of Campeche on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. After receiving a ransom for the city, he is said to have retired to Tortuga.
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    3 votes
    140

    Project A

    Project A (Chinese: A計劃; Jyutping: A Gai3 Waak6; also known as Pirate Patrol and Jackie Chan's Project A) is a 1983 Hong Kong martial arts action comedy film written and directed by Jackie Chan, and starring Chan, Sammo Hung and Yuen Biao. Set in the 1900s in old Hong Kong, Project A blends comedy moments and spectacular stunts, including set-pieces reminiscent of Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd. One stunt in particular involved Chan hanging and falling from the hand of a clock tower some 60 feet high, tearing through awning canopies before hitting the ground head-first. It was inspired by Lloyd's famous clock-tower stunt from the 1923 film Safety Last!. Marine Police officer Dragon Ma (Jackie Chan) is part of the Marine Police's effort to suppress the pirates, who have been raiding ships for months. Members of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force and the Marine Police, who have a strong interservice rivalries, get into a fight in a bar. Shortly after this, Captain Chi (Kwan Hoi-San) releases all of the sailors to their commanding officer, and two of the Marine Police's ships get blown up. Gangsters Chiang and Mr. Chow meet at a VIP Club, and discuss fleeing to Vietnam. As soon as
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    3 votes
    141

    William Jackson

    William Jackson (c. fl. 1639-1645) was an English privateer who, based in Guanaja and Roatan, was in the service of the Providence Island Company from 1639 until around 1641. During that year, he captured a Spanish slave ship at the Honduran port of Trujillo and received a ransom of 8,000 pounds of indigo as well as 2,000 pieces-of-eight and two gold chains. Leaving the Providence Island Company, he sailed to England where he sold sugar and indigo to obtain supplies for another privateering expedition and, upon receiving a three year letter of marque from the Earl of Warwick, he set sail commanding a fleet including such prominent privateers as Samuel Axe, William Rous and Lewis Morris in 1642. It was during this expedition that Jackson's fleet captured Jamaica in the name of Great Britain. Although Jackson's later activities are not recorded, another Captain William Jackson led a small fleet consisting of over 1,000 buccaneers from St. Kitts and Barbadoes looting and plundering throughout the Spanish Main including looting the cities of Maracaibo and Truxillo during 1642 and 1643. Anchoring in the harbor of present day Kingston on March 25, he led a party of 500 men against the
    6.33
    3 votes
    142

    Beauvallet

    Beauvallet is a 1929 novel written by Georgette Heyer. The year is 1586 and 35-year-old Sir Nicholas Beauvallet (great great great grandson of Simon Beauvallet – Simon the Coldheart (1925)) is one of the most infamous pirates of the Elizabethan era. With the blessing of the Queen, Beauvallet sails the seas with the intention of plundering any Spanish ships that come his way. It is while thus occupied that he meets and falls in love with Doña Dominica de Rada y Sylva. He returns Doña Dominica and her father to Spain and vows that he will come back to claim her with total disregard of the danger that the Spanish Inquisition poses to a Protestant in a Catholic land.
    8.00
    1 votes
    143
    Demetrius of Pharos

    Demetrius of Pharos

    Demetrius of Pharos (also Pharus) (Greek: Δημήτριος ἐκ Φάρου) was a ruler of Pharos involved in the First Illyrian War, after which he ruled a portion of the Illyrian Adriatic coast on behalf of the Romans, as a Client king. Demetrius was a regent ruler to Pinnes, the son of Agron who was too young too rule as king. When the Romans were occupied with their own problems, he had grown stronger as an ally of Macedonia and also by conquering Dimallum of Dalmatia, on the shore facing Issa. Together with Scerdilaidas, he sailed south of Lissus and broke the Roman treaty, attacking Roman allies in the Adriatic and by devastating and plundering many cities in the Cyclades and the Peloponnese. He was expelled from Illyria by Rome after the Second Illyrian War and became a trusted councilor at the court of Philip V of Macedon. He became a strong political influence to Philip V and encouraged him to clash with Rome. Demetrius remained there until his death at Messene in 214 BC while attempting to take the city. Demetrius, described as Illyrian or Greek, was from the Greek colony on the island of Pharos (modern Hvar, founded in 385 BC, in Croatia), in the Adriatic Sea off the coast of
    8.00
    1 votes
    144
    Francis Drake

    Francis Drake

    Sir Francis Drake, Vice Admiral (1540 – 27 January 1596) was an English sea captain, privateer, navigator, slaver, and politician of the Elizabethan era. Elizabeth I of England awarded Drake a knighthood in 1581. He was second-in-command of the English fleet against the Spanish Armada in 1588. He also carried out the second circumnavigation of the world, from 1577 to 1580. He died of dysentery in January 1596 after unsuccessfully attacking San Juan, Puerto Rico. His exploits were legendary, making him a hero to the English but a pirate to the Spaniards to whom he was known as El Draque, Draque being the Spanish pronunciation of "Drake". His name in Latinised form was Franciscus Draco (Francis the Dragon). King Philip II was said to have offered a reward of 20,000 ducats, about £4 million (US$6.5M) by modern standards, for his life. Francis Drake was born in Tavistock, Devon, in February or March 1544 at the earliest, when his namesake godfather Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford was age 17. Although Drake's birth is not formally recorded, it is known that he was born while the Six Articles were in force. "Drake was two and twenty when he obtained the command of the Judith"
    8.00
    1 votes
    145

    John Coxon

    Captain John Coxon was a late seventeenth-century buccaneer who terrorized the Spanish Main. Coxon was one of the most famous of the Brethren of the Coast, a loose consortium of pirates and privateers. Coxon lived during the Buccaneering Age of Piracy. Coxon's ship, a vessel of eighty tons that carried eight guns and a crew of ninety-seven men, is lost to date, with no traces of its name anywhere. Very little is known about Coxon's early life. The act that brought Coxon to public notice was his surprising and plundering the Spanish town of Santa Marta in the Caribbean. Coxon was held responsible for abducting the governor and the bishop of Santa Maria to Jamaica. Soon after, Coxon met with many privateers, staging a raid in the Gulf of Honduras. This raid proved to be useful, as the pirates and privateers collected a stash of five hundred chests of indigo dye, in addition to cocoa, cochineal, money, plate, and tortoiseshell. Shortly afterwards, he made himself an ally of several other important buccaneers of the day, including Cornelius Essex, Bartholomew Sharp and Robert Allison. after which they set sail for Portobelo. Upon reaching, they travelled for around four days, and on 17
    8.00
    1 votes
    146

    Juan Guartem

    Juan Guartem was a Spanish renegade pirate who raided Spanish settlements in New Spain during the late 17th century, most notably his raid against Chepo in 1679. According to Spanish records, Juan Guartem traveled up the Manginga River with buccaneers Eduardo Blomar and Bartolomé Charpes. Once across the Isthmus of Panama, they arrived at the coastal town of Chepo and then looted the town before burning it in 1679. Although forces were sent by Spanish by the Viceroy of Panama, they failed to capture them as the buccaneers escaped into the jungle. Despite this, the three were tried in absentia by the Viceroy and were sentenced them to death; Guartem and his two partners being hanged in effigy at Santa Fé de Bogotá the following year. Despite this, Guartem and the others continued to raid settlements throughout the northern and southern coast of Panama.
    8.00
    1 votes
    147

    On Stranger Tides

    On Stranger Tides is a 1987 historical fantasy novel written by Tim Powers. It was nominated for the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel, and placed second in the annual Locus poll for best fantasy novel. The story was also the inspiration for the Monkey Island video game series by LucasArts and for the fourth installment in the Pirates of the Caribbean film series, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides. This book follows the exploits of John "Jack Shandy" Chandagnac, who travels to the new world after the death of his puppeteer father to confront his uncle, who apparently has made off with the family inheritance. During the voyage, he gets to know a woman named Beth Hurwood and her father Benjamin Hurwood, an Oxford professor. Before they arrive, their ship is waylaid by pirates and, with the help of the professor and his assistant, the captain is killed and Chandagnac is forced to join the pirate crew. The reader discovers a sinister plot being concocted by the professor involving his dead wife, his living daughter, the Fountain of Youth, and Blackbeard. Chandagnac, now known as "Jack Shandy", must put a stop to these plans and save Beth Hurwood. Orson Scott Card, declaring
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    1 votes
    148
    The Crimson Pirate

    The Crimson Pirate

    The Crimson Pirate is a 1952 American adventure film directed by Robert Siodmak. It stars Burt Lancaster, who also co-produced the film, as Captain Vallo, the eponymous pirate, and is set in the Caribbean late in the 18th century, on the fictional islands of Cobra and San Pero. Tongue-in-cheek, it provides light comedy touches in an otherwise dramatic story. In the Caribbean, late in the 18th century, Captain Vallo (Burt Lancaster), a pirate known as "The Crimson Pirate", and his crew capture a ship of the King's navy. The ship is carrying Baron Gruda (Leslie Bradley), the special envoy to the King, who is on his way to the Island of Cobra to help crush a rebellion by rebels opposed to the King's rule. Vallo proposes to make money by selling the weapons on the ship to El Libre, the leader of the rebels. Baron Gruda then proposes to pay Vallo money if he can capture El Libre and bring him to him. Vallo accepts and Baron Gruda and his crew are released, Vallo keeping their ship and releasing Gruda and his men onto his own. While some of the pirates complain that this is not pirate business, they soon come around when they find out the amount of money to be made. Vallo and his crew
    8.00
    1 votes
    149
    The Eagle's Prophecy

    The Eagle's Prophecy

    It is spring ad 45 in Rome, and Centurions Macro and Cato, dismissed from the Second Legion in Britain, are waiting for an investigation into their involvement in the death of a fellow officer. It is then that the imperial secretary, the devious Narcissus, makes them an offer they can’t refuse: to rescue an imperial agent who has been captured by pirates operating off the Illyrian coast. With him were scrolls vital to the safety of the emperor and the future of Rome.
                But Narcissus also sends Vitellius, an old enemy of the two centurions. The three officers set out from Ravenna with the imperial fleet but the pirates are forewarned and the Romans pay a heavy price. Outnumbered by the enemy, surrounded by rumors of treachery, and endangered by Vitellius’s desire to redeem himself, Centurions Macro and Cato must find the pirate base to avert a disaster that could destroy the emperor and the very core of Rome.
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    1 votes
    150

    William Aleyn

    William Aleyn (fl. 1430-1448) was a 15th century English pirate. During the 1430s and 40s, he raided shipping throughout Southeast England and sometimes worked with William Kyd in the Thames and the English Channel. Like others of his trade, Aleyn operated freely and without interference from authorities while under the protection of corrupt custom officials. In 1431, Aleyn was listed as one of several pirates active in the area according to a public document published that year. He joined William Kyd and several others in capturing four ships carrying provisions bound for Rouen in 1433. Fifteen years later, he and Kyd began seizing ships in the assisted him in seizing ships in the Thames and carrying them down to the English Channel. He was particularly active near Thanet, although no more is heard of him after this time.
    8.00
    1 votes
    151
    Blackbeard

    Blackbeard

    Edward Teach (c. 1680 – 22 November 1718), better known as Blackbeard, was a notorious English pirate who operated around the West Indies and the eastern coast of the American colonies. Although little is known about his early life, he was likely born in Bristol, England. He may have been a sailor on privateer ships during Queen Anne's War before settling on the Caribbean island of New Providence, a base for Captain Benjamin Hornigold, whose crew Teach joined sometime around 1716. Hornigold placed him in command of a sloop he had captured, and the two engaged in numerous acts of piracy. Their numbers were boosted by the addition to their fleet of two more ships, one of which was commanded by Stede Bonnet, but toward the end of 1717 Hornigold retired from piracy, taking two vessels with him. Teach captured a French merchant vessel, renamed her Queen Anne's Revenge, and equipped her with 40 guns. He became a renowned pirate, his cognomen derived from his thick black beard and fearsome appearance; he was reported to have tied lit fuses under his hat to frighten his enemies. He formed an alliance of pirates and blockaded the port of Charleston, South Carolina. After successfully
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    4 votes
    152
    Klein Henszlein

    Klein Henszlein

    Klein Henszlein [Klaus Hanslein] (died 1573) was a German pirate from 1560 to 1573 who raided shipping in the North Sea until his defeat and capture by a fleet from Hamburg. Taken back to Hamburg, Henszlein and his men were paraded though the city streets before being beheaded; their heads were then impaled on stakes. In a later account, the executioner described how he "flicked off" the heads of the thirty three pirates (not including Henszlein) in only 45 minutes, then proceeding to behead the bodies of those pirates killed during their capture. He later claimed to have been "standing in blood so deep that it well nigh in his shoes did creep."
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    4 votes
    153

    Andrew Barton

    Sir Andrew Barton (c. 1466 – 2 August 1511), Scottish sailor from Leith, served as High Admiral of the Kingdom of Scotland. Some of Andrew Barton's trading voyages to Flanders ports in the 1490s are recorded in the Ledger of Andrew Halyburton. He was the oldest of three brothers, a younger brother Robert Barton of Over Barnton became Lord High Treasurer of Scotland. Andrew became notorious in England and Portugal as a 'pirate', though as a seaman who operated under the aegis of a letter of marque on behalf of the Scottish crown, he may be described as a privateer. The letter of marque against Portuguese shipping was originally granted to his father John Barton by James III of Scotland before 1485. John's ships had been attacked by Portuguese vessels when he was trading at Sluis in Flanders. James IV revived the letters in July 1507. When Andrew Barton, sailing in the Lion tried to take reprisals against Portuguese ships in 1508, he was detained by Dutch authorities at Veere. James IV had to write to Maximilian, the Holy Roman Emperor, and others to get him released in 1509. Andrew then took a Portuguese ship which carried an English cargo, leading to more difficulties, and James IV
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    154

    Ingela Gathenhielm

    Ingela Olofsdotter Gathenhielm née Hammar, (11 September 1692 – 29 April 1729), was a Swedish privateer in service of King Charles XII of Sweden during the Great Northern War. From 1711, Ingela was married to the privateer and pirate Lars Gathenhielm, who in 1710 had received permission from the king to attack and plunder ships from enemy nations on the Baltic Sea (and also, as it was said, often attacked other ships as well) and sold the valuables of the ship in Dunkerque. He was making a fortune, and was ennobled in 1715. Ingela had met Lars when they were children, as the farms of their parents were next to each other. They had five children, and she is believed to have been not only his wife but also his companion in his professional life, and the brain behind a lot of his plans as a privateer and pirate. They both ran the affairs from their base in Gothenburg. When her husband died in 1718, Ingela took over his Privateering (and his alleged Pirate empire), continued its business and also expanded it during the remaining war. She was called the Shipping Queen. Swedish privateering ended after the peace treaty with Denmark in 1720 and Russia in 1721. Ingela married the
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    155

    John Ansell

    John Ansell (d. 1689?) was an English buccaneer who participated in the raids against Maracaibo and Gibraltar, Venezuela under Sir Henry Morgan during the late 1660s.
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    156

    Magister Wigbold

    Magister Wigbold (1365–1402), also called “Master of the Seven Arts”, was a German pirate who belonged to the famous Likedeeler pirates of Klaus Störtebeker. Wighold was one of the most noted Likedeeler, along with Gödeke Michels and Störtebeker. The nickname Wigbold comes from wig (strife) and bold (courageous, bold). His real name is unknown. The early life of Wigbold is poorly documented. He is said to have entered a monastery, where he learned various skills. However, he was expelled under unclear circumstances. He then supposedly attended university at Oxford. He was often described as the brains behind the pirate band. Unlike Michels or Störtebeker, Wigbold did not seek battles but preferred to negotiate a surrender and reduce casualties. The Likedeelers robbed ships on the "Western Sea" (today North Sea) until the Hanseatic League sent a sizable military force to smash the group. Michels and the Magister escaped at first, but after the death of Störtebeker in 1401, they were finally captured and were executed in 1402 on the Grasbrook in Hamburg.
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    157

    Treasure Island

    Treasure Island is a 1934 movie adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s famous 1883 novel Treasure Island. Jim Hawkins (Jackie Cooper) discovers a treasure map and travels on a sailing ship to a remote island, but pirates led by Long John Silver (Wallace Beery) threaten to take away the honest seafarers’ riches and lives. Young Jim Hawkins (Cooper) and his mother run the Admiral Benbow, a tavern near Bristol, England. One dark and stormy night, during a birthday celebration, the mysterious Billy Bones (Lionel Barrymore) arrives and drunkenly talks about treasure. Soon after, Bones is visited by Black Dog then Pew, and drops dead, leaving a chest, which he bragged contained gold and jewels. Instead of money, Jim finds a map that his friend Dr. Livesey (Otto Kruger) realizes will lead them to the famous Flint treasure. Squire Trelawney (Nigel Bruce) raises money for a voyage to the treasure island and they set sail on Captain Alexander Smollett's (Lewis Stone) ship Hispaniola. Also on board is the one-legged Long John Silver (Beery) and his cronies. Even though Bones had warned Jim about a sailor with one leg, they become friends. During the voyage, several fatal "accidents" happen to
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    2 votes
    158

    Treasure Island

    Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of "buccaneers and buried gold". First published as a book on May 23, 1883, it was originally serialized in the children's magazine Young Folks between 1881–82 under the title Treasure Island or, the mutiny of the Hispaniola with Stevenson adopting the pseudonym Captain George North. With Jim Hawkins as the main character in the story. Traditionally considered a coming-of-age story, Treasure Island is an adventure tale known for its atmosphere, characters and action, and also as a wry commentary on the ambiguity of morality — as seen in Long John Silver — unusual for children's literature now and then. It is one of the most frequently dramatized of all novels. The influence of Treasure Island on popular perceptions of pirates is enormous, including treasure maps marked with an "X", schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen carrying parrots on their shoulders. The novel is divided into 6 parts and 34 chapters: Jim Hawkins is the narrator of all except for chapters 16-18 which are narrated by Doctor Livesey. The novel opens in the seaside village of Black Hill
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    159

    Treasure Island

    Treasure Island is a 1990 film adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s famous 1883 novel Treasure Island. It was filmed in 1989 on location in Cornwall, England, and in Jamaica, and also at Pinewood Studios in Buckinghamshire, England. Jim Hawkins (Christian Bale) discovers a treasure map and embarks on a journey to find the treasure, but pirates led by Long John Silver (Charlton Heston) have plans to take the treasure for themselves by way of mutiny. The film was an original production filmed and aired by the TNT network, and directed by Fraser Clarke Heston (Charlton Heston's son); it was released theatrically outside the USA. The name has appeared on some film covers as "Devils Treasure", rather than "Treasure Island". This version of the story is noted for its faithfulness to the book, with much of the dialogue coming directly from it. It also removes several violent scenes from the book. The music was composed by Paddy Moloney, leader of the Irish folk music group The Chieftains, and performed by the group; selections from it can be heard on their album Reel Music: The Filmscores. According to Allmovie, Charlton Heston "plays the character of Long John Silver as written: a
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    3 votes
    160

    George Lowther

    George Lowther (died 1723) was an 18th century English pirate who, although little is known of his life, was active in the Caribbean and Atlantic. One of his lieutenants was Edward Low. Not much is known about him before becoming the 2nd Mate on the slave ship, Gambia Castle, which was under the command of Captain Charles Russell; however Lowther was more popular with the crew, as Russell seemed to care more about his shipment of slaves than for his men. Russell distrusted Lowther, and when he attempted to have him flogged many crew members took Lowther’s side and defended him, causing a schism among the crew. Also on board, after retreating from their fort, was a Captain Massey, along with a company of soldiers under his command. One night, while Captain Russell was offboard, Massey and Lowther decided to set sail without him. Massey intended to return to England, but Lowther, the crew, and Massy's own soldiers disagreed. Lowther was made captain and he renamed the Gambia Castle, Delivery. They attacked many ships but when Massey wanted to pillage a village on shore, he lost the vote as the risk was deemed too great. Lowther was able to obtain a smaller ship, named the Happy
    5.67
    3 votes
    161
    Golden Age of Piracy

    Golden Age of Piracy

    The Golden Age of Piracy is a common designation given to usually one or more outbursts of piracy in maritime history of the early modern period. In its broadest accepted definition, the Golden Age of Piracy spans from the 1650s to the 1730s and covers three separate outbursts of piracy: Narrower definitions of the Golden Age sometimes exclude the first or second periods, but most include at least some portion of the third. The modern conception of pirates as depicted in popular culture is derived largely, though not always accurately, from the Golden Age of Piracy. Factors contributing to piracy during the Golden Age included the rise in quantities of valuable cargoes being shipped to Europe over vast ocean areas, reduced European navies in certain regions, the training and experience that many sailors had gained in European navies (particularly the Royal Navy), and ineffective government in European overseas colonies. The colonial powers at the time constantly fought with pirates and engaged in several notable battles and other related events. The term "Golden Age of Piracy" is an invention of historians, and was never used by anyone who lived through the period that the name
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    3 votes
    162

    Manuel Rivero Pardal

    Manuel Ribeiro Pardal also known as Manuel Rivero Pardal or Pardel (died 1671) was a 17th century Portuguese privateer in Spanish service during the late 1660s and early 1670s. Pardal was originally hired by the Spanish to attack British bases in the Caribbean following Captain Henry Morgan's raid on Puerto Bello in 1668. Although it was anticipated that he would take on Morgan himself, Pardal instead attacked the turtle settlement on Little Cayman in 1670. Flying under false colors with a fleet of five ships, Pardal's 200-man force landed on the beach burning homes and turtle sloops and captured the Jamaican ship Hopewell. Before leaving for Cuba, he reportedly took two sloops and several prisoners with him. While in Cuba, he encountered Dutch pirate Bernard Speirdyke and later captured his ship. Upon his return to Cartagena in 1671, a festival was held in his honor and was appointed "Admiral of the Corsairs" by the Governor. During that same year, he sailed with his flagship the San Pedro and a captured French frigate seizing another sloop and attacking remote villages on the northern Jamaican coastline. According to popular lore, he wrote a poem issuing a challenge to Captain
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    3 votes
    163
    Alv Erlingsson

    Alv Erlingsson

    Alv Erlingsson (Alv Erlingsson den yngre. died 1290) was a Norwegian nobleman, earl of Sarpsborg and governor of Borgarsyssel. Alv Erlingsson was born at Tanberg in Norderhov, Buskerud. Alv Erlingsson was the son of Erling Alvsson of Tanberg (ca. 1230–1283) and grandson of Alv Erlingsson of Tanberg (ca. 1190 – ca. 1240). Tanberg (Tornberg) was an old manor which was considered to have been among the oldest farms in Norderhov. His grandmother was Ingeborg Baardsdatter of Rein, sister of Duke Skule Bårdsson. Alv Erlingsson was also a second cousin of King Magnus VI of Norway. With his father’s death in 1283, Alv Erlingsson inherited Sarpsborg and served as governor of Borgarsyssel which today makes up the county of Østfold. Alv Erlingsson had a central role in Norwegian national governance following the death of King Magnus VI in 1280. King Magnus's heir, Eirik Magnusson was a minor and unable to take government control in their own hands. A guardianship board was established which would rule the kingdom on behalf of the king until he was of age. Alv was not included in the formal guardianship government, but had much power as governor of Borgarsyssel. It is said he was a favorite of
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    2 votes
    164
    Cheung Po Tsai

    Cheung Po Tsai

    Cheung Po Tsai (simplified Chinese: 张保仔; traditional Chinese: 張保仔; pinyin: Zhāng Bǎozǎi; Wade–Giles: Chang Pao Tsai; Cantonese Yale: Jēung Bóu Jái; 1783 – 1822) was a 19th century Chinese pirate. He was also known as Cheung Po/Chang Pao/Zhang Bao ("Cheung Po Tsai" literally means "Cheung Po the Kid"). Several places in Hong Kong are linked to Cheung Po Tsai: A famous pirate in Hong Kong, he was a son of a Tanka fisherman who lived in Xinhui of Jiangmen but was kidnapped by the pirate Cheng I and his wife Ching Shih when he was 15. He was adopted by the kidnappers as their son. Cheung Po later took over the pirating business from his adopted parents. Cheung Po Tsai was active along the Guangdong coastal area during the Qing Dynasty. His followers are said to have reached 50,000+ and his fleet said to have possessed 600 ships. His piracy mate was Cai Qian and the two worked together until Cai Qian was destroyed by the Qing government, making Cheung decide to surrender. Cheung Po capitulated to the Chinese government in 1810 and became a captain in the Qing imperial navy, receiving the rank of navy colonel and an appointment in Penghu, far away from Hong Kong. He spent rest of his
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    2 votes
    165
    Christopher Myngs

    Christopher Myngs

    Sir Christopher Myngs (1625–1666), English admiral and pirate, came of a Norfolk family and was a relative of another admiral, Sir Cloudesley Shovell. Pepys' story of his humble birth, in explanation of his popularity, is said to be erroneous. His name is often given as Mings. The date of Myngs's birth is uncertain, but probably somewhere between 1620 and 1625. It is probable that he saw a good deal of sea-service before 1648. He first appears prominently as the captain of the Elisabeth, which after a sharp action during the First Anglo-Dutch War brought in a Dutch convoy with two men-of-war as prizes. From 1653 to 1655 he continued to command the Elisabeth, high in favour with the council of state and recommended for promotion by the flag officers under whom he served. In 1655, he was appointed to the frigate Marston Moor, the crew of which was on the verge of mutiny. His firm measures quelled the insubordinate spirit, and he took the vessel out to the West Indies, arriving in January 1656 on Jamaica where he became the subcommander of the naval flotilla there, until the summer of 1657. In February 1658, he returned to Jamaica as naval commander, acting as a commerce raider
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    166

    Dionysius the Phocaean

    Dionysius the Phocaean or Dionysius of Phocaea (fl. 494 BC) was a Phocaean admiral of Ancient Greece during the Persian Wars of 5th century BC, and was the commander of the Ionian fleet at the Battle of Lade in 494 BC. Although commanding a formidable force, according to the Greek historian Herodotus, his men were worked so hard in preparing for battle that on the eve of the battle they refused to engage the Persian fleet. Although little is known of his life, Dionysius was in command of the Ionian contingent gathered from the many islands throughout the Ionia which joined the main Greek naval force off of Miletus' port of Lade. Upon his arrival in the naval camp of Lade, he observed that his command displayed low morale and suffered from a lack of discipline. Believing his men were unprepared for the impending battle, he called a general assembly among the camp, he said in a speech to his men "Now for our affair's are on the razor's edge, men of Ionia, wither we are to be free or slaves ... so if you will bear hardships now, you will suffer temporarily but be able to overcome your enemies." He soon began ordering his men to perform several hours of martial exercises a day as well
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    167

    John Morris

    John Morris (fl. 1663-1672) was an English buccaneer active in the Caribbean during 1660s and early-1670s. His son, John Morris the Younger, held a command of his own ship during his father's later expeditions against Portobelo and Maracaibo. John Morris the Younger was one of the commanders killed in an explosion during a party on-board Henry Morgan's flagship in 1670. Serving with Admiral Christopher Myngs during his campaign against Spain in the West Indies during the early 1660s, he would become associated with many future prominent privateers of the era and later bought four captured prizes from Myngs. One of the early buccaneers participating in the expeditions against Spanish strongholds in Mexico and Nicaragua in late 1663 and early 1664, Morris sailed with Henry Morgan, David Marteen, Captain Jackman and Captain Freeman against Spanish strongholds in the Caribbean under privateering commissions granted by then governor Thomas Modyford. Arriving off the coast of Mexico, Morris and the others anchored their ships at the mouth of the Grijalva River and proceeded to march 50 miles inland to the capital of the Tabasco Province, Villahermosa, taking the Spanish stronghold
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    168
    Paul Watson

    Paul Watson

    Paul Watson (born December 2, 1950) is a Canadian animal rights and environmental activist, who founded and is president of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, a direct action group devoted to marine conservation. The Toronto native joined a Sierra Club protest against nuclear testing in 1969. He was an early and influential member of Greenpeace, crewed and skippered for it, and later was a board member. Watson argued for a strategy of direct action that conflicted with the Greenpeace interpretation of nonviolence, was ousted from the board in 1977, and subsequently left the organization. That same year, he formed Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. The group is the subject of a reality show, Whale Wars. He also promotes veganism, voluntary human population control, and a biocentric, rather than anthropocentric, worldview. Watson's activities have led to legal action from authorities in countries including Canada, Norway, Costa Rica, and Japan. After skipping bail following an arrest in Germany, on August 9, 2012 Interpol issued a red notice requesting his arrest. A second red notice was issued on September 14, 2012, this time at request from Japan. Paul Watson was born in
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    2 votes
    169
    William Kidd

    William Kidd

    William "Captain" Kidd (c. 1645 – 23 May 1701) was a Scottish sailor remembered for his trial and execution for piracy after returning from a voyage to the Indian Ocean. Some modern historians deem his piratical reputation unjust, as there is evidence that Kidd acted only as a privateer. Kidd's fame springs largely from the sensational circumstances of his questioning before the English Parliament and the ensuing trial. His actual depredations on the high seas, whether piratical or not, were both less destructive and less lucrative than those of many other contemporary pirates and privateers. Captain William Kidd was either one of the most notorious pirates in the history of the world or one of its most unjustly vilified and prosecuted privateers in an age typified by the rationalisation of empire. Despite the legends and fiction surrounding this character, his actual career was punctuated by only a handful of skirmishes followed by a desperate quest to clear his name. Kidd was born in Dundee, Scotland January 1654. He gave the city as his place of birth and said he was aged 41 in testimony under oath at the High Court of the Admiralty in October 1695. Researcher Dr David Dobson
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    170

    Yellowbeard

    Yellowbeard is a 1983 comedy film by Graham Chapman, along with Peter Cook, Bernard McKenna and David Sherlock. It was directed by Mel Damski, and was Marty Feldman's last film appearance. The pirate Yellowbeard (Chapman) was incarcerated for 20 years for tax evasion — apart from his years terrorizing the high seas ("Often forcing his victims to eat their own lips..."). He survives the sentence but has not disclosed the whereabouts of his vast treasure ("...in spite of 20 years of rehabilitation. And torture."). The Royal Navy hatches a plot to increase his sentence by 140 years, knowing that he will escape in a rage to set out for his treasure. This he does, recruiting a motley crew of companions. He had left a map of the treasure in the chimney of his wife's pub, but she burned the map. She then tells Yellowbeard that she had the map tattooed on their son's head. Things go wrong when his former shipmate-turned-traitor Bosun Moon's (Boyle) press gangs take over the ship. With the Head of the Secret Service (Idle) hot on their trail, they eventually find the island, where a group of AWOL Spanish Conquistadors (Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong) have taken residence with their ill-gotten
    6.50
    2 votes
    171

    Zheng Jing

    Zheng Jing (Chinese: 鄭經; pinyin: Zhèng Jīng; Wade–Giles: Cheng Ching; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Teⁿ Keng) was a seventeenth century Chinese warlord and Ming Dynasty loyalist. He was the eldest son of Koxinga and grandson of pirate-merchant Zheng Zhilong. After the conquest of Taiwan in 1662 by his father, Zheng Jing controlled the military forces in Xiamen and Quemoy on his father's behalf. Upon the death of his father six months later, Zheng Jing contested throne as the King of Taiwan with his uncle, Zheng Shixi. The dispute was resolved in Zheng Jing's favor after he successfully landed an army in Taiwan despite strong opposition by the forces of his uncle. This was followed by Zheng Shixi withdrawing his claim. With both the vast pirate fleet and the throne of Tainan, he intended to continue his father's plans to invade the Philippines; however, he was forced to abandon this venture when faced with the threat of a Manchu-Dutch alliance. His victory over a combined Manchu-Dutch fleet in 1664 resulted in ending the brief alliance. For the next 19 years, he tried to provide sufficiently for the local inhabitants and reorganizing their military forces in Taiwan. He frequently exchanged
    6.50
    2 votes
    172
    Zheng Zhilong

    Zheng Zhilong

    Zheng Zhilong (1604–1661), also known as Nicholas Iquan Gaspard, was a native of Nan'an, Fujian, China. He was a Chinese merchant, pirate and admiral for the Ming Empire. He was the father of Zheng Chenggong (Koxinga), also a military leader. Under the Qing Dynasty, Zheng was elevated to the rank of Count of the Second Rank. His company was known as Iquan's Party. Zheng was born in Nan'an, Fujian, the son of Zheng Shaozu (鄭紹祖), a mid-level financial official for the Quanzhou government, and Zheng Shaozu's wife Lady Huang (黃氏). Contemporary biographies tell a possibly apocryphal story of how when Zheng was a child, he and his brothers wanted to eat longan fruit. They found a fruit tree in an enclosed courtyard but whose branches hung over the top of the wall into the street. They threw stones in the hope of knocking some of the fruit clusters loose. It happened to be the courtyard of the governor of Quanzhou City, and he was struck by the stones. The boys ran but were caught and hauled before the governor. Due to the child's age and apparent charisma, the governor forgave Zheng and released him, saying "This is the face of one destined for wealth and nobility." The story may or may
    6.50
    2 votes
    173

    Bernard Desjean, Baron de Pointis

    Bernard Desjean, Baron de Pointis (1645 – April 24, 1707) was a French admiral and privateer. Pointis was born in Brittany. He took part in naval operations in the 1680s under Duquesne, like the bombardment of Algiers and the punitive action against Genoa. In the 1690s he fought under Tourville among others in the Battle of Beachy Head (1690). In 1693, he became chef d'escadre. In 1697, he undertook his greatest expedition: the Raid on Cartagena. This raid was so successful that it made him immensely rich and very appreciated by King Louis XIV. In 1702, after the death of Jean Bart, he was appointed head of the Dunkirkers, but he was soon replaced by Marc-Antoine de Saint-Pol Hécourt for lack of initiative. In 1705, he tried to attack Gibraltar by sea, but was completely defeated by John Leake in the Battle of Cabrita point. After this battle Pointis retired from active service. He published Relation de l'expédition de Carthègene faite par les François en 1697. He died in Paris.
    4.75
    4 votes
    174
    Charles Vane

    Charles Vane

    Charles Vane (c.1680 – March 29, 1721) was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping. His pirate career lasted from 1716 – 1719. His flagship was a brigantine named the Ranger. Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the notorious base at New Providence in the Bahamas after the British abandoned the colony during the War of Spanish Succession. After a relatively long and violent career in piracy he was captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica. Charles Vane's history is not well documented, but he most likely started his career aboard one of Lord Archibald Hamilton's privateers. He turned to piracy in 1716 while raiding Spanish salvage ships, sent to retrieve silver from the sunken Spanish treasure fleet off the coast of Florida. Vane successfully raided the Spanish ships and landed crews, stealing a great deal of goods and riches. Vane was infamous for his cruelty toward the crews of captured vessels. After his first act as a pirate he was reported to the governor of Bermuda for torturing men on rival vessels while on a salvage mission. He also showed scant respect for the pirate code, cheating his own
    7.00
    1 votes
    175

    Hennig Wichmann

    Hennig Wichmann (died 1402) was one of the leaders of the Likedeeler, an association of former Victual Brothers who had turned pirate. Together with Klaus Störtebeker and Magister Wigbold, he wreaked havoc in the North and Baltic Sea at the end of the 14th century. They owned fast ships which were able to capture Hanseatic ships with ease. Their aim was plunder and surviving prisoners were usually thrown overboard. In 1402 Wichmann was captured and executed by beheading on the Grasbrook in Hamburg together with 73 of his men, less than a year after the capture and execution of Klaus Störtebeker.
    7.00
    1 votes
    176

    Laurens de Graff

    Laurens Cornelis Boudewijn de Graaf (c. 1653, Dordrecht, Dutch Republic – 24 May 1704, Cap-Français, Saint-Domingue) was a Dutch pirate, mercenary, and naval officer in the service of the French colony of Saint-Domingue during the late 17th and early 18th century. He was also known as Laurencillo or Lorencillo or simply El Griffe (Spanish), Sieur de Baldran or simply de Graff (French) and Gesel van de West (Dutch; "Scourge of the West"). Henry Morgan, the governor of Jamaica, characterized him as "a great and mischievous pirate". De Graaf was described as tall, blond, mustached and handsome. Some Spanish thought he was the Devil in person. Many accounts of Laurens de Graaf are highly romanticized. Some historians speculate that he may have been a mulatto (El Griffe was a common nickname for those of mixed African and European ancestry). He was reportedly enslaved by Spanish slave traders when captured in what is now the Netherlands and transported to the Canary Islands to work on a plantation, prior to 1674. During the early 1670s, de Graaf either escaped or was freed, and French historian Vassiere recorded that he married his first wife (Francois) Petronilla de Guzmán in 1674 in
    7.00
    1 votes
    177

    Pedro de la Plesa

    Pedro de la Plesa (fl. 1622) was a 17th century Spanish privateer. He served as a Dunkirker in the service of the Spanish Crown during the Eighty Years' War. He and Juan Garcia gained notoriety for abandoning their comrade Captain Jan Jacobsen in his final naval battle against the Dutch Republic. In October 1622, he left from Duinkerken along with Juan Garcia and Jan Jacobsen in an attempt to break through the enemy blockade. However, de la Plesa was immediately sighted by a passing Dutch yacht as he sailed out of Oostende. The ship's captain, Jacob Volckertzoon Vinck, cut his mooring lines and sailed out to a nearby fleet under Admiral Harman Kleuter. Being informed of the Dunkirkers activities, he set out after them at once. He was later joined by another squadron from Den Briel under the command of Captain Lambert Hendrikszoon. As the combined fleet appeared, the two Spaniards realizing they were outnumbered chose to retreat. Sailing toward England, Jan Jacobsen chose to fight the nine pursuing warships. Weither Jacobsen had decided to make a final stand or to cover the retreat of Juan Garcia and Pedro de la Plesa is uncertain, however he died in the long, hardfought battle.
    7.00
    1 votes
    178
    Roche Braziliano

    Roche Braziliano

    Roche Braziliano (sometimes spelled Rock, Roch, Roc, Roque, Brazilliano, or Brasiliano) (c. 1630 – disappeared c. 1671), was a Dutch pirate born in the town of Groningen. His pirate career lasted from 1654 until his disappearance around 1671. He was first eternalized in Alexandre Exquemelin's 1678 book The Buccaneers of America; Exquemelin did not know Braziliano's real name, but historians have found he was probably born as Gerrit Gerritszoon and that he and his parents moved to Dutch-controlled Brazil. He is known as "Roche Braziliano", which in English translates to "Rock the Brazilian", due to his long exile in Brazil. Roche Braziliano was a notoriously cruel buccaneer who operated out of Port Royal, Jamaica. He was a privateer in Bahia, Brazil, before moving to Port Royal in 1654. He led a mutiny and adopted the life of a buccaneer. On his first adventure he captured a ship of immense value and brought it back safely to Jamaica. He eventually was caught and sent to Spain, but he escaped with threats of vengeance from his followers. He soon resumed his criminal career, purchasing a new ship from fellow pirate François l'Olonnais and later sailing in company with Sir Henry
    7.00
    1 votes
    179
    Wijerd Jelckama

    Wijerd Jelckama

    Wijerd Jelckama (also spelled Wierd and Wijard) (c. 1490–1523) was a Frisian military commander, warlord and member of the Arumer Zwarte Hoop ("Arumer Black Hope"). He was the lieutenant of Pier Gerlofs Donia (also known as Grutte Pier) and fought along his side against the Saxon and Hollandic invaders. Jelckama took Donia's place as freedom fighter after Donia died in 1520. Jelckama was born in the year 1490 in a large family of farmers and petty noblemen. He was descended from knights who had participated in the Crusades. One of his ancestors from his father's side of the family had died at the Siege of Antioch. Together with Pier Gerlofs Donia, Jelckama fought against the Saxon warriors that occupied their homeland of Frisia, at the capture of Medemblik, and in the siege of Middelburg castle. In addition to the area occupied by the Saxons, parts of Frisia were conquered by Denmark, Holland, and local duchies. Donia and Jelckama's goal was to rid Frisia of all foreign powers and regain independence. Under the leadership of Donia, they used guerilla tactics and gained several victories like the successful siege of two Hollandic castles and the city of Medemblik. Their greatest
    7.00
    1 votes
    180

    Benito de Soto

    Benito Soto Aboal (April 22, 1805, Pontevedra - January 25, 1830, Gibraltar) was a Galician pirate, and captain of the Burla Negra ("Black Joke"). Benito de Soto was the most notorious of the last generation of pirates to plunder shipping in the Atlantic, one of those arising from the ending of the Napoleonic Wars. De Soto served on an Argentinian slave ship before leading a mutiny off the coast of Angola in 1827. When 18 of the crew declined to participate they were cast adrift off in an open boat. Having renamed the vessel the Burla Negra, de Soto crossed the Atlantic, where he sold stolen cargo of slaves in the Caribbean, and then sailed south, attacking English, American, Spanish and Portuguese ships along the South American coast. From 1830 the Burla Negra also ventured eastwards into the Atlantic to intercept vessels returning from India and the Far East. He proved to be one of the most bloodthirsty pirates of any age, murdering crews who fell into his hands and sinking their ships. The most infamous episode in de Soto's career came on 19 February 1828, when the Burla Negra happened upon the Morning Star en route from Ceylon to England. After killing some of the passengers
    5.33
    3 votes
    181

    Cheng I

    Cheng I (1765 – 1807) (鄭一, pinyin: Zhèng Yī, Cantonese: Jihng Yāt, also romanised as Zheng Yi) was one of the most powerful Chinese pirates along the Chinese coast during the 19th century. He and his wife Ching Shih, a prostitute whom he fell in love with, captured Cheung Po Tsai who according to legend became her lover. Cheung was later adopted by them. After Cheng I died on November 16, 1807, Ching Shih took over the pirating business.
    5.33
    3 votes
    182

    Red Legs Greaves

    "Red Legs" Greaves was a Scottish buccaneer active in the Caribbean and the West Indies during the 1670s. His nickname came from the term Redlegs used to refer to the class of poor whites that lived on colonial Barbados. Although considered a successful pirate during his career, most notably his raid of Margarita in the mid 1670s, he is best known for his escape from Port Royal prison during an earthquake June 7, 1692. Born in Barbados, Greaves' parents had been tried for treason for their participation during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms and sold into slavery, as were many Royalists and Covenanters in Scotland. He is thought to have been born in 1649. Born a short time after his parents' arrival in Barbados, Greaves became the servant of a kindly master. However, his parents and master died a short time after another, and the orphaned boy was sold to another man who was claimed to have been violent and to have often beaten Greaves as a teenager. During this time, concerned for his survival, he attempted to escape his servitude and successfully managed to swim across Carlisle Bay, stowing away on a ship preparing to leave Barbados. Although he assumed the vessel was a
    5.33
    3 votes
    183

    The Pirate Movie

    The Pirate Movie is a 1982 Australian musical comedy film directed by Ken Annakin and starring Christopher Atkins and Kristy McNichol. The film is loosely based on Gilbert and Sullivan's comic opera The Pirates of Penzance. The original music score is composed by Mike Brady and Peter Sullivan. The movie performed far below expectations when first released and is generally reviewed very poorly. Mabel Stanley is an introverted girl yearning for popularity in a seaside community in Australia. She attends a local pirate festival featuring a swordplay demonstration led by a curly-haired instructor, Frederic, who then invites her for a ride on his boat. She is duped by her acquaintances into missing the launch, so she rents a small sailboat to give chase. A sudden storm throws her overboard, and she washes up on a beach. She subsequently dreams an adventure that takes place a century before. In this fantasy sequence, the swordplay instructor is now named Frederic, a young apprentice of the Pirates of Penzance, celebrating his 21st birthday on a pirate vessel. Frederic refuses an invitation from the Pirate King, his adopted father, to become a full pirate, as his birth parents were
    5.33
    3 votes
    184
    Jacques de Sores

    Jacques de Sores

    Jacques de Sores was a French pirate who attacked and burnt Havana, Cuba in 1555. Other than his attack on Havana, little is known of de Sores. He was nicknamed "The Exterminating Angel" ("L'Ange Exterminateur"). He was the leader of a band of Huguenot pirates and a lieutenant or former lieutenant of another French pirate, François le Clerc, who was called "Pegleg" or "Jambe de Bois" on account of his wooden leg. Le Clerc and Sores had set out from France in 1553 with three royal ships and a number of privateers under commission from Francis I of France who was envious of the riches returning to Spain from the New World. Le Clerc had raided Santiago de Cuba in 1554, and some accounts mention a raid on Santiago de Cuba by de Sores, although whether this was as part of the attack by le Clerc is not clear. He may have used Cayo Romano and Cayo Coco in the archipelago of Jardines del Rey adjacent to the northern Cuban coast as a base of operations. Details of the attack on Havana are also sketchy: the number of ships that de Sores used in the attack varies in different accounts from 2 to 20. Regardless of the number of ships involved, de Sores had little trouble in capturing the
    6.00
    2 votes
    185

    James Alday

    James Alday (1516-1576?) was a 16th century English navigator, explorer and privateer. He participated in raids against the Spanish with fellow privateers James Logan and William Cooke during the 1540s and is credited, along with Sebastian Cabot and Henry Ostrich, of the start of regular trading between England and the Barbary coast. He himself claimed to have organized the earliest known voyage to the Barbary coast "inventing the Barbary trade" and, although intending to command the expedition himself, Alday was forced to turn his command to another due to illness. This voyage was not successful however and a rival expedition commanded by Thomas Windham became the first to arrive there in 1551. His claim has generally been dismissed partly due to his involvement in piracy as well as lack of evidence. Alday was a Dartmouth skipper who was said to "hover between privateering and piracy". Commanding the Trinity Gilbert, he joined James Logan of the Flying Ghost and others in raiding the coast of Galicia during the 1540s. An apprentice and close friend of Sebastian Cabot, Alday was involved with Cabot and Henry Ostrich in plans to establish trade with the Barbary coast. He had
    6.00
    2 votes
    186

    William Wright

    William Wright (fl. 1675-1682) was an English privateer in French service and later buccaneer who raided Spanish towns in the late 17th century. Little is known of William Wright before he settled in French Hispaniola in the mid 1670s. Accepting a French commission of war from the French Governor in 1675 he later raided the Spanish colony of Segovia (present day Nicaragua) with several other privateers. Sailing to the San Blas Islands in 1679 he recruited several sailors before traveling to the Mosquito Coast encountering an old friend John Gret. Returning to the San Blas Islands, Gret negotiated on Wright's behalf to form an alliance with the local natives. However despite this alliance the privateers, led by Jean Bernanos, were defeated after an attempted attack on the Spanish town of Chepo several weeks later. Soon after the raid Wright left Petit Goâve with Captain Thomas Paine sailing the Spanish Main from Cartagena to Caracas capturing a ship escorted by the Spanish Armada de Barlovento. In May 1680, while at Isla Blanca, Wright and Paine joined French buccaneer Captain Michel de Grammont later capturing La Guayra seaport in Caracas before being driven off by the Spanish
    6.00
    2 votes
    187
    Hook

    Hook

    Hook is a 1991 American fantasy film directed by Steven Spielberg and written by James V. Hart and Malia Scotch Marmo. It stars Robin Williams as Peter Pan/Peter Banning, Dustin Hoffman as Captain Hook, Julia Roberts as Tinker Bell, Bob Hoskins as Smee, Maggie Smith as Granny Wendy, Caroline Goodall as Moira Banning, and Charlie Korsmo as Jack Banning. The film is based on the 1911 novel Peter and Wendy by J. M. Barrie and acts as a sequel to those adventures, focusing on a grown-up Peter Pan who has forgotten his childhood. Now known as "Peter Banning", he is a successful corporate lawyer with a wife and two children. Hook kidnaps his children, and Peter must return to Neverland and reclaim his youthful spirit in order to challenge his old enemy. Spielberg began developing the film in the early-1980s with Walt Disney Productions and Paramount Pictures, which would have followed the storyline seen in the 1953 animated film and 1924 silent film. Peter Pan entered pre-production in 1985, but Spielberg abandoned the project. James V. Hart developed the script with director Nick Castle and TriStar Pictures before Spielberg decided to direct in 1989. Hook was shot entirely on sound
    5.00
    3 votes
    188
    Lars Gathenhielm

    Lars Gathenhielm

    Lars Gathenhielm (1689–1718) was a Swedish merchant and privateer. Lars Gathenhielm was born on the Gatan estate in Onsala Parish in Halland. His parents were the sea captain Anders Börjesson Gathe and his wife Kerstin Larsdotter, daughter of a mill owner in Hjälm, Fjärås Parish. Before his knighthood in 1715he was known as Lars Andersson Gathe or Lasse i Gatan. To protect Swedish shipping from pirates and to harm the enemy, the government of Charles XII of Sweden began a maritime campaign, and in June 1710 gave Lars Gathe from Onsala permission to act as a privateer and attack ships from enemy-nations such as Denmark and Russia. He gained a great deal of early success with his galleon Lilla Jägaren (The Little Hunter). The hijacked ships increased in numbers and many of Onsalas sailors were quickly re-educated to work the privateer ships. Lars suffered from a hip injury that made him dependent on crutches to walk and therefore probably didn't spend much time on the sea himself, but rather directed the work from Gothenburg. His strength was probably as shipowner while the practical matters were handled by his serfs. Lars was a few times accused of pure piracy (hitting Swedish ships
    5.00
    3 votes
    189

    Nathaniel North

    Nathaniel North (ca. 1671 - ca. 171?) was a pirate during the Golden Age of Piracy who operated in the Indian Ocean. He served under John Bowen and succeeded him as captain of the Defiant following Bowen's retirement in 1704. After losing the Defiant, he was ruler of a pirate colony at Ambonavoula made up of his former crew for a number of years before returning briefly to sea. Following his retirement as a wealthy man in 1709, he settled in Rajapura, married a local girl but was shortly murdered by her family for his poor treatment of her. The year he was killed was never recorded but it is clear that he was killed after 1709. In fact, there is no documentation proving his actual birth date or the year of his birth but it is clear in one document date sometime in 1689 that he could have been born in late 1671 or early 1672. In 1689, at the age of seventeen North was a crewman aboard an English privateer attacking French shipping during the War of the Grand Alliance. He was impressed into the Royal Navy but made his way to Jamaica. There he again met British press gangs, but escaped by jumping overboard and swimming to shore. By 1696 North was a crewman in a band of privateers who
    5.00
    3 votes
    190

    Baltazar de Cordes

    Baltazar de Cordes (16th century–17th century), the brother of Simon de Cordez, was a Dutch corsair who fought against the Spanish during the early 17th Century. Born in the Netherlands in the mid-16th century, Baltazar de Cordes began sailing for the Netherlands against Spain during the Eighty Years' War. Baltazar possibly arrived in the Pacific during the 1598 Magellano Company expedition attempting to circumnavigate South America. This expedition, under the command of Admiral Jacques Mahu, consisted of five ships. One of the vessels, the Liefde ("Love" or "Charity"), reached Japan in 1600, pilot William Adams among the surviving crew. He succeeded Captain Jurriaan van Bokholt (or Van Boekhout) who died around August 23, 1599 shortly after crossing the Straits of Magellan. In early 1600, (whether this occurred before or after the capture of Chiloe is unknown), Cordes occupied the Spanish colony of Castro, Chile. In April 1600, with combined Dutch and native forces, Cordez organized the capture of the island of Chiloé off the coast of Patagonia (Chile). However Cordez's forces suffered heavy losses upon the recapture of the city by the Spanish, executing all but 23 Dutch and over
    5.50
    2 votes
    191

    Salomo de Veenboer

    Ivan Dirkie De Veenboer (died October 10, 1620 near Cartagena ) was a 17th century Dutch corsair. A privateer during the Eighty Years' War, he later turned to piracy and became an officer under Simon the Dancer. He later converted to Islam, becoming known as Süleyman Reis (also spelled Sulayman, Soliman or Slemen Reis), and had a highly successful career as an Ottoman Captain and Barbary corsair commanding the Algiers corsair fleet during his later years. Born in Hoorn, De Veenboer first came to prominence as a privateer for the Dutch Republic against the Spanish during the Eighty Years' War. He operated legally under a letter of marque from the Dutch Admiralty, but left the service of the Republic after little success. He joined other former corsairs operating in North Africa, becoming an officer under Simon the Dancer sometime between 1606 and 1609. De Veenboer found far more success on the Barbary coast and, while in Algiers, he converted to Islam and changed his name to Sulayman Reis. He was later given the title of Soliman-ray (or Admiral) while visiting Constantinople and, by 1617, he was in command of his own fleet. He most often used the colors of Algiers, however his crew
    5.50
    2 votes
    192

    Shipwrecked

    Shipwrecked (Norwegian: Haakon Haakonsen) is a 1990 action-adventure film intended for family viewing. In Norway it was titled "Haakon Haakonson". The movie was produced by a consortium of Scandinavian companies and released in the U.S. in an English-language version by Walt Disney Pictures. Shot on location in Fiji, Norway, Spain and the United Kingdom, the movie is a dramatization of Norwegian author Oluf Falck-Ytter's book Haakon Haakonsen: En Norsk Robinson (Haakon Haakonsen: A Norwegian Robinson). This adventure story aimed at young readers was inspired by Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe and published in 1873. The film has received favorable reviews as a well-made adventure story for families. Haakon Haakonsen (Stian Smestad), a young Norwegian boy in the 1850s, becomes the sole support of his family as a cabin boy on a ship after his father is injured. Jens (Trond Peter Stamsø Munch), a family friend and a fellow shipmate of Haakon’s father, becomes an older brother to Haakon on their voyage. At first, Haakon has a difficult time adjusting to life at sea, but eventually earns the respect of his shipmates while earning the distrust of the first mate - after Haakon catches the
    5.50
    2 votes
    193

    The Light at the Edge of the World

    The Light at the Edge of the World is a 1971 adventure film, narrated by Sean Connery and adapted from Jules Verne's classic 1905 adventure novel Le Phare du bout du monde. The plot involves piracy in the South Atlantic during the mid 19th century, with a theme of survival in extreme circumstances, and events centering on an isolated lighthouse. Despite having a large Hollywood budget, collaboration with prestigious foreign film studios, exotic shooting locations in Europe and some of the biggest name movie stars, the movie was mainly a failure at the box office. The year is 1865. Will Denton (Kirk Douglas) is a jaded American miner escaping a troubled past. Seeking isolation for two reasons - to mend his broken heart after a failed romance during the California Gold Rush, and also to escape punishment after he murdered a man in a gunfight - Denton tends a lonely and isolated lighthouse with a minimal crew of three men, himself included. The lighthouse sits on a fictional rocky island adorned with many caves carved by the crashing waves of the Atlantic Ocean; it is however set in the geographic location of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago at the southern tip of South America.
    5.50
    2 votes
    194

    Thomas Paine

    Thomas Paine (1632–1715) was a colonial American privateer who, during the late 17th century, raided several Spanish settlements, including his raid with Jan Willems who together looted Rio de la Hacha in 1680 as well as driving the French out of Block Island. Although a subject of Great Britain, he was associated with many prominent Dutch privateers of the day including Jan Corneliszoon. A resident of Jamestown, Rhode Island, he had received a commission from Jamaica's governor Sir Thomas Lynch which instructed him to “seize, kill, and destroy pirates” however, in 1683, he joined the privateers John Markham, Jan Corneliszoon, Conway Woolley and a French Captain Bréhal in a raid against the Spanish town of Saint Augustine, Florida in March 1683. In command of an 8-gun bark, the Pearl, Thomas Paine led his crew of sixty men under the command of Captain Bréhal who possessed a French privateering commission, obtained from Jacques Nepveu, sieur de Pouanéay and governor of Saint Domingue. As did the others, Paine sailed under a French flag as the fleet arrived off the Florida coast. However, finding the Spanish had prepared for their arrival in advance, they were forced to withdraw
    5.50
    2 votes
    195

    Tuanku Abbas

    Tuanku Abbas was a Malayan pirate active in the 1840s and the brother of a rajah of Aceh. He was well known for sponsoring and leading pirate raids, the most notable of which occurred in 1843 when he captured an Indian Crew and plundered their ship. After the incident the crew escaped and appealed to the British authorities who, the following year, burned Abbas' village to the ground.
    5.50
    2 votes
    196
    Shanghai'd

    Shanghai'd

    Your ordinary boring Life on St. Kitts is about to be shaken to it's core after your night of binge drinking lands you as the newest conscripts on the pirate ship "Massacre."
    4.67
    3 votes
    197

    Jacquotte Delahaye

    Jacquotte Delahaye (17th century), was a French pirate, or Buccaneer, and together with Anne Dieu-Le-Veut one of very few female buccaneers. She was active in the 1660s, came from Haiti, her father was French and her mother Haitian. She is described as a great beauty who became a pirate after her father was killed. It is rumored that her mother died in childbirth. Her brother suffered from mild retardation and was left in her care after her father's death. To escape her pursuers, she faked her own death and took on an alias, living as a man for many years. Upon returning she became known as "back from the dead red" because of her striking red hair.
    6.00
    1 votes
    198

    James Kelly

    James Gilliam, also known as James Kelly, (died July 12, 1701) was an English pirate active in the Indian Ocean during the 1690s and was a longtime associate of Captain William Kidd. One of Kidd's earliest crew members, Gilliam was a participant in the mutiny on board the Moacha and the subsequent murder of Captain Edgecomb who was killed in his sleep. After taking command of the East Indiaman, Gilliam and the crew of the Mocha captured several ships in the eastern seas until his arrest after returning to New England with Kidd in 1699. Transported to Great Britain, he was tried at the Old Bailey and found guilty of piracy. While in prison, he wrote A full and true Discovery of all the Robberies, Pyracies, and other Notorious Actions, of that Famous English Pyrate, Capt. James Kelly which included references to the as yet undiscovered Galapagos Islands before his eventual execution on July 12, 1701.
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Kristoffer Throndsen

    Kristoffer Throndsen

    Kristoffer Throndsen (c. 1500–1565), posthumously also with the family name Rustung, was a squire, admiral, feudal overlord in Norway and Denmark, privateer captain and pirate. Kristoffer served Archbishop Olav Engelbrektsson, the interregnum leader of Norway, in the years ending the Kalmar Union. Kristoffer is famous for playing a role in the last years before the reformation in Norway, firstly as head of the national fleet, defending Norway from attacking Danish ships; also, notably, for having murdered Vincent Lunge, a Danish nobleman sent to Bergen in 1537 to enforce the Norwegian annexation by Denmark, by Danish King Christian III. This dramatic moment in Norwegian history is memorialized today in an annual "midnight opera" sponsored by the Norwegian Ministry of Culture, titled Olav Engelbrektsson, which takes place on the premises of the castle, outside of Trondheim. Kristoffer appealed for pardon from Christian III, (probably for the murder) but also, notably, for his pirating of the Norwegian coast under foreign flags, whereby he attacked Danish ships and installations in Norway after 1536. He was granted a post under the Danish crown, which badly needed a naval leader; He
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    Robert Culliford

    Robert Culliford (c. 1666 - ?) was an English pirate from Cornwall who is best remembered for repeatedly checking the designs of Captain William Kidd. Culliford and Kidd first met as shipmates aboard the French privateer Sainte Rose in 1689; there were only six other Britons aboard. After the War of the Grand Alliance broke out, Kidd, Culliford, and their British comrades mutinied against a French prize crew, taking the ship and renaming it the Blessed William, with Kidd put in command. But in February, 1690, Culliford led his own mutiny and deprived Kidd of his command. The pirates elected William Mason as captain. Culliford sailed with the pirates through the Caribbean, sacking ships and attacking a town. They went to New York to sell their booty. Mason was granted a letter of marque by Jacob Leisler, then acting governor of New York, and Culliford accompanied the pirates as they ransacked and laid waste two French Canadian towns. The pirates also captured a French frigate named L'Esperance. Mason granted this ship to Culliford, who renamed it the Horne Frigate, Culliford's first pirate command. However, the pirates lost most of their booty when the two ketches they sent to bring
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    202
    Dominique You

    Dominique You

    Dominique You (1775-1830) was a privateer, pirate, and soldier. Born in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (which is now Haiti) in 1775, You joined the army of Revolutionary France as an artillerist. He served in the French Republic's artillery corp. In 1802 he accompanied General Victor Leclerc to Santo Domingo to quell Toussaint Louverture's slave revolt. Yellow fever took the lives of many of the French soldiers including General Leclerc. Afterwards You went to New Orleans where he joined his half brothers Jean Lafitte and Pierre Lafitte, where he became the captain on the French Corsair Le Pandoure. He was nicknamed "Captain Dominique" by the French and "Johnness" by the Americans. He acquired quite a reputation for being very bold and daring. During the next few years he and his brothers became quite successful smugglers in the Louisiana bayous, and as privateers preyed on Spanish ships in the Gulf of Mexico, doing extensive damage to Spanish commerce in the gulf. On one occasion, a storm on the Mississippi River caused severe damage to the Pandoure and almost killed Captain You. In July 1814 You was falsely convicted of piracy in the gulf, but the Americans failed to capture
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    203

    Alexander Dalzeel

    Alexander Dalzeel (c. 1662 – December 5, 1715) was a seventeenth-century pirate and former officer under Henry Avery. Born in Port Patrick, Scotland, Dalzeel went to sea as a child and, by the age of 23, was captain of his own ship with six successful voyages to his credit. Earning a reputation for dishonesty, Dalzeel arrived in Madagascar in 1685 and soon enlisted into the ranks of Captain Avery. According to pirate lore, Dalzeel participated in the capture of the treasure ship Ganj-i-Sawai, which carried The Great Mogul's daughter to her arranged marriage. Avery, who had decided to take her as his own wife, gave Dalzeel his own ship and crew within Avery's fleet. Dalzeel would continue to serve under Avery until finally leaving for the West Indies on his own. However, upon their arrival in the Caribbean, the pirates' search for targets was fruitless. With their supplies slowly running short, starvation began to set in before a Spanish vessel was sighted. As the ship came into view, Dalzeel realized the Spanish ship was a well-armed Spanish war galleon which had presumably become separated from its escorts. Despite their ship's smaller size, Dalzeel gave orders to close in on the
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    204

    Hendrick Jacobszoon Lucifer

    Hendrick Jacobszoon Lucifer (1583–1627) was a Dutch-born pirate. Hendrick's last name, Lucifer, referred not to a lighting stick, but to the fallen angel Lucifer, and was most likely used as a nickname due to his use of fire and smoke to surprise enemies. In 1627, Hendrick was in charge of 3 ships transporting colonists to Guyana for the Dutch West India Company, accompanied by two other pirate captains. One encounter off the coast of Cuba caused by a near collision with a two-ship Honduran treasure fleet allowed Hendrick's fleet to capture a ship and contents worth 1.2 Million Guilders. Hendrick fought as brave as a lion, (according to surviving crewmen), and personally killed around ten enemy soldiers in close combat, before being hit by a bullet. He still continued his plundering, but another bullet hit him in the chest and he had to quit fighting. He made it back safely to his ship, and his crew finished up the last of the treasure fleet's sailors. Lucifer, by then mortally wounded, gave the order to transfer the money to his ship. He then walked to his cabin. He slowly lay down to bed, saying he would go to rest, and then died as a result of wounds received during the
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    205

    Nathaniel Gordon

    Nathaniel Gordon (c. 1834 – February 21, 1862) was the only American slave trader to be tried, convicted, and executed "for being engaged in the Slave Trade" in accordance with the Piracy Law of 1820. Gordon was born in Portland, Maine. He loaded 897 slaves aboard his ship Erie at Sharks Point, Congo River, West Africa on August 7, 1860, "of whom only 172 were men and 162 grown women. Gordon was one of those infamous characters who preferred to carry children because they could not rise up to avenge his cruelties." The Erie was captured by the USS Mohican 50 miles from port on August 8, 1860. After one hung jury and a new trial, Gordon was convicted on November 9, 1861 in the circuit court in New York City and sentenced to death by hanging on February 7, 1862. President Abraham Lincoln issued a stay of Gordon's execution, setting the new date for February 21, 1862. Lincoln made clear that the respite was only temporary to allow Gordon time for his final preparations. In his Stay of Execution, Lincoln gave him a two-week stay of execution to “[make] the necessary preparation for the awful change which awaits him.” The evening before the execution, Gordon unsuccessfully attempted
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    206
    The Count of Monte Cristo

    The Count of Monte Cristo

    The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas (père). It is one of the author's most popular works, along with The Three Musketeers. He completed the work in 1844. Like many of his novels, it is expanded from plot outlines suggested by his collaborating ghostwriter Auguste Maquet. The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815–1838 (from just before the Hundred Days to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France). The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty. The book is considered a literary classic today. According to Luc Sante, "The Count of Monte Cristo has become a fixture of Western civilization's literature, as inescapable and immediately identifiable as Mickey Mouse,
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    207

    The Island

    The Island is a 1980 American thriller film, directed by Michael Ritchie and starring Michael Caine and David Warner. The film was based on a novel of the same name by Peter Benchley who also wrote the screenplay. It is about a savage race of ancient pirates, made up of outcasts, thieves, and murderers, who are hidden from the outside world by an uncharted Caribbean island, and who raid boats to sustain themselves. Blair Maynard (Michael Caine) is a British-born American journalist who decides to investigate the mystery of why so many boats disappear in the Bermuda Triangle of the Caribbean. He takes his estranged son with him to the area on the "vacation" and, while fishing, are both attacked by an unkempt man and brought to an uncharted island. On the island, Blair discovers the terrible truth: the inhabitants on the island are actually a centuries old, colony of savage French pirates. The group has been living on the island for centuries, unseen by society, who sustain themselves by raiding pleasure boats. The pirates kill whoever comes to the island, however, Blair and his son are both kept alive due to a false assumption regarding their lineage and a need to offset the
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    208

    The Pirates of Pompeii

    The Pirates of Pompeii is a children's historical novel set in Roman times by Caroline Lawrence. The novel is the third in the Roman Mysteries series. Flavia and Nubia look over the devastation of Mount Vesuvius. Their friend Jonathan ben Mordecai is in a coma, and Nubia and Flavia search for a flower that his father who is a doctor needs for medicine. Scuto, Flavia's dog finds the precious flower, as well as a little girl, Julia who says that her big brother Rufus was kidnapped by some “scary men” and told her to hide in the cave while he drew them off. Returning to the refugee camp, Flavia and Nubia help to medicine Jonathan, who awakes from his coma. While he is recovering, Nubia meets a runaway slave named Kuanto, from the same region of Africa as she. He asks her to run away and be free with him, but she hesitates. The four friends learn that children are disappearing everywhere, and Flavia guesses that some kind of organized kidnapping racket is going on. Hearing one of the refugees mutter “Felix just got luckier” with news of another disappearance, Flavia suspects the powerful local landlord Publius Pollius Felix, who happens to be her uncle Gaius’s patron. Felix is in the
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    209
    Uluj Ali

    Uluj Ali

    Uluj Ali (Turkish: Uluç Ali Reis, later Uluç Ali Paşa and finally Kılıç Ali Paşa; born Giovanni Dionigi Galeni; 1519 - 21 June 1587) was an Italian by birth who was captured as a slave and later converted to Islam, became a pirate, and later became an Ottoman admiral (Reis), king of Algiers, and Grand Admiral (Kapudan Pasha) of the Ottoman Fleet in the 16th century. He was also known by several other names in the Christian countries of the Mediterranean, and in the literature also appears under various names. He was often, especially in Italy, referred to as Occhiali, and Miguel de Cervantes called him Uchali in chapter XXXIX of his Don Quixote de la Mancha. Elsewhere he was simply called Ali Pasha. John Wolf, in his The Barbary Coast, refers to him as Euldj Ali. Uluj Ali was born as Giovanni Dionigi Galeni, the son of seaman Birno Galeni and his wife Pippa de Cicco, in the village of Le Castella (near modern Isola Capo Rizzuto) in Calabria, Southern Italy. His father wanted him to receive a religious education, but on 29 April 1536, Giovanni was captured by Ali Ahmed, one of the corsair captains of Barbarossa Hayreddin Pasha, and was forced to serve as a galley slave. After
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    210
    Hezekiah Frith

    Hezekiah Frith

    Hezekiah Frith, Sr. (1763–1848) was an 18th-century British ship owner with the reputation of a "gentleman privateer", who engaged in piracy during the 1790s. One of the richest men in Bermuda during the late 18th and early 19th century, he built the Spithead House in Warwick, Bermuda. He was married three times, his daughters all marrying Presbyterian ministers; his son Hezekiah Frith, Jr. became a prominent religious figure. Heather Nova, a popular Bermudian singer and songwriter with Lillith Fair, is a descendent of Frith. Born in Bermuda, he was one of seven children born to Captain William Frith and Sarah Lee. As a successful shipowner during the 1780s and 90s, he became engaged in privateering and smuggling, from which he reportedly made his fortune. He often mixed slaves and free men in his crews. In August 1796 he slipped into the French port of Cap Français at San Domingo during the night and stole away a captured British transport ship. His colourful piratical career may very likely be exaggerated. Participating in a number of privateering expeditions with the Royal Navy, he is supposed to have hoarded treasure from at least two captured ships in the store he operated
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    Thomas Cocklyn

    Thomas Cocklyn was an 18th-century English pirate, known primarily for his association and partnership with Howell Davis and Oliver La Buze. He was reportedly elected captain "due to his brutality and ignorance" when first sailing from New Providence in 1717. On April 1, 1719, Cocklyn was a participant in the capture of the West African-bound English slave ship the Bird Galley at the mouth of the Sierra Leone River. The three pirate captains celebrated their victory on board the ship for nearly a month before releasing its captain, William Snelgrave, and giving him the Bristol Snow and the remaining cargo left from the pirates' week-long occupation of the ship. Due to disagreements between the captains, the three parted ways on May 10, 1719. Subsequently, records of Cocklyn's career and life after 1719 are undocumented.
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    Barbarossa Khair ad Din Pasha

    Barbarossa Khair ad Din Pasha

    Hayreddin Barbarossa, or Barbarossa Hayreddin Pasha (Turkish: Barbaros Hayreddin (Hayrettin) Paşa or Hızır Hayreddin (Hayrettin) Paşa; also Khizr Reis before being promoted to the rank of Pasha and becoming the Kapudan-i Derya, born Khizr or Khidr, Turkish: Hızır; c. 1478 – 4 July 1546), was an Ottoman Turkish admiral of the fleet who was born on the island of Lesbos/Mytilini and died in Constantinople, the Ottoman capital. Barbarossa's naval victories secured Ottoman dominance over the Mediterranean during the mid 16th century, from the Battle of Preveza in 1538 until the Battle of Lepanto in 1571. Hayreddin (Arabic: Khair ad-Din خير الدين, which literally means "goodness" or "best of the religion" of Islam) was an honorary name given to him by Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent. He became known as "Barbarossa" ("Redbeard" in Italian) in Europe, a name he inherited from his elder brother Baba Oruç (Father Aruj) after Aruj was killed in a battle with the Spanish in Algeria. This name sounded like "Barbarossa" ("Redbeard") to the Europeans, and Aruj did have a red beard. The nickname then stuck also to Hayreddin's Turkish name, in the form Barbaros. Khizr was born in the 1470s on the
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    213

    Charles Swan

    Charles Swan was a reluctant buccaneer, killed 1690. Captain Swan was forced into piracy by his crew in the 1680s, and proceeded to write letters to the owners of his ship Cygnet in London, begging them to intercede with James II of England for his pardon - even as he looted his way up and down the coast of South America. He was present at the attack on Payta in 1684, where he petulantly burned the town after no booty was found. On 25 August 1685, he separated from his confederates Peter Harris and Edward Davis, and sailed up the coast of Mexico, but met with little success. He seized the town of Santa Pecaque but lost fifty men to a Spanish counter-attack, including Basil Ringrose. On 31 March 1686 he set out across the Pacific to ambush the Manila treasure galleon, but failed to over-take the ship. Due to the failure of the assault on Santa Pecaque provisions were short, and by the time they reached the crew were plotting to eat their officers of the Cygnet as it crossed the Pacific (starting with the Captain). (Swan is reported to have remarked that the lean William Dampier would have made them a poor meal; the captain himself was a remarkably fat man.) Fortunately they arrived
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    Jan van Ryen

    Jan van Ryen (fl. 1620s-1630s) was a 17th century Dutch privateer, explorer, and colonist. He was granted a commission by the Dutch West Indies Company and active against the Spanish in the West Indies during the 1620s. He and Claude Prevost attempted to establish Dutch colonies in Guyana, although they both failed with most Dutch colonists being killed by natives in 1627. However, Zeelandian merchant Abraham van Peere was able to found a successful colony in the area shortly after. In November 1626, he and Claude Prevost appeared before the Chamber of Zeeland with a proposal to establish a colony in Guyana and requesting the WIC to provide ships and 30 or 40 men. The WIC agreed and, at separate meetings from November 23–26 and December 10–24, the members discussed where to sent them. While it was suggested Prevost to be sent to either the Amazon, Oyapok or Essequebo, it was decided that van Ryen alone would colonize Oyapok. On January 22, 1627, Jan van Ryen left Flushing with three ships and 184 men (including 36 colonists). The small fleet was commanded by Admiral Hendrick Jacobszoon Lucifer and included Galeyn van Stabels in the Vliegende Draeck and Jan Pieterse in the Leeuwin
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    215
    Jørgen Jørgensen

    Jørgen Jørgensen

    Jørgen Jørgensen (surname changed to Jorgenson from 1817) (29 March 1780 – 20 January 1841) was a Danish adventurer during the Age of Revolution. During the Action of 2 March 1808 his ship was captured by the British. In 1809 he sailed to Iceland, declared the country independent from Denmark and pronounced himself its ruler. He was also a prolific writer of letters, papers, pamphlets and newspaper articles covering a wide variety of subjects, and was an associate of the famous botanists Joseph Banks and William Jackson Hooker for a period. At the age of 15, Jørgensen served as an apprentice to Captain Henry Marwood of the British collier Janeon. In 1799 he sailed to Cape Town and from there in 1800 to Port Jackson, the new British colony in Australia. In 1801 he joined the crew of the Lady Nelson. As a member of that crew, Jørgensen was present at the establishment of the first settlements of Risdon Cove and Sullivans Cove in Van Diemen's Land, as Tasmania was then called. In 1807, while Jørgensen was visiting his family, he witnessed the Battle of Copenhagen and soon afterwards was given command of a small Danish vessel, the Admiral Juul. In 1808 he engaged in a sea battle with
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    216

    Richard Worley

    Richard Worley (born ca. 1686 - died February 17, 1719) was a pirate who was active in the Caribbean Sea and the east coast of the American colonies during the early 18th century. He is credited as one of the earliest pirates to fly the first version of the skull and crossbones pirate flag. The name of Worley's ship has never been identified, nor those of the four ships that he captured during his five month career from late September 1718 to February 16, 1719. He is first recorded leaving New York with a small boat and a crew of eight men hoping to make their fortune in the so-called Golden Age of Piracy. However, their first prize resulted in the capture of household goods from a ship in the Delaware River in September 1718. This attack was technically burglary rather than piracy, as according to British maritime law at the time the attack did not take place in international waters. Local authorities mistakenly attributed the attack to Worley's better-known counterpart Blackbeard, who had raided the same waterways earlier in the year. Their second prize brought better luck as, upon capturing a sloop bound for Philadelphia, Worley also gained four additional crew members. As they
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    217

    Thomas Howard

    Thomas Howard was a pirate primarily active in the Indian Ocean and the Red Sea during the Golden Age of Piracy. He served under other pirates of the time, including George Booth and John Bowen. He also commanded the 36-gun Prosperous. He later retired to Rapajura, in India, where he married a local woman. He was later murdered by her relatives. While little about his early life is known, Howard arrived in Jamaica at some time prior to 1698 after spending his entire inheritance. Howard began his career by, along with a small group of pirates, first stealing a canoe and then stealing further ships until they captured a 24-gun ship. Howard was elected quartermaster by the crew. After attacking a number of ships off the east coast of North America during 1698, the ship crossed the Atlantic Ocean and began raiding the West Coast of Africa in 1699. Howard and the crew took a large prize from a ship that had run aground on a reef off Madagascar. Shortly after this, Howard was marooned by the crew while hunting and it was not until he was rescued by George Booth in early 1701. Serving alongside John Bowen aboard the Speaker, Howard remained with the crew following Booth's death and
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    218
    Mary Read

    Mary Read

    Mary Read (died 1721) was an English pirate. She is chiefly remembered as one of only two women (her comrade, Anne Bonny, was the other) known to have been convicted of piracy during the early 18th century, at the height of the Golden Age of Piracy. Mary Read was illegitimately born in England, in the late 17th century, to the widow of a sea captain. Her date of birth is in disputed among historians because of a reference to the "Peace of Ryswick" by her contemporary biographer Captain Charles Johnson in A General History of the Pyrates. He very well may have made an error, intending to refer to the "Treaty of Utrecht". Whichever it is, her birth was anywhere from 1670-1698. Read's mother began to disguise illegitimately-born Mary as a boy after the death of Mary's older, legitimate brother (name unknown). This was done in order to continue to receive financial support from his paternal grandmother. The grandmother was apparently fooled, and Read and her mother lived on the inheritance into her teenage years. Still dressed as a boy, Read then found work as a footboy, and later found employment on a ship. She later joined the British military, allied with Dutch forces against the
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    219

    Pieter Schouten

    Pieter Schouten (fl. 1622-1625) was a 17th century Dutch corsair and privateer. He was one of the first Dutchmen to explore to the Caribbean and, while employed by the Dutch West Indies Company, was involved in extensive reconnaissance to establish Dutch bases in the West Indies. Born in Vlissingen, Pieter Schouten found employment in the Dutch West Indies Company as would other former corsairs during this period. In early 1624, he was assigned three ships with which to chart the Caribbean as well as provide valuable reconnaissance on possibility of establishing Dutch bases in the region. Leaving port on January 26, his small squadron included the 24-gun Hoop under Captain Willem Jacobszoon, the 14-gun Eendracht under Captain Hillebrandt Janszoon and the 8-gun yacht Trouwe commanded by Captain Hendrik Worst. After arriving in Barbados in mid-March or May, he visited several islands and charted the coasts of Venezuela, Haiti, Jamaica and Cuba. He also briefly visited the Little Caymans to hunt turtles, becoming one of the earliest Europeans to land on the islands. His fleet captured several small vessels on the way, although none of his ships were capable of taking the faster and
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    George Booth

    George Booth (died 1700) was an English pirate who was one of the earliest active in the Indian Ocean and the Red Sea during the late 17th century. Among his fleet included prominent captains such as Nathaniel North, Thomas Howard and Booth's eventual successor, John Bowen. Although his early life is largely unknown, he is first recorded in his career as a gunner aboard the Pelican around 1696, and later the Dolphin, both of which operated in the Indian Ocean. While Booth was still a gunner aboard the Dolphin, she was trapped at Sainte-Marie Island by a British fleet in September 1699. The crew of the Dolphin were offered a pardon by the British commodore. Although some of the pirates surrendered, Booth was among those who escaped to nearby Madagascar after burning the Dolphin. Booth would later participate in the capture of a French merchant ship on the pretence of buying supplies carrying liquor and other goods in exchange for slaves and, elected by the crew as captain, they continued onward to Madagascar. Booth later encountered fellow British pirate John Bowen and, choosing to join forces, they later captured the Speaker, a 450 ton slaver carrying 50 guns, near Majunga in
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    221
    Henry Every

    Henry Every

    Henry Every, also Evory or Avery, (23 August 1659 – after 1696), sometimes erroneously given as John Avery, was an English pirate who operated in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans in the mid-1690s. He likely used several aliases throughout his career, including Henry Bridgeman, and was known as Long Ben to his crewmen and associates. Dubbed "The Arch Pirate" and "The King of Pirates" by contemporaries, Every was the most notorious pirate of his time; he earned his infamy by becoming one of the few major pirate captains to retire with his loot without being arrested or killed in battle, and also for being the perpetrator of what has been called the most profitable pirate raid in history. Although Every's career as a pirate lasted only two years, his exploits captured the public's imagination, inspired others to take up piracy, and spawned numerous works of literature. Every was born in England's West Country, but little else is known about his early life. He served in the Royal Navy from 1689 to 1690, likely participating in several battles of the Nine Years' War (1688–1697). Following his discharge from the navy, Every began slave trading along Africa's Slave Coast. In 1693, he was
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    Isaac Rochussen

    Isaac Rochussen or Isaac Rockesen (1631–1710) was a 17th century Dutch corsair and privateer during the Second and Third Anglo-Dutch War. His capture of the The Falcon, a merchantman belonging to the East India Company, was one of the most valued ships captured during the late 17th century. Isaac Rochussen was born in the city of Vlissingen, although little of his life is recorded. An active corsair during the Second and Third Anglo-Dutch War, he captured the English East India merchantman The Falcon near the Isles of Scilly on July 7, 1672. The prize was sold at as 350,000 gilders, the highest paid for the time when an average ship and cargo went for only a few thousand or, at best, tens of thousands of gilders. The Falcon was thereafter referred to by the Dutch as De Gouden Valk (or The Golden Falcon). Rochussen himself received a gold medal from the ships´ owner for this capture. He later became a successful privateer in his later years, a trade followed by his son Isaac Rochussen, Jr., before his death in 1710.
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    John Evans

    John Evans (died c. 1723) was a Welsh pirate who had a short but successful career in the Caribbean. Evans was the master of a sloop operating from the island of Nevis until he lost his employment there. For a while he found employment as a mate of ships sailing from Jamaica. This was a time when there was a surplus of seamen, so that wages were low and berths scarce, and towards the end of September 1722 Evans and a few friends decided to try their luck at pirating. They started by leaving Port Royal in Jamica in a rowing boat and going ashore on the north side of the island to raid some houses. A few days later they found a small sloop at anchor and commandeered her, giving her the name Scowerer. They sailed to Hispaniola, where they captured a Spanish sloop which proved a rich prize: when shared out the booty came to 150 pounds per man. They went on to take a number of other ships, adding to their own crew by inducing many of their crews to join them. A Dutch sloop which they captured was commandeered. They then headed for the Grand Caymans to careen. Here an incident put an end to Evans' career as a pirate. The captain had trouble with the boatswain of his ship, and several
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    Moise Vauquelin

    Moïse Vauquelin or Moses Vanclein (fl. 1650-1670) was a 17th century French buccaneer. During his four-year career as a privateer, he served as an officer under l'Ollonais and formed a brief partnership with Pierre Le Picard. He and Philippe Bequel later co-wrote a book detailing their explorations of the Honduran and Yucatán coastline. Vauquelin first arrived in the Caribbean from Normandy, France around 1650. He was part of a buccaneering fleet being organized by l'Ollonais at the pirate haven of Tortuga and which would loot and plunder Spanish settlements throughout the Spanish Main during the next two years. Vauquelin was one of several officers serving in this expedition and was present at the raids against Maracaibo and Gibraltar in 1666 and Puerto de Cavallo and San Pedro in 1667. l'Ollonais and his fleet eventually split up, arguing over l'Ollonais desire to sail for Guatemala, shortly after the capture of a Spanish ship off the coast of the Yucatán. He and Pierre le Picard chose to leave the expedition, some accounts suggesting they were the ringleaders and instigators of the fleet's disbandment, and began privateering together for a time. Sailing along the coast of Costa
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    Piracy in the Strait of Malacca

    Piracy in the Strait of Malacca

    Piracy in the Strait of Malacca has historically been an unresolved threat to ship owners and the mariners who ply the 900 km-long (550 miles) sea lane. In recent years, coordinated patrols by Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore, along with increased security on vessels have sparked a dramatic downturn in piracy, according to the International Maritime Bureau (IMB). The geography in the Strait of Malacca makes the region very susceptible to piracy. It was, and still is, an important passageway between China and India, and was used heavily for commercial trade. As for modern times, the Strait is on the route between Europe, the Suez Canal, and the oil-exporting countries of the Persian Gulf; and the busy ports of East Asia. The strait is narrow, contains thousands of islets, and is an outlet for many rivers, making it an ideal location for pirates to hide and evade capture. Historically, piracy in the Strait of Malacca was not only a lucrative way of life, but also an important political tool. Rulers relied on the region's pirates to maintain control. One example was the 14th-century rule of the Palembang prince, Parameswara. It was through the loyalty of pirate crews made of the
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    226

    Pirates

    Pirates is a 1986 adventure-comedy film written by Gérard Brach, John Brownjohn, and Roman Polanski and directed by Polanski. It was screened out of competition at the 1986 Cannes Film Festival. The film begins with Captain Red (Walter Matthau) stranded aboard a raft at sea with his first mate, Frog (Cris Campion), both of whom are presumably close to death from dehydration. After Red, cracking under the starvation, tries to kill and eat Frog, the duo is picked up by a Spanish Galleon and are forced into slavery before instigating a shipwide mutiny with the other prisoners and taking control of the vessel. Frog falls in love with María-Dolores de la Jenya de la Calde (Charlotte Lewis), the niece of the governor of a Spanish colony. Red covets the golden throne that the Spanish have taken from an Aztec king. Large amounts of explosions and gunfights occur as they recruit a crew of cutthroats to win over the gold (with Frog trying to romance the girl as well) throughout the remainder of the film. Ironically, the film ends in a Pyrrhic victory for the heroes, with Captain Red and Frog again stranded on a raft, Red sitting on the golden throne urging Frog to eat and "fatten up"
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    227

    Sam Hall Lord

    Samuel Hall Lord, also called "Sam Lord" (1778 – 5 November 1844) was one of the most famous buccaneers on the island of Barbados. Sam Lord as he was usually known, amassed great wealth for his castle-mansion in Barbados. He did this through the direct plundering of ships stranded in the coral reefs just off the coast of his estate(UN/LOCODE: BB SLC ). According to legend, Sam Lord would hang lanterns high in the coconut trees around his estate. Passing ships far out at sea would think it was the port city of Bridgetown and would sail towards the reef in the area, leading them to wreck their ships. Sam Lord would then board the ships and keep the riches for his castle that existed in the parish of Saint Philip. Eventually his castle estate was turned into a hotel called the Sam Lord's Castle. However due to massive debt this hotel was auctioned off and parts of it were scheduled to be demolished to make way for a larger hotel development on the property by the new owners. In 2007 Sam Lord's Castle was bought by CLICO (Barbados), but due to financial woes, the redevelopment didn't happen. For awhile the Government of Barbados was proposing a buy-out. On 20 October 2010 Sam Lord's
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    William Rous

    William Rous (fl. 1631-1645) was a 17th century English privateer in the service of the Providence Island Company. He was later enlisted by William Jackson to accompany him on his expedition to the West Indies. A step-nephew of John Pym, William Rous was a lieutenant in the local militia in the Providence Island colony and later became commander of the local garrison Fort Henry. In 1634, while still in second-in-command under Captain William Rudyerd, he was involved in a dispute with the principal smith Thomas Forman and, losing his temper, he struck Forman in the presence of the Governor Philip Bell. Rous was thereafter suspended both from the council table, his offices in militia training and his duties at Fort Henry until he acknowledged his fault. Being dismissed from office would have meant humiliation and disgrace to him as a gentleman, however agreeing to make public confession of guilt would have caused him even deeper humiliation. Matters were further complicated when Bell attempted to return him to his seat without making a public apology. The Providence Island Company overruled Bell, adding that he had "acted in an undue manner", although his suspension was not to
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    229
    Woodes Rogers

    Woodes Rogers

    Woodes Rogers (ca. 1679 – 15 July 1732) was an English sea captain, privateer, and, later, the first Royal Governor of the Bahamas. He is known as the captain of the vessel that rescued the marooned Alexander Selkirk, whose plight is generally believed to have inspired Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe. Rogers came from an affluent seafaring family, grew up in Poole and Bristol, and served a marine apprenticeship to a Bristol sea captain. His father, who held shares in many ships, died when Rogers was in his mid-twenties, leaving Rogers in control of the family shipping business. In 1707, Rogers was approached by Captain William Dampier, who sought support for a privateering voyage against the Spanish, with whom the British were at war. Rogers led the expedition, which consisted of two well-armed ships, the Duke and the Duchess, and was the captain of the Duke. In three years, Rogers and his men went around the world, capturing several ships in the Pacific Ocean. En route, the expedition rescued Selkirk, finding him on Juan Fernandez Island on 1 February 1709. When the expedition returned to England in October 1711, Rogers had circumnavigated the globe, while retaining his original
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    Antipope John XXIII

    Antipope John XXIII

    Baldassarre Cossa (c. 1370 – 21 December 1418) was Pope John XXIII (1410–1415) during the Western Schism. The Catholic Church regards him as an antipope. Baldassarre Cossa was born on the island of Procida or Ischia in the Kingdom of Naples into a noble but impoverished family. Initially he followed a military career, taking part in the Angevin-Neapolitan war. His two brothers were sentenced to death for piracy by Ladislaus of Naples. He studied law at the University of Bologna and obtained a doctorate. In 1392 he entered the service of Pope Boniface IX, first working in Bologna and then in Rome. (The Western Schism had begun in 1378 and there were two competing popes at the time, one in Avignon supported by France and Spain, and one in Rome supported by most of Italy, Germany and England.) Still a member of the laity, he became Cardinal deacon in 1402 and Papal legate in Forlì in 1403. At this time Cossa also had some links with local robber bands, often used to intimidate his rivals and attack carriages, this part of Cossa's life isn't widely known, but gave him certain influence and power in the region. He was one of the seven cardinals who, in May 1408, deserted Pope Gregory
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    231

    Blackbeard the Pirate

    Blackbeard the Pirate is a 1952 Technicolor adventure film made by RKO. The film was directed by Raoul Walsh and produced by Edmund Grainger from a screenplay by Alan Le May based on the story by DeVallon Scott. The film follows Edward Maynard (Keith Andes), who sets out to earn a reward by proving that privateer Henry Morgan (Torin Thatcher) also engages in piracy. Maynard, however, winds up posing as a surgeon on a ship captained by Blackbeard (Robert Newton), who is in the middle of a conflict with Morgan. Blackbeard must deal with Morgan, Maynard, and even his own greedy crew.
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    232
    Captain Blood: His Odyssey

    Captain Blood: His Odyssey

    Captain Blood: His Odyssey is an adventure novel by Rafael Sabatini, originally published in 1922. The protagonist is the sharp-witted Dr. Peter Blood, a fictional Irish physician who had had a wide-ranging career as a soldier and sailor (including a commission as a captain under the Dutch admiral De Ruyter) before settling down to practice medicine in the town of Bridgwater in Somerset. The book opens with him attending to his geraniums while the town prepares to fight for the Duke of Monmouth. He wants no part in the rebellion, but while attending to some of the rebels wounded at the Battle of Sedgemoor, Peter is arrested. During the Bloody Assizes, he is convicted by the infamous Judge Jeffreys of treason on the grounds that "if any person be in actual rebellion against the King, and another person—who really and actually was not in rebellion—does knowingly receive, harbour, comfort, or succour him, such a person is as much a traitor as he who indeed bore arms." The sentence for treason is death by hanging, but King James II, for purely financial reasons, has the sentence for Blood and other convicted rebels commuted to transportation to the Caribbean, where they are to be sold
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    233

    Captain William Knight

    William Knight (fl. ca. 1686) was a 17th century English buccaneer who, in 1684, led a landing party consisting of forty English and twenty French buccaneers in an attack on La Serena, but was forced to retreat in the face of strong cavalry . The following year he joined a privateering expedition with Swan, Townley and Harris under the command of Captain Edward Davies and participated in looting the town of Realejo before the eventual departures of Swan and Townley who sailed for Mexico and of Harris who left soon after due to the deaths of many of the crew from disease. Remaining with Davies, the two continued down the Peruvian coast throughout 1686 and, with fewer than 250 men, looted the Spanish town of Sana, Peru in March, carrying away an estimated 100,000 pesos (£25,000). Although a similar raid against Paita gained slightly less, forty slaves were liberated and joined the expedition. The expedition attacked five more cities during the months of May and June, reportedly murdering city officials and priests who refused to reveal information on hidden treasure, with the city of Pisco paying £5,000 in July. Knight and Davies parted company at the Juan Fernández Islands, with
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    234

    David Marteen

    David Marteen (fl. 1663-1665) was a Dutch privateer based in Tortuga during the mid-17th century, known primarily as the sole non-English Captain who participated in the raids against Spanish strongholds in present-day Mexico and Nicaragua during 1663 until 1665. Although raids against the Spanish were prohibited under British law, he agreed to join Sir Henry Morgan's expedition and soon set sail from Port Royal along with John Morris and Captain's Jackman and Freeman under letters of marque issued by Governor Thomas Modyford. After reaching the Grijalva River, Marteen and the others led their men 50 miles overland and successfully looted Villa Hermosa in a surprise raid. Returning to the coast, they discovered a Spanish patrol had captured their ships and, after a fierce battle, they managed to retake two barques and four Indian canoes. Marteen eventually made his way back with the others, raiding Spanish villages on the way, until their arrival in Port Royal in November 1665. Although Marteen served as a pirate hunter under Modyford during the next year, nothing more is known of his activities after this time. There have been reports that Marteen led a group that later
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    235

    Edward Collier

    Edward Collier was an English buccaneer who served as Sir Henry Morgan's second-in-command throughout much of his expeditions against Spain during the mid-17th century. In command of one of the ships which took part in Sir Henry Morgan's raid on Portobello in 1668, he was given command of the 34-gun Oxford with a commission as a pirate hunter before the end of the year and eventually captured Captain la Veven and his ship, the Satisfaction. Rejoining Morgan in his later raids on Maracaibo and Gibraltar, Venezuela, an explosion aboard his ship would kill many of the officers in the expedition before his ship was sunk. Reportedly despondent over the loss of his ship, Collier left the fleet and was allowed to take command of the Satisfaction spending the next 18 months off the Mexican coastline. Eventually he was persuaded to join Morgan as he was planning his raid on Panama September 1670 and appointed vice-admiral of the expedition. As the expedition was being prepared, Collier was ordered to sail with six ship to Venezuela to obtain provisions and other supply as well as to gather information from locals. Arriving at Rio de la Hacha, he captured the Spanish stronghold and
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    236
    Francis Spriggs

    Francis Spriggs

    Francis Spriggs (d. 1725?) was a British pirate who, associated with George Lowther and Edward Low, was active in the Caribbean and the Bay of Honduras during the early 1720s. Although much of his early life is unknown, Francis Spriggs was first recorded serving as a quartermaster for Captain Edward Low (possibly as part of the original crew members who left the service of Captain George Lowther). However, after being given command of the recently captured the 12-gun British man of war the Squirel (renamed the Delight shortly thereafter), he and Low apparently had a falling out over the disciplining of one of the crew around Christmas 1724, resulting in Spriggs deserting Low in the night. After leaving Low, Spriggs and the crew began flying a black flag similar to Captain Low's and set sail for the West Indies. By January 28, 1725, he had looted a Rhode Island slaver captained by Richard Duffie. Capturing a Portuguese bark en route, they looted the ship's stores while the crew were put through "the sweats" or a "sweat", a mild form of torture in which a ring of candles is lit in a circle around the mainmast and each crewman was made to enter the circle and run around the mast while
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    237

    Henry Mainwaring

    Sir Henry Mainwaring (1587 – 1653), was an English lawyer, soldier, author, seaman and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1621 to 1622. He was a for a time a pirate based in Newfoundland and then a naval officer with the Royal Navy. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War. Mainwaring was born in Ightfield, Shropshire, second son of Sir George Mainwaring and his wife Ann, the daughter of Sir William More of Loseley Park in Surrey. His maternal grandfather was Sir William More, Vice-Admiral of Sussex. He graduated from Brasenose College at Oxford University, where he was awarded a B.A. in Law, at the age of 15, in 1602. He then served as trial lawyer (admitted in 1604 as a student at Inner Temple), soldier (possibly in the Low Countries), sailor, and author (pupil of John Davies of Hereford) before turning to piracy. In 1610, at the age of 24, Mainwaring was given a commission from Lord High Admiral Nottingham to capture the notorious Newfoundland "arch-pirate" Peter Easton, then feared to be hovering around the Bristol Channel. This may have been just a convenient excuse for the well-armed Resistance, his small but speedy ship, to become a scourge to
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    238
    Henry Morgan

    Henry Morgan

    Admiral Sir Henry Morgan (Harri Morgan in Welsh; ca. 1635 – 25 August 1688) was an Admiral of the British Royal Navy, a privateer, and a pirate who made a name for himself during activities in the Caribbean, primarily raiding Spanish settlements. He was one of the most notorious and successful privateers in history, and one of the most ruthless who worked in the Spanish Main. Henry Morgan was the eldest son of Robert Morgan, a squire of Llanrumney Hall just outside of Cardiff then part of Monmouthshire. He also had a sister Catherine. An entry in the Bristol Apprentice Books showing "Servants to Foreign Plantations" 9 February 1655, included "Henry Morgan of Abergavenny, Labourer, Bound to Timothy Tounsend of Bristol, Cutler, for three years, to serve in Barbados on the like Condiciouns." Henry's father Robert Morgan (born c.1615) was a descendant from a cadet branch of the ‘Tredegar Morgans’ and had two brothers, Thomas and Edward. Major-General Sir Thomas Morgan (1st Baronet 1604-79) served in the Commonwealth forces during English civil war from 1642-9, was Governor of Gloucester 1645, fought in Flanders, wounded, and in 1661 retired to his estate in Kynnersley, Herts. He was
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    239

    Jacob Collaart

    Jacob Collaart or Collaert (floruit ca. 1625-1637) was a Flemish admiral who served as privateer and one of the Dunkirkers in Spanish Habsburg service during the Dutch Revolt. He was responsible for the capture of destruction of at least 150 fishing vessels, bringing 945 captured sailors back to his base in Dunkirk for ransom. A leading admiral over the next decade, he would have later encounters with other Dutch corsairs of the period including Captain Claes Compaan who escaped from him after sighting the corsair off the Spanish coast. From 1633 until 1637, Collaart served as Vice Admiral with the Royal Squadron operating out of Dunkirk and, in 1635, his attacks against Dutch herring redders would cost the city of Flushing over two million guilders in income. Although the city of Dunkirk was under a Dutch blockade during early 1635, the blockade was temporarily weakened as several warships under Lieutenant-Admiral Philips van Dorp were supporting French naval forces in the Gulf of Biscay and, on 14 August, Collaert sailing out of Dunkirk successfully broke through the Dutch blockade with a fleet of twenty-one vessels. Within three days, Collaart's fleet located a herring fleet
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    240
    Jan Janszoon

    Jan Janszoon

    Jan Janszoon van Haarlem, commonly known as Murat Reis the younger (circa 1570 - post 1641?) was the first President and Grand Admiral of the Corsair Republic of Salé, Governor of Oualidia, and a Dutch pirate, one of the most notorious of the Barbary pirates from the 17th century; the most famous of the "Salé Rovers". Jan Janszoon was born in Haarlem, North Holland, Netherlands in 1575. Little is known of his early life, except that he married young and had a child, Lysbeth Janszoon. In 1600, Jan Janszoon began as a Dutch privateer sailing from his home port, Haarlem, working for the state with letters of marque to harass Spanish shipping during the Eighty Years' War. Working from the Netherlands was insufficiently profitable, so Janszoon overstepped the boundaries of his letters and found his way to the semi-independent port states of the Barbary Coast of north Africa, whence he could attack ships of every foreign state: when he attacked a Spanish ship, he flew the Dutch flag; when he attacked any other, he became an Ottoman Captain and flew the red half-moon of the Turks or the flag of any of various other Mediterranean principalities. During this period he had abandoned his
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    241

    John Callis

    John Callis (or Calles) (died 1576) was a 16th-century Welsh pirate. He was active in South Wales from Cardiff to Haverfordwest, often selling his prizes and cargo in the villages of Laugharne and Carew in Milford Haven, only a few miles south of Little Newcastle, Wales. His piratical career lasted for decades before pressure from neighbouring countries forced to English government to take action and managed to capture him in 1576. The elderly pirate attempted to assist authorities in tracking down other pirates in exchange for his release, however the authorities refused his offer and he was hanged in Newport later that year. Following his execution, a commission was appointed to investigate merchants and others in the counties of Cardigan, Pembroke, Carmarthen, Monmouth and Glamorgan associated with locally-based pirates. A list of those illegally dealing with pirates was compiled by the commission and the offenders fined.
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    242

    Mariel of Redwall

    Mariel of Redwall is a fantasy novel by Brian Jacques, published in 1991. It is the fourth book in the Redwall series. When a young mousemaid loses her memory in a shipwreck, she takes the name "Storm Gullwhacker" after a successful encounter with a seagull. As she regains her memory while at Redwall Abbey, however, she swears vengeance against Gabool the Wild, the searat who had tried to slay her, and had taken her father captive. The protagonist, Mariel Gullwhacker, was enslaved by Gabool the Wild when her father Joseph's ship, the Periwinkle, was captured. It had been carrying a bell to Lord Rawnblade Widestripe in Salamandastron, and that, too, was seized by Gabool. After attacking Gabool, the mouse was thrown into the sea and washed up on the shore, causing her to lose her memory. She took the name "Storm Gullwhacker", and gave the name "Gullwhacker" to the rope she had used to fight off a seabird. Three members of the Long Patrol, Colonel Clary, Brigadier Thyme, and the Honorable Rosemary, escort Mariel to a squirrel named Pakatugg. He is given the task to lead Mariel to Redwall, where the woodlanders help her regain her memory. She befriends a young fieldmouse named Dandin,
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    243

    Nicholas Brown

    Nicholas Brown (died 1726) was an English pirate who was active of the coast of Jamaica during the early 18th century. Although accepting a royal pardon, he continued raiding shipping until his capture by pirate hunter and childhood friend Captain John Drudge. Brown used the caves, on the cliffs of Negril to hide his plunder and Drudge laid in wait to capture him. After a fierce gunbattle, Brown surrendered. He eventually died of wounds during his capture and, following his death, Drudge had Brown's body decapitated and his head pickled for which he would use to collect his reward.
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    244
    Pier Gerlofs Donia

    Pier Gerlofs Donia

    Pier Gerlofs Donia (c.1480 – 1520) was a Frisian warrior, pirate, and rebel. He is best known by his West Frisian nickname Grutte Pier ("Big Pier"; in the pre-1980 West Frisian spelling written as Greate Pier), or by the Dutch translation Grote Pier which referred to his legendary size and strength. His life is mostly shrouded in legend. Based upon a description now attributed to Pier’s contemporary Petrus Thaborita, the 19th-century historian Conrad Busken Huet wrote that Grutte Pier was Grutte Pier was born Pier Gerlofs Donia (Pier Gerlofs), around 1480 in Kimswerd near the city of Harlingen, Wonseradeel in Friesland, Netherlands. Pier Gerlofs was one of at least four children born to Fokel Sybrants Bonga and Gerlof Piers. Pier's mother Fokel was the daughter of the Schieringer noblemen Sybrant Doytsesz. Bonga of Bongastate, Kimswerd. Pier married Rintsje Syrtsema and they had two children, a son named Gerlof and a daughter named Wobbel, who were born around 1510. Pier died in 1520, and in 1525, Pier's mother appointed in her will Pier's brother, Sybren, as guardian of Pier's children, who still were minors. Pier and Pier's brother-in-law Ane Pijbes (husband of Tijdt Gerlofs),
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    245

    Simon Danziger

    Siemen Danziger (c. 1579 – c. 1611), better known by his anglicized names Zymen Danseker and Simon de Danser, was a 17th century Dutch privateer and corsair. His name is also written Danziker, Dansker, or Danser. Danseker and the English pirate John Ward were the two most prominent renegades operating in the Barbary coast during the early 17th century, both of whom were said to command squadrons in Algiers and Tunis equal to their European counterparts, and represented a formidable naval power as allies (much like Aruj and Hayreddin Barbarossa the previous century). Later in his Barbary career, Danseker became known by the Turkish epithet Simon Re'is. He is suspected of teaching the Turks and the Moors to use sailing ships to go through the Strait of Gibraltar as early as 1601. Commanding a vast squadron made up of English and Turks while in the service of Algiers, he captured over 40 ships in a two-year period after "turning Turk" and was stopped only after his capture and execution in 1611. Both men are featured prominently in Kitab al-Munis fi Akhbar Ifriqiya wa Tunis written by Tunisian writer and historian Ibn Abi Dinar. A Dutchman from Dordrecht by traditional accounts, he
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    246

    The Pirates! in an Adventure with Scientists

    The Pirates! in an Adventure with Scientists is the first book in The Pirates! series by Gideon Defoe dealing with a hapless crew of pirates. It was published in 2004 by Orion Books (ISBN 0-297-84885-2). The book is set in 1837, and follows the adventures of "The Pirate Captain" and his crew of unorthodox pirates. They meet a young Charles Darwin and Mister Bobo, a highly trained and sophisticated "man-panzee", who have been exiled from London by a rival scientist. Having sunk the Beagle, which he believed was a Bank of England treasure ship thanks to a tip-off from Black Bellamy, the Pirate Captain agrees to take Darwin home and help him defeat his enemies. The Pirate Captain is vain, self-deluded and mostly incompetent as a pirate and as a sea captain, but he's ultimately kind-hearted and very much respected by his crew. He doesn't appear to possess any of the stereotypical pirate accoutrements, though he dresses in the traditional manner, and much is made of his luxuriant beard. He is said to have a "pleasant, open face", though he is quite successful at terrifying non-pirates. His pirates are never given names, only descriptions, such as "the pirate with a scarf", "the pirate
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    247

    The Sea Hawk

    The Sea Hawk is a novel by Rafael Sabatini, originally published in 1915. The story is set over the years 1588–1593, and concerns a retired Cornish seafaring gentleman, Sir Oliver Tressilian, who is villainously betrayed by a jealous half-brother. After being forced to serve as a slave on a galley, Sir Oliver is liberated by Barbary pirates. He joins the pirates, gaining the name "Sakr-el-Bahr", the hawk of the sea, and swears vengeance against his brother. Sir Oliver Tressilian lives at the house of Penarrow together with his brother Lionel and his servant Nicholas. Sir Oliver is betrothed to Rosamund Godolphin, but her brother Peter, a young hothead, detests the Tressilians, as there had been a feud between their fathers, and therefore tries to drive a wedge between his sister and Sir Oliver. Peter and Rosamund's guardian, Sir John Killigrew, also has little love for the Tressilians. One day, Peter's actions lead to Sir Oliver dueling Sir John, whom he deems to be the source of the enmity. Sir John survives the duel, but is badly wounded, and this only serves to infuriate Peter. One day, he insults Sir Oliver in front of a few nobles. Sir Oliver sets in a furious pursuit, but
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    248

    Treasure Island According to Spike Milligan

    According to Spike Milligan is a series of literary pastiche novels written by Spike Milligan from 1993 to 2000. Each part of the series was a rewriting of an original novel, with surreal comic elements added that fit into certain points of the originals whilst at the same time poking fun at the situations involved. The Bible—the Old Testament According to Spike Milligan is a 1993 parody novel, and the first book in the series. The book is an almost ad verbatim parody of the Old Testament, with some exceptions. It does not list each section by the names featured in the Bible (Genesis, Exodus etc.), and omits some Bible stories such as the Tower of Babel to save time. Frankenstein According to Spike Milligan was a comic-horror novel released in 1997, the second book in the series. It is a parody of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. The story is a simplified and humorous version of the original novel, with minor changes. In this equivalent, Frankenstein's monster is a heavy smoker whose trousers are constantly falling, and Dr. Frankenstein is continually put in a straitjacket when he begins to talk about the monster he created. Also, there are running gags about Dr. Frankenstein's sea
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    Wang Zhi

    Wang Zhi (Chinese: 汪直 or 王直) was a Chinese pirate and trader of the 16th century, one of the chief named and known figures among the wokou ("Japanese" pirates) prevalent at the time. It is said he was aboard the Portuguese ship of Fernão Mendes Pinto when it landed on Tanegashima, off the coast of Japan in 1543, marking the first contact between Europe and Japan. By the 1550s, Wang had organised a large trading consortium and commanded a well-armed fleet with sailors and soldiers to protect it. Between 1539 and 1552 he cooperated with local military intendants on several occasions, expecting relaxation of the Chinese ban on overseas trade. When the ban was instead tightened in 1551, Wang began organising large attacks on official establishments, granaries, county and district treasuries along the Chinese coast, and on the surrounding countryside, which was thoroughly pillaged. Brigandage along the coast of Zhejiang became so widespread and common that towns and villages had to erect palisades for security. In the spring of 1552 raiding parties of several hundred people attacked all along the coast of Zhejiang. In the summer of 1553 Wang Zhi assembled a large fleet of hundreds of
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    250

    William Kyd

    William Kyd (fl. 1430-1453) was a 15th century English pirate active in Southwest England from the 1430s until the 1450s. He and others, such as John Mixtow, William Aleyn and Clays Stephen, acted under virtual immunity from the law for over two decades while under the protection of corrupt custom officials. William Kyd first appears in a list of pirates published in 1431 as the master of the balinger La Trinite of Exmouth. The previous year, he and a number of other pirates active in the West Country seized a Breton ship off the coast of Guernsey. Two years later, he joined William Aleyn and several others in capturing four ships carrying provisions to Rouen. In 1436, sailing into the harbor of Saint-Pol-de-Léon in Brittany with eight barges and balingers, he sailed off with the Seynt Nunne which was under safe-conduct by local authorities. Arriving in Plymouth with the captured ship as well as goods belonging to a Thomas Horewoode valued at £100. Continuing his exploits during the next decade, one of Kyd's most notable accomplishments included the capture of the La Marie of London in 1448. Taking the Flanders-bound ship off the coast of Queenborough in the Thames, he quickly
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