Top List Curated by Listnerd
  • Public list
  • Nov 27th 2012
  • 1.126 views
  • 623 votes
  • 623 voters
  • 11%
Best Olympic venue of All Time

More about Best Olympic venue of All Time:

Best Olympic venue of All Time is a public top list created by Listnerd on Rankly.com on November 27th 2012. Items on the Best Olympic venue of All Time top list are added by the Rankly.com community and ranked using our secret ranking sauce. Best Olympic venue of All Time has gotten 1.126 views and has gathered 623 votes from 623 voters. Only owner can add items. Just members can vote.

Best Olympic venue of All Time is a top list in the Sports category on Rankly.com. Are you a fan of Sports or Best Olympic venue of All Time? Explore more top 100 lists about Sports on Rankly.com or participate in ranking the stuff already on the all time Best Olympic venue of All Time top list below.

If you're not a member of Rankly.com, you should consider becoming one. Registration is fast, free and easy. At Rankly.com, we aim to give you the best of everything - including stuff like the Best Olympic venue of All Time list.

Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:

Items just added

    1
    Allianz Stadium

    Allianz Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Sydney Football Stadium (currently known by its sponsorship name, Allianz Stadium), Moore Park, Sydney, New South Wales is a stadium built in 1988, to be the city's premier "rectangular field" venue for rugby league matches, and is now also used for major rugby union and football (soccer) matches and domestic competition. The Wallabies and the Socceroos occasionally play at the stadium, while the Sydney Roosters, NSW Waratahs and Sydney FC are the grounds major tenants. The Sydney Football Stadium usually hosts both NRL semi finals and one preliminary final, and also held the annual pre-season Charity Shield football match between South Sydney and St George Illawarra for a number of years. All NSWRL / ARL Rugby League Grand Finals as well as the first Grand Final under the NRL banner were played there between 1988 and 1998. Prior to its construction, major events were usually held at the Sydney Cricket Ground, as it was the largest stadium in Sydney. But the SCG, being an oval field, was not considered ideal for sports requiring a rectangular field like soccer, rugby league and rugby union, although it had been used many times for such events. The Sydney Football Stadium was
    6.40
    10 votes
    2

    Shenyang Olympic Sports Centre Stadium

    The Shenyang Olympic Sports Center Stadium (simplified Chinese: 沈阳奥林匹克体育中心; traditional Chinese: 瀋陽奧林匹克體育中心; pinyin: Shěnyáng Àolínpǐkè Tǐyù Zhōngxīn) is a 60,000-seat multi-purpose stadium in Shenyang, China. Nicknamed "Crystal Crown" 水晶皇冠, the stadium was built by AXS Satow as a replacement for Wulihe Stadium. It hosted football matches at the 2008 Summer Olympics. Also is the home ground of the Shenyang Dongjin F.C. currently playing in the second Chinese division. The complex includes a 10,000-seat gymnasium, a 4,000-seat natatorium, and a 4,000-seat tennis field.
    8.57
    7 votes
    3
    National Auditorium

    National Auditorium

    Auditorio Nacional (English: National Auditorium) is an entertainment centre located at Paseo de la Reforma #50, Chapultepec in Mexico City right in front of the Polanco hotel zone next to Campo Marte. The National Auditorium, main site Mexico shows and considered among the top in the world by various specialized media, Pedro Ramírez Vázquez and Gonzalo Ramírez del Sordo, Mexican architects and remodeled ingeralmente by Abraham zabludovsky and Teodoro González de León. There are carried out music concerts, art, Theatre and dance among other genres. It also has a small venue available for smaller events, which is called Auditorio Lunario. Its total seating capacity is just under 10,000. Auditorio Nacional, the main campus of shows in Mexico and among the leaders of the world by various specialised media, the work of Mexican architects Pedro Ramirez Vazquez and Gonzalo Ramirez of the Deaf, And renovated by ingeralmente Abraham Zabludovsky and Teodoro Gonzalez de Leon. The concerts that are held here include music, art, theater and dance, among other genres. Constructed in 1952, it was used for volleyball and basketball matches of the 1954 Central American and Caribbean Games and had
    8.14
    7 votes
    4

    Olympic Gymnastics Arena

    The Olympic Gymnastics Arena is an indoor sports arena, located at the Olympic Park, in Bangi-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul South Korea. It was constructed between 31 August 1984 and 30 April 1986, to host the gymnastics competitions at the 1988 Summer Olympics. It has a capacity of 14,730. The roof was design by David H. Geiger. It is self-supporting cable dome with a four-layer fabric cladding. It is the first of its kind weighing in at 2 psf. Since the Olympics it has hosted a variety of events, notability as a concert venue for Koreans as well as international artists.
    7.71
    7 votes
    5
    Nanjing Olympic Sports Center Gymnasium

    Nanjing Olympic Sports Center Gymnasium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    The Nanjing Olympic Sports Center Gymnasium (Simplified Chinese: 南京奥林匹克体育中心体育馆) is an indoor arena in Nanjing, China. The arena used mainly for indoor sports such as basketball and figure skating. The facility has a capacity of 13,000 people and was opened in 2005. It is located near Nanjing Olympic Sports Center.
    7.43
    7 votes
    6
    Olympic Sports Centre

    Olympic Sports Centre

    Olympic Sports Centre (simplified Chinese: 奥体中心体育场; traditional Chinese: 奧體中心體育場; pinyin: Ào Tǐ Zhōngxīn Tǐyùchǎng) is a multi-purpose stadium in Beijing, China. It is currently used mostly for football matches. It was constructed in 1990 for the Asian Games held that year. It was renovated to host the 2008 Summer Olympics, where it hosted football matches and the running and riding parts of the modern pentathlon events. For the riding discipline, the football field at the core of the venue has been turned into a high-standard temporary equestrian field. The renovation also added four pavilion-styled rotating rampways around the stadium. The stadium has a floor space of 34,975 square metres, which exceeds the original building area of 20,000 square metres. Its capacity has doubled after the renovation, from about 18,000 to 36,228.
    7.14
    7 votes
    7

    Lake Placid Olympic Sports Complex

    • Olympic games used in: 1980 Winter Olympics
    The Lake Placid Olympic Sports Complex is a winter sports complex located at the foot of Mount Van Hoevenberg near Lake Placid, New York. Part of the Olympic Regional Development Authority (ORDA), it was created following the 1980 Winter Olympics. The complex includes a bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track along with trails for both biathlon and cross country skiing. Constructed in 1930 for the 1932 Winter Olympics, the track was the first bobsleigh track located outside of Europe. In 1949, it hosted the FIBT World Championships, also the first outside of Europe. The original bobsleigh track was demolished in 1978 to pave the way for an artificial track for the 1980 Winter Olympics with a separate luge track being constructed for those same games. The luge track was the first luge track in North America when it was completed in 1979. In 1983, the luge track was the first venue to host the FIL World Luge Championships outside of Europe. Both tracks were demolished in the late 1990s and a combination track was constructed in early 2000 in time for the only Winter Goodwill Games. The track is a regular venue for World Cup competitions in bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton. In 2009, the
    7.33
    6 votes
    8
    Weingart Stadium

    Weingart Stadium

    Weingart Stadium (formerly ELAC Stadium) is a 20,355-seat multipurpose stadium located at East Los Angeles College, in Monterey Park, California. It was built in 1951 at a cost of $3.1 million, and following renovations in 1984 it was renamed after philanthropist Ben Weingart. Also, in 1984 it hosted all Olympic field hockey matches. US Field Hockey played a home game here in 1990. The Los Angeles Salsa soccer club called Weingart home in the early 1990s. It is one of the only mid-size stadiums in the western United States that is retrofitted with turf-playing surface certified by the Federation International de Football Association (FIFA). In the film Forrest Gump, special effects were used to turn ELAC's Weingart Stadium into the University of Alabama's football stadium. Using digital FX, a small crowd which was filmed at ELAC, appears to fill the entire stadium. Today, although it remains home to the East Los Angeles College football team, it is best known as the site of the annual Garfield High School–Roosevelt High School football game, better known as the East Los Angeles Classic, which has been responsible for the Stadium's largest crowds, numbering over 25,000. (There are
    7.17
    6 votes
    9
    Sydney Showground

    Sydney Showground

    The Sydney Showground is a purpose built venue used each year for the Sydney Royal Easter Show. Located at Sydney Olympic Park in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, it was opened in 1998, as a venue for the 2000 Summer Olympics and to replace the ageing old Sydney Showground at Moore Park. Sydney Showground is operated by the Royal Agricultural Society of NSW (RAS), under lease from the NSW Government. Sydney Showground Stadium (commercial name Skoda Stadium) is the centrepiece of the Showgrounds and is used for flagship Show events such as the Grand Parade. It has been used for various sports including baseball at the 2000 Summer Olympics and Rugby League between 2001 and 2005. From 2012, it is used for Australian Rules Football as the primary home ground of the Greater Western Sydney Giants. The Dome, also known as The Dome and Exhibition Complex is a large indoor venue with a circular shaped floor plan and a ceiling up to 42 metres in height. It has 7,200 square metres of floor space, which can be expanded to 21,600 square metres when combined with the adjoining Exhibitions Halls 2, 3, & 4. During the Olympics, it hosted the finals for team handball and some of the preliminary
    8.20
    5 votes
    10
    Dunc Gray Velodrome

    Dunc Gray Velodrome

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Dunc Gray Velodrome is located at Bass Hill approximately 5 kilometres north west of the Sydney suburb of Bankstown. The Dunc Gray Velodrome was opened on 28 November 1999 and is named after Edgar "Dunc" Gray, the first Australian to win a cycling Gold Medal at the Olympic Games (Los Angeles 1932). Costing $42 million as a track cycling venue for the Sydney 2000 Olympics, construction of the velodrome, as well as an 800m Criterium Practice Track, commenced in May 1998 and finished in November 1999. It currently has a seating capacity of 3,150, but was expanded to 5,821 seats to cater for the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. Being 250 metres long, 60 kilometres worth of Baltic Pine (Finland) were used in its composition. The track bends at a maximum angle of 42° degrees, while the straights are at 12.5°. The Safety Track is 5 metres wide and the racing surface is of 7 metres width. The first major international cycling event ever held was the Oceania International Cycling Grand Prix during from 8 to 12 December 1999 – an official pre-Olympic test event. In April 2000 it hosted the 'The Bankstown Millennium Buzz' performance in celebrating the Olympics and the millennium year. It
    7.00
    6 votes
    11

    Young Pioneers Stadium

    The Young Pioneers Stadium (Russian: Стадион Юных пионеров) was a sports complex in the Soviet Union, intended exclusively for children and youth training, the largest in Europe of this kind. It was located in Moscow. Built in 1932 - 1934, the complex consisted of a football stadium surrounded by a 6-lane 400 m athletics track, two volleyball grounds, five tennis courts, a cycling track, an indoor ice skating rink, as well as indoor gyms, choreography halls and chess school apartments. Besides that, an Indoor Athletics Area was built there in 1968. The site was reconstructed in 1980 to comply with Olympic standards and the football stadium (capacity 5,000) was used as a venue of the hockey tournament at the 1980 Summer Olympics, including the final. After that, the complex was again the seat of the Central Children's Training and Competition Complex with more than 2,000 children regularly practising sports. In post-Soviet Russia, when many children's sports schools and sections around the country had been closed, the complex was used primarily for other purposes than children's training. At the present time it is being destroyed to prolong the tunnel under Leningrad Avenue.
    9.25
    4 votes
    12
    Whistler Olympic Park

    Whistler Olympic Park

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Cross-Country Skiing at the 2010 Winter Olympics - Men's 50 km Classical
    The Whistler Olympic Park is the location of the Nordic events facilities for the 2010 Winter Olympics and is located in the Madeley Creek basin in the Callaghan Valley, west of Whistler, British Columbia, Canada. The facility hosted the biathlon, cross-country skiing, Nordic combined, and ski jumping. After the Olympics will remain a public facility, complementing the extensive wilderness trails and alpine routes already in use. Three temporary stadiums were built with a capacity for 12,000 spectators each (6,000 for the Paralympics). The location is approximately 8 km from the junction of its access road with Highway 99 and 14 km from the Whistler Olympic Village. The two year construction project saw, 14 km (8.7 mi) of cross country and biathlon trails, two ski jumps (HS 106 and HS 140 metre), and another 20 to 25 km of recreational trails built. There is also a permanent Biathlon range which can be used daily. Overall, $119.7 million was spent on the facilities in the Callaghan Valley. Permanent features were completed in the fall of 2007. It is now a public cross-country and back country ski facility. Located between the ski jumps and cross country area there is an
    7.80
    5 votes
    13
    Soldier Hollow

    Soldier Hollow

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    Soldier Hollow is a cross-country ski resort located 53 miles (85 km) southeast of Salt Lake City in Wasatch Mountain State Park, Utah, United States. The resort was created for the 2002 Winter Olympics, and during the games it hosted the biathlon, cross-country skiing and the cross country skiing portion of the Nordic combined events. Since hosting the Olympics, it has been developed as a cross-country skiing, tubing, and snowshoeing resort, while featuring mountain biking and golfing in the summer. Soldier Hollow is located in the southeastern-most part of Wasatch Mountain State Park, a 21,592 acres (8,738 ha) nature preserve created in 1961, which became a state park in 1968. Soldier Hollow's location within the state park did not carry a name until Olympic organizers coined it Soldier Hollow. This name was chosen because of its proximity to Soldier Springs, which were thought to have been used by U.S. Troops originally sent to Utah to quell a supposed Mormon uprising, in an incident known as the Utah War. Prior to becoming a state park certain locations within the park were used for farming and grazing activities, while much of the remainder was used recreationally by locals.
    9.00
    4 votes
    14

    Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Badminton at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Women's doubles
    The Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium (simplified Chinese: 北京工业大学体育馆; traditional Chinese: 北京工業大學體育館; pinyin: Běijīng Gōngyè Dàxué Tǐyùguǎn) is an indoor arena located on the campus of the Beijing University of Technology in the Chaoyang District in Beijing, China. The gymnasium hosted the 2008 Summer Olympics badminton and rhythmic gymnastics events. The gymnasium seating capacity is 7,500 and has a floor space of 24,000 square metres. After the Olympic Games, it has served as a training facility for Chinese badminton teams and also as a sports and recreational activities centre for students and local communities. The gymnasium was completed in September 2007.
    6.67
    6 votes
    15
    Herb Brooks Arena

    Herb Brooks Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 1980 Winter Olympics
    The Herb Brooks Arena, one of three ice surfaces at the Olympic Center, is a 7,700-seat multi-purpose arena in Lake Placid, New York. This surface, along with the USA Rink was built for the 1980 Winter Olympics. The 1932 Rink – Jack Shea Arena, also in the Olympic Center, was the first indoor arena used for the Winter Olympics. For the 1932 Games, it hosted the figure skating and six of the twelve ice hockey games. The 1980 Rink – Herb Brooks Arena hosted various events during the 1980 Winter Olympics, most famously the ice hockey tournament that saw the United States's 4–3 victory over the Soviet Union, the game commonly referred to as the Miracle on Ice. Figure skating events took place during those games. In 2005, to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the American victory, the arena was named after the late Herb Brooks, who coached United States team during the 1980 Olympics The arena has been used several times for college hockey championships in the United States. It hosted the 1970, 1984 and 1988 men's NCAA Men's Ice Hockey Championship, commonly referred to as the Frozen Four. The arena has hosted the NCAA Women's Ice Hockey Championship as well, in 2007. From 1994 to 2002,
    7.60
    5 votes
    16
    8.75
    4 votes
    17
    Estadio Olímpico Universitario

    Estadio Olímpico Universitario

    • Olympic games used in: 1968 Summer Olympics
    Estadio Olímpico Universitario is a stadium located in Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City. It was built in 1952 and at that time was the largest stadium in Mexico. This stadium has a capacity of 63,186 . During the 50s and the 60s this stadium was used mostly for college American football matches between the largest Mexican public universities: UNAM and IPN. From the late 1950s it was used for football matches, some American football matches and athletics contests. It resembles a volcano, due to it being built in a volcanic stone surface. The Olímpico Universitario hosted the Olympic Games of 1968; for the event the seating capacity was increased from 70,000 to 83,700 spectators (without substantially modifying the original structure) to cover the IOC requirements for an Olympic stadium. It was the location of the track & field competitions, equestrian events, certain association football matches, the arrival of the marathon and the opening & ending ceremonies. This was the Olympics in which Tommie Smith and John Carlos protested against the treatment of black people in the USA by performing a black power salute during the medal ceremony for the 200m. The stadium also hosted several
    10.00
    3 votes
    18
    China Agricultural University Gymnasium

    China Agricultural University Gymnasium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Wrestling at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's Greco-Roman Welterweight
    The China Agricultural University Gymnasium (simplified Chinese: 中国农业大学体育馆; traditional Chinese: 中國農業大學體育館; pinyin: Zhōngguó Nóngyè Dàxué Tǐyùguǎn) is an indoor arena located on the campus of the China Agricultural University in Beijing. It hosted the wrestling events of the 2008 Summer Olympics. The Gymnasium's rooftop has a staggered, stair-like design. It covers an area of 23,950 square metres and has a capacity of 8,200 which will be reduced to 6000. It will also be turned into a sports complex for students of the China Agricultural University after the Olympic Games. Construction started the first half of 2005 and was completed in July 2007.
    7.40
    5 votes
    19
    Olympic Sports Centre Gymnasium

    Olympic Sports Centre Gymnasium

    The Olympic Sports Center Gymnasium (simplified Chinese: 奥体中心体育馆; traditional Chinese: 奧體中心體育館; pinyin: Ào Tǐ Zhōngxīn Tǐyùguǎn) is an indoor arena next to the Olympic Sports Centre Stadium at the southern part of the Olympic Green in Beijing, China. It was reformed for the 2008 Summer Olympics where it hosted the handball tournaments up to and including the quarter-finals, after which they will move to the larger Beijing National Indoor Stadium. It has a seating capacity of 7,000 expanded from the original 6,000 and a floor space of 47,410 square metres from the current 43,000. Three handball training courts were put to use in 2008. The renovation was complete in August 2007.
    7.40
    5 votes
    20
    Laoshan Bicycle Moto Cross (BMX) Venue

    Laoshan Bicycle Moto Cross (BMX) Venue

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    The Laoshan Bicycle Moto Cross (BMX) Venue (simplified Chinese: 老山小轮车赛场; traditional Chinese: 老山小輪車賽場; pinyin: Lǎoshān Xiǎolúnchē Sàichǎng) was one of 9 temporary venues used for the 2008 Summer Olympics. It was located in Laoshan, Shijingshan District, Beijing. The venue was used for the men's and women's BMX racing events.
    8.50
    4 votes
    21
    Shunyi Olympic Rowing-Canoeing Park

    Shunyi Olympic Rowing-Canoeing Park

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Canoeing at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's slalom C-2
    The Shunyi Olympic Rowing-Canoeing Park (simplified Chinese: 顺义奥林匹克水上公园; traditional Chinese: 順義奧林匹克水上公園; pinyin: Shùnyì Àolínpǐkè Shuǐshàng Gōngyuán) is the new, purpose-built venue for the rowing, canoeing and 10 km open-water swimming events in the 2008 Summer Olympics. It is located in Mapo Village in the Shunyi District in Beijing. The first competitions at the venue were held in August 2007, a year ahead of the 2008 Olympic Games for which it was built. The World Junior Rowing Championships, China Open Canoe/Kayak Slalom and China Canoe/Kayak Flatwater Open were all held in that month as part of the "Good Luck Beijing" series of sporting events. The 10 km marathon swimming Olympic 2nd qualification event was held there in June 2008 The slalom course is generally considered to be very tough, even by Olympic standards. The water speed is 7.5 meters/second. With a drop of 6.3 meters (21 ft), the 300-meter course has a 2.1% slope of 20.9 m/km (110 ft/mile). Powered by electric pumps, the slalom course is located at the southwest corner of the long rectangular rowing pond, from which it draws its water. Its western loop is the competition course; the eastern loop, with branches,
    8.50
    4 votes
    22

    Busan Gudeok stadium

    Busan Gudeok Stadium (Korean: 부산 구덕 운동장; Hanja: 釜山九德運動場) is a multi-purpose stadium in Busan, South Korea. It is currently used mostly for football matches. The stadium holds 24,363 people and opened in 1928. During the 1988 Summer Olympics, it hosted some football preliminary matches. And it was a main stadium for the 2nd East Asian Games.
    7.20
    5 votes
    23
    Harvard Stadium

    Harvard Stadium

    Harvard Stadium is a U-shaped football stadium in the Allston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States. Built in 1903, the stadium seats 30,323. The stadium seated up to 57,166 in the past, as permanent steel stands (completing a straight-sided oval) were installed in the north end of the stadium in 1929. They were torn down after the 1951 season due to deterioration and reduced attendance. Afterwards, there were smaller temporary steel bleachers across the open end of the stadium until the building of the Murr Center (which is topped by the new scoreboard) in 1998. Harvard's stadium was constructed on 31 acres of land known as Soldiers Field donated to Harvard University by Henry Lee Higginson in 1890. The structure similar in shape to the Panathenaic Stadium, the site of the first modern Olympics in 1896, was completed in just four and a half months costing $310,000. Much of the funds raised came from a 25th Reunion gift by Harvard's Class of 1879. It is the home of the football team of Harvard, whose all-time record (at the end of the 2010 season) at the stadium is 427-222-34 (.650). The stadium also hosted the Crimson track and field teams until 1984 and was
    7.20
    5 votes
    24

    Sochi Olympic Oval

    • Olympic events contested here: Speed skating at the 2014 Winter Olympics – Men's 10000 metres
    The Adler Arena Skating Center (Адлер-Арена) is a description of a 8,000-seat multi-purpose arena in the Olympic Park, Sochi, Russia that is currently in the construction stage. It is due to be open in 2012 and will looks like an iceberg or ice fault. The center will host the speed skating events at the 2014 Winter Olympics. It will cost $32.8 million to build the venue, including the temporary works for the Olympics. After the Olympics, it will be turned into a exhibition center. A crystal face theme is supported by angular walls and triangular stained-glass windows. The gray and white color of the building enhances this impression. The walls along the sides of the skating rink are made transparent so the spectatos can look outside. The skating center is designed to make the utmost use of local natural features.
    7.20
    5 votes
    25
    Palau Sant Jordi

    Palau Sant Jordi

    • Olympic games used in: 1992 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 1992 Summer Olympics - Men's volleyball
    Palau Sant Jordi (Catalan pronunciation: [pəˈɫaw ˈsaɲ ˈʒɔrði], English: St. George's Palace) is an indoor sporting arena and multi-purpose installation that is part of the Olympic Ring complex located in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. The maximum seating capacity of the arena is 16,500 for handball, 17,000 for basketball, and 24,000 for musical events. It was opened in 1990 and designed by Japanese architect Arata Isozaki. The Palau Sant Jordi was one of the main venues of the 1992 Summer Olympics hosting the artistic gymnastics, handball final, and volleyball final. Nowadays, it is used for all kinds of indoor sport events as well as for concerts and other cultural activities, due to its great flexibility. The arena was the venue of the 1995 IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics. The arena was the venue of three Euroleague final four in 1998, 2003 and 2011. It also hosted the EuroBasket 1997 from the quarter-finals. The final of 2000 Davis Cup was the 89th edition of the most important tournament between nations in men's tennis. Spain defeated Australia at Palau Sant Jordi on 8–10 December, giving Spain their first title. The arena also received the final of 2009 Davis Cup
    8.25
    4 votes
    26
    Wembley Arena

    Wembley Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Badminton at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's singles
    Wembley Arena (originally the Empire Pool) is an indoor arena, at Wembley, in the London Borough of Brent. The building is opposite Wembley Stadium. It was built for the 1934 British Empire Games, by Arthur Elvin, and originally housed a swimming pool, as reflected by its former name, Empire Pool. The pool itself was last used for the 1948 Summer Olympics. The building is used for music, comedy and family entertainment and for sport. The venue was renovated, along with Wembley Stadium, as part of the early-21st-century regeneration of the Wembley area. The arena refurbishment cost £35m and the new arena opened to the public on 2 April 2006, with a concert by the English electronic-music band Depeche Mode. With 12,500 seats, it is London's second-largest indoor arena after The O2 Arena and third-largest indoor concert venue after the O2 and Earls Court Exhibition Centre, an exhibition hall which regularly stages concerts. Since its opening in 1934, the venue has become the third-largest indoor concert venue and London's second-largest indoor arena, having hosted concerts by the world's most famous artists, spanning many different genres of music. When the venue was known as the
    8.25
    4 votes
    27
    Olympic Stadium

    Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2004 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Athletics at the 2004 Summer Olympics - Women's 1,500 metres
    The Olympic Stadium "Spiros Louis" (Greek: Ολυμπιακό Στάδιο "Σπύρος Λούης", Olympiakó Stádio "Spiros Louis"), is part of the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. It is named after the first modern Olympic marathon race winner in 1896, Spiros Louis. Located in the area of Marousi in Athens, the stadium was originally designed in 1979 and built in 1980–1982. It was completed in time to host the 1982 European Championships in Athletics. It was inaugurated by the President of Greece, at the time Konstantinos Karamanlis, on 8 September 1982. It also hosted several events of the 1991 Mediterranean Games and the 1997 World Championships in Athletics, sought in order to prove that it was capable of hosting major sporting events after the failure of Athens to win the 1996 Summer Olympics. It was extensively renovated in time for the 2004 Summer Olympics, including a roof designed by Santiago Calatrava, and innovatively positioned with Enerpac hydraulics. The roof was added atop the sidelines and completed just in time for the opening of the Games. The stadium was then officially re-opened on 30 July 2004. It hosted the athletics events and the football final at the 2004 Summer Olympics. It also
    6.17
    6 votes
    28
    Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena

    Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena

    The Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena is a multi-purpose arena, in the University Park neighborhood, of Los Angeles, California, at Exposition Park. It is located next to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, just south of the campus of the University of Southern California. The Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena was opened on July 4, 1959 by then U.S. Vice President Richard M. Nixon. Its first event followed four days later, a Bantamweight title fight between Jose Becerra and Alphonse Halimi on July 8, 1959. The Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena became a companion facility to the adjacent Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and home court to the Los Angeles Lakers of the NBA from October 1960 to December 1967, the Los Angeles Clippers also of the NBA from 1984–1999, the Los Angeles Kings of the NHL from October to December 1967 during their inaugural 1967-68 season, the USC Trojans basketball team of the NCAA from 1959–2006, the UCLA Bruins Basketball team of the NCAA from 1959–1965 and again as a temporary home in 2011-2012, the Los Angeles Blades of the Western Hockey League from 1961 to 1967, the Los Angeles Sharks of the WHA from 1972–1974, the Los Angeles Cobras of the AFL in 1988, and
    8.00
    4 votes
    29

    The Copper Box

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Handball at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament
    The Copper Box was a venue for the 2012 Summer Olympics in the Olympic Park in Hackney, London, England. Previously known as the Handball Arena, it was renamed because, aside from handball, it hosted modern pentathlon (fencing) during the Olympics and was the goalball venue for the 2012 Summer Paralympics. London's Olympic bid proposed that there would be four indoor arenas in the Olympic Park, in addition to other main venues, but the revised masterplan published in 2006 reduced this to three, with the volleyball being moved to Earls Court Exhibition Centre. The fencing arena was also cancelled, and the fencing took place at ExCeL. Construction of the building was completed on time in early 2011 and came in under budget. The design incorporates light pipes and rainwater collectors to reduce both energy and water use by 40%. Test events were successfully hosted at the venue ahead of the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012. In January 2012, the venue was renamed the Copper Box from the Handball Arena, thus reflecting the look of the building and the fact that it was not just be used for Handball. English Handball campaigned for the rebrand to be reversed. The Copper Box has 7,000
    8.00
    4 votes
    30
    Aqua Wing Arena

    Aqua Wing Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 1998 Winter Olympics
    Aqua Wing Arena is an indoor arena in Nagano, Japan. The last venue to be completed for the 1998 Winter Olympics in October 1997, it hosted the ice hockey events. The arena was converted into an aquatics centre in 1999. The roof is retractable.
    6.80
    5 votes
    31
    Beijing Shooting Range Hall

    Beijing Shooting Range Hall

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Shooting at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Women's 10 metre air rifle
    The Beijing Shooting Range Hall (simplified Chinese: 北京射击馆; traditional Chinese: 北京射擊館; pinyin: Běijīng Shèjīguǎn) is a shooting hall located in Shijingshan District, Beijing. It hosted the qualifying rounds and finals of ten shooting events at the 2008 Summer Olympics, consisting of all 10-, 25- and 50-metre events. It was the venue of the first gold medal awarded at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. The entire shooting sports events for the 2008 Summer Paralympics were also held at this venue. Construction of the venue broke ground on July 13, 2004 and was completed on July 28, 2007. It was used for a pre-Olympic test event in April 2008 as part of the 2008 ISSF World Cup. The venue, with a total surface area of 45,645 square meters, contains qualification competition halls, a final competition hall, a storehouse, a room for armed police use, a heating and ventilation equipment room, and an electric transformer room. The qualification competition hall contains 10m, 25m, and 50 m target ranges. The final competition hall contains sealed 10m, 25m, and 50m target ranges. The venue has a total seating capacity for 8,600 spectators, with 2,170 permanent seats and 6,430 removable seats.
    6.80
    5 votes
    32

    Seoul National University Gymnasium

    Seoul National University Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Seoul, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 5,000 people and was built in 1986 to host table tennis and badminton (demonstration) events at the 1988 Summer Olympics.
    6.80
    5 votes
    33

    Olympic Hockey Centre

    • Olympic events contested here: Field hockey at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament
    The Riverbank Arena is a stadium in the Olympic Park, in Hackney Wick, London, United Kingdom, containing a water-based astroturf. It was built with two venues for field-hockey competition at the 2012 Summer Olympics with capacities of 15,000 and 5,000, respectively, and venues for the football 7-a-side and football 5-a-side competitions at the 2012 Summer Paralympics. The budget for the stadium was £19 million. After the Olympics, the venue will be scaled down to a 5,000-seat arena and a training pitch and moved north to Eton Manor, a sport and leisure venue in Leyton, Waltham Forest. In January 2011, Leyton Orient F.C. expressed an interest in moving into the stadium after the games. In May 2012, it opened with a test event, a men's and women's invitational hockey tournament. The stadium will host the 2015 EuroHockey Nations Championships. Media related to Riverbank Arena at Wikimedia Commons
    9.00
    3 votes
    34
    Gersten Pavilion

    Gersten Pavilion

    The Gersten Pavilion is a 4,156 seat multi-purpose arena in Los Angeles, California. It is the home of the Loyola Marymount University Lions. It was built in 1981. It is also the part-time practice home for the Los Angeles Lakers. It was the site for the weightlifting competition for the 1984 Summer Olympics. On March 4, 1990, LMU star Hank Gathers died during a West Coast Conference men's basketball tournament game from cardiomyopathy. The tourney was promptly suspended and LMU was awarded the NCAA bid based on their regular season title. The facility also hosted the WCC tournament in 1997. The arena is known among LMU alumni as "Hank's House," after fallen LMU basketball star Hank Gathers.
    7.75
    4 votes
    35

    Whistler Media Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    The Whistler Media Centre (WMC) will be located in the Whistler Conference Centre, in the heart of Whistler’s town centre.
    7.75
    4 votes
    36
    Dynamo Stadium

    Dynamo Stadium

    Dinamo Stadium was built in 1928 and was able to hold 36,540 people. It was the home ground for Dynamo Moscow. It was also one of the venues of the football tournament of the 1980 Summer Olympics. A new stadium will be built in preparation for the 2018 FIFA World Cup and will be named VTB Arena. Dynamo Stadium was built in 1928 by architects Aleksandr Langman and Leonid Cherikover. An athletics track circles the football field, but is no longer in use. A momument to Lev Yashin stands at the stadium's north entrance and VIP boxes are positioned above the entrances to the north and south stands. In 2008, the stadium celebrated its 80-years anniversary. Michael Jackson brought his HIStory World Tour to Dynamo Stadium in 1996 and Deep Purple performed there the same year. Dynamo Stadium was closed for demolition in 2008 with the farewell match played on November 22, 2008. The stadium's main tenant, FC Dynamo Moscow, moved to Arena Khimki, a stadium in the Moscow suburb of Khimki.
    5.83
    6 votes
    37
    Whiteface Mountain

    Whiteface Mountain

    • Olympic games used in: 1980 Winter Olympics
    Whiteface Mountain is the fifth-highest mountain in New York State, and one of the High Peaks of the Adirondack Mountains. Set apart from most of the other High Peaks, the summit offers a 360-degree view featuring the Adirondacks and perhaps on a clear day glimpses of Vermont and even Canada. The skyscrapers of Montreal, 80 miles (130 km) away, can be seen on a very clear day. Located in the town of Wilmington (about 13 miles / 21 kilometers from Lake Placid) the mountain is home to a ski area with the highest vertical drop in the eastern United States (3,430 ft/1,050 m). Part of the post World War II growth in recreational skiing attributed to the efforts of returning veterans of the Army's 10th Mountain Division, Whiteface also hosted the alpine skiing competition of the 1980 Winter Olympics. Unique among the High Peaks, Whiteface features a developed summit and seasonal accessibility by motor vehicle. Whiteface Memorial Highway reaches a parking area at an elevation of 4,600 feet (1,402 m), with the remaining 267 feet (81 m) being obtained by tunnel and elevator. Conceived and initiated before the start of the Great Depression, Whiteface Castle and the Whiteface Mountain
    6.60
    5 votes
    38
    Laoshan Velodrome

    Laoshan Velodrome

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Cycling at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's team sprint
    The Laoshan Velodrome (Chinese: 老山自行车馆; pinyin: Lǎoshān Zìxíngchēguǎn) is a velodrome that is located in Laoshan, Shijingshan District, Beijing, China. It was built for the 2008 Summer Olympics. The venue was tested during the UCI Track World Cup in December 2007. The velodrome hosted track cycling disciplines during the Olympics. It has a capacity of 6,000 spectators, a 250-metre oval shaped track, and a total land surface of 32,920 square metres. The Laoshan Velodrome will be used for international and national cycling competitions and training after the Olympic Games. The seating capacity may be reduced to 3,500. The velodrome was designed by Schuermann Architects, designers of the ADT Event Center in Carson, CA and the UCI Cycling Center in Aigle, Switzerland.
    5.67
    6 votes
    39
    ExCeL Exhibition Centre

    ExCeL Exhibition Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Fencing at the 2012 Summer Olympics - Men's Foil, Individual
    ExCeL London (Exhibition Centre London) (often referred to as the ExCeL Exhibition Centre) is an exhibitions and international convention centre in the London Borough of Newham, England. It is located on a 100-acre (0.40 km) site on the northern quay of the Royal Victoria Dock in London Docklands, between Canary Wharf and London City Airport. The centre was built by Sir Robert McAlpine and first opened in November 2000. In May 2008, it was acquired by Abu Dhabi National Exhibitions Company. Phase II was completed on 1 May 2010. This expansion created The International Convention Centre London (ICC London) adding to ExCeL's event space, as well as further meeting space and banqueting facilities. The Royal Victoria Dock closed to commercial traffic in 1981, but it is still accessible to shipping. The centre's waterfront location allows visiting vessels to moor alongside the centre (for example, the 2005 London Boat Show was visited by HMS Sutherland). The exhibition building itself consists of two column-free, rectangular, subdividable halls of approximately 479,493 square feet (approximately 44,546 m²) each, on either side of a central boulevard containing catering facilities and
    7.50
    4 votes
    40
    Stegeman Coliseum

    Stegeman Coliseum

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 1996 Summer Olympics - Men's volleyball
    Stegeman Coliseum is a 10,523-seat multi-purpose arena in Athens, Georgia, United States. The arena opened in 1964. It is home to the University of Georgia Bulldogs basketball and gymnastics teams. It was also the venue of the rhythmic gymnastics and preliminary indoor volleyball matches during the 1996 Summer Olympics, as well as the 1989, 1995, and 2008 NCAA gymnastics championships. It replaced Woodruff Hall, a 3,000-seat field house built in 1923. The building's design is a unique one. The ceiling is barrel-shaped, with the Sanford Drive side being curved as well. The resulting inside seating is in a "U" shape, with the flat end, which includes the scoreboard, not having the upper levels of seating. The Sanford Dr. side is probably the most familiar side of the building, and was decorated with the Olympic insignia and other markings for the 1996 Olympics. Also, the roof is a separate structure from the coliseum itself, and is connected by an aluminum bellows which allows the roof to rise and fall with the temperature. The roof has 4 outward supports in an arc style. These were often used in fraternity initiations until gated off. The former Georgia Coliseum received its current
    7.50
    4 votes
    41

    Centennial Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    Centennial Olympic Stadium was the 85,000-seat main stadium of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta. Construction of the stadium began in 1993, and it was complete and ready for the Opening Ceremony in July 1996, where it hosted track and field events and the closing ceremony. After the Olympics and Paralympics, it was reconstructed into the baseball-specific Turner Field. During the week-long athletics program, the stadium bore witness to Donovan Bailey of Canada winning the 100 m in a world record time of 9.84 s; Michael Johnson winning both the 200 and 400 metres titles, breaking the 200 m world record in the process; and France's Marie-José Pérec also winning the 200/400 double. Meanwhile, Carl Lewis won his fourth consecutive Olympic title in the long jump, becoming only the second person, after Al Oerter, to win the same athletics event at four consecutive Games. After the closing ceremony of the 1996 Paralympics, the stadium was officially leased by the Atlanta Braves. Private entities, including NBC and other Olympic sponsors, agreed to pay a large sum of the cost to build Centennial Olympic Stadium (approximately $170 million of the $209 million bill). The Atlanta
    10.00
    2 votes
    42
    Chichibunomiya Rugby Stadium

    Chichibunomiya Rugby Stadium

    Chichibunomiya Rugby Stadium (秩父宮ラグビー場, Chichibunomiya Ragubī-jō) (also called Prince Chichibu Memorial Stadium) in the Aoyama district of central Tokyo is the spiritual home of Japanese rugby union and the headquarters of the Japan Rugby Football Union. The stadium currently seats 25,194 spectators, but only part of the stands are covered. A large electronic scoreboard was added to the grounds as a step toward modernization before the fifth Rugby World Cup in 2003. On April 19, 2007 it was announced that the stadium was to be equipped with lights for night games by the end of July, to assist with the RWC 2015 bid. The first rugby game under lights was Japan v Asian Barbarians in August 2007, the send-off for Japan going to RWC 2007. Since then it has been used for the first Top League game of the 2007-8 season between Suntory Sungoliath and Toshiba Brave Lupus, also played under lights and won 10-3 by the former on October 26, 2008. Originally completed in 1947, it was at first called Tokyo Rugby Stadium. In 1953 the name was changed to Chichibunomiya Rugby Stadium. The stadium also served as a venue for football matches in the 1964 Summer Olympics. The name Chichibunomiya
    10.00
    2 votes
    43
    Camp Nou

    Camp Nou

    Camp Nou (Catalan pronunciation: [kamˈnɔw], New Field) is a football stadium in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain which has been the home of Futbol Club Barcelona since 1957. The Camp Nou seats 99,354, reduced to 96,336 in matches organized by UEFA, making it the largest stadium in Europe and the 11th largest in the world in terms of capacity. It has hosted numerous international matches at a senior level, including two UEFA Champions League finals and the football competition at the 1992 Summer Olympics. The construction of Camp Nou started on 28 March 1954 as Barcelona's previous stadium, Camp de Les Corts, had no room for expansion. Although originally planned to be called Estadi del FC Barcelona, the more popular name Camp Nou was used. The June 1950 signing of László Kubala, regarded as one of Barcelona's greatest players, provided further impetus to the construction of a larger stadium. Construction of Camp Nou began on 28 March 1954 before a crowd of 60,000 Barça fans. The civil governor of Barcelona, Felipe Acedo Colunga, presided at the laying in place of the first stone, with a blessing from the Archbishop of Barcelona, Gregorio Modrego. Construction took three years, going
    6.40
    5 votes
    44
    Vélodrome de Vincennes

    Vélodrome de Vincennes

    • Olympic games used in: 1900 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Cricket at the 1900 Summer Olympics
    The Vélodrome de Vincennes (officially Vélodrome Jacques Anquetil - La Cipale) is a stadium in Vincennes, near Paris, France. Initially built as a velodrome in 1894, it became the main stadium for the 1900 Summer Olympics; Events that took place in the Velodrome at the 1900 Summer Olympics included cycling, cricket, rugby union, football and gymnastics. However, the track and field events were held at the Racing Club de France. At the 1924 Summer Olympics it became the cycling (track) venue. The venue was the finish line of the Tour de France between 1968 and 1974 most notably seeing Eddy Merckx winning each of his five Tour victories there. Prior to this, the finish had been held at the Parc des Princes from 1904 to 1967. From 1975 to the present, the Tour de France has ended on the Champs-Élysées. It has featured in two feature films, La Rafle and Sarah's Key, standing in for the Vélodrome d'hiver, in films about the notorious round-up of Parisian Jews in July 1942. The stadium is still used for cycling, football and rugby matches. .
    6.40
    5 votes
    45

    Francis Field

    • Olympic games used in: 1904 Summer Olympics
    Francis Field is a stadium at Washington University in St. Louis, currently used by the University's track and field/cross country, football, and soccer teams. It is located in St. Louis County, Missouri on the far western edge of the University's Danforth Campus. It was built in time for the 1904 World's Fair, and was used as the main stadium for the 1904 Summer Olympics. At its height, the stadium had a 19,000 person seating capacity, but 1984 stadium renovations reduced the capacity to 4,000 persons. It is one of the oldest sports venues west of the Mississippi River still in use. Francis Field has been upgraded to include many of the characteristics of modern stadiums. Instead of grass, the stadium now utilizes artificial Field Turf, which can be configured for both soccer and football. The 1904 Summer Olympics (the first to be held in the Western Hemisphere) were given to St. Louis, Missouri, as a result of the efforts of David Rowland Francis, for whom the stadium and accompanying gymnasium are named. Built in 1902, Francis Field's permanent stands represent one of the first applications of reinforced concrete technology. Both Francis Field and its gymnasium are U.S. National
    7.25
    4 votes
    46
    Melbourne Cricket Ground

    Melbourne Cricket Ground

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) is an Australian sports stadium located in Yarra Park, Melbourne and is home to the Melbourne Cricket Club. It is the tenth largest stadium in the world, the largest in Australia, the largest stadium for playing cricket, and holds the world record for the highest light towers at any sporting venue. The MCG is within walking distance of the city centre and is serviced by the Richmond railway station, Richmond and the Jolimont railway station, East Melbourne. It is part of the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Precinct. Internationally, the MCG is remembered as the centrepiece stadium of both the 1956 Summer Olympics and the 2006 Commonwealth Games. The open-air stadium is also one of the world's most famous cricket venues, with the well-attended Boxing Day Test match commencing on Boxing Day (26 December) each year. Throughout the winter, it serves as the home of Australian rules football, with at least one game (though usually more) held there each round. The stadium fills to capacity for the AFL Grand Final in late September, or early October. The MCG, often referred to by locals as "The G", has also hosted other major events, including
    7.25
    4 votes
    47
    Park City Mountain Resort

    Park City Mountain Resort

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    Park City Mountain Resort is a ski resort in Park City, Utah, located 34 miles (55 km) east of Salt Lake City. The resort has been a major tourist attraction for skiers from all over the United States, as well as a main employer for many of Park City's citizens. Park City, as the resort is often called by locals, contains several training courses for the U.S. Ski Team, including slalom and giant slalom runs. During the 2002 Winter Olympics the resort hosted the snowboarding events and the men's and women's alpine giant slalom events. The Resort is currently owned by Powdr Corporation. Park City is also one of the featured mountains in the video game Shaun White Snowboarding for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. The present resort was opened on December 21, 1963 as Treasure Mountain by United Park City Mines. This company was the last surviving mining corporation in Park City, and the resort was opened with funds from a federal government program meant to revive the economically depressed town. When it originally opened, it boasted the longest gondola in the United States, as well as a double chairlift, a J-bar lift, base and summit lodges, and a nine-hole golf course. The gondola was a
    7.25
    4 votes
    48
    Richmond Olympic Oval

    Richmond Olympic Oval

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Speed skating at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Women's 3000 metres
    The Richmond Olympic Oval (French: Anneau olympique de Richmond), or the Richmond Oval is a facility in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada. It was the venue of the speed skating events and the official Olympic anti-doping lab of the 2010 Winter Olympics. The total cost of the project was $178 million. It has been built on a site beside the Fraser River, a few blocks away from Lansdowne Station on the Canada Line. From the air, it is the first Olympic venue many visitors will see flying into Vancouver, and the roof takes the stylized native shape of a heron's wing, a tribute to the Salish First Nation and the large wading bird that cohabited the riverbank at first European contact 230 years ago. It is a 33,750 m facility, including a 20,000 m main floor that includes a 400 m refrigerated track. It can accommodate 8,000 spectators. The Oval was built to qualify the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Scale (LEED) Silver certification; for example, the Oval's refrigeration plant is designed to heat other areas of the building through the utilization of what is otherwise waste heat from cooling the ice surface. A distinctive feature of the Richmond Oval is its unique "wood
    7.25
    4 votes
    49
    Olympic Stadium

    Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1980 Summer Olympics
    Olympic Stadium, known locally as the Olimpiyskiy or Olimpiski, is a large indoor arena, located in Moscow, Russia. It was built for the 1980 Summer Olympics and, divided into two separated halls, hosted the basketball and boxing events. A part of the Olimpiyskiy Sports Complex, it makes up one architectural ensemble with another venue, constructed at the same time, the Swimming Pool. The venue is so large, that up to 80,000 people can occupy its space. It has hosted the Davis Cup finals and Bandy World Championships on several occasions, and is the home of the Kremlin Cup tournament. It was the world's 1st indoor bandy arena. When smaller indoor sports are held at the venue, such as tennis or basketball, only 1/4 of the floor space is used. Capacity at this configuration can vary between 10,000 and 16,000 people. The arena hosted the 1999 FIBA EuroStars game and the 2005 Euroleague Final Four. The stadium can hold up to 16,000 people for televised events. The stadium was the venue for the Eurovision Song Contest 2009. French singer Mylène Farmer has performed at the arena in July of 2009 and March of 2000, and is scheduled to return in November of 2013. Russian metal band Aria
    8.33
    3 votes
    50
    Pauley Pavilion

    Pauley Pavilion

    Edwin W. Pauley Pavilion, commonly known as Pauley Pavilion, is an indoor arena located in the Westwood Village district of Los Angeles, California, on the campus of UCLA. It is home to the UCLA Bruins men's and women's basketball teams. The men's and women's volleyball and women's gymnastics teams also play here. The building, designed by architect Welton Becket, was dedicated in June 1965, named for University of California Regent Edwin W. Pauley, who had matched the alumni contributions. Pauley donated almost one fifth of the more than $5,000,000 spent in building the arena. The arena was renovated in 2010-12 and will be reopened on November 9, 2012 when it hosts a men's basketball game against Indiana State. Pauley Pavilion contains 10,337 permanent theater-style upholstered seats, plus retractable bleachers for 2,482 spectators, making a total basketball capacity of 12,829. This capacity has been exceeded several times for several men's basketball games by adding portable bleacher seating alongside the retractable bleachers. The single-game attendance record of 13,478 was set on February 23, 1997 (UCLA vs. Duke). When the bleachers are retracted, there is space for three
    8.33
    3 votes
    51

    Sangmu Gymnasium

    Sangmu Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Seongnam, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 5,000 people and was built in 1986 to host wrestling events at the 1988 Summer Olympics.
    8.33
    3 votes
    52

    The Dome

    The Dome, also known as The Dome and Exhibition Complex is an indoor sporting arena located in Sydney, Australia. It hosted the finals for team handball and some of the prelimiary basketball games for the 2000 Summer Olympics. Four other pavilions were constructed during those games to host badminton, rhythmic gymnastics, handball, the shooting and fencing part of the modern pentathlon competition, and indoor volleyball events. The arena has a capacity of 10,000 people and is 22,000 square metres is size. It used to host the 2008 series of Gladiators Australia. Filming was carried out in early January 2008.
    9.50
    2 votes
    53
    Alberca Olímpica Francisco Márquez

    Alberca Olímpica Francisco Márquez

    The Alberca Olímpica Francisco Márquez is an indoor swimming pool Olympic facility located in Mexico City, Mexico. It has a capacity of 10,000. It hosted the 1968 Summer Olympics for competitions of swimming, diving, water polo, and the swimming part of modern pentathlon. The only Mexican gold medal in Olympic swimming competitions was won at this site. It was won by Felipe Muñoz in the 200 metres men breast stroke competition.
    7.00
    4 votes
    54
    Alexander Memorial Coliseum

    Alexander Memorial Coliseum

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    The Alexander Memorial Coliseum (also nicknamed The Dome or The Thrillerdome) is an indoor arena located in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. It is the home of the basketball teams of Georgia Tech and hosted the Atlanta Hawks of the NBA from 1968–1972 and again from 1997–1999. Tech's women's volleyball team occasionally uses the facility as well, primarily for NCAA tournament games and other matches that draw crowds that would overflow the O'Keefe Gymnasium. The 270-foot-diameter (82 m) Alexander Coliseum opened in 1956 at the intersection of 10th Street and Fowler on the northeast end of the Georgia Tech campus. The huge dome was constructed in a way in which there are no support pillars to obstruct the view of any fans during games. It served as a replacement for the Third Street Gymnasium (later known as the Heisman Gym) on the campus of Georgia Tech, an 1,800 seat arena opened just eighteen years before. (That gym was demolished in 1994 to make way for the expansion of the north stands at Bobby Dodd Stadium.) The arena's original capacity was 6,996 seats, though crowds larger than that sometimes assembled for big games. It has undergone three major renovations. In 1986, 2150
    7.00
    4 votes
    55
    Georgia World Congress Center

    Georgia World Congress Center

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    The Georgia World Congress Center or GWCC is the major convention center in Atlanta. It is the fourth-largest convention center in the United States at 3.9 million ft (360,000 m) and hosts more than a million visitors each year. At the time opened in 1976 the Georgia World Congress Center was the first state owned Convention Center in the United States. The A, B, and C buildings of the GWCC (the actual Convention Center), Centennial Olympic Park and the Georgia Dome are all run by the Georgia World Congress Center Authority under the auspices of the State of Georgia and funding for new expansions and other major project come from the Georgia General Assembly. The GWCC is located in downtown Atlanta at 285 Andrew Young International Blvd. NW, adjacent to Centennial Olympic Park, the Georgia Dome, CNN Center and the Philips Arena. Public transportation is serviced by the Dome/GWCC/Philips Arena/CNN Center MARTA station. The GWCC was designed by Atlanta-based architects Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates (TVS) and is made up of three adjacent buildings, Buildings A, B, and C. In total these buildings have twelve exhibit halls, 105 meeting rooms, and two ballrooms. Building A
    7.00
    4 votes
    56
    Lord's Cricket Ground

    Lord's Cricket Ground

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Archery at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's individual
    Lord's Cricket Ground, generally known as Lord's, is a cricket venue in St John's Wood, London. Named after its founder, Thomas Lord, it is owned by Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) and is the home of Middlesex County Cricket Club, the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), the European Cricket Council (ECC) and, until August 2005, the International Cricket Council (ICC). Lord's is widely referred to as the "home of cricket" and is home to the world's oldest sporting museum. Lord's today is not on its original site, being the third of three grounds that Lord established between 1787 and 1814. His first ground, now referred to as Lord's Old Ground, was where Dorset Square now stands. His second ground, Lord's Middle Ground, was used from 1811 to 1813 before being abandoned to make way for the construction through its outfield of the Regent's Canal. The present Lord's ground is about 250 yards (230 m) north-west of the site of the Middle Ground. A major redevelopment has been proposed for Lord's which would increase capacity by another 10,000 as well as adding apartments and an ice rink. The earliest known match played on the current Lord's Cricket Ground was Marylebone Cricket Club v
    7.00
    4 votes
    57
    Olympic Stadium

    Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1936 Summer Olympics
    The Olympiastadion (Olympic Stadium) is a sports stadium in Berlin, Germany. There have been two stadia on the site: the present facility, and one that is called the Deutsches Stadion which was built for the aborted 1916 Summer Olympics. Both were designed by members of the same family, the first by Otto March and the second by his son Werner March. It is the second biggest stadium in Germany behind Signal Iduna Park. It is the home stadium of the Hertha Berlin football team playing in the German Bundesliga. The current Olympiastadion was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics in the southern part of the Reichssportfeld (today Olympiapark Berlin). During World War II, the area suffered little damage. After the war, the British military occupation used the northern part of the Reichssportfeld as its headquarters until 1949. From 1951 to 2005, the Olympischer Platz had a giant antenna transmitting for all the portable radios in Berlin. Aside from its use as an Olympic stadium, the Olympiastadion has a strong footballing tradition. Historically, it is the ground of club Hertha BSC since 1963. It was also used for 3 matches in the 1974 FIFA World Cup. It hosted six matches,
    7.00
    4 votes
    58
    Whistler Olympic and Paralympic Village

    Whistler Olympic and Paralympic Village

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    The Whistler Olympic and Paralympic Village is a 2010 Winter Olympics facility in the resort town of Whistler, British Columbia. The Olympic Village is considered one of Whistler's legacy projects, in that it will be used after the Olympics to help house and train Canadian athletes. Whistler is one of the two host communities for the Games. The site of this athletes' village is in the Cheakamus Valley approximately 20 minutes south of the Whistler Mountain competition venues, and 6 km from the highway cutoff for the Whistler Olympic Park sliding events venue in the Callaghan Valley. The village can hold 2,400 athletes and officials. The athletes and officials housed in this village participated in the events held at the Whistler Olympic Park, Whistler Creekside and the Whistler Sliding Centre. The cost of the village was estimated at 32 million dollars. It consists of a 100-room lodge and a 20-unit townhouse complex.
    7.00
    4 votes
    59
    Brisbane Cricket Ground

    Brisbane Cricket Ground

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Brisbane Cricket Ground, commonly known as The Gabba, is a major sports stadium in Brisbane, the capital of Queensland. It is named after the suburb of Woolloongabba, in which it is located. The land on which the ground sits was first set aside for use as a cricket ground in 1895 and the first cricket match was held on the site on 19 December 1896, between Parliament and The Press. Prior to this, cricket was played at the cricket ground located in the area then known as 'Green Hills' (then located beside Countess Street Petrie Terrace opposite the Victoria Barracks - now occupied by the Northern Busway), since at least the early 1860s. The Gabba shared first-class cricket matches with the Exhibition Ground until 1931. The first Sheffield Shield match scheduled for The Gabba was to be played between 31 January 1931 and 4 February 1931. However, it was washed out without a ball being bowled. The first Test match at The Gabba was played between Australia and South Africa between 27 November and 3 December 1931. Over the years, The Gabba has hosted athletics, Australian rules football, baseball, concerts, cricket, cycling, rugby league, rugby union, soccer and pony and greyhound
    8.00
    3 votes
    60
    Luzhniki Stadium

    Luzhniki Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1980 Summer Olympics
    The Grand Sports Arena of the Luzhniki Olympic Complex (Russian: Большая спортивная арена Олимпийского комплекса Лужники) in Moscow, or briefly Luzhniki Stadium (Russian: Стадион "Лужники"), is the biggest sports stadium in Russia. Its total seating capacity is 89,318 seats, all covered(upgraded). The stadium is a part of the Luzhniki Olympic Complex, previously called the Central Lenin Stadium (Russian: Центральный стадион имени В. И. Ленина). The name Luzhniki derives from the flood meadows in the bend of Moskva River where the stadium was built, translating roughly as "The Meadows". The stadium is located in Khamovniki District of the Central Administrative Okrug of Moscow-city. As part of the Olympic complex Luzhniki also have the Palace of Sport at Luzhniki. Its field is used mainly for football games by Torpedo Moscow club, who also own the sports complex, and Spartak Moscow. It is also one of the few major European stadia to use an artificial pitch, as it installed a FIFA-approved FieldTurf pitch in 2002. The pitch is necessary for the cold Russian climate, as regular grass pitches are often destroyed during a typical winter and must be replaced at high cost. However, a
    8.00
    3 votes
    61
    Mitsuzawa Stadium

    Mitsuzawa Stadium

    Nippatsu Mitsuzawa Stadium is a football stadium in Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, Japan. It serves as a home ground of Yokohama F.C. and, on occasion, Yokohama F. Marinos. Until 1999 it had been the home of Yokohama F.C.'s spiritual predecessor, Yokohama Flügels, and also, on occasion, to Kawasaki-based NKK F.C. The stadium holds 15,046 people. It is also used sometimes for Top League rugby games. During the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, it hosted some of the football preliminaries.
    8.00
    3 votes
    62
    Allphones Arena

    Allphones Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Sydney Super Dome (also known by its current sponsored name, Allphones Arena) is a large entertainment and sporting complex located in Sydney, Australia. It is situated in Sydney Olympic Park, and was completed in 1999 as part of the facilities for the 2000 Summer Olympics. The $190 million dollar facility was designed and constructed by Abigroup Ltd and Obayashi Corporation with environmental factors in mind; however, the air-conditioner unit for the facility used HCFCs and was said to be a breach of the Green Guidelines for the Olympics. Bob Carr, premier of New South Wales, officially opened the stadium in November 1999. The development of the stadium was part of three subsites which also included a 3,400 space carpark which cost A$25 million, and a plaza with external works, also costing $25 million. The roof's masts reach 42 metres above ground level, and the stadium occupies a site of 20,000 m². The arena is ranked in the top 10 arenas worldwide. For three consecutive years the venue has been a finalist for the Billboard Touring Awards in the top venue category. The arena was known as the Sydney SuperDome from opening in 1999 until 11 May 2006 when it was renamed Acer
    6.75
    4 votes
    63

    Cypress Mountain

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Freestyle skiing at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Women's moguls
    Cypress Mountain is a ski area in West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, located in the southern section of Cypress Provincial Park, and is operated under a Park Use Permit. The ski resort is a 30- minute drive north of downtown Vancouver, and has 53 named alpine ski runs (many accessible for night skiing) and 21.2 km cross country of trails. Snowshoeing tours are also popular. Snow schools and rentals, cafeteria and Crazy Raven Bar and Grill and a Big Bear Sports retail shop are also located on the premises. The Resort is legally known as Cypress Bowl Recreational Limited Partnership, previously owned by Boyne Resorts and recently sold to CNL Income Properties of Florida, but Boyne will continue to run the ski operation for several years under a lease-back agreement. The ski resort name Cypress Mountain is derived from the name of the bowl between the three mountains, Mt. Strachan, Black Mountain, and Hollyburn Mountain - "Cypress Bowl", which was the original and still used common name of the resort (which is owned by Cypress Bowl Recreations Ltd.). The term "Cypress" comes from the Yellow Cedar tree Chamaecyparis nootkatensis which is common in the park at altitudes over
    6.75
    4 votes
    64

    Hanyang University Gymnasium

    • Olympic games used in: 1988 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 1988 Summer Olympics - Men's volleyball
    Hanyang University Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Seoul, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 8,000 people and was built in 1986 to host volleyball events at the 1988 Summer Olympics.
    6.75
    4 votes
    65
    Utah Olympic Oval

    Utah Olympic Oval

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    The Utah Olympic Oval, an indoor speed skating oval built for the 2002 Winter Olympics, is located 14 miles (23 km) southwest of Salt Lake City, in Kearns, Utah. The Oval hosted the long track speed skating events for the 2002 games. Inside the facility the 400-meter skating track surrounds two international sized ice sheets, and is itself surrounded by a 442-meter running track. Thanks to its high altitude, 4,675 feet (1,425 m), and the associated low air resistance, 10 Olympic and 9 world records were set at the oval during the 2002 games, the largest number of world records ever set at one event. Following the 2002 Olympics the oval temporarily held the title of "Fastest Ice on Earth". Along with Soldier Hollow and the Utah Olympic Park, the Utah Olympic Oval was built specifically for the 2002 Winter Olympics. On October 5, 1992 the Utah Sports Authority chose the Oquirrh Park Fitness Center in Kearns as the site for the 2002 Olympic Oval, beating out other locations in West Valley City, Sandy and downtown Salt Lake City. Funds from the 1989 Olympic referendum would be used to construct the oval, and would be repaid with profits from the games. The plans called for using $3.7
    6.75
    4 votes
    66
    Helsinki Olympic Stadium

    Helsinki Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1952 Summer Olympics
    The Helsinki Olympic Stadium (Finnish: Helsingin olympiastadion; Swedish: Helsingfors Olympiastadion), located in the Töölö district about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) from the center of the Finnish capital Helsinki, is the largest stadium in the country, nowadays mainly used for hosting sports events and big concerts. The stadium is best known for being the center of activities in the 1952 Summer Olympics. During those games, it hosted athletics, equestrian show jumping, and the football finals. It was built however to host the 1940 Summer Olympics, which were moved from Tokyo to Helsinki before being cancelled due to World War II. The stadium was also the venue for the first World Athletics Championships in 1983 as well as for the 2005 World Championships in Athletics. It hosted both the 1971 European Athletics Championships and the European Athletics Championships in 1994. It will once again be the venue for the championships in 2012. It is also the home stadium of the Finland national football team. Construction of the Olympic Stadium began in 1934 and it was completed in 1938. The Olympic was designed in functionalistic style by the architects Yrjö Lindegren and Toivo Jäntti. The
    9.00
    2 votes
    67
    Horse Guards Parade

    Horse Guards Parade

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Beach volleyball at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament
    Horse Guards Parade is a large parade ground off Whitehall in central London, at grid reference TQ299800. It is the site of the annual ceremonies of Trooping the Colour, which commemorates the monarch's official birthday, and Beating Retreat. Horse Guards Parade was formerly the site of the Palace of Whitehall's tiltyard, where tournaments (including jousting) were held in the time of Henry VIII. It was also the scene of annual celebrations of the birthday of Queen Elizabeth I. The area has been used for a variety of reviews, parades and other ceremonies since the 17th century. It was once the Headquarters of the British Army. The Duke of Wellington was based in Horse Guards when he was Commander-in-Chief of the British Army. The current General Officer Commanding London District still occupies the same office and uses the same desk. Wellington also had living quarters within the building, which today are used as offices. For much of the late 20th century, Horse Guards Parade was used as a car park for senior civil servants; about 500 were granted the privilege, which was known as the 'Great Perk'. The Provisional IRA's mortar attack on 10 Downing Street on 7 February 1991, which
    9.00
    2 votes
    68
    London Velopark

    London Velopark

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Cycling at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's BMX
    The London Velopark is a cycling centre in Leyton in east London. It was one of the permanent Olympic and Paralympic venues for the 2012 Summer Olympics. The Velopark is at the northern end of Olympic Park. It has a velodrome and BMX racing track, which have been used for the Games, as well as a one-mile (1.6 km) road course and a mountain bike track. The park replaces the Eastway Cycle Circuit demolished to make way for it. The facilities built for the Olympics were constructed between 2009 and 2011. The first event in the Velopark was the London round of the 2011 UCI BMX Supercross World Cup series. In February 2005 plans were announced for a £22 million VeloPark. Sport England would invest £10.5 million, Lee Valley Regional Park Authority £6 million and the Mayor of London and Transport for London would invest £3 million and £2.5 million respectively. The site was to be 34 hectares on the northern end of the proposed Olympic Park, next to the A12. The park would include a velodrome seating 1,500, which could be increased to 6,000 if London's bid for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games were successful. The site would also have an international competition BMX circuit, a BMX
    9.00
    2 votes
    69
    Peking University Gymnasium

    Peking University Gymnasium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    Peking University Gymnasium (simplified Chinese: 北京大学体育馆; traditional Chinese: 北京大學體育館; pinyin: Běijīng Dàxué Tǐyùguǎn), nicknamed China's Spine (simplified Chinese: 中国脊; traditional Chinese: 中國脊; pinyin: Zhōngguó Jǐ), is an indoor arena located in the southeastern part of Peking University in Beijing, China. The gymnasium was constructed for the 2008 Summer Olympics and hosted the table tennis events of the 2008 Summer Olympics and the Paralympics. The gymnasium is the first in the world specifically designed for table tennis. The gymnasium has a floor space of 26,900 m², 6,000 permanent seats and 2,000 temporary seats. It was completed in August 2007.
    9.00
    2 votes
    70
    Asim Ferhatović Hase Stadium

    Asim Ferhatović Hase Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1984 Winter Olympics
    Asim Ferhatović Hase Stadium is a stadium owned by the city of Sarajevo. It is also known as Koševo Stadium and formerly Olympic Stadium. Koševo Stadium is located in the Koševo neighborhood of Sarajevo and it is used mostly by FK Sarajevo. The stadium was opened in the year 1947. In 1984, it was reconstructed for the 1984 Winter Olympics, and is therefore often called Olympic Stadium. Now, it is officially called "Asim Ferhatović - Hase" since July 2004, after Asim Ferhatović, the legendary FK Sarajevo player who retired in 1967. Today Koševo can seat 37,500 though attendance for concerts can be expanded to roughly 80,000, such as for U2's PopMart Tour in 1997 and Dino Merlin's Burek tour in 2004. It is also the home stadium of the national football side of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Construction works started in 1947. The stadium was literally buried into a local hill thus merging with its natural surroundings. In 1950 a pitch and a tartan track were also added. The first international football match, between Yugoslavia and Turkey, was played in 1954. In 1966, the stadium hosted an athletic championship for the Balkans. It was renovated for that occasion. New administration building
    7.67
    3 votes
    71
    Beijing Institute of Technology Gymnasium

    Beijing Institute of Technology Gymnasium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's volleyball
    Beijing Institute of Technology Gymnasium (simplified Chinese: 北京理工大学体育馆; traditional Chinese: 北京理工大學體育館; pinyin: Běijīng Lǐgōng Dàxué Tǐyùguǎn) is a 5,000-seat indoor arena located on the campus of Beijing Institute of Technology in Beijing, China. It hosted volleyball competitions at the 2008 Summer Olympics and the goalball competition at the 2008 Summer Paralympics.
    7.67
    3 votes
    72
    Dorney Lake

    Dorney Lake

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Canoeing at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's K-1 1000 metres
    Dorney Lake (also known as Eton College Rowing Centre, and as Eton Dorney as a 2012 Summer Olympics venue) is a purpose-built rowing lake in England. It is near the village of Dorney, Buckinghamshire, and is around 3 km (2 miles) west of Windsor and Eton, close to the River Thames. The lake is privately owned and financed by Eton College, which spent £17 million developing it. Additional grants, totalling £500,000, were obtained from Sport England, UK Sport, the DCMS and SEEDA in order to build the lake's finish tower. The project was completed in 2006, after 10 years of construction. Although it is primarily for use by the school, the facilities are hired out for rowing, as well as for canoeing, dragon boating and triathlon training. The lake was used as the 2012 Summer Olympic venue for rowing and canoe sprint, and as the 2012 Summer Paralympic venue for rowing. For the duration of the Olympics, the lake was officially referred to as Eton Dorney. To provide for Olympic spectators, the existing facilities were enhanced to include 20,000 additional seats; most of these seats were temporary. Construction began in October 2009 of enhancements to Dorney Lake, including a new
    7.67
    3 votes
    73
    Estadio Azteca

    Estadio Azteca

    Estadio Azteca (Spanish pronunciation: [esˈtaðjo aθˈteka], Aztec Stadium) is a stadium in Santa Ursula, Mexico City, Mexico. It is the official home stadium of the Mexico national football team and the Mexican team Club América. The stadium was the venue for football in the 1968 Summer Olympics. It has the honour of being the only stadium in the world to have hosted two FIFA World Cup Finals. In the 1970 World Cup final, Brazil defeated Italy 4–1 and in the 1986 World Cup final, Argentina defeated West Germany 3–2. It also hosted the 1986 quarter-final between Argentina and England in which Diego Maradona scored both the "Hand of God goal" and the "Goal of the Century". The stadium also hosted the "Game of the Century", when Italy defeated West Germany 4–3 in extra time in one of the 1970 semifinals. With a capacity of 105,064, it is the third largest stadium in the American continent, fifth largest in the world and the largest association football-specific stadium in the world. The opening game was between Club América and Torino F.C. on May 29, 1966, with seats for 107,494 spectators. The first goal was scored by Brazilian Arlindo Dos Santos Cruz and the second one by Brazilian
    7.67
    3 votes
    74
    Estadio Cuauhtémoc

    Estadio Cuauhtémoc

    Estadio Cuauhtémoc is a football stadium in Puebla, Puebla (110 kilometres east of Mexico City). The stadium, which has a capacity of 42,648 seats, is the home of Puebla F.C., it's one of the best and very historical football stadium in Mexico, being currently the fifth biggest stadium in Mexico in term of its capacity. It belongs to other Puebla's team well known as Lobos de la BUAP. This stadium has hosted two football World Cups: 1970 FIFA World Cup and 1986 FIFA World Cup. The stadium is close to the Puebla-Veracruz highway, next door to the baseball stadium Estadio Hermanos Serdán. The stadium is named after Cuauhtémoc, who was the last Aztec emperor. Estadio Cuauhtémoc has been the home for Puebla F.C. for the last 40 years and has witness various national and international tournaments the stadium is located in Puebla, Puebla Mexico. The Stadium was design by the architect Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, who also designed el Estadio Azteca and the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe. It was inaugurated on October 6, 1968 during the pre inauguration of the 1968 Summer Olympics. It takes its name from the Mexican brewery Cuauhtémoc-Moctezuma who paid for most of the construction. The
    7.67
    3 votes
    75

    Olympic Fencing Gymnasium

    Olympic Fencing Gymnasium (Hangul: 올림픽펜싱경기장; literally: "Olympic Handball Gymnasium") is an indoor sporting arena located at the Olympic Park in Bangi-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 6,341 people and was built from September 1984 to April 1986 to host fencing and fencing part of the modern pentathlon events at the 1988 Summer Olympics. In 2011 it was remodel for handball games. Besides holding fencing at the 1988 Olympics, the arena also hosts concerts by Korean as well as international artists.
    7.67
    3 votes
    76
    Olympic Green Archery Field

    Olympic Green Archery Field

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Archery at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Women's individual
    The Olympic Green Archery Field (simplified Chinese: 北京奥林匹克公园射箭场; traditional Chinese: 北京奧林匹克公園射箭場; pinyin: Běijīng Àolínpǐkè Gōngyuán Shèjiànchǎng) was one of nine temporary venues for the 2008 Summer Olympics. It hosted the archery events. The field occupied 9.22 hectares and had a seating capacity of 5,000. After the games it was dismantled and the site became open space.
    7.67
    3 votes
    77
    Olympic Green Hockey Field

    Olympic Green Hockey Field

    The Olympic Green Hockey Field (simplified Chinese: 北京奥林匹克公园曲棍球场; traditional Chinese: 北京奧林匹克公園曲棍球場; pinyin: Běijīng Àolínpǐkè Gōngyuán Qūgùnqiú Chǎng) was one of nine temporary venues used for the 2008 Summer Olympics. It hosted the field hockey competitions during those games. It covered an area of 11.87 hectares with 2 pitches and could seat 17,002 fans. It was dismantled after the Games.
    7.67
    3 votes
    78
    Utah Olympic Park

    Utah Olympic Park

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    The Utah Olympic Park is a winter sports park built for the 2002 Winter Olympics, and is located 28 miles (45 km) east of Salt Lake City near Park City, Utah, United States. During the 2002 games the park hosted the bobsleigh, skeleton, luge, ski jumping, and Nordic combined events. It still serves a training center for Olympic and development level athletes. Other facilities in addition to the ski jumps and bobsled track located on site include a 2002 Winter Olympics and Ski Museum, day lodge, summer aerial training splash pool, ziplines, and a mountain coaster. Like the Utah Olympic Oval and Soldier Hollow, the park was designed and built specifically for the Olympic games, under the supervision of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee (SLOC). The 1989 Olympic referendum, which was passed by Utahns, allowed for tax payer money to fund a winter sports park, which would be used if Salt Lake City won its bid for either the 1998 or 2002 Winter Olympics; Olympic funds and revenue would then be used to repay the state. In 1990 the Utah Sports Authority announced their plans to build the park, which included ski jumps and a bobsled-luge track, in Bear Hollow near Park City. Before
    7.67
    3 votes
    79

    Blacktown Olympic Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    Blacktown Olympic Centre is a multi-sports venue in Doonside, a suburb in western Sydney, Australia. It includes three baseball diamonds, four softball diamonds, and an athletics track. It hosted all softball events for the 2000 Summer Olympics, as well as being the secondary venue for baseball, behind the Sydney Showgrounds. The stadiums combined holds 8,000 people.
    10.00
    1 votes
    80

    EnergySolutions Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    EnergySolutions Arena (originally Delta Center) is an indoor arena, in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States, owned by Jazz Basketball Investors, Inc., the estate of Larry H. Miller. The arena seats 19,911 for basketball, has 56 luxury suites, and 668 club seats. Opened in 1991, the arena was known as the Delta Center, until EnergySolutions purchased the naming rights, after Delta Air Lines declined to renew their 15 year contact, effective November 20, 2006. The arena is the home of the NBA's Utah Jazz and resuming in 2011, the AFL's Utah Blaze. The arena was also home to the figure skating and short track speed skating competitions of the 2002 Winter Olympics (during the Olympics, the arena was referred to as the Salt Lake Ice Center). The arena was originally imagined as 20,000-seat home for the Utah Jazz and Salt Lake Golden Eagles to replace the since-demolished Salt Palace arena, which had 12,616 seats. Under the leadership and private financing of Utah businessman Larry H. Miller, ground was broken on May 22, 1990, and it was completed on October 4, 1991 in time for late-October basketball games, at a cost of $93 million. The first game played in the arena was a Golden Eagles
    10.00
    1 votes
    81

    Millennium Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament
    The Millennium Stadium (Welsh: Stadiwm y Mileniwm) is the national stadium of Wales, located in the capital city, Cardiff. It is the home of the Wales national rugby union team and also frequently stages games of the Wales national football team, but is also host to many other large scale events, such as the Super Special Stage of Wales Rally Great Britain, Speedway Grand Prix of Great Britain, boxing and many music concerts, including Tina Turner, Madonna, The Rolling Stones, U2, Stereophonics, Paul McCartney, and the Tsunami Relief concert. It was built to host the 1999 Rugby World Cup. The Millennium Stadium is owned by Millennium Stadium plc which is a subsidiary company of the Welsh Rugby Union (WRU). The stadium was designed by a team led by architects Bligh Lobb Sports Architecture, who merged to become HOK Sport Venue Event, which would be renamed Populous in early 2009. WS Atkins were the structural engineers, and the building contractor was Laing. The total construction cost of the stadium was £121 million, of which the Millennium Commission funded £46 million. The stadium opened in June 1999, and the first major event to be held was an international rugby union match on
    10.00
    1 votes
    82
    Sydney International Aquatic Centre

    Sydney International Aquatic Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Sydney Olympic Park Aquatic Centre is a swimming venue in Sydney, Australia. For the 2000 Summer Olympics, it hosted the swimming, diving, synchronized swimming, the medal events for water polo, and the swimming portion of the modern pentathlon competitions. The stadium currently holds 10,000 people but had a boosted capacity of 17,000 during the 2000 Summer Olympics and was built in 1994. It is Australia's largest swimming area.
    10.00
    1 votes
    83
    Sydney International Regatta Centre

    Sydney International Regatta Centre

    The Sydney International Regatta Centre, located in Penrith, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, is a rowing and canoe sprint venue built for the 2000 Summer Olympics. It is now a popular sporting venue, with the Head of the River Regatta held annually here. Defqon.1 Festival is also held here; as a newly established and reasonably popular hard dance music event Defqon.1 Festival requires a large venue which is somewhat removed from residences, making the Regatta Centre an ideal location. In May 2012 the second round of the UIM world powerboat championships for Blown Alcohol and 6 Litre boats was held here over 3 days and will return in 2013 It is part of the Penrith Lakes. The site is managed by NSW Sport and Recreation.
    10.00
    1 votes
    84
    Lake Xochimilco

    Lake Xochimilco

    Lake Xochimilco is an ancient endorheic lake located in the Valley of Mexico, part of a series of lakes, which included the brackish Lake Texcoco, Lake Zumpango, and Lake Xaltocan and the fresh water Lake Chalco. These lakes were the home of many Mesoamerican cultures, including the Teotihuacanos, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs. Due to its shallow waters and the freshwater springs that lined the south shore of the lake, Lake Xochimilco was the center of chinampa agriculture in the centuries leading up to the Spanish conquest of Mexico. This made the region a prime target for the expansionist Aztecs, who obtained control over the lake in a series of campaigns, from circa 1432 until 1440, during the reign of the Aztec Hueyi Tlatoani, Itzcóatl. The Spaniards' destruction of the dams and sluice gates in the 1520s, as well as the sharp declines in the native population, led to the near abandonment of the chinampa gardens. The five lakes within the Valley of Mexico have now largely disappeared, drained to reduce flooding. Only the Xochimilco canals remain from the original Lake Xochimilco. Even today, some chinamperos still work their chinampa gardens within the canals. Lake Xochimilco is
    6.50
    4 votes
    85
    8.50
    2 votes
    86
    Hampton Court Palace

    Hampton Court Palace

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Cycling at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's road time trial
    Hampton Court Palace is a royal palace in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, Greater London, and the historic county of Middlesex; it has not been inhabited by the British Royal Family since the 18th century. The palace is located 11.7 miles (18.8 kilometres) south west of Charing Cross and upstream of central London on the River Thames. It was originally built for Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a favourite of King Henry VIII, circa 1514; in 1529, as Wolsey fell from favour, the palace was passed to the King, who enlarged it. The following century, William III's massive rebuilding and expansion project intended to rival Versailles was begun. Work halted in 1694, leaving the palace in two distinct contrasting architectural styles, domestic Tudor and Baroque. While the palace's styles are an accident of fate, a unity exists due to the use of pink bricks and a symmetrical, albeit vague, balancing of successive low wings. Today, the palace is open to the public, and a major tourist attraction. It is cared for by an independent charity, Historic Royal Palaces, which receives no funding from the Government or the Crown. The palace's Home Park is the site of the annual Hampton Court
    8.50
    2 votes
    87
    Olympic Stadium

    Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1964 Summer Olympics
    National Olympic Stadium (国立霞ヶ丘陸上競技場, Kokuritsu Kasumigaoka Rikujō Kyogijō) or National Stadium is a stadium in Kasumigaoka, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan that served as the main stadium for the 1964 Summer Olympics. It currently serves as the stadium where the Japan national football teams home matches and major football club cup finals are held. The stadium was completed in 1958 as the Japanese National Stadium on the site of the former Meiji Shrine Outer Park Stadium. Its first major event was the 1958 Asian Games. Despite the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, the venue appears to be unscathed. Yasuhiro Nakamori, international relations director for the Japanese Olympic Committee, told Around the Rings he attributes the lack of damage to Japan's stringent building codes. After Tokyo submitted their bid for the 2020 Summer Olympics, there has been talk of possibly renovating the National Olympic Stadium. The stadium could host the opening and closing ceremonies as well as track and field events. It was confirmed in February 2012 that the Stadium would receive a $1 Billion upgrade for the 2019 Rugby World Cup as well as the 2020 Olympics. In addition to the 1964 Summer Olympics, the
    8.50
    2 votes
    88
    7.33
    3 votes
    89
    Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium

    Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium

    The Tianjin Olympic Center Stadium (simplified Chinese: 天津奥林匹克中心体育场; traditional Chinese: 天津奧林匹克中心體育場; pinyin: Tiānjīn Àolínpǐkè Zhōngxīn Tǐyùchǎng), often colloquially referred to as the Water Drop (Chinese: 水滴; pinyin: Shuǐdī), is a stadium in Tianjin, China. Construction started in August 2003 and was completed in August 2007. The stadium hosted games for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup and Football preliminaries at the 2008 Summer Olympics. It covers 78,000 square meters and has a capacity of 60,000. It as a length of 380 meters, a width of 270 meters, and a height of 53 meters. The stadium is nicknamed "The Water Drop" because the outside of the venue was designed to resemble a drop of water. The stadium cost nearly 1,500,000,000 Yuan to build. The architects were AXS Satow. The stadium houses sports facilities, exhibition halls, conference rooms and gyms. It also has the capacity for entertainment and shopping complexes.
    7.33
    3 votes
    90

    Grand Olympic Auditorium

    • Olympic games used in: 1932 Summer Olympics
    The Grand Olympic Auditorium is the former name of a sports venue in Los Angeles, California, United States. Located at 1801 S. Grand Avenue, the venue was built in 1924. The grand opening of the Olympic Auditorium was on August 5, 1925, and was a major media event, attended by such celebrities as Jack Dempsey and Rudolph Valentino. The Auditorium was leased by the 1932 Olympic organizing Committee for a very nominal sum sufficient to cover expenses, for the purpose of conducting the training and competitions of the boxing, wrestling and weightlifting events of the Games. At the time it was the largest indoor venue in the U.S., originally seating 15,300. Throughout the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s it was home to some of the biggest boxing, wrestling and roller derby events and has become somewhat of a landmark for boxing history. The 1960s and 1970s were a major boom period for the Olympic, as major wrestling events were held at the arena every other Friday night, as well as being the home to the roller-derby's Los Angeles T-Birds. Some scenes in the 1976 film Rocky were filmed at the venue. In 1980, The Grand Olympic Auditorium became a musical venue. This period in music performances
    6.25
    4 votes
    91

    Golden Park

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    Golden Park is a 5,000-seat baseball stadium in Columbus, Georgia, United States, that opened in 1926. Located on the Chattahoochee River in Downtown Columbus, it currently is not home to any professional baseball team. The exterior of the Golden Park is a red brick façade and has many well-landscaped sidewalks that connect to the Chattahoochee RiverWalk. Golden Park is named after Theodore Earnest Golden SR, co-founder of Goldens' Foundry and Machine Co.. Golden led the effort in Columbus for the city's first South Atlantic League team. Golden Park was renovated in 1994 in anticipation of the softball events of the 1996 Summer Olympics that were held in the city of Columbus.
    5.40
    5 votes
    92

    Aquatics Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Diving at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's 3 metre springboard
    The London Aquatics Centre is an indoor facility with two 50-metre (160-foot) swimming pools and a 25-metre (82-foot) diving pool in Olympic Park at Stratford, London, it was one of the main venues of the 2012 Summer Olympics and the 2012 Summer Paralympics. The centre was used for the swimming, diving and synchronised swimming events. After significant modification the centre is due to open to the public in 2014. It was designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid in 2004 before London won the bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics. The centre was built alongside the Water Polo Arena, and opposite the Olympic Stadium on the opposite bank of the Waterworks River. The site is 45 metres (148 feet) high, 160 metres (520 feet) long and 80 metres (260 feet) wide. The wave-like roof is stated to be 11,200 square feet (1,040 m), a reduction from the previously stated 35,000 square feet (3,300 m). The complex has a 50m competition pool, a 25m competition diving pool and a 50m warm-up pool. The 50m pool is 3 metres deep, like the one in the Beijing National Aquatics Center, in order to be fast. Its floor can be moved to reduce the depth. There are also moveable booms that allow its
    7.00
    3 votes
    93
    Deer Valley

    Deer Valley

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    Deer Valley is an alpine ski resort in the Wasatch Range, located 36 miles (58 km) east of Salt Lake City, in Park City, Utah, United States. The resort, known for its upscale amenities, is consistently ranked among the top ski resorts in North America. Deer Valley was a venue site during 2002 Winter Olympics, hosting the freestyle moguls, aerial, and alpine slalom events. It also regularly hosts competitions for the International Ski Federation. With a number of other large ski resorts nearby, Deer Valley competes by catering to a more upscale audience than its neighbors, offering amenities such as free ski valets, free parking shuttles, fine dining and boutique shopping in the main lodge. The resort's mid-mountain lodge, the Stein Eriksen Lodge, offers luxury accommodations and spa facilities. Stein Eriksen, its gold medalist namesake, is host of the lodge and director of skiing at the resort. Deer Valley uses more grooming equipment than other Wasatch ski areas, and limits access to avoid overcrowding; as of 2006, the resort limited ticket sales to 6,500 per day. Deer Valley's total uphill lift capacity of 46,500 skiers per hour is approximately 50% higher than the capacity of
    7.00
    3 votes
    94
    7.00
    3 votes
    95
    London

    London

    London /ˈlʌndən/ is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its founding by the Romans, who named it Londinium. London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its square-mile mediaeval boundaries. Since at least the 19th century, the name London has also referred to the metropolis developed around this core. The bulk of this conurbation forms the London region and the Greater London administrative area, governed by the elected Mayor of London and the London Assembly. London is a leading global city, with strengths in the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transport all contributing to its prominence. It is the world's leading financial centre alongside New York City and has the fifth- or sixth-largest metropolitan area GDP in the world depending on measurement. London has been described as a world cultural capital. It is the
    7.00
    3 votes
    96
    Omni Coliseum

    Omni Coliseum

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 1996 Summer Olympics - Women's volleyball
    The Omni Coliseum, usually called The Omni, from the Latin for "all," or "every", was an indoor arena located in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. Completed in 1972, the arena seated 16,378 for basketball and 15,278 for ice hockey. It was part of the Omni Complex, now known as the CNN Center. Demolished in 1997, the only remaining reminder is the scoreboard from the Omni that now hangs in the pavilion of the Philips Arena. This arena was an architectural marvel when first constructed, combining innovative design for the roof, seating, and the structure itself. The logo is based on the unique seating arrangement. The exterior was composed of Cor-Ten weathering steel, which was supposed to seal itself by continuing to rust, making a solid steel structure that would last for decades. The Omni was noted for its distinctive space frame roof, often joked about as looking like an egg crate or a rusty waffle iron. Designed by the firm of Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates with structural engineering work by the firm of Prybylowski and Gravino, the roof was technically described as an ortho-quad truss system. Elvis Presley performed twice in the Omni and a plaque was placed on an
    7.00
    3 votes
    97
    Peaks Ice Arena

    Peaks Ice Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    Peaks Ice Arena is an indoor ice hockey arena in Provo, Utah, United States, located 43 miles (69 km) south of Salt Lake City. It was built, along with the E Center in West Valley City, Utah, to serve as an ice hockey and practice venue for the 2002 Winter Olympics. It currently serves as the home of the BYU Cougar men's ice hockey team, Peaks Youth Hockey Association, and several high school teams. Provo was chosen as the site for an Olympic venue because the leaders of Utah County refused to support Utah's 1989 Olympic referendum unless they were promised at least one Olympic event would be held in the county. Originally county leaders wanted a speed skating oval built somewhere in Provo or on the campus of Utah Valley University; others suggested the game's Closing Ceremony could be held at Brigham Young University's football stadium. After the 1989 Olympic referendum passed, and Salt Lake City lost its 1991 bid to host the 1998 Winter Olympics, the Utah Sports Authority and Provo City decided to wait until Salt Lake City bid again for the 2002 Winter Olympics before any venue planning would start. After Salt Lake City won the 2002 Olympic bid in 1995, planning began again for
    7.00
    3 votes
    98

    Seoul Olympic Park Tennis Center

    Seoul Olympic Park Tennis Center is a tennis venue in Seoul, South Korea, located in the Olympic Park. It hosted the tennis events for the 1988 Summer Olympics and has hosted several South Korea Davis Cup team and South Korea Fed Cup team ties. The center currently hosts the Hansol Korea Open Tennis Championships. The main stadium has a capacity of 10,000 people. The No.1 court has a capacity of 3,500, and the other 12 courts have a capacity of 900.
    7.00
    3 votes
    99
    Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium

    Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium

    Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium (東京体育館, Tōkyō Taiikukan) is a world-class sporting complex in Sendagaya, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. Built in 1954 for the World Wrestling Championship, it was also used as the venue for gymnastics events at the 1964 Summer Olympics. The gymnasium was rebuilt to a futuristic design created by Pritzker Prize winner Fumihiko Maki and completed in 1991. The gymnasium is a one-minute walk from Sendagaya Station on the Chūō-Sōbu Line and Kokuritsu Kyogijo Station on the Toei Oedo Line. The main arena includes a large indoor arena that hosts national and international sporting events. The arena holds 10,000 people (6,000 fixed, 4,000 temporary). An incomplete list of events held in the arena include: Since 2000, the arena has also been used as a concert venue. The first artist to perform there was the Japanese group Porno Graffitti. The sub-arena houses an olympic size (50mX20m, eight lanes) swimming pool with seating for 900 people. The Japan Waterpolo Championships is held here. There is also a 25m pool (25mX13m, 6 lanes), an outdoor oval running track; a weight training room, and conference rooms. Since April 1, 2006, the Tokyo Lifelong Learning and Culture
    7.00
    3 votes
    100
    Urban Road Cycling Course

    Urban Road Cycling Course

    • Olympic events contested here: Cycling at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's Individual Time Trial
    The Urban Cycling Road Course (simplified Chinese: 公路自行车赛场; traditional Chinese: 公路自行車賽場; pinyin: Gōnglù Zìxíngchē Sàichǎng) was one of nine temporary venues used during the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, People's Republic of China. The road cycling race started at the North Square of Yongdingmen in Beijing's Chongwen District and finished at Juyong Pass in Changping District. The route also passed through Xuanwu, Dongcheng, Xicheng, Chaoyang and Haidian districts.
    7.00
    3 votes
    101
    Anaheim Convention Center

    Anaheim Convention Center

    The Anaheim Convention Center is a major convention center in Anaheim, California. It is located across from the Disneyland Resort on Katella Avenue. Much of the Anaheim Convention Center has been renovated in recent years with state-of-the-art facilities. The basketball arena, fronting Katella Avenue, was opened in July 1967, while the convention hall behind it opened to business shortly afterward. Since then, the convention hall has undergone three major expansions, and currently encloses 815,000 square feet (75,700 m) of exhibit space, 200,000 square feet (19,000 m) of prefunction space, and 130,000 square feet (12,000 m) of meeting and ballroom space. According to frequent news reports, the largest exposition held at the Convention Center in recent years has been the Winter NAMM Show. This music-equipment convention (trade only, not open to the general public) had 1,560 exhibitors and a record-breaking 88,100 attendees during the 2008 show. The NAMM Show has been running at the Anaheim Center since 1977, except for a 3-year break in 1998-2000 while the Convention Center underwent major renovations. Recent news reports indicate that NAMM's long-term lease with the Anaheim
    8.00
    2 votes
    102
    Arena Mexico

    Arena Mexico

    Arena México is an indoor arena in Mexico City, Mexico located in the Colonia Doctores neighboorhood in the Cuauhtémoc borough. The arena is primarily used for professional wrestling, or Lucha libre, shows promoted by Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre (CMLL). The building is called the "cathedral of lucha libre". Arena México has a seating capacity of 16,500 when configured for professional wrestling or boxing events. The current building was completed in 1956, build by Salvador Lutteroth, owner of CMLL at the time and is the largest arena build specifically for wrestling. The building was used as the venue for the boxing competition at the 1968 Summer Olympics, and throughout the last half of the 20th century hosted several large boxing events. The location on calle Doctor Lavista #203, Col. Doctores on the intersection of Dr.Rafael Lucio, Dr. Carmona and Valle, was originally an all-purpose arena called Arena Modelo. Arena Modelo was built in the 1910s or 1920s for boxing events. By the early 1930s the arena was abandoned until professional wrestling promoter Salvador Lutteroth began promoting wrestling, or Lucha libre events in Arena Modelo on September 21, 1933. For the next ten
    8.00
    2 votes
    103
    Estadio Nou Camp

    Estadio Nou Camp

    The Estadio León, unofficially known as Nou Camp, is a mid-sized football stadium with a seating capacity of 33,943 built in 1967, and located in the city of León, Guanajuato, in the Bajío region of central Mexico. This sport facility is used mostly for football matches and is the home of the Club León. Because of its excellent location and facilities this stadium hosted matches for the 1970 FIFA World Cup and the 1986 FIFA World Cup. It hosted several football matches during the 1968 Summer Olympics. During those games, it seated 23.609.
    8.00
    2 votes
    104
    Forest Park

    Forest Park

    • Olympic events contested here: Swimming at the 1904 Summer Olympics - Men's 440 yard breaststroke
    Forest Park is a public park located in western part of the city of St. Louis, Missouri in the United States. It is a prominent civic center and covers 1,371-acre (5,550,000 m). The park, which opened in 1876 more than a decade after its proposal, has hosted several significant events, including the Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904 and the 1904 Summer Olympics. Bounded by Skinker Boulevard, Lindell Boulevard, Kingshighway Boulevard, and Oakland Avenue, the park is known as the "heart of St. Louis" and features a variety of attractions, including the St. Louis Zoo, the Saint Louis Art Museum, the Missouri History Museum, and the St. Louis Science Center. An 1864 plan for a large park in the city limits was rejected by St. Louis voters. In 1872, St. Louis developer Hiram Leffingwell proposed a 1,000-acre (4.0 km) park about three miles (5 km) outside the city limits near land which he owned. After a period of intense lobbying by Leffingwell, the Missouri General Assembly authorized the city to purchase the land; however, city taxpayers challenged the purchase in court, and in 1873, the Missouri Supreme Court overturned the authorization. The next year another developer, Andrew
    8.00
    2 votes
    105

    McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium

    The McDonald's Swim Stadium is an outdoor aquatics venue located on the campus of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, USA. The facility features two pools: a long course pool (50x25 meters), and a diving well (25x25 yards), which features, with towers. The facility is the home pool for the USC Trojans Swimming and Diving teams. The facility was originally constructed for the 1984 Summer Olympics, and opened in July 1983. Financial assistance for the construction of the facility came from McDonald's. At the time of the '84 Games, it was called the "Olympic Swim Stadium", and was the main Aquatics venue at the Games, hosting competitions in Swimming, Diving, and Synchronized Swimming. (Note: Water Polo was held Raleigh Runnels Memorial Pool in Malibu, California.) For the Games, the facility featured temporary bleacher seating around the two pools, which were removed after the Games. In 1989, the Lyon Center was built on a portion of the land where the Games stands were. The pool has hosted several high-level national meets since 1984, including the 1989 U.S. Swimming Nationals, the Swimming competitions at the 1991 U.S. Olympic Festival, and the 1993 U.S. Diving
    8.00
    2 votes
    106

    Suwon Gymnasium

    Suwon Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Suwon, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 5,145 people and was built in 1963 to host handball events at the 1988 Summer Olympics. Today it forms part of Suwon Civic Stadium.
    8.00
    2 votes
    107
    Beijing Shooting Range Clay Target Field

    Beijing Shooting Range Clay Target Field

    The Beijing Shooting Range Clay Target Field (simplified Chinese: 北京射击场飞碟靶场; traditional Chinese: 北京射擊場飛碟靶場; pinyin: Běijīng Shèjīchǎng Fēidié Bǎchǎng) is a shooting range in the Shijingshan District of Beijing, China. It was under renovation and was completed in August 2007 for the 2008 Summer Olympics. At the 2008 Olympics, the shooting range hosted men's and women's skeet shooting and trap shooting events. It has floor space of 6,170 square metres with a capacity of 5,000 seats which was reduced to 1,047 after the Games.
    9.00
    1 votes
    108
    Cesana Pariol

    Cesana Pariol

    • Olympic events contested here: Luge at the 2002 Winter Olympics – Women's singles
    Cesana Pariol was the venue for bobsled, luge and skeleton during the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy. The track, built for the games, is located in Cesana. The venue holds approximately 7,130 spectators, of whom 3,624 are seated. The track is constructed with about 54 miles (87 km) of ammonia refrigeration pipes to help form ice on the track for proper sliding. Numerous sensors located along the track ensure that the ice's thickness is kept between 5 and 10 cm (2 to 4 inches) to keep the track properly smooth during competitions. During construction of the track prior to the 2006 games, there was concern that the track would be completed in time for homologation. A minor archaeological find (Roman ruins) during construction slowed progress until the remains were excavated (near the current Turn 11). The track was completed in late 2004. In January 2005, the FIBT and FIL held their homologation events at the track. The FIBT had no issue when they ran their events during the weekend of 21–23 January 2005. The following week, the FIL ran their events, and had several crashes. Included in the crashes were Austria's Wolfgang Linger (broken ankle and calfbone), Brazil's Renato
    9.00
    1 votes
    109

    Clark Atlanta Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    Panther Stadium is a 5,000-seat stadium located on the campus of Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. It was the secondary venue for the field hockey events during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.
    9.00
    1 votes
    110
    Hadleigh Farm

    Hadleigh Farm

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Cycling at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's cross-country
    Hadleigh Farm is an educational working farm and cross-country cycling venue located in Hadleigh, within the borough of Castle Point, in the county of Essex. The men's and women's mountain biking events of the 2012 Olympic Games took place at Hadleigh Farm on 11 and 12 August. Hadleigh Farm is owned by the Salvation Army and run as an educational working farm. It features a rare breeds centre and tea room for visitors. The 700-acre (2.8 km) farm was purchased in 1891 by William Booth as part of a plan to rescue the destitute from the squalor of London. Hadleigh Farm overlooks the Thames Estuary to the south and adjoins Hadleigh Castle, built in the 1230s during the reign of King Henry III, and one of the most important late-medieval castles in Essex, now preserved by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building. A portion of the mountain bike course for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games crosses the adjacent Hadleigh Country Park, owned and managed by Essex County Council and a Site of Special Scientific Interest with special regard for invertebrates. Hadleigh Farm was confirmed in 2008 as the venue for the mountain biking competitions of the cycling programme of the 2012
    9.00
    1 votes
    111
    Komazawa Stadium

    Komazawa Stadium

    Komazawa Olympic Park Stadium (駒沢オリンピック公園総合運動場陸上競技場) is a multi-purpose stadium in Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan. It is currently used mostly for football matches (although mostly amateur and women's matches) as well as American football games. The stadium holds 20,010 people. The stadium hosted some of the football preliminaries for the 1964 Summer Olympics. Some J. League Division 1, J. League Division 2, J. League Cup, and Emperor's Cup matches, (including the Finals on 1965 and 1966), had also been played at the stadium. 12 minutes walk from Komazawa-daigaku Station (Tōkyū Den-en-toshi Line)
    9.00
    1 votes
    112
    Lake of Banyoles

    Lake of Banyoles

    Lake of Banyoles (or Estany de Banyoles) is a natural lake located in the comarca "Pla de l'Estany", Province of Girona, in northeastern Catalonia, Spain. It is named after the nearby town of Banyoles, to which it belongs entirely. On the western shore it borders with the town of Porqueres. The lake is approximately 2,100 m by 750 m with an average depth of 15 m that in several points gets down to 46.4 metres. It is located in a natural tectonic depression. Presently Lake Banyoles is the largest natural lake in Catalonia. Lake Sils, located 33 kn further south, was formerly the largest lake in the area until it was drained in 1851. There are both native and introduced fish species in the lake, like carp, gardí, bavosa de riu, sunfish, tench, black bass and eel. It is known that other fishes like the pike, the peix gat and the goldfish were introduced in the 19th century, but no specimens of those species have been found in recent surveys in the lake. This lake became famous as the rowing location for the Barcelona Olympics 1992 and the World Rowing Championships in 2004. It is also a popular training location for many foreign rowers, particularly English rowers. It was also the
    9.00
    1 votes
    113
    Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center

    Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center

    The Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center is a convention center located in Long Beach, California. It was built on the site of the Long Beach Municipal Auditorium beginning in 1962. The primary venues of the complex include: The Long Beach Arena was the first building to be completed in the complex. Capacities are as follows: 11,200 for hockey, 13,609 for basketball, and either 4,550, 9,200 or 13,500 for concerts depending on the seating chart. The Arena has hosted various entertainment and professional and college sporting events, most notably the volleyball events of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games. For trade shows, the arena features 46,000 square feet (4300 m²) of space, with an additional 19,000 square feet (1800 m²) of space in the lobby and 29,000 square feet (2700 m²) in the concourse. Hanging from the arena's 77 foot (23 m) high ceiling is a center-hung scoreboard with four White Way "Mega Color" Animation Screens. There is an 11 by 15 foot SACO Smartvision LED Wall located on the south end of the arena. Long Beach Arena was the site of the first National Hockey League game involving an expansion team, as the Los Angeles Kings and the Philadelphia Flyers, both
    9.00
    1 votes
    114

    Main Media Center

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    The Main Media Center for the 2010 Olympics will be located within the Canada Place complex and the Vancouver Convention Centre on the city’s downtown waterfront.
    9.00
    1 votes
    115
    Shanghai Stadium

    Shanghai Stadium

    The Shanghai Stadium (simplified Chinese: 上海体育场; traditional Chinese: 上海體育場; pinyin: Shànghǎi Tǐyùchǎng) is a multi-purpose stadium in Shanghai, China. It is currently used mostly for football matches. The stadium was built in 1997 when the 8th National Games of the People's Republic of China was held in Shanghai. It can hold about 80,000 people, so it is also called the "80,000 people's Stadium" (八万人体育场). It is one of the thirty largest football stadiums in the world, and is the third largest stadium in China after the Guangdong Olympic Stadium and the Beijing National Stadium. It was used for football preliminaries at the 2008 Summer Olympics. Shanghai Stadium was also the venue for the Opening Ceremony of the 2007 Special Olympics World Summer Games. Shanghai Stadium is close to Shanghai Indoor Stadium. Since the names of the two buildings differ by only a word in both Chinese and in English, many people have confused the two. This has been made worse by the opening of Shanghai Metro Line 4, in which the two are situated at adjacent stops. The Regal Shanghai East Asia Hotel is located within the stadium. To reach Shanghai Stadium, take Shanghai Metro Line 4 to the Shanghai
    9.00
    1 votes
    116
    Stockholms Olympiastadion

    Stockholms Olympiastadion

    • Olympic games used in: 1912 Summer Olympics
    Stockholms Olympiastadion, most often called Stockholms Stadion or just Stadion, is a stadium in Stockholm, Sweden. Designed by architect Torben Grut, it was opened in 1912, its original use was as a venue for the 1912 Olympic Games. At the 1912 Games, it hosted the athletics, some of the equestrian, some of the football, gymnastics, the running part of the modern pentathlon, tug of war, and wrestling events. It has a capacity of 13,145–14,500 depending on usage and a capacity of nearly 33,000 for concerts. In 1956, when Melbourne hosted the Olympics, the equestrian competitions were held here due to quarantine rules in Australia. In 1958 the stadium was the venue of the European Athletics Championships. Finland-Sweden athletics international has been held here 29 times. The annual Stockholm Marathon finishes with a three quarter lap around the tracks of the stadium. Since 1967 the stadium has been the venue of the annual international athletics meeting DN Galan, from 2011 part of IAAF Diamond League. Originally, the north-east stand had two levels, increasing the capacity to about 20,000. After the Olympics, it was reduced to one level. The Metro station Stadion was opened in
    9.00
    1 votes
    117

    Estadi de la Nova Creu Alta

    Estadi de la Nova Creu Alta is a multi-use stadium in Sabadell, Catalonia, Spain. It is currently used mostly for football matches and hosts the home matches of CE Sabadell FC. The address of the stadium is Plaça Olímpia s/n, 08206 Sabadell, and the offices of the club are in the stadium. The stadium holds 20,000 people. The stadium was built in 1967. During the 1992 Summer Olympics it hosted six football matches.
    6.67
    3 votes
    118
    Hampden Park

    Hampden Park

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament
    Hampden Park (often referred to simply as Hampden) is a football stadium in the Mount Florida area of Glasgow, Scotland. The 52,063 capacity venue serves as the national stadium of football in Scotland. It is the home venue of the Scotland national football team and amateur Scottish Football League club Queen's Park and hosts the latter stages of the Scottish Cup and Scottish League Cup competitions. It is also used for music concerts and other sporting events. There were two 19th century stadia called Hampden Park, built on different sites. A stadium on the present site was first opened on 31 October 1903. Hampden was the biggest stadium in the world when it was opened, with a capacity in excess of 100,000. This was increased further between 1927 and 1937, reaching a peak of 150,000. The record attendance of 149,415, for a Scotland v England match in 1937, is the European record for an international football match. Tighter safety regulations meant that the capacity was reduced to 81,000 in 1977. The stadium has been fully renovated since then, with the most recent work being completed in 1999. The stadium houses the offices of the Scottish Football Association (SFA), Scottish
    6.67
    3 votes
    119
    Olympic Stadium

    Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Athletics at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres
    The Olympic Stadium in Olympic Park in Stratford, London, England was the centrepiece of the 2012 Summer Olympics, the last stop in the 2012 Olympics torch relay, and the venue of the athletic events as well as the opening and closing ceremonies. It was the central venue of the 2012 Summer Paralympics. It is located at Marshgate Lane in London's Stratford district in the Lower Lea Valley. The stadium has a capacity of 80,000, making it the third-largest stadium in England behind Wembley Stadium and Twickenham Stadium. Land preparation for the stadium began in mid-2007, with the official construction start date on 22 May 2008, although piling works for the foundation unofficially began four weeks ahead of that date. The stadium will also host the 2017 World Championships in Athletics. On 13 October 2009, LOCOG confirmed that it had selected the Team Stadium consortium (consisting of Sir Robert McAlpine; HOK Sport + Venue + Event, now known as Populous; and Buro Happold) to start negotiations with, in hope to find the contractor fulfilling the eventual design and build contract of the new Olympic Stadium. The ODA received international and national interest to prequalify for the
    6.67
    3 votes
    120
    Palacio Municipal de Deportes de Badalona

    Palacio Municipal de Deportes de Badalona

    Palau Municipal d'Esports de Badalona, most frequently called the Pavelló Olímpic de Badalona is an arena in the Gorg area of Badalona, Catalonia, Spain. The arena holds 12,500 people, and it is primarily used for basketball, though it's also an habitual home for music concerts and other municipal events. Built in 1991, it hosted the basketball tournament of the 1992 Summer Olympics, the 1992 Olympic Basketball Tournament. It was designed by the architects Esteve Bonell and Francesc Rius, who won the 1992 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture for this building. It's also the home arena of Joventut de Badalona, one of the most important professional basketball squads in Spain. Before the Pavelló Olímpic was built, the now 3,300 capacity Pavelló Club Joventut Badalona hosted the city basketball games and most of the other indoor sports. The closest Barcelona Metro station is Gorg, on lines L2 and L10. It is also served by trams belonging to the Trambesòs system.
    6.67
    3 votes
    121

    Palau dels Esports de Barcelona

    • Olympic games used in: 1992 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 1992 Summer Olympics - Men's volleyball
    The Palau dels Esports de Barcelona (Barcelona Sports Palace) is a multi-purpose indoor arena in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. It is on Lleida Street on the slopes of Montjuïc, a hill to the south east of the city centre. The arena is able to host competitions of any indoor sport. In 2000 it was adapted to better accommodate such shows and given a new name: Barcelona Teatre Musical - Palau dels Esports. Seating capacity was reduced from 8,000 to 3,500, but comfort and the acoustic quality were enhanced. Inaugurated in 1955 for the Mediterranean Games, it was designed by the architect Josep Soteras. It was the only indoor arena of its type in Barcelona until 1971 when FC Barcelona inaugurated the Palau Blaugrana. Even after this, the Palau dels Esports continued to be the only indoor arena in public hands: for this reason it continued to host the main sporting, social, cultural and musical events that took place in the city. During the 1980s it was the home of the RCD Espanyol basketball team, which for several seasons competed in the ACB. It was remodelled in 1986 by the architect Francesc Labastida for the group E games of the World Basketball Championship of 1986. At the beginning
    6.67
    3 votes
    122
    Panathinaiko Stadium

    Panathinaiko Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1896 Summer Olympics
    The Panathenaic Stadium or Panathinaiko (Greek: Παναθηναϊκό στάδιο, also known as the Kallimarmaro (Καλλιμάρμαρο, meaning the "beautifully marbled"), is an athletic stadium in Athens that hosted the first modern Olympic Games in 1896. Reconstructed from the remains of an ancient Greek stadium, the Panathenaic is the only major stadium in the world built entirely of white marble (from Mount Penteli) and is one of the oldest in the world. In ancient times, the stadium on this site was used to host the athletic portion of the Panathenaic Games, in honor of the Goddess Athena. During classical times, it had wooden seating. In 329 BC it was rebuilt in marble by the archon Lycurgus and in 140 AD was enlarged and renovated by Herodes Atticus, giving a seated capacity of 50,000. The remnants of the ancient structure were excavated and refurbished, with funds provided by Evangelis Zappas, for the revival of the Olympic Games. Zappas sponsored the Olympic Games that were held there in 1870 and 1875. In 1895 the stadium was refurbished a second time for the 1896 Olympics, with completion funding provided by the Greek benefactor George Averoff, whose marble statue now stands at the entrance,
    6.67
    3 votes
    123

    Pavelló Olímpic de Badalona

    • Olympic events contested here: Basketball at the 1992 Summer Olympics - Women's
    Pavello Olᅢᆳmpic de Badalona is an indoor arena located in Badalona, Catalonia (Spain). It was built in 1992, designed by the architects Esteve Bonell and Francesc Rius. The arena mostly hosts basketball games. It holds 12,500 people. During the 1992 Summer Olympics, this arena hosted the basketball games. It hosts the matches of the basketball Club Joventut de Badalona. This building won the 1992 architecture Mies Van der Rohe Pavilion Award.
    6.67
    3 votes
    124
    Ying Tung Natatorium

    Ying Tung Natatorium

    The Ying Tung Natatorium (simplified Chinese: 英东游泳馆; traditional Chinese: 英東游泳館; pinyin: Yīngdōng Yóuyǒngguǎn) is a swimming venue located in the Olympic Sports Centre in Beijing, China with a seating capacity of 4,852. It was upgraded for the 2008 Summer Olympics and expanded to 44,635 square metres. It hosted Olympic water polo matches and the swimming part of the modern pentathlon event. The renovations were complete by September 10, 2007. It also served as the main swimming venue in the 1990 Asian Games. It is named after Henry Fok Ying Tung, a businessman who left a large amount of money toward Olympics construction.
    6.67
    3 votes
    125

    Jangchung Gymnasium

    The Jangchung Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Seoul, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 7,000 and was built in 1963. It hosted judo and taekwondo (demonstration) events at the 1988 Summer Olympics.
    5.75
    4 votes
    126

    Omiya Park Soccer Stadium

    NACK5 Stadium Omiya (ナックファイブスタジアム大宮, Nakku-faibu Sutajiamu Ōmiya) is a football (soccer) stadium located in Ōmiya-ku, Saitama city, Saitama Prefecture, Japan. It is the home stadium of a J.League club Omiya Ardija. Since May 14, 2007 it has been called NACK5 Stadium Ōmiya (ナックファイブスタジアム大宮, Nakku-faibu Sutajiamu Ōmiya) for the naming rights. Built in 1960, it was one of the first stadia in Japan dedicated to the code. The grandstands were added to host several matches of 1964 Summer Olympics and 1967 National Sports Festival of Japan. The stadium used to accommodate 12,500 spectators. In 2006-2007 it was closed for expansion works to meet the J. League Division 1 requirements for Ardija to host its home matches. Ardija used Saitama Stadium 2002 and Urawa Komaba Stadium until works were complete. From May 14, 2007 it would be called NACK5 Stadium Ōmiya (ナックファイブスタジアム大宮, Nakku-faibu Sutajiamu Ōmiya) to reflect a six-year sponsorship from FM NACK5 (エフエムナックファイブ, Efu Emu Nakku-Faibu) (JODV-FM, 79.5 MHz), an independent commercial radio station based in Ōmiya-ku and covering Saitama Prefecture. The expansion works were complete in October 2007 and since it accommodates 15,500 spectators. On
    5.75
    4 votes
    127
    Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre

    Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, is located in Sydney's Darling Harbour near the Central Business District. The building is adjacent to Cockle Bay, Tumbalong Park and the Harbourside shopping centre. The Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre was a key meeting venue of APEC Australia 2007 in September, 2007 when the political leaders of the 21 member states of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation met. The venue was host to the Business Leader's Summit held in conjunction with APEC Leader's Week. The Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre was officially opened in 1988, with a new section of the centre added for the 2000 Summer Olympics. During those games, the venue played host to the boxing, fencing, judo, weightlifting, and wrestling competitions. The building is owned by the State Government of New South Wales, and the centre administration and business is run by the Accor Hotel Group. The Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre is used as a conference and convention venue and to hold exhibitions, as well as hosting various smaller events such as weddings and meetings. The Convention Centre has around 30 rooms, ranging from small meeting rooms to a 3500 capacity
    5.75
    4 votes
    128
    Earls Court

    Earls Court

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's volleyball
    Earls Court is a district in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. It is an inner-London district centred on Earl's Court Road and surrounding streets, located 3.1 miles (5 km) west south-west of Charing Cross. It borders the sub-districts of South Kensington to the East, West Kensington to the West, Chelsea to the South and Kensington to the North. The Earls Court ward had a population of 9,659 according to the 2001 Census. It is home to the Earls Court Exhibition Centre, one of the country's largest indoor arenas and a popular concert venue. Former residents include Diana, Princess of Wales, Freddie Mercury, Stewart Granger, Alfred Hitchcock, and Benjamin Britten. Current residents include Gary Barlow. Earls Court was once a rural area, covered with green fields and market gardens. The Saxon Thegn Edwin held the lordship of the area prior to the Norman Conquest. For over 500 years the land, part of the ancient manor of Kensington, was under the lordship of the Vere family, the Earls of Oxford and descendants of Aubrey de Vere I, who held the manor of Geoffrey de Montbray, bishop of Coutances, in Domesday Book in 1086. By circa 1095, his tenure had been
    7.50
    2 votes
    129
    Estadi Olímpic Lluís Companys

    Estadi Olímpic Lluís Companys

    Estadi Olímpic Lluís Companys (Catalan pronunciation: [əsˈtaði uˈɫimpiɡ ʎuˈis kumˈpaɲs], formerly known as the Estadi Olímpic de Montjuïc or Barcelona Olympic Stadium) is a stadium in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Originally built in 1927 for the 1929 International Exposition in the city (and Barcelona's bid for the 1936 Summer Olympics, which were awarded to Berlin), it was renovated in 1989 to be the main stadium for the 1992 Summer Olympics. The stadium has a capacity of 55,926 (67,007 during the 1992 Olympics), and is located in the Anella Olímpica, in Montjuïc, a large hill to the southwest of the city which overlooks the harbour. In 2001 the stadium was renamed after the former president of the Generalitat de Catalunya Lluís Companys i Jover, who was executed at the nearby Montjuïc Castle in 1940 by the Franco regime. The stadium, designed by architect Pere Domènech i Roura for the 1929 Expo, was meant to host the People's Olympiad in 1936, a protest event against the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, but the event had to be cancelled due the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War. In the fifties, the stadium was the centerpiece of the 1955 Mediterranean Games, and in 1957 it hosted
    7.50
    2 votes
    130
    Estadio Sarriá

    Estadio Sarriá

    Estadi de Sarrià (Catalan pronunciation: [əsˈtaði ðə səriˈa]) was a football stadium in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. The stadium was the home of RCD Espanyol from 1923 to 1997. The stadium was located in the Barcelona district of Sarrià and has become a legendary place for the Catalan club. The stadium was named after the road in which it was constructed, which linked the ancient cities Barcelona and Sarria. Construction began on December 31, 1922 under the supervision of architect Matías Colmenares, and the cost was 170,000 pesetas. The initial forecast capacity was for 40,000 spectators, but due to the bankruptcy of the construction company the initial capacity was only for 10,000 spectators. The opening game was played on February 18, 1923 with RCD Espanyol beating UE Sants 4-1, the first goal scored by Vicenç Tonijuan. In 1929 the club won its first Cup in Spain. On 10 February, at the Sarria stadium, 'Pitus' Prats scored the first goal of the first Spanish league title. The team currently stood above everyone "The Divine", Ricardo Zamora. However, although the club won several Catalan Championships they had to wait until 1940 before winning their second cup in Spain. In 1948,
    7.50
    2 votes
    131
    Georgia Tech Aquatic Center

    Georgia Tech Aquatic Center

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    The Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center (abbreviated CRC, formerly known as the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center and the Georgia Tech Student Athletic Center) is part of the Georgia Tech campus. Georgia Tech's athletic center began at its current location in 1977 as the Student Athletic Center, or SAC. Later, Georgia Tech was chosen as the site of the 1996 Summer Olympics aquatic venue, and the Aquatic Center was constructed next to the SAC. The Aquatic Center cost $16,800,000, and featured competitions in swimming, synchronized swimming, diving, water polo, and the swimming segment of the modern pentathlon competition. The stadium had a capacity of 14,600 at the time. It also had a temporary pool for the water polo competitions seating 4,000. After the games, it has been used as a recreational facility for Georgia Tech students and faculty. Initially an outdoor stadium with a roof to protect spectators and competitors from rain, the Aquatic Center was renovated between 2001 and 2003 to enclose the Center completely. The seating capacity was reduced to 1,950. Above the Olympic pool, an upper floor of multi-purpose courts was added by suspending it from the roof; this set a record for
    7.50
    2 votes
    132
    Nagai Stadium

    Nagai Stadium

    Nagai Stadium (大阪市長居陸上競技場, Ōsaka-shi Nagai Rikujō Kyōgijō) is an athletic stadium in Osaka, Japan. It is the home ground of J. League club Cerezo Osaka. The stadium has a seating capacity of 50,000. When Nagai Stadium initially opened in 1964, its capacity was 23,000, and its opening event was a football match during the 1964 Summer Olympics. The stadium's seating capacity was expanded to 50,000 in 1996 for the 52nd National Sports Festival of Japan in 1997. The stadium hosted three matches in the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Nagai Stadium has been used many times for athletic competitions; it played host to the Athletics at the 2001 East Asian Games and the 2007 World Championships in Athletics. It was also the venue for the annual Osaka Grand Prix athletics meeting which took place every May from 1996 to 2010 , and it is still the starting and finishing point for the Osaka International Ladies Marathon, held annually in late January-early February. Media related to Nagai Stadium at Wikimedia Commons
    7.50
    2 votes
    133
    Wembley Stadium

    Wembley Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1948 Summer Olympics
    The original Wembley Stadium, officially known as the Empire Stadium, was a football stadium in Wembley, a suburb of north-west London, standing on the site now occupied by the new Wembley Stadium that opened in 2007. Debris from the Old Wembley Stadium was used to make the award-winning Northala Fields in Northolt,Ealing. It was famous for hosting the annual FA Cup finals, five European Cup finals, the 1948 Summer Olympics, the 1966 World Cup Final, the final of Euro 96 and the 1985 Live Aid concert. Of Wembley Stadium, Pelé said, "Wembley is the cathedral of football. It is the capital of football and it is the heart of football" in recognition of its status as the world's best-known football stadium. The twin towers were once an icon for England and Wembley before their demolition in 2003 which upset many members of the public. The stadium's first turf was cut by King George V, and it was first opened to the public on 28 April 1923. First known as the British Empire Exhibition Stadium or simply Empire Stadium, it was built by Sir Robert McAlpine for the British Empire Exhibition of 1924 (extended to 1925). The stadium cost £750,000, and was constructed on the site of an earlier
    7.50
    2 votes
    134
    Georgia International Horse Park

    Georgia International Horse Park

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    The Georgia International Horse Park (referred to by locals as The Horse Park) is located in Conyers, Georgia, United States, 30 miles (50 km) east of Atlanta. Due to the growth of Rockdale County, Georgia in the late 1980s, the county was looking to expand its wastewater treatment system, but they were having to find alternative uses to strict environmental regulations on the local, state, and federal levels. The City of Conyers, Georgia found 1,139 acres (4.61 km) of land on Georgia State Route 138 north of Interstate 20 that would have been suitable for land application. Both the City Manager and the County Council were in the process of finding other uses for this land other than land application when Atlanta was awarded the 1996 Summer Olympics on September 18, 1990. This led to a change in plans from a city park to the development of the land that would later become the Georgia International Horse Park. As a result, an equestrian task force was developed to have the park developed, under cooperation with the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). The proposed site was visited on August 7, 1991 with details about the land, the proposed facilities, and their
    5.50
    4 votes
    135
    The O2 arena

    The O2 arena

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Gymnastics at the 2012 Summer Olympics- Men's Floor Exercises
    The O2 Arena (visually typeset in branding as The O2 arena, referred to as North Greenwich Arena in context of the 2012 Summer Olympics and 2012 Summer Paralympics) is a multi-purpose indoor arena located in the centre of The O2, a large entertainment complex on the Greenwich Peninsula in London, England. With a capacity of up to 20,000 depending on the event, it is second-largest arena in the UK after the Manchester Arena and one of the largest in Europe. In 2008, The O2 Arena took the crown of the world's busiest music arena from the Manchester Arena, a title which it had held since 2001. The closest underground station to the venue is the North Greenwich station on Jubilee Line. Following the closure of the Millennium Experience at the end of 2000, the Millennium Dome was leased to Meridian Delta Ltd. in 2001, for redevelopment as an entertainment complex. This included plans for an indoor arena. Construction of the arena started in 2003 and finished in 2007. Owing to the impossibility of using cranes inside the dome structure, the arena's roof was constructed on the ground within the dome and then lifted. The arena building's structure was then built around the roof. The arena
    6.33
    3 votes
    136
    Whistler-Blackcomb

    Whistler-Blackcomb

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Alpine skiing at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Women's downhill
    Whistler Blackcomb (TSX: WB) is a major ski resort located 125 km north of Vancouver, in British Columbia, Canada. By many measures it is the largest ski resort in North America; it is 50% larger than its nearest competitor in terms of size, has the greatest uphill lift capacity, and until 2009, had the highest vertical skiable distance by a wide margin. Whistler Blackcomb also features the Peak 2 Peak Gondola for moving between Whistler and Blackcomb mountains at the top; Peak 2 Peak holds records for the highest and longest unsupported cable car span in the world. With all of this capacity, Whistler Blackcomb is also often the most-visited ski resort, often besting 2 million visitors a year. Whistler was originally conceived as part of a bid to win the 1968 Winter Olympics, but a series of events led to the bids being withdrawn or losing to other cities. Construction of the resort started in spite of this, and the resort first opened for business in February 1966. The resort expanded extensively in the 1980s and 90s, becoming the centrepiece of a renewed bid on the part of nearby Vancouver. Vancouver/Whistler was selected as the winning bid for the 2010 Winter Olympics in July
    6.33
    3 votes
    137
    8.00
    1 votes
    138
    Olympic Stadium

    Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1988 Summer Olympics
    The Seoul Olympic Stadium, aka Jamsil Olympic Stadium (formerly romanised as Chamshil) is located in Seoul, South Korea. It is the main stadium built for the 1988 Summer Olympics and the 10th Asian Games in 1986. It is the centrepiece of the Jamsil Sports Complex in the Songpa-gu District, in the southeast of the city south of the Han River. The stadium was designed by Kim Swoo Geun. The lines of the stadium's profile imitate the elegant curves of a Korean Joseon Dynasty porcelain vase. Spectator seats are distributed on two tiers, totally covered. Initially built with a capacity of approximately 100,000, today it seats 70,091. Prior to its construction, Seoul's largest venues were Dongdaemun Stadium and Hyochang Stadium. Seating 30,000 and 20,000 respectively, they were too small to attract world-class sporting events. Construction on the new stadium began in 1977 with the aim of staging the Asian Games in 1986. However, when Seoul was awarded the Games of the XXIV Olympiad in September 1981, this stadium became the centrepiece. The stadium opened on 29 September 1984, and served as the site for the 10th Asian Games two years later, then the Olympics in 1988. However, it was not
    8.00
    1 votes
    139
    Triathlon Venue

    Triathlon Venue

    The Triathlon Venue (simplified Chinese: 铁人三项赛场; traditional Chinese: 鐵人三項賽場; pinyin: Tiěrén Sānxiàng Sàichǎng) — is one of nine temporary venues used for the 2008 Summer Olympics. The venue was used for the Triathlon events at the 2008 Summer Olympics. The Triathlon Venue is located at the Ming Dynasty Tomb Reservoir, in the Changping District of northern Beijing.
    8.00
    1 votes
    140
    Workers Stadium

    Workers Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    The Workers Stadium (simplified Chinese: 工人体育场; traditional Chinese: 工人體育場; pinyin: Gōngrén Tǐyùcháng), often called Gongti or Gong Ti, is a multi-purpose stadium in the Chaoyang District of north-eastern Beijing, China. It is mostly used for football (soccer) matches. The stadium was built in 1959 and was last renovated in 2004 (the concrete structure was strengthened, a new rotating display screen and energy-saving devices were installed). It has a capacity of 66,161 and covers a land area of 350,000 square meters. It is one of the Ten Great Buildings constructed in 1959 for the 10th anniversary of the People's Republic of China. The stadium was the main venue for the 1990 Asian Games, where the opening and closing ceremonies were held. Some high attendance matches of the Beijing Guo'an football club are held at the stadium. In 1993 the stadium was host to a slew of World Records set by the world-leading group of Chinese distance runners at the 7th Edition of the Chinese National Games, the most famous being international stars and world champions Wang Junxia and Qu Yunxia, who had dominated the 1993 World Championships a month before. The stadium holds claim to the fastest
    8.00
    1 votes
    141
    Beijing National Aquatics Centre

    Beijing National Aquatics Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Swimming at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's 4 x 100 metre freestyle relay
    The Beijing National Aquatics Center (simplified Chinese: 北京国家游泳中心; traditional Chinese: 北京國家游泳中心), also officially known as the National Aquatics Center, and colloquially known as the Water Cube (Chinese: 水立方), is an aquatics center that was built alongside Beijing National Stadium in the Olympic Green for the swimming competitions of the 2008 Summer Olympics. Despite its nickname, the building is not an actual cube, but a cuboid (a rectangular box). Ground was broken on December 24, 2003, and the Center was completed and handed over for use on January 28, 2008. Swimmers at the Water Cube broke 25 world records during the 2008 Olympics. After the Olympics, the building underwent a 200 million Yuan revamp to turn half of its interior into a water park. The building officially reopened on August 8, 2010. In July 2003, the Water Cube design was chosen from 10 proposals in an international architectural competition for the aquatic center project. The Water Cube was specially designed and built by a consortium made up of PTW Architects (an Australian architecture firm), Arup international engineering group, CSCEC (China State Construction Engineering Corporation), and CCDI (China
    7.00
    2 votes
    142
    Dinamo Stadium

    Dinamo Stadium

    Dynama Stadium (Belarusian: Стадыён Дынама, Belarusian pronunciation: [stadɨˈjɔn dɨˈnama]) is a multi-purpose stadium in Minsk, Belarus. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of FC Minsk. The stadium has a seating capacity for 40,000 people. Dynama Stadium was constructed in 1934, but was destroyed during World War II and rebuilt in 1954. The stadium was one of the venues of the football tournament at the 1980 Summer Olympics and was used as the home venue of BATE Borisov for the 2008–09 UEFA Champions League group stage and 2011–12 UEFA Champions League play-off round. In October reconstruction works began and it will be relaunched in 2014 as a purpose-built soccer stadium.
    7.00
    2 votes
    143
    La Romareda

    La Romareda

    Estadio de La Romareda is the home stadium of Real Zaragoza, in Zaragoza. It was inaugurated on September 8, 1957, with a game between Real Zaragoza and CA Osasuna (4–3). The official capacity is 34,596, with an average attendance of around 30,000 for Real Zaragoza matches. The stadium has gone through various upgrades, in 1977 and in 1982, when it was a 1982 FIFA World Cup venue. The stadium was also used for football group matches and a quarterfinal during the 1992 Summer Olympics. It became an all-seater stadium in 1994. Plans to build a new stadium in Zaragoza have been abandoned. La Romareda was proposed as the Olympic Stadium in Jaca's failed bid for the 2014 Winter Olympics. Works for the enlargement of La Romareda into a 43,000-seat stadium were due to begin on April 17, 2006 and end in time for the Zaragoza Expo of 2008. However, a lawsuit was filed by a political party (PAR), claiming that the enlargement of the stadium would be to the detriment of the population, in order to suspend the planned works. A judge ordered the suspension and the works were put on hold. The construction of La Romareda was due to the efforts of the mayor, Luis Gómez Laguna, and his successor
    7.00
    2 votes
    144
    Lake Sagami

    Lake Sagami

    Lake Sagami (相模湖, Sagami-ko) is an artificial lake located in Midori-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa in Japan's Kantō region. Created in 1947 after the Sagami River was dammed, it serves as use for recreational and hydroelectric purposes. The lake also served as venue for canoeing events at the 1964 Summer Olympics held in Tokyo, located 60 kilometres (37 mi) from the lake. Typical lake flows (in m/s) are 85 hydroelectric, 10.34 domestic, 4.16 irrigation, and 2.15 industrial. Land usage is 87.5% natural, 4.6% agricultrual, and 7.9% other. Eutrophication issues have been a serious issue of the lake that was first observed in 1967. The main issue was microcystis algae bloom and reached its highest cell count of 2,500,000 cells/mL in July-October 1979 (data from 1985). Most vegetation grown around the lake are grassland and weeds while most crops grown are rice and vegetables. Fertilizer application for crops near the lake is moderate. Because of the lake's creation in 1947, it displaced the careers of many local fishermen in the area. In return for their livelihood being taken away, many of these families were offered rental boats in the new lake. No private boats are allowed on the lake as
    7.00
    2 votes
    145
    Laoshan Mountain Bike Course

    Laoshan Mountain Bike Course

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    The Laoshan Mountain Bike Course (simplified Chinese: 老山山地自行车场; traditional Chinese: 老山山地自行車場; pinyin: Lǎoshān Shāndì Zìxíngchē Chǎng) is a mountain bike cycling venue located in western Beijing, China adjacent to the Laoshan Velodrome. It began its renovation and expansion program in May 2006. The course hosted the mountain bike competitions of the 2008 Summer Olympics. The project involves a competition course of 4.6 kilometres in circumference, a fixed building with a floor space of 8,275 square metres, a temporary spectator stand that seats 2,000 and other temporary facilities for competitions. The project was completed in the second half of 2007 and became a training base for the Chinese cycling team. It was also opened to the public after the 2008 Games.
    7.00
    2 votes
    146
    Minor Arena

    Minor Arena

    The Minor Arena (formerly, of the Central Lenin Stadium ;Russian: Малая спортивная арена) is an 8700-seat indoor arena that is part of the Luzhniki Sports Complex in Moscow, Russia. The Arena was built in 1956 in the USSR. It hosted volleyball competitions during the 1980 Summer Olympics. It also hosted events of the 1973 Summer Universiade, 1986 Goodwill Games, Spartakiads of the Peoples of the USSR and others. The arena is the home arena of ice hockey club Dynamo Moscow since 2000.
    7.00
    2 votes
    147
    Olympic Green Tennis Center, Beijing

    Olympic Green Tennis Center, Beijing

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Tennis at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Women's Singles
    The Olympic Green Tennis Center or Beijing Olympic Green Tennis Court (simplified Chinese: 北京奥林匹克公园网球中心; traditional Chinese: 北京奧林匹克公園網球中心; pinyin: Běijīng Àolínpǐkè Gōngyuán Wǎngqiúzhōngxīn), is a tennis centre located in the Olympic Green. It opened on 1 October 2007. It hosted the tennis preliminaries and finals of singles and doubles for men and women at the Beijing 2008 Olympics as well as the Paralympic wheelchair tennis competitions. The Center is located in Beijing, just 1.7 mi (2.7 km) from the Beijing National Stadium (a.k.a. The Birds Nest Stadium). The tennis centre covers an area of 41.22 acres (166,800 m) with a floor space of 285,394 sq ft (26,514.0 m). According to the requirements of the Olympic Games, the centre have 10 competition courts and 6 training courts, with a capacity of 17,400 seats. The main court, called Diamond court has a capacity of 15,000. The Center court, Court 1 and Court 2, each represent a lotus flower, one of the emblems of the 2008 Summer Olympics. Each have 12 stands, each one representing a petal of the lotus flower. Center court has a capacity of 10,000, Court one 4,000 and Court two 2,000. The courts have been specially designed for
    7.00
    2 votes
    148
    Qingdao International Sailing Centre

    Qingdao International Sailing Centre

    • Olympic events contested here: Sailing at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Women's 470 class
    The Qingdao International Sailing Centre (simplified Chinese: 青岛奥林匹克帆船中心; traditional Chinese: 青島奧林匹克帆船中心; pinyin: Qīngdǎo Àolínpǐkè Fānchuán Zhōngxīn) is a sailing marina located on the former site of the Beihai Shipyard by Qingdao's Fushan Bay at Shandong Province in China. It was constructed for the 2008 Summer Olympics. It hosted the Olympic and Paralympic Sailing competitions. Wind conditions vary greatly from very light winds to +15knots. During the Olympic competitions, fog was also an occasional factor. The venue hosted “Good Luck Beijing - 2006" and in May 2008, the IFDS Qingdao International Regatta, where Olympic and Paralympic sailors got a headstart on familiarizing themselves with the venue and weather conditions. Access from the Qingdao Paralympic Village to the dock, work areas, etc. was provided by numerous golf carts making endless daytime rounds. Both ends of the work area had 2 cranes apiece, which could lift large keelboats like the Sonar from cradles and lower these into the water. At night, a laser light show from the main breakwater lighthouse would play from early evening to midnight. Facing the Yellow Sea, the main breakwater with spectator seating,
    7.00
    2 votes
    149

    St. Moritz Olympic Ice Rink

    • Olympic games used in: 1948 Winter Olympics
    St. Moritz Olympic Ice Rink (German: Eisstadion Badrutts Park) is an outdoor stadium in St. Moritz, Switzerland. It was the venue for the ice hockey, speedskating and figure skating events, as well as the location of the opening and closing ceremonies at the 1928 Winter Olympics and 1948 Winter Olympics.
    7.00
    2 votes
    150
    Stadium Australia

    Stadium Australia

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The ANZ Stadium, also known as Stadium Australia, formerly known as Telstra Stadium, is a multi-purpose stadium located in the Sydney Olympic Park precinct of Homebush Bay. The stadium, which in Australia is sometimes referred to simply as the "Olympic Stadium", was completed in March 1999 at a cost of A$690 million to host the 2000 Summer Olympics. Every year since the stadium was built, the New South Wales rugby league team's home games in the State of Origin series have been played there. Also since then the stadium has since hosted the annual National Rugby League grand final. Stadium Australia also hosted the 2003 Rugby World Cup finals and Bledisloe Cup matches. The stadium was originally built to temporarily hold 110,000 spectators, making it the largest Olympic Stadium ever built as well as the largest stadium in Australia. In 2003 reconfiguration work was completed to shorten the north and south wings, and install movable seating. These changes reduced the capacity to 83,500 for a rectangular field and 82,500 for an oval field (making it the second largest stadium in Australia after the Melbourne Cricket Ground). Awnings were also added over the North and South stands,
    7.00
    2 votes
    151
    The Mall

    The Mall

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Athletics at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's marathon
    The Mall ( /ˈmæl/) is a road in London running from Buckingham Palace at its western end to Admiralty Arch and on to Trafalgar Square at its eastern end. Before its termination at Whitehall it is met by Spring Gardens, which was where the Metropolitan Board of Works and, for a number of years, the London County Council were based. It is closed to traffic on Sundays and public holidays, and on ceremonial occasions. The Mall was created as a ceremonial route in the early 20th century, matching the creation of similar ceremonial routes in other cities such as Berlin, Mexico City, Oslo, Paris, Saint Petersburg, Vienna and Washington, D.C. These routes were intended to be used for major national ceremonies. As part of the development – designed by Aston Webb – a new façade was constructed for Buckingham Palace, and the Victoria Memorial was erected. The Queen Victoria Memorial is immediately before the gates of the Palace, whilst Admiralty Arch at the far end leads into Trafalgar Square. The length of The Mall from where it joins Constitution Hill at the Victoria Memorial end to Admiralty Arch is exactly 0.5 nautical miles (0.93 km; 0.58 mi). St. James's Park is on the south side of The
    7.00
    2 votes
    152
    Yokohama Cultural Gymnasium

    Yokohama Cultural Gymnasium

    Yokohama Cultural Gymnasium (横浜文化体育館, Yokohama Bunka Taiikukan) is an indoor sports arena, located in Naka-ku, Yokohama, Japan. The capacity of the arena is 5,000 people and was opened in 1962. It is a five minute walk from the closest subway station, Kannai Station, on the JR/Yokohama Municipal Subway. The arena hosted the volleyball events of the 1964 Summer Olympics.
    7.00
    2 votes
    153
    Dynamo Sports Palace

    Dynamo Sports Palace

    Dvorec Sporta Dinamo (Russian: Дворец спорта «Динамо»; English: Dynamo Palace of Sports) is an indoor sporting arena located in Moscow, Russia. The capacity of the arena is 5,000. It hosted the home games of MBC Dynamo Moscow until 2006. It was built during the preparations for the 1980 Summer Olympics, hosted by Moscow, USSR and was used as a venue of the handball tournament there. It was the home venue of Dynamo Moscow basketball team until 2006. The Dynamo Moscow volleyball team currently play their home matches here
    6.00
    3 votes
    154

    Magdalena Mixhuca Sports City

    The Magdalena Mixhuca Sports City is an Olympic Park which was used during the 1968 Summer Olympics. Found in the area of Mexico City known as the Magdalena mixhuca, the Park continues to serve as a venue for cultural, social, and sport events such as events of worship. The Park is administrated by the Government of City. It contains numerous sports venues, most importantly the Sport Palace and it has hosted important events, most prominently the 1968 Summer Olympics. ("Rodríguez Brothers Racetrack") is a 4.421 km (2.747 mi) race track in Mexico City, Mexico, named for the famous Rodríguez brothers. Built in a public park in 1962, the circuit hosted its first Formula One Grand Prix the same year, as a non-Championship race. The following year the Mexican Grand Prix became a full World Championship event. The circuit remained part of the F1 calendar through 1970, when spectator overcrowding caused unsafe conditions. When the track re-opened in 1986, the circuit boasted a new pit complex, as well as improved safety all around. The Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez (as of 2008) has been the only venue for the Mexican Grand Prix. The circuit is located within the public park of the
    6.00
    3 votes
    155
    Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium

    Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium

    Navy – Marine Corps Memorial Stadium is an outdoor athletic stadium near the campus of the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. It is the home field of the Navy Midshipmen football team, the men's lacrosse team, and the Chesapeake Bayhawks lacrosse team. The stadium opened on September 26, 1959, when Navy defeated William & Mary in football, 29–2. The current seating capacity is 34,000. The attendance record for the stadium is 37,970, when Navy lost to the Pitt Panthers in football, 42-21, on October 18, 2008. Prior to 1959, Navy played its home games at Thompson Stadium, which seated only 12,000. In the summer of 1984 The Navy Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis hosted soccer games as part of the 1984 Summer Olympics. The stadium serves as a memorial to the Navy and Marine Corps; it is dedicated to those who have served (and will serve) as upholders of the traditions and renown of the Navy and Marine Corps of the United States. The thousands of memorial bench-back and wall plaques are a constant reminder, as well as the list of numerous battles involving the Naval and Marine Corps forces since the early 1900s. In 2004 the stadium underwent a major renovation by 360
    6.00
    3 votes
    156
    Sha Tin Racecourse

    Sha Tin Racecourse

    Sha Tin Racecourse (Chinese: 沙田馬場) is one of the two racecourses for horse racing in Hong Kong. It is located in Sha Tin in the New Territories. It is managed by Hong Kong Jockey Club. Penfold Park is encircled by the track. It was built in 1978 (under the administration of Sir David Akers-Jones, the then-Secretary for the New Territories) on reclaimed land and is the larger of the two tracks in Hong Kong. The course has 474 races per season including: On September 9, 2007, Sha Tin race track opened for the season with record 1-day crowd of about 60,000. Chief Secretary Henry Tang stroke the ceremonial gong. The Hong Kong Jockey Club collected US$106 million in bets (highest since 2001). Children of horse owners were admitted amid protest of local anti-gambling groups. Sunny Power, booted by Howard Cheng got the trophy in the 1,200 metre dash. Michael Jackson was scheduled to perform two concerts here for his Dangerous Tour on August 15 & 16, 1993 but both were cancelled. Originally built with capacity for 35,000 and one grandstand, it now has capacity for 85,000 and two grandstands. It also has 20 stables for a capacity of 1,260 horses. Other features include: Track
    6.00
    3 votes
    157
    Tokyo Dome City

    Tokyo Dome City

    Tokyo Dome City (formerly known as Big Egg City prior to January 1, 2000) is an entertainment complex in Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan. It includes the world's largest roofed baseball stadium known as Tokyo Dome (nicknamed "Big Egg"), an amusement park known as Tokyo Dome City Attractions (formerly Kōrakuen Yūenchi), and Korakuen Hall. In May 2003, a spa resort known as LaQua opened for business near Tokyo Dome City Attractions. It also hosts character shows for the Super Sentai series. The Tokyo Dome City contains the Tokyo Dome Hotel, a 43-story hotel that is easily visible from the street and from the Tokyo Subway Suidobashi Station, which is only two blocks away.
    6.00
    3 votes
    158
    5.00
    4 votes
    159
    Beijing Wukesong Culture & Sports Center

    Beijing Wukesong Culture & Sports Center

    • Olympic events contested here: Baseball at the 2008 Summer Olympics
    The MasterCard Center (simplified Chinese: 万事达中心; traditional Chinese: 萬事達中心), formerly Beijing Wukesong Culture & Sports Center (simplified Chinese: 五棵松体育馆; traditional Chinese: 五棵松體育館), is an indoor arena for the 2008 Summer Olympics basketball preliminaries and finals. Ground was broken on 29 March 2005 and construction was completed on 11 January 2008. The stadium has a capacity of 18,000 and covers an area of 63,000 square metres. It was scaled back from its original design due to a 43% budget cut. The stadium was constructed by "Beijing Wukesong Cultural & Sports Co. Ltd." whose five shareholders are Zhongguancun CENCONS Group, Haidian State-owned Assets Investment Co. Ltd, Beijing Urban Construction Group Co. Ltd, Beijing Urban Construction Co. Ltd and the Tianhong Group. After the Olympic Games, the center become an important part of Beijing's Olympic Games heritage, allowing citizens to enjoy cultural, sports, leisure, recreational and commercial activities. It was a large-scale comprehensive project rare in Beijing in integrating cultural, sporting functions and commercial purposes with large-scale gardens and green space. On 6 January 2011 MasterCard Worldwide announced
    5.67
    3 votes
    160
    Olympic Stadium Munich

    Olympic Stadium Munich

    Olympiastadion is a stadium located in Munich, Germany. Situated at the heart of the Olympiapark München in northern Munich, the stadium was built as the main venue for the 1972 Summer Olympics. With an original capacity of 80,000, the stadium also hosted many major football matches including the 1974 World Cup Final and the Euro '88 Final. It hosted the European Cup Finals of 1979, 1993 and 1997. Until the construction of the Allianz Arena for the 2006 World Cup, the stadium was home to Bayern Munich and TSV 1860 Munich. Today, the Olympiastadion holds 69,250. Designed by the German architect Günther Behnisch and the engineer Frei Otto, the Olympiastadion was considered revolutionary for its time. This included large sweeping canopies of acrylic glass stabilized by steel cables that were used for the first time on a large scale. The idea was to imitate the Alps and to set a counterpart to the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, held during the Nazi regime. The sweeping and transparent canopy was to symbolize the new, democratic and optimistic Germany. This is reflected in the official motto: "The Happy Games" ("Die Heiteren Spiele"). The stadium was built by Bilfinger Berger between
    5.67
    3 votes
    161
    Shibuya Public Hall

    Shibuya Public Hall

    The Shibuya Public Hall (渋谷公会堂, Shibuya Kōkaidō) or Shibuya C.C. Lemon Hall (渋谷C.C.Lemonホール, Shibuya C.C. remon hōru) is a live theatre in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan. It was completed in 1964. In the 1964 Summer Olympics, the weightlifting events took place there. The theatre was sponsored by Dentsu and Suntory, which paid ¥80 million to have its name associated with the building from 2006 to 2011.
    5.67
    3 votes
    162
    Utah Olympic Park bobsleigh/luge/skeleton track

    Utah Olympic Park bobsleigh/luge/skeleton track

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Luge at the 2002 Winter Olympics – Men's singles
    The Utah Olympic Park Track is a bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track located in the Utah Olympic Park, near Park City, Utah, United States. During the 2002 Winter Olympics, held nearby in Salt Lake City, the track hosted the bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton events. Today the track still serves as a training center for Olympic and development level athletes, and hosts numerous local and international competitions. In 1989, Utah's voters passed the Olympic referendum, which allowed for tax payer money to be used to construct a winter sports park, which would include the track. The park would be used if Salt Lake City won its bid for either the 1998 or 2002 Winter Olympics, and following the games Olympic funds and revenue would then be used to repay the state. In 1990 the Utah Sports Authority announced their plans to build the park, which included ski jumps and a bobsled/luge track, in Bear Hollow near Park City. The following year, on June 15, 1991, Salt Lake City lost its 1998 Winter Olympics bid by four votes to Nagano, Japan. Still, construction on the park commenced following a groundbreaking ceremony on May 29, 1991. The original estimated cost of the park was $26.3 million and
    5.67
    3 votes
    163
    Beihang University Gymnasium

    Beihang University Gymnasium

    Beihang University Gymnasium (simplified Chinese: 北京航空航天大学体育馆; traditional Chinese: 北京航空航天大學體育館; pinyin: Běijīng Hángkōng Hángtiān Dàxué Tǐyùguǎn, sometime listed as the Beijing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics Gymnasium) is a 5,400-seat indoor arena located on the campus of Beihang University in Beijing, China. It hosted weightlifting competitions at the 2008 Summer Olympics and powerlifting competitions at the 2008 Summer Paralympics.
    6.50
    2 votes
    164
    Beijing National Stadium

    Beijing National Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Athletics at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's 100 metres
    Beijing National Stadium, officially the National Stadium, also known as the Bird's Nest (鸟巢 Niǎocháo), is a stadium in Beijing, China. The stadium was designed for use throughout the 2008 Summer Olympics and Paralympics. Located in the Olympic Green, the stadium cost US$423 million. The design was awarded to a submission from the Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron in April 2003 after a bidding process that included 13 final submissions. The design, which originated from the study of Chinese ceramics, implemented steel beams in order to hide supports for the retractable roof; giving the stadium the appearance of a bird's nest. Leading Chinese artist Ai Weiwei was the artistic consultant on the project. The retractable roof was later removed from the design after inspiring the stadium's most recognizable aspect. Ground was broken on 24 December 2003 and the stadium officially opened on 28 June 2008. A shopping mall and a hotel are planned to be constructed to increase use of the stadium, which has had trouble attracting events, football and otherwise, after the Olympics. In 2001, before Beijing had been awarded the right to host the 2008 Summer Olympics, the city held a
    6.50
    2 votes
    165

    Broxbourne White Water Canoe Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Canoeing at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's slalom K-1
    Lee Valley White Water Centre (previously known as Broxbourne White Water Canoe Centre) is a white-water slalom centre, that was constructed to host the canoe slalom events of the 2012 Summer Olympics. On 9 December 2010, Anne, Princess Royal officially opened the venue. The £31 million project was finished on schedule and was the first newly constructed Olympic venue to be completed. Olympic competition was held from July 29 through August 2. The venue has also been selected to host the 2015 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships. The venue is located between the towns of Waltham Cross in Hertfordshire and Waltham Abbey in Essex. The site is just outside the northern boundary of Greater London and 9 miles (14 km) north of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, east London. It is in the heart of River Lee Country Park which is part of the 10,000-acre (40 km), 26-mile (42 km) long Lee Valley Park. The venue opened in late 2010 offering canoeing and rafting activities to the public ahead of the London 2012 Summer Olympics. The venue has a purpose-built slalom course for the Olympic white-water canoe events (flatwater canoeing and kayaking events will take place at Dorney Lake,
    6.50
    2 votes
    166
    Olympic Green Convention Centre

    Olympic Green Convention Centre

    • Olympic events contested here: Fencing at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's team sabre
    The Olympic Green Convention Center or National Convention Center (simplified Chinese: 国家会议中心; traditional Chinese: 國家會議中心; pinyin: Guójiā Huìyì Zhōngxīn) is a new convention center located in the Olympic Green in Beijing. It was designed by RMJM and was used for the 2008 Summer Olympics. It covers an area of 270,000 square metres. It is one of the principal buildings of the Olympic Green. The convention centre served as the competition spot for fencing, and the shooting and fencing parts of the modern pentathlon events. The International Broadcast Centre was located in this venue. The nearest subway station is Olympic Green (exit E) on line 8.
    6.50
    2 votes
    167
    Beijing National Indoor Stadium

    Beijing National Indoor Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Gymnastics at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's artistic individual all-around
    The Beijing National Indoor Stadium, also known as the National Indoor Stadium (simplified Chinese: 国家体育馆; traditional Chinese: 國家體育館; pinyin: Guójiā Tǐyùguǎn), is an indoor arena that is located in the Olympic Green in Beijing, China. The stadium was constructed for the 2008 Summer Olympics. It is nicknamed the Fan (扇子, shānzi) due to its design resembling a traditional Chinese folding fan. The stadium opened its doors on November 26, 2007 for the artistic Gymnastics test event. At the 2008 Olympics, it hosted the Artistic Gymnastics, Trampolining, and Handball events. After the Olympics, the stadium can be used for sports competition, cultural and entertaining purposes, and will serve as a multi-functional exercise center for local residents. The stadium has a capacity of 18,000 people.
    7.00
    1 votes
    168
    Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre

    Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Ice hockey at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Men's tournament
    The Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre (formerly UBC Winter Sports Centre, also known as UBC Thunderbird Arena) is a LEED Silver certified indoor arena in Canada, on the campus of the University of British Columbia. Located in the University Endowment Lands, it is just outside the city limits of Vancouver, British Columbia. The arena is home to the UBC Thunderbirds men's and women's ice hockey teams, and contains one international-size 61 m × 30 m (200 ft × 98.4 ft) ice rink. The facility was built around an older hockey facility, the historic Father Bauer Arena, which opened in October 1963. This was named after the late Rev. Father David Bauer, who, together with Bob Hindmarch, established Canada’s first national hockey team at UBC in 1963 in preparation for the 1964 Winter Olympics. The UBC Thunderbird Arena replaced the Father Bauer Arena as the home of the UBC Thunderbirds ice hockey team. The main ice rink has 7,500 seats and can expand to 8,000 for concerts. The other rinks are Father Bauer Arena and Rink C with spectator capacities of 980 and 200, respectively. Construction began in April 2006 with the refurbishment of the Father Bauer Arena and the addition of a new
    7.00
    1 votes
    169
    Palacio de los Deportes

    Palacio de los Deportes

    Palacio de los Deportes (English: Palace of Sports) is an indoor arena, located in Mexico City, Mexico, within the sports complex Magdalena Mixhuca Sports City, near the Mexico City International Airport and in front of the Foro Sol, in which sports and artistic events are also celebrated. It is operated by Grupo CIE. The arena seats 17,800, for football and the overall capacity is approximately 20,000. It hosted the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games for the competitions of basketball and can be used to host volleyball and basketball matches. It was the home of the CBA Mexico City Aztecas in 1994 and 1995, and the Mexico Toros of the CISL in 1995. Another common use is to host big expositions and rock or pop concerts. There is a smaller pavilion for expositions and concerts. The Sports Palace—located 14 miles (23 km) from the Olympic Village and 6.5 from downtown Mexico City in the Magdalena Mixhuca Sports City near the conflux of two expressways (Miguel Alemán Viaduct and Río Churubusco Interior Loop)—was constructed specifically for the Olympic basketball competition. Built between October 15, 1966 and September, 1968, it is circular in design with a square-patterned dome spanning
    7.00
    1 votes
    170
    Peace and Friendship Stadium

    Peace and Friendship Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2004 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 2004 Summer Olympics - Men's Volleyball
    The Stadio Eirinis kai Filias (Greek: Στάδιο Ειρήνης και Φιλίας, Peace and Friendship Stadium), known as S.E.F., is a multi-use indoor sports arena that is located in Faliro, Piraeus, Athens, Greece. It is the central venue of the Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex and is mostly known for being the long-time home court of the famous Euroleague basketball powerhouse Olympiacos Piraeus, since 1992. In addition to basketball, its multi-purpose main arena is also able to host athletics, gymnastics, volleyball, handball, ice skating, concerts, conventions and exhibitions. The arena was built by Thymios Papagiannis and Associates and opened in the year 1985 and it has since hosted basketball events such as the final stage of the 1987 FIBA European Championship and the preliminary stages of the 1998 FIBA World Championship. In November 1991, the arena won the Golden Award architecture award from IAKS, the International Association for Sports and Leisure Facilities. It also hosted the indoor volleyball tournament during the 2004 Summer Olympics. Scorpions held their last concert in Greece at the stadium, on October 6, 2010 during their Get Your Sting And Blackout Tour. The arena needed to
    7.00
    1 votes
    171

    Rice-Eccles Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    Rice-Eccles Stadium is an outdoor college football stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the campus of the University of Utah. It is the home field of the Utah Utes of the Pacific-12 Conference. It served as the main stadium for the 2002 Winter Olympics; the Opening and Closing Ceremonies were held at the stadium, which was temporarily renamed "Rice-Eccles Olympic Stadium". The FieldTurf playing field runs in the traditional north-south configuration, and sits at an elevation of 4,657 feet (1,419 m) above sea level, 330 feet (100 m) above downtown Salt Lake City. When Salt Lake City was awarded the 2002 Winter Olympics in 1995, it was obvious that Rice Stadium was not suitable to serve as the main stadium. The concrete, timber, and earth-fill facility had been built in 1927 and was showing its age. In 1996, U of U athletic director Chris Hill announced plans to renovate Rice Stadium into a new facility that would be up to Olympic standards. It was initially expected to take three years to completely overhaul the facility. However, in 1997, Spencer Eccles, a Utah alumnus and chairman of Utah's biggest bank, First Security Corporation, announced that the George S. and Dolores Dore
    7.00
    1 votes
    172
    St James' Park

    St James' Park

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament
    St James' Park is an all-seater stadium in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. It is the home of Newcastle United Football Club and is the sixth largest football stadium in the United Kingdom with a capacity of between 52,387 and 52,409. St. James' Park has been the home ground of Newcastle United since 1892 and has been used for football since 1880. Throughout its history, the desire for expansion has caused conflict with local residents and the local council. This has led to proposals to move at least twice in the late 1960s, and a controversial 1995 proposed move to nearby Leazes Park. Reluctance to move has led to the distinctive lop-sided appearance of the present-day stadium's asymmetrical stands. Besides club football, St. James' Park has also been used for international football, it was used as a football venue for the 2012 Olympics, and will also be used as a rugby venue for the 2015 Rugby World Cup. In addition to professional football, the stadium has hosted charity football events and rock concerts, and been used as a set for film and reality television. The stadium is featured on the front cover of the football video game, FIFA 13. The site of St. James' Park was originally
    7.00
    1 votes
    173
    State Sports Centre

    State Sports Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The State Sports Centre is a multi-use indoor arena in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It hosted the table tennis and taekwondo events for the 2000 Summer Olympics. With a total of 3,854 fixed and retractable seats the main arena is the focal point of the Sydney Olympic Park Sports Centre. An additional 1,152 portable seats can be accommodated on the floor level. In 1988 and 1989 the centre was the original home of NBL side the Sydney Kings before they moved to the larger Sydney Entertainment Centre. It was also home to former NBL team the West Sydney Razorbacks (later renamed the Sydney Spirit) from 1998 until the club folded in 2009. The Sydney Sandpipers netball team who played in the Commonwealth Bank Trophy called the venue home and since 2008 it has been the home venue for the New South Wales Swifts netball team who play in the ANZ Championship.
    7.00
    1 votes
    174

    Vancouver Olympic Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Curling at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Women's tournament
    The Vancouver Olympic Centre, located in the Riley-Hillcrest neighborhood, was constructed for the 2010 winter Olympics and will feature the curling competition.  After the games, it will become a multi-purpose community recreation centre.
    7.00
    1 votes
    175
    Workers Indoor Arena

    Workers Indoor Arena

    The Workers' Indoor Arena, also known as Beijing Workers' Gymnasium (simplified Chinese: 北京工人体育馆; traditional Chinese: 北京工人體育館; pinyin: Běijīng Gōngrén Tǐyùguǎn), is an indoor arena located west of the Workers Stadium in Beijing, China. It was inaugurated in 1961 for the 26th World Table Tennis Championships. It hosted the boxing events at the 2008 Summer Olympics and the Judo events at the 2008 Summer Paralympics. It is one of 11 Beijing-based venues to be renovated and upgraded for the Olympics. The arena has a maximum seating capacity of 13,000.
    7.00
    1 votes
    176
    Atatürk Olimpiyat Stadyumu

    Atatürk Olimpiyat Stadyumu

    Atatürk Olympic Stadium (Turkish: Atatürk Olimpiyat Stadı) located in İkitelli, a district in the western outskirts of Istanbul, is the largest-capacity stadium of Turkey. The stadium is named after Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey. Its construction began in 1999 and was completed in 2002. It was built for Turkey's failed bid for the 2008 Olympic Games that were ultimately awarded to Beijing. It cost about 140 million USD. With its 76,092 (all-seater) capacity and Olympic size, it was granted the "5-star sports complex" title by the UEFA in 2004, enabling it to host the finals of UEFA events. The 2005 UEFA Champions League Final between A.C. Milan and Liverpool F.C. was played at the Atatürk Olympic Stadium on 25 May 2005. The stadium is also certified by the IAAF and IOC as a first-class venue for track and field, and has hosted several European athletic competitions. Galatasaray SK played its home games at the Atatürk Olympic Stadium during the 2003–2004 football season, due to the renovation of their own venue, the Ali Sami Yen Stadium, and this was criticized by other teams. Galatasaray eventually returned to Ali Sami Yen for the
    6.00
    2 votes
    177

    CSKA Universal Sports Hall

    Alexander Gomelsky CSKA Universal Sports Hall, formerly known as CSKA Palace of Sports, is an indoor sporting arena located in Moscow, Russia. The seating capacity of the arena is 5,500 people. The arena is named in the honor of the late Alexander Gomelsky, former CSKA coach and honorary president. The Palace of Sports, that hosts the home games of CSKA Moscow Basketball Club, was completed in the year 1979 during the preparations for the 1980 Summer Olympics, hosted by Moscow, USSR. The arena was used as a venue for the 1980 Olympic basketball tournament there.
    6.00
    2 votes
    178
    E Center

    E Center

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    The Maverik Center, originally known as the E Center, is a 10,100 seat multi-purpose arena located in West Valley City, Utah, United States. Construction on the arena started in 1996 and was completed in time to hold its first event on September 22, 1997. The arena is owned by West Valley City, and managed by Centennial Management Group, Inc. During the 2002 Winter Olympics it served as the main venue for the ice hockey events, and as the venue for ice sledge hockey during the 2002 Winter Paralympics. Today the arena is home to the Utah Grizzlies, and it is also a major venue in the area for numerous concerts and live touring productions. In July 1995, only a month after winning the 2002 Winter Olympic bid, the Salt Lake Organizing Committee (SLOC) accepted a proposal from West Valley City to build a new ice hockey facility in their city. SLOC loaned $7 million to the city for construction costs, and would rent the arena from the city during the Olympic games. The arena would be funded through a variety of ways, but would be owned by the municipality of West Valley City, and used for various events before and after the games. Ground was broken for the arena on March 22, 1996, and
    6.00
    2 votes
    179
    Jamsil Students' Gymnasium

    Jamsil Students' Gymnasium

    • Olympic games used in: 1988 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 1988 Summer Olympics - Men's volleyball
    Jamsil Students' Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Seoul, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 7,500 and was built from November 1972 to December 1976 to host Boxing events at the 1988 Summer Olympics. It also hosted boxing events at the 1986 Asian Games and wheelchair basketball events at the 1988 Summer Paralympics. and KBL's Seoul SK Knights home stadium.
    6.00
    2 votes
    180
    Lake Casitas

    Lake Casitas

    Lake Casitas is an artificial lake in the Los Padres National Forest of Ventura County, California, created by the construction of Casitas Dam on Coyote Creek, two miles (3 km) before it joins the Ventura River. Santa Ana Creek and North Fork Coyote Creek also flow into the lake. The dam was constructed of earth-fill and was completed in 1959. It is 279 ft (85 m) and was built by the United States Bureau of Reclamation. The lake has a capacity of 254,000 acre·ft (313,000,000 m). The dam was built as part of the Ventura River Project. The project provides drinking water and water for irrigation. A secondary benefit is flood control. In the centre of Lake Casitas is 2 km Main Island, whose peak rises more than 500 feet (150 m) from the lake surface. Human contact with the water is prohibited since it is used for drinking water, but fishing, boating and camping are permitted. During the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, Lake Casitas hosted the canoeing and rowing events. The lake was used as the site for filming the scenes of Camp Greenlake in the 19th century in the 2003 film Holes.
    6.00
    2 votes
    181
    Mestalla

    Mestalla

    Mestalla Stadium (Spanish: Estadio de Mestalla, Valencian: Estadi de Mestalla) is a football stadium in Valencia, Spain. The stadium is the home ground of Valencia Club de Fútbol. With a capacity of 55,000 seats, it ranks as the fifth-largest stadium in Spain. It is also renowned for its steep terracing and being one of the most intimidating atmospheres in all of Europe in which to play. On 20 May 1923, the Estadio Mestalla was inaugurated with a friendly match that brought Valencia CF and Levante UD face to face. It was the beginning of a new era a farewell to the Algirós, which will always remain in the memories of Valencians as the club's first home. A long and rich history has taken played out on the field of the Mestalla since its very beginning, and before Valencia CF was in Primera División. Back then, the stadium could hold up to 17,000 spectators, and the club started to show its potential in regional championships which led to a decision by management to carry out the first renovations of the Mestalla in 1927. As a result the stadium's seating capacity was increased to 25,000. Unfortunately the stadium was severely damaged during the Spanish Civil War. During the Civil
    6.00
    2 votes
    182
    Olimpiysky National Sports Complex

    Olimpiysky National Sports Complex

    The Olympic National Sports Complex (also known as Olympic Stadium; Ukrainian: Національний спортивний комплекс "Олімпійський") is a multi-use sports facility in Kiev, Ukraine, located on the slopes of the city's central Cherepanov Hill, Pechersk Raion. The stadium is the premier sports venue in Ukraine and the second largest in Eastern Europe after Moscow's Luzhniki Stadium. The complex also features several other sports facilities and is designed to host the Olympic Games (the stadium hosted some football matches at the 1980 Summer Olympics). Following extensive renovation works, including the construction of a new roof, the stadium was reopened on 9 October 2011 with a performance by Shakira and had its international inauguration with a 3–3 friendly draw by Ukraine against Germany on 11 November 2011. It hosted the final of Euro 2012. After Ukrainian independence in 1991, the stadium was given national status in 1996 and renamed again as the "Olympic" National Sports Complex. Kyivans still commonly refer to it as the Tsentralny (Central) or Respublykanskyi stadion (Republican Stadium), and the nearby metro station "Olimpiiska" that was also called "Respublykanskyi Stadion". In
    6.00
    2 votes
    183
    Olympic Stadium

    Olympic Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1976 Summer Olympics
    The Olympic Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium in the Hochelaga-Maisonneuve district of Montreal, Quebec, Canada built as the main venue for the 1976 Summer Olympics. The stadium is nicknamed "The Big O", a reference to both its name and to the doughnut-shape of the permanent component of the stadium's roof; "The Big Owe" has been used to reference the astronomical cost of the stadium and the 1976 Olympics as a whole. The stadium is the largest by seating capacity in Canada. After the Olympics, it became the home of Montreal's professional baseball and Canadian football teams. Since 2004, when the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, D.C., the stadium has no main tenant, and with a history of financial and structural problems, is largely seen as a white elephant. It currently serves as a 56,040-seat multipurpose facility for special events (e.g. concerts, trade shows), and continues to serve as a 66,308-seat venue for playoff and Grey Cup games hosted by the Montreal Alouettes. The Montreal Impact also use the stadium on occasion when a larger capacity venue is needed or when the weather restricts outdoor play in the spring months. The tower incorporated into the base of the
    6.00
    2 votes
    184
    Sokolniki Arena

    Sokolniki Arena

    Sokolniki Arena or Sokolniki Sports Palace is an indoor sporting arena located in Moscow, Russia. It is located in the Sokolniki District of the city, a fifteen minute walk from Sokolniki metro station, right by Sokolniki Park. Initially it was an outdoor skating rink, roofed in 1973 during the preparations for the 1973 Summer Universiade. The capacity of the arena is 5,000. The Sokolniki Sports Palace was a venue of handball tournament for the 1980 Summer Olympics, including the final. It is the home arena of the HC Spartak Moscow ice hockey team. There is a small practice rink located just to the east of the main arena.
    6.00
    2 votes
    185
    Stanford Stadium

    Stanford Stadium

    Stanford Stadium (capacity 50,000 as of 2006) is an outdoor athletic stadium on the Stanford University campus. It is the home of the Stanford Cardinal college football team. It originally opened in 1921 as a football and track stadium, an earthen horseshoe with wooden bleacher seating and flooring upon a steel frame. Its original seating capacity was 60,000, which grew to 89,000 by 1927 as a nearly enclosed bowl. Immediately following the 2005 season, the stadium was demolished and rebuilt as a dual-deck concrete structure, without a track. Built partly in competition with the University of California, Berkeley to see who could build a football stadium first, Stanford Stadium was built in four months and opened its gates on November 19, 1921, replacing Stanford Field. The first game was against California, who defeated Stanford 42-7. Seating capacity was originally 60,000, with a 66-row, U-Shaped structure second only to the Yale Bowl in size at the time. In 1925, 10,200 seats were added to the stadium, nearly enclosing the horseshoe while still keeping the overall height of the facility intact. In 1927 14 additional rows of seating were added, increasing the stadium to its
    6.00
    2 votes
    186
    Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex

    Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Complex

    • Olympic games used in: 2004 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 2004 Summer Olympics - Men's Beach Volleyball
    The Faliro Coastal Zone Olympic Sports Complex is a complex in the coastal zone of Athens, Greece. It consists of two indoor arenas and a beach volleyball stadium, and it hosted Handball, Taekwondo, and volleyball events at the 2004 Summer Olympics. The complex is located in Faliro, not far from the port of Piraeus. The complex consists of the following venues: The Peace and Friendship Stadium SEF (37°56′32.91″N 23°40′02.27″E / 37.942475°N 23.6672972°E / 37.942475; 23.6672972), known as S.E.F. after its Greek name (Stadio Erinis & Filias - Greek: Στάδιο Ειρήνης και Φιλίας) is an indoor arena located in Faliro that hosted indoor volleyball at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. The arena which was opened in 1985 had previously hosted various major international events, including the Final tournament of the 1987 Men's European Basketball Championships and preliminary games of the 1998 FIBA World Basketball Championships. Renovations for the Olympics commenced in April 2002 and were completed on June 30, 2004. The new stadium was officially opened on August 11, 2004, shortly before the opening of the games. The venue's current regular seating capacity is 14,905 seats, while
    5.00
    3 votes
    187
    Druzhba Multipurpose Arena

    Druzhba Multipurpose Arena

    The Druzhba Multipurpose Arena (Russian: Универсальный спортивный зал "Дружба") is an indoor arena in Moscow, Russia, part of the Luzhniki Sports Complex. It was built in 1979, and the first competition held there was the finals of the 7th USSR Summer Spartakiad. It hosted volleyball preliminaries of the 1980 Summer Olympics and was a venue of the 1986 Goodwill Games (women's basketball, freestyle wrestling, judo and handball events were held there). The capacity of the arena is for 3,500 people and is the regular home venue of WVC Dynamo Moscow Volleyball team.
    5.50
    2 votes
    188
    Estadio Jalisco

    Estadio Jalisco

    The Jalisco Stadium is a football stadium located in Guadalajara, Mexico. It is the third largest Mexican football stadium behind Estadio Azteca and Estadio Olímpico Universitario. The facility is located in the city of Guadalajara, Jalisco, 400 kilometres north-west of Mexico City, and has a maximum capacity of 63,200 spectators. Estadio Jalisco was the home ground of Guadalajara, one of the oldest football teams in Mexico, until 2010. It remains the home stadium of Club Atlas. Both teams play in the Mexican Primera División (Mexican First Division League). It is also the home ground of the Club Universidad de Guadalajara from the Liga de Ascenso. Several football preliminary matches took place for the 1968 Summer Olympics. The stadium has hosted the 1970 and 1986 FIFA World Cup. During both of those tourneys the Estadio Jalisco was the temporary home of the Brazilian national team and today remains a liaison between the people of Guadalajara and the Brazilian national team. The stadium is centrally located in the heart of the neighbourhood called Colonia Independencia, and is in front of the Plaza de Toros Nuevo Progreso ("New Progress" Bullring). Its address is Calle Siete
    5.50
    2 votes
    189
    NSW Tennis Centre

    NSW Tennis Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    NSW Tennis Centre is a tennis venue in Sydney, Australia. It hosted the tennis events for the 2000 Summer Olympics, and each year it hosts the Sydney International in January, before the Australian Open The centre was built in 1999. The centre court is called Ken Rosewall Arena in honour of the Australian tennis player Ken Rosewall, and holds 10,000 people. There are 2 further show courts seating 4000 and 2000, as well as 7 other match courts, and 6 practice courts.
    5.50
    2 votes
    190

    Olympisch Stadion

    • Olympic games used in: 1920 Summer Olympics
    The Olympisch Stadion (Dutch pronunciation: [o.ˈlɪm.pi.ˈstaː.di.ˌjɔn]) or Kielstadion [ˈkiɫ.staː.di.ˌjɔn] was built as the main stadium for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. For those games, it hosted the athletics, equestrian, field hockey, football, gymnastics, modern pentathlon, rugby union, tug of war, and weightlifting events. It is currently used as the home ground of K.F.C. Germinal Beerschot, a Belgian football club. It is possible that Archibald Leitch was involved in the design of the stadium having made several visits prior to the Games.
    5.50
    2 votes
    191
    Palau Blaugrana

    Palau Blaugrana

    Palau Blaugrana (Catalan pronunciation: [pəˈɫaw ˌβɫawˈɣɾanə], meaning in English "Blue and deep red Palace") is an arena in Barcelona, Catalonia Spain, belonging to FC Barcelona. The 7,585 seating capacity arena is home to the basketball, handball, roller hockey, and futsal divisions of FC Barcelona. Palau Blaugrana is located between Mini Estadi and the Camp Nou. Built in 1971, the stadium originally held 5,696 spectators, but the facility was remodeled in 1994 to fit the current capacity of 7,585. During the 1992 Summer Olympics, the arena hosted several events, including roller hockey, taekwondo and judo. Several basketball and handball players have had their jerseys retired: 4 Andrés Jiménez, 7 Nacho Solozábal and 15 Epi for basketball and 2 Òscar Grau, 7 Iñaki Urdangarin, 14 Joan Sagalés, and 16 David Barrufet for handball. Under Sandro Rosell's presidency, the club announced that by 2013 it plans to build a new Palau Blaugrana for the handball and basketball teams, with a capacity of 12,000 seats. Also included in the plan, is a smaller campus with a capacity of 3,000 seats, plus [a special conditions] for hotel partners (operated by a specialist company located on the corner
    5.50
    2 votes
    192
    Schinias Olympic Rowing and Canoeing Centre

    Schinias Olympic Rowing and Canoeing Centre

    The Schinias Olympic Rowing and Canoeing Centre (Ολυμπιακό Κωπηλατοδρόμιο Σχοινιά) was built to host the rowing and canoe sprint events at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Greece. It is the most northerly venue of the 2004 Games situated to the east of the town of Marathon. It covers 1.24 km² and has a spectator capacity of 14,000. It is a part of Schinias National Park. Although not fully completed until January 31, 2004, it held its first successful competition, the Junior World Rowing Championships, in August 2003. During these championships, many boats became waterlogged due to gale force winds and the resulting water conditions. Most of the final rounds were raced over a shortened course to avoid worse water in the second half of the 2 km lake. During construction there was controversy over environmental destruction as wetlands were remodelled for its construction. The centre is one of only three FISA-approved training centers in the world, the others being in Munich and Seville. It Hosts domestic and international rowing and canoeing meets, and has hosted the 2008 European Rowing Championships in September 2008. After the 2004 Olympics, the facility was completely reconstructed by
    5.50
    2 votes
    193
    Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

    Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, often referred to as Fulton County Stadium and originally named Atlanta Stadium, was a multi-purpose stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. The stadium was built to attract a Major League Baseball team and in 1966 succeeded when the Milwaukee Braves relocated from Wisconsin. The Braves and Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League shared the venue from 1966 until 1991, when the Falcons moved into the newly completed Georgia Dome. The Braves continued to play at Fulton County Stadium until the end of the 1996 season, when they moved into Turner Field, a converted Centennial Olympic Stadium originally built for the 1996 Summer Olympics. During his 1961 campaign for mayor of Atlanta, Ivan Allen, Jr. promised to build a sports facility to attract a Major League Baseball team. After winning office, Allen chose a 47-acre plot in the Washington-Rawson neighborhood for the building site, citing its proximity to the Georgia State Capitol, downtown businesses and major highways. Allen, along with Atlanta Journal sports editor Furman Bisher, attempted to persuade Charlie Finley, owner of the Kansas City Athletics, to move his team to Atlanta. Finley was receptive
    6.00
    1 votes
    194

    Basketball Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Basketball at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men
    The Basketball Arena for the 2012 Summer Olympics and the 2012 Summer Paralympics is located in the Olympic Park in Stratford, London. London's Olympic bid proposed that there would be four arenas in the Olympic Park, but the revised masterplan published in 2006 reduced this to three, with the volleyball matches being moved to Earls Court Exhibition Centre. The fencing arena was also cancelled, and the fencing took place at ExCeL. The Basketball Arena has 12,000 seats for Olympic basketball and the semi-finals and finals of the Olympic handball, and 10,000 for Paralympic wheelchair basketball and wheelchair rugby. The arena was also used as a holding area for athletes during the Opening and Closing Ceremonies of the games. Concept designs by Wilkinson Eyre Architects & KSS Design Group (sports consultants) were agreed in June 2008 and a planning application was submitted in November 2008. It is a temporary venue, and the largest built for any Games. The possibility of subsequently deconstructing the arena and transporting it to Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 Summer Olympics was discussed, though the plan has been shelved due to doubts from some Brazilian officials about its
    6.00
    1 votes
    195
    6.00
    1 votes
    196
    Kirov Stadium

    Kirov Stadium

    Kirov Stadium was a multi-purpose stadium in St. Petersburg, Russia, and was one of the largest stadiums anywhere in the world. The stadium was named after Sergey Kirov. The stands of the Kirov stadium were located on the slopes of a circular artificial mound in the western part of Krestovsky Island, on the coast of the Gulf of Finland. Construction started in 1932, initial project was designed by architect Aleksandr Nikolsky and his workshop. During the 1930s and 1940s, construction was mainly focused on groundworks for the artificial mound on the sea shore. Construction was interrupted by the World War II and the Siege of Leningrad, and resumed in 1945 with the return of citizens to Leningrad. Thousands of Red Army and Red Navy recruits were also conscripted as labor force for construction. The stadium was open on 30 July 1950 with the game between two main Leningrad teams, Zenit and Dynamo, drew 1-1. Initially the stadium held 100,000 people (including 16,000 standing places). For the match between Zenit and CSKA on 14 July 1951, additional temporary stands were installed, increasing the capacity of the stadium to 100,000. The stadium was sold out, and the attendance of 100,000
    6.00
    1 votes
    197
    Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

    Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

    • Olympic games used in: 1984 Summer Olympics
    The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum is a large outdoor sports stadium in the University Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, at Exposition Park, that is home to the Pacific-12 Conference's University of Southern California Trojans football team. It is the largest football stadium in the Pac-12. It is located next to the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena in Exposition Park, across the street from the University of Southern California (USC). The stadium is jointly owned by the State of California, Los Angeles County, and the City of Los Angeles; it is currently managed by the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission, which has board members drawn from the three ownership interests. The Coliseum is the only stadium to have hosted the Olympic Games twice, in 1932 and 1984. It is also the only Olympic stadium to have also hosted Super Bowls and World Series. It was declared a National Historic Landmark on July 27, 1984, the day before the opening ceremony of the 1984 Summer Olympics. The Coliseum is now primarily the home of the USC Trojan football team. During the recent stretch of its success in football, most of USC's regular home games, especially the alternating games with
    6.00
    1 votes
    198
    Nippon Budokan

    Nippon Budokan

    The Nippon Budokan (日本武道館, Nippon Budōkan), often shortened to simply Budokan, is an indoor arena in central Tokyo, Japan. This is the location where many "Live at the Budokan" albums were recorded. The Nippon Budokan, however, was originally built for the judo competition in the 1964 Summer Olympics, hence its name, rendered in English as Martial Arts Hall. The Nippon Budokan is located in Kitanomaru Park in the center of Tokyo, two minutes' walking distance from Kudanshita Subway Station, and near Yasukuni Shrine. This 42 m (140 ft) high imposing octagonal structure holds 14,201 people (arena seats: 2,762, 1st floor seats: 3,199, 2nd floor seats: 7,760, standee: 480) and is modeled after Yumedono (Hall of Dreams) in Hōryū-ji in Nara. Though it still functions as a venue for big musical events, its primary purpose is for Japanese martial arts (indeed, the name literally means "Japan Martial Arts Hall"). The national championships of the different branches of the martial arts judo, kendo, karate, aikido, shorinji kempo, kyūdō, naginata, etc.) are held annually at the Budokan. For wrestling fans the Budokan means professional wrestling's big shows. Now, the Budokan is mostly used by
    6.00
    1 votes
    199
    Ricoh Arena

    Ricoh Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament
    The Ricoh Arena (commonly known as The Ricoh), home to Coventry City F.C., is a stadium complex situated in the Rowleys Green district of the city of Coventry, England containing a 32,609 seater football stadium, a 6,000 square-metre exhibition hall, a hotel, a leisure club, and a casino. The site is also home to Arena Park Shopping Centre containing one of the largest Tesco Extra hypermarkets. The site was previously home to the Foleshill gasworks. It is named after its sponsor, Japanese company Ricoh who paid £10million deal for the naming rights over ten years. For the 2012 Summer Olympic Games and the 2015 Rugby World Cup, where stadium naming sponsorship is forbidden, the stadium will be known as the City of Coventry Stadium. The arena was opened officially by Dame Kelly Holmes and Sports Minister Richard Caborn on 24 February 2007. This was after the arena had been open for a year which included hosting a sell out England under 21 football match against Germany and a full season of Coventry City football matches. The decision to relocate Coventry City from Highfield Road to a new stadium – with a larger capacity and better road links and parking facilities – was made in 1997
    6.00
    1 votes
    200
    Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir

    Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir

    • Olympic games used in: 1924 Summer Olympics
    The Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir - stadium in Colombes, near Paris, France (also known as the Stade Olympique de Colombes, or simply Colombes to the locals). Named in memory of French rugby player Yves du Manoir in 1928, it was the main stadium for the 1924 Summer Olympics and had a capacity of 45,000 at the time. During the 1924 games, it hosted the athletics, some of the cycling, some of the horse riding, gymnastics, tennis, some of the football, rugby, and two of the modern pentathlon events (running, fencing). It was later expanded to a capacity of over 60,000. Colombes was also the venue for the 1938 World Cup Final between Italy and Hungary. Colombes hosted a number of French Cup finals and home games of the French national football and rugby union teams into the 1970s. It remained the country's largest stadium until the renovated Parc des Princes was inaugurated in 1972. By that time, Colombes' capacity had dropped to under 50,000 due to more stringent safety regulations. The national rugby union team played its last game at Colombes in 1972, and the national football team last played there in 1975. French professional football team RC Paris used Colombes as their home
    6.00
    1 votes
    201
    Sydney Entertainment Centre

    Sydney Entertainment Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 2000 Summer Olympics - Men's volleyball
    The Sydney Entertainment Centre (SEC) is a multi-purpose venue, located in Haymarket, Sydney, Australia. It opened in May 1983, to replace Sydney Stadium, which had been demolished to make way for a new railway. The centre is currently owned by the Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority, which administers the neighbouring Darling Harbour area, and managed under a lease. It is one of Sydney's larger concert venues, licenced to accommodate over 13,000 people as a conventional theatre or 8,000 as a theatre-in-the-round. The centre's only regular tenant is the Sydney Kings who play in the National Basketball League. The SEC, known as the "Kingdome" during Kings home games has a capacity of 10,517 for basketball. It is averaging an attendance of 1 million people each year and hosts concerts, family shows, sporting events and corporate events. Elton John has played numerous concerts there over the years, including eight dates in 1986 with an orchestra. The latter shows were some of the last he performed prior to throat surgery. In 1986, Dire Straits finished their 1985-1986 world tour by playing 21 consecutive shows at the venue. Genesis played 9 dates at the 1986 leg of the Invisible Touch
    6.00
    1 votes
    202
    The Big Hat

    The Big Hat

    • Olympic games used in: 1998 Winter Olympics
    The Big Hat (ビッグハット, Biggu Hatto) is an indoor ice hockey arena in Nagano, Japan with a capacity of 5,000 seated spectators. Its official name is the Nagano Wakasato Tamokuteki Sports Arena. The arena was completed and officially opened on December 10, 1995. The ice hockey games from the 1998 Winter Olympics, including the men's and women's finals, were held at this arena. The rink still serves as the location of the Nagano Cup, an annual ice hockey tournament held to commemorate the 1998 games, as well as many short track speed skating competitions. The Wakasato hall in the complex features a stage and theater seating, and frequently serves as a venue for music recitals and public meetings.
    6.00
    1 votes
    203
    Torino Palasport Olimpico

    Torino Palasport Olimpico

    • Olympic events contested here: Ice hockey at the 2006 Winter Olympics – Men’s Team
    The Palasport Olimpico or Olympic Arena or Palaisozaki (from the name of the architect) is a multipurpose indoor sports/concert arena located at the Santa Rita district in Turin, Italy. It is a few metres east of the Olympic Stadium. With its 12,300 seats (cost 87 million euros) is the largest indoor arena in Italy. Built for the 2006 Winter Olympics, it hosted with Torino Esposizioni the ice hockey events. The design of the building has been the subject of an international competition, won by a team led by architect Arata Isozaki of TokyoComposed the study Archa S.P.A. Turin, Italy Arup s.r.l. Milan, Ing. Joseph Amaro, Arch. Mark Brizio. The venue was designed by the Japanese architect Arata Isozaki Italian architect Pier Paolo Maggiora and is part of the larger complex known as the central compartment Olympic Composed of Olympic stadiums, the Swimming Hall and Park parade ground. The futuristic building looks like a strict rectangular Cartesian coated stainless steel and glass, with a base of 183 to 100 metres. Spread over four levels, two underground ( up to 7.5 metres below ground) and two outdoor (up to 12 metres high ) . The overall length of the plant is about 200
    6.00
    1 votes
    204

    Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Village

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    For the location of the Olympic Village in Singapore, see Nanyang Technological University or 2010 Summer Youth Olympics#Youth Olympic Village The Vancouver Olympic Village (VVL), is an Olympic Village built for the 2010 Winter Olympics and 2010 Winter Paralympics hosted in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. A 600,000 sq ft (56,000 m) village with over 600 units, that was able to accommodate over 2,800 athletes, coaches, and officials. The site, a former industrial area which was previously mostly parking lot, is located on the shoreline at the southeast corner of False Creek, north of 2nd Avenue between Quebec and Manitoba Streets. Just south of Science World, its waterfront is part of the False Creek Seawall promenade and bike route, and is adjacent to the stations of the Granville Island Heritage Railway, the Spyglass Place pedestrian ferry wharf (served by Aquabus and False Creek Ferries), the Science World pedestrian ferry wharf (normally served by Aquabus and False Creek Ferries but closed temporarily from 25 January 2010 to 24 March 2010) and the Main Street and Olympic Village SkyTrain stations. The Whistler Olympic and Paralympic Village (WVL) is located in Whistler,
    6.00
    1 votes
    205
    Yoyogi National Gymnasium

    Yoyogi National Gymnasium

    Yoyogi National Gymnasium (国立代々木競技場, Kokuritsu Yoyogi Kyōgi-jō) is an arena in Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan which is famous for its suspension roof design. It was designed by Kenzo Tange and built between 1961 and 1964 to house swimming and diving events in the 1964 Summer Olympics. A separate annex was used for the basketball competition at those same games. The design inspired Frei Otto's arena designs for the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. The arena holds 13,291 people (9,079 stand seats, 4,124 arena seats and 88 "royal box" seats) and is now primarily used for ice hockey, futsal and basketball.
    6.00
    1 votes
    206
    Whistler Sliding Centre

    Whistler Sliding Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Luge at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Men's singles
    The Whistler Sliding Centre (French: Centre des sports de glisse de Whistler) is a Canadian bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track located in Whistler, British Columbia, that is 125 km (78 mi) north of Vancouver. The centre is part of the Whistler Blackcomb resort, which comprises two ski mountains separated by Fitzsimmons Creek. Located on the lowermost slope of the northern mountain (Blackcomb Mountain), Whistler Sliding Centre hosted the bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton (an individual sport in which the racer slides down the track head first) competitions for the 2010 Winter Olympics. Design work started in late 2004 with construction taking place from June 2005 to December 2007. Bobsledders Pierre Lueders and Justin Kripps of Canada took the first run on the track on 19 December 2007. Certification took place in March 2008 with over 200 runs from six different start houses (the place where the sleds start their runs), and was approved both by the International Bobsleigh and Tobogganing Federation (FIBT) and the International Luge Federation (FIL). Training runs took place in late 2008 in preparation for the World Cup events in all three sports in early 2009. World Cup competitions
    4.33
    3 votes
    207
    Rogers Arena

    Rogers Arena

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Ice hockey at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Men's tournament
    Rogers Arena, nicknamed "The Phone Booth" and "The Cable Box" (even though Rogers no longer provides cable television service in western Canada) and also "The Garage" (when it was called GM Place), is an indoor sports arena located at 800 Griffiths Way in the downtown area of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Opened in 1995, the arena was known as General Motors Place (GM Place) from its opening until July 6, 2010, when General Motors Canada ended its naming rights sponsorship and a new agreement for those rights was reached with Rogers Communications. Rogers Arena was built to replace Pacific Coliseum as Vancouver's primary indoor sports facility and in part due to the National Basketball Association's 1995 expansion into Canada, where Vancouver and Toronto were given expansion teams. The arena seats 18,890 for ice hockey and 19,700 for basketball, with 88 luxury suites, 12 hospitality suites and 2,195 club seats. It is home to the Vancouver Canucks of the National Hockey League and was the site for the ice hockey events at the 2010 Winter Olympics. The name of the arena temporarily became Canada Hockey Place during the Olympics. It was previously home to the Vancouver
    5.00
    2 votes
    208
    Santa Anita Park

    Santa Anita Park

    Santa Anita Park is a thoroughbred racetrack in Arcadia, California, United States. It offers some of the prominent racing events in the United States during the winter and in spring. With its backdrop of the San Gabriel Mountains, it is considered by many as the world's most beautiful race track. The track is home to numerous prestigious races including both the Santa Anita Derby and the Santa Anita Handicap. In 2010, Santa Anita's ownership was moved to MI Developments Inc. (MID). Trevor Denman is the track announcer. Santa Anita Park was opened on December 25, 1934 and is the oldest racetrack in Southern California. It was designed in the art deco style by architect Gordon B. Kaufman. Originally part of "Rancho Santa Anita", owned originally by former San Gabriel Mission Mayor-Domo, Claudio Lopez, named after a family member "Anita Cota". The ranch was later acquired by rancher, Hugo Reid, a Scotsman. Later, it would be owned by gold prospector Lucky Baldwin. He initially founded a racetrack adjacent to the present site in what is today, Arcadia, outside of the city of Los Angeles in 1904. It closed in 1909 and burned in 1912. In 1933, California legalized parimutuel wagering
    5.00
    2 votes
    209
    St. Moritz-Celerina Olympic Bobrun

    St. Moritz-Celerina Olympic Bobrun

    • Olympic games used in: 1948 Winter Olympics
    The St. Moritz-Celerina Olympic Bobrun (known officially as the Olympia Bobrun St. Moritz-Celerina) is a bobsleigh piste located in St. Moritz, Switzerland. Constructed in 1903, it officially opened on New Year's Day 1904 and is the oldest bobsleigh track in the world and the only one that is naturally refrigerated. It is also used for other sliding sports, including skeleton and luge. The track was initially created for winter guests from Great Britain who created bobsleigh. In 1897, the St. Moritz Bobsleigh Club was created. Because of popularity of the sport, fund raising for a track begin which was completed in 1903 with CHF 11,000 raised. The track served as host to the bobsleigh events for both the 1928 and the 1948 Winter Olympics. Track modifications have been made several times since the 1948 games, especially on the lower part of the track to meet the demands for higher speeds of the sleds and the increased braking issues after the end of the run. The Horse shoe curve, constructed of natural stones, was strengthened and its height and radius increased during the winter of 1995 and 1996 with a second and final modification taking place in 1995. This was also important
    5.00
    2 votes
    210
    The Forum

    The Forum

    The Forum (known for a 15-year period as the Great Western Forum) is an indoor arena, in Inglewood, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. Along with Madison Square Garden, it was one of the most well-known indoor sports venues in the US, during its time operating as a major venue. The Forum achieved its greatest fame as the home of the Los Angeles Lakers, of the NBA and of the Los Angeles Kings, of the NHL from 1967–1999, when the teams moved to Staples Center. The building was also the home of the Los Angeles Sparks, of the WNBA, from 1997, until they too moved to Staples Center in 2001. The Forum was the site of the 1972 and 1983 NBA All-Star Games, the 1981 NHL All-Star Game, Basketball at the 1984 Summer Olympics and hosted the Big West Conference men's basketball tournament from 1983–1988 and also the 1989 Pacific-10 Conference men's basketball tournament. In 2000, it was acquired by the Faithful Central Bible Church, which used it for occasional church services, while also leasing the building for sporting events, concerts and other events. In December 2010, Madison Square Garden, Inc. (MSG) was reported to be finalizing a deal to purchase the Forum. A possible refurbishment
    5.00
    2 votes
    211
    Old Trafford

    Old Trafford

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament
    Old Trafford is a football stadium in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, England, and the home of Manchester United. With a capacity of 75,765, Old Trafford is the second-largest football stadium in England after Wembley, the third-largest in the United Kingdom and the eleventh-largest in Europe. The stadium is approximately 0.5 miles (0.8 km) from Old Trafford Cricket Ground and the adjacent tram station. The ground, nicknamed the Theatre of Dreams by Bobby Charlton, has been United's permanent residence since 1910, with the exception of an eight-year absence from 1941 to 1949, following the bombing of the stadium during the Second World War. During this period, the club shared Maine Road with local rivals Manchester City. The ground underwent several expansions in the 1990s and 2000s, including the addition of extra tiers to the North, West and East Stands, which served to return the ground almost to its original capacity of 80,000. Future expansion is likely to involve the addition of a second tier to the South Stand, which would raise the capacity to over 90,000. The stadium's record attendance was recorded in 1939, when 76,962 spectators watched the FA Cup semi-final between
    4.50
    2 votes
    212

    Water Polo Arena

    • Olympic events contested here: Water polo at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament
    The Water Polo Arena was a venue of the 2012 Summer Olympics held in London from 27 July to 12 August 2012. It is situated in the south-east corner of the Olympic Park, alongside the Aquatics Centre, and opposite the Olympic Stadium on the opposite bank of the Waterworks River. Construction on the temporary structure began in spring 2011. During the Olympics, the 5,000-seat arena hosted both the men's and women's water-polo competitions, and contained both a warm-up pool and a 37-metre (121-foot) competition pool. The Aquatics Centre and Water Polo Arena are adjacent to each other in one of the most compact areas of the park. To make the best use of the space available, some back-of-house facilities, such as space for broadcasters, catering and security were shared between the two venues. The first dedicated water-polo venue to be built for an Olympics, the structure will be taken down after the games. Elements of the venue are expected to be reused or relocated elsewhere.Parts of the Roofing Covers and membranes of different temporary venues of the Building will be recycled via Vinyloop. This allows to meet the standards of the Olympic Delivery Authority, concerning environmental
    4.50
    2 votes
    213
    4.50
    2 votes
    214
    Beijing Science and Technology University Gymnasium

    Beijing Science and Technology University Gymnasium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Taekwondo at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's 58 kg
    The Beijing Science and Technology University Gymnasium (simplified Chinese: 北京科技大学体育馆; traditional Chinese: 北京科技大學體育館; pinyin: Běijīng Kējì Dàxué Tǐyùguǎn) is an indoor arena located on the campus of the University of Science and Technology Beijing. The venue covers an area of 2.38 hectares and the total floor space of construction reaches 24,662 square metres. The seating capacity is 8,024 seats, including 3,956 temporary ones. It consists of a main gym and a comprehensive facility. Construction started on October 2005 and was completed in August 2007. At the 2008 Summer Olympics it hosted the judo and taekwondo matches. During the 2008 Summer Paralympics, it hosted the preliminary rounds of wheelchair basketball and the wheelchair rugby competition. After the Olympic Games, the gymnasium could be used to host sport competitions, art performances, and cultural activities. It will also continue to serve the campus.
    5.00
    1 votes
    215
    Canberra Stadium

    Canberra Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    Canberra Stadium (originally known as Bruce Stadium) is a facility primarily used for rugby league and rugby union games, located adjacent to the Australian Institute of Sport in Canberra, the capital of Australia. Bruce is the Canberra suburb where the stadium is located, and in turn Bruce was named after Stanley Bruce, Australian Prime Minister 1923–1929. Constructed in 1977 for the Pacific Conference Games, it also was the venue for the 4th IAAF World Cup in Athletics. At the latter meet, the still-current world record for the women's 400m for women was recorded by East German Marita Koch, and a world record for the women's 4x100m was set by East Germany and stood until the 2012 London Olympic Games. In the late 1980s the running track was removed and re-located to the warm up stadium at the AIS site and in 1990 the Canberra Raiders Rugby league team started playing their home games at Bruce in 1990 after they became more successful. The removal of the track meant that Australian rules football, more specifically the Australian Football League (AFL), could now be played at the ground and in 1995 the first AFL match for premiership points was contested between the West Coast
    5.00
    1 votes
    216
    Titan Gym

    Titan Gym

    Titan Gym is a 4,000 seat, indoor multi-purpose stadium on the campus of California State University, Fullerton in Fullerton, California. Titan Gym was built in 1964. Twenty years later, the gym hosted handball competitions for the 1984 Summer Olympics. Olympic athletes haven't been the only famous people to grace Titan Gym though. Ronald Reagan spoke on behalf of the Bush/Quayle campaign in 1988, his last Orange County appearance as President of the United States. In order to combat the old age, as well as wear and tear, on Titan Gym there have been a number of recent improvements made. Bleachers, which were used to seat the attendees, have been replaced with chair-back seats. The floor was completely redesigned and resurfaced. A new scoreboard was unveiled before the 2003 season and additional balcony seating was added before the start of the 2004 season. For the Cal State Fullerton Titans athletes, Titan Gym is the home to a practice floor for the basketball and volleyball programs as well as additional practice rooms for wrestling, women's gymnastics, and fencing. Future renovation plans include an expansion of the Titan Gym entrance to include a Titans Hall of Fame as well as
    5.00
    1 votes
    217
    White City Stadium

    White City Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 1908 Summer Olympics
    White City Stadium (originally The Great Stadium) was built in White City, London, for the 1908 Summer Olympics and is often seen as the precursor to the modern seater stadium and noted for hosting the finish of the first modern distance marathon. It also hosted greyhound racing, speedway and a match at the 1966 World Cup, before the stadium was demolished in 1985. It was the first Olympic Stadium in the UK. Designed by the engineer J.J. Webster and completed in 10 months by George Wimpey, on the site of the Franco-British Exhibition, this stadium with a seating capacity of 68,000 was opened by King Edward VII on 27 April 1908. The cost of construction was £60,000. Upon completion, the stadium had a running track 24 ft wide (7.3 m) and three laps to the mile (536 m); outside there was a 35-foot-wide (11 m), 660-yard (600 m) cycle track. The infield included a swimming and diving pool. Many events of the 1908 Olympics were at the stadium itself (except for several football games hosted at Shepherds Bush Green), whereas nowadays there are many arenas. The Olympic rugby union final between Australia and Great Britain was held in the stadium on 26 October 1908 and events such as
    5.00
    1 votes
    218
    Bondi Beach

    Bondi Beach

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 2000 Summer Olympics - Women's beach volleyball
    Bondi Beach or Bondi Bay ( /ˈbɒndaɪ/ BON-dy) is a popular beach and the name of the surrounding suburb in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Bondi Beach is located 7 km (4 mi) east of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of Waverley Council, in the Eastern Suburbs. Bondi, North Bondi and Bondi Junction are neighbouring suburbs. "Bondi" or "Boondi" is an Aboriginal word meaning water breaking over rocks or noise of water breaking over rocks. The Australian Museum records that Bondi means place where a flight of nullas took place. In 1809, the road builder William Roberts received a grant of land in the area. In 1851, Edward Smith Hall and Francis O'Brien purchased 200 acres (0.81 km) of the Bondi area that included most of the beach frontage, which was named the "The Bondi Estate." Hall was O'Brien's father-in-law. Between 1855 and 1877 O'Brien purchased his father-in-law's share of the land, renamed the land the "O'Brien Estate," and made the beach and the surrounding land available to the public as a picnic ground and amusement resort. As the beach became increasingly popular, O'Brien threatened to stop public beach access. However, the Municipal
    4.00
    2 votes
    219
    Olympisch Stadion

    Olympisch Stadion

    The Olympic Stadium (Dutch: Olympisch Stadion) was built as the main stadium for the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam. The first event at the stadium was the start of the 1928 Olympic hockey tournament on 17 May 1928. When completed, the stadium had a capacity of 31,600. Following the completion of the rival De Kuip stadium in Rotterdam in 1937, the Amsterdam authorities increased the capacity of the Olympic Stadium to 64,000 by adding a second ring to the stadium. AFC Ajax used the Olympic Stadium for international games until 1996, when the Amsterdam Arena was completed. In 1987 the stadium was listed as a national monument. Renovation started in 1996, and the stadium was refurbished into the original construction of 1928. The second ring of 1937 was removed, reducing capacity to 22,288, and the stadium was made suitable for track and field competitions again. Since 2005, the stadium is home to a sports museum, the Olympic Experience Amsterdam. It is no longer used as a football stadium. The Olympic Stadium was designed by architect Jan Wils, and is one of the finest examples of Amsterdamse School architecture, complementing the surrounding neighbourhood designed by H.P.
    4.00
    2 votes
    220

    Georgia Dome

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    The Georgia Dome is a domed stadium located in Atlanta, Georgia, United States, between downtown to the east and Vine City to the west. It is primarily the home stadium for the NFL Atlanta Falcons and the NCAA Division I FCS Georgia State Panthers football team. It is owned and operated by the State of Georgia as part of the Georgia World Congress Center Authority. The Georgia Dome was the largest domed structure in the world until 1999, when London's Millennium Dome was completed. The Dome is accessible by rail via MARTA's Blue and Green lines, which service the nearby Dome/GWCC/Philips Arena/CNN Center and Vine City stations. It is the 11th-oldest stadium in the NFL – 16 other venues that were hosting NFL teams at the time of the Dome's opening have either since closed or merely lost their NFL tenants. It was announced in 2010 that the Georgia World Congress Center, the stadium's operator, is pursuing a new stadium with a retractable roof. If a deal is reached, the Georgia Dome would then be demolished. The Georgia Dome was completed in 1992 at a cost of $214 million (US), which came from the Georgia General Assembly, making it one of the largest state-funded construction
    4.00
    1 votes
    221
    Lake Lanier

    Lake Lanier

    • Olympic games used in: 1996 Summer Olympics
    Lake Lanier (officially Lake Sidney Lanier) is a reservoir in the northern portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. It was created by the completion of Buford Dam on the Chattahoochee River in 1956, and is also fed by the waters of the Chestatee River. The lake encompasses 38,000 acres (150 km) or 59 square miles of water, and 692 miles (1,114 km) of shoreline at normal level, a "full summer pool" of 1,071 feet (326 m) above mean sea level. It was named for poet Sidney Lanier, and was built and is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It is patrolled by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR). The lake is in Hall, Forsyth, Dawson, Gwinnett, and Lumpkin counties, split about 60%, 30%, 5%, 4%, and 1% respectively, filling the valley into numerous small arms and fingers. The former thalweg of the Chestatee and the Chattahoochee south of it form the county line between Hall and a tiny corner of Gwinnett to the east, and Dawson and Forsyth to the west. One of the main purposes of the lake is flood control downstream of the lake, mainly protecting metro Atlanta. There have only been two major flooding events on the downstream section since the construction of Buford Dam.
    4.00
    1 votes
    222

    Prado Regional Park

    Prado Regional Park is a 2,000-acre (8.1 km) park in Chino, California within the jurisdiction of San Bernardino County. It offers fishing, a shooting range (site of the 1984 Olympic shooting events), archery, camping, and a golf course.
    4.00
    1 votes
    223
    Royal Artillery Barracks

    Royal Artillery Barracks

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Shooting at the 2012 Summer Olympics - Men's 10m air rifle
    The Royal Artillery Barracks at Woolwich in the Royal Borough of Greenwich in London, was the home of the Royal Artillery. The Barracks were built between 1776 and 1802 on a site overlooking Woolwich Common. Their use by the RA ended with the departure of 16 Regiment, Royal Artillery in July 2007. Woolwich has extensive links with weaponry. Besides the Royal Artillery Barracks it was the location of the Royal Arsenal complex, which was the British Government's principal armaments manufacturing facility for over 200 years, and the Royal Military Academy which trained artillery officers and engineers from 1741 to 1939. There was also a military hospital based at Woolwich which closed in the mid 1990s. Woolwich Common is still a designated military training area although troops are not often seen nowadays. Woolwich Dockyard was one of the principal Royal Dockyards during the Tudor and Stuart periods, although it closed in the late 19th century for Royal Navy use as the Thames was by then too difficult to navigate for the naval vessels of the time. Most Royal Artillery units have now moved out and the public duties line infantry battalion and incremental companies of the Foot Guards
    4.00
    1 votes
    224

    Sydney Baseball Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    Sydney Baseball Stadium is a baseball stadium in Sydney, Australia. It hosted the baseball events for the 2000 Summer Olympics. The stadium holds 15,000 people and was built in 1998.
    4.00
    1 votes
    225
    Velòdrom d'Horta

    Velòdrom d'Horta

    Velòdrom d'Horta is a velodrome in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain that was the track cycling venue for the 1992 Summer Olympics. It was also the venue for the UCI Track Cycling World Championships in 1984. The velodrome, designed by Esteve Bonell and Francesc Rius, was built in 1984 as the first of Barcelona's construction projects in preparation for the bid for the 1992 Summer Olympics in 1986. It was the first velodrome built to new FIAC rules permitting a 250 m (270 yd) track if surfaced with wood. The building won the FAD architecture prize in 1985. It was the last permanent open-air velodrome used for Olympic Track Cycling events (Atlanta's velodrome at Stone Mountain in 1996 was temporary). Olympic velodromes have been built with a roof since 2000.
    4.00
    1 votes
    226
    Wembley Stadium

    Wembley Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament
    Wembley Stadium (often referred to simply as Wembley, pronounced /ˈwɛmbli/, or sometimes as the New Wembley) is a football stadium located in Wembley Park, in the Borough of Brent, London, England. It opened in 2007 and was built on the site of the previous 1923 Wembley Stadium. The earlier Wembley stadium, originally called the Empire Stadium, was often referred to as "The Twin Towers" and was one of the world's most famous football stadia until its demolition in 2003. It is a UEFA category four stadium. The 90,000-capacity venue (105,000 combined seating and standing) is the second largest stadium in Europe, and serves as England's national stadium. It is the home venue of the England national football team, and hosts the latter stages of the top level domestic club cup competition, the FA Cup. It is owned by English football's governing body, The Football Association (The FA), through their subsidiary Wembley National Stadium Ltd (WNSL). Designed by Foster and Partners and HOK Sport (since renamed Populous), it includes a partially retractable roof. A signature feature of the stadium, following on from the old Wembley's distinctive Twin Towers, is the 134-metre-high (440 ft)
    4.00
    1 votes
    227
    All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club

    All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Tennis at the 2012 Summer Olympics - Men's Singles
    The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (AELTC), also known as the All-England Club, based at Aorangi Park, Wimbledon, London, England, is a private members club. It is best known as the venue for the Wimbledon Championships, the only Grand Slam tennis event still held on grass. Initially an amateur event that occupied club members and their friends for a few days each summer, the championships have become far more prominent than the club itself. However, it still operates as a members tennis club, with many courts in use all year round. The club has 375 full members, about 100 temporary playing members, and a number of honorary members, including past Wimbledon singles champions and people who have rendered distinguished service to the game. In order to become a full or temporary member, an applicant must obtain letters of support from four existing full members, two of whom must have known the applicant for at least three years. The name is then added to the Candidates' List. Honorary Members are elected from time to time by the club's Committee. Membership carries with it the right to purchase two tickets for each day of the Wimbledon Championships. The patron of the club
    0.00
    0 votes
    228
    BC Place

    BC Place

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    BC Place is a multi-purpose stadium located at the north side of False Creek, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It is owned and operated by the BC Pavilion Corporation (PavCo), a crown corporation of the province. When originally opened on June 19, 1983, it was the world's largest air-supported stadium. In 2010 the stadium closed for a major renovation and reconfiguration. It reopened on September 30, 2011 as the world's largest cable supported retractable roof stadium. It is the home field for the BC Lions of the Canadian Football League (CFL) and the Vancouver Whitecaps FC of Major League Soccer (MLS). It was the Olympic Stadium during the 2010 Winter Olympic and 2010 Paralympics and has hosted the CFL Grey Cup eight times. The BC Sports Hall of Fame is located within the stadium. Construction of the stadium started in 1981 and was completed in 1983. BC Place was built as part of the preparations for the 1986 World's Fair, Expo 86. The stadium was the world's largest air-supported domed stadium until May 4, 2010 when it was deflated for the last time in preparation for the erection of its new retractable roof. Its original air-supported design was similar to the Hubert H.
    0.00
    0 votes
    229
    0.00
    0 votes
    230
    Capital Indoor Stadium

    Capital Indoor Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Men's volleyball
    The Capital Indoor Stadium (simplified Chinese: 首都体育馆; traditional Chinese: 首都體育館; pinyin: Shǒudū Tǐyùguǎn) is an indoor arena in Beijing, China that was built in 1968. It hosted matches between national table tennis teams of China and the United States in 1971; these matches were part of the exchange program known as ping pong diplomacy. Capital Indoor Stadium recently underwent a renovation and expansion that was completed in late 2007 for the 2008 Summer Olympics, where it hosted volleyball events. It was renovated in 2001 to become a venue for the World University Games. On the 23rd of October 2010, the South Korean boy band Super Junior held the Super Junior 3rd ASIA Tour Super Show 3 in this stadium. It has a capacity of 17,345 and a floor space of 54,707 square meters expanded from the old 53,000. The stadium hosted one of the first NBA games to China, hosted on October 17, 2004 in front of a sellout capacity of 17,903.
    0.00
    0 votes
    231
    Chaoyang Park Beach Volleyball Ground

    Chaoyang Park Beach Volleyball Ground

    • Olympic games used in: 2008 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Volleyball at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Women's beach volleyball
    The Chaoyang Park Beach Volleyball Ground (simplified Chinese: 朝阳公园沙滩排球场; traditional Chinese: 朝陽公園沙灘排球場; pinyin: Cháoyáng Gōngyuán Shātān Páiqiú Chǎng) is one of 9 temporary venues used for the 2008 Summer Olympics. It was located in Chaoyang Park in Beijing. The ground was used for the beach volleyball matches. The venue had a capacity of 12,000, consisting of 1 competition ground, 2 warmup grounds, and 6 training grounds. Court 2 was used on Day 6 of competition.
    0.00
    0 votes
    232

    Dongdaemun Stadium

    The Dongdaemun Stadium, was in Seoul, South Korea and included a multi-purpose athletics stadium, a baseball park and other sports facilities. It was located near the Dongdaemun or Great East Gate and the surrounding Dongdaemun market and had many vendors selling athletics-related goods. It was demolished in 2008 to make way for the Dongdaemun Design Plaza & Park. Construction on the main athletics stadium and baseball field began on May 26, 1925 and was opened for use in March 1926 as the Gyeongseong Stadium. The venue was the main center for sports events in the city, and, along with the Kirim Stadium in Pyongyang, was one of the two venues used in the Gyeongseong-Pyongyang inter-city soccer tournament in the 1930s. The stadium was the location for mass celebrations of the end of Japanese colonial rule, as almost 250,000 citizens gathered at the venue on August 15, 1945, to celebrate the liberation. Additional construction was undertaken in 1962 to modernize the two existing venues as well as create a swimming pool, volleyball courts and soft clay tennis courts. Floodlights were added to the baseball venue in 1966 and the athletics venue in 1968 to allow for nighttime sporting
    0.00
    0 votes
    233

    Fengtai Softball Field

    • Olympic events contested here: Softball at the 2008 Summer Olympics
    Fengtai Softball Field, or Fengtai Sports Center Softball Field (simplified Chinese: 丰台体育中心垒球场; traditional Chinese: 豐臺體育中心壘球場; pinyin: Fēngtái Tǐyù Zhōngxīn Lěiqiúchǎng) is a softball stadium located in Beijing, China. It hosted the softball competitions at the 2008 Summer Olympics. The complex consists of 2 competition grounds and 1 training ground. The stadium has a capacity of 13,000 and a floor space of 15,570 square metres. It also has a backup field with a capacity of 3500 and 2 training fields. It was also one of the venues of the 1990 Asian Games and the 1992 Women's Softball World Cup Championships. The stadium's renovation was completed on July 28, 2006 ready for the XI ISF Women's World Championship in late August. It was the first Olympic venue in Beijing to be completed and put to use.
    0.00
    0 votes
    234
    Greenwich Park

    Greenwich Park

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Equestrian at the 2012 Summer Olympics - Individual dressage
    Greenwich Park is a former hunting park in Greenwich and one of the largest single green spaces in south-east London. One of the Royal Parks of London, and the first to be enclosed (in 1433), it covers 74 hectares (180 acres), and is part of the Greenwich World Heritage Site. It commands fine views over the River Thames, the Isle of Dogs and the City of London. The park is open from 06:00 for pedestrians (and 07:00 for traffic) all year round and closes at dusk. The estate of some 200 acres (81 ha) was originally owned by the Abbey of St. Peter at Ghent, but reverted to the Crown in 1427 and was given by Henry VI to his uncle Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (Barker 1999). He built a house by the river, Bella Court, and a small castle, called Greenwich Castle as well as Duke Humphrey’s Tower, on the hill. The former evolved first into the Tudor Palace of Placentia and then into the Queen's House and Greenwich Hospital. Greenwich Castle, by now in disrepair, was chosen for the site of the Royal Observatory by Charles II in 1675. In the 15th century the park was mostly heathland and probably used for hawking. In the next century, deer were introduced by Henry VIII for hunting, and a
    0.00
    0 votes
    235
    Hindmarsh Stadium

    Hindmarsh Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    Hindmarsh Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium located in Adelaide, South Australia. It is the home of the Australian A-League team, Adelaide United. The stadium now has a capacity of 17,000, of which 15,500 is seated. Home team, Adelaide United regularly fill this capacity, and averaged crowds of over 12,000 to its matches during the 2006/2007 Season and 2007/2008 Season. United used the stadium for its home matches in the 2008 AFC Asian Champions League, the 2010 AFC Asian Champions League, and the 2012 AFC Asian Champions League. Built in 1960, the stadium stands on the site that was once Hindmarsh Oval which housed the West Torrens Football Club of the SANFL from 1905 until 1921. The Soccer Association of South Australia owned land on a former brick pit on Torrens Road at Brompton named Rowley Park which was located only 5 km from the city and the original plan was for the land to be the home of Soccer in SA. However, the Soccer Association had received press regarding its failure to grow grass on the site. Rowley Park also had a tendency to flood during winter as the bottom of "The Brick Pit" was below the level of the water table which made playing soccer virtually impossible.
    0.00
    0 votes
    236
    Hong Kong Sports Institute

    Hong Kong Sports Institute

    • Olympic events contested here: Equestrian at the 2008 Summer Olympics - Team eventing
    The Hong Kong Sports Institute (香港體育學院) is a sports institute in the Fo Tan, Sha Tin district of Hong Kong. It was the site of equestrian events of the 2008 Summer Olympics.
    0.00
    0 votes
    237
    Hyde Park

    Hyde Park

    • Olympic games used in: 2012 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Swimming at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's marathon 10 kilometre
    Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London, United Kingdom, and one of the Royal Parks of London, famous for its Speakers' Corner. The park was the site of the Great Exhibition of 1851, for which the Crystal Palace was designed by Joseph Paxton. The park has become a traditional location for mass demonstrations. The Chartists, the Reform League, the Suffragettes and the Stop The War Coalition have all held protests in the park. Many protesters on the Liberty and Livelihood March in 2002 started their march from Hyde Park. On 20 July 1982 in the Hyde Park and Regents Park bombings, two bombs linked to the Provisional Irish Republican Army caused the death of eight members of the Household Cavalry and the Royal Green Jackets and seven horses. The park is divided in two by the Serpentine. The park is contiguous with Kensington Gardens; although often still assumed to be part of Hyde Park, Kensington Gardens has been technically separate since 1728, when Queen Caroline made a division between the two. Hyde Park covers 142 hectares (350 acres) and Kensington Gardens covers 111 hectares (270 acres), giving an overall area of 253 hectares (630 acres), making the combined area
    0.00
    0 votes
    238
    Luzhniki Palace of Sports

    Luzhniki Palace of Sports

    Luzhniki Palace of Sports, formerly the Palace of Sports of the Central Lenin Stadium, is a sports palace (arena) in Moscow, Russia, a part of the Luzhniki Sports Complex. Built in 1956, it originally had a spectator capacity of 13,700. In the past it was the host site of the world and European championships in ice hockey, gymnastics, volleyball, basketball, boxing and other sports. It hosted several games during the 1972 Summit Series ice hockey tournament between the Soviet Union and Canada and was a venue for gymnastics and judo events at the 1980 Summer Olympics. In 2002, the arena experienced a major reconstruction and the seating capacity was lowered to 11,500. The arena subsequently hosted the 2005 World Figure Skating Championships. It was primarily used for ice hockey as the home arena for HC Dynamo Moscow up until the year 2000, in which the club moved to Minor Arena.
    0.00
    0 votes
    239
    Pacific Coliseum

    Pacific Coliseum

    • Olympic games used in: 2010 Winter Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Short track speed skating at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Men's 1500 metres
    Pacific Coliseum is an indoor arena, at Hastings Park, in Vancouver, British Columbia. Its main use has been for ice hockey and the arena has been the home for several ice hockey teams. The arena is currently the home of the Vancouver Giants of the WHL. Other hockey tenants of the Pacific Coliseum have been the Vancouver Canucks, of the NHL, from 1970–1995 and the WHL, from 1968-1970, the Vancouver Blazers, of the WHA, from 1973–1975 and the Vancouver Voodoo, of the RHI, from 1994–1995. It was completed in 1968, on the site of the Pacific National Exhibition. Originally holding 15,713 for ice hockey, capacity has fluctuated slightly over the years and currently holds 16,281. During the 2010 Olympic Winter Games, it was the venue for figure skating and short track speed skating. The arena also hosts a variety of concerts and other events. Designed by W. K. Noppe in 1966–67, with its simple geometric shape and distinctive ring of white panels, the building can be classified as formalist architecture. Used initially as home to the WHL's Vancouver Canucks, the building was used to attract an NHL franchise in 1970 and a World Hockey Association franchise in 1973. The Coliseum underwent
    0.00
    0 votes
    240

    Parnitha Olympic Mountain Bike Venue

    • Olympic games used in: 2004 Summer Olympics
    The Parnitha Olympic Mountain Bike Venue was the site of the Mountain Biking events at the 2004 Summer Olympics at Athens, Greece. The venue is located at Parnitha, a mountain to the north of Athens in Acharnai.
    0.00
    0 votes
    241
    Penrith Whitewater Stadium

    Penrith Whitewater Stadium

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Penrith Whitewater Stadium is located near Sydney, Australia. It is an artificial whitewater sporting facility which hosted the canoe/kayak slalom events at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney. The facility is part of the Penrith Lakes Scheme, which is converting open-pit sand and gravel mines into lakes for recreation. It is close to Cranebrook, New South Wales and is adjacent to the Sydney International Regatta Centre. These lakes are not filled via the Nepean River, but are filled via rain water and ground water. The operation of the facility aerates the water and improves water quality in the flat water rowing and canoeing course. The course is in the shape of a massive 'U', 320 metres in length, between 0.8 and 1.2 metres deep and between eight and 12 metres wide. The overall drop from top to bottom is 5.5 metres. During events a conveyor belt is used to take boats, and their occupants, from the finishing pool back to the start. As the course has been built in a relatively flat area (flood plain), it has been built up and landscaped to create the sloping course necessary for the required rapids. Five of the six available 300-kilowatt pumps lift the water from the bottom to
    0.00
    0 votes
    242

    Qinhuangdao Olympic Sports Centre Stadium

    Qinhuangdao Olympic Sports Center Stadium (simplified Chinese: 秦皇岛市奥体中心体育场; traditional Chinese: 秦皇島市奧體中心體育場; pinyin: Qínhuángdǎo Shì Ào Tǐ Zhōngxīn Tǐyùchǎng) served as one of the football venues during the 2008 Summer Olympics. The multi-use stadium lies inside the Qinhuangdao Olympic Sports Centre on the Hebei Avenue in Qinhuangdao, China. Its construction was started in May 2002 and completed on July 30, 2004. The sports centre covers 168,000 square metres, the Olympic-standard stadium has a seating capacity of 33,572, 0.2% of which are reserved for the disabled persons.
    0.00
    0 votes
    243
    Rose Bowl

    Rose Bowl

    • Olympic games used in: 1932 Summer Olympics
    • Olympic events contested here: Football at the 1984 Summer Olympics
    The Rose Bowl is an outdoor athletic stadium in Pasadena, California, U.S., in Los Angeles County. The stadium is the site of the annual college football bowl game, the Rose Bowl, held on New Year's Day. In 1982, it became the home field of the UCLA Bruins college football team of the Pac-12 Conference. It hosted events during the 1932 and 1984 Olympics, and was the venue for the 1994 FIFA World Cup Final and the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup Final. The natural grass playing field runs in a north–south configuration and sits at an elevation of 825 feet (251 m) above sea level. The stadium is a National Historic Landmark and a California Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. Its design was based upon the Yale Bowl in New Haven, Connecticut. The game now known as the Rose Bowl Game was played at Tournament Park until 1922. The Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association, the game's organizer, realized that the temporary stands were inadequate for a crowd of more than 40,000, and sought to build a better, permanent stadium. The stadium was designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1921. His design was influenced by the Yale Bowl in New Haven, Connecticut, which was built in 1914. The Arroyo Seco
    0.00
    0 votes
    244
    Snowbasin

    Snowbasin

    • Olympic games used in: 2002 Winter Olympics
    Snowbasin Resort is located 33 miles (53 km) northeast of Salt Lake City, in Weber County, Utah. Opened in 1939, as part of an effort by the city of Ogden, Utah to restore the Wheeler Creek watershed, it is one of the oldest continually operating ski resorts in the United States. Over the next 50 years Snowbasin grew slowly. After a large investment in lifts and snowmaking by current owner Earl Holding, Snowbasin hosted the 2002 Winter Olympic alpine skiing races for downhill, combined, and super-G. The movie Frozen was filmed there in 2009. Snowbasin is located on Mount Ogden at the west end of State Route 226, which is connected to I-84 and SR-39 via SR-167 (New Trappers Loop Road). Snowbasin is one of the oldest continuously operating ski areas in the United States. Following the end of World War I and the Great Depression numerous small ski resorts were developed in Utah's snow-packed mountains, and Weber County wanted one of their own. They decided to redevelop the area in and around Wheeler Basin, a deteriorated watershed area that had been overgrazed and subjected to aggressive timber-harvesting. Lands were restored and turned over to the U.S. Forest Service, and by 1938 the
    0.00
    0 votes
    245
    Stadio Olimpico

    Stadio Olimpico

    • Olympic games used in: 1960 Summer Olympics
    The Stadio Olimpico is the main and largest sports facility of Rome, Italy. It is located within the Foro Italico sports complex on the north of the city. An asset of the Italian National Olympic Committee, the structure is intended primarily for football. It is the home stadium of Serie A clubs Lazio and Roma, the venue of the final Coppa Italia, the home venue of the Italian national rugby union team and Italy's national athletics stadium. It also occasionally hosts concerts of pop music and events of various kinds. Throughout its history, the Stadio Olimpico has undergone several substantial restructurings and a complete restyling: In its first stages, the Stadio Olimpico was called the Stadio dei Cipressi. It was designed and constructed within the larger project of the Foro Mussolini (Mussolini Forum), which was renamed Foro Italico after the war. Construction work began in 1927, under the direction of Turinese engineer Angelo Frisa and architect Enrico Del Debbio, and was finished, after few variations, in 1932. The construction of masonry stands wasn't foreseen, the original stands consisted of grassy terraces. In 1937 the construction of a second tier of stairs was started,
    0.00
    0 votes
    246
    State Hockey Centre

    State Hockey Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Sydney Olympic Park Hockey Centre, also known as the State Hockey Centre of New South Wales is a multi-use stadium in Sydney, Australia. It was built in 1998 as part of Sydney Olympic Park sporting complex, having held matches for the field hockey events at the 2000 Summer Olympics. Its current capacity is 8,000 people, with seating capacity for 4,000. For the Sydney Olympic Games capacity was boosted to 15,000 through the use of temporary stands. The Sydney Olympic Park Hockey Centre is a premier field hockey facility, with the governing body of hockey in New South Wales, Hockey NSW being based there. The Sydney representatives of both the male and female versions of the semi professional Australian Hockey League, the New South Wales Waratahs and the New South Wales Arrows both play their home games at the stadium. The stadium also hosted the field hockey at the 2000 Summer Olympics, in which the Kookaburras, the men's Australian national hockey team, won the bronze medal, and the Hockeyroos, the woman's Australian national hockey team won the gold medal for the third consecutive time. At the Sydney Paralympic games in 2000, the Paralympic football 5 and 7-a-side games were
    0.00
    0 votes
    247
    Swimming Pool

    Swimming Pool

    The Olympic Pool, formerly Swimming Pool of the Central Lenin Stadium is an aquatics center that is part of the Luzhniki Sports Complex in Moscow, Russia. It was opened in 1957 and renovated in 1980. The 10,500-seat venue hosted water polo events at the 1980 Summer Olympics. It also hosted events of the 1973 Summer Universiade, 15th World Festival of Youth and Students, 1986 Goodwill Games, Spartakiads of the Peoples of the USSR and others.
    0.00
    0 votes
    248

    Sydney International Shooting Centre

    • Olympic games used in: 2000 Summer Olympics
    The Sydney International Shooting Centre in Cecil Park, New South Wales, Australia was built for the shooting events at the 2000 Summer Olympics. It has also been used for: and is available for licenced shooters to use its facilities on a day-by-day basis
    0.00
    0 votes
    249

    Torino Esposizioni

    • Olympic events contested here: Ice hockey at the 2006 Winter Olympics – Men’s Team
    Torino Esposizioni is an exhibition hall and convention centre in Turin, Italy which was completed in 1949, designed by Pier Luigi Nervi. The Torino Esposizioni was converted into a temporary ice rink to host a number of ice hockey events at the 2006 Winter Olympics along with Palasport Olimpico. The temporary arena holds 4,320 people. The boards in the hockey rink are stiffer than in a permanent facility, while the glass has more give. The facility was converted into an ice rink by laying a sand base and refrigeration pipes into the base, and then freezing water ice atop the substrate. This is similar to the temporary outdoor rink the NHL used for its Heritage Classic game in Edmonton. After the Olympics were complete, the arena returned to hosting fairs and exhibitions.
    0.00
    0 votes
    250
    Vikingskipet Olympic Arena

    Vikingskipet Olympic Arena

    Vikingskipet ("The Viking Ship"), officially known as Hamar Olympic Hall (Norwegian: Hamar olympiahall), is an indoor multi-use sport and event venue in Hamar, Norway. It was built as the speed skating rink for the 1994 Winter Olympics, and has since also hosted events and tournaments in speedway, rally, association football, bandy, ice sledge speed racing, flying disc and track cycling. The arena is also used for concerts, trade fair and the annual computer party The Gathering. The venue is owned by Hamar Municipality, and along with Hamar Olympic Amphitheatre is run by the municipal Hamar Olympiske Anlegg. Vikingskipet has a capacity for 10,600 spectators during sporting events and 20,000 during concerts. The arena was designed by Niels Torp, and Biong & Biong and opened on opened on 19 December 1992. The complex cost 230 million Norwegian krone (NOK). The localization was controversial, as it is located at Åkervika, a Ramsar site. It is Norway's national venue for speed skating and bandy, and holds annual ISU Speed Skating World Cup races, as well as regular world championships. It has among other things hosted tournaments of the World Allround Speed Skating Championships,
    0.00
    0 votes
    Get your friends to vote! Spread this URL or share:
    Tags: best, all, time, venue, olympic

    Discuss Best Olympic venue of All Time

    Top List Voters